Citation
Little folk's trip abroad

Material Information

Title:
Little folk's trip abroad
Creator:
DeWolfe, Fiske & Co. (Boston, Mass.) ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publisher:
De Wolfe Fiske & Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 folded sheet ([8] p.) : ill. (some col.) ; 21 x 245 cm. folded to 21 x 31 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Toy and movable books -- Specimens ( lcsh )
Panoramas -- Specimens ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- London ( lcsh )
Toy and movable books -- 1890 ( lcsh )
Baldwin -- 1890 ( local )
Genre:
Toy and movable books ( lcsh )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Leaves attached end-to-end form one continuous sheet with all text on one side and colored views on the other.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026528662 ( ALEPH )
ALF9768 ( NOTIS )
26895963 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
b
sf
i
Y
gs
co Ge

=

i]
a





—_—

2





Notre [Jame.





B
|





The Baldwin Library

RmB



S* Peters,



Rome.’

WILLIS TENE LEE LES OPEC D DNS IE AOS





(atehing
eI Whale






eeaEEEeieeemanteidieneetaanadedameoe meta cemmereraane ce CaeCee cama

In the
Arctic

Regions.

ay tab art a pera NIVPorCmas



rough Russia

Attacked by Wolves :








On board
ee

*

OE \\






eed
ois Iie oer anate Raney pt areas



ae

We call

|
|
|
|
|

: Indian Religious |
Rites.











Gibraltar.









LITTLE FOLKS TRIP. ABROAD.

LL the scholars from Miss Mitchell's school were at the station on a bright June morning. It
was not a picnic, as one might suppose, but the Morris children, Ralph and Inez, were to leave
with their father for a journey abroad, and the teacher and school had come to bid them adieu.

“Write us an account of your trip and we will read your letters in school,” said Miss -
Mitchell.

“Yes, we will write to you all,” replied they. :

“Train’s coming.” “Good-by, good-by, write, good-by,” arose in a confused medley from the
whole company.

“ All aboard,” shouted the conductor, and the train moved out of the station, while hats and
handkerchiefs waved and cheers echoed along the station.

Twenty days later Inez wrote her teacher:

“Dear Miss MircHett: We have been in London five days. Five years would not be
sufficient time to see its many wonders. There are nearly five millions of people in this city, and
the length of the streets is enough to reach around the world. Very few persons, even life-long -
residents, ever saw the whole of London. Of the many interesting and impressive buildings I
think that which first attracts the notice of visitors is the Parliament House,—a fine specimen of
Gothic architecture which cost more than three millions of dollars. The tower is just one hundred feet higher than Bunker Hill
monument, or three hundred and twenty feet; near the top is a clock, the hands of which are twenty-two feet long. This is called
the Victoria Tower. In this building are the most elegant legislative chambers in the world.

“Westminster Abbey is the most majestic and venerable cathedral in England. There is an air of antiquity and a charm
_of magnificence about it that fascinates all visitors. It is the final resting-place of England’s kings and queens and honored dead.

“ An interesting relic of the past is the Tower of London. It is a complex structure containing several towers within walls
of massive masonry. It contains miles of gloomy passages, antique chambers, walled courts, dark dungeons, and winding stairs. -
And its halls are filled with most interesting relics. Many royal persons have been imprisoned within these walls, and many have,
here been beheaded. Others have died in solitary dungeons. It makes us shudder to see the places which suggest so much of
England’s bloody history. We were shown through the tower by an old soldier in knee breeches, crimson tunic, and a broad-
brimmed black hat decked with ribbons, a costume suitable for this weird place. aoe

“The Horse Amoury contains a collection of all kinds of arms which have been used in England’s wars. It was quite dark
when we turned to leave this ancient place; we shuddered and clung to each other as the thought of the horrors these walls had
witnessed. When we reached the street, fog had settled over the city. The clock tower of Parliament House was scarcely visible,
and the smaller towers could not be seen through the veil that hung around them.

“You may read this to the school and think of



“Your affectionate pupil,
“INEZ MORRIS]



LITTLE FOLKS’ TRIP ABROAD.

The next letter was from Ralph. It was written in Paris, France, to Carl Brown, his classmate. It read as follows:

“DEAR BROWNIE: Paris, as you know, is situated on both sides of the River Seine, which flows through it towards
the east. Every part of Paris is interesting or beautiful. The public and private buildings, the monuments and statues, all
display the artistic skill of the people. Tne parks and gardens are thoroughly charming. We listened to an open-air concert in .
the gay Champs Elysées, which is French for Elysian Fields, a vast public square, in which stands the Arc de Triomphe, the
largest triumphal arch in the world, built by Napoleon I.,in 1806. It commemorates the victorics of the French armies. It is one
hundred and sixty-five feet high, built of bronze and marble. From the top there is a grand view of Paris. From this point the
streets seem to radiate like the spokes of a wheel from the hub. It.is inscribed with records of the wars of France. I send you
a sketch of it, and also of some of the other buildings. One is the Cathedral of Notre Dame, a magnificent structure more than
seven hundred years old. Notre Dame is French for Our Lady, the title of the Virgin Mary. Several churches in France and the
French colonics bear this title. It has high, square, Gothic towers and
great belfries. One of the bells is nine feet in diameter, and weighs eigh-
teen tons. The windows are stained glass, and the doors and dadoes are
rich with carvings and ornaments. A large bronze statue of Charlc-
magne on horseback stands in front of it.

“Hotel de Ville, the City Hall of Paris, is a new and elegant
structure. The exterior and the interior are profusely decorated or adorned
with sculpture, statuary, and paintings and carvings, which display the
best productions of French art. The Garden of the Tuileries, in which
once stood a palace, the residence of the early French kings, is the most
beautiful place I have ever seen. It is the resort for fashionable Pari-
sians, and crowds of young and old, rich and poor, gay and sad, throng it
day and night.

“The Eiffel Tower is to me more interesting than anything I have
seen in France. It was built for the Paris Exposition, and is the tallest
structure on the surface of the earth. It is nine hundred and eighty-five
feet high, built of iron bars strongly bolted together. Yet it is of graceful
proportions. There is a restaurant which will accommodate several
hundreds at one time, on the first platform, three hundred and seventy-
six feet from the ground. The second platform, eight hundred and
seventy-six feet from the ground, is used for observations; and there is. still another platform one hundred feet above the second.
When I looked down upon the city from this highest point the houses looked like a child’s toys, and the people like little dwarfs.

“T could write a volume on the sights and scenes in Paris, but have not now time or space.

“Au revotr, that’s French for farewell.



“Truly your wandering friend, RALPH MORRIS;



LITTLE FOLKS’ TRIP ABROAD.

The next letter was from Inez to Annie Stacy. She said:

“We are now in Italy, the land of art, poetry, and song. After
leaving Paris we stopped at several places on our journey. We visited
Nuremburg, a quaint and picturesque old city. Longfellow says:

“«Here, when art was still religion,
shears Py With a firm and reverent heart

ie Lived and labored Albrecht Diirer,

dhe Evangelist ef art.



“His house is still standing, and is much visited by tourists.
Here is an ancient church tower, concerning which there is a curious
legend. It is said that when the bells are rung all evil spirits fly from
the city. If this were true, it would be well to keep them always ringing.

“Cologne Cathedral we turned aside to visit. It was founded
more than five hundred years ago. For several centuries it remained
unfinished. It has since been completed with funds contributed from all
parts of the world, yet it was commenced so long ago that the name of
the architect who planned it is unknown. The towers are over five
hundred feet high, and were, until the building of Washington Monument ~
at Washington (which is a few feet taller), and the Eiffel Tower in Paris,
the tallest structure reared by human hands. It is the most magnificent Gothic building in the world. Itisa European land-
mark, and all visitors to Europe do not leave the country satisfied without a sight of this wonderful building. In Cologne there is |
a curious bridge of boats, by means of which the river is crossed. The city is distinguished for the manufacture of perfumery. It
is said that perfumes were first made here to overcome the disagreeable odors of the streets.

. “Our stay in Berlin was very short. We noticed especially the most beautiful street in the city, possibly the most beauti-
ful in the world, called ‘Uter dem Lindens. It is straight as an arrow for more than a mile, and is bordered on cach side by
majestic linden trees. Lively pedestrians and gay equipages throng this renowned street at all hours of the day. It is the
fashionable resort of the city.

“When I return I will tell you more of Berlin and also of Venice, where we shall remain a few weeks. Thus far I have
only visited St. Mark’s Cathedral, which has stood more than eight hundred years, and is rich in mosaics and sculpture.

“We go from here to Rome. Every tourist talks of Rome. It is the objective point to which they journey, and to see St.
Peter's Church is their strong aspiration. It is, no doubt, the grandest temple for Christian worship in the world. Particulars
concerning it I shall write another time, but you need -not expect me to write from Rome, as I shall be absorbed in sight-seeing in
that interesting city.”



LITTLE FOLKS’ TRIP ABROAD.

A letter of Inez to Jannie Burbank, one of her schoolmates:

“ DEAR JANNIE: We are now in Switzerland, the little inland country of mountains, glaciers, snow, and sagacious dogs. We
intended to join a party who were to ascend Mont Blanc, which, you know, is near three miles high, but we met a party of
tourists who gave us such terrifying accounts of the dangers they had encountered in their attempt to ascend, that we decided
not to undertake the journey. They were overtaken by blinding snow-storms, and lost their way on the mountain, though they
were under the direction of an experienced guide. The men fastened themselves with a rope to their guide so they could
keep together. They wandered thus for several hours, expecting death from cold and weariness; at length the guide found the
path which led to a convent on the side of the mountain, where they were received and entertained by the monks who dwell there,
and devote their lives to rescuing and aiding unfortunate travellers. They keep many dogs which are trained to go in search of
persons lost in the snow. One dog, named Barry, rescued forty persons. Once he discovered a little boy whose mother had_ been.
killed by an avalanche. He induced the little fellow to get upon his back, and he carried him in safety to the convent. The
sagacity of these dogs is wonderful. Barry died of old age. His skin was stuffed, and is exhibited in the museum at Berne, the
capital of Switzerland.

“This party, who told us of their misfortunes in- climbing the mountains of Switzerland, also told us of other
adventures in Russia. They were obliged to travel in a sleigh drawn by three horses. Their route lay through a forest.
As they were gliding along over the crisp and sparkling snow, the howling of a pack of wolves was heard. At this the horses
became frightened, and increased their speed. The driver applied the whip to increase it still more, for there is nothing more
dangerous or terrifying to travellers than an attack from a pack of hungry wolves. They sometimes destroy horses and |
men. By being well armed the party were able to make their escape. They having killed one, the rest of the pack stopped
to tear and devour him. While the wolves were thus delayed the travellers escaped.

“In the Arctic regions this same party had another exciting experience. They
joined a whaling crew, and made a voyage to the North for the purpose of secing how
seals and whales are caught. The seals are very fat and clumsy, and are frequently
killed with a club when they are found on land. The natives also kill them
with a spear. Most of the elegant seal-skin cloaks worn by the ladies of the world are
made from skins of seals captured on the coast of Alaska.

“One day, while this party was in the whaling-ship, a large whale was seen in the
distance. His huge back appeared like an island rising above the surface of the water.
The sturdy crew lowered their boats and quietly rowed towards him. When near
enough, they hurled a harpoon into his massive sides. The harpoon was attached to
the boat by a long, strong cable. When the whale was struck he made a desperate’ 23:5:
plunge, and lashed the waters into fury with his gigantic tail, and nearly capsized the
boat. He came to the surface again, and was killed by a cannon-shot from the ship.
Only the most hardy and daring men are suitable for whaling service.”









LITTLE FOLKS’ TRIP ABROAD.

Letter of Ralph to Carl Hight, his schoolmate:

“We had a delightful trip to India. There was a large party of tourists on the steamer, and we spent most of the time on
deck enjoying all sorts of games;, but in India we had a most terrifying experience. We were riding on an elephant through a
jungle, when from the thicket a large tiger sprang upon the elephant’s neck. Fortunately, papa had his rifle with him, and being a *
skilled marksman, he killed the tiger at the first shot. Elephants are used in India for transporting travellers and merchandise
across the country. They are also much used in religious parades, and some of them are considered sacred. It is said that
elephants live more than a hundred years. There are not so many of them now as there used to be. It is feared that before
' many years this race of noble animals, the largest in the world, will become extinct.

“The elephant is very kind to those who treat him well; but when enraged by ill treatment he is a dangerous and powerful
enemy. Not long ago an elephant became enraged by the prodding of his driver’s spear. He pulled the man from his back and
killed him instantly. Then he chased another man into his house, pulled down the walls, caught the man, and instantly crushed
out his life with one stamp of his ponderous foot. He then attacked every human being that came in his way, and tore down
several houses. In one village he killed six men, in another three, and in two others four each. He also killed cattle and horses.
In fact, he took revenge on everything that came in his way. It was with great difficulty that he was again captured.

“What detracts from the pleasure of travel in India is the snakes and poisonous reptiles. We lived in fear all the time. It
is afact that twenty-three thousand persons have died in one year from bites of these poisonous creatures. We are constantly
watching for them. You may find a snake in your bed or your clothing, or a scorpion or centipede in your table napkin.
They lurk everywhere, and for safety you must be constantly on your
guard.

“T was glad when we were out of the country.

“From India we went to China.

“It is a country unlike any other. It seems that they do every-
thing backwards; at least, everything is done just the reverse of the way
we do it.

“We say that the compass needle points north: they say it points
south. We begin at the left hand to write or read: they begin at the
right hand. We read across a page: they read down and up. Every-
thing in China is thus strange. The cities are rich and populous; their
temples and towers magnificent. Their porcelains are the best and most
elaborately decorated of any in the world; and a cup of tea made in China,
and sipped from one of their delicate cups, is superior to any found else-
where.

“I will tell you more of China when I return.

“Yours in friendship,
CRALPE MORRIS:





pe IN
ri
(ets
Zi



LUTE FOLKS TRIF YABROAD.

Our tourists returned to England by way of the Suez Canal, into the Mediterranean Sea,
through the straits of Gibraltar into the ocean, thence back to London; a distance nearly twice as
great as from London to America. The voyage through the canal and across the Mediterranean was
not as rapid as by ocean steamers, but the enjoyment was sufficient to compensate for the delay.
They were amused by the strange merchandise which was on its way to England and America.

There were monkeys, birds, snakes, and ostriches, and a baby hippopotamus, on their way to
take part in some American menagerie. It required several strong sailors to get an ostrich on board,
for an ostrich is as obstinate as a mule, and will kick as high and as hard. Had the bird given a fair
forward kick with its prodigious strength, the result could scarcely have been other than fatal to the
person kicked. Unlike the emu, which is often exhibited as an African ostrich, he has but one toe
on each foot, which is pointed and will cut like a knife. This is a terrible weapon, as was shown by
the exploit of one bird on board the steamer, which kicked a stout board on the side of its corral,
and broke it in two at one blow.

“Do you know what the Turks call the ostrich,” said an English merchant to Ralph and Inez,
with whom he was conversing as they leaned over the rail. “They call it the camel bird. They say
according to their tradition that when the ostrich is urged to fly it declares that it is a camel, but when
_ they propose to take it at its word and make it bear a camel’s load, it maintains that it is a bird.”

From the deck of the steamer could be seen in the distance the sharp peak of Vesuvius, sending up a pillar of smoke
and flame.

They were reminded of the time when, in its fury, with thunders and earthquakes, it sent forth cinders and lava enough
to bury deeply vast cities, hiding them from human eyes for more than seventeen hundred years. Thus it was with Herculaneum
and Pompeii.

As they passed along the Egyptian coast, in the distance, towards the south, across the vast desert, could be
seen the Pyramids rising in silent and solemn grandeur, pointing their cone-shaped tops to heaven as they have done
for more than four thousand years. Travellers upon their camels, sometimes called “the ships of the desert,’ were
seen passing leisurely on their journeys. Before entering upon the broad Atlantic they passed through the strait
of Gibraltar, and by the rock of Gibraltar, which rises abruptly from the water to a height of fifteen hundred feet,
and it is about one-fourth of a mile long ate its. base —Rhis isa. stronc. Enelish fortification, and commands the
entrance to the Mediterranean. It was called the Pillar of Hercules by the ancients, who considered it the head of
navigation and the end of the world. That was before Columbus had discovered America. The ancient world, though
they” had advanced in art, architecture, and literature, yet had a more limited idea of geography than the children in
our modern primary schools.

From Gibraltar to London the ocean voyage was not pleasant. There were storms, and winds, and high seas that broke
over the steamer in threatening fury. There was no sunshine during the voyage. All on board were seasick, and when they
caught a view of England, though it was enwrapped with fog, there was great rejoicing.







- LITTLE FOLKS’ TRIP ABROAD.

In London there was one more week to be spent in sight-seeing. Every waking hour was
thus improved. Even the hours for sleep were shortened that they might see the city in bright-
ness of gas and electrical illumination. London Bridge, on which thousands are at all hours pass-
ing and repassing, is by night especially attractive.

They visited the places and noted the objects of interest which they omitted on their first
visit. One of these was the Nelson column, a stone shaft one hundred and forty-five feet high, in
Trafalgar square. The top is of bronze, cast from French cannon captured in battle. It was there
erected by the English to the memory of Sir Thomas Nelson. His success in leading British
navies on to victory made his name one of “the few immortal names that were not born to die.”
This column cost $250,000, which was easily raised by subscription. 1t is surrounded by several
statues of persons distinguished for valor in England's wars, and upon the top stands Nelson, in
bronze, seventeen feet high.

Trafalgar square is said by many to be more beautifully situated than any public square on
the European continent. On the north side is the National Gallery, containing many of the finest
paintings in England. From the steps of the gallery there is a charming outlook over some of the
most attractive streets and buildings in London.

Windsor Castle, ten miles from London, is one of the residences of the Queen. This castle
stands upon a high cliff, commanding a view of the whole surrounding country. It has always
been a favorite residence for the kings and queens of England from early times. It was founded by William the Conqueror, and
additions have been made at different times by the sovereigns who have lived there. Queen Victoria has several palaces at which
she resides. In London she has Buckingham Palace, St. James Palace, and Kensington Palace. In the Highlands of Scotland
is Balmoral Castle, and in the Isle of Wight, by the sea, is Osborne House. At one or the other of these last-mentioned she spends
the summer, but winter, and in fact most of the year, she spends at Windsor. Though the Queen has all these places of
luxury in which to reside, she has not as much freedom as her subjects, and has not seen as much of the world as many others, for
she has never yet been out of England. :

It was the good fortune of our tourists to have the privilege of seeing her. Their father was a friend of a British officer,
through whose influence they were all invited to be present at her reception of her army, just returned from a foreign conquest. It
was at her residence in the Isle of Wight. They had always thought of queens as dressed in royal robes, with jewelled crowns,
but in this case they were surprised to see her so plainly dressed. Inez made a note of her costume and appearance. “She was a
stout, matronly looking woman, of fair complexion and rosy cheeks, eyes rich blue. Her dress was plain black, with a sack of the
same material. Her bonnet:was black crape, and she wore a long mourning veil falling over the back, half-way to the bottom of
her dress. As she stood in the open air, she supported a plain black parasol, with ebony and silver handle. As the troops passed
before her she smiled approvingly upon them.” 5

It is so seldom that foreigners have the privilege of seeing the Queen that it seemed to the tourists their trip was completed
when they had been thus favored, and Ralph said to his papa, “ We've seen everything, now let’s go home.”



Pies Toner LITTLE FOLKS’ TRIP ABROAD.

“Out on an ocean all boundless we ride,
We are homeward bound, homeward bound;
Tossed on the waves of a rough, restless tide,
We are homeward bound, homeward bound.”



























































































Thus sang a joyous, hopeful party, including our tourists, as the ma-
jestic steamer on which they had embarked swung out upon the vast swell-
ing ocean, turned her prow westward, and bade adieu to Old England.
The usual experiences of an ocean voyage were encountered. There
were days of soft sunshine when the steamer seemed to be gliding through
a vast expanse of liquid silver, and there were days of storm and tempest.
Then they were tossed upon the billows, and lashed by the hissing waves.
Sometimes the steamer’s bows pointed heavenward, at others they were
plunging toward the bottom of the ocean. But the passengers learned to
accommodate themselves to their circumstances, and when, after a voyage of
eight days, the sunshine smiled placidly upon them as they were entering New York harbor, there were scenes of rejoicing in which
all on board took part. They crowded the deck in their eagerness to see the great American metropolis, which is built upon Man-
hattan Island, at the mouth of the Hudson River. New York is the largest city in America, and if Brooklyn, which is connected with
it by bridge, and Jersey City, which is connected with it by ferry-boats, were united with it, it would be the largest city in the world.

There are two objects which especially attract attention on entering New York harbor, and the young tourists were as much
interested in them as in any objects they had seen during their whole tour. Ralph was much interested in Brooklyn Bridge, and
asked many questions about it. A gentleman on board, who had been interested in building it, said: “This bridge which connects
New York and Brooklyn is nearly a mile long. It is built of small wires, twisted together into great cables. There are five thou-

sand four hundred and thirty-four wires in each. These cables weigh eight hundred tons each. They are drawn over towers two
hundred and seventy-six feet six inches high, and the bridge in the middle is one hundred and thirty-five feet above the water. It
required thirteen years of labor to complete it, and the cost was fifteen millions. It is more than a mile long, and was opened to
travel May 24, 1883. As it is the connecting thoroughfare between two great cities,a vast amount of travel passes over it, by
foot, train, and carriage.”

A short distance above this bridge, on Bedloe’s Island in the North River, on a foundation of granite and concrete, stands
the world-famed statue —“ Liberty Enlightening the World.” It was given to New York by the citizens of France. It is three
hundred and five feet eleven inches high. Hammered copper is the substance of which it is built. By night it is illuminated, and
its light falls far out into the darkness to guide the mariner safely into harbor.

« The tourists spent but a short time in New York, for their father had promised to take them there on their next vacation.
They were anxious to return to their home and school, and when they were again greeted by friends and schoolmates, they all
joined in singing “ Home, sweet home, there's no place like home.”





PPAR ‘ : Me
comer set eeteiaec nore aren

BIN

Homewa rd B ound.
(rogsingaia?





Full Text
b
sf
i
Y
gs
co Ge

=

i]
a


—_—

2


Notre [Jame.





B
|





The Baldwin Library

RmB
S* Peters,



Rome.’

WILLIS TENE LEE LES OPEC D DNS IE AOS


(atehing
eI Whale






eeaEEEeieeemanteidieneetaanadedameoe meta cemmereraane ce CaeCee cama

In the
Arctic

Regions.

ay tab art a pera NIVPorCmas



rough Russia

Attacked by Wolves :





On board
ee

*

OE \\






eed
ois Iie oer anate Raney pt areas



ae

We call

|
|
|
|
|

: Indian Religious |
Rites.








Gibraltar.



LITTLE FOLKS TRIP. ABROAD.

LL the scholars from Miss Mitchell's school were at the station on a bright June morning. It
was not a picnic, as one might suppose, but the Morris children, Ralph and Inez, were to leave
with their father for a journey abroad, and the teacher and school had come to bid them adieu.

“Write us an account of your trip and we will read your letters in school,” said Miss -
Mitchell.

“Yes, we will write to you all,” replied they. :

“Train’s coming.” “Good-by, good-by, write, good-by,” arose in a confused medley from the
whole company.

“ All aboard,” shouted the conductor, and the train moved out of the station, while hats and
handkerchiefs waved and cheers echoed along the station.

Twenty days later Inez wrote her teacher:

“Dear Miss MircHett: We have been in London five days. Five years would not be
sufficient time to see its many wonders. There are nearly five millions of people in this city, and
the length of the streets is enough to reach around the world. Very few persons, even life-long -
residents, ever saw the whole of London. Of the many interesting and impressive buildings I
think that which first attracts the notice of visitors is the Parliament House,—a fine specimen of
Gothic architecture which cost more than three millions of dollars. The tower is just one hundred feet higher than Bunker Hill
monument, or three hundred and twenty feet; near the top is a clock, the hands of which are twenty-two feet long. This is called
the Victoria Tower. In this building are the most elegant legislative chambers in the world.

“Westminster Abbey is the most majestic and venerable cathedral in England. There is an air of antiquity and a charm
_of magnificence about it that fascinates all visitors. It is the final resting-place of England’s kings and queens and honored dead.

“ An interesting relic of the past is the Tower of London. It is a complex structure containing several towers within walls
of massive masonry. It contains miles of gloomy passages, antique chambers, walled courts, dark dungeons, and winding stairs. -
And its halls are filled with most interesting relics. Many royal persons have been imprisoned within these walls, and many have,
here been beheaded. Others have died in solitary dungeons. It makes us shudder to see the places which suggest so much of
England’s bloody history. We were shown through the tower by an old soldier in knee breeches, crimson tunic, and a broad-
brimmed black hat decked with ribbons, a costume suitable for this weird place. aoe

“The Horse Amoury contains a collection of all kinds of arms which have been used in England’s wars. It was quite dark
when we turned to leave this ancient place; we shuddered and clung to each other as the thought of the horrors these walls had
witnessed. When we reached the street, fog had settled over the city. The clock tower of Parliament House was scarcely visible,
and the smaller towers could not be seen through the veil that hung around them.

“You may read this to the school and think of



“Your affectionate pupil,
“INEZ MORRIS]
LITTLE FOLKS’ TRIP ABROAD.

The next letter was from Ralph. It was written in Paris, France, to Carl Brown, his classmate. It read as follows:

“DEAR BROWNIE: Paris, as you know, is situated on both sides of the River Seine, which flows through it towards
the east. Every part of Paris is interesting or beautiful. The public and private buildings, the monuments and statues, all
display the artistic skill of the people. Tne parks and gardens are thoroughly charming. We listened to an open-air concert in .
the gay Champs Elysées, which is French for Elysian Fields, a vast public square, in which stands the Arc de Triomphe, the
largest triumphal arch in the world, built by Napoleon I.,in 1806. It commemorates the victorics of the French armies. It is one
hundred and sixty-five feet high, built of bronze and marble. From the top there is a grand view of Paris. From this point the
streets seem to radiate like the spokes of a wheel from the hub. It.is inscribed with records of the wars of France. I send you
a sketch of it, and also of some of the other buildings. One is the Cathedral of Notre Dame, a magnificent structure more than
seven hundred years old. Notre Dame is French for Our Lady, the title of the Virgin Mary. Several churches in France and the
French colonics bear this title. It has high, square, Gothic towers and
great belfries. One of the bells is nine feet in diameter, and weighs eigh-
teen tons. The windows are stained glass, and the doors and dadoes are
rich with carvings and ornaments. A large bronze statue of Charlc-
magne on horseback stands in front of it.

“Hotel de Ville, the City Hall of Paris, is a new and elegant
structure. The exterior and the interior are profusely decorated or adorned
with sculpture, statuary, and paintings and carvings, which display the
best productions of French art. The Garden of the Tuileries, in which
once stood a palace, the residence of the early French kings, is the most
beautiful place I have ever seen. It is the resort for fashionable Pari-
sians, and crowds of young and old, rich and poor, gay and sad, throng it
day and night.

“The Eiffel Tower is to me more interesting than anything I have
seen in France. It was built for the Paris Exposition, and is the tallest
structure on the surface of the earth. It is nine hundred and eighty-five
feet high, built of iron bars strongly bolted together. Yet it is of graceful
proportions. There is a restaurant which will accommodate several
hundreds at one time, on the first platform, three hundred and seventy-
six feet from the ground. The second platform, eight hundred and
seventy-six feet from the ground, is used for observations; and there is. still another platform one hundred feet above the second.
When I looked down upon the city from this highest point the houses looked like a child’s toys, and the people like little dwarfs.

“T could write a volume on the sights and scenes in Paris, but have not now time or space.

“Au revotr, that’s French for farewell.



“Truly your wandering friend, RALPH MORRIS;
LITTLE FOLKS’ TRIP ABROAD.

The next letter was from Inez to Annie Stacy. She said:

“We are now in Italy, the land of art, poetry, and song. After
leaving Paris we stopped at several places on our journey. We visited
Nuremburg, a quaint and picturesque old city. Longfellow says:

“«Here, when art was still religion,
shears Py With a firm and reverent heart

ie Lived and labored Albrecht Diirer,

dhe Evangelist ef art.



“His house is still standing, and is much visited by tourists.
Here is an ancient church tower, concerning which there is a curious
legend. It is said that when the bells are rung all evil spirits fly from
the city. If this were true, it would be well to keep them always ringing.

“Cologne Cathedral we turned aside to visit. It was founded
more than five hundred years ago. For several centuries it remained
unfinished. It has since been completed with funds contributed from all
parts of the world, yet it was commenced so long ago that the name of
the architect who planned it is unknown. The towers are over five
hundred feet high, and were, until the building of Washington Monument ~
at Washington (which is a few feet taller), and the Eiffel Tower in Paris,
the tallest structure reared by human hands. It is the most magnificent Gothic building in the world. Itisa European land-
mark, and all visitors to Europe do not leave the country satisfied without a sight of this wonderful building. In Cologne there is |
a curious bridge of boats, by means of which the river is crossed. The city is distinguished for the manufacture of perfumery. It
is said that perfumes were first made here to overcome the disagreeable odors of the streets.

. “Our stay in Berlin was very short. We noticed especially the most beautiful street in the city, possibly the most beauti-
ful in the world, called ‘Uter dem Lindens. It is straight as an arrow for more than a mile, and is bordered on cach side by
majestic linden trees. Lively pedestrians and gay equipages throng this renowned street at all hours of the day. It is the
fashionable resort of the city.

“When I return I will tell you more of Berlin and also of Venice, where we shall remain a few weeks. Thus far I have
only visited St. Mark’s Cathedral, which has stood more than eight hundred years, and is rich in mosaics and sculpture.

“We go from here to Rome. Every tourist talks of Rome. It is the objective point to which they journey, and to see St.
Peter's Church is their strong aspiration. It is, no doubt, the grandest temple for Christian worship in the world. Particulars
concerning it I shall write another time, but you need -not expect me to write from Rome, as I shall be absorbed in sight-seeing in
that interesting city.”
LITTLE FOLKS’ TRIP ABROAD.

A letter of Inez to Jannie Burbank, one of her schoolmates:

“ DEAR JANNIE: We are now in Switzerland, the little inland country of mountains, glaciers, snow, and sagacious dogs. We
intended to join a party who were to ascend Mont Blanc, which, you know, is near three miles high, but we met a party of
tourists who gave us such terrifying accounts of the dangers they had encountered in their attempt to ascend, that we decided
not to undertake the journey. They were overtaken by blinding snow-storms, and lost their way on the mountain, though they
were under the direction of an experienced guide. The men fastened themselves with a rope to their guide so they could
keep together. They wandered thus for several hours, expecting death from cold and weariness; at length the guide found the
path which led to a convent on the side of the mountain, where they were received and entertained by the monks who dwell there,
and devote their lives to rescuing and aiding unfortunate travellers. They keep many dogs which are trained to go in search of
persons lost in the snow. One dog, named Barry, rescued forty persons. Once he discovered a little boy whose mother had_ been.
killed by an avalanche. He induced the little fellow to get upon his back, and he carried him in safety to the convent. The
sagacity of these dogs is wonderful. Barry died of old age. His skin was stuffed, and is exhibited in the museum at Berne, the
capital of Switzerland.

“This party, who told us of their misfortunes in- climbing the mountains of Switzerland, also told us of other
adventures in Russia. They were obliged to travel in a sleigh drawn by three horses. Their route lay through a forest.
As they were gliding along over the crisp and sparkling snow, the howling of a pack of wolves was heard. At this the horses
became frightened, and increased their speed. The driver applied the whip to increase it still more, for there is nothing more
dangerous or terrifying to travellers than an attack from a pack of hungry wolves. They sometimes destroy horses and |
men. By being well armed the party were able to make their escape. They having killed one, the rest of the pack stopped
to tear and devour him. While the wolves were thus delayed the travellers escaped.

“In the Arctic regions this same party had another exciting experience. They
joined a whaling crew, and made a voyage to the North for the purpose of secing how
seals and whales are caught. The seals are very fat and clumsy, and are frequently
killed with a club when they are found on land. The natives also kill them
with a spear. Most of the elegant seal-skin cloaks worn by the ladies of the world are
made from skins of seals captured on the coast of Alaska.

“One day, while this party was in the whaling-ship, a large whale was seen in the
distance. His huge back appeared like an island rising above the surface of the water.
The sturdy crew lowered their boats and quietly rowed towards him. When near
enough, they hurled a harpoon into his massive sides. The harpoon was attached to
the boat by a long, strong cable. When the whale was struck he made a desperate’ 23:5:
plunge, and lashed the waters into fury with his gigantic tail, and nearly capsized the
boat. He came to the surface again, and was killed by a cannon-shot from the ship.
Only the most hardy and daring men are suitable for whaling service.”






LITTLE FOLKS’ TRIP ABROAD.

Letter of Ralph to Carl Hight, his schoolmate:

“We had a delightful trip to India. There was a large party of tourists on the steamer, and we spent most of the time on
deck enjoying all sorts of games;, but in India we had a most terrifying experience. We were riding on an elephant through a
jungle, when from the thicket a large tiger sprang upon the elephant’s neck. Fortunately, papa had his rifle with him, and being a *
skilled marksman, he killed the tiger at the first shot. Elephants are used in India for transporting travellers and merchandise
across the country. They are also much used in religious parades, and some of them are considered sacred. It is said that
elephants live more than a hundred years. There are not so many of them now as there used to be. It is feared that before
' many years this race of noble animals, the largest in the world, will become extinct.

“The elephant is very kind to those who treat him well; but when enraged by ill treatment he is a dangerous and powerful
enemy. Not long ago an elephant became enraged by the prodding of his driver’s spear. He pulled the man from his back and
killed him instantly. Then he chased another man into his house, pulled down the walls, caught the man, and instantly crushed
out his life with one stamp of his ponderous foot. He then attacked every human being that came in his way, and tore down
several houses. In one village he killed six men, in another three, and in two others four each. He also killed cattle and horses.
In fact, he took revenge on everything that came in his way. It was with great difficulty that he was again captured.

“What detracts from the pleasure of travel in India is the snakes and poisonous reptiles. We lived in fear all the time. It
is afact that twenty-three thousand persons have died in one year from bites of these poisonous creatures. We are constantly
watching for them. You may find a snake in your bed or your clothing, or a scorpion or centipede in your table napkin.
They lurk everywhere, and for safety you must be constantly on your
guard.

“T was glad when we were out of the country.

“From India we went to China.

“It is a country unlike any other. It seems that they do every-
thing backwards; at least, everything is done just the reverse of the way
we do it.

“We say that the compass needle points north: they say it points
south. We begin at the left hand to write or read: they begin at the
right hand. We read across a page: they read down and up. Every-
thing in China is thus strange. The cities are rich and populous; their
temples and towers magnificent. Their porcelains are the best and most
elaborately decorated of any in the world; and a cup of tea made in China,
and sipped from one of their delicate cups, is superior to any found else-
where.

“I will tell you more of China when I return.

“Yours in friendship,
CRALPE MORRIS:





pe IN
ri
(ets
Zi
LUTE FOLKS TRIF YABROAD.

Our tourists returned to England by way of the Suez Canal, into the Mediterranean Sea,
through the straits of Gibraltar into the ocean, thence back to London; a distance nearly twice as
great as from London to America. The voyage through the canal and across the Mediterranean was
not as rapid as by ocean steamers, but the enjoyment was sufficient to compensate for the delay.
They were amused by the strange merchandise which was on its way to England and America.

There were monkeys, birds, snakes, and ostriches, and a baby hippopotamus, on their way to
take part in some American menagerie. It required several strong sailors to get an ostrich on board,
for an ostrich is as obstinate as a mule, and will kick as high and as hard. Had the bird given a fair
forward kick with its prodigious strength, the result could scarcely have been other than fatal to the
person kicked. Unlike the emu, which is often exhibited as an African ostrich, he has but one toe
on each foot, which is pointed and will cut like a knife. This is a terrible weapon, as was shown by
the exploit of one bird on board the steamer, which kicked a stout board on the side of its corral,
and broke it in two at one blow.

“Do you know what the Turks call the ostrich,” said an English merchant to Ralph and Inez,
with whom he was conversing as they leaned over the rail. “They call it the camel bird. They say
according to their tradition that when the ostrich is urged to fly it declares that it is a camel, but when
_ they propose to take it at its word and make it bear a camel’s load, it maintains that it is a bird.”

From the deck of the steamer could be seen in the distance the sharp peak of Vesuvius, sending up a pillar of smoke
and flame.

They were reminded of the time when, in its fury, with thunders and earthquakes, it sent forth cinders and lava enough
to bury deeply vast cities, hiding them from human eyes for more than seventeen hundred years. Thus it was with Herculaneum
and Pompeii.

As they passed along the Egyptian coast, in the distance, towards the south, across the vast desert, could be
seen the Pyramids rising in silent and solemn grandeur, pointing their cone-shaped tops to heaven as they have done
for more than four thousand years. Travellers upon their camels, sometimes called “the ships of the desert,’ were
seen passing leisurely on their journeys. Before entering upon the broad Atlantic they passed through the strait
of Gibraltar, and by the rock of Gibraltar, which rises abruptly from the water to a height of fifteen hundred feet,
and it is about one-fourth of a mile long ate its. base —Rhis isa. stronc. Enelish fortification, and commands the
entrance to the Mediterranean. It was called the Pillar of Hercules by the ancients, who considered it the head of
navigation and the end of the world. That was before Columbus had discovered America. The ancient world, though
they” had advanced in art, architecture, and literature, yet had a more limited idea of geography than the children in
our modern primary schools.

From Gibraltar to London the ocean voyage was not pleasant. There were storms, and winds, and high seas that broke
over the steamer in threatening fury. There was no sunshine during the voyage. All on board were seasick, and when they
caught a view of England, though it was enwrapped with fog, there was great rejoicing.




- LITTLE FOLKS’ TRIP ABROAD.

In London there was one more week to be spent in sight-seeing. Every waking hour was
thus improved. Even the hours for sleep were shortened that they might see the city in bright-
ness of gas and electrical illumination. London Bridge, on which thousands are at all hours pass-
ing and repassing, is by night especially attractive.

They visited the places and noted the objects of interest which they omitted on their first
visit. One of these was the Nelson column, a stone shaft one hundred and forty-five feet high, in
Trafalgar square. The top is of bronze, cast from French cannon captured in battle. It was there
erected by the English to the memory of Sir Thomas Nelson. His success in leading British
navies on to victory made his name one of “the few immortal names that were not born to die.”
This column cost $250,000, which was easily raised by subscription. 1t is surrounded by several
statues of persons distinguished for valor in England's wars, and upon the top stands Nelson, in
bronze, seventeen feet high.

Trafalgar square is said by many to be more beautifully situated than any public square on
the European continent. On the north side is the National Gallery, containing many of the finest
paintings in England. From the steps of the gallery there is a charming outlook over some of the
most attractive streets and buildings in London.

Windsor Castle, ten miles from London, is one of the residences of the Queen. This castle
stands upon a high cliff, commanding a view of the whole surrounding country. It has always
been a favorite residence for the kings and queens of England from early times. It was founded by William the Conqueror, and
additions have been made at different times by the sovereigns who have lived there. Queen Victoria has several palaces at which
she resides. In London she has Buckingham Palace, St. James Palace, and Kensington Palace. In the Highlands of Scotland
is Balmoral Castle, and in the Isle of Wight, by the sea, is Osborne House. At one or the other of these last-mentioned she spends
the summer, but winter, and in fact most of the year, she spends at Windsor. Though the Queen has all these places of
luxury in which to reside, she has not as much freedom as her subjects, and has not seen as much of the world as many others, for
she has never yet been out of England. :

It was the good fortune of our tourists to have the privilege of seeing her. Their father was a friend of a British officer,
through whose influence they were all invited to be present at her reception of her army, just returned from a foreign conquest. It
was at her residence in the Isle of Wight. They had always thought of queens as dressed in royal robes, with jewelled crowns,
but in this case they were surprised to see her so plainly dressed. Inez made a note of her costume and appearance. “She was a
stout, matronly looking woman, of fair complexion and rosy cheeks, eyes rich blue. Her dress was plain black, with a sack of the
same material. Her bonnet:was black crape, and she wore a long mourning veil falling over the back, half-way to the bottom of
her dress. As she stood in the open air, she supported a plain black parasol, with ebony and silver handle. As the troops passed
before her she smiled approvingly upon them.” 5

It is so seldom that foreigners have the privilege of seeing the Queen that it seemed to the tourists their trip was completed
when they had been thus favored, and Ralph said to his papa, “ We've seen everything, now let’s go home.”
Pies Toner LITTLE FOLKS’ TRIP ABROAD.

“Out on an ocean all boundless we ride,
We are homeward bound, homeward bound;
Tossed on the waves of a rough, restless tide,
We are homeward bound, homeward bound.”



























































































Thus sang a joyous, hopeful party, including our tourists, as the ma-
jestic steamer on which they had embarked swung out upon the vast swell-
ing ocean, turned her prow westward, and bade adieu to Old England.
The usual experiences of an ocean voyage were encountered. There
were days of soft sunshine when the steamer seemed to be gliding through
a vast expanse of liquid silver, and there were days of storm and tempest.
Then they were tossed upon the billows, and lashed by the hissing waves.
Sometimes the steamer’s bows pointed heavenward, at others they were
plunging toward the bottom of the ocean. But the passengers learned to
accommodate themselves to their circumstances, and when, after a voyage of
eight days, the sunshine smiled placidly upon them as they were entering New York harbor, there were scenes of rejoicing in which
all on board took part. They crowded the deck in their eagerness to see the great American metropolis, which is built upon Man-
hattan Island, at the mouth of the Hudson River. New York is the largest city in America, and if Brooklyn, which is connected with
it by bridge, and Jersey City, which is connected with it by ferry-boats, were united with it, it would be the largest city in the world.

There are two objects which especially attract attention on entering New York harbor, and the young tourists were as much
interested in them as in any objects they had seen during their whole tour. Ralph was much interested in Brooklyn Bridge, and
asked many questions about it. A gentleman on board, who had been interested in building it, said: “This bridge which connects
New York and Brooklyn is nearly a mile long. It is built of small wires, twisted together into great cables. There are five thou-

sand four hundred and thirty-four wires in each. These cables weigh eight hundred tons each. They are drawn over towers two
hundred and seventy-six feet six inches high, and the bridge in the middle is one hundred and thirty-five feet above the water. It
required thirteen years of labor to complete it, and the cost was fifteen millions. It is more than a mile long, and was opened to
travel May 24, 1883. As it is the connecting thoroughfare between two great cities,a vast amount of travel passes over it, by
foot, train, and carriage.”

A short distance above this bridge, on Bedloe’s Island in the North River, on a foundation of granite and concrete, stands
the world-famed statue —“ Liberty Enlightening the World.” It was given to New York by the citizens of France. It is three
hundred and five feet eleven inches high. Hammered copper is the substance of which it is built. By night it is illuminated, and
its light falls far out into the darkness to guide the mariner safely into harbor.

« The tourists spent but a short time in New York, for their father had promised to take them there on their next vacation.
They were anxious to return to their home and school, and when they were again greeted by friends and schoolmates, they all
joined in singing “ Home, sweet home, there's no place like home.”


PPAR ‘ : Me
comer set eeteiaec nore aren

BIN

Homewa rd B ound.
(rogsingaia?