Citation
Little Saint Elizabeth and other stories

Material Information

Title:
Little Saint Elizabeth and other stories
Creator:
Burnett, Frances Hodgson, 1849-1924 ( Author, Primary )
Birch, Reginald Bathurst, 1856-1943 ( Illustrator )
Browne, Frances, 1816-1879
Charles Scribner's Sons ( Publisher )
J.J. Little & Co ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
Charles Scribner's Sons
Manufacturer:
J.J. Little & Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
146, [16] p. : ill. ; 22 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1890 ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1890 ( rbgenr )
Baldwin -- 1890
Genre:
Children's stories
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.
General Note:
First ed. BAL 2077.
General Note:
"The second story is Mrs. Burnett's version of Granny's wonderful chair by Frances Browne"--Osborne, cited below.
General Note:
Advertisement "By the same author" on verso of half-title.
General Note:
Frontispiece has guard-sheet.
General Note:
Includes list of illustrations.
General Note:
Cf. Osborne Coll., p. 329.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Frances Hodgson Burnett ; illustrated by Reginald B. Birch.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
021392024 ( ALEPH )
ALG3280 ( NOTIS )
00249847 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

E20080318_AAAAAY.xml

UF00078658_00001.pdf

UF00078658_00001.txt

00026.txt

00047.txt

00080.txt

00058.txt

00105.txt

00060.txt

00054.txt

00092.txt

00051.txt

00055.txt

00061.txt

00153.txt

00162.txt

00137.txt

00067.txt

00142.txt

00037.txt

00033.txt

00100.txt

00096.txt

00145.txt

00033b.txt

00108.txt

00062.txt

00002.txt

00112.txt

00146.txt

00076.txt

00057.txt

00148.txt

00158.txt

00087.txt

00066.txt

00073.txt

00075.txt

00007.txt

00127.txt

00027.txt

00063.txt

00114.txt

00091.txt

00071.txt

00120.txt

UF00078658_00001_pdf.txt

00059.txt

00136.txt

00150.txt

00042.txt

00012.txt

00156.txt

00125.txt

00023.txt

00039.txt

00122.txt

00163.txt

00133.txt

00072.txt

00081.txt

00020.txt

00038.txt

00151.txt

00101.txt

00011.txt

00160.txt

00034.txt

00010.txt

00083.txt

00157.txt

00143.txt

00024.txt

00110.txt

00093.txt

00117.txt

00152.txt

00022.txt

00119.txt

00111.txt

00154.txt

00126.txt

00135.txt

00172.txt

00170.txt

00070.txt

00032.txt

00138.txt

00068.txt

00107.txt

00128.txt

00140.txt

00064.txt

00008.txt

00035.txt

00095.txt

00090.txt

00116.txt

00118.txt

00005.txt

00103.txt

00166.txt

00017.txt

00139.txt

00097.txt

00050.txt

00121.txt

00085.txt

00098.txt

00113.txt

00052.txt

00144.txt

00084.txt

00069.txt

00134.txt

00088.txt

00029.txt

00074.txt

E20080318_AAAAAY_xml.txt

00132.txt

00077.txt

00041.txt

00053.txt

00164.txt

00104.txt

00115.txt

00078.txt

00149.txt

00141.txt

00131.txt

00021.txt

00028.txt

00033a.txt

00031.txt

00046.txt

00147.txt

00044.txt

00013.txt

00001.txt

00109.txt

00099.txt

00102.txt

00040.txt

00129.txt

00094.txt

00159.txt

00014.txt

00086.txt

00130.txt

00049.txt

00079.txt

00048.txt

00165.txt

00123.txt

00065.txt

00106.txt

00015.txt

00056.txt

00045.txt

00161.txt

00171.txt

00173.txt

00030.txt

00089.txt

00082.txt

00155.txt

00036.txt

00124.txt

00043.txt

00025.txt

00003.txt


Full Text




Mi
IN

Hy)

y)
yy)











The Baldwin Library

University
RmB of
Florida















y

df

oe 0)
Guy.



LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH

AND: OTHER STORIES



BY THE. SAME AUTHOR.

ere LORD
a
FAUNTLEROY.







SQUARE 8vo, $2.00.

AS “In ‘Little Lord
\

\
another charming child

“\° to add to our gallery of

juventle heroes and heroines ; one

him with real regret when the episode

zs over.”’—LoutsA M. ALcoTr.



ARA CREWE.



SQUARE 8vo, $1.00.



“ Everybody was in
love with ‘ Little Lord
Fauntleroy, and I
think all the world
and the rest of man-
kind will be in love
with ‘Sara Crewe.’
The tale is so tender,

so wise, so human,



that I wish every girl
in America could read it, for I think every one
would be made better by it.”

—Louisz CHANDLER Movutton.

Illustrated by REGINALD ®B. BIRCH.































































































\Page 23.)

IT WAS AUNT CLOTILDE, WHO HAD SUNK FORWARD WHILE KNEELING AT PRAYER,



Flv SAIN] ELIZABETH

AND

OTHER STORIES

BY

FRANCES HODGSON BURNETT



ILLUSTRATED BY REGINALD B. BIRCH

NEW YORK
CHARLES SCRIBNER’S SONS
1890



CopyRIGHT, 1890, BY

CHARLES SCRIBNER’S, SONS.



[AZ rights reserved.|

Press of J. J. Little & Co.,
Astor Place, New York.



CONTENTS:

LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH. — .- . : : : . Page 15

THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRYFOOT—

Part I. . : : : : : : : oe G)
Part Il. 5 5 x : : “ 6 Secc a7)
Part Ill. . ‘ : : : dj ; é Coe on
THE PROUD LITTLE GRAIN OF WHEAT. ; Be O39

BEHIND THE WHITE BRICK. . : : . : oe 1E25







LIST OR IE LOS TT KA TEONS:
FROM DRAWINGS BY REGINALD B. BIRCH.

It was Aunt Clotilde, who had sunk forward while kneeling

at prayer, : : : . ‘ : : . Frontispiece

“« There she is,’’ they would cry,

The villagers did not stand in awe of her, . c : 7

‘© Uncle. Bertrand,’’ said the child, clasping her bands,

“Why ts it that you cry ?’’ she ashed gently;

Her strength deserted her—she fell upon her knees in the snow, .
“Why,” exclaimed Fairyfoot, ‘‘ I'm surprised,’’

“What's the matter with the swine ?’’ he asked,

Almost immediately they found. themselves in a beautiful little
dell,

Fairyfoot loved her in a moment, and he knelt on one knee,

«* There’s the cake,’’ he said,

‘Eb! Eb!’’ be said. ‘“‘What! What! Who's this, Toot-

sicums?”’. ‘ : 5 , , ‘ ; ‘

Page

ce

ce

14

45
51
65

75

83
95

11g

135



LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH.





aX

a EN VAN cS
Z ZS N i P



A
ay

=F











7









iC a MH
eran

















































‘¢ TERE SHE IS,” THEY WOULD CRY.



LITTLE SAINT. ELIZABETH.

HE had not been brought up in America at all. She had
S been born in France, in a beautiful chéteau, and she
had been born heiress to a great fortune, but, neverthe-
less, just now she felt as if she was very poor, indeed. And
yet her home was in one of the most splendid houses in New
York. She had a lovely suite of apartments of her own,
though she was only eleven years old. She had had her own
carriage and a saddle horse, a train of masters, and govern-
esses, and servants, and was regarded by all the children of
the neighborhood as a sort of grand and mysterious little
princess, whose incomings and outgoings were to be watched
with the greatest interest.

“There she is,” they would cry, flying to their windows to
look at her. “She is going out in her carriage.” “She is
dressed all in black velvet and splendid fur.” ‘“ That is her
own, own, carriage.” “She has millions of money; and she
can have anything she wants—Jane says so!” “She is very
pretty, too; but she is so pale and has such big, sorrowful,
black eyes. I should not be sorrowful if I were in her place;



16 LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH.



but Jane says the servants say she is always quiet and looks
sad.” ‘ Her maid says she lived with her aunt, and her aunt
made her too religious.”

She rarely lifted her large dark eyes to look at them with
any curiosity. She was not accustomed to the society of
children. She had never had a child companion in her life,
and these little Americans, WHO were so very rosy and gay, and
who went out to walk or drive with groups of brothers and
sisters, and even ran in the street, laughing and playing and
squabbling healthily—these children amazed her.

Poor little Saint Elizabeth! She had not lived a very
natural or healthy life herself, and she knew absolutely
nothing of real childish pleasures. You see, it had occurred
in this way: When she was a baby of two years her young
father and mother died, within a week of each other, of a
terrible fever, and the only.near relatives the little one had
were her Aunt Clotilde and Uncle Bertrand. Her Aunt
Clotilde lived in “Normandy—her Uncle Bertrand in New
York. As these two were her only guardians, and as Ber-
trand de Rochemont was a gay bachelor, fond of pleasure
and knowing nothing of babies, it was natural that he should
be very willing that his elder sister should undertake the
rearing and education of the child.

“Only,” he wrote to Mademoiselle de Rochemont, “don’t
end by training her for an abbess, my dear Clotilde.”

There was a very great difference between these two peo-«
ple—the distance between the gray stone chateau in Normandy







LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH. 17



and the brown stone mansion in New York was not nearly so
great as the distance and difference between the two lives.
And yet it was said that in her first youth Mademoiselle de
Rochemont had been as gay and fond of pleasure as either of
her brothers. And then, when her life was at its brightest
and gayest—when she was a beautiful and brilliant young
woman—she had had a great and bitter sorrow, which had
changed her for ever. From that time she had never left the
house in which she had been born, and had lived the life of a
nun in everything but being enclosed in convent walls. At
first she had had her parents to take care of, but when they
died she had been left entirely alone in the great chdéeau,
and devoted herself to prayer and works of charity among
the villagers and country people.

“Ah! she is good—she is a saint Mademoiselle,” the poor
people always said when speaking of her; but they also
always looked a little awe-stricken when she appeared, and
never were sorry when she left them.

She was a tall woman, with a pale, rigid, handsome face,
which never smiled. She did nothing but good deeds, but
however grateful her pensioners might be, nobody would ever
have dared to dream of loving her. She was just and cold
and severe. She wore always a straight black serge gown,
broad bands of white linen, and a rosary and crucifix at her
waist. She read nothing but religious works and legends of
the saints and martyrs, and adjoining her private apartments

was a little stone chapel, where the servants said she used to
2



18 LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH.



kneel on the cold floor before the altar and pray for hours in
the middle of the night.

The little cwvé of the village, who was plump and comfort-
able, and who had the kindest heart and the most cheerful
soul in the world, used to remonstrate with her, always in a
roundabout way, however, never quite as if he were referring
directly to herself.

‘‘One must not let one’s self become the stone image of
goodness,” he said once. “Since one is really of flesh and
blood, and lives among flesh and blood, that is not best.
No, no; it is not best.”

But Mademoiselle de Rochemont never seemed exactly of
flesh and blood—she was more like a marble female saint
who had descended from her pedestal to walk upon the earth.

And she did not change, even when the baby Elizabeth
was brought to her. She attended strictly to the child’s
comfort and prayed many prayers for her innocent soul, but
it can be scarcely said that her manner was any softer or
that she smiled more. At first Elizabeth used to scream at
the sight of the black, nun-like dress and the rigid, hand-
some face, but in course of time she became accustomed to
them, and, through living in an atmosphere so silent and
without brightness, a few months changed her from a laugh-
ing, romping baby into a pale, quiet child, who rarely made
any childish noise at all.

In this quiet way she became fond of her aunt. She saw
little of anyone but the servants, who were all trained to quiet-





LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH. 19



ness also. Assoon as she was old enough her aunt began her
religious training. Before she could speak plainly she heard
legends of saints and stories of martyrs. She was taken into
the little chapel and taught to pray there. She believed in
miracles, and would not have been surprised at any moment
if she had met the Child Jesus or the Virgin in the beautiful
rambling gardens which surrounded the chéteau. She was a
sensitive, imaginative child, and the sacred romances she
heard filled all her mind and made up her little life. She
wished to be a saint herself, and spent hours in wandering in
the terraced rose gardens wondering if such a thing was pos-
sible in modern days, and what she must do to obtain such
holy victory. Her chief sorrow was that she knew herself to
be delicate and very timid—so timid that she often suffered
when people did not suspect it—and she was afraid that she
was not brave enough to be a martyr. Once, poor little one!
when she was alone in her room, she held her hand over a
burning wax candle, but the pain was so terrible that she
could not keep it there. Indeed, she fell back white and faint,
and sank upon her chair, breathless and in tears, because she
felt sure that she could not chant holy songs if she were being
burned at the stake. She had been vowed to the Virgin in
her babyhood, and was always dressed in white and blue, but
her little dress was a small conventual robe, straight and nar-
row cut, of white woollen stuff, and banded plainly with blue
at the waist. She did not look like other children, but she
was very sweet and gentle, and her pure little pale face and



20 LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH.



large, dark eyes had a lovely dreamy look. When she was
old enough to visit the poor with her Aunt Clotilde—and she
was hardly seven years old when it was considered proper
that she should begin—the villagers did not stand in awe
of her. They began to adore her, almost to worship her,
as if she had, indeed, been a sacred child. The little ones
delighted to look at her, to draw near her sometimes and
touch her soft white and blue robe. And, when they did so,
she always returned their-looks with such a tender, sympa-
thetic smile, and spoke to them in so gentle a voice, that
they were in ecstasies. They used to talk her over, tell sto-
ries about her when they were playing together afterwards.

“The little Mademoiselle,” they said, “she is a child saint.
I have heard them say so. Sometimes there is a little light
round her head. One day her little white robe will begin to
shine too, and her long sleeves will be wings, and she will
spread them and ascend through the blue. sky to Paradise.
You will see if it is not so.”

So, in this secluded world in the gray old chéteau, with no
companion but her aunt, with no occupation but her studies
and her charities, with no thoughts but those of saints and
religious exercises, Elizabeth lived until she was eleven years
old. Then a great grief befell her. One morning, Made-
moiselle de Rochemont did not leave her room at the regular
hour. As she never broke a rule she had made for herself
and her household, this occasioned great wonder. Her old
maid servant waited half an hour—went to her door, and







THE VILLAGERS DID NOT STAND IN AWE OF HER.













LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH. 23

took the liberty of listening to hear if she was up and moving
about her room. There was no sound. Old Alice returned,
looking quite agitated. ‘Would Mademoiselle Elizabeth
mind entering to see if all was well? Mademoiselle her aunt
might be in the chapel.”

Elizabeth went. Her aunt was not in herroom. Then
she must be in the chapel. The child entered the sacred little
place. The morning sun was streaming in through the stained-
glass windows above the altar—a broad ray of mingled brilliant
colors slanted to the stone floor and warmly touched a dark
figure lying there. It was Aunt Clotilde, who had sunk for-
ward while kneeling at prayer and had died in the night.

That was what the doctors said when they were sent for.
She had been dead some hours—she had died of disease of
the heart, and apparently without any pain or knowledge of
the change coming to her. Her face was serene and beauti-
ful, and the rigid look had melted away. Someone said she
looked like little Mademoiselle Elizabeth; and her old ser-
vant Alice wept very much, and said, ‘‘ Yes—yes—it was so
when she was young, before her unhappiness came. She had
the same beautiful little face, but she was more gay, more of
the world. Yes, they were much alike then.”

Less than two months from that time Elizabeth was living
in the home of her Uncle Bertrand, in New York. He had
come to Normandy for her himself, and taken her back with
him across the Atlantic. She was richer than ever now, as a
great deal of her Aunt Clotilde’s money had been left to her,



24 LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH.



and Uncle Bertrand was her guardian. He was a handsome,
elegant, clever man, who, having lived long in America and
being fond of American life, did not appear very much like a
Frenchman—at least he did not appear so to Elizabeth, who
had only seen the cwvé and the doctor of the village. Secretly
he was very much embarrassed at the prospect of taking care
of a little girl, but family pride, and the fact that such a very
little girl, who was also such a very great heiress, must be
taken care of sustained him. But when he first saw Eliza-
beth he could not restrain an exclamation of consternation.
She entered the room, when she was sent for, clad in a
strange little nun-like robe of black serge, made as like her
dead aunt’s as possible. At her small waist were the rosary
and crucifix, and in her hand she held a missal she had for-



gotten in her agitation to lay down
“But, my dear child,” exclaimed Uncle Bertrand, staring
at her aghast.

He managed to recover himself very quickly, and was, in
his way, very kind to her; but the first thing he did was to
send to Paris for a fashionable maid and fashionable mourn-
ing.

‘Because, as you will see,” he remarked to Alice, “we
cannot travel as we are. It is a costume for a convent or the
stage.”

Before she took off her little conventual robe, Elizabeth
went to the village to visit all her poor. The curé went with
her and shed tears himself when the people wept and kissed



LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH. 25



her little hand. When the child returned, she went into the
chapel and remained there for a long time.

She felt as if she was living ina dream when all the old
life was left behind and she found herself in the big luxurious
house in the gay New York street. Nothing that could be
done for: her comfort had been left undone. She had sev-
eral beautiful rooms, a wonderful governess, different masters
to teach her, her own retinue of servants as, indeed, has been
already said.

But, secretly, she felt bewildered and almost terrified,
everything was so new, so strange, so noisy, and so brilliant.
The dress she wore made her feel unlike herself; the books
they gave her were full of pictures and stories of worldly
things of which she knew nothing. Her carriage was brought
to the door and she went out with her governess, driving
round and round the park with scores of other people who
looked at her curiously, she did not know why. The truth
was that her refined little face was very beautiful indeed, and
her soft dark eyes still wore the dreamy spiritual look which
made her unlike the rest of the world.

‘She looks like a little princess,” she heard her uncle say
one day. “She will be some day a beautiful, an enchanting
woman—her mother was so when she died at twenty, but she
had been brought up differently. This one is a little devotee.
I am afraid of her. Her governess tells me she rises in the
night to pray.” He said it with light laughter to some of his
gay friends by whom he had wished the child to be seen. He



26 LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH.



did not know that his gayety filled her with fear and pain.
She had been taught to believe gayety worldly and sinful, and
his whole life was filled with it. He had brilliant parties—
he did not go to church—he had no pensioners—he seemed
to think of nothing but pleasure. Poor little Saint Elizabeth
prayed for his soul many an hour when he was asleep after a
grand dinner or supper party.

He could not possibly have dreamed that there was no
one of whom she stood in such dread; her timidity increased ,
ten fold in his presence. When he sent for her and she went
into the library to find him luxurious in his arm chair, a novel
on his knee, a cigar in his white hand, a tolerant, half cynical
smile on his handsome mouth, she could scarcely answer his
questions, and could never find courage to tell what she
so earnestly desired. She had found out early that Aunt
Clotilde and the curé, and the life they had led, had only
aroused in his mind a half-pitying amusement. It seemed to
her that he did not understand and had strange sacrilegious
thoughts about them—he did not believe in miracles—he
smiled when she spoke of saints. How could she tell him
that she wished to spend ali her money in building churches
and giving alms to the poor? That was what she wished to
tell him—that she wanted money to send back to the village,
that she wanted to give it to the poor people she saw in the
streets, to those who lived in the miserable places.

But when she found herself face to face with him and he
said some witty thing to her and seemed to find her only amus-



LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH. 27



ing, all her courage failed her. Sometimes she thought she
would throw herself upon her knees before him and beg him
to send her back to Normandy—to let her live alone in the
chateau as her Aunt Clotilde had done.

One morning she arose very early, and knelt a long time
before the little altar she had made for herself in her dressing
room. It was only a table with some black velvet thrown over
it, a crucifix, a saintly image, and some flowers standing upon
it. She had put on, when she got up, the quaint black serge
robe, because she felt more at home in it, and her heart was
full of determination. The night before she had received a
letter from the curé and it had contained sad news. A fever
had broken out in her beloved village, the vines had done
badly, there was sickness among the cattle, there was already
beginning to be suffering, and if something were not done for
the people they would not know how to face the winter. In
the time of Mademoiselle de Rochemont they had always
been made comfortable and happy at Christmas. What was
to be done? The curé ventured to write to Mademoiselle
Elizabeth.

The poor child had scarcely slept at all. Her dear vil-
lage! Her dear people! The children would be hungry; the
cows would die; there would be no fires to warm those who
were old.

“T must go to uncle,” she said, pale and trembling. “I
must ask him to give me money. I am afraid, but it is right
to mortify the spirit. The martyrs went to the stake. The



Be LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH.

holy Saint Elizabeth was ready to endure anything that she
might do her duty and help the poor.”

Because she had been called Elizabeth she had thought and
read a great deal of the saint whose namesake she was—the
saintly Elizabeth whose husband was so wicked and cruel,
and who wished to prevent her from doing good deeds. And
oftenest of all she had read the legend which told that one
day as Elizabeth went out with a basket of food to give to the
poor and hungry, she had met her savage husband, who had
demanded that she should tell him what she was carrying, and
when she replied ‘‘ Roses,” and he tore the cover from the
basket to see if she spoke the truth, a miracle had been per-
formed, and the basket was filled with roses, so that she had
been saved from her husband’s cruelty, and also from telling
an untruth. To little Elizabeth this legend had been beauti-
ful and quite real—it proved that if one were doing good,
the saints would take care of one. Since she had been in
her new home, she had, half consciously, compared her Uncle
Bertrand with the wicked Landgrave, though she was too
gentle and just to think he was really cruel, as Saint Eliza- _
beth’s husband had been, only he did not care for the poor,
and loved only the world—and surely that was wicked. She
had been taught that to care for the world at all was a fatal sin.

She did not eat any breakfast. She thought she would
fast until she had done what she intended to do. It had been
her Aunt Clotilde’s habit to fast very often.

She waited anxiously to hear that her Uncle Bertrand had



LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH. 29



left his room. He always rose late, and this morning he was
later than usual as he had had a long gay dinner party the
night before: ,

It was nearly twelve before she heard his door open.
Then she went quickly to the staircase. Her heart was beat-
ing so fast that she put her little hand to her side and
waited a moment to regain her breath. She felt quite cold.

“Perhaps I must wait until he has eaten his breakfast,” —
she said. “Perhaps I must not disturb him yet. It would
make him displeased. I will wait—yes, for a little while.”

She did not return to her room, but waited upon the stairs.
It seemed to be a long time. It appeared that a friend break-

fasted with him. She heard a gentleman come in and recog-

nized his voice, which she had heard before. She did not

know what the gentleman’s name was, but she had met him
going in and out with her uncle once or twice, and had thought
he had a kind face and kind eyes. He had looked at her in
an interested way when he spoke to her—even as if he were
a little curious, and she had wondered why he did so.

When the door of the breakfast room opened and shut
as the servants went in, she could hear the two laughing
and talking. They seemed to be enjoying themselves very
much. Once she heard an order given for the mail phaeton.
They were evidently going out as soon as the meal was over.

At last the door opened and they were coming out. Eliza-
beth ran down the stairs and stood in a small reception room.

Her heart began to beat faster than ever.



30 LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH.

“The blessed martyrs were not afraid,” she whispered to
herself.

“Uncle Bertrand!” she said, as he approached, and she

”



scarcely knew her own faint voice. ‘Uncle Bertrand

He turned, and seeing her, started, and exclaimed, rather
impatiently—evidently he was at once amazed and displeased
to see her. He was in a hurry to get out, and the sight of her
odd little figure, standing in its straight black robe between
the portzeres, the slender hands clasped on the breast, the
small pale face and great dark eyes uplifted, was certainly a
surprise to him.

“Elizabeth !” he said, “what do you wish? Why do you
come downstairs? And that impossible dress! Why do you
wear it again? It is not suitable.”

“Uncle Bertrand,” said the child, clasping her hands still
more tightly, her eyes growing larger in her excitement and
terror under his displeasure, “it is that 1 want money—a great
deal. 1 beg your pardon if 1 derange you. It is for the
poor. Moreover, the curé has written the people of the vil-
lage are ill—the vineyards did not yield well. They must
have money. I must send them some.”

Uncle Bertrand shrugged his shoulders.

“That is the message of monszeur le curé, is it?” he said.
“He wants money! My dear Elizabeth, I must inquire
further. You have a fortune, but I cannot permit you to

”



throw it away. You are a child, and do not understand
‘‘ But,” cried Elizabeth, trembling with agitation, “ they are



















































fia






















i bi an mF i
We ug

“UNCLE BERTRAND,” SAID THE CHILD, CLASPING HER HANDS,



in i ih















LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH. 33



so poor when one does not help them; their vineyards are so
little, and if the year is bad they must starve. Aunt Clotilde
gave to them every year—even in the good years. She said
they must be cared for like children.”

“ That was your Aunt Clotilde’s charity,” replied her uncle.
“Sometimes she was not so wise as she was devout. I must
know more of this. I have no time at present. I am going
out of town. Ina few days I will reflect upon it. Tell your
maid to give that hideous garment away. Go out to drive—
amuse yourself—you are too pale.”

Elizabeth looked at his handsome, careless face in utter
helplessness. This was a matter of life and death to her; to
him it meant nothing.

“But it is winter,” she panted, breathlessly; ‘there is
snow. Soon it will be Christmas, and they will have nothing
—no candles for the church, no little manger for the holy



child, nothing for the poorest ones. And the children 4

“Tt shall be thought of later,” said Uncle Bertrand. “I
am too busy now. Be reasonable, my child, and run away.
You detain me.”

He left her with a slight impatient shrug of his shoulders
and the slight amused smile on his lips. She heard him
speak to his friend.

‘‘She was brought up by one who had renounced the
world,” he said, “and she has already renounced it herself—
pauvre petite enfant / At eleven years she wishes to devote

her fortune to the poor and herself to the Church,”
7 :



34 LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH.



Elizabeth shrank back into the shadow of the portzeres.
Great burning tears filled her eyes and slipped down her
cheeks, falling upon her breast.

“He does not care,” she said; “he does not know. And
I do no one good—no one.” And she covered her face
with her hands and stood sobbing all alone.

When she returned to her room she was so pale that her
maid looked at her anxiously, and spoke of it afterwards to
the other servants. They were all fond of Mademoiselle
Elizabeth. She was always kind and gentle to everybody.

Nearly all the day she sat, poor little saint! by her window
looking out at the passers-by in the snowy street. But she
_ scarcely saw the people at all, her thoughts were far away, in
the little village where she had always spent her Christmas
before. Her Aunt Clotilde had allowed her at such times to
do so much. There had not been a house she had not
carried some gift to; not a child who had been forgotten.
And the church on Christmas morning had been so beautiful
with flowers from the hot-houses of the ché¢eau. It was for
the church, indeed, that the conservatories were chiefly kept
up. Mademoiselle de Rochemont would scarcely have per-
mitted herself such luxuries.

But there would not be flowers this year, the chateau was
closed ; there were no longer gardeners at work, the church
would be bare and cold, the people would have no gifts, there
would be no pleasure in the little peasants’ faces. Little
Saint Elizabeth wrung her slight hands together in her lap.



LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH. 35



“Oh,” she cried, “what can I do? And then there is the
poor here—so many. And I do nothing. The Saints will be
angry; they will not intercede for me. I shall be lost!”

It was not alone the poor she had left in her village who
were a grief to her. As she drove through the streets she
saw now and then haggard faces; and when she had ques-
tioned a servant who had one day come to her to ask for
charity for a poor child at the door, she had found that in
parts of this great, bright city which she had not seen, there
was said to be cruel want and suffering, as in all great cities.

“ And it is so cold now,” she thought, ‘with the snow on
the ground.”

The lamps in the street were just beginning to be lighted
when her Uncle Bertrand returned. It appeared that he had
brought back with him the gentleman with the kind face.
They were to dine together, and Uncle Bertrand desired that
Mademoiselle Elizabeth should join them. Evidently the
journey out of town had been delayed for a day at least.
There came also another message: Monsieur de Rochemont
wished Mademoiselle to send to him by her maid a certain
box of antique ornaments which had been given to her by
her Aunt Clotilde. Elizabeth had known less of the value
of these jewels than of their beauty. She knew they were
beautiful, and that they had belonged to her Aunt Clotilde in
the gay days of her triumphs as a beauty and a brilliant and
adored young woman, but it seemed that they were also very
curious, and Monsieur de Rochemont wished his friend to see



36 LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH.



them. When Elizabeth went downstairs she found them
examining them together.

“They must be put somewhere for safe keeping,” Uncle
Bertrand was saying. ‘It should have been done before. 1
will attend to it.”

The gentleman with the kind eyes looked at Elizabeth
with an interested expression as she came into the room.
Her slender little figure in its black velvet dress, her delicate
little face with its large soft sad eyes, the gentle gravity of
her manner made her seem quite unlike other children.

He did not seem simply to find her amusing, as her Uncle
Bertrand did. She was always conscious that behind Uncle
Bertrand’s most serious expression there was lurking a faint
smile as he watched her, but this visitor looked at her ina
different way. He was a doctor, she discovered. Dr. Norris,
her uncle called him, and Elizabeth wondered if perhaps his
profession had not made him quick of sight and kind.

She felt that it must be so when she heard him talk at
dinner. She found that he did a great deal of work among
the very poor—that he had a hospital, where he received
little children who were ill—who had perhaps met with
accidents, and could not be taken care of in their wretched’
homes. He spoke most frequently of terrible quarters, which
he called Five Points; the greatest poverty and suffering
was there. And he spoke of it with such eloquent sympathy,
that even Uncle Bertrand began to listen with interest.

“Come,” he said, “you are a rich, idle fellow, De Roche-



LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH. 37



mont, and we want rich, idle fellows to come and look into
all this and do something for us. You must let me take you
with me some day.”

“It would disturb me too much, my good Norris,” said
Uncle Bertrand, with a slight shudder. “I should not enjoy
my dinner after it.”

“Then go without your dinner,” said Dr. Norris. ‘These
people do. You have too many dinners. Give up one.”

Uncle Bertrand shrugged his shoulders and smiled.

“It is Elizabeth who fasts,” he said. ‘ Myself, I prefer to
dine. And yet, some day, I may have the fancy to visit this
place with you.”

Elizabeth could scarcely have been said to dine this even-
ing. She could not eat. She sat with her large, sad eyes
fixed upon Dr. Norris’ face as he talked. Every word he
uttered sank deep into her heart. The want and suffering of
which he spoke were more terrible than anything she had
ever heard of—it had been nothing like this in the village.
Oh! no, no. As she thought of it there was such a look in
her dark eyes as almost startled Dr. Norris several times
when he glanced at her, but as he did not know the par-
ticulars of her life with her aunt and the strange training she
had had, he could not possibly have guessed what was going
on in her mind, and how much effect his stories were having.
The beautiful little face touched him very much, and the
pretty French accent with which the child spoke seemed
very musical to him, and added a great charm to the gentle,



38 LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH,



serious answers she made to the remarks he addressed to her.
He could not help seeing that something had made little
Mademoiselle Elizabeth a pathetic and singular little creat-
ure, and he continually wondered what it was.

“Do you think she is a happy child?” he asked Monsieur
de Rochemont when they were alone together over their
cigars and wine.

“Happy?” said Uncle Bertrand, with his light smile.
“She has been taught, my friend, that to be happy upon
earth is a crime. That was my good sister's creed. One
must devote one’s self, not to happiness, but entirely to good
works. I think I have told you that she, this little one,
desires to give all her fortune tothe poor. Having heard you
this evening, she will wish to bestow it upon your Five Points.”

When, having retired from the room with a grave and
stately little obeisance to her uncle and his guest, Elizabeth
had gone upstairs, it had not been with the intention of going
to bed. She sent her maid away and knelt before her altar
for a long time.

“The Saints will tell me what to do,” she said. “The
good Saints, who are always gracious, they will vouchsafe to
me some thought which will instruct me if I remain long
enough at prayer.”

She remained at prayer a long time. When at last she
arose from her knees it was long past midnight, and she was
tired and weak, but the thought had not been given to her.

But just as she laid her head upon her pillow it came,



LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH. 39



The ornaments given to her by her Aunt Clotilde somebody
would buy them. They were her own—it would be right to
sell them—to what better use could they be put? Was it not
what Aunt Clotilde would have desired? Had she not told
her stories of the good and charitable who had sold the
clothes from their bodies that the miserable might be helped ?
Yes, it was right. These things must be done. All else was
vain and useless and of the world. But it would require
courage—great courage. To go out alone to find a place
where the people would buy the jewels—perhaps there might
be some who would not want them. And then when they
were sold to find this poor and unhappy quarter of which
her uncle’s guest had spoken, and to give to those who
needed—all by herself. Ah! what courage it would require.
And then Uncle Bertrand, some day he would ask about the
ornaments, and discover all, and his anger might be terrible.
No one had ever been angry with her; how could she bear
it. But had not the Saints and Martyrs borne everything?
had they not gone to the stake and the rack with smiles?
She thought of Saint Elizabeth and the cruel Landgrave.
It could not be even so bad as that—but whatever the result
was it must be borne.

So at last she slept, and there was upon her gentle little
face so sweetly sad a look that when her maid came to waken
her in the morning she stood by the bedside for some moments
looking down upon her pityingly.

The day seemed very long and sorrowful to the poor child,



40 LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH.

It was full of anxious thoughts and plannings. She was so
innocent and inexperienced, so ignorant of all practical things.
She had decided that it would be best to wait until evening
before going out, and then to take the jewels and try to sell
them to some jeweller. She did not understand the. diffi-
culties that would lie in her way, but she felt very timid.

Her maid had asked permission to go out for the even-
ing and Monsieur de Rochemont was to dine out, so that
she found it possible to leave the house without attracting
attention. :

As soon as the streets were lighted she took the case of
ornaments, and going downstairs very quietly, let herself out.
The servants were dining, and she was seen by none of
them.

When she found herself in the snowy street she felt
strangely bewildered. She had never been out unattended
before, and she knew nothing of the great busy city. When
she turned into the more crowded thoroughfares, she saw
several times that the passers-by glanced at her curiously.
Her timid look, her foreign air and richly furred dress, and the
fact that she was a child and alone at such an hour, could not
fail to attract attention ; but though she felt confused and
troubled she went bravely on. It was some time before she
found a jeweller’s shop, and when she entered it the men
behind the counter looked at her ih amazement. But she
went to the one nearest to her and laid the case of jewels on
the counter before him.



LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH. At



“J wish,” she said, in her soft low voice, and with the
pretty accent, “1 wish that you should buy these.”

The man stared at her, and at the ornaments, and then at
her again.

‘“‘T beg pardon, miss,” he said.

Elizabeth repeated her request.

“T will speak to Mr. Moetyler,” he said, after a moment of
hesitation.

He went to the other end of the shop to an elderly man
who sat behind a desk. After he had spoken a few words,
the elderly man looked up as if surprised; then he glanced at
Elizabeth ; then, after speaking a few more words, he came
forward.

“You wish to sell these?” he said, looking at the case of
jewels with a puzzled expression.

“Ves,” Elizabeth answered.

He bent over the case and took up one ornament after the
other and examined them closely. After he had done this he
looked at the little girl’s innocent, trustful face, seeming more
puzzled than before.

“ Are they your own?” he inquired.

“Yes, they are mine,” she replied, timidly.

“Do you know how much they are worth ?”

“T know that they are worth much money,” said Elizabeth.
“‘T have heard it said so.”

“Do your friends know that you are going to sell
them ?”



42 LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH.





“No,” Elizabeth said, a faint color rising in her delicate
face. “But it is right that I should do it.”

The man spent a few moments in examining them again
and, having done so, spoke hesitatingly.

“Tam afraid we cannot buy them,” he said. ‘“ It would be
impossible, unless your friends first gave their permission.”

“Impossible!” said Elizabeth, and tears rose in her eyes,
making them look softer and more wistful than ever.

“We could not do it,” said the jeweller. ‘It is out of the
question under the circumstances.”

“Do you think,” faltered the poor little saint, “do you
think that nobody will buy them?”

“T am afraid not,” was the reply. ‘No respectable firm
who would pay their real value. If you'll take my advice,
young lady, you will take them home and consult your
friends,”

He spoke kindly, but Elizabeth was overwhelmed with
disappointment. She did not know enough of the world to
understand that a richly dressed little girl who offered valu-
able jewels for sale at night must be a strange and unusual
sight.

When she found herself on the street again, her long
lashes were heavy with tears.

“Tf no one will buy them,” she said, “what shall I do?”

She walked a long way—so long that she was very tired—
and offered them at several places, but as she chanced to
enter only respectable shops, the same thing happened each



LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH. 43



time. She was looked at curiously and questioned, but no
one would buy.

“They are mine,” she would say. ‘It is right that I should
sell them.” But everyone stared and seemed puzzled, and in
the end refused.

At last, after much wandering, she found herself in a
poorer quarter of the city; the streets were narrower and
dirtier, and the people began to look squalid and wretchedly
dressed ; there were smaller shops and dingy houses. She
saw unkempt men and women and uncared for little children.
The poverty of the poor she had seen in her own village
seemed comfort and luxury by contrast. She had never
dreamed of anything like this. Now and then she felt faint
with pain and horror. But she went on.

“They have no vineyards,” she said to herself. ‘No trees
and flowers—it is all dreadful—there is nothing. They need
help more than the others. To let them suffer so, and not to
give them charity, would be a great crime.”

She was so full of grief and excitement that she had ceased
to notice how everyone looked at her—she saw only the
wretchedness, and dirt and misery. She did not know, poor
child! that she was surrounded by danger—that she was not
only in the midst of misery, but of dishonesty and crime. She
had even forgotten her timidity—that it was growing late,
and that she was far from home, and would not know how to
return—she did not realize that she had walked so far that
she was almost exhausted with fatigue.











44 LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH.



She had brought with her all the money she possessed. If
she could not sell the jewels she could, at least, give some-
thing to someone in want. But she did not know to whom
she must give first. When she had lived with her Aunt
Clotilde it had been their habit to visit the peasants in their
houses. Must she enter one of these houses—these dreadful
places with the dark passages, from which she heard many
times riotous voices, and even cries, issuing ?

‘But those who do good must feel no fear,” she thought.
“It is only to have courage.” At length something happened
which caused her to pause before one of those places. She
heard sounds of pitiful moans and sobbing from something
crouched upon the broken steps. It seemed like a heap of
rags, but as she drew near she saw by the light of the street
lamp opposite that it was a woman with her head in her
knees, and a wretched child on each side of her. The children
were shivering with cold and making low cries as if they were
frightened. —

Elizabeth stopped and then ascended the steps.

“Why is it that you cry?” she asked gently. “Tell me.”

The woman did not answer at first, but when Elizabeth
spoke again she lifted her head, and as soon as she saw the
slender figure in its velvet and furs, and the pale, refined
little face, she gave a great start.

“Lord have mercy on yez!” she said in a hoarse voice
which sounded almost terrified. ‘‘ Who are yez, an’ what
bees ye dow’ in a place the loike o’ this?”



i ‘ g : c
ee |e =
eee

oy
—— eZ aan : ren goi :
= | eenill i ih wii ie a 7
| it Laos - init iil (i su

— =i a i | ine
=== h(t a
| (ile — sl i Ah !

=

SS








LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH. 47



‘‘T came,” said Elizabeth, ‘‘to see those who are poor. I
wish to help them. I have great sorrow for them. It is
right that the rich should help those who want. Tell me why
you cry, and why your little children sit in the cold.” Every-
body had shown surprise to whom Elizabeth had spoken to-
night, but no one had stared as this woman did.

“Tt’s no place for the loike o’ yez,” she said. ‘An’ it
black noight, an’ men and women wild in the drink ; an’ Pat
Harrigan insoide bloind an’ mad in liquor, an’ it’s turned me
an’ the children out he has to shlape in the snow—an’ not
the furst toime either. An’ it’s starvin’ we are—starvin’
an’ no other,” and she dropped her wretched head on her
knees and began to moan again, and the children joined
her.

“Don't let yez daddy hear yez,” she said to them. ‘‘ Whisht
now—it’s come out an’ kill yez he wiil.”

Elizabeth began to feel tremulous and faint.

“Js it that they have hunger?” she asked.

“ Not a bite or sup have they had this day, nor yesterday,”
was the answer. ‘“ The good Saints have pity on us.”

“Yes,” said Elizabeth, “the good Saints have always pity.
I will go and get some food—poor little ones.”

She had seen a shop only a few yards away—she remem-
bered passing it. Before the woman could speak again she
was gone.

“Yes,” she said, “I was sent to them—it is the answer to
my prayer—it was not in vain that I asked so long.”



48 LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH.



When she entered the shop the few people who were in it
stopped what they were doing to stare at her as others had
done—but she scarcely saw that it was so.

“ Give to mea basket,” she said to the owner of the place.
“Put in it some bread and wine—some of the things which
are ready to eat. It is for a poor woman and her little ones
who starve.”

There was in the shop among others a red-faced woman
with a cunning look in her eyes. She sidled out of the place
and was waiting for Elizabeth when she came out.

‘“« ]’m starvin’ too, little lady,” she said. ‘‘There’s many of
us that way, an’ it’s not often them with money care about it.
Give me something too,” in a wheedling voice.

Elizabeth looked up at her; her pure ignorant eyes full of
pity.

“T have great sorrows for you,” she said. ‘Perhaps the
poor woman will share her food with you.”

‘It’s the money I need,” said the woman.

‘‘T have none left,” answered Elizabeth. ‘I will come
again.”

“It’s now I want it,” the woman persisted. Then she
looked covetously at Elizabeth’s velvet fur-lined and trimmed
cloak. ‘That’s a pretty cloak you’ve on,” she said. “ You've
got another, I daresay.” ;

Suddenly she gave the cloak a pull, but the fastening did
not give way as she had thought it would.

“Ts it because you are cold that you want it?” said Eliza-



LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH. 49



beth, in her gentle, innocent way. “I will give it to you.
Take it.”

Had not the holy ones in the legends given their gar-
ments to the poor? Why should she not give her cloak ?

In an instant it was unclapsed and snatched away, and the
woman was gone. She did not even stay long enough to give
thanks for the gift, and something in her haste and rough-
ness made Elizabeth wonder and gave her a moment of
tremor.

She made her way back to the place where the other woman
and her children had been sitting; the cold wind made her
shiver, and the basket was very heavy for her slender arm.
Her strength seemed to be giving way.

As she turned the corner, a great, fierce gust of wind
swept round it, and caught her breath and made her stagger.
She thought she was going to fall; indeed, she would have
fallen but that one of the tall men who were passing put out
’ his arm and caught her. He was a well dressed man, in a
heavy overcoat; he had gloves on. Elizabeth spoke in a
faint tone.

“T thank you,” she began, when the second man uttered a
wild exclamation and sprang forward.

“Elizabeth !” he said, “ Elizabeth !”

Elizabeth looked up and uttered acry herself. It was her
Uncle Bertrand who stood before her, and his companion, who
had saved her from falling, was Dr. Norris.

For a moment it seemed as if they were almost struck
4



50 LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH.





dumb with horror ; and then her Uncle Bertrand seized her
by the arm in such agitation that he scarcely seemed himself—
the light, satirical, jesting Uncle Bertrand she had known at
all.

“What does it mean?” he cried. ‘‘ What are you doing
here, in this horrible place alone? Do you know where it is
you have come? What have you in your basket? Explain!
explain!”

The moment of trial had come, and it seemed even more
terrible than the poor child had imagined. The long strain
and exertion had been too much for her delicate body. She
felt that she could bear no more; the cold seemed to have
struck to her very heart. She looked up at Monsieur de
Rochemont’s pale, excited face, and trembled from head to
foot. A strange thought flashed into her mind. Saint Eliza-
beth, of Thuringia—the cruel Landgrave. Perhaps the Saints
would help her, too, since she was trying to do their bidding.
Surely, surely it must be so!

“ Speak !” repeated Monsieur de Rochemont. ‘Why is
this? The basket—what have you in it?”

“Roses,” said Elizabeth, ‘‘ Roses.” And then her strength
deserted her—she fell upon her knees in the snow—the
basket slipped from her arm, and the first thing which fell
from it was—no, not roses,—there had been no miracle
wrought——not roses, but the case of jewels which she had laid
on the top of the other things that it might be the more

easily carried.



ay Me sl Hy ; i i ina
Reyes eee Ki Wi os

HER STRENGTH DESERTED HER—SHE FELL UPON HER KNEES IN THE SNOW,

i re









LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH. 53





“Roses!” cried Uncle Bertrand. ‘Is it that the child is
mad? They are the jewels of my sister Clotilde.”

Elizabeth clasped her hands and leaned towards Dr. Norris,
the tears streaming from her uplifted eyes.

“Ah! monsieur,” she sobbed, “you will understand. It
was for the poor—they suffer so much. If we do not help
them our souls will be lost. I did not mean to speak falsely.
I thought the Saints—the Saints ” But her sobs filled
her throat, and she could not finish. Dr. Norris stopped, and



took her in his strong arms as if she had been a baby.

“Quick!” he said, imperatively ; ‘“we must return to the
carriage, De Rochemont. This is a serious matter.”

Elizabeth clung to him with trembling hands.

“But the poor woman who starves?” she cried. ‘The
little children—they sit up on the step quite near—the food
was for them! I pray you give it to them.”

“Yes, they shall have it,” said the Doctor. ‘Take the
basket, De Rochemont—only a few doors below. And _ it
appeared that there was something in his voice which seemed
to render obedience necessary, for Monsieur de Rochemont

actually did as he was told.
For a moment Dr. Norris put Elizabeth on her feet again,
but it was only while he removed his overcoat and wrapped
it about her slight shivering body.

“You are chilled through, poor child,” he said; “and you
are not strong enough to walk just now. You must let me
carry you.”



54 LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH.



It was true that a sudden faintness had come upon her,
and she could not restrain the shudder which shook her. It
still shook her when she was placed in the carriage which the
two gentlemen had thought it wiser to leave in one of the
more respectable streets when they went to explore the worse
ones together.

“What might not have occurred if we had not arrived at
that instant!” said Uncle Bertrand when he got into the



carriage. ‘As it is who knows what illness

“Tt will be better to say as little as possible now,” said Dr.
Norris.

“Tt was for the poor,” said Elizabeth, trembling. ‘I had
prayed to the Saints to tell me what was best. I thought I
must go. I did not mean to do wrong. It was for the
poor.”

And while her Uncle Bertrand regarded her with a
strangely agitated look, and Dr. Norris held her hand be-
tween his strong and warm ones, the tears rolled down her
pure, pale little face.

She did not know until some time after what danger she
had been in, that the part of the city into which she had
wandered was the lowest and worst, and was in some quarters
the home of thieves and criminals of every class. As her
Uncle Bertrand had said, it was impossible to say what
terrible thing might have happened if they had not met her
so soon. It was Dr. Norris who explained it all to her as
gently and kindly as was possible. She had always been



LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH. 55



fragile, and she had caught a severe cold which caused her
an illness of some weeks. It was Dr. Norris who took care
of her, and it was not long before her timidity was forgotten
in her tender and trusting affection for him. She learned to
watch for his coming, and to feel that she was no longer
lonely. It was through him that her uncle permitted her to
send to the cuvé a sum of money large enough to do all that
was necessary. It was through him that the poor woman
and her children were clothed and fed and protected. When
she was well enough, he had promised that she should help
him among his own poor. And through him—though she
lost none of her sweet sympathy for those who suffered—she
learned to live a more natural and child-like life, and to find
that there were innocent, natural pleasures to be enjoyed in
the world. In time she even ceased to be afraid of her Uncle
Bertrand, and to be quite happy in the great beautiful house.
And as for Uncle Bertrand himself, he became very fond of
her, and sometimes even helped her to dispense her charities.
He had a light, gay nature, but he was kind at heart, and
always disliked to see or think of suffering. Now and then
he would give more lavishly than wisely, and then he would
say, with his habitual graceful shrug of the shoulders—

“Yes, it appears I am not discreet. Finally, I] think I
must leave my charities to you, my good Norris—to you and
Little Saint Elizabeth.”






THE SPORY OF PRINGE PAIRYFOOT.



PREFATORY NOTE.

“Tue Story oF Prince Farryroor” was originally intended to be
the first of a series, under the general title of “ Stories from the Lost Fairy-
Book, Re-told by the Child Who Read Them,” concerning which Mrs.
Burnett relates :

““When I was a child of six or seven, I had given to me a book of fairy-stories, of
which I was very fond. Before it had been in my possession many months, it disappeared,
and, though since then I have tried repeatedly, both in England and America, to find a
copy of it, I have never been able to do so. JI asked a friend in the Congressional Library
at Washington—a man whose knowledge of books is almost unlimited—to try to learn
something about it forme. But even he could find no trace of it; and so we concluded
it must have been out of print some time. I always remembered the impression the
stories had made on me, and, though most of them had become very faint recollections, I
frequently told them to children, with additions of my own. The story of Fairyfoot I had
promised to tell a little girl ; and, in accordance with the promise, I developed the outline
I remembered, introduced new characters and conversation, wrote it upon note paper,
inclosed it in a decorated satin cover, and sent it to her. In the first place, it was
re-written merely for her, with no intention of publication ; but she was so delighted with
it, and read and re-read it so untiringly, that it occurred to me other children might like to
hear it also. So I made the plan of developing and re-writing the other stories in like
manner, and having them published under the title of ‘Stories from the Lost Fairy-Book,
Re-told by the Child Who Read Them.’ ”

The little volume in question Mrs. Burnett afterwards discovered to be
entitled “ Granny’s Wonderful Chair and the Tales it Told.”



THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRYFOOT.

RARE

NCE upon a time, in the days of the fairies, there was
in the far west country a kingdom which was called
by the name of Stumpinghame. It was a rather cu-

- rious country in several ways. In the first place, the people

who lived there thought that Stumpinghame was all the

world; they thought there was no world at all outside

Stumpinghame. And they thought that the people of Stump-

inghame knew everything that could possibly be known, and

that what they did not know was of no consequence at all.
One idea common in Stumpinghame was really very
unusual indeed. It was a peculiar taste in the matter of feet.

In Stumpinghame, the larger a person’s feet were, the more

beautiful and elegant he or she was considered ; and the more

aristocratic and nobly born a man was, the more immense
were his feet. Only the very lowest and most vulgar persons
were ever known to have small feet. The King’s feet were
simply huge ; so were the Queen’s ; so were those of the young
princes and princesses. It had never occurred to anyone that

a member of such a royal family could possibly disgrace him-

self by being born with small feet. Well, you may imagine,



60 THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRYFOOT.



then, what a terrible and humiliating state of affairs arose
when there was born into that royal family a little son, a
prince, whose feet were so very small and slender and delicate
that they would have been considered small even in other
places than Stumpinghame. Grief and confusion seized the
entire nation. The Queen fainted six times a day; the King
had black rosettes fastened upon his crown ; all the flags were
at half-mast; and the court went into the deepest mourn-
ing. There had been born to Stumpinghame a royal prince
with small feet, and nobody knew how the country could
survive it!

Yet the disgraceful little prince survived it, and did not
seem to mind at all. He was the prettiest and best tempered
baby the royal nurse had ever seen. But for his small feet,
he would have been the flower of the family. The royal
nurse said to herself, and privately told his little royal
highness’s chief bottle-washer that she “never see a hinfant
as took notice so, and sneezed as hintelligent.” But, of course,
the King and Queen could see nothing but his little feet, and
very soon they made up their minds to send him away. So
one day they had him bundled up and carried where they
thought he might be quite forgotten. They sent him to the
hut of a swineherd who lived deep, deep in a great forest
which seemed to end nowhere.

They gave the swineherd some money, and some clothes
for Fairyfoot, and told him, that if he would take care of the
child, they would send money and clothes every year. As for



THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRVYFOOT. 61



themselves, they only wished to be sure of never seeing
Fairyfoot again.

This pleased the swineherd well enough. He was poor,
and he had a wife and ten children, and hundreds of swine to
take care of, and he knew he could use the little Prince’s
money and clothes for his own family, and no one would find
it out. So he let his wife take the little fellow, and as soon
as the King’s messengers had gone, the woman took the royal
clothes off the Prince and put on him a coarse little night-
gown, and gave all his things to her own children. But the
baby Prince did not seem to mind that—he did not seem to
mind anything, even though he had no name but Prince
Fairyfoot, which had been given him in contempt by the
disgusted courtiers. He grew prettier and prettier every day,
and long before the time when other children begin to walk,
he could run about on his fairy feet.

The swineherd and his wife did not like him at all ; in fact,
they disliked him because he was so much prettier and so
much brighter than their own clumsy children. And the
children did not like him, because they were ill natured and
only liked themselves.

So as he grew older year by year, the poor little Prince was
more and more lonely. He had no one to play with, and was
obliged to be always by himself. He dressed only in the
coarsest and roughest clothes; he seldom had enough to eat,
and he slept on straw in a loft under the roof of the swine-
herd’s hut. But all this did not prevent his being strong and



62 THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRYFOOT.





rosy and active. He was as fleet as the wind, and he had a
voice as sweet as a bird’s; he had lovely sparkling eyes, and
bright golden hair ; and he had so kind a heart that he would
not have done a wrong or cruel thing for the world. As soon
as he was big enough, the swineherd made him go out into
the forest every day to take care of the swine. He was
obliged to keep them together in one place, and if any of them
ran away into the forest, Prince Fairyfoot was beaten. And
as the swine were very wild and unruly, he was very often
beaten, because it was almost impossible to keep them from
wandering off ; and when they ran away, they ran so fast, and
through places so tangled, that it was almost impossible to
follow them.

The forest in which-he had to spend the long days was a
very beautiful one, however, and he could take pleasure in
that. It was a forest so great that it was like a world in itself.
There were in it strange, splendid trees, the branches of which
interlocked overhead, and when their many leaves moved and
rustled, it seemed as if they were whispering secrets. There
were bright, swift, strange birds, that flew about in the deep
golden sunshine, and when they rested on the boughs, they,
too, seemed telling one another secrets. There was a bright,
clear brook, with water as sparkling and pure as crystal, and
with shining shells and pebbles of all colours lying in the
gold and silver sand at the bottom. Prince Fairyfoot always
thought the brook knew the forest’s secret also, and sang it
softly to the flowers as it ran along. And as for the flowers,



THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRÂ¥FOOT. 63



they were beautiful; they grew as thickly as if they had been
a carpet, and under them was another carpet of lovely green
moss. The trees and the birds, and the brook and the
flowers were Prince Fairyfoot’s friends. He loved them,
and never was very lonely when he was with them; and if
his swine had not run away so often, and if the swineherd
had not beaten him so much, sometimes—indeed, nearly all
summer—he would have been almost happy. He used to lie
on the fragrant carpet of flowers and moss and listen to the
soft sound of the running water, and to the whispering of
the waving leaves, and to the songs of the birds; and he
would wonder what they were saying to One another, and if
it were true, as the swineherd’s children said, that the great
forest was full of fairies. And then he would pretend it was
true, and would tell himself stories about them, and make
believe they were his friends, and that they came to talk to
him and let him love them. He wanted to love something
or somebody, and he had nothing to love—not even a little
dog.

One day he was resting under a great green tree, feeling
really quite happy because everything was so beautiful. He
had even made a little song to chime in with the brook’s, and
he was singing it softly and sweetly, when suddenly, as he
lifted his curly, golden head to look about him, he saw that
all his swine were gone. He sprang to his feet, feeling very
much frightened, and he whistled and called, but he heard
nothing. He could not imagine how they had all disappeared



64 THE STORF OF PRINCE FAIRFFOOT.



so quietly, without making any sound; but not one of them
was anywhere to be seen. Then his poor little heart began
to beat fast with trouble and anxiety. He ran here and
there . he looked through the bushes and under the trees; he
ran, and ran, and ran, and called and whistled, and searched ;
but nowhere—nowhere was one of those swine to be found!
He searched for them for hours, going deeper and deeper
into the forest than he had ever been before. He saw strange ,
trees and strange flowers, and heard strange sounds: and at
last the sun began to go down, and he knew he would soon
be left in the dark. His little feet and legs were scratched
with brambles, and were so tired that they would scarcely
carry him; but he dared not go back to the swineherd’s hut
without finding the swine. The only comfort he had on all
the long way was that the little brook had run by his side,
and sung its song to him; and sometimes he had stopped and
bathed his hot face in it, and had said, “‘ Oh, little brook! you
are so kind to me! You are my friend, I know. I would be
so lonely without you !”

When at last the sun did go down, Prince Fairyfoot had
wandered so far that he did not know where he was, and he
was so tired that he threw himself down by the brook, and
hid his face in the flowery moss, and said, ‘Oh, little brook!
I am so tired I can go no further; and I can never find
them !”

While he was lying there in despair, he heard a sound in
the air above him, and looked up to see what it was. It



¢

“Bt
NG, i

yy - Wa
A Al a pr

a

mare ty ee ae
is) vi fs,

yt Gin
nti!

i \ i

NIG SL A,
RS {i iz

‘ WHY,” EXCLAIMED FAIRYFOOT

rN

7

\y ih MY
gill!

wt al

af

“I'M SURPRISED !”

x ren

ISG Hie
yite Hie. MN, 7

M a

igh wl ee

yt! aN la
iy

Tae








THE STORYF OF PRINCE FAIRVFOOT. 67



sounded like a little bird in some trouble. And, surely enough,
there was a huge hawk darting after a plump little brown
bird with a red breast. The little bird was uttering sharp
frightened cries, and Prince Fairyfoot felt so sorry for it that
he sprang up and tried to drive the hawk away. The little
bird saw him at once, and straightway flew to him, and Fairy-
foot covered it with his cap. And then the hawk flew away
in a great rage.

When the hawk was gone, Fairyfoot sat down again and
lifted his cap, expecting, of course, to see the brown bird with
the red breast. But, instead of a bird, out stepped a little
man, not much higher than your little finger—a plump little
man in a brown suit with a bright red vest, and with a cocked
hat on.

“Why,” exclaimed Fairyfoot, “I’m surprised !”

“So am I,” said the little man, cheerfully. ‘I never was
more surprised in my life, except when my great-aunt’s grand-
mother got into such a rage, and changed me into a robin-
redbreast. I tell you, that surprised me!”

“YT should think it might,” said Fairyfoot. ‘“ Why did
she do it?”

“ Mad,” answered the little man—‘ that was what was the
matter with her. She was always losing her temper like that,
and turning people into awkward things, and then being sorry
for it, and not being able to change them back again. If you
are a fairy, you have to be careful. If you'll believe me, that
woman once turned her second-cousin’s sister-in-law into a



68 THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRYFOOT.



mushroom, and somebody picked her, and she was made into
catsup, which is a thing no man likes to have happen in his
family !”

“Of course not,” said Fairyfoot, politely.

“The difficulty is,” said the little man, “ that some fairies
don’t graduate. They learn to turn people into things, but
they don’t learn how to unturn them; and then, when they |
get mad in their families—you know how it is about getting
mad in families—there is confusion. Yes, seriously, confusion
arises. It arises. That was the way with my great-aunt’s
grandmother. She was not a cultivated old person, and she
did not know how to unturn people, and now you see the
result. Quite accidentally I trod on her favorite corn; she
got mad and changed me into a robin, and regretted it ever
afterward. I could only become myself again by a kind-
hearted person’s saving me from a great danger. You are
that person. Give me your hand.”

Fairyfoot held out his hand. The little man looked at it.

“On second thought,” he said, «“ } can’t shake it—it’s too
large. I'll sit on it, and talk to you.”

With these words, he hopped upon Perens hand, and
sat down, smiling and clasping his own hands about his tiny
knees.

“T declare, it’s delightful not to bea robin,” he said. ‘Had
to go about picking up worms, you know. Disgusting busi-
ness. I always did hate worms. I never ate them myself—
I drew the line there; but I had to get them for my family.”



THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRYFOOT. 69



Suddenly he began to giggle, and to hug his knees up
tight. i‘

“Do you wish to know what I’m laughing at?” he asked
Fairyfoot.

“Yes,” Fairyfoot answered.

The little man giggled more than ever.

“Tm thinking about my wife,” he said—‘‘the one 1 had
when I was a robin. A nice rage she'll be in when | don’t
come home to-night! She'll have to hustle around and pick
up worms for herself, and for the children too, and it serves
her right. She had a temper that would embitter the life of a

crow, much more a simple robin. I wore myself to skin and
bone taking care of her and her brood, and how I did hate

’em !—bare, squawking things, always with their throats gap-
ing open. They seemed to think a parent’s sole duty was to
bring worms for them.”

- “Tt must have been unpleasant,” said Fairyfoot.

“Tt was more than that,” said the little man; ‘it used to
make my feathers stand on end. There was the nest, too!
Fancy being changed into a robin, and being obliged to build
a nest at amoment’s notice! I never felt so ridiculous in my
life. How was I to know how to build a nest! And the
worst of it was the way she went on about it.”

“ She!” said Fairyfoot.

“Oh, her, you know,” replied the little man, ungram-
matically, ‘‘my wife. She’d always been a robin, and she
knew how to build a nest ; she liked to order me about, too



70 THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRFFOOT,



—she was one of that kind. But, of course, I wasn’t going
to own that I didn’t know anything about nest-building. I
could never have done anything with her in the world if I’d
let her think she knew as much as I did. So I just put
things together in a way of my own, and built a nest that
would have made you weep! The bottom fell out of it the
first night. It nearly killed me.”

“ Did you fall out, too?” inquired Fairyfoot.

“Oh, no,” answered the little man. “I meant that it
nearly killed me to think the eggs weren’t in it at the
time.”

“What did you do about the nest ?” asked Fairyfoot.

The little man winked in the most improper manner.

“To?” he said. “I got mad, of course, and told her that
‘if she hadn’t interfered, it wouldn’t have happened; said it
was exactly like a hen to fly around giving advice and unset-
tling one’s mind, and then complain if things weren’t right.
I told her she might build the nest herself, if she thought she
could build a better one. She did it, too!” And he winked
again. .

““Was it a better one?” asked Fairyfoot.

The little man actually winked a third time. ‘It may
surprise you to hear that it was,” he replied; “but it didn’t
surprise me. By-the-by,” he added, with startling suddenness,
‘‘what’s your name, and what’s the matter with you?”

“My name is Prince Fairyfoot,” said the boy, ‘and I have
lost my master’s swine.”



THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRFYFOOT. 71



“My name,” said the little man, “is Robin Goodfellow,
and I'll find them for you.”

He had a tiny scarlet silk pouch hanging at his girdle,
and he put his hand into it and drew forth the smallest golden
whistle you ever saw.

“ Blow that,” he said, giving it to Fairyfoot, “ and take care
that you don’t swallow it. You are such a tremendous creat-
Ube

Fairyfoot took the whistle and put it very delicately to his
lips. He blew, and there came from it a high, clear sound
that seemed to pierce the deepest depths of the forest.

‘“ Blow again,” commanded Robin Goodfellow.

Again Prince Fairyfoot blew, and again the pure clear
sound rang through the trees, and the next instant he heard
a loud rushing and tramping and squeaking and grunting, and
all the great drove of swine came tearing through the bushes
and formed themselves into a circle and stood staring at him
as if waiting to be told what to do next.

“ Oh, Robin Goodfellow, Robin Goodfellow !” cried Fairy-
foot, “how grateful I am to you!”

‘Not as grateful as I am to you,” said Robin Goodfellow.

“ But for you I should be disturbing that hawk’s digestion at _

the present moment, instead of which, here I am, a respect-
able fairy once more, and my late wife (though I ought not to
call her that, for goodness knows she was early enough hust-
ling me out of my nest before daybreak, with the unpleasant
proverb about the early bird catching the worm !)—I suppose



72 THE STORF OF PRINCE FAIRÂ¥FOOT,



I should say my early wife—is at this juncture a widow.
Now, where do you live?”

Fairyfoot told him, and told him also about the swineherd,
and how it happened that, though he was a prince, he had to
herd swine and live in the forest.

“Well, weil,” said Robin Goodfellow, “that is a disagree-
able state of affairs. Perhaps I can make it rather easier for
you. You see that is a fairy whistle.”

“T thought so,” said Fairyfoot.

“Well,” continued Robin Goodfellow, “you can always
call your swine with it, so you will never be beaten again.
Now, are you ever lonely ?”

‘‘ Sometimes I am very lonely indeed,” answered the Prince.
‘“No one cares for me, though I think the brook is sometimes
sorry, and tries to tell me things.”

“Of course,” said Robin. “ They all like you. I’ve heard
them say so.”

“Oh, have you?” cried Fairyfoot, joyfully.

‘Yes ; you never throw stones at the birds, or break the
branches of the trees, or trample on the flowers when you
can help it.”

“The birds sing to me,” said Fairyfoot, “and the trees seem
to beckon to me and whisper ; and when I am very lonely, I
lie down in the grass and look into the eyes of the flowers and
talk to them. I would not hurt one of them for all the world !”

‘“‘Humph !” said Robin, “you area rather good little fellow.
Would you like to go to a party ?”

\



THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRFFOOT. 73



“A party!” said Fairyfoot. What is that ?”

“This sort of thing,” said Robin; and he jumped up and
began to dance around and to kick up his heels gaily in the
palm of Fairyfoot’s hand. ‘‘ Wine, you know, and cake, and
all sorts of fun. It begins at twelve to-night, in a place the
fairies know of, and it lasts until just two minutes and three
seconds and a half before daylight. Would you like to
come ?” |

“Oh,” cried Fairyfoot, “I should be so happy if I
might |”

“Well, you may,” said Robin; “I'll take you. They'll be
delighted to see any friend of mine. I’m a great favourite ;
of course, you can easily imagine that. It was a great blow
to them when I was changed; such a loss, you know. In fact,
there were several lady fairies, who—but no matter.” And
he gave a slight cough, and began to arrange his necktie with
a disgracefully consequential air, though he was trying very
hard not to look conceited; and while he was endeavouring
to appear easy and gracefully careless, he began accidentally
to hum, “See the Conquering Hero Comes,” which was not
the right tune under the circumstances.

“But for you,” he said next, “I couldn’t have given them
the relief and pleasure of seeing me this evening. And what
ecstasy it will be to them, to be sure! Ishouldn’t be surprised
if it broke up the whole thing. They'll faint so—for joy, you
know—Just at first—that is, the ladies will, The men won't
like it at all; and I don’t blame ’em. I suppose I shouldn’t



74 THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRYFOOT.



like it—to see another fellow sweep all before him. That’s
what I do; I sweep all before me.” And he waved his hand
in such a fine large gesture that he overbalanced himself, and
turned a somersault. But he jumped up after it quite un-
disturbed.

“You'll see me do it to-night,” he said, knocking the dents
out of his hat—‘‘ sweep all before me.” Then he put his hat
on, and his hands on his hips, with a swaggering, man-of-
society air. “I say,” he said, “I’m glad you're going. I
should like you to see it.” ;

“And I should like to see it,” replied Fairyfoot.

“Well,” said Mr. Goodfellow, ‘‘you deserve it, though
that’s saying a great deal. You’ve restored me tothem. But
for you, even if I’d escaped that hawk, I should have had to
spend the night in that beastly robin’s nest, crowded into a
corner by those squawking things, and domineered over by
her! I wasn’t made for that! I’m superior to it. Domestic
life doesn’t suit me. I was made for society. I adorn it.
She never appreciated me. She couldn’t soar to it. When I
think of the way she treated me,” he exclaimed, suddenly
getting into a rage, “I’ve a great mind to turn back into a
robin and peck her head off!”

“ Would you like to see her now ?” asked Fairyfoot, inno-
cently.

Mr. Goodfellow glanced behind him in great haste, and
suddenly sat down.

‘No, no!” he exclaimed in a tremendous hurry; “by no



THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRYFOOT. 95



means! She has no delicacy. And she doesn’t deserve to
see me. And there’s a violence and uncertainty about her
movements which is annoying beyond anything you can .
imagine. No, I don’t want to see her! I'll let her go un-
punished for the present. Perhaps it’s punishment enough
for her to be deprived of me. Just pick up your cap, won’t
you? and if you see any birds lying about, throw it at them,
robins particularly.”

‘“T think I must take the swine home, if you'll excuse me,”
said Fairyfoot, ‘(I’m late now.”

‘Well, let me sit on your shoulder and I'll go with you
and show you a short way home,” said Goodfellow ; “I know
all about it, so you needn’t think about yourself again. In
fact, we'll talk about the party. Just blow your whistle, and
the swine will go ahead.”

Fairyfoot did so, and the swine rushed through the forest
before them, and Robin Goodfellow perched himself on the
Prince’s shoulder, and chatted as they went.

It had taken Fairyfoot hours to reach the place where he
found Robin, but somehow it seemed to him only a very
short time before they came to the open place near the
swineherd’s hut; and the path they had walked in had been
so pleasant and flowery that it had been delightful all the
way.

« Now,” said Robin when they stopped, ‘if you will come
here to-night at twelve o'clock, when the moon shines under
this tree, you will find me waiting for you. Now I’m going.



76 - THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRYFOOT.



Good-bye!” And he was gone before the last word was
quite finished.

Fairyfoot went towards the hut, driving the swine before
him, and suddenly he saw the swineherd come out of his
house, and stand staring stupidly at the pigs. Hewas a very
coarse, hideous man, with bristling yellow hair, and little eyes,
and a face rather like a pig’s, and he always looked stupid, but
just now he looked more stupid than ever. Heseemed dumb
with surprise.

“What's the matter with the swine?” he asked in his
hoarse voice, which was rather piglike, too.

“T don’t know,” answered Fairyfoot, feeling a little
alarmed. ‘ What zs the matter with them ?”

“ They are four times fatter, and five times bigger, and six
times cleaner, and seven times heavier, and eight times hand-
somer than they were when you took them out,” the swine-
herd said.

“I’ve done nothing to them,” said Fairyfoot. “They ran
away, but they came back again.”

The swineherd went lumbering back into the hut, and
called his wife.

“ Come and look at the swine,” he said.

And then the woman came out, and stared first at the
swine and then at Fairyfoot.

‘‘He has been with the fairies,” she said at last to her
husband; “or it is because he is a king’s son. We must
treat him better if he can do wonders like that.



















| = ie

Ka dlas' Ns
\\ hi thy a Ypy Wy
ie ai WA

LE Bi Cy
te la wy? A oe \ M ne aT nn
cn ue Vg 5 Uf one y hiss SA ’ a ‘i M7 ,|
Noten es it ae Mt) AX\ Yi If
ze ay a wh i a Ze Ua nA K i Y - ey
Yi ie i i) Ae WME

th

Mi



“WHAT’S THE MATTER WITH THE SWINE?” HE ASKED.









THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRVFOOT. 79



PART II.

In went the shepherd’s wife, and she prepared quite a
good supper for Fairyfoot and gave it tohim. But Fairyfoot
was scarcely hungry at all; he was so eager for the night to
come, so that he might see the fairies. When he went to his
loft under the roof, he thought at first that he could not sleep ;
but suddenly his hand touched the fairy whistle and he fell
asleep at once, and did not waken again until a moonbeam
fell brightly upon his face and arousedhim. Then he jumped
up and ran to the hole in the wall to look out, and he saw
that the hour had come, and the moon was so low in the sky
that its slanting light had crept under the oak-tree.

He slipped downstairs so lightly that his master heard
nothing, and then he found himself out in the beautiful night
with the moonlight so bright that it was lighter than day-
time. And there was Robin Goodfellow waiting for him
under the tree! He was so finely dressed that, for a moment,
Fairyfoot scarcely knew him. His suit was made out of the
purple velvet petals of a pansy, which was far finer than any
ordinary velvet, and he wore plumes and tassels, and a ruffle
around his neck, and in his belt was thrust a tiny sword, not
half as big as the finest needle.

“Take me on your shoulder,” he said to Fairyfoot, “and
I will show you the way.”

Fairyfoot took him up, and they went their way through



80 THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRFYFOOT.



the forest. And the strange part of it was that though Fairy-
foot thought he knew all the forest by heart, every path
they took was new to him, and more beautiful than anything
he had ever seen before. The moonlight seemed to grow
brighter and purer at every step, and the sleeping flowers
sweeter and lovelier, and the moss greener and thicker.
Fairyfoot felt so happy and gay that he forgot he had ever
been sad and lonely in his life.

Robin Goodfellow, too, seemed to be in very good spirits.
He related a great many stories to Fairyfoot, and, singularly
enough, they were all about himself and divers and sundry
fairy ladies who had been so very much attached to him that
he scarcely expected to find them alive at the present mo-
ment. He felt quite sure they must have died of grief in his
absence.

“T have caused a great deal of trouble in the course of my
life,” he said, regretfully, shaking his head. ‘I have some-
times wished I could avoid it, but that is impossible. Ahem!
When my great-aunt’s grandmother rashly and inopportunely
changed me into a robin, I was having a little flirtation with
a little creature who ‘was really quite attractive. I might
have decided to engage myself to her. She was very charming.
Her name was Gauzita. To-morrow I shall go and place
flowers on her tomb.”

“T thought fairies never died,” said Fairyfoot.

“Only on rare occasions, and only from love,” answered

Robin. ‘They needn’t die unless they wish to. They have



THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRYFOOT. 81



been known to do it through love. They frequently wish
they hadn’t afterward—in fact, invariably—and then they can



come to life again. But Gauzita i

« Are you quite sure she is dead?” asked Fairyfoot.

“Sure!” cried Mr. Goodfellow, in wild indignation, “why,
she hasn’t seen me for a couple of years. I’ve moulted twice
since last we meet. JI congratulate myself that she didn’t see
me then,” he added, in a lower voice. ‘Of course she’s dead,”
he added, with solemn emphasis ; ‘‘as dead as a door nail.”

Just then Fairyfoot heard some enchanting sounds, faint,
but clear. They were sounds of delicate music and of tiny
laughter, like the ringing of fairy bells.

“Ah!” said Robin Goodfellow, ‘there they are! But it
seems to me they are rather gay, considering they have not
seen me for so long. Turn into the path.”

Almost immediately they found themselves in a beautiful
little dell, filled with moonlight, and with glittering stars
in the cup of every flower; for there were thousands of
dewdrops, and every dewdrop shone like a star. There
were also crowds and crowds of tiny men and women, all
beautiful, all dressed in brilliant, delicate dresses, all laughing
or dancing or feasting at the little tables, which were loaded
with every dainty the most fastidious fairy could wish for.

“ Now,” said Robin Goodfellow, “ you shall see me sweep
all before me. Put me down.”

Fairyfoot put him down, and stood and watched him while

he walked forward with a very grand manner. He went
6



82 THE STORF OF PRINCE FAIRYFOOT.



straight to the gayest and largest group he could see. It
was a group of gentlemen fairies, who were crowding around
a lily of the valley, on the bent stem of which a tiny lady
fairy was sitting, airily swaying herself to and fro, and laugh-
ing and chatting with all her admirers at once.

She seemed to be enjoying herself immensely ; indeed, it
was disgracefully plain that she was having a great deal of
fun. One gentleman fairy was fanning her, one was holding
her programme, one had her bouquet, another her little scent
bottle, and those who had nothing to hold for her were
scowling furiously at the rest. It was evident that she was
very popular, and that she did not object to it at all; in
fact, the way her eyes sparkled and danced was distinctly °

reprehensible.

“You have engaged to dance the next waltz with every
one of us!” said one of her adorers. ‘‘ How are you going to
doit?’

“ Did I engage to dance with all of you?” she said, giving
her lily stem the sauciest little swing, which set all the bells
ringing, ‘ Well, I am not going to dance it with all.”

“Not with me?” the admirer with the fan whispered in
her ear.

She gave him the most delightful little look, just to make
him believe she wanted to dance with him but really couldn't.
Robin Goodfellow saw her. And then she smiled sweetly |
upon all the rest, every one of them. Robin Goodfellow saw
that, too. .



SS















ALMOST IMMEDIATELY THEY FOUND THEMSELVES IN A BEAUTIFUL LITTLE DELL,









THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRYFOOT, 85



“T am going to sit here and look at you, and let you talk
to me,” she said. ‘I do so enjoy brilliant conversation.”

All the gentlemen fairies were so much elated by this that
they began to brighten up, and settle their ruffs, and fall
into graceful attitudes, and think of sparkling things to say;
because every one of them knew, from the glance of her eyes
in his direction, that he was one whose conversation was —
brilliant; every one knew there could be no mistake about
its being himself that she meant. The way she looked just
proved it. Altogether it was more than Robin Goodfellow
could stand, for it was Gauzita who was deporting herself
in this unaccountable manner, swinging on lily stems, and
“going on,” so to speak, with several parties at once, in a
way to chill the blood of any proper young lady fairy—who
hadn’t any partner at all. It was Gauzita herself.

He made his way into the very centre of the group.

“Gauzita!” he said. He thought, of course, she would
drop right off her lily stem; but she didn’t. She. simply
stopped swinging a moment, and stared at him.

“Gracious !” she exclaimed. ‘ And who are you?”

“Who am I?” cried Mr. Goodfellow, severely. ‘Don’t
you remember me ?”

“No,” she said, coolly ; ‘I don’t, not in the least.”

Robin Goodfellow almost gasped for breath. He had never
met with anything so outrageous in his life.

“You don’t remember me?” he cried. “Me/ Why, it’s
impossible !”



86 THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRFFOOT.



“Is it?” said Gauzita, with a touch of dainty impudence.
“What's your name?”

Robin Goodfellow was almost paralyzed. Gauzita took up
a midget of an eyeglass which she had dangling from a thread
of a gold chain, and she stuck it in her eye and tilted her
impertinent little chin and looked him over. Not that she
was near-sighted—not a bit of it ; it was just one of her tricks
and manners.

“Dear me!” she said, “ you do look a trifle familiar. It
isn’t, it can’t be, Mr. , Mr. ,” then she turned to the
adorer, who held her fan, ‘it can’t be Mr.
was changed into a robin, you know,” she said. ‘Such a







, the one who

ridiculous thing to be changed into! What was his name?”
, ah—Good-



“Oh, yes! I know whom you mean. Mr.
fellow!” said the fairy with the fan.

‘So it was,” she said, looking Robin over again. ‘And
he has been pecking at trees and things, and hopping in and
out of nests ever since, 1 suppose. How absurd! And we
have been enjoying ourselves so much since he went away! I
think I never azd have so lovely a time as I have had during
these last two years. I began to know you,” she added, in a
kindly tone, “just about the time he went away.”

‘“You have been enjoying yourself?” almost shrieked
Robin Goodfellow.

“ Well,” said Gauzita, in unexcusable slang, ‘‘I must smile.”
And she did smile.

‘““And nobody has pined away and died?” cried Robin.



THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRYFOOT. 87



“T haven't,” said Gauzita, swinging herself and ringing her
bells again. ‘I really haven’t had time.”

Robin Goodfellow turned around and rushed out of the
group. He regarded this as insulting. He went back to
Fairyfoot in such a hurry that he tripped on his sword and
fell, and rolled over so many times that Fairyfoot had to stop
him and pick him up.

“Ts she dead?” asked Fairyfoot.

“No,” said Robin; “she isn’t.”

“ He sat down ona small mushroom and clasped his hands
about his knees and looked mad—just mad. Angry or in-
dignant wouldn’t express it.

“‘T have a great mind to go and bea misanthrope,” he said.

“Oh! I wouldn’t,” said Fairyfoot. He didn’t know what
a misanthrope was, but he thought it must be something
unpleasant. .

‘“Wouldn’t you?” said Robin, looking up at him.

“No,” answered Fairyfoot.

“Well,” said Robin, “I guess I won't. Let’s go and have
some fun. They are all that way. You can’t depend on any
of them. Never trust one of them. I believe that creature
has been engaged as much as twice since I left. Bya singular
coincidence,” he added, “I have been married twice myself—
but, of course, that’s different. I’m a man, you know, and—
well, it’s different. We won’t dwell on it. Let’s go and
dance. But wait a minute first.” He took a little bottle
from his pocket.



88 THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRFFOOT.



“If you remain the size you are,” he continued, “ you will
tread on whole sets of lancers and destroy entire germans.
If you drink this, you will become as small as we are; and
then, when you are going home, I| will give you something to
make you large again.” Fairyfoot drank from the little flagon,
and immediately he felt himself growing smaller and smaller
until at last he was as small as his companion.

“ Now, come on,” said Robin.

On they went and joined the fairies, and they danced and
played fairy games and feasted on fairy dainties, and were so
gay and happy that Fairyfoot was wild with joy. Everybody
made him welcome and seemed to like him, and the lady
fairies were simply delightful, especially Gauzita, who took
a great fancy to him. Just before the sun rose, Robin
gave him something from another flagon, and he grew.
large again, and two minutes and three seconds and a half
before daylight the ball broke up, and Robin took him
home and left him, promising to call for him the next
night.

Every night throughout the whole summer the same thing

happened. At midnight he went to the fairies’ dance; and at
two minutes and three seconds and a half before dawn he
came home. He was never lonely any more, because all day
long he could think of what pleasure he would have when the
night came; and, besides that, all the fairies were his friends.
But when the summer was coming to an end, Robin Good-
fellow said to him: “ This is our last dance—at least it will



THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRYFOOT. © 89



be our last for some time. At this time of the year we
always go back to our own country, and we don’t return until
spring.”

This made Fairyfoot very sad. He did not know how he
could bear to be left alone again, but he knew it could not be
helped ; so he tried to be as cheerful as possible, and he went
to the final festivities, and enjoyed himself more than ever
before, and Gauzita gave him a tiny ring for a parting gift.
But the next night, when Robin did not come for him, he felt
very lonely indeed, and the next day he was so sorrowful that
he wandered far away into the forest, in the hope of finding
something to cheer him a little. He wandered so far that he
became very tired and thirsty, and he was just making up his
mind to go home, when he thought he heard the sound of
falling water. It seemed to come from behind a thicket of
climbing roses; and he went towards the place and pushed
the branches aside a little, so that he could look through.
What he saw was a great surprise to him. Though it was
the end of summer, inside the thicket the roses were bloom-
ing in thousands all around a pool as clear as crystal, into
which the sparkling water fell from a hole in the rock above.
It was the most beautiful, clear pool that Fairyfoot had ever
seen, and he pressed his way through the rose branches, and,
entering the circle they inclosed, he knelt by the water and
drank.

Almost instantly his feeling of sadness left him, and he felt
quite happy and refreshed. He stretched himself on the thick



go THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRYFOOT.



perfumed moss, and listened to the tinkling of the water, and
it was not long before he fell asleep.

When he awakened the moon was shining, the pool
sparkled like a silver plaque crusted with diamonds, and two
nightingales were singing in the branches over his head.
And the next moment he found out that he understood their
language just as plainly as if they had been human beings
instead of birds. The water with which he had quenched his
thirst was enchanted, and had given him this new power.

“Poor boy!” said one nightingale, ‘“ he looks tired; I
wonder where he came from.”

“Why, my dear,” said the other, “is it possible you don’t
know that he is Prince Fairyfoot ?”

“What !” said the first nightingale—“ the King of Stump-
inghame’s son, who was born with small feet ?”

“Yes,” said the second. ‘“ And the poor child has lived
in the forest, keeping the swineherd’s pigs ever since. And
he is a very nice boy, too—never throws stones at birds or
robs nests.”

“What a pity he doesn’t know about the pool where the
red berries grow !” said the first nightingale.





THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRYFOOT. gt



PART III.

“ Wuat pool—and what red berries?” asked the second
nightingale.

‘“Why, my dear,” said the first, “is it possible you don’t
know about the pool where the red berries grow—the pool
where the poor, dear Princess Goldenhair met with her mis-
fortune ?”

“ Never heard of it,” said the second nightingale, rather
crossly.

“Well,” explained the other, “you have to follow the
brook for a day and three-quarters, and then take all the
paths to the left until you come to the pool. It is very ugly
and muddy, and bushes with red berries on them grow around
Itsy oe

“Well, what of that ?” said her companion; “and what
happened to the Princess Goldenhair?”

“Don’t you know that, either?” exclaimed her friend.

Non

“Ah!” said the first nightingale, “it was very sad. She
went out with her father, the King, who had a hunting party ;
and she lost her way, and wandered on until she came to the
pool. Her poor little feet were so hot that she took off
her gold-embroidered satin slippers, and put them into the
water—her feet, not the slippers—and the next minute they
began to grow and grow, and to get larger and larger, until



g2 THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRYVFOOT.



they were so immense she could hardly walk at all; and
though all the physicians in the kingdom have tried to make
them smaller, nothing can be done, and she is perfectly un-
happy.”

“What a pity she doesn’t know about this pool!” said the
other bird. ‘If she just came here and bathed them three
times in the water, they would be smaller and more beautiful
than ever, and she would be more lovely than she has ever
been:?

“Tt is a pity,” said her companion; ‘but, you know, if we
once let people know what this water will do, we should be
overrun with creatures bathing themselves beautiful, and
trampling our moss and tearing down our rose-trees, and we
should never have any peace.”

“ That is true,” agreed the other.

Very soon after they flew away, and Rauvient was left
alone. He had been so excited while they were talking that
he had been hardly able to lie still, He was so sorry for the
Princess Goldenhair, and so glad for himself. Now he could
find his way to the pool with the red berries, and he could
bathe his feet in it until they were large enough to satisfy
Stumpinghame; and he could go back to his father’s court,
and his parents would perhaps be fond of him. But he had
so good a heart that he could not think of being happy him-
self and letting others remain unhappy, when he could help
them. So the first thing was to find the Princess Golden-
hair and tell her about the nightingales’ fountain. But how



THE STORVF OF PRINCE FAIRVFOOT. 93



was he to find her? The nightingales had not told him.
He was very much troubled, indeed. How was he to find
her?

Suddenly, quite suddenly, he thought of the ring Gauzita
had given him. When she had given it to him she had made
an odd remark.

‘“When you wish to go anywhere,” she had said, “hold it
in your hand, turn around twice with closed eyes, and some-
thing queer will happen.”

He had thought it was one of her little jokes, but now it
occurred to him that at least he might try what would happen.
So he rose up, held the ring in his hand, closed his eyes, and
turned around twice.

What did happen was that he began to walk, not very fast,
but still passing along as if he were moving rapidly. He did
not know where he was going, but he guessed that the ring
did, and that if he obeyed it, he should find the Princess
Goldenhair. He went on and on, not getting in the least
tired, until about daylight he found himself under a great
tree, and on the ground beneath it was spread a delightful
breakfast, which he knew was for him. He sat down and ate
‘it, and then got up again and went on his way once more.
Before noon he had left the forest behind him, and was ina
strange country. He knew it was not Stumpinghame, because
the people had not large feet. But they all had sad faces,
and once or twice, when he passed groups of them who were
talking, he heard them speak of the Princess Goldenhair, as



94 THE STORF OF PRINCE FAIRVFOOT.



if they were sorry for her and could not enjoy themselves
while such a misfortune rested upon her.

“So sweet and lovely and kind a princess!” they said ;
“and it really seems as if she would never be any better.”

The sun was just setting when Fairyfoot came in sight of
the palace. It was built of white marble, and had beautiful
pleasure-grounds about it, but somehow there seemed to be a
settled gloom in the air. Fairyfoot had entered the great
pleasure-garden, and was wondering where it would be best
to go first, when he saw a lovely white fawn, with a golden
collar about its neck, come bounding over the flower-beds,
and he heard, at a little distance, a sweet voice, saying, sor-
rowfully, “Come back, my fawn; I cannot run and play with
you as I once used to. Do not leave me, my little friend.”

And soon from behind the trees came a line of beautiful
girls, walking two by two, all very slowly; and at the head of
the line, first of all, came the loveliest princess in the world,
dressed softly in pure white, with a wreath of lilies on her long
golden hair, which fell almost to the hem of her white gown.

She had so fair and tender a young face, and her large,
soft eyes, yet looked so sorrowful, that Fairyfoot loved her in
a moment, and he knelt on one knee, taking off his cap and
bending his head until his own golden hair almost hid his face.

“ Beautiful Princess Goldenhair, beautiful and sweet Prin-
cess, may I speak to you ?” he said.

The Princess stopped and looked at him, and answered
him softly. It surprised her to see one so poorly dressed



hai : ate wee

; H
Aut
oe “a we ae WM wt ine ae ii ue v a pb tl ‘i

AN

' ieee

Rey ts
ui by Be "1 . » f
S Wipat ie ne y ater ‘ he ie Fe wee yy!
4 | “4

heii ain .
| | M hi, Me cB a
f Noa Wh ey oy

ei aN
Fatt Hs

apn yt! Wl
oan i ii Maye,
Ain ada l,

AVY Wt] vain
wll 5

=a yi uid!
oe { Mh Hal

SJ



FAIRYFOOT LOVED HER IN A MOMENT, AND HE KNELT ON ONE KNEE,






THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRVYFOOT. 97

kneeling before her, in her palace gardens, among the brilliant

flowers ; but she always spoke softly to everyone.

‘What is there that I can do for you, my friend ?” she said.

“Beautiful Princess,” answered Fairyfoot, blushing, “I
hope very much that I may be able to do something for you.”

“Por me!” she exclaimed. “Thank you, friend ; what is
it you can do? Indeed, I need a help I am afraid no one can
ever give me.”

“Gracious and fairest lady,” said Fairyfoot, “ it is that help
I think—nay, I am sure—that I bring to you.”

“Oh!” said the sweet Princess. ‘ You have a kind face
and most true eyes, and when I look at you—I do not know
why it is, but I feel a little happier. What is it you would
say to me?”

Still kneeling before ee still bending his head modestly,
and still blushing, Fairyfoot told his story. He told her of
his own sadness and loneliness, and of why he was considered
so terrible a disgrace to his family. He told her about the
fountain of the nightingales and what he had heard there and
how he had journeyed through the forests, and beyond it into
her own country, to find her. And while he told it, her
beautiful face changed from red to white, and her hands
closely clasped themselves together.

‘‘Qh!” she said, when he had finished, ‘“‘I know that this
is true from the kind look in your eyes, and I shall be happy
again. And how can I thank you for being so good to a poor
little princess whom you had never seen ?”

7



98 THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRYFOOT.



‘Only let me see you happy once more, most sweet Prin-
cess,” answered Fairyfoot, “and that will be all I desire—
only if, perhaps, | might once—kiss your hand.”

She held out her hand to him with so lovely a look in her
soft eyes that he felt happier than he had ever been before,
even at the fairy dances. This was a different kind of happi-
ness. Her hand was as white as a dove’s wing and as soft as
a dove’s breast. ‘ Come,” she said, ‘‘let us go at once to the
King.”

Within a few minutes the whole palace was in an uproar
of excitement. Preparations were made to go to the fountain
of the nightingales immediately. Remembering what the
birds had said about not wishing to be disturbed, Fairyfoot
asked the King to take only a small party. So no one was
to go but the King himself, the Princess, in a covered chair
carried by two bearers, the Lord High Chamberlain, two
Maids of Honour, and Fairyfoot.

Before morning they were on their way, and the day after
they reached the thicket of roses, and Fairyfoot pushed aside
the branches and led the way into the dell.

The Princess Goldenhair sat down upon the edge of the
pool and put her feet into it. In two minutes they began to
look smaller. She bathed them once, twice, three times, and,
as the nightingales had said, they became smaller and more
beautiful than ever. As for the Princess herself, she really
could not be more beautiful than she had been ; but the Lord
High Chamberlain, who had been an exceedingly ugly old



THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRÂ¥+H0O0OT. 99



gentleman, after washing his face, became so young and hand-
some that the First Maid of Honour immediately fell in love
with him. Whereupon she washed her face, and became so
beautiful that he fell in love with her, and they were engaged
upon the spot.

The Princess could not find any words to tell Fairyfoot
how grateful she was and how happy. She could only look
at him again and again with her soft, radiant eyes, and again
and again give him her hand that he might kiss it.

She was so sweet and gentle that Fairyfoot could not bear
the thought of leaving her; and when the King begged him
to return to the palace with them and live there always, he
was more glad than I can tell you. To be near this lovely
Princess, to be her friend, to love and serve her and look at ~
her every day, was such happiness that he wanted nothing
more. But first he wished to visit his father and mother
and sisters and brothers in Stumpinghame! so the King and
Princess and their attendants went with him to the pool
where the red berries grew; and after he had bathed his feet
in the water they were so large that Stumpinghame contained
nothing like them, even the King’s and Queen’s seeming
small in comparison. And when, a few days later, he arrived
at the Stumpinghame Palace, attended in great state by the
magnificent retinue with which the father of the Princess
Goldenhair had provided him, he was received with unbounded
rapture by his parents. The King and Queen felt that to
have a son with feet of such a size was something to be proud



100 THE STORÂ¥F OF PRINCE FAIRÂ¥FOOT,





of, indeed. They could not admire him sufficiently, although
the whole country was illuminated, and feasting continued
throughout his visit.

But though he was glad to be no more a disgrace to his
family, it cannot be said that he enjoyed the size of his feet
very much on his own account. Indeed, he much preferred
being Prince Fairyfoot, as fleet as the wind and as light as a
young deer, and he was quite glad to go to the fountain. of
the nightingales after his visit was at an end, and bathe his
feet small again, and to return to the palace of the Princess
Goldenhair with the soft and tender eyes. There everyone
loved him, and he loved everyone, and was four.times as
happy as the day is long.

He loved the Princess more dearly every day, and, of course,
as soon as they were old enough, they were married. And of
course, too, they used to go in the summer to the forest, and
dance in the moonlight with the fairies, who adored them both.

When they went to visit Stumpinghame, they always bathed
their feet in the pool of the red berries ; and when they returned,
they made them small again in the fountain of the nightingales.

They were always great friends with Robin Goodfellow,
and he was always very confidential with them about Gauzita,
who continued to be as pretty and saucy as ever.

‘Some of these days,” he used to say, severely, ‘I'll marry -
another fairy, and see how she'll like that—to see someone
else basking in my society! /’2@ get even with her!”

But he zever did.



Full Text




Mi
IN

Hy)

y)
yy)








The Baldwin Library

University
RmB of
Florida









y

df

oe 0)
Guy.
LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH

AND: OTHER STORIES
BY THE. SAME AUTHOR.

ere LORD
a
FAUNTLEROY.







SQUARE 8vo, $2.00.

AS “In ‘Little Lord
\

\
another charming child

“\° to add to our gallery of

juventle heroes and heroines ; one

him with real regret when the episode

zs over.”’—LoutsA M. ALcoTr.



ARA CREWE.



SQUARE 8vo, $1.00.



“ Everybody was in
love with ‘ Little Lord
Fauntleroy, and I
think all the world
and the rest of man-
kind will be in love
with ‘Sara Crewe.’
The tale is so tender,

so wise, so human,



that I wish every girl
in America could read it, for I think every one
would be made better by it.”

—Louisz CHANDLER Movutton.

Illustrated by REGINALD ®B. BIRCH.




























































































\Page 23.)

IT WAS AUNT CLOTILDE, WHO HAD SUNK FORWARD WHILE KNEELING AT PRAYER,
Flv SAIN] ELIZABETH

AND

OTHER STORIES

BY

FRANCES HODGSON BURNETT



ILLUSTRATED BY REGINALD B. BIRCH

NEW YORK
CHARLES SCRIBNER’S SONS
1890
CopyRIGHT, 1890, BY

CHARLES SCRIBNER’S, SONS.



[AZ rights reserved.|

Press of J. J. Little & Co.,
Astor Place, New York.
CONTENTS:

LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH. — .- . : : : . Page 15

THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRYFOOT—

Part I. . : : : : : : : oe G)
Part Il. 5 5 x : : “ 6 Secc a7)
Part Ill. . ‘ : : : dj ; é Coe on
THE PROUD LITTLE GRAIN OF WHEAT. ; Be O39

BEHIND THE WHITE BRICK. . : : . : oe 1E25

LIST OR IE LOS TT KA TEONS:
FROM DRAWINGS BY REGINALD B. BIRCH.

It was Aunt Clotilde, who had sunk forward while kneeling

at prayer, : : : . ‘ : : . Frontispiece

“« There she is,’’ they would cry,

The villagers did not stand in awe of her, . c : 7

‘© Uncle. Bertrand,’’ said the child, clasping her bands,

“Why ts it that you cry ?’’ she ashed gently;

Her strength deserted her—she fell upon her knees in the snow, .
“Why,” exclaimed Fairyfoot, ‘‘ I'm surprised,’’

“What's the matter with the swine ?’’ he asked,

Almost immediately they found. themselves in a beautiful little
dell,

Fairyfoot loved her in a moment, and he knelt on one knee,

«* There’s the cake,’’ he said,

‘Eb! Eb!’’ be said. ‘“‘What! What! Who's this, Toot-

sicums?”’. ‘ : 5 , , ‘ ; ‘

Page

ce

ce

14

45
51
65

75

83
95

11g

135
LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH.


aX

a EN VAN cS
Z ZS N i P



A
ay

=F











7









iC a MH
eran

















































‘¢ TERE SHE IS,” THEY WOULD CRY.
LITTLE SAINT. ELIZABETH.

HE had not been brought up in America at all. She had
S been born in France, in a beautiful chéteau, and she
had been born heiress to a great fortune, but, neverthe-
less, just now she felt as if she was very poor, indeed. And
yet her home was in one of the most splendid houses in New
York. She had a lovely suite of apartments of her own,
though she was only eleven years old. She had had her own
carriage and a saddle horse, a train of masters, and govern-
esses, and servants, and was regarded by all the children of
the neighborhood as a sort of grand and mysterious little
princess, whose incomings and outgoings were to be watched
with the greatest interest.

“There she is,” they would cry, flying to their windows to
look at her. “She is going out in her carriage.” “She is
dressed all in black velvet and splendid fur.” ‘“ That is her
own, own, carriage.” “She has millions of money; and she
can have anything she wants—Jane says so!” “She is very
pretty, too; but she is so pale and has such big, sorrowful,
black eyes. I should not be sorrowful if I were in her place;
16 LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH.



but Jane says the servants say she is always quiet and looks
sad.” ‘ Her maid says she lived with her aunt, and her aunt
made her too religious.”

She rarely lifted her large dark eyes to look at them with
any curiosity. She was not accustomed to the society of
children. She had never had a child companion in her life,
and these little Americans, WHO were so very rosy and gay, and
who went out to walk or drive with groups of brothers and
sisters, and even ran in the street, laughing and playing and
squabbling healthily—these children amazed her.

Poor little Saint Elizabeth! She had not lived a very
natural or healthy life herself, and she knew absolutely
nothing of real childish pleasures. You see, it had occurred
in this way: When she was a baby of two years her young
father and mother died, within a week of each other, of a
terrible fever, and the only.near relatives the little one had
were her Aunt Clotilde and Uncle Bertrand. Her Aunt
Clotilde lived in “Normandy—her Uncle Bertrand in New
York. As these two were her only guardians, and as Ber-
trand de Rochemont was a gay bachelor, fond of pleasure
and knowing nothing of babies, it was natural that he should
be very willing that his elder sister should undertake the
rearing and education of the child.

“Only,” he wrote to Mademoiselle de Rochemont, “don’t
end by training her for an abbess, my dear Clotilde.”

There was a very great difference between these two peo-«
ple—the distance between the gray stone chateau in Normandy




LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH. 17



and the brown stone mansion in New York was not nearly so
great as the distance and difference between the two lives.
And yet it was said that in her first youth Mademoiselle de
Rochemont had been as gay and fond of pleasure as either of
her brothers. And then, when her life was at its brightest
and gayest—when she was a beautiful and brilliant young
woman—she had had a great and bitter sorrow, which had
changed her for ever. From that time she had never left the
house in which she had been born, and had lived the life of a
nun in everything but being enclosed in convent walls. At
first she had had her parents to take care of, but when they
died she had been left entirely alone in the great chdéeau,
and devoted herself to prayer and works of charity among
the villagers and country people.

“Ah! she is good—she is a saint Mademoiselle,” the poor
people always said when speaking of her; but they also
always looked a little awe-stricken when she appeared, and
never were sorry when she left them.

She was a tall woman, with a pale, rigid, handsome face,
which never smiled. She did nothing but good deeds, but
however grateful her pensioners might be, nobody would ever
have dared to dream of loving her. She was just and cold
and severe. She wore always a straight black serge gown,
broad bands of white linen, and a rosary and crucifix at her
waist. She read nothing but religious works and legends of
the saints and martyrs, and adjoining her private apartments

was a little stone chapel, where the servants said she used to
2
18 LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH.



kneel on the cold floor before the altar and pray for hours in
the middle of the night.

The little cwvé of the village, who was plump and comfort-
able, and who had the kindest heart and the most cheerful
soul in the world, used to remonstrate with her, always in a
roundabout way, however, never quite as if he were referring
directly to herself.

‘‘One must not let one’s self become the stone image of
goodness,” he said once. “Since one is really of flesh and
blood, and lives among flesh and blood, that is not best.
No, no; it is not best.”

But Mademoiselle de Rochemont never seemed exactly of
flesh and blood—she was more like a marble female saint
who had descended from her pedestal to walk upon the earth.

And she did not change, even when the baby Elizabeth
was brought to her. She attended strictly to the child’s
comfort and prayed many prayers for her innocent soul, but
it can be scarcely said that her manner was any softer or
that she smiled more. At first Elizabeth used to scream at
the sight of the black, nun-like dress and the rigid, hand-
some face, but in course of time she became accustomed to
them, and, through living in an atmosphere so silent and
without brightness, a few months changed her from a laugh-
ing, romping baby into a pale, quiet child, who rarely made
any childish noise at all.

In this quiet way she became fond of her aunt. She saw
little of anyone but the servants, who were all trained to quiet-


LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH. 19



ness also. Assoon as she was old enough her aunt began her
religious training. Before she could speak plainly she heard
legends of saints and stories of martyrs. She was taken into
the little chapel and taught to pray there. She believed in
miracles, and would not have been surprised at any moment
if she had met the Child Jesus or the Virgin in the beautiful
rambling gardens which surrounded the chéteau. She was a
sensitive, imaginative child, and the sacred romances she
heard filled all her mind and made up her little life. She
wished to be a saint herself, and spent hours in wandering in
the terraced rose gardens wondering if such a thing was pos-
sible in modern days, and what she must do to obtain such
holy victory. Her chief sorrow was that she knew herself to
be delicate and very timid—so timid that she often suffered
when people did not suspect it—and she was afraid that she
was not brave enough to be a martyr. Once, poor little one!
when she was alone in her room, she held her hand over a
burning wax candle, but the pain was so terrible that she
could not keep it there. Indeed, she fell back white and faint,
and sank upon her chair, breathless and in tears, because she
felt sure that she could not chant holy songs if she were being
burned at the stake. She had been vowed to the Virgin in
her babyhood, and was always dressed in white and blue, but
her little dress was a small conventual robe, straight and nar-
row cut, of white woollen stuff, and banded plainly with blue
at the waist. She did not look like other children, but she
was very sweet and gentle, and her pure little pale face and
20 LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH.



large, dark eyes had a lovely dreamy look. When she was
old enough to visit the poor with her Aunt Clotilde—and she
was hardly seven years old when it was considered proper
that she should begin—the villagers did not stand in awe
of her. They began to adore her, almost to worship her,
as if she had, indeed, been a sacred child. The little ones
delighted to look at her, to draw near her sometimes and
touch her soft white and blue robe. And, when they did so,
she always returned their-looks with such a tender, sympa-
thetic smile, and spoke to them in so gentle a voice, that
they were in ecstasies. They used to talk her over, tell sto-
ries about her when they were playing together afterwards.

“The little Mademoiselle,” they said, “she is a child saint.
I have heard them say so. Sometimes there is a little light
round her head. One day her little white robe will begin to
shine too, and her long sleeves will be wings, and she will
spread them and ascend through the blue. sky to Paradise.
You will see if it is not so.”

So, in this secluded world in the gray old chéteau, with no
companion but her aunt, with no occupation but her studies
and her charities, with no thoughts but those of saints and
religious exercises, Elizabeth lived until she was eleven years
old. Then a great grief befell her. One morning, Made-
moiselle de Rochemont did not leave her room at the regular
hour. As she never broke a rule she had made for herself
and her household, this occasioned great wonder. Her old
maid servant waited half an hour—went to her door, and




THE VILLAGERS DID NOT STAND IN AWE OF HER.







LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH. 23

took the liberty of listening to hear if she was up and moving
about her room. There was no sound. Old Alice returned,
looking quite agitated. ‘Would Mademoiselle Elizabeth
mind entering to see if all was well? Mademoiselle her aunt
might be in the chapel.”

Elizabeth went. Her aunt was not in herroom. Then
she must be in the chapel. The child entered the sacred little
place. The morning sun was streaming in through the stained-
glass windows above the altar—a broad ray of mingled brilliant
colors slanted to the stone floor and warmly touched a dark
figure lying there. It was Aunt Clotilde, who had sunk for-
ward while kneeling at prayer and had died in the night.

That was what the doctors said when they were sent for.
She had been dead some hours—she had died of disease of
the heart, and apparently without any pain or knowledge of
the change coming to her. Her face was serene and beauti-
ful, and the rigid look had melted away. Someone said she
looked like little Mademoiselle Elizabeth; and her old ser-
vant Alice wept very much, and said, ‘‘ Yes—yes—it was so
when she was young, before her unhappiness came. She had
the same beautiful little face, but she was more gay, more of
the world. Yes, they were much alike then.”

Less than two months from that time Elizabeth was living
in the home of her Uncle Bertrand, in New York. He had
come to Normandy for her himself, and taken her back with
him across the Atlantic. She was richer than ever now, as a
great deal of her Aunt Clotilde’s money had been left to her,
24 LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH.



and Uncle Bertrand was her guardian. He was a handsome,
elegant, clever man, who, having lived long in America and
being fond of American life, did not appear very much like a
Frenchman—at least he did not appear so to Elizabeth, who
had only seen the cwvé and the doctor of the village. Secretly
he was very much embarrassed at the prospect of taking care
of a little girl, but family pride, and the fact that such a very
little girl, who was also such a very great heiress, must be
taken care of sustained him. But when he first saw Eliza-
beth he could not restrain an exclamation of consternation.
She entered the room, when she was sent for, clad in a
strange little nun-like robe of black serge, made as like her
dead aunt’s as possible. At her small waist were the rosary
and crucifix, and in her hand she held a missal she had for-



gotten in her agitation to lay down
“But, my dear child,” exclaimed Uncle Bertrand, staring
at her aghast.

He managed to recover himself very quickly, and was, in
his way, very kind to her; but the first thing he did was to
send to Paris for a fashionable maid and fashionable mourn-
ing.

‘Because, as you will see,” he remarked to Alice, “we
cannot travel as we are. It is a costume for a convent or the
stage.”

Before she took off her little conventual robe, Elizabeth
went to the village to visit all her poor. The curé went with
her and shed tears himself when the people wept and kissed
LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH. 25



her little hand. When the child returned, she went into the
chapel and remained there for a long time.

She felt as if she was living ina dream when all the old
life was left behind and she found herself in the big luxurious
house in the gay New York street. Nothing that could be
done for: her comfort had been left undone. She had sev-
eral beautiful rooms, a wonderful governess, different masters
to teach her, her own retinue of servants as, indeed, has been
already said.

But, secretly, she felt bewildered and almost terrified,
everything was so new, so strange, so noisy, and so brilliant.
The dress she wore made her feel unlike herself; the books
they gave her were full of pictures and stories of worldly
things of which she knew nothing. Her carriage was brought
to the door and she went out with her governess, driving
round and round the park with scores of other people who
looked at her curiously, she did not know why. The truth
was that her refined little face was very beautiful indeed, and
her soft dark eyes still wore the dreamy spiritual look which
made her unlike the rest of the world.

‘She looks like a little princess,” she heard her uncle say
one day. “She will be some day a beautiful, an enchanting
woman—her mother was so when she died at twenty, but she
had been brought up differently. This one is a little devotee.
I am afraid of her. Her governess tells me she rises in the
night to pray.” He said it with light laughter to some of his
gay friends by whom he had wished the child to be seen. He
26 LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH.



did not know that his gayety filled her with fear and pain.
She had been taught to believe gayety worldly and sinful, and
his whole life was filled with it. He had brilliant parties—
he did not go to church—he had no pensioners—he seemed
to think of nothing but pleasure. Poor little Saint Elizabeth
prayed for his soul many an hour when he was asleep after a
grand dinner or supper party.

He could not possibly have dreamed that there was no
one of whom she stood in such dread; her timidity increased ,
ten fold in his presence. When he sent for her and she went
into the library to find him luxurious in his arm chair, a novel
on his knee, a cigar in his white hand, a tolerant, half cynical
smile on his handsome mouth, she could scarcely answer his
questions, and could never find courage to tell what she
so earnestly desired. She had found out early that Aunt
Clotilde and the curé, and the life they had led, had only
aroused in his mind a half-pitying amusement. It seemed to
her that he did not understand and had strange sacrilegious
thoughts about them—he did not believe in miracles—he
smiled when she spoke of saints. How could she tell him
that she wished to spend ali her money in building churches
and giving alms to the poor? That was what she wished to
tell him—that she wanted money to send back to the village,
that she wanted to give it to the poor people she saw in the
streets, to those who lived in the miserable places.

But when she found herself face to face with him and he
said some witty thing to her and seemed to find her only amus-
LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH. 27



ing, all her courage failed her. Sometimes she thought she
would throw herself upon her knees before him and beg him
to send her back to Normandy—to let her live alone in the
chateau as her Aunt Clotilde had done.

One morning she arose very early, and knelt a long time
before the little altar she had made for herself in her dressing
room. It was only a table with some black velvet thrown over
it, a crucifix, a saintly image, and some flowers standing upon
it. She had put on, when she got up, the quaint black serge
robe, because she felt more at home in it, and her heart was
full of determination. The night before she had received a
letter from the curé and it had contained sad news. A fever
had broken out in her beloved village, the vines had done
badly, there was sickness among the cattle, there was already
beginning to be suffering, and if something were not done for
the people they would not know how to face the winter. In
the time of Mademoiselle de Rochemont they had always
been made comfortable and happy at Christmas. What was
to be done? The curé ventured to write to Mademoiselle
Elizabeth.

The poor child had scarcely slept at all. Her dear vil-
lage! Her dear people! The children would be hungry; the
cows would die; there would be no fires to warm those who
were old.

“T must go to uncle,” she said, pale and trembling. “I
must ask him to give me money. I am afraid, but it is right
to mortify the spirit. The martyrs went to the stake. The
Be LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH.

holy Saint Elizabeth was ready to endure anything that she
might do her duty and help the poor.”

Because she had been called Elizabeth she had thought and
read a great deal of the saint whose namesake she was—the
saintly Elizabeth whose husband was so wicked and cruel,
and who wished to prevent her from doing good deeds. And
oftenest of all she had read the legend which told that one
day as Elizabeth went out with a basket of food to give to the
poor and hungry, she had met her savage husband, who had
demanded that she should tell him what she was carrying, and
when she replied ‘‘ Roses,” and he tore the cover from the
basket to see if she spoke the truth, a miracle had been per-
formed, and the basket was filled with roses, so that she had
been saved from her husband’s cruelty, and also from telling
an untruth. To little Elizabeth this legend had been beauti-
ful and quite real—it proved that if one were doing good,
the saints would take care of one. Since she had been in
her new home, she had, half consciously, compared her Uncle
Bertrand with the wicked Landgrave, though she was too
gentle and just to think he was really cruel, as Saint Eliza- _
beth’s husband had been, only he did not care for the poor,
and loved only the world—and surely that was wicked. She
had been taught that to care for the world at all was a fatal sin.

She did not eat any breakfast. She thought she would
fast until she had done what she intended to do. It had been
her Aunt Clotilde’s habit to fast very often.

She waited anxiously to hear that her Uncle Bertrand had
LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH. 29



left his room. He always rose late, and this morning he was
later than usual as he had had a long gay dinner party the
night before: ,

It was nearly twelve before she heard his door open.
Then she went quickly to the staircase. Her heart was beat-
ing so fast that she put her little hand to her side and
waited a moment to regain her breath. She felt quite cold.

“Perhaps I must wait until he has eaten his breakfast,” —
she said. “Perhaps I must not disturb him yet. It would
make him displeased. I will wait—yes, for a little while.”

She did not return to her room, but waited upon the stairs.
It seemed to be a long time. It appeared that a friend break-

fasted with him. She heard a gentleman come in and recog-

nized his voice, which she had heard before. She did not

know what the gentleman’s name was, but she had met him
going in and out with her uncle once or twice, and had thought
he had a kind face and kind eyes. He had looked at her in
an interested way when he spoke to her—even as if he were
a little curious, and she had wondered why he did so.

When the door of the breakfast room opened and shut
as the servants went in, she could hear the two laughing
and talking. They seemed to be enjoying themselves very
much. Once she heard an order given for the mail phaeton.
They were evidently going out as soon as the meal was over.

At last the door opened and they were coming out. Eliza-
beth ran down the stairs and stood in a small reception room.

Her heart began to beat faster than ever.
30 LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH.

“The blessed martyrs were not afraid,” she whispered to
herself.

“Uncle Bertrand!” she said, as he approached, and she

”



scarcely knew her own faint voice. ‘Uncle Bertrand

He turned, and seeing her, started, and exclaimed, rather
impatiently—evidently he was at once amazed and displeased
to see her. He was in a hurry to get out, and the sight of her
odd little figure, standing in its straight black robe between
the portzeres, the slender hands clasped on the breast, the
small pale face and great dark eyes uplifted, was certainly a
surprise to him.

“Elizabeth !” he said, “what do you wish? Why do you
come downstairs? And that impossible dress! Why do you
wear it again? It is not suitable.”

“Uncle Bertrand,” said the child, clasping her hands still
more tightly, her eyes growing larger in her excitement and
terror under his displeasure, “it is that 1 want money—a great
deal. 1 beg your pardon if 1 derange you. It is for the
poor. Moreover, the curé has written the people of the vil-
lage are ill—the vineyards did not yield well. They must
have money. I must send them some.”

Uncle Bertrand shrugged his shoulders.

“That is the message of monszeur le curé, is it?” he said.
“He wants money! My dear Elizabeth, I must inquire
further. You have a fortune, but I cannot permit you to

”



throw it away. You are a child, and do not understand
‘‘ But,” cried Elizabeth, trembling with agitation, “ they are
















































fia






















i bi an mF i
We ug

“UNCLE BERTRAND,” SAID THE CHILD, CLASPING HER HANDS,



in i ih









LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH. 33



so poor when one does not help them; their vineyards are so
little, and if the year is bad they must starve. Aunt Clotilde
gave to them every year—even in the good years. She said
they must be cared for like children.”

“ That was your Aunt Clotilde’s charity,” replied her uncle.
“Sometimes she was not so wise as she was devout. I must
know more of this. I have no time at present. I am going
out of town. Ina few days I will reflect upon it. Tell your
maid to give that hideous garment away. Go out to drive—
amuse yourself—you are too pale.”

Elizabeth looked at his handsome, careless face in utter
helplessness. This was a matter of life and death to her; to
him it meant nothing.

“But it is winter,” she panted, breathlessly; ‘there is
snow. Soon it will be Christmas, and they will have nothing
—no candles for the church, no little manger for the holy



child, nothing for the poorest ones. And the children 4

“Tt shall be thought of later,” said Uncle Bertrand. “I
am too busy now. Be reasonable, my child, and run away.
You detain me.”

He left her with a slight impatient shrug of his shoulders
and the slight amused smile on his lips. She heard him
speak to his friend.

‘‘She was brought up by one who had renounced the
world,” he said, “and she has already renounced it herself—
pauvre petite enfant / At eleven years she wishes to devote

her fortune to the poor and herself to the Church,”
7 :
34 LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH.



Elizabeth shrank back into the shadow of the portzeres.
Great burning tears filled her eyes and slipped down her
cheeks, falling upon her breast.

“He does not care,” she said; “he does not know. And
I do no one good—no one.” And she covered her face
with her hands and stood sobbing all alone.

When she returned to her room she was so pale that her
maid looked at her anxiously, and spoke of it afterwards to
the other servants. They were all fond of Mademoiselle
Elizabeth. She was always kind and gentle to everybody.

Nearly all the day she sat, poor little saint! by her window
looking out at the passers-by in the snowy street. But she
_ scarcely saw the people at all, her thoughts were far away, in
the little village where she had always spent her Christmas
before. Her Aunt Clotilde had allowed her at such times to
do so much. There had not been a house she had not
carried some gift to; not a child who had been forgotten.
And the church on Christmas morning had been so beautiful
with flowers from the hot-houses of the ché¢eau. It was for
the church, indeed, that the conservatories were chiefly kept
up. Mademoiselle de Rochemont would scarcely have per-
mitted herself such luxuries.

But there would not be flowers this year, the chateau was
closed ; there were no longer gardeners at work, the church
would be bare and cold, the people would have no gifts, there
would be no pleasure in the little peasants’ faces. Little
Saint Elizabeth wrung her slight hands together in her lap.
LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH. 35



“Oh,” she cried, “what can I do? And then there is the
poor here—so many. And I do nothing. The Saints will be
angry; they will not intercede for me. I shall be lost!”

It was not alone the poor she had left in her village who
were a grief to her. As she drove through the streets she
saw now and then haggard faces; and when she had ques-
tioned a servant who had one day come to her to ask for
charity for a poor child at the door, she had found that in
parts of this great, bright city which she had not seen, there
was said to be cruel want and suffering, as in all great cities.

“ And it is so cold now,” she thought, ‘with the snow on
the ground.”

The lamps in the street were just beginning to be lighted
when her Uncle Bertrand returned. It appeared that he had
brought back with him the gentleman with the kind face.
They were to dine together, and Uncle Bertrand desired that
Mademoiselle Elizabeth should join them. Evidently the
journey out of town had been delayed for a day at least.
There came also another message: Monsieur de Rochemont
wished Mademoiselle to send to him by her maid a certain
box of antique ornaments which had been given to her by
her Aunt Clotilde. Elizabeth had known less of the value
of these jewels than of their beauty. She knew they were
beautiful, and that they had belonged to her Aunt Clotilde in
the gay days of her triumphs as a beauty and a brilliant and
adored young woman, but it seemed that they were also very
curious, and Monsieur de Rochemont wished his friend to see
36 LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH.



them. When Elizabeth went downstairs she found them
examining them together.

“They must be put somewhere for safe keeping,” Uncle
Bertrand was saying. ‘It should have been done before. 1
will attend to it.”

The gentleman with the kind eyes looked at Elizabeth
with an interested expression as she came into the room.
Her slender little figure in its black velvet dress, her delicate
little face with its large soft sad eyes, the gentle gravity of
her manner made her seem quite unlike other children.

He did not seem simply to find her amusing, as her Uncle
Bertrand did. She was always conscious that behind Uncle
Bertrand’s most serious expression there was lurking a faint
smile as he watched her, but this visitor looked at her ina
different way. He was a doctor, she discovered. Dr. Norris,
her uncle called him, and Elizabeth wondered if perhaps his
profession had not made him quick of sight and kind.

She felt that it must be so when she heard him talk at
dinner. She found that he did a great deal of work among
the very poor—that he had a hospital, where he received
little children who were ill—who had perhaps met with
accidents, and could not be taken care of in their wretched’
homes. He spoke most frequently of terrible quarters, which
he called Five Points; the greatest poverty and suffering
was there. And he spoke of it with such eloquent sympathy,
that even Uncle Bertrand began to listen with interest.

“Come,” he said, “you are a rich, idle fellow, De Roche-
LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH. 37



mont, and we want rich, idle fellows to come and look into
all this and do something for us. You must let me take you
with me some day.”

“It would disturb me too much, my good Norris,” said
Uncle Bertrand, with a slight shudder. “I should not enjoy
my dinner after it.”

“Then go without your dinner,” said Dr. Norris. ‘These
people do. You have too many dinners. Give up one.”

Uncle Bertrand shrugged his shoulders and smiled.

“It is Elizabeth who fasts,” he said. ‘ Myself, I prefer to
dine. And yet, some day, I may have the fancy to visit this
place with you.”

Elizabeth could scarcely have been said to dine this even-
ing. She could not eat. She sat with her large, sad eyes
fixed upon Dr. Norris’ face as he talked. Every word he
uttered sank deep into her heart. The want and suffering of
which he spoke were more terrible than anything she had
ever heard of—it had been nothing like this in the village.
Oh! no, no. As she thought of it there was such a look in
her dark eyes as almost startled Dr. Norris several times
when he glanced at her, but as he did not know the par-
ticulars of her life with her aunt and the strange training she
had had, he could not possibly have guessed what was going
on in her mind, and how much effect his stories were having.
The beautiful little face touched him very much, and the
pretty French accent with which the child spoke seemed
very musical to him, and added a great charm to the gentle,
38 LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH,



serious answers she made to the remarks he addressed to her.
He could not help seeing that something had made little
Mademoiselle Elizabeth a pathetic and singular little creat-
ure, and he continually wondered what it was.

“Do you think she is a happy child?” he asked Monsieur
de Rochemont when they were alone together over their
cigars and wine.

“Happy?” said Uncle Bertrand, with his light smile.
“She has been taught, my friend, that to be happy upon
earth is a crime. That was my good sister's creed. One
must devote one’s self, not to happiness, but entirely to good
works. I think I have told you that she, this little one,
desires to give all her fortune tothe poor. Having heard you
this evening, she will wish to bestow it upon your Five Points.”

When, having retired from the room with a grave and
stately little obeisance to her uncle and his guest, Elizabeth
had gone upstairs, it had not been with the intention of going
to bed. She sent her maid away and knelt before her altar
for a long time.

“The Saints will tell me what to do,” she said. “The
good Saints, who are always gracious, they will vouchsafe to
me some thought which will instruct me if I remain long
enough at prayer.”

She remained at prayer a long time. When at last she
arose from her knees it was long past midnight, and she was
tired and weak, but the thought had not been given to her.

But just as she laid her head upon her pillow it came,
LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH. 39



The ornaments given to her by her Aunt Clotilde somebody
would buy them. They were her own—it would be right to
sell them—to what better use could they be put? Was it not
what Aunt Clotilde would have desired? Had she not told
her stories of the good and charitable who had sold the
clothes from their bodies that the miserable might be helped ?
Yes, it was right. These things must be done. All else was
vain and useless and of the world. But it would require
courage—great courage. To go out alone to find a place
where the people would buy the jewels—perhaps there might
be some who would not want them. And then when they
were sold to find this poor and unhappy quarter of which
her uncle’s guest had spoken, and to give to those who
needed—all by herself. Ah! what courage it would require.
And then Uncle Bertrand, some day he would ask about the
ornaments, and discover all, and his anger might be terrible.
No one had ever been angry with her; how could she bear
it. But had not the Saints and Martyrs borne everything?
had they not gone to the stake and the rack with smiles?
She thought of Saint Elizabeth and the cruel Landgrave.
It could not be even so bad as that—but whatever the result
was it must be borne.

So at last she slept, and there was upon her gentle little
face so sweetly sad a look that when her maid came to waken
her in the morning she stood by the bedside for some moments
looking down upon her pityingly.

The day seemed very long and sorrowful to the poor child,
40 LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH.

It was full of anxious thoughts and plannings. She was so
innocent and inexperienced, so ignorant of all practical things.
She had decided that it would be best to wait until evening
before going out, and then to take the jewels and try to sell
them to some jeweller. She did not understand the. diffi-
culties that would lie in her way, but she felt very timid.

Her maid had asked permission to go out for the even-
ing and Monsieur de Rochemont was to dine out, so that
she found it possible to leave the house without attracting
attention. :

As soon as the streets were lighted she took the case of
ornaments, and going downstairs very quietly, let herself out.
The servants were dining, and she was seen by none of
them.

When she found herself in the snowy street she felt
strangely bewildered. She had never been out unattended
before, and she knew nothing of the great busy city. When
she turned into the more crowded thoroughfares, she saw
several times that the passers-by glanced at her curiously.
Her timid look, her foreign air and richly furred dress, and the
fact that she was a child and alone at such an hour, could not
fail to attract attention ; but though she felt confused and
troubled she went bravely on. It was some time before she
found a jeweller’s shop, and when she entered it the men
behind the counter looked at her ih amazement. But she
went to the one nearest to her and laid the case of jewels on
the counter before him.
LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH. At



“J wish,” she said, in her soft low voice, and with the
pretty accent, “1 wish that you should buy these.”

The man stared at her, and at the ornaments, and then at
her again.

‘“‘T beg pardon, miss,” he said.

Elizabeth repeated her request.

“T will speak to Mr. Moetyler,” he said, after a moment of
hesitation.

He went to the other end of the shop to an elderly man
who sat behind a desk. After he had spoken a few words,
the elderly man looked up as if surprised; then he glanced at
Elizabeth ; then, after speaking a few more words, he came
forward.

“You wish to sell these?” he said, looking at the case of
jewels with a puzzled expression.

“Ves,” Elizabeth answered.

He bent over the case and took up one ornament after the
other and examined them closely. After he had done this he
looked at the little girl’s innocent, trustful face, seeming more
puzzled than before.

“ Are they your own?” he inquired.

“Yes, they are mine,” she replied, timidly.

“Do you know how much they are worth ?”

“T know that they are worth much money,” said Elizabeth.
“‘T have heard it said so.”

“Do your friends know that you are going to sell
them ?”
42 LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH.





“No,” Elizabeth said, a faint color rising in her delicate
face. “But it is right that I should do it.”

The man spent a few moments in examining them again
and, having done so, spoke hesitatingly.

“Tam afraid we cannot buy them,” he said. ‘“ It would be
impossible, unless your friends first gave their permission.”

“Impossible!” said Elizabeth, and tears rose in her eyes,
making them look softer and more wistful than ever.

“We could not do it,” said the jeweller. ‘It is out of the
question under the circumstances.”

“Do you think,” faltered the poor little saint, “do you
think that nobody will buy them?”

“T am afraid not,” was the reply. ‘No respectable firm
who would pay their real value. If you'll take my advice,
young lady, you will take them home and consult your
friends,”

He spoke kindly, but Elizabeth was overwhelmed with
disappointment. She did not know enough of the world to
understand that a richly dressed little girl who offered valu-
able jewels for sale at night must be a strange and unusual
sight.

When she found herself on the street again, her long
lashes were heavy with tears.

“Tf no one will buy them,” she said, “what shall I do?”

She walked a long way—so long that she was very tired—
and offered them at several places, but as she chanced to
enter only respectable shops, the same thing happened each
LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH. 43



time. She was looked at curiously and questioned, but no
one would buy.

“They are mine,” she would say. ‘It is right that I should
sell them.” But everyone stared and seemed puzzled, and in
the end refused.

At last, after much wandering, she found herself in a
poorer quarter of the city; the streets were narrower and
dirtier, and the people began to look squalid and wretchedly
dressed ; there were smaller shops and dingy houses. She
saw unkempt men and women and uncared for little children.
The poverty of the poor she had seen in her own village
seemed comfort and luxury by contrast. She had never
dreamed of anything like this. Now and then she felt faint
with pain and horror. But she went on.

“They have no vineyards,” she said to herself. ‘No trees
and flowers—it is all dreadful—there is nothing. They need
help more than the others. To let them suffer so, and not to
give them charity, would be a great crime.”

She was so full of grief and excitement that she had ceased
to notice how everyone looked at her—she saw only the
wretchedness, and dirt and misery. She did not know, poor
child! that she was surrounded by danger—that she was not
only in the midst of misery, but of dishonesty and crime. She
had even forgotten her timidity—that it was growing late,
and that she was far from home, and would not know how to
return—she did not realize that she had walked so far that
she was almost exhausted with fatigue.








44 LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH.



She had brought with her all the money she possessed. If
she could not sell the jewels she could, at least, give some-
thing to someone in want. But she did not know to whom
she must give first. When she had lived with her Aunt
Clotilde it had been their habit to visit the peasants in their
houses. Must she enter one of these houses—these dreadful
places with the dark passages, from which she heard many
times riotous voices, and even cries, issuing ?

‘But those who do good must feel no fear,” she thought.
“It is only to have courage.” At length something happened
which caused her to pause before one of those places. She
heard sounds of pitiful moans and sobbing from something
crouched upon the broken steps. It seemed like a heap of
rags, but as she drew near she saw by the light of the street
lamp opposite that it was a woman with her head in her
knees, and a wretched child on each side of her. The children
were shivering with cold and making low cries as if they were
frightened. —

Elizabeth stopped and then ascended the steps.

“Why is it that you cry?” she asked gently. “Tell me.”

The woman did not answer at first, but when Elizabeth
spoke again she lifted her head, and as soon as she saw the
slender figure in its velvet and furs, and the pale, refined
little face, she gave a great start.

“Lord have mercy on yez!” she said in a hoarse voice
which sounded almost terrified. ‘‘ Who are yez, an’ what
bees ye dow’ in a place the loike o’ this?”
i ‘ g : c
ee |e =
eee

oy
—— eZ aan : ren goi :
= | eenill i ih wii ie a 7
| it Laos - init iil (i su

— =i a i | ine
=== h(t a
| (ile — sl i Ah !

=

SS


LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH. 47



‘‘T came,” said Elizabeth, ‘‘to see those who are poor. I
wish to help them. I have great sorrow for them. It is
right that the rich should help those who want. Tell me why
you cry, and why your little children sit in the cold.” Every-
body had shown surprise to whom Elizabeth had spoken to-
night, but no one had stared as this woman did.

“Tt’s no place for the loike o’ yez,” she said. ‘An’ it
black noight, an’ men and women wild in the drink ; an’ Pat
Harrigan insoide bloind an’ mad in liquor, an’ it’s turned me
an’ the children out he has to shlape in the snow—an’ not
the furst toime either. An’ it’s starvin’ we are—starvin’
an’ no other,” and she dropped her wretched head on her
knees and began to moan again, and the children joined
her.

“Don't let yez daddy hear yez,” she said to them. ‘‘ Whisht
now—it’s come out an’ kill yez he wiil.”

Elizabeth began to feel tremulous and faint.

“Js it that they have hunger?” she asked.

“ Not a bite or sup have they had this day, nor yesterday,”
was the answer. ‘“ The good Saints have pity on us.”

“Yes,” said Elizabeth, “the good Saints have always pity.
I will go and get some food—poor little ones.”

She had seen a shop only a few yards away—she remem-
bered passing it. Before the woman could speak again she
was gone.

“Yes,” she said, “I was sent to them—it is the answer to
my prayer—it was not in vain that I asked so long.”
48 LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH.



When she entered the shop the few people who were in it
stopped what they were doing to stare at her as others had
done—but she scarcely saw that it was so.

“ Give to mea basket,” she said to the owner of the place.
“Put in it some bread and wine—some of the things which
are ready to eat. It is for a poor woman and her little ones
who starve.”

There was in the shop among others a red-faced woman
with a cunning look in her eyes. She sidled out of the place
and was waiting for Elizabeth when she came out.

‘“« ]’m starvin’ too, little lady,” she said. ‘‘There’s many of
us that way, an’ it’s not often them with money care about it.
Give me something too,” in a wheedling voice.

Elizabeth looked up at her; her pure ignorant eyes full of
pity.

“T have great sorrows for you,” she said. ‘Perhaps the
poor woman will share her food with you.”

‘It’s the money I need,” said the woman.

‘‘T have none left,” answered Elizabeth. ‘I will come
again.”

“It’s now I want it,” the woman persisted. Then she
looked covetously at Elizabeth’s velvet fur-lined and trimmed
cloak. ‘That’s a pretty cloak you’ve on,” she said. “ You've
got another, I daresay.” ;

Suddenly she gave the cloak a pull, but the fastening did
not give way as she had thought it would.

“Ts it because you are cold that you want it?” said Eliza-
LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH. 49



beth, in her gentle, innocent way. “I will give it to you.
Take it.”

Had not the holy ones in the legends given their gar-
ments to the poor? Why should she not give her cloak ?

In an instant it was unclapsed and snatched away, and the
woman was gone. She did not even stay long enough to give
thanks for the gift, and something in her haste and rough-
ness made Elizabeth wonder and gave her a moment of
tremor.

She made her way back to the place where the other woman
and her children had been sitting; the cold wind made her
shiver, and the basket was very heavy for her slender arm.
Her strength seemed to be giving way.

As she turned the corner, a great, fierce gust of wind
swept round it, and caught her breath and made her stagger.
She thought she was going to fall; indeed, she would have
fallen but that one of the tall men who were passing put out
’ his arm and caught her. He was a well dressed man, in a
heavy overcoat; he had gloves on. Elizabeth spoke in a
faint tone.

“T thank you,” she began, when the second man uttered a
wild exclamation and sprang forward.

“Elizabeth !” he said, “ Elizabeth !”

Elizabeth looked up and uttered acry herself. It was her
Uncle Bertrand who stood before her, and his companion, who
had saved her from falling, was Dr. Norris.

For a moment it seemed as if they were almost struck
4
50 LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH.





dumb with horror ; and then her Uncle Bertrand seized her
by the arm in such agitation that he scarcely seemed himself—
the light, satirical, jesting Uncle Bertrand she had known at
all.

“What does it mean?” he cried. ‘‘ What are you doing
here, in this horrible place alone? Do you know where it is
you have come? What have you in your basket? Explain!
explain!”

The moment of trial had come, and it seemed even more
terrible than the poor child had imagined. The long strain
and exertion had been too much for her delicate body. She
felt that she could bear no more; the cold seemed to have
struck to her very heart. She looked up at Monsieur de
Rochemont’s pale, excited face, and trembled from head to
foot. A strange thought flashed into her mind. Saint Eliza-
beth, of Thuringia—the cruel Landgrave. Perhaps the Saints
would help her, too, since she was trying to do their bidding.
Surely, surely it must be so!

“ Speak !” repeated Monsieur de Rochemont. ‘Why is
this? The basket—what have you in it?”

“Roses,” said Elizabeth, ‘‘ Roses.” And then her strength
deserted her—she fell upon her knees in the snow—the
basket slipped from her arm, and the first thing which fell
from it was—no, not roses,—there had been no miracle
wrought——not roses, but the case of jewels which she had laid
on the top of the other things that it might be the more

easily carried.
ay Me sl Hy ; i i ina
Reyes eee Ki Wi os

HER STRENGTH DESERTED HER—SHE FELL UPON HER KNEES IN THE SNOW,

i re



LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH. 53





“Roses!” cried Uncle Bertrand. ‘Is it that the child is
mad? They are the jewels of my sister Clotilde.”

Elizabeth clasped her hands and leaned towards Dr. Norris,
the tears streaming from her uplifted eyes.

“Ah! monsieur,” she sobbed, “you will understand. It
was for the poor—they suffer so much. If we do not help
them our souls will be lost. I did not mean to speak falsely.
I thought the Saints—the Saints ” But her sobs filled
her throat, and she could not finish. Dr. Norris stopped, and



took her in his strong arms as if she had been a baby.

“Quick!” he said, imperatively ; ‘“we must return to the
carriage, De Rochemont. This is a serious matter.”

Elizabeth clung to him with trembling hands.

“But the poor woman who starves?” she cried. ‘The
little children—they sit up on the step quite near—the food
was for them! I pray you give it to them.”

“Yes, they shall have it,” said the Doctor. ‘Take the
basket, De Rochemont—only a few doors below. And _ it
appeared that there was something in his voice which seemed
to render obedience necessary, for Monsieur de Rochemont

actually did as he was told.
For a moment Dr. Norris put Elizabeth on her feet again,
but it was only while he removed his overcoat and wrapped
it about her slight shivering body.

“You are chilled through, poor child,” he said; “and you
are not strong enough to walk just now. You must let me
carry you.”
54 LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH.



It was true that a sudden faintness had come upon her,
and she could not restrain the shudder which shook her. It
still shook her when she was placed in the carriage which the
two gentlemen had thought it wiser to leave in one of the
more respectable streets when they went to explore the worse
ones together.

“What might not have occurred if we had not arrived at
that instant!” said Uncle Bertrand when he got into the



carriage. ‘As it is who knows what illness

“Tt will be better to say as little as possible now,” said Dr.
Norris.

“Tt was for the poor,” said Elizabeth, trembling. ‘I had
prayed to the Saints to tell me what was best. I thought I
must go. I did not mean to do wrong. It was for the
poor.”

And while her Uncle Bertrand regarded her with a
strangely agitated look, and Dr. Norris held her hand be-
tween his strong and warm ones, the tears rolled down her
pure, pale little face.

She did not know until some time after what danger she
had been in, that the part of the city into which she had
wandered was the lowest and worst, and was in some quarters
the home of thieves and criminals of every class. As her
Uncle Bertrand had said, it was impossible to say what
terrible thing might have happened if they had not met her
so soon. It was Dr. Norris who explained it all to her as
gently and kindly as was possible. She had always been
LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH. 55



fragile, and she had caught a severe cold which caused her
an illness of some weeks. It was Dr. Norris who took care
of her, and it was not long before her timidity was forgotten
in her tender and trusting affection for him. She learned to
watch for his coming, and to feel that she was no longer
lonely. It was through him that her uncle permitted her to
send to the cuvé a sum of money large enough to do all that
was necessary. It was through him that the poor woman
and her children were clothed and fed and protected. When
she was well enough, he had promised that she should help
him among his own poor. And through him—though she
lost none of her sweet sympathy for those who suffered—she
learned to live a more natural and child-like life, and to find
that there were innocent, natural pleasures to be enjoyed in
the world. In time she even ceased to be afraid of her Uncle
Bertrand, and to be quite happy in the great beautiful house.
And as for Uncle Bertrand himself, he became very fond of
her, and sometimes even helped her to dispense her charities.
He had a light, gay nature, but he was kind at heart, and
always disliked to see or think of suffering. Now and then
he would give more lavishly than wisely, and then he would
say, with his habitual graceful shrug of the shoulders—

“Yes, it appears I am not discreet. Finally, I] think I
must leave my charities to you, my good Norris—to you and
Little Saint Elizabeth.”
THE SPORY OF PRINGE PAIRYFOOT.
PREFATORY NOTE.

“Tue Story oF Prince Farryroor” was originally intended to be
the first of a series, under the general title of “ Stories from the Lost Fairy-
Book, Re-told by the Child Who Read Them,” concerning which Mrs.
Burnett relates :

““When I was a child of six or seven, I had given to me a book of fairy-stories, of
which I was very fond. Before it had been in my possession many months, it disappeared,
and, though since then I have tried repeatedly, both in England and America, to find a
copy of it, I have never been able to do so. JI asked a friend in the Congressional Library
at Washington—a man whose knowledge of books is almost unlimited—to try to learn
something about it forme. But even he could find no trace of it; and so we concluded
it must have been out of print some time. I always remembered the impression the
stories had made on me, and, though most of them had become very faint recollections, I
frequently told them to children, with additions of my own. The story of Fairyfoot I had
promised to tell a little girl ; and, in accordance with the promise, I developed the outline
I remembered, introduced new characters and conversation, wrote it upon note paper,
inclosed it in a decorated satin cover, and sent it to her. In the first place, it was
re-written merely for her, with no intention of publication ; but she was so delighted with
it, and read and re-read it so untiringly, that it occurred to me other children might like to
hear it also. So I made the plan of developing and re-writing the other stories in like
manner, and having them published under the title of ‘Stories from the Lost Fairy-Book,
Re-told by the Child Who Read Them.’ ”

The little volume in question Mrs. Burnett afterwards discovered to be
entitled “ Granny’s Wonderful Chair and the Tales it Told.”
THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRYFOOT.

RARE

NCE upon a time, in the days of the fairies, there was
in the far west country a kingdom which was called
by the name of Stumpinghame. It was a rather cu-

- rious country in several ways. In the first place, the people

who lived there thought that Stumpinghame was all the

world; they thought there was no world at all outside

Stumpinghame. And they thought that the people of Stump-

inghame knew everything that could possibly be known, and

that what they did not know was of no consequence at all.
One idea common in Stumpinghame was really very
unusual indeed. It was a peculiar taste in the matter of feet.

In Stumpinghame, the larger a person’s feet were, the more

beautiful and elegant he or she was considered ; and the more

aristocratic and nobly born a man was, the more immense
were his feet. Only the very lowest and most vulgar persons
were ever known to have small feet. The King’s feet were
simply huge ; so were the Queen’s ; so were those of the young
princes and princesses. It had never occurred to anyone that

a member of such a royal family could possibly disgrace him-

self by being born with small feet. Well, you may imagine,
60 THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRYFOOT.



then, what a terrible and humiliating state of affairs arose
when there was born into that royal family a little son, a
prince, whose feet were so very small and slender and delicate
that they would have been considered small even in other
places than Stumpinghame. Grief and confusion seized the
entire nation. The Queen fainted six times a day; the King
had black rosettes fastened upon his crown ; all the flags were
at half-mast; and the court went into the deepest mourn-
ing. There had been born to Stumpinghame a royal prince
with small feet, and nobody knew how the country could
survive it!

Yet the disgraceful little prince survived it, and did not
seem to mind at all. He was the prettiest and best tempered
baby the royal nurse had ever seen. But for his small feet,
he would have been the flower of the family. The royal
nurse said to herself, and privately told his little royal
highness’s chief bottle-washer that she “never see a hinfant
as took notice so, and sneezed as hintelligent.” But, of course,
the King and Queen could see nothing but his little feet, and
very soon they made up their minds to send him away. So
one day they had him bundled up and carried where they
thought he might be quite forgotten. They sent him to the
hut of a swineherd who lived deep, deep in a great forest
which seemed to end nowhere.

They gave the swineherd some money, and some clothes
for Fairyfoot, and told him, that if he would take care of the
child, they would send money and clothes every year. As for
THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRVYFOOT. 61



themselves, they only wished to be sure of never seeing
Fairyfoot again.

This pleased the swineherd well enough. He was poor,
and he had a wife and ten children, and hundreds of swine to
take care of, and he knew he could use the little Prince’s
money and clothes for his own family, and no one would find
it out. So he let his wife take the little fellow, and as soon
as the King’s messengers had gone, the woman took the royal
clothes off the Prince and put on him a coarse little night-
gown, and gave all his things to her own children. But the
baby Prince did not seem to mind that—he did not seem to
mind anything, even though he had no name but Prince
Fairyfoot, which had been given him in contempt by the
disgusted courtiers. He grew prettier and prettier every day,
and long before the time when other children begin to walk,
he could run about on his fairy feet.

The swineherd and his wife did not like him at all ; in fact,
they disliked him because he was so much prettier and so
much brighter than their own clumsy children. And the
children did not like him, because they were ill natured and
only liked themselves.

So as he grew older year by year, the poor little Prince was
more and more lonely. He had no one to play with, and was
obliged to be always by himself. He dressed only in the
coarsest and roughest clothes; he seldom had enough to eat,
and he slept on straw in a loft under the roof of the swine-
herd’s hut. But all this did not prevent his being strong and
62 THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRYFOOT.





rosy and active. He was as fleet as the wind, and he had a
voice as sweet as a bird’s; he had lovely sparkling eyes, and
bright golden hair ; and he had so kind a heart that he would
not have done a wrong or cruel thing for the world. As soon
as he was big enough, the swineherd made him go out into
the forest every day to take care of the swine. He was
obliged to keep them together in one place, and if any of them
ran away into the forest, Prince Fairyfoot was beaten. And
as the swine were very wild and unruly, he was very often
beaten, because it was almost impossible to keep them from
wandering off ; and when they ran away, they ran so fast, and
through places so tangled, that it was almost impossible to
follow them.

The forest in which-he had to spend the long days was a
very beautiful one, however, and he could take pleasure in
that. It was a forest so great that it was like a world in itself.
There were in it strange, splendid trees, the branches of which
interlocked overhead, and when their many leaves moved and
rustled, it seemed as if they were whispering secrets. There
were bright, swift, strange birds, that flew about in the deep
golden sunshine, and when they rested on the boughs, they,
too, seemed telling one another secrets. There was a bright,
clear brook, with water as sparkling and pure as crystal, and
with shining shells and pebbles of all colours lying in the
gold and silver sand at the bottom. Prince Fairyfoot always
thought the brook knew the forest’s secret also, and sang it
softly to the flowers as it ran along. And as for the flowers,
THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRÂ¥FOOT. 63



they were beautiful; they grew as thickly as if they had been
a carpet, and under them was another carpet of lovely green
moss. The trees and the birds, and the brook and the
flowers were Prince Fairyfoot’s friends. He loved them,
and never was very lonely when he was with them; and if
his swine had not run away so often, and if the swineherd
had not beaten him so much, sometimes—indeed, nearly all
summer—he would have been almost happy. He used to lie
on the fragrant carpet of flowers and moss and listen to the
soft sound of the running water, and to the whispering of
the waving leaves, and to the songs of the birds; and he
would wonder what they were saying to One another, and if
it were true, as the swineherd’s children said, that the great
forest was full of fairies. And then he would pretend it was
true, and would tell himself stories about them, and make
believe they were his friends, and that they came to talk to
him and let him love them. He wanted to love something
or somebody, and he had nothing to love—not even a little
dog.

One day he was resting under a great green tree, feeling
really quite happy because everything was so beautiful. He
had even made a little song to chime in with the brook’s, and
he was singing it softly and sweetly, when suddenly, as he
lifted his curly, golden head to look about him, he saw that
all his swine were gone. He sprang to his feet, feeling very
much frightened, and he whistled and called, but he heard
nothing. He could not imagine how they had all disappeared
64 THE STORF OF PRINCE FAIRFFOOT.



so quietly, without making any sound; but not one of them
was anywhere to be seen. Then his poor little heart began
to beat fast with trouble and anxiety. He ran here and
there . he looked through the bushes and under the trees; he
ran, and ran, and ran, and called and whistled, and searched ;
but nowhere—nowhere was one of those swine to be found!
He searched for them for hours, going deeper and deeper
into the forest than he had ever been before. He saw strange ,
trees and strange flowers, and heard strange sounds: and at
last the sun began to go down, and he knew he would soon
be left in the dark. His little feet and legs were scratched
with brambles, and were so tired that they would scarcely
carry him; but he dared not go back to the swineherd’s hut
without finding the swine. The only comfort he had on all
the long way was that the little brook had run by his side,
and sung its song to him; and sometimes he had stopped and
bathed his hot face in it, and had said, “‘ Oh, little brook! you
are so kind to me! You are my friend, I know. I would be
so lonely without you !”

When at last the sun did go down, Prince Fairyfoot had
wandered so far that he did not know where he was, and he
was so tired that he threw himself down by the brook, and
hid his face in the flowery moss, and said, ‘Oh, little brook!
I am so tired I can go no further; and I can never find
them !”

While he was lying there in despair, he heard a sound in
the air above him, and looked up to see what it was. It
¢

“Bt
NG, i

yy - Wa
A Al a pr

a

mare ty ee ae
is) vi fs,

yt Gin
nti!

i \ i

NIG SL A,
RS {i iz

‘ WHY,” EXCLAIMED FAIRYFOOT

rN

7

\y ih MY
gill!

wt al

af

“I'M SURPRISED !”

x ren

ISG Hie
yite Hie. MN, 7

M a

igh wl ee

yt! aN la
iy

Tae


THE STORYF OF PRINCE FAIRVFOOT. 67



sounded like a little bird in some trouble. And, surely enough,
there was a huge hawk darting after a plump little brown
bird with a red breast. The little bird was uttering sharp
frightened cries, and Prince Fairyfoot felt so sorry for it that
he sprang up and tried to drive the hawk away. The little
bird saw him at once, and straightway flew to him, and Fairy-
foot covered it with his cap. And then the hawk flew away
in a great rage.

When the hawk was gone, Fairyfoot sat down again and
lifted his cap, expecting, of course, to see the brown bird with
the red breast. But, instead of a bird, out stepped a little
man, not much higher than your little finger—a plump little
man in a brown suit with a bright red vest, and with a cocked
hat on.

“Why,” exclaimed Fairyfoot, “I’m surprised !”

“So am I,” said the little man, cheerfully. ‘I never was
more surprised in my life, except when my great-aunt’s grand-
mother got into such a rage, and changed me into a robin-
redbreast. I tell you, that surprised me!”

“YT should think it might,” said Fairyfoot. ‘“ Why did
she do it?”

“ Mad,” answered the little man—‘ that was what was the
matter with her. She was always losing her temper like that,
and turning people into awkward things, and then being sorry
for it, and not being able to change them back again. If you
are a fairy, you have to be careful. If you'll believe me, that
woman once turned her second-cousin’s sister-in-law into a
68 THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRYFOOT.



mushroom, and somebody picked her, and she was made into
catsup, which is a thing no man likes to have happen in his
family !”

“Of course not,” said Fairyfoot, politely.

“The difficulty is,” said the little man, “ that some fairies
don’t graduate. They learn to turn people into things, but
they don’t learn how to unturn them; and then, when they |
get mad in their families—you know how it is about getting
mad in families—there is confusion. Yes, seriously, confusion
arises. It arises. That was the way with my great-aunt’s
grandmother. She was not a cultivated old person, and she
did not know how to unturn people, and now you see the
result. Quite accidentally I trod on her favorite corn; she
got mad and changed me into a robin, and regretted it ever
afterward. I could only become myself again by a kind-
hearted person’s saving me from a great danger. You are
that person. Give me your hand.”

Fairyfoot held out his hand. The little man looked at it.

“On second thought,” he said, «“ } can’t shake it—it’s too
large. I'll sit on it, and talk to you.”

With these words, he hopped upon Perens hand, and
sat down, smiling and clasping his own hands about his tiny
knees.

“T declare, it’s delightful not to bea robin,” he said. ‘Had
to go about picking up worms, you know. Disgusting busi-
ness. I always did hate worms. I never ate them myself—
I drew the line there; but I had to get them for my family.”
THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRYFOOT. 69



Suddenly he began to giggle, and to hug his knees up
tight. i‘

“Do you wish to know what I’m laughing at?” he asked
Fairyfoot.

“Yes,” Fairyfoot answered.

The little man giggled more than ever.

“Tm thinking about my wife,” he said—‘‘the one 1 had
when I was a robin. A nice rage she'll be in when | don’t
come home to-night! She'll have to hustle around and pick
up worms for herself, and for the children too, and it serves
her right. She had a temper that would embitter the life of a

crow, much more a simple robin. I wore myself to skin and
bone taking care of her and her brood, and how I did hate

’em !—bare, squawking things, always with their throats gap-
ing open. They seemed to think a parent’s sole duty was to
bring worms for them.”

- “Tt must have been unpleasant,” said Fairyfoot.

“Tt was more than that,” said the little man; ‘it used to
make my feathers stand on end. There was the nest, too!
Fancy being changed into a robin, and being obliged to build
a nest at amoment’s notice! I never felt so ridiculous in my
life. How was I to know how to build a nest! And the
worst of it was the way she went on about it.”

“ She!” said Fairyfoot.

“Oh, her, you know,” replied the little man, ungram-
matically, ‘‘my wife. She’d always been a robin, and she
knew how to build a nest ; she liked to order me about, too
70 THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRFFOOT,



—she was one of that kind. But, of course, I wasn’t going
to own that I didn’t know anything about nest-building. I
could never have done anything with her in the world if I’d
let her think she knew as much as I did. So I just put
things together in a way of my own, and built a nest that
would have made you weep! The bottom fell out of it the
first night. It nearly killed me.”

“ Did you fall out, too?” inquired Fairyfoot.

“Oh, no,” answered the little man. “I meant that it
nearly killed me to think the eggs weren’t in it at the
time.”

“What did you do about the nest ?” asked Fairyfoot.

The little man winked in the most improper manner.

“To?” he said. “I got mad, of course, and told her that
‘if she hadn’t interfered, it wouldn’t have happened; said it
was exactly like a hen to fly around giving advice and unset-
tling one’s mind, and then complain if things weren’t right.
I told her she might build the nest herself, if she thought she
could build a better one. She did it, too!” And he winked
again. .

““Was it a better one?” asked Fairyfoot.

The little man actually winked a third time. ‘It may
surprise you to hear that it was,” he replied; “but it didn’t
surprise me. By-the-by,” he added, with startling suddenness,
‘‘what’s your name, and what’s the matter with you?”

“My name is Prince Fairyfoot,” said the boy, ‘and I have
lost my master’s swine.”
THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRFYFOOT. 71



“My name,” said the little man, “is Robin Goodfellow,
and I'll find them for you.”

He had a tiny scarlet silk pouch hanging at his girdle,
and he put his hand into it and drew forth the smallest golden
whistle you ever saw.

“ Blow that,” he said, giving it to Fairyfoot, “ and take care
that you don’t swallow it. You are such a tremendous creat-
Ube

Fairyfoot took the whistle and put it very delicately to his
lips. He blew, and there came from it a high, clear sound
that seemed to pierce the deepest depths of the forest.

‘“ Blow again,” commanded Robin Goodfellow.

Again Prince Fairyfoot blew, and again the pure clear
sound rang through the trees, and the next instant he heard
a loud rushing and tramping and squeaking and grunting, and
all the great drove of swine came tearing through the bushes
and formed themselves into a circle and stood staring at him
as if waiting to be told what to do next.

“ Oh, Robin Goodfellow, Robin Goodfellow !” cried Fairy-
foot, “how grateful I am to you!”

‘Not as grateful as I am to you,” said Robin Goodfellow.

“ But for you I should be disturbing that hawk’s digestion at _

the present moment, instead of which, here I am, a respect-
able fairy once more, and my late wife (though I ought not to
call her that, for goodness knows she was early enough hust-
ling me out of my nest before daybreak, with the unpleasant
proverb about the early bird catching the worm !)—I suppose
72 THE STORF OF PRINCE FAIRÂ¥FOOT,



I should say my early wife—is at this juncture a widow.
Now, where do you live?”

Fairyfoot told him, and told him also about the swineherd,
and how it happened that, though he was a prince, he had to
herd swine and live in the forest.

“Well, weil,” said Robin Goodfellow, “that is a disagree-
able state of affairs. Perhaps I can make it rather easier for
you. You see that is a fairy whistle.”

“T thought so,” said Fairyfoot.

“Well,” continued Robin Goodfellow, “you can always
call your swine with it, so you will never be beaten again.
Now, are you ever lonely ?”

‘‘ Sometimes I am very lonely indeed,” answered the Prince.
‘“No one cares for me, though I think the brook is sometimes
sorry, and tries to tell me things.”

“Of course,” said Robin. “ They all like you. I’ve heard
them say so.”

“Oh, have you?” cried Fairyfoot, joyfully.

‘Yes ; you never throw stones at the birds, or break the
branches of the trees, or trample on the flowers when you
can help it.”

“The birds sing to me,” said Fairyfoot, “and the trees seem
to beckon to me and whisper ; and when I am very lonely, I
lie down in the grass and look into the eyes of the flowers and
talk to them. I would not hurt one of them for all the world !”

‘“‘Humph !” said Robin, “you area rather good little fellow.
Would you like to go to a party ?”

\
THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRFFOOT. 73



“A party!” said Fairyfoot. What is that ?”

“This sort of thing,” said Robin; and he jumped up and
began to dance around and to kick up his heels gaily in the
palm of Fairyfoot’s hand. ‘‘ Wine, you know, and cake, and
all sorts of fun. It begins at twelve to-night, in a place the
fairies know of, and it lasts until just two minutes and three
seconds and a half before daylight. Would you like to
come ?” |

“Oh,” cried Fairyfoot, “I should be so happy if I
might |”

“Well, you may,” said Robin; “I'll take you. They'll be
delighted to see any friend of mine. I’m a great favourite ;
of course, you can easily imagine that. It was a great blow
to them when I was changed; such a loss, you know. In fact,
there were several lady fairies, who—but no matter.” And
he gave a slight cough, and began to arrange his necktie with
a disgracefully consequential air, though he was trying very
hard not to look conceited; and while he was endeavouring
to appear easy and gracefully careless, he began accidentally
to hum, “See the Conquering Hero Comes,” which was not
the right tune under the circumstances.

“But for you,” he said next, “I couldn’t have given them
the relief and pleasure of seeing me this evening. And what
ecstasy it will be to them, to be sure! Ishouldn’t be surprised
if it broke up the whole thing. They'll faint so—for joy, you
know—Just at first—that is, the ladies will, The men won't
like it at all; and I don’t blame ’em. I suppose I shouldn’t
74 THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRYFOOT.



like it—to see another fellow sweep all before him. That’s
what I do; I sweep all before me.” And he waved his hand
in such a fine large gesture that he overbalanced himself, and
turned a somersault. But he jumped up after it quite un-
disturbed.

“You'll see me do it to-night,” he said, knocking the dents
out of his hat—‘‘ sweep all before me.” Then he put his hat
on, and his hands on his hips, with a swaggering, man-of-
society air. “I say,” he said, “I’m glad you're going. I
should like you to see it.” ;

“And I should like to see it,” replied Fairyfoot.

“Well,” said Mr. Goodfellow, ‘‘you deserve it, though
that’s saying a great deal. You’ve restored me tothem. But
for you, even if I’d escaped that hawk, I should have had to
spend the night in that beastly robin’s nest, crowded into a
corner by those squawking things, and domineered over by
her! I wasn’t made for that! I’m superior to it. Domestic
life doesn’t suit me. I was made for society. I adorn it.
She never appreciated me. She couldn’t soar to it. When I
think of the way she treated me,” he exclaimed, suddenly
getting into a rage, “I’ve a great mind to turn back into a
robin and peck her head off!”

“ Would you like to see her now ?” asked Fairyfoot, inno-
cently.

Mr. Goodfellow glanced behind him in great haste, and
suddenly sat down.

‘No, no!” he exclaimed in a tremendous hurry; “by no
THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRYFOOT. 95



means! She has no delicacy. And she doesn’t deserve to
see me. And there’s a violence and uncertainty about her
movements which is annoying beyond anything you can .
imagine. No, I don’t want to see her! I'll let her go un-
punished for the present. Perhaps it’s punishment enough
for her to be deprived of me. Just pick up your cap, won’t
you? and if you see any birds lying about, throw it at them,
robins particularly.”

‘“T think I must take the swine home, if you'll excuse me,”
said Fairyfoot, ‘(I’m late now.”

‘Well, let me sit on your shoulder and I'll go with you
and show you a short way home,” said Goodfellow ; “I know
all about it, so you needn’t think about yourself again. In
fact, we'll talk about the party. Just blow your whistle, and
the swine will go ahead.”

Fairyfoot did so, and the swine rushed through the forest
before them, and Robin Goodfellow perched himself on the
Prince’s shoulder, and chatted as they went.

It had taken Fairyfoot hours to reach the place where he
found Robin, but somehow it seemed to him only a very
short time before they came to the open place near the
swineherd’s hut; and the path they had walked in had been
so pleasant and flowery that it had been delightful all the
way.

« Now,” said Robin when they stopped, ‘if you will come
here to-night at twelve o'clock, when the moon shines under
this tree, you will find me waiting for you. Now I’m going.
76 - THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRYFOOT.



Good-bye!” And he was gone before the last word was
quite finished.

Fairyfoot went towards the hut, driving the swine before
him, and suddenly he saw the swineherd come out of his
house, and stand staring stupidly at the pigs. Hewas a very
coarse, hideous man, with bristling yellow hair, and little eyes,
and a face rather like a pig’s, and he always looked stupid, but
just now he looked more stupid than ever. Heseemed dumb
with surprise.

“What's the matter with the swine?” he asked in his
hoarse voice, which was rather piglike, too.

“T don’t know,” answered Fairyfoot, feeling a little
alarmed. ‘ What zs the matter with them ?”

“ They are four times fatter, and five times bigger, and six
times cleaner, and seven times heavier, and eight times hand-
somer than they were when you took them out,” the swine-
herd said.

“I’ve done nothing to them,” said Fairyfoot. “They ran
away, but they came back again.”

The swineherd went lumbering back into the hut, and
called his wife.

“ Come and look at the swine,” he said.

And then the woman came out, and stared first at the
swine and then at Fairyfoot.

‘‘He has been with the fairies,” she said at last to her
husband; “or it is because he is a king’s son. We must
treat him better if he can do wonders like that.
















| = ie

Ka dlas' Ns
\\ hi thy a Ypy Wy
ie ai WA

LE Bi Cy
te la wy? A oe \ M ne aT nn
cn ue Vg 5 Uf one y hiss SA ’ a ‘i M7 ,|
Noten es it ae Mt) AX\ Yi If
ze ay a wh i a Ze Ua nA K i Y - ey
Yi ie i i) Ae WME

th

Mi



“WHAT’S THE MATTER WITH THE SWINE?” HE ASKED.



THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRVFOOT. 79



PART II.

In went the shepherd’s wife, and she prepared quite a
good supper for Fairyfoot and gave it tohim. But Fairyfoot
was scarcely hungry at all; he was so eager for the night to
come, so that he might see the fairies. When he went to his
loft under the roof, he thought at first that he could not sleep ;
but suddenly his hand touched the fairy whistle and he fell
asleep at once, and did not waken again until a moonbeam
fell brightly upon his face and arousedhim. Then he jumped
up and ran to the hole in the wall to look out, and he saw
that the hour had come, and the moon was so low in the sky
that its slanting light had crept under the oak-tree.

He slipped downstairs so lightly that his master heard
nothing, and then he found himself out in the beautiful night
with the moonlight so bright that it was lighter than day-
time. And there was Robin Goodfellow waiting for him
under the tree! He was so finely dressed that, for a moment,
Fairyfoot scarcely knew him. His suit was made out of the
purple velvet petals of a pansy, which was far finer than any
ordinary velvet, and he wore plumes and tassels, and a ruffle
around his neck, and in his belt was thrust a tiny sword, not
half as big as the finest needle.

“Take me on your shoulder,” he said to Fairyfoot, “and
I will show you the way.”

Fairyfoot took him up, and they went their way through
80 THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRFYFOOT.



the forest. And the strange part of it was that though Fairy-
foot thought he knew all the forest by heart, every path
they took was new to him, and more beautiful than anything
he had ever seen before. The moonlight seemed to grow
brighter and purer at every step, and the sleeping flowers
sweeter and lovelier, and the moss greener and thicker.
Fairyfoot felt so happy and gay that he forgot he had ever
been sad and lonely in his life.

Robin Goodfellow, too, seemed to be in very good spirits.
He related a great many stories to Fairyfoot, and, singularly
enough, they were all about himself and divers and sundry
fairy ladies who had been so very much attached to him that
he scarcely expected to find them alive at the present mo-
ment. He felt quite sure they must have died of grief in his
absence.

“T have caused a great deal of trouble in the course of my
life,” he said, regretfully, shaking his head. ‘I have some-
times wished I could avoid it, but that is impossible. Ahem!
When my great-aunt’s grandmother rashly and inopportunely
changed me into a robin, I was having a little flirtation with
a little creature who ‘was really quite attractive. I might
have decided to engage myself to her. She was very charming.
Her name was Gauzita. To-morrow I shall go and place
flowers on her tomb.”

“T thought fairies never died,” said Fairyfoot.

“Only on rare occasions, and only from love,” answered

Robin. ‘They needn’t die unless they wish to. They have
THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRYFOOT. 81



been known to do it through love. They frequently wish
they hadn’t afterward—in fact, invariably—and then they can



come to life again. But Gauzita i

« Are you quite sure she is dead?” asked Fairyfoot.

“Sure!” cried Mr. Goodfellow, in wild indignation, “why,
she hasn’t seen me for a couple of years. I’ve moulted twice
since last we meet. JI congratulate myself that she didn’t see
me then,” he added, in a lower voice. ‘Of course she’s dead,”
he added, with solemn emphasis ; ‘‘as dead as a door nail.”

Just then Fairyfoot heard some enchanting sounds, faint,
but clear. They were sounds of delicate music and of tiny
laughter, like the ringing of fairy bells.

“Ah!” said Robin Goodfellow, ‘there they are! But it
seems to me they are rather gay, considering they have not
seen me for so long. Turn into the path.”

Almost immediately they found themselves in a beautiful
little dell, filled with moonlight, and with glittering stars
in the cup of every flower; for there were thousands of
dewdrops, and every dewdrop shone like a star. There
were also crowds and crowds of tiny men and women, all
beautiful, all dressed in brilliant, delicate dresses, all laughing
or dancing or feasting at the little tables, which were loaded
with every dainty the most fastidious fairy could wish for.

“ Now,” said Robin Goodfellow, “ you shall see me sweep
all before me. Put me down.”

Fairyfoot put him down, and stood and watched him while

he walked forward with a very grand manner. He went
6
82 THE STORF OF PRINCE FAIRYFOOT.



straight to the gayest and largest group he could see. It
was a group of gentlemen fairies, who were crowding around
a lily of the valley, on the bent stem of which a tiny lady
fairy was sitting, airily swaying herself to and fro, and laugh-
ing and chatting with all her admirers at once.

She seemed to be enjoying herself immensely ; indeed, it
was disgracefully plain that she was having a great deal of
fun. One gentleman fairy was fanning her, one was holding
her programme, one had her bouquet, another her little scent
bottle, and those who had nothing to hold for her were
scowling furiously at the rest. It was evident that she was
very popular, and that she did not object to it at all; in
fact, the way her eyes sparkled and danced was distinctly °

reprehensible.

“You have engaged to dance the next waltz with every
one of us!” said one of her adorers. ‘‘ How are you going to
doit?’

“ Did I engage to dance with all of you?” she said, giving
her lily stem the sauciest little swing, which set all the bells
ringing, ‘ Well, I am not going to dance it with all.”

“Not with me?” the admirer with the fan whispered in
her ear.

She gave him the most delightful little look, just to make
him believe she wanted to dance with him but really couldn't.
Robin Goodfellow saw her. And then she smiled sweetly |
upon all the rest, every one of them. Robin Goodfellow saw
that, too. .
SS















ALMOST IMMEDIATELY THEY FOUND THEMSELVES IN A BEAUTIFUL LITTLE DELL,



THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRYFOOT, 85



“T am going to sit here and look at you, and let you talk
to me,” she said. ‘I do so enjoy brilliant conversation.”

All the gentlemen fairies were so much elated by this that
they began to brighten up, and settle their ruffs, and fall
into graceful attitudes, and think of sparkling things to say;
because every one of them knew, from the glance of her eyes
in his direction, that he was one whose conversation was —
brilliant; every one knew there could be no mistake about
its being himself that she meant. The way she looked just
proved it. Altogether it was more than Robin Goodfellow
could stand, for it was Gauzita who was deporting herself
in this unaccountable manner, swinging on lily stems, and
“going on,” so to speak, with several parties at once, in a
way to chill the blood of any proper young lady fairy—who
hadn’t any partner at all. It was Gauzita herself.

He made his way into the very centre of the group.

“Gauzita!” he said. He thought, of course, she would
drop right off her lily stem; but she didn’t. She. simply
stopped swinging a moment, and stared at him.

“Gracious !” she exclaimed. ‘ And who are you?”

“Who am I?” cried Mr. Goodfellow, severely. ‘Don’t
you remember me ?”

“No,” she said, coolly ; ‘I don’t, not in the least.”

Robin Goodfellow almost gasped for breath. He had never
met with anything so outrageous in his life.

“You don’t remember me?” he cried. “Me/ Why, it’s
impossible !”
86 THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRFFOOT.



“Is it?” said Gauzita, with a touch of dainty impudence.
“What's your name?”

Robin Goodfellow was almost paralyzed. Gauzita took up
a midget of an eyeglass which she had dangling from a thread
of a gold chain, and she stuck it in her eye and tilted her
impertinent little chin and looked him over. Not that she
was near-sighted—not a bit of it ; it was just one of her tricks
and manners.

“Dear me!” she said, “ you do look a trifle familiar. It
isn’t, it can’t be, Mr. , Mr. ,” then she turned to the
adorer, who held her fan, ‘it can’t be Mr.
was changed into a robin, you know,” she said. ‘Such a







, the one who

ridiculous thing to be changed into! What was his name?”
, ah—Good-



“Oh, yes! I know whom you mean. Mr.
fellow!” said the fairy with the fan.

‘So it was,” she said, looking Robin over again. ‘And
he has been pecking at trees and things, and hopping in and
out of nests ever since, 1 suppose. How absurd! And we
have been enjoying ourselves so much since he went away! I
think I never azd have so lovely a time as I have had during
these last two years. I began to know you,” she added, in a
kindly tone, “just about the time he went away.”

‘“You have been enjoying yourself?” almost shrieked
Robin Goodfellow.

“ Well,” said Gauzita, in unexcusable slang, ‘‘I must smile.”
And she did smile.

‘““And nobody has pined away and died?” cried Robin.
THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRYFOOT. 87



“T haven't,” said Gauzita, swinging herself and ringing her
bells again. ‘I really haven’t had time.”

Robin Goodfellow turned around and rushed out of the
group. He regarded this as insulting. He went back to
Fairyfoot in such a hurry that he tripped on his sword and
fell, and rolled over so many times that Fairyfoot had to stop
him and pick him up.

“Ts she dead?” asked Fairyfoot.

“No,” said Robin; “she isn’t.”

“ He sat down ona small mushroom and clasped his hands
about his knees and looked mad—just mad. Angry or in-
dignant wouldn’t express it.

“‘T have a great mind to go and bea misanthrope,” he said.

“Oh! I wouldn’t,” said Fairyfoot. He didn’t know what
a misanthrope was, but he thought it must be something
unpleasant. .

‘“Wouldn’t you?” said Robin, looking up at him.

“No,” answered Fairyfoot.

“Well,” said Robin, “I guess I won't. Let’s go and have
some fun. They are all that way. You can’t depend on any
of them. Never trust one of them. I believe that creature
has been engaged as much as twice since I left. Bya singular
coincidence,” he added, “I have been married twice myself—
but, of course, that’s different. I’m a man, you know, and—
well, it’s different. We won’t dwell on it. Let’s go and
dance. But wait a minute first.” He took a little bottle
from his pocket.
88 THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRFFOOT.



“If you remain the size you are,” he continued, “ you will
tread on whole sets of lancers and destroy entire germans.
If you drink this, you will become as small as we are; and
then, when you are going home, I| will give you something to
make you large again.” Fairyfoot drank from the little flagon,
and immediately he felt himself growing smaller and smaller
until at last he was as small as his companion.

“ Now, come on,” said Robin.

On they went and joined the fairies, and they danced and
played fairy games and feasted on fairy dainties, and were so
gay and happy that Fairyfoot was wild with joy. Everybody
made him welcome and seemed to like him, and the lady
fairies were simply delightful, especially Gauzita, who took
a great fancy to him. Just before the sun rose, Robin
gave him something from another flagon, and he grew.
large again, and two minutes and three seconds and a half
before daylight the ball broke up, and Robin took him
home and left him, promising to call for him the next
night.

Every night throughout the whole summer the same thing

happened. At midnight he went to the fairies’ dance; and at
two minutes and three seconds and a half before dawn he
came home. He was never lonely any more, because all day
long he could think of what pleasure he would have when the
night came; and, besides that, all the fairies were his friends.
But when the summer was coming to an end, Robin Good-
fellow said to him: “ This is our last dance—at least it will
THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRYFOOT. © 89



be our last for some time. At this time of the year we
always go back to our own country, and we don’t return until
spring.”

This made Fairyfoot very sad. He did not know how he
could bear to be left alone again, but he knew it could not be
helped ; so he tried to be as cheerful as possible, and he went
to the final festivities, and enjoyed himself more than ever
before, and Gauzita gave him a tiny ring for a parting gift.
But the next night, when Robin did not come for him, he felt
very lonely indeed, and the next day he was so sorrowful that
he wandered far away into the forest, in the hope of finding
something to cheer him a little. He wandered so far that he
became very tired and thirsty, and he was just making up his
mind to go home, when he thought he heard the sound of
falling water. It seemed to come from behind a thicket of
climbing roses; and he went towards the place and pushed
the branches aside a little, so that he could look through.
What he saw was a great surprise to him. Though it was
the end of summer, inside the thicket the roses were bloom-
ing in thousands all around a pool as clear as crystal, into
which the sparkling water fell from a hole in the rock above.
It was the most beautiful, clear pool that Fairyfoot had ever
seen, and he pressed his way through the rose branches, and,
entering the circle they inclosed, he knelt by the water and
drank.

Almost instantly his feeling of sadness left him, and he felt
quite happy and refreshed. He stretched himself on the thick
go THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRYFOOT.



perfumed moss, and listened to the tinkling of the water, and
it was not long before he fell asleep.

When he awakened the moon was shining, the pool
sparkled like a silver plaque crusted with diamonds, and two
nightingales were singing in the branches over his head.
And the next moment he found out that he understood their
language just as plainly as if they had been human beings
instead of birds. The water with which he had quenched his
thirst was enchanted, and had given him this new power.

“Poor boy!” said one nightingale, ‘“ he looks tired; I
wonder where he came from.”

“Why, my dear,” said the other, “is it possible you don’t
know that he is Prince Fairyfoot ?”

“What !” said the first nightingale—“ the King of Stump-
inghame’s son, who was born with small feet ?”

“Yes,” said the second. ‘“ And the poor child has lived
in the forest, keeping the swineherd’s pigs ever since. And
he is a very nice boy, too—never throws stones at birds or
robs nests.”

“What a pity he doesn’t know about the pool where the
red berries grow !” said the first nightingale.


THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRYFOOT. gt



PART III.

“ Wuat pool—and what red berries?” asked the second
nightingale.

‘“Why, my dear,” said the first, “is it possible you don’t
know about the pool where the red berries grow—the pool
where the poor, dear Princess Goldenhair met with her mis-
fortune ?”

“ Never heard of it,” said the second nightingale, rather
crossly.

“Well,” explained the other, “you have to follow the
brook for a day and three-quarters, and then take all the
paths to the left until you come to the pool. It is very ugly
and muddy, and bushes with red berries on them grow around
Itsy oe

“Well, what of that ?” said her companion; “and what
happened to the Princess Goldenhair?”

“Don’t you know that, either?” exclaimed her friend.

Non

“Ah!” said the first nightingale, “it was very sad. She
went out with her father, the King, who had a hunting party ;
and she lost her way, and wandered on until she came to the
pool. Her poor little feet were so hot that she took off
her gold-embroidered satin slippers, and put them into the
water—her feet, not the slippers—and the next minute they
began to grow and grow, and to get larger and larger, until
g2 THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRYVFOOT.



they were so immense she could hardly walk at all; and
though all the physicians in the kingdom have tried to make
them smaller, nothing can be done, and she is perfectly un-
happy.”

“What a pity she doesn’t know about this pool!” said the
other bird. ‘If she just came here and bathed them three
times in the water, they would be smaller and more beautiful
than ever, and she would be more lovely than she has ever
been:?

“Tt is a pity,” said her companion; ‘but, you know, if we
once let people know what this water will do, we should be
overrun with creatures bathing themselves beautiful, and
trampling our moss and tearing down our rose-trees, and we
should never have any peace.”

“ That is true,” agreed the other.

Very soon after they flew away, and Rauvient was left
alone. He had been so excited while they were talking that
he had been hardly able to lie still, He was so sorry for the
Princess Goldenhair, and so glad for himself. Now he could
find his way to the pool with the red berries, and he could
bathe his feet in it until they were large enough to satisfy
Stumpinghame; and he could go back to his father’s court,
and his parents would perhaps be fond of him. But he had
so good a heart that he could not think of being happy him-
self and letting others remain unhappy, when he could help
them. So the first thing was to find the Princess Golden-
hair and tell her about the nightingales’ fountain. But how
THE STORVF OF PRINCE FAIRVFOOT. 93



was he to find her? The nightingales had not told him.
He was very much troubled, indeed. How was he to find
her?

Suddenly, quite suddenly, he thought of the ring Gauzita
had given him. When she had given it to him she had made
an odd remark.

‘“When you wish to go anywhere,” she had said, “hold it
in your hand, turn around twice with closed eyes, and some-
thing queer will happen.”

He had thought it was one of her little jokes, but now it
occurred to him that at least he might try what would happen.
So he rose up, held the ring in his hand, closed his eyes, and
turned around twice.

What did happen was that he began to walk, not very fast,
but still passing along as if he were moving rapidly. He did
not know where he was going, but he guessed that the ring
did, and that if he obeyed it, he should find the Princess
Goldenhair. He went on and on, not getting in the least
tired, until about daylight he found himself under a great
tree, and on the ground beneath it was spread a delightful
breakfast, which he knew was for him. He sat down and ate
‘it, and then got up again and went on his way once more.
Before noon he had left the forest behind him, and was ina
strange country. He knew it was not Stumpinghame, because
the people had not large feet. But they all had sad faces,
and once or twice, when he passed groups of them who were
talking, he heard them speak of the Princess Goldenhair, as
94 THE STORF OF PRINCE FAIRVFOOT.



if they were sorry for her and could not enjoy themselves
while such a misfortune rested upon her.

“So sweet and lovely and kind a princess!” they said ;
“and it really seems as if she would never be any better.”

The sun was just setting when Fairyfoot came in sight of
the palace. It was built of white marble, and had beautiful
pleasure-grounds about it, but somehow there seemed to be a
settled gloom in the air. Fairyfoot had entered the great
pleasure-garden, and was wondering where it would be best
to go first, when he saw a lovely white fawn, with a golden
collar about its neck, come bounding over the flower-beds,
and he heard, at a little distance, a sweet voice, saying, sor-
rowfully, “Come back, my fawn; I cannot run and play with
you as I once used to. Do not leave me, my little friend.”

And soon from behind the trees came a line of beautiful
girls, walking two by two, all very slowly; and at the head of
the line, first of all, came the loveliest princess in the world,
dressed softly in pure white, with a wreath of lilies on her long
golden hair, which fell almost to the hem of her white gown.

She had so fair and tender a young face, and her large,
soft eyes, yet looked so sorrowful, that Fairyfoot loved her in
a moment, and he knelt on one knee, taking off his cap and
bending his head until his own golden hair almost hid his face.

“ Beautiful Princess Goldenhair, beautiful and sweet Prin-
cess, may I speak to you ?” he said.

The Princess stopped and looked at him, and answered
him softly. It surprised her to see one so poorly dressed
hai : ate wee

; H
Aut
oe “a we ae WM wt ine ae ii ue v a pb tl ‘i

AN

' ieee

Rey ts
ui by Be "1 . » f
S Wipat ie ne y ater ‘ he ie Fe wee yy!
4 | “4

heii ain .
| | M hi, Me cB a
f Noa Wh ey oy

ei aN
Fatt Hs

apn yt! Wl
oan i ii Maye,
Ain ada l,

AVY Wt] vain
wll 5

=a yi uid!
oe { Mh Hal

SJ



FAIRYFOOT LOVED HER IN A MOMENT, AND HE KNELT ON ONE KNEE,
THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRVYFOOT. 97

kneeling before her, in her palace gardens, among the brilliant

flowers ; but she always spoke softly to everyone.

‘What is there that I can do for you, my friend ?” she said.

“Beautiful Princess,” answered Fairyfoot, blushing, “I
hope very much that I may be able to do something for you.”

“Por me!” she exclaimed. “Thank you, friend ; what is
it you can do? Indeed, I need a help I am afraid no one can
ever give me.”

“Gracious and fairest lady,” said Fairyfoot, “ it is that help
I think—nay, I am sure—that I bring to you.”

“Oh!” said the sweet Princess. ‘ You have a kind face
and most true eyes, and when I look at you—I do not know
why it is, but I feel a little happier. What is it you would
say to me?”

Still kneeling before ee still bending his head modestly,
and still blushing, Fairyfoot told his story. He told her of
his own sadness and loneliness, and of why he was considered
so terrible a disgrace to his family. He told her about the
fountain of the nightingales and what he had heard there and
how he had journeyed through the forests, and beyond it into
her own country, to find her. And while he told it, her
beautiful face changed from red to white, and her hands
closely clasped themselves together.

‘‘Qh!” she said, when he had finished, ‘“‘I know that this
is true from the kind look in your eyes, and I shall be happy
again. And how can I thank you for being so good to a poor
little princess whom you had never seen ?”

7
98 THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRYFOOT.



‘Only let me see you happy once more, most sweet Prin-
cess,” answered Fairyfoot, “and that will be all I desire—
only if, perhaps, | might once—kiss your hand.”

She held out her hand to him with so lovely a look in her
soft eyes that he felt happier than he had ever been before,
even at the fairy dances. This was a different kind of happi-
ness. Her hand was as white as a dove’s wing and as soft as
a dove’s breast. ‘ Come,” she said, ‘‘let us go at once to the
King.”

Within a few minutes the whole palace was in an uproar
of excitement. Preparations were made to go to the fountain
of the nightingales immediately. Remembering what the
birds had said about not wishing to be disturbed, Fairyfoot
asked the King to take only a small party. So no one was
to go but the King himself, the Princess, in a covered chair
carried by two bearers, the Lord High Chamberlain, two
Maids of Honour, and Fairyfoot.

Before morning they were on their way, and the day after
they reached the thicket of roses, and Fairyfoot pushed aside
the branches and led the way into the dell.

The Princess Goldenhair sat down upon the edge of the
pool and put her feet into it. In two minutes they began to
look smaller. She bathed them once, twice, three times, and,
as the nightingales had said, they became smaller and more
beautiful than ever. As for the Princess herself, she really
could not be more beautiful than she had been ; but the Lord
High Chamberlain, who had been an exceedingly ugly old
THE STORY OF PRINCE FAIRÂ¥+H0O0OT. 99



gentleman, after washing his face, became so young and hand-
some that the First Maid of Honour immediately fell in love
with him. Whereupon she washed her face, and became so
beautiful that he fell in love with her, and they were engaged
upon the spot.

The Princess could not find any words to tell Fairyfoot
how grateful she was and how happy. She could only look
at him again and again with her soft, radiant eyes, and again
and again give him her hand that he might kiss it.

She was so sweet and gentle that Fairyfoot could not bear
the thought of leaving her; and when the King begged him
to return to the palace with them and live there always, he
was more glad than I can tell you. To be near this lovely
Princess, to be her friend, to love and serve her and look at ~
her every day, was such happiness that he wanted nothing
more. But first he wished to visit his father and mother
and sisters and brothers in Stumpinghame! so the King and
Princess and their attendants went with him to the pool
where the red berries grew; and after he had bathed his feet
in the water they were so large that Stumpinghame contained
nothing like them, even the King’s and Queen’s seeming
small in comparison. And when, a few days later, he arrived
at the Stumpinghame Palace, attended in great state by the
magnificent retinue with which the father of the Princess
Goldenhair had provided him, he was received with unbounded
rapture by his parents. The King and Queen felt that to
have a son with feet of such a size was something to be proud
100 THE STORÂ¥F OF PRINCE FAIRÂ¥FOOT,





of, indeed. They could not admire him sufficiently, although
the whole country was illuminated, and feasting continued
throughout his visit.

But though he was glad to be no more a disgrace to his
family, it cannot be said that he enjoyed the size of his feet
very much on his own account. Indeed, he much preferred
being Prince Fairyfoot, as fleet as the wind and as light as a
young deer, and he was quite glad to go to the fountain. of
the nightingales after his visit was at an end, and bathe his
feet small again, and to return to the palace of the Princess
Goldenhair with the soft and tender eyes. There everyone
loved him, and he loved everyone, and was four.times as
happy as the day is long.

He loved the Princess more dearly every day, and, of course,
as soon as they were old enough, they were married. And of
course, too, they used to go in the summer to the forest, and
dance in the moonlight with the fairies, who adored them both.

When they went to visit Stumpinghame, they always bathed
their feet in the pool of the red berries ; and when they returned,
they made them small again in the fountain of the nightingales.

They were always great friends with Robin Goodfellow,
and he was always very confidential with them about Gauzita,
who continued to be as pretty and saucy as ever.

‘Some of these days,” he used to say, severely, ‘I'll marry -
another fairy, and see how she'll like that—to see someone
else basking in my society! /’2@ get even with her!”

But he zever did.
THE PROUD LITTLE GRAIN OF
WHEAT.
THE PROUD LITTLE GRAIN OF
WHEAT.

HERE once was a little grain of wheat which was very
a proud indeed. The first thing it remembered was be-
ing very much crowded and jostled by a great many
other grains of wheat, all living in the same sack in the
granary. It was quite dark in the sack, and no one could
move about, and so there was nothing to be done but to
sit still and talk and think. The proud little grain of wheat
talked a great deal, but did not think quite so much, while
its next neighbour thought a great deal and only talked when
it was asked questions it could answer. It used to say that
when it thought a great deal it could remember things which
it seemed to have heard a long time ago.

“What is the use of our staying here so long doing
nothing, and never being seen by anybody?” the proud little
grain once asked.

“T don’t know,” the learned grain replied. ‘I don’t
know the answer to that. Ask me another.”

‘““Why can’t I sing like the birds that build their nests in
the roof? I should like to sing, instead of sitting here in the
dark.”

‘Because you have no voice,” said the learned grain.

’
104 THE PROUD LITTLE GRAIN OF WHEAT.



This was a very good answer indeed.

“Why didn’t someone give me a voice, then—why
didn’t they?” said the proud little grain, getting very
cross.

The learned grain thought for several minutes.

“There might be two answers to that,” she said at last.
“One might be that nobody had a voice to spare, and the
other might be that you have nowhere to put one if it were
given to you.”

‘Everybody is better off.than I am,” said the proud little
grain. ‘The birds can fly and sing, the children can play
and shout. I am sure I can get no rest for their shouting
and playing. There are two little boys who make enough
noise to deafen the whole sackful of us.”

“Ah! I know them,” said the learned grain. “And it’s”
true they are noisy. Their names are Lionel and Vivian.
There is‘a thin place in the side ‘of the sack, through which I
can see them. I would rather stay where I am than have to
do all they do. They have long yellow hair, and when they
stand on their heads the straw sticks in it and they look very
curious. I heard a strange thing through listening to them
the other day.”

‘““What was it?” asked the proud grain.

“They were playing in the straw, and someone came in to
them—it was a lady who had brought them something on a
plate. They began to dance and shout: ‘It’s cake! It’s cake!
Nice little mamma for bringing us cake.’ And then they
THE PROUD LITTLE GRAIN OF WHEAT. 105
each sat down with a piece and began to take great bites out
of it. I shuddered to think of it afterward.”

ce Why 2!

‘Well, you know they are always asking questions, and
they began to ask questions of their mamma, who lay down
in the straw near them. She seemed to be used to it. These
are the questions Vivian asked :

““« Who made the cake ?’

ts Bhecook,)

““« Who made the cook ?’

““« God,’

“«« What did He make her for ?’

“Why didn’t He make her white ?’

““« Why didn’t He make you black ?’

“ «Did He cut a hole in heaven and drop me through when
He made me?’

«Why didn’t it hurt me when I tumbled such a long
way ?’

‘“She said she ‘didn’t know’ to all but the two first, and
then he asked two more.

«What is the cake made of ?’

“« Blour, sugar, eggs and butter.’

“«« What is flour made of ?’

“Tt was the answer to that which made me shudder.”

“What was it?” asked the proud grain.

“She said it was made of—wheat! I don’t see the ad-

”



vantage of being rich
106 THE PROUD LITTLE GRAIN OF WHEAT.



‘Was the cake rich?” asked the proud grain.

“Their mother said it was. She said, ‘Don’t eat it so fast
—it is very rich,’”

“Ah!” said the proud grain. ‘I should like to be rich.
It must be very fine to be rich. If I am ever made into
cake, I mean to be so rich that no one will dare to eat me at
alls

“ Ah?” said the learned grain. ‘I don’t think those boys
would be afraid to eat you, however rich you were. They
are not afraid of richness.” _

“They'd be afraid of me before they had done with me,”
said the proud grain. “Iam not a common grain of wheat.
Wait until I am made into cake. But gracious me! there
doesn’t seem much prospect of it while we are shut up here.
How dark and stuffy it is, and how we are crowded, and
what a stupid lot the other grains are! I’m tired of it, I must
say.”

“Weare all in the same sack,” said the learned grain, very
quietly.

It was a good many days after that, that something hap-
pened. Quite early in the morning, a man and a boy came
into the granary, and moved the sack of wheat from its place,
wakening all the grains from their last nap.

“What is the matter?” said the proud grain. “Who is
daring to disturb us?”

‘Hush !” whispered the learned grain, in the most solemn
manner. ‘Something is going to happen. Something like
THE PROUD LITTLE GRAIN OF WHEAT. 107
this happened to somebody belonging to me longago. I seem
to remember it when I think very hard. I seem to remember
something about one of my family being sown.”

“What is sown ?” demanded the other grain.
“Tt is being thrown into the earth,” began the learned

grain.
Oh, what a passion the proud grain got into! ‘“ Into the
earth?” she shrieked out. ‘Into the common earth? The

earth is nothing but dirt, and I am zo¢ a common grain of
wheat. I won’t be sown! I will zof be sown! How dare
anyone sow me against my will! I would rather stay in the
sack.”

But just as she was saying it, she was thrown out with the
learned grain and some others into another dark place, and
carried off by the farmer, in spite of her temper; for the
farmer could not hear her voice at all, and wouldn’t have
minded if he had, because he knew she was only a grain of
wheat, and ought to be sown, so that some good might come
of her. i

Well, she was carried out to a large field in the pouch
which the farmer wore at his belt. The field had been
ploughed, and there was a sweet smell of fresh earth in the
air; the sky was a deep, deep blue, but the air was cool and
the few leaves on the trees were brown and dry, and looked
as if they had been left over from last year.

“Ah!” said the learned grain. “It was just such a day
as this when my grandfather, or my father, or somebody else
108 THE PROUD LITTLE GRAIN OF WHEAT.
related to me, was sown. I think I remember that it was
called Early Spring.” ;

“As for me,” said the proud grain, fiercely, “I should like
to see the man who would dare to sow me!”

At that very moment, the farmer put his big, brown hand
into the bag and threw her, as she thought, at least half a.
mile from them.

He had not thrown her so far as that, however, and she
landed safely in the shadow of a clod of rich earth, which the
sun had warmed through and through. She was quite out of
breath and very dizzy at first, but in a few seconds she began
to feel better and could not Help looking around, in spite of
her anger, to see if there was anyone near to talk to. But
she saw no one, and so began to scold as usual.

‘They not only sow me,” she called out, “but they throw
me all by myself, where I can have no company dt all. It is
disgraceful.”

Then she heard a voice from the other side of the clod. It
was the learned grain, who had fallen there when the farmer
threw her out of his pouch.

‘Don’t be angry,” it said, “1 am here. We are all right
so far. Perhaps, when they cover us with the earth, we shall
be even nearer to each other than we are now.”

“Do you mean to say they will cover us with the earth ?”
asked the proud grain.

“Yes,” was the answer. ‘And there we shall lie in
the dark, and the rain will moisten us, and the sun will
THE PROUD LITTLE GRAIN OF WHEAT. 109

warm us, until we grow larger and larger, and at last burst
open!”

“‘ Speak for yourself,” said the proud grain; “I shall do
no such thing !”

But it all happened just as the learned grain had said,
which showed what a wise grain it was, and how much it had
found out just by thinking hard and remembering all it could.

Before the day was over, they were covered snugly up
with the soft, fragrant, brown earth, and there they lay day
after day. ;

One morning, when the proud grain wakened, it found
itself wet through and through with rain which had fallen in
the night, and the next day the sun shone down and warmed
it so that it really began to be afraid that it would be obliged
to grow too large for its skin, which felt a little tight for it
already.

It said nothing of this to the learned grain, at first, because
it was determined not to burst if it could help it; but after
, the same thing had happened a great many times, it found,
one morning, that it really was swelling, and it felt obliged to
tell the learned grain about it.

“Well,” it said, pettishly, “ I suppose you will be glad to
hear that you were right. I am going to burst. My skin is
so tight now that it doesn’t fit me at all, and I know I can’t
stand another warm shower like the last.”

“Oh!” said the learned grain, in a quiet way (really
learned people always have a quiet way), “I knew I was
T10 THE PROUD LITTLE GRAIN OF WHEAT.



right, or I shouldn’t have said so. I hope you don’t find it
very uncomfortable. I think I myself shall burst by to-
morrow.”

“ Of course I find it uncomfortable,” said the proud grain.
“Who wouldn’t find it uncomfortable, to be two or three
sizes too small for one’s self! Pouf! Crack! There I go!
I have split up all up my right side, and I must say it’s a
relief.”

“Crack! Pouf !so have I,” said the learned grain. “Now
we must begin to push up through the earth. I am sure my
relation did that.” -

“Well, I shouldn't mind getting out into the air. It
would be a change at least.”

So each of them began to push her way through the earth
as strongly as she could, and, sure enough, it was not long
before the proud grain actually found herself out in the world
again, breathing the sweet air, under the blue sky, across
which fleecy white clouds were drifting, and swift-winged,
happy birds darting.

“It really is a lovely day,” were the first words the proud
grain said. It couldn’t help it. The sunshine was so delight-
ful, and the birds chirped and twittered so merrily in the
bare branches, and, more wonderful than all, the great field
was brown no longer, but was covered with millions of little,
fresh green blades, which trembled and bent their frail bodies
before the light wind.

“This zs an improvement,” said the proud grain.
THE PROUD LITTLE GRAIN OF WHEAT. ITI

Then there was a little stir in the earth beside it, and up
through the brown mould came the learned grain, fresh,
bright, green, like the rest.

“T told you I was not a common grain of wheat,” said the
proud one.

‘You are not a grain of wheat at all now,” said the learned
one, modestly. ‘You are a blade of wheat, and there are a
great many others like you.”

“See how green I am!” said the proud blade.

“Yes, you are very green,” said its companion. ‘You
will not be so green when you are older.”

The proud grain, which must be called a blade now, had
plenty of change and company after this. It grew taller and
taller every day, and made a great many new acquaintances
as the weather grew warmer. These were little gold and
green beetles living near it, who often passed it, and now
and then stopped to talk a little about their children and their
journeys under the soil. Birds dropped down from the sky
sometimes to gossip and twitter of the nests they were build-
ing in the apple-trees, and the new songs they were learning
to sing.

Once, on a very warm day, a great golden butterfly, float-
ing by on his Jarge lovely wings, fluttered down softly and lit
on the proud blade, who felt so much prouder when he did it
that she trembled for joy.

“He admires me more than all the rest in the field, you
see,” it said, haughtily. ‘That is because I am so green.”
112 THE PROUD LITTLE GRAIN OF WHEAT.



“Tf I were you,” said the learned blade, in its modest
way, ‘I believe I would not talk so much about being green.
People will make such ill-natured remarks when one speaks
often of one’s self.” ce

“T am above such people,” said the proud blade; “I can
find nothing more interesting to talk of than myself.”

As time went on, it was delighted to find that it grew
taller than any other blade in the field, and threw out other
blades ; and at last there grew out at the top of its stalk ever
so many plump, new little grains, all fitting closely together,
and wearing tight little green covers.

‘Look at me!” it said then. ‘1 am the queen of all the
wheat. I have a crown.”

“No,” said its learned companion. ‘ You are now an ear
of wheat.”

And in a short time all the other stalks wore the same
kind of crown, and it found out that the learned blade was
right, and that it was only an ear, after all.

And now the weather had grown still warmer and the trees
were covered with leaves, and the birds sang and’ built their
nests in them and laid their little blue eggs, and in time,
wonderful to relate, there came baby birds, that were always
opening their mouths for food, and crying ‘‘ peep, peep,” to
their fathers and mothers. There were more butterflies
floating about on their amber and purple wings, and the gold
and green beetles were so busy they had no time to talk.

“Well!” said the proud ear of wheat (you remember it
THE PROUD LITTLE GRAIN OF WHEAT. . 113

was an ear by this time) to its companion one day. ‘“ You see,
you were right again. I am not so green as Iwas. I am
turning yellow—but yellow is the colour of gold, and I don’t
object to looking like gold.”

“You will soon be ripe,” said its friend.

“And what will happen then?”

“The reaping-machine will come and cut you down, and
other strange things will happen.”

‘There I make a stand,” said the proud ear, “I will zot be
cut down.” .
But it was just as the wise ear said it would be. Not long
after a reaping-machine was brought and driven back and
forth in the fields, and down went all the wheat ears before
the great knives. But it did not hurt the wheat, of course,
and only the proud ear felt angry.

“JT am the colour of gold,” it said, “and yet they have
dared to cut me down. What will they do next, ] wonder ?”

What they did next was to bunch it up with other wheat
and tie it and stack it together, and then it was carried in a
wagon and laid in the barn.

Then there was a great bustle BRE awhile. The farmer’s
wife and daughters and her two servants began to work as
hard as they could.

‘The threshers are coming,” they said, “and we must make
plenty of things for them to eat.”

So they made pies and cakes and bread until their cupboards

were full; and surely enough the threshers did come with the
8
114 THE PROUD LITILE GRAIN OF WHEAT.



threshing-machine, which was painted red, and went “ Puff!
all the time. And the proud
wheat was threshed out by it, and found itself in grains again

(22

puff! puff! rattle! rattle

and very much out of breath.

“T look almost as I was at first,” it said ; ‘‘only there are
so many of me. I am grander than ever now. I was only
one grain of wheat at first, and.now I am at least fifty.”

When it was put into a sack, it managed to get all its
grains together in one place, so that it might feel as grand as
possible. It was so proud that it felt grand, however much
it was knocked about.

It did not lie in the sack very long this time before some-
thing else happened. One morning it heard the farmer’s wife
saying to the coloured boy:

“Take this yere sack of wheat to the mill, Jerry. I want
to try it when I make that thar cake for the boarders. Them
two children from Washington city are powerful hands for
cake.”

So Jerry lifted the sack up.and threw it over his shoulder,
and carried it out into the spring-waggon.

“Now we are going to travel,” said the proud wheat.
“ Don’t let us be separated.”

At that minute, there were heard two young voices,
shouting :— :

‘‘ Jerry, take us in the waggon! Let us go to mill, Jerry.
We want to go to mill.”

And these were the very two boys who had played in the
THE PROUD LITTLE GRAIN OF WHEAT. 115



granary and made so much noise the summer before. They
had grown a little bigger, and their yellow hair was longer,
but they looked just as they used to, with their strong little
legs and big brown eyes, and their sailor hats set so far back
on their heads that it was a wonder they stayed on. And
gracious! how they shouted and ran.

‘“What does yer mar say ?” asked Jerry.

“Says we can go!” shouted both at once, as if Jerry had
been deaf, which he wasn’t at all—quite the contrary.

So Jerry, who was very good-natured, lifted them in, and
cracked his whip, and the horses started off. It was a long
ride to the mill, but Lionel and Vivian were not too tired to
shout again when they reached it. They shouted at sight
of the creek and the big wheel turning round and round
slowly, with the water dashing and pouring and foaming
over it.

“ What turns the wheel ?” asked Vivian.

“The water, honey,” said Jerry.

«What turns the water ?”

“ Well now, honey,” said Jerry, ‘“‘ you hev methar. I don’t
know nuffin bout it. Lors-a-massy, what a boy you is fur
axin dif’cult questions.”

Then he carried the sack in to the miller, and said he would
wait until the wheat was ground.

‘‘Ground!” said the proud wheat. ‘We are going to be
ground. I hope it is agreeable. Let us keep close together.”

They did keep close together, but it wasn’t very agreeable
116 THE .PROUD LITTLE GRAIN OF WHEAT,



to be poured into a hopper and then crushed into fine powder
between two big stones.

“Makes nice flour,” said the miller, rubbing it between his
fingers.

“Flour!” said the wheat—which was wheat no longer.
“ Now I am flour, and ] am finer than ever. How white I
am! I really would rather be white than green or gold colour.
I wonder where the learned grain is, and if it is as fine and
white as I am?”

But the learned grain and her family had been laid away
in the granary for seed wheat. |

Before the waggon reached the house again, the two boys
were fast asleep in the bottom of it, and had to be helped out
just as the sack was, and carried in.

The sack was taken into the kitchen at once and opened,
and even in its wheat days the flour had never been so proud
as it was when it heard the farmer’s wife say—

“T’m going to make this into cake.”

“Ah!” it said; “I thought so. Now I shall be rich, and
admired by everybody.”

The farmer’s wife then took some of it out in a large white
bowl, and after that she busied herself beating eggs and sugar
and butter all together in another bowl : and after a while she
took the flour and beat it in also.

‘Now I amin grand company,” said the flour. ‘‘ Theeggs
and butter are the colour of gold, the sugar is like silver or
diamonds. This is the very society for me.”
THE PROUD LITTLE GRAIN OF WHEAT. 117



‘The cake looks rich,” said one of the daughters.

“Tt’s rather too rich for them children,” said her mother.
“ But Lawsey, I dunno, neither. Nothin’ don’t hurt ’em. I
reckon they could eat a panel of rail fence and come to no
harm.” :

“T’m rich,” said the flour to itself. ‘That is just what I
intended from the first. I am rich and I am a cake.”

Just then, a pair of big brown eyes came and peeped into
it. They belonged to a round little head with a mass of
tangled curls all over it—they belonged to Vivian.

“ What’s that ?” he asked,

ake

“Who made it ?”

ledid =

“T like you,” said Vivian. ‘You're such a nice woman.

Who’s going to eat any of it? Is Lionel?”

“T’m afraid it’s too rich for boys,” said the woman, but she
laughed and kissed him.

NOMA Saide Vivian.“ limeattaid=itestetss

“1 shall be much too rich,” said the cake, angrily. ‘“ Boys,
indeed. I was made for something better than boys.”

After that, it was poured into a cake-mould, and put into
the oven, where it had rather an unpleasant time of it. It
was so hot in there that if the farmer’s wife had not watched
it carefully, it would have been burned.

“But I am cake,” it said, “‘and of the richest kind, so I

can bear it, even if it is uncomfortable.”
118 THE PROUD LITTLE GRAIN OF WHEAT.



When it was taken out, it really was cake, and it felt as if
it was quite satisfied. Everyone who came into the kitchen
and saw it, said—

“Oh, what a nice cake! How well your new flour has
done!”

But just once, while it was cooling, it had a curious, dis-
agreeable feeling. It found, all at once, that the two
boys, Lionel and Vivian, had come quietly into the kitchen
and stood near the table, looking at the cake with their
great eyes wide open and. their little red mouths open,
too.

“Dear me,’

>

it said. “How nervous I feel—actually
nervous. What great eyes they have, and how they shine!
and what are those sharp white things in their mouths? I
really don’t like them to look at me in that way. It seems
like something personal. I wish the farmer’s wife would
come.”

Such a chill ran over it, that it was quite cool when the
woman came in, and she put it away in the cupboard ona
plate.
But, that very afternoon, she took it out again and set it
on the table on a glass cake-stand. She put some leaves
around it to make it look nice, and it noticed there were
a great many other things on the table, and they all looked
fresh and bright.

“This is all in my honour,” it said. ‘They know I am
rich;


WY Sy
SN
ASS

WES SNS
Se













” HE SAID.

‘© PHERE’S THE CAKE,



THE PROUD LITTLE GRAIN OF WHEAT. 121



Then several people came in and took chairs around the
table.

“ They all come to sit and look at me,” said the vain cake.
“] wish the learned grain could see me now.”

There was a little high-chair on each side of the table,
and at first these were empty, but in a few minutes the door
opened and in came the two little boys. They had pretty,
clean dresses on, and their “bangs” and curls were bright
with being brushed.

“Even they have been dressed up to do me honour,”
thought the cake.

But, the next minute, it began to feel quite nervous again.
Vivian’s chair was near the glass stand, and when he had
climbed up and seated himself, he put one elbow on the table
and rested his fat chin on his fat hand, and fixing his eyes on
the cake, sat and stared at it in such an unnaturally quiet
manner for some seconds, that any cake might well have felt
nervous.

“There’s the cake,” he said, at last, in such a deeply
thoughtful voice that the cake felt faint with anger.

Then a remarkable thing happened. Some one drew the
stand toward them and took the knife and cut outa large slice
of the cake. i

‘“Go away,” said the cake, though no one heard it. “I am
cake! I amrich! Iam not for boys! How dare you?”

Vivian stretched out his hand; he took the slice ; he lifted
it up, and then the cake saw his red mouth open—yes, open
122 THE PROUD LITTLE GRAIN OF WHEAT.

wider than it could have believed possible—wide enough to
show two dreadful rows of little sharp white things.



“Good gra ” it began.

But it never said “cious.” Never at all.. For in two
minutes Vivian had eaten it!!

And there was an end of its airs and graces,
BEHIND THE WHITE BRICK.

BEHIND THE WHITE BRICK.

T began with Aunt Hetty’s being out of temper, which, it
| must be confessed, was nothing new. Att its best, Aunt
Hetty’s temper was none of the most charming, and this
morning it was at its worst. She had awakened to the con-
sciousness of having a hard day’s work before her, and she
had awakened late, and so everything had gone wrong from
the first. There was a sharp ring in her voice when she
came to Jem’s bedroom door and called out, “ Jemima, get up
this minute!”

Jem knew what to expect when Aunt Hetty began a day
by calling her “Jemima.” It was one of the poor child’s
grievances that she had been given such an ugly name. In
all the books she had read, and she had read a great many,
Jem never had met a heroine who was called Jemima. But
it had been her mother’s favourite sister's name, and so it had
fallen to her lot. Her mother always called her ‘‘ Jem,” or
“ Mimi,” which was much prettier, and even Aunt Hetty only
reserved Jemima for unpleasant state occasions.

It was a dreadful day to Jem. Her mother was not at
home, and would not be until night. She had been called
away unexpectedly, and had been obliged to leave Jem and
the baby to Aunt Hetty’s mercies.
126 BEHIND THE WHITE BRICK.



So Jem found herself busy enough. Scarcely had she
finished doing one thing, when Aunt Hetty told her to begin
another. She wiped dishes and picked fruit and attended to
the baby; and when baby had gone to sleep, and everything
else seemed disposed of, for atime, at least, she was so tired
that she was glad to sit down.

And then she thought of the book she had been reading
the night before—a certain delightful story book, about a little
girl whose name was Flora, and who was so happy and rich
and pretty and good that Jem had likened her to the little
princesses one reads about, to whose christening feast every
fairy brings a gift. i ;

“T shall have time to finish my chapter before dinner-time
comes,” said Jem, and she sat down snugly in one corner of
the wide, old fashioned fireplace.

But she had not read more than two pages before some-
thing dreadful happened. Aunt Hetty came into the room in
a great hurry—in such a hurry, indeed, that she caught her
foot in the matting and fell, striking her elbow sharply against
a chair, which so upset her temper that the moment she found
herself on her feet she flew at Jem.

“What!” she said, snatching the book from her, “reading
again, when I am running all over the house for you?” And
she flung the pretty little blue covered volume into the fire.

Jem sprang to rescue it with a cry, but it was impossible
to reach it; it had fallen into a great hollow of red coal, and
the blaze caught it at once.
BEHIND THE WHITE BRICK. 127



“You are a wicked woman!” cried Jem, in a dreadful
passion, to Aunt Hetty. ‘You are a wicked woman.”

Then matters reached a climax. Aunt Hetty boxed her
ears, pushed her back on her little footstool, and walked out
of the room.

Jem hid her face on her arms and cried as if her heart
would break. She cried until her eyes were heavy, and she
thought she should be obliged to go to sleep. But just as
she was thinking of going to sleep, something fell down the
chimney and made her look up. It was a piece of mortar,
and it brought a good deal of soot with it. She bent forward
and looked up to see where it had come from. The chimney
was so very wide that this was easy enough. She could see
where the mortar had fallen from the side and left a white
patch.

“How white it looks against the black!” said Jem;
“it is like a white brick among the black ones. What a
queer place a chimney is! I can see a bit of the blue sky, I
think.”

And then a funny thought came into her fanciful little
head. What a many things were burned in the big fireplace
and vanished in smoke or tinder up the chimney! Where did
everything go? There was Flora, for instance—Flora who
was represented on the frontispiece—with lovely, soft, howing
hair, and a little fringe on her pretty round forehead, crowned
with a circlet of daisies, and a laugh in her wide-awake round
eyes. Where was she by this time? Certainly there was
128 BEHIND THE WHITE 8RICK.



nothing left of her in the fire. Jem almost began to cry again
at the thought.

“Tt was too bad,” she said. ‘She was so pretty and funny,
and I did like her so.”

I daresay it scarcely will be credited by unbelieving people
when | tell them what happened next, it was such a very
singular thing, indeed.

Jem felt herself gradually lifted off her little footstool.

“Oh!” she said, timidly, “I feel very light.” She did feel
light, indeed. She felt so light that she was sure she was
rising gently in the air.

“Oh,” she said again, “ how—how very light I feel! Oh,
dear, I’m going up the chimney !”

It was rather strange that she never thought of calling
for help, but she did not. She was not easily frightened ; and
now she was only wonderfully astonished, as she remem-
bered afterwards, She shut her eyes tight and gave a little
gasp.

“T’ve heard Aunt Hetty talk about the draught drawing
things up the chimney, but I never knew it was as strong as
this,” she said.

She went up, up, up, quietly and steadily, and without any
uncomfortable feeling at all; and then all at once she stopped,
feeling that her feet rested against something solid. She
opened her eyes and looked about her, and there she was,
standing right opposite the white brick, her feet on a tiny
ledge.
BEHIND THE WHITE BRICK. 129



“Well,” she said, “this is funny.”

But the next thing that happened was funnier still. She
found that, without thinking what she was doing, she was
knocking on the white brick with her knuckles, as if it was
a door and she expected somebody to open it. The next
minute she heard footsteps, and then a sound, as if some one
was drawing back a little bolt.

“It is a door,” said Jem, “and somebody is going to open
te

The white brick moved a little, and some more mortar and
soot fell; then the brick moved a little more, and then it slid
- aside and left an open space.

“It’s a room!” cried Jem. ‘“There’s a room behind
ite

And so there was, and before the open space stood a pretty
little girl, with long lovely hair and a fringe on her forehead.
Jem clapsed her hands in amazement. It was Flora herself,
as she looked in the picture, and Flora stood laughing and
| nodding.

“Come in,” she said. “I thought it was you.”

“But how can I come in through such a little place?”
asked Jem.

“Oh, that is easy enough,” said Flora. ‘Here, give me
your hand.”

Jem did as she told her, and found that it was easy
enough. In an instant she had passed through the opening,
the white brick had gone back to its place, and she was

9
130 BEHIND THE WHITE BRICK.



standing by Flora’s side in a large room—the nicest room
she had ever seen. It was big and lofty and light, and there
were all kinds of delightful things in it—books and flowers
and playthings and pictures, and in one corner a great cage
full of love-birds,

“Have I ever seen it before?” asked Jem, glancing
slowly round.

“Yes,” said Flora; ‘you saw it last night—in your mind.
Don’t you remember it ?”

Jem shook her head.

“T feel as if I did, but

“Why,” said Flora, laughing, “it’s my room, the one you



”

read about last night.”

‘So it is,” said Jem. “ But how did you come here ?”

“T can’t tell you that; I myself don’t know. But I am
here, and so”—rather mysteriously—‘“ are a great many
other things.”

“Are they?” said Jem, very much interested. ‘What

”



things? Burned things? 1 was just wondering

“ Not only burned things,” said Flora, nodding. “ Just
come with me and I'll show you something.”

She led the way out of the room and down a little pas-
sage with several doors in each side of it, and she opened
one door and showed Jem what was on the other side of it.
That was a room, too, and this time it was funny as well as
pretty. Both floor and walls were padded with rose colour,
and the floor was strewn with toys. There were big soft
BEHIND THE WHITE BRICK. 131



balls, rattles, horses, woolly dogs, and a doll or so; there
was one low cushioned chair and a low table.

“You can come in,” said a shrill little voice behind the
door, “ only mind you don’t tread on things.”

“What a funny little voice!” said Jem, but she had no
sooner said it than she jumped back.

The owner of the voice, who had just come forward,
was no other than Baby.

“Why,” exclaimed Jem, beginning to feel frightened, “I
left you fast asleep in your crib.”

“Did you?” said Baby, somewhat scornfully. ‘ That’s
just the way with you grown-up people. You think you
know everything, and yet you haven’t discretion enough to
know when a pin is sticking into one. You'd know soon
enough if you had one sticking into your own back.”

“But I’m not grown up,” stammered Jem; “‘and when
you are at home you can neither walk nor talk. You're not
six months old.”

“Well, miss,” retorted Baby, whose wrongs seemed to
have soured her disposition somewhat, ‘you have no need
to throw that in my teeth; you were not six months old,
either, when you were my age.”

Jem could not help laughing.

“You haven’t got any teeth,” she said.

“Haven't I?” said Baby, and she displayed two beauti-
ful rows with some haughtiness of manner. ‘When I am up
here,” she said, “I am supplied with the modern conveniences,
132 BEHIND THE WHITE BRICK.



and that’s why I never complain. Do I ever cry when I am
asleep ? It’s not falling asleep I object to, it’s falling awake.”

‘Wait a minute,” said Jem. ‘Are you asleep now ?”

“Tm what you call asleep. I can only come here when
I’m what you call asleep. Asleep, indeed! It’s no wonder
we always cry when we have to fall awake.”

“But we don’t mean to be unkind to you,” protested
Jem, meekly.

She could not help thinking Baby was very severe.

“Don’t mean!” said Baby. ‘ Well, why don’t you think
more, then? How would you.like to have all the nice things
snatched away from you, and all the old rubbish packed off
on you, as if you hadn’t any sense? How would you like to
have to sit and stare at things you wanted, and not to be able
to reach them, or, if you did reach them, have them fall out
of your hand, and roll away in the most unfeeling manner?
And then be scolded and called ‘cross!’ It’s no wonder we
are bald. You'd be bald yourself. It’s trouble and worry
that keep us bald until we can begin to take care of our-
selves ; [had more hair than this at first, but it fell off, as well
it might. No philosopher ever thought of that, I suppose!”

“Well,” said Jem, in despair, “I hope you enjoy your-
self when you are here?”

“Yes, I do,” answered Baby. ‘ That’s one comfort.
There is nothing to knock my head against, and things have
patent stoppers on them, so that they can’t roll away, and
everything is soft and easy to pick up.”
BEHIND THE WHITE BRICK. 133



There was a slight pause after this, and Baby seemed to
cool down.

‘‘T suppose you would like me to show you round?” she said.

“Not if you have any objection,” replied Jem, who was
rather subdued.

“T would as soon do it as not,” said Baby. ‘You are
not as bad as some people, though you do get my clothes
twisted when you hold me.”

Upon the whole, she seemed rather proud of her position.
It was evident she quite regarded herself as hostess. She
held her small bald head very high indeed, as she trotted on
before them. She stopped at the first door she came to, and
knocked three times. She was obliged to stand upon tiptoe
to reach the knocker.

‘“He’s sure to be at home at this time of year,” she
remarked. ‘This is the busy season.”

“Who's ‘he’ ?” inquired Jem.

But Flora only laughed at Miss Baby’s consequential air.

“S. C., to be sure,” was the answer, as the young lady
pointed to the door-plate, upon which Jem noticed, for the
first time, “S. C.” in very large letters.

The door opened, apparently without assistance, and they
entered the apartment.

“Good gracious!” exclaimed Jem, the next minute.
‘“Goodzess gracious |”

She might well be astonished. It was such a long room
that she could not see to the end of it, and it was piled up
134 BEHIND THE WHITE BRICK.



from floor to ceiling with toys of every description, and there
was such bustle and buzzing in it that it was quite confusing.
The bustle and buzzing arose from a very curious cause, too,
—it was the bustle and buzz of hundreds of tiny men and
women who were working at little tables no higher than
mushrooms,—the pretty tiny women cutting out and sewing,
the pretty tiny men sawing and hammering and all talking
at once. The principal person in the place escaped Jem’s
notice at first; but it was not long before she saw him,—a
little old gentleman, with a-rosy face and sparkling eyes,
sitting at a desk, and writing in a book almost as big as
himself. He was so busy that he was quite excited, and had
been obliged to throw his white fur coat and cap aside, and
he was at work in his red waistcoat.

“Look here, if you please,” piped Baby. “I have brought
some one to see you.”

When he turned round, Jem recognized him at once.

“Eh! Eh!” he said. ‘What! What! Who’s this,
Tootsicums ?”

Baby’s manner became very acid indeed.

“T shouldn't have thought you would have said that, Mr.
Claus,” she remarked. ‘I can’t help myself down below, but
I generally have my rights respected up here. I should like
to know what sane godfather or godmother would give one
the name of ‘Tootsicums’ in one’s baptism. They are bad
enough, I must say; but I never heard of any of them calling

”

a person ‘ Tootsicums.’




























































, TOOTSICUMS ?”

‘©wHaT! WHAT! WHO's THIS,

HE SAID,

‘rH! EH!”

BEHIND THE WHITE BRICK. 137



“Come, come!” said S. C., chuckling comfortably and
_ rubbing his hands. “ Don’t be too dignified,—it’s a bad
thing. And don’t be too fond of flourishing your rights in
people’s faces,—that’s the worst of all, Miss Midget. Folks
who make such a fuss about their rights turn them into
wrongs sometimes.”

Then he turned suddenly to Jem.

“You are the little girl from down below,” he said.

“Yes, sir,” answered Jem. ‘I’m Jem, and this is my friend
Flora,—out of the blue book.”

“’m happy to make her acquaintance,” said S. C., ‘and
I’m happy to make yours. You are a nice child, though a
trifle peppery. I’m very glad to see you.”

“T’m very glad indeed to see you, sir,” said Jem. “I

”



wasn’t quite sure

But there she stopped, feeling that it would be scarcely
polite to tell him that she had begun of late years to lose
faith in him.

But S.C. only chuckled more comfortably than ever and
rubbed his hands again.

“Ho, ho!” he said. “You know who I am, then?”

Jem hesitated a moment, wondering whether it would not
be taking a liberty to mention his name without putting
“Mr.” before it ; then she remembered what Baby had called
him.

“Baby called you ‘ Mr. Claus,’ sir,” she replied; “and I
have seen pictures of you.”
138 BEHIND THE WHITE BRICK.



“To be sure,” said S..C. “S. Claus, Esquire, of Chim-
neyland. How do you like me?”

“Very much,” answered Jem; “very much, indeed, sir.”

“ Glad of it! Glad of it! But what was it you were go-
ing to say you were not quite sure of ?”

Jem blushed a little.

“T was not quite sure that—that you were true, sir. At
least I have not been quite sure since I have been older.”

_ S.C. rubbed the bald part of his head and gave a little
sigh. i

“T hope I have not hurt your feelings, sir,” faltered Jem,
who was a very kind hearted little soul. ;

“Well, no,” said S.C. “Not exactly. And it is not your
fault either. It is natural, I suppose; at anyrate, it is the way
of the world. People lose their belief in a great many things
as they grow older; but that does not make the things not
true, thank goodness! and their faith often-comes back after
awhile. But, bless me!” he added, briskly, “I’m moralizing,

”



and who thanks a man for doing that? Suppose

“ Black eyes or blue, sir?” said a tiny voice close to them.

Jem and Flora turned round, and saw it was one of the
small workers who was asking the question.

‘‘ Whom for?” inquired S. C.

“Little girl in the red brick house at the corner,” said the
workwoman ; ‘‘name of Birdie.”

‘Excuse me a moment,” said S. C. to the children, and he
turned to the big book and began to run his fingers down the
BEHIND THE WHITE BRICK. 139



pages in a business-like manner. ‘Ah! here she is!” he ex-
claimed at last. “Blue eyes, if you please, Thistle, and
golden hair. And let it be a big one. She takes good care
of them.”

“Yes, sir,” said Thistle; “I am personally acquainted
with several dolls in her family. I go to parties in her dolls’
house sometimes when she is fast asleep at night, and they
all speak very highly of her. She is most attentive to them
when they are ill. In fact, her pet doll is a cripple, with a
stiff leg.”

‘She ran back to her work and S. C. finished his sentence.

‘Suppose I show you my establishment,” he said. ‘Come
with me.”

It really would be quite impossible to describe the wonder-
ful things he showed them. Jem’s head was quite in a whirl
before she had seen one-half of them, au even Baby con-
descended to become excited.

“There must be a great many children in the world, Mr.
Claus,” ventured Jem.

“Yes, yes, millions of ’em; bless ’em,” said S. C., growing
rosier with delight at the very thought. ‘“ We never run out
of them, that’s one comfort. There’s a large and varied
assortment always on hand. Fresh ones every year, too, so
that when one grows too old there is‘a new one ready. I
have a place like this in every twelfth chimney. Now it’s
boys, now it’s girls, always one or t’other; and there’s no end
of playthings for them, too, I’m glad to say. For girls, the
140 BEHIND THE WHITE BRICK.



great thing seems to be dolls. Blitzen! what comfort they
do take in dolls! but the boys are for horses and racket.”

They were standing near a table where a worker was just
putting the finishing touch to the dress of a large wax doll,
and just at that moment, to Jem’s surprise, she set it on the
floor, upon its feet, quite coolly.

“Thank you,” said the doll, politely.

_ Jem quite jumped.

“You can join the rest now and introduce yourself,” said
the worker.

The doll looked over her shoulder at her train.

“Tt hangs very nicely,” she said. ‘‘I hope it’s the latest
fashion.”

“Mine never talked like that,” said Flora. ‘My best one
could only say ‘ Mamma,’ and it said it very badly, too.”

“She was foolish for saying it at all,” remarked the doll,
haughtily. ‘We don’t talk and walk before ordinary people ;
we keep our accomplishments for our own amusement, and
for the amusement of our friends. If you should chance to
get up in the middle of the night, some time, or should run
into the room suddenly some day, after you have left it,
you might hear—but what is the use of talking to human
beings ?”

“You know a great deal, considering you are only just
finished,” snapped Baby, who really was a Tartar.

‘IT was FINISHED,” retorted the doll. “I did not begin
life as a baby!” very scornfully.
BEHIND THE WHITE BRICK. 141



“Pooh!” said Baby. “ We improve as we get older.”

‘IT hope so, indeed,” answered the doll. ‘ There is plenty of
room for improvement.” And she walked away in great state.

S. C. looked at Baby and then shook his head. ‘TI shall
not have to take very much care of you,” he said, absent-
mindedly. “You are able to take pretty good care of
yourself.”

“T hope I am,” said Baby, tossing her head.

S. C. gave his head another shake.

“Don’t take too good care of yourself,” he said. ‘That’s
a bad thing, too.”

He showed them the rest of his wonders, and then went
with them to the door to bid them good-bye.

“T am sure we are very much obliged to you, Mr. Claus,”
said Jem, gratefully. ‘I shall never again think you are not
true, sir.”

S. C. patted her shoulder quite affectionately.

“That's right,” he said. ‘Believe in things just as long
as you can, my dear. Good-bye until Christmas Eve. I
shall see you then, if you don’t see me.”

He must have taken quite a fancy to Jem, for he stood
looking at her, and seemed very reluctant to close the door,
and even after he had closed it, and they had turned away,
he opened it a little again to call to her.

‘“ Believe in things as long as you can, my dear.”

“ How kind he is!” exclaimed Jem, full of pleasure.

Baby shrugged her shoulders.


142 BEHIND THE WHITE BRICK.

‘Well enough in his way,” she said, “ but rather inclined
to prose and be old-fashioned.”

Jem looked at her, feeling rather frightened, but she said
nothing.

Baby showed very little interest in the next room she took
them to.

“T don’t care about this place,” shé said, as she threw open
the door. “It has nothing but old things init. It is the
Nobody-knows-where room.”

She had scarcely finished speaking before Jem made a little
spring and picked something up.

“Here’s my old strawberry pincushion!” she cried out.
And then, with another jump and another dash at two or
three other things, ‘‘And here’s my old fairy-book! And
here’s my little locket I lost last summer! How did they
come here ?”

“They went Nobody-knows-where,” said Baby.

“ And this is it.”

“ But cannot I have them again,” asked Jem.

“No,” answered Baby. “Things that go to Nobody-
knows-where stay there.”

“Oh!” sighed Jem, “I am so sorry.”

« They are only old things,” said Baby.

“But I like my old things,” said Jem. “I love them.
And there is mother’s needle case. I wish I might take that. |
Her dead little sister gave it to her, and she was so sorry
when she lost it.”
BEHIND THE WHITE BRICK. 143



“People ought to take better care of their things,” re-
marked Baby.

Jem would have liked to stay in this room and wander
about among her old favourites for a long time, but Baby was
in a hurry.

‘You'd better come away,” she said. ‘Suppose I was to
have to fall awake and leave you ?”

The next place they went into was the most wonderful
of all.

“This is the Wish room,” said Baby. “Your wishes
come here—yours and mother’s, and Aunt Hetty’s and father’s
and mine. When did you wish that?”

Each article was placed under a glass shade, and labeled
with the words and name of the wishers. Some of them
were beautiful, indeed; but the tall shade Baby nodded at
when she asked her question was truly alarming, and caused
Jem a dreadful pang of remorse. Underneath it sat Aunt
Hetty, with her mouth stitched up so that she could not
speak a word, and beneath the stand was a label bearing
these words, in large black letters—

“7 wish Aunt Hetty’s mouth was sewed up. Jem.”

“Oh, dear!” cried Jem, in great distress. ‘“ How it must
have hurt her! How-unkind of me to say it! I wish I
hadn’t wished it. I wish it would come undone.”

She had no sooner said it than her wish was gratified.
The old label disappeared and a new one showed itself, and
there sat Aunt Hetty, looking herself again, and even smiling.
144 BEHIND THE WHITE BRICK.



Jem was grateful beyond measure, but Baby seemed to
consider her weak minded.

“Tt served her right,” she said,

“But when, after looking at the wishes at that end of
the room, they went to the other end, her-turn came. In
one corner stood a shade with a baby under it, and the baby
was Miss Baby herself, but looking as she very rarely looked ;
in fact, i was the brightest, best tempered baby one could
imagine.’

“T wish I had a better aaa baby. . Mothet,” was
written on the label.

Baby became quite red in the face with anger and confusion.

“ That wasn’t here the last time I came,” she said. «“‘ And
it is right down mean in mother !”

This was more than Jem could bear.

“Tt wasn’t mean,” she said. ‘She couldn’t help it. You
know you are a cross baby—everybody says so.”

Baby turned two shades redder.

“ Mind your own business,” she retorted. ‘“ It was mean ;
and as to that silly little thing being better than I am,” turn-
ing up her small nose, which was quite turned up enough by
Nature—“I must say I don’t see anything so very grand
about her. - So, there !.”

She scarcely condescended to speak to them while they
remained in the Wish room, and when they left it, and went
to the last door in the passage, she quite scowled at it.

“‘T don’t know whether I shall open it at all,” she said.
BEHIND THE WHITE BRICK. 145



“Why not?” asked Flora. ‘You might as well.”

“It is the Lost pin room,” she said. “I hate pins.”

She threw the door open with a bang, and then stood and
shook her little fist viciously. The room was full of pins,
stacked solidly together. There were hundreds of them—
thousands—mnillions, it seemed.

“T’m glad they ave lost!” she said. “I wish there were
more of them there.”

‘“‘T didn’t know there were so many pins in the world,”
said Jem.

“Pooh!” said Baby. ‘‘ Those are only the lost ones that
have belonged to our family.”

After this they went back to Flora’s room and sat down,
while Flora told Jem the rest of her story.

“Oh!” sighed Jem, when she came to the end. “ How
delightful it is to be here! Can I never come again ?”

“Tn one way you can,” said Flora. ‘“ When you want to
come, just sit down and be as quiet as possible, and shut your
eyes and think very hard about it. You can see everything
you have seen to-day, if you try.”

“Then I shall be sure to try,” Jem answered. She was
going to ask some other question, but Baby stopped her.

“Oh! I’m falling awake,” she whimpered, crossly, rubbing
her eyes. ‘I’m falling awake again.”

And then, suddenly, a very strange feeling came over Jem.
Flora and the pretty room seemed to fade away, and, without
being able to account for it at all, she found herself sitting on

Io
146 BEHIND THE WHITE BRICK.



her little stool again, with a beautiful scarlet and gold book
on her knee, and her mother standing by laughing at her
amazed face. As to Miss Baby, she was crying as hard as
she could in her crib.

“Mother!” Jem cried out, “have you really come home
so early as this, and—and,” rubbing her eyes in great amaze-
ment, “ how did I come down?”

“Don’t I look as if I was real?” said her mother, laughing
and kissing her. ‘And doesn’t your present look real? I
don’t know how you came down, I’m sure. Where have you
been ?”

Jem shook her head very mysteriously. She saw that her
mother fancied she had been asleep, but she herself knew
better. :

“T know you youldn’t believe it was true if I told you,”
she said; “I have been

BEHIND THE WHITE Brick.”
SCRIBNER’S ‘BOOKS FOR THE YOUNG.



SARA CREWE;
OR, WHAT HAPPENED AT MISS MINCHIN’S,
BY FRANCES HODGSON BURNETT,
Richly and Fully Illustrated by R. B. Birch.
One volume, square 8vo, : : : : ; $1.00.



As a beautiful story filled with an exquisite pathos and sweet-
ness, ‘ Sara Crewe” took rank at once with the author’s famous
“Little Lord Fauntleroy,” now in its one hundred and sixteenth
thousand. As her former story had a boy for its hero, so this
has a girl for its heroine—a weird, queer little creature, whose
elfish cleverness and odd ways with her romantic imaginings
and “‘supposes,” are made of striking interest by the exquisite
art with which the author has woven them into the texture of
the story.

«Sara Crewe’ will join company with ‘Lord Fauntleroy,’ and the two to-
gether will take their place among the classic children of literature.’—T7ke
Christian Union.

‘**Sara Crewe’ is the Nineteenth Century Cinderella, equally triumphant in
the ashes of the Kitchen or in the soft luxury of the Parlor. The story is beyond
many a longer and more ambitious one in its fascinating, artistic, heart-subduing
power. Like its predecessor, ‘ Fauntleroy,’ it has come to stay in our literature
among its best gems.” —The Brooklyn Eagle.

‘Everybody was in love with ‘ Little Lord Fauntleroy,’ and I think all the world and the rest of mankind
will be in love with ‘Sara Crewe.’ The tale is so tender, so wise, so human, that I wish every girlin Amer‘ca
could read it, for I think every one would be made better by it.”—Loxise Chandler Moulton.

“Itis a story to linger over in the reading, it is so brightly, frankly, sweetly and tenderly written, and to re-
member and return to. In creating her little gentlewoman, ‘Sara Crewe,’ so fresh, so simple, so natural, so
genuine, and so indomitable, Mrs. Burnett has added another Child to English fiction. No one who reads this
story can read it without feeling or can doubt the loving genius of Mrs. Burnett.—R, H. Stoddard.

LITTLE LORD FAUNTLEROY.

BY FRANCES HODGSON BURNETT.

Beautifully Illustrated by R. B. Birch.
One volume, square 8vo, . , : «82:00.







The lapse of time only confirms the verdict with which this story was re-
ceived—that it would take and hold its place among children’s classics,

“The story is a masterpiece of refinement and beauty."— The Newark Advertiser.

‘CA delightful book for reading aloud to children because it is one that both grown people
and children can enjoy keenly, and the pleasure can be equally. shared.”—T7he Chicago
Tribune.

“In ‘Little Lord Fauntleroy’ we gain another charming child to add to our gallery of juve-
nile heroes and heroines; one who teaches a great lesson with such truth and sweetness, that
we part with him with real regret when the episode is over.” —Louisa M. Alcott.

‘We have seldom found among the issues of children’s books for many years a story so
winsome and charmingly written, The ‘holy simplicity of childhood,’ as the Germans call it,
is the key-note of the narrative. The little hero wins all hearts by the irresistible sympathy of
his nature, the inborn refinement of his manners, and the responsive goodness of his heart,—
The Providence Fournal. :


SCRIBNER’S ‘BOOKS FOR THE YOUNG.

LITTLE PEOPLE:

1 And Their Homes in Meadows, Woods and Waters.
fe P BY STELLA LOUISE HOOK,

-@ BEAUTIFULLY ILLUSTRATED BY DAN BEARD AND
HARRY BEARD,



























One volume, square Svyo, . - $1.50. f

HE boy or girl who reads this book will be astonished at the
amount of curious and entertaining information which it con-
, tains about little insects, some of whose ways are familiar to
Aes 'all. The author is an ardent lover of nature, and writes with
> affectionate fondness and with a charmingly simple and winning
iW style of these tiny denizens of the field and water. She dwells,
in a way that will fascinate every young reader, on the manner of
development, habits, mode of life and appearance of animated mites,
describing, in words that any child can understand, the wonderful trans-
formations through which many of them pass and the strange and .busy
lives that they lead. It is a book that takes the young reader intoa
veritable fairy-land; and the author’s daintiness of touch By
enables her to maintain the pleasing illusion and to hold the :
unflagging attention of her young readers,

SUMMARY OF CONTENTS.

The Flower Fairies —The Musical Elves—
Little People in Armor—The Water Sprites—
The Troublesome Midgets—The Wisest of the
Little People-- Fairies’ Pets and their Relations
ace Brownies.


SCRIBNER’S ‘BOOKS FOR THE YOUNG.

‘* Most delightful.”—_Nrw YorxK TIMES.

TWO LITTLE CONFEDERATES.

BY THOMAS NELSON PAGE.
WITH EIGHT FULL-PAGE ILLUSTRATIONS BY E, W. KEMBLE AND A. C. REDWOOD.



One volume, square 8v0, . : ? : : » $1.50.

The two heroes of Mr. Page’s story are brave, winning little fellows, full of pluck and
courage, yet tender-hearted withal at the sight of the suffering they cannot relieve. They are
Virginia lads who have been left at home with their mother while the men went to war. But



the plantation is the scene of raids from both the gray and blue-coated cavalry, who engage in
some hot skirmishes, and who supply a picturesque background for the adventures of the lads.
War is in the air ; and the boyscan no more resist going gunning for deserters in the swamp
than they can help breathing. The trustful, confiding natures of the gallant youths and their
zeal to aid the Confederates lead them into some comical escapades, from which their sturdy
manliness and self-reliance alone extricate them. As would be inferred from the author’s ‘‘ In
Ole Virginia,” the note of deep feeling is dominant in some scenes. Taken altogether the story
is not only entertaining, but is significant in its graphic picture of home life in Virginia during
the war.
SCRIBNER'S BOOKS FOR THE YOUNG.

THE BO@Y’S
LIBRARY OF LEGEND & CHIVALRY

EDITED BY SIDNEY LANIER,
And Richly Illustrated by Fredericks, Bensell, and Kappes.

Four volumes, cloth, uniform binding, price, per set, - - - $7.00.
Sold separately, price, per volume, - - - - - -~ $2.00.

Mr. Lanier’s books, in which he presents to boy
readers the old English classics of history and
legend in such attractive form, are now issued
in four uniform volumes, well made and well
illustrated. While they are stories of action
and stirring incident, which make them ex-
tremely exciting, they teach those lessons which
manly, honest boys ought to learn. The oath
of the young fourteenth century knight made
him vow to speak the truth, to perform a prom-
ise to the utmost, to reverence all women, to
maintain right and honesty, to help the weak,
to treat high and low with courtesy, to be fair
to a bitter foe, and to pursue simplicity, modesty
and gentleness of heart and bearing ; and the
nineteenth century knight is he who takes the
same oath of fidelity to truth, honesty and
purity of heart. The illustrations are full of
fire and spirit, and add very much to one’s en-
joyment of the book.

THE BOY’S KING ARTHUR.

BEING StR THOMAS MALLORY’S History OF KING ARTHUR
AND HIS KNIGHTS OF THE ROUND TABLE.

THE BOY’S FROISSART.

BEING SIR JOHN FROISSART’S CHRONICLES OF ADVENTURE,
BATTLE, AND CUSTOM IN ENGLAND, FRANCE, SPAIN, ETC.

THE BOY’S PERCY.

THE
KNIGHTLY LEGENDS OF WALES;
OR, THE BOY’S MABINOGION.

‘“ Amid all the strange and fanciful scenery of these stories, character and the ideals of character remain
at the simplest and purest. The romantic history transpires in the healthy atmosphere of the open air on the
green earth beneath the opensky. * * * The figures of Right, Truth, Justice, Honor, Purity, Courage;
Reverence for Law, are always in the background ; and the grand passion inspired by the book is for strength
to do well and nobly in the world.”—The Independent.

“Tt is quite the beau ideal of a book for a present to an intelligent boy or girl.” —Baltimore Gazette.

ZF

Z
Zi,

=~


SCRIBNER’S BOOKS FOR THE YOUNG.

HEROES OF THE OLDEN TIME.

By JAMES BALDWIN.





Three vols., 12mo, each beautifully illustrated, Singly, $1.50; The Set, $4.00.

In these three volumes. Mr. Baldwin presents in consecutive narrative forms the
Legends relating to the Trojan War, the great Siegfried myth of Northern Europe, and
the medizval romance of Roland and Charlemange; bringing before the reader, with
great spirit, with scholarly accuracy and with unfailing taste these heroic figures and
the times in which their adventures are supposed to have occurred.

A STORY OF THE GOLDEN AGE.

With a series of superb Full-page Illustrations by | iS
HowarbD PYLE.

One volume, 12mo0, = - = $1.50,’

“Mr. Baldwin’s book is redolent with the spirit of thee
Odyssey, that glorious primitive epic, fresh with the dew of the,
morning of time. It is an unalloyed pleasure to read his recital
of the adventures of the wily Odysseus, slightly expurgated=
though it be, and adapted for the intelligence of youthful minds.
Howard Pyle’s illustrations render the spirit of the Homeri
age with admirable felicity.’—Prof. H. H. Boyesen.

‘Mr. Baldwin’s work here as in ‘ Siegfried’ and ‘ Roland’ i
of exceptional merit, and is to be classed with the ‘Tangle
wood Tales’ of Hawthorne rather than with the average story
for the young. Mr. Pyle has furnished the volume with
dozen drawings of great artistic excellence and of genuinely
illustrative character.” — The Providence Journal,

THE STORY OF SIRGERIED,

With a series of Full-page Illustrations by HOWARD PYLE. fam
One volume, 12mo, - = = $1.50.

‘It is told with spirit and is beautifully illustrated.”—7/e
New York Sun. i

“©The Story of Siegfried’ is charmingly told. The author §
makes up the story from the various myths in a fascinating
way which cannot fail to interest the reader. It is as enjoy-
able as any fairy tale. The writer’s style is simple and very§
attractive, and the book is in every way an excellent one for
young readers.” — The Hartford Courant. ‘

THE STORY OF ROLAND.

With a Series of Full-page I'lustrations by R. B. BIRCH.
One volume, 12m0, - - = $1.50.

“Finely written, beautifully bound and excellently illus:
trated, it isa charming gift-book for either a boy or a girl.””—
The Critic.

“The old romance is thus told in English for the first time
in a connected form, and is admirably told in the true spirit of
chivalry.”— Te Boston Traveler.

‘* Mr. Baldwin has culled from a wide range of epics, French, Italian and German, and has once more proved
his aptitude as a story teller for the young, while conveying information for which many of their elders will be
thankful.” — Zhe Nation.
































SCRIBNER’S ‘BOOKS FOR THE YOUNG.

THE BLACK ARROW.
A Tale of the Two Roses.

BY ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON.
WITH 12 FULL-PAGE ILLUSTRATIONS BY WILL H. LOW AND ALFRED BRENNAN.

One volume, 12mo, paper, 50 cents; cloth, $1.00.

Rep ete with brisk dialogue and enlivening incident, and told in the
nervous, picturesque style peculiar to the author of ‘t Kidnapped” and
‘© Treasure Island,” this tale of adventure will share the popularity of the best
of Mr. Stevenson’s romances. It is a story of thrilling
interest from first to last.























“An absorbing book.”— The New York Yournal of Commerce.

‘«Thestory is full of the atmosphere of adventure, and is one of the strongest pieces
of romantic writing ever done by Mr. Stevenson.” —- The Boston Times.

‘It has all the good qualities of his other stories—their invention, their spirit and their
charming Engiish, The hand that wrote ‘Treasure Island’ and ‘Kidnapped’ is visible in
its stirring pages.” —The New York Mail and Express.
; “SWe have devoured the book at a sitting; and were the question to arise which of the

author’s two books, ‘Treasure Island’ or ‘The Black Arrow’ should be preserved, if only
one of them could escape destruction, we should hesitate not a moment to cry out for ‘The
Black Arrow.’ It hasallthe charm of the other book and something more. The island is
become a forest, with castles and abbeys and caverns in its depths ; and the treasure a lovely
maiden.”"— The Critic.

*¢The Black Arrows are a kind of Robin Hoods, who foregather ip the greenwood,

{ kill the King’s venison, waylay the King’s subjects, and exercise a simple and primi-
tive injustice by killing everybody in any way connected with the objects of their
special animosity. Mr. Stevenson has made a striking series of dramatic pictures,
The action is vigorous and incessant. The lawless condition of the time is kept in evidence. Everybody is fighting
or flying, plotting or baffling plots. doing or hindering overt wrong, The tale sweeps on to its close with plenty
of clan, — The New York Tribune.

KIDNAPPED.

Being Memoirs of the Adventures of David Balfour in the Year 1751,

BY ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

One volume, 12mo, . . paper, 50c.; cloth, $1.00
With 16 full-page illustrations, $1.25,



‘*Mr, Stevenson has never appeared to greater advantage than in ‘Kid

napped,’”— The Nation.

‘‘He brings back old chivalries and piracies, and talks to the boyhood of

«to-day of shipwrecks and highwaymen, as if these venerable objects of worship
had not been superseded long ago by mercantile heroes and dollar-coining
newsboys.’’— The Atlantic Monthly.

“It is written with a beautiful earnestness and verity that convince the reader,
with every sentence, he 1s reading a true history, while the author’s wonderful
ower of description, his cunning discrimination of character and his charming
‘nglish combine to make the story irresistible.” — The Boston Courier.

A CHILD’S GARDEN OF VERSES.

BY ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON.
One volume, 12mo, gilt top, : é ‘ ine : $1.00.

- & These verses are simply exquisite. They are the “A more exquisite and dainty art than Mr. Steven-
child's thought in the child’s language, and yet altogether son’s has not come to the service of children and their
poetical.. We do not know anything in the whole range | interpretation.”’—The Springfield Republican.
of English literature to equal them in their own peculiar “To our thinking, Mr, Stevenson has made a book
charm. There is a subtle beauty in them which is | which will become a classic in the not over-crowded
indescribable and unequalled.— The Churchman. field of children’s poetry.”"—Te Brooklyn Union.


SCRIBNER’S BOOKS FOR THE YOUNG.

CHILDREN’ S STORIES IN ENGLISH LITERATURE
TALIESIN TO SHAKESPEARE.

BY HENRIETTA CHRISTIAN WRIGHT.
One Volume, 12mo, - - - = rs - : $1.25
Miss Wright’s aim in this new volume has been to
bring to the attention of young readers a summary, set
forth in simple, attractive language, of the lives and
works of the great men of English Literature. Especial
stress is laid upon popular literature, the old British and
Saxon Songs, the romantic episodes of King Arthur's
reign in its relation to learning, Robin Hood, etc. The
book is written in a charmingly winning style, and is
both entertaining and valuable as a first book of English
literature.

CONTENTS.—OLp BritisH Soncs; OLD SAxon SonGS; C4DMON ; THE VENERABLE BEDE;
Kinc ALFRED; THE ROMANCE OF KING ARTHUR; Robin Hoop: THE HERO OF THE
PEOPLE ; LANGLANDE AND GOWER; SIR JOHN MANDEVILLE; GEOFFREY CHAUCER ;
Wickes Caxton; THE FAgry QUEEN; SIR PHILIP SIDNEY ; Tue RISE OF THE

RAMA,





BY THE-SAME AUTHOR.

CHILDREN’S STORIES

OF THE _GREAT SCIENTISTS.

With numerous Portraits. ty - 12mo, $1,25

‘“The author has succeeded in naene her pen pictures of the great scientists as
graphic as the excellent portraits that illustrate the work. Around each name she has
picturesquely grouped the essential features of :
scientific achievement.”—Bvooklyn Times.

OF AMERICAN PROGRESS.

/Ilustrated. - - - - 12mo, $1.25

‘* Miss Wright is favorably known by her vol-
ume of well-told ‘Stories in American History,’
and her ‘ Stories of American Progress’ is equally
worthy of commendation. Taken together they
present a series of pictures of great graphic in-
terest. The jllustrations are excellent.”’— Zhe
Nation

IN AMERICAN HISTORY.

/Ilustrated. - - - - 12mo, $1.25

‘A most delightful and instructive collection
of historical events. told ina simple and pleasant
manner. Almost every occurrence in the gradual
development of our country is woven into an at-
tractive story for young. people.”"—San Francisco
Evening Post.




SCRIBNER’S BOOKS FOR THE YOUNG.

PERSONALLY CONDUCTED.

BY FRANK R. STOCKTON,
With Forty-Siz Illustrations by Joseph Pennell, Alfred Parsons and others.

One volume, square 8v0, 2h) Trey AES RRSS ag rhs Rees oS OO



FASCINATING volume of travel by the famous story- SS SS
teller, whose route is outlined “with characteristic ST

quaintness in the table of contents given, below. The
chapters are a Series of pleasant, informal talks with an im-
aginary party of young people to whom the author is show-
ing the curious and interesting sights of the old world ;— ff
a fancy that Mr, Stockton works out with his customary in- SF
genuity and cleverness. |

sThe two-score and more of illustrations by Joseph Pen-
nell, Alfred Parsons, and others, enriching’ the pages with
many beautiful old-world views, give the book a high
artistic quality and make it a volume admirably suited for
a holiday gift,




CONTENTS.—Tue Romans, suT NoT Rome; THE City or THE BeNDED _~
Knee; Litrte Pisa ano GreEAT RoME; GREAT RoME AGAIN;
AROUND THE Bay oF Naptes; IN FLORENCE AND VENICE; A
Mountain Top, AnD. How we Ger THERE; QUEEN Paris;
Kinc Lonpon; In EnciisH Country; THe Low Counrkigs
AND THE RHINE; THE PEopLE WE MEET. .

STOCKTON TS: OFF HE RIB OOS:

THE STORY OF WITEAU.
With 16 Full-Page Illustrations by R. B. BiRcH. - - - 12mo, extra Cloth, $1.50

“Tt is as romantic and absorbing as any boy could wish for, full of adventure and daring, and yet told in
excellent spirit and with a true literary instinct.”—Christian Union.

A JOLLY FELLOWSHIP.





With Twenty Illustrations. - - 12mo, $1.50
‘* We can think of no book published the present season which will more delight the wide-awake, adven-
ture-loving boy. It is, to borrow the adjective from the title, just ‘jolly.’’’"—Boston Transcript.

The Floating Prince and Other Fairy Tales.
With Ilustrations, - - - : - - - Squore 8vo, $1.50

‘* These tales are full of the quaintest conceits and the oddest fancies, and the strange adventures in which
the different characters engage are just the kind to excite the intense interest of children.”’—PAzla. Bulletin.

THE TING-A-LING TALES.

With numerous Illustrations. - - - - - - - 72mo, $1.00

_, ‘It would be difficult to find anything more dainty, fanciful and humorous than these tales of magic,
fairies, dwarfs and Giants. Thereisa vein of satire in them too which adult readers will enjoy.”—V. Y. Herald.



Roundabout Rambles in Lands of Fact and Fiction.
With 200 Illustrations. - - - - - - : - Square 8vo0, $1.50

= TALES OUT OF SCHOOL,
With nearly 200 Iitustrations. . : - - - : - : - Square 8vo, $1.50
‘The volumes are profusely illustrated and contain the most entertaining sketches in Mr. Stockton’s

most entertaining manner.”’—Christian Union,


SCRIBNER’S BOOKS FOR THE YOUNG.



HANS BRINKER:

OR, THE SILVER SKATES.

A STORY OF LIFE IN HOLLAND.
By MARY MAPES DODGE,

One volume, 12mo, with sixty beautiful illus-

trations, - - 5 a

‘““For children, what could be better as a gift than a copy of Mrs. Dodge’s
‘ Hans Brinker ; or, the Silver Skates’? This is one of the most charming of juven-
ile stories, dealing with fresh scenes and a strange life, and told with sweet sim-

Plicity and great beauty.’’— The Congregationalist.

RHYMES AND JINGLES.

By Mrs. MARY MAPES DODGE,
Epiror or ‘' Sr. Nicuoras.”
Profusely illustrated.
One vol.,12mo. New edition, $1.50
Mrs. Dodge’s ‘‘ Rhymes and Jingles’ is a collection
of her child’s poems—a department of literature in

which she has no equal. Some of these poems have
been pronounced ‘‘ without rivals in our language.”



ERINGESREEKEESS:

A FaIRy FOLK STORY Book.
By MARGARET COLLIER.

(Madame Gelletti Di Cadilhac).
ILLUSTRATED BY JOHN COLLIER,
One volume,12mo, - - - $1.25

‘* More admirable and fascinating a fairy story book
we have not lately set eyes upon. The stories are
most airily conceived and most gracefully executed.”
—The Hartford Post.

PHAETON ROGERS.

ASSN: @ Wes Orr B Ose Eelhurss
By ROSSITER JOHNSON.
Mtlustrated,

One volume,1i2mo, - - - $1.50

‘* One of the funniest, liveliest juvenile stories of the
year is ‘ Phaeton Rogers,’ by Rossiter Johnson. The
writer shows as much ingenuity in inventing comical
adventures and situations as Phaeton does with his

kite-teams, fire ladders, and comets.”—T7he Holyoke
Transcript.





$1.50.



THE BOY EMIGRANTS.
By NOAH BROOKS,
Lllustrated.

One volume, 12mo, - - - $1.50

“Tt is one of the best boy’s stories we have ever
read. There is nothing morbid or unhealthy about it.
His heroes are thorough boys, with all the faults of
their age.” — The Christian at Work,

THE FAIRPORT NINE.

By NOAH BROOKS.

One volume,12mo, - - - $1.25

‘“ As a thoroughly wholesome and delightful book
for boys, ‘ The Fairport Nine’ 1s not likely to have its
superior this season.”— The NV. Y. Evening Mail.

ABOUT OLD
STORY TELLERS.

OF HOW AND WHEN THEY LIVED, AND WHAT
STORIES THEY TOLD.

By DONALD G. MITCHELL.
With numerous illustrations.

One volume,12mo, - - - $1.25

é

“¢ About Old Story Tellers’ is made up of the best
of the old stories, gathered from all sources, re-told in
Mr. Mitchell’s inimitable manner, and interwoven with
lively sketches of the original writers and the times in
which they flourished."—7ze New Haven Journal
and Courier.
SCRIBNER'S BOOKS FOR THE YOUNG.

Marvets OF ANIMAL LIFE SERIES.

By CHARLES F. HOLDER.



Three vols., 8v0, each profusely illustrated, Singly, $1.75; The Set, $5.00,

The marvellously strange forms of animal life that exist



—— Le 5 or have existed in the earth, air or sea, supply Mr.
j il p Holder with a theme of entrancing interest for every boy.
i | vulg) a The style is popular; there is a mass of accurate informa
{ naa ment | CS CNT D OU -
feats ATCA cb tion, much of which is based upon the personal observa-
; i | tion of the author and the illustrations are numerous
ees ll i lh ny and of substantial help to the reader.

LIVING LIGHTS.

A POPULAR ACCOUNT OF PHOSPHORESCENT
ANIMALS AND VEGETABLES.

With 27 Full-page Illustrations, $1.75.



“We have read more books of the class of the one before us than we can remember, but none that has
attracted us so much as this thick little quarto. There is a world of entertainment in Mr. Holder’s book.”
—R. H, Stoddard.

“A very curious branch of natural history is expounded in most agreeable style by this delightful book.
Mr. Holder furnishes a great mass of infermation concerning fire-flies, luminous beetles and other insects, the
phosphorescent animals and animalcule of the sea, and even of plants and flowers that give light. He has re-
vealed a world of new wonders to those who are inquisitive about certain mysteries of great interest, concern-
ing which no other naturalist has written.” — The Philadelphia Bulletin.

MARVELS OF ANIMAL LIFE.

With 24 Full-page Ilustrations, - $1.75.

“Mr. Holder combines his descriptions of these odd crea-
tures with stories of his own adventures in pursuit of them
in many parts of the world. These are told with much
spirit and humor, and add greatly to the fascination of the
book.” — The Worcester Spy.

THE IVORY KING.

A POPULAR HISTORY OF THE ELEPHANT AND
ITS ALLIES,

With 24 Full-page Illustrations, - $1.75.

‘* The author also talks in a lively and pleasant way about
white elephants, rogue elephants, baby elephants, trick
elephants, of the elephant in war, pageantry, sports and
games. A charming accession to books for young people.”
— The Chicago Interior,


-SCRIBNER’S BOOKS FOR THE YOUNG.

A NEW AND CHEAPER EDITION IN THREE PARTS.

JULES VERNE’S GREATEST WORK.
“THE EXPLORATION OF THE WORLD.”

‘*M, Verne’s scheme in this work is to tell fully how man has made
acquaintance with the world in which he lives, to combine into a single
work in three volumes the wonderful stories of all the great explorers,
navigators, and travellers, who have sought out, one after another, the
once uttermost parts of the earth.’—The New York Evening Post.





The three vols. in a set, $7.50; singly, $2.50.

FAMOUS TRAVELS AND TRAVELLERS.

With over Ioo full-page Illustrations, Maps, etc., 8vo, $2.50

THE GREAT NAVIGATORS OF THE XVINITH CENTURY.

With 96 full-page Illustrations and Nineteen Maps, 8vo, $2.50

THE GREAT EXPLORERS OF THE XIXTH CENTURY.

With over too full-page Illus’ns, Fac-similes, etc., 8vo, $2.5¢.





** The Prince of Story Tellers.”—TuHE LONDON TIMEs,

TUES) VeE-REN Ee (Sy Soh OURS:
UNIFORM ILLUSTRATED EDITION.

9 vols., Svo, extra cloth, with: over 750 FEU DAs’ mgetse tons:
Price, per set, in a box, . . . « $17.50;

Sold also an Genacate volumes.

BS ce
aaa PicRoicihacienea

Soe

So i ———_—
Rates He wens phen ene



Michael Strogoff; or, The Courier of From the Earth Po the Moon Direct
therCzarcee nee eee $2.00 in Ninety-seven Hours, Twenty
A Floating City and the Blockade Minutes; anda Journey Around
RIT NETS: case isicns footer testers aiieve 2.00 de a 8) acct Ne dae tr ec ae $2.00
Hector Servadac.................. 2.00 | The Steam House.............:... 2 00
DickiSandswjen suvensnscce ee 2.00 | The Giant Raft..............--eeee 2.00

A Journey tothe Centreofthe Earth 2.00 | The Mysterious Island............ 250
SCRIBNER’S BOOKS FOR THE YOUNG.
THE BOY’S LIBRARY OF PLUCK AND ACTION.

Four volumes, 12mo, in a box, illustrated, - - - -+- + $5.00
Sold separately, price per volume, =- = = = - = = 1.50

Ad OLLY- PEL LOW SHIP:

BY FRANK R. STOCKTON.





HANS BRINKER;
OR, THE SILWER SKATES.
A Story of Life in Holland.

BY MRS. MARY MAPES DODGE.



THE BOY EMIGRANTS.

BY NOAH BROOKS.



PHAETON ROGERS.

BY ROSSITER JOHNSON.



In the **Boy’s Library of Pluck and Action,” the design was to bring together the repre~
sentative and most popular books of four of the best known writers for young people.
The volumes are beautifully illustrated and uniformly bound in a most attractive form.

ILLUSTRATED LIBRARY OF TRAVEL.

BY BAYARD TAYLOR.



Per sei, six volumes, 12m0, $6.00. Each with many illustrations.

Sold separately, per volume, = = $1.25.

JAPAN IN OUR DAY.

TRAVELS IN ARABIA.

TRAVELS IN SOUTH AFRICA.

CENTRAL ASIA.

THE LAKE REGION OF CENTRAL
AFRICA.

SIAM, THE LAND OF THE WHITE
ELEPHANT.

Each volume is complete in itself, and
contains, first, a brief preliminary sketch
of the country to which it is devoted; next,
such an outline of previous explorations as
may be necessary to explain what has
been achieved by later ones; and finally,
a condensati on of one or more of the most
important narratives of recent travel, accompanied with illustrations of the scenery,
architecture, and life of the races, drawn only from the most authentic sources.

‘* Authenticated accounts of countries, peoples, modes of living and being, curiosities in natural history,
and personal adventure in travels and explorations, suggest a rich fund of solid instruction combined with de-

lightful entertainment The editorship by one of the most observant and well-travelled men of modern times,
at once secures the high character of the ‘ Library’ in every particular.”— 7he Sunday School Times.


SCRIBNER'S BOOKS FOR THE YOUNG.

STODDARB’S BOOKS FOR BOYS.

DAB KINZER. A Story of a Growing Boy. SALTILLO BOYS.

THE QUARTET. A Sequel to “Dab Kinzer,” AMONG THE LAKES.
WINTER FUN.

BY. WILLIAM O. STODDARD.





Five volumes, 12mo, in a box, - - - . . ~ $5.00.
Sold separately, price per volume, - - - . - - r.00.

‘* William O. Stoddard has written capital books for boys. His ‘Dab Kinzer,’ and ‘The Quartet,’ are among
the best specimens of ‘Juveniles’ produced anywhere. In his latest volume, ‘Winter Fun,’ Mr. Stoddard gives
free rein to his remarkable gift of story telling for boys. Itis a connected tale of winter life in the country, in
whicha party of bright lads extract their fun from hunting rabbits, trapping bears, snow-balling,coasting, skating,
making maple sugar, and leading a semi-wild life in the woods and fields part of the time. They are good boys
too, and neglect none of their home duties while furnishing the materials for this entertaining book. Healthful
works of this kind cannot be too freely distributed among the iittle men of America as a counterpoise to the
pernicious literature too often provided for them.” —~/ournal of Commerce.

ANEW AND REVISED EDITION: OF
THE ILLUSTRATED

LIBRAKY OF WONDERS.

THE WONDERS OF MAN AND NATURE.

Intelligence of Animals.—Mountain Adventures—Bodily Strength and Skill—Wonderful Escapes
~—Thunder and Lightning—Adventures on the Great Hunting Grounds—Wonders of the Human
Body—The Sublime in Nature. .

THE WONDERS OF SCIENCE:

Wonders of Heat—Wonders of the Heavens—Wonders of Optics—The Sun—Wonders of
Acoustics—Wonders of Water—Wonders of The Moon—Meteors, Aerolites, Storms and Atmos-
pheric Phenomena.

THE WONDERS OF ART AND ARCHAOLOGY.

Egypt 3,300 Years Ago—Wonders of Sculpture—Wonders of Glass Making—Wonders of European
Art—Wonders of Pompeii—Wonders of Architecture—The Wonders of Italian Art—The Wonders
of Engraving.

Twenty-four volumes, containing over a Thousand Valuable Illustrations.
Each Set, 8 volumes, in a Box, - $8.00.

Each volume, 12mo, complete in itself. Sold separately at $1.00 per volume,
SCRIBNER’S ‘BOOKS FOR THE YOUNG.
A NEW EDITION AT REDUCED PRICE.



—_—__.

THE

AMERICAN Boy’s Hanpy Beok

OR, WHAT TO DO AND HOW TO DO IT.
BY DANIEL C. BEARD.

One volume, octavo, fully Illustrated by the Author, - - $2.00.

Mr. Beard’s book is the first to tell the active, inventive and practical American boy the things
te really wants to know; the thousand things he wants to do, and the ten thousand ways in
which he can do them, with the helps and ingenious contrivances which every boy can either
procure or make. The author divides the book among the sports of the four seasons; and he
has made an almost exhaustive collection of the cleverest modern devices, besides himself
inventing an immense number of capital and practical idea,.



SUMMARY OF CONTENTS.

Kite Time—War Kites—Novel Modes of
Fishing—Home-made Fishing Tackle—How
to Stock, Make and Keep a Fresh-Water
Aquarium—How to Stock and Keep a Ma-
rine Aquarium—Knots, Bends and Hitches—
Dredge, Tangle and Traw] Fishing—Home-
made Boats—How to Rig and Sail Small
Boats—How to Camp Out Without a Tent
—How to Rear. Wild Birds— Home-made
Hunting Apparatus—Traps and Trapping—
Dogs — Practical Taxidermy for Boys —
Snow Housesand Statuary—Winged Skaters
— Winter Fishing —Indoor Amusements —
How to Make a Magic Lantern—Puppet
Shows—Home-made Masquerade and The-
atrical Costumes—With many other subjects
of a kindred nature.

1 Os i * Se Sz

Be
E:AMERIGAN: BOYS

“Tt is the memory of the longing that used to possess myself and my boy friends of a few years ago for a rea)
practical American boy’s book that has induced me to offer this volume, Of course such a book cannot, in the nature
of things, be exhaustive, nor is it, indeed, desirable that it should be. Its use and principal purpose are to stimulate
. theinventive faculties in boys, to bring them face to face with practical emergencies when no book can supply the
place of their own common sense and the exercise of personal intelligence and ingenuity.”—From the Author's
Preface.

Xs Each particular department is minutely illustrated
to the boys themselves, but to parents and guardians who have at heart their happiness and
of mind and muscle.”—Pittsburgh Telegraph.

‘** The boy who has learned to play all the games and make all the toys of which it teaches, has unconsciously
exercised the inventive faculty that is in him, has acquired skill with his hands, and has become a good mechanic
and an embryo inventor without knowing it.”—Milwaukee Evening Wisconsin.

and the whole is a complete Gesetty invaluable not only
ealthful development
SCRIBNER'S BOOKS FOR THE YOUNG.

THE AMERICAN Gir’s Hanpy Book

HOW TO AMUSE YOURSELF AND OTHERS.
BY LINA AND ADELIA B. BEARD.
With nearly 500 Illustrations by the Authors.





One volume, square S8vo, - - a . . ° - $3.00,

Full of information upon the thousand and one things that interest every girl, this volume
forms a notable companion to the book for boys by Daniel C. Beard, brother of the present
authors, published last year, Everything that girls want to know about their sports, games, and
winter afternoon and evening work, is told clearly and simply in this helpful and entertaining
volume. Beginning with April Fool's Day, the authors take their readers through the circuit of
the year, dwelling upon the sports, games, etc., appropriate to each season and to all the holidays,
and furnishing welcome instruction regarding the many little accomplishments that girls like to
become proficient in. The volume is fully and
handsomely illustrated from drawings by the
authors, whose designs are in the best sense illus-
trative of the text.

SUMMARY OF CONTENTS.

First of April—Wild Flowers and Their
Preservation— The Walking Club—Easter-
Egg Games—How to Make a Lawn-Tennis
Net — May-Day Sports — Midsummer -Eve
Games and Sports—Sea-side Cottage Deco-
ration—A Girl’s Fourth of July—An Impres-
sion Album—Picnics, Burgoos, and Corn-
Roasts—Botany as applied to Art—Quiet
Games for Hot Weather—How to Make a

Others (i; Te

A ,



TF

THE: AMERIGAN:GIRLS.
*HANDY:Book:

BY;
LinaBeard
and
Adelia BBeard

NewYork
Charles



Hammock-—Corn-Husk and Flower Dolls—
How to Make Fans—All Hallow Eve—Na-
ture’s Fall Decorations and how to Use Them
—Nutting Parties—How to Draw, Paint in
Oil-colors,and Model in Clay and Wax—China
Painting—Christmas Festivities, and Home
made Christmas Gifts—Amusements and
Games for the Holidays.



FROM THE AUTHOR’S PREFACE.

One of our objects is to impress upon the minds of the girls the fact that they all possess talent and ability to
achieve more than they suppose possible, and we would encourage a belief in the remark made by a famous French-
man: ‘* When you Americans undertake anything you never stop to ascertain if it be possible, you simply do 7t."’

We desire also to help awaken the inventive faculty, usually uncultivated in girls, and, by giving detailed methods
of new work and amusement, to put them on the road which they can travel and explore alone. r

We know well the feeling of hopelessness which accompanies vague directions, and, to make our explanations
plain and lucid, we have ourselves, with very few exceptions, made all of the articles, played the games, and solved

the problems described.

The materials employed in the construction of the various articles are within easy reach of all, and the outlay, ir

most cases, little or nothing.




SCRIBNER’S ‘BOOKS FOR THE YOUNG.

OTTO OF THE SILVER HAND.

WRITTEN AND ILLUSTRATED BY HOWARD PYLE.
WITH TWENTY-FIVE FULL-PAGE AND MANY OTHER ILLUSTRATIONS,

One volume, royal 8vo, half leather, Cua ope oer et $2.06

THREAD of romantic and touching interest runs through this tale by the
author of the ever-popular ‘‘ Merry Adventures of Robin Hood.” The
young hero is the motherless son of a valiant robber baron of the old
days of medizval Germany, when these lawless chiefs, with bands of
fierce and desperate retainers at their backs, were constantly fighting
with each other or despoiling the caravans of the merchant burghers.
_ The motive of the story springs from the feud between Otto’s father, the
Lord of Drachenhausen, and the rival house of Trutz-Drachen. Mr.
Pyle tells with great spirit the narrative of how the little fellow was kid-
napped by Baron Henry of Trutz-Drachen, and of One-eyed Hans’s thrilling adventures when
he attempted the boy’s rescue. Otto is a lad of sweet and lovable character ; and his trustful
tenderness of heart is brought into striking prominence by contrast with savage roughness of
most of those around him, The illustrations are in Mr. Pyle’s best vein, graceful, spirited
and vigorous. :

THE MERRY ADVENTURES oF ROBIN HOOD

Of Great Renown in Nottinghamshire,



WRITTEN AND ELABORATELY ILLUSTRATED BY HOWARD PYLE.

One volume, royal 8v0, full embossed leather, $4.50; cloth, -— $3.00.

“A superb book.”—The Chicago Inter-Ocean.
“ An excellent piece of literary, artistic and mechani- “A captivating book.’?— The London Daily
cal work.”— The Louisville Commercial, News,

“ This superb book zs unguestionably the most original and elaborate ever produced by any American
artist, Mr. Pyle has told, with pencil and pen, the complete and consecutive story of Robin Hood and his
merry men in their haunts in Sherwood Forest, gathered from the old ballads and legends. Mr. Pyle’s ad-
mirable illustrations are strewn profusely through the book.’’—TuE Boston TRANSCRIPT.

Little- John- knoweth-not-which- Road: to: take :- <>

FB Se TIE le SED eer LA ee Reese REARS
PATI ELRS pt SN ES
SEY
1

“4 very original work.”’— The Boston Pos?.









Hh



RT
WYSE

oa favo
eg
y aps
LIAR




NY,

2 . SATE. BLVE-BOARs LES:












Z

BSS fs tlt
pe y i
MAA Si




MRE Ab
2 ee





2



§
ee









xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20080318_AAAAAY' PACKAGE 'UF00078658_00001' INGEST_TIME '2008-03-18T23:47:07-04:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T17:05:53-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 297900; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-19T10:31:23-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '3' DFID 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfile0' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00173.txt'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
'SHA-1' cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
EVENT '2011-09-28T11:11:18-04:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'2011-09-28T11:05:00-04:00'
redup
'622089' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALKU' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
1b8daea80c3c62df717a6be0ae3009f6
0fa20c613ac137839b1863525cdc39f64e33931a
'2011-09-28T11:06:55-04:00'
describe
'172895' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALKV' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
091a3e1bc32cf6615595e3c56d035876
d5bfb147f4386c58af31ab343ad3dab2cf663208
'2011-09-28T11:06:22-04:00'
describe
'211' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALKW' 'sip-files00001.pro'
da9977cca091b4f0439fcc3433d9551d
2f777f3fb8f8e80038311e2d730716d195cf5eac
'2011-09-28T11:06:50-04:00'
describe
'56497' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALKX' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
5643153a79b22f7ca9c89a9001063e90
85de4f3e8051c4fba72766dae609ee685ef49d91
'2011-09-28T11:06:42-04:00'
describe
'14955772' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALKY' 'sip-files00001.tif'
e4239a33675cd15c75b0004578cb2f90
f5dd835bb6e26a7bf71d822b197abc8705864478
'2011-09-28T11:08:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALKZ' 'sip-files00001.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2011-09-28T11:07:23-04:00'
describe
'30817' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALLA' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
045f3d4378efd703dbc48ae36cb8053e
43796987569cd326dd6aeb149243326b4a5084e4
'2011-09-28T11:10:24-04:00'
describe
'629836' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALLB' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
07fdc5866c2b0d75a27a9a83f03fd83f
76881145b6c85dc2c34fd40ec57486aee88a7b9e
'2011-09-28T11:10:27-04:00'
describe
'60455' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALLC' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
4e767e251e57a263f6372277644a1c49
9146e12294832d83693eebbadf12716962fdad1b
'2011-09-28T11:11:54-04:00'
describe
'1216' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALLD' 'sip-files00002.pro'
714ad490413850506d53ce72b467920a
3167427f607d372c8184a742656c7734f927242d
'2011-09-28T11:05:15-04:00'
describe
'26684' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALLE' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
108e470515ffe2e77b31eef9e8dd05f4
21b1ca12e769d7bbc21af929e3ecad3c20c90aff
'2011-09-28T11:07:05-04:00'
describe
'15134164' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALLF' 'sip-files00002.tif'
873edc8dd1db1317a6da8d6f60b8470f
e69b92b29c9905f6c85362f55ac1e3061298a306
'2011-09-28T11:08:58-04:00'
describe
'185' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALLG' 'sip-files00002.txt'
54f547fdb84257491013614d4102ae34
0933b31868ea419eccb4fa0425b3628c920619cb
'2011-09-28T11:10:23-04:00'
describe
'20506' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALLH' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
cf01610e0a98efdefe4beeda7b3e179e
ed59eb25e958c392af4f04a1d1c90ed418daf040
'2011-09-28T11:12:05-04:00'
describe
'564324' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALLI' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
39dca78d1f8d256c9eda5cc27106183d
9d930dc57b6e67318b3c7e9862d96a865fcd48bc
'2011-09-28T11:07:24-04:00'
describe
'53641' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALLJ' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
c32b7ce6f360695771a8021f319618e7
d880bda189502b9974de4f232f492c87b21a296f
'2011-09-28T11:06:25-04:00'
describe
'24342' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALLK' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
1c8ab70f1b608e886f78add5a01db527
feb8f8ada9fc8d5a42ed42ad8b88f035faa1d02d
'2011-09-28T11:09:00-04:00'
describe
'13561064' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALLL' 'sip-files00003.tif'
512524493008fca46ef963105b5f5879
b668b4a77aae10e86f5352eb74d482da75f027a2
'2011-09-28T11:12:13-04:00'
describe
'19488' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALLM' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
fcfee6d2384520b7459a174e341c5456
e322e16842d939088fa49ee24eb28529e10369f5
'2011-09-28T11:09:35-04:00'
describe
'544466' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALLN' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
5648b60c351529872e148af9407cb270
55cdd2566a96cf1e429895dc410e8614ef5784cb
'2011-09-28T11:11:08-04:00'
describe
'42519' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALLO' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
6a8a35e1fc834dad5d8f4030d6583424
d1ee94415d0b044f35fc99ce4832c6a98ac6293d
'2011-09-28T11:11:31-04:00'
describe
'22729' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALLP' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
8675a4158e2047ddb365048b9ea306d8
99672c2cec8c40b2ab50be25072a5668f67909bd
'2011-09-28T11:07:52-04:00'
describe
'4375068' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALLQ' 'sip-files00005.tif'
244aa48fb6dfb3e177a09146fa5ea80c
9121aea8ffb2cacb8e9a500233323169109cee05
'2011-09-28T11:07:38-04:00'
describe
'19195' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALLR' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
6af2cf52b8cb6554c4c138c3b090736e
e2e1e78c0bfb1d6ab9bd4ec2587109dceca23621
'2011-09-28T11:07:08-04:00'
describe
'544547' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALLS' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
e6981bd4c7d1366c1d879553dc170be8
4b1d0a3541a1553dbc5a4b10fa32bf06c9b127a1
'2011-09-28T11:12:14-04:00'
describe
'45129' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALLT' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
9e4c04596ef47c4233ddac7e7a4fde0c
356112c2bd6cd20fe47adb56a68a02c710e4cc3e
'2011-09-28T11:06:37-04:00'
describe
'1317' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALLU' 'sip-files00007.pro'
550a3115c81145779f25fb6c5691f360
28d8cf5f87bc00d5322652fa71d3966cb2ec1849
'2011-09-28T11:12:03-04:00'
describe
'23628' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALLV' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
2ee0cb81f405a22687058f37c3676480
e9c9617571b792205a0519778b69a2694390caf1
'2011-09-28T11:09:28-04:00'
describe
'4375100' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALLW' 'sip-files00007.tif'
a572967f7263666415efdb8201b62544
e257c98086f35de63980cb5901eb027541a60e56
'2011-09-28T11:08:33-04:00'
describe
'82' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALLX' 'sip-files00007.txt'
59bb5ea9c381e026bf3f924220280522
11319421497fa35e269e1e25ee1a53e4edcd1289
'2011-09-28T11:06:11-04:00'
describe
'19634' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALLY' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
c7f0edae07dba9b48413190c2b04e454
923eb1870c003ab6316aa3546101a1cc54eb2004
'2011-09-28T11:10:18-04:00'
describe
'544665' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALLZ' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
7053fba053f3817e27f5a0b2d3bdc143
77784da059b438aed3d3c935f8cf9d2b8507a0dd
'2011-09-28T11:12:30-04:00'
describe
'89333' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALMA' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
b44cf90c83b5aca2c1a83fc4aecc1243
b396c94eeab3ac3feda52334e8a14eae47950b5a
'2011-09-28T11:06:21-04:00'
describe
'19668' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALMB' 'sip-files00008.pro'
eef804a34137e3ba7b7b690357431b48
99d75e6b0164b31168a324c878e2afd1c1c7086e
'2011-09-28T11:10:58-04:00'
describe
'38123' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALMC' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
dd9d700ae27896f7c88424588459e81c
7b5c9313da073f7894d8d30502d54e986c61cd77
'2011-09-28T11:12:08-04:00'
describe
'4377064' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALMD' 'sip-files00008.tif'
09324be428896977feb0da30000024f4
188f91df5f2427b39c1abc99393c6af129630be4
'2011-09-28T11:09:48-04:00'
describe
'935' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALME' 'sip-files00008.txt'
bb09552d88ece346fd1ce372c0e5dd77
3907b702cafabfe2459a1d3274779e61ea8e1856
'2011-09-28T11:06:34-04:00'
describe
'24399' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALMF' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
0190c438212631f63241084ce9835dee
e3c28c919388ff5123645004a03e59906861b842
'2011-09-28T11:08:45-04:00'
describe
'544664' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALMG' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
8da7983cbd3d647858aa67e1217e27c9
b82afedec917e3343dd6bc3b3c3af6e3e1bd9313
'2011-09-28T11:06:58-04:00'
describe
'217635' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALMH' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
656505b7b4d829ff4700770352b87658
7fe298870bc4d150ed225d61cf792ae3460ba52a
'2011-09-28T11:10:54-04:00'
describe
'4067' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALMI' 'sip-files00010.pro'
f75697d43735bcf9ee5c2e3f8581e4a6
130f377870dcf2d3d319a9a438efd5b8b9b5b3a1
'2011-09-28T11:05:41-04:00'
describe
'66236' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALMJ' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
87b6b0b3d3dac0bea3fb7756cb254a56
ea7110f9acdb94c89a8aeef0b498da84175cae9e
'2011-09-28T11:11:46-04:00'
describe
'4380432' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALMK' 'sip-files00010.tif'
1454c93e89cac2d06c173bc659baecf0
8f5cc6b77f0730282e5b7e372ed18105883c5dd3
'2011-09-28T11:07:53-04:00'
describe
'281' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALML' 'sip-files00010.txt'
48afbe2ec8049e7c926bdee78a169396
4d6ce690678b5d24e41cbb62d653d668f02a0610
'2011-09-28T11:06:03-04:00'
describe
'32797' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALMM' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
d7876117bc985f4123284d141d79b8dd
19b79489ba6653662aa2c8bb70dc99d4e0db29ee
'2011-09-28T11:10:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALMN' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
2af42763a16095bfd6d46c3c91688fe2
2850f5a8066c95dae1f9e462fc315345e2dabfad
'2011-09-28T11:10:45-04:00'
describe
'77027' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALMO' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
ba20cb7e348eba54b09646482876e4b9
e421db03f82d17aa19cb6b5258e2b946d19191a6
'2011-09-28T11:05:24-04:00'
describe
'4186' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALMP' 'sip-files00011.pro'
be605a2abbd1842733dc82e18f3d67e7
e9029764017575bf0d69535e212fb2c007708e65
'2011-09-28T11:05:52-04:00'
describe
'34598' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALMQ' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
ede19ddbcee9ddbe422ed45824e9e165
9cb1f40d95c64f72c7cfa38ce5722e8bfe7d2356
'2011-09-28T11:05:55-04:00'
describe
'4376700' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALMR' 'sip-files00011.tif'
80221abcec317025d249c9e05726a6ff
e8e6fcc730fb9744c10c1187a4756887751a06a4
'2011-09-28T11:07:36-04:00'
describe
'214' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALMS' 'sip-files00011.txt'
bc71235dd093ab3c0b2a8ff0e0e710aa
2099e5e764327b293bb2fef0108e515f7d961520
'2011-09-28T11:07:18-04:00'
describe
'23703' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALMT' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
1feb35243f1a63c355a4416e937a0361
8854722739a3a12cd16d1e1a143dd5c194b279a9
'2011-09-28T11:11:42-04:00'
describe
'544422' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALMU' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
a3a2fc4069461f91d9c89a2323f653f5
11b3ea199ca9d1397de750090f47d5f451ddef83
'2011-09-28T11:11:13-04:00'
describe
'43374' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALMV' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
a371db9a68d521ef813fbd9b7bd373a7
4636fe0a504a56cfb5bb5100c8dcc55068f2eec1
'2011-09-28T11:05:34-04:00'
describe
'3359' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALMW' 'sip-files00012.pro'
4aaccc41beb512a2c7772e4de12f87a5
50702f4564c4bd84e26a006ed0c01f41fd6e9b4b
'2011-09-28T11:08:10-04:00'
describe
'22295' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALMX' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
7d3887c4a64b3d09359bccc8b8e3a998
e02b1c21f68df579218f8ed5cbc11b62cc01da4c
'2011-09-28T11:05:59-04:00'
describe
'4374964' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALMY' 'sip-files00012.tif'
947286dfb72998e23f40e72012b7ceb5
34a073af34376718010423a406d4929cf840623f
'2011-09-28T11:07:22-04:00'
describe
'224' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALMZ' 'sip-files00012.txt'
035f4f3e4babe6b5a48e318dddea7c12
8cdc86140dd0ec4fe7b4e66575399f98c74da329
describe
'19110' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALNA' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
891b9fc1dbf0d2afa72971fbbd4fc64f
6baef4f07dcb5153c86c78c1c56aab1e5a7841f0
'2011-09-28T11:10:50-04:00'
describe
'544614' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALNB' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
35b2b1087ceae4b3ab59eeb3905b47aa
cec10e47cb75c0f428838b332c179616f3b2fef8
'2011-09-28T11:05:09-04:00'
describe
'57643' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALNC' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
5cbc6238b284cde5401ca2c60153928c
ead7fbca9ae1e4b0924ab15132bab44c8c6f9be9
'2011-09-28T11:06:18-04:00'
describe
'6564' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALND' 'sip-files00013.pro'
981c4598cd440b989e17c45c7ce41aae
1bc90e0640d7f68a2a1c7359c176aecb00db959e
describe
'29239' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALNE' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
9df92fc63f2e4362ab21ad81d1ebb78e
71708ab59c44ca6557e764b123977b12c0e085c9
'2011-09-28T11:11:49-04:00'
describe
'4376036' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALNF' 'sip-files00013.tif'
7a356e6a32d72d7f69333af3e40e0ff8
58dc949dde542fc5ae9cebeeb5840cf273388346
describe
'340' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALNG' 'sip-files00013.txt'
869c16486fca712dd9a4f05edb0191a0
909ed92d3de4b0caaccbb755403d87f9447b23f0
'2011-09-28T11:07:44-04:00'
describe
'22114' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALNH' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
1420c93fa42152193a79c9baa72bd101
005dcfb99aadf75521fe2ec10777f809b330f77c
'2011-09-28T11:09:47-04:00'
describe
'544314' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALNI' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
a8178714e54a099a2247967b53597c61
08fc3535f3d9439905cdbdc408501a8af0256bea
'2011-09-28T11:10:08-04:00'
describe
'38659' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALNJ' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
a1e0d9ee08a4ff1477b151b148fd23ae
e384af964fab1a0451d378a0ed13ff6ea1e38d72
'2011-09-28T11:09:19-04:00'
describe
'20664' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALNK' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
ea4c0d7bfc51c0d015e6c41e2093caca
37c6514b4fbd26907debee3fd28b8eb4d52181ae
'2011-09-28T11:11:55-04:00'
describe
'4372296' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALNL' 'sip-files00014.tif'
569c9328c48c2b99c7b1e300f38a6f2e
285cbc7af06b0abf1fd0e0e087a5930b2ed9cf0d
'2011-09-28T11:10:48-04:00'
describe
'18448' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALNM' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
d73babac2c5466e8b622a9473b4563b4
15ac9f8cd368d3592e01ecb5174c72388fb776c9
'2011-09-28T11:08:38-04:00'
describe
'544606' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALNN' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
bc94129025998977890f79dc78c40433
4468176924f9802a62a74944cf9dfb63addb6b85
'2011-09-28T11:10:19-04:00'
describe
'93761' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALNO' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
b2ab959cf74ccc02cf4fdd23a51cb8be
62f9ccc11143cdd0680cc41e7e28444334105646
'2011-09-28T11:10:53-04:00'
describe
'24424' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALNP' 'sip-files00015.pro'
96bb75e450658b045da2407e3b0e7791
6007fe6ee88851a4e8c80dfcdd967b78b76e73af
'2011-09-28T11:08:29-04:00'
describe
'42606' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALNQ' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
13280aca3b133fe380d6245dbd15d132
3ee00b7ad26ba3bc114f166215fc5618f17c319f
'2011-09-28T11:07:27-04:00'
describe
'4377760' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALNR' 'sip-files00015.tif'
81f0b06605032b27fc5cb4003c9a1dfd
69a55ccb0ef7471a7bda576f5b80ce50c8c913ea
'2011-09-28T11:08:56-04:00'
describe
'1139' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALNS' 'sip-files00015.txt'
9e1f539b7c47ce4e28558fd803ae5416
6d54d89d77f32995305c4b1df12ee12b68134542
'2011-09-28T11:07:58-04:00'
describe
'26562' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALNT' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
cf75c3d0db5a334af3308c15fb72aace
a356a8a5a0d2354c453a219f78b7248b5cc80741
describe
'544560' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALNU' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
b0024d1215c4752df8a04465fe86aa03
491da893bcfb22c9689d92bc114dfe3413f915bf
'2011-09-28T11:08:13-04:00'
describe
'46950' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALNV' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
79e5d00a735fe1002c390c753c5b12ad
984681011e9d5da4a8e912ecd35f813fd26a34e4
'2011-09-28T11:11:43-04:00'
describe
'860' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALNW' 'sip-files00017.pro'
c1426f7ea7328a95de23c6d06dc9be2b
4f60a17f6b81a51969038b3a17335b1f17410f5d
'2011-09-28T11:08:39-04:00'
describe
'23526' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALNX' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
b207340a1f3ba5b4f0aae22ee2f54f3f
f9f4eee8d56a67611e47523ca7bc5672baa142bb
'2011-09-28T11:05:17-04:00'
describe
'4375264' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALNY' 'sip-files00017.tif'
0cdac6fe10087225077e83749825f945
1c0e8f9a4845c574574d26132973f06752ddbd63
'2011-09-28T11:08:09-04:00'
describe
'56' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALNZ' 'sip-files00017.txt'
cb7eac207d05593b08295e2b6f03d943
646a787bc3fcb2114ff798bbefac77f3a4a246a0
'2011-09-28T11:11:11-04:00'
describe
'19618' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALOA' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
899426afb090a7d492fca2bfa67c74d2
d9c7bc0ee2b59ce85b16184338abcbf19e5e9d5e
'2011-09-28T11:08:17-04:00'
describe
'544644' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALOB' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
c950c32905c8e1c5c851f16554691feb
5cabe0916016edbd940b918935a882945289f098
'2011-09-28T11:10:02-04:00'
describe
'190699' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALOC' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
5d25489fe02fb08d68b4625ee0a6e138
3b2145c4acfabee5cc36a2f1283588c6d5e97936
'2011-09-28T11:10:28-04:00'
describe
'2226' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALOD' 'sip-files00020.pro'
21c117cd79fd7d4e0a2863a89e986514
87bdb2fed45a006cb82d65ab0428940684aa3098
describe
'63135' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALOE' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
6e7beb1092ddf37ac788d7f90212be37
195177cd871f9876031cec516a93e8199183fa61
'2011-09-28T11:07:31-04:00'
describe
'4380540' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALOF' 'sip-files00020.tif'
743610abe10e089d7ff70407bc830640
3d05b04a2199a177bc5ebc2040892d8f248bdf1c
'2011-09-28T11:12:00-04:00'
describe
'122' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALOG' 'sip-files00020.txt'
bb0e24fe90d027d33e1f1592588c2cfe
4ab98fbe61eb91eb900a2924e20cebd40fc29dcb
'2011-09-28T11:09:23-04:00'
describe
'32622' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALOH' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
dc03e7975726ed686c376b284828b998
a7ddc99edc6f2ebaa6810d8a86d16e5941985d47
describe
'544663' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALOI' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
e7a1a0de42a23583a315466a8aa2d48a
b6e2aab428068a4bcccc3d935b50b172764c04f1
describe
'125199' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALOJ' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
e6cb9a35a0ded0d0ad8afd93c33e4040
fd78d63e73eaa8cc4403bf635f00870b2853ac7f
'2011-09-28T11:06:20-04:00'
describe
'29122' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALOK' 'sip-files00021.pro'
8f97f04affb7584c2495ffdb683e88be
b5e3821b9ce7c499b50be86e2c3e86ed0da771fc
'2011-09-28T11:05:38-04:00'
describe
'52032' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALOL' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
bf9d63a5f94830155d9671188e5f6928
29a2b93f9597431d98f92fe1cddd0411f67ed444
'2011-09-28T11:09:43-04:00'
describe
'4378452' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALOM' 'sip-files00021.tif'
5a32c6f40eeddc04bab6e84b523933ba
ca51118136901f71ba92ecedbaed8af8a9afaa98
'2011-09-28T11:08:50-04:00'
describe
'1182' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALON' 'sip-files00021.txt'
6bd4fcdacabdd5d18565fb40be1bd7a2
9cae2bd7fd27362b8a50949b94c0103596181fc1
'2011-09-28T11:05:21-04:00'
describe
'28009' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALOO' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
fc0e2e688c70a330fa317fe78aadb4ed
c337dc716bb2eaa906980cc2b1a862024e9c1beb
describe
'544662' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALOP' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
223b4f71e48ff9ec2ac4d7734d729d76
b142ce094688662baf17c2a93a5ac59cd228bf9e
'2011-09-28T11:09:49-04:00'
describe
'159361' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALOQ' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
bf265d4758449fbcdd74958d91188338
1aba9450d01b9ce252f7aaf9c6a9130ad6f3bb8c
'2011-09-28T11:10:25-04:00'
describe
'40229' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALOR' 'sip-files00022.pro'
a4fd947d9ae77a9b411b4ad5e2d28214
5fbd052b437d5f49aae5417162b3d1b7b1e82844
'2011-09-28T11:06:40-04:00'
describe
'63875' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALOS' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
53b944d6e0d69e3fa99b7fa43e5d4f34
93b75dcb481d923063a6dd0a83872958c66203dd
'2011-09-28T11:12:38-04:00'
describe
'4379756' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALOT' 'sip-files00022.tif'
dde6135f5f75798c75dd4ae57d1bcd86
1c1a7fc4381f9be91425886e758cdcced2fa149f
'2011-09-28T11:05:05-04:00'
describe
'1578' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALOU' 'sip-files00022.txt'
31ac328b0e497a50eaea974263b9c066
6c9b714af269d2473b2e47ea5c86ce40043e379a
'2011-09-28T11:06:41-04:00'
describe
'31451' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALOV' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
8768e10a9bd66d99fd952af2249d8df2
453f32268bb61dc1a933bc588f4e3414721cfd49
'2011-09-28T11:09:25-04:00'
describe
'544626' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALOW' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
70a12df19d37359ceed6925c2b2842c2
05e029b8288e55ba16d50eeb6db46a4e40251bef
describe
'163973' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALOX' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
47092039d7c34925041df0652a9f5476
a5e8d3f1791c461f1686ed36a3709edaafd55b10
'2011-09-28T11:06:04-04:00'
describe
'41158' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALOY' 'sip-files00023.pro'
be04b2fc0f7d9351292f2f9ef38ef86a
ea622b78ffa5f8c8c615353b0c70d29f7188431b
'2011-09-28T11:05:53-04:00'
describe
'64135' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALOZ' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
0f65fae43cca89d6f8ab31e4b644baf1
fffa4ce229c3b0c4ed5c0cba2db8c2030410a3bf
'2011-09-28T11:07:49-04:00'
describe
'4379700' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALPA' 'sip-files00023.tif'
15f45f16f83050ab8056f03734c2b795
8590c47ecccf203c8bfc01fe060a9d90e7019a40
'2011-09-28T11:08:32-04:00'
describe
'1635' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALPB' 'sip-files00023.txt'
dcfb9351cb8ad65ba61972ce91c855df
3151ff0b35f5ba62e4b4518361d0c73f1b214325
'2011-09-28T11:11:50-04:00'
describe
'31317' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALPC' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
845056201c84b0c8c83176e920c4305d
5b8029cce2ccde5963364f2714c0e48b97400168
describe
'544642' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALPD' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
14e416622faadf5bba246c34bdaad897
c2fc3412598f707191c2d6bbe6bb21723f39ac93
'2011-09-28T11:08:34-04:00'
describe
'148401' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALPE' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
bfc8b96b18ccd818fcbb53d689e58437
7f5320a38463ad9fe5c138623a75ad58f6fcca03
'2011-09-28T11:08:21-04:00'
describe
'38827' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALPF' 'sip-files00024.pro'
228f04ea9a3c51665dd5360cc8328230
a9aa566a16540a7ec10e9254632c19f0ec52cd54
describe
'60522' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALPG' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
af3f6095eb7827f2f64cad0944376e43
2bd15098ac5bf933c96132d56389b1750a252d00
'2011-09-28T11:12:10-04:00'
describe
'4379528' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALPH' 'sip-files00024.tif'
2a99c0e6f6169e6ad8f7d997c5ac6aef
245977329eddf4562b7b9ab628120c45ecb9d734
describe
'1526' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALPI' 'sip-files00024.txt'
903912fbfda437ff870adee793ccc52e
a9094d3394e6dc912a691910c92d77d4edeef9cd
'2011-09-28T11:11:45-04:00'
describe
'31099' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALPJ' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
3e05904d9659a5bdd3ebb6cdaae688de
ba994e656a6fc2b8f777875f553362eac60220b7
describe
'544658' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALPK' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
919cabee80a2bee242245ebd9a5f7071
b47f505ed4efef6eba6b0c4f6bdead4ef345f9d9
'2011-09-28T11:11:10-04:00'
describe
'159812' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALPL' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
ec2d09c0d2ac736a5df63549be3d1596
e46ee84b19ddc3efac724cd8b6f1d79cac1fd5e2
'2011-09-28T11:08:14-04:00'
describe
'43321' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALPM' 'sip-files00025.pro'
5ba19f11a2e3ef2e8a5d3490152057aa
e3813d5854199791a9750303cdfca1964e04a819
'2011-09-28T11:06:27-04:00'
describe
'64737' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALPN' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
49398be07b38d3c738052a35181d2e24
81857d7ada0d06ef2ff787f8ecc5657b31eede79
'2011-09-28T11:12:31-04:00'
describe
'4379788' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALPO' 'sip-files00025.tif'
bfefcbedeff2cae45c6e1bc59b3952a8
5c277eb6ff4b2c191cedb31bab995f46ab715585
'2011-09-28T11:09:27-04:00'
describe
'1694' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALPP' 'sip-files00025.txt'
6965a7329e5298ff50f80b4f1f2848a0
d074d6d24579cc2040c52f5d2b7bf991e1bd8ac9
'2011-09-28T11:05:40-04:00'
describe
'31804' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALPQ' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
ca4c4d73a787b4a5ce9829246670efa2
146160a39ef59811961bb4000d12799bb9d9f2cb
'2011-09-28T11:11:34-04:00'
describe
'544670' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALPR' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
ba60b55aa3e999b6e4fa6275be711428
eca2384003e94bdd31982fb5573af23bacbb8604
describe
'158624' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALPS' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
9e810ba7b39aa2670976a172cec750c4
407ff019424c6d92dcb392e2a8564d137f47f535
describe
'41741' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALPT' 'sip-files00026.pro'
edc38c05ee6646b7f1f5b2385dd60b96
21965a40137d0ae1718544b7d43bdc45ac235811
'2011-09-28T11:11:29-04:00'
describe
'63236' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALPU' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
5d5a7303e0e39b75d2ecea5d26dd0630
c124f460f408822f6a143a543b77f77fc5278e16
'2011-09-28T11:10:10-04:00'
describe
'4379688' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALPV' 'sip-files00026.tif'
f08701ddbd39f054d4922033b4b2c64b
4ad42c37bca7d56262790653e7713cabea233496
'2011-09-28T11:09:55-04:00'
describe
'1630' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALPW' 'sip-files00026.txt'
83aa2d29f0e7bdda9356cd81d0ace7b8
0357537c791b5f193498139c3874933abc8c81b5
'2011-09-28T11:07:28-04:00'
describe
'31028' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALPX' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
09949e2338a4ca1db4c65483c1357974
1c26a945cd8852110a84bdf04d4fd53299ec8845
describe
'544434' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALPY' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
d62adfb5718643f2972252edd71c235b
ca0eaf70a7cb0764c227dd6aff07b9defb067091
describe
'156064' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALPZ' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
882b88ccdbec3683514ed421caed4d31
1cc699ef873af05814e74e904b990b0d68ef7025
describe
'1311' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALQA' 'sip-files00027.pro'
709523105b412c23cdc3f71ecbb4273b
87309bd32eafc071c8e4050c614126b41425bf23
'2011-09-28T11:05:12-04:00'
describe
'55221' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALQB' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
0902cce367531a2233a45e252c8061b8
d46851658f53fc91fcde4491b69f9c537d213479
'2011-09-28T11:09:16-04:00'
describe
'4379448' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALQC' 'sip-files00027.tif'
bc46f4667ab50d65e582edbc222426c6
c4da85afa478beb90e5d8de158b9abde170ea5c6
'2011-09-28T11:07:46-04:00'
describe
'195' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALQD' 'sip-files00027.txt'
bb642d2d15a34e61fcbb7f9be1ad89f9
1060c25740e633882595de6b46adb39a311e8db4
'2011-09-28T11:08:43-04:00'
describe
'30470' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALQE' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
dbb438e2a6bef44cecb9378bbb66faee
af52a55df732682f0833fbeccce1b290e7d520d9
'2011-09-28T11:10:41-04:00'
describe
'544630' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALQF' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
a424a6110aa7ad208e373c9a362fc646
5ad120b7eedb18e603f43776835875fc17fb03c7
'2011-09-28T11:11:06-04:00'
describe
'34164' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALQG' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
07dd67add3c5d8b92142bf685d96ba37
e0a66456fe54174da637726c9e23ddefbdcbff55
describe
'20312' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALQH' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
04174955ee775067c1963adf8de12c8f
ec718eda041c0e603d67ab3b7fa1cca2457f46fc
'2011-09-28T11:12:35-04:00'
describe
'4374868' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALQI' 'sip-files00028.tif'
abef463958b3483a0374a0f1be14e584
89e07e606e83e2e80f9cee084273058c9a130bab
'2011-09-28T11:05:18-04:00'
describe
'18550' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALQJ' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
554edc7fc09df49908fb53183d28ce5f
09583b00604a71f2ddd02ead80b9fa811c4f7473
'2011-09-28T11:12:29-04:00'
describe
'544675' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALQK' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
eebb82da6a73acbb36514b344878bfa2
355d6eafeaafa2a6cdaaf36d51ee410776fada4f
'2011-09-28T11:06:44-04:00'
describe
'156617' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALQL' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
6f908d4ef59e8b93e59bf2bb63b72f63
74ea9c3ffbf4d7ecea55b55e2e72b002eb7767e1
'2011-09-28T11:07:26-04:00'
describe
'40910' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALQM' 'sip-files00029.pro'
0cedf1c414e1c1d024475c0f67afea85
b5df25f109e103ada2d2267592fe1f5ae0fa9869
'2011-09-28T11:09:46-04:00'
describe
'64452' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALQN' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
fd361c7e87d154d3c56bdefd9c0ac6ea
07d5ac7e2b8aa7dae5116e32550752431d6f8164
'2011-09-28T11:07:33-04:00'
describe
'4379884' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALQO' 'sip-files00029.tif'
65e1281d5c8f063a13c59b3a4a494b6c
8c0e87f1ce1155f252204fe3356d095f31fba921
'2011-09-28T11:08:07-04:00'
describe
'1607' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALQP' 'sip-files00029.txt'
73fd108218f3475c409a97e4dc4bb909
90ad522ec25f6c08642627e0796a36e22532777f
'2011-09-28T11:07:10-04:00'
describe
'31437' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALQQ' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
da9278a803f0f8bb83982359c556626d
417bc310811246d07a0948293e232a29d42f28af
'2011-09-28T11:09:02-04:00'
describe
'544649' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALQR' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
f745a163b0a298a14c76585c4807c686
0f159f4b88f12c57564f09a9a09c7c98f383bac2
'2011-09-28T11:11:44-04:00'
describe
'147063' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALQS' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
3dac4730e9ce9f57a945c266097435ed
bcf0c01d80f5cbd6577cceff0514b26396cee3e5
'2011-09-28T11:08:11-04:00'
describe
'38782' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALQT' 'sip-files00030.pro'
f4de68030d7b670a5ec11c4e660b1849
5ac833aaf9aa0e1e7f466783a6ec9c01c394e669
'2011-09-28T11:11:58-04:00'
describe
'60662' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALQU' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
2a36e9c9db7a8122f0c76ae47f8b5776
465c1e40a587cec713693840eaf2044fe7075d8e
'2011-09-28T11:08:25-04:00'
describe
'4379504' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALQV' 'sip-files00030.tif'
7c95a1a4c598d1a71202cc83ddff770b
1996767a613aa4e8e24d118565c58febe7bab7ad
'2011-09-28T11:05:47-04:00'
describe
'1534' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALQW' 'sip-files00030.txt'
6e1b3d0e5ad655decbd49411aa9ca5fb
e303867c6f4c9243fb5e1638e3360585fc755984
describe
'30672' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALQX' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
68f16053df824a41ba55a55b86863a3a
5ab86f7c3070cc52e5f2712cae6628b23cc81b2b
'2011-09-28T11:09:54-04:00'
describe
'544622' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALQY' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
cfbe5a0555d6b2fbe69f3354d7ac4a1b
e91d1b3b8886cd40fae9ba20d00ef5272114c741
'2011-09-28T11:11:28-04:00'
describe
'154296' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALQZ' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
2ec93b077da968df204c186981217b70
021c4e60b4c569e7e60eafcf4814e901fd55acae
describe
'40935' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALRA' 'sip-files00031.pro'
4c6030c0ed899234ea9dc60c0e1513ca
3d4aa27af3397f6582790e0e3f1bb06a59df0e67
'2011-09-28T11:08:36-04:00'
describe
'61050' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALRB' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
a0c0c76e464bda60e788279115402ff1
3b76f9f53df5354c86465e633eb791e0ce64a5d5
describe
'4379408' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALRC' 'sip-files00031.tif'
02c6883c3f501aecaf33d671d1055d2b
bcf8e231b3554b7011ff0f59e589e6039a4c0d7a
'2011-09-28T11:08:51-04:00'
describe
'1612' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALRD' 'sip-files00031.txt'
5e4ef3c3372c3d60cbf17c2571add78c
2b3e5b4382906efdb06f12b5914faa9831f6dc8c
'2011-09-28T11:08:31-04:00'
describe
'30750' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALRE' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
19bf4428be7355a0fd1e7856914a96ea
4af3e8d8f3f92458fd3794411d515d6938489b50
'2011-09-28T11:09:05-04:00'
describe
'544687' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALRF' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
9710209e16cfe3ac5be06facdf142f7b
5ff16f7f28c7c5ddae3e1f9b1ad605983ce42384
'2011-09-28T11:09:06-04:00'
describe
'160039' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALRG' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
31cb917e5015c3add851dd4e05e7fb3e
8b443dd40b53c080288738e629efccada7327e59
'2011-09-28T11:09:11-04:00'
describe
'41969' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALRH' 'sip-files00032.pro'
af6f1b8a2d47bed98e700583f7691b93
1bfeb3c0c60574aff1727fd5a2b27cbd21a7bde1
'2011-09-28T11:07:45-04:00'
describe
'64149' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALRI' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
08be09c876427355ee327a5eed04f438
a98e9e7f12b9ddc0e4e0e30466cc1a64d6012358
'2011-09-28T11:09:22-04:00'
describe
'4379752' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALRJ' 'sip-files00032.tif'
8a2ffbe55387c8377c659fc1c3c82c6c
eef9833e53bcbb7dd42f59b26530695c10103b62
'2011-09-28T11:05:19-04:00'
describe
'1638' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALRK' 'sip-files00032.txt'
02c6bef3908ddac5a74042bc8c0e682c
36f4c136671948b2916ab424760b6e2da5fb8f43
'2011-09-28T11:09:20-04:00'
describe
'31412' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALRL' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
00af5cdab67997ac6e2836f8ffa3b64b
962a20e4f5f3355c8e1d57b0e82feb24e6343855
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALRM' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
ea10617d42b2d7dd31c7cf2562a6d5ae
b444f8bf98eaf46ea03b5fe02841f0769915e2ba
'2011-09-28T11:10:09-04:00'
describe
'152967' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALRN' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
a9fcb9c983b0bd47511d59f922004729
161b6440f69a070058ae1221b7f50d4325e908cd
'2011-09-28T11:11:23-04:00'
describe
'39302' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALRO' 'sip-files00033.pro'
f9acb82af93495db23acf06f6fb0a139
ecbaa51f2ed7482138f5b75855cd0ebbff029dd7
'2011-09-28T11:05:42-04:00'
describe
'62623' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALRP' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
bd60526d61794ff0ed3976b42bd20e14
c35d50555ab924bbd0d86099578f85339e8dfa66
describe
'4379748' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALRQ' 'sip-files00033.tif'
232422daabfa1e763df2285ca139c974
2824e986d02212f2955f6b4291564a76715c9833
'2011-09-28T11:07:14-04:00'
describe
'1548' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALRR' 'sip-files00033.txt'
63481b6ed5d0f5c9241b7a7cc9da7ad7
492bfd83748a328da7fd4f79ec9274676590bde4
'2011-09-28T11:07:48-04:00'
describe
'2303635' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALRS' 'sip-files00033a.jp2'
5cd0bf0d01ab229c84c6e9f1f456b0b4
9f4d4026520f29e416a14c5e474e6c51d945b594
describe
'136647' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALRT' 'sip-files00033a.jpg'
2c79e1fcb8c9e64fe386d55fa7cbdb85
373ed0d93e3759a9d50b64027714e9fa5e7cd319
describe
'42153' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALRU' 'sip-files00033a.pro'
78773ab719ccae6a5e2c150b4097e4e1
e751a22c5a2743d340e8878b98e2c172fb43d579
'2011-09-28T11:06:43-04:00'
describe
'58041' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALRV' 'sip-files00033a.QC.jpg'
16b791284a826e05b7ccd07f3504375b
180a711931d46ed6e116f92ec75f3f9ad35c82e9
'2011-09-28T11:09:42-04:00'
describe
'18451164' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALRW' 'sip-files00033a.tif'
20006c53fc8f33c288166db28c76753b
3e58b37e7e745371abda52901b34d165015a1d16
'2011-09-28T11:08:16-04:00'
describe
'1652' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALRX' 'sip-files00033a.txt'
8f3b6b0a714059dfa9df6c36d233712d
48edfb484c07ef0f7d21fe218747fae8c80acd8c
describe
'30015' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALRY' 'sip-files00033athm.jpg'
7c0ebf25d4b3a3588893a2f5480be549
6e0ab9fc8084cbae6373853e7a0379750e22ea69
'2011-09-28T11:08:37-04:00'
describe
'2288583' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALRZ' 'sip-files00033b.jp2'
180795cd8273bc6918e106bb67dfb6f2
ffc0b71e83303662da3c3bc9113665d70812e7e2
'2011-09-28T11:07:51-04:00'
describe
'133015' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALSA' 'sip-files00033b.jpg'
e8350c85df8cbb2bbf5aa7a82df0811b
0fda010ad670d5bd9b0ab7a2f209f52746b75460
'2011-09-28T11:09:09-04:00'
describe
'40498' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALSB' 'sip-files00033b.pro'
c3333119c074134fbad92d4876c8492d
62aafc72abf19809fa65e13dbaca2d5b30808706
'2011-09-28T11:12:09-04:00'
describe
'56736' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALSC' 'sip-files00033b.QC.jpg'
dec4d5cbfb95d7c6c84f99e25c0874f3
9d4d60f606b005639a7c0d8f32dd69971adbcee7
'2011-09-28T11:12:16-04:00'
describe
'18330688' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALSD' 'sip-files00033b.tif'
0c8b0491be46944dc784842065368f05
1657e00525718ff6521140f40b910fae7eb120da
'2011-09-28T11:09:21-04:00'
describe
'1600' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALSE' 'sip-files00033b.txt'
03b16e59841c38d9069a1443281d457e
725ec0ae4d069347c3ae79093b64e91ec0b501bf
'2011-09-28T11:06:28-04:00'
describe
'29882' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALSF' 'sip-files00033bthm.jpg'
7fde1b9cbf6abcbfe6e4c0713e3132f9
7cc885dba4ea10ba6812d13dad5d360e2bdf87af
'2011-09-28T11:05:02-04:00'
describe
'31439' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALSG' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
671ea5ed45c7fba9625a54caff76e9b4
873bd700064a7aa7ccec1c9d491d3427a1eea8f1
'2011-09-28T11:10:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALSH' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
2c45bb83426ed0a85f605316c0461ee0
66aee98b017b7d42e55d4b35970a800d330da805
'2011-09-28T11:06:24-04:00'
describe
'149868' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALSI' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
2125d86a566b2d7cdf380fc42077ed4b
bd1c49e22b8195bfa2f73244157554f501fdd8e3
'2011-09-28T11:08:52-04:00'
describe
'38276' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALSJ' 'sip-files00034.pro'
c6cf4fe62626f83c53f682fd9692f6cf
f850b659d6236cb3799ba350c34649160c3cca1b
describe
'61461' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALSK' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
9bfd088404f4b1053d10b4db70f76246
2d42de3d0e2b788a741afba69cef58aae1593d88
'2011-09-28T11:11:15-04:00'
describe
'4379484' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALSL' 'sip-files00034.tif'
c33c4cc83110011ebb9c7862a9031e64
6f75f9e305064dc5ae113dc554b00a4711069f18
'2011-09-28T11:07:43-04:00'
describe
'1513' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALSM' 'sip-files00034.txt'
81b02c39f79e34d2e98ca527d77ab669
53c11d6b4833cf9165637d8f74ffc3cd52b3b421
'2011-09-28T11:11:59-04:00'
describe
'30896' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALSN' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
452f10b577f0fee3606cce20680e94ee
1c7c9efd8e68176865c6a5d475451e7160b4b1f9
'2011-09-28T11:09:24-04:00'
describe
'544354' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALSO' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
e798a54b4214619bb98ea7ec28f4e810
3289f34dc56ba59804016c03c13d5990f22a1b7e
'2011-09-28T11:09:59-04:00'
describe
'191548' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALSP' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
b0581bf212c6e0d8b2ebcc04ea84db8b
bf1057310f8c9e386d074631a95d44fd2fd1f7b9
'2011-09-28T11:06:23-04:00'
describe
'2622' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALSQ' 'sip-files00035.pro'
0e279335acd89d35bb6933f987eac6ca
53754be5c38855d26a33e0cb911fb4b2aa0836f3
describe
'62391' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALSR' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
912666f1d68b0d4a4cd032ec9c4c3f52
de5836e22061d42d6da86a2db7570ee433901a32
'2011-09-28T11:06:45-04:00'
describe
'4377784' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALSS' 'sip-files00035.tif'
3ff35e4b72526fa1f78e438cd73729ba
c0f6c185d4d01bc79973bd10ddcc18ebcb4425ac
describe
'120' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALST' 'sip-files00035.txt'
a9e06ac1828ebe43f839f6c68234727d
c56395f8b60af9ecc466ab2071a475595ce37fac
'2011-09-28T11:10:29-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'32034' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALSU' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
67ff2ec072dea5affab1f3a546446d6c
504192c2f2c069d04cd9fb5f901d9df9b0e1d40c
describe
'544579' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALSV' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
8a47f457718d2fd481ff228499e80deb
cba1a19ab08ef20473a2c06e33090c139e08f863
describe
'47246' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALSW' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
b008ebeac26862cc99b222d4fd161287
74c15deb4cbf24e395c36669b1d0619baa0d2da7
'2011-09-28T11:05:54-04:00'
describe
'22160' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALSX' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
a94efcb8dec1f6e06643ee67ef4bbc2c
059903a44a0a38a97cc0afcea359077858bfe3cf
'2011-09-28T11:10:33-04:00'
describe
'4374804' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALSY' 'sip-files00036.tif'
3b77af6a2f437368c377cec31a44d11a
7138d0ecc93ee421e6a676d4293d199c4725795f
'2011-09-28T11:11:22-04:00'
describe
'18837' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALSZ' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
01c008c2f87685efd52f1f23bc474940
92533cfbcf75738792930a9be9c117b595b63f9b
'2011-09-28T11:08:12-04:00'
describe
'544309' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALTA' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
e1b2d2cd740074f5dc8b09869ab4b91d
b66f23b3a8fc49a8617fc920527dc7ec0f6879e7
describe
'147436' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALTB' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
86327ca0edcae77780ff1c9a3ac5a467
a86b217c5cd351aab81a76c40fcb29e84d212bee
describe
'37929' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALTC' 'sip-files00037.pro'
82c80882f87b007c51df9ef70e9d2ca8
821930009f2a30ffdbca635af5bd7e750215597a
'2011-09-28T11:11:53-04:00'
describe
'60577' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALTD' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
b7349abce2fe342e2a424c8548f68e91
77decdd70fd430f9692176eac12c938f27c50442
'2011-09-28T11:06:09-04:00'
describe
'4377116' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALTE' 'sip-files00037.tif'
ce3beed2cf71dbe04c1b6e4942e5f234
b1a94ebfb07d18f7df0141af2128da759d7e3c52
'2011-09-28T11:10:44-04:00'
describe
'1540' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALTF' 'sip-files00037.txt'
dc7186b6cd93c867ad3fc7d3705fac75
50fe46939106d2ce400d2743f02d8a26b60fd80f
'2011-09-28T11:10:49-04:00'
describe
'30819' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALTG' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
0ede4fa4043ae792cf80d9b96631e26e
652fd054390d9de24457e37a2e71bcd1c6f392ea
describe
'544668' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALTH' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
e96927b327f6589245075e4c481b8ca7
8a5ebc5d97745382058a35edbaf6ae7b84ef87b1
'2011-09-28T11:05:32-04:00'
describe
'155522' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALTI' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
6291be189e0909948e4050cfad3268d7
c21b10d740dcf4c97ea8509a0324cc3fb262ca96
'2011-09-28T11:08:46-04:00'
describe
'40148' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALTJ' 'sip-files00038.pro'
f882e9e3cd92274f72fc526ebdf19b1a
2d62781461677bcabfcbe0a0b656130420e43ac1
'2011-09-28T11:11:00-04:00'
describe
'63190' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALTK' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
ff7bc479675af6bd376cd79eef4b9111
14765a214edc8f04c1386943fe88c4a3f2b74b52
describe
'4379784' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALTL' 'sip-files00038.tif'
9ad40639a78b130e9e4790e056dcda32
d58bd597a4e47785c5ad63766288f1b56c190858
describe
'1581' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALTM' 'sip-files00038.txt'
edad6ba0230b296265236f10014c9856
b9816f014c17749f0eea915c7a09fcfab90039da
'2011-09-28T11:08:54-04:00'
describe
'31605' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALTN' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
10805ef5fa1e58f34ea412d59bfe6614
59d7f9e54d6d660c30c58b87be091d2752e4e8b7
'2011-09-28T11:05:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALTO' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
5496ff213cafe0fa5f6769cd4c90e81a
6764e611bb07d29e5403e8702e426d8a2daf17bc
'2011-09-28T11:08:28-04:00'
describe
'157826' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALTP' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
a4e3e9072c5242c074b68a22b13c7806
3b476fc41da6ba27e10e3c55fc484e86c4d3f3b4
describe
'40690' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALTQ' 'sip-files00039.pro'
2de41c0bd680a918dd47b5ddb8137a2f
96fe82723e1fb102cff02e8739e76577bf86235b
describe
'63726' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALTR' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
bb696c3da7495fe5724db31d68e0169d
39e2250521f381537ca12a68b99f03bd38c06115
'2011-09-28T11:07:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALTS' 'sip-files00039.tif'
c5b9aaefbb1e00259ea90b849f79248f
cd34bd4899a4614e57ac06679886a9a4ae06b220
'2011-09-28T11:09:17-04:00'
describe
'1603' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALTT' 'sip-files00039.txt'
d243eaf6baf7d55f39196975f9c309f0
98185bd5b02853e9f3c6746d28aadd0130263aa3
describe
'31409' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALTU' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
2aeb5773d80928f79fc31696c78e5d4e
a76b19b273732d91ff7db25fc50b7e038d2b58cb
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALTV' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
5398a9c060aa938f6051dc1352a5d87e
682ca4a268a4a728527cf08dd425c43b0d81bbe4
'2011-09-28T11:05:36-04:00'
describe
'157500' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALTW' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
e156f91ef4c942a5fd363522d05375bd
7a5442df48cc2b3cc9186793ae0bd3f28d9b2cfd
'2011-09-28T11:09:08-04:00'
describe
'39811' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALTX' 'sip-files00040.pro'
aed98e23ffa0a994708711d7ac037c07
c3b7b63bd5b3762618c315592eab1797e3d23cf4
'2011-09-28T11:11:17-04:00'
describe
'62977' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALTY' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
e82b0521f42d90422e8be3b29f2a8139
93a1c38846c6a0d25bac7d2579ed48c94b5b4309
describe
'4379732' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALTZ' 'sip-files00040.tif'
252444d8efad0830e46506e73fac57a8
f62781c2eca8acab1ea629098a3560421a11f020
describe
'1569' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALUA' 'sip-files00040.txt'
75454fd30b7f7b6192f88929f7c15f72
370cb7cf578c8d6c00b5cda5c33de35a5478d339
'2011-09-28T11:08:44-04:00'
describe
'31348' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALUB' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
7c31ab754ac788968ce39a172d25da8c
822ab0c049d08e78f4dbaf4ac60938350b9c23c8
describe
'544656' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALUC' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
d13c85bb664d3ce2e3b35d5164a26ea5
8c538d3220df8e77f109ec2dcc086a197f707f74
'2011-09-28T11:07:00-04:00'
describe
'153822' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALUD' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
7cf382593472c2d9f05c69232dc353e3
a9b80590b4f1c78be9591600abe99f1ec049f017
describe
'38920' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALUE' 'sip-files00041.pro'
34af8fc562010f9b8523788089935fa4
4b16116f66fce59bc145cc0b459c6509292d1359
'2011-09-28T11:08:18-04:00'
describe
'62111' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALUF' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
d59988d9481a9c5cbd35df394314a7ef
c3d540226585a5ce1a562d907f57bc504b62c838
describe
'4379716' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALUG' 'sip-files00041.tif'
87bd2df529d4d12e158d17b62fef3afd
46a123a46d69c7c3bfecc4a8661ffa2148b6682f
'2011-09-28T11:06:12-04:00'
describe
'1560' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALUH' 'sip-files00041.txt'
56016181b678c149d122b451d36b64bb
81138575d447333a7fdb3b9fe1ed356067f7b545
describe
'31237' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALUI' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
7266fe58e093b31e605cac224d209bdd
c31cdfe14b6d26c49e27c77eeb252c569c32df84
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALUJ' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
66ecd8a97e0b0f5e08c5176f8d25e3b3
1ad4f19494be75e0c705afeb4f814fab007da38d
'2011-09-28T11:05:44-04:00'
describe
'150654' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALUK' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
b4ae0e5c136e0e6af5d6ddcbac169888
8dbb92507236e1ad231a1b4ebedbbaf70e24178f
'2011-09-28T11:05:14-04:00'
describe
'38510' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALUL' 'sip-files00042.pro'
3453c37ae615244c1ae922565708c067
e33c8a0f8ba11b29540fa3349a42bf2509240ed7
'2011-09-28T11:06:07-04:00'
describe
'61531' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALUM' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
24a0b599cb225f18060220db1cf44512
258cee7740870db2fc7970ebf1fd80a21714e5ad
'2011-09-28T11:05:27-04:00'
describe
'4379632' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALUN' 'sip-files00042.tif'
6ef751a63e06e240765f780edb7dd35a
7c991fc442db822ca0922bd7a00a9bc0a0d6eeb3
describe
'1516' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALUO' 'sip-files00042.txt'
0c19b9a607dabcf699cb18aa261112e5
61d935c13bff437df1fead3ae9e6f0eccbebda1e
describe
'31223' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALUP' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
bc21da10f23ae315c73f4274ee74715f
7f07caca8620b778ac94b2286a5c1eb1eb973b2f
'2011-09-28T11:05:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALUQ' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
1c2297e5d80b6226434655efada66d69
fdecfcfffeabf6250b27032b2d34056b34db7e0d
'2011-09-28T11:07:06-04:00'
describe
'157610' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALUR' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
98924ad21e80e7732fd8160c74f253c6
897d8c72f29d4528178011c66e4f30024368e1cd
describe
'40125' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALUS' 'sip-files00043.pro'
cc492b3fc0b2816667b50fd3365da622
78b7862dfc5d3f7ca0503a02a07c65edef09f3d6
describe
'63866' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALUT' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
4e007ad8a7ea883288cd5d309bcb5eb2
700c36c5d4deabc0db93cef3ff22fd59bc2cd2e2
'2011-09-28T11:12:24-04:00'
describe
'4379868' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALUU' 'sip-files00043.tif'
8f63a2c38eadbf0a78041b1f597820af
32ea62398289da2f78177070144b7b13583f1171
describe
'1572' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALUV' 'sip-files00043.txt'
32614fdf32c5bdd496a26699e21c6905
1db4cba5d1e68567ba006a8099883b854b441a27
describe
'31371' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALUW' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
0708cabfb1f29116fbeabd14d84bd0ba
23a3121aada5c0cfc54c4f223e5c9f90e22fe183
'2011-09-28T11:07:17-04:00'
describe
'544682' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALUX' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
7b7a2e5bb3e922b8085088f46ed278fb
f102d07acb4ab069fdfeed7acd73e64290284e82
'2011-09-28T11:05:33-04:00'
describe
'152361' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALUY' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
41a1b9076411f9c51bc988a76a692b02
7f1c5804e8d7a1e225ab74753fb8ad48d59cd0bc
'2011-09-28T11:09:36-04:00'
describe
'38825' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALUZ' 'sip-files00044.pro'
de03e1881afe7a599e5c15d4edb62f05
6db450dfe6ed3ad7b3ec47dfe04f8f65491a723d
'2011-09-28T11:11:25-04:00'
describe
'61853' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALVA' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
0c46d1879a885d9356d333a26a7b4cb9
1ed9647b1679ce8bac91317bb7b99bccf19ad244
'2011-09-28T11:05:25-04:00'
describe
'4379396' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALVB' 'sip-files00044.tif'
9c29c69ce516b8ddd41c7d9f613f2888
ce2c2c8bc1fa117a30cd6fa12cb12fa7de70f8cf
describe
'1524' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALVC' 'sip-files00044.txt'
e5dd313efad139840898ac8f8ffc3368
6a9deeb0deff57a1f2d93963088b604cfd76ebab
describe
'30786' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALVD' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
adaa144410e362ccf20dd801fe278b73
cff8e4baec4c15ef1ccc65b0c27199a7a4dda8b0
'2011-09-28T11:11:07-04:00'
describe
'544671' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALVE' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
961ec9d9336faf1bbd85c6997480a3ec
0b39afe931fc35d49f927c5bfe7d0d8b1f79de55
'2011-09-28T11:07:01-04:00'
describe
'126290' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALVF' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
5c676beeb50f7bc9dadabfbc6142a104
5c4ecb37bf20f275e6c39833b79f5a46d6661589
'2011-09-28T11:07:54-04:00'
describe
'30889' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALVG' 'sip-files00045.pro'
e82a35692bd116570876410b7a701a98
7001c00ee70ad322a05ba9ac7e554a4fc195f7cf
'2011-09-28T11:11:57-04:00'
describe
'54530' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALVH' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
2a2b9549cb8529a4eae9c377bc22ec4a
7e2cab856ed8c696a06e798d95c883c0f30c7c1f
'2011-09-28T11:12:19-04:00'
describe
'4379104' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALVI' 'sip-files00045.tif'
15e069223a8063b4310d3d2704a524d2
2c34ca90a538ce379ca24f1bb6301e477b7a8e6d
describe
'1251' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALVJ' 'sip-files00045.txt'
30bf4f73904173e4b37f99309b9f0612
5317a879eca98080fc9f07255901e85a6184ab06
describe
'29567' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALVK' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
e46a7c588d0c8ec824b30c136b60b996
6a15bdbadf26e5249c94c79c7d2838e0c2c0eaee
'2011-09-28T11:05:57-04:00'
describe
'544672' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALVL' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
af99f2af8421ed71c7ddd8ba1efe5e10
83686403393ba61d593b5bc518b3f2699f137228
'2011-09-28T11:09:34-04:00'
describe
'141235' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALVM' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
ff0ea9a9a67924b889416e26c0ba231d
2b133d9816d6b61c29e2e7165c7252faaad03888
'2011-09-28T11:06:06-04:00'
describe
'36251' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALVN' 'sip-files00046.pro'
aade2008d819f3c8017481ff7b75fb12
37e64b35c0669120c8c59f303b795ecb7c36113a
'2011-09-28T11:06:49-04:00'
describe
'58899' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALVO' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
14d643a172270eab49c95e9d17c60d12
a350a2e7e6826f37c8cfd2018fb76b971f1e47f7
'2011-09-28T11:11:37-04:00'
describe
'4379524' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALVP' 'sip-files00046.tif'
41594d3f9d2a63367d7ec785d60ea64f
4c01d9f51db628e0840d6ae16ab1b4c3049d784e
describe
'1448' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALVQ' 'sip-files00046.txt'
25190bde651dd733874d82b7eb2d6e79
6859b83ac71e40f351785103ef1285bca7462cfc
'2011-09-28T11:08:27-04:00'
describe
'30766' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALVR' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
c9439cfa1c7ea50e9893048db6889e2e
ca3e29a015c61eaad4c70d6a4148d374ad9eec0d
describe
'544514' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALVS' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
6a1540a1317334a79646d0863466d0df
43d845ef5ced69c5d4a3aedbd5a8004c969269ac
'2011-09-28T11:07:42-04:00'
describe
'146028' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALVT' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
82efcd198dd8c48066e87c688ab1aed9
d08ae02e4fe3d3859a1da1295fb29133a7e0f389
describe
'38480' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALVU' 'sip-files00047.pro'
ad2f977bd68418b2e2e03676c06300c0
60d83652052d95f7071db4d552feafd35fc39608
describe
'60553' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALVV' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
35891eb9a289d0399879d5c4c84b3eef
b98534595e2b922f177de6defaaf2c54e602f7ed
describe
'4379388' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALVW' 'sip-files00047.tif'
9082b9be2f1c3216148166b37648f901
2abb3858e9bbffea959bff36a4fb5a69f882c2f1
'2011-09-28T11:06:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALVX' 'sip-files00047.txt'
54dc0e4e661df22cadfcca8072aa4aa7
97e21d4d96c27d839c48fc8d585b87e3d81e7f2f
'2011-09-28T11:11:56-04:00'
describe
'30651' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALVY' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
627050b3efe43ab0fb0ac23677c296c9
a992ef845426626ad2046df01d9fda8f120081c4
'2011-09-28T11:11:33-04:00'
describe
'544679' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALVZ' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
50f5f9189a22c049a59c4e355ad5b8a3
9877420d9870cdb2ce17b735a23322d4e64894ef
'2011-09-28T11:05:16-04:00'
describe
'154788' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALWA' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
33f85b382916317653f7b5e3de4c2d73
ad632de993dfe510b9054b551c7e5531f95c83f7
describe
'39278' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALWB' 'sip-files00048.pro'
81479e926bd0e3eadf96bacb85e18ca7
38c34471d2ad5d02c2cf6fc01a735898d832a892
'2011-09-28T11:08:49-04:00'
describe
'62820' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALWC' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
f5f958c81bc93aec8ea8d8c91111fa05
277f3a489292b2c2961bdc36aa19ed1d850388ea
'2011-09-28T11:12:32-04:00'
describe
'4379808' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALWD' 'sip-files00048.tif'
25982cd9c063c6996ff5d61569a22464
e90594d0f71431c4fc25ed3b590fde482dc2fcf9
'2011-09-28T11:11:09-04:00'
describe
'1550' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALWE' 'sip-files00048.txt'
483cf69188237f646ccec4fca5e2d5bf
42edb586a58c21be133042e2f2f3bfaa1503d359
'2011-09-28T11:11:38-04:00'
describe
'31459' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALWF' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
a56adfaefd359b4c07fafc0464be4cd7
f45bb4e6657537ba58ba8b22a089214ba119f481
describe
'544681' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALWG' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
05e46edf31b60bd9493b427468361426
6f94d4f9ff8307d8a3e52ec1461cb8019dda6ec8
'2011-09-28T11:10:05-04:00'
describe
'238784' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALWH' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
f1ededf9fc2fac9dc50034275fd6d8af
b1fe254ad4165d6ad7508f7811106d94ac50ad32
'2011-09-28T11:12:15-04:00'
describe
'1361' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALWI' 'sip-files00049.pro'
0140df797733fe6532b588664c204737
99f92d7b92ba7068c06319d525e9f048c40d464f
'2011-09-28T11:12:28-04:00'
describe
'75321' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALWJ' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
039d590a7879ce8ee5f523f69d788219
a1d157c10bc69f851d599fafa0d6da0ff7867f76
'2011-09-28T11:11:19-04:00'
describe
'4381852' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALWK' 'sip-files00049.tif'
cb49ab72ae9c3aa0b01a17a3473fa978
0aca9762b43560d5e4d251f68b3e64a2c83e31df
'2011-09-28T11:12:20-04:00'
describe
'189' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALWL' 'sip-files00049.txt'
4117feebae9c4e67fd184cd5749cef59
8dd671491fc8b046262fc9b93897ff1c96b59cda
describe
'35744' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALWM' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
3fbb6093f5f6780b0306992729942e6d
573dcbfe0d80dca5b4c015f250af2ecb0ac864a1
'2011-09-28T11:06:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALWN' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
7955f6b3617adc7e35b3cfbb49c86b42
bc9d147fd5207fb8b18e9c5aeaa15a67f9126f7f
describe
'39788' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALWO' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
cdd50f5b1123b91dd01f8b85e0ff19bf
103a6555d278f2a10279891f0b51b347b43dae21
describe
'21114' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALWP' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
ed237d62c68fa6a64f7594a437259576
dd99ca790e0ecd891f5a94a4fdd533c65d0b6c5a
describe
'4374764' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALWQ' 'sip-files00050.tif'
4aad53e961b833893d2e5df51ea47dfe
28c089391c664483bfc7376773ec4e3318c4d7a5
'2011-09-28T11:07:47-04:00'
describe
'18604' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALWR' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
ac4fe32ba7a099168a509775b8447d8c
b0857aee57327847b1bb5bc8d1ab014713680bed
'2011-09-28T11:05:11-04:00'
describe
'544390' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALWS' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
628b722bcd97e915f497b216f196c2da
d73cd39eb03611df8a91cad5f4b0efe36a7209db
'2011-09-28T11:06:47-04:00'
describe
'143309' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALWT' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
544c5d775cf22a565e36f96423f56788
d1e2075106a17dc952da20eaf6ceece9f8b5a4c5
describe
'37105' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALWU' 'sip-files00051.pro'
a8ce01eabc1982589858db1d3a82775a
f0b5d459be51518b1f02c5d7e13d3abe1d8f9451
'2011-09-28T11:10:13-04:00'
describe
'59557' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALWV' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
0611a96d252cdaa928d74c37070d79a3
a9c5c92b58019177c07c10f9bc76b6c4253693a8
describe
'4379520' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALWW' 'sip-files00051.tif'
1774936845dd08d78e8c9915f8982053
548178017a76ce2e8d52a2a45144c5300bd715df
'2011-09-28T11:11:01-04:00'
describe
'1478' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALWX' 'sip-files00051.txt'
7ffa435a5e934a056f310aebbf151e35
5c4dee4c6946dbc4248f4678a6ad5ffc84d8d9df
describe
'30668' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALWY' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
9335a81cd327192d1d71e1d605c93810
34bf7a3f788ce23decd87a2ea1730c293b90689c
'2011-09-28T11:10:36-04:00'
describe
'544561' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALWZ' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
40bf1bcdf97923fbacba9c23c7e8a8b6
6573a5089d5f0835d929a25a2d5a54f28f538103
'2011-09-28T11:08:23-04:00'
describe
'138722' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALXA' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
2d28110bbb217fd07565d15e505947cb
0c190e2e0e9e764abefefa08e3d817f6bd3f062a
'2011-09-28T11:10:46-04:00'
describe
'35252' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALXB' 'sip-files00052.pro'
c1e41dcca9796d77a960d0d218a49743
d33d3494dfcb608686fe6dff65c52b243e3612c7
describe
'58027' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALXC' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
2584713ee4d122090a7c1af04bcb9469
756db3e665006a9bdec9d7fa7694c9414857a196
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALXD' 'sip-files00052.tif'
ec7ce02c55c8dc7085470864d58869a1
dbdeddb200f0371fc06d11d58f47e7603892d44e
describe
'1409' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALXE' 'sip-files00052.txt'
1fb781684295735bcf6723922685a78d
ddd6f270a1ee5493c85b57be0f1c9c1687d3b067
'2011-09-28T11:09:32-04:00'
describe
'30696' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALXF' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
3779a62bf001c8d8b0309f525c13b85c
53fd8b2cbd22ef8d4f4d6bac427ac393a6f02608
describe
'544611' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALXG' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
96c6023a2606aae8d69b7c0e6419b046
1e8b0a382ca6e7afaef7f9bc0ea738cd8ec6aaaa
'2011-09-28T11:09:57-04:00'
describe
'142522' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALXH' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
e6c54c3f8a777d132c699fac58fea282
b8638309b1396748ee4df06c951c8489d8ec9c71
'2011-09-28T11:05:48-04:00'
describe
'35816' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALXI' 'sip-files00053.pro'
e2d42b59173ec8b336339e1dd6cacd13
f1df4e84a933ea8e76dd856c819481a484332087
describe
'58600' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALXJ' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
20cb07a44a250cd857928d4dee0dc984
9f26376747c32b6c45c261683127f94249d175e8
'2011-09-28T11:10:07-04:00'
describe
'4379380' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALXK' 'sip-files00053.tif'
bf8252192ed7ecf90d4cbdca9168b053
fbb8221d818d680d7fcf8ec66b76a99acb571ad1
'2011-09-28T11:10:00-04:00'
describe
'1435' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALXL' 'sip-files00053.txt'
fe49ed526597680e27ceed5ae2f0e365
387bde96b4f79c82bbf129dc3fa0fb56e0b47117
'2011-09-28T11:08:08-04:00'
describe
'30478' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALXM' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
0e31ee96734a4e9ba7baff20324fbceb
70ef2764bc160294f24338f977659e955e401774
describe
'544666' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALXN' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
f7762c91ce2d6b7ff01a6efbd809f083
0d3093971863cdba81fa8c03a45f243aeb1014c5
'2011-09-28T11:07:13-04:00'
describe
'148940' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALXO' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
71d095b570f62c506f7db55a700a0d76
4a281d647ca560e3e8317dfe093f3f88ad73b67d
describe
'36798' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALXP' 'sip-files00054.pro'
2facfc084a57e247cb91689befad21f3
9068c6a5a90128727471827720e9d5257181e139
'2011-09-28T11:07:19-04:00'
describe
'61717' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALXQ' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
e5597041498ae8d99181aa9b100531ca
7387f4ac386f6a7fe2dde2d840c64f7db3984ab3
describe
'4379636' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALXR' 'sip-files00054.tif'
87fd48434c60b7665004e4566d233022
58214cf89d5a62cde2f877a84ab68f5aeb8f9fd0
describe
'1446' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALXS' 'sip-files00054.txt'
0614485cd78f45f1283ed068cfee56e4
0f499f51652ad00183e7991ac4f7e8e5649f0376
describe
'31005' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALXT' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
616cdc48b78b5287db7dc3cbd0e291cf
ed94db682128141c5a26818386dace7dc22fa56a
'2011-09-28T11:09:10-04:00'
describe
'544636' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALXU' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
700a57d278503808cd2620c22568cd15
428279bb49e8bde6767c81f398792b1de25b6fc7
describe
'233970' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALXV' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
82c4cf5c607554fb0066311a400c13bc
ffb8616dd9650c1bb0d36f86c3e25bc7b46963c3
describe
'2486' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALXW' 'sip-files00055.pro'
3b3d9c2a34e1d0dd7be4110fb077bb17
c58bb3c621f2c8fd2ab8670c195eb93bbed26d2c
describe
'74694' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALXX' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
e5588b7a67cfb47edef3b570431fdadd
f8ec67921ba6be82b37eab7bb989d2a731d06c6e
describe
'4381736' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALXY' 'sip-files00055.tif'
deb0a1dbfd48aefc510e3ac7bb110f05
e34e9b9d652a1057facd502e841918e01303e8cb
describe
'111' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALXZ' 'sip-files00055.txt'
6fc682aa83142c9e310c1515e9691a01
40aa81a3bc2b3cb65788195d15c0a80ecafb129a
'2011-09-28T11:11:35-04:00'
describe
'35568' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALYA' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
a51f175c10ec6523124d97e94209548d
b0fce2d2f06418a2ef78d8db364da2ae8d88ed1a
'2011-09-28T11:12:06-04:00'
describe
'544593' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALYB' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
5b8db17363620b2a30873e23b9c546b5
cd0faa9c4a283e848247c7b282e4d62716145751
'2011-09-28T11:10:37-04:00'
describe
'37744' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALYC' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
88e1ada0061478908545f67fe9171e58
535ff533ed0a3ff3cba729dfb38f48d12b5cc0df
describe
'20602' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALYD' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
a71c8d41f3a8182c8762f4535c300c68
e3b4e76701fd94a0433f3a5513ad4623ade9c552
describe
'4374720' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALYE' 'sip-files00056.tif'
0c28d6f9c069d38b47987a2bc86b6c21
551b2cfb431463d5ee552fa600a5e00f5cfb255c
describe
'18480' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALYF' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
562ba67b016fba71c2482dff77f1e328
8d0bd6db0feaa065a5f0e4a27d521537ab1f6e23
'2011-09-28T11:05:28-04:00'
describe
'544610' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALYG' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
937f3bb0f4c84ca5c95d694218441d90
3d554909a5f2933b2fc44258e1f2854ee059e13f
'2011-09-28T11:06:53-04:00'
describe
'143713' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALYH' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
40518c24ba35ece27f0aa8babc178add
1ee548839d7e174829478194e37a22a26bcdbf2c
describe
'37481' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALYI' 'sip-files00057.pro'
8984dbc1dc44d9715534d0cff9472fa4
f54cd488a6cf5e3000950b861b1e64fb58cf0d20
'2011-09-28T11:09:13-04:00'
describe
'60030' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALYJ' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
08ac64e09a89ec8d17d3c72e3675cefb
ac804f5ddd6d3983cb7c6f4fef18e0d8c828b72b
describe
'4379596' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALYK' 'sip-files00057.tif'
1f7aca91fe9ec55d5b1a678ce7f1d0e3
fc3f31d801ff4f1cacd6cfce7f8dbb8c206ef6fa
'2011-09-28T11:05:46-04:00'
describe
'1494' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALYL' 'sip-files00057.txt'
12dd78bdc898f870c473a074e3353785
2fcbdb504e791e9311709ba7b459533d218b374a
'2011-09-28T11:06:39-04:00'
describe
'30841' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALYM' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
dcb36161f4c36d1cdeb696c069f56b38
15263eb75d169572794d3891b2f5c12e7b74e4f8
describe
'544652' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALYN' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
cc006779c1cb7392be84e4b0c9584cef
d358c9a0800b56c51009cb3ed30b82144f713592
describe
'142371' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALYO' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
055c4695a095ffbac85aa13a7f4b46b3
b44db9944b1a22beaa6982a90fbbffd76923ea83
describe
'36758' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALYP' 'sip-files00058.pro'
00c7420b857656449e66a37d7f33a3fe
9d1c849a981510a6ce0a771f394fcf99d0bfc181
'2011-09-28T11:09:58-04:00'
describe
'59021' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALYQ' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
366b8dd9d6be62603c13003340db3c9b
b40281478e1a2bbed17477908a345b7ed4bc31e8
'2011-09-28T11:10:06-04:00'
describe
'4379480' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALYR' 'sip-files00058.tif'
0818db90547f6e8a17a21aac8c06027c
fc3953a0960cc9bf19b92c590ebf013a878c624d
'2011-09-28T11:09:40-04:00'
describe
'1450' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALYS' 'sip-files00058.txt'
15043ce8bb668a4f7c1051a84829018a
7944c7d017685873c957ec4959abaf3a5a20eae7
'2011-09-28T11:06:13-04:00'
describe
'30731' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALYT' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
71616212570f3b7acd3b08ca034e0ae3
f9c4f24e8bba46fec0e16dbbdefac1f12093a902
describe
'544651' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALYU' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
f3df0bff0849a98fdffbd8a5bfece139
ac5df23ded48e91f0c801202a3c3c90c9e87a355
'2011-09-28T11:05:35-04:00'
describe
'149594' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALYV' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
278d207782c1f23f2aa04052ab121cd4
f5cc10b135b69fba81a12d67b172d3abceed4c4a
'2011-09-28T11:09:31-04:00'
describe
'38488' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALYW' 'sip-files00059.pro'
22f520efb5a9b6947b3a515e6228310f
a21e1125a36867f166791aefdb5910dbe6d1d259
'2011-09-28T11:08:47-04:00'
describe
'60773' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALYX' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
75396692033904f81485ddd3c7ef1d44
0791ab70884559061d5312f531b109b9a1c8e8fa
describe
'4379224' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALYY' 'sip-files00059.tif'
854e1cd34820550d8f71b67d86fb21e0
4fc59c266468c9180cb7fc5e0b56353784656467
describe
'1504' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALYZ' 'sip-files00059.txt'
e0e91848f7465ab7c6ed45cd6cf72f64
4d416cc1baf29825c801b2691607c97a06b41146
describe
'29998' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALZA' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
fea5e204be96d2155b6314b1a8875d1e
a4dfee471b3cd129d7d6c85ad0a9d68fd6b20226
'2011-09-28T11:06:26-04:00'
describe
'544638' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALZB' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
64b13a077e6361800fe8166a73e48325
e56f976714edd02384eafec1df98cc4fe69cc383
describe
'38288' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALZC' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
211283c42585a4fa6288eabebbc5458a
a6a6638ecc02285fe18916f59e4d29b381bf5dae
'2011-09-28T11:12:22-04:00'
describe
'20939' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALZD' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
7df467756521c7380896c7becc804702
0b7762858b7e7562defdc2f1b4b7152597801812
'2011-09-28T11:06:52-04:00'
describe
'4374792' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALZE' 'sip-files00060.tif'
987c1e4677e0589c5f76b8a96e2da391
772556ff739b8f08dab33983eecd23eb1c27c780
describe
'18656' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALZF' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
fd661d4410d2b7f1b7f3a4c143ec35ce
287e0a7b6523d486b49a412dcd1f6a95407f4fae
describe
'544455' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALZG' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
5424d1d79deb8d83fc75937e1f201bdc
6dbeb53fc9610a78554936ce5bcf59fea54ea27c
describe
'43575' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALZH' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
e8f8128583e282c9872812fc9a55a34a
6d6e59891858f15c9bf791c173b04e256088790d
describe
'1039' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALZI' 'sip-files00061.pro'
f545fc3bf0ea999a471ff7a30a883db4
7d05a3abac0295b0546bad7e60c372f57b2443b9
describe
'23123' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALZJ' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
2f891b3fe1f9b83fd9250550e01f7983
11faaa097ca2904213cd1f85c9381207d2d69c42
describe
'4375080' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALZK' 'sip-files00061.tif'
679d157eb7f4a13d22529211f1acba5f
8ca37408e3287cf629001d6a8c57546c57a7ca24
'2011-09-28T11:08:30-04:00'
describe
'63' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALZL' 'sip-files00061.txt'
030e9a2eeb80442cb0c366819a07eb4b
96b50518d82196ee643c8e415a179a40813f90aa
describe
'19506' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALZM' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
3cb4f488971a66ea74d90007a4d62941
c1ce0d94ae4029ca2a7bf9023c7dcf1e3d404dd9
describe
'544618' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALZN' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
c77da7052851f45fb276cb50225b9b71
db4fa677a8cd1aeae66728ac5dce0b0fbb2e9bf1
'2011-09-28T11:06:29-04:00'
describe
'121994' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALZO' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
442c8a7a707091653cb918aadd47c373
745ba1f7f61e8fb21badf886890b30e55abb9a44
describe
'45957' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALZP' 'sip-files00062.pro'
a0b14a2008cea35acff81b57df9e4d5d
b978c27c2d398fc2d8f3285c7dd6ada1d1f70f9e
'2011-09-28T11:06:46-04:00'
describe
'44905' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALZQ' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
46bc835929913ef82eea65c28bbde75c
cde4d1659c81f32c50147dba283d6cc9bedbeaf2
describe
'4377852' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALZR' 'sip-files00062.tif'
a4bbe2774bc5b5aed9b1e3a338b7829d
b5b4d46ac84251362bdbe7e3c290a12aae211e1d
'2011-09-28T11:09:30-04:00'
describe
'1916' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALZS' 'sip-files00062.txt'
70f8b0465f63f0f5387caa03fa28b6db
91350942aa4cac426ece497d59c8c4c71dc85e3c
'2011-09-28T11:07:12-04:00'
describe
'26389' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALZT' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
cbaa295a641d831c358f5cdb4770d746
78dd24d2c35957e1408d7d121900388086ac9a62
'2011-09-28T11:10:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALZU' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
2d44cc10a763d7572119519a086f26a0
49c76db233eb34af8ef9aa136cee6b8090d02368
'2011-09-28T11:11:05-04:00'
describe
'131577' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALZV' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
6456a7c117c1023a2c19c1a9e060ac0b
7f97264f5df6e708d78daf1eb58eb7cca9ef450c
'2011-09-28T11:12:17-04:00'
describe
'31278' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALZW' 'sip-files00063.pro'
adbd72b9b083791e38bf7cd910ecd780
fd044d71cc08e8764c8dd822c018e99b804e6c1a
'2011-09-28T11:06:02-04:00'
describe
'54608' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALZX' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
6c28be91e3e19d4bfbbf9826550fc9f3
04eed66e43381877b3157f2a54f90de515be54c2
'2011-09-28T11:07:03-04:00'
describe
'4378680' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALZY' 'sip-files00063.tif'
7d76c54bfd7cddc11536391009001211
dea5af6b0da7715d1bc041c072cc51afccb9f80f
describe
'1294' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAALZZ' 'sip-files00063.txt'
d1f44d7f6750cf8cc3b0e5bd6bd2501b
09df4da4dbd7fae469a2f1474f44c4fe83a55753
'2011-09-28T11:07:55-04:00'
describe
'29090' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMAA' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
b1a29b0f42e9616fef056d23dc7062e0
3c1f71adc042aa15736f5833c70fd7e1d11a1679
'2011-09-28T11:10:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMAB' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
4e5e0c1fa85d84e0bb4ddfaf69c648a3
7534bcf9c659ca4b33a8efb0f805b94da60d0fd8
describe
'156696' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMAC' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
550abd3af1b67fb5241e25b48ad4d8bd
abb9786f3a5f850953dea743ee41b3702bbcce07
describe
'40735' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMAD' 'sip-files00064.pro'
2bdb04707373f05b3d1bf4832dd7d048
321c5f8324e3e29ac1437d13579397948fe0febe
'2011-09-28T11:06:17-04:00'
describe
'63674' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMAE' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
146490c2e6e84e80e04eda2bfd8bf929
dbcb9bd51947d7ca50092e0a72d2a8c22702bf8b
describe
'4379728' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMAF' 'sip-files00064.tif'
fbc923a3c5d4099c80c0c9f97233867b
78801c39ab5dfaae0c0e43b68f93f09ea3273223
'2011-09-28T11:10:43-04:00'
describe
'1591' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMAG' 'sip-files00064.txt'
45df05d76b0a501593ad517e10f3516b
1c58cf58ae51301d2468c80d54a70159e2184986
describe
'31666' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMAH' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
eee26d184e60fd6ac379083a9936dd6a
9768164865997d2660c25e961f91f3a79e8e8962
describe
'544667' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMAI' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
90b035f2cdfc77c92985623d5604cc36
c1e78f7ec2c22dadb05e480370f3d9c4eef8fd0b
'2011-09-28T11:07:56-04:00'
describe
'151237' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMAJ' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
ddf62ff0fe0cef7d413628366548cbd9
99a42c7cb7ff4e8bb5c9e9ad796af5e1bca61a9e
describe
'39940' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMAK' 'sip-files00065.pro'
03702c6c49fb09e3d234060a359ad133
0d3312b6187d4c9e36a604f13d9c8ab8e8aa24eb
describe
'63008' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMAL' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
8b531518c60462474ff38dae1e014e40
885da70c61c702fd5691a412d527fdcf1db7a00f
'2011-09-28T11:07:32-04:00'
describe
'4379848' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMAM' 'sip-files00065.tif'
a9c60bc08aba72f2a72c8137429966d8
91e5ef30b986fe28482a47917433c2b723938691
'2011-09-28T11:07:20-04:00'
describe
'1571' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMAN' 'sip-files00065.txt'
ef57c5abe3ed8664291c3d346f8744bb
d4039e239c10a3d13adebd6525511a638fabbbb1
describe
'31498' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMAO' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
8bab5274844901f6b40d2d9cc2377943
8887eff2b000f50d46339eba2ced7d0bc2dcc01c
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMAP' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
32adade54bfbe329c6f5d31bd119688a
47c04d7c351797feb7d3a620a7a4f41d482554c5
describe
'159559' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMAQ' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
f74502181a7ef2f386b9f6338a1fa378
aa60966147ded21502c6d7e5427fec4b380ee680
describe
'42631' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMAR' 'sip-files00066.pro'
c60535fc1d11cf485b6cc62c2a7320b4
eff2fe0974f75864e8ed6301fe8dbeab2da79229
describe
'64079' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMAS' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
a994ee47a2cf8f414e55b3973795c38c
073fb78769ac577f55dfd0f4d42fe358409c2c8d
describe
'4379796' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMAT' 'sip-files00066.tif'
14f9b781053b9a9d2fa745bf39b9f54c
cd9c440686f3660a1cfb22d43a47cc1178b47fb3
'2011-09-28T11:11:03-04:00'
describe
'1670' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMAU' 'sip-files00066.txt'
7c2488c560dfeaf885434ede2764d10b
6b82c78485f990fe8bd05eda0926dbb7a2d760d3
'2011-09-28T11:07:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMAV' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
d48a40406d1303b5d8c7292c0183d0b9
801e055b7f0ed86bb15f4b666a932eefc59b158e
describe
'544631' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMAW' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
851d0b97c034643c807035453c6bf055
1fc887934d6f06294c31abb9ca64c005ab3f442f
describe
'157912' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMAX' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
53283fbbe3142176f274ce1151604a54
de1cc566ba976b0badaee97b6564bb66533693f7
'2011-09-28T11:07:30-04:00'
describe
'41046' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMAY' 'sip-files00067.pro'
86dee20860f8e454809241c70c948e26
481bd8fcd603b1ff304a06c6d75c3dcf889e73ff
'2011-09-28T11:08:53-04:00'
describe
'64316' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMAZ' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
bfc9c8532321da1c98e31c6addcecc60
1aa7645010a7a24bc6e5eda7bdb419f84dbde77d
describe
'4379852' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMBA' 'sip-files00067.tif'
76649e6b648fa0bbe1566fa7d4e9ccd0
0aab846b3b9be95ac9a06f6d10277324c84a4996
'2011-09-28T11:08:26-04:00'
describe
'1605' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMBB' 'sip-files00067.txt'
ce9b3592263ede364d9646f65e3b6032
8317c59065d6717676447be895c26e3c8d6ee225
'2011-09-28T11:07:09-04:00'
describe
'31190' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMBC' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
b8ab0c253948bafaa4419868501e967e
c17f021edf9da59e5808199fff39dc1b172f4e94
'2011-09-28T11:08:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMBD' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
dc58e9c3a0b3c2119d802daf8cccc57f
40ab38ec6d45f3a622178403c1ca6e9cc082db3e
describe
'156147' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMBE' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
f3442eca38fa5eead3692722431e50be
d0461ce61e280718299f5ab4368f53f756ea5f10
'2011-09-28T11:05:58-04:00'
describe
'40365' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMBF' 'sip-files00068.pro'
4364837e04b9c0ec779f7914198cedc4
c1267c7c1229234946a1a7a28050ce36ffec8743
'2011-09-28T11:12:34-04:00'
describe
'63635' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMBG' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
bd00efd9cc6c9cb17baad3a06f1fbcb0
0f7e1b3c33f1a5ef7f5441726f31df7463dc9401
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMBH' 'sip-files00068.tif'
65cd69097dd4e664643314bf9f4779ab
c26836c47fe6b924172717851c67e8384dd7cef7
'2011-09-28T11:10:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMBI' 'sip-files00068.txt'
4aa23a1a2957b4b6851ce733cd452385
c7f5a03f567c97c7a5c34957f2d79b20e1be262a
'2011-09-28T11:09:01-04:00'
describe
'31460' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMBJ' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
ce57e348436f08824ddff1c3ff304981
5cf2e83dd4167c814a20de95df063c45d77493e6
'2011-09-28T11:09:45-04:00'
describe
'544587' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMBK' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
4ae00caa548428cd74e0b2aa5a34b9a6
5f3897c10a61851a728806b54038921dfba1288a
describe
'209841' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMBL' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
2f6b81491a2a0a98cc3db7e57b14c131
284c250001c76cca3f5dff6f553368f3ef86d3e6
describe
'4630' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMBM' 'sip-files00069.pro'
1a1c5d5121897bd454cd19a6a6c12a02
c4c71b1edcfbb672dfa56edc1455641d1d79a6bd
describe
'68481' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMBN' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
af9fa340054ce38cc58322cdd382817b
e4fd4a597031e15eaa48a596b8f3ba3e14c6d833
describe
'4380972' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMBO' 'sip-files00069.tif'
ee9fa562a71eaf12c1d3f56a67e249f8
dae110d541a38d772f8fafedbffec753bad80e2b
describe
'535' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMBP' 'sip-files00069.txt'
a7378cffb9aa9c3c4cb6aa3b1ea523a5
99c37be9555acddc8b54fcad3aac422425aa5557
describe
Invalid character
'33937' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMBQ' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
b3ae6c7763ccb39ea34328246eae0538
d942f552e29aea1152e4c2e3435f023ada3cacec
'2011-09-28T11:07:07-04:00'
describe
'544589' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMBR' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
e39084f9377b2bea2252ed13ce2d2d64
8870663560aaeaaf37146e2ad07e09b09518e60b
'2011-09-28T11:07:15-04:00'
describe
'38805' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMBS' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
3a68f360a983b575264f2e774042cfa9
3b521ac14860bad172ec3d482d4621e4d6f9d3d9
describe
'21162' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMBT' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
b8e5200adf3aca8bab19c5342546a54a
495fce246006ec2da8bce3171f4fad3d79c4052d
describe
'4374808' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMBU' 'sip-files00070.tif'
2d9c780004e946e62d287c8558f39284
9e5dbf6774963aa6c64ddce09a9e548d57cfa1ff
describe
'18691' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMBV' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
1dbb60aab516273f47a89bd57d68b9c7
5397e9e9f69f71aec494125a1dc51b3b48440bf1
describe
'544616' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMBW' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
b3e4a45908e83f89875d1e44b11ca6d6
789d507f84896de9d3c5bc0ee4a0227fbb4f020e
describe
'149225' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMBX' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
30dba759a75b519aa1dc2c7013f38984
ed95151f2470196d8ddb101da1cb698e1c6bf532
describe
'38763' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMBY' 'sip-files00071.pro'
4b142576eb6f4cf5f887f7201100c215
6078b7fc1745e6919a4a1deffccd664e754785ca
'2011-09-28T11:10:14-04:00'
describe
'61766' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMBZ' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
e4290776ef8c355eb7a5c39391ea0cc8
fb105ffe09ef464d48da404dc7d6362677706692
'2011-09-28T11:11:16-04:00'
describe
'4379744' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMCA' 'sip-files00071.tif'
8b77b11aec14312c4d1ff960a06ef339
849de998819c6d39d54834f0ea7b133747231fc5
'2011-09-28T11:11:32-04:00'
describe
'1536' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMCB' 'sip-files00071.txt'
b2a0459130337ad1460d2b36a8a11919
326e90ba5d582624965f7a147df4435957905709
describe
'31363' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMCC' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
2d70c65c28854a0b4656d1e22b9ccd8a
2fac7072907df1d84464748bcacbc625d59e223e
'2011-09-28T11:10:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMCD' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
956021f33283cafce3c5557e67423184
cfad2c65651762f3c54b1504d302c63133e65ec1
describe
'149453' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMCE' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
46a658744fdae9e2ac9e7239c2af9de6
dbdefd6c4c4dcd7c18fe6fe9df822714a87de94d
'2011-09-28T11:08:24-04:00'
describe
'38315' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMCF' 'sip-files00072.pro'
073bcb7111d101fa8a1ed1643043f724
9c929aa5787c6c643678b60eb6bde9a9afede2e1
describe
'61467' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMCG' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
8efea7ae78d28e17af55295fa5c7c776
0b26be9edfe60bfce7eb7930f55f16e16fca7c7a
'2011-09-28T11:08:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMCH' 'sip-files00072.tif'
a686ab553c2e36dde5835a175a70801f
a6b6c93863ae50ee14ed1a6b8b9cbb004491896b
'2011-09-28T11:06:00-04:00'
describe
'1512' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMCI' 'sip-files00072.txt'
c8e41e8a11802d804130d32488c341fb
a27aba6df2e7c438204127630ecaea2b65a237b0
describe
'31418' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMCJ' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
79ff0d6ac428b81af5910cf32c668042
f1d86d49f1bb5e61ab772b8136f6aae81fcb4a4b
'2011-09-28T11:11:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMCK' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
751d27531f9a9c6d939200b2ac278a22
e9e9e3088cb91d151b6bb133a97974216cbb7613
'2011-09-28T11:10:34-04:00'
describe
'145108' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMCL' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
4ab52feecff2e2704a5d8a610fd62cf8
979edf95f6119d6eb1c3e50d766bfbfb35528758
describe
'36019' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMCM' 'sip-files00073.pro'
501db04f7072dc8a1c5a3195b0a71fbe
0e4b1d6501dc636647c7fc8f7de0bb4927478e53
describe
'59752' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMCN' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
044919e6d47f3730ea77b20b50a68f5b
9887b432cc2b46bb80e8adf334f653c981e845cd
describe
'4379600' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMCO' 'sip-files00073.tif'
56193e9ac9f106df05da9e22ee2cf538
e9d84aea7b7e365f1b1bccbaf8a8368c37b1adaf
describe
'1434' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMCP' 'sip-files00073.txt'
4256e3a6c630a5926a0b5c967f4a20f9
60dc422503050ddc1d6888951196679b47ee90c5
describe
'30871' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMCQ' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
acb1a347466133dc9ad2fe1f5fb81a6b
b16de975e77b4dd0d287bff08778c1d7d28b4448
describe
'544605' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMCR' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
127848fc42c63898bdec4edcd751dd2e
79d1d1797664d3d31ddfc69f73157e9b825907aa
describe
'145346' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMCS' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
e2aa0fbce31043c7213faada55e4addd
2009914cb162bee7b53c941012cbfa8a0428c9d1
'2011-09-28T11:08:41-04:00'
describe
'37300' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMCT' 'sip-files00074.pro'
bb212b225f3950532169f5ba23654ef0
67d5649eadf08216f0aac6952a7b682ab4c5ff01
'2011-09-28T11:10:20-04:00'
describe
'60613' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMCU' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
cbd3e944998daf8761476033627dd068
68381f7b3097cb53b322dc3bfe3da790f23d7b7e
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMCV' 'sip-files00074.tif'
d8d543502ab58a0546c2418b3cd4aabb
4b3004f0653a60b6fbbb99d57a07660d6f576e55
describe
'1484' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMCW' 'sip-files00074.txt'
8e8c2966fb116d8132116f427930d315
b08e867dc5441ff19cedaa299477a55e27c2cdb8
'2011-09-28T11:10:39-04:00'
describe
'31144' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMCX' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
898266fa4903f043af7ab9df97839252
9931579a0bd318c7450f809f0068120234e19a23
'2011-09-28T11:06:05-04:00'
describe
'544457' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMCY' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
45b47ba87d1e071b83d0d89043a8ba63
7bc0d50914d3da906ce299b5c511e2e79e604d50
'2011-09-28T11:05:51-04:00'
describe
'149040' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMCZ' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
c7a5182a529ccac463677ff945f4d2ee
1dd04c34d001e998d635ff466710363496f78cb7
describe
'38598' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMDA' 'sip-files00075.pro'
68e7679fa2fa48ad5fcda73b6e1ebe03
c48de5b9a5ca807eada5758d1977991848217ee7
'2011-09-28T11:10:35-04:00'
describe
'60807' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMDB' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
1908c9080d4b29c21b0c3d5d5ea9451b
d9f10e80930f1ca2a822dca370e8b375a4236295
'2011-09-28T11:06:32-04:00'
describe
'4379564' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMDC' 'sip-files00075.tif'
fe6eab1f7db16ed9f01b191393fc27b5
1ee1d8a4665532292a3b559d910894fa32877077
describe
'1535' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMDD' 'sip-files00075.txt'
84406d5a8024e06dec7fa914fcdc8ff2
3ba9e4db12c52c142fcd63290921f7b373fae188
describe
'30962' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMDE' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
191b10d10962fed5d5c0f75786a9ab9e
28a6d84e3642eb08ad23fcc0dd9102b5598a4401
describe
'544476' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMDF' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
3e956a28f3ca90f3b42c0b6593558620
f9a3405a9d53371ac557e42bb101277a7a46c6b3
describe
'138826' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMDG' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
b0ec3d11be5d5a8e8cc58ef1a46141ac
75fcd75659ab16914a3cbf1c56b25f62fa3458a0
'2011-09-28T11:12:21-04:00'
describe
'35502' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMDH' 'sip-files00076.pro'
9ad1cff3fdf38c9f1b213d583015f78f
eb7362fbc7ef562218d13460f3fecd9ce5fae121
'2011-09-28T11:05:04-04:00'
describe
'57884' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMDI' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
c27b35e7c2686e605a14fc20a6954634
213590ae37466de6968804b905f7f7773842f73f
describe
'4379184' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMDJ' 'sip-files00076.tif'
642bf7cf9c07e44d9f398f5277694d93
5ecf3c51c0cb48323355f517c117f0dc26efc433
describe
'1417' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMDK' 'sip-files00076.txt'
cc5f62205a726301ba74d06e40e58b3f
be842a07f962b41122d99eb48cf932f1c75f0d19
describe
'30198' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMDL' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
b700827d792e064d855ead9f732898b7
a3b0de927d3676f8f0bc1ad63673cca660151b19
'2011-09-28T11:10:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMDM' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
1bce6199e31b2c139df02b07360a1c09
24d9d764b40c29cf0d22da690640f717b31d9fa6
'2011-09-28T11:11:41-04:00'
describe
'153658' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMDN' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
0f5867d327a1b42ab288768d64e632fb
fdedeb427eeb407cdcbdbf2c843988af670dcac7
'2011-09-28T11:07:35-04:00'
describe
'39255' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMDO' 'sip-files00077.pro'
9291e9d8b904476b640290a101c87ab9
b2486c8da88381b174ca5c850d0b932a6c68bce1
describe
'62073' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMDP' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
c4fc951349b0d7048d7063fe9e89ad27
2234c5377ed2b7fd32c1630d76ae6a7006ded52b
describe
'4379568' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMDQ' 'sip-files00077.tif'
1f92a9ea3c04e6f35edce166a1d00e31
5237e0e1d596d2d89edd6c9b7d3ea00035344884
describe
'1549' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMDR' 'sip-files00077.txt'
fc8812f99588c4a485af011f0a44290e
cc3e181622c6faea113379509577fc1b8294ac39
describe
'31120' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMDS' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
11157b71ac0b15b713536595c43b222b
670448656f289749a7b819cd1c018dd64cb58cd6
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMDT' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
181019def77d7944002a40404bc93f02
f9cd2581041f9d1088dc394bcebb6686eb949a6f
describe
'148519' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMDU' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
2bc9a88e7eee9b49e2e85dcb5bdee1b3
c6f6a24a84c70f94ea516e00d9cd4b4b2318c16c
describe
'37157' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMDV' 'sip-files00078.pro'
85f5cdf2cc502f9a9756c2adc8c87353
11b26b3bda7e41094faebd606705e4884df98fe7
describe
'60630' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMDW' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
774f741e7604b5a3b4c80164a1bf0308
9a9a78bc66d6fb5a21993c35d51a43ebb086cfd4
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMDX' 'sip-files00078.tif'
5032de75b4a26fe88563c67bcb2e7fa1
e1781b3aa0ab284d5511380423fb96922e1e59fe
'2011-09-28T11:05:26-04:00'
describe
'1473' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMDY' 'sip-files00078.txt'
1e5b912af933409502de34a083dd566d
1550687c0977a76572a60b68e911f358a638432a
describe
'31168' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMDZ' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
943a5f67cd6a2839dc769e5092efa114
b3ad30738f3efccd78345e86e68a6aae0d229a1e
describe
'544640' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMEA' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
a522e36ead30e0fb5619d06e20e237d0
e5a7102da97d149b9facd7117a244599c93616a7
describe
'149863' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMEB' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
a195eb5920ea75e7f5e55f546b99af47
1e656312d98855bf921da2007ae19500c88ce398
describe
'37898' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMEC' 'sip-files00079.pro'
6926fd72e139f1f704b50ecf12bc78a5
d843b52eb86b2a1c79e9c062e441855ee0ed3ec3
'2011-09-28T11:11:24-04:00'
describe
'62054' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMED' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
b3c7f69cc401448286e6c346b9291241
09f0760d8a137f9f1ec304f5de94b7dfa2a19815
describe
'4379900' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMEE' 'sip-files00079.tif'
b336410c32d94a995265783a921264a3
36a9697fcc80bf3d626154576e6711ee7edb5948
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMEF' 'sip-files00079.txt'
ef25c322588d9ef0811ee4b7ea64a960
d722d7fd48b69b380dfd566aaf27641c4e3f2585
'2011-09-28T11:10:31-04:00'
describe
'31745' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMEG' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
4207bdfb85c9de6a6a7f81ecd393f974
52ab3350d9d084ba9a23a4b72cb2516f1e5ea08a
'2011-09-28T11:09:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMEH' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
26509cb8792c5fce620baedcc19a0af8
184648e08e0e0125c23b86aaa3e3e6a2dd3982ff
'2011-09-28T11:07:02-04:00'
describe
'142219' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMEI' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
650bee8dcf2f9faeebb31b94fdf1c735
769041bb6e51aabee8fde21b9ef00529e92d888e
'2011-09-28T11:06:54-04:00'
describe
'34408' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMEJ' 'sip-files00080.pro'
f57468eeb5199bbd549b11c322897401
b116b6f455254a08f6b860c504e81df32aa190cc
'2011-09-28T11:09:14-04:00'
describe
'57665' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMEK' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
3ec982f03fdfc965125c1ec4e5ee5709
fd9f801c69632960cd2899d30e4509a4d6d24e52
describe
'4379612' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMEL' 'sip-files00080.tif'
37695d111c0a109c2748fb8f2083ebfe
2c7161b9badaff170b9df237934f150135aa0254
describe
'1370' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMEM' 'sip-files00080.txt'
486932d00295fcad823c5d5363c2fe38
3a38d8d7b289bfb845d13b492a475dce233dee32
'2011-09-28T11:05:06-04:00'
describe
'30930' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMEN' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
1dfd9819d467fa54a66f4024b7e1aef5
f5447bb66ece835919057c999650e4e562d53305
describe
'544653' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMEO' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
ec30afedd335cf85f04ec1224a369b96
1829632845656a304c0a916fbb0610bb2ff3c4d1
describe
'211713' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMEP' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
db017a6d86ee9c656e24b1a1ebd23ef9
4f8e8f2ff7278043f451f1ac72f55d006898f2da
'2011-09-28T11:10:59-04:00'
describe
'2611' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMEQ' 'sip-files00081.pro'
fcef77b092d73bae80a058f55484be68
248fffa34cb4d3573c36022cc12b40c99037f53f
describe
'68152' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMER' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
9f6ad1a88b5ac961b52a8288cba2abc6
4551fbaaeb4d6a308686a51f6c2678a7614c2af3
describe
'4381036' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMES' 'sip-files00081.tif'
c5335bcdc14ed198d398fbafc678293d
39ff9fd31b6a40b30ae4be6d9aa90d581944c4be
describe
'188' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMET' 'sip-files00081.txt'
f1dbdaec18ff7ede44b57be233a03e4a
077f2c75abb6472ba733997cd9fe5dc291758a98
'2011-09-28T11:05:49-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'34091' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMEU' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
6c767349570c0769ac2e18d392f4d2aa
33565f883739f2664fef7973922ad684627cec8e
describe
'544654' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMEV' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
a9527e7a06899e1cf6aa963edebbdd7e
35021940865833a7c673c7cf43799f822e725af6
describe
'29997' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMEW' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
346de96a7b464cf094e1188be18544cf
5fc535590ff9140567e101f3c809c14efcdb45bb
describe
'19876' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMEX' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
6b2c728a9bbf57354f8508654e15dc9d
e57bc38e0555ac9fb61eb94d893672b4a81a2bee
describe
'4374892' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMEY' 'sip-files00082.tif'
6873966efbf7f15fe7925e45cf59fde6
90cd7d640f7dba949423af35fb88ef3eba14d439
'2011-09-28T11:06:01-04:00'
describe
'18509' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMEZ' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
503f30905cd1ae3342a29e7e880a5f68
6b535b2a548e33b52083aac571c3668bbda58b43
describe
'544684' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMFA' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
281d4970e2434c71ad52d28282ecec95
4943de153cd95a32e229cdf71250a4a2f9aa4bbf
describe
'147054' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMFB' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
1570b08241c87e6525c5ffe0ebcef461
86fea8f51d009b4d311f423da8454de8e24022d3
'2011-09-28T11:10:22-04:00'
describe
'36712' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMFC' 'sip-files00083.pro'
3d667a23f2533a506d0a8c1c84279fa1
a2213792309ed3506a41b322a7fd744d9b50232a
describe
'60348' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMFD' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
ecb2b7438a6af3a9dfd2b4c61c10ce9b
ebcd380415abdc82d4c0cd56788cfd34f4ab4e99
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMFE' 'sip-files00083.tif'
01e96d5249f03fed204207243778f144
d8aa526e2b9a08602ce787d55477c1589ac00c28
'2011-09-28T11:12:37-04:00'
describe
'1475' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMFF' 'sip-files00083.txt'
fbadb27a5c468ef253de0c86bd25c778
61f2f02f982320b25821a6759b04bfd60fdbba18
'2011-09-28T11:11:52-04:00'
describe
'30671' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMFG' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
f198ea13cf8afdb2cbea7f6ecd147e2f
72ec8d856bb88e21d0189b0c668588755b538e41
describe
'544598' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMFH' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
252fa80f120cbb8607f68eef1e6514ea
0499d853fb45ce72e48072598431ec98140667db
'2011-09-28T11:06:35-04:00'
describe
'154639' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMFI' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
bb931606d3372d2185e8098b13175ef1
967969f02e9a5af39c126a52fbd544cbb88bbfcf
describe
'39598' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMFJ' 'sip-files00084.pro'
cdd8abc717d24339d3c4f3b809e170f5
0d5e5e61ecc8ba9513d09396d59b9101717edc72
describe
'62383' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMFK' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
d26dcba9e9b63107a1bb36785afe02e0
55a177302c4f9b428f754a500d5e7a7d7bd4be87
describe
'4379812' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMFL' 'sip-files00084.tif'
1eb1b78c4f5aac24154c0050d1611f30
570f6c3b12d7ff40a09babf09d48842b8439a22d
describe
'1556' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMFM' 'sip-files00084.txt'
4c40332e950d69664c7dcece2428fdc2
bde01047faffd9ec4b92a92ffa3d13c656f52b86
'2011-09-28T11:07:21-04:00'
describe
'31276' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMFN' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
9d1aa50edf9558a8da851753a7d1a6e9
fa1de00c2059e35b64dc98b7d7b1a4d6cdab3aaf
describe
'544650' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMFO' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
a9dfd619e5fc511ec56b80533da379a6
4dbd2b3f49e0028a655dbba1b6cf2732e2ada7af
describe
'154943' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMFP' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
09cc9aac26d27f562006aefd343a8f63
5cba58b107e167c83f65e8479dbba81df5603e59
'2011-09-28T11:08:19-04:00'
describe
'40202' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMFQ' 'sip-files00085.pro'
83dccc920e7c8d07bc36c8a676613c35
eaafc4f8f1a6c53dd8c19cbaf12c10cc878211d1
'2011-09-28T11:05:10-04:00'
describe
'62908' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMFR' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
8dc70c387797545036c2e09cf242e52e
a264a0360be9263bee5b0e60bffd5cb1feed1a65
describe
'4379804' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMFS' 'sip-files00085.tif'
89c34dcf5caec1d7609693a88b33df52
e29d6fbb129ce16a58585b6023f1063adbeaa89a
'2011-09-28T11:07:39-04:00'
describe
'1620' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMFT' 'sip-files00085.txt'
63e67f19cca1859fa543d9dd0b37959e
3205010fe7736e84cbdbbd1db783840da923f8ad
describe
'31438' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMFU' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
b02885667b83d9c0e3f1f1c31478308a
16f9ac7c6afa7e5b633c4d8d9fdde3834b36c5a4
'2011-09-28T11:10:21-04:00'
describe
'544509' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMFV' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
54e9613166803fec13a60e682280a378
16e03e8066f118dd907d01c033168ab2aaca5783
'2011-09-28T11:11:47-04:00'
describe
'145775' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMFW' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
7a8f3cd4572fee9e5303f5d6092c02f0
3c84ef2f17bbd16ce40307881ba396e2ee6a4444
describe
'37464' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMFX' 'sip-files00086.pro'
29dc09c97cb46c6a229d5e48f7dff465
67e2dc6cc09de98aaf714d34d2012f24bf037aec
'2011-09-28T11:05:56-04:00'
describe
'60414' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMFY' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
feb62860ebc33fcbeb365a108d9e3db9
90aaf5943ce66b6cc6bb513abd59f21f9106b6e1
describe
'4379560' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMFZ' 'sip-files00086.tif'
b251572ae723224cd51415965ae41ed8
ffac7ea6a56d206130e26d119e0865a364478842
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMGA' 'sip-files00086.txt'
ea2b165f78bbe03a1d29e903acdd07dc
ace52daebaf6f6114f356de616180b0a07696022
describe
'30812' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMGB' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
afaeb7114201718fad81273a3624e272
f27446f3e6aa28d0c35944b71a125953afb7e0b5
describe
'544678' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMGC' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
510254a5125ec523e87bd125973b461d
beff2549489518e69b0a72471398037e86cc2069
describe
'224451' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMGD' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
123b2411aa7357b120932f4d10d01bf2
3c4d104d7916035cf02bcee1670701ca0ff19079
describe
'2114' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMGE' 'sip-files00087.pro'
3ba4701476f278cc1031b8673f5e3ae4
80352658cc2eff6d46c2c0283cc8069374aed3f2
describe
'69461' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMGF' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
c14d5f00bdc49a6d604fbfaaf9009102
fc5bc008374a9a5f5690853eb36a678cfd696c21
describe
'4381152' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMGG' 'sip-files00087.tif'
521e903ed22b1673f0dab230f9805702
c34de737bc45140cd53b07f1d7d9180429b203cc
'2011-09-28T11:07:25-04:00'
describe
'165' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMGH' 'sip-files00087.txt'
c7e46cd81a62c6eb2979a6bdfab0eba7
5cd88d92a9e4198199ce7c1293aca6655966e280
describe
'34310' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMGI' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
428736b6c51b3d122ef70a0c3962f127
847e180bb74815f6a6eb191df1b331847c2025e5
'2011-09-28T11:11:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMGJ' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
fee7dc6377119d18cc888b4f048afee0
e9f3fd5a9857f93760462dd770ea4bcaa06d93bf
'2011-09-28T11:12:04-04:00'
describe
'38417' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMGK' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
8cd4273cc23c139ea3311d28644b2c8d
c2a1af2446f375fb5ce2bd0c5394cc9d8c7c50e5
'2011-09-28T11:05:39-04:00'
describe
'20797' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMGL' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
41d1eb0f96135e57de59d742b39608e2
ece4addd94c00d1c7df8602825aa4e79bb54eac3
describe
'4374748' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMGM' 'sip-files00088.tif'
8075e39bdc657dd545bf6b54575c482b
432edd9e0e8a6787c89937b71398e634ba31e5ed
'2011-09-28T11:11:40-04:00'
describe
'18511' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMGN' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
500be4644ef90b67e29bed28492e5b90
86fc5787736cd5b3ece702ba08fdb2d66d264927
'2011-09-28T11:06:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMGO' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
a0417cbc789d5405880b8c1ce38c6a90
36f5a9e3bd36c10b2fc9f65aeaddba708574a238
'2011-09-28T11:12:26-04:00'
describe
'148933' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMGP' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
09ed06cd6b94cb0bf266b45e94aba82e
ce52230a66ddfcbe5f914cd46c9a75b04aac04ea
describe
'38430' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMGQ' 'sip-files00089.pro'
92734884b765a960daafa6f8c33fcb11
85b933565f224282c328b7190e78585ec231aa0e
'2011-09-28T11:09:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMGR' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
33b3c0b640b0e474b766c766666f7d2f
b7b52040048455301ece6c7944766a09ec0245fa
'2011-09-28T11:12:07-04:00'
describe
'4379464' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMGS' 'sip-files00089.tif'
95e5348f48080bd4b13f56e52f5d3f6c
7ba219b0bfc913eb73dfa5a7708b7a6eb9e95f20
'2011-09-28T11:06:33-04:00'
describe
'1527' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMGT' 'sip-files00089.txt'
aac414239f814449fc55ab9c151865ae
21464be3fc7215fc0fdc7ac7523c31329e646551
describe
'30654' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMGU' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
4f84a659cd39e21da8b25eb6de6004ad
0a7bb7a88e41405a4d37194c55ed13ca9b91400e
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMGV' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
9e8e44c739f410b842f8174640dae1f7
06a8edfd7e668ecb647d188de1e4ff912ca67bce
'2011-09-28T11:10:55-04:00'
describe
'144779' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMGW' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
684828d9a2893bf43cb91c385bc94a66
629fb68a0832a5eb25ec4c9a5a950ca32ac8e3f6
describe
'37158' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMGX' 'sip-files00090.pro'
1f38a42001488c0edb5a469ff1051276
be7273d19fa09cee845accb9d1734cf44e1e7d42
'2011-09-28T11:08:35-04:00'
describe
'59513' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMGY' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
dc37d8ba066857b68c730688ab68da4f
564045a1db09ccf4f825f7a1fa07821864c11775
'2011-09-28T11:12:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMGZ' 'sip-files00090.tif'
60ac83531fff428a622a31274cd8058d
8526bb796101025f14c7601c7ed55e91fb894b25
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMHA' 'sip-files00090.txt'
b324b8eadbc7e4de15f6ae0195a45b5b
2c7632cde6a40b0af0a1762ecc5e9c6da79459ee
describe
'30747' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMHB' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
85f2c5000981570ca6e9f6a5b59300f1
a6749fc5d81513a8447d843cab9d630951f7f62b
'2011-09-28T11:08:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMHC' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
2642cdd50c25155d721307708d5f8307
1dc4db81d599ee0d69b9fb7c410c991e6be52648
describe
'135451' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMHD' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
b56f38faebd7c1f8dc2540ecaacc9cc3
c0a5c5cb33bca846f7c6c6ca06f7d2195a92cd8c
'2011-09-28T11:11:26-04:00'
describe
'35286' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMHE' 'sip-files00091.pro'
108252658d5a026698a77ea10bae4ebf
4c5149fd37b546a5f846361965bf69d89ade369c
describe
'57226' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMHF' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
6dafb5cd6fd595f6033c974be2bb91ca
a295b9c0a6ecb6c3f9822a755a3e3ba6de89de76
describe
'4379060' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMHG' 'sip-files00091.tif'
7ab47071d289dca9f45f54fd3c396bfe
271d8f2f25bec01b716d4096e625e9db0d2ee9eb
'2011-09-28T11:12:33-04:00'
describe
'1408' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMHH' 'sip-files00091.txt'
4d326f01519b6e7b09d84b8cd5b895bf
6b280d917f6c86fe135166d3f03e5fc443e98f4d
'2011-09-28T11:05:08-04:00'
describe
'29920' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMHI' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
dc11b60903a59de5644d20ef89d3f82d
f1157ee4432c7377795c05d9de3a7a4fc4428265
describe
'544688' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMHJ' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
fa6546d10535af358e8140f6a14efc1f
aa3811b40ea438ee0ee456617b73f1a53c0479cc
describe
'159866' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMHK' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
3ce4bdeffe0299f6cc7cfc5cd1dbc5fa
f67518fec3cbb9a91e683dd7b017c09986d66fe0
'2011-09-28T11:11:51-04:00'
describe
'39816' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMHL' 'sip-files00092.pro'
1ed8d57dee8c79d101306f51a00ca412
2d607584004e7dae4b46819a0d909e2136ff1811
describe
'63733' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMHM' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
a29848351a19c127cbaab773f03bd231
19bd095bf5c7d1d5f33c8b0482c8e3a841082064
describe
'4379648' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMHN' 'sip-files00092.tif'
be26717b928d23842cbd9a46af3aee1f
c703a96db027c387dd3a6ef523f78e8588ce1575
'2011-09-28T11:09:04-04:00'
describe
'1568' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMHO' 'sip-files00092.txt'
7416b92704ebf4549f03d93846b9620a
ad685f6e89f45699bbe04c2046a4796d8b4306c9
describe
'31287' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMHP' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
52d48910e4e9b502106c2f18370dd1d0
635f1d90cf4ba33221288f287ddb574478199803
describe
'544643' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMHQ' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
b9529da228e3e1080c8467be30776db0
2f3d09f517601f60ac425af5e6bff69254604c69
'2011-09-28T11:05:22-04:00'
describe
'156978' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMHR' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
64b2c797d7edcbf193ed0fda8d150397
85bb01ae4d6811e564ad6c419e83b724bf2ccf68
describe
'40683' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMHS' 'sip-files00093.pro'
8722119d61d19386c2b050230118ee3f
52ef40c1de6afa26463ce3f6382efa3b1ec2a1c8
describe
'63007' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMHT' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
4f2d601825cf7dc874a63c7eeff62d5c
18ebf3938aa0ff30c20902c2a4b23507d020a5eb
describe
'4379620' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMHU' 'sip-files00093.tif'
49bb6512a1bdc80d13e72257d22fc745
dd54e6625b0da7f5567322084f49414c6257ec53
describe
'1593' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMHV' 'sip-files00093.txt'
f2a9f49672be87f2cdff83dfec65bcfa
bbcad4c7b1eaead6775ff276f269cc85c7b2a943
'2011-09-28T11:11:21-04:00'
describe
'31295' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMHW' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
75f903ecac1bb0aba974ea6703924ddf
a007294f92a8c6cf31051e4e34e7f9d7c44e3f62
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMHX' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
a5d6925a9c22301b7ab7c3f3d38311ad
57140b200a9e40ce2ae40f8df099199eed914f9d
'2011-09-28T11:09:33-04:00'
describe
'124372' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMHY' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
5d5833c987bcf120c67efdd7067860e5
0cd9f6af112c0f25bb0abbad1aeb637382907756
describe
'29202' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMHZ' 'sip-files00094.pro'
53f04696b67d0181acabdccd950ed36e
121ab70fe92c16e19c2a01e3c973fc0e2fbdd319
describe
'51467' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMIA' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
6b10c5fa3a178e117af25196f4cafa60
871bfda4cccc957e640f3bff3a2afc1716523671
describe
'4378588' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMIB' 'sip-files00094.tif'
13695bc645fc32a6119d659df630160a
064ffec2f5f4bd6403019757a8e103cc01018198
'2011-09-28T11:09:03-04:00'
describe
'1158' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMIC' 'sip-files00094.txt'
4f637e3fc516b684e087a22e06dbb456
25e382c4b043e01a5b639c7bdffb746017c5f324
describe
'28497' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMID' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
f1f4323abcd1476f7a331155e145ec1b
bee5960a3343f9e58428c2f94a901cf4b4042eec
describe
'544680' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMIE' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
d122adbf89153537e22bf0b6e912b63e
406cfecd63857968e484d90267364487857b054b
'2011-09-28T11:11:14-04:00'
describe
'125442' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMIF' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
0c13e51f26a338d05c6655dddf575b42
72f9e2b0e255f55b73c2e4bad36961db2db12930
describe
'30830' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMIG' 'sip-files00095.pro'
b2e4d54674b65c4dd9b39f88568bd668
246b76ca40fdcab120491db04902cf421771baee
describe
'54059' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMIH' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
9e71fe83d2396970ddefa63b08b811b7
c2b4ad0132829a8285217be7f1f8bf7d320cf6ef
describe
'4379212' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMII' 'sip-files00095.tif'
18025d7cb3e08edfaf2ec4a53a2891fa
62a822ebd9266ee78725c972e8645ba0add59e8e
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMIJ' 'sip-files00095.txt'
6e03ac68d62ac3a99e5a1f80af58641a
b14622945bcbac09c0ea4b2dde99fd01854b6b63
'2011-09-28T11:06:08-04:00'
describe
'29996' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMIK' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
cc70b5cb9ff1bba5d1cfff356537b3a8
a8b3f791804c80f4f66d442c46ef2eba415dfcbb
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMIL' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
42d8475b9b38cf2cce54e167c8a4a3df
d7cccd68040da4e2bc1b929641528e9641f7ee21
describe
'149397' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMIM' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
279da920ed96988dbe8b13d993f9081b
cdddf70bd7e8e69e4d8c7c4a74ad18f66d50208c
describe
'38607' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMIN' 'sip-files00096.pro'
b53c24e05fa9185d0fb02f7007f50d26
acda0112f3d8d58a282c90aba14b3351947a94e3
describe
'60686' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMIO' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
fe01fcd5e49fd0a745076fd856b4cfba
16756fb09fec1246e62ad8392494a152b4a2b59c
describe
'4379540' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMIP' 'sip-files00096.tif'
3bf0d49528e54f407071a928455c7e78
68521a511bb116532b67f46dd4480235ae4953ac
'2011-09-28T11:08:20-04:00'
describe
'1519' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMIQ' 'sip-files00096.txt'
95ec97fc871ddcf819153636b9f8ce5b
295900cd689c4c2858225b0daa78ca248f114f58
describe
'30903' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMIR' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
ddf10867dcbc6b4f510582c3b7c2d531
1adb42ee2f7626ec0f3276da2221d142b6adcc3a
describe
'544674' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMIS' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
1bab4ac4fc08f676c084f8252a842b42
60418923ca5476f814498473a847d71ff186d68e
describe
'146340' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMIT' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
e71799dc299e7a4f4800a77f255ed0d9
e2b020788618c9b80e0af073727bbc9d24404a33
describe
'37978' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMIU' 'sip-files00097.pro'
90d66b2d93987aa35edc2c6a4f688426
5b1598930fe1033f3a9fe3c6e10e0ceeee1f2909
describe
'60771' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMIV' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
d479da1616622923419ea07c485b4af3
52cfdfa4d975e5104a401d6bfee84256fb8d4597
describe
'4379588' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMIW' 'sip-files00097.tif'
a8963ee381024e7bbf49c2299f9a3527
daab603eab026d0e191e5e34aedaa72d36794c48
'2011-09-28T11:06:36-04:00'
describe
'1499' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMIX' 'sip-files00097.txt'
423c1bdadf5772d241898bbe1db73651
4447d0d8de1854b1c8a634017e87af1aa56946d6
describe
'30924' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMIY' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
1b5d7ccf4fc49149abde2dde6e7762ef
881c5fd55850901e86a745d80c85962ccd21335a
describe
'544352' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMIZ' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
baa6c66e2e16e89f16c649966239a333
f3c44e07511e78ed0a363c97eea84fdc94b485ff
describe
'157115' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMJA' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
77f4c3ff0d7fa0d281d2134c5a347a3f
074ae7e430ac58aeb587e0293f6e8767514691a6
'2011-09-28T11:09:18-04:00'
describe
'42116' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMJB' 'sip-files00098.pro'
b4901bcf1c2cc497ae46674259e35ee2
01574cf5ec794f8eb4b9254fade063279237f4e1
describe
'63684' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMJC' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
1b0aa5e8faf6bb55aec391da0bdb72db
18f3b46c70465bd9b8d20dac56f8c09bfb7a0c06
'2011-09-28T11:05:29-04:00'
describe
'4377212' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMJD' 'sip-files00098.tif'
dfa93aa183ee437e6009e43880163a3b
e4a51077eafb0cdffd19b1d32ce5e722cf9111c8
describe
'1662' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMJE' 'sip-files00098.txt'
4a505d3468fc1960ca54b81412b58ec5
b0f68e67002d76fd86e857ac5612cebd348b75dc
describe
'31296' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMJF' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
f48df48a4d25be085a278c44be149c20
81d0805a04306755de0c86d8955907f56db90981
'2011-09-28T11:09:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMJG' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
d671b3d46f8ee7034b850493d6bc8f39
b305e5c6c01e7b1d39ac80c3d21e17edb9c7753c
describe
'181239' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMJH' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
7545eb950ef42cc586cc4992fb58f4fb
9d1f448da73d8efef9c474454c789d1fef9e923e
describe
'3691' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMJI' 'sip-files00099.pro'
fb03e2a5243b887d3c844d2dac04afe9
d50db276afb9d6f79e29080dafd0a91062c73322
describe
'64064' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMJJ' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
86559de027b819f8bd28776c09418527
4b28f32e6f4c82959df8c18b6de52def417921dd
describe
'4380860' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMJK' 'sip-files00099.tif'
2fb56612943a28417b00432eb107205e
d4b55c4a71e6f1c97f14884577c46ba2a2fab029
describe
'362' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMJL' 'sip-files00099.txt'
2f9ba3ab6ce6edc1a649ad11d5e776a4
6a9cca82428e8a29fbe1516c7868502e188e0bda
describe
Invalid character
'33435' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMJM' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
5a52c050c1e8caa0ea37a154ee0c2d65
8152b7bba45b755aa4c52cabfe4b690c8a2219f6
describe
'2153' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMJN' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
6b3a6fdec2d8463944be6b9a3ecc651e
cc3651ec9d809b3fd9e103e5d5d03316f5dd6be0
'2011-09-28T11:11:04-04:00'
describe
'19974' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMJO' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
c0987945f80ef509a175eb59ad37bab7
8b2d06d896107b5da9bb4ff3440e99dc24792354
describe
'18411' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMJP' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
3571e35721b95780866baf4ad39cd6fb
2667bf0e4a15e36af0e0aa83ff13fc97b33935fa
describe
'4374668' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMJQ' 'sip-files00100.tif'
9b6458d222866ce60b80bcb1216063b6
645968d91ae78cd79953b7a7adacc197b9785446
describe
'18004' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMJR' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
68abd9ac0a6002dd177b82d7421cc60f
b488779392b0a012d566cf7d080c495a138c1e4b
'2011-09-28T11:09:44-04:00'
describe
'544609' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMJS' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
09412ce6f0fa713e8ce57fb0f3084129
c90b53a3e8ad17828af10edd132c368cb6e630cb
describe
'150632' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMJT' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
5c879a4c2ca45424f6cceedd69183394
23b8278ab7c8ff8a882e6ed1744cbbb70147f9ea
describe
'39290' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMJU' 'sip-files00101.pro'
bc7f068b1059f5d2cc29fefa560e9665
089863a4f22b285c0a30f8dd931476403c5503f3
describe
'61772' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMJV' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
daf868778a99f58b20a0821d4489caea
b48cffc21fce31651368e1bed44a4b8181748e65
describe
'4379696' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMJW' 'sip-files00101.tif'
13479aadabdd809731063018fbe153cb
bf23856489db4d7f39cdc240e989154b35ef8178
describe
'1759' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMJX' 'sip-files00101.txt'
5ed83beaf5ffb75ddd8b9241f7213238
0be4ed11b4c767ec1bf19e52fe5bc408767e89f2
describe
'31293' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMJY' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
d4864c32ee1508e162940524937faaed
fa0976cfde7e8b1f66f6c869d98719cc2dd96f78
describe
'544645' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMJZ' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
671e41d92e436752ccbf526d39884ed1
048423e587397a7214b7438f686a2c165dedfc24
describe
'156084' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMKA' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
749682a4a7c1303aa7e93aefa2c771ab
c400b121345652ae7bb1af4594156bff6d98db85
describe
'39903' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMKB' 'sip-files00102.pro'
c5b2ecc009ba5ba521bb83b883900654
20b284ed078a0dd8c1ec7a82d43dc3a06322c637
describe
'62369' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMKC' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
cf79a687aa3a9cdf7d14d6bb0b7606e5
cfdfc1d86250a7b1037667cc92c77121904e5ec8
'2011-09-28T11:12:36-04:00'
describe
'4379768' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMKD' 'sip-files00102.tif'
2b73d8f9cf36edd097ed35b7dfe805b8
5129acdcf23c970e9f57604b91d83c686e6a5d21
'2011-09-28T11:07:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMKE' 'sip-files00102.txt'
fb24d3b680f33da9f58c0bfa7fc329af
92856234950ad2f487876a80acfee5bf57412c9d
describe
'31421' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMKF' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
cf6f36e5408ab098d8b943d210438ef1
4e7fd4c9736d083b828560308691e257025a93bb
describe
'544686' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMKG' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
74f5bc7185b09d05eb58c5c91c8ea7d3
0c34cf0909d8d6ce4cead6a5dc88a24c70ead0df
describe
'159888' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMKH' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
2f14ef77ffbf0f91c8df31d1fd89c651
0fb68fd42605eeafccf1da98e9993923b125d3a8
'2011-09-28T11:09:15-04:00'
describe
'41358' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMKI' 'sip-files00103.pro'
d264a26fd081c3e48ee9760f31651204
6e626ad85f920d5a1a79e19ca7d751e21773f265
describe
'63771' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMKJ' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
7f981f5a8a7777c6849a64ae452d2118
df1c167f7160f33e60686f8ed79b8e8ca5940d4e
describe
'4379684' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMKK' 'sip-files00103.tif'
e3357638c4d36c325223d64bbcb27f08
d85dd24601e897008f49bfc15cb4a4d8f9487e88
'2011-09-28T11:08:04-04:00'
describe
'1639' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMKL' 'sip-files00103.txt'
c21e75ec57f3185d13af2b6970d36580
2644e599a9e7a79a8825b37d87138054fd4b8fc2
describe
'31346' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMKM' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
ddadf09cd83ee08b5e5484aeb620e905
fa1231491f975f564f54c86cd622df069fd6a216
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMKN' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
c6ff4a58d4a00014ebb10ac377a4f16e
b6247bd5170ebebc20a837e5400ef06b2adb6980
describe
'155317' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMKO' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
5e19e72e31af2836206661cd38293b17
32fc5b718231b3c1712614097f5da0b7dc4eb3a6
'2011-09-28T11:05:07-04:00'
describe
'40277' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMKP' 'sip-files00104.pro'
3010a896de311ebc9403cee39d6e950d
13e9ac2f02126818f8d92560e6cd8102673efa88
'2011-09-28T11:11:27-04:00'
describe
'61053' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMKQ' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
b507afa3e96b24788349a8acff1aa22a
0324ca5295a8a1192bd16aa5274b2108392080fa
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMKR' 'sip-files00104.tif'
f35e552fc4c93cdefb7a4e02b2206b10
01d103e9634bd56a2a89f2922e75d2967890c69d
'2011-09-28T11:11:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMKS' 'sip-files00104.txt'
6c1c73032a67411fd7c17c3a875c941d
ab5b452a543f8c90fb0a86fe94088b912925e7b5
describe
'30778' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMKT' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
f0a1b33fe9b9c2f0903ba3a809ca5bd1
be58dcaaa4ef900857a80af7b0d8709ec02bdca4
'2011-09-28T11:10:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMKU' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
6b3ca986555f039668b8feb122168428
ae4ea8822a406ede29a7e7a103d77f6b342fb554
describe
'44993' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMKV' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
c600bb8c23ffc6182aa953f5c020946e
0581ee63d23ddec7e726e1b17829471b49621ed1
describe
'1109' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMKW' 'sip-files00105.pro'
d98613509d24dda69a09ed3ebaa19818
bf047d13833b55d14cf2d55a7bdeca27563483b7
describe
'23478' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMKX' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
54213f98fee96eb218ba8865ca8d1885
0b1bd638343b4b254db3a2fc90d55b179e4e1f72
describe
'4375096' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMKY' 'sip-files00105.tif'
069d20da0f104db53d41e8d840c5fe6b
3fcd3dd1a008d9ef083810d0439bf754953db84b
describe
'75' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMKZ' 'sip-files00105.txt'
b0c09a384335df6dead1f0b8856572ab
9c131ee194dc32494a8208a87b58e073050e0814
describe
'19443' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMLA' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
82ad1b44ef717f36fa54680a35f3e03e
04ba4739c6c5f9f62ef98ac2059a5424ccd02647
describe
'544532' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMLB' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
b940f98850a85bd93c84019a4e891226
0f4420e26b498685c6e4a77728b96b9028f4b9b5
'2011-09-28T11:10:15-04:00'
describe
'32165' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMLC' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
dbca1d53909f0f7619df1df625573906
bf8d52eb0f83d31883fc1322501584084195df79
describe
'20032' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMLD' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
c0a5bfae9b8355fdb733112b051e326c
80c80d169941300eebc6a9c55078f9befc030043
describe
'4374876' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMLE' 'sip-files00106.tif'
be58d61c989d12fb9bbec23d2177652c
b2ddf266d3aaf47b3b7ca9b211c8f4a5dac779b6
describe
'18440' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMLF' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
3676bd24ed4a85c4f44ca4719df0ea2a
2945e0dc1646f324052f83bc4206806176789ed6
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMLG' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
151b1fe7e78536be6cba446603e73e22
2452a8e6dc5acaf11e8accb27938e6af0c34db37
describe
'125007' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMLH' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
c26613ced78df65b221541eeff36ac9c
26f428f611758ec9357547bb89af12b0785de51a
describe
'29735' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMLI' 'sip-files00107.pro'
7d3381fda369c864d998b66164b0f594
f9aaaa838b0198c18f7ebee4a8e4e6c3d9d35460
'2011-09-28T11:12:39-04:00'
describe
'52868' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMLJ' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
2cb2883c60542b2597360f1575117863
681db4b97b0f1a132c41b801980914d689a7250a
'2011-09-28T11:09:38-04:00'
describe
'4378616' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMLK' 'sip-files00107.tif'
7280ec7d1924c4e8323cb8405521a902
93034482e38160e1dd05d376b68bddd90b7c9908
describe
'1234' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMLL' 'sip-files00107.txt'
604fee9a2898c965f2adc319d9a2cd52
9f59a6fb2cac7ddfdf6d5613a21a28f0a612ba44
describe
'28694' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMLM' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
aa82a91c5b1f1902a9b3fa168aae89d7
5a5722e09b44459d31d231c2e927b7a568684923
describe
'544357' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMLN' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
a3359cc86ab624fa7df46e62a33c1ca0
c0466bc628451b71ac6898c756f0ceae13cb70ae
'2011-09-28T11:08:42-04:00'
describe
'144418' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMLO' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
16c10ded591448391546c10a5d1add17
4a96f6980b8b272537121109b9dfd80d6d34b855
describe
'36677' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMLP' 'sip-files00108.pro'
44c60b6d81c9e4e7a83a8bb761855854
c045e6b15c2f540f2b1817c2ea701b4b4bfb8109
describe
'60018' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMLQ' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
c884839647c22cc69ec1f7e734082cc3
f2281af9be878576f215933343030b7d6f5a020d
describe
'4376940' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMLR' 'sip-files00108.tif'
172692edc0b643913fccb9d0ed075969
76c8ef9c00a19e42ad8d0a873bf55eadc811d082
describe
'1460' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMLS' 'sip-files00108.txt'
0668b995cefb48790b0ff22012916291
f3bfbbb62ee8ffca61230625a193d02e2d74f1ef
describe
'30590' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMLT' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
a419eef6fa9b7e25f3ef54e8d357773f
999744da92b9f3103b02a2f9d57dc1f55f9bd281
describe
'544677' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMLU' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
6f082997684dcf6f25d802d2dfbbee16
27ebaf7bc5c5a3065cf21f29bd6396c9ff741de3
'2011-09-28T11:07:04-04:00'
describe
'118605' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMLV' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
cc6bb0b8860d55a16daddf8d2e784554
f5e426667e424fa728ec0badeff9c5a6e5e5ae26
describe
'26526' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMLW' 'sip-files00109.pro'
bba923f9c68557431a3aa097ec60a482
b8bcaf82813d2c61882f9a74057942fc93c8af14
describe
'49307' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMLX' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
eae9df3a7f1f23e5b11c37a68e6746e1
222ad7bf9e23c9542472b894e5a9cc30e9309545
describe
'4378556' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMLY' 'sip-files00109.tif'
b2143b172ff32cd9cffb09e74ca686c2
bd481bc29cfcb3a89a13b3d7d475260e9e554c4d
describe
'1094' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMLZ' 'sip-files00109.txt'
63408a287c52e9df0ec88626bc747dd5
1acd0a371d08f3c816ac2bf21f1878e5a7c45649
describe
'28330' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMMA' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
f662bacfd6742a3440a86e936255af9b
e2af210dd4435e0599a68f3f2d70e13a2717a739
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMMB' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
741c738cc0edd2832a7dd2857467dee0
2b833c9fa1d8857679fecdf760eb187d4cec7e63
'2011-09-28T11:05:37-04:00'
describe
'136255' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMMC' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
89eb9c29b30087c1495a4463673cb01f
86ccaa4d48ffa1e8738729f95b1235eabbf84df7
describe
'34872' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMMD' 'sip-files00110.pro'
b51b801ebeeed2a8b7e599ac9c6ac0ed
13635131e427c8d0d3b3b70512bd2b9e074717d4
describe
'57871' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMME' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
224278b5bbba9dd7d3dd2aea9b4ef8c5
efca257015f156e062fca66078d0fe1b886017d3
describe
'4379416' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMMF' 'sip-files00110.tif'
31f548dea4e80f02e719110085588cc7
9731b81a2fd35c22db4af75216f2e2b0c8967cb5
'2011-09-28T11:08:03-04:00'
describe
'1388' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMMG' 'sip-files00110.txt'
6b231cf5b68328c933caa3bfe05d5e6a
6e7e2a9e3052fd7d7a974b41631c3a332ada3eb0
describe
'30715' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMMH' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
d503de37ac125d70628bc0b0a155015c
c6cf6bceb5c62ba9c259afb5b4c74305423f3c03
describe
'544625' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMMI' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
67ea04c61773bed7198d51e9c4e2373a
ab6cfa182b9ae2fc2fc1e04a23fdd0f9df2c14e5
describe
'141608' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMMJ' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
4b5ba1c343d85c1c6ee2320c1068614a
22f26044e2411fe7ce249abbec629f0c5b1fff02
describe
'37082' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMMK' 'sip-files00111.pro'
c0ffe5edda216c87bc2bbc452b38aa25
6ac0c9f57363ec376ab66fb6c356eae356cc88a4
describe
'59586' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMML' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
ca7a5e881ccd84937bd095eccb2e55fd
05d87ebd1a0842c962d978b8c4ddb04ade98995f
describe
'4379516' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMMM' 'sip-files00111.tif'
3d4e103b4c1d3d6d3590322fc410b711
3016a6d1fbf8726d0a9ef00cd4dffc7e2cd9494e
describe
'1468' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMMN' 'sip-files00111.txt'
859b61134836b4a8531eee8fc5317c73
7174f423878998538a7013f8c22ea6e62edda9cd
describe
'30616' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMMO' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
1eaf05eac89b8e652df9bb29c3be1241
950fb62128bcf38f71eb325a59550557877e6950
'2011-09-28T11:05:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMMP' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
f2dce8e8bf4d627fb25ba38bfbb4e3b3
e1c4ab09a054af04276a79ebb86cfdbdf86b49ae
describe
'143598' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMMQ' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
ac58798f02eaba65a9ea2b1c450bd9a5
2d0022db5770b72a467582a14e43abb838100dee
describe
'36765' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMMR' 'sip-files00112.pro'
1d4599689ba0aa3d99254e3d27068782
4814137d9988af41cf17922268b38e92c3b46feb
describe
'58726' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMMS' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
e1fc47f32cada13804ff17d5dd30c663
53a621014be575aaca624d30ad0bb55138fb6cc5
'2011-09-28T11:11:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMMT' 'sip-files00112.tif'
2078dfe8e37ed87c64d5ed844f204dad
753b982151ed62b8ba1943a8086adcec021802ec
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMMU' 'sip-files00112.txt'
7f481fad0b7c1d03596f839d55b3c785
7864e9316b9cb33e5e071b1bd2d30fb7d6029abd
describe
'30721' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMMV' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
8dc6737efde0e898b43039548cf6aa2d
6fa85c0485a6ad36916b31144a81cd37f435aea3
describe
'544597' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMMW' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
92f3f42430598abf3d8e63402ab8e9cb
b0b277a9c937e7fa611d2b49377011666d1ac54f
'2011-09-28T11:11:36-04:00'
describe
'143378' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMMX' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
47a005d23c5ff2c41c9f9b0d77a4ef7e
07ac15e17cb09f989753ad63f6ea3095c9646452
describe
'37026' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMMY' 'sip-files00113.pro'
5d070d3bfa85f09d6f2ff6992ede6780
2cee56cb95897832d3a726ade6524a0aa03fbce9
'2011-09-28T11:10:52-04:00'
describe
'59374' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMMZ' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
c1e7a98967f9a571426f66f5087a3b8a
3cbc11d671ac6f02e5fc509d09e694f641dc64fa
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMNA' 'sip-files00113.tif'
edb3743cf0767deb55a160bd84ac6055
a261f1ca3f6f38a6bcda4891e8aedef5c8bf1f88
describe
'1467' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMNB' 'sip-files00113.txt'
c506f696ee7a9a11b3b775a780110c3b
1e67cee946384f3dd230a263ee88ec852a089787
describe
'30925' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMNC' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
85705ff463b506375dc3266b06f64f29
66e0e5aa0903fd53bc3e4f62fafd7f61a9c47a36
describe
'544633' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMND' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
338b5d12e88cc6e9500e2d91644ead3d
427aa339d9bec19c7ab5407604b7e15e191e8d6a
describe
'144194' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMNE' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
3e6853f416ac71d6b88fb0e69819111e
3aca869963e65c17bf99a649bcbd24ef342f61db
describe
'36630' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMNF' 'sip-files00114.pro'
bf8749f155b8858b28ed3487489a738b
bd098c72b1d6208adb3dba9084efccf85854fbef
describe
'59176' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMNG' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
c16103c5eb25cb67d47d5a8f7f7d9305
e830a5d2f2c79331c7ac3085dbdb548edd93b1b1
'2011-09-28T11:07:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMNH' 'sip-files00114.tif'
71a5d00775604067c8a76d40c4eabefe
7a73457485cd8ed2d98ebcf0a6fc79e8c867ffce
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMNI' 'sip-files00114.txt'
4bfc47e09806dd5966ecc325f892b424
b2921896e5a1aa3d5563058402a69f0243a63d7e
describe
'30952' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMNJ' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
1a7036e81aedcd6cea3bcae796f9a74b
0533d4c3444d493e1ba9102a49f540c8b4f9d056
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMNK' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
129729d3d8dbcafd013d0a4e0799c98b
b0469d46c2e5ade0fe09ae04f6e1adfde1f94e93
describe
'146583' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMNL' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
67b0f5c044d48c3af4724d185b72f221
2e0a2584073ecb6f2b08c557d5c66c343aff51c7
describe
'37165' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMNM' 'sip-files00115.pro'
a93df307da4b2f82e61bd1bc73304bc0
9b3eff146647cd33f25c416a9cb7a1a1006fb0c6
describe
'60149' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMNN' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
60ed0a64ec28130322af7860ef5c58f9
a4ff14401429c223ea5be33dcc54416c2f50a54b
'2011-09-28T11:10:40-04:00'
describe
'4379348' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMNO' 'sip-files00115.tif'
5ae49932ac4cdfeb4225c955088928a9
1c0cb96c00376898da667f121a9f4d4d0d75ab0b
describe
'1483' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMNP' 'sip-files00115.txt'
fe900792042044a6db2aaaa5c5889f8f
da56e540dee4a73ed8d5a6e3faa3846fdd9c711c
describe
'30613' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMNQ' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
1cc82c686702b019cffe903c070f7843
6f2e967e748bc1c4959059220c3cd91b23574024
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMNR' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
6beb8d893e60037e865a506bca45b7ed
5e0d4a8b9bdb8946f2598a97e22f52842555600f
describe
'152553' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMNS' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
1b3c152371fd522a4e2de14cc60090bb
f994e9ab892d94d44e06ff7d3de7709190df4a02
describe
'38680' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMNT' 'sip-files00116.pro'
d6605354e3825f15141ba3c69263ac63
2679227e441adb3885543865b479032b2bb79059
describe
'60679' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMNU' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
5f8947df2449b9621f4995c47a2de43d
44170f0c634043dc960efc1f970d1ef8f3d0813e
describe
'4379672' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMNV' 'sip-files00116.tif'
a2d07a3faf35391621b94fcf8bd2e938
8269f2d4fc3aa62335b36ef3fae71dc11fb78a46
describe
'1537' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMNW' 'sip-files00116.txt'
898285da498ef5269c1b928ec3a23a8d
876b8458db0b34c0948363a38447d574b4184724
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMNX' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
11467daa0b8d1e39f84d3468fa60b763
897b4f6ca81b37153ac1d37095f0bcf8a8a3b23e
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMNY' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
ce5c201abe8a2f0ed18f12e1e02855ac
409da83e0e8c125c2d89edbc660972100e7d2554
describe
'143024' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMNZ' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
312ab349278f437459719dca585cd2d1
0ef210f10da3cb3cc283fe6771323fd3ed8bb6a6
describe
'36000' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMOA' 'sip-files00117.pro'
54d9950505ce7eb49ab705d3b1b23561
cf28c4efa4f6da29af07ee5e3ae35b3c32e88335
describe
'58886' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMOB' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
ba8a6ea978436913e09d08cf646980b5
5111a31e14f93471fd710f7d0ee7f944db98c70b
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMOC' 'sip-files00117.tif'
e311db49057238c532e0c77bba2582e7
270b8acfdfb454644d09122a3c5337db29c61e12
describe
'1469' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMOD' 'sip-files00117.txt'
709216837f96d1c62630fb578dd1ee58
88c59baf73d8a440d84993a5dc3db6068f54c466
describe
'30442' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMOE' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
b381dd8547c44885fd1626a89b7ae7e2
e9997e825078e0f83da4a6670ea4372b69bc0b04
describe
'544685' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMOF' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
7d98184964ae9c5b2e275970b05b2e1f
91d65bdf4c8a5cbbbc64314311fe464cf5baa1bc
describe
'145820' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMOG' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
c35b35dc59b34a63895c89096dbb2dac
e15c3c9c270bd862af69b1c307a824329ec5893d
describe
'35311' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMOH' 'sip-files00118.pro'
06d1748fa4dd47d9587470c72a561326
b859a0be02dfae2e5e96fb803edfcd3bd4a269a4
describe
'59040' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMOI' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
00186ace2529cef9a7d1e89024617cc3
ae0f276d8865962d8dccf44402a2bab9aa43b744
describe
'4379472' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMOJ' 'sip-files00118.tif'
77d619c0dbc6f01c76e05b844e861c84
b71d3f27d699f86a25171ef4b34fd3ee3a1fdf09
'2011-09-28T11:08:40-04:00'
describe
'1404' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMOK' 'sip-files00118.txt'
4654b3e0fd2e1ef32a433e3a786f17a5
44aeae49c8ca3d4696e76a8727a441218d165d72
describe
'30387' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMOL' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
5df35e06181ff771e0c6f9675673c3c2
95fca9204d5519d3e3215695d2259f4e20d53c20
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMOM' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
8b97625012b3e0d093778127d0807fc0
6fe2cbf03f4118590a311ab3b37e35c510291c08
describe
'141855' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMON' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
4f78f457df5486c07e9127116a369971
2d7f77d337f05b5b2dcae7f4cd11dab0078181ef
describe
'36380' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMOO' 'sip-files00119.pro'
45c0a1e8e5a838448a28640e48be31e0
ed7bc92f54e48560dfc6986cf9da477181ce36ca
describe
'58564' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMOP' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
5a8740a2dcf2f4ee6e6ad9f25f42d171
8e89bde597704d664eb4410f9da2428bfc031432
'2011-09-28T11:10:56-04:00'
describe
'4379336' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMOQ' 'sip-files00119.tif'
c3e1b641d06cfd3f318fdc6bb537b53d
1412fbba4ec776b248159a69c438869a458e173d
describe
'1454' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMOR' 'sip-files00119.txt'
723e2bc5899b4c1c07d288a7544ed5a3
124196801baf277953d081e12fb903fa33448a15
'2011-09-28T11:12:01-04:00'
describe
'30339' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMOS' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
6f2b89968b22125fd96e8d674cbf38e2
27478f8a5005aa6f0456f3f71fba2c058052eaa9
'2011-09-28T11:06:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMOT' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
54fd37708637c4ba4ced98cc32013138
6980000cbd1c311e2e923d695e98ec8e354fe231
describe
'138046' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMOU' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
bca15875a700a40de0523fa88d1fc2b5
b3ce384c2cbf748ad160a954026c37a20e11de77
describe
'35664' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMOV' 'sip-files00120.pro'
d3bd6966690e008333a806d58bc494c8
967d97625f3f66bacdcedc36bbb261c7e1856115
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMOW' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
5ef6bd7c33b62080458270aa83e1ffcb
e3562eccd546d493238368f5cd7a8b13d6f95b12
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMOX' 'sip-files00120.tif'
dc4811d0bda4b11dd5d6682ceab6ba23
9830062424bbebca87280acf073e7e838ef7b2a3
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMOY' 'sip-files00120.txt'
4f2c7db8c9b69bc859f7b362ed51c3a9
208b586ba45bd4e63c3d380199ddc71ad084b449
describe
'30500' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMOZ' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
52037471ebf0e9195f84e506ffda85c9
31777e5a06f1510f8b66d69dfc751d3f8fd76cea
describe
'544683' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMPA' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
a8b9101f74ff803ceae13fba66f6cf7b
d726f46ea6b17a4744c3511aa0856470f03310af
describe
'129622' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMPB' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
b1030d023dde9cd93809e8736aa67da3
1624bfb8ef6617788b9d06e4aa3d4888f4f4133f
describe
'33753' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMPC' 'sip-files00121.pro'
78d478c8d95f75e5ff58c784645f013d
e16e8ece2ef6711f42ec572cd410d1cc8d521d00
describe
'54846' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMPD' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
af50e1c95da656c99fb4f404985e8ce3
8dcdcbd9e362868d893b2969e81a25ddccd6589c
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMPE' 'sip-files00121.tif'
cef3c995f3ac6a2d673edaecbfcff757
551dce4f85e35a65590585f4249fadc54720ed14
describe
'1378' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMPF' 'sip-files00121.txt'
1db39676614d7f378102da8a37f57ee5
2433a6f47e366399ea052acfa0b05b2a601bb6ce
describe
'29553' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMPG' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
a116f3bd25d4c36b2fc91f45ae25a4e2
336d76a027b7839074d174b16131ac3014072484
describe
'544624' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMPH' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
7474eba368dcb7cef049c258ab4a23a7
2ece924e0b2707f64eae2de33c0272f0b403c3e9
describe
'134154' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMPI' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
e0fc969aad8ba55033a8a185d3d73db5
e69136074c64d8a619e118b353dcb7879d8efb76
describe
'32855' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMPJ' 'sip-files00122.pro'
fc7d336e8172a4ecf51dec81c936166c
3cfdfff9b5fc874acfb20367abca1963a4f9e830
describe
'57382' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMPK' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
9f575b5b16751213c9a0b02e046df58c
ac69bd38405977a47aa2065f89a167f3b2ec8f3f
describe
'4379428' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMPL' 'sip-files00122.tif'
13c9ba8045d2f7132f5f066d33b3fa54
468f66115c81905c8bf839104a6e2f612d982791
describe
'1305' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMPM' 'sip-files00122.txt'
eba62661689a5ad1eeaccd5a45ae5224
549383bedab6fd47b28c30926a6068c5424357a0
describe
'30380' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMPN' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
ab2c1c803f8e3759679a0074f2b94359
3549b7093651ec59982325cc88ce5bc3214a3da6
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMPO' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
d33f3812ccc85265b382a7ead14f10e3
39866e40d8101a044f2f569ae63e9f1c197eab9a
describe
'209960' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMPP' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
1fa4f9e444896dff0e67ce0c43726679
fbc5cd2c932f6e977ee4534abb5f142286f0d045
'2011-09-28T11:07:16-04:00'
describe
'2526' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMPQ' 'sip-files00123.pro'
7c013b20dde29d826bbc231e922403c4
466bfbb364268168d52d63259c7eef79d467222f
describe
'64720' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMPR' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
324b76ee726c63755a34f3ef873b14d4
afa628df8d73c6934b7664405a408082ab1be5fd
describe
'4380228' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMPS' 'sip-files00123.tif'
0f16285751f68e410c087e0744c326dc
86b8e12d92cfc58490bc115b9df1ced65ea1b0a5
describe
'113' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMPT' 'sip-files00123.txt'
172aca7fdee73e755956bc003e21eb5d
7a6e406ee4866eaae46833f45aced13391b254ef
describe
Invalid character
'32174' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMPU' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
2f4f354de5d448d330b6e214622d3be5
e71c16c567c26d4442cef38d50e53cd08658e779
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMPV' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
bbab688fc81034ceadd02ca18a683621
c162c182ef29980aae593c3696fb189dd541301d
describe
'38986' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMPW' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
bbc0d18005c843d6c1e54a316ec17820
4d9410320dc7543b4c36a09f18e7277a325435d8
describe
'21001' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMPX' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
ab40a9988a6e5bf42f57efa8a40568df
97559efac8e320fe62b944c207d5d4c131504642
'2011-09-28T11:12:25-04:00'
describe
'4374732' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMPY' 'sip-files00124.tif'
2887516bde0a650c357cdbecd2a6a9b5
c2432fe8e940a4af95ebb52b26042a3888879aff
'2011-09-28T11:08:48-04:00'
describe
'18551' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMPZ' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
f265c8f92d9ac62bc217c7523eb8c579
e637f1d12a7bea6c00c5cbae3cdfba83802bf579
describe
'544474' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMQA' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
c9a4f9da8903566f1c3bf22878dddf57
2c003c950e4c0667eb57ebee373a6484c122648b
describe
'140674' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMQB' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
2778ff98d3c168e709cc1227154b61d3
9ee50bb05250a4b29f2a3fa61fa5462241c051d2
describe
'36043' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMQC' 'sip-files00125.pro'
007e4dd3ee692c3e4e13f57540081e5e
2769aabcdb92d0f7040c2490467793d96928d35e
describe
'59214' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMQD' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
45372d93d0aff9b267870b88387f3879
d89a9926609ed5c6e2c4dbb1d49d07c0ceaa6ecc
'2011-09-28T11:09:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMQE' 'sip-files00125.tif'
5754082298c67420da46855656d1945d
418b46a9f5e6624d3a7058968bb8b18eceb7dade
describe
'1442' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMQF' 'sip-files00125.txt'
c7a9ed5bfc57ecd87e7d2f4aa567d144
18a55a9f9da49e4cdca7bc0d619bef3b5f74937e
describe
'30781' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMQG' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
40cd8da449c8ecd0c7119b8ae73bc288
419fc4f876d738c8658b0938346738db0eb82834
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMQH' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
f116d6e6ab3cf45b52e72363ccc60699
b28bfd41d5a99b98ef7ed6c147eff403127c4332
describe
'60734' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMQI' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
d5e1f82d4dacf8ab091fc59047349a1b
d8506e9b54a1744bd9645e7f17c9b0c2308e3c26
describe
'8086' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMQJ' 'sip-files00126.pro'
787f13dd00b6547902353bc21ada0971
34550507fdee9adcb9fc3fac0a067a8bf4e6f05f
describe
'29857' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMQK' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
e2da1b42c0518762b931d73017f30c72
f585e9134a91f856f2310d6f81a988e6c35dc44c
describe
'4375908' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMQL' 'sip-files00126.tif'
ef17c996a1625a9796e013e1f7fef805
99caa99d56295e5f2466514a05b7054b1dd029d6
describe
'335' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMQM' 'sip-files00126.txt'
312d4dcd033bdb9a6263c0eab371059f
e6c28fac50a697649cdff1ce2ca7a4a3afe29d1a
describe
'21617' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMQN' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
6f540702063ea98b6687fd6ac1865b9d
c7737c67f93a1f451d92a26d0ffc5fbdff53b049
describe
'544673' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMQO' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
301d7bb4cf2b781d36af2d21404eb9de
9b84eb43a02d50157cfe7acb89b6ace9c8b831cb
describe
'38500' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMQP' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
b448e722618677aa4c2e14f7cf187866
233dcd7c677e4d3fa102aed37a269426ceb5467b
'2011-09-28T11:09:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMQQ' 'sip-files00127.pro'
f1862fc049200e947fe844c6d793fec5
56716653a9bff7f06d45da67ae72fad98a094c96
describe
'22381' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMQR' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
d1a8254259c055fef40e96bae793f26e
7ac0936e123c3d15835d081eab4bbd6df0765919
'2011-09-28T11:09:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMQS' 'sip-files00127.tif'
2c784508515c2c02fc85d647b9f17b98
f4277b518ade4311fae311c4eb1173a77b5a5265
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMQT' 'sip-files00127.txt'
f49d9658e29ab0aad69ddf79e73c0097
6977cf65809b71a9e5e1b11baf7fe4f02d4f2b5e
describe
'19286' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMQU' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
8285f79060df33815a8ac64956e3f244
dad97bba43674905364cb23ad20468378e911611
describe
'544571' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMQV' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
9e5440856c38c1475cb64f17c9f6a073
97b5eb6d9cfc7b31e854f4696581626bbc01b030
describe
'35519' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMQW' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
4ddc690feaa2bedf8f5ca9173d5da647
85a6470fafb494e0c7644f73b604f9ad02a1be2f
describe
'20504' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMQX' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
3c0c1fbdd8e5111eb64850a0292c92c7
62f83b2502f65f660e7cf349783e5b46e6a5edd9
describe
'4374768' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMQY' 'sip-files00128.tif'
52c7752e6588b47aa7d3f049fbd3522b
026cf15f0c4295d88fe5575cbafe8931db4e966e
'2011-09-28T11:06:51-04:00'
describe
'18589' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMQZ' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
22190dc27b8183ef932af815e8f8f839
1d6519a81250e393e096468028394aa927592184
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMRA' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
61baaa2d58654f8d30166c4f7cf760f6
b73a0fa9a91158d0d9cc5772e1127b39dfe72ac3
describe
'129265' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMRB' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
93b4b05f5ddb0e9b2e90cc7588e89fc7
1c8b5ecd73c2964db1075d2e10dd83a1e96decf2
describe
'31821' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMRC' 'sip-files00129.pro'
4b464f131da4e0d7abc728acf5155d67
d4f1059cf90dd82b0978ed353b9cdea8d5c473b4
describe
'54368' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMRD' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
385e66992132643111e52fbab9a73830
399e079da282b00f4f64ea15070dac95e1fa91c8
describe
'4378724' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMRE' 'sip-files00129.tif'
8c3d1d977342d8f2c0b69a6f67a92215
5184b6b235947d1010adc734d670f1c42fcac2df
describe
'1277' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMRF' 'sip-files00129.txt'
cde17d52a4e77d51013e9fddf48fa2f8
87e65f7113bc15f112e9eb0ffe629594fa2134f9
describe
'28776' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMRG' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
62206fc5ea038517aa69060732b9fe5a
1ee43cb3e373ec61ceff1c3af1093b58e7225582
describe
'544565' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMRH' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
210e8520098379224efdabda0038e5e1
3bc78356d60c3f715836e535bea53213c64a5180
describe
'147512' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMRI' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
8fda0911da315cfbe286e1a23243a80a
dec0f2aa78cc6f5b2452172ad251bf3871b5a28d
describe
'39167' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMRJ' 'sip-files00130.pro'
717c5228697db181ebcd7b63f219af47
7e3bb2e54cc0d028740302b7204671ca522cca20
describe
'60460' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMRK' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
0ba53398c6b8284f408f764e01e79658
5b2745ec3baa2582f11ae565b5bdd9d98c23459c
'2011-09-28T11:05:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMRL' 'sip-files00130.tif'
917865800d347a415d2f2635c51b89f0
cb779d8fe0406b13337e46ec2c1c6a59147f6e6f
describe
'1547' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMRM' 'sip-files00130.txt'
703864bd654c9b80cbf7a6eb1fe85e9a
19c187097b30558acee07ccf5d9f42ab9b5d9ddd
'2011-09-28T11:05:30-04:00'
describe
'30637' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMRN' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
b9470950a74b3134d7a53caadb74c46a
a087a6610fa6752a56d2f8e0367be3f289ee486b
'2011-09-28T11:09:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMRO' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
acb67850dda0584b91488278af644b0d
74e257b748285830dace5dc1c8aeda79f8fa3168
describe
'143502' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMRP' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
24adb2de17ef855e1d7e3b4fe6314d84
bd6cf351986eee708ccbce5b7ef6672c11c785ea
describe
'37873' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMRQ' 'sip-files00131.pro'
6b0f0a9acb386e78279344f24d64e87c
09af6288e6ae7839fedd02f488e83f4124cdbe69
describe
'60006' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMRR' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
035c4840a86b645341dd4719ca5f523a
6411bd6c4cd64642f13915ec3d2ff118bdfb6573
'2011-09-28T11:05:43-04:00'
describe
'4379436' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMRS' 'sip-files00131.tif'
b23de6b7263496d7dfb1b13e29941988
92e3b1b38eb84f79276ee9837c635ca01a7c8de4
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMRT' 'sip-files00131.txt'
c1462f70825d26128a448628f4787005
50ac681e2af9e4298fc3be1af26bd3d63fa6e3b0
describe
'30037' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMRU' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
25bb84773d28b1d228c5e1f728bd60c8
1e93d32b3e82ee7f0bf589ba898250682ebf6b88
describe
'544646' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMRV' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
2aebbac10ac7252115c746595a5ee10a
d7a1ec9aadb6c9886d7c9f443e16b1b4bd18ca1b
describe
'138373' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMRW' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
8f202f596a2dbbcbf615fc9e3ebcf411
4a59305d1319abd73cf1adaad327de05dff5fe86
describe
'34417' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMRX' 'sip-files00132.pro'
83df656ec393832de7274df0049e2edf
7c73aac807411d3eb6ccd9a54eb6ffbee789de20
describe
'57835' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMRY' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
9d56b11531344ba2359fb40ed946982a
ae6c03ff887dd32d71cf3d3d0988b3fc53e32dae
'2011-09-28T11:07:57-04:00'
describe
'4379440' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMRZ' 'sip-files00132.tif'
4054eeb9e33dfb8d4eeb291ec3074cd9
a03125f54c83e5b8daf199e055042ace389316fc
describe
'1366' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMSA' 'sip-files00132.txt'
5571c74584e4d530b9e3df19ae5a7678
06458b1cb7027576ef771aa5e129ba481669d9bc
describe
'30538' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMSB' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
71f96d32223fa06388f61e9dd905607d
86e71963e471edc6469bbf694ed3c3a90fd898d9
describe
'544627' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMSC' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
e55dd9691b2b9339841af3be44a8670c
5d357c7d06cee33fd3d9512a8cb1e0f98b34a78b
describe
'133039' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMSD' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
2090483f82c938a2970da282206f8946
e81c290c697337b427423c2cb697c193e2b8b5b8
describe
'33185' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMSE' 'sip-files00133.pro'
1940f3c4dfcf7ad4330470750bf76c74
dc872a15e385bc8c8290e16008ee0bf7c62a118d
'2011-09-28T11:07:37-04:00'
describe
'55763' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMSF' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
279cf84b547771edc063974a7eceb169
dea6d55e664be235e923dab0d10f0e58c3f1c507
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMSG' 'sip-files00133.tif'
6c96285f81a6d382a3c6dc6170783696
fc8881c42bc8372320f55cc048138febed52f4fe
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMSH' 'sip-files00133.txt'
c2ff23fe4cb3b775a0df7b325aaeb87f
e7ad0e48c6152fa85fefcc4bcb476dc9e087397c
describe
'30043' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMSI' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
6117b0db3e2c08915b4f6675f4978906
a7c0d4537f6392f562f1f7f639f05f0b11b7a6f5
describe
'544524' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMSJ' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
c671d5e3f737367f17208f23e91226cb
a4c23c6de098028436556ea9e1f8c1dd6a8b9ada
describe
'134959' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMSK' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
9724b2a0ae3e5fcadc5bab773cc545aa
b18ab2fad750d8726ac2b1e2d324c4d0209cf370
describe
'33832' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMSL' 'sip-files00134.pro'
a4f0c571978ca8a1cbf48210b1517a42
4c0081a6098a098226d0e0c5c1840120b813a670
describe
'56198' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMSM' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
ac70f1486c13d9b8a4e7e78b19be6239
d0d2dee138f8321dfc537d5c96834a4f7fcec12e
describe
'4379172' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMSN' 'sip-files00134.tif'
38c2d03bb39f0ae9b6980651c09dbdb7
91b4f3a20f4f8f6f09dbc8a6527489f92d199b6c
describe
'1349' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMSO' 'sip-files00134.txt'
f0e3eff6494821c548737973f38a1bb9
385acf39b5fdacd22e806ab222ff1d1e55b8146e
describe
'30121' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMSP' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
ac66d4eb272799fb9b3ef894c0669fdc
30aea4dc22489237b31192fb6e82928750910696
describe
'544513' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMSQ' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
2e48bb828ad3cfad3cf0fc1e12b04e70
5702afaa016369d16ca90013298a968ad02f6d79
'2011-09-28T11:09:41-04:00'
describe
'137550' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMSR' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
b1811397a022f7cc0f1e02952c341719
838c77a53821b4aa4cdd86f3766013c39ef8c1a2
describe
'35070' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMSS' 'sip-files00135.pro'
331edeb278a8b29cbc6d04c9d9e452ce
767559a81e37cf2f64553e8cdd2e02238876fcf3
describe
'58356' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMST' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
43519ec704cbc624f90e14b63da53280
f2538a0ffce629a9b5c46c6e40e317e58a50b5e3
describe
'4379312' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMSU' 'sip-files00135.tif'
9d620112c6059326fcc2d44737405542
e0287b89bbaa1e5fa9a22b6dca1225cce96264d8
describe
'1400' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMSV' 'sip-files00135.txt'
20086a74569d0e3a9d127c8046cc6eb6
419fc93f3aa9fc82320986ac2f21857a2d2c5ace
describe
'30304' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMSW' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
380a3734b7e5e747fefcd7eeaf06a84b
f87be0d751fe4ee271a28a2388ecc870740f9d6b
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMSX' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
04a1579650a97f4420eff1d846362669
8bd85d31beebec24b34143f90c50e46f5b8dbe8c
describe
'149278' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMSY' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
9b18e26205676ab4beedbc0eaf3b8d04
f726e375a03c3e14a150db3e2b8976a3b1c6becf
describe
'39138' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMSZ' 'sip-files00136.pro'
251aa5ac7cc1346558414f5118f12042
724b3d7b41577da79c4facb7d557a85fe21e9785
describe
'60731' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMTA' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
23ff83ebfba021c8f69e4fa087e9553a
6dcc2276c3571a0c76435170eab13628162e6875
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMTB' 'sip-files00136.tif'
fe5747653ad21d3283e784aabe99953c
1c927eed415c1e5f3836bf9bfb552193250e9bd7
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMTC' 'sip-files00136.txt'
f1a8564f4d1330232eb3f246af92a730
67fba2b0f960a3a6e9146b4e5da16ebcf56e4d74
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMTD' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
47988edda4c3300a8453a7018d560d6f
3124de7707cecfbff402688164a7f3eef0af9506
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMTE' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
07f164632fdcee7575f28829cb3d2949
b9ba5a829f3993feb75251e1fa7ff90ff2f0c3de
describe
'137518' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMTF' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
012ecbbcc9d732ce891eb9a115732a09
60f96a81009030c9c4bb0bc7225e30684f7e0b1b
describe
'33739' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMTG' 'sip-files00137.pro'
be21e27b5ff55473adb7aafd09c78b29
12b75ee21c273f82ab06c88e8472819ccd2d0504
describe
'57012' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMTH' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
938fe4e790dd9693a6f250720002ec50
45f96ac13917674c40dac4374717f87318c992fa
describe
'4379296' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMTI' 'sip-files00137.tif'
eaa7a699f315b556ce8d00822b849c4b
9509e771eec3a413c4f34668eb5ac408447ed65b
'2011-09-28T11:05:03-04:00'
describe
'1355' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMTJ' 'sip-files00137.txt'
49e11dbbcc2045b3d4a51a9667df3d74
1001b9f63574460cf6a6b955ef0ec35beb65b091
'2011-09-28T11:06:10-04:00'
describe
'30352' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMTK' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
22558449aa62b643c275a4e905013271
1434e47994d7419ecc3140eba8fb2841fcf52bdb
describe
'544669' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMTL' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
b0e5b23ace583cd5d91b922aa0f2ea9b
6f406ffc5485363e0e83865b79909e04a1c20773
describe
'151857' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMTM' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
2f1acf0c881432d274c16e89f518ad0e
8fb0c8384fc6f665ef052bab45c6e1d65184ac5d
describe
'37732' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMTN' 'sip-files00138.pro'
43a654af290bc6539b1a381ffc704833
0d85e0f2c87f97b2005fd1323e83ef1d63cc7505
describe
'60963' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMTO' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
f1c4bc294bba82416f7b60dd1e888299
d27f4a7e26cf234e7bed02ec3e1deb8d44249eae
describe
'4379616' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMTP' 'sip-files00138.tif'
0ac2d91fac15dcd93694e4045249e227
de471eac65be9d4bb576c6d6b23bb7080e3d11e4
'2011-09-28T11:06:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMTQ' 'sip-files00138.txt'
eaa82c47875b5787912eee0032ad220e
d55bc743c0a9caf3a2dffd267fa17f71ab897399
describe
'30751' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMTR' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
087f9f4cd5467729445e29f7bd695a8b
086821ec70df8588a1ce2f7d5dc07576da619d90
describe
'544659' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMTS' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
6da13dcc9f7386323b32aff54403130e
7ae51e7c74f54c26bc995eff20e7d967677b00d3
describe
'228530' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMTT' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
f998126230a0dede942970846c60a4c0
35b1bbf99b07b4114453c36667b279204f61a88c
describe
'2019' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMTU' 'sip-files00139.pro'
b3335bf6b15ee5625ea912d8cb83c5f6
1065ef1321850af76fb37d3010adc97215ccf65e
describe
'70603' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMTV' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
455369847dc31d72acbc5ea32d9a585a
ff01199c4435cd9af9a0986407774d02c8bce7ed
describe
'4381424' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMTW' 'sip-files00139.tif'
9c95b9734f9d45c3aefe4cddc427e841
04d547bd62cd460e12c2d67d41704967e840f157
describe
'98' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMTX' 'sip-files00139.txt'
77e5a1f5e34511c9f3bff2f6686e7248
ee30b50fe02c3c37a0af66263f1e110ac1409991
describe
'34544' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMTY' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
b9c0a72b374ff6a4a1e4a0fc7d8041b6
17964a86d2ea90cf4788afac1f51af215ec9d1bd
describe
'544397' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMTZ' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
4ea07eec030a0e30de59f9f915f940e3
26bc26d7e1e2c028c6017293620176833b7bf15d
'2011-09-28T11:06:57-04:00'
describe
'35453' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMUA' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
25879e1e094f61ec8ef668aaeb58b09b
66eba0af7cc4d520c48a51da1cec9e13cdadf075
describe
'20178' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMUB' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
8c7d185e5f604a66355be832aafdb0fa
0ca5a0740a54f15c74e6284254f9422dc3a8223f
'2011-09-28T11:12:27-04:00'
describe
'4374824' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMUC' 'sip-files00140.tif'
b063496b0698b402c2a92caaed01643e
0a8e497307142b27f521a0fcc0440012e6fc7ccb
describe
'18384' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMUD' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
b47dde28ccb8974f78c9f4cb3b638bb5
a70d307ee2af364cb55de579936768c346ddb07c
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMUE' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
1ae8f6077377b1eaae2ecdc82324a97e
d9b7ed32090be593b3787862e5fb2cf9a17734a5
describe
'132948' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMUF' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
f8c2833e3ee9799e85dec84b78764868
8e616e40ba90adfb907b58f5df83a57c16564447
describe
'33244' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMUG' 'sip-files00141.pro'
0fa939be12b318494907ed54a61bb626
f43684a5ce8768f2fe19390a71acc8bdb633d31c
describe
'55381' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMUH' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
c9f81acd77f4318ff7eb16a1c75ce4a5
dbb1401e2e4e45aaae5024156ec501db80773d4a
describe
'4379128' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMUI' 'sip-files00141.tif'
0e708755221553913a6f4bc56580fbc6
4965f23b41631e7dad91548ba5036ec63931d725
describe
'1358' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMUJ' 'sip-files00141.txt'
e8742b2028b88e88d62ada281fa28e4a
6ac5205a2d058e7eee5f8d7305b54d7159c6b25a
describe
'29814' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMUK' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
f41bb4566937a98569b18e33812b72e6
9c6ac7d3ea1abf4a9b57502170654883af195be6
describe
'544498' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMUL' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
1bdf95d5438824ca2fb42eb713441cad
d5ed07d199fd926bbef4ab501c2a7bc7fa10fca5
'2011-09-28T11:08:22-04:00'
describe
'141369' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMUM' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
64ded043561f88591e1f230a33e81167
da7894029237d64b398bcd201b939e3cba08fc41
describe
'36448' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMUN' 'sip-files00142.pro'
aa28b6a929d9078d7a4a551bfc6c133a
d3fdf8418f7a42adfcd10c89a66a77ea32c5e26d
describe
'57582' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMUO' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
4dfee2e5bc83b6359a7a1b726ad3bca5
6c7b25427cbf8aee3a4aaeff88dd20fa44e0a57c
describe
'4379460' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMUP' 'sip-files00142.tif'
e7889a1a1ca553fc16aab40d32161582
73180aa79b91ce107d682753079ddb1483b074dd
describe
'1459' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMUQ' 'sip-files00142.txt'
cebd6892eb7067729b5226e82476c69d
7dfcbea2ff71b3b88f8188d080f38ba64e375a63
describe
'30439' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMUR' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
0b5fd3dbc69ee6aa90c337bc685a2fb4
af49b699b168c3b0bbe5b1df242f7af8bc4a86fb
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMUS' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
6d92f72e549ca1ee3646440790aa28bd
61847bb1da885cea9a446da593027a60556f48d2
describe
'142387' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMUT' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
cbce5fee396443577cabe7a834993dd1
2d387f096975f1dca72d23b972f98ddfbf581aec
describe
'37242' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMUU' 'sip-files00143.pro'
001e263a4dc2d3a16e53c037795c4082
eb159fc4d596c6414ef9061feec2f078fa398128
describe
'58026' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMUV' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
434fba6c101a36d3292a8f5b9c56f68c
68206d50534cddde09dc0e0243cb34e6a0023552
'2011-09-28T11:10:38-04:00'
describe
'4379292' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMUW' 'sip-files00143.tif'
6d62bde63a13a201b00ee09f1e10a1b7
ef7124b849b739e2551b52eccce62ef7868df3b9
'2011-09-28T11:09:29-04:00'
describe
'1498' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMUX' 'sip-files00143.txt'
e0b628c66bbe4d8951b174721af9ff5f
7bcf176caa7a72ff4c567d6d01a569ab8354e659
'2011-09-28T11:10:17-04:00'
describe
'30484' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMUY' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
5966eb54b7ba0da41c78c5751c0bbcb0
fdad67d2c5e7bd6f33d44f77d11b3079b52e399f
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMUZ' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
c06f94ce7df4f8d8133bbb15facdde73
2177f0677f563dc846d78a812f33aea7ce9ff62b
'2011-09-28T11:10:26-04:00'
describe
'140430' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMVA' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
38cee463badb224c05002d74b40ec6be
4956e77a4829329001d880aaf8b5989f166bb8ec
describe
'35092' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMVB' 'sip-files00144.pro'
f8daed44ffa7831a4eda708992ee2e49
61ff0993cebf520aed2debe5d94e7af102e245c4
describe
'56940' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMVC' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
38d468ad0d6a34a514faff7685716853
d6d83ca8f7aa8394acd53cb34bfe43949ab11d06
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMVD' 'sip-files00144.tif'
193e8541bd28d8d4f91a2607ab989ce4
0870207c1af441c53ac062620a54cedd723bb866
describe
'1403' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMVE' 'sip-files00144.txt'
ad0c64c55536d28a9a52d3bac7703428
7d414fb2a6b37d2a8a5d6fa7db6fdb4dbff0a266
describe
'30188' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMVF' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
fa4d166bd58d553c1e6d87a2e95011c5
e690e160fc9b5fe039e06c975e04762de1449597
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMVG' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
42b6f5cd8375c2412216e42c6fe7b2c6
f18cf42221aa4111168d01adbd9b218c75916797
describe
'139211' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMVH' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
6b8e60d13ad1d5d8c7c48132b711be11
8498fc194c81aee10e8b9f28cd66aed64837d125
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMVI' 'sip-files00145.pro'
66c9033fb080f1e1d1b927ce96bbe5f2
fc5a7d1d5435577b6d4ce6451cb11df6843a0568
describe
'57073' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMVJ' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
d89d305cafcc24f8f7d4a22652512f4d
8f2a40b092bc4ad5272ab95b142e91058c3ca35c
describe
'4379216' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMVK' 'sip-files00145.tif'
e8c6179f21237460f23cd5b58248fae4
72c3094f4e10bf729dc7d5ce66ba8d427bfd96ba
describe
'1432' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMVL' 'sip-files00145.txt'
98b87f886c7514b8b74371409031f6f4
4f1c85375d5ba6e93d1b2317834be8700ac02215
describe
'29915' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMVM' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
7aed26a5efc091b6521de53efae54b15
4f9dbbda712a1ec499d894ba48f7299abfd915f9
describe
'544676' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMVN' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
6431635b07bf745442f2f7e71bf1aad5
beeb7199c7b92d3a035ff7e29604f16a3e0ae74d
'2011-09-28T11:07:50-04:00'
describe
'131064' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMVO' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
f2ea295430018097ed86dd5dea19fcbf
98dcbea84d9dcefae58ae3ded393d9eb30d32f61
describe
'31286' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMVP' 'sip-files00146.pro'
18b877d8f21998577690a02dda1087df
18bf68e5e2a1021285ce260141c156da406efdf6
describe
'54169' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMVQ' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
d87999a80a1abf2499d127bc0e5bb0cb
392219ac0fa369d3f49ccf1d2baaa3bcf6feae17
describe
'4379036' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMVR' 'sip-files00146.tif'
a869108babd1eabe9acebdaa049156d9
038d0aca35c8378a102ef7c239da9b1e030f2841
describe
'1264' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMVS' 'sip-files00146.txt'
23544c14ff65b60192697852617d3c1c
a4d595a73bbe34b3567ef984dea6696ead854380
describe
'29473' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMVT' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
a728c4bfbc3baf7b986bf397d3805459
6ce53df1a23845a9eec7982dc24fea9932e17162
'2011-09-28T11:08:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMVU' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
4a8771ca2659ccc0a3eba9b725b4a3c9
5af18f5854203cf7043ab4f4e9c0fc0f465e6fab
describe
'141602' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMVV' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
ff6eddbe8ef61bf5f22610a61e2da85d
ce192b0feb7e01961a8a0dc09831d4c28cf42b09
describe
'35190' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMVW' 'sip-files00147.pro'
57d5b9dbcebec2714edc47b3e0c6d913
4efa7748f63618247648c7cb42f5f498862f4724
describe
'58693' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMVX' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
8fd229e6d334caf02fe13fb03d4daab8
fc961e68ae137bf070e3452cc220172f9de5fae2
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMVY' 'sip-files00147.tif'
63bb98d41e18f3365af83d5e00f166a1
e583e3ce981823cd63f2e0c5e338f9d3c726471a
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMVZ' 'sip-files00147.txt'
b318f60f9dab64fa078e705bf4cd0d7b
9fc243740fd0abc54b8e00238e812e02aae8ed4b
describe
'30472' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMWA' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
287842ed59c2f9a7225f0411dcab00cf
6cee1262f0ac3b863e6f2e0fb9406dbc74cdc11f
describe
'544500' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMWB' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
d43a1dc939d62a1c2dd056c9abc7a76d
be2854aee09cc90e1912d800c985eb4f9a393e06
describe
'143205' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMWC' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
a0c25493ddbb05c16eea663f4f9ba135
374b17520e5fbdad90de125b81f0da77144ad58f
describe
'35083' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMWD' 'sip-files00148.pro'
7e9cd55d2434de0aa5fa3ac9f5375221
5f2ca0cfeb6bcaed91cf32c8635adf5f686c8efb
describe
'57813' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMWE' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
6778141de7c6cc0aecd5713278992031
7ade487006aaf0b693e875a464c7ddab176244c0
describe
'4379232' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMWF' 'sip-files00148.tif'
57e8bbabf82e14ac410dbe0720f2121a
d0145d6195f104309074e59e83eed9c4dedd79c6
describe
'1410' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMWG' 'sip-files00148.txt'
3734c04e420b57b82792f5f0f5b6a423
a8b5414e7edd6f0439b1c313db8fc0747f8f8be2
describe
'29944' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMWH' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
a8356b070c84648e0d2ccb4def332fc3
0b59812daf0d0624dacdc40e9ae457fa7e441757
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMWI' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
1abed857dd6c72f323df35891a5564be
a441285b8d602d6380e360a68f4cdf333b1fe506
describe
'142995' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMWJ' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
2776bb92436083e08d785ad5528d4049
5d7766516c3310a0fa13a92d532dc9e5433181bc
describe
'36161' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMWK' 'sip-files00149.pro'
87a3d76261af5ea797e26ae3fa3f576e
274841dac41e9436debbfd05c7f331ffbca24260
describe
'58661' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMWL' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
6936a21cbfa857e48e18f3f6fbd83d69
dfa28f117667f267c05defafb17307fd201b1521
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMWM' 'sip-files00149.tif'
cc67bc98e8d4880ca2ffef1a4ef2773a
12a8e191f3d354f6ce411877d2ef108a5f4de545
describe
'1456' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMWN' 'sip-files00149.txt'
8918132209d3def37c06642a81ff772e
891b577399452d087eb12eb7d8a53aa2cce99245
describe
'30503' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMWO' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
23b0adbd0e78c00ff3fb734a996d6a5c
77e835e20c6c72105e2b8c483cfc4d2a67e6c913
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMWP' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
fbc62b1e4666d71e44e9b8f33ea9c559
02e345281fc8ede92d2322701a72fd067793c4a5
describe
'100285' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMWQ' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
8725c96366dcdd694ef0f827e6ecfdc0
841ae49aba1094ce9ed36a2d6cc21046c66fdcfe
describe
'20895' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMWR' 'sip-files00150.pro'
03f8831bb4b17fdc4668bbe28a74925f
e72c7f1d9e742d19f455c6fe7a7088fd322ec8e6
describe
'43750' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMWS' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
fd7f0d7bef045104420c4f3f3a3505de
6eee30228736275e6616839316b5566580c210ea
describe
'4377640' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMWT' 'sip-files00150.tif'
4c63eab8290f77e0ec8b58780db2da9d
2c33328a7b8504e96ad7f00620a8e9e2d543d954
describe
'836' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMWU' 'sip-files00150.txt'
3984a2c99a77e0f878d065400aaca8b5
d16b930de9c05a9e5442cf74ad8bb773d28afb8d
describe
'26188' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMWV' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
303a2d73296e50c42c09b3c7366dd078
6a4c22d777474d339099d8220eb0fb6d114eb99f
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMWW' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
e5d92dd1a71e19f93b868a08d7cf7c79
e9784c58e296f6daae86360735e186339ed97377
describe
'183138' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMWX' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
41d40f6f4a1ddd38b18efc0165664ef1
ff59dd0d642febe15fefda183ec813dc047d8c68
describe
'82506' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMWY' 'sip-files00151.pro'
9df353f5dfef6ea13862112b111d41f6
92db49b21828ffdd059ce7dae2ef01b60c92e978
describe
'66580' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMWZ' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
c65cda6184e6753a7900e535b5935288
a5397866f4e01fbd476fb22dea5fdacedbda5346
describe
'4380724' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMXA' 'sip-files00151.tif'
97d39224c5cace2f999119ce29d6b73b
420ae872cb538c4e914815a9605911bad32453bc
describe
'3967' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMXB' 'sip-files00151.txt'
177d8b20e029ffead63aa93a06ac4964
c17e4b7c70ecbbc43aa0ccf791592198182e7e28
describe
'33447' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMXC' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
05b3222191f6ca462607a915e7fa7c64
ff1a2dfc081fa4c1c71e7a101ea8acf58aa380cb
describe
'544527' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMXD' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
afb049f2d69f3c69c5563d7716e4bd66
8c43e7421b1aa556d38535f7b37241ab382cb5b1
'2011-09-28T11:06:19-04:00'
describe
'191966' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMXE' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
76904c958dab1fde1d44612237e7fb17
14cee0f4bb8242a1118fbac921e9e019b4ddeef4
describe
'34116' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMXF' 'sip-files00152.pro'
abdc437b20072d3db838f82019d68172
34fb0a5587d81e665b726315877729fc3b3b6b06
describe
'69214' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMXG' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
30f16df39e73e6ea0c2f4420c994a47c
9572df122d1da993f44d4791fa065373cedfbecf
describe
'4381420' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMXH' 'sip-files00152.tif'
32427197e2bef2d16996d2e01c3bfbfd
8ecd967857134c70522804d5afa20348243a9d23
describe
'1521' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMXI' 'sip-files00152.txt'
0d5bc6777b59b17929e369629c1ce948
5789b178c4d207addd3d97955892f444b743a6fe
describe
'34861' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMXJ' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
1b7c8f9579970dc902be486f1fb53849
69d7e73d4cc4e35ccebf0f4c3d0b49913f951227
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMXK' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
b7b7809bee32e3edcef315edaf30a43c
c0b5a81f203f2c9042f577489fe9d9b8e7751935
describe
'189984' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMXL' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
09f476d49e48562d399c2b43b4ec939f
836c8b72b933f5692ddb47077270cae77508ac05
describe
'35704' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMXM' 'sip-files00153.pro'
b0f72d719f62755fe4d043907240c6d1
faf2c34e729ab19d8bb04a9da87725ffb3dd98b4
describe
'65417' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMXN' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
0314e6774f75b37fda4667cd1a69c810
5cf1860296bfda211806c74efdc57a46261cbf28
'2011-09-28T11:07:41-04:00'
describe
'4380992' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMXO' 'sip-files00153.tif'
5f7c740d605015a5a63fdfef456e20bc
337f1a54d3cb768a1f7df0866ee7d2b2b48817dd
'2011-09-28T11:06:14-04:00'
describe
'1586' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMXP' 'sip-files00153.txt'
50c982ea8e6cb5723d2d3550a590dd79
e3318ff47489062e2228042194ac9a267b4a175a
describe
Invalid character
'34073' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMXQ' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
ba5ce31b6cfd3a4ab7ff2c882616c058
9e7a75946798594e1cf02c35222dbe1dc3e927f3
describe
'544556' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMXR' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
b106e4fc670cec1a59a339c483ca8342
b064932cae1d8dd995c7881761b07e2c31ff2deb
describe
'193844' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMXS' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
99bc1e1329823501b6587069b9250e6c
91ecfc8aa3b6b8fc11d80e6af4aa73bd2537599c
describe
'54309' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMXT' 'sip-files00154.pro'
2924ea83a7fe08fe31a9695a48876acd
6f7b6ae73ccf5a76bb0246a88f860bb80358f9da
describe
'67401' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMXU' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
98bcda710efc21cd59aee31256f08595
630e5a8843d7e21610f6761f1016cac259bfbbc7
describe
'4380808' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMXV' 'sip-files00154.tif'
a9589cfe0270b2ae6070355232e0f753
4e05a18d7affa7c0da98a83f60fc0452f0f02b7f
describe
'3336' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMXW' 'sip-files00154.txt'
fdf7dfe5b98fccf3e79b41134718c858
30fba6e9c42782e3c672cccb2c75605e1af50a44
describe
'33664' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMXX' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
70ead298969851f35eb3eee375f73199
5697e484f5b8b736be12f21c804bd0b73303e996
describe
'544648' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMXY' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
50dbb1e2b30b3ba3e08b43b161ffc31e
29ddb436d259bd15d8824d558c885e599216a66c
describe
'187221' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMXZ' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
611bcf70596660c787bd58d71a454d7f
c1561b920f570141ff5d94eb1b1f2e9aa4ccdb9d
describe
'67309' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMYA' 'sip-files00155.pro'
92f006ae3d3f019103351fb3d010b1a3
e4a6e2fc0ab89727dd661148d37a097bc0b4df3a
describe
'66271' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMYB' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
9ff495010bb9a89523ff66dc39d2f0b6
856dc8e154784aff2a03f03f69a07f63feb80c6c
describe
'4380792' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMYC' 'sip-files00155.tif'
2b142522ab92199bf62aaaf67ecdbd70
a994124f00f3fce83f415dfc8417a0355ec989b5
describe
'2876' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMYD' 'sip-files00155.txt'
7f881410dc992e4efc99d8e966950ec5
1505d0cc061e94843f45b36382ddaaaac5bab7bc
describe
'33551' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMYE' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
a4571b916e6fff18c4916b12be838de4
87574ce4cca39596882605fba1dac2d3451019f8
describe
'544615' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMYF' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
b3c03a094b2e189caff1f580f77f7eb8
0fbac671cd6636d0e7d6166d55c7dcf617681c13
describe
'191620' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMYG' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
c4163835be21ab1d082725a86d03b571
3f91951526ec9b99095744f7098ef7792f2a009f
describe
'93241' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMYH' 'sip-files00156.pro'
c221eafbbfdcb52ee363bc93d82e5f9b
0f8bbda5d78e4736893638825bb1388737b7e3ab
describe
'67231' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMYI' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
50901c214577d4f5c7a4e93d880417d4
a1287effc4a279de7f9597b344e3ad023e9a6277
describe
'4380832' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMYJ' 'sip-files00156.tif'
cb3f61be1d0345434b77b1ba6d163ca9
ccf517dbccacea1e82ea9251a86ee488b71a7d89
describe
'4491' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMYK' 'sip-files00156.txt'
bd9c6f3ca6ce2f2927cca04ba93c7d75
0428edf205ce67ef0edda09796b0d91bf3a90d98
describe
'33562' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMYL' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
1c71da4f5d68851a7647b8ad2552710c
dd189569937b718e70492ebc19104d6f78ddd39b
'2011-09-28T11:09:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMYM' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
9c9d933e76b7059d88c498a8402e6d6a
c42206472de922c49741825fe18f3b7801771240
describe
'188063' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMYN' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
b29c9e026b52a39b61c8be8e5a2e1241
4bcd1f06e51f748dd829abc25800eef3f6180d68
describe
'52503' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMYO' 'sip-files00157.pro'
b9485119e136da98ced7f5a0376b12a8
f8b5f7c022971a3f8e0185e11b4ba4998ac232ce
describe
'67712' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMYP' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
0801531c564453aa75a09aed518db9cf
9a6d7c808cbe20ec80e65e6bdeb45d15c3aeee21
describe
'4380680' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMYQ' 'sip-files00157.tif'
4a27ccd7f62e1a8ed6ac14eace84aee2
977e508f276aec31b9e74aaa74d9619ffc1dc904
describe
'2492' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMYR' 'sip-files00157.txt'
3a46a8452d40953e70220f760be9bb1d
d30f4e8bbc7ac4961b7a81709373c79489f3500f
describe
'33628' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMYS' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
0a0db7168bc10c9ab28317009c11e412
313aa45896dd8eed1330e13cb201eddbc318b5e5
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMYT' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
df5aaad53d52a61282a3b9d297b3f91e
7081ee0222727ae22c3969fb52a0a4d57a433cfd
describe
'170927' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMYU' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
9b1114772c9689d5bb8488f4a987f30c
cd043119bec24ff96ac26fd495d20d8d96a6948d
describe
'71146' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMYV' 'sip-files00158.pro'
8cb20319e677da2c07d2d88c40d64747
dcffe21fe363c1e0f3b41a2b84dbb9aad63efdb6
describe
'64013' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMYW' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
c7b19fce7645dfbcd53b59c5bb7ecd17
a022214dbc8aca58e860f727db467178792b5a2b
describe
'4380740' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMYX' 'sip-files00158.tif'
40f321ea8ee036f0bb6c8a79d21071a7
6f9190dfb1654f528419195afecd6ede1fafe581
describe
'3241' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMYY' 'sip-files00158.txt'
121d0e2b6e086ec2a5d1edd410f030f2
e9dff077d795911b01c09e90e03deca21ce633c4
describe
'33092' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMYZ' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
64a61f3f03ce566c2f45f39f9fff2989
fa0814b0e5b609ee3b5c77ec0909f3ad80010498
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMZA' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
b0a46bbf6b435ed5b43456b0cc88f871
f25844c02aff4bb26c339fa9e6e0bc8a3c6eb6a8
describe
'155026' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMZB' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
8ab74de906ee3ca7529cce6ef6e72031
6715739d59885515452de24a02b60945b2ec7450
describe
'64373' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMZC' 'sip-files00159.pro'
309894ed411f5bc52ebbfa8ce80ca540
8e0bb3993c04e6ceb353c8f4dd4cddaee2ffd6d2
describe
'59602' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMZD' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
1554c33cdd4adac5478427c8fa7a5b12
d96ca0c231c37545a10f6dd8cc478d837eccffdc
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMZE' 'sip-files00159.tif'
cd998c091aa7b39d30e5cbb7eb5c17be
7d38bbc2511dc215a0edaf736f1263eb39b77fff
describe
'2916' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMZF' 'sip-files00159.txt'
9d21c8650880d56441fe72eaa0ffd6df
ceb6302c33d56abfc69be3edcd07b0b640292b56
describe
'31685' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMZG' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
e111ed23eaba3f3aec9485a254a19227
3b3322526cf971fd4724ae2ea27bb044d6567c79
describe
'544655' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMZH' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
0d4ed9480f0aa4323bef3741b6a809a5
ce6b3fdcda59c9d6d2be4f5a4b4408e5694d005b
describe
'179631' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMZI' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
c14adffa76420ebafb1cd654ef052f9f
c88364e8329f3c902ec75b5fae4e0c97a093c9c8
'2011-09-28T11:07:40-04:00'
describe
'54028' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMZJ' 'sip-files00160.pro'
40456613ad4c850a3fd1ee6cd33e1106
38034ced454f405e1310f1e96482bb47014fa4ad
describe
'65339' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMZK' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
1361c02800ccb1d4170ff619ab2057f0
bef9485e018e9d8aca9d082898b6159f4c723af2
describe
'4380996' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMZL' 'sip-files00160.tif'
830e9e975cbd449e584574a59777b4a2
dda46afb7e6443e92871ab8eeac2d37242e152c8
describe
'2582' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMZM' 'sip-files00160.txt'
7bc3106cf1821c068ecfc5e8bde6744b
63ea958c391eada8a708e7513284d960b953f718
describe
'33701' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMZN' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
3973c14d13042aac1355da7af3e8648a
1b78c820da8a1137e5628c7e9a843fef710b7b25
describe
'544604' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMZO' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
91a7bc4ae204c57296d7b47d9f05ce1a
91c011ae000440005117c4373e941183b57bd8e2
describe
'189820' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMZP' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
ce4835c1906b5c86cc1943a294f4a068
1a251908ed78d69c3d51487d78586e150106fe62
describe
'44433' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMZQ' 'sip-files00161.pro'
cb7b9e3098db7047d053840964ba9f70
9463dd0da6fcd1950df6c186cc86d2dfcab53e6e
describe
'68049' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMZR' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
6e0f7fb87e00774764e46d57451426e4
bfe6daa4dfb07e70eb8dfb53c7c361516028bdb6
describe
'4381364' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMZS' 'sip-files00161.tif'
33b0fd22da9b322fa0267cccf851b54c
01b7e6f9ad7bbd4a70d06d5921d76e4852c474b2
'2011-09-28T11:06:15-04:00'
describe
'2178' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMZT' 'sip-files00161.txt'
d0eb2f8a5ee1a62468600957f9c7dd53
0b4c455add282748ff25ea322dc2495479a9a892
describe
'34525' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMZU' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
aa9e097c73efa22a1cf52c2817e17620
f7e51b26d2457bfe67d8af78c20c82e23c8951bc
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMZV' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
077d699992dba58677ec5ab772c0b630
b16265a5763bcb27faf8d831c05909247d286b88
describe
'183370' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMZW' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
0898ee827075684f714ea29ebbaecf52
d4d347e482158b10139d41d2ba7f64f76b26a8ea
describe
'54851' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMZX' 'sip-files00162.pro'
4630c02d51f25afea183d0236cdec168
b1dae5ed66a2af44fa352b8e5624a890ac62bb75
describe
'66806' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMZY' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
f1d458e09f0a29efb2bd824a46848620
c214cd674e44dd2360c0a8d3f114b9311f3b85fd
describe
'4380804' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAAMZZ' 'sip-files00162.tif'
46fb981050d2ac08045407a0a44bb74c
4e0f8ef209e8693305d9df8c91123b9eb1b201d8
describe
'2858' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANAA' 'sip-files00162.txt'
0dbc01181aea9f444143a8e2d864d79c
9550ac95573f640c5dfd72c6777999ff6de37fdb
describe
Invalid character
'33523' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANAB' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
0120a09837a016ee03fe452e24bf1b70
555a25d5cce5326d68698e09a249d1fbc278ff31
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANAC' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
35b2e47a66a4d338f741037dbfde0f35
e7fc91f4f59307cf30a2ad0bdaa742793e9f0965
describe
'149992' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANAD' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
278547f2403aef2d6ccbc1465376fab5
d668bb39e6f7f8cfaea59ae876aa266418b197be
describe
'53969' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANAE' 'sip-files00163.pro'
38b0f4dc6a4a4bc2adc6351548da43a3
3372c9e5d6d4a03c7d3b3957757f2c1e8a94156d
describe
'59771' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANAF' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
8b511fa89cea97342d54901f1ee37d90
9c352dd7f82872993b3ccdc116d8c3cd1bb5952d
describe
'4379928' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANAG' 'sip-files00163.tif'
cdc85f98cd6909c453162e8b48d47003
447108f5a931633922589a74efdfa8cfabad572c
describe
'2350' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANAH' 'sip-files00163.txt'
67f667e8499ef5a02023fb36582f1bf5
476d00d2bd04d91d6830265ac21d852b8bd2b4ca
describe
'31851' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANAI' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
d4db1ad43cf06f5c9a2faa4c1fad782a
b9fd8e64f58ef7e41bed3329f5ffccf9b6d51ddd
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANAJ' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
a600c19cbbc7c962484c5093b91be033
aa5cce4a4d6f8277640bd0689105fa0e2dff5948
describe
'191691' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANAK' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
2b0011c055af77ef5f39f0d486637853
14db6b008a898e0694d56d80a0230739dce01c01
describe
'71595' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANAL' 'sip-files00164.pro'
f85e0ccd25384a3fb78004d50af4f48d
b8f551086eaf0f188c79439811938f1a6be5fdb9
describe
'69524' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANAM' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
ab3b84e7c7bba9e4c848833b937fdff2
01070a8ab09ce64fa5219c9ee77a2d81ade9f45c
describe
'4381628' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANAN' 'sip-files00164.tif'
07052e6d9ac2f155c70dd86e21035e67
e0a0d0b1b26a801ee4df5ffe7df4767201a21bb8
describe
'3191' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANAO' 'sip-files00164.txt'
1a4f02a34a8138e6000467e45763a210
323ef83416172923491631715235cc04934e22e4
describe
'35302' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANAP' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
de6261e50cfe3a5d418f448814da9520
d0bac5baf8cf57eb994685ebdced2f0ecdb52c84
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANAQ' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
6863cb7660b06f7074a26cacf13a78a2
04fd22d4930b66c8662101bef3a051f19b95dba4
describe
'194192' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANAR' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
67857125e0d05576277a79772073b22a
9d857743366594e81de1072ef2062ea6a92e4c89
describe
'77367' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANAS' 'sip-files00165.pro'
f7f3a453935c2b9637b9831941647ec0
b306723fe3c1bea5b3b8af3f729a16816ca45e09
describe
'70504' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANAT' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
5d8675e450502de71f0f60b40408e028
ea92903e05dc889d667d49b6f990fb87cf4b74b4
describe
'4381480' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANAU' 'sip-files00165.tif'
fb0bfd706320283064e03e1993ec1cf7
042f04ae603eabdeaf7186541f6b554481a5d5cd
describe
'3753' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANAV' 'sip-files00165.txt'
ee7795a1f6db8a2607c980070628bc93
c1a073bd2fa6c397856bd985ba11aab869d6d378
describe
'35172' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANAW' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
1afd55599bb0dfceae93da69f1e870af
5b09f6e9bbcc57334e370b4ad13b2913d98dcc54
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANAX' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
e1085aa91edca10889b25f5ace3b20d5
013ae66f8079ace73b3e92b5c03134fb0546ad8a
describe
'196436' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANAY' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
a2a2b46f4a7166176fdf545bcd784722
119d4b024df839084346dc59ef1e2d9e0c6f2c1b
describe
'53182' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANAZ' 'sip-files00166.pro'
dd165d322c263337a833521b89fcc5f0
6f279a111e97d0c3332cbd4be1dff375a530d22d
describe
'69795' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANBA' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
f000bc97dd03007a14d27294f4390aa2
cd0a444dbddcdabfa4c28f09da60dbdf76fdfc13
describe
'4381092' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANBB' 'sip-files00166.tif'
9e4454882f5ae540c89b5647805a5c7f
db0363a8cf7ffbbe3a97d6754abd1b2982d0572a
describe
'2439' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANBC' 'sip-files00166.txt'
181e1ba83f66199be09a01edca53a709
064d4b1980be0b1c4e098cccb834d91c438a5c0e
describe
'34802' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANBD' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
415e440869254abee82c35ac9d598698
6f983a81cda6166d648ea26e2a98262cd6a81d51
'2011-09-28T11:11:12-04:00'
describe
'556947' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANBE' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
9fe97ca9a4a04eb9023dd02a520644f9
d61cc45ba0d27e8f28f0da1bfcccbead0644593a
describe
'50591' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANBF' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
7ab572f630d9af49661d6553eab2b044
ab844750f35757f9365e9d54699fa9ddd0eef123
describe
'23327' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANBG' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
e3e008083f2ac35c2b6007b1aa189786
c2629d06e94b979b0242aa33c21465f86615251a
'2011-09-28T11:06:56-04:00'
describe
'13383212' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANBH' 'sip-files00170.tif'
ed44d0c2157c0b721832da229f7c17b2
dabd3bd27000df8d0ea2c2af03064a7875bb5503
describe
'19221' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANBI' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
98dd73cf2c2b56434a03e4c5f6f21374
aac3944b0de86738c5f1ad903fcde68133353c6a
describe
'625812' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANBJ' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
b29ac9fe519e37ac8aca61404d8b231d
9fb4b8ae5a3e02676002cde656c260f174159c7d
describe
'58798' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANBK' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
e7e416ad79f218cf10d3366f062e0bdb
b87c24aa7f2e6851618522e351d8fa415364316e
describe
'26058' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANBL' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
419ea2c9485f9473b00bf0d284c3ba3e
6c19ab7fd707e020f01a7605e1f8b00bbaf85292
describe
'15038396' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANBM' 'sip-files00171.tif'
ecc85984247ce58f9f031c36e1ca891a
0d055b0c64ab05be4a1268d3f03bdc7fa6b79bee
describe
'20179' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANBN' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
8a86bf5e1be6979f6c10b8471bb2dd0f
f0527859bc48fb0c5e1c283d3ff3cd7ec480c7be
describe
'600871' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANBO' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
e6b4204e5334d7486a8153e71777a0fc
e57c38e7609b2990fef88d7266aa2561c7ac75f2
describe
'111187' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANBP' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
b12e343fb5dbd83ebc1bc1581fdec583
a29372e6763375f70e27b02d3a7cc2fbbe318b8a
describe
'30912' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANBQ' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
046f11bddfded8ee83c82e4e986f0405
55509ed2d83bf21f319eb7f6c29f95bfdbf82b93
describe
'14439280' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANBR' 'sip-files00172.tif'
276a8f551412ee150394d3384b3cbe27
aa7b8f8dfe59bf778596586eafead9419a0b80e6
describe
'20224' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANBS' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
a97d48c5e8ba61c4ed3fcde54bddb1a4
897779b4b7a26d802a6f64c99aa0db7842907863
describe
'108354' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANBT' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
feaddef600b2573bfce63b76ac1e6208
f22a3d75d4635cacc7de1a59d06c73d08209d729
describe
'62781' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANBU' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
ea823ac81b5349fb9ef6e774d07948ec
4c6a3563472476e60188be6e0a7f3abe3b1ed713
describe
'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANBV' 'sip-files00173.pro'
509d5a1073fc20cf5d4110f5d05e080b
cd910173802140017b29c17b99af305d586a318b
describe
'27946' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANBW' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
dde688f3fafe2d6df7023c7e0e9bac4f
95dfb0fedb4bc66885d4df255c40c4f6b31e8587
describe
'2617448' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANBX' 'sip-files00173.tif'
e3bc85278efecef9473090baf9d802ef
6671782a44c46281a0b080cfe5619ddfae12e28c
describe
'21955' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANBY' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
9c00bb4dd455b09910d7d7b65760ae15
9d5cff84daac967111e85f64b84316f841550ef6
describe
'152' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANBZ' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
0d25806d27ff34ab061d88b1459c7d2e
384a1e1b9ed4493ec410943b7d56c7b9fa80e042
describe
'266687' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANCA' 'sip-filesUF00078658_00001.mets'
5b26fa50ae56b50f90449a0c78cc40a5
365a7851c46fe036ea61382007509e2fd2cf2209
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-19T10:22:04-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'347538' 'info:fdaE20080318_AAAAAYfileF20080319_AAANCD' 'sip-filesUF00078658_00001.xml'
1234b9262bb14d70602836b4498e1c23
6a33cf6c8652951f11676718bf3a69ac57591510
describe
'2013-12-19T10:22:06-05:00'
xml resolution