Citation
Three fairy princesses

Material Information

Title:
Three fairy princesses Snow White The Sleeping Beauty Cinderella ; the old stories
Uniform Title:
Cinderella
Sleeping Beauty
Snow White and the seven dwarfs
Creator:
Paterson, Caroline
Marcus Ward & Co ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Marcus Ward & Co. Limited
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 v. (various pagings) : col. ill. ; 17 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1890 ( lcsh )
Fairy tales -- 1890 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1890
Genre:
Children's stories
Fairy tales ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Ireland -- Belfast
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication from inscription.
General Note:
Some illustrations printed in colors and gilt; text and some illustrations in Brown.
Statement of Responsibility:
illustrated by Caroline Paterson.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026987520 ( ALEPH )
ALH9049 ( NOTIS )
174969573 ( OCLC )

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SNOW Wil Ce: CHE SLEEPING BEAU GY- CINDERELEA

THE OLD STORIES (LLUSTRATED BY

Caroline Paterson



LONDON

MARCUS WARD & CO LIMITED
BELFAST AND NEW YORK



Of three princesses famed in days of yore
The history again we would unfold;
Come. children, then, and search our fairy store,
Nor weary of the tales so often told.
Snow-White, the peerless fair, we here behold,
Who sank in death-swoon spellbound on the floor,
Type of our earth that dies in Winter’s cold,
And with the Sun’s kiss wakes to life once more;
The Sleeping Beauty too, who, wounded sore
By the charmed spindle which she touched, too bold,
Slept in her home within the thicket hoar,
Dreaming until a hundred years grew old;
And last the maid, who, cast in gentle mould,
All uncomplaining, scoffs and burdens bore,
Sweet Cinderella, with the tresses gold,
Whose dainty foot the famous slipper wore.

Exiza Kerary.



flakes fell down like feathers from the sky, a
@| queen sat at the window of her boudoir in the
=a palace, working at her embroidery, which was in
a black ebony frame. As she sewed, she pricked her finger,
and three drops of blood fell upon the white ermine trim-
ming of her dress. The queen looked at the red blood
and at the white snow outside, and she said to herself, “If |
only I had a dear little child as white as snow, as red ;
as blood, and as black as my ebony embroidery frame !”
Soon after this she had a little daughter, whose skin
was as white as snow, whose cheeks and lips were rosy-red,

and whose hair and eyes were as black as ebony. This fo
N





ag

) little girl was called the Princess Snow-White.
After the princess was born, the queen died,
and the king married another wife.

The new queen was very beautiful, but so
proud of her beauty that she could not bear
to hear anyone called beautiful but herself.
She had a wonderful looking-glass. When she
stood before it, and looked at herself in it, she
used to say—

“ Mirror, mirror on-the wall,
Who is fairest of us all?”

And the mirror answered her—

“ Lady queen, lady queen,
Thou art fairest to be seen.”

Then she was content, for she knew

that the mirror spoke the truth.
Snow- White, however, grew

from a baby to a little girl, and

became more and more beauti-

ful every day. It would

seem as if each hour brought

her some newer beauty and

grace; and she was as good

of heart as she was fair

of face. When she was

seven years old she was

more beautiful than (

the queen herself.





Once, when the queen in-
quired of the glass—

“ Mirror, mirror.on the wall,
Who is fairest of us all?”

it answered her—

“ Lady queen, lady queen,
Snow-White is fairest to be seen.”

Then the queen was fright- —
ened, and full of envy, and
from that hour she hated
the little princess. And her
hatred grew so strong, that
she had no rest by night or
by day. At last she called
one of the king’s huntsmen
to her, and said, “ Take the
child away into the woods
and kill her. I will not
have her before my eyes
any more.” The huntsman
dared not refuse; he took
her away, but when he drew
out his hunting knife, and
was going to pierce Snow-
White’s innocent heart, she
began to cry, and said—
“Dear huntsman, do not kill
me. [{ will run about in
the woods, and never come





home again.” And because she was so beautiful, the hunts-
man had pity on her and spared her life, and said, “ Run
away, my poor child.”
Now Snow-White was alone in the forest, and she was
very much afraid. She ran over the stones and through
: my the brambles, and the
wild animals sprang out
at her, but they did not
hurt her. She wan-
dered on as long as
her feet would carry
her, until evening drew
near, and then she saw
a little house, and went
into it to rest.
Everything was very
small in that tiny little
house, but very neat
and very pretty, pret-
tier than words can
tell. There was a table
covered with a white
cloth; on the table were
seven little plates, and
— seven little drinking
cups, and seven little knives and forks and spoons; and
seven little chairs were placed round the table. Seven
little candlesticks with candles in them stood on the
chimney-piece. We can only count five candlesticks in
the picture, but that is because we do not see the





whole of the chimney-piece. There were seven little
beds against the wall opposite the window, all of which
had neat white coverlets; the beds were all made, and
the bed-clothes turned down, ready for use. Snow-White
was very hungry and very thirsty, so she ate a piece of
bread from each plate, and drank a drop of wine from
each little cup. Then, as she was also very tired, she

lay down on one of the beds. It did not suit her, how-
ever; none of the beds seemed to please her; one was
too long, and another was too short, and another was too
hard, and another was too soft, and so on. She tried
them all, one after another, until she came to the seventh,
and that was just right for her, so she lay down on it
and fell fast asleep.





When it was dark, the masters of the house came home.
These were seven dwarfs, who dug in the mountains all day
for treasure. They lit their seven candles when they came
in, and then they saw that some one had been in the house.
The first dwarf said, “ Who has been sitting in my chair ?”
The second of them said, “ Who has been eating from my
plate?” The third dwarf said, “Who has taken some of































































































































my bread?” ‘The fourth said, ‘“ Who has been drinking out
of my little cup?” The fifth said, “ Who has used my little
fork ?” The sixth said, “Who has been cutting with my
little knife ?” The seventh said, ‘Who is this lying upon
my bed?” Then the others all came crowding up to him,
bringing their candles with them. They held their candles
up so that the light fell upon Snow-White, and when they
saw her, the whole seven cried out with one voice, “ What





a pretty little maid!” The good dwarfs were so much
pleased with her that they allowed her to remain sleeping
where she was, and the seventh dwarf, to whom belonged
the bed which she had chosen, spent the night with his
companions, sleeping one hour in each of the other little
beds until the morning.

When Snow-White awoke and saw the dwarfs, she felt
rather frightened ; but they spoke kindly to her, asking her
name, and where she came from. Then Snow-White told
them how cruel her step-mother had been to her, and how
the huntsman had been going to kill her, and how she had
wandered about alone in the shady forest the whole day.
and had at last come to their house. ‘ Well,” answered
the dwarfs, “if you can make yourself useful, you
may stay here and live with us, and we will protect you.
Can you make our beds, and cook our supper, and wash
our clothes, and knit our stockings, and keep all our little
things clean and tidy ?” And Snow-White said she could.
So it was settled that the little maiden should be sister to
the seven dwarfs, and live with them.

Every morning, as soon as it was daylight, the dwarfs
went out to the mountain to dig for treasure, and they never
came home again till after sunset, so the whole day the
child was alone. When setting out in the morning, they
always said to Snow-White, “Let no one come in whilst
we are away.” And Snow-White always locked the door
after they were gone.

All this time the queen supposed that Snow-White was
dead. But one day this vain and wicked woman stood
before her mirror admiring herself, and said as before—





‘« Mirror, mirror on the wall,
Who is fairest of us all?”

Then the mirror made
answer—

“Thou art the fairest, lady
queen,
In the king’s country to be
seen ;
But in the dwarfs’ home,
dwelling there,
Snow-White is many times
more fair.”

The queen saw then that
the huntsman had not
obeyed her, and that

Snow-White was still liv-
ing. She thought of no-
thing after this but of
how she might kill the
princess, for she could
not bear that there should
be anyone more beautiful
than herself. At last she
thought of a plan. She
dyed her face, and dressed
herself like an old pedlar-
woman, so that no one
could recognise her, took
a basket of laces and other
pretty things, and went





over the mountain to the
house of the seven dwarfs, »
When she got there, she
knocked at the door and
cried, “ Good wares to sell,
cheap, cheap.” Snow-
White looked from the
window and said, ‘‘ Good
day, my good woman ;
what have you got in
your basket?” ‘Stay-
laces,” answered the ped-
lar-woman, and she held
one up which was woven
of coloured silk, and was
very pretty to look at.
“Child,” said the woman,
“you look very untidy ;
let me lace your dress
with the pretty lace.” And
Snow-White, who feared
nothing, came out, and let
her do as she said. But
the old woman laced so
tightly, that Snow-White
could not breathe, and fell
down as if she was dead.
The pedlar-woman has-
tened away, and not long
afterwards the dwarfs





came home. Oh! how frightened they were when they
saw Snow-White lying on the ground! They saw that
she had fainted away because she was too tightly laced,
so they cut the lace, and Snow-White began to breathe,
and by-and-by she was well again. When the dwarts heard
what had happened, they said, “The pedlar-woman must
have been your wicked step-mother. Take care, Snow-
White, and open the door to zo one again whilst we are away.”
As soon as the queen got back to the palace, she stood
before her mirror and said—
fs Mirror, mirror on the wall,
Who is fairest of us all ?”
and it answered—

“ Thou art the fairest, lady queen,
In the king’s country to be seen ;
But in the dwarfs’ home, dwelling there,
Snow-White is many times more fair.”

Then she knew that Snow-White had come to life again,
and she felt as unhappy as she had been before. ‘Snow-
White shall die,” she said to herself. So she prepared a
poisoned apple, beautiful to look at. Any one seeing that
apple would certainly wish to eat it, but whoever ate it
would be sure to die. The queen dyed her face, and
disguised herself as a peasant woman, and went again over
the mountain. When she got to the dwarfs’ house, she
knocked at the door, and Snow-White looked out from the
window. “I may not let any one come in,” said she, “the
dwarfs have forbidden it.” “Very well,” answered the
peasant woman, “I don’t wish to come in; I only want to
get rid of my apples. Here, I will give one to you,” and





she held up the beautiful poisoned apple, which looked so
tempting that Snow-White longed to taste it. She stretched
out her hand, and took the apple from the woman, and ate
a little piece; but no sooner had she attempted to swallow
it than she fell down dead on the ground. Then the wicked
queen laughed aloud and said—‘ White as snow, red as
blood, black as ebony! this time the dwarfs cannot bring
you to life again.” When she got home, she stood before
her mirror and said—

“ Mirror, mirror on the wall,

Who is fairest of us all?”

And at last the mirror answered as she wished it to do—

“ Lady queen, lady queen,
Thou art fairest to be seen.”







When the dwarfs came home in the evening, they found
Snow-White lying cold and stiff upon the floor of their
room. ‘They raised her up, unlaced her dress, and bathed
her face; but all was of no use, she never moved or breathed
—she was dead. Now Snow-White looked as beautiful as
if she were still alive. The dwarfs said, “We cannot
put her under the ground;” so they made a glass coffin
and placed her inside, so that they could always see
her, and they wrote upon the coffin in golden letters—
“A King’s-Daughter.” Then they carried the coffin to the
top of the mountain, and they took turns in watching beside





|
MY it. By-and-by an owl came to mourn for her, then a raven,
and last of alla dove. Snow-White lay there as if asleep,
and the colour never left her cheeks or her lips.

One day it happened that a king’s son rode through the
wood, and saw the coffin on the mountain, with Snow-
White lying inside. He read what was written upon it
in golden letters, and he begged the dwarfs to give
the coffin to him, offering to give them in exchange for it
anything that they liked to ask. But the dwarfs said they
would not part with Snow-White for all the gold in the
world. Then the king’s son said again, “ Give the coffin to
me, and I will guard it as my dearest treasure.” When he
said this, the good little dwarfs had pity on him, and they
let him take the coffin away. He directed his servants





to carry it on their shoulders, and then he set off home-
wards through the wood. On the way, it chanced that the
servants who were charged with this precious burden
stumbled and jolted the coffin, and the piece of poisoned
apple which Snow-White had attempted to swallow was
shaken out of her throat. Immediately she sat up and
began to look about her, and exclaimed, ‘Where am I ?”
The king’s son was full of joy. ‘“ You are with me,” he
answered; then he knelt beside her, took her hand
and kissed it, and told her of all that had happened, and
that he loved her better than any one in the world. “Come

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with me,” he said, “to my father’s castle, and be my bride.”
And Snow-White was not unwilling to go, for she thought
kindly of the handsome prince.

The king welcomed Snow-White to his kingdom, and
gave orders that great preparations should be made to
celebrate her marriage with his son. {nvitations were
sent to the kings and queens in all the countries near.
Amongst others, Snow-White’s wicked step-mother was
asked to the wedding feast. When she had dressed
herself in her finest clothes, and was ready to set off, she
stood before her mirror and said once more—

“ Mirror, mirror on the wall,
Who is fairest of us all?”
and the mirror answered—

“Thou art fairest, lady queen,

In ¢his kingdom to be seen ;

But waiting in the Bridal Hall,

The Bride is fairest of us all.”
Then the queen was so angry she did not know what to do.
She thought at first she would not go to the feast, but
she could not help wishing to see the bride who was
said to be so wonderfully beautiful. Accordingly she went
to the Bridal Hall, where all the other guests were fast
arriving. When she got there, she saw Snow-White
in her bridal dress, looking more lovely than can be
imagined. The heart of the wicked step-mother fell
within her, and she turned to leave the place, for she
could not bear to look upon Snow-White. But “dancing
shoes” had been prepared for her, which she was obliged to
put on; and then—you know what happens to those who





are obliged to wear such shoes against their will. She
could never stop dancing any more, but went on and on,
dancing over the hills, and through the woods, and along the
sea-shore—away, and away, and away; and she never came
again to the country where Snow-White and her handsome
husband lived happily together for the rest of their lives.

‘Go look in any glass, and say
What moral is in being fair.”







NCE upon a time there lived a king and queen
who possessed almost every good thing you can
think of, and yet they were not happy ; for they
had no child.
“If only we had a child,’ they used to say to one
another several times every day.
At last it happened that one hot summer evening the
queen sat alone by the side of the lake near which the





royal palace stood, and as she sat there, she listened to
the croaking of the frogs in the water. ‘There are

many families of little frogs below in the lake,” said she
to herself; “but in the palace we have not even one
little child.”

Then a frog came up from the water on to the land,
and hopped to her side, and said to her, “ Before summer
comes round again, you will have a little daughter.”

The queen went home feeling very happy after the frog
had said this, and by-and-by it came to pass as he had told
her. The queen had a daughter, and the king was so
much delighted, that he gave a great feast to celebrate
the christening of the child.

He asked all his own relations, and all the relations
of the queen, to come to it, and all the great lords and
ladies of the land; and, besides these, he invited the
wise women, as they were called—that is to say, the fairies





who lived in his dominions—that they might be god-
mothers to the little princess, and bestow beautiful gifts

upon her.

There were thirteen fairies living in that country,
and the king ought to have invited them all to the
feast; but as he had only got twelve golden plates,
he only asked twelve fairies to come; he was afraid to
put a china plate, or even a silver one, before a fairy
god-mother. Thus it happened that one of the wise
women was not invited, but she came all the same, and
very angry.

; The fairy god-mothers came to the feast, flying through
the air. You can see most of them in the pictures above,
and you will easily judge which is the angry one. The
banquet was a very sumptuous one. When it was over, the
god-mothers came up one by one to the throne, on which
the queen sat with her little daughter in her arms, and,





kneeling before the throne, each endowed the child with
some gift. The first fairy gave her beauty; the second
said that she should be as sweet-tempered as an angel;
the third said-she should sing like a nightingale; the





fourth said she should dance like a leaf on a tree; the
fifth said she should be as wise as a sage; the sixth said she
should be modest; the seventh gave her cheerfulness; the
eighth gave her wit; the ninth said she should be generous ;
the tenth said that every one should love her; the eleventh
gave her riches. But just as the eleventh fairy had spoken,
the door of the banqueting-room suddenly burst open,
and the fairy god-mother who had zo¢ been asked to come
entered with a sullen face. She had hovered behind the
others, and now glided up the hall without looking at any-
body. She pointed her wand towards the baby, and cried
with a loud voice, “ When the princess is fifteen years old,
she shall prick herself with a spindle, and fall down dead.”
Then she turned and left the room.

As soon as she was gone, the twelfth god-mother, who

had not yet spoken, came forward and knelt before the

queen and her child, and said, “The princess shall not
die; but when the spindle pricks her finger she shall fall
asleep, and sleep for one hundred years.”

The king, however, hoped to save his little daughter from
the misfortune of being pricked by a spindle, and having
to sleep for a hundred years. So he made a decree that
very day, that all the spindles throughout his dominions
should be immediately burnt. After this, his mind, and
that of the queen, his wife, were at rest on account of the
princess.

Every day the child grew to be more _ beautiful,
more witty, more graceful, and more wise, and became
everything that the hearts of her parents could desire.
Everyone who saw her loved her, and everyone who heard



of her wished to see the charming princess
who had been so richly endowed by her
fairy god-mothers.

At last the time came when she had
attained her fifteenth year, and one after-
_ noon, when the king and queen were gone
out for a long drive, it happened that the
princess was left quite alone to amuse
herself. With the restlessness which falls
upon the mind when there is nothing to
do, and when we are left alone, she started
up from her chair. ‘What shall I do,”
she said to herself, “till my dear father
and mother return?” She gazed from
the window at the trees. There was
nothing to please her in the garden, ,
(ey

galleries and tapestried sit-
ting-rooms, and ° peeped
into all the odd nooks
and crannies, and at last
she climbed a long,
winding turret-stair-

for she had seen it all before. She

left the windowand begantowander {¢0
about. She went from one room

of the palace to another to look

about her, and she saw every-

thing that was to be seen. /
She walked through the state !
rooms, and the long picture















case, and at the top of the staircase she saw a wooden door,
with a little rusty key sticking in the lock. The princess
turned the key, and the door opened, and she went into
the room, and there she found an old woman diligently
spinning flax. ‘Good morning,” said the princess to the
old woman. “What are you doing?” “I am spinning,”
answered the old woman, and she nodded her head as she
spoke, but she did not look up from her work for a moment.
“Spinning,” said the princess; “what a wonderful thing !
What is this beautiful soft thing you are making into such
fine shiny threads?” “That is flax,” said the old woman.
“Ttis like your own beautiful hair, and once it grew in
the fields and had pretty

- flowers on it, as blue

as the bright jewelled

band on your own

locks.” “Will you teach

me how to spin? I

should so like to be

able to spin flax like

you,” said the princess.

Then the old woman

showed the girl how

she worked her foot

up and down on the .

treadle, and thus made

the wheel go round:

how the band on the

wheel went round, and

how the spindle was





kept in motion. Then the princess asked to be allowed
to examine the wonderful spindle. This was exactly what
the old woman (who was the wicked fairy in disguise) wanted

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her todo. “Let me hold it in my hand,” said the princess.

So saying, she took the spindle from the old woman; but

no sooner had she touched it than she pricked her finger (|
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with it, and immediately she fell back on a bed that stood
in the room, and lay there in a deep sleep.

The fairy who had brought this about was the kind
twelfth god-mother of the princess, and now she had saved
her from death at the hands of the wicked old woman.
See the lovely “Sleeping Beauty” on her enchanted bed,
where she must lie for a hundred years.



“She sleeps: her breathings are not heard
In palace chambers far apart ;
The fragrant tresses are not stirred,

That lie upon her charméd heart.
* ¥ * * ¥ *

She sleeps, nor dreams, but ever dwells
A perfect form in perfect rest.”



Then everybody in the castle fell asleep too. The king
and queen had come in from their drive, and were sitting
on their thrones in the great hall, and they fell asleep; all
the lords and ladies-in-waiting fell asleep around them; the
footmen fell asleep, and the housemaids; the cook, who was
just going to box the ears of the scullion, fell asleep with her
ladle in her hand; the horses fell asleep in their stalls; the
dogs fell asleep in the yard ; the pigeons on the roof put their
heads under their wings and fell asleep also. Even the

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flies upon the walls
stood stock still, and
fell asleep, each one in
his place; the fire on
the hearth ceased to
flicker, and the meat
left off being roasted.
The wind was hushed,
and blew no more out-
side the castle; not a
leaf stirred upon the
trees that grew around
it; everything was per-
fectly still) Every per-
son and every thing
fell asleep, for an evil
enchantment had ©
fallen upon the
place, and all

that belonged





Years passed on, and by degrees a hedge of thorns
grew up around the castle, until at last it was quite hidden,
and nothing could be seen above the hedge but the
weathercock at the top of the tower. Still, the people
of the country used to speak of the beautiful princess
who was lying there asleep, and from time to time many
kings’ sons tried to get to the castle through the thorny
screen that guarded it.

Not one of them succeeded, however; for as soon as
they pushed their way into the hedge the thorns stuck into
them, and held them fast, so that they could neither go
on nor get-out again, and they all died miserably there.
Not even the sun could beat
through the thick thorns, and
the world was in every way shut
out from the wonderful sight
within.

At last the hundred years
were all gone but one day,
when it happened that a prince
who was riding through that
country fell into conversation
with an old countryman, who
told him that not far off there
was an enchanted castle sur-
rounded by a hedge of thorns,
and that inside the castle a
beautiful princess had lain asleep
for one hundred years, and that
he had heard his grandfather say _





many a king’s son had
met his death in trying
to reach the place where
she lay.

When the prince had
heard all that the old
man had to say, he de-
termined that he would
try to get through the
thorn hedge and reach
the beautiful princess,
and he told the old man
what he was resolved to
do. The countryman
begged him not to make
the attempt, telling him
that he would be sure
to die as the others had
done.

“JT am not in the
least afraid,” answered
the prince, and then he
turned his horse’s head
in the direction of the
castle. He rode towards
it with might and main,
and very soon he could
just see the weathercock
peeping up above. the
trees.





So the prince rode
on until he came to the .
thorn hedge; then he
alighted from his horse,
and began to force his
way in amongst the
thorns. Immediately, as
the prince approached,
the thorns all turned into
beautiful large flowers,
which bent their heads
before him, and turned
aside and opened a way
for him to go; and as
he passed, the flowers
closed round him behind,
and so he went on.

When the prince had
got safely through the
hedge, he came to the
castle yard, and there he
saw the dogs lying fast
asleep, and in the stables
the horses asleep, and
on the roof the pigeons
asleep, with their heads
under their wings. In-
side the castle it was
just the same. As he
opened the door to go





in, he saw at once that even the flies were asleep on the
walls, and everything was so still, he could hear himself
breathing as he walked. He passed through the kitchens
first, and there he saw the cook with her hand raised ready
to box the scullion’s ears. In the hall and the state-rooms
the courtiers were all fast asleep, sitting or standing just
in the same place that they were in one hundred years ago,
when the magic sleep fell upon them. The king and the
queen still slept upon their thrones. The prince walked
on—it was like passing through some place of death—and
at last he came to the winding turret-staircase; he went up
round and round to the very top, and came to the wooden





door with the little rusty key in it, and he opened the door
and went into the room, and there on the bed lay the beauti-
ful princess who had not
moved for one hundred
years. She looked so
beautiful in her charmed ~
sleep, that the prince could
not look away from her
again, but he stooped and
kissed her, when imme-
diately
“The charm was snapt,

There was a noise of striking

clocks,
And feet that ran, and doors that

clapt,
And barking dogs and crowing

cocks.”

The princess opened
her eyes; and she seemed
quite as much pleased to
see the prince as he was
to-see here oNe Sot up
from the bed, and put her
hand in his, and they went
down the winding stairs
together, hand-in-hand.

The king and queen,
and all the courtiers,
looked up from their





T=

sleep, just as if they were awaking from a short afternoon
nap. The horses shook themselves in their stables, and
felt quite ready for a gallop; the dogs began to bark; the
pigeons drew their heads from under their wings, and cooed
softly in the sunshine; the flies on the walls crept on
towards where they had intended to go a hundred years
before; the kitchen fire blazed up, and the meat went on
being roasted; and the cook boxed the scullion’s ears,

By-and-by, the prince and princess were married, and
lived happily together for the rest of their lives.





good woman for his wife; he had also one little
daughter. When the child was still young, the
wife was taken ill; and as she felt that she was
about to die, she called her little daughter to her, and said,
“Dear child, be good and pious all your life, and you
will be protected and happy.” After saying this, she died.





The little girl wept for the loss of her mother; but she
remembered what she had said, and was always good
and gentle. When a year had passed, the father took
another wife, who brought with her to her new home two
daughters of her own, who were neither good nor beautiful.
After her father’s marriage, a sad time began for the little _
daughter. Her step-sisters hated her, and did not choose
that she should share with them in anything that was
good or pleasant. ‘ What business has this creature in the
room?” they used to
say. ‘Out with her,
she is only fit to be a
kitchen-maid!” Sothey
took all her fine clothes
from her, and made
her put on an old grey
dress, and laughed at
her, and drove her into
the kitchen. They also
made her do all the
hard work of the house
—get up early, light
the fire, cook, and wash
for them; and they
threw crusts into the
ashes for her to pick
out and eat. At the
end of the day, when
she was tired, she was
not allowed to rest





upon a bed, but was obliged to lie on the hearth among
the cinders all night; and because her clothes became the
colour of the cinders they called her Cinderella.

Now it happened that the king of the country gavea
-great feast, which lasted for several Oye and during that
time there was a ball at the
palace every night, for the king
had decreed that his only son
should choose a bride for him-
self, and, of course, it was neces-
sary that he should see every-
body. Cinderella’s step-sisters
were invited, and very much
pleased they were to be asked
to. the= Princes ball. — They.
made their step-father buy the
richest dresses for them, they
stuck feathers in their hair, and
covered their arms and necks
with jewels. Cinderella helped
to dress them. “Come and
comb my hair, Cinderella,” said
one. “Fasten my _ necklace,

Cinderella,” said the other. Poor
Cinderella was kept hard at
work all the afternoon and
evening. “Would you like to
go to the ball, child?” asked
the eldest sister; and

when Cinderella answered





that she should, they both burst out laughing at her. At last,
their toilets being completed, the step-sisters drove off from

the house, and Cinderella was left alone. Then she sat
down amongst the cinders on the hearth, and gave way





to a fit of weeping; she would so much have liked to go
to the ball. In the midst of her sobbing, Cinderella heard
a soft voice say to

her, “What are you

crying for, my little

maid?” She looked

up surprised, for she

had not heard anyone

come into the room;

and no wonder, for it

was a fairy who had

spoken to her, and

fairies can come in

and go out without

making any noise.

This fairy was Cin-

derella’s fairy god-

mother.

“You wish to go
to the ball, my child ?”
said she. ‘“ Well, do
as I bid you, and you
shall go, First, you
must go into the gar-
den, and bring me the
largest pumpkin you
can find.” Off ran
Cinderella, and soon
came back with a

large pumpkin, which





The fairy touched it with her wand, and immediately it
was changed into a gilt coach lined with pink satin, and
with pink satin cushions inside. “ Now, Cinderella,” said
her fairy god- mother, “ fetch me the mouse-trap.” Cinderella
went into the pantry, and brought the mouse-trap, and, lo!
there were six fat, sleek mice inside the trap. The god-
mother opened the door of the trap, and as they ran
through, she touched each with her wand, and immediately
they were seen with complete harness, ready to draw the
carriage. So there was a “coach-and-six,’ but as yet no
coachman to drive, or lacqueys to attend | upon this splendid
coach.

“Go, Cinderella, ‘said the. fairy, “and bring =me
the rat-trap.” Cinderella was obliged to go to the cellar
for the rat-trap, but presently she returned with it, and
there was a large black rat and two smaller ones inside.
The fairy touched the rats with her wand, and they were
instantly transformed into a coachman and two lacqueys
with grand livery. The fairy sent Cinderella out once more
to pick up six lizards from behind the pumpkin-frame, and
these she changed into six swift footmen to run beforé
and behind the coach.

“Now, my child,” said the fairy, “you may go to
the ball.” But Cinderella looked down at her shabby
clothes, and the tears rolled down her cheeks once more.
“How can I go in my shabby clothes?” exclaimed she.
Then the kind god-mother touched Cinderella’s dress
with her wand, and the ragged grey skirt was changed
into the most beautiful ball-dress that ever was seen;
her golden hair hung down her neck; a wreath of roses





clasped her head; a bouquet was in her hand, and her little
feet were shod with a dainty pair of wonderful slippers
made of glass.

“ Now, good-bye, Cinderella; go to the ball and enjoy
- yourself,” said the fairy. “Only, remember one thing:
you must come away before the clock strikes twelve;
for if you should stay a moment too long, your coach
will turn into. a pumpkin again, your coachman and lacqueys
into rats, your horses into mice, your pretty dress into

the old ragged frock, and you will be the little cinder-
wench once more.”

Of course Cinderella thought there was no danger of
forgetting what her fairy god-mother said to her; but she
was in such high spirits at the wonderful change of fortune
which had come to her, that it was well she had such a
serious warning of the danger of disobedience.

All being now ready, Cinderella got into her carriage,
and drove away to the palace. The king’s son met her










at the door of the ball-room, and took her by the hand
and danced with her, and with nobody else.



The Prince was enchanted by her beauty, and so were the
king and the queen; and no wonder, for she looked more
lovely than anyone else at the ball. Her sisters saw her





dancing with the Prince, but they did not know her in the
least. They supposed that she was some strange princess.
Once or twice
Cinderellaspoke
kindly to them,
and they were
delighted be-
cause the beau-
tiful lady with
whom the king’s
son danced had
noticed them.
At a quarter to
twelve o'clock,
Cinderella left
the ball - room,
and got safely
home, and was
sitting amongst
the cinders on
the hearth when
her sisters came
back. ‘Come
and help us to
undress, Cinder-
ella,” they said ;
and whilst she
waited upon
them, they told her about the beautiful lady who had been
at the ball, with whom the king’s son had danced almost





all the evening, and who had paid them so much attention.
But Cinderella did not say anything.

The next night there was another ball, and the step-
sisters went as before. When they were gone, Cinderella
was left alone; but this time she did not cry, because she

_ thought her fairy god-mother would. not forget her... Ina
very few moments the kind
little old lady appeared, and
the mouse-trap, and the rat-
trap, and the six lizards,
and everything happened
as it had done the first time
her god-mother
visited her. This
night, however,
Cinderella had a
still more beauti-
ful dress than she
had worn on the
previous one.
Elerehaic was
done up high, and
her head was fas-
tened with costly
jewels. When
Cinderella





was ready to get into her coach, which was waiting for
her at the door, her god-mother said to her, pointing to the
clock with her wand, “Adieu, dear child, go and dance,
and be happy; but remember to leave the ball-room
before the clock strikes twelve, for if you stay one moment
too long, you know what the consequences will be.” Cin-
derella remembered the warning of the night
before, and promised, and away she
went to the palace, where the king’s
» SON was waiting to receive her. He
led her into the ball-room,
and danced only with her.
“This is my partner,”
he said; and it
was of no use to





introduce anyone else
tohim. At length the
Prince took Cinderella
into a charming little
alcove, amongst flower-
ing trees, and they sat
there talking so de-
lightfully that Cinder-
ella forgot that it was
growing late.
Suddenly she heard
the clock begin to.
strike twelve; then in
great terror she sprang
away from the Prince’s
side, and flew down
the palace stairs to the
great door of the en-
trance hall. As she
ran, one of her glass
slippers fell off, but
she dared not stop to
put it on again, so it
remained where it fell.
Alas! the clock had
finished striking by
the time she reached
the door. She looked
in vain for her car-
riage — it had disap-





peared; and all she
saw was a pumpkin
lying on the road, and
six little mice scam-
pering away. Cinder-
ella ran home as fast
as she could; her
smart dress was gone,
she had only her rag-
ged clothes on, her
head and feet were
bare, and she was the
little cinder - wench

once more.
The _ king’s son,

who had followed her
downstairs, picked up
the little shoe, and
kept it as a souvenir
of his beautiful partner,
whom he could not
see anywhere. When
he reached the door of
the palace she was
gone, and though he
strained his eyes look-
ing down the road, he
could distinguish no-
body but a little rag-
ged girl running along





in the wind and the rain. However, Cinderella got safely
home before her sisters returned. Whilst she was helping
them to undress, they talked to her about the ball, and
were more full of praises than ever of the beautiful lady
with whom the Prince was so much in love. They told
Cinderella about her having run away as the clock was
striking twelve, and of her having left her little slipper on
the stairs, and that the Prince had picked it up. Still
Cinderella did not say anything.

The next day, one of the king’s heralds made known
that the king’s son intended to marry the lady to whom
belonged the little glass slipper which he had picked up
on the stairs of the palace, and that, in order to find her,
all the young maidens in the country were to try on the

shoe; whosoever it should fit would
be the Prince’s bride. So the glass
slipper was taken to every house,
and ever so many maidens tried to
put it on; but there was not found
one whom it fitted exactly. At last
the Prince came to the house in
which Cinderella and her step-sisters
lived. . The step-sisters were in a
great state of excitement and tm-
patience to try on the glass slipper,
and equally anxious to keep Cinder-
ella in the background. First the
elder sister tried it, but her foot was
too large to go in; then the second
sister tried, but with her it was even





worse than with the other, for her foot was bigger still; and
then it was Cinderella’s turn. The sisters laughed loudly
at the idea of Cinderella putting on the slipper; but when
she came forward, the Prince recognised her at once as his
beautiful partner at the ball, and, kneeling down, placed
the slipper himself on her little foot, and, lo! it fitted
perfectly.
*““As shines the moon in Clouded skies,
She in her poor attire was seen ;

So sweet a face, such angel grace,
In all that land had never been.”

Cinderella then drew from her pocket the fellow slipper,
and the moment she put it on, her old grey frock was
instantly changed, and she stood up before them.all in the
splendid dress she had worn at the ball; and everyone
knew her to be the beauti-
ful lady the Prince loved.

She, who had been once a
kitchen-maid, was now to
be a Princess.

The Prince took her
away with him in his car-
riage to the palace, where
the king and queen were
waiting to receive her as
their daughter, and very
soon she and the Prince
were married with great
pomp and ceremony.





As for the unkind step-sisters, Cinderella forgave them
all their cruel treatment of her, for she continued to be good
and pious, as she had always been. She asked them to the
palace, and treated them with great gentleness; and by-

and-by they were married to two rich gentlemen of the
court.











er men Ges Ses

]





- (Marcus UDarD & Co hey

ig pitas



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WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
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'2011-12-05T21:38:24-05:00'
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describe
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Invalid character
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7f0bbf598d31922114af1a812f4ad759
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describe
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'2011-12-05T21:39:19-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
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describe
Invalid character
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'2011-12-05T21:40:39-05:00'
describe
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'2011-12-05T21:39:34-05:00'
describe
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'2011-12-05T21:40:36-05:00'
describe
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1ff10e220aa474560988e728bf271871
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'2011-12-05T21:38:32-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'720' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYNI' 'sip-files00038.txt'
508a87b28c28ea1d913f556c63ff09ee
3912dac1474931ead7d1b1f55a9d0f19d2dd76cd
'2011-12-05T21:39:07-05:00'
describe
'743' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYNJ' 'sip-files00039.txt'
619d66f9dbccabcd3307d03e812b6d56
b6fa856e6e38e1ad1d6ccaa35a984488320f7b58
'2011-12-05T21:38:57-05:00'
describe
'715' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYNK' 'sip-files00040.txt'
488360b80f234cad99f6ea717a2d59f7
5cffedbf4ac7d31a2b0a4c7762914bcc29d66b02
'2011-12-05T21:40:06-05:00'
describe
'941' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYNL' 'sip-files00041.txt'
f7ee6f98aa31eae5c975d495b6c35cc9
004adfc7d5c67170a55d47a2010ea3abe812e0e5
describe
'639' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYNM' 'sip-files00042.txt'
3e0214aaa45542ba7dbae2e3db1602e0
536c27b81f79164802ffbddff70c4da0c2739b9e
'2011-12-05T21:40:50-05:00'
describe
'514' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYNN' 'sip-files00043.txt'
8b8dcee10407246c6c0fa82e84e28609
1d64707a05b905fe71108dcd3da35a61af04a3f2
'2011-12-05T21:40:31-05:00'
describe
'1663' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYNO' 'sip-files00044.txt'
71e06227501657916305364276d91229
9758034c695998d5c670773182dd061af3a52b59
'2011-12-05T21:38:41-05:00'
describe
'1174' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYNP' 'sip-files00045.txt'
2a9e115749960dfa2da95d6b3e6dddcf
347b24435afea0e310a4f8afb7a4f69fa3cd15a6
'2011-12-05T21:39:59-05:00'
describe
'259' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYNQ' 'sip-files00046.txt'
e8845dc7da094e1f0dd74378689d560d
fc640678c13e0ff888f4a96da8875ff0f00bfd08
'2011-12-05T21:39:57-05:00'
describe
'836' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYNR' 'sip-files00047.txt'
248b258e04393b67ca2c2692c45d9ac6
b0cd1eab99d3422d9f6588ae4ec1bc80e7e8c54f
'2011-12-05T21:40:44-05:00'
describe
'1700' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYNS' 'sip-files00048.txt'
877af64498db2cee5ffc6a6ef96e19dd
03f67825090e614dc582250ddc706973ca2fa565
'2011-12-05T21:38:43-05:00'
describe
'1094' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYNT' 'sip-files00049.txt'
280a92488dd856895b0c43c2bf7bb6cc
32467064c71e0a7b82112b2d0502873f5a84b10c
'2011-12-05T21:39:43-05:00'
describe
'316' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYNU' 'sip-files00050.txt'
fcd77a9a68c6b6583daf659c7c696b2e
96dfef8b5933806b222c96b2e752e1598b51274a
'2011-12-05T21:40:42-05:00'
describe
'688' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYNV' 'sip-files00051.txt'
947e48bd77e5aceb35cad6646076575c
96739a8d7b5026ba793880cb2d375fd2240c26b0
'2011-12-05T21:40:04-05:00'
describe
'886' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYNW' 'sip-files00052.txt'
264e72ac1a2146fb3df9f11ac1d1334c
63cc1a0d13e4c218a007fb2cf72a4669f5d8c4ee
'2011-12-05T21:39:12-05:00'
describe
'756' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYNX' 'sip-files00053.txt'
83bf0b4e37f09f7b81f80cd8cdc9a623
459d7905e677777057e6551e55175557fc1e6c74
'2011-12-05T21:38:23-05:00'
describe
'712' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYNY' 'sip-files00054.txt'
7b384c1904dca53b0113f97e4b379f04
f58584e4c1188beec757d4d41aa71fd8f9ecd945
'2011-12-05T21:40:43-05:00'
describe
'752' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYNZ' 'sip-files00055.txt'
bddcf57d77e227a02af43a79e7841870
e2ccc8ea347af1e82b7c2a3ad813b9a3f357fe07
'2011-12-05T21:38:34-05:00'
describe
'1894' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYOA' 'sip-files00056.txt'
72fe8651cfeb36788d5de1ac0c20613e
fc56ff9152c2ff50fdaa119f88ef346c39fe5cd1
describe
'1188' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYOB' 'sip-files00057.txt'
a875da3abde7c4015e37e2582c47420f
c3014c3a1a0d2bd523369c9f9b8da9f0acccd3aa
'2011-12-05T21:40:00-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'361' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYOC' 'sip-files00058.txt'
71f47736b0776d65be92c1f7ff697e46
7cb8db27ffc1a938a468c09923b45cc84817d86f
'2011-12-05T21:38:27-05:00'
describe
'48' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYOD' 'sip-files00062.txt'
05a133e8efc81a58ea6f0a94791833af
f45f89c7689b0ade5b1da2e064302fcb8289e1c6
'2011-12-05T21:39:35-05:00'
describe
'437' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYOE' 'sip-files00001.pro'
de3849804535c0eab256b3a48fe7e82e
81b4718a30b01f8303f5b520796d3b0a5c82d657
'2011-12-05T21:40:05-05:00'
describe
'732' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYOF' 'sip-files00007.pro'
d211fd6ede8db90707117b7c5d9419fc
5de0bf2c408c8a952118d4c7db9df1dca4246c8e
'2011-12-05T21:39:58-05:00'
describe
'1097' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYOG' 'sip-files00008.pro'
57726b07e60fbc4ccc8e3ae8d9b5c376
c9a9f380cbbe8df275106b92331870b05196ce6d
describe
'4698' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYOH' 'sip-files00009.pro'
156f5ac2bf836d32890d2515633b657b
d42fc24dff5077772902ccf8e9516f60cb17f146
'2011-12-05T21:39:03-05:00'
describe
'18518' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYOI' 'sip-files00010.pro'
bc187aae36423d5488affa2cb0c033b1
ee1154981e479ab4786281c05ba401a36d3d8524
'2011-12-05T21:39:15-05:00'
describe
'20116' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYOJ' 'sip-files00011.pro'
37307839f7602da4ae5e153dea6d558c
42bf7cab9669043e02c2e8924d2c355a1af6d7e6
'2011-12-05T21:38:46-05:00'
describe
'23663' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYOK' 'sip-files00012.pro'
921b9d6ee98fc188a762867af6765901
97b7184a73d1e3607221d6c00d19de8e2cad2cb1
describe
'20466' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYOL' 'sip-files00013.pro'
41bef493becdd967c8aa741998306a89
22489e934c6e37e17d5bd7d7116769aeccab0a36
'2011-12-05T21:39:29-05:00'
describe
'25789' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYOM' 'sip-files00014.pro'
020f945ef09f201a56c645de468cb9f9
6fc9643ddc1cd0373cb005393d883ad7a1dd7e8d
'2011-12-05T21:39:06-05:00'
describe
'20370' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYON' 'sip-files00015.pro'
42f5dcc143408083629f70556c1666cb
baa8b52d5c54d5cf2cb7d9c4c65a98b64f2e5962
'2011-12-05T21:40:11-05:00'
describe
'22992' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYOO' 'sip-files00016.pro'
8af9fbffea42164ba5e14d6cf20977a7
23cfcde3763b96eaeabdb7de30f8ee9bca0c7d74
describe
'41842' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYOP' 'sip-files00017.pro'
415d021b456cecaf609be4b8a09bda29
4f778fdd84f9da264be1fe6a4533a119a501230f
'2011-12-05T21:40:33-05:00'
describe
'18686' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYOQ' 'sip-files00018.pro'
86c6703e0bad9921472f061a4c4a056d
fe72c4b9d4fb6d4b143f3a1e80856e8f66941324
describe
'19467' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYOR' 'sip-files00019.pro'
3bbb2495fb2ead940f79973f635f3b2a
8717cd2829e976183ef7fc361da9fb13eff9de35
describe
'38397' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYOS' 'sip-files00020.pro'
6d6ad029db52ee86597384d3848fa014
e746b7fc8046abdd242c5ded0aa22793a9567981
describe
'17110' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYOT' 'sip-files00021.pro'
c5c3952300909c2a2f6923d51586e0ab
0182247993b206751bcfe8f3b7cd7aa003a7f5a1
'2011-12-05T21:39:16-05:00'
describe
'16630' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYOU' 'sip-files00022.pro'
d5378f1bf06e79d7334c5b421f1dd1cf
e4c1bae89456cddc28230b60821a93659acaaf8b
describe
'21079' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYOV' 'sip-files00023.pro'
c96828e86a1d454d68d8b71a5652affa
d97c770f422845e65f1be1d059c014e8dc12ee49
describe
'15907' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYOW' 'sip-files00024.pro'
37d1b01ac29407da64ed35ed548134d9
193d0ffd5c928191087b1348a45f04f448939015
'2011-12-05T21:39:45-05:00'
describe
'37884' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYOX' 'sip-files00025.pro'
0055cdc14e1e4d6d17481ebf94474e33
756dec866513474377156ad9df0a953ce2d048e7
'2011-12-05T21:38:45-05:00'
describe
'11213' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYOY' 'sip-files00026.pro'
929a1fba75beabc6f12f42d1a5c962eb
e10fe59a2f8d18046e53640328ca2cf32aec290f
'2011-12-05T21:40:47-05:00'
describe
'9847' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYOZ' 'sip-files00027.pro'
286311dab21de5af1bf9c1faaf7ab7bf
28b4a36328e75c8c5932eddbc042ec3bd0612e07
'2011-12-05T21:38:50-05:00'
describe
'24410' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYPA' 'sip-files00028.pro'
60eb37cf84790a10fb19b1f20e0287a2
35bf265ec0c0baa344d0df41ce65500531800e21
'2011-12-05T21:38:48-05:00'
describe
'22480' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYPB' 'sip-files00029.pro'
0fd43842c18f1b96a436daeba87bc569
b2b9b5f64caf331163bb64c2f9c65998c38d5c4f
'2011-12-05T21:38:58-05:00'
describe
'6579' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYPC' 'sip-files00030.pro'
2ded27935ce989b3b5568b96dbdc5cdd
1778b9a15ad842c580e134f4e1299b41bfab4ccc
describe
'43175' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYPD' 'sip-files00031.pro'
9cb9a3eb1df61e02c51fa5a49de48f2e
0948cd98031926c8558de9dc4fbc89f8427bf758
describe
'29594' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYPE' 'sip-files00032.pro'
2792704f8850ad49b29d1742010dacc5
71b09d2dbd18346a66979c2f47de346b3f4f5d93
describe
'29563' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYPF' 'sip-files00033.pro'
22a487456bf0de9b7371c43840db3d53
7bdcb44a58c5bef842499319a1415416a2556bb4
'2011-12-05T21:38:47-05:00'
describe
'9711' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYPG' 'sip-files00034.pro'
ba0e5b216ebc4df21d3899ea0083288a
b7277ab4ca19a060e981265fd4f7af4cf38c99bc
'2011-12-05T21:40:49-05:00'
describe
'15698' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYPH' 'sip-files00035.pro'
d54dbb363c92c3affa268270cf4c998f
7e69f617179d2b97730438a7bd89f8f03002478e
describe
'28139' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYPI' 'sip-files00036.pro'
5d2b2b3a06eb393214a38ba305bd9748
6b4b78ea3727c9337881afbb977df190f09975d2
'2011-12-05T21:40:40-05:00'
describe
'32213' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYPJ' 'sip-files00037.pro'
936e4dcf8a4e286e3acce3dd9b897479
4c32d07387e050a709fdff7a39859ee8acb46c0f
describe
'17803' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYPK' 'sip-files00038.pro'
630734dade38beb326ce631765a5b446
35e775f0fa140eedbe247a1b911d4f1de035d8fb
describe
'18502' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYPL' 'sip-files00039.pro'
54d12391fc8488a371111981831d7eed
537061487af579ba991f56a4b3bc967caef72aac
describe
'18186' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYPM' 'sip-files00040.pro'
fa34634c077ad840bfca10d55a987427
b78fab921e3139203934515331bb98eadc1ee1eb
describe
'21576' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYPN' 'sip-files00041.pro'
deb0f6d3d40e167c096d7887bc063f2b
20a0d565bf16fc0349404e84aebd62081cbb21d1
describe
'15331' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYPO' 'sip-files00042.pro'
fe61b91ec232b58adff8324765e9861d
c363f74a822be3e6aeae02deaef052947df9a5c4
describe
'10531' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYPP' 'sip-files00043.pro'
9c0c43fa389a8148c93fc039f86e4988
4e5d01a11079d3981ca16c209fc72cb5e716b3bf
describe
'27697' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYPQ' 'sip-files00044.pro'
f56b26fdf9ed0a6bbf87560b8c40ee03
fb1cef9d74e80e9145b825526e37d75ebfbca833
'2011-12-05T21:38:26-05:00'
describe
'28532' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYPR' 'sip-files00045.pro'
cd144c0ff6faa3dc9a65af4e7b2204ea
6d8afdbfd5701ad7d9405c11414179f6dcd0deff
describe
'6430' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYPS' 'sip-files00046.pro'
87da9dc10d35d3eb4a4f7a392640c40b
48cb11490442f40fa1d6da55325bade466df2b3e
describe
'19048' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYPT' 'sip-files00047.pro'
7f063a63df4b17af32d19a16a61c3120
390cc4f86d938c252e2c770f156b4e48da440389
'2011-12-05T21:38:30-05:00'
describe
'41790' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYPU' 'sip-files00048.pro'
dc73379faecda6ae766c9b371b36e1f1
8882daf69d79d1cf06d13c08d0e1a5ca34ca7c10
describe
'25101' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYPV' 'sip-files00049.pro'
f2a6db63206aed61189892089cd6e8b7
5ee4cc80acef4c3a6f7089dfc22b384d6bf16a91
'2011-12-05T21:40:46-05:00'
describe
'7595' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYPW' 'sip-files00050.pro'
0d5a8abd82139eb3338d2ddad46366ef
f535f77b9936fc67583236e9513b1054b8a95092
'2011-12-05T21:38:28-05:00'
describe
'17079' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYPX' 'sip-files00051.pro'
f887f7965fee1521e06ad8c607f21025
b27cfe9fa17f5f4fcff476ee4d52c3a147cad992
describe
'18801' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYPY' 'sip-files00052.pro'
52d6f6b45d6546f4c88d825652f2477f
95cf3668fc0c4d0160ce42307684d9958bc21b95
describe
'16823' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYPZ' 'sip-files00053.pro'
db78d12eb5fb120bdf7a2c549e999500
265664c115a10bcc5899bc8468074877a0657e23
describe
'17957' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYQA' 'sip-files00054.pro'
2ea78a8990108ec4edd23bf433439c3f
e1ae564db2e883f675a9a7a4fb26493991bdea1d
describe
'17156' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYQB' 'sip-files00055.pro'
1665d843da4001def819bda9ea032c67
7dc304cf429eec3c76a9add49c602a63ed78f6a8
describe
'37498' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYQC' 'sip-files00056.pro'
97c7e4957cccea199fed40c821561d7b
2cf2616c19a0a8d3bc3d162dadc670987066f456
describe
'28124' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYQD' 'sip-files00057.pro'
454ef808b1e785b0a3cb1f8acef6a428
003e1f48b9f0e52d07c8ce5c131cdb76c90ae58f
describe
'8145' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYQE' 'sip-files00058.pro'
97062194a0de4670ed01b12527b2dc58
1e49460f1a9f11b6d0e426a055b62d4bdfd9600d
describe
'891' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYQF' 'sip-files00062.pro'
aee9a365f9d62c65b03cd6b649bcc3a7
925c51551cdf3d54627fa9ab3cd45f09318bcfd7
describe
'421437' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYQG' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
b3d3beb1fd9dbed3c37871430648a6cc
bccc76859d9800184fc68a746e2fa1003b620415
'2011-12-05T21:38:38-05:00'
describe
'432310' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYQH' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
3a3ff3302c95fa61ab526652c62d07a8
124fa321e72a61e6918f5f31ae6e75ab84ba9e27
describe
'387821' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYQI' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
f2b3740bea08faa1f337ea112349100c
c8fdabac310338e8d660ad8d54b59f0e6f5b5064
describe
'404282' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYQJ' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
88d9b4c3613aa70aa5288d01bfcbe989
4458390d15652fc634a9670ad3a56be529481577
describe
'404313' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYQK' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
d639fd46e3c1a12c68078c6ad83c3193
36a6308744de1928e882969409d49c139a7ae8ff
'2011-12-05T21:39:51-05:00'
describe
'404265' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYQL' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
fa59d99472d9eae8cb262fef1c891b60
35005369c7e4709f166c12a50b8062d290feaf58
describe
'404270' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYQM' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
9049b932392e748b90c3f277c36b83be
0fcf3e5632be2abe64525dce9be21a89135369a0
'2011-12-05T21:39:47-05:00'
describe
'404249' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYQN' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
fcbce594be624b6c58806f78d52bd437
8754a9b6b9c5e1b64d343986e5dd7fafcf67c835
describe
'404292' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYQO' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
31ad69bf3980001b7e3c87b9de02de7c
c2cfb23b910e29a3f156dbf0b7cd0c84371b7c49
describe
'404272' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYQP' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
b826e14caf2fe98872cf5a9c96d23bbe
7b14736d6d1847b4737a3d635ef55d66bc3f284d
describe
'404269' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYQQ' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
40d64e7348e3f86ab9f3a9fdea8cfb59
b90ccd861a055ab24b25a003193a7a46e064a45f
describe
'404152' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYQR' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
2eae060136cebe1052f445579a996224
1776d9d35fd7897077fe9dfc63bca2ba888ebaba
describe
'404318' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYQS' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
7ccd9a5168b03373e108cf20794779ed
7e764539194d74f4046ad114f9e901568f689f31
describe
'404257' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYQT' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
612e22e4d77763292a9e3d333ff688da
39e80e81eb6e04c5e97ac9d03486d46417c968fd
'2011-12-05T21:39:02-05:00'
describe
'404322' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYQU' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
f2eb5de1d7c0854a850fa1e85c19e277
05e572d484425cb003ac06b78fe857430697bf33
describe
'404205' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYQV' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
fa46a27d21d34a3b2e7058514b9fd092
2d8fbd668c1933ba8336829e99e2b5ade8568eb7
'2011-12-05T21:39:52-05:00'
describe
'404267' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYQW' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
2da10e256252b3070c578e9e1b199d1f
ab993ee4da191447cee00cb177f0794025feb510
'2011-12-05T21:39:05-05:00'
describe
'404300' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYQX' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
4a412e3a55e4662ffe9ede29277c2476
0b43aaf0b7d66acb259b585f5881649592a1f7e0
describe
'404275' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYQY' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
ae5486ba82ab852c9818c9cff9767530
81fc9cf3cacbd9c669b86a986303224d8b94a5ce
'2011-12-05T21:39:21-05:00'
describe
'404288' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYQZ' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
e4cf60e410e2f29c4e556608cd156ea8
09228900fce9323ffef487669a3efea4820a1512
describe
'404308' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYRA' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
5152e9082a8605b4c6e3f54bf28cdc15
c00e018af6a2479a4d6fef92f0dd5fd27f35f9a0
describe
'404203' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYRB' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
78e67a6d2a310db54c7affabc11249d7
9602e1da6bc24cc10bf8dd296eb6f1c71fd4d355
describe
'404279' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYRC' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
ba3fd1ca02f9e03e148ba31e12657c08
41a47f9feb662262711945a14136c3247aa548f6
'2011-12-05T21:39:48-05:00'
describe
'404100' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYRD' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
9b2365a35d38a99f2472760ec245897e
72929c7237a0028b3b8d75fa5618db6f0922ae25
'2011-12-05T21:39:46-05:00'
describe
'404302' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYRE' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
af099dd09f5713168aa909fbeefabe35
f5e8bf323eb3b13937743ec4d4a607197119d612
describe
'404112' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYRF' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
1779380732db42d846a71bba7ef6a48d
44a17e6bc6c9662179d2231c546b7ce8045fba88
'2011-12-05T21:40:45-05:00'
describe
'404294' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYRG' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
bb6838db26b68b4e30c13f7f3838600c
80223ee48f9b4c3d0548217e3c67d6ae0fc1ebea
'2011-12-05T21:39:55-05:00'
describe
'404246' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYRH' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
27f4cfae0e55f964b40cd2ec0dabaf44
c992ff873bd83528216984a1d8d65c7cca889368
describe
'404298' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYRI' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
30dc8a38ab33ee3db40f04e856bbe36f
5228f55b834e95c60f531317fe907b2568996cdb
'2011-12-05T21:38:44-05:00'
describe
'404271' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYRJ' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
f0bd4f3d2d993e1fb311d280bc1dfec2
ce81c7c34b12c5b86026a7a2700c39c5932ec82e
describe
'404135' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYRK' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
ed3fe93679199d25f695658bbe4c94a8
91caf61ebb3e68080701e0628faf05c7fce2b107
'2011-12-05T21:40:38-05:00'
describe
'404285' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYRL' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
48115c5efdea5c7a002e83865199f341
ecd8856d2d7a306cb4c0aa85f462ffc6ed7c0434
'2011-12-05T21:38:40-05:00'
describe
'404185' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYRM' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
551d4901fea7ded2cd50501a4e2193d9
c50e3ea0a1fc39bc94837cc893caaed56e65e68a
describe
'404284' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYRN' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
2cce847b15ecb3a6dd9915d495444b65
6b1f23c9d4b71ff35409f5aa72fae6bc5f395ca2
describe
'404278' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYRO' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
ab850db83a95fbc990d5f0815a913f80
7e18427c14dd613226ebff8607dcd3da52bae2dc
describe
'404073' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYRP' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
a3cfb7888b2ec367922e4612612c9f45
51323bf08fbfc933267e352c345eae09c9938767
describe
'404260' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYRQ' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
c5857f475f263aabbe35faed6f9f389e
115442cdb65b6c29f6df184e3f14f0292769f35e
'2011-12-05T21:39:38-05:00'
describe
'404254' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYRR' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
51d22ea2a780d7f81f000703e2ba1a98
82717ebcf21a86c2d1eb8243ee043d4ad35e2005
'2011-12-05T21:40:35-05:00'
describe
'404303' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYRS' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
74d4c189e758ce328c58a935ced5c380
58e16f2dbe8d1037e383ca5b6150234d35bd1501
'2011-12-05T21:40:51-05:00'
describe
'404213' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYRT' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
b2fc0f7e5f9895a7ed4f2bd78e2b410b
67f7e53dc6be912db9e9edcb88f59a241f13f2eb
describe
'404170' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYRU' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
87c4acfa89e52c313f13c96b096a728e
0614b66e80e7fd54ea6dc5be0b5ddb2d5967eb51
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYRV' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
3880d094e7f925017a9de0676fe5fc1a
29e5a9889f7101f7c210c48ec22e88ca1fefd865
'2011-12-05T21:39:04-05:00'
describe
'404324' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYRW' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
e3e8dd71b5f451e8e9801b15f1ecd098
cbaa7f38f9604573aa35ccffb066c2f8d324fbf8
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYRX' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
8c86023597e4bc904b8852f036559006
b48eb7e3c44ef5094e2317ea975ffc2d25d0c8cf
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYRY' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
28314abacea012fc855296cfdfbdd22f
9c5c63c3038ae07e14e56f74f0b8de60525a9eeb
describe
'404154' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYRZ' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
523ed42920ce9c570ba58877c4c2a14c
e45be0fecfb1283f6b8138fe72d0cf9763d09f79
'2011-12-05T21:39:20-05:00'
describe
'404311' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYSA' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
adbd1aefaf58cb4ee015002cbefe263a
1a3e89a95537b838173eef983cca6b5497438131
describe
'404184' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYSB' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
9c3b701cb9860ce76c6af92dbb5b7c42
def51ac6227cf646e2cb31d7bafb1fb17eae7b1f
'2011-12-05T21:39:56-05:00'
describe
'404240' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYSC' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
62b8e03b73d3cf82112cf337ad3d83c4
1bc6851684b6eab186945803a988dfcdcebdae34
describe
'404304' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYSD' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
1142a30aecf30b12438cfa2ed24d9203
a99836574e2267c937d42edb6baa937bf9f8a1ae
describe
'404309' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYSE' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
29f5ff622cd31c00acbbf14a5f7a0cf8
c36cab724f8fb972a69f52c52ba83d7b07e267de
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYSF' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
b73d81a3eb81ab6b75544e2a41cde1fd
e98986cfdf1de6329f3a4875e18f723ff5915942
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYSG' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
8a4c441ff84ab8532d78fb6c311edd09
5b4b01c1885c500032ddbac0ae9b99c0aeb26892
describe
'404130' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYSH' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
11f8f1d2d76726abfd2818d74827c29e
f1ca5cf4030781c2d0fbfd9e1ade4bd613650dc2
describe
'404221' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYSI' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
71ac2b5026ae8d28d3cba7335668ed77
1fdc1f2dbb5ccec7cb13f0bd1bff0c23335086a9
describe
'436381' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYSJ' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
79d7109b895598c3fd0f119eff35c717
165fb1a6a9f41550138df59fe2ae191a4c87666f
'2011-12-05T21:39:18-05:00'
describe
'417940' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYSK' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
d5f6dac40e8077d4cbd0bf974b300d24
05851be7620af2c5493c3d6aa2d34e2dee014a68
'2011-12-05T21:38:59-05:00'
describe
'10143692' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYSL' 'sip-files00001.tif'
dbf236e0094f4be4f339fd0466256e70
edc271ca4ff0d12cfcad29f5cf8bad291ab2c9ae
'2011-12-05T21:39:25-05:00'
describe
'10400080' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYSM' 'sip-files00002.tif'
c74a67c3483e4057adfd5fed7130fbdc
f6aa3c39784eb737c3c804be82d4149e59b61c5f
'2011-12-05T21:39:54-05:00'
describe
'9325928' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYSN' 'sip-files00004.tif'
6c235fa94207de83e1ef400cd8103d81
96287066d62cb73627c7a7c8dfe75bf49b3cdf10
'2011-12-05T21:40:41-05:00'
describe
'9720840' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYSO' 'sip-files00007.tif'
3cbe63744a18d292309b260c07a1d7c2
5bcd06e9b8fd9b74d10546746d6eaaa9da1a4849
describe
'9728552' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYSP' 'sip-files00008.tif'
5a4b13066e47f96e8e4c794b436c0826
f0f7a310e33cd8d904d9c3d10ac483f02762a242
'2011-12-05T21:38:53-05:00'
describe
'9723632' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYSQ' 'sip-files00009.tif'
988aba0905fd935f1b9b36d4b200d1aa
7ceb9d2a089dd1fd31e1e3a136fa71701256be66
describe
'9722012' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYSR' 'sip-files00010.tif'
d5e4a864782e4fe7b151750fbdb1ecd9
f652d77d34c39694007b2c083d4a7568e61b441a
'2011-12-05T21:40:30-05:00'
describe
'9727572' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYSS' 'sip-files00011.tif'
d1767d819d42a345ef6e6ec98c8381c4
2ff8df787edf7db8beae48ed4a826f8eb8b44a4d
describe
'9725612' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYST' 'sip-files00012.tif'
3b004b108f49389219497a580ae9da81
35333c7b90bd37bc92a77fa7480a47f4347ab562
describe
'9726304' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYSU' 'sip-files00013.tif'
7363ad6039254e6d1b235460f6df245a
3e486bca1de9cffb6bf00ec476ea065353daf601
describe
'9726108' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYSV' 'sip-files00014.tif'
ad15790d791206c3b32bbdd8e80a5e1a
2548653fde476d872ff57a69fbc72f2b810e7b79
'2011-12-05T21:39:37-05:00'
describe
'9726104' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYSW' 'sip-files00015.tif'
c6ec51f65d8af26dac4a49409651d043
9426af5cdcc4ec11ad1b8289e4d63763c0284cfa
'2011-12-05T21:39:10-05:00'
describe
'9726012' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYSX' 'sip-files00016.tif'
8d53a137c9967a7fcf536fa42f1e994c
8e60678a16747d3635ac4669b76980068bc95df1
describe
'9725648' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYSY' 'sip-files00017.tif'
e3b25f77a7476a7969ea2ba4b9891dda
eb14a75c4c5d426ea02af0c2c441bd88327c88e7
'2011-12-05T21:39:00-05:00'
describe
'9726676' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYSZ' 'sip-files00018.tif'
f7e40567771f55c3ac3272eb47aa7dd0
e2196f1404a3ca3cc9d5e52d377fd63b28f4733d
'2011-12-05T21:40:54-05:00'
describe
'9726468' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYTA' 'sip-files00019.tif'
3b9b128ea5e438d83d95bcc5f1b62aec
1fd06a8e1ea32dd164eccca2a8a54a9c2b1ac1d8
describe
'9725568' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYTB' 'sip-files00020.tif'
7388dbfc524aa333e5d7d6db42965f60
698ff6f0218e16068be8b3be7d2d1d509cf3f446
'2011-12-05T21:39:26-05:00'
describe
'9725640' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYTC' 'sip-files00021.tif'
49fc940f5dbf17f99f4b809a11793302
1a67da1d7ee08f3d89471132d1627a3dda93fe6a
describe
'9726344' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYTD' 'sip-files00022.tif'
fa99b3c0c95c536e5ed8c93223e39241
5e9ea1ba800b82e3b07859e6bd3eed766e3a6585
describe
'9725876' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYTE' 'sip-files00023.tif'
c80ac31d2e4a4a54962dd3e29de69a4b
679c5ac9be547593db29cba0c235dcf0565fa5d4
'2011-12-05T21:38:37-05:00'
describe
'9725780' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYTF' 'sip-files00024.tif'
5cd35663a1cd98299030fbd82b756778
40fe541822a37eff11a2310865b1cb590b93a766
describe
'9725012' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYTG' 'sip-files00025.tif'
eb6ab13d367f6166be51d7a37105b157
66206545b9d987c83ace90abbe591ee8b56cecac
describe
'9724808' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYTH' 'sip-files00026.tif'
5ed6b8616376c369be0cc61a1761e6b0
9dccb73c40e98360c383f1043dc12f1f99cf5cfb
'2011-12-05T21:39:42-05:00'
describe
'9727052' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYTI' 'sip-files00027.tif'
a26256a17762b60d3bac3ba4a2c0f2a9
50b0b56e234fafe3a4a6304f50593941fe7ce583
describe
'9724716' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYTJ' 'sip-files00028.tif'
b4d79d3187f7e46b982c0dd303a57233
fa2ac90384e8dc1b8033e6736d1481059dfb6997
describe
'9725180' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYTK' 'sip-files00029.tif'
9895dbadafbb653fac2c9f37737ab3cb
2abce3cf3ca1321632128fba3e9300197e367312
'2011-12-05T21:39:49-05:00'
describe
'9726124' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYTL' 'sip-files00030.tif'
645e4bfc69f37e9d817789c23ec6224a
98d527d4e34cc28d7e48a640b4786895da663dfa
'2011-12-05T21:38:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYTM' 'sip-files00031.tif'
39cd348274cbdf6723d1ee800202cafb
7055d991dcc049069f8692000ac0f2bb155fd817
'2011-12-05T21:38:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYTN' 'sip-files00032.tif'
a139f8ae2ffaa818755174e1df9441a8
1a6db148d5f4820eb166d69989300c6c09db0b07
'2011-12-05T21:40:37-05:00'
describe
'9725392' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYTO' 'sip-files00033.tif'
bff4b09baae1d726c991bf7a2fe34031
93349a90d959854afa45e638db63f26be22f4da7
describe
'9726176' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYTP' 'sip-files00034.tif'
973f554908b270cacecab9ddf643b66b
d7a2b815cb35d99be99826bc40056fef28c08610
describe
'9724860' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYTQ' 'sip-files00035.tif'
a10d80f3eef5ca82ae820f54cfd42d11
c915d288fc8d9952ed8b1f52eea843defcb11a1e
'2011-12-05T21:39:17-05:00'
describe
'9725252' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYTR' 'sip-files00036.tif'
89a84ff0764694f9dc1097ae1c6cb539
4a835746cbec28d2782d1e587a3fe103eb9bbcf0
'2011-12-05T21:39:09-05:00'
describe
'9725456' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYTS' 'sip-files00037.tif'
ec7e7dbf48daf6dcef23d6611c638754
dc7f427ed2feb2b86a361ba14b0b682a49840482
describe
'9727056' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYTT' 'sip-files00038.tif'
d13770dd6fdcbd85df0f79a69ec03cd3
589a25540365074d8c2d0d855d3013de82051230
describe
'9727212' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYTU' 'sip-files00039.tif'
e6f77c4cecb2c408339a264ddfd83c87
1478e14dd9a6fb5a598bc9c834b837982c4292fd
describe
'9726748' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYTV' 'sip-files00040.tif'
3f81bbf4f9749e6c9ceb31f66e98139d
9f8756b2286ba4ba6a6c590e322abbe10333f1a7
'2011-12-05T21:40:14-05:00'
describe
'9725688' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYTW' 'sip-files00041.tif'
14af15b8275abdf7c8e4080395701678
694fda3648b23671f6dd949a2a756a593493960b
describe
'9725092' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYTX' 'sip-files00042.tif'
1bca59a0086d6df2f30356b6fe4269f0
a7577dc19c57e32c8ba65ef36bd8d7a933eec30c
describe
'9726388' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYTY' 'sip-files00043.tif'
83112498ce24415d0d16f3e951488790
8cbc30508b24103a81080d7a5dac50f57915a3a9
describe
'9725968' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYTZ' 'sip-files00044.tif'
e72128dbd67aee1d5ddaf37d216dd8c5
5917c7e216164f6c261a8e5a25c2ada08ea7b582
'2011-12-05T21:39:22-05:00'
describe
'9725880' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYUA' 'sip-files00045.tif'
088dd43223457b444e7d154a1d2094ab
7d622e8e1a0cf11d580ae71cab4d38e692f24469
'2011-12-05T21:38:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYUB' 'sip-files00046.tif'
e8d891f5796ae02a305d5ee1a4999606
8de9fdbefedebe7df38fdf2f3bd34d691d87bf7f
describe
'9726148' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYUC' 'sip-files00047.tif'
f40b6b45523742db42b1d3caa056de80
4462237b6567235bf13db949841eda03df365f3c
'2011-12-05T21:39:01-05:00'
describe
'9725884' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYUD' 'sip-files00048.tif'
21e0eba6d369df20868ccfa40ea3700a
587192d5f2606944d7b506f7a47f6976c5ccf03d
'2011-12-05T21:39:50-05:00'
describe
'9725428' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYUE' 'sip-files00049.tif'
3cd248dd4c7a872f11982ef2959a5e16
7022db33294c738ca5a0ab500b622433c2a92eee
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYUF' 'sip-files00050.tif'
0ffc7ebffbaf5f01158528197111ec11
bf4fdc9c64df316b3216b7b5f83ae761d336846b
describe
'9726736' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYUG' 'sip-files00051.tif'
779d19deef098ec0fc49a36d775e38e5
55bd0205033b34401cfa811d650ca779a931827c
describe
'9724688' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYUH' 'sip-files00052.tif'
0ec45bca9070984b8b993f1de4bd029c
d4e9098b007e369a813f42ec3ae47421a162a964
'2011-12-05T21:39:31-05:00'
describe
'9725816' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYUI' 'sip-files00053.tif'
8bb27be1e36b385582b968311561c9cd
4d8535f5481300db63c655bbe3bfc17b74b1edd7
describe
'9725860' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYUJ' 'sip-files00054.tif'
0b13a3beee579536b03584ac13c3693b
a99badb3b0f0b9c58de195d90497ef760188a8e1
'2011-12-05T21:40:08-05:00'
describe
'9725724' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYUK' 'sip-files00055.tif'
0cc9897486764e87f74d96a74f6155d2
70331a41ddd34fdda522a946ab3748c684bc136f
describe
'9725920' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYUL' 'sip-files00056.tif'
665b866ca58595fa069290440fb82b7b
453049a5ec6a11868de75478e6af070e2d941391
describe
'9724276' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYUM' 'sip-files00057.tif'
4455469ba32df7ba5d71b9d7c6eaba0d
9f85b2970faec794e248bf18dd99c472c1d5815a
describe
'9724676' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYUN' 'sip-files00058.tif'
d9eb69d3028d4ded34130a4abd8b82dd
fe7764acb34623bb7d1ec772d3a837487acd5085
describe
'10496388' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYUO' 'sip-files00061.tif'
fb2a607950da47b945b3a3407c2a2727
58aca2c2a319e2042236c67d09fb8fe0783a1853
describe
'10058512' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYUP' 'sip-files00062.tif'
d3b6b916dd36ed0809fcb5f7c2b9dde7
01a07308e3dd561afd0006cb1927a9ec60d6d4e8
describe
'512419' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYUQ' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
348e7366e8f54d89a1774a001abf348d
b656ceb965b4ff3e8d5d421a3a142b7e93b9f8ed
describe
'439077' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYUR' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
1992fbcbf5d6505e330c2a24d28bb91a
7c508cb362bc1a910b77df976443a4bc06f13ef4
describe
'405621' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYUS' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
b954e6f26eee990bd7f1d603f66975e9
ef89a3c3900354bbb346a65519235b5e3b423a0a
describe
'251270' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYUT' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
131fe4885f0ad12f1a9f9324d09f1bd3
8c5f376c70fc38493ffcae22f8c93a3564dad7d2
describe
'482607' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYUU' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
6c63cd5a59ed93b8039c29131664dc3b
18b19a0bbf869769b6f06059af0117a09ce26b8a
describe
'353995' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYUV' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
a306cee7f084534a04666c01637fd3d9
0d87d63fa018b2d4b20aa4dee5244af05432ed52
'2011-12-05T21:39:30-05:00'
describe
'303448' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYUW' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
9cb0619ec9d8aeaf2d0a9700981d3ae6
0f52b80d673fd47ce58b7303e7e81f7dca8379f3
describe
'471778' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYUX' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
4a01e09f39367705c08e870587983db5
140cadd0e2d263227cc81f94077b8266bf8dac36
describe
'443566' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYUY' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
4a726412ace9845dca5a9aa862fb98e6
224802e09628e67526a24340b64c2616abe5286b
describe
'452979' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYUZ' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
e903443b3064de00818ad1f21440c3eb
afa6516820c7eaaab175bf79070990432d57e736
describe
'458240' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYVA' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
3502560080483d2de026b34a4f1367f6
45c9e9f968696b30e72cfd58434a386c23606cfc
describe
'450392' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYVB' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
0fc97dd35abe229982fd46ee0c907994
edd517effc4492ab840bd74295dfe38790c908e8
describe
'462695' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYVC' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
7583a443ce152e9a0b89510da5adc1f4
69090d28d76ae984ed1b1f365efa75154f10b87d
describe
'465015' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYVD' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
8055baa2a65bf3f59eec719fde99f47f
caae12e062695a799b5854831960c107d52a02ff
describe
'451358' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYVE' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
856072f49eec3632bda580506980b58b
1e35937d588232098e48d2ab6fb54c1e65107376
describe
'462672' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYVF' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
bd969373ac584d39df8296d648234577
d87a1bca80be3a14aee79a67b87a4e8bcc39a76a
'2011-12-05T21:39:36-05:00'
describe
'447936' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYVG' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
1f85af2a4b9d1d5fa342648e1149c1c2
1bcffdf2d5f2b2b899368dc331649a56ec26dda8
describe
'430146' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYVH' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
0c9783683a414ee8d201376d4d660a34
fb4c6d68b1c594033954c071680c9f325945a5be
describe
'458437' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYVI' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
2afd4f4f24a351f4e0c6db0193f204b6
bf360e7a68c0130add06454ec31c8835a6a4bdea
describe
'460816' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYVJ' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
2ed576df4e9ed4a7ef1326da39956390
9595366a55193120d07e3e0a961336f8bf08d589
describe
'438068' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYVK' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
fcf671445e55fc8c3dc8496f4465b0b8
6c6349ad820a35a2b829d960f35c8e1f1663ed3f
describe
'440380' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYVL' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
41672b221669398a6fdf8466b29f628a
a16bb2dfdfc160a9843457f503d279b5301cbbbc
describe
'401998' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYVM' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
6cd87d971ca8427fe0b5e16842834ea3
349b810efdf1949bd3c8a1c33dd2a0a875ee4e4e
describe
'456964' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYVN' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
31c1733db90995ec8703d55eeb236c40
a226716e85385a6e7296162c49002e5dcf7ce35f
describe
'427866' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYVO' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
175cde84fd2e183151fdac9b6e1419ce
78d02db43d9334d68fb36f52d11aa9fb3c93c555
describe
'429739' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYVP' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
0a709e93564070203b42cd658bcf70f8
b70db91fdb74efae05f6b9dbf58fcc9004cf8f22
'2011-12-05T21:38:51-05:00'
describe
'461666' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYVQ' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
2b91a1733d680ec50a16ee8d421c5224
f635f0d04fa62ec875f095df693d4fa1f8f609d4
describe
'461584' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYVR' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
9e34c72ec3613d5e0a3532c61f0a5ec4
e9bebe73f0712692de1ef9d8809c643fbfc1358a
'2011-12-05T21:40:02-05:00'
describe
'454120' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYVS' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
2de00f78b90466ed268f81d0d3de13a0
2bc24c156bb7c548f4d651ddb6c7b48216bd1c84
describe
'446800' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYVT' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
5b016aec9bec7e2169b00fe8435ed01f
15147fb8c650512c008b46158ea25963b59b621e
'2011-12-05T21:40:07-05:00'
describe
'450577' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYVU' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
a77bed748ca61b00ca65565c8b299bf9
a4ba00bd7984c3871b57ec149072ea5abbf4525e
describe
'430889' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYVV' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
9b8fa68a8eee5eee83cc19738fa405fe
efb7dbed0193faa33bcedf8b96bd0c09130d905f
describe
'442956' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYVW' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
0e740349a68b685045abab2361b776c6
80bca12418cc32db44df59b5f189d7d9927824bc
describe
'444195' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYVX' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
8e99f22062f2a7e77c48a0c12c63ef5c
499415f042540860aa4c58368309039b1bb9b579
describe
'470608' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYVY' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
4994c6bfd14dbbd394b894e1ec799f56
93f3de2fc093aa60a159727ab1fe0f97db7675b0
describe
'478868' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYVZ' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
d436e228897f0635606f3013aa6e5311
81b4899f60ddea538ab3f5eaceee3801aad283c9
describe
'471228' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYWA' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
8cb88e1051a28449143fee69000debae
182676b94ef3156b2f120042aef33f21f078188d
describe
'435090' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYWB' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
f0e26cc0310b3281271350bf6eae45b5
78bc36ed2f559db046cb3892b9787b50d9238a96
describe
'411062' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYWC' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
8f8b6053d190f536b27cc569b4f438e8
bcd0fdaafd6552ed9f20a012bd36186eac13b60d
describe
'456109' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYWD' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
40b0422dabdcf18a213059377ae6f50e
124a4598547d0bb98c0e01102b07a7f0f2d38480
describe
'444241' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYWE' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
b797b3af74c43cf0934cee63b4fda8e0
e7afa6453e2903e2dc575744607b7df0c79bfde8
describe
'453288' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYWF' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
f72248629b60d9fc691a50677ef8311d
b39b19da1b5f0b87efc3018e88d126616a92573a
describe
'435839' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYWG' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
ef3096a7a8358b5a38e58c88b71f37d0
44ce3dff51598050b4a303458f94a4b6ac132ea4
describe
'454316' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYWH' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
faa49c753a39ede71b451393592be263
3fc1c27a6c54a147cce6ef57c31a38d65511b118
describe
'465541' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYWI' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
d43ef3a9bf22b06802bba303bd721c2e
cbc02661990b8c7b76663ea9305540952e127119
describe
'425364' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYWJ' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
9e1af0284e31f234ecf364347afc3fe3
d84235d2cf3efc92e40fd11a1b435a0661824c62
describe
'436628' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYWK' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
af247e8c6ef791ca3f27329f84b47d82
b11d7ab532ee196d87986f0bea3b13a4ad93f15a
describe
'463974' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYWL' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
9caf66c44066b958c53aa57ff11ca03d
7380b253bfff297c09a7d06144de17cdfeda9169
'2011-12-05T21:40:32-05:00'
describe
'425166' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYWM' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
89c5cde83fc5d4f62bb6fe45b8ea1471
b8b647b3527f445b5d5490056fe10cb297977656
describe
'441085' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYWN' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
df1952444a0c263d54720570795de90f
c37b2521019d28d84be1fc4bccef4463ce06f37e
describe
'457177' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYWO' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
eac8805a29823c3b7123dd403a470b7c
50a42644df20a52b1102423021f7c50673034cb9
'2011-12-05T21:40:09-05:00'
describe
'457134' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYWP' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
6cbec1f38567794a0c9537a64ddda0b3
5a5bbc845eaaf975cd4f01b5023554aaaed8bba3
describe
'460510' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYWQ' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
284c30a4f9cc14b83bb36325e05f7880
d92476d631c38d1bced78ef1834011cf05b53f1f
describe
'419338' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYWR' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
5933ad35a31c5c90e741192db1eba4f3
d8bb76b2956100d40fa3e6a0339c2e7d1f3b1ecc
describe
'385155' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYWS' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
8fc8ed88e46a3cb36afe5c461bb74475
e25ce9a9681ae2b7c192b366674fd72f9cbe9b39
describe
'453589' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYWT' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
a954aa74f3eb76b601704919853d065a
5b5496c9aca43c2f09b2dcf57c655d45c64d43c5
describe
'500446' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYWU' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
55493d1823f1c29dfdeaf21a17728747
9905f574cc4ef2c230b3c7dfe6d381165a5114e7
describe
'144625' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYWV' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
44bddad1aab9b542a208016bb02c97ee
2f64ed9a9870b20c7845f23717bcef3ea3e12529
describe
'45994' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYWW' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
21f13fbd4a2578eebccc3b0efbabb4a6
1389f6908f217d83d54f1277633ddd902098b423
describe
'115348' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYWX' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
1ad5734a1d45b47fa5c0d7a030fbf881
745ae29ee3a4f088414e25532f944f7c022fdb08
'2011-12-05T21:39:14-05:00'
describe
'32204' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYWY' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
e7c7798559a66967b323b4325f5b59a1
01854987f5810e1cb879423f0a42e1b86f4a81ef
describe
'31473' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYWZ' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
5b087f27ec0af05fad32bfe6453f275c
bd5ae5b87d8331f672b05bdcd179ba7e70a5380b
describe
'99038' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYXA' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
a5e7c99a228b44664b55c99c2d659b02
4affb8320db9474aa44d4047ba193bb631101ead
describe
'26427' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYXB' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
0545e73f3281b5e274a4615ee1329031
4f323b9ea9709ff5010525a81b8403f187d4ed3e
'2011-12-05T21:38:52-05:00'
describe
'21798' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYXC' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
b81c04fd954ccf3a858de54e6cd7a391
fe878bebdc2da69671492543e23dfc049e9ca0e4
describe
'25802' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYXD' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
ab25c6b4c1e1655bcdef49d9ae17de7e
7887b4bd2301b86d42168259ec8e50215cd3351e
describe
'60227' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYXE' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
70c6af4997ae361a31ca69a8dc10d457
5b1be6368cd87825168383f8164f988db5587462
describe
'17437' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYXF' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
a8b703105cf134fdd39e62adfeb987d2
d3e2d93863ab3e923b8dfb64ed59729cabea5251
describe
'130004' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYXG' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
ebaed04d41998abcc22088dcc6bb1d94
7c18b3af38a723153a0aec85556f50c71599616b
describe
'40324' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYXH' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
79e62393cbdf1565eefdf6f67b6a73c2
e66117a2fd7f4c6e801e5b6addd6441b98763ef1
describe
'91978' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYXI' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
725310d6706a9a4097ec6910cea5dce8
fcb68e308acfde9baf2954d22fbaca53b51d3a3f
describe
'27140' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYXJ' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
c3353ff05344829bb3ac191d6bc7c990
290251d5310addc2ed6a4691507caa59cdfa2aa2
describe
'72566' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYXK' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
eb52f5580d85fd0e85fe31566d939cca
b7332e481560a08524744b5c4cf893a8bb18cd03
describe
'20004' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYXL' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
14e40cc0e9b171b5cffed8754ef6559d
571146366516b173e326da107256bf5a4c591054
describe
'127446' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYXM' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
1f2607e83257d9c37ba99e0fd95b8d53
d4cd1bffc4d3e9a75cf2bcaa41955b58e6836f93
describe
'37837' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYXN' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
5144ff5741accf286160581d4943de1b
a8954c300dfdeb48fbd326564c26e05389f94990
describe
'117127' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYXO' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
90d6550775e6865cc43560b0eb1d2327
7ecbbf78643e509d72b4f19dd9891c47e42af1bb
describe
'33194' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYXP' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
a79400c8ade185a1200cb3bddfbd7001
7920d1972bc35d545b517c3581f92f61ec905109
describe
'121125' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYXQ' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
5838aa198201ddbb1f995d9d3fe57b8d
a68c20f583e60f69c1cf8cc98540510979c07c1d
describe
'34894' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYXR' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
9e567bd582db316f1d267f7a37fa43ca
f8bcc1173032de1d1fd19e0755322b3f0138bfa9
describe
'121229' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYXS' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
b20495b3a70920d8d1727a3758883ea8
ed3b506b523a62f1176277a08c5aa130ac50af76
describe
'34755' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYXT' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
13be4286dfa611875e7c074b47227ee8
72fd55452d0d382974ad522dc17ae067ca18f5c2
describe
'119923' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYXU' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
dd6d558452897bcfeedc45f4d4f492a4
a56979ddd72e4cac4a0412e0c833dbab8c57c39b
describe
'34605' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYXV' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
a6a1c041482ed934abfcb60941898b5a
5613a1aacc5a00c7ccfcfad9e406726724a2ed55
describe
'120733' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYXW' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
87e0a3f3ea3128cc7b802234ba54777d
6fa2c6bdb382d7386be752f83c42d4e55b8c3373
describe
'33838' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYXX' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
4ffc3b746c7ce6f0f5a8577ba383093e
6ce96d79bd218912c24889097502efc8456e65a7
describe
'122195' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYXY' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
b7b49ce9fc88088207163f0727cdaf0a
d2eec7fe2ed85f0c68d7366ed297b6dbb44718e6
describe
'33240' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYXZ' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
24d859b1c9f717c1c48deffb87ce9d7e
3839e2e6b27aa0e782702c9f9efab406d991f885
describe
'121734' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYYA' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
9c004ac7681449415f71220004fdaa4b
4377343af1da4fa204d61b916687000ab1bc389c
describe
'36185' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYYB' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
675dc035d7de7ea20e98114221d008ed
e87d311856aa0eb8bfc23413ad5e2a4695377f1e
describe
'123408' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYYC' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
f6cca1e4cf4f960c52aabdde7c89c198
b5b810481e4e730584fda29bc907b7086139a847
describe
'36072' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYYD' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
8e3371a46909fc4e07e58a38f3cc0dbf
3f178227a6b026043123346e7bfc4402c65f44ca
'2011-12-05T21:39:41-05:00'
describe
'117438' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYYE' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
3c9a90e8cdc6d9b45e162fc84012f4d2
502df9a4a0e07fff09e71001f110858ea9dac029
describe
'32714' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYYF' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
ca8a299a2262e47417e1c8d55ba14ecf
92f427b8c5cc0e293af0a441b7f89266d2b0ec21
describe
'112852' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYYG' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
92388120dd59328727c7e53e7e9471a7
f90d4b2a5f795551deda0e2b1bfe41556b2ff134
'2011-12-05T21:40:03-05:00'
describe
'32808' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYYH' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
65bcde48ee2fa59832426d260b475fa8
96ece47353e19c5db3c596394ffd5599e22b99e2
describe
'120718' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYYI' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
00ec348c452088fa834520d0849ea2a8
504bc667c76884697feb793866536a65c16afafa
describe
'35425' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYYJ' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
4353faa56c67450e83d12e6ecf49f1db
9baaa77b337974a56afce36a022fad0fb8fd2535
describe
'121023' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYYK' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
ce8b27e629f3ec936545343df34595ce
542ac77c44cdcd4b5eb97fd17e3d562d4cd28017
describe
'34657' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYYL' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
800930a488b7e6631d6c244ae006bb13
b365e2854e067c5d89898dff228e26891a1a6bb4
describe
'114704' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYYM' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
b735a11bdbd44388301f46625fc716ad
8b58dace3e70e1284e4455ddf4ac50510b506ae1
describe
'32922' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYYN' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
71a8236235c027349c03bcce80e92ab5
65d732bb237d17846fb07bd1a0bc07732edc58d9
describe
'114735' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYYO' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
554acad7c2a04edc6b126ae098e1f4bd
84ec8b4d753a5c84020316355c0b424d1d6ad1a4
describe
'31311' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYYP' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
0353e23f3ce07a4ab8ead7e84deaf3d8
d83d88cb114caa2ad76ab18a909a0e765dd7898e
describe
'102634' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYYQ' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
e0192ac4367ae4cf14c8b7ce8beebf4a
7de956c2747cc0434328850c212177b86c674121
describe
'30223' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYYR' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
d4a7dff2eb7c65a4204b8ebd824dfd9d
b07dd5857b578106d189b5cf36e4c9803920fbb0
describe
'122673' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYYS' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
d09033695edf7ad702fa9cf953c6017d
5788ef5fbd06bcac938049a9f466b86c8b89d78f
describe
'36692' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYYT' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
995262169f0c21b68ea0bf6b216a2e89
1fb80c046e4ab2045ad4fe319d148b2dabe76053
describe
'111467' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYYU' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
939363f0228d925dcd8aab69e1524d50
bf9d98350eda9519ecbfe25c2ffeaca0de00cb8c
describe
'30908' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYYV' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
bfc31ce308105d6c51f0a57be901921e
b03b39e7d2404cb08b2891c85016518ed216ff40
describe
'113036' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYYW' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
f4741f0df118417148274bc2252242ae
4914131e4ccb3659386a61b63aeb73d71bd2bc4d
describe
'31735' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYYX' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
d1e985a1fb8850609c901de99817a76d
45bbc988233f8a93e1b0e88ee6bfb8ca2555cc80
describe
'120652' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYYY' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
7a08a4ecf235cf620a8ea8a38b049840
6b0ba9acbab039b22587aca36dc2af0fe3227793
describe
'35280' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYYZ' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
161431c8c9c84f8e98287e9dd257c9b3
a0d07e306c60aa0e756045a8e2282640174f18b4
describe
'121527' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYZA' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
cb1e0b6c7f5a27de9995e9f6790c4fdc
a22bf1cef2c255ffe0eea3736533f26fca13af15
describe
'33275' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYZB' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
796f287ef7d3f01a9edd52c72d0eb6c2
444f93e97c89022608248bca3fe807ad034224e3
describe
'118421' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYZC' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
95bc7d562e0ca78b58b1f2aeeb2ff1c5
aed288c8a0986b40ee3d3b23c55f61114598e6af
describe
'32864' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYZD' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
0afc7dbfe61fc057419e9446eae0b77e
326f5dcab4b47a4ec651aa0da59b8cb936324e7e
describe
'116596' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYZE' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
b2db923d4d7654beac0b862d5e84ce84
a93539476e5f220b2a29d364e6725a6402ff5540
describe
'32766' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYZF' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
eeaf8d5000859a068b18525c544c0170
78ed5e26aa1911915a93139088be0393410ff60b
describe
'119138' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYZG' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
31145ccd0f2a5aaadee2891a7f33f593
c7f0bd7de4972f549d0b3aa3010fd9531c9f0bb7
describe
'35101' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYZH' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
da05d58506c4cdc258bab2629461cd0d
f39489d40824dcf151580a96a314099c46777262
describe
'110669' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYZI' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
8ed444b572ee7f2b2001910054d3af75
65fc024ebcb1f79511ab9c1df0c19c6d45c4e1c9
describe
'31942' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYZJ' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
94e6df59772ec6c514efdfb8f074e9d8
5fc10d1df0c5a8a9c3a7fa2c40d6eef1508abef7
'2011-12-05T21:40:53-05:00'
describe
'114948' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYZK' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
ae49f4e301f3a5ade19bb9fed6e71cfb
aa0e42c78c4fb497a63964e16ee8e7346aba945e
describe
'31867' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYZL' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
b45df4c11b3342868db9d062fa7f5c16
19ade9ad83c8cfcfddd88aed3e3dfab5fbe0a4c7
describe
'116952' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYZM' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
692332d1821d61939a175025045cd3cc
02466baaa0028ad0eea315f23abc61291d724e83
describe
'32456' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYZN' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
1e21e280dc8b2948fadbf805c2d88058
eb68402f5d21efc54be6f258498b6edb9e9c42c6
describe
'125364' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYZO' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
bdbbe29b05f7f0beb51b7c7be89885b7
51fbfae351c62408d104bf81628cfa483ae9fb26
describe
'36279' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYZP' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
14db3a4f9702697288bb35fb88dff9b6
0adb867c3a3282f3a179672989f213e9945ec72c
describe
'128630' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYZQ' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
1d1f17965f0882fc8382683ab7185836
918f8f564de988e71a2d2038f7727d4ffe05540c
describe
'37383' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYZR' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
5388e6811b0882505de4e3bd08fe587e
f5d7936659f2593824f2615b39db686d6e8fb9ef
describe
'123636' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYZS' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
4b983aebaaa0760cb0595bde1b63a4a8
d638ca28be93ac304a00d2a4a821a0ece441d034
describe
'35593' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYZT' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
24865f847fcf89ce2993da79fbe34b72
1e56721d16df2f0b592702dd7c99cffa3552d5c9
describe
'114130' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYZU' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
d3c1656549f49900db40a7402d32fb12
c060a904127b2f371bde699f808d60bca82f8f09
describe
'33159' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYZV' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
0b881170cfaf1bcdf4d15eef96eeda34
9205cda6c24c53996209ebf3852395099bdf076e
describe
'106904' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYZW' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
3fba4074fdb73dec297f85511e9c73b5
94fc371ef49278df6514299d54b29a924b30977c
describe
'31481' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYZX' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
5daf4e014bf4bba9b502902a33196979
8fd8306f0355b654f25d0725cb432ce123fc08b3
describe
'121231' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYZY' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
85d9b0efed1e26f13122a7efad224e7e
1c61279c601b348b0f704d4430b20c738f420d62
'2011-12-05T21:40:48-05:00'
describe
'36050' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABYZZ' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
d85e6fe44af106a05011dcbabae50695
b8758fed21fd071fee7871893dc7eabf89528b54
describe
'117306' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABZAA' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
0fb47fcf11dfa7f07307457bec98a62f
4159a066f76dc122211b64952c8cc68243b7caac
describe
'33222' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABZAB' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
97479e0dba3d145f94a9360b0acd689e
6648e38eba7a3ed40747d6c34d260f2d61bc6e9a
describe
'119322' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABZAC' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
0468f540bda3267e557344780431a57e
36a5c1cd4110968fe1d75ebd136d94e0bed1d96f
describe
'33469' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABZAD' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
806950457435ee6577058e2bad5bf3cd
13fd0781a712f7468c308a8b88878c9669c529a9
describe
'113270' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABZAE' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
c4a715c8bc0dea32158efb74e9f2b71e
294bbe9bd91d6868ed7e363ff5e55743d9a0c63d
describe
'33467' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABZAF' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
8abcf24ab28a2d2c84ac8da397fef7df
c60d201650bc2fd6c75ea8f37ce35c71aed1e83a
describe
'120089' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABZAG' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
c5703cfff1e7d0a1729acd1ff9494e57
63e621d120ba10ebb7a0e2bace30d736561d35b7
describe
'34831' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABRBfileF20080430_AABZAH' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
3a9ddb4c59ad73304bde3d366633dd0e
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Fairy PRINCESSES

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SNOW Wil Ce: CHE SLEEPING BEAU GY- CINDERELEA

THE OLD STORIES (LLUSTRATED BY

Caroline Paterson



LONDON

MARCUS WARD & CO LIMITED
BELFAST AND NEW YORK
Of three princesses famed in days of yore
The history again we would unfold;
Come. children, then, and search our fairy store,
Nor weary of the tales so often told.
Snow-White, the peerless fair, we here behold,
Who sank in death-swoon spellbound on the floor,
Type of our earth that dies in Winter’s cold,
And with the Sun’s kiss wakes to life once more;
The Sleeping Beauty too, who, wounded sore
By the charmed spindle which she touched, too bold,
Slept in her home within the thicket hoar,
Dreaming until a hundred years grew old;
And last the maid, who, cast in gentle mould,
All uncomplaining, scoffs and burdens bore,
Sweet Cinderella, with the tresses gold,
Whose dainty foot the famous slipper wore.

Exiza Kerary.
flakes fell down like feathers from the sky, a
@| queen sat at the window of her boudoir in the
=a palace, working at her embroidery, which was in
a black ebony frame. As she sewed, she pricked her finger,
and three drops of blood fell upon the white ermine trim-
ming of her dress. The queen looked at the red blood
and at the white snow outside, and she said to herself, “If |
only I had a dear little child as white as snow, as red ;
as blood, and as black as my ebony embroidery frame !”
Soon after this she had a little daughter, whose skin
was as white as snow, whose cheeks and lips were rosy-red,

and whose hair and eyes were as black as ebony. This fo
N


ag

) little girl was called the Princess Snow-White.
After the princess was born, the queen died,
and the king married another wife.

The new queen was very beautiful, but so
proud of her beauty that she could not bear
to hear anyone called beautiful but herself.
She had a wonderful looking-glass. When she
stood before it, and looked at herself in it, she
used to say—

“ Mirror, mirror on-the wall,
Who is fairest of us all?”

And the mirror answered her—

“ Lady queen, lady queen,
Thou art fairest to be seen.”

Then she was content, for she knew

that the mirror spoke the truth.
Snow- White, however, grew

from a baby to a little girl, and

became more and more beauti-

ful every day. It would

seem as if each hour brought

her some newer beauty and

grace; and she was as good

of heart as she was fair

of face. When she was

seven years old she was

more beautiful than (

the queen herself.


Once, when the queen in-
quired of the glass—

“ Mirror, mirror.on the wall,
Who is fairest of us all?”

it answered her—

“ Lady queen, lady queen,
Snow-White is fairest to be seen.”

Then the queen was fright- —
ened, and full of envy, and
from that hour she hated
the little princess. And her
hatred grew so strong, that
she had no rest by night or
by day. At last she called
one of the king’s huntsmen
to her, and said, “ Take the
child away into the woods
and kill her. I will not
have her before my eyes
any more.” The huntsman
dared not refuse; he took
her away, but when he drew
out his hunting knife, and
was going to pierce Snow-
White’s innocent heart, she
began to cry, and said—
“Dear huntsman, do not kill
me. [{ will run about in
the woods, and never come


home again.” And because she was so beautiful, the hunts-
man had pity on her and spared her life, and said, “ Run
away, my poor child.”
Now Snow-White was alone in the forest, and she was
very much afraid. She ran over the stones and through
: my the brambles, and the
wild animals sprang out
at her, but they did not
hurt her. She wan-
dered on as long as
her feet would carry
her, until evening drew
near, and then she saw
a little house, and went
into it to rest.
Everything was very
small in that tiny little
house, but very neat
and very pretty, pret-
tier than words can
tell. There was a table
covered with a white
cloth; on the table were
seven little plates, and
— seven little drinking
cups, and seven little knives and forks and spoons; and
seven little chairs were placed round the table. Seven
little candlesticks with candles in them stood on the
chimney-piece. We can only count five candlesticks in
the picture, but that is because we do not see the


whole of the chimney-piece. There were seven little
beds against the wall opposite the window, all of which
had neat white coverlets; the beds were all made, and
the bed-clothes turned down, ready for use. Snow-White
was very hungry and very thirsty, so she ate a piece of
bread from each plate, and drank a drop of wine from
each little cup. Then, as she was also very tired, she

lay down on one of the beds. It did not suit her, how-
ever; none of the beds seemed to please her; one was
too long, and another was too short, and another was too
hard, and another was too soft, and so on. She tried
them all, one after another, until she came to the seventh,
and that was just right for her, so she lay down on it
and fell fast asleep.


When it was dark, the masters of the house came home.
These were seven dwarfs, who dug in the mountains all day
for treasure. They lit their seven candles when they came
in, and then they saw that some one had been in the house.
The first dwarf said, “ Who has been sitting in my chair ?”
The second of them said, “ Who has been eating from my
plate?” The third dwarf said, “Who has taken some of































































































































my bread?” ‘The fourth said, ‘“ Who has been drinking out
of my little cup?” The fifth said, “ Who has used my little
fork ?” The sixth said, “Who has been cutting with my
little knife ?” The seventh said, ‘Who is this lying upon
my bed?” Then the others all came crowding up to him,
bringing their candles with them. They held their candles
up so that the light fell upon Snow-White, and when they
saw her, the whole seven cried out with one voice, “ What


a pretty little maid!” The good dwarfs were so much
pleased with her that they allowed her to remain sleeping
where she was, and the seventh dwarf, to whom belonged
the bed which she had chosen, spent the night with his
companions, sleeping one hour in each of the other little
beds until the morning.

When Snow-White awoke and saw the dwarfs, she felt
rather frightened ; but they spoke kindly to her, asking her
name, and where she came from. Then Snow-White told
them how cruel her step-mother had been to her, and how
the huntsman had been going to kill her, and how she had
wandered about alone in the shady forest the whole day.
and had at last come to their house. ‘ Well,” answered
the dwarfs, “if you can make yourself useful, you
may stay here and live with us, and we will protect you.
Can you make our beds, and cook our supper, and wash
our clothes, and knit our stockings, and keep all our little
things clean and tidy ?” And Snow-White said she could.
So it was settled that the little maiden should be sister to
the seven dwarfs, and live with them.

Every morning, as soon as it was daylight, the dwarfs
went out to the mountain to dig for treasure, and they never
came home again till after sunset, so the whole day the
child was alone. When setting out in the morning, they
always said to Snow-White, “Let no one come in whilst
we are away.” And Snow-White always locked the door
after they were gone.

All this time the queen supposed that Snow-White was
dead. But one day this vain and wicked woman stood
before her mirror admiring herself, and said as before—


‘« Mirror, mirror on the wall,
Who is fairest of us all?”

Then the mirror made
answer—

“Thou art the fairest, lady
queen,
In the king’s country to be
seen ;
But in the dwarfs’ home,
dwelling there,
Snow-White is many times
more fair.”

The queen saw then that
the huntsman had not
obeyed her, and that

Snow-White was still liv-
ing. She thought of no-
thing after this but of
how she might kill the
princess, for she could
not bear that there should
be anyone more beautiful
than herself. At last she
thought of a plan. She
dyed her face, and dressed
herself like an old pedlar-
woman, so that no one
could recognise her, took
a basket of laces and other
pretty things, and went


over the mountain to the
house of the seven dwarfs, »
When she got there, she
knocked at the door and
cried, “ Good wares to sell,
cheap, cheap.” Snow-
White looked from the
window and said, ‘‘ Good
day, my good woman ;
what have you got in
your basket?” ‘Stay-
laces,” answered the ped-
lar-woman, and she held
one up which was woven
of coloured silk, and was
very pretty to look at.
“Child,” said the woman,
“you look very untidy ;
let me lace your dress
with the pretty lace.” And
Snow-White, who feared
nothing, came out, and let
her do as she said. But
the old woman laced so
tightly, that Snow-White
could not breathe, and fell
down as if she was dead.
The pedlar-woman has-
tened away, and not long
afterwards the dwarfs


came home. Oh! how frightened they were when they
saw Snow-White lying on the ground! They saw that
she had fainted away because she was too tightly laced,
so they cut the lace, and Snow-White began to breathe,
and by-and-by she was well again. When the dwarts heard
what had happened, they said, “The pedlar-woman must
have been your wicked step-mother. Take care, Snow-
White, and open the door to zo one again whilst we are away.”
As soon as the queen got back to the palace, she stood
before her mirror and said—
fs Mirror, mirror on the wall,
Who is fairest of us all ?”
and it answered—

“ Thou art the fairest, lady queen,
In the king’s country to be seen ;
But in the dwarfs’ home, dwelling there,
Snow-White is many times more fair.”

Then she knew that Snow-White had come to life again,
and she felt as unhappy as she had been before. ‘Snow-
White shall die,” she said to herself. So she prepared a
poisoned apple, beautiful to look at. Any one seeing that
apple would certainly wish to eat it, but whoever ate it
would be sure to die. The queen dyed her face, and
disguised herself as a peasant woman, and went again over
the mountain. When she got to the dwarfs’ house, she
knocked at the door, and Snow-White looked out from the
window. “I may not let any one come in,” said she, “the
dwarfs have forbidden it.” “Very well,” answered the
peasant woman, “I don’t wish to come in; I only want to
get rid of my apples. Here, I will give one to you,” and


she held up the beautiful poisoned apple, which looked so
tempting that Snow-White longed to taste it. She stretched
out her hand, and took the apple from the woman, and ate
a little piece; but no sooner had she attempted to swallow
it than she fell down dead on the ground. Then the wicked
queen laughed aloud and said—‘ White as snow, red as
blood, black as ebony! this time the dwarfs cannot bring
you to life again.” When she got home, she stood before
her mirror and said—

“ Mirror, mirror on the wall,

Who is fairest of us all?”

And at last the mirror answered as she wished it to do—

“ Lady queen, lady queen,
Thou art fairest to be seen.”




When the dwarfs came home in the evening, they found
Snow-White lying cold and stiff upon the floor of their
room. ‘They raised her up, unlaced her dress, and bathed
her face; but all was of no use, she never moved or breathed
—she was dead. Now Snow-White looked as beautiful as
if she were still alive. The dwarfs said, “We cannot
put her under the ground;” so they made a glass coffin
and placed her inside, so that they could always see
her, and they wrote upon the coffin in golden letters—
“A King’s-Daughter.” Then they carried the coffin to the
top of the mountain, and they took turns in watching beside


|
MY it. By-and-by an owl came to mourn for her, then a raven,
and last of alla dove. Snow-White lay there as if asleep,
and the colour never left her cheeks or her lips.

One day it happened that a king’s son rode through the
wood, and saw the coffin on the mountain, with Snow-
White lying inside. He read what was written upon it
in golden letters, and he begged the dwarfs to give
the coffin to him, offering to give them in exchange for it
anything that they liked to ask. But the dwarfs said they
would not part with Snow-White for all the gold in the
world. Then the king’s son said again, “ Give the coffin to
me, and I will guard it as my dearest treasure.” When he
said this, the good little dwarfs had pity on him, and they
let him take the coffin away. He directed his servants


to carry it on their shoulders, and then he set off home-
wards through the wood. On the way, it chanced that the
servants who were charged with this precious burden
stumbled and jolted the coffin, and the piece of poisoned
apple which Snow-White had attempted to swallow was
shaken out of her throat. Immediately she sat up and
began to look about her, and exclaimed, ‘Where am I ?”
The king’s son was full of joy. ‘“ You are with me,” he
answered; then he knelt beside her, took her hand
and kissed it, and told her of all that had happened, and
that he loved her better than any one in the world. “Come

ah Dp AM

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with me,” he said, “to my father’s castle, and be my bride.”
And Snow-White was not unwilling to go, for she thought
kindly of the handsome prince.

The king welcomed Snow-White to his kingdom, and
gave orders that great preparations should be made to
celebrate her marriage with his son. {nvitations were
sent to the kings and queens in all the countries near.
Amongst others, Snow-White’s wicked step-mother was
asked to the wedding feast. When she had dressed
herself in her finest clothes, and was ready to set off, she
stood before her mirror and said once more—

“ Mirror, mirror on the wall,
Who is fairest of us all?”
and the mirror answered—

“Thou art fairest, lady queen,

In ¢his kingdom to be seen ;

But waiting in the Bridal Hall,

The Bride is fairest of us all.”
Then the queen was so angry she did not know what to do.
She thought at first she would not go to the feast, but
she could not help wishing to see the bride who was
said to be so wonderfully beautiful. Accordingly she went
to the Bridal Hall, where all the other guests were fast
arriving. When she got there, she saw Snow-White
in her bridal dress, looking more lovely than can be
imagined. The heart of the wicked step-mother fell
within her, and she turned to leave the place, for she
could not bear to look upon Snow-White. But “dancing
shoes” had been prepared for her, which she was obliged to
put on; and then—you know what happens to those who


are obliged to wear such shoes against their will. She
could never stop dancing any more, but went on and on,
dancing over the hills, and through the woods, and along the
sea-shore—away, and away, and away; and she never came
again to the country where Snow-White and her handsome
husband lived happily together for the rest of their lives.

‘Go look in any glass, and say
What moral is in being fair.”




NCE upon a time there lived a king and queen
who possessed almost every good thing you can
think of, and yet they were not happy ; for they
had no child.
“If only we had a child,’ they used to say to one
another several times every day.
At last it happened that one hot summer evening the
queen sat alone by the side of the lake near which the


royal palace stood, and as she sat there, she listened to
the croaking of the frogs in the water. ‘There are

many families of little frogs below in the lake,” said she
to herself; “but in the palace we have not even one
little child.”

Then a frog came up from the water on to the land,
and hopped to her side, and said to her, “ Before summer
comes round again, you will have a little daughter.”

The queen went home feeling very happy after the frog
had said this, and by-and-by it came to pass as he had told
her. The queen had a daughter, and the king was so
much delighted, that he gave a great feast to celebrate
the christening of the child.

He asked all his own relations, and all the relations
of the queen, to come to it, and all the great lords and
ladies of the land; and, besides these, he invited the
wise women, as they were called—that is to say, the fairies


who lived in his dominions—that they might be god-
mothers to the little princess, and bestow beautiful gifts

upon her.

There were thirteen fairies living in that country,
and the king ought to have invited them all to the
feast; but as he had only got twelve golden plates,
he only asked twelve fairies to come; he was afraid to
put a china plate, or even a silver one, before a fairy
god-mother. Thus it happened that one of the wise
women was not invited, but she came all the same, and
very angry.

; The fairy god-mothers came to the feast, flying through
the air. You can see most of them in the pictures above,
and you will easily judge which is the angry one. The
banquet was a very sumptuous one. When it was over, the
god-mothers came up one by one to the throne, on which
the queen sat with her little daughter in her arms, and,


kneeling before the throne, each endowed the child with
some gift. The first fairy gave her beauty; the second
said that she should be as sweet-tempered as an angel;
the third said-she should sing like a nightingale; the


fourth said she should dance like a leaf on a tree; the
fifth said she should be as wise as a sage; the sixth said she
should be modest; the seventh gave her cheerfulness; the
eighth gave her wit; the ninth said she should be generous ;
the tenth said that every one should love her; the eleventh
gave her riches. But just as the eleventh fairy had spoken,
the door of the banqueting-room suddenly burst open,
and the fairy god-mother who had zo¢ been asked to come
entered with a sullen face. She had hovered behind the
others, and now glided up the hall without looking at any-
body. She pointed her wand towards the baby, and cried
with a loud voice, “ When the princess is fifteen years old,
she shall prick herself with a spindle, and fall down dead.”
Then she turned and left the room.

As soon as she was gone, the twelfth god-mother, who

had not yet spoken, came forward and knelt before the

queen and her child, and said, “The princess shall not
die; but when the spindle pricks her finger she shall fall
asleep, and sleep for one hundred years.”

The king, however, hoped to save his little daughter from
the misfortune of being pricked by a spindle, and having
to sleep for a hundred years. So he made a decree that
very day, that all the spindles throughout his dominions
should be immediately burnt. After this, his mind, and
that of the queen, his wife, were at rest on account of the
princess.

Every day the child grew to be more _ beautiful,
more witty, more graceful, and more wise, and became
everything that the hearts of her parents could desire.
Everyone who saw her loved her, and everyone who heard
of her wished to see the charming princess
who had been so richly endowed by her
fairy god-mothers.

At last the time came when she had
attained her fifteenth year, and one after-
_ noon, when the king and queen were gone
out for a long drive, it happened that the
princess was left quite alone to amuse
herself. With the restlessness which falls
upon the mind when there is nothing to
do, and when we are left alone, she started
up from her chair. ‘What shall I do,”
she said to herself, “till my dear father
and mother return?” She gazed from
the window at the trees. There was
nothing to please her in the garden, ,
(ey

galleries and tapestried sit-
ting-rooms, and ° peeped
into all the odd nooks
and crannies, and at last
she climbed a long,
winding turret-stair-

for she had seen it all before. She

left the windowand begantowander {¢0
about. She went from one room

of the palace to another to look

about her, and she saw every-

thing that was to be seen. /
She walked through the state !
rooms, and the long picture












case, and at the top of the staircase she saw a wooden door,
with a little rusty key sticking in the lock. The princess
turned the key, and the door opened, and she went into
the room, and there she found an old woman diligently
spinning flax. ‘Good morning,” said the princess to the
old woman. “What are you doing?” “I am spinning,”
answered the old woman, and she nodded her head as she
spoke, but she did not look up from her work for a moment.
“Spinning,” said the princess; “what a wonderful thing !
What is this beautiful soft thing you are making into such
fine shiny threads?” “That is flax,” said the old woman.
“Ttis like your own beautiful hair, and once it grew in
the fields and had pretty

- flowers on it, as blue

as the bright jewelled

band on your own

locks.” “Will you teach

me how to spin? I

should so like to be

able to spin flax like

you,” said the princess.

Then the old woman

showed the girl how

she worked her foot

up and down on the .

treadle, and thus made

the wheel go round:

how the band on the

wheel went round, and

how the spindle was


kept in motion. Then the princess asked to be allowed
to examine the wonderful spindle. This was exactly what
the old woman (who was the wicked fairy in disguise) wanted

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her todo. “Let me hold it in my hand,” said the princess.

So saying, she took the spindle from the old woman; but

no sooner had she touched it than she pricked her finger (|
a
with it, and immediately she fell back on a bed that stood
in the room, and lay there in a deep sleep.

The fairy who had brought this about was the kind
twelfth god-mother of the princess, and now she had saved
her from death at the hands of the wicked old woman.
See the lovely “Sleeping Beauty” on her enchanted bed,
where she must lie for a hundred years.



“She sleeps: her breathings are not heard
In palace chambers far apart ;
The fragrant tresses are not stirred,

That lie upon her charméd heart.
* ¥ * * ¥ *

She sleeps, nor dreams, but ever dwells
A perfect form in perfect rest.”
Then everybody in the castle fell asleep too. The king
and queen had come in from their drive, and were sitting
on their thrones in the great hall, and they fell asleep; all
the lords and ladies-in-waiting fell asleep around them; the
footmen fell asleep, and the housemaids; the cook, who was
just going to box the ears of the scullion, fell asleep with her
ladle in her hand; the horses fell asleep in their stalls; the
dogs fell asleep in the yard ; the pigeons on the roof put their
heads under their wings and fell asleep also. Even the

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flies upon the walls
stood stock still, and
fell asleep, each one in
his place; the fire on
the hearth ceased to
flicker, and the meat
left off being roasted.
The wind was hushed,
and blew no more out-
side the castle; not a
leaf stirred upon the
trees that grew around
it; everything was per-
fectly still) Every per-
son and every thing
fell asleep, for an evil
enchantment had ©
fallen upon the
place, and all

that belonged


Years passed on, and by degrees a hedge of thorns
grew up around the castle, until at last it was quite hidden,
and nothing could be seen above the hedge but the
weathercock at the top of the tower. Still, the people
of the country used to speak of the beautiful princess
who was lying there asleep, and from time to time many
kings’ sons tried to get to the castle through the thorny
screen that guarded it.

Not one of them succeeded, however; for as soon as
they pushed their way into the hedge the thorns stuck into
them, and held them fast, so that they could neither go
on nor get-out again, and they all died miserably there.
Not even the sun could beat
through the thick thorns, and
the world was in every way shut
out from the wonderful sight
within.

At last the hundred years
were all gone but one day,
when it happened that a prince
who was riding through that
country fell into conversation
with an old countryman, who
told him that not far off there
was an enchanted castle sur-
rounded by a hedge of thorns,
and that inside the castle a
beautiful princess had lain asleep
for one hundred years, and that
he had heard his grandfather say _


many a king’s son had
met his death in trying
to reach the place where
she lay.

When the prince had
heard all that the old
man had to say, he de-
termined that he would
try to get through the
thorn hedge and reach
the beautiful princess,
and he told the old man
what he was resolved to
do. The countryman
begged him not to make
the attempt, telling him
that he would be sure
to die as the others had
done.

“JT am not in the
least afraid,” answered
the prince, and then he
turned his horse’s head
in the direction of the
castle. He rode towards
it with might and main,
and very soon he could
just see the weathercock
peeping up above. the
trees.


So the prince rode
on until he came to the .
thorn hedge; then he
alighted from his horse,
and began to force his
way in amongst the
thorns. Immediately, as
the prince approached,
the thorns all turned into
beautiful large flowers,
which bent their heads
before him, and turned
aside and opened a way
for him to go; and as
he passed, the flowers
closed round him behind,
and so he went on.

When the prince had
got safely through the
hedge, he came to the
castle yard, and there he
saw the dogs lying fast
asleep, and in the stables
the horses asleep, and
on the roof the pigeons
asleep, with their heads
under their wings. In-
side the castle it was
just the same. As he
opened the door to go


in, he saw at once that even the flies were asleep on the
walls, and everything was so still, he could hear himself
breathing as he walked. He passed through the kitchens
first, and there he saw the cook with her hand raised ready
to box the scullion’s ears. In the hall and the state-rooms
the courtiers were all fast asleep, sitting or standing just
in the same place that they were in one hundred years ago,
when the magic sleep fell upon them. The king and the
queen still slept upon their thrones. The prince walked
on—it was like passing through some place of death—and
at last he came to the winding turret-staircase; he went up
round and round to the very top, and came to the wooden


door with the little rusty key in it, and he opened the door
and went into the room, and there on the bed lay the beauti-
ful princess who had not
moved for one hundred
years. She looked so
beautiful in her charmed ~
sleep, that the prince could
not look away from her
again, but he stooped and
kissed her, when imme-
diately
“The charm was snapt,

There was a noise of striking

clocks,
And feet that ran, and doors that

clapt,
And barking dogs and crowing

cocks.”

The princess opened
her eyes; and she seemed
quite as much pleased to
see the prince as he was
to-see here oNe Sot up
from the bed, and put her
hand in his, and they went
down the winding stairs
together, hand-in-hand.

The king and queen,
and all the courtiers,
looked up from their


T=

sleep, just as if they were awaking from a short afternoon
nap. The horses shook themselves in their stables, and
felt quite ready for a gallop; the dogs began to bark; the
pigeons drew their heads from under their wings, and cooed
softly in the sunshine; the flies on the walls crept on
towards where they had intended to go a hundred years
before; the kitchen fire blazed up, and the meat went on
being roasted; and the cook boxed the scullion’s ears,

By-and-by, the prince and princess were married, and
lived happily together for the rest of their lives.


good woman for his wife; he had also one little
daughter. When the child was still young, the
wife was taken ill; and as she felt that she was
about to die, she called her little daughter to her, and said,
“Dear child, be good and pious all your life, and you
will be protected and happy.” After saying this, she died.


The little girl wept for the loss of her mother; but she
remembered what she had said, and was always good
and gentle. When a year had passed, the father took
another wife, who brought with her to her new home two
daughters of her own, who were neither good nor beautiful.
After her father’s marriage, a sad time began for the little _
daughter. Her step-sisters hated her, and did not choose
that she should share with them in anything that was
good or pleasant. ‘ What business has this creature in the
room?” they used to
say. ‘Out with her,
she is only fit to be a
kitchen-maid!” Sothey
took all her fine clothes
from her, and made
her put on an old grey
dress, and laughed at
her, and drove her into
the kitchen. They also
made her do all the
hard work of the house
—get up early, light
the fire, cook, and wash
for them; and they
threw crusts into the
ashes for her to pick
out and eat. At the
end of the day, when
she was tired, she was
not allowed to rest


upon a bed, but was obliged to lie on the hearth among
the cinders all night; and because her clothes became the
colour of the cinders they called her Cinderella.

Now it happened that the king of the country gavea
-great feast, which lasted for several Oye and during that
time there was a ball at the
palace every night, for the king
had decreed that his only son
should choose a bride for him-
self, and, of course, it was neces-
sary that he should see every-
body. Cinderella’s step-sisters
were invited, and very much
pleased they were to be asked
to. the= Princes ball. — They.
made their step-father buy the
richest dresses for them, they
stuck feathers in their hair, and
covered their arms and necks
with jewels. Cinderella helped
to dress them. “Come and
comb my hair, Cinderella,” said
one. “Fasten my _ necklace,

Cinderella,” said the other. Poor
Cinderella was kept hard at
work all the afternoon and
evening. “Would you like to
go to the ball, child?” asked
the eldest sister; and

when Cinderella answered


that she should, they both burst out laughing at her. At last,
their toilets being completed, the step-sisters drove off from

the house, and Cinderella was left alone. Then she sat
down amongst the cinders on the hearth, and gave way


to a fit of weeping; she would so much have liked to go
to the ball. In the midst of her sobbing, Cinderella heard
a soft voice say to

her, “What are you

crying for, my little

maid?” She looked

up surprised, for she

had not heard anyone

come into the room;

and no wonder, for it

was a fairy who had

spoken to her, and

fairies can come in

and go out without

making any noise.

This fairy was Cin-

derella’s fairy god-

mother.

“You wish to go
to the ball, my child ?”
said she. ‘“ Well, do
as I bid you, and you
shall go, First, you
must go into the gar-
den, and bring me the
largest pumpkin you
can find.” Off ran
Cinderella, and soon
came back with a

large pumpkin, which


The fairy touched it with her wand, and immediately it
was changed into a gilt coach lined with pink satin, and
with pink satin cushions inside. “ Now, Cinderella,” said
her fairy god- mother, “ fetch me the mouse-trap.” Cinderella
went into the pantry, and brought the mouse-trap, and, lo!
there were six fat, sleek mice inside the trap. The god-
mother opened the door of the trap, and as they ran
through, she touched each with her wand, and immediately
they were seen with complete harness, ready to draw the
carriage. So there was a “coach-and-six,’ but as yet no
coachman to drive, or lacqueys to attend | upon this splendid
coach.

“Go, Cinderella, ‘said the. fairy, “and bring =me
the rat-trap.” Cinderella was obliged to go to the cellar
for the rat-trap, but presently she returned with it, and
there was a large black rat and two smaller ones inside.
The fairy touched the rats with her wand, and they were
instantly transformed into a coachman and two lacqueys
with grand livery. The fairy sent Cinderella out once more
to pick up six lizards from behind the pumpkin-frame, and
these she changed into six swift footmen to run beforé
and behind the coach.

“Now, my child,” said the fairy, “you may go to
the ball.” But Cinderella looked down at her shabby
clothes, and the tears rolled down her cheeks once more.
“How can I go in my shabby clothes?” exclaimed she.
Then the kind god-mother touched Cinderella’s dress
with her wand, and the ragged grey skirt was changed
into the most beautiful ball-dress that ever was seen;
her golden hair hung down her neck; a wreath of roses


clasped her head; a bouquet was in her hand, and her little
feet were shod with a dainty pair of wonderful slippers
made of glass.

“ Now, good-bye, Cinderella; go to the ball and enjoy
- yourself,” said the fairy. “Only, remember one thing:
you must come away before the clock strikes twelve;
for if you should stay a moment too long, your coach
will turn into. a pumpkin again, your coachman and lacqueys
into rats, your horses into mice, your pretty dress into

the old ragged frock, and you will be the little cinder-
wench once more.”

Of course Cinderella thought there was no danger of
forgetting what her fairy god-mother said to her; but she
was in such high spirits at the wonderful change of fortune
which had come to her, that it was well she had such a
serious warning of the danger of disobedience.

All being now ready, Cinderella got into her carriage,
and drove away to the palace. The king’s son met her







at the door of the ball-room, and took her by the hand
and danced with her, and with nobody else.



The Prince was enchanted by her beauty, and so were the
king and the queen; and no wonder, for she looked more
lovely than anyone else at the ball. Her sisters saw her


dancing with the Prince, but they did not know her in the
least. They supposed that she was some strange princess.
Once or twice
Cinderellaspoke
kindly to them,
and they were
delighted be-
cause the beau-
tiful lady with
whom the king’s
son danced had
noticed them.
At a quarter to
twelve o'clock,
Cinderella left
the ball - room,
and got safely
home, and was
sitting amongst
the cinders on
the hearth when
her sisters came
back. ‘Come
and help us to
undress, Cinder-
ella,” they said ;
and whilst she
waited upon
them, they told her about the beautiful lady who had been
at the ball, with whom the king’s son had danced almost


all the evening, and who had paid them so much attention.
But Cinderella did not say anything.

The next night there was another ball, and the step-
sisters went as before. When they were gone, Cinderella
was left alone; but this time she did not cry, because she

_ thought her fairy god-mother would. not forget her... Ina
very few moments the kind
little old lady appeared, and
the mouse-trap, and the rat-
trap, and the six lizards,
and everything happened
as it had done the first time
her god-mother
visited her. This
night, however,
Cinderella had a
still more beauti-
ful dress than she
had worn on the
previous one.
Elerehaic was
done up high, and
her head was fas-
tened with costly
jewels. When
Cinderella


was ready to get into her coach, which was waiting for
her at the door, her god-mother said to her, pointing to the
clock with her wand, “Adieu, dear child, go and dance,
and be happy; but remember to leave the ball-room
before the clock strikes twelve, for if you stay one moment
too long, you know what the consequences will be.” Cin-
derella remembered the warning of the night
before, and promised, and away she
went to the palace, where the king’s
» SON was waiting to receive her. He
led her into the ball-room,
and danced only with her.
“This is my partner,”
he said; and it
was of no use to


introduce anyone else
tohim. At length the
Prince took Cinderella
into a charming little
alcove, amongst flower-
ing trees, and they sat
there talking so de-
lightfully that Cinder-
ella forgot that it was
growing late.
Suddenly she heard
the clock begin to.
strike twelve; then in
great terror she sprang
away from the Prince’s
side, and flew down
the palace stairs to the
great door of the en-
trance hall. As she
ran, one of her glass
slippers fell off, but
she dared not stop to
put it on again, so it
remained where it fell.
Alas! the clock had
finished striking by
the time she reached
the door. She looked
in vain for her car-
riage — it had disap-


peared; and all she
saw was a pumpkin
lying on the road, and
six little mice scam-
pering away. Cinder-
ella ran home as fast
as she could; her
smart dress was gone,
she had only her rag-
ged clothes on, her
head and feet were
bare, and she was the
little cinder - wench

once more.
The _ king’s son,

who had followed her
downstairs, picked up
the little shoe, and
kept it as a souvenir
of his beautiful partner,
whom he could not
see anywhere. When
he reached the door of
the palace she was
gone, and though he
strained his eyes look-
ing down the road, he
could distinguish no-
body but a little rag-
ged girl running along


in the wind and the rain. However, Cinderella got safely
home before her sisters returned. Whilst she was helping
them to undress, they talked to her about the ball, and
were more full of praises than ever of the beautiful lady
with whom the Prince was so much in love. They told
Cinderella about her having run away as the clock was
striking twelve, and of her having left her little slipper on
the stairs, and that the Prince had picked it up. Still
Cinderella did not say anything.

The next day, one of the king’s heralds made known
that the king’s son intended to marry the lady to whom
belonged the little glass slipper which he had picked up
on the stairs of the palace, and that, in order to find her,
all the young maidens in the country were to try on the

shoe; whosoever it should fit would
be the Prince’s bride. So the glass
slipper was taken to every house,
and ever so many maidens tried to
put it on; but there was not found
one whom it fitted exactly. At last
the Prince came to the house in
which Cinderella and her step-sisters
lived. . The step-sisters were in a
great state of excitement and tm-
patience to try on the glass slipper,
and equally anxious to keep Cinder-
ella in the background. First the
elder sister tried it, but her foot was
too large to go in; then the second
sister tried, but with her it was even


worse than with the other, for her foot was bigger still; and
then it was Cinderella’s turn. The sisters laughed loudly
at the idea of Cinderella putting on the slipper; but when
she came forward, the Prince recognised her at once as his
beautiful partner at the ball, and, kneeling down, placed
the slipper himself on her little foot, and, lo! it fitted
perfectly.
*““As shines the moon in Clouded skies,
She in her poor attire was seen ;

So sweet a face, such angel grace,
In all that land had never been.”

Cinderella then drew from her pocket the fellow slipper,
and the moment she put it on, her old grey frock was
instantly changed, and she stood up before them.all in the
splendid dress she had worn at the ball; and everyone
knew her to be the beauti-
ful lady the Prince loved.

She, who had been once a
kitchen-maid, was now to
be a Princess.

The Prince took her
away with him in his car-
riage to the palace, where
the king and queen were
waiting to receive her as
their daughter, and very
soon she and the Prince
were married with great
pomp and ceremony.


As for the unkind step-sisters, Cinderella forgave them
all their cruel treatment of her, for she continued to be good
and pious, as she had always been. She asked them to the
palace, and treated them with great gentleness; and by-

and-by they were married to two rich gentlemen of the
court.





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- (Marcus UDarD & Co hey

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