Citation
Grimm's Household fairy tales

Material Information

Title:
Grimm's Household fairy tales
Uniform Title:
Kinder- und Hausmärchen
Cinderella
Hansel and Gretel
Little Red Riding Hood
Creator:
Grimm, Jacob, 1785-1863 ( Author, Primary )
Grimm, Wilhelm, 1786-1859 ( Author, Secondary )
Boldey, Ella ( Translator )
André, R ( Richard ), 1834-1907 ( Illustrator )
McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
McLoughlin Bros.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
276 p. [1] leaf of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 27 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Fairy tales -- Germany ( lcsh )
Fairy tales -- 1890 ( rbgenr )
Children's stories -- 1890 ( lcsh )
Baldwin -- 1890
Genre:
Fairy tales ( rbgenr )
Children's stories ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Scope and Content:
Cinderella -- Hansel and Grethel -- Little Red Cap
General Note:
Frontispiece printed in colors.
Statement of Responsibility:
newly translated from the original by Ella Boldey ; with illustrations by R. Andre.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026627099 ( ALEPH )
ALG3877 ( NOTIS )
181341517 ( OCLC )

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Full Text

















KBE

ae

Wy .
ke IOs 2 ae

Rewly Yranglated from tke Original by Ella Boldey.

We

Wit ILLUSTRATIONS By R ANDRE.





GON LENT sS.



A GOOD BARGAIN.
A LOT oF ROGUES.
A PRINCESS IN DISGUISE.

BEARSKIN.
BIRDIE, THE FOUNDLING.
BRIAR ROSE.

BROTHER JOLLY.

CINDERELLA.
CLEVER ALICE.
CUNNING GRETHEL.

DAME FROST.
DocTOoR KNOW- ALL.

DocTOR KORBES.
FAITHFUL JOHN.

HANSEL AND GRETHEL.

“Tr I CouLD ONLY LEARN TO
SHUDDER.”

KING THRUSH- BEARD.

LAZINESS AND INDUSTRY. : : B
LITTLE BRITTLE LEGS.
LITTLE RED Cap.

OLD SULTAN.

ONE-EVE, TWO-EYES, AND THREE-EYES.

ONE GOOD TURN DESERVES ANOTHER.

PAGE

29

269

84
219
214
154

100
161

17

124

117
182

23

50

TO

223

128

2IT

97
81

PAGE.

PRINCESS MALEEN. : f é = 531

RAPUNZEL, OR THE MAID WITH THE

GOLDEN Harr. . : : : 61
SIX WONDERFUL TRAVELLERS. . - 145,
SNOW-WHITE AND RED-ROSE. . 3 56
STAR DOLLARS. : : ‘ : +. 210
THE ANGEL GUEST. . : 3 : 32
THE ANT AND THE FLEA. . ; . 149
THE BEAR AND THE WREN. : : 137
THE BEWITCHED FLOWER. . g . 244

THE BRAVE LITTLE TAILOR, OR
SEVEN AT ONE STROKE. . ; gi
THE CAT AND THE MOUSE IN PART-
NERSHIP. : : : ‘ : 3
THE CoOcK, THE SCYTHE, AND THE

CAD a: : : : : : 9
THE CoUNT'’S REWARD. . : é . 197
THE CRYSTAL BALL. . : : : 240
THE DANCING SHOES. . : : heeeOS
THE DEATH OF THE HEN. 3 ; 49
THE ENCHANTED FAWN. : ‘ eae AG
THE ENCHANTED TREE. . . : 204
THE FAIRY OF THE MILL- POND. . 264

THE FAIRY-QUEEN AND THE WOoOp-

CUTTER’S CHILD. 3 : é 5
THE FISHERMAN AND HIS WIFE. +. 100
THE FOX AND THE CaT. . : : 105
THE FOX AND THE HORSE. . : . 208



(BLOINE IOI IM IES



THE FROG PRINCE AND FAITHFUL
HENRY.

THE GOLDEN BIRD.

THE GOLDEN GOOSE.

THE GOOSE GIRL. :

THE GREEDY GOLDSMITH’S REWARD.

THE HARE AND THE HEDGEHOG.

THE HousE IN THE WOODS.

THE IMP IN THE BOTTLE.

THE IRON CHEST.

THE KING OF BIRDS. .

THE KNAPSACK, THE HAT, AND THE
Horn.

THE LAMB AND THE FISH.

THE Macic MIRROR.

THE Macic WINDOWS.

THE MAIDEN WITHOUT HANDS.

THe MILLER BOY AND THE KITTEN.

THe Mouse, THE BIRD, AND THE
SAUSAGE.

THE OLD GRANDFATHER AND THE
CHILD.

THE PEASANTS CLEVER DAUGHTER. .

THE PRINCE WHO WAS NOT AFRAID.

THE QUEEN- BEE.

THE RAVEN.

THE RIDDLE. . é : : : :

THE ROBBER BRIDEGROOM. : :

THE SEVEN CROWS. : 3 : :

THE SHREWD FARMER. 3

THE SINGING BONE. : y 5 :

THE SKILLFUL HUNTER. . : =

PAGE.

235
47
20

122
59
118
79
175
213

227
247
187

38
150

136

121

218

64
221
267
II2
114
205
126
185

143
180

THE SPARROW AN” AER FouR YOUNG

ONES. ; i ;

THE SPINDLE, THE SHUTTLE, AND THE .

NEEDLE.
THE STRANGE GOD- FATHER.

THE STRAW, THE COAL, AND THE

BEAN.
THE TAILOR aND THE BEAR.
THE THREE FEATHERS.
THE THREE GOLDEN HAIRS.
THE THREE LANGUAGES.
THE THREE LITTLE MEN
WOODS.
THE THREE SNAKE LEAVES.
THE THREE SPINNERS.
THE THREE TASKS.
THE THREE WISHING GIFTS.

IN THE

THE TOWN MUSICIANS OF BREMEN.

THE TWELVE BROTHERS.
THE TWELVE HUNTSMEN.
THE TWIN BROTHERS.
THE WEDDING OF MRs. Fox.
THE WISHING GIFT. : :
THE WOLF AND THE MAN.
THE WOLF AND THE SEVEN
KIps.
THE WONDERFUL CABBAGE.
THE WONDERFUL FIDDLER.
THUMBLING. .

WHAT THE FAIRIES Do.

YORINDA AND YORINGAL. ,

LITTLE

.

PAGE.

1S
159

148

18
88
34
171

194

275



THE FROG PRINCE AND FAITHFUL HENRY.

a : N olden times, when people could have “by wishing,
= ahh) there lived a king whose daughters were all beautiful ;
but the youngest one was so lovely that even the sun him-
self, who had looked upon many beautiful things, was filled
with admiration every time he shone upon her face.

Close by the king’s castle lay a large,
dark forest, and in the midst of this, under
an old linden, was a deep pool or spring.
One day when it was very warm, the little
princess went out into
the woods and sat down
by the cool spring. When
she became tired of the
quiet, she took out a
golden ball, her favorite
plaything, and began to
toss it into the air and
catch it again. Now it
happened that the ball
missed her hands, and
falling upon the ground,
rolled down into the
water. The little prin--
cess tried to follow it
with her eyes, but the
spring was deep--so deep
that no one could see to
the bottom--and the ball
disappeared.

Then she began to
weep, her cries grew



































THE FROG PRINCE AND FAITHFUL HENRY.

louder and louder, and it seemed as if nothing
would ever comfort her. Suddenly some one
called to her; ‘Little princess, what is the
matter? your cries would move a stone to
pity.” She looked around whence the voice
came, and saw a frog stretching his thick ugly
head out of the water.

“Qh, it is you, is it, old water-paddler ?
““T am crying because my ball has fallen
into the water.”

*“Be quiet, and do not cry,” answered the
frog. “can get your plaything for you. But
what will you give me if I will bring it to you
again?”

* Whatever you wish, dear frog,” she answer-
ed, ‘‘my dresses, my pearls and jewels, and
even the golden crown on my head.”

But the frog replied: ‘‘I do not care for your
dresses, your pearls and jewels, and your golden
crown. But if you will love me, and let me be
your companion and playmate ; if you will let
me sit at the table with you, eat from your plate
and drink from your golden cup, and sleep in
your little bed ; if you will promise me all this,
I will dive down into the water and bring up
your golden ball to you.”

“Oh, yes!” she answered, ‘I promise you
everything you ask, if you will only bring me
my ball again.” But she thought, ‘“‘ What is the
silly frog chattering about? He must sit in the
water with others like himself and croak, he
cannot be a companion to mankind.”

As soon as the frog had heard the promise,
his head dipped under the water, and he sank
out of sight. In a little while he appeared
again with the ball in his mouth, and threw it
upon the grass. The little princess was full of
joy. As soon as she saw her beautiful play-
thing she picked it up and ran quickly away.

“ Wait, wait,” cried the frog, “take me with
you, I cannot run as fast'as you can.” But his
loud croaking was in vain; the princess would
not listen to him, but hastened home and soon
forgot all.about the poor frog, who had to return
again to the water.

The next day when the princess was sitting
at the table with the king and his courtiers,

2

* she
said.

eating from her golden plate, she heard a strange
sound, splish, splash, splish, splash, as if some~
thing were creeping up the marble steps. Soon
a knock was heard at the door and a voice cried :

“Little princess, open the door for me.” At
this she ran to the door to see who was there ;
she opened it, and there sat the frog. As soon
as she saw him, she hastily closed the door, and
seated herself again at the table, looking quite
pale. The king saw at once that she was
frightened, and said: “My child, what are you
afraid of? Does a giant stand at the door to
carry you away ?”

‘‘Oh, no,” she answered, “it is no giant, but
an ugly old frog.”

“What does the frog want of you?”

“ Alas, dear father, when I was in the woods
yesterday playing by the spring, my golden bal!
fell into the water. And because I cried so
bitterly, the frog said he would get it for me if I
would promise him that he might live with me
and be my playmate; but I never thought he
could get out of the water and come here. Now
he is outside and wishes fo come in.”

Just then a second knock was heard at the
door, and a voice cried ;

“*Dear little princess, open for me,
That I may come in and live with thee.

Forget not the promise you made so free
By the pool ‘neath the shade of the linden tree.”

Then the king said, ‘‘ You must keep your
promise, my daughter, go now and open the °
door.” ;

She obeyed, and the frog hopped in, keeping
close to her feet until she reached her chair.
Then he cried, “lift me up by you.” She would
not do it until the king again commanded her
to do as the frog wished. He was no sooner
upon the chair, than he jumped upon the table.

“Now push your little golden plate nearer,”
he said, “that we may eat together.” She did
so, but every one saw that she did it unwillingly.

The frog enjoyed his dinner very much, but
the little princess could not swallow a mouthful.
At last he said, “I have eaten enough, I am
tired, and now you may carry me up to your





THE FROG PRINCE AND FAITHFUL HENRY.

little room and make your silken bed ready,
where we are to sleep.” Then the princess
began to cry and shudder, for how could she
have that cold frog, which she was afraid to
touch, sleep in her neat, beautiful little bed.

Then the king was angry and said, ‘‘ Any one
who has helped you in your need is not to be
despised afterward.” So with two fingers she
picked up the frog and carried him upstairs and
placed him in a corner of herroom. But as she
lay in her bed, the frog came creeping toward
her and said: ‘‘I am tired, I would like to sleep
as well as you, take me up by you or I will tell
your father.” This made the princess very
angry, and seizing the frog, she threw him with
all her strength against the wall, saying, ‘‘ Now
you will have rest, you ugly frog.”

But as he fell to the floor he was no longer
a frog, but a young prince with beautiful friendly
eyes. He told the princess how he had been
changed into a frog by a wicked witch, and no
one had the power to set him free from the
spring except herself.

At the king’s wish he became the playmate
of the princess, and years after, her husband.

The morning after the wedding a splendid
carriage drawn by eight white horses drove up

to the door. They had golden harness, and on
their heads white feathers, and standing behind
was the young king’s servant, Faithful Henry.
Faithful Henzy had grieved so much when his
master had been changed into a frog, that he
had fastened three iron bands around his heart
so that it would not break with sorrow.

The carriage was to take the young king and
his bride to their own kingdom. Faithful Henry
lifted both into the carriage, and then sprang to
his place behind, full of joy over the release of
his master. They had driven a little way,
when a loud crack was heard as if something
had broken. Turning around, the young king
cried: ‘‘What is the noise, Henry, is the car-
riage breaking ?”

And Faithful Henry replied:

‘« Fear not, naught threatens my bonny young king ;
The noise that you hear is the snap ofa ring,

That I bound round my heart till you should be free

From the pool ’neath the shade of the old linden tree.”

Again and still again the same sound was
heard, but it was only the bursting of the bands
of sorrow from the heart of Faithful Henry who _
was full of gladness now that his master was
free and happy.

Ete eAd AN Doi MOUSE=IN-PARTNERSHIP:

Once upon atime a cat made the acquaint-
ance of a mouse, and he said so much about his
love and friendship for her, that at last she con-
sented to live in the same house with him and
do his house-keeping.

One day the cat said to the mouse: “We
must get ready for winter, or we shall starve,
but you, little mouse, ought not to venture out
for fear you will get caught in a trap.”

The mouse followed this good advice and
staid at home, while the cat went out and bought
a little jar of fat. But they did not know where
to put it for safe-keeping ; at last, after he had
thought for a long time, the cat said: ‘I know

of no better place than in the church. Surely
: 8

no one will dare to take it away from there, and
we will not touch it until we have nothing else
left to eat.”

So the jar was brought safely to the church.
But in a short time the cat began to long for it,
and one day said to the mouse: “I have some-
thing to tell you, little mouse, my cousin has
invited me to the christening of her son. He
is a beautiful kitten, white, with yellow spots,
and Iam to stand god-father. So I will leave ¢
you to-day to take care of the house alone.” .

“Oh, yes! go by all means,” answered the
mouse,” and when you are eating the good
things, think of me. How I would like a drop
of the sweet red wine!”



THE CAT AND THE MOUSE IN PARTNERSHIP.







But this was not true. The cat had no cousin,
and he had not been invited to stand god-father.

He went straight to the church, crept slyly
up to the jar, and began to lick the fat. He ate
and ate until he had eaten the top all off. Then
he took a walk on the roofs of the town, thought
over what he had done, and at last stretched
himself out in the sun, and stroked his whiskers
while he thought of the jar of fat. As soon as
evening came, he returned home. ‘Oh! you
are back again,” said the mouse; ‘‘ you have
certainly had a delightful day.”

“It passed off very well,” answered the cat.

‘““What was the kitten named,” asked the
mouse. :

“ Top-off,” he dryly answered.

“Top-off!” cried the mouse; “that is indeed a
strange name. Is it common in your family ?”

‘““That does not matter,” said the cat, ‘It is
no worse than crumb-stealer, as your god-chil-
dren are called.”

4

Not long afterwards the cat was again seized
with a longing for the fat. So he said to the
mouse: ‘I must leave you once more to keep
house alone. I have been invited a second time
to stand god-father, and since the child has a
white ring around the neck, I cannot refuse to
go.” And the kind little mouse con-
sented. The cat crept away behind
the wall to the church again, and
ate the fat until the jar was half
empty. ‘‘ Nothing tastes so good as
what one eats by himself,” he said,
and he was well satisfied with his
day’s work.

When he reached home, the mouse
asked what name had been given to
this kitten.

“ falf-out,” answered the cat.

‘“ Half-out ! why what are you talking about ?
I never heard such a name in all my life. Vl
wager that name cannot be found in the calen-
dar.”

In a little while the cat's mouth watered again
at the thought of the dainties in the jar. ‘Good
things always go in threes,’ he said to the
mouse one day. ‘‘ Again I am invited to stand
god-father. This time the kitten is quite black,
with little white paws, not a white hair on its
whole body. This happens only once in two
years, so you will have to let me go.”

“ Top-off ! Falf-out!” answered the mouse,
‘they are such curious names, I do not know
what to think of them.”

“That is because you always stay at home.
You sit here in your soft, gray coat and long
tail, and these foolish whims get into your head.
It is always the way when one does not go out
in the daytime.”

The little mouse staid at home and put the
house in order, while the greedy cat went once
more to the church, and this time ate the fat
till the jar was quite clean.

‘When everything is eaten, then one can
rest,” he said, as he returned sleek and fat to
his home.

The mouse asked at once for the name of the
third kitten.



THE CAT AND THE MOUSE IN PARTNERSHIP.

“Tt will not please you,” said he, “ it
is called Adl-out.”

“ All-out/” cried the mouse, “that is
the most curious name of all. I have
never yet seen it in print. ‘ Adl-ont!
what does it mean?” She shook her
head, rolled herself up, and went to
sleep.

After this no one invited the cat to
stand godfather.

Winter came on, and nothing more
could be found outside to eat. Then
the mouse thought of the store they
had put by, and said: ‘‘Come, let us
go to our jar of fat now, it will taste
good to us.”

“Ves, indeed,” answered the cat, ‘it
will taste as if you were sticking your
fine little tongue out of the window.”

They set out at once, and when they
reached the church, there stood the jar
in the same place, but—empty.

“Ah!” said the mouse, ‘‘now I see what has
happened ; it is as clear as day; you are indeed
a true friend; you ate it all up when you stood
godfather, first, zop-off, then, half-out then A

“Will you be* quiet?” cried the cat. ‘One
word more and I will eat you.”





€

“ All out” was on the end of her tongue, and
before the poor mouse could stop herself, was
out. The cat made a spring, seized her, and
swallowed her.

And this you will learn is the way of the
world.

THE FAIRY-QUEEN AND THE WOODCUTTER’S CHILD.

NEAR a large forest lived a woodcutter with
his wife and only child, a little girl three years
“old. They were so poor they could scarcely
earn enough to eat from day to day.

One day the woodcutter went to his work in
the woods with a sad heart. As he was cutting
the trees, suddenly there stood before him a tall,
beautiful lady wearing a crown of shining stars
upon her head.

“T am the Fairy-queen,” she said, ‘‘ you are
poor and needy, bring me your child, I will take
her with me, care for her, and be a mother to
her.” The woodcutter obeyed, brought the
child, and gave her to the Fairy~queen, who
took her away to the happy land.

5

Here all went well. She had sugared bread
to eat, and fresh milk to drink; her dresses were
of gold, and she had little fairies to play with her.

When she was fourteen years old, the Fairy-
queen called her to her, and said, ‘‘ Dear child,
Iam going ona long journey. I leave the keys
to the thirteen doors of my palace in your care.
Twelve of the doors you may open and behold
the beautiful things that the rooms contain, but
the thirteenth, to which this little key belongs,
you are forbidden to enter. Obey me in this or
great sorrow will come to you.”

The maiden promised to be obedient, and as
soon as the Fairy-queen was gone, began to
visit the rooms of the palace. Each day she



THE FAIRY-QUEEN AND THE WOODCUTTER'S CHILD.

unlocked a room until she had been around to
the twelve. In every one sata fairy surrounded
by a bright light. All this splendor and bright-
ness pleased her very much, and the little fairies
who went with her were also very happy. Only
the forbidden door remained unopened, and she
felt a great desire to know what was hidden
behind it. So she said to the fairies: “I will
not open it wide, neither will I go in, but I will
just unlock it, so we can get a peep through
the crack.”

“Oh! no, no!” said the little fairies, ‘that
would bea sin. The Fairy-queen has forbid-
den it, and it would surely bring unhappiness.”

At this the maiden was silent; but the long-
ing in her heart would not be silent; it grew
stronger and stronger, and gave her ne rest.




‘
ae





RASA
VS MAS
x7

Wee
AIL





One day when her fairy companions were all
out of the palace, she thought; ‘‘Now I am all
alone, and can peep in, and no one will ever
know that I did it.”

She took the key of the room in her hand, put
it in the door, and turned it around. She had no
sooner done this than it sprang open, and she
beheld three fairies of dazzling beauty, seated
ona throne of fire. For a moment she stood
bewildered, gazing in astonishment. Then she
moved her finger through the bright light, and
the finger became like gold.

All at once she felt a great fear, and shutting
the door quickly, ran away. But the fear did
not leave her; whatever she did, her heart beat
violently and would not be still. Neither could
she get the gold off her finger, though she
washed and rubbed it with all her strength.

Not long after this the Fairy-queen returned






her



THE FAIRY-QUEEN’S COMMAND.

oO



THE FAIRY-QUEEN AND THE WOODCUTTER’S CHILD.

from her journey. She called the maiden to her
and asked for the keys to her palace. As she
placed them in her hand, the Fairy-queen looked
into the maiden’s eyes, and asked: ‘‘ Have you
opened the thirteenth door ?” ;

“No,” was the answer. Then the Fairy-queen
laid her hand on the girl’s heart, and felt the
loud beating, and she knew her command had
been disobeyed, and the door had been un-
locked.

She asked a second time: ‘‘ Have you opened
the thirteenth door?”

And again the answer came “ No.”

Then the Fairy—queen saw the finger that had
touched the fiery light, and become golden, and
she knew without doubt the maiden had sinned,
but she asked a third time: ‘‘ Have you opened
the thirteenth door?” But the maiden still
answered, ‘‘No.” Then the Fairy-queen said:
“You have not obeyed me, and you have not
told the truth; therefore you are no longer fit
for the Happy Land.”

At this a deep sleep came upon the maiden,
and. when she awoke, she lay upon the earth in
the midst of a great wilderness. She would
have called out, but her voice was dumb. She
sprang up and would have run away, but every
way she turned were thick thorn bushes, and
she could not break through them.

In the wilderness where she was shut in, stood
an old hollow tree. This was to be her home.
When night came she crept in and slept till
morning, and when it stormed and rained, the
old tree was her only shelter. Oh, it was a
miserable life, and when she thought of the
deautiful place she had left, and the fairies who
had played with her, she wept bitterly. Roots
and berries were her only food, and she had
to search for them as far as she could travel.

In autumn she gathered nuts and leaves and
carried them to the hollow tree. In winter the
nuts were her food, and when snow and ice
came she crept in among the leaves, like a poor
little animal, that she might not freeze.

It was not long before her clothes became
so cld and torn that they dropped into rags;

then she clothed herself in her long beautiful
7

hair. Thus one year passed after another, bring-
ing to the maiden no relief from her sorrow and
misery.

One spring when the trees had become green
again, the king of the country was hunting in
the forest. He had been chasing a deer, and it
had disappeared among the bushes that sur-
rounded the old hollow tree. The king sprang
from his horse, and tore the briars apart, cutting
a path with his sword. When at last he had
cleared a way, he saw, sitting under a tree, a
beautiful maiden, clothed from head to foot in
her own golden hair. He stood silent, gazing
at her in astonishment. Then he spoke, saying:
‘Who are you? and why are you sitting here
in this wilderness?” But she made no answer,
for she could not open her mouth to speak.

Again the king asked: “Will you go with
me to my castle?”

She nodded her head slightly, and the king
took her in his arms, and lifting her on his
horse, rode home with her. When she reached
the castle he gave her beautiful ciothing, and
everything she needed in abundance. And
though she could not speak, yet she was so
beautiful and charming, the king loved her with
all his heart, and it was not long before they were
married. A year passed away, and the queen
had a little son. One night as she was lying
in her bed, the Fairy-queen came to her and
said: ‘Will you now tell the truth and confess
that you opened the forbidden door? If you
will, I will open your mouth and speech shalk
be given you. If not, and you still deny the
sin, I will take your new-born babe with me.”

. The Fairy-queen allowed her to speak, but
her heart was hardened, and she said: ‘‘ No, I
did not open the forbidden door.” Then the
Fairy-queen took the babe from her arms and
disappeared with it.

The next morning when the child could not
be found, a murmur went up from the people
that the queen had destroyed her child. The
queen heard everything, but could not explain,
and the king loved her too well to believe any
evil of her.

Another year passed, and another son was



THE FAIRY-QUEEN AND THE WOODCUTTER’S CHILD.

born to the queen. In the night the Fairy-
queen entered again and asked: ‘ Will you con-
fess that you opened the forbidden door? If so,
I will give back your child, and your tongue
shall be loosed. If not, I will take this new-
born babe with me also.”

But the queen made answer: ‘No, I did not
open the forbidden door.” And the Fairy-
queen took the child from her arms, and
carried it away to the Happy Land.

The next morning, when the people learned
that a second child was missing, they raised an
angry cry against the queen, and said openly
that she had slain it, and the king’s counsellors
advised that she be tried for the crime. But
the king’s love for her was so great that he
would not believe the report, and ordered his

counsellors never to mention it on pain of death.
8














“ce
i
i



THE KING DISCOVERS THE MAIDEN.

The next year a beautiful little daughter was
born. In the night the Fairy-queen appeared
a third time and said to the queen: ‘“ Follow
me.” Taking the queen by the hand, she led
her to the Happy Land, and then showed her her
two oldest children, laughing and playing among
the stars. The queen’s joy was very great at

seeing them once more, and the Fairy-queen







THE FAIRY-QUEEN AND THE WOODCUTTER’S CHILD.

said to her: ‘Has not your heart softened yet?
If you will confess that you opened the forbid-
den door, I will give you back both your sons.”
But the queen made answer the third time:
“No, I did not open the forbidden door.”

Then the Fairy-queen allowed her to sink
down again to the earth, and she took from her
arms the third child. The next morning when
it became known that the third child had dis-
appeared, the people cried with a loud voice:
“The queen is an ogress; she has eaten her
children ; she must die.” And the king could
no longer silence his counsellors.

A trial was held, and as she could not defend
herself, the queen was condemned _to be burned
alive. The wood was brought, and laid in a

pile, the queen was bound to the stake, the fire
was lighted and began to burn around her.
Then the icy pride melted, and her heart was
moved to repent, and she thought: “Oh! if I
could only confess before my death that I opened
the door!” Then her voice came to her, and
she cried out: ‘“‘ Yes, Fairy-queen, I did it!”
And immediately it began to rain, and the fire
was put out. A bright light shone above, and
in it appeared the Fairy-queen with the two lost
sons at her side, and in her arms the baby-girl.

She spoke kindly to the queen, saying: “‘He
who repents and confesses his sins, shall be for-
given,” and she gave her the three children,
loosed her tongue, and promised her happiness
for the rest of her life.

eras COCK, ELE SCY tH EAN) Lie (CAT

A FATHER who was dying called his three
sons to him and gave the first a cock, the sec-
ond a scythe, and the third a cat.

“‘T am old,” he said, ‘“‘and death is near, but
before I leave you, I would like to provide for
you. I have no money to leave you, and what
I hav just given you seems of little value, but
it al) depends on how you use them. Take
these things and go to a country where they are
unknown, and your fortunés are made.”

After the father’s death, the eldest son set out
with his cock. But wherever he went the cock
was well known. As he approached the large
towns, he could see it sitting on the tall towers,
turning in the wind, and as he passed through
the little villages, he heard more than one crow-
ing. Noone would wonder over such a familiar
bird, and he could not understand how he was
to make his fortune by it.

But at last he reached an island where the
people had never heard of a cock, and they also
had no division of time. They only knew when
it was morning and evening, but in the night, if
they did not sleep, they had no way of finding
out the time.

“ Look,” said he to the people, showing them
9 ‘

the cock, ‘‘ what a proud bird this is; he has a
ruby crown on his head, and wears spurs like
a knight; he calls out the hour three times in
the night, and the last time is always the hour
of sunrise; also if he crows on a clear day,
you may rest assured there will be a change of
weather.”

The people were so pleased that not one of
them slept all night, but listened for the crow-
ing of the cock. When they heard it call out
the time loudly and plainly at two, four, and
six o'clock, they were delighted, and asked the
traveller the next morning if it were for sale,
and how much he would like for it.

«As much gold as an ass can carry,” said the
man.

“A small sum for such a valuable creature,”
said the people, and they collected the money

‘and gave him willingly what he asked.

When he reached home with his riches, his
brothers were greatly astonished, and the second
said: ‘I think I will go now and see if I shall
have as good luck with my scythe.”

He travelled a long distance without any pros-
pect of success. In every place he met farmers
who carried as good a scythe on their shoulders



SHE COCK.
as he had. But finally he, too, arrived at an
island where the people had never seen a scythe.
When the grain was ripe, they planted cannons
around the field and shot the grain down. But
this was an awkward proceeding, often they shot
entirely over the grain, at other times they fired
through it in such a manner as to lose the greater
part, and worse than all was the constant noise.
The man took his scythe and went out into the

field, and so quickly and silently did he mow.

the grain, that the people watched him with
mouth and eyes wide open. They were willing
to give him whatever he asked for the scythe,
and he received as much gold as a horse could
carry.

Now the third brother wished to try his for-
tune with his cat. It happened to him exactly
as it had with his brothers. There was no place
on the mainland where there were not cats, and
oftentimes they were so numerous that all the
young kittens were drowned as‘soon as they
were born. At last he sailed for an island, and
there, fortunately for him, the people had never
seen a cat. The mice were so numerous that
they had the upper hand, and danced on the
tables and chairs whether the people were at
home or not. There were loud complaints
against this nuisance, but the king was unable
to do anything for them. The mice could be
heard squealing and scampering in every corner
of his palace, and they gnawed everything their
teeth could lay hold of.

When the cat arrived she began to hunt them.
She cleared the mice from two rooms, and the
people begged the king to buy the wonderful
animal that could rid the kingdom of its pest.

The king was willing and gave the man a mule
heavily laden with gold. Then the third brother
returned home with the largest treasure of
them all.

The cat had a fine time in the royal palace,
and killed more mice than could be counted.
Finally she became hot and tired with her work,
and wanted a drink; so she stood still, twisted
her head around in the air, and cried: ‘ Miau,
miau!” When the king heard this strange cry,
he was frightened, and called all his people
together, but they too were so frightened when
they heard puss mew, that they all rushed out
of the castle. Then the king held a council as
to what they had better do. It was finally de-
cided to send a herald to the cat, and ask her
to leave the palace, or she would be driven out

by force.
‘““We would rather have the plague of the
mice,” said the councillors—‘‘ we are used to

that evil—rather than sacrifice our lives to such
a monster.”

A young nobleman was chosen as herald, and
he entered the palace, and asked the cat if she
were willing to leave the castle. But the cat
who was now thirstier than ever, cried loudly:
‘“Miau, miau!”

The nobleman understood this: ‘‘ Not now,
not now!” and carried the answer to the king.

“Now,” said the councillors, ‘‘we shall use
force.” Cannons were brought, and the palace
was set on fire. When the fire reached the room
where.the cat was, she sprang through the win-
dow and escaped without harm, but the be-
siegers never ceased their work until the palace
was levelled to the ground.

&TF- 1 COUED-ONLY LEARN DOsSHUDDERS

A FATHER had two sons, the elder of which
was quick and bright, and knew how to make
himself handy and useful, but the youngest was
a dull boy, who could not learn or understand
anything, and people would say of him: ‘He
will be only a burden to his father.” Ifan errand

was to be done, the elder one was always called
10

upon to do it, but if it was in the night, and the
road led through a church-yard or past a lonely
place, he would say: ‘‘Oh! no, father, I cannot
go there, it makes me shudder,” for he was
a coward. Or if in the evening, when they sat
by the fire, and stories were told that made the
flesh creep, he would cry out ‘Oh, don't tell





fF [ COULD ONLY LEARN TO SHUDDER.

that! it makes me shudder.” But the younger
son would sit in the corner and listen to every-
thing, but could not understand what it all
meant, and would say to himself: “He always
says, ‘That makes me shudder.’ I never shudder.
That must be something I don’t understand.”

One day, the father said to him: “‘ Hark, you
there in the corner, to what I say. You too
must learn to earn your living. See how your
brother works, while you are good for nothing.”

“Yes, father,” the boy answered, “I will
gladly learn to do something. But if it does
not make any difference, I should like to learn
what it is to shudder. That is something I do
not know anything about.”

His brother laughed as he heard this, and
thought to himself: ‘“What a dunce my brother
is, and they say, ‘the boy is father of the man,’
what will he be when grown? He will never
be able to earn his living.”

The father sighed, and said: “You will learn
soon enough to shudder, but that will not earn
your living.”

A short time after this the village sexton
came in for a friendly call, and the father told
him of his trouble, how his younger son was
not skilled in any kind of work, that he knew
nothing and could learn nothing. ‘Just think,”
said he, ‘‘ when I asked him how he would like
to earn his living, he answered he only wished
to learn to shudder.”

‘Tf that is all,’ answered the sexton, ‘‘he can
learn that with me. Let him come to me I will
soon satisfy him.”

So he took the boy home with him, and had
him ring the church bell.

He had been there a couple of days, when
the sexton called him up in the middle of the
night, and told him to go to the church and ring
the bell. ‘‘ You shall soon learn to shudder,” he
thought, as he quickly left the house.

The boy was soon in the tower, and as he
turned around to.seize the bell-rope, he saw
standing on the steps below a white figure. |

““Who’'s there?” he called out. But the fig-
ure gave no answer, neither made the slightest
- motion.

il

“Answer me,” cried the boy, “or else take
yourself off; you have no business here in the
night.”

But the sexton stood motionless, thinking he
would make the boy believe he was a ghost.

The boy called a second time: ‘‘What do
you want? If you are an honest man, speak, or
I will throw you down stairs.” But the sexton
thought: ‘He does not mean that,” and stood
as silent as if he were made of stone.

The boy called to him a third time, but there
wasnoreply. Then making a spring, he pushed
the ghost down the stairs with so much force
that he rolled ten feet, and then lay quiet in
the corner. After this the boy went back and
rang the bell, returned home, and without a
word, went to bed and fell asleep.

The sexton’s wife waited a long time for her
husband, but he did not return. Then she be-
came alarmed, woke the boy, and asked: “Do
you know where my husband is staying? He
went into the town before you did.”

-“ No,” answered the boy; ‘‘but I saw some
one standing on the steps, and as he would not
answer me, nor go away, I took him for a thief
and pushed him down stairs. I left him lying
there, go and you will see whether it is your
husband. Ishould be very sorry to have treated

-him in this manner.”

. The woman ran off, and there in the corner
she found her husband, crying and groaning,
for his leg was broken. She carried him home,
and then ran with loud outcries to the boy’s fa-
ther: ‘‘ Your son has done us great harm. He
has thrown my husband down the steps and
broken his leg. Take the good-for-nothing out
of our house.”

_ The father was terrified, and came running
to get his son. ‘What do you mean by such
wicked tricks? You bring only harm to your-
self and others,” he said.

“Father,” said the boy, ‘listen! I am not to
blame for this. The sexton stood on the steps
in the night like one who would do a wicked
deed. I did not know who it- was, and three
times I called to him, begging him to speak or

else go away.”
z



LF I COULD ONLY LEARN TO SHUDDER.



























‘ttre SAW STANDING ON THE STEPS A WHITE
FIGURE.”

“ Alas!” said the father, “you will only
be a trouble to me all my life. Get out
of my sight, I never want to see you
again.”

“Yes,” father, I am willing to go,” ans-
wered the boy. “Only let me wait until
morning, then I will go and learn what it is to
shudder. Surely then I shall know something
by which I can earn my living.”

“Learn what you like,” said the father, “it is
12

all the same to me. Here is fifty dollars,
take it, and go out into the wide world,
but do not shame me, by telling any one
who you are or who your father is.”

“Yes, father, if that is all you ask, I
can do that very easily.”

As soon as it was morning, the boy
put the fifty dollars in his pocket, and
went out upon the highway. As he walked
along, he kept saying to himself: ‘If I
could only learn to shudder—if I could
only learn to shudder.” Presently a man
came along, who heard what the boy was
saying to himself. He waited until they
came to a place where they could see a
gallows, then he said: ‘‘Do you see that
tree there where seven men have wedded
the ropemaker’s daughter, and learned to
fly ? Sit down under it, and wait till night,
and you will know what it is to shudder.”

“Oh! is that all I have todo? That
is very simple. If I learn to shudder as







fF £ COULD ONLY LEARN TO SHUDDER.

quickly as that, I will give you my fifty dollars.
Come to me early to-morrow morning.”

The boy ran off toward the gallows, sat down
under it, and waited till evening. Then he

became chilly and made a fire; but in the night -

the wind blew so cold, that, in spite of the fire,
he could not keep warm. As the wind blew
the bodies of the seven men against each other,
and they swung to and fro, he thought to him-
self: “You would be cold down here by the
fire, you must be nearly frozen up there.” His
heart was full of pity, so he took the ladder,
climbed up the gallows, untied the ropes, and
brought all seven of the men down. Then he
stirred the fire, and seated them around it, that
they might warm themselves. But they sat
there stiff and stark until their clothing caught
fire. Then the boy said: “If you cannot take
care of yourselves, I will hang you up again.”

But the dead could not hear him, they said
nothing, and let their rags burn. Then he be-
came angry, and cried: “If you will not listen
to what I say, I cannot help you. I am not
going to burn with you,” and he hung the bodies
up again in a row. Then he lay down by his
fire and fell asleep. In the morning the man
came to him for the fifty dollars, saying: ‘‘ Now
you have learned to shudder.”

‘* No,” the boy answered, “how could I learn
that here? Those men up there have not opened
their mouths, and were so stupid when I seated
them by the fire, that they let the rags on their
bodies burn.”

The man saw that he would not carry away
the fifty dollars that day, and he went away
saying: ‘“‘ Heisthe strangest person I ever met.”

The boy went on his way, and soon began
again to say to himself: ‘Alas! if I could only
learn to shudder!—if I could only learn to
shudder!”

A driver walking along behind him, heard
him and said: ‘‘ Who are you?”

‘“‘T don’t know,” replied the boy.

‘Where did you come from ?”

“T don’t know.”

““Who is your father ?”

“T can’t tell you.”

13

“What were you grumbling to yourself
about?”

“Oh!” said the boy, ‘‘I want to learn to
shudder, but no one can teach me.”

“Stop your stupid joking,” said the driver.
“Come, go with me, and I will see that you are

_provided for.”

The boy went with the driver, and at evening
they came to an inn where they were to spend
the night. As he entered the room, he said
again to himself: “If I could only learn to
shudder!”

The landlord, who happened to hear him,
laughed and said: “If that is what you want,
here is a good chance to learn it.”

“Oh! be still,” said his wife. “So many lives
have already been lost in trying to satisfy their
curiosity, it would be a shame for these beautiful
eyes never to see daylight again.”

But the boy said: ‘‘ Though it is so difficult,
yet I would like to learn it at once; for it was
for this I left my home.” He gave the landlord
no rest until he told him the following story:

‘‘ Not far from here stands an enchanted castle
where you can surely learn to shudder. The
king has promised his daughter in marriage to
any one who will venture to sleep in the castle
three nights. She is the most beautiful maiden
the sun ever shone upon, and there are also
great treasures hidden in the castle. These are
guarded by wicked spirits, but if you succeed,
the gold will be set free, and you will be a rich
man. Many have entered the castle, but not
one has ever come out again.”

The next morning the youth went to the
king and said: “If you will allow me, I would
like to watch three nights in the enchanted
castle.”

The king looked at him, and was pleased
with him, and said: ‘‘ You may ask for three
things to take with you into the castle, but they
cannot be living creatures.”

The boy answered, “If you please, I would
like a fire, a turning-lathe, and a cutting-board
with a knife.”

The king had these things taken to the castle
for him during the day. When night came, he



IF I COULD ONLY LEARN TO SHUDDER.

went up to the castle, made a bright fire in one
of the rooms, placed the cutting-board with the
knife, near it, and sat down on the turning-lathe.
“Oh! if I could only learn to shudder!” he
said, “but I will not learn it here.”
midnight his fire needed stirring. As he stooped
over to blow it, a cry came suddenly from one
corner of the room: “Ow! miouw! miouw!
How cold we are!”

‘“What fools you are then,’ he said, “If you
are cold, come and sit down by my fire, and
warm yourselves.”

As he said this, there came leaping from the

corner, two large black cats. They sat down by .

him, one on either side, and stared at him with
wild, fiery eyes.
become warm, they said: ‘Comrade, will you
have a game of cards?”

“Why shouldn't I?” replied the boy.
first you must show your paws.”

At this they stretched out their claws. “Oh!”
said he, ‘‘what long nails you have! Wait a
minute, I must cut them off first.” And he
seized them by the neck, threw them upon the
cutting-board, and fastened them down securely,

“ Now that I have seen your fingers, I have
no desire to play cards with you,” he said. Then
he killed them and threw them out of the win-
dow into the ditch. He had no sooner got rid
of these two, and seated himself by his fire,
than there rushed out from every corner and
side of the room black cats and black dogs in a
fiery chain. They howled fiercely, jumped upon
the fire, and scattered it about the room, as if
they would put it out. He looked on quietly
for a while, then he became angry, and seizing
his cutting-knife, cried: ‘‘ Away with you, you
black rabble!” He struck with his knife in
every direction; part of them ran away, the
rest he killed and threw into the moat.

When he came back, he blew the sparks of
fire into a blaze, and warmed himself. After a
while he became so sleepy he could not hold
his eyes open any longer. He looked around
for a place to lie down, and saw in a corner a
large bed.

“That just suits me,” he said, and lay down
14

* But

Towards -

In a little while, when they had.

to go to sleep. He had no sooner closed his
eyes than the bed began to move of itself, and
travelled all around the castle. ‘This is very
good,” said he, “ only I would like to go faster.”
At this the bed rolled away as if it were drawn
by six horses; over stones and steps it flew, till
suddenly, hop! hop! over it went, bottom up-
wards. It lay upon the boy like a mountain,
but he threw the blankets and pillows into the
air, climbed out, and saying, ‘‘Now you may
travel where you like,” went back to his fire, lay
down and went to sleep.

In the morning the king came to the castle,
and when he saw the boy lying on the floor, he
thought the wicked goblins had killed him. ‘ It
is a shame this beautiful youth should die,” he
said.

The boy heard him, and sprang up, saying:
“Tt has not come to that yet.” The king was
astonished, but very glad that he was still alive,
and asked him how the night had gone with
him.“ Very well,” he answered. ‘One night
has passed, the other two will also.”

When he returned to the inn, the landlord
could hardly believe his eyes.

“T never expected to see you alive again,” he
said. ‘ Have you learned yet what it is to shud-
der?”

“No,” was the reply, “it is of no use.
if some one could only tell me!”

The second night he went again to the old
castle, and seating himself by the fire, began his
old song, “If I could only learn to shudder !”

As midnight drew near, he heard a noise as
of something tumbling, first soft, then louder,
then for a little time all was still. At last, with
a loud scream, there came tumbling down the
chimney half the body of a man.

“ Hey-day!” he cried, ‘“ That is too little, we
want another half.”

At this the noise began again. A howling
and yelling was heard, and then the other half
fell down.

“Wait,” said he, “I will stir up the fire a
little.”

He did this, and then looking round, he saw
the two parts had joined themselves together, .

Oh!





IF I COULD ONLY LEARN TO SHUDDER.



‘“‘THE BED BEGAN TO MOVE OF ITSELF.”

and that a hideous man was seated on his bench,
“T did not bargain for that,” said the youth,
“the seat is mine.” The man tried to push him
away, but the boy would not let him, and giving
him a powerful push, dislodged him, and he sat
down in his old place.

Soon more men came tumbling down the
chimney, one after the other. They brought
with them nine thigh bones and two skulls.
They set up the bones, and then began to play
nine-pins. As the boy watched them, he also
wanted to- play, and called out: ‘Hey there!
may I play with you?”

“Yes,” they answered, “if you have any
money.”

‘Plenty of money,” he said; ‘but your balls
are not perfectly round.”

So he took the skulls, and placing them in
his turning lathe, turned them until they were

round.
15

“ There,” said he, ‘‘now they will roll better.
Hey-day! isn’t this fine!” He played with
them, and lost some of his money, but when
the clock struck twelve every man had disap-
peared. Then he lay down and slept quietly.

The next morning the king came to inquire
after him.

« And how has it gone with you this time?”
he asked.

“T played nine-pins, and lost a little money,”
the youth answered.

‘Was there nothing to make you shudder?”

“Shudder?” said the boy, “I have had a
merry time. Oh! if I only knew how to shud-
der!” %

The third night he sat down again on his
bench by his fire, saying to himself quite fret-
fully, “TfI could only shudder !”

When it grew late, six tall men came into the

room, bearing a coffin.



fF I COULD ONLY LEARN TO SHUDDER.

“Ha! ha! That is certainly my little cousin
who died a few days ago,” cried the boy, and he
beckoned with his finger, and said, ‘‘ Come, lit-
tle cousin, come.”

They placed the coffin on the floor. He went
up to it, and taking off the cover, saw lying
within a dead man. He felt of his face, but it
was cold as ice.

“Wait,” he said, “I will warm you a little,”
and going to the fire he warmed his hands, and
laid them upon the dead man’s face, but it was
still cold. Then he took him out of the coffin,
sat down by the fire, and holding him on his
lap, rubbed his arms that the blood might cir-

-culate once more. But it was of no use. Then
the boy remembered that if two lie in bed to-
gether, they warm each other. So he brought
the dead man to the bed, covered him up, and
lay down by him. In a little while the body
became warm, and began to move.

“See, little cousin, how I have warmed you!”
he said. :

But the dead man raised himself up and cried:
“Now I will strangle you!”

“What!” said the boy, is that the thanks I
get? You shall go back at once to your coffin,”
and he lifted him up, threw him into the coffin,
and fastened the cover. Then the six men
came in, lifted up the coffin, and carried it away.
“This does not make me shudder. I should
never learn here, if I staid all my life,” he said.
At that moment a man walked in. He was
taller than all the others and more frightful,
but he was old and had a long white beard.

“Oh, you weak, silly creature!” he cried.
“You shall soon learn what it is to shudder, for
you shall die.”

““Not so fast,” said the boy, “if Iam to die,
I would like to know by what means.”

“TI will seize you at once,” cried the hideous
creature.

‘Softly, softly, don’t be so sure; I am as
strong as you are, and indeed, I think I am
stronger.”

‘We will see about that,” said the old man.”
“If you are stronger than I am, I will let you

go. Come, let us have the trial.”
16

He led the boy through a dark hall to a black~
smith’s forge. Seizing an axe, with one blow
he drove the anvil into the earth.

“T can do better than that,” said the boy,
taking up the axe, and going to another anvil.

The old man followed to watch every move.
He stood so close to the anvil, his long white
beard rested upon it.

The boy lifted the axe, and with one stroke,
split the anvil in two, and fastened the old man’s
beard in the crevice.

‘Now I've got you!” cried the boy. ‘ Now
you must die,” and he seized an iron bar and
beat the old man till he cried for mercy, and

“promised to give him great riches.

The boy drew the axe from the anvil, and set
the old man free. True to his word, he led him
to a cellar in which were stored three chests full
of gold.

** Of these,” he said, ‘‘ one is for the poor, one
for the king, and one for yourself.” Just then it
struck twelve, the old man disappeared, and the
boy was left standing alone in the dark.

‘“‘T must get out of here some way,” he said.
He groped round, found the way to his room,
and lay down by his fire and went to sleep.

The next morning, the king came and asked:
“Have you learned now what it is to shudder?”

“No,” he answered, “what is it? My dead
cousin was here, and a long-bearded man came
and showed me where great sums of money were
hidden; but no one told me what it was to
shudder.”

Then the king said: ‘‘ The castle is now free
from the wicked spell, the gold is yours, and you
shall marry my daughter.”

“That is all very good,” the youth answered,
“but I do not know yet what it is to shudder.”

The gold was brought from the castle, and not
long after the marriage was celebrated. But
the young prince was not perfectly happy,
though he loved his bride dearly. He would
often say: ‘Oh! if I could only learn what it is.
to shudder.”

At last the princess became troubled about it,.
and one of her maids said: ‘I will help you. I
will show you how to make him shudder.” She



JF I COULD ONLY LEARN TO SHUDDER.



THE OLD MAN’S BEARD IS

went down to the brook that flowed through the
garden, and brought up a pail full of water con-
taining little fish. At night when the prince
was asleep, his wife drew the cover from him,
and threw the cold water and little fishes over

CUNNING

THERE was once a cook named Grethel, who
had shoes with red heels and when she wore
them out she would dance hither and thither,
‘thinking to herself: ‘I am indeed a beautiful
maiden.” When she came home, she would
take a sip of wine, and that usually gave her an
appetite, and then she would taste of all the
best things she had cooked, saying : “‘ Indeed,
the cook shouid know how her food tastes.”

One day her master said to her: ‘“ Grethel, I
expect a visitor this evening ; cook me two of
the finest fowls for supper.” ‘I will begin at
once, master,” she said.

So she killed the chickens, picked, and dressed
17

FASTENED IN THE ANVIL,

him, so that they flapped and wriggled all
around him. The prince woke up, calling
loudly ; .

“Oh, how I shudder! what can it be, dear
wife? Ah! now I know what it is to shudder.”

GRETHEL.

them, and towards evening put them over the
fire to roast. They became brown and tender,
but the guest did not arrive.

Then Grethel called to the master: “If the
guest does not come soon, I must take the fowls
from the fire. It is ashame not to have them
eaten when they are soft and tender.”

“JT will go myself and find him,” said the
master.

When his back was turned, Grethel took the
spit from the fire, and thought: “I have stood
by the fire so long, I am hot and thirsty. Who
knows when they will come? I will run down
cellar and get a sip of wine.”



CUNNING GRETHEL.

She ran down cellar, and filling a cup, pro-
posed her own health, and drank the wine
without stopping. ‘One swallow of wine calls
for another,” she said, and poured out another
cupful, which she drank eagerly. Then she
went back, placed the chickens back on the fire,
spread some butter over them, and turned the
spit round merrily. How good they smelled:
There was no other way, she must try them, so
she dipped her finger in the gravy and tasted it.

“Oh! how good those fowls are!” she satd.

“It is a shame not to have them eaten now.”

She ran to the window to see if her master
was coming yet: but no one was in sight. She
went back to the fowls: ‘‘ One wing is burning ;
it would be better for me to eat it,” she thought.
So she cut off the wing and ate it. It tasted so
good, that when she had finished, she thought:
‘‘T had better cut off the other one too, or the
master will notice that something is missing.”

When she had eaten the other wing, she went
to the window to look for the master and _ his
guest, but she saw no one. ‘‘Who knows,” she
thought, ‘‘ whether they will come at all? Per-
haps they are having their supper at an inn.”
Then she said aloud: ‘‘ Heigh ho! Grethel, be of
good cheer. Drink a little more wine, and then
finish the fowl. Why should these good things
be allowed to spoil ?”

So after taking another drink of wine, she ate
the fowl with great relish. When she had fin-
ished the one, she looked at the other, and
thought: ‘‘ Where one is, the other must be

- also, the two belong together. I think if I had
another drink of wine, I could eat the other
easily.”

EEE WOE AND IE

THERE was once an old goat who had seven
little kids, and she loved them as dearly as a
mother loves her children. One day she wanted
to go to the woods and get some food for them,
so She called all seven to her, and said: ‘‘ Dear

children, Tam going out into the woods; be on
18

She drank another cup of wine, and the

second fowl followed the first. She had hardly
finished, when the master came running in.

“ Be quick, Grethel,” he cried; ‘‘ The visitor
will soon be here.”

Then he went to look at the table to see if
it was properly set, and taking up the knife,
with which he would carve the fowls, began to
sharpen it on the steel. Just then the guest
arrived, and knocked softly and politely at the
house door. Grethel went to open it, and see-
ing the guest, put her finger on her lips, and
said: ‘‘Hush, hush! Go away quickly; you
must escape my master, or you will meet with
a great misfortune. He has invited you here
this evening for no other purpose than to cut
off your ears. Listen, you can hear him sharp-
ening his knife.”

The visitor heard the sound, and rushing
down the steps, ran away. Grethel was not
idle ; she ran crying to her master: ‘‘A pretty
guest you invited here.”

‘““Why, what is the matter?” he asked.

“He has taken both the fowls that I har
all ready to be brought on the table, and run
away with them.”

“That is a nice way to treat one,” said the
master, grieving that he should lose such beau-
tiful fowls. “If he had even left me the smallest
one that I might have had one for my supper.”

He went out, and called to the guest, but he
ran as if he did not hear him. The master fol-:
lowed him, with the knife still in his hand,
calling: ‘Only one, only one!” meaning one
fowl. But the guest thought he meant only one
of his ears, and ran as if fire was chasing him
until he safely reached his home.

SE VEN ber E PEGS

your guard against the wolf. If he gets in, he
will eat you hide and hair. The wicked fellow
will try in every way to deceive you, but you
can easily tell him by his rough voice and black
feet.”

‘‘ Dear mother,” said the little kids, “do not











_ THE WCLF AND THE SEVEN LITTLE KIDS.

worry about us; we will be very careful not to
Tet the wolf in.”

So the old one bleated a ‘‘Good-bye,” and
went away contentedly.

It was not long before some one knocked at
the door, and cried; ‘“‘Open the door, dear
children, your mother is here and has brought
something nice for each one of you.”

But the little kids knew by the rough voice
that it was the wolf, and said: ‘We will not
open the door for you. You are not our mother;
she has a fine, sweet voice, but yours is coarse
and harsh; you are a wolf.”

So he left them and going to a store, bought a
large piece of chalk, which he ate to make: his
voice soft. Then he came back and knocked
at the hut-door again, and cried: ‘Open the
door, dear children, your mother is here, and
has brought something for each one of you.”

But the wolf had put his black paws on the
window-sill, and the kids seeing them, cried:
<‘We will not open the door for you; our mother
has not big, black feet; you are a wolf.”

Then the wolf ran to a baker's and said: “I
have hurt my foot, please put some dough
on it.”

As soon as the baker had covered his foot
with dough, he ran to the miller and said:
«« Sprinkle my foot with white flour.”

The miller thought: ‘The wolf wants to de-
ceive some one,” and hesitated, but the wolf
said: ‘If you don’t do it, I will eat you.”

This frightened the miller, and he powdered
his foot with flour. Such is mankind.

Then the wicked wolf went a third time to
the hut-door, knocked, and cried: “Open the
door, children, your mother has come home, and
has brought each one of you something nice
from the woods.”

“Show us your feet first,” said the little kids,

“that we may know whether you are our
mother.” The wolf placed his paw on the win-
dow-sill, and when they saw it was white, they
thought it was really their mother, and opened
the door. But imagine their fright and surprise
when the wolf entered. They ran in every direc-

tion trying to hide. One jumped under the
"19

table, another into the bed, a third into the oven,
a fourth into the kitchen, a fifth into the cup-
board, a sixth under the wash-tub, and the
seventh into the clock-case. But the wolf found
them and made short work of eating them. One
after another disappeared down his throat, all
but the youngest one hidden in the clock-case,
which he did not find.

After he had satisfied his appetite, he strolled
out, and lying down on the green grass under
a tree, fell asleep. Not long after the old goat
came home from the woods. But what a sight
met her eyes! The door stood wide open; table,
chairs, and benches were upset; the wash-tub
lay in pieces; blankets and pillows were thrown
from the bed. Not a child was to be found;
one after another she called by name, but not
one answered, till she came to the name of the
youngest, when a soft little voice said: ‘ Dear
mother, I am hidden in the clock-case.” She
helped the little kid out, and heard how the
wolf had come and eaten all her other children.
When she heard this, the old goat wept bitterly
for her lost children. After a while they went
out together for a walk. When they came to
the meadow, they saw the wolf lying on the
grass under a tree, snoring so loudly that the
branches trembled. The old goat, regarding
him from every side, thought she saw some-
thing move in his well-filled stomach.

“Can it be,” she thought, ‘that my children
that he swallowed for his supper are alive!”
She immediately sent the little kid home for
scissors, needle, and thread.

She had scarcely cut a little place in his skin,
before a kid stretched out its head. She cut a
little further, and out it jumped, then another
and another, until all were out, as lively as ever,
for the wolf had not harmed them at all, having
in his greediness swallowed them whole. Oh!
it was a happy time! The little kids hugged
their mother, and skipped about iike a tailor on
his wedding-day.

But the old goat said to them: ‘‘Go now and
get me some stones, and we will fill this wicked
fellow’s stomach before he wakes up.”

So the little kids ran in great haste and



THE WOLF AND THE SEVEN LITTLE KIDS.





, 4
‘a

Te

Ne
A Of

ae > fs
a
a as

‘© 4 SOFT LITTLE VOICE SAID: ‘DEAR MOTHER, I AM HIDDEN IN THE CLOCK-CASE.’”

brought stones which they put in the wolf’s
stomach, as many as it could hold. Then the
old goat quickly sewed up the slit, and the
wolf neither woke nor moved.

When the wolf had slept enough he got up,
and as the stones in his stomach had made him
very thirsty, he went to a spring to get a drink.
As he walked along, the stones began to move,

rolling and rattling against each other, and he
cried out:

‘‘Rumble, rumble! rattle, rattle!

Hear the noise of those little bones!

One would think, by the din and clatter,

That all had been turned into stones.”

As he stooped over the spring to drink. the
heavy stones inside pushed him forward, and he
fell in and was drowned.

Then the seven little kids ran crying: ‘‘ The
wolf is dead! the wolf is dead!” and they danced
for joy with their mother around the spring.

‘EEE SGOOSE, GIRE,

THERE once lived an oid queen whose hus-
band had been dead many years, but she had
one child, a beautiful daughter. When she was
grown, she was betrothed to a king’s son living
many miles away, and when the time came for
her to be married and go away to a strange land,
her mother gave her many costly jewels, gold

and silver vessels, furniture and dresses, in short,
20

everything that belonged toa royal bridal treas-
ure, for the old queen loved her daughter dearly.
She also gave her a waiting-maid to accompany
her on the journey and conduct her to the bride-
groom. Then she provided each with a horse,
but that of the princess was called Falada, and
could talk.

When the parting-hour came, the queen went



THE GOOSE GIRL.

to her sleeping-room, and taking a little knife,
cut her finger till it bled. She held a white
napkin under it, and let three drops of blood
fall on it; then folding it up, she said to her
daughter: ‘Take this, dear child, and preserve
it carefully, for you will have great need of it on
the way.” The maiden put the napkin in her
bosom, and bidding her mother a sorrowful fare-
well, mounted her horse, and rode away to her
intended bridegroom.

After she had ridden about an hour, she
became very thirsty, and said to her maid:
<‘Get down, and dip me a little water in the
gold cup which you brought with you; I would
like something to drink very much.”

“If you are thirsty, get down and drink from
the brook; I am not going to be your servant,”
said the maid. The princess dismounted, and
bending over the stream, drank, for she dared
not ask for the goldencup. As she did this she
sighed: ‘Alas! dear God,” and the three drops
of bloodreplied: ‘If your mother knew of this,
it would break her heart.”

But the princess, who was humble and patient,
said nothing, and again mounted her horse.
They rode several miles, and then as the day
was warm, and they were riding in the hot sun,

the princess again became thirsty. She had’

forgotten the saucy words of her maid, and
when they came to a running stream, she said:
“Get down and bring me some water in my
golden cup.”

But the maid replied more proudly than
before: ‘If you would like a drink, get it for
yourself; I am not your servant.”

As the princess was very thirsty, she knelt a
second time over the water, weeping as she did
so, and saying: ‘Alas! dear God.” The drops
of blood replied: ‘If your mother knew of
this, it would break her heart.”

As she bent over the water to drink, the little
napkin fell out of her dress and floated away
on the stream, without her seeing it in her
sorrow and trouble. But the waiting-maid saw
it, and was delighted, for now the princess would
be powerless in her hands, and she could do with

her as she liked. As the princess was about to
21

mount her horse again, the waiting-maid said :
“Falada belongs to me; and you shall have
my horse,” and the princess was obliged to make
the change. Then the maid commanded her to
take off her royal dress, and put on her own
common one, and finally she made her swear
before heaven that when she reached the royal
court, she would not reveal what had taken place.
This oath she was obliged to take or she would
have been killed on the spot. But Falada saw
and heard everything, and she would not forget.

The maid mounted Falada, and the true bride
the other horse, and in this manner they con-
tinued their journey until they came to the royal

. palace.

There was great rejoicing over their arrival ;
the king’s son came out to meet them, lifted the
waiting-maid from her horse, as if she were his
promised bride, and led her up the steps, while
the true princess was left standing in the court-
yard. Presently the old king looked out of the
window and saw her standing there. As she
looked so delicate and beautiful, he hastened
away to ask the bride who it was she had brought
with her and left standing in the court below.

“Oh! that is a maid I brought with me for
company. Give her something to do that she
does not become idle,” was the reply.

But the king had no work for her, and knew
not what to give her to do, until suddenly he
thought: ‘She can help the little boy watch
the geese.” So the princess and true bride helped
little Conrad, as he was called, take care of the
geese.

One day not long after their arrival, the false
bride said to the prince: ‘Dearest, will you do
mea favor?” -

‘With pleasure,” he replied.

“T beg of you to call the executioner, and
have him kill the horse that brought me here,
for it vexed me all the way.” She was afraid
Falada might speak and betray her.

So now it was decided that the faithful horse
must die. When the princess heard of it, she
went to the executioner and promised him a
gold piece if he would do a favor for her.

In the town was a large gloomy arch through

”



THE GOOSE GIRL.

which the princess drove the geese every morn-
ing and evening, and she said to him: ‘I would
like to have the head of Falada hung under this
dark arch, that I may see it every time I pass
through.” He promised to do this, and when
Falada’s head was cut off, he nailed it firmly
under the arch.
Early the next morning as she and Conrad

passed under the arch, she said to the head:

‘‘O, Falada, hanging high!”
and the head replied:

‘*Q, young princess, passing by !

If thy fate thy mother knew,

Her fond heart would break for you.”

They passed through the town to a field, and
when they arrived on the meadow where the
geese fed all day, the princess sat down and
began to comb her hair. It looked like pure
gold, and little Conrad wanted to pull out a
couple of handfuls. Finally she said:

‘*Blow, blow, wind, blow,
Take Conrad’s hat in the air,
And do not let him catch it
Till I have combed my hair.”

And a strong wind came just then and blew
Conrad’s hat a long distance over the field, and
when he came back the hair was all combed
and put up. Then little Conrad was angry and
would not speak to his companion, so they
watched the geese in silence till night, and
then went home.

The next morning as they passed under the
arch, the maiden said:

**O, Falada, hanging high!”
and the head replied:
‘‘ Oh, young princess, passing by!
If thy fate thy mother knew,
Her fond heart would break for you.”

They went on to the meadow ; and the prin-
cess sat down to comb her hair. Conrad ran
towards her as if to seize it, but she quickly said:

“* Blow, blow, wind, blow;
Take Conrad’s hat in the air,
And do not let him catch it,

Till I have combed my hair.’
22

?

Away went Conrad's hat in the wind, and he
had to run a long distance before he caught it,
and when he came back the hair had been put
up a long time. Little Conrad was not pleased,
but he watched the geese with her till evening.

When they reached home, he went to the
king and said: ‘I do not wish to watch the
geese any longer with that maiden.”

“Why not,” asked the old king.

“Oh! she vexes me all day. In the morning
when we pass through the dark arch, she says
to an old horse’s head that is nailed there:

‘QO, Falada, hanging high !’
and the head answers:
‘O, young princess, passing by !
If thy fate thy mother knew,
Her fond heart would break for you. ’”

Then he told the king what had happened om
the meadows, how the wind had blown his hat
away, and he had to run after it.

But the king commanded him to go with her
to the fields the next morning; and he himself
also went and sat in the dark arch, and heard
what the horse’s head said. Then he followed
them to the field, and hiding in a bush, saw the
maiden take down her hair, that shone like
gold, and heard her say:

«Blow, blow, wind, blow ;
Take Conrad’s hat in the air,
And do not let him catch it,
Till I have combed my hair.”

A gust of wind came and carried the boy’s
hat far away, and while he was chasing it, the
king watched the maiden comb and braid her
hair. The king went home unperceived, and
when evening came, and they had returned with
the geese, he sent for the maiden, and told her
all he had seen and heard.

“What does it all mean?” he asked.

“TI cannot tell you,” she replied; “I dare not
tell any one my trouble; for to save my life, T
gave my oath not to do it.”

The king urged her, but all to no purpose;
he could get nothing out of her. Then he said:
“Tf you will not complain to me of your troubles









THE GOOSE GIKL.

go and tell them to that iron oven.” The maiden
crept into it, feeling now that her last friend had
deserted her. Thinking the king had gone
away, she began to weep and pour out her heart.

“T am deserted by all the world,” she sobbed,
and yet I am a king’s daughter. My royal
clothes were taken from me by a waiting-maid,
and she was received as the true bride, while I
must go out and watch the geese. Oh! if my
mother knew of this it would break her heart.”

But the old king had been standing just out-
side the oven door, and had heard all she said.
He called her to come out, and had her dressed
in royal clothing, then O, wonder! how beauti-
ful she appeared! The king sent for his son and
told him he had wedded the wrong bride, she
was only a waiting-maid, while the true bride
was this maiden, their former goose-girl.

The young king was very glad when he saw
her beauty and goodness, and a great feast was
announced to which all the king’s friends and

the people of his kingdom were invited. When
the day arrived, the bridegroom placed the prin-
cess on one side of him, and the waiting-maid
on the other, but so dazzled was she with her
own splendor, that she did not recognize the
princess. After the company had eaten and
drank and were feeling very merry, the king
proposed a riddle to the waiting-maid: ‘‘ What
punishment would a person deserve who de-
ceived his master?” and he related the story
which the princess had told the oven.

The false bride had no suspicion of harm to
herself, and said: ‘“‘Sucha person deserves noth- _
ing better than to be put into a barrel full of
spikes and dragged up and down the streets by

_ two white horses until he dies.”

“You are that person,” said the king, “and
you have spoken your own sentence.”

The deceitful woman received her punishment,
the young king married the princess, and they
ruled their kingdom in peace and happiness.

——

FAITHFUL JOHN.

ONCE there was a king who was very ill, and
feeling that death was near, he said to those
about him, ‘Send Faithful John to me.”. Faith-
ful John was the king’s favorite servant, and had
been so called because he had lived with the
king all his life and served him faithfully.

As soon as he came to his bedside, the king
said: ‘Most Faithful John, I feel that my end
is near. There is not a care on my mind except
for my son. He is still too young to be left
without some one to advise him, and I cannot
rest in peace unless you promise to be his guar-
dian, and instruct him in all he ought to know.”

And Faithful John answered: ‘I will never
leave him, and I will serve him faithfully, even
at the cost of my life.”

“Then,” said the king, ‘I shall die happy.
After Jam dead,” he continued, “take my son
and show him over the entire castle—all the
rooms, halls, and vaults, and the treasures that

are in them; but the room at the end of the long
28

hall you must not allow him to enter, for in it is
hidden a statue of the princess of Golden:Palace.
As soon as he sees this statue of the princess,
he will be seized with a great love for her, and
will fall down in a swoon, and for her sake will
have to pass through great dangers. See to it,
therefore, that he does not ‘enter this room.”

As Faithful John once more took his hand
and promised, the king sank back upon his pil-
low and died.

When the king had been laid in his grave,
Faithful John told the young king all he had
promised his father as he lay on his death-bed.
« And I will keep that promise,” he said, ‘‘and
serve you as faithfully as I did him, even though
it cost me my life.”

The days of mourning being over, Faithful
John said to the king, one day: ‘It is now time
you saw your possessions. Come, and I will
show you the castle your father left you,” and he ©
led him through all the splendid rooms and



FAITHFUL SOHN.

showed him the rich treasures they contained,—
one room alone, that which contained the dan-
gerous statue, he did not open.

The statue was so placed, that one saw it as
soon as the door was opened, and so exquisitely
was it carved, that at first sight, one thought it
lived and breathed. The beauty and loveliness
of this figure were unsurpassed by anything in
the world. -

The young king was not long in noticing that
Faithful John passed one door without opening
it, and he said: ‘Why do you not unlock this
one?”

‘There is something in it that would frighten
you,” he answered.

But the king said: ‘I have seen everything
else in the castle, and I must know what is in
here,” and he went himself and tried to force
the door open.

But Faithful John held him back, saying: “I
promised your father before his death that you
should not see what was in that room.

If you

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enter, great misfortune will come to both you
and me.”

“Oh, no!" said the king. ‘But if I do not
go in, I shall surely dic, for I shall rest neither
night nor day until my eyes have seen what is
hidden there; no, I will not stir from this spot
until you unlock the door.”

Faithful John saw that he could not move him,
and with a heavy heart and many sighs, selected
the key from the bunch, and opened _ the door.
He entered first, hoping that he might be able
to cover the statue before the king could see it.
But it was of no use, the king entered on tip-toe,
and looking over Faithful John’s shoulder, saw
the statue ; but he no sooner beheld it, glittering
with gold and precious jewels, than he fell faint-
ing to the floor. Faithful John lifted him up,
and carried him to his bed, saying with a heart
full of sorrow: ‘‘ The evil is done; dear God,
how will it all end?” He gave the king some
wine, and he soon revived. His first words
were: “Alas! whose is that beautiful statue ?”






%,
‘he

Wie wy
a Wana
i Ap S

eh



FAITHFUL JOHN’S PROMISE,















FAITHFUL FOHN.

“The princess’s of the Golden Palace,” Faith-
ful John replied.

The king continued: ‘My love for her is so
great, that if all the leaves on the trees were
tongues, they could not express it. I would risk
my life to win her. You are my Faithful John,
and you must help me.”

The trusty servant thought for a long time
how it were best to begin, for it was very diffi-
cult to get into the presence of the princess. At
last he thought of a plan and said: ‘Everything
the princess has is of gold—tables, chairs, dishes,
goblets, cups, and all the furniture. You have
five tons of gold among your treasures. Let
one of the goldsmiths of your kingdom make
trom this, vessels and utensils of every kind, all
kinds of birds, and wild and curious animals,
such as will please her, and we will take them
and go and seek our fortune.”

The king at once gave orders for all the gold-
smiths in his kingdom to work night and day
until the beautiful things were ready.

When all had been placed on board a ship,
Yaithful John dressed himself asa merchant, and
told the king he must disguise himself in the
same manner. Then they sailed away across
the sea until they came to the city where the
princess of the Golden Palace lived. -

Faithful John told the king to remain on the
ship while he went to the palace. ‘‘ Perhaps,”
said he, ‘“‘I shall bring the princess back with
me. See, therefore, that everything is in order.
Set out the golden vessels and decorate the
whole ship.”

Then Faithful John, having put some of the
little articles of gold into his pocket, landed,
and went straight to the royal palace.

As he passed through the court-yard, a beau-
tiful maiden stood by a fountain drawing water
with two golden pails. As she turned to carry
away the sparkling water, she saw the strange
man, and asked who he was.

“T am a merchant,” was the reply, and he
took from his pocket the beautiful articles of gold.

She no sooner saw them than she cried:
“Oh! what beautiful things,” and setting down
her pails, she examined the articles one after

25

- chant!

another. Then she said: ‘The princess must
see these ; she is so pleased with anything made
of gold, that she will buy all you have.”

She took him by the hand and led him into
the palace, for she was the princess’s maid.

When the princess saw the trinkets, she was
greatly pleased, and said: ‘‘ They are so beauti-
fully made, I will buy them all.”

Then Faithful John replied: ‘I am only the
servant of arich merchant. What I have here
is nothing compared to what my master has on
board ship. The most curious and costly things
that have ever been made of gold, you will find
there.”

She asked to have them brought to her, but
he said: “That would take many days, and
there are so many, Oe palace is not large
enough to hold them.”

This only roused her eines the more, and
at last she said: ‘‘Take me to the ship; I will
go myself and see your master’s treasures.”

It was with great joy that Faithful John led
the princess to the ship. As soon as the king
beheld her, he saw that she was even more
beautiful than the statue that stood in his palace,
and as she approached,,it seemed as if his heart
would burst within. him.

She came on board, and the king led her
below. But Faithful John staid on deck with
the helmsman, and orders were given to weigh
anchor: ‘Unfurl every sail, that she may fly
like a bird through the air,” he cried.

Meanwhile the king was showing the princess
all the golden treasures—the dishes and cups
and birds and the wild and wonderful animals.
It was many hours before she had looked at
everything, and in her joy she did not notice
that the ship was sailing. When she had looked
at the last, she thanked the merchant, and
started to go ashore. She reached the edge of
the ship, and then saw for the first. time that
they had left the shore, and were out upon the
high sea, sailing before the wind with every sail
spread. ‘Alas!” she cried in great terror, ‘I
have been deceived! I have been carried away
from my home, and am in the power of a mer-

1”

I would rather have died !



FAITHFUL FOHN.

But the king took her kindly by
“the hand, and said: “I am nota
merchant, but a king, as nobly
born as yourself.- It was my great
love for you that led me to carry
you away in this manner. The
first time I saw your statue I fell
to the earth in a swoon.”
When the Princess of the Golden
Palace heard his words, she was
comforted; her heart inclined to the young
king, and she promised to become his wife.

It happened one day as they were sailing over
the high sea, and Faithful John sat in the fore
part of the ship playing music, that three crows
flew through the air and lighted on the ship.
He stopped playing and listened to what they
were saying to each other, for he understood
their language well.

“Ah!” cried one of them, ‘there is the king
carrying away the princess of the Golden Palace.”

“Yes,” said the second, “but he hasn't got

her yet.”




































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FAITHFUL JOHN HEARS THE CROWS PROPHECIES.











FAITHFUL FOHN.

‘“Why not?” said the third ; ‘‘she is sitting by
his side in the ship.”

Then the first crow began again: ‘‘ That does
not matter. As soon as he lands, a chestnut
horse will spring toward him, which he will
mount, and immediately it will leap into the air
and bear him away from his bride, whom he will
never see again.”

Then said the second one: ‘‘Is there nothing
that can save him?”

“Oh, yes! if some one else should quickly
mount the horse, seize the pistol from his belt,
and shoot the horse dead, then would the king’s
. life be saved. But who knows this? And if any

one did know of it, and tell the king, that per-
son would be turned into stone from his feet to
his knees.”

The second one spoke again: ‘‘I can tell you
still more. Even though the horse be killed, the
young king shall not have the princess. When
they reach the palace, a beautiful bridal gar-
ment will be waiting him. It will look as if it
were woven of gold and silver, instead of which
it will be made of sulphur and pitch, and as
soon as he puts it on, will burn him to the bone
and marrow.”

“Ts there nothing that can save him from
this?” asked the third.

“Oh, yes,” answered the second, ‘if some
one wearing gloves should seize the garment,
and throw it into the fire, the garment would
burn, and the king would be saved. But that will
not help him, for if any one knew it, and warned
the king, that person would be turned into stone
from his knees to his heart.”

“And I know still more,” said the third ; ‘ if
the bridal garment is burned, the king shall not
be able to keep his bride ; for on the wedding-
night, when the ball is held, and the young
queen is dancing, she will suddenly turn pale
and fall as if dead. If some one does not raise

-her up, and take from her breast three drops of
blood, she will die. But any one who tells of
this, will turn to stone from the crown of his
head, to the soles of his feet.” Saying this, the
crows all flew away.

But Faithful John had understood every word,
27

a

and from that time was sad and silent. If he
kept from his master this that he had heard,
great misfortune would come to the king, and
if he told him, it would cost him his life. At
last he said to himself: ‘I will save my master,
even though I die for it.” :

As soon as they had landed, there appeared,
as the crow had said, a splendid chestnut horse.
“Capital!” said the king, “he shall carry me
to the palace.” He was about to mount, when
Faithful John stepped up, and swinging himself
quickly on the horse, drew his pistol from his
belt and shot the horse dead.

‘What a shame to shoot such a beautiful ani-
mal, that was to carry the king to his palace!”
cried the king’s servants who were envious of
Faithful John. But the king said: ‘Be quiet, ~
and let it pass. He is my Faithful John, and
knows what is best.” :

They soon arrived at the palace, and there in
one of the rooms lay the bridal garment, glit-
tering as if woven of gold and silver. The king
went towards it as if to take it in his hands, but
Faithful John pushed him away, and seizing it
in his gloved hands, threw it into the fire and
left it to burn. Again the servants murmured,
and said: ‘Look! now he has even burnt the
king’s bridal robe!”

But the king replied: ‘‘Who knows the good
he may have done? Leave him alone, he is my
Faithful John.”

The wedding-day arrived, and it was cele-
brated with song and dance. In the evening
the bride entered the ball-room. Faithful John
watched her anxiously. Suddenly, as she was
dancing, her face grew pale, and she sank to the
floor as ‘if dead. Faithful John sprang quickly
forward, lifted her in his arms, and carried her
into a room. Then laying her once more on
the floor, he knelt by her side, and drew the
three drops of blood from her breast. In a
short time she breathed again and raised her-
self up. But the young king who had been
watching Faithful John, did not understand his
strange conduct, and in his astonishment and
anger, ordered him to be thrown into prison.

The next morning Faithful John was tried



FAITHFUL FOHN.

and led to the gallows. As he stood on them

ready for the death awaiting him, he said:
“Every one about to die is allowed to speak,
shall I be allowed this right?”

“Yes,” replied the king, “it is granted you.”

THE KING'S GRIEF.
28



“T have been unjustly condemned, I have
always been true to you,” said Faithful John,
and then he told the king what he had heard
the crows say while they were at sea, and how
everything he had done had been necessary in
order to save the king.

When the king heard this he cried: ‘Oh!
my most Faithful John! Pardon! Pardon!

Take him down !”

But Faithful John as he uttered the last word,
had fallen lifeless, and was turned into stone.

This was a great sorrow to the king and
queen, and often the king would say: ‘Alas!
that I should have rewarded faithfulness so
poorly!” He ordered the stone statue to be
brought into his bed-chamber, and placed near
his bed. Whenever he looked at it, he would
weep, and say: ‘Oh! if I could only make
you alive again, my Faithful John!”

Time passed on, and twins were born to the
queen, two little sons, who filled her heart with
joy. One day when the queen was at church,
and the two children were with their father, he
looked up at the statue, and sighing sadly, said:
“Could I only make you alive again, Faithful
John!”

At this, the figure began to speak, saying:
“You can make me alive again, if you will give
that which you hold dearest?”

“Ves,” cried the king, ‘I will give up all I
have in the world to bring you back?”

“Then,” continued the stone, “with your own
hand, you must cut off both your children’s heads,
and sprinkle their blood over me, and I shall be
restored to life.”

The king was terrified when he heard that he
must kill his dear children, but when he thought
how Faithful John had died serving him, he
drew his sword, and with his own hand cut off
the children’s heads. He sprinkled the stone
with their blood, and instantly life returned, and
Faithful John stood once more before him, alive
and well. “ Your faithfulness shall not go unre-
warded,” he said to the king, and taking the
heads of the children, replaced them, healing
the wound with their own blood. Again they
were running and playing about as if nothing
had happened.





A GOOD BARGAIN.

Then the king was very happy. When he
saw the queen returning from church, he hid
Faithful John and the children in a large closet.
As she entered the room, he said: ‘Did you
pray at church to-day ?”

“Yes,” she answered, ‘but I could not help
thinking constantly of Faithful John, and the
great misfortune that came to him through us.”

‘Dear wife,” he replied, “we can bring him
back to life, but it will cost us the lives of our
two little sons.” The queen turned very pale,

and her heart shrank from the sacrifice, but she
did not falter: ‘‘We owe it to him for his faith-
fulness to us,” she said.

The king was greatly pleased when the queen
said this, and opening the closet he brought
out the children and Faithful John. ‘God be
praised !” he said, ‘Faithful John is restored to
us, and our little sons are also here,” and then he
told her how it had all happened. From this
time they all lived together in great happiness
till the end of their lives.

A GOOD BARGAIN.

A GERMAN peasant had driven his cow to
market, and sold her for seven dollars. On his
way home he had to pass a ditch where he
heard from a distance the frogs calling: ‘‘Acht,
acht, acht!’*

“Yes,” said he to himself, ‘you are crying
down there in the oatfield, but it is seven that I
got for the cow, not eight.” .

When he reached the water he called to them
again:

‘Dumb beasts, that’s what you are.
you know any better than to call that?
seven dollars, not eight.”

But the frogs only croaked: ‘‘ Acht, acht,
acht, acht!”

“Well, if you won't believe it, I will count
it for you,” and he took the money from his
pocket, and counted the seven dollars that had
been paid him in small silver.

But the frogs paid no attention to his count-
ing, and cried again: ‘ Acht, acht, acht,
acht!”

“Hey, then!” cried the peasant, now very
angry, ‘‘if you know better than I, just count
it for yourselves,” and he threw the money into
the water, right amongst the frogs.

He stood there a while, waiting for them to
return him his money, but the frogs kept to
their first saying, and cried out in a loud voice :

Don’t
It is



* Pronounced okt, and means in German eight.
29

‘“‘“Acht, acht, acht, acht!” and did not throw
the money back to him again.

He waited a long time until evening came on,
and he had to go home. Then he abused the
frogs, and cried: ‘‘ You water-paddlers! you
staring blockheads! Your great mouths can
scream loud enough to split one’s ears, but you
can’t count seven dollars. Do you think Iam
going to stay here until you get ready?” So
saying he went away, but the frogs cried after
him, ‘“ Acht, acht, acht, acht!” so that he
reached home very much out of humor.

Some time after he bought another cow,
which he killed, reckoning that if the flesh sold
well, he would receive as much as both the
cows were worth and have the skin besides.
When he came to the town with the flesh, there
was a great pack of hounds gathered before the
door of the market. One of them, a large grey-
hound, sprang around the meat, sniffing and
barking, ‘‘ What, what, what, what!”

As he did not stop, the peasant said to him:
“Yes, I understand you very well. You say,
‘What, what,’ because you want some of the
meat. I should fare nicely if I gave it to you.”

But the dog only said, ‘‘ What, what !”

“Will you not eat it up or give it to your
companions there ?”

“What, what!” was the answer.

“Well, if you insist upon it, I will leave it
with you, but I know you well, and to whom



A GOOD

you belong; remember in three days I must
have my money or it will go ill with you. You
can bring it to me.”

So he laid the meat down, and went back
home. The dogs immediately fell upon it,
barking loudly: ‘‘ What, what!” The peasant
hearing them from a distance, said to himself:
‘Now they are all saying, ‘What, what!’ but
the big one must answer them for me.”

Three days passed, and the peasant thought:
“This evening I shall have the money in my
pocket,” and he was very contented and happy.
But evening came, and it brought no money.

‘There is no confidence to be placed in any
one,” he cried, losing all patience, and he went
immediately to the town and demanded his
money of the butcher.

The butcher at first thought it a very good
joke, but the peasant cried: ‘‘ Joking aside, |
want my money. Did’ntthe dog tell you of the
slaughtered cow I brought here three days ago ?”

This made the butcher angry, and seizing a
broom, he drove the peasant out.

“Wait,” said the peasant, ‘there is a little
justice left in the world; you will get your
dues.” And away he went to the king's palace,
and begged for an audience with the king. He
was taken before the king, who was sitting with
his daughter.

“What is your complaint?” he asked.

“ Alas!” replied the peasant, ‘‘ the frogs and

the dogs have taken away what belonged to }

me, and the butcher has paid me what he owed
me with a stick,” and he told at great length
how it had all happened.

The story over, the king’s daughter began to
laugh loudly, and the king said: ‘I cannot re-

store your own to you in this case, but I will |

give you my daughter for a wife. In all her
life she has not laughed as she did just now over
your story, and I have promised her in marriage
to the one who should make her laugh. You
may be very thankful for your good fortune.”

“Oh!” answered the peasant, “I do not ~

want her at all; I have one wife at home, and
that is too many ; when I go home, it seems as

if there was one in every corner.”
30

BARGAIN.



is

















SA
Z
.

” i a
4. Pte NN

LO Ah Ni
ll fr his ti ENN f aay eH |
ye Tai Yao

THE PEASANT THROWS HIS MONEY TO THE FROGS.







A GOOD BARGAIN.

Then the king was angry, and said: ‘“ You
are a rude clown!”

“ Alas ! your majesty,” he replied, “what can
you expect ofa pig but bristles ?”

“Wait,” said the king, “I will give you
another reward. Now be off at once, but in
three days come to me again, and I will pay
you five hundred in full.”

As the peasant passed through the gate, the
guard said to him: ‘ You have made the king’s
daughter laugh; you will get a great reward.”

“Yes,” replied the peasant; ‘five hundred
dollars are to be counted out for me.”

“Five hundred dollars!” cried the soldier,
“you can give me part of it. What could you
do with so much money?”

“Well, since it is you,” said the peasant, ‘I
will give you two hundred. In three days go
to the king, and it will be counted out to you.”

A Jew, who was standing near, heard this
promise, and running after the peasant, caught
him by the coat, and said: ‘Oh, wonderful!
what a child of fortune you are! But what can
you do with hard dollars? I will change them
for you in small coin.”

“Very well,” said the peasant. ‘Give me
change for three hundred, which in three days
will be paid you by the king.”

The Jew was pleased with this trade, and

‘brought the sum in miserable little coin, any
three of which were equal to two good ones.

At the end of the three days the peasant went
before the king as he had ordered.

“Take off his coat; he shall have his five
hundred now,” said the king.

“But they don't belong to me,” cried the
peasant. “I have already given two hundred
to the soldier at the gate, and a Jew let me have
the change for the remaining three hundred.”

Just then the soldier and the Jew entered,
and, demanding what the peasant had promised
them, received instead of dollars, the one two
hundred, and the other three hundred, strokes.

The soldier bore them patiently, for he had
tasted them before, but the Jew complained
bitterly, crying: ‘‘Oh, woe is me! are these
the hard dollars I was to receive?”

31

The king could not help laughing at the
peasant, and now that his anger had passed
away, he said: “Since you lost your reward
before it was yours, 1 will give you another.
Go into my treasure-room, and take as much
money as you like.”

The peasant did not have to be told twice,
and filled his deep pockets as full as they would
hold. After leaving the palace, he went into
an inn to count his money. The Jew who had
followed him, crept in behind him, and heard
him grumbling to himself: ‘ That rogue of a
king has cheated me. If he had given me the
money himself, I would then have known what
I had, but how could I tell whether I put enough
into my pockets or not ?”-

“Just hear him!” said the Jew to inimel ‘he
is speaking disrespectfully of the king. I must
go and tell him, and perhaps I tae receive the
money then, and he, the stripes.”

When the king heard what the Teun had
said, his anger was roused, and he ordered the
Jew to bring the peasant before him.

The Jew ran to the peasant, saying: ‘“‘ You
are to appeat before the king at once, just as
you are.’

‘“‘T know better what is proper,” answered the
peasant. “ First I-must have a new coat made.
Do you think any one with so much money in
his pocket should go before the king in these
rags?”

The Jew, seeing that the peasant would not
go without another coat, and fearing that the
king’s anger might cool before he received his
reward and the peasant his punishment, said:
“T will lend you a beautiful coat for a short
time out of pure friendship. What will not one
do for love?”

The peasant was pleased with this arrange-
ment, and putting on the coat which the Jew
had given him, went with him into the king’s
presence. As soon as the king told him what
the Jew had said, he exclaimed: ‘Oh! but he
never tells the truth, you cannot believe a word
he says. That fellow even declared I had his
coat on.”

“What is that?” cried the Jew. ‘“Isn’t that



THE ANGEL GUEST.

coat mine? Didn't Ilend it to you out of pure
friendship that you might appear before the
king ?”

When the king heard this, he said: ‘ The
Jew has surely deceived one of us,” and he

ordered him once more to be paid in hard
dollars.

But the peasant went home in the good coat
with his pockets full of money, saying joyfully
to himself: ‘tI made a good bargain this time.”

(PELE AAUNG EA GheS ae

IN olden times when angels visited this earth
in the form of human beings, it happened that
one of them, wandering about, was overtaken
by night before he had found any shelter. At
last he saw before him two houses standing
opposite each other, one large and beautiful,
belonging to a rich man, the other small and
miserable, belonging to a poor man.

“T should not be any trouble to the rich
man, I think I will spend the night with him,”
thought the angel.

When the rich man heard some one knocking
at his door, he put his head out of the window,
and asked what was wanted.

“T should like a night's lodging,”
angel.

The rich man looked at the traveller from
his head to his feet, and because he wore poor
clothes and looked as if he had but little money
in his pocket, shook his head, and said: ‘‘ No,
you cannot stop here; my rooms are full of
vegetables and seeds. If I took in every one
that knocks at my door, I should soon be
carrying a beggar’s staff myself. You
look somewhere else for lodging.”

He shut the window; the angel turned his
back on the grand house, and went across the
road to the little one. He had scarcely knocked,
when the poor man opened the door, and
invited the stranger in.

“Stay with us to-night,” he said; ‘it is
now quite dark, and you cannot travel farther
to-day.”

The angel was pleased and entered. The
wife of the poor man took him by the hand
and bade him weicome.

‘“Make yourself at home,” she said. ‘ We
82

said the

must

have not much, but such asit is, we give you
with all our hearts.”

She put some potatoes over the fire, and
while they were cooking, milked the goat that
the stranger might have a little milk to drink.
‘As soon as the supper was ready, the angel
seated himself at the table, and ate the rude
fare with a keen relish, because kind hearts
and happy faces were near him.

After they had eaten, and it was time to go
to bed, the woman called her husband aside
and said: ‘Dear husband, let us put some
straw on the floor for ourselves to-night, and
give the stranger our bed. He has been travel-
ling all day, and must be very tired.”

“With all my heart,” said her husband, ‘1
will offer it to him at once,” and going up to
the angel he begged him to accept their bed
that he might have a good night's sleep and
rest his weary limbs. The angel was not
willing at first to accept this offer, but they
urged so hard, he finally consented and lay
down in their bed, while the old people slept
on a straw couch which they made on the floor.

Early the next morning they cooked as good
a breakfast as they could afford for their guest,
and when the sun was risen, he rose and ate
with them again.

As he stood in the door, ready to leave them,
he turned to them and said: ‘Since you have
been so kind to me, you may wish three times,
and each wish shall be granted you.”

“What else should I wish for but eternal
happiness,” said the old man, ‘‘and that as long
as we two live we may have good health and
never want for daily bread. I cannot think of
a third wish.”





THE ANGEL GUEST.

“Would you not like a new house in place of
this old one!” asked the angel.

“Oh, yes!” replied the man, ‘if that could
be granted me also, I should be very well
satisfied.”

Then the angel changed the old house into a

new one, gave the old couple his blessing, and

went away.

It was late in the morning when the rich man
rose. He walked to his window and looked
across the street. To his surprise he saw a
handsome house of red brick where the little
hut had formerly stood. He called his wife and
said: ‘‘ What has happened? Yesterday the
little hut stood there, but now there is a beauti-
ful new house. Run over and ask how it has
all come about.”

The woman ran over to ask about the won-
derful change. ‘‘ Last evening,” said the poor
man, ‘‘a traveller came to our house and asked
for a night’s lodging. We took him in, and
this morning, just as he was going away, he
granted us three wishes, eternal happiness,
health and food in this life, and a new house in
place of our old one.”

The woman ran home in great haste, and
told her husband what she had heard.

“T could tear and beat myself,” he ex-
claimed. ‘The man stopped here first and
wished to stay over night, but I turned him
away.”

‘Be quick,” said his wife, ‘‘ get on your horse,
and overtake the man, and make him grant
you three wishes.”

The man followed her advice, and soon
overtook the traveller. He spoke to him very
kindly and politely, saying he hoped he would
not take it amiss that he had not been admitted
to his house, that he had gone to look for the
door-key, and when he returned, he was gone.
The next time he passed that way, he hoped
the stranger would stop with him.

‘Yes,” said the angel, “when I come again

I will do so.”
Then the rich man asked if he would be
allowed to make three wishes as his neigh-

bor had done.
33

“Yes,” said the angel, “but it would be
better for you if you did not wish.”

But the rich man thought he should ask for
nothing but what would add to his happiness, if
he was only sure his wishes would be fulfilled.

‘Ride home,” said the angel, and your three
wishes shall be fulfilled.”

The rich man had what he desired, and turn-
ing about, rode homewards. On the way, he
tried to think what he should wish for. As he
thus thought, he let the bridle fall loosely,
when suddenly the horse began to spring and
prance, and disturbed him so that he could
not come to any decision. He patted her on
the neck and said: ‘‘ Be quiet, Bess,” but she
only began some new pranks. Finally he
became angry and quite out of patience, he
cried: “I wish that you would break your
neck.”

As he said it, the horse fell under him, and
lay dead and motionless: so his first wish was
fulfilled.

As he was a miserly man, he would not lose
his saddle also, so he unfastened it from the
dead horse, threw it over his back, and started
for home afoot, comforting himself with the
thought that he had two more wishes.

As he travelled slowly through the sand, the
mid-day sun shone hot upon him, and he
became warm, and fretful with fatigue. The
saddle pressed heavily on his back, and he
was not able to decide what to wish for.

“Tf I were to wish for all the treasures in the
world,” he said, ‘something that I want would
be lacking. I must try to arrange it, so that
nothing remains to be wished for.”

Then sighing, he continued: ‘If I were only
like the Bavarian peasant who had three wishes
offered him: first, he wished for a good draught
of beer, then he wished for as much beer as he
could drink, and lastly, for a whole cask of |
beer.”

Many times he thought he knew what to
wish, then it would seem too small. All at
once it flashed through his mind how comfort-
ably his wife was seated at home, in a cool
room and probably enjoying something good



THE WONDERFUL FIDDLER.

to eat.
out:

‘IT wish she was seated on this saddle, and
so high she could not get down, rather than
carry it on my back.”

The saddle disappeared, and he knew his
second wish had been fulfilled. He was now
very angry, and started for home as fast as he
could run, that he might sit down quietly in a
room and think of some great thing to wish
for. As he entered the house, the first thing
he saw was his wife, perched in mid-air on the
saddle, crying and scolding with a will.

This thought vexed him, and he spoke

“Be quiet,” he said, “and I will wish for all
the treasures in the world for you.”

But she called him a blockhead, and said:
“ Of what use are all the treasures in the world
if I have to sit here? You wished me here,
and now you shall help me down.”

So, willing or not, he had to make his third
wish, that his wife might be set free from the
saddle, and it was immediately granted.

So the rich man received nothing from his
wishes but vexation, trouble, scolding words,
and a lost horse, while the poor man lived in
peace and plenty all his life.

THE -WONDEREU LE. FIDDLER.

ONCE upon a time a wonderful fiddler was
travelling alone through a forest. At last he
became tired of his own thoughts, and said to
himself: ‘‘I shall be in this forest a long time.
I think I will try to find a good companion.”

He took the fiddle from his back, and played
until it echoed through the trees. Soon a wolf
came trotting through the thicket.

“ Ah! a wolf, is it? Well, I have no desire
for such a companion,” said the fiddler.

But the wolf came nearer, and said: ‘ Oh,
you dear fiddler! how beautifully you play! I
should like to learn how.”

“You can soon learn,” answered the fiddler;
“but you must do everything just as I tell you.”

“Oh, fiddler!” said the wolf, “I will mind
you just as the school-boy does his teacher.”

‘“Come with me, then,” said the fiddler.

When they had gone a little way together,
they came to an oak tree which was hollow, and
split through the middle.

‘‘ Here,” cried the fiddler, “if you would like
to learn to fiddle, place your fore-feet in this
cleft.” :

The wolf did as he told him, and the fiddler,
taking a stone, quickly wedged both feet in the
crevice so firmly that the wolf could not move,

but must stay there a prisoner.
34

“Wait there until I come again,” said the
fiddler, and went on his way.

In a little while he said to himself a second
time: ‘I shall be in the forest a long time. I
think I will try again to find a companion,” and
taking his fiddle from his back, began to play.
It was not long before a fox came sneaking
among the trees.

“ Ah! a fox this time,” said the fiddler. ** Ido
not want him for a companion.”

The fox came towards him, and said: ‘* Oh,
you dear fiddler! how beautifully you play! 2
also would like to learn.”

“You can soon learn,” said the fiddler; “ but
you must do everything exactly as I tell you.”

“Oh, fiddler!” answered the fox, “I will
mind you as a schoolboy does his teacher.”

“Follow me,” said the fiddler.

They went a short distance when they came
toa foot-path, on each side of which grew tall
bushes. Here the fiddler stopped. Bending a
hazel-nut bush from one side to the ground he
placed his foot on it, then bending one from the
other side, and holding it, he said: ‘‘ Well, little
fox, if you wish to learn to play, put out your
left fore-foot.” The fox obeyed, and the fiddler
bound it fast to the bush on the left.

“ Now, the right one, little fox,” he said, and







THE WONDERFUL FIDDLER.

bound that to the bush on the right. Then
seeing that the knots were firmly tied, he
let go; the bushes sprang back to their
places, carrying the fox with them up into
the air, where he remained kicking and
swinging.

“Wait there till I come back,” said the
fiddler, and went on his way.

Soon he said again: ‘I have still a
long time to be in the forest. I will try
once more to bring a pleasant companion
to me.”

A third time he took his fiddle from his
back, and played until the music sounded
through the woods.

In a few minutes a hare came leaping
towards him.

“ Ah! here comes a hare,” said the fid-
dler. ‘I don’t want him for a companion.”

“Dear fiddler,” said the hare, “how
beautifully you play! how much I should
like to learn!”

“You can learn very easily,” replied
the fiddler, ‘‘if you will do exactly as I
tell you.” '

“Oh, fiddler, I will mind you as a
schoolboy does his teacher,” said the little
hare.

They went on together for a short dis-
tance, till they came to a place in the
woods where an aspen-tree grew. The
nddler tied one end of a long string
around the hare’s neck, while the other
he fastened around the tree.

““Come lively, now, little hare,” cried
the fiddler,‘‘ jump around this tree twenty
times.”

The little hare obeyed, and ran twenty
times around the tree, and of course,
wound the string twenty times around the
trunk. The hare was caught. He could
not unwind the string, and pull and tug as
he might, he could not free himself, and
only cut his soft neck with the string.

‘Wait here till I come back,” said the
fiddler, and went away.

In the meantime, the wolf had pushed
385

—— — Se
Se = ae str
2S = eo ae as

Ss
se

NS

a IN yi

x

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Ny



: \\
SAN
VF, y) ‘
EF SS



THE FIDDLER AND THE HARE,



aA LOT OF ROGUES.

and bitten and worked so long at the stone, he
had at last got his feet free.

Full of rage and fury, he hastened after the
fiddler, determined to tear him to pieces. he was running along, the fox saw him, and
called loudly to him: ‘‘ Brother wolf, come to
my help! The fiddler has deceived me!”

The wolf drew down the bushes to which the
fox was fastened, bit the string in two, set the
fox free, and they both went on together to seek
revenge on the fiddler.

They came to the hare tied to the aspen-tree.
They set him at liberty also, and then all three
set out to find their enemy.

But the fiddler had again taken out his fiddle,
and this time had been more fortunate. The
music fell on the ear of a poor wood-cutter, and
whether he was willing or not, he immediately

A eOEsOr

ONE day in autumn a little cock said to his
wife: ‘Now is the time when nuts are ripe.
Come, let us go together up there on the hill,
and eat all we want before the squirrel carries
them away.”

‘Oh, yes, let us go!” said the little hen.
“That would be a great pleasure !”

So they went together to the hill, and as the
day was bright and pleasant, they staid until
evening.

Now I do not know whether it was because
they had eaten so much, or whether they had
become proud, at all events they would not
walk home, and the cock was obliged to make
a little carriage of nut-shells. When it was
finished, the hen seated herself in it saying:
““Now you may harness yourself to it, and draw
me home.”

“That is very kind of you,” said the cock.
“T would rather walk home alone, than allow
myself to be harnessed to that carriage. I am
willing to be coachman and sit upon the box,
but draw it myself, I will not.”

While they were thus quarreling a duck

36

left his work, and, with his axe under his arm,
came to listen to the music.

‘At last, here comes the right companion,”
said the fiddler ; ‘I have been looking for a man,
not wild animals.”

He began to play so softly and sweetly, that
the poor wood-cutter stood as if charmed, his
heart beating for joy.

While he was listening, the wolf, the fox, and
the hare came up. The wood-cutter saw they
had some wicked design, and raising his glit-
tering axe, placed himself in front of the fiddler,
as much as to say: * Whoever attacks him, had
better take care, he will have to deal with me.”
The animals were frightened and ran back into
the forest, while the fiddler played his thanks
to the wood-cutter; and then went on his
journey.

ROGUES:

quacked out: ‘t You thieves, who said you could
come to my nut-hill?) You shall pay dearly for

this!" and she rushed at the cock with wide
open bill. But he was ready for a fight, as cocks

usually are, and struck her so hard with his
spurs that she soon begged for mercy, and
willingly allowed herself to be harnessed to the
carriage as a punishment for her rudeness.

The cock seated himself on the box
coachman, and away they drove at a rapid
rate, the driver calling out: ‘** Run, duck, run,

cho

as fast as you can!”

They had gone a short distance when they
met two foot-passengers, a pin and a necdle.

“Stop, stop!” they cried. “It will soon be
so dark we cannot see a step before us, and the
road is so dusty. Will you not let us ride a
little way with you? We stopped at the tailor’s
shop and are very much belated.”

The cock seeing that they were thin people
who would not take up much room, allowed
them to get in, only they had first to promise
they would not step on the hen’s toes.

Late in the evening they came to an inn.





A LOT OF ROGUES.

Here they decided to stop for the night, as the
duck, who was not a very good traveller, had
become lame and fell from side to side. The
landlord at first made many objections to their
staying there, saying his house was already full,
and he thought, too, there was nothing very dis-
tinguished about such guests. But they
promised to give him the egg which the
hen had laid on the road, and also the one
which the duck would lay in the

morning, so the landlord told
them at last they might stay

and they made themselves at home, and rev-
elled and feasted all the evening.

As soon as morning dawned, when every-
body was asleep, the cock awoke the hen, and
bringing the egg, they ate it together for their

breakfast, and threw the shell into the fireplace.
87

After this they found the needle, who was still
asleep, and seizing her by the head, stuck her
into the cushion of the landlord's chair; then
they put the pin in the hand-towel, and without a
word to any one, left the house, and flew away









‘THE COCK SEATED HIMSELF ON THE BOX AS COACHMAN.”

over the meadows. The duck, who had staid
in the yard and slept in the open air all night,
heard them as they flew past, and rousing her-
self, waddled down to the brook and swam
away, moving much more swiftly than when
she had to draw the carriage.

Two hours later the landlord rose, washed
himself, and taking up the towel to dry his face,
drew the point of the pin across it, leaving a
long red scratch from ear to ear. Then he went
into the kitchen to light his pipe. As he stooped
over the hearth, the egg-shells popped into his
eyes. ‘‘Everything happened to my head this
morning, he said, sitting down in his grand-



LHE MAGIC WINDOIVS.

father’s chair quite vexed. But he had no sooner
seated himself, than he suddenly sprang into
the air, crying: ‘Oh, woe is me!” for the needle
had pricked him worse than the pin had scratched
him. He was now very angry, and began to
suspect his guests who had arrived so late the

THE MAGIC

A KING’S daughter once had a room in the
top of her castle that had twelve windows in it.
They commanded a view of every point of the
heavens, and the princess had only to climb to
this room and she could see every part of her
realm. The windows possessed more than or-
dinary properties. One could discern objects
very well from the first, but better from the
second, still better from the third, and so on
until on reaching the twelfth, nothing above or
below the earth could be hidden from the eye.

The princess was very proud, would accept
no lovers, and perferred to rule her kingdom
alone. Whether for amusement or otherwise,
she made it known that no one should become
her husband who could not hide himself so that
it would be impossible for her to findhim. And
further, any one making the attempt and failing,
should lose his head and have it stuck ona pole.

In a short time there were ninety-seven poles,
each bearing a head, standing before the castle.
Then for a long time no suitors appeared, and
the princess was pleased and thought: ‘‘ Now
I shall remain free all my life.”

But such was not to be her fate. Three broth-
ers announced that they would like to try their
luck. The eldest one thought himself safe if
he crept into a limestone quarry, but the prin-
cess had only to look out of the first window
in order to find him, and off came his head.
The second one hid in the cellar of the castle;
but he also was found through the first window,
and the ninety-ninth pole bore his head. When
it was the third one’s turn, he begged for a day
in which to think of the matter, also would she
be so kind as to give him three trials. If he

38 ;

evening before. He went out to look for them,
and found they were gone.

Then he vowed he never would take into his
house again such a set of rogues, who ate so
much, paid nothing, and for thanks played
wicked tricks.

WINDOWS.

failed in the third attempt, he would willingly
give up his life. As he was so beautiful and
begged so earnestly, she said yes, but it would
do him no good.

The following day the young man tried to
think where he should hide himself, but to no
purpose. At last he gave up, took his gun, and
went out into the woods. Presently he saw a
crow, and taking aim was about to shoot him.

“Don’t shoot me,” he cried,‘* and I will re-
ward you.”

On hearing this, he turned away, and walked
on through the woods till he came toa lake.
As he stood on the shore, a large fish came to
the surface. Again he took aim, thinking he
would shoot it, but the fish also cried: ‘‘ Don’t
shoot me, and I will reward you.”

He walked on into the fields, and there saw a
fox limping towards him. He fired, but missed.
Then the fox called: ‘*Do not shoot me, but
come and take this thorn out of my foot.”

The young man did so, and then wanted to
kill him for the sake of his fine skin.

‘“Let me go,” said the fox, ‘‘and IJ will surely
reward you.”

The youth let him go, and then as it was
evening, returned home.

The next day he was to hide, but how or
where he had not the slightest idea. After
racking his brains for a long time, he went out
into the woods. Almost the first thing he saw
was the crow, and he said: ‘I spared your life
yesterday, now in return tell me where I can
hide that the princess may not find me.”

The crow dropped his head and thought.
Finally he croaked: ‘‘I have it,” and going to





THE MAGIC WINDOWS.

a nest, he took an egg from it, and cut it in two.
Then by some magic or other, the young man
crept into the shell, and the egg was closed up
and laid back into the nest.

When the princess walked to the first window,
to her surprise, she could not find him. Neither
could she discover him from the second nor the
third. She looked from all the windows up to
the eleventh, and then she found him. She
ordered the crow shot and the egg brought to
her. It was opened and the youth stepped out.

““T spare your life this time, but you must do
better than this, or you are certainly lost,” she
said.

The next day he went to the lake, called the
fish, and said: ‘I spared your life, now tell me
where I can hide so that the princess cannot
find me.”

The fish thought a moment and then said:
“T have it; I will shut you up in my stomach.”

So the fish swallowed him, and dived to the
bottom of the lake.

The princess looked from all the windows,
her face growing paler and more anxious at
each one, but on looking from the twelfth she
discovered him. She had the fish caught and
killed and the young man brought into her
presence. You can easily imagine what his
feelings were now that he had reached his last
chance.

‘A second time I grant you your life; but
now comes the third trial, and your head will
surely appear on the hundredth pole.”

The last day he went out into the country
with a heavy heart, and there met the fox.

‘You know every hiding-place,” he said,
“tell me where I can hide so that the princess
cannot find me.”

“That is a difficult task,” replied the fox,
putting on a thoughtful face. But at last he
cried: ‘I have it.”

He went to a spring, and diving in, came out
a dealer in small wares and curious animals.
Then the young man was obliged to dive into

Q
oO

the water, and he came out as a cunning little
seal. ;

The merchant put him ina basket and car-
ried him to the town. The animal attracted
great attention, and the people came together
in crowds to look at it. Finally the excite-

-ment reached the ears of the princess, and she

too came to see the curiosity. Being pleased
with it, she offered to buy it for a large sum of
money. Before parting with it, the merchant
whispered in the little creature’s ear: “‘ When
the princess looks from the windows, creep
under the braids of her hair.”

When the time came for her to search for the
young man, she looked from all the windows in
turn, but when she reached the twelfth and was
still unable to find him, her heart was filled with
fear and rage. She closed the window so vio-
lently that the glass in all the windows flew
into a thousand pieces and the entire castle
shook.

As she turned away, she felt the seal that
she had been petting under her hair. In her
impatience she seized it, and throwing it to the
floor with violence, cried: ‘Away with -you,
out of my sight.” 7

It crawled back to the merchant, who took it
to the spring, when both dived in a second time
and were immediately restored to their former
shape.

The youth thanked the fox, and complimented
him by saying: “The crow and the fish are
stupid creatures compared with you. You know
the right tricks at the right time.”

Then he went directly to the castle. The
princess was waiting for him and submitted to
her fate. The wedding was celebrated and the
young man became ruler of the kingdom. But
he never told his wife where he hid the third
time, for she thought he had done it all by his
own knowledge and skill. She therefore held
him in the greatest possible respect, and often
said to herself:

‘“How much more he knows than I do.”



THE TWELVE. BROTHERS:



TERENCE ian
no S\N Gan AY).

AUER UE











na ial
Serre ae
Sa hr

pe
eon,






Figo
na Pa
4

eae
15 oar
aad
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ats xf

Bee
ee

een

ONCE upon a time there lived happily together
a king and queen, who had twelve children—
all of them boys. One day the king said to
his wife: “If our thirteenth child should bea
daughter, our twelve sons must die, that she

may inherit all our kingdom.”
40








Then he ordered made twelve coffins. They
were filled with shavings, and locking them up
in aroom, he gave the key to his wife and com-
manded her to tell no one about the matter.
ene
whole day. long.
who was always with her, and had been called
Benjamin after the one in the Bible, said to her.

queen was very sad, and mourned the
One day her youngest child,

“Dear mother, why are you so sad?”
“Dearest child.” she answered, “1
But he would give her no peace

cannot
tell you.”
until she had opened the door of the closed
room and shown him the twelve coffins filled
with shavings. ‘Dear Benjamin,” she said,
‘these coffins have been made for you and your
eleven brothers, for if you ever have a sister,
you will all be killed and buried in them.”

While she was speaking, she wept bitterly,
but her little son tried to comfort her, saying:
“Do not cry, dear mother, we will take care of
ourselves, and go away from here.”

But the mother said: ‘You and your eleven
brothers go out into the woods yonder and
remain for a time. Watch the tower of the
castle from the highest tree, and if a little son
is born, I will hang out a white flag, and you
may then return in safety; but if it is a daughter,
I will hang out a red flag; hasten away then
as quickly as you can. Every night I will rise.
and pray for you—in the winter, that you may
have a fire to warm you, and in the summer
that you may not be overcome by the heat.”





THE TWELVE BROTHERS.

Eleven days passed and it was Benjamin’s
turn to watch. A flag was floating from the
tower, but it was not white, but biood-red,—a
‘signal that they were all to die.

When the brothers heard this, they were very
angry, and said: ‘Ought we to die on account
of a maiden? We swear we will have revenge.
Every maiden we meet shall die.”

They left the place and went deep into the
forest. Here they found a little hut which they
made their home, and it was arranged that
Benjamin, the youngest, should stay at home
and keep house, while the rest went to kill game
for food. They lived thus for ten years, which
seemed to pass very quickly.

In the meantime, the queen’s little daughter
had grown into a beautiful girl, very lovely in
‘disposition. Once, when there had been a great
washing, she looked out and saw twelve little
shirts. Knowing they could not be her father’s,
she asked her mother whose they were.

Then her mother told her of her twelve broth-
ers, and, weeping, showed her the twelve coffins.
When she had finished, the maiden said: ‘Do
not cry, dear mother, I will go and seek my
brothers.”

She took the twelve shirts, and went into the
forest. All day she wandered, till, at night-fall,
she came to the little hut. She entered and
saw a young boy, who stared with astonish-
ment at her beauty, her rich clothing, and the
golden star she wore upon her forehead. In
reply to his questions, she told him she was the
king’s daughter, and that she was searching for
her twelve brothers, and then Benjamin knew
she was his sister, and told her he was her
brother.

On hearing this, the maiden wept for joy, and
the two embraced each other with great affec-
tion. But presently Benjamin thought of his
brothers’ vow and told his sister of it.

‘“‘I should be glad to die,” she answered, “ if
I could restore them to their home.”

“No,” he said, “you shall not die. Hide
yourself under this tub until my brothers come
home, and I will make them promise to spare
you.”

41

So when they returned, Benjamin said that
he had strange news.

“Oh, tell us what it is!” they all cried.

“Will you promise me that the first maiden
you meet shall not be killed?” he asked.

“Yes, yes,” she shall be spared, only tell us.”

Then he said: ‘ Our sister is here,” and lifting
the tub, the little princess came forward, looking
so beautiful and delicate in her royal robes, with
the golden star on her forehead, that the brothers
were full of joy, and embraced and kissed her, _
and loved her with all their hearts.

She staid at home with Benjamin, and helped
him in his work, and the brothers were very
contented and happy, and lived in perfect har-
mony with their little sister.

One day Benjamin and his sister made a feast
for their brothers. Near the house was a little
garden in which were growing twelve lilies.
Thinking it would give her brothers a pleasure
to present to each a flower as they sat at their
meals, the maiden broke off the twelve lilies.
No sooner had she done this, than the twelve
brothers were changed into twelve crows, and
flew away through the forest. At the same
moment the house and garden disappeared, and
she was left standing alone in the middle of the
deep woods. Looking round, she saw an old
woman standing near her, who said: “My
child, what have you done? Why did you not
leave the twelve white lilies growing? They
were your brothers, but now they have become
crows, and will always remain so.”

“Ts there no way to set them free?” asked
the maiden, weeping.

“No,” said the old woman; ‘‘there is but one
thing in all the world, and that is too difficult
for you to do. You must be dumb for seven
years. You must not speak or laugh. Should
you utter a single word, and it lacked only an
hour of the seven years, all you had done before
would be in vain, and your brothers would die.”

The maiden went away, saying in her heart:
“JT know for certain I shall set my brothers
free.” She found a tall tree in which she lived,
and here she would sit and spin, without ever
speaking or laughing.



THE TWELVE BROTHERS.



THE MAIDEN PLUCKS THE FATAL LILIES,
42

It happened one day that the king was in the
woods hunting with a large greyhound. Sud-
denly it ran to the tree in which the maiden was
sitting, and springing round it, barked furiously.
The king, coming up, saw the princess, and was
so charmed with her beauty, that he asked her
if she would become his bride. She made no
answer except to nod her head slightly. Then
the king himself climbed the tree, brought her
down, and rode away with her to his palace.

The marriage was soon celebrated with great
splendor and joy, but the bride neither spoke
nor laughed.

They had lived happily together a couple of
years, when the king’s step-mother, who was a
wicked woman, began to whisper evil things
about the young queen. ‘It is some low beg-~-
gar-maiden that you have brought to your
palace,” she would say to the king. ** Who knows
for what wicked deed she was driven from her
home? Even if she is dumb, and can't speak,
she might laugh. Any one that does not laugh,
has a bad conscience.” The king would not
believe her at first, but the old woman talked
so much, that at last the king was convinced,
and had her condemned to death.

A great fire was made in the court-yard,
where the king stood watching with tearful eyes,
for he still loved her dearly. She was bound
to the stake; the fire had already scorched her
clothing; but now the moment had arrived
when the seven years expired. She heard a
whirring sound in the air, and looking up, saw
twelve crows flying towards her. The instant
they touched the earth, they were changed to
her twelve brothers whom she had set free.

They scattered the burning wood, put out the
flames, and freeing their sister, once more em-
braced and kissed her. And now that she was
allowed to speak, she told the king why she
had been silent and never laughed. The king
was very happy to find she was innocent, and
they lived together in happiness to the end of
their lives. But the wicked step-mother who
was brought to justice, was condemned to be
thrown into a vat full of boiling oil and poison-
ous snakes, and thus she died a terrible death.







































wv wo; eee.
an THE

Fy
?}7 ENCHANTED FAWN.

A LITTLE brother once took his sister by the
hand, and said: ‘We have not had a happy
hour since our mother died. Our step-mother
beats us every day, and if we go to her for any-
thing, she kicks us away. Our only food is the
hard bread-crusts that are left over. The dog
under the table fares better than we do; she
throws him many a good bite. Heaven help
us! Oh! if our mother only- knew what we
suffer! Come, let us leave here, and go out inte
the wide world.”

All day they wandered over fields and mead-
ows and stony roads. They were very sad, and
once, when it rained, the little sister said: ‘‘ God
and our hearts are weeping together.” By even-
ing they came to a large forest. Tired out with
hunger, sorrow, and the long journey, they crept
into a hollow tree, and fell asleep.

The next morning when they awoke, the sun
was high in the heavens, and shone warm and
bright into the tree.

“JT am so thirsty,” said the little boy to his
. sister. “If I only knew where there was a
brook, I would go and get a drink. Hark! I
think I hear water running.” They climbed
out of the tree, and taking hold of each other’s
hands, went to find the brook.

Now the wicked step-mother was a witch, and
had seen the children go away, and knew where
they were.

THE WICKED STEP-MOTHER BEWITCHING THE WATERS,

43



THE ENCHANTED FAIWN.

She had sneaked after them, as is the habit
of witches, and had bewitched all the water in
the forest.

Soon the children found the little brook, that
sparkled and rippled over the stones. But just
as the boy was stooping to drink, the sister
heard, as if the brook murmured:

“ Drink not of me! drink not of me!
Or to a tiger changed you'll be.”

So she begged of him not to drink the water
or he would become a wild beast and tear her
to pieces. Thirsty as he was, the boy did as
she wished, and said he would wait until they
came to the next spring. Soon they came to
another brook, and the maiden heard the waters
whisper :

“Drink not of me! drink not of me!
Or to a black wolf changed you'll be.”

And a second time the sister begged her
brother not to drink the water or he would be
changed into a black wolf and devour her
Again the brother did as she wished, but he
said: “I will wait until we come to the next
brook, then I must drink, say what you will, or
I shall die of thirst.” 5

But when they came tothe third brook, the
sister heard the cool waters murmuring:

“ Drink not of me! drink not of me,
Or to a young deer changed you'll be.”

And she cried: “Dear brother, do not drink
here, or you will be turned into a fawn, and run
away from me.”

But her brother had already knelt by the
stream to drink, and as soon as the first drop
passed his lips he became a fawn.

The little sister wept bitterly over her poor
bewitched brother, and the little fawn also wept,
and kept close to her side. At last the maiden
said: ‘‘ Do not cry any more, dear little fawn, I
will never leave you,” and she untied her golden
garter and fastened it around his neck, then
braiding some rushes into a soft string, she tied
it to the collar, and led him away into the deep

forest.
44

After they had travelleda long, long distance,
they came to a little cottage. The maiden
looked in, and seeing it was empty, thought:
‘We can stay here and live.”

She gathered leaves and moss and made a
soft bed for the fawn. Every morning she went
out into the forest to gather roots and _ berries
and nuts for her own food, and tender grass for
the fawn, who would eat out of her hand and
play happily around her. When night came,
and the little sister was tired, she would say
her prayers, lay her head on the fawn’s back for
a pillow, and sleep peacefully until morning.
Their life in the woods would have been a very
happy one, if the brother could only have had
his proper form.

The maiden had lived a long time in the
forest with the fawn for her only companion,
when it happened the king of the country held
a great hunt. The loud blasts of the horn, the
baying of the hounds, the lusty cries of the
huntsmen, sounded on every side. The young
deer heard them, and was eager for the chase.
“Please let me join the hunt,” he said to his
sister; ‘I cannot restrain myself any longer,”
and he begged so piteously, that at last she
consented.

“At evening you must come back again,”
she said. ‘But I shall have my door locked
against those wild hunters, and that I may
know you when you knock, say: ‘Sister, let me
in. If you do not say this, I shall not open the
door.”

She opened the door and the deer bounded
away, glad and joyful to breathe the fresh air,
and be free. The king and his huntsmen saw
the beautiful animal, and started in chase of
him, but they could not catch him, and when
they thought they had him safe, he sprang over
the bushes and disappeared. As soon as it be-
came dark, he ran to the little cottage, knocked
at the door, and cried: ‘Sister, let me in.”
The door was quickly opened; he went in, and
rested all night on his soft bed.

The next morning the chase was continued,
and when the deer heard the sound of the horn,
and the ‘Ho! ho!” of the huntsmen, he could



THE ENCHANTED FAWN.

no longer rest, and said: “‘ Let me out, sister, I
must go.”

His sister opened the door, saying to him:
“You must return at evening, and don’t forget
what I told you to say.” ;

As soon as the king and his huntsmen caught
sight of the young deer with the golden collar,
they all gave chase, but he was too quick and
nimble for them. All day long they followed
him. Towards evening the huntsmen surrounded
him, and one of them wounded him a little in
the foot, so that he limped and had to run more
slowly. One huntsman followed him to the
cottage, and heard him cry: “Sister, let me in.”
Then he saw the door open, and quickly close
again. The huntsman was astonished, and went
and told the king all he had seen and heard.
‘To-morrow,’ said the king, ‘we will once
more give him chase.”

But the maiden was very much frightened
when she saw that the deer was wounded. She
washed the blood from his foot, and bound
healing herbs on it, and said: ‘Go and lie down
upon your bed now, dear fawn, that you may
become strong and well again.”

But the wound was so slight, that the next
morning he felt nothing of it. And when he
heard the sound of the hunt again outside, he
said: “I cannot stay here, I must join them.
They will not catch me so soon again.”

‘No, no,” said his sister weeping ; ‘‘ you must
not go. They will kill you, and I shall be left
alone here in the forest, deserted by all the
world.”

“Tf I do not go, I shall die of longing,” he
said. ‘‘When [hear the hunting-horn, I feel that
I must bound away.”

With a heavy heart, his sister opened the
door, and the young deer went leaping joyfully
through the woods. When the king saw him,
he said to his huntsmen: ‘‘ Do not lose sight of
him all day, but see that no one does him any
harm.”

When evening came, the king said to his
men: ‘‘Come now, and show me where the
cottage stands.” They did so, and the king

going to the door, knocked, and cried, ‘“ Sister,
45

let me in.” The door opened, the king entered,
and he saw standing before him a maiden more
beautiful than he had ever seen before. But
how great was her astonishment on opening
the door, to see, instead of the deer, a man
enter, wearing a golden crown on his head. But
the king looked at her kindly, and extending
his hand, said: ‘‘ Will you go with me to my
castle and be my dear wife?”

“Oh, yes!” replied the maiden, “Iam willing
to go, but the deer must go also; I can never
leave him.”

‘He shall remain with you as long as you
live, and shall never want for anything,” said
the king.

At this moment the deer came bounding in.
His sister again fastened the string of rushes to
his collar, and leading him by her own hand,
they went out from the lonely cottage in the
woods for the last time.

The king placed the maiden upon his horse
and rode with her to the castle, where the mar-
riage was celebrated with great splendor, and
she became queen, and they lived together
happily for a long time, while the deer played
in the castle garden and received every care and
attention.

In the meantime, the wicked step-mother on
whose account the children had been driven
into the world, had no thought but that the
little sister had been torn to pieces by wild
animals, and that the boy, whom she had turned
into a fawn, had been shot by the hunters.
When she heard, therefore, of their good fortune,
and how happy they were, she was filled with
envy, and gave herself no rest until she had
thought of a way to destroy their happiness.

One day, her own daughter, who was as ugly
as night, and had only one eye, said to her:
‘Oh, if I had only been born a queen!”

“Be quiet now,” said the old woman; “ when
the time comes, I shall be on hand, and you
shall yet be a queen.”

The time came when a little son was born to
the queen and the king was away to the hunt.
The old woman, taking the form of a nurse,
entered the room of the queen, and said : ““Come,



LHE ENCHANTED FAIVN.

your bath is ready. Let us be quick before it could not restore, so she had her lie on the side
gets cold.” Her daughter, who was also there, where there was no eye.
carried the queen into the bath-room, where In the evening when the king came home, and
they had made a suffocating fire, and leaving heard that he hada son, he was greatly rejoiced,
her there to die, closed the door and went away. and went at once to see the queen. But as
This done, the old
woman tied a cap on
her own daughter's
head, and had her lie
down in the queen’s
place. She gave her
the form and appear-
ance of the queen as
nearly as she could,
but the lost eye she

















THE KING TAKES THE MAIDEN TO HIS CASTLE,

he drew the curtain, the old woman
cried: ‘For your life do not draw that
curtain, the queen cannot bear the
light!” So he went away without
knowing that a false queen had taken
her place.

At midnight when every one was asleep, as
the child’s nurse sat alone by the cradle, she saw
the door open and the true queen enter. She
took the child in her arms, nursed it,and then



LHE ENCHANTED FAWN.

laying it in its cradle again, covered it carefully,
and went out. She did not forget the deer, but
went to the corner where he lay and gently
stroked his back, and then silently disappeared.

In the morning the child’s nurse asked the
guard if he had seen any one leave the castle,
but he said no, he had seen noone. The queen
came many nights in this manner without speak-
ing to any one. The nurse saw her, but said
nothing to any one about it.

After some time had passed, the queen one
night began to speak, and said:

‘“* How fares my child? how fares the deer?

Twice more shall I come, and then disappear.”

The nurse made no answer, but when the
queen had gone, she went to the king and told
him everything.

“ Alas !” said the king, ‘‘what does this mean?
To-morrow night I will watch by the child.”

The next evening he went into the nursery,
and at midnight the queen came in, and said:

‘* How fares my child? how fares the deer?
Once more shall I come, and then disappear.”

She took the child in her arms as usual, and
then went out. The king would not trust him-
self to speak, but he watched the following night,
and this time she said:

‘* How fares my child? how fares the deer?
This time do I come, and then disappear.”

But the king could hold back no longer, and -
sprang towards her, saying: ‘‘ You can be no
other than my dear wife!”

“Yes, [am your dear wife,” she replied, and
at that moment she was restored to life, as well
and beautiful as ever.

Then she told the king how he had been
deceived by the wicked witch and her daughter.
He had them brought to judgment and they
were condemned to death. The daughter was
driven to the forest where she was torn to pieces
by wild beasts, and the old witch was led to
the fire and miserably burnt. No sooner was
she burnt to ashes than the young deer was
restored to his human form, and the brother and
sister spent the rest of their days happily
together.

bE -GOLDEN
«A MAN once had three sons, the youngest
of whom was considered foolish, and on this
account was despised and made fun of by every
body. One day the eldest son wished to go to
the forest, and cut wood, so his mother made
him a rich little cake, and gave him a bottle of
wine, that he might not be hungry or thirsty
while away.

When he reached the woods, he met a little
gray-headed man, who bade him good morning,
and said: “I pray you, give me a piece of the
cake that is in your pocket, anda sip of wine,
for Iam very hungry and thirsty.”

But the wise youth answered: ‘If I give
you my cake and wine, J shall have nothing for
myself, so take yourself off,’ and he went on.
He began chopping, but had not worked long

when the axe slipped and cut his arm so badly
47

he was obliged to go home and have it bound
up. The little old man was the cause of all
this trouble.

Then the second son wished to go to the
woods, and his mother made him a rich little
cake, and gave him a bottle of wine. He also
met the little gray-headed man in the woods,
and when. asked for some of his food and wine,
replied as his brother had done, and went on to
his work. But his punishment was not long in
coming. He had scarcely given two strokes
with his axe, when he hit his leg, cutting it so
badly that he had to be carried home.

Then the foolish son said: ‘‘ Father, let me
go and cut wood.”

But his father said: ‘Your brothers only came
to harm for going, what could you do, when you
know nothing about such work ?”



THE GOLDEN GOOSE.

The boy, however, begged so hard to go, that
at last his father said: ‘‘ Go along, then; you
will learn by experience.”

His mother gave him a cake, but it had been
mixed with water and baked in the ashes, and
a bottle of sour beer.

When he reached the woods, the little man
met him, and after greeting him, said: ‘' Give
mea piece of your cake, and a drink of your
bottle, [am so hungry and thirsty.”

“T have only a cake baked in the ashes and
some sour beer,” said the boy, ‘‘ but if they will
suit you, we will sit down and share them
together.”

So they seated.themselves, but when the boy
took out his cake, lo! it was changed to a beauti-
ful rich cake, and the sour beer into good wine.
After they had eaten and drank, the little man
said: ‘‘ Because you have a kind heart, and were
willing to share what you had with me, I will
reward you. Yonder stands an old tree; cut
it down, and you will find something at the
roots.” So saying he took his departure.

The boy cut down the tree, and as it fell to
the ground, he saw sitting at the roots a goose
with feathers of pure gold. He took it in his
arms, and went to an inn where he intended to
pass the night. But the landlord had three
daughters, who, when they saw the goose, were
very curious over the wonderful bird, and wished
very much to possess one of the golden feathers.
The oldest one watched her opportunity, and
when the youth had gone out, she seized the
goose by the wing to pull out a feather. But
the moment her fingers touched the bird, she
could not remove her hand, and had to remain
standing there. Soon the second daughter came,
and thought she too would have a feather, but
she no sooner touched her sister, than she was
unable to move away.

Lastly, the third one came up with the same
intention of having a feather, but the others
cried to her: ‘“Remain where you are, remain
where you are,” but she saw no reason for
remaining where she was, and thought: ‘If
you can stand by the goose, so can J.” She

sprang towards it, but as soon as she touched
48

her sister, she could not leave her. Thus all}
three sisters passed the night standing by the
goose.

The next morning the boy took the goose in
his arms and went away without so much as
noticing the three girls that followed close be-
hind, running new to the right, and now to the
left, just as he happened to turn. As they were
passing through a field, they met the parson.
‘Shame on you,” he cried to the maidens;
“why are you following that young man? Go
back home,” and he took hold of the youngest
one to turn her about. But he no sooner touched
her, than he too stuck fast, and was obliged to.
run along with them. Not long after, they passed
the sexton, who, secing the parson running
along with these maidens, called to him: * Hal-
loa, master, where are you going so fast? Have
you forgotten the christening we are to have
to-day?” and seizing the parson’s cloak, stuck
fast, and was compelled to run with them. As.
the five were trotting along together, they came
to two farmers, who were just returning from
the field, with their hoes on their shoulders. The
parson called to them to come and set him and
the sexton free. They hastened to do so, but
when they took hold of the sexton, they could
not let go, and now there were seven running
after the foolish boy and the goose.

They travelled on until they came to a city
ruled by a king whose daughter was so melan-
choly, she had never been known to laugh.
Therefore the king had proclaimed, that who-
ever should make her laugh, should receive her
as his wife. Hearing this, the young man took
his goose and went with his ridiculous train
before the princess. It had the desired effect;
when she saw the seven persons all following
the goose, and running one behind the other,
she began to laugh loudly, and the people
thought she would never stop.

Then the youth demanded his bride, but the
king was not pleased with sucha son-in-law, and
raised many objections, and finally said before
he could have his daughter, he must bring him
a man who could drink a cellarful of wine. He
remembered the little gray-headed man—he





THE GOLDEN GOOSE.

could probably help him now—so he went out
into the woods, and there on the very spot where
he had cut down the tree, saw a man sitting with
a very miserable face. ‘What is troubling you
that you look so sad?” he asked.

“ Alas! Iam so thirsty,” the man replied. “I
cannot endure cold water. I have already
drank a cask of wine, but what is a drop on a
hot stone?”

“ Oh, I can help you,” said the youth joyfully ;
“Come with me, you shall have all you want.”

He led him to the king’s cellar, and the man
drank and drank till his sides ached, but he
never ceased till the cellar was emptied.

Again the youth demanded his bride, but the
king was vexed that this fellow, whom every
one called a simpleton, should carry off his
daughter, and made a new condition that he
should first find a man who could eat a moun-
tain of bread. The simpleton thought a moment,
and then went out again to the woods. He
found a man sitting in the same place where he
had seen the other, buckling a belt around his
body, and making hideous faces.

“Tam so hungry,” he said. ‘I have eaten
a whole ovenful of bread, but what of that? My
stomach is so empty, I have to tighten my
belt, or I should die of hunger.”

‘LEE DEA TE

ONCE upon a time a cock and a hen went
nutting together, and it was agreed that which-
ever found a nut should divide with the other.
Soon the hen found a very large nut, but said
nothing about it, and tried to swallow it whole.
But the nut stuck in her throat, and fearing she
would choke to death, she screamed loudly to
the cock to bring her some water. The cock
ran as quickly as he could to a spring and said:
“ Spring, give me some water, or the hen lying
on the hill yonder, will choke to death from a
large nut she has swallowed.”

“Run first to the bride, and ask her to give

you a piece of red silk,” said the spring.
49

The stupid youth was delighted. ‘Get up
quickly, and go with me,” he cried; “I will
satisfy you.”

He took him to the king’s court-yard, where
all the flour in his kingdom had been brought,
and baked into one immense mountain of bread.
The man from the woods sat down before it,
and began to eat, and in one day the pile dis-
appeared.

A third time the youth asked for his bride,
but the king was not willing yet.

“Bring me a ship that can sail on land as
well as on water, and you shall have my daugh-
ter,” he said.

The youth went straight to the woods, and
there found the little old man with whom he
had divided his cake.

“Well,” said the man, “I have eaten and
drank for you, and now I will give you the ship,
because you were kind and merciful to me when
I was in want.”

He gave him the ship that would sail on land
as well as on water, and when the king saw it,
he could no longer refuse him his daughter. So
the marriage was celebrated, and the foolish
boy whom every one had laughed at, became a
prince, and on the death of the king, succeeded
to the throne.

OP EE ELEN:

The cock ran to the bride, and said: ‘“ Bride,
give me a piece of red silk, then the spring will
give me some water, and I can save the life of -
the hen, who is choking to death with a nut
stuck fast in her throat.” But the bride said:
“Run and bring me my wreath first, that hangs
on a willow.”

The cock ran and fetched the wreath, for
which the bride gave him the red silk, and the
spring in turn gave him the water. Quickly he
carried it to the hen, but too late, she lay on
her back quite dead. Then the cock in his
grief set up so loud acry that all the animals
and birds came and mourned with him. Six



THE DEATH OF THE HEN.

mice built a little wagon in which to carry the
hen to her grave, and when all was ready, they
harnessed themselves to it, and the cock got in
and drove.

On the way, they met a fox. ‘‘ Where are you
going, cock?” he asked.

“To bury my little hen,” was the reply.

“May I go with you?” asked the fox.

“Yes, but sitin the back part of the wagon,
or my little horses will not be able to draw
you.” said the cock.

After this the wolf, the bear, the deer, the
lion, and all the animals of the woods joined
the procession. They had not gone far before
they came to a brook.

‘ How shall we get across ?” asked the cock.

A straw lay on the bank, and said: ‘I will
throw myself across, and you can walk over
on me.”

The six mice passed first, but when they were
well over the water, the straw slipped, and they

all fell in and were drowned. Now their trouble
began anew. A live coal offered next to take
them over, but unluckily fire and water cannot
live together, and the minute the coal touched
the water, the fire went out, and it too came
to its end.

Then a stone took pity on their distress and
offered to roll into the brook and make a bridge
for them. It did so, and the cock took hold of
the wagon and drew it over himself. When he
had reached the other side with the dead hen,
he wished to bring the mourners over also, so he
went back for them, but just as he had almost
reached the bank, the wagon slipped from the
stone, and all who were in it fell into the water
and were drowned.

Now the cock was all alone with the dead
hen. He dug the grave, laid her in it, and raised
a mound over it. Then he seated himself by it,
and wept and mourned until he died—and this
was the end of the funeral party.

HANSEIZAND GRE EEE.

ONCE upon a time there lived near the borders
of a large forest a poor woodcutter with his wife
and two children—a boy named Hansel and
a girl named Grethel. They had little enough
to eat, and finally when a great famine came,
they could no longer earn their daily bread.

One night as the woodcutter lay awake think-
ing of their troubles, he sighed, and said: ‘‘ What
will become of us? How can we feed our chil-
dren when we cannot get food for ourselves
even.”

“JT know what we will do,” said his wife,
who was only the step-mother of the children.
“Early to-morrow morning we will take the
children out into the thickest part of the woods.
We will build them a fire, and give them our
only remaining piece of bread. Then we will
leave them and go to our work. They cannot
find the way home again, and we shall be freed
from them.”

‘No, wife,” said the man, “I cannot do that.
50

How could I have the heart to leave my chil-
dren alone in the woods where the wild beasts
would soon devour them.”

“Oh, what a fool!” she cried. “Then all
four of us must die of hunger. You may as
well plane the boards for our coffins at once,”
and she gave him no peace until he consented.
But his heart was full of pity and sorrow for
the poor children.

The two children, who were also too hungry
to sleep, heard what their step-mother had said
to their father.

Grethel cried bitterly and said to her brother:
‘“ Now we shall surely die.”

But Hansel said: ‘Hush! Grethel, do not
cry, I shall be able to help you.”

He waited until their parents were fast asleep,
then he got up, dressed himsclf, unfastened the
door, and slipped quietly out. The moon shone
brightly, and the white pebbles that lay in front
of the cottage. glittered like silver coins.





HANSEL AND GRETHEL.

Hansel stooped and picked up as
many of the pebbles as his pockets
would hold. Then he went back to
Grethel, and said: ‘‘Be comforted, dear
little sister, and sleep in peace. God
will not forsake us.” So saying, he
went back to bed and slept.

In the morning before the sun rose,
the step-mother came and woke the
two children, and said: ‘ Get up, you
lazy-bones, we must go into the forest
now and gather wood.” Giving each
a piece of bread, she said: ‘‘ Here is
something for your dinner. Do not eat
it before then, for you will get nothing
more.”

Grethel took the bread in her apron,
while Hansel carried the stones in his
pockets. Soon they were all on the
way to the forest. After they had
gone a little way, Hansel stopped and
looked back at the house. This he
did several times, till at last his father
said: ‘Hansel, what are you looking
at, that you lag behind so? Take care,
and don’t forget your legs.”

‘Oh, father!” replied the boy, ‘I
am looking at my white cat that sits
on the roof, and wants to say good-
bye to me.”

But his step-mother said: “ Foolish
boy! that is not your cat, but the sun
shining on the chimney.”

Hansel, however, had not been look-
ing at a cat, but had staid behind to
take a white pebble from his pocket
and drop it on the ground as they
walked along. When they reached
the middle of the forest, the father
said: ‘‘Come, children, gather some
wood now, and I will make you a fire,
so that you will not be cold.”

Hansel and Grethel gathered a pile
of twigs together, which the father
kindled. As the flames blazed up, the
step-mother said: ‘“ Lie down by the
Gre now and rest, children, while your

61

fa

A
i



‘HANSEL TOOK HIS LITTLE SISTER BY THE HAND.”



HANSEL AND GRETHEL.

father and I go into the forest and cut wood.
When we get ready to go home we will come
for you.”

Hansel and Grethel sat down by the fire, and
when noon came, ate their little piece of bread.
As long as they heard the sound of the axe,
they thought their father was near; but it was
not an axe they heard, but a limb that their
father had bound to a dead tree, so that it would
blow back and forth in the wind, and strike the
tree like an axe.

They sat by the fire a long time, till at last
their eyes became heavy, and they fell fast
asleep. When they awoke, it was dark night.
Grethel began to cry, and said: ‘“‘ How are we
to get out of the woods?”

But Hansel comforted her, saying: “Only
wait a little while until the moon rises, then we
shall find our way out.”

When the full moon had risen, Hansel took
his little sister by the hand, and followed the
white pebbles that glistened in the moonlight.
They travelled all night, and at break of day
reached their father’s house. They knocked at
the door. The old woman opened it, and when
she saw them, cried out: ‘‘ You wicked chil-
dren, what did you sleep so long in the woods
for? We thought you were never coming back
again.” But the father was overjoyed to see
them, for he had grieved to think he had left
them all alone in the forest.

Not long after this, want again stared them
in the face, and the children heard the step-
mother saying one night: ‘“‘ We shall soon have
nothing to eat; there is half a loaf of bread
yet, and then we are at the end of the rope. The
children must go away. We will take them
deeper into the woods this time, so that it will
be impossible for them to find their way out.
There is no other way for us to save ourselves.”

This made the father’s heart very sad, and he
thought: ‘It would be better to share the last
morsel with my children, and then die, than to
leave them in this way.”

But his wife would not listen to him, and
scolded and reproached him a long time. When

a person has once said A, he must also say B.
62

Because he had yielded the first time, he could
not refuse to do so the second.

The children had heard this conversation also,
and when the parents were asleep, Hansel rose
to go out and gather pebbles as he had done
before. But the step-mother had fastened the
door so securely, he could not get out. So he
went back and comforted little Grethel, telling
her not to cry, but go to sleep, and God would
surely help them.

Early in the morning the step-mother came
and pulled the children out of bed. Before they
went to the woods, she gave them each a piece
of bread for their dinners, smaller even than
she had given them before.

As they went along, Hansel, who had the
bread in his pocket, stopped every now and
then, and threw little crumbs along the path.

“Hansel,” said his father, “what are you
jooking around at? Keep in the path.”

“fam looking at my little dove, who sits on
the roof nodding good-bye to me,” answered
the boy.

‘“Simpleton,” said his step-mother, ‘there is
no dove there; it is the morning sun shining
upon the chimney.”

But Hansel still kept dropping the crumbs as
he went along. The step-mother led them far
into the woods where they had never been be-
fore in all their lives. Again the parents made
a large fire for the children, and the step-mother
said to them: ‘‘Sit here, children, and when
you are tired, you can lie down and sleep a
little. Weare going into the forest to cut wood,
and when we are ready to return, will come and
get you.”

When it was noon, Grethel divided her piece
of bread with Hansel, who had scattered his
along the way, and they ate their dinner.
Then they fell asleep. Evening came on, but
no one came for the poor children. When they
awoke, it was quite dark, and again Hansel
comforted his little sister, saying: ‘“ Wait a
little, Grethel, till the moon rises, then we can
see the bread-crumbs that I strewed along the
path, and we can find our way back to the
house.”



HANSEL AND GRETHEL.

When the moon rose, they got up, but they
could not see any bread-crumbs, for the thou-
sands of birds that fly about in the fields and
woods had picked them all up.

But Hansel cheered his sister saying: ‘“‘We
will soon find the path;” but they did not find
it. They walked all night, and all the next
day from morning until evening, but they did
not come out of the forest. They were very
hungry, for they had had
nothing to eat but a few &
berries that grew close to Nie
the ground. At last they
became so tired, their little
legs could go no farther,
and they lay down under
a tree and fell asleep.




It was now the third —~ EG SY » |
morning since they left OS! @, Es ;
their father’s house. They oN e ey?

started on their wanderings

once more, but they only

got deeper and deeper into the forest.
“Tf help does not come soon, we
shall die,” they thought. About noon
they saw a beautiful snow-white bird
sitting on a branch of a tree. It sang
so sweetly, they stopped to listen,
When it had finished its song, it spread
out its wings, and flew on before them.
They followed it until they saw it
alight on the roof of a little cottage.
What was the surprise of the children
on coming near to find that the house
was built entirely of bread, orna-
mented with cake, and that its win-
dows were of clear sugar.

‘“‘Let us stop here,” said Hansel,
‘“and have a splendid feast. I will
take a piece from the roof, and you can take a
piece from the window; how good it will taste!”

So Hansel reached up and broke a very little -

from the roof, while Grethel nibbled from one
of the window panes. Presently a soft voice
called out from the room:
‘*Nibble, nibble, like a mouse,
Who is nibbling at my house?”

53



ee pes
oUt,
a























“‘TT SPREAD OUT ITS WINGS AND FLEW ON BEFORE THEM.”

And the boy answered :

“The wind, the wind, so soft and mild!”
And the girl said:

“‘The wind, the wind, the heavenly child!”

The children kept on eating without a thought
that they were doing wrong. As the roof tasted
very nice to the hungry boy, he broke off a



HANSEL AND GRETHEL.

larger piece, and Grethel broke out a whole
round window-pane, and sitting down on the
door-step, they prepared to enjoy their feast.
But just then, the door of the cottage opened,
and avery old woman, leaning upon crutches,
came out. Hansel and Grethel were so fright-
ened that they dropped what they held in their
hands.

The old woman nodded her head, and said:
“Oh! you dear children, who has brought you
here? Come in and live with me, I will not
hurt you,” and taking both by the hand she drew
them into the cottage.
She gave them a good

sugar, milk, apples and
nuts. When they had fin-
ished, she led them to



wickedly to herself, and said: “I have them
now ; they shall not escape from me again.”
Early in the morning before the children were
awake, the old woman was up, and when she
looked at the two children as they lay quictly
sleeping, and saw their round rosy cheeks, she
muttered: ‘They will make a good bite for
me.” Then she seized Hansel with her rough
hand, and dragging him out into a little stall,
closed it with a grated door. He might scream
as much as he liked, it would not help him.
Then going back to Grethel, she shook her,






|
|









two beautiful white-curtained beds, where
they lay down and thought they were in
heaven. But the old woman was only
pretending to be friendly; she was a
wicked witch and hated children, and
had built the little cottage of bread and
cake purposely to entrap them. Whenever she
could catch a child, she killed it, and cooked
it, and ate it for her dinner—that was a feast-
day for her. Witches have red eyes and can-
not see very far, but, like animals, they have a
keen scent, and can tell when human beings are
near. So when Hansel and Grethel came near
her in their wanderings in the forest, she laughed
54

‘(SHE MUTTERED: ‘THEY WILL MAKE A GOOD BITE FOR ME.”

at ee

a”

and cried: ‘t Get up, lazy-bones, and get some
water and cook your brother something good.
I have put him out in the stall where I shalt
fatten him. When he gets fat I shall cat him.”
Grethel began to cry bitterly, but it was of no
use ; she had to do as the wicked witch told her.

The best of food was cooked for poor Hanscl,
but Grethel received nothing but crabs’ claws.





HANSEL AND GRETHEL.

Every morning the old woman crept out to the
stall and said: “Stick out your finger, Hansel,
that I may feel of it and see if you will soon be
fat.” But Hansel would reach out a little bone
instead, and as the witch could not see very
well, she thought it was his finger, and won-
dered why he did not get fatter.

When four weeks had passed, and Hansel did
not get any fatter, she became impatient, and
would not wait any longer.

‘“Heigh-ho! Grethel,” she called tothe maiden,
‘‘be quick and get some water. Hansel maybe
fat or lean, I shall kill him and cook him to-

: morrow.” How the pooc little

, . sister wept as she brought the

fi water. With the tears rolling
a















down her cheeks, she cried

= paras acd
9) SSE —

[== S cae :

ee = = oe



=—

THE DUCK CARRYING GRETHEL OVER THE WATER.

out: ‘ Dear God, help us! If we had only been
eaten by the wild beasts, then we should have
died together!”

“Save your prayers,” said the old woman,
“they won't help you.”

Grethel was ordered up early in the morning,
to kindle the fire, and hang over it the kettle of
water.

First we will bake,” she said ; ‘‘I have already
heated the oven, and kneaded the bread,” and
she pushed Grethel towards the oven in which
the fire was still burning fiercely.

“Creep in,” she cried, ‘‘and see if it is hot.
enough, and we will put the bread in right away.”

But Grethel knew what she wanted to do, and
said: ‘I do not know how to do it. How can
I creep in?”

“What a goose you are,” said the
old woman, ‘‘the door is large enough.
Look here, I can get in myself,” and
she crawled up and stuck her head in
the oven. A sudden thought came to
Grethel. She gave the old woman a
push and she fell into the
oven. Then she quickly
closed the iron door, and
drew the bolt. The old
woman howled horribly,
but Grethel ran away, leav-
ing the wicked witch to.
burn to death. She went.
straight to Hansel, and
opening the grated door,.
exclaimed joyfully : ““ Han-
sel we are free! the old
witch is dead!”

As quick as the door was:
opened, Hansel sprang out
like a bird from its cage.

They threw their arms
around each other’s necks,
and kissed each other, and
ran about for very joy.
As there was nothing to be afraid of, they went
into the witch’s house, and there in every cor-
ner stood chests of pearls and heaps of precious.
stones.



HANSEL AND GRETHEL.

“ These are much better than pebbles,” said
Hansel, as he filled his pockets.

“T will carry some home too,” said Grethel,
and she filled her little apron.

‘Now we must go,” said Hansel, ‘‘and get
out of this bewitched forest.”

They had been walking a couple of hours,
when they came to a large body of water.

“We cannot get across,” said Hansel; ‘‘I see
no bridge of any kind.”

‘There are no little boats either,” answered
Grethel. ‘“ But there is a white duck swimming
on the water, that I think will help us across if I
ask her.” So she cried:

‘* Little white duck, we are waiting for thee ;

Not a bridge nor a boat can one of us see;
Yet must we cross to the other side;
Little white duck on your back let us ride.”

The duck swam up to them, and Hansel seated
himself on her back, and wanted his sister to

’

sit behind him, but she said, ‘‘ No, that would
be too much for the duck. She must take one
of us at a time.”

The good little duck did so, and carried them
safely over. They went on their way very hap-
pily, and soon they came to a part of the woods
where they had been before. Everything grew
more and more familiar, till at last they came
in sight of their father’s house. Then they began
to run, and bursting into the room, threw their
arms around their father’s neck. The poor man
had not had one happy hour since he left his
children in the forest, and after he had lost
them, his wife died also.

Grethel shook out her apron and the pearls
and precious stones rolled all over the floor,
while Hansel drew handful after handful from
his pockets. Their sorrow and troubles were
now at an end, and they lived together in great
happiness.

SNOW-WHITE AND RED-ROSE.

A POOR widow once lived with her two
children in a lonely little cottage. In the
garden grew two rose-bushes, one red and the
other white, and because the children resembled
the roses they bore, she named one Snow-
White, and the other Red Rose.

They were as good children as ever lived,
always industrious and cheerful. But Snow-
White was quiet and gentle, while Red-Rose
loved to run about in the meadows looking for
flowers and butterflies. Snow-White preferred
to stay with her mother and help her in her
work, or. read to her if there was nothing else
todo. But the children loved each other dearly,
and whenever they went out, would walk hand
in hand. If one said: ‘We will never leave
each other,” the other would reply: ‘Never, so
long as we live,” and the mother always said
that what one had was divided with the other.

Often they went together to the woods to
gather berries, but no harm came to them: the

little hare ate a cabbage-leaf from their hands,
56

the deer grazed at their side, and the birds sat
on the branches near them and sang to them.
They met with no accident, and if night came
on before they left the woods, they had no fear,
but lay down on the moss and slept till morning.
Their mother knew they were safe, and she
also had no fears. Once when they had slept in
the woods all night, and the dawn of morning
had waked them, they saw a beautiful child
dressed in glistening garments sitting near their
bed. But as soon as they awoke, she arose,
looked at them kindly, but said nothing, and
disappeared into the forest. On looking around
them, they found they had slept near the edge
of a precipice, and that if they had gone twe
steps farther in the darkness, they would have
been dashed to pieces. When their mother heard
of this, she said the child must have been the
angel that watched over good children.
Snow-White and Red-Rose kept their mother’s
cottage so clean that it was a pleasure to look
at it. In the summer time, Red-Rose swept the



SNOW-WHITE AND RED-ROSE.

kitchen, and placed a fresh bouquet of roses by
her mother’s bedside every morning before she
was up; and in the winter, Snow-White made
the fire and hung the brass kettle on the hook,
where it shone like gold, so bright did the little
maid keep it scoured. In the evening, when
the snow fell, the mother would say: ‘Go and
bolt the door, Snow-white;” and then they
would all sit down by the fire, and the mother
would put on her spectacles and read from a
large book, while the two girls listened and
spun. Near them on the floor lay a little lamb,
while perched in one corner sat a white dove
with its head under its wing.

One evening as they were thus sitting to-
gether, some one knocked at the door as if he
were anxious to get in.

‘““Quick Red-Rose,” said the mother, “open
the door; it may be some traveller who is look-
ing for shelter.”

Red-Rose opened the door thinking to see a
poor man, but instead, she saw a big black bear
stretching his head towards the door. The
maiden screamed loudly, and jumped back;
the lamb gave a frightened bleat; the dove
flew wildly round the room, while little Snow-
White crept under her mother’s bed.

The bear began to talk and said: ‘Do not
be afraid, 1 will not hurt you. Iam half frozen
and only wish to warm myself a little by your

- fire.”

“You poor bear,” said the mother, “lie down
by the fire, but take care that you do not burn
your fur.” Then she called: ‘Snow-White,
Red-Rose, come here, the bear will not hurt
you.”

The children came out, and by degrees ap-
proached the bear, the lamb did the same, and
finally even the dove lost all fear of him. Then
the bear said: ‘“‘Get the broom, children, and
brush the snow from my fur.” They brought
the broom and brushed his fur till it was quite
clean, after which he stretched himself out com-
fortably before the fire.

In a short time they lost all fear of their
clumsy guest; they pulled his fur with both
hands, planted their feet on his back, pushed

57

him first one way and then another, and beat
him with a hazel-bush. If he growled they only
laughed, and when they were too rough with
him, he only said: ‘Spare my life, children.
Snow-White, Red-Rose, would you kill one who
loves you?”

When it was bed-time, and the children were
in bed, the mother said to the bear: “ You may
lie on the hearth all night, if you want to. You
will at least be protected from the cold and bad
weather.”

As soon as morning dawned, the children let
him out, and he trotted away over the snow to
the woods. But at a certain hour every evening,
he returned to the cottage, lay downonthe hearth,
and allowed the children to play with him a
little while. They became so accustomed to
his visits, that the door was never bolted until
their black friend had arrived.

One day in spring, when everything was green,
he said to Snow-White: “I must go away now,
and I shall not return all summer.”

‘‘Where are yougoing, dear bear?” she asked.

“‘T’must go to the woods,” he replied, “and
protect my treasures from the wicked dwarfs.
In the winter when the ground is frozen, they
have to remain below, but as soon as the sun
melts the frost, they work their way up, and steal
whatever they can find, and when once anything
is in their hands, it is not easy to get it again.”

Snow-White felt very sorry to part with the
bear. As she opened the door for him to pass
out, his fur caught on a hook, and a piece of
skin was torn off. Snow-White thought she
saw something glitter like gold under his skin,
but was not sure, for the bear trotted away very
quietly and was soon lost sight of among the
trees.

Some time after this, the mother sent the
children into the woods to gather brush-wood.
As they approached the forest, they saw that a
large tree had fallen down and that something
was springing up and down on one of the
branches, but they could not tell what it was.
When they came nearer, they saw a little dwarf
with a wrinkled face and a beard a yard long.
The end of his beard had caught in a cleft in



SNOW-WHITE AND RED-ROSE.

the tree, and the little fellow sprang about like
a puppy fastened to a string, and knew not how
to help himself.

He glared at the maidens with his fiery eyes,
and cried: ‘‘Why do you stand there? Can't
you come and help me?”

“What have you been doing, little man?”
asked Red-Rose.

“You stupid piece of curiosity!” he cried. “I
was trying to split some wood for our kitchen,
for if we used large pieces, such as you greedy
people do, the little morsels we cook would burn
up. I had driven in the wedge, and everything
was going on well, when suddenly it slipped
out, and the wood closed up so quickly that
my beautiful white beard caught, and I cannot
draw it out. Now stand there and laugh, you
smooth, milk-faced creatures! Whew! but how
ugly you are!”

The children tried to get his beard out, but
could not. Finaliy one of them said: ‘1 will
run and get some one to help us.”

“Stupid blockheads!” he snarled. ‘Who
wants any more people? you are two too many.
Can't you think of anything better?”

‘Do not be impatient,” said Snow-White ;
“T can help you,” and taking her scissors from
her pocket she cut off the end of his beard.
As soon as the dwarf felt himself free, he seized
a sack full of gold that had been hidden among
the roots of the tree, lifted it on his shoulders,
and growled; ‘‘Smooth-faced people! they
have cut off a piece of my beard. They will get
their pay for it.” Then he went away without
giving the children a glance.

One day Snow-White and Red-Rose went
to catch a mess of fish. As they came near the
brook, they saw something hopping towards the
water like a grasshopper. They ran towards it,
and saw it was the dwarf. ‘‘ Where are you
going?” asked Red-Rose. ‘Why do you wish
to jump into the water?”

‘Tam not such a fool as to wish to do that
he cried, ‘‘ but this fish is trying to pull me in.”

He had been sitting on the bank fishing, and
his beard had become entangled in the line, so

that when a large fish swallowed his bait, he
58

1»

had not the strength to draw it out, but, instead,
the fish was pulling him into the water. He
had clung to the rushes and grass, but it was
of no use, he was in great danger of losing his
life.
They held him back, and tried to get his beard
loose, but their efforts were uscless—beard and
string were in a dreadful tangle. There was
nothing to be done but to take out the scissors
and cut off another little piece of the beard.

The dwarf was ina great rage. ‘t You toad-
stools!” he cried. ‘Is that the way you dis-
figure faces? It was not enough that you cut it
once, now you must take away the best part of
it. I dare not show myself among my people
again. I wish you may have to run till your
shoe-soles come off for this.”

Then he drew a bag of pearls from the rushes,
and without another word, disappeared behind
a rock.

It happened one day that the mother sent
both the maidens to the village to buy needles,
thread, and ribbons.
through a meadow, on which, here and there,
great stones lay scattered, they saw a large bird
slowly flying in a circle over their heads. It
drew nearer and nearer the earth, till finally it
sank down by one of the stones. At the same
instant they heard a piercing scream, and run-
ning towards the bird, they saw that their old
friend, the dwarf, had been seized by the bird
and was about to be carried off. The kind-
hearted children held him firmly, and struggled
with the eagle until he let go his prize. As
soon as the dwarf had recovered from his fright,
he exclaimed in his sharp voice: ‘Could you
not have treated me a little more politely ? You
have pulled on my thin coat until it is hanging
in tatters on my back. Clumsy ragamuffins!
that’s what you are!” and without a word of
thanks, he picked up his bag of precious stones
and slipped into his den under the stone. The
maidens, who were used to his ingratitude,
thought nothing of it, but went on to the village
to make their purchases.

On their way home, as they were crossing
the meadow they came unexpectedly upon the,

The maidens came at just the right time.

As they walked along



SNOW-WHITE AND RED ROSE.

dwarf who, supposing that no one would pass
at that late hour, had come out of his den in
order that he might spread out his jewels. They
glittered and shone in the setting sun, and the
children stopped to gaze at the beautiful sight.

‘“What are you standing there gaping at?”
he cried, and his ashen-gray face became scarlet
with rage. He was about to continue his scold-
ing, when a loud growling was heard, and
a black bear rushed out of the woods. The
dwarf sprang up in fright, but he could not
reach his den, the bear was too near.

Then he cried piteously: ‘Dear bear, spare
me! I will give you all your treasures. See,
there are the precious stones! Spare my life;
of what use would such a poor little fellow be
to you, you would hardly feel me between your
teeth? Take those two wicked maidens, they
will make a tender morsel; they are as fat as
young quails—eat them instead of me!”

But the bear paid no attention to his words;
he struck him one blow with his great paw, and
he never moved again,

THE HARE AND

ONE beautiful Sunday morning in harvest-.

time when the buckwheat was in blossom, the
sun rose clear in the heavens, the morning-
wind blew warm over the fields, the larks sang
for joy, the honey-bees buzzed in the buck-
wheat, and along the country paths walked the
people on their way to church, all creatures
seemed full of joy, even the hedgehogs.

Mr. Hedgehog stood before his door with his
arms folded, humming a little song as sweetly
as any hedgehog ever sang on a Sunday
morning. As he was singing softly to himself,
it occurred to him that while his wife was washing
and dressing the children, he would takea walk
in the fields and see how his crops were coming
on. Thecrops really belonged to a farmer, but
as the fields lay near the hedgehog’s house, and
he was accustomed to feed his family in them,

he regarded them as his own.
59

When the maidens saw the bear, they started
to run away, but he called: Snow-White, Red-
Rose, do not be afraid of me; wait, and I wilt
go with you.”

They knew his voice and stopped, but when
he came up to them, the bearskin fell off, and
there stood before them a beautiful man, dressed
in gold-embroidered clothes.

“T am a king’s son,” he said. The wicked
dwarf bewitched me, stole my treasures, and
compelled me to run in the woods as a wild
bear till I should be set free by his death: but
now he has received his deserved reward.”

Not many years afterward Snow-White was
married to the prince, and Red-Rose to his
brother, and all the treasures the dwarf had
collected and hid in his den, were divided be-
tween them. The old mother came to live
with her daughters, and the rose-bushes were
also brought to the castle and planted before
the windows of the two sisters, where every
year they bore an abundance of beautiful rea
and white roses.

THE HEDGEHOG.

He had not gone far from the house, when he
met a hare, who was out on the same business,
namely, to look after his cabbages. He bade
him a friendly good morning, but the hare, whe
happened to be a distinguished gentleman among
his own kind, did not return the greeting, but
looking at the hedgehog scornfully, said : ‘How
is it that you are running about in the fields so
early in the morning ?”

“T am out taking a walk,” said the hedgehog.

“ Taking a walk!” laughed the hare. ‘‘I think
you might be putting those legs toa better use.”

The hedgehog was vexed at these words. He
could bear anything but having his legs laughed
at, for nature had given him very short ones.

“Perhaps you think your legs can travel faster
than mine,” he said to the hare.

‘Indeed I do,” was the reply.

“ That is best shown by trial,” said the hedge-



THE HARE AND THE HEDGEHOG,

hog; “I think if we were to run a race I should
pass you.”

“Hal! ha! ha! You with your short legs!”
said the hare. ‘‘As far as I am concerned, I

am willing to try it, ifit will give you any great -

pleasure. What shall the winner receive as a
prize?”

‘A gold sovereign and a bottle of wine.”

“Splendid!” said the hare. ‘‘ Let us start
at once.”

“No, no,” said the hedgehog, I am not in
such great haste. Iam not quite ready ; Iwould
like to go home first and get a little breakfast.
Within a half an hour I shall be back again
ready for the race.”

The hare was satisfed, and the hedgehog
“The hare is

”

went away thinking to himself:
very proud of his long legs, but I will beat him.
He thinks he is a distinguished gentleman, but
he is only a stupid fellow, and will not win the
prize.”

When he reached home he said to his wife:
“Wife, get ready quickly, I want you to gowith
me out into the fields.”

‘What are vou going to do?” she asked.

“T have wagered a gold sovereign and a bot-
tle of wine that I shall win a race with the hare.
You are to go with me and look on.”

* Oh, husband!” she cried, ‘are you crazy?
Have you lost your mind completely? How
can you, with your short leys, run a race with
a hare?”

* Hold your tongue, wife,” said the hedgehog,
that is my business. Do not meddle in a man’s
affairs, but get yourself ready at once and come
with me.”

What could a wife do with a hedgehog hus-
band? She must go with him whether she
wanted to go or not.

On the way he said toher. ‘“ Now pay atten-
tion to what I shall tell you. We will run the
race in these two deep furrows. The hare will
run in one and I inthe other. We will start
from the other end, and all you have to do is
to stay here at this end of the furrow, and when
the hare comes up on the other side, put up

60

your head and call out to him: ‘I am already
here.”

The hedgehog left his wife, and went up the
furrow to the appointed place where the hare
was waiting for him.

“Shall we start,’ called the hare.

“Certainly,” said the hedgehog. The hare
counted: ‘‘One, two, three, go!” and away he
went like a whirlwind. But the hedgehog took
only a few steps, then he turned and sat down
at the end of the furrow. When the hare reached
the other end of the furrow, the hedgehog’s wife
put up her head and said: “ lam already here.”
The hare was greatly astonished. for he thought
of course that it was the hedgehog himself who
called to him, so closely did they resemble
each other.

“There is something wrong here,” he thought,
but he cried: “We'll try again,” and away he
ran at the top of his speed, his long ears lying
flat on his back, while the hedgehog’s wife sat
still in her place. When he came to the’starting
place, the hedgehog called to him: ‘Iam
already here.”

The hare was beside himself with rage. ‘We
will try it again,” he screamed.

“With pleasure,” said the hedgehog, ‘‘as often
as you like.” The hare ran through the furrow
seventy-three times, but the hedgehog was
always before him. Every time he reached the
end, the hedgehog or his wife called: “I am
already here.”

But the seventy-fourth time, the race ended,
for the hare dropped dead in the middle of the
furrow. The hedgehog took the gold sovereign
and the bottle of wine, and calling his wife, they
went home greatly pleased that they had out-
witted the hare and won the prize, with so little
trouble.

The teaching of this story is, first, that no
one however distinguished he may think him-
self, should make fun of another, until he knows
what he is able to do; and, secondly, that when
one marries, he should choose a hedgehog, if he
be a hedgehog, for a wife, and one that looks
exactly like himself.



















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THE WITCH CLIMBING UP BY MEANS OF RAPUNZEL'S HAIR,

RAPUNZEL,

OR
THE MAID WITH THE GOLDEN HAIR.

THERE lived once a man and his wife who
wished very much for a little child. The back
window of their cottage looked out on a beau-
tiful garden, full of choice flowers and vegeta-
bles. But it was surrounded by a high wall,
and no one dared venture into it, for it be-
longed to a witch who possessed power so
great that all the world was afraid of her.

One day as the woman stood at the win-
dow looking down upon the garden, she saw
a bed of lettuce. It looked so fresh and
green, that she longed for some of it to eat.
This wish grew stronger every day, and as
she knew it was impossible for her to get
any, she became quite miserable over it, and
looked pale and thin. Her husband was
alarmed, and asked: ‘Dear wife, what is
the matter with you?”

‘‘ Alas!” she answered, “If I do not have
some of that lettuce growing behind the
house, I shall die.”

The husband who loved his wife dearly,
thought; ‘Before I-will let you die, I will
get the lettuce for you myself, cost what it
will.”

So that evening he climbed over the wall
into the witch’s garden, and gathered in
great haste a handful of lettuce, which he
brought to his wife. She immediately made
it into a salad, which she ate with great
relish. It tasted so good to her that she
could not forget it, and the next day the
desire for the lettuce returned three times
as strong, and she had no rest until her
husband once more climbed over the wall
into the witch’s garden. As he was return-
ing, he shrank back in great fright, for
standing before him, was the old witch. She
looked at him angrily, and said: ‘‘ How do
you dare to climb over into my garden, and
steal my lettuce like a thief? you shall pay
dearly for this.”



RAPUNZEL, OR THE MAID

“Alas!” replied the man, “let mercy go
before justice. Iam compelled to do this act.
My wife saw the lettuce from our window, and
wished so much for it, she would have died if I
had not gathered it for her.”

When the witch heard this, her anger died out,
and she said: ‘If what you have said to me is
true, you may take all the lettuce you like, but
I make one condition. If you ever have a little
child, you must give it to me. I will do well
by it, and care for it as its own mother would.”
In his anxiety to get away, the man promised
everything she asked. Weeks afterwards, when
a child was born to them, the witch appeared,
and naming it Rapunzel, she took it in her arms
and went away with it.

Rapunzel grew to be the most beautiful child
under the sun. When she was twelve years old,
the witch locked her in a tower in a forest. The
tower had neither steps nor doors, only a little
window in the top. When the witch wished to
get in, she would stand at the foot and call up
at the window: ‘‘ Rapunzel, Rapunzel, let down
your hair.” Rapunzel had beautiful long hair,
fine as spun gold. When she heard the voice
of the witch, she would unbind her hair, braid
it like a rope, and letting it fall from the win-
dow, which was twenty feet from the ground,
the old witch would mount up by it into the
tower.

Two years passed, and it happened, one day,
that a young prince was riding through the
forest, and came to the tower. As he was pass-
ing, he heard some one singing so sweetly that
he stopped and listened. It was Rapunzel, who
in her loneliness, passed away the time by sing-
ing. The prince tried to enter the tower, and
looked for a door, but none was to be found. He
went home, but the song still rang in his ears,
and every day he went out into the forest, and
listened.

Once when he stood behind a tree, he saw a
witch come to the tower, and heard her cry:
“ Rapunzel, Rapunzel, let down your hair.” And
immediately a long golden braid fell from the
window, and the witch climbed up.

“Is that the ladder by which one enters the
62

WITH THE GOLDEN HAIR.

tower? I will try my luck too,” said the prince.
So the next day, he placed himself under the
window, and cried: ‘Rapunzel, Rapunzel, let
down your hair.”

In a few moments her hair fell over the win-
dow-sill, and the prince mounted.

At first, Rapunzel was greatly frightened to
see a man enter the room, for she had never
seen one before. But the young prince talked
with her kindly, and told her how he had heard
her singing, and how his heart had been so
touched by her song that he could not rest until
he had seen her.

He succeeded in making Rapunzel forget her
fear, and when he asked if she would go with
him and be his wife, she thought how young
and beautiful he was, and laying her hand in
his, said:

“Yes, lam willing to go with you, but I do
not know how we can get out of here. Every
time you come, bring with you a skein of silk,
and I will weave it into a ladder, and when it
is finished, I will descend on it, and you shall
take me away on your horse.”

The prince agreed to this plan, and it was
further arranged that he should invariably make
his visits to the tower in the evening, as it was
the custom of the old witch always to come dur-
ing the day.

This went on for a long time, and Rapunzel
and the prince spent many happy hours together,
and their love for each other grew stronger and
stronger. They were so careful at first, that the
old witch noticed nothing to make her suspect
the truth, until Rapunzel, one day as she was
drawing her up, forgot herself, and said:

“How is it that you are so much heavier to
draw up than the young prince, who mounts in
a moment?”

“You wicked child!” cried the witch. “ What
are you saying? I thought I had hidden you
from all the world, and you have cheated me.”
And in her anger, she seized the girl's beautiful
hair in one hand and a pair of shears in the
other, and,—snip! snap! the beautiful braids
fell to the floor. Then she was so hard-hearted,
she took Rapunzel away from the tower to a



RAPUNZEL, OR THE MAID WITH THE GOLDEN HAIR.

desert, and left her there alone in her
sorrow and misery.

But this did not satisfy her. She
determined to make the prince feel
her vengeance as well.-

The same day on which she had
taken Rapunzel away, the witch took
the braids which she had cut off, and
fastened them firmly to the window-
sill. In the evening, when the prince
came, and cried: ‘‘ Rapunzel, Rapun-
zel, let down your hair,” she let the
golden braids fall from the window,
and the prince climbed up. What was
his surprise to see instead of his dear
Rapunzel, the old witch, blinking and
winking at him with her cruel eyes.

“Aha!” she said scornfully, “you
would like to take away your lovely
bride; but the beautiful bird has left
the nest, she will sing no more: the
cat carried her off, and will now scratch
your eyes out.”

The prince was beside himself with
grief when he heard these words, and
in his despair sprang from the win-
dow. He escaped with his life, but
the thorns in which he fell put out his
eyes. He wandered blindly through
the woods, eating nothing but roots
and berries, and mourning for his lost
bride. He wandered in this way sev-
eral years, till at last he came to the
desert where Rapunzel had lived in
great want and sorrow. As he drew
near the place, he heard a voice that
sounded familiar. He went towards
it; Rapunzel saw him, knew him, and
running to him, threw her arms around
his neck and wept. Two of her tears
fell on his eyes, and his sight immedi-
ately became clear, and he saw as
well as ever. He led her away to his
kingdom, where they were received
with great rejoicing, and lived long in
happiness and content.

63











































THE PRINCE FALLS AMONG THE THORNS,



THE PEASANT’S CLEVER DAUGHTER.

THERE once lived a peasant who was so poor
he had no land, only a little house and a very
clever daughter. One day the daughter said to
her father: “Let us ask the king for a little
piece of waste land.” When the king learned
of their poverty, he gave them an acre of good
land, which they at once prepared to sow with
seed. While they were turning up the earth,
they found a mortar of pure gold.

‘Since the king has been so good as to give
us the land, we should give him the mortar in
return,” said the father to the maiden.

But the clever girl was not willing, and
replied: ‘If we give him the mortar without
the pestle, he will make us work till we find the
pestle. Therefore we had better keep still.”

But the father would not listen to her; he
carried the mortar to the king, saying where he
had found it, and hoping he would accept it as
a token of their gratitude.

The king took it, and asked if he had not
found anything else. The peasant said he had
not, but the king said the pestle should have
been with the mortar. The peasant declared
he had not found it, but he might as well have
talked to the wind, the king ordered him to be
put into prison, there to remain until the pestle
should be brought.

When the servants carried him bread and
water, they heard him crying: ‘“‘ Alas! if I had
only listened to my daughter! If I had only
listened to my daughter!” and he would neither
eat nor drink.

The servants told the king of the prisoner’s
strange actions, and he ordered him brought
before him.

“Why do you cry: ‘Alas! if I had only
listened to my daughter!’ What did your
daughter say?” asked the king.

“She told me I ought not to take you the
mortar, for you would want the pestle also,”
said the peasant.

“Tf your daughter is so wise, I should like

to see her,” said the king.
64

So the maiden was sent for. When she arrived
the king said to her: “If you are so clever, I
would like to give you a riddle. If you solve it,
I will make you my wife.”

She said she was willing to try, so the king
gave the following riddle: ‘* Come to me neither
clothed nor unclothed, neither riding nor walk-
ing, neither in the road nor out of the road, and
I will marry you.”

She went home, took off all her clothes, and
wrapped herself in a fishing-net; then was she
neither clothed nor unclothed. She borrowed
an ass, tied the fishing-net to the tail, so that it
was obliged to partly drag and partly carry her ;
thus she neither drove, rode, nor walked.
Lastly, she made the ass walk in the wagon-rut,
so she was neither in the road nor out of it.

In this manner she arrived at the castle, and
when the king saw her, he declared the riddle
solved. The father was released from prison,
and his clever daughter became queen and
shared the honors and wealth of the kingdom.

Several years passed. One day when the king
was out on parade, it happened that several
peasants stopped with their wagons before the
castle. They were loaded with wood, and some
had oxen and some horses harnessed to them.
Now one of the horses had a little colt, which
suddenly ran away from its mother, and lay
down between two oxen. All the peasants came
together, and began to quarrel and even to
fight over the colt, the man who owned the
oxen claimed it was his, while the real owner
of the colt declared it belonged to him. The
king heard the noise and came to learn the
cause. Then it was agreed that he should de-
cide whom the colt belonged to. His decision
was, that where the colt was lying it should re-
main, so the owner of the oxen received what
did not belong to him, and the real owner went
home lamenting over the loss of the animal.

All at once the poor man thought of the
queen. He had heard she was very kind and
clever, and had once been a poor peasant her-



THE PEASANT’S CLEVER DAUGHTER.

self. So he went to her and begged her to help
him get his colt again,

“Ves, I will help you,” she said; ‘if you will
promise not to betray me. Early to-morrow
morning when the king is out walking, place
yourself in the middle of the street, and as he
passes throw out a fishing-net, and draw it in
as if you were fishing, and had a netful.” Then
she told him what to say when the king ques-
tioned him.

The next morning the peasant stood in the
dry street and acted as if fishing. When the king
saw him, he sent a servant to ask the foolish
man what he was doing.

“T am fishing,” was the reply.

“How can you fish where there is no water?”
asked the servant.

“T can fish in a dry place, just as easily as a
colt can belong to two oxen,” said the peasant.

The servant told the king what the man had
said, and he immediately sent for him.

“Who told youto say that?” he asked. “You
could not have thought of it yourself.”

But all the peasant would say was: ‘‘ Heaven
help me! The answer was my own.”

But the king was not convinced, and had him
taken away and beaten till he confessed that
the queen had helped him.

When the king reached home, he said to his
wife: ‘‘ Why have you been false to me? I will
not have you for my wife any longer. Your
time is over; go back where you came from
and live again in a peasant’s hut.” He would
allow her, however, to take with her as a parting
gift, one thing that she cared the most for.

She ordered a powerful sleeping-draught made,
and when she was ready to go, asked the king
to drink a parting-cup with her. He did so,
swallowing the whole mixture, while she only
took one swallow. In a short time, he had fallen
into a deep sleep. Then she ordered the ser-
vants to wrap him in a beautiful white linen
cloth, place him in a wagon, and drive him to
her old home. She had him laid on a little bed,
where he slept several days. When he awoke,
he cried out: ‘(Where am I?” and called for
his servants, but none came. Finally his wife
came to him and said: ‘‘ My dear husband, you
gave me permission to take with me that which
I cared the most for. What have I- dearer to
me in the world than yourself? and so I brought
you here with me.”

Tears were in the king’s eyes as he said:
“You are and ever shall be my own dear wife.”

They returned to the royal castle, and from
this time on, their happiness was unbroken.

THE DANCING SHOES.

A KING once had twelve daughters, one quite
as beautiful as another. They all slept together
in a large room where their beds stood near one
another, and every evening when they were
asleep, the king would come and close and bolt
the door himself. One morning as he went to
open it, he saw that their shoes had been danced
to pieces, and no one could explain how it had
happened as the maidens were securely locked
in their room the night before. So to solve the
mystery, the king had it proclaimed that who-
ever should discover where his daughters danced,
might choose one of them for his wife, and rule
the kingdom after his death. But if he did not

65

succeed after trying for three days and three
nights, his life should be forfeited.

First a young prince came, and offered to
undertake the task. He was well received, and
at evening was led to a room adjoining that of
the princesses. A bed was put up for him here,
and his door left open that the princesses might
not escape him if they came out by the door.

But the prince’s eyelids felt as heavy as lead,
and in a short time he was fast asleep. When
he awoke in the morning, all the maidens had
been to the dance, for their shoes stood there
with the soles full of holes. The second and
the third evenings passed in the same way, and



THE DANCING SHOES.

at the end of the time his head was cut off
without mercy. After this many others came
and offered to take their chance, but they all
met with the same fate.

It happened one day that a poor soldier who
had been badly wounded, and was therefore no
longer able to serve, was travelling towards the
city in which the king lived. An old woman
met him and asked where he was going.

“T do not know myself,” was the reply, and
then in a joking manner he added: ‘‘I had half
a mind totry to find out where the king’s daugh-
ters dance their shoes to pieces, and thus become
king.”

“That is not a difficult task,” said the old
woman; ‘‘you must not touch the wine that is
brought you in the evening, and must pretend
that you are sound asleep.”

Then she gave him a mantle, saying: “If
you will wear this, you will be invisible, and can
follow the twelve.”

When the soldier heard this, he became seri-
ously inclined to undertake the task. He took
courage and went before the king as a suitor.
He was as kindly received as the others had
been, and royal clothing was given him to wear.
When it was time to retire, he was led to the
ante-room, and before he slept, the eldest daugh-
ter brought him a glass of wine. But he had tied
a sponge under his chin, and, while he pretended
to drink it, poured it into that. Then he lay
down, and in a little while snored as if in a deep
sleep.

The twelve sisters heard him, and laughed,
while the eldest said: ‘There is another that
does not care for his life.”

Then they all rose from their beds, opened
closets and chests, and took out beautiful dresses.
They made their toilets before the glass, and
danced about for joy, thinking of the pleasure
that awaited them.

The youngest one only was sad, and said:
“T do not know how it is; you are so happy,
while I feel very sad, as if some trouble were
about to overtake us.”

‘You are a little goose,” said the oldest,” you

are always afraid. Have you forgotten how many
66

princes have perished on our account? And as
for that soldier I have given him such a sleeping
draught that the clown will not awake very soon.”

When they were all ready, they looked in at
the soldier, but he had his eyes closed and they
thought themselves perfectly safe. Then the
eldest one knocked on her bed, and it imme-
diately disappeared, leaving an opening in the
floor, through which they began to descend one
after the other, the eldest leading.

The soldier, who had seen everything, did not
delay long. He threw his mantle around him
and followed the youngest who came last. About
half way down he stepped on her dress. At
this, she was greatly frightened and screamed
out: “What is that?) Whois holding me by
the dress?”

“Don't be so silly,” cried the eldest, ‘it caught
on a nail.”

They went on till they came to the bottom
of the stairs where an avenue of trees stretched
before them, whose leaves were of silver.

“T must have a proof that I have really been
here,” thought the soldier, reaching up for a
branch. As he broke it off, a loud report sounded
among the trees.

“Everything is not right,” said the youngest.
“ Did you hear that report ?”

“That is a salute of joy because we have been
delivered from the princes,” said the eldest.

Soon they came to another avenue of trees
where all the leaves were of gold, and last toa
third whose leaves were pure diamonds. From
each of these he broke off a branch, causing
the youngest one to shriek with fright as she
heard the report.

They went on farther till they came to a
large lake on the shore of which were twelve
little boats. A handsome prince sat in each,
waiting for the maidens. Each took one into
his boat, and the soldier seated himself with
the youngest.

“T don’t know how it is that the boat is
so heavy to-day. I have to row with all my
strength to get it over the water,” said the
prince.”

“What can be the cause of it?” said the



THE DANCING SHOES.

maiden. ‘‘Perhaps it is the warm weather; I
feel almost overcome myself.”

On the opposite shore of the lake stood a
splendid castle, brilliantly illuminated, and from
the windows came sounds of music. Here was
the place where the princesses came to dance.
They rowed towards it, went in, and each prince
danced with his partner. The soldier danced
with them, but unseen, and when one of them
lifted a glass of wine to drink, he drank it before
it could reach the mouth. The youngest one
was greatly troubled over these things but the
eldest always silenced her. They danced until
three o'clock in the morning, when all the shoes
were completely worn out, and they were obliged
to stop.

The princes conducted them over the water,
bade them good-bye and promised to meet them
the next evening. In returning the soldier had
seated himself with the eldest that he might
reach home first. So on landing, he ran on
before her, ascended the steps, and when they
came tripping into their room, was in bed loudly
snoring. They heard him and said: “ From
him we are quite safe.”

They took off their beautiful dresses, put them
away, placed their worn-out shoes under the
bed, and were soon fast asleep.

dee eee el ie

ONCE there was a man who had lost his wife,
and a woman who had lost her husband, each
of whom had a daughter. The two children
knew each other, played together, and one day
went into the widow's house.

‘Listen to me,” said the widow to the man’s
daughter, “tell your father I should like to
marry him, and every morning you shall wash
in milk and drink wine, while my own daughter
shall wash in water and drink water.”

The girl went home and told her father all
the woman had said.

“What shall Ido?” said the man. ‘Marriage

ts a blessing, but it is also a torment.”
67

The next morning the soldier said nothing ;
he wished to see the wonderful sight again. He
went a second and a third time with the prin-
cesses, and they danced as before till their shoes
were full of holes. But the third night he brought
away with him a goblet that he might have
another proof to his story.

When the hour came for him to give his an-
swer, he took the three branches and the goblet
and went before the king.

“Where do my daughters spend the night
dancing ?” asked the king.

“With twelve princes in an underground
castle,” was the reply, and he held out the
branches and the goblet as proofs.

The king sent for his daughters and asked
them if the soldier had told the truth. When
they saw that they had been betrayed and lying
would not help them, they confessed everything.

“Which one will you have for a wife?” asked
the king.

‘As lam no longer young,” said the soldier,
“T will take the eldest one.”

They were married that day, and the king-
dom was promised the soldier on the death of
the king. As for the princes they were con-
demned to as many days’ punishment as they
had danced nights with the princesses.

MEN IN THE WOODS.

Finally, as he could not come to any decision,
he pulled off his boot, and said: ‘Take this
boot that has a hole in the sole, and carry it
into the garret; hang it on a large nail, and pour
water into it. If it holds water, I will marry
the woman, but ifthe water runs out, I will not.”

His daughter did as he told her, but the
water drew the hole together, and the boot
became full to the very top. The girl went and
told her father what had happened. He was not
satisfied until he had gone to the garret and seen
for himself. Then being assured that she had
spoken the truth, he went to see the widow, and
in a short time they were married.

~



THE THREE LITTLE MEN IN THE WOODS.

On the first morning, when the two girls
arose, there stood waiting for the husband’s
daughter, milk to wash in, and wine to drink,
while water for washing and water for drinking
were ready for the wife’s daughter. On the
second morning, water for washing and water
for drinking were waiting both girls. On the
third morning, water for washing and water for
drinking stood before the
husband’s daughter, while
milk for washing and wine
for drinking were waiting
the wife’s, and so it con-
tinued from this time on.

Za al a
PODS

The woman was a bitter enemy to ner step-
daughter, and every day tried to make her life
more unhappy. She was full of envy, because
her step-daughter was beautiful and lovely,
while her own was ugly and disagreeuble.

One cold day in winter, when the ground was
frozen hard, and the hills and valleys were cov-
ered with snow, the woman, having made a dress

of paper, called her step-daughter to her, and
68



= 7 a7 Qayytny

said: ‘Put on this dress, and go out into the
woods, and bring me a basketful of strawber-
ries. I have a great desire for some.”

‘Mercy onus!” exclaimed the maiden. Straw-
berries do not grow in the winter; the ground
is frozen, and everything is covered with snow!
And why must I wear this paper dress? It is
so cold out that it freezes one’s breath ; the wind







tet
|



|





THE THREE LITTLE MEN.

will blow right through it, and the briars will
tear it from my body.”

‘“How dare you contradict me?” said the
step-mother. ‘Get yourself ready to go, and
I do not want to see you back again, until you.
have your basket full of berries.”

She gave her a small piece of dry bread, tell-
ing her she could eat it during the day, and
thinking to herself: ‘Once out in this weather,
she will die of hunger and cold, and my eyes
will never see her again.”

The girl obeyed her, put on the paper dress,



THE THREE LITTLE MEN IN THE WOODS.
| |

and went out with the little basket. Far and
near there was nothing but snow, not a green
blade was to be seen. As she was walking in
the woods, she came to a little cottage, out of
which peeped three strange little men. She
nodded ‘ good day” to them, and knocked tim-
idly at the door. They bade her come in, and
she stepped in, and sat down on a bench by the
fire to warm herself. As she was eating the
piece of bread which she had brought with her,
the three little men said: ‘‘ Give us some of your
bread.”

“Willingly !” she replied, and gave them half.

“What are you doing in the woods in the
winter time in so thin a dress?” they asked.

“ Alas!” she replied, “I have been sent to
find a basketful of strawberries, and I cannot
return home until I take them with me.”

When she had eaten her bread, they gave her
a broom, and told her to go out and sweep the
snow from the back door. While she was out,
they talked among themselves what they should
give her because she was so pretty and good,
and had divided her bread with them.

“YT grant that she shall grow more beautiful
every day,” said the first.

“T grant that a piece of gold shall fall out of
her mouth every time she speaks a word,” said
the second.

“TI grant that a king shall choose her for his
bride,” said the third.

The maiden did what the little men had told
her, and swept the snow away from behind the
house. Then what do you think she found?
Strawberries | growing ripe and red under the
snow! She quickly filled her basket, then thank-
ing the little men, she bade them good-bye, and
ran home to take her step-mother that which
she had so much wished for.

As she entered the house, and said ‘ good
evening,” a piece of gold dropped from her
mouth and as she told them all that had hap-
pened in the woods, at every word she spoke,
a piece of gold fell, so that the whole floor was
covered.

“Just look, what pride!” cried the step-mother;

“see her throw away the money.” But her own
69



‘THEY GAVE HER A BROOM, AND TOLD HER TO GO OUT
AND SWEEP THE SNOW FROM THE BACK-DOOR.”



THE THREE LITTLE MEN IN THE WOODS.

daughter was envious, and she too
wanted to go out into the woods and
look for strawberries.

“No, my dear little daughter,” said
the mother ;” it is too cold, I cannot
let you freeze.”

But the spoilt child would give her
no peace until she consented. So her
mother dressed her in a warm fur
cloak, and gave her a lunch of bread
and butter and cake to eat on the
way. The girl went into the
forest, and came straight to
the little cottage. The three
little men peeped out, as be-
fore, but there was no greet-
ing for them. Without even
looking at them or knocking,
she stalked into the room, sat
down by the fire, and began
to eat her bread and butter
and cake.

“Give us some of that,” cried
the little men.

* T haven't enough for my-
self, how can I give any of it
away ?” was the reply.

When she had finished, they
said: ‘‘ Here is a broom, take
it and sweep the back-door clean.”

“ Indeed!” she cried, ‘‘I am not your servant.”

When she saw they were not going to give
her anything, she went out, thinking she might
find the strawberries.

Then the little men talked once more among
themselves: ‘‘ Because this maiden is so ugly,
and has so wicked and envious a heart, what
reward shall she have?” they asked.

“T grant that she shall grow uglier every
day,” said the first.

“T grant that at every word she speaks, a
toad shall hop out of her mouth,” said the second.

“] grant that she shall die an unhappy death,”
said the third.

As the maiden did not find any strawberries
outside, she went home cross and out of tem-

per. When she told her mother all that had
70















THROWING THE QUEEN FROM THE CASTLE WINDOW.

happened, instead of gold pieces, there sprang
out of her mouth a toad at each word she spoke,
at the sight of which every one fled from her ir
disgust.

This greatly vexed the step-mother, whose
only thought now was, how she might injure her
husband’s daughter, who grew more beautiful
every day.

At last one day she took out a kettle and
hung it over the fire to boil linen yarn. When
it had boiled, she hung it on the shoulders of
her step-daughter, and giving her an axe, told
her to cut a hole in the frozen river, and thor-
oughly rinse the yarn.

She obeyed, and went away to cut the hole
in the ice. While she was chopping, a beautiful
carriage drove by, in which was seated the
king. The king saw her, and ordered the car-



THE THREE LITTLE MEN IN THE WOODS.

riage to be stopped, and asked: ‘‘ Who are you
my child? and what are you doing there ?”

“Tama poor maiden,” she replied, ‘and am
washing yarn.”

The king felt sorry for her, and when he saw
how beautiful she was, said: ‘‘ Would you like
to ride with me?”

“Oh, yes! with all my heart,” she replied,
overjoyed at the thought of leaving her mother
and sister. So he took her into his carriage,
and drove away with her to his home. Not long
after this, there was a wedding at the castle, and
the bride was the good little maiden whom the
three little men in the woods had promised that
she should marry a king.

A year passed and the queen had a little son.
When the step-mother heard of the good fortune
that had befallen her step-daughter, she came
with her own daughter to the castle, as if they
wished to make a They entered the
queen’s room, and as no one was near to pre-
vent, one of them seized the queen by her head,
and the other by her feet, and lifting her from
the bed, threw her out the window into the river
that flowed past the castle. Then the ugly
daughter lay down in the queen’s place, and her
mother covered her over with the clothes, so
that only the top of her head could be seen.

When the king came in to speak to his wife,
the old woman cried: ‘‘ Hush! hush! she has
just fallen asleep, and must not be disturbed.”
The king thought nothing, and went away.

Early the next morning, he came in to see
the queen, and as he talked with her and
she answered him, toads sprang from her
mouth at every word, as pieces of gold, had
done before. The king inquired what had
caused so great a change. But the old
woman made light of it, and said that she
had slept too soundly.

That night the kitchen-boy saw something
swim through the stream like a duck, and
heard it call:

‘What does the king, once so happy and gay?

Is he sleeping or waking? Give answer I pray.

But no answer
was heard :

visit.

”

came. Again the voice

‘How fare my guests, as I float on the tide?”
Then the kitchen-boy answered:

‘They are all sleeping soundly, the young queen
beside.”

Once more the voice asked:

‘‘And how is my child? Do they watch o’er him
keep?”

And the boy answered:

‘‘ He lies in his cradle, safe, well, and asleep.”

Then a form like that of the young queen
came up from the water, and went into the cas-
tle. She took up the child, shook up the pil-
lows, and laying it down again, covered it over
carefully. She disappeared, and nothing was
seen but a duck swimming away on the river.
She came two nights in this manner. The third,
she said to the kitchen-boy: “ Go, and tell the
king to take his sword, and swing it over me
three times.”

The boy did as he was told. Three times
the king swung his sword over the ghostly form,
and then there stood before him the young
queen, as fresh and beautiful as ever.

The king was very happy, but he thought it
best to conceal the queen until the following
Sunday, when the child was to be christened.

After the child had been christened, the king
asked: “What punishment should a man re-

ceive who takes a person froma bed and throws
him into the water?”
‘‘He deserves nothing better,” said the old

id

pare

amit | /

‘NOTHING WAS SEEN BUT A DUCK SWIMMING Away.”



TTT |



THE TAILOR AND THE BEAR.

woman, ‘‘than to be put into a barrel, full of
sharp pointed nails, and rolled down a hill into
the water.”

“You have sentenced yourself,” said the

king. He ordered a barrel to be brought; the
old woman and her daughter were put into it;
the ends nailed up; and it was rolled downa
hill until it fell into the river.

THE TAILOR AND THE BEAR.

THERE once lived a princess who was very
proud and haughty. When suitors came, she
gave them a riddle to guess, and if they failed,
sent away with ridicule and scorn.
Finally it was announced that whoever suc-
ceeded in guessing the riddle should receive
the princess for his wife.

It happened at this time that three tailors met
in the town where the princess lived. The two
eldest, who had done very fine work, and had
succeeded well in their trade, when they heard
the report, were sure they could guess the rid-
dle. But the third one, who was a wild little
fellow and did not like work, wished to try his
luck also.

“Oh, stay at home,” said the two others:
“what could you do with your little under-
standing ?”

But he was not to be dissuaded from going,
saying that he had set his heart upon it, and
would go, and marching off as if the whole
world belonged to him.

So all three appeared before the princess and
said: ‘‘ We should like to hear the riddle. We
are without doubt, the only persons who can
guess it, for our understanding is so fine it can
be threaded through a needle.”

Then the princess said: ‘‘I have two kinds of
nair on my head; what color are they?”

“Tf that is all,” said the first, “I can tell you.
They are black and white like the cloth called
pepper and salt.”

“Wrong,” said the princess. ‘‘ The second
may answer.”

‘They are red and brown like my father’s
holiday-coat,” said the second.

‘“Wrong again,” she cried.

72

(4

they were

‘“*Now the third

may answer. I see by his looks that he knows
surely.”

The youngest one stepped boldly forward and
said: “ The princess has a golden and a silver
hair on her head, and those are the two colors.”

When the princess heard this, she turned very
pale, and almost fainted from fright, for the little
tailor had guessed the riddle, which she had
firmly believed no one in the world could solve.

But she took heart and said: ‘“ You have not
won me yet, there is one thing more you must
do. A bear lies in a stall below; you must
pass the night with him, and if in the morning
you are still alive, I will be your wife.”

Then she thought she was surely rid of the
tailor, for the bear spared no one that came
within reach of his paws. But the little tailor
was not at all frightened. On the contrary he
seemed greatly pleased, and said cheerfully:
“ Boldly ventured is half won.”

When evening came, he was taken down to
the bear, who, as soon as he entered, ruslied
upon him as if he would give him a warm
embrace.

“ Softly, softly!” said the tailor, “I will soon
make you quiet,” and he took some nuts from
his pocket, bit them open, and ate the kernels.
As soon as the bear saw them, he wanted
some. The tailor put his hand into his pocket
and drew out a handful of what appeared to be
nuts, but were really pebbles. The bear put
them in his mouth, but try as hard as he might,
he could not crack them.

“What a dumb-head I must be not to be able
to crack these nuts,” he thought. ‘My friend,”
said he, ‘‘ bite the nuts for me.”

“ What a fellow you are, to have sucha great



LHE TAILOR AND THE BEAR.

mouth and yet not be able to bite a little nut !”
Then the tailor took one of the stones, quickly
exchanged it for a nut, put it in his mouth, and
—crack ! it was in two.

“T must try once more,” said the bear.
“When I sce you do it, it seems as if I might
also.”

So the tailor handed him the stones again,
and he worked and bit with all his strength,
but, as you very well know, without success.

When he was tired of trying any longer, the
tailor took a violin from under his coat and
began to play. As soon as the bear heard the
music, he rose on his hind legs and began to
dance. When he had danced a while, he was
so pleased that he asked: ‘‘Is it very hard to
play on that fiddle?”

“ Mere child's play,” replied the tailor. ‘“ See,
T hold it with my left fingers, and draw the
bow with my right, and then merrily sounds
the music, hoop-sa-sa! viva-la-lera!”

“Then I must learn to fiddle, so I can dance
whenever I want to,” said the bear. ‘‘ What do
you think of it? Will you teach me?”

“Willingly,” said the tailor, “if that is pos-
sible. Let me see your paws. They are too
long; your nails must be cut off a little.”

So a vise was brought and the bear placed
his paws in it, and allowed the tailor to screw
them fast.

“Now wait until [ run and get the shears,”
said the cunning little fellow, and, leaving the
bear to growl as much as he liked, he lay down

in a corner on a bundle of straw and slept
quietly till morning.

When the princess heard the bear growling
in the night, she thought it was from joy over
the little tailor whom he was making a meal of.
So when she rose in the morning, she felt very
happy and light-hearted. But what was her
surprise on going down to the bear’s stall to
find the tailor as fresh and lively as a fish in
water. She could no longer make objections;
she had given her word, and the king ordereda
carriage at once to take the couple to the church
that they might be married.

They had no sooner entered the carriage
than the other tailors, who had wicked hearts
and envied their companion his good luck, set
the bear free from the vise, and allowed him to
follow the carriage. The princess soon heard
him snorting and growling, and cried out in
great fright; “ The bear is chasing us, and will
carry you off.”

But the tailor was ready for him. Standing
on his head he stuck his legs out of the window
and called: ‘‘Do you see that vise? If you
don't go away, you will find yourself in it again.”

The bear no sooner heard this, than he turned
around and ran off as fast as he could. The
tailor drove on with the princess to the church
where he made her his wife. They returned to
the castle and the wild little tailor and the
haughty princess lived as happy as meadow-
larks all their lives. Whoever doubts it, will
be fined a dollar.

THE WISHING GIFT.

THERE once lived a queen who had no chil-
dren. Every morning she went into the garden
and prayed God to send her either a son or a
daughter. One morning an angel came to her
and said: ‘Be happy; God will send you a
son, and he shall have the ‘wishing gift,’ and
whatever he wishes for shall be given him.”

The queen was very happy when she heard
this, and went and told the king the joyful mes-

9
0

sage. He was greatly pleased, and after a time,
when the child was born, their happiness seemed
complete.

Every morning the queen took the child to
the park, in which were many kinds of animals,
and gave him a bath in a beautiful clear fountain.
It happened one time, after she had given the
child his bath and he lay in her lap, that. the
queen fell asleep. An old cook who knew that



THE WISHING GIFT.

the child had the ‘ wishing-gift, came and stole
him away. He cut off a chicken’s head, and
dropped the blood upon the queen’s dress and
apron, then having hidden the child in a secret
place, ran and told the king that the queen had
let the wild animals carry off her child. When
the king saw the drops of blood, he believed the
cook, and was so full of rage he ordered a high
tower to be built, in which neither sun nor moon
could shine.

In this place the queen was to be imprisoned
for seven years without food or drink, and so
perish. But she did not die; God sent two white
daves that came twice a day during all the seven
years, and brought her food.

About this time the cook thought to himself:
“Tf the child has the ‘wishing-gift, and I remain
here, he may bring some misfortune upon me.”
So he left the king’s palace and went where the
child was concealed. He was now old enough
to talk, and the cook said to him: “ Wish for
a beautiful castle and garden, and all that will
make them complete.”

The child wished, and scarcely were the words
out of his mouth, when everything appeared that
he had wished for. After a while the cook said:
“You should not be alone ; wish for a beautiful
little playmate.” The king’s son wished, and a
little maiden more beautiful than an artist could
‘paint stood before him.

So the two children grew up together and
loved each other dearly, and the cook had an
important place in the household. But the
thought came to him one day that the prince
might wish some time to return to his father,
then great trouble would come upon him. So
he called the maiden to him one day and said:
‘* When the prince is asleep to-night, I wish you
to go to him, and thrust this knife into his heart.
You must bring me his heart and tongue or you
will lose your life.” So saying he left her.

But when the next morning came, the maiden
had not done as he told her. ‘“Howcan I take
the life of an innocent person who has never done
harm to any one?” she said.

“Tf you do not do this, it will cost you your
life,” said the cook.

74

The maiden went away and hada young deer
brought and killed. She took the heart and
tongue, laid them upon a plate, and when she
saw the old man coming, said to the prince:
“Lie down in your bed, and draw the cover over
you.”

The old cook entered: ‘Where are the heart
and tongue of the prince?” he asked.

The maiden handed him the plate, but the
young prince sprang up, saying: ‘ You old sin-
ner, Why did you wish to kill me? Now you
shall receive your punishment. You shall be-
come a black poodle-dog and wear a golden
chain around your neck; glowing coals shall be
your food until the flames come out of your
mouth.” It was no sooner said than the cook
was changed into a poodle-dog with a golden
chain about his neck. The servants were or-
dered to bring live coals for him to eat, and he
was obliged to eat them until the flames came
out of his mouth.

Not long after the king’s son thought of his
mother, and wondered whether she were still
living. So he said to the maiden:
like to return to my native land. Will you go
with me? Ifyou will, I will take good care of
you.” ‘Oh, no,” she replied; “the way is so
long; and what would I do in a strange land
where Iam not known?” So because she was
not willing to go, and yet did not wish to be
separated from him, he changed her into a pink,
and took her with him. Thus he set out for
his native land, the poodle-dog running along
with him.

When he came to the tower where his mother
was shut up, he wished to enter it; but it was
very high, and could be entered only from the
top. So he wished for a ladder, which was im-
mediately given him. He mounted it, and look-
ing down into the tower, called: ‘ Dearest
mother, are you living, or are you dead?”

‘‘T have just eaten, and am satisfied,” she re-
plied, thinking it was the dove she heard.

“Tam your dear son,” he called again, ‘‘whom
the wild animals stole from your lap; but Iam
still living, and will soon come to help you.”

Then he descended, and went to his father,

“T should



THE WISHING GIFT.

pretending he was a hunter, and wished to enter
his service. The king was willing to receive
him if he would promise to bring him game, for
they had not been able to find any in his king-
dom for years. The prince promised to bring
him all he could possibly use on the royal table.

Then he called the hunters together, and they
set out for the woods. Just outside the forest,
he had them form in a circle, leaving one end
open, then he began to wish. Immediately there
came rushing from the woods some two hundred
head of game, which ran into the circle, where
the hunters quickly shot them. Whenthey had
finished, there were sixty wagon loads to take
home to the king, and the royal table was spread
as it had not been in years.

The king was so pleased that he invited all
his court to dine with him the following day.
When they were assembled, he said to the hun—
ter: ‘‘As you were so successful, you shall sit
near me.”

“Pardon me, your majesty, but I am only a
poor hunter,” he answered.

But the king insisted, and he was obliged to
take the seat of honor. As he sat there, he
thought of his dear mother, and wished that one
of the king’s chief servants would ask after the
queen. And as he wished, so it was done,—the
marshal stepped forward and said: ‘Your royal
majesty, we are living and feasting in great hap-
piness, may I ask at this time how it fares with
the queen? Is she living, or is she dead ?”

But the king replied: ‘She allowed the wild
beasts to carry off my son; I wish to hear noth-
ing about her.’

Then the hunter rose and said: ‘ Most hon-
ored father, the queen is living, and I am her
son. The wild animals did not steal me away ;
but a wicked man, the cook, stole me from my
mother’s lap while she slept, and sprinkled the
blood of a chicken on her dress to deceive you,”
and pointing to the dog with the golden collar,

75

he said: ‘Here is the wicked man.” Then
he ordered burning coals to be brought, and the
dog was obliged to eat them before all the com-
pany till the flames came out ofhis mouth. The
hunter then asked the king if he would like to
see the cook restored to his proper form. The
king said he would, the hunter wished, and im-
mediately the cook stood before them, with
white apron on, and knife by his side. When
the king saw him, he was very angry, and
ordered him thrown into the deepest dungeon.

“And now, dear father,” said the hunter,
“would you like to see the maiden who has
cared for me so tenderly, and even saved my life
at the risk of her own?”

‘Oh, yes,” said the king, “I should be very
happy to see her.”

“Vou shall see her first as a beautiful flower,”
said the hunter, and he took the pink from his
pocket and stood it in a vase on the king’s table.
Every one admired it, and the king said he had
never seen so beautiful a flower.

“Now I will show you the maiden,” said the
hunter. He wished, and the flowers changed
to a maiden, more beautiful than any artist
could have painted.

The king sent two waiting maids and two at-
tendants to the tower to bring the queen to the
royal table. They led her in, but she could eat
nothing, and only said: ‘The dear God, who
has preserved me in the tower, will soon set me
free.” She lived three days and then died happy.
The two white doves that had fed her in the
tower, followed her to her grave, and when they
had buried her, hovered over it in the form of
two angels from heaven.

The old king was so grieved over the sad fate
of his wife, that he died soon after. The son
became king of the land and married the beau-
tiful maiden that he had brought with him as a
flower ; but whether they are living yet is not
known to you or me.



THE THREE SNAKE LEAVES.

ONCE there was a poor man who was unable
to support himself and his only son. So the son
said to him one day: ‘It is too hard work, dear
father, for you to earn bread for both of us.
Rather than be a burden to you, I will go out
into the world and earn my own living.”

So the father gave him his blessing, and took
leave of him with many tears.

At this time a great war was going on. The
youth enlisted, and marched to the battle-field.
He won his honors in his first battle. There was
great danger, the shot rattled round him like
rain, and his comrades fell on every side. Finally
their leader was slain, and the soldiers were
ready to take flight. Then the youth stepped
out, and calling loudly, ‘‘ Let none desert
his native land,” inspired them with new
courage. They followed him, as he
led an attack, and routed the enemy.
When the king heard the
news of the victory, and
that he had to thank
the brave youth alone

for it, he raised him to the highest rank in the
army, gave him great treasures, and made him
second to himself in the kingdom.

Now the king had a daughter who was very
beautiful, but odd and full of strange fancies.
She had made a vow never to marry any one
unless he would promise before their marriage,
that if she died first, he would be buried alive
with her.

“Tf he loves me with his whole heart, what
would his life be worth to him after lam dead 2”
And on the other hand, she
was willing to be buried with him, should he
die first.

she would say.










‘IT WENT BACK, AND QUICKLY RETURNED, BRINGING THREE GREEN LEAVES 1N ITS MOUTH.
76



THE THREE SNAKE LEAVES.

This strange vow had frightened away all
suitors, but the young soldier was so charmed
with her beauty, that he cared for nothing ex-
cept to obtain the consent of her father.

‘Do you know what you must promise?”
asked the king.

“TI must promise to be buried in the grave
with her, if I outlive her,” he replied. ‘ But
that has no terrors for me, my love is so great.”

At this, the king gave his consent, and the
marriage was celebrated with great pomp.

They had lived together in happiness and
contentment a long time, when the queen was
seized with a fatal illness. Remedies were sought
The physicians could not help her,
and she died. Not until she lay there dead, did
the young prince remember his promise. He
shuddered at the thought of being buried alive.
But there was no escape. The king had placed
a watch at every gate, that he might not escape
his fate. When the day came on which the
body should be laid in the royal vault, he was
led away with it, and the iron door was closed
and bolted.

Near the coffin stood a table, on which four
tapers, four loaves of bread, and four bottles of
wine had been placed. As soon as these came
to an end, he knew he must die. So each day
he ate the smallest morsel of bread, and drank
only a little sip of wine. Thus day by day he
sat in the tomb, with a heart full of pain and
sorrow, Waiting for death that he saw coming

in vain.

nearer every day.
One day, as he sat gazing before him, he saw
a snake crawl out of the corner towards the
dead body. Seizing his sword, he said: ‘‘ As
long as I live you shall not touch her,” and he
cut the snake in three pieces. In a little while
a second snake crawled out of the corner, but
seeing the other lie dead, cut in three pieces, it
went back, and quickly returned, bringing three
green leaves in its mouth. It then took the
three pieces of the snake, laid them together,
and placed a leaf on each of the wounds.
Immediately the parts became joined, the
snake moved and was once more alive, and the
two crawled hastily away together. But they
a7

left the leaves lying on the ground. The un- |
happy man, who had watched them in all they
had done, now thought that the leaves that had
the power to bring a snake to life, might restore
a human being. He picked up the three leaves,
and laid one on the mouth of his dead wife, and
the other two on her eyes. He had hardly done
this, when the blood began to circulate, and
tinge her pale cheeks, soon she breathed, then
opening her eyes, said: ‘Where am I?”

“ You are with me, dear wife,” he answered,
and he told her how she had died, and been re-
stored to life again.

Then he gave her bread and wine. As soon
as she was strong enough, she rose, and going
to the door, knocked and called until the guards
heard her. They quickly ran and told the king,
who came himself and opened the door, rejoic-
ing greatly to see them both alive and well.
But the young prince took the three snake-leaves
with him, and giving them in charge of a serv-
ant, said: ‘Preserve these carefully, and al-
ways keep them with you. Who knows in
what great need they may serve us again?”

But a great change had come over the
princess since she had been restored to life ; it
seemed as if all love for her husband had died
out of her heart. Some time after, the prince
wished to take a voyage over the sea, to visit
his old father. While they were aboard the
ship, the princess forgot the love and faithful-
ness of her husband, and how he had brought
her to life, and took a wicked fancy to the cap-
tain. One day, when the prince lay asleep, she
called the captain to her, and one of them tak-
ing the sleeper by his head, and the other by
his feet, they threw him into the sea.

After this shameful deed was done, she said
to him; ‘Now let us return home, and say
that he died on the voyage, and I will praise
you in such a manner to my father, that he will
consent to our marriage, and leave the crown
to you at his death.”

But the faithful servant who had charge of
the snake-leaves, had seen everything. Un-
noticed he had lowered a boat, and leaving the
traitors to themselves, went back to find his



THE THREE SNAKE LEAVES.

master. He soon discovered the body, and
drew it up into the boat. With the aid of the
snake-leaves, which he laid on his eyes and
mouth, the prince was soon restored to life.
Both of them rowed with all their strength,
and the little boat flew over the water so swiftly,
that they reached home before the others. The
old king wondered at seeing the young prince
alone, and asked what had happened. When
he heard of his daughter's wickedness, he said :
“T cannot believe she would do such a wicked
deed. But the truth will soon be brought to
light.”. Then he told both the prince and his
servant to hide themselves in a private room of
his, and let no one know of their arrival.
_ Soon the great ship came sailing home, and
the wicked princess appeared before her father
with a sad face. ‘Why have you returned
alone? Where is your husband ?” he asked.
‘‘Alas, dear father,” she replied, ‘‘my hus-

band was taken suddenly ill during the voyage,
and died. If it had not been for this good cap-
tain, who assisted me, and conducted me home,
I do not know what evil would have befallen
me. He was with me when my husband died,
and can tell you all about it.” Then the king
said: “IT will bring the dead to life,” and
opening the door of the private room, led out
the prince and his servant.

The Princess was thunder-struck. Talling
upon her knees, she begged for mercy. But
the king said: ‘IT have no mercy. Your hus-
band was ready to die with you, and restored
you to life, but you murdered him while he
slept, and you shall receive the reward you
deserve.

She and her companion were placed in a
leaky vessel and carried out to sea, where they
soon disappeared beneath the waves and were
seen no more.







































































































FATE OF THE GUILTY PRINCESS AND HER COMPANION,

78



THE -IMP IN; -EHE BOPELE-

THERE lived once a poor wood-cutter who

worked hard from early morning till late at —

night. After a long time he managed to lay by
a small sum. Calling his son to him one day,
he said: ‘‘ You are my only child, and I wish
the money that I have earned by the sweat of
my brow to be used for your education, that
when I am old, you may have some trade by
which you can support me.”

So the youth was sent to a high school, and
was so industrious and successful in his studies
that his teachers were greatly pleased with him.
When he had passed through two courses of
study, the father’s savings were exhausted and
he was obliged to return home.

“Alas!” said his father sadly, “I can give
you nothing more, for in these hard times I can
scarcely earn our daily bread.”

‘Dear father,” replied his son, ‘do not give
yourself any further trouble about me. What-
aver is God's will is for the best. I can adapt
nyself to circumstances.”

As the father prepared to go out into the
forest to cut some cord-wood, his son said: “I
will go with you and help you.”

“That will be too hard work for you,” said
the father ; “you are not accustomed to it, and
would soon tire out. Besides I have only one
axe, and no money to buy another with.”

“Go to your neighbor, and borrow one, until
I can earn one for myself,” said his son.

So the wood-cutter borrowed an axe of his
neighbor, and the next morning at break of
day, both father and son were on their way to
the woods. At noon the father proposed that
they rest while they ate their lunch, but the son
said: ‘You rest father; I am not tired, so I
will walk about a little and look for bird’s nests.”

Then the son took his bread in his hand, and
went joyfully away into the woods, peering
among the green branches for any nest he
could find. He ran hither and thither till
finally he came to an immense oak, that must
have been several hundred years old. As he
stood gazing at it, he thought he heard a voice.

79

He listened,.and heard in a smothered tone,
“Let me out! let me out!” He looked around,
but could find nothing, but it seemed as if the
voice came from the earth.

“Where are you?” he cried.

‘Tam hidden here at the root of the oak, let
me out! let me out” was the reply.

The scholar began digging and searching
about the roots. Finally in a little hole he
found a glass bottle. He held it up in the light,
and saw a creature springing up and down in it
that looked like a frog.

“Let me out! let me out!” it called more
loudly than ever, and the scholar, not suspect-
ing any evil, took out the stopper. The crea-
ture jumped out, and immediately began to
grow, and grew so rapidly that in a few minutes
he was half as big as the trunk of the oak.

“Do you know what your reward will be for
letting me out?” he cried in a fearful voice.

“No,” replied the scholar, not at all fright-
ened, ‘how should I know ?”

“Then I will tell you,” said the giant; ‘‘your
neck shall be broken.” ‘‘ You should have told
me that before,” said the scholar, ‘‘and I should
not have let you out. But I shall save my neck
yet; there are more people to be consulted in
this matter.”

- “People or no people,” said the giant, “you
shall receive your reward. Do you think I have
been shut up so long out of mercy? No, it was
for punishment. I am the mighty Mercury, and
he who sets me free must have his neck broken.”

“ Softly !” said the scholar, ‘‘do not be too
fast. First I must know if you are really this
great person. If you are, you may do with me
as you like. Could you enter the bottle again?”

“That would be a great feat!” said the
giant, full of scorn, and he immediately began
to shrink, until he was as little and thin as: be-
fore and crept through the same opening into
the bottle. Scarcely was he in, when the
scholar quickly put in the stopper, and threw

‘the bottle back to its old place under the oak.

As the scholar turned to go back to his



THE

father, the voice called to him most pitifully :
“Oh, please let me out, please let me out !”

“No, not a second time,” said the scholar.
“He who has threatened my life, shall not
escape when once I have caught him.”

“Tf you will let me out, I will give you riches
that will last your lifetime,” he pleaded.

“No,” said the scholar, ‘you would cheat
me as you did the first time.”

‘You are throwing away a fortune,” said the
bottle-imp. ‘I will do nothing to you, except
reward you richly.”

The scholar thought:
may keep his word, and do me no harm.”

So once more he took the stopper from the
bottle, and ina moment the giant stood before

“To will venture; he

him again.

‘Now you shall have your reward,” he said,
handing him a little rag that looked like a
plaster. © When you place one end of this on
a wound,” he continued, ‘it will heal at once ;
and if you place the other end on steel or iron,
it will change into silver.”

“T must try it first,” said the scholar, and
going to a tree, he cut a deep gash in it with his
axe. He rubbed the gash with one end of the
rag, and it closed at once.

“You have told me the truth,” he said, **and
now we can part.” The giant thanked him for
his freedom, and the scholar in turn thanked
the giant for his gift, and then went back to
join his father.

‘Where have you been?” asked his father.
“Why did you forget the work ?”

‘Have patience, father, I will soon make up
for it,” he said.

“Make up for it, indeed,” said his father
angrily, ‘that is not possible.”

“Now look, father, and I will cut down the
tree at one blow,” he said. He rubbed the plas-
ter on his axe, and struck a powerful blow on
the tree, but as the axe had been changed into
silver, the edge turned.

“Oh, look, father!” he cried, ‘‘ what a miser-
able axe you have given me; it is all twisted.”

The father was frightened, and said: ‘Alas!
what have you done?) Now I must pay for the

50

IMP IN THE BOTTLE.

axe. That is all the good I get from your help-
ing me.”

* Do not be angry,” said the son, ‘tT will pay
for it.”

“You stupid fellow!” he cried, ‘Show can you
pay for it? you have nothing except what I
give you. You have only book-learning in your
head, you know nothing about wood-cutting.”

In a little while the scholar said: “I cannot
work any longer, let us have a holiday evening.”

“What is that?” “Do you
think Iam going to sit with folded hands, be-
Go on home if you want to,

said his father.

cause you do?
but I will stay and work.”

“This is the first time ] have been in the
woods, and I do not know the way home alone,
please go with me,” he said.

Much against his will, the father consented
On the way he said to his son: ‘*Go
and sell the axe you spoiled. Get what you
can for it, and what is lacking I will supply, so

to go.

we can pay our neighbor.”

The son took the axe to a goldsmith, who
weighed it and said: “It is worth four hundred
dollars. I haven't so much cash by me.”

“Give me what you have,” said the scholar,
‘‘and what’s lacking, I will lend you.”

The goldsmith gave him three hundred dol-
lars, and there remained one hundred owing.
The scholar went home and told his father he
had the money, and asked how much the man
would want for his axe.

“ About a dollar,” said his father.

“Then pay him two dollars,” said the son,
‘that is just double. See I have money in
abundance,” and he handed his father a hundred
dollars, saying: “Take your comfort now, you
shall never want again.”

‘In heaven's name!” exclaimed the old man,
how did you come by this money ?”

The youth told his father what had happened
in the woods and how he had risked his life
for the fortune.

Afterwards, he went back to school and fin-
ished his education, and as he was able to heal
all wounds with his plaster, he became the most
celebrated doctor in the world.



ONE GOOD TURN DESERVES
ANOTHER.

MANY years ago, there lived a king who was
noted for his wisdom throughout all the land.

Nothing was unknown to him, and it seemed as

if the news of every secret act or word was
brought to him through the atr.

He had a strange custom, however. Every
day at noon, when the dinner had been removed,
and no one was present at the table, he had a
trusty servant bring on another dish. This was
always covered, and even the servant did not
know what it contained, for the king never
removed the cover, nor ate of the dish, until he
was quite alone.

This went on for a long time, until one day
the servant's curiosity got the better of him,
and as he carried the dish away from the table,
he took it to his own room. After carefully
locking the door, he lifted the cover, and saw
lying in the dish a white snake. At the sight
of it, he could not resist tasting it, so he cut off
a little piece and put it in his mouth. It had
scarcely touched his tongue, when he heard

gs of soft voices near his

strange whisperin
window.

He went and listened, and soon saw that it
was the sparrows, who were telling each other
all they had seen in the fields and woods. The
little piece of snake which he had eaten, had
given him the power to understand the speech
of animals.

Now it happened on this very day, that the
queen had lost her most costly ring, and as this
trusty servant had access to every part of the
palace, suspicion fell on him that he had stolen
it. The king ordered him into his presence,
and with angry words threatened to have him
tried and sentenced, if he did not find out before
to-morrow, who had committed the act. In
vain he declared his innocence; the king was
immovable.

In his distress and anxiety, he went down
into the court-yard. The ducks were sitting

near each other, quietly resting on the flowing
$1

z
ane
ane

a



THE SERVANT’S CURIOSITY GETS THE BETTER OF HIM.



ONE GOOD TURN DESERVES ANOTHER.

stream. They were pluming their feathers with
their smooth bills, and idly gossipping together.
Just now they were telling where they had been
that morning, and what they had found for
breakfast. Suddenly the servant heard one of
them say in a vexed tone:

“There is something heavy lying in my
stomach. In my haste this morning, I swal-
lowed a ring that lay under the queen’s window.”

The duck was immediately seized by the
neck, and carricd into the kitchen. “ Kill this
for dinner,” said the servant to the cook; ‘see
what a fat duck it is !”

“ Yes,” said the cook, as she lifted it, “it has
spared no trouble in cramming itself, and has
been ready for roasting some time.”

She cut off its head, and in dressing it, found
in its stomach the queen’s ring.
ant could easily prove his innocence to the
king, whose only wish when he heard the story,
was to repair the wrong he had done. He
promised to grant any favor the servant should
ask, and bestowed upon him the highest position
in his court.

But the servant declined all honors, and asked
only for a horse and some money, that he might
travel about for a little while.

His request was granted, and he set out on
his travels. One day as he was passing a pond,
he saw three fishes that had become caught in
the reeds, and were gasping for water. Although
people say that fishes are dumb, yet he dis-
tinctly heard their complaint that they must
‘die so miserably.

Having a kind heart, he got down from his
horse, and put the three fishes again into the
water. They splashed about for joy, and stick-
ing their heads out of the water, cried: ‘We
will often think of you, and some day you will
be rewarded for having saved us.”

He rode away, and in a little while, it seemed
as if he heard a voice from the sand beneath
his feet. He listened, and heard the complaint
of the ant-king :

“Tf these men with their awkward animals
would only keep away! There comes a stupid
horse, whose heavy hoofs will trample on my

people without mercy.”
82

Now the serv-

The rider turned his horse aside, and the ant-
king called to him: ‘We will remember you,
and reward you.”

The way now led through a forest. As he
rode along, he saw a father-crow and a mother-
crow throwing their children out of their nest.

“Away with you, you gallows-birds !” they
cried. ‘*We cannot feed you any longer ; you
are big enough to take care of yourselves.”

The poor little crows lay upon the ground,
flapping and beating their wings, and crying:
“We are helpless children. Now can we take
care of ourselves, when we cannot fly? There
is nothing left for us, but to die of hunger.”

The king’s servant felt sorry for them, and
getting down from his horse, drew his dagger,
and killed it, and left it for the young crows to
feed upon. They hopped towards it, crying :
“We will remember you, and reward you some
day.”

He must now use his legs. He travelled a
long way, until he came to a large town, where
streets were crowded with people making a

great noise. «A rider was going through the

town crying: The king’s daughter wishes a
husband, but the person who sues for her hand,
must perform a very difficult task, and if he
fails, he must forfeit his life.”

Many had attempted the task, but had failed,
and lost their lives. But when the king's serv-
ant saw the princess, he was so dazzled by her
beauty that he forgot the danger, and went before
the king and offered himself as a suitor.

He was at once conducted to the sea, anda
gold ring was thrown into the waters. The
king told him to fetch the ring from the bottom
of the sea, adding: ‘“ And if you return without
it, you shall be thrown back again, till you per-
ish in the waves.”

Every one pitied the beautiful youth, and
went sadly home, leaving him standing on the
sea-shore alone. While he was considering
what he ought to do, all at once he saw three
fishes swimming towards him, and they were
none other than the three whose lives he had
saved.

The middte one had a mussel in its mouth,



ONE GOOD TURN DESERVES ANOTHER.

which it laid at the young man’s feet. He
picked it up, opened it, and saw lying within,
the gold ring. Full of joy, he took it to the
king, expecting to receive the promised reward.

But the proud princess, learning that he was
not so well born as herself, refused him with
scorn, and said he must perform another task.
She went down into the garden, and taking ten
sacks of grain, scattered it over the grass, say-

‘ing: “ You must have this all picked up by
to-morrow morning before the sun rises, and
not one kernel must be wanting.”

The youth thought for a long time how it
were possible to do this task, but at last he gave
up, and sat waiting sadly for the first dawn of
day, when he should be conducted to his death.
But when the morning rays of the sun fell upon
tue garden, not a kernel of grain was to be
seen. It had all been gathered up, and the ten
sacks were standing together, full, with not a
kernel wanting.

The ant-king had come in the night with his
thousands of subjects, and the grateful little
insects had gathered up the grain, and put it
into the bags.

The princess herself came into the garden
the next morning, and saw with astonishment
that the task had been accomplished. But her

. proud heart would not yield yet.

“ You have done both of the tasks I required
of you, but you shall not become my husband
until you bring me an apple from the tree of
life.”

The youth did not know even where the tree
of life grew, but he set out, determined to walk
as far as his legs could carry him, but with lit-
tle hope of ever finding it. He had travelled
through three kingdoms, when, one evening, he
came to a forest, and being very tired, lay down
under a tree to sleep.

He heard a rustling in the branches, and
presently a golden apple fell into his hand.
Immediately three crows flew down to him, and
perching on his knee, said:

“We are the three young crows that you
saved from starving. When we were grown we

heard that you were looking for the golden
83







CHE SAW THREE FISHES SWIMMING TOWARDS HIM,”



Bel ALR S ASTON]

apple, so we flew over the sea, even to the end
of the world, where the tree of life stands, and
brought you the apple.”

Full of joy he returned home, and gave the
golden apple to the beautiful princess, who

BEAR

ONCE there was a young fellow who enlisted
as a soldier. He was very brave, and when the
shot fell like rain, was foremost in the battle.
AAs long as the war lasted, he was well provided
for, bue when peace was proclaimed, he re-
ceived his discharge, and was told by the
captain he might go where he liked.

As his parents were dead, and he had no
home, he went to his brothers and begged them
to give him shelter until the war broke out
again. But his brothers were hard-hearted, and
said: ‘* What do we want of you ?
do anything.

You cannot
Come, stir yourself, and see if
you cannot make your way through the world.”

Shouldering his gun, which was the only
thing he owned in the world, the soldier left
them, and wandered forth into the fields. He
saw a circle of trees, and going to them, he sat
down and thought over his fate. ‘tI have no
money,” he said to himself, “I know no other
trade than soldiering, and now that there is
peace, that is not needed. I see I must die of
hunger.”

Suddenly he heard a rustling sound, and
looking round, saw a strange man_ standing
before him, wearing a long green coat. He
would have looked very stately and grand but
for one thing—he had a hideous horse’s foot.

‘‘T know very well what you want,” he said
to the soldier. ‘‘ You shall have money and
possessions, as much as you can possibly use.
But first I must know if you are easily fright-
ened, for I cannot spend my money in vain.”

‘A soldier and fright! what have they to do
with each other?” said the soldier. ‘‘ You can

test me and see.”
84

now had no more excuses. They divided the
apple of life, and ate it together. Then her
heart was filled with love for him, and they
lived united in unbroken happiness to a good
old age.

SKIN.

“Very well,” answered the stranger. * Look
behind you.”

The soldier turned around and saw a large
bear, growling and coming towards him.
“Oho!” he cried, “I will tickle you on the
nose so that you will lose all desire for growl-
ing,” and taking aim at the bear’s snout, he
fired, and the bear moved no more.

“T see that you do not lack courage,” said
the stranger, ‘t but there is one other condition
that you must agree to.”

“Tf it will not affect my eternal happiness,”
said the soldier, ‘‘ I shall not be afraid of agree-
ing to anything.”

* You can judge for yourself,” replied Green-
coat. * For seven years, you must neither wash
yourself, nor comb your hair and beard, nor cut
your nails, nor say your prayers. Then I will
give you a cloak and a mantle which you must
wear during this time. If you die before the
seven years are up, you are mine, but if you
live, then you shall be free and rich for the rest
of your days.”

The soldier thought of his great poverty, and
how many times he had faced death without
fear, till finally he consented to the conditions.
Then the stranger took off the green coat and
handed it to the stranger, saying: ‘t Wear this,
and whenever you put your hand in the pocket,
you can take out a handful of gold.” Then he
took the skin from the bear, and said: ‘¢ This
shall be your mantle and your bed, you will
not be allowed to sleep in any other, and on
account of your dress, your name henceforth
shall be Bearskin.” So saying, the stranger
disappeared.



BEARSKIN.

The soldier put on the coat, and the first
thing put his hand into his pocket and found
the money was indeed a reality. Then he
threw the bearskin over his shoulders and went
out into the world. He was in good spirits and
denicd himself nothing that money could buy.
The first year passed quite pleasantly, but dur-
ing the second he began to look like a monster.
His hair and beard almost covered his face, his
nails were like long claws, and his face was so
dirty, that if any one had sown seed on it, it
must have grown. People that saw him, ran
away as fast as they could, but because he gave
much money to the poor, they prayed for him,
that he might live the seven years, and for the
same reason that he had plenty of money, he
was always able to find shelter.

In the fourth year, he came to an inn where
the landlord would not take him in, and even
refused to give him a place in his stables, fear-
ing he would frighten his horses. But when
Bearskin took out a handful of ducats, the land-
lord softened, and gave him a room in one of
the out-buildings, after he had promised that he
would not allow himself to be seen, as it might
give the inn a bad name.

In the evening as Bearskin sat alone in his
room, wishing from the bottom of his heart that
the seven years were ended, he heard a loud
crying in an adjoining room. As he hada kind
heart, he opened the door to learn the cause of
the distress. As he did so, he saw an old man
striking his hands over his head and crying
bitterly. Bearskin went towards him, but at
the sight of him the old man jumped up as if he
would run away. But when he heard a kind
human voice speaking friendly words to him, he
came back and told the soldier his troubles.
All his property was gone, and his daughters
must suffer want. He was so poor that he
could not pay the landlord, and would there-
fore be put into prison.

“Tf that is your only trouble, I can help you,
I have plenty of money,” said Bearskin, and
calling the landlord, he paid him what was
owing him and gave, besides, a purse full of

money to the old man.
85

The old man did not know how to show his
gratitude. ‘Come with me,” he said, ‘‘my
daughters are wonders of beauty, you may
choose one of them for a wife. When they
hear what you have done for me, they will not
refuse you. Perhaps you do look a little
strange, but they will soon put you to rights.”

Bearskin was pleased and went home with
the old man. When the oldest daughter saw
him, she was so shocked, she uttered a loud
cry and ran away. The second one stood still,
and looked him over from head to foot.

‘“How could I accept a man who does not
look like a human being? The shaved bear
that came here once, and tried to pass himself
off for a man, pleased me better than this one,
for he wore a soldier’s hat and white gloves.
lf the man were simply homely, I might get
used to him.”

But the youngest one said: ‘“ Dear father, he
must be a good man to have helped you in
your distress, and if you have promised him a
bride, you must keep your word.”

It was a shame that the soldier's face was
covered with hair and dirt or one could have
seen how his heart laughed for joy when he
heard these words. He took a ring from his
finger, broke it in two, gave half to her, and
kept half himself. On her half he wrote his
name, and on his own he wrote hers, and told
her to preserve the piece carefully.

“TJ must go away for three years,” he said.
“Tf I do not return, you will know I am dead,
and you will be free. Pray to God that my life
may be spared.” Then he went away.

The poor bride dressed herself in black, and
whenever she thought of her bridegroom, tears
came into her eyes. Both her sisters made her
an object of ridicule and scorn.

‘Vou must be very careful,” said the oldest
one; ‘when you give him your hand, that he
does not scratch you with his claws.”

“Take care, bears love sweet things, and if
he should be pleased with you, he might eat
you up,” said the second.

“You must always do as he wishes you to or
he will begin to growl,” continued the first.



BEARSKIN.

‘But what a lively time we shall have at the
wedding,” said the second, ‘bears are such
good dancers.”

But the bride said nothing and would not
allow her heart to be turned from her lover.

In the meantime, Bearskin travelled about in
the world from one place to another, giving
alms and doing good, and receiving in return
the prayers of the poor that his life might be
spared. Finally the last day of the seven years
came. He went to the meadow and seated
himself under the trees. He did not wait long
before the strange man appeared. He looked
at the soldier angrily, and throwing him his
old coat, asked for his green one back again.

“Not just yet,” replied Bearskin, “first you
must make me clean.” The man was obliged
to do this; he brought water, washed the
soldier, combed his hair and beard, and cut his
nails. Then he looked once more a brave
soldier, and even handsomer than before.

Then the stranger vanished, to Bearskin’s de-
light. He went to the nearest town, bought a
beautiful velvet suit, in which he dressed him-
self, seated himself in a carriage drawn by four
white horses, and drove to the house of his
bride. No one knew him, the father thought he
was some great general, and conducted him
into the room where his daughters were. He
was seated between the two oldest ones at the
table. They paid him every attention, gave him
the best wine and the choicest food, and thought
they had never seen a handsomer man. But

the youngest one sat opposite in her black dress,
with down-cast eyes, and did not utter a word.
When he asked the father for the hand of one
of his daughters, the two oldest ones jumped
up and ran to their room to put on their costliest
dresses, for they thought one of them of course
would be the chosen bride. When the stranger
was alone with his bride, he dropped his half of
the ring in a glass of wine and handed it across
the table to her. She took it, drank the wine, and
saw the half-ring in the bottom. Her heart beat
quickly as she held up the other half, which she
wore tied to a ribbon around her neck. The
two parts fitted together.

“Tam your promised bridegroom,” he said,
“whom you knew as Bearskin, but by the mercy
of heaven, I have been restored to my proper
form and once more made clean.” He went to
her and embraced and kissed her.

At this moment the two sisters entered in
full dress. When they saw that the handsome
stranger had.chosen their young sister, and
learned that he was no other than Bearskin, they
rushed out of the house full of rage and scorn,
and so great was their disappointment, one of
them drowned herself in the well, and the other
hung herself on a tree.

At evening some one knocked at the door.
The bridegroom opened it and there stood
Green-coat, looking perfectly satisfied.

“T gave up your soul, but I have now two
others,” he said, referring to the two sisters, and
then went away, and was seen no more. ~



THE STRAW, THE COAL, AND THE BEAN.

IN a little village, there lived a poor old
woman. One day she gathered a dish of beans,
which she wished to cook for dinner. So she
made a fire upon the hearth, and that it might
kindle more quickly, threw on a handful of
straw. As she was pouring the beans into the
pot, one of them dropped on the floor, and
rolled near a straw, and soon after this a glow-

ing coal popped from the fire, and fell near both.
86 :

Then the straw began to speak: ‘Good
friends, where did you come from ?”

“T had the good luck to spring from the fire,”
answered the coal. ‘If I had not had the
strength to tear myself away, my death was
certain, for I should have been burnt to ashes.”

The bean replied: ‘I also narrowly escaped
with a whole skin. Ifthe old woman had put

me in the kettle, I should have been cooked



THE STRAW, THE COAL, AND THE BEAN.

to pieces without mercy, like
the rest of my comrades.”

‘And I too!” exclaimed
the straw. ‘Would my fate
have beenany better? Allmy
brothers went up in the fire
and smoke; the old woman
seized sixty at one time, and
took away their lives. Hap-
pily I slipped through her
fingers.”

“What shall we do now?”
asked the coal.

“J think,” said the bean,
‘tas we have all been so for-
tunate as to escape death, we
had better keep together as
good friends, and _ before
another misfortune overtakes
us, leave this place, and travel
into a strange land.”

This pleased
the other two, and they all
set out at once on their trav-
els. They had not gone far
when they came to a little
stream, and as_ there
neither bridge nor boat, they
were at a loss to know how
they should get over. Finally
the straw said:

“J will throw myself across
the stream, and you can walk
over me as if I were a bridge.”

So the straw stretched him-
self from one bank to the
other, and the coal, who was
a hot headed youth, tripped
boldly out upon the newly-built bridge.
when he reached the middle, he became fright-
ened, stopped, and dared not move another
step. The straw began to burn, and breaking
in two pieces, fell into the stream. The coal
slid in.after him, hissing and steaming as he
struck the water, and he too gave up the ghost.

The bean, who had remained on the shore,

was so amused that she laughed so heartily her
87

proposition

Was



THE THREE COMPANIONS START FORTH ON THEIR TRAVELS.

But

sides burst. Her fate would have been no bet-
ter had it not been for a tailor who happened to
be resting near the little stream. He felt sorry
for the little bean when he saw her burst in two,
and taking out his needle and thread, sewed her
together. The bean thanked the tailor very
prettily for his kindness ; but as he had used
black thread to sew with, from that day to this,
every bean has a black mark on it.



Ties WVONDEREUL- CABBAGE,

ONE day a young hunter went out into the
His heart was light and merry, and he
walked along without any fear, whistling care-
lessly on a leaf. Suddenly he met an ugly old
woman, who spoke to him and said: ‘ Good-
day, dear hunter, Iam suffering from hunger
and thirst, please give me some money that I
may buy food.” The hunter felt sorry for the
old woman, and gave as much as he could
afford to help her. He was moving away, but
she caught hold of him, and said: ‘Listen to
what I say, dear hunter. Because you have
such a kind heart I will reward you. Go on for
a little way and you will come to a tree, in the
branches of which sit nine birds holding a
mantle in their claws and quarreling over it.
Shoot into their midst, and the mantle will fall,
and one of the birds will drop dead. Take
the mantle—it is a wishing mantle—and throw
it over your shoulders, and whatever place you
wish to be in, you have only to wish, and you
will find yourself there. Then take the heart
from the dead bird and swallow it, and every
morning on rising, you will find a gold piece

woods.

under your pillow.”

The hunter thanked the wise old woman, and
thought as he went away: ‘She has made me
fine promises, if they will only come to pass.”

But he had not gone more than a hundred
steps before he heard a great twittering and
fluttering among the branches. He looked up
and saw a number of birds fighting with their
bills and claws over a cloth. They screamed
and scratched and tore, as if each one were
determined to have the cloth for himself alone.

“This is strange,” said the hunter; ‘‘it has
happened just as the old woman said it would,”
and taking his gun from his shoulder, he fired
among them. Immediately the mantle fell and
one of the birds also. He did as the woman
had commanded him, cut open the bird, took
out the heart, and swallowed it. Then he threw
the mantle over his shoulders and went home.

The next morning, when he awoke, he re-

membered the promise, and wished to know if
88

it had come true.
lay a shining gold picce.
he found the same, and the next, and so on
every morning he continued to find one until

He lifted his pillow and there
The next morning

he had a great pile of gold pieces.

Finally he said: ‘*Of what use is
gold to me, if I always stay at home?
take it and go out into the world.”

He bade his parents good-bye, took his hunt-
ing-~bag and gun, and started on his travels.
One day as he came out of a thick woods he
saw before him a splendid castle. An old
woman and a beautiful young girl stood in one
of the windows looking out. The old woman

all this
I will

- Was a witch, and she said to the girl: ‘‘ Yonder

comes one from the woods who has a wonderful
gift. We must get it away from him, dearest
daughter ; it will be of greater use to us than to
him. He has a bird’s heart within him, and
every morning finds a gold piece under his pil-
low.” Then she told her how they must act,
and the part the maiden was to play, and lastly
she said with angry eyes: “If you do not obey
me, evil will come upon you.”

When the hunter came nearer and saw the
beautiful maiden, he said to himself: ‘I have
travelled a long distance and am tired ; I think
I will rest awhile at this splendid castle ; I have
money enough to pay for my entertainment.”
But it was the form he had seen in the window
that made him pause in his travels.

He was received in a friendly manner and
was very politely entertained. In a short time
he was deeply in love with the maiden and had
no wish but to do her bidding.

Then the old woman said to her daughter:
“Now we must have the bird’s heart ; he will
not miss it when it is taken from him.”

She prepared a drink for him and gave it to
her daughter, to hand to the hunter. She gave
it to him, saying: ‘“ Now, dearest, drink to
my health.” He could not refuse, so he took
the glass, and swallowed the mixture at one
draught. Instantly the bird’s heart sprang out
of his mouth and the maiden carried it away



THE WONDERFUL CABBAGE,

secretly and swallowed it, as the oid woman had
commanded her to do. The hunter found no
more gold pieces under his pillow ; they were
found instead under the maiden’s, but this gave
him no uneasiness, for he was so bewitched over
the girl, he cared only for her pleasure.

“We have the bird’s heart, now we must take
the wishing-mantle away from him,” said the
old woman.

“Oh, no! do not let us take that,” replied
the maiden, ‘‘for then all his wealth will be
This made her mother angry, and she
cried: ‘That mantle is a wonderful thing,
and is seldom found in this world. I must and
shall have it.” She struck the maiden, and then
added: ‘If you do not mind me, you will be
sorry for it.”

A short time after, she placed herself by the
window, as her mother had told her, and gazed
sadly out.

“ Why are you so sad ?” asked the hunter.

“ Alas! dear heart,” she replied, “far away
from here is a granite mountain covered with
precious stones, J long so much to go there,
that whenever I think of it, it makes me sad.
But how can one go there? Only the birds can
fly back and forth, but a human being can never
reach that mountain.”

“Ts that all you wish for ?” asked the hunter.
“T can soon take that trouble from your heart,”
and wrapping his mantle around them both, he
wished himself over on the granite mountain.
In an instant they were both sitting there, sur-
rounded on every side with precious stones.
What a joy it was to see them! After they had
gathered together some of the most beautiful
ones, a drowsiness came over the hunter, and
he said to the maiden: ‘I am so tired I cannot
take another step, let us sit down and rest a
little,’ and laying his head in her lap, he soon
fell asleep. Then she placed his head gently
on the ground, took the mantle from his shoul-
ders, fastened it on her own, gathered up the
precious stones, and wished herself home.

When the hunter awoke, and found that the
maiden had deceived him, his heart was filled

with pain and sorrow.
89

gone.”

‘“Alas” he cried “was there ever such un-
faithfulness as this!”

He knew not where to go nor what to do,
but as he sat there in despair, three giants, to
whom the mountain belonged, came striding
along. When he saw them he quickly stretched
himself out on the ground, as if he were in a
deep sleep. As the giants passed him, one of
them kicked him with his foot, and said: ‘‘What
earthworm is this ?”

“Step on him, and kill him,” said the second.
But the third one said scornfully: ‘He is not
worth the trouble. Let him live, he cannot stay
here, and if he climbs up higher, the clouds
will seize him, and carry him away.”

Then they left him, but the hunter had heard
all they said, and as soon as they were out of
sight, he rose, and climbed to the top of the
mountain. He sat there a little while, then a
great cloud swept over the mountain and car-
ried him away. He floated hither and thither
through the air, and finally sank down into a
garden full of cabbages and other vegetables.

“If I only had something to eat,” he said as
he got up and looked around him, “but there
is not an apple nor a pear or any kind of fruit
here, nothing but cabbages.”

He selected a fine large head of cabbage and ©
began to eat it, but he had not taken two mouth-
fuls before he felt a wonderful change come over
him. His arms were changed into legs, so that
now he had four instead of two, his head grew
large and thick, and his ears long. He saw to
his horror he had been turned into a donkey.
But as he was very hungry, he continued eat-
ing. By chance he tried another kind of cabbage,
which, as soon as he had tasted :t, turned him
back again to his former shape.

Then he lay down and slept, quite worn out
with weariness. When he awoke the next morn-
ing, he broke off a head of the bad and also
of the good cabbage.

“With these I shall be able to get my own
back again, and punish the unfaithful,” he said,
and hiding the two heads of cabbage under his
coat, he climbed over the wall and went away
to find the castle of his faithless bride. After



THE WONDERFUL CABBAGE.

wanaering about a couple of days, luckily he
found it again.

He stained his face and hands so that his own
mother would not have known him, and went
to the castle and asked for a night's lodging, say-
ing he was so tired he could not go any farther.

“Countryman, who are you, and what is your
business?” asked the witch.

“Tama kine’s messenger,” he replied. ‘I
was sent out to find the choicest cabbage that
grows in the world. I have been so lucky as to
find it, but the heat of the sun has been so
great, that the tender leaves are wilting, and I
am afraid I cannot take it any farther.”

When the old woman heard of the choice
cabbage, she wanted it and said: ‘Dear friend,
fet me try this wonderful cabbage.”

‘““Why should I not?” he replied.
two heads with me, and I will give you one,”
and he opened his coat and gave her the one
that would work evil.

But the witch suspected nothing wrong. Her
mouth watered so for the cabbage that she went
herself to the kitchen to prepare it. When it
was ready she could not wait till it was brought
to the table, but took off a couple of leaves and
put them in her mouth. She had scarcely swal-
lowed them, when her human form was gone,
and she ran out into the court-yard, a little
donkey. Just then the maid came, and seeing
the cabbage there, took it up to carry to the
table. On the way, she took off a couple of
leaves, ate them, and in an instant the dish fell,
and another donkey was running in the yard.

In the meantime, the hunter and the beautiful
maiden were sitting at the table waiting for the
cabbage to be brought them. As no one ap-
peared with it, the hunter thought: ‘It has
done its work,” and said aloud: ‘I will go my-
self to the kitchen and bring it.”

When he reached there, he saw the cabbage
on the floor and the two donkeys in the yard.

“Very good!” he said, ‘two have received
their reward,’ and picking up the remaining
leaves he laid them on the dish, and brought
them to the maiden. ‘I brought the costly

food myself,” he said, ‘‘that you might not have
90

‘*T have

to wait.” She ate of it, lost her beautiful form
and face and ran out to join the others.

The hunter washed the stains from his face
and hands, and then went out and said: ‘* Now
you shall receive your reward.”

He tied all three to a rope, and drove them
before him till they came to a mill. He knocked
on the window, and the miller put his head out
and asked what was wanted.

“T have three ugly animals here, that I do
not wish to keep any longer,” he said. “If you
will give them food and shelter until I come
for them, I will pay you what you ask.”

“Certainly,” said the miller, ‘‘ but how shall
I treat them ?”

The hunter replied: ‘The old one” (which
was the witch) ‘tis to be beaten three times a
day and fed once.” ‘The young one” (which
was the maid) “is to be beaten once and fed
three times ; but the youngest” (which was the
beautiful maiden) ‘is not to be beaten at all,
and fed thrée times.” He had not the heart to
have the one whom he had loved so dearly,
beaten like the others.

Having given these orders, he went back to
the castle, and found all that he was in need of.
A few days passed, and then the miller came
to him and said; ‘* The old donkey that you
commanded me to beat three times a day and
feed once, is dead. The others are alive and eat
three times a day, but they are so sad, that I
cannot have them around any longer.”

The hunter's heart was touched. He went to
the miller’s, and fed the donkeys some of the
good cabbage, and they were restored to their
natural shape. The maiden fell on her knees
before him and said; ‘‘ Alas, my lover, forgive
me the wrong I have done you, I did it against
my will, for my mother compelled me. Your
mantle hangs in a closet, and I will prepare a
drink that will give you the bird’s heart again.”

The hunter no longer thought of punishment,
and said: ‘You may keep them both; it is
all the same, for you shall now become my
faithful wife.”

Their marriage was celebrated and they lived
in great happiness till their death.



THE BRAVE LITTLE TAILOR,

ONE summer morning, a little tailor sat on
his table by the window, cheerfully plying his
Presently a peasant woman came
down the street, crying: ‘Good jam for sale!
Good jam for sale!”

“That is just what J want,” he thought, and

needle.










4

«
\}

.

<

Es o

THE LITTLE TAILOR AND THE

91



(
uy
NY os

oR SEVEN AT ONE STROKE.

putting his head out of the window, he called:
‘Here, up-stairs, my good woman! here is the
place to sell your goods !”

The woman carried her heavy basket up
three flights of stairs, and unpacked all the little
pots of jam. The tailor took up each one, held
it to the light, smelt of it, and finally said:
“This jam seems to be very good. Weigh me
out four half-ounces ; I would not mind if you
made it a quarter of a pound.” The woman,

who had hoped to make a good sale, gave him

what he asked for, and went away vexed and
grumbling.

“This jam will be a blessing to me!” cried
the tailor. “It will give me fresh
strength and energy,” and taking the
bread from the cup-board, he cut a
slice around the loaf, and spread it over
with jam. ‘That will not taste bad to
me,” he said; ‘‘but before I take a bite
of it, I will finish this vest.”

He laid the bread near him, and
stitched away, taking longer and longer
stitches in his joy and haste. In the
meantime, the flies that were sitting
on the wall, had been attracted by

GIANT.





THE BRAVE LITTLE TAILOR, OR SEVEN AT ONE STROKE.

the sweet smell of the jam, and were settling
down in swarms upon the bread.

‘Hey ! who invited you to come here!” said
the tailor, as he drove the unbidden guests
away. But the flies did not understand Eng-
lish, would not be driven off, and returned in
still greater numbers.

Suddenly the little tailor went head over
heels into the chimney-corner, saying ; ‘‘ Wait,
I will give it to you!” He pulled out an old
cloth, and struck at the flies without mercy.
When he lifted the cloth, he counted no less
than seven lying dead before him with out-
stretched legs.

“What a fellow Tam!” he said, admiring his
own bravery. ‘‘The whole town must hear of
this deed,” and he hastily cut out a belt, and
stitched on it in large letters, ‘‘Seven at one
stroke.”

“The town, indeed! why the whole world
shall hear of it!” and his heart fluttered for joy,
like a little lamb’s tail.

The little tailor fastened the belt around his
body, and went out into the world, for he
thought the workshop was too small a place
for so much bravery. Before leaving, he looked
around the house, to see whether there was
anything he could take with him. He found
nothing but an old cheese which he put into
his pocket. As he went out, he saw a bird en-
tangled in the bushes. This he caught and put
into his pocket also.

He now set out bravely on his journey, and
as he was lieht and nimble, felt no weariness.
The road led him up a mountain. When he
reached the highest point, there, quite at his
ease, sat a powerful giant looking around him.

Not at all frightened, the little tailor walked
up to him, and said: ‘Good day, comrade.
You have a fine position there, indeed, from
which to look out upon the world. I amon my
way to seek my fortune: would you like to go
with me?”

“You scamp! you miserable fellow!” said
the giant, looking scornfully at the tailor.

“That may be,” answered the tailor, and

unbuttoning his coat, he showed him the belt,
92

saying: “ You can read for yourself what kind
of a man I am.”

The giant read, ‘Seven at one stroke,” and
thinking it meant seven men whom he had
killed at one stroke, became more respectful
to the little man. But the giant wished to test
his strength, and taking a stone in his hand,
squeezed it until the water ran out.

“Do that,” said the giant, and I shall know
then that you are strong.”

“Ts that all?” said the little tailor, ‘that is
only play for me,” and seizing the soft cheese
he had in his pocket, he squeezed it until the
whey ran out of it. ‘Indeed, I think that was
a little better than you did,” he said.

The giant did not know what to say, and
could hardly believe it of the little man.

Then he picked up a stone, and threw it so
high in the air, that the eye could not follow
it. “There, you little whiffet, do that, if you
can,” he said.

“Well done!” said the tailor; “ but the stone
will fall again to the earth. I will throw one
that will not come back again,” and taking the
bird from his pocket, threw it into the air. The
bird, glad of its freedom, flew higher and higher
till it was lost to sight, and never returned.

“ How does that please you, comrade?” asked
the tailor.

“You throw very well,” was the reply. ‘But
come, let me see if you can lift as well as you
can throw.”

He led the little tailor toa mighty oak, that
had fallen to the ground, and said: “If you are
strong enough, help me carry this tree out of
the forest.”

“Willingly,” replied the tailor, “only you lift
the trunk on your shoulder, and I will carry the
branches with all their little twigs—that will be
the heaviest part.”

So the giant took the trunk of the tree on his
shoulder, and as he could not look around to
watch him, the little tailor seated himself among
the branches, and thus the giant had to carry
not only the whole tree, but the tailor besides.
The little fellow behind was very cheerful, and
whistled a merry tune, ‘There rode three



THE BRAVE LITTLE TAILOR, OR SEVEN AT ONE STROKE.

tailors out from the gate,” as if carrying a tree
were mere child’s play.

The giant dragged the heavy load a short
distance, and then stopped. ‘I shall let the
tree fall,” he cried, ‘‘do you hear ?”

The tailor sprang nimbly down, and seized
the branches with both arms, as if he had been
carrying them.

“You are such a big fellow, and yet cannot
carry this tree a little way,” he said.

They went on together. Soon they came to
a cherry tree. The giant seized the top where
the ripest fruit hung, and bending it down,
handed it to the tailor, telling him to help him-
self. But the little tailor was entirely too weak
to hold the tree down, and as he took hold of
it, it sprang back, jerking him high into the air.
As he dropped to the ground in safety, the
giant said: ‘‘What is the matter with you?
Haven't you strength enough to hold a little
switch like that?”

“Tt was not for lack of strength,” replied the.

tailor. ‘Do you think that would be anything
difficult for one who has killed seven at one
stroke? I sprang over the tree, because I saw
some hunters shooting in yonder thicket. You
do the same, if you can.”

The giant made the attempt, but could not
get over the tree, and remained sticking in the
branches. So once more the little tailor had
the best of him. Soon the giant said: ‘Since
you are so brave a fellow, come and spend the
night in our cave.”

The little tailor was ready, and followed him.
As he entered the cave, he saw several other
giants sitting by the fire, each holding a roasted
sheep in his hands, eating his supper. The
tailor looked around, and thought: ‘This is a
much bigger place than my workshop.” The
giant showed him a bed, and told him to lie
down and go to sleep. But the bed was en-
tirely too large for him, and he would not lie in
it, but instead, crept into a corner. At mid-
night, the giant rose, and thinking the tailor
was fast asleep, took an iron bar, and struck
the bed a blow so heavy that it broke in two.

“There, I think that has finished the little
93

grasshopper,” he said, and he went back to bed.
Early in the morning the giants went out into
the forest. They had quite forgotten the little
tailor, when suddenly he appeared before them,
as bold, and as merry as ever. ‘Now he will
strike us all dead at one blow,” they thought,
and greatly frightened they ran away as fast as
they could.

Rid of them, the little tailor followed his
nose, and travelled on, till he came to the
courtyard of a king’s palace. Feeling tired, he
lay down on the grass, and went to sleep.
While he lay there, the people came and looked
at him on every side. But when they read on
his belt, “Seven at one stroke,” they ex-
claimed: “Alas! what is this great warrior
doing here in a time of peace? He must be
some mighty hero!”

They went and told the king, who thought
what a powerful and useful man he would be in
case of a war, and sent one of his courtiers to
tell the soldier as soon as he awoke, that he
wished him to enlist in his service. The court-
ier remained standing by the sleeper until he
opened his eyes and stretched his limbs, then
he delivered his message.

“ That is just what I came here for,” the tailor
replied; “I am ready to enter the king’s service
at once.” Then he was received with great
honor, and a handsome house was given him to
live in.

But the soldiers were afraid of him, and
wished him a thousand miles away. ‘What
would become of us,” they said among them-
selves, ‘if we should quarrel with him, and he
struck at us? Seven would fall at every stroke.
We cannot stand against sucha man.” So they
decided they would go before the king in a
body and resign. ‘‘ We cannot remain near a
man, who can kill seven at one stroke,” they
said to the king. The king was grieved that
he must lose all his faithful servants on account
of one man, and wished he had never set eyes
on him. He would willingly have allowed him
to resign, but he did not dare mention it, for
fear such a powerful soldier might destroy his
whole kingdom, and seat himself on the throne.



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describe
'23031' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKLA' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
9905f025f22f861bcfb0bc032138dd88
d14bb26ef1db9dc7bbcaf9712bd8fba257545062
'2012-02-18T10:46:56-05:00'
describe
'6876088' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKLB' 'sip-files00003.tif'
cdf68d8b04e0dbf2e3748622138d60a4
5119bcfbffff05752b7aecceed4cfdd86935806d
'2012-02-18T10:37:21-05:00'
describe
'19329' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKLC' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
2acbb07bb763c176518992cf1ad20f1c
1e99fee86222879988132ce5c68ad47234c83e90
'2012-02-18T10:37:38-05:00'
describe
'871213' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKLD' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
2e1b7332613fdbafcd43a8bca223c485
a2d98de1c366ffab967d7a31cc6a7d50db6fff38
'2012-02-18T10:38:59-05:00'
describe
'178277' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKLE' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
7804efbf24d2efb279af8e11b8479ef2
46990c7e4396473918c1b8ae826308dcce952bdc
'2012-02-18T10:43:37-05:00'
describe
'67092' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKLF' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
6543828f0291c108ef82ff77c0828973
ed702191938068beeaf4e0ec7aefb18968a898f7
'2012-02-18T10:48:23-05:00'
describe
'20934044' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKLG' 'sip-files00006.tif'
f798b58a1fe6a7f311c90b2114671fa4
0f32d96ddf9839de5627f678f5e1664b6d1d8bb9
'2012-02-18T10:44:30-05:00'
describe
'36802' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKLH' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
e78c76009ea3d6d2554c7696de30775d
7a430532464d6c538f91741a791920e56924a6eb
'2012-02-18T10:44:20-05:00'
describe
'857306' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKLI' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
4c08ffbb0a27ce4381816da071847c25
5acac70a07229c88039b16b442192f4a1af58cb8
'2012-02-18T10:46:18-05:00'
describe
'91811' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKLJ' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
498d6a5d1db0cf852f324e4452cd3c95
3c61f230c2a4ad922fc99daa56b659c885c5b6cf
'2012-02-18T10:46:53-05:00'
describe
'3048' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKLK' 'sip-files00007.pro'
def002f9d30dbecbfa6b46a1793a5ddd
25a2138fb5728882705fb9e5c32b37f541badc06
'2012-02-18T10:45:31-05:00'
describe
'41195' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKLL' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
072b8726b5bcdb2ed740e18425b5cffb
6715913f8fe33d78f84368363fb82e3e7d8cbada
'2012-02-18T10:44:50-05:00'
describe
'6879188' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKLM' 'sip-files00007.tif'
eb6172dda360ba5587f090d9ded912c7
c16e7046602630c927a463a1135546fc07db408e
'2012-02-18T10:44:06-05:00'
describe
'128' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKLN' 'sip-files00007.txt'
08e1ebda6a05aaafe4b56fe70d200620
3d862bcc2f914cf25db3c84d93b5104db2b1e0ea
'2012-02-18T10:41:04-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'26791' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKLO' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
3e37fefc1f541770e33ee6a83407cfba
85a2dbb1f0175e7a0b0e225948cddd9fd346ad50
'2012-02-18T10:38:28-05:00'
describe
'857318' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKLP' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
ac94e2d1d5daafe3843d7e48fcaa51d0
5d2420082df689b3e7600bd3c5f10db8b31be73e
'2012-02-18T10:47:34-05:00'
describe
'112251' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKLQ' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
9e794cb9e619070d12740613b2b1a135
f044ad79f3a76bdc6cc7dcfc9b678f9b165be1e5
'2012-02-18T10:42:48-05:00'
describe
'35286' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKLR' 'sip-files00009.pro'
a6601072911ae283b3b80e11be35d14b
c46b78acb49bc10c5e439c96150ca0781024e8ad
'2012-02-18T10:42:47-05:00'
describe
'46757' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKLS' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
bf607464c026830741169ea59a4ab810
df2877e86c5b0b46f2a12e9a855d0bf737c92036
describe
'6879348' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKLT' 'sip-files00009.tif'
0237c0b7f9d7b1cb60603bb348e99646
3e45cf52a66ede130d290fc451f00759ff436c40
'2012-02-18T10:45:24-05:00'
describe
'1633' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKLU' 'sip-files00009.txt'
c3cabf351c04ec2d5d3a6234e52e9eb2
4c4b9de63e8a751bb23c504e2d984d4541ff4c3f
'2012-02-18T10:37:23-05:00'
describe
'27174' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKLV' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
0acb61e7b52d09ad858a00e10a34155e
55489b6609b0483061e47b6e49edefcd2b3b2776
'2012-02-18T10:47:22-05:00'
describe
'857248' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKLW' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
69404d592b92dad45179907b2ebb9722
c5c1a905ec4000fbbe14a04beb7539e0dd829dd1
'2012-02-18T10:40:06-05:00'
describe
'129895' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKLX' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
7256e243765701edb6640ed033743868
c65df983afa4afe8df7100ebd298a6d695561e27
'2012-02-18T10:45:35-05:00'
describe
'45181' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKLY' 'sip-files00010.pro'
3f35ebc2ecf6310bfeff6cd69c05bb19
c041dc1443d2349bc08c798a1236f79d411a0f2f
'2012-02-18T10:39:16-05:00'
describe
'53444' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKLZ' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
7949d84e838e610c18f127753bbf2de0
41312866c0254023c0651a0ff5c6bf49b6c12ffa
'2012-02-18T10:48:16-05:00'
describe
'6880176' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKMA' 'sip-files00010.tif'
8dbd234f858e40e1fe86b4ba94e19211
2aad301b1699cda6728aac2d84dc853c7b2dac5b
'2012-02-18T10:45:20-05:00'
describe
'2016' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKMB' 'sip-files00010.txt'
96876fc663fb3e47793a749dc52eadd7
9cbe5c5854d9bbf2fd0ba7f6d91506b0fdd8ad7f
'2012-02-18T10:39:54-05:00'
describe
'28939' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKMC' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
52e0bf97daf3b156023fc9acf4007dfd
f29498a2d40c38a8ee7a9cdf783c21b450a10455
'2012-02-18T10:37:54-05:00'
describe
'857319' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKMD' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
83668b1b422c9d457d8e76af62db5042
992ff6f251ece3c49d6f4dd1e6776fbd841d3bbe
'2012-02-18T10:40:03-05:00'
describe
'176947' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKME' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
e9f3b392a207f9d03c5dbc08f06134a5
ba3bebe17c6400b5a80f00a1af08662f21b52c21
'2012-02-18T10:39:03-05:00'
describe
'31404' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKMF' 'sip-files00011.pro'
86a0fff80fe2f0ac07365638249f08ae
f56c063c1f52968c97fc315ac3167030576500cc
'2012-02-18T10:45:49-05:00'
describe
'60915' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKMG' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
7a5d30ae23e4f1fa75d5a04330420bdb
d1ef2d73c5767834d749a372019a16337772c8af
'2012-02-18T10:47:36-05:00'
describe
'6881480' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKMH' 'sip-files00011.tif'
56730200581572bce178e03db3301b2e
ecc8c23fef7211b6c579498c2d5f6858fa05c814
'2012-02-18T10:37:07-05:00'
describe
'2417' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKMI' 'sip-files00011.txt'
7482a1130e8d8976292ecdc8bd833156
ff664771be80a403bf6f10ef29114cec686b4cc9
'2012-02-18T10:46:34-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'31729' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKMJ' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
750d1cab8b33541defbd0ec6fc7d8704
4650141e6884588800ca4e42f46768e7ce8bac07
'2012-02-18T10:45:57-05:00'
describe
'857310' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKMK' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
c1a24055174e3952811759419c970c5d
bff63e480d7505ebcfc7ced2f657e674e95c7b0a
'2012-02-18T10:48:48-05:00'
describe
'195645' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKML' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
1ad53d19ddb0d961d66f393699744d05
eda9bdb34c822b80e97efcb16fbefe919ccbdd8b
'2012-02-18T10:38:18-05:00'
describe
'106260' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKMM' 'sip-files00012.pro'
4d08ff4c5d7899a33eb4d0afd7468393
b660975df5fc79703586d26ad22c5bd2ef43c153
'2012-02-18T10:37:24-05:00'
describe
'64538' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKMN' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
4f8d9613c61291b7fcb81996b29558bd
946949185213df314e7e7ba2b2da5b75ce35c914
'2012-02-18T10:38:08-05:00'
describe
'6881332' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKMO' 'sip-files00012.tif'
8913e6b229a13385bdfbe055f3197578
27f3ab7e427956a51c512e2f13521e9856adbcde
'2012-02-18T10:37:46-05:00'
describe
'4179' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKMP' 'sip-files00012.txt'
5c0562ba7f7600032300440bf5cdee35
b56e783641986ffe2b6432a4320277aeb1b0185f
'2012-02-18T10:45:03-05:00'
describe
'31580' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKMQ' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
acbab9b7680095bbb592690192d79e99
d5335ab41829f9deeba100337ff5fa6793ba5e01
'2012-02-18T10:48:00-05:00'
describe
'857302' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKMR' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
053368f102cd0ff9a48e31fcd8d3c924
c3544935a7393accca2f5f0df00c75eca28c4f2d
'2012-02-18T10:48:20-05:00'
describe
'190006' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKMS' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
863aa17175343433549871d585936ddc
a86dd245e455770813cce0995baeb70895c5f1c3
'2012-02-18T10:49:51-05:00'
describe
'98536' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKMT' 'sip-files00013.pro'
e164edafa4341b62cfac60169629dab9
1f7d09d58a63584c27ddb3d2b68d8e6b693b2da9
'2012-02-18T10:42:42-05:00'
describe
'62593' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKMU' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
6dd86a40f5ed873f6a550509fe8ca1f6
596d6ba6eb20ab75ef521c4b9263a933e0323d9b
'2012-02-18T10:49:45-05:00'
describe
'6881044' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKMV' 'sip-files00013.tif'
c686238e7691b2865c3e2854afce1761
da0ce043c71172da83f1445d20583e86f04c9d2c
'2012-02-18T10:48:05-05:00'
describe
'3877' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKMW' 'sip-files00013.txt'
29edcc56cfaf218438ba0ff23df3bd7a
32ffc5b0cbd6f206158b2d29ec4ed9c2ba17a2f1
'2012-02-18T10:37:09-05:00'
describe
'31331' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKMX' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
c7772d96e25d949b162e919b5a4ce22b
c271dd5b3949402150de7c0bad6e7e72f58a55ec
'2012-02-18T10:46:45-05:00'
describe
'857261' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKMY' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
9cda00f360afa9861490732b10333e2f
505b993682ca87d5eefb94839037127d650bb2ca
'2012-02-18T10:37:52-05:00'
describe
'172690' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKMZ' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
8c51fb32612a13ffed286b6f27c223fa
afc89e3fe76676f4f616bbeabfeaa225bd5a8b73
'2012-02-18T10:44:27-05:00'
describe
'73767' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKNA' 'sip-files00014.pro'
9db550b784993fb305ece912f4777c0f
3c2785b5d07c1ef157b392f6ffd1adea4d6f98f0
'2012-02-18T10:48:24-05:00'
describe
'58659' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKNB' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
0c1d4acf2dbc888805365ee1559edcd0
b724419685be078396ced50394974e4c68da2be0
'2012-02-18T10:49:38-05:00'
describe
'6880784' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKNC' 'sip-files00014.tif'
552c5d5c691a12cd3d87f5a669061aa2
39e225beda9cc45a34244614e629650eb108d95b
'2012-02-18T10:44:52-05:00'
describe
'2932' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKND' 'sip-files00014.txt'
f30651d5ac4fac2d419292e58a15bcda
f762360c80adcae86959ed817ddd1df0dc18e1e8
'2012-02-18T10:46:22-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'30439' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKNE' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
6ef0932a714b455d6fae4117851b4c12
975a75f1faf29117de32b7f2b7bfd9d682c7d2be
'2012-02-18T10:48:50-05:00'
describe
'857210' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKNF' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
df01d0bbf5317e8d8e5f451e1938e926
ac18aa4d1911633800b7a6a08333be303ba5eb49
'2012-02-18T10:42:27-05:00'
describe
'172115' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKNG' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
8d3189b168a05ff8e18b4cf3c3d2c7e0
9a6d4a0ff9e82f4ef754320504e976f408eea325
'2012-02-18T10:37:08-05:00'
describe
'69603' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKNH' 'sip-files00015.pro'
59b2cb73d64a4a52edb1bf49a949b68c
7362d696b46bc6adcf7244e421752cf8cdaa2dcc
'2012-02-18T10:44:43-05:00'
describe
'59348' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKNI' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
f8dc5c35ad22f1ab1770119b0286e196
c56f75a88b0fa6ff7fe4ca97677aad70b3cf8d8c
'2012-02-18T10:47:04-05:00'
describe
'6881024' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKNJ' 'sip-files00015.tif'
8a873c55e8f714fa667fa2bc93296c21
b11fde885cbd6ebd011cb19be3bbfdbb5d635dd6
'2012-02-18T10:46:21-05:00'
describe
'2750' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKNK' 'sip-files00015.txt'
1aa57581c3d6f92b2e99d2a70a9c4010
6b8513933c5940d3b0b82b800dce66109709effc
describe
'30955' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKNL' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
97ab5aba93d28536da6400815da1612c
8266cbfb4773af0637ba7e2959ce43a09a20921a
describe
'857313' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKNM' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
5eb327cc3862c0a495f39c0e5ee9e7cd
63c13fef7ddfa21499cad27c766d7cc7c5e8090c
'2012-02-18T10:42:51-05:00'
describe
'176256' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKNN' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
7eb526402394cc90b1ced600b7c1cede
b01f5a18d2c90c3b06aae0dfb79d12161736e6aa
'2012-02-18T10:43:59-05:00'
describe
'44050' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKNO' 'sip-files00016.pro'
35fb2f9fb8632e578637dea06d2455c3
74db6d708540193d47ff934a66603ffbe5611da5
'2012-02-18T10:46:01-05:00'
describe
'59084' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKNP' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
a9e03e36b8cb8a032e0c3d945f9a3e8a
893c0aa077a03fd39d7db822f4fe14d2c98940dc
'2012-02-18T10:38:35-05:00'
describe
'6880944' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKNQ' 'sip-files00016.tif'
0476855efea98031b0a145c40c665863
3c16fb22e9c98756b5fb8d1c0eca04971b1f69fe
'2012-02-18T10:37:35-05:00'
describe
'1735' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKNR' 'sip-files00016.txt'
267ec25d058b66fcd241f938ffb9d551
37aab75d875b0497864d1a1a8b99cf2f24d103a6
'2012-02-18T10:42:02-05:00'
describe
'30850' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKNS' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
6964916723c0904174cf98bfdee550f2
17465b7cb2a38b0a97117a59c1a16c65b108a4c1
'2012-02-18T10:44:35-05:00'
describe
'857281' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKNT' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
5e44131f2df7636308a2c6c7f387a52b
bac5ccb99e277a6bccbe6d5bc9ee3b525d7bb945
'2012-02-18T10:47:27-05:00'
describe
'201507' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKNU' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
1ee5012310cd3c87a7223625b31f464f
ed2f918ddc2e7ff0cc5c1b22bb3e7cc888ca6938
'2012-02-18T10:43:21-05:00'
describe
'107330' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKNV' 'sip-files00017.pro'
14a2c50533f953dd78722b1b0b2a2d5a
08337ce7113553427adb29c0bacfcd72a8028aee
'2012-02-18T10:40:51-05:00'
describe
'65256' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKNW' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
d9a734d8ff488d139585d163090a05d5
cec158ea098abe1c96c8398f1ef79b8c873511a2
'2012-02-18T10:40:21-05:00'
describe
'6881560' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKNX' 'sip-files00017.tif'
9464133dcc559d971b5cfeb15ff8429b
72c2cd9ba4852d51243aa1822e6dfcf54e3cb0e8
'2012-02-18T10:47:10-05:00'
describe
'4200' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKNY' 'sip-files00017.txt'
6be7ed5ddfaa6092af2f71f6f593136e
5c773d6b156794778a16598a8685769df447ebe6
'2012-02-18T10:45:07-05:00'
describe
'31935' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKNZ' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
439ea2b2ad91e66cc1a99d3f6429aa93
07cb3ea398e1ae3a939f7526382f0ec2e8be929f
'2012-02-18T10:48:03-05:00'
describe
'894188' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKOA' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
1f9a4432434cc19a0f0348aa9e8a9605
266289f4dd911a79fd0cf70cf191b6d138a61b5f
'2012-02-18T10:38:25-05:00'
describe
'192534' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKOB' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
505335536e080f2d6a569b8a28ba72db
4549b21b208356fc0d67ed603f8abd8bfb3e1627
'2012-02-18T10:46:52-05:00'
describe
'34686' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKOC' 'sip-files00018.pro'
509085629e9e37341fc196bd59188c1f
efa1998a89e0443dd75d442ad220818d540ef670
'2012-02-18T10:46:26-05:00'
describe
'63897' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKOD' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
d5615c031fdbfd11e9d7b38314fd6ff9
bb483ed9bc2f7058022b76adc0e553715b64ef46
'2012-02-18T10:38:07-05:00'
describe
'7176988' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKOE' 'sip-files00018.tif'
647e250a35baabe3167cddd9c0b4ce40
fb5727794095af2311be6bf1a0af49b7994c2a5e
'2012-02-18T10:48:32-05:00'
describe
'1388' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKOF' 'sip-files00018.txt'
e81a842718cb591a755e41974458e5f1
49ab5124aa788ba535d1b03b32728f1954b8a7af
describe
Invalid character
'32681' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKOG' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
75629bf48f9381b37fd516490a6db8b9
0cd5e1ace24bb3e37991ed888151a100635e6a5d
'2012-02-18T10:39:32-05:00'
describe
'857315' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKOH' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
0f0b382a28513d053a53c2c51c1132f4
0c86ca341eceeaca9fa8eded4896a4b80d3401ca
'2012-02-18T10:42:50-05:00'
describe
'190885' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKOI' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
d067d2202300515c88e9247ebd027ce6
90a8e4c046e9af0cf01d2a363e262b42cff026b5
'2012-02-18T10:47:54-05:00'
describe
'99548' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKOJ' 'sip-files00019.pro'
013ff0ef0b35f05d4d9d9e2337553937
212a39e606e726c1a096de9a7e28d5e39b32fac7
'2012-02-18T10:43:50-05:00'
describe
'62196' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKOK' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
04b37624fdce50c3c10d3df403594984
0784428ed367a6e0a4ef57c16a42dce153a8be2c
'2012-02-18T10:47:55-05:00'
describe
'6881152' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKOL' 'sip-files00019.tif'
40fabfa45d4b417648540904e5a8fff8
51851ddb83baa5d15d0232bd30ad0e9b5337a0bc
'2012-02-18T10:47:23-05:00'
describe
'3907' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKOM' 'sip-files00019.txt'
1675ca839367bbb375ce67a19bc7676d
172621a8a71bc2a4e0cc409d2fb76d2ad0f67b65
'2012-02-18T10:46:37-05:00'
describe
'31359' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKON' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
f5b2e1267e6a664842711f72feda0bc2
9d65c188522a66bc1e40471d3cf9bfbf221c8b6c
'2012-02-18T10:49:58-05:00'
describe
'857205' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKOO' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
230558e8491c0ed5f1aa269e68d84dbd
36ce06314921e2706c6f4f54786f78564090bd91
'2012-02-18T10:40:15-05:00'
describe
'194881' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKOP' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
f504dfa6bd539857867a87a8a47a6001
c0fe3fec5bb6051fc975a7c324b52e6357638188
'2012-02-18T10:43:45-05:00'
describe
'102226' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKOQ' 'sip-files00020.pro'
4aeff700e10e913bc9c05d81b78ffa89
455b713105c795800887907949c247edaf81a32d
describe
'63688' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKOR' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
52b51d8ec1fce92b55142ee4cef426fe
1e40f0bceb8c0a4b24f885e4ce06e98da3744711
'2012-02-18T10:46:00-05:00'
describe
'6881144' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKOS' 'sip-files00020.tif'
a2d341acd00cd0eaad926c925887ba04
508a8d06febd3924c0cbe3526722d9a374a7c617
'2012-02-18T10:41:29-05:00'
describe
'3975' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKOT' 'sip-files00020.txt'
dfc6223c8270a7f554d36c7d03a3b25a
ace908dcf4f097c8a7b2a5b3a2ca52fd2ab29f09
'2012-02-18T10:37:18-05:00'
describe
'31628' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKOU' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
23dd20ca7343f080c6170e90b1c74567
a7fa3cbbb86ac05b30fac8c6d82880d9a93597ae
'2012-02-18T10:38:13-05:00'
describe
'857199' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKOV' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
940796db360da0c5f3150af26a87aca4
d2917bf875eab7c23075d6a3e67403e0546566f8
'2012-02-18T10:49:13-05:00'
describe
'200677' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKOW' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
e4bf4f3fbe6744feb19962d1b8203632
d85b83f2aefed04c8ae715ec431a8976d731a787
'2012-02-18T10:44:34-05:00'
describe
'104044' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKOX' 'sip-files00021.pro'
aac2edf9b230a421cfdf454cd0d000b8
c41a45fd0a3b653f41b6c0083f4e07fe6c33aed9
'2012-02-18T10:41:25-05:00'
describe
'66022' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKOY' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
0cd9cad3545bdd470818f815e032965e
448c63a4df3f5edc853b40094b98e19bc5c2fbbd
'2012-02-18T10:39:51-05:00'
describe
'6881608' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKOZ' 'sip-files00021.tif'
e7124c9d9863e1f9922534879e25f6e0
61e4e1d02cde2e61377da88fcc0a1cad48bfedb0
'2012-02-18T10:47:06-05:00'
describe
'4099' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKPA' 'sip-files00021.txt'
469535c4f550409e752c0051775789ac
fdb54b4f4fba0c1c42b5af17552ee2fe71e77056
'2012-02-18T10:42:35-05:00'
describe
'32510' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKPB' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
5fcbddaf130fa13f3df3e1a1c6da4d0b
daa85446d5eb2393b58dde7d6ae4f13a4671d6a5
'2012-02-18T10:42:17-05:00'
describe
'857247' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKPC' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
b65204003f0aa40ed3c364b1b511490c
a7639ef3ad4045b0dda1b57c4c2eca5561e34880
'2012-02-18T10:43:48-05:00'
describe
'188351' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKPD' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
3d8badc01c474ab15fc64ce61679fca9
c6093a4dc5e163968c84c7c2362432992c719d14
'2012-02-18T10:37:56-05:00'
describe
'36793' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKPE' 'sip-files00022.pro'
558c893ef9fdf5528d255f2044989966
4d57faed112f00274e1779b7d0a055ec75840eb3
describe
'62947' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKPF' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
f7ac7bb070495401d7c7215c8f97070c
f86f2884e8454514f1cab719968e6696f38c1556
'2012-02-18T10:39:40-05:00'
describe
'6881852' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKPG' 'sip-files00022.tif'
b53bc2798ef5d0fcd307957275c62345
84b6679a026362f19ce3b48414b6a85fbe891358
'2012-02-18T10:37:31-05:00'
describe
'2666' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKPH' 'sip-files00022.txt'
b99e73350137a123d0cc531e4893a144
2658f3156551d9455eda4e3d1946a6945e8a092f
describe
'32758' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKPI' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
4a674c913e340f51768005a22dbe9d52
218f011fa52d069fb064b0b00d0ced421da2c96c
'2012-02-18T10:37:20-05:00'
describe
'857260' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKPJ' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
bb7867cbcadf078f33088cb4d0fe251e
d1dff0a9bf4cdbe977f206f3fad7f7afb179a290
describe
'194815' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKPK' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
b0fc00d7c6b1308a5805055e9a7d3514
e62b550f9885db7a7356f7d631bf4a863da2e8cb
'2012-02-18T10:45:28-05:00'
describe
'102549' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKPL' 'sip-files00023.pro'
bddabf9eb9d7cfd6e3561b60156e10a5
6ac4a2f762bb4c7a46c4c1ece1d24605217d13da
'2012-02-18T10:42:53-05:00'
describe
'63810' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKPM' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
5a997a4e2d87df6dedef205bb8f03ff8
d112736ca68121bc502d66cf5a5d082aed772013
'2012-02-18T10:44:19-05:00'
describe
'6881184' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKPN' 'sip-files00023.tif'
17d0b57a13ac9bb0ff76f833ddc90101
8502ea961493e40b2a9c77c72fab3737831823b6
'2012-02-18T10:42:37-05:00'
describe
'4254' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKPO' 'sip-files00023.txt'
426637e56ff615ad0dc57471d64ab3d5
29f1b516f91d9b1dd7d25f33ffb7ceb4db8b0936
'2012-02-18T10:49:44-05:00'
describe
'31643' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKPP' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
ac2f71c2f5c046d263bea0500ccd0e85
3e73cb83b1ebc066b5136531d4b44db6ea389468
'2012-02-18T10:40:16-05:00'
describe
'857312' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKPQ' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
0cff65822b9644149a560aa3084acb00
0f31985410299595bd7aff08aded5824a2cadbea
'2012-02-18T10:49:05-05:00'
describe
'197499' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKPR' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
0299e6735d6ae64ed107dd0be09209dc
0e5dd2d6fe3b259afae734581a215f6739a774b1
'2012-02-18T10:44:38-05:00'
describe
'105775' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKPS' 'sip-files00024.pro'
68dfdd655bc57850af8504551e551c21
6fbfa890be9ed68a65eecd3257a46287afb4bdab
'2012-02-18T10:43:49-05:00'
describe
'64892' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKPT' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
f4c1352ff010446fafd068d877889f86
0e413b79bc51e50bb3698a55aeea50b5bfb74f14
describe
'6881288' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKPU' 'sip-files00024.tif'
2e7da1b1da562473d76613d8251272db
4a9aaeb43ccdaf364bbfe8f99fc1a466c06f37de
'2012-02-18T10:46:42-05:00'
describe
'4147' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKPV' 'sip-files00024.txt'
3b22043ef10d92b6ff45563b5c3cd276
c2f44f52bb363375751faa1d97d02d10a685e89f
'2012-02-18T10:37:06-05:00'
describe
'31744' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKPW' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
3f3498198c750ae4ec318cf5981f4eaf
71010235e4a4bbff27b0e13370182e1350bbd74a
'2012-02-18T10:44:02-05:00'
describe
'844035' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKPX' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
a285f059cdc9abc81a55341f3d83f96b
dd307c99082048b308fda02c33825580e43b893c
'2012-02-18T10:43:11-05:00'
describe
'165232' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKPY' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
194e3d68baf0be09a2ffb3d7b183020c
c2fa668da4c2740d253c469ed17e0d6f5576ee2a
describe
'40771' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKPZ' 'sip-files00025.pro'
e5c4b4055dd1da3d7fecf919a6384d2b
6bff40629bf9e4be14f4b8a9c297179ad7178562
'2012-02-18T10:49:48-05:00'
describe
'57769' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKQA' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
08f6f8ea254f1546645a34410b20c565
3d50adc23d2d77d639e890a045e2de277ca0076d
'2012-02-18T10:46:25-05:00'
describe
'6774780' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKQB' 'sip-files00025.tif'
58465c4c1afa0af1b9f26c9a3fbb31d1
cf43965febdebc62d819031e8b59b35adfe2aac4
'2012-02-18T10:41:24-05:00'
describe
'1656' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKQC' 'sip-files00025.txt'
5b8cff4f77cb24b55f501c6400490be9
0401cd6960a94d92f4c1a0dd767dab961af9ee2d
'2012-02-18T10:39:11-05:00'
describe
'30993' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKQD' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
fe38eb65f38413f796c1420374b6d42f
00396b06ab6c1d48c8c007cfeb7910f206121053
'2012-02-18T10:46:36-05:00'
describe
'857280' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKQE' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
159d34c0201ec6eb61b5a28eb15b85bf
6c8fb56cc15f862af33544327d8b53eadfd2685e
'2012-02-18T10:43:20-05:00'
describe
'194758' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKQF' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
8b57319adf70e11211d9ead9cdad4ada
9a7e3d26c424c8e46a578efc2c84fa871652224c
'2012-02-18T10:44:08-05:00'
describe
'103818' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKQG' 'sip-files00026.pro'
abe9066c3d9b9d3644b99e03bcbe6dda
f2e92d52eb6db31ae7134eed4df3c3e1cb145df8
'2012-02-18T10:42:49-05:00'
describe
'63963' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKQH' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
d71c868f1d5e1d609ba84ad908380bf6
bf472b3ee8dadcc65571263d95ab2b2ac1378297
'2012-02-18T10:48:47-05:00'
describe
'6881104' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKQI' 'sip-files00026.tif'
06639270a4331c275deea3aec54f6dc8
812eddb71a7ccc59bf3323f8728ba53464223b76
'2012-02-18T10:37:39-05:00'
describe
'4088' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKQJ' 'sip-files00026.txt'
c513577cbb60356bf3fc8e2c7566b026
ca0dc024616c731e551e6d3d7746210633742c74
'2012-02-18T10:41:36-05:00'
describe
'31475' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKQK' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
61205442e41c018208d0eebe96521201
685d5cfbd4f8b72ddbae031fb8cd765627331c91
'2012-02-18T10:39:53-05:00'
describe
'843918' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKQL' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
54686ec59edab712ca89da8aec0e00b0
036876c0683a4c9b3565a609444091256cab7809
'2012-02-18T10:49:30-05:00'
describe
'184060' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKQM' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
69fe4f7c245154ee212ac2ba6528679f
bef2d46ca71b779cb85464c7f6db22cfdc4afe8b
'2012-02-18T10:47:31-05:00'
describe
'45150' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKQN' 'sip-files00027.pro'
930d278285ff1533ff16bf31653d7e07
e6f6cc167eca814a32999e734fd0c64c4039fbef
'2012-02-18T10:45:11-05:00'
describe
'61739' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKQO' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
a41764c56d9aae4b534b4b61c150b281
6ae37364ad99fe0a482ce97c98b265e35493ccfb
'2012-02-18T10:38:43-05:00'
describe
'6775224' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKQP' 'sip-files00027.tif'
78d6197addbffdcf4e3ef5f095bdc4fc
b0ce192536d06ce214290ae5bc374d4615417ac0
describe
'1800' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKQQ' 'sip-files00027.txt'
938c0f783b68bf4ff14ed383f1d72b62
e0b45eb3a3fc7f5d1610591a330c9f6b2868e6f8
'2012-02-18T10:47:47-05:00'
describe
'31954' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKQR' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
84139bf0562028eba2247a1584276e2d
6c00f949fa80f2640fd786deeef7073b63e428f6
'2012-02-18T10:49:52-05:00'
describe
'857059' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKQS' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
55bf367469bc11010128f3e3ebc8be1f
d86a3f18d9f5e75b550d29162d7d3ff07e968107
'2012-02-18T10:49:41-05:00'
describe
'187491' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKQT' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
d000b801327508cc453d0c2688dce09c
e160a5548097015950e6f39d4a6276c298dd0a79
'2012-02-18T10:45:29-05:00'
describe
'99164' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKQU' 'sip-files00028.pro'
33861e9ebe4485bdc62a7292b78bdc25
5ae7938694cf4f81a41ed47641c5132d0507e28d
'2012-02-18T10:47:46-05:00'
describe
'62288' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKQV' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
fe1c45ca9704f63a0323a2f26d8e2d1b
8d0af00467b8c11e41a0bf1c590878d61cff3aff
'2012-02-18T10:39:09-05:00'
describe
'6880948' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKQW' 'sip-files00028.tif'
0168504155adc238f4ce5f3b4e8d138f
6d16e8237825d1f8706b12d7b3db786dc2836ca8
'2012-02-18T10:40:44-05:00'
describe
'3886' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKQX' 'sip-files00028.txt'
9223beef95266e3c6bbfb5f3f3f25449
c254a213eb7f5cadfb1be8d7c5ca57f2e6cdf0af
'2012-02-18T10:45:08-05:00'
describe
'30904' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKQY' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
4808c518b27d3b7542084186f13f478b
476e584993166272d26ca89d636cf91edbd40416
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKQZ' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
a7e0a711d88d4bb44fd5bc956a3b77bb
344cdfbf508d45100f30a790a9ba964703891454
'2012-02-18T10:46:33-05:00'
describe
'200157' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKRA' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
64067c5a69a56d8d940fbc86eff97aa9
3e38f9a179ab61d7c8bd7665bb42bef18b0e88ad
'2012-02-18T10:45:26-05:00'
describe
'108007' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKRB' 'sip-files00029.pro'
7c2838c4e92e204b15840a5e785ccd6f
955572936032b00c454fcf8bf1853150ad0c0572
'2012-02-18T10:46:12-05:00'
describe
'65348' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKRC' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
69543d043a546dc0696022d31b22ac94
96c6f0e91d07ef712b856f35a0c5b58c04911332
'2012-02-18T10:41:18-05:00'
describe
'6881396' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKRD' 'sip-files00029.tif'
a022eb55a21a5111e5ce749be30bed41
9de5a26a1cae11ad09f534e0e89ddc4f5cc69f9b
'2012-02-18T10:45:00-05:00'
describe
'4259' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKRE' 'sip-files00029.txt'
d53555ff13d2abdee80b7dbe856b7ed3
c3bf03d47fb84468ba4c53d7fee139b32ca42693
'2012-02-18T10:42:12-05:00'
describe
'32000' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKRF' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
55de272de401154e760ef68fd198c0f7
5316d6ecea4afd4e0a7b314547a030ab06deeb3e
'2012-02-18T10:49:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKRG' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
82e30194bfa1624c6f29ece7740c153b
4383a0f6f30b16c3e6e34076d5781cd015dd03d6
'2012-02-18T10:48:01-05:00'
describe
'178902' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKRH' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
765d768b6269a3ac299a524c763ff0ef
92d756db93747c412a3a66b446788a48008711e4
'2012-02-18T10:47:20-05:00'
describe
'44647' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKRI' 'sip-files00030.pro'
6be0ec3b33effbebabfeeceecd4d98b4
4389149c12729d0a1b90a64ce6f3d00f71b1a806
'2012-02-18T10:38:50-05:00'
describe
'59755' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKRJ' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
6b1e03c81a83e7750d9d9142060ce891
a278eff24a827b01fd4b2f1f6d049bfcc5f0d757
describe
'6881284' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKRK' 'sip-files00030.tif'
88106d92ca6fb797f31768a581b85513
39c42136b4d4be57ad8d1b874e3c2c7ddc6f575a
'2012-02-18T10:45:48-05:00'
describe
'1858' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKRL' 'sip-files00030.txt'
7162d4b9c068e222017b0c1d1b97575b
6bd2a1e93c9638b7be9fd4950841d4528d32fbe9
describe
'31440' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKRM' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
01db34e69aa133dc80f19bdc5b6004c0
be9a95f2ac2136e8dcd91f773b4be3942d6638c8
'2012-02-18T10:38:40-05:00'
describe
'848476' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKRN' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
f96461310bbb2e1a75d8c22da147db18
50881977d25b3fc69f2e2931970071c17d38a73d
'2012-02-18T10:40:43-05:00'
describe
'202493' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKRO' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
e3142a7e44a31349b27e7a75c0a77cf9
8b9b3b05ec9a72fb43d84e1b0ff284b5fb36fc34
'2012-02-18T10:49:35-05:00'
describe
'107847' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKRP' 'sip-files00031.pro'
8cd5fd229dcc383fda8ee58683610daa
28931a2bef4f7fe5f62e656cd6d05636426bf7a6
describe
'65791' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKRQ' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
297a8d21ce757a3a139c63ee7014c6d2
022a3d744579041ad4408f442ccedc4cf1ce671b
'2012-02-18T10:44:59-05:00'
describe
'6810528' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKRR' 'sip-files00031.tif'
c76f9897d54d4fdec37ccea155179663
0409acd7f089c25caccab6cd026121cceba64e72
'2012-02-18T10:43:04-05:00'
describe
'4255' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKRS' 'sip-files00031.txt'
effaacc0db3d23db5cd7024016e1b87d
4577df2f721f527eacac284b078160bb8a9c5489
'2012-02-18T10:44:09-05:00'
describe
'31785' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKRT' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
635649bcb7770608e919f0655abb9045
f99eadce0dbb2cb12dac875535cd100462ea0ddd
'2012-02-18T10:42:19-05:00'
describe
'857298' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKRU' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
04f23ac184b1e1776b03f588321473d3
772269b280f9f54bba740cb248796fd78101241d
describe
'174022' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKRV' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
5ea648823f85a4da1d13e72652c0faaa
bcd6e32a3c5428c82e5fec11b0980dc79d69f96b
'2012-02-18T10:44:57-05:00'
describe
'92259' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKRW' 'sip-files00032.pro'
b5b05f204bdcbe2a2fd3a88e778c9116
846afa898629e9453c1b8eea6d84de35a48aff82
'2012-02-18T10:45:30-05:00'
describe
'59842' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKRX' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
75f532606f481eb62af904964f9f048f
bd3bdd883ed40425bf6ef97d2325e8aacf28aa44
'2012-02-18T10:43:38-05:00'
describe
'6880808' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKRY' 'sip-files00032.tif'
66ec8709f13cf34a2ea73ca74045152d
18e4d75598f52b99703006ae128b707ba69b01b3
'2012-02-18T10:43:47-05:00'
describe
'3809' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKRZ' 'sip-files00032.txt'
ab84a35338a24b12a9b9e35ea43b2b81
ad64ffe6a07ccf802d1b33128cc1186ff0fcb58a
'2012-02-18T10:41:17-05:00'
describe
'30564' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKSA' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
7ce4c94e9b3663e68b0f21e018b38741
079c6d02ea89e554fe355b5a9f7d1bf30b427a70
'2012-02-18T10:43:36-05:00'
describe
'857290' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKSB' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
99751ed8fcb6b163808a2c4ac75ec0e6
7a5a47da44e3b4e5d34593b60513166b2c6411aa
describe
'189529' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKSC' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
785740def300b510e55a5175e2baab58
ce00779cab9edc74de71f0e6df296e9518a59887
describe
'100848' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKSD' 'sip-files00033.pro'
643ce4c213c8d59d14b87173f6c157f6
00ccdaa752381006345fa1397b60ab0b195457a2
describe
'62838' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKSE' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
8e93f372e4c746a7d8b10e26f2db608b
53e16ce88da99922ebb4ab3dba6a9e50beb45f21
'2012-02-18T10:49:19-05:00'
describe
'6881172' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKSF' 'sip-files00033.tif'
80316a95ad0a398b361279266f700f98
b92496d6512b926ff13513181f71e5d42a47ef57
describe
'3956' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKSG' 'sip-files00033.txt'
ceebf04fada34e31c1659a5b92e49f92
afc63f0dff4c739f737cba17ceccc95467a18347
describe
'31307' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKSH' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
6dd5c904172ab09074cc1800da347284
96b8198a3e9de0648b20ea96e5a3ef25a2efd38c
'2012-02-18T10:45:46-05:00'
describe
'857676' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKSI' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
c64f0b84df97471f1ac50204c202369e
2176720c3f4d98a1f7371cc0bc17ad75afea8dd7
'2012-02-18T10:42:11-05:00'
describe
'163970' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKSJ' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
54906a2906d162393058a20f226e5824
89077202d7c42af3fa1dc707d8d6c4b50b00f7a8
'2012-02-18T10:47:30-05:00'
describe
'50473' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKSK' 'sip-files00034.pro'
27371b576b04870da6a8401191d832ac
bbd31d9a9aad5b3bea007f38ccbd3a95c616b687
'2012-02-18T10:37:50-05:00'
describe
'56585' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKSL' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
a36f10ef6bf214a2af56231b08363804
ccf80b94f82df801a5a018073b482e1ab2e0fa85
'2012-02-18T10:49:12-05:00'
describe
'6883804' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKSM' 'sip-files00034.tif'
eb508622b516198a14d40f1e6db7fb9a
e298780552d8f79bab3b82a49b0c870c31f79792
'2012-02-18T10:48:46-05:00'
describe
'1985' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKSN' 'sip-files00034.txt'
e16dd2a388891a7e863b158a6db462c2
046ff3fe48a7dee374121985b1053d7b30432287
'2012-02-18T10:49:34-05:00'
describe
'30364' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKSO' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
06b16435a4d1860bb1b06c6b3a50ca18
e5cb3af0f37759fe54f37c2af9ce149bae387b4a
'2012-02-18T10:41:16-05:00'
describe
'857274' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKSP' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
bbd0bd1a7dcce6ba02f310d6af1be2a8
50c35f12e815444b2d40daaecb0c7e5e2f2a4e37
describe
'200079' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKSQ' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
c5fff4ba058b3d0e499165788d7f4133
d1e51676d7de489757035dc4454002c09f18b95c
describe
'107666' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKSR' 'sip-files00035.pro'
965d766832840b20ea466b4e3f0f7902
ab6b78cdf98b0647070fa8dfc9c2418b2a47bfa2
'2012-02-18T10:46:11-05:00'
describe
'64614' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKSS' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
f6d2d81115bb3a7417322af7f2201f94
e58be3a0a1865947f2df4d108e86becc7a136fd5
describe
'6881368' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKST' 'sip-files00035.tif'
d5534e0667f505fe29ab42935d24a741
430f6615973f61d624673998f88e2f9ba2540c65
'2012-02-18T10:37:48-05:00'
describe
'4239' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKSU' 'sip-files00035.txt'
9fe2c36b4515bf560baccc6a291e45a4
01a1c7e7f7954cc4971fbca9884cf9761a50f696
'2012-02-18T10:44:33-05:00'
describe
'31759' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKSV' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
4c002b67714d25db4872dcc367efd8a7
0335962d0e5ee255daa7f22846f9fc448814a6be
describe
'857152' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKSW' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
a68e50dffe7f2ba4f045db903156a704
d8abe2177a7dc89c539f345c5bb5206dbbd0bf82
describe
'172433' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKSX' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
7f67c7798ddb3d6b4e90a2fb66394020
b63d4b8bd2f3cf3f6b5c7ef43cbf2b9a984678aa
'2012-02-18T10:46:02-05:00'
describe
'26141' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKSY' 'sip-files00036.pro'
c1a2e53421466e667d13a5fe4c5c9053
9d788dc3d471e077c2f6fff61d086dd7004a7236
'2012-02-18T10:44:22-05:00'
describe
'59143' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKSZ' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
168a8368624ff718ae99ee662ddc348b
177de633a9ac1113351ed6803b7d96fb3bfbfcea
'2012-02-18T10:47:28-05:00'
describe
'6881372' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKTA' 'sip-files00036.tif'
8151087130ce069f43c15cb8bb5f9129
b6137ab6797d15105d1c3b3c5a896f10d9aeabb1
'2012-02-18T10:44:05-05:00'
describe
'2041' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKTB' 'sip-files00036.txt'
c6588a8fc4c6cfbeafeee6b0d9147659
906865c1388a9f9a65a32156699ba1a28b94c69c
'2012-02-18T10:47:39-05:00'
describe
'31408' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKTC' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
d93e6ffb5aa7ebea501502491fd2f40e
06cae2e865de7ffb1464757aa6d955ae4fedcfdd
'2012-02-18T10:44:42-05:00'
describe
'857287' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKTD' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
bb82505803e2708af96ec34d16628dcf
3945a28638bf454ebf6920d54e9595cd59ab73ec
'2012-02-18T10:40:36-05:00'
describe
'202920' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKTE' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
52a48c3956fc7c12fe51d1a335964ea0
eb5e43d4e6dab40a142064d8ed5ad141f102026d
'2012-02-18T10:42:28-05:00'
describe
'106987' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKTF' 'sip-files00037.pro'
a40accff52746f9f13c5f3eaf8f7f481
5aa0e81dbe8b154b852aa6feca9f616ed9f7c7e0
'2012-02-18T10:43:17-05:00'
describe
'65546' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKTG' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
a1f4b04581bb3b3bfaa361558e64db8c
c7b90764ccede4874a0319f20e471dcfd6c54ed0
'2012-02-18T10:42:24-05:00'
describe
'6881428' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKTH' 'sip-files00037.tif'
508d4ac77e5eac252c606d652fcb8405
c140f4abffce074679a121e256f0bf691c28d780
describe
'4198' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKTI' 'sip-files00037.txt'
5d05715c969024743141e7a5305dfc8b
46a829a674fae6a9acf88f88afb315838af0e407
'2012-02-18T10:37:19-05:00'
describe
'32170' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKTJ' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
8c1e1922c376f03e93573f865b9dad8c
1d2bd429fce780d9c5e45be4584b6de0de2d3a24
'2012-02-18T10:45:51-05:00'
describe
'857307' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKTK' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
05fa47df243816b197954087d23b9678
a8428e3e3a1dbef3d0debb6df1307cd27df0ccb6
describe
'177629' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKTL' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
960c7b79a513f537afbfe149b8c10a02
db21d63a50e7c0005669b8494c23dcdf63f633a4
'2012-02-18T10:42:36-05:00'
describe
'60176' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKTM' 'sip-files00038.pro'
3bac3421ccf9d5fbb0f32f2c193cf27d
ffe5e7aa6334b2aedb33f1805227064386ae7cc0
describe
'60469' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKTN' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
d9b7adea745792c4d57ddd9829ca3523
5bc28ccaedf90292a45b00f5c992a23d0a8257e1
'2012-02-18T10:45:04-05:00'
describe
'6881136' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKTO' 'sip-files00038.tif'
517d34905266ccdf73942efaf5b46d11
b5995924475addd9104fd5adda5d235eeac90147
'2012-02-18T10:47:48-05:00'
describe
'2357' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKTP' 'sip-files00038.txt'
48e1b46ff2338634408906158ea9f6ed
ebef2670ec2a3c36c498a63f658f2b7461bf9e95
'2012-02-18T10:43:15-05:00'
describe
'31294' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKTQ' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
ac5d73b68bd1ee3180b0075569c9982c
5067637f9d1690fa517ff206d4ffd6afaca6de04
describe
'856956' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKTR' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
b167afa8bdc8c9990d6aa6e0e59ca84a
757d21c77e2667f36c28113d66c30d69abb0ed92
'2012-02-18T10:39:23-05:00'
describe
'176763' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKTS' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
2d09cf991e6e8cf3624d83daba72a360
660d331fb97ea1ef6c35e5c61aabc619261aa2bd
describe
'91943' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKTT' 'sip-files00039.pro'
206268632fa5e1b0ff8169e878beb1b7
c11ad213e930ae1317ef51c39788360f721fcd48
'2012-02-18T10:41:34-05:00'
describe
'59899' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKTU' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
92363893cc331befaa18dbaccdc32cdb
79dd786414919503a5e82f724aca10c4ae2ea6e7
'2012-02-18T10:45:16-05:00'
describe
'6878496' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKTV' 'sip-files00039.tif'
70aaee6aef8b39b4e8e7e125a8cc4903
6fa6bcb47551e01a9a5327e846b368ca850152d6
describe
'3623' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKTW' 'sip-files00039.txt'
8c545cba7228f1c12af36bec4e81503b
7a8763cd877ed3303efd8685ff1fcd32c301cdee
'2012-02-18T10:48:38-05:00'
describe
'30646' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKTX' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
d22bbfddeda2042810db542247f2516e
97b668d1e1adf671229337ac7f02e06499010f9f
'2012-02-18T10:44:03-05:00'
describe
'857113' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKTY' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
10a1117dbc8cfbd0bb210f76b58e0e01
a6d58a774fbb626f9870894f39fb40195bceef7a
'2012-02-18T10:41:59-05:00'
describe
'196847' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKTZ' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
4056734cc7ca3346aa6aada7159c6961
101c689819c5530151edc3e879427d6c8eda6ddd
'2012-02-18T10:43:05-05:00'
describe
'55683' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKUA' 'sip-files00040.pro'
a06af3e78d78b21ceb1a6029311b6d95
f67162e365eded566493898a426fa5c2e1b80a2f
'2012-02-18T10:49:46-05:00'
describe
'64629' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKUB' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
5338732523e2062ae7a76d227446e965
72fca69a2c8e2aa9217e8eff651e5155a175b8f8
describe
'6881756' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKUC' 'sip-files00040.tif'
d12cc7258f54e6a9fa37240476c3f496
d3fa9a574b0c95ea776fa5be63851a4e8ecb17dd
'2012-02-18T10:47:03-05:00'
describe
'2203' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKUD' 'sip-files00040.txt'
986301d21110555ad0492efa5cb18419
1cca8421897836929553021b83ecf18255e26e9c
describe
'32496' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKUE' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
24fa9e95aef94955f887faea0a3d0ee0
12b3377977fa8765399e3a8bb8f014049d03e3cc
'2012-02-18T10:37:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKUF' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
2acaedb84287832f4675d365829e394d
771a050555388af4a210e09b3a316c3f0b329264
'2012-02-18T10:47:18-05:00'
describe
'190504' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKUG' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
ab0aff681c9bdf668c81a50ae06d2703
97065e287438c7a894fad0afc8020613ff48d7c2
'2012-02-18T10:48:18-05:00'
describe
'102883' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKUH' 'sip-files00041.pro'
a15a0caef93c90b9c9be4de2a9ac0473
6ecce27d5459b035fe791730413e9a2a884491ec
'2012-02-18T10:44:41-05:00'
describe
'62402' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKUI' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
9c7dbb43b04533ca27be2ef1e2be51b1
648474af8703d2dbc0294df867e44c8a1b83a1c6
'2012-02-18T10:45:06-05:00'
describe
'6880828' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKUJ' 'sip-files00041.tif'
ccbeee6123bf39bc2002039682be8e41
a9c920111527876b3487c3c54ad9ba6e0660565f
'2012-02-18T10:41:27-05:00'
describe
'4054' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKUK' 'sip-files00041.txt'
12a715d86a7a4926703d80ebde3bcab5
87acaee92f663b621b509d2d83e54acadcb01e26
'2012-02-18T10:46:17-05:00'
describe
'30906' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKUL' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
f7aee925c45dfac97d4f32ae568d445c
139236278974d887782d4dfcc3ba8e16ed642cf0
describe
'857099' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKUM' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
b218316263b0ecfcff45a6c16bf6f4aa
16a3dd7703f0151d58484513fb93f76ccb42ebf0
'2012-02-18T10:38:24-05:00'
describe
'178827' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKUN' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
b88c81ac8a00f1254c34ac6307477e65
9d2c0f71cfcf9c213c99febf68218abc8fc7ae92
'2012-02-18T10:43:23-05:00'
describe
'91842' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKUO' 'sip-files00042.pro'
507b499bd5c5b6c312d50759deffe2ef
a7f9723d0c3f47d8fdf83cd8e2e007a427f66ab4
describe
'59863' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKUP' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
a355d1b0626072cf8614a8a4b58c6f7b
65a9cef968a95ad5c5da68ce55b9ccda458b98b7
describe
'6880816' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKUQ' 'sip-files00042.tif'
662bf4205f528c73ad2e3b79a84a48b6
925a913aaccb5ef3a576d5c0924117e398b5bd74
describe
'3653' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKUR' 'sip-files00042.txt'
546c8f8828bbce55c63d72c335566103
f16237b0fac9291d188f3de4e231bfcb3ade7ec9
'2012-02-18T10:45:15-05:00'
describe
'30602' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKUS' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
75b147089463a5ba8196a0f9e5ec525e
c210cac31e6c79ea3a01ccec5d5ee48ac1c57b06
'2012-02-18T10:42:58-05:00'
describe
'857316' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKUT' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
053639cf2eb1124b0c486a3bdfedf38d
bbadf7e1da53261bfbbb4899ab85de01b3ce7388
'2012-02-18T10:44:49-05:00'
describe
'187670' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKUU' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
0dfbaad2d59c20dcb337926bac893637
10facf54148d56f9203b0f34c7a751a16750cf0a
'2012-02-18T10:44:17-05:00'
describe
'99847' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKUV' 'sip-files00043.pro'
8c2c4d23a2d73f5316571ac5425a1069
ca375ac5a2fe53f9fb6c0bb1abf337c15b506dbb
'2012-02-18T10:47:13-05:00'
describe
'62022' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKUW' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
e65e14281d8e17869526c367f7acba71
8a0b104774b7416b0ae17671a61c235244fdf887
'2012-02-18T10:47:35-05:00'
describe
'6881156' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKUX' 'sip-files00043.tif'
40b3292ec4f63d06e8512124f8ba20cd
b5724826015ce86d79c552e95bbde1c9a5899fa3
describe
'3924' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKUY' 'sip-files00043.txt'
a59bec581e357369083b3015c3a3dbac
2a87115bf248fda4b53f04ac8d6984f53261850a
'2012-02-18T10:43:31-05:00'
describe
'31381' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKUZ' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
1653abfe809fef0116732db1471adeb6
b2dea0e851bbbc113de67b4fd929bde32c90ef95
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKVA' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
bc26cc1338f0a0aab196a988c31e9382
6b789c44903ae46ffa19a94541df92c0c5eb101f
'2012-02-18T10:47:58-05:00'
describe
'176784' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKVB' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
425abf81ac1d02bb8fb71bc7e863f93c
2ae8faa63d63d25e31c5f543d65bbcefa4b0421d
describe
'93017' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKVC' 'sip-files00044.pro'
723c9056ce86cd0ed22b420b4ac14efd
481e658c5de3dd04a52f1557d0cf6699a547e497
describe
'58986' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKVD' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
7eedf38acd5996ec8992358fc20b0033
868bde4d6592597b7ce58787b5d3ebf07b1d92fb
'2012-02-18T10:39:02-05:00'
describe
'6880664' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKVE' 'sip-files00044.tif'
c1533b73305534c642fe70a03484a76a
c8d573ca9fda02863945693def6c59cd5b3db5ed
'2012-02-18T10:49:57-05:00'
describe
'3672' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKVF' 'sip-files00044.txt'
95d321a3e2640fd7863becc1194aef43
d33ec46b99d7dc4326da93a3e0a2cabc3e1a3ee3
describe
'30166' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKVG' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
b907a26305210ad0862486f4c51fdaa9
dee5d955680a206431f76b7a65e8186a1ca68090
'2012-02-18T10:47:44-05:00'
describe
'857203' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKVH' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
c2c5077303e19bd2886b28a255bac9a9
54b4aa4f2604292083a4ec4b07224e44e72114b6
'2012-02-18T10:37:15-05:00'
describe
'202011' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKVI' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
4d2024435838eb8bff1b3cc3aba8b443
90566d3174ce9df4b45265179d8b28327326e5e4
'2012-02-18T10:37:22-05:00'
describe
'44230' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKVJ' 'sip-files00045.pro'
5701b2f405573107d9cef247d80c5b8d
25bbdecc3a65b42d86fb837b0892926431f9a948
'2012-02-18T10:42:43-05:00'
describe
'65958' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKVK' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
ddd2fec8171fa9df0bf2ea4b905e4071
bb57b0847adb216d1986845dad9ce72fe57b1f68
'2012-02-18T10:38:09-05:00'
describe
'6881876' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKVL' 'sip-files00045.tif'
14917ed6a25995bd82cbc9bd0973d87d
30598be00e896d96e29091c4b695c93625b7cf4f
'2012-02-18T10:46:58-05:00'
describe
'1758' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKVM' 'sip-files00045.txt'
fdbc5b22220ef999214f8d27426a44b3
70d6e6e6d482f98668eb39b27d0df87d5c6bf972
describe
'32946' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKVN' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
6e6dfe008b15bf6f199568d503ae7843
b54cc1f2b8a1a0f1f5182be8ba3eecff31498a24
describe
'857668' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKVO' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
32afa89e606b9021c232092dbed27a7d
7f5073c1f526f66601134e24f4c5b1e029fe91c9
'2012-02-18T10:46:14-05:00'
describe
'175272' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKVP' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
22ba4fca70f4847b38c1c62aebf4b00b
bf8bea664b0c3da1cb04462d5cfbae855cd0aa9d
'2012-02-18T10:39:25-05:00'
describe
'94022' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKVQ' 'sip-files00046.pro'
75557826c87fbcf9344ffeb0766f9280
ffb64194ae6709a01483589d676bdb4be3eb0b9e
describe
'58385' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKVR' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
5d307b29dfc6e663a7233f578b978e48
6526bdfd79fc5e351b154cbc9abdd2b18845d4a3
'2012-02-18T10:40:50-05:00'
describe
'6883412' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKVS' 'sip-files00046.tif'
73a93e0017975b89a2517326c66b28d1
78b477f866dd7ac002ee83a1e072767a24e6215b
'2012-02-18T10:37:30-05:00'
describe
'3692' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKVT' 'sip-files00046.txt'
6093396b84e05f0204395a6f5b0a5faf
58d34e5ee65891d979265b97968f5669ae74f348
'2012-02-18T10:46:38-05:00'
describe
'29797' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKVU' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
37794b0b84b30af8be17c355edfc201a
87f9e2905322ce38ee35a8ff6e265c75a480c6bb
'2012-02-18T10:45:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKVV' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
efe6e6ac74379b31ba967d9e71ca455d
ea14f0c6fcf7fafdb687b73b607cc2eb695e86a7
'2012-02-18T10:44:46-05:00'
describe
'184918' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKVW' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
2d48b8cdc7d252e3c38c6a66ad317c6c
ca37944e6111b665374cba6b104b974c1c27d5ec
'2012-02-18T10:45:01-05:00'
describe
'45788' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKVX' 'sip-files00047.pro'
ab1833403f24ff11a94d952c99184c85
23e55e9d3574ca69c830054d84e2018cf96a6d1b
'2012-02-18T10:44:01-05:00'
describe
'62602' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKVY' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
1ec8f24fbc1f41f5cf058382df272ce9
38798e487f0bfc83d66bcf462e8b3b3bf2c34eab
'2012-02-18T10:45:53-05:00'
describe
'6881740' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKVZ' 'sip-files00047.tif'
9c1bf406239a63915012efb3f7382809
40d2947c0ad7ced6b488c6d943885d35d3ced5de
'2012-02-18T10:39:42-05:00'
describe
'1776' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKWA' 'sip-files00047.txt'
41174d6dbf2e275cd216c0949ad573b0
1079d420d6c4ca405bd696e497d5dba17891aeee
'2012-02-18T10:42:45-05:00'
describe
'32383' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKWB' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
4b0c998c349f5b7005b573762c1b80f6
ad56a56121d8f0829a33a326b5727e8f89053759
describe
'857216' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKWC' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
9a748c5a5a2c034f1f8fae3d449a2b7c
94f2c59f27a4d224caf402dea8a581005b4b2a13
'2012-02-18T10:49:42-05:00'
describe
'187872' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKWD' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
50631c5ef17e40c8ed561189ff140f71
afdf077d12a41ce3cb6978696cbae44556b08341
describe
'98202' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKWE' 'sip-files00048.pro'
0272c1e88296930875640b42fd4fcbd3
7047619744ca4667ff78ae09bf83bec8df8a42d0
'2012-02-18T10:48:14-05:00'
describe
'62186' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKWF' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
8c8f519d25af56c9c4c0794eb04af016
6c104538ffa1fdf94d498e4d2896eed1fc45cd43
'2012-02-18T10:40:23-05:00'
describe
'6880860' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKWG' 'sip-files00048.tif'
76e9cc6e773dde642d7b5e74554f4d7e
10f95dbd739d354a28f76779296b960a37ec63d8
'2012-02-18T10:49:33-05:00'
describe
'3864' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKWH' 'sip-files00048.txt'
2f8b3a37e096f98fcfd9b84bb982fae4
21a284a1413b0f2fd6ac4dbc9440c8be3ca6ac8b
describe
'30849' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKWI' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
b1ba6a3b8620501452b10bc36c5417c1
780926595e85e1440d7ce2bc898a248c5bc1b4c7
'2012-02-18T10:46:49-05:00'
describe
'857279' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKWJ' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
6eff353d2c40e4398db629929e1ce53d
4513fed77dce2e1390daf11dd7e9a401b06a7324
'2012-02-18T10:45:36-05:00'
describe
'181553' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKWK' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
da61e6bfbe446a67126f02b3650d767a
57345f6f51b751e75b26a475ac67d86392bbe4eb
'2012-02-18T10:47:29-05:00'
describe
'95027' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKWL' 'sip-files00049.pro'
e9c7b03f934585108bc03b323276c881
624772b85727fd2add3eb315df964ed164b3cc7d
'2012-02-18T10:45:42-05:00'
describe
'59620' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKWM' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
1b992989096b621f768d5af36532163d
7c2366110ed8fdf16ff13dffa11841d5544c0918
'2012-02-18T10:47:17-05:00'
describe
'6880804' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKWN' 'sip-files00049.tif'
efe5e8a6e74d4e2c00407a937353d639
56eb85a679318107976fa8580058afb54243a776
'2012-02-18T10:40:38-05:00'
describe
'3757' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKWO' 'sip-files00049.txt'
632cf23f937f4cbc3e2b0702c5944a87
7b1c2f420cdd79e88770a13d63b64d5c3865ccb2
'2012-02-18T10:45:12-05:00'
describe
'30482' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKWP' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
877214cf6400acc7cf25bfcfca5cab2d
374575b03c9317baa5464e9cd06275872020465d
describe
'857674' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKWQ' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
25be7def03112cb761436ed8e5c03e9e
236d6c00f7e25e9958e9fc10a5701baf528faf1a
describe
'194769' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKWR' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
79fd21748ee8e0a55d5e1283b209657b
b2362b807f5c6763178d7fef32ae883d0f39911d
'2012-02-18T10:37:43-05:00'
describe
'48128' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKWS' 'sip-files00050.pro'
56a1e7be808adfdc7a72ccacae6f7b9e
764ba815c3cf5bb23cf9ec689b11b7a2af552194
'2012-02-18T10:38:01-05:00'
describe
'64033' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKWT' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
f667623c11906ae1af006ccaa9608de6
319afc8dec4c14b33dc2e4d1c298be186b4d640c
'2012-02-18T10:47:11-05:00'
describe
'6884596' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKWU' 'sip-files00050.tif'
504b452741ccdf994d5861080b5bbe6e
0aa1845dfee2da75aeef35eb10e8d36528258932
describe
'1909' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKWV' 'sip-files00050.txt'
e0cc6cc285041c484a6c5cb218c14dd8
852be8b912e803c7f7e972d2c8725463c3b0d488
describe
'32452' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKWW' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
de9da260a504b9cfa0efa53eb6b3ae8d
52a79536151d62705f22a3921882196d6354eba7
'2012-02-18T10:43:19-05:00'
describe
'857304' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKWX' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
d5edbc2fd2053c230256e35d37d3397c
f49dbff141c0051a14cb286bb494d96e6b806599
describe
'198102' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKWY' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
21bf3e8d105ee1fbbcf7133f04ccaddb
f2e16687672af5acd322d7e1ca2c6171f52a19fc
'2012-02-18T10:38:29-05:00'
describe
'106799' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKWZ' 'sip-files00051.pro'
1c311e9b45c03ef6ac644858e1b3d2b1
3447fd0b7930e8efccdeaa14672834fa07a46c75
describe
'63235' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKXA' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
a40b4045b4502794ac5df420a0035bfd
239bdba13e265e59af528c7d8833e519b02e8ebd
'2012-02-18T10:44:53-05:00'
describe
'6881064' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKXB' 'sip-files00051.tif'
1ea18c54eeedf48381db613001917f73
510b18073e748c1ed766cfa84378d0f2f7d8eb05
'2012-02-18T10:41:12-05:00'
describe
'4215' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKXC' 'sip-files00051.txt'
7982419bd96e525deda13a8b802fa886
293974584160d0e9121db1dd25ba7908f5e8c509
'2012-02-18T10:44:36-05:00'
describe
'31387' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKXD' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
27e0ce7a6435000497c2ef8fe57feeda
7986ab27364a65aa97fcfcbaf3dbcbed5bd28ea3
describe
'857680' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKXE' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
8f7083be6b9243436a8a13f4090ccbb3
603f01c10cdbd954837a7b7af6c259cc9d0fc75c
'2012-02-18T10:42:09-05:00'
describe
'201885' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKXF' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
a3bddc91f8e6c50b0aa5841acbb71046
9c5a713363975f9ff7658c96060d6b1171bde722
describe
'57189' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKXG' 'sip-files00052.pro'
62396ea6789721707aa4bb9046f7e980
75b834d330b5bd309f570367537af69ab0e83c28
'2012-02-18T10:46:35-05:00'
describe
'65961' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKXH' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
9c5c7b66cd7565438de66282fb56d0e7
32889779b5b97c9c8ed178ab7821ebef27a2b3ff
'2012-02-18T10:41:05-05:00'
describe
'6884992' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKXI' 'sip-files00052.tif'
3dad645d21561288ae552151cf59635e
24c6aaa61e93e9819c0880aafb576d19829e3b34
describe
'2231' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKXJ' 'sip-files00052.txt'
d7131b31a491d854ac8f92c589d88333
5b735d64b40565511c6369273db4ce686bebaf1a
'2012-02-18T10:38:15-05:00'
describe
'33072' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKXK' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
2f2597ecbd61e5d28bcca4197974b52c
de1c930b3c29c76ce6c3965f51f81aa3659b1850
'2012-02-18T10:45:22-05:00'
describe
'857296' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKXL' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
cef85198db9d4db60515cfd5b104710d
03cbc9127c3fa1b6d79e4ec43ba77e61fb875303
'2012-02-18T10:43:39-05:00'
describe
'183088' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKXM' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
824f1faf458a91ff48e345723bb51a78
935710b8dae48ee7a9495e850930b2ca8e8cca21
describe
'42180' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKXN' 'sip-files00053.pro'
35455274ae3919172e2768a66a1e8b51
40519a908389e6bb6c528f9cea03d9e0b93a02a0
describe
'62013' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKXO' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
1f67bb2f3d0fa4285ac66e412ad57a4b
8df5f54ffe753cae1bbbffd02e928b6a72a26dbe
'2012-02-18T10:45:43-05:00'
describe
'6881564' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKXP' 'sip-files00053.tif'
69214551be121837654641e5270e749b
5b07dd48147d140d97da0c24896b0b8337f4855b
'2012-02-18T10:41:14-05:00'
describe
'2141' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKXQ' 'sip-files00053.txt'
cc923c4d9aa762526fb952a0190c7e0f
2f9abe816fbf2f663f8cb6b60286fa6e9f00d6b4
describe
Invalid character
'32108' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKXR' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
f580055070712b927ac2e5cbed04dd8f
c4140b274a5aacab4fa23670df08a1308288f949
'2012-02-18T10:46:04-05:00'
describe
'857249' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKXS' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
ce92f613c408d042b1034d3353da2559
3f26d9c34389b33c418d63f4a2d188dd9cae7191
'2012-02-18T10:37:27-05:00'
describe
'188475' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKXT' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
4124dca81696e3624c0eb25d819f5c73
b3971b0229b0b5c80692412e1c75e9d61c1952a1
describe
'101009' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKXU' 'sip-files00054.pro'
fca1ffeb4d710b1c40fddcbcbd281b16
c2d189a026bacd0a9d63604ff5f24732cdc3d11f
describe
'62570' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKXV' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
04429a925d20ac787e5d053a119bdb95
a63f636f17642bdb17d8e12d1fd966d0ad3b4a5d
'2012-02-18T10:43:44-05:00'
describe
'6881028' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKXW' 'sip-files00054.tif'
946da9dd46de1b4372be341861234f21
c0554cd52946253a0565c58ec75d10977740294e
'2012-02-18T10:42:44-05:00'
describe
'3987' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKXX' 'sip-files00054.txt'
3dcc8b0d9b40e8517e7a64850c94da94
3e9cc408f760ce743dd2a4fec49616f0ec3b3c2c
describe
'31238' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKXY' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
e8165ca1bd74d8ba06c1832126d49a4a
a5c9450583635957ffea06e6d853d204cd7dde2d
describe
'857277' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKXZ' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
6de862dac6329cd34cfb8185a5da80f6
6882c27f4137beed1d5652de0ed68a4668b84876
'2012-02-18T10:40:02-05:00'
describe
'192348' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKYA' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
c0dbf9edaefec69b7ff5af034aed26b7
1fb881145f783a85289a35c6184170199ad37703
describe
'103195' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKYB' 'sip-files00055.pro'
78744cdaa9ebb53490c864cc5c5cca66
5f8bab4fae4d71b3c4e4ae8f3928718291572732
'2012-02-18T10:40:29-05:00'
describe
'63684' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKYC' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
7243665961ebe1dfd403df7c07621d81
236142475d8edc4b36c61f7c3aacf0874a0a86a0
describe
'6881276' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKYD' 'sip-files00055.tif'
0d349b99aa6e85fa21804268d943b046
c4f59aa678f5e0d89222e87e2df480e819484f0c
'2012-02-18T10:44:54-05:00'
describe
'4055' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKYE' 'sip-files00055.txt'
d0a082a04dc5c7e5dfd4fdc8211a67a2
418a6bad9458f51bc665f21e98d11f32f261df23
'2012-02-18T10:41:22-05:00'
describe
'31669' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKYF' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
e598693a64d928b2994d9a6b3f604d12
4579210f796bfb49bbbd28eade70c4ffc3f49659
'2012-02-18T10:46:20-05:00'
describe
'857289' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKYG' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
90af23f974f3fd4cae5a1a1d4ef01166
982da962074133256825224913cf9775ac9e00b6
'2012-02-18T10:45:54-05:00'
describe
'178438' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKYH' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
4fe87304258df832dac511ced04b0f4d
e9e1848d72d18520bda858e3ca195be637b1b25f
'2012-02-18T10:46:57-05:00'
describe
'36576' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKYI' 'sip-files00056.pro'
528d340d43db8cc3474989ab02a326d1
d51662ccea5265106512828c7937e5b527ec4734
'2012-02-18T10:44:39-05:00'
describe
'60535' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKYJ' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
634e4bfb85832246e7b39ac7ad1ea0b9
4e0b32fc1e708ccbf2e698c08e6ba8f3322125a0
'2012-02-18T10:49:18-05:00'
describe
'6881120' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKYK' 'sip-files00056.tif'
9644ff83dbb286a4e2de4665c8c69a22
c5a049dda9f818d16ec002ce3bf9498ee4e4fc13
'2012-02-18T10:40:58-05:00'
describe
'1583' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKYL' 'sip-files00056.txt'
ac52815f08e778bc58add942115aaa45
76509b957edd7df145fc387a56ab2b1ac5322d27
'2012-02-18T10:49:24-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'31334' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKYM' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
13858fb99b60c1a83cb44f10a6ff4c2a
9820710b3030daa5d236aa095950a71c93e9ad41
'2012-02-18T10:39:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKYN' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
dcc017807f141f6c3f346ea89e562c1f
f05bf83f15c74c77bacc6c037e7ab90cacbbb8b2
describe
'177067' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKYO' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
36683994ffb332e4d349bfd44f55c3f0
b72ee6e76260559bc5e646bbff48bc4f1a641448
'2012-02-18T10:39:05-05:00'
describe
'91897' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKYP' 'sip-files00057.pro'
bc6ce300593da9517b8b0d6879a690de
c6867f3fbf031c8e404bbe7d14695ec56eaff176
'2012-02-18T10:42:57-05:00'
describe
'58945' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKYQ' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
e6a51f00254c617f38abc140acf1c9b9
f77f7c90e8a7b5db5e0e2531937d00f1e4ec1b9a
'2012-02-18T10:43:41-05:00'
describe
'6880532' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKYR' 'sip-files00057.tif'
1244c2f070c2fa936d21e7da5bfcc781
8cd726ed76f26359b5d32b8ba746b2e63baa4d60
'2012-02-18T10:45:17-05:00'
describe
'3633' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKYS' 'sip-files00057.txt'
87c629fea5493a05ace68e39b7836aa6
60327afa7e805fd43a8834b3d1f43b4abadd3714
'2012-02-18T10:47:14-05:00'
describe
'30096' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKYT' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
6c47d754c0a3b5c3489efebbe0361d33
20fcfd6bf85d99db3ec382c7c6ce1e3d7e6b596a
describe
'857309' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKYU' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
f2bfe7d83e593a31a5358c9f224428b1
b84b19a8adb4ab3543c3a82cc6b72c2585201d67
'2012-02-18T10:42:46-05:00'
describe
'201734' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKYV' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
6c6f558e35743157db474ebf6df37917
9d269690edff6e1d39d5ec1e316196a237eb029b
'2012-02-18T10:48:33-05:00'
describe
'110118' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKYW' 'sip-files00058.pro'
7daa037be7587537a260bd2b204d7436
225c89fbe03ca2d424eff7768eead9054dac6b3d
'2012-02-18T10:46:39-05:00'
describe
'64377' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKYX' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
7817e24b3d457a7e230cda8263ad0d63
0575fe9abf8c4fb200656dadf0ff62b49cf856b9
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKYY' 'sip-files00058.tif'
320b6c73cd6dfe4d2cd9a1d01fd1ba9c
1c01df0dc19d46f3f52d96f8a9107ff00d06dd75
'2012-02-18T10:47:56-05:00'
describe
'4289' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKYZ' 'sip-files00058.txt'
7c4803c3e59f9a80ef07e35b3c478c8c
2dfc82e4d4e3886247c616b4d5c19aba9d3eae53
describe
'31180' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKZA' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
09d0fa5f81463c581bccfd9c759db2b5
b49a27b93bfea723e8bef6423f1f95b592bd7624
'2012-02-18T10:37:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKZB' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
984e1ae3e63b0a31fcd5ae97ab678969
1ae23ce21db4640258c6cc00fa09d01a57c9a40c
'2012-02-18T10:45:14-05:00'
describe
'183578' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKZC' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
343da8569e95aedc549367e90fa39880
f97881797a252080ec780400ba529c21a57d4ad7
describe
'94365' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKZD' 'sip-files00059.pro'
85ceee828d2893f0d9c1dac9c74fd3e6
ac6aed0cb175f63a72f766b8409406548e751cde
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKZE' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
1667c327ef415e8557b79da487b13481
0d391d6f2e0a4b89f09e194e8b7223a4afae9eba
describe
'6881004' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKZF' 'sip-files00059.tif'
9e1e762f323068b98879256d2adb3df9
158bc05df384e9ca1df870b1278ec657bbd746b7
'2012-02-18T10:41:54-05:00'
describe
'3693' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKZG' 'sip-files00059.txt'
1b0de004c1a30714acc6885875be6f85
906b00bb9b19cb7d45a799e0ab2444db6450dd88
'2012-02-18T10:47:02-05:00'
describe
'30908' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKZH' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
94241772ecbe6bcb2ff50e249d964ec1
e4ce9bced6809ddcb4297ecf29037ddcff28599f
describe
'857271' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKZI' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
3b9e592be050a6bed1d85422b9cdf78e
64fc8ca50ca952beab098f3e312f540bcf4f3124
'2012-02-18T10:37:44-05:00'
describe
'173587' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKZJ' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
2a6190faaab8de7a0136308c164eebba
1d45b243ed775e575dc0d030ad9f5badb16d0559
describe
'93260' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKZK' 'sip-files00060.pro'
3614ef605e737384127758b16d7e04e6
a03609622c431dc048d4df0cfd03a383461eaa17
'2012-02-18T10:44:23-05:00'
describe
'59021' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKZL' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
0f095745ffa3de5ef9131cc600a8c731
0e989480a89f5cf2ef00a853a2c24b99a7e57254
describe
'6880396' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKZM' 'sip-files00060.tif'
a0175f4d453e27816c861ae82a6f9748
12d65ff14c6470f2caa934d533d097e908c89ef3
'2012-02-18T10:47:33-05:00'
describe
'3665' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKZN' 'sip-files00060.txt'
c150a487cf4578b2706c4efbbb836258
87b6aaf34ab999bca4f521d74983ae77facc888c
describe
'29875' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKZO' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
fe62b35073392f1e06a0be359235a3f9
b2539894ba400dc8769461f4ad1aacb5a0f0c835
'2012-02-18T10:39:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKZP' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
6183758dfc5c26469a027a0590e2087a
a68d563ba7c7d83f6555ceccc4683c12e118474d
'2012-02-18T10:41:19-05:00'
describe
'188624' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKZQ' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
7b4a9c915ee77eb643f40027f84a1473
2e3904cc34ba6c1422bd7e0e5ae5a964902b5e90
describe
'45186' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKZR' 'sip-files00061.pro'
0215b9ecb06b9524e44761200f48f2c1
e91501c1ceff27e4000c8c59c6dddd2c7b8ecf2d
describe
'62262' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKZS' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
acc94f78fba2d95c1e42ff7665b5c095
f647eb3cdd08f1a97cb275a4a9b9532ad1d8644b
'2012-02-18T10:38:05-05:00'
describe
'6881528' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKZT' 'sip-files00061.tif'
ff0aad9a67069af848e00fbed9d37b39
2850ee353de049227e3175b18971144a00623100
'2012-02-18T10:48:09-05:00'
describe
'1799' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKZU' 'sip-files00061.txt'
f4a903b9268a4ccadc401e7138da9000
00ba1ee1944fdeb86aef48367eaab3e7c8aa6bcc
describe
'32077' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKZV' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
92e9caed64b99c5ae984aa7a6f798c21
bb1300a87fedf83443176c86979fd899b81b929d
describe
'857243' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKZW' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
c23e7919e4bc4b3cf0679a64e50ced12
4f907a161744ee3898b29c30eeb91beb1bf56aae
describe
'197298' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKZX' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
e16aa87b443ba1c906bb7911db1a7c79
a4e9600383938499e5afcacff22c1bf5931eebbd
describe
'105449' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKZY' 'sip-files00062.pro'
5ce8bcfd517241c73a7531f5ab467e8d
7a54c4ca4b43c1311a7db6efb87be68d6173f12a
'2012-02-18T10:48:13-05:00'
describe
'63564' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAKZZ' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
38a9cddbe86c56f653815e9500e01f5c
27eb84ae7ff240157c142df50284814e7f83067f
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALAA' 'sip-files00062.tif'
ff60ccd4072661662043611c3aa11d89
5213adf2afdf6115f72f592758682f63a5515028
'2012-02-18T10:48:27-05:00'
describe
'4131' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALAB' 'sip-files00062.txt'
0193be04482a3d54a451e7efd4deb42c
079bf078893da12ccf2388aecd5f7080559f9ca5
describe
'31305' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALAC' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
1a48305ee8068bc08505116437f1040a
7baa173a849b43c01add2d28399533991d1a0d7e
'2012-02-18T10:42:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALAD' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
e9519dd7590cb9113ee0de0046913bbf
dd04f3a56716ff9185865d5e8dcec1b974481fd2
'2012-02-18T10:39:00-05:00'
describe
'183125' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALAE' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
c1311820a2e47230c3103899d37b7085
6758243b2337da721562b9a4c1910cc946c2ab2a
describe
'53658' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALAF' 'sip-files00063.pro'
f78333f1b61f9a069f2c364abacba1f7
d083e57494c2b15a0e0c2984bb72e97e63ddcda8
'2012-02-18T10:39:07-05:00'
describe
'61242' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALAG' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
5ad848a77e2593208bfa6ebf0976df27
7ee5212020dffb8522ff06f5993dfc75a790b4f9
'2012-02-18T10:46:19-05:00'
describe
'6881336' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALAH' 'sip-files00063.tif'
e1b5109328b918584de6139f9028128b
91017607194036e7dea2e272699d0b948a2abad1
'2012-02-18T10:39:43-05:00'
describe
'2194' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALAI' 'sip-files00063.txt'
0ded4ddc84f678ed9960309bec5dc904
c52d8265ff1dd0480580854b6d9f891dbd02093e
'2012-02-18T10:41:35-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'31627' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALAJ' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
34269a665efa40b1873b7c6a28f9b0c4
e3b94b025dbad06bf7fe29de701bfcc6e36c272b
'2012-02-18T10:39:14-05:00'
describe
'857317' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALAK' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
bda3a3aa74b1bd0b657661dd18f7e34d
63c28e0caf467a6e426e56ea4d3e85ce35318eae
'2012-02-18T10:39:17-05:00'
describe
'198060' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALAL' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
0298d5343671f45f28d76262e49ffbe2
6a477b156c412b03732ad40031a5d30e2cb803d1
'2012-02-18T10:42:08-05:00'
describe
'61709' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALAM' 'sip-files00064.pro'
9b4d8f39155d166c6b80aa656f0c7935
55c4fa254ca5345d94efa29414d606c2b2e58ff4
describe
'64832' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALAN' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
d7d944f4133aea7566ba591a06b2041a
dbfcb567e671bac3cd0f0729d54b5f1e228d6a31
describe
'6881544' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALAO' 'sip-files00064.tif'
cc9f83a0344368b615188f5eec8e54a6
03506ce5fb8d8c5f769059cdf75cbe9e3fc846ec
describe
'2535' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALAP' 'sip-files00064.txt'
f11ecedb5c8050c20807c252c0db31c8
f136dced75993a320cfb4cf746dc9efc78ac81de
'2012-02-18T10:45:10-05:00'
describe
'32338' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALAQ' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
9a54d47b4a900b4482a6e600a762729e
e1e93d94cbc245403bd5d18e39ae5fe892bc748b
describe
'857297' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALAR' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
c5c23157f2113e8e15b8cfbab6ebf355
6ec571377334aaadd30791172aa3d29a0fe399b9
'2012-02-18T10:45:27-05:00'
describe
'169530' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALAS' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
6504d65a397a7baf39baaffd67bd165a
9d7c35e6f5313750e2480ca7e641bd42346745f1
'2012-02-18T10:40:10-05:00'
describe
'62873' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALAT' 'sip-files00065.pro'
432e66086b6b9cda60e1c6681d364e0d
f83a351eeef23d87077b9fa8d1e9a45420f272ee
'2012-02-18T10:49:01-05:00'
describe
'57608' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALAU' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
934dc8815715f7993a5af27840dbf3c8
f10766e66e602f72d99b2ebb3de908d9dc18d0e5
'2012-02-18T10:45:19-05:00'
describe
'6880836' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALAV' 'sip-files00065.tif'
122372fd07908fb71863d3b176b6eb81
31ef580d6c5303374e0556d807af3f6bd20bc1ce
'2012-02-18T10:38:38-05:00'
describe
'2837' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALAW' 'sip-files00065.txt'
cebce0a9e413311c10e730d66c44a0fa
c86345a11538e4b595783c34225a89ab32003d87
'2012-02-18T10:40:25-05:00'
describe
'30586' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALAX' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
695f8463370b708909457485c11981b6
4ea30cddeee0f3b33c6747ba51677bac8f9fa2a1
'2012-02-18T10:49:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALAY' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
34e4e9a27cfbf5badad8468dcceab5d5
1eeec748cbb2d94642e392f4ceac5e7fd5d358db
describe
'186140' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALAZ' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
7e3b75295622f01b2e90d4477bca298c
60c509b1f459ddcd882b39d82a4726fe299910c1
'2012-02-18T10:37:10-05:00'
describe
'97993' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALBA' 'sip-files00066.pro'
4c4c8e2992cc92219be9fae01aec3f1b
6c876723bcb5b045b24758c974339f0892abda9a
describe
'60709' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALBB' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
3bed3decf046daa21bdad72f6ed68f18
d8eef8553ce58a061e1c30a06a13e5659df44890
'2012-02-18T10:41:07-05:00'
describe
'6880652' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALBC' 'sip-files00066.tif'
cbe01f45fc57708b6e8ad7b42dcb0233
bddf8fb95dc37f154a02524f4ef9b2bd45a2f63f
describe
'3852' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALBD' 'sip-files00066.txt'
d9036d386a7f2028dcd10ede146ac5a2
0d2c3d49f135798119ddd21b98eb34c6a43af0c2
describe
'30406' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALBE' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
acbd388ac64393e30249d5051ce5a57d
29be9064083cbdeda54c048cb77512b7731a0214
describe
'857314' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALBF' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
7d92597f16068cf17ccd5c4a2a906198
b85e08fb35466d405fa280aa62cf63ba7ef849a8
describe
'194623' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALBG' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
45a38da02041df192bef76fbd2bcede9
11def11dfabd2c526b4d8456b10f156e531763f5
describe
'106334' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALBH' 'sip-files00067.pro'
4eb2cfccd1f2e85c27b3a4f5f541afab
34b268b996f4f58a1a6b0d462756d8d59ce73b10
'2012-02-18T10:46:27-05:00'
describe
'63354' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALBI' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
dea32b8533ad899680851c99fb70d8c0
9e71cbe73865026edb68787b6b63a30c88872d39
describe
'6881056' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALBJ' 'sip-files00067.tif'
3ddd2c5e2c9ee790e1640f121ae23870
9093f5c4d9d85638915a5e0c67ecceffdc0b725c
'2012-02-18T10:46:50-05:00'
describe
'4172' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALBK' 'sip-files00067.txt'
2a86855d9382e0a340cc47abbfbbcdde
9294f452374a82d5fe232bcdf12d5392056652dc
describe
'31202' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALBL' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
c3066e97fa4cd2871622578a4483cbe8
d1e292040ffc7d3affb83e260324ea236d34b813
describe
'857229' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALBM' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
800b8b949af49d81dbf81183aa5ed6df
2d78213405bfee7a4fd2b41972ed03ca0f124397
'2012-02-18T10:37:28-05:00'
describe
'194519' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALBN' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
fc61d79911146ed75b4ff1bb5b4bf734
697c7650c3f4ee97a6f1d38e53b22b693b8f535d
'2012-02-18T10:44:44-05:00'
describe
'109078' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALBO' 'sip-files00068.pro'
f12c63cff9f32b32d8fd21e4cc99806c
84c0872f8b19186d882ae290ef10778c9593515d
'2012-02-18T10:47:09-05:00'
describe
'62754' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALBP' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
485d1f7f018acb65fe0d4ab2c27e7304
ee2fc0777a8cd2159c0e025df407a25db006038a
'2012-02-18T10:45:18-05:00'
describe
'6880796' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALBQ' 'sip-files00068.tif'
a415824d20d98e1068147936be2d885a
fc3db32ce35ee62c8ee87bcde45585864a299f96
'2012-02-18T10:41:56-05:00'
describe
'4261' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALBR' 'sip-files00068.txt'
b40252a442f0a2166e6ee0ea63a4aa63
010407f21de608b7b327317c35e1eda37d97e68f
'2012-02-18T10:48:28-05:00'
describe
'30697' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALBS' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
0bb2a4c7d5d2ba2ed5ea5dfdb8bedfd7
ef4fe90eb735140fc7daebe1232525651ca9cbde
'2012-02-18T10:41:09-05:00'
describe
'857258' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALBT' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
9c7ac0fc2d584d5a8b643bb371d4a80d
753753425185e00d30e68ba90b33f22bb8521325
'2012-02-18T10:40:05-05:00'
describe
'186503' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALBU' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
7755c4578f6eabcfff7050a230e3c7fa
2f5f5e6d657fd901170320706527d29e4087717f
describe
'98142' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALBV' 'sip-files00069.pro'
50a0170d8fa4c33bad16bc0aad0a0726
6618f7bbd958653503551aca0cafb58fd0450268
'2012-02-18T10:38:33-05:00'
describe
'60918' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALBW' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
8231a13048a1b407c4d6d6ca9806d58a
a51e053d973056bd1f0d83c2372d5d7b509f3243
'2012-02-18T10:42:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALBX' 'sip-files00069.tif'
1e3288fd8b6169fc66bfe6dc864f91b8
b9287cbcc4d7d9bddf48eb0ccfc93bd39c2ce052
'2012-02-18T10:38:49-05:00'
describe
'3860' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALBY' 'sip-files00069.txt'
9fca1999865902c3d4c6b6616878000e
0dc876f7c747db054526ae97cf79efc75de7c05d
describe
'30603' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALBZ' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
b5bd3becfb8c9e409e606be325275261
b7527f40356218d14f3c8cb30107ae9261e1251c
describe
'857206' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALCA' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
5290df087708d00f3742d7ecfbb415c3
a91458b1368679e931633fc54757c754489ecd12
describe
'179452' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALCB' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
7d128f752d1ee5838c505f382577fb5f
c278bde24e4157fd92f5f8a1bf1276f06b6051f6
'2012-02-18T10:49:27-05:00'
describe
'98537' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALCC' 'sip-files00070.pro'
ae81865a9b6e117b071ab3e8944402df
b30ae0bc53673bacaf76b88edc0b83c5dc9e2dae
describe
'59823' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALCD' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
df7e0ac1f620d229501f76cfeb8f682e
aa247f9734b8a82e6f41e63d7ce916fd0932844b
describe
'6880616' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALCE' 'sip-files00070.tif'
e6beb7b9e2065996dcf6c31f6a6f01c4
b7cd57661a0d88a9cb050926254839b4f4dd3604
'2012-02-18T10:46:28-05:00'
describe
'3876' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALCF' 'sip-files00070.txt'
2d283ceee0a3bde6fd4ec45a18d278eb
43384589769add2ba818fec93d7c925d94999c9e
describe
'30217' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALCG' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
b1fcd6e0ab6bdb5ecea15c4972711bad
f8d73049d976504433454f0e9c808cb007d82908
'2012-02-18T10:43:27-05:00'
describe
'857235' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALCH' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
7e70502615d09f6c37ca18b1f0606127
9ee5f0663c2aa9992ef8aa86d003806ff14fd373
'2012-02-18T10:43:02-05:00'
describe
'186275' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALCI' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
5dca79a6915ba79ad408bcbf17a9fbaa
ff9ce815296a52785ffae955f7d04dfd00af400a
'2012-02-18T10:49:28-05:00'
describe
'47625' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALCJ' 'sip-files00071.pro'
f19337bc8d39f8958e8e352c210f69fb
bc755e239364731b0a88cb89251206cc86974d9e
describe
'62178' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALCK' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
ba7b74501dd82ccd907429c5a31c6b2d
55d8b16090e8876a90e7aee3e2079011fef4c03d
'2012-02-18T10:45:47-05:00'
describe
'6881552' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALCL' 'sip-files00071.tif'
e5eb0265ef0dcc416757ad35fff6c4a0
2388a70f558147c1822ab3626d170eaedb420e5a
'2012-02-18T10:41:32-05:00'
describe
'2097' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALCM' 'sip-files00071.txt'
6bf03489807ea313bc8ed4700b820067
a6090f4737d75b84294a19407da908999c5d6250
'2012-02-18T10:39:59-05:00'
describe
'31931' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALCN' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
373685c1a736edf43a943259bc000152
df65884cb4addd5f92cc3e3484c2bbcef8784ce0
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALCO' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
3fd8e4450ac8f09921a9f25174afaa0b
b8856c0c156a264773a67550640c2ddb447cddc4
'2012-02-18T10:43:22-05:00'
describe
'200446' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALCP' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
341520db1d9ae1230e319eeb0d8d4c0b
ed338858cb2a67dba2f1136bf5e66c22842f3300
'2012-02-18T10:49:43-05:00'
describe
'107719' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALCQ' 'sip-files00072.pro'
6d116ee9569d6bc7c97af02ce64e7190
618acb3a49b368da0e6275348de6c0fe09a8cff7
'2012-02-18T10:37:57-05:00'
describe
'64846' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALCR' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
6a946ab339dcee62624e715a4602f5b7
2a406ba439c22437fbbd3fc5c2c36592af61bdb9
'2012-02-18T10:40:30-05:00'
describe
'6881440' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALCS' 'sip-files00072.tif'
0be25426ff6f98d912ff25bfb99cff1c
85f87d67b874c77020bcc24e92ab9ef854f62d22
'2012-02-18T10:47:41-05:00'
describe
'4218' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALCT' 'sip-files00072.txt'
eddbee4fb4cfd3c9e50d33669242a188
de7f58da9a0646566426dee311c324c4e5880218
describe
'31892' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALCU' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
65e654ce2f3c38f026a2a34b2e884a35
8b90a5fdc195fef79d62005924d2662cffe6003b
'2012-02-18T10:49:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALCV' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
cf0ac1ccbbf2f7463daaddae5db93162
e56a991ed8b8cce40d8357e9d4a6ca027573f744
describe
'176081' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALCW' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
7dbea9a63ecb7fd88042ba75e4ba4ff9
8c6b24d2c99e942b6043441536d5928b65847f9c
'2012-02-18T10:47:53-05:00'
describe
'45103' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALCX' 'sip-files00073.pro'
83ffda6e42a4778aac9260a534190618
3f6190321211034eb337fb327dd41bef81e1c18f
describe
'59475' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALCY' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
f0261693aeace83ba4ccd14bc93d55d4
f0afa8a0102e5b52ebd7d4663136f4f439917349
'2012-02-18T10:46:54-05:00'
describe
'6881012' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALCZ' 'sip-files00073.tif'
c3d446e9fb40ef8401f8e17064078918
530eb93e9ded7b33017d85d9e83bab91961db91d
'2012-02-18T10:48:21-05:00'
describe
'1778' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALDA' 'sip-files00073.txt'
ce3b6b2e44d8f2b79ca6b460e333c2c2
580ce1a7ee84e116fdc931f788404b2018d5e54d
describe
'31152' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALDB' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
2a931a604dc1512934e5a37737a0bf83
d197b2bb36c2b3ff4633a4fdf0ed3f2daa69951f
'2012-02-18T10:38:48-05:00'
describe
'857251' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALDC' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
00f47604b1fb27a7ed6fd854b0527ddc
9801cad59ec169858aea98dd82c0afb823a30183
'2012-02-18T10:44:45-05:00'
describe
'187653' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALDD' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
dc20770128398c0be48f7239a2d8f4cb
0826ec47985483d4c8265230e0d6ca5b73a3f28e
describe
'100747' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALDE' 'sip-files00074.pro'
1a9e6560d0332868d8a7a884b8a3e9f1
c40d61689e662664d718e2811450022381714b1a
'2012-02-18T10:40:33-05:00'
describe
'60742' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALDF' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
64fde37b3c412ab4e28c6f57032d9a3c
9243330e2d54a71890c2b554868defcdbecc83c3
'2012-02-18T10:40:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALDG' 'sip-files00074.tif'
9f0997012f76178ab2e8df5b020f277b
00db592cddebedbb2cb7bce72282cd7c3fce3aec
describe
'4010' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALDH' 'sip-files00074.txt'
371eff089be67668e889f907d5413dca
df7e1fdecdc8c3b9182dcd17bb20520d817c803c
describe
'30573' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALDI' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
7316e03ada13ed0681f59f0fb55ddd14
983ed9b9e81896d779d0e49ebe05ef10ed88cd00
'2012-02-18T10:41:37-05:00'
describe
'857253' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALDJ' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
e424453e9d9f8220050a5c22dabd084b
6fd083164c54daaee6817cba22da30ca010f5724
describe
'185700' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALDK' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
b6381aa7954c2ec1b8ccfcd14f6075ab
ff8ac1b2b714849f9de5f0987a0975fd224037b4
'2012-02-18T10:45:32-05:00'
describe
'98548' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALDL' 'sip-files00075.pro'
d8c5b528b00d2db5204a8035e68dfc00
186d12453046616778ccbd130b01ee0b8d6c5a79
'2012-02-18T10:49:36-05:00'
describe
'60237' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALDM' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
2e4db7b441886bae1293f9f94e4d7415
16b5330be402f9814141b93a946816e2dffa62e7
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALDN' 'sip-files00075.tif'
c0d4244f19704e960f4773af3c8ab5d1
c9234fa045c4d1671798edbd326363cc3a078f7e
'2012-02-18T10:44:55-05:00'
describe
'3866' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALDO' 'sip-files00075.txt'
1d1d2f50a68b1550d39c56a7e7b8115a
7b54c571fd773f2e26c2ff2758bec16bc568c1b1
'2012-02-18T10:39:38-05:00'
describe
'30455' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALDP' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
f5bc4c6a6246971a713c41976f589315
137c9352b08a31188681a82efccf4ccfdb194146
describe
'857267' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALDQ' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
e2af82bd9d86e2ec07ab4207ee6a389a
c8803d395729b9987d41f379fe56d0776e1f11b9
describe
'190777' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALDR' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
7d7f04ffa25a078e5d5e28e3e08e1264
fada6c60f437790e352e3ab0ca2b33082cf36960
'2012-02-18T10:46:32-05:00'
describe
'103718' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALDS' 'sip-files00076.pro'
f71d50258aaa46f393e4fef023b741d1
a76fc0b8ae1d867e22ca45acb9156849f1b86b02
'2012-02-18T10:45:39-05:00'
describe
'62516' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALDT' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
cae30ee28c29989f6683cd8119f06d80
d5accd6a325aaf5e841b3ec007f162aa9f7c36da
describe
'6880988' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALDU' 'sip-files00076.tif'
f1d776e8ed7e85f51962cdb532d820c2
83894a1e0aaca333e5c69b38017e1c4285f46da0
'2012-02-18T10:39:24-05:00'
describe
'4071' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALDV' 'sip-files00076.txt'
0e6f45fee3dba4781433085dceb951ea
a78336bfe554e6d975fe0d378d891127c04b33b0
describe
'31031' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALDW' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
d2967901a84bd91519aae38df3d47eb2
d1d3f9ec6a7dbe37150313f9c85aa488516bb955
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALDX' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
8adb685d2abbed9e39e3099eb7cb6c40
32f555c3daaf112b16b7a5199640bbbb9c24c1d0
describe
'184859' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALDY' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
3d209ba47dc9f6b84901e65201c39b2b
da6dc749ee538fba7b704e1d0663a820fbe48146
describe
'96163' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALDZ' 'sip-files00077.pro'
2db9283491000b1350b6bf1e9649fd0a
42e35b14037bdafd8047e132393cdca5a85efc32
describe
'61296' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALEA' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
b28d32a50bc0074954c624ee756e4c0a
76ea7d8679904c7ab5bce81eb307fb9ee8c62b5c
'2012-02-18T10:45:55-05:00'
describe
'6880672' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALEB' 'sip-files00077.tif'
6e4a0e862e9e4d7111572d16159aeaf9
50d73c269068bfdff99e47ad5e570917b10ea97f
'2012-02-18T10:43:33-05:00'
describe
'3782' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALEC' 'sip-files00077.txt'
8c7fe580e0ec3eeefada169b5d562a0d
451a1e5d700d7c47a7a949693868dfba444e54f6
'2012-02-18T10:44:13-05:00'
describe
'30753' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALED' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
f4d827a0890764712da5690a82c53163
316bc1654fbb87c215233d9f62b12b8c06bb2711
describe
'857293' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALEE' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
8da3b2bc6a07b02e52921732e90ed907
1c1f83da8c4d6c66add255520367b589efaa5402
'2012-02-18T10:42:04-05:00'
describe
'177608' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALEF' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
376881b03d7f4304ed8f03d5a67b5f15
c67e593e316cf68047a3581a61d7532ca1daf306
'2012-02-18T10:47:50-05:00'
describe
'49604' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALEG' 'sip-files00078.pro'
f8f30e955237c0fae12b426a4eaf5080
baab824f05d78cb109f1049c96913fb5f2dc9c3e
'2012-02-18T10:49:39-05:00'
describe
'60424' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALEH' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
46794948e75dc80b658a29e85a2fda59
404b058d005bac716be2ed236aa490918dd75daa
describe
'6881404' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALEI' 'sip-files00078.tif'
b705d9d8beab4cd989fdd4dbd57bbe97
6e1e53b5a458d7f33567ccfa439870f92028405d
'2012-02-18T10:38:52-05:00'
describe
'1951' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALEJ' 'sip-files00078.txt'
1e983f7c7bd568766ec68fac65455fc7
896a17ba5c309a1fac3a7ef395fa89f1762283bf
'2012-02-18T10:48:08-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'31822' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALEK' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
e0825464c84d6b391812dc039aff0e23
b4522e8d38a1f34adfe49c7e6f915d04ee82acb2
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALEL' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
bae3ee6c549f06bd9820b59bded38026
8da3a7402134f0dcfd177f844b30f04dadb09a8d
'2012-02-18T10:49:03-05:00'
describe
'189554' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALEM' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
3b6299b8bb65063abe5ea7785f94a30a
a26add316b97ea512d4cc6d57c0100a545857f1c
'2012-02-18T10:42:39-05:00'
describe
'56316' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALEN' 'sip-files00079.pro'
79354344379f824b945240393c3b9e29
2221e1c0f1764dd7fb296cb10c7027ef9189119c
describe
'63770' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALEO' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
e398c3f2483aaf395f12a72ff0d9a44a
63ab380fff4038bcde1496217abe4748738915d6
'2012-02-18T10:48:26-05:00'
describe
'6881836' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALEP' 'sip-files00079.tif'
909f435318fc13bf787770edf5f80f3e
071031bfdee23e6270fe3aeb3ca099b07678746f
'2012-02-18T10:41:33-05:00'
describe
'2279' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALEQ' 'sip-files00079.txt'
7855dc5f66c95ae296baf98947b12b56
db20c7e91bff5352b2b172e5167ffd764c2a2b78
'2012-02-18T10:45:56-05:00'
describe
'32748' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALER' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
b248cebe078c194cea469f9815cf8cce
5f082ff42b5b986663e2e5b5844a85c8c2fe7cf8
'2012-02-18T10:45:59-05:00'
describe
'857264' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALES' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
3552ad10eb89cd16f8970657e7f7da31
d116435fa1f419337b34a3a53b705c29a67abd1b
'2012-02-18T10:38:19-05:00'
describe
'179917' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALET' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
fb501e8b2b1cbeaf60fee0c96d5e2112
18ae7ae054d74ed25630162c6bde42a4a45c9b78
'2012-02-18T10:48:07-05:00'
describe
'67242' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALEU' 'sip-files00080.pro'
1b8216993fb54201dbf4feae4dffef04
0f112b78b2f38122c5244c72ebf3ae19ca0530e6
describe
'60593' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALEV' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
4c7a335554581f6e1151b56904e08c57
efce7ef29f5630541e6935320e206e04d5bdb67a
'2012-02-18T10:46:43-05:00'
describe
'6880916' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALEW' 'sip-files00080.tif'
e1177c2c52ea0d1072e42fc62ff8418f
20c5663ee300f8a95b8440ca92208011773b92ac
'2012-02-18T10:49:10-05:00'
describe
'2718' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALEX' 'sip-files00080.txt'
20637cdcaab23267a953b94d809934de
45b3e3b5ecfea173927d6fbc9c5dd03b82157443
'2012-02-18T10:46:16-05:00'
describe
'31009' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALEY' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
2648c09f3b5f565fe8d8e50ae8a0f5ca
00e55f71f390317f1365b2d0b071bd018af935fb
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALEZ' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
714db6a13b08a25d491e80b4e95b90b1
006c451cd59d9e6651c0e8c9efc3e6b95e2ab13c
'2012-02-18T10:43:46-05:00'
describe
'187570' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALFA' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
25741c76fce6cfa218511af6a4e014b0
f21230c12e736d335dc10dbafed95c7d1d331b68
'2012-02-18T10:45:44-05:00'
describe
'83992' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALFB' 'sip-files00081.pro'
0fef890c2d46cfc80ae3163aa4d1f1c8
dade7146ace7c6acd9b5fc8676c0507aadc9aa57
describe
'62531' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALFC' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
f661dc4b00ebc91b29ca8d9ad0d83047
df4fc71b126c6bba83f040a47d6dcc3cb5caa10a
describe
'6881164' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALFD' 'sip-files00081.tif'
c8f14a3d8bff2e92c20adce1441a51e3
4812b1d4377065bbea7bf6875b9ca4a6065d226e
'2012-02-18T10:48:37-05:00'
describe
'3366' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALFE' 'sip-files00081.txt'
7aac8e2d582d2b2c5e7a8d65024b87c5
2e2e93986172af00833dbf8bd9e34bbdc5fdd8cc
describe
'31638' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALFF' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
ae09fa1e400c1ca77bf2273fb622ba4f
281773509c2a629ec4ca0245d1dda5a5fb788ce4
describe
'857198' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALFG' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
ba11e205a0d35343e1c901c68789fb0f
9727190a194ceebc122db3782a47d6a68d0f0cf8
describe
'175047' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALFH' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
9a2ab905b3235fe38d4a451cab495a40
f8776f03a0db1241d5954abae37c441b92f58d01
describe
'89996' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALFI' 'sip-files00082.pro'
37d7a4061c5e4999e58dd27459d9c67d
b13e0d9c62038fe24d3c90bec934ec7a4d3d9fae
'2012-02-18T10:48:29-05:00'
describe
'58500' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALFJ' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
8d55e10986bd71ba5510ea1316e275ad
f7d600b7e4cee21ac69daa6b232fcf6d6a807378
describe
'6880604' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALFK' 'sip-files00082.tif'
30b0f4ba499a1c21cf8180df1d3b6f02
3583138ab80459d37b06be8676b3c57dec18a2ef
'2012-02-18T10:49:20-05:00'
describe
'3675' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALFL' 'sip-files00082.txt'
741370335bf321d6169d0b087daedccf
e2e9da3b781d05034efa3b2f70e7b6ce171ed6ef
'2012-02-18T10:49:53-05:00'
describe
'30221' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALFM' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
a9d46d51d7ff1252e02063f3067acc76
3d579c7b35a5b63be399ee8513cbdc0503cce469
'2012-02-18T10:46:07-05:00'
describe
'857194' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALFN' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
7034d754a6715b423dc7eb03181287b0
55b3a42068f23c91f734769341f1fef1d74193dd
'2012-02-18T10:49:55-05:00'
describe
'177497' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALFO' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
db317ec27784e6640cac0fa7fc953e53
d86bc5edde501c7c71813a315c1797134b0b1940
describe
'96399' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALFP' 'sip-files00083.pro'
b4c5809a0da942a2081f98628e571a2d
8c68655e96683599ae293c70e6367f23a768d795
describe
'58413' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALFQ' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
04c04198559ba1276c9e7ed3d872ad03
99cb0626315ee3315bce718d9e8248e2b58fe452
describe
'6880424' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALFR' 'sip-files00083.tif'
b2a4df6945d4e8b5014c7620a18e639c
0d714a7e26edfe14ccccfd39bb9eae432c2a3536
'2012-02-18T10:49:49-05:00'
describe
'3784' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALFS' 'sip-files00083.txt'
e9154afd04d7f4cd9a57ecf8b8977ab6
566c1752982b00430a371813eeb186ea80419a59
describe
'30025' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALFT' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
d1ad977ce2ff5e7b295fb59c26ec4d8f
68ec32028deec248bc24a1c91acfb60076deaaf0
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALFU' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
9ef876ab579c3d54f712726c86f717aa
6883b8562ca86ee298e977c76351bef8cc442ff6
'2012-02-18T10:47:21-05:00'
describe
'191437' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALFV' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
230ae0251dad281d97c7bf5e6662e874
e47c8aa99092a4166edcd7504982da4a81018911
'2012-02-18T10:47:16-05:00'
describe
'108302' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALFW' 'sip-files00084.pro'
6a325895a77fa5bf6566036c677f3e36
c4ca4dbda81cf845f1cc46bc33302129e90f659b
'2012-02-18T10:40:12-05:00'
describe
'62320' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALFX' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
13ac8b6d010301f5f0b53d6016dd2814
00ed5cb71be7ab31479ea25deeadb56ebf6bf822
'2012-02-18T10:49:50-05:00'
describe
'6880884' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALFY' 'sip-files00084.tif'
e81839e172d878752d0ec1ecd390a7a0
c95b93ce745b45bf3a524af839b68399b37e3702
'2012-02-18T10:48:36-05:00'
describe
'4242' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALFZ' 'sip-files00084.txt'
5e704eb331d22236f47af378e33ffc05
e593a4ee0aae5df3454bd34375f22ba3aef3c154
describe
'30707' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALGA' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
9f07df43b2fe76fae7fdf96a56b8c65a
d7a41e3132f8692755e1f33ce81e27ee26a15c72
'2012-02-18T10:43:56-05:00'
describe
'857268' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALGB' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
3dbc11d9c16fb12ce01cc44074f9cf32
3a47018b2d67ce5ecbd7833fc9c9211338edbd0f
'2012-02-18T10:47:57-05:00'
describe
'177396' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALGC' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
e45a205a5493e5ceedd591cbbcf527d1
6402d3fae1519ac421a74e647ebd972b3d834d53
describe
'96857' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALGD' 'sip-files00085.pro'
b752cb5651ad17677039d72d38656fdf
2821c0914f0b78ef490fdcdfd5c8dca63935b8a5
'2012-02-18T10:46:55-05:00'
describe
'58068' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALGE' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
a114e3733f3c0c046853983ef8d76a19
8f0aaa4c1709c15cf98dd2b5d6e8cb888baee4fb
'2012-02-18T10:40:41-05:00'
describe
'6880416' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALGF' 'sip-files00085.tif'
107587b805e8f86bcdc264cd3558c6ca
f881358f318f0b301f6ffb9980f44f4ee192ebb1
'2012-02-18T10:39:45-05:00'
describe
'3817' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALGG' 'sip-files00085.txt'
b2b4199b698098cd115ef0652efe9641
9a0d44aa4451691a6123788e27168b1be78ffd19
'2012-02-18T10:48:30-05:00'
describe
'29493' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALGH' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
8fbabc4ac873d550a41b04b0f2dfedfa
bec165ec3406abefafff38974893fa6b12d14c8f
'2012-02-18T10:48:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALGI' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
e52670c76d508012b6cd22e586dc30a8
eac6a1a1ba0c16f5b525fe0656a1d2b8a7dc12c9
describe
'194149' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALGJ' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
7c34b44c234c19ffeff064719623f665
e9a3d8f506c3ea71ff7de5325a695eb2924c6a6a
describe
'41017' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALGK' 'sip-files00086.pro'
095da153dfe14f223cd9a256dfaf93c3
0d5f10e55d385b1332cfee3d2e5ddec8d584cbd9
'2012-02-18T10:47:38-05:00'
describe
'63627' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALGL' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
aa2f13bf94d4b5a60f4970bf07f97ff0
6b08d6c58bc3f11f26550b7f7c392fff3574a70a
'2012-02-18T10:49:16-05:00'
describe
'6881940' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALGM' 'sip-files00086.tif'
9f02aed98a2e453af5b15d0c1386dc4f
887f8614a100250be72e883f55f0f4962763d545
describe
'1675' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALGN' 'sip-files00086.txt'
64f800c97ccfa65e16f9598bdec6d24b
c1e899b9ddac28162eb539c9301eb1ccba46521c
describe
'32745' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALGO' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
1eed4ac4e4a6a9a62ce12018aa7e48c0
1057656b6adaa18815dddbf9eba79e4d9d031787
'2012-02-18T10:37:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALGP' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
42513bd2028f8ea8996e4013246c7ade
249e41388fb9c4be1418f13f70ac2dff686dea7b
'2012-02-18T10:42:10-05:00'
describe
'194722' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALGQ' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
8b28d3723d1290d48962a9c49e0dbd4b
92649ec653e77840fd822f2360d8d62e6e430bf7
'2012-02-18T10:43:03-05:00'
describe
'109907' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALGR' 'sip-files00087.pro'
ffbb725427f012cdbf517e84c56a7981
58b356d64ef2904cc314196c3ccae0c58921f703
describe
'62832' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALGS' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
69124e1787db49fec3da698e7fbe8393
641a16792404268054906e2c90fe5d4aafcbb96a
'2012-02-18T10:38:22-05:00'
describe
'6880848' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALGT' 'sip-files00087.tif'
049027c480a9373d8dad23a35558d7fd
c0f76f0c9e8cadf5f3c45e678547744b8aa5d35c
'2012-02-18T10:42:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALGU' 'sip-files00087.txt'
fc80657d721fc028b1888d9630fd2f75
bf725dd7e1a37474203e634a7c32f2002fca1302
'2012-02-18T10:48:41-05:00'
describe
'30781' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALGV' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
a523dd8c9656183bb5ba2c7d92040936
42d7bdafd2865071ec74531a536588cade0388b2
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALGW' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
2c9ad6edde3a14249b9136760b9880c4
7dd844cdac37f6cc413b96b8f182b4caf20bd443
describe
'175302' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALGX' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
822ca62eefb966cf852f86f3de4f9585
bd46660c75fb1a4b52f522fd016d1ba8206f3854
'2012-02-18T10:42:40-05:00'
describe
'47094' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALGY' 'sip-files00088.pro'
b8aa1e81a11dfc6a860eda6e26d6dac0
fe83baaf28a3bb661666d3440d135a3ba49350ac
'2012-02-18T10:48:02-05:00'
describe
'58203' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALGZ' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
71e3476e341092508707d40ecbe6e8c4
961417e46f1c6cd6025180a2e3060b69e015f8ee
describe
'6880824' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALHA' 'sip-files00088.tif'
6f4798d40eec1a8a7cb24775770d3664
fbe879c5719d0153f5d01c21588d9d688154a842
describe
'1852' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALHB' 'sip-files00088.txt'
2aa97f763654f19c7f17430aa40f60b9
d6d9c9bb0da0527fce896d8f55c662fe4f936f51
describe
'30622' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALHC' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
770df0020ff53d3badc8f01e6660408b
cb87a2d8a894fe12e6ece7007248fa03a1c1372d
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALHD' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
ad88c7649e81672262a5c3efd701714f
84a9fb42907527b9bdac909cd9b6e972cc74aa8c
'2012-02-18T10:47:05-05:00'
describe
'193086' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALHE' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
8272de954f031f7a15de7f3e566644f4
8128c8b501d02cefbdbac99428b054bddcc38798
'2012-02-18T10:47:15-05:00'
describe
'103887' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALHF' 'sip-files00089.pro'
438b6eff1a2c42f83abbe94fd6a58b15
3b78aebd49d426dc6cfbd1d94bc43bff4e9ad97b
'2012-02-18T10:39:19-05:00'
describe
'63073' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALHG' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
1164c3de3f350964a3659548e94e93b3
2592513e984979086e9fb0d6a5fc17ac77431d76
describe
'6881072' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALHH' 'sip-files00089.tif'
16960f6d56dd93df1a8eb87ec3dbd411
bbd3fe0d068ff82d9656d56e19531d818fb9368d
'2012-02-18T10:39:56-05:00'
describe
'4087' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALHI' 'sip-files00089.txt'
c3b91dce82d6bd8c7c4910a1d9460654
a20d3e34c017e79344d69063c6f1d8e6b22d992e
describe
'31049' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALHJ' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
e298c0d7c7da359640faa521fcc2afbc
2347625e21a0e50902c2f396410b4ba9570cd122
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALHK' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
73811136c1fdb95f3c25a1679e474ea3
8eb43b05c1a5e557e6fcf11e22f4e9779d86f4af
'2012-02-18T10:37:59-05:00'
describe
'179617' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALHL' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
54cc7d0ebc743fb07c70da383221e4d0
ed7297d24145840432d6bcfc9c60964c5897a601
'2012-02-18T10:38:31-05:00'
describe
'99242' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALHM' 'sip-files00090.pro'
603fad8842da563ae4240b7ca812cf2f
355694b4c88d0dac45b25be4f88e189122a332bf
'2012-02-18T10:47:08-05:00'
describe
'59399' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALHN' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
63ba674884f5adb2fb5cd509120950a8
e261be6b8ee1477a8f9d44fb9c09e44bb8798a74
'2012-02-18T10:41:02-05:00'
describe
'6880540' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALHO' 'sip-files00090.tif'
8e6262a9f6f6f7adc6c55b068dafa6ec
752f98c70e76279386368432987f3a64244f4f21
describe
'4014' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALHP' 'sip-files00090.txt'
42a1bb6845358eb1606821d71aeebc35
e1f8767ac3f46ccbf55e44e8a085b4dc55d45c05
describe
'30095' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALHQ' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
b4c8270590e5a234a6aeea30babe90e2
5eb40c8f1601fbbc0e5f82ea16997c741cf486f3
describe
'857294' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALHR' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
65b783021d4614ecd4f28c389dde91d9
0d6c8b7458e1dd23bfdf1557e78efce5d9ab7dd7
describe
'186096' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALHS' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
ae6a60babf3e81f01d3270c4df569eb6
2037f3b2199d0f5e0aeddc5fc2411e0bc8623ac1
'2012-02-18T10:42:06-05:00'
describe
'50248' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALHT' 'sip-files00091.pro'
e6ad766434c8c0c8c1f425f5d8c35c61
1db728bd0ce6c226056d4aedf4c4e444ca30f215
'2012-02-18T10:43:18-05:00'
describe
'61760' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALHU' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
6470ee28367f22ce1b01ed4679a294d1
6fe9a11c5aec31f6eedbe393a8d50969c29a6c21
describe
'6881488' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALHV' 'sip-files00091.tif'
d52bf20fe813cc56f27896f21dcaf45a
851c1bc1235b621fc09d5740b314ecc66c457423
'2012-02-18T10:37:16-05:00'
describe
'1994' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALHW' 'sip-files00091.txt'
4d4bcf24dd16a3e23cf2652752848104
de72b3b455897d3ae3a94d7a4f1f115c2928a221
describe
'32072' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALHX' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
74300b83a7c82701a26c096e8cfbceee
7fc5efcff8608e7673d6951992e848f2d09a9e86
describe
'857687' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALHY' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
0e0f6d9defc089a2152df2409b1ffaa9
51576b3feaef0a5a7c74628d83efb45fa0137fe4
'2012-02-18T10:48:39-05:00'
describe
'191390' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALHZ' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
256650bfe5e30219745f1e3cd06e8a62
6bb76eef7bada3986f53fe9322c3c50587916f85
'2012-02-18T10:45:34-05:00'
describe
'105550' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALIA' 'sip-files00092.pro'
c9103a378be7c3feadbd8e835519f29c
eaf32244934231f88de97693ebde62c3bf95d68b
'2012-02-18T10:42:38-05:00'
describe
'61548' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALIB' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
09bbd518af9833b221a64fac85780955
c2eaadd6a5989d7180b343e6438c943273e8da33
'2012-02-18T10:46:15-05:00'
describe
'6883712' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALIC' 'sip-files00092.tif'
d2f3742e8a4e1dc5d236bfcea031189f
34e6d70717a3191f74005d6efe95de8d12c56535
describe
'4193' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALID' 'sip-files00092.txt'
edc898f1df897dd0dffb0d71287b3cd7
61eb3b04dbfe29a5747eb9f1b5645d8e545218f3
'2012-02-18T10:42:25-05:00'
describe
'30694' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALIE' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
74c95d465517c03013afef31a84c8758
9a235bf424dc70dff5354661c2072e1b3728f594
'2012-02-18T10:39:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALIF' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
c7d33dd587c06945f4a78a1cd2625643
29116f921eb5d86d3b3cc05c1f2ad256b803d40d
'2012-02-18T10:38:21-05:00'
describe
'190756' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALIG' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
4f803aa54e19f67bc0cac6657be0cfd7
c3efec698c02eba9e6325583a79dca63be3e5234
describe
'54914' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALIH' 'sip-files00093.pro'
d5b47bc5bc4e0daa5abd9a369da9b015
045c888bdfbdbe0389b0ed8bd54edc29613ae400
describe
'63260' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALII' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
52313ce4949cd77ba29ec3616852f40d
149c7a77ec08fbe6abc741c04dc4447738c3bea7
'2012-02-18T10:46:31-05:00'
describe
'6881324' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALIJ' 'sip-files00093.tif'
06d5a670bda080ad0f5e0e7d634f6891
5b6b006488967791e41e6445e4e683d4cd3e8907
describe
'2205' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALIK' 'sip-files00093.txt'
ee0ad74423a26d88ce4d91671e63d2db
b6010874d682420e262f6ec329381f9173b3878a
describe
'31979' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALIL' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
2107204b034e8e8dd0728006a7a7e9aa
2502034a993c156d77ba36df9a5bce29f35710e2
describe
'857259' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALIM' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
21a7b9908aa70208dc0ab5c1369c5525
8bde0b03a4e3a67fb4a1873557bf499a3f133bb0
describe
'167605' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALIN' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
2eba3424ebfd8df2dd8367b92c7efb9a
55ce59555f5548b87bc2d4628532b802a79ad556
describe
'91566' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALIO' 'sip-files00094.pro'
62905b79e50094c5f7f9a8e3f7cbb5bb
e1758415223d52dda2638512cf3798b7612c75b0
describe
'55897' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALIP' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
f0b6603b83c20a9baa71d73de0a6d097
d9a9d670b58d88ab6084623bcf00ee6577ea5f8b
'2012-02-18T10:40:32-05:00'
describe
'6880132' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALIQ' 'sip-files00094.tif'
43d66aaf513abe7a979328c17af2d3e3
471defc92a3156ab9286d3fd589d161d52812ea3
'2012-02-18T10:44:10-05:00'
describe
'3588' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALIR' 'sip-files00094.txt'
ba59ea48bffa3118bed8258919fce927
0afa0089b63b480fd82e6e725b311b9872018eb2
'2012-02-18T10:41:38-05:00'
describe
'29169' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALIS' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
4adc3641bc63b7f985d1b268d03c640d
dd8aa61aac52f7263dc51905bf070af0f3a803d6
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALIT' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
cde6c019dd4c70e68700485a87ee9c54
74757738ae16f31cda657c6d4545b0bacf7d3b32
'2012-02-18T10:48:51-05:00'
describe
'192716' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALIU' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
2820729c8aa14f5dd0a361f7a8018ba5
2b770fb199fc200aead183cc2ba9782d935529f7
'2012-02-18T10:44:21-05:00'
describe
'107690' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALIV' 'sip-files00095.pro'
13197e5a033abb2f86db9da0623c6bc1
a7b7c6ae8809de1a98069ba2e169229aad19d425
'2012-02-18T10:42:56-05:00'
describe
'61648' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALIW' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
bd5f4f832a2051087ab4082073f22074
b6a5caf9fb450bd90abbd3f3add2af3a5633142e
'2012-02-18T10:38:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALIX' 'sip-files00095.tif'
efed9fbf46b88a9fe1bc6e494487e230
39107e0756456497d3e51255f9b166e2743228fd
'2012-02-18T10:41:11-05:00'
describe
'4258' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALIY' 'sip-files00095.txt'
9a4b9ab4e4da11d9b9b1581f714c568f
c4054002b19a6111a1a1a1b51e90e2b4dc82d58b
describe
'30659' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALIZ' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
b6d38ba141323a7db87e8c1e80381fa8
7a9931d19f3bfdbf8ceb76c5f326fc8426d56a1f
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALJA' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
b9ae23e505f6c436e3e563d34dce541b
66f6b24a757d4bb1c53f3398e8a175ee15582cff
describe
'186059' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALJB' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
ff6e22e0e5be47ad0945999461e805e7
e6ee30fd0741787be658da401f5248663fa5e38e
'2012-02-18T10:37:49-05:00'
describe
'99802' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALJC' 'sip-files00096.pro'
5d30f3f32abd1f280cb0f91672408443
927ed10315471f69738db18e74459a7fdbd7619f
describe
'60540' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALJD' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
69461072bdb06c3f72d1e81d5f933c80
5f1b819c5fc2b5483c71e69f3ff2c8662c40b14a
describe
'6880752' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALJE' 'sip-files00096.tif'
bb6fc2a6cf60573b30876370741b0c1a
8b613b4dc90277401d13a6d208322ff659b79d14
'2012-02-18T10:49:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALJF' 'sip-files00096.txt'
e5e22745489979832ac28789d22bdd35
4b1eecac5fd8b39bcf185ae83e91a13ec3ba1182
describe
'30169' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALJG' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
68149c27f8f866c0182fe21555fa247a
744b6bc336b6ef4ba89617cde7253e259c2d6cb0
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALJH' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
4b0b20a344aa5a8b422050de7a4684cb
56e8380024ff794756abd438a328b34a9c9913a3
describe
'174971' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALJI' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
8e93a8c675c172f3b91b84334459b485
b9db895e6c932b8bd87cf81a83763ee14ef9ea1c
'2012-02-18T10:47:52-05:00'
describe
'52678' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALJJ' 'sip-files00097.pro'
49b4753534f2571a64c690f387c319ab
db7f508cbe6f707b04387ebd9c1b622d0bf3be33
describe
'58590' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALJK' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
dd5408484d7d40bc4b89406461ec6d42
1c92285e2a065142de71dceffc25b08775678314
'2012-02-18T10:43:01-05:00'
describe
'6881116' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALJL' 'sip-files00097.tif'
e9449f66ff78c0f85b4dd899421cb8ab
4cd93903da219ac8ee4b94c974da21f6aa84bc58
describe
'2099' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALJM' 'sip-files00097.txt'
289b88247f6dc36eaf8c2378f338882c
1af03c9ce4ff42aade4704ce3f744784180d3df0
describe
'31286' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALJN' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
4cdb8f8e89aa61b10193338daf8d0eeb
8d21db56f3a46aecd7e1cc556d132fd9eec36f63
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALJO' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
7b88e2ffffdd2d283d52f6705fcf7648
9b7683954af0a896b237d0e1599004d44a2860ba
'2012-02-18T10:37:29-05:00'
describe
'188966' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALJP' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
878fca8ae5fafbd59c710e6e2b0925a1
1bd361d0821ab3ffd66830cdfebacc7f14264639
'2012-02-18T10:38:00-05:00'
describe
'105563' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALJQ' 'sip-files00098.pro'
8e56ac5849a8f5e3d01a7b7147394a25
e1f168c420493d40a20ed9817a5d348a90be76dd
describe
'60431' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALJR' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
98624855b2bd07c33f581a456d6ee335
e9a4d534f2406917166fa497aa87513e25078374
'2012-02-18T10:41:06-05:00'
describe
'6880780' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALJS' 'sip-files00098.tif'
aa6f5bb1cb58dcc653e0adf36ae15683
791cc3930ad9ca2d7e862d9c58620ac713f16a40
'2012-02-18T10:44:12-05:00'
describe
'4119' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALJT' 'sip-files00098.txt'
4eee9a8af0a7fb1a6710aa2b14392d3a
42320d08d87220877672d3ddf36773a270e5d1c9
'2012-02-18T10:46:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALJU' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
faf4e4a7d829709cc4749ee3cff062e9
12428d0c7db83a1b7b29432abecc188c8b4bc536
'2012-02-18T10:48:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALJV' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
825e04849248cbae0731e1934ca7c211
0aeafd1d0fd3d153f33cc286bb09530b118d1372
'2012-02-18T10:48:06-05:00'
describe
'194898' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALJW' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
dd50e0fb08382a0daae9c010dcd27d4c
ec25cd859ff47a21e48b92a5316925fa64f56161
describe
'107901' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALJX' 'sip-files00099.pro'
0599093056988f7e1241b4b58bbacb2c
2f2b4ea65007f0c990b7895796e940ff787a59cc
describe
'62438' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALJY' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
628c4bc5517b588d243ce8996952fa63
9b34a1f3bc189ea6e1286f7befa81b6a6a4b26c7
describe
'6880896' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALJZ' 'sip-files00099.tif'
4843a6e898357a5f6a39775efb857ce6
fd1bfd69a025f8bf894f5bdb52bb72a476a00750
describe
'4228' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALKA' 'sip-files00099.txt'
db33a513f6bb03bfdebc52e831ed47c6
fa1cb460222f41132b83bbe48c23b94102901efa
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALKB' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
b7bbb3841c59f59b19524a5766d91e1b
21d9a572cc32a40281e3ffadb55699724b78f061
'2012-02-18T10:44:47-05:00'
describe
'857255' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALKC' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
a674bfae1ce56d596a4bcf762bff4430
67ae7aa4ffb5e838082fcfa3d5c74ecf481debcf
describe
'193447' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALKD' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
0dc36ae83e8a9caec732176adbedf418
3f81fa088c2a5463e5e949b4a5c2c2fe26c66bda
describe
'108208' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALKE' 'sip-files00100.pro'
9bfd60444bfa41fea744b5442a0921d7
85831f2ab1a403addb34c48bb6618ca6ba2913af
'2012-02-18T10:45:38-05:00'
describe
'63286' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALKF' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
8718c8ef874bf3fed7887bded8ac7b08
dec4b42281b2c2fa6ba99b98cacb746b24980743
describe
'6881096' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALKG' 'sip-files00100.tif'
77266cf06ae913cc33c21f0d38187096
6bf3719bb68d68b9c43047c2deabd9ad888f9073
describe
'4294' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALKH' 'sip-files00100.txt'
ecebf06537548c2c65a1f891f49a0330
ea6fa2e38693e1788787dffaedf89653c63ec0e4
describe
'31042' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALKI' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
cd86319c163de93eb3fab4ad1161e4c0
e7ce4cb131c350372f4da44ff1994d1a87ec763d
describe
'857311' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALKJ' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
69b2237ab1e031fe7a829229b8fe84d3
ba94a9e53ee7a56faea385bf0b172f455d122e15
describe
'166334' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALKK' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
a4b711f3b35abab3ab4f3322ed933425
f5efdb008e357861075a47beeb1a4c00e3d64f8b
describe
'36780' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALKL' 'sip-files00101.pro'
abd5481063deb6b42fea1aed3ecf7604
7cbf78d93523e5b066bce02a1ee737f8b0a97de3
describe
'57416' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALKM' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
50c6d67bbe5a3e865d18cce9bcdafd49
244a8f4dfe22504cc93b96db9b125b2034095c62
'2012-02-18T10:47:00-05:00'
describe
'6881216' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALKN' 'sip-files00101.tif'
27feb031347fbf2094477b1fd4c26d5c
49c742c7da2a2f2eb6645f6a77a219f096f936cd
describe
'1581' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALKO' 'sip-files00101.txt'
b9046534a7ea9cba0393dd6c4409e826
6cd0024c3e4cd6dc770467a2b4f5ae309e15ca4a
describe
Invalid character
'31329' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALKP' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
433fc85f6fbacadc8280550dc899e828
d54c84940a03582ab8c19bd32d9cf58d040e215c
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALKQ' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
1873031a993e1b088bedee16dae6ffbb
46bc1078b3b58c1a8c153748497bfc28ba88cf07
'2012-02-18T10:44:14-05:00'
describe
'190850' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALKR' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
f50d20ed27fa24b58ba90e4929d1ecab
6032031a93a3fa71b2392fe2304ef28105d4d43f
describe
'104766' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALKS' 'sip-files00102.pro'
475b4313125f0530616196a2f18f124d
b50168a23746ea82014a0a98482869f70e448bb2
describe
'62586' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALKT' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
55a3548cb7c947a714a710b1e103fa0c
6a3db5412f18609df4fe754f781ae363d1809098
'2012-02-18T10:43:06-05:00'
describe
'6880992' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALKU' 'sip-files00102.tif'
6005f891e1b9b706bf9c492cbd3f85bf
b8a6c2f17dbf23b91edc7884a7996190c46616e7
'2012-02-18T10:43:58-05:00'
describe
'4095' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALKV' 'sip-files00102.txt'
788da95484098535b7456218d4d38e02
9f3c1ae6d0c098e8ecf119ca5060c5cbe6507117
describe
'30970' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALKW' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
7e87ad90ccf4475e84d000a74b1e7677
4287fdb088b5df9de31f3829d6a40db8794c9f6f
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALKX' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
cc37a8e9127029c6cf265bdf69bb5698
c4793a0b1fcc1857e997ad618987ee71e911349f
'2012-02-18T10:40:11-05:00'
describe
'193365' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALKY' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
3705a8f87e79b6bcd7510864d8f861a3
e7d3c11caeed7fc24a2942626fce368e9d9fc9c3
describe
'108399' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALKZ' 'sip-files00103.pro'
0f1d15a112687d3992d0589f444b241d
b8a819496fb368715c9898878ca8632fa9463ddc
describe
'62484' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALLA' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
51949ef9606293d07449e7cc730e7d33
a87d7b5a89e45591db1b875ecad15d8dcadb4296
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALLB' 'sip-files00103.tif'
70c10b37c08e4817889b1a73ea7364cd
21e7101b0b031642dadfff609b7daa293306bf08
'2012-02-18T10:46:09-05:00'
describe
'4278' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALLC' 'sip-files00103.txt'
793ecd1ba6349a1e43fe4198eb0e108c
36067bec7fde2774df2ca5eb8add079cd1f20ecb
describe
'30763' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALLD' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
84864720b0d63e0f7d716a5349d16fde
b393bde9ded2aab58640fdada76eae7d0ba37607
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALLE' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
4bbe3edecd36558f8b6d4546651462fd
e81c4bdbf33e7dfcaab9bdd6995b62b5477911a0
describe
'172882' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALLF' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
9712d0f791cb2e90d6f1be09a65fc652
a0aaaf4dd67661e9e685250f037042f7369a02dc
'2012-02-18T10:46:13-05:00'
describe
'64005' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALLG' 'sip-files00104.pro'
ac8213502733fe84a772467652ac09f8
022182a31b80376c0b2d3f590990e7f9fea1b200
describe
'58112' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALLH' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
991030b22504b572237fb74b22cc8b0c
f14a3b657c43f49807c5cd46ab239978deda3f53
describe
'6880716' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALLI' 'sip-files00104.tif'
74313ec5865c440fc5263d57300ad78b
ee43ef6662b468bbe5ab692546c4cb1379fe4d1f
describe
'2607' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALLJ' 'sip-files00104.txt'
c9a5f92c8ea03b8a42b1c3ebddce0bac
9b7de97170e544181b4f913185c9657b7cad1a2d
'2012-02-18T10:37:40-05:00'
describe
'30423' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALLK' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
42612ae4db431f399f624b39666b2094
c9da9b62dab279b1f417d9200ec3b307e764f249
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALLL' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
5e89c869294a0d5ab854e46743b94703
56bb0c0bc82f0af9c15850422e9f399784a24656
describe
'194928' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALLM' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
e727b7bf54ac1ac72864abbe51106952
7266f44299d29bdee02425ce13e5c48bfe3b41d0
describe
'106070' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALLN' 'sip-files00105.pro'
8c36a213ce4dba7ca2e1abdda7ae7b1e
e7a0782d3d7f5683d8cd40ef7f2fd2c776ba3ff7
describe
'63767' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALLO' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
ca160c3e7cbce0b7f34a60f375c1a100
543bc649f1fb479b36fe1c6f9cf401124a33cbee
'2012-02-18T10:38:45-05:00'
describe
'6881036' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALLP' 'sip-files00105.tif'
7f43875d199c02abec6acc7af0d843dc
a891b48a30a22de2fe166ba9b128196a771a5750
describe
'4170' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALLQ' 'sip-files00105.txt'
31b1754e42864655207f122a96752b29
3c7cbff65ed8446d935735b44206173524860339
'2012-02-18T10:44:48-05:00'
describe
'31254' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALLR' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
53c5080b7eb6a3de8b4f6585e5322005
44f4f08eadc858639686a0ab29c169eb30d35586
describe
'857176' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALLS' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
93e58b7894a0cc3bbe529db65dc7be05
59ab7b787fe41f52164726b1a998e97b352ee00c
'2012-02-18T10:42:31-05:00'
describe
'181664' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALLT' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
4f57a98472cb80df35d1ce84b4d9630d
32fc10959633a0b1e486670fc1bd33e33fcc7650
describe
'46832' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALLU' 'sip-files00106.pro'
12edabfcc5a64a7c15ecbc43340073f8
6269e7043b4273dc7e92461910fff2c66aca8fcf
'2012-02-18T10:45:58-05:00'
describe
'59465' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALLV' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
fedc234bfc6dc3dd596cf2118015634f
9ea338f9145b364646c6610c1cca20b2b8a84133
describe
'6880960' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALLW' 'sip-files00106.tif'
8ee954c44a958061a657a6b1fa05068e
b2400342bf1f5fbceb014badec36990885c64dfc
'2012-02-18T10:41:23-05:00'
describe
'2172' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALLX' 'sip-files00106.txt'
98e372865c0a05fd8f7e2fc282960648
9b884307ab16df1fe13e86fc4ba903c9a22fc2f7
'2012-02-18T10:42:14-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'30952' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALLY' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
d1a5112a7c23cda1e329178abfb74a03
f59244a5fdf2f0743e6a49eed2a1ba3054026e7b
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALLZ' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
6e8acc191027ba537be5d8af6b0ac8b1
bc87931294df49d39a70b7e8d295247e8c316ff0
describe
'174744' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALMA' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
cadc66ec10a338d8e97a59d3131a4d12
340f325b492cca7e6bd8e3c4a0a7c12debf7f7f3
'2012-02-18T10:44:07-05:00'
describe
'89401' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALMB' 'sip-files00107.pro'
e96ac9cac7bcbcfe9b4e976f4174db11
f1871619fe29727ccd42ec1306e277ecfcdb6cda
describe
'58938' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALMC' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
c61378d30e39557279d08a6f24f72d63
fa97968ae651a32d73ed52f8468b1156e72a8baf
'2012-02-18T10:47:07-05:00'
describe
'6880580' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALMD' 'sip-files00107.tif'
ab1103a4bd36672e791c378721ec3752
b023f7f8d7fb2dba83d4308cbd30dfeb614e0059
describe
'3630' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALME' 'sip-files00107.txt'
44aea9ea26d07fc86b798bb7eb7ffdbd
38ddca3fc728c8f9b528f48e5c5f35b5dd661b25
'2012-02-18T10:45:41-05:00'
describe
'30035' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALMF' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
ec0fa0169ed50d196f6a8e56a98f055f
c0f78795a43d436d55a02f353bf1ebca346c7004
describe
'857305' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALMG' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
c04ee9efe31833b33d40244c86f6d85d
c9efdbbde39f5cafbfb188c8f25c6ef44c7dbd3b
'2012-02-18T10:47:42-05:00'
describe
'161820' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALMH' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
0828a250ed6bf9702ab6b49e54313d3b
c711bd605d1c323b6fa334df449859b4714ff0b6
'2012-02-18T10:42:22-05:00'
describe
'84463' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALMI' 'sip-files00108.pro'
645eb1a76332038ed1e52b05b062cc8c
55544548695cb6aa3087de1254b9dbb62da3913d
'2012-02-18T10:38:12-05:00'
describe
'55218' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALMJ' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
f3551c3d6cd1d80b2c0449f81e6fa67f
fdfea2015b10e76aec3549021cb3b8c1f79ffe78
describe
'6880204' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALMK' 'sip-files00108.tif'
c9971b68a6a1cc18a3c17f2d578b0216
74570e37e15a6c91d388e16c94a328613080cb9a
describe
'3546' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALML' 'sip-files00108.txt'
6736105c9fe5afe49c5521b1319e5bd7
8059b4851146fdd27a27bcdb547616196f5194fc
describe
'29342' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALMM' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
aa95cbfda0714cbcacc8398b4d9cd275
e9ebca07483d055ae4deb0b2fe1618ad7360d5db
'2012-02-18T10:40:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALMN' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
682fcf538f9b7d7b654c98b3e93a145b
5a52398e293b2db892055f46275023fad270aabc
describe
'195415' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALMO' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
2d1248ddfae083876681a594e354510d
6df7569baf52d1e01bfa8014dfedc6b68fb4016e
'2012-02-18T10:46:30-05:00'
describe
'107006' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALMP' 'sip-files00109.pro'
6ccf8c2d5de2c10a251e8b6c80089862
759474989bf5962f56a8950580dcbbe6bf5c19d9
describe
'63329' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALMQ' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
55d432bfd609d00cd4e7758652e68532
69ea3fb9e22d2dfd73bb5d780707196ce1bd3a4b
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALMR' 'sip-files00109.tif'
1990b977ee02a63227de268e143650ec
3c3960ca3bc72f4de3d9a62f97f5cfc883f7d809
describe
'4202' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALMS' 'sip-files00109.txt'
eb3ff808e57d3250b5268f25b37404ae
7f30b4ec23d4eb6c7b78ba982c2943862923d273
describe
'31038' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALMT' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
ae78ec145c17fe0848845ed0d6aef52e
207318d919ce45c11c9646bd83c7c087595fd983
'2012-02-18T10:48:22-05:00'
describe
'857242' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALMU' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
ddf2ca34603d6431ab78a8a8e86a5277
c0b1ad8e4d1a413e7e59e2ead7fb7c2618376e3d
describe
'175647' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALMV' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
3bdeb8bf8a0a7d801125d374be9e2123
e33c3fcbab86dad530cbd96fa0c3db98ee7ee1c8
'2012-02-18T10:46:24-05:00'
describe
'92118' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALMW' 'sip-files00110.pro'
8f18fcc3b300bd296996cc04f39c3251
ce3046eb9fbb7c5aaebe2b0d62b054c3285aaf8d
'2012-02-18T10:45:25-05:00'
describe
'58213' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALMX' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
3c05b74a6abb92f8043da180bb7384eb
985ce3cd500a1b354219910bc006dc8e185702ab
describe
'6880556' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALMY' 'sip-files00110.tif'
6c73d2118c64fa18cdbca1d7c364dd00
1a3fc100d24fbe50f3c57c7051e66f348a756942
'2012-02-18T10:39:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALMZ' 'sip-files00110.txt'
ca3dca5ca1475cb72192075cd65e9864
d00a8b9ce09f3f664f760cce29d407611aa96ac1
describe
'29917' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALNA' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
e3982d21c57c5acf6701d4f113130c22
d859264af9ba157469fd5464d2a937bafb386fcd
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALNB' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
23a9dfdaae5f3c22afc9b78d56e6d8c6
720d23b39d406fe85727a0d9d8b9effac79b6c62
'2012-02-18T10:38:27-05:00'
describe
'159742' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALNC' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
bd2feff32eb2da9563720c5b15d05c4f
26014b2670991392c686dfd7c25b4a7f5dec58fc
'2012-02-18T10:44:58-05:00'
describe
'49728' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALND' 'sip-files00111.pro'
dd41f92061d91e7e9160f3e8bb4a91a0
df8b6cab90fd4134cc567d9ebceee22837c8e4cf
'2012-02-18T10:38:20-05:00'
describe
'55271' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALNE' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
8eb4bdd3b6e1af0febb897856e426be4
a1a08a453d56aa100c4b718a6117c09da6ff2ea3
describe
'6880632' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALNF' 'sip-files00111.tif'
3e8ec88bf324b637c6a8e3cf03ef41fb
16a43dcf59f6e0b897e1ab4187a0a79f1517f7c8
describe
'2083' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALNG' 'sip-files00111.txt'
054a9a1cadc18ffa131b5342f31d6e3d
99fb9b301253a7e01a63b68c0df3534be01c0821
describe
Invalid character
'29981' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALNH' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
268fa6f15cdcc30dea0983ab1ca7d118
1a190597312b16c1e1fcd9dcda7ba5406130ce3b
'2012-02-18T10:49:31-05:00'
describe
'857272' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALNI' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
7ca4ee827652cdbb8652d7f8c373109d
5c75ca8a870c2680d625e96f31c15b56b3b09a3c
describe
'179671' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALNJ' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
3cc2b0928b14ab09b49bd7c34414976e
a2e34f7c405db716d9bfd90c01c205be849dfb31
describe
'98646' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALNK' 'sip-files00112.pro'
fcd9ceb700a5c6637a0dd7d2a9978508
d5b425b349ccc7624630771e03f6e04184a8808d
describe
'60081' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALNL' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
1f4121e501d5617e4a8c03cfc1d0f055
e98331037f7ba90e072c6c28b640f01111656794
describe
'6880744' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALNM' 'sip-files00112.tif'
b9df820d6aa72475d1cb77dd0cf81890
deae1a3d1289648bcbebb656ec14bfb8812c2b33
'2012-02-18T10:42:01-05:00'
describe
'3993' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALNN' 'sip-files00112.txt'
1270d2af48f9dc42af8e68bd85c4467f
51844ad94370038208b6e9b8d4ad6396a87a5859
describe
'30725' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALNO' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
f5f1851986a0bf3d3d13da4d101e1ada
1c803422b13148beeb2a31e0a5ccb4961c501945
describe
'857291' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALNP' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
eefe6a6f0dd3412251219b455b3ed8da
e0c2128b3fabfd6d59e97d740cf32850fb093480
'2012-02-18T10:49:14-05:00'
describe
'187636' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALNQ' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
a5676b61880b8d53ea0757c74474abab
cd03dd3b11d572ed85c2a0bbb853027dd39efef2
describe
'102165' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALNR' 'sip-files00113.pro'
fa135fa4061c4b5dbd96a317651f90bb
ea92a21a34fd54e99e9a69759b432288a590c991
describe
'61809' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALNS' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
80e609ca3f7f70aef7058364fd841a15
5ac993e0c60354f628618c72cbf0eba5dd13cf63
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALNT' 'sip-files00113.tif'
15209bac625b3ced48d998497057a016
0c8fa8e8afc8715c1ef89ef0411f55619c97da67
'2012-02-18T10:49:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALNU' 'sip-files00113.txt'
a2c5b909716eb0f10b52c47fb3215094
2f280c8653db8022f1c03eeb359efceee61c9567
'2012-02-18T10:41:01-05:00'
describe
'31039' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALNV' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
e517c134c92bd25e921e2d63c4c27297
beadbc5d57d0b9150b4b4f555602896d3a370b93
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALNW' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
f853da5553cd5ce1b3450a003c316616
78bd75c768f879a3b9c43639eaa4a10d07556268
describe
'161748' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALNX' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
351c9cbcf66c9276c8ed1c11cbf26172
8c55dedaa6abe8e8cf58b5378e1893b789202612
describe
'19699' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALNY' 'sip-files00114.pro'
a255a75bbd290bfeb7b2b6382058d8e8
05e30211de78c000ee4f211121c67fc0d3c0b411
'2012-02-18T10:43:54-05:00'
describe
'55515' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALNZ' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
db2f43fca306efa1318a240119990b73
fb6c001e661912692e88fe447aac78e21455bec2
'2012-02-18T10:49:23-05:00'
describe
'6880704' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALOA' 'sip-files00114.tif'
8b5e4f9d9f73e31e99b4e2ca55785aaa
9e6fd9a42309c9cfd56338cc5b5a87b23e70e35d
describe
'820' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALOB' 'sip-files00114.txt'
e445846a4242cd106917e29e3524f827
a34246802094642dca440dc461e5c04767d8a2f2
describe
'30093' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALOC' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
3e3bfb6ca42656a9e5b8117659dc9caa
22bb664f82b1b255393b5d18af4a83713a0bfa76
describe
'857178' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALOD' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
1693b455f61f45b60b7394fdcaa6fbc9
1f48194c314d2dbae759e52523f5f8f4ee51b698
describe
'176854' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALOE' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
0ee857d2b8c60bbd57871eb776f28a1e
f42153190b092c4ca1dec30e39963c7f0649d219
'2012-02-18T10:41:58-05:00'
describe
'89896' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALOF' 'sip-files00115.pro'
414ac97d7a7ea0b94853c24d78479793
d4b50a292814d823fea69375e769df99acc262d5
describe
'59736' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALOG' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
896aae579e239a129f2be6969b606731
6de1545d75c20fb708993b3dd8019cbf6b88a252
describe
'6880800' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALOH' 'sip-files00115.tif'
931f2faa4f5200379437413fc7dce46d
b3aba8d1df044cbf172f50ae5db9171968799e37
describe
'3589' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALOI' 'sip-files00115.txt'
7cbfd7cac05807e207fc64acb7e1df46
09a32d9578f1c40ace14ec02ab0e67b5d9def423
describe
'30547' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALOJ' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
c7f70ec752dde6689c1dbabc07b72cdc
97cf33465b1d50236e5aabf176107cd1c8dfa417
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALOK' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
81d88dc2b82feb381c9509507d5004e0
3eb157e3c01ae6f2452d37be92cba086123740a6
describe
'181193' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALOL' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
c07424b8ad19d88c31c96ab8ab9311b1
733eaa80bc10ca3c0ec5dffe4673cb565c5d18fa
describe
'93999' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALOM' 'sip-files00116.pro'
20ac8b40221ecbeaf5d5e17bb9ea3ef2
5d4c211182dcd384826382241651268faaea2058
describe
'59809' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALON' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
8cfac13f7a28110c993e27d2f7e3d82b
dc3562fd655ba426c38e2398648b47dd0cb6d71b
describe
'6880684' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALOO' 'sip-files00116.tif'
9c5f91fd2e8fa00a7b5cc754b3d38d59
923a5e551c41ea7818c4a4b706f5b9fd6af50593
'2012-02-18T10:47:40-05:00'
describe
'3694' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALOP' 'sip-files00116.txt'
9bc6b889d5b5c9c31dfe2d1a1468543b
3ad72abaf7d1244a1b1cdd3415484e0800a4c95d
describe
'30236' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALOQ' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
5eb1228b34459ea059fe722f1ebb8660
f4549a15574d7708ec3b1c9507ae74d6925347e6
describe
'857308' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALOR' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
ac29a60760eafad253c1361b49a3c0ea
175bf0e1ebae211f6cddcb4ed8a41d7698988c2d
'2012-02-18T10:45:40-05:00'
describe
'193502' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALOS' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
a4d7a5f1f689e8675adf501aaa237a21
b00afa63bc767be86ae1a5dca51f010ce7147e86
describe
'47063' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALOT' 'sip-files00117.pro'
fb62a94ee0e7dd126f81f56c16f06e84
e338802a89b7d6779e2f2bc45bc8720a062218ef
describe
'63994' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALOU' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
95738de18fb50e30fe09029a2bd9bfc0
c91745103e15b6e21fc2ffe1658b87d7ba732c3b
describe
'6881856' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALOV' 'sip-files00117.tif'
b4fda085adfc1a6330d6339c4b8ce9fc
2a310c80590f2d5c587cf3f1aaa975f61f92ce3c
describe
'1861' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALOW' 'sip-files00117.txt'
7355d9cceca0f06d9ae0545aa6047515
d9a702f273efa73990f1a503059891855670a06e
describe
'32608' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALOX' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
8729e204062c0180ef52bcdff89ca981
39a02d96622c1e6ec6d25f0fd782e208a7a6b6eb
'2012-02-18T10:39:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALOY' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
fee80fc9361057b76f4078d213cb4d9a
b6768ff4facdd742c84b963ae917e07a442f9dd6
describe
'185882' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALOZ' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
631e50ed323406f0353625a851dd941a
da6cd3fa82269fdce6f0f37c1aead366a8c9d2cc
describe
'102812' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALPA' 'sip-files00118.pro'
68f03c2fa41f927bf6dd8aca6759e35e
d2b8909015f472ace8fcc8354b1371017d62f692
describe
'60717' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALPB' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
a12448d718fa5e7abdae6fcee43d0c39
319bfdbf498f82f972d8a77949fc584fcc897f0c
'2012-02-18T10:37:13-05:00'
describe
'6880692' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALPC' 'sip-files00118.tif'
0dc2a31f987d880f2856da36108d054f
df02aeeeb438f22329e8902db43631938d7802ef
'2012-02-18T10:47:49-05:00'
describe
'4161' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALPD' 'sip-files00118.txt'
4341fd083085622536b65207106db080
107ebc24577ad828aaf1d833576c9d8c64373a46
describe
'30396' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALPE' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
d6290fe26a8cb7f65cc57e4ccf39817a
2c12095a1373611805c4ca19c5a14fecbec04ac4
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALPF' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
3cbcf8f2eb8b12f183cd2b23a80e4a7e
95f4b3337c97682e0985c640ac7ea3f0f292021a
describe
'145577' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALPG' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
46dbd06e5d50ce1cc51d0d9cea0ff4f3
b15351ed225902cc49d668a6ecf467bf3efb442a
describe
'27016' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALPH' 'sip-files00119.pro'
7b8d644bf9eb56637c179f8cd4859a3b
be6255908d2ecca5a5341b22bed4e8a580367556
describe
'51181' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALPI' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
21661670bbb2b3e9ae8085292711cc9f
cbd308645237bf80eb814f931a53418c75c8af2a
describe
'6880064' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALPJ' 'sip-files00119.tif'
21a6da3d05566b276b414e0ccecb9156
271ab2724b07c77ffbc1215946f767b801e22226
describe
'1312' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALPK' 'sip-files00119.txt'
eff3ecc1595a368b2e1b5760871ec33c
791032adab97763800e13a68f2408125ff8586e9
describe
Invalid character
'28552' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALPL' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
b5ab2c75b5efeb9aa7dfc628b9e8e75a
127a7b0ca1ce494d6edc65f295f85e3209893e79
describe
'857299' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALPM' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
5d6f955cd91bf7f00163f33723975515
351802762b53ec7be7b0e83ce69f80536170d520
describe
'185274' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALPN' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
5b03fe83615e03ed551aead40f229f96
1c421032eee37979ba36443c486b8bbdca4f9821
describe
'102241' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALPO' 'sip-files00120.pro'
5b1fcbba0c2ca5f01dd8e59891e8eda0
b9690d685de52a52b31c6adf6d212a626c225014
'2012-02-18T10:42:32-05:00'
describe
'60866' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALPP' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
3015a86add016f74994220486a87cb7c
882fde910a1b433a7f903e98c95b6023d923cba1
describe
'6880812' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALPQ' 'sip-files00120.tif'
78b012bcaa4d50f753b32156a93ee447
336b210006fda11294a2789cbe040e1f912b9acf
describe
'4117' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALPR' 'sip-files00120.txt'
751faab750bddf5417f92aed36716784
52e4d6513ddba397ca363f1dee06c095e931a32e
'2012-02-18T10:42:34-05:00'
describe
'30397' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALPS' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
edbe13ed2f2dff6136e1a9a4a668e398
e784ff2ba68f1fa473d55616212f7ff6029978f1
'2012-02-18T10:40:01-05:00'
describe
'857116' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALPT' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
0ce16e5f4ac918b5a09e388bc109c3a7
36084d3e98aaf9e4eda5a5325fbcb63eb0c765d1
'2012-02-18T10:42:03-05:00'
describe
'158554' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALPU' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
1b7ae16c53f1c105366a4eeae7b454f2
9579221c23b7743016447cfb96b84265c78015e1
describe
'47446' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALPV' 'sip-files00121.pro'
e97adff835a500e7c6139290a2fe50f4
8b2709e3179229f937af630a6557679e5970fe43
describe
'54087' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALPW' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
08e72e4bc5511f33a8085e5c0d6ee1c0
0b16bcd7d42a6e9c5fa42d8236a48fd4c512a69a
describe
'6880384' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALPX' 'sip-files00121.tif'
4251828bb8ccab2226b65cc503c01528
6d792a016d2aa4bfe28710c350584ac1773d29b7
describe
'2226' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALPY' 'sip-files00121.txt'
f2df1bd48949afa16788c741441f438b
83d23ba37ba07d77679988d6d29e36bbcdaa69e4
describe
'29488' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALPZ' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
996e1976bacda614c011521fc007b731
4c8ada97ba339d94e7966118c6763f1e36b09c6c
describe
'857089' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALQA' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
fa4fb4b3f5518014f1fdac898857be69
f218ccef44db8a48823da6d75e91bd7f4f863e12
describe
'181260' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALQB' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
4cc87bf1126d18bef07d159ef893548c
9c312df4c097cea3a27ef05b82ee991da5703441
describe
'98483' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALQC' 'sip-files00122.pro'
191653196596224a2a8f71d6c9b57da8
4b66c1ac315096966f420abb85007e51f4e9d385
describe
'60391' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALQD' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
3fec259944b5958dd03fd98d632844ea
6e0ead334783f529a673e966638cfaa486074283
describe
'6880596' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALQE' 'sip-files00122.tif'
1200c1a0c4321016c75efe5c11fdc564
a10fec98dfccbadc2b6cc872e374375653319f43
describe
'3868' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALQF' 'sip-files00122.txt'
3b0889fbb79a25160cc96dd4e543e89d
cff5d16213e7ca1387f4d5d994af31eb4c113014
describe
'30106' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALQG' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
7af9409a8c8590cc1b9872e7c58d862f
43514192a3e29703b4156a8703f0657656e93afe
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALQH' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
daa09a4fc3ea59678e20cff567758533
cc536a2bea8f64193d5c0deeb3bf46f63ac0e961
describe
'189494' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALQI' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
4b9144530f38384d46cae1e458ca73d9
7c017b5bf998a2347ae639da53b6781898a734b5
describe
'105661' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALQJ' 'sip-files00123.pro'
71a7eaa1708ac3af30d3774e7cdcb68f
05238e320e4f601fb711ed2ee86bcd7d1034ea2a
describe
'61743' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALQK' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
91946742b8abb95736662711a362a50c
9171c4eb68eda0bd543233849c8f1d76080b9ec4
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALQL' 'sip-files00123.tif'
0b7259f33590f8f11d5b315cfe1de0ef
48635dd32fa89d4235c3c52fb68dc7eb87470e36
describe
'4148' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALQM' 'sip-files00123.txt'
98f868b9fa262e1bad2992e94dafcb1a
d5935ccff9b3ffff4a82adb139ea38abd3157797
describe
'30700' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALQN' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
f2d0f98970a9efa1ace3d010532f4d74
34194f04a72077dd34b7821e8a04818e157d47b3
describe
'857236' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALQO' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
7e68ab466ee60d46266f205f65f8c5af
012260f32fe71a010021150b563634d7e58e15d4
'2012-02-18T10:42:23-05:00'
describe
'178153' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALQP' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
b29278ce2c6ea0c75cdfbfb90ac1224c
e8f82f7a6e9d557e683e675b07eb55c63161add0
describe
'89866' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALQQ' 'sip-files00124.pro'
ed886e2960955c331aa0c9864eeca072
3202cbf68412d439ac8be7f9abec26e8e27ce77b
describe
'59749' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALQR' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
001cd22cbe1de073e01f3318d0547b87
f12bb1189a4642cc24bf1760177ae005aa92c080
describe
'6880724' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALQS' 'sip-files00124.tif'
dea4e467279479639019bdabf1dc2c94
20c07f82a3e2028989ecd901681ef0ba28f7f080
'2012-02-18T10:47:45-05:00'
describe
'3534' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALQT' 'sip-files00124.txt'
f2f5242d430a4fbaf36fae463e49a67a
815211e21195a912380f1c99d6b23124a15f092d
'2012-02-18T10:43:24-05:00'
describe
'30290' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALQU' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
37777c0c816b30c9df08187d77ea3534
8d94107ccf7b99a5e6e89b64fe868c1841916698
describe
'857276' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALQV' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
8a59af9bfc3e4f315a852522f43a7f10
3f7c0b36f2ac75f93754bf0995b5f1824f5d76e1
describe
'179666' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALQW' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
914bf762b44a03a21b5eefd0f8cdcb76
0f9d0ce82e57c64e110dfc4c2b4d90b839d1d0c0
'2012-02-18T10:39:49-05:00'
describe
'46218' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALQX' 'sip-files00125.pro'
b2a08e19d3401275549ff45566d70e60
fa02744daca2035f93db96efd6239fd7ad3c460c
describe
'60715' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALQY' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
1ca865d939282a9b05df5644023cd08e
7dda76063d6b3ebdc91a08e111306aeffaa8d6ba
'2012-02-18T10:47:43-05:00'
describe
'6881548' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALQZ' 'sip-files00125.tif'
b46fdefd0b123f44dd91541db85b40b1
dbf432a60585f930eea09237b4568f85706fc2e9
describe
'1833' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALRA' 'sip-files00125.txt'
3d1856f47122d85969876d8b846bd0ec
414c5b38a06b67d4db15d842836a92274e02cdff
describe
'32082' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALRB' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
9476b662120e41fd09016e7c6929e535
bbac3edb4e007bc60facfb1a1143974f75a33304
describe
'857256' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALRC' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
a6e2a1faf6843390c40de6fd143d87d7
4dc01e7c60c3733fedf8a544de9856194b68948d
describe
'179607' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALRD' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
bde3341e44a86ade057736bce38048fe
9aa1e9a3c4bcd51d1fe4c33a66431258d1b55049
describe
'61060' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALRE' 'sip-files00126.pro'
ce27e9e38bae375ad57f44aab6728d4a
3ee5288d709a0392f1f7235a632b2d747cb62935
describe
'60759' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALRF' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
aff66bfdc07f960a903afb4d1b215217
6770f4eeb9e536d81c820233fb820f39a1e6a886
describe
'6881344' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALRG' 'sip-files00126.tif'
ec4b7ed2db105ad3e3032327b0936eed
5ad2061201b13c1126213bb09cf2189c4eb53e81
describe
'2502' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALRH' 'sip-files00126.txt'
03ffb6e460729e815c68dd67814d9643
c2f5833bbdfb18ec505f8005c0239f94667f0f4a
'2012-02-18T10:45:05-05:00'
describe
'31512' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALRI' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
8ebd1605a614efd950ada718f6852eb9
0e823c7db518400c4ea3c12400cf07ea14c3ccd8
describe
'857070' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALRJ' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
dcbdff13d97f31ba9a804a74f4fa199a
406e09e6d7ff18d961b262b7b0ca3b53d2a7a6aa
describe
'176376' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALRK' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
490f34dac384a9c198c237c4b42db8a7
08c4bd6f6ab2bc67017ef3be770f3f4d32b9374d
describe
'88609' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALRL' 'sip-files00127.pro'
185c46764b5e715189663f8b8e0cfc23
4f786c22e41cc5de19b6a43dc3aa03f63fc623f1
'2012-02-18T10:44:15-05:00'
describe
'59147' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALRM' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
8ddfb4497d8942138c3f976bb1c75281
646c33e7686416a92a8bf8f61fd576b869998842
'2012-02-18T10:40:08-05:00'
describe
'6880760' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALRN' 'sip-files00127.tif'
953c484b6104816701859cbc7193c4be
fc51dfbe90813ce1d278bc57cf70576d0977de63
describe
'3473' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALRO' 'sip-files00127.txt'
567aeee9e4ee7010b9606ac42ffceff3
25acd2928d54bd4939a51ec36e709bbead282d43
'2012-02-18T10:43:55-05:00'
describe
'30281' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALRP' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
8840ee99f3e1e870555c22c494b714b7
4e5b5f908f0a48e1c0e05627998d0849c9a03152
'2012-02-18T10:43:30-05:00'
describe
'857015' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALRQ' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
b7cd92f806cfd01eb26da0fd399b282b
c6743a662502cb0b7317630ceefe79c59d1b5245
describe
'180846' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALRR' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
31e0f1b0667122955d99613ff1397dfb
5337025159e70b5b37fab991121f3b12a1e766c1
describe
'92644' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALRS' 'sip-files00128.pro'
3ca235c8ec0bb2f831eaa649b52a8a7f
b6e32233b5c57fa80e41f68fb0025a8d29b87993
'2012-02-18T10:39:55-05:00'
describe
'60327' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALRT' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
570a0678bff515fe36d77ca199a5aa12
7c9a8258fa4d490b1d14c2c65218e6d4bc130aef
describe
'6880876' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALRU' 'sip-files00128.tif'
4615cc52ea47f0855a0f69d8ca383615
adb5198d08ee2146440da6c9fd6d17b8e8eef9ad
'2012-02-18T10:43:28-05:00'
describe
'3681' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALRV' 'sip-files00128.txt'
51d59044d51992c358756054100f42e2
8bd429bb10ae3421e335ef4a57866cd855d832a6
describe
'30628' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALRW' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
ad134d4fc6a65fda74444f3dbd6a59bf
ad17afead555219dcd5a09215603bd2c21a0b4ac
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALRX' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
6e33e58768201568b2e01e736cc49154
c1bab2b9fcdc245a6b8afc67f4728657379b2c0e
describe
'184964' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALRY' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
1ade686a7bd8316980c495f752a98d4d
58eca37f07fc862511a1bc2f36b95460981accf3
'2012-02-18T10:38:47-05:00'
describe
'98670' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALRZ' 'sip-files00129.pro'
a9e555ead2d613a3a9db43c567c76b49
5d993e3703d1dc4e9f3ca2406b72c2e56dbc63b6
describe
'60858' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALSA' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
0caa4e1911f5d9e4994c682408dbf214
ad530fbbe2daf4bb4224bc8e1bdf50869ce92be1
'2012-02-18T10:37:53-05:00'
describe
'6880872' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALSB' 'sip-files00129.tif'
9bf118e8eb4798384a35b3c5e9655250
0f55d19ad9210584b3c30d185d1d9158b82d10fe
describe
'4004' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALSC' 'sip-files00129.txt'
5c51efc94a9f3379bb6fff1585101c13
ae0ffd3fd535855713f6e8f88413196fac6ffe2c
describe
'30911' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALSD' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
8ffc07c8700c468c7bbc16adcadd36c7
ad0bf4d07906bc8b5e78576b8159390339b8206f
describe
'857170' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALSE' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
14cdb0ceca6fb6359280101ad98ccf62
d9c6e332317319866ab4d224b2bd229efe413cfc
describe
'180616' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALSF' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
b03fec860cc4f3e3fef9e4c0a46e4670
3359864b37b945d3b380bc96767c6897f0ba0b4e
describe
'97598' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALSG' 'sip-files00130.pro'
04af6578e8c575a1383e49d99ce67e0c
6b64dab943d0091c22fbac584416491181cb7e77
'2012-02-18T10:49:04-05:00'
describe
'59223' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALSH' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
34b7e172f3b4b9fc75b9ab895f27f587
52b33422ab250ba1fdf6ed5f1c0e0ab461188036
describe
'6880400' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALSI' 'sip-files00130.tif'
dace1917a175f281568cca6798eb9970
da139d1d19bb8b6a7b61656d25e95c265968bfe7
describe
'3912' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALSJ' 'sip-files00130.txt'
7448f6f2650c747bf9cb4a0a2f03b1af
d9883dbe7d54ed595601fee6d5f97443900caeeb
describe
'29968' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALSK' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
81636a731aa595b492fe7dd0ffd82f97
335a092cee03da8d694c08fcf0b1eeacf0854ce8
'2012-02-18T10:39:26-05:00'
describe
'857193' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALSL' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
88a2d29210a00e740bdfe62824bc9b02
f3090963ab1984395603b64cb257a468eae3be45
describe
'169502' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALSM' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
e97d786787ea802006898f3a9722e963
b6e84b28643e268b7a554ea15aeb776885cfbf19
describe
'25582' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALSN' 'sip-files00131.pro'
f679d6a9a36e132ba7b6a41c04eb117c
95b5fe16102924e9fb276bf3bd39a944137a39a2
'2012-02-18T10:43:09-05:00'
describe
'58777' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALSO' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
5e906640ca8bfe6c1bfef96deafeaf95
ff677a801936bcb8703d3d7303987ec3f1b9effe
'2012-02-18T10:43:26-05:00'
describe
'6881264' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALSP' 'sip-files00131.tif'
d8f2c7aba33e2407b846fd865502f5e0
b942a1207bfc3f36b7355d656c6c32fc03fcec30
describe
'996' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALSQ' 'sip-files00131.txt'
6967040f942a98f797938674a3f4b43b
5fc96cf048fda9c310e931e046fba6116345a11b
describe
'31581' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALSR' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
9fea2881c1a4c2feca4aa2974cbba41e
3f0ab1834f02fa7e2b5205ece9a63ef076d767c9
'2012-02-18T10:41:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALSS' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
b4f494567534e09dcc754c17173cd34e
2a49c1eacd3825d937e6ce9ca57e5a5c340ef023
describe
'179098' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALST' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
5098ae02351771f67e8bc2f3ee6aa2c1
e084053166c7ec76f61ab6b76209807cc6b02635
describe
'95326' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALSU' 'sip-files00132.pro'
d80d57167751e96f84b3088785780856
86b4d320ba4dcc9c3c3ea4f729e7452f0c4c842d
describe
'58672' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALSV' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
05729f55e26b25d4693315a525987c73
4d52f9ec482ff2ccffa3475a8a664c904361dff8
'2012-02-18T10:39:30-05:00'
describe
'6880476' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALSW' 'sip-files00132.tif'
02eca69f2cb3143d965137c439ad7231
59447cefa21b6b1d3399706800a9366524c5f93b
'2012-02-18T10:40:07-05:00'
describe
'3728' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALSX' 'sip-files00132.txt'
b3e9e19f53685ac728d67dd3ab466e20
8219fc30fdfb3627cd502f8382aace813d1744cc
describe
'29853' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALSY' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
2d4a2c669b6121e582877d038261373d
26169749215193cebaef9ecd50d6b41fa38a297c
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALSZ' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
313469f694b48e2741f9a63a4885d77e
85388e1ef77ddb73304c0eb57e4c4d1b7e691294
describe
'189315' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALTA' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
fa7f5b45d144120b88b08bdcb248e47a
cb7a67b76bcfaa0b79424dbff02a4630fe05b7da
describe
'99999' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALTB' 'sip-files00133.pro'
2c151a6e8e956da3ee7b0958d57c7310
9afefdb30101c7589bd904ff5fa924f5ece18e69
describe
'62009' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALTC' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
3f62d408b20d829c29cd24f5bdf3bc0b
d53056f14a935dc2e8c9f691094ec851604a62ee
'2012-02-18T10:42:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALTD' 'sip-files00133.tif'
12de1add918146902f8c3f17de08ac7c
79d845cd58e63f4653a6c056806efd63cca09fa7
describe
'3937' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALTE' 'sip-files00133.txt'
c67d6af222b76ae17ef7b1eb780639e6
8f516785c3c88857a58ed40042563c4a2cc151bc
describe
'30957' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALTF' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
8ee34e14f573e1b88610f0818dfac507
1e444bb85cd007cf396742ee67cde7a04cf4400f
describe
'857285' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALTG' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
60d3c20ceb765105ae4e34a103a3fa55
b79050fd59f529d62ffb8ad6bad606ef9aff3366
describe
'182655' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALTH' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
161092d9340a9d8c7ad83a1505ce21f4
b0c3081e9620dab0dffe39d82d9b5bb3398a1dd2
describe
'98416' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALTI' 'sip-files00134.pro'
02d1147061b1209296a07dd4d2396846
34bba75e0c4458e6f4d83d4e8751a71362f6631a
describe
'59558' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALTJ' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
0c2fad4b68846af9a135f6e75f7e31e6
a9251c283e9587ec426e9d87183328ef327b638d
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALTK' 'sip-files00134.tif'
9a53ac073acdc8852ca7cadc886d5a3b
5e1efab6898c614347a322eb7f3edf46e4046cd7
describe
'3856' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALTL' 'sip-files00134.txt'
e6c6dcec2727e4d05b094420a52f9b8c
0f634189a0ce3d79603f3e0fb17da433602d2cbd
describe
'30267' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALTM' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
600db2af08e90b0421b071a954639779
cbbe3ad7fe64dbb92167dc729033c689cdbc0296
'2012-02-18T10:42:33-05:00'
describe
'857174' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALTN' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
7218f855f3908cce4f7a831a3d24269c
7676c6909d9e127fb79f15faafdb39ec8ec45155
describe
'169203' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALTO' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
1ff501d142859e00d4ac385981e1e73a
22f05c19049d27d2049f5abcf6cb89bdb3942707
'2012-02-18T10:38:44-05:00'
describe
'52569' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALTP' 'sip-files00135.pro'
e023b21679edfcb40fad00bcbf241af0
09e04769ced815654903d65086f26fc0f158e9bd
describe
'58252' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALTQ' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
09aa59a35ec5d07c54592d487613e6d1
29396065532908476d1dd50986f69908177bf179
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALTR' 'sip-files00135.tif'
6e57a0c3924e0d34a8b0b7167de90517
960f618a33f6227a539d62a1bd0da5747f71931e
describe
'2249' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALTS' 'sip-files00135.txt'
3e78dd5d892b983bffb8e8b3ba5d100a
fd1f8e9fc6dc66baf2a03b85c3088161217b3dd2
describe
'30810' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALTT' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
d7e424dae234578d353e9a5bdeada375
e8d493a5363dcb1e20bf69cd4afd0acb59318214
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALTU' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
2b73297e543ea5bf1bf4968dedb85b33
4211b8c6493e837ed86d9b4ebfce33f7ed02b13d
describe
'176355' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALTV' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
57f097274edc2efba31115b171cb65bc
ec63653faffc797884d8d5c447c14c8a5efc2019
'2012-02-18T10:38:30-05:00'
describe
'94199' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALTW' 'sip-files00136.pro'
2ccd8e64e63ad2facc92135f48a2755c
c6b1cb32a65fb81e9c556968b82ffe8c582d0067
describe
'57944' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALTX' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
81cbbf6694892040bf9c3135eaa38567
acef9282468837187fab31abe278f5436d3675d6
describe
'6880408' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALTY' 'sip-files00136.tif'
6cacd2b7fd01daea7ccc303975d1463a
69d993b35d654d25fa60a9202a76af1083e46c5d
describe
'3734' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALTZ' 'sip-files00136.txt'
1f7dde1543608604b813ac9185bd9a0f
c9b2670086b957e835b556c61f9ae62ac3a674fb
describe
'29828' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALUA' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
4632c60b85ab24bee31fe6d35f340379
aa8860fe6ccfdf08f2eaedd98f4fede499b88589
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALUB' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
7561a008296d18c22fa8491a37f697d8
1a6de896a21efd98c14dede64d48ec6500064d87
'2012-02-18T10:49:47-05:00'
describe
'170571' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALUC' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
86242755134c66a623590fb5c7f0f6b4
f65702e57cae72d99af5945c12788762cfa25389
'2012-02-18T10:41:31-05:00'
describe
'31543' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALUD' 'sip-files00137.pro'
6dc5f7d420df98ea5c2c94e715e18754
be724f52497ae7e714e85c71c904f030e7bb8ce8
describe
'60433' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALUE' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
e4f095c2887bdfc0ca7c3a6ed3d5f300
f7d8a5dec0a67d8a9806027f8dd047349b775e6e
describe
'6881772' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALUF' 'sip-files00137.tif'
794cce97cc0f564ded9ba03c9e0ab7a9
43f81c52554184d6fbde06f0162a90e6b53a5242
'2012-02-18T10:40:18-05:00'
describe
'1242' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALUG' 'sip-files00137.txt'
050f1c8cfe2ef4ed43488464738d39db
9fe3032823967ba906eab00c7f0083840ef756ba
describe
'32546' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALUH' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
fbffa832a043f8dd7af978b5a3406680
3dbf1d18b4c516bfcd3aae5a34bbee3e9c90cabd
'2012-02-18T10:49:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALUI' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
dbd30bc6f08f88fb5eafd16c7f997953
2da23ee7b989499836eaeda7c9281d2a400a70ac
describe
'176634' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALUJ' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
00899af8dc72a1de5f89f4d8740d7265
22560283851c348fb38593fd583b3703ddcd435b
'2012-02-18T10:45:33-05:00'
describe
'90733' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALUK' 'sip-files00138.pro'
2c5a0a58ae766f7b719b235d3c7cf3c0
b14ec6eaa01b17a6f13e2602940db8cef97b8641
describe
'59694' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALUL' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
623e81cc078295169ab1e4fb1250d1b3
cf3debfbaf634a73a146f1aa5cbc17196ecf9247
describe
'6880568' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALUM' 'sip-files00138.tif'
6e0563b611ea693ea17138a1b266a7b2
7b2cacfa0ae1aead63bbafebef47370763506ab2
'2012-02-18T10:48:11-05:00'
describe
'3584' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALUN' 'sip-files00138.txt'
78214a0361526ae9f681b67e506d7834
2175cef097f1532b489afe5c8a5457215f7e7e6f
describe
'30296' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALUO' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
a6754e7ac212e145019341575346da6f
b00473a5343b4147063edc27fd21631c1c0c401a
describe
'857263' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALUP' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
04a1e600db814b13c88b60d6d9df9f56
c788135b2ef928c5357bc61f7a4c932ef934aa4a
describe
'178998' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALUQ' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
0143f46d0b8eeb0d56922605ef7c9728
a7293aec161155b81bbc28be3ad7e4995f0322a0
'2012-02-18T10:43:42-05:00'
describe
'54788' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALUR' 'sip-files00139.pro'
d382eacc673d21b034cd94b4f0b42371
5b98982ac8db2e16d1130bb2823466bb7c0363fe
describe
'61077' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALUS' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
87f0c49856b516d14ceda33909c0df13
0b601046def362bc81c2f29456ab2865f583259c
'2012-02-18T10:45:23-05:00'
describe
'6881248' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALUT' 'sip-files00139.tif'
9ac420139ff457c887a28336dd8ca9e4
6718888466596e1fa9ec80b28bda102835e85e2b
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALUU' 'sip-files00139.txt'
ad50a8f03f9306bfb9834ba59762b74f
1c6457466c223bb9d03186257786e17051486653
describe
Invalid character
'31455' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALUV' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
2d62f64e6448c0f4758a2a01bfeb073e
191b0da0b4c2c287ec076b3e8510a3e7bafb3189
'2012-02-18T10:46:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALUW' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
682326d4f80aaeca4b3af051ee63f596
03529853499f1641511a8f8dd4dfdc16e58a029e
'2012-02-18T10:49:56-05:00'
describe
'182946' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALUX' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
d55427039af5e67bfa64506da14a426b
0a497ccad206486a2250fd602e9079efe927e2cd
describe
'70316' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALUY' 'sip-files00140.pro'
7036b0b0ff0e682f5a6e86cddc5877df
e15ca3695a817c84985d50403ea0cd76424cd542
describe
'61073' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALUZ' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
1c5e662c1b8f70168d012039a3e1ba71
156ebd218b244e931e948c09e9cfbb6d0715edf5
describe
'6881140' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALVA' 'sip-files00140.tif'
5260806b608a827d532570adc5df1c4c
4ac3286eb0bc5d7a6483ce81f993c33c41131c73
describe
'2822' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALVB' 'sip-files00140.txt'
14ba49485e5238046f92c02078611e13
54b913df4b7cb9662c41f856a659d604f6b575ce
describe
'31510' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALVC' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
149fbed4c9cd7b041831daf71b4fdbe1
37ae9988774b653e5653fb4bb54176ccc381a571
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALVD' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
6e44ce60492ee4b2e2a6a3438d3903a8
7cb745e5d9f535e9b3c7dcba620f68606604d2a0
'2012-02-18T10:46:06-05:00'
describe
'193746' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALVE' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
246fb70d85be9e9ce3f425ac2e9c3f91
691e64536fcc682e9bde542c80ea890e8cbd34d5
describe
'100349' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALVF' 'sip-files00141.pro'
434a99bad11e43e28dcf96a0b4fe6836
8d3c7a905fd7a4d66b7df8291876cba505587b81
'2012-02-18T10:45:13-05:00'
describe
'62923' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALVG' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
b9376979aa0869a6e2d96285872c017a
b4f014854899e7a9ebbf71340bfdf98bebd8a08f
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALVH' 'sip-files00141.tif'
727a2bcba69f8dd6c6114134bf373b60
430a1b076dbf38b7b71d370f92960a381edaede7
describe
'4011' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALVI' 'sip-files00141.txt'
1932122d172c05ed7765d88fc583cda7
7e576d09b57d5ae96a6fafcad81b67fac9bfc90b
describe
'31034' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALVJ' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
c115057547df68ec6b648ff016d6215a
798d2260266daeb02c144f60cfb9a31df3b3d1b1
'2012-02-18T10:43:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALVK' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
b2028b632403412b3737b3d93e533bd2
b719861e5eb353d02dc9d3bc7df34fc5deaa32e3
'2012-02-18T10:40:37-05:00'
describe
'171723' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALVL' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
25fa3cbd914a559a9341dbece75aa5ef
1297aa24d52d4f9c171d5282db01c01623c7cd41
describe
'89994' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALVM' 'sip-files00142.pro'
f0694cfa7382fb188ec37dea53cbff6b
30e083d85824842866d57c5717f342fefdd0f59b
'2012-02-18T10:37:26-05:00'
describe
'58244' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALVN' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
6e6e5d7201ecc7cb0548abfd430fadf0
06bc215b2574da19589ce53d836ddaefd85f48d1
describe
'6880372' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALVO' 'sip-files00142.tif'
e9912697953fbe56cb16a80a4065fe30
744904ced5cdbec1f9987d221a54ae7dc7d403f3
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALVP' 'sip-files00142.txt'
ee98bd89b6c3c381abec336ac82fa3b3
4caf572da59a22292432650fdd0316cb93562787
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALVQ' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
a51ee9897fc5a1b74b6ab9e016523680
6a0edecb1e7834e00fd1f29b38a060a5cc533059
'2012-02-18T10:45:45-05:00'
describe
'857107' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALVR' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
8b758a77cd8708418547c19aea1ac548
00573a3b912adca67af5d3a37d2edf67b7c50de7
describe
'180357' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALVS' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
15ecd0e71a14a2b17ec610219125953d
5213edc061995dff07fe38710eebb32d270d3e7d
'2012-02-18T10:41:57-05:00'
describe
'94897' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALVT' 'sip-files00143.pro'
c0fa620baf51bac1e73c9bc5ce742017
9adc71a73dc46700d53d1e10be4a8a4a36b812de
describe
'60097' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALVU' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
c9e7d23754d0cdea632e70298d2f751b
00821464d114877cd97f3093064cc4121d6471c4
describe
'6880788' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALVV' 'sip-files00143.tif'
6a2fdaffb0fc7f1a7038dcfa774b56b0
6892b560db868f65cbe1ee6ffde7bd27845e8c05
'2012-02-18T10:45:21-05:00'
describe
'3772' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALVW' 'sip-files00143.txt'
b7e3c6c37a309141318a2a57b949a1c4
7f2aa15795a972187252aa5b2add539badf7afd4
describe
'30444' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALVX' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
fa3504f4c3a6d007619f7351b3336301
ebce6b434f40d6761f760359c8eef92fdb50585d
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALVY' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
7fc36fcb8f554b0b70c20cb920472185
79f47f7fb18f57eb1eb18cdcbb6c6b097f2e6582
describe
'188709' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALVZ' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
3235c55527e85a2fd4a5ff85cdc2ed28
85caaff1229ac4bd3c6242282e1b7e55ff59915b
describe
'101395' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALWA' 'sip-files00144.pro'
0ef2c6cd3d49f8d94c321e5023723664
e9a93943347e4f012b9411843dc932f129b3cb6e
'2012-02-18T10:39:28-05:00'
describe
'62768' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALWB' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
8f074e76b7c02af17e041024cbd50c55
20446923533585029e8ca87919e56999a50e4392
'2012-02-18T10:46:59-05:00'
describe
'6880956' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALWC' 'sip-files00144.tif'
e4a1c94a6d40a13784328ae2a8b6ffe6
671eaee006159c23b294517d7c3d80ed8173f317
'2012-02-18T10:47:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALWD' 'sip-files00144.txt'
942b7887564b31f7bca86c8142a41c04
b9bc1c5cef28011ffabbfe3829ea17a6f58c5d9e
describe
'30947' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALWE' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
e9c666c17020ff971d66eabbf0126961
bfd1beea13b6e3121c7b594314c2549a8a02b65c
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALWF' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
1cfb39cfc254fb2f5e8c8199f8cf9e7d
f10778aae8c0d7d3aebfbce5b0446111032c81d6
describe
'182569' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALWG' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
4094d4c429c2856520872a04e5bf8560
75ebd3316b8a079f0230560d21adeb0f5dfcac58
describe
'55734' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALWH' 'sip-files00145.pro'
287fdde68eb26a92dcc749dcfa48f582
0d6e098cd112049455a8f7a9024aa39f77db88eb
describe
'61018' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALWI' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
b09cb83c0d94ad340a2d5318bdae5f4c
98e78f21c723e0ea31cb10e0d36ae3d2bcd68ddf
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALWJ' 'sip-files00145.tif'
342def3fadca88aa046673d703889c51
2ac70be143cc0067a4c4ce1bfd96147ba98e46a7
describe
'2179' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALWK' 'sip-files00145.txt'
36cb7983f663dd23cf3a4392b508a48c
8d653528eb93899ec95697800b79fedaabbe09f2
describe
'31684' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALWL' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
9514fd5f4a9ce997e33cc9eec0556c21
2c629420ce22934335e246bd02155cd9990c9edd
describe
'857181' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALWM' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
0fd342de1848be06c866917ed39bf80a
86535cd68ce8e90d536fef0b8d135d5418790e86
describe
'183610' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALWN' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
987ce53055b8d8d1397624d38e387df2
ee15ee6f3ae8d2c26aad203b1e540f0ce3fd56d7
'2012-02-18T10:43:08-05:00'
describe
'99437' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALWO' 'sip-files00146.pro'
907b59d9cbd58efbc374632d9438c3b4
67356ac111e90c470ac34b615e04b1c009381676
'2012-02-18T10:43:29-05:00'
describe
'60463' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALWP' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
8aa8415820e993efd6100c615622f711
d9e92dc0dd0d48029cb21a4b65211c9a8330ec65
describe
'6880648' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALWQ' 'sip-files00146.tif'
69d267ece5c1b75bbcd122ba40240b99
91d8c11da3bce8fc518d3488329ea25b52d18d7e
describe
'3898' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALWR' 'sip-files00146.txt'
5b45ae304b0ebedcbb2775271ff67c52
ad3179ea414ff1dc7ff0dd5ac86518b9be944afb
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALWS' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
0a634e028f10a7c79bfffe8357ffcfa4
30e107fdc5acd5ecfc71a5cbf5bdcaa9369b8b75
describe
'857282' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALWT' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
66785d101fc0be44d64f5bb65596136d
6f2f5a1aa45317f5f89d2b31be6945984fd41c72
describe
'186416' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALWU' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
db086744c131479848c101f467fed135
e31a43b672c8db7b3ff297c60391378ee05a65b6
describe
'96024' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALWV' 'sip-files00147.pro'
dc58babef1ea6238a916eabd098b0b8e
b9f4c8ebccfb8479420bbdaf3c26cb0d511f3a69
describe
'62127' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALWW' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
77f1d10ef71c5a10da6364544e3528e6
1078d9c9a471483bba3c4c3d32236efa91dd4455
describe
'6880936' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALWX' 'sip-files00147.tif'
330ffac6050b9309321f5707abb8d024
927038ee10d376049d3d4e9e56ced7441c759bb2
'2012-02-18T10:42:29-05:00'
describe
'3790' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALWY' 'sip-files00147.txt'
d86210625062f2d0405727d6e6865c49
156d117590b788257337d1a1715393560edc2df2
describe
'31140' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALWZ' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
8cee320cf882b185ecf3de5ea42053c3
3d62ca980dec9be5d25ada6b966eca06cbe06088
'2012-02-18T10:41:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALXA' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
6beaf0624183074f0d597c4b99ea3333
2009546004e3a74b78d27ba8699ef210c26e2c6b
describe
'193916' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALXB' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
3ff574ca7a6a6611073f1cc1333aafa8
cf86cb76de8036ace9c88a4d4f74777e38a8050e
describe
'99286' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALXC' 'sip-files00148.pro'
d0af0521f1c484ed1a5ede660a0b36b5
2ffdfa0942c30eda76dfd79d785ad604eb2b43b1
describe
'64343' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALXD' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
e3711f6b1a26acb0f81a4d5814c5b477
b6fffd7fbbd989d005c424928ac18a81fa141c76
'2012-02-18T10:48:04-05:00'
describe
'6881556' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALXE' 'sip-files00148.tif'
0bfe14b197bb04a421d6c07f3c98558e
41f710a54e5efe2f4cf156c9cc35b1458799cc50
describe
'3931' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALXF' 'sip-files00148.txt'
6c427215cc2c6cd7b111483d87010571
b75b16f0fa68863658cf70e8d2cb1548f4d86b3e
describe
'32239' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALXG' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
9d13ab375f3aef30a10bcc1f94dba004
0f6d0c5c0d13dc970ec2f92a776ce42acba32cd5
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALXH' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
09dcd2ad0361bb98e6236b7c04089927
af7926f1ded5ccd0bb253708a79a988ed01c7cf1
'2012-02-18T10:37:32-05:00'
describe
'177075' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALXI' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
00163136e121061abfee9259484bd49b
2bbe83a665738ba1a48a8b7ad9ac69b618eb7ae4
describe
'48947' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALXJ' 'sip-files00149.pro'
00ce15bc4601111517615c9a5ea90975
3d4f2e701c3a8e97489d435f6aa454be92d9005b
describe
'61236' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALXK' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
5ed4625e0ac8cdb046dc20174e221f9b
e4f10928830ec0f324d162766cc3b62c49cb93b1
describe
'6881752' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALXL' 'sip-files00149.tif'
a77d7e952de903bc1a7709ad77fa6b79
ef0dd3d653ca7420b8661330e2408789c30ff543
describe
'2462' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALXM' 'sip-files00149.txt'
ec8d0c252523ad8c7dbf18fb9a634031
9dcf934773265af23ef229239a2887c07b23689a
describe
'32320' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALXN' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
ceef37a8425f1a109e96cbae9ca12443
aaeccf8bac2189baf8968713dc34918c02c84e6e
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALXO' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
e8e4d0cd6d454066d8ea8c9623ed0dd2
3c84efddc0c4d30c12df7174b60a15347eaae0a1
describe
'190013' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALXP' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
8e3591e7784f78e364898163a022276b
e728f94c649d6512aa67a985121ea869fa748b21
describe
'104414' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALXQ' 'sip-files00150.pro'
ad739d527dea175555756a501b5c6733
3090e0b23d0b4819a80e391961f46bcc9da6b3be
describe
'62666' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALXR' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
daa185e10bf8b9520f600af671da9a6a
dbbda3743c031999b9180db5dadf8e6b0b3c05bb
describe
'6880964' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALXS' 'sip-files00150.tif'
9b0c0ff1fa9e864f27e135f0ab9d1c4d
0085edce5a408ee3531883a4eb4715f4fa76d9cd
describe
'4107' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALXT' 'sip-files00150.txt'
b9455278d78dbb2f587745481f8ab72b
24f7accab830dc6643ea53059e517587a78a082c
describe
'30937' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALXU' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
f9609a2611ec2d52ab33118b98186640
b011853160e12c10b54d05aba4ffac58b446ebe9
describe
'857262' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALXV' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
13e8649431ee5ca7bf4d8ed5941e3ae0
da9153e2bb2f6143444fd49b75c9eb6802816fd9
'2012-02-18T10:44:28-05:00'
describe
'190400' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALXW' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
b694e6c20a80d667276e31a8fe715897
0dd259f072070e16622c6720f72cf1ef51e48195
describe
'100591' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALXX' 'sip-files00151.pro'
3518ad1ee81cd4192e29dc8bc983fd2f
500eba63794d9e8474248b4557777c1d6a8eafaf
describe
'62804' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALXY' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
6c82c315540331cc94b41a9e365da041
c27a141883b96d7a7be7f1ea3ea1f0da34ba4861
describe
'6881148' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALXZ' 'sip-files00151.tif'
a74a618ba91f7932ad5dc0cdc50ddceb
d6804ca6f431723176c55b4765aa9de209f05808
'2012-02-18T10:48:17-05:00'
describe
'3979' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALYA' 'sip-files00151.txt'
c8095ee570a469338c7df2a6a1b043a6
665d32c80b34cdcd1db56356d417f824759d16ba
describe
'31179' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALYB' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
2e7af4df1b9a35188bd61310da153462
87eb73f9255fb43d13bb42befc6e3015a2faa4b4
describe
'857202' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALYC' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
4315bc85f899930182a6793af6d0e307
15386bbbb9be0a14fde0fef6767fa06c99a2ecc1
describe
'163452' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALYD' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
1d438a69831ed9e79a25093cdd358bf1
4fc2dfb796dc20b3588d7bbf8b3b3e8366f8cc09
describe
'35668' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALYE' 'sip-files00152.pro'
ed86f2fd067f6ffaf0e542b73c45c466
0b1664771356b9fba6cfbf1abfac36c009e28db0
describe
'57104' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALYF' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
2e273387b72b93eb26452c7b82dee872
6d9786103780578a85434ba2b6bde236907363f9
'2012-02-18T10:48:49-05:00'
describe
'6880708' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALYG' 'sip-files00152.tif'
3f298cb24dacf7398dbd079397c91a2f
9b53bbc05aa83d3fc348c81204b7e618a54f6d27
describe
'1414' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALYH' 'sip-files00152.txt'
14fa2970ac606d43e571bb95c167f99d
e49213d2119fc558de43942814d1cb4881f8ce24
describe
'30322' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALYI' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
f2a306ca40bbac9e20ba083529a9ccce
42f1442c0191f52bb24d2c413ced7ef89bd769b0
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALYJ' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
393e4ed223c072ed8b38588b0bbb37f3
1d533f111bbe4566672db7e780c4c2f20f241ce8
describe
'187161' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALYK' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
d94489867b98ddbf7513a32b9a19c49d
2b59bb697064b5f5b7f60c3057d82bcf18985149
describe
'91508' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALYL' 'sip-files00153.pro'
872340531ec8b10ba4a73fa87e05e2c0
b4bfbd6238dd16f372e4e76707c97be877f80a61
'2012-02-18T10:45:02-05:00'
describe
'62138' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALYM' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
6deabedc01a0e0eae991652195fe05ea
77edb265ee6082e7c983f3744cf867e301a10d33
describe
'6881204' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALYN' 'sip-files00153.tif'
5f46a514aade961d051ff28832ad3838
705491704a67b17bedae3a2a67cf46076fc67293
'2012-02-18T10:47:51-05:00'
describe
'3602' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALYO' 'sip-files00153.txt'
de30633aff65deea7045cb2576ae5189
7e5bf59f3ae3bda35f29f7ba3d12b9334f05c5f4
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALYP' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
22f7507d482aef2a16b1b2dd3016bd4e
81cb3a170020c8673102f770a04ea9c2f8d96e63
'2012-02-18T10:38:32-05:00'
describe
'857300' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALYQ' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
540621cc93c8284ef64af65a2ad6669c
afd65ac127fb4647e897d1f2532c3cd2090a41e5
describe
'185710' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALYR' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
7ad1573686ca1ed7f1d676142ec8b086
d6c39c2a99e204e6325c4c1bb2516d0537a13ddb
'2012-02-18T10:44:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALYS' 'sip-files00154.pro'
7318d11d190395290fcf4649edeecb64
a4cce1e7551ec45244e0f01777de7edbe6dc2cf3
describe
'64311' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALYT' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
69b3a08c11a943b67f7f7dc7dfd73d93
aabb4fc693c0511ffb95e99bcfc4b72ffc9c8b79
describe
'6882220' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALYU' 'sip-files00154.tif'
b23ab703ac4c790223fbe528a53f82c0
84a4ab879bd76cace8a5a883ab37d7830b947d5e
describe
'1743' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALYV' 'sip-files00154.txt'
db18e1d75cc3748410554e48095334bb
685846621b78e8850a612229eb64d2b0be5c4dd6
describe
'33385' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALYW' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
7be2c208bd4994b01f87f7b1f0fea4ee
fb68866e004bbd01b0197b9b42f2fce97a8bb8d6
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALYX' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
719d1b4956e9fb2127fd92810c0d5dd1
80defe9170f692e0ea06627ae44a3eb6cbfb671d
describe
'182734' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALYY' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
50c96d5d43737c9589f21c42dde786f4
60e8d955e24ed3a0bf834b5a7093be36bacfeb5e
describe
'92330' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALYZ' 'sip-files00155.pro'
0099d191a618cb070d361855ea1cc763
550716b9bd979a2a8c213eaaa35481467c7c1d69
describe
'60504' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALZA' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
172bf759b10e988347d2fb45bc760bdb
33819a5f9b8c814ce17d17466ada869836993d3c
'2012-02-18T10:44:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALZB' 'sip-files00155.tif'
31320d7d70354e625694200fe80b7cb3
97f92e5843d132dcd9d33299cd6d1f01aea37595
'2012-02-18T10:37:14-05:00'
describe
'3684' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALZC' 'sip-files00155.txt'
53a2992000c7f09f3d3ea471065fbd15
faed0a5f86fd8b814f1e50a0adbf60cd382a9fbe
'2012-02-18T10:39:29-05:00'
describe
'30963' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALZD' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
eafb334d481c42abdc638a2404457fe7
703c77fcea9db09e624491443fa9464708707483
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALZE' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
e4a6008fedde288a45deac0673c1857e
727f6d05c75b54d8bda2f6e7768a46ee47c088fd
describe
'192142' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALZF' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
368a7146c417d9dab8a4d483443ab483
74b69b8598da99f000ee91e5d92f8a1fc83ce568
describe
'100393' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALZG' 'sip-files00156.pro'
de7d3401684b11b1e03f3bebb7aa3d65
8d6c8fc826f00ecf6ec0df8fddbadf335b4ad1a7
describe
'63677' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALZH' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
aadcdb98c3a314f2624d87b9f020a674
0f9b606d034ed4585cbbb1de9ec0866c901c5c1c
describe
'6881304' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALZI' 'sip-files00156.tif'
ad6d2f71db832096de8e20f6dbf518ad
d0c07b38df33dba30b76e1c8f3dcce05613bc996
describe
'3991' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALZJ' 'sip-files00156.txt'
d34d60a6743efdc79d5ae8d589a3b137
0fcd768e7a432da7cf0f28b06d87f9c1a28832cb
'2012-02-18T10:44:37-05:00'
describe
'31752' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALZK' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
64145b4338678190e83e78694d60c187
0520b4f69f488f5006379e09296b6352e241aa9f
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALZL' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
a1d762ac2b4a88ca630db31801f55697
72e8fb22c1f31cefb7bca1d1192d1afbc047d5b3
describe
'198084' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALZM' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
f94242fc1efa9c1b03e0408f5de82953
df0b35c888cf3f881c1421f6bfc63aa2ad225ea0
describe
'100981' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALZN' 'sip-files00157.pro'
9b383eaf024f398d87eca9c1ac222298
ad99e61566dbdc2d3bf080242506de6dcf910364
describe
'65707' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALZO' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
0bf7e87e8e885e83536b57c1e3824a31
082e2dd545bcfc738a23b3417251ff857efad0aa
'2012-02-18T10:40:22-05:00'
describe
'6881732' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALZP' 'sip-files00157.tif'
23e5fe5f484b8c9ca9020ac4487d6bd3
fcc536a725d714cbded1f3f7380a00b4d4a5f6c2
describe
'4029' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALZQ' 'sip-files00157.txt'
9bbd28c03a4b4d3bcaf54dd760fafd6d
1b58d4dff63872c77f8626399bae1e78536ded28
describe
'32514' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALZR' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
30068b4c99cf0702a2ca3653e20aea12
36bd8028268a0b3c4cbeec05f277bd819cf7e1ef
describe
'857669' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALZS' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
84cece2bad4149e07f9387c8666ffd13
1189d5bc560a974797c96ebdee59bd60aa3e20a7
describe
'170292' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALZT' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
17d1043781a72ca7b906c03b784d2239
0556cdfc1d3da5d22560f44ad080a08dff1ad532
describe
'85610' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALZU' 'sip-files00158.pro'
1e35fd11e00bccb67b6bd64c055338da
afc1cde3be2e97396ecf5fb77c258faa8c3fd986
'2012-02-18T10:37:17-05:00'
describe
'57423' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALZV' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
ddffd6a95c0a7b326416b7b88d5ecc61
14a6e8d6eb498903f04e8d070f3c53a2767be6d7
describe
'6883432' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALZW' 'sip-files00158.tif'
0c571214b22e2d556a400d77d31d484a
f18d6412ed3250238f62ea8e16ffa3803341a83b
describe
'3407' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALZX' 'sip-files00158.txt'
b9e67ea4b5026eebdae9822f0a6e4ae9
ff07eb04948f643f9bc939c6e7d0bc5fc6d1f712
'2012-02-18T10:37:41-05:00'
describe
'29915' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALZY' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
f076058d58691044367ec5776a553c21
33983fc579b513da9293ab4419203fcf969c081c
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAALZZ' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
aad3b5b82b9957a0a748183fc538c4d0
a7dcb5ca1182c2fcbe3c246b1766b409e0129566
describe
'169813' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMAA' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
c2c0e8b5f14888d002e65718de2ce0a7
f8a027238e622be50640c17e82c90bd422245c8d
describe
'40381' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMAB' 'sip-files00159.pro'
0ced681575e82b3b0053d772ba4355e6
a7068d261804b5dce3652176f2e3fe9b7561c3f2
describe
'57390' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMAC' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
b7356454f651f4d46b85233eed901ba5
799afd11574baf920506f07572fd18d0b2664734
'2012-02-18T10:37:25-05:00'
describe
'6880764' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMAD' 'sip-files00159.tif'
129b41a9d5028f99fb1644b8111d54bc
b50f7217ac4799469392699bf23cdfd8bac2bfd8
'2012-02-18T10:49:22-05:00'
describe
'1719' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMAE' 'sip-files00159.txt'
0aa5f7278a19e29b92785f17bbe002fb
df7447f883bfbeb9f0b647b02d4217ac8ab1e019
describe
'30371' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMAF' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
cc63a65014405271bc76427f1e402788
f018121ccb9fb1fc274812eaa53e02be3dab9cf2
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMAG' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
d3a25520eef861d16822dbaca60c486b
e27733fc75d0610bf71fcffdafc3a7737761c023
describe
'177362' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMAH' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
bb292f4bdbd90c316c37b28db7afabd1
7c772630f7c8e5a1b95db8198c3b2fb77085168d
describe
'86788' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMAI' 'sip-files00160.pro'
b4f3eb22afe822ec51ef13615aeae382
86dfdf28664745dc24572283b29c3607aa8813ac
describe
'59281' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMAJ' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
d0459ddeb41a9ec36fca9e53ec3ce9d0
fe34cf2c56e22bebb78534bc13c20ff6ff7bfd60
describe
'6880932' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMAK' 'sip-files00160.tif'
6ea9196e6f8b9346eca695f0164afb45
3958012fdc55df6f601f707d5217f30659be3659
'2012-02-18T10:39:10-05:00'
describe
'3512' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMAL' 'sip-files00160.txt'
65fe6b7a45f35edfc2038a831ffb8be4
c81011546c5679dad4e5c0420156877027c7ed85
describe
'30751' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMAM' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
a547777684b7f360aaa17fe8e532117e
4667d42c40e7bb51a3f4cb6571f741448d80eb32
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMAN' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
718b0bca33cc8c4efa45393d5ad8bec0
bcd66a824bf762b3672dd0274e2a13b18d312e7d
describe
'211358' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMAO' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
d550e1cc727a604f921bd47268033107
049c880af8e61fbb719d1ebe353039e47a8aab12
describe
'62986' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMAP' 'sip-files00161.pro'
7e28f3c5ffa946200a8631d65e0285a5
d46150b8130d64d194798b90b19397d29f6e3eeb
describe
'68168' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMAQ' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
91b073aaf92fbb86bc2af27d002b3981
78d4b1792b7cded0b2d87f64e60d2ef5d10ef0cd
describe
'6882376' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMAR' 'sip-files00161.tif'
0d38a10c7357492cad6c2bbd784cde6c
8274f79d4cf40ef514a9f0fd859261d80053dc72
describe
'2531' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMAS' 'sip-files00161.txt'
9fba6048fdda25f51425e71b5cf23d71
de74de13fb99def8f9dd951a303002bb8130b6f1
describe
'33812' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMAT' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
7a7e66386851e38826dbce2cdd3a221c
436b2bd5e9b457401c042cfc151af434fe8df9d0
describe
'857217' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMAU' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
c3d0c9c8b0d5799ac6971829cb8088e9
21cde20e45fc64ce70a00a370d982a5f0d534e98
describe
'196272' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMAV' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
ed23d0db437dbed13e69e003be2a430e
5c93fc5f25dce7d415b621063c39894142593c46
describe
'106250' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMAW' 'sip-files00162.pro'
a426cdbfc68921b7da26a2689b7356d8
b5a1690fa8657861f5450bf8496b8c5e13b15956
describe
'64071' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMAX' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
43c4c6ca1ee31df7603ccbfc779f2f19
8951282bf3a10c00f1aae9ffd40cd788ab2b8dcc
'2012-02-18T10:38:51-05:00'
describe
'6881108' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMAY' 'sip-files00162.tif'
6213aa8b80a01ae043ec970f28d98154
5ef0d397253749f511349b9a8fc4f50467cf1cab
describe
'4160' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMAZ' 'sip-files00162.txt'
9072b167328bb2b6f83029f8f9b67a72
ee1fad3e0ad237d644caa9a400ef3f562c09bbea
describe
'31366' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMBA' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
350ea3ffe7f2e42ea0ad76d17b2f91cb
cb9248b343a67fd1c5b9fde91b3476027c656163
describe
'857200' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMBB' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
e5c03f0baf612f8a5f38b9f46df1a290
1eabaa852c3fbce76f7c42ebe01ba324016390c9
describe
'190579' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMBC' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
78c8e47c0da1c08895d920dfe6d70e61
a7cc6c386af359d18437d584394b7c5e6f0594e7
describe
'48822' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMBD' 'sip-files00163.pro'
04190ab64df6697079cc2de5cad3c7bf
3f659b05aaf88b7b92a2d8106c6d8e4651d0f377
'2012-02-18T10:43:10-05:00'
describe
'63546' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMBE' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
8f4cc6cabc5cd3e8098efee352e7596b
d300a6fd52d2a4e03ed0d71dc871d05c5294fb69
describe
'6881660' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMBF' 'sip-files00163.tif'
17a8f1a8c71c010e3789ccada0940daa
c73b4ea9af086fe0460a58665520d094d2d5ec05
describe
'2020' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMBG' 'sip-files00163.txt'
48f4ba5bf433c5d600dd6eb005a93f85
4100c4b753295878e5f5b45edcc9d8ded23297ce
describe
'32335' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMBH' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
82dd7a09e48d1cfc2ee70332918f302d
e539672a1182ccbc30571fd7aab372af87eea71d
'2012-02-18T10:41:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMBI' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
3e91e56de41f9939ebc9b8725662a55f
f7127064208a6671a7de4c20d28d24cecd5ab9c8
'2012-02-18T10:43:52-05:00'
describe
'183871' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMBJ' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
abc0e89da25fe8b3da4c8cf4ad1d3032
0ff3768252f579c1ea37cad189a4fc1ff221ff96
describe
'93481' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMBK' 'sip-files00164.pro'
1b462c5b537a8f2fc2312289b0f15ff5
edb52a623e9869b725278e8c0aa69be406f725c2
describe
'61195' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMBL' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
d933f7221e6bd0adc4990c0614ca9ef9
6a8e12ac06d24fec0ff4b484dca0f69f5d3cfef4
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMBM' 'sip-files00164.tif'
f5d9bee64de65bdbe8caf03e3f5db1d9
bf370154057bad2c9c410506fa9f47bf30e13691
describe
'3666' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMBN' 'sip-files00164.txt'
e1ced16acc34bcc8eac74775614795d6
352fd35a1d74da1636090753d75dbac7fdd5151e
describe
'30984' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMBO' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
1fb07118f0a2c272c00f0eb8d367633d
6c9c4335fa2234eefad6ae999b06dee3daf4af05
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMBP' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
4ed8a532b564adbd18db1ba5dfc13b4e
e1f62b5c41a7ff8b037b421651fb26fec27195f7
describe
'192218' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMBQ' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
83d1981e3d99044d7ba49bd3e64cc2ee
00315dc5f8889b8065824c96c8eac2fcdca6c132
describe
'101736' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMBR' 'sip-files00165.pro'
1effc29d56064faea920c97f7d063466
462f19f39098c2f689d8c9801a50121cd87e318b
'2012-02-18T10:47:01-05:00'
describe
'63613' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMBS' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
416b11d27b5c0db873a049f0d0ebcdfe
aa13332a914a40821010ce0e8a88a6b13a077f63
describe
'6881420' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMBT' 'sip-files00165.tif'
b67e62583226e2e33f1acea6a3264ef6
e32866526fbe52d1731605f2e89605dddd736094
'2012-02-18T10:46:05-05:00'
describe
'4023' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMBU' 'sip-files00165.txt'
e19b4b49532bd4dfe85ed166e324d19a
220208d4fc60ce84ccb07340cf750a264b0cd4a1
describe
'31705' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMBV' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
189a55b1536616753d05083a4fa87de7
f24709028f14026be744d4d2b666a65300ef5659
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMBW' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
cffa4519e7f3aeee31e3a6c263f54bfd
3d46492b9f1eb9074ff5dcf96b0bcc327022a006
describe
'189363' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMBX' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
803f4de6c04a504fddb442d133989f5e
4d94dc3efeca517ef77433c64e7bbb34757f1148
describe
'102893' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMBY' 'sip-files00166.pro'
b0d1c18aee54274193b50f1956d45268
0ae39bf069b54ffdf92266808c68835e0122b27c
describe
'62707' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMBZ' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
bc4103fb29d22a7bb2121f1974804c04
82331758d74bdfe20fcd9ec6b9a5d1b69a62c099
'2012-02-18T10:43:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMCA' 'sip-files00166.tif'
cfcded2525b61486bb401ebca7934743
01dc3746a463ffe8ed4747e00de0c4d2451bf9a7
'2012-02-18T10:37:33-05:00'
describe
'4067' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMCB' 'sip-files00166.txt'
1606aadeeda15bf4488ab9f6f38ce52b
cdcf782801f638351e286c852bc829be2a249f78
describe
'31078' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMCC' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
ef83f587b7b53b800a5eeee50baf7a83
388b249e364bb4fd63c3b8031d70ebf9db66f5ee
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMCD' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
5eda29f92eba39f218c4dc4738287f41
8b69c6b15a007341a4de204a330e5fc5f9c3cce5
describe
'193481' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMCE' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
826942b443f3e535721e0a3058271944
9decf32a479afc9dd656ceeba8abcf77feb9310a
describe
'102848' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMCF' 'sip-files00167.pro'
bd555fdddece9fbb665ec1c5e2f078b4
3f5aa06b11676ad13e7757579624f24c40dd2a00
describe
'64266' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMCG' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
c27a01aab0685c060d144afc3117ae4f
9be3bee4bcd9b08db77949bb78ccbaf6dcbf57ab
describe
'6881464' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMCH' 'sip-files00167.tif'
35df31ba1ac1fdfa3a1b6eabbf557e1a
459ee67a53c00b28f7620fcc55aa16abec260bb8
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMCI' 'sip-files00167.txt'
55e3120d90827220bcff84eb331ef9b6
1456373679293a96e25e427073005b202d545fd9
describe
'31879' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMCJ' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
84734876dd425cc0dc3f832b37ff635d
8bd08c7b48653ea13b60f762138a8cd3f324fd35
describe
'857230' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMCK' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
64d9e9ed059da6a9f990a16d37c4ab4a
6b6c6fe356c4ad580036751302f9a0fa7d54ffc2
describe
'191102' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMCL' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
e9bfdd5a2aee2d089680e5792a7f013e
22bbab92c9f6ca40520ecb3b0e0a933759af63e5
describe
'100851' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMCM' 'sip-files00168.pro'
de1fa5c43115755b624da6cc0acac923
b23f3b62e0862924153cd10e6f946c328d17133a
'2012-02-18T10:42:21-05:00'
describe
'63100' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMCN' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
b90968a4420c5d3299fb072d83a34f9e
fa6fbe340c4d2d3239f4f9fda83be6141da119f0
describe
'6881308' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMCO' 'sip-files00168.tif'
1db9ed951d0ae9c8b43b6df723f9e3c3
17ccc6d561c182715dda5c127f9fcde272879083
describe
'3957' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMCP' 'sip-files00168.txt'
143d9896f2eeddbd3b9925fd7c8eec29
0ef114d2cc28b9290054688c827baf7bb2bb73a2
describe
'31782' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMCQ' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
7fa281e59f563d3b05508cc2c6f42679
58903f2b6f8af801797f4737adace5bc72dfe606
describe
'857223' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMCR' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
53489fcf2755a65ff1c32c4cda649b51
9f2af9302c48a0d262d8777da457d05e675ad378
describe
'183606' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMCS' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
cc5e71adbb4bed164ee3b1dc5b9dc8eb
a7681830a3be09e346286899dae00628ac36c984
describe
'90744' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMCT' 'sip-files00169.pro'
e1170369a3ad55d75d7209ffb3cd182a
f9aa909de183e16ae027c4e1ebc2774a7253d753
'2012-02-18T10:44:51-05:00'
describe
'61758' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMCU' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
f13f3631ebea2868efc887ed1c1dff6b
d22f80736f372980b06ba76fe6f1050b6e200c45
'2012-02-18T10:39:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMCV' 'sip-files00169.tif'
4ef2c7e0af80b9a3057eff3b9c29b6f7
cdb320126632dff17f1f5ec279eebdd37e355093
'2012-02-18T10:40:20-05:00'
describe
'3563' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMCW' 'sip-files00169.txt'
74181bce2d30347f408c92900641861f
13eacdef4900a1d94032cbf2602717aa81b19213
'2012-02-18T10:42:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMCX' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
8532f0760f486877c8e1ea8c6fbe1226
eb3abacf3294aca4790ff4f91b11145e21112935
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMCY' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
5abe1ee187f4825c77a0c86cd1ddd3c0
cf62588e331a379fc863095ee876896bc7685ae2
describe
'175950' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMCZ' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
80a4965ba503fb8f38bca6cede38e92e
ccea3cd439ce67d08f96dd1f55f73bb76f61f222
describe
'46691' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMDA' 'sip-files00170.pro'
d2b41595c3c1862abf1a653cd540615a
fdb27eefa97f08da2b46fcba616e1a172f5c44a2
describe
'60019' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMDB' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
d20df6f5e1816fd272800cf18eaabfae
934a826d95f8652d80225722e22ff957c718fe5d
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMDC' 'sip-files00170.tif'
1477190e568e5dd77f75ebff17ed07d6
0144d1a041e3dc9d1527f01dd757e371e6039df8
'2012-02-18T10:42:07-05:00'
describe
'1835' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMDD' 'sip-files00170.txt'
2fc0f318c30ef1b171d139fb4378a9ce
b0a40eae082c0e75d91a84bb0272ee5371cb1d57
describe
'31718' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMDE' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
25205707f6b30fc7c8afc021f1550479
e6f950e9fbda0d2a569a3647015363af987c232f
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMDF' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
0ccfe81c1ef4794a08011609cdce4377
ea752ee577401df800fd5956d87112237e67d131
'2012-02-18T10:38:17-05:00'
describe
'179987' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMDG' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
b8e84087d1be5e15fcbf099af862cf11
e09eebb6ea2a9967952dd2c33f1989f8f0bbc681
describe
'91590' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMDH' 'sip-files00171.pro'
4d6d9d166a6a3cbd85660c4965d6a501
f947d345be4709fb03f70d5c0b4236c2b2721ed4
describe
'60677' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMDI' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
6adff818d13ff9f3b152ab537f8673c3
d88fa668701e62d768f330672788e9ecb8ae651f
'2012-02-18T10:45:09-05:00'
describe
'6880912' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMDJ' 'sip-files00171.tif'
29c1f206cf72d6b96ddfd258a2ee476d
d5e1a169b3854c45604e8488a1174e380cc8e5b8
'2012-02-18T10:38:57-05:00'
describe
'3610' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMDK' 'sip-files00171.txt'
f88dd777c3cd53f8fa762dbb70584cec
d96bf8662f7fc27e88ac47af65070f4dc681faf4
describe
'30721' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMDL' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
269b0cc9da04dbee79ea20fc27d785a2
b00ee7f252977312907b1d53d59c95fa37852915
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMDM' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
53fb0a9ea6509d932c360ec7d2326fd7
ff4176e4fe1b45e231d01d6c894a872baf6ccb52
describe
'180190' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMDN' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
b5149e38c13e3eee91df3bb25261256c
cc6318670bc4d175ebf023066c17bad849dacb3d
describe
'55821' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMDO' 'sip-files00172.pro'
d58e054325e6f56a8a73929c15809fb2
d1621c3063c1fa7f1d637bea306f5c23c4c2ae2d
describe
'61499' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMDP' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
94295bdaae72c8344338d135f8becc45
69994e5050869ee97a7df944c964172874204d63
'2012-02-18T10:40:27-05:00'
describe
'6881224' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMDQ' 'sip-files00172.tif'
2e664619005246b2d96dcc947d633d17
abc800e87ba0787bbf2906d70080d51bac6289d8
describe
'2209' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMDR' 'sip-files00172.txt'
3172298ee341d8b59329dce7c3f45ec4
ce70aa3633a661c8cc8ee8de2451860574de2e71
'2012-02-18T10:44:24-05:00'
describe
'31660' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMDS' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
9d538851a9dca9a5a984917a3faed8e7
0faeae88cc0a3934684c1a083af045329cef46ed
describe
'857055' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMDT' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
dfec95f92a2e1f18cd6ec5826cf075af
cc6f2dd0a93952f4b85aa44f8f5117c06e9eac9c
describe
'176398' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMDU' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
2db9122913ed759d1f3d358911fb7609
08abba936fef5a2b0cf381eb600aa31de189ee6b
describe
'84528' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMDV' 'sip-files00173.pro'
4445b48ff2935425de4186c63825ef09
e5bdd12d9603f11eb198ed485939eb2a37e380b0
describe
'59925' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMDW' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
d3235d7438927448ca81c2ce9a2b6493
c6bf5e24342a30491b49a14101000efe04c1e904
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMDX' 'sip-files00173.tif'
c39306eb8c2f4a4f3a41a9ee8666489e
24f19576d00fe980741457800aaae680ee89c46c
describe
'3453' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMDY' 'sip-files00173.txt'
88e2a37f5217f85a9f0e991e90ad3850
19cf04f8f96a91b8c03f9dfc6874dd1a3992ce3b
describe
'31121' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMDZ' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
f82519e0539f295c71b3aa1a5b8fed95
18c1451387c0307cb50da4b962b3a1edd6b11418
describe
'857675' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMEA' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
ef736ecb64c91a130b737b1fc6860f9c
80907b69b2e36283c6588b4f971e0c34567f7ef1
'2012-02-18T10:44:04-05:00'
describe
'155947' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMEB' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
4ead6bd778d1262e281c7a5121f22be5
5b5e754bf10030bb7d440f94b6ce6d69994ad4f2
describe
'80453' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMEC' 'sip-files00174.pro'
a9cb68d44cbac921863f446347278a68
e9ea8514edb6b47a97b755287022106bcd163e29
describe
'54585' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMED' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
d133f880155a2ad10a60e28e4425d84f
2fd2334816e44fe9d24a0bc8ec7ed970cbc6522c
describe
'6883192' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMEE' 'sip-files00174.tif'
86ffcc5f2eca7a37b93c6b77b23985f5
00da67906a39bcf530a2e714ec1603b84fa86917
'2012-02-18T10:44:40-05:00'
describe
'3554' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMEF' 'sip-files00174.txt'
3da45606e7265585c199484c80efe6eb
7806ca00dd248945c2666b8098340c9bd82139f5
'2012-02-18T10:49:25-05:00'
describe
'29157' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMEG' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
a17adfb9f309389579b106240dc6488a
95a5e8ba8af8f949bd27af9a9b43bc655beb9887
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMEH' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
893e179b0a4c832d93cbb8ee0cffe727
776c71cee726cf6a14434bfdc64fe88883311ec0
describe
'180165' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMEI' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
9adee29f4d800207d864cc932d6cf3f5
7a281d69703f17e0a861757a1c0932d51851812e
describe
'53835' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMEJ' 'sip-files00175.pro'
4f8a68ea19455dc861ca6d5dfcacbb77
adfcf7c6db7a987477265ed189b4533361594fe5
describe
'62032' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMEK' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
598e6cd77091283f6fb2dcd663a8ac14
c000696b74e39cd2215a3e86ebac2d0f3e2051f1
describe
'6881520' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMEL' 'sip-files00175.tif'
e317a3133e417652ec69b250226d164d
cf90bf560c3d6653aa18fd8d4df8122f085cb0a1
'2012-02-18T10:49:26-05:00'
describe
'2354' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMEM' 'sip-files00175.txt'
a267069f1ec5adbaff139f89a64d88c7
a2d3167e1bcf63bd9a270fcc42ccda780c0a0857
describe
Invalid character
'32250' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMEN' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
7075ace4985c21a005fe2bb44ffb1299
9aefd180a15b45d46c00ba88e411501aaa4f2711
describe
'857288' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMEO' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
6f84cd505845caf3803026a5617ece6b
07f4ee09cc7f0b125445129cad5c24d8c9885cb1
describe
'177430' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMEP' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
fd578227bf4afe525a37fc006be8cc26
aee600d5aff4e31647231e82cb29a0ff3bfba1da
describe
'43192' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMEQ' 'sip-files00176.pro'
18ca31b1e094593b948e536f5bf2e5d4
e4be7cc2a0afeddc6276bf0126af8aaa14251681
describe
'59592' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMER' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
22f3dfc34d34889abffb334c2ef427ec
ebb2765a5b0119c4ab9a566ba2032dd5bcdc240c
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMES' 'sip-files00176.tif'
b951616720be16a5735b18b284cc7659
440e1aff762afc2b9cced1fc52c564496e1e035d
describe
'1742' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMET' 'sip-files00176.txt'
a8fe3b59c27797d5bf9eaa14bd0cd886
4942a0ec9f3ce7d299e9a43557b012a750301b52
describe
Invalid character
'30994' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMEU' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
17c871d4cf8176b8334355f46b7c3328
0c73eee610ead24ba454116e550762de275bafa3
describe
'857250' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMEV' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
fce5824cd3b6de42284da560e221ed57
03c1ced478c59c7846f4578bdf3437f23ac4aea0
describe
'199651' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMEW' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
6117951ac02e55a51d80f207aefb2d85
5711045b6aeb59c8904b04414fc96494b72ad33f
'2012-02-18T10:49:21-05:00'
describe
'105005' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMEX' 'sip-files00177.pro'
965cd7c1da0646b21c27af247a4f0aeb
ebfec798819b923afc17b3a8108689ffcd54e5ad
'2012-02-18T10:47:19-05:00'
describe
'65062' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMEY' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
6bf5bf1c9ad62b7885f676d0148d6a7f
622f6c4aa289a99dd5ce3312f301bcc119f080b9
'2012-02-18T10:40:26-05:00'
describe
'6881644' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMEZ' 'sip-files00177.tif'
3639bbdd2d81cc0743b76e9bd6a4877f
b712730797220d39bcf3ca026d81678410a2e970
describe
'4120' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMFA' 'sip-files00177.txt'
604ae2e3c164fe9ea385d1f3515d44b6
40b228b6833727210a5e9aafe0b77b576920ed36
describe
'32401' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMFB' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
56700c9edb893cdf39353a6ec7e04aa5
4adb3e194aaa96673055e003320c351e43c297a7
'2012-02-18T10:43:40-05:00'
describe
'857523' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMFC' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
efd7a6d0c8afa4ae8a8e3abcd710729e
035b9475076f20888c5f6639f9ee6a0e15e27998
describe
'174695' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMFD' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
30f7680ce304b2ea70242c0379b995cf
b2c8bf90ed3bf014ca2788f8f157838ab59fe853
describe
'48016' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMFE' 'sip-files00178.pro'
ede11166216c660539de5eeb255e8b1c
9d7dbb60bf70bc85f1295341035dc12fe8a14984
describe
'59652' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMFF' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
8024f0797319fda739ac8cda248b5588
468fcddaad7164a1f7562682658affdaea94730e
describe
'6883936' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMFG' 'sip-files00178.tif'
7283f062a18a28782c7a27f4027bc33e
271145b170af4c9d0f42438574e77f4c53f8b175
describe
'2574' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMFH' 'sip-files00178.txt'
e5f981a54f39dcde9c5a4912a584a94f
4498035f1cf4db80e74dbe5128893898711b99bc
describe
Invalid character
'31092' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMFI' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
d7b888fe3291a8927ebdc11193c56241
4b431ed94b24dc1edfb4f5e7c41e4a2e1254c45a
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMFJ' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
5597c66febfa7b01a097afddf5ada780
243d4406f52233654bad10508d43de85a24dd4ee
'2012-02-18T10:47:12-05:00'
describe
'193659' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMFK' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
865c2253fd7af065ad273fcad22a2d99
ad5480c33abbc8fd6631e39a891993dff2abf3c9
describe
'105410' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMFL' 'sip-files00179.pro'
7f6ca0279f5cac42a7ddf52809ceda8f
c3f492ed5290e50583af102ea5a37874ca8b8f47
describe
'63295' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMFM' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
e3fe4119c7adc21cfcbeab170096357b
77750a1987f217053d990a833302489a079ac057
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMFN' 'sip-files00179.tif'
f986b365a87c643504a07045cfc85634
c0691df3ac77525e5ec7f3ff889adbb5dcd5ecbe
describe
'4183' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMFO' 'sip-files00179.txt'
5055c60044135daf47f4a5e0f2fa42ff
59c7e2f1a288953c484c176109bd0cd597045b8c
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMFP' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
cf83d38e70a65a0249ba752da4c84c50
9476cbbf2c8350643cfd77957f068ec71785bf1c
describe
'857631' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMFQ' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
9436f7ddd6c242d4f6e87561dad25049
21f8b021e3cb11bd4583feb1a7553bb0093707d8
'2012-02-18T10:39:04-05:00'
describe
'173296' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMFR' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
c56a4a68f82035b51b8561f8597d3f61
dfec179d3f425cb043c76e1489bab03edcc55aef
describe
'46972' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMFS' 'sip-files00180.pro'
bb5d69fcb670cdf2d166096320ee3311
ea158fbd6f93dc572f6375f77e0b2c5f09ff6255
describe
'59525' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMFT' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
b775b58416de395f2bed2138d8fe7f3a
919996326a50372f8854c8e0c73769b20d4746fd
describe
'6884148' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMFU' 'sip-files00180.tif'
f5fff40b83892773141fa6661d17f11d
84f837081f606a08f6d7ed35e84f08911cbedc09
'2012-02-18T10:39:33-05:00'
describe
'1923' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMFV' 'sip-files00180.txt'
a835da42e5e25822c0cda743735fd737
7f7de031734d74386e94232d4d927017574ad86a
describe
Invalid character
'31270' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMFW' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
24229acbf6cea8bdd93674852b18b3b5
fad9669f84ae486c199a358bd4efd4c4525de4cd
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMFX' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
5c58744822a22f81a3e31522cc7a9189
db9fdef31c2c43a105b29d948a71026e0534a035
'2012-02-18T10:40:40-05:00'
describe
'181077' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMFY' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
ca0053e933ceb45ce4bc8e5fcee4cf00
ec3752108ddd61c9478f05ceb76cef7bd9de4078
describe
'91272' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMFZ' 'sip-files00181.pro'
80ed629901be980eb8e59bbcfc0dd7d5
260b846ee7e2ea757713b2a4f8f48a7319ad51a3
'2012-02-18T10:46:29-05:00'
describe
'60683' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMGA' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
30c5167f7c2e6e5d74f822d3e7ccca1a
60e2faf2627e72583fdd508c30dd08f418930959
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMGB' 'sip-files00181.tif'
f2db34a55f687e40ff5178904100bbd0
b7dcac878379d3a7250291e1cafc6fe782068543
'2012-02-18T10:38:04-05:00'
describe
'3615' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMGC' 'sip-files00181.txt'
3b336d1203367de45fb29aa5c6746b76
b30628369d5a5c07510a59d774101b49119e370d
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMGD' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
c2b5d41bd101b6df22c66af63950a954
9aaf1d6e8cd7e3ea83407ad1af9ea72dcccfe3fd
'2012-02-18T10:40:14-05:00'
describe
'857257' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMGE' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
f47dad6e00a8cb9e43f0cc012351e17e
3d24c7005ad51a4e0cdf016d125b390cab30b2e4
describe
'175295' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMGF' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
b0b6265d0c80fa72af4af1b7304d8ac0
1c9d56147481c091af73c315b0df500483481b83
'2012-02-18T10:40:19-05:00'
describe
'64877' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMGG' 'sip-files00182.pro'
d32f11888e2a6291b3330c47676e63e9
b763f873840ecff7ee0334e5c25c99949271bf3f
describe
'59061' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMGH' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
8cd07036ae4569203a7c05d6c3f55daa
3d88b68623be6f9770d9e2a8e59dc69fafa55717
describe
'6880768' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMGI' 'sip-files00182.tif'
0a9ef435c54ce22bfc75b2dd27db6b30
e18cb0f306a52acf5f7bd00bb6db9e0cfbe84fad
'2012-02-18T10:49:54-05:00'
describe
'2852' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMGJ' 'sip-files00182.txt'
ebc5620bcebef6c7a729ef370f7ecc2c
d0977e80198a390ded6ba11758665b196d8e05e6
describe
'30688' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMGK' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
934790ca67d8e8a8be74b3173e7b83db
3069325a233c6c6e0d214a0256e41512fb1ab070
describe
'857649' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMGL' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
25aadf90aa94b7074c7637d460b65ce2
9f13cfa1d5cb3fc6744d24343a862ff1af11bcbc
describe
'194844' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMGM' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
bb1c83ebe428c4f4ea686095068eb9ee
ae67e90b1f306363f7ed00e75ea1378fd3148655
describe
'101418' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMGN' 'sip-files00183.pro'
0375e9efcbb951f580c37c0adbf84025
841b437cf1eb1bcb9c8a0b0fe626ff31387e2fed
'2012-02-18T10:42:00-05:00'
describe
'63779' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMGO' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
169170f18b659da7e1fcc56bc0b116d5
f030261cf3556f6a4735577e1a63eb7f9507252b
'2012-02-18T10:40:28-05:00'
describe
'6884064' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMGP' 'sip-files00183.tif'
b9b8376e47cc6cf3b7ced4870ffdfe01
eac9813fa5399bc7b4db7b9a415553fb255139cc
describe
'4046' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMGQ' 'sip-files00183.txt'
1c409c801f34b86be489a10b59f7023b
27f1e2a6912221468821e5bbdea12dde1b792e35
describe
'31457' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMGR' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
11076617b7b660f532cfa3edd918d227
f78408434e9e4a1dddcf1efac137c3de6cee00ee
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMGS' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
957c3862da75a0d1b1b914a3f170317a
d14da27aa9c47b95b7108da1a5dd1f7221426819
describe
'190090' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMGT' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
368e8828223445aef2fb17ceb9d27bcf
bdea6ef236c762b00bc58d987d3e2a13f20f07ab
'2012-02-18T10:43:00-05:00'
describe
'53465' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMGU' 'sip-files00184.pro'
5ec8a98a92fe51de35ae7a6c0cf03ba5
e4e67d2c7be1da3a6e3f81d700d85a7d48c31ca7
describe
'62049' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMGV' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
95ced2b010cf7b6a67c3d56d27e2d7ad
a2007f5582c59a4fc93783ee555a60ff55549e5d
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMGW' 'sip-files00184.tif'
4572b60b170565b5d9e69a0f0d2bd48d
a3f04983c1eae9873b4d0550bf74c8bf5307cb09
describe
'2378' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMGX' 'sip-files00184.txt'
7baaea7b6c7b444315b973538d9c5195
9612477de9ce66922cdbc946dd30d92f20861d14
describe
'31775' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMGY' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
d9784fe5c0131849b60530d496d30740
6a6d169f05edfa39e807996bc6c4bfc493d63c06
describe
'857286' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMGZ' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
5ce331adb853055f0d63aed11eeb6cb5
60990ee1d073088db93a57b3c8f9a3c989b23255
describe
'187795' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMHA' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
f791f5c704bf7a09ece0ca752b70c2a3
a4c52914332d488f24d616ac3bf8e9527c4a43a8
describe
'92887' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMHB' 'sip-files00185.pro'
4c6a236ac008ab1f98cc4df54c3bd12f
b4100a3cd056104a6cbd803af417d5b7218e3850
describe
'62403' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMHC' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
470b49a465140561e9183ea4b35c3954
435c9c401883718693c8fd50193fd9a9a9e056d8
'2012-02-18T10:49:09-05:00'
describe
'6881180' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMHD' 'sip-files00185.tif'
e52afebd49817605d3acf366178e2453
12509d00ad06b0c550ac49edac28051668e4ab0b
describe
'3649' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMHE' 'sip-files00185.txt'
812e0e8c02904b08a37164e1e6edc3e5
6b2376fdf85a3b96794b9f3988010e3a655f1d7a
describe
'31171' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMHF' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
bb1e1aea97516c23bb5b06e9f5dce1f3
e806b26a48a2158ebb76cbfbd9a9fb98dc322cfb
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMHG' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
0cbd6eb21828419fc246b95e63858733
15b6e66dff01d712378374c8bea2a45aaf645713
describe
'199500' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMHH' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
6a315dc8b712f222b8eb1ce6a7904fce
c4608b0d6f93acc8eabfe021886801401f93450a
describe
'107474' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMHI' 'sip-files00186.pro'
d86b4ad6bda86945272783cc895188ea
1973323d5c3d99af0756bf6bc072797b3ce09caa
describe
'64428' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMHJ' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
2276f57201f03f0d1244e00c70465903
68435e9e6a94657f38c3dac6cefb5a4e469c33dc
describe
'6881272' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMHK' 'sip-files00186.tif'
5e711bf7627a61318911a7b8acaba76d
13eab5123dee8e4e42ed880fa0bbfc96b936c5e1
describe
'4205' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMHL' 'sip-files00186.txt'
31ba36baeff26999154e3405550ea488
3382a17283b74e66758922c2a6310c9617008a3b
describe
'31706' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMHM' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
875b4c604da85560165500f96f2dd0c5
28eb1177568c9d34747ceb83aaf96bcab6ab7aca
describe
'857187' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMHN' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
db6cbf4c101253dd18c2736fb763fe3f
766bce450ba76a8606dd251b6c2572a30886cca4
describe
'196087' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMHO' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
a39fa508e02474cd1448647aef00ab88
8b1031207c99bed84eedb77ccdfa026a7c52925c
describe
'102855' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMHP' 'sip-files00187.pro'
427342012fb4d00de078cb1af40fadf1
63effefa143a9350450779b88b635d0831d8da85
describe
'63612' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMHQ' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
3d5049234f005dd1e4b10d3863fb1d66
d663cc4cbdc8968a1b98dfc15337aaa2bd1184b1
describe
'6881016' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMHR' 'sip-files00187.tif'
8d1fe5057b0f201221712614a1e9ea64
055b652a9571f61aae88c49785863f4885bb3bfb
describe
'4031' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMHS' 'sip-files00187.txt'
b8e0b3f1f04d3818cf2743bf12e5cbe4
adaeed8c2bf9cba4472b64eedf9f1b4d3e5cf58a
describe
'31127' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMHT' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
4e14c126be9e0c7da955379084dc8d56
27a09c410b351fe1c38e6778558857c1f5bd2e80
'2012-02-18T10:41:15-05:00'
describe
'857301' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMHU' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
ff74bcba3b65057c38f14dbe5ed93277
959cae80e3fd8a597b618c9f0ab48d0ed2b49340
describe
'166444' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMHV' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
3e6f89e8e55ecf64dfb70dd302e679c3
77cd3ed937605ba504592d1b1e7a76f556386201
describe
'29099' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMHW' 'sip-files00188.pro'
954d2e291be6e209230641edbeb2477f
a5d0d4eccde29244d2cfde5b7f6b04827a526946
describe
'57682' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMHX' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
18cea1c4ceb5c1721c692f9647571aec
9d45d06de9c18e8c591a9984db1f6240fdebae49
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMHY' 'sip-files00188.tif'
1769002ae92c497dba7556b5d54c5d47
6f14b06bc7f66723f82b29ef758e9baa24dd6752
'2012-02-18T10:49:15-05:00'
describe
'1290' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMHZ' 'sip-files00188.txt'
a62e82b3705138b8ad8b1fd19b591780
1200c9cf44c30fa5eb0067a8df3fa4448f65b419
describe
'30902' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMIA' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
c96e34779fc0dd4fc70271fe93d0fbc9
94dba63495f4f4387ce1a1e2886a3804ed96b5f5
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMIB' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
a67910462c7af14c980dff362893e70b
09050cf81d312adefc3bb8744c73f92ce70c0b36
describe
'164513' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMIC' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
064b08d47baf75616555e11e825b5141
60d297a45c0117f720ab22f07664cdb818142a63
'2012-02-18T10:47:32-05:00'
describe
'85053' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMID' 'sip-files00189.pro'
7c75b4da4ce00c571d1324f3415be290
b251b3716e7d2967462d7a1393bcca679a179a7d
describe
'56589' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMIE' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
b8271ac428247a5edf95e0c077bd756f
04ca527afb16876d256ea6f0daa41b9b5d843676
describe
'6880492' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMIF' 'sip-files00189.tif'
8c9ae98256640d2ba269e0e4bd83647e
c93cf9768005f375664d89010879d8811e81cc60
describe
'3601' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMIG' 'sip-files00189.txt'
54fbe2579ddfabc73d0dfe19b5af0ebc
cd7700b0145d7ee0753f919a563f3728cf757fea
describe
'29722' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMIH' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
d2dca3e9e5f3bc091618294fcd4911b0
12b3cdc825013708459b128c61aea706eb2a7efc
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMII' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
81b3ce10cb9fd28ed545913b97e8d401
9b3710be78d9bc68a3c4133b02f3a908e7e56f2d
describe
'188253' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMIJ' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
7c30c36a999eb17238d560375ee3ca60
95360d441a98053ab77b56db5a157f20e3550656
describe
'101183' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMIK' 'sip-files00190.pro'
c0497417dee846e2fe967cd1c7b093e5
37caab2d95b953938cf8b46b0a802c908e6b8b52
describe
'61309' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMIL' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
2893157494e47c9aa402850189501fd2
16516852799704c9df12f3c44a1b6f385ef29294
'2012-02-18T10:44:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMIM' 'sip-files00190.tif'
0834e398b22ea5d7f27fc3cb1b0ac0d0
439fecad28a304aa75ed8ae010ee0e0ebb213193
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMIN' 'sip-files00190.txt'
212d5b7f1a075aa2526ffcd448c65475
5914fae6e5c9c9b888dee12333a1efad98459003
describe
'30179' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMIO' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
1a68e68088bf08361f4386797b83c5f2
142bcd17d98fab8ab720af1626b1e9709b3a88e2
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMIP' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
dba1c2b1be4341a397388d26faf38342
7f09992184bb462d9a80b55f74b6fe87c90ad520
describe
'199562' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMIQ' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
262a0a3bff623432be33baaeaac5929f
5f1b6a4370d3c2310fa3ab5de6cb0b6fff226d94
'2012-02-18T10:37:47-05:00'
describe
'106754' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMIR' 'sip-files00191.pro'
1c9e5dff08d865f9b6027189d288cedd
5de5c145397f3ffc1e1e27935087f612184c3f71
'2012-02-18T10:47:26-05:00'
describe
'64904' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMIS' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
3e2cab6046f9ee9bfb2327e5ed385a07
4bf5fbc6be2c45d6de83db3203ecefdb4c575668
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMIT' 'sip-files00191.tif'
c91848fae445b128c5abfee5759b799e
d0ed697560aac04985b4f27804b7aa58c3e1ada2
describe
'4212' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMIU' 'sip-files00191.txt'
d77255fcedd14a79541fea2a87357df5
d9dd9dbaece44d09fa6163a83b43ea88a150f725
'2012-02-18T10:39:15-05:00'
describe
'32075' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMIV' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
7b8bb03749e0a840f4c181decc965fab
32b9f09907f08ec67363ff7b60bc3e1954e65fdd
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMIW' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
69ab5f12dc9aeeba95d907a24d797490
f3c68c8bbf360d98637be7a19b1d49bcc327e871
describe
'175634' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMIX' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
c7610be0597a633497e9d4ef52998621
5ea3b9f1ef85aa5d0473f7a3d864a9681d953523
'2012-02-18T10:43:57-05:00'
describe
'87917' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMIY' 'sip-files00192.pro'
85563dfa6717ee8e7595de24d911c8dc
b5709979974c0d855830dc8d2c6033c3d37ca301
describe
'58876' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMIZ' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
475d2b9eef167e21249f5b64f4ffa657
2f61cd0a508c840b943bf77344d31e8a92c9a910
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMJA' 'sip-files00192.tif'
4cc0bd4ea633b095d47c388293158f85
4d35b55e3f860d47755c4d9256913200aef2648b
describe
'3545' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMJB' 'sip-files00192.txt'
dbe4d6e553e5539dabfe0aa962295147
c5339c7657ac5ffd35e72a2fdd23813a96a8505b
describe
'30299' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMJC' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
5cdb07a98949d3e8ac12a6397376534b
6243e0f3ac79126feb8f5d69033989fcb4ebdbf0
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMJD' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
6886ab75a4eb883719d23ff0f948e7d2
f90ecdeaf8d467275e49096bcae67b75d8af2740
'2012-02-18T10:42:30-05:00'
describe
'157382' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMJE' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
acd5078b988a7eae84823aee32c4cffd
4b69b15887274d9b22ba773e40b725041747d0ba
describe
'28989' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMJF' 'sip-files00193.pro'
ce4f637d30c51fd637f222bd0d2d9f9d
8f8ff8b3082518fb2e1a793c16c47a62996fdf40
describe
'53855' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMJG' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
06799dd8a73700c17c15bdcf75019202
7df7e6fef5ab23caa72fe4946849ca961cada9f8
describe
'6880392' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMJH' 'sip-files00193.tif'
e5ea1ea12f1d504c6b89097c84f8a6e1
cae363161f4be4b2b2dab17edc14617b28eb9d02
describe
'1171' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMJI' 'sip-files00193.txt'
bc0ec8984e8b80e66126e2f48adecf93
b749435939ae09c8e8adee954ffa4eb549cf78e2
describe
'29327' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMJJ' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
a09bc5b454b0e2dc9b62a33fdabff7e2
058adc2c00b1dfcb97f615f94c748a8140f87128
describe
'857295' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMJK' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
709fc0f5ed0450b86ebe31e9b9859584
a5b67c39fcdbe14262e5a65814ba03568cec5f0e
describe
'168423' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMJL' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
c93cf8974ee15ab1044379856c250230
38c6a144c4dd5998fdf11d8dddbd940e116f14e8
describe
'33149' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMJM' 'sip-files00195.pro'
06df5c2a686dd609917f1ddb0247bc33
30715b5279538f3e2022465ca4c94a0d0d3ff7ad
describe
'55466' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMJN' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
2b813e1e7f4d5c447d323d6570e7b625
c3b5c1b716da3482608d7ee11c4f0e0e1ea647d2
describe
'6880552' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMJO' 'sip-files00195.tif'
f6dd6451df8f4c4354094ffa4c01fc17
950256e7cd1d5e13a2c712cc92793caecb4e2ffc
'2012-02-18T10:45:50-05:00'
describe
'1491' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMJP' 'sip-files00195.txt'
435b0d0a27280b1bbebc339a43967da0
581b93e3b6a8d461c51dbf742aa6cd64ad1d09b1
'2012-02-18T10:47:24-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'29770' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMJQ' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
fc0ee8bbc27ce864adf09e44d14fae7a
ae6715854503e18b823445be6798c53adeb2ffef
describe
'857677' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMJR' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
552e38122d1fe151d421adc2a5de9fdf
2d07e8e4b72db271ec01981e2d0580c81577f85c
describe
'178970' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMJS' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
a90cb6c6747ae1f7ffe5d6d5c3409c78
4be891d357d96bf3e7d2bbf16b8ae3e83de2b61a
describe
'92865' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMJT' 'sip-files00196.pro'
5d8fcca9d10e2ed1f7bd862a5bb8e756
a337d4e958821ec53a7f6fdc16dbf72dcc15af9e
describe
'58936' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMJU' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
f31bb8faefbc8d08ddb5301f221c0a1e
9010acfb46068929b2885e089d8b061cc2e7df76
describe
'6883516' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMJV' 'sip-files00196.tif'
79e3b32e8a9b5e2b320c1865cd79f70a
0ab1fd36803f257111d3513f081dd9681ab71de6
'2012-02-18T10:47:37-05:00'
describe
'3724' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMJW' 'sip-files00196.txt'
36f6de252134f45d28a9c46ff9740476
867f3440c9c75c9bdf45099360425032df4743b8
describe
'30305' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMJX' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
00ecee37af688462147f36e2279401d8
bf746a28aee4521090e6445ae32b62c20e95ff46
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMJY' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
ba590226a970b6ddf45866cae166a0a5
c035d9b6915dc1f810f2f4a094cdbf852747887c
'2012-02-18T10:40:34-05:00'
describe
'186014' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMJZ' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
2c1de114950c2b924beecb33eb19c7de
64cf926db1b7b4215b07be86b8708b3ad466cf69
describe
'95744' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMKA' 'sip-files00197.pro'
4fba2ee46a87df46b385361dd550b7c9
b4ee9fd7a7fdb40c36d5d68cca771fe88c73922a
describe
'61329' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMKB' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
1163160b69583884372cd939ce5e9f74
0e3aa029ec75d0493f12d2b8adce601e6c2cc3f7
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMKC' 'sip-files00197.tif'
20d74b46f03d69992784da78aba25201
09a0877246dd824999fb446b6077434a91f8151d
describe
'3793' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMKD' 'sip-files00197.txt'
720b2df57a7bcf500531a6710b410e70
cadc47988e31714f8e590b032b77b111d2f87380
describe
'31052' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMKE' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
8958e57493a8451c2026eaa91a5fe75c
0ab6829d42f59988bfd83cb2491ba0459c9f8ff6
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMKF' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
9615c22f0c148a54230229153ce3c268
1e970dc14f9dd58b0523bf9736e98f50d93fbdef
describe
'189977' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMKG' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
7265ca20eb730856ff900bee80489e25
705f5933e74ab0a135414d5838abaa00166b85a0
describe
'103814' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMKH' 'sip-files00198.pro'
94dc4c8d1538414398716d5aa77f3574
65132ba20cfc03245f8317bd9ad866c2c5d5cc4c
'2012-02-18T10:42:20-05:00'
describe
'62686' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMKI' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
f08cb24432e85b4ab6d16e6884193271
7fff2983c35e7a26f88c00c225731bbe74d18166
describe
'6880968' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMKJ' 'sip-files00198.tif'
08588a4125af5e8a413584acb8934b7a
0125a0f53fbff3c2aa655073e486e6bf91c9cf86
describe
'4140' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMKK' 'sip-files00198.txt'
923865aa17af69e8d2ad8fc578e9ac23
d425c153d977b637877e1571abe3c7439a383db9
describe
'30881' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMKL' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
ee7ac4d096f2530ffb04e2ce774b762c
1a9866ced9afede6b0b3970f0e00fa6170d39daf
describe
'857292' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMKM' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
df76093f65be57f07a0fe3cdb97038d3
37613bc2666696d6421ce2788b0393a398c76f27
describe
'166063' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMKN' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
28a8611eb39c88b9dc0835f5e76105ed
51d4945837a8c7765050eebcee9a65444e92285c
describe
'32243' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMKO' 'sip-files00199.pro'
56b8228a623bc54bb0313a796858f0cd
3b8e9e00aade7e325acf897ac4c8cd2ae31839d3
describe
'57358' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMKP' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
6a80c8ebcc8e9578a9ebcac84138e068
0e3721e98d3676a2c032b6d8e9f5af08e2a1ffaa
describe
'6881112' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMKQ' 'sip-files00199.tif'
488ff101e26b5a1de1220cb32becc626
3250f9724ecb222a29734d9973ba9382e41a9a8b
describe
'2004' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMKR' 'sip-files00199.txt'
9225b7a4e81da79e0e019a0c2a409fa0
acc53bd1b12f4a4f8107fc4598c7a2909792d127
describe
'30805' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMKS' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
f464fee556c89d41551b4bcc18c82b56
7eb89b15cfa62f0b11fa314dd30dcdf042ac9abd
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMKT' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
662c38851761a91badd7013fa4a36974
79b66711af4af91a4821976a529a2cd922ace519
describe
'180905' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMKU' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
526c50f338591bb9014253da7a8eef4c
bf83c61312ff580ae9af84ec40b5ce2b27aacf40
'2012-02-18T10:45:52-05:00'
describe
'100299' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMKV' 'sip-files00200.pro'
355bca8ed534b51da523ae6490c5bcb9
c6bdd3880cf9c74298f070c4acaa6c57871ba24f
describe
'62046' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMKW' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
dd45ecf88c06b734ef9361de41910739
f1668d54b1aa040f22dc14ba9b5a1e9aef56e6e1
describe
'6881244' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMKX' 'sip-files00200.tif'
2403c39a887d6acd4d79203c26030164
44b3f1202d9432662e9eafdff337670cfcc9f5c4
describe
'3978' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMKY' 'sip-files00200.txt'
b52a73f455c04a4a9be978cd94b2f909
d394651f81f20fa8617c57c2449e2b66c3e25e95
'2012-02-18T10:43:35-05:00'
describe
'31302' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMKZ' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
f7b72d10cd5a7d0da5645768cb50ebff
105f0a59d377f8df72666073501a485977dc04d1
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMLA' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
57b34c00169d132e738ad8a47ee882cd
77c7bdd967cf3c5fcad36849c161a6adfdcb0901
describe
'127811' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMLB' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
1b7e0c12144c0725bb8fb16fc9fb85f9
dfb59aacb38f7f77d1b0355f93a3b365fe2ee070
describe
'18551' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMLC' 'sip-files00201.pro'
af2a353b232eaa9901b568974c12599e
2218b04f3bfb1ef76a1f704285472e7253b46bf2
describe
'50222' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMLD' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
52d599f1186791bcb7979a778bdeefa8
63a2ecae38c54bb09e617fad3ade727a92470d33
describe
'6880624' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMLE' 'sip-files00201.tif'
02ff9a423c84c5d0e5ea6d4082264c63
516d14c0d3528f058670d01158853968dc9c6194
'2012-02-18T10:48:31-05:00'
describe
'781' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMLF' 'sip-files00201.txt'
5ec25b4a2bc889c71df6b08262f97b82
0d7dd47a217423bce582fe36035255362b5694c4
'2012-02-18T10:41:03-05:00'
describe
'29602' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMLG' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
4c6206e703c1a062856667b45a4fc83b
8f0280738838359474c8627117119735eb135f54
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMLH' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
aae576bb219881fdba6db43008323740
589d21c8fd1825dbf9168836a872f3f9e5a7d31c
describe
'183892' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMLI' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
c24a1465f0f925a0f7333db00acefd14
98133b5cf28591e89821d4edcbe6cc55972a9568
describe
'96926' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMLJ' 'sip-files00202.pro'
7089e647256cc109bdf62ae8f3838b56
686f58b126ac1e97bd684875763e808f07ca6565
describe
'60797' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMLK' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
1b95dfba61ca11f62af1c9479a38105f
612c33c49d590a1bbb6377b9ab4fb80ea17bc871
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMLL' 'sip-files00202.tif'
559f90895112503ed74ef86c2c6dea7e
ab51516c96c9fc8167e1606c9f2716b6340ab76d
describe
'3862' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMLM' 'sip-files00202.txt'
59eb57419fb8446c44c603d9971d9cb2
9ea069c52d0e93f2aaa6f269724f42a850db2ab9
describe
'30593' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMLN' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
41d0815a9e6409f6ea8f003f27ec3124
cee32ff56c521b5d0fd4126b7c3fcca738e94065
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMLO' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
cd190ecc76eb7ea9018292d3dd887bb8
015724a9f7a40c5197b3de92f3164c140ff3e7ca
describe
'166328' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMLP' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
4f6b7228daf726ca55caa8271999ac7b
12f36d06eb1e24fdda94addd924c63de1fcfeaed
describe
'13351' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMLQ' 'sip-files00203.pro'
681e023c8d43cfb54d5072834078e6f8
be05703f98f655dc192e1c0499ca5be9890cb1d7
describe
'55840' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMLR' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
02fabfb8f7bdc6d67ec41ccce3636e48
da9e3a7294ec37dfbf8dfedaafd636b2852a3e2f
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMLS' 'sip-files00203.tif'
b40a446a684b6d4fff887198466fc2ee
7e8da57cccbd54fa1a067103dc4d3bead6f8f8bf
'2012-02-18T10:37:34-05:00'
describe
'569' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMLT' 'sip-files00203.txt'
0711bceed8c8160e7f9a8e3e70e77020
9cbe40a9342d1c4eb305cc2d51ad1dce898aec48
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMLU' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
8959339521cb0eabcb4db416c75c849e
97c8c61a863a0b8a58ab39c64addf08b75014fad
describe
'857042' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMLV' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
a356ec5717d3e4c0995b129ab739508a
a6a748704533d1f0dffe3b1731232d074c9253b0
describe
'182990' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMLW' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
33ad91c4df50102954f2c1012a7990b2
0fa50fc6fac27596d55e5d4f410ce0ae48991fdd
describe
'98095' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMLX' 'sip-files00204.pro'
58794fe7217b57277adec0d7642bbce8
101bb0d19598384c48f1c7eb44ea550ed0ba6aa3
describe
'61053' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMLY' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
330fa208809df3b7797ea6298c86200f
eb08a44827375422895dfed44659640ef939b3e0
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMLZ' 'sip-files00204.tif'
6d5624c6c23be0efd59c049d21b8e7b6
faf87cd110abafd8e45137055fdbe166394882bd
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMMA' 'sip-files00204.txt'
efbe26696aa12d86a777ea69a2c04874
aea9b744541f97a60fc0920a9a07ef8ab4caf201
describe
'30660' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMMB' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
ac616d7952acba4539ff51ce3531a40c
39d4755a26194325fd3d182cfa561b791b3db9fb
'2012-02-18T10:42:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMMC' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
85a9ba10b60ee3b6081481cc0967d6be
8142dd22823b3f084607946feb83c2e615e70af7
describe
'184680' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMMD' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
567e25ec2be451e2accd4f11479d3f09
455a05b8bb990e5696a434b7b96c3cfc88faa2a5
describe
'93074' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMME' 'sip-files00205.pro'
ac3792b6964aaae22b60ad040ab8218f
6ed75ac968b1598e36f02992d556c7d8d4e256d4
describe
'61369' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMMF' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
89663a156260546e0c08df6d601dda62
5e99a845134a9c787ccf1031702ad3505c4f752a
describe
'6881176' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMMG' 'sip-files00205.tif'
f8171e992db7c8a94a9992a9e5dd7812
1f3d65def6bca44d912fcbffcd73637d59661283
'2012-02-18T10:46:08-05:00'
describe
'3702' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMMH' 'sip-files00205.txt'
1f522c0d2f5a9e15064fc4457c9169c1
f08d328055504c1f914a38f462a13b96881edc51
describe
'31313' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMMI' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
e534dab3fb7241aa06273c4bc6cf3354
205f7feadc1f639e7c8c9fc7bf3f79a7f14e7362
'2012-02-18T10:38:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMMJ' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
0b2c36bb90f391862388538837b04090
c7f661144bff6ce407ef595c3603cd5aa72b8171
describe
'164108' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMMK' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
e9743c08b899417371259c8b6cc9b9a3
8162845b2be6b25ebc53f8149b3430fca0d81a15
describe
'58736' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMML' 'sip-files00206.pro'
88b70e2c24931b1378324871acfdf02a
6c10737409110daec034ebb2b29ab4906ab1ccb7
describe
'56183' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMMM' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
ad42426aa2e2804b35e709db7e354d6b
42289025aac56262bb61239d4d0b50cef8a4d194
describe
'6880600' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMMN' 'sip-files00206.tif'
c9fdce9e06da1dca15fb023f08993c41
2357e5001014fc8e1a45e2ac4f6d45a2fa2944b7
describe
'2350' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMMO' 'sip-files00206.txt'
e55dc90b74fb5d7bf40a8276bf2ee5b4
1d839f14f0cb8fc332b60bd155151f6b3466675a
describe
'30068' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMMP' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
486a76d68135edf5be7abe34691c85e5
9fb2fa1ef4637c8f19e25890df146470303d2cc0
describe
'857270' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMMQ' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
38d3531ed1b57f29f9c28735a0d91531
ae9e9c7c7631516d64fdd86f399f5531f04a7552
describe
'146721' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMMR' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
ba48e63d769f0e5965df0d41b5badd0a
332c49541220ada97c14c08a72a5910daeb651b5
describe
'37634' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMMS' 'sip-files00207.pro'
d3d241c3b01dd52111fe05b875fe8b2b
e625c308349a6d20fac938e99c10a2581451e9d0
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMMT' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
bcf1d14a97dc76c743da360f657c3014
c656d4223ac0644d2d8a7118de0eaeb8e0450c15
describe
'6879540' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMMU' 'sip-files00207.tif'
510b0def2ce41bca1247390856b51954
7cf1ae0c10d5444f0ff7ca9835123eda1b8a4d20
describe
'1563' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMMV' 'sip-files00207.txt'
2495f412cde27fc6e36ac40737fac36c
de702df85f1300130e4d61bd076d6a7f2faabd50
describe
Invalid character
'27786' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMMW' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
187a6dda686a5bbfed0140d356ab8745
0c66aecb9f941734abc1411bf24905f86dede073
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMMX' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
d118822cca6ac1e3c87759094d9cc66d
6cb5ecfb29394c7956c44f3e80bcca2af8ac3a92
describe
'180005' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMMY' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
38ea51316a5d90754cb4018d3c5aacf1
53b1b815459c2aa99df20972ef89269db04248b9
describe
'74252' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMMZ' 'sip-files00208.pro'
2cc834ca02994fbbbb8c206bfc21eb2c
10be3ce8fa297240e8002aaa8f212fd1ae2012e5
describe
'60165' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMNA' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
e4524bea1a9029aceb0242609b47fcaf
a29ab76229d550bc24729af5957f08545414721b
describe
'6880756' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMNB' 'sip-files00208.tif'
ff45fb42ee3788dda7a37719f3ace3b2
2565a8aaafe01bd496189471d1ba567f516537a4
describe
'3096' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMNC' 'sip-files00208.txt'
8006cbb0fa9108fd5fcde325d354b58e
60cedbd78f8d764398d1f44f67cbbcbe4f33b192
describe
'30525' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMND' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
0305867de165524fed946e7d45a38b22
ee225960b86fc773e2ef34d48a2453024a6a757f
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMNE' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
0a16b858b5a290e16771da276b17d650
1d214d57122fa549e98c0c9a1f0d7df176a3c5e5
describe
'186957' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMNF' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
f92830d0f931f1def0b2c484c500b83f
1f78498e2da63fb50e5d31426982a434324c5a2e
describe
'95044' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMNG' 'sip-files00209.pro'
4d101134a1c7ca7e3c03cd19068ceb31
c8c6cd4b2559bc76b338558f0403c40388d15709
describe
'61717' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMNH' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
d0b3b41290ead7352b69160192a67ad8
9541d19777805687aa0d17b0cab8d4d9b09f1dc5
describe
'6880996' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMNI' 'sip-files00209.tif'
70562a07c110548094090b062aaf0f81
9c59fc6d78750ddae5f67dd1b381b45874ae6fad
describe
'3822' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMNJ' 'sip-files00209.txt'
d38b4fc9f151fb05e7638a05b40b62f3
b051be2c5968f9c519efe2367d20c59ef83d1b95
describe
'31029' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMNK' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
62aa139ed79ef0124a50a48350c60947
542c03bd48bf935ec55c76909cf3dc9cbe0fafc0
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMNL' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
2c35b6b30ed4a49ac7d43af0e74cb4ac
16585bf39468050f87fa1b7dcd985411e9aa7b0f
describe
'194827' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMNM' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
751752205b978ea8bc6af3ef0a877f9d
3e2c3cae1257e177fea0c125a34c01bb4815d609
describe
'106927' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMNN' 'sip-files00210.pro'
586a4b4ef26afb727209ae12b3ad37d1
7a8eede513691cad239aca3b7d244668405a8c4d
describe
'62338' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMNO' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
016e17d8116544992a71d2ad4fc2cec1
1eff2c38bb5f7109ad3537b9fc7c107a238035bd
describe
'6880892' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMNP' 'sip-files00210.tif'
be07394ec0725d132daafd069106fa8c
1607837692954208ac3adf353b1bc163cb84ca1a
describe
'4189' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMNQ' 'sip-files00210.txt'
0c2d1f8cc099ecc829adf4de73b431eb
bd2c164a6876ea87179e7882504e125bf56208c6
describe
'30990' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMNR' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
03841a9e02cc885997ecd127eb582a20
c4944e2a03dfb0eb689a72081899b9b93e67ba0f
'2012-02-18T10:42:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMNS' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
fba6a68f69795ec5fa094979307114b0
bafd754e3198b4e87be018c772d7d3bda8cd4972
describe
'197989' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMNT' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
d897fcd2fbab9898ea4a03a3df1a0010
f1987efea2d61a9c68500c9b545dc8f375a3df9a
describe
'105218' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMNU' 'sip-files00211.pro'
f44ecc3fa22edc02edc873c45e573994
4ea480e1b7723f7aa29f4d10e1ea703b15ad916b
'2012-02-18T10:48:10-05:00'
describe
'63858' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMNV' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
20db33467940b66d04d929c63ff84540
7e56ffe96a4cf6d90fe792bf01d8aab6aec4c1df
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMNW' 'sip-files00211.tif'
900ba23c1d6f7b8c934d540952a23b72
865baba85dbf6d2a8952af8cb2717b0119b7ebee
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMNX' 'sip-files00211.txt'
131f48533b8eb388bb2e4a01dc929198
e596a1125c2b1e88ce376873f70d2bd190006c20
describe
'31420' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMNY' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
b10b32bfa5852b7eca74fe6282e424cc
724cf508940d280933606b28d1443114e4b24774
describe
'857303' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMNZ' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
8368f2bd9fa6d029a993952f465e8587
496497a92eb64e913899311e0dc8e53836727d97
describe
'191318' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMOA' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
50dc785dbf8a815e76db3f04b48c536d
6b6e8116d4c817e67ee67c68c66cc9856c4545dc
describe
'101806' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMOB' 'sip-files00212.pro'
c13d06ab3739354e6695603cdd8b4248
496a3d6dcdd570d3cd49c5ff130699e59d89c77d
describe
'62926' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMOC' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
245a7b69a6ddbcc9d6b71c1c76e64e39
f7ada512bd530a42c215c30621c8e68ef4268f17
'2012-02-18T10:41:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMOD' 'sip-files00212.tif'
504311dab7d304f36fd032ba9c980d43
0376b62df1124f1e82a73550ed76e98a56dca2bc
describe
'4021' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMOE' 'sip-files00212.txt'
c9dcf2755bcfb4d32b96708bec7f5d7a
38ef08325e645c6d26788e4be50a93440b27b7fb
describe
'31205' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMOF' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
cc11d8430834a6f91466b9d2deb393c5
992c8f3c11904d1afc993372e4603f962ba55829
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMOG' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
537af06b6148ef10638593285b1e6e50
1933affb4a6e0c32bd653ec79139d4eaf674f404
describe
'190599' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMOH' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
3b363420e4a0963df364e0e542d18d9f
33598efb8b4589312ccaf139367b74f8f4017f7e
describe
'102640' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMOI' 'sip-files00213.pro'
67d92c0050c8071394b47fab1fbc9ee4
8d40056d704a88006c5b6f3c9dde991942e1eca5
describe
'61460' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMOJ' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
e01df1b10e0b8e99c25e2056f62d7887
648d11dc4acefa8da1ae1c029e3327efabe46456
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMOK' 'sip-files00213.tif'
2281abbef6e4c501bfcea6e5af7cc10a
a46a94b3bb200b2c98d98df6ca2c08ee60185eac
describe
'4049' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMOL' 'sip-files00213.txt'
6aa2ca6ce8129eeec94db4b356609b7d
9636d1cdeb636bb2b1f2af1413ff63474e7deace
describe
'30503' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMOM' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
12c1e0f9472ab32a95803ad45befd656
1bee964b830a832b1c2532b1b24d369a674bd736
describe
'857114' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMON' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
c6a0828b24618fcafffa28a1a80d8abe
2ca1df7f4596c02a1484bd86bc97f56e7cca2fe4
'2012-02-18T10:44:25-05:00'
describe
'188471' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMOO' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
5936661a552330beee73a952993eed51
2b21050f28b0cb276c285c6628f0a5fa4b3427ff
describe
'99218' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMOP' 'sip-files00214.pro'
59e87827e30e4f166a11d809b4f6928c
26213450cf787b9a41bb239bec4ec10c3a9eecf2
describe
'60948' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMOQ' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
7788c67d05dbdb36196812ccd7288b8f
599869c31df864c55180cb852133fe40b0263ab1
describe
'6880472' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMOR' 'sip-files00214.tif'
b084261436497b67f7461f33f82d88a9
b366289980835a672c90a25a26617609ea75e696
describe
'3879' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMOS' 'sip-files00214.txt'
d43aa1ee12853901213c848e1c44d777
7286872c1f73ea5bf7846ca6a76097051c16a761
describe
'30089' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMOT' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
82aaceb836bca5c703c1a5ac2b8d391a
73b0b700346cc2ebabe006ee1fbc3af1bc3f6328
'2012-02-18T10:39:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMOU' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
b907a58e72a5924c777e6e31d16d0c68
a0691c25c7cb4cc63edd367fea7f0c333ad03e15
describe
'176182' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMOV' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
5a4c9ffba8ac009fee1994b67d2fbbd6
2716fbd4639972da7098281a370e58fc337e050b
describe
'22033' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMOW' 'sip-files00215.pro'
56cef83b611a159a5d03fd10dd6c0f5c
b4ea0c363477827e697eaf0a1a2860898b8e98d0
describe
'59901' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMOX' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
d7a1ac7462747606fe788bb1c8e15401
1374be80056821192687720b33fa939bd18fa174
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMOY' 'sip-files00215.tif'
2fa3c5f197a00532306e61c7725b74e1
fa569a7ec576932a07fcc97b27a4c7c79e099a05
describe
'882' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMOZ' 'sip-files00215.txt'
78948a7e7349d473df30ef61bbc63829
8f704b0abd7ccd06a2cf79b9b08f2b1a9a4c0cf8
describe
'31944' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMPA' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
c83fb2dd1089b811a63c85e98b84b68b
9c813957e087e9fc13d9ac56d3a5149429fb2640
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMPB' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
f48819ed55d6e1d94feb1011ab8e4bfe
f754074cd616fc592568916c298e1aa83ad96881
describe
'178574' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMPC' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
e0451bd40ccc4dcf6b7e8cf0b43d3f21
55338d792bed4a41485c19ff0ebc58adb99c26b8
describe
'97873' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMPD' 'sip-files00216.pro'
39507f32c42c80fc01c62fe0a2ec9146
ada3064edfea7105b61d8a71062cd2ac2bafe840
describe
'59046' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMPE' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
624a2641609ddc1b358173bd0851f4b5
27641cbe979b431a14e4ef5edef201831ff97351
describe
'6880324' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMPF' 'sip-files00216.tif'
68f831019edd6998846398f4d9fc6c82
4e2f7cfcd835bd6072b257e747302c3e43122417
describe
'3835' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMPG' 'sip-files00216.txt'
2d0ddfba7bf2233a940e7d94d0bb6260
e6ef769a0d51ac10bd8db9bf6be17b89dee0d37f
'2012-02-18T10:38:41-05:00'
describe
'29672' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMPH' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
7350c08554ef2eb828802b2d6c009891
136d9eaeea8f8d1805801ba209e949791540b6d7
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMPI' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
f3da19cb64f9b54faed8f3b3f07814f2
079c079bb895ccfbd6cdb586a6afee4897cf059e
'2012-02-18T10:49:40-05:00'
describe
'175331' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMPJ' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
e6e071c193391219699050a428449335
8cdc0aacc9ae726710f30072de5bcdd62c27fc2e
describe
'88110' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMPK' 'sip-files00217.pro'
44f06fd5533158e54250e12413a8814c
4fc63cd7bc681502702725448f76c00f1b982dd8
describe
'58800' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMPL' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
5cd01679b448bcad6332b5ae37dbafa1
f92e34d777e3e31f3893f5e05bffcf50fbc6e543
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMPM' 'sip-files00217.tif'
ee529a0b2de35a49ee1c0c14841489cd
3f73038e27e26772bac881ce38fd5ed8963f3c85
describe
'3549' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMPN' 'sip-files00217.txt'
7fc3a3ba488c17b065b2ebd0b168157c
d5c2f8f7feb518527ff76fc647d66a4a5599a58b
'2012-02-18T10:43:12-05:00'
describe
'30214' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMPO' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
94e22c57c9b3304c6bcc4410bf60b19a
d3df71de78b8537f7817b7e86aef50cff0074b55
'2012-02-18T10:43:51-05:00'
describe
'857594' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMPP' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
7f0be254ce825091703253dd4cf7f4c0
f116847b0f1f48adc03655838ae12239c9c68db7
describe
'197901' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMPQ' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
653d3999853b32861ceacb4ae9940734
79f24117eb781872c1b53c6858c634d2eb9d8a4e
describe
'110161' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMPR' 'sip-files00218.pro'
44bfec698a175f2638686a0f89002dcc
42d807999a778ce1148c7c8dfeb94b67b77092e7
describe
'63540' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMPS' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
16d88946c0654010082e6e815b650d1b
216da2aff5ea5cb3c7062bfa8a8addf1d14d04b4
describe
'6883792' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMPT' 'sip-files00218.tif'
4fa583f97fe89ba4d832a93933a796b5
dd964b158172258f56cca6f2499049c2c7df9dd3
'2012-02-18T10:38:23-05:00'
describe
'4293' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMPU' 'sip-files00218.txt'
0391ff84a25d4b8a16c32423ee4839f4
771274c99922ee2c1e861ad4c1bea7c8c342473e
describe
'30841' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMPV' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
0b9c005827ae2bed0f65dfd0da00dcde
65814d63a784872e6e373831bd6fab3cdf795fe0
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMPW' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
6f9ca83aeba10e6ac1a3c7abd92df903
b03e013cb8f8c7b3179445340451da60982a04af
describe
'185086' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMPX' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
d0e1b70026567391a54c0972f450d9d6
4d1964ae302d6bc7011176cf706cf0b4abac83ba
describe
'18187' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMPY' 'sip-files00219.pro'
47f982b28a81b67576c649888ef57e87
e0675f3863fde518bbc227a37606d83877af8b04
describe
'60986' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMPZ' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
b681ad7dc236bcce908669354be2d7ee
e783ac1a5599252058e01b2f2015e860314fcd49
'2012-02-18T10:46:44-05:00'
describe
'6881384' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMQA' 'sip-files00219.tif'
ac1164b2b7ceaa5ed66cb01bf36dec9d
ebd51367efa4bdc0cb8699746f0ccfc2a64030d3
'2012-02-18T10:46:48-05:00'
describe
'791' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMQB' 'sip-files00219.txt'
c88a1acda135339f5c7a8e95e2b30d28
1a19b2f17f94f03e9624d83d72a96f5afa82e435
describe
'31613' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMQC' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
dc0a6df5b1f9163ecf2d4795e29c6581
963e4851111a53c1db630f55713d6d45199941bf
describe
'857673' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMQD' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
8f68ebe40afb0c9e6e89eb46e53037d7
eeb1ee21edd1155b79e571ff369b64cbb0c4bfd2
describe
'174581' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMQE' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
557346e10a71b07d7814a670055b835b
246889dd89fe112bec359746de0a22181e4a1048
describe
'88962' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMQF' 'sip-files00220.pro'
854c50ee8b506cdb2b2233fcdca78f7a
85e20bd0a33fdd1c8a78e0f33bf162d1aaf22aff
describe
'58357' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMQG' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
4950bc74dc865978aef3b28f0f4b6d1c
ff88a5f9351450cc65685946ca16ce5cb9b725ad
describe
'6883436' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMQH' 'sip-files00220.tif'
51ba64d1d64439c2efb5192da4a2b25a
230df9f0b0e56594c68451d863f074ee4cb5a011
describe
'3501' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMQI' 'sip-files00220.txt'
01640a9fc997b024b0c46332d945f8fc
3f059695b1fcb11e237aebd506658110c557ff03
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMQJ' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
ec0843cf2af7ba9c688b75cd50f8acc9
ca07627d5747c0615535f2cbebdcac4cc4e39d73
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMQK' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
c4e68fcee16516e4b5d4c60fb7ca2fde
45263b4e5894f31b3567425ffa5134d12bd79757
describe
'155550' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMQL' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
47aaebb84c206c6502ff8cd5aea5cac3
00749dfde2ee460c7e143f24ed375ecaaafa156e
describe
'24592' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMQM' 'sip-files00221.pro'
458e22c2a5ab2bd13a53d3705fce191d
bf1564fe878e7e5c8e893ac125eff5216eb6ea88
describe
'53769' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMQN' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
fbcd82f0db087809802c01486b35d298
9e5809087e5ebd1279cfabe566ad3c7d5c7f44eb
describe
'6880172' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMQO' 'sip-files00221.tif'
48167cb97aed9756a7d4ac19323708c8
1cb575b852ed37dd157b24426e5d661ef6efd62c
describe
'1118' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMQP' 'sip-files00221.txt'
d9f9b6c4c4e4f55dfafea5a0b5b34309
73dd4de732120a94a5aa5c8d538fe23eef7f776d
describe
'29257' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMQQ' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
210fd1ceaa278145de0cbb6af98dc743
9e743e2daa63e5c0018fa5e3afbad7dc1c6f7f33
describe
'857685' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMQR' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
9610491b5f5de28720d236d19259f093
b1e41764dfcf7a85386db55e9a22e31460501ba5
describe
'174404' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMQS' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
c212be714f1dcdf07cc659f96cba074c
615d473a44b9987eefa6aa5d3da0065ed5d73fab
describe
'88059' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMQT' 'sip-files00222.pro'
a878753c230522fe2a505d2b5363d39d
73c64e97243c140c1f6cae74fc0ace9236841fd7
describe
'58285' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMQU' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
9d4ef33d9a54d75bd1be563aee814b6f
8b46f7a20070a6caa680cd92853856178844e152
describe
'6883396' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMQV' 'sip-files00222.tif'
f449d0e5ad817f488b6d050a3b4ac6eb
2feb4dd754b833cf0491fa8246e0d4559ba3e4f4
'2012-02-18T10:40:04-05:00'
describe
'3538' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMQW' 'sip-files00222.txt'
c07bed004be303df8349934e44288c3f
25c0fdebe71e1376da294128393946b6fd1d35f0
describe
'30135' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMQX' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
1a40ad7251b5878cfd43bdfe76852705
b694d16bbd44cb1605214afa431fd1419a9d76cd
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMQY' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
aaa6bfeed48a197a53aefc71516f061d
0c40e9c01f26857fac441e73b93d17757f2dda29
describe
'183496' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMQZ' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
88e7f5914949e2fb24b9510a09f633c1
a48fad9c32bb7dacef443f7f1c91e2aa6f2d2690
describe
'79355' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMRA' 'sip-files00223.pro'
b285672fc83107da62f60326ba0c846f
4958d48fdc680d9e287636426d0972ba62ca0a3b
describe
'60801' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMRB' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
82ffff7201f625b8e8053058202ee811
e96b020bb7bc0b60ec9a8329299ec1e26261c18d
describe
'6880868' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMRC' 'sip-files00223.tif'
1527daa58ae3179d3dc94d119da8e210
8ad1ffadc63763d005a44f7056c9ba20e2473c0a
describe
'3152' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMRD' 'sip-files00223.txt'
fb5a6c30b6b1610914cc10fc6ead2b41
6a2d088cf563cba5a00fe18d70df2f8d6a072079
describe
'30882' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMRE' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
d97228450b58153190a42560da7e51f6
ace9375fa8ed4b2ea5e8de315bf884af23d508e0
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMRF' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
1bfe2cc20d3703232619b8373877f2ca
a99496cc6dea9f67b4fdec1c8d67b40fc7ee2384
describe
'141376' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMRG' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
79043fb461531c6ddbee63ab728f89f3
cfb74073c68ac708f83f25199005ad9698a53f31
describe
'42822' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMRH' 'sip-files00224.pro'
ce04d1c227b27b12e3d635f434dd435a
df709854d8b6d6fd94df74f9b3262b983c06f3fc
describe
'49999' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMRI' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
f62a0a313a79aac9b89ac26f932d5464
b6439b38127ec422832484122ae07ef77ffb4a96
describe
'6879728' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMRJ' 'sip-files00224.tif'
61291ff1aa0115c6c1c3f7cd5b716f33
64601206fef6a87403f9a89ffd105f8286246948
describe
'1718' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMRK' 'sip-files00224.txt'
3bdc33d13a5df6e74ee2d65c25f3e1f1
10aeace87dded0ed2633f28deab2f74ededec224
'2012-02-18T10:43:25-05:00'
describe
'28117' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMRL' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
c2accbe3f9db49dc7c96e13c2210fc45
f1aafe21933b1cce249bbb3565a2bcb1ed7ea03a
'2012-02-18T10:42:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMRM' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
d72192a08bea5c7ccded2ea579a55ef1
5c648333d3fbe9ff7dbace3784a259959ab7b917
describe
'191650' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMRN' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
0ab44e522fe5afcc4e3ac3539db77a27
a334f0390cfafe05a50f673d343095d83322ce18
'2012-02-18T10:41:13-05:00'
describe
'99317' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMRO' 'sip-files00225.pro'
8a2ff27a2988f5f4158b818461c79d71
47847bf746509c6a2521737465b0cfe1bbd878af
describe
'62316' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMRP' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
6379deba268f4252ec942db33b7c2a5f
841189e689907f7154093607c17f7497c3e0d7b4
describe
'6880888' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMRQ' 'sip-files00225.tif'
c3edd85d177a82e3d03e5b7711daaede
2ef86c61d3e41867bb4107df844cc892b200db0c
describe
'3966' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMRR' 'sip-files00225.txt'
55d80cded424fc47bc29111ad23d97e2
55ef84a868c69cd0e37c99ecd41f4c263d68a143
describe
'30905' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMRS' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
ed2c66e6c4bc9ab7c7c4492815d43f27
7be393a994bb3c837c9dbd07e08a2c357873596f
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMRT' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
a1987e3280b5f1314a3e3185a70a076b
c17a2a219d7182c19e18d089f6c6a630291ffee1
describe
'188701' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMRU' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
192b7ef5300af3c238e9d4409e64aaa2
80107b03dfd178b1a0b2a1c8b642130912783f7b
describe
'95843' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMRV' 'sip-files00226.pro'
d8937c82756846796101c830a46ed319
0d3b942d6983aaeef3af7feece6780180458f162
describe
'61953' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMRW' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
030f1606b7c306e27cf10f6792935f69
3a3f0624d8e4792b4b5304e562edf2e05b77256d
describe
'6883956' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMRX' 'sip-files00226.tif'
38c99b3fa113e5199c515b3ff581afd2
b9808e5efc5c94f1a8d8b502a09155c4e3b49d8b
'2012-02-18T10:38:36-05:00'
describe
'3799' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMRY' 'sip-files00226.txt'
96878f04a28baa6838decd4ff3097e84
a2725b09d2818db657d52c5c8e4efa8c0c07065d
describe
'30998' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMRZ' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
76d13ddae00941f4e796555d693402b4
9b671e0301bb8498c1e38813d69644dce9962852
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMSA' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
4a791c11f9f262c7db7a89be056a552a
87c61d12e35ba9e314afc1dbfccf55a2fe37cd13
describe
'188751' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMSB' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
3015a4eff69dfba2466cd0a773c280c5
f4436d04e83666935af1f78a1b782c75c51018af
'2012-02-18T10:39:20-05:00'
describe
'71262' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMSC' 'sip-files00227.pro'
614a99b09642ac6e17387a4f42541598
fa8ff4c218bbe8f05aa2cea08e9e4c5aee3c1e7c
describe
'62172' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMSD' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
4190c03123c3d15a142f482acda4ec94
e172cb6b42d750fcd562d889a52bab7b0f9cb9f4
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMSE' 'sip-files00227.tif'
2ea0a8bff8857629772272222c847f14
ec0bdb2e20085f683c1a6891efaed7b0628d3ee0
describe
'2782' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMSF' 'sip-files00227.txt'
80e719b4a2d0531a5446818227bf6c78
2211f9c56ad4243e0f8da2e860911037ee2eb3ae
describe
'31664' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMSG' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
2e70ce9acaa62ec88accc356d6df2a7d
fcbaf0630c0837debb371b59e5a576b988fefad6
'2012-02-18T10:40:24-05:00'
describe
'857651' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMSH' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
bac40a5d4171556ff7715df3e84da15a
d7a3a7ded4c176c0034695fbe4d6bd0cf35c378a
describe
'174259' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMSI' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
67ac01419b47ecb7b29a59acdac6962a
cf2df4261884753eec9c3ab658578d3d05daacce
describe
'60089' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMSJ' 'sip-files00228.pro'
92c554fc65085ffc082ef9edd7502a62
b75ab6b4c8601f4533ab2c1981d126c094c9724a
describe
'58423' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMSK' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
1e55c3e8c96eec1f15defe97f1ca0648
ba4ea68acb570b9f7e7a333745c09b1587a8c3fd
describe
'6883676' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMSL' 'sip-files00228.tif'
faacbf65a05360d9101141b87168f5c0
f769586e52fd76fce8f651e44e00f2a842acfc6f
describe
'2344' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMSM' 'sip-files00228.txt'
cd241dc0d87c55d9414b7538c2181cb2
475578ddca37a4e21d1674c9f1ea997b3fe47704
describe
'30185' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMSN' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
f13e29828f6de327629956161c565fa3
805f74dd942c8df1a8d4ac7bb4171ada7ad4c4fe
describe
'857161' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMSO' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
427c446c8bfb91b561d67b6e08f22593
153336681656013211f2cbf9ed47f451d603384a
describe
'181162' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMSP' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
5024685aae9fb57897c2cdc5257feaf5
6dafba42c44debb71c8a703bda1093f9457576d0
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMSQ' 'sip-files00229.pro'
d0e2ad9be6c06fd2ee86563eca969bcc
098a10e00b3388fe3144a4498b76851f592d5611
describe
'60968' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMSR' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
79f5a31faa5f27c2ff735be79c1aa984
b052cd5dc5bc7f7031eb3007ebf69340af34339d
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMSS' 'sip-files00229.tif'
a7f1ed54aaf00bf2e109159aa7daccb6
f55e640daf3a573870213b4998d5ed83a2fdab65
'2012-02-18T10:43:13-05:00'
describe
'3735' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMST' 'sip-files00229.txt'
33f955d280c2a52a9dfd961a969fdd8c
f82247b0aa3dced9ac6ceb2892a093a9df8cce9b
describe
'30869' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMSU' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
ce36985549ec66fb22cfdcbac12d12db
d3fda1e5a2c850ff9f3df6391df34ce7696386c2
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMSV' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
39fc3c267bc3aa80d1d0d3f98c91fef1
1e244757076fdf3846a4d1378714fcba798c65dd
describe
'167861' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMSW' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
7d353fd178caf09ebc6531d38dd3b8b7
3fc130851dd3831fa3cce87c2cc7ecd30d88474f
describe
'86468' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMSX' 'sip-files00230.pro'
bfb9c7db2ae2ae73cb14c69e2fda5d13
14f939ae7e32065517fd284180b0ff92f75bd6ec
describe
'57696' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMSY' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
527e9f07c83084e953deaf619d121947
ebc45e55a5e3a41e6e980e9ed5696b6754b78a3a
describe
'6883468' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMSZ' 'sip-files00230.tif'
7d5b4c64e52d0fac9270dd1b431d4da4
4e854ae95316f24b54a99d954bf411241b445cff
describe
'3424' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMTA' 'sip-files00230.txt'
57e309fb8e372100c038ef22bff43efb
2753c2494c2160d553a892dbb0fca4822bb21d89
describe
'29998' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMTB' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
0192c74eee5d4221fb665ae7b75a7045
00a4d6eb49ab4cefae273c38766e763a601b9f02
describe
'857686' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMTC' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
822537aa1eca8342996df7e570b6f4c4
29bde511ea6a3e806341b9c552b364402e6d7ad0
describe
'169209' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMTD' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
649d3d26008706fb88b3c8d80179894e
2a723c99d84099f8c9be7f0946acac8360503814
describe
'69258' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMTE' 'sip-files00231.pro'
055334a65447d2bcd18e0effb49ba520
029916c981d0f685fb66f898a2921747498fe5f6
describe
'59951' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMTF' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
567d1249b5186a80735e6b86b383eab9
ec65b3be36ff4adb262711960acb842b89472910
describe
'6884248' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMTG' 'sip-files00231.tif'
098d2b0e510e35ca9b9fcaf27d0fa72c
432337b8332168771af7f4214582babf21ba3efb
describe
'2962' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMTH' 'sip-files00231.txt'
12ea46b734da742afe9f0e489cb12fb5
b91a1e3e8d1f947aee72ee3f6ae5df903bedb87f
describe
'31103' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMTI' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
5180baa1c09698b264e23803c1ff0a2f
d2364b26aca4b986abff705c59adcf6fb570d87f
describe
'857553' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMTJ' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
6937a0ee29dc61aaf5d8d70c5a4af1e6
c9aec2c50d120b73ee67ac14466414d8b50baa4f
describe
'167701' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMTK' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
71d3645ccb2430c5661844066351b58f
b382e2b5478b31e5123a405024e9c4b2ed93ed4a
describe
'55923' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMTL' 'sip-files00232.pro'
49f5920f2e24b8fefd5b1570db1086ee
678e860a1d6c999cb9d890b572fe52fa0e84ea5a
describe
'58291' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMTM' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
f2d6ac6de1dd21b6d405ca9706201942
b4c1d6abf9b80b510fb34891c73f8d1870e57ddc
describe
'6884008' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMTN' 'sip-files00232.tif'
0e779a0766b462a9eb4471a287c80a8d
2318d325cb2a9b79b8b872841343faf0424fdea8
describe
'2428' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMTO' 'sip-files00232.txt'
3e6687525036787f814949db333d4c6d
830b219402a6bdc18b52d0ed9644ec0ca55c8088
describe
Invalid character
'30975' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMTP' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
82d873b347dda27c5af3ca420ec8c894
1adbba7785e2108622ea594dc5fdab1b72d789a3
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMTQ' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
b86689e526aebe34042c3e3faa6a56fb
3b5b0fe2c82594bafac1b92e343e4bbee2d69bd8
describe
'185352' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMTR' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
bd17730191bdf9ca3f834786b83417a6
ccf169f1cc11b744da15b15d73e484562981f3cc
'2012-02-18T10:44:26-05:00'
describe
'95376' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMTS' 'sip-files00233.pro'
c039988a4ddfee468924874f32047a98
5ea1a36372e35acc54b23dfec29ed906821e990c
'2012-02-18T10:42:18-05:00'
describe
'62371' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMTT' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
099dee27743e3713cf5a9cd0220b1228
2ad4235410595b4c5e65feffb45c3d9eb3f18b34
describe
'6881320' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMTU' 'sip-files00233.tif'
c9cd4295bff7ee21ed66e1f84b4474c9
e4eb062ef8e05b5c3792730a8fd27aea1c21b0ec
describe
'3748' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMTV' 'sip-files00233.txt'
64791db933ab1e022282cc151eb7a46e
a4147ffeb6c1437d722624840c609ab8032cd2f4
describe
'31283' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMTW' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
2bde0f15aba0d12f78112f7a019dec50
112cefc3a5c873132e2f310f818f61fad345e815
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMTX' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
a19a8aea85dc6e97a479c795e78f2a99
bed617320c870f69d38c350898b4b099affd22f1
describe
'192977' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMTY' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
11298fafc2ef1ae9af13d4275b64fbd8
69da64e12ba4f2502c1ac5b0a2389695dd7b38a9
describe
'106138' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMTZ' 'sip-files00234.pro'
8e26f74d0e8012de3a03253a415ed183
7d182c4e2a571eaeae5ae61d87afa08ec7bc9ff0
describe
'64362' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMUA' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
36c46d02cad39790630e0c1ca0151d85
fcc4629b5a2b9dc3b6affc5d55c808267cf8e07e
describe
'6881536' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMUB' 'sip-files00234.tif'
2a98a90c8370d8ba5685c2642c5866e0
25c5c1f22bf16e3c39d7da29757638a258e0cf12
describe
'4223' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMUC' 'sip-files00234.txt'
2a5fd8f4d724d2a4a685dd2a1c89cf83
9b489dace9994d7773281ccfd4026ae53a37c03b
describe
'31730' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMUD' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
99208ac4470cb8d68930ca439aa7f928
41ee3251d01f74af980338272b6c3b53da013cb8
describe
'857269' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMUE' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
ac040885e66306c8bf863b1720e79f7c
e74ec7c57ec272d041e66133b0a1d4e825590c5f
describe
'181054' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMUF' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
6c5975b39796fd3a18394f0ea0d95a97
49be4472146fb93d58fb1d27b7a491eab7298864
describe
'96221' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMUG' 'sip-files00235.pro'
59ad37144adbbebbaec3cda7c2ce56ab
ca496d737ae433df1ce7dba80e241c8563b9a6b0
describe
'60854' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMUH' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
15019ad84b0fb442eb6ad7ab82f2f29f
fe03f2972d3ea89d2e6186e0f9d5320c07bad947
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMUI' 'sip-files00235.tif'
9b70359afae4ddd6e89c9876c11cadce
9cad26c24859ad96cd35012f6d87761c656cecff
describe
'3763' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMUJ' 'sip-files00235.txt'
90d18dfd29a47d2feef776710d1cf270
9ab5c59ba0eb95a142106095aff41d7cb6910536
describe
'31095' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMUK' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
35d527279e67f94cf542840077078914
986ad617c7607ba7df483e37192a0a457fe3c9d2
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMUL' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
3a5b125c3fe7cf9f79e34f70844e7aa9
095e25bbefdc60cc5d0eb4ac4b7afb30da254e0a
describe
'180257' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMUM' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
ab435f7c7f9c64ba17b79b8c48cf526e
2e65c645f2d74d43efa7302754f3a51390e07621
'2012-02-18T10:40:54-05:00'
describe
'28988' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMUN' 'sip-files00236.pro'
d2c9e9bf87db6a791b962d75628c9a9c
062e786d48b442ed961124d85f4ec2039067de38
'2012-02-18T10:40:55-05:00'
describe
'61078' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMUO' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
507df3ff3982766364670bc59cc3caf6
a7e53b3999aae1d6c0f2eaf80ab57f174d7747dd
'2012-02-18T10:40:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMUP' 'sip-files00236.tif'
e88c0129079597cc9b5f5866c24ec23a
714748009ef090a33d4d32d6223697eee2dc861a
describe
'1137' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMUQ' 'sip-files00236.txt'
cf8e20a56647427cddc80d310a997d15
187f6802bb2892b1301dd6b9a6cb4034f5a37af1
describe
'32073' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMUR' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
d1b66fa9c4485d660ced5df8ee41750f
da94a21448150287bd576dc93998ae8a9f859131
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMUS' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
0148ae7947588ac7c3d3019a6a184b4e
23ee6a02357b1dbcc4687ba15b986a78411ebccd
describe
'183937' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMUT' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
f4f2f43a87261d95609085644dbdcc44
1b546314c5fc8d591f75c224e1fcdfd86bb487d8
describe
'97820' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMUU' 'sip-files00237.pro'
fc690e1157cb4e6fa2d329f300c01956
9b1b3e3a047ae084771d2b97d89571203f564a07
describe
'62392' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMUV' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
c2bd9824e3c3cbb44aaa34d1246e1007
a685fe333c488eb0abe84f1dcbc5aa4665f92014
describe
'6881240' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMUW' 'sip-files00237.tif'
1fe36f6a704b0f6adb4fc1c3a86ff197
f1b699216307add38ea9cc32830e24557fb6478f
'2012-02-18T10:46:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMUX' 'sip-files00237.txt'
565f8a1c93704bb431c56ef8f6ffbc06
0d636755c22801c8eeafa94367b36799530c4d05
describe
'31351' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMUY' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
6f6603c03dd7a8b9b198d6b1892f4794
bfe52346e3c7284171faeb17a1e68ca6e37cdac5
describe
'857254' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMUZ' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
f19fd9c0a04678e3ebab4ae52fc64f1a
0f80ffba637b3485ea5d941138ec77069093259d
describe
'176354' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMVA' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
15e4550a0afe92d369a5f91faa9362f9
4331b2ce1a08688335b0099033f2e4539d805292
describe
'51428' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMVB' 'sip-files00238.pro'
787dd1021bca68b4d82001a4b1b87bd9
e2975f105594d70b4b4c3858927d4e384ec0f219
describe
'60513' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMVC' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
1c098287f976241adf5034cd4daba609
17295605f9620c53aac2f0c2c2097814c1ab9633
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMVD' 'sip-files00238.tif'
9d6d816ab88215f632f22ff0f98e206a
cc087126cd465d7ec1c31e3d97f3b9f5b9b45996
describe
'3510' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMVE' 'sip-files00238.txt'
88248635fe1db4c4affa62a24f3fcadb
81afb8c1f4d098d10b62da8cae12c1c3e170b310
describe
'31560' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMVF' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
322403e86d7787008e85e180d7c265fa
f7de9a56a6db974fce2198bfb1a669482b1bd5a4
describe
'857186' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMVG' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
928d1ee773c9dc3c291fac5cc7b6533c
807ea0509b549666637feb11691bb2391086f613
describe
'185854' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMVH' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
ab8b4217de8fee53601688a72ae972bd
ed3b5d7d94728f75fef0377afa2be95dd6efa499
describe
'93430' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMVI' 'sip-files00239.pro'
7f9f2d3675b98e8b670f651f1e3d04c2
c27d2f992e7ef949b1c4eb07c7c8e13b4e2f7d0e
describe
'63389' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMVJ' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
f81e415f26cd0b6fc9eadf42c5ba7acb
e162a30f051273819a18462751200bd1f77bb7b0
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMVK' 'sip-files00239.tif'
449866f5b752ec59fb52027049d4563f
0c7b4076bcfcd5dbb5241f47660a89f284217444
describe
'3662' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMVL' 'sip-files00239.txt'
129d502608987aee96baf54fa3cd0408
7f2593be21854d18040d1fea52c7566af7d7910e
'2012-02-18T10:40:46-05:00'
describe
'31767' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMVM' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
2df2dfc7d5b7c3cf1f0cc5bfcf541e8e
f6e55704fc97e180b63e961411c00d0646cca4c2
describe
'857683' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMVN' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
bf34fcaf2d039b9675a988074a146baa
c97dfd3699c73185022801093f0ed0af54144f5d
describe
'196362' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMVO' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
9bcf99b8ec8a4659d44549b9b7f74515
f12a2bacf691590649125e2a154cc5938e013801
describe
'103511' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMVP' 'sip-files00240.pro'
2f5673a15e25145b310f75f99401552b
3582cc22610efdfcbdd90dc5eb4d2b8a4c333abc
'2012-02-18T10:39:18-05:00'
describe
'64561' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMVQ' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
2e1e3cb749c9d70f7a9ec02fb5b4cc57
dc08969a0ab405df2ccc8c370a0fa50198e1c81a
describe
'6884260' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMVR' 'sip-files00240.tif'
badae3aa37098831a71b861c912ed83b
449c331e49dc9828e231fa0c88b937741aef30f0
'2012-02-18T10:41:30-05:00'
describe
'4058' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMVS' 'sip-files00240.txt'
06d7511d32cb1e32833c297bfa63daf6
7b4decc989556a2e3181d68a7e83ef280d3c5cd1
describe
'31562' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMVT' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
18fb1782593a525f939efd2996a2e2ec
4411c66ca5d66947ce8d04943f43bfe1c2927649
'2012-02-18T10:40:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMVU' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
e0300587c6068b86bee19d5bf96afd1b
30bdbc81dd2bae3c21e0a60d8d50a560f1b6ca14
describe
'197756' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMVV' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
eef9622dc80bf8615c7d92dcfb89bf97
ea02102f0a372cf3d064c30278ce1d7a0665f6c1
'2012-02-18T10:42:59-05:00'
describe
'44682' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMVW' 'sip-files00241.pro'
e65e555c9d773fd91497114f547516af
f75784124cc99c699fcdc5382521c3cd83b29411
describe
'64609' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMVX' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
796aa686ddde40a1d396b83af50d150b
c552c59428c789ed0e9dc6321cdcaeba3deec53a
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMVY' 'sip-files00241.tif'
e76606276a9ce7500c10a4b3b6ea6e1e
9d2101ff549e5705f091b04b432d93c5bec0b74d
describe
'1764' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMVZ' 'sip-files00241.txt'
229974dcf3cd5da81060da0a1e9ccf16
2154e750278a580c02aef07fee206e4f495fbfcb
describe
'32563' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMWA' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
ae592512729399c61a753d7c3583f8be
4f54f0739d893741077b5be9fa630805e9efd4c0
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMWB' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
36c894b2b4dc53c6e70dde1e57c45577
00fa0a45ad83ac0142156f4e937c5027f2989fb2
describe
'196314' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMWC' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
5af9eda8fd34e021c164d5d94ea77a03
91118151970b46e4e8c1c56fbf3a6373a08fd57e
describe
'106992' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMWD' 'sip-files00242.pro'
e560ea0e04a4b208de56e574f1ba18c6
525892b372246809b9bc1dd7707f961f4669da94
describe
'65401' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMWE' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
d5a165bd4705bb5ed56cab3f3d561aa6
52dcfcdce5be0230725ee2b9c4c6d90206eb871f
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMWF' 'sip-files00242.tif'
4111b56ca9e00893c514a86ed709dd63
0f07aabc0f3c80dec4f5e95034a3de80f1e68324
'2012-02-18T10:39:21-05:00'
describe
'4175' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMWG' 'sip-files00242.txt'
ebc4709429cb39b81ec6352b0bfd0cd4
62e00cc966a479c599557f424655cdb04ca859b3
describe
'31866' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMWH' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
032a0ac997c771811453e84d5e62896f
27bca0f43bf4c7d19b6219ee8813e420a88125ea
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMWI' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
f7ed7aaa23f2eda801e6daf058572b57
e267246b0f10844245970b546cfc523758f2ace1
describe
'139626' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMWJ' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
4e41cbaed26642285d0c58d0a8d8e8db
627c2c7d02d926b5c95df80d98e14ee1a5e6a705
describe
'21583' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMWK' 'sip-files00243.pro'
4ace1992f69317aa57bc5e7be2969ef2
9e045a76923ed3cf227d82b952282de9bda8c1b0
describe
'51750' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMWL' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
3a13a0df05944c289dc25b39b56ac4d7
46123c58c84e17b1160b1e1140869fdd7d16dd00
describe
'6880608' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMWM' 'sip-files00243.tif'
93fbabc531a0934bd165264759aac5f8
fed0413007bae7d23245fa741f0e9d4211f33076
'2012-02-18T10:38:14-05:00'
describe
'850' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMWN' 'sip-files00243.txt'
2b6c50b9c0311bac8954ba8febc5eb25
74d249d46aa6d141ad4bcb63314f767edc549214
describe
'29684' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMWO' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
7a3315da1b8837a9a6c384ace318b1f9
98a838f0e7bb202acc0585169619db65fb40fbe7
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMWP' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
6048bf39b3d20847f0d6c7f842886f7b
075dede4b4d6936c1b5b899e7417a744ed7d1264
describe
'188940' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMWQ' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
23005542ae7553dac8abdd595ac0ae39
dcc81998a3b883a8ea5fea6e599b0f0d39bbee21
describe
'97750' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMWR' 'sip-files00244.pro'
0cb19081ac870c8630386a8e1a537388
ba46fb204620bf24b05e83d48f7bd3da196aae43
describe
'61885' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMWS' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
5d3df9ef204132dc42b41082601d20b4
88cfad1c44bca821588aa2c1dc4aad13af2fef7a
describe
'6883964' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMWT' 'sip-files00244.tif'
2d385f0b4599875050a94c48a91a37c1
c6bb2c041cc20bb299ac897a21f735a4f7085a94
'2012-02-18T10:39:35-05:00'
describe
'3888' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMWU' 'sip-files00244.txt'
1ee95481082258b1747e57b334b23e2d
08aacbcd5b67461f8bbf3a1b3840acaaf7cc961f
describe
'31037' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMWV' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
376cc7a723b10ad9455406f0ea8bc794
e258f1f8abd46f3e8166c18792a82685cc84101a
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMWW' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
36fc81c2619acce6d988a3f4c7a45272
4a238efb71e5bc8a1f3b39e12a8d5aeb7b4e76b5
describe
'208055' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMWX' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
8489e3c8b439f8dbbc156b16fe3f6de1
d12611fe2af0a3aba21ab0e9a59a631e68051912
describe
'108361' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMWY' 'sip-files00245.pro'
e41584be95c97536506d8ae103c20de5
e9a5f5dd82563ae29d6a7059719657e03620fd35
describe
'67446' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMWZ' 'sip-files00245.QC.jpg'
fe44ef549a9d80fa2c6c49d7f955366f
2928318069ceddfe214a8385d4b1411d49ee412c
describe
'6881776' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMXA' 'sip-files00245.tif'
844ac80015d7faa09ad68618231186ce
433bbf71f7e3c2c425de925d4a4543213ccc0da6
describe
'4285' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMXB' 'sip-files00245.txt'
d9c620e6beb9e1f98e1097dc56953526
4bd0bd70cd4653265a5cbb2ff54bac609cdef423
describe
'32505' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMXC' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
fc262f0f602766d711f2233853354563
2916ef36784c35f9dc77a1313eaa98558840e2fe
describe
'857612' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMXD' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
4579d00c691c9306b6f02a8cb7a1b590
e8f957406afeb342a6c06f2cea177aaf765c29ce
describe
'194144' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMXE' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
264a71708dfeca2963b398d82d311aa1
fda9fb325a13f0ee357a16b9ea54dca071b26497
describe
'99665' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMXF' 'sip-files00246.pro'
b71c0d9b208e820b044fb0af2ae0af71
639ff69dedd5660e91ac46af4d5aaa1fbb04c470
describe
'65073' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMXG' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
8d4d6a5b713637a916484ecc559d4bf7
3c718556bb3af69b6e0023188a890bac3eb865de
describe
'6884480' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMXH' 'sip-files00246.tif'
9da8136268d9fa32d9de64dc41aad62a
64bfdfc96e0dab08eb182684b6ed4e61cfa654fc
describe
'3982' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMXI' 'sip-files00246.txt'
d2ef4b07f3c358dab05fb644f4d17848
bcfb229a37a72ac010717da0517ff2efdd7710d3
describe
'32084' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMXJ' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
2cc14f12a8063e6a0aa9e0ed40c801c8
5c0e70c47ab81a102b627229228df9dfbb22db3e
describe
'857222' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMXK' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
cb97cdbc5a89cb9b2ab28feeda93b0a7
4ac42c9f22c1d0e2a6da02652352e6034bec117f
describe
'175364' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMXL' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
5cd1dfffc6c8a50968ec09caf5b936ef
4dd61679947ec987601bf1ef532a2d67c1fb556b
describe
'20068' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMXM' 'sip-files00247.pro'
8d516c0367d05a1ddcebc93deba093d2
1721af10f4cf8902bb9c2a5898a8467df6df7eee
describe
'57553' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMXN' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
15ef2f6b12589caa1719c40febee193f
5846fd3c17e619d9a95a30772b755e5982d1a2e7
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMXO' 'sip-files00247.tif'
8675045557551b68da8ae5948bce15f4
994aad76f2dec47daca48d410ed1b258562a6c8f
'2012-02-18T10:40:45-05:00'
describe
'855' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMXP' 'sip-files00247.txt'
d4c698de02da7079d89d09d6973fa1f6
0ad7f2ee2504bfa5700d9223fd0e7cc084c4238f
describe
'30621' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMXQ' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
54931dd23806d92024b77c30360bd58a
2834f53a3e2b46e1f9eecfaa30d5656bcd5086d3
'2012-02-18T10:39:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMXR' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
7dd8f852e107e1f5bf8c0d3574ee5c44
26c4c778e08205d26fbb4f5a0a6f5a0922d82900
describe
'191337' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMXS' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
e50d71f99bfd9eb295b7d57d1899b54d
9d41e5c6905790b6ccbf3c27c08fd0976d725280
describe
'105404' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMXT' 'sip-files00248.pro'
3d6e0de807009c4aab64038aff6713ca
4f7d5751c869cf63c77d68f865750c51c25feb0b
describe
'64088' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMXU' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
63cd694908e27f9e7c180fb83470ddf7
4c9d77bc49a9bf9bf16d88b9ac8fda3cf3256d27
describe
'6884336' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMXV' 'sip-files00248.tif'
a6e47520c64b4024ac341e5fb1485ced
774bc4efae5fe9c2bf79360c97a8fa3e402528d0
'2012-02-18T10:41:28-05:00'
describe
'4165' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMXW' 'sip-files00248.txt'
a315b31378754197adb4afde3f257bda
f2ae994f61dd2863f5e7c09df55b17f6f61a553e
describe
'31553' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMXX' 'sip-files00248thm.jpg'
8773c9e7fbf8ba74bb4b2efcecb58b23
7d89b543a742ef023a276b23af386c376d8d9d2c
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMXY' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
dc4432b4e4895bf20611aa2f5383d48e
904d6f76c3cd01bfdde3aee727801c7858d45094
describe
'173336' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMXZ' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
a902c5b3fa86efdca79e1d2f480f783b
369bda5e5dd1b35d2294d0444fdb6ac2df9d9655
describe
'74553' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMYA' 'sip-files00249.pro'
dc45dd73c6dcb623550c41ff8c5246d5
47b8cc47f5b078b41b58aff914248938269cfc13
describe
'58261' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMYB' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
e7f4d614ca16638fc523ec6e31071855
bfb61e4ef51ed125d82a2634d75cd3d08fe975c5
describe
'6880612' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMYC' 'sip-files00249.tif'
4bb29d51386ec5b99dbdf2b59da1621a
c434423345468de52d340860d9770de15dc4c936
describe
'2953' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMYD' 'sip-files00249.txt'
ff6e0704880b72a108258eecdb202849
27c8db4351219b6bf291c42f91e3aaa07002f32d
describe
'30154' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMYE' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
b5c1f671b8cff3012742146d48116f2d
9976330d9e4db4252cb209c405a4bbb914a6553a
describe
'857658' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMYF' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
7565d9b20d5a2d477f764569646fc829
6bb53f53288d392015a467163c631b27b16aa67b
describe
'199040' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMYG' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
039ded6244e8e433d42b8fb3fe4b4598
886a5b40b4668ee149d0c8c23261964508f6261f
describe
'107831' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMYH' 'sip-files00250.pro'
cba0ea29a2612ee490ccbb37b941bde4
b54b76938701404decb76a8b7d7bac439e4b5f1a
describe
'64542' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMYI' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
eb5dcef9d25d1235900ca3b701d2efc1
b494a306a0b8db1dcd712993e63e3d4748423c8f
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMYJ' 'sip-files00250.tif'
9939eee8530618abe2720db6dbb80cc5
e46525c32d436e09e8787e856c11bb1d2f0b6729
'2012-02-18T10:49:11-05:00'
describe
'4224' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMYK' 'sip-files00250.txt'
a46d64a643190e271da4fbc3caa43e6b
98e159db55069241a7b9f1549431b79c93b41275
describe
'31548' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMYL' 'sip-files00250thm.jpg'
c9c8786032220d4270fa6c6189d0f199
64ea1d038ba8efadd4852778a7df0b85c7fabf4f
describe
'857284' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMYM' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
3df3bf62ed6af3c7437f6b80f21ac544
bb2660de39097ca44ba43af016f72b0d34adf0e0
describe
'175519' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMYN' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
f20588cf084cdd1c98a49d3ac9dc6f2f
1884dea69d893758d8eafd13c739c29d4a754631
describe
'46111' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMYO' 'sip-files00251.pro'
a5b0280f274289f4591f050078cf4570
0a2d2ae3a04cb187f178d4e8103f82a6f1455ec5
describe
'59310' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMYP' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
d85eddace923b63389e3eac5dfcfa647
e7333accd38d50fd29e2408a8f4d583752ae97d6
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMYQ' 'sip-files00251.tif'
047d39d83effad3f6b0965410cb7b095
e8a7bae06774756fa7787b5df3953f8aa58f82e3
describe
'1816' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMYR' 'sip-files00251.txt'
dc925b3e84b948f6f128cc49a6536a94
e87bdcf167c276df2deec313e16585ed882631c2
describe
'31201' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMYS' 'sip-files00251thm.jpg'
fca258db6bbd1905d72e29879e13ddeb
e43cdd4fe8317611d187de6949f8857123e33ba9
describe
'857423' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMYT' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
b7ce44d04499a152fcf116c647c3721a
ce974329772f78f7bae3047e2992402f821540db
describe
'182418' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMYU' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
494359a08115a060162a170ee9ca5d94
498a1dd9e32d29d3e2aaf38aa98be50f8abc446f
describe
'95238' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMYV' 'sip-files00252.pro'
fc7185571f31bc381fd9ed89721b4cb2
6196f0bfdea7573d16c75acbf3ce14d8e62302cf
describe
'59668' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMYW' 'sip-files00252.QC.jpg'
89becbd23f947140f0c70436cbc014c4
2907ecb863f9f718fa6971da5379b26b62ec71e2
describe
'6883788' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMYX' 'sip-files00252.tif'
e5c2dc2073d1177ce7df94b6d40fd14e
84c4fc3430349b015f73c35cc593126adb0fda3e
describe
'3722' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMYY' 'sip-files00252.txt'
4f4e86c9b5209ce2285f5827669eb1fa
9f127c57d29ea942fd607c8edf22b2eac5bcbe39
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMYZ' 'sip-files00252thm.jpg'
1851dd2420b572656739d9678916905c
392db747776d72a6b0d39b7e0d5382c4a3bb1542
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMZA' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
ccd339e9164915b979da5beed02d53f3
356905498e1e5c25f5c3b40d288b8a71364a4aff
describe
'198427' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMZB' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
4397ce490621d6f088efa8e5a0a1575a
eeb6bd269e2479f287626b07b5ecb3f415a60b6e
describe
'108206' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMZC' 'sip-files00253.pro'
c1ac884076b844f9d569996852f2b2e9
04f368ade62123b3125a87504b63a0246441359d
describe
'65120' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMZD' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
b4fccb460afcdd9fe4897857026bb6ca
76b8daa229b1ebf1158d1dea85dfbc5741e0392f
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMZE' 'sip-files00253.tif'
4f22f217a78cc3b937599934b8050498
2864606ce3d4a26e3ea44131b09c5c0e461f7c06
describe
'4231' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMZF' 'sip-files00253.txt'
11a0d933b0352c7e0ace25042b0e3016
ace8ea0a12e45e23f88bf805aa3b19f13b02d749
describe
'31934' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMZG' 'sip-files00253thm.jpg'
305b14f46eaf92e15f9c909946cd698b
0b3ce560f8a80c9f4b49612b19cc5bffe0a8c8c2
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMZH' 'sip-files00254.jp2'
6a047993a90b6c5a8b28a2f632b3b8e8
7e6498ef78eca214252df2f8e95337192af470de
describe
'175709' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMZI' 'sip-files00254.jpg'
666cfef25119a834f6ed34b297584622
826d93fa717fb47ba7758f2f2ab761a8f2718ab8
describe
'88025' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMZJ' 'sip-files00254.pro'
333bc2b8619e281dadd44bb7f175b48e
a58dbfc258342c5943e2709fbaa595d9c873dbb6
describe
'60005' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMZK' 'sip-files00254.QC.jpg'
2d8cd06ac54e5eeb01ca16a266ae2c9d
632f5f77044ef62df6429c5c83d21ec26ddc8907
describe
'6883912' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMZL' 'sip-files00254.tif'
4a1b533cef8bcd25c652925bf4f35305
5314d1d4d3d977c2c4253a3d33155c7ce71c9d78
'2012-02-18T10:48:15-05:00'
describe
'3469' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMZM' 'sip-files00254.txt'
c1c400de1e729d94e6e57de00caeef2e
164efc9b27564856f010013d4334f52f4e93d67a
'2012-02-18T10:40:39-05:00'
describe
'30824' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMZN' 'sip-files00254thm.jpg'
4f8dcd7946d45856320ade7bdfcfaf10
b89e7851f2fdacad17fb41cc562dc0a9e620989f
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMZO' 'sip-files00255.jp2'
98bf9911f62254914cc31febdb7e31bb
0a505932ddf41f5962a05074b0ac4ebfadf695ab
describe
'189056' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMZP' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
9a0f1dcd8c7e67adbc52a5e142b7a36e
5c29063f530e659a7d22cd09ee1d4f0a4e0f3b3d
describe
'49232' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMZQ' 'sip-files00255.pro'
3f520e9d93d298e368e92708cede11a3
d40915b3df4cc7ebbf307e60ece45ccc64a0800a
describe
'61703' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMZR' 'sip-files00255.QC.jpg'
2b02c5cabe964b9a460d0cfb9ea104b9
3fe7bc206d77b497df1acc1d3664f09fe108843f
describe
'6884672' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMZS' 'sip-files00255.tif'
b898c4589800cb06d8d800cdb584280e
a0675307ed7ed2b6851a65b48564ead067fa7922
'2012-02-18T10:43:07-05:00'
describe
'2012' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMZT' 'sip-files00255.txt'
a7d75d809a3ffa321fcfe6695181c3ac
0b95a9129278c2200edbf8083a81a3209c93168a
describe
Invalid character
'32400' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMZU' 'sip-files00255thm.jpg'
00ae043274c197997e991eb68daa944f
5bd3198d1f2645da22391f12c7d47ee7e71f9922
describe
'857192' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMZV' 'sip-files00256.jp2'
fd9873727caab52853aab205c09e0413
ec12df9f6b260bc1a9a7a9e66976b3a6aca9156a
describe
'174807' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMZW' 'sip-files00256.jpg'
fe2ff4260ca2a49a18a599415729565f
94df1011f831273d1f73776c6a0557bce4e46830
describe
'89358' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMZX' 'sip-files00256.pro'
21311e71e42a34e0d1ae496d8d42249a
a1d4d83713f77c922e181211142fee13dba61e57
describe
'58746' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMZY' 'sip-files00256.QC.jpg'
20471d0f6468dfc42b8b71c6e8169201
c84b310d5dbc4e9b536ac08cf5597494c59d6dbc
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAAMZZ' 'sip-files00256.tif'
c5ef263ab1c73c311b54dafa7db3835f
14f57fe0c002cfa43e313ad11b75005258a1523e
'2012-02-18T10:43:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANAA' 'sip-files00256.txt'
c391eeb3490295e1d9176a337975d51b
c1da3825ada6d89e1742a5b9785999b3a889840f
describe
'30243' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANAB' 'sip-files00256thm.jpg'
b00d41506ee30e3f4cc2eafa0b70d006
f25979fa16e739a1c06d4b5bc1543a5ade82dec6
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANAC' 'sip-files00257.jp2'
11ef6b120b1b52506c0247270b88cb8a
a6f44961fba0dc5bccbb9bc0e0fd6b4a932e8c93
describe
'165865' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANAD' 'sip-files00257.jpg'
d7ef5dd24b5833e6eb9aac0987476ba5
5305345d3a9f32ce8e58f941b75d24c715c399b7
describe
'66525' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANAE' 'sip-files00257.pro'
e14a61724a96cf62f81f70f55d773565
e30f75b2aef551544aeb2bdb133a7c44a843515b
describe
'57316' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANAF' 'sip-files00257.QC.jpg'
8fcba3f0f966df7d13552f13e273f3dd
3ab461a4a07447f33166dc73bc5c1d448fa06f8b
describe
'6880676' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANAG' 'sip-files00257.tif'
bc50b9277cb8542ded7428a2ab1dc3a1
4b77e226110e5adf90ec69d97f24f34098838b9c
describe
'2631' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANAH' 'sip-files00257.txt'
1d3b80276ac7f2dc6403d9b4542cc621
afa6617ea498b3d14cb7c184ee8679eafc1ddcad
describe
'30490' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANAI' 'sip-files00257thm.jpg'
a07cd815a2ca219bc441d5e3df22ce3d
75835da9efb3a5cb68b616b5967fa837bbff11eb
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANAJ' 'sip-files00258.jp2'
594eb417870ea3e3a4eb4f260f81c311
50d0056a83952c8ccfd0949fe27c4f57752512dc
describe
'198894' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANAK' 'sip-files00258.jpg'
b6661d58c499e97eae9a8d4fc4bfc84e
340b47f74f7807b3646df103b0b1d5463fb786c9
describe
'64445' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANAL' 'sip-files00258.pro'
bf817bd83ea0ac966526b23c92ca1d5e
8b226e29837438d31e8eb5882c939b3d2b8017e0
describe
'65014' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANAM' 'sip-files00258.QC.jpg'
cbcb2d933a577e339143c9ccb8a5fa1f
3058c03862789e177e2ca27bce68df10b40237d9
describe
'6882052' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANAN' 'sip-files00258.tif'
51d5f967b18d13887a092dffe713b8f8
d589ccb7d542baccda9a63d8e6d19e687e84f21c
'2012-02-18T10:46:41-05:00'
describe
'2577' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANAO' 'sip-files00258.txt'
c0e6d5336ea162715aa769fa420be16b
8cf81d49a6b6c7587b836131221ac0d09f1f478b
describe
Invalid character
'33192' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANAP' 'sip-files00258thm.jpg'
9113abb25f219d13441c1bd50fbdadc1
f22985ae38367daee3da26625dae4256f1c6de4d
describe
'857076' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANAQ' 'sip-files00259.jp2'
bc4bbc03e4ae2b402ac516a967b4373c
d55d1daa67d3fb201fb121793a8ffa836eecd1b9
describe
'173946' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANAR' 'sip-files00259.jpg'
bb8c64b32395c3d61f8360cc7c0aaf13
92618e2a68fbed21d384b70f6b4ada7c7fb5c45b
describe
'84832' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANAS' 'sip-files00259.pro'
e5bd9dd4121f84328c347c88a68f9b81
eac72182c63e38aa96f76f416bb0159865e88885
describe
'58110' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANAT' 'sip-files00259.QC.jpg'
432540be9315a9e4e74cb0c57cccff15
088b1898ba8b443c37ed143c07489769a31cc453
describe
'6880736' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANAU' 'sip-files00259.tif'
a50d5e61fa868b30cbaba5287ffffe5a
202390446ef04cd5ff4ffb5faca971bd4504ec2f
describe
'3509' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANAV' 'sip-files00259.txt'
b5648c642c724218164337e7af3713c0
10cde4f800cf500938c6183a4d1501fd24d2e092
describe
'30317' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANAW' 'sip-files00259thm.jpg'
8741e6d0f659d473891cd6c1608574ba
4f7b167f2fc3956aadfed61f6daa9fae52d31b51
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANAX' 'sip-files00260.jp2'
43a065bc4acbdbe51ccdc145eb8858ea
9211e3516be839a958a249e48238efb27ce77822
describe
'173080' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANAY' 'sip-files00260.jpg'
88966261d220eef610df750b68d567af
cd38cb6c3e39ed14a6061ebfa5319fe01dc973ab
describe
'85873' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANAZ' 'sip-files00260.pro'
6b05387a031d94c5d0466169f762559d
a7868468faac385d73cb9e8fdd3e0729177df9df
describe
'58952' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANBA' 'sip-files00260.QC.jpg'
b0498f9abc554dae6879a10422ad1c0d
0ffa2615726432eb6d26e0a45344ba2d93c2edce
describe
'6883636' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANBB' 'sip-files00260.tif'
7221b0b1b1530dd2153b313f4ac8e6e7
ecd0421dd87034f18aef52d4a651384582e647d5
describe
'3517' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANBC' 'sip-files00260.txt'
d2b6b97a28e6e2cd2c3dfce09d2376cb
a3b5d29624b1f5a3d217860bf8fa5fb94b233671
describe
'30126' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANBD' 'sip-files00260thm.jpg'
269489b4d58d1d31147c0a07b9f80f4d
6f5f2960ff1dee689c72ef49c2f474e866fd7e81
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANBE' 'sip-files00261.jp2'
5cffd8e041d44b71a2607b158aaa23eb
523e9eebe0e903f340527cd78f9098195c9a4cf9
describe
'176400' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANBF' 'sip-files00261.jpg'
d2347f7b44f329060209be7473d38d95
d3d432ff19f26b740a878733850ddf09bdf48fe1
describe
'87976' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANBG' 'sip-files00261.pro'
a128a61c0ae711a2c78ebbde51436a7a
79ebea883a7e4b9d3e151f043be5c055a5cb0fa5
describe
'58711' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANBH' 'sip-files00261.QC.jpg'
16536807854bbd2c112cbc784c10e38f
c07682e8a9c6c4d3b64247ceccd82235aec3dcff
describe
'6880700' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANBI' 'sip-files00261.tif'
7d73e0cc51df2587e7d70a8cd3b5fb1e
e25e3fa44f1247b03fe3d99a942a695a36e1f2c6
describe
'3455' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANBJ' 'sip-files00261.txt'
688e1d4b0fd9ef0088fd287dcde1acf5
7748da7e2deec6c287673c343265a678a7bba8e9
describe
'30415' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANBK' 'sip-files00261thm.jpg'
6f8fff57b89ac63dfeec90d81971bd13
3b44e1f31db3f3b39600c981a23b3cb07a8cc493
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANBL' 'sip-files00262.jp2'
b8588ede54dd82de480c3e9fc8330184
4e4ea7b247f4050e45f8de91fd4ed77256001ab7
describe
'174511' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANBM' 'sip-files00262.jpg'
a48c0d48827d714e37e6dced99d45117
94732992da70b4a20d2bdc28ed03617560e94783
describe
'51223' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANBN' 'sip-files00262.pro'
9392828f56ca044321de3f0b4af5fe0d
88d43063d313c6e771bd7c9b4fcc32c918d3be84
describe
'59785' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANBO' 'sip-files00262.QC.jpg'
9f95f528015c7cd23dd0f3cac43cf54e
a80689b5e56b75925b2331d92c8e4f18a515feba
describe
'6884088' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANBP' 'sip-files00262.tif'
c8672538513a47374e98010d5aa67b0e
3f722cf678678cd4c26ed9de7eb1326ecb70155a
describe
'2032' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANBQ' 'sip-files00262.txt'
5be87d868d0ad54dd92d18a940cd626f
97af8340abfb3ffa119f891a7ed1185dbb67a553
describe
'31032' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANBR' 'sip-files00262thm.jpg'
2b235fdc3780d6cd2476d9f5c7ad34fa
c3512198c75487c1bb32faecc53b57e9ff2273b1
describe
'857684' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANBS' 'sip-files00263.jp2'
45f9c5d61e79f2e7d4f6d973e8528da4
1704cc1f335ebce3d334a554614e5009633ea215
'2012-02-18T10:38:37-05:00'
describe
'198254' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANBT' 'sip-files00263.jpg'
41b0f3f98a68e1207c32e850e046fc58
ad125ccf0dad484cf1a7df4f6072c6c4b1cd76e8
describe
'105478' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANBU' 'sip-files00263.pro'
b8e7b816f046a13afc73edeb2afce2a9
2ff5c42ac21a20b46d7b185705f9353dd0b5bd2a
describe
'64226' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANBV' 'sip-files00263.QC.jpg'
43e6fa11a022c8d1bcec47a3d71c0585
fc8eae832eddd1f222e472b427dbd65430a8815c
describe
'6884292' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANBW' 'sip-files00263.tif'
e93136cc302ca853bdba955bdd76f364
a9cbd6be254e581f6421d8d8db1259c4c65ed5a6
describe
'4132' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANBX' 'sip-files00263.txt'
032396ec51db897ec4e5923960063a45
3338a58d51e2afcffba87476be90b8541144203f
describe
'31688' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANBY' 'sip-files00263thm.jpg'
0d966d2de94268155c72ae996c20eb79
3b6cbdfb4280ec1c552848d1f8af9f4b0e126e17
describe
'857659' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANBZ' 'sip-files00264.jp2'
1e7d40343b248b400f382bce6f3b5caf
f5e887acc7e3d05c533059abae72ba8468f329e2
describe
'184467' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANCA' 'sip-files00264.jpg'
b0f02af687d9dbe6b08719eb4361dda8
db2495a9c03e1d771c64fcf6cd51261dcee9b75e
describe
'102438' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANCB' 'sip-files00264.pro'
c90a0b86a4cf39dde68b571fe7e6a5e4
01d7aeab82db90240606438df5ed5816c3f27d2c
describe
'59874' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANCC' 'sip-files00264.QC.jpg'
b793f4b2911765ed95c81fb72da4ab6c
69515ae89b0b01a73710303fa5f8a9d1dbfcd4b6
describe
'6883504' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANCD' 'sip-files00264.tif'
1a35621d9dcd76ac7ed0aaa64ca4d315
5e37f29af10299746296dce2c9ed35fe2aeb7c84
describe
'4128' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANCE' 'sip-files00264.txt'
fab9fc3f6cb17d58b8e28c7e0f2df5ff
d38216a6a75401f4e3cdae9a8acc531cbdc2b41e
describe
'30031' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANCF' 'sip-files00264thm.jpg'
357b02c281275ada36ba0380b3dd698a
2338e3e9ee78b552cd5a850c8af7387ccbd18987
'2012-02-18T10:37:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANCG' 'sip-files00265.jp2'
6ce94670f230689e462aff4af660161b
bbaae2fbf90afb878d98db42a12964ca199d1bc0
describe
'187561' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANCH' 'sip-files00265.jpg'
d2d6fae0b42e21dae7468c9ddc7d7d16
503f19238176f987808326cd71822447f3c55514
describe
'49147' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANCI' 'sip-files00265.pro'
7be1383596b23dbb775f018c4e15b0a5
bba0d7b52cbfab427af54653c56df95e56f3e6d8
describe
'64044' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANCJ' 'sip-files00265.QC.jpg'
6bb0259f8affe6724e5e3d4ea2c32448
45a4fb6b69f65e0e7609a6d35821b8a1188db2ae
describe
'6882172' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANCK' 'sip-files00265.tif'
93a455f7e664123c9e85f24f2c6d00eb
63fb15379fd1bbd2530d31d1bfbc295fd637966d
describe
'2544' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANCL' 'sip-files00265.txt'
af169c2a59d99cd59f7cbc17192e0cce
5024e55382b8e1391b193303282ac81d51060889
'2012-02-18T10:40:57-05:00'
describe
'33173' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANCM' 'sip-files00265thm.jpg'
ce1ebed0fca05bb39b6728ba7258f584
d7ac7b3a93bc02ef03407905dc37a1652ef5b8e3
describe
'857624' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANCN' 'sip-files00266.jp2'
5268cc22d663f458af477ddf1a83baa6
0511b0e0fb727e0f5bbd2a82aae9ac307c77aa1d
describe
'201529' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANCO' 'sip-files00266.jpg'
2c26ffc31f1543f9afc05fffbb5f574b
aff13597772d6d01d0995b7341fbc5f38c0e7da7
describe
'107504' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANCP' 'sip-files00266.pro'
f2d45bc513d965e8d375c232ec8ad558
ad2df4a35cc57b96d3b5eb5a446e0738570d4035
describe
'65273' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANCQ' 'sip-files00266.QC.jpg'
a9aed30d7043b8b249a86ca400b5afb9
4578ea3d08b101cf3609af95bdbc00e58480a1e7
describe
'6884420' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANCR' 'sip-files00266.tif'
f5e7046af9c5fe47774612b26c008d80
29bcde5fac4d758ccb84f75956b229bfb530cc57
describe
'4214' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANCS' 'sip-files00266.txt'
1aee7248aeaa624fbae7ce214b84170d
f5827a4d54c74cc2e1de28752dea9e2c313084c0
describe
'31835' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANCT' 'sip-files00266thm.jpg'
e8806ae6b859056b6b3e24c3bb4ae866
d0fabbc1e31b450d28f92854e17c3b7f83c88198
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANCU' 'sip-files00267.jp2'
92d303972df5352d93fe36419b474da3
13999eadba95fa76dc01ebd218d4fff733918a9d
describe
'198511' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANCV' 'sip-files00267.jpg'
54edc8ca0c8a0d3a79f55dd8475e8252
e62a2b84cbf9cc0f06d60b94ebdec10771e4e1e5
describe
'104144' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANCW' 'sip-files00267.pro'
bff5294fc5a51ec0f784a8072acfe8e5
6c6e584b834506f1a9eec487047b5a046d365f3f
describe
'64744' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANCX' 'sip-files00267.QC.jpg'
c13cd40866ba227d7ce8a37c00dfe6eb
b128ece0ae0660dd7aae565009a0f693114a0764
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANCY' 'sip-files00267.tif'
2211a1a7945ed96920eb06bcdbb7dda0
e05e9c01671c0369996a854f77170efb11807447
'2012-02-18T10:39:36-05:00'
describe
'4127' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANCZ' 'sip-files00267.txt'
34a46d0b5db0dfb60a6b5d7a39d02409
a51002d357adfb38582300a2ae258ed7dd9e1cd8
describe
'32105' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANDA' 'sip-files00267thm.jpg'
785fe7a0a2b795a5155828dc7843050f
a6609187196e78b12618439fedbfa90d409df5d4
describe
'857637' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANDB' 'sip-files00268.jp2'
236e2547248f5b641f7459f27fbbebb3
a0b95ecfcd7856549103eb206c169bec1c0ee264
describe
'173877' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANDC' 'sip-files00268.jpg'
4a609af133ff9486455970fd9538fda8
902838334d1531a196ae4551ffe220ba15b5e6a5
describe
'49397' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANDD' 'sip-files00268.pro'
b2390cd6852ffe1feaa1d552bd6ef343
da28b34cd90997df3be02a396d023f9a5b4420da
describe
'58731' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANDE' 'sip-files00268.QC.jpg'
c5db70da5b2fa8658e134aa98d7fe246
466c6692d8fd8ee25210584ccaec47f44d8a6c59
describe
'6884320' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANDF' 'sip-files00268.tif'
3cb856c1b110fc775707799aa73e27d1
a8fa90dfb370c8f35b38b0aabb58156e27d277e8
describe
'2473' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANDG' 'sip-files00268.txt'
dae13a4ebe58883ace5e86391293ad82
b50584225bbcd7eb305c287af22ab75274943ce4
describe
'31685' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANDH' 'sip-files00268thm.jpg'
d887f67590306201a1d9c7d27a02cb08
0aedc8f657052efa9048f26102264b8457e29085
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANDI' 'sip-files00269.jp2'
e12a6b0742c60ad66cbd679d78911190
ce07def3a4204f72c2d8fe10ccb75da8a00afc0f
describe
'193405' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANDJ' 'sip-files00269.jpg'
53011b4c26583ecb0e6ebc7f30ede011
ebd805f8b877b1e5dac135d42c4fb258391d3450
describe
'103094' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANDK' 'sip-files00269.pro'
1af8f0063ec45fa9c4e6130795bf4198
debe62f6995d37092460db8c7248ac6829c98326
describe
'63694' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANDL' 'sip-files00269.QC.jpg'
f01c5a151b9d079c873a6ea38dd312bc
f1c78239d599694e882c5ea991076cc2cf5bafba
describe
'6881220' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANDM' 'sip-files00269.tif'
1e765b0c006cdc9e7d8522d84a785edc
e76cb8aefc9b98e2a0de119f58ba3b4940db8c5e
describe
'4050' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANDN' 'sip-files00269.txt'
999c61a6269ae0c9f6901180f7657fcb
972f36e6aa6affbe3d8a131abb915111a333ae8f
describe
'31461' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANDO' 'sip-files00269thm.jpg'
9fde2fa57f9ed368770d699fd44d3016
df836c320e9286c6e0a6ab6e67d4523bf0eedd76
describe
'857575' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANDP' 'sip-files00270.jp2'
a27f42c103ecd1d119078084dba46472
71844fe7ef3222c85e4fdfa48cf9a670c5696c84
describe
'180330' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANDQ' 'sip-files00270.jpg'
696dc75d7240ece679277b5b33b50213
53afa6c97bcbf870b3ed789f4279e00198bbdd1e
describe
'31365' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANDR' 'sip-files00270.pro'
afc25fee6b18fcaf6a155d591d3aa251
682764c057d11ef8d0d91d569c7da59af0d03b76
describe
'60904' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANDS' 'sip-files00270.QC.jpg'
06b63f7a21b854076d457b5e94e1a537
526ff250b0e9b51751e2cc96ef7f9b7844661f3b
describe
'6884392' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANDT' 'sip-files00270.tif'
6440e52852549b9f98ab190190cc85eb
1127385bf51059005efa6c213b69852afe3dcd31
describe
'1249' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANDU' 'sip-files00270.txt'
5728d846d0083232aa0013fa4750b9e3
0ac27fce31ee3027ff069cfb2aecd9ce3f1e4dcb
describe
'31793' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANDV' 'sip-files00270thm.jpg'
ec5addb18fedd444dd71293547836c44
18168bcbd7b86ba8194500573b01a343b54a91e1
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANDW' 'sip-files00271.jp2'
a3e82f9f9cc011dfa740c07d27865f4b
f0dfad1247dd5b38b8ddcc5a9867e95f61e698c4
describe
'204406' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANDX' 'sip-files00271.jpg'
56b7a85245331d6caee41d2ded72ba37
4716c21f125a61c318c3b67ae5178b07d2017f75
describe
'106945' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANDY' 'sip-files00271.pro'
cef32bda60f01437fd4052ded35335b3
7e563a7e3f89c0d4881776fcc0d3c3914174bb7d
describe
'65711' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANDZ' 'sip-files00271.QC.jpg'
2a47316c676b136b2d67d2a7ed086269
4b23c11fe3c65355217cfbdd7ceaa441a6fd94a2
describe
'6881640' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANEA' 'sip-files00271.tif'
78a30be2053e61ec82ae961882ec7912
9cc49ed50f4da76713cef8e2ba6b88c2f9703119
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANEB' 'sip-files00271.txt'
a6029d6669972fe7021deee5c3d5d709
8bea33fcb76bc16ab65d4e237219f63afc6e4113
describe
'32158' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANEC' 'sip-files00271thm.jpg'
4138af5a2276e5fd1914d7b17538e39c
d981de78345126a0277387a869763f9f68586b27
describe
'857596' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANED' 'sip-files00272.jp2'
cd996a009e0a83487f1359f2c1d64e50
f82c2cf637f50013dd5e5b9d384df726bc70b2e6
describe
'170665' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANEE' 'sip-files00272.jpg'
c39d0f32e75f240f658478d79066d31b
32d97f4f06651839e35ea6eba35f3841ddd281b9
describe
'27475' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANEF' 'sip-files00272.pro'
3133c2487b9524b349db390474d5297d
ed1eff9e348b416096a926b07a13155d478bc1a5
describe
'58441' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANEG' 'sip-files00272.QC.jpg'
59cd9e7faf6d5361ec1341174a1c29a0
9f3248027dcbaa99f2329806c204593f1f05b2ec
describe
'6884080' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANEH' 'sip-files00272.tif'
ec4e9c0b5e8cbb52a8ee25a0b5450963
8db34e32d0444ec4b5bd07056d4fcd6b780d7f0d
describe
'1124' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANEI' 'sip-files00272.txt'
30d39da305f36796e588862c17c12c72
1da62bd236ed7f734c4147f76e181ee6f1403b13
describe
Invalid character
'31054' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANEJ' 'sip-files00272thm.jpg'
cc1459d7559c6f85b56256ca8f518064
5f557d14298b35d9303aec5fd9200e49c5a13ebe
describe
'857278' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANEK' 'sip-files00273.jp2'
839100cf99961295b8e4dbb360828a80
7fc3e2628d77f1d8d76553bb867212f5080d66cc
describe
'200705' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANEL' 'sip-files00273.jpg'
a3d95471733aa31abf3effbe27addb0c
df04e03c1cbd39921abfff6a3804cf0584e6937a
describe
'106052' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANEM' 'sip-files00273.pro'
37600f9cf2b2e4ba00f34c7e8e7d771b
91bd3f2ce5a895d8e84cb6f376eae8d63000d644
describe
'65149' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANEN' 'sip-files00273.QC.jpg'
511420e86994f0b6f6748ab403d57720
175baeb8e4f297cfb3fd44c78e9086b0f2bb51d1
describe
'6881540' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANEO' 'sip-files00273.tif'
af20d8f34439ac495c26c4e43e48e9bd
7a0e9d6a8bc0854744eda0850ef4743d637ee973
describe
'4141' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANEP' 'sip-files00273.txt'
fd3dc83ef6533803b2b8b6216b232084
86c202dd1960db9a259ef16028491dc649ec5480
describe
'32369' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANEQ' 'sip-files00273thm.jpg'
3204e05c52aa00e0f6b08d3470cc8606
0eceaa39da63a0352953c95d9d95b51b3d136ec5
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANER' 'sip-files00274.jp2'
199ebeb2a390d78ac63a5acc4d76aeb8
897f752f5b90a09bc6c115748b6db3a27e3e08b3
describe
'197374' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANES' 'sip-files00274.jpg'
545d06b25c624f67c9c43916bd0caadc
360a276c9ae1e00e34cf2f835f798ce747ea4fa1
describe
'101649' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANET' 'sip-files00274.pro'
34d7112d031909c9603be17a0f5ae5af
bdaaf807a9bd1b8d61365e06eaf3be8ee8b222cd
'2012-02-18T10:37:51-05:00'
describe
'66018' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANEU' 'sip-files00274.QC.jpg'
8747ef4899523c09b7947e8f7dd33e96
8df3b53a916285eee62de6af1756b7f18f1da3df
describe
'6881748' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANEV' 'sip-files00274.tif'
efdd465f25caf0a81a4c4ffa21240f8e
3684e1c36fd8a2b15c5aa427c66d89a657410f0c
describe
'4022' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANEW' 'sip-files00274.txt'
84727150dc89534a8a6a56411c824501
11a50a78e39ae101914af95b2ae0b5ead0c2fdaa
describe
'32443' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANEX' 'sip-files00274thm.jpg'
4300e295773fbd94062ca898bc080a9c
9aadc61ee8f9b4b23753bdedde2cde71b54abea9
describe
'857667' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANEY' 'sip-files00275.jp2'
2c39604a601ab996319446ac34274273
4383b67b7bb6456175209b14dde71a3dd410f7e3
describe
'167661' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANEZ' 'sip-files00275.jpg'
d1bfa31883dd6616aefda09055e9d079
57796a1d8e83e2c5110aaa689b6213e1e687ad9d
describe
'46367' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANFA' 'sip-files00275.pro'
7a66cc3248ed1e01384fbdbfa54011de
421c3a493d6415ccd8adcd99f77ef9fb794ec5e3
describe
'57446' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANFB' 'sip-files00275.QC.jpg'
cc663d9cbbb08b4b7c9c8017d7c5adcf
ba1561e675a24ab20ad983b2cb71980af89b26f2
describe
'6883692' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANFC' 'sip-files00275.tif'
e7652a5b3138909bf3e7af57442d284a
fb900d7802033c177fa264474424a8c9140373dc
describe
'2499' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANFD' 'sip-files00275.txt'
c775ef15a7282ebc257b14bf21322400
7d662ab41b82c7afa018da8c52e96741f024c642
describe
'30332' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANFE' 'sip-files00275thm.jpg'
d4705ebf6cf926fda70b6d411cff6283
f7af7947a51793ce5378ba116c98f5a582d932fc
describe
'857577' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANFF' 'sip-files00276.jp2'
5a2c5d1d167c6939e49a37201ab0e7b7
e83e121f26fbaad4e5efebd8c796f1af28f3156a
describe
'179636' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANFG' 'sip-files00276.jpg'
6b39b6f8e9db7ef20eef46c2ced896e5
b07c3132617fd28e6cd00e011df8f071d5a1af54
describe
'93857' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANFH' 'sip-files00276.pro'
a132463988c6c8fbceff610ff92782a7
53abbda9bdb9c8e032caad16805cd30682bb04b8
describe
'60468' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANFI' 'sip-files00276.QC.jpg'
22f036801ecc70aae250a2c4e5b7c0f7
05d089a6883619f7fa5def3a17661b7ed7dfa37c
describe
'6883748' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANFJ' 'sip-files00276.tif'
9ee9fcd04022b1a5e92b554d2e555e3e
7d2457356c3a37c6d6e5ed927f6ad18184cd484f
describe
'3678' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANFK' 'sip-files00276.txt'
27ab17bd927b4375e53d71c9a28dac7a
ff5b26439cc49a75b2ff28d58be7649cef2002ed
describe
'30402' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANFL' 'sip-files00276thm.jpg'
22b9a8e7fae462b369d479b8a5841325
57920e513c744565b6f1c95315857310e1ce69aa
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANFM' 'sip-files00277.jp2'
12f1ad792b4f53d019438d65a571ef60
8476d96b950f2b1a097f22bb6ccf4044f488855d
describe
'206539' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANFN' 'sip-files00277.jpg'
3c1f75f4ccc3dc54a59af8c93d48cd03
945d9021ecf1bc7e696145f143c31751be54fda9
describe
'107223' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANFO' 'sip-files00277.pro'
4a695d9c0987ea1a59590cd588e5f62e
22fa282e60184d0c91c5a395b176a31779997c6d
describe
'66138' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANFP' 'sip-files00277.QC.jpg'
99d4669fa27e156cbff2220a173f5597
f7503e72f99247ef8857789f5c19d38448010c85
describe
'6884548' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANFQ' 'sip-files00277.tif'
50aacabdc7439b68fc05a3796fb7a659
15ea112735b8861c6644619f1afb08e94504eeaa
describe
'4257' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANFR' 'sip-files00277.txt'
9f1b4770bdf9ffc7894ee2b7982af0e7
97f516489b78861a805ee8b9ce9cb864659fe8ed
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANFS' 'sip-files00277thm.jpg'
d6b79b70535eefd3c958650ef2b58439
ebe4538454878804aaeafe65de3bc7ad6a09bc9f
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANFT' 'sip-files00278.jp2'
8d851650527919a708409373df26ae12
bc542972722194cbc1cd184e6315e65029a532ae
describe
'198543' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANFU' 'sip-files00278.jpg'
4e26d5b1f30c8452dbaa90bdba50c2a5
bc8657a8e474cae499350ae59698ad420242fdc4
'2012-02-18T10:38:42-05:00'
describe
'108458' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANFV' 'sip-files00278.pro'
178c0fd589a0b7e92a847405499c2067
208779e3c71dac9f741d9f97f8592002440e89b0
describe
'65216' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANFW' 'sip-files00278.QC.jpg'
f8114e75c8e735528921bfb2762eb89d
c308bb507c63f59c2a33c553680a6a466967b740
describe
'6881616' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANFX' 'sip-files00278.tif'
3626a85d8a7f83d2331339d1df7104dc
35dda6410b0f52656319ef0107b9d64e2b15b392
describe
'4235' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANFY' 'sip-files00278.txt'
31bd36cccceb0ee02d7237b5084da63c
b7325aa1e6937760bc8138eb2e547ab5ad2cc3a8
describe
'32041' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANFZ' 'sip-files00278thm.jpg'
974835986b0c8ddb8a068be1f98ccd59
d1c78e3cce17e6c3a9149fcd81400d0e9b120df6
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANGA' 'sip-files00279.jp2'
81af60f6b2f4e2c1bc51294cb4306cef
061f50645609e53d24d26b67c2b28367d1f16798
'2012-02-18T10:37:58-05:00'
describe
'194285' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANGB' 'sip-files00279.jpg'
aab5b6609170f7744b1cb3281a614ef7
f830f01789940572711c99aaecfee29519315e97
'2012-02-18T10:38:10-05:00'
describe
'102262' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANGC' 'sip-files00279.pro'
0d4bd364e3de3c3a374a135af422188f
722f713f992c658c0d256d02d997e2c6972885bd
describe
'63326' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANGD' 'sip-files00279.QC.jpg'
15e0edd3b80f2462d5198e0738d8c8f0
0378a88f61e7e07122cb2b091f217e988cbcdf6a
describe
'6881296' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANGE' 'sip-files00279.tif'
e1bc87e1c1999f7fac29e018fe87487f
9bc8739fb164c022c833ff800e1d7b6b6e92bd14
describe
'4000' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANGF' 'sip-files00279.txt'
77c18dfc814f071b16bf31898c40d3fc
81f27e86f8f8d5eaac83ea43ac197f41fc5197ce
describe
'31083' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANGG' 'sip-files00279thm.jpg'
1ec6dee28a5f5329308e7c77330d531a
2be94b0c36931f95288de1c99a1e6b9c68d312e7
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANGH' 'sip-files00280.jp2'
8932e38efaa795c94220c6ac219ba8d5
e85d984e18f01c979687e5cf6282e4cb8087fe68
describe
'130994' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANGI' 'sip-files00280.jpg'
441b39e3cfac9a9e476fe79f4b1213a1
7d15178b6453476ac3aedb2e5e8ab23555813a63
describe
'20517' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANGJ' 'sip-files00280.pro'
69a199fad1f5e736e12dd5a3ec512a0a
48b54e0f4849e3945d199e087cc37c7fcf0a008a
describe
'49149' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANGK' 'sip-files00280.QC.jpg'
7a7ddceed895afd71f1a4359470ec62e
fd13815c4f21770cdb31a43091224aecc39f7ac4
describe
'6880288' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANGL' 'sip-files00280.tif'
f2b3ac1e342dfe3a7ec6151a35c1eebb
2d9ea8df5674e39ed2fb51218fb6ed9f23ba0934
describe
'813' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANGM' 'sip-files00280.txt'
799bb0db0a3c12941c94d7cf7bfa4fff
bdf9d765a7862697c2a780e4cd4b935f7fe210ce
describe
'28873' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANGN' 'sip-files00280thm.jpg'
f63973ed80190dce8d1d3214afa8c7f4
3fe7f9fce4aeef78ab1a0193615d3d2a833523b9
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANGO' 'sip-files00281.jp2'
fd08f615fa630a0d654ff3481e7cd939
ef814c14ee390804514f4ad5813afce61d9448d1
describe
'185175' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANGP' 'sip-files00281.jpg'
f8939819a857bcb43bf5a21319b9a915
a4db043187de866818b46905762908ff0d17995f
describe
'99293' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANGQ' 'sip-files00281.pro'
60ade7e40379b6e7d2457c62a7a65e9e
fab8066956e4de3485d05798301e311e661c9922
describe
'61338' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANGR' 'sip-files00281.QC.jpg'
1dccef5f0fdd6b587d56197b66878e91
dc047da3e58a54e25833d98ac01e52aa685a984e
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANGS' 'sip-files00281.tif'
1287be2c23c267dc507b9b3d1c664850
0cc31ab390f0b4584df3558c6ae5fb49c37c7a19
describe
'3894' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANGT' 'sip-files00281.txt'
ee7382bfc16540d631e7101f9a4b6fa7
be6687a09f91509d43de6ce5c1306169863b52b6
describe
'30930' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANGU' 'sip-files00281thm.jpg'
38d2155d3d560a0fd796dfd04f104e5d
5466ef0da0903d46dba4a53bab16adbcfdeef00b
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANGV' 'sip-files00282.jp2'
57db0b96a21d6f665630315142ec9a81
04e60feb314ca3f0ae59a8e9e27ab07433a14738
describe
'180888' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANGW' 'sip-files00282.jpg'
658b7732e4a42d8d523ae413c030b7ae
76da3892e834043dd630850a9bc5d31fd822f4d1
describe
'58232' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANGX' 'sip-files00282.pro'
1c9599bb1edb2ba3d1cbf3b75bf96b75
db7c7130876a20cc335a00536e9fc22e4cbd6008
describe
'60821' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANGY' 'sip-files00282.QC.jpg'
ef7192831678d273da2a2e0bba8b4ab1
fa1bb2d467aef14cde8787841cac161af633926a
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANGZ' 'sip-files00282.tif'
46284ee7d0e8750cc2afc2150f44357d
13968165372300b8ae29ec1a74665d71e024c7fb
describe
'2290' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANHA' 'sip-files00282.txt'
c873f822ba5a7714e0008937e0bfa574
a51eefb2d13887843c02d4cb4cc616fe52859a87
describe
'31109' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANHB' 'sip-files00282thm.jpg'
9d3b07f263b2eb056009e17ba1afde55
5ca6d4f575840e442f12faecb51ca31a64e647dc
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANHC' 'sip-files00283.jp2'
7309c710ff5ce2eb5b530dfcbd213d84
7a108a9174d2877331c1eb5595a8220261aa0fe0
describe
'174291' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANHD' 'sip-files00283.jpg'
1503253b77cacaaa2d68c10831fc2675
6d366de1676a05fdf803946f2792c9ea03c36628
describe
'51688' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANHE' 'sip-files00283.pro'
4c35ba0c8c1d554ab24468a39543e1c6
e4441bdc48308005e8fcac93004f4f8a2b38c31e
describe
'58568' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANHF' 'sip-files00283.QC.jpg'
3e30425137e3280fa285b8456b305c70
46f41a50923058a56d4983539daf956177cbda55
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANHG' 'sip-files00283.tif'
1a3be2d51f4866f4b6079df8d6d171ce
e94df99aa5d2ffbf71904c48e184fe8342f5a8b7
describe
'2113' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANHH' 'sip-files00283.txt'
97aec65868c8da61dcca39274ac4bfb9
fffc26bfdbbbf7876d8f480f2deda39429fd96d3
describe
'31000' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANHI' 'sip-files00283thm.jpg'
2de19ba616bed65824999b24e915cd95
3febc4601f9718243ab4a76cf43a7b5fddb40f06
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANHJ' 'sip-files00284.jp2'
617e598d777618c375cd2134e6593b2d
bc67e02ffe353285533f48009d1d49e372544ab5
describe
'186480' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANHK' 'sip-files00284.jpg'
e92725f6b854fdda8fc635b644f3f0b2
9ecc320972a60904615c063b64cb3f0fa74d2a4f
describe
'98610' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANHL' 'sip-files00284.pro'
e13b71a82c25252b7feb1d31e17fa10a
d4376ad761f6b97180752a5f6e44fc7cf7ac1df0
describe
'60641' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANHM' 'sip-files00284.QC.jpg'
b46fe2d9910bd0a716d95f6e03d2f5c3
4bf42f14faaff7c6769756a6ca743005f6efe79a
describe
'6880840' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANHN' 'sip-files00284.tif'
825434b4e0769c03b8f64aea6723f6b4
3cf410d81076c9dc387181a258480d50b3b82e27
describe
'3855' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANHO' 'sip-files00284.txt'
59b0ebf8b6802f42957153e665f89338
873cb946b7953450a0c19d363a1a964efce2eeb0
describe
'30613' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANHP' 'sip-files00284thm.jpg'
ff060300662c93abb1b5748b9c2408b2
a8b0b436233b8f4e17ca6aabc67373af8f5f161d
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANHQ' 'sip-files00285.jp2'
5955600142f8f61d1e5de5941ff2b4bc
44da7479c0140502ad2be3e07666c3c3fb6b61f5
describe
'197014' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANHR' 'sip-files00285.jpg'
845c1223c54b247895cbfde72b8996fc
3988cb59ff309e4c2bc2a09b1bee79edcd1101e4
describe
'102342' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANHS' 'sip-files00285.pro'
3a4a0a537e1b02ebe3eb92ac81e5ffa3
d1d449a98292ca7169a899e2cc95a382edd60320
describe
'63719' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANHT' 'sip-files00285.QC.jpg'
47d34bbce193a3c11cb2c2418d23db7d
d8169269ec44a6dbf450938d21a3ef08854c0dd5
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANHU' 'sip-files00285.tif'
435deb85cf432487a88c5e7145067219
ef6ed0c5bc182aaa09c284ecb8465d12063cf012
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANHV' 'sip-files00285.txt'
016f379317febc1c257ae627a3d94849
2a3b4ab8bbf753c2e0302076e8fe745dba6dde9a
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANHW' 'sip-files00285thm.jpg'
4eaae554621a43797c760cac2c44dda3
47249fad17d911bdd432f6f65b8c91f07f1fc64c
describe
'857014' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANHX' 'sip-files00286.jp2'
f156fa6d70fd5a5d6e077e51ff9db4a0
85e045a2f528e473f22299a5ac096def6b00b72f
describe
'204579' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANHY' 'sip-files00286.jpg'
bc8206397cf38e5d566e7f0c10507d84
60376965afcd4b6f8b6e00dc80a8bb0eeb0a7c5b
describe
'67907' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANHZ' 'sip-files00286.QC.jpg'
e7a8d0739818253e3cd37c37d7de7f60
93ff9d2c0ffdb5fa43f941395d50e21c3b2ec5c7
describe
'6882568' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANIA' 'sip-files00286.tif'
7cf4acc00175e1bb0670e99ceaadf56b
006eeb89b6f6ccf807829e18e2d988795f084922
describe
'34136' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANIB' 'sip-files00286thm.jpg'
9ac3e20f86a1a77506de4e7dee11a7c8
3c069243311b5e38c0653f4235c1f901fd1db84b
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANIC' 'sip-files00287.jp2'
d26728dffad1e6adad85efd5ac948152
cafafd28bfab922bf6b3790a88b27394c8c4fd83
describe
'190371' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANID' 'sip-files00287.jpg'
7a001045fab82c55c6f942e19072593e
62402f6a788b9ebdb56a4eed9aa3ae48c80ff787
describe
'95810' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANIE' 'sip-files00287.pro'
6f39a718846200e92bd1b6d91b5d5b58
7a18f23be00b8ada511ed6084468368e4ec4c73d
describe
'63044' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANIF' 'sip-files00287.QC.jpg'
6640bdbe79f952c33327fd262d2166fb
74f8ce1b2a94b728586e72341abef9fa9e547576
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANIG' 'sip-files00287.tif'
cb9741c18f4b37888bdcc70ab3b845f2
a8866b172e4887e3c7c369a7e4766c4da70c85ac
describe
'3759' 'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANIH' 'sip-files00287.txt'
4d008653e6ecdee5145b6793688b22ce
4b855b161f866339f439ea46e5d3d789803f3c36
describe
'info:fdaE20090625_AAAAAGfileF20090625_AAANII' 'sip-files00287thm.jpg'
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KBE

ae

Wy .
ke IOs 2 ae

Rewly Yranglated from tke Original by Ella Boldey.

We

Wit ILLUSTRATIONS By R ANDRE.


GON LENT sS.



A GOOD BARGAIN.
A LOT oF ROGUES.
A PRINCESS IN DISGUISE.

BEARSKIN.
BIRDIE, THE FOUNDLING.
BRIAR ROSE.

BROTHER JOLLY.

CINDERELLA.
CLEVER ALICE.
CUNNING GRETHEL.

DAME FROST.
DocTOoR KNOW- ALL.

DocTOR KORBES.
FAITHFUL JOHN.

HANSEL AND GRETHEL.

“Tr I CouLD ONLY LEARN TO
SHUDDER.”

KING THRUSH- BEARD.

LAZINESS AND INDUSTRY. : : B
LITTLE BRITTLE LEGS.
LITTLE RED Cap.

OLD SULTAN.

ONE-EVE, TWO-EYES, AND THREE-EYES.

ONE GOOD TURN DESERVES ANOTHER.

PAGE

29

269

84
219
214
154

100
161

17

124

117
182

23

50

TO

223

128

2IT

97
81

PAGE.

PRINCESS MALEEN. : f é = 531

RAPUNZEL, OR THE MAID WITH THE

GOLDEN Harr. . : : : 61
SIX WONDERFUL TRAVELLERS. . - 145,
SNOW-WHITE AND RED-ROSE. . 3 56
STAR DOLLARS. : : ‘ : +. 210
THE ANGEL GUEST. . : 3 : 32
THE ANT AND THE FLEA. . ; . 149
THE BEAR AND THE WREN. : : 137
THE BEWITCHED FLOWER. . g . 244

THE BRAVE LITTLE TAILOR, OR
SEVEN AT ONE STROKE. . ; gi
THE CAT AND THE MOUSE IN PART-
NERSHIP. : : : ‘ : 3
THE CoOcK, THE SCYTHE, AND THE

CAD a: : : : : : 9
THE CoUNT'’S REWARD. . : é . 197
THE CRYSTAL BALL. . : : : 240
THE DANCING SHOES. . : : heeeOS
THE DEATH OF THE HEN. 3 ; 49
THE ENCHANTED FAWN. : ‘ eae AG
THE ENCHANTED TREE. . . : 204
THE FAIRY OF THE MILL- POND. . 264

THE FAIRY-QUEEN AND THE WOoOp-

CUTTER’S CHILD. 3 : é 5
THE FISHERMAN AND HIS WIFE. +. 100
THE FOX AND THE CaT. . : : 105
THE FOX AND THE HORSE. . : . 208
(BLOINE IOI IM IES



THE FROG PRINCE AND FAITHFUL
HENRY.

THE GOLDEN BIRD.

THE GOLDEN GOOSE.

THE GOOSE GIRL. :

THE GREEDY GOLDSMITH’S REWARD.

THE HARE AND THE HEDGEHOG.

THE HousE IN THE WOODS.

THE IMP IN THE BOTTLE.

THE IRON CHEST.

THE KING OF BIRDS. .

THE KNAPSACK, THE HAT, AND THE
Horn.

THE LAMB AND THE FISH.

THE Macic MIRROR.

THE Macic WINDOWS.

THE MAIDEN WITHOUT HANDS.

THe MILLER BOY AND THE KITTEN.

THe Mouse, THE BIRD, AND THE
SAUSAGE.

THE OLD GRANDFATHER AND THE
CHILD.

THE PEASANTS CLEVER DAUGHTER. .

THE PRINCE WHO WAS NOT AFRAID.

THE QUEEN- BEE.

THE RAVEN.

THE RIDDLE. . é : : : :

THE ROBBER BRIDEGROOM. : :

THE SEVEN CROWS. : 3 : :

THE SHREWD FARMER. 3

THE SINGING BONE. : y 5 :

THE SKILLFUL HUNTER. . : =

PAGE.

235
47
20

122
59
118
79
175
213

227
247
187

38
150

136

121

218

64
221
267
II2
114
205
126
185

143
180

THE SPARROW AN” AER FouR YOUNG

ONES. ; i ;

THE SPINDLE, THE SHUTTLE, AND THE .

NEEDLE.
THE STRANGE GOD- FATHER.

THE STRAW, THE COAL, AND THE

BEAN.
THE TAILOR aND THE BEAR.
THE THREE FEATHERS.
THE THREE GOLDEN HAIRS.
THE THREE LANGUAGES.
THE THREE LITTLE MEN
WOODS.
THE THREE SNAKE LEAVES.
THE THREE SPINNERS.
THE THREE TASKS.
THE THREE WISHING GIFTS.

IN THE

THE TOWN MUSICIANS OF BREMEN.

THE TWELVE BROTHERS.
THE TWELVE HUNTSMEN.
THE TWIN BROTHERS.
THE WEDDING OF MRs. Fox.
THE WISHING GIFT. : :
THE WOLF AND THE MAN.
THE WOLF AND THE SEVEN
KIps.
THE WONDERFUL CABBAGE.
THE WONDERFUL FIDDLER.
THUMBLING. .

WHAT THE FAIRIES Do.

YORINDA AND YORINGAL. ,

LITTLE

.

PAGE.

1S
159

148

18
88
34
171

194

275
THE FROG PRINCE AND FAITHFUL HENRY.

a : N olden times, when people could have “by wishing,
= ahh) there lived a king whose daughters were all beautiful ;
but the youngest one was so lovely that even the sun him-
self, who had looked upon many beautiful things, was filled
with admiration every time he shone upon her face.

Close by the king’s castle lay a large,
dark forest, and in the midst of this, under
an old linden, was a deep pool or spring.
One day when it was very warm, the little
princess went out into
the woods and sat down
by the cool spring. When
she became tired of the
quiet, she took out a
golden ball, her favorite
plaything, and began to
toss it into the air and
catch it again. Now it
happened that the ball
missed her hands, and
falling upon the ground,
rolled down into the
water. The little prin--
cess tried to follow it
with her eyes, but the
spring was deep--so deep
that no one could see to
the bottom--and the ball
disappeared.

Then she began to
weep, her cries grew
































THE FROG PRINCE AND FAITHFUL HENRY.

louder and louder, and it seemed as if nothing
would ever comfort her. Suddenly some one
called to her; ‘Little princess, what is the
matter? your cries would move a stone to
pity.” She looked around whence the voice
came, and saw a frog stretching his thick ugly
head out of the water.

“Qh, it is you, is it, old water-paddler ?
““T am crying because my ball has fallen
into the water.”

*“Be quiet, and do not cry,” answered the
frog. “can get your plaything for you. But
what will you give me if I will bring it to you
again?”

* Whatever you wish, dear frog,” she answer-
ed, ‘‘my dresses, my pearls and jewels, and
even the golden crown on my head.”

But the frog replied: ‘‘I do not care for your
dresses, your pearls and jewels, and your golden
crown. But if you will love me, and let me be
your companion and playmate ; if you will let
me sit at the table with you, eat from your plate
and drink from your golden cup, and sleep in
your little bed ; if you will promise me all this,
I will dive down into the water and bring up
your golden ball to you.”

“Oh, yes!” she answered, ‘I promise you
everything you ask, if you will only bring me
my ball again.” But she thought, ‘“‘ What is the
silly frog chattering about? He must sit in the
water with others like himself and croak, he
cannot be a companion to mankind.”

As soon as the frog had heard the promise,
his head dipped under the water, and he sank
out of sight. In a little while he appeared
again with the ball in his mouth, and threw it
upon the grass. The little princess was full of
joy. As soon as she saw her beautiful play-
thing she picked it up and ran quickly away.

“ Wait, wait,” cried the frog, “take me with
you, I cannot run as fast'as you can.” But his
loud croaking was in vain; the princess would
not listen to him, but hastened home and soon
forgot all.about the poor frog, who had to return
again to the water.

The next day when the princess was sitting
at the table with the king and his courtiers,

2

* she
said.

eating from her golden plate, she heard a strange
sound, splish, splash, splish, splash, as if some~
thing were creeping up the marble steps. Soon
a knock was heard at the door and a voice cried :

“Little princess, open the door for me.” At
this she ran to the door to see who was there ;
she opened it, and there sat the frog. As soon
as she saw him, she hastily closed the door, and
seated herself again at the table, looking quite
pale. The king saw at once that she was
frightened, and said: “My child, what are you
afraid of? Does a giant stand at the door to
carry you away ?”

‘‘Oh, no,” she answered, “it is no giant, but
an ugly old frog.”

“What does the frog want of you?”

“ Alas, dear father, when I was in the woods
yesterday playing by the spring, my golden bal!
fell into the water. And because I cried so
bitterly, the frog said he would get it for me if I
would promise him that he might live with me
and be my playmate; but I never thought he
could get out of the water and come here. Now
he is outside and wishes fo come in.”

Just then a second knock was heard at the
door, and a voice cried ;

“*Dear little princess, open for me,
That I may come in and live with thee.

Forget not the promise you made so free
By the pool ‘neath the shade of the linden tree.”

Then the king said, ‘‘ You must keep your
promise, my daughter, go now and open the °
door.” ;

She obeyed, and the frog hopped in, keeping
close to her feet until she reached her chair.
Then he cried, “lift me up by you.” She would
not do it until the king again commanded her
to do as the frog wished. He was no sooner
upon the chair, than he jumped upon the table.

“Now push your little golden plate nearer,”
he said, “that we may eat together.” She did
so, but every one saw that she did it unwillingly.

The frog enjoyed his dinner very much, but
the little princess could not swallow a mouthful.
At last he said, “I have eaten enough, I am
tired, and now you may carry me up to your


THE FROG PRINCE AND FAITHFUL HENRY.

little room and make your silken bed ready,
where we are to sleep.” Then the princess
began to cry and shudder, for how could she
have that cold frog, which she was afraid to
touch, sleep in her neat, beautiful little bed.

Then the king was angry and said, ‘‘ Any one
who has helped you in your need is not to be
despised afterward.” So with two fingers she
picked up the frog and carried him upstairs and
placed him in a corner of herroom. But as she
lay in her bed, the frog came creeping toward
her and said: ‘‘I am tired, I would like to sleep
as well as you, take me up by you or I will tell
your father.” This made the princess very
angry, and seizing the frog, she threw him with
all her strength against the wall, saying, ‘‘ Now
you will have rest, you ugly frog.”

But as he fell to the floor he was no longer
a frog, but a young prince with beautiful friendly
eyes. He told the princess how he had been
changed into a frog by a wicked witch, and no
one had the power to set him free from the
spring except herself.

At the king’s wish he became the playmate
of the princess, and years after, her husband.

The morning after the wedding a splendid
carriage drawn by eight white horses drove up

to the door. They had golden harness, and on
their heads white feathers, and standing behind
was the young king’s servant, Faithful Henry.
Faithful Henzy had grieved so much when his
master had been changed into a frog, that he
had fastened three iron bands around his heart
so that it would not break with sorrow.

The carriage was to take the young king and
his bride to their own kingdom. Faithful Henry
lifted both into the carriage, and then sprang to
his place behind, full of joy over the release of
his master. They had driven a little way,
when a loud crack was heard as if something
had broken. Turning around, the young king
cried: ‘‘What is the noise, Henry, is the car-
riage breaking ?”

And Faithful Henry replied:

‘« Fear not, naught threatens my bonny young king ;
The noise that you hear is the snap ofa ring,

That I bound round my heart till you should be free

From the pool ’neath the shade of the old linden tree.”

Again and still again the same sound was
heard, but it was only the bursting of the bands
of sorrow from the heart of Faithful Henry who _
was full of gladness now that his master was
free and happy.

Ete eAd AN Doi MOUSE=IN-PARTNERSHIP:

Once upon atime a cat made the acquaint-
ance of a mouse, and he said so much about his
love and friendship for her, that at last she con-
sented to live in the same house with him and
do his house-keeping.

One day the cat said to the mouse: “We
must get ready for winter, or we shall starve,
but you, little mouse, ought not to venture out
for fear you will get caught in a trap.”

The mouse followed this good advice and
staid at home, while the cat went out and bought
a little jar of fat. But they did not know where
to put it for safe-keeping ; at last, after he had
thought for a long time, the cat said: ‘I know

of no better place than in the church. Surely
: 8

no one will dare to take it away from there, and
we will not touch it until we have nothing else
left to eat.”

So the jar was brought safely to the church.
But in a short time the cat began to long for it,
and one day said to the mouse: “I have some-
thing to tell you, little mouse, my cousin has
invited me to the christening of her son. He
is a beautiful kitten, white, with yellow spots,
and Iam to stand god-father. So I will leave ¢
you to-day to take care of the house alone.” .

“Oh, yes! go by all means,” answered the
mouse,” and when you are eating the good
things, think of me. How I would like a drop
of the sweet red wine!”
THE CAT AND THE MOUSE IN PARTNERSHIP.







But this was not true. The cat had no cousin,
and he had not been invited to stand god-father.

He went straight to the church, crept slyly
up to the jar, and began to lick the fat. He ate
and ate until he had eaten the top all off. Then
he took a walk on the roofs of the town, thought
over what he had done, and at last stretched
himself out in the sun, and stroked his whiskers
while he thought of the jar of fat. As soon as
evening came, he returned home. ‘Oh! you
are back again,” said the mouse; ‘‘ you have
certainly had a delightful day.”

“It passed off very well,” answered the cat.

‘““What was the kitten named,” asked the
mouse. :

“ Top-off,” he dryly answered.

“Top-off!” cried the mouse; “that is indeed a
strange name. Is it common in your family ?”

‘““That does not matter,” said the cat, ‘It is
no worse than crumb-stealer, as your god-chil-
dren are called.”

4

Not long afterwards the cat was again seized
with a longing for the fat. So he said to the
mouse: ‘I must leave you once more to keep
house alone. I have been invited a second time
to stand god-father, and since the child has a
white ring around the neck, I cannot refuse to
go.” And the kind little mouse con-
sented. The cat crept away behind
the wall to the church again, and
ate the fat until the jar was half
empty. ‘‘ Nothing tastes so good as
what one eats by himself,” he said,
and he was well satisfied with his
day’s work.

When he reached home, the mouse
asked what name had been given to
this kitten.

“ falf-out,” answered the cat.

‘“ Half-out ! why what are you talking about ?
I never heard such a name in all my life. Vl
wager that name cannot be found in the calen-
dar.”

In a little while the cat's mouth watered again
at the thought of the dainties in the jar. ‘Good
things always go in threes,’ he said to the
mouse one day. ‘‘ Again I am invited to stand
god-father. This time the kitten is quite black,
with little white paws, not a white hair on its
whole body. This happens only once in two
years, so you will have to let me go.”

“ Top-off ! Falf-out!” answered the mouse,
‘they are such curious names, I do not know
what to think of them.”

“That is because you always stay at home.
You sit here in your soft, gray coat and long
tail, and these foolish whims get into your head.
It is always the way when one does not go out
in the daytime.”

The little mouse staid at home and put the
house in order, while the greedy cat went once
more to the church, and this time ate the fat
till the jar was quite clean.

‘When everything is eaten, then one can
rest,” he said, as he returned sleek and fat to
his home.

The mouse asked at once for the name of the
third kitten.
THE CAT AND THE MOUSE IN PARTNERSHIP.

“Tt will not please you,” said he, “ it
is called Adl-out.”

“ All-out/” cried the mouse, “that is
the most curious name of all. I have
never yet seen it in print. ‘ Adl-ont!
what does it mean?” She shook her
head, rolled herself up, and went to
sleep.

After this no one invited the cat to
stand godfather.

Winter came on, and nothing more
could be found outside to eat. Then
the mouse thought of the store they
had put by, and said: ‘‘Come, let us
go to our jar of fat now, it will taste
good to us.”

“Ves, indeed,” answered the cat, ‘it
will taste as if you were sticking your
fine little tongue out of the window.”

They set out at once, and when they
reached the church, there stood the jar
in the same place, but—empty.

“Ah!” said the mouse, ‘‘now I see what has
happened ; it is as clear as day; you are indeed
a true friend; you ate it all up when you stood
godfather, first, zop-off, then, half-out then A

“Will you be* quiet?” cried the cat. ‘One
word more and I will eat you.”





€

“ All out” was on the end of her tongue, and
before the poor mouse could stop herself, was
out. The cat made a spring, seized her, and
swallowed her.

And this you will learn is the way of the
world.

THE FAIRY-QUEEN AND THE WOODCUTTER’S CHILD.

NEAR a large forest lived a woodcutter with
his wife and only child, a little girl three years
“old. They were so poor they could scarcely
earn enough to eat from day to day.

One day the woodcutter went to his work in
the woods with a sad heart. As he was cutting
the trees, suddenly there stood before him a tall,
beautiful lady wearing a crown of shining stars
upon her head.

“T am the Fairy-queen,” she said, ‘‘ you are
poor and needy, bring me your child, I will take
her with me, care for her, and be a mother to
her.” The woodcutter obeyed, brought the
child, and gave her to the Fairy~queen, who
took her away to the happy land.

5

Here all went well. She had sugared bread
to eat, and fresh milk to drink; her dresses were
of gold, and she had little fairies to play with her.

When she was fourteen years old, the Fairy-
queen called her to her, and said, ‘‘ Dear child,
Iam going ona long journey. I leave the keys
to the thirteen doors of my palace in your care.
Twelve of the doors you may open and behold
the beautiful things that the rooms contain, but
the thirteenth, to which this little key belongs,
you are forbidden to enter. Obey me in this or
great sorrow will come to you.”

The maiden promised to be obedient, and as
soon as the Fairy-queen was gone, began to
visit the rooms of the palace. Each day she
THE FAIRY-QUEEN AND THE WOODCUTTER'S CHILD.

unlocked a room until she had been around to
the twelve. In every one sata fairy surrounded
by a bright light. All this splendor and bright-
ness pleased her very much, and the little fairies
who went with her were also very happy. Only
the forbidden door remained unopened, and she
felt a great desire to know what was hidden
behind it. So she said to the fairies: “I will
not open it wide, neither will I go in, but I will
just unlock it, so we can get a peep through
the crack.”

“Oh! no, no!” said the little fairies, ‘that
would bea sin. The Fairy-queen has forbid-
den it, and it would surely bring unhappiness.”

At this the maiden was silent; but the long-
ing in her heart would not be silent; it grew
stronger and stronger, and gave her ne rest.




‘
ae





RASA
VS MAS
x7

Wee
AIL





One day when her fairy companions were all
out of the palace, she thought; ‘‘Now I am all
alone, and can peep in, and no one will ever
know that I did it.”

She took the key of the room in her hand, put
it in the door, and turned it around. She had no
sooner done this than it sprang open, and she
beheld three fairies of dazzling beauty, seated
ona throne of fire. For a moment she stood
bewildered, gazing in astonishment. Then she
moved her finger through the bright light, and
the finger became like gold.

All at once she felt a great fear, and shutting
the door quickly, ran away. But the fear did
not leave her; whatever she did, her heart beat
violently and would not be still. Neither could
she get the gold off her finger, though she
washed and rubbed it with all her strength.

Not long after this the Fairy-queen returned






her



THE FAIRY-QUEEN’S COMMAND.

oO
THE FAIRY-QUEEN AND THE WOODCUTTER’S CHILD.

from her journey. She called the maiden to her
and asked for the keys to her palace. As she
placed them in her hand, the Fairy-queen looked
into the maiden’s eyes, and asked: ‘‘ Have you
opened the thirteenth door ?” ;

“No,” was the answer. Then the Fairy-queen
laid her hand on the girl’s heart, and felt the
loud beating, and she knew her command had
been disobeyed, and the door had been un-
locked.

She asked a second time: ‘‘ Have you opened
the thirteenth door?”

And again the answer came “ No.”

Then the Fairy—queen saw the finger that had
touched the fiery light, and become golden, and
she knew without doubt the maiden had sinned,
but she asked a third time: ‘‘ Have you opened
the thirteenth door?” But the maiden still
answered, ‘‘No.” Then the Fairy-queen said:
“You have not obeyed me, and you have not
told the truth; therefore you are no longer fit
for the Happy Land.”

At this a deep sleep came upon the maiden,
and. when she awoke, she lay upon the earth in
the midst of a great wilderness. She would
have called out, but her voice was dumb. She
sprang up and would have run away, but every
way she turned were thick thorn bushes, and
she could not break through them.

In the wilderness where she was shut in, stood
an old hollow tree. This was to be her home.
When night came she crept in and slept till
morning, and when it stormed and rained, the
old tree was her only shelter. Oh, it was a
miserable life, and when she thought of the
deautiful place she had left, and the fairies who
had played with her, she wept bitterly. Roots
and berries were her only food, and she had
to search for them as far as she could travel.

In autumn she gathered nuts and leaves and
carried them to the hollow tree. In winter the
nuts were her food, and when snow and ice
came she crept in among the leaves, like a poor
little animal, that she might not freeze.

It was not long before her clothes became
so cld and torn that they dropped into rags;

then she clothed herself in her long beautiful
7

hair. Thus one year passed after another, bring-
ing to the maiden no relief from her sorrow and
misery.

One spring when the trees had become green
again, the king of the country was hunting in
the forest. He had been chasing a deer, and it
had disappeared among the bushes that sur-
rounded the old hollow tree. The king sprang
from his horse, and tore the briars apart, cutting
a path with his sword. When at last he had
cleared a way, he saw, sitting under a tree, a
beautiful maiden, clothed from head to foot in
her own golden hair. He stood silent, gazing
at her in astonishment. Then he spoke, saying:
‘Who are you? and why are you sitting here
in this wilderness?” But she made no answer,
for she could not open her mouth to speak.

Again the king asked: “Will you go with
me to my castle?”

She nodded her head slightly, and the king
took her in his arms, and lifting her on his
horse, rode home with her. When she reached
the castle he gave her beautiful ciothing, and
everything she needed in abundance. And
though she could not speak, yet she was so
beautiful and charming, the king loved her with
all his heart, and it was not long before they were
married. A year passed away, and the queen
had a little son. One night as she was lying
in her bed, the Fairy-queen came to her and
said: ‘Will you now tell the truth and confess
that you opened the forbidden door? If you
will, I will open your mouth and speech shalk
be given you. If not, and you still deny the
sin, I will take your new-born babe with me.”

. The Fairy-queen allowed her to speak, but
her heart was hardened, and she said: ‘‘ No, I
did not open the forbidden door.” Then the
Fairy-queen took the babe from her arms and
disappeared with it.

The next morning when the child could not
be found, a murmur went up from the people
that the queen had destroyed her child. The
queen heard everything, but could not explain,
and the king loved her too well to believe any
evil of her.

Another year passed, and another son was
THE FAIRY-QUEEN AND THE WOODCUTTER’S CHILD.

born to the queen. In the night the Fairy-
queen entered again and asked: ‘ Will you con-
fess that you opened the forbidden door? If so,
I will give back your child, and your tongue
shall be loosed. If not, I will take this new-
born babe with me also.”

But the queen made answer: ‘No, I did not
open the forbidden door.” And the Fairy-
queen took the child from her arms, and
carried it away to the Happy Land.

The next morning, when the people learned
that a second child was missing, they raised an
angry cry against the queen, and said openly
that she had slain it, and the king’s counsellors
advised that she be tried for the crime. But
the king’s love for her was so great that he
would not believe the report, and ordered his

counsellors never to mention it on pain of death.
8














“ce
i
i



THE KING DISCOVERS THE MAIDEN.

The next year a beautiful little daughter was
born. In the night the Fairy-queen appeared
a third time and said to the queen: ‘“ Follow
me.” Taking the queen by the hand, she led
her to the Happy Land, and then showed her her
two oldest children, laughing and playing among
the stars. The queen’s joy was very great at

seeing them once more, and the Fairy-queen




THE FAIRY-QUEEN AND THE WOODCUTTER’S CHILD.

said to her: ‘Has not your heart softened yet?
If you will confess that you opened the forbid-
den door, I will give you back both your sons.”
But the queen made answer the third time:
“No, I did not open the forbidden door.”

Then the Fairy-queen allowed her to sink
down again to the earth, and she took from her
arms the third child. The next morning when
it became known that the third child had dis-
appeared, the people cried with a loud voice:
“The queen is an ogress; she has eaten her
children ; she must die.” And the king could
no longer silence his counsellors.

A trial was held, and as she could not defend
herself, the queen was condemned _to be burned
alive. The wood was brought, and laid in a

pile, the queen was bound to the stake, the fire
was lighted and began to burn around her.
Then the icy pride melted, and her heart was
moved to repent, and she thought: “Oh! if I
could only confess before my death that I opened
the door!” Then her voice came to her, and
she cried out: ‘“‘ Yes, Fairy-queen, I did it!”
And immediately it began to rain, and the fire
was put out. A bright light shone above, and
in it appeared the Fairy-queen with the two lost
sons at her side, and in her arms the baby-girl.

She spoke kindly to the queen, saying: “‘He
who repents and confesses his sins, shall be for-
given,” and she gave her the three children,
loosed her tongue, and promised her happiness
for the rest of her life.

eras COCK, ELE SCY tH EAN) Lie (CAT

A FATHER who was dying called his three
sons to him and gave the first a cock, the sec-
ond a scythe, and the third a cat.

“‘T am old,” he said, ‘“‘and death is near, but
before I leave you, I would like to provide for
you. I have no money to leave you, and what
I hav just given you seems of little value, but
it al) depends on how you use them. Take
these things and go to a country where they are
unknown, and your fortunés are made.”

After the father’s death, the eldest son set out
with his cock. But wherever he went the cock
was well known. As he approached the large
towns, he could see it sitting on the tall towers,
turning in the wind, and as he passed through
the little villages, he heard more than one crow-
ing. Noone would wonder over such a familiar
bird, and he could not understand how he was
to make his fortune by it.

But at last he reached an island where the
people had never heard of a cock, and they also
had no division of time. They only knew when
it was morning and evening, but in the night, if
they did not sleep, they had no way of finding
out the time.

“ Look,” said he to the people, showing them
9 ‘

the cock, ‘‘ what a proud bird this is; he has a
ruby crown on his head, and wears spurs like
a knight; he calls out the hour three times in
the night, and the last time is always the hour
of sunrise; also if he crows on a clear day,
you may rest assured there will be a change of
weather.”

The people were so pleased that not one of
them slept all night, but listened for the crow-
ing of the cock. When they heard it call out
the time loudly and plainly at two, four, and
six o'clock, they were delighted, and asked the
traveller the next morning if it were for sale,
and how much he would like for it.

«As much gold as an ass can carry,” said the
man.

“A small sum for such a valuable creature,”
said the people, and they collected the money

‘and gave him willingly what he asked.

When he reached home with his riches, his
brothers were greatly astonished, and the second
said: ‘I think I will go now and see if I shall
have as good luck with my scythe.”

He travelled a long distance without any pros-
pect of success. In every place he met farmers
who carried as good a scythe on their shoulders
SHE COCK.
as he had. But finally he, too, arrived at an
island where the people had never seen a scythe.
When the grain was ripe, they planted cannons
around the field and shot the grain down. But
this was an awkward proceeding, often they shot
entirely over the grain, at other times they fired
through it in such a manner as to lose the greater
part, and worse than all was the constant noise.
The man took his scythe and went out into the

field, and so quickly and silently did he mow.

the grain, that the people watched him with
mouth and eyes wide open. They were willing
to give him whatever he asked for the scythe,
and he received as much gold as a horse could
carry.

Now the third brother wished to try his for-
tune with his cat. It happened to him exactly
as it had with his brothers. There was no place
on the mainland where there were not cats, and
oftentimes they were so numerous that all the
young kittens were drowned as‘soon as they
were born. At last he sailed for an island, and
there, fortunately for him, the people had never
seen a cat. The mice were so numerous that
they had the upper hand, and danced on the
tables and chairs whether the people were at
home or not. There were loud complaints
against this nuisance, but the king was unable
to do anything for them. The mice could be
heard squealing and scampering in every corner
of his palace, and they gnawed everything their
teeth could lay hold of.

When the cat arrived she began to hunt them.
She cleared the mice from two rooms, and the
people begged the king to buy the wonderful
animal that could rid the kingdom of its pest.

The king was willing and gave the man a mule
heavily laden with gold. Then the third brother
returned home with the largest treasure of
them all.

The cat had a fine time in the royal palace,
and killed more mice than could be counted.
Finally she became hot and tired with her work,
and wanted a drink; so she stood still, twisted
her head around in the air, and cried: ‘ Miau,
miau!” When the king heard this strange cry,
he was frightened, and called all his people
together, but they too were so frightened when
they heard puss mew, that they all rushed out
of the castle. Then the king held a council as
to what they had better do. It was finally de-
cided to send a herald to the cat, and ask her
to leave the palace, or she would be driven out

by force.
‘““We would rather have the plague of the
mice,” said the councillors—‘‘ we are used to

that evil—rather than sacrifice our lives to such
a monster.”

A young nobleman was chosen as herald, and
he entered the palace, and asked the cat if she
were willing to leave the castle. But the cat
who was now thirstier than ever, cried loudly:
‘“Miau, miau!”

The nobleman understood this: ‘‘ Not now,
not now!” and carried the answer to the king.

“Now,” said the councillors, ‘‘we shall use
force.” Cannons were brought, and the palace
was set on fire. When the fire reached the room
where.the cat was, she sprang through the win-
dow and escaped without harm, but the be-
siegers never ceased their work until the palace
was levelled to the ground.

&TF- 1 COUED-ONLY LEARN DOsSHUDDERS

A FATHER had two sons, the elder of which
was quick and bright, and knew how to make
himself handy and useful, but the youngest was
a dull boy, who could not learn or understand
anything, and people would say of him: ‘He
will be only a burden to his father.” Ifan errand

was to be done, the elder one was always called
10

upon to do it, but if it was in the night, and the
road led through a church-yard or past a lonely
place, he would say: ‘‘Oh! no, father, I cannot
go there, it makes me shudder,” for he was
a coward. Or if in the evening, when they sat
by the fire, and stories were told that made the
flesh creep, he would cry out ‘Oh, don't tell


fF [ COULD ONLY LEARN TO SHUDDER.

that! it makes me shudder.” But the younger
son would sit in the corner and listen to every-
thing, but could not understand what it all
meant, and would say to himself: “He always
says, ‘That makes me shudder.’ I never shudder.
That must be something I don’t understand.”

One day, the father said to him: “‘ Hark, you
there in the corner, to what I say. You too
must learn to earn your living. See how your
brother works, while you are good for nothing.”

“Yes, father,” the boy answered, “I will
gladly learn to do something. But if it does
not make any difference, I should like to learn
what it is to shudder. That is something I do
not know anything about.”

His brother laughed as he heard this, and
thought to himself: ‘“What a dunce my brother
is, and they say, ‘the boy is father of the man,’
what will he be when grown? He will never
be able to earn his living.”

The father sighed, and said: “You will learn
soon enough to shudder, but that will not earn
your living.”

A short time after this the village sexton
came in for a friendly call, and the father told
him of his trouble, how his younger son was
not skilled in any kind of work, that he knew
nothing and could learn nothing. ‘Just think,”
said he, ‘‘ when I asked him how he would like
to earn his living, he answered he only wished
to learn to shudder.”

‘Tf that is all,’ answered the sexton, ‘‘he can
learn that with me. Let him come to me I will
soon satisfy him.”

So he took the boy home with him, and had
him ring the church bell.

He had been there a couple of days, when
the sexton called him up in the middle of the
night, and told him to go to the church and ring
the bell. ‘‘ You shall soon learn to shudder,” he
thought, as he quickly left the house.

The boy was soon in the tower, and as he
turned around to.seize the bell-rope, he saw
standing on the steps below a white figure. |

““Who’'s there?” he called out. But the fig-
ure gave no answer, neither made the slightest
- motion.

il

“Answer me,” cried the boy, “or else take
yourself off; you have no business here in the
night.”

But the sexton stood motionless, thinking he
would make the boy believe he was a ghost.

The boy called a second time: ‘‘What do
you want? If you are an honest man, speak, or
I will throw you down stairs.” But the sexton
thought: ‘He does not mean that,” and stood
as silent as if he were made of stone.

The boy called to him a third time, but there
wasnoreply. Then making a spring, he pushed
the ghost down the stairs with so much force
that he rolled ten feet, and then lay quiet in
the corner. After this the boy went back and
rang the bell, returned home, and without a
word, went to bed and fell asleep.

The sexton’s wife waited a long time for her
husband, but he did not return. Then she be-
came alarmed, woke the boy, and asked: “Do
you know where my husband is staying? He
went into the town before you did.”

-“ No,” answered the boy; ‘‘but I saw some
one standing on the steps, and as he would not
answer me, nor go away, I took him for a thief
and pushed him down stairs. I left him lying
there, go and you will see whether it is your
husband. Ishould be very sorry to have treated

-him in this manner.”

. The woman ran off, and there in the corner
she found her husband, crying and groaning,
for his leg was broken. She carried him home,
and then ran with loud outcries to the boy’s fa-
ther: ‘‘ Your son has done us great harm. He
has thrown my husband down the steps and
broken his leg. Take the good-for-nothing out
of our house.”

_ The father was terrified, and came running
to get his son. ‘What do you mean by such
wicked tricks? You bring only harm to your-
self and others,” he said.

“Father,” said the boy, ‘listen! I am not to
blame for this. The sexton stood on the steps
in the night like one who would do a wicked
deed. I did not know who it- was, and three
times I called to him, begging him to speak or

else go away.”
z
LF I COULD ONLY LEARN TO SHUDDER.



























‘ttre SAW STANDING ON THE STEPS A WHITE
FIGURE.”

“ Alas!” said the father, “you will only
be a trouble to me all my life. Get out
of my sight, I never want to see you
again.”

“Yes,” father, I am willing to go,” ans-
wered the boy. “Only let me wait until
morning, then I will go and learn what it is to
shudder. Surely then I shall know something
by which I can earn my living.”

“Learn what you like,” said the father, “it is
12

all the same to me. Here is fifty dollars,
take it, and go out into the wide world,
but do not shame me, by telling any one
who you are or who your father is.”

“Yes, father, if that is all you ask, I
can do that very easily.”

As soon as it was morning, the boy
put the fifty dollars in his pocket, and
went out upon the highway. As he walked
along, he kept saying to himself: ‘If I
could only learn to shudder—if I could
only learn to shudder.” Presently a man
came along, who heard what the boy was
saying to himself. He waited until they
came to a place where they could see a
gallows, then he said: ‘‘Do you see that
tree there where seven men have wedded
the ropemaker’s daughter, and learned to
fly ? Sit down under it, and wait till night,
and you will know what it is to shudder.”

“Oh! is that all I have todo? That
is very simple. If I learn to shudder as




fF £ COULD ONLY LEARN TO SHUDDER.

quickly as that, I will give you my fifty dollars.
Come to me early to-morrow morning.”

The boy ran off toward the gallows, sat down
under it, and waited till evening. Then he

became chilly and made a fire; but in the night -

the wind blew so cold, that, in spite of the fire,
he could not keep warm. As the wind blew
the bodies of the seven men against each other,
and they swung to and fro, he thought to him-
self: “You would be cold down here by the
fire, you must be nearly frozen up there.” His
heart was full of pity, so he took the ladder,
climbed up the gallows, untied the ropes, and
brought all seven of the men down. Then he
stirred the fire, and seated them around it, that
they might warm themselves. But they sat
there stiff and stark until their clothing caught
fire. Then the boy said: “If you cannot take
care of yourselves, I will hang you up again.”

But the dead could not hear him, they said
nothing, and let their rags burn. Then he be-
came angry, and cried: “If you will not listen
to what I say, I cannot help you. I am not
going to burn with you,” and he hung the bodies
up again in a row. Then he lay down by his
fire and fell asleep. In the morning the man
came to him for the fifty dollars, saying: ‘‘ Now
you have learned to shudder.”

‘* No,” the boy answered, “how could I learn
that here? Those men up there have not opened
their mouths, and were so stupid when I seated
them by the fire, that they let the rags on their
bodies burn.”

The man saw that he would not carry away
the fifty dollars that day, and he went away
saying: ‘“‘ Heisthe strangest person I ever met.”

The boy went on his way, and soon began
again to say to himself: ‘Alas! if I could only
learn to shudder!—if I could only learn to
shudder!”

A driver walking along behind him, heard
him and said: ‘‘ Who are you?”

‘“‘T don’t know,” replied the boy.

‘Where did you come from ?”

“T don’t know.”

““Who is your father ?”

“T can’t tell you.”

13

“What were you grumbling to yourself
about?”

“Oh!” said the boy, ‘‘I want to learn to
shudder, but no one can teach me.”

“Stop your stupid joking,” said the driver.
“Come, go with me, and I will see that you are

_provided for.”

The boy went with the driver, and at evening
they came to an inn where they were to spend
the night. As he entered the room, he said
again to himself: “If I could only learn to
shudder!”

The landlord, who happened to hear him,
laughed and said: “If that is what you want,
here is a good chance to learn it.”

“Oh! be still,” said his wife. “So many lives
have already been lost in trying to satisfy their
curiosity, it would be a shame for these beautiful
eyes never to see daylight again.”

But the boy said: ‘‘ Though it is so difficult,
yet I would like to learn it at once; for it was
for this I left my home.” He gave the landlord
no rest until he told him the following story:

‘‘ Not far from here stands an enchanted castle
where you can surely learn to shudder. The
king has promised his daughter in marriage to
any one who will venture to sleep in the castle
three nights. She is the most beautiful maiden
the sun ever shone upon, and there are also
great treasures hidden in the castle. These are
guarded by wicked spirits, but if you succeed,
the gold will be set free, and you will be a rich
man. Many have entered the castle, but not
one has ever come out again.”

The next morning the youth went to the
king and said: “If you will allow me, I would
like to watch three nights in the enchanted
castle.”

The king looked at him, and was pleased
with him, and said: ‘‘ You may ask for three
things to take with you into the castle, but they
cannot be living creatures.”

The boy answered, “If you please, I would
like a fire, a turning-lathe, and a cutting-board
with a knife.”

The king had these things taken to the castle
for him during the day. When night came, he
IF I COULD ONLY LEARN TO SHUDDER.

went up to the castle, made a bright fire in one
of the rooms, placed the cutting-board with the
knife, near it, and sat down on the turning-lathe.
“Oh! if I could only learn to shudder!” he
said, “but I will not learn it here.”
midnight his fire needed stirring. As he stooped
over to blow it, a cry came suddenly from one
corner of the room: “Ow! miouw! miouw!
How cold we are!”

‘“What fools you are then,’ he said, “If you
are cold, come and sit down by my fire, and
warm yourselves.”

As he said this, there came leaping from the

corner, two large black cats. They sat down by .

him, one on either side, and stared at him with
wild, fiery eyes.
become warm, they said: ‘Comrade, will you
have a game of cards?”

“Why shouldn't I?” replied the boy.
first you must show your paws.”

At this they stretched out their claws. “Oh!”
said he, ‘‘what long nails you have! Wait a
minute, I must cut them off first.” And he
seized them by the neck, threw them upon the
cutting-board, and fastened them down securely,

“ Now that I have seen your fingers, I have
no desire to play cards with you,” he said. Then
he killed them and threw them out of the win-
dow into the ditch. He had no sooner got rid
of these two, and seated himself by his fire,
than there rushed out from every corner and
side of the room black cats and black dogs in a
fiery chain. They howled fiercely, jumped upon
the fire, and scattered it about the room, as if
they would put it out. He looked on quietly
for a while, then he became angry, and seizing
his cutting-knife, cried: ‘‘ Away with you, you
black rabble!” He struck with his knife in
every direction; part of them ran away, the
rest he killed and threw into the moat.

When he came back, he blew the sparks of
fire into a blaze, and warmed himself. After a
while he became so sleepy he could not hold
his eyes open any longer. He looked around
for a place to lie down, and saw in a corner a
large bed.

“That just suits me,” he said, and lay down
14

* But

Towards -

In a little while, when they had.

to go to sleep. He had no sooner closed his
eyes than the bed began to move of itself, and
travelled all around the castle. ‘This is very
good,” said he, “ only I would like to go faster.”
At this the bed rolled away as if it were drawn
by six horses; over stones and steps it flew, till
suddenly, hop! hop! over it went, bottom up-
wards. It lay upon the boy like a mountain,
but he threw the blankets and pillows into the
air, climbed out, and saying, ‘‘Now you may
travel where you like,” went back to his fire, lay
down and went to sleep.

In the morning the king came to the castle,
and when he saw the boy lying on the floor, he
thought the wicked goblins had killed him. ‘ It
is a shame this beautiful youth should die,” he
said.

The boy heard him, and sprang up, saying:
“Tt has not come to that yet.” The king was
astonished, but very glad that he was still alive,
and asked him how the night had gone with
him.“ Very well,” he answered. ‘One night
has passed, the other two will also.”

When he returned to the inn, the landlord
could hardly believe his eyes.

“T never expected to see you alive again,” he
said. ‘ Have you learned yet what it is to shud-
der?”

“No,” was the reply, “it is of no use.
if some one could only tell me!”

The second night he went again to the old
castle, and seating himself by the fire, began his
old song, “If I could only learn to shudder !”

As midnight drew near, he heard a noise as
of something tumbling, first soft, then louder,
then for a little time all was still. At last, with
a loud scream, there came tumbling down the
chimney half the body of a man.

“ Hey-day!” he cried, ‘“ That is too little, we
want another half.”

At this the noise began again. A howling
and yelling was heard, and then the other half
fell down.

“Wait,” said he, “I will stir up the fire a
little.”

He did this, and then looking round, he saw
the two parts had joined themselves together, .

Oh!


IF I COULD ONLY LEARN TO SHUDDER.



‘“‘THE BED BEGAN TO MOVE OF ITSELF.”

and that a hideous man was seated on his bench,
“T did not bargain for that,” said the youth,
“the seat is mine.” The man tried to push him
away, but the boy would not let him, and giving
him a powerful push, dislodged him, and he sat
down in his old place.

Soon more men came tumbling down the
chimney, one after the other. They brought
with them nine thigh bones and two skulls.
They set up the bones, and then began to play
nine-pins. As the boy watched them, he also
wanted to- play, and called out: ‘Hey there!
may I play with you?”

“Yes,” they answered, “if you have any
money.”

‘Plenty of money,” he said; ‘but your balls
are not perfectly round.”

So he took the skulls, and placing them in
his turning lathe, turned them until they were

round.
15

“ There,” said he, ‘‘now they will roll better.
Hey-day! isn’t this fine!” He played with
them, and lost some of his money, but when
the clock struck twelve every man had disap-
peared. Then he lay down and slept quietly.

The next morning the king came to inquire
after him.

« And how has it gone with you this time?”
he asked.

“T played nine-pins, and lost a little money,”
the youth answered.

‘Was there nothing to make you shudder?”

“Shudder?” said the boy, “I have had a
merry time. Oh! if I only knew how to shud-
der!” %

The third night he sat down again on his
bench by his fire, saying to himself quite fret-
fully, “TfI could only shudder !”

When it grew late, six tall men came into the

room, bearing a coffin.
fF I COULD ONLY LEARN TO SHUDDER.

“Ha! ha! That is certainly my little cousin
who died a few days ago,” cried the boy, and he
beckoned with his finger, and said, ‘‘ Come, lit-
tle cousin, come.”

They placed the coffin on the floor. He went
up to it, and taking off the cover, saw lying
within a dead man. He felt of his face, but it
was cold as ice.

“Wait,” he said, “I will warm you a little,”
and going to the fire he warmed his hands, and
laid them upon the dead man’s face, but it was
still cold. Then he took him out of the coffin,
sat down by the fire, and holding him on his
lap, rubbed his arms that the blood might cir-

-culate once more. But it was of no use. Then
the boy remembered that if two lie in bed to-
gether, they warm each other. So he brought
the dead man to the bed, covered him up, and
lay down by him. In a little while the body
became warm, and began to move.

“See, little cousin, how I have warmed you!”
he said. :

But the dead man raised himself up and cried:
“Now I will strangle you!”

“What!” said the boy, is that the thanks I
get? You shall go back at once to your coffin,”
and he lifted him up, threw him into the coffin,
and fastened the cover. Then the six men
came in, lifted up the coffin, and carried it away.
“This does not make me shudder. I should
never learn here, if I staid all my life,” he said.
At that moment a man walked in. He was
taller than all the others and more frightful,
but he was old and had a long white beard.

“Oh, you weak, silly creature!” he cried.
“You shall soon learn what it is to shudder, for
you shall die.”

““Not so fast,” said the boy, “if Iam to die,
I would like to know by what means.”

“TI will seize you at once,” cried the hideous
creature.

‘Softly, softly, don’t be so sure; I am as
strong as you are, and indeed, I think I am
stronger.”

‘We will see about that,” said the old man.”
“If you are stronger than I am, I will let you

go. Come, let us have the trial.”
16

He led the boy through a dark hall to a black~
smith’s forge. Seizing an axe, with one blow
he drove the anvil into the earth.

“T can do better than that,” said the boy,
taking up the axe, and going to another anvil.

The old man followed to watch every move.
He stood so close to the anvil, his long white
beard rested upon it.

The boy lifted the axe, and with one stroke,
split the anvil in two, and fastened the old man’s
beard in the crevice.

‘Now I've got you!” cried the boy. ‘ Now
you must die,” and he seized an iron bar and
beat the old man till he cried for mercy, and

“promised to give him great riches.

The boy drew the axe from the anvil, and set
the old man free. True to his word, he led him
to a cellar in which were stored three chests full
of gold.

** Of these,” he said, ‘‘ one is for the poor, one
for the king, and one for yourself.” Just then it
struck twelve, the old man disappeared, and the
boy was left standing alone in the dark.

‘“‘T must get out of here some way,” he said.
He groped round, found the way to his room,
and lay down by his fire and went to sleep.

The next morning, the king came and asked:
“Have you learned now what it is to shudder?”

“No,” he answered, “what is it? My dead
cousin was here, and a long-bearded man came
and showed me where great sums of money were
hidden; but no one told me what it was to
shudder.”

Then the king said: ‘‘ The castle is now free
from the wicked spell, the gold is yours, and you
shall marry my daughter.”

“That is all very good,” the youth answered,
“but I do not know yet what it is to shudder.”

The gold was brought from the castle, and not
long after the marriage was celebrated. But
the young prince was not perfectly happy,
though he loved his bride dearly. He would
often say: ‘Oh! if I could only learn what it is.
to shudder.”

At last the princess became troubled about it,.
and one of her maids said: ‘I will help you. I
will show you how to make him shudder.” She
JF I COULD ONLY LEARN TO SHUDDER.



THE OLD MAN’S BEARD IS

went down to the brook that flowed through the
garden, and brought up a pail full of water con-
taining little fish. At night when the prince
was asleep, his wife drew the cover from him,
and threw the cold water and little fishes over

CUNNING

THERE was once a cook named Grethel, who
had shoes with red heels and when she wore
them out she would dance hither and thither,
‘thinking to herself: ‘I am indeed a beautiful
maiden.” When she came home, she would
take a sip of wine, and that usually gave her an
appetite, and then she would taste of all the
best things she had cooked, saying : “‘ Indeed,
the cook shouid know how her food tastes.”

One day her master said to her: ‘“ Grethel, I
expect a visitor this evening ; cook me two of
the finest fowls for supper.” ‘I will begin at
once, master,” she said.

So she killed the chickens, picked, and dressed
17

FASTENED IN THE ANVIL,

him, so that they flapped and wriggled all
around him. The prince woke up, calling
loudly ; .

“Oh, how I shudder! what can it be, dear
wife? Ah! now I know what it is to shudder.”

GRETHEL.

them, and towards evening put them over the
fire to roast. They became brown and tender,
but the guest did not arrive.

Then Grethel called to the master: “If the
guest does not come soon, I must take the fowls
from the fire. It is ashame not to have them
eaten when they are soft and tender.”

“JT will go myself and find him,” said the
master.

When his back was turned, Grethel took the
spit from the fire, and thought: “I have stood
by the fire so long, I am hot and thirsty. Who
knows when they will come? I will run down
cellar and get a sip of wine.”
CUNNING GRETHEL.

She ran down cellar, and filling a cup, pro-
posed her own health, and drank the wine
without stopping. ‘One swallow of wine calls
for another,” she said, and poured out another
cupful, which she drank eagerly. Then she
went back, placed the chickens back on the fire,
spread some butter over them, and turned the
spit round merrily. How good they smelled:
There was no other way, she must try them, so
she dipped her finger in the gravy and tasted it.

“Oh! how good those fowls are!” she satd.

“It is a shame not to have them eaten now.”

She ran to the window to see if her master
was coming yet: but no one was in sight. She
went back to the fowls: ‘‘ One wing is burning ;
it would be better for me to eat it,” she thought.
So she cut off the wing and ate it. It tasted so
good, that when she had finished, she thought:
‘‘T had better cut off the other one too, or the
master will notice that something is missing.”

When she had eaten the other wing, she went
to the window to look for the master and _ his
guest, but she saw no one. ‘‘Who knows,” she
thought, ‘‘ whether they will come at all? Per-
haps they are having their supper at an inn.”
Then she said aloud: ‘‘ Heigh ho! Grethel, be of
good cheer. Drink a little more wine, and then
finish the fowl. Why should these good things
be allowed to spoil ?”

So after taking another drink of wine, she ate
the fowl with great relish. When she had fin-
ished the one, she looked at the other, and
thought: ‘‘ Where one is, the other must be

- also, the two belong together. I think if I had
another drink of wine, I could eat the other
easily.”

EEE WOE AND IE

THERE was once an old goat who had seven
little kids, and she loved them as dearly as a
mother loves her children. One day she wanted
to go to the woods and get some food for them,
so She called all seven to her, and said: ‘‘ Dear

children, Tam going out into the woods; be on
18

She drank another cup of wine, and the

second fowl followed the first. She had hardly
finished, when the master came running in.

“ Be quick, Grethel,” he cried; ‘‘ The visitor
will soon be here.”

Then he went to look at the table to see if
it was properly set, and taking up the knife,
with which he would carve the fowls, began to
sharpen it on the steel. Just then the guest
arrived, and knocked softly and politely at the
house door. Grethel went to open it, and see-
ing the guest, put her finger on her lips, and
said: ‘‘Hush, hush! Go away quickly; you
must escape my master, or you will meet with
a great misfortune. He has invited you here
this evening for no other purpose than to cut
off your ears. Listen, you can hear him sharp-
ening his knife.”

The visitor heard the sound, and rushing
down the steps, ran away. Grethel was not
idle ; she ran crying to her master: ‘‘A pretty
guest you invited here.”

‘““Why, what is the matter?” he asked.

“He has taken both the fowls that I har
all ready to be brought on the table, and run
away with them.”

“That is a nice way to treat one,” said the
master, grieving that he should lose such beau-
tiful fowls. “If he had even left me the smallest
one that I might have had one for my supper.”

He went out, and called to the guest, but he
ran as if he did not hear him. The master fol-:
lowed him, with the knife still in his hand,
calling: ‘Only one, only one!” meaning one
fowl. But the guest thought he meant only one
of his ears, and ran as if fire was chasing him
until he safely reached his home.

SE VEN ber E PEGS

your guard against the wolf. If he gets in, he
will eat you hide and hair. The wicked fellow
will try in every way to deceive you, but you
can easily tell him by his rough voice and black
feet.”

‘‘ Dear mother,” said the little kids, “do not








_ THE WCLF AND THE SEVEN LITTLE KIDS.

worry about us; we will be very careful not to
Tet the wolf in.”

So the old one bleated a ‘‘Good-bye,” and
went away contentedly.

It was not long before some one knocked at
the door, and cried; ‘“‘Open the door, dear
children, your mother is here and has brought
something nice for each one of you.”

But the little kids knew by the rough voice
that it was the wolf, and said: ‘We will not
open the door for you. You are not our mother;
she has a fine, sweet voice, but yours is coarse
and harsh; you are a wolf.”

So he left them and going to a store, bought a
large piece of chalk, which he ate to make: his
voice soft. Then he came back and knocked
at the hut-door again, and cried: ‘Open the
door, dear children, your mother is here, and
has brought something for each one of you.”

But the wolf had put his black paws on the
window-sill, and the kids seeing them, cried:
<‘We will not open the door for you; our mother
has not big, black feet; you are a wolf.”

Then the wolf ran to a baker's and said: “I
have hurt my foot, please put some dough
on it.”

As soon as the baker had covered his foot
with dough, he ran to the miller and said:
«« Sprinkle my foot with white flour.”

The miller thought: ‘The wolf wants to de-
ceive some one,” and hesitated, but the wolf
said: ‘If you don’t do it, I will eat you.”

This frightened the miller, and he powdered
his foot with flour. Such is mankind.

Then the wicked wolf went a third time to
the hut-door, knocked, and cried: “Open the
door, children, your mother has come home, and
has brought each one of you something nice
from the woods.”

“Show us your feet first,” said the little kids,

“that we may know whether you are our
mother.” The wolf placed his paw on the win-
dow-sill, and when they saw it was white, they
thought it was really their mother, and opened
the door. But imagine their fright and surprise
when the wolf entered. They ran in every direc-

tion trying to hide. One jumped under the
"19

table, another into the bed, a third into the oven,
a fourth into the kitchen, a fifth into the cup-
board, a sixth under the wash-tub, and the
seventh into the clock-case. But the wolf found
them and made short work of eating them. One
after another disappeared down his throat, all
but the youngest one hidden in the clock-case,
which he did not find.

After he had satisfied his appetite, he strolled
out, and lying down on the green grass under
a tree, fell asleep. Not long after the old goat
came home from the woods. But what a sight
met her eyes! The door stood wide open; table,
chairs, and benches were upset; the wash-tub
lay in pieces; blankets and pillows were thrown
from the bed. Not a child was to be found;
one after another she called by name, but not
one answered, till she came to the name of the
youngest, when a soft little voice said: ‘ Dear
mother, I am hidden in the clock-case.” She
helped the little kid out, and heard how the
wolf had come and eaten all her other children.
When she heard this, the old goat wept bitterly
for her lost children. After a while they went
out together for a walk. When they came to
the meadow, they saw the wolf lying on the
grass under a tree, snoring so loudly that the
branches trembled. The old goat, regarding
him from every side, thought she saw some-
thing move in his well-filled stomach.

“Can it be,” she thought, ‘that my children
that he swallowed for his supper are alive!”
She immediately sent the little kid home for
scissors, needle, and thread.

She had scarcely cut a little place in his skin,
before a kid stretched out its head. She cut a
little further, and out it jumped, then another
and another, until all were out, as lively as ever,
for the wolf had not harmed them at all, having
in his greediness swallowed them whole. Oh!
it was a happy time! The little kids hugged
their mother, and skipped about iike a tailor on
his wedding-day.

But the old goat said to them: ‘‘Go now and
get me some stones, and we will fill this wicked
fellow’s stomach before he wakes up.”

So the little kids ran in great haste and
THE WOLF AND THE SEVEN LITTLE KIDS.





, 4
‘a

Te

Ne
A Of

ae > fs
a
a as

‘© 4 SOFT LITTLE VOICE SAID: ‘DEAR MOTHER, I AM HIDDEN IN THE CLOCK-CASE.’”

brought stones which they put in the wolf’s
stomach, as many as it could hold. Then the
old goat quickly sewed up the slit, and the
wolf neither woke nor moved.

When the wolf had slept enough he got up,
and as the stones in his stomach had made him
very thirsty, he went to a spring to get a drink.
As he walked along, the stones began to move,

rolling and rattling against each other, and he
cried out:

‘‘Rumble, rumble! rattle, rattle!

Hear the noise of those little bones!

One would think, by the din and clatter,

That all had been turned into stones.”

As he stooped over the spring to drink. the
heavy stones inside pushed him forward, and he
fell in and was drowned.

Then the seven little kids ran crying: ‘‘ The
wolf is dead! the wolf is dead!” and they danced
for joy with their mother around the spring.

‘EEE SGOOSE, GIRE,

THERE once lived an oid queen whose hus-
band had been dead many years, but she had
one child, a beautiful daughter. When she was
grown, she was betrothed to a king’s son living
many miles away, and when the time came for
her to be married and go away to a strange land,
her mother gave her many costly jewels, gold

and silver vessels, furniture and dresses, in short,
20

everything that belonged toa royal bridal treas-
ure, for the old queen loved her daughter dearly.
She also gave her a waiting-maid to accompany
her on the journey and conduct her to the bride-
groom. Then she provided each with a horse,
but that of the princess was called Falada, and
could talk.

When the parting-hour came, the queen went
THE GOOSE GIRL.

to her sleeping-room, and taking a little knife,
cut her finger till it bled. She held a white
napkin under it, and let three drops of blood
fall on it; then folding it up, she said to her
daughter: ‘Take this, dear child, and preserve
it carefully, for you will have great need of it on
the way.” The maiden put the napkin in her
bosom, and bidding her mother a sorrowful fare-
well, mounted her horse, and rode away to her
intended bridegroom.

After she had ridden about an hour, she
became very thirsty, and said to her maid:
<‘Get down, and dip me a little water in the
gold cup which you brought with you; I would
like something to drink very much.”

“If you are thirsty, get down and drink from
the brook; I am not going to be your servant,”
said the maid. The princess dismounted, and
bending over the stream, drank, for she dared
not ask for the goldencup. As she did this she
sighed: ‘Alas! dear God,” and the three drops
of bloodreplied: ‘If your mother knew of this,
it would break her heart.”

But the princess, who was humble and patient,
said nothing, and again mounted her horse.
They rode several miles, and then as the day
was warm, and they were riding in the hot sun,

the princess again became thirsty. She had’

forgotten the saucy words of her maid, and
when they came to a running stream, she said:
“Get down and bring me some water in my
golden cup.”

But the maid replied more proudly than
before: ‘If you would like a drink, get it for
yourself; I am not your servant.”

As the princess was very thirsty, she knelt a
second time over the water, weeping as she did
so, and saying: ‘Alas! dear God.” The drops
of blood replied: ‘If your mother knew of
this, it would break her heart.”

As she bent over the water to drink, the little
napkin fell out of her dress and floated away
on the stream, without her seeing it in her
sorrow and trouble. But the waiting-maid saw
it, and was delighted, for now the princess would
be powerless in her hands, and she could do with

her as she liked. As the princess was about to
21

mount her horse again, the waiting-maid said :
“Falada belongs to me; and you shall have
my horse,” and the princess was obliged to make
the change. Then the maid commanded her to
take off her royal dress, and put on her own
common one, and finally she made her swear
before heaven that when she reached the royal
court, she would not reveal what had taken place.
This oath she was obliged to take or she would
have been killed on the spot. But Falada saw
and heard everything, and she would not forget.

The maid mounted Falada, and the true bride
the other horse, and in this manner they con-
tinued their journey until they came to the royal

. palace.

There was great rejoicing over their arrival ;
the king’s son came out to meet them, lifted the
waiting-maid from her horse, as if she were his
promised bride, and led her up the steps, while
the true princess was left standing in the court-
yard. Presently the old king looked out of the
window and saw her standing there. As she
looked so delicate and beautiful, he hastened
away to ask the bride who it was she had brought
with her and left standing in the court below.

“Oh! that is a maid I brought with me for
company. Give her something to do that she
does not become idle,” was the reply.

But the king had no work for her, and knew
not what to give her to do, until suddenly he
thought: ‘She can help the little boy watch
the geese.” So the princess and true bride helped
little Conrad, as he was called, take care of the
geese.

One day not long after their arrival, the false
bride said to the prince: ‘Dearest, will you do
mea favor?” -

‘With pleasure,” he replied.

“T beg of you to call the executioner, and
have him kill the horse that brought me here,
for it vexed me all the way.” She was afraid
Falada might speak and betray her.

So now it was decided that the faithful horse
must die. When the princess heard of it, she
went to the executioner and promised him a
gold piece if he would do a favor for her.

In the town was a large gloomy arch through

”
THE GOOSE GIRL.

which the princess drove the geese every morn-
ing and evening, and she said to him: ‘I would
like to have the head of Falada hung under this
dark arch, that I may see it every time I pass
through.” He promised to do this, and when
Falada’s head was cut off, he nailed it firmly
under the arch.
Early the next morning as she and Conrad

passed under the arch, she said to the head:

‘‘O, Falada, hanging high!”
and the head replied:

‘*Q, young princess, passing by !

If thy fate thy mother knew,

Her fond heart would break for you.”

They passed through the town to a field, and
when they arrived on the meadow where the
geese fed all day, the princess sat down and
began to comb her hair. It looked like pure
gold, and little Conrad wanted to pull out a
couple of handfuls. Finally she said:

‘*Blow, blow, wind, blow,
Take Conrad’s hat in the air,
And do not let him catch it
Till I have combed my hair.”

And a strong wind came just then and blew
Conrad’s hat a long distance over the field, and
when he came back the hair was all combed
and put up. Then little Conrad was angry and
would not speak to his companion, so they
watched the geese in silence till night, and
then went home.

The next morning as they passed under the
arch, the maiden said:

**O, Falada, hanging high!”
and the head replied:
‘‘ Oh, young princess, passing by!
If thy fate thy mother knew,
Her fond heart would break for you.”

They went on to the meadow ; and the prin-
cess sat down to comb her hair. Conrad ran
towards her as if to seize it, but she quickly said:

“* Blow, blow, wind, blow;
Take Conrad’s hat in the air,
And do not let him catch it,

Till I have combed my hair.’
22

?

Away went Conrad's hat in the wind, and he
had to run a long distance before he caught it,
and when he came back the hair had been put
up a long time. Little Conrad was not pleased,
but he watched the geese with her till evening.

When they reached home, he went to the
king and said: ‘I do not wish to watch the
geese any longer with that maiden.”

“Why not,” asked the old king.

“Oh! she vexes me all day. In the morning
when we pass through the dark arch, she says
to an old horse’s head that is nailed there:

‘QO, Falada, hanging high !’
and the head answers:
‘O, young princess, passing by !
If thy fate thy mother knew,
Her fond heart would break for you. ’”

Then he told the king what had happened om
the meadows, how the wind had blown his hat
away, and he had to run after it.

But the king commanded him to go with her
to the fields the next morning; and he himself
also went and sat in the dark arch, and heard
what the horse’s head said. Then he followed
them to the field, and hiding in a bush, saw the
maiden take down her hair, that shone like
gold, and heard her say:

«Blow, blow, wind, blow ;
Take Conrad’s hat in the air,
And do not let him catch it,
Till I have combed my hair.”

A gust of wind came and carried the boy’s
hat far away, and while he was chasing it, the
king watched the maiden comb and braid her
hair. The king went home unperceived, and
when evening came, and they had returned with
the geese, he sent for the maiden, and told her
all he had seen and heard.

“What does it all mean?” he asked.

“TI cannot tell you,” she replied; “I dare not
tell any one my trouble; for to save my life, T
gave my oath not to do it.”

The king urged her, but all to no purpose;
he could get nothing out of her. Then he said:
“Tf you will not complain to me of your troubles






THE GOOSE GIKL.

go and tell them to that iron oven.” The maiden
crept into it, feeling now that her last friend had
deserted her. Thinking the king had gone
away, she began to weep and pour out her heart.

“T am deserted by all the world,” she sobbed,
and yet I am a king’s daughter. My royal
clothes were taken from me by a waiting-maid,
and she was received as the true bride, while I
must go out and watch the geese. Oh! if my
mother knew of this it would break her heart.”

But the old king had been standing just out-
side the oven door, and had heard all she said.
He called her to come out, and had her dressed
in royal clothing, then O, wonder! how beauti-
ful she appeared! The king sent for his son and
told him he had wedded the wrong bride, she
was only a waiting-maid, while the true bride
was this maiden, their former goose-girl.

The young king was very glad when he saw
her beauty and goodness, and a great feast was
announced to which all the king’s friends and

the people of his kingdom were invited. When
the day arrived, the bridegroom placed the prin-
cess on one side of him, and the waiting-maid
on the other, but so dazzled was she with her
own splendor, that she did not recognize the
princess. After the company had eaten and
drank and were feeling very merry, the king
proposed a riddle to the waiting-maid: ‘‘ What
punishment would a person deserve who de-
ceived his master?” and he related the story
which the princess had told the oven.

The false bride had no suspicion of harm to
herself, and said: ‘“‘Sucha person deserves noth- _
ing better than to be put into a barrel full of
spikes and dragged up and down the streets by

_ two white horses until he dies.”

“You are that person,” said the king, “and
you have spoken your own sentence.”

The deceitful woman received her punishment,
the young king married the princess, and they
ruled their kingdom in peace and happiness.

——

FAITHFUL JOHN.

ONCE there was a king who was very ill, and
feeling that death was near, he said to those
about him, ‘Send Faithful John to me.”. Faith-
ful John was the king’s favorite servant, and had
been so called because he had lived with the
king all his life and served him faithfully.

As soon as he came to his bedside, the king
said: ‘Most Faithful John, I feel that my end
is near. There is not a care on my mind except
for my son. He is still too young to be left
without some one to advise him, and I cannot
rest in peace unless you promise to be his guar-
dian, and instruct him in all he ought to know.”

And Faithful John answered: ‘I will never
leave him, and I will serve him faithfully, even
at the cost of my life.”

“Then,” said the king, ‘I shall die happy.
After Jam dead,” he continued, “take my son
and show him over the entire castle—all the
rooms, halls, and vaults, and the treasures that

are in them; but the room at the end of the long
28

hall you must not allow him to enter, for in it is
hidden a statue of the princess of Golden:Palace.
As soon as he sees this statue of the princess,
he will be seized with a great love for her, and
will fall down in a swoon, and for her sake will
have to pass through great dangers. See to it,
therefore, that he does not ‘enter this room.”

As Faithful John once more took his hand
and promised, the king sank back upon his pil-
low and died.

When the king had been laid in his grave,
Faithful John told the young king all he had
promised his father as he lay on his death-bed.
« And I will keep that promise,” he said, ‘‘and
serve you as faithfully as I did him, even though
it cost me my life.”

The days of mourning being over, Faithful
John said to the king, one day: ‘It is now time
you saw your possessions. Come, and I will
show you the castle your father left you,” and he ©
led him through all the splendid rooms and
FAITHFUL SOHN.

showed him the rich treasures they contained,—
one room alone, that which contained the dan-
gerous statue, he did not open.

The statue was so placed, that one saw it as
soon as the door was opened, and so exquisitely
was it carved, that at first sight, one thought it
lived and breathed. The beauty and loveliness
of this figure were unsurpassed by anything in
the world. -

The young king was not long in noticing that
Faithful John passed one door without opening
it, and he said: ‘Why do you not unlock this
one?”

‘There is something in it that would frighten
you,” he answered.

But the king said: ‘I have seen everything
else in the castle, and I must know what is in
here,” and he went himself and tried to force
the door open.

But Faithful John held him back, saying: “I
promised your father before his death that you
should not see what was in that room.

If you

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enter, great misfortune will come to both you
and me.”

“Oh, no!" said the king. ‘But if I do not
go in, I shall surely dic, for I shall rest neither
night nor day until my eyes have seen what is
hidden there; no, I will not stir from this spot
until you unlock the door.”

Faithful John saw that he could not move him,
and with a heavy heart and many sighs, selected
the key from the bunch, and opened _ the door.
He entered first, hoping that he might be able
to cover the statue before the king could see it.
But it was of no use, the king entered on tip-toe,
and looking over Faithful John’s shoulder, saw
the statue ; but he no sooner beheld it, glittering
with gold and precious jewels, than he fell faint-
ing to the floor. Faithful John lifted him up,
and carried him to his bed, saying with a heart
full of sorrow: ‘‘ The evil is done; dear God,
how will it all end?” He gave the king some
wine, and he soon revived. His first words
were: “Alas! whose is that beautiful statue ?”






%,
‘he

Wie wy
a Wana
i Ap S

eh



FAITHFUL JOHN’S PROMISE,












FAITHFUL FOHN.

“The princess’s of the Golden Palace,” Faith-
ful John replied.

The king continued: ‘My love for her is so
great, that if all the leaves on the trees were
tongues, they could not express it. I would risk
my life to win her. You are my Faithful John,
and you must help me.”

The trusty servant thought for a long time
how it were best to begin, for it was very diffi-
cult to get into the presence of the princess. At
last he thought of a plan and said: ‘Everything
the princess has is of gold—tables, chairs, dishes,
goblets, cups, and all the furniture. You have
five tons of gold among your treasures. Let
one of the goldsmiths of your kingdom make
trom this, vessels and utensils of every kind, all
kinds of birds, and wild and curious animals,
such as will please her, and we will take them
and go and seek our fortune.”

The king at once gave orders for all the gold-
smiths in his kingdom to work night and day
until the beautiful things were ready.

When all had been placed on board a ship,
Yaithful John dressed himself asa merchant, and
told the king he must disguise himself in the
same manner. Then they sailed away across
the sea until they came to the city where the
princess of the Golden Palace lived. -

Faithful John told the king to remain on the
ship while he went to the palace. ‘‘ Perhaps,”
said he, ‘“‘I shall bring the princess back with
me. See, therefore, that everything is in order.
Set out the golden vessels and decorate the
whole ship.”

Then Faithful John, having put some of the
little articles of gold into his pocket, landed,
and went straight to the royal palace.

As he passed through the court-yard, a beau-
tiful maiden stood by a fountain drawing water
with two golden pails. As she turned to carry
away the sparkling water, she saw the strange
man, and asked who he was.

“T am a merchant,” was the reply, and he
took from his pocket the beautiful articles of gold.

She no sooner saw them than she cried:
“Oh! what beautiful things,” and setting down
her pails, she examined the articles one after

25

- chant!

another. Then she said: ‘The princess must
see these ; she is so pleased with anything made
of gold, that she will buy all you have.”

She took him by the hand and led him into
the palace, for she was the princess’s maid.

When the princess saw the trinkets, she was
greatly pleased, and said: ‘‘ They are so beauti-
fully made, I will buy them all.”

Then Faithful John replied: ‘I am only the
servant of arich merchant. What I have here
is nothing compared to what my master has on
board ship. The most curious and costly things
that have ever been made of gold, you will find
there.”

She asked to have them brought to her, but
he said: “That would take many days, and
there are so many, Oe palace is not large
enough to hold them.”

This only roused her eines the more, and
at last she said: ‘‘Take me to the ship; I will
go myself and see your master’s treasures.”

It was with great joy that Faithful John led
the princess to the ship. As soon as the king
beheld her, he saw that she was even more
beautiful than the statue that stood in his palace,
and as she approached,,it seemed as if his heart
would burst within. him.

She came on board, and the king led her
below. But Faithful John staid on deck with
the helmsman, and orders were given to weigh
anchor: ‘Unfurl every sail, that she may fly
like a bird through the air,” he cried.

Meanwhile the king was showing the princess
all the golden treasures—the dishes and cups
and birds and the wild and wonderful animals.
It was many hours before she had looked at
everything, and in her joy she did not notice
that the ship was sailing. When she had looked
at the last, she thanked the merchant, and
started to go ashore. She reached the edge of
the ship, and then saw for the first. time that
they had left the shore, and were out upon the
high sea, sailing before the wind with every sail
spread. ‘Alas!” she cried in great terror, ‘I
have been deceived! I have been carried away
from my home, and am in the power of a mer-

1”

I would rather have died !
FAITHFUL FOHN.

But the king took her kindly by
“the hand, and said: “I am nota
merchant, but a king, as nobly
born as yourself.- It was my great
love for you that led me to carry
you away in this manner. The
first time I saw your statue I fell
to the earth in a swoon.”
When the Princess of the Golden
Palace heard his words, she was
comforted; her heart inclined to the young
king, and she promised to become his wife.

It happened one day as they were sailing over
the high sea, and Faithful John sat in the fore
part of the ship playing music, that three crows
flew through the air and lighted on the ship.
He stopped playing and listened to what they
were saying to each other, for he understood
their language well.

“Ah!” cried one of them, ‘there is the king
carrying away the princess of the Golden Palace.”

“Yes,” said the second, “but he hasn't got

her yet.”




































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FAITHFUL JOHN HEARS THE CROWS PROPHECIES.








FAITHFUL FOHN.

‘“Why not?” said the third ; ‘‘she is sitting by
his side in the ship.”

Then the first crow began again: ‘‘ That does
not matter. As soon as he lands, a chestnut
horse will spring toward him, which he will
mount, and immediately it will leap into the air
and bear him away from his bride, whom he will
never see again.”

Then said the second one: ‘‘Is there nothing
that can save him?”

“Oh, yes! if some one else should quickly
mount the horse, seize the pistol from his belt,
and shoot the horse dead, then would the king’s
. life be saved. But who knows this? And if any

one did know of it, and tell the king, that per-
son would be turned into stone from his feet to
his knees.”

The second one spoke again: ‘‘I can tell you
still more. Even though the horse be killed, the
young king shall not have the princess. When
they reach the palace, a beautiful bridal gar-
ment will be waiting him. It will look as if it
were woven of gold and silver, instead of which
it will be made of sulphur and pitch, and as
soon as he puts it on, will burn him to the bone
and marrow.”

“Ts there nothing that can save him from
this?” asked the third.

“Oh, yes,” answered the second, ‘if some
one wearing gloves should seize the garment,
and throw it into the fire, the garment would
burn, and the king would be saved. But that will
not help him, for if any one knew it, and warned
the king, that person would be turned into stone
from his knees to his heart.”

“And I know still more,” said the third ; ‘ if
the bridal garment is burned, the king shall not
be able to keep his bride ; for on the wedding-
night, when the ball is held, and the young
queen is dancing, she will suddenly turn pale
and fall as if dead. If some one does not raise

-her up, and take from her breast three drops of
blood, she will die. But any one who tells of
this, will turn to stone from the crown of his
head, to the soles of his feet.” Saying this, the
crows all flew away.

But Faithful John had understood every word,
27

a

and from that time was sad and silent. If he
kept from his master this that he had heard,
great misfortune would come to the king, and
if he told him, it would cost him his life. At
last he said to himself: ‘I will save my master,
even though I die for it.” :

As soon as they had landed, there appeared,
as the crow had said, a splendid chestnut horse.
“Capital!” said the king, “he shall carry me
to the palace.” He was about to mount, when
Faithful John stepped up, and swinging himself
quickly on the horse, drew his pistol from his
belt and shot the horse dead.

‘What a shame to shoot such a beautiful ani-
mal, that was to carry the king to his palace!”
cried the king’s servants who were envious of
Faithful John. But the king said: ‘Be quiet, ~
and let it pass. He is my Faithful John, and
knows what is best.” :

They soon arrived at the palace, and there in
one of the rooms lay the bridal garment, glit-
tering as if woven of gold and silver. The king
went towards it as if to take it in his hands, but
Faithful John pushed him away, and seizing it
in his gloved hands, threw it into the fire and
left it to burn. Again the servants murmured,
and said: ‘Look! now he has even burnt the
king’s bridal robe!”

But the king replied: ‘‘Who knows the good
he may have done? Leave him alone, he is my
Faithful John.”

The wedding-day arrived, and it was cele-
brated with song and dance. In the evening
the bride entered the ball-room. Faithful John
watched her anxiously. Suddenly, as she was
dancing, her face grew pale, and she sank to the
floor as ‘if dead. Faithful John sprang quickly
forward, lifted her in his arms, and carried her
into a room. Then laying her once more on
the floor, he knelt by her side, and drew the
three drops of blood from her breast. In a
short time she breathed again and raised her-
self up. But the young king who had been
watching Faithful John, did not understand his
strange conduct, and in his astonishment and
anger, ordered him to be thrown into prison.

The next morning Faithful John was tried
FAITHFUL FOHN.

and led to the gallows. As he stood on them

ready for the death awaiting him, he said:
“Every one about to die is allowed to speak,
shall I be allowed this right?”

“Yes,” replied the king, “it is granted you.”

THE KING'S GRIEF.
28



“T have been unjustly condemned, I have
always been true to you,” said Faithful John,
and then he told the king what he had heard
the crows say while they were at sea, and how
everything he had done had been necessary in
order to save the king.

When the king heard this he cried: ‘Oh!
my most Faithful John! Pardon! Pardon!

Take him down !”

But Faithful John as he uttered the last word,
had fallen lifeless, and was turned into stone.

This was a great sorrow to the king and
queen, and often the king would say: ‘Alas!
that I should have rewarded faithfulness so
poorly!” He ordered the stone statue to be
brought into his bed-chamber, and placed near
his bed. Whenever he looked at it, he would
weep, and say: ‘Oh! if I could only make
you alive again, my Faithful John!”

Time passed on, and twins were born to the
queen, two little sons, who filled her heart with
joy. One day when the queen was at church,
and the two children were with their father, he
looked up at the statue, and sighing sadly, said:
“Could I only make you alive again, Faithful
John!”

At this, the figure began to speak, saying:
“You can make me alive again, if you will give
that which you hold dearest?”

“Ves,” cried the king, ‘I will give up all I
have in the world to bring you back?”

“Then,” continued the stone, “with your own
hand, you must cut off both your children’s heads,
and sprinkle their blood over me, and I shall be
restored to life.”

The king was terrified when he heard that he
must kill his dear children, but when he thought
how Faithful John had died serving him, he
drew his sword, and with his own hand cut off
the children’s heads. He sprinkled the stone
with their blood, and instantly life returned, and
Faithful John stood once more before him, alive
and well. “ Your faithfulness shall not go unre-
warded,” he said to the king, and taking the
heads of the children, replaced them, healing
the wound with their own blood. Again they
were running and playing about as if nothing
had happened.


A GOOD BARGAIN.

Then the king was very happy. When he
saw the queen returning from church, he hid
Faithful John and the children in a large closet.
As she entered the room, he said: ‘Did you
pray at church to-day ?”

“Yes,” she answered, ‘but I could not help
thinking constantly of Faithful John, and the
great misfortune that came to him through us.”

‘Dear wife,” he replied, “we can bring him
back to life, but it will cost us the lives of our
two little sons.” The queen turned very pale,

and her heart shrank from the sacrifice, but she
did not falter: ‘‘We owe it to him for his faith-
fulness to us,” she said.

The king was greatly pleased when the queen
said this, and opening the closet he brought
out the children and Faithful John. ‘God be
praised !” he said, ‘Faithful John is restored to
us, and our little sons are also here,” and then he
told her how it had all happened. From this
time they all lived together in great happiness
till the end of their lives.

A GOOD BARGAIN.

A GERMAN peasant had driven his cow to
market, and sold her for seven dollars. On his
way home he had to pass a ditch where he
heard from a distance the frogs calling: ‘‘Acht,
acht, acht!’*

“Yes,” said he to himself, ‘you are crying
down there in the oatfield, but it is seven that I
got for the cow, not eight.” .

When he reached the water he called to them
again:

‘Dumb beasts, that’s what you are.
you know any better than to call that?
seven dollars, not eight.”

But the frogs only croaked: ‘‘ Acht, acht,
acht, acht!”

“Well, if you won't believe it, I will count
it for you,” and he took the money from his
pocket, and counted the seven dollars that had
been paid him in small silver.

But the frogs paid no attention to his count-
ing, and cried again: ‘ Acht, acht, acht,
acht!”

“Hey, then!” cried the peasant, now very
angry, ‘‘if you know better than I, just count
it for yourselves,” and he threw the money into
the water, right amongst the frogs.

He stood there a while, waiting for them to
return him his money, but the frogs kept to
their first saying, and cried out in a loud voice :

Don’t
It is



* Pronounced okt, and means in German eight.
29

‘“‘“Acht, acht, acht, acht!” and did not throw
the money back to him again.

He waited a long time until evening came on,
and he had to go home. Then he abused the
frogs, and cried: ‘‘ You water-paddlers! you
staring blockheads! Your great mouths can
scream loud enough to split one’s ears, but you
can’t count seven dollars. Do you think Iam
going to stay here until you get ready?” So
saying he went away, but the frogs cried after
him, ‘“ Acht, acht, acht, acht!” so that he
reached home very much out of humor.

Some time after he bought another cow,
which he killed, reckoning that if the flesh sold
well, he would receive as much as both the
cows were worth and have the skin besides.
When he came to the town with the flesh, there
was a great pack of hounds gathered before the
door of the market. One of them, a large grey-
hound, sprang around the meat, sniffing and
barking, ‘‘ What, what, what, what!”

As he did not stop, the peasant said to him:
“Yes, I understand you very well. You say,
‘What, what,’ because you want some of the
meat. I should fare nicely if I gave it to you.”

But the dog only said, ‘‘ What, what !”

“Will you not eat it up or give it to your
companions there ?”

“What, what!” was the answer.

“Well, if you insist upon it, I will leave it
with you, but I know you well, and to whom
A GOOD

you belong; remember in three days I must
have my money or it will go ill with you. You
can bring it to me.”

So he laid the meat down, and went back
home. The dogs immediately fell upon it,
barking loudly: ‘‘ What, what!” The peasant
hearing them from a distance, said to himself:
‘Now they are all saying, ‘What, what!’ but
the big one must answer them for me.”

Three days passed, and the peasant thought:
“This evening I shall have the money in my
pocket,” and he was very contented and happy.
But evening came, and it brought no money.

‘There is no confidence to be placed in any
one,” he cried, losing all patience, and he went
immediately to the town and demanded his
money of the butcher.

The butcher at first thought it a very good
joke, but the peasant cried: ‘‘ Joking aside, |
want my money. Did’ntthe dog tell you of the
slaughtered cow I brought here three days ago ?”

This made the butcher angry, and seizing a
broom, he drove the peasant out.

“Wait,” said the peasant, ‘there is a little
justice left in the world; you will get your
dues.” And away he went to the king's palace,
and begged for an audience with the king. He
was taken before the king, who was sitting with
his daughter.

“What is your complaint?” he asked.

“ Alas!” replied the peasant, ‘‘ the frogs and

the dogs have taken away what belonged to }

me, and the butcher has paid me what he owed
me with a stick,” and he told at great length
how it had all happened.

The story over, the king’s daughter began to
laugh loudly, and the king said: ‘I cannot re-

store your own to you in this case, but I will |

give you my daughter for a wife. In all her
life she has not laughed as she did just now over
your story, and I have promised her in marriage
to the one who should make her laugh. You
may be very thankful for your good fortune.”

“Oh!” answered the peasant, “I do not ~

want her at all; I have one wife at home, and
that is too many ; when I go home, it seems as

if there was one in every corner.”
30

BARGAIN.



is

















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.

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4. Pte NN

LO Ah Ni
ll fr his ti ENN f aay eH |
ye Tai Yao

THE PEASANT THROWS HIS MONEY TO THE FROGS.




A GOOD BARGAIN.

Then the king was angry, and said: ‘“ You
are a rude clown!”

“ Alas ! your majesty,” he replied, “what can
you expect ofa pig but bristles ?”

“Wait,” said the king, “I will give you
another reward. Now be off at once, but in
three days come to me again, and I will pay
you five hundred in full.”

As the peasant passed through the gate, the
guard said to him: ‘ You have made the king’s
daughter laugh; you will get a great reward.”

“Yes,” replied the peasant; ‘five hundred
dollars are to be counted out for me.”

“Five hundred dollars!” cried the soldier,
“you can give me part of it. What could you
do with so much money?”

“Well, since it is you,” said the peasant, ‘I
will give you two hundred. In three days go
to the king, and it will be counted out to you.”

A Jew, who was standing near, heard this
promise, and running after the peasant, caught
him by the coat, and said: ‘Oh, wonderful!
what a child of fortune you are! But what can
you do with hard dollars? I will change them
for you in small coin.”

“Very well,” said the peasant. ‘Give me
change for three hundred, which in three days
will be paid you by the king.”

The Jew was pleased with this trade, and

‘brought the sum in miserable little coin, any
three of which were equal to two good ones.

At the end of the three days the peasant went
before the king as he had ordered.

“Take off his coat; he shall have his five
hundred now,” said the king.

“But they don't belong to me,” cried the
peasant. “I have already given two hundred
to the soldier at the gate, and a Jew let me have
the change for the remaining three hundred.”

Just then the soldier and the Jew entered,
and, demanding what the peasant had promised
them, received instead of dollars, the one two
hundred, and the other three hundred, strokes.

The soldier bore them patiently, for he had
tasted them before, but the Jew complained
bitterly, crying: ‘‘Oh, woe is me! are these
the hard dollars I was to receive?”

31

The king could not help laughing at the
peasant, and now that his anger had passed
away, he said: “Since you lost your reward
before it was yours, 1 will give you another.
Go into my treasure-room, and take as much
money as you like.”

The peasant did not have to be told twice,
and filled his deep pockets as full as they would
hold. After leaving the palace, he went into
an inn to count his money. The Jew who had
followed him, crept in behind him, and heard
him grumbling to himself: ‘ That rogue of a
king has cheated me. If he had given me the
money himself, I would then have known what
I had, but how could I tell whether I put enough
into my pockets or not ?”-

“Just hear him!” said the Jew to inimel ‘he
is speaking disrespectfully of the king. I must
go and tell him, and perhaps I tae receive the
money then, and he, the stripes.”

When the king heard what the Teun had
said, his anger was roused, and he ordered the
Jew to bring the peasant before him.

The Jew ran to the peasant, saying: ‘“‘ You
are to appeat before the king at once, just as
you are.’

‘“‘T know better what is proper,” answered the
peasant. “ First I-must have a new coat made.
Do you think any one with so much money in
his pocket should go before the king in these
rags?”

The Jew, seeing that the peasant would not
go without another coat, and fearing that the
king’s anger might cool before he received his
reward and the peasant his punishment, said:
“T will lend you a beautiful coat for a short
time out of pure friendship. What will not one
do for love?”

The peasant was pleased with this arrange-
ment, and putting on the coat which the Jew
had given him, went with him into the king’s
presence. As soon as the king told him what
the Jew had said, he exclaimed: ‘Oh! but he
never tells the truth, you cannot believe a word
he says. That fellow even declared I had his
coat on.”

“What is that?” cried the Jew. ‘“Isn’t that
THE ANGEL GUEST.

coat mine? Didn't Ilend it to you out of pure
friendship that you might appear before the
king ?”

When the king heard this, he said: ‘ The
Jew has surely deceived one of us,” and he

ordered him once more to be paid in hard
dollars.

But the peasant went home in the good coat
with his pockets full of money, saying joyfully
to himself: ‘tI made a good bargain this time.”

(PELE AAUNG EA GheS ae

IN olden times when angels visited this earth
in the form of human beings, it happened that
one of them, wandering about, was overtaken
by night before he had found any shelter. At
last he saw before him two houses standing
opposite each other, one large and beautiful,
belonging to a rich man, the other small and
miserable, belonging to a poor man.

“T should not be any trouble to the rich
man, I think I will spend the night with him,”
thought the angel.

When the rich man heard some one knocking
at his door, he put his head out of the window,
and asked what was wanted.

“T should like a night's lodging,”
angel.

The rich man looked at the traveller from
his head to his feet, and because he wore poor
clothes and looked as if he had but little money
in his pocket, shook his head, and said: ‘‘ No,
you cannot stop here; my rooms are full of
vegetables and seeds. If I took in every one
that knocks at my door, I should soon be
carrying a beggar’s staff myself. You
look somewhere else for lodging.”

He shut the window; the angel turned his
back on the grand house, and went across the
road to the little one. He had scarcely knocked,
when the poor man opened the door, and
invited the stranger in.

“Stay with us to-night,” he said; ‘it is
now quite dark, and you cannot travel farther
to-day.”

The angel was pleased and entered. The
wife of the poor man took him by the hand
and bade him weicome.

‘“Make yourself at home,” she said. ‘ We
82

said the

must

have not much, but such asit is, we give you
with all our hearts.”

She put some potatoes over the fire, and
while they were cooking, milked the goat that
the stranger might have a little milk to drink.
‘As soon as the supper was ready, the angel
seated himself at the table, and ate the rude
fare with a keen relish, because kind hearts
and happy faces were near him.

After they had eaten, and it was time to go
to bed, the woman called her husband aside
and said: ‘Dear husband, let us put some
straw on the floor for ourselves to-night, and
give the stranger our bed. He has been travel-
ling all day, and must be very tired.”

“With all my heart,” said her husband, ‘1
will offer it to him at once,” and going up to
the angel he begged him to accept their bed
that he might have a good night's sleep and
rest his weary limbs. The angel was not
willing at first to accept this offer, but they
urged so hard, he finally consented and lay
down in their bed, while the old people slept
on a straw couch which they made on the floor.

Early the next morning they cooked as good
a breakfast as they could afford for their guest,
and when the sun was risen, he rose and ate
with them again.

As he stood in the door, ready to leave them,
he turned to them and said: ‘Since you have
been so kind to me, you may wish three times,
and each wish shall be granted you.”

“What else should I wish for but eternal
happiness,” said the old man, ‘‘and that as long
as we two live we may have good health and
never want for daily bread. I cannot think of
a third wish.”


THE ANGEL GUEST.

“Would you not like a new house in place of
this old one!” asked the angel.

“Oh, yes!” replied the man, ‘if that could
be granted me also, I should be very well
satisfied.”

Then the angel changed the old house into a

new one, gave the old couple his blessing, and

went away.

It was late in the morning when the rich man
rose. He walked to his window and looked
across the street. To his surprise he saw a
handsome house of red brick where the little
hut had formerly stood. He called his wife and
said: ‘‘ What has happened? Yesterday the
little hut stood there, but now there is a beauti-
ful new house. Run over and ask how it has
all come about.”

The woman ran over to ask about the won-
derful change. ‘‘ Last evening,” said the poor
man, ‘‘a traveller came to our house and asked
for a night’s lodging. We took him in, and
this morning, just as he was going away, he
granted us three wishes, eternal happiness,
health and food in this life, and a new house in
place of our old one.”

The woman ran home in great haste, and
told her husband what she had heard.

“T could tear and beat myself,” he ex-
claimed. ‘The man stopped here first and
wished to stay over night, but I turned him
away.”

‘Be quick,” said his wife, ‘‘ get on your horse,
and overtake the man, and make him grant
you three wishes.”

The man followed her advice, and soon
overtook the traveller. He spoke to him very
kindly and politely, saying he hoped he would
not take it amiss that he had not been admitted
to his house, that he had gone to look for the
door-key, and when he returned, he was gone.
The next time he passed that way, he hoped
the stranger would stop with him.

‘Yes,” said the angel, “when I come again

I will do so.”
Then the rich man asked if he would be
allowed to make three wishes as his neigh-

bor had done.
33

“Yes,” said the angel, “but it would be
better for you if you did not wish.”

But the rich man thought he should ask for
nothing but what would add to his happiness, if
he was only sure his wishes would be fulfilled.

‘Ride home,” said the angel, and your three
wishes shall be fulfilled.”

The rich man had what he desired, and turn-
ing about, rode homewards. On the way, he
tried to think what he should wish for. As he
thus thought, he let the bridle fall loosely,
when suddenly the horse began to spring and
prance, and disturbed him so that he could
not come to any decision. He patted her on
the neck and said: ‘‘ Be quiet, Bess,” but she
only began some new pranks. Finally he
became angry and quite out of patience, he
cried: “I wish that you would break your
neck.”

As he said it, the horse fell under him, and
lay dead and motionless: so his first wish was
fulfilled.

As he was a miserly man, he would not lose
his saddle also, so he unfastened it from the
dead horse, threw it over his back, and started
for home afoot, comforting himself with the
thought that he had two more wishes.

As he travelled slowly through the sand, the
mid-day sun shone hot upon him, and he
became warm, and fretful with fatigue. The
saddle pressed heavily on his back, and he
was not able to decide what to wish for.

“Tf I were to wish for all the treasures in the
world,” he said, ‘something that I want would
be lacking. I must try to arrange it, so that
nothing remains to be wished for.”

Then sighing, he continued: ‘If I were only
like the Bavarian peasant who had three wishes
offered him: first, he wished for a good draught
of beer, then he wished for as much beer as he
could drink, and lastly, for a whole cask of |
beer.”

Many times he thought he knew what to
wish, then it would seem too small. All at
once it flashed through his mind how comfort-
ably his wife was seated at home, in a cool
room and probably enjoying something good
THE WONDERFUL FIDDLER.

to eat.
out:

‘IT wish she was seated on this saddle, and
so high she could not get down, rather than
carry it on my back.”

The saddle disappeared, and he knew his
second wish had been fulfilled. He was now
very angry, and started for home as fast as he
could run, that he might sit down quietly in a
room and think of some great thing to wish
for. As he entered the house, the first thing
he saw was his wife, perched in mid-air on the
saddle, crying and scolding with a will.

This thought vexed him, and he spoke

“Be quiet,” he said, “and I will wish for all
the treasures in the world for you.”

But she called him a blockhead, and said:
“ Of what use are all the treasures in the world
if I have to sit here? You wished me here,
and now you shall help me down.”

So, willing or not, he had to make his third
wish, that his wife might be set free from the
saddle, and it was immediately granted.

So the rich man received nothing from his
wishes but vexation, trouble, scolding words,
and a lost horse, while the poor man lived in
peace and plenty all his life.

THE -WONDEREU LE. FIDDLER.

ONCE upon a time a wonderful fiddler was
travelling alone through a forest. At last he
became tired of his own thoughts, and said to
himself: ‘‘I shall be in this forest a long time.
I think I will try to find a good companion.”

He took the fiddle from his back, and played
until it echoed through the trees. Soon a wolf
came trotting through the thicket.

“ Ah! a wolf, is it? Well, I have no desire
for such a companion,” said the fiddler.

But the wolf came nearer, and said: ‘ Oh,
you dear fiddler! how beautifully you play! I
should like to learn how.”

“You can soon learn,” answered the fiddler;
“but you must do everything just as I tell you.”

“Oh, fiddler!” said the wolf, “I will mind
you just as the school-boy does his teacher.”

‘“Come with me, then,” said the fiddler.

When they had gone a little way together,
they came to an oak tree which was hollow, and
split through the middle.

‘‘ Here,” cried the fiddler, “if you would like
to learn to fiddle, place your fore-feet in this
cleft.” :

The wolf did as he told him, and the fiddler,
taking a stone, quickly wedged both feet in the
crevice so firmly that the wolf could not move,

but must stay there a prisoner.
34

“Wait there until I come again,” said the
fiddler, and went on his way.

In a little while he said to himself a second
time: ‘I shall be in the forest a long time. I
think I will try again to find a companion,” and
taking his fiddle from his back, began to play.
It was not long before a fox came sneaking
among the trees.

“ Ah! a fox this time,” said the fiddler. ** Ido
not want him for a companion.”

The fox came towards him, and said: ‘* Oh,
you dear fiddler! how beautifully you play! 2
also would like to learn.”

“You can soon learn,” said the fiddler; “ but
you must do everything exactly as I tell you.”

“Oh, fiddler!” answered the fox, “I will
mind you as a schoolboy does his teacher.”

“Follow me,” said the fiddler.

They went a short distance when they came
toa foot-path, on each side of which grew tall
bushes. Here the fiddler stopped. Bending a
hazel-nut bush from one side to the ground he
placed his foot on it, then bending one from the
other side, and holding it, he said: ‘‘ Well, little
fox, if you wish to learn to play, put out your
left fore-foot.” The fox obeyed, and the fiddler
bound it fast to the bush on the left.

“ Now, the right one, little fox,” he said, and




THE WONDERFUL FIDDLER.

bound that to the bush on the right. Then
seeing that the knots were firmly tied, he
let go; the bushes sprang back to their
places, carrying the fox with them up into
the air, where he remained kicking and
swinging.

“Wait there till I come back,” said the
fiddler, and went on his way.

Soon he said again: ‘I have still a
long time to be in the forest. I will try
once more to bring a pleasant companion
to me.”

A third time he took his fiddle from his
back, and played until the music sounded
through the woods.

In a few minutes a hare came leaping
towards him.

“ Ah! here comes a hare,” said the fid-
dler. ‘I don’t want him for a companion.”

“Dear fiddler,” said the hare, “how
beautifully you play! how much I should
like to learn!”

“You can learn very easily,” replied
the fiddler, ‘‘if you will do exactly as I
tell you.” '

“Oh, fiddler, I will mind you as a
schoolboy does his teacher,” said the little
hare.

They went on together for a short dis-
tance, till they came to a place in the
woods where an aspen-tree grew. The
nddler tied one end of a long string
around the hare’s neck, while the other
he fastened around the tree.

““Come lively, now, little hare,” cried
the fiddler,‘‘ jump around this tree twenty
times.”

The little hare obeyed, and ran twenty
times around the tree, and of course,
wound the string twenty times around the
trunk. The hare was caught. He could
not unwind the string, and pull and tug as
he might, he could not free himself, and
only cut his soft neck with the string.

‘Wait here till I come back,” said the
fiddler, and went away.

In the meantime, the wolf had pushed
385

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THE FIDDLER AND THE HARE,
aA LOT OF ROGUES.

and bitten and worked so long at the stone, he
had at last got his feet free.

Full of rage and fury, he hastened after the
fiddler, determined to tear him to pieces. he was running along, the fox saw him, and
called loudly to him: ‘‘ Brother wolf, come to
my help! The fiddler has deceived me!”

The wolf drew down the bushes to which the
fox was fastened, bit the string in two, set the
fox free, and they both went on together to seek
revenge on the fiddler.

They came to the hare tied to the aspen-tree.
They set him at liberty also, and then all three
set out to find their enemy.

But the fiddler had again taken out his fiddle,
and this time had been more fortunate. The
music fell on the ear of a poor wood-cutter, and
whether he was willing or not, he immediately

A eOEsOr

ONE day in autumn a little cock said to his
wife: ‘Now is the time when nuts are ripe.
Come, let us go together up there on the hill,
and eat all we want before the squirrel carries
them away.”

‘Oh, yes, let us go!” said the little hen.
“That would be a great pleasure !”

So they went together to the hill, and as the
day was bright and pleasant, they staid until
evening.

Now I do not know whether it was because
they had eaten so much, or whether they had
become proud, at all events they would not
walk home, and the cock was obliged to make
a little carriage of nut-shells. When it was
finished, the hen seated herself in it saying:
““Now you may harness yourself to it, and draw
me home.”

“That is very kind of you,” said the cock.
“T would rather walk home alone, than allow
myself to be harnessed to that carriage. I am
willing to be coachman and sit upon the box,
but draw it myself, I will not.”

While they were thus quarreling a duck

36

left his work, and, with his axe under his arm,
came to listen to the music.

‘At last, here comes the right companion,”
said the fiddler ; ‘I have been looking for a man,
not wild animals.”

He began to play so softly and sweetly, that
the poor wood-cutter stood as if charmed, his
heart beating for joy.

While he was listening, the wolf, the fox, and
the hare came up. The wood-cutter saw they
had some wicked design, and raising his glit-
tering axe, placed himself in front of the fiddler,
as much as to say: * Whoever attacks him, had
better take care, he will have to deal with me.”
The animals were frightened and ran back into
the forest, while the fiddler played his thanks
to the wood-cutter; and then went on his
journey.

ROGUES:

quacked out: ‘t You thieves, who said you could
come to my nut-hill?) You shall pay dearly for

this!" and she rushed at the cock with wide
open bill. But he was ready for a fight, as cocks

usually are, and struck her so hard with his
spurs that she soon begged for mercy, and
willingly allowed herself to be harnessed to the
carriage as a punishment for her rudeness.

The cock seated himself on the box
coachman, and away they drove at a rapid
rate, the driver calling out: ‘** Run, duck, run,

cho

as fast as you can!”

They had gone a short distance when they
met two foot-passengers, a pin and a necdle.

“Stop, stop!” they cried. “It will soon be
so dark we cannot see a step before us, and the
road is so dusty. Will you not let us ride a
little way with you? We stopped at the tailor’s
shop and are very much belated.”

The cock seeing that they were thin people
who would not take up much room, allowed
them to get in, only they had first to promise
they would not step on the hen’s toes.

Late in the evening they came to an inn.


A LOT OF ROGUES.

Here they decided to stop for the night, as the
duck, who was not a very good traveller, had
become lame and fell from side to side. The
landlord at first made many objections to their
staying there, saying his house was already full,
and he thought, too, there was nothing very dis-
tinguished about such guests. But they
promised to give him the egg which the
hen had laid on the road, and also the one
which the duck would lay in the

morning, so the landlord told
them at last they might stay

and they made themselves at home, and rev-
elled and feasted all the evening.

As soon as morning dawned, when every-
body was asleep, the cock awoke the hen, and
bringing the egg, they ate it together for their

breakfast, and threw the shell into the fireplace.
87

After this they found the needle, who was still
asleep, and seizing her by the head, stuck her
into the cushion of the landlord's chair; then
they put the pin in the hand-towel, and without a
word to any one, left the house, and flew away









‘THE COCK SEATED HIMSELF ON THE BOX AS COACHMAN.”

over the meadows. The duck, who had staid
in the yard and slept in the open air all night,
heard them as they flew past, and rousing her-
self, waddled down to the brook and swam
away, moving much more swiftly than when
she had to draw the carriage.

Two hours later the landlord rose, washed
himself, and taking up the towel to dry his face,
drew the point of the pin across it, leaving a
long red scratch from ear to ear. Then he went
into the kitchen to light his pipe. As he stooped
over the hearth, the egg-shells popped into his
eyes. ‘‘Everything happened to my head this
morning, he said, sitting down in his grand-
LHE MAGIC WINDOIVS.

father’s chair quite vexed. But he had no sooner
seated himself, than he suddenly sprang into
the air, crying: ‘Oh, woe is me!” for the needle
had pricked him worse than the pin had scratched
him. He was now very angry, and began to
suspect his guests who had arrived so late the

THE MAGIC

A KING’S daughter once had a room in the
top of her castle that had twelve windows in it.
They commanded a view of every point of the
heavens, and the princess had only to climb to
this room and she could see every part of her
realm. The windows possessed more than or-
dinary properties. One could discern objects
very well from the first, but better from the
second, still better from the third, and so on
until on reaching the twelfth, nothing above or
below the earth could be hidden from the eye.

The princess was very proud, would accept
no lovers, and perferred to rule her kingdom
alone. Whether for amusement or otherwise,
she made it known that no one should become
her husband who could not hide himself so that
it would be impossible for her to findhim. And
further, any one making the attempt and failing,
should lose his head and have it stuck ona pole.

In a short time there were ninety-seven poles,
each bearing a head, standing before the castle.
Then for a long time no suitors appeared, and
the princess was pleased and thought: ‘‘ Now
I shall remain free all my life.”

But such was not to be her fate. Three broth-
ers announced that they would like to try their
luck. The eldest one thought himself safe if
he crept into a limestone quarry, but the prin-
cess had only to look out of the first window
in order to find him, and off came his head.
The second one hid in the cellar of the castle;
but he also was found through the first window,
and the ninety-ninth pole bore his head. When
it was the third one’s turn, he begged for a day
in which to think of the matter, also would she
be so kind as to give him three trials. If he

38 ;

evening before. He went out to look for them,
and found they were gone.

Then he vowed he never would take into his
house again such a set of rogues, who ate so
much, paid nothing, and for thanks played
wicked tricks.

WINDOWS.

failed in the third attempt, he would willingly
give up his life. As he was so beautiful and
begged so earnestly, she said yes, but it would
do him no good.

The following day the young man tried to
think where he should hide himself, but to no
purpose. At last he gave up, took his gun, and
went out into the woods. Presently he saw a
crow, and taking aim was about to shoot him.

“Don’t shoot me,” he cried,‘* and I will re-
ward you.”

On hearing this, he turned away, and walked
on through the woods till he came toa lake.
As he stood on the shore, a large fish came to
the surface. Again he took aim, thinking he
would shoot it, but the fish also cried: ‘‘ Don’t
shoot me, and I will reward you.”

He walked on into the fields, and there saw a
fox limping towards him. He fired, but missed.
Then the fox called: ‘*Do not shoot me, but
come and take this thorn out of my foot.”

The young man did so, and then wanted to
kill him for the sake of his fine skin.

‘“Let me go,” said the fox, ‘‘and IJ will surely
reward you.”

The youth let him go, and then as it was
evening, returned home.

The next day he was to hide, but how or
where he had not the slightest idea. After
racking his brains for a long time, he went out
into the woods. Almost the first thing he saw
was the crow, and he said: ‘I spared your life
yesterday, now in return tell me where I can
hide that the princess may not find me.”

The crow dropped his head and thought.
Finally he croaked: ‘‘I have it,” and going to


THE MAGIC WINDOWS.

a nest, he took an egg from it, and cut it in two.
Then by some magic or other, the young man
crept into the shell, and the egg was closed up
and laid back into the nest.

When the princess walked to the first window,
to her surprise, she could not find him. Neither
could she discover him from the second nor the
third. She looked from all the windows up to
the eleventh, and then she found him. She
ordered the crow shot and the egg brought to
her. It was opened and the youth stepped out.

““T spare your life this time, but you must do
better than this, or you are certainly lost,” she
said.

The next day he went to the lake, called the
fish, and said: ‘I spared your life, now tell me
where I can hide so that the princess cannot
find me.”

The fish thought a moment and then said:
“T have it; I will shut you up in my stomach.”

So the fish swallowed him, and dived to the
bottom of the lake.

The princess looked from all the windows,
her face growing paler and more anxious at
each one, but on looking from the twelfth she
discovered him. She had the fish caught and
killed and the young man brought into her
presence. You can easily imagine what his
feelings were now that he had reached his last
chance.

‘A second time I grant you your life; but
now comes the third trial, and your head will
surely appear on the hundredth pole.”

The last day he went out into the country
with a heavy heart, and there met the fox.

‘You know every hiding-place,” he said,
“tell me where I can hide so that the princess
cannot find me.”

“That is a difficult task,” replied the fox,
putting on a thoughtful face. But at last he
cried: ‘I have it.”

He went to a spring, and diving in, came out
a dealer in small wares and curious animals.
Then the young man was obliged to dive into

Q
oO

the water, and he came out as a cunning little
seal. ;

The merchant put him ina basket and car-
ried him to the town. The animal attracted
great attention, and the people came together
in crowds to look at it. Finally the excite-

-ment reached the ears of the princess, and she

too came to see the curiosity. Being pleased
with it, she offered to buy it for a large sum of
money. Before parting with it, the merchant
whispered in the little creature’s ear: “‘ When
the princess looks from the windows, creep
under the braids of her hair.”

When the time came for her to search for the
young man, she looked from all the windows in
turn, but when she reached the twelfth and was
still unable to find him, her heart was filled with
fear and rage. She closed the window so vio-
lently that the glass in all the windows flew
into a thousand pieces and the entire castle
shook.

As she turned away, she felt the seal that
she had been petting under her hair. In her
impatience she seized it, and throwing it to the
floor with violence, cried: ‘Away with -you,
out of my sight.” 7

It crawled back to the merchant, who took it
to the spring, when both dived in a second time
and were immediately restored to their former
shape.

The youth thanked the fox, and complimented
him by saying: “The crow and the fish are
stupid creatures compared with you. You know
the right tricks at the right time.”

Then he went directly to the castle. The
princess was waiting for him and submitted to
her fate. The wedding was celebrated and the
young man became ruler of the kingdom. But
he never told his wife where he hid the third
time, for she thought he had done it all by his
own knowledge and skill. She therefore held
him in the greatest possible respect, and often
said to herself:

‘“How much more he knows than I do.”
THE TWELVE. BROTHERS:



TERENCE ian
no S\N Gan AY).

AUER UE











na ial
Serre ae
Sa hr

pe
eon,






Figo
na Pa
4

eae
15 oar
aad
rs ts
ats xf

Bee
ee

een

ONCE upon a time there lived happily together
a king and queen, who had twelve children—
all of them boys. One day the king said to
his wife: “If our thirteenth child should bea
daughter, our twelve sons must die, that she

may inherit all our kingdom.”
40








Then he ordered made twelve coffins. They
were filled with shavings, and locking them up
in aroom, he gave the key to his wife and com-
manded her to tell no one about the matter.
ene
whole day. long.
who was always with her, and had been called
Benjamin after the one in the Bible, said to her.

queen was very sad, and mourned the
One day her youngest child,

“Dear mother, why are you so sad?”
“Dearest child.” she answered, “1
But he would give her no peace

cannot
tell you.”
until she had opened the door of the closed
room and shown him the twelve coffins filled
with shavings. ‘Dear Benjamin,” she said,
‘these coffins have been made for you and your
eleven brothers, for if you ever have a sister,
you will all be killed and buried in them.”

While she was speaking, she wept bitterly,
but her little son tried to comfort her, saying:
“Do not cry, dear mother, we will take care of
ourselves, and go away from here.”

But the mother said: ‘You and your eleven
brothers go out into the woods yonder and
remain for a time. Watch the tower of the
castle from the highest tree, and if a little son
is born, I will hang out a white flag, and you
may then return in safety; but if it is a daughter,
I will hang out a red flag; hasten away then
as quickly as you can. Every night I will rise.
and pray for you—in the winter, that you may
have a fire to warm you, and in the summer
that you may not be overcome by the heat.”


THE TWELVE BROTHERS.

Eleven days passed and it was Benjamin’s
turn to watch. A flag was floating from the
tower, but it was not white, but biood-red,—a
‘signal that they were all to die.

When the brothers heard this, they were very
angry, and said: ‘Ought we to die on account
of a maiden? We swear we will have revenge.
Every maiden we meet shall die.”

They left the place and went deep into the
forest. Here they found a little hut which they
made their home, and it was arranged that
Benjamin, the youngest, should stay at home
and keep house, while the rest went to kill game
for food. They lived thus for ten years, which
seemed to pass very quickly.

In the meantime, the queen’s little daughter
had grown into a beautiful girl, very lovely in
‘disposition. Once, when there had been a great
washing, she looked out and saw twelve little
shirts. Knowing they could not be her father’s,
she asked her mother whose they were.

Then her mother told her of her twelve broth-
ers, and, weeping, showed her the twelve coffins.
When she had finished, the maiden said: ‘Do
not cry, dear mother, I will go and seek my
brothers.”

She took the twelve shirts, and went into the
forest. All day she wandered, till, at night-fall,
she came to the little hut. She entered and
saw a young boy, who stared with astonish-
ment at her beauty, her rich clothing, and the
golden star she wore upon her forehead. In
reply to his questions, she told him she was the
king’s daughter, and that she was searching for
her twelve brothers, and then Benjamin knew
she was his sister, and told her he was her
brother.

On hearing this, the maiden wept for joy, and
the two embraced each other with great affec-
tion. But presently Benjamin thought of his
brothers’ vow and told his sister of it.

‘“‘I should be glad to die,” she answered, “ if
I could restore them to their home.”

“No,” he said, “you shall not die. Hide
yourself under this tub until my brothers come
home, and I will make them promise to spare
you.”

41

So when they returned, Benjamin said that
he had strange news.

“Oh, tell us what it is!” they all cried.

“Will you promise me that the first maiden
you meet shall not be killed?” he asked.

“Yes, yes,” she shall be spared, only tell us.”

Then he said: ‘ Our sister is here,” and lifting
the tub, the little princess came forward, looking
so beautiful and delicate in her royal robes, with
the golden star on her forehead, that the brothers
were full of joy, and embraced and kissed her, _
and loved her with all their hearts.

She staid at home with Benjamin, and helped
him in his work, and the brothers were very
contented and happy, and lived in perfect har-
mony with their little sister.

One day Benjamin and his sister made a feast
for their brothers. Near the house was a little
garden in which were growing twelve lilies.
Thinking it would give her brothers a pleasure
to present to each a flower as they sat at their
meals, the maiden broke off the twelve lilies.
No sooner had she done this, than the twelve
brothers were changed into twelve crows, and
flew away through the forest. At the same
moment the house and garden disappeared, and
she was left standing alone in the middle of the
deep woods. Looking round, she saw an old
woman standing near her, who said: “My
child, what have you done? Why did you not
leave the twelve white lilies growing? They
were your brothers, but now they have become
crows, and will always remain so.”

“Ts there no way to set them free?” asked
the maiden, weeping.

“No,” said the old woman; ‘‘there is but one
thing in all the world, and that is too difficult
for you to do. You must be dumb for seven
years. You must not speak or laugh. Should
you utter a single word, and it lacked only an
hour of the seven years, all you had done before
would be in vain, and your brothers would die.”

The maiden went away, saying in her heart:
“JT know for certain I shall set my brothers
free.” She found a tall tree in which she lived,
and here she would sit and spin, without ever
speaking or laughing.
THE TWELVE BROTHERS.



THE MAIDEN PLUCKS THE FATAL LILIES,
42

It happened one day that the king was in the
woods hunting with a large greyhound. Sud-
denly it ran to the tree in which the maiden was
sitting, and springing round it, barked furiously.
The king, coming up, saw the princess, and was
so charmed with her beauty, that he asked her
if she would become his bride. She made no
answer except to nod her head slightly. Then
the king himself climbed the tree, brought her
down, and rode away with her to his palace.

The marriage was soon celebrated with great
splendor and joy, but the bride neither spoke
nor laughed.

They had lived happily together a couple of
years, when the king’s step-mother, who was a
wicked woman, began to whisper evil things
about the young queen. ‘It is some low beg-~-
gar-maiden that you have brought to your
palace,” she would say to the king. ** Who knows
for what wicked deed she was driven from her
home? Even if she is dumb, and can't speak,
she might laugh. Any one that does not laugh,
has a bad conscience.” The king would not
believe her at first, but the old woman talked
so much, that at last the king was convinced,
and had her condemned to death.

A great fire was made in the court-yard,
where the king stood watching with tearful eyes,
for he still loved her dearly. She was bound
to the stake; the fire had already scorched her
clothing; but now the moment had arrived
when the seven years expired. She heard a
whirring sound in the air, and looking up, saw
twelve crows flying towards her. The instant
they touched the earth, they were changed to
her twelve brothers whom she had set free.

They scattered the burning wood, put out the
flames, and freeing their sister, once more em-
braced and kissed her. And now that she was
allowed to speak, she told the king why she
had been silent and never laughed. The king
was very happy to find she was innocent, and
they lived together in happiness to the end of
their lives. But the wicked step-mother who
was brought to justice, was condemned to be
thrown into a vat full of boiling oil and poison-
ous snakes, and thus she died a terrible death.




































wv wo; eee.
an THE

Fy
?}7 ENCHANTED FAWN.

A LITTLE brother once took his sister by the
hand, and said: ‘We have not had a happy
hour since our mother died. Our step-mother
beats us every day, and if we go to her for any-
thing, she kicks us away. Our only food is the
hard bread-crusts that are left over. The dog
under the table fares better than we do; she
throws him many a good bite. Heaven help
us! Oh! if our mother only- knew what we
suffer! Come, let us leave here, and go out inte
the wide world.”

All day they wandered over fields and mead-
ows and stony roads. They were very sad, and
once, when it rained, the little sister said: ‘‘ God
and our hearts are weeping together.” By even-
ing they came to a large forest. Tired out with
hunger, sorrow, and the long journey, they crept
into a hollow tree, and fell asleep.

The next morning when they awoke, the sun
was high in the heavens, and shone warm and
bright into the tree.

“JT am so thirsty,” said the little boy to his
. sister. “If I only knew where there was a
brook, I would go and get a drink. Hark! I
think I hear water running.” They climbed
out of the tree, and taking hold of each other’s
hands, went to find the brook.

Now the wicked step-mother was a witch, and
had seen the children go away, and knew where
they were.

THE WICKED STEP-MOTHER BEWITCHING THE WATERS,

43
THE ENCHANTED FAIWN.

She had sneaked after them, as is the habit
of witches, and had bewitched all the water in
the forest.

Soon the children found the little brook, that
sparkled and rippled over the stones. But just
as the boy was stooping to drink, the sister
heard, as if the brook murmured:

“ Drink not of me! drink not of me!
Or to a tiger changed you'll be.”

So she begged of him not to drink the water
or he would become a wild beast and tear her
to pieces. Thirsty as he was, the boy did as
she wished, and said he would wait until they
came to the next spring. Soon they came to
another brook, and the maiden heard the waters
whisper :

“Drink not of me! drink not of me!
Or to a black wolf changed you'll be.”

And a second time the sister begged her
brother not to drink the water or he would be
changed into a black wolf and devour her
Again the brother did as she wished, but he
said: “I will wait until we come to the next
brook, then I must drink, say what you will, or
I shall die of thirst.” 5

But when they came tothe third brook, the
sister heard the cool waters murmuring:

“ Drink not of me! drink not of me,
Or to a young deer changed you'll be.”

And she cried: “Dear brother, do not drink
here, or you will be turned into a fawn, and run
away from me.”

But her brother had already knelt by the
stream to drink, and as soon as the first drop
passed his lips he became a fawn.

The little sister wept bitterly over her poor
bewitched brother, and the little fawn also wept,
and kept close to her side. At last the maiden
said: ‘‘ Do not cry any more, dear little fawn, I
will never leave you,” and she untied her golden
garter and fastened it around his neck, then
braiding some rushes into a soft string, she tied
it to the collar, and led him away into the deep

forest.
44

After they had travelleda long, long distance,
they came to a little cottage. The maiden
looked in, and seeing it was empty, thought:
‘We can stay here and live.”

She gathered leaves and moss and made a
soft bed for the fawn. Every morning she went
out into the forest to gather roots and _ berries
and nuts for her own food, and tender grass for
the fawn, who would eat out of her hand and
play happily around her. When night came,
and the little sister was tired, she would say
her prayers, lay her head on the fawn’s back for
a pillow, and sleep peacefully until morning.
Their life in the woods would have been a very
happy one, if the brother could only have had
his proper form.

The maiden had lived a long time in the
forest with the fawn for her only companion,
when it happened the king of the country held
a great hunt. The loud blasts of the horn, the
baying of the hounds, the lusty cries of the
huntsmen, sounded on every side. The young
deer heard them, and was eager for the chase.
“Please let me join the hunt,” he said to his
sister; ‘I cannot restrain myself any longer,”
and he begged so piteously, that at last she
consented.

“At evening you must come back again,”
she said. ‘But I shall have my door locked
against those wild hunters, and that I may
know you when you knock, say: ‘Sister, let me
in. If you do not say this, I shall not open the
door.”

She opened the door and the deer bounded
away, glad and joyful to breathe the fresh air,
and be free. The king and his huntsmen saw
the beautiful animal, and started in chase of
him, but they could not catch him, and when
they thought they had him safe, he sprang over
the bushes and disappeared. As soon as it be-
came dark, he ran to the little cottage, knocked
at the door, and cried: ‘Sister, let me in.”
The door was quickly opened; he went in, and
rested all night on his soft bed.

The next morning the chase was continued,
and when the deer heard the sound of the horn,
and the ‘Ho! ho!” of the huntsmen, he could
THE ENCHANTED FAWN.

no longer rest, and said: “‘ Let me out, sister, I
must go.”

His sister opened the door, saying to him:
“You must return at evening, and don’t forget
what I told you to say.” ;

As soon as the king and his huntsmen caught
sight of the young deer with the golden collar,
they all gave chase, but he was too quick and
nimble for them. All day long they followed
him. Towards evening the huntsmen surrounded
him, and one of them wounded him a little in
the foot, so that he limped and had to run more
slowly. One huntsman followed him to the
cottage, and heard him cry: “Sister, let me in.”
Then he saw the door open, and quickly close
again. The huntsman was astonished, and went
and told the king all he had seen and heard.
‘To-morrow,’ said the king, ‘we will once
more give him chase.”

But the maiden was very much frightened
when she saw that the deer was wounded. She
washed the blood from his foot, and bound
healing herbs on it, and said: ‘Go and lie down
upon your bed now, dear fawn, that you may
become strong and well again.”

But the wound was so slight, that the next
morning he felt nothing of it. And when he
heard the sound of the hunt again outside, he
said: “I cannot stay here, I must join them.
They will not catch me so soon again.”

‘No, no,” said his sister weeping ; ‘‘ you must
not go. They will kill you, and I shall be left
alone here in the forest, deserted by all the
world.”

“Tf I do not go, I shall die of longing,” he
said. ‘‘When [hear the hunting-horn, I feel that
I must bound away.”

With a heavy heart, his sister opened the
door, and the young deer went leaping joyfully
through the woods. When the king saw him,
he said to his huntsmen: ‘‘ Do not lose sight of
him all day, but see that no one does him any
harm.”

When evening came, the king said to his
men: ‘‘Come now, and show me where the
cottage stands.” They did so, and the king

going to the door, knocked, and cried, ‘“ Sister,
45

let me in.” The door opened, the king entered,
and he saw standing before him a maiden more
beautiful than he had ever seen before. But
how great was her astonishment on opening
the door, to see, instead of the deer, a man
enter, wearing a golden crown on his head. But
the king looked at her kindly, and extending
his hand, said: ‘‘ Will you go with me to my
castle and be my dear wife?”

“Oh, yes!” replied the maiden, “Iam willing
to go, but the deer must go also; I can never
leave him.”

‘He shall remain with you as long as you
live, and shall never want for anything,” said
the king.

At this moment the deer came bounding in.
His sister again fastened the string of rushes to
his collar, and leading him by her own hand,
they went out from the lonely cottage in the
woods for the last time.

The king placed the maiden upon his horse
and rode with her to the castle, where the mar-
riage was celebrated with great splendor, and
she became queen, and they lived together
happily for a long time, while the deer played
in the castle garden and received every care and
attention.

In the meantime, the wicked step-mother on
whose account the children had been driven
into the world, had no thought but that the
little sister had been torn to pieces by wild
animals, and that the boy, whom she had turned
into a fawn, had been shot by the hunters.
When she heard, therefore, of their good fortune,
and how happy they were, she was filled with
envy, and gave herself no rest until she had
thought of a way to destroy their happiness.

One day, her own daughter, who was as ugly
as night, and had only one eye, said to her:
‘Oh, if I had only been born a queen!”

“Be quiet now,” said the old woman; “ when
the time comes, I shall be on hand, and you
shall yet be a queen.”

The time came when a little son was born to
the queen and the king was away to the hunt.
The old woman, taking the form of a nurse,
entered the room of the queen, and said : ““Come,
LHE ENCHANTED FAIVN.

your bath is ready. Let us be quick before it could not restore, so she had her lie on the side
gets cold.” Her daughter, who was also there, where there was no eye.
carried the queen into the bath-room, where In the evening when the king came home, and
they had made a suffocating fire, and leaving heard that he hada son, he was greatly rejoiced,
her there to die, closed the door and went away. and went at once to see the queen. But as
This done, the old
woman tied a cap on
her own daughter's
head, and had her lie
down in the queen’s
place. She gave her
the form and appear-
ance of the queen as
nearly as she could,
but the lost eye she

















THE KING TAKES THE MAIDEN TO HIS CASTLE,

he drew the curtain, the old woman
cried: ‘For your life do not draw that
curtain, the queen cannot bear the
light!” So he went away without
knowing that a false queen had taken
her place.

At midnight when every one was asleep, as
the child’s nurse sat alone by the cradle, she saw
the door open and the true queen enter. She
took the child in her arms, nursed it,and then
LHE ENCHANTED FAWN.

laying it in its cradle again, covered it carefully,
and went out. She did not forget the deer, but
went to the corner where he lay and gently
stroked his back, and then silently disappeared.

In the morning the child’s nurse asked the
guard if he had seen any one leave the castle,
but he said no, he had seen noone. The queen
came many nights in this manner without speak-
ing to any one. The nurse saw her, but said
nothing to any one about it.

After some time had passed, the queen one
night began to speak, and said:

‘“* How fares my child? how fares the deer?

Twice more shall I come, and then disappear.”

The nurse made no answer, but when the
queen had gone, she went to the king and told
him everything.

“ Alas !” said the king, ‘‘what does this mean?
To-morrow night I will watch by the child.”

The next evening he went into the nursery,
and at midnight the queen came in, and said:

‘* How fares my child? how fares the deer?
Once more shall I come, and then disappear.”

She took the child in her arms as usual, and
then went out. The king would not trust him-
self to speak, but he watched the following night,
and this time she said:

‘* How fares my child? how fares the deer?
This time do I come, and then disappear.”

But the king could hold back no longer, and -
sprang towards her, saying: ‘‘ You can be no
other than my dear wife!”

“Yes, [am your dear wife,” she replied, and
at that moment she was restored to life, as well
and beautiful as ever.

Then she told the king how he had been
deceived by the wicked witch and her daughter.
He had them brought to judgment and they
were condemned to death. The daughter was
driven to the forest where she was torn to pieces
by wild beasts, and the old witch was led to
the fire and miserably burnt. No sooner was
she burnt to ashes than the young deer was
restored to his human form, and the brother and
sister spent the rest of their days happily
together.

bE -GOLDEN
«A MAN once had three sons, the youngest
of whom was considered foolish, and on this
account was despised and made fun of by every
body. One day the eldest son wished to go to
the forest, and cut wood, so his mother made
him a rich little cake, and gave him a bottle of
wine, that he might not be hungry or thirsty
while away.

When he reached the woods, he met a little
gray-headed man, who bade him good morning,
and said: “I pray you, give me a piece of the
cake that is in your pocket, anda sip of wine,
for Iam very hungry and thirsty.”

But the wise youth answered: ‘If I give
you my cake and wine, J shall have nothing for
myself, so take yourself off,’ and he went on.
He began chopping, but had not worked long

when the axe slipped and cut his arm so badly
47

he was obliged to go home and have it bound
up. The little old man was the cause of all
this trouble.

Then the second son wished to go to the
woods, and his mother made him a rich little
cake, and gave him a bottle of wine. He also
met the little gray-headed man in the woods,
and when. asked for some of his food and wine,
replied as his brother had done, and went on to
his work. But his punishment was not long in
coming. He had scarcely given two strokes
with his axe, when he hit his leg, cutting it so
badly that he had to be carried home.

Then the foolish son said: ‘‘ Father, let me
go and cut wood.”

But his father said: ‘Your brothers only came
to harm for going, what could you do, when you
know nothing about such work ?”
THE GOLDEN GOOSE.

The boy, however, begged so hard to go, that
at last his father said: ‘‘ Go along, then; you
will learn by experience.”

His mother gave him a cake, but it had been
mixed with water and baked in the ashes, and
a bottle of sour beer.

When he reached the woods, the little man
met him, and after greeting him, said: ‘' Give
mea piece of your cake, and a drink of your
bottle, [am so hungry and thirsty.”

“T have only a cake baked in the ashes and
some sour beer,” said the boy, ‘‘ but if they will
suit you, we will sit down and share them
together.”

So they seated.themselves, but when the boy
took out his cake, lo! it was changed to a beauti-
ful rich cake, and the sour beer into good wine.
After they had eaten and drank, the little man
said: ‘‘ Because you have a kind heart, and were
willing to share what you had with me, I will
reward you. Yonder stands an old tree; cut
it down, and you will find something at the
roots.” So saying he took his departure.

The boy cut down the tree, and as it fell to
the ground, he saw sitting at the roots a goose
with feathers of pure gold. He took it in his
arms, and went to an inn where he intended to
pass the night. But the landlord had three
daughters, who, when they saw the goose, were
very curious over the wonderful bird, and wished
very much to possess one of the golden feathers.
The oldest one watched her opportunity, and
when the youth had gone out, she seized the
goose by the wing to pull out a feather. But
the moment her fingers touched the bird, she
could not remove her hand, and had to remain
standing there. Soon the second daughter came,
and thought she too would have a feather, but
she no sooner touched her sister, than she was
unable to move away.

Lastly, the third one came up with the same
intention of having a feather, but the others
cried to her: ‘“Remain where you are, remain
where you are,” but she saw no reason for
remaining where she was, and thought: ‘If
you can stand by the goose, so can J.” She

sprang towards it, but as soon as she touched
48

her sister, she could not leave her. Thus all}
three sisters passed the night standing by the
goose.

The next morning the boy took the goose in
his arms and went away without so much as
noticing the three girls that followed close be-
hind, running new to the right, and now to the
left, just as he happened to turn. As they were
passing through a field, they met the parson.
‘Shame on you,” he cried to the maidens;
“why are you following that young man? Go
back home,” and he took hold of the youngest
one to turn her about. But he no sooner touched
her, than he too stuck fast, and was obliged to.
run along with them. Not long after, they passed
the sexton, who, secing the parson running
along with these maidens, called to him: * Hal-
loa, master, where are you going so fast? Have
you forgotten the christening we are to have
to-day?” and seizing the parson’s cloak, stuck
fast, and was compelled to run with them. As.
the five were trotting along together, they came
to two farmers, who were just returning from
the field, with their hoes on their shoulders. The
parson called to them to come and set him and
the sexton free. They hastened to do so, but
when they took hold of the sexton, they could
not let go, and now there were seven running
after the foolish boy and the goose.

They travelled on until they came to a city
ruled by a king whose daughter was so melan-
choly, she had never been known to laugh.
Therefore the king had proclaimed, that who-
ever should make her laugh, should receive her
as his wife. Hearing this, the young man took
his goose and went with his ridiculous train
before the princess. It had the desired effect;
when she saw the seven persons all following
the goose, and running one behind the other,
she began to laugh loudly, and the people
thought she would never stop.

Then the youth demanded his bride, but the
king was not pleased with sucha son-in-law, and
raised many objections, and finally said before
he could have his daughter, he must bring him
a man who could drink a cellarful of wine. He
remembered the little gray-headed man—he


THE GOLDEN GOOSE.

could probably help him now—so he went out
into the woods, and there on the very spot where
he had cut down the tree, saw a man sitting with
a very miserable face. ‘What is troubling you
that you look so sad?” he asked.

“ Alas! Iam so thirsty,” the man replied. “I
cannot endure cold water. I have already
drank a cask of wine, but what is a drop on a
hot stone?”

“ Oh, I can help you,” said the youth joyfully ;
“Come with me, you shall have all you want.”

He led him to the king’s cellar, and the man
drank and drank till his sides ached, but he
never ceased till the cellar was emptied.

Again the youth demanded his bride, but the
king was vexed that this fellow, whom every
one called a simpleton, should carry off his
daughter, and made a new condition that he
should first find a man who could eat a moun-
tain of bread. The simpleton thought a moment,
and then went out again to the woods. He
found a man sitting in the same place where he
had seen the other, buckling a belt around his
body, and making hideous faces.

“Tam so hungry,” he said. ‘I have eaten
a whole ovenful of bread, but what of that? My
stomach is so empty, I have to tighten my
belt, or I should die of hunger.”

‘LEE DEA TE

ONCE upon a time a cock and a hen went
nutting together, and it was agreed that which-
ever found a nut should divide with the other.
Soon the hen found a very large nut, but said
nothing about it, and tried to swallow it whole.
But the nut stuck in her throat, and fearing she
would choke to death, she screamed loudly to
the cock to bring her some water. The cock
ran as quickly as he could to a spring and said:
“ Spring, give me some water, or the hen lying
on the hill yonder, will choke to death from a
large nut she has swallowed.”

“Run first to the bride, and ask her to give

you a piece of red silk,” said the spring.
49

The stupid youth was delighted. ‘Get up
quickly, and go with me,” he cried; “I will
satisfy you.”

He took him to the king’s court-yard, where
all the flour in his kingdom had been brought,
and baked into one immense mountain of bread.
The man from the woods sat down before it,
and began to eat, and in one day the pile dis-
appeared.

A third time the youth asked for his bride,
but the king was not willing yet.

“Bring me a ship that can sail on land as
well as on water, and you shall have my daugh-
ter,” he said.

The youth went straight to the woods, and
there found the little old man with whom he
had divided his cake.

“Well,” said the man, “I have eaten and
drank for you, and now I will give you the ship,
because you were kind and merciful to me when
I was in want.”

He gave him the ship that would sail on land
as well as on water, and when the king saw it,
he could no longer refuse him his daughter. So
the marriage was celebrated, and the foolish
boy whom every one had laughed at, became a
prince, and on the death of the king, succeeded
to the throne.

OP EE ELEN:

The cock ran to the bride, and said: ‘“ Bride,
give me a piece of red silk, then the spring will
give me some water, and I can save the life of -
the hen, who is choking to death with a nut
stuck fast in her throat.” But the bride said:
“Run and bring me my wreath first, that hangs
on a willow.”

The cock ran and fetched the wreath, for
which the bride gave him the red silk, and the
spring in turn gave him the water. Quickly he
carried it to the hen, but too late, she lay on
her back quite dead. Then the cock in his
grief set up so loud acry that all the animals
and birds came and mourned with him. Six
THE DEATH OF THE HEN.

mice built a little wagon in which to carry the
hen to her grave, and when all was ready, they
harnessed themselves to it, and the cock got in
and drove.

On the way, they met a fox. ‘‘ Where are you
going, cock?” he asked.

“To bury my little hen,” was the reply.

“May I go with you?” asked the fox.

“Yes, but sitin the back part of the wagon,
or my little horses will not be able to draw
you.” said the cock.

After this the wolf, the bear, the deer, the
lion, and all the animals of the woods joined
the procession. They had not gone far before
they came to a brook.

‘ How shall we get across ?” asked the cock.

A straw lay on the bank, and said: ‘I will
throw myself across, and you can walk over
on me.”

The six mice passed first, but when they were
well over the water, the straw slipped, and they

all fell in and were drowned. Now their trouble
began anew. A live coal offered next to take
them over, but unluckily fire and water cannot
live together, and the minute the coal touched
the water, the fire went out, and it too came
to its end.

Then a stone took pity on their distress and
offered to roll into the brook and make a bridge
for them. It did so, and the cock took hold of
the wagon and drew it over himself. When he
had reached the other side with the dead hen,
he wished to bring the mourners over also, so he
went back for them, but just as he had almost
reached the bank, the wagon slipped from the
stone, and all who were in it fell into the water
and were drowned.

Now the cock was all alone with the dead
hen. He dug the grave, laid her in it, and raised
a mound over it. Then he seated himself by it,
and wept and mourned until he died—and this
was the end of the funeral party.

HANSEIZAND GRE EEE.

ONCE upon a time there lived near the borders
of a large forest a poor woodcutter with his wife
and two children—a boy named Hansel and
a girl named Grethel. They had little enough
to eat, and finally when a great famine came,
they could no longer earn their daily bread.

One night as the woodcutter lay awake think-
ing of their troubles, he sighed, and said: ‘‘ What
will become of us? How can we feed our chil-
dren when we cannot get food for ourselves
even.”

“JT know what we will do,” said his wife,
who was only the step-mother of the children.
“Early to-morrow morning we will take the
children out into the thickest part of the woods.
We will build them a fire, and give them our
only remaining piece of bread. Then we will
leave them and go to our work. They cannot
find the way home again, and we shall be freed
from them.”

‘No, wife,” said the man, “I cannot do that.
50

How could I have the heart to leave my chil-
dren alone in the woods where the wild beasts
would soon devour them.”

“Oh, what a fool!” she cried. “Then all
four of us must die of hunger. You may as
well plane the boards for our coffins at once,”
and she gave him no peace until he consented.
But his heart was full of pity and sorrow for
the poor children.

The two children, who were also too hungry
to sleep, heard what their step-mother had said
to their father.

Grethel cried bitterly and said to her brother:
‘“ Now we shall surely die.”

But Hansel said: ‘Hush! Grethel, do not
cry, I shall be able to help you.”

He waited until their parents were fast asleep,
then he got up, dressed himsclf, unfastened the
door, and slipped quietly out. The moon shone
brightly, and the white pebbles that lay in front
of the cottage. glittered like silver coins.


HANSEL AND GRETHEL.

Hansel stooped and picked up as
many of the pebbles as his pockets
would hold. Then he went back to
Grethel, and said: ‘‘Be comforted, dear
little sister, and sleep in peace. God
will not forsake us.” So saying, he
went back to bed and slept.

In the morning before the sun rose,
the step-mother came and woke the
two children, and said: ‘ Get up, you
lazy-bones, we must go into the forest
now and gather wood.” Giving each
a piece of bread, she said: ‘‘ Here is
something for your dinner. Do not eat
it before then, for you will get nothing
more.”

Grethel took the bread in her apron,
while Hansel carried the stones in his
pockets. Soon they were all on the
way to the forest. After they had
gone a little way, Hansel stopped and
looked back at the house. This he
did several times, till at last his father
said: ‘Hansel, what are you looking
at, that you lag behind so? Take care,
and don’t forget your legs.”

‘Oh, father!” replied the boy, ‘I
am looking at my white cat that sits
on the roof, and wants to say good-
bye to me.”

But his step-mother said: “ Foolish
boy! that is not your cat, but the sun
shining on the chimney.”

Hansel, however, had not been look-
ing at a cat, but had staid behind to
take a white pebble from his pocket
and drop it on the ground as they
walked along. When they reached
the middle of the forest, the father
said: ‘‘Come, children, gather some
wood now, and I will make you a fire,
so that you will not be cold.”

Hansel and Grethel gathered a pile
of twigs together, which the father
kindled. As the flames blazed up, the
step-mother said: ‘“ Lie down by the
Gre now and rest, children, while your

61

fa

A
i



‘HANSEL TOOK HIS LITTLE SISTER BY THE HAND.”
HANSEL AND GRETHEL.

father and I go into the forest and cut wood.
When we get ready to go home we will come
for you.”

Hansel and Grethel sat down by the fire, and
when noon came, ate their little piece of bread.
As long as they heard the sound of the axe,
they thought their father was near; but it was
not an axe they heard, but a limb that their
father had bound to a dead tree, so that it would
blow back and forth in the wind, and strike the
tree like an axe.

They sat by the fire a long time, till at last
their eyes became heavy, and they fell fast
asleep. When they awoke, it was dark night.
Grethel began to cry, and said: ‘“‘ How are we
to get out of the woods?”

But Hansel comforted her, saying: “Only
wait a little while until the moon rises, then we
shall find our way out.”

When the full moon had risen, Hansel took
his little sister by the hand, and followed the
white pebbles that glistened in the moonlight.
They travelled all night, and at break of day
reached their father’s house. They knocked at
the door. The old woman opened it, and when
she saw them, cried out: ‘‘ You wicked chil-
dren, what did you sleep so long in the woods
for? We thought you were never coming back
again.” But the father was overjoyed to see
them, for he had grieved to think he had left
them all alone in the forest.

Not long after this, want again stared them
in the face, and the children heard the step-
mother saying one night: ‘“‘ We shall soon have
nothing to eat; there is half a loaf of bread
yet, and then we are at the end of the rope. The
children must go away. We will take them
deeper into the woods this time, so that it will
be impossible for them to find their way out.
There is no other way for us to save ourselves.”

This made the father’s heart very sad, and he
thought: ‘It would be better to share the last
morsel with my children, and then die, than to
leave them in this way.”

But his wife would not listen to him, and
scolded and reproached him a long time. When

a person has once said A, he must also say B.
62

Because he had yielded the first time, he could
not refuse to do so the second.

The children had heard this conversation also,
and when the parents were asleep, Hansel rose
to go out and gather pebbles as he had done
before. But the step-mother had fastened the
door so securely, he could not get out. So he
went back and comforted little Grethel, telling
her not to cry, but go to sleep, and God would
surely help them.

Early in the morning the step-mother came
and pulled the children out of bed. Before they
went to the woods, she gave them each a piece
of bread for their dinners, smaller even than
she had given them before.

As they went along, Hansel, who had the
bread in his pocket, stopped every now and
then, and threw little crumbs along the path.

“Hansel,” said his father, “what are you
jooking around at? Keep in the path.”

“fam looking at my little dove, who sits on
the roof nodding good-bye to me,” answered
the boy.

‘“Simpleton,” said his step-mother, ‘there is
no dove there; it is the morning sun shining
upon the chimney.”

But Hansel still kept dropping the crumbs as
he went along. The step-mother led them far
into the woods where they had never been be-
fore in all their lives. Again the parents made
a large fire for the children, and the step-mother
said to them: ‘‘Sit here, children, and when
you are tired, you can lie down and sleep a
little. Weare going into the forest to cut wood,
and when we are ready to return, will come and
get you.”

When it was noon, Grethel divided her piece
of bread with Hansel, who had scattered his
along the way, and they ate their dinner.
Then they fell asleep. Evening came on, but
no one came for the poor children. When they
awoke, it was quite dark, and again Hansel
comforted his little sister, saying: ‘“ Wait a
little, Grethel, till the moon rises, then we can
see the bread-crumbs that I strewed along the
path, and we can find our way back to the
house.”
HANSEL AND GRETHEL.

When the moon rose, they got up, but they
could not see any bread-crumbs, for the thou-
sands of birds that fly about in the fields and
woods had picked them all up.

But Hansel cheered his sister saying: ‘“‘We
will soon find the path;” but they did not find
it. They walked all night, and all the next
day from morning until evening, but they did
not come out of the forest. They were very
hungry, for they had had
nothing to eat but a few &
berries that grew close to Nie
the ground. At last they
became so tired, their little
legs could go no farther,
and they lay down under
a tree and fell asleep.




It was now the third —~ EG SY » |
morning since they left OS! @, Es ;
their father’s house. They oN e ey?

started on their wanderings

once more, but they only

got deeper and deeper into the forest.
“Tf help does not come soon, we
shall die,” they thought. About noon
they saw a beautiful snow-white bird
sitting on a branch of a tree. It sang
so sweetly, they stopped to listen,
When it had finished its song, it spread
out its wings, and flew on before them.
They followed it until they saw it
alight on the roof of a little cottage.
What was the surprise of the children
on coming near to find that the house
was built entirely of bread, orna-
mented with cake, and that its win-
dows were of clear sugar.

‘“‘Let us stop here,” said Hansel,
‘“and have a splendid feast. I will
take a piece from the roof, and you can take a
piece from the window; how good it will taste!”

So Hansel reached up and broke a very little -

from the roof, while Grethel nibbled from one
of the window panes. Presently a soft voice
called out from the room:
‘*Nibble, nibble, like a mouse,
Who is nibbling at my house?”

53



ee pes
oUt,
a























“‘TT SPREAD OUT ITS WINGS AND FLEW ON BEFORE THEM.”

And the boy answered :

“The wind, the wind, so soft and mild!”
And the girl said:

“‘The wind, the wind, the heavenly child!”

The children kept on eating without a thought
that they were doing wrong. As the roof tasted
very nice to the hungry boy, he broke off a
HANSEL AND GRETHEL.

larger piece, and Grethel broke out a whole
round window-pane, and sitting down on the
door-step, they prepared to enjoy their feast.
But just then, the door of the cottage opened,
and avery old woman, leaning upon crutches,
came out. Hansel and Grethel were so fright-
ened that they dropped what they held in their
hands.

The old woman nodded her head, and said:
“Oh! you dear children, who has brought you
here? Come in and live with me, I will not
hurt you,” and taking both by the hand she drew
them into the cottage.
She gave them a good

sugar, milk, apples and
nuts. When they had fin-
ished, she led them to



wickedly to herself, and said: “I have them
now ; they shall not escape from me again.”
Early in the morning before the children were
awake, the old woman was up, and when she
looked at the two children as they lay quictly
sleeping, and saw their round rosy cheeks, she
muttered: ‘They will make a good bite for
me.” Then she seized Hansel with her rough
hand, and dragging him out into a little stall,
closed it with a grated door. He might scream
as much as he liked, it would not help him.
Then going back to Grethel, she shook her,






|
|









two beautiful white-curtained beds, where
they lay down and thought they were in
heaven. But the old woman was only
pretending to be friendly; she was a
wicked witch and hated children, and
had built the little cottage of bread and
cake purposely to entrap them. Whenever she
could catch a child, she killed it, and cooked
it, and ate it for her dinner—that was a feast-
day for her. Witches have red eyes and can-
not see very far, but, like animals, they have a
keen scent, and can tell when human beings are
near. So when Hansel and Grethel came near
her in their wanderings in the forest, she laughed
54

‘(SHE MUTTERED: ‘THEY WILL MAKE A GOOD BITE FOR ME.”

at ee

a”

and cried: ‘t Get up, lazy-bones, and get some
water and cook your brother something good.
I have put him out in the stall where I shalt
fatten him. When he gets fat I shall cat him.”
Grethel began to cry bitterly, but it was of no
use ; she had to do as the wicked witch told her.

The best of food was cooked for poor Hanscl,
but Grethel received nothing but crabs’ claws.


HANSEL AND GRETHEL.

Every morning the old woman crept out to the
stall and said: “Stick out your finger, Hansel,
that I may feel of it and see if you will soon be
fat.” But Hansel would reach out a little bone
instead, and as the witch could not see very
well, she thought it was his finger, and won-
dered why he did not get fatter.

When four weeks had passed, and Hansel did
not get any fatter, she became impatient, and
would not wait any longer.

‘“Heigh-ho! Grethel,” she called tothe maiden,
‘‘be quick and get some water. Hansel maybe
fat or lean, I shall kill him and cook him to-

: morrow.” How the pooc little

, . sister wept as she brought the

fi water. With the tears rolling
a















down her cheeks, she cried

= paras acd
9) SSE —

[== S cae :

ee = = oe



=—

THE DUCK CARRYING GRETHEL OVER THE WATER.

out: ‘ Dear God, help us! If we had only been
eaten by the wild beasts, then we should have
died together!”

“Save your prayers,” said the old woman,
“they won't help you.”

Grethel was ordered up early in the morning,
to kindle the fire, and hang over it the kettle of
water.

First we will bake,” she said ; ‘‘I have already
heated the oven, and kneaded the bread,” and
she pushed Grethel towards the oven in which
the fire was still burning fiercely.

“Creep in,” she cried, ‘‘and see if it is hot.
enough, and we will put the bread in right away.”

But Grethel knew what she wanted to do, and
said: ‘I do not know how to do it. How can
I creep in?”

“What a goose you are,” said the
old woman, ‘‘the door is large enough.
Look here, I can get in myself,” and
she crawled up and stuck her head in
the oven. A sudden thought came to
Grethel. She gave the old woman a
push and she fell into the
oven. Then she quickly
closed the iron door, and
drew the bolt. The old
woman howled horribly,
but Grethel ran away, leav-
ing the wicked witch to.
burn to death. She went.
straight to Hansel, and
opening the grated door,.
exclaimed joyfully : ““ Han-
sel we are free! the old
witch is dead!”

As quick as the door was:
opened, Hansel sprang out
like a bird from its cage.

They threw their arms
around each other’s necks,
and kissed each other, and
ran about for very joy.
As there was nothing to be afraid of, they went
into the witch’s house, and there in every cor-
ner stood chests of pearls and heaps of precious.
stones.
HANSEL AND GRETHEL.

“ These are much better than pebbles,” said
Hansel, as he filled his pockets.

“T will carry some home too,” said Grethel,
and she filled her little apron.

‘Now we must go,” said Hansel, ‘‘and get
out of this bewitched forest.”

They had been walking a couple of hours,
when they came to a large body of water.

“We cannot get across,” said Hansel; ‘‘I see
no bridge of any kind.”

‘There are no little boats either,” answered
Grethel. ‘“ But there is a white duck swimming
on the water, that I think will help us across if I
ask her.” So she cried:

‘* Little white duck, we are waiting for thee ;

Not a bridge nor a boat can one of us see;
Yet must we cross to the other side;
Little white duck on your back let us ride.”

The duck swam up to them, and Hansel seated
himself on her back, and wanted his sister to

’

sit behind him, but she said, ‘‘ No, that would
be too much for the duck. She must take one
of us at a time.”

The good little duck did so, and carried them
safely over. They went on their way very hap-
pily, and soon they came to a part of the woods
where they had been before. Everything grew
more and more familiar, till at last they came
in sight of their father’s house. Then they began
to run, and bursting into the room, threw their
arms around their father’s neck. The poor man
had not had one happy hour since he left his
children in the forest, and after he had lost
them, his wife died also.

Grethel shook out her apron and the pearls
and precious stones rolled all over the floor,
while Hansel drew handful after handful from
his pockets. Their sorrow and troubles were
now at an end, and they lived together in great
happiness.

SNOW-WHITE AND RED-ROSE.

A POOR widow once lived with her two
children in a lonely little cottage. In the
garden grew two rose-bushes, one red and the
other white, and because the children resembled
the roses they bore, she named one Snow-
White, and the other Red Rose.

They were as good children as ever lived,
always industrious and cheerful. But Snow-
White was quiet and gentle, while Red-Rose
loved to run about in the meadows looking for
flowers and butterflies. Snow-White preferred
to stay with her mother and help her in her
work, or. read to her if there was nothing else
todo. But the children loved each other dearly,
and whenever they went out, would walk hand
in hand. If one said: ‘We will never leave
each other,” the other would reply: ‘Never, so
long as we live,” and the mother always said
that what one had was divided with the other.

Often they went together to the woods to
gather berries, but no harm came to them: the

little hare ate a cabbage-leaf from their hands,
56

the deer grazed at their side, and the birds sat
on the branches near them and sang to them.
They met with no accident, and if night came
on before they left the woods, they had no fear,
but lay down on the moss and slept till morning.
Their mother knew they were safe, and she
also had no fears. Once when they had slept in
the woods all night, and the dawn of morning
had waked them, they saw a beautiful child
dressed in glistening garments sitting near their
bed. But as soon as they awoke, she arose,
looked at them kindly, but said nothing, and
disappeared into the forest. On looking around
them, they found they had slept near the edge
of a precipice, and that if they had gone twe
steps farther in the darkness, they would have
been dashed to pieces. When their mother heard
of this, she said the child must have been the
angel that watched over good children.
Snow-White and Red-Rose kept their mother’s
cottage so clean that it was a pleasure to look
at it. In the summer time, Red-Rose swept the
SNOW-WHITE AND RED-ROSE.

kitchen, and placed a fresh bouquet of roses by
her mother’s bedside every morning before she
was up; and in the winter, Snow-White made
the fire and hung the brass kettle on the hook,
where it shone like gold, so bright did the little
maid keep it scoured. In the evening, when
the snow fell, the mother would say: ‘Go and
bolt the door, Snow-white;” and then they
would all sit down by the fire, and the mother
would put on her spectacles and read from a
large book, while the two girls listened and
spun. Near them on the floor lay a little lamb,
while perched in one corner sat a white dove
with its head under its wing.

One evening as they were thus sitting to-
gether, some one knocked at the door as if he
were anxious to get in.

‘““Quick Red-Rose,” said the mother, “open
the door; it may be some traveller who is look-
ing for shelter.”

Red-Rose opened the door thinking to see a
poor man, but instead, she saw a big black bear
stretching his head towards the door. The
maiden screamed loudly, and jumped back;
the lamb gave a frightened bleat; the dove
flew wildly round the room, while little Snow-
White crept under her mother’s bed.

The bear began to talk and said: ‘Do not
be afraid, 1 will not hurt you. Iam half frozen
and only wish to warm myself a little by your

- fire.”

“You poor bear,” said the mother, “lie down
by the fire, but take care that you do not burn
your fur.” Then she called: ‘Snow-White,
Red-Rose, come here, the bear will not hurt
you.”

The children came out, and by degrees ap-
proached the bear, the lamb did the same, and
finally even the dove lost all fear of him. Then
the bear said: ‘“‘Get the broom, children, and
brush the snow from my fur.” They brought
the broom and brushed his fur till it was quite
clean, after which he stretched himself out com-
fortably before the fire.

In a short time they lost all fear of their
clumsy guest; they pulled his fur with both
hands, planted their feet on his back, pushed

57

him first one way and then another, and beat
him with a hazel-bush. If he growled they only
laughed, and when they were too rough with
him, he only said: ‘Spare my life, children.
Snow-White, Red-Rose, would you kill one who
loves you?”

When it was bed-time, and the children were
in bed, the mother said to the bear: “ You may
lie on the hearth all night, if you want to. You
will at least be protected from the cold and bad
weather.”

As soon as morning dawned, the children let
him out, and he trotted away over the snow to
the woods. But at a certain hour every evening,
he returned to the cottage, lay downonthe hearth,
and allowed the children to play with him a
little while. They became so accustomed to
his visits, that the door was never bolted until
their black friend had arrived.

One day in spring, when everything was green,
he said to Snow-White: “I must go away now,
and I shall not return all summer.”

‘‘Where are yougoing, dear bear?” she asked.

“‘T’must go to the woods,” he replied, “and
protect my treasures from the wicked dwarfs.
In the winter when the ground is frozen, they
have to remain below, but as soon as the sun
melts the frost, they work their way up, and steal
whatever they can find, and when once anything
is in their hands, it is not easy to get it again.”

Snow-White felt very sorry to part with the
bear. As she opened the door for him to pass
out, his fur caught on a hook, and a piece of
skin was torn off. Snow-White thought she
saw something glitter like gold under his skin,
but was not sure, for the bear trotted away very
quietly and was soon lost sight of among the
trees.

Some time after this, the mother sent the
children into the woods to gather brush-wood.
As they approached the forest, they saw that a
large tree had fallen down and that something
was springing up and down on one of the
branches, but they could not tell what it was.
When they came nearer, they saw a little dwarf
with a wrinkled face and a beard a yard long.
The end of his beard had caught in a cleft in
SNOW-WHITE AND RED-ROSE.

the tree, and the little fellow sprang about like
a puppy fastened to a string, and knew not how
to help himself.

He glared at the maidens with his fiery eyes,
and cried: ‘‘Why do you stand there? Can't
you come and help me?”

“What have you been doing, little man?”
asked Red-Rose.

“You stupid piece of curiosity!” he cried. “I
was trying to split some wood for our kitchen,
for if we used large pieces, such as you greedy
people do, the little morsels we cook would burn
up. I had driven in the wedge, and everything
was going on well, when suddenly it slipped
out, and the wood closed up so quickly that
my beautiful white beard caught, and I cannot
draw it out. Now stand there and laugh, you
smooth, milk-faced creatures! Whew! but how
ugly you are!”

The children tried to get his beard out, but
could not. Finaliy one of them said: ‘1 will
run and get some one to help us.”

“Stupid blockheads!” he snarled. ‘Who
wants any more people? you are two too many.
Can't you think of anything better?”

‘Do not be impatient,” said Snow-White ;
“T can help you,” and taking her scissors from
her pocket she cut off the end of his beard.
As soon as the dwarf felt himself free, he seized
a sack full of gold that had been hidden among
the roots of the tree, lifted it on his shoulders,
and growled; ‘‘Smooth-faced people! they
have cut off a piece of my beard. They will get
their pay for it.” Then he went away without
giving the children a glance.

One day Snow-White and Red-Rose went
to catch a mess of fish. As they came near the
brook, they saw something hopping towards the
water like a grasshopper. They ran towards it,
and saw it was the dwarf. ‘‘ Where are you
going?” asked Red-Rose. ‘Why do you wish
to jump into the water?”

‘Tam not such a fool as to wish to do that
he cried, ‘‘ but this fish is trying to pull me in.”

He had been sitting on the bank fishing, and
his beard had become entangled in the line, so

that when a large fish swallowed his bait, he
58

1»

had not the strength to draw it out, but, instead,
the fish was pulling him into the water. He
had clung to the rushes and grass, but it was
of no use, he was in great danger of losing his
life.
They held him back, and tried to get his beard
loose, but their efforts were uscless—beard and
string were in a dreadful tangle. There was
nothing to be done but to take out the scissors
and cut off another little piece of the beard.

The dwarf was ina great rage. ‘t You toad-
stools!” he cried. ‘Is that the way you dis-
figure faces? It was not enough that you cut it
once, now you must take away the best part of
it. I dare not show myself among my people
again. I wish you may have to run till your
shoe-soles come off for this.”

Then he drew a bag of pearls from the rushes,
and without another word, disappeared behind
a rock.

It happened one day that the mother sent
both the maidens to the village to buy needles,
thread, and ribbons.
through a meadow, on which, here and there,
great stones lay scattered, they saw a large bird
slowly flying in a circle over their heads. It
drew nearer and nearer the earth, till finally it
sank down by one of the stones. At the same
instant they heard a piercing scream, and run-
ning towards the bird, they saw that their old
friend, the dwarf, had been seized by the bird
and was about to be carried off. The kind-
hearted children held him firmly, and struggled
with the eagle until he let go his prize. As
soon as the dwarf had recovered from his fright,
he exclaimed in his sharp voice: ‘Could you
not have treated me a little more politely ? You
have pulled on my thin coat until it is hanging
in tatters on my back. Clumsy ragamuffins!
that’s what you are!” and without a word of
thanks, he picked up his bag of precious stones
and slipped into his den under the stone. The
maidens, who were used to his ingratitude,
thought nothing of it, but went on to the village
to make their purchases.

On their way home, as they were crossing
the meadow they came unexpectedly upon the,

The maidens came at just the right time.

As they walked along
SNOW-WHITE AND RED ROSE.

dwarf who, supposing that no one would pass
at that late hour, had come out of his den in
order that he might spread out his jewels. They
glittered and shone in the setting sun, and the
children stopped to gaze at the beautiful sight.

‘“What are you standing there gaping at?”
he cried, and his ashen-gray face became scarlet
with rage. He was about to continue his scold-
ing, when a loud growling was heard, and
a black bear rushed out of the woods. The
dwarf sprang up in fright, but he could not
reach his den, the bear was too near.

Then he cried piteously: ‘Dear bear, spare
me! I will give you all your treasures. See,
there are the precious stones! Spare my life;
of what use would such a poor little fellow be
to you, you would hardly feel me between your
teeth? Take those two wicked maidens, they
will make a tender morsel; they are as fat as
young quails—eat them instead of me!”

But the bear paid no attention to his words;
he struck him one blow with his great paw, and
he never moved again,

THE HARE AND

ONE beautiful Sunday morning in harvest-.

time when the buckwheat was in blossom, the
sun rose clear in the heavens, the morning-
wind blew warm over the fields, the larks sang
for joy, the honey-bees buzzed in the buck-
wheat, and along the country paths walked the
people on their way to church, all creatures
seemed full of joy, even the hedgehogs.

Mr. Hedgehog stood before his door with his
arms folded, humming a little song as sweetly
as any hedgehog ever sang on a Sunday
morning. As he was singing softly to himself,
it occurred to him that while his wife was washing
and dressing the children, he would takea walk
in the fields and see how his crops were comin