Citation
Budget of stories for boys and girls

Material Information

Title:
Budget of stories for boys and girls
Series Title:
Red line series
Creator:
McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
N.Y
Publisher:
McLoughlin Brothers
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
247, [1] p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1890 ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1890 ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1890
Genre:
Children's stories
Children's poetry
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication from inscription.
General Note:
Text is within a red and black double ruled line.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026613574 ( ALEPH )
ALG3318 ( NOTIS )
181341537 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
os

AON

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COIN TID IN a Sy

EU CVin GRR Vee terse erate

Tue THIEvIsH Cats....

THe Cats’ CONSULTATION...

Tue Rainzow..

Jounny Witson.......

Rossir’s Rep APPLE ..

Tue Town PIGEON......

Her Faruer’s Dar ine .

THE ERMINE...........

Two RoGuks............

Tue LittLte Toy-Giri.....

WucyviGREEN a eeu era ese

STRIKE THE Kwot...........

Our FaTHER, WHO ART IN
HEavEN..

Tue Kixnp Driver

Basy BROTHER......

Srory or A Brrn’s Ngsr.....

Tue Happy FamILy...

Hattie’s BrrTupay...

THE ScHoot-MastTeEr..

Wuo 1s SHE?........

GranDma’s DARLINGS

Tue DaucGHTer or A Kine.

Tres SoASas 5 acco ssase5

READING THE BIBLE.......

Countine A Day’s Sport.....

Harry’s FrienD ne

Tue Sparrow's Mornine Visit.

PHILIP THE IpIoT......

SPOILING A QUARREL.........

LaMENT oF A LitrLe MorHER
RROBINGeeaere eterna



ScatTER SEEDS oF KINDNEss..
THE SHEEP WITH A CarT....
Dan anp DIMPLE, aND HOW

THEY QUARRELLED,......
Our FATHER MADE THEM ALL.
JOHNNGRIMLY Am ener e er ie
Tue Two Girts............
My Lirrre Treasurk........
THE Moon... oe
THe Fry anD THE BEE......
A Buessine ror BaBy.......
Tue Cominc SHOWER........
Out IN THE COLD...........
Tue Sorrows or Poor Boss. .
SPARE CARRE asc eo ai reecereaie

| FREDDY AND HIs Mamma

GRANDPA AND LOTTA.........
Tue Goon Sup ‘‘ NEVER-FAIL”
Tue Doc anp THE IcE......
BABY SMART GING careers seater
Cousin’ our. 2 eae. ee
Tue Srray SHEEP... ar
Tue TREAT.........

Tue Farrurut Doc

THe Raccoon.......

My Kirrens........

Tue Burnet Motu.

Goop Humor.........
KEEPING SHOP.........

A Japanese ORCHESTRA.

Tue Two SprITES......
Lirtte Eunice ....

WD OGSaerraessneterarcueree





CONTE NES.

WATERING HIS GARDEN WITH
Rain...

A PLEAsant ‘FaMILy

WHAT IS THE MATTER WITH

CuristMAs BELLS

Moruer’s LEtrer

SHEEP...

WINTER..... t

Tue Birp THar WALKS ON THE
WATER.

CHILDREN AMONG THE FLOWERS.

Pussy Cat

Tue New ScHOLAR

Tue PRISONER ;

Tue Fricgate-BirD.........

Minniz To Dotty.

Tue Doti’s WasHING.

THE GARDENER’S GRANDCHILD.

SEH REESSC ADR ae reat eerr eee

Tue Lost PENKNIFE.

Lity anp HER DOLLY.

Tue Kirren anp FAaLiine
Leaves

Nicut-WatTcHMEN

Ipa’s CHICKENS

Try, Try, Try AGAIN

Tue Grerpy Micr

Goop ApvicE ror LITTLE ONES

SHAVING JACK

THe Pursuir or THE BUTTER-

A Happy New YEAR

Roman CHILDREN....

Birps anp Birps’ Nests

Kurrie
Do SoMETHING FoR EacH OTHER



PAGE
GHP OISTERS tres . 186

Homer ror THE Horipays.... 188

DisoBEDIENT Harry

Our FatHER In Heaven

A Merry Heart is BrETrer
THAN Money

Fan anp Her Puppies

Tue Litre Exirz’s Sonec....

Tue Lion..

Snow...

Tue Litrtte SoLpier

Goop CounsEL

Tue Boy's WisH

Eva’s Fairy Srory.....

Frost Picrures

Tue First Sxyow Storm

Tuer Cat THAT SAVED THE Bay 222
Tue Oxp Country. Housk.... 224
Wivuir’s Happy Day

Susrz’s Rosin

My Lirtte BrotTHEer

THE

THE

(HE CANARY. BIRDas se jeecese

Tue Sxippinc Rope

Pur

Our

THE





PP ye ee

Ee a ee Meee ae ens ee eee pe et

THE BUDGET.

LUG) Grey.

UCY GREY was sent by her mother to carry her father’s
dinner to him, as he was making hay in a meadow
nearly a mile off, and would not have time to come home
for it. “And be quick, Lucy,” she added, “for I have

put a hot steak and potatoes in a basin inside the bundle for a
treat for him, and if it gets cold he won’t enjoy it.”

It was very hot, and the roads looked white and dusty; but
the wild-flowers looked lovely in the bright sunshine, and the
birds sang their sweetest songs from the tree-tops.

In the first field she saw little Will Jones, trying to see-saw
by himself.

“Oh, come, Lucy !” said he, “just for a little while, and see
what fun we will have.”

Lucy forgot everything her mother had said, and was soon
haying a grand play on the see-saw.

Time flew on, and Lucy heeded it not; at last she heard a
loud laugh, and looking up saw a boy, commonly known as
“ Bad Ben,” running off with the bundle and tin can. Lucy
called and ran after him, but it was of no use; and at last, tired ~
and hot, she sat down on the grass and burst into a flood of tears.

If she had done as her mother had told her it would not
7 3







Â¥

THE THIEVISH: CATS.

have happened, and now her father would lose his nice dinner
through her thoughtlessness and disobedience. She must go
and tell him, and then go home for some bread and cheese for .
him. She walked on, still crying, and -soon saw her father
coming towards her, pitchfork in hand.

“ Heyday, Lucy ! what’s the matter?” said he; “and where’s
my dinner? for I’m very hungry, I can tell you.”

And then poor Lucy told him all, and ended by sobbing out
that she was very sorry, and would never be so naughty again.
Her father could never bear to see his little girl cry, so kissing
her kindly, he told her not to mind, but to run home and see
what she could get for dinner, and they would have it together.

Lucy’s mother was vexed, but she sent some cold bacon and
bread, which they ate in the pleasant hay-field. Her father
told her she was old enough to be a comfort to those around her,

‘and she must be more careful. Lucy promised, and she did try
from that time.



THE THIEVISH CATS.

HE family in which these kittens live must be very fond

of cats; only think, to have four good-sized kittens in

one family, and maybe one or two under the table! I

think that until we can teach kittens to speak and to

reason it will be better to keep them out of the dining-room, or
the crockery will get broken and the cream-jug upset.

I am afraid that the plate is done for; and as to that fish that
Spotty is busy with, I don’t think I should care for it. Maybe
Whitey didn’t upset the cream-jug, but he is certainly having
_ the benefit of it. Blackey is cultivating a taste for coffee that

seems to be a sign of early depravity for a cat.

“ Better run along, kittens; I think I hear some one coming!”
noes



ee ee

On ; j

cs

i

a i

i A











































































































































Li

y

ie. )

yy







THE CATS’ CONSULTATION.

FOUR VOICES AND CHORUS.

long LL the cats consulted :

What was it about?

How to catch a little mouse
Running in and out.

The cat with the black nose
Made this remark :

“T will eat the mouse up,
Because my nose is dark.”

Chorus.—All the cats consulted :
What was it about?

How to catch a little mouse
Running in and out.

The cat with the white tail
Said, “Stop a bit,

I have got a white tail, .
Only look at it ;”

Then softly murmured,
Under her breath,

“T with my white tail
Will switch him to death.”

Chorus.—All the cats consulted :
What was it about ?

How to catch a little mouse
Running in and out.

The cat with the double teeth
Laughed loud at this:
“ll kill the mousykin

With a kind kiss;
10





THE CATS’ CONSULTATION.

i
| | | i

| ! I i ge
i g - 4 J

Ae



Pll say ‘ whisky—whisk,
Mew, mew, mew,’

Nibble up the mousykin
Before you count two.”

Chorus.—All the cats consulted :
What was it about ?

How to catch a little mouse
Running in and out.

The cat with the long claws

Turned up her lip:
11





THE RAINBOW.

“You can only snip-snap,.
It’s J can grip;

Stick in my long claws,
Hold him rather tight,

Then with my little jaws
Whisk him out of sight.”

Chorus.—All the cats consulted :
What was it about ?

How to catch a little mouse
Running in and out.

The mouse, who kept list’ning
To all that was said,
Felt extremely frightened,
And thought he’d soon be dead ;
But time may be wasted
If cats have much to say,
And while the cats consulted,
The mouse—ran away !
Chorus.—All the cats consulted :
What was it about?
How to catch a little mouse
Running in and out.

THE RAINBOW.

OME, see how fast the weather clears, —
The sun is shining now ;
And on the last dark cloud appears

A beauteous-colored bow.
12











THE RAINBOW.





























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































’Tis God who make the storm to cease,
And sun to shine again ;

The rainbow is the sign of peace
Between Himself and men.

This lovely bow He stretches forth,
And bends from shore to shore—

His own fair token to the earth
He'll bring a flood no more.

13 : 34





JOHNNY WILSON.

Just such a bow shines brightly round
The throne of God in heaven,

Which shows His mercy has no bound,
And speaks of sins forgiven.

JOHNNY WILSOW.

(f OHNNY WILSON was a good little boy in the main,
but he had one fault that gave him a deal of trouble, and
that was driving nails. Now, I hear some of you little
folks say, “ Driving nails is not a fault.”

Well, if a little boy should ask papa to give him a block of
wood, a paper of nails, and a hammer, he could have a nice
. time and not trouble anybody. But Johnny Wilson was not
content with a block of wood; he drove nails into everything;
into the walls, carpets, chairs, and tables. In short, whatever
was large enough to hold a nail, was sure to come under Johnny’s
hammer. I really think mamma was afraid he would drive
nails into the baby. He was punished and forbidden to touch

a*hammer, but it seemed, indeed, as if he could not help it, for

whenever any one made Johnny a present, it was sure to be a
hammer.

One bright summer morning, mamma took the baby and
went out to spend the day; she left Johnny at home alone with
the servants, feeling ae as he had no hammer, that all would
go right. 2

As I said before, ee was a good boy when hammers weré out
of the question; but no sooner had mamma. gotten fairly off,
than the carpenter came to hang a gate at the top of the stairs, to
keep baby, who was just beginning to toddle, from falling down.

14










TA
Yi 9)

Z
LLY EU

Z, Ze

JOHNNY DRIVING NAILS IN HIS FATHER’S HAT.

LMU

















JOHNNY WILSON.

Johnny was much interested in watching the man measure,
and saw, and hammer, but did not offer to touch any of his
tools. At twelve o’clock, however, the carpenter was obliged
to go home to his dinner, and as the gate was not quite finished,
he left his tools until he should return. It was too much for
Johnny to be left alone with such a beautiful hammer, and
nails of every size and shape.

In the room close to the stairs stood mamma’s cedar chest,
and this was what first caught Johnny’s eyes. “That would
be a ee place to drive nails,” thought he. “TI will just
try one.’

So he first put a little one in; but that went so nee hi
tried another, and another, until there were ever so many.
Then he screwed the gimlet in the chest, he hammered in the
chisel, and what do you think he did after that? Why, he
found papa’s high hat that was put away for the summer, and
filled that full of nails. Oh, Johnny, Johnny!. what will
mamma, say ?

When the carpenter returned he felt very cross, but after he
had seen all the damage that was done, he felt very sorry for
Johnny, as he knew a punishment was sure to follow. So he
tried his best to mend the matter; he drew the chisel and all
the nails out of the chest, and unscrewed the gimlet; but the
marks were still there, and the hat was ruimed forever. When
mamma came home, how do you think she punished Johnny?
Not by whipping and scolding. No; but she made him wear
the hat, nails and all, every day to school for a week. Poor
little boy! She felt very sorry sometimes, when the boys
laughed and made fun of him, but he was at last cured of his
bad fault of driving nails, and so effectual was mamma’s remedy
for the trouble, that Johnny was ever afterwards ready almost
to run away out of sight of a hammer.

16







ROBBIE’S RED APPLE.

NE day Robbie was visiting his cousin. They went to a
neighboring farmhouse, and the kind people gave them
permission to go into the orchard and get some ripe apples

to eat. The trees were bending with fruit, and under-
neath their laden boughs were many mellow apples fallen to
the ground. Some were yellow, some rosy-cheeked, and some
were red all over. A few were very large, and others quite
small.

Robbie looked around, trying to find a very nice one. He
wasn’t satisfied with those that seemed “fair to middling,” but
wanted a very good one indeed. Presently he chose one. It
was one of the largest and reddest—a fine apple to look at.
But apples were made to eat. Robbie took a bite of his beau-
tiful one, and found its looks were a great deal better than its
taste. It was not sweet or thoroughly ripened, and it was hard
and coarse-grained besides. Many apples, lying close at hand,
though but half as large and not half so pretty as this one, were
ten times better, for they were mellow, sweet, and juicy.

Robbie showed a little of the unwise and selfish side of the
heart, which is too common in the world. He was fond of size
and show; he judged from outward appearance, and so made a
very poor choice.

The great and showy things of life, and the bright and glit-
tering things of the world, are not always what they seem.
Fine clothes and big purses do not make good, wise people.
Such things are like the rind of Robbie’s red apple, merely out-
side show that deceives the thoughtless. Real merit does not

love to deck itself in showy garb.
17

}







THE TOWN PIGEON.

HE beautiful picture on the opposite page reminds me of
the following poem, which I think you will agree with
me is very pretty.

Stoop to my window, thou beautiful dove!

Thy daily visits have touched my love.

I watch thy coming, and list the note

That stirs so low in the mellow throat,
And my joy is high

To catch the glance of thy gentle eye.

Why dost thou sit on the heated eaves,

And forsake the wood with its freshened leaves ?

Why dost thou haunt the sultry street,

When the paths of the forest are cool and sweet?
How canst thou bear

This noise of people—this sultry air?

Thou alone of the feathered race

Dost look unscared on the human face,

Thou alone, with a wing to flee,

Dost love with man in his haunts to be;
And the “ gentle dove”

Has become a name for trust and love.

A holy gift is thine, sweet bird!
Thowrt named with childhood’s earliest word !
Thow rt linked with all that is fresh and wild
In the prisoned thoughts of the city child;
And thy glossy wings
Are its brightest image of moving things.
18









A

* v
May FYE VAY DAR

MUA

ag
VAN

VS



GT TR ED

a



HER FATHER'S DARLING.

It is no light chance. Thou art set apart,

Wisely by Him who has tamed thy heart,

To stir the love for the bright and fair

That else were sealed in this crowded air ;
I sometimes dream

Angelic rays from thy pinions stream.

Come then, ever, when daylight leaves
The page I read, to my humble eaves,
And wash thy breast in the hollow spout,
And murmur thy low sweet music out!

I hear and see
Lessons of heaven, sweet bird, in thee! .

HER FATHER’S DARLING.

Six sunny tumbled curls,
Two rosebud lips apart
Disclosing milk-white pearls.

Ci

A TINY happy face,

Two wondering wide blue eyes,
Now bright with baby glances;
Beaming on some small prize,
Now wet with some small sadness.

Plump shoulders, soft and white,
For kissing surely meant ;

Rumpled and crumpled muslins,
‘With here and there a rent.

Dimpled little fingers,
Everywhere they fumble ;
Restless, little active legs,

Now and then a tumble.
20







HER FA THER'S DARLING.



Saucy little stampings,
Pretty little rebel !
Saucy small expressions
In a silvery treble.

Ringing shouts of laughter,
Sobs of deepest woe ;

Going to see wee piggies,
Hurt a tiny toe.

Now naughty wilful ways,
And most indignant glances ;
Anon her stick a racer,
She caracoles and prances.

A little sunbeam ever,
With very soft’ning power,
Oh! how her father loves her,
His sweet unopened flower !

21





THE ERMINE.

Co WAY up in northern latitudes, where there is nearly
always snow and ice, and where the summers are very
short indeed, lives a little creature which wears such a
beautiful dress that we are all envious and desire to rob

him of it. His dress is soft as any velvet, and creamy white,
and so warm that it is a protection against the coldest weather.
Ladies want it to border their garments with, judges think that
it adds to their dignity to wear it, and even kings and nobles
desire to have it to help to make their crowns and coronets. So
this beautiful, shy little creature, scarcely as large as a cat, is
hunted by the trapper, and when caught ee not only of
its garment, but of life itself, that lords and ladies, kings and
judges, may have their whims gratified.

This little animal is called an ermine. Its food consists of
rats, young rabbits, birds, small animals of every description,
and birds’ eggs. It is long, slender, and graceful in form, and
can climb trees as easily as a cat.

During the summer the ermine is called a stoat, and then its
back is of a reddish brown, which allows it to pass along the
ground among the fallen leaves and rubbish without being
perceived. But when the cold weather comes, the fur gradually
turns white, all but the tip of its tail, which remains black.

TWO ROGUES.

CaP IVING all alone in a silent house I stay,
No one speaking to me through the weary day ;
Reading, sewing, knitting, doing this and that,
No companions have I but my dog and cat.
None to say good-morning, spring with willing feet,
None good-evening bid me with their kisses sweet.
22





THE ERMINE.

Co WAY up in northern latitudes, where there is nearly
always snow and ice, and where the summers are very
short indeed, lives a little creature which wears such a
beautiful dress that we are all envious and desire to rob

him of it. His dress is soft as any velvet, and creamy white,
and so warm that it is a protection against the coldest weather.
Ladies want it to border their garments with, judges think that
it adds to their dignity to wear it, and even kings and nobles
desire to have it to help to make their crowns and coronets. So
this beautiful, shy little creature, scarcely as large as a cat, is
hunted by the trapper, and when caught ee not only of
its garment, but of life itself, that lords and ladies, kings and
judges, may have their whims gratified.

This little animal is called an ermine. Its food consists of
rats, young rabbits, birds, small animals of every description,
and birds’ eggs. It is long, slender, and graceful in form, and
can climb trees as easily as a cat.

During the summer the ermine is called a stoat, and then its
back is of a reddish brown, which allows it to pass along the
ground among the fallen leaves and rubbish without being
perceived. But when the cold weather comes, the fur gradually
turns white, all but the tip of its tail, which remains black.

TWO ROGUES.

CaP IVING all alone in a silent house I stay,
No one speaking to me through the weary day ;
Reading, sewing, knitting, doing this and that,
No companions have I but my dog and cat.
None to say good-morning, spring with willing feet,
None good-evening bid me with their kisses sweet.
22





TWO ROGUES.



t

T’ve a next-door neighbor more fortunate than I;
Thinking of her blessings, I sometimes pause and sigh.
Little children scamper in and out all day,
Making dreadful racket at their merry play ;

23





THE LITTLE TOY-GIRL.

Losing playthings here, and dropping playthings there ;
Letting song and laughter echo everywhere.

Little rogues, I see you, peeping down at me,

With your laughing eyes, and faces full of glee.
How your presence brings the gladness to my heart!
Would you come to me and nevermore depart?
Darlings, you are welcome, come whene’er you will;
Blessed is the home you with your sunshine fill!

—_—_———-______

PELE TOG iE

. NE pleasant summer afternoon, Bertha and wee two-year-

iy old Hermann were playing merrily up and down the

garden walks, while their good mother sat on a bench by

the cottage door, busily knitting. In the flower-beds, gold

and purple pansies, fair white lilies, and nodding blue-bells

were in full blossom, filling the air with their sweet perfume.

Among the cherry-trees the little birds sang, and the gay butter-
flies flitted from flower to flower.

“ Dear little ones,” said the mother to herself, as she watched
her children in their play, “how happy they are and how good
the sunshine is for them! They need it—my little home-blos-
soms—as much as do the flowers in the garden.”

And then she thought of the many little children shut wp in
cities, with never a sight at the fresh green fields and sweet
flowers; to whom bird-songs were unknown music, and whose
only play-ground was the paved and dusty street. “Thank
God,” said she, wiping a tear from her eye, “that my darlings
are not shut up like caged birds, within city walls!”

Presently little Bertha, who was peeping through the palings

of the garden gate, exclaimed, “ Oh, mother, here comes a little
24





THE LITTLE TOY-GIRL.



girl with a basket! Shall I open the gate and ask her to
come in?”

“Yes, darling,” said her mother. So Bertha held the gate
wide open and the little girl entered. She was very fair, with
sweet blue eyes, and golden hair that rippled in bright waves to
her shoulders. Her simple dress and apron were clean and
tidy, and the napkin that was thrown over her basket was
snowy white. She dropped a courtesy and said, “ Will the
lady please buy some toys for her little children ?”

Bertha and Hermann came near and, with their mother,
looked into the basket.

“My brother carved these from wood,” said the little girl,

showing many curious and beautiful toys; “and he painted all
25





THE LITTLE TOY-GIRL.

the pictures in these books. He is lame, and he sits in his chair
all day long, making toys and painting pictures for me to sell.”

“Where does your father live?” asked the mother.

The blue eyes of the little girl filled with tears as she softly
answered, “In heaven. It is many a long day since he went,
and though, as mother says, it is happy for him to be there, it
is sad enough for us without him.”

“ And your brother,” asked the mother, “was he always lame?”

“ Not always,” answered the child, “though I*can remember
him only as he is now. He reads to me every day, from his
little Testament, of the fair land where our dear father has gone,
and says that it will not be long before he will be there too.
He does not say so before mother, for it would make her cry
too much.

“But I must not stay too long,” continued the little girl, “ for
I want to sell all that I have brought before night, for we
have many things to buy with the money that I —o get for
them.”

So the mother selected a book with beautifully colored en-
gravings for Bertha, who had just begun to learn to read, and a
little horse and cart, with a little whip, for Hermann.

As she put a bright silver coin in the little girl’s hand she
said, “I will go and see your mother and lame brother soon, if
you will tell me where you live.”

“ Will you?” said the child, her cheek flushing with pleasure ;
“that will please us all so much, for we are strangers here.”

So she told where she lived, and after another courtesy she
took her leave with a glad heart.

Flowers, birds, and butterflies were now, for ie time, forgot-
ten, as Bertha, leaning upon her mother’s knee, looked at the
beautiful pictures in her new book, and little Hermann, sitting
upon the grass at her feet, gave himself up to the full enjoy-

ment of his new treasure.
26





LUCY GREEN.

LUGY GREEN.

Cay UCY GREEN was a dear little girl, and took great
delight in flowers, of which she had a great many. She

was quite a favorite with old William, the market
gardener, for she very seldom missed a week without
going to him for a new pot, and the old man would choose her
the prettiest flowers he had, and often add one asa gift from
himself to those she paid him for. It was quite a pretty sight
to see*the two friends; they were both so very fond of their
flowers, and would stay chatting about the roses that had budded

since they last met, or the new flowers they had discovered.
27





STRIKE THE KNOT.

City HEN we were little boys—little fellows—our father
began to teach us how to work, and we were anxious to
perform the allotted tasks. We were splitting wood.
A tough stick with a most obstinate knot tried all

the skill and strength of a weak arm, and we were about to

relinquish the task when our father came along. He saw the
piece of wood had been chipped down and the knot hacked
around, and took the axe, saying,—

“ Always strike the knot.”

The words have always remained safe in my memory. They
are precious words, boys. Never try to shun a difficulty, but
look it right in the face; catch its eye, and you subdue it as a
man can a lion.

OUR FATHER, WHO ART IN HEAVEN

HY Father, little one, and mine,
Is He who reigns above ; :
Thy prayers and mine He deigns to hear,
In mercy and in love—
Thy prayers and mine, dear little child,
He deigns in love to hear;
Oh, to His blessed mercy-seat
Let us in faith draw near.

Thy Father, little one, and mine,
All hallowed be His name; ~
Oh, pray thou that His will be done,
In earth and heaven the same.
Thy Father, little one, and mine,
Pray thou for daily bread,
For by His power alone we live,
And by His bounty fed.
28





STRIKE THE KNOT.

City HEN we were little boys—little fellows—our father
began to teach us how to work, and we were anxious to
perform the allotted tasks. We were splitting wood.
A tough stick with a most obstinate knot tried all

the skill and strength of a weak arm, and we were about to

relinquish the task when our father came along. He saw the
piece of wood had been chipped down and the knot hacked
around, and took the axe, saying,—

“ Always strike the knot.”

The words have always remained safe in my memory. They
are precious words, boys. Never try to shun a difficulty, but
look it right in the face; catch its eye, and you subdue it as a
man can a lion.

OUR FATHER, WHO ART IN HEAVEN

HY Father, little one, and mine,
Is He who reigns above ; :
Thy prayers and mine He deigns to hear,
In mercy and in love—
Thy prayers and mine, dear little child,
He deigns in love to hear;
Oh, to His blessed mercy-seat
Let us in faith draw near.

Thy Father, little one, and mine,
All hallowed be His name; ~
Oh, pray thou that His will be done,
In earth and heaven the same.
Thy Father, little one, and mine,
Pray thou for daily bread,
For by His power alone we live,
And by His bounty fed.
28





OUR FATHER, WHO ART IN HEAVEN.

\"

A\ NAN
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\



Thy Father, little one, and mine—
From evil keep us, Lord ;

Oh, turn our feet in those blest paths
That lead us to our God!

Thy Father, little one, and mine,
To Him the glory be;

To Him the kingdom, Him the power,

To all eternity.
29





THE KIND DRIVER. —

long LADY, sitting at a window in the country with some
friends, saw a wagon and pair of horses coming down
CX. the road, driven by a stout old man.

“ Here comes a kind driver,” she said. “ T’ve noticed
the way he treats his horses, and their obedience and attach-
ment. Wait antil he gets near and I'll speak to him.”

So when the man came opposite to the house, the lady called
.out,—

“ Good-morning, Benjamin. Won’t you show my friends
what a bright pair of horses you have? Make them shake

hands.”

The man called, “ Whoa!” to the horses, and as soon as they
had stopped, he said, speaking to one of them, “'Tom, shake
hands!” when instantly the horse lifted his foot in a pleased,
gentle way, and gave it into the man’s hand, who, after shaking
it and letting it fall, said,—

“ Now, Tom, the other ;” and up went that also. Then he
went around to the other horse, and he did the same thing in
the same gentle and pleased way.

“ Now turn round and come on,” called out the man; and
“instantly, without the crack of a whip or a loud command, the
docile animals turned carefully the wagon to which they were
harnessed, and followed their kind driver as a dog would have
followed his master.

“Thank you, Benjamin,” said the lady. “I wanted my
friends to see how much more obedient animals can be made
by kind than by harsh treatment.” |

As the man drove on with his horses, pleased with the notice
that had been taken of him, one of the ladies said,—

“This reminds me of a little pony that is managed entirely

without a whip, his driver only carrying a bit of straw in his
30





THE KIND DRIVER.



hand. The pony obeys his master with all the docility of a
dog. He has but*to say, ‘Tom, come here a little; or, ‘ Tom, a
little farther, and pony, just as if he could do everything but
say ‘ Yes’ in reply, instantly does what he is told. On being
asked one day if he never used the whip, the driver answered,
‘Oh, sir, if I were to use a whip, he would feel it,’ meaning
that if he were to strike the pony, the animal’s feelings would

be hurt as much as his body.”
31





NE

BABY BROTHER.

BABY brother Louis!
You are fairest of the fair ;
There’s nothing half so beautiful
In earth, or sea, or air.

O baby brother Louis!
You are sweetest of the sweet ;

_ With breath as fragrant as the breeze

When spring and summer meet.

O baby brother Louis!

You are fair, and sweet, and wise;
The angels, mamma says, look out
Upon us from your eyes—

The angels, pure and innocent,
Who’re near unto the Lord ;

I read about them yesterday,
While reading in his Word.

And I am sure it must be so,
For every one can see,

While gazing in your heavenly eyes,
A heavenly mystery—

A mystery of love and peace.
What better can I say ?

There is no power in human words
Their meaning to convey.

Oh, darling baby brother!
If angels are so near,
That, while his face beholding,
They’re dwelling with you here,
32























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les, ;



ERNE

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STORY OF A BIRDS NEST.

How gentle and how loving
Should all our actions be!
How tender and how truthful

Ev'ry spoken word to thee!



STORY OF A BIRD'S NEST.

ID you ever, dear children, watch the birds in spring-time

' building their pretty nests; and did you think how won-

derful it was that they should know how to make so nice

a little home from such things as they pick up here and

there? How smooth and beautiful they make the inside of

their nests, so as to form a soft bed for their eggs and little
birdies ! .

Do you suppose that your fingers, which are so skilful about
many things, could form as nice a nest as the little birds can,
with their slender beaks? If you think that perhaps they
might, just try it some day, and see if you can weave together
twigs and hair, with perhaps some bits of wool or cotton, into a
little rounded nest as beautiful as that which a pair of robins
would make! Even if you should succeed in making some-
thing to look like a nest, you would be obliged to try a number
of times first, and you would probably make many mistakes,
and have to take your work into pieces and begin anew again
and again before it would suit you.

Not so with the birds. They never make mistakes, and they
are not even obliged to think how to make their pretty homes,
because God has given them what is called instinct. In other
words, He teaches every little bird how to build just the kind of
nest best fitted for its use.

I will tell you a true story of a pair of golden orioles that
many years ago built a nest in an elm-tree so near a farm-house

that the children who lived there could watch them every day
34



STORY OF A BIRD'S NEST.

Pan



about their work and could hear the chirp of the little birds
after the wee things were hatched. ‘You all know, perhaps,
what kind of nests the orioles build, like slender baskets hung
from the branches of the trees.

If they could speak, the mother orioles might well sing to

their babies, —
85





THE HAPPY FAMILY.

“ Rock-a-bye, baby, on the tree-top ;
‘When the wind blows the cradle will rock !’

For several years the same pair of orioles came back to their
home in the elm-tree, made what repairs were needed, laid their
egos, and reared their little ones,

One spring, just after the little birds were hatched, there came
a long, cold rain, which lasted several days. The children and
others who lived in the house saw the golden orioles flying about
as if in great distress, and heard the pitiful chirping of the little
ones. At last, after the storm was over, some one took a ladder
and went up the tree to see what the trouble was, and found
that the pretty hanging nest was filled with water, and the
young birds were drowned. Now comes the strange part of the
story. After afew days of flying and fluttering about, as if
they had some new idea in their little heads, the parent birds
began to build another nest in the same tree, but instead of
forming it like the old one, they built a round nest like that of
the common robin upon a branch, and soon they had another
family of little birds nestled therein.

THE HAPPY FAMILY.

Cat E are not going out to-day,
So shall we have a game of play?
Let us be ladies, and we'll see ©
What happy ladies we can be.

We must have other names, of course—
I will be Mrs. Wilberforce.
Will you be Mrs. Wiggins, Flo?

Because you like that name, you know.
36





THE HAPPY FAMILY.

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“Yes, Vl be Mrs. Wiggins, dear,
But here is our dear brother here;
We really must have him to play:
I’m sure he won’t be in the way.”

*Tis very pleasing thus to see

Brothers and sisters all agree ;

So all good little girls and boys

Should share their pretty books and toys.

Dear little boys and girls, will you
Do as these little children do ;
And never, never try to tease,

But always do your best to please ?
87





HATTIE’S BIRTHDAY.

H, this is a happy, beautiful world!
My heart is light and gay ;
The birds in the tree sing blithely to me,
And I’m six years old to-day.

Yes, six, and father has bought me a book,
And mother, the sweetest doll,

All dressed in white, with blue eyes bright,
And the nicest hat and shawl.

My Kitty sat quietly near the fire
As Dolly and I came by;

Miss Dolly bowed, and pussy meowed,.
And opened her yellow eye.

Ah, me! if Kit could only talk,
And Dolly could but chat,

We'd social be as any three—
Talk, sing, and all of that.

I dressed all up in grandma’s cap,
And put on her glasses, too ;

“Why, Grandma!” I said, as I looked at myself,
“T’m almost as old as you.”

My mother softly kissed my cheek,
And then she blessed me, too,..

Praying that I, as years went by,
Might be as good and true.

My birthnight song is a merry one,
And my heart is warm and light;
Kind father, mother, and dear grandma,
Sweet dolly and pussy, good-night.
38









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THE SCHOOL-MASTER.

N days gone by, young people found it no easy thing to
pick up a little learning. They had not then the easy, —
pleasant books which they now have. Schools were often
very dismal places, and school-masters were very severe. If

a boy were a dunce, or behaved amiss, he was struck on his
hand with a ruler, or beaten with a cane, or poised on another
boy’s back and flogged with a birch-rod. But we need not
dwell on these things, as most young people have heard of them.
A change has taken place, and kindness is found to be a better
teacher than severity.

We know a school-master in a country town who is as cheer-

ful as May-day, and he brings on his scholars nicely. It was
on a holiday afternoon that he was seated in a sheltered seat at
the end of the playground, reading a book. Taking off his
spectacles he called out to his scholars, who had been enjoying
themselves at trap and ball, “ Boys, stop a moment or two in
- your play, and I will tell you a tale.”
Ina moment the trap and ball were left on the ground, and
the boys gathered around him. After a little scuffing for the
nearest place to their kind master, silence prevailed. You
might almost have heard the tick-tack of a watch, and every
eye was fixed on the school-master. After a short pause, he
related to them the following tale:

“Many years ago, a certain vizier, for some cause or other,
was condemned to perpetual imprisonment in a lofty tower. At
night his wife came to weep below his window.

“* Cease your grief,’ said the sage, putting out his head with
a turban on it. ‘Go home for the present, and return hither
when you have procured a live beetle, together with a little ghee
(that is, butter made from the milk of buffaloes), three balls,
one of the-finest silk, another of packthread, another of stout

whipeord, and finally a bundle of strong rope.’
40





THE SCHOOL-MASTER.
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“ Away went the vizier’s wife to do his bidding, and when
she again came to the foot of the tower, provided according to
her husband’s commands, he directed her to touch the head of
the insect with a little ghee, or butter, to tie one end of the silk
thread around him, and to place the beetle on the wall of the
tower.

“ Deceived by the smell of the butter, which he considered to
be in store somewhere above him, the beetle continued to ascend
till he reached the top, and thus put the vizier in possession of
the end of the silk thread. He then drew up the packthread

by. means of the silk, the small cord by means of the packthread,
41



THE SCHOOL-MASTER.

and, by means of the cord, a stout rope capable of sustaining
his own weight. Thus was he enabled at last to escape from
his. place of confinement. We see, then, from this story, what
great endings may be brought about by small beginnings.”

The boys were all highly amused with the tale which had
been told them ; but the cheerful school-master had not yet done
with his story, for, without losing any time, in a lively and
encouraging manner he made the following remarks:

“Tt appears to me that our tale is well suited to all of us.
Every boy in my school, though he does not wear a turban, may
be called a vizier, and may be said to be shut up in a high
tower—the tower of ignorance—from which he ought to do his
best to deliver himself.

“The vizier’s wife may be set forth by the printing-press,
which has provided what is necessary to free the vizier school-
boy from captivity. What we should do without the printing-
press I cannot tell.

“But where shall we find a black beetle? for somehow or
other we must have one. In my opinion your school-master
will be the very thing. If I am not blind, I wear a black coat,
and am very persevering; yes, I see I must play the part of a
black beetle.

“The ghee, or buffalo butter, is my desire for your good;
and this, I hope, will be quite enough to lead me on to serve
you so long as you are in the tower, and I have the means of
rendering you assistance.

“The silken line that I bring you is the alphabet; a very
small beginning, which may produce a very large and profitable
ending. Had we no alphabet, you might almost as well stop
away as come to school. If the alphabet be our silk line, well
may we regard words as our packthread. Single letters pro-
duce words, and thus, as we proceed, we gradually increase in

knowledge.
42



WHO IS SHE?

“ After words come sentences; these must be whipcord ; and
then follow books, which are strong rope, so necessary to set -you
free from the tower of ignorance.

“ And now, boys, as the beetle has brought you the silk line,
the packthread, the whipcord, the strong rope, after you have
finished your game of trap-ball set to work at your books as
fast as you can, that you may enjoy liberty, and turn your
backs on the tower of ignorance for ever.”

WHO IS SHE ?

HERE is a little maiden—
Who is she? Do you know ?—
Who always has a welcome,
Wherever she may go.

Her face is like the May-time,
Her voice is like a bird’s;
The sweetest of all music
Is in her lightsome words.

Each spot she makes the brighter,
As if she were the sun ;

And she is sought and cherished
And loved by every one;

By old folks and by children,
By lofty and by low:

Who is this little maiden ?
Does anybody know ?

You surely must have met her ;
You certainly can guess ;—
What! I must introduce her?

Her name is—Cheerfulness.
43





On

GRANDMA'S DARLINGS.

HICH is grandmother’s darling
Of the children three at play?

Which does she love the dearest,
Hattie, Fannie, or Jay?

Which are the brightest eyes for her,
Soft black, or blue, or gray ?

Which would she miss the soonest,
If away from her loving care:

Hattie, the dark-haired maiden,
Blue-eyed Fanny, the fair,

Or Jay, with the honest, truthful face,
And sober, manly air?

Keep still, for grandma is thinking ;
She'll tell you by and by.

She is gazing upon them fondly,
With a far-off look in her eye,
With a sad, sweet smile upon her face,
And on her lips a sigh.

She thinks of three other darlings
In the far-off, long ago:

Of the baby, who long has slumbered
Under the daisies and snow,

And beside it, a noble, manly form
In ‘his early strength laid low.

And the other? Oh, that’s the papa,
Who is coming now through the lane,
And back from the past so distant
Comes grandma’s heart again ;
As she kisses the little ones o’er and o’er
They are darlings all, ’tis plain.
44












































Yj 77.

























































GRANDMA’S DARLINGS.









THE DAUGHTER OF A KING.

WISH I were a princess !”

Emma stood with a dust-brush in her hand, pausing on
her way up-stairs to her own pretty room, which was re-
quired to be put in order every day.

“Why, my. child?” asked her mother.

“Because then I would never have to sweep and dust and

make ce but would have plenty of servants to do these things
for me.’

“That is a very foolish wish,” her mother replied; “and
even if you were a princess, I think you would find it es to
learn how to do all these things, so that you could do them in
case of necessity.”

“ But it never is necessary for princesses to work.”

“There my little girl proves her ignorance. If she will come
to me after her work is done, I will show her a picture.”

The little bedroom was at length put to rights, and Emma
came to her mother, reminding her of her promise about the
picture.

“What do you see, my child?” her mother asked as she laid
_ the picture before her daughter.

“T see a young girl with her dress fastened up, an apron on,
and a broom in her hand.” ;

““Can you tell me what kind of a place she is in ?”

“T do not know. There are walls and arches of stone, and
a bare stone floor. I do not think it can be a pleasant place.”

“No, it is not. It is a prison, and the girl is a king’s
daughter.”

“A king’s daughter ?”

“Yes; and her story is a very sad one.”

“ Please tell me about her.”

“More than eighty years ago the king of France was Louis
46
























LAGDSEBACH











QUEEN MARIA ANTOINETTE IN PRISON.





I RSS PGT EO TT TI I FL I EI NL ET TET TTS

2 Sew









THE DAUGHTER OF A KING.”

XVI.; his wife was Marie Antoinette. They were not a wicked
king and queen, but they were thoughtless and fond of pleasure.
They forgot that it was their duty to look after the good of their
people, so they spent money extravagantly in their own pleas-
ures while the whole nation was suffering. The people became
dissatisfied, and when finally Louis and Marie Antoinette saw
the mistake they had been making and tried to change their
conduct, it was too late. The people, urged on by bad leaders,
learned to hate their king and queen. They were taken with
their two children and the sister of the king, and shut up in a
prison called the Temple.

“There were dreadful times in France then, and every one
who was suspected of being friendly to the royal family was_
sent to prison and to the guillotine. The prisoners in the
temple passed the time as best they could. The king gave
lessons to his son and daughter every day, or read aloud to them
all, while Marie Antoinette, Madame Elizabeth, and the young
Maria Theresa sewed.

“ After a time the angry people took away the king and be-
headed him. And shortly after tle little son was separated
from his mother, sister, and aunt, and shut up by himself in
the charge of a cruel jailer. Next it was Marie Antoinette’s
tarn to ascend the scaffold, which she did October 16, 1798.
Her daughter Maria Theresa was then left alone with her aunt,
the Madame Elizabeth.”



WHEREVER in this world we are,
‘In whatsoe’er estate,

We have a felléwship of hearts
To keep and cultivate ;

And a work of lowly love to do

For the Lord on whom we wait.
48



THE SEA-SIDE.











































































































































































































































































































































es ANN
THE SEA-S/DE.
ley NNIE and little Fred are spending happy days by the
sea-side, where their mamma has taken them to pass the
C’|\ summer months. Mamma is tired, and she and aunty
are resting while the little folks play in the sand. They
have made friends with a boy who has brought out his father’s
glass for them to look through. And he tells them all about
the boats, and how the poor fishermen are out on the sea day
and night, to catch fish. He tells Annie how he sometimes is
permitted to go with his father in the boat, and what fine times
they have when the weather is clear: how they throw over the
net; and after carefully drawing it along for some distance, they
land it at last full of slimy, slippery fishes.
49





READING THE BIBLE.

OME, darling, bring the Bible,
And place it on my knee;

And you climb up beside it,
And sit close up to me.

Now slowly turn the sacred page,
Not rough—as though it were

A mere unworthy common book,
That you might soil or tear.

But ever, ever bear in mind
That ’tis a holy Book,

And on its every page, my child,
With humble reverence look.

It is God’s holy Word, my dear,
To sinful mortals given ;

A lamp unto our feet below,
To light us on to heaven.

Oh, learn to prize it as you ought;
Seek wisdom from on high

To teach you how to read aright,
To read it prayerfully.

The child who loves God’s holy Word,
And takes delight therein,
That child will not be led astray

In wickedness and sin.
50







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COUNTING A DAY'S SPORT.

OM GILES is Farmer Giles’s son, and they live at an old
farm-house at the end of a shady lane.
Tom is a thoughtful boy, and Blackboard, the old
school-master of our village, says he is a first-rate fellow
at school; and I know the old housekeeper at the farm finds
him very useful indeed.

Everybody likes Tom Giles, from the ploughman that follows —
his father’s team, to the magpie who calls out Tom! Tom! from
the top of the barn door.

At Mr. Blackboard’s school the boys have a holiday every
Wednesday afternoon, and away they all scamper to the village
green, kick up their heels as though the whole school had gone
mad, and I'll warrant you that Tom Giles is as merry as any
boy among them.

One day they proposed to go fishing in the large pond at the
end of the village green, and then there was such a lot of cut-
ting fishing-rods, and making nets, and borrowing pickle-jars

to put the fish in, that at last Farmer Giles declared that his
best hedge was almost cut to pieces, and the old housekeeper
said she had scarcely a jar left. But, after all, the day’s sport
was soon over, and when Tom got home again he put his jar
upon the kitchen table to count what he had caught.

One, two, three, four little sticklebacks, bobbing about as
though they were playing at hide-and-seek. One, two, three
little efts were also there, looking very gloomy indeed ; perhaps
they wanted to play at puss-in-the-corner, but as there are no
corners in a round pickle-jar of course they could not do that.

But you know I told you that Tom was a thoughtful boy, and —
ashe looked at the little fish swimming about in the jar, he
wondered whether they were happy, and whether there were
any little baby fish left in the pond who were calling out for

their papas and mammas that he had caught, or whether there
52:





COUNTING A DAY’S SPORT.



were any fathers and mothers in the pond who were wonder-
ing wherever their little sticklebacks had gone to.

And Tom was a kind as well as a thoughtful boy, and so he
crept silently out of the back door, and ran all the way to the
pond, and let the little prisoners free just at the very spot at
which he had previously caught them.

Ani they all swam home to supper, and Tom Giles was hap-
pier in letting his little prisoners go than he would have been
if he had caught a great big whale and kept it all to himself.

53





HARRY’S: FRIEND.

Cy {ARRY! that was wrong. How could you strike old
Rover !”
“ Because he Ae on my kite with his great, heavy
foot, and. liked to have made a hole in it,” replied the boy,
a lad of ten years old, who had been reproved by his oe
for striking a faithful old house-dog.

“But Rover did not do it on purpose; he didn’t mean to
break your kite.”

“T don’t suppose he did; but he had no business to tread on
my kite. He’s big aie to know better, I should think—
and old enough too.”

“He’s old enough to be a wise dog, Heer ; and so I think
he is—much wiser as a dog than you are asa boy. If he had
been as foolish and passionate a dog as you are a boy, he would
have turned round and bitten you, instead of walking off as he
did with a look of grief at your bad treatment. I am sorry
that you would treat Rover unkindly—you of all others.”

“Why me of all others, mother ?”

“ Have I never told you how Rover saved your life?”

“No! How was it, mother? When did he save my life?
Tell me about it.”

“T was looking from the window, and all at once I saw Rover
start up, and come running into the house. He acted as if some
one had called him. After running through all the rooms
below, I heard his big feet on the stairs. He came up with
two or three heavy bounds. Entering my room, he looked all
about and then up into my face. ‘Where’s Harry, Rover? I
said, for the Laat hl of you came instantly into my mind. ‘Go
find him, sir.’

“The dog understood me. He turned short away, sprang
B4





HARRY’S FRIEND.

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down-stairs, and out into the garden. I followed hin, for I felt
strangely concerned about you. As I approached the lower end
of the garden, I heard Rover growling, and soon saw him
shaking something in his mouth, with great violence, while the
hair on his body stood out straight and stiff like bristles. Close
beside him, you lay sleeping calmly on a bank.

“You may suppose I was almost horror-stricken when I
came near enough to see a venomous snake in Rover’s mouth.

“The faithful dog had, doubtless, saved your life. And you
—ah, Harry! think of it—and you have been so thoughtless
as to strike Rover.”

The boy, at this, burst into tears, and hid his face in his
mother’s lap. He continued so for some time; then he went
after the faithful animal, and when he had found him, caressed
him, and talked to him in such a kind way, that Rover, who
never held resentment, forgot in an instant the blow he had
received, and was as happy again as an old dog could be,

55

a





THE SPARROWS MORNING VISIT.

LAD to see you, little bird ;
"Twas your pretty chirp I heard ;
What did you intend to say—
“Give us something this cold day ?”

That I will, and plenty too ;

All these crumbs I saved for you;
Don’t be frightened—here’s a treat ;
I will wait and see you eat.

Thomas says you steal his wheat ;
John complains his plums you eat ;
Choose the ripest for your share,
Never asking whose they are.

‘Yet you seem an honest bird;

And I may say I’ve also heard

That insects, grubs, and worms you eat,
And other things that spoil the wheat.

So I will not try to know

What you did so long ago;
There’s your breakfast, eat away,
Come and see me every day.



PHILIP THE IDIOT.

T is a very sad sight to see a poor boy who is not quite
right in his mind, even though he be not altogether
insane. Some of these poor half-witted creatures are able
to move about the streets, doing simple errands for their

friends. We should’ always be very kind to such, and never
run after them, or shout and make fun of them, as some bad
boys and girls will do. Philip Turner was one of these poor

creatures, and lived with his sister Sophia, who was very good
ms 56



THE SPARROWS MORNING VISIT.

LAD to see you, little bird ;
"Twas your pretty chirp I heard ;
What did you intend to say—
“Give us something this cold day ?”

That I will, and plenty too ;

All these crumbs I saved for you;
Don’t be frightened—here’s a treat ;
I will wait and see you eat.

Thomas says you steal his wheat ;
John complains his plums you eat ;
Choose the ripest for your share,
Never asking whose they are.

‘Yet you seem an honest bird;

And I may say I’ve also heard

That insects, grubs, and worms you eat,
And other things that spoil the wheat.

So I will not try to know

What you did so long ago;
There’s your breakfast, eat away,
Come and see me every day.



PHILIP THE IDIOT.

T is a very sad sight to see a poor boy who is not quite
right in his mind, even though he be not altogether
insane. Some of these poor half-witted creatures are able
to move about the streets, doing simple errands for their

friends. We should’ always be very kind to such, and never
run after them, or shout and make fun of them, as some bad
boys and girls will do. Philip Turner was one of these poor

creatures, and lived with his sister Sophia, who was very good
ms 56































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to him, and took great care of him. Philip was very quiet and
harmless, and had such funny ways. He would walk up and
down the street with a sword, and think he was a soldier. And
as it pleased him, his kingl sister would humor him and let him

do as he pleased.



57





SPOILING A QUARREL.

OHNNY stood a little while at the gate, nibbling the
scallops from the edge of his cookey; possibly he was
nursing his courage to say a kind word. He was waiting
for Jerry White to turn around and look. .
“allo, cry-baby!” shouted Jerry, as he discovered him;
“what you got there ?”
“Halloo, pretty-face!” retorted Johnny, good-humoredly ;
“come and see.

_ “Open your mouth and shut your eyes,
And Tll give you something to make you wise.’”

“Open your eyes and shut your mouth,” responded Jerry,
“and Pil—” and here a snowball that was meant for Johnny’s
face fell harmlessly over his shoulder. The next minute the
extra cake was struck from Johnny’s hand into a snow-drift. .

LAMENT OF A LITTLE MOTHER ROBIN.

H, where is the boy, dressed in jacket of gray,
Who climbed up a tree in the orchard to-day
And carried my three little birdies away ?

They hardly were dressed
When he took from the nest
My three little robins, and left me bereft

?

Oh, humming-birds, have you seen to-day
A very small boy, dressed in jacket of gray,
Who carried my three little robins away ?
He had light-colored hair,
And his feet were both bare.
Ah me! he was cruel and mean, I declare.

88





SPOILING A QUARREL.

OHNNY stood a little while at the gate, nibbling the
scallops from the edge of his cookey; possibly he was
nursing his courage to say a kind word. He was waiting
for Jerry White to turn around and look. .
“allo, cry-baby!” shouted Jerry, as he discovered him;
“what you got there ?”
“Halloo, pretty-face!” retorted Johnny, good-humoredly ;
“come and see.

_ “Open your mouth and shut your eyes,
And Tll give you something to make you wise.’”

“Open your eyes and shut your mouth,” responded Jerry,
“and Pil—” and here a snowball that was meant for Johnny’s
face fell harmlessly over his shoulder. The next minute the
extra cake was struck from Johnny’s hand into a snow-drift. .

LAMENT OF A LITTLE MOTHER ROBIN.

H, where is the boy, dressed in jacket of gray,
Who climbed up a tree in the orchard to-day
And carried my three little birdies away ?

They hardly were dressed
When he took from the nest
My three little robins, and left me bereft

?

Oh, humming-birds, have you seen to-day
A very small boy, dressed in jacket of gray,
Who carried my three little robins away ?
He had light-colored hair,
And his feet were both bare.
Ah me! he was cruel and mean, I declare.

88





LAMENT OF A LITTLE. MOTHER ROBIN.

Oh, butterfly ! stop just one moment, I pray ;
Have you seen a boy, dressed in jacket of gray,
Who carried my three little birdies away ?

He had pretty blue eyes,

And was small of his size.
Ah, he must be wicked, and not very wise!

Oh, boy with blue eyes, dressed in jacket of gray,
If you will bring back my three robins to-day,
With sweetest of music the gift I’ll repay!

Pll sing all day long

My merriest song,
And I will forgive you this terrible wrong.

WHENEVER you know a thing is right,
Go and do it with main and might,
Nor let one murmur fall,
For duty makes as strong a claim
As if an angel called your name,
And all men heard the call.

Keep all the day, and every day,

Within the straight and narrow way,
And all your life, in fine,

Be temperate in your moods and meats,

And in your sours, and in your sweets,
And, lastly, don’t drink wine!



eo»

A LApy teacher inquired of the members of a class of juve-
niles if any of them could name the four seasons. Instantly
the chubby hand of a five-year-old was raised, and promptly
came the answer,—

“ Pepper, salt, vinegar, and mustard.”
59





“SCATTER SEEDS OF KINDNESS”

CET us gather up the sunbeams,
Lying all around our path ;
Let us keep the wheat and roses,
Casting out the thorns and chaff;
Let us find our sweetest comfort
In the blessings of to-day,
With a patient hand removing
All the briers from the way.
Then scatter seeds of kindness,
Then scatter seeds of kindness,
Then scatter seeds of kindness
For our reaping by and by.

Strange we never prize the music
Till the sweet-voiced bird has flown!
Strange that we should slight the violets
Till the lovely flowers are gone!
Strange that summer skies and sunshine
Never seem one-half so fair,
As when winter’s snowy pinions
Shake the white down in the air.
Ten scatter, ete.

If we knew but half the sorrow
That the poor have oft to bear,
How our hearts would yearn to help them,
Though their griefs we could not share:
And the broken-hearted mourners,
Who in silence pass us by,
Would be lightened of their burden
If they knew a friend was nigh.

Then scatter, ete:
60





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Oh
‘Wish





THE SHEEP WITH A CART.

NEVER saw a sheep harnessed up before,” said Harry,
as he turned over the leaves of a big book on natural his-
tory, and found a picture of a sheep drawing a two-wheeled
cart.

Do you know what natural history means? It means a
history or description of animals, birds, and fishes.

“ Let me see,” said his mother. So Harry brought the great
book and laid it in her lap. “ Ah, yes,” she continued, “ it is a
sheep that lives in Syria and Egypt, and other parts of Asia
and Africa, and has a long heavy tail which sometimes trails on
the ground. This tail usually weighs fifteen or twenty pounds ;
but when the sheep is fattened, it sometimes gets to weigh
seventy or eighty, or even one hundred and fifty pounds. The
sheep cannot carry it then, so a little cart is made to lay it on,
and the sheep draws it about.”

“What is the use of such big, fat tails ?”

“The people, when they kill the sheep, use the fat of the tail,
which is not at all like tallow, for butter.”

Harry shut up his book and put it away, and went out to
play; and his mother kept on sewing, and forgot all about the
sheep with the cart. After a while she heard a great racket
outside the window, and looking out, she saw Harry and Nep.
He had fastened his cart to the dog, and as Nep would not let
his tail lie in the cart he had tied his white tippet to the end of
the tail. Nep did not understand these proceedings, and was
frisking about and wagging his tail, with every wag setting the
tippet flying in the air, and every few steps overturning the
cart.

“Never mind, Nep, I’ll teach you yet. If you don’t be a
good dog and let your tail lie down in the cart, Pll have to tie

it down.”
62







[HE SHEEP WITH A CART.



But the next jump brought Nep quite out of the harness,
and away he capered, looking back roguishly, as much as to say,
. “No you don’t, old fellow.”

Harry was about to follow him, but just then a lady passed
by, her long, trailing skirt sweeping the walk and gathering
dirt and dust. Harry stood looking at her until she was out of
sight, and then turning to his mother, he said,—

“Mother, don’t you think it would be a good plan for ladies
who wear tails to their dresses to have a little cart to keep them
up out of the dirt?”



A Nozsitz Answer.— Why did you not take one of those
pears?” said one boy to another. ‘There was nobody to see
you.”

“Yes, there was. I was there to see myself, and I do not

wish to see myself doing so mean a thing as stealing.”
63



DAN AND DIMPLE, AND HOW THEY QUARRELLED.

O begin in things quite simple
Quarrels scarcely ever fail—
And they fell out, Dan and Dimple,
All about a horse’s tail!

So that by and by the quarrel

Quite broke up and spoiled their play—
Danny said the tail was sorrel,

Dimple said that it was gray !

“Gray I” said Danny, “ you are simple!
Just as gray as mother’s shawl,

And that’s red!” Said saucy Dimple,
“Yow re a fool, and that is all !”

Then the sister and the brother—
As indeed they scarce could fail,

In such anger, struck each other—
All about the horse’s tail!

“ Red!” cried Dimple, speaking loudly,
“ How you play at fast and loose!”
“Yes,” said Danny, still more proudly,
“When I’m playing with a goose!”

Tn between them came the mother—
“ What is all this fuss about ?”
Then the:sister and the brother
Told the story, out and out.
64





DAN AND DIMPLE, AND HOW THEY QUARRELLED.































































And she answered, “TI must label
Each of you a little dunce,

Since to look into the stable
Would have settled it at once !”

Forth ran Dan with Dimple after,

And full soon came hurrying back
65







JOHN GRIMLY.

Shouting, all aglee with laughter,
That the horse’s tail was black !

So they both agreed to profit

By the lesson they had learned,
And to tell each other of it

Often as the fit returned.



OUR FATHER MADE THEM ALL.

WOULD not hurt a living thing,
However weak or small ;

The beasts that graze, the birds that sing,
Our Father made them all;

Without his notice, I have read,
A. sparrow cannot fall.



JOHN GRIMLY.

OHN GRIMLY lived in a worn-out house—
A house unpainted, old, and gray—
That let in the wind in winter time,

And the drenching shower of the April day.
The windows were little, and rough, and square,
And a man must stoop to go in at the door;

And the winter sleet and the sunshine fair
Came in through the chinks on the rotten floor.

John Grimly’s years were sixty and two,
His form was bent and his hair was gray,
Yet he trudged, be the skies or gray or blue,
To his lonely workshop every day. |
66





JOHN GRIMLY.

Shouting, all aglee with laughter,
That the horse’s tail was black !

So they both agreed to profit

By the lesson they had learned,
And to tell each other of it

Often as the fit returned.



OUR FATHER MADE THEM ALL.

WOULD not hurt a living thing,
However weak or small ;

The beasts that graze, the birds that sing,
Our Father made them all;

Without his notice, I have read,
A. sparrow cannot fall.



JOHN GRIMLY.

OHN GRIMLY lived in a worn-out house—
A house unpainted, old, and gray—
That let in the wind in winter time,

And the drenching shower of the April day.
The windows were little, and rough, and square,
And a man must stoop to go in at the door;

And the winter sleet and the sunshine fair
Came in through the chinks on the rotten floor.

John Grimly’s years were sixty and two,
His form was bent and his hair was gray,
Yet he trudged, be the skies or gray or blue,
To his lonely workshop every day. |
66







—————







The children who passed by the workshop door
Hushed shout and laughter till they were by,
And shunned the sound of his old, cracked voice.

And the passing glance of his stern gray eye.
67









THE TWO GIFTS.

T was Christmas Eve and snow was falling silently, but the
storm was not severe enough to keep the children from the
church. Their happy voices mingled with the deep, rich

tones of the organ in Christmas hymns, the soft light poured
through the stained windows on the snow-covered paths, and
the beautiful tree shed its varied and abundant fruit. Homes.
looked doubly cheerful to-night; there was many a glad
reunion, married sons and daughters coming with their little
ones from their own firesides to the old hearthstone.

But in two chambers in the quiet village the lamp burned
dimly ; footsteps were silent, voices hushed to low, tender tones,
and in one, a mother’s heart aching in secret for a little child
lying on a bed of pain and weariness. In another home an
orphan boy had received all of care and kindness he had known
since his mother went to live with angels. Love would gladly
have given these little ones as fair a tree as the rest, and did
bring to their bedsides all they could enjoy, hot-house flowers,
golden oranges, and rich, juicy grapes. Ethel took these from
her mother’s hand, and while that hand gently bathed her
aching temples and the low, sweet voice sang the lullaby she
loved best, her white eyelids drooped and a refreshing sleep
held her free from pain. __

Who can tell how Jamie longed for his mother? Well did
he remember her smile and voice and touch. His friends were
kind and took good care of him, only not a mother’s care. His
Sunday-school teacher was most like her; she came to him
to-night as soon as she could leave the church, after seeing her
little class safely on their way home. She brought his flowers .
and fruit; she bathed his brow with a hand so gentle that it
seemed like his mother’s; she sang to him and soothed him, too,

to sleep. As she still sat beside him a beautiful smile played
68







THE TWO GIFTS.

over his thin face. He opened his eyes with a new, glad light

‘shining from their depths, and said, twining his wasted arms
around her neck, “Oh, Miss Wells, TPve had such a good
dream !”

“ What was it, dear ?”

“T sat at the window watching the snow falling so quietly,
just as it does to-night, and I did not feel cold, though the
window was open. It was light, too. By and by the tiny flakes
seemed to hold together, and then to spread like wings, and a
beautiful angel floated down, all in white, with long golden
curls and clear gentle eyes. She came closer and closer to me,
and I felt so glad to see her; she seemed like my mother. She
took me in her arms and laid my head on her breast. Then
she kissed me, and all the pain went away and I felt rested and
well. And then I saw that it was mother. Oh, how happy lL
was! too happy to say anything only, Mother! Mother! She
seemed to move upward a little, and I thought she was going to
carry me with her home to heaven, but just then I woke. I
feel well, though, and it is a beautiful Christmas, for I’ve seen
. mother.” :

Christmas morning dawned clear and beautiful. The sun
shone on the new-fallen snow as white as an angel’s wing, and
on trees and fences studded with brilliants. The village children
were early astir, and merry with their Christmas gifts. In
Ethel’s sunny chamber were rejoicing hearts, for she was better.
A good night’s rest, such as she had not had for weeks, calmed
her pulse and gave her new strength; she would soon be well.

Jamie’s little form lay white and still, with snowy blossoms
on his breast and twined in his dark hair. He had found his
mother. .

“There shall be no more death, neither sorrow nor crying;
neither shall there be any more pain, for the former things are

passed away, and God shall wipe away all tears from his eyes.”
69





MY LITTLE TREASURE.

To each little one the angel had brought the gift that was
best. To Ethel—the joy of her mother’s heart and cherished.
by loving friends—healing and strength for life’s work yet
before her. To Jamie, the poor orphan, his mother, rest, and
heaven.

MY LITTLE TREASURE. |

OULD you know my little treasure,
Rarest, priceless beyond measure ?
Come with me;
Look and see—
Ripe lips brimming o’er with pleasure—
Laughter-loving Mayjorie!

Little darling, bright eyes gleaming,
Full of thought and tender dreaming—
Thought for me!
Look and see
All the love that there is beaming—
"Sweetest, dearest Marjorie!

Little daughter, full of laughter,
Whom the sunbeams ripple after,
Dear to me;
Look and see
All the love that I would waft her—

Best of treasures, Marjorie!
70





THE MOON.

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nen

THE MOON.

N and out, in and out,
Through the clouds heaped about,
Wanders the bright moon.
What she seeks, I do not know;
Where it is, I cannot show.
T am but a little child,
And the night is strange and wild.
7





THE FLY AND THE BEE.

In and out, in and out,

Wanders the bright moon ;
In and out, in and out,

She will find it soon.
There she comes! as clear as day,
Now the clouds are going away.
She is smiling, I can see,
And she’s looking straight at me.

THEORET SANDS) ii Bie.
A FLY once said to a bee, “Tell me, my friend, how is it

that no one pursues or torments you, as they do me? I
have to protect my life from every one, but you fly about
in the air gathering honey unforbidden from the flowers.
If I venture to put out my trunk to reach a crust of bread, or
perchance to dip into some more dainty dish, death threatens
me on the spot. I think if I could sting, and take vengeance
on my foes as thou canst, that I should be left in peace.”

“You are mistaken,” replied the bee. “A much surer pro-
tection to me is that by diligence I serve mankind.”

a

Tomay’s mamma had given him a beautiful watch. “ What
time is it?” asked ae ae young mother.

“ Quarter-past six.’

“You are mistaken; it is half-past six.”

“How glad I am!” said the boy.

“Why so?”

“T have loved you a quarter of an hour longer.”

72







ENN

BABY.

Ca LESS thee, my baby, may life for thee ever
Be bright as a long summer’s day ;
May all that is sweetest and all that is dearest
Like sunshine descend on thy way.
May thoughts that are holy like angels attend thee,
May sorrows like shadows depart ;
May love like a blossom unfold in its beauty,

And peace find a home in thy heart.
73





THE COMING SHOWER.

OW close and how warm the air is!
Oh, never a breath is stirring ;
And loud in the pathway there is
A sound of locusts whirring.

All drooping and hot the grass is;
The leaves have no life nor motion;
The stream like a river of glass is
As it glides away to the ocean.

Ah, it is too warm for eating,

So the sheep leave the scorching meadow ;
And here on the hill-side meeting,

They lie in the trees’ cool shadow.

But see, while I yet am speaking,
The clouds are the sunlight dimming,
While the swallows, the water seeking,
Are lowly and swiftly skimming.

Take courage, O panting creatures,
Take courage, O drooping grasses!

Oh, flowers, lift your delicate features
To be bathed in the rain as it passes !

‘Afar o’er the distant hill-tops,

See the welcome shower advancing ;
And now a thousand raindrops

On the river’s breast are dancing.

It is here, the blessed shower !_
Give thanks, a myriad voices!
While bird and beast and flower

Each in its way rejoices.
74















































SSS

OUT IN THE COLD.
ACK FROST is a sharp one,
And nips, as he goes,
Poor mittenless fingers
And stockingless toes,
And bites without mercy
Your ears and your nose.

‘Why, dear little maiden!
Out here in the cold,

The snow and the north wind
That whistles so bold,

Like a shivering pet lamb
Astray from its fold ?

Hurry on! Hurry on!
Little maiden, I say,
For the wind bloweth keen
On this cold winter day,
And the frost has no pity
For any astray.
75







THE SORROWS OF POOR BOSE.

HE sat in the deep kitchen window, blinking her eyes in

the sun. She had snow-white feet, of which she seemed

UC’ proud, for she took great care of them, and had a habit

of curling her tail about them when she sat down, in a

very genteel manner : perhaps she thought the effect was stylish,
for her tail was white at the end; and her name was Tabby.

Bose lay on the floor trying to get a troubled nap. He had
some few accomplishments: could sit on his hind feet and beg
for his dinner, shake hands, and roll over. But his temper was
unpleasant, for he would bark at strangers, however quiet and
well-behaved they might be. Perhaps it was a remorseful
conscience that disturbed his rest,—the ghost of a murdered
gosling that he wantonly shook to death, or a stolen depredation
upon the sheep pasture. He first stretched himself out with
his head on his paws, but sleep refused to visit his eyelids, then
he crawled round three times and curled himself up in a semi-
circle, but in vain; so he sat up gloomily and sleepily, and
looked at Tabby, who sat in the kitchen window blinking in
the sun.

At length he broke out in a fretful tone; it sounded like a
short bark,—

“Tabby, you are purring again !”

Tabby unwound her tail from her ae and waved it
slowly once or twice, and. said,—

“AmI? Well, it is so pleasant here in the sun, and I had
such a nice breakfast. I really don’t know half the time when
I do purr. It is a comfort, too, to purr. If you should try it,
I dare say you could sleep better. I often purr myself to
sleep.”

“Who said I couldn’t fe ? You seem to take a great

many things for granted.”
76





THE SORROWS OF POOR BOSE.

“T thought you seemed restless. Perhaps you ate too much

breakfast.”

“T suppose you mean to insinuate that I ate more than my
share? You are the most disagreeable cat I ever saw in my life!”

Another sharp bark, and Bose stretched himself on his side
to his utmost dimensions, and resolutely shut his eyes. Presently
he raised his head, and said, a little more mildly,—

“Tabby, you are purring again.”

“ Now, really, Bose, you must excuse me, for I didn’t know
it. I was thinking what a sweet girl my mistress Mary is.
When she pats me on the head, and smooths a fur, my
happiness is complete.”

“Now, Tabby,” Bose jumped up into a chair by the window,
and Tabby curled her tail more ae as if she thought he
would bite, “I want to talk with you.”

“With pleasure, Bose.”

“ And try and keep from purring; you have no idea how it
disturbs me.”





THE SORROWS OF POOR BOSE.

“TJ will try; but if you would only purr yourself.”

“ Don’t mention it! I wouldn’t for the world! I want to
know, Tabby, if you are really so satisfied with your lot as you
pretend to be. Don’t you ever have anything to annoy you ?”

“T don’t remember anything. Oh, yes; Susan shut my tail
in the door the other day, and yesterday I caught a mouse and
it got away from me. Yes, I was excessively annoyed; but one
was an accident, and for the other no one was to blame but
myself.”

Poor Bose made no answer, but he was so discontented with
his home that he took the first opportunity of running away,
which was the following morning. The butcher-boy that
brought the meat called him, and he gladly followed.

When Bose reached the butcher’s headquarters, and saw the
array of beef, mutton, pork, sausage, and liver hanging upon
the wall, he thought he had come to a sort of dog’s Paradise.
He willingly obeyed the command of his new master to lie
under the bench, and gratefully gnawed the bone he threw to
him. The boy took great pleasure in making him roll over,
and run after a stick which he threw across the street. But he
got out of patience when the dog would not walk on his hind
feet, and ordered him to lie down under the bench, where he
was forced to remain for two or three hours.

But he was afterwards fed bountifully with bits of liver and
kidneys, and began to feel that it was very much better for him
than at home with Mary and Tabby.

At last when the snow was on the ground, and Bose was
nearly frozen under the door-step, and had suffered the insult
of having his head whitewashed by the butcher-boy, he put his
tail between his legs, and, looking behind him as he ran, disap-
peared in the direction of the old farm-house.

Cold, and hunger, and insult had broken his spirit and

conquered his pride, and he longed for the old box in the shed,
78





TAKE CARE.

and thought the music of Tabby’s purring would be the
sweetest sound he could hear. Good, gentle Tabby, how glad
she would be to see him once more! He would never chide her,
or be impatient toward her again.

It was late when he reached his old home. The house and
shed were fastened for the night, and he lay down quietly to die.
_ His heart was quite broken; and when Willie found him
stiff and frozen in the morning on the door-step, and saw a
well-known star on his breast, he said, “ Poor Bose !”

So they buried him tenderly, while Tabby, unconscious of
his misfortunes and his unhappy fate, still sat in the window,
purring and blinking in the sun.

TAKE CARE.

CaPITTLE children, you must seek
Rather to be good than wise,
For the thoughts you do not speak
Shine out in your cheeks and eyes.

If you think that you can be
Cross or cruel, and look fair,
Let me tell you how to see
You are quite mistaken there.

Go and stand before the glass,
And some ugly thought contrive,
And my word will come to pass

Just as sure as you're alive.
79





FREDDY AND HIS MAMAIA.

What you have, and what you lack,
All the same as what you wear,
You will see reflected back :
So, my little folks, take care !

And not only in the glass

Will your secrets come to view ;
All bebolders, as they pass,

Will perceive and know them too.

—__—___-~+e>_—____-

FREDDY AND HIS MAMMA.

t OME, my bonnie birdie,”
Mamma to Fred will say:

“Come, prepare for bye-bye.
Fred is tired to-day.

“Put his hands together,
Shut his weary eyes,

Pray God to bless him,
As in sleep he lies.

“ Bless mamma and sister,
Both to me so dear ;

Bring papa back safely
To his loved ones here.”

Then mamma takes Freddy
To his little cot,
And, though no one sees them,
Angels guard the spot.
80





SOR

FREDDY AND HIS MAMMA.



















Angels watch dear Freddy,
As he slumbers there ;
Mamma’s treasure, papa’s darling,
Little sister’s care.

———-+

A LITTLE boy, seeing a man sauntering about a public-house
door, counting some money held in his hand, and evidently
about to go into the public-house, stepped up to him and said,
“Don’t go in there.” The man put his hand, with the money,
in his pocket, thanked the little boy for his advice, and did not
go in. :

81





GRANDPA AND LOTTA.

ND now what does puss want?” said grandpa, as Lotta
climbed into his lap. It was a warm afternoon, and
grandpa had been dozing in his chair ever since dinner.

Lotta, before tellmg what she wanted, put her two

hands on grandpa’s cheeks and gave him a good kiss.

“ Now, what is it?”

“JT want you to take me——” Lotta did not finish the

sentence. .

“Where?” asked grandpa.

“Out to——” she stopped again.

“Well, go on.”

“The park !”

She threw out the last word quick and strong. ie you gee

she was not sure of grandpa, and wanted to make him under-
stand how much she wanted to go.

Ce

“Oh, dear !” answered grandpa, who was feeling dull. “It’s
too hot.”
“But it’s so cool in the park, and so nice out there. Do,

1?

grandpa !” and Lotta put her arms about his neck and gave him
the biggest kind of a hug.

“T suppose I shall have to, after that,” said grandpa, who
was beginning to get wider awake, and to feel the dulness passing
off. “So get yourself ready.”

Off scampered Lotta, and soon came dancing and singing
back, ready for a ride to the park. Grandpa and his little pet
took one of the cars, and in less than half an hour were in the
beautiful park, where hundreds of happy children were playing
on the cool green grass, and hundreds of carriages sweeping
along the feel roads, making a scene of life and beauty
refreshing to look upon. It was almost as good for grandpa to
be there as Lotta. While she ran about on the green sward
and picked her hands full of buttereups, gay as a little bird, he

82





GRANDPA AND LOTTA.























































































































































































sat in the pleasant shade and breathed in the sweet fragrance
of the mown grasses, feeling that it was good for him to be
there, and having a double enjoyment in seeing the delight
of Lotta.

The birds were so tame that they hopped about on the
ground close to where he was sitting and sang in the trees right
above his head. The cool air fanned his cheeks and lifted his
gray hair and filled his lungs with a new life.

“Tsn’t it nice out here, peda ?” asked Lotta, as she came
running up to him with her hands full of wild flowers.

“Yes, indeed,” answered grandpa.

“ Ain’t you glad you came ?”

“Yes, dear.”

“T thought so;” and she gave him a kiss, and then ran off
again. They stayed there until the sun was low down in the
west, and then came home, both feeling better and happier for

their visit to the park. I think they will go again very soon.
83





THE GOOD SHIP “ NEVER-FAIL.”’

HY don’t you launch your boat, my boy ?”

I asked the other day, —

As strolling idly on the beach
I saw my lads at play;

One blue-eyed rogue shook back his curls,
And held his ship to me,

“Tm giving her a name,” he cried,
“ Before she goes to sea ;

We rigged her out so smart and taut,
With flag and snow-white sail,

And now J’ll trust her to the waves,
And call her ‘ Never-fail.’ ”

The little ship sailed proudly out,
Through mimic rock and shoal,

The child stood watching on the beach,
His vessel reached its goal ;

The wind had risen soft at first,
But wilder soon it blew,

Tt strained and bent the slender mast,
That still rose straight and true:

“Yet,” cried the boy, “my ship is safe,
In spite of wind and gale,

Her sails are strong, her sides are firm,
Her name is ‘ Never-fail.’ ”

And presently the wind was lulled,
The little bark came home,

No wreck, although her sails were wet,
Her deck all washed with foam ;

And loudly laughed my true boy then,

As on the beach she lay.
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THE GOOD SHIP “NEVER-FAIL.”







THE DOG AND THE ICE.

And wisely spoke my true boy then,
Although ’twas said in play—

“ Grandpa, I thought if mast and sail
And tackle all were true,

With such a name as ‘ Never-fail,’
She'd sail the wide sea through.”



THE DOG AND THE ICE.

Coy HAT ever is that dog a doing?” exclaimed our little
Patty, and her eyes grew bright with wonder.
“Two words too much,” said Aunt Ruth, in a grave
voice and with a graver face. “Why don’t you learn
to talk right ?” !

“Oh, dear! you’re always a putting of a body out!” Patty
looked very much annoyed.

“Two words too much,” said Aunt Ruth, in a dead-level
voice.

“Youre always a doing of it, aunty. Why can’t you tell
me about the dog ?”

“Two words more. I’m really surprised, Patty. Where do
you hear that kind of talk ?”

“What kind?” the child asked, looking puzzled as well as
annoyed. .“ How should I talk?”

“«What is that dog doing? was all you need have said,”
replied Aunt Ruth.

“ Well, wasn’t that just what I did say ?” returned Patty.

“No; you put in two useless words that spoiled the sentence.
You said, ‘ What ever is that dog a doing?’ ”

“Oh, well, that doesn’t kill anybody. You knew what I
meant, aunty.” And Patty tossed her little head in an injured
way.

86



THE DOG AND THE ICE.





































































































































































































































































“And then,” continued Aunt Ruth, “you said, ‘ You're
always a putting of a body out,’ instead of saying, ‘ You're
always putting a body out,’ which sounds better and saves
breath. You must think about these little things, my dear,
and learn correct ways of speaking. And now let us see what
the dog is doing. Oh! breaking the ice with his foot, I do
declare !”

“ Wouldn’t ‘I declare,’ be just as well, aunty, and save breath
on the do 2” said Patty, turning upon Aunt Ruth with an arch,
saucy smile.

“Fairly caught!’ was Aunt Ruth’s good-humored reply.
: 87





BABY, THE KING.

“Yes, dear, that do was a word too much. Your old aunty
learned some bad habits when she was young like you, and
finds it hard even now to get over them, so she wants her little
niece to have as few faults as possible to overcome when she
grows old. She does not know yet that unlearning is a great
deal harder than learning. And now for the dog.”

Aunt Ruth read for a minute in the book which Patty held
open in her hand. Then she said,—

“ Well, that is curious! This dog you see was walking along
with his master one frosty morning. The night before had
been cold, and all the little pools of water were frozen over.
The ice was not very thick, and so looked nearly the color of
water. The dog put his head down to drink first at one frozen
pool and then at another, and each time looked surprised and
disappointed. Then his master broke the ice with his foot, and
the dog drank his fill, On they went, and soon the dog wanted
to drink again. But this time he did not wait for his master,
but struck his great foot on the surface of an ice-covered stream
and broke a hole for himself.

“ Just look at him in the picture He’s as pleased as any
boy.”



BABY, THE KING.

Y country’s very small—
Tis just a room
Built by the forest edge,
_ Watched by the moon.
Only two persons in it!
I’m one, and sing;
Baby’s the other one—

Baby, the king !
88

C



BABY, THE KING.

His crown is golden hair,
Measuring an inch ;
His sceptre chubby arms,

Tempting to pinch ;
His robe’s a snowy one;
And I will sing
Of all the gems that deck
Baby, the king!
89





COUSIN LOU.

Two very drowsy eyes,
One funny nose,

Two little feet that kick,
Ten pinky toes;

His law’s a ery, but he
Crows while I sing—

Now you know all about
Baby, the king!

COUSIN LOU.

ITTLE roguish Cousin Lou,
With her dancing eyes of blue ;—
While the long and silken lashes
Can’t conceal their mirthful flashes.
Careless waving, golden tresses,
Which each passing breeze caresses ;
Dimpled cheeks—and sunny smiles,
Silvery laugh—and playful wiles,
All these charms your love will woo,
For my witching Cousin Lou.

These are sure enough to please,

But my Lou has more than these ;—
From her eyes of heavenly blue
Beams a spirit kind and true;
Every warm and generous feeling

O’er her childish heart is stealing,—
90 :





COUSIN LOU.

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Is it very strange, think you,
That I love my darling Lou?

91







THE STRAY SHEEP.

Cy HO is the good Shepherd ?” asked our teacher, as she
took her seat in front of her class of little boys and
girls one Sunday afternoon. It was many years ago,
and I was only a little child then, but I can remember

that pleasant afternoon and the sweet, earnest face and tender

voice of our teacher almost as well as if only a year had passed.

“The Lord,” answered one of the children.

“ Yes, the Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, who came to seek
and to save that which was lost.” Then she showed us the
picture of a shepherd carrying a sheep in his arms, and said,
“Of what parable does this remind you?”

‘Of the parable of the lost sheep,” two or three eager voices
replied.

“Yes; and now can you find this parable?”

There was a quick turning of leaves by the children. Mary
Foster—dear Mary ! she was taken to the heavenly fold many
years ago—found the parable first, and read it aloud:

“ How think ye? Ifa man have an hundred sheep, and one
of them be gone astray, doth he not leave the ninety and nine,
and goeth into the mountains, and seeketh that which is gone
astray ?

“And if so be that he find it, verily I say unto you, he
rejoiceth more of that sheep, than of the ninety and nine which
went not astray. Even so it is not the will of your Father
which is in heaven, that. one of these little ones should perish.”

“T want to talk to you about the good Shepherd to-day,”
said our teacher as Mary stopped reading, “and it was that you
might the more surely remember what I am going to say that I
brought with me this sweet and beautiful picture. Its image in
your memories will help you to recall my words.”

All the children in the class grew very still, and looked

earnestly into her face. We loved to hear her talk.
92 ;





STRAY SHEEP.











































































































































































































































































































































































































































































A a OL

“You remember,” she went on, “ how often in the Bible God
is spoken of as a Shepherd, and His people as sheep. And
now, children, what I want particularly to impress upon your
minds is that the Lord, our Shepherd, really loves us. Think
of what He has said: ‘I am the good Shepherd: the good
Shepherd giveth his life for the sheep.’ And again, ‘I lay

999

down my life for the sheep.
She paused for a little while that we might take this

assurance of God’s tender care over us deep into our hearts.
93





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EU CVin GRR Vee terse erate

Tue THIEvIsH Cats....

THe Cats’ CONSULTATION...

Tue Rainzow..

Jounny Witson.......

Rossir’s Rep APPLE ..

Tue Town PIGEON......

Her Faruer’s Dar ine .

THE ERMINE...........

Two RoGuks............

Tue LittLte Toy-Giri.....

WucyviGREEN a eeu era ese

STRIKE THE Kwot...........

Our FaTHER, WHO ART IN
HEavEN..

Tue Kixnp Driver

Basy BROTHER......

Srory or A Brrn’s Ngsr.....

Tue Happy FamILy...

Hattie’s BrrTupay...

THE ScHoot-MastTeEr..

Wuo 1s SHE?........

GranDma’s DARLINGS

Tue DaucGHTer or A Kine.

Tres SoASas 5 acco ssase5

READING THE BIBLE.......

Countine A Day’s Sport.....

Harry’s FrienD ne

Tue Sparrow's Mornine Visit.

PHILIP THE IpIoT......

SPOILING A QUARREL.........

LaMENT oF A LitrLe MorHER
RROBINGeeaere eterna



ScatTER SEEDS oF KINDNEss..
THE SHEEP WITH A CarT....
Dan anp DIMPLE, aND HOW

THEY QUARRELLED,......
Our FATHER MADE THEM ALL.
JOHNNGRIMLY Am ener e er ie
Tue Two Girts............
My Lirrre Treasurk........
THE Moon... oe
THe Fry anD THE BEE......
A Buessine ror BaBy.......
Tue Cominc SHOWER........
Out IN THE COLD...........
Tue Sorrows or Poor Boss. .
SPARE CARRE asc eo ai reecereaie

| FREDDY AND HIs Mamma

GRANDPA AND LOTTA.........
Tue Goon Sup ‘‘ NEVER-FAIL”
Tue Doc anp THE IcE......
BABY SMART GING careers seater
Cousin’ our. 2 eae. ee
Tue Srray SHEEP... ar
Tue TREAT.........

Tue Farrurut Doc

THe Raccoon.......

My Kirrens........

Tue Burnet Motu.

Goop Humor.........
KEEPING SHOP.........

A Japanese ORCHESTRA.

Tue Two SprITES......
Lirtte Eunice ....

WD OGSaerraessneterarcueree


CONTE NES.

WATERING HIS GARDEN WITH
Rain...

A PLEAsant ‘FaMILy

WHAT IS THE MATTER WITH

CuristMAs BELLS

Moruer’s LEtrer

SHEEP...

WINTER..... t

Tue Birp THar WALKS ON THE
WATER.

CHILDREN AMONG THE FLOWERS.

Pussy Cat

Tue New ScHOLAR

Tue PRISONER ;

Tue Fricgate-BirD.........

Minniz To Dotty.

Tue Doti’s WasHING.

THE GARDENER’S GRANDCHILD.

SEH REESSC ADR ae reat eerr eee

Tue Lost PENKNIFE.

Lity anp HER DOLLY.

Tue Kirren anp FAaLiine
Leaves

Nicut-WatTcHMEN

Ipa’s CHICKENS

Try, Try, Try AGAIN

Tue Grerpy Micr

Goop ApvicE ror LITTLE ONES

SHAVING JACK

THe Pursuir or THE BUTTER-

A Happy New YEAR

Roman CHILDREN....

Birps anp Birps’ Nests

Kurrie
Do SoMETHING FoR EacH OTHER



PAGE
GHP OISTERS tres . 186

Homer ror THE Horipays.... 188

DisoBEDIENT Harry

Our FatHER In Heaven

A Merry Heart is BrETrer
THAN Money

Fan anp Her Puppies

Tue Litre Exirz’s Sonec....

Tue Lion..

Snow...

Tue Litrtte SoLpier

Goop CounsEL

Tue Boy's WisH

Eva’s Fairy Srory.....

Frost Picrures

Tue First Sxyow Storm

Tuer Cat THAT SAVED THE Bay 222
Tue Oxp Country. Housk.... 224
Wivuir’s Happy Day

Susrz’s Rosin

My Lirtte BrotTHEer

THE

THE

(HE CANARY. BIRDas se jeecese

Tue Sxippinc Rope

Pur

Our

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THE BUDGET.

LUG) Grey.

UCY GREY was sent by her mother to carry her father’s
dinner to him, as he was making hay in a meadow
nearly a mile off, and would not have time to come home
for it. “And be quick, Lucy,” she added, “for I have

put a hot steak and potatoes in a basin inside the bundle for a
treat for him, and if it gets cold he won’t enjoy it.”

It was very hot, and the roads looked white and dusty; but
the wild-flowers looked lovely in the bright sunshine, and the
birds sang their sweetest songs from the tree-tops.

In the first field she saw little Will Jones, trying to see-saw
by himself.

“Oh, come, Lucy !” said he, “just for a little while, and see
what fun we will have.”

Lucy forgot everything her mother had said, and was soon
haying a grand play on the see-saw.

Time flew on, and Lucy heeded it not; at last she heard a
loud laugh, and looking up saw a boy, commonly known as
“ Bad Ben,” running off with the bundle and tin can. Lucy
called and ran after him, but it was of no use; and at last, tired ~
and hot, she sat down on the grass and burst into a flood of tears.

If she had done as her mother had told her it would not
7 3




Â¥

THE THIEVISH: CATS.

have happened, and now her father would lose his nice dinner
through her thoughtlessness and disobedience. She must go
and tell him, and then go home for some bread and cheese for .
him. She walked on, still crying, and -soon saw her father
coming towards her, pitchfork in hand.

“ Heyday, Lucy ! what’s the matter?” said he; “and where’s
my dinner? for I’m very hungry, I can tell you.”

And then poor Lucy told him all, and ended by sobbing out
that she was very sorry, and would never be so naughty again.
Her father could never bear to see his little girl cry, so kissing
her kindly, he told her not to mind, but to run home and see
what she could get for dinner, and they would have it together.

Lucy’s mother was vexed, but she sent some cold bacon and
bread, which they ate in the pleasant hay-field. Her father
told her she was old enough to be a comfort to those around her,

‘and she must be more careful. Lucy promised, and she did try
from that time.



THE THIEVISH CATS.

HE family in which these kittens live must be very fond

of cats; only think, to have four good-sized kittens in

one family, and maybe one or two under the table! I

think that until we can teach kittens to speak and to

reason it will be better to keep them out of the dining-room, or
the crockery will get broken and the cream-jug upset.

I am afraid that the plate is done for; and as to that fish that
Spotty is busy with, I don’t think I should care for it. Maybe
Whitey didn’t upset the cream-jug, but he is certainly having
_ the benefit of it. Blackey is cultivating a taste for coffee that

seems to be a sign of early depravity for a cat.

“ Better run along, kittens; I think I hear some one coming!”
noes
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THE CATS’ CONSULTATION.

FOUR VOICES AND CHORUS.

long LL the cats consulted :

What was it about?

How to catch a little mouse
Running in and out.

The cat with the black nose
Made this remark :

“T will eat the mouse up,
Because my nose is dark.”

Chorus.—All the cats consulted :
What was it about?

How to catch a little mouse
Running in and out.

The cat with the white tail
Said, “Stop a bit,

I have got a white tail, .
Only look at it ;”

Then softly murmured,
Under her breath,

“T with my white tail
Will switch him to death.”

Chorus.—All the cats consulted :
What was it about ?

How to catch a little mouse
Running in and out.

The cat with the double teeth
Laughed loud at this:
“ll kill the mousykin

With a kind kiss;
10


THE CATS’ CONSULTATION.

i
| | | i

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Pll say ‘ whisky—whisk,
Mew, mew, mew,’

Nibble up the mousykin
Before you count two.”

Chorus.—All the cats consulted :
What was it about ?

How to catch a little mouse
Running in and out.

The cat with the long claws

Turned up her lip:
11


THE RAINBOW.

“You can only snip-snap,.
It’s J can grip;

Stick in my long claws,
Hold him rather tight,

Then with my little jaws
Whisk him out of sight.”

Chorus.—All the cats consulted :
What was it about ?

How to catch a little mouse
Running in and out.

The mouse, who kept list’ning
To all that was said,
Felt extremely frightened,
And thought he’d soon be dead ;
But time may be wasted
If cats have much to say,
And while the cats consulted,
The mouse—ran away !
Chorus.—All the cats consulted :
What was it about?
How to catch a little mouse
Running in and out.

THE RAINBOW.

OME, see how fast the weather clears, —
The sun is shining now ;
And on the last dark cloud appears

A beauteous-colored bow.
12








THE RAINBOW.





























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































’Tis God who make the storm to cease,
And sun to shine again ;

The rainbow is the sign of peace
Between Himself and men.

This lovely bow He stretches forth,
And bends from shore to shore—

His own fair token to the earth
He'll bring a flood no more.

13 : 34


JOHNNY WILSON.

Just such a bow shines brightly round
The throne of God in heaven,

Which shows His mercy has no bound,
And speaks of sins forgiven.

JOHNNY WILSOW.

(f OHNNY WILSON was a good little boy in the main,
but he had one fault that gave him a deal of trouble, and
that was driving nails. Now, I hear some of you little
folks say, “ Driving nails is not a fault.”

Well, if a little boy should ask papa to give him a block of
wood, a paper of nails, and a hammer, he could have a nice
. time and not trouble anybody. But Johnny Wilson was not
content with a block of wood; he drove nails into everything;
into the walls, carpets, chairs, and tables. In short, whatever
was large enough to hold a nail, was sure to come under Johnny’s
hammer. I really think mamma was afraid he would drive
nails into the baby. He was punished and forbidden to touch

a*hammer, but it seemed, indeed, as if he could not help it, for

whenever any one made Johnny a present, it was sure to be a
hammer.

One bright summer morning, mamma took the baby and
went out to spend the day; she left Johnny at home alone with
the servants, feeling ae as he had no hammer, that all would
go right. 2

As I said before, ee was a good boy when hammers weré out
of the question; but no sooner had mamma. gotten fairly off,
than the carpenter came to hang a gate at the top of the stairs, to
keep baby, who was just beginning to toddle, from falling down.

14







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JOHNNY DRIVING NAILS IN HIS FATHER’S HAT.

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JOHNNY WILSON.

Johnny was much interested in watching the man measure,
and saw, and hammer, but did not offer to touch any of his
tools. At twelve o’clock, however, the carpenter was obliged
to go home to his dinner, and as the gate was not quite finished,
he left his tools until he should return. It was too much for
Johnny to be left alone with such a beautiful hammer, and
nails of every size and shape.

In the room close to the stairs stood mamma’s cedar chest,
and this was what first caught Johnny’s eyes. “That would
be a ee place to drive nails,” thought he. “TI will just
try one.’

So he first put a little one in; but that went so nee hi
tried another, and another, until there were ever so many.
Then he screwed the gimlet in the chest, he hammered in the
chisel, and what do you think he did after that? Why, he
found papa’s high hat that was put away for the summer, and
filled that full of nails. Oh, Johnny, Johnny!. what will
mamma, say ?

When the carpenter returned he felt very cross, but after he
had seen all the damage that was done, he felt very sorry for
Johnny, as he knew a punishment was sure to follow. So he
tried his best to mend the matter; he drew the chisel and all
the nails out of the chest, and unscrewed the gimlet; but the
marks were still there, and the hat was ruimed forever. When
mamma came home, how do you think she punished Johnny?
Not by whipping and scolding. No; but she made him wear
the hat, nails and all, every day to school for a week. Poor
little boy! She felt very sorry sometimes, when the boys
laughed and made fun of him, but he was at last cured of his
bad fault of driving nails, and so effectual was mamma’s remedy
for the trouble, that Johnny was ever afterwards ready almost
to run away out of sight of a hammer.

16




ROBBIE’S RED APPLE.

NE day Robbie was visiting his cousin. They went to a
neighboring farmhouse, and the kind people gave them
permission to go into the orchard and get some ripe apples

to eat. The trees were bending with fruit, and under-
neath their laden boughs were many mellow apples fallen to
the ground. Some were yellow, some rosy-cheeked, and some
were red all over. A few were very large, and others quite
small.

Robbie looked around, trying to find a very nice one. He
wasn’t satisfied with those that seemed “fair to middling,” but
wanted a very good one indeed. Presently he chose one. It
was one of the largest and reddest—a fine apple to look at.
But apples were made to eat. Robbie took a bite of his beau-
tiful one, and found its looks were a great deal better than its
taste. It was not sweet or thoroughly ripened, and it was hard
and coarse-grained besides. Many apples, lying close at hand,
though but half as large and not half so pretty as this one, were
ten times better, for they were mellow, sweet, and juicy.

Robbie showed a little of the unwise and selfish side of the
heart, which is too common in the world. He was fond of size
and show; he judged from outward appearance, and so made a
very poor choice.

The great and showy things of life, and the bright and glit-
tering things of the world, are not always what they seem.
Fine clothes and big purses do not make good, wise people.
Such things are like the rind of Robbie’s red apple, merely out-
side show that deceives the thoughtless. Real merit does not

love to deck itself in showy garb.
17

}




THE TOWN PIGEON.

HE beautiful picture on the opposite page reminds me of
the following poem, which I think you will agree with
me is very pretty.

Stoop to my window, thou beautiful dove!

Thy daily visits have touched my love.

I watch thy coming, and list the note

That stirs so low in the mellow throat,
And my joy is high

To catch the glance of thy gentle eye.

Why dost thou sit on the heated eaves,

And forsake the wood with its freshened leaves ?

Why dost thou haunt the sultry street,

When the paths of the forest are cool and sweet?
How canst thou bear

This noise of people—this sultry air?

Thou alone of the feathered race

Dost look unscared on the human face,

Thou alone, with a wing to flee,

Dost love with man in his haunts to be;
And the “ gentle dove”

Has become a name for trust and love.

A holy gift is thine, sweet bird!
Thowrt named with childhood’s earliest word !
Thow rt linked with all that is fresh and wild
In the prisoned thoughts of the city child;
And thy glossy wings
Are its brightest image of moving things.
18






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HER FATHER'S DARLING.

It is no light chance. Thou art set apart,

Wisely by Him who has tamed thy heart,

To stir the love for the bright and fair

That else were sealed in this crowded air ;
I sometimes dream

Angelic rays from thy pinions stream.

Come then, ever, when daylight leaves
The page I read, to my humble eaves,
And wash thy breast in the hollow spout,
And murmur thy low sweet music out!

I hear and see
Lessons of heaven, sweet bird, in thee! .

HER FATHER’S DARLING.

Six sunny tumbled curls,
Two rosebud lips apart
Disclosing milk-white pearls.

Ci

A TINY happy face,

Two wondering wide blue eyes,
Now bright with baby glances;
Beaming on some small prize,
Now wet with some small sadness.

Plump shoulders, soft and white,
For kissing surely meant ;

Rumpled and crumpled muslins,
‘With here and there a rent.

Dimpled little fingers,
Everywhere they fumble ;
Restless, little active legs,

Now and then a tumble.
20




HER FA THER'S DARLING.



Saucy little stampings,
Pretty little rebel !
Saucy small expressions
In a silvery treble.

Ringing shouts of laughter,
Sobs of deepest woe ;

Going to see wee piggies,
Hurt a tiny toe.

Now naughty wilful ways,
And most indignant glances ;
Anon her stick a racer,
She caracoles and prances.

A little sunbeam ever,
With very soft’ning power,
Oh! how her father loves her,
His sweet unopened flower !

21


THE ERMINE.

Co WAY up in northern latitudes, where there is nearly
always snow and ice, and where the summers are very
short indeed, lives a little creature which wears such a
beautiful dress that we are all envious and desire to rob

him of it. His dress is soft as any velvet, and creamy white,
and so warm that it is a protection against the coldest weather.
Ladies want it to border their garments with, judges think that
it adds to their dignity to wear it, and even kings and nobles
desire to have it to help to make their crowns and coronets. So
this beautiful, shy little creature, scarcely as large as a cat, is
hunted by the trapper, and when caught ee not only of
its garment, but of life itself, that lords and ladies, kings and
judges, may have their whims gratified.

This little animal is called an ermine. Its food consists of
rats, young rabbits, birds, small animals of every description,
and birds’ eggs. It is long, slender, and graceful in form, and
can climb trees as easily as a cat.

During the summer the ermine is called a stoat, and then its
back is of a reddish brown, which allows it to pass along the
ground among the fallen leaves and rubbish without being
perceived. But when the cold weather comes, the fur gradually
turns white, all but the tip of its tail, which remains black.

TWO ROGUES.

CaP IVING all alone in a silent house I stay,
No one speaking to me through the weary day ;
Reading, sewing, knitting, doing this and that,
No companions have I but my dog and cat.
None to say good-morning, spring with willing feet,
None good-evening bid me with their kisses sweet.
22


TWO ROGUES.



t

T’ve a next-door neighbor more fortunate than I;
Thinking of her blessings, I sometimes pause and sigh.
Little children scamper in and out all day,
Making dreadful racket at their merry play ;

23


THE LITTLE TOY-GIRL.

Losing playthings here, and dropping playthings there ;
Letting song and laughter echo everywhere.

Little rogues, I see you, peeping down at me,

With your laughing eyes, and faces full of glee.
How your presence brings the gladness to my heart!
Would you come to me and nevermore depart?
Darlings, you are welcome, come whene’er you will;
Blessed is the home you with your sunshine fill!

—_—_———-______

PELE TOG iE

. NE pleasant summer afternoon, Bertha and wee two-year-

iy old Hermann were playing merrily up and down the

garden walks, while their good mother sat on a bench by

the cottage door, busily knitting. In the flower-beds, gold

and purple pansies, fair white lilies, and nodding blue-bells

were in full blossom, filling the air with their sweet perfume.

Among the cherry-trees the little birds sang, and the gay butter-
flies flitted from flower to flower.

“ Dear little ones,” said the mother to herself, as she watched
her children in their play, “how happy they are and how good
the sunshine is for them! They need it—my little home-blos-
soms—as much as do the flowers in the garden.”

And then she thought of the many little children shut wp in
cities, with never a sight at the fresh green fields and sweet
flowers; to whom bird-songs were unknown music, and whose
only play-ground was the paved and dusty street. “Thank
God,” said she, wiping a tear from her eye, “that my darlings
are not shut up like caged birds, within city walls!”

Presently little Bertha, who was peeping through the palings

of the garden gate, exclaimed, “ Oh, mother, here comes a little
24


THE LITTLE TOY-GIRL.



girl with a basket! Shall I open the gate and ask her to
come in?”

“Yes, darling,” said her mother. So Bertha held the gate
wide open and the little girl entered. She was very fair, with
sweet blue eyes, and golden hair that rippled in bright waves to
her shoulders. Her simple dress and apron were clean and
tidy, and the napkin that was thrown over her basket was
snowy white. She dropped a courtesy and said, “ Will the
lady please buy some toys for her little children ?”

Bertha and Hermann came near and, with their mother,
looked into the basket.

“My brother carved these from wood,” said the little girl,

showing many curious and beautiful toys; “and he painted all
25


THE LITTLE TOY-GIRL.

the pictures in these books. He is lame, and he sits in his chair
all day long, making toys and painting pictures for me to sell.”

“Where does your father live?” asked the mother.

The blue eyes of the little girl filled with tears as she softly
answered, “In heaven. It is many a long day since he went,
and though, as mother says, it is happy for him to be there, it
is sad enough for us without him.”

“ And your brother,” asked the mother, “was he always lame?”

“ Not always,” answered the child, “though I*can remember
him only as he is now. He reads to me every day, from his
little Testament, of the fair land where our dear father has gone,
and says that it will not be long before he will be there too.
He does not say so before mother, for it would make her cry
too much.

“But I must not stay too long,” continued the little girl, “ for
I want to sell all that I have brought before night, for we
have many things to buy with the money that I —o get for
them.”

So the mother selected a book with beautifully colored en-
gravings for Bertha, who had just begun to learn to read, and a
little horse and cart, with a little whip, for Hermann.

As she put a bright silver coin in the little girl’s hand she
said, “I will go and see your mother and lame brother soon, if
you will tell me where you live.”

“ Will you?” said the child, her cheek flushing with pleasure ;
“that will please us all so much, for we are strangers here.”

So she told where she lived, and after another courtesy she
took her leave with a glad heart.

Flowers, birds, and butterflies were now, for ie time, forgot-
ten, as Bertha, leaning upon her mother’s knee, looked at the
beautiful pictures in her new book, and little Hermann, sitting
upon the grass at her feet, gave himself up to the full enjoy-

ment of his new treasure.
26


LUCY GREEN.

LUGY GREEN.

Cay UCY GREEN was a dear little girl, and took great
delight in flowers, of which she had a great many. She

was quite a favorite with old William, the market
gardener, for she very seldom missed a week without
going to him for a new pot, and the old man would choose her
the prettiest flowers he had, and often add one asa gift from
himself to those she paid him for. It was quite a pretty sight
to see*the two friends; they were both so very fond of their
flowers, and would stay chatting about the roses that had budded

since they last met, or the new flowers they had discovered.
27


STRIKE THE KNOT.

City HEN we were little boys—little fellows—our father
began to teach us how to work, and we were anxious to
perform the allotted tasks. We were splitting wood.
A tough stick with a most obstinate knot tried all

the skill and strength of a weak arm, and we were about to

relinquish the task when our father came along. He saw the
piece of wood had been chipped down and the knot hacked
around, and took the axe, saying,—

“ Always strike the knot.”

The words have always remained safe in my memory. They
are precious words, boys. Never try to shun a difficulty, but
look it right in the face; catch its eye, and you subdue it as a
man can a lion.

OUR FATHER, WHO ART IN HEAVEN

HY Father, little one, and mine,
Is He who reigns above ; :
Thy prayers and mine He deigns to hear,
In mercy and in love—
Thy prayers and mine, dear little child,
He deigns in love to hear;
Oh, to His blessed mercy-seat
Let us in faith draw near.

Thy Father, little one, and mine,
All hallowed be His name; ~
Oh, pray thou that His will be done,
In earth and heaven the same.
Thy Father, little one, and mine,
Pray thou for daily bread,
For by His power alone we live,
And by His bounty fed.
28


OUR FATHER, WHO ART IN HEAVEN.

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Thy Father, little one, and mine—
From evil keep us, Lord ;

Oh, turn our feet in those blest paths
That lead us to our God!

Thy Father, little one, and mine,
To Him the glory be;

To Him the kingdom, Him the power,

To all eternity.
29


THE KIND DRIVER. —

long LADY, sitting at a window in the country with some
friends, saw a wagon and pair of horses coming down
CX. the road, driven by a stout old man.

“ Here comes a kind driver,” she said. “ T’ve noticed
the way he treats his horses, and their obedience and attach-
ment. Wait antil he gets near and I'll speak to him.”

So when the man came opposite to the house, the lady called
.out,—

“ Good-morning, Benjamin. Won’t you show my friends
what a bright pair of horses you have? Make them shake

hands.”

The man called, “ Whoa!” to the horses, and as soon as they
had stopped, he said, speaking to one of them, “'Tom, shake
hands!” when instantly the horse lifted his foot in a pleased,
gentle way, and gave it into the man’s hand, who, after shaking
it and letting it fall, said,—

“ Now, Tom, the other ;” and up went that also. Then he
went around to the other horse, and he did the same thing in
the same gentle and pleased way.

“ Now turn round and come on,” called out the man; and
“instantly, without the crack of a whip or a loud command, the
docile animals turned carefully the wagon to which they were
harnessed, and followed their kind driver as a dog would have
followed his master.

“Thank you, Benjamin,” said the lady. “I wanted my
friends to see how much more obedient animals can be made
by kind than by harsh treatment.” |

As the man drove on with his horses, pleased with the notice
that had been taken of him, one of the ladies said,—

“This reminds me of a little pony that is managed entirely

without a whip, his driver only carrying a bit of straw in his
30


THE KIND DRIVER.



hand. The pony obeys his master with all the docility of a
dog. He has but*to say, ‘Tom, come here a little; or, ‘ Tom, a
little farther, and pony, just as if he could do everything but
say ‘ Yes’ in reply, instantly does what he is told. On being
asked one day if he never used the whip, the driver answered,
‘Oh, sir, if I were to use a whip, he would feel it,’ meaning
that if he were to strike the pony, the animal’s feelings would

be hurt as much as his body.”
31


NE

BABY BROTHER.

BABY brother Louis!
You are fairest of the fair ;
There’s nothing half so beautiful
In earth, or sea, or air.

O baby brother Louis!
You are sweetest of the sweet ;

_ With breath as fragrant as the breeze

When spring and summer meet.

O baby brother Louis!

You are fair, and sweet, and wise;
The angels, mamma says, look out
Upon us from your eyes—

The angels, pure and innocent,
Who’re near unto the Lord ;

I read about them yesterday,
While reading in his Word.

And I am sure it must be so,
For every one can see,

While gazing in your heavenly eyes,
A heavenly mystery—

A mystery of love and peace.
What better can I say ?

There is no power in human words
Their meaning to convey.

Oh, darling baby brother!
If angels are so near,
That, while his face beholding,
They’re dwelling with you here,
32




















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STORY OF A BIRDS NEST.

How gentle and how loving
Should all our actions be!
How tender and how truthful

Ev'ry spoken word to thee!



STORY OF A BIRD'S NEST.

ID you ever, dear children, watch the birds in spring-time

' building their pretty nests; and did you think how won-

derful it was that they should know how to make so nice

a little home from such things as they pick up here and

there? How smooth and beautiful they make the inside of

their nests, so as to form a soft bed for their eggs and little
birdies ! .

Do you suppose that your fingers, which are so skilful about
many things, could form as nice a nest as the little birds can,
with their slender beaks? If you think that perhaps they
might, just try it some day, and see if you can weave together
twigs and hair, with perhaps some bits of wool or cotton, into a
little rounded nest as beautiful as that which a pair of robins
would make! Even if you should succeed in making some-
thing to look like a nest, you would be obliged to try a number
of times first, and you would probably make many mistakes,
and have to take your work into pieces and begin anew again
and again before it would suit you.

Not so with the birds. They never make mistakes, and they
are not even obliged to think how to make their pretty homes,
because God has given them what is called instinct. In other
words, He teaches every little bird how to build just the kind of
nest best fitted for its use.

I will tell you a true story of a pair of golden orioles that
many years ago built a nest in an elm-tree so near a farm-house

that the children who lived there could watch them every day
34
STORY OF A BIRD'S NEST.

Pan



about their work and could hear the chirp of the little birds
after the wee things were hatched. ‘You all know, perhaps,
what kind of nests the orioles build, like slender baskets hung
from the branches of the trees.

If they could speak, the mother orioles might well sing to

their babies, —
85


THE HAPPY FAMILY.

“ Rock-a-bye, baby, on the tree-top ;
‘When the wind blows the cradle will rock !’

For several years the same pair of orioles came back to their
home in the elm-tree, made what repairs were needed, laid their
egos, and reared their little ones,

One spring, just after the little birds were hatched, there came
a long, cold rain, which lasted several days. The children and
others who lived in the house saw the golden orioles flying about
as if in great distress, and heard the pitiful chirping of the little
ones. At last, after the storm was over, some one took a ladder
and went up the tree to see what the trouble was, and found
that the pretty hanging nest was filled with water, and the
young birds were drowned. Now comes the strange part of the
story. After afew days of flying and fluttering about, as if
they had some new idea in their little heads, the parent birds
began to build another nest in the same tree, but instead of
forming it like the old one, they built a round nest like that of
the common robin upon a branch, and soon they had another
family of little birds nestled therein.

THE HAPPY FAMILY.

Cat E are not going out to-day,
So shall we have a game of play?
Let us be ladies, and we'll see ©
What happy ladies we can be.

We must have other names, of course—
I will be Mrs. Wilberforce.
Will you be Mrs. Wiggins, Flo?

Because you like that name, you know.
36


THE HAPPY FAMILY.

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“Yes, Vl be Mrs. Wiggins, dear,
But here is our dear brother here;
We really must have him to play:
I’m sure he won’t be in the way.”

*Tis very pleasing thus to see

Brothers and sisters all agree ;

So all good little girls and boys

Should share their pretty books and toys.

Dear little boys and girls, will you
Do as these little children do ;
And never, never try to tease,

But always do your best to please ?
87


HATTIE’S BIRTHDAY.

H, this is a happy, beautiful world!
My heart is light and gay ;
The birds in the tree sing blithely to me,
And I’m six years old to-day.

Yes, six, and father has bought me a book,
And mother, the sweetest doll,

All dressed in white, with blue eyes bright,
And the nicest hat and shawl.

My Kitty sat quietly near the fire
As Dolly and I came by;

Miss Dolly bowed, and pussy meowed,.
And opened her yellow eye.

Ah, me! if Kit could only talk,
And Dolly could but chat,

We'd social be as any three—
Talk, sing, and all of that.

I dressed all up in grandma’s cap,
And put on her glasses, too ;

“Why, Grandma!” I said, as I looked at myself,
“T’m almost as old as you.”

My mother softly kissed my cheek,
And then she blessed me, too,..

Praying that I, as years went by,
Might be as good and true.

My birthnight song is a merry one,
And my heart is warm and light;
Kind father, mother, and dear grandma,
Sweet dolly and pussy, good-night.
38






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THE SCHOOL-MASTER.

N days gone by, young people found it no easy thing to
pick up a little learning. They had not then the easy, —
pleasant books which they now have. Schools were often
very dismal places, and school-masters were very severe. If

a boy were a dunce, or behaved amiss, he was struck on his
hand with a ruler, or beaten with a cane, or poised on another
boy’s back and flogged with a birch-rod. But we need not
dwell on these things, as most young people have heard of them.
A change has taken place, and kindness is found to be a better
teacher than severity.

We know a school-master in a country town who is as cheer-

ful as May-day, and he brings on his scholars nicely. It was
on a holiday afternoon that he was seated in a sheltered seat at
the end of the playground, reading a book. Taking off his
spectacles he called out to his scholars, who had been enjoying
themselves at trap and ball, “ Boys, stop a moment or two in
- your play, and I will tell you a tale.”
Ina moment the trap and ball were left on the ground, and
the boys gathered around him. After a little scuffing for the
nearest place to their kind master, silence prevailed. You
might almost have heard the tick-tack of a watch, and every
eye was fixed on the school-master. After a short pause, he
related to them the following tale:

“Many years ago, a certain vizier, for some cause or other,
was condemned to perpetual imprisonment in a lofty tower. At
night his wife came to weep below his window.

“* Cease your grief,’ said the sage, putting out his head with
a turban on it. ‘Go home for the present, and return hither
when you have procured a live beetle, together with a little ghee
(that is, butter made from the milk of buffaloes), three balls,
one of the-finest silk, another of packthread, another of stout

whipeord, and finally a bundle of strong rope.’
40


THE SCHOOL-MASTER.
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“ Away went the vizier’s wife to do his bidding, and when
she again came to the foot of the tower, provided according to
her husband’s commands, he directed her to touch the head of
the insect with a little ghee, or butter, to tie one end of the silk
thread around him, and to place the beetle on the wall of the
tower.

“ Deceived by the smell of the butter, which he considered to
be in store somewhere above him, the beetle continued to ascend
till he reached the top, and thus put the vizier in possession of
the end of the silk thread. He then drew up the packthread

by. means of the silk, the small cord by means of the packthread,
41
THE SCHOOL-MASTER.

and, by means of the cord, a stout rope capable of sustaining
his own weight. Thus was he enabled at last to escape from
his. place of confinement. We see, then, from this story, what
great endings may be brought about by small beginnings.”

The boys were all highly amused with the tale which had
been told them ; but the cheerful school-master had not yet done
with his story, for, without losing any time, in a lively and
encouraging manner he made the following remarks:

“Tt appears to me that our tale is well suited to all of us.
Every boy in my school, though he does not wear a turban, may
be called a vizier, and may be said to be shut up in a high
tower—the tower of ignorance—from which he ought to do his
best to deliver himself.

“The vizier’s wife may be set forth by the printing-press,
which has provided what is necessary to free the vizier school-
boy from captivity. What we should do without the printing-
press I cannot tell.

“But where shall we find a black beetle? for somehow or
other we must have one. In my opinion your school-master
will be the very thing. If I am not blind, I wear a black coat,
and am very persevering; yes, I see I must play the part of a
black beetle.

“The ghee, or buffalo butter, is my desire for your good;
and this, I hope, will be quite enough to lead me on to serve
you so long as you are in the tower, and I have the means of
rendering you assistance.

“The silken line that I bring you is the alphabet; a very
small beginning, which may produce a very large and profitable
ending. Had we no alphabet, you might almost as well stop
away as come to school. If the alphabet be our silk line, well
may we regard words as our packthread. Single letters pro-
duce words, and thus, as we proceed, we gradually increase in

knowledge.
42
WHO IS SHE?

“ After words come sentences; these must be whipcord ; and
then follow books, which are strong rope, so necessary to set -you
free from the tower of ignorance.

“ And now, boys, as the beetle has brought you the silk line,
the packthread, the whipcord, the strong rope, after you have
finished your game of trap-ball set to work at your books as
fast as you can, that you may enjoy liberty, and turn your
backs on the tower of ignorance for ever.”

WHO IS SHE ?

HERE is a little maiden—
Who is she? Do you know ?—
Who always has a welcome,
Wherever she may go.

Her face is like the May-time,
Her voice is like a bird’s;
The sweetest of all music
Is in her lightsome words.

Each spot she makes the brighter,
As if she were the sun ;

And she is sought and cherished
And loved by every one;

By old folks and by children,
By lofty and by low:

Who is this little maiden ?
Does anybody know ?

You surely must have met her ;
You certainly can guess ;—
What! I must introduce her?

Her name is—Cheerfulness.
43


On

GRANDMA'S DARLINGS.

HICH is grandmother’s darling
Of the children three at play?

Which does she love the dearest,
Hattie, Fannie, or Jay?

Which are the brightest eyes for her,
Soft black, or blue, or gray ?

Which would she miss the soonest,
If away from her loving care:

Hattie, the dark-haired maiden,
Blue-eyed Fanny, the fair,

Or Jay, with the honest, truthful face,
And sober, manly air?

Keep still, for grandma is thinking ;
She'll tell you by and by.

She is gazing upon them fondly,
With a far-off look in her eye,
With a sad, sweet smile upon her face,
And on her lips a sigh.

She thinks of three other darlings
In the far-off, long ago:

Of the baby, who long has slumbered
Under the daisies and snow,

And beside it, a noble, manly form
In ‘his early strength laid low.

And the other? Oh, that’s the papa,
Who is coming now through the lane,
And back from the past so distant
Comes grandma’s heart again ;
As she kisses the little ones o’er and o’er
They are darlings all, ’tis plain.
44









































Yj 77.

























































GRANDMA’S DARLINGS.






THE DAUGHTER OF A KING.

WISH I were a princess !”

Emma stood with a dust-brush in her hand, pausing on
her way up-stairs to her own pretty room, which was re-
quired to be put in order every day.

“Why, my. child?” asked her mother.

“Because then I would never have to sweep and dust and

make ce but would have plenty of servants to do these things
for me.’

“That is a very foolish wish,” her mother replied; “and
even if you were a princess, I think you would find it es to
learn how to do all these things, so that you could do them in
case of necessity.”

“ But it never is necessary for princesses to work.”

“There my little girl proves her ignorance. If she will come
to me after her work is done, I will show her a picture.”

The little bedroom was at length put to rights, and Emma
came to her mother, reminding her of her promise about the
picture.

“What do you see, my child?” her mother asked as she laid
_ the picture before her daughter.

“T see a young girl with her dress fastened up, an apron on,
and a broom in her hand.” ;

““Can you tell me what kind of a place she is in ?”

“T do not know. There are walls and arches of stone, and
a bare stone floor. I do not think it can be a pleasant place.”

“No, it is not. It is a prison, and the girl is a king’s
daughter.”

“A king’s daughter ?”

“Yes; and her story is a very sad one.”

“ Please tell me about her.”

“More than eighty years ago the king of France was Louis
46





















LAGDSEBACH











QUEEN MARIA ANTOINETTE IN PRISON.





I RSS PGT EO TT TI I FL I EI NL ET TET TTS

2 Sew






THE DAUGHTER OF A KING.”

XVI.; his wife was Marie Antoinette. They were not a wicked
king and queen, but they were thoughtless and fond of pleasure.
They forgot that it was their duty to look after the good of their
people, so they spent money extravagantly in their own pleas-
ures while the whole nation was suffering. The people became
dissatisfied, and when finally Louis and Marie Antoinette saw
the mistake they had been making and tried to change their
conduct, it was too late. The people, urged on by bad leaders,
learned to hate their king and queen. They were taken with
their two children and the sister of the king, and shut up in a
prison called the Temple.

“There were dreadful times in France then, and every one
who was suspected of being friendly to the royal family was_
sent to prison and to the guillotine. The prisoners in the
temple passed the time as best they could. The king gave
lessons to his son and daughter every day, or read aloud to them
all, while Marie Antoinette, Madame Elizabeth, and the young
Maria Theresa sewed.

“ After a time the angry people took away the king and be-
headed him. And shortly after tle little son was separated
from his mother, sister, and aunt, and shut up by himself in
the charge of a cruel jailer. Next it was Marie Antoinette’s
tarn to ascend the scaffold, which she did October 16, 1798.
Her daughter Maria Theresa was then left alone with her aunt,
the Madame Elizabeth.”



WHEREVER in this world we are,
‘In whatsoe’er estate,

We have a felléwship of hearts
To keep and cultivate ;

And a work of lowly love to do

For the Lord on whom we wait.
48
THE SEA-SIDE.











































































































































































































































































































































es ANN
THE SEA-S/DE.
ley NNIE and little Fred are spending happy days by the
sea-side, where their mamma has taken them to pass the
C’|\ summer months. Mamma is tired, and she and aunty
are resting while the little folks play in the sand. They
have made friends with a boy who has brought out his father’s
glass for them to look through. And he tells them all about
the boats, and how the poor fishermen are out on the sea day
and night, to catch fish. He tells Annie how he sometimes is
permitted to go with his father in the boat, and what fine times
they have when the weather is clear: how they throw over the
net; and after carefully drawing it along for some distance, they
land it at last full of slimy, slippery fishes.
49


READING THE BIBLE.

OME, darling, bring the Bible,
And place it on my knee;

And you climb up beside it,
And sit close up to me.

Now slowly turn the sacred page,
Not rough—as though it were

A mere unworthy common book,
That you might soil or tear.

But ever, ever bear in mind
That ’tis a holy Book,

And on its every page, my child,
With humble reverence look.

It is God’s holy Word, my dear,
To sinful mortals given ;

A lamp unto our feet below,
To light us on to heaven.

Oh, learn to prize it as you ought;
Seek wisdom from on high

To teach you how to read aright,
To read it prayerfully.

The child who loves God’s holy Word,
And takes delight therein,
That child will not be led astray

In wickedness and sin.
50




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COUNTING A DAY'S SPORT.

OM GILES is Farmer Giles’s son, and they live at an old
farm-house at the end of a shady lane.
Tom is a thoughtful boy, and Blackboard, the old
school-master of our village, says he is a first-rate fellow
at school; and I know the old housekeeper at the farm finds
him very useful indeed.

Everybody likes Tom Giles, from the ploughman that follows —
his father’s team, to the magpie who calls out Tom! Tom! from
the top of the barn door.

At Mr. Blackboard’s school the boys have a holiday every
Wednesday afternoon, and away they all scamper to the village
green, kick up their heels as though the whole school had gone
mad, and I'll warrant you that Tom Giles is as merry as any
boy among them.

One day they proposed to go fishing in the large pond at the
end of the village green, and then there was such a lot of cut-
ting fishing-rods, and making nets, and borrowing pickle-jars

to put the fish in, that at last Farmer Giles declared that his
best hedge was almost cut to pieces, and the old housekeeper
said she had scarcely a jar left. But, after all, the day’s sport
was soon over, and when Tom got home again he put his jar
upon the kitchen table to count what he had caught.

One, two, three, four little sticklebacks, bobbing about as
though they were playing at hide-and-seek. One, two, three
little efts were also there, looking very gloomy indeed ; perhaps
they wanted to play at puss-in-the-corner, but as there are no
corners in a round pickle-jar of course they could not do that.

But you know I told you that Tom was a thoughtful boy, and —
ashe looked at the little fish swimming about in the jar, he
wondered whether they were happy, and whether there were
any little baby fish left in the pond who were calling out for

their papas and mammas that he had caught, or whether there
52:


COUNTING A DAY’S SPORT.



were any fathers and mothers in the pond who were wonder-
ing wherever their little sticklebacks had gone to.

And Tom was a kind as well as a thoughtful boy, and so he
crept silently out of the back door, and ran all the way to the
pond, and let the little prisoners free just at the very spot at
which he had previously caught them.

Ani they all swam home to supper, and Tom Giles was hap-
pier in letting his little prisoners go than he would have been
if he had caught a great big whale and kept it all to himself.

53


HARRY’S: FRIEND.

Cy {ARRY! that was wrong. How could you strike old
Rover !”
“ Because he Ae on my kite with his great, heavy
foot, and. liked to have made a hole in it,” replied the boy,
a lad of ten years old, who had been reproved by his oe
for striking a faithful old house-dog.

“But Rover did not do it on purpose; he didn’t mean to
break your kite.”

“T don’t suppose he did; but he had no business to tread on
my kite. He’s big aie to know better, I should think—
and old enough too.”

“He’s old enough to be a wise dog, Heer ; and so I think
he is—much wiser as a dog than you are asa boy. If he had
been as foolish and passionate a dog as you are a boy, he would
have turned round and bitten you, instead of walking off as he
did with a look of grief at your bad treatment. I am sorry
that you would treat Rover unkindly—you of all others.”

“Why me of all others, mother ?”

“ Have I never told you how Rover saved your life?”

“No! How was it, mother? When did he save my life?
Tell me about it.”

“T was looking from the window, and all at once I saw Rover
start up, and come running into the house. He acted as if some
one had called him. After running through all the rooms
below, I heard his big feet on the stairs. He came up with
two or three heavy bounds. Entering my room, he looked all
about and then up into my face. ‘Where’s Harry, Rover? I
said, for the Laat hl of you came instantly into my mind. ‘Go
find him, sir.’

“The dog understood me. He turned short away, sprang
B4


HARRY’S FRIEND.

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down-stairs, and out into the garden. I followed hin, for I felt
strangely concerned about you. As I approached the lower end
of the garden, I heard Rover growling, and soon saw him
shaking something in his mouth, with great violence, while the
hair on his body stood out straight and stiff like bristles. Close
beside him, you lay sleeping calmly on a bank.

“You may suppose I was almost horror-stricken when I
came near enough to see a venomous snake in Rover’s mouth.

“The faithful dog had, doubtless, saved your life. And you
—ah, Harry! think of it—and you have been so thoughtless
as to strike Rover.”

The boy, at this, burst into tears, and hid his face in his
mother’s lap. He continued so for some time; then he went
after the faithful animal, and when he had found him, caressed
him, and talked to him in such a kind way, that Rover, who
never held resentment, forgot in an instant the blow he had
received, and was as happy again as an old dog could be,

55

a


THE SPARROWS MORNING VISIT.

LAD to see you, little bird ;
"Twas your pretty chirp I heard ;
What did you intend to say—
“Give us something this cold day ?”

That I will, and plenty too ;

All these crumbs I saved for you;
Don’t be frightened—here’s a treat ;
I will wait and see you eat.

Thomas says you steal his wheat ;
John complains his plums you eat ;
Choose the ripest for your share,
Never asking whose they are.

‘Yet you seem an honest bird;

And I may say I’ve also heard

That insects, grubs, and worms you eat,
And other things that spoil the wheat.

So I will not try to know

What you did so long ago;
There’s your breakfast, eat away,
Come and see me every day.



PHILIP THE IDIOT.

T is a very sad sight to see a poor boy who is not quite
right in his mind, even though he be not altogether
insane. Some of these poor half-witted creatures are able
to move about the streets, doing simple errands for their

friends. We should’ always be very kind to such, and never
run after them, or shout and make fun of them, as some bad
boys and girls will do. Philip Turner was one of these poor

creatures, and lived with his sister Sophia, who was very good
ms 56




























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to him, and took great care of him. Philip was very quiet and
harmless, and had such funny ways. He would walk up and
down the street with a sword, and think he was a soldier. And
as it pleased him, his kingl sister would humor him and let him

do as he pleased.



57


SPOILING A QUARREL.

OHNNY stood a little while at the gate, nibbling the
scallops from the edge of his cookey; possibly he was
nursing his courage to say a kind word. He was waiting
for Jerry White to turn around and look. .
“allo, cry-baby!” shouted Jerry, as he discovered him;
“what you got there ?”
“Halloo, pretty-face!” retorted Johnny, good-humoredly ;
“come and see.

_ “Open your mouth and shut your eyes,
And Tll give you something to make you wise.’”

“Open your eyes and shut your mouth,” responded Jerry,
“and Pil—” and here a snowball that was meant for Johnny’s
face fell harmlessly over his shoulder. The next minute the
extra cake was struck from Johnny’s hand into a snow-drift. .

LAMENT OF A LITTLE MOTHER ROBIN.

H, where is the boy, dressed in jacket of gray,
Who climbed up a tree in the orchard to-day
And carried my three little birdies away ?

They hardly were dressed
When he took from the nest
My three little robins, and left me bereft

?

Oh, humming-birds, have you seen to-day
A very small boy, dressed in jacket of gray,
Who carried my three little robins away ?
He had light-colored hair,
And his feet were both bare.
Ah me! he was cruel and mean, I declare.

88


LAMENT OF A LITTLE. MOTHER ROBIN.

Oh, butterfly ! stop just one moment, I pray ;
Have you seen a boy, dressed in jacket of gray,
Who carried my three little birdies away ?

He had pretty blue eyes,

And was small of his size.
Ah, he must be wicked, and not very wise!

Oh, boy with blue eyes, dressed in jacket of gray,
If you will bring back my three robins to-day,
With sweetest of music the gift I’ll repay!

Pll sing all day long

My merriest song,
And I will forgive you this terrible wrong.

WHENEVER you know a thing is right,
Go and do it with main and might,
Nor let one murmur fall,
For duty makes as strong a claim
As if an angel called your name,
And all men heard the call.

Keep all the day, and every day,

Within the straight and narrow way,
And all your life, in fine,

Be temperate in your moods and meats,

And in your sours, and in your sweets,
And, lastly, don’t drink wine!



eo»

A LApy teacher inquired of the members of a class of juve-
niles if any of them could name the four seasons. Instantly
the chubby hand of a five-year-old was raised, and promptly
came the answer,—

“ Pepper, salt, vinegar, and mustard.”
59


“SCATTER SEEDS OF KINDNESS”

CET us gather up the sunbeams,
Lying all around our path ;
Let us keep the wheat and roses,
Casting out the thorns and chaff;
Let us find our sweetest comfort
In the blessings of to-day,
With a patient hand removing
All the briers from the way.
Then scatter seeds of kindness,
Then scatter seeds of kindness,
Then scatter seeds of kindness
For our reaping by and by.

Strange we never prize the music
Till the sweet-voiced bird has flown!
Strange that we should slight the violets
Till the lovely flowers are gone!
Strange that summer skies and sunshine
Never seem one-half so fair,
As when winter’s snowy pinions
Shake the white down in the air.
Ten scatter, ete.

If we knew but half the sorrow
That the poor have oft to bear,
How our hearts would yearn to help them,
Though their griefs we could not share:
And the broken-hearted mourners,
Who in silence pass us by,
Would be lightened of their burden
If they knew a friend was nigh.

Then scatter, ete:
60


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Oh
‘Wish


THE SHEEP WITH A CART.

NEVER saw a sheep harnessed up before,” said Harry,
as he turned over the leaves of a big book on natural his-
tory, and found a picture of a sheep drawing a two-wheeled
cart.

Do you know what natural history means? It means a
history or description of animals, birds, and fishes.

“ Let me see,” said his mother. So Harry brought the great
book and laid it in her lap. “ Ah, yes,” she continued, “ it is a
sheep that lives in Syria and Egypt, and other parts of Asia
and Africa, and has a long heavy tail which sometimes trails on
the ground. This tail usually weighs fifteen or twenty pounds ;
but when the sheep is fattened, it sometimes gets to weigh
seventy or eighty, or even one hundred and fifty pounds. The
sheep cannot carry it then, so a little cart is made to lay it on,
and the sheep draws it about.”

“What is the use of such big, fat tails ?”

“The people, when they kill the sheep, use the fat of the tail,
which is not at all like tallow, for butter.”

Harry shut up his book and put it away, and went out to
play; and his mother kept on sewing, and forgot all about the
sheep with the cart. After a while she heard a great racket
outside the window, and looking out, she saw Harry and Nep.
He had fastened his cart to the dog, and as Nep would not let
his tail lie in the cart he had tied his white tippet to the end of
the tail. Nep did not understand these proceedings, and was
frisking about and wagging his tail, with every wag setting the
tippet flying in the air, and every few steps overturning the
cart.

“Never mind, Nep, I’ll teach you yet. If you don’t be a
good dog and let your tail lie down in the cart, Pll have to tie

it down.”
62




[HE SHEEP WITH A CART.



But the next jump brought Nep quite out of the harness,
and away he capered, looking back roguishly, as much as to say,
. “No you don’t, old fellow.”

Harry was about to follow him, but just then a lady passed
by, her long, trailing skirt sweeping the walk and gathering
dirt and dust. Harry stood looking at her until she was out of
sight, and then turning to his mother, he said,—

“Mother, don’t you think it would be a good plan for ladies
who wear tails to their dresses to have a little cart to keep them
up out of the dirt?”



A Nozsitz Answer.— Why did you not take one of those
pears?” said one boy to another. ‘There was nobody to see
you.”

“Yes, there was. I was there to see myself, and I do not

wish to see myself doing so mean a thing as stealing.”
63
DAN AND DIMPLE, AND HOW THEY QUARRELLED.

O begin in things quite simple
Quarrels scarcely ever fail—
And they fell out, Dan and Dimple,
All about a horse’s tail!

So that by and by the quarrel

Quite broke up and spoiled their play—
Danny said the tail was sorrel,

Dimple said that it was gray !

“Gray I” said Danny, “ you are simple!
Just as gray as mother’s shawl,

And that’s red!” Said saucy Dimple,
“Yow re a fool, and that is all !”

Then the sister and the brother—
As indeed they scarce could fail,

In such anger, struck each other—
All about the horse’s tail!

“ Red!” cried Dimple, speaking loudly,
“ How you play at fast and loose!”
“Yes,” said Danny, still more proudly,
“When I’m playing with a goose!”

Tn between them came the mother—
“ What is all this fuss about ?”
Then the:sister and the brother
Told the story, out and out.
64


DAN AND DIMPLE, AND HOW THEY QUARRELLED.































































And she answered, “TI must label
Each of you a little dunce,

Since to look into the stable
Would have settled it at once !”

Forth ran Dan with Dimple after,

And full soon came hurrying back
65




JOHN GRIMLY.

Shouting, all aglee with laughter,
That the horse’s tail was black !

So they both agreed to profit

By the lesson they had learned,
And to tell each other of it

Often as the fit returned.



OUR FATHER MADE THEM ALL.

WOULD not hurt a living thing,
However weak or small ;

The beasts that graze, the birds that sing,
Our Father made them all;

Without his notice, I have read,
A. sparrow cannot fall.



JOHN GRIMLY.

OHN GRIMLY lived in a worn-out house—
A house unpainted, old, and gray—
That let in the wind in winter time,

And the drenching shower of the April day.
The windows were little, and rough, and square,
And a man must stoop to go in at the door;

And the winter sleet and the sunshine fair
Came in through the chinks on the rotten floor.

John Grimly’s years were sixty and two,
His form was bent and his hair was gray,
Yet he trudged, be the skies or gray or blue,
To his lonely workshop every day. |
66




—————







The children who passed by the workshop door
Hushed shout and laughter till they were by,
And shunned the sound of his old, cracked voice.

And the passing glance of his stern gray eye.
67






THE TWO GIFTS.

T was Christmas Eve and snow was falling silently, but the
storm was not severe enough to keep the children from the
church. Their happy voices mingled with the deep, rich

tones of the organ in Christmas hymns, the soft light poured
through the stained windows on the snow-covered paths, and
the beautiful tree shed its varied and abundant fruit. Homes.
looked doubly cheerful to-night; there was many a glad
reunion, married sons and daughters coming with their little
ones from their own firesides to the old hearthstone.

But in two chambers in the quiet village the lamp burned
dimly ; footsteps were silent, voices hushed to low, tender tones,
and in one, a mother’s heart aching in secret for a little child
lying on a bed of pain and weariness. In another home an
orphan boy had received all of care and kindness he had known
since his mother went to live with angels. Love would gladly
have given these little ones as fair a tree as the rest, and did
bring to their bedsides all they could enjoy, hot-house flowers,
golden oranges, and rich, juicy grapes. Ethel took these from
her mother’s hand, and while that hand gently bathed her
aching temples and the low, sweet voice sang the lullaby she
loved best, her white eyelids drooped and a refreshing sleep
held her free from pain. __

Who can tell how Jamie longed for his mother? Well did
he remember her smile and voice and touch. His friends were
kind and took good care of him, only not a mother’s care. His
Sunday-school teacher was most like her; she came to him
to-night as soon as she could leave the church, after seeing her
little class safely on their way home. She brought his flowers .
and fruit; she bathed his brow with a hand so gentle that it
seemed like his mother’s; she sang to him and soothed him, too,

to sleep. As she still sat beside him a beautiful smile played
68




THE TWO GIFTS.

over his thin face. He opened his eyes with a new, glad light

‘shining from their depths, and said, twining his wasted arms
around her neck, “Oh, Miss Wells, TPve had such a good
dream !”

“ What was it, dear ?”

“T sat at the window watching the snow falling so quietly,
just as it does to-night, and I did not feel cold, though the
window was open. It was light, too. By and by the tiny flakes
seemed to hold together, and then to spread like wings, and a
beautiful angel floated down, all in white, with long golden
curls and clear gentle eyes. She came closer and closer to me,
and I felt so glad to see her; she seemed like my mother. She
took me in her arms and laid my head on her breast. Then
she kissed me, and all the pain went away and I felt rested and
well. And then I saw that it was mother. Oh, how happy lL
was! too happy to say anything only, Mother! Mother! She
seemed to move upward a little, and I thought she was going to
carry me with her home to heaven, but just then I woke. I
feel well, though, and it is a beautiful Christmas, for I’ve seen
. mother.” :

Christmas morning dawned clear and beautiful. The sun
shone on the new-fallen snow as white as an angel’s wing, and
on trees and fences studded with brilliants. The village children
were early astir, and merry with their Christmas gifts. In
Ethel’s sunny chamber were rejoicing hearts, for she was better.
A good night’s rest, such as she had not had for weeks, calmed
her pulse and gave her new strength; she would soon be well.

Jamie’s little form lay white and still, with snowy blossoms
on his breast and twined in his dark hair. He had found his
mother. .

“There shall be no more death, neither sorrow nor crying;
neither shall there be any more pain, for the former things are

passed away, and God shall wipe away all tears from his eyes.”
69


MY LITTLE TREASURE.

To each little one the angel had brought the gift that was
best. To Ethel—the joy of her mother’s heart and cherished.
by loving friends—healing and strength for life’s work yet
before her. To Jamie, the poor orphan, his mother, rest, and
heaven.

MY LITTLE TREASURE. |

OULD you know my little treasure,
Rarest, priceless beyond measure ?
Come with me;
Look and see—
Ripe lips brimming o’er with pleasure—
Laughter-loving Mayjorie!

Little darling, bright eyes gleaming,
Full of thought and tender dreaming—
Thought for me!
Look and see
All the love that there is beaming—
"Sweetest, dearest Marjorie!

Little daughter, full of laughter,
Whom the sunbeams ripple after,
Dear to me;
Look and see
All the love that I would waft her—

Best of treasures, Marjorie!
70


THE MOON.

a

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nen

THE MOON.

N and out, in and out,
Through the clouds heaped about,
Wanders the bright moon.
What she seeks, I do not know;
Where it is, I cannot show.
T am but a little child,
And the night is strange and wild.
7


THE FLY AND THE BEE.

In and out, in and out,

Wanders the bright moon ;
In and out, in and out,

She will find it soon.
There she comes! as clear as day,
Now the clouds are going away.
She is smiling, I can see,
And she’s looking straight at me.

THEORET SANDS) ii Bie.
A FLY once said to a bee, “Tell me, my friend, how is it

that no one pursues or torments you, as they do me? I
have to protect my life from every one, but you fly about
in the air gathering honey unforbidden from the flowers.
If I venture to put out my trunk to reach a crust of bread, or
perchance to dip into some more dainty dish, death threatens
me on the spot. I think if I could sting, and take vengeance
on my foes as thou canst, that I should be left in peace.”

“You are mistaken,” replied the bee. “A much surer pro-
tection to me is that by diligence I serve mankind.”

a

Tomay’s mamma had given him a beautiful watch. “ What
time is it?” asked ae ae young mother.

“ Quarter-past six.’

“You are mistaken; it is half-past six.”

“How glad I am!” said the boy.

“Why so?”

“T have loved you a quarter of an hour longer.”

72




ENN

BABY.

Ca LESS thee, my baby, may life for thee ever
Be bright as a long summer’s day ;
May all that is sweetest and all that is dearest
Like sunshine descend on thy way.
May thoughts that are holy like angels attend thee,
May sorrows like shadows depart ;
May love like a blossom unfold in its beauty,

And peace find a home in thy heart.
73


THE COMING SHOWER.

OW close and how warm the air is!
Oh, never a breath is stirring ;
And loud in the pathway there is
A sound of locusts whirring.

All drooping and hot the grass is;
The leaves have no life nor motion;
The stream like a river of glass is
As it glides away to the ocean.

Ah, it is too warm for eating,

So the sheep leave the scorching meadow ;
And here on the hill-side meeting,

They lie in the trees’ cool shadow.

But see, while I yet am speaking,
The clouds are the sunlight dimming,
While the swallows, the water seeking,
Are lowly and swiftly skimming.

Take courage, O panting creatures,
Take courage, O drooping grasses!

Oh, flowers, lift your delicate features
To be bathed in the rain as it passes !

‘Afar o’er the distant hill-tops,

See the welcome shower advancing ;
And now a thousand raindrops

On the river’s breast are dancing.

It is here, the blessed shower !_
Give thanks, a myriad voices!
While bird and beast and flower

Each in its way rejoices.
74












































SSS

OUT IN THE COLD.
ACK FROST is a sharp one,
And nips, as he goes,
Poor mittenless fingers
And stockingless toes,
And bites without mercy
Your ears and your nose.

‘Why, dear little maiden!
Out here in the cold,

The snow and the north wind
That whistles so bold,

Like a shivering pet lamb
Astray from its fold ?

Hurry on! Hurry on!
Little maiden, I say,
For the wind bloweth keen
On this cold winter day,
And the frost has no pity
For any astray.
75




THE SORROWS OF POOR BOSE.

HE sat in the deep kitchen window, blinking her eyes in

the sun. She had snow-white feet, of which she seemed

UC’ proud, for she took great care of them, and had a habit

of curling her tail about them when she sat down, in a

very genteel manner : perhaps she thought the effect was stylish,
for her tail was white at the end; and her name was Tabby.

Bose lay on the floor trying to get a troubled nap. He had
some few accomplishments: could sit on his hind feet and beg
for his dinner, shake hands, and roll over. But his temper was
unpleasant, for he would bark at strangers, however quiet and
well-behaved they might be. Perhaps it was a remorseful
conscience that disturbed his rest,—the ghost of a murdered
gosling that he wantonly shook to death, or a stolen depredation
upon the sheep pasture. He first stretched himself out with
his head on his paws, but sleep refused to visit his eyelids, then
he crawled round three times and curled himself up in a semi-
circle, but in vain; so he sat up gloomily and sleepily, and
looked at Tabby, who sat in the kitchen window blinking in
the sun.

At length he broke out in a fretful tone; it sounded like a
short bark,—

“Tabby, you are purring again !”

Tabby unwound her tail from her ae and waved it
slowly once or twice, and. said,—

“AmI? Well, it is so pleasant here in the sun, and I had
such a nice breakfast. I really don’t know half the time when
I do purr. It is a comfort, too, to purr. If you should try it,
I dare say you could sleep better. I often purr myself to
sleep.”

“Who said I couldn’t fe ? You seem to take a great

many things for granted.”
76


THE SORROWS OF POOR BOSE.

“T thought you seemed restless. Perhaps you ate too much

breakfast.”

“T suppose you mean to insinuate that I ate more than my
share? You are the most disagreeable cat I ever saw in my life!”

Another sharp bark, and Bose stretched himself on his side
to his utmost dimensions, and resolutely shut his eyes. Presently
he raised his head, and said, a little more mildly,—

“Tabby, you are purring again.”

“ Now, really, Bose, you must excuse me, for I didn’t know
it. I was thinking what a sweet girl my mistress Mary is.
When she pats me on the head, and smooths a fur, my
happiness is complete.”

“Now, Tabby,” Bose jumped up into a chair by the window,
and Tabby curled her tail more ae as if she thought he
would bite, “I want to talk with you.”

“With pleasure, Bose.”

“ And try and keep from purring; you have no idea how it
disturbs me.”


THE SORROWS OF POOR BOSE.

“TJ will try; but if you would only purr yourself.”

“ Don’t mention it! I wouldn’t for the world! I want to
know, Tabby, if you are really so satisfied with your lot as you
pretend to be. Don’t you ever have anything to annoy you ?”

“T don’t remember anything. Oh, yes; Susan shut my tail
in the door the other day, and yesterday I caught a mouse and
it got away from me. Yes, I was excessively annoyed; but one
was an accident, and for the other no one was to blame but
myself.”

Poor Bose made no answer, but he was so discontented with
his home that he took the first opportunity of running away,
which was the following morning. The butcher-boy that
brought the meat called him, and he gladly followed.

When Bose reached the butcher’s headquarters, and saw the
array of beef, mutton, pork, sausage, and liver hanging upon
the wall, he thought he had come to a sort of dog’s Paradise.
He willingly obeyed the command of his new master to lie
under the bench, and gratefully gnawed the bone he threw to
him. The boy took great pleasure in making him roll over,
and run after a stick which he threw across the street. But he
got out of patience when the dog would not walk on his hind
feet, and ordered him to lie down under the bench, where he
was forced to remain for two or three hours.

But he was afterwards fed bountifully with bits of liver and
kidneys, and began to feel that it was very much better for him
than at home with Mary and Tabby.

At last when the snow was on the ground, and Bose was
nearly frozen under the door-step, and had suffered the insult
of having his head whitewashed by the butcher-boy, he put his
tail between his legs, and, looking behind him as he ran, disap-
peared in the direction of the old farm-house.

Cold, and hunger, and insult had broken his spirit and

conquered his pride, and he longed for the old box in the shed,
78


TAKE CARE.

and thought the music of Tabby’s purring would be the
sweetest sound he could hear. Good, gentle Tabby, how glad
she would be to see him once more! He would never chide her,
or be impatient toward her again.

It was late when he reached his old home. The house and
shed were fastened for the night, and he lay down quietly to die.
_ His heart was quite broken; and when Willie found him
stiff and frozen in the morning on the door-step, and saw a
well-known star on his breast, he said, “ Poor Bose !”

So they buried him tenderly, while Tabby, unconscious of
his misfortunes and his unhappy fate, still sat in the window,
purring and blinking in the sun.

TAKE CARE.

CaPITTLE children, you must seek
Rather to be good than wise,
For the thoughts you do not speak
Shine out in your cheeks and eyes.

If you think that you can be
Cross or cruel, and look fair,
Let me tell you how to see
You are quite mistaken there.

Go and stand before the glass,
And some ugly thought contrive,
And my word will come to pass

Just as sure as you're alive.
79


FREDDY AND HIS MAMAIA.

What you have, and what you lack,
All the same as what you wear,
You will see reflected back :
So, my little folks, take care !

And not only in the glass

Will your secrets come to view ;
All bebolders, as they pass,

Will perceive and know them too.

—__—___-~+e>_—____-

FREDDY AND HIS MAMMA.

t OME, my bonnie birdie,”
Mamma to Fred will say:

“Come, prepare for bye-bye.
Fred is tired to-day.

“Put his hands together,
Shut his weary eyes,

Pray God to bless him,
As in sleep he lies.

“ Bless mamma and sister,
Both to me so dear ;

Bring papa back safely
To his loved ones here.”

Then mamma takes Freddy
To his little cot,
And, though no one sees them,
Angels guard the spot.
80


SOR

FREDDY AND HIS MAMMA.



















Angels watch dear Freddy,
As he slumbers there ;
Mamma’s treasure, papa’s darling,
Little sister’s care.

———-+

A LITTLE boy, seeing a man sauntering about a public-house
door, counting some money held in his hand, and evidently
about to go into the public-house, stepped up to him and said,
“Don’t go in there.” The man put his hand, with the money,
in his pocket, thanked the little boy for his advice, and did not
go in. :

81


GRANDPA AND LOTTA.

ND now what does puss want?” said grandpa, as Lotta
climbed into his lap. It was a warm afternoon, and
grandpa had been dozing in his chair ever since dinner.

Lotta, before tellmg what she wanted, put her two

hands on grandpa’s cheeks and gave him a good kiss.

“ Now, what is it?”

“JT want you to take me——” Lotta did not finish the

sentence. .

“Where?” asked grandpa.

“Out to——” she stopped again.

“Well, go on.”

“The park !”

She threw out the last word quick and strong. ie you gee

she was not sure of grandpa, and wanted to make him under-
stand how much she wanted to go.

Ce

“Oh, dear !” answered grandpa, who was feeling dull. “It’s
too hot.”
“But it’s so cool in the park, and so nice out there. Do,

1?

grandpa !” and Lotta put her arms about his neck and gave him
the biggest kind of a hug.

“T suppose I shall have to, after that,” said grandpa, who
was beginning to get wider awake, and to feel the dulness passing
off. “So get yourself ready.”

Off scampered Lotta, and soon came dancing and singing
back, ready for a ride to the park. Grandpa and his little pet
took one of the cars, and in less than half an hour were in the
beautiful park, where hundreds of happy children were playing
on the cool green grass, and hundreds of carriages sweeping
along the feel roads, making a scene of life and beauty
refreshing to look upon. It was almost as good for grandpa to
be there as Lotta. While she ran about on the green sward
and picked her hands full of buttereups, gay as a little bird, he

82


GRANDPA AND LOTTA.























































































































































































sat in the pleasant shade and breathed in the sweet fragrance
of the mown grasses, feeling that it was good for him to be
there, and having a double enjoyment in seeing the delight
of Lotta.

The birds were so tame that they hopped about on the
ground close to where he was sitting and sang in the trees right
above his head. The cool air fanned his cheeks and lifted his
gray hair and filled his lungs with a new life.

“Tsn’t it nice out here, peda ?” asked Lotta, as she came
running up to him with her hands full of wild flowers.

“Yes, indeed,” answered grandpa.

“ Ain’t you glad you came ?”

“Yes, dear.”

“T thought so;” and she gave him a kiss, and then ran off
again. They stayed there until the sun was low down in the
west, and then came home, both feeling better and happier for

their visit to the park. I think they will go again very soon.
83


THE GOOD SHIP “ NEVER-FAIL.”’

HY don’t you launch your boat, my boy ?”

I asked the other day, —

As strolling idly on the beach
I saw my lads at play;

One blue-eyed rogue shook back his curls,
And held his ship to me,

“Tm giving her a name,” he cried,
“ Before she goes to sea ;

We rigged her out so smart and taut,
With flag and snow-white sail,

And now J’ll trust her to the waves,
And call her ‘ Never-fail.’ ”

The little ship sailed proudly out,
Through mimic rock and shoal,

The child stood watching on the beach,
His vessel reached its goal ;

The wind had risen soft at first,
But wilder soon it blew,

Tt strained and bent the slender mast,
That still rose straight and true:

“Yet,” cried the boy, “my ship is safe,
In spite of wind and gale,

Her sails are strong, her sides are firm,
Her name is ‘ Never-fail.’ ”

And presently the wind was lulled,
The little bark came home,

No wreck, although her sails were wet,
Her deck all washed with foam ;

And loudly laughed my true boy then,

As on the beach she lay.
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THE GOOD SHIP “NEVER-FAIL.”




THE DOG AND THE ICE.

And wisely spoke my true boy then,
Although ’twas said in play—

“ Grandpa, I thought if mast and sail
And tackle all were true,

With such a name as ‘ Never-fail,’
She'd sail the wide sea through.”



THE DOG AND THE ICE.

Coy HAT ever is that dog a doing?” exclaimed our little
Patty, and her eyes grew bright with wonder.
“Two words too much,” said Aunt Ruth, in a grave
voice and with a graver face. “Why don’t you learn
to talk right ?” !

“Oh, dear! you’re always a putting of a body out!” Patty
looked very much annoyed.

“Two words too much,” said Aunt Ruth, in a dead-level
voice.

“Youre always a doing of it, aunty. Why can’t you tell
me about the dog ?”

“Two words more. I’m really surprised, Patty. Where do
you hear that kind of talk ?”

“What kind?” the child asked, looking puzzled as well as
annoyed. .“ How should I talk?”

“«What is that dog doing? was all you need have said,”
replied Aunt Ruth.

“ Well, wasn’t that just what I did say ?” returned Patty.

“No; you put in two useless words that spoiled the sentence.
You said, ‘ What ever is that dog a doing?’ ”

“Oh, well, that doesn’t kill anybody. You knew what I
meant, aunty.” And Patty tossed her little head in an injured
way.

86
THE DOG AND THE ICE.





































































































































































































































































“And then,” continued Aunt Ruth, “you said, ‘ You're
always a putting of a body out,’ instead of saying, ‘ You're
always putting a body out,’ which sounds better and saves
breath. You must think about these little things, my dear,
and learn correct ways of speaking. And now let us see what
the dog is doing. Oh! breaking the ice with his foot, I do
declare !”

“ Wouldn’t ‘I declare,’ be just as well, aunty, and save breath
on the do 2” said Patty, turning upon Aunt Ruth with an arch,
saucy smile.

“Fairly caught!’ was Aunt Ruth’s good-humored reply.
: 87


BABY, THE KING.

“Yes, dear, that do was a word too much. Your old aunty
learned some bad habits when she was young like you, and
finds it hard even now to get over them, so she wants her little
niece to have as few faults as possible to overcome when she
grows old. She does not know yet that unlearning is a great
deal harder than learning. And now for the dog.”

Aunt Ruth read for a minute in the book which Patty held
open in her hand. Then she said,—

“ Well, that is curious! This dog you see was walking along
with his master one frosty morning. The night before had
been cold, and all the little pools of water were frozen over.
The ice was not very thick, and so looked nearly the color of
water. The dog put his head down to drink first at one frozen
pool and then at another, and each time looked surprised and
disappointed. Then his master broke the ice with his foot, and
the dog drank his fill, On they went, and soon the dog wanted
to drink again. But this time he did not wait for his master,
but struck his great foot on the surface of an ice-covered stream
and broke a hole for himself.

“ Just look at him in the picture He’s as pleased as any
boy.”



BABY, THE KING.

Y country’s very small—
Tis just a room
Built by the forest edge,
_ Watched by the moon.
Only two persons in it!
I’m one, and sing;
Baby’s the other one—

Baby, the king !
88

C
BABY, THE KING.

His crown is golden hair,
Measuring an inch ;
His sceptre chubby arms,

Tempting to pinch ;
His robe’s a snowy one;
And I will sing
Of all the gems that deck
Baby, the king!
89


COUSIN LOU.

Two very drowsy eyes,
One funny nose,

Two little feet that kick,
Ten pinky toes;

His law’s a ery, but he
Crows while I sing—

Now you know all about
Baby, the king!

COUSIN LOU.

ITTLE roguish Cousin Lou,
With her dancing eyes of blue ;—
While the long and silken lashes
Can’t conceal their mirthful flashes.
Careless waving, golden tresses,
Which each passing breeze caresses ;
Dimpled cheeks—and sunny smiles,
Silvery laugh—and playful wiles,
All these charms your love will woo,
For my witching Cousin Lou.

These are sure enough to please,

But my Lou has more than these ;—
From her eyes of heavenly blue
Beams a spirit kind and true;
Every warm and generous feeling

O’er her childish heart is stealing,—
90 :


COUSIN LOU.

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Is it very strange, think you,
That I love my darling Lou?

91




THE STRAY SHEEP.

Cy HO is the good Shepherd ?” asked our teacher, as she
took her seat in front of her class of little boys and
girls one Sunday afternoon. It was many years ago,
and I was only a little child then, but I can remember

that pleasant afternoon and the sweet, earnest face and tender

voice of our teacher almost as well as if only a year had passed.

“The Lord,” answered one of the children.

“ Yes, the Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, who came to seek
and to save that which was lost.” Then she showed us the
picture of a shepherd carrying a sheep in his arms, and said,
“Of what parable does this remind you?”

‘Of the parable of the lost sheep,” two or three eager voices
replied.

“Yes; and now can you find this parable?”

There was a quick turning of leaves by the children. Mary
Foster—dear Mary ! she was taken to the heavenly fold many
years ago—found the parable first, and read it aloud:

“ How think ye? Ifa man have an hundred sheep, and one
of them be gone astray, doth he not leave the ninety and nine,
and goeth into the mountains, and seeketh that which is gone
astray ?

“And if so be that he find it, verily I say unto you, he
rejoiceth more of that sheep, than of the ninety and nine which
went not astray. Even so it is not the will of your Father
which is in heaven, that. one of these little ones should perish.”

“T want to talk to you about the good Shepherd to-day,”
said our teacher as Mary stopped reading, “and it was that you
might the more surely remember what I am going to say that I
brought with me this sweet and beautiful picture. Its image in
your memories will help you to recall my words.”

All the children in the class grew very still, and looked

earnestly into her face. We loved to hear her talk.
92 ;


STRAY SHEEP.











































































































































































































































































































































































































































































A a OL

“You remember,” she went on, “ how often in the Bible God
is spoken of as a Shepherd, and His people as sheep. And
now, children, what I want particularly to impress upon your
minds is that the Lord, our Shepherd, really loves us. Think
of what He has said: ‘I am the good Shepherd: the good
Shepherd giveth his life for the sheep.’ And again, ‘I lay

999

down my life for the sheep.
She paused for a little while that we might take this

assurance of God’s tender care over us deep into our hearts.
93


THE STRAY SHEEP.

“Tt is hardly possible,” she went on, “to comprehend a love
like this. Our heavenly Shepherd gave His life for us poor,
wandering, disobedient sheep. And now I want you to lay up
what I am going to say in your hearts, and keep it there all
your lives. It is not the good and obedient sheep alone that
the heavenly Shepherd loves. For the lost and wandering
sheep He cares with an equal—nay, a tenderer—love, and goes
after them in the wilderness to which they have strayed. He
is not angry with them for leaving the fold. There is no frown
on His face when He finds them. Lovingly He takes them in
His arms and bears them on His bosom, and rejoices over them
more than over those that went not astray.

“ And this is the lesson I wish you to take to heart. IPf ever
you do wrong—and doing wrong is staying away from the fold
of God—do not think of Him as angry with you, and so let a
fear and dread of Him come into your minds. But think of
Him as seeking you, full of tenderest pity and love. Go to
Him in sorrow for the wrong you have done, but without fear.
His arms are always held out for His children, His countenance
is always sweet, His heart always full of love.”

How often in childhood, and in ripened years, have I thanked
my heavenly Father for the true knowledge of His character I
then received! Ever afterward I could go to Him in loving
confidence. If I did wrong, strayed from the fold, as happened
many times, my fear of His anger did not drive me away from
Him. I was sure that the good Shepherd who went after His
lost sheep and rejoiced when it was found could not be angry or
offended with me because my weak, foolish, evil heart led me
away from His fold. And so, when I found myself out in the
dreary wilderness and heard the ery of wolves, I hastened back
in tears and sorrow, but not in fear, and always to find the good
Shepherd ready to take me in His arms and bear me on His

bosom.
94.








THE TREAT.

OME, children, all sit quietly on the sofa; I have a treat
for you,” said mother one evening.

“What is it?” asked they all at once, “ Candy ?’—

“No!” “Apples ?”—“ No!”

“What is it? Do tell us, mother,” coaxed Will.

“Tt is something you all like, although you have never tasted
it; something you will not enjoy unless you all share in it; and
something you must divide by the mouth, yet you cannot taste
it when in the mouth, neither can you feel it.”

“ Whose is it?” asked Percie.

“Tt belongs to all of you.”

“‘ Have we ever seen it,” asked Rose.

“No; you have never seen it,” was mother’s answer. “It is
a beautiful book papa brought home last night. Now Rose and
Percie sit down together, and Will will show you the pictures

and tell you what they are about.”
95


THE FAITHFUL DOG.

HE picture on the opposite page reminds me of a story
|) I once heard of a faithful dog. A gentleman named
Wilson, residing near a river in the western country,
owned a pleasure-boat, in which he often went sailing.
One day he invited a small party to accompany him in an
excursion on the river. They set out. Among the number
were Mr. Wilson’s wife and little girl, the latter about three
years of age. The child was delighted with the boat, and with
the water-lilies that floated on the surface of the river. Mean-
while, a fine Newfoundland dog trotted along the bank of the
stream, looking occasionally at the boat, and thinking, perhaps,
that he would like a sail himself.

Pleasantly onward went the boat, and the party were in the
highest spirits, when little Ellen, trying to get a pretty lily,
stretched out her hand over the side of the boat, and in a
moment she lost her balance and fell into the river. What
language can describe the agony of those parents when they
saw the current close over their dear child! The mother, in
her terror, could hardly be prevented from throwing herself
into the river to rescue her drowning girl, and her husband
had to hold her back by force.

No one took any notice of Nero, the faithful dog. But he
had kept his eye on the boat, it seems. He saw all that was
going on; he plunged into the water at the critical moment
when the child had sunk to the bottom, and dived beneath the
surface. Suddenly a strange noise was heard on the side of
the boat opposite the one to which the party were anxiously
looking, and something seemed to be splashing in the water. It
was the dog. Nero had dived to the bottom of that deep river,
and found the very spot where the poor child had settled down
into her cold, strange cradle of weeds and slime. Seizing her

clothes, and holding them fast in his teeth, he brought her up
96






THE FAITHFUL DOG.





js AA a,

As ats
if ip,
[Le Ut

AT

Vi

Tn
yen
m

i







‘face of the water, a very little distance from the boat,

£0 the sur

s that told his joy, he gave the little girl into the

hands of her astonished father.

and with look



97
THE RACCOON.

Coty HAT a queer-looking rat !”

No, my little friend, it is not a rat. Take a closer
look. Rats have smooth tails, while the animal sitting
up there so cunning, just as if he expected to have his

picture taken, has, you will see, a bushy tail. |

“T can tell you what it is,” says little Freddy Green, whose
father is a farmer, and lives near a wild piece of woods—“ yes,
T can tell you what it is. It’s a ’coon, just as sure as can be.
Brother Jim caught one not long ago out in the ‘swamp woods.’
And he’s made a pet of him, and keeps him tied up by a chain,
and he sleeps in a box; and a funny fellow he is, too; only he
tries to bite us when we tease him. Yes, and he did bite Ellis
Treadway right through the hand when Ellis was pulling his
tail to make him snarl. Brother Jim caught him one night
long after I was in bed. He and George Gruff, and Ellis
Treadway, and Charlie Richmond went out in the swamp with
Mr. Gruff’s big dog, old Tip. . Tip soon scared up a ’coon—
that’s what we call it here, though Eddie Jones, who lives in
town, and reads no end of books, says we ought to say raccoon.”

“ But what is the raccoon in the picture doing?” our young
friends may ask. This question the gentleman who drew the
picture must answer. As he was a Frenchman, we will put his
reply in English. He had gone in a cance along with a guide
and a negro boy to spend a week in a Florida swamp. One
day, while taking a nap, he was awakened by the buzzing and
the sharp stings of some great gnats with black wings, with
which the place was swarming. “TI raised my eyes,” he goes
on to say, “and looked over the edge of the canoe. The tide
was low, and the canoe almost on dry ground. Right in front
of me, on the other side of the creek, I saw an animal of a

grayish color spotted with black. Its tail was bushy, with rings
98












































THE RACCOON.


















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































MY KITTENS.

of black and gray. It was about the size of a fox, and its head
was like a fox’s, only the ears were short, as if they had been
trimmed off. From its hair I would have thought it a hyena,
while in its shape it looked like a small bear. Not having seen
us, it was busying itself’ catching shrimps in the little ponds of
water left by the tide. Sitting upright, like a monkey, the
animal would stir the water with one of its paws, causing the
shrimps to jump up in the air, when it would catch them, pull
off their heads, and lay them in a heap by its side. Having
thus caught as many as it wanted, it washed them carefully, ©
made them with its paws into little balls, dipped them in the
water, and then ate them up. This was what Cuvier has named
in Latin the ‘washing bear,’ from the strange habit it has of
wetting all its food before eating it. The negroes, who give it
the name of raccoon, are very fond of its flesh.”

MY KITTENS.

I loved you—the gray ones, the spotted, the white;
I brought you your breakfast of warm milk each morning,
And saw you all lap it with keenest delight.

1 ;
OF t dear little kittens !—my five little darlings !—

You played, too, so merry and cunning together ;
Your mother would watch while she lay in the straw,
A-winking her eyes in the warm summer weather,
And giving you sometimes a tap with her paw.

‘You would pull at her tail, at her ears you would nibble;
You had no respect for her gray hairs at all;
I am sure, though, she liked it, but sometimes she scolded,

And said in ecat-laneuage, “ Be off with you all !”
guage, Ni
100




MY KITTENS.



But one day poor Whitey, the prettiest darling

Of all these five kittens, grew sick and then died ;
I never again could have such a sweet kitten,

And oh how I grieved, and how sadly I cried!

I went out and dug her a grave in the garden,
And lined it all softly with leaves and with moss;
' brought to the burial her brothers and sisters,
Thinking that they, too, would mourn for her loss.

But the heartless things capered and whisked all around me—
They chased a bright butterfly, searched for a mouse,
Jumped for the bird that sang up in the pear-tree ;

I whipped them and sent them all back to the house.
101


THE BURNET MOTH.

Then I filled up the grave and I rounded it over,
And made it a border of white pearly stone,
And on it I planted a nice root of catnip,
Then left little Whitey to sleep all alone.

THE BURNET MOTH.

NSECTS are thus named because their bodies look as if

} they were notched or cut into, and that is the real meaning

of the word insect. They have no red blood in them, but
in its place is found a cold, yellowish liquid. They have
at least six hard, horny legs.

There are numerous kinds of insects. Indeed, there are
more varieties of insects than of any other living thing. Over
sixty thousand species have already been discovered, and more
are constantly being found.

Insects vary in size from the large butterfly and beetle down
to the tiny living thing that only can be seen by the aid of a
microscope. Everywhere, in-doors and out, on the ground, in
the air and in the water,.the world is swarming with countless
forms of insect life.

We all know how ugly, crawling caterpillars become beautiful
butterflies, but perhaps some of us do not know that nearly all
insects pass through some kind of change, or transformation as
it is called, before they assume their perfect shape.

Some insects live in communities, like ants and bees, and
build houses, and lay by store from year to year. Others live
and work allalone. Still others take no thought for to-morrow,
but are content to enjoy the honey and sunshine of to-day.
Among the latter the butterflies and moths may be found.

Butterflies and moths are similar in appearance and habits.

If there is any doubt whether an insect is a butterfly or a moth,
102


















































































































































































































































there is one rule by which they can almost certainly be
distinguished. The butterfly when at rest closes its wings like

a sheet book, or like the two hands with palms laid together,
103




GOOD HUMOR.

only the under side of the wings being seen. The moth, on the
contrary, lays its wings flat, and laps one over the other, as
though you placed the palm of one hand on the back of the
other, the upper or right side of the wing being left in sight.

Butterflies fly by day, and moths usually by night. All
moths do not fly by night, however. There is the Burnet moth,
a beautiful creature found in Europe upon the shores of the
Mediterranean Sea. It forms, perhaps, a link between moths
and butterflies, as it delights in sunshine. Its head, antenne,
or horn-like feelers, legs, and body are black and somewhat
hairy. Its upper wings are of a bright bluish-green, with six
spots of a beautiful red on each, bordered by a little green.
The caterpillar from which this elegant creature comes is yellow
spotted with black, and the cocoon or cradle of the baby butter-
fly is boat-shaped, with lengthwise furrows, and of a straw
color.

GO0D-HUMOR.

AM a first-rate fairy,
“ Good-humor” is my name;
T use my wand where’er I go,
And make the rough ways plain ;

And makes the ugly faces shine,
The shrillest voices sweet,
The coarsest ore a golden mine,
The poorest lives complete.
104


KEEPING SHOP.

‘ T is not so easy to keep shop as you might think. When
{| you have got your counter and your scales, you have to

lay in a stock of things, and make sure you have enough.

Some customers want tea, some want acid drops, some
of them ask for flour, and some for sweet marjoram; then, of
course, you want bread, and vinegar, and carrots, and sugar,
and writing-paper, and ink, and coffee, and mushroom ketchup,
and people are sure to ask for postage stamps. ;

Oh, here comes the gentleman that called yesterday! I must
be very civil to him, because he is new in the neighborhood,
and looks wealthy, so we must try to get his custom.

“ Good-morning, sir.”

“Oh, good-morning. H’m! h’m!”’

“H’m! h’m! What did you please to require, sir?”

“Well, I want half a dozen of the same golden syrup as [
had yesterday, and a pint of your very best postage stamps!”

Of course, I saw at once he had made a mistake, but Arthur
burst out laughing. He is very rude, and he always likes to
spoil things.

“Yes, sir,” I said to the gentleman, “is there anything else?”

“Well, I should like a box of chocolate creams for my baby.”

“Flow old is the baby, sir? because we have different sizes.”

“Fe is not quite two months old.”

“Then,” said Arthur, “he wants the chocolate creams for him-
self, you know: a baby of that age can’t eat ’em, I do believe.”

That was his impudence again; and besides, it was bad
grammar. I have told him of it ever so many times.

“Shall I send the boy round with you to carry the things,
sir?” says I; “you need not be troubled to carry them.”

That was because I wanted to find out where he lived. There

is a great art in carrying on a business like mine.
105






















KEEPING SHOP.






KEEPING SHOP.

“Well, yes, I think you had better,” said the gentleman,
“and I will pay him for them when I get home.”

“Certainly, sir. Here, Arthur,” I said, “make haste and
take the basket, and follow this gentleman with the articles he
has ordered.”

At this Arthur showed his temper in a way you would hardly
believe. He was in such a passion.

“Carry the things yourself,” said he. “J’m not going to
walk behind your customers with a basket.”

This was very unkind of him. He knew it was all in play,
but he was so jealous at not being allowed to keep the shop
himself.

“Your shop-boy is a very ill-behaved youth,” said the gen-
tleman; “I was going to give him a penny if he had carried
the things, but now I shall not,” and he was going off quite in
a huff.

“T assure you, sir, I shall discharge him at once,” I said.

“Oh, will you?” said Arthur. “Now, look here! Z’m going
to be a customer. I want a pound of candles, and a penny’s
worth of caraway-seeds, and a bunch of turnips, and a couple
of boot-laces, and a cake of yellow soap, and two dozen oysters,
and [ll carry them in my hands, and mind they’re fresh, for
the last we bought at your shop had to be thrown away.”

Just at that moment mamma put her head in at the door, and
said she wanted me at once; and after I was gone he went be-
hind the counter, and wanted to serve the gentleman himself.
And when he said “No,” he walked up and down in front of
the shop, and kept on calling out,—“ Now, then, ladies; buy!
buy! What’'ll you buy ?”

—_————_____-

Aw indolent boy rarely if ever becomes a good business
man. 107




A JAPANESE ORCHESTRA.

Coty HAT funny kind of music!” said Eddie White. He
was turning over the leaves of a book which his father
had brought home that morning. “ Just see that man,
papa! Ishould say he was beating on a looking-glass.”

And Eddie pointed to one of the figures in a picture of Japanese

musicians.

“Tt does look like a mirror,” replied Eddie’s father, “ but it
isn’t for all that.”

“No, I suppose not, or else it would be smashed all to pieces,”
said Eddie. “Is it some kind of a musical instrument?”

“Yes, a gong.”

“Tve seen gongs and heard them too;” and Eddie put his
hands over his ears and made a wry face. “But that doesn’t
look like one.” ; 3

“The Chinese gong is a round metal pan, and gives forth a
terrible noise, but this gong is made of dressed skin stretched in
a frame and handsomely ornamented. It is set upon a stand or
pedestal, and the player sits before it as you see in the picture.”

“Qh, that’s it! And just look at his cap! It’s got wings.”

“It’s the Japanese musician’s cap, and is made after the style
of the ancient national helmet,” said Mr. White. “ You see
that five musicians have caps just alike. And they are playing
on the five principal instruments used by their people—the
gong, the flute, the mouth-organ or pan-pipe, the tom-tom or
drum, and the conch or shell. These five instruments the
Japanese consider sacred.”

“How sacred, papa ?” asked Eddie.

“The Japanese are heathen, as we say—that is, they do not
know and worship the true God.”

_ “What do they worship ?”
108




JAPANESE MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS.







i



KN



ay


THE TWO SPRITES.

“Tn ancient times all the people worshipped the great sun
goddess called Yen-sio-dai-sin, and very large numbers still
worship this imaginary being. The mikado, or spiritual
emperor of the nation, is claimed to be a descendant of this
sun goddess.”

“A sun goddess! I wonder what she looked like?” said
Eddie. :

“T guess nobody ever saw her,” replied his father.

THE TWO SPRITES.

OME and sit beside me, darling,
In the shifting sunset lights,
And Pll tell, if you will listen,
Of two busy little sprites,
Busy, busy, always busy,
From the morning till the nights.

One is slow in all her movements,
And her form is bent awry,

And a frown is on her forehead,
And a scowl is in her eye ;

And if you will listen closely,
You will often hear her sigh.

If you let her once come near you,
By the sea or by the land,

If you let her wave before you.
Once the wretched little wand

Which, where’er she goes or tarries,

Still she carries in her hand,
110




THE TWO SPRITES.

WY























You will find the lesson hopeless
Which was easy when begun,
And the shortest task so lengthened

That it never will be done
And a thousand grievous troubles
Where before you found but one.

Do not listen to her whispers ;
Do not look at her, I pray;
111


THE TWO SPRITES.

Always turn your back upon her
Jn your work and in your play,

Or you'll always find a mountain
Or a lion in your way.

But the other comes with footsteps
Dancing lightly as the breeze,

And her face is wreathed with smiling,
Like the sunshine ’mong the trees,

And her song is like the bird-notes,
‘Yet e’en merrier than these.

If her dancing feet should travel
In the path the first has trod,
‘You will see the frowning mountains

Quickly vanish at her nod,
And the shadows flee to hide them
From before her tiny rod.

When she waves her silver sceptre,
If you follow in the way,

Never, never turning backward,
At the closing of the day

With a crown success will wait you,
All your labor to repay.

Will you have the bright attendant,
Or the sprite with scowling eye?
‘You must choose between them, darling,
One of them is always by.
_And their names—pray listen closely—

Are I can’t and I wit Try.
112


































































































































































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LITTLE EUNICE.

Am@yYAIRER face was never seen ;
Eyes so shy, so soft, serene,
: Tender little Eunice.
Kiss me, darling, through the bars,

Then to sleep watched by the stars,
Papa’s little Eunice.
113


DOGS.

OGS are great favorites of mine. I agree with the man

' who said there is no friend like a dog. Dogs are so

faithful and so forgiving. They never get in the sulks.

They never go and tell tales out of school. They always
remember favors, and are so thankful for them.

A dog will wag his tail and be contented with a bone, and
be just as grateful to you as though you had shared the best
with him. Dogs are always ready for frolic, and a man or
woman, boy or girl, who cannot take real delight in a rough-
and-tumble play with a dog, must be very cross-grained.

There are some dogs, to be sure, who are cross and snappish,
and would like nothing better than to bite. But then I am
sure this is the fault of their bringing up. They have bad
masters, who are responsible for their bad traits. ven the
worst of dogs always has some good in him. He will, at least,
be faithful to his master, and guard his property.

I like the looks of Watch in the picture. I know he is a
kind, benevolent dog, who would never attack a smaller dog
than himself. But with all his good nature I don’t think it
would be safe to venture too near him at night when he is
guarding his master’s house. He is sitting and looking very
intently at the moon, and seems thinking very deeply. I
- wonder what he can be thinking about? for I have no doubt
dogs do think. Is he trying to study out what the moon is?
and does it puzzle him very much? Maybe he knows all
about it as well as we do, and thinks we are as ignorant as we
think him, while he would explain the matter to us if we were
not so stupid that we could not understand.

Watch seems like a happy, contented dog. He has a nice
warm kennel, with plenty of soft straw for a bed. He has a

very pleasant place to sit outside his kennel on the banks of
. 114








the river in the full moonlight. I have no doubt he enjoys
the scene. If he did not, he would just as soon remain in his
dark kennel. Only the moon seems to trouble him. He looks
at it, and occasionally he barks at it, but the moon doesn’t mind
him in the least. It is really a very provoking moon. It sails
right on up the sky, and stares Watch full in the face, and he
feels certain that if he takes his eyes off from it one moment it
will pounce down and do something dreadful. Keep a good
lookout, Watch.

“ Bow wow!”

——___~e>.—___—

ANGER in dispute is like an unquiet horse in a dusty way—
it raises such a cloud that it obscures the vision and clouds the
anderstanding.


WATERING HIS GARDEN WITH RAIN.

T was a great disappointment to Edgar. He was all dressed
and ready for a walk with his mother in the fields and
woods, when it suddenly grew dark and large rain-drops
came pattering against the window.

“Oh, dear!’ he eried, as he looked up at the clouds—“ Oh,
dear! it’s always the way when I’m going out. I wish it
would never rain,”

“What did my little boy say?” asked Edgar’ 8 ee who
heard these fretful sentences. ‘“ Never rain?”

“There’s no good in it,” Edgar replied, his face as gloomy as
the sky. “No good at all, but to wet the ground and make it
so muddy a little boy can’t go out.”

“Do you know what makes the grass grow ?”

Edgar did not answer.

“The rain,” said his mother. “If it were never to rain any -
more, the grass, and flowers, and trees would all die. We
should have no grain or fruit for food. The earth would

become a barren waste, and birds, and beasts, and men would «

all perish.”

Edgar got down from the chair and came to where his
Sie was sitting.

“Does the rain make things grow, mamma ?” he asked, the
fretful look going out of his face; and his mother answered :

“The rain and the sunshine together.”

“Oh! I didn’t know that,” said Edgar.

“ You've seen me water the flowers. They were dry, just as
little boys get dry, and I gave them water to drink. If I had
not done so, they would have withered and died. Now, the
earth is a great fruit and flower garden given to us by the
Lord; and he waters it with rain. If he were not to do so,
every green thing would perish, and we would have neither

food to eat nor water to drink. Isn’t he good ?”
116


WATERING HIS GARDEN WITH RAIN.

cay

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Edgar had climbed up in the chair, and was looking earnestly
out of the window.

“ And is he watering his garden now, mamma?” he asked.
7.

I aeeruate

\

Sv




WATERING HIS GARDEN WITH RAIN.

“Yes, darling.”

Edgar was silent for some moments. In the pause the patter
of large drops could be heard on the window-panes. A gentle,
serious, but sweet expression was ee on his countenance.

“T hope he is not angry with me,” said the adele a little
tremor in his voice.

“No, darling ; God 1 is never angry with us, but only sorry
when we do wrong.”

“Tt was wrong “he me to wish it would never rain.”

“You didn’t mean to do wrong ?”

“No, ma’am. I only felt so bad; and I didn’t know that it
was the good Lord watering his garden with rain.”

“ And here comes his sunshine after the rain!” exclaimed
Edgar’s mother, as beams of light came bursting into the room.
“He has watered the earth as a garden, and now sends upon it
his twin plese of sunshine. See how beautiful it is making
everything.”

The clouds had broken and were passing away. The rain
had ceased as suddenly as it began. On every leaf and flower
and blade of grass hung crystal drops, brighter in the sunbeams
than diamonds; and far away in the heavens a beautiful rain-
bow had thrown its arch of colors on the clouds.

“God knows best, my darling, when to send the rain and
when the sunshine,” said the mother.

Peace had come into the child’s heart, and he only answered:

“T am glad now that the good Lord has sent the rain.”




A PLEASANT FAMILY.



















































































A PLEASANT FAMILY.

Cat HAT a gay time the little ones are having! Nelly is
just three years old, and papa has made her such a nice

; birthday present. What do you think itis? Why, a
cradle almost big enough to lie down in herself, and a

dolly as large as a live baby. Wasn’t she a happy little girl
when that cradle and dolly came home? You would have
thought so if you had seen and heard her. Tom has a drum,

for papa couldn’t pass him by, of course, if he is a year older
119

“


WHAT IS THE MATTER WITH ROBBY?

than Nelly and almost a man. The noise he makes on that drum
is wonderful, but nobody seems to hear him, not even mamma,
who is playing baby for Nelly, and saying her “ Now I lay
me” before going to bed.

How happy they all seem! Nelly isn’t a bit selfish, but lets
Clara nurse dolly while she and mamma “play go to bed.”
John and Ada are examining a picture-book together, and
Milly is trying to write a letter or a composition.

It really does you good to look at this picture. Each one is
busy in his or her own way; not one of them interferes with or
troubles the other. How happy the father and mother of so
pleasant a family must be!



WHAT 18 THE MATTER WITH ROBBY ?

NEVER saw him act so before,” said Mrs. Goodwin,

wondering, and not a little mortified, at the behavior of

Robby, as she presented him to her dear old Uncle Morgan,

whom she had not seen since her marriage—her dear old
Uncle Morgan, whom she had loved from childhood, and to
whom she had been a pet and plaything when no bigger than
Robby, years and years ago.

To think that Robby should hold back from Uncle Morgan,
and behave in such a shy, strange manner! What had got
into the boy?

Uncle Morgan drew Robby to his Pe and lifted him on his
knee opposite to Eddy, but the boy hung down his head, look-
ing so shy and shamefaced that his mother, who had for days
ousht of this moment with pride and pleasure, was annoyed
and disappointed. What could it mean? It was so unlike the
frank, manly boy. And to act so with Uncle Morgan—the one

_of all others in whose eye she wished Robby to appear to the

best advantage !
, 120


WHAT IS THE MATTER WITH ROBBY?



































Uncle Morgan knew all about it, and so did Robby, for they
had met before.

Indeed! Where and when could that have happened? I
will tell you all about it.

When Uncle Morgan, who had ridden a long distance to
visit his niece, came up from the railroad station, he saw a
pretty cottage surrounded with fine shrubbery and almost
covered with vines.


WHAT IS THE MATTER WITH ROBBY?

“Who lives there?” he asked of a man whom he met.

“ Mr. Goodwin,” answered the man.

“YT thought so,” said Uncle’ Morgan to himself. “It looks
like Katy, so neat and trim and beautiful.”

As he came near the cottage he heard a hen give a sudden
ery of alarm, and then cluck, eluck, to her brood of chicks.
The cry was repeated several times, and there was the noise as
of some one striking her. Her chicks were in trouble also, for
he heard their little voices crying peep, peep, peep, in a dozen
different places. He could not see what was going on, for a
fence hid the chickens from his view.

Uncle Morgan was one of the kindest-hearted men alive.
He would not hurt a fly. So he put his foot on a rail, and
climbed up until he could look over the fence and see what was
going on. And what do you think he saw? Why, a little boy
with a long switch in his hand slashing away at the hen and
her downy chickens, and laughing at their pain and fright.

“Stop that, you young rascal !” cried Uncle Morgan.

' The child glanced up, and on seeing a strange, stern face
looking down upon him, dropped his stick and fled into the
house.

Do you wonder now that he behaved as he did when his
mother presented him to her dear old Uncle Morgan?

But Robby was not a cruel, only a thoughtless little boy
sometimes. It was such fun to make the old hen spread her
wings and dance about, and to see the chicks scamper off on
their slender legs. He never thought of its hurting or scaring
them.

Uncle Morgan soon understood all this, and he and Robby
became the best of friends. And when his visit was over, the
dear little boy, into whose tender mind he had infused something
of his own gentleness and kindness toward the weakest and

humblest things God has made, parted with him in tears.
122


CHRISTMAS BELLS.

Wi hey























































































































































































































































CHRISTMAS BELLS.

O74 | ARK !: the Christmas bells are ringing—
Ringing through the frosty air—
Happiness to each one bringizig,
And release from toil and care.

How the merry peal is swelling
From the gray old crumbling tower,
To the simplest creature telling

Of Almighty love and power.
128


MOTHER'S LETTER.

Ankle deep the snow is lying,
Every spray is clothed in white,

Yet abroad the folk are hieing,
Brisk and busy, gay and light.

Now fresh helps and aids are offered
To the aged and the poor,

And rare love-exchanges proffered
At the lowliest cottage door.

Neighbors shaking hands and greeting,
No one sorrowing, no one sad ;

Children loving parents meeting,
Young and old alike made glad.

Then while Christmas bells are ringing,
Rich and poor, your voices raise,

And—your simple carol singing—
Waft to heaven your grateful praise.

MOTHER'S LETTER.

Cig Y DARLING DAUGHTER: Your loving letter came
t to me like sunshine, and has made me feel happy all

day. When I opened it, my head was aching, but the

pain went off-as if by a kind of magic before I had

_ read through the first page. I feel lonely, sometimes, now that
you are away, and often find myself listening for the sound of
your feet or the tones of your voice. But it is so much better
for you to be where you are. J know that you are studying
faithfully, and improving yourself, and this thought helps me

to bear the separation cheerfully.
124


MOTHER'S LETTER.

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T read a part of your letter to Mrs. Warfield, who called this
morning. I heard her sigh once or twice, and fancied that she
did not look happy when I finished reading. I hope Clara is
a studious girl, and not so wild and thoughtless as when at
home. When children go away from their parents, their hearts
go out after them with more than usual tenderness, and if they
hear only what is good about them, it makes them feel very
happy, but if any bad reports comes, it hurts and distresses them
sorely. For this, if for no other reason, boys and girls, when
they go away to school, should be very careful not to do or say
anything that, if known, would give pain to loving hearts
at home.

You need not be afraid of getting the ill-will of Katy Wing
and Lou Elder, so long as you feel kindly toward them. They

125



4]


MOTHER'S LETTER.

will see this kindness in your face and manner, and it will
soften them toward you.

You must be very patient with Lina Blaine. She is such a
trial, you say. But think how little chance she has had at
home! Think, too, how different she is from you—how quick
and hot her temper is! If quick-tempered men and women
find it difficult, and often nearly impossible, to control them-
selves, think how hard it must be for a little girl like Lina! So
be very patient with her. She is warm-hearted and generous,
and you may gain a good influence over her, and to do good to
any one, my dear child, is the best and noblest thing in the
world.

What you said to Cora Ellis was just right. She will be
sorry for her hasty answer when she thinks it over. Don’t
let her see a shade of difference in your manner toward her.
“ How would mother feel if she knew of it?” Yes, that is the
question every young girl should ask herself, and ask it very
often.

Dear Effie grows sweeter and sweeter every day, and Harry
is the same bright, frolicsome little fellow you parted with two
months ago. He sends ever so many kisses, and wants you “to
tome home yight soon.” Bless his dear heart! He is so
loving and good.

Your father says, “Tell Edith to study hard.”

You must write to him one of your sweetest letters. It always
pleases him to get a letter from you. He doesn’t say much
about it, but I can see how deeply he is gratified. And now,
Edith, my sheet is full, and I must say good-night. God bless
and keep you, my precious child !

Moruer.






































HERE is scarcely an animal which is so useful to man as
the sheep. The wool which is taken yearly from their
backs furnishes us with material for clothing, and their
flesh is almost constantly upon our tables for food.

A flock of sheep is a beautiful object in a landscape, and
every one has a tender spot in his heart for the little white,
innocent, clumsy lambs which frisk about in happy, awkward
play beside their dams. Every country boy loves to be on
hand on sheep-washing and sheep-shearing days, and I could
tell you a great many interesting things, if I had time, about
what happens to the wool after it has been taken from the

sheep’s back, before it appears in broadcloth, merino, delaine,
127


SHEEP.

and flannel, and a hundred other fabrics, and is then made up
into shirts, jackets, stockings, coats, caps, shawls, blankets, and
I cannot remember how many things besides.

Sheep are found in all parts of the world. It is well that it
is so, for it would seem impossible for any civilized people to do
without them. Each country has its peculiar kind of sheep.
In Egypt and Syria there is a singular variety with a long,
heavy tail which sometimes trails on the ground.

In the Rocky Mountains there is a species of sheep which
runs wild, living in retired parts of the mountains. At the
approach of danger it scales the rocks with the greatest ease and
speed. The horns of these sheep grow to an enormous size.

The moufflon is another species of sheep, which is found in
Egypt and other countries. It really looks more like a goat
than a sheep. It has two long curved horns, and its covering
is more like hair than like wool. Under its lower jaw is a long
silky beard. The beard on the jaw is from two to four inches
long, while lower down on the throat it is about a foot in length.
Its fore legs are also covered with a long thick fringe of hair,
reaching nearly to the ground.

The merino sheep is among the most prized of domestic
sheep for the length, fineness, and silkiness of its wool. The
finest and softest of woollen fabrics are made from their fleece,
and it is used in the manufacture of imitation cashmere shawls,

which nearly equal the genuine in appearance, and are more
durable.


WINTER.

T is now winter, dead winter. Desolation and silence reign
in the fields; no singing of birds is heard, no humming of
insects. The streams murmur no longer; they are locked
up in frost. The trees lift their naked boughs like withered

arms into the bleak sky ;
the green sap no longer
rises in their veins; the
flowers and the sweet-smelling
shrubs are decayed to their
roots.

Nature mourns for her chil-
dren. A little while ago and
she rejoiced in her offspring:
the rose spread its sweet per-
fume upon the gale; the vine
gave its fruit; her children
were springing and blooming
around her on every lawn.

The spring once more will
break the icy chains of winter,
and her mourning shall be
turned to joy. The south-



















































































































































































THE BIRD THAT WALKS ON THE WATER.

wind’s gentle breath will fan to life the silent streams, and beauty
will come forth wherever falls the music of his whispering voice.

The rose shall again breathe its sweetness on the soft air, and
from the bosom of the ground verdure shall spring forth. The
forest shall put on her robes of green, and welcome to her leafy
bowers the feathered harbingers of spring.

“The grass is soft, its velvet touch is grateful to the hand;

And, like the kiss of gentle love, the breeze is sweet and bland;

The daisy and the buttercup are nodding courteously,

It stirs their blood with kindest love to bless and welcome thee.

And’ mark how with thine own thin locks—they now are
silvery gray—

That blissful breeze is wantoning, and whispering, ‘ Be gay !’”

THE BIRD THAT WALKS ON THE WATER.

OME, Percy, let me show you a bird that walks on the
water,” said Aunt Helen.
She spoke to a boy who sat pouting on the carpet
because his mother would not let him go into the garden
while it was raining. Little boys are very unreasonable some-
times. Percy looked up, with a half-provoked, half-surprised
expression on his face.
“You're only fooling me, Aunt Helen.”
“ Come and see.”
“ Birds can’t walk on the water.”
“ Here’s the picture. Come and see for yourself.”
Percy got up slowly and came to where his aunt sat with an
open book in her hand.
“There, didn’t I tell you so?” said Aunt Helen, pointing to

the picture.
180




THE.BIRD THAT WALKS ON THE WATER.



















































































































































“Ho! Pshaw! He isn’t walking on the water!” exclaimed
Perey. “ You can’t fool me!”

“What is he walking on, then?” asked Aunt Helen.

“Why, on great broad leaves.”

“Well, that’s curious, and quite a new thing under the sun,
Don’t you think so, Perey ?”

“Why, yes. And just look what long, slender toes the
181


CHILDREN AMONG THE FLOWERS.

fellow has; just like bits of wire. What is he doing away off
in the middle of a pond, or lake?”

“ After his dinner,” replied Aunt Helen.

“T wouldn’t give much for all he’ll get out there,” said Percy,
with a laugh that smoothed the pouting wrinkles from his face.

“ He'll take care of that. Birds and beasts never go on what
we call fool’s errands. They always do the right thing, at the
right time, in the right place. Let me read to you what it says
in the book about this bird, which is called the Jacana, and is
to be found in South America, and also in some parts of Africa,
Asia, and Australia.”

And Aunt Helen read:

“The Jacanas are remarkable for the extraordinary length
of their toes, which are so long and so slender that they seem to
have been drawn out like wire, and to hinder the progress of
their owner. ‘These long toes are, however, of the greatest use,
as they enable the bird to walk upon the floating leaves that
overspread the surface of many rivers, and to pick its food from
and between the leaves on which it walks. As the bird marches
upon the leaves, the long toes dividing the pressure upon several
leaves at each step, they are slightly sunk below the surface by
the weight, so that the bird appears to be walking on the water.”

CHILDREN AMONG THE FLOWERS.

C%| { APPY, happy children,
As ye pluck the flowers,
Thank God for the sunny time,

Thank Him for the showers;
132


CHILDREN AMONG THE FLOWERS.

Thank Him for the seasons

That, in coming, bring
Summer and the autumn time,
_ Winter and the spring.

For His love is boundless,
Tender is His care,
Sending us so many flowers,

Each and all so fair.
138


PUSSY CAT.

USSY CAT lives in the servants’ hall,
She can set up her back and purr ;
The little mice live in a crack in the wall,
But they hardly dare venture to stir ;

For whenever they think of taking the air,
Or filling their little maws,

The pussy cat says, “Come out if you dare,
T will catch you with my claws.”

Scrabble, scrabble, scrabble, went all the little mice,
For they smelt the Cheshire cheese ;

The pussy cat said, “It smells very nice,
Now do come out if you please.”

“Squeak,” said the little mouse ; “squeak, squeak, squeak,”

Said all the young ones too;
“We never creep when cats are about,
Because we are afraid of you.”

So the cunning old cat lay down on the mat
By the fire in the servants’ hall: -

“Tf the little mice peep, they’ll think I’m asleep,”
So she rolled herself up like a ball.

“Squeak,” said the little mouse, “ we'll creep out
And eat some Cheshire cheese ;

That silly old cat is asleep on the mat,
And we may sup at our ease.”

Nibble, nibble, nibble, went the little mice,
And they licked their little paws ;
Then the cunning old cat sprang up from her mat,

And caught them all with her claws. -
184




























































































































































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Tet
Y CAT AND HER KI
oe


THE NEW SCHOLAR.

HIS is a boys’ school,” said the kind old teacher, as he put
the rod he held in his hand behind him. “ We don’t
take dogs.” ;

There was a smile in his pleasant eyes.

“ Ponto would come along, you see, he’s so ‘fond of Josie.”

“Yes, ma’am. I’ve no doubt of it; and the lambs and the
kittens too. But we only take boys.”

Josie had seen the rod which the teacher was trying to keep
out of view, and it frightened him. So he drew back and
caught hold of his mother’s dress, while Ponto, a little scared,
like his master, but on the alert, smelled suspiciously at the
teacher’s trowsers.

“ He’s a good boy,” said Josie’s mother, lifting the cap from
his pure white brow, “and won’t, I am sure, give you any
trouble.”

But the rod was too much for Josie. He kept his eyes upon
the arm that held it, and bent round to get sight of the terrible
instrument.

“Tt isn’t for good little boys like you,”—the teacher smiled
and looked kindly at the lad—* but for bad boys and dogs.”

And he looked at Ponto, lifting his hand and making be-
lieve he was going to strike. ', he dog started back in alarm,
and ran out of doors, Josie following; and in the next instant

both were seen scampering down the road and on their way
home. It was all in vain that Josie’s mother called him; he .
neither stopped nor turned, but kept on as fast as his legs would
carry him, and didn’t stop till he and Ponto were safe at home.

“So much,” said the teacher, a little severely, to Josie’s
mother, “for letting him bring his dog along. You ought to
have known better.”

“And so much,” answered Josie’s mother, a flash of anger
186


































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE NEW SCHOLAR AND HIS DOG.




















































THE PRISONER.

in her eyes, “for keeping an instrument of torture in your hand
to frighten little children. ‘You ought to know better.”

The mother and teacher stood looking at each other with
severe faces for some moments. Then a change came over that
of the kind old man. It grew mild and gentle.

“You are right,” he said, with a tender regret in his tone.
“T ought to have known better, and I thank you for telling me
the truth. Bring your little boy to-morrow, and I promise you
there will be no rod visible to frighten him. But be sure,” he
added, a smile lighting up his face, “to leave Ponto at home.”



THE PRISONER.

H, dear! It will never stop raining!” And Harvey
came back from the window where be had been watching
the clouds that rolled across the sky, driven by stormy
winds.

“My little prisoner must be patient for a while longer,” said
his mother. “It always stops raining.”

“Tt won’t stop to-day,” answered the child, in a fretful voice.

“Maybe not; but it will clear to-morrow, or next day, and
then you can go out.”

“To-morrow! Next day! Oh, dear! Tl never stand it!”
And Harvey went tearing about the room in a very impatient
kind of a way. : é

“Get your blocks and build a castle,” said his mother.

“T don’t want to build a castle,” was replied.

“Go up in the garret and take a swing.”

“Don’t want to swing.”

“Read a story in one of your books.”

* Don’t want to read.”
138


THE PRISONER.
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“Well, what do you want ?”

“T want it to stop raining.”

“ But it won’t stop. It keeps right on, you see, pouring and
pouring. And I guess it’s going to do a world of good.
Farmer Elwood told me yesterday that the ground was as dry
as dust; that the wells were falling, and the crops suffering.
He’s very thankful for this rain, I have no doubt, and is glad,
while you are sorry; and I am thinking he has more cause for
gladness than you have for sorrow.”

Harvey grew quiet as his mother talked.

“But it is so hard to be kept in the house, mother, when a

boy wants to be out of doors.”
189




THE PRISONER.

“T know it is, But a little patience will make it ever so
much easier. And you have so many things to interest and
occupy your mind if you will use them—books and pictures and
‘playthings. And then you have a whole house to go about in.
When you are tired of one thing, you can go to another; and
when you are tired of one room you can go to another. There
is a great deal of freedom in all this, and a great deal of
pleasure to be found, if you will only look for it. All this is
very different from being shut up in the cell of a prison.”

“Tn a prison? Who’s shut up in a prison?” asked Harvey.

“ A great many people,” answered his mother. “Shut up in
small, narrow cells not half so large as this room.”

And the mother, as she said this, took up a book and turned
to a picture.

“See,” she said, “here is a picture of one of these innocent
persons. A young girl sent to prison because an enemy had
accused her falsely. It’s a sad story.”

Harvey looked at the picture, and saw at the bars of a grated
window the face of a woman. She was holding one of her
hands, in which were some crumbs, through the bars, and two
birds were feeding out of her hand. He looked for a long time
without speaking, At last he said, drawing a deep sigh as he
spoke: 4

“ Poor prisoner !”

“She had only the birds for companions, you see ; eal she
shares with them her scanty food.”

“Dear little birds!’ said Harvey, still in a tender and
subdued voice. ‘“ And they’re not a bit afraid of her.”

“No, for she feeds them, and they know her to be their
friend. Every day many birds came to her window, eating out
of her hand, hopping down upon the floor of her cell, chirping
and singing to her, and often sending rays of sunshine into her

sad and lonely heart. And she was thankful to her ees
140
THE FRIGATE-BIRD.

Father for the presence and love of these bright and beautiful
creatures, the only companions of her solitary life.

“ And now, dear,’ added Harvey’s mother, “think how
pleasant a prison you have in comparison with that in which
this girl lived for many years.”

“ What prison?” asked the little boy, half in surprise, for he
did not see at the moment what his mother meant.

“ Thig one, in which the rain has shut you up for a day,” she
replied.

“Qh!” It was uttered softly. He stood with a thoughtful
~ air for some moments; and then, drawing his arms about his
mother’s neck, said,—

“Tt isn’t a prison. And it may rain and rain just as long as
it pleases.”

Harvey’s mother put her arm about him, and laid a sweet
kiss on his lips.



THE FRIGATE-BIRD.

T was a pleasant evening in June when Uncle John came
to see his little nephew and nieces. He found them
all out on the front porch enjoying the fresh air. George
brought his uncle a great arm-chair, and he sat down in

it, and drew little Lucy upon his knee and stroked back her
soft brown locks. It is strange—isn’t it?—how these great,
rough-bearded men sometimes like such little soft, tender bits
of girls, and how gentle and loving they can be! Lucy gave
Uncle John’s whiskers a little pull’now and then, but he didn’t
seem to mind it in the least. :

There was a belated or over-industrious bee humming around
the honeysuckles. A little mite of a bird, that certainly had

his nest somewhere in the honeysuckles, and who ought to have
141



49
THE FRIGATE-BIRD.

been in bed half an hour at least, hopped out on a twig with a
twitter and a bob of his head and a flirt of his tail, as much
as to say, ‘“‘ Who’s to send me to bed if Pm not ready to go?”
and sung a few lively notes, and then, with a chirp or two,
hopped out of sight again. A whippoorwill fluttered clumsily
down a few yards off, and set up his nightly ery, seemingly in
the greatest hurry to have poor Will punished immediately ;
while his companion in the next field was equally impatient,
answering cry for.cry, each one going faster and faster until
they were quite out of breath.

Uncle John had a quiet talk with Mary and George about
these birds, while little Lucy sat and listened.

“TY must tell you about the strange birds one sees on the
ocean,” said Uncle John.

“On the ocean, Uncle John? How can there be birds there

where there are no places for them to build their nests?” asked
Mary.
“Why, don’t you know?” replied George, somewhat impor-
tantly, because of his superior knowledge. “Haven’t you seen
gulls? I’m sure they are ocean birds, but they build their nests
on the land. Then we've read about stormy petrels—how
sometimes they fly so far out at sea that they are glad to light
on a ship to rest.”

“You do not find either gulls or stormy petrels very far
from the land—from an island at least,” Uncle John remarked.
“But I can tell you about a bird that flies hundreds of miles
over the ocean, and seems never to need rest. Indeed, some
people say that it sleeps upon the wing.

“This is the frigate-pelican or man-of-war bird. It is a
native of the Tropics, black in color, and is quite large, measur-
ing about three feet from head to tail. Its tail is long and
forked, and it has long, narrow wings, which when spread out

- measure ten or twelve feet from tip to tip. With these wings
142






























































































































































it can fly very fast and very far. It will sometimes rise far
above the clouds, or, if there are no clouds, so high that, large
as it is, it can scarcely be seen,

143


THE FRIGATE-BIRD.

“Tt lives on fish, and will dart down and seize them from the
surface of the water, or will pursue clouds of flying-fish ; but
it can neither dive nor swim. It is a great robber, and does not
in the least mind attacking a gull or a pelican to make it drop
its prey, which it will seize before it reaches the water.”

“ But, uncle, what do these birds do when they get far out to
sea and a storm comes up?” asked Mary.

“Oh, they do not mind storms in the least. There is no
frightening them with big waves and strong winds. Ifthe wind
is in their favor, it only helps them to fly the faster; and in the
worst of weather they sail as coolly as possible down in the
hollows of the sea and up over the crests of the waves, on an
eager lookout for the frightened fish, which seem then to be
more easily caught.”

“Do they never land ?”

“Oh, yes, they find some barren coast or uninhabited and
where they make their nests, either a trees or high rocks, but
never lay more than one or two eggs.”

“Come, children,” called mamma’s voice from within ; “ it is
bedtime.”

“ Good-night, uncle.”

“Good-night. Come and see us again soon, won’t you?”

_ “Oh, yes, if you promise to be good children,” called back
Uncle John, as he swung the garden gate; and a moment after-
ward they heard him going down the road with his quick, firm
step, whistling softly to himself.



144






































































































































































































































































































MINNIE TO DOLLY

Cy OUR hair is so pretty,
| Your eyes are so blue,
© Your cheeks are so rosy,
Your frock is so new,
Yow’re the prettiest dolly

I ever did see.
145


THE DOLLS WASHING.

Though your hair is so pretty,
And your eyes are so blue,
Pd rather be Minnie
Than I would be you.

For you can’t see the flowers
When they come up in spring;
You can’t hear the birdies,
How sweetly they sing;
Nor run out of doors
To look in the sky,
And see the white clouds
As they pass swiftly by.

You’ve no kind papa
Or mamma to be near,
To love you and teach you;
So, dolly, my dear,
Though your cheeks are so rosy,
And your dregs is so new,
I'd rather be Minnie
Than I would be you.

THE DOLL’S WASHING.

H, dear! I’m tired of making believe,” exclaimed little
Annie Granger; and she bundled up Dolly’s clothes,
which she had been pretending to wash, and threw them

“into a basket. “If I could wash them real, in a tub with

soap and water, and dry them on a line, and iron them with a
hot flat-iron, th re’d be some fun in it; but I’m sick of making

believe washing and ironing.”
146


THE DOLI’S WASHING.

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AN ——

A cloud of discontent was gathering on Annie’s face.

“ And would like to do some real washing ?” said her mother.

“Oh, dear! yes, mamma. And why can’t I? Tl be very
careful about the soap and water. I won’t spill any over the
floor nor on my dress. I can do it in the dining-room, and so
not trouble Mary the least bit. I hope she isn’t cross to-day ;
she’s so cross sometimes.” :

“The dining-room isn’t the place for real washing to be
done,” Mrs. Granger replied. “As for Mary’s crossness, I
don’t think there would be any cause to fear that if my
daughter had always been careful not to give trouble when she
went into the kitchen.”

“T won’t give her the least bit of trouble to-day, mamma,”
replied Annie; “Ill be just as careful, and won’t slop the floor

nor tumble things about. Won't you ask her, mamma?”
147


THE DOLLS WASHING.

“You see how it is, my dear,” said Mrs. Granger, looking at
her little daughter with a serious face. “The wrong we do
never dies with the doing, but lives in its consequences until it
punishes us. I want you to remember this. If you had never
given needless trouble to Mary when you went into the kitchen
—had never pulled her things about nor spilled water over the
floor nor upset her dishes nor acted rudely or saucily—you
wouldn’t now be in any fear of her crossness. So you see how
it is. If Mary’s crossness stands in the way of your pleasure,
you have only yourself to blame.”

So the little girl went slowly down to the kitchen.

Mary was standing at the table rolling out pie-crust.

“ Ave you making apple pies ?” Annie asked, in a respectful
way, that took Mary by surprise.

“Peach and lemon,” answered Mary, in a kind, quiet voice.

“Oh, that’s nice; your lemon pies are splendid.”

“ Would you like to make a little one for yourself?” asked
Mary.

“ May 1?”

“Why, yes, dear. Ill leave you a nice bit of dough, and
you shall have one of the small patty-pans to bake it in.”

“Thank you, Mary,” said Annie, in a pleased voice, which
was another surprise to the cook. “ And, Mary, there’s some-
thing else I’d like to do if you'll let me. I won’t trouble you
a bit, and [ll try to keep everything nice.”

“ What is it, dear ?”

Mary’s voice was kind and encouraging.

“JT want to wash Dolly’s clothes—a real wash, you see,
Mary—and then iron them with a hot flat-iron.”

“Tt will make such a slop, Annie, and my kitchen is all done
up clean and nice. I couldn’t have water and suds spilled all
about.”

“T won’t make a bit of slop or dirt, Mary,” pleaded the
148


THE DOLLS WASHING.

child. “ You shall tell me just what to do and fix everything
for me, and I won’t give you the least, least mite of trouble;
indeed I won’t, Mary. And [ll never worry you any more.”

“Tf you were a nice, orderly little girl,” she said, “I might
let you do it, but you know, Annie, how careless you are
sometimes.”

“TY know all about it, Mary,” the child answered, quickly,
“and I don’t wonder you're afraid, but I’m not going to be
careless and bad any more. Just try me. Won’t you, Mary?
And if I don’t do it all right and nice, you needn’t ever trust
me again.”

“All right,” answered Mary. “Just wait until I get these
pies ready for the oven, and then you shall have a doll’s
washing.” ;

“Oh, but you’re so nice, Mary!” exclaimed Annie, dancing
about the kitchen, at which Mary was so well pleased that she
hurried with her pies, and soon got them into the oven. Then
’ she brought from the cellar a small washing-tub, while Annie
ran up-stairs to get her doll’s clothes.

I don’t believe either Mary or Annie ever spent a happier
hour than the one that followed. Which was most pleased or
interested it would be hard to tell. Mary showed the little girl
how to put the clothes in soak, then how to rub and wring
them out, and how to rinse and blue them. She stretched a
line as near to the range as possible, so that they would dry
quickly, and when they were all dry showed Annie how to
sprinkle them. Then came the ironing.

“Just see, mamma !” exclaimed Annie, coming eagerly into
her mother’s room with a tray of beautifully-ironed doll-baby
clothes in her hands. Mrs. Granger thought she had never
seen her little girl look so beautiful. “And I did them all
myself, only Mary showed me. Oh, but she was so nice and

good, and not a bit cross!”
149


THE GARDENERS GRANDCHILD.

“T wonder,” said Mrs. Granger, “ what made her so nice and
good to-day? I wonder why she was not cross, and why she
didn’t send you flying the moment you put your head into the
kitchen ?”

The color in Annie’s face deepened.

“T understand it all, dear. You were kind and respectful to
Mary, and that made her feel kind toward you. See how
much better it is all around—better for Mary as well as your-
self. “You are both a great deal happier, and I will trust that _
this is the beginning of a better state of things. Never again
be rude to Mary, never touch anything in the kitchen without
her consent. If you want a cup, a tumbler, pan, or anything,
ask her for it in a respectful way; and if it is right for you to
have it, you will be sure to get it. Be, in a word, a little lady,
and every servant in the house will love you and do all in her
power for your comfort and pleasure.”

THE GARDENER’S GRANDCHILD.
Woe is the Queen of the Roses?

Gardener, can you tell?”
| “Oh, the Queen of the Roses to me, sir,
Is my own little grandchild, Nell.”

“She works in my garden, too, sir,
She weeds in the shady dell,

Where the violets and the lilies
Blossom around my Nell.

“ And when with Rover beside her

She carries them out to sell;
150


THE GARDENERS GRANDCHILD.

|

|

EAU TREATIES AEE

Not one is so bright to me, sir,
As my own little grandchild, Nell.

“T love the flowers I’ve tended
More years than I can tell ;—
Geranium, sweet-pea, fuchsia,

Jessamine, gentianelle,
151


THE ESCAPE.

“Salvia, and China-aster,
Heliotrope, heather-bell ;—

My flowers have been my treasures,
Next to my grandchild, Nell.

“ But the Rose is the Queen of the Flowers,
As every one can tell,

And she is the Queen of the Roses,
My own granddaughter, Nell.”



THE ESCAPE.

Cy) I. had very pleasant times at the sea-shore last summer,”
said little Ned, to some of his friends who came to see
him when he had got over his illness, “ but it came to a
stop all of a sudden. Papa, won’t you tell the boys
about it, and show them the picture the artist made of me and
Ponto and Jane in the sea?”

“Yes,” said Neddy’s father. “It was this way. Ned had
been having a splendid time gathering shells and making |
shell-rings in the sand at the shore, when his nurse, who was a
fisherman’s daughter, said, ‘Let us go take a sail? So Ned
got into the boat with Ponto and the nurse, Jane; and away
they went nicely enough for a little while, but all of a sudden _
a gust of wind struck the boat, and over it went, pitching
everything inside out into the water. Ponto was soon all right,
and by great barking attracted the attention of some fishermen
who were a short distance away, but poor Ned and the nurse
were nearly drowned before they were rescued, and Ned is not
yet well, although it happened last summer. See, here is the
picture, with the boat half over in the water. Don’t Ned look
frightened? ‘Look at his eyes. But I think it isa very good

likeness and a nice, pretty picture.”
152




















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































UPSET INTO THE SEA.


THE LOST PENKWNIFE.

Ca )ICHARD ROSS was going home from school one day

') when he saw a handsome penknife lying on the ground.

Now, a knife was of all things just what Richard wanted,

and the sight of this one made his heart jump for joy.

He caught it up eagerly, pulled open the bright blade, and
feasted his eyes on the white pearl handle and shining steel.

“T’m a lucky fellow,” he said to himself, and then he started
for home at a full run to tell his brother and sister of his good
luck and show his beautiful knife.

“JT wonder who could have lost it?” said brother Charley.

“Tt’s more than I know, or care either,’ replied Richard.
“ Finding is keeping.”

“Suppose you had lost it?” said grave brother Charley.

“Oh, bother!” answered Richard, with some impatience.
Charley’s suggestion had. fallen like a wet blanket, as we say
sometimes, on Richard’s self-satisfaction.

“Somebody must have lost it,” said Charley.

“ Maybe it was Mr. Ellis,” suggested sister Marion. “I saw
him going down the road half an hour ago.”

“T don’t believe it’s his knife,” spoke out Richard, who was
not feeling quite as comfortable as when he came in.

“Td ask him if I were you,” said Charley.

Richard made no reply to this suggestion. Suppose he
should ask Mr. Ellis if it was his knife, and he should say yes?
He would of course have to give it up. The thought was any-
thing but agreeable.

“Suppose,” said Charley, looking up from his book that
evening as they sat round a table studying their lessons, “ you
had lost that knife, Richard.”

“Why can’t you let the knife rest ?” answered Richard, half
angrily. “It’s no concern of yours.”

“But I can’t help feeling sorry for the person who lost it,”

154


THE LOST PENKNIFE.













said Charley. “It’s such a beauty of a knife, and maybe was
a gift or keepsake. Or maybe a little boy or girl bought it
with the money saved up for months.”

“Qh, bother!” exclaimed Richard, using his favorite word
when things didn’t go smoothly with him. “ What’s the us
of supposing all that? The knife is mine now. If I hadn’
picked it up, somebody else would. When a thing’s lost, it’s
lost, and there’s the end of it. If people are careless enough to
drop their things in the public road, they mustn’t expect the
finders to run all through creation to look them up. Finding’s
keeping the world over.”

“Tt isn’t according to the Golden Rule,” answered Charley.
“Let me read it.”




THE LOST PENKNIFE.

“Oh, never mind about the Golden Rule! What has that
to do with my finding a penknife ?” returned Richard.

“We shall see;’” and Charley, who had opened a New
Testament that was lying on the table, read: “As ye would
that men should do to you, do ye even so to them.”

“ Well, I don’t see anything about finding a penknife there,”
said Richard. “Do you?”

“Yes,” answered Charley.

“Then your eyes are sharper than mine.”

“Tf you had lost a penknife, and Tom Link had found it,
wouldn’t you be glad if he were to ask all around for the
owner, instead of keeping the knife and not saying a word
about it? Of course you would! And you would say that
Tom was a nice fellow—so unselfish and honorable; and all
because he had done as he would be done by—had kept the
Golden Rule.”

Richard looked very sober at this, for it brought the matter
home to him as he had not seen it before. There was some-
thing about this penknife in the Golden Rule, and he was
beginning to see it.

And now a gradual change began to come over his feelings,
for he was able to put himself in place of the one who had lost
the knife, and to feel sorry for the logs. He took it out of his
pocket and turned it over in his hands.

“Tt is beautiful,” he said, “and the person who lost it must
feel very badly. It isn’t my knife, though I did find it, that’s
clear.”

“ And you never could enjoy it,” said sister Nell, “ because
you’d be always thinking how sorry the person who lost it
must be.”

“Maybe I would. Anyhow, I’m going straight over to see
Mr. Ellis in the morning, and ask him if he lost it.”

And he did so.

156


LILY AND HER DOLLY.

“Why, Richard!” exclaimed Mr. Ellis, when he saw the
knife, a glow of surprise and pleasure on his face. “ Where did
you find it? It is one grandma sent to Horace for a birthday
present, and I lost it on my way home. This is his birthday.
I have been so annoyed about the loss.”

“Vm glad I found it for you,” said Richard. And he did
feel glad as he handed Mr. Ellis the beautiful pearl-handled
knife.

On the next day Richard received from Mr. Ellis a fine
four-bladed pocket-knife, worth, for real service to a boy, a
dozen such as the one he had found, and the pleasant note that
came with it made him, to use his own words, “ feel good.”
He could enjoy this knife, because it was really his own.
Nobody had lost it, and so no thought of what another had lost
could intrude itself and mar the pleasure of its use.

—_—_—
LILY AND HER DOLLY.

UR LILY!” So every one in the house calls her, from
Hannah, the cook, up to grandma. She is “Our Lily”
to each and all of us—dear, sweet, kind-hearted, happy
little Lily! Almost any hour in the day her voice may

be heard breaking out in pleasant laughter, or singing a
“hushaby” song to her dolly, or cheerily calling from hall or
stairway, from kitchen or chamber. She’s an active little body,
and, like the birds, keeps flitting about and making merry
with life.

One thing that makes Lily so dear to us all is her usefulness.
She is so ready to share with her brother and sister any of the
good things she has; and when other children come to the
house, she brings out her toys, and seems to take more pleasure
in letting her little friends play with them than in using them

herself.
157


LILY AND HER DOLLY. °

One day, Maggy Elder, who lives close by, came in to spend
the afternoon with Lily. Maggy is a nice little girl, but rather
quick in her motions, and not so careful in handling things as
she ought to be. Accidents often happen to her, as they do
with such children. They get into many troubles which
might be avoided. Lily had a new wax doll, with the softest
of blue eyes, that opened and shut. She carried it about as
tenderly as a mother would carry her baby, laid it down in the
softest places, and watched over it with a loving interest.

When Maggy came, Lily brought out this dolly. Her
visitor was in rapture over its charms, and reached out her
hands to take it.

“Hold it softly,” said Lily, as she gave the little beauty into
Magegy’s arms.

And Maggy did hold the doll gently at first. But soon she
began moving her arms about, and tossing dolly high up, and
then swinging her low down, until her clothes swept the floor.

Lily’s heart began to beat anxiously, for she knew Maggy
was a wild ao thing, and apt to forget herself.

“Take care,” she al gently.

“Oh,” cried Maggy, whose spirits were rising, “ “ wouldn’t
hurt Dolly for the world!” And then she hugged her so
tightly that Lily held her breath, expecting to hear an arm or
a leg crack.

“Dolly wants to go to sleep now,” she said, holding out her
hands.

“Indeed she doesn’t! She’s just as wide-awake as you are.
Just look at her eyes!” answered Maggy. And then she gave
another hug, whirling around as she did so. Crack! What
was that? Poor Dolly’s foot lies broken on the floor! Maggy
did not know she was so near the sofa as she wheeled about.

“Oh, what have I done!” she said, in great distress, as she
saw the broken foot.






aimed, taking the precious

xcel
But not an angry or rebuking





Lily e

“Oh, my poor Dolly!’
thing from Magegy’s arms.

word fell from her lips.



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THE KITTEN AND FALLING LEAVES.

“T didn’t mean to do it, Lily! Oh, I am so sorry!” cried
Maggy, the tears running over her face.

“T know you didn’t,” answered Lily, half sobbing, as she
struggled with her feelings. “It was only an accident.” And
stooping down she picked up the broken foot. After looking
at it carefully, she said,—

“Never mind about it, Maggy dear! I guess mamma can
mend it. And it’s just nice to think Dolly has no feeling, and
don’t have any pains as you or I would with a broken foot.”

Maggy dried her tears, and then they took Dolly to the
nursery and laid her in bed; and mamma was called to mend
the broken foot, which she did as skilfully as a surgeon. And
all the while Lily and Maggy stood with their arms about each
other lovingly, drawn closer together by their mutual interest
m the broken doll.

After that, I think Maggy tried harder than ever to be

watchful over herself, and to be gentler and more thoughtful.

THE KITTEN AND FALLING LEAVES.

EE the kitten on the wall,
Sporting with the leaves that fall,
Withered leaves—one—two—and three—
From the lofty elder-tree !
Through the calm and frosty air
Of this morning bright and fair,
Eddying round and round they sink
Softly, slowly: one might think,
From the motions that are made,
Every little leaf conveyed
Sylph or Fairy hither tending,
To this lower world descending,

160






















































































THE KITTEN AND FALLING LEAVES.

f







Mit
fun

Each invisible and mute,

In his wavering parachute.

—But the kitten, how she starts,
Crouches, stretches, paws, and darts!
First at one, and then its fellow,
Just as light and just as yellow;
There are many now—now one—
Now they stop and there are none:
What intenseness of desire

In her upward eye of fire!

With a tiger-leap half-way

“Now she meets the coming prey,
Lets it go as fast, and then

Has it in her power again:

Now she works with three or four,

Like an Indian conjurer ;
161


NIGHT-WATCHMEN.

Quick as he in feats of art,

Far beyond in joy of heart.

Were her antics played in the eye
Of a thousand standers-by,
‘Clapping hands with shout and stare,
What would little tabby care

For the plaudits of the crowd ?
Over-happy to be proud,
Over-wealthy in the treasure

Of her own exceeding pleasure !



N/IGHT-WATCHMEN.

O our young readers know what a night-watchman is?
Some years ago, before most, if not all, of them were
born, few large cities, like Philadelphia for instance, were
without their night-watchmen.

These were a sort of police who went around the street at
night to see that there were no thieves about, and to watch over
the safety of the houses, and of such people as were obliged to
go out at that time. Hach man had a certain part of the city
under his charge. On dark nights, before street-lamps were in
fashion, he used to carry a lantern. But this was a great many
years ago. Each watchman had a little box of a house, with
a peaked roof, usually on the corner of a street,where in winter
he had a stove by which he could warm himself. People used
to say that he slept there, too. It is not many years since these
houses were quite common in Philadelphia. They were called
watch-boxes, and drunken men would sometimes fasten the
door on the watchman inside, and then upset the whole concern.

These watchmen used to call out the time of night; after a

certain hour you would hear them all over the city bawling out
162
NIGHT-WATCHMEN.





















in a sort of a sing-song way, “ Past twelve,” or “past one,”
or “past two o'clock,” and so on until morning. And very
often they would at the same time tell the people lying in bed
what kind of weather it was; as “Past one o’clock, and a
dark, cloudy morning,” or the contrary, as the fact might be.
These calls sounded very odd to strangers, and J have known
persons to be frightened terribly at the queer noises the watch-
men used to make. We have our night-watchmen still, but
they are now called police, and they have no little houses to get
into, and they move about the streets very quietly.

In Japan, as you will see by our picture, the night-watchmen
still carry lanterns. These are made of gay-colored paper, and
. ust look quite pretty at night, as do the dresses of the men,
which are a sort of patchwork of cloth of every color. Our
picture shows them as they are marching out at night, each

one to go to the part of the city over which he is to watch.
168
IDA’S CHICKENS.

CaP ITTLE Ida Frost had always lived in the city, in a brick
house with pavement in front and a little yard at the
back. This yard had a little grass-plot in it about as
large as a sheet, with a border of flowers around it.

When the flowers were in bloom it looked very gay, but it was

not big enough for a little girl to play in, and if she even tried

it she was sure to hear,—

“Tda, be careful of the verbenas,” or “Ida, see how you have
broken the strings of the cypress-vine,” or “Ida, your dress is
brushing that rose-bush, and will break it if you are not careful.”

Her mother did not mean to be cross, only she did not like
to see her darling flowers injured. So after a little Ida would
come in and sit by the parlor windows and look out into the
street, or perhaps her mother would let her roll her hoop on the
pavement.

But the little girl needed more exercise and fresh air. She
began to get pale and thin, and the doctor said she must be
taken into the country.

So the father found a pretty cottage not far from the city,
with vines running over its porches and with borders of flowers
and rows of fruit-trees, and a fine large yard for Ida to play —
in. But she did not seem to care about playing, and would sit
quietly all day looking out of the window.

One day she was lying on the lounge with a book in her

hand. But she was not sleeping, and was “too tired” to read,
164


CHICKENS.

she said. Her father came in, holding a basket, which he
brought to her side.

“What do you think I have got for you here?” said he.

“TJ don’t know. Some strawberries, maybe.”

“No; you will have to guess again.”

“Qh, I can’t, papa, I’m too tired. Tell me, please.”

So her father uncovered the basket and showed Ida a dozen
beautiful white eggs, lying on a bed of soft cotton.

“Ts that all?” she exclaimed, in a disappointed tone. “Why,
I have eggs to eat every day, if I want them. I thought you
had something nice.”

“But these eggs are not to eat. They are to hatch into
chickens.”

“Into real live chickens! And may I have them for mine?”
165


IDAS CHICKENS.

cried Ida, with more animation than she had shown for a long
time.

“Yes, they are for you. I was talking to Mrs. Martin on
my way home, telling her about my ‘tired’ little girl, and how
I couldn’t get her to go out of doors at all. And she said she
would send you something that would please you, and would
take you out of doors if anything would. So she brought out .
this basket of eggs, and told me to hold them carefully so they
would not get spoiled for hatching.”

“ But how shall we hatch them, papa? We have no hen.”
Ida was sitting up by this time, with the basket in her hand.

“T declare, I never thought of that! No; we can’t hatch
them without a hen, that is certain.”

“Couldn’t you buy one?”

“T could buy one, but I couldn’t make her promise to sit
right away, and she might not be ready until the eggs were all
spoiled.”

“T will see what can be done,” said Ida’s mamma, who had
been listening and watching her little girl, and was pleased to
find that anything interested her. So Mrs Frost left the room,
but returned in the course of ten minutes, saying, with a smile:

“T have just borrowed a sitting hen for you from Mrs.
Wilkinson.”

Mrs. Wilkinson was their next neighbor, who had taken
quite an interest in the pale little girl who did not care to run
and play like other children. She had, moreover, a great many
fowls, and there was one among them which was very anxious
to sit.

“Well, I will go and fix a nest for her,” said Mr. Frost.

So papa made a nest, and for three weeks Ida watched and
waited as patiently as she could for the eggs to hatch. Mean-
time, her face began to look less pale, and her step was firmer

and quicker than it had been.
166


_IDA'S CHICKENS.

At last one morning she fancied she heard a little peep.
And Mrs. Wilkinson had to come out to make sure of it.
That lady put her hand under the hen, and drew out the
funniest, fluffiest little chicken you ever saw—at least Ida
thought so—and put it in Ida’s apron.

“Why don’t you leave it with its mother?” asked Ida.

“Because she might get off the nest with it, and lave the
chickens in the eggs to die.”

So Ida fixed a soft, warm nest in a basket, and set the ee
by the kitchen fire; and a happier little girl I think you never
saw than she was that night, when there were ten little fluffy,
yellow balls of chickens ready to put in the nest under their
mother. She fairly danced with joy, and her eyes sparkled as
they had not done for a year. The other two eggs were taken
out of the nest and thrown away, for Mrs. Wilkinson said—
and she knew all about such things—that they would not hatch.

I would like to tell you how this little girl watched her
chickens, and fed them, and took care of them, and how they
grew prettier and more cunning and tamer every day; but have
not the space. So I can only say that the bigger the chickens
grew, the fatter and rosier Ida grew; and her father used to call
her “ chick,” “ because she followed the old hen so constantly.”

But Ida’s chickens, when they got partly grown, did not look
quite like other chickens. Mrs. Wilkinson found her brushing
one of them one day with a hair-brush.

“ What are you doing, Ida?” she asked.

“T am trying to make this chicken’s feathers lie smooth. I
never saw anything like them.. They all grow the wrong way.
Papa says the chicken looks like my head when it hasn’t been
combed.”

“T don’t think you can get your chicken’s feathers any
smoother. It is a frizzled chicken, and its feathers will curl

up in spite of brushing.”
167


TRY, TRY, TRY AGAIN.

They were not all frizzled, however. Some of them had
feathers long and soft that looked almost like fur. These Mrs.
Wilkinson said were silky fowls. Ida did not know at first
whether she was really pleased or not to have her chickens so
different from others. But she soon became quite proud of them
when she found that every one who saw them admired them
very much.

A house had to be built for them, and before their little
mistress went back to the city late in the fall, they had laid her
a number of eggs, which made her happier, if possible, than
ever.

At last cold weather came, and Mr. Frost thought it best to
go to town again.

TRY, TRY, TRY AGAIN.

IS a lesson you should heed,
Try again ;
If at first you don’t succeed,
Try again:
Then your courage should appear ;
For if you will persevere,
You will conquer, never fear—

Try again.

If you find your task is hard,
Try again:
Time will bring you your reward—

Try again.
168










































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































All that other folks can do,
Why, with patience, should not you?
Only keep this rule in view,
Try again.
169




















i

(aa



























Hi i

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THE DEAF MICE.





















PEIN aS ese)


THE GREEDY MICE.

ID you ever hear the story of two little mice that were
deaf? No. Well, I am sorry if you are disappointed,
but I didn’t either. Such a thing as a deaf mouse I never
heard of, but I have heard of two little mice who were

so dreadfully greedy, that when they managed to steal a little
bit of cheese they forgot all about everything else; and their
mother’s repeated warnings of what would become of them, if
they didn’t correct the habit, were entirely lost sight of. On
this day they have forgotten everything else but cheese, and
just think what a dreadful fate awaits them; for even if they
do escape from the pussies, the doggies will be after them.
But I believe they will get off this time after all, for their
natural enemies are enemies of each other, and after frightening
mousey they will get to quarrelling who shall have whitey, who
is the youngest, for dinner, and so both of the mousies will
get away by jumping into a hole that is just over the edge of
the picture.

GOOD ADVICE FOR LITTLE ONES

Ut Y dear little child,
Be gentle and mild;
For what can you get
By passion and pet,
But sorrow and shame,
A very bad name,
The loss of your peace,
And guilt in its place?

170


SHAVING JACK.

HERE'S something going on,” said Aunt Lois, and the
click of her needles stopped. ‘“ They’d never be as still
as this if something wasn’t going on.”

“They’re reading, most likely,” answered Mrs. Barclay,
the mother of one of the children referred to by her sister.
But Aunt Lois shook her head. “ There’s something going
on, you may depend. Katy’s a perfect witch when she gets
started, and I saw this morning that she was let loose. She’ll

be into everything if you don’t look after her.”

“'There’s no harm in the child,” said Mrs. Barley. “Only
boiling over with spirits.”

“Exactly! Boiling over with spirits. You've said it. But
when a kettle or a child boils over, there’s apt to be mischief.
So V’ll just take a look after her.”

Aunt Lois put by her knitting and went out quietly. Ins
few minutes she came back with a broad smile on her kindly
face.

-“ Well, Pll give up!” she said. “That child beats me out!”

“ What is she doing?” asked Mrs. Barclay.

“Shaving Jack!” And Aunt Lois sat down, fairly shaking
with laughter.

But Mrs. Barclay did not join in her mirth. A slight pallor
came into her face, and she ran out of the room hastily. At
the word shaving there arose in her mind the image of a sharp
razor. But her fear was groundless. Katy had not done

lathering Jack when she glided into the chamber.
172




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THE PURSUIT OF THE BUTTERFLY.

“ What on earth are you doing?” she exclaimed, not able to
conceal the mirth that twitched at the corners of her mouth.

“Only shaving Jack,” replied Katy, with much gravity.
And she went on rubbing the brush over Jack’s face.

Mrs. Barclay turned the key in her husband’s shaving-case
to make sure of the razors, and then went back laughing to
Aunt Lois.

“She’s a limb,” said Aunt Lois, “if there ever was one. [
don’t know what will become of her.”

“'There’s no harm in the child,” answered Mrs. Barclay.

—————— fo —__—_

THE PURSUIT OF THE PUTTERFLY.

T shall not escape,” cries Frederick. “I will have that

butterfly.”
“ But take care! take care!” says little Emily. “ Look
at its beautiful wings. Your hard cap will hurt them.
Let me catch it in my pinafore.”

“You can never manage to get your pinafore over it,” says
Frederick. “Come, run on through the grass. If it flies over
the hedge it will escape.”

“Stop, stop, it is going to settle on that clematis,” whispers
Emily. “Do wait a moment. I can manage to catch it
gently.”

So Frederick stopped. The beautiful butterfiy had settled
on the white flower of a wild clematis in the hedge. Emily
had to hold Frederick’s cap with all her strength, or it would
have been down over the flower in a moment, but she wanted
to look at what the butterfly was doing. It was sipping the
sweet juices out of the flower with its long trunk—for a
butterfly has a trunk very like the great elephant’s, that it can

174


THE PURSUIT OF THE BUTTERFLY.

unfurl and dip down into the flower-cups to drink; and all the
time it quivered its four bright wings in the sun, and they
glanced and shone as if they were powdered with gold. They
were crimson, and blue, and black, and it looked as if the
butterfly enjoyed the sunlight, and liked to look so beautiful
while it sipped out of the clematis flower.

“Tt will fly away in a minute,” said Frederick.

So Emily softly put one hand over the flower, and with the
other quickly picked it off, and then enclosed both flower and
butterfly in both hands. .

“Now let us make haste home,” she said, “and show it to
Marianne.”


A HAPPY NEW YEAR.

ITTLE ones, I wish you joy,
Every day this New Year through,
In your school, your home employ, ~
In your merriest play-time too.

May your glad obedience cheer
Those you love and those who love you;

May you live in filial fear
Of your Father, God above you.

- Surely if you only knew
How much gladness you would find
If you were but brave and true,
And to deeds of dove inclined ;

How much happier school would be,
How much home itself would brighten,

And, from half her cares set free,
Mother’s anxious brow would lighten ;

You would cry at once for grace
Every evil path to shun ;
You would seek the Saviour’s face
Ere the set of this day’s sun.
176























































































ROMAN CHILDREN.

Days and weeks pass on with speed,
This New Year’s already flying,
Happy if you find indeed
Jesus for your friend undying.

Hark! He speaks in tender love,
“Let the children come to Me.
J will lead them safe above:
They my little lambs shall be.

“Twas for such my blood was shed,
Pure and happy I will make them,
And, when earthly days are fled,
I to endless joys will take them.”

ROMAN CHILDREN.

in Rome—that old and wonderful city—and put them in
a picture. And this is all we know of them. Beautiful
children like these may be seen, travellers tell us, every-
where in Italy, that sunny land so famous in song and story.
But children in our own dear land are far better off than
those in Italy. Lovely as Nature is there, the great mass of
the people are ignorant, and large numbers of their children
never go to school or learn to read. But it is pleasant to know

that a new order of things is coming about, and that schools for
178

‘
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ROMAN CHILDREN.



















all the children, rich and poor, will soon be found everywhere




BIRDS AND BIRDS’ NESTS.

I my young readers love birds as well as I do, they will not
consider it a hardship to follow me through a few pages, of
rambling thoughts about these songsters. If they do not
love birds as well, then I think there is more need that

they should go with me. So in either case I shall hope to
have their company.

T really do not see how any one can help loving birds. If I
should find a person who said he cared nothing for the music
of the orchard and meadow, I should certainly think there was
something wrong in the machinery of his mind.

Of all birds, I love the robin most—his notes are so cheerful,
he is so confiding, and builds his nest so near my door. Besides,
he is with us among the first in the spring. In the month of
April, the robin commences his nest. Watch their movements
in April, and you will see them, in pairs, flying about from
tree to tree, until they find a suitable place for their nest, and
then they set about the work of building. The robin’s nest
is formed generally of small sticks and straws, held in their
place by mortar. The inside is finished with a soft lining.

“Tt wins my admiration
To view the structure of that little work—
A bird’s nest. Mark it well, within, without;
No tool hath he that wrought; no knife to cut;
No nail to fix; no bodkin to insert;
No glue to join; his little beak was all.
And yet how neatly finished! what nice hand,
With every instrument and means of art,
And twenty years’ apprenticeship to boot,
Could make me such another? Fondly, then,
We boast of excellence, whose noblest skill

Instinctive genius shames.”
180


i



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BIRDS AND BIRD’S NESTS.


BIRDS AND BIRDS’ NESTS.

While the female robin is confined to the nest, the male
brings her food when she is hungry, and sits on the same
tree with her, or on one near by, and sings his song of
love from morning till night. The robin is a most devoted
husband.

There is another pretty bird, too, which is quite domestic in
its habits and preferences. I mean the blue-bird. It appears
about the same time with the robin in the spring, perhaps a
little earlier. The male sings sweetly, though not so sweetly as
the robin. These birds find a hole in some tree partly decayed,
and build their nests in the cavity. The woodpecker frequently
bores the hole in the tree for his own nest, and the next season
the blue-bird occupies it.

The black-bird has no very great musical talents, but the
beauty of his form and the splendor of his plumage almost
make up for this deficiency. By the way, did you ever notice
what a difference there is between the male and female black-
bird? The dress of the female is brown, and she is quite
homely compared with her mate. The black-bird has a trick
which evinces not a little cunning. When anybody comes near
his mansion, he will fly off the tree where his nest is, without
making any noise, and, if possible, without allowing himself to
be seen, and alight on another tree some distance from home.
Then he will set up a great clamor, as if his nest were on that
tree, and he was in great fear on account of his young.

A favorite author has well said,—

“The child who has heard the notes of the robin near his
chamber window, will feel their influence in after-life, as a holy
remembered thing. No tone of music shall fall on his ear like
that thrilling song in the dim twilight of early morning.
Encourage this love for these things of nature, ye who would
bring up yvur children in purity and peace. No after-teaching

can give you such holy feeling.”
182


THE OAK.

HE oak is the largest and most majestic of all trees. It is
the king of the forest. The growth of the oak is slower
than that of any other tree that grows in our country ; it
takes several hundred years to attain its full grandeur.

The timber of the oak is very tough and strong; it is much
used in ship-building, and is found in very old churches and
mansions. The fruit of the oak is the acorn; it is a kind of
nut held in a cup. Acorns are very pretty. In times long
gone by poor folks used to make bread of the acorn, but it is
now given to the pigs. The oak-apple or gall-nut is caused by
a small insect called the gall-fly. The bark of the oak is used
for tanning leather, and ink.is made from a kind of oak-apple

that comes from abroad.
183




TKI

HE summer sun shone on a very pretty picture. Little
Kittie nicely washed and dressed, her blue eyes bright
and eager, standing in the garden, her apron full of
flowers, and her little hand holding tightly the stalk of a

hollyhock.

Well, this morning mamma was very busy, and had left her
little girl alone a few minutes, and she had trotted to the door,
and everything looked so bright and pleasant she thought she
would take a walk. First she turned round and crept carefully
backward off the doorstep; then patter, patter went the little
feet through the open gate.

The grass was very green, the birdies sang, and buttercups
and daisies were plenty. 'To be sure, Rover, the great house-
dog, came rubbing against her, and down she tumbled, but she
was not hurt, and little did she care that the pretty pink and
white dress and apron were much the worse. She picked her-
self up and went stumbling through the long grass to a place
where the buttercups were thickest, and sat down awhile to pick
them. When she had her apron full, her dress adorned here
and there with a spot of green, she trotted on again. A tiny
field-mouse ran right over her foot with pussy in full chase.
Kittie started to run too, for she wanted to see whether there
was a nest with wee baby mousies in it; but pretty soon she
tripped over a stone, and down she went again, losing all her
flowers. Kittie cried a little then, rubbing her small brown
paws in her eyes, and by this time face and hands, clothes and
shoes, were not at all in trim to suit mamma. Kittie brightened
up, though, and found her way out to the road. Near by was
a wide, deep, rushing brook, that the little girl greatly liked,
but which was very unsafe for small travellers. Kittie thought

of the flowers that grew close beside it—large yellow cowslips
184
RITTIE.

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—and of the nice time she had down there with Cousin Frank,
throwing pebbles in the water. Oh, how they did splash!
Kittie thought she would go to the brook. On she trotted,
though a frog frightened her once or twice, but nothing harmed
her, and she spent a very happy hour by the water’s side.

At last Kittie remembered that mamma would be wondering
what had become of her, so she gathered up her flowers and
trotted home, a very tired but happy little girl.

185


DO SOMETHING FOR EACH OTHER.

O something for each other,
Though small the help may be ;
There’s comfort oft in little things,
Far more than others see.

It wants a loving spirit,
Much more than strength, to prove
How many things a child may do
For others by its love.

THE SISTERS.

’M sorry; but one of you will have to stay at home,” said
the mother. “Hannah’s father is sick, and I promised her
that she should go to see him; and I cannot take care of
Eddy all day.”

Of course she could not. You had only to look into her
pale face, and on her thin, weak body, to know that.

Her two little girls, Fanny and Alice, were standing before
her when she said this. She saw their countenances fall.

“JT wish it were not so,” the mother added, feebly ; “but I
would be in bed, sick, before the day is half over, if I were left
alone with Eddy. Some one has to be after him all the time.”

Fanny pouted and scowled, I am sorry to say. Alice looked
sober and disappointed. They went from their mother’s room
without speaking. When so far away that her voice could not
be heard, Fanny said, in a sharp, resolute tone, from which all

kind feeling had died out,—
186


THE SISTERS.

“T’m not going to stay at home, Miss Alice! You can make
your mind up to that.”

Alice did not reply, but sat down quietly. Her disappoint-
ment was keen, for some little girls in the neighborhood had
made up a small picnic party, and were going to have a
pleasant day in the woods.

“™¢ will be as mother says,” she spoke out, presently.

~“Tm the oldest and have the best right to go,’ answered
_ Fanny, selfishly. “And, what’s more, ’m going;” and she
commenced putting on her things.

A few tears crept into the eyes of Alice. It would fall upon
her to stay at home; she saw that. Fanny was selfish and
strong-willed, and, unless positively ordered by her mother to
remain at home and let her sister go, would grasp, as her own,
the pleasure to which Alice had an equal right with herself.
If the decision was referred to her mother, a contention would
spring up, and then Fanny would speak and act in a way to
cause her distress of mind.

“Tf mother were to make Fanny stay at home,” Alice said,
in her thought, “she would pout, and fling, and act so ugly
that there’d be no comfort with her; and mother isn’t strong
enough to bear it.”

The tender love that Alice held in her heart for both her
mother and dear little two-year-old Eddy was all-prevailing,
and soon turned her thought away from the picnic and its
promised delights to the pleasures and loving duties of home.

“T’m going to stay,” she said, coming back into her mother’s
room with a bright face and cheerful voice.

“ Are you, dear?” It was all she said; but in her tone and
looks there was a precious heart-reward for Alice.

In the afternoon Alice came in where her mother sat by a
window, with the cool airs of the late afternoon fanning her

wasted cheeks. She had a weary look.
17

9)




HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS.

Sad it is mothers and daughters must part again,
Ere of their meeting they’ve felt the full bliss!
E’en as I’m speaking the tears quickly start again,
Ag I remember how short the time is.
Foolish am I! My tears quickly drying,
With kisses and smiles let me welcome you home.
Now is no moment for weeping and sighing;
These are the holidays; daughter has come!
These are the holidays—
Brightest and best of days!

Daughter has come!
189


HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS.

“You have been very useful, my darling!” said the mother,
in a tender voice, as she laid her hand on Alice’s head. “TI
don’t know what I should have done without you. It has
been one of my weak days. But you look tired, dear,” she
added. ‘Sit down in that easy-chair and rest yourself. Come,
Eddy.” :

And she held out her hands for the child; but he clambered
into Alice’s lap and laid his cunning little head against her
bosom. Both were tired—loving sister and sweet pet brother.
It seemed hardly a minute before they were asleep; and as the
mother, with eyes that were fast growing dim, looked at their
tranquil faces and quiet forms, she thanked the good Father in
heaven for a gift so precious and beautiful.

HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS.

Cay ACK again, darling! oh, welcome to home again!
Pet, I have missed you this many a day ;
Now I have got you, and ne’er shall you roam again,
Till your school duties shall summon away.
Darling, you smother almost with your kisses!
Sweet! I am happy—lI have you safe here
On my bosom, my arms folded round you. Ah, this is
The brightest and pleasantest day of the year!
These are the holidays—
Brightest and best of days -

In all the year!
188


DISOBEDIENT HARRY.

C4{\¥ OW, Harry, my son,” said Mrs. Gray, as her little boy
started off to school one winter morning, “be sure and
not cross the mill-pond, but go over the bridge.”

Harry did not answer his mother, but ran off briskly.

He didn’t want her to think he heard. He wished to cross

the mill-pond on the ice, and had made up his mind to do so,

before his mother said anything about it. He took his skates,
determined to have a fine time. =

Mrs. Gray knew that Harry had heard her, and she expected
he would obey, although he did not answer.

But Harry did not mean to obey. He had been thinking
all the morning how pleasant it would be to skate over on the
ice. So he sat down on the bank and put on his skates. He
was sure it was hard enough to bear a wagon, much more a
little boy like him. And so it was in some places; but there
were fresh-water springs bubbling up from the bottom in many
places, and the warmer water from these kept the ice thin above
them, and through one of these thin places poor Harry broke,
ere he was half across.

“ Did he get drowned ?” you ask, almost holding your breath.

No, thanks to a kind and watchful Providence! Just as the
ice broke, a man saw him from the shore, and ran and pulled
him out. How frightened his mother was when the man
brought Harry home, all wet and cold, and full of shame for
the act of disobedience which came near ending in a fearful
death !

There is only one path of safety, children, and that is the
path of obedience. The moment you leave this, you are in
danger, and no one: can tell how soon some dreadful evil will

overtake you.
190












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DISOBEDIENT HARRY ABOUT TO CROSS THE MILL-
OUR FATHER IN HEAVEN.

UR Father in heaven:

We kneel as we say,

Thy name be all hallowed
By night and by day ;

And to Thy bright kingdom,
That we may all come,

Let Thy will, as in heaven,
On this earth be done.

Oh, give to us children
The bread that we need,

For which we ask daily,
As humbly we plead.

And as true forgiveness
To others we show,

Oh, Father in heaven,
Thy pardon bestow !

From each day’s temptation,
From evil and wrong,
Lord, keep us and guide us
Through all our life long:
For thine is the power,
The glory and might,
That can shield us and guide us
By day or by night.
192






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A MERRY HEART IS BETTER THAN MONEY.

HERE was once a poor man, a carpenter, who stood every
day, from earliest dawn, in his workshop hard at work ;
and, as he was one who put his trust in God, to pass away
the time he would sing many a hymn or innocent song,

accordingly as he felt inclined. And he had so clear and strong
a voice that the neighbors required no alarum to wake them in —
the morning.

But this greatly annoyed a rich merchant who dwelt near
198









A MERRY HEART IS BETTER THAN MONEY.

him; for he neyer could sleep before midnight, owing to his
anxious thoughts about his money, and very early in the morn-
ing he was awoke by this noisy, vexatious sing-song of his
neighbor the carpenter.

He reflected how he could put an end to this annoyance. He
could not forbid it; for singing, like praying and working, is.
the right of every man in his own house, with which no one
can interfere. He must use other means, then.

He sent for the workman, and asked him at what value he
estimated his singing.

The workman replied that he thought it was certainly worth
a day’s wages, as it made the day’s work itself so easy to him,

The merchant inquired how much that was.

The man replied; and it certainly was not a large sum which
he named.

Then the merchant said he would pay him a fone S wages
in advance; not for the singing, indeed, but that he should
henceforth sing no more, but keep a strict silence. And he laid
down the money ready before him.

The carpenter thought to himself it could not possibly be
easier earned; so he took the money and promised that he
would be as still as a mouse in his workshop.

When he got home with the money he counted it out full of
joy; and they were all good new coins—more money than he
had ever possessed at once in his life before. In the evening,
before he went to sleep, he gazed at his treasure for nearly an
hour; and at night he put it under his pillow, lest a thief should
steal any of it. At midnight he still had it in his head, and
thought about what he should do with it. And in the morning
when he arose it seemed to weigh down all his limbs like lead
—his head was weary with lying awake so anxiously, his hands
were heavy and lazy, and refused their usual service.

Ah! and he dared not sing!
194






FAN AND HER PUPPIES.

Time passed away slowly and tediously, so that he could
scarcely endure the day. Meanwhile he had been thinking the
matter over, and had come to a conclusion; for the man who -
stood at eight that evening in the merchant’s office was the
carpenter.

“Sir, with your permission,” he said, “here you have your
money back again; it is an evil spirit, which does not allow me
to sleep quietly.”

And before the merchant could say a word in reply the
carpenter was already outside the door, and singing, with a
clear, full voice,—

“A fresh and merry heart
Is worth more than money or wealth.
Trilirum, tralirum !”



FAN AND HER PUPPIES.

C¥i{I! What's all the rumpus in my room?” said Uncle Joe,
rising from his chair and listening.
There was a scurrying about and pattering of feet and
knocking over of things in Uncle Joe’s room, and no
mistake. :
“Tt’s Fan and her puppies, Pll bet a dollar!” and off went
Uncle Joe, we following. Sure enough, there were Fan and
her two babies, fat, roly-poly little fellows, as-full of life and
fun as they could be. Fan had the handle of Uncle Joe’s
riding-whip in her mouth, and her two puppies were trying to
get it away from her, tugging at the lash and fussing and
growling, while she held her head high, and looked down upon
them as happy and proud as any mother in the land.

“Well, you are a beauty, Fan!” said Uncle Joe, kindly;
195
FAN AND HER PUPPIES.

“and your puppies are just the nicest young dogs in the world;
but I can’t have you here for all that, nor let you chew up and
pull to pieces my new riding-whip. Here! give me that whip.”

But Fan didn’t see it just in that way. The whip was a
splendid plaything for her and her babies, and they were
having lots of fun. So she bounded away to the side of the
room, dragging her fat little puppies, who held on, sticking
their feet into the carpet, pulling back, and doing all the make-
believe growling they could. It was a pretty sight. Fan was so
handsome and graceful and happy, so full of life and freedom.

Over went a chair, down fell Uncle Joe’s cane, off went a
book from the table as Fan struck it in a bound across the room.
Things were getting serious.

“Wi! hi! hi!” cried Uncle Joe, while we laughed and
shouted; and after Fan he went, catching hold of the whip
and pulling it away from her by main strength. . The puppies
tugged awhile at the lash, but had to let go. Then they made
a dash for Uncle Joe’s legs and caught in his trousers, and bit
and pulled him in a jolly way that made us children laugh and
scream till we almost cried.

“Tt’s all very fine fun for you and the dogs,” said Uncle Joe,
“but it can’t goon in my. room! Here, Fan! Out with you!”
And he opened the door and pointed to the entry.

But Fan looked at her puppies, and then at Uncle Joe,
wagging her great bushy tail, and saying just as plainly as she
could,—

“Tt’s so nice here, and we’re having such a good time.”

“T know all that,” answered Uncle Joe, who understood dog
language as well as anybody, “but it isn’t the thing for my
room, and you must be off!”

Fan saw it was of no use—that Uncle Joe was in earnest—
so she dropped her head in a disappointed, half-sheepish way,
and went toward the door. But the puppies had no idea of

196








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following her. They didn’t understand Uncle Joe as well

she did.
197

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THE LITTLE EXILE’S SONG.

“Out with you!” he cried, giving first one and then the —
other of Fan’s babies a shove with his foot, tumbling them over
and over on the floor, while they growled and bit at his panta-
loons, and made a noisy time of it.

“Tl drown Fan’s puppies if she don’t keep them out of my
room,” he said, trying to make believe he was ever so angry.
But we laughed, for we knew he wouldn’t hurt a hair of their
heads. Dear, kind, Uncle Joe.

THE LITTLE EXILES SONG.

(y H, Vsabbo !* dear Vsabbo !
y I long so to fly
Where brave mountain larches
Hang tassels up high,

And sunshine laughs through them
From Italy’s sky !

Oh, Vsabbo! dear Vsabbo!
I’m pining to show

The children of cities
How oranges grow—

Ripe orange-fruits golden,
With blossoms like snow.

Oh, Vsabbo! dear Vsabbo!
Though far, far from me

Are thy fishing-nets drying,
Thy boat on the sea,

The heart of poor Gemma
Is always with thee.

* Daddy.
198








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THE LION.

SN’T he a splendid fellow!” said Albert Lee, as he turned
to the picture of a lion. “ What beauty, and majesty, and
strength! No wonder he is called the ‘King of Beasts,’
T’d rather be a lion than any other animal.”

“T’d rather be a lamb, or a dove,” spoke out little sister Helen.

“ Lions are cruel.”

“Oh, but I wouldn’t be a cruel lion,” replied Albert. “One
needn’t be cruel because he is strong.”

The children’s mother, who had been listening, now spoke,—

“No, my son; one need not be cruel because he is strong.
You have said the right thing in the right words. Nor, to
be a lion, must you become a beast; for there is no quality or
character in animals that does not exist in men.”

“TJ don’t know about that, mother,” answered Albert. “A
man can’t fly like a bird, nor live under water like a fish.”

“T said quality or character, my son; meaning what we have
in our minds. Every animal is known by its quality almost as
well as by its form. The lamb is innocent, the tiger cruel, the
fox cunning, and the ox patient. The lion has strength and
courage. He is the mightiest of all the beasts, and can destroy
them if he will. In the souls of men are to be found all the
good or evil qualities that exist in animals. The lion and the
lamb are there; the eagle and the dove; the tiger and the kid.
_ A lion-like man is one with a bold, strong, clear-seeing mind ;
one who, by his great mental strength and knowledge, has
power over other men. But this power may be used for good
as well as evil. Because a man has strength and courage, he
need not be cruel.”

“ God is called a lion in the Bible,” said Albert.

“Yes; in the Revelation of St. John He is called the Lion

of the tribe of Judah. And in one of the Hpistles, the devil
200


_THE LION.























































































































































































































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is called a ‘roaring lion.” So you see that the quality repre-
sented by a lion may be good or evil.”

“Then,” said Albert, drawing up his slender body to its full
height, “let me be a lion. Not a cruel lion; but brave and
strong, and not afraid of any other beast. No wolf shall hurt
this little lamb ;” and he put his arm tenderly around Helen.
“T will be gentle to the innocent and weak, but a terror to the
cruel ones that seek to do harm.”

“The lion’s life, my son, is not one of ease and comfort.
The King of Beasts has many to dispute his power.”

“But he is stronger than them all, mother,” replied Albert,
with glowing cheeks and eyes full of manly courage.

“Yes, the true lion-quality is strongest in the human soul,

and, whether it be good or evil, bears down all opposition.”
201


NOW, snow everywhere!
On the ground and in the air,
Tn the fields and in the lane,
On the roof and window-pane.

Snow, snow everywhere!
Making common things look fair,

Stones beside the garden-walks,
Broken sticks, and cabbage-stalks.

Snow, snow everywhere!
Dressing up the trees so bare,
Resting on each fir-tree bough,
Till it bends, a plume of snow.

Snow, snow everywhere!

Covering up young roots with care,
Keeping them so safe and warm,
Jack Frost cannot do them harm.

Snow, snow everywhere!
We are glad to see it here;
Snowball-making will be fun

When to-morrow’s work is done!
202






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DOLLY’S BEDTIME.

C4|{ ER name was Dolly, but she wasn’t a little pink-and-
white thing made of wax. No, she was a real Dolly,
CIN of flesh and blood, and she lived in a pretty little white
cottage, overrun with sweet wild-roses, that held up their
heads and blossomed in the sun from early June until late
September.

There were red roses and white roses hid in the dainty
bowers of green, but Dolly loved the white roses best—perhaps
because she was so like a white rosebud herself.

No flush ever crossed her pale cheek, and the light of health
never bloomed there. People used to stop at the gate, and
watch the little lame girl, who went up and down the garden-
walk on her old-fashioned crutch, and think there never was
such a patient face as hers, but no one ever thought of calling
it beautiful. —

Sometimes grandpapa would take her long rides in her little
carriage out among the trees and wild-flowers, then mamma
would wrap her up warm, and give her little girl a sad, loving
kiss, for she knew that soon the angels would call her to their
beautiful home.

By and by the gay, golden summer had gone away, and
autumn came, with its crown of scarlet leaves, with its wide
delicious orchards sweetening the air with the smell of apples
and pears and great mellow peaches; and other children ran
and gathered the fruit in big baskets, and laughed away the
hours as they turned toil into pleasure with their happy hearts ;
but little Dolly no longer went up and down the garden-path
on her little crutch, or out riding in her little carriage. Her
patient little face was only seen through the window; but she
was cheerful and sunny-tempered all day long, and every day,

in spite of pain and disappointment.
204


DOLLY’S BEDTIME.







You could hear her song in the morning, when the mist lay
over the hills; and at noon when the sun had pierced the mist
with his golden arrows, she would still sing—glad little bits of
melody, that floated up through the still air like mellow music
over quiet lakes.

But at twilight, when the gray shadows began to fly about

the cottage eaves, then Dolly grew still; for then pain racked
205



46


THE LITTLE HAREBELL.

her tiny frame and drew cruel lines on the fair little face, until
you would scarcely have known it for the face of a child.

Her mother used to hold her in her arms and sing to her
pleasant lullabys which she had heard her mother sing years
before, when she was a little girl like Dolly; and Dolly always
longed for bedtime to come that her mother might sing away
her pain.

Day by day she grew worse, but the dear mother was always
at hand to smooth the aching brow and quiet the quivering lips
with a tender kiss.

But one evening, just as the bright sun sank to rest behind
the hills, Dolly’s last bedtime came, and with her mother’s
voice still ringing in her ears she fell asleep to wake in heaven.

THE LITTLE HAREBELL.

ELL me, little harebell,
"Are you lonely here,
Blooming in the shadow
On this rock so drear,
Clinging to this bit of earth
~ As if in mid-air,
With your sweet face turned to me,
Looking strangely fair?”

“Lady,” said the wild-flower,
Nodding low its head,
“Though this spot seems dreary,
Though the sunlight’s fled,
Know that I’m not lonely,
That I ne’er despair—
God is in the shadow,

God is everywhere.”
206








pe ie eee
Sey Enea



MY DOG TRAY.

HIS is my dog, good honest Tray,
Looking as if he meant to say,—
“T wish that I could speak, I do,
That I might tell my love for you !”
My dog, I understand it all,
It really needs no word at all ;
Ready to serve me and obey,
Watching and guarding night and day,
Your trustiness and eager zeal
Show very plainly what we feel ;
And deeds, dear Tray, much better are

Than any fine professions far.
207




THE BEAR.

UR picture represents three polar bears at war over the
body of a seal. I think from appearances the one on the
iceberg will get the better of the other two. These
animals live in a country where it is always winter.

They are very fierce and powerful, but not so strong as the
grizzly, which dwells in North America.

The grizzly bear is a formidable antagonist. Few Indians
will follow him alone to his lair. His strength is enormous;
he can kill and carry a buffalo bull. Fortunately his move-
ments are comparatively slow, and his huge form is upraised
upon his hind legs before he grapples his adversary. Woe be
to that adversary should those great fore-paws ever encircle
him! Once only have I known a man live to tell the tale of
that embrace; his story was a queer one. He had been attacked
from behind; he had only time to fire his gun into the beast’s
chest when the monster grappled him. The Indian never lost
his power of thought; he plunged his left arm into the brute’s
throat and caught firm hold of the tongue, with his right hand
he drove his hunting-knife into its ribs and side; his arm and
hand were mangled, his sides were gashed and torn, but the
grizzly bear lay dead before him.



One step and then another,

And the longest walk is ended ;
One stitch and then another,

And the largest rent is mended.
One brick upon another,

And the highest wall is made ;
One flake upon another,

And the deepest snow is laid,
208
































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































POLAR BEARS AT WAR OVER THe BODY OF A SEAL.


THE LITTLE SOLDIER.

Ca¥ HAT shall it be?” said grandpa, as Freddy brought him a
soft piece of wood. “ A windmill, a shovel, or a see-saw ?”
“T want a sword,” answered Freddy, drawing himself

up straight and tall, and pushing back his shoulders.

“A sword!” exclaimed grandpa, in mock astonishment.
“ Good gracious! What are you going to do with a sword?”

“Fight,” said Freddy. “ That’s what swords are for. Pm
going to be a soldier.”

“ And kill men ?”

Freddy lifted his large, clear eyes to grandpa’s face—eyes
that were very soft and tender—and looked at him half in
wonder half in rebuke.

“T ouess I can be a soldier and not kill men, grandpa, can’t
I?” He spoke with a slight quiver of indignation in his voice.

“What else is there for a soldier to kill?” asked grandpa, as
he began to whittle away at the stick Freddy had given him.

“ He can kill dragons, can’t he, and bears and wolves ?”

“Yes, I suppose so,” answered grandpa, speaking a little less
confidently.

“Very well, sir;” and the boy spoke up strongly, as one who
feels that he has the best side. “T’m going to kill dragons, and
bears, and wolves.”

“Oh, you are?” said grandpa. “Then you shall have the
handsomest sword J can make. This is the nicest kind of wood,
even-erained and soft. But where are the dragons and wolves?”

“Oh, never do you mind, grandpa. Just make me the sword
and Pl) find ’em,” returned Freddy.

“Up in the garret ?”

“Why, no, grandpa! Bears and wolves don’t live in garrets.”

“Maybe they’re down in the cellar.”

“*Tain’t no use, grandpa,” said the little fellow, throwing

back his head and looking ’cute and knowing.
210

&


“THE LITTLE SOLDIER.

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“No use in what ?”
“Tn your poking fun at me.

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bears and wolves live!
“Oh, you know all about it, then? Very well. You shall

have the sword.”
And grandpa whittled away, Freddy looking on and watching
the rough piece of wood as it gradually changed its form, grow-
ing smooth and shapely under the knife.
_ © Were you ever a soldier, grandpa?” asked Freddy.

“Yes.
“ And did you kill men?”
Grandpa’s mild face grew sober. He did not answer Freddy

until the question was eee Then he ‘sald, in an absent
kind of way,—

Just as if I didn’t know where

211


THE LITTLE SOLDIER.

“T don’t know anything about that.”

“Didn’t you try, grandpa ?”

“T tried to conquer the enemies of my country who came
across the sea to destroy it,” said grandpa. “A great many of
them got killed) We had to kill them or they would have
killed us. It is wrong to hurt other people if they let us alone,
but if they try to hurt and destroy us, we must defend ourselves.
So long as there are bad people in the world there will be fight-
ing, for unless the good defended themselves, the bad would
utterly destroy them.”

By this time the sword was finished, and then grandpa
showed Freddy how to hold and use it. Before he got through
with the exercise, Freddy was feeling every inch a soldier,
marching about and cutting and thrusting in splendid style.

“Té would be bad for the dragons and wolves if they were to
show themselves now, wouldn’t it, Freddy ?” said grandpa.

“T’d cut them all up!” shouted Freddy, slashing around
with his sword.

After the little fellow had marched about, and cut and thrust
with his sword to his heart’s content, he came and leaned
against grandpa, saying,—

“T guess I’ve killed ’em all.”

“Tt was hard fighting, though, and my little soldier is hot and
tired,” said grandpa, smiling, as he lifted Freddy upon his knee.
“When you grow up to be a man, I hope you'll be as strong
a fighter as now, and slay every dragon and bear and wolf that
comes in your way.”

“Dragons and bears?” returned Freddy. “It was only
make believe! There won’t be any dragons and bears to fight
with when I’m a man.”

“T don’t know about that,” said grandpa. “By dragons and
bears I mean things that do us harm, that will destroy us unless

we destroy them. Now, the world is full of these dragons and
BO)




GOOD COUNSEL.

bears. They are our enemies, and we must fight and conquer
them, or they will destroy us. So you see that every one has to
be a soldier. Some have to fight with greediness, some with
pride and envy, some with intemperance, some with anger, and
some with things low and mean and miserly. These are our
souls’ enemies, and will destroy all that is good in us, and make
us miserable forever, unless we fight against them as brave
‘soldiers and utterly destroy them.”

As grandpa talked he felt the head of his brave little soldier
pressing more and more heavily against him, and looking down
into Freddy’s face, he saw that he was asleep.

“The Lord make thee a brave and good soldier in the battle
of life, my boy !” said the old man, lifting his eyes reverently.
And there he sat for a long time, holding the child in his arms
as something very dear and precious.

GOOD COUNSEL.

UARD, my child, thy tongue,
That it speak no wrong ;
Let no evil word pass o’er it;
Set the watch of truth before it,
That it do no wrong.
Guard, my child, thy tongue.

Guard, my child, thine eyes;
Prying is not wise;
Let them look on what is right;
From all evil turn their sight ;
Prying is not wise.
Guard, my child, thine eyes.

218


THE BOY'S WISH.

THINK many of the little folks will say with Willie,
when they look at the beautiful picture on the other page,—

“Well, I think I’ll bea soldier ;
Mother, don’t you think I’m right?
It must be so fine, I fancy,
With a gun and sword to fight—.

“Fine to see the flags all flying,
And to hear the cannon roar—
Fine to get a silver medal
When the fighting is all o’er.

“‘Shan’t I like to be a soldier,
Charging with my gallant men!

T’ll come home with hat and feathers—
You won’t know your Willie then.”

“ Ah, my son, if vou must battle,
Be a soldier of the Lord;

Let your foe be sin and evil,
And the Bible be your sword.

“Your reward will be the brighter,
More, my son, than earthly gain:
Life with Jesus everlasting,
All of pleasure, nought of pain.”
214






























































































































































































































































































































































































THE LITTLE SOLDIER.


EVA'S FAIRY STORY.

CF STORY, please, sister Grace,” said Eva, as she clasped
her plump arms around her sister’s neck. It was the
pleasant twilight hour, when books and work were laid
aside and father would soon be home to tea.

“What sort of a story, dear?” Grace asked, caressing the
little one.

“Oh, a fairy story—something about the fairies living
among the flowers, you know.”

Grace thought a moment.

“TJ will tell you one mother used to tell me when-I was a
little girl, not older than you are now. It is called ‘The Dew-
Drop.’ Will that do?”

“Oh, yes! tell me that story.”

And Grace began,—

“Once upon a time a dew-drop came softly down through
the air one morning, and rested on the white edge of a lily-cup.

“<«T am a very little thing and weak,’ it said, ‘but I would
like to do some good.’

“ Just then a breeze came by and whispered to the dew-drop,
‘Come get on my wings, and I will carry you away over fields,
and woods, and mountains, and you shall see wonderful things.’
And the breeze bent down to the dew-drop and tried to lift it
from the flower; but the dew-drop held fast to the lily and
answered,—

“*T don’t care for sight-seeing. I must do some good; then
I will be happy. LPve been up in the sky among the clouds,
and have looked down upon mountains and fields, on great
cities built by men, and on the ocean. But all this did not
make me happy. The sweetness of life is to do good.’

“Then the breeze laughed out, and said, ‘You silly little

thing! A single dew-drop is of no account. You can’t do any
216


EVA'S FAIRY STORY.

A Sor

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Si





good. Come! get on my wings for a sail through the air, and
enjoy yourself while you can.’

“And the breeze made a dash at the dew-drop, intending to
bear it off on its wings. But the dew-drop clung to the lily;
and the lily said, softly, ‘Drop down into my bosom, and then
you will be safe.’

“So the dew-drop loosed her hold and fell down into the
lily-cup.

“<« Tear dew-drop !’ whispered the lily, tenderly, ‘how I love

you ! and she drew it away down into her heart. ‘I shall be
217


EVAS FAIRY STORY.

happier for youi coming, for now, with your help, I can perfect
the rich odors that I am making, and send them forth to
sweeten the air.’

“And even as the lily spoke all her leaves thrilled with a ney,
joy and she breathed sweetness on the air. Just then came by
a zephyr, which caught up some of the odor, and carried it
into the open window of a poor cobbler who sat silent at his
work.

“ Ag he smelt the delicious fragrance, his thoughts went back
to his childhood, when he played knee-deep among flowers in
the meadows; and forgetting the dulness and weariness of life,
his lips answered to the memories of youth, and he sang to
himself a song of other days.

“The voice was feeble and broken, but there were ears to
which it came bearing sweetness and refreshment.

“Tn the room aboye that in which the cobbler worked lay his
sick wife. She had been feeling lonely and discouraged. But
when she heard the good old man singing at his work, tears of
thankfulness came into her eyes, and lifting her heart to God,
she prayed, saying, ‘Kind Father of us all, give him patience
and strength. I am no longer a help but a burden to him.
O my Father, let his faithfulness have the reward of peace.’

“And then she heard the voice, still singing in a low,
pleasant way, coming nearer. Footsteps sounded on the stairs.
Her husband looked into the little chamber, and kindly said,
‘Do you want anything ?”

“* Nothing,’ she answered, in a patient voice.

“ And then he went down to his work again, and for a whole
hour he sang to himself the old songs he had loved in the far-
off times, and his sick wife lay in her bed listening to his voice.
And there were peace and rest in her heart.

“Of all this the dew-drop and the lily knew nothing, but

God knew.”
218




































FROST PICTURES.

H, sister, get up just as quick as you can,
And come to the window, and see
What the artist, Jack Frost, in the silence of night
Has been painting for you and for me!

There’s the loveliest lakelet, with trees on the shore;
And here is a dear little pond,

With lilies and fern-leayes all fringing it round,
And towering mountains beyond.

And yonder’s a castle with turrets and spires ;
Oh, hurry, don’t stop for the cold,
For the sun is just peeping up over the hill,

And the silver is turning to gold!
219


THE FIRST SNOW STORM.

Co¥ AKE up, children, and see what has been going on while
you have been sleeping,” said mamma, to Charlie and
|" Minnie, one bright winter morning.

A beautiful sight burst upon their view. In the east
the clouds were of the loveliest crimson and gold, and the earth
and trees, which were bare and brown when the children were
tucked in their little beds the evening before, were now covered
with a pure, white mantle of snow. On the sill, close beside
the window, were two of the dearest little snow-birds.

The children clapped their hands with delight when they
saw them, and wanted to bring the birdies into the nice warm
parlor. But when they opened the window they flew far, far
away.

“ Now, Charlie,” said Minnie, who always thought of her
little brother’s pleasure before her own, “I can draw you to
school on my sled, and you can wear your little red mittens and
make snow-balls; and some time we will go out and make a
snow image, that perhaps will turn to a little live girl and play
with us, as the one did in the story that mamma read to us.”

_ That would be splendid,” said Charlie; “only we wouldn’t
let her come into the warm parlor, for fear she would melt
away.”

“See!” said Minnie, “the apple-trees, loaded with snow,
make me think of the way they looked last spring when they
were covered with blossoms. How white and beautiful they
were then! Don’t you remember how we picked some of the
pink and white flowers from the lower limbs, and put them
with our blue violets to carry to the teacher ?”

“Yes, I remember,” said Charlie; “but what will become
of the dear little violets now, and the buttercups, and all the

flowers which you said had gone to sleep in the ground to wait
220
















































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THE CAT THAT SAVED THE BABY.

till spring? The snow well freeze them, so that they will never
wake up and grow again.’

“No, indeed !” a the pleasant voice of their mother, wha
from the next room had heard her little chatterboxes.

“No, indeed! This pure white snow will not freeze the
roots of the pretty flowers that are fast asleep in the brown
earth beneath it. It will cover them as with a white fleecy
blanket, keeping out the cold frost and winds, and they will
sleep snug and warm as you do in your little beds, my darlings.

“Ffow good and kind in our heavenly Father to send this
beautiful white snow to cover the sleeping plants and flowers,
that they may rest securely until the warm spring sun awakes
them !

“But come, my little ones,” continued the kind mother, “we
must get ready for our breakfast, and after it is over we will go
out and feed the birds. They would have a hard time of it to
scratch for their breakfast through all this snow.”

THE CAT THAT SAVED THE BABY.

H, mamma! Just see this picture!” cried Annie May, as
she sat turning the leaves of a new book. “Here’s a
pussy-cat pulling a lady’s dress. What is she doing?”
Mrs. May took the book, and after reading a page,
said,—
“Why, this 7s wonderful! The pussy-cat you see in the
picture saved a baby’s life.”
“Why, mamma! Sayed a baby’s life? Tell me about it.”
“The book says it is a true story, and was told to the writer
by one who saw it,” replied Mrs. May. “ A lady was sitting
by the fire, when her cat came running into the room in a
hurried, distressed kind of way, and looking up imto her face
began to mew piteously. At first, the lady, being busy with
222




THE CAT THAT SAVED THE BABY.

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her work, paid no attention to the cat, but the animal would not
be put off. She continued her piteous cries, running to the
door and then back again to the lady, showing more and more
distress. At last the cat stretched out one of her claws and
pulled her mistress by the apron. The lady, beginning to feel
alarmed at this strange conduct, started up, when the cat ran
before her into a small wash-house. And what do think she
found? Why, her own two-year-old boy in a tub of water,
and nearly drowned. The cat had saved the baby.”

“Oh! What a dear, good cat!” exclaimed Annie.

“Yes; [think you may well say a dear, good cat,” answered
her mother. “If it had been a dog, we should not wonder so
much, but for a cat to do a thing like this is strange indeed, for

cats do not usually show much affection or intelligence.”
228
THE OLD COUNTRY HOUSE.

HERE it is, my child,” said father. I think that his
words fell into a little half-doze into which I had dropped,
for we had ridden at least twenty miles since we left the
cars, at the little brown depot by the side of the river.

So, as it drew toward night, I was tired betwixt the car and the
carriage ride, and a drowsy mist began stealing over me, as the
mists did over the great mountains on the right, when my
father’s words eee me back suddenly into a keen, strong
life.

I sat up straight, of a sudden, and looked out. My heart beat
so fast. I saw the blue vapor of the smoke as it rose slowly up
through the bare trees, and a moment later we dashed over the
little brook-bridge, and the house came in sight—the gray house
with the gambrel-roof that: I had never seen, but that I had
heard of so long and often that it seemed familiar as our own.

A great house, wide and low, a little back from the street,
with the bare trees all around it, and the roof and ground white
with snow.

This old country-house, this old gray, gambrel-roofed farm-
house, was the one where my father had been born, and I was
coming home to it now in my ninth year, because almost the
saddest thing which can happen in this world to a little child
had come suddenly to me: my mother was dead—my mother,
with her pale, sweet face, and the soft, brown hair that shaded
it; my mother, with the tender smile upon her lips, and the
love in her deep blue eyes; my mother, whose sweet, tender
voice seemed still to call to me softly, though I knew how dark
and cold and silent was the grave where she lay!

So my father had brought me home to the old house here
he was born, and to the old grandmother there, whose heart he

knew held for me now the warmest place this side of heaven.
224




















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE OLD COUNTRY


WILLIE’S HAPPY DAY.

We drove up to the gate; papa lifted me out swiftly and carried
me up the little gravel path into the great, wide hall, and here
she met me—my grandmother.

I looked up in the wrinkled face of an old, old lady ina
black dress and a snowy cap, who bent down and took me up
suddenly, and kissed me, and then cried.

“Oh, Edward, my boy, is this the child?” she sobbed.

“This is the child—the little motherless child,” said my
father, and then he went out suddenly without so much as
shaking hands with her, and again my grandmother cried over
me. And from that hour I loved her. :

I felt at home at once in the old house. I went through its
wide, low, still rooms before it was dark. I followed the girl
when she went out into the yard to call the chickens to supper.
I saw her scatter the small corn-like flakes of yellow snow
among the great flock of chickens that crowded around her ;
I saw the boy going to feed the cows, and I wanted to go out
and see the little white calf inside the barn, but it was too late,
they told me, and I must wait for another day.

And so I lived on all my boyhood in that dear old house,
and now, in my manhood, long often for its peace and quietness.



WILLIE’S HAPPY DAY.

C4 { AVE you had a happy day, Willie?” asked Mrs. Caswell
of her little boy, as she sat down one pleasant winter
evening and took him in her lap. They lived about
twenty miles from Boston, and she had been in the city

all day, shopping.

“Yes, mamma, only I missed you. But you know you said
~226




XS |



MINNIE AND WILLIE POSTING THE LETTERS.



WOM
WILLIE’S HAPPY DAY.

the day would go fast if I kept busy, and I did. First, there
was our nice ride home from the station. Then Minnie and I
went and posted the letters you gave as, and then we went to
see Johnny Sheldon—you know he has been sick and is not
well enough yet to go out—and we carried him some oranges
and apples papa gave us this morning. You would have liked
to see him, mamma, he was so pleased. "When we came home
it was almost dinner-time, and, after we had ours, I fed puss
and Royer, and the doves and chickens. Minnie hemmed the
new sails for my ship, and I mended her doll’s table—one leaf
was off. Then we played out-doors till it was time to go for
you, and we had another nice ride.”

“Tt has been a well-spent day, Willie dear; that is the
reason it has been a happy one. Was there any hard place in
it—any time, I mean, when you found it hard to do right?”

Willie thought a moment:

“Yes, mamma; when Minnie asked me to put on her table-
leaf, I wanted to play menagerie—I didn’t know she was going
to hem my sails—but I thought I ought to please her, and I
am glad I did.”

“ And I am glad, too, my boy.”

“There was another time, mamma—when I felt very angry
because I couldn’t find my top, and I thought Sarah had swept
it out. But I didn’t say a word, only to whisper, Help me!
and the bad feelings went away, and after-awhile I found my
top just where I had left it myself, in your room.”

Willie’s mother kissed him tenderly as she said,—

“My dear. boy, you have won two victories to-day—one over
selfishness and one over anger. No wonder it has been a happy
day. But you must be watchful, Willie, or to-morrow may be
very unlike it. And remember that the will and power to do
right are from the Lord alone, and in oo) temptation look to

nan for strength. He will never fail you.”
228


Pe
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ca

SUSIE’S ROBIN.

USIE is in a brown study. What is she thinking about,
so intently, as she sits alone in the woods, with her hands
folded in her lap, while the sunlight pours a golden glory
around her, and tinges her rippling brown hair ?

Beautiful in their wavy greenness are the trees and rushes;
blue and silvery the little brook winds noiselessly on its way at
her feet, and the crickets chirp to her from their mossy bed.

All this beauty Susie sees and enjoys, but a questioning and
almost troubled thought causes the shadow in her eyes. She is
doing battle with herself Shall I tell you why? At home,
in the sunniest window, hangs a clean, roomy cage, and in it is
Susie’s dearest treasure, a robin. She had found it, when a very
little bird, on the ground in the garden; too young to fly, it
would soon have died but for her tender care. How dearly she
loved the brown-winged stranger! And soon it ceased to flutter
in her little soft palm, and would eat dainty morsels from her

mouth. As soon as it was strong enough she bought a cage,
229


SUSIE’S ROBIN.

and all through the happy days that followed, her little darling
grew more tame, and would wake her in the early morning
with its twittering; but, as the warm spring days began to
come, the little bird drooped, and would stand on its perch and
look out longingly at the budding maples.

Susie fancied that its eyes were less bright and the chirp was
almost a sigh; this hurt her tender little heart, and she spent
many hours by the cage trying to bring back somewhat of its
glad spirit, but all in vain.

One morning, when it was warm enough to open the windows,
Susie heard a great fluttering and chirping. On looking out at
the cage she saw a dainty little redbreast talking to her bird,
and seeming to beg it to come out and share its freedom; but
the cruel bars were very strong and it was of no avail to beat
the tender wings against them, and it soon sank exhausted in
the bottom of the cage. Then Susie knew what all the sadness
and drooping meant—the little bird was pining for its freedom ;
but it was hard to part with it now, after all her care and
trouble, and the woods were so large she should never see it
again, after once the cage door was open, and the restless little
wings skimming their way through the blue sky.

And this is what is troubling Susie, as she sits alone by the
brook; but right conquered at last, and rising, she followed
the well-worn path toward her home, resolved that the little
captive should be caged no longer, and that its evening song
should be one of glad freedom. :

How much dearer than ever before to Susie seems the little
bird, as she lifts the bright cage from its hook ; and tears are in
her soft blue eyes, as she thinks how lonely it will be without _
her morning greeting. I will take the cage to the woods, Susie
says to herself, and then perhaps my darling will light on a
branch near by, and sing me a little song of thanks.

Back to the woods go the dainty feet. Soon a spot is reached
230


SUSIE'S ROBIN.

where the grass is very green, and the branches of the alder-
bushes grow very near the ground; here Susie opens the cage
door, and with a cry of gladness the little bird flies from its

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gilded prison, and lighting upon the nearest bough, sings as
though its little throat would split. Susie stands with the empty

cage in her hand until the song is finished and the bird has
231


MY LITTLE BROTHER.

flown far out of sight, then she turns and goes toward home.
Why is it the grass is less green, and the shadows deeper and
longer? It is only that Susie’s eyes are filled with tears and
she can hardly see the narrow path; but they are not tears of
regret, only of sadness, that she has gone home without her
robin.

Every day finds Susie in the same spot among the alder-
bushes, hoping to catch a glimpse of the bright eyes and brown
wings of the little wanderer. For many days she watched in
vain, until at last she heard a fluttering and chirping among
the bushes, and pulling them aside she saw Mistress Brown-
wings sitting proudly on the daintiest little nest, in which were
fou tiny eggs. One day followed another, and the eggs were
hatched; then how proudly did the mother stand on a twig
above them, and chirp and twitter, with her saucy head first on
one side and then on the other. Dear little Susie, you have
your reward now in seeing the love and joy of that bird-mother ;
and I am sure, could she talk, she would tell all those dear little
birdlings of the dear mistress who so tenderly cared for her
when helpless, and in due time opened her prison door and set
her free. ;

MY LITTLE BROTHER.

HAVE a little brother, he’s only two years old ;

To us, who dearly love him, he’s worth his weight in gold;

We often play together, and I begin to find,

To make my brother happy, I must be ever kind.

And I am very gentle, when in the fields we play,

And he laughs and shouts with pleasure when I cover him
with hay ;

And I must never tease him, nor ever angry be,

But always love my brother, that God has given to me.
282




































































































































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COVERING LITTLE BROTHER WITH HAY.


THE LUCKY-BAG.

HE lucky-bag! What is that?” cried a chorus of young
voices.
“T will show you,” said Aunt Fanny.
Aunt Fanny was one of the nicest aunts in the world. |
So thought her little nephews and nieces. She it was who told
nice long stories and who invented delightful new games for
their amusement when they were tired of all the old ones.
And that was just the case with them now.

It was Christmas evening. There was quite a collection of
children at Grandpapa Davis’s—cousins, all of them—who had
come with their parents to spend the holidays. They came
every year, and every year the number grew larger, until it
was well that Grandpapa Davis’s house had plenty of room in
it to hold them all.

“ Aunt Fanny, please tell us a story.”

Now Aunt Fanny had foreseen just such a time as this—it
_always did come every Christmas evening—and so she was
ready for it.

“T have a new game for you. It is called ‘The lucky-bag.’”

“The lucky-bag! What is that ?”

Aunt Fanny went out of the room, and presently returned
with a gayly-figured chintz bag, tied with a bright red ribbon.
She hung the bag by a string to a nail she had already driven
in a doorway. | ; .

“Now, children,” said she, “ that bag is filled with nice things,
and you must each earn the right to help yourselves. Mary,
you are the oldest: I will bandage your eyes and give you this
stick, and after turning around three times, you must see if you
can hit the lucky-bag with the stick. You may have three
trials. If you succeed in hitting the bag, you will have a right,
at the end of the game, to take something from it.”

After Mary’s eyes were bandaged she turned around slowly
. 284


THE LUCKY-BAG.



































































































three times, and then tried to hit the bag. Little Lucy and
Alice stood by the doorway watching her, while Grace, Anna,
and the rest gathered around their aunt.

The first time she failed, but hitting the side of the doorway,
she gained an idea of the position of the bag, so that the second
trial proved successful.

“Very well done, Mary. Now, Gracie, let us see how you
succeed.”

Grace’s eyes were bandaged, and she turned round the three
times, and so completely lost herself in so doing that when she
attempted to strike the bag she stood with her back to it. The
children all laughed heartily, and poor Grace did not succeed

in hitting the bag at all.
285


THE RAIN.

Then it was Clara’s turn, and, wonderful to tell, she hit it
the first trial.

They each took their turn with the stick, and when they
were all done, Aunt Fanny opened the lucky-bag and told
‘ Mary to try her luck in drawing from it. She put in her hand
and drew out a very prettily-dressed doll. She looked at it
rather scornfully, as she had given up doll-playing for a long
time—at least six months. Clara drew out a package of
candies, which pleased her better, and which she generously
divided with the rest, and little Alice drew a very handsome
needle-book containing thimble and scissors. Mary and Alice
made an exchange at once, and so both were satisfied.

When all the lucky ones had put their hands in the bag,
then they began the game over again, and kept it up until the
bag was empty.

THE RAIN.

EE, the rain is falling
In the dusty street ;
-} See the clouds dispersing
Blessings fresh and sweet.

See, the cooling shower
Comes at God’s command;

Brightens every flower,
Cheers the parchéd land.

When the rain is over,
Then the painted bow,
O’er the cloudy hill-top,
Will its colors show!
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THE CANARY BIRD.

CI LITTLE girl named Caroline had a charming canary
bird. The little creature sang from early morning until
Cc evening. It was a very beautiful bird, of a bright yellow,
with a black head. Caroline gave it seeds and green
vegetables, and at times a piece of sugar, and every day fresh
and pure water. .

But all at once the little bird began to droop; and one morning
as Caroline came to bring it water it lay dead in its cage.

The little girl raised loud lamentations over the beloved bird,
and wept bitterly; but the child’s mother went and purchased
one with colors still more beautiful, and which sang as sweetly
as the other one, and placed it in the cage. But the little girl
wept still more when she saw the new one.

Then the mother wondered greatly, and said, “My dear
child, why do you weep? Why are you so very sad? Your
tears will not call the dead bird back to life again, and here
you have another equally as beautiful.”

Then the child said, “ Ah, dear mother, I have acted
unkindly toward the little creature, and I have not done all for
it that I could and ought to have done.”

“ Dear Lina,” answered the mother, “you have tended it

_very carefully.”

“Ah, no!’ replied the child. “A short time before its
death, I did not bring it a piece of sugar which you gave me
for it, but ate it myself.” The little girl spoke with a heavy

_hear+
238








The mother did not smile at her self-reproaches, for she
recognized in them the voice of conscience in the tender heart
of her gentle child.

239


THE SKIPPING ROPE.

Ca{> ESSONS now at last are over,
Books and slates are put away ;

Hymn attentively repeated,

Copy without blot completed,
Now’s the time for fun and play .
Lessons done with cheerful spirit
Bring the sure reward of merit,
Smiling face and heart so gay ;

In this bright and smiling weather,
Merrily they all together,
With the skipping rope will play ;
And if only Tom and Polly
Will come too, it will be jolly !
Here they are now, foot it lightly,
Hand in hand they skip so cy
Bees are humming,
Summer’s coming,
Birds are singing, as they’re bringing
Twigs from many a distant tree ;
Lined with down, and moss, and feather,
Where they'll sit and chirp together,
Oh! how snug those homes will be!
O’er the ropes so lightly skipping,
O’er the grass so lightly tripping,
The children are as glad as they.
Lessons done with cheerful spirit,
Bring the sure reward of merit ;
And remember, too, that they
Who work hardest day by day,
Always most enjoy their play.
240




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Peau AND POLLY SKIPPING ROPE.


PUT YOUR PAW UP!

OME here, children, and I’ll tell you a little story about a
pussy-cat named Mew-mew. She was a very good puss,
and never stole the cream which cook put on one side,
nor frightened Gyp the canary, who used to sing so

loudly from his cage in the window. 0; she used to sit and
purr, purr, cosily on the rug before the fire in winter, or lie in
her mistress’s lap blinking at everything about her.

She had one fault, however, and that was a very rude habit,
and one which no pussy-cat, and certainly no little boy or gil,
ought ever to indulge in. What do you think it was? Can’t
you guess? Well, it was this. When she was a little sleepy
or hungry she used to yawn with her mouth very wide open.
She could not help that, because hungry and sleepy people
can’t help yawning; but the dreadful part of it was that she
never put up her paw in front of her wide-open mouth !

Well, Mew-mew lived with a little girl who was fond of all

sorts of animals, and one of her pets was a little yellow-hammer,
a small bird with a yellowish and blackish coat.
_ Well, this little bird, whose name was Pippin, was allowed to
fly about the room quite freely, and Mew-mew never hurt him,
for he was a great friend of hers, and they had grown up
together. Pippin used to pretend to peck at Mew-mew’s tail,
and she would pat at him gently without putting out her claws,
for she would not have hurt him for the world.

One day in the winter Mew-mew was dozing cosily by the
fire, and hoping she would soon have bread and milk, and
Pippin was hopping about the floor, or flying up on the picture-
frames, or looking at himself in the glass.

They had been going on comfortably like this, and their
little mistress was sitting in a chair by the fire, when she made
a little movement with her foot, near which pussy was lying.

This disturbed Mrs. Mew-mew, and so she roused up and
242


Bi



PUT YOUR PAW UP!









stretched herself, and then gave herself a good washing all over ©

with her tongue, which is pussy-cat’s soap and flannel, you
248


OUR LILY.

know; and by that time Pippin, who was tired of playing
alone, came down on the rug and hopped in front of her, wait-
ing for her to play. But Mew-mew was lazy; and when she
had done her washing she folded her tail neatly round her, and
gave, oh! such a great, long yawn! One would have thought
her head must have split in two; and she never put up her paw!

And then, before you would have time to count one, Pippin
had flown into her mouth; and before puss. knew what had
happened, her mouth had shut again. But oh! sad to say, she
had bitten off poor little Pippin’s head! She sat staring before
her as the poor little yellow body tumbled on the floor, and then
ran away into a corner and sat huddled up there, looking so
unhappy ; and her mistress could not scold her because she had
not done it on purpose, and because for days afterwards she
went about the house looking so wretched.

And now that you have heard the story of what may come
of this rude habit, I hope none of you, my dear little boys and
girls, will think of yawning, however sleepy or hungry you
may be, without being very careful to “put your hand up.”



OUR TIL.

Cay ERY full of life and play
Is our Lily; ©
Busy all the livelong day,
Here and there and everywhere,
Is this little maiden fair.

Helping mother mind the house,
Goes our Lily ;
Now as still as ‘any mouse,
Then with skipping-rope she plays,
On the pleasant summer days.
244.



O UR LILY.

Soon the books and slate are brought
By our Lily ;

And examples hard are wrought ;

Other lessons, one by one—

Studied well—and school is done.

Then, with little skipping feet,
Goes our Lily

Up the broad and pleasant street,

On her music-lesson bent,

Practising to heart’s content.

Then at home returns again
Small Miss Lily;

Through the sunshine or the rain,

Ready now, at quiet play,

In the house awhile to stay.

Now her doll, with garments rare,
Brings our Lily—

Charming doll, with coal-black hair!

And she cuts and fits and sews

Multitudes of dolly’s clothes.

So you see the livelong day .
Little Lily,

Busy at her work and play,

Tired enough to sleep quite sound

When the sleepy time comes round. _

And with loving hearts we'll pray
For our Lily.

May God guard her night and day,

Guide her wandering feet aright,

On through darkness into light !
246


THE CHETAH.

N most countries we hunt animals with dogs, but in India,
that wonderful country, antelopes and other animals are
hunted by means of a kind of leopard.

The chetah, or hunting-leopard of India, is smaller than the
usual leopard, being about the size of a large dog. In its wild
state it lives in the lower branches of trees in forests. The
chetah can be taught to hunt like a dog; and when it has been
properly trained it is taken out for a day’s hunting in the
following manner :

The chetah is placed in a kind of tumbrel or open cart, and
247


generally fastened with a chain; for its temper is uncertain,
and, like all the large cats, it never quite loses its savage nature.
A hood is kept over its eyes, and it is carried along in the cart
until some animal, generally an antelope, appears in view.
Then the antelope is shown to the chetah, whose hood and
chain have been taken off, and the hunting-leopard at once
starts off in pursuit of the prey. The antelope can run faster
than the chetah, but it becomes so terrified at the sight of its
fierce enemy that it stumbles and totters and cannot exert its
full speed. So in time the chetah comes up with the poor
antelope, leaps on its back, and pulls it to the ground. Then
the hunters come running up with the chetah’s hood and chain,
and entice it away from the fallen beast by giving it a piece of
meat. Then it is led back to the cart by the chain, with the
hood over its eyes, and is kept chained up until another antelope
or deer appears, and the chetah again starts in pursuit of it.

The chetah requires to be carefully watched, like a savage
dog, and would not be at all a good playmate for children.









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2a3ae4ea009d7478411fd243020cbdd1
95d5c7ce0fce7407a24085a7c97f3e1da42cbf67
'2011-12-13T00:03:19-05:00'
describe
'315' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAABB' 'sip-files00006.txt'
4dcb151d0e586264def60d4d2224f4ee
858b81c19bb334141cceb226badb2a439e6158b8
'2011-12-13T00:02:49-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'35976' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAABC' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
38eb69df96702a28c888735f2e486d89
46062f23ddb75597d4c7ee3c5d5d8e71795ca8e0
'2011-12-12T23:59:59-05:00'
describe
'685187' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAABD' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
7902a45a868f67a9fffc321f66a74825
cfa1e9cb630154a4f5b8a1c4a27b2ff08117fa38
'2011-12-13T00:05:46-05:00'
describe
'136192' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAABE' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
6957d521a998186f39c0dbf8e7060791
7ab069efcc12e34eebe772f3f504619efce0e06e
'2011-12-13T00:00:27-05:00'
describe
'1077' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAABF' 'sip-files00007.pro'
ba4ee7886601eae86d3631e3eb755db1
6a5e18008b33a80e67979283fa2086c50acdc973
'2011-12-13T00:02:25-05:00'
describe
'54818' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAABG' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
b68e446c91852a94c5664895809e2d9f
af45fc5469893ad4e56d90f2d196acfe2a3a7a5e
'2011-12-13T00:02:04-05:00'
describe
'16465700' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAABH' 'sip-files00007.tif'
7aef257c7834fec10d4b1b1a892ea19f
b0936d8e82c1bd24f2695f0e1d2a2477b69552b4
'2011-12-13T00:00:46-05:00'
describe
'127' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAABI' 'sip-files00007.txt'
fe1718bde49984afdebcfcdd71567927
66a50e3b07ba02406d0bc9481b2da99b91d37c4a
'2011-12-12T23:58:14-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'31632' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAABJ' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
e7c117ac08085502ac3a2868eafaddd7
2ed18511b31b6e35227002d79d8b7ed9b32680ed
'2011-12-12T23:59:21-05:00'
describe
'701161' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAABK' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
b50b8cec11feacad62769675dfb2a6c6
3e61f4e5fbbf195465a64093d041892b8609c59e
'2011-12-13T00:02:55-05:00'
describe
'143781' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAABL' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
c8fa1b912c3e8dc03d5d3014c9b974f2
6443f1172c2a02c26d7080da32edd4cb07e588fb
'2011-12-13T00:05:19-05:00'
describe
'49944' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAABM' 'sip-files00009.pro'
9b85b8def52d8463a4d32f77f74ac4bd
7379016556b9a7e4dce75a30c0afeecb02a65d44
'2011-12-12T23:56:52-05:00'
describe
'54575' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAABN' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
f4f09d1c9ebcd53a8ec1404e052cd254
38668dc6a4d3bb13dce61a585887b7386d943b01
'2011-12-13T00:04:00-05:00'
describe
'16848772' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAABO' 'sip-files00009.tif'
1dc04a7d152f6e2e0c1ec326b0ce355a
957ecd43b84bf335a500212b2a0917a88481d690
'2011-12-12T23:58:04-05:00'
describe
'2084' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAABP' 'sip-files00009.txt'
be9aabf32d9407e0b73200f49b30c25c
01afb4c6ac2f259215c4b1a7e85f5cad25730ed4
describe
'29817' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAABQ' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
0f448638c2207fea174746bd97990f3d
4cf86d160cc290f453cd76efd1e658c7b163a3b3
'2011-12-13T00:00:26-05:00'
describe
'701077' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAABR' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
103d637cff92f96292c2227cfb04bceb
48e16ba4b8695a629eb5ddec24c7369cf28bd75e
'2011-12-12T23:57:05-05:00'
describe
'139811' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAABS' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
4364dbf04c2153145ed04e1a9512deea
100b731380879d06193f06dbb0beee09b53601b9
'2011-12-13T00:01:25-05:00'
describe
'58259' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAABT' 'sip-files00010.pro'
80327667944d87e00d5f7987e3aa2e12
ddd2052b55f39e45859ef8a14ca6a1adad24164f
'2011-12-12T23:58:49-05:00'
describe
'53021' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAABU' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
a85ba690cdc5c529d5ed0020b981c720
5d5c0e3a09dc44a3732e5c9389aafbda1f53c20e
'2011-12-13T00:03:26-05:00'
describe
'16848732' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAABV' 'sip-files00010.tif'
b15036ed13b51428378a098371708016
2fc1f07c0e2a1e6b43652b4f7fc928e0b8619656
'2011-12-13T00:00:11-05:00'
describe
'2494' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAABW' 'sip-files00010.txt'
88b3265a9095ae7b982e04fe7df9b7b9
bd5bb29bd0794aa61a1f74d5c43b9801802c38ad
'2011-12-13T00:05:38-05:00'
describe
'28991' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAABX' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
cf3e22f59dc0a36afdd8cd740ccfdfac
f5e464065847c14cef37d6acfc158078a46f229d
'2011-12-12T23:58:22-05:00'
describe
'701181' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAABY' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
79c9bef95c1af9883fec8718eb574766
74ae7dd95d902803bdc115ed52ba81e8c6505397
'2011-12-13T00:02:39-05:00'
describe
'130168' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAABZ' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
0aff9d1f1fd24136c2b8e6a310730b03
7c55ffac6a7e971a0f22da258aef4567c224b4e1
'2011-12-13T00:00:02-05:00'
describe
'32007' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAACA' 'sip-files00011.pro'
0045c2465b895400f462b3ed72669200
2e327196a98b064d6e37bf15b799d34c8f39f814
'2011-12-12T23:57:15-05:00'
describe
'52106' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAACB' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
f3df23950b92136b5f22af6dd6f3486f
39ba594be097fb78bcd0469756746715456c2b0b
'2011-12-12T23:57:56-05:00'
describe
'16848980' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAACC' 'sip-files00011.tif'
e142f0f3c3a4652ec06912c59f3f454a
bceb53447bfaaa1a108270addd0992d453c3ac83
'2011-12-13T00:02:07-05:00'
describe
'1348' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAACD' 'sip-files00011.txt'
d07f29da5dc15b15b7b6ea7496711d6c
4d0f7c511430e2195b99ce3a932c6d16309b8649
'2011-12-13T00:01:18-05:00'
describe
'29835' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAACE' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
8d825a518d1025f8b652d6802e6b240f
5e1c4298fbb8a717a431e5f25858071626be49a2
'2011-12-13T00:03:00-05:00'
describe
'701192' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAACF' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
f019330f56116f6db8047ab3a69eeb20
a5ecca031fada506bed499a3164f1ccfd3976c08
'2011-12-12T23:58:56-05:00'
describe
'160611' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAACG' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
08594e894c78ca884cfb52a3d34e9d9d
8728447ef49df01a8380185f08fa9b8cee76f3f6
'2011-12-13T00:00:17-05:00'
describe
'45428' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAACH' 'sip-files00012.pro'
41062fbb2006a24ce87271b43838a374
eedde8c9d37f7acb4d8402cd6fd7858e27fc4494
'2011-12-12T23:57:41-05:00'
describe
'60218' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAACI' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
8ab8f5c3e59e95b8fddc016b0d957683
ad552fb6f4214ec23ffaedf7955efcf8828b3478
describe
'16849628' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAACJ' 'sip-files00012.tif'
dce480ccb225567952493d2b3b0a8ae9
c4837b91802fd7094a9c8f07e36fcbaaed4aeb06
'2011-12-13T00:01:01-05:00'
describe
'1820' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAACK' 'sip-files00012.txt'
6f0fd43a127bd52755307162adcf46b1
97903e95ba4ee1de5e7d9fd90035b1e96b5679d6
'2011-12-13T00:05:30-05:00'
describe
'32030' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAACL' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
a2a42a5131802983c95faf74e497b195
79d30929de8f7d200888348a0112ce3b73d8a669
'2011-12-12T23:58:28-05:00'
describe
'701186' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAACM' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
74ba2e537d215d77454cb6fe9079e202
3557f1a81bef3820f000ee7ba7b48b8d5efb25eb
'2011-12-12T23:57:55-05:00'
describe
'182945' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAACN' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
6269839bdcdb7c577459254185122bdd
8a22c2cc69c6bad1b121ed0e25476981cd8db73e
'2011-12-13T00:00:57-05:00'
describe
'62358' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAACO' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
cc0835b142ec0d6782a2ea655b246868
10319a327882f12c85d31d77ee782a510a97c15f
'2011-12-13T00:03:20-05:00'
describe
'16850524' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAACP' 'sip-files00013.tif'
19e352e2eb1a90d237dec256ea491713
b61248b44827b08921490fc7340d8997df93a2c9
'2011-12-13T00:03:10-05:00'
describe
'689858' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAACQ' 'sip-files00013a.jp2'
c27657a871d368972eca1f190cab2ddb
44d4fa54238cbe048bd04de7db8f4e41c84f11e3
'2011-12-13T00:03:22-05:00'
describe
'99660' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAACR' 'sip-files00013a.jpg'
3219b49780d091d9db3f7eb98d45a3bd
bf9c55e7883df57473780336619d93a3b00a913a
'2011-12-12T23:57:31-05:00'
describe
'20089' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAACS' 'sip-files00013a.pro'
ca616a0995d7f0c9a662fa74f54d6416
af8744f7360444b5d00a07326d08513ce6a53696
'2011-12-12T23:59:41-05:00'
describe
'43247' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAACT' 'sip-files00013a.QC.jpg'
8a1a19e6bfa88e0552323841fb429a62
4767fd9a567fdddf639ee4bb8e4f94b70200bc68
'2011-12-12T23:59:02-05:00'
describe
'16579424' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAACU' 'sip-files00013a.tif'
d9d5622d4b634a07207171d1e40c73d0
a5700951ba7b0d43097d4559e5fa12ea18e1c1c8
'2011-12-12T23:56:55-05:00'
describe
'1041' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAACV' 'sip-files00013a.txt'
d463c0a78eee54bffe8a5e673fb4de25
8e9f41f1ff2fd68f5049433902b73338f8e11d7f
'2011-12-12T23:57:19-05:00'
describe
'26870' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAACW' 'sip-files00013athm.jpg'
c1fc36a6355724ea8e1ea2ca3859851d
9dae0b190c68399af86f29543f776cbd381ca01d
describe
'706582' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAACX' 'sip-files00013b.jp2'
d1f217f6f3978496bb8e4e17ced4f9e1
97675290deabc35fc00f48492c8e277d5f3e37f4
'2011-12-12T23:57:50-05:00'
describe
'126565' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAACY' 'sip-files00013b.jpg'
d8e2673ffda8b3dc12eec44b33e0bd45
bfba6684549a115650bc0955e9ad65c61438c99a
'2011-12-13T00:03:45-05:00'
describe
'7684' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAACZ' 'sip-files00013b.pro'
5f74c4a4ccc947560c35435182a0f7f0
da88698213ce38ff3d169ac4733d1f066d8f1f16
describe
'50424' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAADA' 'sip-files00013b.QC.jpg'
83016e13d8f0a06bdb7223ec7ab3723b
c7ff5b1707bea39aab6070b3fbf3c123c4ab00b8
'2011-12-13T00:02:58-05:00'
describe
'16978688' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAADB' 'sip-files00013b.tif'
cd4a912fab1a0ee3b7e7f3424306bda7
4c3906e5b2602c8cadf18f29d4ac012ead2d237b
'2011-12-13T00:04:06-05:00'
describe
'396' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAADC' 'sip-files00013b.txt'
b1e76493e4ff9b63628bcda4fcc8c341
9dbfa594668078466a161a2681c23f08f02345f2
describe
'29666' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAADD' 'sip-files00013bthm.jpg'
8982506c97d26ed396260621b14cef35
cf58ef2b972529b61baa87543afe945e7bc749f2
'2011-12-13T00:02:30-05:00'
describe
'33269' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAADE' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
d012690d22eb61a2a4d487181e0e36b8
5eb438acd81a45f1c9ff291621bf0326a289d591
'2011-12-13T00:04:10-05:00'
describe
'701196' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAADF' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
aa2f446d8669f60afab90e63f02ff796
04971510e0345792cf07e485b0fc955073d8fecb
'2011-12-12T23:58:54-05:00'
describe
'98779' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAADG' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
4fce74285cabaa2dde8b3948c77064a1
ac341d4cfd979667f9a5cb9363e1876476afe143
'2011-12-13T00:01:12-05:00'
describe
'21935' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAADH' 'sip-files00014.pro'
0a5f58d5165afbb733a4df6eaf09073e
576c645bcaaab023bd95c5fe1aac2a9205718a95
describe
'43368' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAADI' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
a0920edb384946dd2c4c8e43074cd6cb
c477d2ee5bc836d84bb2953ea82167ade8058db8
'2011-12-13T00:05:33-05:00'
describe
'16847800' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAADJ' 'sip-files00014.tif'
ac37f13a2dbcc1611b5ad0c56f866551
2795dfbc371268d7e58a279bcca7c2d031da6ae8
'2011-12-13T00:05:27-05:00'
describe
'1159' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAADK' 'sip-files00014.txt'
311c215c5eb8db7faf3fb70d21c132a9
8a23f54b6eb8a1dc4b898852b996fc247fc35b22
'2011-12-12T23:57:40-05:00'
describe
'27097' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAADL' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
d5b808b78b3e50b6cd68cfb5c51247ca
8bb1a06795b0c8f54f1d9cdfef027327793f0b83
'2011-12-12T23:57:13-05:00'
describe
'700917' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAADM' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
f9f64530456f138fc290b1a227a9c4a9
f4ea82ff5c721c215893e964fac13434c5085ff7
'2011-12-13T00:01:04-05:00'
describe
'141639' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAADN' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
a9bd52aba54c327b1cfa85999f4d703f
5aa1e38441946cd4161748ca847f95651dcb4023
describe
'7530' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAADO' 'sip-files00015.pro'
c9202b6edd0afb283c6858429580f656
2b0497de2829c1ed7eae6ad186d715c59d30c13f
'2011-12-12T23:59:37-05:00'
describe
'51421' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAADP' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
e3b4bb5528182005d0f89414b620b00d
9f21e5358e0a9745e501a7e7812b78f825096d63
'2011-12-13T00:00:55-05:00'
describe
'16848792' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAADQ' 'sip-files00015.tif'
3116c90cdfc39cb10bdaacfdda102e49
ee9dc745737ad9bf3e61b0c82ca7d4db0a3c524b
'2011-12-13T00:03:02-05:00'
describe
'314' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAADR' 'sip-files00015.txt'
aae6d275890124339b6e36d046382378
5f866e759749b713e5b7b85f5f1098499d81e59f
'2011-12-13T00:02:57-05:00'
describe
'29593' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAADS' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
d18b50a2d28acfdd5077549ad80d8376
5548827755c7c19ad3976a18996e442d11ffae98
'2011-12-13T00:03:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAADT' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
d0fcf812ad2911a5f98a9a8ffe0e7328
4544c5e3b526d55d7b65d7598a70c4f5d08e659c
describe
'145354' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAADU' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
e30b687a7a38683a4bed7c619bbcd6dc
b0775d704c8fe8061091bb1fd0ddd68a949ce392
'2011-12-13T00:05:18-05:00'
describe
'39542' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAADV' 'sip-files00016.pro'
06f67988f14467275fb5b2e352a82895
440106d80c3299ef60908fd3adce05bf2cfbc462
'2011-12-12T23:58:23-05:00'
describe
'54249' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAADW' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
0d9281d8df25c229c664029fbc324d89
196cbb252275a3681fcf02a9f3f2e7805f76d51e
'2011-12-12T23:57:26-05:00'
describe
'16848904' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAADX' 'sip-files00016.tif'
175516ce5c67b020dc868aed1d7c3291
36ea5bc8e6c520e6789fa15eeef01cb4b984a257
'2011-12-13T00:00:35-05:00'
describe
'1732' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAADY' 'sip-files00016.txt'
49598658ec08f3a8f213463bc608ac90
523d5d1f6b47a411b82d021be69673b79a686341
'2011-12-13T00:00:51-05:00'
describe
'29874' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAADZ' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
3d5bcd9109f6b4c212e588487ac0a5ef
2886d715e3fb5d47d577c0b8c8dff39a967cbbfb
'2011-12-13T00:00:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAEA' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
e064b3d98f215e500ee89c70e3b05c71
61121b5bd8b66031551e9ffaf219f56086f6ffb9
'2011-12-12T23:58:20-05:00'
describe
'167719' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAEB' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
2f601cfeaf397795231e3474d2974190
8c4ef0285b156ccdac3536c415fec840b3b19cae
describe
'2466' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAEC' 'sip-files00017.pro'
00e493d9d2f21174765ae3712ecdaef5
3fca43ba4e87ff9732b3973a0a919296ca1622c4
'2011-12-13T00:04:15-05:00'
describe
'55369' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAED' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
2fb9b07eb061ae1be65297ea1fd5a5c6
8c704369a009719590dc189d7599126861a3c888
'2011-12-13T00:03:49-05:00'
describe
'16849420' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAEE' 'sip-files00017.tif'
286d3ff7eabb2c753dc2a03a9b91042d
9237075b1ce0bd0daa179bd84ba2cd9b694ac564
'2011-12-13T00:05:03-05:00'
describe
'191' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAEF' 'sip-files00017.txt'
ab7e59f45de65f746e71fcbbd4fbc07e
f8c9044be424c56ba2e527f8fb7f7dced818e5c7
'2011-12-13T00:04:55-05:00'
describe
'30781' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAEG' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
769bbbed8b1376e233fc553c91c25325
b3f1eeed1b7a3887d0d3fa63cb987dfac7814938
'2011-12-13T00:03:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAEH' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
5d34f581a2696207b431e22a040adb62
0693f6db63df978cb3d70c1fc000eebc9506e14a
'2011-12-12T23:57:35-05:00'
describe
'153581' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAEI' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
67142e103a28131b9b466228b13d0ace
a69a3a91112dda14cf006001c03c1f9cbe3b1bf6
'2011-12-13T00:01:39-05:00'
describe
'48181' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAEJ' 'sip-files00018.pro'
63243f160e5e99d185aceff78aeb186e
3a238976a7390c46c27d41106d93768dc259ed23
'2011-12-12T23:59:07-05:00'
describe
'58038' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAEK' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
050b7c1b1f6b2bb2d3bbbf91dbdb040b
ea6d05a256232e2e57c04cb04597fd35e34097e7
'2011-12-13T00:00:31-05:00'
describe
'16849204' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAEL' 'sip-files00018.tif'
098bcbd763f9f49d195c24df86f6dee4
edd6eb0cec0c291a028e9fa26809e9c614ae7721
'2011-12-13T00:02:06-05:00'
describe
'1940' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAEM' 'sip-files00018.txt'
8dc78e9015b89b940434e65174f1f270
3aae8b9c4782ce4b8ea4ac504d7789e365987a65
'2011-12-13T00:03:09-05:00'
describe
'31120' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAEN' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
5182a35fe25b3cf8c2f923e4b292e628
c64a3fbc443f1b6adbdc70129ce608a10fd344ba
'2011-12-12T23:57:43-05:00'
describe
'701191' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAEO' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
272ebc4bdcfec56fa655784647004345
b0f1a5f30ef2166921c41fbfb095ecc58b1cf081
describe
'157713' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAEP' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
5397d9f660e3f60c35122799edcf7717
f9fd1114282a9ec92fd6399c7d81bf14e347a9ef
'2011-12-12T23:58:17-05:00'
describe
'42162' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAEQ' 'sip-files00019.pro'
c35cad2b274a818fbb0b0d735f054f99
9e6e8796d8d02e0f75e0c44adf812130873979cd
describe
'59295' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAER' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
d0d57de2670c71d4bcc565afe715bcf2
d1932e22204f06de043454bbbf3f2f106d2f308b
'2011-12-13T00:01:32-05:00'
describe
'16849696' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAES' 'sip-files00019.tif'
17436662a5705d08e94bff1630870172
c921c272dba8f4708fb6406dabd03314398438c3
'2011-12-13T00:04:46-05:00'
describe
'1704' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAET' 'sip-files00019.txt'
80f2953a66ef38dfa09bbbdf4f572a7a
54a500877ac74e2cd0852b8997ed4acbd3cb0d34
'2011-12-13T00:01:21-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'31516' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAEU' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
2a8f33f43de7c4d5dad58d368c6b69e3
8810c816b14d06db2566065d341011e71210fe73
'2011-12-12T23:58:13-05:00'
describe
'701085' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAEV' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
799f785f2b76dd7b6f85afe4721bd70f
07d3d068ba1ba0e4292d58bd1ce10702d4c9760d
'2011-12-13T00:01:19-05:00'
describe
'118883' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAEW' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
7ba6304f52f1703c779a11e6790fddf9
10ebdda0b0a4176fa35a1aa89ecb10fb59df7b27
'2011-12-13T00:04:24-05:00'
describe
'28541' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAEX' 'sip-files00020.pro'
2d178441d8e06d55abe3768b781a17ab
35b65ef0890a4c0392860e7003ceb327a9c91b4a
'2011-12-12T23:57:49-05:00'
describe
'47934' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAEY' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
1f645cd3575f4a8d9d4ee842b9d9f8c8
a21a41c797d42f72d1abf3df596b8b94915b3ab7
'2011-12-13T00:05:35-05:00'
describe
'16848324' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAEZ' 'sip-files00020.tif'
00102baf33e8139e0c7f8fd268e1d264
eb5ee434f63eb3d0ce2a0bd7d31adc79fbe47e03
describe
'1403' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAFA' 'sip-files00020.txt'
9760c6d7ce406350a9e692bc32a8db24
8065a9904a5d04945de6e7e1a4c72483bce7938b
describe
Invalid character
'28408' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAFB' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
bc04499f51abf0b5aa07cc4bb0ee22b2
d02ded80c47007a5d56f06cfba697686867e95af
'2011-12-12T23:59:55-05:00'
describe
'701162' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAFC' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
7ada40e5ac6ccc93de04e235e234f186
ff6b418dd6c8cd0fe60420fbd909c7aa7857b644
describe
'207977' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAFD' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
0dd421bcf5633c3176f62c45ed8aee39
881c933151f3a587df58641cd2fe4880aec3b59f
'2011-12-12T23:57:24-05:00'
describe
'907' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAFE' 'sip-files00021.pro'
109d8169d7d15896960d2f12ec7913cd
f6134d56fed9388e7145a7138f3d880919277c77
describe
'67773' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAFF' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
0e694030e4fe15e3cb24f4ca4ba545ba
1ebc269e03a23a3079f92cc3cbd54b9062d91a9f
'2011-12-13T00:05:32-05:00'
describe
'16850936' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAFG' 'sip-files00021.tif'
b9f057d2445316aa425d3f9ed9127624
847fe0c887b5d9e1d2275b29dd903f6b9e2f1aba
'2011-12-13T00:02:13-05:00'
describe
'132' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAFH' 'sip-files00021.txt'
50a0e1a9ac310438c83bf2095c26758c
898136b7652f2643fe33de1bb638a2a8eac75c71
'2011-12-13T00:00:06-05:00'
describe
'34407' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAFI' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
6278f449b37aabd2baabbaf8df6e3d05
ea1dc16fd6025984451f5c4ec14d4a2b3d3ce8d8
'2011-12-13T00:04:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAFJ' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
8bae941565176edaecc9e60fdbb81ec3
8c326918c0e5f357c19f0b3305b9ec1fec6c3443
'2011-12-12T23:58:52-05:00'
describe
'108853' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAFK' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
3a80dc47ceff6646ab35d97778de1f6a
f6d891245906621a5d87c0ef900f6ed06a561afd
'2011-12-12T23:57:12-05:00'
describe
'25669' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAFL' 'sip-files00022.pro'
f98fb28fda65903f416fbec14282db33
af7f7ef586d6a1e4d4cb4ae7c1d33613ebe0c0b0
'2011-12-12T23:59:15-05:00'
describe
'46041' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAFM' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
c005e4c67d2ac5837f48d5529d5298cb
6091884e1cc6bc8b193eff437625e7c897c811b7
'2011-12-12T23:58:02-05:00'
describe
'16847928' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAFN' 'sip-files00022.tif'
ca104f543fa3b0177a7fb6d87f339075
c03355334a08e225e75310408b3d52bce1384a0c
'2011-12-13T00:04:45-05:00'
describe
'1217' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAFO' 'sip-files00022.txt'
dde533a1018b1a1c42deb3b5103986d8
f2ac528e1f20fb2c8bf55b203732a6ef88d5ffaf
'2011-12-12T23:58:19-05:00'
describe
'27462' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAFP' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
fe272af09f8644281b20a176faa16ef0
d228834aff1f823f7acbb33849ce648d447d85da
'2011-12-12T23:56:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAFQ' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
f484140a7a6f5bc7c9ab1f72cab83922
0f32902d4e058daaadb62d85d92968c328959b40
'2011-12-13T00:04:35-05:00'
describe
'126689' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAFR' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
2ed90250ec84c826f920378e593d02ac
9361a27a6a308560c9c9c734fa05a38f7ca6bd28
describe
'14074' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAFS' 'sip-files00023.pro'
7c7014e38c73d15becbbc14fb94d10a0
e790823c05ad5fe6aaa36732ffe6e836d80033b8
'2011-12-12T23:59:25-05:00'
describe
'48637' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAFT' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
6c6f9b413d2561af7419a23b0d462aa3
35f6ccaef5644e66cec5a89f2e76701590fa0348
describe
'16848692' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAFU' 'sip-files00023.tif'
b7042abab2041f4936aaf63e51a77b81
81241b1f6fa4b8200740d6d66fe1df4f55ddae9c
'2011-12-12T23:59:09-05:00'
describe
'682' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAFV' 'sip-files00023.txt'
99a1628d39c3c56689ae5d492aa5cf4b
62fd08ce68f04b397ff86f6db42b27a649f49d17
describe
'28971' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAFW' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
852469c905d45cb1795e835bc20fc550
bcd6c13f9e30f73c27dfe4216dd7d91e9f36c565
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAFX' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
f1d7f7401c7ff31b8b647b96d970b00e
2e4d7d70a69fad588a6401a8a6acfc1f89e59a7f
'2011-12-13T00:04:29-05:00'
describe
'150160' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAFY' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
4fc468f5ba3fb7ce98d274c125c90f2c
f2497b7154a3435a4d1cd671864f2899d312aa1e
'2011-12-13T00:00:29-05:00'
describe
'43175' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAFZ' 'sip-files00024.pro'
fcd98ae1e70a3dc4ca5f22df049efa0b
520f447fa44c7094d80bac5b5b6a754beebcbe7d
describe
'56574' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAGA' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
ce74b9d41dd2bb368c6aaa6fefc6853d
7fc8915a0b5df7076a19f3900c9d49c3a36d5463
'2011-12-12T23:58:50-05:00'
describe
'16849120' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAGB' 'sip-files00024.tif'
531ddc60470ee894835dd43d7af613b7
bde3725762c64bbbf16dacae0e83619c2dc6aca0
describe
'1767' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAGC' 'sip-files00024.txt'
0bfb8c4b8f305c11fdb45d48cafaa3ce
d52317bef58114c727c5214338df9d2b4bc1efe0
'2011-12-13T00:01:11-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'30636' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAGD' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
20a4e84ec6f85b16796772d35bf1e8aa
477495a8bad3a572eae02ea1e0f436c870235131
'2011-12-12T23:56:41-05:00'
describe
'701156' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAGE' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
e468dfef3998726f0365c30f67582488
4b51500c2681fa49b6aae88795378072abc64212
'2011-12-12T23:56:50-05:00'
describe
'169295' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAGF' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
5458a15a71ea65615cc1977188697099
5e945a308b8abbc1146a6f48a061fd1298fc9831
describe
'6745' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAGG' 'sip-files00025.pro'
cdcfade691803376853710b339ad15ca
74e177bf3b20eee5e55cd9b41177d3424a4b5962
'2011-12-12T23:59:31-05:00'
describe
'58428' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAGH' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
dae35e32bac7738a4526903384a0033e
61d6d56a99c5a79cb2421ac1805733d62beba307
describe
'16849640' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAGI' 'sip-files00025.tif'
6a450260a2c1497e2d1e0e64ef9302da
4d45b1e051eaf4108c3b8812f2c4c72f70c3699e
describe
'319' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAGJ' 'sip-files00025.txt'
6c429e3f1929b1609af900575fb9ad1c
905c342e5f18ca8540218db4275480fc5dc6a511
describe
'31510' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAGK' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
71a84797b27dee3d6559bd33fe09874c
da4543944971b93149d0d8eb82a8a49741445da8
describe
'701163' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAGL' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
bf07b535cc7ebcdc1150681f9b9c8193
ae3be0eb529354b70f7092cd6f1899f8f9502d1c
'2011-12-12T23:58:42-05:00'
describe
'143576' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAGM' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
2ec2f94771f49af49a95cbff009e57f7
3995d16adb46dd9171a533b590a48f6417dd9cef
'2011-12-13T00:02:40-05:00'
describe
'42564' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAGN' 'sip-files00026.pro'
758cf1c63216f2cb9a6000b8e1d9673c
86384345d9d9061f8157b0039f974250e5ecad09
'2011-12-13T00:02:18-05:00'
describe
'55570' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAGO' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
5ec63d7c71ff6ca85c4dd3ddd4d635c9
3f65763df46bd4d36e62dd5858d40564aa93055a
'2011-12-12T23:59:12-05:00'
describe
'16849128' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAGP' 'sip-files00026.tif'
c990b7be267af872d4ca09e2a3ecc953
b48dd271fb8e214ba09c77cd14f0495d3bab5865
'2011-12-13T00:04:58-05:00'
describe
'1734' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAGQ' 'sip-files00026.txt'
9d31f4adbb3894e200ce89bc5e0aadbe
b453a4cbf47e5f28e6d6a452a735a7553b5f4d8d
'2011-12-13T00:03:03-05:00'
describe
'30449' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAGR' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
444f0de70eb88c72a5d3e33590ee35d7
815a82ebd1d1aac01a20eb1da35f13d36b37f73e
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAGS' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
ad69b4d7756608884c1e82484f3fa6f4
c140bba6b9a2a953ff1f65a41f301518368c5f84
'2011-12-12T23:56:44-05:00'
describe
'154043' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAGT' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
7f6c3051ca4f8ad43f96b80e02930023
c8aeb2abfd9fe992a00939148cc1be3506b60ce9
'2011-12-13T00:03:42-05:00'
describe
'19047' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAGU' 'sip-files00027.pro'
1141637fea2363606fa6541bfcd6d7d1
31d25fff754f0bbf3c6f321517e201c0816e6e90
describe
'56889' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAGV' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
e074c8d30f57d807c5848b1baf9c38d0
993a3a57839adf4c3c3fd0036826ca73086391a1
'2011-12-13T00:02:54-05:00'
describe
'16849820' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAGW' 'sip-files00027.tif'
48d448e8f9f549d365c712f8746c727c
3f75b3d3be6b3f9f4bb49b09f76110f2490c6ea2
'2011-12-12T23:57:11-05:00'
describe
'751' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAGX' 'sip-files00027.txt'
be687b37226a91f99ec13f19c3ea6389
c4289a49c93d45133225f26e406e5cbf94751b33
describe
'31739' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAGY' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
4b3b6d233f9731bfb66620c5c2299f62
3fe463fa69f14dc3d3f4e45a22a6064a65637350
'2011-12-13T00:05:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAGZ' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
1ffca287b21d1e02b0f8a14cac7a1631
dcc0023b4e38106859121595349e8a17c45973dc
'2011-12-13T00:01:43-05:00'
describe
'156086' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAHA' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
8037c1e1f272524e4e098bc7a15b61ed
cac8529f2c3bac15f4cb9910287ca273603ddc98
describe
'48911' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAHB' 'sip-files00028.pro'
b0a09d19ab8effe71ec62f55f3473f30
b4eea2adefe23f42723cc41c33c9b8c80e213e12
describe
'58836' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAHC' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
459b02c1fb99dc6637063604a1e8fc31
df3108af09f12ecce6a367afa3e29846ec877a3b
'2011-12-12T23:59:33-05:00'
describe
'16849900' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAHD' 'sip-files00028.tif'
632af6195c876aad189e058a2df3fb3e
83db90d670a5c819491441501611bda2803d5088
'2011-12-13T00:04:02-05:00'
describe
'1924' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAHE' 'sip-files00028.txt'
1279a6f6b3784cad86ede1cf62935fc1
019b4ae6f42b26035e16c26456e49a55135c3632
describe
'31619' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAHF' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
d95fa52f57613713fe6b6e89392d8a86
12af8362cf70d84827966cf67229502d727aa441
'2011-12-13T00:03:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAHG' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
43fa2b9d255da887e5d22078cf3b1621
79d8df758f541b4b382dce80bf81c584a46dabe3
'2011-12-12T23:58:47-05:00'
describe
'130125' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAHH' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
44115dc2fbd0c495bed3aeb3acef3823
ec8da2fc75c08c1149309e1e38b6745a8c83d283
'2011-12-12T23:58:34-05:00'
describe
'17639' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAHI' 'sip-files00029.pro'
cf9c9390e181ca906c8843162e424805
7a9c221e36aacbced70e18788cc990e0b0f14dac
describe
'50549' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAHJ' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
83e6de9ffd4e7cc497d7e50e895a0c19
2d0a36d80a95b6da2ce01721aa308f39b2009a28
'2011-12-12T23:58:31-05:00'
describe
'16848916' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAHK' 'sip-files00029.tif'
8d3fe13cdb323ff1d0aac2bd53c824b1
a6f654c48fdb4ac53c82fe664b00e0502e7adc37
'2011-12-13T00:02:37-05:00'
describe
'789' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAHL' 'sip-files00029.txt'
356566447fc75d4f4a77670ea9f7ab3f
7f79c5a9b2f33b5f9a33090572cc7a7c5cafcf8f
describe
'29610' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAHM' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
fe7bdd2793c685ba70bedd239d54ca69
1091397d29c945090aa94d1ad2db568970755746
'2011-12-12T23:57:58-05:00'
describe
'701185' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAHN' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
a03db4ebd970284f241efb7251292395
d849318108540cc87d4311122ae1d7a668ad7385
describe
'124465' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAHO' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
d9dfde739ff54fcb0dcb44a22195c0c3
732a61f4c7aabbe1d3aa817e4753fd8e1b6733cb
'2011-12-12T23:57:17-05:00'
describe
'32500' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAHP' 'sip-files00030.pro'
7faee1bd12848dc3354698fcd46df43e
2ec892318e87088a0a0fb6c983f8e4d675ab879b
'2011-12-13T00:04:23-05:00'
describe
'50350' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAHQ' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
131e09ccf22f16c687b170c5e094c5dc
f94c7a3a7160e078d3ba5fb6fd163da32a8fe71d
describe
'16848604' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAHR' 'sip-files00030.tif'
0b8a5a1b36a3e52b6ed6bcb589f7822a
994d6d1502c38eaa92159f8ef0598dc98d2a9a77
'2011-12-12T23:58:36-05:00'
describe
'1548' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAHS' 'sip-files00030.txt'
b2f431a1e2b6c26a5b285c1ed408c66a
36fc01ce853705634eb28b569fba6c3a20546c3f
'2011-12-13T00:03:29-05:00'
describe
'29292' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAHT' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
f14f4104c255a821d8a203a3980b0c1e
6cb217077ccde2bebf8556d0e825a5d85a9646b4
'2011-12-12T23:56:45-05:00'
describe
'700972' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAHU' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
4db727324b0c5e3986649a038028d8bc
a02dd93d25d2382df82641da0f3c64bd6146dbb1
'2011-12-13T00:00:32-05:00'
describe
'150986' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAHV' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
d5b0a6c227227ab2f8aa850c7d8a2dd3
4c92aa05dc336b235ed679cc2810c0eb25e7bc93
'2011-12-12T23:57:34-05:00'
describe
'7968' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAHW' 'sip-files00031.pro'
3b0a5f3eb8478aa5b7cc3205df9bd358
bc71af573634615dc249ed3a8b6afa41c9fa75f3
'2011-12-12T23:59:40-05:00'
describe
'54638' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAHX' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
80aeeee62cf9265861a1597a20a32ae1
c69dc7f88fc17c5f31b892bcf524980ad902206b
describe
'16849184' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAHY' 'sip-files00031.tif'
43a5072d325c9259b4c352b472ed1929
9cbe7d09143caeb840fc39672d07b51e72c0205f
'2011-12-13T00:01:22-05:00'
describe
'332' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAHZ' 'sip-files00031.txt'
3031ea7a5992c08e668c18fa0c6484fa
704b2a0ecc4287f8b21fc567a174a702b932c7ac
'2011-12-13T00:05:07-05:00'
describe
'30695' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAIA' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
b8247f4ae406d71b5e0203194572c24d
f76bb28d7ae12b5d714b39cbeabff8415c921880
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAIB' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
e7ed669b43dcb66dc68856ed6c91d825
f48d3095fa7c2ee7f51b191cbc154739406a2228
'2011-12-12T23:56:40-05:00'
describe
'147150' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAIC' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
fa64750acf2444da3dae22cb8c0af9d5
f5ce96f2f4be21a31a1bae9035198af90d5b7979
'2011-12-13T00:00:39-05:00'
describe
'41944' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAID' 'sip-files00032.pro'
4b92a36aa8bf768134957a82a7af6568
2106f18e1fe0834fbcdf00b5cb3267a1cf9f111c
'2011-12-13T00:02:24-05:00'
describe
'56962' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAIE' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
848e72a5d225a4ee4b0370d7a39abf9c
9bc57c744bba973e7909bea70f855d391b7d34a2
'2011-12-13T00:02:50-05:00'
describe
'16849312' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAIF' 'sip-files00032.tif'
4beb2324cfc932babbe907104d0f8074
f9aecb4585144ecd92c084c9f7f6127428ba48f8
'2011-12-13T00:05:17-05:00'
describe
'1712' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAIG' 'sip-files00032.txt'
9a993c8fc95f9ba28530e058660a5a46
cac955fb40a82ef7ff4cefb5555c232b4cd42048
describe
'31269' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAIH' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
99faad789ff855c3b5c613cb1bd0a439
12e4dd6a122e4d07c738a33753f1eaa61fda7fb0
'2011-12-13T00:03:43-05:00'
describe
'700842' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAII' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
54e75c12845cb72b10acd67b995db886
ed1f6adb4af24896b7a6d5bc45c7b0af340a98ff
describe
'159003' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAIJ' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
e59feb7d71c1aef359827bb096e74d31
344dd2675f3a21e1322d26e185f58b1f31c813f9
describe
'14072' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAIK' 'sip-files00033.pro'
da06d7472ee51ca0f592102fff61cdbd
4d1c09d77655ffea98b54e4b958b4181679cdf53
'2011-12-12T23:58:38-05:00'
describe
'57869' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAIL' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
10ab1073bc32b7a98e3a7bdd5115b683
c9b666cc317891bd9cee09531eb94143f6f727a6
'2011-12-12T23:58:35-05:00'
describe
'16849704' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAIM' 'sip-files00033.tif'
bf97af6b705b58c8e4c7a0fa2d40c205
ad033eda4c7f3a0898e5c21c8fbfbfea98c3c82a
'2011-12-12T23:59:44-05:00'
describe
'611' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAIN' 'sip-files00033.txt'
ad728887581bccbc321982c82b46f9eb
6cefc38e6d306b9fc6958d36fc5559864eef9498
'2011-12-13T00:04:49-05:00'
describe
'31596' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAIO' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
d66ccc5d03d804436ee5245a8b4920e9
d08a2b78921c0892c81fe50e5c789730fce80749
describe
'701182' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAIP' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
03e00015edccd6ff5defe2514e3a800b
e336ab3c26313fe2d92333a387feb0e9633a73d8
describe
'105148' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAIQ' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
455f9bf82def6af1d6a5578fe7d8f9c9
6ae86de5dbcc114328022ea03581720809b819d9
describe
'22536' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAIR' 'sip-files00034.pro'
e80709daeb4a56ad86abdf629d9f3664
96ea346dd7f4e14dd892ed2fd6dc96b9902bbbd8
'2011-12-13T00:02:14-05:00'
describe
'44669' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAIS' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
60825da04c2dc897a0ee2a386f312690
eafd6708cba9102022310c4cb20e73204a7e6cdf
'2011-12-13T00:05:36-05:00'
describe
'16847724' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAIT' 'sip-files00034.tif'
efeb937fb8e3aa38f06af9e7e03f2658
ee678b6dfa297e15de55118bb7521bcd8d9d0de5
'2011-12-13T00:03:41-05:00'
describe
'1005' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAIU' 'sip-files00034.txt'
70b54054b56704fecc865b18a7d1f64e
06b6800d943e8c88d079837707cd389b89b1b629
describe
'27017' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAIV' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
c58215c2655bb50cd61b3935d45376df
02f82738c8a82da392ac9afeeb7b3f606c2c099e
'2011-12-13T00:04:40-05:00'
describe
'700940' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAIW' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
09c87dfcd2674ec7f7a1e03b8f0947ab
009e8625d7cfeb44fd558a87835be69ff9d2f312
describe
'176980' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAIX' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
6f1dc9d8364c0c1e053d81941d068a97
d56da265a3f44d2da11314f14f044e787554405a
'2011-12-12T23:59:51-05:00'
describe
'1453' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAIY' 'sip-files00035.pro'
77f2ee0790bec986b727422dfe4c1992
04282c2d9dddca170bd1dfedb1cde99340a3fde7
'2011-12-13T00:02:34-05:00'
describe
'58357' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAIZ' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
387f7d327f268c5a6f54b90ba9b9c80d
5ccda6e9522e5cb5bcf812e0109f6533a31cae3a
describe
'16849980' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAJA' 'sip-files00035.tif'
3b8597dd7a6a913a2b32467de25830c6
f5c51e0f6cbce562697c68d812e0c70447109383
'2011-12-13T00:04:51-05:00'
describe
'100' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAJB' 'sip-files00035.txt'
403d7183b92329b858fb0132aa22396b
5587c9214e08659ce6372e3fd8bc024c65fb306c
describe
'32151' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAJC' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
6a40a3543779a5e81fdb1fdcf2be6dea
651934dc5159750c0851ce102c8e8a68887ecc16
describe
'701532' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAJD' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
634684d0a0a6ae1b245d2875914efb41
a0b73629a26093e834b547c53a71bd63bf7ecb64
describe
'147448' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAJE' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
615d911b811768eef37de4e91d31dc4f
e5160ae9c328f44861212d8389734dbe0cceb40c
describe
'45435' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAJF' 'sip-files00036.pro'
623c6d75f8c1f26d34d742332f8b55c8
c36e33b6f6cbd1d0d72aaa4bdfc5748fbd7eabc2
'2011-12-13T00:02:52-05:00'
describe
'56005' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAJG' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
7d02ccc97bdc17876afb845f67d08164
874adcd0d33ef07a79eb41e2033c7d48fb577709
'2011-12-12T23:57:42-05:00'
describe
'16857236' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAJH' 'sip-files00036.tif'
1a407e636280e2e22dab14a060815eb8
2f1be83e35ee6635993d11f1448fa39ac8edb5d7
'2011-12-13T00:00:19-05:00'
describe
'1944' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAJI' 'sip-files00036.txt'
415d0f0872cdd90114349a4bd550b02f
4860641f2aad26dbc766b29834b15d11e58797ce
'2011-12-12T23:59:16-05:00'
describe
'30968' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAJJ' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
7d55e72cc704fc9f7859b78aae1f495a
31793c635dca4318e3c91485c05506c6425e0721
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAJK' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
991b20baffe6eaf9e3fd0886c09bae83
315cea0da82c9d3935061416b397e65d192489a2
describe
'142062' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAJL' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
a81d74cf6bc36e0515f9e183b5395634
8dd5a86c06406d336eaa9ab5ad6f5306411508cd
'2011-12-12T23:56:39-05:00'
describe
'11612' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAJM' 'sip-files00037.pro'
6682c544ccc8fd2e0ec54fe2199bdede
704bab206af5a4a9e9faa900e6d169c80f220e5f
describe
'53211' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAJN' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
fb52b776903e320e4503d803a9fb0575
7d8f4867075e11308813b80dd5ca543d77a24f22
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAJO' 'sip-files00037.tif'
2eac7d38186b71b146135cabee87933b
8ac7ace1756350c8d06f745364d7afe5af60d45f
describe
'470' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAJP' 'sip-files00037.txt'
499d8d78eb3fee699d3e2e42fd606c35
d683a6360822dce274ff8c06f6b7d47bd7033549
'2011-12-13T00:05:11-05:00'
describe
'30322' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAJQ' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
28a50730ae6d47304e4cccb086b6ace9
3667eb98bcf8255570129acdba48151abbb83efd
'2011-12-13T00:05:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAJR' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
a0c84ec645c6c2ccee8a7e1a90d275a4
aea1ed91e502c569d29d9dab0850e7f9dde2a0e6
'2011-12-13T00:00:08-05:00'
describe
'134545' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAJS' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
275337eaa0d71ae697b6a99608d1232e
c880b9b0406744d66c1724a1bcd801a3744d3a91
'2011-12-13T00:01:48-05:00'
describe
'37310' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAJT' 'sip-files00038.pro'
334325cb00fd27f2f16c059082aead65
949896b20b9ec24e65684baf312aa18eb8edd8b1
'2011-12-13T00:02:59-05:00'
describe
'52743' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAJU' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
65ff1220e4663c3b87d55f4cb9f7d3ce
af842e823d9d25bc0cd4f36c8c9cfd885bb3a021
'2011-12-13T00:03:52-05:00'
describe
'16848976' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAJV' 'sip-files00038.tif'
ef1c23f3296941f91a53506793edc3e4
dcec1c82a4a74284849cfc842376b1551f01e2c9
'2011-12-12T23:57:20-05:00'
describe
'1599' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAJW' 'sip-files00038.txt'
202b755783727f08319db2448ba6a03c
674142464d971a8a844536a35bdd6a9fc7d53c07
describe
'29547' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAJX' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
c01822d84560453092ac898317c8edd0
446117b0cf08d15013a1675558fa87a7f82c4b1b
describe
'701188' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAJY' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
f0366d978b1dffac0370beae891ad683
7e92131e259f86c60ffad99232bf9c8b429142d3
describe
'128186' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAJZ' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
d9bb8549605d8673c47408daba810279
f4bd9a656a4cbb7aeb9b6cfb738d2f34c9dc74e9
'2011-12-13T00:04:09-05:00'
describe
'12934' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAKA' 'sip-files00039.pro'
ec3a6eca04a3a81eb0ad88880244e2b9
4ca88f83028fe12e86204ae03973b44d8c794fa4
'2011-12-12T23:57:29-05:00'
describe
'48795' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAKB' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
75b21796718d3d7374f793924cbdf0d9
8378fa281c1cb7b4397c69479441991eed2dfba4
describe
'16848764' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAKC' 'sip-files00039.tif'
4fc7c37ab651adf833b07e656eb7af3f
e18d8b62bae9c97149b0d8859a72ab37b6c33379
'2011-12-13T00:05:20-05:00'
describe
'558' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAKD' 'sip-files00039.txt'
27b1827e542962a6f026bc4825db4e47
a7abb19d4ac1e2c090298592da1f8e2bb6f1669d
describe
'29144' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAKE' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
e437b6430f5cc782932426a1ade42b5e
6ab887eac2322ed20efb74c42f9ab347720716aa
'2011-12-13T00:04:21-05:00'
describe
'701180' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAKF' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
d6f7f10503d6ecd8862bf76d3ad9c201
1bbce68dece2f48712ebdba9baae5e99ba6d334d
'2011-12-12T23:57:22-05:00'
describe
'114033' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAKG' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
ff1eea956f77aa9063931960041ac594
2c21c0c992fe95ba2617828c88d3dbc044627f6d
'2011-12-12T23:57:32-05:00'
describe
'27199' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAKH' 'sip-files00040.pro'
b853d9b8503269a563e2ea4be6b02ea2
5c7c9e822b3dee8efe42e08581ec5219f2852ea2
describe
'47070' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAKI' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
765b097f36d9d3920700b8cc9a2db3d5
b1112645ff25e6dd18059787ff44f502a423306e
'2011-12-12T23:59:45-05:00'
describe
'16847980' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAKJ' 'sip-files00040.tif'
f16be8e1f135ffbd36a7dc112b8ade49
e688aa8cd48e4b8ffe7e2c92f4b8b6c7670e8d13
'2011-12-12T23:57:01-05:00'
describe
'1259' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAKK' 'sip-files00040.txt'
bc2e58a604b202dd6e71d9fa395fc492
c22f38491f034721cf846e090e6c694d43111e5d
'2011-12-12T23:59:46-05:00'
describe
'27899' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAKL' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
dbe7560e037651f8ae8c75201634daf0
8935a8f939294b08c65d1d5b2a3774e7ca84e585
describe
'701194' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAKM' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
2e26a2f5e99c51b182920c543b4ba680
165fc8ab88a998d42d1ead54b9e9a7922f4d5ab6
'2011-12-13T00:01:29-05:00'
describe
'184929' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAKN' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
567726609ec266876e71b7e25428256b
bf56be1ac6c15280b011f2da7807de02099044e6
describe
'1531' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAKO' 'sip-files00041.pro'
98c689dfc708662922db576e98706a98
2d3554bd0a127486189e36babf38a1b9adc18d1b
describe
'61301' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAKP' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
ee0b9c0caa7db3f3a2cbad86f6f9cd8c
8e376f9c81aa62e8a7310a4133c1c308d7feacb0
'2011-12-13T00:04:36-05:00'
describe
'16850384' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAKQ' 'sip-files00041.tif'
22e5d3ae3eb6e92098c8772046ecf6a1
d05af136a6ddc9d0fbbb07256e8b4c2fd44a5e91
describe
'112' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAKR' 'sip-files00041.txt'
4c4cf639ec4369d75f54fdccad72a8b0
13660c7237096a1730c2f6ac2f0d1d6dd5647c3d
'2011-12-13T00:01:16-05:00'
describe
'32839' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAKS' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
c5b2566d6d9c7929df31c3f00f7f9598
faa82e26eb95cafa8c53d603214f41a677b6c616
describe
'701197' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAKT' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
d7348e5918ba37540af05556d6d88370
b752f23384c8522ff382a162831b5f2ea0bbeac3
'2011-12-13T00:04:01-05:00'
describe
'159538' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAKU' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
c09bdf1687ac8773e5d5e5b4bd606723
ad142335a0a908ea5d41c1db9b1317713bfd6a98
describe
'49656' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAKV' 'sip-files00042.pro'
88b7bc54570834336037e58ed62c2e6b
fcbbae00a56c282b4132263623701812e7b7c000
describe
'58603' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAKW' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
8ee8ea0d6845e28d776857d86af1a250
fa8aeebe9f8b8b5565f0921d558fcf8e426b3c8c
describe
'16849788' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAKX' 'sip-files00042.tif'
c725087538e74a4dc1909abc03c51f6c
c7eca38f53060644d7473c0dcaf82e1ed37559c3
'2011-12-12T23:56:49-05:00'
describe
'2012' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAKY' 'sip-files00042.txt'
cc72e616b7882a27ee9e0ce2c1e93a8b
0589cbad219f440d9c236f25809b06a5000872c7
'2011-12-13T00:04:14-05:00'
describe
'31454' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAKZ' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
10cc041d7857d03edf6537130f48e205
2283e041ceb81410e906e0f86c54aab1e93a6721
'2011-12-13T00:02:10-05:00'
describe
'701134' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAALA' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
314aaa04e4051183bd9c95d1961576fe
7d135cf830891a1770857f5a0950046ac51002f4
describe
'159476' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAALB' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
2fb4b23c52b404451f9b084f56ca116f
13bde764dfc3bb0a318967cdb30604564b9d6a9e
describe
'18760' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAALC' 'sip-files00043.pro'
987fe48c0d9c86e36200bc7780115bc2
102645b6bb1ce1564adf50b3c75ea3f183655155
'2011-12-13T00:00:28-05:00'
describe
'57086' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAALD' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
fd787c63bc598e154a91c17337ce6095
17a5cfcc2ed14c52a539bb1e771f4070ccaec9a7
describe
'16849676' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAALE' 'sip-files00043.tif'
7a95b49ca61611f7120d0f5822f81e3b
004e1a8ec16988850813224f32cde197c3956527
describe
'815' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAALF' 'sip-files00043.txt'
4cb44d49fc6ff3fa18b2304f29446c72
ac8711fb856d26eacd60d35f510654447bbc1d3b
'2011-12-13T00:04:34-05:00'
describe
'31503' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAALG' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
85cac009a37d232efe63344b7b7f89d0
ba07389c9d91af6a2335caad3cfb9392fd098d18
describe
'701170' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAALH' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
3eb231baee1fba3a67b0afdc89ab0f71
4785a31276c3637aeefa64499548ede11e258426
describe
'159173' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAALI' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
df4aa259090cae69b8b8f52fb1ff126b
5424619ecffe37d6f43f2a997a0d94c44a72e485
'2011-12-13T00:01:13-05:00'
describe
'49041' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAALJ' 'sip-files00044.pro'
1b5d1bcb76b390c6d995db878d319293
ca6b6dd9ae88cba2cb3411cf623bfe782e9b6a3f
'2011-12-13T00:05:29-05:00'
describe
'58866' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAALK' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
bb9e832da676a834ed12da0a41407c2e
b4d8d457484ea96acbe1696b49114c6dc8943c16
'2011-12-13T00:03:24-05:00'
describe
'16849728' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAALL' 'sip-files00044.tif'
152593a43c86f279c21a0b4594b05e87
ef482b5e6720cc6df5203e8a9be1e2d964ec752e
'2011-12-13T00:05:16-05:00'
describe
'2018' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAALM' 'sip-files00044.txt'
fa0bff23c4beaa3a56cf5609a9b90574
d57ad50e9fe60f37671d02079703d621652b1610
describe
'31522' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAALN' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
ede17bd6dc54f8e20ac77104b8198cc7
1a33ea310de135333943d3e7659fb9c07c276379
'2011-12-13T00:02:45-05:00'
describe
'701166' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAALO' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
73e9e7e6f2122914d0bb9a6af2d64b86
53dd9d755dc6f5247ae0a28c88e078a3584ff41c
'2011-12-12T23:59:29-05:00'
describe
'116719' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAALP' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
73a64949afccbfab7d1ca4285bc8a26f
75057010296bcb57bba67e0e4b42dd7655048bc8
describe
'27404' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAALQ' 'sip-files00045.pro'
07d61bd8c639b5dc0f8382d87d4383af
c8690b8e03b463215338d6109ccf00d15245deb3
'2011-12-13T00:01:58-05:00'
describe
'47472' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAALR' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
b02951720e9fd6e7190a07f0f3ddddb5
c9d6061e1775249bb1d9cd6ae3e39de6be556f7e
'2011-12-12T23:56:47-05:00'
describe
'16848044' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAALS' 'sip-files00045.tif'
5ba1898bbaaca557b75f76b457bd92f0
f1b09505234622cae26af43938a91a412591517e
'2011-12-12T23:57:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAALT' 'sip-files00045.txt'
d3fe001dfafddf2a23cd97f0466553fd
32e1f5d02a1069a27ba1927c7c7e67c27fbbc98f
'2011-12-13T00:04:20-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'28153' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAALU' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
33451732afb1b5c6e6ef97c00938de60
a8906b9bc06334b9f77c7821af3232cf148851dc
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAALV' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
e48122000e3ce2fbbba565efa699fa3d
00a1a15f35993f917758400cfc25cdc2f24efd39
'2011-12-13T00:00:58-05:00'
describe
'114316' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAALW' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
9fc223b0129a3c954cef18dd651c8200
51002a028a82736c9ff2f36d0313b213d81b4b21
'2011-12-13T00:02:36-05:00'
describe
'27144' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAALX' 'sip-files00046.pro'
0e6ca5f1e7dd3b3df3eab2a02633a323
c734838bade991bbc63cb06e2180a0d33d072c20
'2011-12-13T00:02:28-05:00'
describe
'46615' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAALY' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
33ae0a15a4f6f4590ab8aa232a64c742
6918c5211354f4196fb7b4a216934e818a865fe8
'2011-12-12T23:57:51-05:00'
describe
'16847948' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAALZ' 'sip-files00046.tif'
0c0ecadfd739d1a7768fa40b029d9fd9
8bdcc2508486803a8ca67ff5b7ee13cc05b39588
describe
'1234' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAMA' 'sip-files00046.txt'
920448e5a6a1ae3b36c27b5b40fd8fd0
a8b0f3d5406ee00e7dd57c29eb3b3294f7987e6c
describe
'27662' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAMB' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
8c9bb6b720892910e29a5461c1ce5ffd
ed658b654a49e82770b6928c7bbc1f323fc0ef78
'2011-12-12T23:57:45-05:00'
describe
'701124' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAMC' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
8fadc389d05e63bc971d372f3b159dcd
e48a010d1dc07858240fa844b277419f1249c9c6
'2011-12-13T00:03:27-05:00'
describe
'139943' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAMD' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
076134503fb86cb96ef753d565290cab
bd96c99a2f60885e0a68e8e48fb14c5e39217b15
describe
'1442' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAME' 'sip-files00047.pro'
d0fa0d88231110f7083c07c4c5cbddef
42c86ae85c47d73a4d7b3d7f0e8b06918ee5acab
describe
'52121' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAMF' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
925997f7f6d1ccc035b9be87d57d415a
55076299676c06f3ecb6eeababbe1070f980762a
'2011-12-13T00:02:23-05:00'
describe
'16849236' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAMG' 'sip-files00047.tif'
90d43154b772d2e0082a3da3ff237ecc
9b948a00c311e19d30565ea66045508b2f8a20bb
describe
'295' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAMH' 'sip-files00047.txt'
401eb1663147ca56d0e49a2e0078b1f3
0be87c1367a944f03b306310ef8cc70fb8f21ce2
describe
'30365' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAMI' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
e248e068a1a1bfa36cca03bccd6fc8a3
d8c3f2bb21ff82106a07f1e5bfe20c412823de16
'2011-12-13T00:02:20-05:00'
describe
'701184' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAMJ' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
508a128501fadfea0c1db62e4e85828a
a694c23c5e3908a39cd5d08bb62447e8effc9f46
describe
'139074' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAMK' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
1c298608e998621b7127a01d83fd4f80
9a29334e1c59826393088722fca299a4807398fc
describe
'39029' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAML' 'sip-files00048.pro'
7c27c4080275e838d741544091917131
a5fc6ad28eb6b242a1e0f3fc40af94ec995a48c3
'2011-12-13T00:04:07-05:00'
describe
'53981' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAMM' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
23166284b3a628ad9bb24098cb667e64
6d8295d402147a0ff46d8f4e0b37580ddf7edae9
'2011-12-12T23:58:58-05:00'
describe
'16848936' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAMN' 'sip-files00048.tif'
ff482b3ad9378e045052647957962fac
d457b361c910f38ea1fd4474f1f092c79b9afb52
describe
'1641' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAMO' 'sip-files00048.txt'
05ffe476e4c96fa439bd00e760675ddc
6ca9f7f0a0835c3b371ac62b39424d61ded3da86
describe
'30394' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAMP' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
e2006cfc0977d5a5a8ae674de57bac2f
5285fca23780fd57df1cf066a60eabb659b71fd1
describe
'701139' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAMQ' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
13c0204ba656e4a7e8ce2cc70be146ab
1617b2cc6520079aedda12447361a054fa3ba543
'2011-12-13T00:04:44-05:00'
describe
'154125' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAMR' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
623ca9d9922ec9a50de8e3a13ccc2065
a974bbae945c0ddad3bb7eabe23ef350f7dd092d
describe
'2610' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAMS' 'sip-files00049.pro'
1bfcbadd474541df868536ae9b73a449
fc9abc7ab3df98b92069936a498f8f71cd6bbb50
describe
'52275' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAMT' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
72b1f42070e38f23c55b2bd7eda88a6d
885645a65ba86af1837c79ce31ea3fc45538ecbb
describe
'16848744' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAMU' 'sip-files00049.tif'
d611dc5cc276b95c930e2f7057766eea
665cfd33e2e6391d9d285725e65f858130141b89
'2011-12-13T00:03:31-05:00'
describe
'125' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAMV' 'sip-files00049.txt'
1d17f82d90a9f356a44e4201438d143a
d082f8c0875dd05e6626137fc53313c99d4a978d
describe
'29711' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAMW' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
9ba9b539b2c867f77613b74983a527de
b499fb64fde812f39d8e56a58a6268876c9e2537
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAMX' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
46909b33b39b227fddde4d340f26357e
f7ea28b4f05c311e2736da52c156c714f6c28b88
'2011-12-13T00:03:56-05:00'
describe
'145482' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAMY' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
75c37a4e59ca26b914657df8df626320
0292b90b0737326a4d6fa780ef04fa61c4f3e0b3
describe
'44423' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAMZ' 'sip-files00050.pro'
f0506d94ec8524936393df2d643bcd66
8540e9bcb2c52f8fa7d6297d34b031f14402ae9b
describe
'55565' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAANA' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
df769ad9ee314f2d8e2cd37b6f1e1234
418a1df4558213d94fc49b5d011be748a7014794
describe
'16849244' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAANB' 'sip-files00050.tif'
b109c60dde924a882c3f05d97bd35473
80d9000b6d58b98a897c5074237718c649e170e5
'2011-12-13T00:02:42-05:00'
describe
'1912' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAANC' 'sip-files00050.txt'
34b14fa960c96f136cec6ed9fa5c766b
0aab517e373394d6931731982cd4e8dd37fd5fa7
describe
'30302' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAND' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
17653d2234d6d60b16e31fc7dd4873c4
c4dee1f610b6aa1952a866118a6f63fbadf51534
'2011-12-13T00:01:02-05:00'
describe
'700995' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAANE' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
1a40df5e95b053d2dd06b5230b174e1d
a8fb081f5deb4e48834455fd2d83dbc667c561c2
'2011-12-12T23:59:57-05:00'
describe
'166812' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAANF' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
3affde7e1618aeeb59469a027ec1a028
a26be4969461caa2515ec82e57ee929a0d2632bf
'2011-12-13T00:05:15-05:00'
describe
'21102' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAANG' 'sip-files00051.pro'
0f6a8b3a6903e87858e63cf5a69e7966
602d90afb4260a7ef03ddef8e0da9878a5a90f02
'2011-12-12T23:58:55-05:00'
describe
'58416' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAANH' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
8e5d7f4c3014b3b8c13c5d68a7946b9d
d803442e4d5bc675ba85e62760ea66a073456cd1
'2011-12-12T23:56:56-05:00'
describe
'16849904' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAANI' 'sip-files00051.tif'
ac4be59190a0f6a6631474969d45f6e5
752957d791da5cba403f946b1409ee11084068f8
'2011-12-12T23:59:11-05:00'
describe
'1008' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAANJ' 'sip-files00051.txt'
279ed398a6d7d68e484c2d015345926a
7d159ca6b0e2fcccee0afe5a0ee59944e8df0d81
'2011-12-13T00:05:52-05:00'
describe
'32211' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAANK' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
51db30cdb85fbe0b7fd4138e15f22a6f
3fd783f40920c11c99c7553bb7d16325a7a5f86e
'2011-12-13T00:04:05-05:00'
describe
'701176' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAANL' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
ca5799b71a5a0929cd7d15af7f7bcc47
40089a3c3fb3628d4981e70a74ba97a0c593e706
'2011-12-13T00:05:40-05:00'
describe
'99127' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAANM' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
b3a1da8f6f1a25e7968ea6460999617b
8899acf4236d709aa2e58836fa86a45168619edd
'2011-12-12T23:58:15-05:00'
describe
'20002' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAANN' 'sip-files00052.pro'
cd882819a99e7daffab293cb2507ea32
3faf62550505111f61dec9efec47ec27905e52dc
describe
'42723' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAANO' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
952693eabfa57211c9d799df2bc41f30
36ca220e9c49cdd5d2245dd49208d4497e132b2c
'2011-12-12T23:59:38-05:00'
describe
'16847628' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAANP' 'sip-files00052.tif'
ef56cb8c7576c6c60550b347d6f48a6d
6d7df99b93c5b1c095bcc8aaa115d8d3c3b98af3
'2011-12-12T23:59:06-05:00'
describe
'952' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAANQ' 'sip-files00052.txt'
fd2207189ceefbac599398f8e62d7ede
3b8c587b493aef110f73b7295085b1108df0e845
describe
'26797' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAANR' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
d5f50776f520e9c3b4bd540d6b72d36f
46b3dbc5a5d6148969eee3b6d14fc0009dd7f9a8
describe
'701076' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAANS' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
ab4779cc6d7e497651978dabff9b9b71
49049a01b40b6c30ffcb2e72d07ac9b84a0d8f95
describe
'151188' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAANT' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
6ae4b04011ce466db208e650881629fc
778670b16a2ab4b6f55f54bab1c6e06228865390
describe
'2121' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAANU' 'sip-files00053.pro'
1563e1c47a67cfbc8bf160179f2bff48
4eb0c8efc3a80f44ad21994aba3bc1038c7dcac7
describe
'51986' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAANV' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
2c941c9cb2a9673f26958e399da6b9d2
eb9ff864be37de37c4133631f684ab10bc4861ce
'2011-12-12T23:56:54-05:00'
describe
'16849020' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAANW' 'sip-files00053.tif'
16c6c1018fc6b8a4555284e57d4084bb
4a16d558f90ff5ce661682f25fec9d44d54b76f1
'2011-12-13T00:02:44-05:00'
describe
'123' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAANX' 'sip-files00053.txt'
43f64e4e1f3d640881f702eef8d7da63
90012b97f4ea9b321a07fe57edad6c30508c89d3
'2011-12-13T00:04:47-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'29992' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAANY' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
c6b9cba80f892f77ee6c1d958215e22a
48ef167e641f9071d9ba5c39d24db31dd1795be5
'2011-12-13T00:00:59-05:00'
describe
'701195' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAANZ' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
e5ffe14baeadb3fdc789bd530d361665
f60c54e4f637976cdff95d43ec8f6b69d95ba3d9
'2011-12-13T00:01:00-05:00'
describe
'156563' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAOA' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
394fc75c8a65b74baa536549e0f3e910
da9173117b385d7523519292e56a909056063e84
describe
'48600' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAOB' 'sip-files00054.pro'
9dd3f2ee794943ef045f07a335910ea8
b9322e9c9ac0fc3e042d5ad0682b7466a6b8d10a
describe
'58047' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAOC' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
3e4a46be935de7c5d95c236f1297c13d
51e9a1c581682e8f430f9ee7016f849afc5d2d86
describe
'16849344' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAOD' 'sip-files00054.tif'
90522cccc5c0c9f403ac6422e7e9891e
e5264e20cc2dad4cedd80d2c9d24d428d37652d7
describe
'1943' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAOE' 'sip-files00054.txt'
8dfd3284f61255db6027270dcc6e2b29
21cf57a7116462bd657e0a7129c99793e460265a
describe
'31114' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAOF' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
8600f37636fef4c5620411c779340c85
7e24dec2f950d36f73e9b85aeca85a84687de2ee
describe
'701006' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAOG' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
59691165e25a7131896ec3e2286c365b
3a4eaceb127fe14a432b4f3956a22b223990d98a
describe
'157111' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAOH' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
5b35b82e9635fc51873f624165490b28
3ac993e0e063005db6f00f58426041aa42596e23
'2011-12-13T00:04:28-05:00'
describe
'15995' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAOI' 'sip-files00055.pro'
10efe8480e6a5b87ae3ab9850de56f99
928c5bc385b395ebd300760c6960e8a176711542
describe
'56528' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAOJ' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
f260f024745a4bd0429d816fe8b6aa7a
823ec58f5ea4f6d1e8680c29fb08c1fc4b72ff93
'2011-12-13T00:04:57-05:00'
describe
'16849608' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAOK' 'sip-files00055.tif'
d2738de83c53fbec93221ba1cbf9ba56
b671d490dd30305abbc80df527ca98a2843390ac
describe
'676' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAOL' 'sip-files00055.txt'
8750db22f897bad4281ad828baa2e0f8
bda361661f4f39cdbe247a9af93b8ab963732fcc
describe
'31430' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAOM' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
856e7da19ce20f43f06f0d338c36552f
5124621d0719cc1db1fb6568dcfe034af2d444a7
'2011-12-12T23:59:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAON' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
6a491b07fe475b235d669f4fb1d95c86
c59d0bd8c3c80eaae0c5d7c985f6dd37585ff4ef
describe
'148015' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAOO' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
79689809d537013ecdd8eaeab3826b2c
4963270a20950e50ab2b41ef03bce62d3ac3c617
'2011-12-12T23:59:48-05:00'
describe
'41497' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAOP' 'sip-files00056.pro'
9847689d75d1a42381b5b476f0bcbfaf
df30976a0bb90d50ca36c21537801198e4454e0d
'2011-12-12T23:58:48-05:00'
describe
'57358' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAOQ' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
2286a5a2e70ddf78f9a8725a0b66fc4f
7ebe1a630326f92ba80d9db502df694c3dd7fbc6
'2011-12-13T00:03:13-05:00'
describe
'16849716' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAOR' 'sip-files00056.tif'
f827410a6c9540403de35e15d2b7fa89
76430632503cf239f1e06d3bc92f24a143880a81
'2011-12-13T00:00:42-05:00'
describe
'1747' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAOS' 'sip-files00056.txt'
35bbbb6c0c552613a460215fa369418d
83cdf6679bde24e9e05ef38259057df269ff3ceb
describe
'31298' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAOT' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
c66cd7a1e0a31586eb7c8b8ab159216e
bd595c2d0a7b537e5c26197aaf71470d6a898818
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAOU' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
3358162c73dd00da8949dda6b31903be
16253372de430f71b543783be9fe8bb6a79e8158
'2011-12-13T00:03:40-05:00'
describe
'155536' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAOV' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
aff5d5c2f0208cee35ae1d57617d9822
53df44378a1fbf30843ea315bb8cba86da7f5866
describe
'26982' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAOW' 'sip-files00057.pro'
fe7eb87bf77a10ca80aa7a9c4f46abbf
7b3ad56c3f3335caccdfe2de15fae836afcc52fd
describe
'56344' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAOX' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
b9e29f92db580fe1ca35880ea97f372e
46f80e038c75b50257a9c3664be34c85f155b23e
describe
'16849460' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAOY' 'sip-files00057.tif'
47a1ca7609c97166809d33737c73f72f
6a066deda3495d6683bb34348a4da38a6a8cc35d
'2011-12-12T23:59:22-05:00'
describe
'1118' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAOZ' 'sip-files00057.txt'
7466638deb38baa9b695cf8f6e9a473f
945ab345ac8352a89a8482390ad0fb3236dee34d
'2011-12-12T23:58:46-05:00'
describe
'30903' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAPA' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
4158ff528d37e0b74ef5e0f092765512
4d9ca8bc56da52f39a1847a2070aca448a8e7ca8
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAPB' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
7152733188a94c71a1035dbcd2a7fea4
4902b37da8da22dd1b406a45065c0b24cf6b7379
'2011-12-13T00:05:24-05:00'
describe
'121074' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAPC' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
079c35a3b1285d268710d9feee27d395
802f2ea81c14a83e2bdb375fca888c9ea70e5562
describe
'33982' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAPD' 'sip-files00058.pro'
50683f5faca9fd6ed020cce3a46be907
256e9fa9097591783c875c3cd50e3e09aa544168
'2011-12-12T23:59:56-05:00'
describe
'49111' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAPE' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
0c33c953cbb2699aad2222936f8fccc0
fecb9058f03bd189e232901a8d945a91f971697e
describe
'16848280' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAPF' 'sip-files00058.tif'
463b30c8ae999c389778538ef528bec4
4a8a2b652d4235c210d18ad5fc3698fb416958d2
'2011-12-13T00:05:09-05:00'
describe
'1703' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAPG' 'sip-files00058.txt'
56d7beef0b3f50dcd574ef8b78eea379
d1ef54a6c92f7ff431d23eda01caf151df593043
describe
'28478' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAPH' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
70f053d634512cee2ec7e1ba5e4d1a07
0bdf5275c4013fb6b7de0d7eee7195dd10ae0d8f
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAPI' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
e57bdc8de235adea6128c855b322b1fa
db356f4ee8d3e17d272d43d1b66de057c85012ca
describe
'169450' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAPJ' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
a9dd0114650970f8fb7f10623071348f
824cd2f4603a1c81c200b5e86de72c7c913ec439
'2011-12-13T00:01:51-05:00'
describe
'9545' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAPK' 'sip-files00059.pro'
d4f6eb77623a1bbcf082087c9c87f5c3
6952c5805a92568fc48ecfd7f0aa24ad62f37ed9
'2011-12-13T00:01:31-05:00'
describe
'58908' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAPL' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
4c23377dc5d0f9e3774f3243161eef78
c5993981f1a3100ea11a743e45c873007b2ac2d9
'2011-12-13T00:02:48-05:00'
describe
'16850228' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAPM' 'sip-files00059.tif'
b56db6fbe6bae8be01d08a823ebbd8de
1cfede2bf574e2df61ab2416062f543f09dcfe85
'2011-12-12T23:59:27-05:00'
describe
'431' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAPN' 'sip-files00059.txt'
e883c98d4c6047b1d42014e4e7334323
0544ae59a575b6a27a88fc08bd6f846ac50f9401
describe
'32456' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAPO' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
c6bf3e9bbb01e38b0f68dd27e8e338a5
81a5f5749478701932c8a793d7349a2eb0426e67
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAPP' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
c27d5d46037f3fea4499dae931309228
f5c151c4874680df6d6e9f1b7b60685d224c46d1
'2011-12-13T00:04:56-05:00'
describe
'127194' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAPQ' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
f28d81a4113600dc2e312dc871a7b7f2
7d4b4dc1c78787fbc92f585258371347752eb7da
'2011-12-12T23:57:03-05:00'
describe
'32792' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAPR' 'sip-files00060.pro'
be8c67ff810dafe7473b440584be8091
0ccee11d2737a9d9028f4af26c968d57c6130bb2
'2011-12-13T00:04:48-05:00'
describe
'51414' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAPS' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
afa090db3f40c531b8562e1bd01c5efb
b00703cdcc54fd4238fc36440e72c9be5648d107
describe
'16848724' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAPT' 'sip-files00060.tif'
1f806d63e0805ef9aa1ea72dd39a3fb6
4e0cce71e5739f29c9bd7e3d666bf0e5f5c41866
describe
'1483' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAPU' 'sip-files00060.txt'
77cbf73a0b6af0493b1526b7bff59589
e5c4bc96d45113944442a99444e088c557a87320
describe
'29378' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAPV' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
85bcb0341ffddcf9feea63a3f7802977
886704f0ea2c21b1aeeda075b656d045d1f9fa7c
'2011-12-12T23:59:58-05:00'
describe
'700988' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAPW' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
815784d967ff7e3754b42e9968bc5eac
4d0bdb6082712f9bafcee51fe677705c94681b70
'2011-12-13T00:04:52-05:00'
describe
'117620' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAPX' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
377dbec97c7f924d7bc91d68ee0cd2f2
44b09d7de5266d7ff913245a709748d427b4ee70
describe
'31873' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAPY' 'sip-files00061.pro'
af0a270aad3f50f122edb2d43dfe5fbc
9f554bfafe1e3e709bea1433e68b381af70566ce
describe
'47781' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAPZ' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
5aeb772ed0a32ba0cbd00042c470bde1
574f0db797d36a7ec43879834bf11ccde3e33bde
'2011-12-13T00:03:53-05:00'
describe
'16848168' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAQA' 'sip-files00061.tif'
4a85d7f0cf630593e6e9acd26132e059
3b97d3fd72c95c9be4c7b18192d07b737430f175
describe
'1632' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAQB' 'sip-files00061.txt'
991cbae8707e12d05df5590ce5722676
cc5818fcbd4a767dfafc1a6d0fafec2ef46c4424
describe
'28143' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAQC' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
93e49ebd5607d3ef62c217c3151015c8
90e7ec4f8a86ed8385db33c99b3472bde8e6570e
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAQD' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
e058ea9c4b038d26f2443696924cb332
eee38aacfa205881fc72806e6b083ef31f6f07e0
'2011-12-13T00:03:16-05:00'
describe
'113660' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAQE' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
b0e5e0de682d2a9dc23975fcec8011bf
d521d1b4da2b29686718aa07c72730e75372e2bf
describe
'27234' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAQF' 'sip-files00062.pro'
740238dae1a0798e3a59e42a7d416c45
1d4e56773530ff9ce19c1ac85f9ba48a9971e8cb
'2011-12-13T00:03:30-05:00'
describe
'46731' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAQG' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
35498ec1dbdfd01701ca3c016c86560c
86f40cb2a59db7cfb131df6599763a387f38e555
describe
'16848296' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAQH' 'sip-files00062.tif'
ba48fbe014af9d6200777d4ffcc6b7f3
66beeea2e517ab9d7a089723c25eb9ea1e2454e9
describe
'1224' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAQI' 'sip-files00062.txt'
7f3823b526bf75e2f714f40e1eaf0142
026fa27a2d5bfe2c9bd84ca5f5475e863b904d94
'2011-12-12T23:59:00-05:00'
describe
'27913' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAQJ' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
9f027d588dbbf452218bf819f3ab4335
a03393536cf7ab324bc6e94b8d2865c6c293c50e
'2011-12-13T00:03:12-05:00'
describe
'701177' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAQK' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
7415e370cac7a14a0a85fb538deac2a8
ae4eacfc06d2e4044622ccb6976a696dff72790a
'2011-12-13T00:00:40-05:00'
describe
'132298' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAQL' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
3a3421ad9c009f8b090534e9cbbc25b6
38fd280cafb3746bb69e8ec1bce31c16c38d58ea
describe
'13217' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAQM' 'sip-files00063.pro'
5315967799f33049af968a084f918410
f75e00936a85244c864032650d531124da62f773
'2011-12-13T00:03:44-05:00'
describe
'50249' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAQN' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
052ce87656b80c3dfb3a8a884968d8f7
f1602350770522bbbae0344ef2217617d1bfc347
describe
'16848720' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAQO' 'sip-files00063.tif'
26cb1c429fd2ebb7d524480f7c493bd6
ca694633967820fff7827f9967ef42a2715cdf24
'2011-12-13T00:01:10-05:00'
describe
'446' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAQP' 'sip-files00063.txt'
54198b01ecc756c39fb2772d9e64afc9
0587616c27892502f67e4eb97048a79e1a7fe959
describe
'29287' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAQQ' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
8dc338b142b3bc6b3dd08073fd2bc996
57813a22ea42636b89db25624d9242285c713b31
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAQR' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
2709f44bf8a1b4c2706f1f28e5920b70
4d25a3926ab7471e2e7cfddb009b224ee765f96b
'2011-12-13T00:05:45-05:00'
describe
'146658' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAQS' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
7e7099bcb56c35f8fa512b24500f898c
0d979d35f86bc2240040aca9ba914f08ec2ccaae
'2011-12-13T00:04:08-05:00'
describe
'45091' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAQT' 'sip-files00064.pro'
d977700cdd3e981ca32676c3aae62f79
9d9153f11c948b792066fbb4b5e2aa51ff3a7667
'2011-12-13T00:00:09-05:00'
describe
'56524' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAQU' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
744b7bcad730b1c69e12d67c9b0d3df9
c27da38d44786e64eb2b77eb51e8d5e12330f4ce
'2011-12-12T23:59:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAQV' 'sip-files00064.tif'
dec6272a9310f8f827a25cbb3cf969f0
a1b6a7df6b69f190ae091f327f4dbdf8e9063d5a
'2011-12-13T00:04:33-05:00'
describe
'1819' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAQW' 'sip-files00064.txt'
511be477d946f9049e242afcbbee7c15
deba49f8dbd90e54cf1b0cacb4a2f9a58093b140
describe
'30766' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAQX' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
b47a2f410cd6f1d062b8094b10d429ee
72c34996e7f4f273e2929789029c86a727331ad7
'2011-12-12T23:58:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAQY' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
ad4cb231466099bfa89a2947134dbc29
580f0833af50bc8483b010dc470f493f237d8118
describe
'137173' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAQZ' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
f025b2007c5ef951b5c2885616d041de
eb9ba1931f6bf17cc80f8bbcb6ed6178cb7e13a1
'2011-12-12T23:59:50-05:00'
describe
'23270' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAARA' 'sip-files00065.pro'
277a9d96a0bc3d0d111b149d09dce1ee
626bed17315bc8c9b8270eb5539e69aefe76a0fb
'2011-12-13T00:01:44-05:00'
describe
'54167' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAARB' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
d312fa2b22679ccd53d80024eaef72f8
1c3bcbee95cf03fa69b212966d073ca428a20091
describe
'16849320' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAARC' 'sip-files00065.tif'
c3648b465da1a40b06fb5c21a1874870
e09f1f03a78619a17709cdec24d88ba6588eed5a
describe
'1076' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAARD' 'sip-files00065.txt'
91784336efabce24c6da1eaaa8854293
1249731d22de1ba933e489ae1c76e96b30fded24
describe
Invalid character
'30729' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAARE' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
a907df2a505c8bf7ae701c7ba2eab465
8c2e45c3ac238bf0067ef5578aeec7a78119f9de
describe
'701193' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAARF' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
060adb13356fac5583d801cf594f1af8
fa3bed81f048ade04aa0b645208088e061695e67
describe
'105029' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAARG' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
0cdc933eabd2dd9930683f5cad927a61
e916567129a0f8f3f6aa4862e04043c7cca78096
describe
'23433' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAARH' 'sip-files00066.pro'
c8b6175a3a9fc8601b26c86642ebcfc4
9d32b454272cc22b8bb45c1500d4a01300928a38
'2011-12-13T00:03:55-05:00'
describe
'45688' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAARI' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
0eb8d535e96d2c92eb7d46bf457a29e6
b46efca3b74ed43d0690637bcc8a197edf3b2c80
describe
'16847932' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAARJ' 'sip-files00066.tif'
c9cc02a0871d770a37ca1db585178dde
837cf453b7c2d3a5cefe1fb73c296525deff7927
'2011-12-13T00:00:33-05:00'
describe
'1200' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAARK' 'sip-files00066.txt'
3023ef8ac19005a8dfab956bc73bb7d1
26c7a7d7b73352decade0b131e8844950497f6b4
describe
'27544' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAARL' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
59f687bf5c8be097538bce040c5d6677
8999b9a77b3c39bb0b329f940706f9a4e936947a
'2011-12-13T00:05:41-05:00'
describe
'701189' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAARM' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
d9c3076ce0114a27c2788df754c05298
c86973619515272dc88a46cc0f0590cefce88bf5
describe
'137591' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAARN' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
4810cf720fd98432a41e7585dd9ad7c1
6a77e325a1ef4b65d9affd64033e2b1880ec86ce
describe
'6871' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAARO' 'sip-files00067.pro'
96a612a9cbd8e87b6ec47e37a3c6d45b
1eef593ff7adf85c4099a86f40d8e8b705c3294c
describe
'51770' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAARP' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
e53b5a6ef1f6b37c09a66ada01644a09
c4ee2fef71966feff0bbd9d9f2467dfe777bad30
describe
'16849040' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAARQ' 'sip-files00067.tif'
44ea59e9c6f1e88cecb40b0654e267e9
61d482f4e8c9789f8b1bac494cca35a3670d1357
'2011-12-13T00:02:15-05:00'
describe
'296' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAARR' 'sip-files00067.txt'
5ae8de4d43da223a51a3f135f8a89a9e
5299d01c6478e09b4a78d7645886f6a483e2b9e0
describe
'29901' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAARS' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
87cc5a1c5d20c0279105e5f82bbd438f
48e28e5b2cf96a8ceee2d5c031006190c3676bef
'2011-12-13T00:04:11-05:00'
describe
'701172' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAART' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
a3831916f98d4063022c86c1461815a6
68bda3021a9ad58dffc967b792be9d3c6a7ecf8a
'2011-12-12T23:59:04-05:00'
describe
'109150' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAARU' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
b3d2b000d9916f5011f6d1a64bdbb9f0
ec1e424ec71d549ea2a5a40c151a29c0ace05ada
'2011-12-13T00:03:39-05:00'
describe
'25019' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAARV' 'sip-files00068.pro'
6abf5e6042e9cf8403b9a8a90772043b
282a041255f8ba893f5aa4b4b1fe1d97ea192b0a
'2011-12-13T00:05:37-05:00'
describe
'45987' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAARW' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
dc163979feeb51947197063b6a70ef7c
494a6b994e5cc27d2fc869ff4cd42e1bbb0f1c95
'2011-12-13T00:02:56-05:00'
describe
'16848020' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAARX' 'sip-files00068.tif'
55c546fc4be575692afed54efb0706d2
18d996b13e3dee2c266ef75a86c7f90dcb21813f
'2011-12-12T23:58:03-05:00'
describe
'1209' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAARY' 'sip-files00068.txt'
45f724039ab8aa5612299ebace898286
ecb8ba1da5f8523b890862704ffe79b3deda85fa
describe
'27660' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAARZ' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
271445d26dd908bbc3b14fd798198f1b
f9a8cba48aaa8c4fb98c5129cf536a324ea2248f
describe
'701024' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAASA' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
16fbdc132d9ef8707616d0b8beb1b6ba
8cd013c0484d724a4132485a0c7267e9229e952d
describe
'166437' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAASB' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
61e2f622167f320acd3862dd3aa6e777
79b69079ff34dd811474eecdeea0ad1adff9e6e9
describe
'7231' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAASC' 'sip-files00069.pro'
7a948408f5b27987aa93b8f595ff7aa4
79e1fa47fd0b3355fea4a00add1fc76b9512b14d
describe
'58119' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAASD' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
22f6c48b6f9140e3b46d0f7e6a9f686c
d67540ed3eb69312056b701492159ed0ac0e9dd9
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAASE' 'sip-files00069.tif'
17c289ddde71ddce222fc9b08073c3ef
9665e03996e6a57fd9e02d5f8be7be6bd04550be
'2011-12-12T23:57:16-05:00'
describe
'327' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAASF' 'sip-files00069.txt'
faaa72238364b6911fefe7c04ba22438
d19225d02912cbb3194ba91b4f6c714c615aed0c
describe
'31839' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAASG' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
effc5a1df038824c5f3a4398734e13a7
706f3fa2d4274af5060167e558f11dbdd1a7608b
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAASH' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
292dd8c74b7b6ab4f763b00d68550722
79addcbcf98aec0e42784ce92354696b341a5baa
'2011-12-13T00:03:47-05:00'
describe
'156094' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAASI' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
774779d4bf4ee77ef5924bfec2d352e4
3096e588efeb5f292ec44630c9d32aaaf0b5ce02
'2011-12-12T23:57:23-05:00'
describe
'50546' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAASJ' 'sip-files00070.pro'
797cfd6ef9358a40d9f96d348d1698cd
90ebd990a9849caff4585e22fbecb3eb13ed6c57
'2011-12-13T00:00:22-05:00'
describe
'57430' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAASK' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
8e8fa41153231bbec2f7f9d12697ca2a
7b0f6a0b7abf8e3bbe884360dd7ad099fa4ffa3c
describe
'16849376' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAASL' 'sip-files00070.tif'
b753e2463fbaa75b2472618c4a237514
6429ab3c3f268ae0e4ed72860b39d8fc2907b88a
'2011-12-12T23:59:35-05:00'
describe
'2129' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAASM' 'sip-files00070.txt'
80600a717720b42f4dacd527fa319f76
161721da7dc31fc84f501caf971a9deed272ebc1
describe
'30665' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAASN' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
a80fcaee06a41d0fc75674041d4eb788
96265a6e825b12095da65abd34679970f9011284
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAASO' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
319c78153130a5af62cd7485e3ffc5c7
32d3212ace606f7de526866d875592f77939c454
describe
'154700' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAASP' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
a4d3d51c02bfca81bf95d37105ce07b8
2b0da4480e936aad6aca3d4b234d9956d7913806
describe
'49495' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAASQ' 'sip-files00071.pro'
06adce260c77b2460ab9e28218e85418
294900ae145029ddf31b87936b14e4d0aadbcc7d
describe
'57712' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAASR' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
aba239617edc89925b65b810a471b4af
fed6eb3b8322c8e672b08269ee0e04c1e9fdf30f
describe
'16849340' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAASS' 'sip-files00071.tif'
68c85ae8c6d73ee6748717de3c1c675b
79cd6746b03850591ec72aa343c2626a0abc108d
describe
'2041' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAST' 'sip-files00071.txt'
b612ceedb22f573150c6958b0a71db4a
b419cf92614d9a252b5067ba8717d32cc12c6bfa
describe
'30905' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAASU' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
2b74290a689ec3128d8b51fc35c6067e
09b1b670d28018bfc257966834f44ef45fd2b9fd
'2011-12-13T00:03:05-05:00'
describe
'701119' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAASV' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
237e0ce29c8261e717c09097f94c62cf
f7b4dae95e1abd884364d06e8850a75c27db2989
describe
'101416' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAASW' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
26bdc5e5d76ddb3adc75abf9c7ad1b65
89bcba5a831bfb842970eaaccf46ba811cf82703
describe
'21934' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAASX' 'sip-files00072.pro'
885e2918c82f215fdd93b6aee3b83523
8ca43903d5fb4df905961322501eeb2bc7558167
describe
'43977' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAASY' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
f739e531313a0fa8c709ea0c043ebf6c
95312107a62ab960689731a10217ba86ae7b4233
describe
'16847868' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAASZ' 'sip-files00072.tif'
c558bfd13b4deaf70c8fa6139cc00c81
c580d63620231b58b30148594755c16b2852bde5
describe
'1186' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAATA' 'sip-files00072.txt'
4265da1f1d7c5e194630cc954856d590
19632c9da71c3d2c45f67f92be4b8bb9cf84b89f
describe
'27334' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAATB' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
b4563fec81b057a7d637c506f847b386
d00d15820e5fb493e6f090c5a6e723b1323b550c
'2011-12-13T00:03:32-05:00'
describe
'701072' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAATC' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
fc6ed7c615666850d01a887f1f6d465a
d76432889887af2555f564c44630ac91aa563847
describe
'137332' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAATD' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
91554ab72e55913054e531f02f408579
6caa20af246459a6451816b39e23cb7286fbfdc2
'2011-12-13T00:03:54-05:00'
describe
'7565' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAATE' 'sip-files00073.pro'
2b503211a4f51560b4f5ea3ef0580e62
cda6deac7ed91cc4fad22cf989dd2e00f5feb6cc
'2011-12-13T00:02:19-05:00'
describe
'51219' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAATF' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
256439607cb54182728210357228fade
33ddb166c2e286ba2452b9c33f5fadeebf4893b1
describe
'16849116' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAATG' 'sip-files00073.tif'
1cac36736e2f607ce37a09ee38a8be9a
eb87f513fe30419519445e2dae014b5fd2bf08a2
'2011-12-12T23:57:48-05:00'
describe
'415' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAATH' 'sip-files00073.txt'
971d10c6fe32fcea777ca3d5b5b37057
e4677d7a94e0b2181537c7f0ef5cb5a0693255c8
'2011-12-12T23:57:30-05:00'
describe
'30398' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAATI' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
9686ff6a3f53d0771ae105e2aee77e8e
cce1b0a93153d3e15e108ea9bf913eb02828cacf
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAATJ' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
1a20f8f2f66fdb53eec57f09bc0466dc
3cd3c178a7e3f7570d24afe1cd15b77ae6c1ca2f
describe
'119838' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAATK' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
969aac791eb390c318c0ca8fe1d328bc
e93c2df245715beb6329f41ed775af6023a41a4f
describe
'29819' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAATL' 'sip-files00074.pro'
5c5d9cc9d1ebeb4d2fc392c32e641a7b
4747f3260dd1d7b651e4473be476fef9b562bbd0
describe
'48175' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAATM' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
903e9f5dd6a2476c2811f7cf059812aa
59830170c3f1df74c72934521d0a88faaa1692e1
'2011-12-13T00:05:49-05:00'
describe
'16848372' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAATN' 'sip-files00074.tif'
4f8e88f6900393b9f608d8cf32cadefb
61e09b66eb42790517a8756bd9dc32e4818db8d7
'2011-12-13T00:00:47-05:00'
describe
'1371' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAATO' 'sip-files00074.txt'
e4552b963d4941fed08e545b03e42033
688b5b7fffc9ebdfed8b71acf0309f4a334532b0
'2011-12-13T00:00:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAATP' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
c477528d750bed8cb19b3b78e741b3d4
68a45e970c3ad8bec06a4275296bdede569f1384
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAATQ' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
370c117e657e28b022a2c1ad23d38745
b0aea7c61f6ef6795adcf1790f6041983bc26019
'2011-12-13T00:01:41-05:00'
describe
'147995' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAATR' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
dddf82a63e4b1511f472909526570c7c
314990287c9b25041b5df98d31213c1dd8337d96
describe
'10816' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAATS' 'sip-files00075.pro'
76d1b85f9384c7f2f2136b5e096207d0
b0f12adafe9f22e3f708c4e66cfb247d00d32eab
describe
'53855' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAATT' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
c85334b0a61d794a9b86d9cfdacc1403
f5afb247e13e98868f76509da43ffe5fed049c20
'2011-12-12T23:57:47-05:00'
describe
'16849512' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAATU' 'sip-files00075.tif'
b6491a885096610120d119f05249e934
fa03433b8b82a20201ca2a8c6cbc8c22f625d5d5
'2011-12-13T00:02:41-05:00'
describe
'511' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAATV' 'sip-files00075.txt'
3562d579446070a83318c6ea73d31431
3167a2e717ac311ea82b08faa19adcb20e170d50
'2011-12-13T00:00:54-05:00'
describe
'30981' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAATW' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
e448446f675e0198867cfe66c527ea2b
76856c134cda4a37165d8eacabd31a5267defe23
'2011-12-13T00:00:00-05:00'
describe
'701160' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAATX' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
630a86c8d29312cabbb58e1638d9a39c
18e87d9fb497c03be1e5e4bc375dd0f380d5d9a8
'2011-12-12T23:58:21-05:00'
describe
'111708' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAATY' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
a4235efbcb5ec40c3b393ab1cf29815b
60ae91b02e66130b3b17c91376d54c2779b6f4a5
describe
'28171' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAATZ' 'sip-files00076.pro'
0457ebc9490873ca4363d7ef4c3c8b80
0157ca914a3f97c3133ef3908edeb52bbd2bbdf4
describe
'46202' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAUA' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
18f1bfbad4b59bf9d9d51f1eb4a767e1
66a0f8b1960dfb0eefd5f4be33f60a298a851f50
describe
'16847992' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAUB' 'sip-files00076.tif'
455fdb4279dfeaeb8210156f4d8f7220
9b9ce6907d977ea434bb036a4115d308d22c42ff
describe
'1428' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAUC' 'sip-files00076.txt'
60811eec19400ca5ef4b9201bf52d80c
45af498a1a067c915aa3bdf02406352f3b1dc045
describe
'27821' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAUD' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
9732d041baa133765521a30043325798
97de7e73453b7f99ba30e2f438c24d44cc09b71b
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAUE' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
8fc581cac86ead1b82328ad03fc4db1b
bdbcb1f11c1fcde37d0960dee7be117c88ceaf8b
'2011-12-13T00:05:12-05:00'
describe
'108743' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAUF' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
083a3cfab3cfd18d77f7283afe31ab68
9be3df751fdf12146985d0ec766545b96c39e7d8
describe
'14161' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAUG' 'sip-files00077.pro'
dd6237dc63e6f853d6bda234f7d8fb26
2c8f4962fe529974eb9196e53ac4408209799e25
describe
'44510' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAUH' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
520093ea0293abc75919a16460ced8bf
2740350dc814189e4cea5d0560373f6ef0cb42e8
'2011-12-12T23:57:38-05:00'
describe
'16847908' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAUI' 'sip-files00077.tif'
ca794bf5f9ca0c7b56190f141621c261
a64bb92bb660ccafaf6662c10f0c715413cc63c6
'2011-12-13T00:00:15-05:00'
describe
'777' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAUJ' 'sip-files00077.txt'
99dd1f4b7797b790c6c32e3696299d1a
919f0e49946b80324d7b9075a406506d8b7fe2ad
describe
'27521' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAUK' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
8acd2939cbff65bd98dad22ede5fd939
81b7bf50901c7cfd6cb4eacdc4e9ad1c9498a837
'2011-12-13T00:00:14-05:00'
describe
'701117' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAUL' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
50cf91885238237a5675dac1f33b7623
1bfb5a4e4217199fd20327711a78f9b04ff94145
describe
'153168' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAUM' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
6523395368d09132f68c3657bbeddf01
6e576599a6e2d7713c5f757d66871fa70f96a3f1
'2011-12-12T23:57:06-05:00'
describe
'44110' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAUN' 'sip-files00078.pro'
69f6133dc038d2209b006bae4e28cbd1
4eb71117bf202891424fdc71d9b4354bb13e1139
describe
'57400' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAUO' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
c0198739b36b70ea61785a390041a13b
d5e513e5de3de9ed00b7170ac31b8000590af03e
describe
'16849304' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAUP' 'sip-files00078.tif'
f605369c1cab237c0d73371488fa3229
a38678efb45239be86d6a1eca0e7b39e90b8c48c
describe
'1770' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAUQ' 'sip-files00078.txt'
a6464d6b6359f02f2b0ed14e9b444ddf
3d187dd928e5f7c0eaf43ce0a7135cf37b8b9ca9
describe
Invalid character
'31084' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAUR' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
81a8df5249769eaba011341bc4836f2d
c4eeadcb51d47453a59cfa54368f99ffeafae808
'2011-12-12T23:58:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAUS' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
26948129af9b572393fc2c1f40d9a51f
0a5a4a45031ccbfa2205f3446068cd57867202e8
describe
'140914' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAUT' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
9decf5af608df4da2a7ca61c0a944afd
5dfa8f3425b295cf26aff29f23bd2a0bb570241b
describe
'23805' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAUU' 'sip-files00079.pro'
dfd2857a796618a5a5c3dd1184b8fdfa
f0a6e6c95158521fdc7a16f9409d9e06501e3023
describe
'53103' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAUV' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
ad348b54d2de823c336fe97e1054ef11
e023694ef00f1e5c32690babe4e8da3171bc57da
describe
'16849112' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAUW' 'sip-files00079.tif'
ec5838fff3bfc185c8b6fe17e21c8d62
9d05993c52d1d32f97fdda02e094dd3ce7256e3e
describe
'950' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAUX' 'sip-files00079.txt'
3003ba8a85697405cce9458989daddf4
20fede841bc14cdedc86134663322f2d162dfb42
describe
Invalid character
'30512' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAUY' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
81c7b19889d177b21c1d7073162a1c2b
db481f6b8cdcd0369fa13d2f639cfe74b34644ab
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAUZ' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
f47ef99677ca94c4e395c54848710dfe
f545e8b57ad2c4da069b7de2745d12d3e5fb351d
describe
'164778' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAVA' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
83f08768d14dfe1fc334696e16f1f490
947939adc5cbbb97b4e2a6252e7e270fb5579410
describe
'53091' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAVB' 'sip-files00080.pro'
10ea18187316f3a57a687a90c0e73394
528d8c794bacb65bf50f73023c17e40139d35fbd
describe
'60521' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAVC' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
f204560f9c8500456afa7c16839438d6
a77ad90ae58f097d1e22d0a978f2efb241062d6c
describe
'16849572' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAVD' 'sip-files00080.tif'
b3226d898e854c8f05a7fbe80b3c8861
467bdeb96949ec79e300dc16c73cbde5eae7598e
'2011-12-13T00:05:23-05:00'
describe
'2144' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAVE' 'sip-files00080.txt'
76d15060d924793292bd8c5ad3a9fc11
3e2a11e6068d10b35e8d5c14fba611b985bf27a1
'2011-12-12T23:58:37-05:00'
describe
'31835' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAVF' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
62906ba8ace15e2e1372c67439301890
7ea2abeeda8caa814fb6d1948cfeb1fc6464bff2
describe
'701187' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAVG' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
7c69a58f3a4bcd0c3afc88f9d9aa27ee
9e38f58aa9be4c41c75a0158e42a5f537b472a4b
describe
'116238' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAVH' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
5ce00196bc243c40b447be6d04d2ea24
06715d75c59553f68b501cd867f53f456e9008d7
describe
'28460' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAVI' 'sip-files00081.pro'
3b956cb6dff6954d3013063cf8040911
8ebcb1f4f6edf005b14764af9ca2163dd336918c
'2011-12-12T23:58:16-05:00'
describe
'47421' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAVJ' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
c1a2707804e232d849a5c1a21d4d3c5a
16520626aba7ebad3d42cc60cf88881f628c3ed5
describe
'16848384' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAVK' 'sip-files00081.tif'
b89f7e75eb736e9635dd34b46e34fbe2
765ffd5ceaf259e97af2b935c8a327ae09d189dc
'2011-12-12T23:59:53-05:00'
describe
'1343' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAVL' 'sip-files00081.txt'
1891dfd5e5b9fcdd9a8cb9a459f2cb82
4a8ddfa7946b866e172737bb0c55cc3c36eeea5e
'2011-12-12T23:58:25-05:00'
describe
'28377' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAVM' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
8bc6f0545fceaba98f92ea52b267783d
5ad528a2413b64febac6d38a4b3af2b9e6aad68f
describe
'701165' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAVN' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
a56a9f8b268ccf0f9b8768d57667de2e
2aff93c8709a114ea3f61e549f9b42787f128e99
describe
'100768' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAVO' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
50b598470873db73cc0452285afb0056
fb1cefe336be334c99f5acbdb430a33fcbfe4740
describe
'19182' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAVP' 'sip-files00082.pro'
6c68ee2c4ad01c97027920ffa26edbc9
a623863c92eef221f4a27966d008a5fa8b03a194
describe
'43233' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAVQ' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
1cb64613386741d321f2e4b278622c4b
151474811911ea02bb9d1fdf8cc0469f71af1a70
describe
'16847584' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAVR' 'sip-files00082.tif'
f47fa104f104c5ece30a1beb20a88a2f
26cb5944b1ca346aa803a1495201ca881e3314e5
'2011-12-12T23:59:14-05:00'
describe
'911' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAVS' 'sip-files00082.txt'
b5631af96addd15619b160c4d023b384
0ede6a5972b1b606f3d54dd08939c475c5feb950
describe
'26680' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAVT' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
b93630c31b5cb88445a7f36ea179e835
e6bf64d0957705532934d8d606eed72fed65ddc3
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAVU' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
041245609763fa8b3445bfddf610829f
a17afe983acab1786bd7f4b4a989451bdba2a1db
describe
'137189' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAVV' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
84df3b48b84cfb9a6e7689b4472c3714
6a704836eef17938b773127ef51b85fb83da0be9
describe
'12119' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAVW' 'sip-files00083.pro'
38276e95f05d47cdf7c97984d028e7b7
309022415705167f475eb995824518e77b02e96f
describe
'51738' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAVX' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
b7915fa535d1feb0ef2cbffa39c17bdf
7c9732a1b5fd82c93f637e48cdae8876f27e4ed7
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAVY' 'sip-files00083.tif'
e38eac4efef55e309cefc9ffdac6d908
c2702b87de64fcb12df855868af8ec00d13c7f03
'2011-12-12T23:59:32-05:00'
describe
'549' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAVZ' 'sip-files00083.txt'
4782f4c74c6786fe3189a69226dc43fe
532f9ced070cbd268c8479cb44e76b91735215f0
describe
'30386' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAWA' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
301bd39c00b50dc2e42d4af2564d5fcf
7a0a43ebd515bd10fff4ede2069192b7f846b587
describe
'701127' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAWB' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
a51d91ab31688290464fb11e104ba0fe
12d49edf58211826d250eaa34b7696fff92fdd83
describe
'144653' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAWC' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
4d40c2fa6078b9d9178548f6b5b5d0d9
1da46cece72d1160494dfc30a7c34264d788a579
describe
'41384' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAWD' 'sip-files00084.pro'
7a04566deafbe4be0170b7109c3039b9
63cc381bd22ac501c5fd0a466196ee8080b93989
describe
'55528' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAWE' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
d2a0357b19cd793c4f49b044eb4854a1
ba37af9647b4bea21ef485cad5ba2368984049ec
'2011-12-12T23:59:49-05:00'
describe
'16849368' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAWF' 'sip-files00084.tif'
20ca4ac23bc36d4a0b5100ea0c33a052
f7ee3c326c92c24d2993cb04c820de77196aa270
describe
'1701' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAWG' 'sip-files00084.txt'
6f8f52a2fefdc71605e462df2e8f3562
4b48f045cb7c3b53b9bf82d930422960759fbc94
describe
'30794' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAWH' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
27fd7bbda61c99117907bbe9148f6113
40c02d463c0318f3e63869e4a98c64e8b33d2be8
'2011-12-12T23:59:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAWI' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
c972962a1d02bde8f1e751c8aba6d3df
3e01e0b676cac93425d16738ec8758649aada74f
'2011-12-13T00:00:21-05:00'
describe
'149000' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAWJ' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
555ce76189d75f61fc9628d89af521f0
bd02e4f3a9b5ef0f20dc99d7839f377d28a48352
describe
'24197' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAWK' 'sip-files00085.pro'
b7383054ae3faf87bd48de04c40b0e0f
0fde097081d794f1e970875ad1017f94738b7b06
describe
'54063' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAWL' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
e0be10720293130a10a487cac666faec
3a78db60ef429cd5a3a976439b653861eabb11d9
describe
'16849108' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAWM' 'sip-files00085.tif'
dba97f3021bdb7e8a8299b22612468b9
4a60ce1f4d6cb587f060fb2066bfb65aebfc48fd
'2011-12-13T00:00:04-05:00'
describe
'1065' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAWN' 'sip-files00085.txt'
5e50f8cfcaa0c81ffc03084e28fae082
76aa01213a092142982b4cf7a319c14d828e3630
describe
'30482' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAWO' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
eed9916dbe43e5ca0d9f14f0d08f34fb
730b5380f2b5e0c1546cd0051fa5dae17405a2bd
'2011-12-12T23:56:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAWP' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
3969f507dbbe15ead0bc32e29b5bb812
886636cd33d7f8a8b926741f8f86e68d1a1cd53e
describe
'114946' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAWQ' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
a06f301cf6630be811eda7dd179076b0
4503d4944923c2e886e247d5ed9bc73042ef6ae5
describe
'28079' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAWR' 'sip-files00086.pro'
6b82b6017c5c25e956ce10c003d6fc2e
0294473cacdd4b6c731b29e27bb3768eaeb09b7f
describe
'47243' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAWS' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
6e7bfd2b6a832e656e6457757066de4e
e0ff186182de070b1ba0b4e146de3bf813477472
'2011-12-12T23:58:27-05:00'
describe
'16848224' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAWT' 'sip-files00086.tif'
08f9c1db73cac5557b6873d8c00d0c79
fb5ebca4d5374437a2068038e02f9eb4832626fa
describe
'1397' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAWU' 'sip-files00086.txt'
94a34c61bd47c2b1f482d247a73b784a
1c900e3bf8678da691c8cf0d59b0bd64e123d511
describe
'28000' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAWV' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
f68d5a192fcdbe079f745563e77e2121
0e9aaa2ebc4f87a9d628e3a57fb8bc97cf4b71d4
describe
'701001' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAWW' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
d875492dcd184be3c80e47e1daa9e0e0
b0f50f36b8938aff0174ad34cf8ad50f05fc957b
describe
'159282' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAWX' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
67e890474502183784bd1dcee96394a1
0c11117c99a38149a653216056f646503aa6cfa6
'2011-12-13T00:04:30-05:00'
describe
'1973' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAWY' 'sip-files00087.pro'
ec36539749b9fec00ec96fd36cf55a17
dccc7277845489797a78f97449172f9e4593b117
'2011-12-13T00:00:36-05:00'
describe
'56890' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAWZ' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
59cff6ae472ecbe0e9b6161e3699a2e5
c4edd9eb998b23c4e791f7fe51bf0a16480ef88c
'2011-12-13T00:04:53-05:00'
describe
'16849780' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAXA' 'sip-files00087.tif'
61675ef0796bcf696277e304bd56299e
b5765d7617e8aee9b0c40bc4ad8da12cbd237110
'2011-12-13T00:03:57-05:00'
describe
'204' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAXB' 'sip-files00087.txt'
6dd85494478dd1e1490e56a8246fc043
210ebd03b8153a94bae0a5bf1dcad1f3f55948d7
describe
'31933' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAXC' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
0202fffed1ec1e84dda84ce7141236ba
3e6dd2971c6a575068286b42c4b6d080199b1e74
describe
'701068' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAXD' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
9c94e790009b2e4b9504026f8a1a89e0
ce933011b86e4403fdf28f1731cdd02693ada9a5
describe
'129166' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAXE' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
7acfcc771442fab43ad709db5f11d662
925ca2bf66aefd62ff9aae4d165923608b16ae8b
describe
'33597' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAXF' 'sip-files00088.pro'
3932e9cec6de6b84ef646a818e5a1147
5595f2311640f54c253f1c7503ec5c653b48a64b
describe
'52156' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAXG' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
7f24c37b5662fd9c8a812dfc6d419c49
41ce562a4c8b28507abca97e6a66b5207612593e
describe
'16848716' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAXH' 'sip-files00088.tif'
bdf29fcedbeb103f435db7e7e9d10951
6ed71b7136827444d50bb50e2eef8c66e5793ba6
'2011-12-13T00:00:43-05:00'
describe
'1480' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAXI' 'sip-files00088.txt'
0f7c253a487e7efbf2f4b5281a4f4dd6
cb73dcd16929b247d7ce20da55e63dbd0e532ab3
describe
'29735' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAXJ' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
fc6b565328cf31b5280a270675b3cf44
037e6d93650ad335c729a2e0ac2276605e618e76
'2011-12-13T00:05:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAXK' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
76617560c2edcab10211ffea93a4cce7
a197b731f95bd76b22f001c0d025427936b0086f
describe
'143085' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAXL' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
1781620bd5dbc63d29f146c89b6feefb
df0a77fc3290b072bab39a0b9a6c7480f75bd657
describe
'17120' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAXM' 'sip-files00089.pro'
7c2b0d06fcc6f8029bdecf40c704abd8
33e5da028fd6aa7da27deff360c529c673adfc7c
describe
'53702' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAXN' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
f3bc2229ec0cc99ada775ae1a34e768c
d1610876093f6e58fa354f62c6c160f07ba61048
'2011-12-13T00:00:37-05:00'
describe
'16849104' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAXO' 'sip-files00089.tif'
e7963515dc2bfa0b8b5cb8e6042de68b
7cd49fd7bebc4a880959dcff3808423473a0d6cc
'2011-12-13T00:04:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAXP' 'sip-files00089.txt'
b6eb0fd693304dc191d72c4ad88a28f3
8fe2208bcda41757248de2890ea93a540d26fb25
describe
Invalid character
'30380' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAXQ' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
580d9eac000a1b7621d8bcdde1515644
0181e832a01c967d7a208361f8954094f2a8e642
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAXR' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
cde0e92ee73806cbcf2d6366b327e309
2b7d1ee70060756c56d0c63e7ba1b678ca150fea
'2011-12-12T23:58:08-05:00'
describe
'135602' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAXS' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
efb54b687106c1f07a5af49ac771e447
71c8848d85500bb7c2937b6623c190ce46425bad
describe
'39578' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAXT' 'sip-files00090.pro'
b16c2bf4aaa5483bcaf403f6e749a659
a1e112287ebcf98c5116ef13bf61b02883ee7d1a
describe
'52165' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAXU' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
84729f22e5be27533eccb3bbf06abbc8
c685e70901f4748fd854552e52dd50ed9bc5a047
describe
'16848532' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAXV' 'sip-files00090.tif'
0c6c52fb536d3ef42b72c1f04394d2ab
b521e346247fcd8a9d4351c5f990f7047fd34603
'2011-12-13T00:01:15-05:00'
describe
'1685' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAXW' 'sip-files00090.txt'
6ce88a51bed8ab10e5646ac11a34df1d
2bc8e7e11fd9605bff6e62e848079a15cf2efafe
describe
'29241' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAXX' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
5cef566963ceba3bd8b3ca3317adda42
c395ad286f7ca2cdfcd47f7fc20027f8320add65
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAXY' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
4140dba8c2ed3f310128d720dd339409
7c4993f8762c3bef5afe67582462d8c816aaba21
'2011-12-13T00:00:30-05:00'
describe
'113404' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAXZ' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
538a074296d6eaa73e06591ad4179319
1f295bf7ca88bbd0903b8aeb01e7561de618b70a
describe
'7385' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAYA' 'sip-files00091.pro'
8667418b7d5f61e5d10396773ddc4d28
c03601123a867d8361d302436d339452b549ce49
'2011-12-13T00:05:00-05:00'
describe
'45146' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAYB' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
49d06adb5fd9baf929309cee5e777696
099e43d44f6c079c4e68a28e18a913e321c0791b
'2011-12-13T00:03:33-05:00'
describe
'16848108' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAYC' 'sip-files00091.tif'
ebebf6f9a32e733764a0872793c84ff8
462047ad60dd09a60a64da5d60c9874cd4c4c160
'2011-12-13T00:00:12-05:00'
describe
'401' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAYD' 'sip-files00091.txt'
ae22cfdb81625ccb80aa320fc120e491
da78e57f56647f9cffa0b805817e7028b1e69829
describe
'27954' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAYE' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
fd5ce5cec6c1af80358173d15b23a3f8
969aca81e7a226f1b73a5cb1dcdf88f25a28c1c5
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAYF' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
27fceec1055664761dff697f014dc1cd
91d98b24e328e2659b87d41a91399606ffc0c2d0
describe
'101475' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAYG' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
431937bf1092122c356b6d408eb9149a
d4d14d66b66241d68a92cd8803487c1808c39eff
describe
'21884' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAYH' 'sip-files00092.pro'
681dcc9b308ebf811d500618af74e439
8c6016f80ce52418f758ac68e7978a64761be9a9
describe
'41847' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAYI' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
7cdfd05f059fc8971f605689e981dc3d
34c45a783bd950b16ce2d649bbc310b662300958
describe
'16847288' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAYJ' 'sip-files00092.tif'
b20fca0799d609f46a11ab913c072b89
cde533e7e02c73be9db2a535612b950b219ae95f
'2011-12-12T23:59:36-05:00'
describe
'1026' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAYK' 'sip-files00092.txt'
043eab262c4cf229cb49f2d8fc558c15
4f7ad06eb93b024bbdbff7d771ef6f2491f1db95
describe
'26181' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAYL' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
76c26a9a5928d2a0c9fe0dd5ea47d1ef
1c32f34df14420bb398eebcd27bb58760a6d93f3
describe
'701142' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAYM' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
09d2013bba06321e908a12532cf8511b
d70306116ffe49f8210dc66d97bf5f9c63c2b4af
describe
'124710' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAYN' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
b97d06bc620e16a4d572da710c8226a8
6b820062a3198c5b522ea92d307b155a1804aabd
describe
'5245' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAYO' 'sip-files00093.pro'
49da32a459e419fc38a62ddf031850b7
1350734863baf101d70705f5a391ca79e8b4ead6
'2011-12-12T23:59:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAYP' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
2279d70a395c2d1dab826e8183405783
5ed1b5f16551b3a317dac20338112c496613f9b7
'2011-12-12T23:59:47-05:00'
describe
'16848520' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAYQ' 'sip-files00093.tif'
8ae814d0808720b8d5eef475594e84d7
9226096af46ed63f8cc7ed824fea7caca356e7fc
describe
'281' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAYR' 'sip-files00093.txt'
47ebd670c8fd56b61328f5631e369311
af7d8c05ce0422e61ceef94ad0dd43b655b00cc7
describe
'28957' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAYS' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
a7ae08fcb22f5e037a091c72755b1114
052cf1f61f8c9b6d7a8f4dc7e227c8dc52230e58
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAYT' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
b426e470d7f0405a7f7e3497ae85047e
8b4833d47c495c9b55f4d8e62c3e1bde028f73a4
describe
'154025' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAYU' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
c859cd5dce427bf8aaad37e2e19915ff
57f8ee455115d8a0364cdc2ba4a8b09989ecfc00
'2011-12-13T00:05:02-05:00'
describe
'47463' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAYV' 'sip-files00094.pro'
1dafea70940612d1a4ca95e8999b9076
b1fd9d40ec8dacc61506114edfd5e8e11a031473
'2011-12-13T00:00:50-05:00'
describe
'57916' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAYW' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
0744048628ceb54caa500f2c2522921d
cb8d45ddf0797635b6c598477b89f38d8e0a70eb
describe
'16849352' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAYX' 'sip-files00094.tif'
4e3da9e27f2940a4007302af1b665604
615455e0ec73fd8918757459d94d2097b1dd97d9
'2011-12-13T00:03:35-05:00'
describe
'1948' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAYY' 'sip-files00094.txt'
b6e09debca781eef8a2d7d70173bda58
832d74fd111fbb1877263c6ebfeab65ac269415f
describe
'31242' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAYZ' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
5885e867ee8077930fb5203f5e6a47ff
d101a8e3f54183a6b006237f53757dd60df94bcd
'2011-12-13T00:05:22-05:00'
describe
'701150' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAZA' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
3a62171466469506a9e958cf7368bc6f
4678810b117237bed8ba5167fa5cdf2d6f34a681
describe
'146153' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAZB' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
579233142a22456052c2819d3c02e453
6c5af4097a3e21da5c26b3716a88fd66a3a24b35
describe
'15764' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAZC' 'sip-files00095.pro'
eb7e16edf59b2bf68d63fed2753d92ca
7e44e8c05f30c86007bb3dd0a56b340c18cd71dd
describe
'54089' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAZD' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
c7ce6915b7af68a0412182c1a24cb934
d433e295056ffdcf08927c1343a21670e4864c35
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAZE' 'sip-files00095.tif'
487cad7540b26ef54adddbe3281e2d71
ee5df9274f6652e567abd125e256bd04a1050a46
'2011-12-13T00:01:38-05:00'
describe
'713' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAZF' 'sip-files00095.txt'
c6c8d9783f011a40df37201ce89d6ac8
f588368bf555201f8f801d964e6026119bb63590
describe
'30155' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAZG' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
3b82e55f6a47175b20f5c7733b94dafe
71386a662ad8cd71331634c3caebe40cca0f120e
'2011-12-13T00:03:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAZH' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
a05dd6f1e9fa73fbe04c85177c18b368
5e0411489abfe5f587da570193e62a853fc42d48
describe
'162529' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAZI' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
d39ff4576557e8cb5453adc7b82f8ab1
595d8192b5e3535abb5e7f8dacd35aa7d025baad
describe
'52155' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAZJ' 'sip-files00096.pro'
87e7e368a835b0abf1e1736395b16658
cb01b6d0200b2fd5c362386b1ae991528a829c7e
describe
'58522' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAZK' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
71008dcde5642026511c833971bf1ba6
cc2fb53c84e87cf88868de6628dee6874689560d
'2011-12-12T23:59:01-05:00'
describe
'16849392' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAZL' 'sip-files00096.tif'
187a6e47273f1a36bbd6e1194e246163
8c2324b3f38881252dd3a348e81b44b27f1f1ba9
describe
'2067' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAZM' 'sip-files00096.txt'
a844ec4e68a7095a7ee4f86fe721722f
7f5b25ea745cdbf904ad7389550e10a9b1ec5bfe
describe
'31092' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAZN' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
bc5ae4ce2376a0e22fd40fff11cf424d
e8b4f407d4cce10d33585574c1e6f26a4e8f360e
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAZO' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
5676df6eb64271c86a3e2dfac625a3ed
0ca95592deb999ed76d4628f22eb11f53ad99790
describe
'145772' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAZP' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
38056f30e0832a313da837090c691cc7
7ab825600d7cac06e5670584646d01e9ff9dd91e
'2011-12-13T00:02:08-05:00'
describe
'21434' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAZQ' 'sip-files00097.pro'
cf9c9400ea5ebec0695ba688570f41ce
10860acf4c5e96e39488d1e5e7d26b1ee96f0441
describe
'54897' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAZR' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
61c0713bcea9c9d5e8b07c6b1aff4eeb
bfa4bf9a9f23765016ccd8402e40f49006a78cb5
describe
'16849668' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAZS' 'sip-files00097.tif'
2a44697715d7090e13293b7e43a54767
021d6dc6a29fd048f4b691171b1f8f76078343f4
describe
'958' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAZT' 'sip-files00097.txt'
b146c440f95b84e571a00dfad7263155
e405367b6d90d8083d24c7df9e9160735e51a0c5
describe
Invalid character
'31328' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAZU' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
0b9d6b7dda17530a6699b77a9c11023e
bb2a5f55b972adde8efe7c1d48fab55d58a98624
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAZV' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
dbe4329319c81ffeb970eb1eb101cc20
905aef36271a86f1071050eba59f5d1e0db881cf
describe
'159226' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAZW' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
67ace3c977f6a93164ac7bc10cd62306
a183f3c136a57ad82d62a1185ba95d771a2d1b83
'2011-12-12T23:57:21-05:00'
describe
'49940' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAZX' 'sip-files00098.pro'
f3f46e3bed817a2a96cdc20530bf1242
9629ae67fcb86542472f990b48c1e881689c9716
describe
'58697' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAZY' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
71a9c59d77c9db26cc0c17048ec3c8c9
3963b51c90cdee6dd0d6b3e9cbf23b0c01b31bc6
describe
'16849432' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAAAZZ' 'sip-files00098.tif'
66f6288fa5b974424770efb66ab05e03
7bf496c11e1b12a7cdc3090087d596570cf1843c
'2011-12-13T00:01:09-05:00'
describe
'1976' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABAA' 'sip-files00098.txt'
192b3cef677c7f1fd27e6160768e5d62
2f2a8768ca96fdc8a1269318dedb01221493a9dc
describe
'30954' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABAB' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
ec599d279f7cfc5d3e732f0e7f293bf3
e6efa48cf387cb5fd6b962e8669f11d2bc71b451
describe
'701130' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABAC' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
c97f956a1a2d5044f7f3ed13148d1b4c
8bb748529a707ca172582ea7a3ca706dc21b0ad2
describe
'166944' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABAD' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
bc75fe501426d1bf18dc39eaef9399bb
d45ba0efedd9ee7a5df1b18e7ba527f423a00395
describe
'9524' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABAE' 'sip-files00099.pro'
2579d1f38315f75e23dbefb0c9418d80
685a6c106c815b8ea9d90b2a45f35a6916680082
'2011-12-12T23:56:46-05:00'
describe
'58003' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABAF' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
c0ef28a7004fa6a19b6a3f92b4b7d3f0
e41373fb4aa7832d645d236b4e1e8da03ec33b73
'2011-12-13T00:03:14-05:00'
describe
'16849816' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABAG' 'sip-files00099.tif'
069cf8496e75a63ca4495247f25a1a50
d4cecdb36edf8227698ab484df2436f96d958d42
describe
'559' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABAH' 'sip-files00099.txt'
d25716292712838d4d803c9333ebfa48
9960b1b526912c50fee0e5fe3b13d8d7f5787be4
describe
Invalid character
'31926' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABAI' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
b44595be6a7fff2773605f6181a7b835
4891aeb79a7105f9bb541b04d07b1f9f98ef2337
'2011-12-12T23:58:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABAJ' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
b26573d0628694875525aad6cde457da
b3ff7a1825502cd5f2da0b15d96244398e1aaba8
describe
'157546' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABAK' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
dea68f730760f8d541085e57c3de979c
e8bd34b0d4ef91e5bc370dace61fa1f08a171ed2
'2011-12-13T00:04:03-05:00'
describe
'49707' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABAL' 'sip-files00100.pro'
e658d460499169dfdf328a0aefccc04d
54efc3c4bed3510290cc3fa3c708d0a56adecc9b
describe
'58101' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABAM' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
5ec5e211d850353cb24e064fcb6be602
d72c064bf90da522b0cfe25c3234ad74b2e13112
'2011-12-13T00:01:49-05:00'
describe
'16849536' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABAN' 'sip-files00100.tif'
ba7f99edc741ec7e5d9cf018b52520f8
b36f19bbde0d1987585029e517922054eed3311f
describe
'2020' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABAO' 'sip-files00100.txt'
3c86eee9d9a71f8ca3c594123147b100
e8fc1a60e34b5a4a70234891b1283f62339a1526
describe
'30927' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABAP' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
599791c38f2bb84c876c5090bc3618da
24fb12b38bbe06e7f29c68a6d1f73dfa21489880
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABAQ' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
884c54347f6ec9663fda98287004db40
5eae2d1f8b28cc7f5932d9f3013bf98107a173a6
describe
'164726' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABAR' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
af0592187195416ae95a4da778beaef4
c1e34db7e6e2d67d3026e3e7a2091a654a84b392
'2011-12-12T23:58:09-05:00'
describe
'1673' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABAS' 'sip-files00101.pro'
9542567a02fe073a8dd405b8b2441fe7
9169363a93e6c629aa7e69c6f6b43d398f3708fe
describe
'56536' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABAT' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
f717a648bd9652188aa11d0f091920c4
a62929e19cbe09c0185acf8675a54f7433e44c33
describe
'16849528' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABAU' 'sip-files00101.tif'
5f3ebb0e25126ce9adc5f31d0516652d
4880725a860baf48ced589b558799a8e28684e6e
'2011-12-12T23:57:00-05:00'
describe
'62' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABAV' 'sip-files00101.txt'
b9c9a5f06aa1a5105d7e496f87d512fe
98488e8229aeb2ec8e15ad75a66d7c4e7a72e1e7
describe
'30947' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABAW' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
7d5e51c2f1e371b4623d46399f705a01
65471b4a78382d2c54eecadd4a1c3b2aed20bc04
describe
'701178' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABAX' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
644417d76a01bbb5e63640c81b5efc17
45fe35ea49687a518ae144b85ff9b2dd6e7df0d1
'2011-12-13T00:00:18-05:00'
describe
'140078' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABAY' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
2a41462150a9ec8d36714ac45ee0ed56
b30f112f66aac694f8d44c133ec0417039bad1c9
describe
'42243' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABAZ' 'sip-files00102.pro'
bf21e8831051df327d96be15e24a8b8d
a1845ffbd34f71b33a4453d235b0909cf7b14ddc
describe
'53267' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABBA' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
112f6d956cd10601089d7f46b5d533ba
12a4683099ffef0c539be00b25f012cc22a14e04
describe
'16848548' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABBB' 'sip-files00102.tif'
fab62c163130e902f7d4c0e18ac1f440
0850bc7ad42bf09c784ea388ed70922817ce5a0b
describe
'1842' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABBC' 'sip-files00102.txt'
b6384428ec61f62dea2f621150d63d37
1ee70992e07fe47db8e04b9bf4cc06d6e8de21f2
describe
'29576' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABBD' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
aef63377c482f7c0a9f9ab2b12f76f4c
46e916e4043ec79ba31caaf67122f8be96b333d6
describe
'701153' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABBE' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
e419a91268839b24b2f74fad53dd1663
ad2245615a3c1aac68fff2df05371127bfa74ffb
describe
'139346' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABBF' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
1ca654f691309ce63749d64f180c2377
e0c758ce22bf4afa90d70ba9732a0515f9e09992
describe
'18847' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABBG' 'sip-files00103.pro'
fbf1c7311dbdb26980bd34bd52bb7ca3
bba663131d58a78b9951372384dfc73074762713
'2011-12-13T00:01:36-05:00'
describe
'52550' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABBH' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
c6dd5f3875140c9e2d842634030e98f3
80b4ae697a679808d226eaf18ac3f9b60ba8e747
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABBI' 'sip-files00103.tif'
68762178c922aea7816442d44480ad5f
71054a0dbd01e3c17d553560aa089a18d13cdb5b
'2011-12-12T23:59:54-05:00'
describe
'765' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABBJ' 'sip-files00103.txt'
5fac95889b2d7a7e6d6ceda1059f7464
3620939de02523af33449c74146bc57d42919133
describe
'30370' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABBK' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
8f2e3f0eddbb0c88fd728121917606fd
339f433a6aac8f76f091e6d5411513e31ecac121
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABBL' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
9c39a819ae89c3059b8f585e6d616648
8f6ff4c91ed1437471a9accbb92e37f423cb780a
describe
'146449' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABBM' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
8fdc75d4beaebc33c810efb8f47b054a
71bd7269d042afb040400ec42faf33083edbbc54
describe
'43506' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABBN' 'sip-files00104.pro'
93275198bb7ccb4c7e6071c1e9fd1328
d5f0dd41f12d10d86680958d6722a154d7ec3660
describe
'55415' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABBO' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
c6a513677b414ed869166b553696d3bf
c28fbb2a00fcc3359cd514d918236d850003b3fc
describe
'16849364' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABBP' 'sip-files00104.tif'
e01f4bb98d54df0e61da2400ed931a44
a60b8a7947e8f3e8d88ac88855d31790df421442
describe
'1835' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABBQ' 'sip-files00104.txt'
8c76cb067fae11d2f2f88fa84b36ca88
80bd009c246a85e5e85d095fefa8fdaa9821977e
describe
'30616' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABBR' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
dbeb95daaffdd8a39e1115955b5dc4f8
7c06cadfad1345a966658c562fb02d4b6619b03a
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABBS' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
d6ca958546450e4bf75c895dfeb6ec40
824cd7311ad1b6b3c3bb93b20dd8170099fe8685
describe
'170003' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABBT' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
7c6df0ee9eaac4ebbbacdf1c4931beb2
69a8f4dc83fb25ba0a700ff88d2eb45b003e0b69
describe
'6666' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABBU' 'sip-files00105.pro'
062a097cb670e2e856b53d3bedc07ec3
0194c490b9d55e797a510ce51d68dc9a30cfff05
describe
'58262' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABBV' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
4a3941fee85b75864d605b7d957fa6cd
97336732e80936cb455e5baf0e7dbc4205c8d5ff
describe
'16849768' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABBW' 'sip-files00105.tif'
e38366ad2f3c57c2967af1ec60ca28fb
fe911e4685f87d2f2e4a3b4d7a2dcd8dfa425f3f
describe
'354' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABBX' 'sip-files00105.txt'
a61d441c0e02c9bc53dab3788337641d
96c9c9bebba844da384f0b68c67b0c2428db6233
describe
'31918' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABBY' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
cb20b71104a1d5dd1b0736893cca6cc0
cae1de3584066e6ef7dc4a085bba77e94fe56870
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABBZ' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
c21b5e3310aa39a830c5fb5474232ef2
db658824e830c41ca1d48b60b646612d215680b3
describe
'121421' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABCA' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
1394bad41581019c9ea7c222b1b043e9
3960ce8534a8f79ff145bb9fb42666424b479450
'2011-12-12T23:57:27-05:00'
describe
'33936' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABCB' 'sip-files00106.pro'
caa18e1e736b181799d85f31f13c3e85
b05d7fcff6a30930855b4fbbc3c48c98e60c4d9a
'2011-12-13T00:04:17-05:00'
describe
'47843' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABCC' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
db659fe89d4126794e3690597bc46f7a
faee6ba7ec9c691b80bf060051cf4e8035c21081
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABCD' 'sip-files00106.tif'
745a24ab428c21c36b04748d1f2e2260
767736d8ed54c7a1284d3d305c2e06bcdfa07cf3
'2011-12-12T23:58:41-05:00'
describe
'1585' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABCE' 'sip-files00106.txt'
bef51359cbc23beb47de4a14d5d159d8
fbb560310b584e28a73ce019ba9b7fee1bbfb7a2
describe
Invalid character
'28085' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABCF' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
3fdf58805da6484932ccc8be38dccfef
3f0fbfac676a0903e9fdf961c1c203154f0cf4ec
describe
'701167' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABCG' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
b617dee9d1b6c2e3e80bf3c187c9b1c5
3551d310068ac8bb38e6b92c796fa7e93576fa91
'2011-12-12T23:58:45-05:00'
describe
'145094' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABCH' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
34fc0606c0c05c1037cf92de5ec26e4e
dcb0c703fff998bcbefa8edb1327d1c218b9e6c3
describe
'44976' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABCI' 'sip-files00107.pro'
5e3132b67b53601f4b861bde79410fe9
abff234e5c74f19fd19679fff9473a29ea5570a4
describe
'54743' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABCJ' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
0d3fd3121d25c6854105fb29bd8cf57d
38730ef6502945db139f2b62468564cb65311c39
'2011-12-12T23:56:58-05:00'
describe
'16848852' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABCK' 'sip-files00107.tif'
2596333224ff79951e4e73d87342d3ad
cbba4d1c04b67d0182be3b169bae90cbef997cb5
'2011-12-12T23:58:18-05:00'
describe
'1833' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABCL' 'sip-files00107.txt'
8a78f26587c79905ba33ca6546a43011
20df0c3f5776efccea4b6999e470bbbdd7f451dd
describe
'30228' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABCM' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
1c2c16b917521af12675ea775dcfdbf7
d57ffab8d74039fa932a1491ec8f76c65f11b9dd
describe
'701169' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABCN' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
a357dad815cec751244bc88133793d61
81d716cea039a7d6f7661918583744613d008430
describe
'158995' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABCO' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
4bcffc375dd2acb04a94810e4ba91374
88ec436a3045f5640761d7374a2e0135ed94efec
describe
'1802' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABCP' 'sip-files00108.pro'
1a7cca5826653fc90f75ff6cecc21e53
e58218c88c768cc39e18eb33ea098e25cb957cc7
describe
'57498' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABCQ' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
6bf409a02866bdb389a31e267eda5851
0ee9eb91c96b006bdf2c303d9daacb3bb2f412a5
describe
'16849836' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABCR' 'sip-files00108.tif'
64ee60dbefb3e8e9885240b870fccf78
9d1421fa736aa6471e1930071f9ed52d440b95ad
'2011-12-13T00:00:23-05:00'
describe
'193' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABCS' 'sip-files00108.txt'
6efeb0a6e7d81ea5e3f6a25363271e06
70e16407666a31eb4511b8cb911e35a55863ffee
'2011-12-13T00:01:42-05:00'
describe
'31984' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABCT' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
cdac80cbfa440c6966b8c86533612025
6185e62b53a4d023771fd2622c98017fc60cebad
'2011-12-12T23:58:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABCU' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
6e74529658cc9cf41954dd0bdd58d548
b904afa5da21468e5b2d3190890eedfddfc4a07d
describe
'144898' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABCV' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
5c64537ef78f07814146ec07b8566feb
67ba1a428c42ef53a3d347595756a16bbc7b76c5
describe
'41966' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABCW' 'sip-files00109.pro'
b9658327e75d3d89d4d2682cd9d180f0
50b9d529580e6b2e6bffd326e9a4e5048994d723
describe
'55542' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABCX' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
70056dca8d9f0cbfe875b8bef871f5e8
299b3495b6063de3d74abe6e4aaf4bee037ad6b5
'2011-12-13T00:05:26-05:00'
describe
'16849132' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABCY' 'sip-files00109.tif'
bb4820526bdbee08d6278d8d2c310ff2
0a79a7b0943a885632067c69122a98994f3faedc
'2011-12-13T00:04:16-05:00'
describe
'1689' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABCZ' 'sip-files00109.txt'
5631caaa191c55108a4bdffae82740ac
f774df82f733f527c89d4e3a07ad8fa9b2972693
describe
Invalid character
'30279' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABDA' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
3b383d21ee82aa635c9b3994e8707650
3d31b351f38062fc9f55d031895047a5671b3b0a
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABDB' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
f75a0238f7029d2c52a36b6bfe460ad4
8358aec3cf80d5f0bd071191c4b9a8e9bfb98ea6
describe
'141668' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABDC' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
37e5b33eb0e1f1bb6a1b4b7ae8d1ceb6
28f04a9b2336eb09291260d16e342433f79c039d
'2011-12-12T23:58:57-05:00'
describe
'40929' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABDD' 'sip-files00110.pro'
7c23d5b4d4174b111b8f8a7b7dbab0fe
cd794205073b14ca561f46f7e26e80ba25ec3681
describe
'54579' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABDE' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
060b0dcedaa48cd8c2a2ffb33afbdfc4
ba42918705bb9f2122942fd6d1f70235bbfdaf67
'2011-12-13T00:03:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABDF' 'sip-files00110.tif'
11f4fdf2d7021d5dbaf009a0f1f0575d
caabe086fc9ee2ad1be8ab4b99430c76f7832b61
describe
'1728' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABDG' 'sip-files00110.txt'
61995898d49e749a1c1ba0166dd7b415
7e650bfac9a1e7129c11d2353efcaa8839e75039
'2011-12-12T23:58:29-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'30065' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABDH' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
e178386fa1c33be7f2d3c44862d14638
b4b3573ff99ab83fa59a7025207111be03664946
describe
'700996' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABDI' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
0f628de3df57a7ce48bb6f70cfd81925
3b8b937b3996ed80fe5aa3a723d7e3d00c46e84f
describe
'98784' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABDJ' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
272e06074daaaebb08cd40acc18a8556
bf89c9faee76f16e96e4f50f13eb515aec96433c
'2011-12-13T00:05:31-05:00'
describe
'4619' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABDK' 'sip-files00111.pro'
a61e0578fabadaaaac8d447fcd02fd1a
b66f16b21810cc2301c1bc04edd99e8be882c143
describe
'41482' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABDL' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
195dfe86a3670a56acc22f120f10dd6e
3fa68dea45dba5b417b44e1ba682d100b2e01fce
'2011-12-13T00:03:23-05:00'
describe
'16849096' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABDM' 'sip-files00111.tif'
7a5be2787e43faed991b6fcfa75a18d3
da1228d0457529c0daf205f72c5344de8cdc52da
describe
'217' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABDN' 'sip-files00111.txt'
96373c362a0daac3eead5d69563a1844
0d700658f43616f67ac374ce0afd4fcf335a5347
describe
'27432' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABDO' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
e01450904237c16b0a9b09104c597bbd
d2f2641581569f89718d9df632a41b4c390f2cbd
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABDP' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
eb278252e5187b48112bb2998f5c10ee
673c9fc20d5b350a0000c22cc67bc896b9a6f739
describe
'112126' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABDQ' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
8fda70b3f6545ccea2b38ae56a879410
abd1b4dfab1f83745efb4f938dc3ddac8e135e4e
describe
'26263' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABDR' 'sip-files00112.pro'
8d60a5043a6c728a7c54f34565a6e8a7
0312303b2493f1fa91e1390f3a691551548db4af
describe
'47528' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABDS' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
bc28503394a7399e37061caa484b5687
ec0fc5af6605b11603844a82c3051d8a741067da
describe
'16848220' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABDT' 'sip-files00112.tif'
1899ff8da101cb9b1b3254274f8100d5
df768d44e9619a718ef998b2c8c8583f558e3f2b
describe
'1356' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABDU' 'sip-files00112.txt'
ad68b02a882f336b8c6e06ebd49594b1
bf8b9d03ad28801a679e9bf446289e5135060fb5
'2011-12-13T00:04:50-05:00'
describe
'28265' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABDV' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
a8228eefb3c24ec12b2be36782cf0648
85f72c388d3ce642e294274d9c631d3e0eeb5082
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABDW' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
e7d76ec1fa82de7cf1d5ab561da668b5
114d972e4a9f27574951e16c07ffddcda3afad93
describe
'114623' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABDX' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
eb8b4e3fdaa48260c3a52f66cee6d940
dbc463809b3d859df3f1bdf2fc5b73ac589a9a6a
'2011-12-12T23:59:52-05:00'
describe
'9109' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABDY' 'sip-files00113.pro'
0e5cbcf2a08df5d8177c65e4d58ccaaf
2cd7d2dfdb761759c089845c6317e55df116386e
describe
'46221' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABDZ' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
e562edafdd7057f80c598bb0eaece658
a493a4ecd2fb07b0bb9b62c51756117b2baa625d
'2011-12-13T00:00:45-05:00'
describe
'16848232' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABEA' 'sip-files00113.tif'
0a473dc64a724eb236b35b95fe49c204
915bc150e31df3323951cd993148183e450e5b9b
'2011-12-12T23:58:24-05:00'
describe
'421' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABEB' 'sip-files00113.txt'
df60b95ddd11b03a25782e8568555f6d
8b9a78be1b29e51e77f4db13d604386d898e7d1d
describe
'28017' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABEC' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
df1667c6494de4d62d33b7ad26bcc836
5ef52a8267d85c08c6c49f7e260e30ed970b8552
'2011-12-13T00:01:55-05:00'
describe
'701179' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABED' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
5492d321eda1a575836c7a3c3879235f
181417d91228c0786725348f248844c3503a7807
describe
'108166' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABEE' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
1d099590c777d716fd85925b93b49b4c
a83d363e3c9aacd1e70b33d92950c60f625ba86d
describe
'26039' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABEF' 'sip-files00114.pro'
d8d26f6cf6f9e7775b9d711928a7f76b
626c8cb6eb20534bf52608046b38d390b7208b65
describe
'44955' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABEG' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
8519e117eccc748e1b2c70bb36f46fec
de59bb57f0f832f37f4721c79d89f950865e40f2
describe
'16847536' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABEH' 'sip-files00114.tif'
55a8f166224edb8b1f36841474074214
8fb8c73ec0a3f1e1a76292746792123c25dfd143
'2011-12-13T00:03:50-05:00'
describe
'1127' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABEI' 'sip-files00114.txt'
4921ec903e9c7dfde95440cbf423f3fb
4a10a4664c9cd380a7ba1ee6d620be2fb91e8ea0
'2011-12-13T00:02:38-05:00'
describe
'26869' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABEJ' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
d6115b15037f3af7fa344cb41c42c5ee
641444623d83ec8fd5671c9d5136608a4a7dd5c5
describe
'701080' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABEK' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
98501fca2c8d89ba7ab6f7ba72046bf8
353b1a1d9615503e444e360d2dc2d4c23485df35
describe
'128809' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABEL' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
7d0503d395c35c80d2d73411ebe2c71e
978bc9be7bf0b799f7e5009b0bc1b1bf1dbad715
describe
'7401' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABEM' 'sip-files00115.pro'
cd9d957be252a5e60cb7917ccd38eb21
ca9d5ee6e9c7a29a6a898be444b6f88620c98304
'2011-12-12T23:56:59-05:00'
describe
'49706' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABEN' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
9c056e744f530fde0caf3fbbcabd112f
f1fb3a15880d2a3b3f773e4ccd2be14d90c3bb32
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABEO' 'sip-files00115.tif'
45709c7c9071745a1b4e6da21e30c4a9
b509f9509237f1eae9cf30649aae1e71d4a87fb9
'2011-12-13T00:03:07-05:00'
describe
'447' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABEP' 'sip-files00115.txt'
d6ff96a191eeb62582515bae21823620
331ae421e8bfb313fa147b5b8fffdc48920b666c
describe
'29322' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABEQ' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
e83772536903fa21c736d896767c5901
53893c6ad017e516e32d78a78d168b355472c381
'2011-12-13T00:04:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABER' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
aaefdc9fc90606b227845b4e593cb11c
f000f814d4ec615a6803c925c60130b6e0604851
describe
'158167' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABES' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
f32fc98a38f954d98a3374c298f0a73b
1fa619dcacbdc5aa5a54f4c3d20ddea9af9044a5
'2011-12-13T00:04:38-05:00'
describe
'48394' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABET' 'sip-files00116.pro'
58e92c018d4929ed49115cb8261b06c3
ae0614a23c0938d702ce911c0f58bbdb9d18feae
describe
'57689' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABEU' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
d4483caf90600dca2766e1b59f2d60d1
ac47b54c2168c8dec5b1815e7dedfa4541755c6a
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABEV' 'sip-files00116.tif'
090339020499fbf14e241f0bcf328e3d
7b493c7db04e34a8f82aa64bf21830e38a100e8d
describe
'2016' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABEW' 'sip-files00116.txt'
1598a43e86fa5facfc8bd121b60b1d4e
e8b6b0924d3a9fa9158862c51eaa257385e3bf46
describe
'31234' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABEX' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
aaf4ec88a718bdf4fc0199d765fd4aec
69b02cbff5110d8f87c3802cc9b0c43460c60926
describe
'701175' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABEY' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
638a18839281a344d00b8af1931b3d40
e90e8ecf4a89d53673510ef510760cd0bb23295a
describe
'151224' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABEZ' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
6f08e997ddb2f4310256663409c7d1e3
8a8444fe45f36c4bee9e8c97bb236c5c6de002f7
describe
'18249' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABFA' 'sip-files00117.pro'
0b8390aec4d59ac81ee42e8aa06ade5c
b5d50fead24fbedcce54265f2239cf12561372ae
describe
'53783' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABFB' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
d69e3a0f7e3cccdd71d57db287c273e8
af3deca7b067d6feacb82ae3f3f4418b5c55094f
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABFC' 'sip-files00117.tif'
a30fe4f8288d7012272acb16dc82ecc1
cf96c348dec1e30d9d999f99846987cca74d3697
'2011-12-13T00:04:39-05:00'
describe
'730' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABFD' 'sip-files00117.txt'
fd4894d84b03ae1528281cb15664fb35
0a84c7da7efa6fd4bcebc454b2dcf61844ab8afd
describe
'30555' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABFE' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
c6470a72baaef8a82ec7a9d3e5acfe08
110793ff4a62c9b9a3a331b311e77c6d8701107c
'2011-12-13T00:01:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABFF' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
c05ad68fb9ccfc052d901945b5653f36
66317f1cf5e24b311c6ef76b1d0cd05cc5c5a08f
describe
'146508' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABFG' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
d563c418cb74b13dc192c0a7ffa1be4e
78bf5cf66bb72e658dac0b579e0608ad96ae1463
describe
'42884' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABFH' 'sip-files00118.pro'
6bacdaf0eb6e6db7a7f2621d83f4e11c
b48e77ccccfe741d3b195e8177933312cb77192b
describe
'55878' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABFI' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
848cb82322252e936f9f392f1ba1a4bb
892b24e9733e3d3bcef58956ac6b37b802a58304
describe
'16849216' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABFJ' 'sip-files00118.tif'
d9d60cc00b9607525ec1f531ee77fbde
eb950361c21548a7ffe5d0ff76bb4757d6f0434a
describe
'1753' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABFK' 'sip-files00118.txt'
e65f4bcedb43b4d5662719bd2a66e7a2
dbaa15d50bace20107da79422b4eda94a66071b3
describe
'30917' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABFL' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
e2b506d30fcaf78c1c1d82790956e5ce
a024d04c3490867703eedc0368ebf23a4b53d639
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABFM' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
9581853ed358569e83788835a50b0d0c
e4ef04b203d009a080183afb102eb57c73ec7409
describe
'166257' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABFN' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
ae715b7d5d9fe6c4af80324952ce9d78
0703c7e16d0118a6eb75954fe58f133e39eb25eb
describe
'7209' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABFO' 'sip-files00119.pro'
20e9dc6ef703b06c35b858e88a80e9be
198d2b379728ab215f1a2654845d7a59a1469808
describe
'58009' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABFP' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
1bfd98432ce8bcb716440fc4626bab5b
e134a11182429a6672d5910a328e0a4bdbf23021
describe
'16850000' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABFQ' 'sip-files00119.tif'
33b613a6320985c7d525de7cea430530
1b76e2cb8d1f720f8e890cb60b447e0f1d284862
describe
'355' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABFR' 'sip-files00119.txt'
c4519f25c34f1bcc5d54df50a997e6ea
37ad6b5d64f84fa263d2b5ac00f3189dd0bb2e3a
describe
'32319' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABFS' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
eb38360137c8ed90289b067d86ba21e9
88d64945f41bb059ef7c8533623b66a2d3f1c81c
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABFT' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
4f4c1b274e9a2d5126153bdb93495948
70f08231dda587abb45f10d9f141f0bb94e9ad04
describe
'135250' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABFU' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
1c7c7277dfcbb7caf1a6720299483ff2
c0a7e99c34bc26838df507e5fda7cd3c32876497
describe
'36920' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABFV' 'sip-files00120.pro'
06f4d6445b1506bda15f583c04a1f174
d75e3457e27a545f3fd7e1ea659e555e880de0bd
describe
'53695' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABFW' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
873b8849a7b7b8dcbf2c2fd069c74a88
761117a2371af9a4763ea198ab605a59c7902405
'2011-12-13T00:01:47-05:00'
describe
'16849192' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABFX' 'sip-files00120.tif'
80412db9a82b8d277b2cbfd227b2d353
730956c7d3eb65e22dc492173e7d6990c388fc85
'2011-12-13T00:03:17-05:00'
describe
'1502' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABFY' 'sip-files00120.txt'
ca657116984ec19bd15fc87130fe5971
442e5cf7194ffa50a35ff99f9b0d0708dda90e73
describe
'30115' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABFZ' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
52208d0a2692c0f4fed7fad3aa5f21f9
504390d52bf8191b7eb68fc36f6f3c47fb9f9335
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABGA' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
6eb31dde950a1986fdd8400dc8fbb95c
41fb364eaa536931f9f1e96f176e49332f1cd273
describe
'143845' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABGB' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
42adc36007aeea2071ee94e789e840f1
a357d101d2e74c05cd1666e98316e015e80df55d
describe
'14950' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABGC' 'sip-files00121.pro'
c423a51e4d4f559ddfced1c9a1e09c22
ebf2febd355a616c4ac1da034b8d5b414eb30547
describe
'53548' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABGD' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
d3b60f1d2f5e5c039c7544ccda66ceef
db050b6f979ab883c3bb2ae22c5b73b1c29a23f6
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABGE' 'sip-files00121.tif'
bf538c87b450c581a4df57df626cac01
eed9be85447f5eaf07b37e33d4f4cb4b0c2ba996
describe
'661' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABGF' 'sip-files00121.txt'
4e282fc36216714c9e49deb1da1f526c
aa637b34fbd7269bbb73fe1291c745679ccc5efd
describe
'31028' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABGG' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
03e470c4dde800daf25adac1310a39a7
12bb35ea2dfbcb42ff469c22d8ddce435ba317ad
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABGH' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
d5562873b00a99938e74080f8747bcf8
75f4ac6efa46d6ca601e6a5b570505f00278cc0b
describe
'152200' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABGI' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
2f25d0585d7f0051ff7420066d2c9c68
3b78d0d749640b0808bd91abeefd7b349fa32f00
describe
'44080' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABGJ' 'sip-files00122.pro'
ddd5d709c8844540863a6599e3156056
d4bd42da55e38d0915b5475514f0f1658cb7f350
'2011-12-13T00:05:48-05:00'
describe
'59009' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABGK' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
c7d71a92eb1a11bffc7a63d8a5a9db1a
a8016cabfc6a4b938def8d023e0fb4695d9e3c60
describe
'16849444' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABGL' 'sip-files00122.tif'
f49ad6211cd0939b1819a30aa5ea1fe1
8926aa18549d011f972f80762211bde794a39aa4
describe
'1779' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABGM' 'sip-files00122.txt'
5b454f581b3ff2e959fb884a8726210f
4abf8033659923e0d831928aa44c45999b597909
describe
'31357' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABGN' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
a0ca4961d020cbad92d0f4b7a0a6335c
0a6c51fb0346d3a81811ed0ca7db2f377d918cfb
'2011-12-13T00:02:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABGO' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
59f6f1cc55f5bd1e2bf539ab92b32a8d
7a7d71051c696d2b3dbd7f6f56bd4044eb3b00c5
describe
'141001' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABGP' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
8b704d315740264ddcc497b0470c8799
aea891d27b0d022fc33431fe0b6d1ac062cb4a66
describe
'1103' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABGQ' 'sip-files00123.pro'
b7fa9c7bed52f04dc11e4212c4b8fb2c
fd2b2028469f9e1758d3543e6a690d17f0a46ef6
describe
'53011' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABGR' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
4f715a2fbd10639a345a024a89fc4d6f
e2912dbe54a6061eb4c7c68ff819d848bcfd620e
describe
'16849416' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABGS' 'sip-files00123.tif'
bfd61ddcc32b4b9cd4f876e17a4ddcc8
dab298ebbc299457c8c36162c93d3af0634a99f0
describe
'67' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABGT' 'sip-files00123.txt'
72138bb3e72f9df9752b097e17b5d500
cb45e8fada5ad7a9ad65cf0f9c7dc4f92102b61d
describe
'30906' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABGU' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
a228eaf09a05e924a3b1264ee7126ad0
cf89e40df7cfc5590b04701349ae52afa18f9f61
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABGV' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
81fbfc26e20a0fdbd686ceb0b85bc0c3
91dc9c73b497e7b98f7247a82d9f1f43b262893a
describe
'158816' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABGW' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
b618e483850b43214368f19d0fbe4114
367d294ce2331c9cd7c6ff44549d1d76233fcb97
describe
'48076' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABGX' 'sip-files00124.pro'
0fcbf13b360e9cd722129a34c59c6bb9
fae8d24fa07e6fcd237fe4d906b0cd46dd5eb805
describe
'59457' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABGY' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
e0881143f448b3947c68f5851dd7f662
53bfb098216e52759fae094069b9dc78b549ae39
describe
'16849576' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABGZ' 'sip-files00124.tif'
51da8ee278ec2181326a248700f95918
0b866e73d7581aafcf2a7b735fc85652c8e084f1
'2011-12-13T00:01:20-05:00'
describe
'1927' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABHA' 'sip-files00124.txt'
3614ff847579a63c90afb1d7db651e47
0f320b8dc2f380eea70c8873428b4166636db0f5
describe
'31572' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABHB' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
f2f5d687b052bf21a6ae7e7adcebed24
8688ab4e3e63a23c7bd6682a7d88887fd7d59245
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABHC' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
3bb3d75d615abe671d01abf15e08229a
2de0670a17e21fa486c489e4d4656c8f65dfca23
describe
'133327' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABHD' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
8f3e7c7969da04d10471bda802d4b697
84c16fff22cc293c2366d502f19b6a4739cdc8c6
describe
'9001' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABHE' 'sip-files00125.pro'
bbbffad9eec0e7e91efcc9ed8a5852fa
a8c496d272b1c600d546184f896b69b119c703e0
describe
'51073' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABHF' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
adec84058faa7bd9b5625078b03f59d7
af84fe25a6b75b33281982e18a7c6e6c73035973
'2011-12-12T23:58:59-05:00'
describe
'16849016' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABHG' 'sip-files00125.tif'
69dbede811fffc56661b9f679b1ad6df
d0f258c661ba7c4d433f2754f76c3ab58515bc52
'2011-12-13T00:03:48-05:00'
describe
'453' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABHH' 'sip-files00125.txt'
3bd1b2ea0d3251efc3eeda3a4f00c4b5
a07ebc138d34931be132d644c6cbbd9f63844a23
'2011-12-12T23:59:10-05:00'
describe
'29731' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABHI' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
a98f842272879da104cbffd7e1e9fae0
b630dbd477c63e4a4068ea5c9e618a391847da9f
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABHJ' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
f05e4142074c4af8863af6fdde4daa31
603ee598f9cf13cd3e9d67f6b64bbe4fc772951a
'2011-12-12T23:59:20-05:00'
describe
'120502' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABHK' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
f044568e332851bf4f2fb7d3bbe967d4
a5d4aa7b530f7c4ee9b7c02fab9492c7bd7b7a83
describe
'31543' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABHL' 'sip-files00126.pro'
19c4b963010a2c6c87823888dfbb5c2f
e1663788948ad5f7a36d87c7fc369d3d09d83c26
describe
'49048' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABHM' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
8ab3d47dfee9a4939d8cfb0a8ceac997
4bcb60c0e4b16927adec022ef73d59c44e93289c
describe
'16848160' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABHN' 'sip-files00126.tif'
c147af264acb12cdcd0c0eefdf1652c7
055a5428d614824b184a0654819818de34c61a7b
describe
'1519' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABHO' 'sip-files00126.txt'
716df06e1c2913f4d825912af7eedeb4
02fa5f58123d8ed067c515fa1cb09e61572ab14c
describe
'28288' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABHP' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
52d67649a09c5fcb325264129c6cb014
3a165c33a112d2221128089635d6fdb01da217a5
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABHQ' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
685015d4bc5da06028adf00de5fb8640
2f0f7457f110e368315d9aed7c00f68a86821cc1
describe
'143812' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABHR' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
47b556d1fcd9378f916a6cbefc64ef9e
3ba4985e778a45774ff71d713275051f85942668
describe
'22738' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABHS' 'sip-files00127.pro'
953ecdfc94e87833a5a4264c97022e85
45e64ae59c3ef333b4d5010ae6be8eac02f0fd6e
describe
'54055' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABHT' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
f799ad7d79a8ac02f15ac8a387d5d98d
7201a08ccb77262ed2e7ffa5e0ce4009060cbd2d
describe
'16849252' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABHU' 'sip-files00127.tif'
4f946fd8c4b8599a431773821d61ec12
885979ef49144b5c5ef2f0430a5d0aed5b683618
'2011-12-12T23:57:18-05:00'
describe
'930' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABHV' 'sip-files00127.txt'
ab45a24ea8c904c03b66dd14d06e0631
82587b6ad3397535ce0de364723819ba3ac90ee0
describe
Invalid character
'30642' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABHW' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
c9d61701e3e421a34ee8035eaebdb408
fd1d1cf186022901cb70ce037c23167af03e5443
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABHX' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
3864c3d0f3468570ea836e08020a884f
218d072c2b7d887bdc4418e11809728e8867446c
describe
'146390' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABHY' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
7ffbed4e99d205f2f98bafb923f22e5f
654052d12ac36bd3f315a02c260b959667131397
describe
'43264' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABHZ' 'sip-files00128.pro'
f6448d67961a420aa19b42486ccf4874
a888f21b6250125f9c8e0da6c09321f4fcd8fd2c
describe
'56348' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABIA' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
fb8e7d6306eae4a69a422d37cbcec07e
121e1dba1878a074cc6256fa1c62f5afdba75fbd
describe
'16849156' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABIB' 'sip-files00128.tif'
6ed1c10314ac845aeb7213925417a584
8023db4efd658472fbe1e03fc560b44b74e4fb6e
'2011-12-13T00:03:04-05:00'
describe
'1877' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABIC' 'sip-files00128.txt'
53844161de05e3acafd0ed0c907e0989
260dfa03d64fa9984244f0288d8d7a120b590bce
describe
'30756' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABID' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
ab8759a117e3f4f45d318154b067a523
6c5538429338e42279a2b6304a1af4c8392126fd
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABIE' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
1133b77623f971bcb7d329053f1edc6a
fbe66dade2fdda7cc0fc4dbb72e65b5aea7a402c
'2011-12-13T00:03:59-05:00'
describe
'157328' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABIF' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
2e0328aa26120ca8e16a55787eaec7c1
464b2eaa710ec90800a69b2152e95ce655156d0f
describe
'22364' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABIG' 'sip-files00129.pro'
a375457adfdccbf302a25e73b2f65189
dc7f8e9283cbfcfde5e8ded6a59c9bf72cf32282
describe
'57162' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABIH' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
29743a4646a692c9cd7e5467c4d5ed8f
275f89b4ba18b141055fa3bf521d729b47bc0b4d
describe
'16849660' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABII' 'sip-files00129.tif'
c3a6b9e2c66031a6c470dd9d5498573b
5f79ff100f78675a59ec85f1e3c5a07d914b1a42
'2011-12-12T23:57:09-05:00'
describe
'1048' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABIJ' 'sip-files00129.txt'
3585d362bd3e354d92540e6afbe55437
b82b0458eb4c8c0f738b3a6ddaee73f0e7ddf66e
'2011-12-13T00:03:36-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABIK' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
50a8b5f4f0058a34a01052fd2aa0d2d7
6b8b56fcb1924b34b8a729639d53438729b8c049
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABIL' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
c6e5227e9e629619966e2d67848cf3fa
7d1908cf954b386c0153b6c0c5d2e0986bc6e0cb
'2011-12-13T00:01:30-05:00'
describe
'143853' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABIM' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
b5208efe85276d5e475804b9a5efebf9
288091bb1dfe4bef7afc39fbc0af1cf6cf5203a8
describe
'41376' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABIN' 'sip-files00130.pro'
54915e0773b7107192f0258a2fcbe193
5cc34eb5b1349c7d8815e5d4a9b7f183a95214cc
describe
'53983' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABIO' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
0ed3e8ca84548de2296cbe8f3a2d9815
6f3bcda245b03247a45a5e3a5e3347b800a504bc
describe
'16849060' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABIP' 'sip-files00130.tif'
7ef7edb94548d1954983bae68d4480cd
88aaaafad74f8e1f50a6c2856bc80a7158360342
'2011-12-13T00:01:17-05:00'
describe
'1731' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABIQ' 'sip-files00130.txt'
435ff5fb2d6414e3be4e63e60605ef85
03cbec3d6d37944cd2567c52fd99c02bb039b1f2
describe
'29866' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABIR' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
ba1431381e1b7d9d0a13dcee0789456d
f463856d5ffc1b76ca4eebc6ffe07b83aa5f2ccf
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABIS' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
ed16df9131099dbd4fd54bb8e8d89521
6b29d3bd0a801474ac3cd3d2c634c3ef6b018537
describe
'152531' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABIT' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
a64117130b3b325f1b8352aeaf80dd2d
0cf66fb13438c231af0bdd9319a81db36e614de8
describe
'16809' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABIU' 'sip-files00131.pro'
3c04f4da9c2949f412c369cd71e9f95f
b124d377f1bc0bb61932f2c300cc58319051cfb2
'2011-12-12T23:59:23-05:00'
describe
'56211' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABIV' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
6ffa2436731f2cc158998237cf0acdc4
396915192be75ac615d74ff05e6fe03cea62c77d
describe
'16849404' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABIW' 'sip-files00131.tif'
1fdd38971972ba7a0e7a39951ad3871b
1660f8fcb56d75518682c1486b6af3d3f91bd203
describe
'1031' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABIX' 'sip-files00131.txt'
6b532f425fde2d5d0b54805c5ef5dfcf
27dfcf13f5220e4796a857f6cabd60e5b3e5b323
describe
'31502' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABIY' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
2411a76bc1304606ad03c3cc41249373
f2401e53dd822bbc9cfb3f41f4c7bbb409753f8a
describe
'701149' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABIZ' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
f543f0f070edc7b58d847344ca92daea
a2d2d7daf5ea6c1cf716d5855812ef616fb52163
'2011-12-13T00:00:03-05:00'
describe
'144688' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABJA' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
3bb4704a1455195cff27fc9d5f3e1d8c
4ffcdb91a38d09619f7586bcf65a63025c25f440
'2011-12-12T23:56:57-05:00'
describe
'39818' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABJB' 'sip-files00132.pro'
8a83a654fd32d06b615901dfc6b3b2d2
5383283ac1f3bd19d1c0b11b617340efcc230ec6
describe
'55862' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABJC' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
7631b0c8456d27224c40cfdfadd0d19f
7e48b933824b84c28c9fa67dbb81867e4c194449
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABJD' 'sip-files00132.tif'
e9d702ce4c35c2ee6b68be15bfb4dc83
15aa548431304ce1aed78927b2b20916456287f2
describe
'1661' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABJE' 'sip-files00132.txt'
9a838417ab02b5e167388944b1d7609b
eac79f7405f9c29ed2364064c8f54704f0a98fc3
describe
'31006' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABJF' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
59a2702c0d0d6aa18a4eee2113fda099
b8b08734db0dd3df2078cb04fae25e6c113555a2
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABJG' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
1840b74e75d1609079619677e0926e3f
d961ff91020fba3592efbfceb410f1bbf816214e
describe
'130422' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABJH' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
1feff07e63069bdce5d1171b8fef1df5
9274f3b5a2a237394301a24e1e9ce5e89b91e2df
'2011-12-13T00:05:04-05:00'
describe
'12027' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABJI' 'sip-files00133.pro'
00e17c942c60b60698cea2f818241c9e
8e43724eaf2b84bad683b9bd7099c360cefc36ee
describe
'50738' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABJJ' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
708084b08cf932fa1df5997bcdb5b601
41b6d17de7c410508ad49e181dbe80930ded3f3b
describe
'16848816' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABJK' 'sip-files00133.tif'
6ecd5546cd652ba3a6ab16bed04a22ea
3950311f52cf65ba808083c1ec858358c6384008
'2011-12-12T23:59:13-05:00'
describe
'706' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABJL' 'sip-files00133.txt'
3605bc8664dfe01a79577fb5b2c74043
62f5f73c4e3e0e42eefb3872442fc20091f9d41f
describe
'29570' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABJM' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
cbaa1baf69bff8d87ef88a67cb6a6d2e
10b4641c2ee6961779428d760acd3e1332dcea5f
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABJN' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
a4286d2446e49c976de17686ede090b9
271a35976c2e2fafb0de53a2a582b34060334302
describe
'138118' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABJO' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
fa43b4e5aaa1f44c71cb1c92883ce877
cec14c60dfa05d8e8530a14aa5e7f153fbab3e05
'2011-12-13T00:03:34-05:00'
describe
'37903' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABJP' 'sip-files00134.pro'
cee3be741d6a49e9445d21af868e3d3f
e061c3d57c2901981ea32408e77ac279abdf7a21
describe
'54196' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABJQ' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
3b6e1a024157582ddb1703dc5a9c5b83
a1183566b41c7cc895da99d612eb6f3b93d18fa2
describe
'16849248' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABJR' 'sip-files00134.tif'
c96db834d413322f0fd27aa1fe98a596
92ffaae996b8ab0a3a75406d5040d9e8fea36314
describe
'1566' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABJS' 'sip-files00134.txt'
9acf5a654604d3439c3ebb69fe7b44b3
f82f3872980794c195678987d4dc433e1247af8a
describe
'30097' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABJT' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
2a51134178807415d2302b81acbfed8c
bde6d327f9b9f9eb4b08f98ef161a0224b37f2d3
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABJU' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
d622dd79433c20ca27cd0fb5d0cbee44
7d7bc69bcd01f67816495cfa7c8b94ba7aaa25ac
describe
'134900' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABJV' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
38986ed0159262654e2c8c54e3771de4
faa9d76352f23747547cc49cb73d47b99cc9da5f
describe
'11019' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABJW' 'sip-files00135.pro'
e6421c7e275494fe19f470659dbb7cb8
7cdc713c20c6dd199b67c2d129b3d7eae9f0f485
describe
'51171' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABJX' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
d549a36de67e314c1530ff240f8fb03f
072c0d9249ac1751c6fe958374b7999b909500d0
'2011-12-13T00:00:16-05:00'
describe
'16849024' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABJY' 'sip-files00135.tif'
c7a329201427939bd262b3e9b0b2b5d7
38bda9e40bb951ca01c31b164673cf26663b763b
'2011-12-12T23:57:57-05:00'
describe
'537' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABJZ' 'sip-files00135.txt'
bb14d065be5d2e689fb527338b032778
73223fe18c6aed87aeb9b29664f7a3a7aceae521
describe
Invalid character
'30024' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABKA' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
1c74d9b12f283a42a81b1268774f085d
71cdd6f0e31c4497087046a713231d6454c4f44d
'2011-12-12T23:57:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABKB' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
c0d6c3087d4e794672d400aafa6e8e02
93d808a82cba33b4d6704afa3bbf6657311a9a62
describe
'125956' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABKC' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
02bafefca7959eeb551c10f1eca33c53
0890859c77ee141a0b339eb8893b26efe259efa0
'2011-12-12T23:57:07-05:00'
describe
'31922' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABKD' 'sip-files00136.pro'
a7893c2f414f185598b8ba8855943d67
3343724cc456019e56f5f5a2051718379a3f5bcf
'2011-12-13T00:03:08-05:00'
describe
'51866' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABKE' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
1a52b99b7ec349594e5b959378bdd5bb
07197576fd15d50fb3b28c2da72958fa6632f979
describe
'16848992' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABKF' 'sip-files00136.tif'
f4c76ae6e6c7cce5003c0ded8c0dcce5
2bd4d0b74d2dbb90dabd812880f274b27f8040c9
'2011-12-13T00:02:16-05:00'
describe
'1516' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABKG' 'sip-files00136.txt'
d2cd591fc1287e491ae79d45991cfdc7
c49a827c1c52567fc35af0f3235d4653a2c1c761
'2011-12-12T23:58:43-05:00'
describe
'29502' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABKH' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
eaff66d73d8bc1ab4c603e4e7427954a
5ea9a28df8c47e8dc70a9d76db697c3e1237205b
'2011-12-13T00:03:51-05:00'
describe
'701190' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABKI' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
18ae60b5288a63275c546379e4ea1a68
aecbd2dceabf8a23fd2f1a476ae71c399b194ad9
describe
'182184' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABKJ' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
dec477f7f2f955065e0b7b6bc5153a47
b83c27202d42d14b740e232bfd77130b6d7017e8
describe
'2073' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABKK' 'sip-files00137.pro'
ac226c98599ff38db88363af1daabf43
ca061cec6b77efef7c74a5fbdb2ac9ed9674ae24
describe
'58939' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABKL' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
4e0f1abb4e41e9cb1a3c3a23f46c5561
b6c2aec75056155b95907dcd02ef4a4ad901591b
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABKM' 'sip-files00137.tif'
c7287a6a61a62d5e5d413a7c8b2a7cc8
b97b41ae260b8792b1d89c5301b7ad501ba18815
'2011-12-13T00:05:08-05:00'
describe
'113' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABKN' 'sip-files00137.txt'
9c5d318a7db0b296ce091e098f802684
a014e658ce9399f302e408467d7e39e4ff5ff8b0
'2011-12-13T00:03:11-05:00'
describe
'31615' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABKO' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
40b6055462406df730bdadc55d6f8d6b
7d0b167e99f09dae4e2499dad41f2fc076542782
'2011-12-12T23:58:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABKP' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
6ec7e32ddf5adb14caf3c5ddb0d2360f
2f38f8f73a1c7bf402de952eaf08ad2a7d6c0405
describe
'152359' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABKQ' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
f58bab3b8466a5dde1b35392494a1104
8cba602741bea59a516485c02605fff701a48692
describe
'44140' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABKR' 'sip-files00138.pro'
712a488e231f9c017476af7e3739ea43
d3c03d4aa39cacd931fbf8d8521050cbac25221e
describe
'58368' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABKS' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
fe6e9cd551ed35d93214e1799020c545
a96e719fabfddab441c24abf72b3897a368d06fb
describe
'16849448' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABKT' 'sip-files00138.tif'
d509a7733256a1b1fa02db5c70628dd7
8463a8c8d5859a775fb5d2c9d52cc936fc8330b6
describe
'1895' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABKU' 'sip-files00138.txt'
46d72d9ee57d515db5ccb55716460dc5
79a7cf339d027691e39473d2af025cba1436a046
describe
'31287' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABKV' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
854ed23fcc5e9e42f40693a6d0d9c9df
e8ca719caafe9718186ad962ec84831876906521
describe
'701000' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABKW' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
7b4ed60a080573a29d7a168ecd8d1803
d4a115f3a02f139dba1ef1c3569da1d1d4a480fe
describe
'151816' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABKX' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
8d5f237627c74fccee348238a91975fe
28486a57b7157c1d257853eaa28f00b00e735148
describe
'2654' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABKY' 'sip-files00139.pro'
1001470993b27dada89df94336ab8cd7
0f5c7a857f91b0d070ec349e0acadc65fc30e089
describe
'54415' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABKZ' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
ec89c4d74cfa4333ce6e09711f5bc36f
5fb98ab4a96145e4e6633645817e976c2e4fc95b
describe
'16849744' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABLA' 'sip-files00139.tif'
a6af75f2e7e65e0c88766a357d88b336
1ec5be92076e9b4b58a57874aa58d10fcb2c9320
'2011-12-13T00:05:50-05:00'
describe
'144' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABLB' 'sip-files00139.txt'
d47214f30c2c9047a4a7bbc43ea35176
5bec808747213f2748e22c0a393fb402f274c2f2
'2011-12-13T00:02:22-05:00'
describe
'31267' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABLC' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
e1959fcc3f30a443b0790267def556f2
c58abaf3e3ce2a6e5564744f9f672e553d8a8ddc
describe
'701152' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABLD' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
149f75b14641f8329febf779f02ccbbe
ed0fe526616b0482cc7b133803ff98766076bac5
describe
'135415' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABLE' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
55c76adaa930e235db93ec908fdb0b7a
39b19d253e06ff17dd29b53b3ab5f0209ce4c765
describe
'37497' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABLF' 'sip-files00140.pro'
7ee905680c4f6edcd51866392851b411
03704b640ca54a7cf8fb505f37caad04b7dfec7a
describe
'53881' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABLG' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
6ef95393f58d025ba295fdec2873456e
eb212c3e01658a8b2a6ded98e6ac069912214d62
describe
'16848988' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABLH' 'sip-files00140.tif'
3791b2337fd57a480f8a953ab98da17b
0d19d4189791ad9836c2f1df3c8de34d718731db
describe
'1614' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABLI' 'sip-files00140.txt'
bcf8e1434eba7c60a1bb67d225ecf7dd
4a693d5e5ee33c042932dafe63e3e5d069389f2c
describe
'30275' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABLJ' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
b5548e22f6c985f9d11fe78068c93704
5aea7b4cef897a5356f5e55c3625140e99f10fb4
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABLK' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
7c13ecc8d3eb1d63d8b1cb2f368ea353
4dd7bbac6343a1737be0c9ca3b0bbc3c21fe4ab6
'2011-12-12T23:58:11-05:00'
describe
'165108' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABLL' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
678c6768662921f82fffb2356207cfdb
002fc836a1b475668e35ddf9230d1687f2dbb3da
describe
'18460' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABLM' 'sip-files00141.pro'
52fe2914261c6256612f99fea44f0de7
c1f6542f758aadc1e39de6a22e1d4014ad0ab33a
describe
'57839' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABLN' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
8f5e58e7f995bbb9d444834a2105d562
11cc8c2eb7373f60e83dc59e2d078174fdd43942
describe
'16849692' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABLO' 'sip-files00141.tif'
ad3aed0564eab5212e4e806e900b3a28
97f1259218d327d2bc5766aa455c21a2068c3d21
'2011-12-12T23:59:24-05:00'
describe
'721' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABLP' 'sip-files00141.txt'
b2086c1e30635bad2e35d98de3988707
69af0d8ac7a945df8ceccbd27bec64e37e55c867
describe
'31486' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABLQ' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
b39123c62183878d7d449fd1d3ef46ff
4ab42119cb38f6be6eb4c94a86708950f77aa655
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABLR' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
0cb14a36544d72a3d31f79de00138055
e615d55373606b01163c52c8494d81b4c3c16fe5
describe
'156888' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABLS' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
94216138bf281d56a830e49f8bf8e990
80f7863c2d305511560eb9d850a7bc529c89528d
'2011-12-12T23:59:05-05:00'
describe
'49241' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABLT' 'sip-files00142.pro'
7a364e938a4ae13c69ca74e798916f4b
e267c9bff91579deff6fcbeaf61722c92c417279
describe
'58625' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABLU' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
de34820a0a94851862d8a490d75a5422
088ae18af8ed9618c4f1603ee4aebed6322e47f3
describe
'16849612' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABLV' 'sip-files00142.tif'
99fc2dcb58d5fc5a075d10a7b13a9f69
d7194f8d4a75e6b9401c136647152542488ef2dd
describe
'2005' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABLW' 'sip-files00142.txt'
ee12dde5a9bdb0cdbc88dade1ad6e7b4
feb486aac099da24723275b893693b333320d260
describe
'31740' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABLX' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
715f4a64384bdd4955ae8b33089cb6ad
265ab31d8da8950480a54257ceccb897112b4537
'2011-12-13T00:02:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABLY' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
d8cb220f9b336f03132416c436319531
665f19edfca35a742f9e720bc1e9f1e0454ba053
describe
'145898' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABLZ' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
9d9b2f21fff81971028634fb173621a4
c6fe02445528c399ed19366c02e7b18e961e52c3
describe
'41541' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABMA' 'sip-files00143.pro'
c0dbde077dcfd583780479900cea73bc
e0baada54a26ffde0915a77e89422d8c2bb4ecb1
describe
'57441' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABMB' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
016c6687ec2db0cc234a5c1c32f30624
3d1f96830e229cabbba0faf9a79481cd7247203a
describe
'16849772' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABMC' 'sip-files00143.tif'
212e0b60782ce74fc65afc11de434610
247dc51978ceb2ae892e8f717c6b0110ae85b204
describe
'1807' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABMD' 'sip-files00143.txt'
7a2b5b3ec4a0a0a49ff6941bad5bfae9
90d28e61557b61761be10066dcf5ba2a3998fc4a
describe
'31367' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABME' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
555c5cd3cc6af5defbfa8638c4232772
1b74796f6f1ad1fb9d424852db557114d1ce5cd4
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABMF' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
283069761e6869e9b3f2a638c9f7cfb9
46d2f50a1d4c5b4eb9de5c968bedf2e318be6419
describe
'155083' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABMG' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
4297c48429e78244e9c802d7d3eebc0e
f6183e9f50cb3c2a14c0c6bf6f683af72f57d60d
describe
'49424' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABMH' 'sip-files00144.pro'
fe2f22bf846bb5b5049427d1d56b8a2a
d77b682af69f089b40dac45155075de544c9adcb
describe
'58234' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABMI' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
7d594b13e856766860771671cb4a37e6
5cea31e324598f69da8ac981d4ab4a272422d71b
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABMJ' 'sip-files00144.tif'
25a086191e65c7e8c80963445940df22
5f5997e17e5414312b2fbb86cd0439ef3474b752
describe
'2003' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABMK' 'sip-files00144.txt'
8dd3795c01693839978d8815b871d43c
4908afb05ef3309c51edd8251df4c2edb7f2029d
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABML' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
f497643c42b504d94c0329f660d23cdb
4134a7a23f7e4f44b7dda0d8a9a2c2fb42181a1a
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABMM' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
5a94303699da0fc885ac8b7865a9148b
e3fd9b5e986451205e8a67e30ff745614e1af40c
describe
'132854' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABMN' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
d275fa9c6f1647e24bae9a2780042d21
5503cfcbc5e2747a822689d2b42274a1e72e2b22
describe
'6216' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABMO' 'sip-files00145.pro'
1f6eec97e69799545ea016317f981607
1b767cd306ef94f00cde288dc7c4dfeae35cab1b
describe
'47282' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABMP' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
23b8ac8a046c8421111e7962afa428ee
560ba4b5827a33e4fe7dc11cc34f4806e2f92c17
'2011-12-13T00:00:52-05:00'
describe
'16848244' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABMQ' 'sip-files00145.tif'
35d0e54aaba1c2ede7cf9614ee64c9b3
d2081631783a23a88a54e4d9a9c3f84c59f42455
describe
'271' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABMR' 'sip-files00145.txt'
158918fa41158fcdc34b9d42e7d0f9a0
e01e5eec46f656fe4464f16808669d346ceb4c29
describe
Invalid character
'28400' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABMS' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
017aa54b120ebee181942a9948832513
1e8ff9382ae67b946ab8e5412ebe92761cff08d2
describe
'701121' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABMT' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
c63d44a5d07430e5c85955d227885d5f
fb8bf61013b224daef6669fdf33b6b01b297daa7
describe
'134023' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABMU' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
2ac93c321abc9d3c1c32b64a4e9b5e9c
bd663ae070f45caca9fde028d15a44073824beae
describe
'37444' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABMV' 'sip-files00146.pro'
2cc393ec226d2582f10ca295edf8b4f4
698f5ffc81654efb42e771a0220be19f7361350f
describe
'52917' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABMW' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
71d723b3d05305f8660bdd63bb6314f7
23cf332ddbb9d5f2dbff10b0dbdf05fb1290925a
describe
'16849292' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABMX' 'sip-files00146.tif'
30f6c165e0c3796f30dfef7b523e0597
694d3c4650be3446a6acb3607b2c7b6ae4f1e8d0
'2011-12-13T00:05:14-05:00'
describe
'1544' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABMY' 'sip-files00146.txt'
9edceda22e865fd479f7b7b765045f2b
482b187d3ffd433c9c70039671b9634eb2bf2d43
describe
'30196' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABMZ' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
cb033a95183776252006d172596b1496
8dd2643623815f5ed3c3190c0204f62b190ce611
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABNA' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
6ca8295fbae574476cf29358122af901
1c4bc0552416ac0c3f996e0bf202a90cea576532
describe
'139318' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABNB' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
d2c5d9e99038b73b36c5e82197b84b0b
92dc725cbc05232c905badeba538e30be78c29c6
describe
'6092' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABNC' 'sip-files00147.pro'
79a1391b54dec93e5486633e88524bd1
e3b61f114d280285ee2af3b133182e0d1b9282ad
describe
'50902' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABND' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
aa4e69dffadd2b757c71865c943c004a
ab3ae51ac681523ed5067f0de52c5cdfc3a7e466
'2011-12-13T00:00:10-05:00'
describe
'16849068' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABNE' 'sip-files00147.tif'
79be8bf15244202a9e74f4b909de2650
6127410878d88fd536564a57a861b228150e1cbc
describe
'370' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABNF' 'sip-files00147.txt'
f1fc7563d58df5c5b8f802673b71e3af
1510c7db51130af0f4da49ea2a3c2263e197fd9f
describe
'29906' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABNG' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
9ef3772f28b95fcc1c98f09e2c36c0e0
4236f19102ef3e60228278d60cf25529955e276a
describe
'701061' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABNH' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
057c82bcb79a755393898bfdc2784139
f5b973248a6445b1b1cd5a555f6e8c1aa2d310be
describe
'107746' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABNI' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
c8b960a4cc77a484f28e683b12f09300
099c12e23fc7904fe1c808f8856e4be7ee7262a5
describe
'24831' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABNJ' 'sip-files00148.pro'
527cec00a47b83e62236ed312582629e
b1f77fc48c1c56dea31a3bb08aa4c7a030b173cb
'2011-12-13T00:02:12-05:00'
describe
'45685' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABNK' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
4cf827eab2864c28bdefae51b5f10940
2ed7112ce112a7a6b55252bb703a913fa0bc21ad
describe
'16848488' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABNL' 'sip-files00148.tif'
597d357b20c007fe175fd510d407fcec
091618ecc1392cfa12f653b692ca04f6ca00c0cb
describe
'1460' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABNM' 'sip-files00148.txt'
104b63e2a7972736e9cb37506811ca04
3d2c0c2d70a4129822a6d70378675fbe71876a19
describe
'28208' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABNN' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
bc84ea1559adac76e7aff9bdb2888a80
f9ae95157471f6b24d6fc86ec2122903a3814aac
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABNO' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
0b40965f0f4e277a9145d9873b650edc
c314704b549ba68deae3ba8822939c939a104e7f
describe
'139384' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABNP' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
bbe4a51315ea77bcf57c43d8e3cd5225
1c28972fb97c6361176a686e817f24edf9d86a0e
describe
'23034' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABNQ' 'sip-files00149.pro'
cc67589c90e9638163a0ef9597b912b4
561f098e8330d50a3d12e1c3a8ef4402ce8b3ed6
describe
'51654' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABNR' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
cda63871f956a8746dbccf395fb78d68
f66b258254d98c23427d91ee0782b8991900adb0
describe
'16848832' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABNS' 'sip-files00149.tif'
cb7f2fc710a33d6ff4e4f8390c3b0ad0
9ac901b4442a2dd8301d25a374fb69bfd3a2c9e3
'2011-12-13T00:02:43-05:00'
describe
'959' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABNT' 'sip-files00149.txt'
3edc8b1d2fc5ec163fba52563c53c482
b5cde8f8052e832d42bc4788ae106a57d7c814bc
describe
'29813' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABNU' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
a4eba25440f02001f8985be56786da27
6d96ffc6b80d23d743779bf8d0a91daf966b5d37
describe
'701174' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABNV' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
48e6cea7135131fd5fab53c51d5c436d
87b75002e00f39006f66fc8c35bfb6ce60798e55
describe
'150502' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABNW' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
878a179380220c668c51ecd5485b6b9e
2266890de7e5f69af2fc1952e857e7caca2a946b
'2011-12-13T00:02:05-05:00'
describe
'45644' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABNX' 'sip-files00150.pro'
358e88c78533613aa0e996a348a91e3f
a4a20c9c9b38e4eabf87e518a758fe8829dd6a32
describe
'57761' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABNY' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
4d9fca164d43c0e8e6bebcda68bc670c
e65116fc76812fb3f66c589c7399646371233d3f
describe
'16849580' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABNZ' 'sip-files00150.tif'
f3a22b88869c37a97efccaef4e4a62af
84fefd772365e4dc1ed39da624267920f6c89abf
describe
'1894' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABOA' 'sip-files00150.txt'
6ad87b26be1156ada29e390a3f2cff15
f781dccecae13bbcb7632305ab18eef2753b1d4a
describe
'31541' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABOB' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
0c3db58ab5c2c94c36dc844d4b911664
23c54188cf847983f38ad188543ef9bea46af298
'2011-12-12T23:58:26-05:00'
describe
'701136' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABOC' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
a4f30d5d60d9172efb4d547d01e3732a
9d385ba65eb14559793b20b377069431d873ed8c
describe
'152294' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABOD' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
918af2333cefa984d0ebc014bd6d0b8f
aed4ade35d551d6691883e3ca1a057056c7d6137
describe
'48056' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABOE' 'sip-files00151.pro'
f8d42f3b4f58cfa881c6a3eb90c706fd
637030d6ea80c8a835523cb9a1d3fc22e20864aa
'2011-12-13T00:04:32-05:00'
describe
'58565' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABOF' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
e6c09185cc15353602f73b137161fbdb
6633c3030d514cc817ece7567af4668a22e28ef8
describe
'16849688' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABOG' 'sip-files00151.tif'
a571d7e4722ac2d343c7478153822024
bb504f3d16e8963dc1f675141048341e1f4e0a66
'2011-12-12T23:57:36-05:00'
describe
'1931' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABOH' 'sip-files00151.txt'
c669cc17c4d7e787f7204d409d47ec4b
160307ed6eebdb6e3233677b8cfb8bfab33d6b88
'2011-12-12T23:58:32-05:00'
describe
'31405' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABOI' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
01c7fc8b302f87397707ac916b4dbdb0
4815760bb16ba5d6f699b631a83e6da2fbf8945c
describe
'701171' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABOJ' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
ac3857d72f22a94c86fca5b4abfee38a
f15dada8d4df793e60caec2df23bdfe7428c1fe0
describe
'125052' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABOK' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
e32e5fbfaeb8c9f5b79919723696d31c
30c116812b5ac4284786c04f3a5ce6020e33dd3e
describe
'34626' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABOL' 'sip-files00152.pro'
d4e28e5cae912d89397d3b681c0b677a
a2e0c146cbfa3e3a6f41713004d71ac8b631aa11
describe
'50440' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABOM' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
5a3ad76e892e757686bcf4c28d4024a5
4de4285e127477605e3444e67ea91563d6c2cb62
describe
'16848640' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABON' 'sip-files00152.tif'
42ce16a47492d613c4ba58514259b569
603359a73abfd745fcab5a43403bfbfdae4828d7
'2011-12-13T00:00:05-05:00'
describe
'1523' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABOO' 'sip-files00152.txt'
a5ba432a5c8b1eb3ee8380e16d784571
45e8d0b11d1b472e18488fe5f861cd3ff381ca3a
describe
'28979' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABOP' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
a67fc06826e39ae85d4efe805bd57424
2d84b4338d0e7a3b62dcd7ec5f99411d9f367e68
describe
'701091' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABOQ' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
80259319dda9a454ec95a762ead0291e
e312deb4fcac31c0ab4f587674ecfdfb4c22c4a3
describe
'136160' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABOR' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
b526c61ef23f64637f3e8457233b9c3a
415ab647037fac1b5ba2bc43c0d16db80c67b9e1
describe
'6863' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABOS' 'sip-files00153.pro'
f261d5c28dfee31b547b1c08408cd05e
542bc38d8ed861c00d2500222315251f025bcda9
describe
'50705' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABOT' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
81eebcc67f7cb71f820d945ce45400e9
5116d8dbad64010a8ad8a4b9dc3569c761e6066a
describe
'16849032' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABOU' 'sip-files00153.tif'
ff942ac5e313d05bde6eb3f896c6849b
7661b3ec2b0955c2748ebe5818ca959a80fe560a
describe
'343' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABOV' 'sip-files00153.txt'
fea101213564171a2b6855ca64ca50d4
d509e0c104d2507df331780a03cd81346ef4e5ec
'2011-12-13T00:00:48-05:00'
describe
'29800' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABOW' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
56d89905ba0fca58e7c62a315171a29a
e7ccf9a9d34352493f1398c54e39a90b476f2b80
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABOX' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
ca5dfc249b19b012d5ca365a2754e51e
00884db706b4419c8b8bbdf09b4124f50318f08b
describe
'138277' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABOY' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
53471b6f34fb2cbd53e7239526c062c3
92f2301fa02c5efc8f05594d5098f9ab21e019b8
describe
'40142' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABOZ' 'sip-files00154.pro'
24d0ba04bc62ec8712eeff242d3be606
ac45a6c4cfeedb91c9a8ef301b64ad4e323e983a
describe
'53194' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABPA' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
edee73f61b7fa6112d44a0043c3e0b62
9892f0a585b015d0842b65f7b5901631009334b6
describe
'16849088' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABPB' 'sip-files00154.tif'
c428f89fde43c8e7661a16fa2790c06b
bea04555c857a315acda525ef8c54fc939b52468
'2011-12-13T00:02:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABPC' 'sip-files00154.txt'
45c2b0a78cb765fa6e250cd8fd3cfff7
265e997a77db56b532ef27ffd51e4e6ae89e57f9
'2011-12-13T00:04:59-05:00'
describe
'29974' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABPD' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
3a0cd3ca90c4d5a8a62783cdc6f3b771
1fade26691f72ce837002346db27df6808f48bd2
describe
'701011' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABPE' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
d540dcdd5dab928a285639886470899e
d9034a2e93e59794b939cddd55d755c4ab2ad9a0
describe
'153014' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABPF' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
839e7e647e1b52aae1b28e51531c7891
9dfa069e06bed4291b98e6414dcb2b90e852f252
describe
'664' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABPG' 'sip-files00155.pro'
264ef77adfb8a2c4f68fe78cebfd37f3
20ab4f42b9bdebb22511dd25e97aca9d279dc433
describe
'54725' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABPH' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
44aa38e9308c5831c36273dd83c8b209
5de024a957b4f2ee00dc5d435cf2ccd250499b58
'2011-12-12T23:56:42-05:00'
describe
'16849140' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABPI' 'sip-files00155.tif'
9f897fc178030ecebc7806c459b86619
c245954b6f6bbdd4ae2d0f396eef397aa110ee89
describe
'31' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABPJ' 'sip-files00155.txt'
ff125b5c699459c7ac7dc068cbf50679
e262faa155397bd4a4cd99e4e25677fe98b68ae4
describe
'30460' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABPK' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
85ee62a9c60fcc39ed5d94ec7e3367f9
982ded1364f8415029c96ac8956f8849e63d32f9
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABPL' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
e23891ed54beefb2ef7354a3b41b6b5e
29505da8758b3c0380ca0f6b311c8d488f4941f9
describe
'150703' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABPM' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
11d47dde945b973a4e3c359a772d9c03
96fbf69281c1dc7872cf6edd878b326b0806291d
describe
'45853' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABPN' 'sip-files00156.pro'
2c50c581a5339252ab8acd8267787a1b
bc83a54ef943784a8d9df7235c95721b8f113011
describe
'55896' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABPO' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
47b947e1d947398911082ee6ad8c2703
6f67b48fc7f7b8a5cb889ade7ff77428666e72db
describe
'16849224' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABPP' 'sip-files00156.tif'
6ecd6db638e4ece42d30d159e5220ff6
3816d809ce8b902b018c667ca86522c5eb5b3b53
describe
'1937' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABPQ' 'sip-files00156.txt'
9566ce682e725d55ce5b478a56ae2e40
ab51c447cc32a988c400f8a1e634a1e01f77aab0
describe
'30517' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABPR' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
e63c1dfcf25b4527285a1c6231be7d30
a31a6b7ffbd1962cb300b98a0d4bc745a1ec9747
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABPS' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
4d282c6e5395e144726bb41726079516
61a465b7cdf8b723c0e790719cba91b9cb29e242
describe
'154405' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABPT' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
324ce4c7241e711ec0503ab8d5ec5d58
8d6a4feb38cd86cd9e3c981cc20207aecc8ef8d4
'2011-12-12T23:58:01-05:00'
describe
'19833' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABPU' 'sip-files00157.pro'
0874858fbb681fa74103d1264542849f
79c43db0ff9989d942d15695ea758c7204f82708
describe
'56113' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABPV' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
aaf252cbc324eb1ebea16bc78724b359
747adcddd6e8226d5456e30b1185c3fed5ee0886
describe
'16849504' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABPW' 'sip-files00157.tif'
5b6f0cf0d92bb7feb44972ef35b9b6af
6e087af5d79f03937fdf666524cab340cf25c784
describe
'870' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABPX' 'sip-files00157.txt'
954c3f1e01f46ce257e52d9b1617d295
aa266e87e2c634ce4e4661359107e938bce3cce5
describe
'31265' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABPY' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
71d865b211b1bc8efafbd1d834adb32d
8c53f43ec3aebde11d0649b70de12513ab30f5a5
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABPZ' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
597ebabd0667b40884845c6377c947e8
0972a404c8878cc886a452aa996c2886e7d1bf20
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABQA' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
2041382753e9a6351f30526c20bf31c7
9d3d2d5306baffcaa96a1f408e64435d44674df7
describe
'44266' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABQB' 'sip-files00158.pro'
a0603c6b91f0c1bf066d088ee9f23109
74b7e23bae4af557fd0908ab5ee1dd509eb405e8
describe
'56981' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABQC' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
adab34973c438991e2745890a8022ba2
3c9a29a3f75f057d8026bcfe8e9192c7b6ce5d87
describe
'16849380' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABQD' 'sip-files00158.tif'
db023f048aa8f1e020a08f988de99f74
8da1955b230257ce58b1141b9991f1fd12b61179
'2011-12-12T23:58:06-05:00'
describe
'1804' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABQE' 'sip-files00158.txt'
64a6d6f3668eb4712dd2dc902036daa5
370a2ecaf60b97d3f9aa1a33a55ea1c89c33f5d9
'2011-12-13T00:02:51-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'31227' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABQF' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
20a43e59ada05a36838cc710eee8b277
42d0a194c234a1b4a2dccbcff368444449b0b4a5
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABQG' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
51e79067b5b26724ec41195ec1adc748
f95c124bd885b50abafc5c4d5d8bd8576367da9c
describe
'150274' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABQH' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
127bb0dd8a954e114af1ee58bc8cde18
eeef555f28cd54db53adf8434f6a89575b2efa05
describe
'45695' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABQI' 'sip-files00159.pro'
009922b4c4c11692120408704d2d1b30
09904c0772cbc340187c296657c4e48547b66ce4
describe
'57170' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABQJ' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
25b26f7c76651ca1d2cd1410cc0f30ab
7c31fac1042b2b3e58f4de85ade1692b869000d7
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABQK' 'sip-files00159.tif'
2183ddd798eec9ef70f5ffefc0a098ef
4c6efd4e31a77a673680a92007639a81530deca4
'2011-12-12T23:56:48-05:00'
describe
'1845' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABQL' 'sip-files00159.txt'
db020fe3c856b62118c895421db060fc
e0a5bf56dd0c367e611b4186630cd10e9cb937c5
describe
'30825' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABQM' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
668cc9934a4098777a93004414b48ca4
a464e107044d965a2e5f6565615b1fe1cb72d97b
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABQN' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
c88273c802913cfbb4e4e638bb7dd0cf
7d58988d6c39745eaca87d5a9be8c5b2b636b8e1
describe
'150917' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABQO' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
5ba5325cd3f9de5297dd956b3849cb21
9edab281619803d0fcd8349c5a1af81008a9eba5
describe
'47652' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABQP' 'sip-files00160.pro'
a5078463df988a6e0a9b9d5a56bf836d
a2f2130dc3b97fa04350ec9f36dc057fea0df411
describe
'56983' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABQQ' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
6d7caa564b4e7a24894034723cd83985
2e7aaa60ac1813318de5cd4e65d5d10d8ecbf7fa
describe
'16849316' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABQR' 'sip-files00160.tif'
d08ad869f34253fc43b5682d9209f9c2
3ee666371af65374177e105e8df44c713e431dea
describe
'1964' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABQS' 'sip-files00160.txt'
cae899e720763368785cd739631b9986
34cb94f9c28bc139bed3f9abe601bb958e1e1748
describe
'30962' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABQT' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
a829b31a83f4b72caa7b8e0f6e93ce43
923ed2b642d8e14e8ac7804b4574321750b2cd7a
describe
'701109' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABQU' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
3b006c4db4dc753a1dc498dd4fb0a8d9
2e7b61bf1f4a3229f5fd3e8c29d0e89c7d3bfc0a
describe
'125841' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABQV' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
bf9e83ce317785188c9d0a3d6bdb8352
45d641be946aa169a7b57ee6be3c0eacacde22ab
describe
'6761' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABQW' 'sip-files00161.pro'
749fc3119aeb4306bfdf03e4e17fd70d
e2b643f69ac56a448b7502194bc5e97264901b13
describe
'48202' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABQX' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
9f1cda6c4283718c904ddcf5690aae2c
e7adfad32b02dbd06918a3ba97c2399cd06c2731
describe
'16848452' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABQY' 'sip-files00161.tif'
022d936c4169f8c62ce0464aa882cd4e
59a05b69bfb18c5eb4caecd1a80f2b8258ad2d8c
'2011-12-13T00:02:46-05:00'
describe
'358' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABQZ' 'sip-files00161.txt'
850b65bc3f453786ef4241a50be9118e
c6936cd079f802721e7f95fa57ed915b34b87aff
describe
'28929' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABRA' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
162960583c78e51fb00d88080f2d53d5
3e9071fab5488afcbd9a7e86722a9e48827579cf
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABRB' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
e91738f595696874a9633bb61ecad04c
22e770054ea4b18ecc66c5c634e92a9fb467a5a4
describe
'130903' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABRC' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
a1d5e6a216bfc545cbd6159cc7dde2cf
2d211dac40807b90a680eb7d96dbe00cee48fe02
describe
'37915' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABRD' 'sip-files00162.pro'
f30f5a5940fe1e411ddcf8f630a0f71f
9380079ea5e7726b6a2c56cfb8a94b8878b8cf37
describe
'52668' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABRE' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
305beae75823dc5fca016a07f172c1f5
0236e25e3c146b1f24e414f31cc5fe174c1f4d2e
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABRF' 'sip-files00162.tif'
7e5e325f9f6215cb008a9fa7df2c1fcb
df98d0582cd9db82288ef8b010aa0933a3691015
describe
'1737' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABRG' 'sip-files00162.txt'
46ea2b6c5928867c4ba032b1ed732faf
dc5bbe5a212765c492260ae6e6d6d629040263a2
describe
'29801' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABRH' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
440a72a16dc9bd457bebbee4c9e7b852
5dcdb1f825549a896054690e8dda6c5dda3f79f5
describe
'701159' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABRI' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
a5206e89cbc363e409ba316edf295da1
d86d3152f4562668fd1c17bae87b9d2ecd4a43f6
describe
'143886' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABRJ' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
288325328d0ed75cd850b00812fb2fbc
407f12b5d5ebe300e1fb23ddcf37275c21acfcd2
describe
'17667' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABRK' 'sip-files00163.pro'
7bc89b1160b6bd7fb6599550796fb952
eb99a8ff414e4daa6787ba87cdf55b8a8c31bae8
describe
'52291' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABRL' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
33ef6b601d68f1cfe42328feff69ae45
f53b79d77990c3e5e9c0af1834860ea3156d4277
describe
'16848796' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABRM' 'sip-files00163.tif'
ebfa14048f63cf988e92862f9fd046bb
b9833936566f40009ca7b898e116c95db250dfb9
'2011-12-13T00:04:41-05:00'
describe
'763' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABRN' 'sip-files00163.txt'
5a3fb8c5a5f80895534e6fbaade69ac0
dde0afe3f3df454624c336193a15c340aee55084
describe
'29607' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABRO' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
4a5a2961f1ed39b80ec6e739d16c675a
64cbceb85576b32359b33ce0c9c2562773e85b23
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABRP' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
57ea5893e0ec7a03d078db46cc659352
e865c44dc9f67867cc52a58e569dd38c84811c0d
describe
'138293' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABRQ' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
e926aa5c40d20815755223e204edd394
8728337ec5bf09b6f6c9df3810bbf958b4be19f8
describe
'39891' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABRR' 'sip-files00164.pro'
f4f179b69e9690a2aa456aeac96a1a85
2cab072b30cae32bb3998d20d91e12f8c1be322e
describe
'53844' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABRS' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
98925475ac6e583273c44f9f8b4cf48f
a44ea8868a52f3cbe8cae327389519f9f08e420c
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABRT' 'sip-files00164.tif'
5cb59a83b020f09a796ffa5690803e03
f7267f5e8aed5c40d0debc89a5b49fd2e8631312
'2011-12-12T23:59:19-05:00'
describe
'1834' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABRU' 'sip-files00164.txt'
44bfbdc3f12330de4cf30d1a1e7ef2a0
1389513c4883a32242044170de30363b4cad475a
'2011-12-12T23:57:39-05:00'
describe
'30010' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABRV' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
b6bbf6120b1d8820a38fd465e5f65f75
082a861efda140d7f29411f657ef9afeca975371
describe
'700805' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABRW' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
d56232e30ff9d15270e0370c693a9094
0440f3c42bbfcc45a1eb192bd29873baa1319ede
describe
'162625' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABRX' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
48f7aa3a8783250b285273ead5114daa
86670020eb7498aeab392856b919b57466ddb05d
describe
'28651' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABRY' 'sip-files00165.pro'
8e135450b2e807b8c570a92fdb707490
5c6bdd5f9f1dee77adeb073ced814b22b8db82b5
describe
'57801' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABRZ' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
0d422d818dc708f60737cf48b9419851
8ba0fbc79833887a6b1008a6beca0a48fbc80d60
'2011-12-12T23:59:30-05:00'
describe
'16849616' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABSA' 'sip-files00165.tif'
38325eaeb1aef5d09b0bf46714dffe0e
2c365526f50163308c7ab35710e762e57f0d731c
'2011-12-13T00:03:37-05:00'
describe
'1160' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABSB' 'sip-files00165.txt'
1b37eefc60c78cd5acec6a9ab39dd4a2
52fb3d6fcada7e07c4ad98d5cfacb2bfd376618a
describe
'31206' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABSC' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
9dd5243c3391dd8f3eca44ade3e7b055
53fc8913ba0d196c14dfac83538a1cb27f0a1997
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABSD' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
94ef84dbad386ba4c3f73d160536e309
c61b81df65b85e0edc9f5ba8cb2888bad07fea36
'2011-12-12T23:58:10-05:00'
describe
'150732' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABSE' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
52bf067f778d405b26800d33cd98d873
2658a6a622ca6adc507ea2c8e46fcb67892a4a42
describe
'37619' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABSF' 'sip-files00166.pro'
f8d1519f5e09597199c037c0d2240829
9c934fde2e1a9123c89c419567930dacdd0a8ec0
describe
'56250' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABSG' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
23d6d17317467301a634a017bd865dd2
3a80c58ec4f033e8293aac16fb6dba7405af9a75
describe
'16849492' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABSH' 'sip-files00166.tif'
23153d4bc7bc9151817a3ec84d2bafd8
1fd89e344e2502f85ff2fb399c3ea61508191f9c
describe
'1528' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABSI' 'sip-files00166.txt'
250fe912c2d27022089888dd8887abdb
02a85aaecd2fcaf772c95b570ea76cf1fc4be30d
describe
Invalid character
'31304' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABSJ' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
adc9a80d444b7caa0a5cd4addbd0534a
a8aeb892d2618c7cd5e8131e101bd3cd8151368b
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABSK' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
553039b7dfdea06d6ec5a0afbbd6f1c2
4ce67cf440ba3ed3d974d649ed77ab20344c34d2
describe
'154290' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABSL' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
793fb594d3b96007a2f4404b4c31bd70
fc0587c3b42b0669bce7731dd2246689e5c1af0c
describe
'18126' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABSM' 'sip-files00167.pro'
4c3661fea017aaa3ab002c7849f422b3
8d1ce701a3e885544ff0c36704c3fdb6627ae95d
describe
'56389' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABSN' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
a98f386a5526dbe9981132b101ba249d
525522ca7e7db97ae8d04aa3cdd530dcc2f018e8
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABSO' 'sip-files00167.tif'
c849706063d2abe3fb8d49dc4a47bafe
409e095e25cbe3c4d24e65ed1ae74bc601b7b33b
describe
'764' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABSP' 'sip-files00167.txt'
eca969467308bc3c8edf2540d44fda27
c7f2ce8b3c169407086055f3b7b5b31088aa8cd1
describe
'31102' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABSQ' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
dd00b984d414f81ad819fdb89bc3b3dc
ba93a695440d3f5076b921ecfa77c7c72c12f444
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABSR' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
6f5b9ddfaffaf9d4f47f0a70b3622a62
99a1844722069157f83c35368f78a8d8489cc247
describe
'147322' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABSS' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
3af39cd3188bb13f8a25eff0b66aee42
b4ec25524488c7559cf6fcda3cebbe02ed5e2a4f
describe
'45775' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABST' 'sip-files00168.pro'
d5db3ea50b0cf3edb0a04d9366fab37c
c53c3dde40a6fca4e5871fd1c9bd889115160f07
describe
'57051' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABSU' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
d1f0a34c1f25a58c7e0bc2a46b031ca5
df4866e18b72d1d510e3eb501396d41861eae200
describe
'16849776' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABSV' 'sip-files00168.tif'
767d8dc819c7dca13c008832fcf660d1
2c829472a8babb11e2c6238f440b4cfbb1f05471
'2011-12-13T00:00:53-05:00'
describe
'1857' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABSW' 'sip-files00168.txt'
9fe4040fdceb6b79d2e53bd5728d8c49
e26dd23526dcfc50873fc94c8783a4414b27fa46
describe
'31323' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABSX' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
192265ba518b332a434c9661ace80bad
a6340025e4cc4661e0cc04d9ecae7d8dc7433641
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABSY' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
a0512e4efad2d225c3fca33d19968a6c
8c791bd6d153bf3b3fff482270171a37effeb1bc
describe
'155170' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABSZ' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
1215dbed21b28425ba58d367c173bfe0
7f2f6f2a573079aac1b0628fdf590398d916cce2
describe
'49547' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABTA' 'sip-files00169.pro'
3f8b4497f9e87fe6a7d7a5ae98803cc8
8f508f73876f3da9a101f1cd91335cf56561b405
describe
'58676' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABTB' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
074d136c8571db249ea7a11b03f0a5db
3d8a4b83e2d4c17cf1883748edb9ba1b33a02585
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABTC' 'sip-files00169.tif'
cea9ababc3fd50214148b6af889ce62b
8f5ba48e5a7910667b70876100d0fd3b45a453a2
describe
'1974' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABTD' 'sip-files00169.txt'
82c6e02f5b9600b52334ba11494becb8
c75e3e329e6d3b9eb3b8067229b5343b2ef840fc
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABTE' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
e118ef605c03eb46821e660115d84e21
9854bf20b7b364238fa4fd683353b8c01591a498
'2011-12-13T00:01:46-05:00'
describe
'701505' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABTF' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
7f89e502745cf1ba22cf8b901cd03418
6b1145bcaac1a514040bcb9e9575ba789143a75c
describe
'107125' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABTG' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
98ea62c626b2810318cd2286159daacf
2396ada5e73bc68ee3dbcd75d7a2cf2c12fcdb46
describe
'26309' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABTH' 'sip-files00170.pro'
1031157da518e7c7e8612fb1c55fa047
62018aacb87a81a6e374055a8f8618199d6bae9a
describe
'46413' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABTI' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
c58fd98fec493c3048cf9a1307cdbb12
be3848de880e1fe6675989a61049a5d47859a71a
describe
'16856296' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABTJ' 'sip-files00170.tif'
9450221088795929e70cc602ce4802cb
c6337526db2bd5b16848321d9cfa6aec0981217f
'2011-12-12T23:57:25-05:00'
describe
'1391' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABTK' 'sip-files00170.txt'
e643effa00bc2cdc0eb0c995a1c6f845
03301192f3206e874955404ef93342b092b93806
describe
'28303' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABTL' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
55c94ae43f679d9cd31bd120d6bd3ac7
01c4d1a29efd6a405d5bdacbdef8aaeb14e71158
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABTM' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
9701439bda08ed5b1e47c2d75abe0696
899270e28bb844414616db262997bd633248790c
describe
'148609' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABTN' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
712c86ed57857e9660992e618f5fed1c
c962d537ab885a79708769c4a8aaae98bb10906c
describe
'4301' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABTO' 'sip-files00171.pro'
8ad0a97fee35a0018cc485a3099d529f
2bae2fbe5ccf5d904c133652ef89a451fba335a3
describe
'52823' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABTP' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
ca013d75648e6625aeca941fd998c764
1a7d4f63fb3008c98a214e96f525f9ee36afdc74
describe
'16849440' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABTQ' 'sip-files00171.tif'
b0197ba2c6b66ecfed34d99964ff3f31
cc932c757c552ec05316e81cdab507b70a3757c9
'2011-12-12T23:58:30-05:00'
describe
'199' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABTR' 'sip-files00171.txt'
17b0b2ee2c0f33f660e6d65103ce3e75
eea87a210f24f3a519f76d1bdb1a87606e85b528
describe
'30793' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABTS' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
4f4207a124422def6e1cc6b8262281c9
5a3d165e0921b9172bff14b1b4ce8a9ce117f191
describe
'701530' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABTT' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
f136c8a9c31e4ba708e8c86fcd22df6a
d278d940df789681a8c529764e0e036d8b6f3333
describe
'126147' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABTU' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
30fa2363734e5abad4ae130a03047f17
5465fa50c754fbf7bbe378c3428b69c430b1aa1a
describe
'32955' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABTV' 'sip-files00172.pro'
15033f2ea30d69c98a0083ab7efd06a5
6a8efec2b8c536bb99705dc383b47ab30695a3bb
describe
'49841' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABTW' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
d8ac878c65aac8773d6fbd87c1f9cb05
a9670659507a8c4549995627b96d4e98ddc7f91f
describe
'16856688' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABTX' 'sip-files00172.tif'
8a503d2b720baa330a961d9e9b9c2558
3597078c590d93d58fa01ae530ac1670cae4cae4
'2011-12-13T00:05:05-05:00'
describe
'1586' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABTY' 'sip-files00172.txt'
3586a1a622eee1d909821cae8da43078
50e9997f75823bffd490875e712090af7b229fac
describe
'29351' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABTZ' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
8a1e0c8dc57692f51be08fc85e925c28
847ffe2e7509f60b1db988b6bbe8e9bf86b26589
'2011-12-12T23:57:53-05:00'
describe
'701022' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABUA' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
0258cd79266fa4ae0bcc6526e3e3d1e6
7ea2e443bb5f628ac6006271767a2e16ed3c5ac7
describe
'179546' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABUB' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
889fe03d581a85c9e8e4bbb9d123e543
1543177a973b2d05b492963046c1956ab5742b26
describe
'2889' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABUC' 'sip-files00173.pro'
6a2230e64917624d072415ab33f3cbde
a0419dad27ea127fd8ac3c3d820cb4ff285a69fa
describe
'61015' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABUD' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
0289ce653400ad1109bf9b2d638f77e7
66c9af2387b85ba1dcd8a83024747b98cf405c74
describe
'16850268' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABUE' 'sip-files00173.tif'
811e4ed510fdc2bb2f2ca1edb3cf341f
043d0b9292864945d9723690b8f3e0d5b922cf26
'2011-12-12T23:57:52-05:00'
describe
'211' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABUF' 'sip-files00173.txt'
a2c735399d7e8ca77dd88b9766bb66c5
92cc537d174adfac7a557aab673e09dc0c154df0
describe
'32696' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABUG' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
c5bf0dbb59083b15e3a71b2dfd2eaaf9
134192807737205f126f75f88c57f41f59a4df6c
'2011-12-13T00:04:22-05:00'
describe
'701173' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABUH' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
ffc9b9a002bc71b943e0a104c718e723
11624405bb512f8ec785520c23ef0e4a85558c58
describe
'137448' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABUI' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
81dcb617bd1beb545f424d182728163d
e0c5e0c1724ca9e2d94db166322f81257eaea4c3
describe
'36412' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABUJ' 'sip-files00174.pro'
4319d6927be506a4c562b7752666cc33
d67fd178956385f86647d6ba2c8626a5ed7557f3
describe
'54711' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABUK' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
e8d6eaadfb7b24416219780405a30d89
27ae4f1eb613dfe9c6f5a36db2c2003a5a8cbc54
describe
'16849260' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABUL' 'sip-files00174.tif'
786088268317127b22ff37c0d1a630d0
922e3bf20aa005c1d6e56cbed7db22c11dde78ad
describe
'1565' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABUM' 'sip-files00174.txt'
8945ed3fcb04faeea99343ecdeefbaaf
bf9da531a6fe3de40ee16fb738dd6a6a2a98f6d4
describe
'30822' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABUN' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
cf0d0fe1405a406ee6bb62dff09be68f
ae0078e703323936dcb954f6f99b57c1aa6858a4
describe
'701048' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABUO' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
2d5ccf3967a3883c578f6269126ecc98
ec5d8a5464e7a63426756903d6e3b0cf487ef441
describe
'157206' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABUP' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
06a0cb7ebb4dc12a040f797c2d723dd4
c2fb50da5c26be7ce6c4e15689a6401e36be812f
describe
'1801' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABUQ' 'sip-files00175.pro'
bfb72461feecec392db594881bb24d07
3b0f0da6b60d305820a7a3a071092a8d7ccaf7ce
describe
'56341' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABUR' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
138278b8fcb57ac06e4e0098e9719325
fd076d917a4360641f9c81177405e4ecce3305c9
'2011-12-12T23:58:39-05:00'
describe
'16850084' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABUS' 'sip-files00175.tif'
2833816b996b3048756318c5cb8ad6d2
66a3c5d6fc793d5fb1e1f4382493559f825706c5
describe
'90' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABUT' 'sip-files00175.txt'
cebf5641b05e53a6382e0164da4ba7f3
98604bfd4361f3d014b847fdde2e017e530b8905
describe
'32174' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABUU' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
20f2eb429310a18ada1a6a528a5acddf
3591c8c0b2711cc8acb5fba09174697c4614fe76
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABUV' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
4c453a8d25e15c26dd9faa8a6b6b3496
5b5a95e6a9a1b1e09894a40d1d9810700aa0684e
describe
'137512' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABUW' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
d13bb41ca2514f2209d01a35708ab954
b53807666f1afaf344af93b91366d99859c04ff7
'2011-12-13T00:01:08-05:00'
describe
'41981' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABUX' 'sip-files00176.pro'
1d6def57948a82c96e3cb03b39158c4d
12840c764a2321250a1704de78aed916e3d3ad92
describe
'55168' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABUY' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
0097afa7fd8215c3353afa034ba1b4b0
4a5f2e740b2ee12e13ce250609dc116a334a27b0
describe
'16849272' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABUZ' 'sip-files00176.tif'
8b635a34e45f656b76bbd3ecd634c6c1
0860a32383aa6273ad25f87f075b139217808c2c
'2011-12-13T00:02:21-05:00'
describe
'1796' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABVA' 'sip-files00176.txt'
421793e3b2b034688839b10c0c7fd6c0
c2453450a5aec22d39542f01cd9e8c25d40f5f4c
describe
'30965' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABVB' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
974ff1a44cfae940685bd5b80959ff32
55a3e877ec395a007418eb2b055e94abd82fa14f
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABVC' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
10685d1e478fa5eb17a55b578ff7f907
05d006869847193f2bae48fe91d5332a9c973d6a
describe
'152256' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABVD' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
5da88288aabccadaa40bb8784f61ac1f
af5ff2fdfee09d48dd3ce753082f5147d1f75c54
describe
'18892' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABVE' 'sip-files00177.pro'
501afa8da2b18b13f5ed0c3c32d9abe3
da827055fffb361afbe22e35a982b5c29f995e4c
describe
'57203' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABVF' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
d0ce2d1269b98bf6f7ee4bdce47aa049
64e55bd694e54046c60751f4e6d855ca7bcf16f9
describe
'16849976' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABVG' 'sip-files00177.tif'
60acea586e641aa9dadf80b609d7b679
6d9e99af9c081c8cc32cc16efef1b8520b69767f
'2011-12-12T23:57:44-05:00'
describe
'816' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABVH' 'sip-files00177.txt'
51618a1e0f5db6086183efde9b321ee4
ad4cae307a54b7ab626e090d6607c945b0b9a115
describe
'31853' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABVI' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
d735e6c50d2b4a7365345d67ba6b252f
734d9075864120b3c66921fc4b1d6d2a77201e3e
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABVJ' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
20916eda349c6cac998e3f1cc7fd5191
a2d87b8752b8af0b24efb96857cba23887f3f64e
describe
'107106' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABVK' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
e1fe1ef4614606fe2b6a988c3d427039
575342888f9862e6285e9a2cbd03531d340b56f7
describe
'18786' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABVL' 'sip-files00178.pro'
aeca0e7cd86f3424324a1cbe623c38af
6158fd1332296784d93b13d1bcfd98bc6cd10e7c
describe
'45255' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABVM' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
3c92d90de96b3de5a217571dc3579e4b
cab4b4b0dfd95cf7e928f9c3d33c5070933c0ad0
describe
'16848080' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABVN' 'sip-files00178.tif'
15506e3a2e8ee3bb98a77130cf390f58
0e6c3d1e8cb354f1a41c69fa6ccdec9c5ba3a6cf
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABVO' 'sip-files00178.txt'
286806c8573e26409e960d49c184e025
c30a5e341fd425fcf6744a9b178c9fcb130b97e5
describe
'27879' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABVP' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
946fae0e510337245766e1c7dcc847e1
b5c924f1df2d237877c0ec6f0b4945f6d7801e85
describe
'701014' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABVQ' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
5cfa4aaa9b778195b513c28b2b2747a5
2eb65a6c474a792b393ceb35b1237d9c2d926639
describe
'159967' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABVR' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
852e4656a959849f2941727dcb07090b
b5cbd5a8eab9b9f4e042d3cfaf7a7d024af068ba
describe
'58196' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABVS' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
0974824eff0cf4d5dd945ea9b83bb60b
192335625b1146f6abd17e73473b6ac947e19b3a
describe
'16850280' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABVT' 'sip-files00179.tif'
28aec548952fda3db647db52cc2d0fe9
2fa588af66004e757a7184fe0ea63db32078faa6
'2011-12-13T00:01:53-05:00'
describe
'32754' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABVU' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
efd62ed67bacf99a467d7c8feeede268
f64750ca9d0e4501d3901bd28ef7ca49972d26ac
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABVV' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
c18b9689bc82528546e50187c237c0d1
8e32e4714a3e958bb79ae8e525995e979a3c88b4
describe
'113360' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABVW' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
8c6e88037b563e94f1820955d375d956
58f06a1c294af6c7e8f5c8833b312bd9f12b5ba4
describe
'28249' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABVX' 'sip-files00180.pro'
ef1736ada278ac4b0120c9d772f556a9
a102881db5e81a245e27aa3623133875e7938961
describe
'46721' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABVY' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
9762f14b7a6d870037f4d8834b40cd53
69b4ac145cb7ffd40aa3dfae390d3ba7f472fb07
describe
'16848112' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABVZ' 'sip-files00180.tif'
e1eb51a154da602c0a4ba94dbdcc9b57
d136832011353ec3f0140c6b0395afb74e48712d
describe
'1367' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABWA' 'sip-files00180.txt'
a0710aad64892ffe78119ef0778e8dd0
bddea44cfaa130dcb49b7c11eff649e78a2ea8f7
describe
'27886' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABWB' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
c47cbed1954af6c6d62d8bcda48eb287
f5e2c20cd9bf14ed3b1f229db10a8ebbe921b86e
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABWC' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
6a6333c3547670239086ada4d77a7220
3b5124547c97182a10f03df96d2b86021f8c9621
'2011-12-13T00:04:31-05:00'
describe
'156149' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABWD' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
76c8014cc55a8ed5bb9fbcb27058a822
c61933a23fc1d982568ec9fbbc59c6bf015b948c
describe
'3891' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABWE' 'sip-files00181.pro'
3d78a2175f0321cb6133296e02e1b7ab
0c95cfbe60f96583014031799bc38b4f2e54024b
describe
'55503' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABWF' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
9dd4e9c8c0e9868b85d0dfe0e8d86510
49263568b0b627968858215cd4173562664dee84
describe
'16849360' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABWG' 'sip-files00181.tif'
8d2f8e43a445b5fb7a9db17e3516fdb3
5c7e0cc069cc5a137f580127c2492ca436d7c784
'2011-12-12T23:59:08-05:00'
describe
'206' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABWH' 'sip-files00181.txt'
a7c3785359911bce0cac90f195b5d59b
4b50861bbf15216cffc63188fe4315b1f226c2c2
describe
'31108' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABWI' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
1fc79020ea0f774900d08a5f87c8c222
4c8c07ec8868aa4f3c0bf390a69dba5eb2a5c130
describe
'701059' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABWJ' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
507c66b4291b6749fd9442658437ea3a
ac37a0543c8f7eea1d3b09f6fedce0400196311a
describe
'145350' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABWK' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
c7a60a3ae37de104930daf67306ff1e4
b5c712e33a5a0167b66cb2862cb292f09bbf9ace
describe
'44992' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABWL' 'sip-files00182.pro'
efbf9a42e4c4d3a15e35323663abfab3
8fead9ce478e61bd510eea5c6adaa219b914e17c
describe
'55445' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABWM' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
b839ebb49e36417ee1733c96d7406b8f
c59b5c64bc99a40444f807d12458c47af5233f07
describe
'16849296' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABWN' 'sip-files00182.tif'
08bb343e0d641281bd413a0f6a6faa64
a5ba31487feac668b419411a7467c4f3f0e58ab6
describe
'1993' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABWO' 'sip-files00182.txt'
9427161a9e1b3cfbde4f9e65295ed931
9cfd086313a207c10efeb165799f8b9dfc0a3d5d
describe
'30513' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABWP' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
272762b089d79a15407b00c3cc07c713
1cfc55bde567fec13f86e1a2a1e0c2113aec755d
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABWQ' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
9869a0c465c94ffe2c6e439ec0fd8b32
8265b3390e313241e591f5638ad223614441b45e
describe
'159652' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABWR' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
6a87a7117a36984583fd5e4d992fbbfa
3dc78d2560176dcb0a8b72ad4dc85d088bd933a1
describe
'3355' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABWS' 'sip-files00183.pro'
d8b9c710de5eba36e9d87b730cdb6fb6
fdc195f497cdf122bde159c9d09f6275f438781f
describe
'57531' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABWT' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
33381c47cef5beacc6712d86574cc881
3ef0dfea616ef4aeb2aafb7a7591caf6b8e35990
describe
'16850108' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABWU' 'sip-files00183.tif'
1354f465e0666b1821dc5ef10c58f3a8
fbc8028b4165e70d5aa9e1b99e6c64cbfd2018ed
'2011-12-13T00:01:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABWV' 'sip-files00183.txt'
56f69c35ac326f96d22ad5a049fa6caa
38791697f648e9b26af3cd22438b887bc6aa6136
describe
'32469' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABWW' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
e3306de51f1da51bbb2274aa4ae08780
3d9838e5e24afeb104d3bd4d880a3f86a665594f
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABWX' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
dadfa56fd447864eb1a0ead61b83794b
d271e7c6e92755e2522954551801f6ea4f3a0b03
describe
'153418' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABWY' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
79af3dc34850d3823cbd6dbd33ecc043
b88ccb0c7bd0e1eae0ae45fa662813e7f5e97e9b
describe
'51881' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABWZ' 'sip-files00184.pro'
ecb50ca3539ae7ee1c38a72f6105afb7
ef4019b54eeeea8406236fa60eb6449a28b9ea02
describe
'57724' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABXA' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
b563e9fdcdff7fa68d6367a629c4ef96
e3d660cb7c572c9d13f1039331af1ad472f73398
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABXB' 'sip-files00184.tif'
3073ae198322d16c39ce1f5b4c3b0b39
31a1da1a97b926d978398a3c346b5f9fc2375535
describe
'2135' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABXC' 'sip-files00184.txt'
30dddda185307af2f7c383eafb94d06f
2ffae939e5ff99c7d063f38cd2d9a3743aaa4976
describe
'31029' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABXD' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
a0a440066e3d8cc5e0e79944826418a5
8b8b129710311688c362220fd70d626862bdf6da
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABXE' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
4fd920f99463c074cd01e4eff2ee2187
8a88cacb49771e40aa98ebf068e0c1e33f29597c
describe
'153147' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABXF' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
02e5027ae16bc79684ad8920905ae1d6
e61f403c39829e5d725f848f86d0e01d051adbe6
describe
'20843' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABXG' 'sip-files00185.pro'
5f065af1adf94e52addf2a6af78b67fb
a7fc229ae5cfcf132a73afb6ddd8206b2aaaf4cc
describe
'56219' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABXH' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
6410165ba7fc8554c3868a3a7c3619c8
9355e9fdfa636c4dd1fbeba69ee650b9d06ce563
describe
'16849516' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABXI' 'sip-files00185.tif'
1411e97808001c849cb3a4100813321d
a8a0796a2aac02fb53c29b92ace6b4d360148dd5
describe
'914' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABXJ' 'sip-files00185.txt'
499bef62d20954f446508bb7e95f84c5
ce3c433fe8772a58176465dc276e0198320a32b7
describe
'30939' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABXK' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
33affafd354813df12e734a1bbfc06e4
9135074c1661ee5feeeef08aeb6cd78968b51ed4
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABXL' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
39031867241fa0020e60da73bd29e19f
a6e2847325d9301623a88628aa63f9770d6b5ee9
describe
'155142' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABXM' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
32284b9008e53464dc464257d3e7e95b
fc7be03b58c39f959a2e22d6b8881d8afdfc5c86
describe
'50421' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABXN' 'sip-files00186.pro'
e52078d40bd54aaafc58c57baac37c48
84b487070a08996df678d733cd00ebd5aed8202b
describe
'56884' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABXO' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
41c74b97137451acdf86ee1fe93affbc
fe7d6d54d0bd9951a48e0af9ee8a0fb89ee5ac2e
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABXP' 'sip-files00186.tif'
1311463119151bfd030225bc61c9352f
d32e98893366ce5f901770da344f01284b8fa756
'2011-12-13T00:02:53-05:00'
describe
'2152' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABXQ' 'sip-files00186.txt'
b6e93ebf4aec18ca7dafd28b9b56a264
6976112d4f0d54920c5502fac0931c48ea72a74c
describe
'30912' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABXR' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
ea8dec4f0c6e86799e295be625104593
a55c01526188304b94e397c85ef5b275051a6cad
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABXS' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
61a03d37eaf7ca9ecfaba010fbd51089
d45b2623567c14d7ceb2b686d71e4aba8598b44c
describe
'163243' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABXT' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
424aca929efd26fd1f153db6d9aa4734
bfe13106962849e7198c99ca66efdcc5f3ccabea
describe
'13953' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABXU' 'sip-files00187.pro'
39277f5548972d0d5c8a4fd2c151a2c5
93c73213ad5af55b2e8fcefb2bddc13180966d8e
describe
'58467' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABXV' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
3eb774da68ada7bfadb484eda646f25b
1ee136f15c20bd419ff0abf213ef8699e341041c
describe
'16850036' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABXW' 'sip-files00187.tif'
6d42da0664f564de34299395dcaaaff9
53ff8c4a4c19f6661d4f535bcd68ceaeab3e3777
'2011-12-13T00:05:06-05:00'
describe
'614' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABXX' 'sip-files00187.txt'
837d156cd8443eece87d9c9f7f2fe74c
d6b4fdd67e1328a09bc49ce62916b13c7641ba19
describe
Invalid character
'31929' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABXY' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
ddbe850ff2926dc227e926043fca1fac
6d05ab2c121e5b5c980ae0316fbc48b8fc80a999
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABXZ' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
7ba37cc7275af0c1a53e6f6ed3937fb2
888e875c0a51c3553d07c7b009ff09f77614d57b
describe
'120546' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABYA' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
560b9632656d0b6c25653f4b5e152281
ea8b21db3dbc359cd8ff7348d8482fdde5986cd7
describe
'31046' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABYB' 'sip-files00188.pro'
27ff5565aada177d1ca8fdfbf0dc1591
091fead516141c65ad01798df39e8160e4b38a9a
describe
'48582' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABYC' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
81802d46f7235328c4260b7b0e7bde85
e0ad027092ce05b3dd1ebc4464b46214712cedea
describe
'16848568' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABYD' 'sip-files00188.tif'
8a3e7ccfca593abcf71edf66c4c0b508
14c92a17f82e9c757c7725970f393487e81a2390
describe
'1430' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABYE' 'sip-files00188.txt'
1c8afce7f414bb80de003ca2e3eeefed
bf95c3122efbe6703e99688180d2ed5adad786d2
describe
'29050' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABYF' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
e295037da6f1bebe6e1d5f28afda1720
a6ea02cc4fde13b06f7a3a738aeadaa995456a8f
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABYG' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
168b67028f1e60de2934bb20ed78913a
f6afd2d228c7e85cc5878ed971786c219298bbbb
describe
'151432' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABYH' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
77afd2bba7d81ad0d28eebc9d257013b
aa1616c80104ed456ade4428416687391638f250
describe
'48260' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABYI' 'sip-files00189.pro'
9aa9295bfd813b1da5ca81c416e93c8f
b665f808aa21e251cdb2324a76baf4060f47f55f
describe
'57350' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABYJ' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
393775c15dbabafd7ef5573ab705a10c
376f0768c7f7bf27b05bf0cb96892cb2e37576fc
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABYK' 'sip-files00189.tif'
097a5f8c0c7d007079207e924c28cc79
d7dd55bc6b9c9d360b5310cec6874a92db11a764
describe
'2042' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABYL' 'sip-files00189.txt'
a82f3e5e5b02a0222780c23d738fb43d
8348879e3415e0749c16ed25749a0df1eafaee10
describe
'30861' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABYM' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
90cda0281cefa57cd264f479a0cb1679
d67aeb3ca159804dd81ff2b65e1c8c7ae71b22f0
describe
'701104' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABYN' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
ccdf9882e0e91429b37c22ebdfe71253
5f9d5496af83892af100baf3e32463b6794bf8ed
describe
'126277' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABYO' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
9a4f67e7fb8707300e632245c41ddf01
06538efbd38251f7ced231e980d43ea5ff95d972
describe
'33453' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABYP' 'sip-files00190.pro'
fe8026917fb702c033cbe6eb3e0dacda
b529e35cc4c6f245d1088282d54939a92ae659e9
describe
'50352' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABYQ' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
4711b5a0c14bebc309ac11269cb751cb
b16d946f5bcbb17f3265fe056872bed74a1c3578
describe
'16848480' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABYR' 'sip-files00190.tif'
a74a2ed9ba6cc85c7071f1cb7385e19e
bfc48b774a1f96dd5abb792be76b8588b44fa7b2
describe
'1539' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABYS' 'sip-files00190.txt'
1de3f007590b730eb3176c08a44a6b63
88ef9d145a49002c581a4fe71c770686b59a35d5
describe
'29130' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABYT' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
2ff5cb6cf85569607914b4a9ff0f497c
1a405c5fd9b784d87e0195844a5f2318db88e0b2
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABYU' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
57db915748ea15e37216449d36bbea0d
47b6ab93b3b98b0e6a706e5c743a8facf32ca249
describe
'136776' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABYV' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
bae4d0aff80758ba3dd76195bf399ac6
74d2197f8bc38e1eafeb5b2dd8e08a911bdc71bd
'2011-12-13T00:01:50-05:00'
describe
'13821' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABYW' 'sip-files00191.pro'
c9eeebc241d43c6366d42fc2cd4e8b56
c7859751f0ceee79008c3834280e8ea750bccf50
describe
'51248' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABYX' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
07df1f64670c4f9e13d5e6788f398169
418573c120b9ee2abc417976ab5508172fb83d7a
'2011-12-13T00:04:42-05:00'
describe
'16848912' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABYY' 'sip-files00191.tif'
6c6dec6675fd0f77cfcebb4dd8366545
047fb73e84dc7260f82a98ed5dcd43a0f3889d4f
'2011-12-13T00:01:34-05:00'
describe
'634' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABYZ' 'sip-files00191.txt'
1b61afb1e095f29ad615ae28aef6bfc5
15796bb626eb288858406c19766a84c4ee2f9a6c
describe
'29355' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABZA' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
d6635fe3d915de610c0dce0580ef65e4
adf6f02720207e9d7fd5fa65ecd985c5a392f162
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABZB' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
57cec721ed9c2ee60ca8256e2a1dec6e
2542d2c92542bb23a9513d5c3ee35de01a21f623
describe
'148708' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABZC' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
2c0e2dd3a4ec167fd6063dfa720acc0c
8c95a6d1433dea203f13a2d4d7135e41291c38cc
describe
'42636' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABZD' 'sip-files00192.pro'
c90bda8064332f6cba9d5c9ac53d08e0
d93ef2341dce5838f16a3ffd4c2fc23af7d34da6
describe
'56289' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABZE' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
ff1537a4872b47b5fc3dfad201487e65
5a1d2664bd85596163ae143ea6c8d376d7834cde
describe
'16857320' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABZF' 'sip-files00192.tif'
89a3b706e84c2bb85ef316039e256b40
de4dde049e1d960f412a14acc5bf6251e0def7d2
describe
'1715' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABZG' 'sip-files00192.txt'
695782e905ecdf85ca8c596f1196bce7
6360fcf754f0705ee54077fd65d05f14ef8c724f
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABZH' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
a76156f882ab07b3c86aed195f81a757
6ee74367c40cf61dc323a86c6ed337c0ea5d1d07
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABZI' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
ab5bad4c42a45d6ab64518e1d0df8a81
0f7229150e5c5ae02b63ba26d4b6506e16ac62b4
describe
'184166' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABZJ' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
b64b3197a839e773a9e735ec23d34517
effece9198bd4b4cc6e5d842a158df3e5ee0bedd
describe
'4388' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABZK' 'sip-files00193.pro'
1b0147782ef07ad9da1542f5e2ae36fd
f01a052e9b33d9205d2a642483f1f7d407f84973
describe
'62925' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABZL' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
4d60a07f4cf50d3424c498c010f0f9c0
741382ad611c6d9392b097904cdcb74bbf6038d0
describe
'16850636' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABZM' 'sip-files00193.tif'
19751399617d52170dd950215de7dcdf
d47f10a89ff3d56425e5fb479348eb8c545c9a35
describe
'234' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABZN' 'sip-files00193.txt'
bb9457dc9fe1d0c679f78e323d262e2d
5d6bdf7cc5b654180c8b9ec5cc2908cab4eb166a
describe
Invalid character
'33524' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABZO' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
1495fac5b8945f621dce25042c86f6c4
6bccf192ee11cb8ddf9d8d5333db707c7fa6e012
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABZP' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
6abf735cfeaafbcd6c267bb1dd47faa5
687f983a95935a7acaf82d5b9b8513e196d31a8e
describe
'102385' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABZQ' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
85fc23247c83e0d8d11c8f25d29db410
cdfe8782639295487f8c4ef7f06956b6c7332b01
describe
'17023' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABZR' 'sip-files00194.pro'
22f6cab5061431e37e9b8f0c9e3a8767
a4c226ed991d13e8ff9659b981a9f56a1837076f
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABZS' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
f6a979112891533d075e3ffafe86d2cc
cac6d205a18e93665c88f3ced002ecbb16afd65c
'2011-12-12T23:57:02-05:00'
describe
'16847728' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABZT' 'sip-files00194.tif'
ca75b022975672dba9194ecdcf9a1d67
1630e832d4c00e44087751b1a92d8efafc694529
describe
'918' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABZU' 'sip-files00194.txt'
569939f45cef036d4138082ecd87707f
e54860944ebee7377cb0096869e1bc6643a333d3
describe
'26942' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABZV' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
2368428a0d76b4a72987fe89f5be973e
5f2c3d233222a323c1ca982b961997be9dcc6a0f
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABZW' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
dcf37c2fe8374d458d2662bbfea9d717
4f960a0f9de6633a8fbc5e291d29817a73d4f248
describe
'157020' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABZX' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
09d256e8a0c09d47f5508c359a8200f8
48dda77a211cc99d8e5e8e5ca1dd2b5015dec5d8
describe
'14264' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABZY' 'sip-files00195.pro'
b8756dac158283bc6b492aa8f40975e7
2c58f5db9f19408f81d35d4dfa8d2d1b48cbbf9f
describe
'56339' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAABZZ' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
5bf623d3dce66ea22f1eddc887d39968
6e03600da77f056520fd5b793b5950308bae7c51
describe
'16849624' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACAA' 'sip-files00195.tif'
c4e927a149aebc0029e4a673db4c5d9d
89edf3c890896b25d5469834501b0925ac75a876
describe
'692' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACAB' 'sip-files00195.txt'
edf43a62fc1e5c9946e497f9f1295712
c5cdd56371c3b30e57d7885d2304c37007206c95
'2011-12-13T00:04:26-05:00'
describe
'31544' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACAC' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
5383b1daacc1daa14383e392bcd1723c
db3d15f7ec9715619e15f39687724fbcea9bd00e
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACAD' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
fe67671ee5ba04adbaec75afa940b50b
eefe489a6b9eb5a3b6d651b23df745693b292ad5
describe
'153076' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACAE' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
a94bd69aabe18205384ab52bca0637e4
d44109a0cce99af5329aa480dbe8fd8551df32f0
describe
'48556' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACAF' 'sip-files00196.pro'
57550f54341df6d3b7f0b076e64462a8
fb130c1a261670c4776ab71f9525b7535b361e9e
describe
'58116' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACAG' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
2112c6fd8d8bb0f750b3ac3a3fe2830e
54618edf24c7c147cb096d3dba468732744242e1
describe
'16849476' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACAH' 'sip-files00196.tif'
704755b7ce9230de860c4dd22d4f7f0d
9b99bf7a4ce4fe3f149785628769b01243e27b7b
'2011-12-12T23:58:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACAI' 'sip-files00196.txt'
0fde0ebb85e4c88ca5d7caab431c0bf2
dca70e1f9f97285c89b1fb0c8e70ce52661e286b
describe
'31135' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACAJ' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
e54a4f63482b9bf5f6e8ba09a908b59d
b1e874db2b26d01e237e9991e39e58efeaf4b84c
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACAK' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
f1e340370811d8835665403724ec0b9b
991b1b91a3bec8e9a65fc91eb2ca105dba2dd478
describe
'133584' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACAL' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
3972772688ae01772356181c0dbd23a5
c88f5074f8148b50476785ab3de733367a6b01b5
describe
'38838' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACAM' 'sip-files00197.pro'
c37c9a0559067aa867d5c2559cf26e51
63033f283272918a485c09b42495d642438e0b32
describe
'52970' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACAN' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
cf1e1bc25da24f219a49130abb517316
58120556125eb91f166585190bad450bf4395805
describe
'16849228' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACAO' 'sip-files00197.tif'
0a9f146f9b4f965d0f692c9a08c2c260
7a296fef222c8132ee11c2ee4b169417a4fdf362
describe
'1694' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACAP' 'sip-files00197.txt'
56086f44456eff96479ea99c5d71145e
bd60fbc2f238807958a500fb8f7ddd8645172115
describe
'30192' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACAQ' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
ed21fb47d5186f3d7b2923903457cd72
ff2d3825432c57d7a7fea9deb01f96f55b31e700
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACAR' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
cd00770051a87b4eed757a2bf0fade0e
b8589998f5b23c12b31fd53cac83b288af49527e
describe
'155696' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACAS' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
3458f222ecd0b6bbd9166816c5aa1878
24127e0277d803cd55ce5cb9169742bbe0dfe37e
describe
'49084' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACAT' 'sip-files00198.pro'
50c5bdb79336c55d0d828215bfa7c874
18de3f7840f26ec035cdb66c19912cc96ebd19e2
describe
'57864' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACAU' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
20db5232819c21ac958e7d52a63bd922
3a5dda49a778c7296b5bc7286dffb84303d7ba0c
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACAV' 'sip-files00198.tif'
a40b2f0d0f939ac0781c465d7c3254ca
4215d38ad7c5988033a3abe4182ccec267a476c9
'2011-12-12T23:56:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACAW' 'sip-files00198.txt'
165404df56606208131b5ef0f8f83634
9a02842682c84a405e8cb81c2fc43815e82d0e15
describe
'31065' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACAX' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
72451a8d97309c1a43b926a4aeb2a4a9
242a14808f4fad425ba618359393689e52737644
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACAY' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
6a37d1147440b2501335b7e203217145
3dcd416103cc87f316b43e052980d382c5cd3aaa
describe
'169733' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACAZ' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
935e7f444d9e28a915555a5917553e80
c1d8ce325f1c867ef175ce3a4ac9e9c7c76fbeac
describe
'4983' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACBA' 'sip-files00199.pro'
7c3e46628bd09cede6f62cd412acff0d
85bd95792acff0f563b043990a179708262861cd
'2011-12-13T00:02:33-05:00'
describe
'56437' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACBB' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
cbb68b7aa848bb488867fc1ff24520ec
75ec72d552486b0acd6bb4449c4de0c588f38b60
describe
'16849164' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACBC' 'sip-files00199.tif'
7eee48a29c64818c4bf06ec3c918c747
35066d8225893eeadc6299394ecd2792633179e1
describe
'251' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACBD' 'sip-files00199.txt'
418396fdba90cbdb8205cbed2698b643
8d29713c003a7e999f4513a7d1d0587f1109b7f5
describe
'30780' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACBE' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
68d9bd2514868ed7685005d92666844b
d599ba87c7f73ceb963f63385c0a2837a62773a1
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACBF' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
fd898d953d120773a3c478d5ff5cbc9f
fa54306054e550f1bc42ca787dbf08b70adc1e17
describe
'110668' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACBG' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
966a2c6a5df83c3482f7fc933a5b3b89
aad494678d107b9e2b88e251cdc69797add8927e
describe
'25764' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACBH' 'sip-files00200.pro'
84503b2e171655d7092ce472f08c45ff
16ba40149bf9ff96bdda9ca51d3fc0d9c46a5b29
describe
'46102' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACBI' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
8c37f0918cb8ea6f83adfbb6d7a8ac3f
5e5faacec2d8df0e3c56c47daa6eccb3c8e28200
describe
'16847804' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACBJ' 'sip-files00200.tif'
89a05737136608926fbf97bcebb95d6f
da4b88a0c0bbbb398e1a5bd4ea85725d8dacb821
'2011-12-13T00:00:24-05:00'
describe
'1329' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACBK' 'sip-files00200.txt'
86567fae59e6a48ba11174a6d7b5be99
316f3105df12819afb091988034af0c7744a5f0d
describe
'27514' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACBL' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
127eaf9678598e3251796e2564bc3e82
80d97ed0d3280a11a4557a5e3def177a5b77aef1
describe
'701113' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACBM' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
1befd3299a1074024edcd9f2e757a9df
ad3cb504676f72f9af5d866317d3144008453144
describe
'192638' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACBN' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
f84ead18375ebcb4e61c43f54daed227
f550964cbe45150b9aed583a61ac225c59034c13
describe
'3579' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACBO' 'sip-files00201.pro'
edc47134a2982a677d675dbd442cc299
2ed67d74c67da9986cfaaa59964354d6fe90c4ee
describe
'60828' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACBP' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
e31418c1ed9fce5d6a937904c89ef3a8
25d7c6477375e554809c4741ab8d354c8a8c4368
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACBQ' 'sip-files00201.tif'
8f7dbf604fae125d03c7566fdbdfd64c
52eb259752d016e1867645d8f9ec23af620f0b75
describe
'201' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACBR' 'sip-files00201.txt'
32ad87baebaba5a3c98939772a23bdbd
c544e2962312417ce71ef0bd2324e9cb02273dc0
describe
Invalid character
'31435' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACBS' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
0b4498ea12754248c70022fe6033b621
1b2d428a99e6896f6c4ddf8fda8f23ea8a6403a0
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACBT' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
261dcc82d5bebf2c9e7ade62d7f4368b
8567813226bd3c7f324101ccdde6df75dd955df1
describe
'147945' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACBU' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
18abb954262aa8c41883dfe10f12a218
b993e51bcd9b6ec8e27b851a2a5a97b59c42023c
describe
'46396' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACBV' 'sip-files00202.pro'
361cfff7ab5e02e97232c00ec2553309
5967103fc5a216598e932ae5a71ef8d82f003ca4
describe
'55791' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACBW' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
f1d4079ad558a6a47ba0680aabb56a47
1f2e27ce7612f46db83822d229f2bd1c3aa3df9a
describe
'16849160' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACBX' 'sip-files00202.tif'
4ae68f074db9cd8d1969246d2edbde1f
b259827c591ee932dccdcbe15c9c4f710b3f7e82
'2011-12-13T00:02:17-05:00'
describe
'1871' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACBY' 'sip-files00202.txt'
e3631e16f2ef6238fa1ebc6ed2175c05
54f01bd01204bf62e8037184d8e814d5ac54becf
describe
'30637' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACBZ' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
4ecf6dbd85d0ddcbab916d53c674dacc
bd0e7d944a1845f86c594fdf6b0217cccd3e4e59
describe
'701028' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACCA' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
95f780db5ab9a07d559af5a6b19dda0c
781ce71ae9fb53869e1fe5382d479ce5623a403b
describe
'165786' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACCB' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
7ea61cca3c421f23f0334239aa3c6da4
0e073533b253e81c2a688c3f67a195632a39e67e
describe
'23406' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACCC' 'sip-files00203.pro'
63c6c1cfd7c36d1c04c13defb15a9e88
a3a766db1670642f245602893982e363d887073d
describe
'59648' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACCD' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
d69068bba1574533c141e0601e5409b9
82f329a36df51c3349eb1988e6c1dbbaba71257f
describe
'16850076' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACCE' 'sip-files00203.tif'
72ca65dd8e5f2c8b308517fd90222a36
8629c7d1549ca9e536b9bfb3aacfe1a0d99d52c1
'2011-12-13T00:05:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACCF' 'sip-files00203.txt'
474e21dd68a4f69fb6c4ed10ad36cc3a
eaa420d65e83838d6788431ecfd9d92cc832e70c
describe
'32076' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACCG' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
df9d66bf56bc67804cb0e9717328572f
709a34873f046013eaadb70eb5f66628ab2b8bd2
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACCH' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
265bb092e8f3960b67368c9c1d076968
2d1c9836d642313cdf22992807b2bbd797c3d227
describe
'99502' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACCI' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
842e4f23ddcdb92a5f99926fedb48a05
2db5262dacfbb90fe3601b0c4db1925d5b6f17c1
describe
'16515' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACCJ' 'sip-files00204.pro'
a27880c355a4bddfeb9e598751fbb62c
43e6dbd1c10c657ec984f8c7b9b628099952f01d
describe
'42602' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACCK' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
c57e07979cb4a61b06dd204d4ed953d0
31230e7029ca6d99a7202a5fb79b5bf9a85c28ed
describe
'16847560' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACCL' 'sip-files00204.tif'
17f8a35339295d0346d0a23a61b3eeca
b172c506b395054a8c15f6123dd0aae227a65641
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACCM' 'sip-files00204.txt'
4aa0d0c10f50a91bc2767433c31b3718
463fd96e6bde858326ae94fe18f052b49dee6878
describe
'26534' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACCN' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
a8b6124d4ef6d8223ff3b48b612e136e
59f6f6da6a9adc7f2a835ceb734db4c8699f069f
describe
'701125' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACCO' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
4aec32e7ec06ddc4f5434cc278aeee20
4dacf6d263da73748032512a4c1a362ba496e87e
describe
'185720' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACCP' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
9740286bedfeb4c54ab53c969e6b17a5
13996ecde6eff39bc8fe825f3eed6e8822cd597a
describe
'4406' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACCQ' 'sip-files00205.pro'
eb479e507d0a57637f9e4fd771f67124
1dac70b776346c29f41372215fbe5508717b14ba
describe
'62018' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACCR' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
4703ec4c54e43ff4581434e0a09a8b6c
0e2ddf1fea3e98cfc1227df012c93aaaa299de78
describe
'16850348' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACCS' 'sip-files00205.tif'
240c776ffb5f7cbe15b69d4275efaf0d
55d6428495c4e01f804229317fe873359ca96bbc
describe
'286' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACCT' 'sip-files00205.txt'
ccbbb5b1927a1936d2dbed89e14c905e
25f62c3eac74fc72c8a4f13fd81629c9e4984aec
describe
'32867' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACCU' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
274c03257bada855a1d7ed1ba7c16747
8c16ca36991e1a3de10e0e17f863d3c06fd6ebdc
describe
'701164' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACCV' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
70f3164c9ec60f091f627a103c6eaf5a
d93129bdc47ed250e041178af81d438a1fa21244
describe
'149510' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACCW' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
fc8de8de6fbb3f10ec656033343d4952
5eecc59277128ac39da5431640171c5d916ea40f
describe
'45473' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACCX' 'sip-files00206.pro'
4e8bfab46d97d2d16c3fcc6e76b63c9d
8d77721deb1b7b5c2486788d9fdce71ce099b694
describe
'56806' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACCY' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
7d2d627e8f82895e7d4c83a5f4635d3e
5155b3e8c7ad87c1102b28f6a0300b09f82bb7dd
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACCZ' 'sip-files00206.tif'
93d62477aba44615957e5903df591e5e
73d90a9db3d9a7b956759806f21e67afab81200e
'2011-12-12T23:57:37-05:00'
describe
'1848' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACDA' 'sip-files00206.txt'
50a5cab89ad9ca1ffb3bb1c5e6255e91
52cf4c512df8bc70ae754bf508ffb002e06ffeb2
describe
'31018' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACDB' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
7c9f686069e1a0d0a61c9b72c11f7cce
507a2d90bc774d840c4744a2b4b30cccbf10c9bf
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACDC' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
414fb653372c62cb2c0995bc9109ee58
250a67e78ce2306f87ed331c6fe90cc3f40ffeca
describe
'145650' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACDD' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
5e05bf88616863b02832e9d925689e8e
3f3c50fb1f3d6c960448b9b508ed71437404cfe6
describe
'13124' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACDE' 'sip-files00207.pro'
4b0381ce8c4dca97a301699909525f5e
71128f3d706869b5fd4b0632f15e20e1f6a9c199
describe
'53771' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACDF' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
69191a1b345216ff33b72fdc5ce90a45
f69bb7aec6bab5a629cb6bdf79aa80ce655ad06d
'2011-12-13T00:00:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACDG' 'sip-files00207.tif'
8a660814d6125a1ec5f3271e68d643fd
c8ed3b05668cb056a7f90f710acb855b3c7c8987
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACDH' 'sip-files00207.txt'
1aa097f1ab490e4af6d0f118bfbc563b
8d62c8caef8ee5c8277565d864f3a2b82565ea5f
'2011-12-13T00:02:27-05:00'
describe
'30581' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACDI' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
61c2bde85a6644e1ec40c24ae393cb5f
4e19b40e38df4ddb55d516c5e2d423aaa8227bb0
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACDJ' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
e2bb44855779e87e090ec82bdf7d3977
7f46d69eb3313d59d8f956854689562c74686a8c
describe
'123715' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACDK' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
0390df7824120f1457c3167b10677a50
795b93a6c9e2f93c56382df4720831a262536d46
describe
'31097' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACDL' 'sip-files00208.pro'
6839e88ea4c291d50f1b95b9166a7d28
90270537431563593dc64a37838b314ce7c5192c
describe
'49352' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACDM' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
d600000a46b3f64c1dd9bd48fe68ea31
580678d026346c5a20b6dc37bec137eb4d214ba1
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACDN' 'sip-files00208.tif'
14cd0d5c802e9b3bbf1886d8390070a4
862ef1fdcae4f2b777d5a3d76378645d949963e2
'2011-12-12T23:59:42-05:00'
describe
'1471' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACDO' 'sip-files00208.txt'
c4ae5add6efba3533da23d4c2fc9ec04
1655e1e34a4506e3d6ad8bc882bbb362dd7c4484
describe
'28615' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACDP' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
c954190b64532a19f40ab0aa4c464dd7
7f479953a5858679453ae15de2fab49ac35fe770
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACDQ' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
a7fe3819f732c722943420ddb44ccbce
da503f1b834727558e8730ace566605c72e56bb1
describe
'121206' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACDR' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
01be969e32e4f6b1c403a4b0356e80d8
1a8e52fbbb542d517f5ad5ab9a76defe4dd254a8
describe
'13456' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACDS' 'sip-files00209.pro'
618ce76a326bfeb4a679baa2755ee420
bc73034a24123ec286b466339e0672c8c7046df1
describe
'47261' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACDT' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
5107695857b01b9933231d70d8d5e682
05d78d8b9e6621bbe797df8722213eee3f516f69
describe
'16848672' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACDU' 'sip-files00209.tif'
76c5409464d011f9bf87052a7a088005
00f3d2dfcb38c7550440b9ac3fd804338a335130
describe
'629' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACDV' 'sip-files00209.txt'
598c2b2999f9f283e7a92883d8079b2b
cdb3235bc03275143395fadcb164bd7981f09228
describe
'28841' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACDW' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
b5f87bcfa307029869a10f1a4be37eaa
5afecb645b160f481005d8b328d9efa1482bf60b
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACDX' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
f0cd539cb015dcd86982602bb07c50b7
1a3f926bcd077f8edca5f2b379fa31e61dd5c2be
describe
'136077' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACDY' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
68c0985015dfb5783f90696c36e3d3cf
4802a083d83870946e684915f4e6a5541372da1f
describe
'38788' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACDZ' 'sip-files00210.pro'
81aa2abf9210472b4b62502684ea9728
bb69cf73725805e7cb1110f6b033651aad14eaec
describe
'52817' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACEA' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
2e1798cd2a80f5cc9f862696dc9063c4
f7cf208cc2f2320bdd48b24c5686a1ce7ff9c092
describe
'16848844' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACEB' 'sip-files00210.tif'
6d0e847b1de4b214f9f5f32a4c2458db
af4d5894c2e20f0affba229e8f23160667d9b87d
'2011-12-12T23:58:12-05:00'
describe
'1725' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACEC' 'sip-files00210.txt'
d14a36448f17e7d7d0e6ec7b489875db
9f65ad2ed328b4e333bff5c0366e3d9961e37d22
describe
'29586' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACED' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
60efe07d99ca183d9eb727c8b23d597b
1763028fef3dfc45e39a2316e5c483d9dbc2e45a
describe
'701095' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACEE' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
dbdc197597f054278ab72b8fed6ce976
e0dd72464d534635c391def99d3c516d9d1ba5f8
describe
'170726' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACEF' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
19f2d6400fa3c5edcaa357ad2c167bd1
cf1090fa02d0c150315e9f1354cb67673bc63cba
describe
'9528' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACEG' 'sip-files00211.pro'
0c11a405b8835fb487452f1a961c963d
799fc7bf16b1bf71d84e9c281324e8ebd4ddbcd5
describe
'57992' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACEH' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
d1adf6600494dc92d58d40f08b43f53a
2d15e817a2c41673b0c2c436cf703ab8bd717146
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACEI' 'sip-files00211.tif'
b83b03bf7b22e381ead18a3517cc869c
44b7da041473c78021f6407ff59470c27d233649
describe
'473' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACEJ' 'sip-files00211.txt'
0b4d351f6639b0ccc57b345e07a01b9d
770c9e1758b172d3400ad5a08a2dd87849d7e520
describe
Invalid character
'31979' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACEK' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
fb46ad35e0e5e41100280882d5b16c8f
f333d05083d8dce9437226367468907a584573ed
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACEL' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
b976bc45fb0127bf85fbc7f40c4eab82
e706f9bdfd32bccee0a6e7ca2301e8dcd582e2ee
describe
'149557' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACEM' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
6308c2ead615d7f84259d56ffcdc7d38
ce702821eadb672577ff2661388a377fe97ec7b6
describe
'44446' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACEN' 'sip-files00212.pro'
cf2bce17f77c3b927850b37f7e3113b2
d5ab211021f7f38733403216e52f14a7177d9052
describe
'57776' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACEO' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
1311b1df960e589d2814cd9af5979af0
eb38da6d0af7bd3beeacf7ecf8d37c272e0c0b1b
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACEP' 'sip-files00212.tif'
40bfa9ed089ce616c88527212e70b964
088c298a96f251671fd3c1bf0d98a507c3ba5589
describe
'1886' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACEQ' 'sip-files00212.txt'
75a82ff96a934e470cbb486acbab6c63
998dd90ccb19d119531aac7b2c62729282788e45
describe
'31589' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACER' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
f44ec9b6e37ef96463668ae978820a9e
278028bb4aea60914b1f530902a2aa4a4c45c514
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACES' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
057a035ecb52a66d6e2bbdf0eeea3706
480e33b5114f20ec7add33111bf2a7ce94f7c3e6
describe
'130148' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACET' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
29cc90f7d68e4a6fe8aa9f85f36e4e98
d0ae052e3ba18dadf3d29c6e237fa3c3a67401ea
describe
'15980' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACEU' 'sip-files00213.pro'
9e5ea828f9c2e5241b43ac078468da63
51c171db09035e2ffb032c940c2d748e7dea9e36
describe
'50797' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACEV' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
9722d8370e2b4521a3bd2d996ab3e953
c466c5df8a4ba26d11ad1aa52e6651e792860913
describe
'16849200' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACEW' 'sip-files00213.tif'
fc6b815f04f49cafee0edafaa0913d9d
be5f6928f04c9aee5d3da4b2f0f5ccf1bbbfd745
'2011-12-13T00:01:56-05:00'
describe
'715' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACEX' 'sip-files00213.txt'
8d6ec19e15d554d84a39b55f7a686d55
499d243d9d6ea23164518ca4b200250efceb4ddc
describe
'29911' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACEY' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
ac25df2a68beece938092ad0593d4e08
6e7e8bee937943538153c4087243139ad09c7df1
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACEZ' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
0e08d9f5c37c40a6eafe3deb6c2b938b
52cf310b1ac1d025c68084ec663a3c8f753e5817
describe
'153552' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACFA' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
78ddb932ac929800763e6a832067e28c
242dc583b61d440965899883e28dc9cc3b9c2713
describe
'46794' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACFB' 'sip-files00214.pro'
c97fe8ab0f03d6605bddef0aa5abac2d
32943559fa53a03832143699dc74c0cd0806dba4
describe
'56894' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACFC' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
c2de5ca19d9f9a7d03f986c8c9f27917
970ee3e3540ba16606840ebf83270cb26816d4a5
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACFD' 'sip-files00214.tif'
c25e6ca139902da9bc1a3e6b0b080e20
1e4031a38c0778bedd12c1c427d6a19cd7d5bdc3
'2011-12-13T00:02:29-05:00'
describe
'1928' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACFE' 'sip-files00214.txt'
478a25bec506af4645373e55757d2c84
5fb4a5f1fcc1b8b1c9dfe5c29176b13cc1516722
describe
'30812' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACFF' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
959e699d974a29ce53139d9970794fc2
65a5220b1de26040a1332fd78d2b5fd176c6db21
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACFG' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
c428dc60f9c4dd6f8addfcf6e0dabb46
39940923925e22348c290e7d368d38e26d1d575f
describe
'127688' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACFH' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
e310f04a7fe9bc9ba8e479391f602114
1761d635ae856f9e6fc85b69610a33c64a771d96
describe
'34625' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACFI' 'sip-files00215.pro'
1a155dcf918f7d0a09e3200f74434eae
0d5631babc96538621cfd4acb26e4e87c231bbed
describe
'49704' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACFJ' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
313d62e0997821be56da877da1fcab41
b4b84b76006a07a55d7ed80c9b9a75d3e3a93350
'2011-12-13T00:05:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACFK' 'sip-files00215.tif'
27af766d6e221f933e7062d90b6e1a54
74e1ed2a587fd468f4e7ef7bf0d3fedd7d994f68
describe
'1616' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACFL' 'sip-files00215.txt'
079644b4320c3bdba386b0f8ba598dbf
179794479544669012e7288bbd6be9dd027e21c7
describe
'28622' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACFM' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
e106f3f80deaf499bee196468a3641ce
fadbc4c0a4ffc25862fa84cc3a4fe8370a4497ae
describe
'701522' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACFN' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
dc5becf31063c408ed76fb024eed0cff
5d3593fd82bca3cf5069cf54cab2e2d2f0b1b953
describe
'110732' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACFO' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
10a95aa9e3edb59bfd41221b9e5840dc
9be299626b042a647eefc9e8d8f9f990b2d068e8
describe
'21611' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACFP' 'sip-files00216.pro'
7463dc5b3e751d11e59c84f871a7371f
50ad1818693bbb0810a3563c80ac62b8a085b801
describe
'46417' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACFQ' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
938af3b3c784a0b8198b0a9bde9dbd4d
668ce9590e907195655cb7061c79dc3840262445
describe
'16856472' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACFR' 'sip-files00216.tif'
fee66851b1d9efc755f73dfd8f2f7766
8278ad17abc4877f1153b73af3753a28eefe8ac5
describe
'1173' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACFS' 'sip-files00216.txt'
ecf28282945dc4f33e9a3ac085d972c1
4e34b5e9ef38eb488b4808aacf73a58b1a12ad83
describe
'28280' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACFT' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
42fc2fcba93c04fbd8626d1a95942a03
5bde60c1f51feea6106dc5fc437305cb7cd59e9e
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACFU' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
5b4c7254521fb48fcc4f9a75ba565d7b
c63b086c0d799f51ba52a5b185b3b242693033bf
describe
'170587' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACFV' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
57cf1e8f4da470d5ac5950db5d46735a
dc3a629c77c954238b2566e3721e7d1ca3c6acd7
describe
'4761' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACFW' 'sip-files00217.pro'
6aaa3fa38cf2be1b73066a214a87cf4e
96b92849a54cf3a1699d08bfc241d949bfcddf48
'2011-12-13T00:05:51-05:00'
describe
'58530' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACFX' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
cd9fbd6041c527280a1bcd05ffcd4663
44317f93909e29926d5e01efb92357258702bf69
describe
'16849808' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACFY' 'sip-files00217.tif'
095588a7410274036bfafcce73801c93
8688edd86a3bd058261be0ea9d2afc2660ba02c9
'2011-12-13T00:04:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACFZ' 'sip-files00217.txt'
c816efb714bfab75b319a3f7b791180d
a5589b1b8b06e98557ee3140e61117b112f22789
describe
Invalid character
'31717' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACGA' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
473ebddf8cf545c38874938351144ce2
b58d891ae2101fe6ba929d64b9eaa626d7aa8951
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACGB' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
a0e0016bcec5c9c014e177703ded23b2
b7ab4bbcc3bc65bfc8979649926dd8f924dc7798
describe
'139786' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACGC' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
8a1d4ea686686aba36ee2c32e067287b
52c7da6cb9fee8553b86da0a23ab6d3e7c801054
describe
'42786' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACGD' 'sip-files00218.pro'
5513b3d2b95876c525abeee6eeed6cdb
5be3dd53fd8b33f6663fdbf9633ad8cba6e2b650
describe
'54536' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACGE' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
e25676aaf7f5c3050ae3ef7931e7552c
9b61f49478077196a0befb0bd2ccc478cc2358c0
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACGF' 'sip-files00218.tif'
ba3f60803fdbf9a78ad2e7d0020ae594
8b78b20d8b5a7e1cea185b3ad930e82f05126f77
'2011-12-13T00:04:54-05:00'
describe
'1829' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACGG' 'sip-files00218.txt'
3c2dd20626a6e0b601b4cd8c75e33241
50d57e1152a119e51571dfc65f6e4c8099a84ddd
describe
'30453' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACGH' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
567b3376199c6bd41e1d070eea787894
729b76df336f336159ee14bccfdf814063b6c648
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACGI' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
9f12bcbc4e50d567330488157d277cfc
f0c2f92e00ac753383f285007dc6f26a6b181669
describe
'124580' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACGJ' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
9a91dfd8db1442bef0c0e095ba415913
ef4d94a20c7af5d708b2d0aa3a824cbe4d50e19e
describe
'15087' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACGK' 'sip-files00219.pro'
3e9623e6e53502f890699fd7dbedaf08
26d28e6f8f972690b35b631931b1902dcdb482b8
describe
'48899' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACGL' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
e86e6a7b5ac9dba866bd8b56e5759d32
7f4877495be1712bef6309ff1b1ac418401584a4
describe
'16848476' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACGM' 'sip-files00219.tif'
2737e2fe1e1f24b928e918c14b71355b
89ac10f1a1563501690189c94ddddcdb2a21e7da
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACGN' 'sip-files00219.txt'
7692d44800090ef2afa316dbd76bdc71
93f2f3e61a368c6fcd8e3d98eaf76bbb997d71eb
describe
'28714' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACGO' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
3d98faae0c8dea1fe470f73c9ed0988d
9bfdf02ea431835f744cd70f13c81ee5dee25428
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACGP' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
af694a3169635b9b468154df1eedd1d6
58ab3164cbef1c1d9c8224fdaac8f67c9e52818f
describe
'155192' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACGQ' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
1c80fe875758da30b43c11aae30f2b9f
4713634f2f2392f99ccb91dbec49d451bf30eb9b
describe
'48842' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACGR' 'sip-files00220.pro'
0c067e336ef41b1366a39b675fad9727
c31aad530b8956e2aa78215c5cc66059dfe29317
describe
'57900' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACGS' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
bae896aece84417a1451eafc587a0717
52a4b17df26f9704f58aa7391bef3404348f867b
describe
'16849436' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACGT' 'sip-files00220.tif'
a7c0a19906246ac9b6bd8184b0f224c4
3708a14d4fd2c41094ee85ca890022a5ae207a31
describe
'1986' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACGU' 'sip-files00220.txt'
3effd23b0eeb18754ef5def07d67f98a
860ace73fdc4e7bf61525656d8ed42edb9c20b8a
describe
'31248' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACGV' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
21f6824a994cb8903eba71208b495fab
b6fc0191e632baa0cec984dd812ecc904dd6006d
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACGW' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
85a979bcf5ed65b9177be1188baf7ae9
ee3eee792d50f3095110bf6083a41eea75f16cc6
describe
'107019' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACGX' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
c421040cc926db3940ee8832351a4b5e
efae93d35c19b5ac494b3d1c6b8eeddcf2f2c652
describe
'14554' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACGY' 'sip-files00221.pro'
75cadd456ba30e8bdeaf77d0f34b20bb
36065a9d6cc72da35f09e13b6606589a8cc93929
describe
'44175' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACGZ' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
0594e6f2c29dcd39e9745ee3f291a236
92cb125fd8da0ba04daca4bc65c0fedb20a9d18a
describe
'16847808' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACHA' 'sip-files00221.tif'
bd34686bdd4323750f7e7b54c6891aa5
5898537b55aa3df640b0071af45fe3b668d5e10a
'2011-12-13T00:02:35-05:00'
describe
'623' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACHB' 'sip-files00221.txt'
3bb8ebacba61784ae7ad0ceba3ed89c2
2282d1c04a4891d93e432a52b4bfa55333156e7f
describe
'27473' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACHC' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
7fdb39a6c5f46ae1459246305ff481c3
ad1b90647ae9981412b8875cda12a7f84e170599
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACHD' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
ed899e4e83699cf2fa14fc1c2aed1a42
849a936fb2e472490e33a539eb796b15ef09478f
describe
'150530' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACHE' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
0ce9c5d7cf42097c01e487c1ba1a0956
29afd500250c3fb6ae16df1d8c3c809defa11c6a
describe
'47023' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACHF' 'sip-files00222.pro'
26655f5bc44774180cb62bad1b4fcc67
e24eeb5a2d8f40908bd4a356edcb2047f410ef7f
describe
'56610' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACHG' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
a50e01c3dc2ed6a256f0e937d423e6d7
1916dd7ce07d0bed6e8dc037932da7a85225eefc
describe
'16849308' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACHH' 'sip-files00222.tif'
1f90de10c5cb62161437e82745ff1816
1591f4440b91695a70a667a9f56c9ac75bcbb235
'2011-12-13T00:05:44-05:00'
describe
'1945' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACHI' 'sip-files00222.txt'
b759ef5b49fbfaf2acc700cffa16e9b2
286f9d6a3b208b81f465f545124285bdaf880fab
describe
'31026' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACHJ' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
e05b53027bbee6ec8f6b27b8b1a78e84
fff9a383312054072f84f7bab82dedf083559ad1
describe
'701084' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACHK' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
91fe98367b46b23005b09dbfa74c69a7
3ce2f4055e761d0a18c03a3df0e34e1b6993e0b7
describe
'184877' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACHL' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
b76988de332c354552fb1a552f5a7eac
600c8a0f3d1737681290a77d861c6b8628191624
describe
'2211' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACHM' 'sip-files00223.pro'
a1375ae17345a95dc3bd72c54a981b91
ef38f88443ad2446ae5de720cd8faf3eb58f6263
describe
'61701' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACHN' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
a5064f7b98a5d03775a86601078298ff
96e0b6a7c77fa6d48bc23fa0779ebd961e9a5103
'2011-12-13T00:02:32-05:00'
describe
'16850300' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACHO' 'sip-files00223.tif'
625128d3e3d2439881ca2de4e045a0cf
9dcbb818a4cca239df07d1f38b77d79240350c80
describe
'218' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACHP' 'sip-files00223.txt'
88ad4cc91421c5b731576940cf132bf2
eb21aa8249089f6a4ec77e3108c80d7c8ebd2ed9
describe
'32694' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACHQ' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
a736dfcbc85c1748b0d03fa16b5a15be
df130090a1e7b744060f287535e01ce1286475bd
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACHR' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
2c48aa44df76903a41a0576317301915
8578284c1d56d196cfd7ca7f7472ba7aaf6cb0d6
describe
'147981' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACHS' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
dc5514edcf486f4dbe15f9bc9a646812
d8debfe5b93ae88a082f64ac8eeb46d732434b51
describe
'45940' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACHT' 'sip-files00224.pro'
6433d2512b8cc4506a44d22066eef0cc
062c2b6bf9b22e4063b1050e1ce71b32a19cd1f8
describe
'57006' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACHU' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
a9ba70c6ad338146a24c8c07c2e7105e
ea3fa4e829d0e55513df9810e0e36ed3bade7a4e
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACHV' 'sip-files00224.tif'
85793870ec91ed8a67004042dea9fcd1
0b18876c438d13358c22ec5f6b974f8b34177e05
describe
'1957' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACHW' 'sip-files00224.txt'
c537218a48904afffd4cae7c7f4f31ff
9ede679052b818aee303043b17309709ee2bbbdd
describe
'31049' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACHX' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
91c0674f2efdf59bac6be3ce56acb1bf
80a1fe147ec6610c40cfcd817d9d2923427b8eed
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACHY' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
8e1d91a0ccad083cbd86b09b53af4031
8878dd116d22d0e7d17676c9525a12bea93e4a8e
describe
'152503' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACHZ' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
f75c71d931a4857ca3caa5a31755f3ed
ae841e068ed157a005f44b218a25994c1d19dac2
describe
'23111' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACIA' 'sip-files00225.pro'
d162b6ab8b20e9ce9366abb15a788a2b
0d85446533c2d4e7487e27f0edc8dd35ee6c4b31
describe
'55845' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACIB' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
9dda253cf19cfec6b21123dea08ba195
31c22545186f2e44c4df7e5553a67de34edd8e86
describe
'16849408' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACIC' 'sip-files00225.tif'
e013a536dc5974c029c08d72a1bf731c
10e231d36bcf9b5506e3042505129282781ca51f
describe
'942' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACID' 'sip-files00225.txt'
93b34f0b55d5996a6cea59e74ea77acd
835651bf807dac12d9650eb3cb805ce775d7ddf3
describe
'30742' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACIE' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
0d488f5b58875e4ec4632ead265296a6
062a13aea4b4847901a55e4004800816d6659c04
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACIF' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
5d0c283e8948ceda4dd85fdaeca17f50
407fd57d25249de800064db05e3af7767692d590
describe
'151668' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACIG' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
c97535d515762a4bdab4e01c0ae76613
d2f573dc9ee102a7bcb60c853b8b8ef2ace53e10
describe
'49080' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACIH' 'sip-files00226.pro'
974f00cbfcd7f7a0bbbac346e530a49f
856f4143c9bdd510511413f4e3e97e0afa9eae4b
describe
'55948' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACII' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
9771f6a52dbe76a253beae443f47b9a0
f5fb4428e003a42c28a79246b0c7f2e49728e249
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACIJ' 'sip-files00226.tif'
2118ff3f149fdaaf16507ba99b0a0010
63ac7e75cfa8bd51513a70aa703db126a0db6dd2
describe
'2066' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACIK' 'sip-files00226.txt'
842d57614e338aec162810689c7efdc4
df40ed7c34a9c08463854064ef2f0047e95f6573
describe
'30748' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACIL' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
231b1b9730f608b92520ed3d1945c2fc
a4550df946aef31670d78eb3fb0768722f5727ff
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACIM' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
2055f5e15d4ec4edc7671dd1897dc84b
08a1591ee3833e0847367a50b9fbf0900d8f3bed
describe
'174117' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACIN' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
5aef99cbbb2e283e5149cfde3b0c1aee
5661971971e992feac505006556da0450d833001
describe
'6497' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACIO' 'sip-files00227.pro'
34ef2ce1d79a5b5757024e59d154709f
59d0dd9a92363a6b6be4e166593ec1607d128555
describe
'58300' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACIP' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
3f42ebddf93760e0db5c89c21839c623
1f0dc8e37c0d26fc007f969fe5bb6ecbc329b56e
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACIQ' 'sip-files00227.tif'
c1b662983bdae02bd41c6f101d87d33d
837164f69d021277728ec0a0a5790ec50160d27b
'2011-12-13T00:04:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACIR' 'sip-files00227.txt'
2cbf1b4f781f80baaef8f2547c15e845
390472f742e1ebde70d7dede365ecb29f275f4d9
describe
'31564' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACIS' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
f00542b41ce6e99b5f41444ef99327f6
3314cbab7b4b3471ef8c5fdba7e9542a1974c794
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACIT' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
22c97f0d4e8436ac24292a3fd30735fe
82542b20755605e9f5ad178e586d3760d0021c92
'2011-12-13T00:00:41-05:00'
describe
'148340' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACIU' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
b25cbdf988de994db07ecc9b275517f1
97036eeed7222d44781edca427977129e3c0166b
describe
'41668' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACIV' 'sip-files00228.pro'
ab5f19fda339e9f02795e2df0016dd19
fd259fa18e94150d2a966fadaf436cc7322ba067
describe
'57279' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACIW' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
9c2f1a39676f708219e435bfc7208fb2
65c818bf99837963fb765e56e8e1547efc7702e0
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACIX' 'sip-files00228.tif'
21b46ec1c9c1b1137f1de7e7752b111e
f7bf59b786597c654f36eb727f4ca6d89d3fd937
describe
'1791' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACIY' 'sip-files00228.txt'
b092696cb0106c7961a1a6c04489ae7f
6fe4d85d0d4e66bc2ea2df08e7c59f6e084ba477
describe
'31395' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACIZ' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
03164cb56952e46d2ff5e2371c880257
81d026931b8c519db9a44a6ef41222b1e9a6db60
'2011-12-13T00:00:34-05:00'
describe
'701105' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACJA' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
4f7dff059e9f0acd885f8d5915be6c74
e95e2930906c0eecbd40bcf624bb31486f6a36e8
'2011-12-13T00:00:07-05:00'
describe
'186842' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACJB' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
ba5f38e208316571080df248f929e34b
d87ac01d4a5da9735e95f7a4989be99a50a9313e
describe
'2748' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACJC' 'sip-files00229.pro'
cfa55a363c2be71edfffcc6ef88ea2fa
f2d1d43dfc6afef11554cbdafadf559f830de26c
describe
'63771' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACJD' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
2cd005904a12e962a8c28121d4403a3e
c3ae3fb26278fc438e116e0fb908b35be2bb7ef3
describe
'16850824' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACJE' 'sip-files00229.tif'
7a7fd1bdf3d25b0de666690aa6a3c3dd
6a5130499ff88d5cad6dc2c7ef1e73ad14edf875
describe
'141' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACJF' 'sip-files00229.txt'
53c3921e4800b068c56f1775d8cddd8f
9daacf652c8c7c9b3084602468e5d52fe15c84dd
describe
'33984' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACJG' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
3307336f4a8a237d94641564c41f9357
042d2490e76df66a10e7a4c499180367ae03ea1d
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACJH' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
6bc284cbe6053389ff9ae98b40111b20
ee02c8fe209db296073d859123dd6ff355fd1fe8
describe
'159315' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACJI' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
bda0dde7be96abc1cb1e634b64ceebc5
6947aefaa7fcda6f6be51e4fd9aae13bb8059053
describe
'49131' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACJJ' 'sip-files00230.pro'
9f43806ab73b3ff407d18467feb9d24f
66d1b7236c47ee04476e56ec46823e220e8dbaa7
describe
'59434' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACJK' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
028d79ecf38d0684a4dc588c45f202ea
320f78c81428faed05b0686e3426554cfdf28d37
describe
'16849892' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACJL' 'sip-files00230.tif'
bc65a2c0576135bf38ffb5a47c912dbe
b9e3a1983af75033bf7338d9e0073510af4d34cf
'2011-12-13T00:05:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACJM' 'sip-files00230.txt'
0b8cb6bec0d0564904f292e89ab7db04
4927c29a8ad0ba4b42c503d4d6453e92af325dfa
describe
'31668' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACJN' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
d7e1735287f35fcec4768d1bb5b5481c
269fa44ba900992b6f44a8f307089e98a7f8222b
describe
'701148' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACJO' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
a463326d17dd2cb4ffe637c96ae570d8
bf834891cb1d2912b5c8834770507441538431c8
describe
'149962' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACJP' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
d68b838bffefb6e70cbb22c521af058b
f56134c3e481c6d9713bf405ce6bf61e937aa9ce
describe
'31250' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACJQ' 'sip-files00231.pro'
2081e858419d350e2d614ec457e8f73f
a7ca9911b866eab53c98ad6d24c32e83e00d6fe5
describe
'55883' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACJR' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
98176e8f3180964e58bc3a4a6edb9eb5
5107cda6a90be9efa5593030f82a6bb95b70512a
'2011-12-12T23:56:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACJS' 'sip-files00231.tif'
b81f925985f2c77c31ab7d6975483253
967f05f3ed586f6e06d7e3df6a334c126e2c2d57
describe
'1433' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACJT' 'sip-files00231.txt'
a7e360e2b213b5b5135020ca22bd09a5
0584c0c82184100ab86459da6389c74085cbc46d
describe
'31056' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACJU' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
b690962fa0c94d1c3b01369bc7bf8184
f91acd859a35aca4fa55b5cf9b639f7a2a495c82
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACJV' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
89e99b2a26e5d10cb5fccdbf52100c7d
9aaef3cae662899e910725a22e5676f3e05d8aaa
describe
'167502' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACJW' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
8e49f9b10898c5f40c1943d84b857a74
35db7a3cebb86becdab2b2e61f1ee86b1b6c163a
describe
'52623' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACJX' 'sip-files00232.pro'
47d2db5bc210d9c1639d2d5f637d1c4a
0fe91a9ba2b42a1b64280e7cec88525212f2a98e
describe
'61264' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACJY' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
c2af76dd932957b48f3c402bca84595b
525d337bbfacf8ed8c4333bd653c19e43c199d19
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACJZ' 'sip-files00232.tif'
df3e4c139a7ed8d83ce0ce298b539b1b
a7456859442b31f72af61b1502041b1e6acad247
describe
'2153' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACKA' 'sip-files00232.txt'
abb30f977453ba39c42affd4806d3e9c
f9f473c60075f988c056ad2b260ff42f7ec45d52
describe
'32193' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACKB' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
b67273d1d9195f3ee7d18c8af27e52d0
6c1e6b25c2cf36fdf6350cd15b34cdd68931b5aa
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACKC' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
79687df46401dd707ff042d33009250b
e679fc4a667adb3ca47341aa6f4672c8643cbd91
describe
'145564' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACKD' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
9a6ee4e7e4ef30d603889bb74d57f70f
56ba488f95886388bad1bfcf1a10718a4fb91779
describe
'12151' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACKE' 'sip-files00233.pro'
3f970145262b4f4716e00d01296d7e9c
3911b3b73408c0d75989c8dc6f393548ec1e80f0
describe
'55121' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACKF' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
6b9eeab7477303536ebd5e4029c5fc70
45c4bf5894077ff7319a989789b62a12f6b040b9
describe
'16849544' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACKG' 'sip-files00233.tif'
9e51c80e2f85e8beb5fa86dd28f99783
1fc54c042ddc4992de8312ffdd2d1f61d9b75517
describe
'683' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACKH' 'sip-files00233.txt'
911b66d0c43d13f9f1798e8f91fa374a
e7fce6606165f74e622da09c497ca66ef62b3a69
describe
'30749' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACKI' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
62a51c251e5ea1d4abe1bca2073f8093
0c020580edbdc6619bc636431f596b8c8cc0733e
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACKJ' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
d819d70d9ee5653b93539a15158ecc1c
ca0e25f7685fe7762104387eb364c9eddc16301d
describe
'148197' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACKK' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
cd08ac13a2e0e494f27c778547c623ce
5d74b39382d947571492be19e90defefe91a55f4
describe
'45022' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACKL' 'sip-files00234.pro'
d2ca64196656b24742630c84c46d5ee9
444bceb2dbc691a4fb18be8b94a383af2e6ef025
describe
'56212' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACKM' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
0ffe06eafe02260d6305f01d3f84dff6
b5cc67e8368a84abb422143757d862dbdb3d78e3
describe
'16849568' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACKN' 'sip-files00234.tif'
f6837b51533587309c4d43eb0cfc2aa8
5f7ee17f947b84b503af26911cca2759bb726426
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACKO' 'sip-files00234.txt'
0fbd1d4296b1fc011923b30c070b99d9
f6cea06717d4740c33aff206115a645c3ad90233
describe
'31338' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACKP' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
295d05b5f8f714a14d1f1d65c3d1d46d
416bba26ef84628331d8e4c78aa94e494af2c78a
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACKQ' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
54784adfadade8fb91bd3455bbb6d970
0cd4a6d1fbc1bdb54ab51a31c5d6927abdd34aba
describe
'182348' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACKR' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
23f2b9c8ef1a668eacb2d84bb1933e1a
6d813faa8727eb81180990e7ba3a0c3fd85d5f3e
describe
'2669' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACKS' 'sip-files00235.pro'
7ec0ce1e56504353a497bd7b0f65c6c0
cd6dc2dfdd19b460559bc87ce0f3722b544b9fbb
describe
'61118' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACKT' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
6db6cdb943927faeac06f214d0bdc1f7
d0be3590fb856ebcf718eb2f6e2418c4f33e6641
describe
'16850304' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACKU' 'sip-files00235.tif'
ec1674b632a51e23da42ac8dfab3634a
9dd161445e1c7a4dcd16479e78136eff8de95c12
'2011-12-13T00:01:03-05:00'
describe
'219' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACKV' 'sip-files00235.txt'
b24c365c7a64c7ed30c0bbb2790157df
a6835db50f9c342693da9036026af1fcc84d2455
describe
'32825' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACKW' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
1382d87bb7e4141d96fa38835b57b287
98db33eeaa2e1a34fd8483e5088a8b56e0008673
describe
'701168' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACKX' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
2c98c1581562d0e4ff94df350e4e7309
1e15b6c381d31c10c11b4b90cb12f0d8a6224e9e
describe
'147489' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACKY' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
655c0f6678765a28dd537a18a0444042
30c1f0188199a8bbd25887ba04ba60130fcdf06f
describe
'44615' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACKZ' 'sip-files00236.pro'
3abb363e48fa0bd8a3b11e519e9e298a
e30769ca8e23e631f0f3dc95eb91c71c0d65da3b
describe
'56167' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACLA' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
44df10c2259a10ff31c1e1a39f046c0b
11f5272be78eccd36ef5f16d77d965e0ab7d5ba3
describe
'16849424' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACLB' 'sip-files00236.tif'
9ab8ab673ce2c7f848368b701f78712b
31ed271f07fec923b71b268949dc031e8e13663c
'2011-12-12T23:57:54-05:00'
describe
'1893' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACLC' 'sip-files00236.txt'
e159462b588224786bf5d0c4b9fbf617
8afa8dccd944e9bf10e713a71378972e4e82749b
describe
'31032' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACLD' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
dd5040c4226a65388a41a9ac81b7d830
272735d9ac6ef8e1d5c243b624a30ddbed7c56b2
describe
'700884' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACLE' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
b668e5088fbf984dfa5fd74f25492926
4dcca5521ff2eedcdc7cc66d9c195a9232842c5a
describe
'127715' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACLF' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
4c2466c3a781c961c52ce2591ea26603
028dcf5ac1d7d5bdbb918f1448632a4298edfeb8
describe
'18951' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACLG' 'sip-files00237.pro'
cfc67ccc1efbb9bb030aeb65fac3257d
76d5fb002a7fc58d1b67a06c76a42c46539c1575
describe
'50190' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACLH' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
7cefb4ec56e20e1da9bf906f39a6a6b2
99a501e06672a6dc0eeb5c2a34c791ff915c7839
describe
'16848964' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACLI' 'sip-files00237.tif'
ca2956703ae6bff5549fe65ccde503e6
99d80b4d0e63cfc9c0b2614a4b2fa56161ff7382
describe
'807' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACLJ' 'sip-files00237.txt'
4f2446aa0552cc10533cc5f5e6e55c62
91614d182fdd8f2d1c44f0eb315286252114dbc0
describe
Invalid character
'29780' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACLK' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
7871337293c08653ade35d6fa2ba0a5d
16ae0eabbbb773344e6580bad182693189486dfd
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACLL' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
d859e697d690a145f551177ea8e2809c
8372e3f177df864c9232926baba6f00ec9268262
describe
'123054' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACLM' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
e33bb7bd3757f325df76dfd77d4a1cea
14bdb8dcc524bfb4122d0861cd3df99b7c2ea99c
'2011-12-12T23:59:18-05:00'
describe
'30769' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACLN' 'sip-files00238.pro'
bfc93f54c25fd73d315f03da965a995b
36f80a8059aa4686353b08f636e92f749f532776
describe
'49374' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACLO' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
59393786d5c5be2733f8f3acfd168ab9
40124e92454a4cb4e32d089c6aaa2b313ffcd624
describe
'16848360' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACLP' 'sip-files00238.tif'
e346eb1a668a3ecfb9992e946ee0a14c
71bb4e523cc80a4f1db00f431ecd5f2648481025
describe
'1476' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACLQ' 'sip-files00238.txt'
8dac60d54f309df32c89cb5b2e9175cf
b93ef54341d432f6159c186ed8c3267a981bb28a
describe
Invalid character
'28503' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACLR' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
26dc4d22ce511bc8fdad05dde695ef18
99b43de1e96d3cce95710456a05221826e430999
'2011-12-12T23:59:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACLS' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
a5393a6c1fdd218d5824e295bc0be654
0402b66a8b6bd012eab73b0cdd55230c95824af8
describe
'186333' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACLT' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
122cc9d44d28fe2a4a36e294dd2fefdf
8c169f80448c398b559c407f489c122dbd613c81
describe
'1032' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACLU' 'sip-files00239.pro'
3972119c651579c6283dc919a00b9d70
40a6c713b21a862a2592e6c28f57718ca9a45160
describe
'62195' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACLV' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
4524c6e1002bc791e8856edfaed98151
c8df94b49737d97164348e685442d055374f5bf5
describe
'16850420' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACLW' 'sip-files00239.tif'
4395d5f1fc84b85257501c1d66135b69
64547f73073e55dcfe6b25450090b2523d2e0cb3
describe
'165' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACLX' 'sip-files00239.txt'
6a339f8aec01fe7205357671fc9d62fd
50443534bdd1f56c28ba246033b8f0974f3af424
describe
'33128' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACLY' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
bfe8f62fd4051487c1c48174f14956b0
dfb0787e7b208afdc1a02dd978adfa4b467535fe
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACLZ' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
de5b3dc277b297e33597eef4facc35f6
28d7653ae96896f3e35603b08e0adf963fef2d9a
describe
'147101' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACMA' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
9474e3249d9d1c8a2390b43b546d8c97
82589c4dd7c36ba245669620170c1787ce25e98d
describe
'37347' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACMB' 'sip-files00240.pro'
6e84a6ed2cd0dd6fff91250b8de6c722
de139672cebdef5d071a7f27b3158235512f4fac
describe
'55663' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACMC' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
02d481661377085946f71e03e7cb4b29
bb671b68a4a84d637bccdaaf43f79519e2c5b367
describe
'16849280' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACMD' 'sip-files00240.tif'
bb8f11f7dd52cf327ecdf1ff1d466d5e
627b2fb03a44b80e43b06e536f8d36c5e4cf8124
describe
'1592' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACME' 'sip-files00240.txt'
cbace920b69befa5097948c25f8d0305
19a94dbc6bf0015c6993574c43f934701f4dd3d5
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACMF' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
c844b372f641956adc44ebb95b46c6a8
ee118ff0cd3139b538f3f1ea65db44e312fbceea
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACMG' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
df07dc5e028bc48216ee85846e64137d
61fa2678f1253941787d80ca82f4351ec2707af9
describe
'166149' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACMH' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
253af1eb839c808ac798739d76d1a72a
e31d8c096cf94896b39733ee6a73d4eb2150940b
describe
'7002' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACMI' 'sip-files00241.pro'
3a471af1e6df9fb2d9b2ed6609c77bd2
e7c7addf016cc0342d0a30c4bf851b2a55444673
describe
'57981' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACMJ' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
d5aa3d953396656fed3ef301ea19f1c7
80a0a35a1c7934577ebf8655a7188d4e1cd7d38c
describe
'16850164' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACMK' 'sip-files00241.tif'
f6fd03cc5db1a0c0d27a4d85612314a0
6bf6521f0198b21153304e73870ecf2c0be576d0
describe
'359' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACML' 'sip-files00241.txt'
242f19838dd70570453400b7c86c29fc
6bfd565ff6c1c7af6b19885f9c1391fa3ae209ef
describe
'32296' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACMM' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
a1a0185f7d0f2fec09e681e8becee522
41626aecd00954bd4d492c707e15ddd4942b8422
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACMN' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
e9e33195ba14223a23f6a154f8d7dbd2
18df7728ae6459121a5209f18b3c83e9b855bade
describe
'117973' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACMO' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
95af32ce589ee5804a95b4163b10e486
bcf48c428d9c4371bd0fa350a0a7c2ed7899b1ca
describe
'26485' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACMP' 'sip-files00242.pro'
1409b76c134592e173d6e5a52cbb9814
e9193104a205ed072866399353e662e073c6f748
describe
'46484' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACMQ' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
c5824bb187af8f52456906dc26e14bc9
35c917432843915b447ff5489933e7d424cd5cac
describe
'16848052' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACMR' 'sip-files00242.tif'
fb5118d66112432a0c4d6ed35b5407e1
bbd5331c05d246deeaeff7eb11b3b27dd118180e
'2011-12-13T00:02:11-05:00'
describe
'1296' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACMS' 'sip-files00242.txt'
2d0f0806e7bdfa83207f1953dc0a4de8
fac4d4669afcf2d4a0b5f56ff76614ca5770bf4b
describe
'27893' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACMT' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
a7ee4ff3ff0a168fa67a7557e19e9dc0
60279f8b55899f9205f4129ca6e632e1ce098f1c
describe
'701038' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACMU' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
006587ce0d01de032f571d3f5c2004c7
660b216291ee65f9f519c5c2bdbc6b2fd08815d7
describe
'186143' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACMV' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
1555a6bc4e34c88c6dbb82c013e9e1f5
518a8b75f9f11156776b566267d6eaef4e44d99e
describe
'2452' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACMW' 'sip-files00243.pro'
2428f85f920c78f5c2ad7d9f3abfc13d
f0f3f99adb298bf7a78c7c87c7fb12b55deb3cc5
describe
'64710' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACMX' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
25700ecafec3a868bc8642bf9c3ff7e9
b7559b33825fcb2496fef70eadb7bc3b4e3d85a8
describe
'16851392' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACMY' 'sip-files00243.tif'
434f29d0704f34fd432d5c878f46f61d
6a1cefdfdf3a79063c430f94b24f9a8edec62fd3
describe
'257' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACMZ' 'sip-files00243.txt'
49e83575c3198ab5e2a8abc6a5d350e9
8fa4bb892b41f0139286fc30003c8837ced38040
describe
'35000' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACNA' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
79ff069730435a0109e3e916481b04b1
0839e432a22cfa4bc715b5483a7d4d36bfc5c7a7
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACNB' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
2f8d5ceb73e49fbac8abab12eaa25a08
d408e3aa02767686c55aa3663f0f82bbf24496fd
describe
'163685' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACNC' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
f0b481fc2e2e70f5230001033c9900e6
43be86578826dacfb16690e2ead1ba5cf9af429d
describe
'49978' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACND' 'sip-files00244.pro'
1f6abc111049542b0c1d8947734e008e
0a2b3d2af1e27e575aea736d7aa2d2521dd2f846
describe
'59936' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACNE' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
f8ddab59a47284d6df6f62044a55172b
d67f52c09207b9826f81325c073f8f88ec14c861
describe
'16849664' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACNF' 'sip-files00244.tif'
b06eca5fb63e831c5cc131ff7bf67245
3f02333bb9d037f79bcc44ac47a20d04878ee371
describe
'2028' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACNG' 'sip-files00244.txt'
5596d9cf8bde2577c833dd460df298e7
86df2d620331285f9b50a216ccd1518b41f2243d
describe
'31760' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACNH' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
99c858b97f21da1f63a9b50abc2c33d9
7e7cb6cd2c94c51f939620d7c0fafbdba185ee8c
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACNI' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
8819a546a37dfd5e30d5f5b0db53fef5
c3ad58b4ccf22bffb6f5030e157597e979de0ad1
describe
'133041' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACNJ' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
32ba1e790b6d552e0b5195e3c21a56a8
610b9a65476fc534c66da474e2d8d58c42657cb6
'2011-12-13T00:00:20-05:00'
describe
'4416' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACNK' 'sip-files00245.pro'
5f3274d1479af6973b2c6acd5c823549
571fa97a0c080aeb601c59cd61704c61ac5b26fd
describe
'52053' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACNL' 'sip-files00245.QC.jpg'
d59354d0ae16b20ad17fedf7e3d0a5a1
6dcd88581bbf4fdb848662ced1a239d6172673a7
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACNM' 'sip-files00245.tif'
20d264a74cfd7e93c9aa5751afb852de
154cc40241fdc106a82fee7fead47556560e11c3
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACNN' 'sip-files00245.txt'
755fab7d2024537fd4c94a172207bdfc
9fd539ea392026b509dce84b76d4893bcb3bee09
describe
'30716' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACNO' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
ccc6f2dac7364adffa9f1980130d8410
eb9c4750f85974a4168933b6b54795689115748c
describe
'701147' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACNP' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
5120292adcbc753ce3197954b30a8356
963efd3a4350d74cddf7225f04a209937780edda
describe
'134701' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACNQ' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
8977a1194b8ee3206a0937b6c85ed5e4
991f5493d63a028e1ea1005d53d048ebc8848b32
describe
'38041' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACNR' 'sip-files00246.pro'
4c82d01ef4daeab314c1cd546b020d4e
54e6f2802e55be0ee0159ca6aa388758a7386f36
describe
'51774' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACNS' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
07d20bc7f2defc05cb0b751ee1206d46
85b968e43d561da8a25ff3913cd3748efd6c52e4
describe
'16848804' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACNT' 'sip-files00246.tif'
2b21a0a0d222ecc85f5fbcc0024ccab8
1bba2d6fd43b98a0407dad49813e7b889d9d62b2
describe
'1698' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACNU' 'sip-files00246.txt'
ba96949507076fb2268ec51e25245269
571cb6485a493a77e419b99223805cf4f51f6838
describe
'29301' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACNV' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
c6fba1fe18d51d309bc02267a0dd4ff4
b006d298d7c1d87ec295248c3c2753ff54081b9c
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACNW' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
d50a0a66ffab4604a07f50d118adc6d8
5e73d4af5d486f7ef839a8c0151b44e64f5a69fd
describe
'119608' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACNX' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
23cbb383f89442bb163c73d0e5dfbc2b
6c99c6f53830e855bf0c3dda27a6fdb3867f7e5c
describe
'3675' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACNY' 'sip-files00247.pro'
0fdf25d196dd9ee6c14e697b45523f11
3a8f874350eb16fcb52522f3d54e56b33e5ffb5d
describe
'49680' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACNZ' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
bd0616a6b53a33d76444eb1927de1292
a9ed94d23c69111ba5bf53e437fa51380d04a55b
describe
'16849468' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACOA' 'sip-files00247.tif'
0f203480c080f5d27d565c2a213ef25b
81f33ac4a4e91e99bf7a8be474711fa9ebbaec96
describe
'216' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACOB' 'sip-files00247.txt'
9fb04740c00c36c8fcfd7f6f91cdf171
06208c53b843bc17a54fbefba979c6182b9d6e41
describe
Invalid character
'30421' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACOC' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
726b5adb90fb92a26fddcd38c80dacb8
85b26fbabfbe9faeb0b5d60b0f2dfcce50a5e131
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACOD' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
133f53572c0e81926168e800fded6656
e0530a1c053b1303246adf5213af475e90b491ae
describe
'108067' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACOE' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
3edd1c925e301b97a317eda83d7f8d8e
751b521b9cf7880a8428353889d026bde10d2a84
describe
'26914' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACOF' 'sip-files00248.pro'
675a036c210f270495051b08617f7491
d61cc8d46d87d98d2883fec497c4a03389456db1
describe
'44951' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACOG' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
a81ab77615dd71587a697d3e1b4c14cf
6ce0ac6331e371aa1fef21ca033f8a00a5c32cd6
describe
'16847840' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACOH' 'sip-files00248.tif'
31a4a7278c8263c7c99caeb4c593be8e
0476574d80ce33e5a84abe5be791d6fba05b2176
'2011-12-12T23:59:03-05:00'
describe
'1150' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACOI' 'sip-files00248.txt'
b0735ccb0af5d3ca1a33c8be5a022714
898d4f308cfa89153063782e4191cce80ae1b012
describe
'27102' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACOJ' 'sip-files00248thm.jpg'
1c88dac65a428bc42cfedba909fd91c2
eb0f8e35dff05e8c878d088628bc6f5cca055a09
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACOK' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
810c5802c35ea85646f365472e30517c
1c4a52419e0dc74d2ad29b7e7c94449f2a0f4364
describe
'153836' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACOL' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
1611df05537d586cbdf46366c4ee2329
271598d165c0eefe7dc4d3fa9cc848b0e58133dd
describe
'15778' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACOM' 'sip-files00249.pro'
bdfbd3451c618d5f49ce4dec8705ac68
caf5707b40102ec7bcb628089d8d420d63e9ba2b
describe
'55759' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACON' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
677eb8e5e3a4c6b6cac5f34e947fec0c
1e093d5064bafcf6829d8058bfbdf733846d766a
describe
'16849796' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACOO' 'sip-files00249.tif'
9e5fee86e338ede33f1c4d43f9434ac7
59cd048afda5c366de7bede5595bee71b90d0b8e
describe
'747' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACOP' 'sip-files00249.txt'
d718d710e0ac15668ffd58271999a5e4
587e1f68ed7b5070ca1a26504220dae7650b3228
describe
'31183' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACOQ' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
bca02829b5001aefa2720d9647043c27
88470537cb495a97c38183bf824d589974198bb5
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACOR' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
2aef2d22cfbcc412805337cbe17a502b
c3813239bf78c975f4d71255492dacc27f6c748a
describe
'113873' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACOS' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
1b84fcdf6772cd2c6aef3dcff3a9fd9b
1ddaa08fbd8b11942f199c66fe0c9b4d593a9912
describe
'29900' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACOT' 'sip-files00250.pro'
731cb0ff7ee9344bb3d538c6a1673782
74984a36d98a33d1b55c2022ea5cd206fc0e5230
describe
'45929' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACOU' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
6f8d7df16a3aceb6794a29e323cc00dd
cd1f60a6c7e6b689a2678be05c6a6ce047918b87
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACOV' 'sip-files00250.tif'
c1d809e30653bb6be7507e01c2cd7bec
e4b99ecbbc8420db879e15b97fc7a656a751b325
describe
'1175' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACOW' 'sip-files00250.txt'
13f6120c99ce0f71545edb8354973e2e
004a1e0bb3f34e15cb7201ff44817984b47ba3c4
describe
'27185' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACOX' 'sip-files00250thm.jpg'
7935c063a8d00f26b18420ad9af2d1f5
1ea4f5f0d6fcbef1aef2d739f676db3a8676051c
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACOY' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
25942a791023650db640a389e61adfe1
e0e2142c8ceb618488a7e32fcb3106fe4fb3dc89
describe
'41596' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACOZ' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
a8774aec704bb4b394136cbc5e830380
62dfd0b47a1ad86faedbc65367b9cfe5b82dcad5
describe
'22806' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACPA' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
7dda54a57289641ce01b6d77adea74c2
4ed884faa08b4b358470ceca36777de4b09c5fa0
describe
'16844596' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACPB' 'sip-files00253.tif'
9b27afaa628f9e513cad3125f49e591e
fb0fee7d4c4dd98df594ecf4822d2db58c46b92a
describe
'19485' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACPC' 'sip-files00253thm.jpg'
bb729014248cbe6f1d914252a0f47412
fa1dc537c67aa794ac1ee42549e51b176ba304a2
describe
'810993' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACPD' 'sip-files00255.jp2'
f2aff3288c249d874dd099ee25d52fc6
67105176ce0d60abfbc8102864656e390a37e90e
describe
'169897' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACPE' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
e45c4b6a7c52597577f00bc5fe9f8904
3ed2ef2a7a0d1f4857e9579f8e87cd92dfdbf5a5
describe
'58335' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACPF' 'sip-files00255.QC.jpg'
51e40ff82443680ef64150974ea7817e
cee18bcc8ce70f3b4c40c02a315c95cf90d72fbe
describe
'19485648' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACPG' 'sip-files00255.tif'
0230054544712922bcee7bf6e1d34dc2
73ce47aafb4bfed5ab6b418543ba9ebdfaa87ae0
describe
'32541' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACPH' 'sip-files00255thm.jpg'
f134df13664bc82c49a352dd7382f220
de50d18036d144681d6c82df43ab2a7127558607
describe
'56' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACPI' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
bbf8b1b666be8a0b727d172929220eea
819b49a1d8d9c05e6009e50c3b1374ee1acee4f1
describe
'426620' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACPJ' 'sip-filesUF00078897_00001.mets'
b04fe089cab5266e0f883e66e65f5a7d
03858911864cb4ea48d8e8660e27fbc0181fa784
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-18T07:56:49-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'550126' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADXfileF20080517_AAACPM' 'sip-filesUF00078897_00001.xml'
094857330a26da97f4d83606e3137faa
2d91354863eb0f14a011101b4b1072976e446f0c
describe
'2013-12-18T07:56:44-05:00'
xml resolution