Citation
Amy's secret, or, The blue silk dress

Material Information

Title:
Amy's secret, or, The blue silk dress
Portion of title:
Blue silk dress
Creator:
Knight ( Printer )
Religious Tract Society (Great Britain) ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Religious Tract Society
Manufacturer:
Knight
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
64, [16] p., [1] leaf of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 16 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Pride and vanity -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Forgiveness -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Fatherless families -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Women dressmakers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Obedience -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1890 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1890
Genre:
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication from inscription.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text and on endpapers.
General Note:
Frontispiece printed in colors.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026618310 ( ALEPH )
ALG3517 ( NOTIS )
180702294 ( OCLC )

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2 The Book of Books.
=== Springfield Stories. *
Little Dot. eens
John Thamson's Nursery.
Twa Ways to begin Life.
Ethel Ripon. Bee
Little Godseberry. a
Fanny Ashley. Be
The Gamekeepers Daughter.
Fred Kenny. Beta
Old Humphreys Study Table.
Jenny's Waterproof. aK
The Holy Well.
The Travelling Sixpence. -
The Three Flowers.
Lost-and Rescued.
Lightbearers & Beacons.
Little Lottie. 3
ThesDog of St. Bernard.
Isaac Gould, the Waggoner.
Uncle Ruperts Stories for Boys. §
Dreaming and Doing.
Many Ways of being Useful.
Rachel Rivers.

Lessons out of School.



































































































es





gq”

‘“— WONDER WHAT THE GIRLS WOULD SAY





Hittle Bot Series. .

Ruy's Srcrer,

Hthe Whe Silk Wress.

THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY,

56, PATERNOSTER Row ; 65, St. Paut’s CHURCHYARD;
AND 164, PICCADILLY.










“CHAP.
1.

I
Tr,

. Iv.
Ve
VI.
vu.
VII.

IX.

CONGE Net S: |

Wuat Amy Dip

THE DISASTER

MOTHER AND DAUGHTER.

DISCOVERY .

A MISERABLE Day

How NeEp WENT SLIDING

Poor Amy.
AMY’s RECOVERY

CONCLUSION



PAGE,

13
22
28
35
41

57
62






See

aE:

EE

&uys SECRET.

SEGRE



—S Pato
CHAPTER I.
What Amy fad.

’N a shabby side street in
the very heart of the great
town of Dustleigh, stood a
small house, built of dull
red bricks, just like its
‘neighbours on either side.
In front it only boasted
two windows, one above

| the other, and a door; and there was

_ nothing, except a card in the window,

to attract the notice of the passer-by.

: Yet three people called it ‘ home,”

and loved it better than any other house
in the street, or even in the town.
Those three persons were Mrs. Miller







6 Amy's Secret, |
and her two children—Edward, a boy |
of thirteen, and Amy, who was about |
eleven years old. And it was no wonder |
that they loved the old house, for the |
children had lived there all their lives; _
and in the front room upstairs they had
watched their father during his last
illness, until he was called to a better
home, and Mrs. Miller was left a widow.

Since that time she had supported
herself and her family by dressmaking.
A very hard struggle she had to bring
up her children, and give them a good
education. But, by God’s help, she
persevered bravely, and succeeded in
her endeavour.

The brother and sister were much
unlike in disposition and character, but
they were very fond of each other; and
although they occasionally had their
petty squabbles, they were soon over,
and they usually agreed very well.

It was a cold raw day in January,
when Amy Miller, with her lesson-





What Amy Did. 7

‘books in hand, entered the little house

/ on her return from afternoon school.

' “Tm glad you have come, Amy,”
isaid her mother, who appeared in the
' passage at that moment dressed in
| bonnet and shawl, and carrying a bundle
i in her arms.
| “Are you going out, mother?” asked
} the child..

| “Yes; so you must stay at home, and
| get tea ready for Ned and me. I am
| going to take this work home myself,
for the people lon’t always pay promptly,

and I think I shall be more likely to get
the money. if I go myself than if I send

Ned. Get tea ready in the kitchen, for
I’ve got some particular work about in

). the back room, and I want to take great

| care of it,” she added, as she opened the
door, and went out into the cold.

Amy ran up to the bed-room, which
she shared with her mother, took off her
hat and jacket, put them away on their
peg in the closet, and then went to the



8 Amy's Secret.

looking-glass to smooth her hair and |
arrange her dress, which had become |)

disordered in her quick walk from school. |
_ It is only true to say that she lingered |
at the glass at least a few minutes more |
than was necessary, for Amy had one
fault, which had been rather encouraged
than checked by the mistaken kindness
of friends. She was a pretty little .girl,
with bright sunny blue eyes, fair white
skin, and a healthy rosy colour upon her
round plump cheeks ; and her soft brown
hair hung in graceful curls round her
head, and rippled above her forehead.
It was a pleasant English child’s face;
but many persons had foolishly praised
her pretty features and her long curls,
until the little girl began to grow vain,
and to assume a self-conscious air which
did not at all suit her childish face.
And she became so anxious to be
admired that she would have done a
_ great many foolish things in order to try
to improve her appearance.





What Amy Did. 9

Amy was very fond of bright-coloured
j ribbons and bows, and usually managed





_ finery, even though it might be soiled or
| crumpled. It was well that Mrs. Miller
| had more sense than her child, for if she
| had made Amy’s dresses according to
| her wishes they would have looked
) quite ridiculous.

| “I wonder what dress mother has
| been making to-day, that she is obliged
to take so much care,” thought Amy, as
she pinned a blue bow on her dress. “I
think I will go and look at it.”

Away she ran to the little back parlour,
which was Mrs. Miller’s work-room. It
was a small barely-furnished room, over-
looking a narrow stone-paved yard, and
never particularly cheerful at the best of
times. A round table, covered with
shreds and cuttings, stood in the middle
of the room, and the walls were adorned
with fashion-plates and paper patterns
which had been used many times. A



10 Amy’s Secret.

small sewing-machine and a few chairs
completed the furniture of the room, for
the floor was uncovered, in order that
the scraps and cuttings might be more
easily swept up.

Directly she entered the room, Amy’s
eyes fell upon a dingy wrapper which
covered somethingon the table. She took
' it off carefully, and gave an astonished
“Oh!” as a dress of pale blue silk met
her leye.

‘““T must look at it, it is so lovely,”
she said; “and I can easily fold it again,
as mother has taught me how to fold.”

She slowly unfolded the dress, and
held it up at arm’s length, when she
found to her surprise that it was a little
girl’s dress just the right size for herself.

“Oh, how beautiful!” she exclaimed:
“T wish I had such a splendid dress.”

It was not often that Mrs. Miller had
a silk dress to make, for she was but
a self-taught dressmaker. But some
persons had found out that, although





What Amy Did. II

| lower in her charges, she was able to do
| her work quite as well as more expensive
| dressmakers, and on this occasion she

'} was entrusted to make a silk dress for



) the child of a well-to-do grocer.

“How beautiful! What a lovely
) colour!” mused Amy; “I wonder if I
| might try it on?” she exclaimed, as the
idea struck her. ‘I should have time
before mother comes back.”

She closed the door, for she knew that
she was doing wrong, as her mother had
often forbidden her to touch any of her
work. In another minute, Amy’s old
brown dress was hanging on a chair,
and she was arraying herself in the pale
blue silk garment, and surveying herself
in the small glass on the mantel-shelf.

“T wonder what the girls at school
would say if they could see me now,”
thought Amy. “I look like a lovely
young lady going to a party, only I]
ought to have bracelets, and a gold chain
and locket. Oh! how I wish the dress



12 eed my ’s Secret.

vas mine! I should never be tired of
looking at it, the colour suits me so well.
I dare say the young lady it is made for
is not nearly so prettyasIam. I believe
it is for that Miss King with the red
hair,—she won’t look at all nice in it.”





‘3

CHAPTER II,
The #Hsaster,

LouD knock at the door,
s followed by the clatter of
feet along the passage, in-
terrupted Amy’s soliloquy.
She feared that her mother
had returned, and moved
e hastily away from the look-
ing- glass, so hastily that she overturned
a small can of machine oil which was
kept upon the mantel-shelf. It was not
Mrs. Miller, but Ned who had just
entered, and was startled by hearing a
loud cry from the little back parlour,
whither he hastened at once.
“Hullo, Amy! what’s the matter? I
thought you were half killed by the noise
you were making. My goodness! what





14 Amy's Secret.

a grand dress! What are you up to?”
he exclaimed, as he caught sight of the
blue silk dress.

“Oh, Ned, I’m in such trouble.
Promise me you won't ever tell,” en-
treated the little girl, with tears in her
eyes.

“All right! Pl promise; but what’s
up? Mischief, I’ll be bound,” replied
her brother.

“T’ve had a dreadful accident, and it’s
all your fault; you made such a noise
and startled me, and I upset some of the
machine oil on this beautiful silk dress, .
and—oh dear! what shall I do?” sobbed
Amy.

“Whose dress is it? Yours?”

“No. Mother had to make it for
some one, and I tried it on, and, and—”

“Silly little vain thing,” cried the boy,
contemptuously. ‘Well, I don’t see
what you can do, except tell mother,
and make a clean breast of it.” ;

“Oh, I couldn’t do that!” gasped



The Disaster. 15

Amy, whose pride was hurt by the sug-
gestion. “At least, I mean—I shouldn’t
like to grieve mother, she would be so
vexed. I know what I’ll do,” she said,
brightening up, and drying her eyes;
‘“you promised you wouldn’t say any-
thing, and the oil has run in a straight
line down this upper skirt not very far
from the seam. [I'll just run it up inside,
—it will only make the top skirt a little
scantier, and no one will notice that, for
they are worn very scanty now, and the
under skirt is not hurt a bit. Oh, yes,
I'll manage it.”

“Well, do as you like; but I call ita
horrid sneaking way of getting out of a
scrape,—just like a girl.”

“ But what else can I do, Ned?” ae
asked, while the tears started again to
her eyes.

“You won’t do the right thing, I.
know, you said so just now, and of course
I shall have to keep my promise; but
mind, I’m not going to tell lies, if any



16 Amy’s Secret.

questions are asked me. Bother you and
your dresses,” he added, not very kindly ;
“I wish I hadn’t come near them.”

“ And so do I,” echoed Amy.

“Very well, then I'll go out. Tell
mother I shan’t be home very early.”
With that he quitted the house, slamming
the door behind him, and leaving his
sister to get out of the difficulty as well -
as she could.

Ned was very angry with Amy, for
whose faults he hadvery little indulgence,
as they were so entirely different from
his own. No one would ever have
thought of accusing him of vanity, for it
was his mother’s lament that he paid no
attention to his personal appearance, and
it was with great difficulty that she could
keep him decent and respectable; while
as for deceit, no one scorned the idea of
it more than Ned, who was naturally
frank and open, and found it much easier
to confess a fault than to hide it even.
for a moment.



The Disaster. 1

But, brave and open as Ned usually
was, he felt rather a coward at this
moment. He had come away from
home without his tea, and determined
to remain out until late rather than meet
his mother; for he was afraid that she
would want him to carry the dress to
Mrs. King’s, and he was not at all
anxious to go.

Not that he was usually unwilling to
run errands for his mother, for he loved
her dearly, and would have done a great
deal for her; in fact, she often told her
neighbours that she did not know what
she should do without him,—he was such
a good boy, and such a comfort to her.

But Ned had an impression that the
trick which his sister had played would
be found out,—perhaps his tell-tale look
would arouse suspicion that something
was wrong,—and he did not want to
have to carry a message from Mrs.
King to his mother revealing Amy's

foolish vanity and its consequences.
‘ ci :



18 Amy's Secret.

While the boy was thinking the matter
over, his sister was stitching away, en-
deavouring to sew up the dark streak
which the oil had made upon the delicate
silk. Amy was a clever little needle-
‘woman for her age, but she found that
she had a difficult task before her. She
ripped the seam, and began to run it up
again, turning in several inches. Very
swiftly her needle flew, for she feared
every moment to hear her mother’s foot-
step on the threshold; and when she
had finished the seam she found that the
‘piece she had turned in was so wide that
she was obliged to cut off a wide strip
of silk, which she burnt on the kitchen
fire. Then flattering herself that she had
quite hidden all traces of her disaster,
and had in fact made the dress more
fashionable than it was before, she folded
it carefully, and placed it upon the table
in the wrapper just as she had found it.

The cups and saucers were set upon
the table, and the tea was almost ready,



The Disaster. 19

when Mrs. Miller returned. She walked
into the kitchen, sat down on the nearest
chair, and exclaimed with a weary sigh,
‘All that long walk for nothing!”

“Didn’t they pay you, mother?” asked
the child.

“No, I must wait until next week.
It is too bad, that it is,” she cried, indig-
nantly; “they can’t wait a day or an
hour for a dress, but I must wait for my
money until they choose to pay me!
But there,” she said, with another sigh,
‘it’s of no use to talk about it. Where's
' Ned ?”

“He has gone out, mother; he said
he should not be in till late.”

* Tiresome boy! To go off when he
might have known that J should be likely
to want him. But, like every one else,
he is selfish, and only thirks of his own
pleasure,’ said Mrs. Miller, rather bitterly.

She was disappointed and unhappy,
‘for she had reckoned upon the money
which was due to her to pay her week’s



20 Amy’s Secret.

rent. It was a serious thing to her to
be disappointed even of a few shillings,
for she had a hard struggle to provide
for herself and her children, and to bring
them up respectably.

Mrs. Miller, when “ put out,” was, like
many other people, disposed to find fault
with every one, and this was the cause
of her speaking so sharply about her son.
But in another minute she repented of
her words, and said, ‘“‘ Well, he is not
usually selfish; and I am glad that I
have a little daughter who is so good
and useful while I am obliged to be.
out,”

Amy hung down her head and blushed,
from modesty at being praised, her mother
thought, but we who are in the secret
know that it was a very different feeling
which caused that blush. She was
ashamed to hear her mother praise her, -
when she knew that she had both dis-
obeyed and deceived her. But she made ~

no reply, and she and her mother began oe

i.



The Disaster. 21

their tea in silence. When it was over,
Mrs. Miller put on her bonnet and shawl,
and prepared to go out again.

“Tf Ned will not be back until late, I
must take Miss King’s dress home my-
self,” she said; “and I may as well go
to try on Mrs. Blackman’s dress, as she
lives close by. I shall be out some time,
Amy, for I shall go into the draper’s on
the way. Mind you keep the fire burning,
and get supper ready, there’s a good girl,
~ for.I shall be cold and hungry when I
come back.”

Mrs. Miller did not unfold the dress,
but simply put it in the wrapper, and
went out again into the cold, carrying
her parcel.

Amy’s mind was relieved from all
fear, for she was sure now that the
accident would never be discovered.

~~ EES



22

CHAPTER III.
Wother and Haughter,

. @ HAT is the time, ma? I[
(aeNd), think it is getting late.”
“Yes, it is past seven,
and your dress hasn’t come
home yet. I hope the dress-
maker won’t disappoint me.
i can tell her that if she don’t bring it
home to-night she won’t have any more
of my custom.” =E.
The speaker was Mrs. King, the wife” :
of a rich grocer living in the High
Street, and the young girl sitting with
her, to whom she was talking, was her
eldest daughter, Hortensia..
Although this young lady had. so fine
a name, she was a quiet, plain, ordinary- .
looking girl, with pale blue eyes, a nose _






Mother and Daughter. 23

that would not turn down in spite of its
owner's efforts to train it in that direction,
and an abundance of decidedly red hair,
but a good-natured, merry expression of
countenance, which made one forget the
irregular features and red hair, and gave
one no surprise to find that Hortensia
King was a general favourite among her
schoolfellows.
“It won’t matter so long as I have it
-in time for the party to-morrow; and
perhaps Mrs. Miller would have had to
sit up very late last night in order to let
us have it to-day,” she suggested, gently.
“She ought at any rate to keep her
_. ypomise, for she knows that I am one of
‘er best customers,—one who pays her
‘iberally, and never keeps her waiting
for her money,” said Mrs. King.
“Hark! there is a knock at the door.
Perhaps she has brought it; shall I go
and see?” asked Hortensia.
’ “No, my dear, sit still. Jane will —”
“If you please, ma’am, the dressmaker



24 Amy's Secret.

has brought Miss Tensia’s dress,” said
the servant, entering the room with a
large parcel in her hands.

‘Where is she ?” inquired Mrs. King.

“ She’s gone, ma’am; she didn’t wait.”

“ How tiresome! I wanted her to see
the dress on, and to make any alterations
that may be necessary. Now, Hortensia,
fty sib one

“Oh, how lovely it is, ma! I’m afraid
it is tog pretty for me, the colour won’t
suit with my hair and face,” said the
young girl, as she held the dress at
arm’s length, and surveyed it with
pleasure.

“Nonsense, Hortensia. I can’t think
why you should be always talking about
your plainness. Your hair is no more
red than mine is; in fact, every one tells
me that there is a great likeness between
us, though your pa doesn’t think that
you'll ever come up to what I was when
We were married.”

Hortensia took off her dress, and put.



Mother and Daughter. 25

on the pale blue silk skirt, and was en-
deavouring to put on the polonaise.

“What is the matter with this dress,
ma? TI think it is too tight, I cannot
get into it.” .

“ Nonsense, the tighter it is the more
fashionable it looks. I told the dress-
maker to make it tight. Let me try,”
she said, as she saw that her daughter’s
efforts were vain.

But although she tugged and strained
the silk, she was obliged to confess that
the dress was really too tight to be worn ;
and giving it one more pull, which only
succeeded in slitting the silk, she said,
“It's of no use, my child; take it off,
and let me see what the foolish woman
has done to it.”

“Well, to be sure,” she cried, “this is
a pretty way to make a silk dress, the
salvage cut off all down this seam, and
not even overcast. And the thing is
one-sided, the right side of the polonaise
is narrower than the left one. I really



26 Amy’s Secret.

didn’t think that Mrs. Miller was so
stupid and slovenly ; but she wont make
another dress for me in a hurry.”

“ Martha,” she said, as the servant
appeared in answer to a vigorous pull
at the bell, “just run over to Mrs.
Miller’s, and tell her that I want to speak
- to her immediately about the dress she
has made so shamefully.”

The servant went at once to take the
message, and returned about half an
hour later, saying that Mrs. Miller was
not at home.

“Not at home? No, I suppose not.
She takes care not to come in when she
brings the dress, and to be out when I
send to her. No wonder she was out;
she knows that she has cut off that-
handsome silk, and completely spoilt the
dress, and now she is ashamed to see
me.”

“Do you think that it is quite spoilt,
ma?”

“Of course it is; and I’m sure I don’t



Mother and Daughter. 27

know what you are going to wear at
your party to-morrow.”.

“My white muslin would ——-

“No, that would not do atall. It is
very tiresome, very annoying, and that
_ dressmaker will never get any more
work.from me. She has lost my custom
through her stupidity and artfulness.”

“Perhaps it was an accident,” sug-
gested Hortensia; ‘the scissors might
have slipped, or ——”

“No, that is very unlikely. But the
dress is quite useless, utterly spoilt in
the making; and if Mrs. Miller don’t
come here to-night I shall go to see her
to-morrow, and tell her what I think of
it. The odd thing is,” she added, ex-
amining the dress again, “that it all
seems done very well, except this side
seam, and that is done very clumsily.”

”

—ABLFLERI HIF >



28

CHAPTER IV.
Piscovery,

MY was not in a very happy
state of mind that evening
“ while her mother was out.
She tried to learn her

lessons, but her thoughts ©
moulels run upon the accident of the after-
noon, and she wondered if it would ever
be discovered.

It was growing late, but neither her
mother nor Edward had returned; and
she was tired of staying in the house
alone, when she heard a knock at the
door. Being rather nervous, she grew
frightened, and wondered who it could
be; but the knock was repeated, and
when she opened the door she saw, to





Discovery. a 29

her relief, a respectable young woman
standing before it.

“Ts Mrs. Miller in ?” she asked.

“No, ma’am, she’s been out all the
evening,” replied Amy.

“Will you tell her that missis wants
to see her about the dress ?”

“Yes, I'll tell her when she comes in,”
said Amy, with a dreadful fear that all
was discovered.

The girl wished her good-night, and
went away; and directly she was out of
sight Amy remembered that she had not
asked her the name of her mistress, and
that after all it might not-be Mrs. King.

But she could not put away the un-
‘welcome thought that Mrs. King had
found out all her naughtiness. Strange
to say, she had never thought of her
disaster, and the way she had tried to
hide it, being discovered by any but her
mother’s eye; and the thought of its
being found out by a stranger so filled
her with terror that she could scarcely



30 Amy's Secret.

bear to give her mother the message -
when she came home, weary and worn
with her day’s work.

“Whose servant was it?” she in-
quired.

“JI forgot to ask.”

“Then I cannot go to-night. I expect
it was Mrs. Mordaunt’s servant, for I
made Miss King’s dress quite according
to her mamma's orders, and I don’t think
there can be anything amiss with it. At
any rate, I can’t go to-night, for I am
dreadfully tired after so much work and
walking.”

Edward, who had just come in, and
was sitting beside her, made no reply,
only gave an angry glance at his sister ;
and she at once took her candle and
went to bed, saying that she was very
tired. But, although she was tired, it
was long before sleep came to her, for
she tossed about restlessly, trying to -
imagine what her mother would say if
she knew all, and wishing—oh! so fer-



Discovery. 31

vently—that she had never seen the
pretty blue dress.

The next day was Friday, the day of
Hortensia King’s birthday party. Amy
rose aS soon as it was light; but she
found that Ned and her mother had been
down some time, and had lighted the
fire, and prepared the breakfast. ar

“ Late again!” cried Ned; “I suppose
you have been a long time over -your
curls, or putting on your dress.”

She did not answer, but sat down to

-her breakfast, trying to keep back the
hot tears and to check the choking sobs
which her brother’s words had caused.

Breakfast was soon over, and Ned
had just started for school when a loud
knock was heard at the door, which Mrs.
Miller opened. A moment later Amy
heard in loud tones the words, “I tell
you it is spoilt—completely spoilt!” and
she trembled as she listened.

- “T can’t understand it, ma’am; indeed
Ican’t, I thought it was made exactly



32 Amy's Secret.

as you ordered it,” replied Mrs. Miller,
mildly and tearfully.

“J don’t say that I can understand it,
unless you have cut off and kept some
of the silk. I only know that the dress
is quite ruined, that my daughter is not
able to wear it at her party this evening,
and that Tam very much annoyed, and”
shall expect you to make it good.”

The next few words were inaudible ;
but the little girl trembled with fright
when she heard her mother’s voice
calling, “Amy! Amy!’

She would have done anything, have
gone anywhere, rather than obey that
call, for now she was sure the truth
would come out, and she wished very
much that she had told her mother at
once, It was therefore with slow and
unwilling footsteps that she obeyed the
summons, and entered the front room
with downcast eyes,

“You remember that I left a dress
on the table in the back room yesterday



Discovery. 33

afternoon. Did you touch it, Amy?”
asked her mother.

A flood of tears and a burst of sobs
were her only answer; but they served
to rouse the suspicions of her mother,
who had never thought of Amy as the
cause of the mischief, but fancied that
some one might have done it in her
absence.

“ There, you see how it is,” exclaimed
Mrs. King, “it is all this naughty child’s
doing. I dare say she spoilt the dress
on purpose to annoy me.”

“No, I didn’t,” sobbed the child; “I
only tried on the dress to see how I
should look, and Ned came, and the oil
was spilt on it, and then I cut it off and
mended it up.”

Mrs. King burst into a torrent of
invective, but poor Mrs. Miller sat
perfectly still; she was so grieved and
shocked to find that Amy had been
guilty of so many faults, and above all
that she had deceived her.

De



34 -Amy’s Secret.

“Tf I were your mother I should whip
you’ well, and keep you on bread and
water all day, you naughty child!” said
Mrs. King, while Amy sobbed piteously.
“As it is, Mrs. Miller,” she continued,
speaking to the dressmaker, “I must ~
repeat what I said before, that I shall
_ expect the dress to be made up as I
ordered it, and that I shall not send you
any more dresses to be tried on and cut
and spoilt by your vain little girl.”

So saying she took her departure, and
Mrs. Miller quitted the room without
saying a word, leaving Amy very tearful,
and utterly miserable.





35

CAPA Re Ve
A PWiserable Hay,

f°r was Sunday, the day to
« which Mrs, Miller’s children
looked forward with great
pleasure, for to them it was
usually the happiest day of
the week. It was their
mother’s leisure day,—her rest day,—and
very happy the children felt as they
walked beside her to the house of God
in the morning and evening. The after-
noon Mrs. Miller spent at home, while
Edward and Amy were at the Sunday-
school; and in the evening, after service,
they would gather round the fire and
sing hymns, or listen while their mother
talked or read to them. Sometimes there
were wet: Sunday evenings; but these





36 Amy's Secret.

were spent just as happily in reading
from the large family Bible, or singing
the Sunday-school hymns.

Perhaps it would not be unfair to say
that the plentiful supply of good whole:
some food helped to make the day —
attractive to Ned; for his mother was
‘not rich, and a good joint of meat was
not an every-day occurrence in that little
household. Nor is it unfair to say that
Amy felt the importance of wearing her
best clothes, and was glad of such an
opportunity of showing them off as the
Sunday-school afforded.

But such a dull, miserable, unhappy
Sunday neither of them ever remem-
bered. There was no hot joint for
dinner, in fact, no meat at all, as Mrs.
Miller had not received the money for
her work, and it would cost a great deal
to replace the silk dress which had been
spoiled. The mother was very quiet .
and sad, Ned cross and ill-tempered, —
and Amy so very unhappy that she felt



A Miserable Day. a7

-no pleasure in wearing her best clothes,
although she had a brand new hat to
put on.

The tears continually started to her
eyes when she was reminded by her
_brother’s contemptuous and angry looks
of the mischief she had done a day or
two before. He confined himself to
looks, and scarcely took the trouble to
speak to his sister. The boy was very
fond of his mother, and so grieved to
: see her looking sad and gloomy that he
gave vent to his sorrow and displeasure
by casting these reproachful sneering
glances at Amy, who quailed under
‘them, and felt as af her heart would

break.

But the most wretched day of one’s
life must come to an end at last; and
that miserable Sunday at length drew to
a close, and Amy laid her head on the
pillow, feeling very thankful that night
‘ had come, and wondering how many
more unhappy days she should spend,



38 Amy's Secret.

and if all her life would be dreary and
miserable as that day had been. But
there was to be a little ray of sunshine
for her, even that night; for when her
mother went up to bed, she noticed her
little girl’s sad tearful face, and felt very
sorry for her. She thought that Amy
“had been punished enough by being
under her displeasure for three days.
So she went to her bedside, and said
kindly, “Don’t cry any more, dear. I
know you are sorry for the faults you
have committed, and now I have quite
forgiven you. Are you sure that God
has forgiven you?”

‘No, mother,” sobbed Amy; “I couldn’t
pray about a—a dress.”
_ “But you have sinned against Him .
both by disobedience and deceit, and I
believe you are sorry for those sins.
Tell Him so, and seek His forgiveness
before you go to sleep.”

Amy crept out of bed, knelt down,
and really prayed for the first time in



A Miserable Day. 39

her life. It was true that she had always
said her prayers night and morning;
but this was the first time that she
‘prayed to God from her heart for what
she really wanted; and in after days she
often looked back to that evening as a
turning-point in her life.

Although her fault was forgiven, the
consequences of it still remained; the
blue silk dress was still quite spoilt, and
upon her mother rested the task of buying
another in its place; while one of her
best customers had left her, and, what
was worst of all to Amy, Ned still con-
tinued angry and petulant. Indeed, as
his sister’s smiles returned, and her face
grew brighter, he seemed to be more
sullen and cross.- He usually met her
with a scowl upon his brow, and answered
her cheerful little remarks in a harsh,
snappish manner.

In vain his mother reasoned with him,
and told him how it grieved her to see
him cherish such an unforgiving spirit



40 Amy's Secret.

towards his sister. He only replied, “It
is all very well for you to forgive her,
mother, for you are so kind and good-
natured you would not hurt anybody.»
And I would forgive her if it were only
me she has injured. But when I see
you toiling and slaving away to get the
* money for that precious dress which she
spoiled through her vanity, I feel down-
right mad. Ifshe were a boy, I’d give
her a jolly good thrashing, and have it
over; but I can’t do that sort of thing
with a girl, so I make her feel it another
way. But forgive her I can’t.”





41

CHAPTER VI.
fiow Red went Sliding.



4 S'S January grew older,
oF FL and the days length-
ened, the cold weather
increased in strength.
Icicles hung from the
windows, water froze
indoors, snow came
down and covered the
houses with a clean
white robe, and made
the streets slippery and unsafe both for
horses and foot-passengers. Every pond
in the neighbourhood was a sheet of
thick strong ice, and numbers of skaters
were to be seen every day making their
“way to the ponds; while those who were
not fortunate enough to possess skates
went out to slide.



42 Amy's Secret.

Early one Saturday morning, Edward
told his mother that if she did not want
him to run errands for her, he should
like to go out sliding with some of his

schoolfellows. Mrs. Miller was quite

_ willing for him to go; and he had just
started, when Amy ran in to tell her
mother that several of her young friends
were going also, and to ask if she might
accompany them. She obtained per-
mission, and went upstairs to put on her
hat and jacket, then started off as fast as
she could to overtake her friends.

For two whole weeks, Edward had
continued to nurse his feeling of spite
and anger, and to take every opportunity
of making Amy feel how much he de-
spised her. Instead of being cheerful,
frank, generous, and full of fun, he grew
sullen and silent, seldom speaking to his
sister in his usual manner.

It happened that he and one of his
companions were walking behind the rest
of the party, so that Amy, panting and



flow Ned went Sliding. 43

out of breath, had to pass him in order
to walk with the others.

“Now then, Amy, where are you
running to ?” he cried, angrily.

“Tam going to the pond with Jessie
and Annie,” she panted.

“Indeed you are not going with us,”
he replied; “you'll be sure to get into
mischief.”

“ But mother said I might go,” pleaded
Amy.

“T wonder you were not ashamed to
ask her,” said her brother. “If you had
a spark of feeling for her, you wouldn't
leave her alone on Saturday morning,
when she’s been slaving all the week to
make up that money for the dress you
ruined through your stupid vanity. No,
if you want to go, go alone; at any rate _
you shan’t go with us,” he said, roughly
pushing her aside, and running off round
the corner of the street to rejoin his
companion, who had left the brother and
sister to settle their dispute alone.



pag Amy's Secret.

The push was more violent than
_.dward meant it to be. Poor Amy fell
heavily to the ground, and was stunned
by the blow. As she fell her foot slipped
from the pavement into the road, anda
man in a baker’s cart, driving rapidly by
at the moment, had not time to pull up
his horse before the wheel passed over
her foot. The pain aroused her for one
instant ; she gave a piercing shriek, and
then fainted away. A crowd soon ga-
thered round her; and one or two kind
persons raised the child, and began to
talk of taking her to the hospital.

When Amy opened her eyes again,
she was conscious of a terrible pain in
her foot, from which the boot was being
removed; while a crowd of strangers,
both sympathetic and curious, stood’
looking on. The baker had been stopped,
and was loudly declaring to a policeman —
that it was quite an accident, and that .
he was not to blame.

“What is the matter?” asked a plain



flow Ned went Shding. 45

but handsomely dressed little girl, who
happened to be passing at the moment,
of a woman:in the crowd.

“ A little gal run over, miss,” was the
reply. “A boy pushed her down; and —
the baker, he run over her foot before
he could stop his ’orse.”

“Poor child!” said Hortensia King,
as she made her way through the crowd
“Why, it is Mrs. Miller's little girl!”
she cried, as she caught sight of Amy’s
pale face, just as she opened her eyes.

“Do you know her, miss?” inquired
two or three voices. ;

“Yes, she is our dressmaker’s little
girl. Oh dear, what trouble she will be
in, poor woman! Shall I run and tell
her about it ?”

“If you know where she lives, it will
be the best thing you can do,” said a
woman standing near. “ You see they’ve
~ got a cab, and they are just going to
take her to the hospital ; the doctors will
soon see what is the matter with her,”.



46 Amy’s Secret

Hortensia set off at once, and ran to
the dressmaker’s house in such haste
that when she reached the door she was
quite out of breatn.

Mrs. Miller came in answer to her
knock; but the girl. stood a moment
trying to regain her breath, and then
said, “Oh, Mrs. Miller, I am so sorry,
but will you go to the hospital? Amy
has hurt her foot, but they hope it isn’t '

hurt badly.” .

“My Amy?” cried the poor woman, ~
who had expected to hear some un-
pleasant message from Mrs. King about
the damaged dress.

“Yes,” said Hortensia, who. could
speak a little less hurriedly now, “a boy
pushed her down, and a cart went over
her foot, and she fainted; but they’ve
taken her to the hospital now.”

“Oh dear! oh dear! what shall I
do?” cried poor Mrs. Miller, as she
hastened to put on her bonnet and
shawl and set out for the hospital.



Flow Ned went Shding. 47

Hortensia meantime made her way
home, and began to tell her mother what
had happened, and how she had taken
the news to Mrs. Miller.
“Was it that fair-haired little girl who
“spoilt your dress ?”.asked Mrs, King.

-“ Yes, mamma; but don’t think any
‘more about it now, the poor little girl is
in so much pain, and I am sure that her
mother is in dreadful trouble about her.
Can you think of anything we can do
for her?”

“T have no doubt that the surgeon at

the hospital will do everything in his

power; but if you like I will speak to
Dr. Arnold, and.ask him to look at her,
and see if anything more can be done,
when he pays his next visit to the
hospital.”



CHAPTER VII.
Poor Amy!

pT was very late in
the afternoon when
Edward returned
from the pond where
he had been sliding
merrily and enjoying
himself, scarcely giv-
ing a thought to the
little sister he had
so roughly sent home that morning.
The street lamps were lighted, and the
cold frosty air in which he had been for
so many hours had given him a keen
appetite, and he ran down the street in
a great hurry, so that he might be in
time for tea.

To his surprise he found the house





Poor Amy !/ 49

dark and silent. The front door was
fastened, and his loud and continued
knocking was not answered. He could
not understand it, for his mother was
usually at home at that hour; but a boy
who was passing down the street shouted,
“Tt's no good for you to knock, there’s
nobody at home; and your mother’s gone
to the hospital to see your sister.”

“To the hospital? Oh, what is the
matter ?” cried Ned, in alarm.

“She was run over,” said the boy
abruptly, as he went down the street
whistling.

Poor Edward was horror-struck. He
had never known until that moment how
much he loved Amy; and now that he
heard she was injured (how seriously he
did not know), the remembrance of his
unkindness to her that morning came
before him like a flash of lightning; and
although he little thought that 4e had
been the cause of the accident, he was

sorry that he had sent her home alone.
E 87



50 Amy’s Secret.

He walked slowly down the street
in the direction of the hospital, half-
hoping, half-fearing, to meet his mother,
and hear from her if his sister were very
much hurt. But he had not gone far
before he met her carrying a large parcel
of work. She saw him directly, and
hastened to meet him with a faint attempt
at a smile.

“Well, my boy,” she said, looking
closely at him in the light of a street
lamp, “I see you have. heard of the
accident.”

“Yes, mother. But tell me, is she
hurt very much?”

“ Not so much as I feared at first, dear.
It seems that the cart-wheel only went
over her foot; and although that is in-
jured,” she said, with a quiver in her
' voice, *‘still we hope that it may not be
very bad, and that she will soon be well
again when the shock to the system is
over.”

“Ts that all? Is it only her foot?’



Poor Amy! 51
asked Ned. “Well, I am glad it is no

worse.”

He had scarcely dared to think how
much Amy might be hurt; and now that
he heard it was only her foot, all his pity
and penitence took flight.

It was just like Amy, he said to him-
self, to upset mother, and make such a
fuss just because she had hurt her foot.
What a stupid little cry-baby she always
was! How silly of her to get in the way.
of a cart and be run over! But perhaps
she had been well frightened this time,
and really was punished for all her stupid
vanity. He might have guessed that she
was not hurt very much.

These hard, unkind thoughts filled
his mind as he walked silently home
beside his mother, and helped her to
light up the fire and get the tea; while -
she, poor woman, fancied that he was
Overcome with sorrow on account of the
accident.

“Poor boy!” she thought, “he is very”



52 Amy's Secret.

unhappy. I won't tell him the worst
to-night, or he will lie awake and fret.
I am sure he is very sorry he has treated
her so badly lately.”

- She tried in vain to swallow a morsel
of bread and butter, but it seemed to
choke her ; and even Edward’s appetite
left him as he looked at her sad face.

“ Mother,” he said at length, “ you are
tired and worried to-night; will you go
to bed, and let me tidy the rooms for
you ?” ney

“Thank you, my boy,” she said,
gratefully, “you are very good and
thoughtful.” -

She wished him good-night ; and after
he had done all he could to save her
trouble in the morning, he went to bed,
his mind still full of impatient and
-unkind thoughts.

How quiet the house seemed the next
morning without Amy’s lively chatter,
and her footsteps about the house as she
dressed herself for Sunday-school.



Poor Amy! 53

Both mother and son thought of her
very much; and Edward was astonished
to find how much he missed her,
especially when he set off down the
street alone. It seemed as if she must
be coming just after him, as if she were
only waiting to put on her new hat ora
pretty ribbon. But it was when he
returned home to dinner that the absent
one was missed most of all, when he sat
opposite his mother, and saw her sorrow-
ful face and eyes that looked full ot
unshed tears.

“Mother,” he cried, as she helped
him to a slice of meat, “mother, I can
see you have been fretting this morning,
I wish you wouldn’t worry about Amy.
I’m sure she has given you trouble
enough without this, and I can’t think
how she managed to get under the
horse’s feet.”

“Some unkind boy pushed her down
at the corner of St. George’s Street, and
before she could rise the wheel passed



°

54 Amy’s Secret.

over her foot. I don’t know what I
could do to that boy,” she said, with
unusual energy and severity; “I’m sure
no punishment could be too great for
him.”

“But you don’t think her foot is hurt
badly ?” asked Ned, in a husky voice,
while his face was working strangely.

‘So badly that the doctor told me he
was afraid she might have to lose it, and
that’ my darling may be a cripple for
life!” she replied in an unnaturally
steady voice; while Ned gasped out,
“Our Amy lose her foot? A cripple
for life!”

“Yes,” said Mrs. Miller, whose tears
were now flowing freely, “I am going
to see her ae afternoon, the operation
may be over.”

“Mother!” burst from the boy’s lips
in a bitter piercing cry, as the truth
flashed before him, and throwing down
his knife and fork beside his untasted
dinner, he rushed away from the table,

is



Poor Amy! 55

upstairs to his own little room, where he
turned the key in the lock, which had
grown rusty from disuse, and threw
himself on his bed in an agony of grief
and remorse. He knew now the extent
of the injury which Amy had received,
and at the same time the fact that he
had caused it; and he could not bear to
think of it.

In vain his mother rapped at the door,
and begged him to come down to finish
his dinner. He could not bear to see
her and to know that she had been
hiding the terrible fact from him on
purpose to save him pain, while he had
been thinking such unkind thoughts
about his suffering sister.

Amy a cripple! How should he ever
bear to see her about the house, and to
know that it was all his fault, that it was
her brother's hand which had dealt the
blow which caused her lameness? He
thought of her affection for him, and
how patiently she had borne his re-

a



56 Amy’s Secret.

proaches, and what meek replies she
had made to his sneering remarks, until
he hated himself, and abhorred the
sullen, unforgiving spirit he had shown
towards her.

“And I thought I was right all the
time, and that I only did it for mother’s
sake,” he said. “Oh, what a wretch |
have been! I am sure she can never
forgive me. But I will run away,—I -
can't stay here when she comes home—
lame. No, I will go away, and earn
money for her and mother, and see if I

can’t do something to make up for my _

unkindness. Oh! if I had only known
_what was coming, how differently L
would have acted.”





Of

CEPAVP IR Vallee

Amy's Recovery,



ae did not stir from
his room all the afternoon,
and it had grown quite
dark when he heard a tap
at his door.

~ “Let me in, Ned,” said
his mother'’svoice, “I have
-good news for you, my
boyeaee

He unlocked the door,
and his mother enteréd the room, looking
so much happier than she had been at
dinner time, that Ned felt hopeful at once.
_“T have been to the hospital, and
have seen our pet,” she said, softly
“She is getting on very well. God has
been very good to us, dear; the doctor





58 Amy's Secret.

says that she will not lose her foot, as he
feared yesterday ; and she is much better
than he could have expected.”

“Thank God!” burst from the boy’s
lips.

“Yes, we will thank Him, He is
indeed good to us. I am sorry that
I told you of the doctor's fears; but I
did so because I feared to keep it from
you any longer.”

“But, mother,” he cried, interrupting
her, “do you know, has Amy told you
who—who pushed her down ?”

- “No, dear, I don’t know; and Amy
will not tell me, although she confesses
that she knows his name. Don’t trouble
to find it out, my boy. She forgives
him. Let us do the same, and not think
of revenge.”

“But Z know, and I can’t bear it. Oh,
mother, can you believe it? Don’t look
at me,—but—but—I did it! No, she
can’t forgive me, and I know that you
' must hate me.”



Amy's Recovery, 59
“T don’t understand you, Edward,”

- said Mrs. Miller, half bewildered.

“TI pushed her away, because I

wouldn’t let her come sliding with us.
It is all my fault,” he said, between his
sobs.
_ His mother could hardly believe it;
but when she saw how thoroughly dis-
tressed he was, her heart ached for him,
and she tried to comfort him by saying,
“Amy forgives you: she sent her love,
and hopes to see you soon.”

Those kind words were too much for
the poor boy, and he sobbed, “ You’re
too kind, mother. How can she forgive
me, when I’ve been so cruel and un-
forgiving to her?”

‘But she does forgive you,—fully.
Oh, my boy, let us thank God for His
goodness in making her better, and
preventing what might have been a
life-long sorrow. Our Father has been
very merciful to you.”

They knelt down with hearts full of



60 Amy’s Secret.

thankfulness, which Mrs. Miller tried to
express in a few words; and both went
downstairs with lightened hearts and
happier faces.

Mrs. King did not forget her promise,
but spoke to the doctor about Amy.
He took particular note of her case when
he paid his next visit to the hospital,
and gave a very favourable report to
Mrs. King, who really felt very sorry
for the poor child.

Kind-hearted MHortensia paid her
several visits, carrying with her a bunch
of early flowers or a pot of snowdrops,
to brighten the ward, which was a dull-
looking place, in spite of the illuminated
texts upon the walls.

Every Sunday afternoon, Mrs. Miller
and Ned went to see her. How bright
_and happy she always looked during
their visits, although the long week days
passed rather slowly at first. But she
regained her health so quickly, and
her foot grew so much better, that her



Amy’s Recovery. 61

brother’s old smile came back when he
saw her able to move a little without
help, and knew how thoroughly she
forgave him.

At last-came the happy day when the
doctor pronounced her well enough to
return home. How thankful she was to
leave the hospital with her foot nearly
cured, and what a joyful reception they
gave her in the dull little house! It
seemed as if her mother and Ned could
not make enough of her ; and the neigh-
bours came in one after another to see
her, and to say how well she was looking.





62

CEVA TEsEER e1OXG

Soanclusion,

-T was in the sweet
spring-time that Mrs.
Miller, having saved
~ enough money to pay
for the unfortunate blue
dress, went at once to see
Mrs. King, to discharge
the tiresome debt.

But when she made
known her errand, Mrs.
King feokedt annoyed and vexed, and
said that she had only spoken in the
heat of the moment, and never really
meant to take the money. “In fact,”
she said, “ Hortensia does not wish for
another silk. She is a strange girl, and
prefers plain stuff dresses, and she -




te



Conclusion. 63

declares that when she grows up she
will be a hospital nurse.”

_ But Mrs. Miller scarcely liked to take
back the money, which she had been so
many weeks in saving, until Hortensia
came into the room, and suggested that

- it would be enough to pay for a week's

holiday at the sea-side, and that she was

sure the change would do pe a great
deal of good.

It was such a charming project that
Mrs. Miller joyfully consented; and a
few weeks later, when the busy season
was over, the hard-worked dressmaker
and her two children spent a happy and
long-remembered week at the sea-side,
where the breezes blew a colour into

their pale cheeks, and gave them fresh
~ health and vigour.

The very day after their return, Mrs. -
King sent two dresses to be made; and
her husband, hearing from Hortensia,
who was ever ready to say a kind word
~ for every one, that Edward was about to



64. Amy’s Secret.

leave school, and was anxious to help
his mother, offered to take the boy into
his shop without any premium, an offer
which Mrs. Miller very gladly accepted.

The mother felt that she had indeed
great cause for thankfulness when she
looked at her two children, and saw Amy
running about, and looking as well as
ever, and knew that her boy’s future
was so kindly provided for; but more
than all did she rejoice to see how well
they agreed together, and how, as young
disciples of Jesus, they tried to help each
other in the Christian way, seeking the
smile and approval of their Heavenly
Father.

“LOLS

LONDON; KNIGHT, PRINTER MIDDLE STREET, E.C.





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Companions.” Small qto. 2s.
cloth boards,
“ The juveniles always like to read about

animals talking, especially when they say
what is worth hearing.”"—7he Queen.
“A capital book, full of illustrations.”
British Weekly.

~ “Quite enticing for the little people.” —Sunday School Chronicle.
a ‘




























alle





Reduced frout “TALKATIVE FRIENDS.”





1 The Book of Books: The Story
of the English Bible.
2 Springfield Stories.
3 Little Dot. By Mrs. WALTON.
4 John Thomson’s Nursery.
5 ‘lwo Ways to begin Life.
6 Ethel Ripon. By G. E. Sar-
GENT,
7 Little Gooseberry.
8 Fanny Ashley,and other Stories
9 ‘the Gamckeeper’s Daughter.
10 Fred Kenny; or, Out in the
World.
11 Old Humphrey’s Study Table.
12 Jenny’s Waterproof.
13 The Holy Well. An. Irish
Story.
14 The Travelling Sixpence.
15 The Three Flowers.
16 Lost and Rescued.
17 Lightbearers and Reacons.
18 Little Lottie ; or, the Wonder-
ful Clock.
19 The Dog of St. Bernard.
20 Isaac Gould, the Waggoner.
21 Uncle Rupert’s Stories for Boys
22 Dreaming and Doing.



id

with COLOURED
FRONTISPIECE.

Dom

SERIES
| Of Books for
7 Children.

23 Many Ways of being Useful.
24 Rachel Rivers; or, What a
Child may Do.

25 Lessons out of School.

26 Setma, the Turkish Captive.

27 Show your Colours,

28 True and False Friendship.

29 Always Too Late, and other
Stories.

80 School Pictures drawn from
Life.

31 Soldier Sam.

82 Stephen Grattan’s Faith. By
the Author of ‘‘ Christie Red-
fern’s Troubles.’’

83 David the Scholar,

34 Tired of Home.'

35 Setting out for Heaven.

36 The Stolen Money, and other
Ballads.

37 Helen’s Stewardship,

38 Pat Riley’s Friends.

39 Olive Crowhurst. A Story for
Girls.

40 The White Feather.



sf







44 The Raven’s Feather.

45 Aunt Milly’s Diamonds, and
Our Cousin from India.

46 My Ladys Prize, and Effie’s
Letter.

47 How the Golden Eagle was
Caught. ji

48 Emily’s Trouble, and what it
taught her.

49 Adopted Son, and other Stories

50 Till the Sugar Melts. By M.
E. Ropes.

51 Story of a Geranium; or, The
Queen of Morocco.

52 The Flying Postman, and other
Stories.

53 The Money in the Milk.

54 Cowslip Ball, and other Stories.

55 Little Model, and other Stories.

56 Mary Sefton. By the Author
of ‘‘ The Two Roses.”

57 Tales from over the Sea,

58 Lisetta and the Brigands; or,
Saved by a Mule.

59 Bessie Graham.

60 In his Father’s Arms.
side Story.

61 Cosmo and his Marmoset.

62 Talks with Uncle Morris.

63 ‘The Patched Frock

64 Herbert and_ his Sister; or,
Not in One Shoe.

65 Lucy Miller’s Good Work.

66 Little Andy’s Legacy.

G7 How the Gold Medal was Won,
and The Young Drovers.

63 Master Charles's Chair, and
How it was Filled.

69 Little Kittiwake; or, The
Story of a Lifeboat.

70 Squire Bentley’s Treat.

71 Jessie’s Visit to the Sunny Bank

72 Amy’s Secret. By Lucy ByER-
LEY.

9% 73 The Children in the Valley.

SERIES—continued.
ES
41 Steenie Alloway’s Adventures.

42 Angel's Christmas. By Mrs. Watton.
43 Cottage Life ; its Lights and Shadows.

A Sea- 5










74 Florence and her Friends.

75 The Two Roses.

76 Little Tenpenny; What she
did, and How she did it.

77 Six China Teacups.

78 His Own Enemy.

79 Three Firm Friends.

80 Empty Jam-pot. By the Author
of “ Lost and Rescued,” etc.

81 Patty and Brownie; or, ‘The
Lord will Provide.

82 ‘T'wo Weeks with the Greys.
A Story of American Home
Life.

83 A Tale of Three Weeks. By
EGLANTON THORNE.

84 My Brother and I.

85 The Blessed Palm.

86 Hubert’s Temptation. A Story
from Real Life.

87 Pretty Miss Violet.

88 The Queen’s Oak.

89 Story of a Yellow Rose. Told
by Itself. By Jessz PaGr.

90 The Blacksmith’s Daughter ;
or, The Little Comforter.

91 Daisy's Trust. By E. S. Pratr

92 The Runaways.

93 Jack Silverleigh’s Temptation.

94 May Lynwood. A ‘Tale of
School Life.

95 Tom’s Bennie. By M.E. Ropes

96 The Captain of the Schocl.

97 Miss Pris.

98 The Story he was Told.

99 Gerty’s Triumph.

100 The Missing Jug.

101 Granny's Darling.

102 Galen! Peter's New Year’s

ift.

103 A True Story of Long Ago.

104 The Little Midshipman, and

other Stories.

105 How Arthur Found out the
Secret. Xa










































































bible Pictures for our Pets

Part J. OLp TESTAMENT PICTURES.
Part II. New TESTAMENT PICTURES.

With large Illustrations drawn by SELOUS, STANILAND,
Wess, Watson, HARRISON WEIR, DownarD, Dori,
and other well-known artists.

Quarto. Each Part complete in itself. In ornamental boards,
with cloth backs. 2s. each Part. Complete in One Volume,
4x 4s. handsomely bound, with medallion on side, gilt edges.







e

JICTURE BOOKS

For Little Children.

The Sweet Story of Old. A:
Sunday Book for‘the Little Ones.
By Hessa_Srrerton, author of
- Jessica's First Prayer,” ‘Bede's
Charity,” eic. With Twelve Col-
oured Pictures. 3s. 6d.cloth boards,
coloured edges.

My Own Picture Book.
First and Second Series. Each
Part complete in itself, 2s, 6d. in
coloured boards; or, in one hand-
some Volume, gilt edges. 4s.

(25) Watts’s Divine and Moral
Songs. New Edition. With many fine Coloured Illustrations.
2s. 6d. cloth boards.

My Holiday Picture-Book. Comprising : Holiday-time
in the Country—Contented Johnnie—The Children of the Bible—
The Busy Farm ; or, a Visit to our Country Friends—Amy’s Birthday
Preseut—The Bible Picture Alphabet. With Coloured Pictures,

2s. 6d. cloth.
My Coloured Picture Story-Book. With Twenty-four

full-coloured page Pictures and Forty Vignette. Comprising : Our
Pretty Village—Little Antoine and the Bear—Rosa, the Little
Cousin from India—The Blackbird’s Nest. 4s. handsomely bound
in cloth boards, full gilt.

Bible Stories and Pictures. With Twenty-four Col-
oured page Pictures and Forty Vignettes. With simple letterpress
in large type. 4s. handsomely bound, cloth gilt.

Harrison Weir's Pictures of Birds and other Family
Pets. With Twenty-four large Coloured Pictures. 5s. handsomely
bound, with side in Gold and Colours.

Storyland. By Srpney Grey. With Thirty-two Ilus-
trations by Ropert Barnes. Engraved and Printed in Colour by
Epmunp Evans. 6s, handsomely bound in coloured paper boards.





Little Dot and Her Friends, With Twenty-four Col-
oured Pictures and Forty Vignettes. 4s. cloth boards, gilt.

Pictures for our Pets. I.--Home and Country Scenes,
etc. II.—Birds, Beasts, Fishes, etc. Profusely Illustrated. 4to.
Second Edition. Each Part is complete in itself, in fancy coloured
boards, 2s. ; or together, handsomely bound in cloth, gilt edges, 4x6





ae







The Children of Cloverley. Illus-
trated. 2s. cloth.

Little Meg’s Children. Illustrated.
1s. 6d. cloth.

Alone in London. Illustrated.
Js. 6d. cloth.

Bede’s Charity. Illustrated.
2s, 6d. cloth.

Carola. Tustrated. 8s. 6d. cloth.

Cassy. Illustrated. 1s. 6d. cloth.

Cobwebs and Cables. Illustrated.
5s. cloth, gilt.

The Crew of the Dolphin. Illus-

trated. Is. 6d. cloth.
Enoch Roden’s Training. Illus-
trated. 2s. cloth. -

Fern’s Hollow. Illus. 9s. cloth.

Fishers of Derby Haven. Ilus-
trated. 2s, cloth.

Friends till Death. 9d. cloth.

Jessica’s First Prayer. Illus-

trated. 1s. cloth.
Sam Franklin’s Savings Bank.
“ 6d. cloth.





SSILLustRared x Boons*K

kA





¢

VESBA

STRETTON

Author of

“Tessica’s First Prayer.”

— Se

The whole of the books forming this
most popular Library are now re-issued in a
new and greatly improved style.
and new Illustrations, with specially attractive binding, will make these
books more than ever suitable for prizes, birthday gifts, etc.

New type

The King's Servants. 1s. 6d. cloth.
Lost Gip. Illus. Is. 6d. eloth.
Max Kromer. Siege of Strasburg. 1s. 6d. cl.
Michel Lorio’s Cross. Illus. 6d.
No Place l:ke Home. Illus. 1s. cl.
Pilgrim Street. A Story of Man-
chester Life. 2s. cloth.
The Storm of Life. Illus. Is.6d. cl.
A Thorny Path. Illus. 2s. cloth.
Under the Old Roof. Illustrated.
Js. cloth.
A Night and a Day. 9d. cloth.

A_ Miserable Christmas and a
Happy New Year. 9d. cloth.

The Worth of a Baby. 6d. cloth.
Left Alone. 6d. cloth.

The Christmas Child. 6d. cloth.

Only a Dog. 6d. cloth.

How Apple-Tree Court was Won.
Gd. cloth.

The Sweet Story of Old.
oured Pictures,

Col-
3s. 6d. cloth.







ES



ILLUSTRATED BOOKS BY

Mas. 0. K. WALON.

Angel’s Christmas.

NANNY
NY
\\

.





Reduced from ‘Curistie’s OLp OnGan.”



16mo. 6d. cloth.
Christie's Old Organ ;
or, Home, Sweet
Home. 1s. cloth.
Launch the Lifeboat.
With 44Coloured Pic-
tures or Vignettes.
4to. 3s. col. cover.

Little Dot. Coloured
Frontispiece. 6d. cl.

Little Faith; or, the
Child of the Toy-stall.
1s. cloth.

Nobody _ Loves
1s. cloth.

Me.

Olive's Story; or, Life
at Ravenscliffe. 2s.6d.
cloth, gilt edges.

A Peep Behind the
. Scenes. Imp. 16mo,
8s. 6d. cloth, gilt
edges

Poppie’s Presents.
Crown 8vo. Is. cloth.

Saved at Sea. A J.ight-
house Story. Is.clcth.

Shadows. Scenes in the
Life of an Old Arm-
Chair. Imp. r6mo.
4s, cloth, gilt edges.

Taken or Left. Crown
8vo. Is. cloth.

Was I Right? 3s. 6d.
cloth, gilt edges.

Our Gracious Queen:
Pictures and Stories
from Her Majesty’s
Life. With many En-
gravings. New and
Revised Edition. 1s.
cloth boards.

tad







1/6 BOOKS ww LARGE TYPE.

FOR YOUNG READERS.

Each in very large type with Engravings. Small 4to. 1s. 6d. Cloth
boards, gilt edges.
Sto

ries of Bible Children. A Sunday Book for very
Little Children. By Mrs. E. M. Waterworth, author of “ Walking
with Jesus,” etc. In very Jarge type. With Illustrations.

Listening to Jesus. A Sunday Book for the Little
Ones. By E. M. Waterworth, author of ‘Sunday Afternoons at
Rose Cottage.” With Illustrations by W. S: Stacy.

Sunday Afternoons at Rose Cottage. Bible Talks
with Mamma. By Mrs. Waterworth, author of ‘ Blessings for the
Little Ones,” etc. In very large type. With Illustrations.

Blessings for the Little Ones.
Walking with Jesus. A Sunday Book for Children.
The Three Brave Princes, and other Bible Stories.

The Beautiful House and its Seven Pillars. By
Frances M. Savill.

Readings with the Little Ones. By Agnes Giberne.
The Children’s King, and other Readings for the Young.

ONE SHILLING EACH.
Picture Stories for Children. With a picture on every

opening, and with letterpress in large type. Crown 8vo. 1s.
attractively bound in cloth boards.

Picture Book for Children. With a picture on every
opening, and with letterpress in large type, well printed. Crown 8vo.
1s. attractively bound in cloth.

SIXPENCE EACH.

THE ROYAL PICTURE BOOKS.

The First of a New Series of Picture Books for very Little Children. A
Picture on every page; the Letterpress in very large type, and in
words of one and two syllables. Engravings by the best Artists.
Imperial 16mo. 6d. each in cloth.

1.—Our Queen, and other Pictures.
2.—Charlie and his Pet, and other Pictures.
3.—Little Kittens, and other Pictures.

4,—Mamma’s Darling, and other Pictures.







FOURPENNY
BOOKS

Each with Itlustira-
tion. Well printed,
and tastefully bound
an cloth boards, and
blocked with colowred
ainks. 4d. each.





























1. Short and Sweet. 18. Lily’s Adventure.
2. I Never Thought of it. 19. Made on Purpose. A Story of
3, Father's Joy, and other Series. Russian Life. By Salem
4. A Sprig of Holly. Hall.
5, Barbara’s Revenge. 20. The White Rosebud, and the
6. Shrimp. Birthday Present.
7. Edith’s Second Thought, and | 21. Carl’s Secret.
- other Stories. 22. Made a Man of.
8. Jack and Shag. 23. Winnie’s Golden Key; or,
9. ‘VhePrincess in the Castle,and The Right of Way. By J.
other Stories. With many Saxby. ‘
Engravings. 24. Trapped on the Rocks; or,
10. Andy and his Book; or, the Only a Word.
Orphan Friends. 25. Susie Wood’s Charge. By
11. Jessie's Roses, and other Mary E. Ropes.
Stories. 26. Fisherman Niels. By Mrs. G.
12. The Village Shoemaker. Gladstone.
13. The Message of the Bells, and | 27. Katy’s Resolution. By Jennie
other Stories. Perrett.
14. The Lily of the Valley, and 28. Watchman Halfdan, and his
other Stories. . Little Granddaughter. By
15. Tony the Tramp; or, Good for Mrs. George G!adstone.
Nothing. By Mary E. Ropes. 29. In Golden London; or, Raised
16. Made Clear at Last; or, The from the Dead. By Mary E.
Story of a Ten-Pound Note. Ropes.
By Mary E. Ropes, Author | 30. Sprats Alive Oh! By Harriette
of “Tony the T'ramp,”’ etc. E. Burch, Author of ‘¢ Wind
17. Chrissy’s Glad News; or, A and Wave fulfilling His
Little Child shall lead them. Word,”’ etc.












HEAP BOOKS

. School Rewards, etc.
Re ic
Threepenny Reward Books.

A Series of mo. Books for the Young. With Covers printed,
back and front, in Colours, on silver ground. Each book in clear type,
with a Frontispiece Engraving.









1 Phil Harvey’s Fortune. 13 Trixie and Her Cousin.
2 His Little Hetty. 14 Kitty’s Concertina.
3 Jock the Shrimper. 15 In Father’s Place.




4 My Master’s Business. [Found | 16 Hilda and Her Pet.
5 How Charlie was Lost and | 17 The Way to Win.








6 Bessie Morton’s Legacy. 18 The Story of Nika.

7 Johan’s Christmas Eve. 19 Addie’s Children.

8 Johnny’s Dream. 20 How Tom Gained the Victory.
9 Old Bagnall’s Ricks. 21 Gaspard’s Promise.
10 Widow Martin's Son. 22 Lucy of the Hall.
11 The Soldier's Legacy. 23 The Oatcake Man.
12 The Flat Iron. 24 Squat and his Friends.





Twopenny Reward Books.
Each containing 48 pages of clearly printed Letter-press, in simple
language for Children. With numerous Engravings, and in attractive
coloured Covers. 2d. each.









1 Children’s Stories. 13 The Round Robin.
2 Little Stories. 14 Elsie in the Snow.
3 Pretty Stories. 15 Mabel’s Mistake.
4 Pretty Stories. 16 The Jackdaw’s Christmas Tree
5 A Mother’s Stories. 17 Angel Rosie.
6 A Sister’s Stories. 48 Faithful Andrew.
7 A Friend’s Stories. 19 Tim's Little Garden.
8 Pleasant Stories. 20 Between Sickle and Scythe.
9 Simple Stories. 21 Freddie’s New Home.
10 True Stories. 22 Kit and his Violin.
11 Useful Stories. 23 Flip, Mish, and Another.
12 Farewell Stories. 24 Jenny Wren’s Mite.







Aunt Mary's Packet of 2 Aunt Mary's Pretty Pages
Picture Stories we for Little People.

Each Packet contains Twelve Books with Glazed Covers, in Gold. Full
of Pictures. Crown 8vo. 1s. the Packet.




New Penny Story-Books.

A New Series of Twelve attractively got-up Reward Books, each com~
yaerising 32 pages, with Cover in Colours, and Illustration. Is. the Packet
ay




wr





oe
-_- oS

12,

Pee
NOOR oo

tone
Son

21,

22,
23.
24.
25,
26
27.
28,
29,

32,

oo
=

1
2
3.
4
5
6
7
8
9.

IN iW

NINEPENNY

Johnny.
Tiger Jack. By Mrs. Prosser.

. Alice Benson’s Trials.
+ Charlie Scott ;

or, There's

Time Enough.

. The Peacock Butterfly.
. Where a Penny went to.
. The Young Folks of Hazel-

brook.

. Miss Grey’s Text; and How

it was Learned.
Basil; or, Honesty and In-
dustry.

- Ben Holt’s Good Name.

Lisa Baillie’s Journal.

« Northcliffe Boys.
. The Little Orange Sellers.
« Georgie’s Prayer.
. Saddie’s Service.
. Nils’ Revenge.

Tale of Swe-
dish Life.
Harry Blake’s Trouble.

- Cousin Jack’s Adventures.
- Hungering and Thirsting.

The China Cup; or, Ellen's
Trial.

How Tilly found a Friend. -
Charity’s Birthday Text.

The Rescue. '

Little Nellie’s Days in India.
The Young Hop-Pickers.
Motherless Bairns.

George Wayland.

The Cinnamon Island and its
Captives.

. Caleb Gaye’s Success.

Dark Days of December.

The Big House and the Little
House ; or, The Two Dreams.
Tim and his Friends, ,

Ned the Barge-boy. *.""

. Ragged Robin. By Mary E.

Ropes.



SERIES.

36.
387.
38,
39.

40.
41,
42.

*
a

50.

51,

53.

Coloured Frontispiece and Wood Engravings,
Attractively bound with Medallion on side.

+ Bessie Mason’s Victories.
- Dame Buckle and her Pet

The Gable House.

The Dangerous Guest. A
Story of 1745.~ By Frances
Browne.

Fruits of Bible Lands. By
Mary K. Martin.

May’s Cousin. By Acthor of
‘“Reuben Touchett’s Grand-
daughter. ’

Billy the Acorn Gatherer. By
Florence EK. Burch.

The Banished Family, and the
Bohemian Confessor.

The Golden Street; or, The
Fisherman’s Orphans. By
Sidney Grey.

. The First of the African Dia-

monds. By Frances Browne.
- The Royal Banner; or,
Dragged in the Dust. By

Emma §, Pratt.

Brave Archie. By Author of
‘Stories of Life in Italy,” etc.
There’s a_ Friend for Little
Children. ByCharlotteMason.
Michael the Young Miner.
A Hungarian Story.

Bob's ‘Trials and Tests. By
Mary E. Ropes.

. Tim Peglar's Secret ; or, The
Wonderful Egg. By Miss
Tandy.

Under the Snow. By the
Author of “Heroes” and

Famous Men of Old.”

The Lost Baby. A Story of
the Floods. By Emma Leslie,
Author of ‘Out of the Mouth
of the Lion,” etc.

Squirrel ; or, Back froma Far
Country. By Florence E.
Burch, Author of ‘How
Tilly found a Friend,” etc.
Rescued from the Burning
Ship ue





" AN ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE for”
Little Bovs and Girls.

OdR LIK DOS.
PENNY
MONTALY.

RRA nnn















nA



“Parents in search of a Mon-
thly Magazine for infants will
not find a better than ‘Our Little
Dots.’ ”—Lnglish Chive chman.

"Just what children will
like.”"—Church Sunday Schoot
Magazine, y

‘Good pictures and reading.”
Spectator. : :

“ Delightful.” —LEcclestastical
Tou siunees Fact aut w vatonerae me oe Gazette. :

“ A valuable little magazine, which is just the thing for the small folk
of the family—full of engravings, little tales in large type and small words,
the ‘ tee Dots’ could wish for nothing better.”—Somerset County.
Herald.

OUR LITTLE DOTS’
AITNUAI |
Lhe Yearly Volume of

‘Our Lari Dens.?

Full of Pretty Pictures and Little Stories
in Large Type. Is. 6d. attractive col-°
oured boards; 2s. neat cloth; 2s. 6d.
eae ome cloth gilt.





















JUVENILE INSTRUCTOR.

especially noticeable for the editor's
sensible practice of giving children credit for
being able to understand something better than
mere jingles and childish things."—The Daily
News.



SS \ ' poetical pieces.” Bookseller. f

“As charming as ever.”—Zcclesiastical
Gazette.

“THE

CHUDS COMPANION

Juvenile Instructor Annual.

Contains a New Story in Twelve Chap-
ters. By Mrs. O. F. Walton, author of .
“‘Christie’s Old Organ,” ‘* A Peep Behind i
the Scenes,” etc. It is full of pretty Z
Pictures and interesting reading for young folks, with a
Coloured Frontispiece, 1s. .6d. attractive coloured boards :
2s. neat cloth; 2s. 6d. handsome cloth, full gilt.







LONDOX: KNIGHT, PRINTER, MIDDLE STRBET, ALDEKSCATE, E,C,

“A pretty little illustrated periodical, |

“A perfect treasury of interesting articles an 35



















































































































































Sa Captive.
SS Show your Colours.
True & False Friendship:
Always too Laté. Sara
School Pictures drawn from Life
Soldier Sam:- :
Stephen Grattan's Faith.
David the Scholar.

Tired-of Home. 3
Ao Setting out forHeaven.
———— aN The Staten Money. aay
—— Helens Stewardship.
Pat Riley's Friends.
Olive Crowhurst.
sa The White Feather.
Steenie Alloway Adventures.
Angels Christmas.
Cottage Life; its Lights@ Shadows
# The Raven's Feather.

Aunt Millys Diamonds & Our.
|. Cousin from India.’ 9
i My Ladys Prize & Effie's Letter.
j How the Golden Eagle was Caught
4 EmilysTroubleéwhat it taught her yg
TheAdopted Son. eet

















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































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'225043' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMHG' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
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6afc006939801218c98f85f0b442417a9b4c3775
'2011-10-13T21:43:39-04:00'
describe
'62845' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMHH' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
e766d67db937e539ce7488b6061572b7
df3b2e0fc96daa8149398fb60ea6f4aa121db860
'2011-10-13T21:43:56-04:00'
describe
'6328392' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMHI' 'sip-files00002.tif'
e42fc3a290c7ee59a6b256a78cadf0f9
f33a07a908a82d565f1d89ed68bf5cbfba80fae6
'2011-10-13T21:43:55-04:00'
describe
'30951' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMHJ' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
d83b80428504bcff5d36f236e5bcd986
d1f31cdab3025b3e9d40f19297925152d31c47b1
'2011-10-13T21:43:17-04:00'
describe
'238990' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMHK' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
0cc868ec0b673d5c83c27c38a1a9d9f2
9668a96efceaac478b5fd7fa2f6b855ad5bb3e15
'2011-10-13T21:43:50-04:00'
describe
'209906' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMHL' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
f28b9535bf2b9ba8f524b576d7d61112
1601d89a548205b12c56b3bc8f9c544d3a501d7b
'2011-10-13T21:43:34-04:00'
describe
'5857' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMHM' 'sip-files00003.pro'
7487f084ea4d83bdfc39605e2d58ae05
37a7901ac39694ce86cb6e81a2dd36b1219122be
'2011-10-13T21:44:12-04:00'
describe
'60492' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMHN' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
96d3a12af63279e4e21aff8e0dd50be9
0453e23069ed72861d5ccac88939456d20a1a8cf
'2011-10-13T21:44:56-04:00'
describe
'5756140' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMHO' 'sip-files00003.tif'
70743fdbc78214caf0ce43f4bd7a768c
d325f6e5aac655f9d2b2f4bfb6534e68a0ce4c14
'2011-10-13T21:44:09-04:00'
describe
'371' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMHP' 'sip-files00003.txt'
a078739f19d300dbddc8ed2ceb9f0309
9e17b386926c0c677f3132153d0e1cf7a263286b
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'28974' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMHQ' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
a582994c12ccfabbb143b5f47c8acdca
c087102472483d3d5749114ae35992250dd23ac2
'2011-10-13T21:45:15-04:00'
describe
'18032' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMHR' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
20241b27a5da9f9f69fc77f5e1770315
b978edcf39f19792e19783142207e6613d0717cd
'2011-10-13T21:43:52-04:00'
describe
'237250' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMHS' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
178e0c3590741c414cfdc6b702048c12
074758d2ee9f50332363c45465e8c78b24bbd6f9
'2011-10-13T21:45:12-04:00'
describe
'79013' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMHT' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
3301ede1ad678e29d7278e3869ef1602
91229e6986eed18ddf77133085610181a5f79bfe
'2011-10-13T21:44:08-04:00'
describe
'33621' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMHU' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
4c43ae9fb076939c17af762f4c1e0860
faba3410919dfe1cf0273ad2f531f388e13e6b40
describe
'1917888' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMHV' 'sip-files00005.tif'
be350d918ef355775862dcb22aada807
03a6db9eba1403a75c831eae614d86bdc885be3d
'2011-10-13T21:44:23-04:00'
describe
'23138' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMHW' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
5db8deda72e0e234985a0ecd3f4e942f
1631cea52b9336e1219be2bc32808e2fe5aae008
'2011-10-13T21:43:48-04:00'
describe
'233833' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMHX' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
d5f63b0a14903f4ad263eab0674cdc1c
823e7282f81806bb6e2cef88840e246af883530f
'2011-10-13T21:45:14-04:00'
describe
'254531' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMHY' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
0f54f9e7733f9247a8c4e471210461fe
38fb01b473071374690a30eb501fd3a1ebf0977d
'2011-10-13T21:44:59-04:00'
describe
'1185' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMHZ' 'sip-files00006.pro'
95dda98bc3bea31189bf878d971a1020
da93872dcbbe09c099dfeba67a928e0a54d33589
'2011-10-13T21:43:37-04:00'
describe
'79530' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMIA' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
44bc287e11e41639417f3fbd12ba429e
ad094c7504f3d7a993a439c17451cf0d6ef65306
'2011-10-13T21:44:55-04:00'
describe
'5633148' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMIB' 'sip-files00006.tif'
00bb1bc70a3ed4ac6bfecb7fb7a6c809
9369a787e70726e185e9f693824a3c79d6b962d0
'2011-10-13T21:43:49-04:00'
describe
'138' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMIC' 'sip-files00006.txt'
453756329eff2e5e076512cb96325d01
6e4f10a211b82140f1c422b8ba4dfdc73b332ea9
'2011-10-13T21:43:46-04:00'
describe
'36038' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMID' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
97690b4b5f7c8f7a1fc113ca3b280b0a
8ac2f6390777168b48c6a7a16b47bce538abd07f
'2011-10-13T21:45:07-04:00'
describe
'237373' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMIE' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
b983a42bb9bb55c6d59f0191e880357d
e27ab82e5f6e6cb6265ac4d5cc6325322348d5a5
'2011-10-13T21:44:33-04:00'
describe
'113128' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMIF' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
0351f57123db510c739aff6e57df16e9
58f5fa526f1662849a4f1e92372687ba20c6f4db
'2011-10-13T21:45:02-04:00'
describe
'4398' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMIG' 'sip-files00007.pro'
136674bcbd719233700a0d1f5998c95a
47c356b5736b93333bc45016106c6f3d3b8c0644
'2011-10-13T21:44:29-04:00'
describe
'45576' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMIH' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
743345d3010b90f31b43ea45875cb6e1
152eb6bbd49008af831e5553f34648d4086b92d4
'2011-10-13T21:44:27-04:00'
describe
'1919428' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMII' 'sip-files00007.tif'
844ae704b38c2c690e3a78a759456ea4
ad339c3e7083e165f93c063c90259c128efcf274
'2011-10-13T21:43:35-04:00'
describe
'213' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMIJ' 'sip-files00007.txt'
46e27107feab420c1b772c4fc937d880
1beb1b2c3c8834ca7d3097f86a2030680d2f9615
'2011-10-13T21:45:06-04:00'
describe
'27125' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMIK' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
49a705c567e2ccf37b70f376c3a77e60
a93d269f2c888f233e5f1b661b0190481b7ead5a
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMIL' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
733bea1e94bec1b990182ec3c13f8f05
c028b67201a44d80e4523e5dc3d60a730cbf1b7c
'2011-10-13T21:44:07-04:00'
describe
'20328' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMIM' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
78b6e4f3a45c53dfdc36700dd4059e8e
3ac66d7d9457683f3f187d0fb6e04c19a288670d
describe
'18505' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMIN' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
44575ccd9b13b1bb5401b8c544ad7e47
92e45356314ec3908a3407d603ea5fa9353d015a
'2011-10-13T21:43:41-04:00'
describe
'1916560' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMIO' 'sip-files00008.tif'
5f77600b6f2df9520357a51819db5bbd
98bc637184332b143628d460f6b44a1134b91a7f
describe
'18038' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMIP' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
604e55325b56db48fe2186562a5bac46
a6274334a2d6ffc4471ff37c904c0db7bc976659
'2011-10-13T21:43:27-04:00'
describe
'237414' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMIQ' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
5a4e73f08f0b01cd783430d6f6e0bba8
757e25d696e4c74a8459f719917f6db841ed52f7
'2011-10-13T21:43:19-04:00'
describe
'100558' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMIR' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
4ec4307f817ef4b935347f26282d5945
ffad5d9efb0aac102defc75843cbbe24dc75fd3a
describe
'9144' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMIS' 'sip-files00009.pro'
42cb40964553595d1ab26809d95cd7e5
0573ebfe5d9b8f3dd671ee3a00a21f0326f9603b
'2011-10-13T21:44:48-04:00'
describe
'43051' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMIT' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
f84ae8166799534dbb5652e27c08c151
89b6400cf3fe4e8cd927226812f6c0a446536d5d
'2011-10-13T21:45:05-04:00'
describe
'1919284' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMIU' 'sip-files00009.tif'
f0472b9eea8001c70b671529b53882af
d4487acecc75d9c6e944c9b0b412fe7fb9e20a35
describe
'540' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMIV' 'sip-files00009.txt'
109bfcc5687352be8c0e80617f06b445
00c62c491a0d17d97bdf2369166e287a671a1e33
'2011-10-13T21:44:10-04:00'
describe
'27489' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMIW' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
02db1ba3717d2cbe32395df763417a17
55f9e15ba77dee75e034c399975a655b52276cea
'2011-10-13T21:44:20-04:00'
describe
'20316' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMIX' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
d659a486a7240262bbc566562bf080ed
33711d764872ab665f7d96f78d5756ee81b8af44
'2011-10-13T21:45:16-04:00'
describe
'18493' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMIY' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
8c6c588c055a2929430e11703863dba0
e6493c174910784c3e6315519f2070f6e8ead0b7
'2011-10-13T21:44:36-04:00'
describe
'1916548' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMIZ' 'sip-files00010.tif'
e0a3ad23a2f23921faa9e2dd1d2a9347
4bf0ca27551903f1a9927c8ac6454df1be5b7280
'2011-10-13T21:43:12-04:00'
describe
'18026' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMJA' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
f5d3733b60acc3eb747241bd3e65c9e0
b49fac2cd837579d4a6a95f3fe7a0364b2f54441
'2011-10-13T21:44:43-04:00'
describe
'237419' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMJB' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
8d94231a5cf8ec5594b85de4b81f07fb
4c0d00bce067f7febbb00f7ce5194ac04b2feee4
'2011-10-13T21:43:36-04:00'
describe
'155690' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMJC' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
c6a296f31427eb74a0dd587afdebdd86
57a173f5c78e8e64f8522c8703475ae605db9bec
'2011-10-13T21:44:41-04:00'
describe
'14183' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMJD' 'sip-files00011.pro'
eb9656ddd66a9cec6a2285959ccc405d
a5bcd6bddf12fee9f902073519debc62dafb21a1
'2011-10-13T21:44:40-04:00'
describe
'62820' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMJE' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
107fd66f0ced1fedb19a2faba35aa702
7964e7feb9375f765464d3bff909ac9f98e33919
'2011-10-13T21:44:38-04:00'
describe
'1920892' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMJF' 'sip-files00011.tif'
9f2f92868ae869889096598197c7ce4b
30f08e2638b200fb763b8539d3d0520dc337b2a2
'2011-10-13T21:44:26-04:00'
describe
'684' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMJG' 'sip-files00011.txt'
30660b3d8da16c09c7711321f14c6543
ec321d539fd6d96f52cb6548fe9b20911fec8dc2
describe
'32387' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMJH' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
3ca940459838986f4e13682318f0ceaa
5c4a83b97ff5a2bf7f341233a8b6445c7d164e54
'2011-10-13T21:43:43-04:00'
describe
'233912' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMJI' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
16aab48e68dbe350451c71744012cbe5
95b4871317112e346b750464d0c2b543dc88f3ec
describe
'189534' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMJJ' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
af0f3d0e925703f34e0c3d1cb2d131d2
de2456ce52f9eefa6ce60871588edcaf438d49b9
'2011-10-13T21:43:15-04:00'
describe
'23695' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMJK' 'sip-files00012.pro'
8ca7d90ce84d7675e4facc23aab3623a
d896a702ac246267ea72aeda2db6cf32b331ab2d
'2011-10-13T21:43:25-04:00'
describe
'78101' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMJL' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
3aca9e2486f341bfcb2497a811b776d3
a3ede3ca145cc6a7c7a0403a70a11772bec138e8
describe
'1894328' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMJM' 'sip-files00012.tif'
0f39dbe3c076250270279efcd3f79265
6c9bffa647383cf6312f73b56f2cdce6a7af11f8
'2011-10-13T21:45:08-04:00'
describe
'944' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMJN' 'sip-files00012.txt'
7fcd69611550ea8cb3e0c928f4ad662a
1c657d279f11a6b36843674ce69168a5b7d87b13
describe
'37967' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMJO' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
6a1d5ebba92b1f3584b52dc11b1d7039
9d661fec02ce2d6029b1bedb74b7e5d5ce33c078
describe
'237416' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMJP' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
bfa637cc12fb47241eb61f1089a69f28
e794f5893ac378328852a2f0896f2aec3ad056ac
describe
'187557' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMJQ' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
ac5d0720e83a94afe68d4e794593c0bf
6113f93a634eee584a4d68266534adc0e0ca2287
describe
'23003' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMJR' 'sip-files00013.pro'
046176f3bda5f0f2a74111f5f83baedc
5a079c27d3ee7eefa008f4290f7f30736500ef38
'2011-10-13T21:44:46-04:00'
describe
'76715' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMJS' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
6e5d283ae48be3d65b41f0afd4c62728
b8efb46095b5f24e5e556af737e5efe4cd1972bb
describe
'1922236' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMJT' 'sip-files00013.tif'
a760d54642147fcbd04600c3ef6187c1
9c067987143712bc512fd46e60bbdf7ae1c7aeea
'2011-10-13T21:43:45-04:00'
describe
'938' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMJU' 'sip-files00013.txt'
11c1c4067618052859412001f61aa7df
40cc5a19ead0558299ed4664939278255f69944f
'2011-10-13T21:45:01-04:00'
describe
'36714' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMJV' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
6232966707ad36f98d78fc3ecb7d6b91
a34505ca14dfbd49c8a3dacb0447a6488e39cecb
'2011-10-13T21:44:28-04:00'
describe
'233015' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMJW' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
0b937981dfc4dffb3eb7b6e51c08d86e
fc6658caf91284ac38f91df8768d83bbb3014601
'2011-10-13T21:43:14-04:00'
describe
'190235' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMJX' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
1fb06a5af6426189206a326e6a46a9db
e1c02cb0d208bf42db6f1a8cf6183eba86cb91da
'2011-10-13T21:43:28-04:00'
describe
'24928' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMJY' 'sip-files00014.pro'
579f85083093729e572e44c078f871b7
28051352d4c5f48676c6f4a21a0afe92a678c712
describe
'78913' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMJZ' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
c3877acffc2794a0a7e7a98dc511e8c1
9340455c6e165638a29a9395b25fbdc27a79c357
describe
'1887232' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMKA' 'sip-files00014.tif'
83dc34236efeffc2f049d828a97eef4f
4380904927e96c34bd27a63c770b958df2c7c6a4
'2011-10-13T21:43:20-04:00'
describe
'991' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMKB' 'sip-files00014.txt'
ec2f7db21d7978ae0e1942fceabf7422
10635f126c35cd21e727158255a36c0dab6a0ded
describe
'37753' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMKC' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
bd6f5a53224b0638eae07b44710d467d
c1a0b5daec4d6579fc23d0aab6d9fff73e508d29
'2011-10-13T21:45:00-04:00'
describe
'232079' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMKD' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
e43e61e94eb7f6875ec091660482f3bb
65bf85136bd31b72804076d6d71239925102c5bb
'2011-10-13T21:43:21-04:00'
describe
'183057' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMKE' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
aa81b274120f1094d4810950324e57e3
0d428b2325075c853cad06d56ded6977d610fdec
'2011-10-13T21:44:31-04:00'
describe
'24114' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMKF' 'sip-files00015.pro'
3f03de60e34a6874bb84490e0bbcec1e
c843dda52c68b127a560e51deff71ba6194fd564
describe
'77265' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMKG' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
de24be05610c912b1e3af18c814ceab6
16dab59482d2d0deb771a0409c69dbdfb7139a26
'2011-10-13T21:45:18-04:00'
describe
'1880044' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMKH' 'sip-files00015.tif'
e19972e515b8317baeb57400e70a300c
96ac90cc4866159d39be680d5c05aaa64de331ed
'2011-10-13T21:44:25-04:00'
describe
'990' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMKI' 'sip-files00015.txt'
5cdc27b377aec91b6cc23cd7a63a1ffc
190c08c57d3d3276da987bc8d7a3422b093f4ab4
describe
'37457' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMKJ' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
317131267efdc49ea4d3b5f0b39882cd
fbe2681da58a39e54e8fe0925bfeabe3202fc1d3
describe
'229477' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMKK' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
e865041765cbade33d551528653e9979
15dc70c2ec4de3a81e423a0472d4a88bfc0f2830
describe
'184545' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMKL' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
6a721a3e367776bd6a8d0a42bcb84934
fec8fe0c0b1c5f26e79818c6a8567bf9ded45ea2
'2011-10-13T21:44:22-04:00'
describe
'23756' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMKM' 'sip-files00016.pro'
d52b3684e099e810afb6cd4e184b3dfc
f1ec1e8d0445d6c234fc6711bcc771f48aa41192
describe
'78329' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMKN' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
99bff4faa2118d3f36e7e2a8deb134d8
9f82283ab4e34363728b7e2c73d0b67aadf441b1
'2011-10-13T21:44:18-04:00'
describe
'1859232' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMKO' 'sip-files00016.tif'
bb6d68f66f4700217d1712d08012cc19
f776ef5a8c63ec64419abeaef4127497d3439cb2
'2011-10-13T21:44:32-04:00'
describe
'958' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMKP' 'sip-files00016.txt'
2a052a144ae5a70a61251e22e9a6bdf2
16e8e252c27a810d9a8ebe45c84def0b43ee15c9
'2011-10-13T21:45:09-04:00'
describe
'38026' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMKQ' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
e5ef17847d52e58c17afe15790cbc88c
ccb15681c196cae1365a7b190139ec560c1dd2ba
describe
'234752' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMKR' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
a5dcadb949bc773224be56804f5c7488
b5e914cda21d49a36841fa04a678b8285988232f
describe
'186245' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMKS' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
9e2957486d905fe3e0150638b030316a
485a3ca86cbd095378c17f638fc14702bfe2ca99
'2011-10-13T21:44:52-04:00'
describe
'24161' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMKT' 'sip-files00017.pro'
ffecf77021663c46a74e6ae5ec0cc0cd
955f2e44cfdc15ff9fceb426485a537f52fe2681
'2011-10-13T21:43:26-04:00'
describe
'79769' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMKU' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
c8b40f37e229cde3498cdabbad2261ae
15c6cb650b5fc28e9d4426e3921e6698135858f5
describe
'1901416' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMKV' 'sip-files00017.tif'
847f7b839d529de2db8550cc60ae3e14
d33cbc7b3787955568d02b8f758abada2997a740
'2011-10-13T21:44:37-04:00'
describe
'1001' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMKW' 'sip-files00017.txt'
c3285a4afd9864608be43ca45998b89d
9ba7b7e6aed158cc6beb592b8925ce85ae0a9ec8
'2011-10-13T21:44:35-04:00'
describe
'38209' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMKX' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
c0b3d2e15c18b3aef85ebc8249b1578a
e049cbe3aa89a20b52c3ad5bfd04c66a64d383b2
'2011-10-13T21:43:58-04:00'
describe
'248737' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMKY' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
1cf76c26eae23f81d3f72ca7d6b689be
9431a2097da9c94d9caaf9ef25c0f9ac610e8c3b
describe
'115928' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMKZ' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
d6cbe70723685986510bf46a4af294ac
376fe8952d15aa0e2777d4b71d68f0eda2ebc083
describe
'7838' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMLA' 'sip-files00018.pro'
2f3d97885ca7041ab4c67581920febe0
328c3ffd4537d7f4570aa4221276e054a0487228
describe
'47028' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMLB' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
aa67a17a5c00a52a166aefdb3cb8f2af
d4472b3867acb54508718e9e6b025643666d1779
describe
'2010320' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMLC' 'sip-files00018.tif'
9df90083d32301e42edede714b16b2fa
89156607c0079a4a6866a5c0513bcb1f74dd7b5b
describe
'312' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMLD' 'sip-files00018.txt'
77170a6c04babb4d1282b9538faea317
4db6a8d06d94e546c10eda3d8250808966e56777
'2011-10-13T21:45:04-04:00'
describe
'26384' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMLE' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
3ba37c1929227cff1c761968a3b92e7b
cc99ca4fd93092fc75aada9e3c07d184fad9a8c3
'2011-10-13T21:43:29-04:00'
describe
'237412' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMLF' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
d11505db6e31193e94f76123183a0ae2
0ad22c727fec9a7514890f86567e6197c7557573
'2011-10-13T21:43:57-04:00'
describe
'151284' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMLG' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
e7dbafdb510470ec635492d9dcc81229
47f4048cc8436d5eec28336c927de7a5ae96db6b
'2011-10-13T21:44:54-04:00'
describe
'15840' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMLH' 'sip-files00019.pro'
4da699adb0f35e8622176618c21c674e
19d435b2752dc384f3f54e342ff7b45d7be29b96
'2011-10-13T21:44:15-04:00'
describe
'62858' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMLI' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
42a7132ea42af220dbaa7342c8d821d3
4fb85204f9b9b5be4c0ee719e2e23d8b45378cd2
describe
'1920820' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMLJ' 'sip-files00019.tif'
f8a9f8b9a74a2c8ff6e7daa319b83197
e55ebd5a50aaa63a80af8a554e696721c543cb78
'2011-10-13T21:45:10-04:00'
describe
'719' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMLK' 'sip-files00019.txt'
55009ef49b63bbb81eb4fd6c61184a92
bb9fbd872548ac0db1bc1a500ee4b95cc0a90c3c
describe
'32415' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMLL' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
8edd131a807c5881c51093cf9aa48e0a
26f88409b824066a23c8847fa2dbc423062c783e
describe
'237387' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMLM' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
df73d6c5ead77b9e9e606be542938fa2
9cc2fba476bc30a14cef44dd4acace5f1b991058
'2011-10-13T21:43:44-04:00'
describe
'171317' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMLN' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
e4e905cc248b9d3ccfb3535289031fcc
6bc642dc1f2763b71dfd35ea1989eb7a2920580e
describe
'21368' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMLO' 'sip-files00020.pro'
cd5e37764f7783cf7411b160335cf15d
2545f807944b7d7828f258b41f46c6243713a2ad
describe
'72489' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMLP' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
356b96369ca7ba6998b77aba77ca69ff
64e727782d6eb60610733416c1e1503132892a50
describe
'1922280' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMLQ' 'sip-files00020.tif'
c52356244c4265d72a123d652d3eedb1
e99f5cb93e9773320da31a942d1cd4d46ca19a97
describe
'880' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMLR' 'sip-files00020.txt'
3a9d26da2d7734b1f04137dc3cca9f05
9f1dc4535bf20fd97f7cb004ebe068463c3a19bf
describe
'35744' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMLS' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
ed2b89ff578c0c6b3dc27fd9f4eb616d
44a42357d18e473a8983c8e146951e8cb4624d62
'2011-10-13T21:43:30-04:00'
describe
'237406' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMLT' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
5321df3a605efcac88789854ea96bbae
0c665659efcfe8b5f1b6101385dec69498cf69bc
describe
'177319' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMLU' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
fdcf1bf39e8555974376b369d23a8694
88969819b7ce4f5440804729e151cf4c61494945
describe
'23506' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMLV' 'sip-files00021.pro'
8d7440837994b3a14364843981368f22
394131023cbbfcbe6c808c1ce2a87b1c51bb9969
'2011-10-13T21:45:13-04:00'
describe
'74770' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMLW' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
7bade60af7dc3276f1fa40497dec1a0f
70923c247e276d4723e7749efe34fa5166d97e58
describe
'1922048' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMLX' 'sip-files00021.tif'
9037ffd4a30acf0ccb8696538f187ec8
f7d3c9dcff2046f0f7ed875fb681f60cbd3e6071
describe
'941' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMLY' 'sip-files00021.txt'
987013411dcc5cb686b52676857e6b89
d889fde581b01035a7d82c61d5eb60152483eda1
describe
'36208' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMLZ' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
e77e0bf9d7c12d2cb1479dd135e52735
a889865fbd8b18e4c2c1cddedda88e9e8f3a28b2
describe
'237423' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMMA' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
5a2681153099417ab490a6e517a00529
017da426b170a9f15f6e27bbd60ab1c93fd087a1
'2011-10-13T21:43:51-04:00'
describe
'177797' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMMB' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
9906f9804af17b7bacb1b2dd12be6108
c4605d28bd6837f07f8bce438330735d5419ad57
'2011-10-13T21:44:02-04:00'
describe
'23640' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMMC' 'sip-files00022.pro'
155e708c1d580c7a86bd8a2b87c0c172
4c8d19424d520a969d3fb41ce5a1fe5029b9d728
describe
'74730' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMMD' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
c52221b79dd8701a14e336064c339f20
b4cee8b85cc3ff8ef78e8d45c4ae64ad43fd4b78
describe
'1921888' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMME' 'sip-files00022.tif'
a34a5a167c8149431379494fc68d81ea
79aca9c912ac5872f55ff8023a80a258dc76f2b1
describe
'952' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMMF' 'sip-files00022.txt'
7c3343e31b3af39134d0edfbf27aec81
cb5220cf7cbd7499c14ff5d251df288afb01e277
'2011-10-13T21:44:50-04:00'
describe
'35633' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMMG' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
6a6b4da2452d3192d7849180501fa0ef
685ea70321b7451745eda53fac19d152c311c07a
describe
'237420' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMMH' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
1924ddfe6b34f65c891af10db7516057
24cf8825eb9afbbbff48aaf662830cbca6496a7d
'2011-10-13T21:44:51-04:00'
describe
'176701' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMMI' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
cc7932d418f58e3d7782f4e2b7481383
a752f5308beebb9c8710a67ff90bdc49435f797c
describe
'23686' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMMJ' 'sip-files00023.pro'
88e992ebd7033622edda37f691b47380
703344cb93645a865ca5c8f119969eff2747e957
'2011-10-13T21:43:42-04:00'
describe
'74772' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMMK' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
669377e4e28ee930ba2927a58b124eed
b97408d90b0cc21d12e0cba61be7dbd9b753d54c
'2011-10-13T21:43:47-04:00'
describe
'1921852' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMML' 'sip-files00023.tif'
51d850426019125e8deb51e3b5a7d1c0
7837c775e923c17acead45ec5725b51b882caede
'2011-10-13T21:43:23-04:00'
describe
'980' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMMM' 'sip-files00023.txt'
a3e428aed7a896460234d58a44ce97fe
05eb61ef12213eb1468b78515ed2bab78c81cd62
describe
'35969' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMMN' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
6692ac49f8bff18224690df558b47bb7
c9cac437ad777e79aa6379185882f542e18abb4c
describe
'237340' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMMO' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
5cb53a179e3bf705c55e82687dd62f16
4b8e0f161a6fad4f61bb82b8ae52924757bf2d93
describe
'192093' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMMP' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
a1a38b02c709db9c78489cd5a3cda04a
0693fee3d0f6b0b77ab387d3fae9463031b293ba
describe
'25683' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMMQ' 'sip-files00024.pro'
3625e342b94c33568f4618474540d8af
22922f9e2a3fd8fe15ef5069936845d62fbb6b6d
describe
'79802' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMMR' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
cbe2a380bf1e8baaed2540e7b9351362
e940c1ee77d55734199abce6559c22224c1dfa8b
describe
'1922524' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMMS' 'sip-files00024.tif'
908311fe95384db44da8d02883bb1cdb
d902aa8b8ba0d2f032d5b2de8840c17b1060b45c
describe
'1033' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMMT' 'sip-files00024.txt'
654d06157ff3093f54943fc891bc95ad
bcb31efdbdc1e3e611087e5ace5adca691dfad84
describe
'37583' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMMU' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
7619a6a02844cffae4b5588557174524
74848c30dd6f41235d9a13909d6eb80cb79cbcc1
'2011-10-13T21:43:59-04:00'
describe
'237411' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMMV' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
cb158a019bc9d5d4475cab011ea03bef
76d7f03bd71d3fc0c6bc8aee5fc936a9bd738f86
describe
'175574' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMMW' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
82a6f133b70f7df4a5c2240a8d637537
f2427054fee3bd0261cccbeeb0f9bd82af1e1d85
'2011-10-13T21:44:44-04:00'
describe
'23285' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMMX' 'sip-files00025.pro'
1c37560264b61d3f75527301e1c0e03f
6c7a922246068d2afce8210d84043629e85cf064
'2011-10-13T21:44:47-04:00'
describe
'74284' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMMY' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
4bcb0984befa58b7e602d2045ff37a27
6e795dd0b83774c5f34d9b1e671e00ad96dfe8fb
describe
'1921772' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMMZ' 'sip-files00025.tif'
c785ec78d737b248ea0ee15161dc7a66
08531fbb47e8bedeb82a275c92c39b998e0c9223
'2011-10-13T21:43:22-04:00'
describe
'964' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMNA' 'sip-files00025.txt'
fffe2df7444990cd397a24d7bd7a4928
d1cf0fbd077a8a7d3b0e7ea16f938a4c2a34d79f
describe
'35650' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMNB' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
82104e4bf0b19e8d55a2017adbb9dc3c
caae4a9bf66beaee0ea61e598834bb5c1f06bad6
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMNC' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
624a6d257b56e9cb3d3ef6ff91404aaa
9a801d6c92ec1406311c8f828fdd357909ea3216
describe
'181670' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMND' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
96c93bf0fea409534dc2d857e05d67b1
6047ea169d2691648492755174d47241aac45b25
describe
'23829' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMNE' 'sip-files00026.pro'
43395ce6cf4c50d5e0b18331fff85ad4
c7985f15f9ab469b2de8cfb523ad5a07c5d0b49a
describe
'76604' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMNF' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
595e6f52e9f29b2aa446ffdda35dc9db
999e1b136e6b9756d50c0a5c3188844e03932a2c
describe
'1922200' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMNG' 'sip-files00026.tif'
cbe00da9c4a68baa74fe7c8b5deb4c06
d2e7f794c22ed4f3464bf9d57a58f9f3f4e4ff12
describe
'950' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMNH' 'sip-files00026.txt'
f76a05a6cf8196fccf8667c36ff5a274
240b8856532cdb84359da1a2edf26eeccc2a5ac9
'2011-10-13T21:43:38-04:00'
describe
'36475' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMNI' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
8c38c3961484c79673e47b055482ff19
a6bcb6093ad623fb0334c1337ee3a4c839cb169d
describe
'237407' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMNJ' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
87a218df60ab8e6236ed08b723de1f4d
b83b6006ff4b756f5e50d8dea01ea3e85d850591
describe
'154639' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMNK' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
f769d36a12d059a90b9f060789885cc3
afb5f5a843b5bf25984deb2c398ab2aa283f0f2d
describe
'19198' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMNL' 'sip-files00027.pro'
40a4a4f356e4bf9d8dc2b0f326367858
1af0017b24d3b58fb074f6dd232d7e0769c06ecc
describe
'65874' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMNM' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
5d6a9c403175bcd79377a00c9fb240b5
9e0037a1f91fcb1890e37508d36f98f7f3d3cdec
'2011-10-13T21:43:33-04:00'
describe
'1920912' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMNN' 'sip-files00027.tif'
fcd5d53da80693530798602b1c34ddaa
43bba8d6eef4d4fc1d4789f1e03e0b3e551dea53
'2011-10-13T21:44:30-04:00'
describe
'771' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMNO' 'sip-files00027.txt'
f0f75d3324d42a5c6022c71864326855
1b6c4df5eb86403ac77ce02a146a2ef8338cdf50
describe
'33151' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMNP' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
177bce6733c7b5f1af18d61d7a2ecb42
0cec86f025ed00179c34bfd139512a01f4a379c4
describe
'237324' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMNQ' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
c639411ff2917131bee471f5ba6a7c25
7f9b1850d1922b17bfadca342622519ee41508ce
describe
'156062' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMNR' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
c40e98faa55b6ffaec035efe4e3f54b0
1d672c862ddb74c6f5032005f0c55da7f144b973
describe
'15711' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMNS' 'sip-files00028.pro'
1b712da4e9a2279f83382598274e6b5a
486a37424eaf6514e91124be4de221a4f2cf24b4
describe
'64557' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMNT' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
3d6a6c5c3b31fb2d346cc8a806089e52
5c54f870d93788cf428dcd32a94fd636e9a10b31
describe
'1920936' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMNU' 'sip-files00028.tif'
f76c369b8ceb4d0988bc27234d084388
e1305cdf92b3159aad1a742e6a4e6f97ab05651c
describe
'711' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMNV' 'sip-files00028.txt'
22a91af3a2c1a3dbb3a4a70472379a9c
829221fd3e7ee21e58625faa6f575e119591df14
describe
'32543' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMNW' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
dc7560ee5b136e77c290f35c97491869
462f114e380c63a951f9537492ef11f5fede41c2
describe
'237338' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMNX' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
7a32d6dacc0f248809ba1651d042604a
0996b4af16fbedeccfc215478570435c8094439f
'2011-10-13T21:44:19-04:00'
describe
'186294' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMNY' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
775f78c31d55fdc1ff6b8b62b6486eca
81758fdfad5d2953abc676e344e9b6c7369f472b
'2011-10-13T21:44:04-04:00'
describe
'24460' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMNZ' 'sip-files00029.pro'
a66a117efb9a14df8bc8d9046f252e69
d902f0506919a2a5b54caa66762340042205595e
describe
'78080' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMOA' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
e09882724a7ba534476c267e81bb49ce
602230e197ebff9644c12aee9f778e4343da965e
describe
'1922396' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMOB' 'sip-files00029.tif'
d31edfbff48ff390d4568b8c4be4bb96
5d3ae9efffd8a5e51611ddecc20cc2c8b9a3d578
'2011-10-13T21:44:45-04:00'
describe
'1009' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMOC' 'sip-files00029.txt'
395bcf5a4a9341f3995d3726be946ba7
89dc9d95ddc1ab75a8d469aca834930d8ea05732
describe
'37189' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMOD' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
21ca9cf657d739e053fc5d7ddd8dae00
9fb6401a8e7d486756fdc3c72f0054e96eee8f61
'2011-10-13T21:44:53-04:00'
describe
'237346' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMOE' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
0997e346cc373b6666ac120d59ad97a9
aeb5aa0a2c7ac066f566626fc558b41db33ef426
describe
'168886' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMOF' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
1713fb9c433b2a8e4336140606a55cb3
46cc6f3aa9840a2f0656836303b911407ef88104
describe
'22751' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMOG' 'sip-files00030.pro'
b03aa43c6b3ebd3b17098a73d81c41eb
6d365c2a2c102b6a699be3e66dd5bec992c981fd
describe
'72264' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMOH' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
9517acf8c7596b64fd8547204faab03b
45d51c931cc6fa510aa8fd0064779fac593311ff
describe
'1921968' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMOI' 'sip-files00030.tif'
96ca951b6c11f43305ed414e8023a379
2a0fbc336e5bdcb220cbb35be5f60df322c83fbe
describe
'921' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMOJ' 'sip-files00030.txt'
8b47ed0584924b7c998f2020cd2a992a
492b26ca99a7835726ef4e082aa1f90b3bd1dcde
'2011-10-13T21:43:53-04:00'
describe
'35462' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMOK' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
206da0b53dccb2c2e68d15aa3f7175df
e6f1af2f1158b67e29734ae2945dde6a2e839e30
describe
'237422' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMOL' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
78c2f6b6fb1fe09b1bc8952a03e2033e
cd68f86eb45d13d6075fe634674098c90f015d1b
describe
'170439' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMOM' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
5d1a26ca9602dea4cc33345146d88ae4
3528a002a69f7ec0f31abbcfe7d8b40dd96e2fc6
describe
'23757' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMON' 'sip-files00031.pro'
53dbd482dbf5a99e37b5fedd11e8b774
d3a5554a4d13069cc80e984f30c918262a18a187
describe
'72700' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMOO' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
86a6c082f6cb5e7a2ca484d4b35fe28a
735b763a544bb89b08863e77eccade1494bc8d69
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMOP' 'sip-files00031.tif'
7c966761f6929ba0c7e5c69727583363
23b9c939bde85d0afdf4c452f4a85d22e163d1df
describe
'972' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMOQ' 'sip-files00031.txt'
dcaf259e375c67caa9960c3a33b363ea
16a4b900c79e8402f89327216674fe6b300e695c
describe
'36006' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMOR' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
30d9c9dbb4625d1529f29dfa16e00f26
05b9aa605d09175414a040f5077619b827884152
'2011-10-13T21:44:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMOS' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
fae76f13620e2b9e6a4f63280857ddb5
1f1f14913e738aa8f362853b78e293cae75ae779
describe
'180463' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMOT' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
a2df5cb91e00e531fc15aca9b3076180
f456f9b0a5d98b210bae4c1be8380262c9eac4a5
describe
'21784' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMOU' 'sip-files00032.pro'
c5f83fe6197846b54f70d768f3c07ae4
98b0e9248565f1e9bb87aa90fc5445c4e7357e54
describe
'74084' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMOV' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
3d2774d880b7bf782e45d529d5ae2105
0d8c804c360d45185bfa12a5562a3d981fb14946
describe
'1922124' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMOW' 'sip-files00032.tif'
e2eb7d6e110e9781d04efefbb4bfd648
5782612c5424045f9e4186ce3374b3105b6404ec
describe
'897' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMOX' 'sip-files00032.txt'
b4323cd89560edd7619522ad29093986
0d7314097f57e69e0f5c961de3c1845c4b222661
'2011-10-13T21:44:49-04:00'
describe
'36289' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMOY' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
83711c1e49aefdbe0ee11659a8a0b942
c82adf577445c5f3424e6d96ce1a08d09739098b
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMOZ' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
30a632f98ef81d59703bbb41478c4ef0
2dfda6b58178785d4fc7dc8cc12e2d7717f2c58e
describe
'169618' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMPA' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
12ab6912ed0166b8bcb3dc3a8b20caf7
94d01e3d18f5d69c8b506b9754e5dc75de5befa1
'2011-10-13T21:44:16-04:00'
describe
'19632' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMPB' 'sip-files00033.pro'
fea1efba6c960b8c3c0dbc325b376230
b1c3456ab23186291565c2e6cd76d3faf2b5286c
'2011-10-13T21:44:17-04:00'
describe
'70515' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMPC' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
5b63cc2b159a3dbfd59fff5541da13c5
d1b633d708819a6f477a34ee161fe539db742218
describe
'1921620' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMPD' 'sip-files00033.tif'
0979a1d2e38afb0ac4702a87f655e7c6
873068060896e59f14abb3209d8f82552d01ead4
'2011-10-13T21:43:16-04:00'
describe
'806' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMPE' 'sip-files00033.txt'
76605cf7854ec592f04b318344feb267
75acec1c2ee40329adb6dbe7a0ba432bfab270dc
describe
'34538' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMPF' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
2e552878b4a2f591ca04d0124f377b09
5b264cbeca224038dac1246763d3fa69bbe84672
describe
'237258' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMPG' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
abf78b527028dd2c76f0eb990471c760
796ea5ae2132e5e6bd5a9dfeaee0da994df81c79
describe
'141900' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMPH' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
3083f44b754e48d2e309403c2ef81a72
36428cea1c0dd207667d9f5e85bf04cb7e5de92c
describe
'14773' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMPI' 'sip-files00034.pro'
b61544857d1e8f125a7ca766603fa511
b84b857cfa1e86e3646c46c101ffdb793a1ef756
describe
'59093' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMPJ' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
ef727633618cf24ffa8232a3aaa1c0c7
21de752b380d8b607363a630bdb7d3283c528e4f
describe
'1920496' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMPK' 'sip-files00034.tif'
4977ca736420d7f33a34ee26d5650994
50a7ec6c92cc6433d886820d3acf9c2fb24484e3
'2011-10-13T21:44:14-04:00'
describe
'670' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMPL' 'sip-files00034.txt'
6d357bf50a6e3fd05543dafb1d47dc9d
2ada65b3d902d1f62116ffdb1d575507fb163925
describe
'31252' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMPM' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
d4d7d2b670b45bcd0b197e64dd1fea35
f1ea17aa9cdeb5425fa0cd9dfdbbd91a20c79d55
describe
'237397' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMPN' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
e4d43d46ce52c83667de41993d70c0e0
56450a983f6c1f162b18e0ac1b0b3e4466d2ee95
describe
'171947' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMPO' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
bd7d48216b27acdcf066c67a88077f53
ed4d58a3c1ecc31647eff82b860de620806f52ea
describe
'22936' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMPP' 'sip-files00035.pro'
6f6402fb05b02c3858631b4dd6ddfb5c
1f62df9fa381741557b722a14967663613e01a45
describe
'73802' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMPQ' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
1b927b4a5aa2ffcc169436e564e3370c
a146e66312f7fea3be2592cf85a07a07e9a51899
describe
'1921832' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMPR' 'sip-files00035.tif'
aab355179347419cb192a872274c908a
23b81df8521386cacfb0e4f377b452258ece25d6
describe
'953' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMPS' 'sip-files00035.txt'
07bb046a0b656480febaf03ddf5c3c02
5a6c55c6746dfd6a6fbc192157b1e14f7a9255c6
'2011-10-13T21:43:54-04:00'
describe
'35338' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMPT' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
11a00c469815ec6cf8994c713bbb8ad3
192a941431955d69ce64327d5b20fe68a68a940e
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMPU' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
31fb33edc852e9957a8c213e71b5b44c
9d5e699afae3a6c2cc4d2c215291a36649465a9a
describe
'169006' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMPV' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
3d0cb5a70a063825b5816060061053aa
d5ce45202d8dc90f7905bafc0802c9bfe5941ea7
'2011-10-13T21:45:11-04:00'
describe
'22107' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMPW' 'sip-files00036.pro'
ad46dd9dca9fd87d1f3f91d76f2c009c
e8f72a01d8b4133f1bd4f6ea143e8d88599f560b
describe
'71284' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMPX' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
2190710dae2275a0075a3a2a89fa24ab
1a3b7a84ccd28ac7b31259af8569a14662f7ba86
describe
'1921480' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMPY' 'sip-files00036.tif'
67f142288137bd5263899eaa9fd67bb3
fd91851ca432ef14a3bc7fbf7048df60228762ad
'2011-10-13T21:43:13-04:00'
describe
'902' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMPZ' 'sip-files00036.txt'
5753393cd43f8c3ee90d8924e701f8f4
8b73a5f1eefdab87623eb92fda10d1a764355073
describe
'34950' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMQA' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
60c9a7dcda40d005d71b379b946cec62
522abe606adf5f2e6d59fc7f1ae7f65695fd889f
describe
'237415' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMQB' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
d26e86acf68645b8a0410e215a633d9f
d3b24b0667858bbba811cbb67730c9b46540ed04
describe
'175252' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMQC' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
db726fb77513dc0475d93b68b374fc87
c09110a98a53d4fbd2504964390f1b58933c93bc
describe
'23397' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMQD' 'sip-files00037.pro'
d5eab9ef736c0a11b31296d95e4bcdee
be0a9139932c40959d7440945a76cbe0241539d9
describe
'74319' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMQE' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
87da90eeb841e87778861e66fa8ba27f
fd29b1bbc23010b79c1cfa78c8add1eb6861a089
describe
'1921868' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMQF' 'sip-files00037.tif'
b66a5373b7e206dcd73f80873e164bff
5cd8d69d673097b27ba946efda592cedc102609d
'2011-10-13T21:45:03-04:00'
describe
'976' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMQG' 'sip-files00037.txt'
1f9f80e2bbefc364375a5ce036778206
bd438f8a6e787e6c8f62b915cdf7318256047f90
describe
'35823' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMQH' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
500eb56ff5fc2fd49026a4b9ae20f75b
73aee901b9e8a9c8a8a0a29d300c6e6c97559b77
describe
'237391' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMQI' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
295d436b27112a48fc7aa8ae2984f7c9
b7bb653e93d66c3cb98281ba8734719431e7a738
describe
'172197' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMQJ' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
98553a4649a4d18ff43fe9bc1e37395a
72ae98bf3d792bc468cc6e496cf69eb366ecd77b
describe
'23232' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMQK' 'sip-files00038.pro'
17d39e86c55a77e6eae919225b88cafc
f757b547a63dea1df4f6f3d4461fc189f4f1e460
describe
'72936' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMQL' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
54212509cdc522adc87c2375ea0f6cad
316696e8e6a3b9f261cacaa5707639deff2ee2aa
describe
'1921800' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMQM' 'sip-files00038.tif'
10a66acafe9f2a0ca29b29f7c2a0fe94
8d955fabf40bbbbf80b01aa39df41f1b0ca91684
describe
'932' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMQN' 'sip-files00038.txt'
b9437476cf60b3839433cdd66731790d
007ac495617bdf27b0fc5c76275e98557360d745
describe
'35421' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMQO' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
6b84c28d2c2ceec48973bb303196388d
448b1c59e978e5d6396bf749779872426d736641
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMQP' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
18d792994ca8254991e8b9cf414b2823
4553e2fd118016e9f5ce4f1894a0a6e1353da9aa
describe
'165083' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMQQ' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
671fe2ad2bfa944d0096484bed8a0ba3
9b272159c72d8411565c9da0e8935b00b936fac9
describe
'22013' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMQR' 'sip-files00039.pro'
dfb4008b1af881f6877c7bb3f8586e90
30fe1894349fcaf915f5c972d1f2c98cca955929
describe
'70730' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMQS' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
bd4cc66e8f1bf0146ab55566942d4b07
3b7d68a67951ad7825a82245d401cad49161c2d4
'2011-10-13T21:44:34-04:00'
describe
'1921444' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMQT' 'sip-files00039.tif'
374828125fd356d297452534cb14f36f
52f5064322a0f42cc2a320f0aab381db8379e31d
describe
'935' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMQU' 'sip-files00039.txt'
27b6816c3cb6e30380a8da400517d3b9
a140f001f6be7f4b153619a637d5cefd904bbecd
describe
'34388' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMQV' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
980fc2fe2a594568b537984477435f44
60a80342211b539fed389a04fd542a25b45cc1b8
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMQW' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
23b09540a405976f08111eccb6359495
248045d446fcdef419b9438e98b7936831fb2eb2
'2011-10-13T21:45:17-04:00'
describe
'150091' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMQX' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
812315439529a8715341f30ac3ac9a58
a537505a3afbab3154c088619dc96ac220956717
describe
'15490' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMQY' 'sip-files00040.pro'
ec65843712723d3d6075619dbf655413
4234af356e6ba5976904500a333f3d892dd37bd7
describe
'61265' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMQZ' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
a29240f0ce4880c4e27b92fa4cde85ff
3ec67b7dbca2f4af740422917af6784c287476bd
describe
'1920316' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMRA' 'sip-files00040.tif'
1d28725ced679410aa8e09c598031133
c1dba2a5f942e9e47d45e39a1810966608cdc27d
describe
'622' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMRB' 'sip-files00040.txt'
a55fc4de3b3449a55e204ab15b8ca14c
005c6fb30fb3646498859808992b46257327860b
'2011-10-13T21:44:06-04:00'
describe
'31229' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMRC' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
989d9aef0c9921386920f6cb2b8fd3e1
50fdccef4e507ac391570de692794469cb3189c2
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMRD' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
c3aedbcf442f429a8b464b8e8d28729e
1ec7332e26190610223cbdda8e0f8e048a956ba1
describe
'157831' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMRE' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
08b40413535bc3ecbbe0941fbc14b733
2a3cb14ec3c095070821b69501f291fcaf6859be
describe
'16326' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMRF' 'sip-files00041.pro'
33c09d7f5da314e872baf69ed3320962
6bcae03df48eded2b03ae4c3d0824b076350b030
describe
'64172' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMRG' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
8dc07cefce6062d908873703356147e2
9e9ed6dbba667897926317598fe2ebe8ba530c24
describe
'1920792' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMRH' 'sip-files00041.tif'
9c02a99f4ab7dc27664b646be0bcc859
6787b470262d78257cc009e8fa26bb8e5f9d31dc
describe
'746' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMRI' 'sip-files00041.txt'
1cc8a4ecc1f0980b4351ec26324844f2
794aa0785ef6bfff93311f533802470c27fccbcc
describe
'32437' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMRJ' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
faea14202c5231956bdb3175a238e8e3
4ed6d3b561a217d2fe53d16a6e2d9a54f5ecc413
describe
'237388' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMRK' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
e400e79cb734e9d39f04eb29a2df5b1b
a7de077b13875e2074e5d2149ab8103d610a8f80
describe
'181069' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMRL' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
8d0316467fe2939b65c6ada77a104a84
4870eb90bc30cb2372fdc4b52bb4e91951663e15
describe
'24072' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMRM' 'sip-files00042.pro'
cff950ec11e9053fd84b76d80007c41c
7edeb7f26e1162ffbf02e0258f3aedc1350b638a
describe
'76903' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMRN' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
e512818a77525ba63d71644494fd67e3
e6e46957786333959bf01f83f7f604db79fe9d24
describe
'1921860' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMRO' 'sip-files00042.tif'
b2932d761ee206df3e84134a80ec826b
dde7bb87046a3ec414dce11f86fd6f76354c6981
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMRP' 'sip-files00042.txt'
d6e9d408e84bae213424780da10eb7cb
bc09b904140441be2117f8161f26049b89e76e56
describe
'36257' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMRQ' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
42baccea451504c117bd2a41a1264faf
a6a05482eb9a512109830b1be1e479115cec566e
describe
'237421' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMRR' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
20fbd341badc2ce738eaed4325e65061
ec2ee831a2775a9f50f87be1eb66c85f038f3b38
describe
'174729' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMRS' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
7f3864155f1e4bcfef657b6cfee6db17
1c8dc4d5792c237d5b5ff3fcc559803a9bd7fc01
describe
'22644' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMRT' 'sip-files00043.pro'
6ded969e264adabab833e97ce72fc385
e765520a8e45d74ff392b7ffa9c3b0860487a626
describe
'74283' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMRU' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
a6fbb5bda536c83693981513132bd9d1
6411a80e1e1658470bcdc38ab0f97784b865b208
describe
'1921884' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMRV' 'sip-files00043.tif'
f3de6b9cfca3cce5ddc60c37b4d2774e
dbae0d026f6851d45a9b2663277810ea6b187713
describe
'945' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMRW' 'sip-files00043.txt'
102adf4b5a98b8faadefd1706d278c1e
a65553391aed32c1a05feb3216ac164ff8bc50d0
describe
'35579' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMRX' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
a4217b5ed391f6330daea27d76b79dd7
1b094b2a92a9062f40177c64e6c405ce0c14d3c5
describe
'237364' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMRY' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
312bfd561f36c05ef55ffdc08c479406
c42cd18675a727c0759ca715a29d72c56a5c9761
describe
'174620' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMRZ' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
a6552f5f61210db703be2a78c13e43e9
04624da9b9fbe7f3da1da18b396448b13efc16ef
describe
'23304' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMSA' 'sip-files00044.pro'
90e5e0e4b89d35172bd6d4c10d954f9b
389b130568b9247fdbb9688a48fd9513fa676133
describe
'74854' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMSB' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
562de32f15f86d44d2240a7c46ab42dc
3e12f84c87559fb5906190b210be7587e4eb860d
describe
'1921856' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMSC' 'sip-files00044.tif'
500b06827c74574b08a6ec340fe38b81
e8c726812a90f6192e78421b032f8279f933ef21
'2011-10-13T21:43:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMSD' 'sip-files00044.txt'
a035983cf0a895e9b2e1c10bdf03591d
6f828c6a7b10ccbaf2010b82c64bc53049aee43a
describe
'35830' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMSE' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
da7bceb49b2eb5ed16c5d1d2d29dee73
b0d4298825f1783322d4c28e23a2f84e32f3771e
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMSF' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
c9f18fd01838debf94b8bcf23f56d650
c22855e5b5d11bf03eaae00d60c78c7038d262c5
describe
'183233' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMSG' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
213d0f8424c5d3432e2bd87150cb6a59
263fed1a9f86d612d862c4b7446e509aea7ff958
describe
'24336' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMSH' 'sip-files00045.pro'
8b8e01e10645df27a482549fb5e2b319
2a1545d37408f6199e09183c5e6a62a92182a503
describe
'76645' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMSI' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
6a75fa69e3daf699f985d3513d23c32b
bb960943d342c250546b1127a0537ff23541c6d6
'2011-10-13T21:43:40-04:00'
describe
'1921960' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMSJ' 'sip-files00045.tif'
a1aec42514ee263d5f76e53c9dd70762
7ce6f32a1d4a8a0d67b9dddd7a09d6a2dee1e95d
describe
'987' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMSK' 'sip-files00045.txt'
710611f8bd209190e58af94288bea888
7998e8df2be57635f10066fbe95f2a5c25eb2063
describe
'35972' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMSL' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
3ab71c30d4c16a10ee215e606fa4c516
f0b116863ea80add61743ea057839f836fe4fd3e
describe
'237390' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMSM' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
8b5f4980749b0b68b7250d868dd81057
23cc742894525a067951b03d635ec1d475d31391
describe
'155765' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMSN' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
6ce19e59da89c61dc73e8125fc9f3bb5
d9eedd28678d14ef1ed712c5d88c66cd96f23ad1
describe
'15256' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMSO' 'sip-files00046.pro'
ab6a5fb2b6b0779a1a218de503e2a0b4
78aa96254d04cebde0160571cbd61223bb4c4645
describe
'63301' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMSP' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
4cc566627690dc8f662fd70a2c1fb951
4e33d79a00baf756cec64c65006da634c0b1f6f6
describe
'1920600' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMSQ' 'sip-files00046.tif'
639ea3fe09fc7cf5b1e34f6e3a6f0cac
0543a1fb543cfb7cb9718b885a1324e11b15aa88
describe
'626' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMSR' 'sip-files00046.txt'
ffd323d27c56c5c6abd1e8555bdf2567
719e8d3579e5873ffa682efc9dbeff5b276cf195
describe
'32047' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMSS' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
8496353ae1f06b482b57da32c58bb854
a7f20d2d94ab1175d5c516750005fcbccb930274
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMST' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
bfe1c14562879a9a332abf54cb130280
8e9e93a0d142d7dee7257030fa4a2b34fcbc9589
describe
'164336' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMSU' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
7d9b469c8165130a51efaaeb25c24ff2
00480d4320446a82a9a6b737b9597b5270d09d63
describe
'14925' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMSV' 'sip-files00047.pro'
6446101988bf6848f92715a5730ccd86
45539fa0b81d5845d26ee7b8b9e7b51580eb0e91
describe
'64660' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMSW' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
647360aa656f78bdf9dab01a58ddacd9
5df6d19c01a551189d70df7992a5afdace7fc525
describe
'1921032' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMSX' 'sip-files00047.tif'
0a7692335df96dd2634dcff1f6af026c
6732d8ba51f8dcf8220d94b13f8388149cf0a7b8
describe
'769' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMSY' 'sip-files00047.txt'
45ae1672cb129850987c752491c45108
237eac15c24d9b01bedd469c6e20db1fff008eda
describe
'32727' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMSZ' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
49dfbf7d433924c76e139702224e5c92
df411b8cb9b19c3618d5618e1a9203724e3b725a
describe
'237410' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMTA' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
c53937715011f650b0c8173eb02f1681
873e147883b53980401c21229fbd1d87ccd67105
'2011-10-13T21:44:00-04:00'
describe
'185163' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMTB' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
b61c55c4c57d594e16d2dbc0012c9a3a
9f0b7b9cf7ff6b4c031b61f7c04b3b3d43ecf8c8
describe
'24655' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMTC' 'sip-files00048.pro'
b66f6f5617912bc90bdf9849cf116728
87af80d5302199744fd7deebed82c601e2214dbd
describe
'77539' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMTD' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
cba211a0288d6fbeddc4989edd7f505a
99e4dc1eeaafb3a02b9e9bc1f022a1d179e78d3c
describe
'1922160' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMTE' 'sip-files00048.tif'
ca183776ea6bcdd643d178795a56fcec
bc2f4a5879fbab92436c98e2aa2fec561da5fcc4
describe
'1000' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMTF' 'sip-files00048.txt'
103d22c0f14f5502fc43a1b62ad5cf7e
a08cc3d59769e05b950afac958e0f9866974360c
describe
'36363' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMTG' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
5211781fda63fcb0932fd7f73f7f8d54
ae546ccd141f8e045aafd9106116901e9e76b82c
describe
'237327' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMTH' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
41a9005a2b0f44227777ae7ad9072b6f
b5202f0d5b226283357e19377bf849c3a61a05d2
describe
'171664' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMTI' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
1bb28912747d37c2cfd8668ad21b77bc
e97a23977171599a2c0a1403def82a2465315c3c
describe
'22564' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMTJ' 'sip-files00049.pro'
e7cece3d29b17faf2aa4d2867a9d8dc4
5d7ca87613823c98f302f57a82fe3953b1723887
describe
'73373' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMTK' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
ad686de5e10ab08a1079d4afa47bd81f
207c3a3737b30d11f9d7471bd19ca35425fb92eb
describe
'1921872' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMTL' 'sip-files00049.tif'
5c8836623ccc9da7d3f2a60bb8b30a1c
37b22f735eff42e85d217e027562ecb3b10338fc
describe
'913' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMTM' 'sip-files00049.txt'
6f3174875bd27c70fcdc903d168ed6a3
11ba7b8917af199b98875d56bf161d890ccf9fa8
describe
'35531' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMTN' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
e02b48ce909edaa2a753d48f716cbac5
a3c51fa036599433b15682628b16f65fb204a696
describe
'237381' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMTO' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
b88b09f2f2d410e7f8c25bdbe7037663
72dc4c73099b0877150fef3ca84c9801ff7fe745
describe
'180858' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMTP' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
04f6efcce6ec9e2520d4ca26649ae0a4
2445a66f8bb8fa8f02e0d1b07c4723de97d6e93c
describe
'24156' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMTQ' 'sip-files00050.pro'
0f4098ad7ba4f7b4b96655874b40bf14
3ee00d80c4d2fbae8ac31652c071d578ae407a96
describe
'76699' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMTR' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
eeb59bf86508818ac84033df7c746aca
84055827c980c1598220f3759e678417a09fdc76
describe
'1921880' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMTS' 'sip-files00050.tif'
eca749a6bb97060c94b4f72ea80edebe
e6b031b4251ada1ffdebd100e276d802e39b9e78
describe
'985' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMTT' 'sip-files00050.txt'
451883c687324b1eb55ef46e1ac5e4ab
33372387126136915441ccf2de837c5459fc3006
describe
'36173' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMTU' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
4ca394e0fecfa87d793f85a1090892ad
bfc804c1efd0245534d3c93bb4ae5c3a58c786ad
describe
'237395' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMTV' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
cf885a8dd205d3a3715db45f0b5cea56
a1752faee6703670ed752ac34e361bf9ec0f033c
describe
'173008' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMTW' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
802e714e431f3e92cc547b4e1e1c8b45
12d2d550d4fc9d0f820f7c446cc4ef6a54170570
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMTX' 'sip-files00051.pro'
b106502d276c1dc7279fb56e949af25c
27878a0ce4ff8fbfa9437878d42ab811217482b3
describe
'73798' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMTY' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
6fe1ac6dd3c8836bed09e9881b67c908
dd749ed918dfd9a56f314c58f2354c45a5444320
describe
'1921952' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMTZ' 'sip-files00051.tif'
326f9d55a420b169785aebd370ce6e16
7676043ccbac10260186d3fab738cdddc10b0e25
describe
'942' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMUA' 'sip-files00051.txt'
8988bc3d6af03047df9c6e377203a3fe
b462325b57faa1c0a5b52bdafd899cf6ad1048c0
'2011-10-13T21:44:13-04:00'
describe
'35471' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMUB' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
70f4a0159f22b069a6f780299ebbc976
86e2ee8b03622f2dca5e8f662ac66a7ea06f313f
describe
'237380' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMUC' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
26d2b9420fd498a3d862dbf3d097e052
b5ce277576f749ef74a0bd20b99c75396c3cc483
describe
'181174' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMUD' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
95dd954e693c1e07cb10fc124a9a5939
01093827cba42794bd113eb17d81366cd2671736
describe
'22104' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMUE' 'sip-files00052.pro'
17231d8a793a5f5bd4cb0c4d34b96ae4
b6f16c5b1d9a66bc8f308aae46405f6bcc54142b
'2011-10-13T21:44:03-04:00'
describe
'75318' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMUF' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
6be5f9ef024108b079d879c01bbdfc83
500fa627abf44911aeae6de9e7e71322dd55337f
'2011-10-13T21:44:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMUG' 'sip-files00052.tif'
ae2ae758180ce179af9e476ae50f316d
32f5facd86153e1c00c977ba6ac1386287808814
describe
'904' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMUH' 'sip-files00052.txt'
2c72e94de0f83f6ffb88b97cda3afc3b
bf680f10902388e8977145535051c4c6324dbb1f
describe
'36282' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMUI' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
9a36b09deb34fe3026c0b16ae25fc351
c56baeea00c3b917c4bf2079566974ae6a816f1d
describe
'237389' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMUJ' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
a382c41441771417ca61f6bb33187e51
3fd4885c009ee3314ae052d20dcba614ed9de2de
describe
'164423' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMUK' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
44d8a58abaff0d2d4308fb6ad10ebf3b
f0a944f3c0435c9bc9e666b299d2195edbf2f942
describe
'18706' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMUL' 'sip-files00053.pro'
9c47571c10ac5efa1de9d33216b164b3
ce829cbb5f3a067c0e1ab763da308156b9c60bba
describe
'67386' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMUM' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
3019760b3295e89d7b94b5aec67bd0a1
25999ae2c1f4d9f65d23891ca699134cac09f6c2
describe
'1921036' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMUN' 'sip-files00053.tif'
faaf65b064167c94a35a3f3a1881098f
82ea757adaf6f595359701763c78f8c45c6a99ec
describe
'766' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMUO' 'sip-files00053.txt'
59a05665797c3ecaa891d4d41320e257
76d678c72119f33fcf34dcae4b19290c9c2d0dfa
describe
Invalid character
'33416' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMUP' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
a99e6a44af038f4bca3a79624dc6d591
6629a69587ed300b3ac0bd38f84102c936c15ade
describe
'237237' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMUQ' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
3d9015a9fcfadd365e6b0122a4f579da
0c4f598d2d45eb8699c7af02377839e7d926d42f
describe
'154608' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMUR' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
b8ed42b5581861c30f44e8ce1c7add4c
f80dadfac3db61bbb6db512325db8f77cac5168f
describe
'13051' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMUS' 'sip-files00054.pro'
db0e8f60960c7023d0a175f8f6187d0f
2967ac6e2f829c821617110777117807fd6c3c6d
describe
'61519' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMUT' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
67177065235dfd9f78e791ac49077d1b
84dd526065a15018d3b2fc3eb830ad63b188eaa1
describe
'1920648' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMUU' 'sip-files00054.tif'
b09c215a7e0479bea2725b9503347de2
1a9684c31920acdcb43625dbe91506b6a1d3dc7f
describe
'690' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMUV' 'sip-files00054.txt'
b318d27883b579c78579eef00e2a45e5
a21daa3714512aebaa1b27df823e91b7a945510e
describe
'31790' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMUW' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
8704ebe6cad096545d1d04f7cf3d3f6d
fb4cbb904ad0a01bedfb3ac30b9e797e6634e793
'2011-10-13T21:44:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMUX' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
48fde718045d75019baad7b59439151c
3101bca5ffa7eeb3024abcecead2206789a62b32
describe
'178166' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMUY' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
daa95590c0e435d70068364761a3fdd4
f45bd431bfc82813769399b9a9c57807301d4fce
describe
'23308' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMUZ' 'sip-files00055.pro'
4ffb4172d82d7c19bc85767f735a2f73
597ac31ff4b998dcbf757b8efb82f9a371343e50
describe
'75847' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMVA' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
1ab83ede44467304dfd96fc2a7ba8a39
a26692e1b81df8fa5b695ea359dcde7f6c2242c3
describe
'1921892' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMVB' 'sip-files00055.tif'
88e9245ad594e4f802d5c90bfeb2e44f
9e7f0b571277e241839097ecd3703115e7e436cf
describe
'960' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMVC' 'sip-files00055.txt'
3a195985039ae948d34af554c1cbe97b
be1d48608e48d24b40d91cdb94ca89997e788921
describe
'36010' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMVD' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
1892dec8adf7d3d7bd6ec06abcb55eb2
d3ba9c327f6aaa8258da64a1ba19dd798fdab135
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMVE' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
1f49cf3f4de1033464d04cbc0dba21fb
044dfa1ba29a4a8d88b9d0d2d939440aff78d8a9
describe
'182506' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMVF' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
c425114613647c9a0d2a961a3e3d19d8
61b89f593894c840e4cfab8f3083e6bf92851493
describe
'22154' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMVG' 'sip-files00056.pro'
92140eb29185c332d1d7a1e3eeeb5065
c70e4747408891e95d3f52ab95f5177067dabbab
describe
'75382' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMVH' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
321c72a26c0b69ee5813f59dc82ae72c
53e8bf5d20863df028f6cd11913b275d7850ca67
describe
'1922232' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMVI' 'sip-files00056.tif'
e6104a520185fb48a983220fb5087b51
f32c89be495207b4576223f6156feb657c4f4732
describe
'905' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMVJ' 'sip-files00056.txt'
bec1cb9796593a38e8e7202e149d5f49
e9476d088f3084f69943414980c73f6a0c4a8b45
describe
'36978' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMVK' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
131a136876e48ab20bb1280350efd8ba
5af15e4023507637866191392e0b06f33269ef95
describe
'237348' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMVL' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
899e6dbba5e20c6546e9ea6de4cf9179
47b1274180b9004e9e39778d836e8305bc047d00
describe
'186681' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMVM' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
7ec22fb22b340a3cae93edaed9700836
47c07c524b53ed5ab084dbb9f695b300e3c6e2ae
describe
'22672' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMVN' 'sip-files00057.pro'
45ee9bf6ccc6ecf142724956b7184e05
00b10fe27adba57c53ec99ebc2d54abf6406638c
describe
'77171' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMVO' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
b14891f6b673051b4bb56372695a1ddf
6659c8ffa9d7ad0165fa301c3cbd8ad93b64fe4b
describe
'1922128' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMVP' 'sip-files00057.tif'
5c8670c51229e2ab6d7504a84ebfb085
7647b6198ea502dd4dbc3e9e070e6437eb58baad
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMVQ' 'sip-files00057.txt'
eb542b3c05f715754eda2b931d034f61
07f9eb8ad662ae736ab5f125a7462eac9ab06041
describe
'36786' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMVR' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
613fb9f66a5e1fd12b261753b9a07158
a1e81d6b58c6698101ff9e8ea84bda071cc05699
describe
'237378' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMVS' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
1b73ca5b6fbfec929ca49d756e8062db
8450d346d5cabc37e0af5a1e70696c8a4ba7cb43
describe
'169758' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMVT' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
96fc43625734983890a5db439f3d76c5
ec8a8e4d1770931ef413abc7f2a98fe4ae83c3ad
describe
'22122' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMVU' 'sip-files00058.pro'
a190363cfe611ddaf6efcbda9320ff37
5bb101ce63345c3742b93495751ad4e077ce660a
describe
'71465' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMVV' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
fe7910340d26ab2cca590b0c8486c82d
e86d454f26b01f842474ec41e466efd222a6a5eb
describe
'1921624' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMVW' 'sip-files00058.tif'
fe7c5ce542785e50c67dabecba172edd
85aae352e72b705b7000e7b2b44997b16d23ab09
describe
'895' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMVX' 'sip-files00058.txt'
21a06b371a3f3b6254ff9f8f18e1dd70
d2fdee2fb5349ba7446c609ac1d7db64af13cdd1
describe
'34845' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMVY' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
e1fd5754f29ac57b5032b8c98a39af42
4a245539abf0f957f9be7dc7538fa014f0442aeb
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMVZ' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
89ad2a1c69d0d09a315df4975a79a3d2
0b5cf6e291f413d16db202cb7a0e73a971f41a86
describe
'174897' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMWA' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
2c8982d85f5b153522b98bbaa8e6b104
7a8d5027c270f8e3d4f0b77daf8d9fda1f69dc3f
describe
'23044' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMWB' 'sip-files00059.pro'
0924b6fe327d3299c298d0930e9a40cc
6ad6dadc33f6c42a202dbed5839d00263f0c04ce
describe
'73928' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMWC' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
50f79c424adf176afa5c81ec7f5006a7
337e931e2de5c6b10aab431cb5bc9d21a1cc64f5
describe
'1921820' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMWD' 'sip-files00059.tif'
a02839c82a8e83bc682c766ebf567003
5d5f92367aa1f99fd864bef26ffe1d308180b767
describe
'956' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMWE' 'sip-files00059.txt'
e1f65e650ad14f253164e10f2e1f9d5c
f4e0717f899b31c397c6096c1b355c5b2c4bd6d6
describe
'35862' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMWF' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
aa757ea648bc8e47f6f0dcc85f12a7bd
f2c6592b403cbf5a7d882551c26d379b208e7134
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMWG' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
16c3d93811170da5088643514b04d321
d36972a4802aec36ce0a26d1c1d1ea1a7fdc79dc
describe
'174814' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMWH' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
5f82964d0636f4797f1fb640b207a24d
197753adb0a1bc9c3546bebfc0bf3872914c4c55
describe
'22384' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMWI' 'sip-files00060.pro'
b4d1ebb0df1ac282c06151c6438a2b59
7e6eacdda91dea09fee0a8c6e055ff1d1629c718
describe
'74145' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMWJ' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
c89a6fd24458537aa5615cba6ea020b5
8e7209ca387d7b1a309782b9ddee162d54929993
describe
'1921980' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMWK' 'sip-files00060.tif'
c84206fce8b97b541511641430121bea
41b91354e050cbbb53ecb201dc25dbcf5d96b3ea
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMWL' 'sip-files00060.txt'
0e60c39bec27a847df41e989f0652118
575d468058da31880887ff4405bca21677338ee2
describe
'36223' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMWM' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
00ef834e9f8034c29c2250730968a0dd
f19e97a8d80778968aa2218b2541f9656f12c34b
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMWN' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
153aa1138b5d993fcdf1cec4abc56ba3
b6796de18a9ce56448bf78c754b53067f03e680b
describe
'182795' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMWO' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
7101f57e7439253a6168f7bbd98f00da
510f743dd35e7ee8a8990b614ae483c138cc7aea
describe
'23384' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMWP' 'sip-files00061.pro'
b933d059b9607bc9bb415ac1ca01347f
31c654d33f9964935d617b0023535b532c7d1444
describe
'77738' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMWQ' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
4e0c4c7cc8e3419ed96476e311483a29
211365a60348026fec9ed82325790c82fd66cddb
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMWR' 'sip-files00061.tif'
16155e897df40acd26e83bc6729b673a
f1bbfedd4df724e235d917bb8e2b81f850fc1022
describe
'951' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMWS' 'sip-files00061.txt'
c192eb10952bef5a40bbb04862f321a3
fe7f660bcdc550cc9767f4c455b760939ba9dc2b
describe
'36463' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMWT' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
9a635fe137c467953b1aaf624729acee
7186c0f1665295692284c413d599638ec09cb75b
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMWU' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
4f4d3fc0397c31bf680f2475640d3097
4491ca9afadec397d6ea1cc6d06add14dd21afa3
describe
'153762' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMWV' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
e3050a39a648499f90c40a589dfa68c3
f9842c968fe864d98734390277b2fb9312c349b4
describe
'16105' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMWW' 'sip-files00062.pro'
f87ee3545cbc4f9f02b6b20b422699ff
34ac05f7118861600b979ff5fef57e0142174970
describe
'65659' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMWX' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
39cb2f02843c478198a008603980cca4
ab92c3efc613a29d63d1388915affa10db8ff0fe
describe
'1920964' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMWY' 'sip-files00062.tif'
230e2f6efb8d6548d3885bb01aa9bc0f
dd0f6a417af2db323c5747478a189d3e40e177a8
describe
'645' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMWZ' 'sip-files00062.txt'
28db5166957cdbef0b56ac3cc4f010e5
ca9a87b1a863274fbf0783fc3351994d61c576e3
describe
'32778' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMXA' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
6e960725d5c56dfd6a6fb69371c4125f
6fbd613e705f98e66fadc4155e5ffb9d5631be12
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMXB' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
aa8e0b5b02fd482ccaf8286c780642f8
080c662e8ef57890660c0b846d15b0ff2b09b479
describe
'161816' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMXC' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
6ac35568b15ddf5b78457e13bba60f77
c5630a367d71f1832ff0d0a606a8166c9dc3e27a
describe
'13540' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMXD' 'sip-files00063.pro'
eb4e027f349381ed03b5651dce52328c
1adb55e7b4e3502ae83797a11951146e26d7e38c
describe
'64544' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMXE' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
c7932becda39334b3b87a9fcf8bdd0b5
73950771f9402e4a2a5567a768a41d02fcf0f638
describe
'1921008' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMXF' 'sip-files00063.tif'
8392c401e5dc656dd6d70b8e3e16fbde
e9537985d07e111eda29e0919304fbc669e2d23e
describe
'703' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMXG' 'sip-files00063.txt'
4ea1a1433003f59d35c3c124073db704
e3ac4a7edf8a4473e2391e54c1b514bf636ddb4b
describe
'32678' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMXH' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
6bcd54f76afb440edf035fe250371e76
9c8105177f4ab757f45958c915002d86d78c4258
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMXI' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
c0ae3df8794d8f746cccae1fb13498b5
978c875776d1be61fdb5edbf8287854bdd36f6e7
describe
'163356' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMXJ' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
9fbd9accf35ff8225ee6a00890be467f
bb0ae3ef06edf4e60ffa5f58e37490f700974d63
describe
'21289' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMXK' 'sip-files00064.pro'
c180f3c86b66866bb1cdd18df6615ddc
fe0aa1ba3d154d0e7da1b1adae50e078679b73a5
describe
'70202' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMXL' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
d04813d6eed692df9d6a4bd16e730f76
9dc41fe40f63b1a9f1775525bda0a3b263cdb394
describe
'1921780' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMXM' 'sip-files00064.tif'
d75d3602fceddc6ead65aab635c674a1
df72f1b11e13cbdf3b37e2d33b2a16fae3dd16fb
describe
'860' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMXN' 'sip-files00064.txt'
2bb0794b76dbebcf99b84249f302013e
2352153fab3fafb39bec0895150e80ac1b3ebc05
describe
'35453' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMXO' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
91bda011b527ad4fccdda5f34a61fed2
0d742bdf316527cbd6bb2b22671007ae3355fe0f
describe
'237409' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMXP' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
89ddd73912d29333f7eae70b9099c1c2
91182f133487540b4336502569e00840ad63ff2f
describe
'171670' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMXQ' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
54b56a5c57faf0fc3de48309cf4f1495
1f48b3fa2efaa3ebaf652be70ac6bcb448b31c65
describe
'21847' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMXR' 'sip-files00065.pro'
715835174fbce1ca1db1de88f42fd919
efae976f36c3e5bf7e6160d212cb616283c028e5
describe
'72599' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMXS' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
0ec283a510f68ba429fba12e485fb3c4
446526d0f7014e83ba87ff1ab16b7cbffe3fd472
describe
'1921740' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMXT' 'sip-files00065.tif'
0f7257cac6a42a471aa7a970b4638137
e3577ace006f73a4bc3398fa903b97aa32c1539a
describe
'903' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMXU' 'sip-files00065.txt'
2cee8b9d9f635c90a45bf8926d3bedb9
382fb5d7067aa59eb34959e3d435fbafc709a01b
describe
'35501' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMXV' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
aee212700b3244aaf5fd6d59becd8e74
4a0a6b41d2625eb87ddc69bf65638f2297ff36ff
describe
'237361' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMXW' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
a0a5e9110229c5e48036c51cbddc55f2
027eeacf4d7382e4b07d590414c8e2f0df210790
describe
'175664' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMXX' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
e73a55a136bf07e237b1063e4ed79747
39392d3e5aa4053e6d17aac7a738270c87d609c5
describe
'23309' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMXY' 'sip-files00066.pro'
b068eb86790048ac20c7d31923cb1f68
1fb4238c5741f5f5c0a8e81f5a81306bc18288cb
describe
'74630' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMXZ' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
af5c9d29b427ed18f46606755a13b9c0
c939d4fa7d2fb57f77f7eb2b26a09cfc5911c17e
describe
'1922036' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMYA' 'sip-files00066.tif'
9e46265e8158e6446869eb7b3e1be655
4d172e0e72ceb339503965e08db00f93b831462f
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMYB' 'sip-files00066.txt'
cbe7b0fe22f33d6c619cdee536e20d7d
37dbf03fc25565a3ba7ec64aae327dd5428dfcda
describe
'35797' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMYC' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
6e99b0c25b022e992fabf267344fb21e
408751a933bf0638a9cf3bc3b602888bb0f1a71f
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMYD' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
7aff766f8127805dcb8a01b1691b6672
043c6366394bbf9d615c26b9a82dc935dd275686
describe
'154357' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMYE' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
3a7d9d90bd1749b8af74e34293488b5e
341a7b06cb16f66564118e7d082077f8532321b9
describe
'13963' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMYF' 'sip-files00067.pro'
2a2bbbd2ddbb523bdb4258ea4bc9546b
118db7b8b143559503838b4ab8ce89b696afaba5
describe
'61364' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMYG' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
fdf32d3c01bde8114017e6b6dfd1c93a
4043cafe194b8eab6755adbe441380b7faff890c
describe
'1920520' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMYH' 'sip-files00067.tif'
5832c9b6aeda1a572c5c0700ea81a8a2
f1a6caa1954a5c8ae46269614be9ac8c14e449f0
describe
'571' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMYI' 'sip-files00067.txt'
d22905dc6ce0ff2b06731f954f92d2a4
2da09d4f81763dc2e68f237dd0c4a6635d97855d
describe
'31562' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMYJ' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
337caedc78c8581a2c7e6d0c4babf926
428fff4ea02695cbf8ab39eaf05795f25e344a74
describe
'237316' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMYK' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
89b2174d67a7ff212a6b0f55f7e86481
018a4ac8648c0c77e6fdc1d6af44658002ca745c
describe
'154250' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMYL' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
3d9c73306084ffcc13205adc24c89ed8
144430be8d9425a6a9e71fa4ac8d9bfe895eb0d3
describe
'14119' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMYM' 'sip-files00068.pro'
4eb70ccc214ef2fc353aeb004142d4ec
24ba1811f8d3b6290763d93ddd19f294a253d445
describe
'62677' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMYN' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
13ded9bb703927215ea9187197eb7d9b
1c6261905b5a642227477a219a42d19a4ab0ce6c
describe
'1920932' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMYO' 'sip-files00068.tif'
1635c9c7307496ed7ad16a7226ddabf0
4689bc7e9004c6fee448c6d7cc5078144e0b6b9d
describe
'698' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMYP' 'sip-files00068.txt'
90dab7eab56364211b4826121244d135
70f2fdd9ec37485a504192ce4ce970bbacb12974
describe
'32139' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMYQ' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
08d71b590215516c8479192ffc1688b0
bc887714868039de899477a302f52dd0ff0740bf
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMYR' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
c3230ca5d3a77323850876e3934da87c
876cf322ebe7c05cdddcfe730858b465f02e2268
describe
'179424' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMYS' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
f306fe978e44ba0248499c1ecee51f5a
9076082bba23568a82807a39025c686ace34eee5
describe
'23087' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMYT' 'sip-files00069.pro'
baaf8a9a9f32920b82820b03126ddf56
4de82a5c77b642f972f67468583961de67681964
describe
'75435' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMYU' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
206264c41469ec8c6915ae9a8d62da69
ed6488e6dbb7e4a07c68ad52917979cc5ce9f26b
describe
'1921864' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMYV' 'sip-files00069.tif'
ff27d25f84309b0b2994a17619d7af19
2a23e318581e6dcdeeab464de309e787a8f554c1
describe
'939' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMYW' 'sip-files00069.txt'
fe8176b17b655741c27b808ed24076df
82a4d4bffb68fa8c09871932a38a74978d3a16a6
describe
'36576' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMYX' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
b627d0db322c464ec474a9ab8254a176
b490011497ba92e8300c4492a99fefc1204c615d
describe
'237297' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMYY' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
7789ad79300d5c5ab79c54e8c6b62bf6
07ae20e539ce30b5a3e996526fdcfa5fa77201f3
describe
'147940' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMYZ' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
e7ed0c777397657cd7f64a46d990e34e
234764a7b8b4e7007783399b18ce595d0121a82e
describe
'17359' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMZA' 'sip-files00070.pro'
e3fdcddbb7fb25ed7dfd6e1b50d87e64
7f725b528ea124514d82209d20c5910d93f9b837
describe
'61432' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMZB' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
a8e0f8fcf734378e1dc3609716cf5d83
6917366ed8add76c266fa0f8e5fef688abf78463
describe
'1920516' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMZC' 'sip-files00070.tif'
6efbadb518956bafc40a08691ef2ab9a
1e7082b7ab2bcf6cfe99723da59bf68dc4c45811
describe
'699' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMZD' 'sip-files00070.txt'
1efa8c8d4fce5f44a59e408fe671750a
a72bb2fa76aa06dd646cda475b79567092c5cbe0
describe
'31563' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMZE' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
3d676d039ec7a1ea431e8c7817f19172
1f865eb393addce70ae34f620cc456850a1e5a50
describe
'237418' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMZF' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
635aaab086bacfeaf1891917f9b6bda8
0fd21f5b8397a2fb4421b84d7dba72f7d89cffb3
describe
'155285' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMZG' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
4f2a04878878884c2db33157e6b28bf8
73af48a8dac071b653c4cd206f2ca89257a7a5ca
describe
'4517' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMZH' 'sip-files00071.pro'
3b57f94dc3791acbda86343062410810
df35af77e99ae24904e21e705763a7d5ce0cb56b
describe
'64146' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMZI' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
336cee38afc3fff611829d0e881523f7
0444db82b06cbb160722cc7ff58e4e34b66be7bd
describe
'1922560' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMZJ' 'sip-files00071.tif'
47c2159548d74c34834dee2adac2c2c0
8a6a84c858a36f03b04bdb97e7edbba02e017494
describe
'249' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMZK' 'sip-files00071.txt'
81e6fec0ad25eb3fd09417106cec04cd
e1759e3387821d3aa961b7e53c154d69c528ff73
describe
'36047' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMZL' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
3c23b04e5c13fa4f5dba8d4c9388f7f3
c5633445e7ba7f9cda789957855fca21adb5099e
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMZM' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
043e0e2af240a787c1f4b523213926ca
ecef5e92eccaf6fc635510e754ae828f6becd5fb
describe
'208320' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMZN' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
ac179147ff84c679bdca6f27680bdf9a
20ce6936d2c3a0ea00d7c06292f713d12febc656
describe
'29700' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMZO' 'sip-files00072.pro'
195c342e7f1fe85398aabf956f3b88e6
fc033d681abfd39677930d683f3a9d9109009e62
describe
'76470' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMZP' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
e683885cf053393164536fb8144d7cba
55fc7af292af3183ebb2ef742dbc627b4a09df59
describe
'1922076' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMZQ' 'sip-files00072.tif'
2c4f3b56ec936da3578dd22e3dbd3d98
0cf38084d52cb47c66f3592ad0d54a5113dd6814
describe
'1862' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMZR' 'sip-files00072.txt'
45d0cc6c5dd5a346b63935828d840160
64213f21bd80dd6e87c00c8145a4f71d24417075
describe
'36191' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMZS' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
d7d429325383f0db11d6bd63b46656b4
f0e51ffdcfafd0be97fa2279c57b3c5f5b18b2ea
describe
'237160' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMZT' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
b8e9a1d4f50ccfa5d370d8d51687506c
2606df9ce50a876b3b6098f63dff7cce891fce9c
describe
'234519' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMZU' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
b5fceac8f5fd19ad3340c917daa2ebfb
051a0162f3d27f7867d5fa1e18c44de470ad9123
describe
'2476' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMZV' 'sip-files00073.pro'
415050f1f68f095eaafa6ff48db5ef55
a4b0174732fc00fdaa868a4655808f939ee38e89
describe
'77268' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMZW' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
3ad43acfb936ad4d3c0b543f08337bb8
dbd7a7da9bc88b07f986396bd89850fd3c96ba38
describe
'1922080' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMZX' 'sip-files00073.tif'
3cc2e06ecfcc96eeaa209268e008f8a1
7fd8e1ac253259d566279122faf04c0a0ced3c2f
describe
'195' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMZY' 'sip-files00073.txt'
82f875c0fbf70755e55634995d8f0cee
d3411a3a13d529b7d770c3edc183da91dcff283c
describe
Invalid character
'35919' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACMZZ' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
d2553f16dd414fe852c851e9f75c212c
e2c3a549380cca06203b075fd322d75646cf2e5c
describe
'237351' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNAA' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
0844ab75e35362adb53fe1123787a5fa
764de55694b16e2108a4c110b45832d2170d2938
describe
'190244' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNAB' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
fc0df82b65c437e503fc2ba8d9e5351b
18202c4cef767a3b6d73d9a164d5301abae8b62e
describe
'34651' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNAC' 'sip-files00074.pro'
99a3bcecf72c5641d45be2122bb7cd82
998741bc8f81f7aa04ab231ac434d7c0dad41be1
describe
'70381' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNAD' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
08ba7f40b3dea9bae3c58539c29d25a8
a3ba2ec9f0e9facd3ce79a8d07384e393cf0ab0a
describe
'1921764' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNAE' 'sip-files00074.tif'
6269c30c096ce03048dcb344cfed33a2
c53df7e113412fc619e19b254d28cf82c324faee
describe
'1711' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNAF' 'sip-files00074.txt'
c38d5c8085fb06566647fddc312ddcc2
2708a01bcc20146740bfae3d187f93eb0e597450
describe
'35052' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNAG' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
b5be0519f6bdadded8da05edd3d97b1b
fb02d0368bc86787f27b565f732ec77af5b18eee
describe
'237405' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNAH' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
6334afc48027be5f85afdf662553dda3
11b13807dfe7fed764a7b7dbf40681d7e7af4934
describe
'218552' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNAI' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
3944b4469863e5c765a714ff53ff8714
5b070c9464fdeb7eb4a30e886bb622b1604cc28b
describe
'63048' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNAJ' 'sip-files00075.pro'
e5e8817129dbe637f2e52527d32eb1e1
d25929acdf6861b92938f7aa7cce6cd86064c703
describe
'78648' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNAK' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
dd8c0923b4b17bd16f6e74bf5592ab8b
686f23dd2ff2096ab24f2375d062d0d757c6c7eb
describe
'1922000' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNAL' 'sip-files00075.tif'
9af7702374a808b8979f6613373e470a
1e296dbe3babe22c484f14171b79349af4af5f99
describe
'2937' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNAM' 'sip-files00075.txt'
60546468a25e30f2914a7ce54d28c59d
6d8576ef92ae332235451439ba752190b0da0a06
describe
'36206' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNAN' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
f8d8b3a5466a725ad57a12237541f907
79fa491896933fbfc85db0dce5280bea5d623813
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNAO' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
ecc7dadb91db745aa55199d50d9b8dbb
558a488dae52c3c7d8d5da3abc381049761d082a
describe
'240044' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNAP' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
b38490b3cdc414adcad1446f796eb3e1
9ed757e8e2b7e43aab72faa67ae92eb2b6ca2b0f
describe
'10547' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNAQ' 'sip-files00076.pro'
014f87894133b0ad4d5e26327168b900
88dba2ca5c4f6ebc79c4d8522eac1f3529bf66c4
describe
'77947' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNAR' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
f96e1ec31b6e50048ff072e15e9bab58
4aaa1c0a7d3246c5d098f5b87900ec7eef1abf8e
describe
'1921924' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNAS' 'sip-files00076.tif'
8433bb21ccf6205e3c203d2ed92c02ce
c9386db0c5b9c60fd60185144556c5c883035a20
describe
'524' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNAT' 'sip-files00076.txt'
71f0c8803884754fcc076dacc237efe6
6af1872580b91cb488f465c8c72ae65a021fb7f6
describe
'35879' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNAU' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
4a8ffdb7989efb70648d4afd8b7e2c0f
cbd027fbca21c35dc548969e8f24830ee76db8bd
describe
'237417' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNAV' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
ecea1fdfbc9026c70a3c97c0794c4f24
fe1e8f7ea66649500ece9800b0f2224412cde9dd
describe
'214077' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNAW' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
f377808c94ede19b79342509cd962416
9d8f56952deebf0652a391bd0073ce654315c10f
describe
'48054' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNAX' 'sip-files00077.pro'
bcdc37ba9420b08796a096921474fa5d
ba32f9b28d06df45ec930af99754de2519cbf629
describe
'78956' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNAY' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
85b7e13522aa526228cfff9648088981
45ba5f954e506baf3f637c1e7bf15ecb78fa44bc
describe
'1922224' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNAZ' 'sip-files00077.tif'
93d845945e92839ac13780d77bedad72
28f6568f4004c8b7a0b0963b16dbd11d6787b5aa
describe
'2474' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNBA' 'sip-files00077.txt'
053ddf4f036c1255fe3b522c2d4bdb52
3a1406012aab0856f82b960f259177cb8cb28ec0
describe
'36653' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNBB' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
4a890981a58afbdae67cc7833ac6999d
0b8f7ae1a8c31fd6f3614bbb6fc3e4fb34dd065a
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNBC' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
255e298b4e0e9c67d38a7a8f8f7f81d2
e09a8fe2c20c9ecff3a85075a2279c434af4c66c
describe
'209475' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNBD' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
6af51296bf1e6aec3200bbc646c3bde2
a6b50da4b5c5b861683d346aea5c90bfd7f1a958
describe
'41993' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNBE' 'sip-files00078.pro'
46318cca1fbd563810c099d41fc5ffc7
e0bfc00b72a5f72e06581e0c467c9426d1ee0552
describe
'77235' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNBF' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
d4014af116e2af0d6831109dbadf1e3c
8491b82b6210de45746c9ab59a08af6b3d1c4bd6
describe
'1922028' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNBG' 'sip-files00078.tif'
cb9d72fa512bdac5169001f6c3f551c3
8caba6ce63b6370b21be93516f17dae719b2f54d
describe
'1916' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNBH' 'sip-files00078.txt'
3d4c56bdaed3f070d99204b2748df926
9f1f2a3f78942135ec95c658c4b2e68a9ee6edf1
describe
Invalid character
'36164' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNBI' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
98710f32931638d00e0f9e7aec5a36a3
1ebb9d20a327901bdcdc010046a2dff133f188d4
describe
'237218' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNBJ' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
5738189a9f5f347e4796c034a15ab341
c16f9180c3000d14ea8342a4b4f474f036c1ffa5
describe
'233248' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNBK' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
2ead860d3437d10c2c97ee0cb3cf2cef
c2e62623e2f9bf773f02e5ab5f157f0601ea1735
describe
'24403' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNBL' 'sip-files00079.pro'
bdcdef9ee00b47c100f1bc8f8f7c9b9a
07b29c354137a893cc8f59cdae42979a99e7a223
describe
'79766' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNBM' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
423b9aca0c4bddb0fa982d9b7f191f42
30d2676ce54c570484c3bbdf1dfb414cfe38c975
describe
'1922468' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNBN' 'sip-files00079.tif'
0cbe6dbdd867bb199abf2c618b4cd678
522c0807410706a90d1948677facbfdc2a081ff9
describe
'2709' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNBO' 'sip-files00079.txt'
1ab92f76696aacfe4ca05ba4ca6429ad
800bf46cbcc75f39ac9aa0aac6de2143598c097d
describe
'36854' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNBP' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
d2fcfa3ecfbbcf072c7432c1939f95c4
6b39d58726ddaceb50f568353cf6b8b1f40c2051
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNBQ' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
a7e67bee16327556d63fc49cd4ad8767
21c544e3413c29eddc1d5f78180757a1db62cd22
describe
'210853' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNBR' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
63a8af044a15de2ec20c465e760a4b55
44189dc1a69366111a9b2740383174e35e8fbe56
describe
'42779' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNBS' 'sip-files00080.pro'
18409fa8f72859d98405452df93f7e32
f4a60036eef394877520b761755d81a044a3c45d
describe
'79659' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNBT' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
22e6d35973b38ec2b8db0ad37e701b5d
9ef4049edccd6c01acde38345be0ac2e86662ff9
describe
'1922252' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNBU' 'sip-files00080.tif'
35b408e46b19f0c51bf2572d20c6888b
cf7aca53b812304b588ee6f78efc050d31aaf9d0
describe
'1891' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNBV' 'sip-files00080.txt'
b1c2398e3fd145c995180c2faf9f6060
f8a2a422ce746d11ae958ee2fb74b44e18617b13
describe
'36855' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNBW' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
72a5271cfbc4400ab0943302b4ea1835
28b9fe79959ffa90c41344b8b1f8c058f08060f2
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNBX' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
3c0ded1e0a60bd5b27299d65bf97ce09
87bf95c0323b4015ae0b474b646fdbd1b2fda038
describe
'210201' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNBY' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
6d61ab38b6efcd822f93126a9a4b5098
ba555fcd5e0c5a85245aaa5ee302106678bb4a0e
describe
'39013' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNBZ' 'sip-files00081.pro'
6354fc6b4e64fb8e35434e451f35edc8
a0bc62567fcaab516d66a71d0769a45f7b030ad0
describe
'75901' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNCA' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
b8d539e6a621f47ea71fa90cba2d6c07
1672ab0132f7adb47d5c5eae1258a25921fd346f
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNCB' 'sip-files00081.tif'
cfe8ef0061158ded60c62093825302a1
0616406053b794e0c5ba2ad4448052c744d62e5c
describe
'1860' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNCC' 'sip-files00081.txt'
ae3ce515410fc8313b33ff4f4f5bacce
958e3365b7c86bd937074faa2825a34850694ef0
describe
'35782' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNCD' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
b6bf85270f53749851938e32a3e20ada
34e6600dc953b94e6b75037e275030088814438a
describe
'237356' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNCE' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
4478dad5673bca872a8ed3a7ae1beac9
9c7099fbc431df17b53639e48f343c3e612a14b5
describe
'202954' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNCF' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
63169fb0310da430c7a5fa5e218ab55d
938dd27930e6d3b50a69cbbf4ec5062fc1ac1f5c
describe
'50671' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNCG' 'sip-files00082.pro'
fbd07690485527b68f510212db38c19d
357a2a4dd8bce9f17a8fcafb99ffdd4140411733
describe
'75097' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNCH' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
68e6c8a32acb93ecb4762e433e4e10dc
991227f2f5693b356bff0ec12322381669c8b655
describe
'1922072' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNCI' 'sip-files00082.tif'
08a68576bdd15e5a8025fbc274d661da
ad352699d7d5642feda3791f1f985115218ffc31
describe
'2437' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNCJ' 'sip-files00082.txt'
12c4fe9ae1e2a481845e3996fdfeead1
ab099eb077641f63645384fdeac14fc8a11479b4
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNCK' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
1ea70208d2792356ea21d0f86f2302c0
1617db27e03d1b304c8a8dd6a05648ef4bd5d46a
describe
'237344' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNCL' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
95c5c07377ca2133197f2e77b99407f3
e949bd69a7ff765f6a4ba0192ec7ae774375f28c
describe
'218217' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNCM' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
a77414ec38eab4a34231c922be61d3a8
5e5e501e832d5f62ccf52784861cccda3a46f29c
describe
'64384' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNCN' 'sip-files00083.pro'
f5985a802dd5d85fdd84c3b3a4527bf8
5a98eecf187879c4376c8ac8b10516644bd9772f
describe
'81226' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNCO' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
f4a7ffa0b45495176465ae4ad47c5749
0cc86ee8fd5b7c33204138fbd9a219b2bab3abba
describe
'1922592' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNCP' 'sip-files00083.tif'
2ad4c48019fb02330098278237b842c4
a11219786338b43501c925d039133f6571d55817
describe
'3045' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNCQ' 'sip-files00083.txt'
facacd30f0c9ad081a8f75264385e461
f911e572d54dffc318b06264edc1281ae8185c13
describe
Invalid character
'37574' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNCR' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
51560d1e608ab6a559c0d93232aa8d79
b4072d7f35b75ed100afaaaf6218d99c335cbf82
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNCS' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
0a3b4ccd67d5dd1da199d3d15816787b
b9dfb2896182438eeb22cb32c31dc8342eea855a
describe
'207824' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNCT' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
aacac9034bb48e755dd84b435b3ee4f4
ca53d032f3343050cff5e0093e568218f093c59a
describe
'23307' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNCU' 'sip-files00084.pro'
a5f1eda63ed36c028023771f779c7af5
07d8791d20bb0b80082f1ec18918a4f41d02ee56
describe
'77186' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNCV' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
4d5a3c8078241f414aa6db166712f0c9
bbc63f280d41c7821c17dd3eb55b70ccbba3e48d
describe
'1922304' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNCW' 'sip-files00084.tif'
b0b6f17098370be03053fcb65f648904
9bdd17cc40ba82913a4f87d231b17377107bebd7
describe
'1301' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNCX' 'sip-files00084.txt'
8ad14c4876035532cd3dfc3f7a5e3e6c
ea7c1e34b77daa00eadb2afe96dd2989c295db2a
describe
Invalid character
'36829' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNCY' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
2164d8fa339c9c38b438725303bf681c
3ba664381233fc1e07120b1e4bd43a678c43bef4
describe
'237086' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNCZ' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
774dfcbf29a3c4c4b611c56d442a1896
4dd12468332ac197c53d1ff33decb917721dcb1f
describe
'239502' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNDA' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
bcd7b2d95d83ce15cb4063b3920cf171
7b4b3302dbf24f1dc45679aaa892b4be21733bd0
describe
'2589' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNDB' 'sip-files00085.pro'
e31246cd64de4e4c2531429bcd8f3d80
3f9435d70e5d7b830096fc27ada4226c68387e33
describe
'74884' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNDC' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
2e57dc3915dfcc7db1acd4bb8effdc8b
f418fb0ccb82505c37c4f669a7a55f0f7d8a3f0e
describe
'1921768' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNDD' 'sip-files00085.tif'
bfe15f0c4b9ea7d47ed7db398d2dc503
073dc99e243007c2a64683c61b076b4a52c312b5
describe
'207' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNDE' 'sip-files00085.txt'
c1844d042d2f58e48e7dda9d64dfbbea
253448904af2f0ee96f533e5dfce4773a2ee1378
describe
Invalid character
'35059' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNDF' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
080ffdbe083ad6dce12857d4b8bf239d
97028912f938709e62ae32336ae7ca1f61cab9db
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNDG' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
897e074aab43ed597f59bd8a4c04f81c
76007838aba25b9584ff494da7c10cdd462f866d
describe
'213823' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNDH' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
be018ed783ffc3c42c5d8383926d5649
02dcd136a7ad6cb92ea27f978f6544d433e71751
describe
'22733' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNDI' 'sip-files00086.pro'
4b0d019d4458da779bd1ce33b7ae23b6
65cb31d0a3212292218bf97e08e2af1c4d06ad0a
describe
'78745' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNDJ' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
e89a1d6e0ce9e4931f13ca3c978e4ed2
eff19b999c729c5f1d8bd463e5618a5cb48b3af8
describe
'1922648' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNDK' 'sip-files00086.tif'
38ff4a9542926ee1d33c03843c6fd3ae
890e8000296c9d6e8ac676ae32ea821a40bb003b
describe
'1322' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNDL' 'sip-files00086.txt'
90088e3a334fb33a1521eb7e2dddeae1
b5a690e3c96ee425f8a2a11e2de9a8a54085a52a
describe
'37705' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNDM' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
f5310b83d3c00238a1b06699a2284fcd
ad141d60090f7d1aea5ca646317f93bae93e6a09
describe
'20346' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNDN' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
96622bb6e7239ea2d2fc90521afaaad4
8456e7f7e6e34334e1a670aa8e9ca91b6c5ecd6f
describe
'234931' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNDO' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
e53b633b4e261e4111a853a087a65421
dc95018c2959cc7802edc7981ab69e7d27d32734
describe
'224667' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNDP' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
7bb429566c526af28615c2aae55612c3
9b3456897179623a24929ceea52ada344efa4e4a
describe
'5551' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNDQ' 'sip-files00088.pro'
14175e570851575c5c83c069bee48cca
cfe9a5d56facba9cdee18ef4dac59d14f427c39c
describe
'62819' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNDR' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
df95fb4e7b319886483b1709875a96f9
fd105dbcddaa13c66c2fde5850abe84894fe2576
describe
'5658892' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNDS' 'sip-files00088.tif'
2b75ff5831672907de5e1d9527cdc582
0236c18729259b196efabc57da384c46a0f26891
describe
'423' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNDT' 'sip-files00088.txt'
84d273a0ad37c06ff6e564f52bbb9416
e3177ac3bda628231b9539d1376b04f0fea3d9f2
describe
Invalid character
'29476' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNDU' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
67d6299b44c3cf35d75e441a9d02472f
28b896abae68f9502fa9f1418cb423093a7c4716
describe
'257164' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNDV' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
82b09bdc0be5f0f4b81116ac0218b2ba
8e43fc8e1940000c946ac0d19c8df56362433f1a
describe
'229034' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNDW' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
8b3614a27e4b1907abc9ced3c0c37164
49dc52c72fced572318da2bea2095e284f450104
describe
'64295' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNDX' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
08326a5136428f4e368ed3175bfcaa79
dbe6a3df0af1eba13f45d838027598aa6716b8a8
describe
'6197168' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNDY' 'sip-files00089.tif'
06d86afbabce632d1c077625c21f1cf7
309ebe2e8ec8e6154ec0589608e09fa8f2ec0e70
describe
'30846' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNDZ' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
b0b22471a069a94d997be9f733bee9ff
74a2c844d124dd80692d9f2273d9e3bca9ee8083
describe
'277412' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNEA' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
241c7f04022a650cd2431792aa2d6480
d7c36ff8bdcbc4c48fe9b08bd8a4f1b60d145607
describe
'182535' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNEB' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
ae8243baf7e75399c8bc55a3233f5151
fbe6a5b808c42a0902749700a3fbadef321afed8
describe
'48584' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNEC' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
fa4907c98c57c2637975566fd87fd818
418207e9fb0b174dcea371fbcbb5a69fc88098a9
describe
'6677228' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNED' 'sip-files00090.tif'
8bc986361f6a241b3e2562fcb9733e1c
8e9826402faee0ee09137f8e276a55070111294b
describe
'24617' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNEE' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
a3e495eb95803601a6e7733a58e9fd21
ef2a241d26afd2f9652ede43d0174ffd81898a42
describe
'56' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNEF' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
4fe5ea6771bea867ef061ba7fdd80a81
66d5c63b5de7949ddc830d314bf50e2913577632
describe
'147087' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNEG' 'sip-filesUF00078575_00001.mets'
142c1f17b83fd0c319dbc8cef5f8b434
a224c1fb7bdbd93f5578239464b348b9d4e458e0
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-18T22:55:11-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'189989' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOLfileF20080411_AACNEJ' 'sip-filesUF00078575_00001.xml'
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2 The Book of Books.
=== Springfield Stories. *
Little Dot. eens
John Thamson's Nursery.
Twa Ways to begin Life.
Ethel Ripon. Bee
Little Godseberry. a
Fanny Ashley. Be
The Gamekeepers Daughter.
Fred Kenny. Beta
Old Humphreys Study Table.
Jenny's Waterproof. aK
The Holy Well.
The Travelling Sixpence. -
The Three Flowers.
Lost-and Rescued.
Lightbearers & Beacons.
Little Lottie. 3
ThesDog of St. Bernard.
Isaac Gould, the Waggoner.
Uncle Ruperts Stories for Boys. §
Dreaming and Doing.
Many Ways of being Useful.
Rachel Rivers.

Lessons out of School.
































































































es


gq”

‘“— WONDER WHAT THE GIRLS WOULD SAY


Hittle Bot Series. .

Ruy's Srcrer,

Hthe Whe Silk Wress.

THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY,

56, PATERNOSTER Row ; 65, St. Paut’s CHURCHYARD;
AND 164, PICCADILLY.




“CHAP.
1.

I
Tr,

. Iv.
Ve
VI.
vu.
VII.

IX.

CONGE Net S: |

Wuat Amy Dip

THE DISASTER

MOTHER AND DAUGHTER.

DISCOVERY .

A MISERABLE Day

How NeEp WENT SLIDING

Poor Amy.
AMY’s RECOVERY

CONCLUSION



PAGE,

13
22
28
35
41

57
62
See

aE:

EE

&uys SECRET.

SEGRE



—S Pato
CHAPTER I.
What Amy fad.

’N a shabby side street in
the very heart of the great
town of Dustleigh, stood a
small house, built of dull
red bricks, just like its
‘neighbours on either side.
In front it only boasted
two windows, one above

| the other, and a door; and there was

_ nothing, except a card in the window,

to attract the notice of the passer-by.

: Yet three people called it ‘ home,”

and loved it better than any other house
in the street, or even in the town.
Those three persons were Mrs. Miller




6 Amy's Secret, |
and her two children—Edward, a boy |
of thirteen, and Amy, who was about |
eleven years old. And it was no wonder |
that they loved the old house, for the |
children had lived there all their lives; _
and in the front room upstairs they had
watched their father during his last
illness, until he was called to a better
home, and Mrs. Miller was left a widow.

Since that time she had supported
herself and her family by dressmaking.
A very hard struggle she had to bring
up her children, and give them a good
education. But, by God’s help, she
persevered bravely, and succeeded in
her endeavour.

The brother and sister were much
unlike in disposition and character, but
they were very fond of each other; and
although they occasionally had their
petty squabbles, they were soon over,
and they usually agreed very well.

It was a cold raw day in January,
when Amy Miller, with her lesson-


What Amy Did. 7

‘books in hand, entered the little house

/ on her return from afternoon school.

' “Tm glad you have come, Amy,”
isaid her mother, who appeared in the
' passage at that moment dressed in
| bonnet and shawl, and carrying a bundle
i in her arms.
| “Are you going out, mother?” asked
} the child..

| “Yes; so you must stay at home, and
| get tea ready for Ned and me. I am
| going to take this work home myself,
for the people lon’t always pay promptly,

and I think I shall be more likely to get
the money. if I go myself than if I send

Ned. Get tea ready in the kitchen, for
I’ve got some particular work about in

). the back room, and I want to take great

| care of it,” she added, as she opened the
door, and went out into the cold.

Amy ran up to the bed-room, which
she shared with her mother, took off her
hat and jacket, put them away on their
peg in the closet, and then went to the
8 Amy's Secret.

looking-glass to smooth her hair and |
arrange her dress, which had become |)

disordered in her quick walk from school. |
_ It is only true to say that she lingered |
at the glass at least a few minutes more |
than was necessary, for Amy had one
fault, which had been rather encouraged
than checked by the mistaken kindness
of friends. She was a pretty little .girl,
with bright sunny blue eyes, fair white
skin, and a healthy rosy colour upon her
round plump cheeks ; and her soft brown
hair hung in graceful curls round her
head, and rippled above her forehead.
It was a pleasant English child’s face;
but many persons had foolishly praised
her pretty features and her long curls,
until the little girl began to grow vain,
and to assume a self-conscious air which
did not at all suit her childish face.
And she became so anxious to be
admired that she would have done a
_ great many foolish things in order to try
to improve her appearance.


What Amy Did. 9

Amy was very fond of bright-coloured
j ribbons and bows, and usually managed





_ finery, even though it might be soiled or
| crumpled. It was well that Mrs. Miller
| had more sense than her child, for if she
| had made Amy’s dresses according to
| her wishes they would have looked
) quite ridiculous.

| “I wonder what dress mother has
| been making to-day, that she is obliged
to take so much care,” thought Amy, as
she pinned a blue bow on her dress. “I
think I will go and look at it.”

Away she ran to the little back parlour,
which was Mrs. Miller’s work-room. It
was a small barely-furnished room, over-
looking a narrow stone-paved yard, and
never particularly cheerful at the best of
times. A round table, covered with
shreds and cuttings, stood in the middle
of the room, and the walls were adorned
with fashion-plates and paper patterns
which had been used many times. A
10 Amy’s Secret.

small sewing-machine and a few chairs
completed the furniture of the room, for
the floor was uncovered, in order that
the scraps and cuttings might be more
easily swept up.

Directly she entered the room, Amy’s
eyes fell upon a dingy wrapper which
covered somethingon the table. She took
' it off carefully, and gave an astonished
“Oh!” as a dress of pale blue silk met
her leye.

‘““T must look at it, it is so lovely,”
she said; “and I can easily fold it again,
as mother has taught me how to fold.”

She slowly unfolded the dress, and
held it up at arm’s length, when she
found to her surprise that it was a little
girl’s dress just the right size for herself.

“Oh, how beautiful!” she exclaimed:
“T wish I had such a splendid dress.”

It was not often that Mrs. Miller had
a silk dress to make, for she was but
a self-taught dressmaker. But some
persons had found out that, although


What Amy Did. II

| lower in her charges, she was able to do
| her work quite as well as more expensive
| dressmakers, and on this occasion she

'} was entrusted to make a silk dress for



) the child of a well-to-do grocer.

“How beautiful! What a lovely
) colour!” mused Amy; “I wonder if I
| might try it on?” she exclaimed, as the
idea struck her. ‘I should have time
before mother comes back.”

She closed the door, for she knew that
she was doing wrong, as her mother had
often forbidden her to touch any of her
work. In another minute, Amy’s old
brown dress was hanging on a chair,
and she was arraying herself in the pale
blue silk garment, and surveying herself
in the small glass on the mantel-shelf.

“T wonder what the girls at school
would say if they could see me now,”
thought Amy. “I look like a lovely
young lady going to a party, only I]
ought to have bracelets, and a gold chain
and locket. Oh! how I wish the dress
12 eed my ’s Secret.

vas mine! I should never be tired of
looking at it, the colour suits me so well.
I dare say the young lady it is made for
is not nearly so prettyasIam. I believe
it is for that Miss King with the red
hair,—she won’t look at all nice in it.”


‘3

CHAPTER II,
The #Hsaster,

LouD knock at the door,
s followed by the clatter of
feet along the passage, in-
terrupted Amy’s soliloquy.
She feared that her mother
had returned, and moved
e hastily away from the look-
ing- glass, so hastily that she overturned
a small can of machine oil which was
kept upon the mantel-shelf. It was not
Mrs. Miller, but Ned who had just
entered, and was startled by hearing a
loud cry from the little back parlour,
whither he hastened at once.
“Hullo, Amy! what’s the matter? I
thought you were half killed by the noise
you were making. My goodness! what


14 Amy's Secret.

a grand dress! What are you up to?”
he exclaimed, as he caught sight of the
blue silk dress.

“Oh, Ned, I’m in such trouble.
Promise me you won't ever tell,” en-
treated the little girl, with tears in her
eyes.

“All right! Pl promise; but what’s
up? Mischief, I’ll be bound,” replied
her brother.

“T’ve had a dreadful accident, and it’s
all your fault; you made such a noise
and startled me, and I upset some of the
machine oil on this beautiful silk dress, .
and—oh dear! what shall I do?” sobbed
Amy.

“Whose dress is it? Yours?”

“No. Mother had to make it for
some one, and I tried it on, and, and—”

“Silly little vain thing,” cried the boy,
contemptuously. ‘Well, I don’t see
what you can do, except tell mother,
and make a clean breast of it.” ;

“Oh, I couldn’t do that!” gasped
The Disaster. 15

Amy, whose pride was hurt by the sug-
gestion. “At least, I mean—I shouldn’t
like to grieve mother, she would be so
vexed. I know what I’ll do,” she said,
brightening up, and drying her eyes;
‘“you promised you wouldn’t say any-
thing, and the oil has run in a straight
line down this upper skirt not very far
from the seam. [I'll just run it up inside,
—it will only make the top skirt a little
scantier, and no one will notice that, for
they are worn very scanty now, and the
under skirt is not hurt a bit. Oh, yes,
I'll manage it.”

“Well, do as you like; but I call ita
horrid sneaking way of getting out of a
scrape,—just like a girl.”

“ But what else can I do, Ned?” ae
asked, while the tears started again to
her eyes.

“You won’t do the right thing, I.
know, you said so just now, and of course
I shall have to keep my promise; but
mind, I’m not going to tell lies, if any
16 Amy’s Secret.

questions are asked me. Bother you and
your dresses,” he added, not very kindly ;
“I wish I hadn’t come near them.”

“ And so do I,” echoed Amy.

“Very well, then I'll go out. Tell
mother I shan’t be home very early.”
With that he quitted the house, slamming
the door behind him, and leaving his
sister to get out of the difficulty as well -
as she could.

Ned was very angry with Amy, for
whose faults he hadvery little indulgence,
as they were so entirely different from
his own. No one would ever have
thought of accusing him of vanity, for it
was his mother’s lament that he paid no
attention to his personal appearance, and
it was with great difficulty that she could
keep him decent and respectable; while
as for deceit, no one scorned the idea of
it more than Ned, who was naturally
frank and open, and found it much easier
to confess a fault than to hide it even.
for a moment.
The Disaster. 1

But, brave and open as Ned usually
was, he felt rather a coward at this
moment. He had come away from
home without his tea, and determined
to remain out until late rather than meet
his mother; for he was afraid that she
would want him to carry the dress to
Mrs. King’s, and he was not at all
anxious to go.

Not that he was usually unwilling to
run errands for his mother, for he loved
her dearly, and would have done a great
deal for her; in fact, she often told her
neighbours that she did not know what
she should do without him,—he was such
a good boy, and such a comfort to her.

But Ned had an impression that the
trick which his sister had played would
be found out,—perhaps his tell-tale look
would arouse suspicion that something
was wrong,—and he did not want to
have to carry a message from Mrs.
King to his mother revealing Amy's

foolish vanity and its consequences.
‘ ci :
18 Amy's Secret.

While the boy was thinking the matter
over, his sister was stitching away, en-
deavouring to sew up the dark streak
which the oil had made upon the delicate
silk. Amy was a clever little needle-
‘woman for her age, but she found that
she had a difficult task before her. She
ripped the seam, and began to run it up
again, turning in several inches. Very
swiftly her needle flew, for she feared
every moment to hear her mother’s foot-
step on the threshold; and when she
had finished the seam she found that the
‘piece she had turned in was so wide that
she was obliged to cut off a wide strip
of silk, which she burnt on the kitchen
fire. Then flattering herself that she had
quite hidden all traces of her disaster,
and had in fact made the dress more
fashionable than it was before, she folded
it carefully, and placed it upon the table
in the wrapper just as she had found it.

The cups and saucers were set upon
the table, and the tea was almost ready,
The Disaster. 19

when Mrs. Miller returned. She walked
into the kitchen, sat down on the nearest
chair, and exclaimed with a weary sigh,
‘All that long walk for nothing!”

“Didn’t they pay you, mother?” asked
the child.

“No, I must wait until next week.
It is too bad, that it is,” she cried, indig-
nantly; “they can’t wait a day or an
hour for a dress, but I must wait for my
money until they choose to pay me!
But there,” she said, with another sigh,
‘it’s of no use to talk about it. Where's
' Ned ?”

“He has gone out, mother; he said
he should not be in till late.”

* Tiresome boy! To go off when he
might have known that J should be likely
to want him. But, like every one else,
he is selfish, and only thirks of his own
pleasure,’ said Mrs. Miller, rather bitterly.

She was disappointed and unhappy,
‘for she had reckoned upon the money
which was due to her to pay her week’s
20 Amy’s Secret.

rent. It was a serious thing to her to
be disappointed even of a few shillings,
for she had a hard struggle to provide
for herself and her children, and to bring
them up respectably.

Mrs. Miller, when “ put out,” was, like
many other people, disposed to find fault
with every one, and this was the cause
of her speaking so sharply about her son.
But in another minute she repented of
her words, and said, ‘“‘ Well, he is not
usually selfish; and I am glad that I
have a little daughter who is so good
and useful while I am obliged to be.
out,”

Amy hung down her head and blushed,
from modesty at being praised, her mother
thought, but we who are in the secret
know that it was a very different feeling
which caused that blush. She was
ashamed to hear her mother praise her, -
when she knew that she had both dis-
obeyed and deceived her. But she made ~

no reply, and she and her mother began oe

i.
The Disaster. 21

their tea in silence. When it was over,
Mrs. Miller put on her bonnet and shawl,
and prepared to go out again.

“Tf Ned will not be back until late, I
must take Miss King’s dress home my-
self,” she said; “and I may as well go
to try on Mrs. Blackman’s dress, as she
lives close by. I shall be out some time,
Amy, for I shall go into the draper’s on
the way. Mind you keep the fire burning,
and get supper ready, there’s a good girl,
~ for.I shall be cold and hungry when I
come back.”

Mrs. Miller did not unfold the dress,
but simply put it in the wrapper, and
went out again into the cold, carrying
her parcel.

Amy’s mind was relieved from all
fear, for she was sure now that the
accident would never be discovered.

~~ EES
22

CHAPTER III.
Wother and Haughter,

. @ HAT is the time, ma? I[
(aeNd), think it is getting late.”
“Yes, it is past seven,
and your dress hasn’t come
home yet. I hope the dress-
maker won’t disappoint me.
i can tell her that if she don’t bring it
home to-night she won’t have any more
of my custom.” =E.
The speaker was Mrs. King, the wife” :
of a rich grocer living in the High
Street, and the young girl sitting with
her, to whom she was talking, was her
eldest daughter, Hortensia..
Although this young lady had. so fine
a name, she was a quiet, plain, ordinary- .
looking girl, with pale blue eyes, a nose _



Mother and Daughter. 23

that would not turn down in spite of its
owner's efforts to train it in that direction,
and an abundance of decidedly red hair,
but a good-natured, merry expression of
countenance, which made one forget the
irregular features and red hair, and gave
one no surprise to find that Hortensia
King was a general favourite among her
schoolfellows.
“It won’t matter so long as I have it
-in time for the party to-morrow; and
perhaps Mrs. Miller would have had to
sit up very late last night in order to let
us have it to-day,” she suggested, gently.
“She ought at any rate to keep her
_. ypomise, for she knows that I am one of
‘er best customers,—one who pays her
‘iberally, and never keeps her waiting
for her money,” said Mrs. King.
“Hark! there is a knock at the door.
Perhaps she has brought it; shall I go
and see?” asked Hortensia.
’ “No, my dear, sit still. Jane will —”
“If you please, ma’am, the dressmaker
24 Amy's Secret.

has brought Miss Tensia’s dress,” said
the servant, entering the room with a
large parcel in her hands.

‘Where is she ?” inquired Mrs. King.

“ She’s gone, ma’am; she didn’t wait.”

“ How tiresome! I wanted her to see
the dress on, and to make any alterations
that may be necessary. Now, Hortensia,
fty sib one

“Oh, how lovely it is, ma! I’m afraid
it is tog pretty for me, the colour won’t
suit with my hair and face,” said the
young girl, as she held the dress at
arm’s length, and surveyed it with
pleasure.

“Nonsense, Hortensia. I can’t think
why you should be always talking about
your plainness. Your hair is no more
red than mine is; in fact, every one tells
me that there is a great likeness between
us, though your pa doesn’t think that
you'll ever come up to what I was when
We were married.”

Hortensia took off her dress, and put.
Mother and Daughter. 25

on the pale blue silk skirt, and was en-
deavouring to put on the polonaise.

“What is the matter with this dress,
ma? TI think it is too tight, I cannot
get into it.” .

“ Nonsense, the tighter it is the more
fashionable it looks. I told the dress-
maker to make it tight. Let me try,”
she said, as she saw that her daughter’s
efforts were vain.

But although she tugged and strained
the silk, she was obliged to confess that
the dress was really too tight to be worn ;
and giving it one more pull, which only
succeeded in slitting the silk, she said,
“It's of no use, my child; take it off,
and let me see what the foolish woman
has done to it.”

“Well, to be sure,” she cried, “this is
a pretty way to make a silk dress, the
salvage cut off all down this seam, and
not even overcast. And the thing is
one-sided, the right side of the polonaise
is narrower than the left one. I really
26 Amy’s Secret.

didn’t think that Mrs. Miller was so
stupid and slovenly ; but she wont make
another dress for me in a hurry.”

“ Martha,” she said, as the servant
appeared in answer to a vigorous pull
at the bell, “just run over to Mrs.
Miller’s, and tell her that I want to speak
- to her immediately about the dress she
has made so shamefully.”

The servant went at once to take the
message, and returned about half an
hour later, saying that Mrs. Miller was
not at home.

“Not at home? No, I suppose not.
She takes care not to come in when she
brings the dress, and to be out when I
send to her. No wonder she was out;
she knows that she has cut off that-
handsome silk, and completely spoilt the
dress, and now she is ashamed to see
me.”

“Do you think that it is quite spoilt,
ma?”

“Of course it is; and I’m sure I don’t
Mother and Daughter. 27

know what you are going to wear at
your party to-morrow.”.

“My white muslin would ——-

“No, that would not do atall. It is
very tiresome, very annoying, and that
_ dressmaker will never get any more
work.from me. She has lost my custom
through her stupidity and artfulness.”

“Perhaps it was an accident,” sug-
gested Hortensia; ‘the scissors might
have slipped, or ——”

“No, that is very unlikely. But the
dress is quite useless, utterly spoilt in
the making; and if Mrs. Miller don’t
come here to-night I shall go to see her
to-morrow, and tell her what I think of
it. The odd thing is,” she added, ex-
amining the dress again, “that it all
seems done very well, except this side
seam, and that is done very clumsily.”

”

—ABLFLERI HIF >
28

CHAPTER IV.
Piscovery,

MY was not in a very happy
state of mind that evening
“ while her mother was out.
She tried to learn her

lessons, but her thoughts ©
moulels run upon the accident of the after-
noon, and she wondered if it would ever
be discovered.

It was growing late, but neither her
mother nor Edward had returned; and
she was tired of staying in the house
alone, when she heard a knock at the
door. Being rather nervous, she grew
frightened, and wondered who it could
be; but the knock was repeated, and
when she opened the door she saw, to


Discovery. a 29

her relief, a respectable young woman
standing before it.

“Ts Mrs. Miller in ?” she asked.

“No, ma’am, she’s been out all the
evening,” replied Amy.

“Will you tell her that missis wants
to see her about the dress ?”

“Yes, I'll tell her when she comes in,”
said Amy, with a dreadful fear that all
was discovered.

The girl wished her good-night, and
went away; and directly she was out of
sight Amy remembered that she had not
asked her the name of her mistress, and
that after all it might not-be Mrs. King.

But she could not put away the un-
‘welcome thought that Mrs. King had
found out all her naughtiness. Strange
to say, she had never thought of her
disaster, and the way she had tried to
hide it, being discovered by any but her
mother’s eye; and the thought of its
being found out by a stranger so filled
her with terror that she could scarcely
30 Amy's Secret.

bear to give her mother the message -
when she came home, weary and worn
with her day’s work.

“Whose servant was it?” she in-
quired.

“JI forgot to ask.”

“Then I cannot go to-night. I expect
it was Mrs. Mordaunt’s servant, for I
made Miss King’s dress quite according
to her mamma's orders, and I don’t think
there can be anything amiss with it. At
any rate, I can’t go to-night, for I am
dreadfully tired after so much work and
walking.”

Edward, who had just come in, and
was sitting beside her, made no reply,
only gave an angry glance at his sister ;
and she at once took her candle and
went to bed, saying that she was very
tired. But, although she was tired, it
was long before sleep came to her, for
she tossed about restlessly, trying to -
imagine what her mother would say if
she knew all, and wishing—oh! so fer-
Discovery. 31

vently—that she had never seen the
pretty blue dress.

The next day was Friday, the day of
Hortensia King’s birthday party. Amy
rose aS soon as it was light; but she
found that Ned and her mother had been
down some time, and had lighted the
fire, and prepared the breakfast. ar

“ Late again!” cried Ned; “I suppose
you have been a long time over -your
curls, or putting on your dress.”

She did not answer, but sat down to

-her breakfast, trying to keep back the
hot tears and to check the choking sobs
which her brother’s words had caused.

Breakfast was soon over, and Ned
had just started for school when a loud
knock was heard at the door, which Mrs.
Miller opened. A moment later Amy
heard in loud tones the words, “I tell
you it is spoilt—completely spoilt!” and
she trembled as she listened.

- “T can’t understand it, ma’am; indeed
Ican’t, I thought it was made exactly
32 Amy's Secret.

as you ordered it,” replied Mrs. Miller,
mildly and tearfully.

“J don’t say that I can understand it,
unless you have cut off and kept some
of the silk. I only know that the dress
is quite ruined, that my daughter is not
able to wear it at her party this evening,
and that Tam very much annoyed, and”
shall expect you to make it good.”

The next few words were inaudible ;
but the little girl trembled with fright
when she heard her mother’s voice
calling, “Amy! Amy!’

She would have done anything, have
gone anywhere, rather than obey that
call, for now she was sure the truth
would come out, and she wished very
much that she had told her mother at
once, It was therefore with slow and
unwilling footsteps that she obeyed the
summons, and entered the front room
with downcast eyes,

“You remember that I left a dress
on the table in the back room yesterday
Discovery. 33

afternoon. Did you touch it, Amy?”
asked her mother.

A flood of tears and a burst of sobs
were her only answer; but they served
to rouse the suspicions of her mother,
who had never thought of Amy as the
cause of the mischief, but fancied that
some one might have done it in her
absence.

“ There, you see how it is,” exclaimed
Mrs. King, “it is all this naughty child’s
doing. I dare say she spoilt the dress
on purpose to annoy me.”

“No, I didn’t,” sobbed the child; “I
only tried on the dress to see how I
should look, and Ned came, and the oil
was spilt on it, and then I cut it off and
mended it up.”

Mrs. King burst into a torrent of
invective, but poor Mrs. Miller sat
perfectly still; she was so grieved and
shocked to find that Amy had been
guilty of so many faults, and above all
that she had deceived her.

De
34 -Amy’s Secret.

“Tf I were your mother I should whip
you’ well, and keep you on bread and
water all day, you naughty child!” said
Mrs. King, while Amy sobbed piteously.
“As it is, Mrs. Miller,” she continued,
speaking to the dressmaker, “I must ~
repeat what I said before, that I shall
_ expect the dress to be made up as I
ordered it, and that I shall not send you
any more dresses to be tried on and cut
and spoilt by your vain little girl.”

So saying she took her departure, and
Mrs. Miller quitted the room without
saying a word, leaving Amy very tearful,
and utterly miserable.


35

CAPA Re Ve
A PWiserable Hay,

f°r was Sunday, the day to
« which Mrs, Miller’s children
looked forward with great
pleasure, for to them it was
usually the happiest day of
the week. It was their
mother’s leisure day,—her rest day,—and
very happy the children felt as they
walked beside her to the house of God
in the morning and evening. The after-
noon Mrs. Miller spent at home, while
Edward and Amy were at the Sunday-
school; and in the evening, after service,
they would gather round the fire and
sing hymns, or listen while their mother
talked or read to them. Sometimes there
were wet: Sunday evenings; but these


36 Amy's Secret.

were spent just as happily in reading
from the large family Bible, or singing
the Sunday-school hymns.

Perhaps it would not be unfair to say
that the plentiful supply of good whole:
some food helped to make the day —
attractive to Ned; for his mother was
‘not rich, and a good joint of meat was
not an every-day occurrence in that little
household. Nor is it unfair to say that
Amy felt the importance of wearing her
best clothes, and was glad of such an
opportunity of showing them off as the
Sunday-school afforded.

But such a dull, miserable, unhappy
Sunday neither of them ever remem-
bered. There was no hot joint for
dinner, in fact, no meat at all, as Mrs.
Miller had not received the money for
her work, and it would cost a great deal
to replace the silk dress which had been
spoiled. The mother was very quiet .
and sad, Ned cross and ill-tempered, —
and Amy so very unhappy that she felt
A Miserable Day. a7

-no pleasure in wearing her best clothes,
although she had a brand new hat to
put on.

The tears continually started to her
eyes when she was reminded by her
_brother’s contemptuous and angry looks
of the mischief she had done a day or
two before. He confined himself to
looks, and scarcely took the trouble to
speak to his sister. The boy was very
fond of his mother, and so grieved to
: see her looking sad and gloomy that he
gave vent to his sorrow and displeasure
by casting these reproachful sneering
glances at Amy, who quailed under
‘them, and felt as af her heart would

break.

But the most wretched day of one’s
life must come to an end at last; and
that miserable Sunday at length drew to
a close, and Amy laid her head on the
pillow, feeling very thankful that night
‘ had come, and wondering how many
more unhappy days she should spend,
38 Amy's Secret.

and if all her life would be dreary and
miserable as that day had been. But
there was to be a little ray of sunshine
for her, even that night; for when her
mother went up to bed, she noticed her
little girl’s sad tearful face, and felt very
sorry for her. She thought that Amy
“had been punished enough by being
under her displeasure for three days.
So she went to her bedside, and said
kindly, “Don’t cry any more, dear. I
know you are sorry for the faults you
have committed, and now I have quite
forgiven you. Are you sure that God
has forgiven you?”

‘No, mother,” sobbed Amy; “I couldn’t
pray about a—a dress.”
_ “But you have sinned against Him .
both by disobedience and deceit, and I
believe you are sorry for those sins.
Tell Him so, and seek His forgiveness
before you go to sleep.”

Amy crept out of bed, knelt down,
and really prayed for the first time in
A Miserable Day. 39

her life. It was true that she had always
said her prayers night and morning;
but this was the first time that she
‘prayed to God from her heart for what
she really wanted; and in after days she
often looked back to that evening as a
turning-point in her life.

Although her fault was forgiven, the
consequences of it still remained; the
blue silk dress was still quite spoilt, and
upon her mother rested the task of buying
another in its place; while one of her
best customers had left her, and, what
was worst of all to Amy, Ned still con-
tinued angry and petulant. Indeed, as
his sister’s smiles returned, and her face
grew brighter, he seemed to be more
sullen and cross.- He usually met her
with a scowl upon his brow, and answered
her cheerful little remarks in a harsh,
snappish manner.

In vain his mother reasoned with him,
and told him how it grieved her to see
him cherish such an unforgiving spirit
40 Amy's Secret.

towards his sister. He only replied, “It
is all very well for you to forgive her,
mother, for you are so kind and good-
natured you would not hurt anybody.»
And I would forgive her if it were only
me she has injured. But when I see
you toiling and slaving away to get the
* money for that precious dress which she
spoiled through her vanity, I feel down-
right mad. Ifshe were a boy, I’d give
her a jolly good thrashing, and have it
over; but I can’t do that sort of thing
with a girl, so I make her feel it another
way. But forgive her I can’t.”


41

CHAPTER VI.
fiow Red went Sliding.



4 S'S January grew older,
oF FL and the days length-
ened, the cold weather
increased in strength.
Icicles hung from the
windows, water froze
indoors, snow came
down and covered the
houses with a clean
white robe, and made
the streets slippery and unsafe both for
horses and foot-passengers. Every pond
in the neighbourhood was a sheet of
thick strong ice, and numbers of skaters
were to be seen every day making their
“way to the ponds; while those who were
not fortunate enough to possess skates
went out to slide.
42 Amy's Secret.

Early one Saturday morning, Edward
told his mother that if she did not want
him to run errands for her, he should
like to go out sliding with some of his

schoolfellows. Mrs. Miller was quite

_ willing for him to go; and he had just
started, when Amy ran in to tell her
mother that several of her young friends
were going also, and to ask if she might
accompany them. She obtained per-
mission, and went upstairs to put on her
hat and jacket, then started off as fast as
she could to overtake her friends.

For two whole weeks, Edward had
continued to nurse his feeling of spite
and anger, and to take every opportunity
of making Amy feel how much he de-
spised her. Instead of being cheerful,
frank, generous, and full of fun, he grew
sullen and silent, seldom speaking to his
sister in his usual manner.

It happened that he and one of his
companions were walking behind the rest
of the party, so that Amy, panting and
flow Ned went Sliding. 43

out of breath, had to pass him in order
to walk with the others.

“Now then, Amy, where are you
running to ?” he cried, angrily.

“Tam going to the pond with Jessie
and Annie,” she panted.

“Indeed you are not going with us,”
he replied; “you'll be sure to get into
mischief.”

“ But mother said I might go,” pleaded
Amy.

“T wonder you were not ashamed to
ask her,” said her brother. “If you had
a spark of feeling for her, you wouldn't
leave her alone on Saturday morning,
when she’s been slaving all the week to
make up that money for the dress you
ruined through your stupid vanity. No,
if you want to go, go alone; at any rate _
you shan’t go with us,” he said, roughly
pushing her aside, and running off round
the corner of the street to rejoin his
companion, who had left the brother and
sister to settle their dispute alone.
pag Amy's Secret.

The push was more violent than
_.dward meant it to be. Poor Amy fell
heavily to the ground, and was stunned
by the blow. As she fell her foot slipped
from the pavement into the road, anda
man in a baker’s cart, driving rapidly by
at the moment, had not time to pull up
his horse before the wheel passed over
her foot. The pain aroused her for one
instant ; she gave a piercing shriek, and
then fainted away. A crowd soon ga-
thered round her; and one or two kind
persons raised the child, and began to
talk of taking her to the hospital.

When Amy opened her eyes again,
she was conscious of a terrible pain in
her foot, from which the boot was being
removed; while a crowd of strangers,
both sympathetic and curious, stood’
looking on. The baker had been stopped,
and was loudly declaring to a policeman —
that it was quite an accident, and that .
he was not to blame.

“What is the matter?” asked a plain
flow Ned went Shding. 45

but handsomely dressed little girl, who
happened to be passing at the moment,
of a woman:in the crowd.

“ A little gal run over, miss,” was the
reply. “A boy pushed her down; and —
the baker, he run over her foot before
he could stop his ’orse.”

“Poor child!” said Hortensia King,
as she made her way through the crowd
“Why, it is Mrs. Miller's little girl!”
she cried, as she caught sight of Amy’s
pale face, just as she opened her eyes.

“Do you know her, miss?” inquired
two or three voices. ;

“Yes, she is our dressmaker’s little
girl. Oh dear, what trouble she will be
in, poor woman! Shall I run and tell
her about it ?”

“If you know where she lives, it will
be the best thing you can do,” said a
woman standing near. “ You see they’ve
~ got a cab, and they are just going to
take her to the hospital ; the doctors will
soon see what is the matter with her,”.
46 Amy’s Secret

Hortensia set off at once, and ran to
the dressmaker’s house in such haste
that when she reached the door she was
quite out of breatn.

Mrs. Miller came in answer to her
knock; but the girl. stood a moment
trying to regain her breath, and then
said, “Oh, Mrs. Miller, I am so sorry,
but will you go to the hospital? Amy
has hurt her foot, but they hope it isn’t '

hurt badly.” .

“My Amy?” cried the poor woman, ~
who had expected to hear some un-
pleasant message from Mrs. King about
the damaged dress.

“Yes,” said Hortensia, who. could
speak a little less hurriedly now, “a boy
pushed her down, and a cart went over
her foot, and she fainted; but they’ve
taken her to the hospital now.”

“Oh dear! oh dear! what shall I
do?” cried poor Mrs. Miller, as she
hastened to put on her bonnet and
shawl and set out for the hospital.
Flow Ned went Shding. 47

Hortensia meantime made her way
home, and began to tell her mother what
had happened, and how she had taken
the news to Mrs. Miller.
“Was it that fair-haired little girl who
“spoilt your dress ?”.asked Mrs, King.

-“ Yes, mamma; but don’t think any
‘more about it now, the poor little girl is
in so much pain, and I am sure that her
mother is in dreadful trouble about her.
Can you think of anything we can do
for her?”

“T have no doubt that the surgeon at

the hospital will do everything in his

power; but if you like I will speak to
Dr. Arnold, and.ask him to look at her,
and see if anything more can be done,
when he pays his next visit to the
hospital.”
CHAPTER VII.
Poor Amy!

pT was very late in
the afternoon when
Edward returned
from the pond where
he had been sliding
merrily and enjoying
himself, scarcely giv-
ing a thought to the
little sister he had
so roughly sent home that morning.
The street lamps were lighted, and the
cold frosty air in which he had been for
so many hours had given him a keen
appetite, and he ran down the street in
a great hurry, so that he might be in
time for tea.

To his surprise he found the house


Poor Amy !/ 49

dark and silent. The front door was
fastened, and his loud and continued
knocking was not answered. He could
not understand it, for his mother was
usually at home at that hour; but a boy
who was passing down the street shouted,
“Tt's no good for you to knock, there’s
nobody at home; and your mother’s gone
to the hospital to see your sister.”

“To the hospital? Oh, what is the
matter ?” cried Ned, in alarm.

“She was run over,” said the boy
abruptly, as he went down the street
whistling.

Poor Edward was horror-struck. He
had never known until that moment how
much he loved Amy; and now that he
heard she was injured (how seriously he
did not know), the remembrance of his
unkindness to her that morning came
before him like a flash of lightning; and
although he little thought that 4e had
been the cause of the accident, he was

sorry that he had sent her home alone.
E 87
50 Amy’s Secret.

He walked slowly down the street
in the direction of the hospital, half-
hoping, half-fearing, to meet his mother,
and hear from her if his sister were very
much hurt. But he had not gone far
before he met her carrying a large parcel
of work. She saw him directly, and
hastened to meet him with a faint attempt
at a smile.

“Well, my boy,” she said, looking
closely at him in the light of a street
lamp, “I see you have. heard of the
accident.”

“Yes, mother. But tell me, is she
hurt very much?”

“ Not so much as I feared at first, dear.
It seems that the cart-wheel only went
over her foot; and although that is in-
jured,” she said, with a quiver in her
' voice, *‘still we hope that it may not be
very bad, and that she will soon be well
again when the shock to the system is
over.”

“Ts that all? Is it only her foot?’
Poor Amy! 51
asked Ned. “Well, I am glad it is no

worse.”

He had scarcely dared to think how
much Amy might be hurt; and now that
he heard it was only her foot, all his pity
and penitence took flight.

It was just like Amy, he said to him-
self, to upset mother, and make such a
fuss just because she had hurt her foot.
What a stupid little cry-baby she always
was! How silly of her to get in the way.
of a cart and be run over! But perhaps
she had been well frightened this time,
and really was punished for all her stupid
vanity. He might have guessed that she
was not hurt very much.

These hard, unkind thoughts filled
his mind as he walked silently home
beside his mother, and helped her to
light up the fire and get the tea; while -
she, poor woman, fancied that he was
Overcome with sorrow on account of the
accident.

“Poor boy!” she thought, “he is very”
52 Amy's Secret.

unhappy. I won't tell him the worst
to-night, or he will lie awake and fret.
I am sure he is very sorry he has treated
her so badly lately.”

- She tried in vain to swallow a morsel
of bread and butter, but it seemed to
choke her ; and even Edward’s appetite
left him as he looked at her sad face.

“ Mother,” he said at length, “ you are
tired and worried to-night; will you go
to bed, and let me tidy the rooms for
you ?” ney

“Thank you, my boy,” she said,
gratefully, “you are very good and
thoughtful.” -

She wished him good-night ; and after
he had done all he could to save her
trouble in the morning, he went to bed,
his mind still full of impatient and
-unkind thoughts.

How quiet the house seemed the next
morning without Amy’s lively chatter,
and her footsteps about the house as she
dressed herself for Sunday-school.
Poor Amy! 53

Both mother and son thought of her
very much; and Edward was astonished
to find how much he missed her,
especially when he set off down the
street alone. It seemed as if she must
be coming just after him, as if she were
only waiting to put on her new hat ora
pretty ribbon. But it was when he
returned home to dinner that the absent
one was missed most of all, when he sat
opposite his mother, and saw her sorrow-
ful face and eyes that looked full ot
unshed tears.

“Mother,” he cried, as she helped
him to a slice of meat, “mother, I can
see you have been fretting this morning,
I wish you wouldn’t worry about Amy.
I’m sure she has given you trouble
enough without this, and I can’t think
how she managed to get under the
horse’s feet.”

“Some unkind boy pushed her down
at the corner of St. George’s Street, and
before she could rise the wheel passed
°

54 Amy’s Secret.

over her foot. I don’t know what I
could do to that boy,” she said, with
unusual energy and severity; “I’m sure
no punishment could be too great for
him.”

“But you don’t think her foot is hurt
badly ?” asked Ned, in a husky voice,
while his face was working strangely.

‘So badly that the doctor told me he
was afraid she might have to lose it, and
that’ my darling may be a cripple for
life!” she replied in an unnaturally
steady voice; while Ned gasped out,
“Our Amy lose her foot? A cripple
for life!”

“Yes,” said Mrs. Miller, whose tears
were now flowing freely, “I am going
to see her ae afternoon, the operation
may be over.”

“Mother!” burst from the boy’s lips
in a bitter piercing cry, as the truth
flashed before him, and throwing down
his knife and fork beside his untasted
dinner, he rushed away from the table,

is
Poor Amy! 55

upstairs to his own little room, where he
turned the key in the lock, which had
grown rusty from disuse, and threw
himself on his bed in an agony of grief
and remorse. He knew now the extent
of the injury which Amy had received,
and at the same time the fact that he
had caused it; and he could not bear to
think of it.

In vain his mother rapped at the door,
and begged him to come down to finish
his dinner. He could not bear to see
her and to know that she had been
hiding the terrible fact from him on
purpose to save him pain, while he had
been thinking such unkind thoughts
about his suffering sister.

Amy a cripple! How should he ever
bear to see her about the house, and to
know that it was all his fault, that it was
her brother's hand which had dealt the
blow which caused her lameness? He
thought of her affection for him, and
how patiently she had borne his re-

a
56 Amy’s Secret.

proaches, and what meek replies she
had made to his sneering remarks, until
he hated himself, and abhorred the
sullen, unforgiving spirit he had shown
towards her.

“And I thought I was right all the
time, and that I only did it for mother’s
sake,” he said. “Oh, what a wretch |
have been! I am sure she can never
forgive me. But I will run away,—I -
can't stay here when she comes home—
lame. No, I will go away, and earn
money for her and mother, and see if I

can’t do something to make up for my _

unkindness. Oh! if I had only known
_what was coming, how differently L
would have acted.”


Of

CEPAVP IR Vallee

Amy's Recovery,



ae did not stir from
his room all the afternoon,
and it had grown quite
dark when he heard a tap
at his door.

~ “Let me in, Ned,” said
his mother'’svoice, “I have
-good news for you, my
boyeaee

He unlocked the door,
and his mother enteréd the room, looking
so much happier than she had been at
dinner time, that Ned felt hopeful at once.
_“T have been to the hospital, and
have seen our pet,” she said, softly
“She is getting on very well. God has
been very good to us, dear; the doctor


58 Amy's Secret.

says that she will not lose her foot, as he
feared yesterday ; and she is much better
than he could have expected.”

“Thank God!” burst from the boy’s
lips.

“Yes, we will thank Him, He is
indeed good to us. I am sorry that
I told you of the doctor's fears; but I
did so because I feared to keep it from
you any longer.”

“But, mother,” he cried, interrupting
her, “do you know, has Amy told you
who—who pushed her down ?”

- “No, dear, I don’t know; and Amy
will not tell me, although she confesses
that she knows his name. Don’t trouble
to find it out, my boy. She forgives
him. Let us do the same, and not think
of revenge.”

“But Z know, and I can’t bear it. Oh,
mother, can you believe it? Don’t look
at me,—but—but—I did it! No, she
can’t forgive me, and I know that you
' must hate me.”
Amy's Recovery, 59
“T don’t understand you, Edward,”

- said Mrs. Miller, half bewildered.

“TI pushed her away, because I

wouldn’t let her come sliding with us.
It is all my fault,” he said, between his
sobs.
_ His mother could hardly believe it;
but when she saw how thoroughly dis-
tressed he was, her heart ached for him,
and she tried to comfort him by saying,
“Amy forgives you: she sent her love,
and hopes to see you soon.”

Those kind words were too much for
the poor boy, and he sobbed, “ You’re
too kind, mother. How can she forgive
me, when I’ve been so cruel and un-
forgiving to her?”

‘But she does forgive you,—fully.
Oh, my boy, let us thank God for His
goodness in making her better, and
preventing what might have been a
life-long sorrow. Our Father has been
very merciful to you.”

They knelt down with hearts full of
60 Amy’s Secret.

thankfulness, which Mrs. Miller tried to
express in a few words; and both went
downstairs with lightened hearts and
happier faces.

Mrs. King did not forget her promise,
but spoke to the doctor about Amy.
He took particular note of her case when
he paid his next visit to the hospital,
and gave a very favourable report to
Mrs. King, who really felt very sorry
for the poor child.

Kind-hearted MHortensia paid her
several visits, carrying with her a bunch
of early flowers or a pot of snowdrops,
to brighten the ward, which was a dull-
looking place, in spite of the illuminated
texts upon the walls.

Every Sunday afternoon, Mrs. Miller
and Ned went to see her. How bright
_and happy she always looked during
their visits, although the long week days
passed rather slowly at first. But she
regained her health so quickly, and
her foot grew so much better, that her
Amy’s Recovery. 61

brother’s old smile came back when he
saw her able to move a little without
help, and knew how thoroughly she
forgave him.

At last-came the happy day when the
doctor pronounced her well enough to
return home. How thankful she was to
leave the hospital with her foot nearly
cured, and what a joyful reception they
gave her in the dull little house! It
seemed as if her mother and Ned could
not make enough of her ; and the neigh-
bours came in one after another to see
her, and to say how well she was looking.


62

CEVA TEsEER e1OXG

Soanclusion,

-T was in the sweet
spring-time that Mrs.
Miller, having saved
~ enough money to pay
for the unfortunate blue
dress, went at once to see
Mrs. King, to discharge
the tiresome debt.

But when she made
known her errand, Mrs.
King feokedt annoyed and vexed, and
said that she had only spoken in the
heat of the moment, and never really
meant to take the money. “In fact,”
she said, “ Hortensia does not wish for
another silk. She is a strange girl, and
prefers plain stuff dresses, and she -




te
Conclusion. 63

declares that when she grows up she
will be a hospital nurse.”

_ But Mrs. Miller scarcely liked to take
back the money, which she had been so
many weeks in saving, until Hortensia
came into the room, and suggested that

- it would be enough to pay for a week's

holiday at the sea-side, and that she was

sure the change would do pe a great
deal of good.

It was such a charming project that
Mrs. Miller joyfully consented; and a
few weeks later, when the busy season
was over, the hard-worked dressmaker
and her two children spent a happy and
long-remembered week at the sea-side,
where the breezes blew a colour into

their pale cheeks, and gave them fresh
~ health and vigour.

The very day after their return, Mrs. -
King sent two dresses to be made; and
her husband, hearing from Hortensia,
who was ever ready to say a kind word
~ for every one, that Edward was about to
64. Amy’s Secret.

leave school, and was anxious to help
his mother, offered to take the boy into
his shop without any premium, an offer
which Mrs. Miller very gladly accepted.

The mother felt that she had indeed
great cause for thankfulness when she
looked at her two children, and saw Amy
running about, and looking as well as
ever, and knew that her boy’s future
was so kindly provided for; but more
than all did she rejoice to see how well
they agreed together, and how, as young
disciples of Jesus, they tried to help each
other in the Christian way, seeking the
smile and approval of their Heavenly
Father.

“LOLS

LONDON; KNIGHT, PRINTER MIDDLE STREET, E.C.


:

ILLUSLRALED

PUBLICATIONS

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PUBLISHED BY

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VEX 56, PATERNOSTER ROW, A
7”) C9 | | )
















a
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Pea. ee ot eee
ILLUSTRATED GIFT BOOKS FOR CHILDREN



SS





eur Pets and Companions:
j.Pictures and Stories Illus-
"trative of Kindness to Animals.

By MARY K. MARTIN.

Author of “fruits of Bible Lands,” etc.




Profusely Illustrated by Weir, Stacey,
Whymper, M. E. Edwards, I. G. Brittain,
and others. Quarto. 2s, cloth boards.





‘A delightful book of anecdotes of Animals, very
=» well illustrated, and interesting to all, old or young,
who are happy enough to have a genial love for
birds and beasts.’ —Guardian.

“Interesting anecdotes, illustrated by spirited
pictures, make up a pleasant book.” —SZectator.

** Amusing as well as instructive.”"—Lnelish Churchman.
“A first-rate book for children.” —Presbyterian Messenger.

ALKATIVE FRIENDS

IN FIELD,
FARM, AND FOREST.

By MARY E. ROPES.

Author of “Tons Bennie,” “ Till
the Sugar Melts,” etc.
_ Profusely Illustrated. A simi-
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cloth boards,
“ The juveniles always like to read about

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“A capital book, full of illustrations.”
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~ “Quite enticing for the little people.” —Sunday School Chronicle.
a ‘




























alle


Reduced frout “TALKATIVE FRIENDS.”


1 The Book of Books: The Story
of the English Bible.
2 Springfield Stories.
3 Little Dot. By Mrs. WALTON.
4 John Thomson’s Nursery.
5 ‘lwo Ways to begin Life.
6 Ethel Ripon. By G. E. Sar-
GENT,
7 Little Gooseberry.
8 Fanny Ashley,and other Stories
9 ‘the Gamckeeper’s Daughter.
10 Fred Kenny; or, Out in the
World.
11 Old Humphrey’s Study Table.
12 Jenny’s Waterproof.
13 The Holy Well. An. Irish
Story.
14 The Travelling Sixpence.
15 The Three Flowers.
16 Lost and Rescued.
17 Lightbearers and Reacons.
18 Little Lottie ; or, the Wonder-
ful Clock.
19 The Dog of St. Bernard.
20 Isaac Gould, the Waggoner.
21 Uncle Rupert’s Stories for Boys
22 Dreaming and Doing.



id

with COLOURED
FRONTISPIECE.

Dom

SERIES
| Of Books for
7 Children.

23 Many Ways of being Useful.
24 Rachel Rivers; or, What a
Child may Do.

25 Lessons out of School.

26 Setma, the Turkish Captive.

27 Show your Colours,

28 True and False Friendship.

29 Always Too Late, and other
Stories.

80 School Pictures drawn from
Life.

31 Soldier Sam.

82 Stephen Grattan’s Faith. By
the Author of ‘‘ Christie Red-
fern’s Troubles.’’

83 David the Scholar,

34 Tired of Home.'

35 Setting out for Heaven.

36 The Stolen Money, and other
Ballads.

37 Helen’s Stewardship,

38 Pat Riley’s Friends.

39 Olive Crowhurst. A Story for
Girls.

40 The White Feather.



sf




44 The Raven’s Feather.

45 Aunt Milly’s Diamonds, and
Our Cousin from India.

46 My Ladys Prize, and Effie’s
Letter.

47 How the Golden Eagle was
Caught. ji

48 Emily’s Trouble, and what it
taught her.

49 Adopted Son, and other Stories

50 Till the Sugar Melts. By M.
E. Ropes.

51 Story of a Geranium; or, The
Queen of Morocco.

52 The Flying Postman, and other
Stories.

53 The Money in the Milk.

54 Cowslip Ball, and other Stories.

55 Little Model, and other Stories.

56 Mary Sefton. By the Author
of ‘‘ The Two Roses.”

57 Tales from over the Sea,

58 Lisetta and the Brigands; or,
Saved by a Mule.

59 Bessie Graham.

60 In his Father’s Arms.
side Story.

61 Cosmo and his Marmoset.

62 Talks with Uncle Morris.

63 ‘The Patched Frock

64 Herbert and_ his Sister; or,
Not in One Shoe.

65 Lucy Miller’s Good Work.

66 Little Andy’s Legacy.

G7 How the Gold Medal was Won,
and The Young Drovers.

63 Master Charles's Chair, and
How it was Filled.

69 Little Kittiwake; or, The
Story of a Lifeboat.

70 Squire Bentley’s Treat.

71 Jessie’s Visit to the Sunny Bank

72 Amy’s Secret. By Lucy ByER-
LEY.

9% 73 The Children in the Valley.

SERIES—continued.
ES
41 Steenie Alloway’s Adventures.

42 Angel's Christmas. By Mrs. Watton.
43 Cottage Life ; its Lights and Shadows.

A Sea- 5










74 Florence and her Friends.

75 The Two Roses.

76 Little Tenpenny; What she
did, and How she did it.

77 Six China Teacups.

78 His Own Enemy.

79 Three Firm Friends.

80 Empty Jam-pot. By the Author
of “ Lost and Rescued,” etc.

81 Patty and Brownie; or, ‘The
Lord will Provide.

82 ‘T'wo Weeks with the Greys.
A Story of American Home
Life.

83 A Tale of Three Weeks. By
EGLANTON THORNE.

84 My Brother and I.

85 The Blessed Palm.

86 Hubert’s Temptation. A Story
from Real Life.

87 Pretty Miss Violet.

88 The Queen’s Oak.

89 Story of a Yellow Rose. Told
by Itself. By Jessz PaGr.

90 The Blacksmith’s Daughter ;
or, The Little Comforter.

91 Daisy's Trust. By E. S. Pratr

92 The Runaways.

93 Jack Silverleigh’s Temptation.

94 May Lynwood. A ‘Tale of
School Life.

95 Tom’s Bennie. By M.E. Ropes

96 The Captain of the Schocl.

97 Miss Pris.

98 The Story he was Told.

99 Gerty’s Triumph.

100 The Missing Jug.

101 Granny's Darling.

102 Galen! Peter's New Year’s

ift.

103 A True Story of Long Ago.

104 The Little Midshipman, and

other Stories.

105 How Arthur Found out the
Secret. Xa







































































bible Pictures for our Pets

Part J. OLp TESTAMENT PICTURES.
Part II. New TESTAMENT PICTURES.

With large Illustrations drawn by SELOUS, STANILAND,
Wess, Watson, HARRISON WEIR, DownarD, Dori,
and other well-known artists.

Quarto. Each Part complete in itself. In ornamental boards,
with cloth backs. 2s. each Part. Complete in One Volume,
4x 4s. handsomely bound, with medallion on side, gilt edges.




e

JICTURE BOOKS

For Little Children.

The Sweet Story of Old. A:
Sunday Book for‘the Little Ones.
By Hessa_Srrerton, author of
- Jessica's First Prayer,” ‘Bede's
Charity,” eic. With Twelve Col-
oured Pictures. 3s. 6d.cloth boards,
coloured edges.

My Own Picture Book.
First and Second Series. Each
Part complete in itself, 2s, 6d. in
coloured boards; or, in one hand-
some Volume, gilt edges. 4s.

(25) Watts’s Divine and Moral
Songs. New Edition. With many fine Coloured Illustrations.
2s. 6d. cloth boards.

My Holiday Picture-Book. Comprising : Holiday-time
in the Country—Contented Johnnie—The Children of the Bible—
The Busy Farm ; or, a Visit to our Country Friends—Amy’s Birthday
Preseut—The Bible Picture Alphabet. With Coloured Pictures,

2s. 6d. cloth.
My Coloured Picture Story-Book. With Twenty-four

full-coloured page Pictures and Forty Vignette. Comprising : Our
Pretty Village—Little Antoine and the Bear—Rosa, the Little
Cousin from India—The Blackbird’s Nest. 4s. handsomely bound
in cloth boards, full gilt.

Bible Stories and Pictures. With Twenty-four Col-
oured page Pictures and Forty Vignettes. With simple letterpress
in large type. 4s. handsomely bound, cloth gilt.

Harrison Weir's Pictures of Birds and other Family
Pets. With Twenty-four large Coloured Pictures. 5s. handsomely
bound, with side in Gold and Colours.

Storyland. By Srpney Grey. With Thirty-two Ilus-
trations by Ropert Barnes. Engraved and Printed in Colour by
Epmunp Evans. 6s, handsomely bound in coloured paper boards.





Little Dot and Her Friends, With Twenty-four Col-
oured Pictures and Forty Vignettes. 4s. cloth boards, gilt.

Pictures for our Pets. I.--Home and Country Scenes,
etc. II.—Birds, Beasts, Fishes, etc. Profusely Illustrated. 4to.
Second Edition. Each Part is complete in itself, in fancy coloured
boards, 2s. ; or together, handsomely bound in cloth, gilt edges, 4x6


ae







The Children of Cloverley. Illus-
trated. 2s. cloth.

Little Meg’s Children. Illustrated.
1s. 6d. cloth.

Alone in London. Illustrated.
Js. 6d. cloth.

Bede’s Charity. Illustrated.
2s, 6d. cloth.

Carola. Tustrated. 8s. 6d. cloth.

Cassy. Illustrated. 1s. 6d. cloth.

Cobwebs and Cables. Illustrated.
5s. cloth, gilt.

The Crew of the Dolphin. Illus-

trated. Is. 6d. cloth.
Enoch Roden’s Training. Illus-
trated. 2s. cloth. -

Fern’s Hollow. Illus. 9s. cloth.

Fishers of Derby Haven. Ilus-
trated. 2s, cloth.

Friends till Death. 9d. cloth.

Jessica’s First Prayer. Illus-

trated. 1s. cloth.
Sam Franklin’s Savings Bank.
“ 6d. cloth.





SSILLustRared x Boons*K

kA





¢

VESBA

STRETTON

Author of

“Tessica’s First Prayer.”

— Se

The whole of the books forming this
most popular Library are now re-issued in a
new and greatly improved style.
and new Illustrations, with specially attractive binding, will make these
books more than ever suitable for prizes, birthday gifts, etc.

New type

The King's Servants. 1s. 6d. cloth.
Lost Gip. Illus. Is. 6d. eloth.
Max Kromer. Siege of Strasburg. 1s. 6d. cl.
Michel Lorio’s Cross. Illus. 6d.
No Place l:ke Home. Illus. 1s. cl.
Pilgrim Street. A Story of Man-
chester Life. 2s. cloth.
The Storm of Life. Illus. Is.6d. cl.
A Thorny Path. Illus. 2s. cloth.
Under the Old Roof. Illustrated.
Js. cloth.
A Night and a Day. 9d. cloth.

A_ Miserable Christmas and a
Happy New Year. 9d. cloth.

The Worth of a Baby. 6d. cloth.
Left Alone. 6d. cloth.

The Christmas Child. 6d. cloth.

Only a Dog. 6d. cloth.

How Apple-Tree Court was Won.
Gd. cloth.

The Sweet Story of Old.
oured Pictures,

Col-
3s. 6d. cloth.




ES



ILLUSTRATED BOOKS BY

Mas. 0. K. WALON.

Angel’s Christmas.

NANNY
NY
\\

.





Reduced from ‘Curistie’s OLp OnGan.”



16mo. 6d. cloth.
Christie's Old Organ ;
or, Home, Sweet
Home. 1s. cloth.
Launch the Lifeboat.
With 44Coloured Pic-
tures or Vignettes.
4to. 3s. col. cover.

Little Dot. Coloured
Frontispiece. 6d. cl.

Little Faith; or, the
Child of the Toy-stall.
1s. cloth.

Nobody _ Loves
1s. cloth.

Me.

Olive's Story; or, Life
at Ravenscliffe. 2s.6d.
cloth, gilt edges.

A Peep Behind the
. Scenes. Imp. 16mo,
8s. 6d. cloth, gilt
edges

Poppie’s Presents.
Crown 8vo. Is. cloth.

Saved at Sea. A J.ight-
house Story. Is.clcth.

Shadows. Scenes in the
Life of an Old Arm-
Chair. Imp. r6mo.
4s, cloth, gilt edges.

Taken or Left. Crown
8vo. Is. cloth.

Was I Right? 3s. 6d.
cloth, gilt edges.

Our Gracious Queen:
Pictures and Stories
from Her Majesty’s
Life. With many En-
gravings. New and
Revised Edition. 1s.
cloth boards.

tad




1/6 BOOKS ww LARGE TYPE.

FOR YOUNG READERS.

Each in very large type with Engravings. Small 4to. 1s. 6d. Cloth
boards, gilt edges.
Sto

ries of Bible Children. A Sunday Book for very
Little Children. By Mrs. E. M. Waterworth, author of “ Walking
with Jesus,” etc. In very Jarge type. With Illustrations.

Listening to Jesus. A Sunday Book for the Little
Ones. By E. M. Waterworth, author of ‘Sunday Afternoons at
Rose Cottage.” With Illustrations by W. S: Stacy.

Sunday Afternoons at Rose Cottage. Bible Talks
with Mamma. By Mrs. Waterworth, author of ‘ Blessings for the
Little Ones,” etc. In very large type. With Illustrations.

Blessings for the Little Ones.
Walking with Jesus. A Sunday Book for Children.
The Three Brave Princes, and other Bible Stories.

The Beautiful House and its Seven Pillars. By
Frances M. Savill.

Readings with the Little Ones. By Agnes Giberne.
The Children’s King, and other Readings for the Young.

ONE SHILLING EACH.
Picture Stories for Children. With a picture on every

opening, and with letterpress in large type. Crown 8vo. 1s.
attractively bound in cloth boards.

Picture Book for Children. With a picture on every
opening, and with letterpress in large type, well printed. Crown 8vo.
1s. attractively bound in cloth.

SIXPENCE EACH.

THE ROYAL PICTURE BOOKS.

The First of a New Series of Picture Books for very Little Children. A
Picture on every page; the Letterpress in very large type, and in
words of one and two syllables. Engravings by the best Artists.
Imperial 16mo. 6d. each in cloth.

1.—Our Queen, and other Pictures.
2.—Charlie and his Pet, and other Pictures.
3.—Little Kittens, and other Pictures.

4,—Mamma’s Darling, and other Pictures.




FOURPENNY
BOOKS

Each with Itlustira-
tion. Well printed,
and tastefully bound
an cloth boards, and
blocked with colowred
ainks. 4d. each.





























1. Short and Sweet. 18. Lily’s Adventure.
2. I Never Thought of it. 19. Made on Purpose. A Story of
3, Father's Joy, and other Series. Russian Life. By Salem
4. A Sprig of Holly. Hall.
5, Barbara’s Revenge. 20. The White Rosebud, and the
6. Shrimp. Birthday Present.
7. Edith’s Second Thought, and | 21. Carl’s Secret.
- other Stories. 22. Made a Man of.
8. Jack and Shag. 23. Winnie’s Golden Key; or,
9. ‘VhePrincess in the Castle,and The Right of Way. By J.
other Stories. With many Saxby. ‘
Engravings. 24. Trapped on the Rocks; or,
10. Andy and his Book; or, the Only a Word.
Orphan Friends. 25. Susie Wood’s Charge. By
11. Jessie's Roses, and other Mary E. Ropes.
Stories. 26. Fisherman Niels. By Mrs. G.
12. The Village Shoemaker. Gladstone.
13. The Message of the Bells, and | 27. Katy’s Resolution. By Jennie
other Stories. Perrett.
14. The Lily of the Valley, and 28. Watchman Halfdan, and his
other Stories. . Little Granddaughter. By
15. Tony the Tramp; or, Good for Mrs. George G!adstone.
Nothing. By Mary E. Ropes. 29. In Golden London; or, Raised
16. Made Clear at Last; or, The from the Dead. By Mary E.
Story of a Ten-Pound Note. Ropes.
By Mary E. Ropes, Author | 30. Sprats Alive Oh! By Harriette
of “Tony the T'ramp,”’ etc. E. Burch, Author of ‘¢ Wind
17. Chrissy’s Glad News; or, A and Wave fulfilling His
Little Child shall lead them. Word,”’ etc.









HEAP BOOKS

. School Rewards, etc.
Re ic
Threepenny Reward Books.

A Series of mo. Books for the Young. With Covers printed,
back and front, in Colours, on silver ground. Each book in clear type,
with a Frontispiece Engraving.









1 Phil Harvey’s Fortune. 13 Trixie and Her Cousin.
2 His Little Hetty. 14 Kitty’s Concertina.
3 Jock the Shrimper. 15 In Father’s Place.




4 My Master’s Business. [Found | 16 Hilda and Her Pet.
5 How Charlie was Lost and | 17 The Way to Win.








6 Bessie Morton’s Legacy. 18 The Story of Nika.

7 Johan’s Christmas Eve. 19 Addie’s Children.

8 Johnny’s Dream. 20 How Tom Gained the Victory.
9 Old Bagnall’s Ricks. 21 Gaspard’s Promise.
10 Widow Martin's Son. 22 Lucy of the Hall.
11 The Soldier's Legacy. 23 The Oatcake Man.
12 The Flat Iron. 24 Squat and his Friends.





Twopenny Reward Books.
Each containing 48 pages of clearly printed Letter-press, in simple
language for Children. With numerous Engravings, and in attractive
coloured Covers. 2d. each.









1 Children’s Stories. 13 The Round Robin.
2 Little Stories. 14 Elsie in the Snow.
3 Pretty Stories. 15 Mabel’s Mistake.
4 Pretty Stories. 16 The Jackdaw’s Christmas Tree
5 A Mother’s Stories. 17 Angel Rosie.
6 A Sister’s Stories. 48 Faithful Andrew.
7 A Friend’s Stories. 19 Tim's Little Garden.
8 Pleasant Stories. 20 Between Sickle and Scythe.
9 Simple Stories. 21 Freddie’s New Home.
10 True Stories. 22 Kit and his Violin.
11 Useful Stories. 23 Flip, Mish, and Another.
12 Farewell Stories. 24 Jenny Wren’s Mite.







Aunt Mary's Packet of 2 Aunt Mary's Pretty Pages
Picture Stories we for Little People.

Each Packet contains Twelve Books with Glazed Covers, in Gold. Full
of Pictures. Crown 8vo. 1s. the Packet.




New Penny Story-Books.

A New Series of Twelve attractively got-up Reward Books, each com~
yaerising 32 pages, with Cover in Colours, and Illustration. Is. the Packet
ay




wr


oe
-_- oS

12,

Pee
NOOR oo

tone
Son

21,

22,
23.
24.
25,
26
27.
28,
29,

32,

oo
=

1
2
3.
4
5
6
7
8
9.

IN iW

NINEPENNY

Johnny.
Tiger Jack. By Mrs. Prosser.

. Alice Benson’s Trials.
+ Charlie Scott ;

or, There's

Time Enough.

. The Peacock Butterfly.
. Where a Penny went to.
. The Young Folks of Hazel-

brook.

. Miss Grey’s Text; and How

it was Learned.
Basil; or, Honesty and In-
dustry.

- Ben Holt’s Good Name.

Lisa Baillie’s Journal.

« Northcliffe Boys.
. The Little Orange Sellers.
« Georgie’s Prayer.
. Saddie’s Service.
. Nils’ Revenge.

Tale of Swe-
dish Life.
Harry Blake’s Trouble.

- Cousin Jack’s Adventures.
- Hungering and Thirsting.

The China Cup; or, Ellen's
Trial.

How Tilly found a Friend. -
Charity’s Birthday Text.

The Rescue. '

Little Nellie’s Days in India.
The Young Hop-Pickers.
Motherless Bairns.

George Wayland.

The Cinnamon Island and its
Captives.

. Caleb Gaye’s Success.

Dark Days of December.

The Big House and the Little
House ; or, The Two Dreams.
Tim and his Friends, ,

Ned the Barge-boy. *.""

. Ragged Robin. By Mary E.

Ropes.



SERIES.

36.
387.
38,
39.

40.
41,
42.

*
a

50.

51,

53.

Coloured Frontispiece and Wood Engravings,
Attractively bound with Medallion on side.

+ Bessie Mason’s Victories.
- Dame Buckle and her Pet

The Gable House.

The Dangerous Guest. A
Story of 1745.~ By Frances
Browne.

Fruits of Bible Lands. By
Mary K. Martin.

May’s Cousin. By Acthor of
‘“Reuben Touchett’s Grand-
daughter. ’

Billy the Acorn Gatherer. By
Florence EK. Burch.

The Banished Family, and the
Bohemian Confessor.

The Golden Street; or, The
Fisherman’s Orphans. By
Sidney Grey.

. The First of the African Dia-

monds. By Frances Browne.
- The Royal Banner; or,
Dragged in the Dust. By

Emma §, Pratt.

Brave Archie. By Author of
‘Stories of Life in Italy,” etc.
There’s a_ Friend for Little
Children. ByCharlotteMason.
Michael the Young Miner.
A Hungarian Story.

Bob's ‘Trials and Tests. By
Mary E. Ropes.

. Tim Peglar's Secret ; or, The
Wonderful Egg. By Miss
Tandy.

Under the Snow. By the
Author of “Heroes” and

Famous Men of Old.”

The Lost Baby. A Story of
the Floods. By Emma Leslie,
Author of ‘Out of the Mouth
of the Lion,” etc.

Squirrel ; or, Back froma Far
Country. By Florence E.
Burch, Author of ‘How
Tilly found a Friend,” etc.
Rescued from the Burning
Ship ue


" AN ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE for”
Little Bovs and Girls.

OdR LIK DOS.
PENNY
MONTALY.

RRA nnn















nA



“Parents in search of a Mon-
thly Magazine for infants will
not find a better than ‘Our Little
Dots.’ ”—Lnglish Chive chman.

"Just what children will
like.”"—Church Sunday Schoot
Magazine, y

‘Good pictures and reading.”
Spectator. : :

“ Delightful.” —LEcclestastical
Tou siunees Fact aut w vatonerae me oe Gazette. :

“ A valuable little magazine, which is just the thing for the small folk
of the family—full of engravings, little tales in large type and small words,
the ‘ tee Dots’ could wish for nothing better.”—Somerset County.
Herald.

OUR LITTLE DOTS’
AITNUAI |
Lhe Yearly Volume of

‘Our Lari Dens.?

Full of Pretty Pictures and Little Stories
in Large Type. Is. 6d. attractive col-°
oured boards; 2s. neat cloth; 2s. 6d.
eae ome cloth gilt.















JUVENILE INSTRUCTOR.

especially noticeable for the editor's
sensible practice of giving children credit for
being able to understand something better than
mere jingles and childish things."—The Daily
News.



SS \ ' poetical pieces.” Bookseller. f

“As charming as ever.”—Zcclesiastical
Gazette.

“THE

CHUDS COMPANION

Juvenile Instructor Annual.

Contains a New Story in Twelve Chap-
ters. By Mrs. O. F. Walton, author of .
“‘Christie’s Old Organ,” ‘* A Peep Behind i
the Scenes,” etc. It is full of pretty Z
Pictures and interesting reading for young folks, with a
Coloured Frontispiece, 1s. .6d. attractive coloured boards :
2s. neat cloth; 2s. 6d. handsome cloth, full gilt.







LONDOX: KNIGHT, PRINTER, MIDDLE STRBET, ALDEKSCATE, E,C,

“A pretty little illustrated periodical, |

“A perfect treasury of interesting articles an 35
















































































































































Sa Captive.
SS Show your Colours.
True & False Friendship:
Always too Laté. Sara
School Pictures drawn from Life
Soldier Sam:- :
Stephen Grattan's Faith.
David the Scholar.

Tired-of Home. 3
Ao Setting out forHeaven.
———— aN The Staten Money. aay
—— Helens Stewardship.
Pat Riley's Friends.
Olive Crowhurst.
sa The White Feather.
Steenie Alloway Adventures.
Angels Christmas.
Cottage Life; its Lights@ Shadows
# The Raven's Feather.

Aunt Millys Diamonds & Our.
|. Cousin from India.’ 9
i My Ladys Prize & Effie's Letter.
j How the Golden Eagle was Caught
4 EmilysTroubleéwhat it taught her yg
TheAdopted Son. eet