Citation
Little Nellie's days in India

Material Information

Title:
Little Nellie's days in India
Creator:
E.E.C ( Author, Primary )
Knight ( Printer )
Religious Tract Society (Great Britain) ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Religious Tract Society
Manufacturer:
Knight
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
80, 16 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 17 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Uncles -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Birthdays -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Elephants -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Christmas -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Juvenile fiction -- India ( lcsh )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1890 ( rbprov )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1890 ( rbgenr )
Baldwin -- 1890 ( local )
Genre:
Prize books (Provenance) ( rbprov )
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.
General Note:
Frontispiece printed in colors.
General Note:
Date of publication from prize inscription.
Statement of Responsibility:
by E.E.C.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026618467 ( ALEPH )
ALG3524 ( NOTIS )
180702295 ( OCLC )

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The Baldwin Library

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The Young Folks Hazelbrook
Miss Greys Tex isle
Basil; or & Industry.
Ben Holys Good Name.

Lisa.Bal tes Journal.
Northcliffe Boys. ~~
Thalittle Orange Sellers.
Georgies Prayer. eer
‘Saddie's Sefvice. oy
Nils Revenge.

Harry Blakes Trouble.























Cousin Jack's Adventures. , SS SS
Hungering & Thirsting. SSS
The China Cup. >

How Tilly found a Friend,
Charity’s Birthday Text.

The Rescue. 17s
Little Nellies Daysi in India.























































































































































































































NELLIE STARTS FOR A RIDE.



—





THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY:

56, PATERNOSTER Row; 63, St. Paut’s CHURCHYARD;

164, Priccapiniy.



AND













CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION D i .
NELuIg’s First Day IN INDIA .
NELLIE’S HOME IN INDIA ; 5
NELLIE’S CHRISTMAS DAY IN INDIA
NELLIE’s DAY AMONG i ELEPHANTS
NELLIE AMONG NATIVE CHILDREN

NELLIE’S BIRTHDAY.IN THE HILLS

CONCLUSION ; 0 ‘

©

.

PAGE

50
59

78







ZL











LITTLE NELLIE’S DAYS IN INDIA.

0

fntroduction,
Grow and noiselessly fell the large

soft snowflakes, and slowly and noise-
lessly the tears dropped from Ethel’s eyes
as she watched them at the window,
growing every. moment more miserable.:
At last, grandmother, wondering what
made her little girl so quiet, looked up
from her work by the fire, and asked
_ kindly: “What is the matter with my
little one?”

Ethel gave a sob as she answered, with-
out turning her head: “Oh! granny, I am
so miserable, I do miss them all so.”

Granny got up with a sigh, and drew
the little girl to her, and cuddled her up
in a most comfortable way before the fire,



6 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

stroking her hair without speaking. For
what could she say ?

But who were “them all ?”

First and foremost, the best and most
perfect father ever little girl had; a father
who had gone away when she was a baby,
and then came back again, almost as long
ago as Ethel could remember ; and came
back the most delightful teacher, compa-
nion, playfellow, and inventor of all sorts
of glorious fun, all rolled into one—a father
who was never so happy as when his little.
girl was with him, even in all sorts of
amusements and expeditions that little
girls do not usually share in. A father with
nothing to do, for-the time being, and
always at liberty, and only too willing to
fall in with any of Ethel’s wishes and
fancies. A father better and cleverer than
twenty playfellows, for he was never cross,
never wished to be first in a game, and
knew how to make and do so many things.
A sort of fairy-tale father in fact, only he
was real and big and strong, and could
carry Ethel ever so far perched on his
shoulder.



Lntroduction. 7

Such was her father, and he was gone.
Can you wonder that Ethel missed him ?

But, much as Ethel missed father, and
when she was very near crying in thinking
about him, a comforting thought used’ to
come intoher mind. I will tell you what
it was. On the very last Sunday evening
that father had been with Ethel, he had
come up into her room, after she was in
bed. This was nothing unusual, he always
did that, and he and Ethel had a nice
little chat together after he had heard her
say her prayers.

But this Sunday evening, when father
came up, he did not speak for a long time,
but sat quite still, with his arm round his
little daughter, holding her as tight as if
he could never let her go, and Ethel felt
a large hot tear fall on her face. Then
she sprang up, and flinging her arms
round him cried: ‘Oh, father, I can’t let
you go away, I can’t spare you, I haven't
got another father!”

Then father spoke:

“ My darling,” said he, “there is but one
thing that can give you and me any com-



8 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

fort in this parting, and that is the thought
that you Zave another Father, a Father in
heaven, a better, wiser, more loving Father
than I can ever be. It is He who has
arranged this separation, which, though it
seems so hard, He sees is best for us, for
He doeth all things well. He can see all
our lives, past and future; and, if it pleases
Him, He will let us meet again. But,
dear Ethel, the first trouble you have ever
had will be for your good if it makes you
lift up your heart from your earthly father,
who is going from you, to the heavenly
Father who wants you to love Him more.
Think of this, my Ethel, every morning
and evening when you say ‘Our Father ;’
and when you miss me very much, think
of the Father who is always near you,
though you cannot see Him, and try to
love Him more, and Pe a dear obedient
child to Him.”

Then there was mother. Mother was
very quiet and gentle; and mother had
liked Ethel to be quiet too, and not like a
tom-boy. Oh! how Ethel wished now she
had minded her more! Mother was never



Lntroduction. 9

tired of reading stories aloud, or telling
charming ones out of her head, or singing
songs and playing the piano. Mother
made the prettiest doll’s clothes as sur-
prises, and often let Ethel do all sorts of
nice things in housekeeping or cooking to
help her. And then, if Ethel was not very
well, how loving mother would be!

Boys and girls who read this story, just
think of your own mothers, and you can
imagine what Ethel’s was like. She was
just “ mother,” and she was gone too.

Last, but not least, it was Nellie that
Ethel missed too. Nellie was Ethel’s little
sister, and they had always been together
ever since Nellie was born. The nursery,
the meals, the walks, did not seem the
same without her. There was no one to
play with, or to understand the games,. or
to care about the dolls and their clothes.
There was now, as Ethel put it, no one
“littler” than she in the house. Every
one seemed so old and quiet.

Ethel lay and cried in grandmother’s
lap, and told her all this between her sobs.
But grandmother knew it all before, and



Io Little Nellie’s Days in India.

missed them too herself. But then grand-
mother was very old, and had missed many
people before this (as people have to do
when they get old), but this was Ethel’s
first miss.

“You see, granny,” Ethel went on,
growing a little calmer, “I’ve seen the sea,
and I’ve seen big ships. Yes, I’ve even
been in one, when we went to Ireland to
see Uncle John. So I can understand all
about the journey, and the funny little
cabins with little round windows, that are
screwed tight and close when there’s a
storm. I know the little tray sort of a
bed—berth, don’t you call it ?—that they
have to sleep in; and I know that when it
blows, and the ship rolls at dinner, that all
the plates and dishes are fixed in frames, so
that they don’t upset into your lap. They
call the frames ‘fiddles,’ father said. Not
very musical fiddles, are they ? And when
you've done drinking, you must not put
your glass on the table by your side, but
into a frame hanging over the table from
the ceiling, or the glass would upset
too. What very uncomfortable dinners



Lutroduction. Il

they must have when it is rough, dear
granny.” io

“Indeed they must,” said granny; “if
they are able to eat them. I have heard
that sometimes, when the waiters—‘ stew-
ards, they call them—are coming along
from the kitchen with great dishes of meat
and gravy, the ship will give a sudden
lurch, and down will go waiters, dishes,
and meat, all on to the floor together. Isn't
that a catastrophe, Ethel ?”

“But it doesn’t always blow, though,
grannie. Father said, when it was fine
and bright and sunny, they spread a large
awning over the deck ; and mother would
sit-in her long chair, and father would walk
about, and Nellie play on the deck with
her toys, as she would at home.”

“Yes, and perhaps she'll see black por-
poises following the ship, splashing along,
their shiny heads and tails peeping out of
the water.”

_ “Qh, granny, do youthinkso? I should
like to be there when she sees them.”

“Then I think father will take Nellie
for walks about the ship, and show her the



12 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

pens where the sheep are kept, and the
poultry, ready to be killed and eaten; and
the cow in her stall who gives Nellie milk.
Perhaps he will take her downstairs to the
engine-room, where the great engines are
always at work, night and day, making
the good ship go on; and the big furnaces,
larger than any cook’s kitchen fire, never
go out, but are always burning, to keep the
engines going. It is very hot, and smells
oily down there; and I do not think they
will stay long, as the poor stokers are
obliged to do, who keep the fires up, and
the engines going. Nellie will be glad to
get up onto the breezy deck again, and
watch the sailors with their bare feet
running up the ropes like cats, to spread
the white sails to the wind.”

“And, granny, what about Sundays?
There are no churches in the sea.”

“They will have service on deck, if it is
fine, with the great sea spreading all round
for a church, and the prayers and hymns
mounting up to the blue sky above. God
can hear prayer on sea as well as on land,
and, as we read in the Bible, needs not



Introduction. 13

a ‘temple made with hands’ for us to
worship Him in aright. He will hear our
prayers in the church at home here, and
their prayers on the sea, if they are offered
faithfully in the name of Jesus Christ. He
heard Jonah’s prayer when he was swallowed
by the whale; He heard Daniel in the lions’
den; He heard St. Paul in the storm at
sea; and our blessed Lord prayed to His
Father on lonely mountain-tops. I am
almost sure they will sing the hymn for .
those at sea which we sang last Sunday,
thinking of them, ‘Eternal’ Father, strong
to save.’”

“Oh! yes, granny, I am sure they wiil.
Mother is so fond of that hymn, she will
ask the clergyman to have it. I hope
Nellie will be good at the service. It is
such a treat for her to go. Do you think
she will gq to church in India, granny ?
You see, it is India I want to know about.
I can understand all about the journey
there; but when they get there they will
seem lost, quite lost. I shall not know
what the place is like, or what they-do all
day, and you cannot tell because you have



T4 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

never been there. Oh! granny, it’s dread-
ful not to know about it!” and Ethel hid
her face in grandmother's shoulder, and
began to cry again.

Grandmother was very ereled and
thought for.some time what she could say
or do to comfort her little lonely girl) At
last a plan came into grandmother's wise
old head. This was it.

The very next time the day came round
for writing to mother, she wrote to them
of this talk she and Ethel had had, and of
Ethel’s trouble in not knowing all about
India, and what Nellie was doing. She
asked mother now and then to write a
special account to Ethel of one of Nellie’s
days in India, and how she spent it. Ethel
had grandmother’s letter read out, and was
delighted with the plan, and waited eagerly
till the answer should come. It seemed
such a long time coming. Several Sundays
came and went after grandmother's letter
had gone, and still Ethel did not know
what Nellie was doing, and she seemed
more lost to her than ever. ;

But grandmother told her she must be



Nellie’s First. Day in India. 15

patient ; that she knew mother would never
fail to do as she wished, though it seemed
a long time to wait. So Ethel waited, and
one day the postman brought her a very
thick fat letter, directed to her own self, in
mother’s dear handwriting. With a shout
of delight, Ethel rushed with it to grand-
mother, and settled herself comfortably on
her knee to have the letter read out to her.
And this was the letter.

Ss egretre

Hellie’s First Bay in India,



Wou may fancy, mother wrote, how glad
Nellie was to leave the ship where

she had been shut up so long, and to see
grass and trees and houses once more.
She, and father and mother and all the
boxes, got into a boat which came up to
the side of the ship. - The boat was rowed
by such funny sailors, Ethel, as unlike the
Beachborough sailors as can be. They
all had dark-brown skins, and dirty cloths



16 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

twisted round their heads for caps, and
only dirty cotton jackets and short trousers,
and they wore no shoes or_ stockings.
Some had bangles on their arms, like
mother’s. They shouted and made such a
noise, that poor little Nellie was quite
frightened, for she could not understand
one word they said. But father took her
up, and lifted her into the boat, and held
her tight on his knee.

When we landed we got into a sort of
four-wheeled cab, with no glass, only
shutters in the windows, and harnessed
with two ponies no bigger than Fairy who
pulls the mowing-machine at home. Small
as they were, they started off at full gallop
when the driver got on to his box and
shouted at them, and soon brought Nellie
along the narrow streets, crowded with dark-
brown people, to the hotel where she was
to dine and sleep.

At dinner all the black men-servants
had on clean white calico petticoats and
long coats to match, and turbans wound
round their heads. ‘They rustled as they
walked about. It was a large room; and



Nellie’s First Day in India. 7

Nellie had never had dinner with so many
people before, and could hardly eat for
staring.

Upstairs the housemaids were wrapped
up, head and all, in red muslin, and carried
the hot-water jugs balanced on their heads.
Do you think grandmother's Jane could do
that up and down stairs? But one of the
things that most astonished Nellie was
that none of the servants at dinner or any-
where in the house wore any shoes or
stockings.

When bed-time came she was quite
tired out with wonderment, and~ could
hardly wonder any more, when she saw
her little bed was closed tight round with
white net curtains, “to keep out the
musquitos,” mother told her. Musquitos
are little black gnats that creep in any-
where and sting, and would dearly have
enjoyed a feast on fat little Nellie. But
mother drew the curtain aside very quickly,
and popped her into bed, and ee her
up carefully all round.

So Nellie, without any fear of musquitos,
came to the end of her first day in India.

c



18

fiellie’s Home in tndia,

——

Nee had a long way to travel, mother
wrote, after she left the ship, before
she got to her new home. Fancy, Ethel,
she was two days and two nights in the
train. No undressing, no baths, only lying
down to sleep on the long wide seats of
the railway carriage (which made a capital
bed even for father), and only getting out
for a few minutes at stations to eat meals.
Out of the carriage windows there was
very little to see but sun and glare and
dust; sometimes forests or fields, and
villages of mud huts, sometimes broad,
shallow, sleepy rivers, large white towns,
with many tall spires and round domes.
At night, a moon, almost as bright as day,
and a refreshing coolness. Nellie got very
weary with the heat and long journey, and
was too tired to take any notice when she
arrived.

When she awoke next morning, she was



Nellie’s Home in India. 19

in a little crib by mother’s side, with mus-
quito curtains all round her. The room
was very large and very high, higher than
- any bedroom she had ever slept in before.
There were so many doors, and no windows,
except two small ones high up in the roof.
Two glass doors were wide open, and led
into a thatched verandah, beyond which
Nellie could see the bright sunny garden.
On every other side of the room was a
door leading into a room beyond. These
doors were all open, and a curtain hung in
the doorway.

Nellie immediately wanted to get up and
see more strange new things, so mother
called her new nurse, the ayah, to dress
her. She was very black, and came along
touching her forehead with her hands, by
way of a curtsey to mother. She had no
cap or apron, but a great white sheet
covered all her head and body, except her
face.. Of course, by this time Nellie did
not even expect to see any shoes or stock-
ings on her feet. She seemed very kind
and gentle, though Nellie understood very
little of what she said. She called Nellie



20 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

“Missee Baba;” and Nellie was not the
least afraid of her, as you fancied she might
be. In fact, father says something about
Nellie getting as spoilt here as some one
else is by their granny at home; for I con-
stantly find Nellie seated like a little queen
in the middle of the nursery floor, with the
ayah and several of the other servants who
ought to have nothing at all to do with
her, squatted round and playing with her.

But that first morning, however, as
Nellie was getting up, a thing happened
that astonished her very much. When
she was dressed, she wanted to kneel down
at the ayah’s knee, and say her prayers, as
she used to do at nurse’s knee at home.
So mother had to explain to her that the
poor black ayah was a heathen, and knew
nothing of the loving Saviour who came
down from heaven and died to save her
and all sinners from their sins, and who
cares for us in heaven now. Mother told
Nellie that the poor ayah worshipped false
gods and idols, and said prayers to them,
though they could not possibly hear or
answer her.



Nellie’s Home in India. 21

Nellie was very much shocked, and quite
sad. It seemed so strange to her that
any one should not know and love the
good God who had watched over her all
the long journey over the sea, and brought
her safe to her Indian home. J am sure
you will think it very sad too, that we are
living among heathen people, who are
quite without hope of another life, and
know nothing of a home above for those
who love God here.

Tam writing this when Nellie has been
some time settled in her new home; and I
am sitting out in the wide verandah, and
Nellie is playing near me. Hearing I am
writing to “tissie,” she comes up and begs
me to tell you about all sorts of things.
So I will tell you to-day about her pets.
They are such an important feature in her
new home, and J can see so many round
me as | write.

To begin with, four green parrots, with
red or purple heads and breasts, hang from
the roof of the verandah, three fastened to
rings, and the fourth in a little cage. A
dreadful screeching they make all day long.



22, Little Nellie’s Days in India.

But I must tell you of an odd thing that
happened to the parrot in the cage. It
always seemed to get through its food
much faster than any of the others, and
still always to be hungry. But one day
father, watching from the drawing-room,
found out the reason. A large rat used to
get in between the bars of the cage directly
the food had been placed there, and nibble
it all up before poor Polly could get any.
So father got ready his gun, and the next
time the thieving rat appeared, he shot
him dead from the drawing-room, just as
he was getting into the cage, without hurt-
ing the parrot perched above.

Two wicker cages of doves, which I am
very fond of—for their cooing reminds me
of those we had at home—hang also in
the verandah. And two tall white paddy-
birds, a kind of stork, stand solemnly on
one of their long legs, in a space railed off
for them at one end. A little brown
monkey is chained to a tree near, and is
quite tame with father and me. But
monkeys rarely take to children; and this
one likes to hide behind the tree, and to



Nellie’s Home in India. 23

spring out and try to scratch Nellie when
she walks past. So he can hardly be
called one of her pets.

A pet you would like has its little hut
under another shady tree near by. It is
a beautiful spotted brown deer, with velvet
horns and large soft dark eyes. I think
it is rather a shame to keep it tied up here,
it would be so much happier bounding
away in the plains. But perhaps it might
be shot by the hunters on their shooting
expeditions.

In a large cage in the drawiag-room is
a collection of sweet little birds of different
colours and shapes, different from any you
have ever seen. Some are like robins, but
have white breasts instead of red. Some
are little green love-birds, and sit all in a
row along the perch, closely huddled to-
gether. ‘But the odd thing is that though
they are so pretty to look at, they can none
of them sing like our English birds, which
have not such bright colours. They only
chirp and twitter like sparrows. In fact,
Ethel, mother misses the English songsters
very much; she would gladly exchange



24 > Little Nellie’s Days in India.

the gay parrots that dart about among the
trees, and the tiny blue humming-birds
that dive into the beautiful bell-shaped
flowers for honey, for some plain brown
thrushes and blackbirds.

A little saucy bird, with a crest on his
head, is strutting along the path in front of
me now, but he can only say, “ Hippoo,
hippoo!” A large black koel has flown
on to a tree near, and I shall have to call
to one of the gardeners to drive him away,
for he has such a dreadful call of three
notes, gradually rising higher and higher
into a screech, that he is called the “ brain-
fever bird!” Indeed, he is sometimes
enough to drive one into a brain fever, for
he screeches by night as well as by day.
Moreover, his coming announces that the
hot weather is near.

There are crows of all sorts,—black,
white, and brown,—always cawing around ;
they are very greedy and impudent crows.
One pounced down on a dish of meat
which was being carried from the kitchen
to the dining-room (for here the kitchen is
away from the house), and flew off with a



Nelhe’s Home in India. # 25

piece of the dinner before the servant could
stop it.

One of Nellie’s prettiest pets was a tiny
“cherub owl,’ so called because his big
eyes looked out of his round feathery head
like a cherub’s face in a picture looks out
of his wings. The servants took him out
of his nest when he was quite small, and
brought him as a present to Nellie, who
was delighted with him. He was hung in
a cage in the verandah. But the poor
little thing was too small to feed himself,
and we got quite anxious about him, till
we discovered the loving mother owl had
found out where her little one had got to,
and in the night, when all was dark and
quiet, used to bring him little tit-bits in her
beak, and feed him through the bars.

Then father had some pets of his own,
and what do you think they were? They
were baby wolves. In India there are
many wolves, not so fierce as those that
live in the forests of Russia and Norway ;
but still they do so much mischief that the
Government is anxious to have them killed.
So a reward is offered, as the Saxon King



26 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

Edgar did hundreds of years ago in
England, to whoever brings in a wolf’s
head or young wolves.

As father was returning home one day
he met a peasant coming in from the
country with some baby wolves he had
found, to claim the reward for them. So
father gave him some money, and, to mother
and Nellie’s great surprise, brought the
wolves home. When the basket was opened
they were found to be like the ugliest little
puppies you ever saw, with little round
black heads, and a horrid snarl on their
tiny faces when they showed their teeth.
Father bought a baby’s feeding-bottle, and
tried to get them to suck milk out of it;
but it was of no use, and they soon died.
Mother thinks, however, had they lived,
three wolves playing about the garden
would have been rather awkward pets !

That reminds me of a story I heard the
other day about wild animals as pets, which
I will tell you now. A gentleman in India
had a beautiful spotted leopard, which he
had reared irom a baby, as iather tried to
rear the wolves. It was quite tame, and



Nellie’s Home in India. . 27

walked about the house and garden like a
large cat. But its wild instincts were in it
still; and one day its master, watching it
out of the window, to his horror, saw it
noiselessly and stealthily stalking a poor
little brown baby, belonging to one of the
servants. The leopard dragged itself along



THE LEOPARD,

the ground, as you have seen a cat stalking
a bird, getting gradually nearer and nearer
the unconscious child, and would finally
have made a spring upon it and choked
it, had not the master, seeing what a dan-
gerous pet it had become, quickly took
down a gun and shot it.



28 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

One evening, lately, father and I were
strolling out in the moonlight after dinner,
to hear the band playing up in barracks,
when suddenly out of the ditch close to
me started an animal, which looked, and
yet did not look, like a large sort of sheep
dog. At once I sprang round to the other
side of father, exclaiming, “Oh! look at
that, it is not a pariah dog!” Pariah dogs
are the half-wild dogs, with no owners, who
are always wandering about. The animal
turned its head towards us, with an ugly ©
grin on its face, slunk across the road and
disappeared in a drain, and we knew it was
a wolf.

To turn to pleasanter subjects. Nellie’s
greatest pet and most constant companion
I have left to the last. It is her pony
Midge. It is only two feet high, and
father can cross his legs over it and stand.
When we had visitors to dinner the other
day, Midge came in with the dessert and
exhibited his tricks. He jumped over the
sofa, clearing it very nicely. Nellie leads
him about alone.

Father was out shooting one day in the



Nellie’s Home in India. 29

country, when a native boy came out of a
village, mounted on this pony. Thinking
it the smallest pony he had ever seen,
father bought it. Midge is a very slow
walker, but can canter quite fast. Every
morning before breakfast Nellie goes out
for a ride on him, before the sun grows
hot. She rides on a chair-saddle, and wears
that funny white pith hat, with the large
crown and broad brim, you saw me buy
for her.

Like every one of the other horses,
Midge has his groom all to himself; but
as he is so small he shares a grass-cutter
with another pony. These grass-cutters
go out every morning into the country, and
cut a bundle of grass for their horse. The
name of Midge’s groom is Mohun. He
walks by Nellie’s side as she rides, and
already they are great friends, and chatter ©
Hindostanee together. Mohun wears rust-
ling white petticoats and a white turban.
A funny sort of livery, is it not ?

This has been a long letter, and I must
finish it when I have mentioned the dogs.
Ethel well knows father would not be



30 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

happy without plenty of dogs about him.
They are all English dogs. Two white .
fox-terriers—Jim and Harry, a Scotch
deerhound, named Oscar, after the one at
home, and a pair of brown and white
spaniels, whose puppy, just like one of
those white woolly toy dogs, is Nellie’s
special playfellow. Then last, but not
least, the greyhound Legacy. She is a
beautiful, ladylike creature, with a finely-
shaped body and soft tan-coloured coat.
She is very swift in hunting jackals and
foxes, but quiet and well-behaved in the
house. Only she will lie on the sofa, not
flat, but with her silky head on the pillow,
like a child. Then at meals, too, she has
a most insinuating way of thrusting her
nose, in mute appeal for food, under your
arm, as you are eating.

One day, when it was getting very hot,
father noticed that there was always a wet
splash round his bath in the bath-room.
He called the attention of the servant to
it. This man (who is called a dheestie,
though he only does the cleanest of work,
carrying water for drinking and baths, from



Nellie’s Home in India. 31

the well in his mussock, or goatskin bag)
assured father that he always left the bath-
room quite dry. So the splash remained
a mystery, till Legacy was discovered
sitting calmly up to her chin in father’s
bath, cooling herself. It was she who
splashed the floor getting out.

Like all other smooth-coated dogs out
here, Legacy feels the sudden chill in the
evening, when the sun goes down. She
wears a little coat, like a horsecloth, with
father’s monogram in the corner. If she
is anywhere with us, not far from home,
when the time for wrapping-up comes,
Legacy will run home of her own accord,
and get her special attendant to put it on
for her, and be back again almost before
we have missed her. -When it gets very
hot, we shall have to send Legacy away to
the cool hills, or she will get ill down here
on the plains.



32

ellie’s Christmas Bay in tdia,



VERY, very happy Christmas, my
darling Ethel, though it is spent so

far away from us, and so different to the
one we are spending. Our Christmas Day
is as bright and warm as your August
birthday generally is, though here we call
it the cold weather. But wherever we
keep it, if we keep it aright, Christmas Day
is the same to all, and especially to the
children. For it is the children’s festival,
above all others. The small ones who
cannot understand much about God and
the story of Jesus, coming down from His
throne in heaven, to be a weak little help-
less baby, born in a stable, that He might
teach sinners what God would have them
do, and at last die a painful death on the
cross to save us from the punishment of
our sins, even the little ones who can hardly
understand all this, know what keeping

birthdays mean; and what is Christmas ©





Nellie’s Christmas Day in India. 33
Day but the birthday of that Holy Child

who came on earth at first as a child to
be “ Our childhood’s pattern ?”

We have no holly and not many suitable
evergreens here, and you would laugh over
the decorations the servants have put up:
yellow marigolds, hung by their stalks
from pieces of string stretched across the
archways of the verandah and the gate.
But the church is beautifully decorated
with ferns, great scarlet pointsettias, and
other summer plants.

After breakfast, Nellie came and sat
with us in the verandah to watch the
servants present us with dollies.

“Dollies!” I hear you exclaim; “what
can father and mother want with dollies ?”

But, Ethel, they are not such dollies as
you mean; but trays full of fruits and
vegetables, cakes and sweetmeats, which
. each servant brings as an offering to his
_. master, and receives a present of money in
return. Very pretty these trays look, as
one after another of the white-robed
servants lay them at our feet, making a
“salaam,” that is, bowing, and touching

D



34 Little Nellie’s Days in India,

their forehead with their two hands.
Many of the fruits you would not know
even by name; but there are oranges and
apples amongst them, and the piles of
pretty coloured sweets would make your
mouth water. Unfortunately, they are not
often as good as they look; for though
natives are particularly fond of sweets, they
‘are not the sort we fancy. However,
Nellie particularly wishes me to tell you
that the different sorts of toffee are delicious.

She went to church on Christmas Day,
you will be glad to hear, and behaved very
well. Though the church is not far off she
drove there with father and mother, for in
India one hardly ever walks, it is so hot,
and the roads are so sandy and dusty.
The church itself is very different from
any you have ever seen: it is very lofty,
and with small windows quite high up, and
a deep verandah all round outside. There
is no tower, and there are no bells.

In all India there are only a few churches
which have a peal of bells, and very sweet
and home-like they sound when one hears
them. Usually a bar of iron is hung up |





Nellie’s Christmas Day in India, 35

outside the church, and a native strikes
it with a hammer for ten minutes before
church. The same plan is adopted at the
. railway stations when the trains arrive and
start. Inside the church great fans made
of white linen, called “punkahs,” are hung
on long boards, and pulled during the service
by natives seated outside in the verandah.
Sometimes even the clergyman has one
waving over his head in the pulpit.

The church was crowded with English
soldiers in gay uniforms. They marched
in, making such a clatter with their spurs
and swords, and each man had his rifle,
which he stood up against the seat before
him. In India, though all is peaceable and
quiet now, we can never forget that we
are in a conquered country, and only a few
English among, masses of heathen natives.

Of course all this was so utterly different
from anything Nellie had ever seen in
church before, that you can fancy how she
sat and stared and wondered. There was
no organ, but the regimental band of
various instruments led the singing. The
service alone remained unaltered. The



36 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

same psalms and some of the same hymns
were sung as you sang in the dear old
church at home, and the same prayers went
up to the same Father in heaven.

We heard the same story read out of the
Bible, of the shepherds who, keeping watch
over their flock by night, heard the bright
angels telling their Christmas message
of the Babe born that day at Bethlehem,
who was to save the people from their sins.
Many thoughts wandered back to other
Christmas Days when we had heard that
story read in familiar churches, now so far
away; and from many of us rose a prayer
for the poor heathen al! around us, that
these glad tidings might be made known
to them also.

After service Nellie was very disap-
pointed at not having a penny to put into
the bag, as she used to do at home. Indian
money is so heavy, chiefly great silver
pieces, bigger than half-crowns, that no
one thinks of carrying it about in purses.
In church, therefore, they hand you little
cards, on which you write how much you
wish to give, and put them into the bag.





Nellie’s Christmas Day tn India. 37

Then next day they send the card round
to your house, and you give the money.
The service over, Nellie stood with us
under the great portico, waiting for the
carriage, and everyone was shaking hands
with everybody else, and wishing each
other “A Merry Christmas.” But what a
mockery that sounds in India, when most
people’s hearts are far away on Christmas
Day! The soldiers filed out of church,
and formed up in front, and marched away
to their barracks, with the band playing at
their head. Father then invited Nellie to
drive up there with him in the dogcart,
and see the men eat their Christmas dinners.
You may imagine how happily she drove
off by father’s side. But she felt rather
shy in the large hall full of soldiers and
gentlemen, and only brightened up when
one of the soldiers got up and proposed
that they should drink father’s health,
which they did with three such cheers
and shouting as nearly deafened Nellie.
Then they drank mother’s health with
three more cheers, and then a soldier got
up and said: “ Now one more, and a lone



38 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

low one for the baby!” Nellie quite un-
derstood it was for her; and when father
hoisted her up on his shoulder, she forgot
her shyness and smiled at them.

Of course, Nellie’s own Christmas dinner
at home was the same as always. But the
-cook added out of his own head a rich and
monstrous cake, in honour of the white
people’s “big day,” as the natives call it.
Poor things! it is little of a big day to
them. Its sweet message of peace on
earth, good will to men, has no meaning
for the Mohammedan, the followers of
a false prophet, who commanded them to
spread his religion by fire and sword; or
for the Hindoos, -who worship idols of
pieces of black stone, and imaginary false
gods, whom they make out to be as blood-
thirsty and revengeful as wicked men.



39

fellie’s Hay among the Blephants,

—

LONG-PROMISED treat was Nellie’s visit
4a to the elephants at home. Often in
her morning and evening rides (you must
remember she never goes out for a walk)



ELEPHANT AND HIS DRIVER,

she had met a long procession of elephants
coming in from the country, carrying small
haystacks of dried grass on their backs for
the soldiers’ horses.



40 Little Nellie’s Days ia Indta.

At first she was quite afraid of them,
they towered so high above her; but when
. her groom assured her. that they were
almost all very obedient to the men who
rode on their necks, and guided them,
Nellie became quite interested, and
wanted to see more of them. So in the
cool of the evening she drove down with
father and mother to a very large sort of
farmyard, where all the elephants, camels,
and oxen, used to carry about the soldiers’
tents and baggage, are kept.

The elephants were all arranged in rows
in one part, each chained to a very strong
iron ring fixed in the ground, each with his
bed of dry grass in front of him, and his
huge saddle, or howdah, lying by his side.
They do not need any stables. They are
all used to the hot Indian sun, and do not
mind the rain, when there is any, on their
thick skins. Being evening, they had all
finished their day’s work, and were munch-
ing away at their supper of dried hay.

"You have seen the elephants at the
Zoological Gardens, Ethel, and you know
how cleverly they take the ginger-nuts out



Neltie’s Day among the Elephants. 41

of your hand with their trunks, and drop
them into their capacious mouths. They
all had names, and the largest, called Lady
Canning, after the wife of one of the
Queen’s former governors of India, was
twelve feet high. Ask grandmother how
high that is against the wall of the house
at home.

The man who had charge of this immense
farmyard, and all its varied inhabitants,
had some strange stories to tell about the
elephants. He showed Nellie one who
was anything but tame, being at that time
in such a bad humour that he was chained
by all his four legs to the strongest tree in
the yard, which was shaking with his efforts
to free himself. None dared go near him
except his own special rider and attendant,
whom heknew. Anyone else who ventured
within range of his trunk he would have
seized and trampled on.

There were two or three other “ bobbery”
or naughty elephants in the yard. The
man told us one was so afraid of horses
that when he got loose, as occasionally
happened, they could only catch him by



42 Little Nellie’s Days tn India.

mounting horses and surrounding him,
when he became so very frightened that
he was quite docile. Another elephant
was afraid of camels in the same way. As
a rule, though, horses do not like elephants ;
and when we meet a string of them in our
evening drive, we sometimes have to pull
up and soothe the frightened horses.

Nellie next went round to the camels,
with their great horny knees, They were
not very difficult to feed; for when they
cannot get anything else, they are quite
content with a meal of dry leaves.

Camels are not so strong as elephants.
They carry their loads hung in nets on
each side of their humps. When father
goes away for a few days’ shooting, a camel
carries his tent, furniture, cooking utensils,
provisions, guns, and clothes, and trots
along at a great rate. However, they are
not pleasant to ride, for their long swinging
trot is very rough. Sometimes we meet
them drawing some natives in a camel
carriage, which is very much like a
large open carrier's van, with very high
shafts. Camels are rather vicious things. —



Nellie’s Day among the Elephants. 43

They can bite with their broad teeth in
their black mouths. They kneel down to
be loaded; and when they are overloaded,
and cannot or will not rise, they give most
dismal brays, and sometimes roll and: kick
the whole pack off their backs.

The oxen, who were in another part of
the yard, are used to draw carts and carry
loads, as horses are in England. Some are
fawn-coloured, like English Alderney cows,
but much larger, and with humps on their
backs. When they are killed for food, these
humps of beef are thought a great delicacy.
Others are very ugly, quite black, with
stupid-looking heads, and horns slanting flat
back. These are called “mud buffaloes,”
because they are so fond of lying up to
their noses in the dirtiest ponds they can
find. ;

We have a pair of the nicer light-
coloured oxen in the garden, who every
evening draw the water up from the well
in buckets, which are emptied into a little
stream, which flows in many channels all
over the garden, flooding each flower-bed.
It rains so little in India, that, if we did



44 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

not have this grand watering every evening,
nothing would grow in the garden. Nellie .
is very fond of watching the oxen at work,
and the little stream filling the beds.

So you see oxen are very useful in India,
in many ways besides being good for food.
They are very slow walkers, though, for
drawing carts; and, I am sorry to say,
some of the natives are often very cruel in
driving them. They goad them with a
sharp piece of iron, and even twist their
tails to make them get on, when all else
fails.

While I am telling you about animals, J
must mention a ride on an elephant Nellie
had the other day; it was so different from
the little turns you and she had on one
once, up and down the gravel paths at the
Zoo. She drove down with father and
mother to the native city, which is some
way from where we and all the English
people live. We drove to the gate at the
entrance, a pretty arch painted in bright
colours.

_ Here we stopped, for the carriage could
go no farther, and we mounted an elephant































NATIVE WAGGON.



46 Little Nellie’s Days in India,

which was waiting for us, by means of a
ladder. There were two seats arranged
on his back, like the seats on the top of
an omnibus, back to back. Elephants
walk very slowly and solemnly ; and as we
passed under the gate and into the city
we had plenty of time to look about us.
It was such a narrow street we did not
wonder the carriage could not drive through
it. The people with whom it was crowded
had to stand up against the houses to let
the elephant pass.

The houses were very low and very
small. The front of each was the shop,
quite a small stall. raised a little above the
street, and quite open to it. There were
sweetmeat shops and shoe shops, and all
kinds of beautiful shops full of gold and
silver work. At one of them father and I
got down. There was only just room for
us; and the two shopmen were sitting
cross-legged on mats, smoking long pipes,
called “‘hubble-bubbles,” the stands of which
were placed on the floor. As they drew the
smoke through the pipe with their mouths,
it made a funny bubbling sound, from



Nellie’s Day among the Elephants. 47

whence comes the curious name. A crowd
of natives collected in front in the street to
watch us, and from the roof of the opposite
house several very tame brown monkeys
sat and stared at us too.

Monkeys wander about these native
towns as freely as do the ownerless dogs.
The natives consider them sacred, and
feed them : indeed, one of their gods is a
monkey god. Just outside the town is a
grove of trees which quite swarms with
brown monkeys, little and big, jumping from
branch to branch, or running about the
road beneath. One of Nellie’s favourite
drives is round by the monkey grove, and
she is never tired of watching their antics.

But I must go on telling you about the
town. From the elephant’s back we could
look right on to the roofs of the houses,
where the people spread their mats to
sleep in the hot weather, cook, dry their
clothes, and do many things. We passed
heathen temples with their tall spires, from
the tops of which priests were calling the
people to prayer. There were no carriages
in the streets, and not many horses or



48 _ Little Nellie’s Days in India.

donkeys. The richer people were carried
about in palanquins, a sort of box on poles,
borne on the shoulders of four men. The
occupant lay at full length inside, getting in
through the side, which pushed back.

Nellie and I got down at one of the
houses, to pay a visit to the lady who lived
there. We passed through a court-yard,
which hada white marble tank and fountain
in it, to the hall, which was exceedingly
dirty, though the lady was very grand.
There were several smart chandeliers and
mirrors, but the floor was never scrubbed,
and there was very little furniture.

Natives in India sit and eat on mats on
the ground, and their beds are only small
wooden frames with very little bedding.
You recollect, Ethel, the story of our Lord
curing the man with the palsy, how He
said to him, “ Take up thy bed, and walk.”
If you could see these little bedsteads, or
“charpoys,” as they are called, you would
understand how easily it can be done in
Eastern countries, where the beds are so
different from our heavy English ones.

The lady received us sitting on a mat on



Wellie’s Day among the Elephants. 49

the ground. She wore some fine jewels,
but her clothes were an odd mixture of
finery and dirt. They were chiefly dirty
white muslin and red cotton. She was
very pleased with Nellie. She had never
seen such a white golden-haired little thing
before. All native children are brown.
She patted Nellie’s arms and hands; but
Nellie was. rather frightened at her, for all
the time she was talking she was chewing
betel nut, which the natives are fond of.
It smelt very strong, and made her teeth
quite black. This lady and her relatives,
who lived with her, are being taught by
kind lady-missionaries the knowledge of
the true God, and how to read. For even
these grand native ladies are very badly
educated; their lives are dull, they have
very little to do. They are not allowed to
walk and drive about, to see and be seen ;
they are always shut up in their houses.
But no sooner do they hear about Jesus
than they are anxious to learn to read, that
they may themselves read more about Him
in the Bible.

Before we left, the lady begged me to

E



50 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

sing something; and so, Nellie. chiming in,
I sang “God save the Queen,” and told
her all about our Queen, who is also
Empress of India.

Helle among Wative Children,

**T thank the goodness and the grace
Which on my birth have smiled,
And made me in these Christian days
A happy English child.”

Be: you know the hymn, part of
s+ which I have just repeated. Well,
Nellie has learnt it too; and in order to
make her realise it thoroughly I have been
showing her a little of the life of native
children in India; and in this letter J will
tell you about it, and about what Nellie
saw, that you may realise it, and be
thankful too.

I have already told you that women are
not thought much of in India. So little do
they think of girl children, that, a little



Nellie among Native Children.: 5t

while ago, a native gentleman said to father,
“Oh, lam so unhappy, I have no children,
only four girls!”

Before the English conquered India, or
ruled it as wisely as they do now, a dreadful
practice of killing almost all the girl babies,
as soon as they were born, was so much
the fashion, that in some villages hardly
any girls could be found. Of course that
has now been put a stop to, and villages
where the girls are not found in proportion
to the boys have to pay a heavy fine.

As I said before, women and girls are
very little thought of, and are in quite a
different position to English women. They
are hardly taught at all. They are kept
shut up in their own houses when they are
grown up, and not allowed to see any men
but their own nearest relatives. They
drive out in closely-shut carriages or palan-
quins. When it is necessary for them to
travel by railway, they are carried on to the
platform in a closed palanquin, the carriage
door opened, and a curtain held up on
either side while they step in, lest any one
should catch a glimpse of them. The



52 TarleNelio’s Days in India.

railway carriages set apart for native
women have no glass windows, only close
shutters. At home they have no amuse-
ments, and very few occupations; hardly
any of them can read, or write, or work.
Their lives are very dull indeed.

Some kind English ladies get together
in a school as many girls as their parents
will allow to come. They try, first of
all, to teach them, by God’s help, to know
and love the Saviour, and then instruct
them in things that will make them faithful
servants of God, and help them to lead
useful and happy lives when they grow
up. And who knows, Ethel, but that many
of these children, having learnt in the
school about the power and love of Jesus,
may become the means of spreading the
blessed light of the Gospel in the dark
heathen homes from whence they come.

I took Nellie down to this school one
day. It was held ina large, cool, vaulted
hall, formerly part of an old palace. Texts
and maps and pictures were arranged
round. It was full of little girls between
three and eleven, for after about that age



Nellie among Native Children, 53

they are shut up for the rest of their lives.
Some were brown and ugly; others had
round roguish faces and black bead-like
eyes. Some were neat, others untidy and
unkempt. Some wore only long cotton
trousers, and a strip of muslin wound many
times round their bodies; others wore
ordinary petticoats and bodies.

The school opened with their repeating
the Lord’s Prayer, but of course in their
own language. Then they sang a hymn.
Nellie knew the tune well, though she could
not understand the words till they were
interpreted for her. It was your old
favourite :

‘There is a happy land, far, far away ;”
and very sweetly they sang it, and Nellie
joined in, in English. For black children
and white, who love the Saviour, are all
alike His children, and journeying on
together to that happy land.

The hymn finished, they did various
marching and clapping exercises, like the
children in the infant schools in England,
and then we looked over their copy-books,
and asked them questions on various



54 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

subjects. They were especially quick over
geography, naming the various mountains,
countries, and boundaries of each continent,
and pointing out the way we had come
from England in the ship. We were quite
surprised to find how much more advanced
they were than children of the same age
would have been in the village school
at home.

The needlework Nellie could understand,
and it interested her most. Some of the
elder ones were knitting socks, and doing
elaborate pieces of wool-work from painted
patterns. Even one tiny brown mite, no
older than Nellie, in a pink cotton frock
down to her heels, was doing wool-work,
counting her stitches, and crossing them
all the right way.

But these: happy-cared-for little girls
were only some of a few picked out of
millions of untaught, benighted heathen,
whose lives, though happily now always
spared, are still so dull and sad. When I
tell you avout Nellie’s little friend Sackina,
I think you will be still more thankful you
are not a little Indian girl.



Nellie cmong Natwe Children. 55

Sackina is the ayah’s little daughter,
twelve years old. She is always in and
out of the nursery, playing with Nellie.
She is dressed like her mother, in long red
cotton trousers, and a white sheet wound
round her and over her head. She leads
a happy idle life, playing about the grounds
with the other servants’ children; going
with her mother when Nellie rides, or
roaming about where she likes, and has
never any lessons to do.

But one day her mother came to me,
and told me she had arranged a marriage
for Sackina with the son of a rich peasant,
in a village some miles off. A few nights
after, the wedding took place, by our per-
mission, in the grounds. Natives think a.
great deal of weddings, and are very
extravagant over them, and the ayah
borrowed of us several months’ wages to
spend on the festivities.

We walked out after dinner in the moon-
light to see what was going on, and found
an awning had been put up near the
stables, which was lit by torches. Under-
neath the awning sat the bridegroom on a



56 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

mat. He was a full-grown man much
older than Sackina, and was dressed in red
muslin. Groups of friends and relatives
stood about, and some hired dancing-girls,
dressed in gay muslins, and with jingling
bangles on their ankles and wrists, per-
formed strange wriggling dances before
them.

“ But where is the bride ?” we inquired.
“Why does not she put in an appearance ?”

But mother was informed that this was
not at all the custom at native weddings.
She was shown the poor little frightened
bride closely covered up in what had once
been some muslin curtains of mother’s, and
hidden away in a dark corner of the hut.
In England it is chiefly the bride that
people look at at weddings ; here it appears
to be the bridegroom. The dancing and
music, which consisted of a most monoto-
nous beating of drums, called ‘“tomtoms,”
was kept up all night. Early in the
morning, poor Sackina was carried off in
a closed “dhoolie” or palanquin, to spend
a week amongst her husband’s relatives,
who were entirely strange to her. Then



Nellie among Native Children. 57

she returned to her mother, and was soon
again the little dirty-brown Sackina, dis-
robed of all her finery, playing about the
grounds. In a few years, when she was
older, she would go away for good to her
mud hut, and never be allowed outside
the yard again. How she would miss the
garden, and trees, and pleasant roads,
where she had walked with her mother and
Nellie, and the sights of English ladies
and gentlemen, soldiers, and carriages!
What a dull future she has before her!
Don’t you pity her, Ethel ?

Before I close this letter, ] must tell
you of a great treat Nellie had the other
day, which she called, “a sight of fairy
land.” It was a great festival of the
Mohammedans, and we drove down to the.
city quite late one evening, when Nellie
ought to have been in bed, to see one of
their finest temples, which contains the
tomb of one of their saints, lit up in honour
of the occasion. We could see the temple
afar off, looking like white marble, and
decorated with thousands of tiny oil lamps,
set on every ledge and wall, turret and



58 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

archway. The road up was also decorated
with them, and was like an avenue of
light.

Passing through an archway outlined in
lamps, we came into a large court-yard,
with a pond of water in the middle. The
stone parapet of the pond was lit up; and
in the middle was a gigantic wooden horse,
also lit up. Then up a broad flight of
steps to the temple, with its archways and
towers and spires. Inside, the light was
perfectly dazzling. The floor was paved
with marble; and over the tomb, in the
centre of the hall, hung brilliant glass
chandeliers of many colours. It was a
warm still night; and Nellie was perfectly
delighted, and begged me to tell you about
it, as the nearest sight of fairy land she
has ever had. It only wanted the fairies
to make it perfect ; and I think Nellie half
expected them to be hopping about the
marble floor or dancing on the water.

SORE Ra



59

flellie’s Birthday in the Hills,

_—_

aes is Nellie’s birthday, mother wrote,
-). and I hope you have not forgotten it,
but have prayed, as father and I have done,
that as God has graciously spared Nellie
to live to be a year older, she may also
have grown in grace and: goodness, and
more like one of His children; and that
every succeeding birthday may find her
more fitted to live with Him in heaven,
when her life is ended.

Nellie is spending her birthday in such
a different way from what she ever spent it
before. Mother is writing at the, door of
a little tent pitched in a pleasant green,
wooded valley, far up among the great
Himalaya Mountains. These snow mon-
sters of different shapes and sizes rise all
round the valley, like a white wall. Mother
is never tired of watching them from the
door of the tent, at sunrise and sunset, lit



60 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

up a rosy red, fading away to a delicate
pink, and then to a cold pearly grey.

Our little encampment is pitched on a
grassy knoll, overlooking a torrent from









AMONG THE HIMALAYAS,

which we get water. There is father’s and
mother’s square tent, with a little awning
in front, where the table is generally put
for meals. Then there is a round tent



Nellie’s Birthday in the Hills. 61

where Nellie and the ayah sleep, and
a cooking-tent where the servants live.
Everything is carried on men’s backs, as
there are no roads, only steep mountain
paths. Therefore all the tents and fur-
niture fold up. The saucepans pack one
inside the other; and the spit is only a
rod of iron, which the cook uses as a
walking-stick as he trudges along. For
cooking, he makes a fire of wood on the
ground; and for an oven a hole in the
ground, with a stone over it, lighting a fire
in the hole. It is quite surprising what
nice dinners he sends up.

Of course, all the dogs are with us. Jim
and Harry, the fox-terriers, sleep under my
bed, and very good watch-dogs they make.
We start very early in the morning, as
soon as it is light enough to see the path.
The cuckoo’s voice sounds across the valley
from the dark mountain-side opposite. The
tents are taken down, and everything
packed. Father marches on ahead with
his gun. Mother follows in her “ dhoolie,”
hoisted on men’s shoulders. Then comes
Nellie in a sort of crib with no legs, and



62 Little Nelltie’s Days in India.

slung on a pole which two men carry.
There is a waterproof cover and curtains,
on four posts. In this conveyance she
travels by day and sleeps at night.
The servants on foot,-and the hill men
carrying the loads, bring up the rear of the
procession.

It is a gipsy sort of life, wandering thus
from place to place, pitching our tents
wherever we fancy. Nellie revels in it,
and so would you. For the first time
since I have been away from you in India,
my darling, mother has wished to have
you with her. Itis no hotter than in the
summer at home, except in the very middle
of the day, when the sun has a good deal
of power.

We go on and on towards the snow
mountains, which look so near morning
and evening, but are still so far off I fear
we shall have to turn back before we ac-
tually get to the snow. We go on and on,
over mountains and through valleys and
forests, where I am pretty sure no fair-
haired English child has been before. How
the natives in the villages stare at her !



























































DHOOLIE TRAVELLING,



64 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

Sometimes the way lies through forests
of rhododendrons, like those planted in
gardens at home; but here they are tall
trees, covered with red or white blossoms,
which strew the path below. The hill-sides
are covered with the most beautiful sorts of
ferns, such as only grow in hot-houses at
home; with the silver, gold, and parsley
fern. Butterflies, gayer and larger than
any Nellie has ever seen before, hover
about the flowers. Flocks of little green
parrots fly through the trees. Sometimes,
as we pass under a tree, a tree-cricket on a
branch makes a noise like the whirl of a
policeman’s rattle, and quite wonderful for
such a small insect.

Now and then we come across troops of
large grey monkeys, called “bungoors.”
They have white hair and beards, like old
men.

Nellie is rather afraid of them, and not
without reason, for they have been known
to pelt travellers passing underneath their
trees with stones.

Father has had bad sport when shooting
ever since we encamped in the valley



Nellie’s Birthday in the Hills. 65

where I am writing from. This morning
we found out the reason of it. A pack of
wild dogs, real wild dogs, not the pariah
dogs I spoke of in towns, have been hunting
all the game on their own account.
Yesterday they drove a deer right into the
middle of the camp. It was very early in
the morning, and father was hurriedly
aroused. He went out, and shot the deer
and one of the wild dogs, the pursuer and
the pursued. So now we have some
venison to eat.

It is not an easy thing to get meat.
When we come to a village, we buy a
sheep, and any poultry they may have ; but
we have great difficulty in getting milk for
Nellie. Long ago we came to the end of
the bread and potatoes we started with;
and instead of bread we eat “chappatties,”
like the natives. They are a sort of dough
flat cake, very good if cut open and eaten
hot with butter. They are made by being
patted flat between the hands.

Father shot the most horrid-looking
animal [ have ever seen. He saw its long

tail moving in a bush, and thought it was.
F



66 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

a large snake. He shot at and killed it,
and found it to be a gigantic lizard about
five feet long, with a horny skin, and its
mouth full of teeth. None of the natives
who are with us have ever seen the like,
- so I cannot tell you its name. Fancy, if
it had crawled into the tent at night!

This tent life, Ethel, reminds me very
much of the accounts we read in the Old
Testament of the patriarchs’ daily life.
_ We can understand how Abraham sat at
the tent door in the heat of the day, and
how the Israelites journeyed with their
tents and flocks and herds. There is so
much in Eastern life now not at all altered
from what we read in the Bible, that I
think we understand the Bible better.
For instance, the man with the palsy
taking up his bed and walking, which
I mentioned before.

On our way to this valley from which
I am writing, we passed a tea-garden;
that is, a hill-side covered with low green
tea shrubs. Perhaps, Ethel, as you drink
your tea every morning and evening, it
will remind you of us, if I describe to you



Nellie’s Birthday in the Hills. 67

how we saw it made. The fresh green
leaves when first gathered look very
different from what we usually call tea-
leaves. But they were carried into an
outhouse, and laid out to dry in baskets,
Then they were cooked in a great iron
pot over a wood fire, when they shrivelled
up and became black. Then they were
rolled and kneaded by natives with their
hands or bare feet. After that they were
cooked again and again. Then the sifting
took place in baskets; and the finer the
siftings are the better tea it is. Finally,
it is packed in the square lead-lined boxes
with gay pictures you have seen in the
shops, and so carried on ponies’ backs
down to the railroad in the plains, and so
on perhaps to you in England.

And now; Ethel, after reading this
account of our gipsy life, you will perhaps
ask grandmother whatever made father
and mother and Nellie leave their own
pleasant home, and the pets, and the
garden, and wander about the mountains
in tents ?

Well, Ethel, it was just this.



68 Little Nellie’s Days tn India.

The hot weather came on in the place
where we were living, which is in one of
the great plains of Northern India. The
summer is very hot indeed, hotter than in
many places where the winter is not so
cool. I do not really know if I can make
you or even grandmother understand what
the hot weather really is like. Of course
it comes on gradually.

Many of the trees after flowering
suddenly lose their leaves, as they do in
the autumn at home. All the English
flowers in the garden droop and die with
the increasing heat. The violets, which we
rear so carefully in pots, are put away into
a dark, cool outhouse. The peasants come
in from the country to hire themselves out
as punkah-pullers. Punkahs were rigged
up in every room; over the dining-table,
and over each bed, so low that they
brushed your head if you sat up.

I described to you before what punkahs
are. Long boards, prettily painted, hang
from the ceiling across the room, with a
curtain of white calico attached, to make
still more wind as they swing. They are



Nellie’s Birthday in the Hills, 69

pulled outside in the verandah by a rope
passing through the wall. The lamps
have special shades, to prevent their being
blown out by the draught; and the dinner
is served on hot-water plates, to prevent its
getting quite cold. The punkah-pullers
have a monotonous life, swing, swing,
swing, all through the long hours, day and
night. Sometimes they go to sleep, and
then they have to be shouted at and roused,
for one cannot bear to be a minute without
the fanning of the punkah.:

A great machine, called a thermantidote,
was placed in the verandah, for pumping
cool air into the house. Nellie’s favourite
play place was just in front of the funnel
where the cool blast blows in. Besides
the heat of the sun, growing more powerful
every day, hot winds like the blast of a
furnace began to blow. Clever contrivances
called “ tatties,” mats of thick grass closely
woven together, were placed in all the
door-ways on the windward side of the
house. A native in the verandah keeps
each well soaked with water, so that the
wind blew cool through them.



70 Little Nellie’s Days in India,

Father and all the soldiers left off their
cloth uniforms, and went about like millers,
all in white calico suits. Mother wore as
few and as thin clothes as she could, and
indeed was generally to be seen all day
indoors in a white dressing-gown. Nellie
played about in very little besides a
pinafore. No one, unless obliged, ventured
out between eight in the morning and five
or six in the evening. The soldiers were
not allowed out of their barracks. No
carriages were to be seen along the
deserted dusty drives. One by one the
English families shut up their houses, and
went off to the mountains. The Church
Service was held at six in the morning;
and punkahs, “ tatties,” and thermantidotes
were in full swing there also, The Sunday-
school was held at five o’clock; but most
of the soldiers’ children had been sent away
to the hills too. A generous officer, who
was once colonel of a regiment out here,
has had nice barracks built in a beautiful
village in the hills, on purpose for soldiers’
families.

The house was always closely shut,



Nellte’s Birthday in the Hills. 71

except for two or three hours in the very
middle of the night. It was as hot after
dinner, when we sat out in the dark in the
garden, as it had been in the day. Nellie
tossed in her bed under the punkah all
night. She had no mattress or blankets.
She lay on a piece of Chinese matting,
with a sheet over her. No need for
musquito curtains now, the insects cannot
live near the draught of the punkah.
About four o'clock, while it was still
dark, father was aroused and went off to
morning parade. Nellie went for her ride,
and mother sat under a tree in the garden,
drinking her morning tea in the grey
twilight, with a native fanning her all the
while with a gigantic fan made of a palm
leaf, four feet across. But the fiery sun
_ gets up, and rises higher and higher; and
about seven drove us indoors again to the
' darkened house, to try to sleep away the
hours, for it is too dark and too hot to
read or work much. We used to eat
quantities of large juicy mangoes or water
melons, but no one has much appetite in
the hot weather. In the evening we



72 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

ventured out for a drive, but the hot blast
scorched our throats, and drove us home
again, ;

Occasionally a dust-storm came on, and
that cooled the air for a time. Very
suddenly the sky opposite to the quarter
the wind was blowing from grew black
and lurid. The birds flew before the
storm, and got into refuge.

Every door and window was closed, or
the furniture would have been smothered
with dust. Any one out of doors took
shelter. With a howl the storm broke,
and with a pelting as of rain, but of dust,
as it whirled over the house. If one was
overtaken on the road, riding or driving,
the horses stood still and cowered. It was -
impossible to see two yards before one. It
was thicker than a London fog, and more
unpleasant, for one could hardly open one’s
eyes or breathe. Sometimes it lasted for
an hour.

This weary hot season lasted for many
weeks, Ethel; and then, after one or two
days, came the welcome rain. It came
in deluges, flooding the parched country,



Nellie’s Birthday in the Hills. 73

filling the deep drains on each side of the
road, which looked so useless all the rest
of the year. The river rose suddenly,
and overflowed its banks. All the doors
and windows were opened in the long
shut-up houses. Tatties and punkahs
were done away with; for though still
very hot, it was a moist heat. The trees
burst forth with new foliage; the grass
and flowers and shrubs almost grew before
your eyes. Hedges grew up tall and green
where a fortnight ago there had been only
a row of dry sticks. Creepers climbed
about thé house and trees, and all kinds of
strange bright tropical flowers bloomed.
Once more we had fresh vegetables, and
this was a great treat.

Now was the grand time of the frogs
and toads. Long green frogs lived in
every puddle, and jumped out in yard-long
leaps when disturbed. To Nellie’s horror,
toads infested any quiet corner in the
house. They hopped about from under
the beds or wardrobes, and even from
under the dinner-table as we sat. Their
croaking from undisturbed nooks frightened



74. Little Nellie’s Days in India.

Nellie in the night. They were such
monsters too, and hopped along so fast.
I have a stuffed one I hope to show you
some day, He is eight inches long! It
was impossible to keep them out, for the
house was open day and night. Nellie
slept with only a curtain between her and
the road, and all the windows were open
down to the ground. - I have even known
an adventurous toad climb up to the top of
the curtain, and drop down with a flop into
the room. Father found one in the pocket
of a great-coat which had long been hung
up. At church, where Nellie now went
regularly, though still at very early hours,
the toads, hopping about the steps and
squatting in rows along the walls, sorely
distracted her attention, and she was afraid
to kneel lest they should crawl from under
the seat.

I think Nellie disliked the rainy season
more than the hot weather. And, 1 am
sorry to say, she now began to droop, like
the little English flower that she is, and
grew whiter and more languid every day.
There is a plot in the cemetery full of the



Nethe’s Birthday in the Hills. 75

small graves of other little English flowers,
who have drooped and died away from
their native air; and mother could not bear
to see Nellie thus.

So one evening we started off by the
train, oh! so thankful to get away. We
had a long hot night and day in the train,
and then where the railway stopped we
took a carriage. It was something like a
small bathing machine, only there were
doors on each side which pushed back.
There were no windows. Inside a mattress
was spread, and father and mother and
Nellie laid themselves down to sleep as
best they could through the jolting and
rumbling. On the roof was piled the
luggage, and the servants sat cross-legged.
Two little ponies were harnessed in, and
after much shouting and whipping and
pushing the wheels, they were induced to
start off at a gallop, the top-heavy con-
veyance swaying from side to side. Every
five miles the ponies were changed, and
every time the same process of getting
them to start had to be repeated. All night
long we went on in the dark, through a



76 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

wild, uncultivated, swampy country. Once
we came toariver. There was no bridge,
and the banks were overflowed. The
driver missed the ford, and the wheels
stuck fast in the sand in the very middle
of the stream. In vain the ponies tugged,
the carriage only lurched to one side, and
mother was afraid it would topple over
into the water. At last, no less than four
yoke of oxen were fetched, and all struggling
and straining together got us safely out,
and we continued our journey.

Tired out, we fell asleep; and when the
driver's horn, which is always sounded as
we approach the place where the ponies
are changed, roused us, it was no longer
bright yellow moonlight, but early dawn.
We put our heads out of the doorway, and
our delighted eyes, so long used to the
endless plains, saw the great Himalayas,
rising black and mysterious before us.
Suddenly the long flat road came to an
end, at their very foot. The carriage
could go no farther. We mounted into
‘“dhoolies,” which were waiting, and were
carried gradually up the mountain paths,



Netlie’s Birthday in the Hills. Po)

the clear morning air growing cooler and
more bracing every moment. Birds twit-
tered, the cuckoos called, and torrents and
waterfalls gushed. It was a refreshing
change. The hill sides covered with trees,
the ferns, the grass, and the undergrowth
all looked delightfully fresh and green
to our eyes, so long wearied with the dusty
parched plains, which lay shimmering
below us in the haze of heat,





78

Conclusion,

—

Teron some time after Ethel had received
laf this last letter, mother did not
write specially to her. But grandmother
looked grave over the letters she received;
and when Ethel inquired the reason, she
was told that Nellie was not picking up in
the mountain air as they had hoped she
would. Each letter brought no better
account, and Ethel was quite beginning
to despair of ever getting one of her own
again. At last, one mail day, having ran
up to grandmother with the letter, and
being again disappointed, she exclaimed :
“Grandmother, I don’t believe mother
ever means to write me another letter. I
suppose she is too taken up with Nellie!” |
Grandmother, who had been hastily
reading the letter, looked up with a happy
smile, and answered:
“ Indeed, Ethel, she sends you a message
that she does indeed never mean to do so!”



Conclusion. 79

“Oh, granny!” was all Ethel could say,
with a blank face,

“Yes, indeed, my child; she is going to
do something much better than writing.
She hopes to send you herself and Nellie
by the next ship after the one which
brought this letter. The doctor has sud-
denly decided that Nellie must not stay
out in India any longer, and mother will
bring her home herself. So, please God,
we may see them both now in a week
or two!”

I leave you now, children, to imagine
Ethel’s joy, and the happy meeting that
followed; and with what happiness and
gratitude in her heart Ethel that night
said her prayers to her Father in heaven,
who had watched over her loved ones, and
spared them and brought them safe back
to her once more.

You can fancy, also, the long talks the
two little sisters had together, the messages
from father, and the presents, so strange
and beautiful, he had sent Ethel. He
hoped to follow mother and Nellie home
before the little girls were many years





80 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

older. In the meantime they jingled
about the house in their silver bangles;
and many a long talk and game did they
have over Nellie’s days in India, which
had now come to an end.





LONDON: KNIGHT, PRINTER, MIDDLE STREET, E.C.





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circle, can roam, guided by such a book, at the will of fancy, through sunny glades, by babbling

streams, or over the breezy moorlands.”—7'imes,

Map and 122

With a

Illustrations, engraved by E. Wuympeer, R. Taytor,

Drawn with Pen and

With a glance at Sweden and the Gotha Canal.
8s. cloth boards, gilt edges ;

M.A.
rming books on Norway that has

appeared for a long time,”— Academy.





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Canadian Pictures. Drawn with

Pen and Pencil, By the MAnguis oF
Lorne. With numerous fine engravings
by E. Whymper, from Sketches by the







and others,
. bound in



Marquis of Lorne,Sydney Hall

$s. extra cloth boards gilt; or 2
morocco elegant,

“ Most inte ing—an extremely pleasant

book.” —Saturday Reriew.





Australian Pictures. Drawn with
Penand Pencil. By Howarb WILLOUGIBY,
of the * Melbourne Argus.” With a large

Map and Ulustratious from Photographs

and Sketches. engraved by E. Whymper

and others. |

eloth, gilt edg:
ey 7



1 8vo. §s., handsome
4s. morocco elegant.

1, vivid, and life-like.
re written by a man who belongs ta the
and the people. The book, therefore,
fitring memoris! to totrists of what
they have scen, and will at the same time be in-
structive to untravelled people.’-A ustralasian.




p








Dy

Indian Pictures. Drawn with Pen
and Pencil. By the Rev. Winuiam Ur-
wick, M.A. Profusely Hlustrated. 8s., in
handsome e¢loth gilt 3. Morocco.

in all their e

Pictures’ (whieh now has in
siderable part of the world). has not given to.
the public a better ated or more interesting
volume than this.''—Spectator.









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Sea Pictures. By Dr. MACAULAY,
i Editor of the Leisure Hour, &, Contain-
i ing the Sea in Poetry, Physical Geography
of the Sea, the Sea in History, and the
Harvest of the Sea, in handsome cloth :
or in morocco elegant.
Mr. Ruskin say: “This beautiful book is
i by far the best Ihave ever seen on thesubject.
and will be a sost precious gift-book for me.”

‘ :

“Those Holy Fields.” Palestine
Illustrated by’ Pen and Pencil. By the
late Rev, SAMUEL Manninc. LL.D. With
numerous Engravings. 8s., handsome cloth
gilt ; 248. morocco.

Pictures from Bible Lands.
Drawn with Pen and Pencil, Edited by
the Rey. $. G, Green, DD. The Engra-
vings by Edward Whymper and others,
8s., handsome cloth gilt ; 25s, morocco,

New Edition. Just Published,

| The Land of the Pharaohs,

Egypt and Sinai. Dlustrated by Pen and







QP















By the late Rev. Samurt MAn-
LL.D. With numerous fine En-



gravings Ss, handsome cloth gilt ; or 24s.
in morocco.

Swiss Pictures. Drawn with Pen
and Pencil. By Samven Mannine, LL.D.
With numerous Illustrations, §s,, hand
some cloth gilt ; 25s, morocco,

eee LL Ee ELICIOUS I pson Socery Townan,







ILLUSTRATED GIFT-BOOKS.

Her
Life
and

Reign.
e a »

By Dr, Macautay, Author of “Sea Pictures,’ ‘‘ Luther Anecdotes,” ‘Gordon

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by Edward Whymper and others, .
“The author's endeavour has been to rec:

With Five Portraits of the Queen, and Sixty Engravings

Small Quarto. 10s, 6d., cloth, gilt edges.

all those qualities in the personal character of

the Queen and the incidents in her life‘which have most endeared her to her people.”—

Illustrated London News,

“It is a beautifully printed and very prettily illustrated volume, and is admirable in tone

and feeling.” —Athenwum,

“A very acceptable gift-book.”--Stamsford Mercury.



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The Harvest of a Quiet
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Busy Lives. By the Rev. J. R.
Vernon, M.A. With numerous En-
gravings. New Edition. 6s. 6d.
cloth, gilt edges,

“Tnever saw anything more gracefully or
more rightly done—more harmoniously
leasant in text and illustration.” — Hr.
uskin.

Ingleside and Wayside
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“The Harvest of a Quiet Eye.”
6s. cloth gilt.

Random Truths in Common
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Vernon, M.A,, author of ‘‘ The
Harvest of a Quiet Eye.” Illustra-
tions, 7s. cloth gilt.

“ Tt seems even -better than ‘The Harvest
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The Life of Jesus Christ the
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many fine Engravings. 5s. cloth.

“‘ Foryoung people to read, orto helpateacher
in lighting up a narrative of the one perfect life,
and interesting young people in all its parts and
details, we have seen no better volume of the
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Dr, Stoughton’s Reformation Books.

The Spanish Reformers,
their Memoriesand Dwelling Places.
By Dr. Sroveuron. Finely Illus-
trated. 8s. handsome cloth gilt,

‘‘ A most interesting and instructive volume.’
Spectator, $
Footprints of Italian Re-

Â¥YORMERS. By Dr.Sroventon. Finely
Illustrated. 8s. handsome cloth gilt.

‘A very charming and useful gift-book.”—
Congregationalist.

Homes and Haunts of
Luruer. By Dr. SroveHTon.
Finely Illustrated. 8s. handsome



cloth, gilt edges.

rr Tn cc ee



6]
A USEFUL SET FOR PRESENTATION

To a Minister or Sunday School Teacher.

LT ESSN

S


















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Bu-faths of Bible Rnotuledge.

“The volumes which the Tract Society is issuing under the above title fully
deserve success. ‘They have been entrusted to scholars who have a special
acquaintance with the subjects about which they severally treat.”— The Atheneum,

1. Cleopatra’s Needle. By the Rev. J. Kine, Lecturer for the

Palestine Exploration Fund. With Illustrations. 2s. 6d.

2. Fresh Light from the Ancient Monuments. By A. H.
Saycr, L1.p., Deputy Professor of Comparative Philology, Oxford, etc.
With Facsimiles from Photographs. 3s.

8. Recent Discoveries on the Temple Hill at Jerusalem.
By the Rev. J. Kine, m.a., Lecturer for the Palestine Exploration Fund.
With Maps, Plans, and Illustrations. 2s. 6d.

4. Babylonian Life and History. By E.A. Wauuis BupGE,
u.A., Cambridge, Assistant in the Department of Oriental Antiquities,
British Museum. 3s.

5. Galilee in the Time of Christ. By Srtan MERRILL, D.D.,
Author of “ Kast of the Jordan.” With a Map. 2s. 6d.

6. Egypt and Syria. Their Physical Features in Relation
to Bible History. By Sir J. W. Dawsoy, r.c.s., ¥.2.s. With many Illustra-
tions. 3s.

7. Assyria: Its Princes, Priests, and People. By A, H.

SAYcs, M.A., LL.D. Tllustrated. 3s.

8. The Dwellers on the Nile. Chapters on the Life, Literature,
History, and Customs of Ancient Egypt. By E. A. Wats Bupa, .a., of
the British Museum. Illustrated. 3s.

9. The Diseases of the Bible. By Sir J. Rispon Brnnert,
M.D., F.R.S., Ex-President of the Royal College of Physicians. 2s. 6d.

10. Trees and Plants of the Bible. By W. H. Grosmr, B.Sc.
Illustrated. Crown 8vo. 3s. cloth.

11. Animals of the Bible. By H. Cuicnester Hart, B.A,

Neturalist to Sir G. Nares’ Arctic Lxpedition and Professor Hull’s Palestine
Expedition. Illustrated. Crown 8vo. 3s.

; Tux, Bewicions ‘Tp p- Soc Ts Loxponx



HANDSOME GIFT-BOOKS

FE

Poung Men and Maidens.

Girl’s Own Indoor Book.
Edited by Cuarrnes Prrers.
528 pages, 84 X 63, With over one
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cloth, gilt edges.

Containing practical helps to Girls
in all matters relating to their
material comfort and moral well-
being. By the Author of “How to
be Happy though Married,” Dora
de Blaquiere. Dora Hope, Marie
Karger, lady Macfarren, Lady
Lindsay, Ernst Pauer, Sir John
Stainer, the Hon. Victoria Gros-
venor, Jobn C, Staples, Canon
Fleming, “‘ Medicus,” Ruth Lamb,
Sophia Caulfeild, and many others.





Indoor Games and Recrea-
yions. A popular Encyclopedia
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Hurcuison. Including chapters by
3. N,. Masxetyne, Lient.- Col.
CuTHeLt, Dr. Gorpon STaBLEs,
R.N., Rev, A. N. Matan, 31a.,
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8s. cloth boards, gilt edges, A
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The Handy Natural His-
rory. By the Rev. J. G. Woop,
author of ‘Homes without
Hands,” ete.,etc. 368 pages, 8 X 64
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boards, gilt edges.

*« A delightful book, and will make
a very handsome and enviable
high-class prize or present.’—--
School Board Chronicle.

A handsome volume, in which the
author, a well-known naturalist,
tells his readers.in simple, un-
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nature of birds, beasts, and rep-
tiles, Mr, Wood’s style is excel-
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Tue Reuiaious Tract Society, Lo

“











8 |
THE SUNFLOWERS SERIES

OF STORIES FOR ALL READERS.
‘ This is a Series of Books intended for adults eaian: t
ers of young people, as well as readers of older rowth, give uw: h i
time to fiction. This Series supplies books which wot only tioreat a eoaraen
Stories that afford studies of character and descriptions of events and scenes likely
to rivet the attention, but which also stimulate the serious thought, and develop
the better nature of those into whose hands they fall. ;

The Manse of Glen Clunie. By
Eouanron Tuornx, author of “The Ola
Worcester Jug,” “The Two Crowns,”’
etc. Illustrated by CHaruxs WuymMrer,
Crown 8vo. 3s. Gd. cloth.

Two Enthusiasts. By E.
Evrrert Green. Illustrated by
Epwarp Wuymprer, Crown 8vo, 5s.
cloth boards.

Barbara’s Brothers. By E,
Everrerr Green, Author of ‘ Lenore
Annandale’s Story,’? ‘* Joint Guardians,”?
ete. Illustrated by R. and E. Tayuonr.
Crown 8vo, 4s, cloth boards.

Joint Guardians. By E.
Evererr GREEN. Illustrated. 5s. cloth.

Joyce Graham’s History ; or,
Overcoming Evil with Good. By H. A.
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Another King. By Janer EpEN.
Illustrated by EF, Wuymprr. Crown 8vo.
38s. 6d. cloth.

The Head of the House. A Story of Victory over Passion and
Pride, By E. E. Grexn. Ilustrated. Crown 8yo, 5s.

Ida Nicolari. By Eetanron Torys. Illustrated. Crown 8vo. 3s. 6d.

The Old Manuscript ; or, Anaise Robineau’s History. A Tale
of the Huguenots of La Vendée. By BLANcHE M. Moceripex. Illustrated
by E. Wuymprer. Crown 8vo. 5s. cloth.

Young Sir Richard. By H.
Freperick Caaruzs. Illustrated. Crown
8vo... 5s. cloth, :

Maddalena, the Waldensian
Maipen anp HER Peopur. Translated by
Juniz Surrer. Illustrated. Crown 8yo.
3s. 6d. cloth.

Turning Points; or, Two Years
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Illustrated. Crown 8vo, 3s. 6d. cloth,

Reaping the Whirlwind. A Story
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8s. 6d. cloth,

One Day at a Time. By BLANCHE
E.M.Grens. Illustrated by E. Wayrmpzr.
Crown 8vo. 3s. 6d. cloth,

The Mistress of Lydgate
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By Evetyn FE. Green. Crown 8vo. ds.

The Two Crowns. By Eananron
Tuorne. With Illustrations. Crown 8vo.
8s. 6d. cloth, J

Lenore Annandale’s Story. By Evetyn E. Green. With
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Carola. By HesBa STRETTON. With Illustrations. Crown 8vo. 3s. 6d.

Sunflowers. Crown 8vo. 3s. 6d. cloth.

Tue Revicious Tracr Socrery, Lonpon.



hanchildren. Large num-







ILLUSTRATED ANNUALS:

ee: PRESENTATION.
EZ Che Leisure Bour.

Annual Volume ‘or 1888.

“ Behold in these what leisure hours demand Arnuse-
ment and true knowledge hand in hand."

Tux VoLUME ror 1888 of this Monthly Maga-
zine fur Family and General Reading contains 856
Imperial 8vo, pages (11 X 73) of interesting reading,
with numerous Illustrations by Eminent Artists.
It forms a handsome Book for Presentation,
and an appropriate and instructive volume for
a School or College Prize. Price 7s. in cloth
boards ; 8s. 6d. extra boards, gilt edges; 10s. 6d.
half-bound in calf.








Al Ae Sais
The Sunday at Bome.
Annual Volume for 1888.

AN ILLUSTRATED FAMILY MAGAZINE FOR
SABBATH READING.

Tuis Votume ror 1888 forms a very suitable
Book for Presentation. It contains 828 pages,
Imperial 8vo (11 X 73), with a great variety of
Interesting and Instructive Sabbath 'Reading for
every Member of the Family. It is profusely
illustrated by Coloured and Wood Engravines,
Price 7s. cloth boards; 8s. 6d. extra boards, °
gilt edges; 10s, 6d. half-bound in calf,

ae ND Niu. @

Che Giel’s Own Annual.

The Ninth Volume of “ The Girl’s Own Paper,”
—containing 848 Demy 4to (11 X 8) pages of
interesting and useful reading. Stories by popu-
lar writers; Music by eminent composers ; Prac-
tical Papers for Young Housekeepers; Medical
Papers by a well-known practitioner; Needle-
work, plain and fancy; Helpful Papers for
Christian Girls; Papers on Reasonable and Sea-
sonable Dress, etc., ete. Profusely illustrated.
Price 8s. in handsome cloth; 9s. 6d, with gilt
edges; 12s. 6d. half-morocco,




Che Boy's Own Annual
FOR 1888.

The Tenth Annual Volume of the ‘‘Boy’s Own
Paper.” Containing 848 large pages (113 x 8$)
of Tales of Schoolboy Life, and of Adventure on
Land and Sea; Outdoor and Indoor Games for
every Season; Perilous Adventures at Home and
Abroad; Amusements for Summer and Winter;
and Instructive Papers written so as to be read by
boys and youths. With many Coloured and Wood
Engravings. Price 8s. handsome cloth; 9s. 6d.
gilt edges; 12s. 6d. half-morocco.

Tue Rextiaious Tracr Socixty, Lonxpox.







10 ]

NEW EDITIONS OF STORIES
ESBS Sal See aun

The Children of Cloverley.
2s. cloth.

Little Meg’s Children. Illustrated. 1s. 6d.
cloth.

Alone in London. MWustrated. 1s. 6d. cloth.
Bede’s Charity. Illustrated. 2s. 6d. cloth.
Carola. Ilustrated. 3s, 6d. cloth.
Cassy. Illustrated. 1s. 6d. cloth.
Cobwebs and Cables. Ilustrated. 5s. cloth

gilt.
The Crew of the Dolphin. Ilustrated.
1s. 6d. cloth.

Enoch Roden's Training. Illustrated. 2s.
cloth.

Fern’s Hollow. Illustrated. 2s. clath.
Fishers of Derby Haven. Illustrated. 2s.

cloth. :
Friends Till Death. Ilustrated, 6d. cloth.
Illustrated. 1s.

J essica's First Prayer.
cioth,

Pilgrim Street. A Story of Manchester Life.
2s. cloth,

The King’s Servants. Illustrated. Is. 6d.

Lost Gip. Dlustrated. 1s. 6d. cloth.

Max Kromer. AStory of the Siege of Stras-.
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No Place Like Home... Illustrated. is.
cloth.

Illustrated.



The Storm of Life. Illustrated. 1s. 6d.

cloth.
A Thorny Path. Illustrated. 2s. cloth.
Under the Old Roof. Illustrated. 1s. cloth.
A Night and a Day. 9d. cloth.
Left Alone. 6d. cloth.

A Miserable Christmas and
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The Worth of a Baby. 6d. cloth.
Sam Franklin’s Savings Bank, 6d. cloth.
Michel Lorio’s Cross. Illustrated. 6d. cloth.





By Mrs. O. F. WALTON.

Christie's Old Organ; or, Home, | Our Gracious Queen: Pictures and
Sweet Home. 1s. cloth. Stories trom “Her Majesty’s Life.

Angel’s Christmas. 16mo. 6d.eloth. With many Pictures. New and

Launch -the Lifeboat. With 44 Revised Edition. 1s. cloth.
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_ 38: coloured cover. | l6mo. 3s. 6d. cloth, gilt edges.

Little Dot. Coloured Frontispiece. Poppie’s. Presents. Crown 8vo.

6d. cloth. 1s. cloth.

Little Faith; or, The Child of the
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Nobody Loves Me. Royal 16mo.
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Olive’s Story; or, Life at Ravens-
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Was I Right? Fine Engravings,
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Tur Beurcious Tract SocrersyLoypow

Saved at Sea. A Lighthouse Story.
New and cheaper Edition. 1s.
cloth. .

Shadows. Scenes in the Life of an
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cloth, gilt edges.

Taken or Left.
cloth.

Crown 8yo. 1s



=

11

ms

BOYS, STORY BOOKS.





Untrue to his Trust. A
Story of Life ang Adventare in
Charles the Second’s Time. By
Henry Janson, Lllustrated.
cloth gilt. v

The Doctor's Experiment.
By the Author of * Under Fire.”
With Ulustrations, Imperial 16mo.

5s. cloth. gilt edges,

The Captain’s Story of
LIFE IN JAMAICA. Witn Thus-
trations by Joun Give . ime
perial lémo. 4s. cloth boards, gilt
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Once upon a Time; or, The
Boy's Book of Adventures, With
TMastrations, 3s. cloth.

Stories of the Old Romans.

y SS. Pucu. Tlustratred. 3s,







CHRISTIAN
RICHARD
four TWustv:
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@he Boy's

CENTURIES. — By
ATH. With Eighty-
ms. 4to:.J0s, hand-





Adventures of 2

WATCH. By Tatpor Barres ReEp.
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trations, Crown 8yo.
Football. A Popular Handbook of the
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authorities, With
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recoguised
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Three - Guinea

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Drake and the Dons; or, Stirring Tales
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What to Read at Winter Entertain-
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More than Conqueror; or, A Boy’s
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All for_ Number One; or, Charlie Rus-
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Hindered and Help. A Story for Boys.

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O tun

Cricket. A Popular Handbook. of the Game.
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May, “a Succourer of Many.” By Miss
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Dorothy Tresilis. A Cornish Tale. By
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Miss Elsie. A Story of Single-hearted
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“Therefore,” or Nessie’s Ideal. A Story

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sae oS o “Joseph Adams,” etc. Illustrated. Crown 8vo.
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John Richmond’s Mistake. By Jaxer
EvEN, author of “ Hester’s Home,” “ Another
King,” ete. Illustrated. Crown 8vo. 2s. 6d.



eloth boards.
i By A. C. Coare Higher Up. By Netum Hexuis,
In A Jesuit Net. BY de Louard," ete. Author of “Three Little Iiddlers,” + Rov-
Illustrated by EowaArRb WHyMPER. Crown ing Robin,” “ Gipsy Jan,” ete.. ete. Tlus-
8vo. 5s. cloth boards. trated. Crown 8vo. 2s. cloth boards.

é ; A
Mrs. Morse’s Girls. A Story of | Hope Reed’s Upper Windows.
eu Sunday School Life. Illustrated. By HOWE BENNING. 3s. 6d. cloth gilt.

Crown 8vo. 3s. 6d. cloth boards, gilt edges, Dolly. A Quiet Story for Quiet People.

The Heroines of Haarlem. Adapt- By M. F. W. Dlustrated. Crown Bvo.
Fl 1s. 6d. cloth boards,
ed from the French of Madame de Witt.
By Haruerre E. Burcu, Author of | Mvery Day. A Story for Sunday
“Count Renneberg's Treason,” etc. With | Afternoons, By Evetyn R. FARRAR.
Illustrations. Crown &vo. 3s. 6d. cloth, | Illustrated. Crown 8vo. 1s.6d. cloth
gilt edges. | boards.

Ghe Girl’s Own Bookshelf.

Aunt Diana. By Rosa Novcnerrz Carry, Author of ‘‘ Not Like Other Girls,”
“ Esther Cameron’s Story,” etc. Illustrated. Imperial l6mo. 2s. 6a. bevelled boards.
Miss Carey is well known as an able and graceful writer of stories for girls. This one

illustrates the working of duty founded upon Christian principle.

Cora; or, Three Years of a Girl’s Life.
Illustrated. Imperial 16mo. 2s. 6d. cloth.

The Girl's Own Cookery Book. By

PHILLIS BRowNE. Feap.8vo. 1s, cloth.

The Queen o’ the May. By Anne
peste Inustrated. Imperial l6mo, 2s. 6d
cloth,

The Master’s Service. A Practical
Guide for Girls, Illustrated. Imperial 16mo.
23. 6d. cloth.

How to Play the Pianoforte. Feap.
8vo. Is. Gd. cloth.

Her Object in Life. By Isapeuna Fyvre
Mayo. Mlustrated. Imperial 16mo, 2s. 6d, cloth.

The Sunbeam of the Factory, and

other Stories. Illustrated. Imperial © l6mo.
2s. 6d. cloth.

Esther. By Rosa Noucuetrrr Carey. Illus-
trated, Imperial l6mo. 3s. 6d. cloth,

The Shepherd’s Fairy. By Daruzy
Date, Author of “ The Great Ank’s Eggs.” {lus-
trated. 2s. 6d, cloth.

Servants and Service. By Ruru Lams,
Author of “ Comfortable Mra. Crook,” ete. 1s, 6d.
cloth boards,



Tus Reuiarous Tracr Soci





I3
THE NEW SERIES OF

HALF-CROWN BOOKS
FOR ALL READERS.
Each with 384 Pages, 74x 5, Illustrated, Cloth, Gilt Edges.

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a OLD MANOR HOUSE

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Chronicles of an Ola Manor House. a, the ae: G. E.
Sarcent, author of “The Story of a Pocket Bible,” etc. 2s. 6d.

A Race for Life, and other Tales. 2s. 6d. cloth, gilt edges.

Strange Tales of Peril and Adventure. Tilustrated. 2s. 6d.
cloth gilt.

Remarkable Adventures from Real Life. Iustrated,
2s, 6d. cloth gilt.

The Black Troopers, and other Stories. Illustrated. 2s. 6d.
cloth gilt,

Adventures Ashore and Afloat. Illustrated. 2s. 6d, cloth gilt.

Finding Her Place. By Howr Bzyyrne, Author of “Quiet
er ‘“Ursula’s Beginnings,’’ etc. Illustrated. Crown 8vo, 2s, 6d.
cloth gi

The Mountain Path. By Liny Watson. Author of “ Within
Sight of the Snow,” etc. Illustrated. Crown 8vo. 2s. 6d. cloth gilt,

Among the Mongols. By Rev. J. Gitmovr. Illustrated.
2s. 6d. cloth gilt.

Within Sea Walls ; or, How the Dutch kept the Faith. By
G. E, SarGEnr. Illustrated, 2s. 6d. cloth gilt.

The Story of a City Arab. With Portrait and Memoir of the

Author, the late G. E. Sarcrenr. 2s. 6d. cloth gilt.



A PRETTY PRESENT.

Morning and Evening. Keble’s Morning and Evening Hymns.
Beautifully illustrated from sketches by J, Cuarx, J. H. Hiesuxy, Davspson
Kwow.ss, James N. Lev, C.J. Sranrianp, J. R. WELLS, andC. M, ’WimrEnis.
Printed in colour by ALFRED Cooke. In a handsome coloured cover, tied
with ribbon. Square l6mo. 1s,

COLOURED BOOKLETS.

Signals for the Voyage of Life and Heavenly Graces.
With Verses by Mary E. Rorsrs.

Two attractive little coloured books, each consisting of twenty-four pages, with
acover. The Texts are given in illuminated letters, and the Verses are from the
practised pen of Miss Ropes. The booklets are finished with gilt edges, rounded
corners, and tied with ribbon. 6d. each.

Tur Retiaious Tracr Socwry, Lonpon.



“BOOKS FOR CHILORED

The Happiest Half-Hour; or, Sunday
; Talks with Ubildren, By Prepenicx Lanc-
BRIDGE, 304. With many Illustrations, sSimali
quarto. 33. td. cloth hoards, giit ed

The Sweet Story of Old.
Bock for the Lintle Ones. SB.
Author of “ Jessica’s Firs
Charity,” cte. ith Twelve Coloured Pictures by
Bs W.Mapbox, dio. 3s.6d, cloth boards, coloured
edges,

Watts’s Divine and Moral Songs.
New Edition. With maay fine Coloured Iussra-
tions by Ronrerr Barnes, Gorpoy Browne
W. Mappox,and J R. Lex 2s, 8. cloth bo:

My Holiday Picture-Book.
prising : Holiday Time in tie Cour e
Johnnie—The
Farm 3 or,
Birthday































With ‘Twenty-four full-coloured page Viet



= | sy, Coloured Picture Story -Book

and Fort, guettes. Comp.



Little Cousin from Tndia—The Bla
4s. handsorae cloth gilt.

Bible Stories and Pictures. With Twenty-four Coloured page Pictures
and Forty Vignettes. With simple letterpress in large type. 4s. handsomely bound, cloth
gilt.

Harrison Weir’s Pictures of Birds and other Family Pets. With

24 large Coloured Pictures. 4s. handsomely bound, wich side in Gold and Colours.

Storyland. By Smxey Gruv. With Thirty-two Tlu
BARNES, Engraved and Printed in Colour by EDMUND EVAN».
coloured paper boards,

Our Pets and Companions: Pictures and Stories Illustrative of Kindness to
Animals, By Mary K.Manrix, Author of “ Fruits of Bible Lands,” ete. Profusely Thus.
trated by WELR, Sracky, WHymren, M. E, Epwaxops, J. G. Brivrarn, and others, Smal) to.
2s, cloth buards. .

Talkative Friends in Field, Farm, and Forest. By Mary BE. Ropers,
Author of “ Tom’s Bennie,” “Till the Sugar Melts,” cte. Prof y Illustrated. A similar
Volume to “ Our Pets and Companions.” Sinelldte. 28 cloth boards,

Little Dot and Her Friends. With
‘Twenty-four Coloured Pictures and Forty Vig-
nettes. 4s. cloth boards gilt,

Launch the Lifeboat! By Mrs, 0, F.
Wanron, Author of Christies Old Organ,” ete.
With Coloured Pictures and Vignettes, from
Drawings by H. J. Ruopys. Beautifully printed
in Colours, ito. 3s. im attractive hoards.

Sunday Afternoons at Rose Cottage
|
|



itions by Roverr
6s, handsomely bound in











Bible Talks with Mamma. By Mrs. WATER WORTH,
Author of “Blessings for the Little Ones,” etc.
In very large type. With Illustrations, Is. 6d.
cloth gilt.

Listening to Jesus. A Sunday Book for
the Little Ones. By E.M. Warenworry. With.
Illustrations by W.S,Sracey, Smulldto. Is.6d
cloth boards, gilt edges.

Children’s Daily: Bread. A Picture,
Text. and Verse for Every Day of the Yeer,
2s. 6d. cloth.

Bible Tales for Children, With Forty
Zyll-pace TMustrations, Small dto, 3s. 6d. cloth
beVelled boards, gilt edges,

Stories of Bible Children. A New Sun-
day Book for very Little Children, By Mrs. EK.
M. Warerworty, In very large type. With
paseo Small 4to, 1s. 6d. cloth boards, gilt
edges,





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Tut Reuicious Tracr Sociury, Lonpon.





POPULAR

THE

Chilt’s Companion
AND
Juvenile Instructor Annual

FOR 1888.
192 pages. 8} by 64.
Contains a Story
in twelve chapters
by Mrs, 0. F. Wat-
ron, Author of
“Christie’s Ql Or-
gan,” «ce, and a
variety of interest-
ing reading for
young folks, with a
Coloured Trontis-





on
n





pices and man
Nustrations, Is. 6d
attr e coloured

boa 3 2s.
cloth; 28. 6d, hand-
me cloth full gilt.

O THE CHEDS COMPANION. O.



| The Gottager and Artisan

5

ANNUALS...

Our Little Dot's
Annual for 1888.

192 pages. 8} by 64.

Lhe Ye , - 1
ue early Volume of ae
OUR LITTLE == TLE |

DOTS.” Our LIT

Full of Pretty Pie-|P ss
tures and Little Storics|q| “Mi
inLarge Type. is. 60 }9
attractive coloured ju}
hoards ; 2s. neat cloth :|N
2s 6d. handsome cloth (s

ili J a
gilt.








Ni

“ Sust whatehildren |S

will like.” — Church |)

Sunday School Maga-
zine,



Annual.

THE VOLUME FOR, 1888.

It contains 144 pages of
interesting reading andillus-
trations. A most suitable
book to present to the Work-
men’s Lustitute, Club, or
Reading Room, and for the
Home Reading of Work-
ing People in Town and
Country. Many Large Pie-
tures, forming quitea family
scrap-book. Much of the
letterpress is in large type.
Js, 6d. in pretty coloured
cover; 28. 6d. cloth boards
gilt.

Size of page 134 by 10.

Ghe Cract Magazine
Annual for 1888.

240 pages. 82 by 5.

Contains a com-
plete story in four-
teen chapters by
; Mrs. ©. NUGENT?
JACKSON, Author
of “Me and Jim,”
&e., entitled “The
Family oe,” and
contributions by P.
B. POWER, M.A,
A. N, MACKRAY,
MA. M. BE. Baek,
R,.R. THOM. LUCY
TAYLOR, G HH.
SPURGEON JAMES
GILMOUR, and
others. With nume-
rous FEngravings.
Is. 6d. cloth boards,

S|
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Tan Reticious Tract Society




“Telling




pieturesand prac-

tical articles. We only wi

, thatany pra fours might
increase the circulation of a
most valuable periodical.’—
The Times,











“A large amount of goou
reading for those who have
little time or opportunity.
The type is large and clear,
and the Hlustrations nume-
rous and good.” — Scottish
Leader.

“A welcoine addition to
the homes of the working
classes."—]Vestern Morning
News,



‘s Friendly Greetings. |

ILLUSTRATED READINGS FOR

THE PEOPLE,
ee 208 pages. 109 by 7°
a Be 7 This Dlustrated
DLY .*y | Magazine is bound
; in half-yearly

rt

ry (GS | soimmes, ” Tiled
REETIN . | with Pictures and
i oy cj._| short anecdotal pa-
i gi ders. Each _half-

yearly vyolnme
complete in itself,
and profusely
Illustrated. 2s. 6d.
cloth boards.



“lively, enter-
taining readings,
The illustrations
are also very
attractive.” — The
Christian,

FRIENOLY OREETI NAS



Lonpon.





16 7

Sixpence Montuty.
One Preyny WEEKLY,

â„¢ SUNDAY
AT HOME.

“The Sunpay ar Homer is made for
Sunday reading, but there is. never-
theless, nothing vapid, goody-goody or
childish about it, but rather writing and
story-telling of unquestionable merit,
obviously done by skilled hands, and
put together by a competent and ex-
perienced editor.”-- Medical Press,

Wew Volume commenced with

January Part,



Sixpency Monruty. One Penny Wetkty.

THE

BOY'S OWN
PAP

“Te appealsidirectly te every youth,
whether he loves fiction or field sports, and
hasa charm even*for boys of maturer age.”
—Daily Telegraph:

New Volume commenced with November
Monthly Part.

A. 31 PATERNOSTOA WE

Lahaye FE ceuivee nou

Lonvon: 56, PArernostEr Row, AND OF ALI. NEWSAGENTS.



MAGAZINES FOR EVERY HOUSEHOLD,

New Seures. Sixpence Montut.

THE

LEISURE
HOUR.

aA Monthly Magazine for Family and |
General Reading,

“The Leisure Hown is, if possible,
better than it used to be, and certainly
its literary and artistic meritsare unsur-
passed in the domain of cheap and good
serial publications,”—The Queen.

A New Volume commenced with the
January Part,




Tart 68 —Seprecivar, WES CUAMMIAIIY Mine Mestae RS FOR AUSUST Pret 6







SixpeENceE Montuny. One Penny WEEKLY

THE

GIRLS OWN
jeusaea ba

“Tt bears the reflection on every page
of that inimitable character, the brieht,
sensible, lady-like English girl.” — Zhe
Bookseller.

New Volume commenced with November
Monthiy Part,






Wk -LENUAK HOURS CEFICE. 1, PAYERNOSTEN ROW, EE







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'2011-10-20T04:41:49-04:00'
describe
'4104' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLFW' 'sip-files00007.pro'
cc5f4b4553a5408b2f727f5a672d30a9
096381ad8bda6e8631723034cee01555ad365774
'2011-10-20T04:43:25-04:00'
describe
'42342' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLFX' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
5e78e00198cac8a4e92fe3284125c110
e5b225c4cd4dcec2cea1c99cb1d80d4afc212a3a
'2011-10-20T04:42:26-04:00'
describe
'2535092' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLFY' 'sip-files00007.tif'
13aa3207ed8cb0dbe02d09eab956a201
2d5224d64b63db42d7826925726cfa78cde0fe5d
'2011-10-20T04:43:27-04:00'
describe
'203' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLFZ' 'sip-files00007.txt'
78f3c9e33fd6f3c99df40428ff641108
f2fb25ad0870c48b8ae3ad81262a85a64975bdb1
'2011-10-20T04:43:38-04:00'
describe
'26023' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLGA' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
cc3359226af1ba3ae9345fa911eafa8e
919d1b38a0f3678ca63f2796a7df756407430e2b
'2011-10-20T04:43:00-04:00'
describe
'314122' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLGB' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
5931bdf349875b84242fffce930988d4
52de6b5f08584df6ca0d5ef75b849a1075a70c42
'2011-10-20T04:41:01-04:00'
describe
'85693' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLGC' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
2fca51173578803cdd6c6a8e71ec57c8
9cdf642cb82195025ce50e078de06c9a802b78a5
'2011-10-20T04:40:48-04:00'
describe
'32323' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLGD' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
28a4283c29cf8868787b11bca845592d
27040bd3e769ef1b844ed14251776e6e6edb7096
'2011-10-20T04:43:23-04:00'
describe
'2533456' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLGE' 'sip-files00008.tif'
1817955bd1348e6c3b2613f53376738c
b1b404b52adb95c78ba8f01c8719932c3d6aa725
describe
'21595' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLGF' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
1e741ee94f5061b494c1872998dddb34
4e44935879c5a5de4ccb6ddbe8c2ec0eb864a03a
'2011-10-20T04:41:07-04:00'
describe
'314342' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLGG' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
6445a565e6e1255674a1c5c234b4a5b6
61f57ae72e8ba5399928e6e740cddc3a3f57b03f
'2011-10-20T04:43:10-04:00'
describe
'90316' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLGH' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
54167829c3eba4ea6c7116f2469e21d5
22664a99afa925be9decf7637614239d905cd60c
'2011-10-20T04:41:58-04:00'
describe
'7655' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLGI' 'sip-files00009.pro'
f374a1c480d502fdb6e7bf7f8870bb65
4bcf0c2df6f07e9e0236d5d2950697840b261796
'2011-10-20T04:40:58-04:00'
describe
'39009' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLGJ' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
593e61245a1c552b18d530f90c4a8807
461da7ba5ac90a7686d8258f5588fc2e93a02277
'2011-10-20T04:40:50-04:00'
describe
'2534672' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLGK' 'sip-files00009.tif'
ee632565289b9d6ebd1b3e53e3eefa48
8375337103bc0e6489fee3c9a5a025529b9e788c
'2011-10-20T04:43:24-04:00'
describe
'451' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLGL' 'sip-files00009.txt'
b6bbd3494186a59155cf5882861ecfe8
06b4ab41d5b07ebd94a515a40dd55fd8bd3f04ac
describe
'25233' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLGM' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
b44510ee6f222fe822cfeef59e66da2e
73401805a32622cfe1eaf529221650c1eef895f1
'2011-10-20T04:42:21-04:00'
describe
'314411' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLGN' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
c3b3653064c893fa994455a3f4e87a4f
1e56fc4bad845162ca7038d3ed7319f2625dddde
'2011-10-20T04:40:49-04:00'
describe
'91092' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLGO' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
a745345969739d3af8e04c906c1c944b
379627a413f25ce3814e0f7c1d9e8e9cba591fb1
'2011-10-20T04:41:09-04:00'
describe
'33273' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLGP' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
a744cdabd1e90a8cfbbdecd11aff8754
b5d9087820da902270da4aa01dbd5ed564af9d7c
'2011-10-20T04:42:48-04:00'
describe
'2533652' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLGQ' 'sip-files00010.tif'
0dacaf7e58148be98e5cb68f90e38b9e
559074eef7ec6a47135b7087880ab3244bb2b48f
'2011-10-20T04:43:46-04:00'
describe
'22154' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLGR' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
01f706eb1bdfe711c36446e82b16f31e
3f705fe77f2853a2eaf51190e026c53e38e71086
describe
'314346' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLGS' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
3f61b1584637abb578fb2a0dae078b60
8c913d5aaed9dcffe98df85c4dd635264b423b76
'2011-10-20T04:42:04-04:00'
describe
'129314' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLGT' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
2c64458a5c2d9b5a99eef35084dc3db0
37802b23dd48dde8feef77f33d886dfdd6843ef6
'2011-10-20T04:42:53-04:00'
describe
'17143' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLGU' 'sip-files00011.pro'
3f9e18458cf50e760ddabdc7f8ef157c
55795b17f768f620c975de8a53331621fc9225fe
'2011-10-20T04:41:15-04:00'
describe
'53939' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLGV' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
015796f203204531cf4c8156247e04f7
8fb3610e5a79117c05d2cbe0a0d34a119499f808
'2011-10-20T04:43:15-04:00'
describe
'2535872' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLGW' 'sip-files00011.tif'
ce2b47be1910e8c5831524584ed26b30
0573a440d04cf0d022aae109d70526afb7875c3e
'2011-10-20T04:42:10-04:00'
describe
'718' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLGX' 'sip-files00011.txt'
9d29e3dc5d609b459526c6ff9f94a0d8
68094f8c0b3beac4c03ca1e0fdf91ac56f1c1587
'2011-10-20T04:42:40-04:00'
describe
'28788' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLGY' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
892011a31c4fdcaa83aa892d648da96e
b68ebf6e6e475b11a78d29c9ef1c6351840c737a
'2011-10-20T04:43:13-04:00'
describe
'314406' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLGZ' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
b31870799101e5404d16c024082f50ff
4d67925300b715105f8b0dbeebe3f27c730dae79
describe
'162845' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLHA' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
97720a21b448e013fad18ead70db55d9
bfbe58dc6d8950cd2c1520e9b86bba8f09245791
describe
'27513' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLHB' 'sip-files00012.pro'
f57e982818f7637a90cdb81e567109dc
fad4777a23e214e0579e27829e1b0114cbf74ae3
'2011-10-20T04:43:48-04:00'
describe
'66532' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLHC' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
f45b0ab3133b57b28125273d63bf6f45
d56e0e2eb97965d350f35a4dfb5d6517ac223e32
'2011-10-20T04:43:34-04:00'
describe
'2536688' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLHD' 'sip-files00012.tif'
0b906ced200b0b7f157ee902b1d306b9
f9788ea109dc70fa2f315aba7fbfb3552f7dc903
describe
'1090' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLHE' 'sip-files00012.txt'
f674db1dfca0b4e4a05d4ffd09d7e4d7
6e82bc98652a054d688dbf231ee70cd6e28fe244
describe
'31978' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLHF' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
a281cf34c880738360a8a2a8db2c171e
668debc5934f004dd306bcc51eeeda3f3bc4c152
'2011-10-20T04:43:08-04:00'
describe
'314404' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLHG' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
38da2ff53db40b97c47a272ba5b34df3
4894bf0968ea6531b6520980bdc25b58c0472fff
'2011-10-20T04:42:45-04:00'
describe
'160682' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLHH' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
0d6582c4b4240e6bdd4653a42da75d0f
afd4a82df87aa05758e918ab590effad9f749fd5
describe
'26640' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLHI' 'sip-files00013.pro'
ceba0f588a40243cbb8fa25836c284e8
9f3f2435199cf57324236d9a13941963caf1fc1d
describe
'66117' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLHJ' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
4d49315f56446e6fc541326c569b8336
0c3171fc066eae2627af20e6edd1105e6f440c7d
'2011-10-20T04:40:55-04:00'
describe
'2536628' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLHK' 'sip-files00013.tif'
e842a3fc6120873726c2bdb0bc752e85
46e007024789ece4bd2507f103b3c69589537941
describe
'1060' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLHL' 'sip-files00013.txt'
21f042b2924158b3fb69544eea0de060
87da7352e888f6615a1c23b15cd2a22480f8b664
'2011-10-20T04:41:36-04:00'
describe
'31491' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLHM' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
ae7f74445ef3e7de3d03fc7087b39e70
012ba037de273643a81d03e29aba89a5e2973796
describe
'314400' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLHN' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
b78c79ff3d54c31fcc0c3367cf6fa6bf
6e8f2b30da337cac9881577522113b71ffd8a14c
'2011-10-20T04:43:41-04:00'
describe
'165903' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLHO' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
363564c0dd0efaf8ce111aefc55678fd
afd6b5af7e9771702f72b3ae86e525df913d608f
describe
'28065' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLHP' 'sip-files00014.pro'
55e5f64dcfc50a2148616bea9f1bb456
cb8573a7c5cb36cc87456c1579efe0c4897b11f3
'2011-10-20T04:42:08-04:00'
describe
'67535' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLHQ' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
b8b218f99a97ca2f549a1260204ffd8f
6d364c52d446555721ded7c69706dd0539ffa63a
describe
'2536896' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLHR' 'sip-files00014.tif'
f6e285fc367b5e07932cc64925e0c934
7d035202efc4ff94c7a13e78b51bbcfce3a32541
describe
'1104' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLHS' 'sip-files00014.txt'
47f5c149c36b74abffc5dee4ed168f0f
b7d33ff8551e55b0aa2fe33ec437b17b7a630505
'2011-10-20T04:43:20-04:00'
describe
'32606' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLHT' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
6bbd33f64389fada471d8275ad2a755a
37cdc96c27b52842ba855576821775204623b2df
'2011-10-20T04:42:07-04:00'
describe
'314401' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLHU' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
68f492304c82fecb85bce56ad23381f0
785dbf64eb3db1cbe4f88c3afd43f95fd2b22e29
'2011-10-20T04:43:17-04:00'
describe
'161978' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLHV' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
8aaabe7213231fd07de5b22fd5b3610f
0211e062bae23cc29d446bd58e1a387d372ea5d8
'2011-10-20T04:43:11-04:00'
describe
'28000' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLHW' 'sip-files00015.pro'
6f7287b5d52470b5ef30b2d06688dd50
3b51513001b26e8ccf5fcea5229e845eaef9c661
describe
'67180' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLHX' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
a02ba83f5dcf73a68961feb81926fe6c
8aecd30c80ce8b4cabd12ee970eb3473d034b967
describe
'2536928' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLHY' 'sip-files00015.tif'
21d4e9d18adc06c016eac97318bb9d2e
b072db0506c5e91b5b04788de48c2aa179604f1c
describe
'1111' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLHZ' 'sip-files00015.txt'
e3579d78850d6f9157f2b33c6854a359
b6bc7adfb1ac664cf72c97be4322be8b1e471f6c
'2011-10-20T04:41:54-04:00'
describe
'31928' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLIA' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
5af100b9d20e821079865cafa6319c79
a1e63cbc2b7d2fbd09288a09e879e2ecb7644e50
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLIB' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
db1a6a5774185ca2d45346b2f68470c9
552f5c839c96c0b66df44be1d64ea24d4101626d
describe
'165791' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLIC' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
7689d8dce949de423ad41073d9151a58
64af4c0e3e3452783940fd83c15c13ec49f0b4b0
describe
'28449' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLID' 'sip-files00016.pro'
09896034fb2e651ffd5f9cdd90cc2c22
f9fcd6cd9afd1ab9659d96a3d97322fba3191649
'2011-10-20T04:43:55-04:00'
describe
'68067' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLIE' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
b1fe141a6d66658c8d2d8c2102912764
384c0e238aee3f45d19c646e8cc59fc9f58fe7cb
describe
'2536812' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLIF' 'sip-files00016.tif'
142cc39bc09cd0ed7599d7f20b8da4a2
090c591a0a2a6c6d1de772a8b3312017bbedfedd
'2011-10-20T04:42:09-04:00'
describe
'1121' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLIG' 'sip-files00016.txt'
7a85a97fa98dd87c7077c6bfdda94801
5acf4669d34056fd595d541c2518ea057d0b28d2
describe
'32138' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLIH' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
9d90ccacbe8ca4c6c9ca9fce3e6f801a
d353a575105fd47769e0912322254366d71aef7e
'2011-10-20T04:43:43-04:00'
describe
'314366' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLII' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
b88e5d22a5c25ad157961bbb00396eb0
3d5fd6663a908bdb3b63b565b94bf1e77fcad087
'2011-10-20T04:43:16-04:00'
describe
'161022' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLIJ' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
84bd6b17486695e03302b8666f15c8fa
ebdb36c1b32acc35e3033d4ffd4752d6c50276c9
describe
'26429' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLIK' 'sip-files00017.pro'
9b681a157a5b6d333d92d54710ec9f90
6124a8be6270857184281ac177ebe2b10caee28f
'2011-10-20T04:42:12-04:00'
describe
'65322' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLIL' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
e3c2caae54ebab75449584ec315d1492
b6db7193cc2ec3ab5d1dc3649d7e588afccc4f9a
'2011-10-20T04:41:30-04:00'
describe
'2536672' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLIM' 'sip-files00017.tif'
41bf2824a701ac33c42c87db9c5816ea
a8b1db22bdd2254fb360ee3de43a4e7d8847afe0
describe
'1073' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLIN' 'sip-files00017.txt'
c36a97f2c0393f18715ad11957b97886
5b8f881d2760f04a52622ce2c22804a7ceda20df
'2011-10-20T04:42:13-04:00'
describe
'31568' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLIO' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
9d0aebe9e9c72e488f0ce9a57d7de1b0
67f24064475af313455bfd9b7a6b2a61d6e77888
'2011-10-20T04:43:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLIP' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
e4c6ee5cd6138b7e389eecf00b379d79
561a402f88c9c05fc5840a5ea75bb3ef161cbf62
'2011-10-20T04:43:29-04:00'
describe
'168524' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLIQ' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
661029dd9c2a558f609ac7e53c190343
7bd11a541a67335d662c82e0929b6358aa6357d6
'2011-10-20T04:43:05-04:00'
describe
'28826' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLIR' 'sip-files00018.pro'
50313991e651dd36c9435d9d41956f3e
8ae973f35506a3692729b8c56820df5338f23355
'2011-10-20T04:41:02-04:00'
describe
'68826' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLIS' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
d55737617df735893061624ecb21d412
256b8ddf2176361f4d1557d5b6dab93038ed596f
'2011-10-20T04:42:35-04:00'
describe
'2536920' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLIT' 'sip-files00018.tif'
1bfeac817a468e36f11eddd910c9dfac
f4fe07f7653cf1ab696423257162f081baf26afe
'2011-10-20T04:42:34-04:00'
describe
'1137' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLIU' 'sip-files00018.txt'
c25e7f10a9130965d1013da884712b3f
0feab642895c09bc40e82f0fa348a2703143c1de
'2011-10-20T04:43:36-04:00'
describe
'32374' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLIV' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
9401a247cc0c2e322f4ac04a8bfb3566
7c2e75a77f3390200ffeb19fbd2401478463c389
'2011-10-20T04:42:56-04:00'
describe
'314345' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLIW' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
291f02160df4093a9299d492aba0b799
bef22ef2b20eb1b41b7498372a53a9af8a99f4cd
describe
'159239' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLIX' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
fd9c7dd9586ca4af34620491c429acec
d7226063ca78614401857924d90d7e726e921618
'2011-10-20T04:43:01-04:00'
describe
'27631' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLIY' 'sip-files00019.pro'
ff56af74bbc87b93c9f35a450c5201e8
fb9f3362b3115e067b897d0133577ab5e3ef27c6
describe
'66461' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLIZ' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
46a1d5c68baac7f816acd4d4256ba1e3
c1a9ca85ffa69faa96cc8eb28a2ec38455166c17
'2011-10-20T04:41:08-04:00'
describe
'2536624' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLJA' 'sip-files00019.tif'
3bcec7538e93f7429739668ae7e6f622
4d8d26d04e83ac7566dc789ee91725807d0548de
'2011-10-20T04:40:59-04:00'
describe
'1102' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLJB' 'sip-files00019.txt'
ee4eb4370da5a2a98500e8f81fea19bf
fb4617ef7e3055cdbf6d97df0fbd7782327d961c
'2011-10-20T04:42:36-04:00'
describe
'31534' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLJC' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
96812da1e3871bb097fe37effa9f4a7f
025cb43a18bec5de6a26118791305e1690fc1f43
describe
'314399' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLJD' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
dc7c2a160425aac181d156f1f3d01fe9
0d20a30c1dc50d35302e7faf14cc5b99a47f536f
describe
'166926' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLJE' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
a388a1b38a6fb457b1e405b624f85f39
8160ddd1373dddf37fb46b273934100d6c9bf4b0
'2011-10-20T04:42:25-04:00'
describe
'27449' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLJF' 'sip-files00020.pro'
b0f8fa8de756ae29c742d2265e0c25a7
27d9d9756e4d36e6571cedc888b232b764ae056a
'2011-10-20T04:43:45-04:00'
describe
'67417' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLJG' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
5606f3d37a7f84d1b8f3f673359e1456
5b0e8c95de8fc490879f02589f5d833a4d2874cb
'2011-10-20T04:42:31-04:00'
describe
'2536844' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLJH' 'sip-files00020.tif'
8b9d31d9b16951d33a4ee63ee26e9d4d
425f8b54087d1dbb8b5d198e14b8810d3e36a387
describe
'1086' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLJI' 'sip-files00020.txt'
cc9759bfd20dc2dede5e3684988ff796
1473b4c34771b8451d082f0a204cc7004e10c9dc
describe
'32409' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLJJ' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
2f55634f88111187fa4cfb968ef93f9c
49f54286ef8ec09ee16ff7d764236f8193e0fda7
describe
'314408' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLJK' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
887189f6a245b074a80c1db930a60142
e31f0c92483fc2aa177280c01638053702143588
'2011-10-20T04:43:37-04:00'
describe
'149370' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLJL' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
5a597f941fa2bb5fd002e960f19fd309
27ffb6fefc313c29099d174d9f560c4f813a2657
'2011-10-20T04:43:39-04:00'
describe
'22970' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLJM' 'sip-files00021.pro'
beed023bfb4e81f3ba1c0dbd2d2a5efb
eb572468e2fdb8430fb203029d36c4013a1b0e05
describe
'60779' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLJN' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
8033e2bf844464887bd2458a1427169d
5db31c6feb88ecdf86d3cc855a05a09a724a99b3
describe
'2536396' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLJO' 'sip-files00021.tif'
7c1b50736d0862c4e4caec198d73c638
1be585585a96a1053f4a4f337bc2c15ea8070ddc
'2011-10-20T04:42:59-04:00'
describe
'931' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLJP' 'sip-files00021.txt'
2e9eefc15f8e04c0e8738a32a4454b3b
08cf279f160499df22f10d963f13b1383215d35b
'2011-10-20T04:42:20-04:00'
describe
'30594' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLJQ' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
d7455b64222ecae094ad5099f71991c7
4c7580c3617fe25b741be7c4e6c65e1762ca604b
describe
'314390' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLJR' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
5fee1db90ee797025c6f76efa4b46632
52dc56fdd3d9561f309c017bf3e07506ac05c7f4
'2011-10-20T04:42:57-04:00'
describe
'156822' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLJS' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
b6931fcfe9bdafba5bbc50aab5267773
ba63f257334bc77c71d9f5a6d0b0c738d670d15a
'2011-10-20T04:42:39-04:00'
describe
'27539' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLJT' 'sip-files00022.pro'
08421cc9be8dd66be46411f58b31cde8
f0206c2af79569def883adb7bdbdd267f43f4b52
'2011-10-20T04:41:48-04:00'
describe
'66012' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLJU' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
49c70f92a3904274cdbd8afbd4289f07
993c0ba19cd3e51928d84769cf6b59a74c61bfdd
'2011-10-20T04:43:18-04:00'
describe
'2536776' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLJV' 'sip-files00022.tif'
bb6dd66895b6cf79d401a8baf7a6a2e1
bebb525aaaef0cfa9e0dfcee4bc8c6abec798c0c
describe
'1091' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLJW' 'sip-files00022.txt'
5d9242cd9a639b36230071d577cacab8
5a94b20a0e28de2654cf7bd53cbe932b77eeb916
'2011-10-20T04:43:40-04:00'
describe
'31850' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLJX' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
b5cdcf2ae474e98cf469211596f9e3ae
b51375f446ce87e3cd6c24fef035590a1b2545a5
describe
'314278' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLJY' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
817d48ac8ca598216336154fc2bd0d8b
d635922f61f0f77863151bebfb230aae52bba4eb
'2011-10-20T04:41:28-04:00'
describe
'154728' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLJZ' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
b471c2f37fe7928c21a440e06bc370b5
fb7bffefb20c587723d04178aa0ff32e4f1d0811
'2011-10-20T04:42:58-04:00'
describe
'26483' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLKA' 'sip-files00023.pro'
021aea6c29e91476e8b0c711c215e32a
d2ff69cfaa63ad1e33b27ffeda17a62fa5edf246
'2011-10-20T04:43:14-04:00'
describe
'66103' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLKB' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
beb3096e2502c47804d4ad481d1a7c44
c4cce184aa0611f8f11b3b5610257f94bbbfa94c
'2011-10-20T04:41:03-04:00'
describe
'2536816' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLKC' 'sip-files00023.tif'
07ca8ce70da3614ac4a61180d6f80182
694f51b18c333c414cefe92a2d15e1df1adb0b09
describe
'1085' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLKD' 'sip-files00023.txt'
7368be99da7b69583e5ad6f7cd8144fc
c9243bf84817d652c4a5b3640f4457b700d3d642
'2011-10-20T04:41:29-04:00'
describe
'31990' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLKE' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
606132d0ad4a0ab2610d9868c9e6c308
b3077b9713558828a61693b208a3fc181eb99b98
'2011-10-20T04:42:17-04:00'
describe
'305132' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLKF' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
8dde66eb77c60da5805bb7e836dc1d64
790ba23f8f3bc41af711a2ed71d2fc4a69262753
'2011-10-20T04:43:52-04:00'
describe
'153390' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLKG' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
037ffe8dc999ad879c3b67f64b69a0e2
abaccf78af4eb8f99b4d29f2d9e5ecc898f5987c
describe
'22706' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLKH' 'sip-files00024.pro'
81b5ab09155732b42eb612e8db290455
c2e8f8b3c881ebd326a16782c7f09179f80ba641
'2011-10-20T04:42:14-04:00'
describe
'61802' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLKI' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
45ebb3c4ed31ece165dd084157610426
6e055c125b2f22afd09e5eb246351a50d9831144
describe
'2462328' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLKJ' 'sip-files00024.tif'
040e58e35931bade6958a479b689cb1b
8721d8e41afc33ff143deb19d58230831389761a
'2011-10-20T04:41:06-04:00'
describe
'907' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLKK' 'sip-files00024.txt'
9058d7c76832a82588bd9ccc1da1923c
c7ae3d519f4feebc229c4f84fa37d4d6ea6fb20a
'2011-10-20T04:42:05-04:00'
describe
'30742' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLKL' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
a618f8dc2b4ca84c8ef58338764af498
bc3bef559d587fccc1a85cf15d04c5f08a795e2a
describe
'305110' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLKM' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
868c2fca9927c9209116ae819f5c1d1f
0bf32e48c9a0b70b4dbac76e1fd9f370da988465
'2011-10-20T04:42:19-04:00'
describe
'176897' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLKN' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
afa889e77b3e187e68b6c6e831454bd2
79ad5c3e4b40c329c1982744e5e66b400a78f6b9
describe
'28036' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLKO' 'sip-files00025.pro'
e9acbf352860d9fd82773cba8726ce0b
3a049b11389296bb8598ee361244df7b88a6d4d4
describe
'69295' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLKP' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
42e70759416cec4809456250898454b4
ab012eef2f315380816308c4af797fc9fd177aff
describe
'2463072' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLKQ' 'sip-files00025.tif'
247313720489ed0fbf49c7b725cb0c85
e9dd83a6e5075d564fecfba824abfdec249cf841
'2011-10-20T04:43:06-04:00'
describe
'1130' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLKR' 'sip-files00025.txt'
16dcefe38987caa6273333b05691cd22
882bb119ce226d671c6da2b5f1946398d6a53069
'2011-10-20T04:43:22-04:00'
describe
'32859' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLKS' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
ea99655db5847f9279700ed9dcb41347
87e999faf61d1ffc46a813ee1818498ee25ddc47
'2011-10-20T04:41:50-04:00'
describe
'305078' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLKT' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
7f40f3c4b0653489a96104a9612f7d54
4528052c3c7aefed521385318d79d944126185a5
'2011-10-20T04:41:37-04:00'
describe
'162854' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLKU' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
1479a57b2b34ea8a7b32817c9e95fe3a
187a58010423503fa94c2c47e7b9d0c8aa6a8a62
describe
'28487' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLKV' 'sip-files00026.pro'
bd8f8e6aec2abc4a34271b97b7fd5246
38634a02b0ce26f6bc5260313f8775f1d6b9f4ff
describe
'69064' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLKW' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
87e3c9f8f21fc36a9acd62f1d96cf5e5
e95cb8620e9a887a9577300e156601feec0718c5
describe
'2462836' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLKX' 'sip-files00026.tif'
f32bba2708e2d076e869dc60e5c0ae00
ee87145016a53462f0dfa6aafc585e1585e6859f
describe
'1134' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLKY' 'sip-files00026.txt'
1dadb4233a2f942080929a1e24b0e6ed
e1d54897743c239593a849528f5f3e04ffd42f93
describe
'32609' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLKZ' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
a9def00deb3bb3acfe7502aaec9cc665
9645e9317d8d86bf1daed4cf0f80a39f7011d85f
describe
'305086' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLLA' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
5303528a0a46f9b5bac4bd61e75580a7
46b9687a358031338ba814f79842b44183a2f335
'2011-10-20T04:43:33-04:00'
describe
'155597' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLLB' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
e05158b8890ad956391a93b9f10f8ad3
98ab1aaf65273bb57e998cf654038e00fd85c366
describe
'27268' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLLC' 'sip-files00027.pro'
65f68d32d03bacc9409af0ed876c5157
294e9b004fc3fd13dc46fc9425a231bc694617e0
describe
'66472' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLLD' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
b4805bae2a70ba95ced86d779b8850a6
fb4a93544f297c2155a4589ea429ad5175f92046
describe
'2462704' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLLE' 'sip-files00027.tif'
bbed2145ba9bcb959df0c91cd5d4b205
00c036b3358fccac92778721cacd98fbd5693807
describe
'1097' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLLF' 'sip-files00027.txt'
e861e80960e894a4f7bd4dbdca4786ad
8f6eb52628893e2c920f6884128bf69f28d8d44d
describe
'32597' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLLG' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
73915ec1d2b16d37d480475c592d03e8
bcf1610a825d4eb4c652b6f785d5db0693a26843
describe
'305070' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLLH' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
448463f795b0b3f85b3a666b59c4b497
6be5a7ab06d982450a7223143a37120a579193e7
describe
'164662' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLLI' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
d1c1c5e4ad1c3e52ddc1c1bb5b08895f
b7a90d4071daefa760028b75ef54c1340ecb2ee6
describe
'28672' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLLJ' 'sip-files00028.pro'
cf198989b575621ef53d2ee2fb63d53d
7a4fd29847a13c049a521c6138e3059f7132a837
describe
'68491' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLLK' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
79bf15e73234e9dbc0a9a3646c361e2d
d740e017bddecd5a9bb428ad09d84e09a45cc5c9
describe
'2462628' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLLL' 'sip-files00028.tif'
e7d9864efbe6ec00c83ed998fe69304f
ffab3641126b30385ca8a71ff0c2071d6e42434f
describe
'1135' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLLM' 'sip-files00028.txt'
126522ce331cf34fa95a741a72701ffb
dd69fec151ba66f543ec97c4eda7fab3df027a30
'2011-10-20T04:40:47-04:00'
describe
'32240' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLLN' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
664d76a5758bc1c51261019aeb20a53e
a984b5af8edf80987e1386939c69ce2e08807866
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLLO' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
c123542ff49826d6ae1a5ec3ed4acdc9
e4a2636681c17cbdab339a6b019e8b1653eeccca
describe
'162014' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLLP' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
7beaeb2ab93e5b7b6bec6e165ebd7c0a
d55780b6a51e17de8327a37bfcb79f43c6a8b3ad
describe
'28102' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLLQ' 'sip-files00029.pro'
40372e4411ac5bc0fb9b4da5d494713f
882f1ff52c0852a7f5f6787e221b9c1734896e50
describe
'66994' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLLR' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
be98cf5bdf56a9d7421aea6cc3e37555
bfcf0318bee75f8613eff6269c1e3b37720b8b01
'2011-10-20T04:42:46-04:00'
describe
'2462684' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLLS' 'sip-files00029.tif'
a769fab5fcbb4238387757f52d9d620f
e63d0ce1b75848fde8d58ebcf4f8dae1b4515c80
describe
'1136' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLLT' 'sip-files00029.txt'
a36f5bd8665b9ab345e75b3bac5d9c67
efbe98e82ac9dd05acdc664e9b4a0fb9c9e48a5f
'2011-10-20T04:43:09-04:00'
describe
'32461' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLLU' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
4c60fa6243fea6946480827e60b7f11e
9be4613b5177c6e91961930ee515b85426245e8d
describe
'305129' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLLV' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
0f33fba6216a26acf95876897fec05ed
53e32aece25d51d08415f5bb2b67364d7d3a7f57
describe
'163544' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLLW' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
0fbc04f080cf3c10daf98d23dbd12cf4
2fc814bada174697f4e96ac62e071e8b79f2bec8
'2011-10-20T04:42:55-04:00'
describe
'28157' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLLX' 'sip-files00030.pro'
56c0d62c8e5cda8693e223a8d894bbe1
c0efc78c3dfac72b00f4744bee7a2bfff96aa167
describe
'68336' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLLY' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
ce13737c5f044caa02799e15530fe6f7
b455669a9acbc7e3f2c0afc26f0e8ce26b13c345
describe
'2462720' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLLZ' 'sip-files00030.tif'
cd8f4c8f2fa6e730ec1fc03f357bff0f
0f60a087168d5238a61ce5fd7094a64f8ed50be3
describe
'1112' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLMA' 'sip-files00030.txt'
73b7757fe61ece8708eb8b52b0244142
d4dddf51c42aeb580d8d7fff402f0cd143721e0b
describe
'32802' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLMB' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
dbf5e09fc27fa34b861fecddf37c8227
f1abb663ee4d5a4b940c8cf65410b36df18818c0
describe
'305061' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLMC' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
63d91be0441750644551b52ee37925b1
bafe783fc768264dca78ade1df1bf31f4b5d30b6
describe
'161153' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLMD' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
2fb57427d72c690d43a1269e0a1a35cb
c846d4044589774946543413c4dd462c7e32ef69
'2011-10-20T04:42:28-04:00'
describe
'28133' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLME' 'sip-files00031.pro'
301d1e6d634036b18bb6ef83c531f32a
a76a208a8ac5cd545ec87e1bd32c20fa10f9d8b4
'2011-10-20T04:42:24-04:00'
describe
'68168' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLMF' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
4bdd02981cee33c6808d5574cd2a2a3b
a713c6f63a8eab2dbf51138873401f3c8ff73679
'2011-10-20T04:41:20-04:00'
describe
'2462732' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLMG' 'sip-files00031.tif'
59b8e47d250c714baf206e6f7637f60c
a2cb68268aadcf83d7334ab823bcf48a4371140b
describe
'1129' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLMH' 'sip-files00031.txt'
9a4dd7ff22fea389e19653cf65f16105
2fcc73af9c1cb340663ea8d518bdb1ee86a01bfe
'2011-10-20T04:43:19-04:00'
describe
'32681' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLMI' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
0a45048f43781a5e8ac463db07233318
fbee307de68425651a7ccd605483a15fc11ee6cf
describe
'305130' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLMJ' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
f64b6f47d2b0c39a87c309924217efca
8833870007c69241ebc14717c00cd86d530d25e5
'2011-10-20T04:41:21-04:00'
describe
'164962' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLMK' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
2bdf3c18330e683422312aec740e6434
3b692046db4c517e66d52b4ae430717e99823f8e
'2011-10-20T04:41:04-04:00'
describe
'28148' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLML' 'sip-files00032.pro'
525b41d2a55267e9442737a1e1913968
e819f572829d428937c2eb9abf860bc59442c397
describe
'68147' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLMM' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
d4255cadd87941f22914116cd68a533c
40d6cc65cc957bc39813c82b30a44baf824ae8dc
describe
'2462636' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLMN' 'sip-files00032.tif'
62321b374c1f9244958dcf144660943c
2b7fa7b9be3c49acc57492402271837189c4364f
'2011-10-20T04:43:07-04:00'
describe
'1113' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLMO' 'sip-files00032.txt'
1acb3eba677852de12a4ad377c122a17
07e2c8b29303c2a09b21ec35db3b624d2650bd46
describe
'32707' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLMP' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
9c6941237e0a88836bdf65cb9f85ea0c
e886b6d10d8546da037c1dd3dce21b36bf080053
describe
'305131' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLMQ' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
d643fd9d9e27d94d78b5cc14a4f6823d
295b2c4ee1affb174ddbbf8c6fa2220f2d8bb4e4
'2011-10-20T04:41:16-04:00'
describe
'163619' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLMR' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
79719a8cc306d08e936dd9f11eff6d4d
c951979364f5d25f3769416534fe70a114ad57cf
describe
'16065' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLMS' 'sip-files00033.pro'
8fbfb63b9471138c3d010171401a5b61
aa5cb298865e1ba3e6543cf32c632a4845eecd51
'2011-10-20T04:43:53-04:00'
describe
'62470' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLMT' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
7d8d33dfeb9b45f7e0a90b9e59aa1fe1
fec16ee36f4264c2aac41b0a6a5ad1edd7d1dd17
describe
'2462228' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLMU' 'sip-files00033.tif'
a3634abf387eca54425e26d8912ad2e2
148d6dd1b75854a758cd589e86b8b1f527c589d2
describe
'698' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLMV' 'sip-files00033.txt'
5634aba6e5b2af184248919971637e70
272efd4e522886d9e864d3a44704d3bd6e26775b
describe
'30674' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLMW' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
389c4285a32e69210a0a193a2c72f4c4
58786b1842be9e9366771dc5c5349b70b727b860
'2011-10-20T04:41:24-04:00'
describe
'305115' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLMX' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
9ca23b17c5e4b4e24c2952e5ed77d3e4
3673b5e3565c76dae0f6e9da33c10153bb78a39c
describe
'161976' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLMY' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
e36116ccb1204425dcae7b250ebb2b3e
f71aca082bc4001fdbc83ccd0cd6b5c91f8baf14
'2011-10-20T04:42:18-04:00'
describe
'27816' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLMZ' 'sip-files00034.pro'
8a21aeb5512bd69bfdab0bedb7c356b5
d995317ff0334e734411b45ed650d2ab17619d49
describe
'67948' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLNA' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
1e9963e184da9f28369f5ae1a03c1091
cb0cc48fff5548df42125e5c54d902995eba439c
describe
'2463024' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLNB' 'sip-files00034.tif'
ad21ff6273f06dbf6cb9b9a6a64ddced
3a6c4f704002b28a8e1baeb0e33cfe2c6d35c417
describe
'1105' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLNC' 'sip-files00034.txt'
01150f4894646a0261a88e799610374e
4e6f73ab184bf32a2903ebdd0b1e42cc5bf814f8
describe
'32664' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLND' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
63ef77008417aef4dade1e91da9420c9
7ed64cc427a31189c8dcce8379ff013fe700322c
describe
'305038' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLNE' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
32741857d690bd4e1adb3a23a6ab4eea
fb2d3f4b9ccf6c69f4d7330356330e6cf32cfc74
describe
'156787' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLNF' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
596a981676b4e7d6178ac5a8d6ba9b32
e11f3f7514d0ae287fa90cff34e9bb2c8fe96ade
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLNG' 'sip-files00035.pro'
4337920e17c38ba73fd7baa4b6c9c4a3
7b547a7bc81ff0f28e6727fe15074d93da72936d
'2011-10-20T04:42:42-04:00'
describe
'67681' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLNH' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
5667ed148930e80f0ca2376fb5e680cf
618d89e9a82c19e74b697b9218ddd4d87d894039
describe
'2462744' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLNI' 'sip-files00035.tif'
be8c727d15c6ca3abe01d1a5421a000b
3fac96eb83a8b0366de25eb704ba4fe9e4490ff6
describe
'1098' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLNJ' 'sip-files00035.txt'
781c0bea5cedefd9058fb17e7351e1be
737584a167d73c7f77ba140cb037c1e9a3c9250a
describe
'32588' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLNK' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
d4f94f11bbd5cf7dd1f0bf1216add8a1
9380df922e3c9b99f0fa3c05d90ec5c78633c173
describe
'305069' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLNL' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
c81de20b670ed8d718ef4b73b2b0b549
513762da92d84a78a07250ef99c8476c0f6b0ce6
'2011-10-20T04:40:57-04:00'
describe
'165381' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLNM' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
b5d99384dabfb4476d6a1bccbdff71ec
db86d38b8da0e50739b40424d2b9421519cc30f3
describe
'28403' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLNN' 'sip-files00036.pro'
abc86536076363376fc5396fc8611e89
b94f6f0c09b6bb9711f1506edc6f019e3af0fa3e
describe
'67833' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLNO' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
de7a94498377b037fa9114415c1c7f74
3ee08d92127b80ae2c4ad94066a0e36aa920ebeb
describe
'2462652' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLNP' 'sip-files00036.tif'
ba9123e8ef9949b48222bdf8ae4f9e26
e54808aafde2931199bd9b0715183e6c5142cbaf
describe
'1124' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLNQ' 'sip-files00036.txt'
da91c6855b3ecb3a8a9b528e7e5c01c9
f742bdc12bacd218d0c7361a811ee8a1eb103a73
describe
'32204' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLNR' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
4dd70bed33966192fa5f582f620872bf
d411f385ce9e668ff0bf3737f94413e423cf1229
describe
'305035' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLNS' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
cade12dbb3d3e7b8d88ad1291cb4e3fd
6e07b921fc3a7b5d368fe3a1e48933d7eac95831
describe
'136758' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLNT' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
2918ec63e06695f6ae08ea9dd6226097
55d6d898ad2e0ddc41a089ce5944ee048573635f
describe
'22402' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLNU' 'sip-files00037.pro'
b746b0443be256be9660ef49008589f8
a12c03219caa933cc0059767e019b2f71ffa044d
describe
'59007' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLNV' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
4e64008b2f28b9d6ce06e855500c7909
7202d20748ba6304fb4460199aaf32b506f87d59
describe
'2462052' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLNW' 'sip-files00037.tif'
4699a84d771c0dd733c3c3e4b539a468
fbbb6c2d2e0e9c0974f8133b7951dc13fb1dd018
describe
'904' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLNX' 'sip-files00037.txt'
bb36b11c168b3c7d8f3483bdfafe6dcf
1f977fd68e6e7b6d9e2f8cb842722e5b8fea03fb
describe
'29739' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLNY' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
8c7cb2674073d367d97e886b2f67a846
2b6fccef034aacf061b533349dbe9d81024ae83b
describe
'305096' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLNZ' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
61d0b1b3365803741ae8bccb8a7667c8
9dafd4fc05bbffca5b51c3e33a60e3b0cdfb7955
describe
'144223' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLOA' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
dd9da0a88f0ed0ee32121df1d70a036f
ea2905d22aad0017ab6126e9891fadbab7cd28a3
describe
'23288' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLOB' 'sip-files00038.pro'
addaf9ea44f14338ad9907c20409fb14
b30f995be8c6282451d429c82a2189a01b245daa
describe
'62208' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLOC' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
f3f3aff29c87610913b0ba42560f75df
0596da38a5704020bb9c597e52938eaae614f1ad
describe
'2462324' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLOD' 'sip-files00038.tif'
56634f0060a21ae31ad7765b637ada37
fed28b252c8b0340699570e46b5de366a2a941da
describe
'935' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLOE' 'sip-files00038.txt'
6d7307495947ae19c1815d891fd99a58
9ffab39b4468f30cef5ad1adde3d55d4ddf888f1
describe
'30856' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLOF' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
9568cb24a7c436cee56eb1a4e453dd38
acf1e5719d64bd3f4552cd85a82898e5615034cb
'2011-10-20T04:42:27-04:00'
describe
'297414' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLOG' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
c63ea54635e22b14bd993a8b261ffe24
2e5fefa476e8a955cefeaf94f2c88fbb690ad1a0
describe
'168386' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLOH' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
ccd1391fb79e86d5b272e912314ddcbb
1aa8df0da73ad62ce2c996357aac37280be812eb
describe
'27458' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLOI' 'sip-files00039.pro'
6355a52b3f6ef1d57eb5811623f5d74b
92ad62a165b9d582c9a6b4ab60e307831f11de65
describe
'69431' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLOJ' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
d7093971069d643fce37775854115ca9
9f041a8bc05fb01a7cc7e158bf522b2744abb4a4
describe
'2400836' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLOK' 'sip-files00039.tif'
98aada54bb7e2f6d1bb5b73dfb29fedb
94508ef3392f945652f1ee589bccaf160c53f2d1
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLOL' 'sip-files00039.txt'
7bb61d9751c7b8a87765ae23b8edfb36
a5d7b303857c155c570d9c16f9476e0614523299
describe
'33072' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLOM' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
e1e4f835e71380bff8e330d2c339d902
f43b3cb99f78de8b438efd17442a01dd4a7f28c5
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLON' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
6c9ad2940df25f5234f8dd709ae77232
ddd1b0752fbac276f9c28c9327b5ba2f840b7299
describe
'167000' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLOO' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
05cfa272e40007541342b6d15951dd57
8b0e02c55543768099afe8d7e2778c8c616760f5
describe
'29101' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLOP' 'sip-files00040.pro'
5a749f902c92dfbe855b47b87539ee14
f7174769880cc61b7ba5311f2f6701ee3beceb6a
describe
'69297' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLOQ' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
da5c1ce42d01528ef39cda2399afbae2
fb91b2541f5de634a62951819d4326acd19b509d
describe
'2462768' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLOR' 'sip-files00040.tif'
50d91a3a230b6cdca5ee7fcef7f41dc8
570619bb9a01609756e06038e4daac4aa0f85005
describe
'1144' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLOS' 'sip-files00040.txt'
68c480ce7af8c11b65e070b90959e972
58d9ab8cdc24811c1f916051201cfa7119212244
describe
'32601' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLOT' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
7c0ca79d29b12870d8c55eb0f9d69beb
88ab3157fe2d02e73b1cdb815510f3e46eab4bf5
describe
'298379' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLOU' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
0c4e0a59f26a0e758865a66b42d68cff
df488d0c21ad4fa98f8c2f9f5b73c844d4fa8c9c
describe
'171528' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLOV' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
7ac15bac5b472cb6e2c7af2434977365
c67ec7015a674b0b5f97abdd052d56faca1da0d4
'2011-10-20T04:42:33-04:00'
describe
'28636' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLOW' 'sip-files00041.pro'
0e92f9a8d6f971034d9904f221f25a1d
fa04a39e05f2c036fa01d5dc24f4449926d7c421
describe
'70811' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLOX' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
1b7c56ee447964695905bfa75782a175
a49217527786f433fc51f71d7e84fc685bfe4a80
'2011-10-20T04:42:16-04:00'
describe
'2408656' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLOY' 'sip-files00041.tif'
34cd5313ad0d791c8ad666eb30a4acd9
cb4233025bd2a7b3e03d2b198039f82c4f1f2bed
describe
'1143' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLOZ' 'sip-files00041.txt'
79a8fc779a0d473a388d9bca4f87517d
35b9a53616a50de7d9ef39c6161023c2cc92639c
describe
'33202' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLPA' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
e7ce6bb33e5a15f747aaaa37445c9f41
7cec717a3b016ea0958f5ec4db34eb7fe798dcb7
describe
'295479' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLPB' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
74b9d9c226059c4f088c5b7756d205d5
abd74091b1835b4c0ef8ee61c360444dae8f0e7f
describe
'167165' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLPC' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
ada46ac35817e0d022beed6d74a6af3b
f9d21b3116f4a1f3b35904c8a0fbb990390eb595
'2011-10-20T04:41:39-04:00'
describe
'28023' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLPD' 'sip-files00042.pro'
95ffab4378cd280df4dfbe9388503751
5fa85358827f183898ebb0d7f24032337aa2ecc6
'2011-10-20T04:43:03-04:00'
describe
'70306' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLPE' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
c37e7fed3bc5dcb603b72eda6ab6ca78
9a4166d86bc6cc276f89ff1d3917aa9cd57c693d
describe
'2385512' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLPF' 'sip-files00042.tif'
46b09f0eeb63ca8651ac3b320a8ab775
368ea54f1c90a7c7dc1a9915aab162dfca1794e5
describe
'1103' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLPG' 'sip-files00042.txt'
cb74a02af99aee6c8659503493513d09
350ecb7bae1237f1d8cce91b9eea8c42fbca8712
describe
'32989' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLPH' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
e829dd104145fcfb7d6d7cf0348e8581
c6cd0ac7822225580775738d4e7729285add7a4c
describe
'301228' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLPI' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
4621a14046b7ca8714b1578edbcc3d94
ed7cd176d6f674b1c6f58bc4dbf4339bc81214e5
describe
'168737' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLPJ' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
3b9a98dc09e7c6751c2c8d72af7fc12e
cbdc52c45e7d916c739ead52c7348fd141705192
'2011-10-20T04:41:05-04:00'
describe
'28457' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLPK' 'sip-files00043.pro'
5975288d275085d70970bb2db203e2b0
fbc49840634b0da5882a31a8607071aa528ce432
describe
'70766' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLPL' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
7c3760f09765da69a367ad16e51eb893
ccb355ff9c75f706dbcc8339dac5e266940e8cb8
'2011-10-20T04:42:30-04:00'
describe
'2432076' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLPM' 'sip-files00043.tif'
afd4fae313208049d298619af594e843
e67c26488a62bd96ff04dd8f7294a5eddf1af32d
describe
'1131' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLPN' 'sip-files00043.txt'
f0566fdad46c79b59c626df6fea7a5f4
d4ed44339817c2db84efe0104b8673e7ce374ee9
describe
'33491' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLPO' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
7ae5269ff325bfb5a4314b8bb89b4ea8
039a2dec5ed7029a9691dc796b851c836a1d30c6
describe
'304955' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLPP' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
127846594b16d48a70a52b7053e273a1
61c7dceea34bd71d334bc8e8d9a0e9bc122e5ce1
describe
'138366' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLPQ' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
4980b9727db72cd4914752a8cb48733f
89cb9190259a1d3b5621a444c1151dbaf11e0ee0
describe
'21108' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLPR' 'sip-files00044.pro'
4ec7c6f56534ca8c57cc0a1fbf4b52c5
bd6644000217adeb4126c7c6a2fbd43d6fa49c0d
describe
'58169' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLPS' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
2f90e1201105f491b37713e01c86ff84
25347604fd744fe3da11e86c5d5abbbf5c24abbc
describe
'2461868' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLPT' 'sip-files00044.tif'
c1908f071418984532d416af79c8781e
643331c8d9b6ca1ff6f57455c736a1db722e1167
describe
'833' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLPU' 'sip-files00044.txt'
d1f07472a2cbdeb75fded1c96dcfe27b
59e55bd5fb2dd3530b8dee0e711feb7f1c92b690
describe
'29768' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLPV' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
855435d0dca0c1174c01e08f3185b96e
ac8ab97ece69205dd733493bcb5822a982c05aba
describe
'297130' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLPW' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
73cb05a737ea344e40d8050b23cb3f1d
1a0e385365acf15fc68f87ea19b1c83d46a31031
describe
'121079' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLPX' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
174f142c6eb1d7ae712111990a2a63d1
f345cd740f69cb5ffa218c33b348a195b82d56a8
'2011-10-20T04:41:35-04:00'
describe
'10071' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLPY' 'sip-files00045.pro'
0627baac7a98360df7baeabef4f27c9f
0607fa1ae6052b3ebcaa1a2e7fb4b817afdb4f74
describe
'48272' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLPZ' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
5c21ce4a1ce6bb7825b154722b121549
b1505a158732f51f6efb1382c1263c9dd55b0074
describe
'2399408' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLQA' 'sip-files00045.tif'
513080ef73c5c0d427ffc154a3e248da
cacdd66f497eb2445888be645677c06126ee5627
describe
'442' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLQB' 'sip-files00045.txt'
e43e689150e98e22be4a1435e11fa64d
bd3ce9bcec5c371c32015ae3db95e1738bb523f7
describe
'27340' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLQC' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
8c9466f99284151d142a8be13c2379ff
583ec308dd9bcf4080ab1be1b7ed8ebac11f79bf
describe
'305089' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLQD' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
d0caa2e07f137a4cd1cc031a691783ce
7b6a0101f95e0c0f98e0a39bc185e9ee134090ab
describe
'167241' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLQE' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
ce2b8d9e3d061330fa212cf748fdee3d
1bbfca1d9c5756222bfc004d5d10a84607f6fe83
describe
'28656' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLQF' 'sip-files00046.pro'
dc59926d0b2d516b43fdec63e7147a9c
55618da55621e06352b228b4d7354fb778b8d4ad
describe
'69640' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLQG' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
1f277b48f32307da81e6d6432e0c0a56
af9ace5fdd720d11b726bdbb310f4a80d1741d15
describe
'2462944' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLQH' 'sip-files00046.tif'
4f18c15e5dcb3c01f75b8d617b384c1c
f316090fc4b07fd5897b8cde0816c7bd3f9d428a
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLQI' 'sip-files00046.txt'
2fa2d8e45a1e2cfc7cbac39315f7fd80
843062f1f3891b81f3c7b8a7ab6e38251b4d373f
describe
'32972' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLQJ' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
d0d9c09c26fb7af191cec6177e67f4bb
7f184495be4003fee2cf2b55483c4cdbe5100982
describe
'305065' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLQK' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
b1bcc0828f992c0c9a33b03d40cbf726
13c0d0e4eec58c1730a6b4207531a8d9a886a357
describe
'162758' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLQL' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
3a34173ab71e74c80e43f311886b18a7
741a485ec36fe77c9bd0fe86d48580d5dcd42751
describe
'27563' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLQM' 'sip-files00047.pro'
53f9d78383f8c86c4ff7bdfe3ffab97f
b60719f270dbfad2eabbaf38120fc2ff1f23a656
describe
'68027' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLQN' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
be4ce6e7a2d26f7be71435e48106bfca
65155538f89db271c419ec6e8cf8cd0879cf32af
describe
'2462996' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLQO' 'sip-files00047.tif'
5632d876be03a03475e3894d393f5b73
c0e6bea8eee12e92b4d2855f2cf3b38a886b92bc
describe
'1093' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLQP' 'sip-files00047.txt'
2e3fcb7fdb9358c59ea6344e92d9a774
65d0b28537c5cf76e7f3bcc1ed0aeeae53ea48a4
describe
'32881' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLQQ' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
74372aac6b05904c9cc2dc40622f17c0
273b1d928aecbb012052bc9edd226904b75849af
describe
'305124' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLQR' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
97ee24a9184a4591cd4940a876c775cc
2212e868022a9082ef87c621f5bbcb717c527e47
describe
'165585' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLQS' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
476cecdb8b00ee2932e58031bcd82bc0
08e295698eff3c880ff9fe4f6444826a091054f8
describe
'28616' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLQT' 'sip-files00048.pro'
e61a697dce128b83c208dbf7f66d4571
d8123f45c140fcfbafedc5dc24cc8650fe5f37c5
describe
'68745' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLQU' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
d3182204d6d30035d056b1572b5d6579
303c026933ce445e9765ec86a2c99d7dacd542a0
describe
'2462724' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLQV' 'sip-files00048.tif'
03c2fcfb1861018b5b8212edf0d0888e
f0588f6114337332e166f164aa193f3d2c9181c0
describe
'1126' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLQW' 'sip-files00048.txt'
0e6d84e41556d8d874865ec5b9fb96e5
d7139718d91f3326e88bc5a9f601f7cfb8ffc92b
describe
'32485' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLQX' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
ed312c0c79d1d9c764eece80abbcb200
ad401bfba24d763b05b8aa914dccbb82a4b571d4
describe
'305102' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLQY' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
c81775827d725b37b181fffe4ce712a3
3c3b98c65113a4208de20257104e480f547ff903
describe
'161699' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLQZ' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
2df29ecd42a462795a3c1d9209d80009
4d2add818f8778fd49ae0b03dd81f6a09432d094
describe
'28243' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLRA' 'sip-files00049.pro'
fdc2e19fda17754a716bf3eed1fbaa34
24eb281bfdb230057c34f370254ffaa082d96f7d
describe
'67574' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLRB' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
f20aead2569f5add9e8627d89bf5e667
393fd39610942aacd85504a107f381ab0f410461
describe
'2462824' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLRC' 'sip-files00049.tif'
402b6bca9fcd248f53b45566955fd784
19896d6be7778e788c246b916571e3e49b8693f4
describe
'1120' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLRD' 'sip-files00049.txt'
dbbaff1cd50e87011752f76e3e62029b
9e867e20ef1f9aea6cd5a2cab932b5a9997ebcac
describe
'32197' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLRE' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
a47ec26a8e2d76f6b71af58a7c75e6ca
46ae2d5334bf5b72a89b469bee6145b1152894fc
'2011-10-20T04:42:41-04:00'
describe
'305134' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLRF' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
7d570cfd10d84f96e4baa500afe1af1b
9df1eb59ca87518d950a744f8d63228fbeb6a8d3
describe
'156830' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLRG' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
c5e7b9e837c4dc5ff703309f14c9ca42
5178f6e3a799d9ff5e32f8f0bc80295d42bbf5ad
describe
'27302' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLRH' 'sip-files00050.pro'
c2f656078b76a655d913625a0b3ce4b2
41643c661f66f2c19b8fada6edec3e4acddd244d
describe
'66665' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLRI' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
7e0feb225de24fac56519702a4aa6934
59b5d7a04309f80386f3522d4a22d77930eebe3c
describe
'2462592' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLRJ' 'sip-files00050.tif'
3cf169863c2b740789f0f609fe9d4c9c
6425fc3a594fa1d4f6125533e1236ef5529c2ad1
describe
'1082' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLRK' 'sip-files00050.txt'
4298fc98422685a10eb88358b7aaab72
8cb975a2e32f87145bfe6fb0e7e86e9b0bad8235
describe
'32260' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLRL' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
4e95f3724ae8c2ccd0463434be7a513d
6502020e59058589aea61f9a79f10b1a31162e34
describe
'305108' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLRM' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
d146dc3833c778dcfc7395b91a37cc33
297eb579d83cfab9aa5da5aea2c59965956f1e77
describe
'103145' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLRN' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
9de5d864618589c48dc936a5064a0a86
e26e45fc3e11b6dd6e687ebdb0e7a9155c729bfe
describe
'611' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLRO' 'sip-files00051.pro'
801521a4194834503c0ee3430ce11ecd
098bdb15764dc7a361a88a83adcc072350edcd2e
describe
'40392' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLRP' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
dd3748536a5d27f4c0f96c2c6bb72f8e
ebf4f62537fd1c4a40017b050a4a3a412bbc0bd2
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLRQ' 'sip-files00051.tif'
4e22c44c2c5ec631eedbc1c58003a049
fdce4f944cbb20034abcb51f0738ec6714a00402
describe
'103' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLRR' 'sip-files00051.txt'
3eb73b0437cb5bc597f25c03eeb5e114
f3b7e7d060a31ab24d83cd2a36f9fd4f02200d04
describe
'26473' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLRS' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
0581c5af241d624348acce9b8170f1c7
29e367821e2653ba4dfbf28a63406d32d8146e84
describe
'305133' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLRT' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
a3c3f591c82e795d9970cdcfcfc76ea8
38fd7e414436f63178ac1d94483aa9e24aca0801
describe
'164894' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLRU' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
8763fe63298245a8d7a8287432db3f23
e3aecdb5a1a2332d5c37e2e729f58a2362bf11a7
describe
'28182' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLRV' 'sip-files00052.pro'
e0c83b26aee9fea2d552ea08fb4b9650
84d41947c62195f0c82a4a4496bb1bc2ceded6f5
describe
'67371' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLRW' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
27da0f0adf8c63255a59c75d5ac7e84a
822d3cf36480c0d183b470a8a4890a51dc138cc2
describe
'2462568' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLRX' 'sip-files00052.tif'
971491c4511a15bef25e34cfc6b78359
4bbaa3c9c2ae1c956ccee20bd66276fb47fc28a9
describe
'1114' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLRY' 'sip-files00052.txt'
95124072dd9eeebce94b80400511c939
339aff4d8f663a0c634a17ca16cdfe87332fd8e5
describe
'31902' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLRZ' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
c717fea91ec9e06de54da5e0e8c9611b
7ed9c5678b2a443f747111896dd9c12a9cf78be3
describe
'305099' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLSA' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
c6bf991a4449218cf1f749661fb63053
37cbb935f5aaea37db80cd5495b68b5484adf748
'2011-10-20T04:41:12-04:00'
describe
'163317' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLSB' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
df6d58c8883aebda60987d99c7712a21
c59c2614a8841bb277f3865daefbed54c8403d67
describe
'28531' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLSC' 'sip-files00053.pro'
84edb8d0cbf34991471751809b8a99f8
cc2aa9e33f0343a333645dee0f7bfe24357636b9
describe
'68379' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLSD' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
acaf92da238810fea8b2eb00054af435
a532efd45f69b233fff6f2c583759cdf90bb79a3
describe
'2462780' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLSE' 'sip-files00053.tif'
e75bfe9e42589040f854f11a0d13f27e
5b52ad00002b4a7009bb370fcc9f486a790d9ce5
describe
'1150' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLSF' 'sip-files00053.txt'
56a505f1c033c3aaf11a8a9b83dcd4d6
a0e05d62410121ced2c6b36253f330fa979ee390
describe
'32245' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLSG' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
f68a4e41288e3bcb8687a87239519996
357ae6a1e678630934b44063f4832132ced8d856
'2011-10-20T04:42:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLSH' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
b9fb84a1762315e3566f07d07fca3746
9b4c709245756419d352f096c4f25fbe6f50a181
'2011-10-20T04:42:47-04:00'
describe
'161503' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLSI' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
e958be45ecd66d0d5373fa38031358ff
8c87bcb462d7020b275bba9c238156148919056a
describe
'29170' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLSJ' 'sip-files00054.pro'
d1e5a515eb3bef3e80534bf19082d585
3fdaf686fe71d6814afc050a47146698074c658a
describe
'67415' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLSK' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
29f94b1c526c2e13bb0675ac11903a55
68f74696d84b3be3c3472c45a04e5c4f23bb85c7
describe
'2462620' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLSL' 'sip-files00054.tif'
7f4f3c823e5cf49b6a41976101fd7b41
178e96fee747faeafc5e2cdba289cc8a8e6b4c8b
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLSM' 'sip-files00054.txt'
2d8cc90f1475bc4e9ae2fc25cf4dbcea
9141c4451a839460c5b334d9072ba2682a9615ae
describe
'32066' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLSN' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
7495e181c1ed33e1e081e61d57a92b68
99ca6bcf71a8c5f1b521748924ed56aba1e95734
'2011-10-20T04:42:11-04:00'
describe
'305128' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLSO' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
8db577dcbacb47c5c34e1ec70a63470b
65477a7d23d89e18a3f5bff24255fdc2b1ad07a0
'2011-10-20T04:41:00-04:00'
describe
'162837' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLSP' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
be5c89d33e29eea0af96f498be9be25e
7adebd98649144f327c182dd870f537cb33adaa9
describe
'28230' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLSQ' 'sip-files00055.pro'
28296bf5b9e47867dba02a235be29648
48af843695603b71fa1adbc9be2159274c665ac8
describe
'69353' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLSR' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
5ef6d60a889cf23be51b6285f799a27d
7a50d532cc7ea3aacc6e6eb94185e5897b650fa0
'2011-10-20T04:41:47-04:00'
describe
'2462924' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLSS' 'sip-files00055.tif'
0218eefdb21759de5c80ae1dc177c238
eec4565db555fa9b2c59763aff3d21326d1fde73
describe
'1123' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLST' 'sip-files00055.txt'
7ae50f4cfc51668d1b663de243e8812b
e424cae8b0232b35220e29680bab43129c8a710d
describe
'32770' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLSU' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
17dedc1976081d2ad7ecdb6f1d09c64d
2a0ce002501ff1bcb7a80abbb44c4746757f28fd
describe
'314326' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLSV' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
27465876e2478e85ea022a60c3969976
d54957ea288da6b2c1c4dd7cefabe7462b19dbf3
describe
'126398' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLSW' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
83b0c2fd644f4ba9799a928776ad05e0
db3e7a115decb40e3c938171c14607ccd9bb0a1a
describe
'21186' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLSX' 'sip-files00056.pro'
4ac096e2365aad428f0febcef83692d3
87266f2bc842eefb28baf02a3e28fcbf94045561
describe
'54058' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLSY' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
82577bff9f5b91830de6a52e1ae55e16
1654afa6e872c9c2a6890ba94ec55cdd5f2aaebf
describe
'2535852' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLSZ' 'sip-files00056.tif'
0a42c860a25401d7cbd49b0eaf249dd6
189b2b04aeb9089303d14cb8e2427b9c7d63b61e
describe
'902' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLTA' 'sip-files00056.txt'
72e9273b96b47130c1ab57b09e3364e2
ac67afc80b62aee36209887766c196aae2bb8b7e
describe
'29239' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLTB' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
45cf7273922941dd0bf370f2246eb5a8
2d9a01885465b35996344261edf9ba567ec9eecd
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLTC' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
195d4ea4b8a1f9fda60a0ea1a96f2669
1158c30259d0a8d8b477c78af4ccb64fd1fe2439
describe
'162557' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLTD' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
9223e65eaa5664c9ffc996d66017ac5b
a82fb3d5897cefe527536b1fa63070175cecb9d3
describe
'28949' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLTE' 'sip-files00057.pro'
57502f5c0405a683a417dbd6ea95e37f
017cbc48030ed298df6b563dc8fbe4fad175fb8e
describe
'68096' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLTF' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
789a7e1e38bebc9163d520b3fa2d7a0a
6d71b1206114c71718de0d4598b3c07f7fff5138
'2011-10-20T04:43:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLTG' 'sip-files00057.tif'
c87bb92b3b2f83942133de599373228c
95e9e844e44420a447cf23500a761ac851dff4ca
describe
'1154' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLTH' 'sip-files00057.txt'
68b6bbceab16a6486537cff302aa2e5f
a3bd99e6c005ff453ed97bf8866c080cd20af609
describe
'32221' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLTI' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
bc4dcc6b9c71c81379d2f71fcfa4563b
7266c26867dc110a56ff086dead31ed77396659b
describe
'305079' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLTJ' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
4dc7e6c703e2ae68207c977c56e48296
46a9585c5f1003a07293e86235af702de784d317
describe
'162729' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLTK' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
8a81284a0773645a55c76c1a88ddef38
bbb9ed14207c505d5ff818f32dda4d12a0f84468
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLTL' 'sip-files00058.pro'
054324c6d325156b2614c74808b4176d
ef055f6d5d50d70429d8ac6c81e8bbb0b5ff6dfc
describe
'68417' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLTM' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
6bf00c29f4fd5a80895d07ce7ebe6432
05bce6c2c7ab55b8938429edde48917256b6d6ee
'2011-10-20T04:40:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLTN' 'sip-files00058.tif'
00d5cbfac4cf2dfaaf0141dfb486a18d
86dd7524b7df6e1ee79696520fd0f9746589f47f
describe
'1122' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLTO' 'sip-files00058.txt'
e5e4c8d9ad54fb3a8ec83500b3031d96
3386a07eb3eb6e7611eb874c4d8facd9457943db
describe
'32559' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLTP' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
7d0079293cb1a0c81a9da857f76c219d
9c1acfb61c9255e35ca4b780e31a833f4c638bb0
describe
'305125' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLTQ' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
d641b2d098489f42ac1a624bd25d13dd
d1692a7ea1697dfc2c05b5c175f88cb3e8c18a2e
describe
'153412' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLTR' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
73b8a84ba3924a96a2618736d26e4b48
9f86e654a44e2cc019483475fc5e685bd84346fe
describe
'27049' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLTS' 'sip-files00059.pro'
88635a5875efa8d119023cb78d4d6637
a21e954d8d11075b2c905a477d09ee73f4ee3395
describe
'65968' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLTT' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
a0395d85b8f74659eb8b8bfb47468ede
79d46eb11cb926093e434fc13dc77453e8991eb7
'2011-10-20T04:41:25-04:00'
describe
'2462692' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLTU' 'sip-files00059.tif'
aadc21e0d5a56a71e7f806c3f00d9299
c8d23a11dac737c4ab8d81ce3ce9a73fa2953841
describe
'1099' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLTV' 'sip-files00059.txt'
cc40e9385f9360e8ff3e03c5d836b9a9
a6d2e1c098fcd0672f7b15f21adf79c0a54be79b
describe
'32215' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLTW' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
fe309cb84b33e9be5c43bf181ad849a1
64179f7c507cf06de42152aac296ba8083543263
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLTX' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
89d4845980de822d4a6141ed4fa18553
51ac917710a1f9ba782c5ec6e622f156ca0f566c
describe
'161576' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLTY' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
69d11dd4a00077ced0f30f7e923ec1aa
314fb46a46f491e579d6ef4b8f2e45d05fd5dd85
describe
'27391' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLTZ' 'sip-files00060.pro'
96d8b1fa004b1420fb4de91a8e107e87
33da86456a361b876e717c79687f6e2552a40994
describe
'66219' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLUA' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
5677a9a64baa4af9a5f197b7e0352127
3de5970e1f5c14831f135621f94e09438bcff93e
describe
'2462488' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLUB' 'sip-files00060.tif'
e85e06bbecceac5633d5a46dc0f27781
4facf81d439f8aede78585d85d22e61a4167807e
describe
'1079' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLUC' 'sip-files00060.txt'
eefc36da821ca2a73fcd788bd3a66960
f1b9bd12477d05a574c8e858acb2271579e820b7
describe
'31718' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLUD' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
63ee6c36ccec8c4f8ffd28db0aa5ddff
1480cf7c0b798e5ed2f59968982f841e82a49889
describe
'305112' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLUE' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
fe5b7b6f645a3cf6b1d7493b1bd84ebd
e38fabe2ca95d0befa414f82af7906179012c48b
describe
'161372' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLUF' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
c7e3c6e48a00de42b5fec749842759bc
82851792236f28d0a703b47d000731a001c480be
describe
'27638' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLUG' 'sip-files00061.pro'
a9cbbcd991be8f34df04505902506a8d
1c11a87b31dbd2ab15d856bd9a91798453cab0cd
describe
'66764' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLUH' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
e4c2d4857521c6d8df739a6377f79955
9d7eefb41509d6902a0ad47be65059f51d1c35be
describe
'2462624' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLUI' 'sip-files00061.tif'
0188d6feae0c569ba216afaf4832897a
254d9abc96f3e1e9448be03079fe3648fcf710ff
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLUJ' 'sip-files00061.txt'
0a18d80eb3400830a3441d668308f5d0
b5eb5556b8a3b11b0100126e58b54681f62f2b21
describe
'32208' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLUK' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
4db8179edee7ed9473fe632f0fc70cc3
87415a411f067711e028c35d593196ab4feaebf8
describe
'305094' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLUL' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
8d8ff2d070bf493c62385e2a6efb1176
b87c44484ecb03b9dcb93b842503469a5e09de17
describe
'162228' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLUM' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
14fdafd2677e31ef469da2d4d3ece0c8
dd6c9c6d78288d2ad9a9dcf3b7060e93bd0dc1d4
describe
'27851' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLUN' 'sip-files00062.pro'
03d9713f95eeea9ac07fc902d4cb5143
248f0837ff2aed4b74faf0b421b8301bb774eec8
describe
'68349' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLUO' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
2ab5c6243ed4295966a13bce3bb8d6ca
963f7ee92faf2d0de31068fe1257df7514181b44
describe
'2462756' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLUP' 'sip-files00062.tif'
bd0ed738733f8169fce8ac4c7d7af3f4
29abb3fb01fdcc7055c5a3b2726d7fce93e18eb2
describe
'1100' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLUQ' 'sip-files00062.txt'
76b38432abe81b68f810d62acc5a8071
a1069f19b029b4d7aea18f6612bba1cd0dac1632
describe
'32635' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLUR' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
bf82b7baecaee8a418dfa27475c07e51
04b3c4eace983dff32b99a7b7edb7abcffe88d75
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLUS' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
546a9ed1420a98a32b2d52dc9f75bc21
3b0f7bcb966fef619d6c729dd7e439b1238d9bf6
describe
'159770' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLUT' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
2600f998eda7b37a6e08eccbea37c400
df4a3b07cf707820ce5a4342ac6539c1dc093124
describe
'28378' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLUU' 'sip-files00063.pro'
7ee4544e93491b81e39c5b87ad9b034c
1397966f068584f4dab736f5298d455cd57c23f2
describe
'67573' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLUV' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
672b97274bdde14ffec36e09346249fe
3086997e410ded1fca75afd5d4a7d7d9368b3a5b
describe
'2462868' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLUW' 'sip-files00063.tif'
cf7e14bb142536ad45ce2a9bc9bfb135
2fa1b05f918d801d0428e1d7c4e68bf8ba8990a3
'2011-10-20T04:41:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLUX' 'sip-files00063.txt'
542036ed8c6041ee4d255cfed352dffe
b5939a033d1fb0ad2501a261a7cc4b51c51692c2
describe
'32413' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLUY' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
837954674e0278afdf0db9d906cd36c0
32367f1a10d6fba81a4b9905e095198cb3a99cfd
describe
'305103' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLUZ' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
ef33bce9b0e93277de747ba03c3a8f65
d05fb6133301f5f8f09b866fd0eaf9b5fb58c186
'2011-10-20T04:41:42-04:00'
describe
'142224' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLVA' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
7b2e6945800867f57633d573f8b14a7e
95091e16749603501e58ea64665a775efcbb97bf
describe
'23634' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLVB' 'sip-files00064.pro'
3a0afd34ecf0bea7f56a028537f118ba
4f31191b51ba4b987ce8b222bf878f18bda3b124
describe
'59892' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLVC' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
8c1591f75682fdad67d426c631de6c89
5d27e4c105575aacc88382f149426ddd892f8b98
describe
'2461896' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLVD' 'sip-files00064.tif'
693958558bf3d839a23fdb5518bbc057
467285990098e2d66ee6f17dbbc9230627154c94
describe
'933' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLVE' 'sip-files00064.txt'
a210b07c94645ff9c6828eba0815cbbe
0b793bd4d9bb71a39e8c645bfa882ee584ca9e19
describe
'29685' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLVF' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
51a6c317ec86741566f3ca089cbce27d
eb2bca33c6175bc1e69c2bd2137d74303c106e58
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLVG' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
07e9b7fd5df2508da3239092133d8d3b
1571c84f4cca825ee9673709a6ea578617cf57a1
describe
'138960' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLVH' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
1861a63253cbb6d7750d58f275fc74fc
f2651c14374fed50f8379392fac1ab0ea41de12d
describe
'22185' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLVI' 'sip-files00065.pro'
2abf5535d6adf134f009428df3707453
975145529666b893ba74dd2057b25bfe2d854f81
describe
'58639' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLVJ' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
6237ba69eb1efdd6057d8db92ee052b8
c1131e3b112bfb0586e14d3ba87bab0523132b78
describe
'2461912' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLVK' 'sip-files00065.tif'
ea806ab78c5ba269b381c41f718bcd12
610923396a6fa0fe906727332ced6811ec8ad7dc
describe
'894' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLVL' 'sip-files00065.txt'
3f3f5510265511fa2be29f6c4bb9bd5e
eb43736bd1377b10c56e3ed62e5c51fb90192e88
describe
'29812' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLVM' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
aff1b4febd57b2ab00a257e9b6a4ee05
a19a4e53e2d25e88a6d9c517f4389d43b9873b40
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLVN' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
2ee1be755ef5be44cfc7729b7d4a4f91
cdc6f649e9f2cad1e87f2cf9a58c1e6d4d3e9fa8
describe
'192383' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLVO' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
a177b91208e546d6cf4be318432d0b71
edf0c3d3849b2b55a7f29e871783a6a8f6af938c
describe
'10273' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLVP' 'sip-files00066.pro'
cf259a3af9964f0535cb043a74e85988
2e7f55e1abcdabf57c5f331d367aa04c641edb54
describe
'65387' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLVQ' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
420ff9c896c6fd302413a2019d2d6271
691ff73a7880c49d4c0bfeb28f20e256f87e6871
describe
'2462772' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLVR' 'sip-files00066.tif'
f387930e31c53f52291cf9011a3a7f66
24fa4789d2c0d390a2d8b23712eef62408d0866f
describe
'414' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLVS' 'sip-files00066.txt'
cf68041e01c83b8db5d552ca2d227c6d
e7ca54483a4f5b9eb30185ddb17c1e07b11e1a35
describe
'31870' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLVT' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
69e92582427c05914050136eb29a4343
f44ab036490123fdc34b6a7785d3a4cc13ad4b64
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLVU' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
3e45c4b47a558b9f26c49d7bbd6f5bcd
d182e090d47b9baceb36bd79462979bc26631634
describe
'161172' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLVV' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
5be1edf094dbfedec952b039242ec65e
aef9f75d00f94900697827730926121c1cb064dc
describe
'28292' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLVW' 'sip-files00067.pro'
a7d90b8e541ee5603ecda2ea6a1597d9
67fe50c56a1f98c6889923955d6ae7e1f66db3e4
describe
'68390' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLVX' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
7c0fb8442c2dc5ec3ac6eb39d76c90ae
6634aa678ffe69739e8e8843537f11a124e4da90
'2011-10-20T04:42:52-04:00'
describe
'2462992' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLVY' 'sip-files00067.tif'
72832ccc60e88db6638543af20571f7c
6cecd9a72c174fcd6fe6d5bb6263c87645fea9e3
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLVZ' 'sip-files00067.txt'
5af0b075df4b2cf9b8d3f54a22ff6932
793ee63c770111e9ff8f8e90f93e815911c011bc
describe
'32794' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLWA' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
24c46bb8bbfb5a744b99eabc7ff43bf6
5da07259261f677671f1995ea531a9dd6b0b2c16
describe
'305120' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLWB' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
30c02a4fd5d525a1c7acb82eb0cb3d42
bd045f60b84b7fae4b90f027ab69078d35abc2c5
describe
'155530' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLWC' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
300a75610066e5b239c4a27434ccfb7c
52b5ca538a40017dc46436cf9ad2d22b099ff5a0
describe
'27052' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLWD' 'sip-files00068.pro'
fb8ce94b84ce8d16a453c588a0a7f8b2
75098e335d34375a7dddc87fdefd2606ecf10cde
describe
'65769' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLWE' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
ed00906bbbd3e93ade0e73b5ea4beb9e
5b6725f2e1ccc1c262db2d046835afae03015d20
describe
'2462528' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLWF' 'sip-files00068.tif'
32de6957914ccca5602eb0fbab080f84
a96c22127b95834df04a3a778ecd8b26f5f186e6
describe
'1084' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLWG' 'sip-files00068.txt'
d165dee05c9a649ede8c7b43439fa865
65ec9b198fc0690ad99b549ea92126844065d810
describe
'32027' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLWH' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
023d5b42ba79909a14525ab06d6c5e6d
c0b4ea616f6d15afde06ddaf288627d905e3e975
describe
'305018' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLWI' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
59308e3ec73a900cf1dbc1ef79176307
0a70b28355ab06d60f744e9aea5049d1e25a6fe1
describe
'229325' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLWJ' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
d14a140d5b52d6a8f0e2ff0a814dc7cf
cddaca0f215127da454f947b847881eb59aebf65
describe
'1773' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLWK' 'sip-files00069.pro'
ba0c05d77c3163dfa7e60e037fa897ed
1ef2c43ebe7dda31bb253fbb077a9bddb5b2d262
describe
'68207' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLWL' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
593df71f7f78898a83b0b891bcccf9bd
7d61a3f738251d39e1024e58abfc69bd2ae5e4f8
'2011-10-20T04:42:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLWM' 'sip-files00069.tif'
2728a2c9c879d4fd5b50f0feb93b19a0
c7199903a453eca5f4f7435076a45cceee328c2a
describe
'193' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLWN' 'sip-files00069.txt'
1b2738f294c0bf40f0585ac33e98e28a
4688fbe80c68dff8d20ba18a1dfb7d2c4b3f7d2c
describe
Invalid character
'31617' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLWO' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
24ea75d2635bcb3f4bd7ee9372e14b32
2a57da5159ed1b473e54a7e0bb9ae4ef11fc043a
describe
'305121' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLWP' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
9f3a5b64c87c0999947388f6410aa0e4
df5872ed80d8dc39f41922a90169071fe4e701b9
describe
'155571' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLWQ' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
6637c66a761ac167581bc2c4d2b9e700
62a904a43e0e1bd61e1a327bc6926f21ac9fafa1
'2011-10-20T04:41:11-04:00'
describe
'27163' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLWR' 'sip-files00070.pro'
07090a946aff6ce22e3e5ee18791c8f5
312e0beba67a9aed38782b7df91e95cd9483448a
describe
'65653' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLWS' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
1c8df7f4ad0b2f78ee49b5b72a36f0e2
2c60f17de4840f264e5c4e82e6aa57febdd1505e
describe
'2462388' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLWT' 'sip-files00070.tif'
e6f917a6c0ff9cfb12a9c1c855d26f44
ca2b1eb7e52c7404df6c97fe4d30d6e1138eb898
describe
'1080' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLWU' 'sip-files00070.txt'
b8a2b9a9ac140f1a4b70d45109240841
f776cc4868a51628fc209f825dc8b108bf14f10f
describe
'31938' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLWV' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
29446c18af5dc72f5a459958be818fcd
14673ab447a5d93f52025116316c55390aee6768
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLWW' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
f3469b293f91eb5d7d6c5093dac2f0fa
3e57adc3233bc8010765012aace1f885f23f265f
describe
'156920' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLWX' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
8f8d66a6a87b72780b06fcc1cdcd0892
4db239255c2c51a870fab809b2cce72d96a9402d
describe
'27602' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLWY' 'sip-files00071.pro'
579a4413c18213fb40fadb9dab4dafc1
2bae588967b31c3751bb0306a8cc01c690ad8d64
describe
'66876' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLWZ' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
79c1ccec9579fa54da1465fd34df64ce
97e6690a6d751961e5072d175a05314f8d4cffdf
describe
'2462708' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLXA' 'sip-files00071.tif'
a5cc2370bd51c056a463953e681a3aab
b5e26b8442bb82408ff21da7f73d008101e86425
describe
'1138' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLXB' 'sip-files00071.txt'
869283356c32fbeb7a9ec2574ce00f31
85f07535ff20e64d6d9d200c8bd363e15b62b527
describe
'32388' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLXC' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
760feac1270056dac5c69a124583601b
a1a1106085bf929518f0cb83e61470ab1efdb31f
describe
'305082' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLXD' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
dd1c3e87530576a2b68101da5c02f71e
1bd2a34411829ac9308c9b2b0caf944b39f2d487
describe
'162172' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLXE' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
03fc7726b701fa4808d5d88468fb8779
7408e689e8f8dc4ca1b6dbd441634472e664e56c
describe
'28079' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLXF' 'sip-files00072.pro'
9039a98a9299f0c1a24fd8ce97199283
f5a546fbf5568a67e5fd329f265d2e34fd75e979
'2011-10-20T04:40:41-04:00'
describe
'69271' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLXG' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
a238c214ea0b59bdfb326bb1e40d9356
ad532e3c8aef178deccfe836fd7c85272a18d9fe
describe
'2463004' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLXH' 'sip-files00072.tif'
3327b5ff97f8fd453349f86fa9808ce3
2448b70ff88420624cc97881ac248ebe5a17a3e7
describe
'1106' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLXI' 'sip-files00072.txt'
1037a9336124be339acb6f174f8fec4f
0791af1c16704c4da1bcec21195de1f552dd3a90
describe
'33045' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLXJ' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
212517aff4b1fb53e9e743363b0307c7
d2cce332ab8662d00e0b305de5bfb1ae235900aa
describe
'305126' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLXK' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
8280c7e0ecd435aaeb3b3dd2b3909c88
dd88621670eeb5966cffb8a777f4429766dc8631
describe
'156068' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLXL' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
4afd31980d483bfff2d77b0ea9eab663
5c8ce8cb7e4534654a18b554b5a1214d619a3d58
describe
'26904' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLXM' 'sip-files00073.pro'
84f5aaf365181125e7dd8cd925683d14
04c3ad810e5b7c04caf6f1a45af914f926d3d9a1
describe
'66992' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLXN' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
3a4e02d9d1620874d9873fc096cd616c
52c042dee20ac4daf353ab2c7cbcbf5166ad0837
describe
'2462908' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLXO' 'sip-files00073.tif'
994303a6c08c9c8c7cb7ddb2e9eefcc8
15be3795f25da202c8da0405dae440f107db8bb3
describe
'1095' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLXP' 'sip-files00073.txt'
db65cb661a5954874409bb0871a9cc14
7e5da8a20ea13617da95c566434f336b670aea62
describe
'32507' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLXQ' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
94f76afed57272fa1809e20ab9819564
75c9ab1c524ba568e5d54ec8309fb99078712557
describe
'305109' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLXR' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
dac40b1d991f3092872c2ef48c1a76cd
4d0ccb93b9a3855a31fe80618bd6d8811375ba66
describe
'159848' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLXS' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
1d4fa2f786ccb0b9ec9be682195f5fd4
c29c60869358f6a3d8c465d24bef263bcfbf6f5c
describe
'27976' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLXT' 'sip-files00074.pro'
9b8e0cbef026641919dc52520aa5b093
3a7487aeb235b0fe50e5dbd30b11bdab5be2b601
describe
'67073' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLXU' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
3894abd67ae827238d44180c750f3846
c8a759324c59b02dafe86c60798be144b89294ab
describe
'2462584' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLXV' 'sip-files00074.tif'
49d1d7f318ba38b64e196caf2f206e07
dd48cbd1c4cbdcfd6484b0f2c8915e8ed1b333ee
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLXW' 'sip-files00074.txt'
f1d93c558e487d7bc26f4109e1f28dd9
c806782bd492696cb879ccffb3d6fdc755649f17
describe
'32176' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLXX' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
2a7ca73b5ef405b63a5903b70ec60708
87e2b6f7f22611d4ebc44c6a7936547e07c833e8
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLXY' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
8920de5b67d72e6361ed7337fed0a676
6666ca772870f5e381a45c969f7ee2779fab3bc3
describe
'160113' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLXZ' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
a0f74bed96a708bb6161724d1c462d17
8727047074df47e1c1c6838abd51fc3d342a03e1
describe
'28544' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLYA' 'sip-files00075.pro'
12e156fffecdcba4c047c6a1fae1ace4
2ce8b4abf51e50c805128b49868238622f9ba3b2
describe
'66770' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLYB' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
b6402e97c6680c4e79526a59b60353ef
eb201fe8d67df9071b190d17b6db8293a38d3e5d
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLYC' 'sip-files00075.tif'
26b3552c361f6b34ade6ac002dfd05c0
28fd977f9572ffd025d173157788e5c3df575035
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLYD' 'sip-files00075.txt'
c463a401c549e295218d728ec023f7f8
f137d4d11686bd53a599f98db93f1d4ba8468f59
describe
'31943' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLYE' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
49f67411b866ab0223f5d8633052fb44
4305790fcf06905d03f72529be1b513398c402fe
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLYF' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
a9f18c639441e6f53371d35398180ac6
00e4b472feb26168783c32634fb076a10b1b5929
'2011-10-20T04:42:02-04:00'
describe
'161070' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLYG' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
7efd4b5a6b2ab03d59faa990111182cb
b5baec9871b970c699be74ad3fea4c1f6b73eda6
describe
'28481' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLYH' 'sip-files00076.pro'
cc9a1071b807beab580343e34f2140c5
8124ad3111257037eb9a2f1da9c96d439a59956c
describe
'68122' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLYI' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
da05ba2264fe8412b551ddd22a42e4e6
5dd001426b1596b7f10d6ced974bc664644d99be
describe
'2462764' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLYJ' 'sip-files00076.tif'
c5a83a87904b991eb9f4a6b6329dc796
82b908a74530d248c5b8341974b5bc48c3d25e29
describe
'1148' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLYK' 'sip-files00076.txt'
d7f72cf0813919a47a546e0b8a1c9664
818dcc3aba0941293d039a6ab6cac15c08cf0b46
describe
'32150' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLYL' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
d684259cdd3db3d4e9e3215a98bcbbac
78b7b931dfb4518e889564c4458a6139be30a068
describe
'305118' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLYM' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
5d73d28ea0a909db51f514196948340c
1d7b933cc753a673ae707e4d58ed5fe74d21c0bd
describe
'161844' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLYN' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
077a1b7bee5bb51943aeea8503af9d8c
e9fbd422496516def2d264e83077d489ae717c89
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLYO' 'sip-files00077.pro'
cb0a7e5326a0a80a2c402388ed0856af
198d31a93dadbb651655411f0870c21ab52e381a
describe
'69830' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLYP' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
fd968fe79fdc86810a3fda95ac4f3dda
2d3096c020105fc48a472571c6166f17c67100e7
describe
'2463200' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLYQ' 'sip-files00077.tif'
3d44b3c1ecdf01f17a8c89312d81d800
07ad3a008f5c426eb4023019297bb2ad161402ce
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLYR' 'sip-files00077.txt'
ac6d367202afd3c9a8883ddaa3aa11c9
a6328db6f3c6230411a2bf4ea2270c5b56edc293
describe
'33196' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLYS' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
95dd4e11bc9c9562b244227e5c516c99
7707b99117600a4df082a6453d381d7a356a7165
'2011-10-20T04:41:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLYT' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
ce43778172e6776bdfdf939aa38db353
545d00abe7ee69517a1faf6dc8660fe2b13b492e
describe
'150273' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLYU' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
4c64b2d29918e3661dc1e336aee8c0a9
c1b393dd924fadbb4719d4f106f6b209f7bd6218
describe
'26463' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLYV' 'sip-files00078.pro'
cfe419ffa9307d73bb444322977b328f
f41c5e04948708ad281475bdf285c9b89cd2c388
describe
'64560' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLYW' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
1451203ed0ff6d8082c559454e22e478
967b6bf3eee977f6bf095339c3b609985fdac653
describe
'2462476' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLYX' 'sip-files00078.tif'
b25de0737dbf834634fbf44ea63df864
516219d2ecfb2e3134d994bd25091cf84ad2d20c
describe
'1057' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLYY' 'sip-files00078.txt'
8158dbe70871e57fc3140925a2fc9931
d0655de73b80f6ba43af3c3efdb9f2365b19916b
describe
'32161' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLYZ' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
d1a96d26bab6d6f90682aea4da7f5523
d621200b3f5d657a45e841b4ab206c8a7d7ffc63
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLZA' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
d0b8f7678098e2d1422b45f451b91744
fe7ee6c7c9a59ed7a68133542d97fab9741e0294
describe
'158896' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLZB' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
2f1d0971092a4787d7ae3d16e88f8b32
37c11aea36ee5505742ea0d07626a70ab5b27508
describe
'27787' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLZC' 'sip-files00079.pro'
57d6960350b01a9deedc8e80a8a07a7c
4e364434812cba87d1752db4da42ad0a817a174a
describe
'67712' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLZD' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
cbd14f7d8decb985c109862c9c794c6b
566bdd43d0cb96e3141f15fa595c4dd88d37e16c
describe
'2462928' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLZE' 'sip-files00079.tif'
9630492009c593f38274cdc86487f82c
becb6716b8bfd9c31ffec29d1733e838d7c02585
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLZF' 'sip-files00079.txt'
028be1ba93ab59cd934e1aead171c956
26d353e4fa39ebbe58f464965460f1c97593916b
describe
'32549' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLZG' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
be0bb420bb95ec2dd99ac093b1b3b303
88e4557748bca045e6d6934bfb20218613027c6f
describe
'305116' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLZH' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
2f4478ebfaa8722e8d8c1b02bd6e3713
0196d2bd03937e957761a2ba601a3e1017d061c9
describe
'162624' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLZI' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
d81924f5493e9b4de937de6da3d3ee92
1511c33a76d6d8f26299cb4c028be6e83ef78099
describe
'28106' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLZJ' 'sip-files00080.pro'
430b7469f6720eee246e17d6591ecf02
373ad493f1a2d95ee17879de1fc5bec22528c674
describe
'68882' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLZK' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
869ba9151ea1f9a666eddea97f2f5bc0
940f2e16ac30004afea49f32912786392e629429
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLZL' 'sip-files00080.tif'
2dde74a04f739c7066f8135c6cd18c48
65d20caeaeb48ba40d280b1452a7c1444cb51c3c
describe
'1109' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLZM' 'sip-files00080.txt'
a8356f105a0170056eb239f53919b500
c13f0051a689264d22a3d516f8145cb0744780af
describe
'33060' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLZN' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
bb8ae6e077fed8d74a697a2af240f5f2
7c5ef78989a7efa77d99127ae60731574a843eca
describe
'305119' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLZO' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
8b7f100606181df8000be3ef1cc759d9
734b130cf90de936d87b34b7c53c30ea0f42baaa
describe
'162465' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLZP' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
2d234eddb87da8f85ee0bb7232dd4397
a1bc048e56e8eb6978c3493cb607d626b2cc2869
describe
'27926' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLZQ' 'sip-files00081.pro'
053a97543e65fa2ce4360dc34b11701c
4d8e992d254325a952017fa765769bdaee1bb241
describe
'68403' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLZR' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
7fd4469bbbc3abc07024416ba8f4cac9
2d31aff01527c43e60079312a9f5b5f649e46fc1
describe
'2463088' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLZS' 'sip-files00081.tif'
5d1e8129a6ccf19d32b3245fd3e9df68
f10a4fb2908c87986912cb5791a188fe4ec0d8fe
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLZT' 'sip-files00081.txt'
1bcbf823b992d3738aaa98347d9a0aa1
0a375a36631e4b9a632c5b322cda676a5ca0613b
describe
'32840' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLZU' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
f14558c4b157f684d42a5d1af10d4769
ed3558f31a1210a6ce15ef2006619a31a112b79c
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLZV' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
0e333c0e9f33850060f6f9c481055da0
89c79997fd5a7d91dca0a3f42576b10238b6f3e9
describe
'161262' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLZW' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
f593ce2813b7e8167b0b47328cf8355e
97b269003682cac027fc04c092f496625cd79718
describe
'28500' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLZX' 'sip-files00082.pro'
ecef750e72320b0f6d3a7d0b79429434
5d285db4e82b3dbc49262a4da345779229219410
describe
'68580' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLZY' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
2e840270c21e8510149ecae27fa8ff7a
cdb8bf25b445fb3b3ea6b5b163aaaaa0f81bcf1a
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACLZZ' 'sip-files00082.tif'
3e3b819825b26a098b089be98c3c2db3
5a76af41f08b5d215b849c090319f960025f5792
describe
'1127' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMAA' 'sip-files00082.txt'
1c7374487f777d2314532219a6ae419f
dda0f9d3bacd9615fd73d5b46d9396f14106af14
describe
'32790' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMAB' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
080caca84a3e75807856e531d7ea8251
1a13f130398daa7e16c924d0e47baa75a07c80f5
describe
'305008' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMAC' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
99aceaec12fd84f93bb6fa63a7d6a9c7
ee75f5b8ab4a54df0a6edbc5c38db5828e3d71bf
describe
'110314' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMAD' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
e88ff6ec1818e6a6b09d52d9205d43ed
66dc9cdfabbc58091da80e577ca68ed7249802a1
'2011-10-20T04:42:50-04:00'
describe
'11542' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMAE' 'sip-files00083.pro'
6dca774cb4e32c4d72b7990d44ac307f
12b7268f97a4770dcf317bdb1b3c535397c5e462
describe
'46564' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMAF' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
c00d6fdda1e9fc3bf6f6f9fd3d687393
630c3c49445b28c055a2a1e824ae1cb70c78387c
describe
'2460964' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMAG' 'sip-files00083.tif'
a4fa9032fad98c0ac673368ebb0a3911
4cc561ba5b9739409ef43c13f7ea024c0d4251b1
describe
'473' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMAH' 'sip-files00083.txt'
1be9f85a1a12d2333b70e000b70a2f0f
6bfec372c5a79fbde6c6236af7a176b29b19e57b
describe
'26553' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMAI' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
812a21a4238771f8cb3afb91c3a63be5
88be1b2aa55e46da97c64d2f5feda915d985a148
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMAJ' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
e0951c74ae923278fe14dbf1467c6683
ee348ba87a3fcac8f5a1c178553156c22f644d7d
describe
'141175' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMAK' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
89f4d898ea27670d96156aec267f3fc3
ce6dc1c63cc19a7c9e33b01344e66834d80f563c
describe
'22060' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMAL' 'sip-files00084.pro'
46b5083618fc1fed11ef5592cf70872d
f200c9b13f126c58637964f54be2ba4a3708b540
describe
'60395' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMAM' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
87547b954d4f0cb2792dfffbe303167e
1df3b9fd9d0db47f0520330352de5196a1602b6d
describe
'2462120' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMAN' 'sip-files00084.tif'
05627450215eb6bbf7b44fd5bafb0672
86afcfa932097644f2ce7a916696374dd40b9931
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMAO' 'sip-files00084.txt'
4143fdbbf20e28234d5f8333db9c3106
91d42e9e9e52fc11f773abca411aa59265252e18
describe
Invalid character
'30508' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMAP' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
0b7f51dc8bcfeee80cdb7277f071a7a2
6205d013edd603387fd1ba64cb7e7bfd9488d892
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMAQ' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
21dbb40a1c1b2b31bd8f5a99d9bc9035
be5523b8dcc8cd6a0242a88d19e18a296f2a569f
describe
'154520' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMAR' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
f3f27238e23a8a5337127bc3c05481d3
21ebddec0e0078411809a796a022f6255db11aa1
describe
'25834' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMAS' 'sip-files00085.pro'
ebf09385be621566e8dc12e949c0ff03
9c0269940366c1653d1e03ed6c6c8eda47186ec6
describe
'66606' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMAT' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
4aa33299a448a21ddca95cae5d2071df
037d00bccc9fa4d537683983903bf238665bd835
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMAU' 'sip-files00085.tif'
f5e537710ca3fbbbeb9967681c7fd2a5
b7f3299cb86631f8eeb93ec887b8e781f219710f
describe
'1037' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMAV' 'sip-files00085.txt'
4c31f8f752743da88d64f800b932f3f3
a8d25292052346dd2fb2e3604ed2d71953bc7800
'2011-10-20T04:43:54-04:00'
describe
'32968' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMAW' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
f16742cd87931cc6b663ab337c54ea65
1ca1e2175caa7155871073fda89f26fd1aaecbdc
describe
'304915' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMAX' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
e7950832f0c4d3d89f895f29f791438b
ac0cf841169445f06626c62fc5f1179fa31db017
describe
'132994' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMAY' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
d28a2207bb19e1bb52a307642e018d5f
350cb78847e5debfd58194a44bb38c78d98a6550
describe
'7059' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMAZ' 'sip-files00086.pro'
77fe38a3c5dd472d864b60b6cede2a83
1d03f9cbd2b413312c56b7f5da2f38dda1293260
describe
'49753' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMBA' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
c7189efff6e6347e1d3ab52c97f1573b
e7ca45b370ffea5571fae783e40e2b9bc4580781
describe
'2461304' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMBB' 'sip-files00086.tif'
a6818414afd27c0ceb97d2ae8d9cbb35
e4295cdf7a3688a75b6719fd42cd573b45a90a23
describe
'289' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMBC' 'sip-files00086.txt'
688ff97b06d8b1d362e6c8f17741c4bf
0ccf04e3a6047bff7f04238deee62eb733277051
describe
'27651' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMBD' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
d4f4d19840545ba60b5b3e604cc32635
fd6c14e767edb9d6a8923157d8f64fb0f09822bc
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMBE' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
3043c9baac93ccb1d8f35b20ca931a08
c0929c81f7892e7cb21c668dde2095cadf5c4c4e
describe
'177893' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMBF' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
f402590ee7b5d674633d20f3e8e01bdb
61b7b53cca4cfb2d76843c1bf30f204f0c4d3bbc
describe
'26000' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMBG' 'sip-files00087.pro'
3cae3c0bda6714e9fa8a1dbfded61d43
57781d7516da3ae2b9c3e36517ad523042d2ab75
describe
'67220' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMBH' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
9b5ad3b15c049d48a659cb89f2388930
45f9759abf157468e29e883c9be81e5c9741e191
describe
'2464164' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMBI' 'sip-files00087.tif'
b57dcaeb3195a9244ea264082aac785c
cacce5b319ae7e54f937529db82c02884fc2e434
describe
'1182' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMBJ' 'sip-files00087.txt'
8061a14df06b33eaf84fee6b3d6d2eb6
778cd23c14b2db52a1724e4b564b8cc249c1fc35
describe
'35217' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMBK' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
8f6a17e2b042ac425f2818a29b5d6067
928c071b84aaebfb706363a537d52b613ecfb26f
describe
'305101' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMBL' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
e658309906f660a3176c127f58f6ca13
87a5b696940d4eb528b4d3a794024d37ad7b7fc9
describe
'174150' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMBM' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
e9ab05fc1c6be9c694f55a2245434ca5
99bdda0a90d1846a25de705c0281017368891f14
describe
'38500' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMBN' 'sip-files00088.pro'
786dad1f8ff588efaa221a16a3b8e5d1
14b376d2d63d366452c690a347350483d6dc9b48
describe
'63824' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMBO' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
acce6048abfb6e1a6f479d4d0347b6c7
2413a336d3c82641c2ffffbaea76b564c5240553
describe
'2462980' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMBP' 'sip-files00088.tif'
77b137a65ef592213d3d7a5029d663cd
e1a6807b4cc48f36a53597a4c9b0b5d99dbcfe83
describe
'1697' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMBQ' 'sip-files00088.txt'
3a095d4806adfd3f53f469bf241d5bf0
9b93ab11287c88efff5c635827dbc65240413757
describe
'32333' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMBR' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
4bfdd3aeb9a6a891dc6b84552a7b7293
1ba877817b35c7c0df2c008524ed9705d8c0928c
describe
'304909' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMBS' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
46f6529d48c2be907c96b3050eb50074
f9fe02d985bf9b3aea71d5daf068da12177c29db
describe
'214378' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMBT' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
faa8bcb0a904d3dbb956e438cf57a92b
d01c4e3129cbc12c629ce51e6710d71277355a05
describe
'62070' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMBU' 'sip-files00089.pro'
9f102ebc7fa37153402c6df173b72ac1
dba06a36ad38cac17ad8cb45af6de0e8bebb7ce4
describe
'76561' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMBV' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
e72c56bd5d69aa4491cdf1e3e78ad4eb
5ef4e98451eae8bc0777781a637c75e79800dfe0
describe
'2464348' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMBW' 'sip-files00089.tif'
0dc34518686441f669098a113c241bc0
fb3b215c012a25dddb00c4688c9856d8fea2036a
describe
'2795' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMBX' 'sip-files00089.txt'
bb016e2ed121cc46dd43cff07d7fcd89
892775123386de707465a621cefe56227ffb7769
describe
Invalid character
'36197' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMBY' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
057db252ce31f22b6e8fe40fece4c6bc
dcf08e4a6851cbf01554336240d2fb0bb0005e5a
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMBZ' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
17d7c345bd029b5ffc6a8b7ed166777d
c02f73a319bb790a4a40e52a1b88bac3107129c2
describe
'240253' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMCA' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
9c61d8d974b3ced981fd8060c464c9fb
ddb3f0b3543d4c3c9ee006981c403d768636681c
describe
'70992' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMCB' 'sip-files00090.pro'
e62f04c6420ef3b8f11bb71ef2bb9c87
e3b3016c068867b7139d94d1d1bb56400ba28f79
describe
'80832' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMCC' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
64dbeb134c2610d9de4980121d343b8e
a1e752da978e1256ba806b338577773bc5ceacdb
describe
'2464640' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMCD' 'sip-files00090.tif'
b76fa6136965bd02af123f499d1dda5d
f925a9247b7b847e65a89325bd1cc9867c949ae4
describe
'3441' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMCE' 'sip-files00090.txt'
f1e9c921e48dff695a69f4bf932db505
543e91a5826d33faf2129e1844e31acd8130f6f1
describe
Invalid character
'37001' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMCF' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
32ea3d714fc431333ca4271fb9c2ddcc
a0ace2a4ee0c19ddd991473593d66e95c8ce513c
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMCG' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
16e5baa0822d8d2f8fa4fe7e5188c51a
a7bac6b0060c447777a71fa596293f873125dd4f
describe
'226855' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMCH' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
83d873f007eb5f54e6b25b88bbc05e6b
4c771afe102f495ea5a3a80abbe2cd381cd075df
describe
'62164' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMCI' 'sip-files00091.pro'
03497c38f5ad1c636313d303cc1d63e0
db92f61b229b304d2fea906850661142313442c3
describe
'80375' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMCJ' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
022fca21434d91b5d7f8a6e0bee677a0
536334a36501612f89b9971f0efcc7bc294df7f4
describe
'2464972' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMCK' 'sip-files00091.tif'
f62ffd09d473d7df6649c623977decb7
a0fbdaea4753ed3158812fab8dec165d7d961b2c
describe
'3089' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMCL' 'sip-files00091.txt'
14823ccbdf73c6ee16fc88c5f0a3e2ad
20296dac9db40863b23c4cd9c714c5b92d81eeab
describe
'37624' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMCM' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
ad3cd5588283f34b0e7a2af811d0f720
e231f4b0cb31d333db6adda6d13f2043e18ce3eb
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMCN' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
9ad635324ac04cf04fa42ad6d3ec2957
ad980568df24f6ca439542b8c61fe0cab5c89fb1
describe
'221860' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMCO' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
ac305f6ed98e5079224e0f194c6f9f4b
fe1680c8f6bcb0ed1bb9e4fd3fa3de58e86aab0e
describe
'57165' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMCP' 'sip-files00092.pro'
33cb478afe0c933364d367f3eb6f2436
757948eb132b9c03a8ba3d325af48e215ccfb3ff
describe
'80048' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMCQ' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
ca99d6648efe729cfa553974e0b489aa
d02d55a3ea2ab8d34779b8a11cf0ad7572ab5b4b
describe
'2464008' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMCR' 'sip-files00092.tif'
6314bb1634e81cdab73186eb6440b5e6
042caac31960b7c97e7584c59271610d681b96e2
describe
'2620' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMCS' 'sip-files00092.txt'
c778031632c01a1ed589dc03016e6f21
698b48e7298787bf73e82c87c5fc5e13f8f3095b
describe
'36036' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMCT' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
3e44907b0b2e7cc56c104be729437a13
c3d3fc7231d0addc929f5dd3221ca70dd965ab64
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMCU' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
67a1be7af5e5cb95c53578d30dd1f0e8
b217faf3bb5397df75b5219b518d17179d21d43b
describe
'222138' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMCV' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
1730842363bf70dc549969aa1216f717
8a91b8ca7210e03d889762b61d7d7e459666a730
describe
'53126' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMCW' 'sip-files00093.pro'
28a75bc74232066550128196438b1a81
9ffcca940b0abe2cec8aafb45302e12b5b03d7fc
describe
'78378' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMCX' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
7cca88b695fc6468a9ab33977b53069b
59a0584ce25a6ea7e586f94c340857590b09eb2a
describe
'2464672' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMCY' 'sip-files00093.tif'
e069a3aa5a622df1de50efe6a1191532
5ec236cfeefb0518727910860058b1937f49195d
describe
'3386' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMCZ' 'sip-files00093.txt'
42d06802a8a38ef027b942a9a2744073
1d95cfd253df4fe589cd8c0ba79adbb8e1fdb420
describe
Invalid character
'36905' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMDA' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
d921bf34222d54a1ed2ee6760dc45a96
67d95d079f293cdb0abba2f7b7cf29516a31d88d
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMDB' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
3a4a36e41b9c1c664cb26d9a208d60c0
1651a06b637ee41b33b7389a368491e56b7028c5
describe
'232948' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMDC' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
85ca9df6b84e0e48862fa444e629bd89
1ab8151be2e81a186532e7eca0278684466361f8
describe
'69065' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMDD' 'sip-files00094.pro'
1f73e99e7b97c52bdc63b12682b17e2c
542d69808bf846e08511c36c9dd9961d72c583f9
describe
'82962' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMDE' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
a2b09fa0a9eaf9ef6002caad00352b76
b25030a421e257bffb2f94d07090c1c277ee783b
describe
'2464996' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMDF' 'sip-files00094.tif'
22c323f663fceee1f9b1fead450eea73
fb3faf1f7408be7a2abd46643eeab132b25d45bd
describe
'3538' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMDG' 'sip-files00094.txt'
41cc3d965ed219dcf5d1529d30f64283
96bd15dd653c2ce756c6f4bd64863addf9717617
describe
'38156' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMDH' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
fb61a9929663de6dfbbc3218dc37e0a2
529f3ff7b1f42f2c3d702c9bf720d2d86be6d243
describe
'304971' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMDI' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
140fb6c6cbe48ea298b64d9bfe0bc709
99b6603025f571e4a9f79d01f0c4bed6da843b80
describe
'239771' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMDJ' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
54718b5f2fcb6a8cb6fc65ec9295cb0f
1d3c8592152512f8cc78e80d0eee67a6d734a83c
describe
'56447' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMDK' 'sip-files00095.pro'
780d19f49d39d3e441c843dcf3c41e93
441c592a847418265037c3ca2e8c3bf8962b4ef7
describe
'82466' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMDL' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
62b924a57d2941346bd5d4d9d1a0d706
cf5c230eaca35a5734860e7161c000074ee6eec5
describe
'2465108' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMDM' 'sip-files00095.tif'
b4ebcbb189946a7cd904e23631af16c7
f56bbfb3ed1ba5872f65ed403f88482b81f1e7a3
describe
'3097' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMDN' 'sip-files00095.txt'
4e897e814037c431b8af43306c3e2451
ba1263f3b18473cb7ade6068f236e143e24b8054
describe
'38008' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMDO' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
9c9085407517a720547c04eb08985350
7916e3be55d0955e8f85d8ba71bb8e1e902b115b
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMDP' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
dbf2c604628a8adc71c8260550b38c70
7f27b0170633fac544af6d8b96bf8b9485885929
describe
'223191' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMDQ' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
4d61abc40cb389a09302ab1e5661c22d
01efed10bc6a96d6869ed5bfeacaef0032709bdb
describe
'60501' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMDR' 'sip-files00096.pro'
c858632e692360bc3f122c2302d28c09
a4666c6efc6563956c01a97060852ce92aedf53d
describe
'80297' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMDS' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
770028e80aeb547520aeeca9d7e9e7b5
9bc41c20d897d1ff237ece7e44e56b344053c637
describe
'2464688' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMDT' 'sip-files00096.tif'
7d79c2250ff20281cd52717ffc8c1000
e501616a14bccb5d79f740d6cd3c63caa023e86f
'2011-10-20T04:40:51-04:00'
describe
'3264' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMDU' 'sip-files00096.txt'
f9983a5f3780a05c21eb668711f11785
0a429ff137632cee8cf13d06679ef56535a7d521
describe
'37312' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMDV' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
55abda0d9710569df3ae2e3ec2b82d77
076b090ead93a9df9e631af1a097f29a9c461600
describe
'305003' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMDW' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
01b09a28c6cc56390c4540bd34d154b2
907e043b4875fd4ecd27b6070f2c398667dfca14
describe
'231586' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMDX' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
1b334bdcf007d5ff91a19218a169915e
d8e557be42ab13ba2fd3bce59ff5f707e68d4d1e
describe
'82251' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMDY' 'sip-files00097.pro'
370c4e51d6d81478f089368fe06e76ec
8da87ce24bd4d026f63c67a25729a19766916a94
describe
'79791' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMDZ' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
5f2a48cc87bcb9a006013af942b73814
4724e106175909362a4737091f5ddbae22f33b14
describe
'2464720' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMEA' 'sip-files00097.tif'
e17fc492f957ca7d23c2cd4fc6a3d258
bc8f7af2579530e4d888f0a6494c7e28a6a11d91
describe
'4175' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMEB' 'sip-files00097.txt'
53670eb30694ef38da8f41d178fa1931
0d92e5e3a68b844c72c4b1ac51a7045e0e6216c6
describe
Invalid character
'37276' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMEC' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
bdff505c5ca877b917d6b612df0a9237
9f321ad032bd66b7a0662dbcbd15a8d1f5f52017
describe
'305097' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMED' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
9e86ccfc5b0d2065d816ea2ad5f9489c
701d3039bf50313dad8d38d0afcea0338679f860
describe
'231540' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMEE' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
0a0902937b6738a7613c2b8912a76df9
d488855891d6e861c2adc85cb30c7b72d324fa48
describe
'77582' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMEF' 'sip-files00098.pro'
cae04a12806370d54821d545a6e90a0b
e1fc6e795c14f8f03c3e77a1a7377572ff6d301e
describe
'82127' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMEG' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
9e0e2d67ad371ea824b052547514a644
44bb6cd90a67ba73d589d0414f2bc190a4a2f5f0
describe
'2464936' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMEH' 'sip-files00098.tif'
3f79c4e129adf14da3b53c23f30b907d
67566c2710c8eb1361e0f80a60c975e3883d8784
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMEI' 'sip-files00098.txt'
c7b31d78128f6be8f71de276167c6b27
dfdba83a27236147a9d32df0c1e95f59e32b337d
describe
'38231' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMEJ' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
1c4fa4ebcd4becf7048cd2fcb570dcf3
b9bafded1f7d17a8c70911dac8e52d116db3c659
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMEK' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
76f162d3631820f7264d09ca21e7cec5
81a03fd55fbd646f90ddb728dfbd32c4ed2ed701
describe
'234064' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMEL' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
8a0f4fde8309dacd7a4d53e1f0941d3c
cd7cd813bef3df1714d71342f3b216c3cdfabbbd
describe
'49226' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMEM' 'sip-files00099.pro'
f183446cc515b0c96b647d997dbcd759
d7101ac8e7202872ea6901f27843caedcb37014e
describe
'81567' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMEN' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
7e9bda3b275e15003787296e1f3e63be
cc44d949566c887d5e0de1f5e320764fa517791d
describe
'2464492' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMEO' 'sip-files00099.tif'
c333656a686c362cb659d38fe504cfd7
2892af8ec8892b36405e2bd55a21f738ea72c884
describe
'2282' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMEP' 'sip-files00099.txt'
0095a9873af103b97cce67c2f9bd2bbc
6721bcdcdacadbc478ca864b5d7036c4b8ea7293
describe
'36694' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMEQ' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
98bfaf96be1f75127955237d405842b7
b29125e3350e8856373beb6c7538396533ca6eed
describe
'305117' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMER' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
20a759fc5b3bb3932ec9f0a455eae925
106c6b53b3282405aec349cf0779021d51fa909d
describe
'247118' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMES' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
52ce06bbf8151479628b704453f617f8
13661bf6ab81702d5a91257cd8b7511ddddd9e35
describe
'71746' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMET' 'sip-files00100.pro'
23179c89488597c68e0e228534c4a50c
906371c532d8c67b7cd6e692fe96250e32817cd5
describe
'82076' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMEU' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
fd1b7778f0fdee83751811cdf9c6a03b
8d00a23f2084ecba1cbf113bb0256bb8d27819ef
describe
'2464316' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMEV' 'sip-files00100.tif'
0c7d44ba896dfe48bf81a29db97830f7
88887bb97ce4aa3d6bf276b9394d5925b98cef5c
describe
'3553' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMEW' 'sip-files00100.txt'
1ee71d8dc1b1a388be5a8a19d053a396
9e7878be29408a516af791623dd06cca86e4f955
describe
Invalid character
'36881' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMEX' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
6dc6b210ad15c42d8f96cbe84db71e9c
3a4e8e1ea51a090ab84822cb4cd6771d75ae669d
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMEY' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
1ab406db90125e65118fc48533665b3a
3727cc6346b8ac697eefc3329155462f5e045a76
describe
'231102' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMEZ' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
165b9a3aaee074b1b6a97aebd527fe09
58c51d55112974b5e2fa23606ee35acfe757335e
describe
'54358' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMFA' 'sip-files00101.pro'
9dedf53e33c90ce89dafe7b634554269
70a351ff95422956197977b66f54f052ce7a5b49
describe
'79204' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMFB' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
8d5e6401ef9535001c59835709c583a7
4dd59ba94a2ea0efb5d732b715f8064bfe0e0ada
describe
'2464440' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMFC' 'sip-files00101.tif'
649c46a64c7a6bcfc0f169bf5e4483a9
47cd92ef76026a72a7833f2854b82b68fed88041
describe
'2787' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMFD' 'sip-files00101.txt'
847f72f9e6c0132444b70809752026cc
6cc9928554239e71a8552a11212d0558cb3ef3b8
describe
Invalid character
'37052' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMFE' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
5d51baca485b142f897b29816af480b7
f2192acc353959d82e93b400cdc0f77d26c236cd
describe
'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMFF' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
63a34cbf76146b52e5944c4fc66008eb
ce9a3c0442d8a9bc8dffd53d2f686ad60b6baee9
describe
'127640' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMFG' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
887aee1b7d0aabb04a935dfd247707e8
433b338eb270100f8b4a7fdd4f1e1b1ca77acd4f
describe
'31166' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMFH' 'sip-files00102.pro'
2aece0c764fb338ccf2b72f955911312
d830246983857216bc290354ab0ab250cb34e4f4
describe
'50999' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMFI' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
1e0e751ea8bb6dcca8088672bf63c59b
b7a48b4ebc02dea4143683bb6d81d4c64ad83716
'2011-10-20T04:41:14-04:00'
describe
'2465192' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMFJ' 'sip-files00102.tif'
9579556670c47e6249cb44120f6ebd99
2cfd30a6b6abf36262202b2b5e9ddae197a062d1
describe
'1602' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMFK' 'sip-files00102.txt'
9a585776f4cff213d391d7359c81fcf9
dd29f095e5572d3f608ee92c987e3c8c92c4a344
describe
Invalid character
'30823' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMFL' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
798dc51ca852954a6338af1a4b01b00e
465574c49991f9414e705e7c9ec55f203fb80934
describe
'18467' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMFM' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
3d2bc72e8e51946ae6c2e9fc54afd47c
d2dc049fe72848e4c0d58e6a6489b31eb823a207
describe
'316140' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMFN' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
1ca6afd69c67550729302ee8c3617cbe
ce6131aa9a233bf2ee5d27491bb5ea3fa55f8fce
describe
'227189' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMFO' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
6088c58761ba858d7549dae9ce7d7ca8
46312b68ade77f4b36a7f1685414cf975ba915bb
describe
'11369' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMFP' 'sip-files00104.pro'
11c163b9314d4ae64d1b38976cf0e7cf
aeaa70f5ebe270a7d5bceefe69eb89e3af73b251
describe
'64041' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMFQ' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
cfec47d3366714dd526f26d5cbb6b754
de606ffbd4b352cc8c3ed13e83bf822f2058716d
describe
'7607404' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMFR' 'sip-files00104.tif'
8e35fd41ca874ed1353b57631ec28355
7d5411985f09409ef5d839fe7f7440720ad7edba
describe
'575' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMFS' 'sip-files00104.txt'
f87b85cdc4b06e0b8aa4b78c746fcdcb
63b95fce6686bad15d63ac6ea51cd13916641e34
describe
Invalid character
'30258' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMFT' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
f736781e868eeaeee49557583ffb1296
4e7682036a36a7413d2e4dbf8d1629070f88b801
describe
'351172' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMFU' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
4c82973e51e07ed05875280736773f61
32d1f8baa9bd447f91149b8a2904046715aa0d08
describe
'245422' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMFV' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
c769a5343f1ad88ceebe622e33b53a2b
e9c8718dc03273953d41682546d07ed9009b32d0
describe
'63185' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMFW' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
48a967fa4e3eae30d50c5f0113cada6e
7cc06421fa79f405e241acf096aeab726a877323
describe
'8451060' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMFX' 'sip-files00105.tif'
7a146eb573e51d45e7adba8b44411fcd
585d86aaa1072ae57b4df1e58a25b01c345e9a30
describe
'30236' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMFY' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
319237916ef27501d7cedba6e831cc44
fba9a4bd594eaefda96ddf88a4a79f222eb1f1a8
describe
'348181' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMFZ' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
93703eb717ce1393837dcf5a55353028
3d29c10e70e006e872c6e32557852f624de4927b
describe
'184982' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMGA' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
672356a986cb525dd105ee5afd3d3484
c052289d5c1020af5caaa09f5f59ee7f5df8bc3b
describe
'47527' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMGB' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
9932a4a6afb5b896be8ebf88e53d69a1
06b6ca2a6b3275d24c325c9af33eb5c5b3627772
describe
'8373568' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMGC' 'sip-files00106.tif'
86b8fdc516589df995b3077191b94d41
7da267b440099cf52b21121aee4d6451c344ed7d
describe
'24942' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMGD' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
cbed1f9835a835a41687213c92d78d4f
ac8263395f0b23dfe60de33fb76fa6ef63fbc376
describe
'48356' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMGE' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
1aed403a5a6f4b71d11a7a7ef0777ad4
88c30a85edf597f79f20c8198d2e8df46dfb501a
describe
'56249' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMGF' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
f64ce3efa7520b568076f652d9e65a34
da06af580983d22964f3b9f616f126690417771a
describe
'1176624' 'info:fdaE20080410_AAACOKfileF20080411_AACMGG' 'sip-files00107.tif'
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xml resolution























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































The Baldwin Library

RmB vin





























——d



















































































































































































































































































































































































The Young Folks Hazelbrook
Miss Greys Tex isle
Basil; or & Industry.
Ben Holys Good Name.

Lisa.Bal tes Journal.
Northcliffe Boys. ~~
Thalittle Orange Sellers.
Georgies Prayer. eer
‘Saddie's Sefvice. oy
Nils Revenge.

Harry Blakes Trouble.























Cousin Jack's Adventures. , SS SS
Hungering & Thirsting. SSS
The China Cup. >

How Tilly found a Friend,
Charity’s Birthday Text.

The Rescue. 17s
Little Nellies Daysi in India.




















































































































































































































NELLIE STARTS FOR A RIDE.
—





THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY:

56, PATERNOSTER Row; 63, St. Paut’s CHURCHYARD;

164, Priccapiniy.



AND







CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION D i .
NELuIg’s First Day IN INDIA .
NELLIE’S HOME IN INDIA ; 5
NELLIE’S CHRISTMAS DAY IN INDIA
NELLIE’s DAY AMONG i ELEPHANTS
NELLIE AMONG NATIVE CHILDREN

NELLIE’S BIRTHDAY.IN THE HILLS

CONCLUSION ; 0 ‘

©

.

PAGE

50
59

78




ZL








LITTLE NELLIE’S DAYS IN INDIA.

0

fntroduction,
Grow and noiselessly fell the large

soft snowflakes, and slowly and noise-
lessly the tears dropped from Ethel’s eyes
as she watched them at the window,
growing every. moment more miserable.:
At last, grandmother, wondering what
made her little girl so quiet, looked up
from her work by the fire, and asked
_ kindly: “What is the matter with my
little one?”

Ethel gave a sob as she answered, with-
out turning her head: “Oh! granny, I am
so miserable, I do miss them all so.”

Granny got up with a sigh, and drew
the little girl to her, and cuddled her up
in a most comfortable way before the fire,
6 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

stroking her hair without speaking. For
what could she say ?

But who were “them all ?”

First and foremost, the best and most
perfect father ever little girl had; a father
who had gone away when she was a baby,
and then came back again, almost as long
ago as Ethel could remember ; and came
back the most delightful teacher, compa-
nion, playfellow, and inventor of all sorts
of glorious fun, all rolled into one—a father
who was never so happy as when his little.
girl was with him, even in all sorts of
amusements and expeditions that little
girls do not usually share in. A father with
nothing to do, for-the time being, and
always at liberty, and only too willing to
fall in with any of Ethel’s wishes and
fancies. A father better and cleverer than
twenty playfellows, for he was never cross,
never wished to be first in a game, and
knew how to make and do so many things.
A sort of fairy-tale father in fact, only he
was real and big and strong, and could
carry Ethel ever so far perched on his
shoulder.
Lntroduction. 7

Such was her father, and he was gone.
Can you wonder that Ethel missed him ?

But, much as Ethel missed father, and
when she was very near crying in thinking
about him, a comforting thought used’ to
come intoher mind. I will tell you what
it was. On the very last Sunday evening
that father had been with Ethel, he had
come up into her room, after she was in
bed. This was nothing unusual, he always
did that, and he and Ethel had a nice
little chat together after he had heard her
say her prayers.

But this Sunday evening, when father
came up, he did not speak for a long time,
but sat quite still, with his arm round his
little daughter, holding her as tight as if
he could never let her go, and Ethel felt
a large hot tear fall on her face. Then
she sprang up, and flinging her arms
round him cried: ‘Oh, father, I can’t let
you go away, I can’t spare you, I haven't
got another father!”

Then father spoke:

“ My darling,” said he, “there is but one
thing that can give you and me any com-
8 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

fort in this parting, and that is the thought
that you Zave another Father, a Father in
heaven, a better, wiser, more loving Father
than I can ever be. It is He who has
arranged this separation, which, though it
seems so hard, He sees is best for us, for
He doeth all things well. He can see all
our lives, past and future; and, if it pleases
Him, He will let us meet again. But,
dear Ethel, the first trouble you have ever
had will be for your good if it makes you
lift up your heart from your earthly father,
who is going from you, to the heavenly
Father who wants you to love Him more.
Think of this, my Ethel, every morning
and evening when you say ‘Our Father ;’
and when you miss me very much, think
of the Father who is always near you,
though you cannot see Him, and try to
love Him more, and Pe a dear obedient
child to Him.”

Then there was mother. Mother was
very quiet and gentle; and mother had
liked Ethel to be quiet too, and not like a
tom-boy. Oh! how Ethel wished now she
had minded her more! Mother was never
Lntroduction. 9

tired of reading stories aloud, or telling
charming ones out of her head, or singing
songs and playing the piano. Mother
made the prettiest doll’s clothes as sur-
prises, and often let Ethel do all sorts of
nice things in housekeeping or cooking to
help her. And then, if Ethel was not very
well, how loving mother would be!

Boys and girls who read this story, just
think of your own mothers, and you can
imagine what Ethel’s was like. She was
just “ mother,” and she was gone too.

Last, but not least, it was Nellie that
Ethel missed too. Nellie was Ethel’s little
sister, and they had always been together
ever since Nellie was born. The nursery,
the meals, the walks, did not seem the
same without her. There was no one to
play with, or to understand the games,. or
to care about the dolls and their clothes.
There was now, as Ethel put it, no one
“littler” than she in the house. Every
one seemed so old and quiet.

Ethel lay and cried in grandmother’s
lap, and told her all this between her sobs.
But grandmother knew it all before, and
Io Little Nellie’s Days in India.

missed them too herself. But then grand-
mother was very old, and had missed many
people before this (as people have to do
when they get old), but this was Ethel’s
first miss.

“You see, granny,” Ethel went on,
growing a little calmer, “I’ve seen the sea,
and I’ve seen big ships. Yes, I’ve even
been in one, when we went to Ireland to
see Uncle John. So I can understand all
about the journey, and the funny little
cabins with little round windows, that are
screwed tight and close when there’s a
storm. I know the little tray sort of a
bed—berth, don’t you call it ?—that they
have to sleep in; and I know that when it
blows, and the ship rolls at dinner, that all
the plates and dishes are fixed in frames, so
that they don’t upset into your lap. They
call the frames ‘fiddles,’ father said. Not
very musical fiddles, are they ? And when
you've done drinking, you must not put
your glass on the table by your side, but
into a frame hanging over the table from
the ceiling, or the glass would upset
too. What very uncomfortable dinners
Lutroduction. Il

they must have when it is rough, dear
granny.” io

“Indeed they must,” said granny; “if
they are able to eat them. I have heard
that sometimes, when the waiters—‘ stew-
ards, they call them—are coming along
from the kitchen with great dishes of meat
and gravy, the ship will give a sudden
lurch, and down will go waiters, dishes,
and meat, all on to the floor together. Isn't
that a catastrophe, Ethel ?”

“But it doesn’t always blow, though,
grannie. Father said, when it was fine
and bright and sunny, they spread a large
awning over the deck ; and mother would
sit-in her long chair, and father would walk
about, and Nellie play on the deck with
her toys, as she would at home.”

“Yes, and perhaps she'll see black por-
poises following the ship, splashing along,
their shiny heads and tails peeping out of
the water.”

_ “Qh, granny, do youthinkso? I should
like to be there when she sees them.”

“Then I think father will take Nellie
for walks about the ship, and show her the
12 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

pens where the sheep are kept, and the
poultry, ready to be killed and eaten; and
the cow in her stall who gives Nellie milk.
Perhaps he will take her downstairs to the
engine-room, where the great engines are
always at work, night and day, making
the good ship go on; and the big furnaces,
larger than any cook’s kitchen fire, never
go out, but are always burning, to keep the
engines going. It is very hot, and smells
oily down there; and I do not think they
will stay long, as the poor stokers are
obliged to do, who keep the fires up, and
the engines going. Nellie will be glad to
get up onto the breezy deck again, and
watch the sailors with their bare feet
running up the ropes like cats, to spread
the white sails to the wind.”

“And, granny, what about Sundays?
There are no churches in the sea.”

“They will have service on deck, if it is
fine, with the great sea spreading all round
for a church, and the prayers and hymns
mounting up to the blue sky above. God
can hear prayer on sea as well as on land,
and, as we read in the Bible, needs not
Introduction. 13

a ‘temple made with hands’ for us to
worship Him in aright. He will hear our
prayers in the church at home here, and
their prayers on the sea, if they are offered
faithfully in the name of Jesus Christ. He
heard Jonah’s prayer when he was swallowed
by the whale; He heard Daniel in the lions’
den; He heard St. Paul in the storm at
sea; and our blessed Lord prayed to His
Father on lonely mountain-tops. I am
almost sure they will sing the hymn for .
those at sea which we sang last Sunday,
thinking of them, ‘Eternal’ Father, strong
to save.’”

“Oh! yes, granny, I am sure they wiil.
Mother is so fond of that hymn, she will
ask the clergyman to have it. I hope
Nellie will be good at the service. It is
such a treat for her to go. Do you think
she will gq to church in India, granny ?
You see, it is India I want to know about.
I can understand all about the journey
there; but when they get there they will
seem lost, quite lost. I shall not know
what the place is like, or what they-do all
day, and you cannot tell because you have
T4 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

never been there. Oh! granny, it’s dread-
ful not to know about it!” and Ethel hid
her face in grandmother's shoulder, and
began to cry again.

Grandmother was very ereled and
thought for.some time what she could say
or do to comfort her little lonely girl) At
last a plan came into grandmother's wise
old head. This was it.

The very next time the day came round
for writing to mother, she wrote to them
of this talk she and Ethel had had, and of
Ethel’s trouble in not knowing all about
India, and what Nellie was doing. She
asked mother now and then to write a
special account to Ethel of one of Nellie’s
days in India, and how she spent it. Ethel
had grandmother’s letter read out, and was
delighted with the plan, and waited eagerly
till the answer should come. It seemed
such a long time coming. Several Sundays
came and went after grandmother's letter
had gone, and still Ethel did not know
what Nellie was doing, and she seemed
more lost to her than ever. ;

But grandmother told her she must be
Nellie’s First. Day in India. 15

patient ; that she knew mother would never
fail to do as she wished, though it seemed
a long time to wait. So Ethel waited, and
one day the postman brought her a very
thick fat letter, directed to her own self, in
mother’s dear handwriting. With a shout
of delight, Ethel rushed with it to grand-
mother, and settled herself comfortably on
her knee to have the letter read out to her.
And this was the letter.

Ss egretre

Hellie’s First Bay in India,



Wou may fancy, mother wrote, how glad
Nellie was to leave the ship where

she had been shut up so long, and to see
grass and trees and houses once more.
She, and father and mother and all the
boxes, got into a boat which came up to
the side of the ship. - The boat was rowed
by such funny sailors, Ethel, as unlike the
Beachborough sailors as can be. They
all had dark-brown skins, and dirty cloths
16 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

twisted round their heads for caps, and
only dirty cotton jackets and short trousers,
and they wore no shoes or_ stockings.
Some had bangles on their arms, like
mother’s. They shouted and made such a
noise, that poor little Nellie was quite
frightened, for she could not understand
one word they said. But father took her
up, and lifted her into the boat, and held
her tight on his knee.

When we landed we got into a sort of
four-wheeled cab, with no glass, only
shutters in the windows, and harnessed
with two ponies no bigger than Fairy who
pulls the mowing-machine at home. Small
as they were, they started off at full gallop
when the driver got on to his box and
shouted at them, and soon brought Nellie
along the narrow streets, crowded with dark-
brown people, to the hotel where she was
to dine and sleep.

At dinner all the black men-servants
had on clean white calico petticoats and
long coats to match, and turbans wound
round their heads. ‘They rustled as they
walked about. It was a large room; and
Nellie’s First Day in India. 7

Nellie had never had dinner with so many
people before, and could hardly eat for
staring.

Upstairs the housemaids were wrapped
up, head and all, in red muslin, and carried
the hot-water jugs balanced on their heads.
Do you think grandmother's Jane could do
that up and down stairs? But one of the
things that most astonished Nellie was
that none of the servants at dinner or any-
where in the house wore any shoes or
stockings.

When bed-time came she was quite
tired out with wonderment, and~ could
hardly wonder any more, when she saw
her little bed was closed tight round with
white net curtains, “to keep out the
musquitos,” mother told her. Musquitos
are little black gnats that creep in any-
where and sting, and would dearly have
enjoyed a feast on fat little Nellie. But
mother drew the curtain aside very quickly,
and popped her into bed, and ee her
up carefully all round.

So Nellie, without any fear of musquitos,
came to the end of her first day in India.

c
18

fiellie’s Home in tndia,

——

Nee had a long way to travel, mother
wrote, after she left the ship, before
she got to her new home. Fancy, Ethel,
she was two days and two nights in the
train. No undressing, no baths, only lying
down to sleep on the long wide seats of
the railway carriage (which made a capital
bed even for father), and only getting out
for a few minutes at stations to eat meals.
Out of the carriage windows there was
very little to see but sun and glare and
dust; sometimes forests or fields, and
villages of mud huts, sometimes broad,
shallow, sleepy rivers, large white towns,
with many tall spires and round domes.
At night, a moon, almost as bright as day,
and a refreshing coolness. Nellie got very
weary with the heat and long journey, and
was too tired to take any notice when she
arrived.

When she awoke next morning, she was
Nellie’s Home in India. 19

in a little crib by mother’s side, with mus-
quito curtains all round her. The room
was very large and very high, higher than
- any bedroom she had ever slept in before.
There were so many doors, and no windows,
except two small ones high up in the roof.
Two glass doors were wide open, and led
into a thatched verandah, beyond which
Nellie could see the bright sunny garden.
On every other side of the room was a
door leading into a room beyond. These
doors were all open, and a curtain hung in
the doorway.

Nellie immediately wanted to get up and
see more strange new things, so mother
called her new nurse, the ayah, to dress
her. She was very black, and came along
touching her forehead with her hands, by
way of a curtsey to mother. She had no
cap or apron, but a great white sheet
covered all her head and body, except her
face.. Of course, by this time Nellie did
not even expect to see any shoes or stock-
ings on her feet. She seemed very kind
and gentle, though Nellie understood very
little of what she said. She called Nellie
20 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

“Missee Baba;” and Nellie was not the
least afraid of her, as you fancied she might
be. In fact, father says something about
Nellie getting as spoilt here as some one
else is by their granny at home; for I con-
stantly find Nellie seated like a little queen
in the middle of the nursery floor, with the
ayah and several of the other servants who
ought to have nothing at all to do with
her, squatted round and playing with her.

But that first morning, however, as
Nellie was getting up, a thing happened
that astonished her very much. When
she was dressed, she wanted to kneel down
at the ayah’s knee, and say her prayers, as
she used to do at nurse’s knee at home.
So mother had to explain to her that the
poor black ayah was a heathen, and knew
nothing of the loving Saviour who came
down from heaven and died to save her
and all sinners from their sins, and who
cares for us in heaven now. Mother told
Nellie that the poor ayah worshipped false
gods and idols, and said prayers to them,
though they could not possibly hear or
answer her.
Nellie’s Home in India. 21

Nellie was very much shocked, and quite
sad. It seemed so strange to her that
any one should not know and love the
good God who had watched over her all
the long journey over the sea, and brought
her safe to her Indian home. J am sure
you will think it very sad too, that we are
living among heathen people, who are
quite without hope of another life, and
know nothing of a home above for those
who love God here.

Tam writing this when Nellie has been
some time settled in her new home; and I
am sitting out in the wide verandah, and
Nellie is playing near me. Hearing I am
writing to “tissie,” she comes up and begs
me to tell you about all sorts of things.
So I will tell you to-day about her pets.
They are such an important feature in her
new home, and J can see so many round
me as | write.

To begin with, four green parrots, with
red or purple heads and breasts, hang from
the roof of the verandah, three fastened to
rings, and the fourth in a little cage. A
dreadful screeching they make all day long.
22, Little Nellie’s Days in India.

But I must tell you of an odd thing that
happened to the parrot in the cage. It
always seemed to get through its food
much faster than any of the others, and
still always to be hungry. But one day
father, watching from the drawing-room,
found out the reason. A large rat used to
get in between the bars of the cage directly
the food had been placed there, and nibble
it all up before poor Polly could get any.
So father got ready his gun, and the next
time the thieving rat appeared, he shot
him dead from the drawing-room, just as
he was getting into the cage, without hurt-
ing the parrot perched above.

Two wicker cages of doves, which I am
very fond of—for their cooing reminds me
of those we had at home—hang also in
the verandah. And two tall white paddy-
birds, a kind of stork, stand solemnly on
one of their long legs, in a space railed off
for them at one end. A little brown
monkey is chained to a tree near, and is
quite tame with father and me. But
monkeys rarely take to children; and this
one likes to hide behind the tree, and to
Nellie’s Home in India. 23

spring out and try to scratch Nellie when
she walks past. So he can hardly be
called one of her pets.

A pet you would like has its little hut
under another shady tree near by. It is
a beautiful spotted brown deer, with velvet
horns and large soft dark eyes. I think
it is rather a shame to keep it tied up here,
it would be so much happier bounding
away in the plains. But perhaps it might
be shot by the hunters on their shooting
expeditions.

In a large cage in the drawiag-room is
a collection of sweet little birds of different
colours and shapes, different from any you
have ever seen. Some are like robins, but
have white breasts instead of red. Some
are little green love-birds, and sit all in a
row along the perch, closely huddled to-
gether. ‘But the odd thing is that though
they are so pretty to look at, they can none
of them sing like our English birds, which
have not such bright colours. They only
chirp and twitter like sparrows. In fact,
Ethel, mother misses the English songsters
very much; she would gladly exchange
24 > Little Nellie’s Days in India.

the gay parrots that dart about among the
trees, and the tiny blue humming-birds
that dive into the beautiful bell-shaped
flowers for honey, for some plain brown
thrushes and blackbirds.

A little saucy bird, with a crest on his
head, is strutting along the path in front of
me now, but he can only say, “ Hippoo,
hippoo!” A large black koel has flown
on to a tree near, and I shall have to call
to one of the gardeners to drive him away,
for he has such a dreadful call of three
notes, gradually rising higher and higher
into a screech, that he is called the “ brain-
fever bird!” Indeed, he is sometimes
enough to drive one into a brain fever, for
he screeches by night as well as by day.
Moreover, his coming announces that the
hot weather is near.

There are crows of all sorts,—black,
white, and brown,—always cawing around ;
they are very greedy and impudent crows.
One pounced down on a dish of meat
which was being carried from the kitchen
to the dining-room (for here the kitchen is
away from the house), and flew off with a
Nelhe’s Home in India. # 25

piece of the dinner before the servant could
stop it.

One of Nellie’s prettiest pets was a tiny
“cherub owl,’ so called because his big
eyes looked out of his round feathery head
like a cherub’s face in a picture looks out
of his wings. The servants took him out
of his nest when he was quite small, and
brought him as a present to Nellie, who
was delighted with him. He was hung in
a cage in the verandah. But the poor
little thing was too small to feed himself,
and we got quite anxious about him, till
we discovered the loving mother owl had
found out where her little one had got to,
and in the night, when all was dark and
quiet, used to bring him little tit-bits in her
beak, and feed him through the bars.

Then father had some pets of his own,
and what do you think they were? They
were baby wolves. In India there are
many wolves, not so fierce as those that
live in the forests of Russia and Norway ;
but still they do so much mischief that the
Government is anxious to have them killed.
So a reward is offered, as the Saxon King
26 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

Edgar did hundreds of years ago in
England, to whoever brings in a wolf’s
head or young wolves.

As father was returning home one day
he met a peasant coming in from the
country with some baby wolves he had
found, to claim the reward for them. So
father gave him some money, and, to mother
and Nellie’s great surprise, brought the
wolves home. When the basket was opened
they were found to be like the ugliest little
puppies you ever saw, with little round
black heads, and a horrid snarl on their
tiny faces when they showed their teeth.
Father bought a baby’s feeding-bottle, and
tried to get them to suck milk out of it;
but it was of no use, and they soon died.
Mother thinks, however, had they lived,
three wolves playing about the garden
would have been rather awkward pets !

That reminds me of a story I heard the
other day about wild animals as pets, which
I will tell you now. A gentleman in India
had a beautiful spotted leopard, which he
had reared irom a baby, as iather tried to
rear the wolves. It was quite tame, and
Nellie’s Home in India. . 27

walked about the house and garden like a
large cat. But its wild instincts were in it
still; and one day its master, watching it
out of the window, to his horror, saw it
noiselessly and stealthily stalking a poor
little brown baby, belonging to one of the
servants. The leopard dragged itself along



THE LEOPARD,

the ground, as you have seen a cat stalking
a bird, getting gradually nearer and nearer
the unconscious child, and would finally
have made a spring upon it and choked
it, had not the master, seeing what a dan-
gerous pet it had become, quickly took
down a gun and shot it.
28 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

One evening, lately, father and I were
strolling out in the moonlight after dinner,
to hear the band playing up in barracks,
when suddenly out of the ditch close to
me started an animal, which looked, and
yet did not look, like a large sort of sheep
dog. At once I sprang round to the other
side of father, exclaiming, “Oh! look at
that, it is not a pariah dog!” Pariah dogs
are the half-wild dogs, with no owners, who
are always wandering about. The animal
turned its head towards us, with an ugly ©
grin on its face, slunk across the road and
disappeared in a drain, and we knew it was
a wolf.

To turn to pleasanter subjects. Nellie’s
greatest pet and most constant companion
I have left to the last. It is her pony
Midge. It is only two feet high, and
father can cross his legs over it and stand.
When we had visitors to dinner the other
day, Midge came in with the dessert and
exhibited his tricks. He jumped over the
sofa, clearing it very nicely. Nellie leads
him about alone.

Father was out shooting one day in the
Nellie’s Home in India. 29

country, when a native boy came out of a
village, mounted on this pony. Thinking
it the smallest pony he had ever seen,
father bought it. Midge is a very slow
walker, but can canter quite fast. Every
morning before breakfast Nellie goes out
for a ride on him, before the sun grows
hot. She rides on a chair-saddle, and wears
that funny white pith hat, with the large
crown and broad brim, you saw me buy
for her.

Like every one of the other horses,
Midge has his groom all to himself; but
as he is so small he shares a grass-cutter
with another pony. These grass-cutters
go out every morning into the country, and
cut a bundle of grass for their horse. The
name of Midge’s groom is Mohun. He
walks by Nellie’s side as she rides, and
already they are great friends, and chatter ©
Hindostanee together. Mohun wears rust-
ling white petticoats and a white turban.
A funny sort of livery, is it not ?

This has been a long letter, and I must
finish it when I have mentioned the dogs.
Ethel well knows father would not be
30 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

happy without plenty of dogs about him.
They are all English dogs. Two white .
fox-terriers—Jim and Harry, a Scotch
deerhound, named Oscar, after the one at
home, and a pair of brown and white
spaniels, whose puppy, just like one of
those white woolly toy dogs, is Nellie’s
special playfellow. Then last, but not
least, the greyhound Legacy. She is a
beautiful, ladylike creature, with a finely-
shaped body and soft tan-coloured coat.
She is very swift in hunting jackals and
foxes, but quiet and well-behaved in the
house. Only she will lie on the sofa, not
flat, but with her silky head on the pillow,
like a child. Then at meals, too, she has
a most insinuating way of thrusting her
nose, in mute appeal for food, under your
arm, as you are eating.

One day, when it was getting very hot,
father noticed that there was always a wet
splash round his bath in the bath-room.
He called the attention of the servant to
it. This man (who is called a dheestie,
though he only does the cleanest of work,
carrying water for drinking and baths, from
Nellie’s Home in India. 31

the well in his mussock, or goatskin bag)
assured father that he always left the bath-
room quite dry. So the splash remained
a mystery, till Legacy was discovered
sitting calmly up to her chin in father’s
bath, cooling herself. It was she who
splashed the floor getting out.

Like all other smooth-coated dogs out
here, Legacy feels the sudden chill in the
evening, when the sun goes down. She
wears a little coat, like a horsecloth, with
father’s monogram in the corner. If she
is anywhere with us, not far from home,
when the time for wrapping-up comes,
Legacy will run home of her own accord,
and get her special attendant to put it on
for her, and be back again almost before
we have missed her. -When it gets very
hot, we shall have to send Legacy away to
the cool hills, or she will get ill down here
on the plains.
32

ellie’s Christmas Bay in tdia,



VERY, very happy Christmas, my
darling Ethel, though it is spent so

far away from us, and so different to the
one we are spending. Our Christmas Day
is as bright and warm as your August
birthday generally is, though here we call
it the cold weather. But wherever we
keep it, if we keep it aright, Christmas Day
is the same to all, and especially to the
children. For it is the children’s festival,
above all others. The small ones who
cannot understand much about God and
the story of Jesus, coming down from His
throne in heaven, to be a weak little help-
less baby, born in a stable, that He might
teach sinners what God would have them
do, and at last die a painful death on the
cross to save us from the punishment of
our sins, even the little ones who can hardly
understand all this, know what keeping

birthdays mean; and what is Christmas ©


Nellie’s Christmas Day in India. 33
Day but the birthday of that Holy Child

who came on earth at first as a child to
be “ Our childhood’s pattern ?”

We have no holly and not many suitable
evergreens here, and you would laugh over
the decorations the servants have put up:
yellow marigolds, hung by their stalks
from pieces of string stretched across the
archways of the verandah and the gate.
But the church is beautifully decorated
with ferns, great scarlet pointsettias, and
other summer plants.

After breakfast, Nellie came and sat
with us in the verandah to watch the
servants present us with dollies.

“Dollies!” I hear you exclaim; “what
can father and mother want with dollies ?”

But, Ethel, they are not such dollies as
you mean; but trays full of fruits and
vegetables, cakes and sweetmeats, which
. each servant brings as an offering to his
_. master, and receives a present of money in
return. Very pretty these trays look, as
one after another of the white-robed
servants lay them at our feet, making a
“salaam,” that is, bowing, and touching

D
34 Little Nellie’s Days in India,

their forehead with their two hands.
Many of the fruits you would not know
even by name; but there are oranges and
apples amongst them, and the piles of
pretty coloured sweets would make your
mouth water. Unfortunately, they are not
often as good as they look; for though
natives are particularly fond of sweets, they
‘are not the sort we fancy. However,
Nellie particularly wishes me to tell you
that the different sorts of toffee are delicious.

She went to church on Christmas Day,
you will be glad to hear, and behaved very
well. Though the church is not far off she
drove there with father and mother, for in
India one hardly ever walks, it is so hot,
and the roads are so sandy and dusty.
The church itself is very different from
any you have ever seen: it is very lofty,
and with small windows quite high up, and
a deep verandah all round outside. There
is no tower, and there are no bells.

In all India there are only a few churches
which have a peal of bells, and very sweet
and home-like they sound when one hears
them. Usually a bar of iron is hung up |


Nellie’s Christmas Day in India, 35

outside the church, and a native strikes
it with a hammer for ten minutes before
church. The same plan is adopted at the
. railway stations when the trains arrive and
start. Inside the church great fans made
of white linen, called “punkahs,” are hung
on long boards, and pulled during the service
by natives seated outside in the verandah.
Sometimes even the clergyman has one
waving over his head in the pulpit.

The church was crowded with English
soldiers in gay uniforms. They marched
in, making such a clatter with their spurs
and swords, and each man had his rifle,
which he stood up against the seat before
him. In India, though all is peaceable and
quiet now, we can never forget that we
are in a conquered country, and only a few
English among, masses of heathen natives.

Of course all this was so utterly different
from anything Nellie had ever seen in
church before, that you can fancy how she
sat and stared and wondered. There was
no organ, but the regimental band of
various instruments led the singing. The
service alone remained unaltered. The
36 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

same psalms and some of the same hymns
were sung as you sang in the dear old
church at home, and the same prayers went
up to the same Father in heaven.

We heard the same story read out of the
Bible, of the shepherds who, keeping watch
over their flock by night, heard the bright
angels telling their Christmas message
of the Babe born that day at Bethlehem,
who was to save the people from their sins.
Many thoughts wandered back to other
Christmas Days when we had heard that
story read in familiar churches, now so far
away; and from many of us rose a prayer
for the poor heathen al! around us, that
these glad tidings might be made known
to them also.

After service Nellie was very disap-
pointed at not having a penny to put into
the bag, as she used to do at home. Indian
money is so heavy, chiefly great silver
pieces, bigger than half-crowns, that no
one thinks of carrying it about in purses.
In church, therefore, they hand you little
cards, on which you write how much you
wish to give, and put them into the bag.


Nellie’s Christmas Day tn India. 37

Then next day they send the card round
to your house, and you give the money.
The service over, Nellie stood with us
under the great portico, waiting for the
carriage, and everyone was shaking hands
with everybody else, and wishing each
other “A Merry Christmas.” But what a
mockery that sounds in India, when most
people’s hearts are far away on Christmas
Day! The soldiers filed out of church,
and formed up in front, and marched away
to their barracks, with the band playing at
their head. Father then invited Nellie to
drive up there with him in the dogcart,
and see the men eat their Christmas dinners.
You may imagine how happily she drove
off by father’s side. But she felt rather
shy in the large hall full of soldiers and
gentlemen, and only brightened up when
one of the soldiers got up and proposed
that they should drink father’s health,
which they did with three such cheers
and shouting as nearly deafened Nellie.
Then they drank mother’s health with
three more cheers, and then a soldier got
up and said: “ Now one more, and a lone
38 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

low one for the baby!” Nellie quite un-
derstood it was for her; and when father
hoisted her up on his shoulder, she forgot
her shyness and smiled at them.

Of course, Nellie’s own Christmas dinner
at home was the same as always. But the
-cook added out of his own head a rich and
monstrous cake, in honour of the white
people’s “big day,” as the natives call it.
Poor things! it is little of a big day to
them. Its sweet message of peace on
earth, good will to men, has no meaning
for the Mohammedan, the followers of
a false prophet, who commanded them to
spread his religion by fire and sword; or
for the Hindoos, -who worship idols of
pieces of black stone, and imaginary false
gods, whom they make out to be as blood-
thirsty and revengeful as wicked men.
39

fellie’s Hay among the Blephants,

—

LONG-PROMISED treat was Nellie’s visit
4a to the elephants at home. Often in
her morning and evening rides (you must
remember she never goes out for a walk)



ELEPHANT AND HIS DRIVER,

she had met a long procession of elephants
coming in from the country, carrying small
haystacks of dried grass on their backs for
the soldiers’ horses.
40 Little Nellie’s Days ia Indta.

At first she was quite afraid of them,
they towered so high above her; but when
. her groom assured her. that they were
almost all very obedient to the men who
rode on their necks, and guided them,
Nellie became quite interested, and
wanted to see more of them. So in the
cool of the evening she drove down with
father and mother to a very large sort of
farmyard, where all the elephants, camels,
and oxen, used to carry about the soldiers’
tents and baggage, are kept.

The elephants were all arranged in rows
in one part, each chained to a very strong
iron ring fixed in the ground, each with his
bed of dry grass in front of him, and his
huge saddle, or howdah, lying by his side.
They do not need any stables. They are
all used to the hot Indian sun, and do not
mind the rain, when there is any, on their
thick skins. Being evening, they had all
finished their day’s work, and were munch-
ing away at their supper of dried hay.

"You have seen the elephants at the
Zoological Gardens, Ethel, and you know
how cleverly they take the ginger-nuts out
Neltie’s Day among the Elephants. 41

of your hand with their trunks, and drop
them into their capacious mouths. They
all had names, and the largest, called Lady
Canning, after the wife of one of the
Queen’s former governors of India, was
twelve feet high. Ask grandmother how
high that is against the wall of the house
at home.

The man who had charge of this immense
farmyard, and all its varied inhabitants,
had some strange stories to tell about the
elephants. He showed Nellie one who
was anything but tame, being at that time
in such a bad humour that he was chained
by all his four legs to the strongest tree in
the yard, which was shaking with his efforts
to free himself. None dared go near him
except his own special rider and attendant,
whom heknew. Anyone else who ventured
within range of his trunk he would have
seized and trampled on.

There were two or three other “ bobbery”
or naughty elephants in the yard. The
man told us one was so afraid of horses
that when he got loose, as occasionally
happened, they could only catch him by
42 Little Nellie’s Days tn India.

mounting horses and surrounding him,
when he became so very frightened that
he was quite docile. Another elephant
was afraid of camels in the same way. As
a rule, though, horses do not like elephants ;
and when we meet a string of them in our
evening drive, we sometimes have to pull
up and soothe the frightened horses.

Nellie next went round to the camels,
with their great horny knees, They were
not very difficult to feed; for when they
cannot get anything else, they are quite
content with a meal of dry leaves.

Camels are not so strong as elephants.
They carry their loads hung in nets on
each side of their humps. When father
goes away for a few days’ shooting, a camel
carries his tent, furniture, cooking utensils,
provisions, guns, and clothes, and trots
along at a great rate. However, they are
not pleasant to ride, for their long swinging
trot is very rough. Sometimes we meet
them drawing some natives in a camel
carriage, which is very much like a
large open carrier's van, with very high
shafts. Camels are rather vicious things. —
Nellie’s Day among the Elephants. 43

They can bite with their broad teeth in
their black mouths. They kneel down to
be loaded; and when they are overloaded,
and cannot or will not rise, they give most
dismal brays, and sometimes roll and: kick
the whole pack off their backs.

The oxen, who were in another part of
the yard, are used to draw carts and carry
loads, as horses are in England. Some are
fawn-coloured, like English Alderney cows,
but much larger, and with humps on their
backs. When they are killed for food, these
humps of beef are thought a great delicacy.
Others are very ugly, quite black, with
stupid-looking heads, and horns slanting flat
back. These are called “mud buffaloes,”
because they are so fond of lying up to
their noses in the dirtiest ponds they can
find. ;

We have a pair of the nicer light-
coloured oxen in the garden, who every
evening draw the water up from the well
in buckets, which are emptied into a little
stream, which flows in many channels all
over the garden, flooding each flower-bed.
It rains so little in India, that, if we did
44 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

not have this grand watering every evening,
nothing would grow in the garden. Nellie .
is very fond of watching the oxen at work,
and the little stream filling the beds.

So you see oxen are very useful in India,
in many ways besides being good for food.
They are very slow walkers, though, for
drawing carts; and, I am sorry to say,
some of the natives are often very cruel in
driving them. They goad them with a
sharp piece of iron, and even twist their
tails to make them get on, when all else
fails.

While I am telling you about animals, J
must mention a ride on an elephant Nellie
had the other day; it was so different from
the little turns you and she had on one
once, up and down the gravel paths at the
Zoo. She drove down with father and
mother to the native city, which is some
way from where we and all the English
people live. We drove to the gate at the
entrance, a pretty arch painted in bright
colours.

_ Here we stopped, for the carriage could
go no farther, and we mounted an elephant




























NATIVE WAGGON.
46 Little Nellie’s Days in India,

which was waiting for us, by means of a
ladder. There were two seats arranged
on his back, like the seats on the top of
an omnibus, back to back. Elephants
walk very slowly and solemnly ; and as we
passed under the gate and into the city
we had plenty of time to look about us.
It was such a narrow street we did not
wonder the carriage could not drive through
it. The people with whom it was crowded
had to stand up against the houses to let
the elephant pass.

The houses were very low and very
small. The front of each was the shop,
quite a small stall. raised a little above the
street, and quite open to it. There were
sweetmeat shops and shoe shops, and all
kinds of beautiful shops full of gold and
silver work. At one of them father and I
got down. There was only just room for
us; and the two shopmen were sitting
cross-legged on mats, smoking long pipes,
called “‘hubble-bubbles,” the stands of which
were placed on the floor. As they drew the
smoke through the pipe with their mouths,
it made a funny bubbling sound, from
Nellie’s Day among the Elephants. 47

whence comes the curious name. A crowd
of natives collected in front in the street to
watch us, and from the roof of the opposite
house several very tame brown monkeys
sat and stared at us too.

Monkeys wander about these native
towns as freely as do the ownerless dogs.
The natives consider them sacred, and
feed them : indeed, one of their gods is a
monkey god. Just outside the town is a
grove of trees which quite swarms with
brown monkeys, little and big, jumping from
branch to branch, or running about the
road beneath. One of Nellie’s favourite
drives is round by the monkey grove, and
she is never tired of watching their antics.

But I must go on telling you about the
town. From the elephant’s back we could
look right on to the roofs of the houses,
where the people spread their mats to
sleep in the hot weather, cook, dry their
clothes, and do many things. We passed
heathen temples with their tall spires, from
the tops of which priests were calling the
people to prayer. There were no carriages
in the streets, and not many horses or
48 _ Little Nellie’s Days in India.

donkeys. The richer people were carried
about in palanquins, a sort of box on poles,
borne on the shoulders of four men. The
occupant lay at full length inside, getting in
through the side, which pushed back.

Nellie and I got down at one of the
houses, to pay a visit to the lady who lived
there. We passed through a court-yard,
which hada white marble tank and fountain
in it, to the hall, which was exceedingly
dirty, though the lady was very grand.
There were several smart chandeliers and
mirrors, but the floor was never scrubbed,
and there was very little furniture.

Natives in India sit and eat on mats on
the ground, and their beds are only small
wooden frames with very little bedding.
You recollect, Ethel, the story of our Lord
curing the man with the palsy, how He
said to him, “ Take up thy bed, and walk.”
If you could see these little bedsteads, or
“charpoys,” as they are called, you would
understand how easily it can be done in
Eastern countries, where the beds are so
different from our heavy English ones.

The lady received us sitting on a mat on
Wellie’s Day among the Elephants. 49

the ground. She wore some fine jewels,
but her clothes were an odd mixture of
finery and dirt. They were chiefly dirty
white muslin and red cotton. She was
very pleased with Nellie. She had never
seen such a white golden-haired little thing
before. All native children are brown.
She patted Nellie’s arms and hands; but
Nellie was. rather frightened at her, for all
the time she was talking she was chewing
betel nut, which the natives are fond of.
It smelt very strong, and made her teeth
quite black. This lady and her relatives,
who lived with her, are being taught by
kind lady-missionaries the knowledge of
the true God, and how to read. For even
these grand native ladies are very badly
educated; their lives are dull, they have
very little to do. They are not allowed to
walk and drive about, to see and be seen ;
they are always shut up in their houses.
But no sooner do they hear about Jesus
than they are anxious to learn to read, that
they may themselves read more about Him
in the Bible.

Before we left, the lady begged me to

E
50 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

sing something; and so, Nellie. chiming in,
I sang “God save the Queen,” and told
her all about our Queen, who is also
Empress of India.

Helle among Wative Children,

**T thank the goodness and the grace
Which on my birth have smiled,
And made me in these Christian days
A happy English child.”

Be: you know the hymn, part of
s+ which I have just repeated. Well,
Nellie has learnt it too; and in order to
make her realise it thoroughly I have been
showing her a little of the life of native
children in India; and in this letter J will
tell you about it, and about what Nellie
saw, that you may realise it, and be
thankful too.

I have already told you that women are
not thought much of in India. So little do
they think of girl children, that, a little
Nellie among Native Children.: 5t

while ago, a native gentleman said to father,
“Oh, lam so unhappy, I have no children,
only four girls!”

Before the English conquered India, or
ruled it as wisely as they do now, a dreadful
practice of killing almost all the girl babies,
as soon as they were born, was so much
the fashion, that in some villages hardly
any girls could be found. Of course that
has now been put a stop to, and villages
where the girls are not found in proportion
to the boys have to pay a heavy fine.

As I said before, women and girls are
very little thought of, and are in quite a
different position to English women. They
are hardly taught at all. They are kept
shut up in their own houses when they are
grown up, and not allowed to see any men
but their own nearest relatives. They
drive out in closely-shut carriages or palan-
quins. When it is necessary for them to
travel by railway, they are carried on to the
platform in a closed palanquin, the carriage
door opened, and a curtain held up on
either side while they step in, lest any one
should catch a glimpse of them. The
52 TarleNelio’s Days in India.

railway carriages set apart for native
women have no glass windows, only close
shutters. At home they have no amuse-
ments, and very few occupations; hardly
any of them can read, or write, or work.
Their lives are very dull indeed.

Some kind English ladies get together
in a school as many girls as their parents
will allow to come. They try, first of
all, to teach them, by God’s help, to know
and love the Saviour, and then instruct
them in things that will make them faithful
servants of God, and help them to lead
useful and happy lives when they grow
up. And who knows, Ethel, but that many
of these children, having learnt in the
school about the power and love of Jesus,
may become the means of spreading the
blessed light of the Gospel in the dark
heathen homes from whence they come.

I took Nellie down to this school one
day. It was held ina large, cool, vaulted
hall, formerly part of an old palace. Texts
and maps and pictures were arranged
round. It was full of little girls between
three and eleven, for after about that age
Nellie among Native Children, 53

they are shut up for the rest of their lives.
Some were brown and ugly; others had
round roguish faces and black bead-like
eyes. Some were neat, others untidy and
unkempt. Some wore only long cotton
trousers, and a strip of muslin wound many
times round their bodies; others wore
ordinary petticoats and bodies.

The school opened with their repeating
the Lord’s Prayer, but of course in their
own language. Then they sang a hymn.
Nellie knew the tune well, though she could
not understand the words till they were
interpreted for her. It was your old
favourite :

‘There is a happy land, far, far away ;”
and very sweetly they sang it, and Nellie
joined in, in English. For black children
and white, who love the Saviour, are all
alike His children, and journeying on
together to that happy land.

The hymn finished, they did various
marching and clapping exercises, like the
children in the infant schools in England,
and then we looked over their copy-books,
and asked them questions on various
54 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

subjects. They were especially quick over
geography, naming the various mountains,
countries, and boundaries of each continent,
and pointing out the way we had come
from England in the ship. We were quite
surprised to find how much more advanced
they were than children of the same age
would have been in the village school
at home.

The needlework Nellie could understand,
and it interested her most. Some of the
elder ones were knitting socks, and doing
elaborate pieces of wool-work from painted
patterns. Even one tiny brown mite, no
older than Nellie, in a pink cotton frock
down to her heels, was doing wool-work,
counting her stitches, and crossing them
all the right way.

But these: happy-cared-for little girls
were only some of a few picked out of
millions of untaught, benighted heathen,
whose lives, though happily now always
spared, are still so dull and sad. When I
tell you avout Nellie’s little friend Sackina,
I think you will be still more thankful you
are not a little Indian girl.
Nellie cmong Natwe Children. 55

Sackina is the ayah’s little daughter,
twelve years old. She is always in and
out of the nursery, playing with Nellie.
She is dressed like her mother, in long red
cotton trousers, and a white sheet wound
round her and over her head. She leads
a happy idle life, playing about the grounds
with the other servants’ children; going
with her mother when Nellie rides, or
roaming about where she likes, and has
never any lessons to do.

But one day her mother came to me,
and told me she had arranged a marriage
for Sackina with the son of a rich peasant,
in a village some miles off. A few nights
after, the wedding took place, by our per-
mission, in the grounds. Natives think a.
great deal of weddings, and are very
extravagant over them, and the ayah
borrowed of us several months’ wages to
spend on the festivities.

We walked out after dinner in the moon-
light to see what was going on, and found
an awning had been put up near the
stables, which was lit by torches. Under-
neath the awning sat the bridegroom on a
56 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

mat. He was a full-grown man much
older than Sackina, and was dressed in red
muslin. Groups of friends and relatives
stood about, and some hired dancing-girls,
dressed in gay muslins, and with jingling
bangles on their ankles and wrists, per-
formed strange wriggling dances before
them.

“ But where is the bride ?” we inquired.
“Why does not she put in an appearance ?”

But mother was informed that this was
not at all the custom at native weddings.
She was shown the poor little frightened
bride closely covered up in what had once
been some muslin curtains of mother’s, and
hidden away in a dark corner of the hut.
In England it is chiefly the bride that
people look at at weddings ; here it appears
to be the bridegroom. The dancing and
music, which consisted of a most monoto-
nous beating of drums, called ‘“tomtoms,”
was kept up all night. Early in the
morning, poor Sackina was carried off in
a closed “dhoolie” or palanquin, to spend
a week amongst her husband’s relatives,
who were entirely strange to her. Then
Nellie among Native Children. 57

she returned to her mother, and was soon
again the little dirty-brown Sackina, dis-
robed of all her finery, playing about the
grounds. In a few years, when she was
older, she would go away for good to her
mud hut, and never be allowed outside
the yard again. How she would miss the
garden, and trees, and pleasant roads,
where she had walked with her mother and
Nellie, and the sights of English ladies
and gentlemen, soldiers, and carriages!
What a dull future she has before her!
Don’t you pity her, Ethel ?

Before I close this letter, ] must tell
you of a great treat Nellie had the other
day, which she called, “a sight of fairy
land.” It was a great festival of the
Mohammedans, and we drove down to the.
city quite late one evening, when Nellie
ought to have been in bed, to see one of
their finest temples, which contains the
tomb of one of their saints, lit up in honour
of the occasion. We could see the temple
afar off, looking like white marble, and
decorated with thousands of tiny oil lamps,
set on every ledge and wall, turret and
58 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

archway. The road up was also decorated
with them, and was like an avenue of
light.

Passing through an archway outlined in
lamps, we came into a large court-yard,
with a pond of water in the middle. The
stone parapet of the pond was lit up; and
in the middle was a gigantic wooden horse,
also lit up. Then up a broad flight of
steps to the temple, with its archways and
towers and spires. Inside, the light was
perfectly dazzling. The floor was paved
with marble; and over the tomb, in the
centre of the hall, hung brilliant glass
chandeliers of many colours. It was a
warm still night; and Nellie was perfectly
delighted, and begged me to tell you about
it, as the nearest sight of fairy land she
has ever had. It only wanted the fairies
to make it perfect ; and I think Nellie half
expected them to be hopping about the
marble floor or dancing on the water.

SORE Ra
59

flellie’s Birthday in the Hills,

_—_

aes is Nellie’s birthday, mother wrote,
-). and I hope you have not forgotten it,
but have prayed, as father and I have done,
that as God has graciously spared Nellie
to live to be a year older, she may also
have grown in grace and: goodness, and
more like one of His children; and that
every succeeding birthday may find her
more fitted to live with Him in heaven,
when her life is ended.

Nellie is spending her birthday in such
a different way from what she ever spent it
before. Mother is writing at the, door of
a little tent pitched in a pleasant green,
wooded valley, far up among the great
Himalaya Mountains. These snow mon-
sters of different shapes and sizes rise all
round the valley, like a white wall. Mother
is never tired of watching them from the
door of the tent, at sunrise and sunset, lit
60 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

up a rosy red, fading away to a delicate
pink, and then to a cold pearly grey.

Our little encampment is pitched on a
grassy knoll, overlooking a torrent from









AMONG THE HIMALAYAS,

which we get water. There is father’s and
mother’s square tent, with a little awning
in front, where the table is generally put
for meals. Then there is a round tent
Nellie’s Birthday in the Hills. 61

where Nellie and the ayah sleep, and
a cooking-tent where the servants live.
Everything is carried on men’s backs, as
there are no roads, only steep mountain
paths. Therefore all the tents and fur-
niture fold up. The saucepans pack one
inside the other; and the spit is only a
rod of iron, which the cook uses as a
walking-stick as he trudges along. For
cooking, he makes a fire of wood on the
ground; and for an oven a hole in the
ground, with a stone over it, lighting a fire
in the hole. It is quite surprising what
nice dinners he sends up.

Of course, all the dogs are with us. Jim
and Harry, the fox-terriers, sleep under my
bed, and very good watch-dogs they make.
We start very early in the morning, as
soon as it is light enough to see the path.
The cuckoo’s voice sounds across the valley
from the dark mountain-side opposite. The
tents are taken down, and everything
packed. Father marches on ahead with
his gun. Mother follows in her “ dhoolie,”
hoisted on men’s shoulders. Then comes
Nellie in a sort of crib with no legs, and
62 Little Nelltie’s Days in India.

slung on a pole which two men carry.
There is a waterproof cover and curtains,
on four posts. In this conveyance she
travels by day and sleeps at night.
The servants on foot,-and the hill men
carrying the loads, bring up the rear of the
procession.

It is a gipsy sort of life, wandering thus
from place to place, pitching our tents
wherever we fancy. Nellie revels in it,
and so would you. For the first time
since I have been away from you in India,
my darling, mother has wished to have
you with her. Itis no hotter than in the
summer at home, except in the very middle
of the day, when the sun has a good deal
of power.

We go on and on towards the snow
mountains, which look so near morning
and evening, but are still so far off I fear
we shall have to turn back before we ac-
tually get to the snow. We go on and on,
over mountains and through valleys and
forests, where I am pretty sure no fair-
haired English child has been before. How
the natives in the villages stare at her !
























































DHOOLIE TRAVELLING,
64 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

Sometimes the way lies through forests
of rhododendrons, like those planted in
gardens at home; but here they are tall
trees, covered with red or white blossoms,
which strew the path below. The hill-sides
are covered with the most beautiful sorts of
ferns, such as only grow in hot-houses at
home; with the silver, gold, and parsley
fern. Butterflies, gayer and larger than
any Nellie has ever seen before, hover
about the flowers. Flocks of little green
parrots fly through the trees. Sometimes,
as we pass under a tree, a tree-cricket on a
branch makes a noise like the whirl of a
policeman’s rattle, and quite wonderful for
such a small insect.

Now and then we come across troops of
large grey monkeys, called “bungoors.”
They have white hair and beards, like old
men.

Nellie is rather afraid of them, and not
without reason, for they have been known
to pelt travellers passing underneath their
trees with stones.

Father has had bad sport when shooting
ever since we encamped in the valley
Nellie’s Birthday in the Hills. 65

where I am writing from. This morning
we found out the reason of it. A pack of
wild dogs, real wild dogs, not the pariah
dogs I spoke of in towns, have been hunting
all the game on their own account.
Yesterday they drove a deer right into the
middle of the camp. It was very early in
the morning, and father was hurriedly
aroused. He went out, and shot the deer
and one of the wild dogs, the pursuer and
the pursued. So now we have some
venison to eat.

It is not an easy thing to get meat.
When we come to a village, we buy a
sheep, and any poultry they may have ; but
we have great difficulty in getting milk for
Nellie. Long ago we came to the end of
the bread and potatoes we started with;
and instead of bread we eat “chappatties,”
like the natives. They are a sort of dough
flat cake, very good if cut open and eaten
hot with butter. They are made by being
patted flat between the hands.

Father shot the most horrid-looking
animal [ have ever seen. He saw its long

tail moving in a bush, and thought it was.
F
66 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

a large snake. He shot at and killed it,
and found it to be a gigantic lizard about
five feet long, with a horny skin, and its
mouth full of teeth. None of the natives
who are with us have ever seen the like,
- so I cannot tell you its name. Fancy, if
it had crawled into the tent at night!

This tent life, Ethel, reminds me very
much of the accounts we read in the Old
Testament of the patriarchs’ daily life.
_ We can understand how Abraham sat at
the tent door in the heat of the day, and
how the Israelites journeyed with their
tents and flocks and herds. There is so
much in Eastern life now not at all altered
from what we read in the Bible, that I
think we understand the Bible better.
For instance, the man with the palsy
taking up his bed and walking, which
I mentioned before.

On our way to this valley from which
I am writing, we passed a tea-garden;
that is, a hill-side covered with low green
tea shrubs. Perhaps, Ethel, as you drink
your tea every morning and evening, it
will remind you of us, if I describe to you
Nellie’s Birthday in the Hills. 67

how we saw it made. The fresh green
leaves when first gathered look very
different from what we usually call tea-
leaves. But they were carried into an
outhouse, and laid out to dry in baskets,
Then they were cooked in a great iron
pot over a wood fire, when they shrivelled
up and became black. Then they were
rolled and kneaded by natives with their
hands or bare feet. After that they were
cooked again and again. Then the sifting
took place in baskets; and the finer the
siftings are the better tea it is. Finally,
it is packed in the square lead-lined boxes
with gay pictures you have seen in the
shops, and so carried on ponies’ backs
down to the railroad in the plains, and so
on perhaps to you in England.

And now; Ethel, after reading this
account of our gipsy life, you will perhaps
ask grandmother whatever made father
and mother and Nellie leave their own
pleasant home, and the pets, and the
garden, and wander about the mountains
in tents ?

Well, Ethel, it was just this.
68 Little Nellie’s Days tn India.

The hot weather came on in the place
where we were living, which is in one of
the great plains of Northern India. The
summer is very hot indeed, hotter than in
many places where the winter is not so
cool. I do not really know if I can make
you or even grandmother understand what
the hot weather really is like. Of course
it comes on gradually.

Many of the trees after flowering
suddenly lose their leaves, as they do in
the autumn at home. All the English
flowers in the garden droop and die with
the increasing heat. The violets, which we
rear so carefully in pots, are put away into
a dark, cool outhouse. The peasants come
in from the country to hire themselves out
as punkah-pullers. Punkahs were rigged
up in every room; over the dining-table,
and over each bed, so low that they
brushed your head if you sat up.

I described to you before what punkahs
are. Long boards, prettily painted, hang
from the ceiling across the room, with a
curtain of white calico attached, to make
still more wind as they swing. They are
Nellie’s Birthday in the Hills, 69

pulled outside in the verandah by a rope
passing through the wall. The lamps
have special shades, to prevent their being
blown out by the draught; and the dinner
is served on hot-water plates, to prevent its
getting quite cold. The punkah-pullers
have a monotonous life, swing, swing,
swing, all through the long hours, day and
night. Sometimes they go to sleep, and
then they have to be shouted at and roused,
for one cannot bear to be a minute without
the fanning of the punkah.:

A great machine, called a thermantidote,
was placed in the verandah, for pumping
cool air into the house. Nellie’s favourite
play place was just in front of the funnel
where the cool blast blows in. Besides
the heat of the sun, growing more powerful
every day, hot winds like the blast of a
furnace began to blow. Clever contrivances
called “ tatties,” mats of thick grass closely
woven together, were placed in all the
door-ways on the windward side of the
house. A native in the verandah keeps
each well soaked with water, so that the
wind blew cool through them.
70 Little Nellie’s Days in India,

Father and all the soldiers left off their
cloth uniforms, and went about like millers,
all in white calico suits. Mother wore as
few and as thin clothes as she could, and
indeed was generally to be seen all day
indoors in a white dressing-gown. Nellie
played about in very little besides a
pinafore. No one, unless obliged, ventured
out between eight in the morning and five
or six in the evening. The soldiers were
not allowed out of their barracks. No
carriages were to be seen along the
deserted dusty drives. One by one the
English families shut up their houses, and
went off to the mountains. The Church
Service was held at six in the morning;
and punkahs, “ tatties,” and thermantidotes
were in full swing there also, The Sunday-
school was held at five o’clock; but most
of the soldiers’ children had been sent away
to the hills too. A generous officer, who
was once colonel of a regiment out here,
has had nice barracks built in a beautiful
village in the hills, on purpose for soldiers’
families.

The house was always closely shut,
Nellte’s Birthday in the Hills. 71

except for two or three hours in the very
middle of the night. It was as hot after
dinner, when we sat out in the dark in the
garden, as it had been in the day. Nellie
tossed in her bed under the punkah all
night. She had no mattress or blankets.
She lay on a piece of Chinese matting,
with a sheet over her. No need for
musquito curtains now, the insects cannot
live near the draught of the punkah.
About four o'clock, while it was still
dark, father was aroused and went off to
morning parade. Nellie went for her ride,
and mother sat under a tree in the garden,
drinking her morning tea in the grey
twilight, with a native fanning her all the
while with a gigantic fan made of a palm
leaf, four feet across. But the fiery sun
_ gets up, and rises higher and higher; and
about seven drove us indoors again to the
' darkened house, to try to sleep away the
hours, for it is too dark and too hot to
read or work much. We used to eat
quantities of large juicy mangoes or water
melons, but no one has much appetite in
the hot weather. In the evening we
72 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

ventured out for a drive, but the hot blast
scorched our throats, and drove us home
again, ;

Occasionally a dust-storm came on, and
that cooled the air for a time. Very
suddenly the sky opposite to the quarter
the wind was blowing from grew black
and lurid. The birds flew before the
storm, and got into refuge.

Every door and window was closed, or
the furniture would have been smothered
with dust. Any one out of doors took
shelter. With a howl the storm broke,
and with a pelting as of rain, but of dust,
as it whirled over the house. If one was
overtaken on the road, riding or driving,
the horses stood still and cowered. It was -
impossible to see two yards before one. It
was thicker than a London fog, and more
unpleasant, for one could hardly open one’s
eyes or breathe. Sometimes it lasted for
an hour.

This weary hot season lasted for many
weeks, Ethel; and then, after one or two
days, came the welcome rain. It came
in deluges, flooding the parched country,
Nellie’s Birthday in the Hills. 73

filling the deep drains on each side of the
road, which looked so useless all the rest
of the year. The river rose suddenly,
and overflowed its banks. All the doors
and windows were opened in the long
shut-up houses. Tatties and punkahs
were done away with; for though still
very hot, it was a moist heat. The trees
burst forth with new foliage; the grass
and flowers and shrubs almost grew before
your eyes. Hedges grew up tall and green
where a fortnight ago there had been only
a row of dry sticks. Creepers climbed
about thé house and trees, and all kinds of
strange bright tropical flowers bloomed.
Once more we had fresh vegetables, and
this was a great treat.

Now was the grand time of the frogs
and toads. Long green frogs lived in
every puddle, and jumped out in yard-long
leaps when disturbed. To Nellie’s horror,
toads infested any quiet corner in the
house. They hopped about from under
the beds or wardrobes, and even from
under the dinner-table as we sat. Their
croaking from undisturbed nooks frightened
74. Little Nellie’s Days in India.

Nellie in the night. They were such
monsters too, and hopped along so fast.
I have a stuffed one I hope to show you
some day, He is eight inches long! It
was impossible to keep them out, for the
house was open day and night. Nellie
slept with only a curtain between her and
the road, and all the windows were open
down to the ground. - I have even known
an adventurous toad climb up to the top of
the curtain, and drop down with a flop into
the room. Father found one in the pocket
of a great-coat which had long been hung
up. At church, where Nellie now went
regularly, though still at very early hours,
the toads, hopping about the steps and
squatting in rows along the walls, sorely
distracted her attention, and she was afraid
to kneel lest they should crawl from under
the seat.

I think Nellie disliked the rainy season
more than the hot weather. And, 1 am
sorry to say, she now began to droop, like
the little English flower that she is, and
grew whiter and more languid every day.
There is a plot in the cemetery full of the
Nethe’s Birthday in the Hills. 75

small graves of other little English flowers,
who have drooped and died away from
their native air; and mother could not bear
to see Nellie thus.

So one evening we started off by the
train, oh! so thankful to get away. We
had a long hot night and day in the train,
and then where the railway stopped we
took a carriage. It was something like a
small bathing machine, only there were
doors on each side which pushed back.
There were no windows. Inside a mattress
was spread, and father and mother and
Nellie laid themselves down to sleep as
best they could through the jolting and
rumbling. On the roof was piled the
luggage, and the servants sat cross-legged.
Two little ponies were harnessed in, and
after much shouting and whipping and
pushing the wheels, they were induced to
start off at a gallop, the top-heavy con-
veyance swaying from side to side. Every
five miles the ponies were changed, and
every time the same process of getting
them to start had to be repeated. All night
long we went on in the dark, through a
76 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

wild, uncultivated, swampy country. Once
we came toariver. There was no bridge,
and the banks were overflowed. The
driver missed the ford, and the wheels
stuck fast in the sand in the very middle
of the stream. In vain the ponies tugged,
the carriage only lurched to one side, and
mother was afraid it would topple over
into the water. At last, no less than four
yoke of oxen were fetched, and all struggling
and straining together got us safely out,
and we continued our journey.

Tired out, we fell asleep; and when the
driver's horn, which is always sounded as
we approach the place where the ponies
are changed, roused us, it was no longer
bright yellow moonlight, but early dawn.
We put our heads out of the doorway, and
our delighted eyes, so long used to the
endless plains, saw the great Himalayas,
rising black and mysterious before us.
Suddenly the long flat road came to an
end, at their very foot. The carriage
could go no farther. We mounted into
‘“dhoolies,” which were waiting, and were
carried gradually up the mountain paths,
Netlie’s Birthday in the Hills. Po)

the clear morning air growing cooler and
more bracing every moment. Birds twit-
tered, the cuckoos called, and torrents and
waterfalls gushed. It was a refreshing
change. The hill sides covered with trees,
the ferns, the grass, and the undergrowth
all looked delightfully fresh and green
to our eyes, so long wearied with the dusty
parched plains, which lay shimmering
below us in the haze of heat,


78

Conclusion,

—

Teron some time after Ethel had received
laf this last letter, mother did not
write specially to her. But grandmother
looked grave over the letters she received;
and when Ethel inquired the reason, she
was told that Nellie was not picking up in
the mountain air as they had hoped she
would. Each letter brought no better
account, and Ethel was quite beginning
to despair of ever getting one of her own
again. At last, one mail day, having ran
up to grandmother with the letter, and
being again disappointed, she exclaimed :
“Grandmother, I don’t believe mother
ever means to write me another letter. I
suppose she is too taken up with Nellie!” |
Grandmother, who had been hastily
reading the letter, looked up with a happy
smile, and answered:
“ Indeed, Ethel, she sends you a message
that she does indeed never mean to do so!”
Conclusion. 79

“Oh, granny!” was all Ethel could say,
with a blank face,

“Yes, indeed, my child; she is going to
do something much better than writing.
She hopes to send you herself and Nellie
by the next ship after the one which
brought this letter. The doctor has sud-
denly decided that Nellie must not stay
out in India any longer, and mother will
bring her home herself. So, please God,
we may see them both now in a week
or two!”

I leave you now, children, to imagine
Ethel’s joy, and the happy meeting that
followed; and with what happiness and
gratitude in her heart Ethel that night
said her prayers to her Father in heaven,
who had watched over her loved ones, and
spared them and brought them safe back
to her once more.

You can fancy, also, the long talks the
two little sisters had together, the messages
from father, and the presents, so strange
and beautiful, he had sent Ethel. He
hoped to follow mother and Nellie home
before the little girls were many years


80 Little Nellie’s Days in India.

older. In the meantime they jingled
about the house in their silver bangles;
and many a long talk and game did they
have over Nellie’s days in India, which
had now come to an end.





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The “PEN AND PENCIL SERIES.’—continued.
Imperial 8vo (size of page, 11 by 74 inches),
Price Eight Shitiings in handsome cloth, gilt edges ; or Pwenty-five Shillings each in moruceo.
English Pictures. Drawn with Pen and Pencil. By Samurn

MANNING, L1..p., and 8. G. Grern, v.v. With Coloured Frontispiece and
numerous Wood Engravings. 8s. handsome cloth, or 25s. in rnorocco.

“Next to seeing the beautifu) places of the earth comes the delight of reading of them; and
many 2 one who is doomed to begin and end his days within a ‘ cribbed, cabined, and confined ’
circle, can roam, guided by such a book, at the will of fancy, through sunny glades, by babbling

streams, or over the breezy moorlands.”—7'imes,

Map and 122

With a

Illustrations, engraved by E. Wuympeer, R. Taytor,

Drawn with Pen and

With a glance at Sweden and the Gotha Canal.
8s. cloth boards, gilt edges ;

M.A.
rming books on Norway that has

appeared for a long time,”— Academy.





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Canadian Pictures. Drawn with

Pen and Pencil, By the MAnguis oF
Lorne. With numerous fine engravings
by E. Whymper, from Sketches by the







and others,
. bound in



Marquis of Lorne,Sydney Hall

$s. extra cloth boards gilt; or 2
morocco elegant,

“ Most inte ing—an extremely pleasant

book.” —Saturday Reriew.





Australian Pictures. Drawn with
Penand Pencil. By Howarb WILLOUGIBY,
of the * Melbourne Argus.” With a large

Map and Ulustratious from Photographs

and Sketches. engraved by E. Whymper

and others. |

eloth, gilt edg:
ey 7



1 8vo. §s., handsome
4s. morocco elegant.

1, vivid, and life-like.
re written by a man who belongs ta the
and the people. The book, therefore,
fitring memoris! to totrists of what
they have scen, and will at the same time be in-
structive to untravelled people.’-A ustralasian.




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Indian Pictures. Drawn with Pen
and Pencil. By the Rev. Winuiam Ur-
wick, M.A. Profusely Hlustrated. 8s., in
handsome e¢loth gilt 3. Morocco.

in all their e

Pictures’ (whieh now has in
siderable part of the world). has not given to.
the public a better ated or more interesting
volume than this.''—Spectator.









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Sea Pictures. By Dr. MACAULAY,
i Editor of the Leisure Hour, &, Contain-
i ing the Sea in Poetry, Physical Geography
of the Sea, the Sea in History, and the
Harvest of the Sea, in handsome cloth :
or in morocco elegant.
Mr. Ruskin say: “This beautiful book is
i by far the best Ihave ever seen on thesubject.
and will be a sost precious gift-book for me.”

‘ :

“Those Holy Fields.” Palestine
Illustrated by’ Pen and Pencil. By the
late Rev, SAMUEL Manninc. LL.D. With
numerous Engravings. 8s., handsome cloth
gilt ; 248. morocco.

Pictures from Bible Lands.
Drawn with Pen and Pencil, Edited by
the Rey. $. G, Green, DD. The Engra-
vings by Edward Whymper and others,
8s., handsome cloth gilt ; 25s, morocco,

New Edition. Just Published,

| The Land of the Pharaohs,

Egypt and Sinai. Dlustrated by Pen and







QP















By the late Rev. Samurt MAn-
LL.D. With numerous fine En-



gravings Ss, handsome cloth gilt ; or 24s.
in morocco.

Swiss Pictures. Drawn with Pen
and Pencil. By Samven Mannine, LL.D.
With numerous Illustrations, §s,, hand
some cloth gilt ; 25s, morocco,

eee LL Ee ELICIOUS I pson Socery Townan,




ILLUSTRATED GIFT-BOOKS.

Her
Life
and

Reign.
e a »

By Dr, Macautay, Author of “Sea Pictures,’ ‘‘ Luther Anecdotes,” ‘Gordon

Anecdotes,’ etc.

by Edward Whymper and others, .
“The author's endeavour has been to rec:

With Five Portraits of the Queen, and Sixty Engravings

Small Quarto. 10s, 6d., cloth, gilt edges.

all those qualities in the personal character of

the Queen and the incidents in her life‘which have most endeared her to her people.”—

Illustrated London News,

“It is a beautifully printed and very prettily illustrated volume, and is admirable in tone

and feeling.” —Athenwum,

“A very acceptable gift-book.”--Stamsford Mercury.



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The Harvest of a Quiet
Eyre; or, Leisure Thoughts for
Busy Lives. By the Rev. J. R.
Vernon, M.A. With numerous En-
gravings. New Edition. 6s. 6d.
cloth, gilt edges,

“Tnever saw anything more gracefully or
more rightly done—more harmoniously
leasant in text and illustration.” — Hr.
uskin.

Ingleside and Wayside
Musines. A companion volume to
“The Harvest of a Quiet Eye.”
6s. cloth gilt.

Random Truths in Common
Tunes, Occasional Papers from my
Study Chair. By the Rev. J. R.
Vernon, M.A,, author of ‘‘ The
Harvest of a Quiet Eye.” Illustra-
tions, 7s. cloth gilt.

“ Tt seems even -better than ‘The Harvest
of a Quiet Eye.’ ’—Mr. Ruskin.

“Should be placed next to Wordsworth on
every student’s bookshelf.”’—Standard.












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The Life of Jesus Christ the
Saviour. By Mrs.S. Warson. With
many fine Engravings. 5s. cloth.

“‘ Foryoung people to read, orto helpateacher
in lighting up a narrative of the one perfect life,
and interesting young people in all its parts and
details, we have seen no better volume of the
kind than this.”—dfethodist. Recorder.

Dr, Stoughton’s Reformation Books.

The Spanish Reformers,
their Memoriesand Dwelling Places.
By Dr. Sroveuron. Finely Illus-
trated. 8s. handsome cloth gilt,

‘‘ A most interesting and instructive volume.’
Spectator, $
Footprints of Italian Re-

Â¥YORMERS. By Dr.Sroventon. Finely
Illustrated. 8s. handsome cloth gilt.

‘A very charming and useful gift-book.”—
Congregationalist.

Homes and Haunts of
Luruer. By Dr. SroveHTon.
Finely Illustrated. 8s. handsome



cloth, gilt edges.

rr Tn cc ee
6]
A USEFUL SET FOR PRESENTATION

To a Minister or Sunday School Teacher.

LT ESSN

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Bu-faths of Bible Rnotuledge.

“The volumes which the Tract Society is issuing under the above title fully
deserve success. ‘They have been entrusted to scholars who have a special
acquaintance with the subjects about which they severally treat.”— The Atheneum,

1. Cleopatra’s Needle. By the Rev. J. Kine, Lecturer for the

Palestine Exploration Fund. With Illustrations. 2s. 6d.

2. Fresh Light from the Ancient Monuments. By A. H.
Saycr, L1.p., Deputy Professor of Comparative Philology, Oxford, etc.
With Facsimiles from Photographs. 3s.

8. Recent Discoveries on the Temple Hill at Jerusalem.
By the Rev. J. Kine, m.a., Lecturer for the Palestine Exploration Fund.
With Maps, Plans, and Illustrations. 2s. 6d.

4. Babylonian Life and History. By E.A. Wauuis BupGE,
u.A., Cambridge, Assistant in the Department of Oriental Antiquities,
British Museum. 3s.

5. Galilee in the Time of Christ. By Srtan MERRILL, D.D.,
Author of “ Kast of the Jordan.” With a Map. 2s. 6d.

6. Egypt and Syria. Their Physical Features in Relation
to Bible History. By Sir J. W. Dawsoy, r.c.s., ¥.2.s. With many Illustra-
tions. 3s.

7. Assyria: Its Princes, Priests, and People. By A, H.

SAYcs, M.A., LL.D. Tllustrated. 3s.

8. The Dwellers on the Nile. Chapters on the Life, Literature,
History, and Customs of Ancient Egypt. By E. A. Wats Bupa, .a., of
the British Museum. Illustrated. 3s.

9. The Diseases of the Bible. By Sir J. Rispon Brnnert,
M.D., F.R.S., Ex-President of the Royal College of Physicians. 2s. 6d.

10. Trees and Plants of the Bible. By W. H. Grosmr, B.Sc.
Illustrated. Crown 8vo. 3s. cloth.

11. Animals of the Bible. By H. Cuicnester Hart, B.A,

Neturalist to Sir G. Nares’ Arctic Lxpedition and Professor Hull’s Palestine
Expedition. Illustrated. Crown 8vo. 3s.

; Tux, Bewicions ‘Tp p- Soc Ts Loxponx
HANDSOME GIFT-BOOKS

FE

Poung Men and Maidens.

Girl’s Own Indoor Book.
Edited by Cuarrnes Prrers.
528 pages, 84 X 63, With over one
hundred and fifty illustrations, gs.
cloth, gilt edges.

Containing practical helps to Girls
in all matters relating to their
material comfort and moral well-
being. By the Author of “How to
be Happy though Married,” Dora
de Blaquiere. Dora Hope, Marie
Karger, lady Macfarren, Lady
Lindsay, Ernst Pauer, Sir John
Stainer, the Hon. Victoria Gros-
venor, Jobn C, Staples, Canon
Fleming, “‘ Medicus,” Ruth Lamb,
Sophia Caulfeild, and many others.





Indoor Games and Recrea-
yions. A popular Encyclopedia
for Boys. Edited by G. A.
Hurcuison. Including chapters by
3. N,. Masxetyne, Lient.- Col.
CuTHeLt, Dr. Gorpon STaBLEs,
R.N., Rev, A. N. Matan, 31a.,
C. Staysrietp - Hicks, Dr.
Srrapuine, and others, “ Boy’s
Own Bookshelf.” Vol. VIII
With many Engravings. Quarto.
8s. cloth boards, gilt edges, A
splendid Gift-Book or Prize for





The Handy Natural His-
rory. By the Rev. J. G. Woop,
author of ‘Homes without
Hands,” ete.,etc. 368 pages, 8 X 64
With 224 Engravings. 88. cloth
boards, gilt edges.

*« A delightful book, and will make
a very handsome and enviable
high-class prize or present.’—--
School Board Chronicle.

A handsome volume, in which the
author, a well-known naturalist,
tells his readers.in simple, un-
technical language the habits and
nature of birds, beasts, and rep-
tiles, Mr, Wood’s style is excel-
lently adapted for attracting the
interest and insuring the attention
of even ordinarily careless rea-
ders.”—Mail. :

Tue Reuiaious Tract Society, Lo

“








8 |
THE SUNFLOWERS SERIES

OF STORIES FOR ALL READERS.
‘ This is a Series of Books intended for adults eaian: t
ers of young people, as well as readers of older rowth, give uw: h i
time to fiction. This Series supplies books which wot only tioreat a eoaraen
Stories that afford studies of character and descriptions of events and scenes likely
to rivet the attention, but which also stimulate the serious thought, and develop
the better nature of those into whose hands they fall. ;

The Manse of Glen Clunie. By
Eouanron Tuornx, author of “The Ola
Worcester Jug,” “The Two Crowns,”’
etc. Illustrated by CHaruxs WuymMrer,
Crown 8vo. 3s. Gd. cloth.

Two Enthusiasts. By E.
Evrrert Green. Illustrated by
Epwarp Wuymprer, Crown 8vo, 5s.
cloth boards.

Barbara’s Brothers. By E,
Everrerr Green, Author of ‘ Lenore
Annandale’s Story,’? ‘* Joint Guardians,”?
ete. Illustrated by R. and E. Tayuonr.
Crown 8vo, 4s, cloth boards.

Joint Guardians. By E.
Evererr GREEN. Illustrated. 5s. cloth.

Joyce Graham’s History ; or,
Overcoming Evil with Good. By H. A.
Gowrinc. Hlustrated. Crown 8vo, 3s.6d.

Another King. By Janer EpEN.
Illustrated by EF, Wuymprr. Crown 8vo.
38s. 6d. cloth.

The Head of the House. A Story of Victory over Passion and
Pride, By E. E. Grexn. Ilustrated. Crown 8yo, 5s.

Ida Nicolari. By Eetanron Torys. Illustrated. Crown 8vo. 3s. 6d.

The Old Manuscript ; or, Anaise Robineau’s History. A Tale
of the Huguenots of La Vendée. By BLANcHE M. Moceripex. Illustrated
by E. Wuymprer. Crown 8vo. 5s. cloth.

Young Sir Richard. By H.
Freperick Caaruzs. Illustrated. Crown
8vo... 5s. cloth, :

Maddalena, the Waldensian
Maipen anp HER Peopur. Translated by
Juniz Surrer. Illustrated. Crown 8yo.
3s. 6d. cloth.

Turning Points; or, Two Years
in Maud Vernon’s Life, By L. C. Sizxs.
Illustrated. Crown 8vo, 3s. 6d. cloth,

Reaping the Whirlwind. A Story
of Three Lives. Illustrated. Crown 8yo.
8s. 6d. cloth,

One Day at a Time. By BLANCHE
E.M.Grens. Illustrated by E. Wayrmpzr.
Crown 8vo. 3s. 6d. cloth,

The Mistress of Lydgate
Priory; or, the Story of a Long Life.
By Evetyn FE. Green. Crown 8vo. ds.

The Two Crowns. By Eananron
Tuorne. With Illustrations. Crown 8vo.
8s. 6d. cloth, J

Lenore Annandale’s Story. By Evetyn E. Green. With
Illustrations. Crown 8vo. 5s. cloth, : -

Carola. By HesBa STRETTON. With Illustrations. Crown 8vo. 3s. 6d.

Sunflowers. Crown 8vo. 3s. 6d. cloth.

Tue Revicious Tracr Socrery, Lonpon.



hanchildren. Large num-




ILLUSTRATED ANNUALS:

ee: PRESENTATION.
EZ Che Leisure Bour.

Annual Volume ‘or 1888.

“ Behold in these what leisure hours demand Arnuse-
ment and true knowledge hand in hand."

Tux VoLUME ror 1888 of this Monthly Maga-
zine fur Family and General Reading contains 856
Imperial 8vo, pages (11 X 73) of interesting reading,
with numerous Illustrations by Eminent Artists.
It forms a handsome Book for Presentation,
and an appropriate and instructive volume for
a School or College Prize. Price 7s. in cloth
boards ; 8s. 6d. extra boards, gilt edges; 10s. 6d.
half-bound in calf.








Al Ae Sais
The Sunday at Bome.
Annual Volume for 1888.

AN ILLUSTRATED FAMILY MAGAZINE FOR
SABBATH READING.

Tuis Votume ror 1888 forms a very suitable
Book for Presentation. It contains 828 pages,
Imperial 8vo (11 X 73), with a great variety of
Interesting and Instructive Sabbath 'Reading for
every Member of the Family. It is profusely
illustrated by Coloured and Wood Engravines,
Price 7s. cloth boards; 8s. 6d. extra boards, °
gilt edges; 10s, 6d. half-bound in calf,

ae ND Niu. @

Che Giel’s Own Annual.

The Ninth Volume of “ The Girl’s Own Paper,”
—containing 848 Demy 4to (11 X 8) pages of
interesting and useful reading. Stories by popu-
lar writers; Music by eminent composers ; Prac-
tical Papers for Young Housekeepers; Medical
Papers by a well-known practitioner; Needle-
work, plain and fancy; Helpful Papers for
Christian Girls; Papers on Reasonable and Sea-
sonable Dress, etc., ete. Profusely illustrated.
Price 8s. in handsome cloth; 9s. 6d, with gilt
edges; 12s. 6d. half-morocco,




Che Boy's Own Annual
FOR 1888.

The Tenth Annual Volume of the ‘‘Boy’s Own
Paper.” Containing 848 large pages (113 x 8$)
of Tales of Schoolboy Life, and of Adventure on
Land and Sea; Outdoor and Indoor Games for
every Season; Perilous Adventures at Home and
Abroad; Amusements for Summer and Winter;
and Instructive Papers written so as to be read by
boys and youths. With many Coloured and Wood
Engravings. Price 8s. handsome cloth; 9s. 6d.
gilt edges; 12s. 6d. half-morocco.

Tue Rextiaious Tracr Socixty, Lonxpox.




10 ]

NEW EDITIONS OF STORIES
ESBS Sal See aun

The Children of Cloverley.
2s. cloth.

Little Meg’s Children. Illustrated. 1s. 6d.
cloth.

Alone in London. MWustrated. 1s. 6d. cloth.
Bede’s Charity. Illustrated. 2s. 6d. cloth.
Carola. Ilustrated. 3s, 6d. cloth.
Cassy. Illustrated. 1s. 6d. cloth.
Cobwebs and Cables. Ilustrated. 5s. cloth

gilt.
The Crew of the Dolphin. Ilustrated.
1s. 6d. cloth.

Enoch Roden's Training. Illustrated. 2s.
cloth.

Fern’s Hollow. Illustrated. 2s. clath.
Fishers of Derby Haven. Illustrated. 2s.

cloth. :
Friends Till Death. Ilustrated, 6d. cloth.
Illustrated. 1s.

J essica's First Prayer.
cioth,

Pilgrim Street. A Story of Manchester Life.
2s. cloth,

The King’s Servants. Illustrated. Is. 6d.

Lost Gip. Dlustrated. 1s. 6d. cloth.

Max Kromer. AStory of the Siege of Stras-.
bourg. Is. 6d. cloth.

No Place Like Home... Illustrated. is.
cloth.

Illustrated.



The Storm of Life. Illustrated. 1s. 6d.

cloth.
A Thorny Path. Illustrated. 2s. cloth.
Under the Old Roof. Illustrated. 1s. cloth.
A Night and a Day. 9d. cloth.
Left Alone. 6d. cloth.

A Miserable Christmas and
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The Worth of a Baby. 6d. cloth.
Sam Franklin’s Savings Bank, 6d. cloth.
Michel Lorio’s Cross. Illustrated. 6d. cloth.





By Mrs. O. F. WALTON.

Christie's Old Organ; or, Home, | Our Gracious Queen: Pictures and
Sweet Home. 1s. cloth. Stories trom “Her Majesty’s Life.

Angel’s Christmas. 16mo. 6d.eloth. With many Pictures. New and

Launch -the Lifeboat. With 44 Revised Edition. 1s. cloth.
Coloured Pictures or Vignettes, 4to. | A Peep Behind the Scenes. Imp.

_ 38: coloured cover. | l6mo. 3s. 6d. cloth, gilt edges.

Little Dot. Coloured Frontispiece. Poppie’s. Presents. Crown 8vo.

6d. cloth. 1s. cloth.

Little Faith; or, The Child of the
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Nobody Loves Me. Royal 16mo.
_ 1s. cloth.

Olive’s Story; or, Life at Ravens-
clifte, 2s. 6d. cloth, gilt edges.

Was I Right? Fine Engravings,
Imp. 16mo, 3s. &d. cloth, gilt edges.

Tur Beurcious Tract SocrersyLoypow

Saved at Sea. A Lighthouse Story.
New and cheaper Edition. 1s.
cloth. .

Shadows. Scenes in the Life of an
Old Arm-Chair. Imp, lémo. 4s.
cloth, gilt edges.

Taken or Left.
cloth.

Crown 8yo. 1s
=

11

ms

BOYS, STORY BOOKS.





Untrue to his Trust. A
Story of Life ang Adventare in
Charles the Second’s Time. By
Henry Janson, Lllustrated.
cloth gilt. v

The Doctor's Experiment.
By the Author of * Under Fire.”
With Ulustrations, Imperial 16mo.

5s. cloth. gilt edges,

The Captain’s Story of
LIFE IN JAMAICA. Witn Thus-
trations by Joun Give . ime
perial lémo. 4s. cloth boards, gilt
edges. ‘ as

Once upon a Time; or, The
Boy's Book of Adventures, With
TMastrations, 3s. cloth.

Stories of the Old Romans.

y SS. Pucu. Tlustratred. 3s,







CHRISTIAN
RICHARD
four TWustv:
some cloth gilt,

@he Boy's

CENTURIES. — By
ATH. With Eighty-
ms. 4to:.J0s, hand-





Adventures of 2

WATCH. By Tatpor Barres ReEp.
3s. 6d. cloth poards.

trations, Crown 8yo.
Football. A Popular Handbook of the
Game.



authorities, With
1s, 6. cloth.



recoguised
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Three - Guinea

With Tlus-

By Dr. Irvine, C. W. Avcock, and other
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firnest Hepburn; or, Revenge and For-
giveness, By H.C. Apams, o.a., Viear of Old
Shoreham. Mlustraced by E, Waymrrr. Crown
Svo. ds. cloth boards,

Drake and the Dons; or, Stirring Tales
of Armada Times. Ediced and Arranged by
RicHarb Loverr, aa. With Portraits, Maps,
and Illustrations. Crown Svo. 3s, 6d. cloth
hoards, gilt edges,

What to Read at Winter Entertain-
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Augels.” “ Poor Folk’s Lives,’ etc. Ench ‘Is. 6d.
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The Latch Key; By T. 8. MILLINGTON,
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More than Conqueror; or, A Boy’s
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Marching. Orders; or, Soldier Bobbie.

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Geoffrey Heywood; or, The Right Way.
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Sailor Jack.
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All for_ Number One; or, Charlie Rus-
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By Henry Jounson, Author of “True to His







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Hindered and Help. A Story for Boys.

2s. cloth hoards,

Illustrated. Crown Svo.

O tun

Cricket. A Popular Handbook. of the Game.
By Pr. W. G. Grace, Rev. J. Pyenorr, Lord
Cuan es Russeuu, F. GALE, and others. 2s. elovh,

A Great Mistake: A Tale of Adventure.

By T.5. Miturserox., With Ulustrations. 3s. 6d.
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The Fifth Form at St. Dominic’s. A
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Through Fire and Through Water.
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INGTON, Wlustrated, 3s, bd. cloth,

Hyold, the Boy Earl. A Story of Old
wngland. By J. F, Hopcrrrs, Author of * Erie
{ the Norseman.” 8s, 60, cloth,



PL ICSTOU . z a
12

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Grace Trevelyan; or, Led into Light.
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May, “a Succourer of Many.” By Miss
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Dorothy Tresilis. A Cornish Tale. By
M. M. Pounarp, Author of ‘ Lilla’s Experiment,”
“Only Me,” ete, Mlustrated. Crown 8yo. 1s. 6d.
cloth boards.

Miss Elsie. A Story of Single-hearted
Service. By H. Mary Witson. Illustrated.
Crown 8vo. 2s. 6d. cloth boards.

“Therefore,” or Nessie’s Ideal. A Story

is FR x Fi for Girls. By Frorence E. Burcu, author of

sae oS o “Joseph Adams,” etc. Illustrated. Crown 8vo.
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John Richmond’s Mistake. By Jaxer
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King,” ete. Illustrated. Crown 8vo. 2s. 6d.



eloth boards.
i By A. C. Coare Higher Up. By Netum Hexuis,
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8vo. 5s. cloth boards. trated. Crown 8vo. 2s. cloth boards.

é ; A
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Crown 8vo. 3s. 6d. cloth boards, gilt edges, Dolly. A Quiet Story for Quiet People.

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Fl 1s. 6d. cloth boards,
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Ghe Girl’s Own Bookshelf.

Aunt Diana. By Rosa Novcnerrz Carry, Author of ‘‘ Not Like Other Girls,”
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Miss Carey is well known as an able and graceful writer of stories for girls. This one

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Cora; or, Three Years of a Girl’s Life.
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The Girl's Own Cookery Book. By

PHILLIS BRowNE. Feap.8vo. 1s, cloth.

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The Master’s Service. A Practical
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How to Play the Pianoforte. Feap.
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Her Object in Life. By Isapeuna Fyvre
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The Sunbeam of the Factory, and

other Stories. Illustrated. Imperial © l6mo.
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Esther. By Rosa Noucuetrrr Carey. Illus-
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The Shepherd’s Fairy. By Daruzy
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Servants and Service. By Ruru Lams,
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Tus Reuiarous Tracr Soci


I3
THE NEW SERIES OF

HALF-CROWN BOOKS
FOR ALL READERS.
Each with 384 Pages, 74x 5, Illustrated, Cloth, Gilt Edges.

kept he

i Ie | Dina] [fre i

be et See h H [i fre
sas ik a

Ss

Fae ip

a OLD MANOR HOUSE

S i:

Hy | a Ce .L.SARGENT,

- ak ,
ce cera Be

el





Chronicles of an Ola Manor House. a, the ae: G. E.
Sarcent, author of “The Story of a Pocket Bible,” etc. 2s. 6d.

A Race for Life, and other Tales. 2s. 6d. cloth, gilt edges.

Strange Tales of Peril and Adventure. Tilustrated. 2s. 6d.
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Remarkable Adventures from Real Life. Iustrated,
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The Black Troopers, and other Stories. Illustrated. 2s. 6d.
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Finding Her Place. By Howr Bzyyrne, Author of “Quiet
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The Mountain Path. By Liny Watson. Author of “ Within
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Among the Mongols. By Rev. J. Gitmovr. Illustrated.
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Within Sea Walls ; or, How the Dutch kept the Faith. By
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The Story of a City Arab. With Portrait and Memoir of the

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A PRETTY PRESENT.

Morning and Evening. Keble’s Morning and Evening Hymns.
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COLOURED BOOKLETS.

Signals for the Voyage of Life and Heavenly Graces.
With Verses by Mary E. Rorsrs.

Two attractive little coloured books, each consisting of twenty-four pages, with
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corners, and tied with ribbon. 6d. each.

Tur Retiaious Tracr Socwry, Lonpon.
“BOOKS FOR CHILORED

The Happiest Half-Hour; or, Sunday
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BRIDGE, 304. With many Illustrations, sSimali
quarto. 33. td. cloth hoards, giit ed

The Sweet Story of Old.
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Author of “ Jessica’s Firs
Charity,” cte. ith Twelve Coloured Pictures by
Bs W.Mapbox, dio. 3s.6d, cloth boards, coloured
edges,

Watts’s Divine and Moral Songs.
New Edition. With maay fine Coloured Iussra-
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My Holiday Picture-Book.
prising : Holiday Time in tie Cour e
Johnnie—The
Farm 3 or,
Birthday































With ‘Twenty-four full-coloured page Viet



= | sy, Coloured Picture Story -Book

and Fort, guettes. Comp.



Little Cousin from Tndia—The Bla
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Bible Stories and Pictures. With Twenty-four Coloured page Pictures
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Harrison Weir’s Pictures of Birds and other Family Pets. With

24 large Coloured Pictures. 4s. handsomely bound, wich side in Gold and Colours.

Storyland. By Smxey Gruv. With Thirty-two Tlu
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Our Pets and Companions: Pictures and Stories Illustrative of Kindness to
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Talkative Friends in Field, Farm, and Forest. By Mary BE. Ropers,
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Little Dot and Her Friends. With
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Launch the Lifeboat! By Mrs, 0, F.
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Sunday Afternoons at Rose Cottage
|
|



itions by Roverr
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Bible Talks with Mamma. By Mrs. WATER WORTH,
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Listening to Jesus. A Sunday Book for
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Children’s Daily: Bread. A Picture,
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Bible Tales for Children, With Forty
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Tut Reuicious Tracr Sociury, Lonpon.


POPULAR

THE

Chilt’s Companion
AND
Juvenile Instructor Annual

FOR 1888.
192 pages. 8} by 64.
Contains a Story
in twelve chapters
by Mrs, 0. F. Wat-
ron, Author of
“Christie’s Ql Or-
gan,” «ce, and a
variety of interest-
ing reading for
young folks, with a
Coloured Trontis-





on
n





pices and man
Nustrations, Is. 6d
attr e coloured

boa 3 2s.
cloth; 28. 6d, hand-
me cloth full gilt.

O THE CHEDS COMPANION. O.



| The Gottager and Artisan

5

ANNUALS...

Our Little Dot's
Annual for 1888.

192 pages. 8} by 64.

Lhe Ye , - 1
ue early Volume of ae
OUR LITTLE == TLE |

DOTS.” Our LIT

Full of Pretty Pie-|P ss
tures and Little Storics|q| “Mi
inLarge Type. is. 60 }9
attractive coloured ju}
hoards ; 2s. neat cloth :|N
2s 6d. handsome cloth (s

ili J a
gilt.








Ni

“ Sust whatehildren |S

will like.” — Church |)

Sunday School Maga-
zine,



Annual.

THE VOLUME FOR, 1888.

It contains 144 pages of
interesting reading andillus-
trations. A most suitable
book to present to the Work-
men’s Lustitute, Club, or
Reading Room, and for the
Home Reading of Work-
ing People in Town and
Country. Many Large Pie-
tures, forming quitea family
scrap-book. Much of the
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Js, 6d. in pretty coloured
cover; 28. 6d. cloth boards
gilt.

Size of page 134 by 10.

Ghe Cract Magazine
Annual for 1888.

240 pages. 82 by 5.

Contains a com-
plete story in four-
teen chapters by
; Mrs. ©. NUGENT?
JACKSON, Author
of “Me and Jim,”
&e., entitled “The
Family oe,” and
contributions by P.
B. POWER, M.A,
A. N, MACKRAY,
MA. M. BE. Baek,
R,.R. THOM. LUCY
TAYLOR, G HH.
SPURGEON JAMES
GILMOUR, and
others. With nume-
rous FEngravings.
Is. 6d. cloth boards,

S|
=
~
uv
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3
x
=
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a
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&
=



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pieturesand prac-

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, thatany pra fours might
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ILLUSTRATED READINGS FOR

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Wk -LENUAK HOURS CEFICE. 1, PAYERNOSTEN ROW, EE
















































































































































The Young Hop-Pickers.
Motherless Bairns. ©
George Wayland.
The Cinnamon Island & its
Captives. <-22.e-gae8
Caleb Gaye's Success. -
Dark Days of December.
The Big House &the Little Beles
Tim & his Friends. an
5. Ned the Barge-boy:
| Ragged Robin.
The Gable Hotise.*
The Dangerous Guest.
Fruits of Bible Lands.
Mays Cousin.
Billy the Acorn Gatherer.
The Banished Family.
The Golden Street.
The First of the African Diamonds.
The Royal Banner.”
rave Archie.
‘There's a Friend for Little Child:
ren,& Trusty & True.
Michael the Young Miner.
» Bobs Trials and Tests.