Citation
Pictures of St. Paul

Material Information

Title:
Pictures of St. Paul drawn in an English home
Creator:
A. L. O. E., 1821-1893
Gall & Inglis ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London ;
Edinburgh
Publisher:
Gall & Inglis
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
352 p., [13] leaves of plates : ill. ; 20 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Parent and child -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Prisoners -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Martyrs -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Missionaries -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Telegraph -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Toleration -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Shipwrecks -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1890 ( rbprov )
Bldn -- 1890
Genre:
Prize books (Provenance) ( rbprov )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication from prize inscription.
General Note:
Plates are printed in red tint.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
by A.L.O.E. ; with many illustrations.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026996150 ( ALEPH )
ALH9388 ( NOTIS )
174969557 ( OCLC )

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Sr. PAUL BEFORE AGRIPPA.





PICTURES OF ST PAUL

Brawn it ath English Home.

BY

A.L.0.E.,

AOTHOBESS OF ‘‘THE CLAREMONT TALES,” ‘‘ NED FRANKS,” “LIFE IN THE
PAGLE’S NEST,’ ‘‘THE WHITE BEAR'S DEN,” ETC., ETC., ETO,

ith mmy Gllustrations.

GALL & INGLIS,
Fondo: Gdinburgh:

PATERNOSTER SQUARE. 20 BERNARD TERRACE.



PREFACE.

—roe

TuE following tale, like others which have preceded it,
has been partly written to replenish a missionary purse;
but this has by no means been the Authoress’s highest
object. A. L.O.E. desires by a brief account of St. Paul—
chiefly drawn from Scripture—to direct the more earnest
attention of her readers to the life and labours of the great
Apostle, and to lead them with more interest to study his
precious Epistles. Thankful would she be if, through
God’s blessing and the grace of the Holy Spirit, she should
be permitted to awaken in some a missionary spirit, a holy
desire to devote life to winning souls for the Saviour.

A. L.O.E. makes no pretensions to learned research.
She has sought jealously to guard her own missionary
work from being encroached on by the pen; composition
has had to take but a secondary place in the duties of the
day.

This little volume is now laid at the feet of the Master,
with a prayer that He may deign to make use of it in
quickening zeal for the cause of Missions. May that zeal
be shown in more liberal gifts, more earnest prayer, and—
where the call of the Spirit is heard—in personal con-
secration to the work of carrying Gospel light into the
abodes of heathen darkness !

Bartana, INDIA.






CONTENTS.

—o——
OHAPTER PAGE
I, THE TELEGRAM, . . . . . . 7

Il, GRIEF AND REVENGE, . : . . . (4
III. THE MARTYR, . A : : . . (9
IV. BIGOTRY AND UNBELIEF, . . . , . 27
V. CONVERSION, 7 . ‘ . : . 34
VI. SIGHT RESTORED, . . . , ’ . Al
VII. AN ARRIVAL, . . ; . . . 50
VIII. VISITS TO JERUSALEM, . . . : . 57
IX. PREJUDICH AND SELF-PLEASING, . . : - 63
X. FIRST MISSIONARY TOUR, . . . : . 7
XI. AN INVASION, . : . ; . »
XII. FIRST MISSIONARY TOUR CONTINUED, ., : . 89
XIII. JEWISH PREJUDICES, : . : . . iol
XIV. PAINFUL DISPUTES, . : ' . .» lil
XV. AN INDIAN MARTYR, : : 7 . . 120
XVI. HOSPITALITY, . . . . . . 126
XVII, THE THORN IN THE FLESH, : \ . . 138
XVIII. NOT BY CHANCE, . . . . ‘ . 144
XIX. ST, PAUL IN EUROPE, : : -, . . 153
XX. SONGS IN THE NIGHT, . . . . . 160
XXI. MISSIONARY TRIALS, : ' . . . 168
XXII THE JAILOR OF PHILIPPI, : . . . 174



vi CONTENTS,

CHAPTER PAGE

XXIII. THE STORM, . : . ; ' . 181
XXIV. ST. PAUL AT ATHENS, . ' ‘ : . 187
XXV. THE STUMBLING-BLOCK, - . : : . 197
XXVI. ST. PAUL AT CORINTH, ‘ : : . 205
XXVII. THE PRIDE OF LIFE, . . . : » 213
XXVIII A SECRET SNARE, . . . , . 219
XXIX. ST, PAUL AT EPHESUS, : 7 : . 225
XXX. REGRETS AND REJOICINGS, . : ‘ . 289
XXXI. ST. PAUL AT TROAS, . ; . . . 246
XXXII. LOST, . : ‘ : : ' . 254
XXXII. Sf. PAUL IN JERUSALEM, , . . » 262
XXXIV. OUTBURST OF PASSION, . ‘ . , 268
XXXV. CALLED TO ACCOUNT, . . . ' . 276
XXXVI. A SUDDEN CALL, : ' : . . 284
XXXVII. THE MURDEROUS PLOT, . . : . 289
XXXVIII. KEEP TO THE TRUTH, . . . : . 298
XXXIX. ST. PAUL BEFORE AGRIPPA, . . : , 803
XL, ONE SMALL SEED, . . ‘ ‘ . dll
XLL ST. PAUL'S SHIPWRECK, . : . . 3816
XLII. THE KALEIDOSCOPE, . . ‘ : . 3828
XLIIL ST, PAUL AT MELITA, . : . ; . 827
XLIV. THE CLOUD AND THE RAY, . ‘ . . 3832
XLV. SI. PAUL AT ROME, . . ' . 1 3838

XLVI. CHANGES, ' : : . . . 847



PICTURES OF ST. PAUL



CHAPTER I.
THE TELEGRAM.

Tue railway guard had given his warning whistle, the
train was already beginning to move on, when the door of
a carriage in which an elderly clergyman was seated alone
was suddenly flung open, and a lady, flushed and breathless
with haste, sprang in, and sank wearily down on a seat, for
she had run half the length of the platform.

“ Just in time,—hbarely in time!” cried the clergyman,
whose ready hand had helped her in, as the snorting
engine rushed on its way. “Why, Lady Laurie, is it you?”
added the clergyman, Mr. Stern, as he recognised in his
fellow-traveller a lady with whom he had some acquaint-
ance.

“Tam so thankful not to have missed the train!” said
Lady Laurie, when she had recovered her breath. “I had
not time to pack up, or anything; I stopped a passing
cab, and hurried to the station. I little thought when
I sat down to breakfast this morning, planning out a long
day’s work in London, that I should be speeding back so
soon to Willowdale Lodge. I had intended to be absent

some days.” |
7



8 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.

“ And what made you change your intention ?” inquired
Mr. Stern.

“ One of those dreadful telegrams from India,” said the
lady, almost shuddering as she glanced at a copy of the
Times, dated ——— July, 1857, which Mr. Stern held in
his hand.

“Ab! I understand—bad news from the scene of the
fearful Mutiny,” said the clergyman, his face expressing
sympathy and pity. “There is the telegram of the mas-
sacre at Lahupore—every one killed. I fear that you have
lost some relative there.”

“Not a relative, no, and I had never even seen Mr.
Hartley.”

“Ah! the missionary who died with the rest, he was
an old college companion of mine. I was shocked to see
his name in the list of sufferers.” ;

“He was the widower of my dearest friend,” said Lady
Laurie, with a deep sigh, “and his poor boys are under
my charge. As soon as I saw in the papers that they
were fatherless, as well as motherless She could not
finish her sentence, her voice was choked with emotion.

“JT did not know, when you spoke to me yesterday of
your boys, that they were not your own.”

“They are mine in everything but mere relationship
and name,” observed Lady Laurie. “ Little Robin could
scarcely run alone when he first arrived, and found in
my house his home. He is only six years old now, and
can scarcely understand his great loss; but Harold! my
poor Harold! who remembers his father, and almost
adores him, how will he bear such dreadful news as that
which I bring! It is not a month since the boys were
half wild with delight in hearing that Mr. Hartley
intended to come home next Spring. It is to break the bad
tidings of his death to them that I am now hurrying back.
I dread Harold’s hearing of it from any lips but my own.”





THE TELEGRAM. 9



“Of what age is Harold ?” inquired Mr. Stern.

“He was twelve last birthday,” replied Lady Laurie.
“We kept the anniversary joyously, and Harold, who is a
general favourite, was loaded with presents. But what
gave him most delight, what he called his best birthday
gift, was a letter from his father, in which Mr. Hartley
wrote that he had made up his mind to start for England
in March, and see his children again. Such a shouting as
there was through the house, “Father’s coming home!
Father's coming home!”—such eagerness to give the
good news to the village,—such a collecting of wood for a
bonfire! Robin had caught the infection of joy from his |
brother, and clapped his hands, and danced about with -
delight! Oh! would that Mr. Hartley had returned to
England at once, and never waited for a Spring—which
he was never to see!

“ My dear friend,” said the clergyman very gently, “are
not all events over-ruled by our Heavenly Father? He
saw that His faithful servant was ready for a glorious
change, and has called him to a better home than any in
England.”

“But in such a dreadful way! he was murdered !”
exclaimed Lady Laurie.

“When we reach Eternity’s shore we shall think that
it mattered but little whether we slowly forded Death’s
river, or cleared it at a bound,” observed Mr. Stern.
“The grand question is not when we go, or how we go,
but where we go. As regards dear Robert Hartley, there
cannot be a shadow of doubt that he is now with Christ,
which—as St. Paul tells us ‘is far better’ than remaining
in this world of temptation and trials.”

“T know it—I feel it,” said Lady Laurie more calmly.
“And Robert Hartley has rejomed his wife, who was one
of the sweetest Christians whom I ever knew. It seems
but yesterday, though thirteen years ago, when she—a



10 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.

happy young wife, came to bid me farewell before she
started with her husband for India. Alice had all a mis-
sionary’s spirit. She longed to win souls; her soul
yearned over the poor benighted Hindus; she loved them
before she saw them. Ah! little did she guess that they
would reward her husband’s zeal by taking his life!
I sadly mourned the loss of Alice, but oh! I am thankful
now that she was taken so early. J tremble to think that
had she been at Lahupore she might have shared the fate
of her husband. Better, far better that she died first—
peacefully on her bed.”

Lady Laurie’s fair face was bathed in tears. Mr. Stern
did not disturb her sorrow by conversation, but repeated
half aloud, the well-known beautiful verse, which so touch-
ingly expresses the calm submission of a Christian
regarding the time of his death.

“Tf life be long, my days are blest,
If they be spent for Thee ;
If life be short—I sooner rest
From sin and sorrow free.”

Lady Laurie did not cry long. She roused herself, and
found a sad comfort in speaking of her departed friend.

“ Alice and I were not related, but at school we were
such inseparable friends, that we used to be called ‘the
Twins” How often we chatted together in the long
winter evenings about being missionaries, and going to
the East, to tell the poor heathen of Christ. I had a
different path appointed me. I married, and for years had
all that earth could give me. My first sorrow was
parting with Alice, when she went out as a bride to India.
But. she was very happy there. Her letters were so
bright and joyful, telling me of one little treasure after
another being given to her arms. She delighted too in
her missionary work. Then came trouble upon trouble.
The climate so fearfully hot, told on her children. Alice’s



THE TELEGRAM. 11



first-born, Harold, became dangerously ill. He recovered
after weeks of anxious nursing, but other trials were to
come. Alice’s two little girls sickened, and were taken
’ away within three weeks of each other. My friend bowed
in submission to God’s will; she never murmured, but she
sorely missed her darlings. She knew not how soon her
own grave was to be beside theirs. Mother and children
were soon re-united in death.”

“Tn bliss,” said Mr. Stern softly.

“Poor Mr. Hartley wrote to me then in the deepest
distress. He had two sons left, but he dared not keep
them in India, especially as they had no longer a mother’s
care. I had had lately a loss as heavy as his own; I was
a widow, left with one daughter. What so natural as
that I should be allowed to take a parent’s place to the
motherless boys? God, in His goodness, confided to me
the precious charge.”

Mr. Stern remembered the Saviour’s words, “He that
receiveth one of these little ones receiveth Me.” He
silently wondered why many Christians do not gain sucha
priceless honour by offering a home to missionaries’
children, when they are necessarily parted from their
parents. |

“It is a great advantage to my Ida to have brothers,”
continued Lady Laurie. “It is so difficult for an only
child not to suffer a little from being the object of
exclusive care and attention. Though two years older
than Harold, Ida can yet find in him a companion, and
the very difference in their dispositions may make this
companionship the more desirable. Ida is a sensible
thoughtful girl; her quiet sedateness which had she been
alone, might have made her too precise a little woman
before her time, serves to soften Harold’s vehement
impetuous character.”

“Ts Harold a promising boy ? ” inquired Mr. Stern.



12 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.





“T think him a noble fellow,” said Lady Laurie,
warmly; with both head and heart, and energy for study
or sport. But Harold is somewhat passionate and proud,
and though I believe that he struggles against his faults,
he is not yet master over them.”

“Tt is a life-long struggle,” observed Mr. Stern. “Happy
the youth who begins the struggle early, and knows where
to look for strength to overcome the foe.”

“Tt is my most anxious desire to train my children,
for I think of them all as mine, and they call me
‘Mother,’ to be faithful soldiers of Christ. Each and all
are the subjects of many prayers.”

“Teach them in childhood to seek their weapons in
God’s own armoury, the Bible,” said Mr. Stern. “The
shield of faith is not too heavy for the arm of a very
young soldier.”

“ Harold’s faith will be sorely tried by the cruel death
of his father,’ observed Lady Laurie. “I really dread
the effect of this blow on my boy. I shall not know how
to give him comfort.”

“ Again I would say, lead him to the Bible. There we
find the still waters which cool the fiery spirit, and refresh
the aching heart.”

“T have a little daily Bible-reading and talk with the
young people in the evening,” said Lady Laurie, “after
Harold has returned from the day-school which he attends.
There is nothing formal about this reading, even merry
little Robin likes to join in it, and not as a silent hearer,
though being yet in his primer, he cannot help in the
actual reading. I encourage the young people to speak
out the thoughts that arise in their minds, and Robin
takes advantage of this privilege quite as often as Ida or
Harold. I think that we all enjoy the twenty minutes or
half-hour which we thus spend together in searching the
Scriptures. We always conclude with prayer.”



THE TELEGRAM. 13





“These quiet talks over God’s Word, this daily searching
in the armoury, this daily drinking from the waters of
truth, may be the most important part of your children’s
training,” observed the clergyman. “It is likely to have
an effect through life. How strange it is that even
Christian parents will make every sacrifice to give sons
and daughters what is called a good education, and yet
neglect its most essential part. Parents make preparation
for their children’s life in this world, and little or none for
life: never-ending. They cram the head and starve the
heart. But I feel assured, dear Lady Laurie, that you
will never fall into this error—this sin.”

Here the conversation ceased. Lady Laurie gave
herself up to silent thought, and the clergyman took up
his copy of the Tvmes. Scarcely another word was spoken
till the train stopped for a few minutes at a modest little
station, where the guard called out “Foreham.” Here
Lady Laurie got down, and after a kindly good-bye
exchanged with her fellow-traveller, went on her lonely
way to her home, Willowdale Lodge. There was no one
to meet her at the station, as her return was quite
unexpected.



CHAPTER II.
GRIEF AND REVENGE.

Ir was a hot midsummer day, and not an hour past
noon, when Lady Laurie hastened along the laurel-
bordered path, then across the green lawn, past the
flower-beds gay with verdure and roses, towards her
pretty dwelling. As she approached the porch, which was
half covered with honeysuckle and clematis, somebody
came out. Lady Laurie saw with anything but pleasure
the well-known green parasol and blue veil of Miss Petty.

For Miss Petty, the Doctor’s sister, was the greatest
gossip in Foreham. With nothing to do but to go in and
out of the houses of her neighbours, she was a real busy-

‘body, and nothing delighted her more than to be the first

to give “a bit of news,” whether it were good or bad.
Lady Laurie tried to obey the command to “honour all
men,” but it was very difficult to obey it at that moment,
for she read in Miss Petty’s face that she knew all about
the telegram, and that she had just been doing the very
thing which Harold’s friend had hurried from London to
prevent her doing, startling her boy with the terrible news.
It then occurred to Lady Laurie that the Doctor took in
an evening paper, and that the sad telegram must have
been in it, and so had arrived by the early post.

“Oh! dearest Lady Laurie, have you heard the frightful
news from India?” eagerly began Miss Petty, holding out
her hand.

“I know all,” said Lady Laurie, just touching the hand
14

‘t



GRIEF AND REVENGE. 15



for a moment, and then running through the porch into
the house.

“Dear me! how rude!” muttered Miss Petty, dis-

appointed of her expected treat of calling up a look of
horror and distress on the fair face of Lady Laurie. She
remembered, however, that Mrs. Miller and the Bulleus
had probably not seen the telegram yet, so off she hurried
to them with the additional pleasure of being able to add
that “the poor dear boy, Harold, was in such a way,
I really thought that he’d have gone mad.”
. Lady Laurie hastened to the sitting-room where she
was likely to find her family at this hour, as morning
lessons would be over, and the dinner-hour was at hand.
The door was open, for it was Miss Petty’s habit never to
shut doors behind her. Ida came to meet her mother,
whom she had caught a glimpse of through the window.
The girl looked grave and concerned, but it was not on
her that the blow had fallen, and she could not, like her
mother, enter with overflowing sympathy into the grief of
another. Robin, a little boy with round face, sunburnt
and freckled, and a shock of unmanageable hair, stood as
if bewildered, looking at his brother, feeling that he ought
to ery, but not quite knowing how. Robin’s thick brown
hair was more than usually rough, for he had been
rubbing it up vigorously with his little red hand, as his
token of distress. Harold lay at full length on the carpet,
his face, which was downwards, buried on his crossed arms.
He uttered no sound, his passionate grief only finding
vent in slight convulsive movements of his feet. He
could not weep, and he could not lie still.

“My boy—my precious boy!” said Lady Laurie, kneel-
ing down and laying on Harold’s curly auburn hair a
touch soft and tender as that of a mother. Harold did
not appear to notice it, only the movement in his feet
ceased at once,



16 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Lady Laurie could not at that moment utter a word of
consolation, she felt that the fatherless lad was not in a
state to receive it. She slowly rose, and stood gazing
down upon him with mingled pity and love.

“They’ve killed our father; oh! they’ve killed our
father!” exclaimed Robin, flingmg his arms round his
. foster-mother.

Then Harold started up, his features—even to his lips
—pale with passion. As he sprang to his feet he clenched
his fist and exclaimed, “ Would that I were a man!”

“ What would you do?” asked Robin.

“Avenge him!” cried Harold, grinding his teeth, a
fierce expression of hatred in his flashing grey eyes.

“Oh! Harold, how wicked!” exclaimed Ida; “ Mamma,
do tell him how wicked it is to wish for revenge.”

“He was not your father!” cried Harold, as he dashed
out of the room, and rushed up the stairs, two steps at a
time, to his own little attic apartment.

“T’ll avenge father too,” said Robin.

“ Robin always echoes whatever Harold says, that makes
it so much worse to give way to passion,” observed Ida.
“Mamma, I am sure that you will speak to Harold, he is
doing so very very wrong.”

“JT will speak, but not now,” said the gentle lady.
“Poor Harold is like one with a smarting wound, and we
must touch it very softly indeed.”

“Tda, don’t,” observed Robin, “she would rub it hard
with a brush and make it bleed.”

The servant entering announced dinner. In times of
distress how strange seems the routine of common life!
Lady Laurie felt that she could not eat, but she went in to
carve. She sent up a plateful of warm food to Harold,
but it came down untouched.

“ Master Harold has locked the door,—he said he wanted
nothing to eat,” said the maid.



GRIE# AND REVENGE. 17



“You know that the doctor ordered Harold to have
plenty of food,” observed Ida.

“To-day we must let Harold do what he likes,” said her
mother.

“ He shall do what he likes,” echoed Robin.

“ Robin always stands up for Harold,” said Ida.

“Cause I love him—he’s my brother!” cried the child
tiercely.

Lady Laurie ordered tea to be made, and herself carried
up a cup of it to Harold’s little room, which was one with
a sloping ceiling just under the roof. She tapped at the
door, and a voice from within cried out, “ Who is there” ?

“Your mother; unlock tbe door.”

Her word was instantly obeyed. Harold opened the door.
His pale face wore a look of pain, and his eye-lashes were
moist with tears.

“Mother—I can’t bear talking now,” said Harold, as
the lady put down the cup on a little table. “There is
only one thought—one wish in my mind—and that is—to
avenge him.”

“My son, do you forget Who hath said, “ Vengeance is
Mine?” Do you not think that the sainted father for
whom you mourn would—like a Christian—have said
“forgive”?

“JT know that I am very bad,” said Harold, who was
now seated on the edge of his bed, “ but I can’t speak or
feel like a Christian. It is not in my power,” he gloomily
added.

“The power, like every other blessing we must ask from
God,” said the widowed lady. “God gives no command
without offering grace to enable us to obey it.”

These few words were all that were said at the time on
the subject. Lady Laurie knew Harold well enough to
know that it was better to leave him to think them over.
She silently offered him the tea which she had brought ;

B



18 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.

the boy, with feverish thirst, emptied the cup. The
beverage revived him.

“Perhaps I ought to come down in the evening for our
Scripture reading,” said Harold.

“Tt will be well if you can. You remember that it was
by your dear father’s special request in a letter received
last Spring, that we began these little readings. Every
wish of his will be doubly sacred now. Oh! Harold, may
you tread in your father’s steps, thus best will you honour
his memory.”

“T shall never be like him—never!” There came a
burst of tears, but they were shed on a mother’s bosom.

Lady Laurie went downstairs to the sitting-room. She
found Ida giving a little lecture to Robin, who was taking
it very badly. Ida could no more manage Robin’s temper
than he could reduce to order that one specially unruly
lock of his, which would stick out from the rest like a feather.

Ida, with many valuable qualities, had not yet that of
winning affection by gentle, considerate kindness. She
was more of the censor than the sister. Calm and unexcit-
able in character herself, she made little allowance for the
temperament of others. To the neat, tidy girl Robin’s
rough romping ways,—his clothes always requiring mend-
ing from his trying to climb up trees, were a source of
pretty constant annoyance. Ida had not acquired her
mother’s indulgent patience.

“Tda is growing very like Lady Laurie,” the Vicar had
once observed at the tea-table to Miss Theresa Petty.
“They resemble each other as these two bits of your
honey-comb do.”

“The difference is that the one comb holds honey and
the other holds none,” was | Miss Petty’s not very good-
natured reply.

“Oh! the honey will come, the honey will come,” said
the Vicar ; “Ida Laurie is brought up amongst flowers.”



CHAPTER IIL
THE MARTYR.

THE little Bible reading was held just after sunset,
while a rich amber glow still lingered in the sky. No
lamp would be needed in the long twilight of the warm
Summer eve. Ida had placed the Bibles ready.

“T wonder if Harold will come,” said Robin, and the
sentence was still on his lips when Harold entered the
room. He looked haggard, like one who has been up all
night, as he silently took his place by his mother. Robin
hardly knew more than his letters, being slow in learning

' to read, though quick in apprehension, but he always

liked to sit at Lady Laurie’s other side, and look over her
book.

“What shall we read now?” asked Ida, “we finished
the Gospels last evening.”

“T thought of our beginning the life of the great mis-
sionary,” replied Lady Laurie.

“Oh! you mean Campbell, or Carey, or Williams ?”
remarked Ida; “but I suppose that we shall begin by
reading a little of the Bible as usual ?”

“The life of the great missionary is in the Bible,” said
Lady Laurie. “Let us turn to the 7th chapter of the
Acts of the Apostles. Beginning at the 54th verse, we
shall have a good introduction to the story of Christian
missions.”

' “This is about the death of St. Stephen,” observed Ida,
who had found the place in the book of Acts.
19



20 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



“Who was St. Stephen ?” asked Robin.

“J will reply in Bible words,” said Lady Laurie.
‘He was a man full of faith and of the Holy Ghost,
He lived in the early days of the Church; when the
Lord had but lately ascended to Heaven, Stephen was
chosen for an important and holy work, that of caring
for the wants of the poor, and especially those of needy
Christian widows.”

“Then everybody loved him?” said Robin.

“So far from it that Stephen became the object of the
special hatred of the unbelieving Jews. The elders,
the scribes, and the people rose up against him, they
seized him, and brought him before a poancil They set
up false witnesses against him. Holy Stephen was
treated as his holier Master had been treated before him.
Blessed are they who share the Lord’s cup of trial here,
for they shall share His glory pee: Lady Laurie
glanced at Harold as she spoke.

“Tam glad that we are to read of missions,” observed’
Harold. “He was a missionary!” all knew that the
boy meant his father. “If I were not such an unworthy
fellow as I am, I should like to be what he was.”

The boy’s lip quivered ; he dared not close his eyes lest
the water brimming in them should overflow, and roll
down his cheeks. Lady Laurie drew off the attention of
Ida and Robin by offering a short prayer, and then
asking Ida to read the 54th verse of the chapter chosen.
This describes the fury of the Jews, when Stephen, with
manly boldness, had accused them of being the betrayers
and murderers of Christ, the Just One.

Reading.
When they heard these things, they were cut to the
heart, and they gnashed upon him with their teeth. But
he, being full of the Holy Ghost, looked up steadfastly



THE MARTYR. 21



into heaven, and said, “Behold! I see the heavens
opened, and the Son of Man standing on the right
~ hand of God.”

Harold did not speak, but he thought, “perhaps such a
glorious vision was granted to my father. It would be
worth dying as Stephen died, to see what Stephen saw.”

Reading.

“Then they cried out with a loud voice, and stopped
their ears, and ran upon him with one accord, and
cast him out of the city, and stoned him; and the
witnesses laid down their clothes at a young man’s feet,
whose name was Saul. And they stoned Stephen, calling
upon God and saying ‘Lord Jesus! receive my spirit!’
And he kneeled down and cried with a loud voice, ‘Lord!
lay not this sin to their charge.’ And when he had said
this, he fell asleep.”

Lady Laurie added the first sentences of the following
chapter, and read, “And Saul was consenting unto his
death. And at that time there was a great persecution of
the Church which was at Jerusalem.”

“Tn this,” continued the lady, “Saul took a very active
share. It is written in the 3rd verse that “he made havoc
of the church, entering into every house, and haling men
and women committed them to prison.” Saul afterwards
described himself as “a blasphemer and persecutor”
(1 Tim. xiii.) Nay more, he owned that he “ persecuted
this way unto death.” (Acts xxii. 4.)

“ He ought to have been killed his own self!” exclaimed
Robin, striking the table.

“Oh! Robin you know nothing about it!” cried Ida;
“Saul lived to be the holy apostle, St. Paul.”

The mind of Harold was still dwelling on the idea

_ which had connected the martyrdom of Stephen with the
death of his own father. “Mother,” he said, “do you think



22 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



that dying people often see sights such as Stephen saw,
holy people I mean?”

“Tt is possible,” was the reply, “though we cannot
speak with certainty on the subject. A poet has
written,—

“Leaving the earth, both worlds at once they view,
Who stand upon the threshold of the new.”

There have been various instances of Christians showing
extraordinary joy at the time of departure; the face
lighted up with a smile, which lingered even after death.”

“Do you not remember the story of the martyr, who
when he was burnt alive clapped his hands two or three
times in the flames,” said Ida.

“A fact has recently come to my knowledge,’* said
Lady Laurie. “A native of India, a Christian, was bitten
by a mad dog, in going to help his young son to turn it
out of the house. The furious creature sprang at the
father’s throat, and wounded it as well as his hand. After
some days the poor man showed decided symptoms of
hydrophobia.”

“What’s that?” asked Robin, to whom the long name
was a new one. “A terrible illness, which sometimes
follows the bite of a mad dog, and which is almost sure to
be fatal. It is impossible for the sufferer to drink, or
even endure the sight of water; he generally becomes
mad himself, and dies.”

“Oh! the poor father!” cried Robin; “was he not
dreadfully frightened when he found that he was to have
such a shocking illness ?”

“No,” replied Lady Laurie, “he was quite calm and
resigned. He knew that his sins were forgiven through
Christ; he said that he was ready, and desired that his
widow should not weep for his loss.”

* This really happened in 1883.



THE MARTYR. 28



on

“Could he have. been a native of India?” exclaimed
Harold, who, after the news brought by the telegram,
hated the very name.

“A Christian native,” replied Lady Laurie. “Oh!
Harold, had there been many such, the Mutiny might
never have happened. Bibles might have prevented the
need of bayonets, missions have stopped all massacre in
unhappy India.”

But Robin wanted the end of the story. “Did the
brave father die of the mad dog’s bite?” he inquired.

“Yes, after a short but terrible illness. Before the end
came, and it was for this that I have related the story, the
dying man said that four ministers had come. No one
but himself could see any. Some one near asked where
they were. The sufferer pointed upwards.”

“They must have been angels,” said Ida. “It makes
me think of that pretty verse,

“T hear a voice you cannot hear,
Which bids me not delay ;
I see a hand ye cannot see
Which beckons me away.”

Lady Laurie added in her soft voice the well known
lines of Pope,—
“Hark ! they whisper, angels say,
Sister spirit, come away !”

A softened expression came over the face of Harold;
he was thinking of his father, and hoping that in the
moment of death he might have been granted some
beautiful vision, or heard some heavenly voice. Lady
Laurie saw that the moment had come when Harold
could bear to be spoken to on the subject of forgiveness of
enemies. But it must not be in the presence of any but
herself. .

“Tda,” said the lady, after the family had, as usual,



24 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL,



knelt together for their closing devotions, “now take up
your little brother to bed, and hear him say his prayers.”

“J don’t want Ida to hear me say my prayers, I want
you,” cried Robin, throwing his arms round the lady’s
neck for what he called “a good tight hug.”

“J will come to you presently, darling,” said the
mother; “but now I want a little quiet talk with
Harold. Ida, take Robin up to bed.”

“He can go by himself, he’s not a baby; mayn’t I stop
for the talk?” said Ida, who was unwilling to quit the
room.

“My child, prompt obedience is the best proof of love,”
said Lady Laurie, who had often to speak twice to Ida.
The girl did not venture to make further remonstrance,
but slowly left the room with the child, after he had
repeated his hug to Lady Laurie, and given another as
hearty to Harold, of whom he was exceedingly fond.

“Jt isa grand thing to be a martyr like Stephen,”
observed Harold; “it seems to a Christian like what
getting the Victoria Cross must be to a soldier, a very
great honour indeed.”

“Stephen did not obtain his Victoria Cross till he had
fought his good fight,” observed Lady Laurie.

“You mean till he had bravely confessed Christ before
all those murderous Jews.”

“ Not only that, but till he had conquered himself, till
he had overcome the anger which rises up against cruelty
and wrong, and had forgiven and prayed for these murder-
ous men.”

“ Mother, I can imagine it possible to do that if—if they
were killing me only!” exclaimed Harold; “but if they
hurt any one whom I love, I could never—never forgive.
I do not believe that any one could.”

“Such grace has been given to Christians,” observed
Lady Laurie.



THE MARTYR. 25



« After the statesman, Mr. Percival, had been murdered,
it is related that bis widow knelt down with her children,
and prayed for the man who had killed her husband.”

“Tt is not-in human nature,’ muttered Harold.

“No, my son, it is not in human nature,” rejoined Lady
Laurie.

“You don’t wish to have me unnatural!” cried Harold
Hartley. “I feel as if I should like to have a sword, and
go to Lahupore, and kill every black man that I met.”

“JT do not wish you to be unnatural, Harold, but I long
for you to have that new nature which is born of the
Spirit. This is the meaning of the Lord’s words, except a
man be born again he cannot see the kingdom of God.
Those who are thus new-born are given power to follow
the example of the Lord who prayed for those who had
just driven the nails into His blessed hands and feet.”

“T am afraid that I am such a bad fellow that I shall
never be like that,” said Harold. “I shall never pray for
those who killed my father.”

“Who was the real cause of his death?” asked Lady
Laurie.

“T don’t know—there was no man’s name given,”
replied Harold.

“ Yet some one caused this crime, and all other crimes
that have been committed on earth.”

“Do you mean the devil?” asked the boy.

“Yes, Harold, and remember that these poor heathen
natives of India, living in darkness, are his slaves, his
miserable slaves. Satan could only harm your dear
father’s body, but the Evil One is destroying the souls of
these wretched men. He is dragging them down to end-
less misery. Could you not pray that Satan should not
have his will, that his kingdom in India should fall?”

“T would pray that with all my heart!” exclaimed
Harold.



26 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL,



“Then let us ask God that light may shine in the dark-
ness, that the chains of Satan’s slaves may be broken, that
even the worst of these sinners may repent, as he who
consented to Stephen’s death repented.” Lady Laurie
knelt down as she finished the sentence, and Harold
silently followed her example.

“Oh! Lord of mercy, have pity on India and her sinful
people,” prayed the Christian lady. “Crush the power of
Satan, let the blood of Thy martyrs be the seed of the
Church! Let no precious life have been given in vain.
Let the Gospel spread amongst the poor ignorant heathen,
and oh! enable us to pity and not to hate. Enable us to
hasten by our prayers and our efforts that blessed time
when in India, and every other heathen land, the wolf
shall lie down with the lamb, and the fiercest persecutors
and blasphemers fall low at the feet of Thy adorable Son.
Grant this for His sake!”

Lady Laurie’s tears fell fast as she prayed, but she was
thankful to hear Harold’s low “Amen” at the end of her.
prayer.



CHAPTER IV.
BIGOTRY AND UNBELIEF.

THE lady and Harold had scarcely risen from their knees
when Ida re-entered the room.

“ Mamma, I wish that you would speak to Robin, he is
so wilful,” said the girl. “He will say ‘ Bless dear father’
in his prayer.”

“Why should he not say it!” cried Harold almost
fiercely.

“T thought that you have told us, mamma, that it is
wrong to pray for the dead,” said Ida.

“Tt is useless,” was the lady’s reply. “The state of the
departed may be shown by that of the ten virgins in the
parable, after the bridegroom had come. No entreaties of
friends would have opened the door for the foolish ones,
and the wise ones needed no prayers, for they had entered
into the brightness and joy of the wedding, and had
already all that could be asked for.”

“T could not bear to leave his name out of my prayers,”
said Harold with feeling

“There is no need to leave the dear name out, my
boy. Only change ‘Bless my dear father’ into ‘I thank
Thee that Thou hast blessed my dear father,’ ‘for blessed
are the dead who die im the Lord.’”

Harold looked satisfied and soothed.

“Now, mamma, I want to ask you a question,” said Ida,
who was of an intelligent, inquiring mind. “ Was it really
very sinful in Saul to persecute the Christians and approve

27



28 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



of the death of St. Stephen, when he honestly thought that
they were teaching a false religion? Had not God com-
manded the Israelites to punish those who wished to lead
others astray ?”

“Saul certainly acted in ignorance,’ replied Lady
Laurie; “but the whole question turns upon whether the
ignorance was wilful or not. Had not Saul evidence
enough to make him believe, if he had not been resolved
not to believe ?” ;

“JT don’t quite understand,” said Ida.

“Saul, according to Mr. Birk’s Chronology, was in Jeru-
salem six years after the resurrection of the Lord, when
many-witnesses of that resurrection must have been living.
He must have met with persons who had seen the miracles
of Christ; he may have even beheld Lazarus, who, six
years before, had himself been raised from the dead. Saul
was a student under the learned Gamaliel, who, from his
speech recorded in the fifth chapter of Acts, seems to have
been a liberal, clear-headed man; Saul would not have
learned bigotry from him.”

“And yet Saul was as bigoted as any Jew could be,”
observed Harold.

«Then Saul, as a learned Pharisee, must have been well
acquainted with the Old Testament Scriptures, and could
have found sufficient proofs in them that the Lord Jesus
was indeed ‘He of whom Moses and the prophets did
write.’ ”

“TJ don’t quite see that,” observed Ida.

“Let us sit down again, my child, and re-open our
Bibles. Let us place ourselves in the position of a student
of the Scriptures in the days of Saul of Tarsus. Turn first
to the ninth chapter of Daniel, and let Harold read aloud
the beginning of the twenty-sixth verse.”

Harold reads—“‘ After threescore and two weeks shall
Messiah be cut off, but not for Himself’ But the name



BIGOTRY AND UNBELIEF. 29



of the Lord Jesus is not in the verse; why is He called
Messiah ?

“Messiah means anointed, as also does the name
Christ. Kings and priests were anointed with oil.
Christ is both king and priest, and was anointed with the
- Holy Spirit. Saul and all intelligent Jews would under-
stand the verse as meaning, the Anointed One shall die.”

“ But what do the weeks mean ?” asked Ida; “I thought
that the Lord came to earth hundreds of years after
Daniel died.”

“A day in prophetical language usually stands for a
year, a week for seven years,’ was the reply. “Before
Christ’s coming there was amongst pious Jews, like Simeon,
an expectation of His appearing. Saul seems neither to
have noticed the time appointed, nor the prophecy that |
‘Messiah was to be cwt off.”

“Were there many other such prophecies?” asked Ida.

“Turn over just to a few of them. You and Harold
shall read them out alternately. Look out Micah, ver. 2,
for the prophecy regarding the place of Christ’s birth.”

Ida reads—*‘‘ But thou, Bethlehem Ephratah, though
thou be little among the thousands of Judah, yet out of
thee shall He come forth unto Me that is to be. the ruler
of Israel, whose goings forth have been of old from ever-
lasting.”

Harold. From everlasting! What would Saul and
the Jews, who were so angry at the Saviour calling Him-
self the Son of God, think of such a verse as that ?

Lda. I remember that when the learned men quoted
that verse to show Herod that the Messiah would be born
in Bethlehem, they left out altogether that last part of
the verse. JI suppose that they did not know what to
make of the declaration that Christ’s goings forth have
been of old from everlasting. That verse showed that He
could not have been a mere man.



30 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Lady Lawrie. As puzzling to. the unbelieving Jews
must have been this verse in the eleventh Psalm, “ Thow
art My Son, this day have I begotten Thee.”

Ida. Or this in my favourite forty-fifth Psalm, “Thy
throne, O God, is for ever and ever; the sceptre of Thy
kingdom is a righteous sceptre ; Thou lovest righteousness -
and hatest wickedness, therefore God, Thy God, hath
anointed Thee with the oil of gladness above Thy
fellows.”

Harold. That must have been written of Christ, who is
God, yet has men for His “ fellows.” I did not know that
we could find out from the Old Testament as well as the
New, that the Saviour is God indeed.

Lady L. Try and remember two special Old Testament
verses by each of which both the divinity and humanity
of Christ can be proved, I mean that he is both God and
Man.

Ida, after reflection. I cannot remember such verses,
unless they be those that we have been reading.

Harold. I have found one—the Christmas verse, the |
one which mother gave me to paint for the school. “ For
unto us a Child is born, unto us a Son is given. And the
government shall be upon His shoulders. And His name
shall be called Wonderful, Counsellor, roe Micury Gop,
THE EVERLASTING FatTHer, the Prince of Peace.” That
verse is in the ninth chapter of Isaiah.

Ida. I do not know where to look for the second verse
which you mentioned. :

Lady L. Turn to Zechariah xiii. 7th verse, it is a verse
quoted in the gospel as relating to Christ.

Ida rveads—Awake, O sword, against my Shepherd,
and against the Man that is My fellow, saith the Lord of
Hosts. Smite the Shepherd, and the sheep shall be
scattered.

Harold, The Man, and yet Gop’s FELLow; the Shep-



i
¢
i
Â¥







BIGOTRY AND UNBELIEF. 31



herd who was to be smitten! How could any Jew reading
such Old Testament Scriptures not see that the Saviour
for whom they looked must be God as well as Man ?

Ida. But Saul did not believe that the Lord Jesus was
the Person thus described in the Bible. How could the
Jew have been sure ?

Lady L. Saul, had he not been blinded by prejudice
and bigotry, might have seen how exactly the Lord’s life
and death fulfilled prophecies written hundreds of years
before the event. The twenty-second Psalm is one striking
prophecy, telling of the piercing of hands and feet, though
crucifixion was a punishment unknown to the Jews when
the Psalm was written by David. Jsaiah liii. describes
the scourging, Isaiah li. the shame and the spitting which
the Saviour endured for our sakes. In the wonderful
prophecy in Zechariah xi. the exact swm received by
Judas for betraying his Master is mentioned, and the very
use to which the blood-money was put. Ida, read the
12th and 13th verses aloud.

Ida did so, and then observed, “I do not think that any
one could have understood such a very strange prophecy
as this, till all came to pass so very exactly.”

Harold. I wonder whether Saul ever had read it.

Lady L. He doubtless had read it, as well as the other
prophecies contained in the Scriptures.

Ida. Then indeed it was strange that he did not
believe.

Lady L. Suppose that we had received a letter giving
us due notice that the Queen would visit us here, and
come in humble guise. Suppose then that our Sovereign
appeared about the time when we had been led to expect
her, not wearing a crown, not in any great state, but with
official papers signed and sealed, stating that she was
indeed our Queen.

Ida. What do you mean by the papers ?



32 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Lady L. I mean the miracles performed by our Lord,
performed in open day, some in the sight of hundreds—
even thousands of people.

“Tike the miracle of the feeding of the five thousand,”
said Harold.

Lady L. Suppose that in addition to this evidence, we
had a large picture of the Queen (I am alluding now to
the prophecies), in which every feature was exactly like
that of her who claimed to be our Sovereign Lady; should
we have the smallest excuse for saying, “ This is not our
Queen,” any excuse for despising, rejecting, insulting, and
casting her out of the palace ?

Harold. Oh! mother, these unbelieving Jews had no
excuse at all. They must have been simply determined
not to believe.

Ida. I only wonder why God forgave Saul after he had
shown such hardness of heart!

Lady L. Let us close our meeting by reading his own
words in the first of his letters to his beloved young
disciple, Timothy. The lady turned to the Ist chapter of
Ist Timothy and read aloud in the 18th, 15th, and 16th
verses, St. Paul’s own description of himself. “ Who was
before a blasphemer and a persecutor, and injurious, but
I obtained mercy because I did it ignorantly in unbelief.
This is a faithful saying, and worthy of all acceptation,
that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners, of
whom I am chief. Howbeit for this cause I obtained
mercy, that in me first Jesus Christ might show forth all
long-suffering, for a pattern to those which should here-
after believe on Him to life everlasting.”

The Bible-reading and Lady Laurie’s prayer had not
been without their effect on the agitated mimd of
Harold Hartley. He could have endured nothing that
came in the form of amusement; he would have shrunk
even from much expression of pity. But the solemn



‘BIGOTRY AND UNBELIEF. 33

passages relating to a crucified Saviour took him for the
time out of himself; and the account of the blessed peace
of the martyred Stephen made the fate of his own
father appear less unutterably dreadful. In the night,
indeed, the poor boy was haunted by feverish dreams; he
heard the roll of the horrible Indian drum, and fancied
that he saw murderous crowds approaching; yet even
with those’ dark forms seemed mixed those of white-robed
angels. Harold dreamed that he saw his father kneeling,
and looking up with radiant joy, and that he heard from
the missionary’s lips the prayer, “Lord! lay not this sin
to their charge!” Harold awoke, indeed, with a heavy
weight on his heart, but still he was able to bless the
Lord who had given to His servant the crown of life
which He has prepared for all who love Him.



CHAPTER V.
CONVERSION.

THE next day, which was Saturday, was a very dreary
one for poor Harold. The hands of the clock seemed
to move more slowly than they ever had-moved before.
The fatherless boy could settle down to no occupation; if
he took up a book he was unable to grasp its meaning.
He did not care for his garden; he would not touch his
carpentering tools. The dismal preparation for putting
himself and his brother into mourning added to the sense
of gloom. Yet it hurt Harold more to hear Robin
whistling merrily on the staircase as if nothing had
happened, and Ida practising scales on the piano until
her thoughtful mother stopped her. Harold was glad
when the glaring July sun went down at last, he almost
wondered how it could shine so brightly upon a world so
full of sorrow and sin. The quiet hour for Bible-reading
was welcome to Harold; there was nothing then to jar on
his feelings. When seating himself by his mother-like
friend, Harold seemed to enter a little sanctuary made
holy by the presence of God.

Lady L. We are now going to read one of the most
interesting passages of Bible history. Do you remember
that there are three accounts in Scripture of the con-
version of St. Paul ?

Harold. I can only remember two; that in the ninth
chapter of Acts, and that in Paul’s speech before Agrippa.

Ida. Oh! do you not remember that he also told the
34





















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































“



CONVERSION. 35



Jews all about his conversion when he stood on some
stairs, in the midst of a terrible riot ?

Lady L. Now I propose that while I read aloud from
the ninth chapter, Ida should have before her the account
in the twenty-second, and you, Harold, that in the twenty-
sixth, so that each giving some extra detail, should, as it
were, fill up the picture.

Robin. And what am I to do? I don’t want to be
left out.

Lady L. You shall bring me the map, and I will show
you the two places, Jerusalem and Damascus, of which
we are going to read.

Robin runs for the Bible atlas, and Lady Laurie
jinds the right map.

Robin. There, I’ll keep my two fingers on the two spots.

Lady L. You see that Damascus is a city nearly 150
miles to the north of Jerusalem. Can any of you
remember the place in the Bible where the first mention
is made of Damascus ?

Silence follows the question.

Lady L. Do you remember the name of Abraham’s
faithful servant who went to find a wife for Isaac ?

Ida and Harold almost together. Eliezer of Damascus.

Lady L. Thus you see that there was a place called
Damascus about 3700 years ago.

Ida. It must be the oldest city in the world.

Lady L. Perhaps the oldest city now standing. Can
any of you tell me of any other remarkable person who
came from Damascus ?

Again silence follows the question.

Lady I. Damascus was the capital of Syria. Who
remembers a Syrian general ?

Harold. The wicked Hazael who murdered his master,
King Benhadad, and afterwards showed such cruelty to
the people of Israel.



36 PICTURES OF S?. PAUL.



Lady £. There is another whom even our little Robin
may remember. Tell me, Robin, who was the leper who
dipped seven times in the river Jordan and was made whole.

Robin, eagerly. Naaman the Syrian, who went where
the little slave girl from Israel told him to go.

Lady L. Thus we have interesting ancient historical
recollections connected with Damascus. The place itself
is beautifully situated. So much so that it has been com-
pared to Paradise itself. The Damascus roses are famous.
Now let us commence our reading.

Reads—And Saul, yet breathing out threatenings and
slaughter against the disciples of the Lord, went unto the
High Priest and desired of him letters to Damascus to
the synagogues, that if he found any of this way, whether
they were men or women, he might bring them bound
unto Jerusalem.

Ida. I see that St. Paul says in the twenty-second chap-
ter that “all the estate of the elders” gave letters as well
as the High Priest.

Harold reads—Authority and commission from the chief
priests.

Ida. They must have put great trust in Saul.

Harold. They thought that he hated Christians just as
much as they themselves did.

Lady L. reads—And as he journeyed he came near
Damascus, and suddenly there shined about him a light
from Heaven.

Ida. It was “about noon,” and the light was “a great
light.”

Harold. “Above the brightness of the sun.”

Lady L. reads—And he fell to the earth.

Harold. I see that it was not only Saul who fell to the
earth, but all his companions also.

Ida. In this chapter St. Paul says, “They that were
with me saw indeed the light, and were afraid.”





























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Tue Lorp Mrrrine Sr. Paun on THE Way.



CONVERSION. 37



Lady L. But only Saul himself saw the Lord Jesus.

Harold. Did Saul see the Lord Jesus? That is not
put in this chapter.

Ida. Nor in that which I have to read.

Lady L. Turn to the fifteenth chapter of 1 Corinthians.
Paul (the same, you know, as Saul) writes in the eighth
verse concerning the risen Lord, last of all he was seen
of me also.

Harold. I never thought of looking for St. Paul’s history
in his letters.

Lady L. If you do not do so you will miss much. The
epistles contain various particulars of what happened to
the Apostle, which you will find nowhere else. Now let
us go on with the story without interruption till we come
to the end of the passage.

Reading.

“ And he fell to the earth, and heard a voice saying unto
him, Saul, Saul, why persecutest thou me? And he said,
Who art Thou, Lord? And the Lord said, Iam Jesus
whom thou persecutest. It is hard for thee to kick against
the pricks.

“And he, trembling and astonished, said, Lord, what
wilt thou have me to do? And the Lord said unto him,
Arise, and go into the city, and it shall be told thee
what thou must do. And the men which journeyed
with him stood speechless, hearing a voice, but seeing
no man.

“And Saul arose from the earth; and when his eyes
were opened he saw no man; but they led him by the
hand, and brought him into Damascus. And he was three
days without sight, and neither did eat nor drink.”

Ludy L. Now, Ida, from your chapter can you add any-
thing to this account ?

Ida, How is this? We read just now that Saul’s com-



38 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.

panions heard a voice, and here St. Paul says, “ They
heard not the voice of Him that spake to me.”

Lady L. I do not think that the two passages are at all
difficult to explain. St. Paul’s companions heard a sound,
but they did not make out any words. So, when in answer
to Christ’s prayer, “ Father ! glorify Thy name!” there came
a voice from Heaven, “I have both glorified it, and will
glorify it again,” some people said that it thundered.
They heard, indeed, an awful sound, but could not distin-
guish articulate words.

Ida. Here is an interesting particular. Paul tells what
it was that struck him blind. “I could not see for the
glory of that light.”

Harold. And in my chapter I have a great deal more
of what the Lord said to poor, Pines trembling Saul as he
lay in the dust before Him.

Reads—Rise and stand upon thy fet for I have appeared
unto thee for this purpose, to make thee a minister and a
witness both of these things which thou hast seen, and of
those things in which I will appear unto thee, delivering
thee from the people, and from the Gentiles, unto whom
Inow send thee, to open their eyes, and to turn them
from darkness to light, and from the power of Satan unto
God.

Lady IL. What wonderful mercy, what tender grace,
did the Lord display in His dealings with the once proud
persecutor. The Saviour would not leave Saul one hour
in despair. Christ spoke to him of a future glorious work
as He might have spoken to His faithful disciples, Peter
or John. The Lord had just turned Saul from darkness
to light, from the power of Satan to that of God, and He
assures the poor trembling penitent that he shall be a
means of converting others.

Harold. And Saul actually saw the Lord—saw Him,
perhaps, with the very look which He turned upon Peter,



CONVERSION. 39



when that apostle had denied his Master with oaths and
curses !

Ida. I do like to think of that word, Why persecutest
thow Me? The Lord considers any wrong to His people
as done to Himself.

Robin. He minds what bad people are doing in India.

The little boy’s simple remark struck a chord in the
hearts of two of those who heard him. The Lord was,
indeed, watching all the sad events passing in the East,
counting injuries to His servants as done to Himself,
regarding each drop of Christian blood shed as His
own.

Ida. I wonder if any of Saul’s companions were con-
verted.

Lady L. There is nothing to lead us to think that they
were.

Ida. But they saw a light from heaven, heard a sound,
and were frightened, and fell to the ground.

Robin. They didn’t say, “What wilt Thou have us to
do?”

Lady L. It strikes me that the difference between Saul
and his comrades is like that between real and nominal
Christians.

Robin. What does that mean ?

Lady LZ. A nominal Christian is one who is a Christian
only in name ;—alas! multitudes of such are to be found
even here in happy England. Such people see some light,
for they read the Bible ; but they do not look up to, and
love a personal Saviour. They hear something, for they
listen to sermons; but the Word of Truth does not find
its way into their hearts. They may have some fear of
God, but not the deep love of those who know that they
have been forgiven.

Harold. As Robin said, they do not ery, “Lord! what
wilt thou have me to do?”



40 PICTURES OF ST, PAUL.

Lady L. Ab! my children, what is real conversion but
seeing Christ as our own Saviour, listening to His voice
as that of our own dear Master, and then humbly, faith-
fully, asking the question, “ What wilt thou have me to
do?” with fixed resolve, by the Spirit’s help, to do it!

Ida. Shall we take Saul’s question as our motto for
next week ?

Lady L. Would that we all might take it as our motto
through life !

Harold. I was just thinking that I would keep away
from church to-morrow, for I hate meeting people just
now,—and that I would ask you to let me off attending
the day-school on Monday; but perhaps going to church,
and studying hard in my class, are the very things that
the Lord would have me to do.

Lady L. I think that you judge rightly, my son.

Harold. But these are such very little duties. One
would rather have something given one to do that is
grand and noble.

Lady L. The first thing given to Saul to do was very
small and simple indeed. It was merely “Go to Damascus,”
the city that lay straight before him. So the duty imme-
diately before us is our Damascus, however trifling it may
seem to our view; from it we may be called to wider
spheres of usefulness, self-denial, and glory.



CHAPTER VI.
SIGHT RESTORED.

“ Don’t make a noise like that, kicking your heels against
the leg of the table, as if you didn’t know that it is
Sunday,” cried Ida on the following afternoon, glancing
up from her book with displeasure at Robin, who was
perched on the edge of the school-room table.

“T’ve done what I could. I’ve been to church, and
learnt my verse, and fed the pigeons. You’ve not done
what you ought to do; you’ve not read to old deaf
Mrs. Gaffer, who can’t get to church.”

“You ’re a saucy, impertinent boy,” cried Ida, all the
more provoked because there was some truth in the child’s
remark.

“You know that mother told you that she would like
you to read the Bible to old Mrs. Gaffer, while she is
busy with her Sunday class; but you just amuse yourself
with a book, and Robin kicked the leg of the table more
vigorously than before.

'“Mind your own business!” cried Ida, with raised voice
and heightened colour.

“T’ve no business to mind,” said practical Robin. “I
can’t read to the blind old woman like you, or write out
the sermon like Harold.”

“You do nothing but worry other people!” cried Ida,
as Robin finished his speech by another strong kick.

41



42 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



“You’re a cross ” but here Robin was interrupted
in saying what was better left unsaid, by Lady Laurie’s
entering the school-room.

“What have we here!” cried the lady; “loud voices
and angry looks! Is this the way in which my children
observe the holy day of rest!”

“Didn’t Ida agree that she’d say all the week ‘ What
wouldst Thou have me to do?’ and she won't read to Mrs.
Gaffer. That’s what she’s bid to do, and she won't do it,
and then she’s cross with me.”

“Robin, Robin, there is one thing which we all are
bidden to do, one command of the Lord which we all are
called to obey. I fear that you both have forgotten it.
Ida, what is the Saviour’s New Command ?”

“ Love one another,” replied the unwilling girl “But
Robin is the most worrying, troublesome boy in the
world!”

“And is Ida Laurie the most patient, unselfish girl in
the world ?” asked the gentle mother.

Ida coloured to the roots of her flaxen hair.

“Come now, let me see which of my children has best
learned yesterday’s lesson ; which of them, having received
such an answer to the question, ‘What wouldst Thou have
me to do?’ is the most ready to obey it !”

Robin jumped down from the table, half upsetting it by
his rough way of doing so, and running up to Ida, held up
his round ruddy face for a kiss.

To stoop down and give it was a harder struggle to Ida.
But she was a girl with a conscience, and honestly wished
to do what was right. So she touched little Robin’s cheek
with her lips.

“Now, Robin, bring your Bible picture-book,” said
Lady Laurie; “shall I tell you some of the beautiful
stories ?”

Robin, quite tired of idleness, was delighted with the



SIGHT RESTORED. 43

offer. As Robin rushed off for the book Ida glanced at
her mother, and the girl’s conscience smote her,
for Lady Laurie looked so much tired, and after hold-
ing a Bible-class in the village, needed a little quiet
and rest.

“Shall I, instead of you, tell the Bible stories to
Robin?” said Ida, in rather a hesitating tone, for she
would have much preferred going on with her reading.

“Thank you, my love,” said Lady Laurie, handing
to her daughter the picture-book which Robin had
brought.

“T’d rather have mother,” said bluff Robin, who did
not like the arrangement.

“But, my Robin, mother has a headache to-day, Friday
tired her so much,” said Lady Laurie. “It is kind of Ida
to offer to tell you Bible stories instead of reading her
book.”

The gentle words fell as oil on troubled waters. Ida,
with her little companion seated on a footstool beside her
found it a really pleasant occupation to recount Bible
stories to a bright intelligent child, whilst her weary
mother, quiet in the drawing-room, fell asleep on the sofa,
When Robin, after twenty minutes spent over the pictures
ran off to the garden, Ida, instead of resuming her book,
went out to read the Bible to poor old Bess Gaffer, who
lived in a cottage almost close to the gate. The conscious-
_ness of having performed little duties gave Ida more
pleasure than indulging her selfish inclinations would
have done.

The Vicar had spoken truly. Ida was being trained
amongst flowers. More of sweetness would be dropped
into the white waxen comb which would be so goodly
and fair if but filled with the honey of loving-kindness.

It was with a brighter expression on her face than
it usually wore that Ida came to the evening reading.



44 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Lady Lawrie. Now let us commence at the tenth verse
of the ninth chapter of Acts. My Ida shall take the first
turn.















































































































































































































































































































































= SS

TH Srrert Srraicur iv Damascus.
Reading.
And there was a certain disciple at Damascus, named

Ananias, and to him said the Lord in a vision, Ananias,
and he said, Behold JT am here, Lord.





:
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:
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SIGHT RESTORED. 45



And the Lord said unto him, Arise, and go into the
street which is called Straight, and inquire in the house
of Judas for one called Saul of Tarsus; for behold he
prayeth, and hath seen in a vision a man named Ananias
coming in, and putting his hand upon him that he might
receive his sight. *

Harold. Surely it was no new thing for Saul to pray ?
I thought that the Pharisees, and he was one, made long
prayers.

Lady L. Saul’s was now the prayer of humility, it was
now the prayer of faith, and was doubtless uttered in the
name of God’s dear Son. As regards true faith and
humility, before the Pharisee’s conversation it could not
have been said that “he prayeth.”

Robin. If I’d been that man in Damascus, I wouldn’t
have liked to go to Saul. I’d have been afraid that he
was pretending, and would catch me if I went to him,
and shut me up in prison.

Harold. You will hear that Ananias was afraid.

Reading.

Then Ananias answered, Lord, I have heard by many
of this man, how much evil he hath done to Thy saints at
Jerusalem, and here he hath authority from the chief
priests to bind all that call on Thy name.

But the Lord said unto him, Go thy way, for he is a
chosen vessel unto Me to bear My name before the
Gentiles, and kings, and the children of Israel, for I will
show him how great things he must suffer for My sake.

Harold. I should have thought that the Lord would
have said what great things he will do for My sake.

* It is an interesting fact that a school for the blind has been
established by Christians in “a street called Straight” in Damascus.
Another pleasing fact is that in Damascus there is now a Depdt of a
Bible Society.



46 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Lady L. These words have always struck me as being
most encouraging to those who seem to be able to do
little but suffer. The Lord, even with a gifted apostle,
seems to place patient endurance above active work. We
all admire the energetic zealous labourer; but who can
say that such will have a higher place in heaven than
some meek sufferer, who has only been able to glorify God
by patience and submission on a bed of pain.

Ida. Oh! mamma, could half-deaf, half-blind Mrs.
Gaffer, though she is so patient and good, ever come near
to St. Paul ?

Lady L. No mortal can with certainty answer that
question. When the Lord was asked who would be
greatest in the kingdom of heaven, He called a little child
as an example of humility.

Harold. And almost the highest praise that the Lord
ever gave, was when He spoke of a poor widow who had
only two mites in the world.

Robin. I want to hear if the Damascus man went to
poor Saul, who was praying, and crying, and eating
nothing at all.

Reading.

And Ananias went his way, and entered into the house,
and putting his hands on him said, Brother Saul, the
Lord, even Jesus, that appeared unto thee in the way as
thou camest, hath sent me, that thou mightest receive
thy sight, and be filled with the Holy Ghost.

And immediately there fell from his eyes as it had
been scales, and he received sight forthwith, and arose
and was baptised. And when he had received meat he
was strengthened.

Robin. Oh! how happy Saul must have been! But
why did the Damascus man call him “brother” when he
was not his brother at all ?





SIGHT RESTORED. 47

Lady L. Because all who are in Christ are one great
family, whether or not they be relatives by birth.

Robin. Just as we three are all one family, and you
love us all alike. But why did the Lord send that man
to cure Saul’s eyes; could He not have made Saul see by
just speaking a word Himself?

Lady £. Tt is usually the Lord’s pleasure to work
through feeble mortals. He does not need us in the least,
but He graciously wills to employ us. It was an honour
to Ananias to be sent with a message to poor, blind,
penitent Saul.

Robin. Then it is an honour to Ida to be sent to poor
old blind Mrs. Gaffer ?

Lady Laurie’s unhesitating “Certamly it is,” rather
surprised Ida Laurie. She had looked on visits to the
afflicted old Christian as a duty, rather an unpleasant
duty; but that it should be an honour to a well-dressed,
pretty young lady, who knew Music and French, to be
sent to read to a ploughman’s widow, in a poor little
cottage, had never entered into her mind.

Lady L. Let us continue our chapter.

Reading.

And straightway he preached Christ in the synagogues,
that he is the Son of God. But all that heard Him were
amazed, and said, Is not this He that destroyed them
which called on this name in Jerusalem, and came hither
for that intent that he might bring them bound unto the
chief priests ?

Harold. They must have been astonished, indeed.
Saul’s change was as wonderful, I think, as Lazarus being
raised from the dead.

Lady L. There is some resemblance between the two
miracles. Saul was raised from a state of spiritual death
to the glory of God, by the voice of the Saviour.



48 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.





Reading.

But Saul increased the more in strength, and confounded
the Jews which dwelt in Damascus, proving that this is
very Christ. And after that many days were fulfilled, the
Jews took counsel to kill him.

Lady L. Let us stop for a few moments. Can any of —
you tell me how many days were fulfilled ?

Ida. There is no mention in the Bible.

Lady L. Here is another of the passages in St. Paul’s
life in which we gain information from his epistles. But
for the Apostle’s letter to the Galatians, we should never
have known that shortly after his conversion he visited
Arabia. Turn to the first chapter of that epistle, and
read the second part of the 16th verse, and that which
follows.

Reading.

Immediately I conferred not with flesh and blood,
neither went I up to Jerusalem to them that were
apostles before me, but I went into Arabia, and returned
again unto Damascus.

Ida. Why did Paul go into Arabia ?

Lady L. Possibly for solemn communion with God,
before beginning his great missionary work. Can any of
you remember two great saints who, in Horeb in Arabia,
were, in solitude, permitted to draw so very near to the
Lord as to hold solemn converse with the Most High ?

Harold. Moses, when he saw the bush burning with
fire, and yet not consumed.

Ida. And afterwards, when he went up twice alone to
the heights of the Mount.

Harold. And Elijah, when after a fire and a whirlwind,
he heard the still small voice, and hid his face in his
mantle.





se
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SIGHT RESTORED. 49



Lady L. How long Paul remained in Arabia we know
not, nor whether he too visited Horeb; but the letter to
the Galatians informs us that he did not revisit Jerusalem
till three years after his conversion.

Harold. Mother, I feel that I am very ignorant, indeed,
about the Epistles of St. Paul. I think that I will begin
them, and read them steadily all through.

Lady L. You will be like one going through a rich
mine of jewels, where every step will show you some new
and precious gem. The Epistles are a very treasury of
Divine wisdom, shining in the light of Divine love.



CHAPTER VII
AN ARRIVAL.

“T COULD not help running over to give you the news!”
exclaimed a voice, which every one recognised as Miss
Petty’s. She came eagerly into the room, too impatient
to ring the bell. Miss Petty came with her blue veil
and her green parasol in her hand, though it was
long past sunset, and the maid had just brought in
the lamp.

“What news—good or bad?” exclaimed Lady Laurie,
hastily rising, for the sad telegram seen on the previous
Friday had made her nervous.

“Good or bad!” repeated Miss Petty; “well, that’s as
it may be, it’s hard to say.” She shook hands with Lady .
Laurie, nodded to the children, and took a seat. “Ah!
Harold, I’m glad to see you more composed. We must
all submit, you know ”-—

“You said that you brought news?” interrupted Lady
Laurie, anxious to take the attention of the tormentor
from her poor boy.

“Oh! this dreadful Mutiny turns everything upside
down, even our house could not escape. A lieutenant in
a native regiment married our cousin—fancy a lieutenant —
having the imprudence to marry! And so she, and all
her three children ””—Miss Petty paused, in order to enjoy
Lady Laurie’s look of anxious suspense.

“ Not killed, I trust!” faltered the lady.

50















AN ARRIVAL. 51



“Killed! Oh! dear, no; of course they were sent double
quick out of the country, got free passage in a troop ship,
were half-boiled in the Red Sea, and grilled in the desert,
for it’s a shocking season to come from India. We did
not even know they were coming, when quite suddenly
the whole party landed on us half-an-hour ago, with such
a mountain of luggage that one can hardly turn round in
the hall!”

On hearing that Miss Petty’s news was nothing very
dreadful, Harold Hartley made a quiet retreat out of the
room.

“Tt put us out most dreadfully,” continued Miss Theresa,
Petty. “It was very inconsiderate in Delia Smith, but she
had not one shilling to rub against another, so could not,
she says, stop at a hotel when she landed to-day. My
brother, the Doctor, had actually to pay for her fly from
the station !”

“Poor lady!” ejaculated Lady Laurie.

“You may well say ‘poor lady’” cried Miss Theresa.
“Three children, the eldest only three years of age, all with
boils on their heads, and sores in their eyes,—and com-
plexions like turnips! You never saw such a wretched
set in your life! And Delia herself looks quite washed
out, as limp as wetted blotting-paper! She does nothing
but cry for the husband whom she has left behind—probably
to be murdered. JI am sure I don’t know what to make of
them all! We’ve to cram them into the little spare room.
My brother, the Doctor, and I never had such a worry in
the course of our lives !”

Ida turned away to the window to hide a smile. She
had no great compassion for Miss Theresa, and could not
help thinking that she might as well have stopped to help
a poor weak mother in looking after three sick children,
and unpacking a mountain of luggage, as have run off to
tell every one of her troubles.



52 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



“T hope soon to call and see poor Mrs. Smith,” said
Lady Laurie; “but to-morrow I must go up to town for
the day to complete some necessary business which I left
unfinished on Friday.”

“The worst of all is that Delia has brought a black
creature with her,” said Miss Petty.

“A cat or a dog?” asked Robin.

“ Not a cat or dog, but a bearer.”

“A bear!” exclaimed Robin, opening his brown eyes
very wide, and wondering whether the beast was to share
the little spare room with the lady and children. He was
quite sure that Miss Petty would keep it out of the
drawing-room.

“Stupid child! a bearer is a black man! I can’t
bear the sight of the creature! We must get rid of
him as soon as possible; but he seems to be a kind
of nursery-maid to the children. We must lock him
up in the stable at night, or I am sure that we shall
all be murdered !”

Robin looked grave; he thought that a bearer must
be something like a bear, at least in fierceness of
temper. _

It was a real relief to Lady Laurie when Miss Petty
hurried off to tell her news to Mrs. Miller and the Bullens,
who might, without any great loss, have waited till Mon-
day to hear it.

On the following day, Lady Laurie started at dawn
by an early train, so as to be back by sunset. Harold
rose very early to see her off, and carry her bag to
the station, for the lady kept no conveyance. She
had given up her pony-chaise when she had adopted
the missionary’s sons; but they never knew why she had
done so.

“Mother, Iam going to study hard in school to-day,”
said Harold, “that I may the sooner cease to be a burden



AN ARRIVAL. 53





on you. I think that is what he would have wished me
to do.”

Harold kept his word, though it was difficult for him to
keep his attention on his tasks. He returned home by a
different path from that which he usually took, for he
wished to avoid being joined on the way by his merry
schoolmates.

Young Hartley had almost reached Dame Gaffer’s cot-
tage, which was not fifty yards from the gate of Willow-
‘dale Lodge, when he heard, beyond a bend in the road,
such a noise of hooting and yelling that he thought that
men and boys must be in pursuit of some mad dog which
was running in his direction. The next moment there
came in view a white-robed, turbaned native of India,
trying to escape from a rude rabble of village lads, and
two or three school-boys, who were evidently bent on
hunting him down as if he were a beast of prey.
The poor Hindu looked terribly frightened, sometimes
running, sometimes stopping and turning round, with
the palms of his hands pressed together, as if to implore
for mercy.

“ Halloa! what are you after!” exclaimed Harold, as he
saw one of his schoolfellows in pursuit stoop to pick up a
large stone, with evident intent to fling it at the unfortu-
nate stranger. ,

“ Harold, you’re the last to stand up for the nigger!”
cried Tom Miller, pausing with the stone in his hand.
He’s one of the wretches who killed your own father. If
I were in your place I’d pummel his head, knock him
down, and jump upon him—I would !”

Harold felt his cheeks glow like fire at the words; but
what Lady Laurie had said to him about’ forgiveness had
not been spoken in vain. Besides, the English boy could
not stand tamely by and see a helpless stranger maltreated.

“Back with you all!” cried Harold, in a tone of com-



54 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



mand; “it’s unmanly to hunt him thus, however bad he ~
may be.”

But the rabble were unwilling to desist from their
cowardly attack. Tom Miller’s stone came hurtling
through the air, though it fell happily short of its mark.
The yelling and the rush were renewed. Harold caught
the poor native by the arm,—drew him within the cottage,
then instantly shut and bolted the door.

The old widow within, seated on her rush-bottomed
chair, pealing potatoes, looked startled and rather fright-
ened at the sudden intrusion, and the yells which even her
dull ears could hear. The Hindu fell on his knees and
poured forth mingled thanks and entreaties in the tongue
of his country.

Oh! how strange to Harold sounded that tongue. It
was by no means unfamiliar, for the boy had not left India
till he was seven years old, and had spoken the language
with fluency and correctness. Harold had, indeed, never
heard it spoken since his arrival in England, but he had
scarcely forgotten it at all. Mr. Hartley, who had cherished
a hope that his first-born might one day join him in the
Mission field, had desired him to keep up his knowledge
of Hindoostani by reading a little every day in his Roman-
Urdu Bible. It was like a voice from dream-land to
Harold to hear the language again, and after the news
from India, the sight of one of its natives gave him acute
pain. But young Hartley’s course of duty was clear. He
must protect the persecuted, and not give way to pre-
judice, or a cruel thirst for revenge. To the great surprise
of the Hindu, Harold told him in Urdu to fear nothing,
for that he would see him safe home.

The cottage window, which was open on account of the
heat, was crowded outside with faces. Had it not been
too small to admit even a boy, some of the rabble would
have tried to climb in.



AN ARRIVAL. 55



“I say, Hartley speaks the fellow’s own jabber!”
exclaimed Tom; “I wonder he does not kick the nigger
out, instead of talking to him like that.”

“You’d better be off, all of you!” cried Harold, “or
I'll report you to the police. It’s not like Englishmen to
set on an unarmed fellow. If you want to fight natives,
be off to India and fight them!”

It was a little time before the space in front of the
widow’s cottage was thoroughly cleared. When the last
of the rabble had disappeared, Harold asked the native his
name, and inquired how he came to be in the country.

The Hindu said that his name was Prem Das, and that
he had come with Ismith Sahiba, as he called Mrs. Smith.
He had always been faithful to his Sahib, and had come
across the “black-water,” the title given by Indians to
the sea, which they dread, to take care of the Baba log, in
India the common name for children.

When Harold was able to take a calm look at the
native, even to a prejudiced eye there was nothing repul-
sive in his appearance. There was no one in Foreham, or
many miles round it, of form so graceful, or features cast
in such a mould of delicate beauty. Prem Das’s fine eyes,
shaded by long dark lashes, had a mild expression which
made it difficult to imagine him as belonging to a
murderous race. Harold felt glad that he had arrived in’
time to save the stranger from serious harm.

After waiting for awhile in the cottage, Harold fulfilled
his promise of escorting Prem Dds to Foreham Villa, the
residence of the village doctor and his sister, Miss Petty.
The youth and his protegé had to pass some dwellings on
the way, and it was very disagreeable indeed to Harold to
hear remarks made by two men standing at the door of a
public-house, on his being seen in company with a native
of India. The meeting was the common subject of con-
versation in every tap-room, and over their greasy penny



56 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



papers artisans and labourers talked of slaughter and
revenge.

But when in the evening Harold walked home from the
station with Lady Laurie, and told her of his adventure, it,
was a sweet reward to meet her gaze turned upon him
with loving approval, and to hear her say, “ My boy, you
did what your merciful, forgiving Lord would have you to
do.”

Lady Laurie reached home a good deal tired, but she
would not on that account give up the little Bible-
reading.



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St. Pavy Escapine From Damascus.



CHAPTER VIII.
VISITS TO JERUSALEM.

Lady L. Rosin, do you remember how much time passed
before St. Paul went back to Jerusalem ?

Robin. Three years, and he went first to Arabia.

Lady I. Well remembered, my boy.

Robin. Perhaps Paul was afraid to go back to Jerusalem,
because the cruel Jews lived there, and they would be so
angry with him for leaving them, and loving the Lord
Jesus Christ.

Lady L. There were Jews in Damascus too, and they
were very angry indeed; we shall hear this evening that
St. Paul’s life was in very great danger.

Reading.

And after many days were fulfilled, the Jews took
counsel to kill him, but their lying in wait was known of
Saul. And they watched the gates night and day to kill
him. Then the disciples took him by night, and let him
down by the wall in a basket.

Robin. Oh! was not he frightened lest the rope should
break, or any Jew come by chance that way, and find him
out and kill him.

Harold. I don’t believe that St. Paul was frightened.

Robin. We'll ask bim when we see him.

Ida. See him! What do you, mean ?

Robin. Won't we all meet him in heaven if we love
the Lord? Mother often says that we shall. St. Paul
loved the Lord very much, and I love Him too, so why
should we not meet ?

57



58 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Ida. Robin has such very odd thoughts.

Harold. But I don’t see that this is a foolish one.
Mother, do you not think that we—I mean that real
Christians—will meet with those of whom we read in
the Bible, and perhaps even be able to speak with.
them ?

Lady L. The idea is not contrary to Scripture. Our
Lord spoke of many who should come from the East
and the West and sit down at His table with Abraham,
Isaac, and Jacob. This sitting down together gives the
idea of companionship, and with companionship naturally
comes conversation.

Harold. What a glorious thought it is that we may
speak even with St. Paul!

Reading.

And when Paul was come to Jerusalem he essayed to
join himself to the disciples; but they were all afraid of
him, and believed not that he was a disciple.

Harold. We cannot wonder at them. In Jerusalem
there would be friends of St. Stephen, perhaps his widow,
perhaps his son! How could they be expected to receive
Saul of Tarsus, to eat with him—to endure the sight of
him! They could not forget who stood quietly by when
their loved one was murdered; they could not forget who
consented unto his death !

Robin. Did nobody tell them that Saul was very, very
sorry for what he had done ?

Lady. L. Let us read a little further.

Reading.

But Barnabas took him, and brought him to the
apostles, and declared unto them how he had seen the
Lord in the way, and that He had spoken unto him,

and how he had preached boldly at Damascus in the
name of Jesus.



VISITS TO JERUSALEM. 59



Robin. Oh! I’m glad that kind man spoke up for poor
Saul.

Harold. Who was this friend in need?

Lady L. We find in the fourth chapter of Acts this
account of this generous-hearted, liberal man. Reads—
And Joses, who by the apostles was surnamed Barnabas,
which is, being interpreted, the son of consolation (marginal
reading “of exhortation ”), a Levite, and of the country of
Cyprus, having land, sold it, and brought the money and
laid it at the apostle’s feet. We are also told in Acts xi.
that Barnabas was “a good man, and full of the Holy
Ghost,”

Harold. Just the person to take by the hand one whom
nobody else would trust.

Ida. I should like to know which of the apostles
received the penitent Paul.

Lady L. You may have your wish gratified at once by
turning to what St. Paul wrote in the 18th and 19th verses
of the first chapter of his Epistle to the Galatians.

Reading.

Then after three years I went up to Jerusalem to see
Peter, and abode with him fifteen days. But other of the
apostles saw I none, save James the Lord’s brother.

Harold. Paul was St. Peter’s guest for a fortnight.
How much the two must have had to tell one another.
St. Peter had been with the Lord for years, but Paul had
been the last to look upon Christ.

Reading.

And he spake boldly in the name of the Lord Jesus,
and disputed against the Grecians. But they went
about to slay him; which when the brethren knew,
they brought him down to Cesarea, and sent him forth
to Tarsus.



60 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Harold. Tarsus—why that was his birthplace. Do any
of St. Paul’s letters tell us what happened to him there,
whether he had a father or mother living, and, if so, how
they received him when they found him to be a Christian.

Lady L. The Scriptures are quite silent on the subject.
St. Paul, indeed, in one letter writes that he had suffered
the loss of all things for Christ, amongst them may have
been the love of father and mother. The apostle may






















































































































































































































namely:

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TARSUS.

have found, as many converts have done, that his worst
enemies were of his own household.

Ida. The ninth chapterof Acts seems to be about St. Peter,

Lady L. We will confine ourselves at present to the
history of St. Paul. You will find the next mention of him
in the 11th chapter, 24th verse. A great spiritual work was
going on in the city of Antioch, the place where the dis-
ciples were first called Christians. Antioch was at that
time a very remarkable place. It has been called the Queen



VISITS TO JERUSALEM. 61



of the East, the third largest city then in the world. Init
dwelt people of various races ; it is said that perhaps half-
a-million of human beings were there gathered together.

Harold. What a grand thing to plant a Church in such
a great city as Antioch!

Lady L. The joyful news of the spread of the Gospel in
this very important place reached the Church at Jerusalem,
and Barnabas was sent to exhort and encourage the con-







































































































































































































































































































































































































ANTIOCH. -

verts. So many people turned to the Lord, that, doubtless,
the work grew too heavy for the small band of workers.
Barnabas remembered St. Paul who was still at Tarsus,
and went there to seek him, and brought him also to
Antioch to help in his blessed labours. Then these
brethren in Christ worked for a whole year together.

Robin. I daresay that it was a happy year.

Lady L. Why Paul then left Antioch to go again to
Jerusalem, we read in the 27th and three following verses,



62 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Reading.

And in these days came prophets from Jerusalem unto
Antioch. And there stood up one of them, named Agabus,
and signified by the Spirit that there should be great dearth
throughout all the world, which came to pass in the days
of Claudius Cesar. Then the disciples, every man accord-
ing to his ability, determined to send relief unto the
brethren which dwelt in Judea. Which also they did, and
sent it to the elders by the hands of Barnabas and Saul.

Ida. Then St. Paul’s second visit to Jerusalem after his
conversion was to carry alms to the poor Christian Jews ;
that must have been a pleasant visit to make.

Lady L. But not one without danger. It appears to have
been about this time that King Herod fiercely persecuted
the Church at Jerusalem. The Apostle James, the brother
of John, was martyred. St. Peter was thrown into prison.

Robin. Oh! but an angel came and took him out, and
the gate of the prison opened of its own accord. I’ve a
picture all about it. Ida told me the story yesterday, and
I’ve not forgotten it.

Harold. Do we know how long St. Paul stayed at
Jerusalem, or where he went when he left it ?

Lady L. The length of his stay is uncertain. St. Paul
and Barnabas returned to Antioch after they had fulfilled —
their charge, and took with them Mark, the nephew of
Barnabas. It is calculated in the book which I have
consulted (“ Hores Apostolic”), that they preached in
Antioch till the year aD. 45, about eight years after
St. Paul’s conversion. We know not much of what
happened to him during this time. We feel certain that
the apostle laboured earnestly, and that the Lord blessed
his labours. When we meet for our reading to-morrow,
we must have the map open before us, that we may trace
on it the course of Barnabas and Paul on their first regular
missionary tour.







































































































































































































































































































































































7 SSS









































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































CHAPTER IX.
PREJUDICE AND SELF-PLEASING.

“OH! Harold, is that you?” said Ida, as young Hartley
entered the drawing-room on his return from school,
and threw himself wearily on a chair, with an expression
of gloom on his face utterly unlike that of frankness and
liveliness which had, till lately, been its characteristic.
Ida did not notice how Harold was looking, for she was
engaged in filling vases with roses, and did not glance up
from her pleasant occupation. Robin was assisting her
after his own fashion, pulling off leaves, snipping off stalks,
and pricking his chubby fingers with thorns.

“Mamma took me with her when she made her first
call on Miss Petty’s newly-arrived guests,” continued Ida.
“ T never paid such a visit before in my life.”

“What did you find?” asked Harold in a tone of
indifference, as if he cared not whether his question were
answered or not.

“ Miss Petty did not exaggerate—not one bit! When
we walked into the sitting-room (you know Miss Petty
prides herself on its prettiness), there was the whole party
gathered together. On one side the sickly Mamma on
the sofa (she has some dreadful swelling on her knee),
with her thin lifeless fingers pricking a pinafore, one
might say, for though she often put her needle into the ~

calico, I did not see a single stitch made. On the other
68



64 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



side—no, everywhere, for they did not keep in one place,
were three whity-brown children, with washed-out ragged
dresses of an old-fashioned shape, bracelets on their skinny
little arms, their heads disfigured with boils, and their
eyes inflamed, looking like anything but proper English
children. They were crawling and rolling about on the
carpet, till Number One spied the tray of cups and saucers,
and a plate of slices of cakes, placed on Miss Petty’s little
round table for afternoon tea. Number One was, perhaps,
hungry; and as the easiest way to get at the cake, gave a
good pull at the cloth, which covered the table. Down
came cloth, tea-pot, cups and saucers, and all, with such
a crash that Mrs. Smith gave a nervous scream. Miss
Petty flew to the spot, and boxed the child’s ear for
breaking her china, which made the little thing roar.
Number Two, scalded by the hot tea from the tea-pot,
joined in the howling, and the two together set off
Number Three, who screamed the loudest of all. You
never heard such a din! What between squalling, and
scolding, and the scream of a parrot, and the barking of
the dog, it was almost enough to deafen one. Mamma
managed to quiet Number Two by taking her on her knee,
and petting her; but Mrs. Smith had but poor success
with the baby. I could not help pitying the poor helpless
lady, for Miss Petty said, quite loud enough for her to
hear, ‘this comes of admitting mischievous brats into the
house.’”

“That was very rude,” remarked Harold.

“Oh! all through the visit it seemed as if Miss Petty
wanted her cousin to see that she and her children were
very, very much in the way.”

“T hope that the poor lady did not understand her.”

“Mrs. Smith must have been dull as a door-nail if she
- did not,” said Ida. “ But in Miss Petty’s excuse, I must
say that she has not a charming set of guests. Mrs, Smith’s



PREJUDICE AND SELF-PLEASING. 63



miserable complaining tone of voice would have much the
same effect on one’s spirits as the wailing of the wind on
a dreary November day. I was heartily glad to leave
Foreham Villa, and shall not care to go there again, at
least while the party from India remain.”

“Tam sorry to hear you say that, Ida,” observed Lady
Laurie, who had entered the room in time to catch the
last sentence.

“Oh! Mamma, even you must own that it was a wretched
scene.”

“ One, two, three babies all squalling together, and the .
dog barking, and Miss Petty scolding like fun,” laughed
Robin. “I wish I had been there to see.”

“Tt was a wretched scene,” said Lady Laurie, thought-
fully and gravely. “I have been thinking ever since
I left the house what could be done for those poor Smiths.
It must be trying indeed to the sick lady to be dependent
on those who do not wish her to stay, and she has probably
neither the means nor the health to set up house for
herself.”

“T don’t believe that Mrs. Smith would know how to
order a mutton-chop for dinner,” observed Ida. “She
seems to have had all the spirit in her dried up,—if,
indeed, she ever had any.”

“This house is a good deal more comfortable than
Foreham Villa,” observed Lady Laurie, glancing around.

“Oh! Mamma, there is no comparison between them,
no more than there is between you and Miss Petty !”

“Would it not be a kindness,” said Lady Laurie, “if we
invited the family here ?”

“Not to sleep, I hope!” cried Ida in alarm.

“T meant to remain here as guests for some time.”

“Oh! please, please don’t invite them!” cried Ida;
“we have no room for such a pack.”

“T have thought over arrangements,” said the widow
E



66 PICTURES OF ST. PAUT.



lady, “and I see how we could manage. You would have
to share my sleeping-room, and Robin go into Harold’s.
The school-room would make a nice play-room for the
children, and you and Robin would do your lessons here.
There is no real difficulty in the plan, but a little self-
denial would be required.”

“Oh, dear! it would be dreadful to have them !” sighed
Ida.

“T will not urge it on you, my child, or do anything
without your consent, for perhaps the chief part of the
inconvenience would fall to your share.”

“T should be a kind of nursery-drudge to those wretched
sore-eyed children!” cried Ida,

“ No, they ’d have their black man,” said practical Robin.

Harold started as if he had been stung. ‘ Mother,” he
said abruptly, “would the Hindu come here too?”

“Mrs. Smith could not do without him; and, if she
could, it would be cruel to turn the poor native off in a
strange land, where almost every one has a strong prejudice
against him. I thought that he might sleep in the tiny
room in the attic, next to yours.”

“He may have both rooms!” cried Harold, rising with
flashing eyes and a heightened colour, “for I won’t stop
an hour in the house if he comes! Oh! forgive me,
mother, I should not speak thus; but you don’t know
what I’ve had to put up with to-day!”

“What has happened?” asked Lady Laurie anxiously ;
for she had seldom seen Harold so stirred.

“T was never more inclined to have a stand-up fight!”
muttered Harold, clenching his fist. “To have the fellows
twitting one with being a white Hindu,* and a friend of

* At the time of the Mutiny indignation against the rebels was
sometimes carried beyond the bounds of humanity, or justice, so
that the contemptuous term of White Hindu has been given to
Englishmen feeling compassion for or sympathy with them,



PREJUDICE AND SELF-PLEASING. 67



my father’s murderers, was enough to drive a fellow mad.
Even the master—Dr. Bullen himself—said that he was
disgusted at my bad taste—yes, he actually said disgusted
—for having taken by the arm, as he heard I had done,
one of so cruel and treacherous a race!”

“How could he speak so!” exclaimed Lady Laurie, with
more of mag ghation in her tone than one so gentle usually
showed.

“The Doctor has lost a cousin in India, and—I’ve
heard—some money too,” said Harold; “it’s that makes
him so bitter.”

“And what did you answer?” sicsa Ida.

“T could not speak ; my heart was in my throat. I could
not explain that I only touched the black fellow to pull
him into the cottage, when the mob seemed ready to tear
him to pieces. But I'll never touch him again, nor look
at him if I can help it; and if you bring him here, I beg
you'll first send me a hundred miles off, for I’d rather die
than sleep under the same roof with a Hindu!”

After uttering these hasty, passionate words, Harold
rushed out of the room, slamming the door behind him.
Robin stared after his brother im wonder; he had never
seen Harold in such a passion before.

“You see, mamma, for Harold’s sake, we could not have
the Smiths here,” said Ida.

“T do not intend to mention the subject again,” said
Lady Laurie, with a sigh which came from her heart.

“One can quite understand MHarold’s feelings,” said
Ida.

Lady Laurie could quite understand Ida’s also, and she
felt that there was more excuse for the boy than for the
girl, though her daughter’s fault appeared the less
glaring.

“Ida,” said Lady Laurie, after a long pause of silence,
“T will send these roses in the morning to Mrs. Smith,



68 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



with the cake that was’ baked to-day, and what straw-
berries may be left in the garden.”

“Oh! not the cake—not our last strawberries!” ex-
claimed Robin dolefully. “Don’t send them away to the
horrid little children!” He had had bad examples before
him.

“ Robin, if when we ask the Lord, ‘ What wilt Thou have
me to do?’ He gives us some little work of self-denial by
which to show our love and obedience, shall we turn away
and refuse to do it? Think of St. Paul who gave up all
for Christ ; shall we, with so many blessings left to us, give
up nothing ?”

Robin rubbed his shock of brown hair, his usual way
of showing that something vexed him, but he made no
remonstrance. Both he and Ida secretly wished that Mrs.
Smith, her children, and bearer, had never come over the sea.

Harold did not appear at the six o’clock meal.

“Shall I carry up something for Harold?” asked Robin,
when it was nearly concluded.

“No, if Harold wishes tea he must come for it,” said
Lady Laurie, who was hurt and displeased.

After awhile Ida glanced at the clock. “It is time for
our evening reading,” said she, “I will bring the Bibles
and atlas.”

“J will run and call Harold!” cried Robin.

“No, I will not have Harold called,” said Lady Laurie,
who felt that she must not pass too lightly over almost
the first act of disrespect shown to herself by the son
whom she had adopted.

But there was no need to call Harold; before the books
were opened he himself appeared at the door. Harold
was of too generous a disposition not frankly to own that
he was sorry for his late conduct to her who had been
more than a mother to him. Young Hartley went straight
up to Lady Laurie, and said, though not without a



PREJUDICE AND SELF-PLEASING. 69



struggle with his pride, “ Mother, forgive me, I know that
I was very passionate and rude.”

Forgiveness was given, but gravely, and Harold took
his place at the table and opened his Bible. But the
spirit of no one present was in tune for the Scripture
reading. Harold had felt it soothing to him when he was
enduring the first pang of bereavement, but it was not
soothing now. How true it is that a great deal of sorrow
disturbs not our peace so much as a little sin! Pride
prejudice, anger, and. selfishness had entered Lady Laurie’s
carefully guarded flock. The children of whom her loving
heart was secretly proud ; those who were spoken of by
neighbours as “a model family,” had shown how full of
weeds is the garden of the human heart. Harold and Ida
were doing their utmost to persuade themselves that they
were justified in keeping the Smiths and their faithful
attendant out of Willowdale Lodge, and thwarting the
kindly designs of one who understood better than them-
selves the claims of Christian charity. Ida was particularly
ingenious in finding excuses for excluding the party from
India. They would weary her mother, distress Harold,
hinder regular study, spoil Robin’s temper and injure her
own. It is not usually difficult to find plausible excuses
for shirking unpleasant duties. How many in London
find good excuses for never visiting the poor! What good
excuses are made for saving instead of giving, for indulging
self, instead of serving God! But such excuses have
thorny stems ; the pillow stuffed with them is not one on
which we can ever find perfect rest. If we have to argue
to convince ourselves that a course is wise and right, which
conscience suspects to be wrong, we are forfeiting that
inward peace which can make even sorrow sweet. Weare
foregoing our comfort in prayer, our joy in thinking of
God; we are losing sight of the golden track of the foot-
steps of Him who pleased not Himself.



70 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.

Lady Laurie felt that the reading of the chapter was
likely to be the mere formal performance of a duty by Ida
and Harold, and that Robin could scarcely be expected to
understand the hard words which he would hear. She
therefore changed a little the style of the evening exercise,
and bade the two elder close their books, and trace the
Missionaries’ course on the map. Then, in a conversa-
tional way, with occasional reading of passages from her
own Bible, the lady commenced the account of St. Paul’s
first recorded Missionary tour.

SOE



CHAPTER X.
FIRST MISSIONARY TOUR.

Lady LD. Have you found Antioch on the map? See it
there, about 200 miles to the North of Damascus, and not
far from the Mediterranean Sea on whose blue shining
waves we may fancy ourselves embarking with the
Christian brethren—Paul mounts the side of the vessel,
followed by his friend Barnabas,—-and Mark their compan-
ion. The missionaries have been solemnly chosen and set
apart for their great work by the Church at Antioch.
Reads—* As they ministered to the Lord, and fasted, the
Holy Ghost said, Separate me Barnabas and Saul for
the work whereunto I have called them.”

Harold. Does the Lord so call missionaries now ?

Lady L. I believe that every true missionary has a
call from the Lord.

Harold. But he hears no voice.

Lady £. It is in the heart, not the ear, that the voice
of the Saviour sounds; “ Follow thou Me, along the path
of self-denying love.” It is repeated that these early
missionaries, Barnabas and Paul, were sent forth by the
Holy Ghost.

Seleucia, you see, is a seaport near to Antioch; it is
there that the friends embark ; not in a vessel propelled
by steam, like those in use in these days, there is no
paddle-wheel going round, and churning the waves into

71



72 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



foam, there is no hissing steam, no cloud of smoke from a
funnel.

Ida. And I suppose no compass to guide.

_ Robin. Perhaps no nice little cabin to sleep in.

Lady L. We all imagine the travellers at night lying
down on the deck, wrapping themselves up in blankets,
in Oriental style, and sleeping with nothing between
them and the bright stars shining above. The first
place where they disembark is in the beautiful island
of Cyprus.

Harold. Here it is on the map, the native country of
Barnabas. Perhaps he visited his family there, and looked
again at the fields which he had sold for the sake of the
Gospel.

Lady L. You see Salamis marked on the eastern coast
of Cyprus.

Harold. I think that the bay is famed for a great battle
won there by the Greeks against the Persians.

Lady L. A far greater hero than the Athenian leader
was in the vessel which, in the days of which we are
reading, anchored off the port of Salamis.

Ida. And yet perhaps few people noticed the three
peaceful-looking passengers who set foot upon the shore,
and then quietly made their way along the beach.

Robin. I don’t think that St. Paul was so quiet. Did
he not cry out to every one as he passed, “Repent and
believe! repent and believe!” or stand under a tree and
preach, till a big crowd gathered around him ?

Lady L. It does not appear that he did so then.
Christian Jews did not fully understand at that time that
the good news of salvation is for every one in the world,
. Greeks, Romans, and barbarians. Paul and Barnabas
went through the island of Cyprus from east to west, but
we only hear of their preaching the Word at first in
the synagogues of the Jews, At Paphos, however, they



FIRST MISSIONARY TOUR. 73

had a grand opportunity of telling of the Lord Jesus
to one of the greatest men in the place. The Roman
Deputy, Sergius Paulus, hearing of the preachers, sent
for them and desired to hear from their lips the Word
of God.

Robin. Perhaps he had known Barnabas before, and
thought him a good wise man, and wanted to hear why he
had sold his land, and become a Christian.

Harold. It was a grand opportunity for the mission-
aries. If the Deputy believed, what numbers of people,
who looked up to him, might follow his example? Satan’s
dominion might soon be overthrown in that beautiful
island,

Lady L. Satan does not yield up anything without a
struggle. The Christians found very powerful influence
exerted against them. Just as in Africa some of the
missionaries’ worst enemies are those who pretend by
some magic power to be able to cause rain, thus gaining.
power over the ignorant people by wicked arts, so in
Cyprus a sorcerer did his utmost to set the Deputy against
the holy religion preached by Barnabas and Paul. With
wicked cunning, Elymas, or Bar-Jesus, tried to turn away
the Deputy from the faith.

Reads—Then Saul, who is also called Paul, filled with
the Holy Ghost, set his eyes on him (the sorcerer), and
said, “O-full of all subtilty and mischief, thou child of
the devil, thou enemy of all righteousness, wilt thou not
cease to pervert the right ways of the Lord? And now,
behold, the hand of the Lord is upon thee, and thou
shalt be blind, not seeing the sun for a season. And
immediately there fell upon him a mist and a dark-
ness; and he went about seeking some to lead him by
the hand.

Robin. Oh! mother, was that not cruel and revengeful
of Paul, to say such very hard words, and then make his



74 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



enemy blind! Should Paul not have been like St. Stephen,
and forgiven and prayed for the man ?

Ida. It does seem as if some of the saints that we read
of in the Bible did very hard things. St. Peter struck
both Ananias and Sapphira dead for telling one lie; and
the Lord had forgiven him after telling them three times,
and swearing and cursing!

Lady L. Tam glad that this question has been raised,
for it gives us an opportunity of talking over what has
been a difficulty to many. You must remember that both
St. Peter and St. Paul, when inflicting punishment, were
acting under the direct inspiration of the Holy Spirit, and
using His supernatural power. It is not in the power of
a man to strike another either blind or dead by a word!
Peter and Paul were like trumpets that only sound because
a living voice gives them breath. The voice that sounded
through the apostles was that of God Himself, pronouncing
sentence on hypocrisy and hatred to truth. The holy and
loving servants of the Lord could not help saying what
they said.

Harold. But I answer that David heartily cursed his
enemies. I only half liked to repeat some of the Psalms
till now, and now I think about India!

A pang shot through Lady Laurie’s heart as she looked
on the stern, gloomy face of the orphan—the compressed
lips, the knitted brow, the fierce eyes. The evil influence
of his schoolmates, and the injudicious words of his
master, had—-for the time—vundone the effect of her
gentle teaching and prayers. Harold hardly seemed the
same being as he who had protected the helpless native of
India.

Lady £. You must remember that the Psalms are
prophecies. David was also as a trumpet breathed through
by the Holy Spirit, to pronounce God’s wrath on those
who would reject and murder their Lord.



FIRST MISSIONARY TOUR. 3)



Harold. How can this be proved ?

Lady L. St. Peter (see the first chapter of Acts) ex-
pressly declared that the Scripture must needs have been
fulfilled, which the Holy Ghost, by the mouth of David,
spake before concerning Judas. Yet the name of Judas
is not to be found in the Psalms. See also the 20¢h Psalm.
They who are spoken of as “ dogs,” “The assembly of the
wicked,” who “pierced My hands and My feet,” are unmis-
takably the Jews, who, more than a thousand years after
the prophecy was written, crucified the Lord Jesus
Christ.

Ida. I am glad that you have explained this, mamma.
Some of the Psalms have always been a puzzle to me;
I did not like to think of David being so very revengeful.

Robin. David did forgive his own enemies, you know.
He would not kill King Saul when he could, and he let off
the man who had cursed him.

Harold. But the Israelites in the time of Joshua swept
their enemies from the face of the earth. If it was right
in them to do so, it must be right in us, who have had a
thousand times more provocation.

Lady L. The Israelites did not punish the people of
Canaan out of revenge at all.

Harold. Then why did they slay them, and show no
mercy ?

Lady L. As Peter and Paul were as a trumpet, so were
_ Joshua and his men like a sword in the hand of the Lord.
The sword is but an instrument; it is the hand that deals
the blow,

Harold. Ido not understand. (He looked as if he had
no wish to do so.)

Lady £. Let me try to explain. You cannot deny two
things. First, that a sentence of death has been passed on
all mankind; that every human being, in the course of
Nature, must die some kind of death.



76 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Harold. Mother, we all know that.

Lady LI. Secondly, we must acknowledge that the
Almighty, who created man, has a perfect right to execute
this sentence of death in any way that His wisdom sees
best. Sometimes plague, sometimes famine, sometimes
earthquakes are as the sword in His hand. Sometimes,
as in the time of Joshua, it is a terrible war. The Lord
chose that way of punishing a most wicked nation that
was most likely to impress the Israelites with a horror of
the sins which they themselves had been the means of
punishing thus,

Ida. It was a terrible lesson.

Lady E. Tam anxious to make my meaning quite clear.
Suppose that a man, convicted of murder, is condemned to
death. The judge pronounces his sentence, the executioner
carries it out. Neither judge nor executioner are acting
from any private motives; they may be merciful men, and
with pain to themselves are obeying the law, and serving
their country. They have the authority given to them by
their queen, and on this authority alone they act. But, if
either judge or executioner even slightly wounded a man
because he had given them private offence, they would
then be themselves breaking the law, and would be liable
to be punished.

Robin. When St. Paul said hard things to the bad man,
and the bad man went blind, it was like the judge giving
sentence. St. Paul did not want to hurt the man, and did
not like to hurt the man, but he was obliged to say what
the Lord bid him say.

Lady L. Robin has caught my meaning exactly.

Robin. I hope that the bad man repented, as St. Paul
repented, when he was struck blind.

Lady L. We know nothing more of the unhappy
Elymas. We can but hope that when darkness was around
him, some light shone on his soul. We may conclude that



FIRST MISSIONARY TOUR. 77



he recovered his sight, as the sentence pronounced by
St. Paul was blindness, but for a seasop. One good effect
was instantly produced by his punishment on the mind of
at least one person present, for we hear that the Deputy,
when he saw what was done, believed, being astonished at
the doctrine of the Lord.



CHAPTER XI.
AN INVASION.

Lapy LAURIE’s means were not large, though by economy
she was able not only to cover the expenses of her family,
but to leave a margin over to help missions, and relieve
the poor. The widow lady was her daughter’s and Robin’s
teacher; and she needed to manage well her time as
well as her money, as she was an active visitor in the
district.

Ida, seated at the piano, was with considerable enjoy-
ment practising a new piece of music brought for her from
London by Lady Laurie, when Robin, who had been in the
garden, ran into the schoolroom.

“They are all coming—all coming up the shrubbery
walk !” he cried in great glee.

“Who are coming ?” asked Lady Laurie, glancing at the
clock. It was not yet eleven, and the hour was too early
for visitors.

“The black man, and all the children! As soon as
Isaw them I ran to tell you.”

“Oh, mamma! you can’t receive any one in the midst
of lessons!” cried Ida. But Lady Laurie had left the
room with Robin, and Ida more slowly followed, just in
time to meet the party from Foreham Villa, at the door
opening into the porch.

Yes; there they were indeed. The graceful Prem Dds

in his turban, with one child on either shoulder, and the
78 -



AN INVASION. 79



eldest little girl clinging to his white dress) The Hindu
gently put down his living burden, and salaaming with
great respect to Lady Laurie, drew from the sash with
which he was girded a note written in pencil. Lady
Laurie took it and read it aloud—

“Dearest Lady Laurie-—As I am going up to London
to see the Exhibitions, and Delia, with her dreadful knee,
cannot look after her children, I send them over to you.
They need not be back till bed-time. They will be no
trouble to any one, as I send the black man with them.—

“Your devoted T. P.”

“ How selfish—how inconsiderate of Miss Petty to land
the whole pack upon us!” exclaimed Ida. “Mamma,
won't you send them back; we can do nothing if they are
here, and when Harold comes back from school what will
he say if he finds the Hindu here! MHarold will be home
early to-day.”

Prem D&s stood quietly waiting for orders, till the
youngest child, frightened at the sight of strangers, began to
cry. Lady Laurie and Ida were struck by the gentle kindli-
ness with which the Hindu raised and fondled the little
one till she was happy again. The children evidently loved
their affectionate attendant, though they treated him witha
rudeness which a white servant would scarcely have borne.

Lady Laurie had no hesitation in welcoming the poor
little strangers thus. thrown on her kindness. But she had
more difficulty in deciding on the right course to pursue
as regarded Prem Dads. The lady did not wish to encourage
Harold in an unjust and cruel prejudice against the poor
native of India, yet it did not seem to her to be wise to go
violently against that prejudice without giving Harold
time, by his own good sense and good feeling, to conquer
what, in calmer moments, he must see to be unworthy of
a Christian. .



80 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.

“Tda, I think that Prem Dds had better return to
Mrs. Smith,” said Lady Laurie, after‘a minute’s reflection.
“When I have ordered some food for the little ones, who
have evidently suffered from the unwholesome fare on
board ship, I will myself take this poor fellow back.”

“ Why should you go—and in the heat of the day, which
you always feel,” said Ida.

“Because I think that the Hindu might be insulted on
the way, as he was last Monday. I want also to see poor
Mrs. Smith, who is left so lonely and ailing.”

“How am I to get on with my lessons?” asked Ida, in
a tone of discontent.

“Lessons must be put off.”

“What am I do with these children!” exclaimed Ida,
who saw that the chief burden of care of them would fall
on herself during her mother’s absence.

“ Receive them, dear girl, as an answer to the question
which you chose for this week’s motto, What will Thou
have me to do?” and with these words on her lips, Lady
Laurie quitted the room and went to give orders to her
cook.

“Oh dear! how shall I take care of them all!” sighed
Ida.

“Tl help you,” cried Robin the ready, who had already
begun to make friends with little Lily. “I’ve a lot of
toys to show them. Come,” he said, with patronising
kindness, taking Lily’s thin fingers into his own chubby
hand ; “come and see my bricks and my pigeons. Isn’t
she a pretty little girl?” he said, appealing to Ida.

Ida was very glad of Robin’s assistance when, about half-
an-hour later, Lady Laurie started with Prem Das. Their
bearer’s departure caused a roar from two of the children,
but even the baby of fourteen months, was pacified by the
sight of a pigeon, whose soft feathers she was allowed to
stroke. Robin was soon down on his knees in the school-



AN INVASION. 81



room, which served as a playroom also, building up castles
of bricks, which Lily and Delly and the “ Baba” screamed
with joy to throw down. Ida looked at the four children
so happy together, and felt sorry that she had ever called
Robin “the most troublesome boy in the world.” His
example made her produce an old doll, and even her small
set of tea-things, though she was very careful indeed to
prevent their sharing the fate of Miss Petty’s. A merry
tune played on the piano set all the children jumping
about the room with Robin, more merry than they had
been for months. Basins of warm sweet bread and milk
completed their enjoyment; it was a day of unusual
festivity to the poor little strangers from India.

In the meantime Lady Laurie pursued her way to
Foreham Villa, with the poor heathen man a little behind
her. The Christian lady felt something like one who sees
a traveller dying of thirst close by a well, but who has no
means of drawing for the sufferer a single drop of water.
What would not Lady Laurie have given for the power of
telling to Prem Das in his own tongue of the love of a
Saviour! She found that the Hindu had picked up about
a dozen words of English, but they were such as would be
of no use whatever in a religious conversation. The little
girls always spoke to him in Urdu.

Lady Laurie, on her arrival at Foreham Villa, found
Mrs. Smith on the sofa as usual,.her cheeks very pale, her
eyes heavy with weeping. A plate near her showed the
relics of a few of the strawberries sent for her from
Willowdale Lodge, the rest Miss Petty had carried off to
enjoy on her journey to London.

The sight of Lady Laurie’s kind face was very welcome
to the poor invalid. With tearful eyes Mrs. Smith
thanked her visitor for coming again so soon. Before long,
as Miss Petty was not near to take the lion’s or parrot’s
share of the conversation, Delia was pouring forth her

F



82 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



sorrows freely to one who could sympathise with her grief.
Mrs. Smith said that she felt so weak, and that life was
so weary; she was a burden to herself and to others.
“But oh!” cried the poor mother piteously, “if I were
taken, who would care for my poor little lambs?”

Then Lady Laurie spoke of the Heavenly Shepherd
who so tenderly loves His flock, and carries the lambs in
His bosom. She poured comfort into no inattentive ear;
the seed was not falling on ground that was hard, there
had been too much weeping for that.

“J wish that I knew more about these things,” sighed -
Delia; “I was married almost as soon as I left school, and
there are so few religious advantages in India. Not evena
church at our station. There was nothing to mark Sunday
from any other day of the week.”

“Qne has always the Bible,’ gently suggested Lady
Laurie.

“T am ashamed to own how little I know of it. It was
read as a matter of course at school, but no one explained
it, or cared to interest us in it. We scarcely listened, and,
I fear never remembered. And then, ever since my
marriage, I have had such a burden of cares. Ignorant asa
baby of household arrangements, not knowing a word of the
language, I am sure that I was perpetually cheated, and yet
I had to try to make the two ends meet on my hushand’s
miserable pay. Babies came so fast one after another,
that we could hardly pay nurse or doctor, or procure what
was absolutely needful. Then came this frightful Mutiny,
the very thought of which makes one shudder! We were
hurried down the country, my children and I, at twelve
hours’ notice; my husband ordered off on active service.
The parting almost broke my heart, for I fear that I shall
never see him again!” The tears were again flowing
fast.

“Cast thy burden on the Lord, trust Him—He careth



AN INVASION. 83



for you,” said Lady Laurie; and she put her soft arm
round the poor young wife, drew her towards her, and
pressed a kiss on her forehead.

“You are so kind, so exceedingly kind!” exclaimed
Mrs. Smith. “Oh! if I were always with you I would
not be the broken, helpless, useless creature that I am.
I ought to go on with my work ;” she continued, lifting »
up her head, “I am sure that you will not mind my trying
to do a little,’ and she raised the pinafore which had
dropped from her listless fingers. “I am ashamed that
people should see my poor babes in rags, but children
wear out clothes so fast on board ship, and really I don’t
know how to get them new ones.”

“Dear Mrs. Smith ”—

“Qh! do call me Delia.”

“Dear Delia, you encourage me to own that I did
venture to bring with me some things that my children
have grown out of. I hope that you will not consider it
as a liberty on my part, but I thought that with cutting
down and altering, you might find them of some little use.”
Lady Laurie spoke almost timidly, she was so afraid of
hurting the poor lady’s feelings.

“Tam very grateful for your goodness,” said Delia ; “ but
I am afraid that I have not the skill to cut down and
alter dresses; I never was taught plain work; and in India
one gives everything to the darzt (tailor) to do.

“TJ thought of that too,” said the visitor smiling.
“I brought scissors, needle and thread, and perhaps if you
were to show me your children’s clothes as a guide to their
size, we might manage something together.”

Delia called for Prem Dés, who was somewhere within
hearing, and by a few words, half in English, half in Urdu,
with the help of signs, made him understand what she
wanted. Lady Laurie brought in the parcel which she
had left in the hall. Delia’s sofa was presently half



84 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



covered with children’s clothes, and she looked on with
the pleasure of a child at the pretty tasteful garments
which her visitor had brought. There was the blue frock
which Robin had worn after coming from India, but which
he had grown out of so fast. Pretty little braided
pinafores, a pelisse which once had been Ida's, with some
alteration, how well it would look upon Lily! Lady
Laurie, skilful at cutting out and contriving, made every-
thing appear easy.

Time sped very quickly away. As her busy fingers
plied their task, Lady Laurie entered on the subject of
Prem Das, the bearer.

“Oh! he is the most faithful creature in the world!”
exclaimed Delia. “When my dear John caught small-pox
when Lily was but two days old, and I could not be with
him, the doctor would not let me so much as see him,
Prem D&s watched his Sahib night and day. And on my
journey home I know not what I could have done without ~
my bearer. I am sure that one or two of the children
would have died in the ship. And yet every one here
looks on my poor servant as if he were a wolf, or a tiger.
I am often glad that he does not understand what is said,
but he must understand manner and looks. He is treated
worse than a dog.” —

“I suppose that he is still a heathen?” said Lady
Laurie.

“Qh! of course,” replied Delia, a little surprised at the
question.

“ But there are some native Christians in India.”

“JT never saw any,” replied Mrs. Smith.*

* The lady’s ignorance is shared, alas! by many, who take no
interest in missions. BeforeA. L. O. E. started for the East, she was
earnestly assured by a Colonel who had been in India, that there were
no converts there. Shortly after her arrival, she took care to iuform
him, that she had met not only native converts, but native clergymen.



AN INVASION. 85

“Have you, or has any one else, ever tried to tell this
faithful servant something of the truths of our blessed
religion ?”

“Ob dear no!” replied the lady from India. “I never
could attempt to speak on such subjects, besides I hardly
know a word of the language.”

“Strange, after four years residence in India,” thought
Lady Laurie, who knew not how many English women
who have been for much longer in Hindustan can say the
same. They only knew enough to give a few orders, and
even those in broken Urdu.

“No one that I ever met with dreamed of talking about
- religion to native servants,” said Delia, who saw that her
visitor was surprised, and who naturally did not like to be
thought worse than others. “They are just like our dogs
and horses, or chairs and tables, we use them for our comfort,
we take care of them, and there is an end of the matter.”

“Oh! what an account our countrymen—at least some
of them—will have to render at the Last Day!” thought
Lady Laurie. “Nay, are they not rendering it now, when
slaughter and fire are desolating so many once happy
homes! How careless many have been of precious souls,
souls for which the Saviour gave His blood! How many
have shown the spirit expressed in the words of Cain, “Am
I my brother’s keeper ?”

“You have worked too hard, you are tired, dear Lady
Laurie,” said Delia, marking the sad troubled expression
on the fair face of her friend.

“Not tired, but I ought to go home. You must
remember that I have little guests,” said Lady Laurie
more playfully; “I shall hardly be back in time to preside
at their dinner.”

“How I wish that I could walk back with you! But
oh! this dreadful knee!” and poor Delia moaned faintly
with pain.



86 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



“Does Dr. Petty give you hopes that it will soon be
better?” asked Lady Laurie.

“Dr. Petty gives me no hopes at all unless I go to
surgeons in London, and I never shall make up my mind
to that !” sighed poor Delia.

“Who applies bandages, or whatever else is needed for
you?” asked Lady Laurie.

“Very little is done to relieve me,” said Delia; “Dr.
Petty has dressed my knee twice, but it’s horrid; I can’t
bear the dreadful things which he says, and the solemn
look with which he says them. The maid here has tried
to do something to follow out the doctor's orders, but her
fingers are all thumbs, and she gives me such pain. As
for Theresa, she saw the tumour once, and turned away in
disgust, and said that she was too sensitive to look at such
things. She cannot bear to see, what I have to endure.
No one has touched my knee for the last twenty-four
hours,—and, oh! how it hurts.”

“Do you think that I could do anything to relieve
you?” said Lady Laurie, with an effort ; for she was at
least as sensitive as Miss Petty, and had not been inured
by habit to this kind of nursing.

Lady Laurie’s offer was thankfully welcomed ; and she
soon found herself on her knees, with a basin of hot water
beside her, tenderly, most tenderly, removing the bandages
which covered the knee. She did what she could, though
that was not much, and the suffering which she witnessed
much increased her compassion and sympathy for the
poor young mother.

“T think that you ought to go to London,” said Lady
Laurie, after her painful task was completed.

“Oh, no, I could not bear to go!” cried Delia; then,
as if to turn the conversation, she asked if she should send
Prem Dé4s for the children in the evening.”

“No, my maid shall bring them,” said Lady Laurie,



AN INVASION. 87

who felt that it was better at present to avoid any meet-
ing between Harold and the Hindu.

Lady Laurie walked home rapidly, for she knew that
she was late. It seemed to her as if she had the whole
helpless family of the Smiths upon her, for it was evident
that Miss Petty either could not, or would not, take pro-
per care of her poor relations. Nourishing, and nursing,
and first-rate surgical skill were required. Lady Laurie
felt a little oppressed by this her new burden of care;
she feared that she was somewhat sacrificing the comfort
of her own family circle for the sake of comparative
strangers.

And yet Lady Laurie felt on her return to Willowdale
Lodge, that her loved daughter had been learning in the
best of schools, the lesson of self-denial which her character
especially needed. There was no cloud upon Ida’s fair
brow as she watched the little party whose coming she
had so much dreaded. Harold, had as had been expected,
come home early, it being a half-holiday at Copley House.
Genial, and naturally lively, young Hartley was at home
amongst little children. His look of gloom had passed
’ away, for a while he forgot his sorrow. Lady Laurie
found him sitting on the floor, the Baba laughing in his
arms, little Delly pulling his curly hair, while Robin and
Lily were listening open-mouthed to the story of Jack the
Giant-Kailler.

The little visitors were so well pleased with Willowdale
Lodge, that they had no wish to return to Foreham Villa
in the evening.

« Want to stop,” pouted Lily, “Cousin Teasy is so cross.”

“But you wish to see your mamma again,” suggested
Ida.

“ And Bearer,” rejoined the child.

“Come again, to-morrow,” said Lady Laurie, lifting up
the little Delly for a kiss,



88 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



“ Yes, come again,” echoed Robin, who heartily enjoyed
a romp with his new playmates.

After the children had left the house, Lady Laurie told
her family particulars of her visit to Mrs. Smith. She
took particular care to repeat in the presence of Harold
all that she had heard of the fidelity of her poor Hindu
attendant. Harold’s storm of passion was over by this
time, and he said, “I suppose that there may be some
fine fellows even amongst the natives of India. It would
certainly be unfair to class good and bad together.



CHAPTER XII.
FIRST MISSIONARY TOUR CONTINUED.

In the evening the story of St. Paul was resumed.

Lady LI. How long the great Apostle and Barnabas
with their companion Mark remained in Cyprus, we know
not. We find them again embarking on the blue waters
of the Mediterranean, going northwards, with an easterly
inclination, towards Perga, a bright Grecian city, capital
of the province of Pamphylia. Here something occurred
which caused displeasure, and, we doubt not pain to St.
Paul.

Robin. What was it that happened ?

Lady L. The little missionary party was deserted by
Mark. We know not why this young nephew of Barnabas
insisted on going back to Jerusalem. Perhaps he was
already weary of a wandering life; perhaps he was afraid
of its hardships ; or perhaps, as has been suggested, Mark
may have been anxious to see his mother in Jerusalem, to
whose house, you may remember, St. Peter went after
- being released by the angel.

Robin. Oh! I remember, when he stood so long at the
door knocking.

Lady LI. The step taken by Mark was greatly dis-
approved of by St. Paul, and remembered at a later
period. It led to a sad result of which we shall presently
hear.

Herold. I cannot fancy any one flinching back from
going on a missionary expedition with St. Paul. To say

89



90 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



nothing of the honour, think of the pleasure of having
such a man as he was for one’s companion.

Lady L. For the honour and pleasure a heavy price
would have to be paid. It was no easy matter to tread in
the same path as the brave, devoted Apostle. I will read
St. Paul’s account in the eleventh chapter of II. Corinthians
of what he had to endure, and you will agree with me that
even a small share of such sufferings would have been too
much for the courage of most men. Reads—Of the Jews
five times received I forty stripes save one. Thrice was
I beaten. with rods, once was I stoned, thrice I suffered
shipwreck, a night and a day I have been in the deep.
In journeyings often, in perils of waters, in perils of
robbers, in perils by mine own countrymen, in perils by
the heathen, in perils in the city, in perils in the wilder-
ness, in perils in the sea, in perils amongst false brethren ;
in weariness and painfulness, in watchings often, in hunger
and thirst, in fastings often, in cold and nakedness.” __

Ida. Oh! what a list of terrible trials! I am not aston-
ished that Mark was not eager to go through them all.

Robin. Shall we read of all these adventures, the beat-
ings, the robbers, and the shipwrecks.

Lady L. No, not by any means of all. The account in
the Acts is short; we have but a glimpse, as it were, of
the fiery furnace through which the Apostle passed.
St. Paul was attacking Satan in his stronghold, and the
many victories won from the Prince of darkness were
gained at heavy loss to the victor. St. Paul’s was a long
martyrdom of suffering before he at last laid his grey head
on the block. But let us return to Paul and Barnabas,
and see them starting from Perga for Antioch.

Harold. What, were the missionaries going back to
Antioch so soon, after visiting hardly any place but the
island of Cyprus! I thought that they were going to
make a good, long missionary tour.



FIRST MISSIONARY TOUR CONTINUED. 91



Lady L. If you examine the map you will see that
there are two places named Antioch; one the grand city
in Syria from which the missionaries started, the other
Antioch in Pisidia, which they were now approaching.
Very beautiful was the scenery through which Paul and





















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Ruins oF ANTIOCH IN PIsIDIA.

Barnabas passed. If they travelled on foot, as is likely,
the journey may have taken them a week.
Ida. What sort of place was this second Antioch ?
Lady L. In the days of St. Paul, Antioch in Pisidia
was a place of great commerce, but it is now utterly in
ruins, At the time of which we are reading, people of



99 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



various lands there met together, to trade in oil, skins, and
various other articles of commerce. But Paul did not at
once give his message to the numerous Gentiles gathered
together in Antioch, of Pisidia ; to his fellow-countrymen,
the Jews, he first proclaimed the free offer of salvation
through Christ. St. Paul visited the Jewish synagogue,
where he was courteously received, and invited to address
his brethren dwelling in this foreign country. Let us
read, taking verses by turns, the account of his sermon.
(Acts wit. from verse 16 to 41 is read aloud.)

Lady £. Some Gentiles appear to have been present
when St. Paul delivered his address, and were greatly .
impressed by what they heard. They besought that these
words might be preached to them on the following
Sabbath, and St. Paul did not refuse to comply with their
wish.

The appointed day arrived, and almost the whole city
of Antioch came to hear the Word of God. The merchant
left his business, the artisan his work, a spirit of earnest
inquiry was abroad. But the eagerness of the Gentiles to
hear the glad tidings brought by Barnabas and Paul
roused the jealousy of the Jews. Reads—When the Jews
saw the multitudes they were filled with envy, and spake
against those things which were spoken by Paul, contra-
dicting and blaspheming.

Harold. It must have been very bitter to St. Paul to
find his worst enemies amongst his own people. One
could bear so much better to be ill-used and slandered by
strangers.

Lady L. We see the jealous Jews typified in our Lord’s
parable of the prodigal son.

Robin. Do you mean that the Jews were like the son
who went far away, and then had to feed the swine ?

Lady L. No, we rather see them represented by the
elder son, who was so much offended at the welcome given



FIRST MISSIONARY TOUR CONTINUED, 93



to the younger. The opposition of the men of Israel only
served to rouse the spirit of the servants of Christ, and
make them see more clearly the duty of offering salvation
to all, of whatever nation, who might be willing to receive
it. Reads—Then Paul and Barnabas waxed bold and said,
it was necessary that the Word of God should first have
been spoken to you; but seeing ye put it from you, and
judge yourselves unworthy of everlasting life, lo, we turn
to the Gentiles. For so hath the Lord commanded us,
saying, I have set thee to be a light to the Gentiles, that
thou shouldst be for salvation unto the ends of the earth.

Robin. Were not the Gentiles glad to hear that the
Lord Jesus loved them as well as the Jews?

Lady L. reads—And when the Gentiles heard this they
were glad, and glorified God.

Harold. So St. Paul won a victory at Antioch in Pisidia.

Lady L. Not what men would call a victory, Harold.
Distress and disappomtment were to follow, though precious
souls were saved. Reads—The Jews stirred up the devout
and honourable women and the chief men of the city.”
St. Paul and Barnabas, who had been at first so honoured
and welcomed, were at last shamefully driven out of the
place.

Robin. When all began so well, I did not think it would
end so badly.

Ida. .The missionaries’ hearts must have been sadly
cast down.

Lady L. Not so, dear Ida. God can give His own
peace, even in the hour of bitterest disappointment. We
read that these faithful disciples “were filled with joy and
with the Holy Ghost.” They knew that when expelled
from Antioch they were but drinking of the cup of Him
who was despised and rejected of men. The disciple was
not to be above his Master, or expect favour from a world
that had crucified the Lord of glory.



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Sr. PAUL BEFORE AGRIPPA.


PICTURES OF ST PAUL

Brawn it ath English Home.

BY

A.L.0.E.,

AOTHOBESS OF ‘‘THE CLAREMONT TALES,” ‘‘ NED FRANKS,” “LIFE IN THE
PAGLE’S NEST,’ ‘‘THE WHITE BEAR'S DEN,” ETC., ETC., ETO,

ith mmy Gllustrations.

GALL & INGLIS,
Fondo: Gdinburgh:

PATERNOSTER SQUARE. 20 BERNARD TERRACE.
PREFACE.

—roe

TuE following tale, like others which have preceded it,
has been partly written to replenish a missionary purse;
but this has by no means been the Authoress’s highest
object. A. L.O.E. desires by a brief account of St. Paul—
chiefly drawn from Scripture—to direct the more earnest
attention of her readers to the life and labours of the great
Apostle, and to lead them with more interest to study his
precious Epistles. Thankful would she be if, through
God’s blessing and the grace of the Holy Spirit, she should
be permitted to awaken in some a missionary spirit, a holy
desire to devote life to winning souls for the Saviour.

A. L.O.E. makes no pretensions to learned research.
She has sought jealously to guard her own missionary
work from being encroached on by the pen; composition
has had to take but a secondary place in the duties of the
day.

This little volume is now laid at the feet of the Master,
with a prayer that He may deign to make use of it in
quickening zeal for the cause of Missions. May that zeal
be shown in more liberal gifts, more earnest prayer, and—
where the call of the Spirit is heard—in personal con-
secration to the work of carrying Gospel light into the
abodes of heathen darkness !

Bartana, INDIA.
CONTENTS.

—o——
OHAPTER PAGE
I, THE TELEGRAM, . . . . . . 7

Il, GRIEF AND REVENGE, . : . . . (4
III. THE MARTYR, . A : : . . (9
IV. BIGOTRY AND UNBELIEF, . . . , . 27
V. CONVERSION, 7 . ‘ . : . 34
VI. SIGHT RESTORED, . . . , ’ . Al
VII. AN ARRIVAL, . . ; . . . 50
VIII. VISITS TO JERUSALEM, . . . : . 57
IX. PREJUDICH AND SELF-PLEASING, . . : - 63
X. FIRST MISSIONARY TOUR, . . . : . 7
XI. AN INVASION, . : . ; . »
XII. FIRST MISSIONARY TOUR CONTINUED, ., : . 89
XIII. JEWISH PREJUDICES, : . : . . iol
XIV. PAINFUL DISPUTES, . : ' . .» lil
XV. AN INDIAN MARTYR, : : 7 . . 120
XVI. HOSPITALITY, . . . . . . 126
XVII, THE THORN IN THE FLESH, : \ . . 138
XVIII. NOT BY CHANCE, . . . . ‘ . 144
XIX. ST, PAUL IN EUROPE, : : -, . . 153
XX. SONGS IN THE NIGHT, . . . . . 160
XXI. MISSIONARY TRIALS, : ' . . . 168
XXII THE JAILOR OF PHILIPPI, : . . . 174
vi CONTENTS,

CHAPTER PAGE

XXIII. THE STORM, . : . ; ' . 181
XXIV. ST. PAUL AT ATHENS, . ' ‘ : . 187
XXV. THE STUMBLING-BLOCK, - . : : . 197
XXVI. ST. PAUL AT CORINTH, ‘ : : . 205
XXVII. THE PRIDE OF LIFE, . . . : » 213
XXVIII A SECRET SNARE, . . . , . 219
XXIX. ST, PAUL AT EPHESUS, : 7 : . 225
XXX. REGRETS AND REJOICINGS, . : ‘ . 289
XXXI. ST. PAUL AT TROAS, . ; . . . 246
XXXII. LOST, . : ‘ : : ' . 254
XXXII. Sf. PAUL IN JERUSALEM, , . . » 262
XXXIV. OUTBURST OF PASSION, . ‘ . , 268
XXXV. CALLED TO ACCOUNT, . . . ' . 276
XXXVI. A SUDDEN CALL, : ' : . . 284
XXXVII. THE MURDEROUS PLOT, . . : . 289
XXXVIII. KEEP TO THE TRUTH, . . . : . 298
XXXIX. ST. PAUL BEFORE AGRIPPA, . . : , 803
XL, ONE SMALL SEED, . . ‘ ‘ . dll
XLL ST. PAUL'S SHIPWRECK, . : . . 3816
XLII. THE KALEIDOSCOPE, . . ‘ : . 3828
XLIIL ST, PAUL AT MELITA, . : . ; . 827
XLIV. THE CLOUD AND THE RAY, . ‘ . . 3832
XLV. SI. PAUL AT ROME, . . ' . 1 3838

XLVI. CHANGES, ' : : . . . 847
PICTURES OF ST. PAUL



CHAPTER I.
THE TELEGRAM.

Tue railway guard had given his warning whistle, the
train was already beginning to move on, when the door of
a carriage in which an elderly clergyman was seated alone
was suddenly flung open, and a lady, flushed and breathless
with haste, sprang in, and sank wearily down on a seat, for
she had run half the length of the platform.

“ Just in time,—hbarely in time!” cried the clergyman,
whose ready hand had helped her in, as the snorting
engine rushed on its way. “Why, Lady Laurie, is it you?”
added the clergyman, Mr. Stern, as he recognised in his
fellow-traveller a lady with whom he had some acquaint-
ance.

“Tam so thankful not to have missed the train!” said
Lady Laurie, when she had recovered her breath. “I had
not time to pack up, or anything; I stopped a passing
cab, and hurried to the station. I little thought when
I sat down to breakfast this morning, planning out a long
day’s work in London, that I should be speeding back so
soon to Willowdale Lodge. I had intended to be absent

some days.” |
7
8 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.

“ And what made you change your intention ?” inquired
Mr. Stern.

“ One of those dreadful telegrams from India,” said the
lady, almost shuddering as she glanced at a copy of the
Times, dated ——— July, 1857, which Mr. Stern held in
his hand.

“Ab! I understand—bad news from the scene of the
fearful Mutiny,” said the clergyman, his face expressing
sympathy and pity. “There is the telegram of the mas-
sacre at Lahupore—every one killed. I fear that you have
lost some relative there.”

“Not a relative, no, and I had never even seen Mr.
Hartley.”

“Ah! the missionary who died with the rest, he was
an old college companion of mine. I was shocked to see
his name in the list of sufferers.” ;

“He was the widower of my dearest friend,” said Lady
Laurie, with a deep sigh, “and his poor boys are under
my charge. As soon as I saw in the papers that they
were fatherless, as well as motherless She could not
finish her sentence, her voice was choked with emotion.

“JT did not know, when you spoke to me yesterday of
your boys, that they were not your own.”

“They are mine in everything but mere relationship
and name,” observed Lady Laurie. “ Little Robin could
scarcely run alone when he first arrived, and found in
my house his home. He is only six years old now, and
can scarcely understand his great loss; but Harold! my
poor Harold! who remembers his father, and almost
adores him, how will he bear such dreadful news as that
which I bring! It is not a month since the boys were
half wild with delight in hearing that Mr. Hartley
intended to come home next Spring. It is to break the bad
tidings of his death to them that I am now hurrying back.
I dread Harold’s hearing of it from any lips but my own.”


THE TELEGRAM. 9



“Of what age is Harold ?” inquired Mr. Stern.

“He was twelve last birthday,” replied Lady Laurie.
“We kept the anniversary joyously, and Harold, who is a
general favourite, was loaded with presents. But what
gave him most delight, what he called his best birthday
gift, was a letter from his father, in which Mr. Hartley
wrote that he had made up his mind to start for England
in March, and see his children again. Such a shouting as
there was through the house, “Father’s coming home!
Father's coming home!”—such eagerness to give the
good news to the village,—such a collecting of wood for a
bonfire! Robin had caught the infection of joy from his |
brother, and clapped his hands, and danced about with -
delight! Oh! would that Mr. Hartley had returned to
England at once, and never waited for a Spring—which
he was never to see!

“ My dear friend,” said the clergyman very gently, “are
not all events over-ruled by our Heavenly Father? He
saw that His faithful servant was ready for a glorious
change, and has called him to a better home than any in
England.”

“But in such a dreadful way! he was murdered !”
exclaimed Lady Laurie.

“When we reach Eternity’s shore we shall think that
it mattered but little whether we slowly forded Death’s
river, or cleared it at a bound,” observed Mr. Stern.
“The grand question is not when we go, or how we go,
but where we go. As regards dear Robert Hartley, there
cannot be a shadow of doubt that he is now with Christ,
which—as St. Paul tells us ‘is far better’ than remaining
in this world of temptation and trials.”

“T know it—I feel it,” said Lady Laurie more calmly.
“And Robert Hartley has rejomed his wife, who was one
of the sweetest Christians whom I ever knew. It seems
but yesterday, though thirteen years ago, when she—a
10 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.

happy young wife, came to bid me farewell before she
started with her husband for India. Alice had all a mis-
sionary’s spirit. She longed to win souls; her soul
yearned over the poor benighted Hindus; she loved them
before she saw them. Ah! little did she guess that they
would reward her husband’s zeal by taking his life!
I sadly mourned the loss of Alice, but oh! I am thankful
now that she was taken so early. J tremble to think that
had she been at Lahupore she might have shared the fate
of her husband. Better, far better that she died first—
peacefully on her bed.”

Lady Laurie’s fair face was bathed in tears. Mr. Stern
did not disturb her sorrow by conversation, but repeated
half aloud, the well-known beautiful verse, which so touch-
ingly expresses the calm submission of a Christian
regarding the time of his death.

“Tf life be long, my days are blest,
If they be spent for Thee ;
If life be short—I sooner rest
From sin and sorrow free.”

Lady Laurie did not cry long. She roused herself, and
found a sad comfort in speaking of her departed friend.

“ Alice and I were not related, but at school we were
such inseparable friends, that we used to be called ‘the
Twins” How often we chatted together in the long
winter evenings about being missionaries, and going to
the East, to tell the poor heathen of Christ. I had a
different path appointed me. I married, and for years had
all that earth could give me. My first sorrow was
parting with Alice, when she went out as a bride to India.
But. she was very happy there. Her letters were so
bright and joyful, telling me of one little treasure after
another being given to her arms. She delighted too in
her missionary work. Then came trouble upon trouble.
The climate so fearfully hot, told on her children. Alice’s
THE TELEGRAM. 11



first-born, Harold, became dangerously ill. He recovered
after weeks of anxious nursing, but other trials were to
come. Alice’s two little girls sickened, and were taken
’ away within three weeks of each other. My friend bowed
in submission to God’s will; she never murmured, but she
sorely missed her darlings. She knew not how soon her
own grave was to be beside theirs. Mother and children
were soon re-united in death.”

“Tn bliss,” said Mr. Stern softly.

“Poor Mr. Hartley wrote to me then in the deepest
distress. He had two sons left, but he dared not keep
them in India, especially as they had no longer a mother’s
care. I had had lately a loss as heavy as his own; I was
a widow, left with one daughter. What so natural as
that I should be allowed to take a parent’s place to the
motherless boys? God, in His goodness, confided to me
the precious charge.”

Mr. Stern remembered the Saviour’s words, “He that
receiveth one of these little ones receiveth Me.” He
silently wondered why many Christians do not gain sucha
priceless honour by offering a home to missionaries’
children, when they are necessarily parted from their
parents. |

“It is a great advantage to my Ida to have brothers,”
continued Lady Laurie. “It is so difficult for an only
child not to suffer a little from being the object of
exclusive care and attention. Though two years older
than Harold, Ida can yet find in him a companion, and
the very difference in their dispositions may make this
companionship the more desirable. Ida is a sensible
thoughtful girl; her quiet sedateness which had she been
alone, might have made her too precise a little woman
before her time, serves to soften Harold’s vehement
impetuous character.”

“Ts Harold a promising boy ? ” inquired Mr. Stern.
12 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.





“T think him a noble fellow,” said Lady Laurie,
warmly; with both head and heart, and energy for study
or sport. But Harold is somewhat passionate and proud,
and though I believe that he struggles against his faults,
he is not yet master over them.”

“Tt is a life-long struggle,” observed Mr. Stern. “Happy
the youth who begins the struggle early, and knows where
to look for strength to overcome the foe.”

“Tt is my most anxious desire to train my children,
for I think of them all as mine, and they call me
‘Mother,’ to be faithful soldiers of Christ. Each and all
are the subjects of many prayers.”

“Teach them in childhood to seek their weapons in
God’s own armoury, the Bible,” said Mr. Stern. “The
shield of faith is not too heavy for the arm of a very
young soldier.”

“ Harold’s faith will be sorely tried by the cruel death
of his father,’ observed Lady Laurie. “I really dread
the effect of this blow on my boy. I shall not know how
to give him comfort.”

“ Again I would say, lead him to the Bible. There we
find the still waters which cool the fiery spirit, and refresh
the aching heart.”

“T have a little daily Bible-reading and talk with the
young people in the evening,” said Lady Laurie, “after
Harold has returned from the day-school which he attends.
There is nothing formal about this reading, even merry
little Robin likes to join in it, and not as a silent hearer,
though being yet in his primer, he cannot help in the
actual reading. I encourage the young people to speak
out the thoughts that arise in their minds, and Robin
takes advantage of this privilege quite as often as Ida or
Harold. I think that we all enjoy the twenty minutes or
half-hour which we thus spend together in searching the
Scriptures. We always conclude with prayer.”
THE TELEGRAM. 13





“These quiet talks over God’s Word, this daily searching
in the armoury, this daily drinking from the waters of
truth, may be the most important part of your children’s
training,” observed the clergyman. “It is likely to have
an effect through life. How strange it is that even
Christian parents will make every sacrifice to give sons
and daughters what is called a good education, and yet
neglect its most essential part. Parents make preparation
for their children’s life in this world, and little or none for
life: never-ending. They cram the head and starve the
heart. But I feel assured, dear Lady Laurie, that you
will never fall into this error—this sin.”

Here the conversation ceased. Lady Laurie gave
herself up to silent thought, and the clergyman took up
his copy of the Tvmes. Scarcely another word was spoken
till the train stopped for a few minutes at a modest little
station, where the guard called out “Foreham.” Here
Lady Laurie got down, and after a kindly good-bye
exchanged with her fellow-traveller, went on her lonely
way to her home, Willowdale Lodge. There was no one
to meet her at the station, as her return was quite
unexpected.
CHAPTER II.
GRIEF AND REVENGE.

Ir was a hot midsummer day, and not an hour past
noon, when Lady Laurie hastened along the laurel-
bordered path, then across the green lawn, past the
flower-beds gay with verdure and roses, towards her
pretty dwelling. As she approached the porch, which was
half covered with honeysuckle and clematis, somebody
came out. Lady Laurie saw with anything but pleasure
the well-known green parasol and blue veil of Miss Petty.

For Miss Petty, the Doctor’s sister, was the greatest
gossip in Foreham. With nothing to do but to go in and
out of the houses of her neighbours, she was a real busy-

‘body, and nothing delighted her more than to be the first

to give “a bit of news,” whether it were good or bad.
Lady Laurie tried to obey the command to “honour all
men,” but it was very difficult to obey it at that moment,
for she read in Miss Petty’s face that she knew all about
the telegram, and that she had just been doing the very
thing which Harold’s friend had hurried from London to
prevent her doing, startling her boy with the terrible news.
It then occurred to Lady Laurie that the Doctor took in
an evening paper, and that the sad telegram must have
been in it, and so had arrived by the early post.

“Oh! dearest Lady Laurie, have you heard the frightful
news from India?” eagerly began Miss Petty, holding out
her hand.

“I know all,” said Lady Laurie, just touching the hand
14

‘t
GRIEF AND REVENGE. 15



for a moment, and then running through the porch into
the house.

“Dear me! how rude!” muttered Miss Petty, dis-

appointed of her expected treat of calling up a look of
horror and distress on the fair face of Lady Laurie. She
remembered, however, that Mrs. Miller and the Bulleus
had probably not seen the telegram yet, so off she hurried
to them with the additional pleasure of being able to add
that “the poor dear boy, Harold, was in such a way,
I really thought that he’d have gone mad.”
. Lady Laurie hastened to the sitting-room where she
was likely to find her family at this hour, as morning
lessons would be over, and the dinner-hour was at hand.
The door was open, for it was Miss Petty’s habit never to
shut doors behind her. Ida came to meet her mother,
whom she had caught a glimpse of through the window.
The girl looked grave and concerned, but it was not on
her that the blow had fallen, and she could not, like her
mother, enter with overflowing sympathy into the grief of
another. Robin, a little boy with round face, sunburnt
and freckled, and a shock of unmanageable hair, stood as
if bewildered, looking at his brother, feeling that he ought
to ery, but not quite knowing how. Robin’s thick brown
hair was more than usually rough, for he had been
rubbing it up vigorously with his little red hand, as his
token of distress. Harold lay at full length on the carpet,
his face, which was downwards, buried on his crossed arms.
He uttered no sound, his passionate grief only finding
vent in slight convulsive movements of his feet. He
could not weep, and he could not lie still.

“My boy—my precious boy!” said Lady Laurie, kneel-
ing down and laying on Harold’s curly auburn hair a
touch soft and tender as that of a mother. Harold did
not appear to notice it, only the movement in his feet
ceased at once,
16 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Lady Laurie could not at that moment utter a word of
consolation, she felt that the fatherless lad was not in a
state to receive it. She slowly rose, and stood gazing
down upon him with mingled pity and love.

“They’ve killed our father; oh! they’ve killed our
father!” exclaimed Robin, flingmg his arms round his
. foster-mother.

Then Harold started up, his features—even to his lips
—pale with passion. As he sprang to his feet he clenched
his fist and exclaimed, “ Would that I were a man!”

“ What would you do?” asked Robin.

“Avenge him!” cried Harold, grinding his teeth, a
fierce expression of hatred in his flashing grey eyes.

“Oh! Harold, how wicked!” exclaimed Ida; “ Mamma,
do tell him how wicked it is to wish for revenge.”

“He was not your father!” cried Harold, as he dashed
out of the room, and rushed up the stairs, two steps at a
time, to his own little attic apartment.

“T’ll avenge father too,” said Robin.

“ Robin always echoes whatever Harold says, that makes
it so much worse to give way to passion,” observed Ida.
“Mamma, I am sure that you will speak to Harold, he is
doing so very very wrong.”

“JT will speak, but not now,” said the gentle lady.
“Poor Harold is like one with a smarting wound, and we
must touch it very softly indeed.”

“Tda, don’t,” observed Robin, “she would rub it hard
with a brush and make it bleed.”

The servant entering announced dinner. In times of
distress how strange seems the routine of common life!
Lady Laurie felt that she could not eat, but she went in to
carve. She sent up a plateful of warm food to Harold,
but it came down untouched.

“ Master Harold has locked the door,—he said he wanted
nothing to eat,” said the maid.
GRIE# AND REVENGE. 17



“You know that the doctor ordered Harold to have
plenty of food,” observed Ida.

“To-day we must let Harold do what he likes,” said her
mother.

“ He shall do what he likes,” echoed Robin.

“ Robin always stands up for Harold,” said Ida.

“Cause I love him—he’s my brother!” cried the child
tiercely.

Lady Laurie ordered tea to be made, and herself carried
up a cup of it to Harold’s little room, which was one with
a sloping ceiling just under the roof. She tapped at the
door, and a voice from within cried out, “ Who is there” ?

“Your mother; unlock tbe door.”

Her word was instantly obeyed. Harold opened the door.
His pale face wore a look of pain, and his eye-lashes were
moist with tears.

“Mother—I can’t bear talking now,” said Harold, as
the lady put down the cup on a little table. “There is
only one thought—one wish in my mind—and that is—to
avenge him.”

“My son, do you forget Who hath said, “ Vengeance is
Mine?” Do you not think that the sainted father for
whom you mourn would—like a Christian—have said
“forgive”?

“JT know that I am very bad,” said Harold, who was
now seated on the edge of his bed, “ but I can’t speak or
feel like a Christian. It is not in my power,” he gloomily
added.

“The power, like every other blessing we must ask from
God,” said the widowed lady. “God gives no command
without offering grace to enable us to obey it.”

These few words were all that were said at the time on
the subject. Lady Laurie knew Harold well enough to
know that it was better to leave him to think them over.
She silently offered him the tea which she had brought ;

B
18 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.

the boy, with feverish thirst, emptied the cup. The
beverage revived him.

“Perhaps I ought to come down in the evening for our
Scripture reading,” said Harold.

“Tt will be well if you can. You remember that it was
by your dear father’s special request in a letter received
last Spring, that we began these little readings. Every
wish of his will be doubly sacred now. Oh! Harold, may
you tread in your father’s steps, thus best will you honour
his memory.”

“T shall never be like him—never!” There came a
burst of tears, but they were shed on a mother’s bosom.

Lady Laurie went downstairs to the sitting-room. She
found Ida giving a little lecture to Robin, who was taking
it very badly. Ida could no more manage Robin’s temper
than he could reduce to order that one specially unruly
lock of his, which would stick out from the rest like a feather.

Ida, with many valuable qualities, had not yet that of
winning affection by gentle, considerate kindness. She
was more of the censor than the sister. Calm and unexcit-
able in character herself, she made little allowance for the
temperament of others. To the neat, tidy girl Robin’s
rough romping ways,—his clothes always requiring mend-
ing from his trying to climb up trees, were a source of
pretty constant annoyance. Ida had not acquired her
mother’s indulgent patience.

“Tda is growing very like Lady Laurie,” the Vicar had
once observed at the tea-table to Miss Theresa Petty.
“They resemble each other as these two bits of your
honey-comb do.”

“The difference is that the one comb holds honey and
the other holds none,” was | Miss Petty’s not very good-
natured reply.

“Oh! the honey will come, the honey will come,” said
the Vicar ; “Ida Laurie is brought up amongst flowers.”
CHAPTER IIL
THE MARTYR.

THE little Bible reading was held just after sunset,
while a rich amber glow still lingered in the sky. No
lamp would be needed in the long twilight of the warm
Summer eve. Ida had placed the Bibles ready.

“T wonder if Harold will come,” said Robin, and the
sentence was still on his lips when Harold entered the
room. He looked haggard, like one who has been up all
night, as he silently took his place by his mother. Robin
hardly knew more than his letters, being slow in learning

' to read, though quick in apprehension, but he always

liked to sit at Lady Laurie’s other side, and look over her
book.

“What shall we read now?” asked Ida, “we finished
the Gospels last evening.”

“T thought of our beginning the life of the great mis-
sionary,” replied Lady Laurie.

“Oh! you mean Campbell, or Carey, or Williams ?”
remarked Ida; “but I suppose that we shall begin by
reading a little of the Bible as usual ?”

“The life of the great missionary is in the Bible,” said
Lady Laurie. “Let us turn to the 7th chapter of the
Acts of the Apostles. Beginning at the 54th verse, we
shall have a good introduction to the story of Christian
missions.”

' “This is about the death of St. Stephen,” observed Ida,
who had found the place in the book of Acts.
19
20 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



“Who was St. Stephen ?” asked Robin.

“J will reply in Bible words,” said Lady Laurie.
‘He was a man full of faith and of the Holy Ghost,
He lived in the early days of the Church; when the
Lord had but lately ascended to Heaven, Stephen was
chosen for an important and holy work, that of caring
for the wants of the poor, and especially those of needy
Christian widows.”

“Then everybody loved him?” said Robin.

“So far from it that Stephen became the object of the
special hatred of the unbelieving Jews. The elders,
the scribes, and the people rose up against him, they
seized him, and brought him before a poancil They set
up false witnesses against him. Holy Stephen was
treated as his holier Master had been treated before him.
Blessed are they who share the Lord’s cup of trial here,
for they shall share His glory pee: Lady Laurie
glanced at Harold as she spoke.

“Tam glad that we are to read of missions,” observed’
Harold. “He was a missionary!” all knew that the
boy meant his father. “If I were not such an unworthy
fellow as I am, I should like to be what he was.”

The boy’s lip quivered ; he dared not close his eyes lest
the water brimming in them should overflow, and roll
down his cheeks. Lady Laurie drew off the attention of
Ida and Robin by offering a short prayer, and then
asking Ida to read the 54th verse of the chapter chosen.
This describes the fury of the Jews, when Stephen, with
manly boldness, had accused them of being the betrayers
and murderers of Christ, the Just One.

Reading.
When they heard these things, they were cut to the
heart, and they gnashed upon him with their teeth. But
he, being full of the Holy Ghost, looked up steadfastly
THE MARTYR. 21



into heaven, and said, “Behold! I see the heavens
opened, and the Son of Man standing on the right
~ hand of God.”

Harold did not speak, but he thought, “perhaps such a
glorious vision was granted to my father. It would be
worth dying as Stephen died, to see what Stephen saw.”

Reading.

“Then they cried out with a loud voice, and stopped
their ears, and ran upon him with one accord, and
cast him out of the city, and stoned him; and the
witnesses laid down their clothes at a young man’s feet,
whose name was Saul. And they stoned Stephen, calling
upon God and saying ‘Lord Jesus! receive my spirit!’
And he kneeled down and cried with a loud voice, ‘Lord!
lay not this sin to their charge.’ And when he had said
this, he fell asleep.”

Lady Laurie added the first sentences of the following
chapter, and read, “And Saul was consenting unto his
death. And at that time there was a great persecution of
the Church which was at Jerusalem.”

“Tn this,” continued the lady, “Saul took a very active
share. It is written in the 3rd verse that “he made havoc
of the church, entering into every house, and haling men
and women committed them to prison.” Saul afterwards
described himself as “a blasphemer and persecutor”
(1 Tim. xiii.) Nay more, he owned that he “ persecuted
this way unto death.” (Acts xxii. 4.)

“ He ought to have been killed his own self!” exclaimed
Robin, striking the table.

“Oh! Robin you know nothing about it!” cried Ida;
“Saul lived to be the holy apostle, St. Paul.”

The mind of Harold was still dwelling on the idea

_ which had connected the martyrdom of Stephen with the
death of his own father. “Mother,” he said, “do you think
22 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



that dying people often see sights such as Stephen saw,
holy people I mean?”

“Tt is possible,” was the reply, “though we cannot
speak with certainty on the subject. A poet has
written,—

“Leaving the earth, both worlds at once they view,
Who stand upon the threshold of the new.”

There have been various instances of Christians showing
extraordinary joy at the time of departure; the face
lighted up with a smile, which lingered even after death.”

“Do you not remember the story of the martyr, who
when he was burnt alive clapped his hands two or three
times in the flames,” said Ida.

“A fact has recently come to my knowledge,’* said
Lady Laurie. “A native of India, a Christian, was bitten
by a mad dog, in going to help his young son to turn it
out of the house. The furious creature sprang at the
father’s throat, and wounded it as well as his hand. After
some days the poor man showed decided symptoms of
hydrophobia.”

“What’s that?” asked Robin, to whom the long name
was a new one. “A terrible illness, which sometimes
follows the bite of a mad dog, and which is almost sure to
be fatal. It is impossible for the sufferer to drink, or
even endure the sight of water; he generally becomes
mad himself, and dies.”

“Oh! the poor father!” cried Robin; “was he not
dreadfully frightened when he found that he was to have
such a shocking illness ?”

“No,” replied Lady Laurie, “he was quite calm and
resigned. He knew that his sins were forgiven through
Christ; he said that he was ready, and desired that his
widow should not weep for his loss.”

* This really happened in 1883.
THE MARTYR. 28



on

“Could he have. been a native of India?” exclaimed
Harold, who, after the news brought by the telegram,
hated the very name.

“A Christian native,” replied Lady Laurie. “Oh!
Harold, had there been many such, the Mutiny might
never have happened. Bibles might have prevented the
need of bayonets, missions have stopped all massacre in
unhappy India.”

But Robin wanted the end of the story. “Did the
brave father die of the mad dog’s bite?” he inquired.

“Yes, after a short but terrible illness. Before the end
came, and it was for this that I have related the story, the
dying man said that four ministers had come. No one
but himself could see any. Some one near asked where
they were. The sufferer pointed upwards.”

“They must have been angels,” said Ida. “It makes
me think of that pretty verse,

“T hear a voice you cannot hear,
Which bids me not delay ;
I see a hand ye cannot see
Which beckons me away.”

Lady Laurie added in her soft voice the well known
lines of Pope,—
“Hark ! they whisper, angels say,
Sister spirit, come away !”

A softened expression came over the face of Harold;
he was thinking of his father, and hoping that in the
moment of death he might have been granted some
beautiful vision, or heard some heavenly voice. Lady
Laurie saw that the moment had come when Harold
could bear to be spoken to on the subject of forgiveness of
enemies. But it must not be in the presence of any but
herself. .

“Tda,” said the lady, after the family had, as usual,
24 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL,



knelt together for their closing devotions, “now take up
your little brother to bed, and hear him say his prayers.”

“J don’t want Ida to hear me say my prayers, I want
you,” cried Robin, throwing his arms round the lady’s
neck for what he called “a good tight hug.”

“J will come to you presently, darling,” said the
mother; “but now I want a little quiet talk with
Harold. Ida, take Robin up to bed.”

“He can go by himself, he’s not a baby; mayn’t I stop
for the talk?” said Ida, who was unwilling to quit the
room.

“My child, prompt obedience is the best proof of love,”
said Lady Laurie, who had often to speak twice to Ida.
The girl did not venture to make further remonstrance,
but slowly left the room with the child, after he had
repeated his hug to Lady Laurie, and given another as
hearty to Harold, of whom he was exceedingly fond.

“Jt isa grand thing to be a martyr like Stephen,”
observed Harold; “it seems to a Christian like what
getting the Victoria Cross must be to a soldier, a very
great honour indeed.”

“Stephen did not obtain his Victoria Cross till he had
fought his good fight,” observed Lady Laurie.

“You mean till he had bravely confessed Christ before
all those murderous Jews.”

“ Not only that, but till he had conquered himself, till
he had overcome the anger which rises up against cruelty
and wrong, and had forgiven and prayed for these murder-
ous men.”

“ Mother, I can imagine it possible to do that if—if they
were killing me only!” exclaimed Harold; “but if they
hurt any one whom I love, I could never—never forgive.
I do not believe that any one could.”

“Such grace has been given to Christians,” observed
Lady Laurie.
THE MARTYR. 25



« After the statesman, Mr. Percival, had been murdered,
it is related that bis widow knelt down with her children,
and prayed for the man who had killed her husband.”

“Tt is not-in human nature,’ muttered Harold.

“No, my son, it is not in human nature,” rejoined Lady
Laurie.

“You don’t wish to have me unnatural!” cried Harold
Hartley. “I feel as if I should like to have a sword, and
go to Lahupore, and kill every black man that I met.”

“JT do not wish you to be unnatural, Harold, but I long
for you to have that new nature which is born of the
Spirit. This is the meaning of the Lord’s words, except a
man be born again he cannot see the kingdom of God.
Those who are thus new-born are given power to follow
the example of the Lord who prayed for those who had
just driven the nails into His blessed hands and feet.”

“T am afraid that I am such a bad fellow that I shall
never be like that,” said Harold. “I shall never pray for
those who killed my father.”

“Who was the real cause of his death?” asked Lady
Laurie.

“T don’t know—there was no man’s name given,”
replied Harold.

“ Yet some one caused this crime, and all other crimes
that have been committed on earth.”

“Do you mean the devil?” asked the boy.

“Yes, Harold, and remember that these poor heathen
natives of India, living in darkness, are his slaves, his
miserable slaves. Satan could only harm your dear
father’s body, but the Evil One is destroying the souls of
these wretched men. He is dragging them down to end-
less misery. Could you not pray that Satan should not
have his will, that his kingdom in India should fall?”

“T would pray that with all my heart!” exclaimed
Harold.
26 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL,



“Then let us ask God that light may shine in the dark-
ness, that the chains of Satan’s slaves may be broken, that
even the worst of these sinners may repent, as he who
consented to Stephen’s death repented.” Lady Laurie
knelt down as she finished the sentence, and Harold
silently followed her example.

“Oh! Lord of mercy, have pity on India and her sinful
people,” prayed the Christian lady. “Crush the power of
Satan, let the blood of Thy martyrs be the seed of the
Church! Let no precious life have been given in vain.
Let the Gospel spread amongst the poor ignorant heathen,
and oh! enable us to pity and not to hate. Enable us to
hasten by our prayers and our efforts that blessed time
when in India, and every other heathen land, the wolf
shall lie down with the lamb, and the fiercest persecutors
and blasphemers fall low at the feet of Thy adorable Son.
Grant this for His sake!”

Lady Laurie’s tears fell fast as she prayed, but she was
thankful to hear Harold’s low “Amen” at the end of her.
prayer.
CHAPTER IV.
BIGOTRY AND UNBELIEF.

THE lady and Harold had scarcely risen from their knees
when Ida re-entered the room.

“ Mamma, I wish that you would speak to Robin, he is
so wilful,” said the girl. “He will say ‘ Bless dear father’
in his prayer.”

“Why should he not say it!” cried Harold almost
fiercely.

“T thought that you have told us, mamma, that it is
wrong to pray for the dead,” said Ida.

“Tt is useless,” was the lady’s reply. “The state of the
departed may be shown by that of the ten virgins in the
parable, after the bridegroom had come. No entreaties of
friends would have opened the door for the foolish ones,
and the wise ones needed no prayers, for they had entered
into the brightness and joy of the wedding, and had
already all that could be asked for.”

“T could not bear to leave his name out of my prayers,”
said Harold with feeling

“There is no need to leave the dear name out, my
boy. Only change ‘Bless my dear father’ into ‘I thank
Thee that Thou hast blessed my dear father,’ ‘for blessed
are the dead who die im the Lord.’”

Harold looked satisfied and soothed.

“Now, mamma, I want to ask you a question,” said Ida,
who was of an intelligent, inquiring mind. “ Was it really
very sinful in Saul to persecute the Christians and approve

27
28 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



of the death of St. Stephen, when he honestly thought that
they were teaching a false religion? Had not God com-
manded the Israelites to punish those who wished to lead
others astray ?”

“Saul certainly acted in ignorance,’ replied Lady
Laurie; “but the whole question turns upon whether the
ignorance was wilful or not. Had not Saul evidence
enough to make him believe, if he had not been resolved
not to believe ?” ;

“JT don’t quite understand,” said Ida.

“Saul, according to Mr. Birk’s Chronology, was in Jeru-
salem six years after the resurrection of the Lord, when
many-witnesses of that resurrection must have been living.
He must have met with persons who had seen the miracles
of Christ; he may have even beheld Lazarus, who, six
years before, had himself been raised from the dead. Saul
was a student under the learned Gamaliel, who, from his
speech recorded in the fifth chapter of Acts, seems to have
been a liberal, clear-headed man; Saul would not have
learned bigotry from him.”

“And yet Saul was as bigoted as any Jew could be,”
observed Harold.

«Then Saul, as a learned Pharisee, must have been well
acquainted with the Old Testament Scriptures, and could
have found sufficient proofs in them that the Lord Jesus
was indeed ‘He of whom Moses and the prophets did
write.’ ”

“TJ don’t quite see that,” observed Ida.

“Let us sit down again, my child, and re-open our
Bibles. Let us place ourselves in the position of a student
of the Scriptures in the days of Saul of Tarsus. Turn first
to the ninth chapter of Daniel, and let Harold read aloud
the beginning of the twenty-sixth verse.”

Harold reads—“‘ After threescore and two weeks shall
Messiah be cut off, but not for Himself’ But the name
BIGOTRY AND UNBELIEF. 29



of the Lord Jesus is not in the verse; why is He called
Messiah ?

“Messiah means anointed, as also does the name
Christ. Kings and priests were anointed with oil.
Christ is both king and priest, and was anointed with the
- Holy Spirit. Saul and all intelligent Jews would under-
stand the verse as meaning, the Anointed One shall die.”

“ But what do the weeks mean ?” asked Ida; “I thought
that the Lord came to earth hundreds of years after
Daniel died.”

“A day in prophetical language usually stands for a
year, a week for seven years,’ was the reply. “Before
Christ’s coming there was amongst pious Jews, like Simeon,
an expectation of His appearing. Saul seems neither to
have noticed the time appointed, nor the prophecy that |
‘Messiah was to be cwt off.”

“Were there many other such prophecies?” asked Ida.

“Turn over just to a few of them. You and Harold
shall read them out alternately. Look out Micah, ver. 2,
for the prophecy regarding the place of Christ’s birth.”

Ida reads—*‘‘ But thou, Bethlehem Ephratah, though
thou be little among the thousands of Judah, yet out of
thee shall He come forth unto Me that is to be. the ruler
of Israel, whose goings forth have been of old from ever-
lasting.”

Harold. From everlasting! What would Saul and
the Jews, who were so angry at the Saviour calling Him-
self the Son of God, think of such a verse as that ?

Lda. I remember that when the learned men quoted
that verse to show Herod that the Messiah would be born
in Bethlehem, they left out altogether that last part of
the verse. JI suppose that they did not know what to
make of the declaration that Christ’s goings forth have
been of old from everlasting. That verse showed that He
could not have been a mere man.
30 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Lady Lawrie. As puzzling to. the unbelieving Jews
must have been this verse in the eleventh Psalm, “ Thow
art My Son, this day have I begotten Thee.”

Ida. Or this in my favourite forty-fifth Psalm, “Thy
throne, O God, is for ever and ever; the sceptre of Thy
kingdom is a righteous sceptre ; Thou lovest righteousness -
and hatest wickedness, therefore God, Thy God, hath
anointed Thee with the oil of gladness above Thy
fellows.”

Harold. That must have been written of Christ, who is
God, yet has men for His “ fellows.” I did not know that
we could find out from the Old Testament as well as the
New, that the Saviour is God indeed.

Lady L. Try and remember two special Old Testament
verses by each of which both the divinity and humanity
of Christ can be proved, I mean that he is both God and
Man.

Ida, after reflection. I cannot remember such verses,
unless they be those that we have been reading.

Harold. I have found one—the Christmas verse, the |
one which mother gave me to paint for the school. “ For
unto us a Child is born, unto us a Son is given. And the
government shall be upon His shoulders. And His name
shall be called Wonderful, Counsellor, roe Micury Gop,
THE EVERLASTING FatTHer, the Prince of Peace.” That
verse is in the ninth chapter of Isaiah.

Ida. I do not know where to look for the second verse
which you mentioned. :

Lady L. Turn to Zechariah xiii. 7th verse, it is a verse
quoted in the gospel as relating to Christ.

Ida rveads—Awake, O sword, against my Shepherd,
and against the Man that is My fellow, saith the Lord of
Hosts. Smite the Shepherd, and the sheep shall be
scattered.

Harold, The Man, and yet Gop’s FELLow; the Shep-
i
¢
i
Â¥







BIGOTRY AND UNBELIEF. 31



herd who was to be smitten! How could any Jew reading
such Old Testament Scriptures not see that the Saviour
for whom they looked must be God as well as Man ?

Ida. But Saul did not believe that the Lord Jesus was
the Person thus described in the Bible. How could the
Jew have been sure ?

Lady L. Saul, had he not been blinded by prejudice
and bigotry, might have seen how exactly the Lord’s life
and death fulfilled prophecies written hundreds of years
before the event. The twenty-second Psalm is one striking
prophecy, telling of the piercing of hands and feet, though
crucifixion was a punishment unknown to the Jews when
the Psalm was written by David. Jsaiah liii. describes
the scourging, Isaiah li. the shame and the spitting which
the Saviour endured for our sakes. In the wonderful
prophecy in Zechariah xi. the exact swm received by
Judas for betraying his Master is mentioned, and the very
use to which the blood-money was put. Ida, read the
12th and 13th verses aloud.

Ida did so, and then observed, “I do not think that any
one could have understood such a very strange prophecy
as this, till all came to pass so very exactly.”

Harold. I wonder whether Saul ever had read it.

Lady L. He doubtless had read it, as well as the other
prophecies contained in the Scriptures.

Ida. Then indeed it was strange that he did not
believe.

Lady L. Suppose that we had received a letter giving
us due notice that the Queen would visit us here, and
come in humble guise. Suppose then that our Sovereign
appeared about the time when we had been led to expect
her, not wearing a crown, not in any great state, but with
official papers signed and sealed, stating that she was
indeed our Queen.

Ida. What do you mean by the papers ?
32 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Lady L. I mean the miracles performed by our Lord,
performed in open day, some in the sight of hundreds—
even thousands of people.

“Tike the miracle of the feeding of the five thousand,”
said Harold.

Lady L. Suppose that in addition to this evidence, we
had a large picture of the Queen (I am alluding now to
the prophecies), in which every feature was exactly like
that of her who claimed to be our Sovereign Lady; should
we have the smallest excuse for saying, “ This is not our
Queen,” any excuse for despising, rejecting, insulting, and
casting her out of the palace ?

Harold. Oh! mother, these unbelieving Jews had no
excuse at all. They must have been simply determined
not to believe.

Ida. I only wonder why God forgave Saul after he had
shown such hardness of heart!

Lady L. Let us close our meeting by reading his own
words in the first of his letters to his beloved young
disciple, Timothy. The lady turned to the Ist chapter of
Ist Timothy and read aloud in the 18th, 15th, and 16th
verses, St. Paul’s own description of himself. “ Who was
before a blasphemer and a persecutor, and injurious, but
I obtained mercy because I did it ignorantly in unbelief.
This is a faithful saying, and worthy of all acceptation,
that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners, of
whom I am chief. Howbeit for this cause I obtained
mercy, that in me first Jesus Christ might show forth all
long-suffering, for a pattern to those which should here-
after believe on Him to life everlasting.”

The Bible-reading and Lady Laurie’s prayer had not
been without their effect on the agitated mimd of
Harold Hartley. He could have endured nothing that
came in the form of amusement; he would have shrunk
even from much expression of pity. But the solemn
‘BIGOTRY AND UNBELIEF. 33

passages relating to a crucified Saviour took him for the
time out of himself; and the account of the blessed peace
of the martyred Stephen made the fate of his own
father appear less unutterably dreadful. In the night,
indeed, the poor boy was haunted by feverish dreams; he
heard the roll of the horrible Indian drum, and fancied
that he saw murderous crowds approaching; yet even
with those’ dark forms seemed mixed those of white-robed
angels. Harold dreamed that he saw his father kneeling,
and looking up with radiant joy, and that he heard from
the missionary’s lips the prayer, “Lord! lay not this sin
to their charge!” Harold awoke, indeed, with a heavy
weight on his heart, but still he was able to bless the
Lord who had given to His servant the crown of life
which He has prepared for all who love Him.
CHAPTER V.
CONVERSION.

THE next day, which was Saturday, was a very dreary
one for poor Harold. The hands of the clock seemed
to move more slowly than they ever had-moved before.
The fatherless boy could settle down to no occupation; if
he took up a book he was unable to grasp its meaning.
He did not care for his garden; he would not touch his
carpentering tools. The dismal preparation for putting
himself and his brother into mourning added to the sense
of gloom. Yet it hurt Harold more to hear Robin
whistling merrily on the staircase as if nothing had
happened, and Ida practising scales on the piano until
her thoughtful mother stopped her. Harold was glad
when the glaring July sun went down at last, he almost
wondered how it could shine so brightly upon a world so
full of sorrow and sin. The quiet hour for Bible-reading
was welcome to Harold; there was nothing then to jar on
his feelings. When seating himself by his mother-like
friend, Harold seemed to enter a little sanctuary made
holy by the presence of God.

Lady L. We are now going to read one of the most
interesting passages of Bible history. Do you remember
that there are three accounts in Scripture of the con-
version of St. Paul ?

Harold. I can only remember two; that in the ninth
chapter of Acts, and that in Paul’s speech before Agrippa.

Ida. Oh! do you not remember that he also told the
34


















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































“
CONVERSION. 35



Jews all about his conversion when he stood on some
stairs, in the midst of a terrible riot ?

Lady L. Now I propose that while I read aloud from
the ninth chapter, Ida should have before her the account
in the twenty-second, and you, Harold, that in the twenty-
sixth, so that each giving some extra detail, should, as it
were, fill up the picture.

Robin. And what am I to do? I don’t want to be
left out.

Lady L. You shall bring me the map, and I will show
you the two places, Jerusalem and Damascus, of which
we are going to read.

Robin runs for the Bible atlas, and Lady Laurie
jinds the right map.

Robin. There, I’ll keep my two fingers on the two spots.

Lady L. You see that Damascus is a city nearly 150
miles to the north of Jerusalem. Can any of you
remember the place in the Bible where the first mention
is made of Damascus ?

Silence follows the question.

Lady L. Do you remember the name of Abraham’s
faithful servant who went to find a wife for Isaac ?

Ida and Harold almost together. Eliezer of Damascus.

Lady L. Thus you see that there was a place called
Damascus about 3700 years ago.

Ida. It must be the oldest city in the world.

Lady L. Perhaps the oldest city now standing. Can
any of you tell me of any other remarkable person who
came from Damascus ?

Again silence follows the question.

Lady I. Damascus was the capital of Syria. Who
remembers a Syrian general ?

Harold. The wicked Hazael who murdered his master,
King Benhadad, and afterwards showed such cruelty to
the people of Israel.
36 PICTURES OF S?. PAUL.



Lady £. There is another whom even our little Robin
may remember. Tell me, Robin, who was the leper who
dipped seven times in the river Jordan and was made whole.

Robin, eagerly. Naaman the Syrian, who went where
the little slave girl from Israel told him to go.

Lady L. Thus we have interesting ancient historical
recollections connected with Damascus. The place itself
is beautifully situated. So much so that it has been com-
pared to Paradise itself. The Damascus roses are famous.
Now let us commence our reading.

Reads—And Saul, yet breathing out threatenings and
slaughter against the disciples of the Lord, went unto the
High Priest and desired of him letters to Damascus to
the synagogues, that if he found any of this way, whether
they were men or women, he might bring them bound
unto Jerusalem.

Ida. I see that St. Paul says in the twenty-second chap-
ter that “all the estate of the elders” gave letters as well
as the High Priest.

Harold reads—Authority and commission from the chief
priests.

Ida. They must have put great trust in Saul.

Harold. They thought that he hated Christians just as
much as they themselves did.

Lady L. reads—And as he journeyed he came near
Damascus, and suddenly there shined about him a light
from Heaven.

Ida. It was “about noon,” and the light was “a great
light.”

Harold. “Above the brightness of the sun.”

Lady L. reads—And he fell to the earth.

Harold. I see that it was not only Saul who fell to the
earth, but all his companions also.

Ida. In this chapter St. Paul says, “They that were
with me saw indeed the light, and were afraid.”


























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Tue Lorp Mrrrine Sr. Paun on THE Way.
CONVERSION. 37



Lady L. But only Saul himself saw the Lord Jesus.

Harold. Did Saul see the Lord Jesus? That is not
put in this chapter.

Ida. Nor in that which I have to read.

Lady L. Turn to the fifteenth chapter of 1 Corinthians.
Paul (the same, you know, as Saul) writes in the eighth
verse concerning the risen Lord, last of all he was seen
of me also.

Harold. I never thought of looking for St. Paul’s history
in his letters.

Lady L. If you do not do so you will miss much. The
epistles contain various particulars of what happened to
the Apostle, which you will find nowhere else. Now let
us go on with the story without interruption till we come
to the end of the passage.

Reading.

“ And he fell to the earth, and heard a voice saying unto
him, Saul, Saul, why persecutest thou me? And he said,
Who art Thou, Lord? And the Lord said, Iam Jesus
whom thou persecutest. It is hard for thee to kick against
the pricks.

“And he, trembling and astonished, said, Lord, what
wilt thou have me to do? And the Lord said unto him,
Arise, and go into the city, and it shall be told thee
what thou must do. And the men which journeyed
with him stood speechless, hearing a voice, but seeing
no man.

“And Saul arose from the earth; and when his eyes
were opened he saw no man; but they led him by the
hand, and brought him into Damascus. And he was three
days without sight, and neither did eat nor drink.”

Ludy L. Now, Ida, from your chapter can you add any-
thing to this account ?

Ida, How is this? We read just now that Saul’s com-
38 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.

panions heard a voice, and here St. Paul says, “ They
heard not the voice of Him that spake to me.”

Lady L. I do not think that the two passages are at all
difficult to explain. St. Paul’s companions heard a sound,
but they did not make out any words. So, when in answer
to Christ’s prayer, “ Father ! glorify Thy name!” there came
a voice from Heaven, “I have both glorified it, and will
glorify it again,” some people said that it thundered.
They heard, indeed, an awful sound, but could not distin-
guish articulate words.

Ida. Here is an interesting particular. Paul tells what
it was that struck him blind. “I could not see for the
glory of that light.”

Harold. And in my chapter I have a great deal more
of what the Lord said to poor, Pines trembling Saul as he
lay in the dust before Him.

Reads—Rise and stand upon thy fet for I have appeared
unto thee for this purpose, to make thee a minister and a
witness both of these things which thou hast seen, and of
those things in which I will appear unto thee, delivering
thee from the people, and from the Gentiles, unto whom
Inow send thee, to open their eyes, and to turn them
from darkness to light, and from the power of Satan unto
God.

Lady IL. What wonderful mercy, what tender grace,
did the Lord display in His dealings with the once proud
persecutor. The Saviour would not leave Saul one hour
in despair. Christ spoke to him of a future glorious work
as He might have spoken to His faithful disciples, Peter
or John. The Lord had just turned Saul from darkness
to light, from the power of Satan to that of God, and He
assures the poor trembling penitent that he shall be a
means of converting others.

Harold. And Saul actually saw the Lord—saw Him,
perhaps, with the very look which He turned upon Peter,
CONVERSION. 39



when that apostle had denied his Master with oaths and
curses !

Ida. I do like to think of that word, Why persecutest
thow Me? The Lord considers any wrong to His people
as done to Himself.

Robin. He minds what bad people are doing in India.

The little boy’s simple remark struck a chord in the
hearts of two of those who heard him. The Lord was,
indeed, watching all the sad events passing in the East,
counting injuries to His servants as done to Himself,
regarding each drop of Christian blood shed as His
own.

Ida. I wonder if any of Saul’s companions were con-
verted.

Lady L. There is nothing to lead us to think that they
were.

Ida. But they saw a light from heaven, heard a sound,
and were frightened, and fell to the ground.

Robin. They didn’t say, “What wilt Thou have us to
do?”

Lady L. It strikes me that the difference between Saul
and his comrades is like that between real and nominal
Christians.

Robin. What does that mean ?

Lady LZ. A nominal Christian is one who is a Christian
only in name ;—alas! multitudes of such are to be found
even here in happy England. Such people see some light,
for they read the Bible ; but they do not look up to, and
love a personal Saviour. They hear something, for they
listen to sermons; but the Word of Truth does not find
its way into their hearts. They may have some fear of
God, but not the deep love of those who know that they
have been forgiven.

Harold. As Robin said, they do not ery, “Lord! what
wilt thou have me to do?”
40 PICTURES OF ST, PAUL.

Lady L. Ab! my children, what is real conversion but
seeing Christ as our own Saviour, listening to His voice
as that of our own dear Master, and then humbly, faith-
fully, asking the question, “ What wilt thou have me to
do?” with fixed resolve, by the Spirit’s help, to do it!

Ida. Shall we take Saul’s question as our motto for
next week ?

Lady L. Would that we all might take it as our motto
through life !

Harold. I was just thinking that I would keep away
from church to-morrow, for I hate meeting people just
now,—and that I would ask you to let me off attending
the day-school on Monday; but perhaps going to church,
and studying hard in my class, are the very things that
the Lord would have me to do.

Lady L. I think that you judge rightly, my son.

Harold. But these are such very little duties. One
would rather have something given one to do that is
grand and noble.

Lady L. The first thing given to Saul to do was very
small and simple indeed. It was merely “Go to Damascus,”
the city that lay straight before him. So the duty imme-
diately before us is our Damascus, however trifling it may
seem to our view; from it we may be called to wider
spheres of usefulness, self-denial, and glory.
CHAPTER VI.
SIGHT RESTORED.

“ Don’t make a noise like that, kicking your heels against
the leg of the table, as if you didn’t know that it is
Sunday,” cried Ida on the following afternoon, glancing
up from her book with displeasure at Robin, who was
perched on the edge of the school-room table.

“T’ve done what I could. I’ve been to church, and
learnt my verse, and fed the pigeons. You’ve not done
what you ought to do; you’ve not read to old deaf
Mrs. Gaffer, who can’t get to church.”

“You ’re a saucy, impertinent boy,” cried Ida, all the
more provoked because there was some truth in the child’s
remark.

“You know that mother told you that she would like
you to read the Bible to old Mrs. Gaffer, while she is
busy with her Sunday class; but you just amuse yourself
with a book, and Robin kicked the leg of the table more
vigorously than before.

'“Mind your own business!” cried Ida, with raised voice
and heightened colour.

“T’ve no business to mind,” said practical Robin. “I
can’t read to the blind old woman like you, or write out
the sermon like Harold.”

“You do nothing but worry other people!” cried Ida,
as Robin finished his speech by another strong kick.

41
42 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



“You’re a cross ” but here Robin was interrupted
in saying what was better left unsaid, by Lady Laurie’s
entering the school-room.

“What have we here!” cried the lady; “loud voices
and angry looks! Is this the way in which my children
observe the holy day of rest!”

“Didn’t Ida agree that she’d say all the week ‘ What
wouldst Thou have me to do?’ and she won't read to Mrs.
Gaffer. That’s what she’s bid to do, and she won't do it,
and then she’s cross with me.”

“Robin, Robin, there is one thing which we all are
bidden to do, one command of the Lord which we all are
called to obey. I fear that you both have forgotten it.
Ida, what is the Saviour’s New Command ?”

“ Love one another,” replied the unwilling girl “But
Robin is the most worrying, troublesome boy in the
world!”

“And is Ida Laurie the most patient, unselfish girl in
the world ?” asked the gentle mother.

Ida coloured to the roots of her flaxen hair.

“Come now, let me see which of my children has best
learned yesterday’s lesson ; which of them, having received
such an answer to the question, ‘What wouldst Thou have
me to do?’ is the most ready to obey it !”

Robin jumped down from the table, half upsetting it by
his rough way of doing so, and running up to Ida, held up
his round ruddy face for a kiss.

To stoop down and give it was a harder struggle to Ida.
But she was a girl with a conscience, and honestly wished
to do what was right. So she touched little Robin’s cheek
with her lips.

“Now, Robin, bring your Bible picture-book,” said
Lady Laurie; “shall I tell you some of the beautiful
stories ?”

Robin, quite tired of idleness, was delighted with the
SIGHT RESTORED. 43

offer. As Robin rushed off for the book Ida glanced at
her mother, and the girl’s conscience smote her,
for Lady Laurie looked so much tired, and after hold-
ing a Bible-class in the village, needed a little quiet
and rest.

“Shall I, instead of you, tell the Bible stories to
Robin?” said Ida, in rather a hesitating tone, for she
would have much preferred going on with her reading.

“Thank you, my love,” said Lady Laurie, handing
to her daughter the picture-book which Robin had
brought.

“T’d rather have mother,” said bluff Robin, who did
not like the arrangement.

“But, my Robin, mother has a headache to-day, Friday
tired her so much,” said Lady Laurie. “It is kind of Ida
to offer to tell you Bible stories instead of reading her
book.”

The gentle words fell as oil on troubled waters. Ida,
with her little companion seated on a footstool beside her
found it a really pleasant occupation to recount Bible
stories to a bright intelligent child, whilst her weary
mother, quiet in the drawing-room, fell asleep on the sofa,
When Robin, after twenty minutes spent over the pictures
ran off to the garden, Ida, instead of resuming her book,
went out to read the Bible to poor old Bess Gaffer, who
lived in a cottage almost close to the gate. The conscious-
_ness of having performed little duties gave Ida more
pleasure than indulging her selfish inclinations would
have done.

The Vicar had spoken truly. Ida was being trained
amongst flowers. More of sweetness would be dropped
into the white waxen comb which would be so goodly
and fair if but filled with the honey of loving-kindness.

It was with a brighter expression on her face than
it usually wore that Ida came to the evening reading.
44 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Lady Lawrie. Now let us commence at the tenth verse
of the ninth chapter of Acts. My Ida shall take the first
turn.















































































































































































































































































































































= SS

TH Srrert Srraicur iv Damascus.
Reading.
And there was a certain disciple at Damascus, named

Ananias, and to him said the Lord in a vision, Ananias,
and he said, Behold JT am here, Lord.


:
;
:
;
|
‘
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SIGHT RESTORED. 45



And the Lord said unto him, Arise, and go into the
street which is called Straight, and inquire in the house
of Judas for one called Saul of Tarsus; for behold he
prayeth, and hath seen in a vision a man named Ananias
coming in, and putting his hand upon him that he might
receive his sight. *

Harold. Surely it was no new thing for Saul to pray ?
I thought that the Pharisees, and he was one, made long
prayers.

Lady L. Saul’s was now the prayer of humility, it was
now the prayer of faith, and was doubtless uttered in the
name of God’s dear Son. As regards true faith and
humility, before the Pharisee’s conversation it could not
have been said that “he prayeth.”

Robin. If I’d been that man in Damascus, I wouldn’t
have liked to go to Saul. I’d have been afraid that he
was pretending, and would catch me if I went to him,
and shut me up in prison.

Harold. You will hear that Ananias was afraid.

Reading.

Then Ananias answered, Lord, I have heard by many
of this man, how much evil he hath done to Thy saints at
Jerusalem, and here he hath authority from the chief
priests to bind all that call on Thy name.

But the Lord said unto him, Go thy way, for he is a
chosen vessel unto Me to bear My name before the
Gentiles, and kings, and the children of Israel, for I will
show him how great things he must suffer for My sake.

Harold. I should have thought that the Lord would
have said what great things he will do for My sake.

* It is an interesting fact that a school for the blind has been
established by Christians in “a street called Straight” in Damascus.
Another pleasing fact is that in Damascus there is now a Depdt of a
Bible Society.
46 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Lady L. These words have always struck me as being
most encouraging to those who seem to be able to do
little but suffer. The Lord, even with a gifted apostle,
seems to place patient endurance above active work. We
all admire the energetic zealous labourer; but who can
say that such will have a higher place in heaven than
some meek sufferer, who has only been able to glorify God
by patience and submission on a bed of pain.

Ida. Oh! mamma, could half-deaf, half-blind Mrs.
Gaffer, though she is so patient and good, ever come near
to St. Paul ?

Lady L. No mortal can with certainty answer that
question. When the Lord was asked who would be
greatest in the kingdom of heaven, He called a little child
as an example of humility.

Harold. And almost the highest praise that the Lord
ever gave, was when He spoke of a poor widow who had
only two mites in the world.

Robin. I want to hear if the Damascus man went to
poor Saul, who was praying, and crying, and eating
nothing at all.

Reading.

And Ananias went his way, and entered into the house,
and putting his hands on him said, Brother Saul, the
Lord, even Jesus, that appeared unto thee in the way as
thou camest, hath sent me, that thou mightest receive
thy sight, and be filled with the Holy Ghost.

And immediately there fell from his eyes as it had
been scales, and he received sight forthwith, and arose
and was baptised. And when he had received meat he
was strengthened.

Robin. Oh! how happy Saul must have been! But
why did the Damascus man call him “brother” when he
was not his brother at all ?


SIGHT RESTORED. 47

Lady L. Because all who are in Christ are one great
family, whether or not they be relatives by birth.

Robin. Just as we three are all one family, and you
love us all alike. But why did the Lord send that man
to cure Saul’s eyes; could He not have made Saul see by
just speaking a word Himself?

Lady £. Tt is usually the Lord’s pleasure to work
through feeble mortals. He does not need us in the least,
but He graciously wills to employ us. It was an honour
to Ananias to be sent with a message to poor, blind,
penitent Saul.

Robin. Then it is an honour to Ida to be sent to poor
old blind Mrs. Gaffer ?

Lady Laurie’s unhesitating “Certamly it is,” rather
surprised Ida Laurie. She had looked on visits to the
afflicted old Christian as a duty, rather an unpleasant
duty; but that it should be an honour to a well-dressed,
pretty young lady, who knew Music and French, to be
sent to read to a ploughman’s widow, in a poor little
cottage, had never entered into her mind.

Lady L. Let us continue our chapter.

Reading.

And straightway he preached Christ in the synagogues,
that he is the Son of God. But all that heard Him were
amazed, and said, Is not this He that destroyed them
which called on this name in Jerusalem, and came hither
for that intent that he might bring them bound unto the
chief priests ?

Harold. They must have been astonished, indeed.
Saul’s change was as wonderful, I think, as Lazarus being
raised from the dead.

Lady L. There is some resemblance between the two
miracles. Saul was raised from a state of spiritual death
to the glory of God, by the voice of the Saviour.
48 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.





Reading.

But Saul increased the more in strength, and confounded
the Jews which dwelt in Damascus, proving that this is
very Christ. And after that many days were fulfilled, the
Jews took counsel to kill him.

Lady L. Let us stop for a few moments. Can any of —
you tell me how many days were fulfilled ?

Ida. There is no mention in the Bible.

Lady L. Here is another of the passages in St. Paul’s
life in which we gain information from his epistles. But
for the Apostle’s letter to the Galatians, we should never
have known that shortly after his conversion he visited
Arabia. Turn to the first chapter of that epistle, and
read the second part of the 16th verse, and that which
follows.

Reading.

Immediately I conferred not with flesh and blood,
neither went I up to Jerusalem to them that were
apostles before me, but I went into Arabia, and returned
again unto Damascus.

Ida. Why did Paul go into Arabia ?

Lady L. Possibly for solemn communion with God,
before beginning his great missionary work. Can any of
you remember two great saints who, in Horeb in Arabia,
were, in solitude, permitted to draw so very near to the
Lord as to hold solemn converse with the Most High ?

Harold. Moses, when he saw the bush burning with
fire, and yet not consumed.

Ida. And afterwards, when he went up twice alone to
the heights of the Mount.

Harold. And Elijah, when after a fire and a whirlwind,
he heard the still small voice, and hid his face in his
mantle.


se
Be
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|

SIGHT RESTORED. 49



Lady L. How long Paul remained in Arabia we know
not, nor whether he too visited Horeb; but the letter to
the Galatians informs us that he did not revisit Jerusalem
till three years after his conversion.

Harold. Mother, I feel that I am very ignorant, indeed,
about the Epistles of St. Paul. I think that I will begin
them, and read them steadily all through.

Lady L. You will be like one going through a rich
mine of jewels, where every step will show you some new
and precious gem. The Epistles are a very treasury of
Divine wisdom, shining in the light of Divine love.
CHAPTER VII
AN ARRIVAL.

“T COULD not help running over to give you the news!”
exclaimed a voice, which every one recognised as Miss
Petty’s. She came eagerly into the room, too impatient
to ring the bell. Miss Petty came with her blue veil
and her green parasol in her hand, though it was
long past sunset, and the maid had just brought in
the lamp.

“What news—good or bad?” exclaimed Lady Laurie,
hastily rising, for the sad telegram seen on the previous
Friday had made her nervous.

“Good or bad!” repeated Miss Petty; “well, that’s as
it may be, it’s hard to say.” She shook hands with Lady .
Laurie, nodded to the children, and took a seat. “Ah!
Harold, I’m glad to see you more composed. We must
all submit, you know ”-—

“You said that you brought news?” interrupted Lady
Laurie, anxious to take the attention of the tormentor
from her poor boy.

“Oh! this dreadful Mutiny turns everything upside
down, even our house could not escape. A lieutenant in
a native regiment married our cousin—fancy a lieutenant —
having the imprudence to marry! And so she, and all
her three children ””—Miss Petty paused, in order to enjoy
Lady Laurie’s look of anxious suspense.

“ Not killed, I trust!” faltered the lady.

50












AN ARRIVAL. 51



“Killed! Oh! dear, no; of course they were sent double
quick out of the country, got free passage in a troop ship,
were half-boiled in the Red Sea, and grilled in the desert,
for it’s a shocking season to come from India. We did
not even know they were coming, when quite suddenly
the whole party landed on us half-an-hour ago, with such
a mountain of luggage that one can hardly turn round in
the hall!”

On hearing that Miss Petty’s news was nothing very
dreadful, Harold Hartley made a quiet retreat out of the
room.

“Tt put us out most dreadfully,” continued Miss Theresa,
Petty. “It was very inconsiderate in Delia Smith, but she
had not one shilling to rub against another, so could not,
she says, stop at a hotel when she landed to-day. My
brother, the Doctor, had actually to pay for her fly from
the station !”

“Poor lady!” ejaculated Lady Laurie.

“You may well say ‘poor lady’” cried Miss Theresa.
“Three children, the eldest only three years of age, all with
boils on their heads, and sores in their eyes,—and com-
plexions like turnips! You never saw such a wretched
set in your life! And Delia herself looks quite washed
out, as limp as wetted blotting-paper! She does nothing
but cry for the husband whom she has left behind—probably
to be murdered. JI am sure I don’t know what to make of
them all! We’ve to cram them into the little spare room.
My brother, the Doctor, and I never had such a worry in
the course of our lives !”

Ida turned away to the window to hide a smile. She
had no great compassion for Miss Theresa, and could not
help thinking that she might as well have stopped to help
a poor weak mother in looking after three sick children,
and unpacking a mountain of luggage, as have run off to
tell every one of her troubles.
52 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



“T hope soon to call and see poor Mrs. Smith,” said
Lady Laurie; “but to-morrow I must go up to town for
the day to complete some necessary business which I left
unfinished on Friday.”

“The worst of all is that Delia has brought a black
creature with her,” said Miss Petty.

“A cat or a dog?” asked Robin.

“ Not a cat or dog, but a bearer.”

“A bear!” exclaimed Robin, opening his brown eyes
very wide, and wondering whether the beast was to share
the little spare room with the lady and children. He was
quite sure that Miss Petty would keep it out of the
drawing-room.

“Stupid child! a bearer is a black man! I can’t
bear the sight of the creature! We must get rid of
him as soon as possible; but he seems to be a kind
of nursery-maid to the children. We must lock him
up in the stable at night, or I am sure that we shall
all be murdered !”

Robin looked grave; he thought that a bearer must
be something like a bear, at least in fierceness of
temper. _

It was a real relief to Lady Laurie when Miss Petty
hurried off to tell her news to Mrs. Miller and the Bullens,
who might, without any great loss, have waited till Mon-
day to hear it.

On the following day, Lady Laurie started at dawn
by an early train, so as to be back by sunset. Harold
rose very early to see her off, and carry her bag to
the station, for the lady kept no conveyance. She
had given up her pony-chaise when she had adopted
the missionary’s sons; but they never knew why she had
done so.

“Mother, Iam going to study hard in school to-day,”
said Harold, “that I may the sooner cease to be a burden
AN ARRIVAL. 53





on you. I think that is what he would have wished me
to do.”

Harold kept his word, though it was difficult for him to
keep his attention on his tasks. He returned home by a
different path from that which he usually took, for he
wished to avoid being joined on the way by his merry
schoolmates.

Young Hartley had almost reached Dame Gaffer’s cot-
tage, which was not fifty yards from the gate of Willow-
‘dale Lodge, when he heard, beyond a bend in the road,
such a noise of hooting and yelling that he thought that
men and boys must be in pursuit of some mad dog which
was running in his direction. The next moment there
came in view a white-robed, turbaned native of India,
trying to escape from a rude rabble of village lads, and
two or three school-boys, who were evidently bent on
hunting him down as if he were a beast of prey.
The poor Hindu looked terribly frightened, sometimes
running, sometimes stopping and turning round, with
the palms of his hands pressed together, as if to implore
for mercy.

“ Halloa! what are you after!” exclaimed Harold, as he
saw one of his schoolfellows in pursuit stoop to pick up a
large stone, with evident intent to fling it at the unfortu-
nate stranger. ,

“ Harold, you’re the last to stand up for the nigger!”
cried Tom Miller, pausing with the stone in his hand.
He’s one of the wretches who killed your own father. If
I were in your place I’d pummel his head, knock him
down, and jump upon him—I would !”

Harold felt his cheeks glow like fire at the words; but
what Lady Laurie had said to him about’ forgiveness had
not been spoken in vain. Besides, the English boy could
not stand tamely by and see a helpless stranger maltreated.

“Back with you all!” cried Harold, in a tone of com-
54 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



mand; “it’s unmanly to hunt him thus, however bad he ~
may be.”

But the rabble were unwilling to desist from their
cowardly attack. Tom Miller’s stone came hurtling
through the air, though it fell happily short of its mark.
The yelling and the rush were renewed. Harold caught
the poor native by the arm,—drew him within the cottage,
then instantly shut and bolted the door.

The old widow within, seated on her rush-bottomed
chair, pealing potatoes, looked startled and rather fright-
ened at the sudden intrusion, and the yells which even her
dull ears could hear. The Hindu fell on his knees and
poured forth mingled thanks and entreaties in the tongue
of his country.

Oh! how strange to Harold sounded that tongue. It
was by no means unfamiliar, for the boy had not left India
till he was seven years old, and had spoken the language
with fluency and correctness. Harold had, indeed, never
heard it spoken since his arrival in England, but he had
scarcely forgotten it at all. Mr. Hartley, who had cherished
a hope that his first-born might one day join him in the
Mission field, had desired him to keep up his knowledge
of Hindoostani by reading a little every day in his Roman-
Urdu Bible. It was like a voice from dream-land to
Harold to hear the language again, and after the news
from India, the sight of one of its natives gave him acute
pain. But young Hartley’s course of duty was clear. He
must protect the persecuted, and not give way to pre-
judice, or a cruel thirst for revenge. To the great surprise
of the Hindu, Harold told him in Urdu to fear nothing,
for that he would see him safe home.

The cottage window, which was open on account of the
heat, was crowded outside with faces. Had it not been
too small to admit even a boy, some of the rabble would
have tried to climb in.
AN ARRIVAL. 55



“I say, Hartley speaks the fellow’s own jabber!”
exclaimed Tom; “I wonder he does not kick the nigger
out, instead of talking to him like that.”

“You’d better be off, all of you!” cried Harold, “or
I'll report you to the police. It’s not like Englishmen to
set on an unarmed fellow. If you want to fight natives,
be off to India and fight them!”

It was a little time before the space in front of the
widow’s cottage was thoroughly cleared. When the last
of the rabble had disappeared, Harold asked the native his
name, and inquired how he came to be in the country.

The Hindu said that his name was Prem Das, and that
he had come with Ismith Sahiba, as he called Mrs. Smith.
He had always been faithful to his Sahib, and had come
across the “black-water,” the title given by Indians to
the sea, which they dread, to take care of the Baba log, in
India the common name for children.

When Harold was able to take a calm look at the
native, even to a prejudiced eye there was nothing repul-
sive in his appearance. There was no one in Foreham, or
many miles round it, of form so graceful, or features cast
in such a mould of delicate beauty. Prem Das’s fine eyes,
shaded by long dark lashes, had a mild expression which
made it difficult to imagine him as belonging to a
murderous race. Harold felt glad that he had arrived in’
time to save the stranger from serious harm.

After waiting for awhile in the cottage, Harold fulfilled
his promise of escorting Prem Dds to Foreham Villa, the
residence of the village doctor and his sister, Miss Petty.
The youth and his protegé had to pass some dwellings on
the way, and it was very disagreeable indeed to Harold to
hear remarks made by two men standing at the door of a
public-house, on his being seen in company with a native
of India. The meeting was the common subject of con-
versation in every tap-room, and over their greasy penny
56 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



papers artisans and labourers talked of slaughter and
revenge.

But when in the evening Harold walked home from the
station with Lady Laurie, and told her of his adventure, it,
was a sweet reward to meet her gaze turned upon him
with loving approval, and to hear her say, “ My boy, you
did what your merciful, forgiving Lord would have you to
do.”

Lady Laurie reached home a good deal tired, but she
would not on that account give up the little Bible-
reading.
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St. Pavy Escapine From Damascus.
CHAPTER VIII.
VISITS TO JERUSALEM.

Lady L. Rosin, do you remember how much time passed
before St. Paul went back to Jerusalem ?

Robin. Three years, and he went first to Arabia.

Lady I. Well remembered, my boy.

Robin. Perhaps Paul was afraid to go back to Jerusalem,
because the cruel Jews lived there, and they would be so
angry with him for leaving them, and loving the Lord
Jesus Christ.

Lady L. There were Jews in Damascus too, and they
were very angry indeed; we shall hear this evening that
St. Paul’s life was in very great danger.

Reading.

And after many days were fulfilled, the Jews took
counsel to kill him, but their lying in wait was known of
Saul. And they watched the gates night and day to kill
him. Then the disciples took him by night, and let him
down by the wall in a basket.

Robin. Oh! was not he frightened lest the rope should
break, or any Jew come by chance that way, and find him
out and kill him.

Harold. I don’t believe that St. Paul was frightened.

Robin. We'll ask bim when we see him.

Ida. See him! What do you, mean ?

Robin. Won't we all meet him in heaven if we love
the Lord? Mother often says that we shall. St. Paul
loved the Lord very much, and I love Him too, so why
should we not meet ?

57
58 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Ida. Robin has such very odd thoughts.

Harold. But I don’t see that this is a foolish one.
Mother, do you not think that we—I mean that real
Christians—will meet with those of whom we read in
the Bible, and perhaps even be able to speak with.
them ?

Lady L. The idea is not contrary to Scripture. Our
Lord spoke of many who should come from the East
and the West and sit down at His table with Abraham,
Isaac, and Jacob. This sitting down together gives the
idea of companionship, and with companionship naturally
comes conversation.

Harold. What a glorious thought it is that we may
speak even with St. Paul!

Reading.

And when Paul was come to Jerusalem he essayed to
join himself to the disciples; but they were all afraid of
him, and believed not that he was a disciple.

Harold. We cannot wonder at them. In Jerusalem
there would be friends of St. Stephen, perhaps his widow,
perhaps his son! How could they be expected to receive
Saul of Tarsus, to eat with him—to endure the sight of
him! They could not forget who stood quietly by when
their loved one was murdered; they could not forget who
consented unto his death !

Robin. Did nobody tell them that Saul was very, very
sorry for what he had done ?

Lady. L. Let us read a little further.

Reading.

But Barnabas took him, and brought him to the
apostles, and declared unto them how he had seen the
Lord in the way, and that He had spoken unto him,

and how he had preached boldly at Damascus in the
name of Jesus.
VISITS TO JERUSALEM. 59



Robin. Oh! I’m glad that kind man spoke up for poor
Saul.

Harold. Who was this friend in need?

Lady L. We find in the fourth chapter of Acts this
account of this generous-hearted, liberal man. Reads—
And Joses, who by the apostles was surnamed Barnabas,
which is, being interpreted, the son of consolation (marginal
reading “of exhortation ”), a Levite, and of the country of
Cyprus, having land, sold it, and brought the money and
laid it at the apostle’s feet. We are also told in Acts xi.
that Barnabas was “a good man, and full of the Holy
Ghost,”

Harold. Just the person to take by the hand one whom
nobody else would trust.

Ida. I should like to know which of the apostles
received the penitent Paul.

Lady L. You may have your wish gratified at once by
turning to what St. Paul wrote in the 18th and 19th verses
of the first chapter of his Epistle to the Galatians.

Reading.

Then after three years I went up to Jerusalem to see
Peter, and abode with him fifteen days. But other of the
apostles saw I none, save James the Lord’s brother.

Harold. Paul was St. Peter’s guest for a fortnight.
How much the two must have had to tell one another.
St. Peter had been with the Lord for years, but Paul had
been the last to look upon Christ.

Reading.

And he spake boldly in the name of the Lord Jesus,
and disputed against the Grecians. But they went
about to slay him; which when the brethren knew,
they brought him down to Cesarea, and sent him forth
to Tarsus.
60 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Harold. Tarsus—why that was his birthplace. Do any
of St. Paul’s letters tell us what happened to him there,
whether he had a father or mother living, and, if so, how
they received him when they found him to be a Christian.

Lady L. The Scriptures are quite silent on the subject.
St. Paul, indeed, in one letter writes that he had suffered
the loss of all things for Christ, amongst them may have
been the love of father and mother. The apostle may






















































































































































































































namely:

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TARSUS.

have found, as many converts have done, that his worst
enemies were of his own household.

Ida. The ninth chapterof Acts seems to be about St. Peter,

Lady L. We will confine ourselves at present to the
history of St. Paul. You will find the next mention of him
in the 11th chapter, 24th verse. A great spiritual work was
going on in the city of Antioch, the place where the dis-
ciples were first called Christians. Antioch was at that
time a very remarkable place. It has been called the Queen
VISITS TO JERUSALEM. 61



of the East, the third largest city then in the world. Init
dwelt people of various races ; it is said that perhaps half-
a-million of human beings were there gathered together.

Harold. What a grand thing to plant a Church in such
a great city as Antioch!

Lady L. The joyful news of the spread of the Gospel in
this very important place reached the Church at Jerusalem,
and Barnabas was sent to exhort and encourage the con-







































































































































































































































































































































































































ANTIOCH. -

verts. So many people turned to the Lord, that, doubtless,
the work grew too heavy for the small band of workers.
Barnabas remembered St. Paul who was still at Tarsus,
and went there to seek him, and brought him also to
Antioch to help in his blessed labours. Then these
brethren in Christ worked for a whole year together.

Robin. I daresay that it was a happy year.

Lady L. Why Paul then left Antioch to go again to
Jerusalem, we read in the 27th and three following verses,
62 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Reading.

And in these days came prophets from Jerusalem unto
Antioch. And there stood up one of them, named Agabus,
and signified by the Spirit that there should be great dearth
throughout all the world, which came to pass in the days
of Claudius Cesar. Then the disciples, every man accord-
ing to his ability, determined to send relief unto the
brethren which dwelt in Judea. Which also they did, and
sent it to the elders by the hands of Barnabas and Saul.

Ida. Then St. Paul’s second visit to Jerusalem after his
conversion was to carry alms to the poor Christian Jews ;
that must have been a pleasant visit to make.

Lady L. But not one without danger. It appears to have
been about this time that King Herod fiercely persecuted
the Church at Jerusalem. The Apostle James, the brother
of John, was martyred. St. Peter was thrown into prison.

Robin. Oh! but an angel came and took him out, and
the gate of the prison opened of its own accord. I’ve a
picture all about it. Ida told me the story yesterday, and
I’ve not forgotten it.

Harold. Do we know how long St. Paul stayed at
Jerusalem, or where he went when he left it ?

Lady L. The length of his stay is uncertain. St. Paul
and Barnabas returned to Antioch after they had fulfilled —
their charge, and took with them Mark, the nephew of
Barnabas. It is calculated in the book which I have
consulted (“ Hores Apostolic”), that they preached in
Antioch till the year aD. 45, about eight years after
St. Paul’s conversion. We know not much of what
happened to him during this time. We feel certain that
the apostle laboured earnestly, and that the Lord blessed
his labours. When we meet for our reading to-morrow,
we must have the map open before us, that we may trace
on it the course of Barnabas and Paul on their first regular
missionary tour.




































































































































































































































































































































































7 SSS






































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































CHAPTER IX.
PREJUDICE AND SELF-PLEASING.

“OH! Harold, is that you?” said Ida, as young Hartley
entered the drawing-room on his return from school,
and threw himself wearily on a chair, with an expression
of gloom on his face utterly unlike that of frankness and
liveliness which had, till lately, been its characteristic.
Ida did not notice how Harold was looking, for she was
engaged in filling vases with roses, and did not glance up
from her pleasant occupation. Robin was assisting her
after his own fashion, pulling off leaves, snipping off stalks,
and pricking his chubby fingers with thorns.

“Mamma took me with her when she made her first
call on Miss Petty’s newly-arrived guests,” continued Ida.
“ T never paid such a visit before in my life.”

“What did you find?” asked Harold in a tone of
indifference, as if he cared not whether his question were
answered or not.

“ Miss Petty did not exaggerate—not one bit! When
we walked into the sitting-room (you know Miss Petty
prides herself on its prettiness), there was the whole party
gathered together. On one side the sickly Mamma on
the sofa (she has some dreadful swelling on her knee),
with her thin lifeless fingers pricking a pinafore, one
might say, for though she often put her needle into the ~

calico, I did not see a single stitch made. On the other
68
64 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



side—no, everywhere, for they did not keep in one place,
were three whity-brown children, with washed-out ragged
dresses of an old-fashioned shape, bracelets on their skinny
little arms, their heads disfigured with boils, and their
eyes inflamed, looking like anything but proper English
children. They were crawling and rolling about on the
carpet, till Number One spied the tray of cups and saucers,
and a plate of slices of cakes, placed on Miss Petty’s little
round table for afternoon tea. Number One was, perhaps,
hungry; and as the easiest way to get at the cake, gave a
good pull at the cloth, which covered the table. Down
came cloth, tea-pot, cups and saucers, and all, with such
a crash that Mrs. Smith gave a nervous scream. Miss
Petty flew to the spot, and boxed the child’s ear for
breaking her china, which made the little thing roar.
Number Two, scalded by the hot tea from the tea-pot,
joined in the howling, and the two together set off
Number Three, who screamed the loudest of all. You
never heard such a din! What between squalling, and
scolding, and the scream of a parrot, and the barking of
the dog, it was almost enough to deafen one. Mamma
managed to quiet Number Two by taking her on her knee,
and petting her; but Mrs. Smith had but poor success
with the baby. I could not help pitying the poor helpless
lady, for Miss Petty said, quite loud enough for her to
hear, ‘this comes of admitting mischievous brats into the
house.’”

“That was very rude,” remarked Harold.

“Oh! all through the visit it seemed as if Miss Petty
wanted her cousin to see that she and her children were
very, very much in the way.”

“T hope that the poor lady did not understand her.”

“Mrs. Smith must have been dull as a door-nail if she
- did not,” said Ida. “ But in Miss Petty’s excuse, I must
say that she has not a charming set of guests. Mrs, Smith’s
PREJUDICE AND SELF-PLEASING. 63



miserable complaining tone of voice would have much the
same effect on one’s spirits as the wailing of the wind on
a dreary November day. I was heartily glad to leave
Foreham Villa, and shall not care to go there again, at
least while the party from India remain.”

“Tam sorry to hear you say that, Ida,” observed Lady
Laurie, who had entered the room in time to catch the
last sentence.

“Oh! Mamma, even you must own that it was a wretched
scene.”

“ One, two, three babies all squalling together, and the .
dog barking, and Miss Petty scolding like fun,” laughed
Robin. “I wish I had been there to see.”

“Tt was a wretched scene,” said Lady Laurie, thought-
fully and gravely. “I have been thinking ever since
I left the house what could be done for those poor Smiths.
It must be trying indeed to the sick lady to be dependent
on those who do not wish her to stay, and she has probably
neither the means nor the health to set up house for
herself.”

“T don’t believe that Mrs. Smith would know how to
order a mutton-chop for dinner,” observed Ida. “She
seems to have had all the spirit in her dried up,—if,
indeed, she ever had any.”

“This house is a good deal more comfortable than
Foreham Villa,” observed Lady Laurie, glancing around.

“Oh! Mamma, there is no comparison between them,
no more than there is between you and Miss Petty !”

“Would it not be a kindness,” said Lady Laurie, “if we
invited the family here ?”

“Not to sleep, I hope!” cried Ida in alarm.

“T meant to remain here as guests for some time.”

“Oh! please, please don’t invite them!” cried Ida;
“we have no room for such a pack.”

“T have thought over arrangements,” said the widow
E
66 PICTURES OF ST. PAUT.



lady, “and I see how we could manage. You would have
to share my sleeping-room, and Robin go into Harold’s.
The school-room would make a nice play-room for the
children, and you and Robin would do your lessons here.
There is no real difficulty in the plan, but a little self-
denial would be required.”

“Oh, dear! it would be dreadful to have them !” sighed
Ida.

“T will not urge it on you, my child, or do anything
without your consent, for perhaps the chief part of the
inconvenience would fall to your share.”

“T should be a kind of nursery-drudge to those wretched
sore-eyed children!” cried Ida,

“ No, they ’d have their black man,” said practical Robin.

Harold started as if he had been stung. ‘ Mother,” he
said abruptly, “would the Hindu come here too?”

“Mrs. Smith could not do without him; and, if she
could, it would be cruel to turn the poor native off in a
strange land, where almost every one has a strong prejudice
against him. I thought that he might sleep in the tiny
room in the attic, next to yours.”

“He may have both rooms!” cried Harold, rising with
flashing eyes and a heightened colour, “for I won’t stop
an hour in the house if he comes! Oh! forgive me,
mother, I should not speak thus; but you don’t know
what I’ve had to put up with to-day!”

“What has happened?” asked Lady Laurie anxiously ;
for she had seldom seen Harold so stirred.

“T was never more inclined to have a stand-up fight!”
muttered Harold, clenching his fist. “To have the fellows
twitting one with being a white Hindu,* and a friend of

* At the time of the Mutiny indignation against the rebels was
sometimes carried beyond the bounds of humanity, or justice, so
that the contemptuous term of White Hindu has been given to
Englishmen feeling compassion for or sympathy with them,
PREJUDICE AND SELF-PLEASING. 67



my father’s murderers, was enough to drive a fellow mad.
Even the master—Dr. Bullen himself—said that he was
disgusted at my bad taste—yes, he actually said disgusted
—for having taken by the arm, as he heard I had done,
one of so cruel and treacherous a race!”

“How could he speak so!” exclaimed Lady Laurie, with
more of mag ghation in her tone than one so gentle usually
showed.

“The Doctor has lost a cousin in India, and—I’ve
heard—some money too,” said Harold; “it’s that makes
him so bitter.”

“And what did you answer?” sicsa Ida.

“T could not speak ; my heart was in my throat. I could
not explain that I only touched the black fellow to pull
him into the cottage, when the mob seemed ready to tear
him to pieces. But I'll never touch him again, nor look
at him if I can help it; and if you bring him here, I beg
you'll first send me a hundred miles off, for I’d rather die
than sleep under the same roof with a Hindu!”

After uttering these hasty, passionate words, Harold
rushed out of the room, slamming the door behind him.
Robin stared after his brother im wonder; he had never
seen Harold in such a passion before.

“You see, mamma, for Harold’s sake, we could not have
the Smiths here,” said Ida.

“T do not intend to mention the subject again,” said
Lady Laurie, with a sigh which came from her heart.

“One can quite understand MHarold’s feelings,” said
Ida.

Lady Laurie could quite understand Ida’s also, and she
felt that there was more excuse for the boy than for the
girl, though her daughter’s fault appeared the less
glaring.

“Ida,” said Lady Laurie, after a long pause of silence,
“T will send these roses in the morning to Mrs. Smith,
68 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



with the cake that was’ baked to-day, and what straw-
berries may be left in the garden.”

“Oh! not the cake—not our last strawberries!” ex-
claimed Robin dolefully. “Don’t send them away to the
horrid little children!” He had had bad examples before
him.

“ Robin, if when we ask the Lord, ‘ What wilt Thou have
me to do?’ He gives us some little work of self-denial by
which to show our love and obedience, shall we turn away
and refuse to do it? Think of St. Paul who gave up all
for Christ ; shall we, with so many blessings left to us, give
up nothing ?”

Robin rubbed his shock of brown hair, his usual way
of showing that something vexed him, but he made no
remonstrance. Both he and Ida secretly wished that Mrs.
Smith, her children, and bearer, had never come over the sea.

Harold did not appear at the six o’clock meal.

“Shall I carry up something for Harold?” asked Robin,
when it was nearly concluded.

“No, if Harold wishes tea he must come for it,” said
Lady Laurie, who was hurt and displeased.

After awhile Ida glanced at the clock. “It is time for
our evening reading,” said she, “I will bring the Bibles
and atlas.”

“J will run and call Harold!” cried Robin.

“No, I will not have Harold called,” said Lady Laurie,
who felt that she must not pass too lightly over almost
the first act of disrespect shown to herself by the son
whom she had adopted.

But there was no need to call Harold; before the books
were opened he himself appeared at the door. Harold
was of too generous a disposition not frankly to own that
he was sorry for his late conduct to her who had been
more than a mother to him. Young Hartley went straight
up to Lady Laurie, and said, though not without a
PREJUDICE AND SELF-PLEASING. 69



struggle with his pride, “ Mother, forgive me, I know that
I was very passionate and rude.”

Forgiveness was given, but gravely, and Harold took
his place at the table and opened his Bible. But the
spirit of no one present was in tune for the Scripture
reading. Harold had felt it soothing to him when he was
enduring the first pang of bereavement, but it was not
soothing now. How true it is that a great deal of sorrow
disturbs not our peace so much as a little sin! Pride
prejudice, anger, and. selfishness had entered Lady Laurie’s
carefully guarded flock. The children of whom her loving
heart was secretly proud ; those who were spoken of by
neighbours as “a model family,” had shown how full of
weeds is the garden of the human heart. Harold and Ida
were doing their utmost to persuade themselves that they
were justified in keeping the Smiths and their faithful
attendant out of Willowdale Lodge, and thwarting the
kindly designs of one who understood better than them-
selves the claims of Christian charity. Ida was particularly
ingenious in finding excuses for excluding the party from
India. They would weary her mother, distress Harold,
hinder regular study, spoil Robin’s temper and injure her
own. It is not usually difficult to find plausible excuses
for shirking unpleasant duties. How many in London
find good excuses for never visiting the poor! What good
excuses are made for saving instead of giving, for indulging
self, instead of serving God! But such excuses have
thorny stems ; the pillow stuffed with them is not one on
which we can ever find perfect rest. If we have to argue
to convince ourselves that a course is wise and right, which
conscience suspects to be wrong, we are forfeiting that
inward peace which can make even sorrow sweet. Weare
foregoing our comfort in prayer, our joy in thinking of
God; we are losing sight of the golden track of the foot-
steps of Him who pleased not Himself.
70 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.

Lady Laurie felt that the reading of the chapter was
likely to be the mere formal performance of a duty by Ida
and Harold, and that Robin could scarcely be expected to
understand the hard words which he would hear. She
therefore changed a little the style of the evening exercise,
and bade the two elder close their books, and trace the
Missionaries’ course on the map. Then, in a conversa-
tional way, with occasional reading of passages from her
own Bible, the lady commenced the account of St. Paul’s
first recorded Missionary tour.

SOE
CHAPTER X.
FIRST MISSIONARY TOUR.

Lady LD. Have you found Antioch on the map? See it
there, about 200 miles to the North of Damascus, and not
far from the Mediterranean Sea on whose blue shining
waves we may fancy ourselves embarking with the
Christian brethren—Paul mounts the side of the vessel,
followed by his friend Barnabas,—-and Mark their compan-
ion. The missionaries have been solemnly chosen and set
apart for their great work by the Church at Antioch.
Reads—* As they ministered to the Lord, and fasted, the
Holy Ghost said, Separate me Barnabas and Saul for
the work whereunto I have called them.”

Harold. Does the Lord so call missionaries now ?

Lady L. I believe that every true missionary has a
call from the Lord.

Harold. But he hears no voice.

Lady £. It is in the heart, not the ear, that the voice
of the Saviour sounds; “ Follow thou Me, along the path
of self-denying love.” It is repeated that these early
missionaries, Barnabas and Paul, were sent forth by the
Holy Ghost.

Seleucia, you see, is a seaport near to Antioch; it is
there that the friends embark ; not in a vessel propelled
by steam, like those in use in these days, there is no
paddle-wheel going round, and churning the waves into

71
72 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



foam, there is no hissing steam, no cloud of smoke from a
funnel.

Ida. And I suppose no compass to guide.

_ Robin. Perhaps no nice little cabin to sleep in.

Lady L. We all imagine the travellers at night lying
down on the deck, wrapping themselves up in blankets,
in Oriental style, and sleeping with nothing between
them and the bright stars shining above. The first
place where they disembark is in the beautiful island
of Cyprus.

Harold. Here it is on the map, the native country of
Barnabas. Perhaps he visited his family there, and looked
again at the fields which he had sold for the sake of the
Gospel.

Lady L. You see Salamis marked on the eastern coast
of Cyprus.

Harold. I think that the bay is famed for a great battle
won there by the Greeks against the Persians.

Lady L. A far greater hero than the Athenian leader
was in the vessel which, in the days of which we are
reading, anchored off the port of Salamis.

Ida. And yet perhaps few people noticed the three
peaceful-looking passengers who set foot upon the shore,
and then quietly made their way along the beach.

Robin. I don’t think that St. Paul was so quiet. Did
he not cry out to every one as he passed, “Repent and
believe! repent and believe!” or stand under a tree and
preach, till a big crowd gathered around him ?

Lady L. It does not appear that he did so then.
Christian Jews did not fully understand at that time that
the good news of salvation is for every one in the world,
. Greeks, Romans, and barbarians. Paul and Barnabas
went through the island of Cyprus from east to west, but
we only hear of their preaching the Word at first in
the synagogues of the Jews, At Paphos, however, they
FIRST MISSIONARY TOUR. 73

had a grand opportunity of telling of the Lord Jesus
to one of the greatest men in the place. The Roman
Deputy, Sergius Paulus, hearing of the preachers, sent
for them and desired to hear from their lips the Word
of God.

Robin. Perhaps he had known Barnabas before, and
thought him a good wise man, and wanted to hear why he
had sold his land, and become a Christian.

Harold. It was a grand opportunity for the mission-
aries. If the Deputy believed, what numbers of people,
who looked up to him, might follow his example? Satan’s
dominion might soon be overthrown in that beautiful
island,

Lady L. Satan does not yield up anything without a
struggle. The Christians found very powerful influence
exerted against them. Just as in Africa some of the
missionaries’ worst enemies are those who pretend by
some magic power to be able to cause rain, thus gaining.
power over the ignorant people by wicked arts, so in
Cyprus a sorcerer did his utmost to set the Deputy against
the holy religion preached by Barnabas and Paul. With
wicked cunning, Elymas, or Bar-Jesus, tried to turn away
the Deputy from the faith.

Reads—Then Saul, who is also called Paul, filled with
the Holy Ghost, set his eyes on him (the sorcerer), and
said, “O-full of all subtilty and mischief, thou child of
the devil, thou enemy of all righteousness, wilt thou not
cease to pervert the right ways of the Lord? And now,
behold, the hand of the Lord is upon thee, and thou
shalt be blind, not seeing the sun for a season. And
immediately there fell upon him a mist and a dark-
ness; and he went about seeking some to lead him by
the hand.

Robin. Oh! mother, was that not cruel and revengeful
of Paul, to say such very hard words, and then make his
74 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



enemy blind! Should Paul not have been like St. Stephen,
and forgiven and prayed for the man ?

Ida. It does seem as if some of the saints that we read
of in the Bible did very hard things. St. Peter struck
both Ananias and Sapphira dead for telling one lie; and
the Lord had forgiven him after telling them three times,
and swearing and cursing!

Lady L. Tam glad that this question has been raised,
for it gives us an opportunity of talking over what has
been a difficulty to many. You must remember that both
St. Peter and St. Paul, when inflicting punishment, were
acting under the direct inspiration of the Holy Spirit, and
using His supernatural power. It is not in the power of
a man to strike another either blind or dead by a word!
Peter and Paul were like trumpets that only sound because
a living voice gives them breath. The voice that sounded
through the apostles was that of God Himself, pronouncing
sentence on hypocrisy and hatred to truth. The holy and
loving servants of the Lord could not help saying what
they said.

Harold. But I answer that David heartily cursed his
enemies. I only half liked to repeat some of the Psalms
till now, and now I think about India!

A pang shot through Lady Laurie’s heart as she looked
on the stern, gloomy face of the orphan—the compressed
lips, the knitted brow, the fierce eyes. The evil influence
of his schoolmates, and the injudicious words of his
master, had—-for the time—vundone the effect of her
gentle teaching and prayers. Harold hardly seemed the
same being as he who had protected the helpless native of
India.

Lady £. You must remember that the Psalms are
prophecies. David was also as a trumpet breathed through
by the Holy Spirit, to pronounce God’s wrath on those
who would reject and murder their Lord.
FIRST MISSIONARY TOUR. 3)



Harold. How can this be proved ?

Lady L. St. Peter (see the first chapter of Acts) ex-
pressly declared that the Scripture must needs have been
fulfilled, which the Holy Ghost, by the mouth of David,
spake before concerning Judas. Yet the name of Judas
is not to be found in the Psalms. See also the 20¢h Psalm.
They who are spoken of as “ dogs,” “The assembly of the
wicked,” who “pierced My hands and My feet,” are unmis-
takably the Jews, who, more than a thousand years after
the prophecy was written, crucified the Lord Jesus
Christ.

Ida. I am glad that you have explained this, mamma.
Some of the Psalms have always been a puzzle to me;
I did not like to think of David being so very revengeful.

Robin. David did forgive his own enemies, you know.
He would not kill King Saul when he could, and he let off
the man who had cursed him.

Harold. But the Israelites in the time of Joshua swept
their enemies from the face of the earth. If it was right
in them to do so, it must be right in us, who have had a
thousand times more provocation.

Lady L. The Israelites did not punish the people of
Canaan out of revenge at all.

Harold. Then why did they slay them, and show no
mercy ?

Lady L. As Peter and Paul were as a trumpet, so were
_ Joshua and his men like a sword in the hand of the Lord.
The sword is but an instrument; it is the hand that deals
the blow,

Harold. Ido not understand. (He looked as if he had
no wish to do so.)

Lady £. Let me try to explain. You cannot deny two
things. First, that a sentence of death has been passed on
all mankind; that every human being, in the course of
Nature, must die some kind of death.
76 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Harold. Mother, we all know that.

Lady LI. Secondly, we must acknowledge that the
Almighty, who created man, has a perfect right to execute
this sentence of death in any way that His wisdom sees
best. Sometimes plague, sometimes famine, sometimes
earthquakes are as the sword in His hand. Sometimes,
as in the time of Joshua, it is a terrible war. The Lord
chose that way of punishing a most wicked nation that
was most likely to impress the Israelites with a horror of
the sins which they themselves had been the means of
punishing thus,

Ida. It was a terrible lesson.

Lady E. Tam anxious to make my meaning quite clear.
Suppose that a man, convicted of murder, is condemned to
death. The judge pronounces his sentence, the executioner
carries it out. Neither judge nor executioner are acting
from any private motives; they may be merciful men, and
with pain to themselves are obeying the law, and serving
their country. They have the authority given to them by
their queen, and on this authority alone they act. But, if
either judge or executioner even slightly wounded a man
because he had given them private offence, they would
then be themselves breaking the law, and would be liable
to be punished.

Robin. When St. Paul said hard things to the bad man,
and the bad man went blind, it was like the judge giving
sentence. St. Paul did not want to hurt the man, and did
not like to hurt the man, but he was obliged to say what
the Lord bid him say.

Lady L. Robin has caught my meaning exactly.

Robin. I hope that the bad man repented, as St. Paul
repented, when he was struck blind.

Lady L. We know nothing more of the unhappy
Elymas. We can but hope that when darkness was around
him, some light shone on his soul. We may conclude that
FIRST MISSIONARY TOUR. 77



he recovered his sight, as the sentence pronounced by
St. Paul was blindness, but for a seasop. One good effect
was instantly produced by his punishment on the mind of
at least one person present, for we hear that the Deputy,
when he saw what was done, believed, being astonished at
the doctrine of the Lord.
CHAPTER XI.
AN INVASION.

Lapy LAURIE’s means were not large, though by economy
she was able not only to cover the expenses of her family,
but to leave a margin over to help missions, and relieve
the poor. The widow lady was her daughter’s and Robin’s
teacher; and she needed to manage well her time as
well as her money, as she was an active visitor in the
district.

Ida, seated at the piano, was with considerable enjoy-
ment practising a new piece of music brought for her from
London by Lady Laurie, when Robin, who had been in the
garden, ran into the schoolroom.

“They are all coming—all coming up the shrubbery
walk !” he cried in great glee.

“Who are coming ?” asked Lady Laurie, glancing at the
clock. It was not yet eleven, and the hour was too early
for visitors.

“The black man, and all the children! As soon as
Isaw them I ran to tell you.”

“Oh, mamma! you can’t receive any one in the midst
of lessons!” cried Ida. But Lady Laurie had left the
room with Robin, and Ida more slowly followed, just in
time to meet the party from Foreham Villa, at the door
opening into the porch.

Yes; there they were indeed. The graceful Prem Dds

in his turban, with one child on either shoulder, and the
78 -
AN INVASION. 79



eldest little girl clinging to his white dress) The Hindu
gently put down his living burden, and salaaming with
great respect to Lady Laurie, drew from the sash with
which he was girded a note written in pencil. Lady
Laurie took it and read it aloud—

“Dearest Lady Laurie-—As I am going up to London
to see the Exhibitions, and Delia, with her dreadful knee,
cannot look after her children, I send them over to you.
They need not be back till bed-time. They will be no
trouble to any one, as I send the black man with them.—

“Your devoted T. P.”

“ How selfish—how inconsiderate of Miss Petty to land
the whole pack upon us!” exclaimed Ida. “Mamma,
won't you send them back; we can do nothing if they are
here, and when Harold comes back from school what will
he say if he finds the Hindu here! MHarold will be home
early to-day.”

Prem D&s stood quietly waiting for orders, till the
youngest child, frightened at the sight of strangers, began to
cry. Lady Laurie and Ida were struck by the gentle kindli-
ness with which the Hindu raised and fondled the little
one till she was happy again. The children evidently loved
their affectionate attendant, though they treated him witha
rudeness which a white servant would scarcely have borne.

Lady Laurie had no hesitation in welcoming the poor
little strangers thus. thrown on her kindness. But she had
more difficulty in deciding on the right course to pursue
as regarded Prem Dads. The lady did not wish to encourage
Harold in an unjust and cruel prejudice against the poor
native of India, yet it did not seem to her to be wise to go
violently against that prejudice without giving Harold
time, by his own good sense and good feeling, to conquer
what, in calmer moments, he must see to be unworthy of
a Christian. .
80 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.

“Tda, I think that Prem Dds had better return to
Mrs. Smith,” said Lady Laurie, after‘a minute’s reflection.
“When I have ordered some food for the little ones, who
have evidently suffered from the unwholesome fare on
board ship, I will myself take this poor fellow back.”

“ Why should you go—and in the heat of the day, which
you always feel,” said Ida.

“Because I think that the Hindu might be insulted on
the way, as he was last Monday. I want also to see poor
Mrs. Smith, who is left so lonely and ailing.”

“How am I to get on with my lessons?” asked Ida, in
a tone of discontent.

“Lessons must be put off.”

“What am I do with these children!” exclaimed Ida,
who saw that the chief burden of care of them would fall
on herself during her mother’s absence.

“ Receive them, dear girl, as an answer to the question
which you chose for this week’s motto, What will Thou
have me to do?” and with these words on her lips, Lady
Laurie quitted the room and went to give orders to her
cook.

“Oh dear! how shall I take care of them all!” sighed
Ida.

“Tl help you,” cried Robin the ready, who had already
begun to make friends with little Lily. “I’ve a lot of
toys to show them. Come,” he said, with patronising
kindness, taking Lily’s thin fingers into his own chubby
hand ; “come and see my bricks and my pigeons. Isn’t
she a pretty little girl?” he said, appealing to Ida.

Ida was very glad of Robin’s assistance when, about half-
an-hour later, Lady Laurie started with Prem Das. Their
bearer’s departure caused a roar from two of the children,
but even the baby of fourteen months, was pacified by the
sight of a pigeon, whose soft feathers she was allowed to
stroke. Robin was soon down on his knees in the school-
AN INVASION. 81



room, which served as a playroom also, building up castles
of bricks, which Lily and Delly and the “ Baba” screamed
with joy to throw down. Ida looked at the four children
so happy together, and felt sorry that she had ever called
Robin “the most troublesome boy in the world.” His
example made her produce an old doll, and even her small
set of tea-things, though she was very careful indeed to
prevent their sharing the fate of Miss Petty’s. A merry
tune played on the piano set all the children jumping
about the room with Robin, more merry than they had
been for months. Basins of warm sweet bread and milk
completed their enjoyment; it was a day of unusual
festivity to the poor little strangers from India.

In the meantime Lady Laurie pursued her way to
Foreham Villa, with the poor heathen man a little behind
her. The Christian lady felt something like one who sees
a traveller dying of thirst close by a well, but who has no
means of drawing for the sufferer a single drop of water.
What would not Lady Laurie have given for the power of
telling to Prem Das in his own tongue of the love of a
Saviour! She found that the Hindu had picked up about
a dozen words of English, but they were such as would be
of no use whatever in a religious conversation. The little
girls always spoke to him in Urdu.

Lady Laurie, on her arrival at Foreham Villa, found
Mrs. Smith on the sofa as usual,.her cheeks very pale, her
eyes heavy with weeping. A plate near her showed the
relics of a few of the strawberries sent for her from
Willowdale Lodge, the rest Miss Petty had carried off to
enjoy on her journey to London.

The sight of Lady Laurie’s kind face was very welcome
to the poor invalid. With tearful eyes Mrs. Smith
thanked her visitor for coming again so soon. Before long,
as Miss Petty was not near to take the lion’s or parrot’s
share of the conversation, Delia was pouring forth her

F
82 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



sorrows freely to one who could sympathise with her grief.
Mrs. Smith said that she felt so weak, and that life was
so weary; she was a burden to herself and to others.
“But oh!” cried the poor mother piteously, “if I were
taken, who would care for my poor little lambs?”

Then Lady Laurie spoke of the Heavenly Shepherd
who so tenderly loves His flock, and carries the lambs in
His bosom. She poured comfort into no inattentive ear;
the seed was not falling on ground that was hard, there
had been too much weeping for that.

“J wish that I knew more about these things,” sighed -
Delia; “I was married almost as soon as I left school, and
there are so few religious advantages in India. Not evena
church at our station. There was nothing to mark Sunday
from any other day of the week.”

“Qne has always the Bible,’ gently suggested Lady
Laurie.

“T am ashamed to own how little I know of it. It was
read as a matter of course at school, but no one explained
it, or cared to interest us in it. We scarcely listened, and,
I fear never remembered. And then, ever since my
marriage, I have had such a burden of cares. Ignorant asa
baby of household arrangements, not knowing a word of the
language, I am sure that I was perpetually cheated, and yet
I had to try to make the two ends meet on my hushand’s
miserable pay. Babies came so fast one after another,
that we could hardly pay nurse or doctor, or procure what
was absolutely needful. Then came this frightful Mutiny,
the very thought of which makes one shudder! We were
hurried down the country, my children and I, at twelve
hours’ notice; my husband ordered off on active service.
The parting almost broke my heart, for I fear that I shall
never see him again!” The tears were again flowing
fast.

“Cast thy burden on the Lord, trust Him—He careth
AN INVASION. 83



for you,” said Lady Laurie; and she put her soft arm
round the poor young wife, drew her towards her, and
pressed a kiss on her forehead.

“You are so kind, so exceedingly kind!” exclaimed
Mrs. Smith. “Oh! if I were always with you I would
not be the broken, helpless, useless creature that I am.
I ought to go on with my work ;” she continued, lifting »
up her head, “I am sure that you will not mind my trying
to do a little,’ and she raised the pinafore which had
dropped from her listless fingers. “I am ashamed that
people should see my poor babes in rags, but children
wear out clothes so fast on board ship, and really I don’t
know how to get them new ones.”

“Dear Mrs. Smith ”—

“Qh! do call me Delia.”

“Dear Delia, you encourage me to own that I did
venture to bring with me some things that my children
have grown out of. I hope that you will not consider it
as a liberty on my part, but I thought that with cutting
down and altering, you might find them of some little use.”
Lady Laurie spoke almost timidly, she was so afraid of
hurting the poor lady’s feelings.

“Tam very grateful for your goodness,” said Delia ; “ but
I am afraid that I have not the skill to cut down and
alter dresses; I never was taught plain work; and in India
one gives everything to the darzt (tailor) to do.

“TJ thought of that too,” said the visitor smiling.
“I brought scissors, needle and thread, and perhaps if you
were to show me your children’s clothes as a guide to their
size, we might manage something together.”

Delia called for Prem Dés, who was somewhere within
hearing, and by a few words, half in English, half in Urdu,
with the help of signs, made him understand what she
wanted. Lady Laurie brought in the parcel which she
had left in the hall. Delia’s sofa was presently half
84 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



covered with children’s clothes, and she looked on with
the pleasure of a child at the pretty tasteful garments
which her visitor had brought. There was the blue frock
which Robin had worn after coming from India, but which
he had grown out of so fast. Pretty little braided
pinafores, a pelisse which once had been Ida's, with some
alteration, how well it would look upon Lily! Lady
Laurie, skilful at cutting out and contriving, made every-
thing appear easy.

Time sped very quickly away. As her busy fingers
plied their task, Lady Laurie entered on the subject of
Prem Das, the bearer.

“Oh! he is the most faithful creature in the world!”
exclaimed Delia. “When my dear John caught small-pox
when Lily was but two days old, and I could not be with
him, the doctor would not let me so much as see him,
Prem D&s watched his Sahib night and day. And on my
journey home I know not what I could have done without ~
my bearer. I am sure that one or two of the children
would have died in the ship. And yet every one here
looks on my poor servant as if he were a wolf, or a tiger.
I am often glad that he does not understand what is said,
but he must understand manner and looks. He is treated
worse than a dog.” —

“I suppose that he is still a heathen?” said Lady
Laurie.

“Qh! of course,” replied Delia, a little surprised at the
question.

“ But there are some native Christians in India.”

“JT never saw any,” replied Mrs. Smith.*

* The lady’s ignorance is shared, alas! by many, who take no
interest in missions. BeforeA. L. O. E. started for the East, she was
earnestly assured by a Colonel who had been in India, that there were
no converts there. Shortly after her arrival, she took care to iuform
him, that she had met not only native converts, but native clergymen.
AN INVASION. 85

“Have you, or has any one else, ever tried to tell this
faithful servant something of the truths of our blessed
religion ?”

“Ob dear no!” replied the lady from India. “I never
could attempt to speak on such subjects, besides I hardly
know a word of the language.”

“Strange, after four years residence in India,” thought
Lady Laurie, who knew not how many English women
who have been for much longer in Hindustan can say the
same. They only knew enough to give a few orders, and
even those in broken Urdu.

“No one that I ever met with dreamed of talking about
- religion to native servants,” said Delia, who saw that her
visitor was surprised, and who naturally did not like to be
thought worse than others. “They are just like our dogs
and horses, or chairs and tables, we use them for our comfort,
we take care of them, and there is an end of the matter.”

“Oh! what an account our countrymen—at least some
of them—will have to render at the Last Day!” thought
Lady Laurie. “Nay, are they not rendering it now, when
slaughter and fire are desolating so many once happy
homes! How careless many have been of precious souls,
souls for which the Saviour gave His blood! How many
have shown the spirit expressed in the words of Cain, “Am
I my brother’s keeper ?”

“You have worked too hard, you are tired, dear Lady
Laurie,” said Delia, marking the sad troubled expression
on the fair face of her friend.

“Not tired, but I ought to go home. You must
remember that I have little guests,” said Lady Laurie
more playfully; “I shall hardly be back in time to preside
at their dinner.”

“How I wish that I could walk back with you! But
oh! this dreadful knee!” and poor Delia moaned faintly
with pain.
86 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



“Does Dr. Petty give you hopes that it will soon be
better?” asked Lady Laurie.

“Dr. Petty gives me no hopes at all unless I go to
surgeons in London, and I never shall make up my mind
to that !” sighed poor Delia.

“Who applies bandages, or whatever else is needed for
you?” asked Lady Laurie.

“Very little is done to relieve me,” said Delia; “Dr.
Petty has dressed my knee twice, but it’s horrid; I can’t
bear the dreadful things which he says, and the solemn
look with which he says them. The maid here has tried
to do something to follow out the doctor's orders, but her
fingers are all thumbs, and she gives me such pain. As
for Theresa, she saw the tumour once, and turned away in
disgust, and said that she was too sensitive to look at such
things. She cannot bear to see, what I have to endure.
No one has touched my knee for the last twenty-four
hours,—and, oh! how it hurts.”

“Do you think that I could do anything to relieve
you?” said Lady Laurie, with an effort ; for she was at
least as sensitive as Miss Petty, and had not been inured
by habit to this kind of nursing.

Lady Laurie’s offer was thankfully welcomed ; and she
soon found herself on her knees, with a basin of hot water
beside her, tenderly, most tenderly, removing the bandages
which covered the knee. She did what she could, though
that was not much, and the suffering which she witnessed
much increased her compassion and sympathy for the
poor young mother.

“T think that you ought to go to London,” said Lady
Laurie, after her painful task was completed.

“Oh, no, I could not bear to go!” cried Delia; then,
as if to turn the conversation, she asked if she should send
Prem Dé4s for the children in the evening.”

“No, my maid shall bring them,” said Lady Laurie,
AN INVASION. 87

who felt that it was better at present to avoid any meet-
ing between Harold and the Hindu.

Lady Laurie walked home rapidly, for she knew that
she was late. It seemed to her as if she had the whole
helpless family of the Smiths upon her, for it was evident
that Miss Petty either could not, or would not, take pro-
per care of her poor relations. Nourishing, and nursing,
and first-rate surgical skill were required. Lady Laurie
felt a little oppressed by this her new burden of care;
she feared that she was somewhat sacrificing the comfort
of her own family circle for the sake of comparative
strangers.

And yet Lady Laurie felt on her return to Willowdale
Lodge, that her loved daughter had been learning in the
best of schools, the lesson of self-denial which her character
especially needed. There was no cloud upon Ida’s fair
brow as she watched the little party whose coming she
had so much dreaded. Harold, had as had been expected,
come home early, it being a half-holiday at Copley House.
Genial, and naturally lively, young Hartley was at home
amongst little children. His look of gloom had passed
’ away, for a while he forgot his sorrow. Lady Laurie
found him sitting on the floor, the Baba laughing in his
arms, little Delly pulling his curly hair, while Robin and
Lily were listening open-mouthed to the story of Jack the
Giant-Kailler.

The little visitors were so well pleased with Willowdale
Lodge, that they had no wish to return to Foreham Villa
in the evening.

« Want to stop,” pouted Lily, “Cousin Teasy is so cross.”

“But you wish to see your mamma again,” suggested
Ida.

“ And Bearer,” rejoined the child.

“Come again, to-morrow,” said Lady Laurie, lifting up
the little Delly for a kiss,
88 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



“ Yes, come again,” echoed Robin, who heartily enjoyed
a romp with his new playmates.

After the children had left the house, Lady Laurie told
her family particulars of her visit to Mrs. Smith. She
took particular care to repeat in the presence of Harold
all that she had heard of the fidelity of her poor Hindu
attendant. Harold’s storm of passion was over by this
time, and he said, “I suppose that there may be some
fine fellows even amongst the natives of India. It would
certainly be unfair to class good and bad together.
CHAPTER XII.
FIRST MISSIONARY TOUR CONTINUED.

In the evening the story of St. Paul was resumed.

Lady LI. How long the great Apostle and Barnabas
with their companion Mark remained in Cyprus, we know
not. We find them again embarking on the blue waters
of the Mediterranean, going northwards, with an easterly
inclination, towards Perga, a bright Grecian city, capital
of the province of Pamphylia. Here something occurred
which caused displeasure, and, we doubt not pain to St.
Paul.

Robin. What was it that happened ?

Lady L. The little missionary party was deserted by
Mark. We know not why this young nephew of Barnabas
insisted on going back to Jerusalem. Perhaps he was
already weary of a wandering life; perhaps he was afraid
of its hardships ; or perhaps, as has been suggested, Mark
may have been anxious to see his mother in Jerusalem, to
whose house, you may remember, St. Peter went after
- being released by the angel.

Robin. Oh! I remember, when he stood so long at the
door knocking.

Lady LI. The step taken by Mark was greatly dis-
approved of by St. Paul, and remembered at a later
period. It led to a sad result of which we shall presently
hear.

Herold. I cannot fancy any one flinching back from
going on a missionary expedition with St. Paul. To say

89
90 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



nothing of the honour, think of the pleasure of having
such a man as he was for one’s companion.

Lady L. For the honour and pleasure a heavy price
would have to be paid. It was no easy matter to tread in
the same path as the brave, devoted Apostle. I will read
St. Paul’s account in the eleventh chapter of II. Corinthians
of what he had to endure, and you will agree with me that
even a small share of such sufferings would have been too
much for the courage of most men. Reads—Of the Jews
five times received I forty stripes save one. Thrice was
I beaten. with rods, once was I stoned, thrice I suffered
shipwreck, a night and a day I have been in the deep.
In journeyings often, in perils of waters, in perils of
robbers, in perils by mine own countrymen, in perils by
the heathen, in perils in the city, in perils in the wilder-
ness, in perils in the sea, in perils amongst false brethren ;
in weariness and painfulness, in watchings often, in hunger
and thirst, in fastings often, in cold and nakedness.” __

Ida. Oh! what a list of terrible trials! I am not aston-
ished that Mark was not eager to go through them all.

Robin. Shall we read of all these adventures, the beat-
ings, the robbers, and the shipwrecks.

Lady L. No, not by any means of all. The account in
the Acts is short; we have but a glimpse, as it were, of
the fiery furnace through which the Apostle passed.
St. Paul was attacking Satan in his stronghold, and the
many victories won from the Prince of darkness were
gained at heavy loss to the victor. St. Paul’s was a long
martyrdom of suffering before he at last laid his grey head
on the block. But let us return to Paul and Barnabas,
and see them starting from Perga for Antioch.

Harold. What, were the missionaries going back to
Antioch so soon, after visiting hardly any place but the
island of Cyprus! I thought that they were going to
make a good, long missionary tour.
FIRST MISSIONARY TOUR CONTINUED. 91



Lady L. If you examine the map you will see that
there are two places named Antioch; one the grand city
in Syria from which the missionaries started, the other
Antioch in Pisidia, which they were now approaching.
Very beautiful was the scenery through which Paul and





















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Ruins oF ANTIOCH IN PIsIDIA.

Barnabas passed. If they travelled on foot, as is likely,
the journey may have taken them a week.
Ida. What sort of place was this second Antioch ?
Lady L. In the days of St. Paul, Antioch in Pisidia
was a place of great commerce, but it is now utterly in
ruins, At the time of which we are reading, people of
99 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



various lands there met together, to trade in oil, skins, and
various other articles of commerce. But Paul did not at
once give his message to the numerous Gentiles gathered
together in Antioch, of Pisidia ; to his fellow-countrymen,
the Jews, he first proclaimed the free offer of salvation
through Christ. St. Paul visited the Jewish synagogue,
where he was courteously received, and invited to address
his brethren dwelling in this foreign country. Let us
read, taking verses by turns, the account of his sermon.
(Acts wit. from verse 16 to 41 is read aloud.)

Lady £. Some Gentiles appear to have been present
when St. Paul delivered his address, and were greatly .
impressed by what they heard. They besought that these
words might be preached to them on the following
Sabbath, and St. Paul did not refuse to comply with their
wish.

The appointed day arrived, and almost the whole city
of Antioch came to hear the Word of God. The merchant
left his business, the artisan his work, a spirit of earnest
inquiry was abroad. But the eagerness of the Gentiles to
hear the glad tidings brought by Barnabas and Paul
roused the jealousy of the Jews. Reads—When the Jews
saw the multitudes they were filled with envy, and spake
against those things which were spoken by Paul, contra-
dicting and blaspheming.

Harold. It must have been very bitter to St. Paul to
find his worst enemies amongst his own people. One
could bear so much better to be ill-used and slandered by
strangers.

Lady L. We see the jealous Jews typified in our Lord’s
parable of the prodigal son.

Robin. Do you mean that the Jews were like the son
who went far away, and then had to feed the swine ?

Lady L. No, we rather see them represented by the
elder son, who was so much offended at the welcome given
FIRST MISSIONARY TOUR CONTINUED, 93



to the younger. The opposition of the men of Israel only
served to rouse the spirit of the servants of Christ, and
make them see more clearly the duty of offering salvation
to all, of whatever nation, who might be willing to receive
it. Reads—Then Paul and Barnabas waxed bold and said,
it was necessary that the Word of God should first have
been spoken to you; but seeing ye put it from you, and
judge yourselves unworthy of everlasting life, lo, we turn
to the Gentiles. For so hath the Lord commanded us,
saying, I have set thee to be a light to the Gentiles, that
thou shouldst be for salvation unto the ends of the earth.

Robin. Were not the Gentiles glad to hear that the
Lord Jesus loved them as well as the Jews?

Lady L. reads—And when the Gentiles heard this they
were glad, and glorified God.

Harold. So St. Paul won a victory at Antioch in Pisidia.

Lady L. Not what men would call a victory, Harold.
Distress and disappomtment were to follow, though precious
souls were saved. Reads—The Jews stirred up the devout
and honourable women and the chief men of the city.”
St. Paul and Barnabas, who had been at first so honoured
and welcomed, were at last shamefully driven out of the
place.

Robin. When all began so well, I did not think it would
end so badly.

Ida. .The missionaries’ hearts must have been sadly
cast down.

Lady L. Not so, dear Ida. God can give His own
peace, even in the hour of bitterest disappointment. We
read that these faithful disciples “were filled with joy and
with the Holy Ghost.” They knew that when expelled
from Antioch they were but drinking of the cup of Him
who was despised and rejected of men. The disciple was
not to be above his Master, or expect favour from a world
that had crucified the Lord of glory.
94 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Harold. I do not wonder now to hear that Antioch in
Pisidia is in utter ruin.

Robin. Where did St. Paul go next ?

Lady L. From Antioch the brethren sped on their way
to Iconium, a city about forty miles distant. There they
remained for some time, performing various signs and
wonders.

Harold. Then Iconium at least was won for the Lord.

Lady I. A church, doubtless, was planted there; but
the persecuting hatred of the Jews pursued St. Paul and
his friend to this city also. They were not to be left to
preach in peace. A violent tumult arose. Gentiles and
Jews united to attack the brave and loving men who had
brought God’s message of mercy. The brethren were in
danger of being stoned at Iconium. Thus rudely driven
from one city after another, Paul and Barnabas fled to
Lystra in Lycaonia.

Robin. T hope that they were more kindly treated
there.

Lady L. The events which happened at Lystra were
exceedingly interesting. Paul there performed a miracle
on a poor helpless cripple, a beggar who had never been
able to walk. I will read the account from the Bible.
Reads—* The same heard Paul speak; who steadfastly
beholding him, and perceiving that he had faith to be
healed, said with a loud voice, Stand upright on thy feet.
And he leapt and walked.”

Harold. Mother, could Paul not have performed the
miracle even if the man had had no faith ?

Lady L. It certainly appears from narratives in the
gospels, that faith in the heart of the person to be blessed,
was needful to obtain the full blessing. Even Robin may
remember some instance of this.

Robin, however, looked puzzled, and Lady Laurie turned

to Ida.
FIRST MISSIONARY TOUR CONTINUED. 95



Ida. The Lord said to the father of the poor boy who
was possessed with a devil, if thou canst believe, all things
are possible to him that believeth.

Robin. Oh! I remember, and the poor father burst into
tears and cried, Lord! I believe, help thou mine unbelief!

Harold. And the Lord said to the woman of Canaan,
who prayed so hard for her afflicted daughter, Oh! woman,
great is thy faith, be it unto thee even as thou wilt.

Robin. When all the people saw the lame man whom
Paul had healed strong and well, and leaping for joy, what
did they say ?

Lady L. A very strange thing, indeed. As it is ex-
pressly mentioned that the people spake in their own
country tongue, it has been thought that Barnabas and
Saul did not at first understand what they said.

Robin. Perhaps they said that they were wonderful
doctors.

Lady L. No, the people said that they were gods.
Reads—‘ The gods are come down to us in the likeness
of men. And they called Barnabas Jupiter, and Paul
Mercurius, because he was the chief speaker.

Robin. I do not understand this part of the story at all,

Lady L. These people of Lystra were ignorant heathen,
who worshipped idols. An old legend was current amongst
them that their supposed gods, at a former time, had come
down in the shape of men. It is not wonderful that they
should think that what had happened once should happen
again. Here were two noble strangers suddenly appearing
amongst them, able by a word to make a poor cripple
spring up and leap. Such miracle-working beings, thought
the people of Lystra, could not be mere men like ourselves.

Robin. What did the people mean by these names
which they gave ?

Harold. The Greeks looked on Jupiter as the king of
the gods, the greatest of all. Mercury was not nearly so
96 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.

high in rank, but was supposed to be the god of eloquence,
that is fine speaking...

Robin. Why was not St. Paul thought the king? He
was much greater than his friend.

Lady L. In talent, energy, and endurance St. Paul may
have been greater than Barnabas, but of this the men of
Lystra knew nothing. Barnabas was probably in their
sight the greater, because the taller and more fine looking
man.

Harold. Mother, I should think that St. Paul was very
noble in appearance. One would not imagine him any-
thing else.

Lady L. As regards the great Apostle’s outward appear-
ance we have little to go upon but what he writes of
himself in one of his own epistles. St. Paul tells us what
he was in the opinion of some who were not friendly to
him. Turn to the tenth chapter of the second epistle to
the Corinthians, and read the tenth verse.

Harold. This quite astonishes me! Could any one
speak thus of St. Paul! Reads—For his letters, say they,
are weighty and powerful; but his bodily presence is
weak, and his speech contemptible.

Lady L. You must remember all the labours and
sufferings of the apostle. Scourgings and stoning, sleep-
less nights, exhausting days, being shut up in the bad
air of prisons, such things leave their mark on the poor
mortal frame, though they may not conquer the soul.
Besides,—but of this we will speak at some future time,—
St. Paul had some special bodily trial. There is cause to
think that it was a distressing complaint in his eyes.

Rob. I want to know what these foolish ignorant
people did, when they mistook the missionaries for
gods.

Lady L. Let us read, taking verses by turns, the
Scripture account.
FIRST MISSIONARY TOUR CONTINUED. +97

Reading.

Then the priest of Jupiter which (or whose temple) was
before their city, brought oxen and garlands unto the
gates, and would have done sacrifice with the people,
which when the apostles, Barnabas and Paul, heard of,
they rent their clothes, and ranin among the people, crying
out and saying, Sirs, why do ye these things? we also are
men of like passions with you, and preach unto you that
ye should turn from these vanities unto the living God,
which made heaven and earth, and the sea, and all things
that are therein.

Robin. Did not these people know the first command-
ment, Thou shalt have none other god but Me?

Harold. Remember, Robin, that these people were not
Jews. They knew nothing of the commandments. They
were poor ignorant heathen, so not so much to be blamed.

Robin. I suppose that they were like the people of
India, who worship all sorts of idols, and do not know how
wicked it is to do so.

Lady L. It was with difficulty that the missionaries,
shocked and distressed at the thought of such sin,
prevented the people of Lystra from offering sacrifices to
them.

Ida. I suppose that it was very disappointing to the
worshippers of Jupiter to find that no gods had come,
but only men. The people may. have expected to have
great rejoicings, and a grand feast.

Harold. It was not so bad to be amongst these ignorant
people as amongst the hard, bigoted Jews. The mission-
aries, though they refused to be worshipped, would at
least be treated with great honour at Lystra.

‘Lady E. Ah! Harold, you know not yet how the human
heart will swing like a pendulum from one extreme to the

other, The Jews of Antioch and Iconium seemed, like
. G
98 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



wolves, to have been determined to hunt out St. Paul.
They tracked him to Lystra. They set the ignorant
people against him. Perhaps the Lystrians thought that
as St. Paul’s miracle had not been wrought by a god, it
must have been the work of one possessed by a devil.
The next event at Lystra of which we read is a most
murderous attack on the holy apostle. St. Paul was
stoned, till his barbarous enemies thought that they had
killed him at last, and silenced his eloquent tongue for
ever. So the apostle’s seemingly lifeless and bleeding
body was roughly dragged out of the city.

Robin. Oh! Mother, had they really killed him with
the stones !

Lady L. No; St. Paul had probably been stunned by a
violent blow on the head. His labours and sufferings
were not yet ended; he had more—far more—both to do
and to endure.

Harold. When the stones were hurled against Paul,
and he thought that his last hour was come, he must
have remembered Stephen.

Ida. When he revived would not his enemies stone him
again, and finish their cruel work ?

Lady L. None but friends were near him when Paul’s eyes
again were opened. Barnabas and other disciples, perhaps
the healed cripple and other people of Lystra who had
been moved by the preaching, stood around. We cannot
doubt but that they were in deep sorrow, and intended to
remove for burial the corpse of their murdered friend.
Great must have been their surprise and joy when Paul
revived, and rose from the blood-stained ground.

Robin. But where could he go and hide, with so many
enemies in the city ?

Lady L. Probably St. Paul was quietly and secretly con-
veyed by night to the house of some friend in Lystra, It
has been supposed that he may have found such a friend in
FIRST MISSIONARY TOUR CONTINUED. 99

Eunice, the mother of young Timothy the convert, and
future beloved friend and adopted son of this great
apostle.

Harold. Timothy, who knew the Scriptures from child-
hood. Did St. Paul first meet him at Lystra?

Lady L. Yes, and it is thought that Timothy, then but
a boy, may have been led to Christ by St. Paul at this his
first visit to the place.

Harold. To see such a noble man as the apostle stoned,
almost to death, and then, perhaps, to help to bind his
hurts, wash his bruises, and bathe his pale and bleeding
face, would make a great impression on the mind of a
boy; at least I am sure that it would on mine.

Robin. All the three cities that we've read about to-day,
treated St. Paul very badly; but this last was the worst
of all.

Ida. St. Paul could not stay at Lystra any more than
at Antioch and Iconium.

Lady L. No, he could not linger then at that dangerous
place, where he had so nearly been killed. On the very
next day, perhaps in the dim still twilight, before the
sunrise, we find him and Barnabas on their way to the
city of Derbe, which was about twenty miles distant from
Derbe.

Ida, A weary journey for a wounded, suffering man.

Harold, One hopes that St. Paul found a little rest at
Derbe.

Lady L. Of positive rest he knew little, but he, as far
as we know, met with no persecutions there. After the
Gospel had been preached in Derbe, Paul and Barnabas
retraced their steps, and again trod the way to Lystra,
Iconium, and Antioch in Pisidia.

Harold. That was rather like venturing again into a
lion’s den. Perhaps they travelled in disguise, or by
night. Is there any account of such a dangerous journey ?
100 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL,





Lady L. The Scripture account is a very short one.
We read of the missionaries on returning to the scenes of
their former perils “confirming ” the souls of the disciples,
and exhorting them to continue in the faith, and that we
must through much tribulation enter into the kingdom of
God.

Harold. Perhaps some of Paul’s beatings, and other
perils of which so little is said, were on this return journey
through cities from which he had been much driven out
such a short time before.

Lady L. Our Robin’s eyes are growing heavy and sleepy.
We have read longer than usual this evening. But a few
verses remain to complete the story of St. Paul’s first
great missionary tour. Let us finish by reading from the
25th to the 28th verse.

Reading.

And when they had preached the word in Perga, they
went down into Attalia: and thence sailed to Antioch, from
whence they had been recommended to the grace of God
for the work which they fulfilled) And when they
were come, and had gathered the Church together, they
rehearsed all that God had done with them, and how He
had opened the door of faith unto the Gentiles. And
there they abode a long time with the disciples.

PEEK
CHAPTER XIII
JEWISH PREJUDICES.

Tue children from Foreham Villa appeared on the following
day; Miss Petty was pleased to be saved the expense
of providing their food, she not being one of those who
show hospitality without grudging. Lady Laurie thought
over little plans by which without lessening her charities,
she could bear additional burdens on her slender means.
Mr. Hartley had always paid Harold’s school expenses, and
made an allowance for the dress of his boys; now the
missionary’s death would leave both his sons wholly
dependent on their kind benefactress. A few little
luxuries must be cut off, the table be more plainly provided.
On.this day while there was a special dish for the small
sickly guests, for the family and the servants who would
share what was left of the meal, there was simply bacon
and beans.

Lady Laurie was vexed to see that Ida took only the

‘vegetables, and would not touch the meat which lay on
her plate.

“ Are you not well, my child?” she inquired.

“Quite well, thank you, mamma; but I would rather
not eat bacon.

Ida looked a little distressed as she gave the reply. As
this was the first time that the girl had ever objected to
partake of such meat, and daintiness was not amongst Ida’s
faults, Lady Laurie did not take further apparent notice,
though Robin watched her with his brown, intelligent

101
102 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL. '



eyes, expecting that his mother would, as usual, insist on
nothing being left on the plate, for waste was abhorrent to
Lady Laurie.

But when Ida and she were alone together, the widow
lady inquired of her daughter her reason for not eating
her food.

“Mamma, I’d rather not say,” replied Ida, her whole
face covered over with a painful flush.

Lady Laurie laid her hand gently on Ida’s shoulders.
“T must press you for a clear answer,” she said. “We are
alone; why should my daughter not freely speak to her
mother ?”

Ida silently went up to the bookcase, took out her Bible,
and opening it with a trembling hand, pointed to the
place where is written, A people that provoketh me to my
face... which eat swine’s flesh, and broth of abomin-
able things 1s in their vessels (Isaiah lxv. 3, 4).

Lady Laurie neither looked surprised nor displeased ;
she respected conscientious scruples, though she knew
them to be mistaken. “So my Ida thought it wrong to
eat swine’s flesh?” she quietly said.

“Ts it not forbidden, mamma,” said Ida, “and not only
here but in several other places?”

“Not in the New Testament, Ida.”

“But did not God give the Old Testament too? Are
we not to obey the Ten Commandments just as if the Lord
Jesus had given them to His disciples?” Ida spoke with
some effort, for she was afraid of being thought silly, and
perhaps even presumptuous. |

“Tam very glad that we have come upon this subject,
my Ida,” said Lady Laurie, seating herself on the sofa,
and making her daughter sit close beside her. “ Without
the explanation which I will try to give you, you could
hardly understand the hard conflict with Jewish prejudices
of which we will read in the life of St. Paul. Perhaps this
JEWISH PREJUDICES. 108



conflict with Christian Jews cost him more effort and pain
of heart than his persecutions by Gentiles.

“What conflict do you mean, dear mamma?”

“T must first explain to you that the law given through
Moses to the Children of Israel is divided into two parts,
the Moral Law, such as is contained in the Ten Com-
mandments, and the Ceremonial Law, which was only
meant for God’s peculiar people. In this Ceremonial Law
we have directions about many sacrifices which, as you
know, we never offer, because they were types of Christ’s
Great Sacrifice, which was to be offered once for all.
There were also many other directions, such as regarded
meats and drinks; also about the rite of Circumcision,
of which Baptism has taken the place. -

Ida. But why should all this Ceremonial Law be neces-
sary for the Jews and not be necessary for us? Surely
God never changes His mind.

Lady L. With Him there is no shadow of turning. But
you are not surprised, are you, that I give you different
food now from what I gave you when you were a baby?
I have not changed my mind as to what is suitable for
infants, but you are one no longer. St. Paul writes that
the law was our schoolmaster to bring us to Christ. “But
after that faith is come we are no longer under a school-
master.’ The Jewish Church was like the child which,
as a Christian Church, had grown up into a woman.

Ida. But, mamma, if it is not wrong to ask, why did
the Lord give to the Children of Israel so many laws
which it must have been very difficult to keep ?

Lady L. It seems to have been the Lord’s way of
separating them as entirely as possible from the idolatrous
nations around them. ~ I will give you a simple illustra-
tion. If we had to walk to the station on a windy, stormy
night, would we take a candle to light us on the way?

Ida. No, for a candle would be blown out in a moment.
104 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



We should take the hurricane lamp, which has strong
glass all around the flame to protect it from the wind.

Lady L. The Israelites, who had to show the light of
God’s truth to a world which lay in darkness, may be
compared to the lamp; and the Ceremonial Law which
was designed to prevent their mixing with the heathen,
may be likened to the glass without which the wind of
idolatry would blow out the lamp. But you know that
when the sun rises the lamp is needed no longer. Christ
is the Sun of Righteousness. When He, by His coming,
had enlightened the world, the Ceremonial Law ceased to
be required. The sun does not confine his light to one
spot, he pours radiance over the world.

Ida. I begin to understand a little better.

Lady L. Take another illustration. The possessor of a
large field wishes to have a garden made init. He builds
a wall to fence off the spot from the rest of the field. The
Jewish Church resembled such a garden. But when the
master desires to make the whole field into a garden, he
naturally throws down the wall of partition.

Ida. I see, the Ceremonial Law was the wall. But still
I should like to know from the very words of the Bible,
that we are not obliged to observe all the laws about not
eating certain meats, which were given to the children of
Israel, I should like to feel sure that things forbidden to
them are quite lawful for us.

Lady L. Remember our Lord’s own words, “ Not that
which goeth into the mouth defileth a man; but that
which cometh out of the mouth, this defileth a man”
(Matt. xv. 11).

Ida. These words are plain enough. But Moses or the
prophet Isaiah could not have spoken thus. They taught
that swine’s flesh and that of other unclean animals did
defile a man.

Lady L. The Lord’s declaration that they did not,
JEWISH PREJUDICES. 105

proclaimed a truth so new to the mind of a Jew, that even
St. Peter asked for an explanation. The words greatly
offended the Pharisees who had added to the Ceremonial
Law a number of useless and minute observances, making
even the washing of pots and pans a matter of religious
duty. The Pharisee regarded eating with unwashen hands
as a greater sin than robbing a widow !

Ida. How glad the Jews—I mean the converted Jews
‘—must have been to be free from all these difficult rules
of the Ceremonial Law! It must have been almost like
putting off chains.

Lady L. You forget how the human mind clings to old
ways and customs. It needed a vision from heaven to
persuade St. Peter that a new order of things was begin-
ning. Do you not remember his vision of a sheet let
down from heaven, full of that which had till then been
forbidden by the Ceremonial Law? A voice gave the
command, “ Arise, Peter, kill and eat.” Can you recollect
his reply ?

Ida. Peter said, “ Not so, Lord, for I have never eaten
anything that is common and unclean.”

Lady I. Mark the words spoken from above, “ What
God hath cleansed call not thou common.”

Ida. But I thought that the vision was to make St.
Peter go to Cornelius a Roman Gentile.

Lady L. Tt was so; but you must see that the lesson
given to the Apostle would include breaking down the
distinction between meats that were clean and unclean.

Ida. I cannot imagine why St. Paul should have had
any battle at all about this change. If Christian Jews
liked to go on abstaining from pork and such other things
as they had thought unclean from childhood, why could
not St. Paul leave them to do as they pleased in the
matter ?

Lady L. Because there were two evils, very great evils,
106 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



to which Jewish prejudices led. You remember that a
number of Gentiles were pressing into the Christian
Church, people who had never been accustomed to keep
any part of the Ceremonial Law, who perhaps, from their
position in life, were quite unable to keep it. Were a
Gentile convert, glowing with his first ardent love to
Christ, longing to confess his Saviour in baptism, even if
confession should bring persecution and death,—were such
a one met by a command to keep numerous rules of which
he never before had heard, what would be the effect on
his mind ?

Ida. I think that he would be sadly taken aback, and
perhaps his ardour would be cooled.

Lady L. Take, for example, the one rule of not eating
the flesh of the pig. The prohibition had been no hard-
ship to the children of Israel dwelling in a land flowing
with milk and honey. In hot countries pork is even
unwholesome, and if not forbidden by religion, might be so
by the laws of health. But what would be the effect in
Ireland, or even in England, of telling the poor that they
must not touch what is one of their chief articles of diet ?

Ida. Mamma, the effect would be that the J ewish
rules would prevent many people from being converts at
all; some poor people could get no meat at all if forbidden
to take bacon and pork.

Lady L. Such a prohibition would have been like an
iron bar across the door of the Christian Church, to
prevent Gentile converts from entering in.

Ida. And St. Paul did his utmost to wrench away such
a bar; I can see that his conduct in this was wise and
kind. But you said that there were two great evils in
keeping up Jewish prejudices. I see this one plainly
enough, but I cannot think of another.

Lady L. The second was of even a more fatal nature
than the first. By persuading converts, or persuading
JEWISH PREJUDICES. 107



themselves, that to keep the Ceremonial Law was needful
to obtain salvation, Jewish Christians were altogether
turning from the very foundation and central point of
their holy religion, which is the doctrine of free salvation
only through Christ.

ida. I do not quite understand.

Lady L. Suppose that to the all-important question,
What must I do to be saved? St. Paul, instead of the
reply, Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ and thow shalt be
saved, had said, “ Believe and obey all the Ceremonial
Law of the Jews.” The convert would naturally have
concluded that salvation was half through Christ, and half
through his own obedience. He would not have received
eternal life as God’s free gift through Christ, but as some-
thing that he himself had to buy by observing a number
of difficult commands.

Ida, That would be altering our beautiful religion alto-
gether, and changing Christians into bond-slaves. But
this seems so plain, I still cannot imagine why St. Paul
should have had any conflict about it.

Lady £. You find it hard to put yourself into the
position of a converted Jew of these times, therefore you
cannot see why such a one should evidently oppose the
free admission of Gentiles into all the privileges of the
Christian Church. But imagine yourself thinking that
you belonged not only to a chosen and holy race, but to
the only chosen and holy race upon earth. Imagine
yourself brought up to believe that certain things were
unlawful, and others actually loathsome. Imagine that
you had regarded people around you as little better than
dogs. Then imagine finding that these despised ones
were to share every right that you had considered
exclusively your own; that the strict obedience to rules
on which you had prided yourself was in no wise needful
for them ; that others were allowed to do what you had so
108 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



long thought unlawful, and without giving offence might
eat what you regarded with disgust. Can you not under-
stand, under such circumstances, that an angry, jealous
feeling might arise in your heart ?

Ida could understand it but too well. She remembered,
though she did not say that she did, that she had been
anything but pleased, on the Hartleys first arrival, to find
that these strangers, as she called them, were to share her
mother’s care and love. Ida, as an only child, had been
accustomed to look on that love and care as her own
exclusive right, and had felt a keen pang of jealousy at
the free loving welcome given to those who were not of her
kin,

Lady L. You see this jealous feeling of the Jews
described in the parable of the prodigal son by the anger
of the elder brother. What! were these sinful Gentiles,
lately idolaters, wanderers from God, to wear the ring of
justification, the spotless robe of Christ’s righteousness,
and to be welcomed with feasting and joy. Perhaps you
can remember another prophetic parable, uttered by the
Lord Jesus Christ, showing the jealousy of the Jews
towards converts from amongst the Gentiles,

Ida. Do you mean the parable of the vineyard
labourers ?

Lady L. I do.

Ida, Those called to labour in the morning were angry,
and murmured because those who had worked but one
hour received the same as themselves. I never understood
that parable before.

Lady L. I hope that you now understand why St. Paul
had to fight a hard battle against the prejudices of Jewish
converts. He was somewhat in the position of David
defending his sheep from both the lion and the bear. The
lion represents fierce persecution outside the Church,
terrible to be encountered; the bear is bitter opposition
JEWISH PREJUDICES. 109



within the Church, perhaps more hard to endure. The
lion would rend in pieces ; the bear seeks to smother true
religion with his fatal hug. St. Paul had to struggle with
all his might at the same time against both.

Ida. But surely the holy apostles would help him in
such a good fight, especially St. Peter who had seen the
vision, and had baptised the Roman Cornelius, and who
knew by a voice from heaven that the Gentiles were not
unclean.

Lady L. St. Peter, as we shall see, did support the
good cause to a certain extent; but even St. Peter, who
- had thrice denied the Lord through fear of the lion of
persecution, was at least once overcome by the bear of
. Jewish prejudice. But of this we shall presently hear. The
apostle who seems to have been least inclined to welcome
in Gentile converts without requiring them to conform to
Jewish law was the good and holy James, who is called -
the brother of the Lord. St. James was a saint and
afterwards a martyr; but his views on this difficult
question seem to have been less clear and liberal than
those of St. Paul. The apostle whose life we are reading
made his especial battle-ground the doctrine of JUSTIFICA-
TION BY Fairu, that is, that true, living faith in Christ is
the sole and all-sufticient means of salvation.

Ida. Oh! surely we must keep the commandments as
well as believe ?

Lady L. Living faith, which. works by love, produces
naturally obedience and holy living. The doctrine of
justification by faith is, as the great Luther said, the test of
a standing or falling Church. Luther, more than fourteen
hundred years after the Apostle of the Gentiles had gone
to his rest, had to fight much the same battle as St. Paul.

Ida. I thought that Luther had to oppose the Pope,
and monks, and friars of the Roman Catholic Church, and
not prejudiced Jews.
110 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.





Lady L. The persons encountered were of course differ-
ent, but not the battle-ground on which the contest was
held. The grand error to be opposed was much the same
in both cases,—that error was the putting the observance
of outward ceremonies in the place of simple faith in
Christ. The Romanists, like the Pharisees of old, are
often scrupulous observers of rites and rules prescribed by
men. I have heard of an Italian robber, who would have
little scruple about stealing a purse or cutting a throat,
thinking it a sin to eat meat on Friday. There is ever
a tendency in the human heart to corrupt the simple
truth, to turn from the Bible to the rules and traditions of
men. People would rather do or suffer something to
purchase salvation than receive it as God’s free gift, and
then, in grateful love, devote themselves to His service for
ever.
CHAPTER XIV.
PAINFUL DISPUTES.

“Wuom do you think that I saw to-day in the little beech
grove?” said Harold, as he took his place at the table for
the sunset reading.

“How can we tell?” replied Ida. “Were it not for the
arrival of poor Mrs. Smith and her children, I should say
that no one ever comes to our quiet Foreham. Whom did
you see amongst the beeches?”

“That poor Prem Das,’ replied Harold. “I heard a’
sound as of moaning or crying, and then saw him lying
under one of the trees in such a prostrate position that
I thought that the poor fellow must be ill) He rose as
I went near, and I saw his face; such a woe-begone face!
I could not help being sorry for him.”

Lady Laurie said nothing aloud, but was evidently
thanking God for softening the prejudiced heart of her
boy.

“T asked Prem D&s what was the matter,” continued
Harold. “He seemed to be glad to have any one with
whom he could talk. Prem Das said that he was miser-
able here. No one likes him, no one pities him, even his
babas (children) are taken away. He feels himself to be
of no use in the world. He would like, he says, to return
to India, but he does not know how. There is no one to
whom he can go in his trouble.”

“Did you not tell him that the Lord Jesus says, Come
unto Me?” asked Robin.

111
112 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.





Harold only shook his head, but Lady Laurie saw by
his face that the arrow shot by the child had hit its mark.
Harold did not continue the conversation; but, as if to
prevent any one else from doing so, opened his Bible and
said, “We left St. Paul and Barnabas safe at Antioch
again after their missionary tour, so full of adventure and
danger.”

Lady L. The first thing which the friends seem to have
done in the great city was to hold what in these days we
should call a missionary meeting. The Church of Antioch
had sent her evangelists forth with many prayers,—that
Church must have the first account of the result of their
labours.

Harold. How long had St. Paul and Barnabas been
away from Antioch ?

Lady L. The period of time is not mentioned in Scrip-
ture, but it is thought that their absence lasted for nearly
a twelvemonth. The brethren at their missionary meeting
could tell not only of hair-breadth escapes, hardships, and
persecutions, but of Churches planted and converts brought
in.

Ida. One would like to have attended such a mission-
ary meeting ! ;

Lady L. The brethren remained for a long time at
Antioch. It was probably a busy and a happy time, for
Paul and Barnabas worked there together. But a cloud
of trouble arose. Let us read by turns the first four
verses of the fifteenth chapter of the book of Acts.

Reading.

And certain men which came down from Judea taught
the brethren, and said, Except ye be circumcised after the
manner of Moses, ye cannot be saved.

Ida. Ah! that is what we were talking about this
afternoon. ‘The Jewish converts insisted on the Gentile
init

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Sr. PauL AND BARNABAS AT ANTIOCH.
PAINFUL DISPUTES. 113



converts keeping all the ceremonial which was not
intended for them.
Reading.

When therefore Paul and Barnabas had no small dissen-
sion and disputation with them, they determined that
Paul and Barnabas, and certain other of them, should go
up to Jerusalem unto the apostles and elders about this
question. And being brought on their way by the Church,
they passed through Phenice and Samaria, declaring the
conversion of the Gentiles: and they caused great joy
unto all the brethren.

Robin. More happy missionary meetings!

Reading.

And when they were come to Jerusalem, they were
received of the Church, and of the apostles and elders, and -
they declared all things that God had done with them.

Harold. That must have been the most interesting
missionary meeting of all, as the apostles, or some of them,
would be present.

Reading.

But there rose up some of the sect of the Pharisees
which believed, saying, That it was needful to circumcise
them, and command them to keep the law of Moses.

Ida. Here comes again the question about the Cere-
monial Law, which the Jews were so determined to force
on the Gentile converts. One would like to know what
St. Peter said on the subject.

Lady L. We learn from the Bible the wise and generous
part taken at this time by St. Peter.

The account of the speech delivered by him, and the
decision pronounced by St. James, was then read aloud
from Acts xv. 6-21.

Ida. Then the Gentiles were to be free; they were to

H
114 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



eat whatever food they pleased, even swine’s flesh was not
forbidden ; only they must keep from impurity of life, and
things strangled or offered to idols, and from blood. These
rules were few, and not hard to be observed.

Lady L. And even of these few, those which regarded
food were given specially, it is thought, to avoid giving
needless offence to brethren of Jewish birth.

Harold. I suppose that when the question was decided,
Paul and Barnabas returned to their post at Antioch.

Lady L. They did, bearing kindly letters from the
apostles at Jerusalem, and accompanied by two chosen
friends, Barsabas and Silas, who are described as chief
men amongst the brethren. Thus the mission to Jerusalem
had been happily accomplished, a difficult question settled
for the time, and the Church of Antioch welcomed back
the missionaries with much rejoicing. Barsabas and Silas
exhorted the brethren with many words. Silas, instead of
returning back to Jerusalem, decided to remain at Antioch
with St. Paul.

Ida. It does not seem to me that the struggle with
Jewish prejudices was a hard struggle after all. St. Peter
stood up for the Gentile converts, St. James made no hard
conditions, and Silas liked the Antioch people so much
that he staid amongst them.

Lady L. It is not from the Acts of the Apostles that
we learn the painful particulars of the struggle made by
St. Paul in behalf of the Gentile converts. To know this,
as well as many other trials of the great Apostle of the
Gentiles, we must turn to one of his letters, that which is
addressed to the Church of the Galatians. From this we
learn that the apparent calm which followed the journey
to Jerusalem was not always to last. A visit was made
by St. Peter to Antioch, and we can imagine the joy
with which the Apostle would be received by St. Paul
and the Church in that city.
PAINFUL DISPUTES. 115

Harold. Peter could tell of things of which even St.
Paul could not tell. He could describe the wonderful
scene on the Mount, when the Lord was transfigured -
before him. He could repeat so many of the Saviour’s
own words. St. Peter had seen the Lord open the eyes of
the blind, and raise the daughter of Jairus and Lazarus
from the dead. Peter had sat at the same table with his
Master, and had had his feet washed by the holy hands of
the Lord. It would seem next thing to speaking with
Christ Himself, to speak with earnest, loving St. Peter.

Lady L. At first the Apostle’s visit must have given
untaingled pleasure, especially as St. Peter showed him-
self to be above Jewish prejudices. He freely partook
of meals with Gentile brethren.

Harold. What an honour they would think it to enter-
tain him who had eaten so often with the Lord Jesus
Himself. .

Lady L. But presently a change took place, which
must have hurt their feelings greatly. Certain believing
Jews came from Jerusalem to Antioch; men who were,
it appears, more zealous for Jewish traditions than for
Christian freedom; men who could not bear that Gentile
converts, who did not conform to the Ceremonial Law,
should be admitted to free intercourse with Abraham’s
chosen race. The influence of these Jews had an unhappy
effect on frank, generous, but inconsistent Peter. He who
could face martyrdom, and endure stripes, shrank from
being thought ill of by his fellow-countrymen and com-
panions. Such a taunt as, “ How can you, a descendant of
Abraham, defile yourself by going amongst these Gentiles,
these eaters of abhorred swine’s flesh, these sons of idolators,
whom no true Jew could ever regard as brethren!” Such
a taunt as this was more than Peter could face. Without
giving any explanation of his strange change of conduct,
Peter left off his free kindly intercourse with Gentile
116 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



converts; he, a leader in the early Church, suffered those
who looked to him as an example to believe that true
faith and deep love are not enough for a Christian, if he
do not observe all the numerous rites of the Ceremonial
Law. Peter let the world think that he who had baptized
the Roman Cornelius, did still regard Gentile believers as
“common and unclean ;” that he who had heard from the
Lord’s own lips that nothing going into the mouth can
defile a man, had either forgotten the lesson, or preferred
keeping the traditions of Pharisees to acting according to
the instruction given by the Son of God.

Harold. What mischief was done by these meddlesome
Jews !

Lady L. What mischief was done by the weakness of
Peter !

Ida. Did St. Paul remain silent when his Gentile
converts were thus neglected and discouraged ?

Lady L. No; Paul was too much above the fear of
man not to oppose even St. Peter, when bis weakness was
harming the Church of Christ. Publicly, in the presence
of witnesses, Paul gave his elder brother Apostle a just
rebuke.

Harold. That must have been a very hard duty to
perform. It would have been easier to face persecution
from the heathen.

Lady L. What made St. Paul’s duty the harder was
that Barnabas, his own loved and honoured friend, had
been drawn into the same error as St. Peter. Paul had
not the comfort of his companion’s support when he boldly
rebuked a leading Apostle.

Robin. Was St. Peter angry at being told of his fault ?

Lady L. We are: not told how that great Apostle took
the indignant reproof from one who had been bitter against
Christ, when Peter himself had been enduring the scourge
for the sake of his Lord. We should so much like to
PAINFUL DISPUTES. 117



know more, but Scripture is silent, and we dare not add
to Scripture. There is no reason, however, for supposing
that the generous Peter made any angry retort.

Robin. I hope that he went directly and ate with the
poor Gentiles again, and let every one see that he loved
them, in spite of those meddling Jews.

Lady L. We know at least that St. Peter afterwards
wrote of the Apostle who had openly rebuked him as “our
beloved brother Paul.”

Ida. One is glad to know that.

Lady L. The next thing of which we read in the life
of St. Paul is his desire to re-visit the places to which he
and Barnabas had gone in their missionary tour. Paul
said unto Barnabas, “Let us go again and visit our
brethren in every city where we have preached the Word
of the Lord, and see how they do.”

Robin. Did St. Paul want to go back to the cities
where he had been turned out, and attacked, and stoned 2

Harold. Remember that he had left converts in each of
these cities. It was very right that he should return and
see the new Christians, and teach them, and comfort them
too, for it is likely that the poor converts had had their
share of persecution.

Ida. So St. Paul and his faithful friend Barnabas again
set forth together.

Lady L. Alas! we come to another painful point in the
life of St. Paul. Barnabas and he, as far as we know,
were never again to work together, never enjoy each
other’s company again. There arose a sharp dispute
between them.

Robin. Oh! mother, if that were not put in the Bible,
I would not believe it at all.

Harold. They who had stood side by side amongst
angry crowds, they who had shared toils, and- hardships.
and dangers! What could separate such true friends!
118 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.

Lady L. The cause of the dispute between them was
this :—The missionaries were, as you know, intending to
start on a second tour. Barnabas determined to take
with him Mark, his nephew, Mark, who, as we remember,
would not accompany the brethren through their first
missionary tour, but went from Perga back to Jerusalem.
Paul was equally firmly resolved not to have as his
companion on a dangerous expedition, one who had thus
deserted him on the way. Neither Paul nor Barnabas
would yield their point; we read “ The contention was so
sharp between them that they departed asunder one from
the other; and so Barnabas took Mark, and sailed unto
Cyprus; and Paul took Silas and departed.”

Robin. I wish that we had not been told of such a
quarrel as that! I thought that both Paul and Barnabas
were such very good men!

Lady L. They were very good men, my son, but even
they were not faultless. The Bible, the Word of God,
shows us that the Lord’s holiest servants are not free from
all sin. Faithful Abraham twice showed want of faith,
meek Moses lost his temper, brave Peter failed in courage,
Paul and Barnabas hotly disputed together! Nota single
man or woman, even amongst Christians, but needs to
utter the prayer, God be merciful to me a sinner !

Ida. Do we hear anything more in the Scriptures of
Barnabas and Mark ?

Lady L. St. Paul merely incidentally mentions Bar-
nabas in one of. his epistles, but in a way that shows that
his old friend was still engaged in missionary work. Of
Mark we know a little more. Long after the sad separa-
tion, when St. Paul was in prison and asked his adopted
son Timothy to visit him there, he expressly desired him
to bring with him Mark, and stated as his reason for
wishing him to come, that he was profitable to him in the
ministry,
PAINFUL DISPUTES. 119



Harold. One is glad that they should be together
-again.

Lady L. Probably the characters of both had ripened
during the years of separation. Mark had become more
brave and firm, and St. Paul more gentle.

Robin. I have not enjoyed our Bible-reading to-day ;
it was all about good Christians quarrelling, instead of
loving one another, as the Lord Jesus told them to do,

Ida. What do we learn from Scripture telling us of
such painful disputes ?

Lady L. A very important lesson, my Ida. We learn
that not even the brightest saints, the most devoted
martyrs, would ever enter heaven if their so doimg
depended upon their perfect obedience to God’s holy law.
We learn that they,in common with the worst sinners, can
only be saved by the merits and death of the Saviour.
The only doctrine to give us true happiness in life, and.
true peace in death, is the doctrine so earnestly preached
by St. Paul, that of justification by farth.
CHAPTER XV.
AN INDIAN MARTYR.

Lapy Laurie always breakfasted early to enable Harold to
go punctually to his day schoo] at Copley House; but on
Friday morning Harold was very late in his class, and
carried with him a note from Lady Laurie to excuse his
being so.

The family had nearly finished the morning meal, when
the early post came in. There was but one letter, which
the parlour-maid, with an expression of mingled surprise
and sympathy, laid silently down beside Harold. The boy
started at the sight of the Indian post-mark, and the
address in a dear familiar hand. Robin almost screamed
out, “A letter from papa! a letter from papa! He is not
killed after all.”

With a voice full of emotion Lady Laurie, in order to
prevent the revulsion of bitter disappointment. from vain
hope, said to the Hartleys, “ Remember that letters travel
more slowly than telegrams. This letter must have been
written nearly a ‘month ago.”

“His dast/” murmured Harold, as with a trembling
hand he opened his father’s letter.

“Ts it to you or to me?” asked Robin. “It was my
turn to have one.”

“Tt is to us both,” said Harold.

«Then read it aloud, read it aloud!” cried the child.

Harold made a brave effort to do so, but he could not
get beyond “My dear Boys,”—the letters seemed to

120
AN INDIAN MARTYE. 121





swim before his eyes. He handed the letter to Lady
Laurie. ,

“Shall I read it aloud?” she asked. Harold made a
sign of assent, then covered his eyes with his hand.

The letter was dated about a fortnight before the day
on which the: Lahupur massacre had taken place. Its
contents were as follows :—

“My dear Boys,—You will have heard long before this
reaches you of the terrible events which have taken place
in India. A storm of trouble has burst upon us, but we
are in the hands of Him who can command the wind and
the sea; and His presence gives peace in the midst of the
raging tempest. The verse constantly in my heart is this,
L will fear no evil, for Thow art with me.

“Yet we cannot but sympathise with the sufferings and
perils of others. I have to-day received a letter from a
missionary friend which has so filled my thoughts, that:
I cannot help letting my children share them. I had
heard some days ago a rumour of the death of my native
friend Wilayat Ali, but only to-day have I received a
detailed account of the martyrdom of my Christian brother
at Delhi.

“Wilayat Ali was of a family thought highly of amongst
Mahomedans, he was a Syed, that is,a reputed descend-
ant of the false prophet himself. But the light of Chris-
tian truth shone on the Syed, and Wilayat Ali was of too
noble a nature to close his eyes against the light. He
believed and was baptised about nine years ago; and
having enlisted in the army of Christ, he did not flinch
from showing his colours.

“ Bitter persecution followed the baptism of the convert.
Friends and relations united against him whom they
regarded as an apostate. Stones were thrown into his
house; an attempt was made to poison um. Wilayat
Ali’s younger brother brought a suit in court against him. .
122 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



The native Christian was, we may say, driven out of Agra.

“ After working for Christ in another place the convert
received a call to preach in Delhi, that grand and ancient
city, which, as the papers will tell you, is now held by the
rebels. At the time when Wilayat Ali received the call
all was in apparent peace; the power of the English was
supreme. But the convert knew well what enemies would
surround him in Delhi, he was aware that the city would
to him be a post of danger. But seeing it to be his duty
to face the peril, Wilayat Ali bravely said, ‘I am ready to
go, even if I should be required to give my life for the
Saviour” Oh! my sons, we little knew then that the
Christian’s words were like a prophecy of what was before
him.

“In Delhi the preaching of Wilayat Ali made a consider-
able impression. A prince of the royal house of Delhi,
like another Nicodemus, sometimes visited the Christian
by night. Yet no doubt there were many Mahomedans
only restrained by fear of the English Government from
silencing the preacher’s lips by shedding his blood.
Bigoted followers of the stern Mahomed consider it no
sin, but a merit, to take the life of one who has abandoned
the false faith of Islam.

“In May, as you know, like a thunder-clap, came the
Mutiny at Meerut, After their work of slaughter there,
the rebels marched upon Delhi. Woe to any Christian,
whether English or native, who should fall into their
hands.

“The following particulars of the closing scene of dear
Wilayat Ali’s life have been taken from the lips of his
widow,” the witness of his martyrdom.

“On the 11th May, at about 9 A.M. when my friend was

* This widow is still living, but aged and almost blind. A. L. O. E.
has repeatedly seen the venerable woman, and one of her daughters
is a valued Bible woman at Batéla (1874).
AN INDIAN MARTYR. 123

going out to preach, another Christian named Thékar
came with the startling news that all the gates of the city
were shut, that there was a great tumult, and that the
sypahis (native soldiers) were plundering and killing all
the Christians! Thaékar implored Wilayat Ali to fly, lest
he too should be murdered. ‘Not so, brother, replied
my friend, ‘none can stay God’s work.’ Then about fifty
sipahis with drawn swords appeared in sight. Thdkar
exclaimed in terror, ‘see! they come! fly—fly, as I will!’
“This is the time for prayer, not for flight, replied my friend.
The attempt to escape them was indeed vain; poor Thékar
attempting to do so was cut down by the rebels!

“At that terrible hour Wilayat Ali called his family
together for prayer, uttering words to this effect: ‘O
Lord! for Thy Name’s sake many have been slain by the
sword, and burnt in the fire, and Thou gavest them
strength to suffer; now, Lord, we have fallen into sore ©
temptation. Oh! mercifully help us, that we too may
endure. Let us not fall away! O! Lord help us, that
we may confess Thee, and till death never deny Thee.’
When this prayer—not for life but for grace—was ended,
Wilayat kissed his wife and children, and bade them,
whatever might happen, never to deny the Saviour. He
then desired them to fly if they could. Some sipahis
appeared, and voices cried out, ‘ kill this man, who by his
preaching has turned some from the faith.’ The sipahis
bade the Christian repeat the Kulma, ‘there is but one
God, and Mahomed is His prophet, but they bade in
vain. A gun was fired at Wilayat Ali; the bullet passed
close by his ear. His frightened children managed to flee;
probably little notice was taken of them; but the faithful
wife remained near her husband. Wilayat Ali himself
had no opportunity for flight. A horseman, perhaps more
merciful than the rest, called out, ‘Do not kill him; his
father was a staunch Mussulman, who made a pilgrimage
124 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



to Mecca. No doubt this man has only turned Christian
for gain, and will again become a true believer.’ Another
horseman questioned Wilayat Ali as to what he was. The
answer was, ‘I was blind, but now I see; God has merci-
fully opened my eyes, and I have taken refuge in Christ.
Yes, [ ama Christian!’ ‘This is an infidel! kill him!’
exclaimed the horseman. But at this moment the atten-
. tion of the murderous fanatics was diverted by the sight
of two Englishmen fleeing for their lives. Their white
faces excited a keener desire to slay, and quitting the
native Christian the sipahis rushed after their European
prey.

“Here then was a brief respite. Wilayat Ali bade his
wife seize the opportunity to escape before the mutineers
should return; he himself would hasten to the house of a
European clergyman, and try to save him.

“On the poor wife’s adventure after they separated I will
not dwell; my letter is already too long. Enough to tell
that she, after bemg in great danger herself, tried to find
her husband again by going towards the house of that
clergyman whose name Wilayat Ali had mentioned.
Fatima saw her husband indeed, but it was in the midst
of a crowd of bigoted enemies; he was on the ground,
and they striking him on the head and face with their
slippers. ‘Now preach Christ!’ was mockingly cried.
‘Where is the Christ in whom you gloried!’ Mahomedans
again urged their helpless victim to repeat the Kulma.
‘Never!’ exclaimed the brave martyr. ‘My Saviour
bearing His cross went to God; I too, bearing my cross,
will go to heaven!’ A horseman rode up, and inquired
what was going on. The fanatics replied, ‘here is a devil,
who will not repent, so kill him!’ The sipahi raised his
sword and struck a death blow! The Christian’s dying
words, like Stephen’s, were ‘Lord Jesus! receive my
spirit!
AN INDIAN MARTYR. | 125

“Thus one of India’s noblest sons joined the army of
martyrs. See, my boys, in Wilayat Ali what a native of
this country can be—what a native can bear. Whatever
my own fate may be, and dangers are so thickening around
me that death may not be far off, I hope that grace may
be given me to be as firm in faith, as strong in endurance,
as that Indian brother whose blood was shed for Christ,
and whose spirit is now with the Lord whom he loved.
Harold and Robin,—my sons, pray for India, hope for
India, and work for India, as does your loving Father,

“Robert HaRtuey.”

The letter had been listened to in the most profound
silence. Tears had risen to Harold’s eyes, but he uttered
no word. He took the letter from the hand of Lady
Laurie, pressed it passionately to his lips, and hastily left
the room.

When, about half an hour afterwards, Harold rejoined .
Lady Laurie in the drawing-room, his first question
rather surprised her.

“ Are you going to send for Mrs. Smith’s little children ?”
he said.

“Tt is not yet the time for them to come,” was the reply.

“ Mother, you wished to invite the family to stop here,
and the native servant besides. I hate myself for trying
to prevent you. I not only gave way to prejudice myself,
but—I am ashamed to own it—I let myself be swayed by
the prejudices of others. I was afraid, like a coward, of
being called a white Hindu. Mother, I see that a native
can show one an example of all that is noble; I feel that
many an Englishman may be unworthy to sit in heaven
at such a native’s feet. Let poor Prem Dads come and
have the room beside mine. I care not what is said in
the school. I will try to obey my father’s last command;
I will pray for India, hope for India, and perhaps the time
may come when I shall work for India also!”
CHAPTER XVL
HOSPITALITY.

“But I say that he must go—and shall go—and by the
very first train!” exclaimed Miss Petty in a tone of shrill
anger. “The blackie is of no use in the house, he is only a
torment anda worry. Do you think that I'll stand having
boys yelling at any one under my roof! It is not respect-
able, it isn’t. Off he shall go to London at once!”

“But what can poor Prem Das do in London?” cried
Delia, tears falling fast from her eyes, for she had a gentle
kindly heart. “He is an utter stranger, he does not know
the language, he has no place to go to,—he’ll be starved !”

“Starved !” interrupted Miss Petty angrily, “he’s likely
enough to be starved here with his heathenish notions
about food. The low creature is too fine to eat our leavings,
though he ought to be thankful for scraps. Lizzie
tells me that he would not so much as touch our nice
boiled beef, which is fifty times too good for a nigger like
him !”

“Tt is against his caste,” said Lydia. “A Hindu like
Prem Das would rather die than touch beef.”

“Then let him die, the thankless heathen!” exclaimed
Miss Petty, “but they ’ll teach him common sense in
some London poorhouse.”

“For my sake,’—Delia clasped her thin jana:

“Really, Delia, you are too absurd! Is ib not enough
that you have landed yourself and your children here, but
you must expect me to provide for your niggers also ?

126
HOSPITALITY. 127

You yourself ought to go to London for surgical advice,
you know that you ought. You have heard what my
brother thinks of your complaint. Do you think that you
will get rid of a tumour by lying all day on the sofa
moaning and crying your very eyes out? You must go
to a hospital in London.”

“T have not the strength, nor the courage, nor the
means!” faltered poor Delia. “You know that my dear
John’s letter, which came to-day, did not contain—as I had
hoped—any money.”

“It was a shame!” cried Miss Petty, indignantly.
“ John has no right to throw his family on others.”

“Tt was no fault of his—” began the fond wife; but, as
usual, Theresa Petty would not let her finish her sentence.

“T have no patience for men who marry and make no
provision for their family! I do say—Oh, Lady Laurie!
is it you at the door! do come in!” cried Miss Petty, in -
suddenly altered tones. She had spoken so loudly before
that it was impossible that Lady Laurie, in coming up the
walk, should not have heard her last sentence through the
open window. Even if the visitor had not heard it, poor
Delia’s face, flushed and streaming with tears, would have
shown that she had been treated with cruel unkindness.

“T was just saying, dear Lady Laurie,” said Miss Petty,
after her visitor had shaken hands with her and _ her
cousin, “that dear Delia needs more surgical advice. She
has a very serious tumour on her knee, and it makes me
miserable to see what she suffers. She would have first-
rate surgical skill in London.”

“We will talk over the matter together quietly,” said
Lady Laurie, taking a seat near Delia. Turning towards
her the gentle widow continued, “I have come to invite
you and your little ones to pay me a visit if you will give
me the pleasure of trying to make you comfortable at
Willowdale Lodge.”
128 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Delia felt somewhat as a drowning man might feel if a
rope were thrown within his reach. Her face lighted up
with something like a smile, but she only faltered “How
kind!”

“An excellent arrangement!” exclaimed Miss Petty ;
“then the dear children need not go backwards and for-
wards in this hot weather. Dear Lady Laurie! they are
so delighted to be with you, and begin to look stronger
already.”

“But what about Prem Das?” asked Delia, looking
timidly at Lady Laurie.

The reply to her question set her mind at rest about
her faithful attendant.

“Prem D&és must come to us also; we have room for
him, and he will take care of the le ones. He seems to
be so gentle and kind.”

“Nothing could suit better!” cried Miss Petty, who
was now all smiles and good humour. “Shall I order the
carriage at once ?”

“T have not yet heard whether Mrs. Smith can come to
me,” said Lady Laurie, turning towards the young wife.

“So gladly—so thankfully !” murmured the poor invalid.

“Then I will go and order the carriage, and tell my
brother, and get Prem D&s to pack up your goods and
chattels. He can carry a good deal himself, and for the
rest of the luggage you will, I am sure, send a cart.”
Miss Petty, eager to get rid of her unwelcome guests,
bustled out of the room.

As soon as she had gone, Delia sank on Lady Laurie’s
bosom, and sobbed like a child.

“You told me to cast my burden on the Lord,” she said,
between her sobs, “and I have been praying—oh ! so hard!
T lay awake half the night with pain, and I did nothing
but pray to the Lord to help me. And He has heard me,
and sent an angel of comfort in you!”
HOSPITALITY. 129



Lady Laurie felt as if cherishing a poor bird with a
broken wing, as she gently caressed and soothed Delia
Smith. '

The conversation was interrupted by the entrance of
Dr. Petty, a stout, stiff-looking man, wearing spectacles,
with a bunch of showy seals dangling from his gold chain,
and a silver-headed cane in his hand. He had a formal,
solemn manner, and gave his opinions in a, slow, dictatorial
way.

“T hear, Madam,” he said to Lady Laurie, “that
Mrs. Smith is going to be your guest. I hope that you
will insist on her seeking surgical advice in London. Her
complaint is of a serious nature—it is of some standing,
and I have no doubt that the time has arrived for an
operation to be required.”

Lady Laurie felt the little wasted hand which she held
in her own grow cold as ice, and tremble with nervous
alarm.

“Tn a hospital there would be more appliances than are
available here,” continued the doctor, who would never
confess to a doubt of his own professional skill, yet who
was really afraid to undertake the case, his hand being no
longer very steady, nor his sight particularly clear. “Too
much time has been lost already; every day’s delay is
injurious. Matters might end in amputation of the
limb.”

Delia looked terribly frightened. Lady Laurie tried to
change the conversation, but could not prevent the Doctor
from making a display of his surgical knowledge by
describing the symptoms of Delia’s complaint, telling of
others like it which had necessitated cutting off a leg, and
declaring that if prompt measures were not taken, he
would not be answerable for the result. Every sentence,
so solemnly and deliberately uttered, was like the cut of a
lancet to the timid, sensitive patient.
I
130 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Lady Laurie was almost as much relieved as was Delia
herself when the carriage drove up to the door; a small,
close one, suitable for a doctor’s. Of course there was
considerable fuss and bustle at the last; Miss Petty could
do nothing without bustle and fuss. Delia looked ready
to faint when she was lifted into the conveyance; but
revived a little as the wheels rolled round, and bore her
farther and farther from the house where she had spent
such miserable days.

“There is Prem Das walking along the road,” said Lady
Laurie, cheerily; “he is well laden with bundles and
packages, but he does not seem to mind their weight.”

“He is as thankful as I am to escape from Foreham
Lodge ;” observed Delia. “Oh! Lady Laurie, you are
indeed performing an act of mercy to my poor, faithful
bearer. He will be so glad to be with the chhota Sahib
(young master) as he calls your son. But I fear, “ added
Mrs. Smith timidly, “that you will find us all a great
burden. J am sure that my cousins did.”

Lady Laurie assured her guest, and with sincerity, that
she considered it a privilege to be able to take the family
under her roof. She silently thought of the words, J was
a stranger and ye took Me im, and these words turned
what would otherwise have been a heavy burden into a
golden treasure bestowed upon her by the Giver of all
good.

Not but that Lady Laurie saw that she would have
difficulties to meet. It was clear that Delia Smith ought
at once to go to London, and place herself under surgical
care. Even if the timid creature could be persuaded to
go, how could expenses be met? Mrs. Smith’s purse was
empty, and her cousins were not likely to open theirs.
Lady Laurie had few superfluities in her simply furnished
house. She turned over and over in her mind what she
could possibly part with. At last she fixed on a large
HOSPITALITY. 131



silver teapot, which had been in the family for genera-
tions.

“It was used by my mother, and her mother before her;
it would be a pain to me to part with it,” thought Lady
Laurie, and she could not repress a sigh. “ But has not
one almost envied the woman who was permitted to break
her alabaster box over the feet of the Lord, and shall
I grudge to bring a little offering to Him who though He
was rich, yet for owr sakes became poor. Accept my
silver, dear Lord, for all that I have is Thine; I would call
nothing mine own.”

Lady Laurie then faced the next difficulty, that of
persuading the poor invalid to go to a surgeon in London.
Delia declared that she could not travel, that she could
not leave her poor darlings, that she would at least delay
a little—only a little longer. Delia’s was the weakness of
a frightened child; she was little more than a girl in years,
and in character young for her age. Gentle Lady Laurie
had to persuade—entreat—almost reprove. She had to
place before Delia the duty which she owed to her husband
and her helpless little ones, and to urge that a wife and
mother was bound to take every lawful means of preserv-
ing her health for their sakes.

At last Delia exclaimed with tears, “I will go to-morrow,
if you will go with me; I cannot—dare not—will not—
venture alone!” and she clung weeping to her new friend.

Lady Laurie could not give a-reply at once. She was
most unwilling to leave her home, which had now six
children in it; her presence amongst them appeared to be
so needful, she dreaded lest anything painful should
happen in her absence. Lady Laurie, in her perplexity,
sought counsel of God; she went to her room, and on her
knees implored for that heavenly wisdom which is pro-
mised to those who ask for it in faith. The lady arose
with her spirit refreshed by such intercourse with her
132 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Lord. She had prayed for guidance, and she felt that it
had been granted. With her mind made up as to what
was the right course to pursue, Lady Laurie returned to
the drawing-room where she had left Delia Smith on the
sofa.

-“T will go with you to-morrow, dear Delia,” she said,
“and take you to a lodging kept by a very respectable
person whom I know, which is conveniently near a large
hospital. I will be with you at any rate during your first
interview with the doctor. I cannot promise to be away
from home many days; as your little children are my
guests, you would hardly wish me to be so.”

“ Could I not take the children with me?” said Delia.

“Consider, dear friend, both the expense, and how
undesirable it would be to shut them up in a London
lodging. Besides, the care of them would hinder your
speedy recovery ; you require perfect quiet and rest.”

“Oh! how I dread this visit!” sighed Delia. “But to
have you with me will be an unspeakable comfort.”

“ How much greater the comfort of having always the
loving Saviour beside you; not an earthly friend who
may change or forsake, but one who has boundless power
to help, and whose love endureth for ever!”

+0
CHAPTER XVII.
THE THORN IN THE FLESH.

THE hour for the evening reading arrived. Lady Laurie
told Delia of the little meetings held at sunset at Willow-
dale Lodge for searching the Scripture, and prayer.

“T should so like to be present,” said Delia; “it would
take my mind a little from the journey to-morrow.”

The Bibles were brought, the brief prayer offered, and
the reading began from the fortieth verse of the fifteenth.
chapter of ‘Acts.

Reading.

And Paul chose Silas, and departed, being recommended
by the brethren to the grace of God. And he went
through Syria and Cilicia, confirming the churches.

Harold. Then on this second missionary tour St. Paul
did not start by sea, as he did on the first.

Lady Laurie. No, you see by the map that his course
lay northwards, and that he travelled by land.

Ida. By the marked line it appears that St. Paul went
to his native Tarsus. I hope that we shall now have an
account of his visit there.

Lady L. Of this there is no account at all, and very
brief notice of the visit to Derbe. One thing of interest
to St. Paul happened at Lystra.

Harold. That was the place where the people first
_ called the missionaries gods, and then nearly stoned the

Apostle to death.
133
134 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Lady L. At this city we find that St. Paul was joined
by his young convert Timothy, who became his companion
in his travels.

Ida. And I hope did not leave him like Mark.

Lady L. The young disciple seems to have been of a
very loving and faithful nature. He was sometimes
employed by St. Paul on such work as obliged him for
a while to leave him whom he looked up to and loved as
a spiritual father; but we have reason to hope that
Timothy was with St. Paul in that last imprisonment
which only was ended by the Apostle’s death.

Harold. I wish that we had a fuller description of the
second great missionary tour.

Lady L. Eixceedingly brief mention is made of the
three evangelists going through Phrygia and Galatia. We
should know little indeed of this very interesting time, did
not St. Paul himself describe it in one of his letters. Turn
to the thirteenth verse of the fourth chapter of the epistle

“ to the Galatians. From this we learn that the visit of

St. Paul to the Roman province of Galatia was to him a
time of very great trial, apparently of severe, distressing
illness.

Robin. If St. Paul could heal other people, could he not
make himself well ?

Lady L. The apostles, like their Divine Master, seem
never to have put forth miraculous powers to escape the
cross of affliction laid upon them by God. We will read
what St. Paul writes of this visit to Galatia.

Reading.

Ye know how that through infirmity of the flesh
I preached the Gospel unto you at the first; and my
temptation which was in my flesh ye despised not, nor
rejected, but received me even as an angel of God, even as _
Christ Jesus. Where is then the blessedness ye spake of,
ji
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‘‘From a chiid thou hast known the Holy Scriptures.’—2 Tr. iii, 15.
THE THORN IN THE FLESH. 135

for I bear you record that, if it had been possible, ye would
have plucked out your eyes and given them to me.
Harold. Does that not look as if St. Paul’s “infirmity
in the flesh” might have been some disease in his eyes?
Lady L. A painful eye malady, called ophthalmia, is by
many supposed to have been the thorn, or “stake” in the
flesh, of which St. Paul writes in one of the most interest-
ing passages in his letters. It probably relates to the
very same affliction as that which so distressed him in
Galatia. Let us turn to the twelfth chapter of second
Corinthians, and begin from the seventh verse.



Reading.

And lest I should be exalted above measure through
the abundance of the revelations, there was given to me a
thorn in the flesh, the messenger of Satan to buffet me,.
lest I should be exalted above measure. For this thing
I besought the Lord thrice, that it might depart from me.
And He said unto me, My grace is sufficient for thee: for
My strength is made perfect in weakness. Most gladly
therefore will I rather glory in my infirmities, that the
power of Christ may rest on me.

Lady L. That St. Paul’s thorn in the flesh was a severe
and painful disease in his eyes seems confirmed by his
usually dictating his letters, instead of writing them with
his own hand.

Harold. What a terrible hindrance anything like blind-
ness would be to one who travelled so much and worked
so hard!

Delia, A thorn in the flesh indeed. You would be
shocked if you could see the horribly disfiguring effect of
ophthalmia as I have often seen it in India. If St. Paul had
that complaint, I wonder that he could do anything at all
except shut himself up in a dark room. Light produces
dreadful pain; and the sufferer from a severe attack is a
136 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



shocking object to behold. My poor little ones had
ophthalmia on board the troopship, and though they
recovered, their eyes are weak from it still.

Lady L. I have been reading a learned life of St. Paul,
written by Canon Farrar. He gives such an interesting
paraphrase, as it is called, of what St. Paul may be
supposed to have meant by what he wrote to the Galatians
in the passage which has just been read aloud, that I have
put a mark in the place that I may let you have a part
of it.

Lady Laurie opened a large volume which lay on the
table beside her, and read aloud from what Canon Farrar
gives as an imaginary filling up of St. Paul’s description of
his visit to the Galatians: —“You know that when
I preached the Gospel amongst you on my first visit it
was in consequence of an attack of illness which detained
me in the midst of a journey; you could not, therefore,
feel any gratitude to me, as though I had come with the
express purpose of preaching to you; and besides, at that
time, weak, agonised with pain... my eyes red and
ulcerated by that disease by which it pleases God to let
Satan buffet me, you might well have been tempted to
regard me as a deplorable object. My whole appearance
must have been a trial to you, a temptation to you to
reject me. But you did not; you were very kind to me.
You might have treated me with contemptuous indiffer-
ence .. . but instead of this you honoured, you loved me;
you received me as though I were an angel. . . . How glad
you were to see me! How eagerly you congratulated
yourselves and me on the blessed accident,—nay, rather on
the blessed providence of God which had detained me
amongst you. So generous, so affectionate were you
towards me, that I bear you witness that to aid me as I
sat in misery in the darkened room, unable to bear even
a ray of light without excruciating pain, you would, if that
THE THORN IN THE FLESH. 137



could have helped me, have plucked out your eyes and
given them to me.”

Harold. One can hardly bear to think of the great,
noble, glorious Apostle looking such a poor and pitiable
object! One imagined him with bright, flashing ayes and
powerful frame, like some famous hero of old.

Lady L. Which would be considered the more wonder-
ful feat, for a knight mounted on a strong horse, with a
bright, sharp sword in his hand, to conquer multitudes of
enemies,—or for the same knight, on a weak, worn-out
steed, with his right hand disabled, or his sight nearly
gone, to dash into the midst of the enemy, and, notwith-
standing such disadvantages, to bear down all before him ?

Harold. Of course for one so seemingly disabled and so
badly mounted to do all that a strong, well-mounted
warrior could do would be by far the more wonderful feat.

Lady L. Consider what St. Paul accomplished, perhaps’
more than any other mere man ever did; think of his
journeyings, his dangers, his labours, his marvellous
success, and then say whether his thorn in the flesh, what-
ever it might be, does not add to his glory, or rather to the
glory of the Lord, whose strength was made perfect in
His servant’s infirmity.

Harold. It does, mother, it does. The weaker the
body, the grander the spirit that triumphed over its weak-
ness. Fear, sickness, danger, —nothing . could conquer
St. Paul.

Robin. Those kind people who would have plucked out
their eyes to help him, what very good Christians they
were !

Lady L. I wish that we could think so, dear Robin;
but the Galatians, we find, were a very feeble, foolish,
changeable race. They gave St. Paul more trouble after-
wards than perhaps any other of his converts gave him.

Ida. Why, what was it that they did ?
138 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Lady L. When St. Paul was with them the Galatians
were full of zeal for the Gospel; but when he was absent,
they fell from the faith, The Galatians gave heed to
Jewish converts, who told them that they could be saved
by the works of the law. They left off trusting entirely in
Christ; they began to trust in themselves. See with
what fervour St. Paul rebukes his beloved converts. “Oh!
foolish Galatians, who hath bewitched you that ye should
not obey the truth; before whose eyes Jesus hath been
evidently set forth. ... I am afraid of you, lest I have
bestowed on you labour in vain.”

Ida. 1 suppose that the Galatians had not held fast the
doctrine of justification by faith.

Delia. It is such a comfort to know that even St. Paul
had a thorn in the flesh. It did seem as if he were so
very, very far above us, like a star in the sky; now I see
that he was more like one of ourselves. But I do wonder
that when so holy an apostle prayed hard for the thorn to
be taken away, the Lord did not answer his prayer.

Lady L. The Lord did answer it, dear Delia. The
Lord did not indeed take away the trial, but he made it a
blessing instead of an evil. No doubt St. Paul in Paradise
blesses God for the thorn.

Delia. But one would like to be given just what one
asks for.

Lady L. What, even if we—in our blindness—asked
for what would harm us ?

Delia. Would it harm us to be well, and strong, and
happy ?

Lady L. In some cases doubtless it would, or St. Paul
would not have been left without the relief which he
sought.

Delia, I wish that I understood more about prayer.
T once heard some one say that God’s gifts are like golden
fruit on a tree, which fruit we pluck by prayer. But it
THE THORN IN THE FLESH. 139



seems to me—I know that it is wrong to say so—but it
seems as if we might try and try again to pluck, and yet
get nothing after all!

Lady Laurie’s family looked at their mother to see what
reply she would make to words so strange.

Lady L. Let us examine this simile of a Tree of Blessing,
and see why our efforts to gather fruit from it sometimes
end in disappointment. In the first place, that Tree is
fenced round, we must reach it, as it were, by a gate. We
are not worthy in ourselves to ask anything of God, but
we find the key of the gate in the Name of the Saviour.
Christ said, “ Verily, verily, 1 say unto you, whatsoever ye
shall ask the Father in My Name He will give it to you”
(John xvi. 23).

Robin. We always say at the end of our prayer, for the
sake of the Lord Jesus Christ.

Harold. But how often we say it without thinking; at
least, I know that J do.

Lady L. And then the fruit-laden Tree of Blessing
being within our reach, it is not enough to stand with
folded hands before it, repeating some form of prayer,
however good that form may be. It is not enough even
to go close to the Tree, and, as it were, lay your hands
upon it, by long lifeless petitions. If you want the fruit
of the Tree, you must shake it, shake it heartily, shake it
perseveringly, and down comes the golden shower.

Ida. But, mamma, suppose that one cannot pray thus.
Sometimes one is like a weak child, standing under the
Tree, looking up, but not able to bring down a single fruit.
One has not strength to move the thick trunk, and the
high branches seem beyond reach. If one cannot even
pray as one ought, what is then to be done?

Delia fixed her eyes anxiously on Lady Laurie, awaiting
her reply, for Ida had exactly described a case which the
poor invalid felt to be often her own.
140 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Lady L. We must ask for the Spirit’s help; He can
teach us how to pray, yea Himself plead our cause. See
some little child, longing for fruit beyond his reach, stand-
ing helplessly under a tree which his feeble hands cannot
shake ; he calls to his father; the father comes up to the
child, and lifts him upon his strong shoulder. The little
hands can grasp a branch now, but have hardly power to
shake it. See what the loving father does! He puts his
strong hands over those which are so small and weak; he
shakes with force, while the child shakes too. The boy
with delight sees the fruit dropping down; it was the
father’s power that brought success, but the child had
done what he could. It is thus that God’s Spirit helps us.
He works in us, and with us. Whenever we kneel down
to pray, we should call the Holy Spirit to our aid.

Delia. But I have asked for the Spirit’s help, and
I have prayed earnestly and long that God would make
me well without this dreadful going to London. I have
shaken the branches night and day, yet my knee only
gets worse; the blessing of health has not come! Why
is this?

Ludy L. There are various reasons for God’s witholding
what His people pray for. Let us think over a few of
these reasons. First, the fruit may not be ripe. God
alone knows the time for gathering the blessing given in
answer to prayer. Abraham doubtless shook the Tree
hard when he desired a son from the Lord, but he was
granted patience to wait for twenty years, and then came
the ripe blessing.

Robin. As I have to wait till the little green balls on
my apple-tree ripen; I plucked one yesterday and tasted
it, and how hard it was, and how sour! If I had waited,
it would have been so good and so sweet.

Harold. The blessing which Abraham waited for was a
grand one at last! From it has sprung other blessings,
THE THORN IN THE FLESH. 141



countless as stars. It was worth while waiting in faith
for the ripening.

Lady L. A second cause of disappointment often is
this, that God sees that the fruit on which we have set
our hearts has a worm at the core. He would give us
something better. Have you not noticed that when shak-
ing a tree for some special fruit which you did not gain,
another—perhaps a much larger one—fell at your feet ?

Robin. Oh! I have seen that often and often.

Lady L. Thus Moses prayed to be allowed to enter the
Promised Land.

Ida, But his prayer was refused.

Harold. No, no, Ida, not quite refused, only the answer
delayed. Nearly fifteen hundred years after his death,
Moses appeared in glory in the very land which he had
prayed to be allowed to enter.

Lady L. And was honoured by being permitted to con-
verse there with the Lord Himself! How much greater
the blessing given than that which Moses had prayed for!
He asked—as a mere man, burdened with cares, the leader
of a people often troublesome and unruly—to go into
Canaan, there to die; he went in immortal strength and
glory, to behold the King in His beauty, and never to die
any more. Oan any of you give me another example of a
blessing being given by God greater than that desired and
prayed for ?

Harold. Elijah prayed for death.

Lady L. God loved him too well to grant the prayer.

Robin. Elijah never died at all; he was carried up to
heaven in a chariot of fire!

Ida. And how the Lord’s mother and His apostles must
have prayed at that dreadful time when the Lord was
brought to trial, that Pilate might set him free!

Lady L. Had such a prayer been granted, if the Saviour
had never died for sinners, how could even Mary and the
142 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL,

apostles have éver reached heaven? Notwithstanding
their prayers, the Lord did die. He went down into the
tomb, notwithstanding the tears and supplications of those
who loved Him; but He rose from it again, and bestowed
on them, as the price of His death, the gift of eternal
life !}

Delia. It is quite true that in these cases God gave
something better than what was asked for. But I cannot
see how He can give to me anything better than a swift

‘ and painless cure.

Lady £. Yes, dear Delia, God can; and in another
world you will see clearly what now seems so dark to your
mind.

Harold. We have heard the two first reasons why we
may seem to shake the Tree of Blessings in vain,—that
the fruit may not be ripe, so that we must wait for awhile,
or the fruit may not be good, and so God gives us some-
thing better instead. Can we find out any more reasons
for our prayers seeming to remain unanswered ?

Lady L. We may have prayed with anger and malice
in our hearts; if so, the Spirit will not help us in prayer.
We are not raised up. We are left to ourselves. Christ
said, when ye stand praying forgive, if ye have aught
against any, that your Father also, which is in heaven,
may forgive you your trespasses.

Harold coloured, for he remembered his own fierce thirst
for revenge.

Lady L. I will mention but one other reason for prayers
seeming to be unheard. We may have prayed without
faith. Faith is the very hand with which we grasp the
branch; without faith we do not so much as touch it, far
less shake it with force.

Harold. Mother, it struck me much in that account of
brave Wilayat Ali, that he did not pray to be saved from
death, he only prayed that he might keep true to the end.
THE THORN IN THE FLESH. 143

Would it have been wrong in him to have asked to be
delivered from a violent death ?

Lady L. Not wrong, if he had said, like his Lord,
nevertheless not my will but Thy will. I think that the
Spirit may have restrained the convert from asking for
longer life here, because it was the will of God that he
should quickly enter on life eternal.

Delia. Surely we may ask for earthly things ?

Lady L. Yes, but with full assurance that God knows
far better than we do whether such things would really
be blessings. In full confidence in His love let us offer
our prayer, assured “’Tis perfect wisdom still that grants
it, or denies.”
CHAPTER XVIIL
NOT BY CHANCE.

It was no easy work to get Delia Smith off by the early
train on the following day. Lady Laurie felt it desirable
to start in the morning, that a surgeon might be consulted
at once without the delay of a Sunday. Delia tried the
patience of her kind friend not a little; it was difficult to
persuade the invalid to rise before her usual hour; then
she lingered over her toilette as if she had the whole day
to spare, and evidently wished so to delay that she might
be able to put off the dreaded journey to London by
missing the train. Harold, after twice announcing that
the carriage was waiting at the door, hurried off on foot
with Ida to the station to see the travellers off.

“Though the horse goes much faster than we can,”
observed Ida, “if Mrs. Smith dawdles as she has been
doing, we shall be first at the station.”

It was a morning of mist, that mist which precedes 4
sultry day. Harold and Ida had to wait some time on the
platform, after securing tickets for the travellers, watching
the road by which they would: come.

“T do believe that Mrs. Smith will manage that the
train should go without them!” cried Ida. “I’m sure
that she delays on purpose.”

“She is dreadfully nervous, any one can see that,
observed Harold.

“Mamma is so patient and tender,” said Ida; “few
people could bear worries as she does; they never seem to

14d

”
NOT BY CHANCE. 145



put her out. I quite lost my patience with Mrs. Smith
this morning when she sat looking at her egg instead of
eating it, though she knew that the clock had struck.
I said something cross when mamma and I left the room
together, and mamma said in a tone of gentle rebuke,
“St. Paul wrote—We that are strong ought to bear the
infirmities of others, and not to please ourselves.”

«St. Paul himself knew what it is to have infirmities,’
said Harold; “I have been thinking that one reason why
he was sent that thorn in the flesh, may have been to
teach him how to pity and feel for the weak.”

“Oh! here comes the train!” exclaimed Ida, “It will
not stop long at this little station; Mrs. Smith will not be
in time!”

“ Here comes the carriage” cried Harold, “the coachman
is whipping the horse. It’s a neck and neck race! yes,
they will be in time after all.”

Poor Delia, looking nervous and scared, had to be
hurried out of the one carriage and into the other, faster
than was pleasant for one so helplessly lame. She had no
time even to say good-bye to the young people, who, when
the long train had disappeared in the distance, turned
sorrowfully away for their homeward walk.

“We have a hard time before us,” sighed Ida; “such a
pack of children in the house, and mamma away, we do
not know for how long. Harold, you and I must stand
by each other; Robin is often hard to manage, but you
seem to have some way of making him do whatever you
like.”

“T think that my secret is that I love the jolly little
chap,” said Harold. “Will you be vexed, Ida, if I say
that I think that you sometimes nag him; you don’t put
yourself into the place of a merry little fellow. You so
often call Robin tiresome and stupid, and he is really a

very bright child.”
K
146 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



“IT must try to be more like mamma,” said Ida, who
was in a more subdued mood than usual, for her heart was
heavy with unwonted care; “I have been thinking,
Harold, that it would be nice for you and me to have a
little prayer together, for I feel so lonely and burdened.”

“Yes, we'll shake the branch together,” said Harold.
“T should like you to help me to pray for something that
is on my mind,”

“T suppose that the Hindu troubles you. You'll have
your worries at school because of his coming to live in our
house.”

“TI was thinking rather of him than of the worries,”
said young Hartley. “Do you know”—Harold paused,
for he was not at all accustomed to be confidential with
the girl.

But on that walk home Harold and Ida were drawn
more closely together than they ever had been before.
The girl was leaning for support on the more vigorous
spirit of her companion, and nothing awoke his sympathies
more quickly than to feel that she was leaning on him.
Harold even grew confidential, and told Ida of what was
laid on his conscience, that he ought to do something,
however little, to give the poor. Hindu who lived under
the same roof as himself, a knowledge of Christ.

“ One reads of missionary journeys, and sufferings, and
devotion,” said Harold, “just as people might look on at a
battle, taking their ease, whilst others are wrestling, and
struggling, and dying. Now here is a heathen close by
me, who has heard nothing of Christ ; I know something
of the poor fellow’s language, and I suppose that I ought
to teach him, but I am at my wit’s end how to begin.
I never did anything like this before; it’s so different
from learning Latin or Greek,—it seems to me ten times
as hard.”

“T should not think it so very very hard,” said Ida,
NOT BY CHANCE. 147



“Just borrow Robin’s book of pictures, and read the
stories, one by one, out of your Hindu Gospel.”

“The very thing!” cried Harold. “Prem Dés’s eye
will help his ear; between the two I may make him under-
stand a little. But though I may get at his eye and ear,
I have no power to reach his heart.”

“Only. the Spirit can do that,” said Ida gently; “we
must pray together for the Spirit.”

What unites Christians so truly as working together,
and praying together for a blessing on the work? Both
Harold and Ida felt this when, after the three little
children lay asleep in their cots upstairs, and Robin had
said good-night, the two elder of the family knelt down
in the drawing-room, side by side. It was Harold who
offered aloud the simple prayer for his mother, the poor
sick lady, and the children under the roof. Harold asked
for wisdom for himself and Ida, forgiveness for all their -
past sins, and grace to do better in future, by the grace of
God’s Holy Spirit. Then, after a pause, Harold prayed
for India, that the blessed Gospel might shine where
there was such darkness, misery, and crime; that the
persecutors might repent and believe; and that the poor
Hindu whom God had sent to their care, might become
a holy, happy Christian. All was asked in the name of
the Saviour.

Harold and Ida were surprised to hear a fervent
“amen!” from a third voice at the close. Lady Laurie,
who had noiselessly glided in while they were praying, was
kneeling beside her children, and now offered aloud a
thanksgiving for countless mercies, which came from an
overflowing heart. To find Ida and Harold thus praying
in loving union together, was to their mother the crowning
blessing of the day. On rising from her knees the
widowed lady embraced them both with affectionate
warmth.
148 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



“ Mother! this is a pleasant surprise! we never thought
to see you back again till Monday at earliest,” cried
Harold.

“How came Mrs. Smith to be so unselfish as to spare
you?” said Ida; “I thought that she would not let you
go for a week !”

“Suppose that before you question me, you treat me
with a cup of tea,” said Lady Laurie, smiling. “Travelling
in this weather is thirsty work, and I am a little tired.”
More than a little tired looked the lady, as she took off
her bonnet, and sank down on a restful arm-chair.

“T'll carry up your packets to your room,” said Harold,
“as Ida hastened away for the tea. “Why, what’s this!”
he cried, with amused surprise, as he took up one of
peculiar shape. From the paper which enwrapped it a
familiar-looking spout was protruding. “ Why mother,
did you think that our silver teapot required a change
of air that you gave it a day’s journey to and from
London ?”

Lady Laurie was soon seated at her table with tea,
bread, and butter before her. After partaking of the first,
she gratified the curiosity of Ida, by recounting the little
events of the day.

“You know that we all but missed the train. Well,
hardly had I had time to settle our poor friend in an easy
position, with her feet up on the seat, and her cushion
behind her, when a richly-dressed lady, who occupied a
place in the same carriage, exclaimed, “ Why, surely this is
Delia Dalmar !”

“Dearest Mrs. Elwyn!” exclaimed Mrs. Smith in
joyful surprise. There was a most affectionate greeting
between the two ladies, almost as if they had been mother
and daughter. Mrs. Elwyn, it appears, had been the most
intimate friend of Mrs. Smith’s mother, and had known
Delia from her birth. The lady was delighted to find her
NOT BY CHANCE. 149

again, though distressed to see her, as she said, ‘looking
so like a shadow.’ ”

“But how came Mrs. Elwyn to know nothing about
Mrs. Smith’s being in England?” asked Ida, “if she was
such a very particular friend.”

“Mrs. Elwyn had been absent on a tour in the Holy
Land and Egypt at the time of her young friend’s leaving
school after finishing her education. Mrs. Elwyn learned
on her return that the young lady had married a
Mr. Smith, after a short engagement, and had gone, it was
not exactly known where. Thus the good lady lost all
trace of her friend.”

“The mere name of ‘Smith’ would be no guide,”
remarked Harold, “there are hundreds and hundreds of
Smiths.”

“T hope that Mrs. Elwyn may prove a real friend,” said
Ida; “for I am sure that poor Mrs. Smith wants one.
sadly.”

“No one could appear more kind than Mrs. Elwyn,”
replied Lady Laurie. “She would not hear of our poor
friend going to any house but her own, where she would
have every comfort, everything that money could procure.
Mrs. Elwyn gave me to understand that she would gladly
undertake all expenses. ‘Even were Delia not like my
own child, observed Mrs. Elwyn, ‘I would do anything
for the family of one of our brave heroes fighting in
India.’”

“ What a lucky thing it was you met with this lady!”
cried Harold. .

“ Lucky is not the word that I would use regarding it,
my son. I believe that God graciously ordered the meeting.
Mrs. Elwyn said so herself, and mentioned, as a remarkable
thing, that for the first time in her life she had yester-
day missed a train, which compelled her to travel to-day.
But for this, which she had deemed a vexatious delay,
150 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Mrs. Elwyn would have been in London last night, and
would probably have never seen anything of her friend.”

“Then if the one lady had been in time for her train,
or the other missed hers, as she almost did, the meeting
would not have taken place!” observed Harold. “ Mother,
do you think that the Almighty arranges even such little
matters as these ?”

“ Nothing that affects the welfare of His children is too
little for our heavenly Father to care for. Can you
remember an account in Scripture of a meeting between
two men evidently arranged by the Lord? Two persons
were brought together, perhaps only for an hour, then
parted, probably never to meet again in this world, though
the effect of their brief intercourse with each other would
last throughout eternity.”

“You mean Philip’s meeting with the treasurer of
Queen Candace, who was travelling along in his chariot,”
said Ida.

Lady L. We shall find in our next conversation about
St. Paul, that the Lord evidently arranged a plan for His
servant’s travels quite different from that which the
Apostle had formed for himself. We may have providen-
tial hindrances as well as helps.

Harold. I suppose that it is too late to-night for our
usual talk. Ida and I have read the Bible together. But
how unkind it is in us never to have asked whether poor
Mrs. Smith has had the tumour cut in her knee.

Lady £. A famous surgeon was sent for as soon as we
arrived in Mrs. Elwyn’s fine large house in Grosvenor
Square. I was present when he examined the knee. He
has fixed on Monday for doing what he says is needful;
but he assured his poor patient that the operation would
give her no pain, as chloroform would be used. The
surgeon also said that, with patience and care, he hoped
that ere long she would have the full use of her limb, and
NOT BY CHANCE. 151



be able to walk ten miles if she liked, and jump over a
stile at the end.

Ida. What cheering news for Mrs. Smith, though I
cannot imagine her ever doing any feat in the jumping
line.

Before the family separated for the night, Ida mentioned
to her mother Harold’s little plan of teaching Prem Das.
There was some difficulty in fixing on a time in the day
in which any instruction could be given.

“My housemaid sleeps in the nursery to be ready to
give the children anything that they might want during
the night,” said Lady Laurie, “but Prem Das. has charge

of them all day long; he plays with them, walks with
them, carries the baby about. Three such young children
give him a great deal to do.”

“ And Harold is almost all day at school,” remarked Ida.

“T could only be with the Hindu after I came back,”
observed Harold. .

“Prem Das takes the children out for their walk at five

- o'clock,” said Ida. “ After the little ones come in, he
gives them their supper; and they go to bed just before
our tea and our Bible reading.”

“Mother will not allow me to sit up later at night than

just to prepare my lessons for the next day,” said Harold ;
he glanced enquiringly at Lady Laurie as he spoke.

_ The lady smiled, but shook her head. “I hold by the

old adage,” said she—

“*Harly to bed and early to rise,
Is the way to be healthy, wealthy, and wise.’”

“Oh, but the early rising is just what I hate!”
exclaimed Harold. “Prem D4&s awoke me this morning
-by stirring about in his attic, and I was so glad to hear the
clock strike five, and to know that I could turn round on
my pillow and take another good nap. It’s hard enough -
152 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.

work to get down in time for morning prayers and our
early breakfast.”

Lady Laurie made no observation. If Harold had to
make any sacrifice of comfort in order to teach the Hindu,
she wished him to do it of his own free will, without her
prompting.

Harold overslept himself on the Sunday morning.
After morning service in church, he made a, little attempt
to speak to Prem Das about Adam and Eve, but found it
impossible to get undivided attention as the children were
in the room. The baby, just able to toddle alone, wanted
to be carried about; Lily’s shoes seemed always to want
tying; Delly tried to snatch away the picture-book, but
only succeeded in tearing a page. Harold very soon gave
up his attempt to instruct in despair.

“You'll get up early and have a good time with Prem
Das, while those children are asleep,” suggested Robin.
CHAPTER XIX.
ST. PAUL IN EUROPE.

SwEET calm Sabbath evening! The holy services of the
church are over, and have left a sense of peace in the
mind. The sunset sky seems more golden, the scent from
the garden more sweet, the air more balmy and soft in the
day set apart for worship and rest. The first passionate
burst of Harold’s grief has calmed down into a quiet
sadness whenever his mind reverts to his loss; but he is
too young, and his spirits naturally too buoyant for him to
be perpetually gloomy. Ida is happier than usual, for her
heart is opening more to affection, and is less occupied by
self. As for Robin, he is much like the bird whose name
he shares—a bright, light-hearted creature, enjoying
summer sunshine, and cheering wintry days with a song.
Lady Laurie feels very happy as she looks around on her
little family, and with a thankful heart opens her Bible.

Lady L. The sixteenth chapter of the book of Acts is
one of the most interesting in this record of the early
Church. You remember that we left St. Paul in Galatia.

Harold. Sick and sorrowful, struggling to bear his thorn
in the flesh.

Ida. And finding that Christ’s grace, which is made
perfect in weakness, was sufficient for him.

Lady L. The sixth and seventh verses of the chapter
before us give an impression that St. Paul, after his
recovery, had another trial very distressing to an ardent
spirit like his. No man willingly sees his own plans over-

153
154 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



turned—his efforts, especially efforts to do good, ending in
disappointment. The missionaries, Paul, Silas, and their
young companion Timothy, made arrangements for a
preaching-tour in Asia, but we are told that the Spirit
forbade them to carry out their design. How the prohi-
bition was given we know not; perhaps by some natural
obstacle, perhaps by some fierce opposition from men.
We have, as we must remember, no particulars given of
various scourgings and other sufferings endured by
St. Paul. Then the Apostle and his companions resolved
to turn their steps northwards and visit Bithynia, a province
bordering on the Euxine, or, as we call it now, the Black
Sea. But again were the missionaries hindered. “The
Spirit suffered them not.”

Robin. Why did the Spirit stop them when they made
such nice plans, and wanted to do so much good? Did
they not pray to be allowed to go on? Did they not
shake the Tree of Blessings ?

Lady L. Doubtless the missionaries did pray fervently.
The Lord only withheld one blessing from them to give a
much richer shower. The Spirit barred their way on one
path, that they might be turned into another. Robin, we
owe it to these hindrances and disappointments of St. Paul,
that he was soon led to carry the Gospel to our own
Europe, and that he there kindled a glorious light which
was in time to shed its beams upon our ownisland. Led by
Him who has promised to guide His people, the missionaries
made a long journey westward, as if following the course
of the setting sun, till they reached Troas, a harbour border-
ing on the Aigean Sea. They gazed on the wide expanse

- of waters, heaving and sparkling before them; they knew
that beyond those waves lay Macedonia and far-famed
Greece.

Harold. Macedonia, the country of that grand leader,

Alexander, who wept because he had no more worlds to
ST. PAUL IN EUROPE. 155



conquer. Greece, the land of Aristides and Demosthenes,
of philosophers, and heroes, and poets! One would like to
stand on the spot where Socrates taught, or where Leonidas
fell. Did not St. Paul long to cross over to Macedonia
and Greece ?

Lady L. If he did, it would not be because these
countries had been made celebrated by those whose fame
remains to these days, but because the Apostle knew that
there were perishing souls there who might be gathered
into the Christian fold.

Ida, I daresay that St. Paul and his companions asked
to be guided in this matter by the Spirit of God.

Lady L. Direction came in a vision, doubtless sent by
the Spirit. “A vision appeared to Paul in the night.
There stood a man of Macedonia and prayed him, saying,
Come over and help us.”

Harold. Of course St. Paul in the morning told the
vision to his two friends.

Lady L. The two had become three. At Troas the
missionary band was joined by St. Luke, “the beloved
physician,” the writer of the gospel bearing his name, and
of the Book of Acts which we are now reading.

Ida. I cannot see in this chapter any account of his
coming. Is it mentioned in an Epistle ?

Lady L. No, the event is not mentioned in any Epistle.

fda. If it is written about nowhere, how can we possibly
tell that St. Luke joined St. Paul at Troas ?

Lady L. By one word, one very little word, which you
see in the tenth verse.

Harold. Ihave it! The wordis we. St. Luke could not
have written we unless he had been of the party himself.
But how quietly he glides in, as it were, as if he wished no
one to notice that he was a missionary also, ready for any
hardship or danger !

Lady £. The four evangelists, those who were inspired
156 PICTURES OF ST, PAUL.



to write the history of Christ, are remarkable for the
humility and modesty with which they keep self in the
background. How simply St. Matthew describes his own
conversion, as though it were the most natural thing in
the world for a man in lucrative government employ to
. leave all, to follow a persecuted Master. “And as Jesus
passed forth from thence, He saw a man named Matthew
sitting at the receipt of custom, and he saith unto him,
Follow Me; and he arose and followed Him.” Matthew
does not even say what St. Luke added to the account,
that the publican left all.

Ida, 1 do not think that Mark’s name is mentioned in
his gospel at all.

Lady L. Mark was not one of the Lord’s immediate
followers, and therefore his name would not necessarily
appear in the sacred narrative; but St. John, who was so
constantly with his Divine Master, seems to shrink from
mentioning his own name; in his gospel he is described,
as the disciple whom Jesus loved. And now, you see
that St. Luke gives no account of what he himself did, or
said, or endured; he would be quite lost to our view but
for that tiny word “ we.”

Ida. T have heard you say that the terrible “I” which
so often comes into conversation even on religious subjects,
is like the jly on the ointment, which spoils the sweetest
perfume.

Lady L. There is an animal in India, called the musk
rat, which has a very overpowering scent. It is said thatif
the creature merely run over a bottle of wine, all its con-
tents are spoilt by the odour. Thus egotism, the terrible
“J,” spoils the value of the noblest actions.

Harold. But does not St. Paul in his writings rather
often bring in “ I.”

Lady L. St. Paul had in self-defence to tell of much of
what he did and suffered; but he seems to be ashamed,
ST. PAUL IN BUROPEH. 157



even when feeling it needful to do so, to write of himself.
“T speak,” he says, “as it were foolishly.” ...“I have
become a fool in glorying, ye have compelled me.” And
how touchingly the devoted Paul writes of himself in his
Epistle to the Corinthians! “For I am the least of the
apostles, that am not meet to be called an apostle, because
I persecuted the Church of God. But by the grace of
God I am what I am; and His grace which was bestowed
on me was not in vain, but I laboured more abundantly
than they all; yet not I, but the grace of God which was
with me.” He confesses the evil that he had done as his
own, and for the good gives glory to God.

Robin. Now I want to know whether Paul and the rest
went where the man in the vision begged them to go.

Reading.

And after he had seen the vision, immediately we
endeavoured to go into Macedonia, assuredly gathering that
the Lord had called us for to preach the Gospel unto them.

Harold. So St. Paul, Silas, Luke, and Timothy, a noble
band of missionaries, embarked for Europe. How joyous
would they have been could they have known that Europe,
to which they were carrying light, would flash it back upon
Asia! How they would have wondered if they could
have seen the stream of Bibles, the hundreds of mission-
aries that the West would return to the East. Oh! had
St. Paul and his companions had a glimpse of such
triumphs to come, with what delight would they have set
foot on the Macedonian shore.

Ida. Where did the travellers land ?

Lady L. At Neapolis, a sea-port, from whence they
proceeded to Philippi, a Roman colony, and a place famous
in ancient history.

Harold. Famous for the victory won there by Augustus
over Brutus and Cassius.


158



Robin. What sort of people lived in the city ?

Lady LZ. A more manly race than the people of Asia
Minor; amongst the dwellers in Philippi were a good
many Roman soldiers. There seem to have been fewer
Jews in this city then in most of those that had been
hitherto visited by St. Paul.

Harold. Then he was likely to have a quieter life.

Ida. We shall have fuller descriptions now of what
happened, since the writer of the Book of Acts is himself
one of the party of Christians. We may hear who was
the first convert made in Europe.

Lady L. The, first convert of whom we hear at Philippi
was a woman, not indeed a European, but a resident in
the Macedonian city. Let us read the account given by
St. Luke.

Reading.

And on the Sabbath we went out of the city by a river
side, where prayer was wont to be made. And we sat
down and spake unto the women who resorted thither.
And a certain woman, named Lydia, a seller of purple, of
the city of Thyatira, which worshipped God, heard us;
whose heart the Lord opened, that she attended to the
things which were spoken of Paul. .

Harold. Then Lydia was a pious woman, even before
she became a Christian, for she went to pray, and she
worshipped God before the missionaries came to Philippi.

Lady L. Lydia was probably a proselyte to the Jewish
religion, and one whose prayers and alms, like those of
Cornelius the Roman centurion, went up to God.

Robin. God sent an angel to that man.

Ida. And an apostle to that woman.

Lady L. To those who walk humbly by a little light, a
greater light is given. Let us notice the expression,
whose heart the Lord opened. This woman’s religion was
ST. PAUL IN EUROPE. 159



one of the heart. We hear of no sudden conviction, no
terrors, as in the case of another convert at Philippi, whose
story we soon shall read. liydia’s conversion makes one
think of a flower opening its petals to the warmth of the
sun. Lydia seems to have had influence with her depend-
ants; we read, she was baptised, and her household. We
may say that the Church of Philippi, a most devoted
Church, called by St. Paul “dearly beloved and longed
for, my joy and crown,” was born in that good woman’s
house.

Robin. I am so glad that St. Paul was with kind people
at last !

Lady L. Lydia delighted to show hospitality to her
Christian teachers. She seems to have had room for all
the missionaries both in her heart and in her home.
Reads—* She besought us saying, If ye have judged me
to be faithful to the Lord, come into my house and abide —
there.” It seems as if St. Paul and his friends had had
some hesitation in accepting the convert’s offer; but Lydia
would take no denial. St. Luke adds, “and she con-
strained us.”

Robin. Now St. Paul will have a good time.

Lady L. What most people would call a very hard time,
my boy. But the account of the terrible storm which
burst on the Christians, when their sky looked so clear,
and they must have been so full of hope, we will leave till
to-morrow evening.

——2030,0-e—-
CHAPTER XX.
SONGS IN THE NIGHT.

WE will now return to the poor young invalid, sheltered
in Mrs. Elwyn’s hospitable house in Grosvenor Square.
Delia’s heart was also gently, very gently, opening under
the influence of generous kindness. It was not only on
account of the earthly comforts which her suffering state
required, that the meeting with Eleanor Elwyn was bene-
ficial to Delia Smith.

Mrs. Elwyn, except in piety and kindness of heart, was
a contrast to Lady Laurie. The latter was tall, fair, and
delicate in appearance, soft in voice, gentle in manner, in
everything the perfect lady. Mrs. Elwyn was lower in
height, but more strongly built, with broad black eyebrows
overshadowing keen intelligent eyes. Her abrupt manner,
her deep-toned voice, suited a character of almost mascu-
line strength. Mrs. Elwyn seemed to be one to lean on,
never herself to lean. Generous and frank, with strong
common sense, she was exactly the friend required by the
weak, timid being who clung helplessly, like a creeper, to
any firm support within her reach. Mrs. Elwyn was
indeed a pillar of strength. Delia was soon pouring forth
the tale of all her miseries into the ear of the friend of
her childhood. Ifthe poor young lady had been looking
at Mrs. Elwyn instead of crying with a handkerchief at
her eyes, she would have seen the dark thick brows drawn

160
SONGS IN THE NIGIT. 161



rather more closely together, as Eleanor listened to a long
string of complaints uttered in Delia’s fretful, monotonous
tone. At the first pause Mrs. Elwyn said rather abruptly,
“So your husband sent you no money by last mail! You
will never trust him again!”

“ Never trust him—my own dear John! what can you
mean?” exclaimed Delia, her pale face flushing as she
spoke,

“ He has left you in very uncomfortable plight.”

“Tt was no fault of his—of that Iam certain! It only
shows—”

“That he cares nothing for you or the children !”

“Oh! Mrs. Elwyn! how can you say so! John is the
dearest and kindest of men!”

“You trust his love, then, whatever appearances may
be?”

“T would never dishonour him by a doubt.”

“Ah! Delia! Delia!” cried Mrs. Elwyn, in an altered
tone, “you would never dishonour your husband by a
doubt; you look as indignant as such a gentle little woman
can-look at the bare idea of John being thought unkind ;
yet you think nothing of dishonouring Him who loves you
better than mortal can love, by your doubts, and fears,
and complaints! Remember what St. Paul wrote to the
Philippians (we’ll take the chapter for our reading to-
night), Rejoice in the Lord always, and again I say
rejoice... . Be careful for nothing, but im everything
by prayer and supplication, let your requests be made
known to God.”

Delia. That was not meant for those afflicted like me.

Mrs. EH. It was written for those in tribulation, for those
exposed to such sharp persecutions as make our trials
seem comparatively light. Have you ever thought what
scourging meant in those days,—the sufferer’s very flesh
torn from his bones by horrible thongs of leather, some-

ts
162 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



times studded with metal to make each successive blow
give more exquisite torture? St. Paul knew what these
Philippians had to bear, for he wrote, Unto you it is given
in the behalf of Christ not only to believe, but also to
suffer for His sake.

Delia. Dear Mrs. Elwyn, I think that some people are
made to be weak and fearful. I cannot help being what
Iam. I cannot help being burdened with cares, and
troubled by fears.

Mrs. EZ. What—when you are commanded to lay down
your burden—when you are commanded to fight against
your fears? Does the Master ever tell us to do anything
that He cannot give us strength to perform? Delia, let
me speak frankly. You give way to a kind of self-
indulgence which is hurtful to yourself and to others.
You remind me of poor Little Faith in the Pilgrim’s
Progress, whom Fear helped to rob of his jewels; or rather,
you naughty child! you are yourself the robber. Mrs.
Elwyn spoke as if she were in jest, but there was earnest-
ness under the playful tone and manner.

“Whom do I rob?” asked Delia, half hurt, and yet half
amused.

“First, you rob yourself of the peace which a more
brave and trustful spirit would bring. Then yow rob
those arownd you of comfort, like a weak swimmer
who is clinging to and dragging down the friend who is
struggling onward beside him. You are doing your best
to make others uneasy. Thirdly, you rob your children
of the example of a bright and trustful mother; and then,
worst of all, you rob God of the glory which is given to
Him by those who show by cheerful submission that they
really believe Him to be all Wisdom and Love.”

“But are not weak health, constant pain, separation
from “what one loves best—enough to break down the
‘spirit ?” sighed Delia,
SONGS IN THE NIGHT. 163

“Quite enough to try its powers of endurance, and the
strength of its faith,” said her friend. “But the Lord can
bear, and does bear, His children through all. I think
that one of the most beautiful names of God is that
mentioned in the Book of Job, Who giveth songs in the
night. It is easy enough to sing in the fresh morning, to
sing in the bright clear noon—any twittering sparrow can
let its voice be heard in the sunshine. But the bird that
we care most to hear is, that whose note sounds through
the darkness; and doubtless the angels, as well as the
Lord of angels, listen with most pleasure to the patient
sufferer’s songs in the night of affliction.”

“T cannot take troubles easily as some people can,” said
Delia.

“T scarcely think that you try very hard to do s0,”
observed her frank friend. “I remember, when you were
a little girl, going to see you when you were ill. More
than a dozen years have passed since then, yet the scene
is as fresh in my mind as if it had happened but yesterday.
There were you, sitting up in your little bed, with the
tears rolling down your cheeks, the very picture of misery;
and there stood your poor mother beside you, with a cup
of physic in her hand, vainly trying to coax the spoilt
young monkey to take it. ‘I’ve been trying for the last
half-hour to persuade her to drink it!’ said your mother,
‘I’d soon make her drink it!’ cried I. Encouraged by
my presence, your mother made her twentieth attempt to
put the cup to your lips. With a louder burst of crying
you dashed it away—the precious stuff went all over the
pretty new coverlet and your mother’s silk dress! I could
not help laughing—I could not!” and Mrs. Elwyn leant
back in her chair and indulged in mirth so infectious that
it drew a smile even from Delia.

“A few days afterwards,” continued Mrs. Elwyn, when:
she had had out her laugh, “I had to administer a very dis-
164 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



agreeable dose to my Hal—you know that he is some years
younger than you are. I saw that the poor little man’s
heart went sorely against swallowing the physic. But
I bad only to say, ‘Mother wishes you to take it,
and he gulped it down like a hero; and then, though
his eyes were brimming with tears, my boy looked
up into my face with a smile. You may be sure that
the child had his kiss, and a good big sugar-plum
besides.”

Delia’s wan face looked almost mirthful. “You see that
I recovered in spite of my naughtiness,” said she.

“You hada great deal more pain, and your poor mother
a great deal more trouble than would have been the case
had you won a victory over yourself,” said her friend. “It
is just the same thing now; you suffer fifty times as much
as you would if you were not always thinking and lament-
ing over your troubles. You look at them through the
telescope of your fears, as if it were a satisfaction to make
them appear larger and nearer. But I daresay, my poor
dear child, that you have had enough of my scolding for
to-day.”

“T could bear anything from you,” said Delia, “for you
scold me because you love me. But Theresa was so very
unkind.”

“There are different ways of treating a patient,”
observed Mrs. Elwyn, playfully, “we may tease, coddle, or
scold. Theresa, Lady Laurie, and I have tried blister,
salve, and tonic, all, perhaps, useful in their way. But
jesting apart, dear child, I do wish that you would make
the wrestling against fear a matter both of prayer and
practice. You may never have to endure what a Paul
endured, but you may seek to meet smaller sufferings in
his spirit of fearless faith. Did you ever hear of a
Christian coward? Do not the two terms seem to involve
a, contradiction ?”
SONGS IN THE NIGHT. 165



Delia faintly smiled, then observed, “But one might
have—a nervous Christian.”

Mrs. Elwyn gave her little peculiar laugh. “I don't
like your nice distinctions,” she said; “I call a spade a
spade. Cowards now-a-days speak of their nerves, and
peevish folk of their sensitive feelings. But, before we
have done with this subject, let me give you a good
anecdote which I heard the other day, because it bears on
the religious side of the question. A woman told what
comfort she had found in the text, What tame I am
afraid I will trust in Thee. ‘I know one still better,
observed an old Christian beside her, ‘J will trust and
not be afraid.” ,

“T doubt that I shall ever get beyond the first text,”
said Delia, but in a tone no longer dismal.

“Get to the first as a stepping-stone to the second,”
said Mrs. Elwyn, and she closed the conversation with a
motherly kiss.

That conversation had done the young invalid good.
Delia had not hitherto recognised that there was selfish-
ness in her constant complaining, and that her fears sprang
partly from unbelief, and a rebelling against God’s will.
She had regarded as simple weakness not to be overcome
that which her friend now showed her to be connected
with sin. Delia made a humble, prayerful resolve that,
she would try, at least through the Sunday, not to weep,
or sigh, or complain ; as for the terrible Monday, she must
not let her thoughts dwell more than she could possibly
help upon that.

Delia’s effort brought its own reward. Mrs. Elwyn’s
tonic was not without its effect. That lady did her best
to cheer and amuse the mind of her guest, sometimes by
playful jest, sometimes by recalling early days, but leaven-
ing even common talk with the piety which blended with
all that she said or did. Delia actually spent a more
166 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



peaceful Sabbath than she had done since leaving India;
she did, at least in part, lay her burden of cares and fears
at the feet of her Lord.

The Monday came, the day so dreaded. It was begun
with Bible reading and prayer. Delia indeed trembled
violently as the surgeon entered the room, and pressed
very hard the hand of Mrs. Elwyn, which she held in her
own. But, as the surgeon had promised, the operation
was perfectly painless, from the effect of chloroform given
before it took place. Delia knew nothing of what was
passing, till she awoke from her artificial sleep to see the
friendly face of Mrs. Elwyn smiling kindly upon her.

“ All over, dear, and well over. The bitter draught has
been bravely taken, and here is the sugar-plum now.”
An envelope was pressed into the hand of the almost
bewildered Delia. When she opened it she found that it
contained a £50 cheque from “a loving old friend.”

Notwithstanding weakness and pain, the spirits of Delia
Smith rose wonderfully on that evening. It was such a
relief to look back upon instead of forward to a great
trial. The light of hope shone upon her now. Mrs.
Elwyn promised that before many days her young friend
should have all her children around her again, and that
when Delia should be strong enough to travel all the
party should go to the seaside together. Hven anxiety on
account of Lieutenant Smith was lessened, a telegram
mentioning that bis company was stationed at a place
where there was comparatively little danger.

“You will see him again, doubtless, when the war is
over,” said the ever hopeful Mrs. Elwyn, “and how happy
you will all be together !”

With a spirit full of thankful peace the invalid fell
asleep in her luxurious room on the night of that to her
eventful Monday.

Delia was suddenly awakened by a clap of thunder.
SONGS IN THE NIGHT. 167



The sultry weather of the preceding week had been
followed by a storm. The rain was pattering on the
window, the lightning flashes were shining through the
blinds, and the rolling, rattling peals which followed
sounded awful to the nervous invalid.

Delia’s first impulse was to spring from her bed in
terror, but this the state of her poor bandaged knee put
out of the question. She was then inclined to scream out
for help, for Delia had always hitherto given way to her
alarms when a thunder-storm was raging. But the timid
lady had just been learning a new lesson in the school of
Faith. She had won her first victory over fear, and every
such triumph makes the next one more easy. Was it not
her Heavenly Father who sent the thunder, and were not
the lightnings at His command? Delia trembled, but
she did not call out. She was struggling to keep down
her fears; and to help herself in the struggle she repeated
aloud, once and again, “J will trust, and not be afraid.”

“Well done, Delia, well done, my brave child!”
exclaimed Mrs. Elwyn, who, having been herself aroused
from sleep by the storm, had come to soothe the alarm of
her more timid companion. “You have made a noble
beginning. You are learning to trust and to glorify God,
and He has given you a song in the night.”
CHAPTER XXT.
MISSIONARY TRIALS.

“WELL, Harold, have you had a bad time of it? Have
the boys been bullying you about having the Hindu
in the house?” inquired Ida, as on that Monday
Harold with his satchel of books returned from his
school.

“Things turned out better than I had expected,”
replied Harold. He laid down his satchel, threw off his
cap, and passed his handkerchief over his heated brow.
“ How close and sultry it is!” he observed; “I think that
we'll have a thunder-storm to-night.”

“ Just tell me all that passed,” said Ida.

“There’s not much to tell,” said Harold. “Tom, and
one or two others, made themselves a little disagreeable,
that’s all. Tom, you must know, is a would-be wit. He
asked me if I had ever heard the fable of the wise little
_ man, who saw a black snake lying frozen on the road, and
took it up to warm and cherish it in bis bosom. Tom was
talking nonsense; he meant to bully me and make me
angry, for of course the black snake was Prem Dds. Then
others joined, and I nearly lost my temper, when in the
midst of the row, in came Dr. Bullen.”

“His words were what pained you most last week.”

“T suspect that the Doctor was sorry for having spoken
them. Our master’s a bit quick and hasty, but he’s kind
and just in the long run. Says he, ‘What’s all this
about?’ So the fellows hung back a little, till Tom

168
MISSIONARY TRIALS. 169



plucked up courage and said, ‘Lady Laurie has taken the
black nigger into her house.’

“*Tady Laurie has a perfect right to receive whom she
pleases, said the Doctor. ‘Unless any boy here has a
fancy to taste the cane, there will not be another word
said here on the subject. This was enough, for the
Doctor always means what he says. We all went off to
our classes as quiet as mice.”

Here Robin burst boisterously into the room. He had
lent his Sunday picture-book to Harold; he knew for what
purpose it was wanted, and the child came rushing eagerly
to know the result of his brother’s first attempt to convert
a Hindu.

“Did you get up early,—did you show my book, did
you talk to Prem Das?” cried Robin eagerly. He would
not have needed to ask the question if he had not himself
been sent off at sunrise with a servant to a farm where -
hay-making was going on,—a long promised treat, which
had prevented his seeing Harold at breakfast.

“Ves, I did get up,—I did show your book, at least the
picture of the birth of our Lord, and I read from my Urdu
Testament, and tried to explain the story.”

Lady Laurie, who had been sitting at her desk, engaged
in writing to Delia, put down her pen, turned round on
her chair, and listened with interest to the conversation
between the two brothers. Harold’s grave manner con-
trasted with the animation of his little companion’s.

“Was not Prem Das glad that the Lord came down and
was a babe to save poor Hindus as well as us?”

“T do not think that he was glad, I do not think that
he cared,” replied Harold, who was not a little disappointed
at the indifference shown by the native of India,

“Did he not understand what you said?” asked the
wondering Robin, who thought that to hear would be to
believe.
170 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



“He understood my words well enough,” said Harold ;
but it seemed as if I were telling him a story with which
he himself had nothing to do. Prem Das said that we
were good people, that the Sahib’s religion was very good,
but he evidently was only speaking to please me. The
Hindu seemed to me like a fish told to join the birds
flying in the air above him: ‘Very nice birds, very nice
thing to fly up in the air; but I’d rather keep down in
my own dirty pond.’”

“Prem Das is a bad man!” said Robin with decision.

“You’re a little hard upon him, Robin. But I see
that it’s of no use at all speaking to him about religion.”

“You have come to that decision rather hastily, my
son,” observed Lady Laurie. “If missionaries were so
easily discouraged, we should very seldom indeed hear of
conversions.”

“T thought that the heathen were longing to be taught
the truth,” said Ida, joming in the conversation. How
often we sing—

‘They call us to deliver
Their land from error’s chain.’”

“That is to say, the knowledge of their need, of their
misery, of their danger, acts as a call,” replied Lady
Laurie. “But I have heard missionaries say that the
utter carelessness regarding their own souls shown by
many of the poor heathen, is one of the sorest trials of
those who bear the Gospel to them. Your own dear
father wrote to me, ‘ We carry them light, but they close
their eyes; we offer them freedom,—they hug their
chains. They are often delighted to see us, but they
would be better pleased if we left our Bibles behind us.
Oh: the sorrow to feel that though we are welcomed, the
Master is rejected ; that the messenger may be loved, but
that how few care for the message.’ ”
MISSIONARY TRIALS. ~ V7



“Can this state of dead indifference last long!”
exclaimed Harold.

“Sometimes month after month, and year after year.”

“T wonder that the missionaries stay amongst such
people!” said Robin.

“What! should they forget the encouraging words,
Your labour is not in vain in the Lord. Be not weary
im well-doing. They who sow in tears shall reap in joy.
The harvest will come at last, though the hands that
scattered the good seed may not be the ones to gather in
the sheaves; the glorious time will come when they who
sow and they who reap shall rejoice together in Heaven.”

“St. Paul had not this trial of patience,” said Harold,
“ He seems to have had converts wherever he went.”

“And yet these converts were but as the few compared
with the many who were hardened,” observed Lady
Laurie. “For one believer over whom St. Paul rejoiced .
over how many unbelievers he must have sorrowed. The
missionary who would tread in the footsteps of the great
Apostle must be prepared to face disappointment as well as
hardship, to exercise not only zeal, but very great
patience.”

“T don’t think I’ll ever be one then!” cried Robin,
“there’s nothing I hate like waiting. Why does God let
the poor missionaries have their patience so tried ?”

“What are all the mysterious reasons for the Gospel’s
spreading gradually, instead of at once flooding the earth,
as the waters cover the sea, we cannot know in this life,”
answered his mother. “We can, however, understand that
Satan is very powerful, and does not readily yield up his
kingdom. But God even brings good out of evil. The
missionaries themselves learn precious lessons through
their very trials of faith.”

Harold. What lessons do they learn, mother, by having
to wait so long for success ?
172 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.

Lady L. They learn their own weakness, Harold; they
learn that real conversion of souls is the work of God’s
Holy Spirit, without whose aid all eloquence, all effort, all
zeal and courage will not prevail to save asingle soul. Many
workers are drawn nearer to God and prayer by the very
difficulties that beset them.

Harold looked very thoughtful; through the boy’s mind
had often passed the thought—‘“TI will be a missionary,
like my father.” The idea of possible danger had been
rather attractive to the youth’s bold, impetuous spirit,
and to be in the forefront of a glorious battle against the
powers of evil had excited his imagination. Nothing
could be grander than to tread in the steps of St. Paul,
and to leave, like him, a mark upon the world. But all
this waiting and watching for souls was a hard test of
devotion to Harold; his own failure, when he had tried to
impress the mind of Prem Dds, made him realise more of
the difficulty of the work. Harold became aware also that
he had undertaken to teach religion toa Hindu in rather
a spirit of presumption. He knew himself to be quick
and clever in the Urdu language; he was aware that
Prem Das regarded his chhota sahib with grateful admira-
tion; and Harold had imagined it to be an easy matter to
convert one poor ignorant man. The young evangelist had
not even remembered to ask that the Holy Spirit might
open the heart of Prem Das. Of his own weakness young
Hartley had not even thought. He had forgotten that
the acorn does not grow up at once into an oak, and that
it requires God’s sunshine and rain to make it do so
at all.

“What are you thinking about?” said Robin, looking
up into the grave face of his brother. '

Harold did not reply to the question, but, turning to
Lady Laurie, asked abruptly,

“ Are there never any quick conversions ?”
MISSIONARY TRIALS. 173





“Thank God! there sometimes are,” replied the lady.
“We shall read of one this evening that, by its sudden-
ness and thoroughness, perhaps surprised St. Paul him-
self. Missionaries have their glad surprises as well as
their weary watchings; and we can well believe that
many more await them in a better world. There they
may find that seed which they thought had fallen by the
wayside and perished had taken root, when they deemed
it lost, and that souls of whose conversion they had
despaired are amongst those whom the Lord will receive
as His own when He cometh to make up His jewels.

RS PES
CHAPTER XXII.
THE JAILOR OF PHILIPPI.

Ida. WE left St. Paul and his companions with kind, good
Lydia, whose heart the Lord had opened.

Lady L. Let us begin our reading from the sixteenth
verse of the sixteenth chapter of Acts.

Reading.

And it came to pass, as we went to prayer, a certain
damsel possessed with a spirit of divination met us, which
brought her masters much gain by soothsaying: the same
followed Paul and us, and cried, saying, These men are
the servants of the most high God.

Robin. Mother, what does this mean? I do not under-
stand it.

Lady L. This poor afflicted slave-girl was one of those
of whom we read in the Bible as being possessed by a
wicked spirit. This made her utterances strange; and,
doubtless, the devil, through her lips, spoke many things
which by herself she could not have spoken. Satan’s
craft and knowledge exceed those of mortal men. Thus
the ignorant people, astonished at the slave’s unnatural
cleverness, supposed her to be inspired—probably by their
suppositious god Apollo. They gave money to know the
future from the girl, just as some foolish people now give
money to have their fortunes told by gipsies, or others
who pretend to know things which God has hidden
from us.

174
THE JAILOR OF PHILIPPI, 175



Harold. But do not some people think that the girl
was only mad ?

Lady L. If we keep to the plain, simple words of Scrip-
ture, we cannot think so, Harold. This is by no means
the first place in the Bible where we read of persons pos-
sessed by devils.

Robin. Ah! I know. There were ever so many devils
in one poor man, and they went out into the swine, and all
the swine were so much frightened that they jumped down
a steep bank, and were every one drowned in the sea.

Lady L. It is clear that the madness of a human being
could not by any possibility be transferred at once to
thousands of animals. It is very dangerous to try to
explain away miracles; we have simply to believe what
the Scripture tells us.

Robin. But why did the bad spirit tell the truth about
St. Paul and the rest?

Lady L. You remember that devils did the same about
our Lord. He would not receive their witness, but com-
manded them to be silent.

Harold. Perhaps the devils bore witness to Christ, that
people might say, as we know that some wickedly said
that He performed His miracles by the help of Satan.

Reading.

And this she did many days. But Paul, being grieved,
turned and said to the spirit, I command thee in the name
of Jesus Christ to come out of her. And he came out the
same hour.

Robin. Don’t you think that the slave-girl was glad ?

Lady L. The relief to the poor creature must have been
great. But her worldly masters, who had cared nothing
for her misery, were very angry when they found that she
could no longer give such answers as those which the bad
spirit had prompted. Furious and eager for revenge on
176 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



those who had interfered with their wicked gains, these
masters caught Paul and Silas, and drew them into the
market place, and brought them to the magistrates, saying,
these men, being Jews, do exceedingly trouble our city,
and teach customs which it is not lawful for us to receive,
neither to observe, being Romans.

Harold. The masters then did not accuse the mission-
aries of casting out devils.

Lady L. No, that would have been no accusation at all,
no one openly takes part with the devil, though, alas!
many secretly do so. These bad masters stirred up the
ignorant people, who raised a great tumult in Philippi.
The worthless magistrates of that city seem to have taken
no trouble to inquire whether the charge laid against the
Christians were true or false. They were quite ready to
sentence innocent men to shame and agony, to satisfy a
furious howling mob. Paul and Silas appear to have been
given no opportunity of speaking a word in self-defence,
They were dragged to the whipping post; their clothes
torn from their backs, and such a frightful flogging was
inflicted, that to read a description of this Roman punish-
ment almost makes one shudder.

Robin. Oh! I hope that St. Paul and his friend were
then allowed to go free.

Lady L. No; more sufferings were in store for them
Let us read from the 23rd verse.

Reading.

And when they had laid many stripes upon them, they
cast them into prison, charging the jailor to keep them
safely. Who, having received such a charge, thrust them
into the inner prison, and made their feet fast in the
stocks.

Robin. The jailor was a wicked, cruel man to treat them
like that.
THE JAILOR OF PHILIPPI, 177



Ida. After their scourging St, Paul and Silas must have
been in a terrible state.

Lady L. Doubtless, with their poor backs bare, bruised,
and bleeding. Think what these two holy men must have
suffered, left in darkness, with their feet so fastened in
the stocks that they could neither stand, nor sit, nor even
lie down in comfort. I doubt whether any one had the
mercy to bring the wounded missionaries so much as a
drop of water.

Robin. I don’t like to hear of such good men being so
wretched. They could not even go to sleep when they
were in such pain,

Lady L. And when they could not sleep, what think
you they did?

Robun. They could not do anything but cry and groan.

Ida. Robin, you forget,—they could pray.

Lady L. They were given grace to do more than pray.
Reads—And at midnight Paul and Silas prayed, and sang
praises unto God, and the prisoners heard them.

Robin. Oh! brave men, to sing in the night! I should
not wonder if God sent an angel to help them, as He did
to St. Peter.

Lady L. God sent help, but not by an angel.

Reading.

And suddenly there was a great earthquake, so that the
foundations of the prison were shaken; and immediately
all the doors were opened, and every one’s bonds were
loosed. And the keeper of the prison, awaking out of his
sleep, and seeing the prison doors open, he drew out his
sword, and would have killed himself, supposing that the
prisoners had been fled.

Robin. And if they had fled, why should he kill him-
self ?

Lady L. Because the law of the Romans was that, in

M
178 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



case of a prisoner escaping, the guard in whose charge he
had been left should be put to death.

Robin. I do not pity that eruel jailor.

Lady L. But St. Paul did. The loving Apostle could
not bear to see the despairing man destroy himself body
and soul. He cried with a loud voice, “Do thyself no
harm, for we are all here!”

Reading.

Then he called for a light, and sprang in, and came
trembling, and fell down before Paul and Silas, and
brought them out and said, Sirs, what must I do to be
saved! And they said, Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ,
and thou shalt be saved, and thy house.

Harold. How glad we are that the jailor asked that
great question, the question for us all, that we might
have a clear straightforward answer from an inspired
apostle !

Lady L. They are words to be written in letters of gold.

fobin. But how did the jailor change so quickly? He
was a bad man; could he be turned into a good one just
in a moment ?

Harold. Paul’s own change had been as quick.

Robin. Yes, but Paul saw the Lord, His very self, and
the jailor only felt the earthquake.

Lady L. The jailor’s conversion was indeed a miracle of
grace, God’s spirit suddenly changing his nature. But we
must remember, Robin, that there were other things to
strike the jailor as well as the earthquake. He had seen
the holy patience of the saints, he may have even heard
words of truth from their lips; he may, ere he fell asleep,
have listened to their hymns. Evidently the jailor felt
that God had sent the great earthquake on the missionaries’
account, so he recognised the peteouted prisoners as the
chosen messengers of God.
— =e z=
ee Z

SSS

SSE
LE BELLLLE GE

tard oie EE

SS

or ——SS—S—=——
= SSS.











































”

“Do thyself no harm, for we are all here,
THE JAILOR OF PHILIPPI. 179



Harold. And so was ready to believe whatever they
told him.

Lady L. There is a beautiful story in English history, of
which that of the jailor reminds me. We read that the
first British martyr, whose name was Albans, was like Paul
and Silas, condemned to undergo the terrible Roman
scourging, because he refused to burn incense to a false
God. No doubt the Briton endured the agony with
patience and courage. The sufferer, fresh from this
torture, was again commanded to burn the incense, but
firm in faith, again refused to do so. Then the Roman
ruler ordered the executioner, doubtless the same man
who had scourged Albans, to strike off his head. But the
holy bearing of the Christian had been the means of
converting the executioner himself. The man would not
obey the cruel command, but prayed that he might die
instead of Albans, or with him. The latter request was
granted, and the converted executioner died, as the
converted jailor had lived, believing on the Lord Jesus
Christ.

Harold. That is indeed a beautiful story.

Lady I. The executioner had only one way of showing
the great change in his soul, that of dying a martyr.
The jailor at once gave proof that he had been born again
of the Spirit. The hard heart of the man had at once
become soft. He had thrust his prisoners into the inner-
most dungeon, and put their feet in the stocks; now he
took them the same hour of the night, and washed their
stripes.

Robin. Where did he take them, Mother ?

Lady L. Apparently to his own house, which may have
formed a part of the prison buildings. The jailor seems,
in the dead of the night, to have called his family and
household together.

Robin. Perhaps the earthquake had roused them all up.
180 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Lady L. To that little congregation the brethren
preached the Word of the Lord, and with such effect that
every one was baptised! Then meat was set before the
apostles, and they and their converts rejoiced together, for
the jailor, and all his house, believed in the Lord.

Ida. What a night for St. Paul and Silas! The first half
spent in pain, and the second in preaching and praising !

Harold. It was a night that they would remember with
joy all their lives; a night that they must remember
in heaven.

Robin. I hope that the Bible tells us a great deal more
about that jailor. I want to hear whether he was turned
out of his place, or beaten, or killed, in the morning.

Lady L. I am sorry that St. Luke has told nothing
more of ‘this penitent man ; not even his name. I hardly
think the Romans would keep him as a jailor when they
knew him to be a Christian. We only feel sure that he
remained a member of that faithful Philippian Church, to
whom St. Paul, from another prison, addressed one of his
most beautiful letters, overflowing with kindness and love.

~ CS aa CHAPTER XXIIL
THE STORM.

THE same storm which on that Monday night startled
Delia from sleep in London, passing on, burst with greater
violence on the district in which Willowdale lay.

Since Delia’s children had come to Lady Laurie’s home,
Robin had shared his brother’s little room in the attic,
which was lighted by a small diamond-paned window,
sheltered by the projecting eaves of the gable-end roof.
A still smaller inner. room, to reach which it was needful °
to pass through Harold’s, was occupied by Prem Dés. For
the sake of air during the summer heat the door between
the two attic rooms was left open, as was also the diamond-
shaped casement.

A brilliant flash, which for an instant made the attic
almost as light as day, was followed by a peal in the clouds
above, which awakened both of the Hartleys.

“T say, what a crash!” exclaimed Robin, starting up in
his bed. “ Halloa, Robin; you’re not frightened!” cried
Harold.

“No; at least, not much,” replied Robin, who was a
truthful child.

“Just wait till I shut the window; it’s raining and |
blowing like mad,” cried Harold, “then T’ll come and sit
down beside you.”

Harold tried with all his force to shut the window; the
fierce wind seemed determined to thwart his design.
Robin watched with uneasiness while the flashes seemed

181
182 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.

at one instant to light up his brother’s auburn hair with
a golden glory, then left the room in midnight darkness.

“Come back, Harold! Come back!” cried Robin.
“The lightning may strike you—blind you—kill you !”

“There—done! Bolted in spite of the wind!” exclaimed
Harold. Vain boast! The blast had its own way, and
would not be bolted out. It blew in the window, frame
and all, the instant after Harold had left it; and the floor
was strewn with fragments of wood and glass. Robin could
not refrain from a cry of childish alarm.

“No keeping out the rain, now!” cried Harold. “Come
here, Robin, we must sit in a more sheltered part of the
room. Poor little chap; are you trembling?” he said, as
Robin came and nestled close to his brother.

“T am thinking of Paul and Silas, and of the earth-
quake at night,” said Robin who, like Delia, was bravely
battling with fear. “Don’t you think that an earthquake
would be more terrible than even such a storm as this ?”

“T think so,” was Harold’s reply.

“But Paul and Silas were not frightened,” said Robin,
blinking as the lightning flashed in his eyes; “they trusted
in God, and nothing could hurt them; “ but, still,” added
the child in a less courageous tone, “ good people might be
struck by lightning, you know.”

“It would be a short way of going to heaven; some-
thing like Elijah’s chariot of fire,” observed Harold; “but
you need not be afraid of being struck now, my boy;
there’s no chance of lightning doing much harm in the
midst of such pelting rain.”

“Look at Prem Das—look!” cried Robin, who had
caught a glimpse of the Hindu in the momentary light.
Harold vainly peered into the darkness which had suc-
ceeded the flash.

“T saw him—didn’t he look frightened; just like the
jailor, you know, Perhaps he’ll be running in here,
THE STORM. 183



crying ” Robin’s voice was drowned in a peal of
thunder.

“What’s he saying, Harold?” continued the child, when
his voice could again be heard.

“He is crying out, ‘Ram! Ram! Rém!’”

“What does that mean?” asked Robin.

“Prem Das is calling on the name of one of his false
gods.”

“Oh! that’s wicked—that’s dreadfully wicked!” cried
Robin.

“He knows no better,” remarked Harold.

“Then why don’t you tell him, why don’t you tell
him!” cried the child, who had quite forgotten his own
alarm. “Can’t you go to him and say, Believe on the Lord
Jesus Christ, and thow shalt be saved.”

“Robin is more of a missionary than I am,” thought
Harold, half amused, half rebuked by the zeal of his.
young companion. “Come here, Prem Das!” Harold
cried to the Hindu in the Urdu tongue.

The native obeyed, and came shivering quite as much
from cold as from fear, for the storm had cooled the air,
and the Oriental’s light garb and bare feet were not
suited to the changes of an English climate.

Prem Dds crouched down upon a dry part of the floor,
close to where Harold and Robin were seated on a little bed
which they had dragged beyond the reach of the rain.

“Prem Das, you are afraid because you know not what
will become of your soul after death,” said Harold. “We
have all done many wrong things, every one of us, and if
we fear that our souls ” Harold paused suddenly,
and said in English, “Oh, I don’t believe that the poor
fellow knows what I mean by a soul!”

“Don’t talk about souls, then,” said Robin; “just tell him
mother’s favourite verse, Jesus Christ came into the world
to save sinners.”




184 “PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Harold repeated the verse slowly twice in Urdu.
Whether the words conveyed any idea to the dark mind of
the Hindu could not at the time be known, for the door
opened, and Lady Laurie in her dressing-gown was seen
for a moment by the light of the lamp which she carried
in her hand, but the lamp was almost instantly blown out
by the wind.

“Come downstairs, my dear boys, come down,” cried the
lady, who had been alarmed by the sound of the crash;
but was relieved to find that the only mischief done was
to the window. “ You cannot stay here in the wind and
rain. Gather up such wraps as are dry; we'll make
the dining-room into a sleeping-room for you.”

“May not Prem Das come too?” asked Robin.

“ Certainly,” replied Lady Laurie; “we would not leave
the poor fellow up here exposed to the storm.”

After a vigorous hunt for slippers and clothes on the
part of the boys, the party felt their way down the dark
staircase till they reached the lighted part of the house.
Lady Laurie rekindled her lamp from that kept in the
room assigned as a nursery to Delia’s children. Lady
Laurie then led the way to the ground floor of the
house,

“Mother, Prem Das was praying to a false God in the
storm,” said Robin, whose hand was in that of the lady.
“Should we not pray to the true God to change his
heart, like the jailor’s?”

“We will pray, my dain replied Lady Laurie,
touched to see that even in the midst of such a tempest,
her boy was full of the subject of the Hindu’s conversion.

Harold said nothing, but he felt all the more. “What
if the lightning had struck that poor heathen,” thought
he. “Prem Dés is not ready to die; and thousands,
millions, tens of millions are in the same darkness as he.”
Solemnly on that night of storm and tempest came on the
THE STORM. 185



soul of the English boy the closing words of his father’s
last letter, as if it were a dying command, “Pray for
India, hope for India, and work for India, my sons.”

The impression had not lost its vividness on the follow-
ing morning, when Harold awoke rather late after a night
so broken. The storm had sunk into peace; it had left
the sky brighter, the air fresher; all Nature revived ; every
spray seemed to be hung with glittering diamonds.

“ Will it be thus after this frightful mutiny in India?”
thought Lady Laurie; “will the storm bring a deeper
calm, the bitter trial a richer blessing! ”

The post brought a letter from Mrs. Elwyn, which was
read aloud at the breakfast table. It gave the welcome
news that the trial which poor Mrs. Smith had so
dreaded was happily over. “My young friend was very
good, and did her best to bear up bravely,” wrote
Mrs Elwyn, which caused glances of surprise to be -
exchanged between Ida and Harold.

As the next day would be Lady Laurie’s birthday, her
family were secretly preparing for her a pleasant surprise.
Pocket-money had been collected to buy what was to Ida
and the boys a beautiful work of art, a plaster cast of the
well-known figure of the infant Samuel praying. Harold
had seen this image in one of the few shops of which Fore-
ham could boast. It was to be bought, and placed on a
little platform of moss encircled with flowers, and so be set
on the breakfast-table on Wednesday morning, with a suit-
able birthday “Round Robin.” Harold had the charge of
making the purchase and secretly bringing the present
home, and was nearly late for school in talking over
arrangements with Ida and his brother.

“Tt is so nice to do anything for some one we love!”
said Robin, as he thrust two big pennies into the hand of
Harold. Young Hartley took the money and ran off to
school, trying to make up by speed for delay. As Robin
186 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.

turned back, he saw Prem Das standing in the porch with
one of the children.

“TI wish that I could do something for poor Bearer,”
thought Robin to himself; “but I can’t even tell him that
it’s naughty to say ‘R&ém! R4m!’ Perhaps, when I grow
to be a man, I will go out to India myself, and then I’ll
say to every native that I meet what St. Paul said to the
jailor.”
CHAPTER XXIV.
ST. PAUL AT ATHENS.

“JT want so much to hear if Paul and Silas got into more
trouble in the morning,” said Robin, as he placed the
Bible before Lady Laurie, and found out the right place
in the Book of Acts.

“Not from the magistrates,” said the lady. “They had
either been alarmed at the earthquake, or, what is perhaps
more likely, were afraid of being called to account by those
in authority over them for cruelly punishing men con-
victed of no crime, merely to please a rude mob. The .
Romans had a sense of justice, and such an act of tyranny
as these officials had been guilty of might bring them into
high disgrace with their rulers. The magistrates thought
that their safest course would be to hush up the matter
and send the prisoners quietly away. So the magistrates
sent orders to the jail that the Christians should be
allowed to go free.”

Robin. Was not the jailor very glad ?

Lady L. reads—And the keeper of the prison told this
saying to Paul, The magistrates have sent to let you go;
therefore depart and go in peace. But Paul said, They
have beaten us openly uncondemned, being Romans, and
have cast us into prison, and now do they thrust us out
privily? Nay, verily, but let them come themselves and
fetch us out.

Robin. I never thought St. Paul would tell a lie! He
was not a Roman, but a Jew.

Lady L. Do not judge hastily, Robin. You do not

187
188 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.

know the custom of giving what is called the freedom of
cities, a custom which prevails even to this day. A man
may be made a citizen of a place which he has never even
seen. I believe that our dear Queen’s husband has thus
been made a citizen of London, though he was born and
brought up in Germany. Sometimes the Romans be-
stowed the honour of citizenship upon a colony, sometimes
on individuals. There is no doubt that St. Paul was
owned by the Romans themselves to be a fellow-citizen,
though he was known to be a Jew by race, and by
birth a native of Tarsus. Is there not something of which
this reminds you regarding the privileges of Christians ?

Ida. Yes, mamma; they are citizens of the New Jeru-
salem, of that city whose builder and maker is God.

Harold. Perhaps it is wrong to think so, but was there
not a little of pride and anger in the reply of St. Paul?

Lady L. Certainly of indignation against base and cruel
injustice. But I think that St. Paul may have had an
important object before him when he returned that stern
answer to these men. He would have them careful not to
exercise upon others the tyranny and injustice from which
he and his friend had suffered so much. Reads— And
the serjeants told these words unto the magistrates, and
they feared when they heard that they were Romans.” It
was a very serious offence in the sight of the law to beat a
Roman citizen uncondemned.

Ida reads—And they came and-brought them out, and
desired them to depart out of the city. And they went
out of the prison, and entered into the house of Lydia;
and when they had seen the brethren, they comforted
them and departed.

Robin. How sorry, how very sorry Lydia and the rest of
the good people must have been to see them go away, but
especially the jailor !

Lady L. Now let us all have a look at the map. You
































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































AED
a

oe






































ST. PAUL AT ATHENS. 189





see that the missionaries are still in Macedonia; but
passing to the south-west through two more cities, where
they do not seem to have made much stay, they arrive at
Thessalonica, where was a synagogue of the Jews.

Harold. If these are Jews, there is sure to be trouble
for Paul.

Lady L. And yet here, as at other places, St. Paul
seems to have made it his first object to go amongst his
own people. From his Epistle to the Romans we see how
his loving heart yearned over his brethren, his “ kinsmen
according to the flesh.” For them St. Paul writes in the
ninth chapter of that epistle, “I have great heaviness and
continual sorrow in my heart.” Again the Apostle writes,
and one could think that he wept as he put the words
down, “ Brethren, my heart’s desire and prayer to God for
Israel is, that they might be saved!”

Harold. One does admire this patriotism; one does
like a man to love his own country and people through ©
thick and thin! I was afraid that, as St. Paul was the
Apostle of the Gentiles, he would not care much for these
persecuting Jews.

Lady I. We see here that St. Paul at Thessalonica
for “three Sabbath days reasoned with them out of the
Scriptures, opening and alleging that Christ must needs
have suffered, and that this Jesus whom I preach to you
is Christ.”

Ida. No doubt St. Paul read to the Jews from the
prophecies of Isaiah, and those contained in the Psalms.

Robin. Were these good Jews; did they believe ?

Lady L. Some did, and some did not. A Church was
formed at Thessalonica, both of Jews and Greeks, and “ of
the chief women not a few.”

Robin. More good women like Lydia.

Ida. But I see that another riot is coming. St. Paul
and his friends seem never to be left long in peace.
190 PICTCRES OF ST. PAUL,

Reading.

But the Jews which believed not, moved with envy,
took unto them certain lewd fellows of the baser sort, and
gathered a company, and set all the city in an uproar, and
assaulted the house of Jason, and sought to bring them
out to the people.

Robin. Oh! Paul will be beaten again, or stoned by
that wicked mob!

Lady L. It seems as if the brethren had been carefully
hidden, for the furious people could not find them. The
mob, however, seized upon poor Jason, the master of the
house in which the missionaries had lodged, and drew him
and some of the brethren before the rulers. There was
the same false accusation made as had been brought for-
ward at Philippi, but the magistrates of Thessalonica
behaved better than those of the other Macedonian city,
Jason had to give security, and then he and his com-
panions were permitted to go free.

Ida. But they were not those whom the rabble specially
wished to attack. What became of St. Paul, Silas, Timothy,
and Luke ?

Lady L. They had to make their escape from the city
by night. The fierce spirit of persecution which had
been aroused in Thessalonica would have made staying
there an act of folly. The brethren had to obey the
command of their Lord: “ When they persecute you in
one city flee to another. Thus, by means of the rage of
its enemies, the Gospel was only carried further, and a
greater number of converts brought into the Church.

Harold. I see that the next place visited is Berea.

Robin. If there were Jews in that place, I should think
that St. Paul took good care not to go near them.

Lady L. On the contrary, he went at once into their
synagogue,




































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































ATHENS IN ITs GLORY,




ST. PAUL AT ATHENS. 191



Harold. Did he find these Jews like the rest ?
Lady L. There is something, as you will see, said to
the honour of the Jews of Berea.

Reading

These were more noble than those of Thessalonica, in that
they received the Word with all readiness of mind, and
searched the Scriptures daily whether these things were so.

Lady L. The result of this Bible reading was conversion;
we find that, “ Many of them believed; also of honourable
women, which were Greeks, and of men, not a few.”

Robin. So in this nice city St. Paul had some peace.

Lady L. No; it was his portion to be hunted like a
wild beast from city to city. His fierce enemies at Thes-
salonica heard of St. Paul’s preaching the Gospel at
Berea, and with unrelenting malice pursued him thither.
Again there was need for instant flight. St. Paul sped on °
his way to Athens.

Harold. So he visited that glorious old city, almost
more famous than Rome itself. How beautiful it must
have looked in these days, with all its temples, and
statues, and wonderful works of art.

Lady L. It is said that there were more statues in

_ Athens than in all the rest of Greece put together.

Harold. It was worth bearing a good deal of trouble to be
in Greece, the land of Homer, and to be amongst the
cleverest men, I suppose, that were at that time to be
found in the world. There would be a great deal to see
and hear, and enjoy in Athens.

Lady L. The triumphs of intellect, the beauties of art,
the disputes of philosophers, the eloquence of orators,
would have little charms for a man like St. Paul, whose
fixed purpose it was to “know nothing but Christ and
Him crucified.” The Apostle wandered about the beauti-
ful city, not to examine its curiosities, or to admire the
192 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



perfections of its sculptures, architecture, and paintings.
St. Paul saw more to make him sad than joyful. Reads—
His spirit was stirred in him when he saw the city wholly
given to idolatry. Therefore disputed he in the synagogue
with the Jews, and with the devout persons, and in the
market daily with them that met him.

Robin. He had not time to look at the sights.

Reading.

“Then certain of the philosophers of the Epicureans
and of the Stoics encountered him.”

Robin. What do those hard words mean ?

Lady L. The Epicureans and Stoics were men who
held very different views, the one from the other, about
what was the chief good of life. The Epicureans held that
it was pleasure, the Stoics declared that it was virtue. The
first indulged in various kinds of sin; the others were
puffed up with pride. Neither of these sects of so-called
philosophers were in the least likely to welcome the
Gospel, even when preached by St. Paul. These Athen-
ians seem to have met the Apostle, not with bitter hatred,
like the Jews, but in a mocking spirit. “What will this
babbler say ?” they cried.

Harold. I think that would be hardest to bear of all;
I would rather be hit than laughed at.

Lady L. But the curiosity of the gay, idle, gossipping
Athenians was roused. Reads—* For all the Athenians
and strangers which were there spent their time in nothing
else, but either to hear or to tell some new thing. And
they took him and brought him unto Areopagus, say-
ing, May we hear what this new doctrine which thou
speakest is ?

Robin. I suppose that that man with the long name
was a magistrate,

Lady L. Areopagus is not the name of a man at all,
but of many men, supposed to be the wisest in the city.


























Saees ett

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vou My,

















































































































































Sr. PAUL BEFORE THE AREOPAGUS.
ST. PAUL AT ATHENS. 193



Areopagus was the highest court in Athens, and held its
meetings at a place called Mars Hill) We see one pale,
worn, earnest, Christian Jew addressing the throng of
clever, self-satisfied, pleasure-loving Greeks, who are listen-
ing, partly from curiosity, partly to find something to
laugh at. Let us now read the noble speech which St. Paul
made to the mocking, curious Athenians, who thought
themselves cleverer than all the rest of the world. “Ye
men of Athens, I perceive that in all things ye are too
superstitious. For as I passed by, and beheld your
devotions, I found an altar with this inscription ‘To the



THe ALTAR AT ATHENS.

unknown God.’ Whom ye ignorantly worship, him declare
N
194 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



I unto you.” Without pause let us read the rest from

verse 24 to verse 31, and, as we do so, imagine the scene
on Mars Hill.

The rest of St. Paul’s Speech at Athens is read aloud.

Ida. Would it not make the Athenians angry to be
told at the very beginning that they were too super-
stitious ?

Lady L. No; for the words in the original Greek
convey no meaning of reproach. They may be translated
“very devout.” The Greeks were so ready to worship

-something, that in addition to their altars to various
deities, they raised one, as you have just heard, to the
Unknown God.

Harold. How strange it is that these Athenians should
begin to mock when they heard of the resurrection. ' That
would be the very last thing to mock at.

Lady L. The doctrine of the resurrection of the body
was one which the most learned and acute of these philo-
sophers could not understand, and what they could not
understand they were too proud to believe. There is much
of this spirit now in the world, my Harold. Some men,
who are esteemed philosophers, set up their views of
science, or what they call science, in opposition to revealed
religion.

Ida. But some of the cleverest philosophers who ever
lived have been pious men.

Lady L. Yes, thank God! there have been many
talented men not too vain to be wise. One of the grand-
est of philosophers, Sir Isaac Newton, described himself as
a child picking up pebbles beside the great ocean of truth.
It is not wisdom, but folly, that would make us believe
ourselves capable of draining that ocean ; it is not wisdom,
but folly, that would make a little child think himself able
to know all that his father knows. It is not wisdom, but
ST. PAUL AT ATHENS. 195





folly, that makes man, a finite creature, suppose that he
can grasp the infinite, and by his unaided powets under-
stand the mysteries of God.

Harold. If these men—these philosophers—would only
believe what they could understand, they could not have
believed that they themselves had souls; for, I suppose
that no one ever has known, or ever will know, how soul
and body are joined together.

Ida. Do you think that the cleverest of these clever
Greeks guessed that the world is round, or that the earth
goes round the sun?

Robin. Why, I know that.

Lady L. Because you benefit by the knowledge of many,
many generations who came before you; as a child on the
top of a house may see farther than the tallest man on the
ground. But the child has nothing to boast of; he did
not build the house.

Robun. The highest house that ever was built would not
make us able to see into heaven.

Harold. That’s not such a bad illustration, Robin. The
knowledge of man may enable him to build a house
of learning; but by all his philosophy he could not reach
as high as to understand the mysteries of God.

Ida. The Athenian philosophers who heard St. Paul did
not know about printing, or the telegraph——

Robm. Or clocks

Harold. Or the power of steam.

Lady L. Things now familiar to every schoolboy.

Robin. Their house was not such a very high house
after all.

Lady L. And yet they dared to laugh at truths which
for so many hundreds of years all God’s people have
rejoiced in! How truly saith the Scripture that the
wisdom of man is foolishness with God.

Ida. It seems to me that the wit and talent of these


196 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



vain Greeks was like the grand clouds which we noticed
last evening; so large, so high; but every minute
changing in shape. The Gospel which St. Paul preached
is like a rock which remains unchanged and firm after a
thousand years. Who would build on a cloud?

Harold. But don’t talk slightingly of talent, Ida.
Surely it is a good thing to be clever and learned, to have
even such wisdom as study can give.

Lady L. Yes, it is a good thing if such talent and learn-
ing be hallowed by the spirit of Faith, which devotes
earthly gifts to the service of God. Let science have its
right place. We all agree with Ida that we would not
build on a cloud; we would not build our hopes for
eternity on our knowledge of mathematics, geology, or
even that grand science that tells of the sun and the stars.
But the clouds have their place in the universe, and that
place is ahigh one. The light of the sun gives them tints
of exceeding beauty, and their mission is to water and
fertilise earth. So science is glorious, gilded by religion ;
and useful, when employed, as it so often is, for the benefit
of mankind.

Ida. But we could do better without all scientific
- discoveries put together, than without the knowledge of
that which St. Paul preached at Athens—the resurrection
of the dead.

Harold. Oh! without that knowledge what comfort
could we have when parted——-. Young Hartley did not
finish the sentence aloud; he thought of his beloved
father’s form lying far far away in a martyr’s bloody
grave.
CHAPTER XXV.
THE STUMBLING-BLOOK.

“Tus is my birthday!” thought Lady Laurie when first
she opened her eyes in the morning, awakened by the
beams of the rising sun, which came shining into her
room. She was alone, for Ida had stolen forth softly at
daybreak, taking care not to rouse her sleeping mother.

“ My birthday ; another mile-stone reached on the high
road of life. J am of the same age as was my blessed
Lord when He spent His last birthday on earth. Oh!
on what a life of spotless holiness, of blessed labour, He
could look back! His earthly course was nearly run;
Christ was not far from the hour when He could look up
to His Heavenly Father and say, I have finished the work
Thow gavest Me to do! But I—unprofitable servant !
feel as if, like the publican, I could only cry, Lord! have
mercy on me, a sinner! Could I but count all the sins
in thought, word, and deed, committed in these thirty-
three years, they would indeed appear as a burden too
heavy for me to bear. But this, and all other burdens,
T lay on my blessed Lord. His grace is sufficient for me;
His strength is made perfect in weakness.”

Lady Laurie arose, and partly dressed; but she was
still combing out her long, fair hair when the sound of
singing from below made her pause to listen. It was
caused by the voices of her three children singing a
birthday hymn below her window. Very sweet to her
was the sound, though poor Robin had little idea either of

197
198 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.

tune or time; he made up in heartiness for what he
lacked in music. Lady Laurie hastily put up her hair,
and before the song was over, went and threw open the
window. She looked down smilingly on the loving faces
that looked up to her from below. A chorus of “Happy
birthday!” was joined in by the two elder of Delia’s
children, who could hardly lisp out the words; for Prem
Das and his little charges were there to make the picture
complete.

A lovely picture it was to the eyes of the lady. She
retired from the window with a happy and grateful
heart.

“My children’s voices are sweet to me,” thought the
mother, “ whether tuneful or not; they are the tones of
love. And shall I not lift up my voice to Him who has
loaded me with undeserved blessings? shall I not tell my
Lord that 1 love Him who hath so tenderly loved me?
And what proof of love can I show—I who can do so
little, while others have done so much? I think of the
Lord’s charge to St. Peter, Peed My lambs—His lambs!
Oh! how delightful the thought! My precious girl, my
adopted boys, the poor little strangers whom the Shepherd
trusts to my care, my Sunday class of village children—
all are part of the Saviour’s flock, and He bids me feed
them. He bids me lead them to the fresh, pure fountain
of Truth, to the green pastures of Peace and Love. He
bids me guide them along the track marked by His blessed
foot-prints. Oh! Lord, give mé grace to be faithful;
grant the wisdom so specially needed by those who have
charge of Thy lambs!”

At the familiar sound of the bell for morning prayers,
Lady Laurie went down to the breakfast-room in which
they were always held; and never with a happier sense of
God’s goodness had she read the chapter, and led the
prayer.
THE STUMBLING-BLOOK. 199



Breakfast usually quickly followed morning devotions,
but the young party at Willowdale Lodge, for some reason
or other, were impatient to draw their mother into the
adjoining room before they tasted their food.

“What! not give me time even to fill the teapot!”
cried Lady Laurie, gaily.

“The teapot can wait, and we can’t,” cried Robin, pull-
ing his mother towards the door.

Lady Laurie let herself be led into the drawing-room,
and, of course, looked as much surprised and delighted as
her family wished her to look at the beautiful milk-white
figure of the infant Samuel, kneeling on moss and wreathed
round with flowers.

“Your love makes your gift to me more precious than
gold,” said the lady; and she thought to herself, “So love,
deep, grateful love, may make even my poor, little services
acceptable to my Lord.”

After breakfast, Harold, as usual, went off to school,
and Ida prepared her lessons for her mother, who for the
next half-hour was engaged in household duties. Prem
Das took his young charges into the garden. Everything
went on in clockwork order at Willowdale Lodge.

On Harold’s return in the afternoon, he was struck by
the stern, shocked, indignant expression on Robin’s face,
usually so full of cheerful good-humour.

“Why, Robin, what has put you out?” he inquired;
“ you look more like a raven than a robin.”

“Something very, very bad; you'll never guess,” said
the child,

“Nothing the matter with mother ?—Ida ?—the chil-
dren ?—the pigeons ?”

Robin shook his head gravely at every question.

“The Hindu—they ’ve been hunting him again ?”

“Serve him right if they did!” cried Robin, striking
his sunburnt little fist on the table.
200 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



“Has Prem Das done any mischief—stolen anything—
hurt one of the children ?”

“ Worse !—worse /—worsE!” was the answer each
time.

Tales of Oriental treachery flashed through the mind of
Harold. “ Robin, speak out!” he cried, impatiently.

“Sit down and 1’ll tell you all,” said Robin. “I’d done
my reading and spelling, and mother told me to go and
play. The children had been put to sleep; you know
they always go to sleep at twelve. Mother said, ‘ Before
you go out show Prem Das that I want him to dust the
things in the drawing-room while I sit in the nursery.’
You know Prem Das understands very well by signs what .
one wants him to do.”

“ He’s intelligent enough in everything except religion,”
said Harold, “ but in that it seems hopeless to try to teach
him anything.”

“T went to the garden to have a good swing,” continued
Robin, “but I found that one swing was broken—I mean,
the rope. I thought I’d get Prem Das to set it right;
he does things so nicely, you know. I ran to the draw-
ing-room, where I had left him dusting. The door was
open, and what do you think I saw ?”

Robin drew closer to Harold, put both his hands on his
brother’s arm, and with a grave look of mystery looked up
into his face.

“How can I tell? Do go on with your story,” cried
Harold.

“There was Prem Das down on the floor—like this.”
The child suited his action to his words, and threw him-
self on the carpet. “He had his hands pressed together—
like this; and he bowed his head two or three times, till
his forehead touched the floor, all right in front of the
table on which we had put our present for mother !”

“ What could he be doing?” cried Harold.
THE STUMBLING-BLOCK. 201

“Oh! don’t you see?” exclaimed Robin, who had
scrambled up again on his feet. “The Hindu—the
wicked, wicked Hindu !—was worshipping little Samuel !”

“T say!” cried Harold, in surprise.

“T know he was,” said Robin, with his usual decision.

“ And what did you say?” asked young Hartley.

“T said, ‘Get up—you!’ but he didn’t understand.
Down went his head to the floor again. I was downright
angry, you know. He went on bowing; sol gave hima
push with my foot.” Again Robin suited the action to
the word,

“Oh, Robin! did you kick the Hindu?” cried Harold;
a question repeated in surprise by Lady Laurie, who came
into the room, followed by Ida.

“Tt was a kind of a kick,” said Robin. “He deserved
it, and a great deal more, for making an idol out of our
dear little Samuel.”

A few words from Harold explained to Lady Laurie
the state of the case.

“Poor ignorant Hindu; he knew not what he did,”
sighed the widow lady.

“ But it was very wrong in Robin to kick him,” said Ida.
“What business had a little boy to judge a man, or to
punish him either ?”

“Tda, you're always at Robin !” exclaimed Harold. The
old feud seemed likely to break out again.

“Hush, my children !” cried Lady Laurie. “ Bien Das
was sinning, but sinning in ignorance.”

“T wanted to teach him better!” cried Robin. “ Didn’t
St. Paul speak against idols?”

“To kick the poor idolater was not to teach him;
St. Paul bad wisdom, and patience, and love; my little
Robin showed none of the three. The only way by which
you can make Prem Das feel that our holy religion is good,
is by letting him see that Christians are kind and gentle.”
202 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



“Tam sorry I kicked him,” said Robin.

“You should go and beg his pardon,” cried Ida.

“Tsay!” exclaimed Harold angrily, a hot flush mount-
ing to his brow; “my brother beg pardon of a nigger !”
The same evil expression which had pained Lady Laurie
before, an expression of scorn, anger, and pride, was on
the face of the youth.

“ Harold, as long as you show such a spirit as this, it is
a mockery for you to attempt to teach the native the
Gospel,” said Lady Laurie; “Can you expect any blessing
on your efforts——can you venture to ask God to bless
them ?”

“Tf Prem Dds had been an Englishman,” muttered
Harold, but he did not finish his sentence.

“Had he been an Englishman, Robin would not have
ventured to kick him. Was it generous, was it right, to
take advantage of the poor stranger’s being one of a
subject race ?’

“ Mother, I’ll ask him to forgive me!” cried Robin, who
was a generous-hearted child. “But you know he won't
understand me, if Harold does not tell him what I mean.”

“J’ll not translate an apology from my brother to a
Hindu,” muttered Harold. Ida was about to speak, but
her mother checked her by a glance.

“T know what I’ll do,” said Robin; “Ill give Prem
Da&s a bunch of cherries from my own tree. Mother,
won't he understand that cherries mean, J am sorry I
kicked you?”

“T think that Prem Das will understand that you mean
to make up for what you thoughtlessly did,” said Lady
Laurie, smiling at the child’s ingenious way of translating.
Robin ran off at once, and Ida could not help saying, “ He
as a dear little fellow !”

“Tda, will you help him to gather his cherries? they are
almost too high for him to reach,” said Lady Laurie.
THE STUMBLING-BLOCK. 203

Ida, who was herself a little penitent, followed the
child.

“ And now, Harold, I have something for you to do,”
said the lady; “will you help me to carry this lovely
little statue—moss, flowers, and all—to my own room up-
stairs; it will be the first thing that I shall look on every
morning ?”

“Why not leave it here to ornament the drawing-room,
where we all shall see it?” cried Harold.

“ Because what is a source of harmless pleasure to us
is a stumbling-block to another,” said his mother. “The
ignorant Hindu thinks that we worship idols.”*

“T have no notion of giving up innocent enjoyment on
account of another’s stupid ignorance,” said young Hartley.

“Then you are very unlike St. Paul.” Lady Laurie
went up to the book-case, and taking out a Bible, found
the place which she sought in the First Epistle to the |
Corinthians. “St. Paul wrote to those who, like ourselves.
thought images nothing of importance, but who dwelt
where others, like Prem Das, looked upon them as idols,
‘Take heed, thus he writes to enlightened believers, ‘lest -
by any means this liberty of yours become a stumbling-
block to them that are weak. . . . Through thy knowledge
shall thy weak brother perish, for whom Christ died ?
But when ye sin so against the brethren, and wound their
weak conscience, ye sin against Christ. Wherefore, if

* A curious anecdote may be given to show the necessity of avoid-
ing all appearance of evil, when we are in contact with ignorant
heathen. A friend of the authoress’s, a very earnest missionary, was
travelling with one or more companions in the Punjab, and at some
resting-place they partook of refreshments together. By chance a
bottle,—it may have been of sherbet,—was left on the table. At
night, before going to rest, the Englishmen knelt down by the table
for united prayer. Natives of India keenly watch our actions. One
of them was afterwards heard to say of the English missionary,
“T never thought that Mr. B—— would have worshipped a bottle.”
204 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL,



meat make my brother to offend, I will eat no flesh while
the world standeth, lest I make my brother to offend. ”

Harold. That was very generous and noble of St. Paul;
but he was writing about brethren; Prem Das is no
brother of mine.

Lady L. What, Harold, have you so soon forgotten the
Apostle’s address which we read last evening? Did he
not tell the idolatrous Greeks that God “hath made of one
blood all nations of men?” I grieve that you still suffer
from being with companions who despise the nations of
India.

“My schoolfellows have left off bullying me about Prem
Das,” said Harold.

“But they do you far greater injury by infecting you
with prejudices which have their root in pride. Harold,
until you can really regard the Hindu as a brother, as one
for whom Christ died, as one over whom your soul yearns,
one whom you can not only teach but love, you have not
the true missionary spirit, you are not fit for evangelising
work for Christ amongst the heathen.”

Harold silently took up the figure of the infant Samuel,
and carried it upstairs to the room of Lady Laurie. He
felt that he was not fit to be a missionary in India.
CHAPTER XXVL
ST. PAUL AT CORINTH.

THE family assembled as usual at sunset.

Lady Lawrie. St. Paul does not appear to have stayed
long in Athens, nor to have planted any church in that
famous city. He departed thence, and came to Corinth.

Robin. What sort of a city was that ?

Lady L. Very large, very rich, very splendid; with a
great deal in it to delight the eye, but still more to
corrupt the heart. Corinth has been compared to Vanity -
Fair in Pilgrim’s Progress.

Robin. And St. Paul was like Christian going through
it; but Christian had only one Hopeful with him, and
St. Paul had three.

Lady L. No, it appears that St. Paul entered the great
bustling city alone; he had left Silas and Timothy in
Macedonia, to strengthen the brethren there. But the
Apostle soon found friends in a pious couple, Aquila, and
Priscilla, who had lately come from Italy. In their house
he lived, and with them he worked, for he knew their
occupation, which was that of making tents.

Ida, Making tents! Surely St. Paul, whose time was
so precious, did not waste it on common labour, such as
any ignorant man could perform !

Lady £. St. Paul not only worked with his hands at
Corinth, but worked very hard indeed. He describes
himself in one of his letters as labouring “ night and day”
that ne might be “ chargeable to no man.”

205
206 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Harold. But how was this? If Corinth was a very rich
place, and a church was founded there, which must have
been the case, as there are two epistles to the Corinthians,
could not the converts have supported their teacher, and
not have left him so exceedingly poor ?

Lady L. Undoubtedly they could; but St. Paul would
take nothing from the Corinthians, even to supply pressing
wants. The poor but generous Church of Philippi sent
gifts; once and again its members supplied the need of
the Apostle whom they loved; but the richest Christian
at Corinth could never say that St. Paul, to relieve his
own wants, had accepted one coin from him.

Robin. I can’t think why St. Paul should take from
some people, and not from others.

Lady L. I have told you that Corinth was an exceed-
ingly wicked place; there drunkenness, revellings, and the
most frightful vice abounded. It seemed like another
Sodom.

Robin. Lot went to Sodom, and he did what was foolish
and wrong; St. Paul went to this other bad place,—was
it wrong in him to go ?

Lady L. Far from it; there was the greatest difference
between the motives of Lot and St. Paul. Lot went to
wicked Sodom for worldly advantage, and if he himself
was not corrupted, there was an evil effect on his wife and
children; but St. Paul was sent by the Lord, and his aim
was to save souls, and promote the glory of God. The
Apostle entered Corinth for a holy purpose, and those who
do so are no more stained by needful contact with evil
than are the sunbeams that fall on the most Joathsome
things, yet keep their purity and brightness. But alas!
the very Church at Corinth became infected with grievous
sin, which caused Paul afterwards much trouble and
grief. Nor was the Church of Corinth a generous Church.
There appear to have been those amongst the converts
ST. PAUL AT CORINTH. 207



who, judging St. Paul by themselves, suspected him of
seeking worldly profit.

Harold. Suspected St. Paul of such meanness! Oh!
how could they do so ?

Lady L. The apostle was resolved that they should
have no reason to do so. He would rather work his
fingers to the bone, than have it said in worldly Corinth,
“ Paul wants to make something out of us.”

Harold. I can quite understand that failing ; one would
have it one’s-self.

Lady L. The pious Scott had it so strongly, that hear-
ing that a rich member of his congregation intended to leave
money by will to him or his family, he wrote a most
urgent request to her not to doso. And yet, as regards
this world, Scott was a poor man.

Robin. But you said that some people sent St. Paul
presents, and he took them. .

Lady L. Of the dear converts at Philippi, and other
brethren in Macedonia, St. Paul writes with overflowing
love. Turn to the eighth chapter of second Corinthians,
where he thus praises these converts: “In a great trial
of affliction the abundance of their joy and of their deep
poverty abounded unto the riches of their liberality; for
to their power, I bear record, yea, and beyond their power,
they were willing of themselves, praying us with much
entreaty that we would receive the gift.”

Harold. Those Corinthians. must have been covered
with shame when they were compared to the poor, but
generous Philippians! What a difference between the
two Churches!

Lady L. Do we not see the same difference now
between professing Christians as regards giving to God?
Some seem to consider how much, and some how Itttle
they can give. The rich man, perhaps, satisfies his
conscience by subscribing a guinea each to various chari-
208 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



ties, the united sum smaller than what he spends on his
wine-merchant or tailor. Other persons, out of deep
poverty, like the Philippians, find it their joy and privilege
to give all that they can.

Harold. And as St. Paul would not accept a penny from
the Corinthians, at least for himself, perhaps God does not
accept those guineas just given to satisfy conscience, or
make the giver be thought respectable by the world. The
mites of the widow who was praised by the Lord were
like the help which St. Paul received with such pleasure,
and owned with such love.

Robin. How very very much vexed we should have
been if mother had not taken our present !

Lady L. It was a joy to me to accept it, because I knew
that it was a joy to you to give it. Where there is such
love there is joy.

Robin. I want Paul to go out of Corinth; I don’t
care to hear about these people who lived in Vanity
Fair.

Lady L. St. Paul does not appear to have stayed there
for his own pleasure, though he had the comfort of being
joined at Corinth by Timothy and Silas. The Jews
opposed and blasphemed. St. Paul writes of this period
in the First Epistle to the Corinthians, “I was with you
in weakness, and fear, and much trembling.”

ida. Worn out with hard labour, surrounded with
wickedness, disappointed, perhaps, in many of whom he
had had good hopes, I wonder that St. Paul stayed for
any long time in Corinth.

Lady L. You will wonder no more if you read of the
tender consolation which the Lord gave to His servant.
It is the rainbow which brightened the cloud of afflic-
tion which at this period hung over St. Paul. Let us
read from the ninth verse of the eighteenth chapter of
Acts.
ST. PAUL AT CORINTH. 209

Reading.

Then spake the Lord to Paul in the night by a vision,
Be not afraid, but speak and hold not thy peace, for I am
with thee; no man shall set on thee to hurt thee, for
I have much people in this city.

Harold. Then, with all their faults, the Lord still
counted the Corinthians as His own people.

Ida. What a blessed vision! It was worth having the
trouble to be comforted thus.

Harold. So Paul did not hastily leave his post at
Corinth. I see that it is written further on,—reads—He
continued there a year and six months, teaching the
Word of God amongst them.

Robin. I wonder there was not another riot; there
always seemed to be one where there were Jews.

Lady L. There was a riot, my boy. Reads—The Jews ©
made an insurrection with one accord against Paul, and
brought him to the judgment seat, saying, this fellow
persuadeth men to worship God contrary to the law.

Robin. I am afraid there will be another dreadful
scourging.

Lady L. No, for the judge was Gallio, a man who
would not be troubled with Jewish questions. “Ill be no
judge of such matters,” he cried, and he drove the
accusing Jews from the judgment seat.

Ida. But I suppose that St. Paul had to fly from
Corinth, as he had done from so many other places.

Lady L. No; we see that “he tarried there a good while.”
Then, perhaps feeling that for this time his mission in
Europe had come to an end, St. Paul bade farewell to the
brethren in Corinth, and embarking in a ship returned to
Asia.

Harold. Let me see whether I can remember the chief
cities in which St. Paul had made any stay, while he

9
210 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



remained in Europe—Philippi, Thessalonica, and Berea in
Macedonia, Athens and Corinth in Greece. How long do
you think that St. Paul had been on this European tour ?

Lady L. Tt has been calculated that from the Apostle’s
sailing from Troas after seeing the vision, to his embark-
ing to return to Asia, probably occupied about two years
and two months, of which time much more than half was
spent in Corinth.

Harold. Did St. Paul write any of his Epistles whilst
he was in Greece.

Lady L. Those who have studied the subject think
that the two Epistles to the Thessalonians, believed to be
the first of his letters contained in the Bible, were written
from Corinth; also, as it is thought, the Epistle to the
Galatians.

‘Ida. Then St. Paul,while working so hard at tent-making,
in addition to all his preaching, and praying, and teaching,
found time to write long letters to his converts in other
cities.

Harold. But I see that something different was written
at the end of these epistles; it is marked in the Bible ~
that the Epistle to the Thessalonians was written from
Athens. Can the Bible account be wrong?

Lady. £. The superscriptions at the end of the epistles
are no part of the Bible; they were added at a later time.
Learned men since then have deeply studied the subject
of the dates, and have given us the fruits of their labours.

Harold. But how can even the most learned men guess
where St. Paul wrote from, if it is not mentioned in the
Scriptures ?

Lady L. Partly from internal evidence.

Robyn. What's that.

Lady L. What we can gather from the epistles them-
selves, comparing them with the Acts, and other history.
For instance, St. Paul could not write of what happened
ST. PAUL AT CORINTH. 211



to him at Ephesus, before he had been to Ephesus, nor
have mentioned that he was in bonds, unless he had
written from some place where he had been in prison.

Robin. I can understand that?

Lady L. I have copied out for you part of a table of
dates from a learned book with a rather formidable name,
Hore Pauline et Apostolice. The author has put in
capitals the dates of which we are almost certain; the
others, he thinks, are likely to be fairly correct.

Date A.D. 87.
40.
42.
4A,
4D.
AT.
50.
51.
52.

53.

54,

55.
57.

58.

The Conversion of St. Paul.

His First Visit to Jerusalem.

St Paul at Antioch.

St. Paut’s Szconp Visit To JERUSALEM.
First Circuit of Paul and Barnabas begins.
Return to Antioch.

Council at Jerusalem. |

SECOND CIRCUIT BEGINS.

St. Paul Crosses from Troas into Europe.
First EPIstLE TO THE THESSALONIANS.
Second Epistle to the Thessalonians.
Epistle to the Galatians.

St. Paul Sails from Corinth.

Fourth Visit to Jerusalem.

Second Circuit of Galatia.

St. Paul arrives at Ephesus.

First EPIstLE 'ToO THE CORINTHIANS.
Second Epistle to. the Corinthians.
ARRIVAL AT CORINTH.

Epistle to the Romans.

Firrs Visit to JERUSALEM,

. Voyage to Rome begins.
. Arrival at Rome.

. St. Paul Martyred at Rome.

Ida. I like to picture to myself St. Paul at Corinth,
after preaching and disputing half the day, stitching at
212 PICTURES OF 8ST. PAUL.



his hard work, by the light of a dim little oil lamp, then
pushing the half-finished tent aside, to take up his pen to
write to his dear Macedonian converts.

Harold. I picture him working away still, with a rude
needle, and thread coarse as twine in his thin hand, bend-
ing over his work, and dictating to some one beside him ;
who, with the parchment on his knees, is noting down the
words as they come from the Apostle’s lips, words that
through ages to come were never to be forgotten. One
would like to have been that scribe! And Paul would
sometimes look up from his work with such a light in his
face, as if his whole soul were being breathed out in what
he dictated, and he were forgetting poverty, persecution,
and pain, in telling of Christ and His love.

Robin. And I ‘taney how the good Christians would
jump for joy when the letters came; and the jailor and
Lydia would shout, “Here’s a letter—a letter from Paul!”

Harold. I have not yet begun reading the Epistles to
myself, but I mean to do so to-morrow. JI will first take
the letters to the Thessalonians, as they were the first ones
written. It doubles one’s interest in them when one knows
something of the people for whom they were meant, and
the place from which they were sent.”

\
CHAPTER XXVII.
THE PRIDE OF LIFE.

“A PARCEL, a big parcel! it’s just come from London by
the train!” cried Robin, rushing into the drawing-room,
where Ida, seated at the piano, was practising a duet with
her mother.

The music was stopped. The arrival of a parcel was an
event in that quiet home. Robin especially was impatient
to tear off the brown paper; he could not think why
people should tie so many knots in the string.

“ What a bold hand the direction is written in,” observed
Ida, “I think that it must be a man’s. Who can have
sent the parcel? There is ‘KE. KE. on the seals.”

“These were the initials on Mrs. Elwyn’s travelling bag,”
said Lady Laurie, as the parcel was at length freed from
its wrappings. There was a tiny note inside, written in a
small, straggling hand, and in pencil. The note was as
follows—

“Dearest Lady Laurie,—I should feel so much obliged
if you could bring my darlings and their bearer to London
on Saturday, and if Harold could accompany you it would
add to the pleasure. I hope that you will accept a trifling
token of love and gratitude from one who will never
forget your kindness. Please give the little presents to
those to whom they are directed, and let Prem Dds take
the small parcel to my cousin Theresa.—Y ours affection-
ately, L. S.

“Something for every one—something for me!” ex-

213
214 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



claimed Robin in delight at receiving from his mother's
hand a parcel containing a dissected puzzle. Harold and
Ida’s names were written on books. There was a coloured
blanket for Prem Das, toys and clothes for his little
charges.

“Mamma, how could Mrs. Smith afford to send such a
parcel?” asked Ida gravely; “you know that Miss Petty
says that her cousin is dreadfully poor.”

“Perhaps the rich lady she is with has given her lots of
money,” said Robin ; the child with his natural shrewdness
coming very near to the truth.

“But I am sure that I saw that white shawl on the sofa
at Foreham Villa when we visited poor Mrs. Smith,” said
Ida.

“T am sorry that the dear lady should have robbed
herself of her pretty shawl to send it to me,” said Lady
Laurie, touched by Lydia’s sending her one of her choicest
possessions.

“Mother, will you take the little ones to London to-
morrow ?” asked Robin.

“Certainly, as their mother wishes it. Harold and I will
start by the early train and be back in the evening.
Saturday being a half-holiday, Harold will not lose much.”

“Except the reading at sunset,” said Ida; “you will be
too late for that.”

“J wish that I had been asked too!” exclaimed Robin.
“JT should so like to see London and the ‘logical Gardens
I’m sorry the little ones are going away,” he added with
rather a doleful air, “and ’specially Lily; she’s a nice
little thing, and she’s so merry and jolly now!”

“And I feel sorry about Prem Das,” observed Harold;
it seems as if the little that I have tried to do for him has
been just like writing upon water.”

“The Lord accepts what is done unto Him, whether or
not He grant apparent success,” remarked Lady Laurie.
THE PRIDE OF LIFE. 215



“Done unto Him!” repeated Harold, as if speaking
to himself. Young Hartley was very doubtful whether
he could take any comfort from these words. Had his
attempts to convert Prem Das been really made from the
constraining love of Christ ?

Harold went off to school, and lessons were proceeded
with at home. Afterwards, Lady Laurie proposed that
Ida and herself should take the little packet directed to
Miss Petty to Foreham Villa.

“Mayn’t I come too?” said Robin. “T like a walk with
mother, though I don’t care for that house, now that the
children have left.”

Miss Petty always expressed delight at seeing her titled
visitor. She was fond of speaking of Lady Laurie as her
most intimate friend. The doctor’s sister was also curious
to hear all about her “Dear Delia,” for whom she seemed
to take a greater fancy now that she was no longer under:
her roof. Had it not been for a slight sprain in her foot,
Miss Petty would long before this have rushed off to
Willowdale Lodge to hear all the news, and then retail it
to the Millers and the Bullens. It was with real pleasure,
therefore, though a little exaggerated in its expression,
that Theresa now welcomed Lady Laurie.

Delia’s little parcel was duly delivered, and quickly
opened. It contained a tasteful paper-knife of bright
metal. Miss Petty examined it curiously to see if it were
silver, or only plated. Coming to the decision that it
was the latter, it lost all value in her eyes, for she
recognised the white shawl on her visitor’s shoulders,
worn on account of the weather having become rather
damp and chilly since the great storm.

“T see that Delia has sent you her Rampore chadder,
the most delightful of wraps!” said Miss Petty, with a
feeling of mean envy in her heart.

“She was too kind; I wish that she had kept it for
216 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.

herself,” said Lady Laurie, and she meant what she
said.

“T do not think that a lieutenant’s wife is entitled to
buy Rampore chadders,’ remarked Miss Petty. “She
was too poor to pay for a lodging, yet could afford such a
luxury as that. By-the-by, did you not say just now that
Delia is in the house of some lady—I did not quite catch
the name.”

“ Mrs, Elwyn, of Grosvenor Square.”

“Mrs. Elwyn!” repeated Miss Petty, with a little jerk
of the head which conveyed no idea of respect for the lady
in question. .

“Do you know her?” enquired Lady Laurie.

“ Know her, yes, that’s to say I know very well who she
is. I should not care for a close acquaintance. (Miss
Petty would have been only too glad to claim intimacy
with Mrs. Elwyn, had it given her a chance of an invita-
tion to Grosvenor Square.) The doctor’s sister had
lowered her voice to a mysterious whisper, as she usually
did when she was about to repeat any piece of ill-natured
gossip.

_ lady Laurie wished to change the conversation, as she

saw that both Ida and Robin’s attention was attracted by
that mysterious whisper; but Miss Petty was resolved to
have out her say. She laid her hand on Lady Laurie’s
arm, and went on with her talk; whilst Ida listened, and
Robin stood watching the speaker with his large round
eyes.

“ Mrs. Elwyn may be a good sort of body; I daresay that
she is; but she is not what J call a lady though she’s
rolling in money. I happen to know how the money was
made. Mrs. Elwyn’s father was a tailor, he actually
worked with his own hands!”

“So did St. Paul,” said Robin.

“Poor, dear Delia knows nothing of the world,”
THE PRIDE OF LIFE, 217

continued Miss Petty, not condescending to notice Robin’s
interruption. “She does not understand, as you and I do,
what 1s what, or the rules of society, or she would not be
hand and glove with the daughter of a tradesman.”

“T saw Mrs. Elwyn for a very short time,” said Lady
Laurie; “but she seemed to me to be not only a kind, but
a very superior woman, one of whom I would gladly see
more. You know, Miss Petty, that some of the noblest
and best who have ever lived have risen from the humbler
ranks of life.”

“St. Paul worked with his hands,” persisted Robin;
who thought that his first little speech had not been
noticed.

“Oh, we’re not speaking of Bible times,” said Miss
Petty, trying not to betray a little impatience at the
persistence of the child.

“ Nor was I alluding to Bible times,” said Lady Laurie, '
in her gentle manner. “I was thinking of such men as the
great and good Carey, of whom an anecdote is related
which you may very possibly have heard.”

Miss Petty knew nothing at all about Carey, and could
not have told whether he was a general, a statesman, or a
poet. But she never cared to betray ignorance, so only
asked what the anecdote was.

“The great missionary was at a dinner-party, when
some one present, possibly to annoy him, asked in a tone
loud enough for others to hear: “Is it true, Dr. Carey,
that you were a shoemaker once?” “No, madam,” was
the doctor’s reply ; “I never succeeded in being more than
a cobbler !”

“ And I know another nice story,” cried the irrepressible
Robin; “ Mother, mayn’t I tell my story, perhaps Miss
Petty would like to hear it.”

“Very much indeed, dearie,” said Miss Petty graciously ;
she was not as truthful as Robin.
218 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



“There was a lady, a proud lady, you know,” began
Robin, “and a clergyman came to see her; I forget his
name, but he was a good man, like St. Paul. And he told
the lady that all people who love the Lord will go to
heaven, rich and poor, all alike.”

“We all know that, dearie,” said Miss Petty, wishing
Robin a hundred miles off.

“The proud lady did not like to hear it,” continued
Robin, “for she was a very silly woman, you know. And
she cried out, ‘You don’t mean to say that Betty (that
was the name of her maid), that Betty and I will be in
the same place in heaven?’ And what do you think that
the good old clergyman answered ?”

“How can I tell?” said Miss Petty.

“He said, ‘Oh! madam, don’t be afraid of that. Ifyou
go on in your own proud way youll never be in the same
place as Betty !’”

Ida saw that Miss Petty winced under the unintended
rebuke, and the girl bit her own lip to keep down a smile.
“Robin, you should not be rude,” said Ida, which made
the matter a great deal worse.

“T was not rude; I was telling a nice little story,” said
Robin; “I’ve heard you tell it your own self.”

Lady Laurie rose to take leave, feeling it difficult to
keep her countenance. Miss Petty covered her confusion
by assuring the lady that she would run over to Willow-
dale Lodge as soon as ever her tiresome ankle would let
her. “I wish that I could have seen the sweet babes
before they started, but unfortunately our carriage needs
repair. You'll miss their dear little voices, but it’s only
natural that their mother should like to have them with
her. Good-bye, dearest Lady Laurie, I have so enjoyed
your visit !”

oe _
CHAPTER XXVIIL
A SECRET SNARE.

On returning to Willowdale Lodge, Lady Laurie found
there Mr. Carse, a cousin of hers. She greeted the
unexpected visitor with pleasure; it was two years since
the relations had met.

“Glad to see you, Clara,” said Mr. Carse, warmly shaking
his cousin's hand. “Why, Ida, you have almost grown
out of my knowledge; you’re wonderfully like your
mother. Ah! I suppose, Clara, that this little chap is one
of your charges, a son of poor Mr. Hartley, who was
murdered in India. This is a stout, manly, little fellow;
he’ll be calling the rebels to account some day for what
they are doing,” and Mr. Carse patted Robin’s shaggy
head, and chucked him under the chin.

“Tt is an unexpected pleasure to see you, Philip,” said
Lady Laurie; “I did not know that you were coming to
London.”

“Well, you see I’ve a little business in the great Babel,”
observed Mr. Carse, taking his seat on an easy-chair in the
drawing-room. “You know that I was left some property
about a year ago, a very fortunate thing for me, as it just
doubled my little income, and a family man like myself
often finds it hard to make the two ends meet.”

“JT heard of your being left some property,” said Lady
Laurie, “and I was told that it consisted of some house or
houses in London.”

“The lease of one, the largest by far, has just run out,”

219
220 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



said Mr. Carse. “The tenant is very anxious that I should
renew it, and for ninety-nine years. He has offered good
terms, very good terms indeed. I am going up to London
to see about the matter, and so have taken Willowdale
Lodge on the way, glad of an opportunity of looking you
up. Your night train does not start for London, I find,
till a quarter to nine, so I shall not have to hurry away.”

Lady Laurie went out of the room to give directions for
a late dinner, leaving Ida and Robin to entertain the
guest.

“Philip looks changed,” she thought to herself, “a good
deal older and more careworn than when we last met. One
would think that he had rather lost property than gained
it. But he is probably only weary to-day from his long
journey from Cornwall.”

The impression given by the gentleman’s first appear-
ance strengthened, however, during the rest of the day.
Philip Carse talked a good deal, and even jested, but his
smile was confined to the lips, the eyes never lighted up
with genuine mirth. He was sometimes absent in his
manner, and would ask a question without seeming to
listen to the reply. It appeared to Lady Laurie as if her
cousin had something on his mind; but she was not
sufficiently at ease with her relative to inquire if such
were the case.

The children’s tea was turned into a late dinner on
account of the guest; the little Smiths had their simpler
meal in the schoolroom. At dinner Mr. Carse brightened
up, and conversed a good deal. He spoke of various good
works which he intended to set on foot in his Cornish
town.

“We want another boy’s school, and library attached to
it,” said Mr. Carse, as he despatched his mutton. “I'll
try in London to get a grant of good books. I’m a Poor-
law guardian, Clara, as you know; that gives me a great
A SECRET SNARE. 221



deal to do; but it’s time well employed—well employed.
I’ve accepted the place of Churchwarden; the parson is
very glad of my help. We’re planning an evening school
for adults who have no time to learn in the day. We shall
get up a dispensary too. We must all do work in our
day, Harold, leave foot-prints on the sands of time, as the
poet tells us to do. The parson and I mean to fight a
good battle against ignorance, dirt, and disease.”

“ And drunkenness too,” said Robin.

A momentary expression almost of pain passed over
the gentleman’s face, but he said “and drunkenness
+00.”

“T ought perhaps to apologise for not offering you
wine,” said Lady Laurie, reminded of it by the conversa-
tion; “but we have had such painful cases of intoxication
in our village, that I like to be able to tell the people that
I never put wine on my table.”

“Quite right, quite right!” said Mr. Carse; “I am a
very moderate man myself; drinking was never a tempta-
. tion to me.”

. “Nor to me,” rejoined Lady Laurie with a smile; “but,”
she added more gravely, “my abstaining from it is for the
sake of others.”

“There was such a dreadful thing happened here,” cried
Robin.

“The butcher, a nice man (I mean he was nice when
he was not tipsy, you know), he would go to public houses,
and sit, and sit, and drink, and drink, and his poor wife
was crying at home. And once he came back, quite quite
tipsy, and he did not know what he was doing, and he
struck his poor wife, very hard, with a poker. Robin, as
usual, suited the action to the word, and brought down
his fist on the table with a thump which set the
glasses ringing. “And do you know, she really died!”
Robin’s honest sunburnt face was raised to that of the
222 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



guest, and he stared full into Mr. Carse’s eyes to see how
much shocked he would look at so dreadful a story.

The child then went on, in a tone of fierce indignation.
“Tf I were the Queen I’d send my soldiers to knock down
-every one of the public houses, I would! Would not you,
if you were the Queen ?”

Somehow or other Mr. Carse’s piece of bread dropped
at that moment under the table. He stooped to pick it
up, and when he again raised it up, his face was con-
siderably flushed.

“Tittle Robin, do you like riding?” said he.

It was an abrupt turn im the conversation, which at once
flowed in a different channel. Mr. Carse had just pur-
chased a pony chaise for his wife, and when she did not
use it, his boys were allowed to ride the ponies. Nothing
more was said of the wretched butcher whose love of
drink had plunged him im ruin, and cost the life of his
wife.

Ida and the Hartleys went out after dinner to amuse
themselves in the garden.

“T do like that gentleman whom mother calls Philip,”
cried Robin. “I think he’s a right good man. He
teaches the boys, and looks after the sick people, and does
all sorts of nice things.”

“We had rather too much of what mamma calls ‘the
terrible I,” observed Ida to Harold. “Mamma never
speaks of what she does for the poor, and I am sure that
she does more than any one else in Foreham. She is not
one of the self-praising, self-satisfied class!”

“J do not think that Mr. Carse is self-satisfied,” said
Harold. “I watched him whilst he was speaking. It is
strange, but it seemed to me more as if he were wanting
to persuade himself that he is doing all that is right, than
as if he wanted to persuade any one else. He has, to my
mind, a sort of uncomfortable, dissatisfied look. He
A SECRET SNARE. 223



laughs, not as if he feels merry, but as if to make himself
_ think that he is.”

“That did not strike me,” said Ida, “but now that you
point it out, I think that you are right. Mr. Carse looked
quite uncomfortable when Robin was talking, something
as poor Miss Petty did this morning.”

Lady Laurie was shy, and exceedingly disinclined to
have her usual evening reading in the presence of her
cousin. Not that she doubted Mr. Carse’s approval of her
plan—she thought Philip too religious a man not to
favour Bible-reading; but, she scarcely knew why, the
lady almost resolved to put off till the morrow going on
with the story of St. Paul.

Whilst Lady Laurie was thinking over the subject, and
My. Carse was reading the newspaper, in came Robin with
roses for “ mother.”

“ And now we’re going to have our reading, and we’re
late,” cried the child, as, throwing down the roses on the
table, he ran for the Bible.

“ What reading ?” inquired Mr. Carse, glancing up from
the paper.

“Oh! mother and we always read—I mean, some read
aloud, and I hear—about St. Paul,” cried Robin. “ We’re
done about Lydia, and the jailor, and the riot; and we’re
coming back to Asia again.”

“ Tt is only a little reading from the Acts that I have
with my young people,” said Lady Laurie. I think of
putting it off for to-day.”

“Nay, do not put it off for me,” said Mr. Carse. “I should
like, of all things, to sit and listen. And is that your
missionary box, little Robin, that I see on the side-table
there ?”

“It’s everybody’s box, but it’s empty,” said Robin.
Last Saturday mother took out the money, and it’s gone
to London to convert the black people in India.”


294 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



“Tt must not remain empty,” said Mr. Carse; and going
up to the table, he took out his purse, and dropped into
the box a bit of bright gold.

Robin almost jumped with delight. “Oh! you are a
good man,” he cried; “not at all like the stingy people we
heard of!”

“The new arrangement about the lease will be twenty
pounds a-year more in my pocket,” said Mr. Carse, turn-
ing towards his cousin. “I mean to devote it all to
charitable purposes. Money is a very valuable talent; one
can do so much with money.”

“If God’s blessing go with it,” said the lady.

This reminded Robin of his last Sunday’s text. The
child went up to his new friend and said, “I’ve learned all
about God’s blessing. Mr. Philip, would you like to hear
my new verse ?”

“ By all means, my boy,” was Mr. Carse’s smiling reply ;
but he looked grave and thoughtful as, in a slow, distinct
voice, Robin repeated, “ The blessing of the Lord it maketh
rich, and He addeth no sorrow with it.”

Bee
















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Ruins or EPHESUS,
CHAPTER XXIX.
ST. PAUL AT EPHESUS.

Lady LZ. A‘Joyrut event happened at Ephesus after the
Apostle’s arrival; you will read of it in the nineteenth
chapter of Acts.

The account of the baptism of some disciples of John
the Baptist was read aloud.

ida. But, mamma, you have told us nothing of Ephesus,
and this is St. Paul’s first visit to that city. Do we read
of it anywhere else in the Bible ?

Harold. Do you not remember, Ida, that Ephesus is
the first of the seven Churches of Asia, to which the Lord
Himself sent a message from heaven by the Apostle
John?”

Lady £. Let us turn to the passage in the Book of
Revelations, the second chapter and second verse. We
shall there hear what testimony our blessed Lord Himself
bare to the graces of the Church planted at Ephesus by
St. Paul.

Reading.

I know thy works, and thy labour, and thy patience,
and how thou canst not bear them which are evil: and
thou hast tried them which say they are apostles, and are
not, and hast found them liars: and hast borne, and hast
patience, and for My name’s sake hast laboured and hast
not fainted.

Harold. This was a noble Church indeed! I am afraid
that the Lord could not say so much of us in England.

225 P
226 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Lady I. And yet, after this praise, there came to
Ephesus a merited rebuke, followed even by a threat from
lips so loving: “ Nevertheless I have somewhat against
thee, because thou hast left thy first love.”

Ida. Then the Church of Ephesus, like that of Galatia,
fell away? That is so very, very sad!

Lady L. But we are going to hear of it to-day, when its
love was fresh and warm; when the converts were eager
to do anything, to part with anything, for the sake of Him
of whose wondrous love they now apparently heard for the
first time.

Harold. You have told us of the Church, but what of
the city ?

Lady L. Idolatry flourished in Ephesus. It was famous
for the very magnificent temple raised to the goddess
Diana, which, from its exceeding splendour, was considered
to be one of the wonders of the world. The citizens of
Ephesus appear to have been peculiarly superstitious.
Many professed knowledge of magic arts, and multitudes _
believed in their power. Such were the idolatrous, super-
stitious, covetous people, bound in the snares of Satan, of
whom many, at the preaching of St. Paul, turned “from
idols to serve the living and true God.” The time of the
Apostle’s residence in this city appears to have been a
period when the Gospel was preached with peculiar power
and blessing. Let us read the eleventh and twelfth
verses,

Reading.

And God wrought special miracles by the hand of Paul,
so that from his body were brought unto the sick handker-
chiefs or aprons, and the diseases departed from them, and
the evil spirits went out of them.

Robin. I wonder that everybody did not turn Christian
when they saw the sick made well in a minute. People
ST. PAUL AT EPHESUS. 227



could not help believing what they saw with their very
own eyes.

Lady L. Many believed, my son, but it was much as
the devils believe. They believed that Paul had wonder-
ful power, and they believed that power to be from God.
Men wondered, admired, and even sought to imitate the
deeds of the great Apostle. Let us read what is one of the
most singular passages in all St. Paul’s wonderful story.

Reading.

Then certain of the vagabond Jews, exorcists, took upon
them to call over them which had evil spirits the name of
the Lord Jesus, saying, We adjure you by Jesus whom
Paul preacheth. And there were seven sons of one Sceva,
a Jew, and chief of the priests, who did so.

And the evil spirit answered and said, Jesus I know,
and Paul I know, but who are ye? And the man in whom
the evil spirit was leaped on them, and overcame them,
and prevailed against them, so that they fled out of that
house naked and wounded.

Robin, who did not in the least understand the meaning
of the words “ vagabond” and “exorcist,” only saw in the
defeat of the sons of Sceva, failure in a brave attempt to
do right. “Poor men!” he exclaimed in a tone of pity,
“they would need St. Paul to cure their wounds, and
comfort them.”

“They would need one greater than St. Paul to heal
their souls and forgive their sin,” said Lady Laurie.

Robin opened his eyes wide in surprise. “Surely it was
a very good thing to cast out bad spirits,” he observed ;
“the Lord did so, and so did St. Paul. I think that the
men were brave and good. Why do you think that it was
wrong in them to try to turn out a terribly strong devil ?”

“They were trying to do a good work from a wrong
motive, and in a wrong way.”
228 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL,



“T don’t understand this one bit,” said Robin, looking
rather aggrieved. “Ifa thing is right, we should do it;
the men could not help the devil being stronger than
they.” :
Lady L. Let me try to explain to you, Robin. Nay,
Ida, do not try to silence the child; that will never remove
his doubts.

Ida. Robin will always persist that he knows better
than any one else.

Robin. I don’t. Mother knows everything best; but
she has not told me why it was wrong to try to cast out
a devil.

Lady £. First let us examine the motive of these Jews.
Do you think that they acted from love. to Christ, or pity
to the poor afflicted man ?”

Harold. We are quite certain that they did not, or the
Lord would not have suffered the evil spirit to conquer
them. These men were those who pretended to know
magic arts. Do you think, mother, that there is any
doubt that the motive of Sceva’s sons was to obtain some
honour or worldly profit ?

Lady L. I have no doubt of it, Harold.

Robin. Still—-they used the Lord’s name.

Ida. But how did they use it? Not in the least as if
they themselves belonged to Christ. Do you not remem-
ber that they said, we adjure you by Jesus whom Paul
preacheth. Surely they took the Lord’s name in vain!

Lady L. These men were mere imitators, wicked pre-
tenders to a power which they did not possess. Without
repentance, without forsaking of sin, without being called
by the Lord to the work, they dared to attempt a deed
which needed the special power of the Holy Ghost sent
from on high. There is a line which Ida and Harold may
understand, which describes such wicked presumption—

“ Fools rush in, where angels fear to tread.”
ST. PAUL AT EPHESUS. 229



Sceva’s seven sons were such fools, and they received
the due reward of their folly.

Harold. Can we learn any lesson from this? I do not
see that we can, for none of us here in England ever
attempt to cast out devils.

Lady £. I think that we may learn a valuable lesson ;
that even in doing what we call good works, we may sin,
grievously sin.

Robin. Sin in good works, how can that be! If I were
rich and built a fine church, I could not do wrong in that,
for it is very right to build churches.

Lady L. I feel sure that men not only can sin, but
that they have very often sinned in building, or helping to
build fine churches.

Again Robin gave his stare of surprise.

Lady L. I will give you a simple example. In olden
times a bold baron would go plundering and robbing the
poor, stealing their cattle, burning their huts, sometimes
carrying off their children. Then perhaps the baron’s
conscience pricked him, particularly if he fell ill, and
feared that he might die. What do you think that he
ought to have done?

Robin. To have given back the cattle, built up the
huts, and said, “I’m very sorry, I won’t do such bad
things any more.”

Lady L. Such a straight honest course as this, which
was what Zaccheus the publican took, would not be to the
taste of the baron. He would find it far easier and
pleasanter to take part of his ill-gotten wealth and build
with it a beautiful church.

Harold. To do so would please his pride too, as well as

quiet his conscience. All the world would be saying, even
long after he died, “ What a generous baron, what a pious
baron, see what a splendid church he raised !”

Robin. The poor robbed people would not think that.
230 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Ida. And God would not think that of the man who
had done so much harm. _

Robin. I see—I see—the Lord would be angry, not
pleased with the baron,—and would not care for his
present of a church.

Lady L. We must not dare to bring to the Holy God
any offering soiled by sin. Let me explain my meaning
by a little parable. Suppose that you wished to give the
Queen a nosegay of flowers.

Robin. Perhaps the Queen would take it—she is so
kind,—if I picked the very best. :

Lady L. But if you first thrust your flowers into the
mire, and then brought them to your sovereign with your
hands all covered with mud

Robiw. The Queen would not take them, she would
throw them away, she would crush them under her
feet !

Lady L. And can we expect the King of kings to do
otherwise as regards what are called good works, done from
a wrong motive, and ina wrong way? Good works done
to win men’s praise, or to quiet a justly troubled con-
science, good works done without faith or humility, are
like soiled, faded, worthless flowers. I fear that we all are
in some danger, more or less, of incurring the guilt of the
sons of Sceva.

Ida, Like the Pharisees with their long prayers. It is
a good thing to pray ; but to pray as they did, just to win
the praise of men

Harold. With unrepented sin in their hearts

Lady L. Was in truth adding io their sin !

Robin. Now I don’t want to hear more of these bad
men, I want to hear of some good ones, who were really
sorry, and tried to make up for what they ’d done wrong.

Lady L. We find an account of such in the eighteenth
and nineteenth verses, which we will read.






ST. PAUL AT EPHESUS. 931



Reading.

Many of them; also, which used curious arts brought
their books together, and burned them before all men;
and they counted the price of them, and found it was
fifty thousand pieces of silver. So mightily grew the
Word of God, and prevailed.

Ida. Mamma, I am going to say something which
perhaps you may think foolish; but, was it not rather a
waste to burn the books, when they might have been sold,
and brought in so much money to the Church? With
those heaps of silver, St. Paul need never to have worked
with his hands, but have given all his time to preaching.
Only think how many widows and orphans he might have
helped! .

Robin. I’d have sold the books, and given away the
money. :

Lady L. Harold, what say you ?

Harold. Were they not wicked books ?

Lady I. There can be no doubt about that.

Ida. I would not have read them; I would have sold
them.

Harold. And presented a sin-stained offering to the
Lord? Oh! no; St. Paul did much better in throwing
them into the fire, where they could do harm to no
one.

Lady L. We must always remember that to do evil
that good may come shows a grievous want of faith. If
we could put the thoughts of people who do so into words,
would they not be something like these: “ The Bible says
that the silver and gold are the Lord’s, but I do not
believe it. The Bible tells me that the Lord abhors sin,
but Z do not believe it, if my sin helps on His cause?”

Ida. Oh! what dreadfully wicked, blasphemous thoughts
of God !
232 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Lady L. Dreadful indeed when put into words; but
are they less dreadful when put into acts ?

Robin. Mother, I’d burn all the wicked books! I’d
make such a blaze !

Harold. It was noble in St. Paul to destroy them,
trust in God, and stitch away at the tents.

Ida. When St. Paul was so long at Ephesus, did he
never feel a wish to cross the sea again, and visit his dear
people in Macedonia and Greece ?

Lady L. You will find the answer to your question in
the twenty-first verse. Reads— After these things were
ended, Paul purposed in the spirit, when he had passed
through Macedonia and Achaia, to go to Jerusalem, saying, ©
After I have been there, I must also see Rome.” So
anxious was St. Paul about his Macedonian converts, that
he sent his beloved Timothy and another disciple to see
them, being himself detained in Asia for a season.

Harold. St. Paul seems to have had a wonderfully
quiet time of it in Ephesus, considering that it was such
an idolatrous city. More than two years there, and no
account of a riot!

Lady L. The account of a riot, and a very serious one,
istocome. This did not arise, like so many others, from
the bigotry of the Jews, but from the love of money
prevailing amongst the silver-smiths in the city.

Robin. What harm could St. Paul do to them? I’m
sure he did not ask them for money.

Lady L. St. Paul’s preaching, and the effects which
followed it, interfered with their profits. Let us go on
with our reading.

Reading.

And the same time there arose no small stir about
that way; for a certain man, named Demetrius, which
made silver shrines for Diana, brought no small gain unto
ST. PAUL AT EPHESUS. 233



the craftsmen; whom he called together with the workmen
of like occupation, and said, Sirs, ye know that by this
craft we have our wealth. Moreover, ye see and hear that
not alone at Ephesus, but almost throughout all Asia, this
Paul hath persuaded and turned away much people, saying -
that they be no gods which are made with hands; so that
not only this our craft is in danger to be set at nought,
but also that the temple of the great goddess Diana
should be despised, and her magnificence should be
destroyed, whom all Asia and the world worshippeth.
And when they heard these sayings, they were full of
wrath, and cried out, Great is Diana of the Ephesians!

Harold. Mother, I cannot understand idolatry at all, it
seems to be so utterly senseless! Imagine men—clever
men—bowing down to a stone, or the stock of a tree !

ida. And think of men not only worshipping stocks and
stones, but sacrificing even life to do them honour! Used
not Hindus to throw themselves down before the huge
car of Juggernaut to be crushed to death under the
wheels! -

Lady L. They would do so still if our Government did
not prevent them.

Robin. And poor little babies used by their own
mothers to be thrown into the river Ganges !

Lady £. There is evidently a strong leaning in the
human heart towards idolatry.

Ida. But never amongst Christians, mamma.

Lady L. You would hardly say so were you to visit
some churches in Roman Catholic countries. In Rome
there is a statue of St. Peter (it is said actually to be an
ancient one of Jupiter), and multitudes of adorers have
fallen on their knees to kiss its toe.

Harold. England, dear old England, at least has
nothing to do with idolatry.

Lady L. Tl have heard—I fear that it is too true! that
234 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



in one of our great manufacturing cities idols have been
made to send out to India!

Harold. I could not believe such a thing!

Ida. It would be so horribly wicked to make anything
to ruin the souls of others!

Robin. Then why do men make spirits ?

Lady L. They make spirits, as Demetrius made silver:
shrines, for profit. But let us go on with the story.

Reading.

And the whole city was filled with confusion; and
having caught Gaius and Aristarchus, men of Macedonia,
Paul’s companions in travel, they rushed with one accord
into the theatre. And when Paul would have entered in
unto the people, the disciples suffered him not. And cer-
tain of the chief of Asia, which were his friends, sent unto
him, desiring that he would not adventure himself into
the theatre.

Robin. They were afraid that he would have been torn
in pieces.

Ida. Or stoned, as he was at Lystra.

Reading.

Some therefore cried one thing, and some another, for
the assembly was confused, and the more part knew not
wherefore they were together. And they drew Alexander
out of the multitude, the Jews putting him forward. And
Alexander beckoned with the hand, and would have made
his defence unto the people. But when they knew that
he was a Jew all with one voice cried out, Great is Diana
of the Ephesians!

And when the town-clerk had appeased the people, he
said, Ye men of Ephesus, what man is there that knoweth
not that the city of the Ephesians is a worshipper of the
ST. PAUL AT EPHESUS. 235



great goddess Diana, and of the image which fell down from
Jupiter? Seeing that these things cannot be spoken
against, ye ought to be quiet and do nothing rashly.

Harold. Paul would rather have died than have made
such a speech !



































































































































RUINS OF THE THEATRE OF EPHESUS.

Lady L. The speech was not made by a Christian, but
apparently by a heathen, who valued peace, and was in
awe of the Roman Government. Notice that he says in the
fortieth verse, We are in danger to be called in question
for this day’s uproar, there being no cause whereby we
236 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



may give an account of this concourse. And when he
had thus_spoken he dismissed the assembly. —_

Robin. The people must have been hoarse after shout-
ing for two hours without stopping.

Harold. And perhaps felt that they had been acting
very foolishly in getting so furiously excited, they did not
know about what.

Lady L. St. Paul’s life had been in very great danger.
It is not exactly known whether it was not in reference to
this riot that he wrote in the fifteenth chapter of
1 Corintlians, “Tf after the manner of men I have fought
with beasts at Ephesus, what advantageth it me if the
dead rise not?”

Harold. Perhaps St. Paul did actually fight with real
wild beasts, for in those days Christians were sometimes
thrown to lions, and in the great threatres men—and
women too—looked on to see the dreadful fights which
took place. Perhaps St. Paul, weak and weary, his eyes
dim, and his body bleeding from the scourges, had to
grapple unarmed with some furious lion,

Robin. And conquered it—just like David.

Lady L. This is exceedingly doubtful. In the Second
Epistle to the Corinthians, however, St. Paul makes use of
language which shows that in Asia, probably at Ephesus,
he had been in most fearful peril. See the first chapter,
eighth verse.

Reading.

For we would not, brethren, have you ignorant of our
trouble which came to us in Asia, that we were pressed
out of measure, above strength, insomuch that we despaired
even of life. But we had the sentence of death in ourselves,
that we should not trust in ourselves, but in God which
raiseth the dead; who delivered us from go great a death.

Robin. Oh! I’m sure that St. Paul fought with a lion!

Ida. I wish that St. Luke had been with him at
ST. PAUL AT EPHESUS. 237



Ephesus, and we should have known all about it, and
what the “great death” was which made even St. Paul
almost despair. But I cannot see the word “ we.”

Lady L. You will see it in the following chapter. Luke
may not have been with the Apostle of the Gentiles at
Ephesus, but he certainly was on his next visit to Philippi.

Ida. I suppose that St. Paul was obliged to leave
Ephesus after the riot.

Lady L. We will conclude our reading with the first
verse of the twentieth chapter of Acts.

Reading.
And after the uproar was ceased, Paul called unto him
the disciples, and embraced them, and departed for to go
unto Macedonia.

“Cousin Philip, will you offer up our evening prayer ?”
said Lady Laurie, turning towards Mr. Carse as she closed
her Bible.

Mr. Carse had been sitting in an arm-chair a little apart
from the rest, remaining in perfect silence, his eyes shaded
by his hand. Robin suspected that the visitor was asleep ;
as he himself could hardly have kept quiet so long if
awake. But there was no sign of drowsiness in the gentle-
man’s manner as he arose, went to the table, and then
knelt down with the family, to conduct their devotions.
Lady Laurie had, years previously, occasionally been
present when her cousin had conducted family prayer
in a somewhat formal and lifeless manner. But on this
evening Lady Laurie was greatly surprised at the fervour
of devotion with which Philip prayed, especially with the
earnest, almost passionate confession of sin, and supplica-
tion for pardon and grace which flowed from his lips.
Philip was not like the being that he appeared to be
an hour before, and when he rose from his knees, Robin
fancied that the visitor’s eye-lashes looked wet.
238 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



After prayers the young people bade good-bye to the
guest, Mr. Carse declining Harold’s offer to accompany
him to the station. The visitor wished to spend the short
interval before his departure alone with his cousin.

As soon as Ida and the Hartleys had left the room, Mr.
Carse turned with emotion to Lady Laurie.

“Clara, I owe more to this visit than I can express to
you,” said her cousin.

“In what way?” asked Lady Laurie in surprise.

“JT was going up to London to-night, almost resolved to
give a ninety-nine years’ lease to the landlord of the
‘Trident,’ one of the largest gin-palaces in the south-west
of London.”

Lady Laurie’s mild face expressed something like
astonishment.

“Many a shaft at random sent
Finds mark the archer never meant,”

pursued Mr. Carse; “such was the case as regards your
words, and those of the children. I saw that my offerings
to God, such as they were, had not been made with clean
hands, that I had been giving a sop to conscience. For
the last twelve months I have been doing what I thought
to be good works, neither with the right motive, nor in
the right way; so that what earned man’s praise might
but rouse God’s anger. Clara, I go now to London resolved
to give the landlord a decided refusal; his lease is out,
and he must go. I shall take my chance of letting the
property. I shall probably have difficulty about it, and
can hardly hope for good terms. Gin-palaces are, alas!
amongst the most lucrative of investments.”

“Nothing is lost that you give up for God,” said Lady
Laurie.

Philip Carse only pressed his cousin’s hand in return,
and soon afterwards quitted Willowdale Lodge to walk to
the railway station by the light of the harvest full moon.
CHAPTER XXX,
REGRETS AND REJOICINGS.

In the early morning Willowdale Lodge was astir. A small
hired conveyance was to take the little Smiths, with their
bearer and luggage, to the station, where Lady Laurie and
Harold would jom them.

While Prem Dads was carrying the children’s boxes to
the carriage, Robin came up to Harold, who was just
about to start on foot for the station.

“Harold, I say,” the child began; putting his hand
confidentially on his brother’s arm, “I feel sorry, now Prem
Das is going, that I treated him badly. Perhaps he did
not quite understand what I meant by the cherries. Will
you just tell him that I’m sorry that I kicked him, and
that I hope that he won’t make God angry any more by
worshipping idols?” The child looked thoroughly in
earnest, and was so.

“T'll give him your message, Robin,” said Harold, and
he accordingly did so.

Prem Das turned and sal4med to Robin with a look of
affection, and said, “ good—much good ;” some of the few
English words which he had picked up.

Robin’s warm young heart was touched; he ran up to
the Hindu and threw his arms around him. Prem Dds
lifted him up, pressed the boy to his heart, and burst into
tears. He then put Robin down, and hastily returned to
his work.

Poor Robin then bade a sorrowful farewell to his little

239
240 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL,

companions, of whom he had become very fond. A win-
some group they now looked, for the visit to Willowdale
Lodge had worked a great change in the children. Pale
cheeks had filled out, and began to wear the hue of health.
There were three sweet little pairs of blue eyes, that
looked up from under three pretty white hats that had
come in Delia’s parcel. The small soft hand of the baby
that was put round the neck of the faithful bearer
looked delicately white in contrast to his swarthy com-
plexion. Robin was very sad as the little open carriage
drove away ; and watched little Lily kissing her hand to
him as long as she kept in sight. Ida saw that the boy’s
eyes were brimming with tears, and it was not often that
the manly little fellow gave way.

“Come, dear Robin,” she said, kindly, “you and I must
be company to each other. You have not yet seen the
pictures in my beautiful new book; nor have I helped
you to make up your puzzle.”

A half-hour was well spent in making the child happy.
At breakfast time Ida found on her plate a lovely purple
heartsease, the very pride of Robin’s garden. Whether
Prem Das had understood the meaning of Robin’s cherries
or not, certainly Ida made out that of the heartsease. She
took the velvet flower and pressed it, and fastened it into
her album, to the great gratification of the little giver.
Many years afterwards, when thousands of miles of sea
flowed between Ida and her adopted brother, she would
look tenderly at a faded and broken heartsease, and think,
“J wish that I had always been kind to dear Robin !”

Lady Laurie and Harold pursued their way to the
station. The latter was the first to break the silence.
Lady Laurie was reflecting over'her conversation of the
previous evening with her cousin Philip.

“ Mother, our reading last night has troubled my mind,”
observed young Hartley.
REGRETS AND REJOICINGS. 241

“In what way?” asked Lady Laurie.

“Why, I think that I may have been trying to do what
I considered a good work in a wrong spirit, and a wrong
way. I mean when trying to convert Prem Das, to cast
out of him the bad spirit of idolatry. I’ve had no success
at all.”

“You are too impatient, my Harold. It was hardly to
be expected that in so short a time long-rooted prejudice
and superstition should be overthrown, and the blessed
truths of our religion be made clear to an uneducated
heathen.”

“T’ve thought a great deal over the matter, especially
when this morning I began to read St. Paul’s letter to the
Thessalonians. Oh, what a different spirit was his from
mine |”

“What specially struck you in the Epistle?”

“T only read the first chapter, but how full thaé is of °
love, of thankfulness, and of prayer! No wonder that St.
Paul won the hearts of the Macedonians! I have been—yes,
I have been looking down on poor Prem Das, as if he were
a being quite inferior to myself, and I fancied that I did
him an honour in trying to teach him. I gave way toa
spirit of pride. Robin showed just now that he knew
better than I did how to get at the native’s heart. And
T have never prayed hard, like St. Paul, for the Lord Him-
self to convert the poor heathen. I had a feeling that
I could do a great deal myself, and I just find out that
I can do nothing.”

“You have made a valuable discovery, Harold.”

“And now my opportunity is gone; I shall never see
Prem D4s after to-day; I shall never be able to read to
him again from the Bible. I did not expect that he would
leave us so soon. It seems so disappointing! I have
sometimes thought that I would like to be a missionary
like St. Paul, or my own dear father, to speak to multi-

Q
242 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



tudes, to convert thousands, to form churches, to do a great
work. Prem Das came, and it seemed as if I might make
a beginning. But I shall never be a missionary, never!
I am not fit for the office !”

“There is One who, by His Spirit, can make you fit,”
said Lady Laurie softly. “But, oh, Harold! you must
watch against ambition and pride, they may intrude even
into missionary work. The most gifted labourer must
be—

‘Content to fill a little space,
So God be glorified.”

Lady Laurie and her party received a warm welcome in
Grosvenor Square, and she enjoyed in Mrs. Elwyn’s house
one of the happiest days which she had passed in her life.
It was a real pleasure to see Delia, though still on the
sofa, looking bright and happy, with no trace of the’ com-
plaining fretfulness which had made her society rather a
penance. The young mother embraced her three little
ones with rapture, told them of the delightful letter which
she had received yesterday from “ papa,” so full of messages
for them, and could not find words to express her thank-
fulness at seeing the improvement in their looks. Mrs.
Elwyn was very cordial and friendly, and confirmed Lady
Laurie in her first impression, that she was one of whom
she would like to know more. A lively young nephew of
Mrs. Elwyn was of the party, and after a meal had been
partaken of, the lady of the house told him to carry off
Harold to the British Museum, a place which she found
that young Hartley had not yet seen.

“T must first do a little bit of busmess given to me by
my schoolmaster, Dr. Bullen,” said Harold. “He desired
me to deliver very carefully a sealed letter to a Mr. White,
an upholsterer, who lives in a street near.”

“My servant shall take the note,” said Mrs. Elwyn.

“Thanks, but I promised to deliver it with my own
REGRETS AND REJOICINGS. 243



hand,” replied Harold; “I fancy that it contains money,
for Dr. Bullen has been refurnishing his principal rooms.”
Harold, as he spoke, drew the letter out of his pocket.
“Ah! my key and pencil-case have cracked the seal right
across; it looks as if I had opened the letter. I am
ashamed to give it in such a state.”

“You can easily put a little more wax,” observed Mrs.
Elwyn. “You will find taper and everything needed on
that little ormulu table, and my agate seal is lying on the
tray of the inkstand.”

Harold soon put the letter to rights, and, not trusting it
again to his pocket, he started off with young Elwyn to
fulfil his commision, and then go off to the museum.

“T like that-boy,” observed Mrs. Elwyn when Harold
had left the room; “one can see that he is to be trusted.”

The little children, tired with their journey, were now
sent off to the nursery to take their forenoon sleep,
Mrs. Elwyn went out on some business connected with
charity, and Delia and Lady Laurie were left for a quiet
conversation together.

“You will sympathise with my joy at receiving a long
letter from my John,” said the former; “and I ought to
tell you that it contained the promised remittance. John
is so kind and thoughtful; he spares on himself to send
home to me.”

The conversation .naturally turned on Mrs. Elwyn.
Delia repeated to Lady Laurie some of the words which
had acted like a tonic on her own nervous, sensitive mind.

“Mrs. Elwyn is doing me so much good by her little
scolds, and still more by her example. She seems too
busy to have any time for fretting or complaining, and
every difficulty that arises she takes straight to God. Mrs.
Elwyn is teaching me to pray, as she does, with the simple
confidence of a child. Ever since I came, she has been
making it her daily prayer, that God would show her some
244 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



suitable place for a large coffee-room and stranger's home
which she has for years wished to start. She has had
disappointment after disappomtment, but she takes all in
her brave, hopeful way ; sure that whatever appearances
may be, God will make all things to work for good to them
that love Him.”

Even while Delia was speaking, Mrs. Elwyn re-entered
the room, with a triumphant air, and a note in her hand.

“Did I not tell you that all would come right about the
coffee-house?” she said. “My man of business has just
sent me this by a special messenger. He writes that he
has found the very place to suit us, and has accidentally
(if one may use such a word), met the owner of the pre-
mises, who seems willing to come to terms. The proprietor
of the building is to call here with him at three oidlodk
to-day, to speak to me about the business.”

Punctual to his appointment, at three o’clock the visitor
rang the house bell. Mrs. Elwyn opened her desk, and
placed writing materials ready.

“Oh! don’t leave the room, Lady Laurie, J should like
to have you present,” said Mrs. Elwyn. “There is nothing
private in this business. I shall be glad of your experi-
ence and advice, for I am sure that the cause of Temper-
ance has a warm .advocate in you,—and that for one of
the largest public-houses to be converted into y

She paused, for the large mahogany door opened, the
servant announced two names; and, introduced by Mrs.
Elwyn’s man of business, in walked Philip Carse.

“Cousin Clara, I never expected to find you here!” he
exclaimed, after his introduction to Mrs. Elwyn. “It is
singular that you should be present to witness my transfer
of ‘The Trident’ to one who will, I am certain, make it
a blessing to the neighbourhood around, instead of a curse
as I fear that it has hitherto been.”

Here was another source of pure pleasure to Lady Laurie.


REGRETS AND REJOICINGS. 245

The business was speedily arranged, though law-forms
would have to be gone through on another day.

“Ts it not singular,” observed Mr. Carse to his cousin,
“that Mrs. Elwyn is willing to take a ninety-nine years’
lease of ‘The Trident, on exactly the same terms as those
offered to me by the publican who has hitherto rented the
place? But I do not forget,” he added, in a lower tone,
“that the extra twenty pounds are not to be considered as
my own; this annual sum will be my contribution to the
noble work to be set on foot by this generous lady.”

Se Soets
CHAPTER XXXI.
ST. PAUL AT TROAS.

It was Lady Laurie’s habit to question her boys, as they
walked home from church, on the sermon which they had
just heard. Ida wrote out what she could remember. Robin,
being an intelligent child, could usually give a simple
account of such prominent points of the discourse as came
within his comprehension. But on the Sunday following
Lady Laurie’s pleasant visit to London, Robin seemed as
dull as the cushion on which he had been seated. The
text all had disappeared from his memory. Not one word
of the sermon could he repeat to his mother.

It would have been different if Robin had been ques-
tioned about the new bonnet of Miss Petty, who sat just
before him in church. The child’s attention had been
much attracted by the artificial wreath around it. Robin
had wondered why primroses and blackberries should be
mixed together, when one came in the spring and the
other in the autumn; and whether the berries which
looked so natural were made of sealing wax or something
else, and why the leaves were all of a different shape from
those in the hedges. Then Robin’s mind had wandered
off to the little Smiths; be wondered whether they would
go to the ‘logical Gardens, and whether Lily would be
afraid of the lion. In the midst of all these idle thoughts
the little boy’s eyes had grown heavy, and his rough,
brown head had fallen so heavily on Lady Laurie’s arm,
that she had had to nudge the child to rouse him. It was

246
ST. PAUL AT TROAS. 247



no wonder that inattentive Robin could give no account
of the sermon.

Finding that Robin could repeat nothing of the sermon,
Lady Laurie gave him a little parable by way of reproof.

“Three men,” said the lady, “went to fill their bottles
at a spring of fine water, which came gushing from
amongst some rocks. The men were bound for a long
journey in a hot country, and they knew that they should
find no more water for many hours, so would do well to
lay in a supply.

“The first man brought to the spring his bottle, well
corked wp. The cool bright water came dashing over it,
and wet the hand which held it, but not one drop could
enter in.”

“What a stupid fellow that was,” said Robin, “to cork *
up his bottle when he wanted to fill it!”

“Very stupid, indeed,” said the lady, smiling. “The
second man brought a bottle uncorked, but with a hole in
the bottom! The water went in fast enough, but trickled
out almost as fast.”

“The second fellow was as stupid as the first!” cried
Robin.

“The third man brought a bottle with neither a cork
nora hole. He filled it with pure clear water, and went
happily on his journey with a good supply to keep off
thirst.”

“He was the sensible fellow!” exclaimed Robin; “I’d
have done just what he did.”

“Would you?” asked Lady Laurie dryly.

“Ob, Robin, mother has caught you!” cried Harold,
who had been an amused listener to the little parable.

“How has she caught me—what do you mean ?”

“Do you not see that the spring of water means the .
sermon preached by the vicar? You either corked up
your ears, so that nothing entered your head at all; or you
248 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



had a great hole in your memory, so that all the lesson
ran out.”

Robin smiled, but looked rather ashamed. “ Whydo
people wear such flowers in their bonnets, just to make
one look at them,” he said; “I might have remembered a
good bit, if it had not been for Miss Petty’s blackberries.
They looked like real ones, all but the leaves.”

“We must learn to govern our eyes, and open out ears,
and fill our memory-bottles,” observed Lady Laurie.
“ Remember, Robin, when you next go to church, to leave
the mischievous cork behind. Harold, I hope that you
have carried something away from the spring.”

“T was more than usually interested, mother, for the
text happened to be from that very second chapter of
1 Thessalonians, which I had taken for my morning read-
ing. That seems such a missionary chapter!”

“Can you remember the verse ?”

“ But as we were allowed of God to be put im trust
with the Gospel, even so we speak, not as pleasing men,
but God which trieth the hearts.

“Can you repeat anything which the vicar said on the
subject ?”

“ He spoke of our knowledge of the Gospel as a trust, a
very solemn trust, something confided to our care of which
we should have to give an account. He said that it was as
if the Queen should place in our care letters written with
her own hand, sealed with her own seal, and had com-
manded us to deliver them to certain persons, telling us at
the same time that each letter contained a bank-note of
very great value. ‘Would we not consider it to be a great
honour to be so trusted, said the vicar; ‘would we not
take care of the letters on the journey, so that weather
should not spoil, nor robbers steal them away? And
would we not faithfully deliver our letters, not that men
should praise our diligence or care, but that we might win
ST. PAUL AT TROAS. 249



a smile from the Queen?’ When I heard that, I thought
of missionaries who have to travel so far to deliver God’s
message ; I thought ”—and here Harold dropped his voice
to a whisper—“I thought of my own dear father; he was
faithful to his trust to the end.”

_ In the evening the Scripture reading was resumed, and
Robin said, as he took his seat by Lady Laurie, “ Mother,
I have not the least bit of cork in my ears.”

Ida. You said, mamma, that we should see St. Luke’s
we in this twentieth chapter of the Acts, so I hope that
we shall have a full account of the Apostle’s second visit
to Macedonia and Greece, and of his happy meeting with
his dear converts at Thessalonica, Philippi, and Berea.

Lady L. One cannot but regret that we have no details
of visits so interesting. We know little, but that St. Paul
gave much exhortation in Macedonia, and that he
remained three months in Greece. As usual, the Jews.
gave trouble; but we remain in ignorance of what
adventures St. Paul met, and what persecutions he
encountered. In the sixth verse we find the Apostle again
sailing away from Europe, and after five days’ voyage,
landing again in Troas, where he remained seven days.

Robin. I’m sorry we hear nothing more of the jailor
who said, What must I do to be saved? but I’m sure he
was a brave Christian.

Harold. It was at Troas that St. Paul had had the
vision which called him to Europe.

Lady L. St. Paul, as we have seen, stayed at Troas only
for a week; but his visit to it was marked by a very
interesting event. We will read the seventh and five
following verses.

Reading.
And on the first day of the week, when the disciples
came together to break bread, Paul preached unto them,
250 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



ready to depart on the morrow, and continued his speech
until midnight. And there were many lights in the upper
chamber where they were gathered together. And there
sat in a window a certain young man named Eutychus,
being fallen into a deep sleep, and as Paul was long
preaching he fell down with sleep, and fell down from the
third loft, and was taken up dead.





























































































































Ruins oF Troas,

Robin. Oh! this is a dreadful story! Was he killed
just for falling asleep, and when the sermon was so long,
and in the middle of the night!

Ida. But think who was speaking, Robin. If we had St.
Paul to preach to us, how we would treasure up every word !

Harold. I do not quite see that, Ida. In the Bible we
have St. Paul’s very words ; it is as if he were preaching to
ST. PAUL AT TROAS. 251



us every time that we open his epistles. And yet, till
yesterday, except learning the twelfth of Romans, and the
chapter about Charity, I scarcely ever brought my bottle
to the spring flowing just, as it were, by my door.

Robin. But the poor poor young man who was killed,
do let us hear more about him. Was not St. Paul dread-
fully sorry when he heard the sound of the crash just in
the middle of his sermon? I think that St. Paui would
run downstairs, and out of the house, and cry over the
poor bleeding body!

Lady L. St. Paul did something better than cry.
Reads—And Paul went down and fell on him, and
embracing him said, trouble not yourselves, for his life is
in him. When he therefore was come up again, and ‘had
broken bread, and eaten, and talked a long while, even till
- break of day, so-he departed. And they brought the
young man alive, and were not a little comforted.

Robin. I’m glad there is such a happy end to the
story !

Harold. Where did St. Paul go next? Did he visit
the Churches in Pisidia and Galatia; did he see again the
converts in Lystra and Derbe ?

Lady L. No; we will see that this time St. Luke and
St. Paul’s other companions travelled by sea, while he
himself went to Assos, which is not far from Troas. The
Apostle of the Gentiles then also embarked in a ship, and
sailed to Miletus.

Harold. Miletus—let me see in the map. Here it is;
it looks only about twenty-five miles to the south of
Ephesus. I am sure that St. Paul went to that city again,
to see the Church that was then so full of its first love.
He would not be kept back by fear of the silversmith
Demetrius, or of the mob who shouted “ Great is Diana
of the Ephesians !”

Lady L. Tt was not fear but haste that prevented —
252 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



St. Paul from visiting Ephesus. He was impatient to be,
if possible, at Jerusalem on the day of Pentecost. But the
Apostle did not forget those amongst whom he had
laboured for more than two years. He sent from Miletus
to Ephesus, and called to him the elders of the Church
which he. had founded. To these, his beloved brethren
gathered around him, St. Paul made a most touching
address. He knew that he was going into exceeding
peril—that at Jerusalem he would have to endure bonds
and afflictions. St. Paul was like a father taking a last
leave of his children. But the address is so beautiful
that we must read it entire. Let us begin at the
eighteenth, and go on without pause to the thirty-fifth
verse.

This portion of Scripture was accordingly read.

Harold. That is a beautiful address indeed, and must
have gone straight to every heart.

Ida. Now I know where to find those words of the Lord
Jesus—Jt is more blessed to give than to receive. I heard
them repeated in a charity sermon, and I wanted to know
where they came from, but did not like to inquire.
I hunted three times through all the four Gospels, and
then made up my mind that the text was not in the Bible;
that people only fancied that the Lord would say such a
beautiful thing, because it was just like Him: to say so.
But how did St. Paul know of the saying ?

Lady L. Some of the blessed Saviour’s words would
naturally be handed down and treasured in the memory
of those who had heard them from His lips. How much
St. Peter could remember !

Harold. And St. John.

Ida. And each of the three Marys.

Robin. I wish that the Lord’s mother had written a
gospel, and told us of every little thing that He did and














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Sr. PAUL BIDDING FAREWELL To THE DiscIPLES AT EPHESUS.
ST. PAUL AT TROAS. 253



said when He was a boy like me. I do so want to know
what the Lord was like when He was only six years old.

Lady L. We are certain that Christ was very obedient,
gentle, and kind; that He meekly bore unkindness from
the rude Nazareth boys; that He was ready to give away
even His food if any one else was in need; that He loved
to hear the Word of God, and to pray to His heavenly
Father.

Ida. How did St. Paul know that he would have bonds
and afflictions if he went to Jerusalem ?

Lady L. St. Paul tells the Ephesian elders that “the
Holy Ghost witnesseth this in every city.” This may
have been by special revelation to the Apostle himself, or,
as we shall see, by the mouths of others.

Harold. How noble are those words of St. Paul !—
“But none of these things move me, neither count I my
life dear unto myself, so that I might finish my course
with joy, and the ministry which I have received of the
Lord Jesus.”

Lady £. Let us now finish the chapter.

Reading.

And when he had thus spoken, he kneeled down and
prayed with them all. And they all wept sore, and fell
on Paul’s neck and kissed him, sorrowing most of all for
the words which he spake that they should see his face no
more. And they accompanied him unto the ship.
CHAPTER XXXII.
LOST.

On Monday morning Harold, with a lighter heart than
he had had for many a day, went to school. He had
begun the week with good resolutions, and the first duty
before him was that of studying hard. Harold would
work at his books to fit himself, as far as mere learning
could go, for the high and holy office of a messenger of
God. Allowed to be put wn trust with the Gospel, not as
pleasing men, but God, who trieth the hearts. “This was
St. Paul the Apostle’s view of a missionary’s work; this
shall be mine,” thought the boy. “If troubles and afflic-
tions should come, as they came to the first great mis-
sionary, I hope that I shall be able to say, as he said—
None of these things move me, neither count I my life
dear to myself, so that I may finish my course with
joy.”

His rapid step corresponding to his energetic resolves,
Harold went up to the well-known iron gate, with the
tall brick gate-posts, topped with what looked like big
round cannon-balls painted white. Brightly on the gate
glistened a brass plate, on which one might read, in clear
letters, Copley Hall, Educational Establishment for
Gentlemen’s Sons.

Beyond the gate was a straight gravel path, leading to
‘the red-brick house, which looked formal and precise as a
rule in arithmetic. Two windows on each side of the door,
five windows above, all exactly alike, with not a creeper to

254
LOST. 255



vary the outline. On the roof not a slate was out of its
place; the very chimneys looked formal, as if each had
been shaped precisely according to the same pattern.
How different from Willowdale Lodge, with its winding
path through the shrubbery, its gable-end, and over-
shadowing eaves and diamond-shaped panes, that glist-
ened so brightly through honeysuckle, clematis, and
roses !

But Harold was rather proud of his school, with all its
prim formality and absence of picturesque beauty. He
had pleasant associations, especially with the large play-
ground behind the house, which had so often echoed with
the merry shout when his bat sent the cricket-ball flying.
Harold enjoyed his game, and was a little proud of his
skill in manly sports, and the popularity which it brought
him. He had lately lost his spirit for games, but his
spirit was regaining its elastic power, and Harold intended |
not only to have a good “set to” at his studies, but a good
“set to” at cricket when studies should be over.

The school-bell was ringing its summons, and the boys
were just swarming like bees into the school-room, when
Harold went up to the door. He was met at the entrance
by Dr. Bullen, with a very ominous scowl on his face.

“ Harold Hartley, you'll please to come into my study,”
said the master, and he led the way to the back parlour,
much dreaded by little boys when they got into scrapes.
Such had no pleasant associations connected with the
mahogany table, with its brass-clasped desk and the tall
bookcase behind, on which reposed the instrument of
terror—the birch. To the truant, the apartment, with its
heavy mantel-piece surmounted by a black marble clock,
flanked by a pair of china bull dogs, was much like the
waiting-room of a dentist.

The Doctor sat down in his high-backed chair of green
leather, and Harold stood before him, feeling himself placed
256 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



in the position of a culprit, though he could not imagine
for what offence.

“Harold Hartley,” began the schoolmaster, in a tone of
almost metallic harshness, “please to inform me whether
you delivered a letter which I entrusted to your care to a
Mr. White, an upholsterer ?”

“Yes, sir,” replied Harold promptly, meeting firmly the
gaze of the hard, stern, penetrating eyes that were fixed
upon him.

“ Answer me—what was in that letter?”

“ How can I tell, sir?” asked the youth in surprise.

“You are not to question, but to answer,” said the master
angrily. “You must be aware of what were the contents.”

“T never saw them; I know nothing about them,”
replied Harold.

“Liar!” exclaimed the master. The word seemed to
send all Harold’s blood into his face; his eyes flashed with
indignation at the insult.

“Took here—read that!” cried the Doctor, in almost
irrepressible anger.

Harold took the note held out to him, and read what
follows :— :

“RESPECTED Sir,—I duly received your letter, dated
Friday ; but as you mentioned in it that you had enclosed
a twenty-pound note of the Bank of England, I beg to say
that no such note was within the cover. A young gentle-
man, accompanied by another, gave me the letter; being
engaged with a customer I did not open the cover at once,
and when I did so, and read your letter, the young gentle-
man had gone, I knew not whither.—Yours obediently,

“J. WHITE.

“ P.S.—The seal of the envelope, which I enclose, looked
as if it had been tampered with. You will observe that
while it has the letters E. E. on it, there are remains of some
former impression on wax of a slightly darker colour.”
LOST. 257



“What say you to that, sir?” asked the Doctor sternly.

Harold was almost overpowered by the suddenness of
the blow which had come upon him. The bare thought
of being suspected of theft covered him with confusion, of
which the Doctor misunderstood the cause. He mistook
the agony of a sensitive spirit for the shame of conscious
guilt.

“The only thing left for you to do, wretched boy, is to
make a frank confession, and at once restore the note com-
mitted to your trust, of which you have basely robbed me.”

“Sir, I am innocent!” cried Harold, his flesh changing
to a deadly paleness.

“Do not add falsehood to theft. You know perfectly
well that my seal does not bear the impression E. E.”

“T used Mrs. Elwyn’s seal,” said Harold.

“Used her seal! then you plead guilty to having broken
open my letter and sealed it again to prevent the fact
being known!”

“T never broke open the letter, but the seal was cracked
in my pocket, and I sealed it up for safety.”

“For safety!” echoed the Doctor bitterly ; “after having
taken out the contents of my letter!”

Sir—I never saw them—I never touched them—
I would rather die than steal!” exclaimed Harold.

“Oh! very fine—very fine!” cried the Doctor; but this
won’t do, this won’t do! Your only chance is prompt con-
fession and restoration ; I should be very sorry, on account
of Lady Laurie, to employ the police ; I should be sorry that
your father’s son should see the inside of a prison.”

“ Police—prison!” faintly repeated Harold. He leant
on the table to steady himself, for the room seemed to be
turning round and round.

“ Will you confess!” criedthe Doctor.

“Sir, I have nothing to confess; I have told you nothing
but the truth.”

R
258 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



“Turn out your pockets!” cried Dr. Bullen.

Harold mechanically obeyed; there was nothing in
them but handkerchief, pencil-case, and key.

“Your room must be searched,” said the schoolmaster ;
“J'll get to the bottom of the matter. Who was the
companion mentioned in this note?”

“Mrs. Elwyn’s nephew, Edward Elwyn,” was the
reply.

“We must have his evidence,” said the Doctor. “ Yes,
I'll sift this matter to the bottom. Go back to your class,
sir; your absence would be noted, and I do not want any
talk about this most disgraceful affair at present.

Harold walked to the school-room like one in a dream.
It hardly seemed to him that what had passed could be
real. It was too horrible to be true. It is scarcely to be
wondered at that Harold did not learn, nor even compre-
hend a single word of his lessons.

In the meantime the Doctor donned his broad-brimmed
hat, took his silver headed cane, and went off at a brisk
pace to Willowdale Lodge. The sound of Ida’s practising
at the piano came through the open window.

Doctor Bullen pulled the door-bell violently, and when
the maid came, sent in a message to Lady Laurie that he
wished to speak to her ladyship directly on very important
business.

The message alarmed Lady Laurie, but she was more
alarmed by the expression on the Doctor's face when he
stalked in.

“My boy—anything the matter with my Harold:” she
exclaimed.

“Madam, may we be alone?” Much to Ida’s vexation,
she had to quit the room directly.

“Madam, it is my painful duty to request your lady-
ship’s permission to search Harold’s room,” said the Doctor.
“T grieve to say that he is suspected—more than suspected
LOST. 259



—of having taken a twenty pound bank-note from a letter
committed to his care.”

“Perfectly impossible!” exclaimed Lady Laurie.
“Some one has deceived you, Dr. Bullen.”

“May I ask you to show the way to the room of this
unfortunate boy?”

Confident in Harold’s innocence, and indignant at the
thought of its ever being questioned, Lady Laurie led the
way up the narrow stair.

Dr. Bullen searched thoroughly both of the little attics,
whilst the mistress of the dwelling looked on in indignant
silence. The bed was examined, the pillow-case stripped
of its cover, the mattress turned up, every drawer not only
emptied but pulled out, to see if anything lay behind.
Every book was shaken, even Harold’s treasured Bibles,
the English and the Urdu. Nothing dropped out but the
marker placed in the former at the fourth chapter of first .
Thessalonians.

“T hope, sir, that you are satisfied,” said Lady Laurie,
looking like a dove rufiling her feathers at a threatened
attack on her nest. Dr. Bullen had even turned up the
bit of carpet, and examined the back of poor Harold’s
framed photograph of his father.

“Tam satisfied that the note is not here, but Iam resolved
to find out where it is. You will favour me, madam, with
the address of Mrs. Elwyn ; her nephew is a most import-
ant witness.”

“What makes you suspect my boy ?” cried the lady.

Dr. Bullen showed her Mr. White’s letter, and explained
in a few words his reasons for feeling assured that Harold
had abstracted the note.

“T hope that you will use your influence to make the
unhappy culprit confess. I should regret the necessity of
employing harsh measures. J would far rather—for your
sake—hush up the matter. I shall, at present, mention
260 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



the matter to no one; but, of course, Harold cannot possibly
continue to attend the school till he can clear himself from
suspicion.”

The narrow staircase was again descended; Lady
Laurie’s heart was so full that she could not utter a word.
By a silent gesture alone she returned the Doctor’s low,
formal bow at parting. When he had left the house,
Lady Laurie returned to the sitting-room, sank into a
chair, buried her face in her hands, and gave a convulsive
sob.

“What is the matter, mother, oh ! what is the matter?”
cried little Robin, running up to her, and throwing his
arms round her neck. “What has the naughty Doctor
been saying to vex yousomuch? Has anything happened
to Harold ?”

“Harold is in trouble, and so am I,” said the lady,
raising her head; “we have heavy clouds above us, but
God will bring all into sunshine.” Lady Laurie bowed
down her head on the neck of the child and, for a few
minutes, gave way to a burst of weeping.

Robin was much alarmed, as was also Ida, who was
impatient to know the cause of the Doctor's mysterious
visit.

Lady Laurie did not long give way to her feelings.
Trying to command her trembling voice she said, “ Harold
has been accused of something of which he never was
guilty. We must all pray that God will make his inno-
cence clear.” So saying, the lady sank on her knees and
poured forth her soul in most fervent supplications, in
which the children joined, though much perplexed as to
the subject of her prayer.

When Lady Laurie arose she was more composed. “Do
not question me, my children,” she said, silencing Robin
by a movement of her hand; “and do not question Harold
when he comes home. J must now write for the post.”
LOST. 261

Lady Laurie was resolved that a letter from herself should
arrive at the same time as Dr. Bullen’s.

Lady Laurie hid nothing from Mrs. Elwyn, to whom
she looked in this time of perplexity and distress for
encouragement and help. She felt much comfort in a
kind of dependence on Mrs. Elwyn’s good sense and power
of getting her friends out of trouble. Lady Laurie almost
persuaded herself that the bank-note must have dropped
out of the envelope in the house in Grosvenor Square. Its
discovery would make everything right. Harold’s inno-
cence would shine forth as the noon-day. It was thus
that, in a hopeful spirit, Lady Laurie met poor Harold on
his return from Copley House. She was quite shocked at
his haggard looks.

“Mother, have you heard?” he inquired, in a hollow
voice.

“T have heard all from the Doctor,” was her reply.

“ And do you suspect me, mother ?”

“T would as soon suspect myself!” exclaimed Lady
Laurie, and pressed her adopted son to her heart.

The Doctor to a certain extent kept his promise of not
mentioning the unfortunate affair of the lost note to any
person in Foreham. He spoke of it to nobody but his
wife; and his good wife, who was very much shocked, told
the painful secret to no one but her particular friend,
Miss Theresa Petty.
CHAPTER XXXIII.
ST, PAUL IN JERUSALEM,

“JT can’r be present at the reading, I’ll just go and shut
myself up in my room!” cried Harold, when the time
came for the little evening meeting.

“You had better be with us, my son, if only to listen,”
said the lady. “The Word of God, which we are going to
read, may have a message of comfort for you. To shut
yourself up with your grief would but make your spirit
morbid. I hope—I am full of hope—that m a few days
we shall all be rejoicing over deliverance from this sore
trouble; in the meantime, Faith must do her part. We
must not, like the disciples in the storm, deserve the
gentle rebuke, “O ye of little faith, wherefore did ye
doubt ?”

Harold, with a heavy sigh, took his place at the table,
Robin watching his brother’s every movement with anxious
wondering eyes!

Lady L. We know little of the voyage of St. Paul from
Miletus to Ceesarea, except the names of places at which
he touched. At Tyre, indeed, where the ship discharged
her cargo, the Apostle and his companions tarried seven
days. Disciples there, mspired by the Spirit, warned St.
Paul against proceeding on to Jerusalem.

Robin. Was it right in St. Paul to go on, when every-
body told him to stay ?

Lady L. The Apostle evidently acted under a strong
sense of duty. He reminds us of our blessed Lord, who

262
ST. PAUL IN JERUSALEM. 263



set his face steadfastly to go to Jerusalem, though He
knew that not only bonds, but a terrible death awaited
Him there. Let us read the description of St. Panl’s
parting from the disciples at Tyre in the fifth and sixth
verses of the twenty-first chapter of Acts.

Reading.

And when we had accomplished these days, we departed
and went our way; and they all brought us on our way,
with wives and children, till we were out of the city; and
we kneeled down on the shore and prayed. And when
we had taken leave one of another, we took ship, and they
returned home again.

Robin. Then did St. Paul sail right up to Jerusalem ?

Lady £. You forget that Jerusalem is an inland city,
and could not be reached by water. Paul and his friends
landed at Ceesarea, which is on the sea-coast, on the way
to Jerusalem. Here St. Paul received further warnings of
the great perils before him, which we will read from the
Bible.

Reading.

We aniseed into the house of Philip the evangelist,
which was one of the seven, and abode with him.

Ida. Was this the Philip who met Queen Candace’s
treasurer when he was sitting in his chariot, and reading
the prophecy of Isaiah ?

Lady £. The same.

Ida. Then he at least Goat not find fault with St.
Paul for mixing freely with Gentiles.

Reading.
And the same man had four daughters, virgins, which
did prophesy. And as we tarried there many days, there
came down from Judea a certain prophet, named Agabus.
264 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.

And when he was come unto us he took Paul’s girdle, and
bound his own hands and feet, and said, Thus saith the
Holy Ghost, so shall the Jews at Jerusalem bind the man
that owneth this girdle, and shall deliver him into the
hands of the Gentiles. And when we heard these things,
both we and those of that place besought him not to go
up to Jerusalem!
Robim. Oh! would not St. Paul go back then!

Reading.

Then Paul answered and said, What, mean ye to weep
and to break mine heart? for I am ready not to be bound
only, but also to die at Jerusalem for the name of the
Lord Jesus. And when he would not be persuaded, we
ceased, saying, The will of the Lord be done.

Ida. And so St. Paul travelled on to the dangerous
city, whose people had killed the Lord Himself. Was
Peter there to welcome St. Paul? I hope that the dispute
at Antioch had left no bitter feeling behind.

Lady £. There is no mention of the presence of St.
Peter. Had that generous-hearted Apostle been at
Jerusalem at the time, we cannot doubt that he would
have welcomed Paul as a brother in Christ. Paul went to
St. James, and with him all the elders at Jerusalem were
gathered together.

Ida. Was it not St. James who was rather inclined to
insist on the Gentiles keeping the Jewish law, instead of
resting entirely on Justification by Faith ?

Lady L. St. James does not seem to have seen the
freedom from ceremonial rites, as given by the Gospel, in
quite so clear a light as did the Apostle of the Gentiles.
But St. James was a very holy man, and afterwards gave
his life for the Faith. It was by his advice and that of
the elders that St. Paul, to quiet the prejudices of the
Jews, observed one of their religious customs. He paid
ST. PAUL IN JERUSALEM. 265

the expenses of men who had made a certain vow of
separation, neither to shave their heads, nor to eat any-
thing coming from the vine, for a certain period of time,
at the end of which period they shaved their heads, and
offered a sacrifice for purification in the Temple.

Ida. But I thought, mamma, that the sacrifice of the
Lord Jesus was enough for all. If St. Paul bought sheep
to be sacrificed for these men, was it not rather like going
back to the law ?

Lady £. Probably St. Paul acted in the spirit of his own
words,-““unto the Jews I became asa Jew, that I might
gain the Jews; to them that are under the law, as under the
law, that I might gain them that are under the law. ... I
am made all things to all men, that I might by all means
save some.” St. Paul seems on this occasion, however, to
have acted rather on the judgment of others than on his
own. He was ready to do anything not actually wrong
in order to satisfy the minds of bigoted Jews.

Robin. And were they quite pleased with him, mother?

Lady L. Alas! no; far from it. The Jews had seen
Paul in company with an Ephesian, and the very idea
that he might have taken a Gentile into the Temple
stirred up their fury almost to madness. In vain had
been the Apostle’s care to avoid giving needless offence.
In the thirtieth verse we read of the fearful riot which
followed.

Reading.

And all the city was moved, and the people ran
together, and they took Paul, and drew him out of the
Temple, and forthwith the doors were shut.

Robin. Oh! they are going to kill him now, just as they
killed St. Stephen.

Lady L. They certainly would have done so, but for the
interference of the Romans, who, as you know, bore rule in
Judea.
266 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.

Reading.

And as they went about to kill him, tidings came unto
the chief captain of the band that all Jerusalem was in an
uproar. Who immediately took soldiers and centurions,
and ran down unto them; and when they saw the chief
captain and the soldiers, they left off beating of Paul.

Robin. I’m so glad they came in time to save him!

Reading.

Then the chief captain came near, and took him, and com-
manded him to be bound with two chains, and demanded
what he was, and what he had done. And some cried one
thing, and some another, amongst the multitude. And
when he could not know the certainty for the tumult, he
commanded him to be carried into the castle. And when
he came upon the stairs, so it was that he was borne of
the soldiers for the violence of the people. For the
multitude of the people followed after, crying, “ Away with
him !” : ;

Ida. And all this fury was because the Jews suspected
St. Paul of having done what he never had done.

Harold, who had sat a silent listener, raised his droop-
ing head at this word.

Lady L. False accusations, unjust suspicions, those
have been amongst the bitterest trials of the Lord’s own
people. See holy Joseph, falsely accused of sin which
his soul abhorred, and thrown into prison! The Bible
tells us that the tron entered into his soul. See Job,
the upright, generous, God-fearing man, denounced as a
hypocrite by his own friends. Moses, the most meek and
self-denying of leaders, was accused of ambition. And—
most marvellous example of all—behold the pure and
spotless Saviour, spoken of as a blasphemer, and as one
who had a devil! See him dragged before a judgment
ST. PAUL IN JERUSALEM. 267



seat, with the very beings whom He had made, to whom he
had given the power of speech, bearing false witness
against Him! To be accused of blasphemy against God
must have been one of the sharpest thorns in the Saviour’s
crown; and yet he was willing to endure it for us!

Lady Laurie knelt down, and—as was her wont—con-
cluded the evening reading with prayer. When the family
rose, and separated, Harold pressed the lady’s hand to his
lips, and said in a scarcely audible voice, “ Thanks, mother!
there was to-night a message of comfort for me.”
CHAPTER XXXIV.
OUTBURST OF PASSION.

“TI SHALL be a complete prisoner here,” said Harold
gloomily, as on the following morning he saw Lady Laurie
about to start for the cottage of her old pensioner, with a
little covered basket hanging on her arm. “I could not
endure to meet any one who knows me, while this horrible
cloud is hanging over me.”

“T hope that this cloud will soon break in blessings o’er
your head,” said Lady Laurie, in an encouraging tone.
“T expect to-morrow morning an answer to my letter to
Mrs. Elwyn, and I am in hopes that she will enclose the
lost note, which must have dropped out of its cover.”

“You need not hope that,” said Harold sadly. “The
note could not have dropped out. The seal was never
broken, only cracked right across.”

“And did you give the letter into Mr. White’s own
hands, or did it go through a third party ?”

“T gave it into his own hands; till I did so the letter
was never out of mine. It is impossible that the bank-
note should have fallen, or have been taken out by any
one.”

Lady Laurie looked distressed and perplexed. “Did
Edward Elwyn see you re-seal it?” she asked. “If he
did, and the first seal had never been actually broken, his
witness ought to bear you clear, if he was with you all the
time from the sealing of the letter, to the giving it to
Mr. White.”

268
OUTBURST OF PASSION. 269



“Edward was with me: we were never parted; we left
the house in the Square together, and together went to
the shop in the neighbouring street. But whether Edward
looked on while I resealed the letter, I really cannot
remember. How could I guess that it would turn out to
be a matter of any importance ?”

“T hope and trust that Edward watched you, and so
can declare that to his certain knowledge the letter was
safely delivered, without the seal having ever been broken.
But—surely there is some one coming along the shrubbery
walk!”

“Tt’s Miss Petty!” exclaimed Harold Hartley.

“Oh! nothing could induce me to see her now!”
exclaimed Lady Laurie, in real alarm. “ Harold—quick
—shut the front door, and when she rings for admittance, ©
» tell Eliza to say that I’m out,—for out I will be. I will
escape by the back door, and go round to the widow’s by
the fields,”

At another time Harold might have laughed at the
lady’s hasty flight from a visitor so unwelcome. But he
was in no mood for laughing now; he felt as if he never
could smile again.

“Not in the house! dear! dear! and I so particularly
wished to see Lady Laurie!” cried Miss Petty, when the
maid had answered her ring at the bell. “Perhaps I can
see Miss Ida,—oh! there she is in the garden with little
Robin!”

Theresa Petty turned her steps in that direction; it
would be easy, she thought, to get the whole truth from
the children.

“Ah! so I’ve found you out, enjoying yourself in this
pretty little summer-house, Ida, my dear! I'll come and
sit down beside you. The shade of the lilac tree is so
delicious! I am so glad to be able to run about again
and see my friends! On Sunday I managed to get to
270 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



church, and that was a comfort, after being tied by my
tiresome foot. I have been longing to have a chat with
my dearest Lady Laurie again.”

Ida sat still, trying to endure the conversation, when
she would so much rather have gone on with her history
of Greece. Robin stood by, with his thumbs in his pockets,
looking rather like a young bull-dog on the watch, ready
to growl at a stranger whom he suspects. He had received
an impression that Lady Laurie and Harold’s trouble was in
some way connected with Miss Petty, who seemed to make
every one uncomfortable or unhappy.

“ By-the-by, what’s all this business about poor, dear
Harold,” pursued the tormentor, with an inquisitive look.
“T am so distressed about it!”

“We do not know all—only part,” said sensible Ida,
and I think—indeed I am sure—that mamma would not
like us to talk about it.”

“But you must know that Harold is accused of stealing
a twenty-pound note.”

This was too much for Robin. of “ He never did!” burst from the child’s throat, while he
gave her a smart blow on the arm; the little bull-dog,
‘too, dashed at her at the same moment; and Miss Petty
started, screamed, and dropped her parasol on the grass.

“Oh! you little ruffian!” she cried in wrath; “you are
as bad as your brother!”

“Go away, Miss Petty, go away!” exclaimed Robin,
pulling her hard by the sleeve. “ You shan’t come here
to speak against Harold; he’s my brother, and I won’t
bear it!”

“Robin! Robin!” said Ida reprovingly, but she did not
look very angrily on the terrible boy.

“T shall certainly inform Lady Laurie of this rudeness.
I was never so treated in my life!” cried Miss Petty, pick-
ing up her parasol, and rising in high displeasure. “I hops
OUTBURST OF PASSION. 271



that you-will have a good flogging, Master Robin, to drive
your impertinence out of you!” And angrily swinging
herself from side to side as she walked, Miss Petty quitted
the shrubbery.

“Robin! it was very wrong to strike a lady,” said Ida,
when Miss Petty’s green parasol and blue veil had dis-
appeared behind the bushes.

“How dared she say that Harold had stolen a twenty-
pound note?”

“She did not exactly say that; she said that some one
had accused him.”

“She’s the some one her own self, and I can’t bear her!”
eried Robin.

On Lady Laurie’s return, Robin, who never hid anything
from her, went straight up to her and confessed.

“ Mother, that naughty Miss Petty said something about
my brother's stealing a twenty-pound note, and I hit her,—
pretty hard, too,” said Robin; “I made her jump, and
squeal a little.”

Lady Laurie was deeply distressed. For Miss Petty to
know the dreadful secret was for all Foreham to know it.
The lady bit her lip, and pressed her hand over her eyes.

“She wants you to beat me,” quoth Robin.

This roused Lady Laurie’s attention to the difficulty
immediately before her. “Oh, Robin! why have you added
to my trouble by your naughty passion?” she plaintively
said, “You will have to go and ask Miss Petty’s forgiveness.”

“T can’t—I won't,’ muttered the child.

Robin was in an obstinate mood. Poor Lady Laurie,
with her heart aching, had not at the moment the spirit to
fight out a battle with her wilful child. She left Ida to
do this, but Ida had no success. Lady Laurie was com-
pelled to punish. Robin was not indeed beaten, but he
went without his dinner.

Harold, who knew nothing of what had passed, asked
272 — PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



why his little brother was in disgrace. To hear that he
had been rude to Miss Petty and would not beg pardon,
was answer enough. Harold did not—perhaps he feared
to inquire further.

To the surprise of the family, who should arrive by the
three o’clock train but Prem Dds. He was the bearer of a
note from Mrs. Elwyn. That kind-hearted woman sympa-
thised too heartily with Lady Laurie’s distress to let her
wait for a reply to her note by the post.

Hope was strong in the lady’s mind as she broke open
the letter thus despatched by a special messenger. She
had a persuasion, not founded on reason, that she would
find within the lost twenty-pound note. Though Harold
did not share that persuasion, he looked eagerly at bis
mother’s face to read in its expression the nature of the
contents of Mrs. Elwyn’s epistle. Lady Laurie looked
disappointed, and, after she had read the letter, handed it
over to Harold. It ran as follows :-—

“Dear FrrenD,—I feel for you all from my heart.
I have searched every corner of the room, but nothing has
been found. Edward’s evidence may be very useful, but
unfortunately he has left London for his school. If possible,
he shall be with you to-morrow, but I hardly expect that
‘ he will be able to go so soon. I send this by Delia’s Hindu
servant; he has been ailing in London, and will be the
better for a change. Keep him just as long as you please,
as a nurse is engaged for the children. Do not give way
to anxiety and fear; remember that all is in the hands of
a wise and loving Father.

«¢ All will be right,
Look to the light,

Morning is ever the daughter of Night,—
All that is dark will be all that is bright”

“Yours most truly,— E. E”

Mrs, Elwyn had shown her usual clear judgment in
OUTBURST OF PASSION. 273



sending Prem Das to Willowdale Lodge. She had heard
that the conversion of the Hindu had been on the mind of
Harold; What so likely,” she thought, “to rouse the
unfortunate boy from a state of despair, as to give him
something to do for his Lord, when he would not care to do
anything for himself?” Mrs. Elwyn had judged rightly.
The sight of the white-draped, graceful form of Prem Das,
the bronzed features, the dark eyes brightening with
pleasure at seeing his young benefactor again, was a
cordial to the drooping spirit of the English youth.
Harold was again “entrusted” with the Gospel, his
Master’s letter signed and sealed, and he would deliver it
faithfully. The Saviour would never misjudge His
servant, however men might misjudge; the all-seeing
One never would wrong His child. Mortals might
suspect, accuse, condemn ; but there was One who would
judge according to truth, and make all right in the end.

Harold took Prem Das up to his own little room, whither
he was followed by Robin.

“Mayn’t I come in, Harold?” pleaded the child in
disgrace.

“Come in, Robin,” said his brother. “I am going to
read and talk a little to this poor Hindu. Do you pray to
God to help me to do so.”

“I’m afraid to pray,” said Robin, sadly ; “I’m naughty,
and I won’t beg pardon.” The little culprit went in, and
sat down silently in a corner of the room.

Harold was in the furnace of affliction, and that furnace
was having its refining, purifying effect. The loss of his
father had been a great grief to young Hartley, but it was
not a grief to humble his pride, though it wrung his heart.
But now to be ashamed to show his face amongst his old
companions, to be branded with the imputation of theft,
would have been an intolerable burden, a burden to crush
a proud spirit to the dust, but for the sustaining power of

8
274 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



religion. Harold’s sorrows drove him closer to his Saviour.
The youth found that indeed—
“Trials make the promise sweet,
Trials give new breath to prayer ;
Bring us to the Saviour’s feet,
Lay us low, and keep us there.”

Tenderly now, in the little attic chamber, did Harold
talk to the poor Hindu. Himself bearing a heavy cross,
with what feeling he spoke of the shame, the anguish,
which the blessed Jesus endured. What came from the
heart went to the heart. Harold felt that the Hindu was
listening as he had never listened before. Tears glistened
in the soft, dark eyes that were raised to Harold’s. There
was not the hardness, the utter indifference to the subject
of religion which had so disappointed the youthful teacher
before. The ice seemed to be beginning to melt under
the influence of Christian love.

“He listens now, he is almost crying!” exclaimed
Robin. “Ob, Harold, I want you to teach me one little
verse in that language, and I would speak to Prem Das
too. I could learn a very easy verse, I could learn God 1s
love.”

“That is very difficult to learn, at least to me just now,”
said Harold, with a sigh.

“Tt is easy if one tries hard,” said Robin, not under-
standing the nature of his brother’s difficulty in mastering
three short words.

“T am trying to learn it by heart,” said Harold; “may
God give me grace to do so.”

While Harold was teaching the Hindu upstairs, Lady
Laurie was having a painful mental struggle below.

“My boy ought to go elsewhere; we should all go, for it
is unbearable to remain at Foreham now,” said the lady to
herself. “But we seem to be chained to this prison.
I have not at present the means to remove without incur-
OUTBURST OF PASSION. 275



ring a debt. All sorts of expenses seem to come upon me
at once; the bill for repairing the damage done by the
storm, the bill for the poor boys’ mourning, the coal bill,
that for a poor friend’s funeral expenses, Harold’s quarter's
schooling—all these have almost drained my purse, and
my dividend will not be due till September. I should
have liked for us all to have taken wing, and have flown
off to Scotland, Wales, the Continent, any place where
there would be nothing to remind us of this horrible
charge. Why such a imysterious trial should have been
sent I know not; it has been almost too much for my
faith. Strengthen that weak faith, O my Lord.”

Lady Laurie walked to the bookcase, took out her Bible,
and opened it at random. Her eyes rested on these words
of St. Paul, so full of heavenly comfort,—* For our light
affliction, which is but for a moment, worketh for us a far
more exceeding and eternal weight of glory, while we look .
not at the things that are seen, but the things which are
not seen; for the things which are seen are temporal, but
the things which are not seen are eternal.”
CHAPTER XXXV.
CALLED TO ACCOUNT.

Lapy Laurie had a nervous headache that evening, and
longed for perfect quiet and rest. She would fain have
laid her aching head on a pillow, and have been alone with
her God. But she felt that she must keep up for the sake
of her family, and exert herself when exertion was a dis-
tressing effort. Robin’s ill behaviour appeared as the last
drop in the lady’s cup of sorrow, nor was it by any means
a mere drop. To the wilful child himself the idea of an
expedition to Foreham Villa with his mother, to beg
pardon of Miss Petty, was not more distressing than it was
to poor Lady Laurie herself. She could not send the
strong-willed child with another escort; she must take him
herself, and the prospect of the interview was to Lady
Laurie much like what the visit of the surgeon had been
to poor Delia. Would not a note of apology suffice?
Yes, if there had been no regard to the effect upon Robin,
but to him the mere sending of a note would have been
no lesson at all. This was the second time in the space
of ten days that Robin had insulted some one by giving
way to a furious burst of temper. If he were ever to learn
self-command it must be by conscience obliging him
always to humble himself by asking forgiveness. The
more he hated doing so, the stronger the check would be.
Lady Laurie had made it an invariable rule that no child
of hers should dare to kneel down at night to pray, with
the sense that a fellow-creature had aught against him
276
CALLED TO ACCOUNT. 277



for which he would not make reparation. On the present
occasion Lady Laurie had tried punishment, but the loss
of his dinner had apparently only the effect of making Robin
more hungry at tea. The evening reading, which the child
enjoyed, might perhaps work on his conscience. The last
reading had conveyed some comfortto Harold, this one might
with God’s blessing be useful to Robin. It was this that
determined Lady Laurie to hold her little meeting, instead
of retiring, as she had at first intended, to her own room.

Ida. St. Paul was saved by the Roman soldiers. These
soldiers, I remember, had actually to carry him into the
castle, so great was the pressure of the furious mob, who
wished to tear him to pieces! I want to read on; this is
a very interesting part of the story !

Lady L. Let us read the thirty-seventh and three
following verses of the twenty-second chapter of Acts.

Reading.

And as Paul was going to be led into the castle, he said
unto the chief captain, May I speak unto thee? Who said,
Canst thou speak Greek? Art thou not that Egyptian who
before these days madest an uproar, and leddest out into
the wilderness four thousand men that were murderers ?

But Paul said, J am a man which am a Jew of Tarsus,
a city in Cilicia, a citizen of no mean city; and I beseech
thee, suffer me to speak unto the people.

And when he had given him license, Paul stood on the
stairs, and beckoned with the hand unto the people. And
when there was made a great silence, he spake unto them
in the Hebrew tongue.

Ida. How one can picture the scene: the Apostle stand-
ing on the stairs, and the Roman soldiers with their bright
armour and flashing weapons behind him, and below the
angry mob, that had been like wolves, longing to tear him
limb from limb !
278 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Harold. Perhaps Paul’s clothes were rent, and his hair

all disordered; perhaps there was blood on his face,
for he had been in the hands of the mob for awhile,
and we may be certain that he had been very roughly
dealt with.
_ Lady I. And yet, while stretching forth his hand to
still the clamour, with what calm gentle dignity the
Apostle speaks to those who had been on the point of
taking his life. Looking down on the sea of angry
upturned faces, he thus addresses the Jews, “Men,
brethren, and fathers, hear ye my defence which I now
make unto you!” There is nothing of passion and anger,
nothing of fear in his manner, but the contrary, which won
even the bigoted Jews to listen for awhile.

Ida. Shall we read all the speech ?

Lady L. No, for much of the account which St. Paul
gives of his own conversion we have already read when
examining the ninth chapter of Acts. But in the 17th
and following verses we have a most interesting addition
on account of what happened when St. Paul returned
to Jerusalem more than three years after he had left it
on his memorable expedition to Damascus.

Reading.

And it came to pass that when I was again at Jerusalem,
even while I prayed in the temple, I was in a trance, and
saw Him saying unto me, Make haste and get thee
quickly out of Jerusalem, for they will not receive thy
testimony concerning Me. And I said, Lord, they know
that I imprisoned, and beat in every synagogue, them
that believed in Thee, and when the blood of Thy martyr
Stephen was shed I also was standing by, and consenting
unto his death, and kept the raiment of them that slew
him, And he said unto me, Depart, for I will send thee
far hence unto the Gentiles,
































St. PAUL TAKEN TO THE CASTLE.
CALLED TO ACCOUNT. 279



And they gave him audience unto this word, and then
lifted up their voices and said, Away with such a fellow
from the earth, for he is not fit to live!

Ida. Then the greatest anger of the Jews arose not from
St. Paul’s speaking of Christ, nor his calling St. Stephen
a martyr, but from his saying that he was sent to the
Gentiles.

Lady L. The storm had doubtless been gathering, but
it was at that word that it burst in all its fury. Paul was
on the point of being murdered.

Reading.

But as they cried out, and cast off their clothes, and
threw dust into the air, the chief captain commanded him
to be brought into the castle.

Robin. Oh! those brave Roman soldiers saved Paul
again! I do like that kind good captain.

Lady L. Kind and good are hardly the words which you
would have used in regard to the captain, had you been
in the place of St. Paul. The stern soldier would not,
indeed, suffer a mob of turbulent Jews to kill his prisoner
before his eyes, but the next command which he gave
showed anything but a spirit of mercy. He ordered
that St. Paul should be put to the torture of the scourge,
to force him to confess what he had done to rouse such
fury against him.

Harold. What, was a prisoner to be tortured, without
even a trial ?

Lady L. Paul, on that terrible day, seems never to have
lost his presence of mind.

Reading.
Paul said unto the centurion that stood by, Is it lawful for
you to scourge a man that is a Roman and uncondemned ?
Lady L. Those words were reported to the captain, and
280 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.





were the means of saving St. Paul this time from the
shameful and agonising punishment of the scourge.

Ida. The captain was at any rate more just than the
magistrates of Philippi had been.

Harold. Were the Jews content to let their victim go ?

Lady L. We see that on the following day the Apostle
‘had to appear before the Jewish council, headed by the
chief-priest Annas himself. The captain probably thought
that these men, learned and wise, were likely to give a
more fair hearing to his prisoner than a bigoted mob had
done. It must have been a very solemn thing to the
Apostle to stand arraigned before the Grand Council of his
nation, as the Blessed Saviour, the Lord of Glory, had
stood about twenty-eight years before. I do not believe
that any pomp of pagan splendour would have had the
same effect on the mind of St. Paul.

Ida. Was the High Priest Ananias, who presided, the
same Annas who had sent the Lord bound to Caiaphas ?

Lady L. Yes, the same man as he who had dared to
have ropes put on the blessed hands of our Saviour.

Robin. I wonder that God let such a wicked man live
for twenty-eight years! St. Paul must have wished to
strike him dead.

Lady L. St. Paul did not recognise Annas, though he
must often have seen him; and this is one reason given
for the belief that the Apostle’s thorn in the flesh was a
malady in his eyes. As Canon Farrar supposes, “all that
his blurred vision took in was a white figure, nor did he
see this figure with sufficient clearness to be able to dis-
tinguish that the overbearing tyrant before him was no
less a personage than the High Priest himself.”

Robin. If St. Paul had known, it would have made him
so angry.

Ida. St. Paul was not like you, Robin; he always kept
his temper. |
CALLED TO ACCOUNT. 281



Harold. How can you say so, Ida, when we are just
going to read of his losing it.

Robin. St. Paul losing his temper!

Lady £. Let us read the Bible account of what happened
when the persecuted prisoner stood before the Great
Council. Let us begin the twenty-third chapter of
Acts.

Reading.

And Paul, earnestly beholding the council, said, Men
and brethren, I have lived in good conscience before God
until this day.

And the High Priest, Ananias, commanded them that
stood by to smite him on the mouth. Then said Paul
unto him, God shall smite thee, thou whited wall; for
sittest thou to judge me after the law, and commandest
me to be smitten contrary to the law?

Ida. I doubt whether Paul was so indignant at all the
dreadful scourgings from Jews and Romans, as he was at
that one blow on the face.

Robin. But the Lord was struck on the face, and He
did not say anything angry.

Lady L. We cannot but contrast the meek dignity of
the Divine Master with the flash of anger in the servant,
at such an unmerited insult. St. Paul probably attained
to as much holiness as any mere man upon earth ever
did, but it is only in the God- -man, Christ, that we must
look for perfection.

Reading.

And they that stood by said, Revilest thou God’s High »

Priest? Then said Paul, I wist not, brethren, that he was

the High Priest, for it is written, Thou shalt not speak evil
of the ruler of thy people.

Ida. So you see, Robin, that St. Paul at once—without
282 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.

one minute’s delay—owned before all that he had broken
God’s law.

Robin. But he never said that Annas did not deserve to
be smitten.

Lady L, That was not the question in point. With
Annas’s sins, which were terribly black, Paul had nothing
todo. But Paul knew that he himself had done wrong,
when he had given way to his anger, and he frankly
. confessed it, like a brave and noble man, as he was.

There was a few moments’ silence in the little circle.
Robin looked flushed and distressed. Then he said, with
a sigh, “Zam sorry that I was such a rude angry boy.”

“Will you say that to Miss Petty, to-morrow ?”

“T can’t say it to her,’ muttered Robin.

“And why not, my child? St. Paul spoke in the pre-
sence of the whole council: in the presence of Annas him-
self.”

“Will you go with me, mother?” asked Robin, with
another deep sigh.

“T will go with you my son; but you must speak for
yourself”

As Robin’s silence spoke assent, and Lady Laurie knew
that he was not a boy to flinch from keeping his word,
without saying more on a painful subject, she asked Ida to
continue the reading.

Reading.

But when Paul perceived that the one part were Saddu-
cees, and the other Pharisees, he cried out in the council,
Men and brethren, I am a Pharisee, the son of a Pharisee;
of the hope and resurrection of the dead I am called in
question.

Harold. That does not seem just like St. Paul. He was
a Christian, and not a Pharisee then.

Lady L. Paul knew that the Pharisees held the doctrine
CALLED TO ACCOUNT. 283

of the resurrection, and so—now as ever—did he. That
belief, which had been his when he was a Pharisee, he had
never given up on becoming a Christian.

Ida. I suppose that St. Paul spoke thus in order to
make the Pharisees who were present take his part.

Lady [. His words seemed for a time to have such an
effect. Pharisees arose and said, We find no evil in this
man, but if a spirit or an angel hath spoken to him, let us
not fight against God. But no real lasting good came of
St. Paul’s trying to please the Pharisees. Another terrible
tumult arose. It was again the Romans who saved St.
Paul from his furious countrymen. Reads—The chief
captain, fearing lest Paul should have been pulled in
pieces of them, commanded the soldiers to go down, and
take him by force from among them, and to bring him
into the castle.

~S RS
CHAPTER XXXVI
A SUDDEN CALL.

Lapy Laurie had another very painful interview with
Dr. Bullen on the Wednesday morning. The school-
master called to see her, and with very stiff politeness took
his seat on a chair opposite to that of the lady. Lady
Laurie had sent Ida and Robin out of the room; Harold
was, happily, engaged with Prem Das in his attic.

“Your ladyship gave me to understand that a young
gentleman would be coming from London to-day, whose
evidence may throw important light on this most unfortun-
ate affair of the twenty-pound note.”

“T expect him,” said Lady Laurie, in a voice less steady
than usual, “but a letter came from his aunt by the
morning post informing me that Edward Elwyn cannot be
here till to-morrow.”

“Every delay is annoying,” said Dr. Bullen. “ Of course
I telegraphed at once to the bank to stop payment of the
note should it be presented. Happily, I had kept the
number ; it is my practice always to take down numbers—
18,043.” The doctor coughed ; it was a sort of preliminary
cough. It was evident that he had not said all that he had
come that morning to say.

“ Harold Hartley has made no confession ?” he asked at
last, looking out of the window, so as not to see the pained
face of the lady. ,

“Tam sure that he has nothing to confess.”

“Ah! yes, madam, parents and friends are partial; they

284
A SUDDEN CALL. 285



do not see what is sufficiently clear to the vision of others.”
The day was hot, but Lady Laurie felt a cold shiver run-
ning through her frame. “I just wished to say,” pursued |
the doctor, “that I am a family man, and—and cannot afford
to lose twenty-pound notes. I don’t want to make Harold
Hartley an example; I don’t want either flogging with
public expulsion, or—or to bring the matter into a police
court. I have every respect for your ladyship, every con-
sideration for your feelings, but I am not called to submit
quietly to considerable pecuniary loss.”

Lady Laurie grew colder and colder. The hand which
rested on the little table near her was almost like ice.

“T understand you, sir,” she said, after a painful pause.
“If—if Harold can in no way clear himself, the loss of the
twenty-pound note must not fall upon you.”

Doctor Bullen looked somewhat relieved at his meaning
being comprehended. He rose and bowed, and shortly
after took his rather abrupt departure.

Lady Laurie stood for awhile perfectly still, then roused
herself to go upstairs to get her silver tea-pot, and what-
ever other valuables she could collect, to put them up in a
box, and send them to a goldsmith in London. This task
done, she braced herself up for another. Lady Laurie felt
that she was indeed struggling up Hill Difficulty, but she
strengthened her failing heart in the Lord.

“Robin,” she said to the boy, whose voice she heard on
the staircase, “put on your cap and make yourself tidy;
we are going to Foreham Villa.”

Robin slowly and unwillingly obeyed; it was easier to
put his rough shaggy head into something like visiting
order, than to bring his unruly feelings into subjection.

“ Mother, I don’t like going !” he said, and stopped short
before he had reached the shrubbery gate.”

“Nor do IJ, Robin,” observed Lady Laurie, “ but I must
pay the visit. Mother is in trouble; you would not add to
286 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



her sorrow by letting her think that she has a proud,
disobedient little boy.”

Robin went on in a doleful mood, and with lingering steps.
Both he and Lady Laurie were too sad for conversation.
Nothing more was said till Foreham Villa was reached.

Lady Laurie expected a very unpleasant visit, for she
knew by experience that Miss Petty possessed none of the
delicacy of feeling which avoids touching a wound. A
host of inpertinent questions might be expected, which it
would be difficult to answer. There was no use, however,
in putting off a meeting which the inquisitive, meddling
Theresa was certain to bring about one way or other.
Lady Laurie went prepared to listen and endure, but. she
was not in the least prepared for the scene which she was
to witness at Foreham Villa.

The sounds of wild passionate distress which met her
ears as she approached the open door made her quicken
her steps. Miss Petty’s voice was easily recognised, but
never before had her visitor heard it uttering such hyster-
ical cries. The cause was apparent as soon as Lady
Laurie, guided by the sounds, hurried into the parlour.
There lay Dr. Petty on the floor, where he had fallen a few
minutes before in a fit of apoplexy. Miss Petty, on her
knees beside him, was wringing her hands and crying in
helpless distress; two maid-servants were present, but
neither of them were doing anything but adding their
exclamations to those of their mistress.

“Loosen his neck-tie—give him air—water! water!”
exclaimed Lady Laurie. “Has any one gone for a doctor?”

No; Miss Pett’ had not had the presence of mind to
send for a medical man.

“Who will go for the new doctor at Harewood?”
cried Lady Laurie, remembering that one had lately come
to the neighbourhood, to the great annoyance of Dr. eae
“Who will go? not a minute is to be lost!”
A SUDDEN CALL. 287



“T’ll go!” cried little Robin; “I know where he lives!”
The child ran to the door, but paused a moment to cry
out, “for I am sorry that I was such a rude and passionate
boy.” ;

Robin knew the way, but he had never been such a
distance quite by himself before, Harewood being more
than a mile from Foreham Villa. But the child dashed
bravely on, sometimes forced to slacken his pace to take
breath, but never stopping. For the sake of making a
short cut he clambered over a stile into a field where cows
were grazing, though he did not much like having to pass
the black one which looked so fierce, and had her calf
beside her. The barking mastiff in the yard at Harewood
at another time would have made Robin beat a quick
retreat, but it did not turn the little boy aside. Robin
ran up the steps, and in at the door, and knocked right
against the doctor himself, who was going out for a ride.

“Come quick—quick, Dr. Petty is dreadfully ill, perhaps
he will die,” cried the panting Robin, down whose crimson
face the toil-drops were streaming.

The doctor was soon cantering off towards Foreham
Villa, and weary Robin returned slowly to Willowdale
Lodge.

Lady Laurie remained at Foreham Villa for hours—
remained till all was over—for the poor doctor never
regained consciousness, and none of the means that were
tried were of any avail to stay the ebbing current of life.
Dr. Petty died “and made no sign.” A man who had so
often witnessed the deaths of others, yet had so seldom
thought of his own, a man whose thoughts and hopes and
cares and fears were all of the earth, earthy, silently passed
into eternity. The doctor had rather patronised religion
if as he said “it be not carried too far.” He liked “to
take things quietly,”—quietly indeed, for his faith had in it
no more warmth and life than a corpse. It was not the
288 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



faith that works, it was not the faith that loves, it was not
the faith that saves. Lady Laurie longed to speak com-
fort to the poor sobbing sister, who cried that she*had now
lost everything in the world; but she knew not what com-
fort to give. To die without Christ is to die indeed!

Poor Miss Petty’s grief was not only for the loss of the
uearest relative whom she had on earth; to lose her
brother was to lose her comfortable home (for the Villa
was only rented), it was to exchange ease for comparative
poverty, to go down in the world, to her a most dreaded
misfortune. Lady Laurie left Theresa sobbing in the
arms of her intimate friend, Mrs. Bullen, in the hopeless
misery of one who in losing earthly enjoyment loses all,
on whose black cloud of trial there shines no radiant bow.

The sad event of the day added solemnity to the
evening meeting. Harold was silently contrasting his
saintly father’s departure with that of the poor doctor
whose familiar face he should see no more. “True,”
thought he, “the one died at home, on his bed, with
friends and a sister near; the other ” Harold dared
not let his mind dwell on the terrible circumstances of his
‘parent's murder; “but my father never really died; he is
living still, living in the presence of the Saviour; for that
glorious epistle which I am reading tells us that our Lord
Jesus Christ ‘died for us, that whether we wake or sleep
we should live together with Him;’ and that, ‘if we
believe that Jesus died and rose again, even so them also
which sleep in Jesus will God bring with Him.’ I shall
see my father again!”



CESSES —
CHAPTER XXXVIL
THE MURDEROUS PLOT.

Lady L. We are introduced, in the part of the Book of
Acts which we have now reached, to two scenes strikingly
in contrast to each other. The one isso dark and terrible
that it is far more suited for midnight darkness than the
pure light of morning. We see a band of more than forty
Jews met together to form one of the most wicked con-
spiracies to murder that the world’s history affords. What
fierce resolution; what pitiless hatred is in each dark face!
One man after another comes forward to swear a horrible
oath that he will neither eat nor drink till he has killed
Paul.

Robin. What a wicked wicked band of men! But you
know that they could not get at Paul. The brave Roman
captain kept him safe in the castle.

Lady L. The conspirators were determined to get at
the innocent prisoner; and it is horrible to think that the
treacherous plan which they formed seems to have been
approved of by the chief priests and elders. They who
from their holy office should have been the first to protect
the innocent were the very persons to whom these Jews
went to ask assistance in carrying out their murderous
plot. We will read from the 14th verse.

Reading.

And they came to the chief priests and elders, and said,
We have bound ourselves under a great curse that we will
289 T
290 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



eat nothing until we have slain Paul. Now, therefore,
ye with your council signify to the chief captain that he
bring him down unto you to-morrow, as though you would
inquire something more perfectly concerning him; and
we, or ever he come near, are ready to kill him.

Robin. Paul will be killed at last! How could one
poor man, and in chains, too, defend himself against forty
cruel Jews armed with swords and daggers!

Harold. I am sure that Satan himself was present at
that council.

Lady L. And another was present also; even He who
confounds the designs of the wicked.

Robin. Now I know that the Lord will send a beautiful
angel to carry off St. Paul to a safe place, just as He did
when St. Peter was in prison.

Lady L. No; the Lord was pleased, as He usually is;
to make use of a human instrument for the protection of
His servant. We do not know how St. Paul’s nephew
knew of the plot against his uncle, but he did so. A secret
shared by so many persons is often no secret at all.

Ida. Perhaps one of the elders, a little more merciful
than the rest, gave a private warning.

Robin. Or the nephew might have been hidden in the
room where the wicked men met.

Lady L. Let us read the account of what followed.

Reading.

And when Paul’s sister’s son heard of their lying-in-
wait, he went and entered into the castle, and told Paul.
Then Paul called one of the centurions unto him, and said,
Bring this young man unto the chief captain, for he hath
a certain thing to tell him.

Ida. How wonderfully calm the Apostle seems to have |
been; not in the least as if he were frightened by the
dreadful news,
THE MURDEROUS PLOT. 291

Lady L. I do not think that he was frightened; and
the secret of his calm confidence we shall find by looking
back to the eleventh verse. This shows us the other scene,
which stands out in such strong contrast to the fearful one
of which we have just been reading. We behold a prison
cell, and there, perhaps lying on straw, perhaps bound
with a chain, we see the poor captive for whose life the
men of blood are hunting.

Ida. St. Paul must have been dreadfully tired, after
having been three times attacked by the mob.

Robin. I daresay he was bruised and wounded too.

Lady L. Certainly he was wounded in spirit, for he
was hated by those whom he loved, a very bitter trial.
All his efforts to soften that hatred had utterly failed.
The sons of Abraham, his brethren, were the Apostle’s
relentless foes. He knew his life to be in imminent dan-
ger; and it is likely enough that St. Paul’s nerves were _
shaken by the terrible events of the day. It was such a
time that the Lord chose to send His servant strong con-
solation. We seem to see a soft pure light pervading the
cell and chasing darkness away. A Form, a Divine Form,
1s standing beside the persecuted saint, and St. Paul looks
up “to the heaven of His eyes,” those eyes which are so
lovingly gazing down upon him. For the third time the
Apostle has the rapture of beholding his Lord. And what
tender words fall on the prisoner’s ear, as if the Saviour
said, “I have called thee by thy name, thou art Mine.”
Reads—Be of good cheer, Paul, for as thou hast testified
of Me in Jerusalem, so must thou bear witness in Rome.

Robin. Then St. Paul was quite certain that if all the
Jews in the city made a plot to kill him there, they could
never succeed.

Harold. The Lord was his fortress, and a far safer one
than that of the Romans.

Lady L. The centurion took St. Paul’s nephew to the
292 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



chief captain, who, at once believing his word, took, as we
shall read, instant measures to secure the safety of his
prisoner.

Reading.

So he took him and brought him to the chief captain,
and said, Paul the prisoner called me unto him, and
prayed me to bring this young man unto thee, who
hath something to say unto thee. Then the chief
captain took him by the hand, and went with him aside
privately, and asked him, What is that thou hast to tell
me? And he said, The Jews have agreed to desire thee
that thou wouldst bring down Paul to-morrow into the
council, as though they would inquire something of him
more perfectly; but do thou not yield unto them; for
there lie in wait of them more than forty men which have
bound themselves with an oath that they will neither eat
nor drink till they have killed him. And now are they
ready, looking for a promise from thee.

Robin. I hope that the captain believed what was
said !

Reading.

So the chief captain then let the young man depart,
and charged him, See thou tell no man that thou hast
showed these things to me. And he called unto him two
centurions, saying, Make ready two hundred soldiers to go
to Caesarea, and horsemen threescore and ten, and spear-
men two hundred, at the third hour of the night; and
provide them beasts that they may set Paul on, and bring
him safe unto Felix the governor.

Robim. Oh! that chief captain was a capital man.

Ida. If he had been in the place of Pilate, I do not
think that he would ever have crucified the Lord to please
the people.

Harold. How great the captain must have thought the
THE MURDEROUS PLOT. 293

danger to be when he provided the large escort of four
hundred and seventy soldiers.

Lady L. The Roman probably regarded Judea as a vol-
cano which might at any moment break out into fiery

ul



M

eae Nil
ST Oa
AN \ Kt

Roman Souprers (from a Sculpture).
eruption. Not many years afterwards the country was
in open rebellion, a rebellion which was with great
difficulty put down by fire and sword, It was no light
294 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



matter to rouse the fierce passions of a brave and bigoted
people. -
_ Ida. Pilate would have preferred sacrificing the life of
one poor prisoner.

Robin. I wonder how the forty men. looked in the
morning when they found that St. Paul had mounted a
horse, and ridden far, far away. Did they sit down to
their breakfasts and eat, when they had made an oath that
they would not?

Ida. And cursed themselves if they did! ,

Lady L. They must have eaten, and their curse, we
doubt not, fell on their guilty heads. It is awful to hear
of the sufferings of the Jews at the coming siege of
Jerusalem. Hundreds of thousands perished, some by
the enemy’s sword, some by fierce fighting amongst them-
selves; some were crucified by the Romans; and some
were starved to death, for the famine in the city was so
frightful that even human flesh was devoured !

Robin. Those men who said that they would not eat
till they had killed St. Paul, I daresay died of hunger.

- Lady L. And Annas, the “ whited wall,” was literally
smitten, for he was stabbed to death.

Ida. What terrible judgments fell on the city that had
murdered its Lord !

Lady L. No wonder that the pitying Saviour wept over’
it, knowing what was to come.

Ida. What sort of man was this governor, Felix, to
whom the chief captain sent St. Paul ?

Lady L. History gives him a very bad character. Felix
was a low-minded, base, money-loving man.

Robin. How far was Cesarea from Jerusalem? Would
St. Paul be very far from the cruel Jews ?

Lady L. The distance was only about fifty or sixty
miles. Annas, the high priest, and the elders actually
followed Paul thither after five days. They brought with
THE MURDEROUS PLOT. 295



them an orator, named Tertullus, who tried by flattering
words to the governor Felix to persuade him to give up
St. Paul. Let us read St. Paul’s defence of himself.

The twenty-fourth chapter is read, from the tenth verse
to the twenty-first.

Harold. How grandly the noble Apostle makes his
defence.

Ida. Let us read what was its effect upon Felix.

Reading.

And when Felix heard these things, having more perfect
knowledge of that way, he deferred them and said, When
Lycias, the chief captain, shall come down, I will know the
uttermost of your matter.

Robin. If Lycias came he could say nothing against
St. Paul.

Lady £. God, in whose hands are the hearts of all men,
seems to have given His servant Paul some favour even in
the eyes of the unprincipled Felix.

Reading.

And he commanded a centurion to keep Paul, and to let.
him have liberty, and that he should forbid none of his
acquaintance to minister or come unto him.

Robin. Were there any Christians in that city ?

Ida. Ob! do you forget Philip and his four daughters ?
and perhaps Agabus, the prophet, was at Cesarea.

Lady L. There were probably many other Christians ;
amongst them Cornelius, the first baptised Roman, with
all his household, and the devout soldiers who had heard
the preaching of Peter.

Ida. Quite a church in Caesarea! What a pleasure it
must have been to the Christians to visit St. Paul’s prison,
and hear him speak, and carry to him whatever he needed.

Robim. Did not the governor want to hear him again ?
996 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Lady L. Yes, after some days Felix sent for his
prisoner, and in the presence of the governor, and of his
Jewish wife Drusilla, again the Apostle of the Gentiles
appeared. We hear not of St. Paul’s defending himself on
this occasion from any false charge. He seems to have
taken this grand opportunity of preaching Christ to a
particularly wicked court. Felix was before him, not so
much as the powerful governor who could sentence him
to death, but as a sinner needing salvation; as one going
on the broad path leading to destruction whom the pitying
Apostle would fain warn and save. Paul, the persecuted
Christian, seems more like the judge than the prisoner, as
in the majesty of God’s appointed ambassador, he reasons
“of righteousness, temperance, and a judgment to come.”

Robin. Did Felix repent like the jailor ?

Lady L. Paul’s powerful words had effect. Conscience
was stirring in the heart of the wicked Roman, it was
almost as if the Saviour were knocking at the door.
Felix was, we believe, nearer salvation than at any other
moment of his life. He listened, and trembled.

Robin. That was just like the jailor! Then he cried
out, what must I do to be saved!

Lady L. Alas, no, Robin! Felix let the opportunity
pass! Satan saw that a spark of Truth had reached the
Roman, and Satan smothered it by delay. Reads—Felix
said, Go thy way for this time, when I have a convenient
season I will call for thee.

Ida. I suppose that the convenient season never came!

Robin. Perhaps Felix never again saw St. Paul.

Lady L. Felix did see him again and again, for St. Paul
remained for two whole years in his power. But never
again do we hear of Felix trembling. He had hardened
his heart, he had silenced his conscience, and so he was
left to pursue his course to ruin. His principal reason
afterwards for sending for St. Paul was the base hope of
THE MURDEROUS PLOT. 297



wringing money out of his noble prisoner. Felix was
greedy of bribes. He probably saw that some of the
Christians in Caesarea were persons of good position, who
could afford, as he thought, to pay a good sum for the
liberation of their friend.

fobim. And why did they not doit? Iam sure that
we would have collected all our pennies to set St. Paul
free.

Lady [. 1 do not think that St. Paul would have
suffered them to do it. Remember how at Corinth, and
at Thessalonica too, he laboured hard with his hands to be
an expense to no one.

Robin. But did not Felix let St. Paul out of prison at
last; for he had done nothing bad. The Romans saw
that he was a very good man.

Lady L. No; by an act of gross injustice, Felix kept
his innocent prisoner two long years in confinement, as we
read in the closing verse of the chapter. Reads—After
two years, Porcius Festus came into Felix’s room, and
Felix, willing to show the Jews a pleasure left Paul
bound.

SOS Ee
CHAPTER XXXVIII.
KEEP TO THE TRUTH.

On the Thursday morning, according to Mrs. Elwyn’s
promise, her nephew Edward appeared by the early train.
Edward, a youth thoughtless and gay, hardly understood
the serious nature of the business in which he was expected
to take a part.

“Here we are!” he exclaimed, in a loud merry tone,
which sounded strange in that saddened home. “I can
hardly understand what I’m expected to do, or why I was
sent for in such hot haste by my worthy aunt; but I’m
ready for anything in a small way!”

“We will talk of business after you have taken your
breakfast,” said Lady Laurie.

Edward was very ready for his breakfast, and enjoyed
it thoroughly, chatting and laughing as he ate. He was a
good-natured lad, and had an idea of cheering up a dull
party: but his thoughtless mirth grated on Harold, who
disliked jokes when his own mind was full of anxious
thought. It seemed to him as if Edward would never
finish his buttered muffins.

At last the breakfast was over. With a glance Lady
Laurie made Ida take Robin out of the room.

“ And now—what is it I’m to do; as I said, I’m ready
for anything,” cried Edward, lounging back on his chair.

“You are merely required to tell Dr. Bullen that you
were with Harold all the time from his drawing a letter
out of his pocket at the house of your aunt, till he
delivered it safely into the hand of Mr. White,” said Lady
Laurie.

298
KEEP (0 THE TRUTH. 299



“Tl declare that I stuck to him like a leech!” cried
Edward.

“The special point is this,” said Harold Hartley. “Did
you watch me whilst over the cracked seal of that letter
I made another with the wax which lay on Mrs. Elwyn’s
table ?”

“No, why should I watch you?” said Dick; “I did not
expect you to burn your fingers. I stood with my back to
you, looking at the little Smiths trying to pull off their
bearer’s white turban.”

“Then indeed we have brought you here for nothing,”
said Harold, with a pang of bitter disappointment. “Of
course Dr. Bullen will say that I broke the first seal, and
opened that wretched letter while your back was turned
towards me!”

“How unlucky that I looked at the children instead of
at you!” cried Edward. “But don’t look so serious about
it; there will be no harm in my saying that I watched
you like a cat all the time. One may strain a little point
to serve a friend in trouble.”

“Strain no point for me,” said Harold Hartley. “Keep
to the truth, whatever you say.”

“Why, ‘you scrupulous fellow! where’s the harm?
I was not a yard from you all the time. What did it
matter whether I turned my head this way or that?”

“There would be harm im your saying that you saw
what you did not see,” said Harold.

“Is he not too absurd?” cried Edward, appealing to
Lady Laurie.

“Harold is right,” said the lady. “Nothing is ever
really gained by swerving—even a little—from the truth.”

The painful task of taking this useless witness to Copley
House was now before Lady Laurie, as she knew that
Dr. Bullen expected the visit. But the Doctor had been
too impatient to wait for it, and had started for Willowdale
300 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.

Lodge. The outer door being open, he walked into the
room unannounced, apologising for so doing, as he saw
that Lady Laurie was a little startled and surprised by his
unexpected appearance.

“T beg your pardon, madam, for intruding in a manner
so informal. I thought that the examination of your
witness had better take place here, rather than at Copley
House, where it might cause some unpleasant talking.”
Lady Laurie motioned to the Doctor to take a chair, but
he preferred to remain standing.

“This is Mr. Elwyn Sopine. Well, sir, can you solemnly
state that the first seal on the letter in MHartley’s
charge was only cracked, not broken, when he took it out
of his pocket, and that in your presence, and under your
eye, he made with wax the second impression which bore
the letters E. E. ?”

“T’m sure that he sealed it all right,” said Edward.

“Keep to the point, sir, keep to the point. Can you
affirm that you actually saw Hartley re-seal the letter ?”

“ Well—not exactly,” said Edward.

“Was your back turned towards him?” asked the
Doctor.

“Well—perhaps—I suppose that it was,” answered
Edward.

“That is enough, Mr. Elwyn. It is quite clear to my
mind that you can give no evidence to show that the first
seal was not broken, the envelope opened, and the note
extracted, as I firmly believe was the case. Harold
Hartley, this most weak attempt to clear yourself only
confirms my conviction of your guilt. I again call upon
you to confess it.”

“God knows my innocence, sir,” said Harold. His
manner was quite different from what it had been when
he had been startled by Dr. Bullen’s first charge. Harold
was indeed very pale, but he looked full into his school-
KEEP TO THE TRUTH. 30]

master’s face with the calmness of conscious integrity.
The youth was upheld by a clear conscience, and firm
faith in God. He remembered that the noblest and most
holy of men had had to stand, like himself, to answer a
false accusation.

“Very well, Harold Hartley, very well. You must take
the consequences of your obstinate silence. This is Thurs-
day,—I give you till Monday,—but not one day more.”

“By Monday, or before—if possible—you shall hear
from me, Dr. Bullen,” said Lady Laurie, with a nervous
tremour in her voice. She hoped that by that time
money would arrive from the goldsmith in London, to
whom she had sent her parcel.

Dr. Bullen understood the lady, and bowed, then,
without vouchsafing so much as another word to Harold,
he quitted the house.

Neither Lady Laurie, who was agitated by the inter-
view, nor Harold could undertake the task of entertaining
young Elwyn. Ida and Robin were called in, and Lady
Laurie, laying her hand on Harold’s arm, led him away to
her own apartment. There she took her adopted son to
her heart.

“You have done nobly—you have acted as your father
would have done!” she cried, and then tears had their way.

Edward did not trouble any one long. There was a
mid-day train to London, and there was nothing to keep
him at Willowdale Lodge. He returned in a somewhat
discontented mood to Grosvenor Square, where he found his
aunt and Delia Smith about to take their afternoon tea.

“You’re back soon, Edward,” said Mrs. Elwyn. “I hope
that all is now made right at Willowdale Lodge.”

“T don’t know what you call being ‘made right,” said
Edward, rather testily, as he helped himself to a large
piece of cake. “I have been sent on a wild-goose chase.
It appears that what was wanted of me was to say that
302 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



I had watched Hartley’s sealing that most unlucky letter.
Thad not been watching, and I told him so; I had just
been looking at the children with their tricks. ‘ But,’ says
I, ‘I see no harm in saying that I saw you, if the matter
is of so much importance.’”

“ And what said Harold?” asked Mrs. Elwyn, fixing her
keen black eyes on her nephew.

“Oh, he’s precious particular is Harold! Says he,
‘Tell nothing but the truth. And then the Doctor came,
and I told the truth; and was not the old don angry!
There’s no saying what mischief mayn’t come of Harold’s
scrupulous folly.”

“No mischief will come,” said Mrs. Elwyn. “I only
wish that my nephew were as foolish as Harold! His
brave truthfulness makes me feel positive of his innocence
regarding the note. A boy of such high honour would as
soon have grasped red-hot iron as have taken what was
given to his care. Would that I could make every one
see the matter in the same light as I do!”

“You would find it precious hard to convince that sour
old Doctor,” said Edward.

“T can at least remove Harold for a time from his pain-
ful position at Foreham,” observed Mrs. Elwyn. “I have
just engaged a nice, large house near Southampton for six
weeks. Mrs. Smith, the children, and I are going down
on Monday, and I will write by this post to invite Lady
Laurie and her three to join us at the Foreham Station, and
accompany us to the seaside. It will make a nice change
for them all, and there is plenty of room in the house.”

“Oh, I do thank you!” exclaimed Delia, warmly
“J feel your kindness to dear Lady Laurie as deeply as
I do that shown to myself.”

Mrs. Elwyn was always prompt in her movements. She
left her cup of tea unfinished, and dashed off a note in her
bold, free hand. Her despatch was in time for the post.
/ CHAPTER XXXIX.
ST. PAUL BEFORE AGRIPPA.

“SWEET are the uses of adversity,” saith our great poet.
It will be well to inquire in what way Harold Hartley pro-
fited from the hot furnace of trial into which, at so early
an age, he had been thrown.

In the first place, it had increased his faith. Like other
graces, faith is strengthened by exercise. Harold, unable
by any earthly means to clear his own character, threw
himself more entirely on God.

Sorrow also strengthened the tie of family love. Pity |
on the one side, and on the other gratitude for unhesitat-
ing trust and tender sympathy, drew the inmates of
Willowdale Lodge more closely together than they ever
had been before. The sorrow of one was the sorrow of all.
Harold had never been attached to Ida, had never regarded
her quite as a sister till now, when he saw that she did
not doubt his innocence, but was ready, as he said to him-
self, to back him up through thick and thin. Ida’s petty
faults were forgotten. She could trust, and she could
sympathise ; and yet the young girl had the intuitive deli-
cacy not to obtrude her sympathy.

Harold’s prayers had become much more fervent.
Prayer was now no mere form prescribed by duty, and
sometimes regarded as a task; it was the free outburst of
a grief-burdened heart.

With far more earnestness than before did Harold seek
to bring light into the dark mind of the Hindu, whom
Providence had, as it seemed, placed under his influence.

303
304 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



To pray and strive for the conversion of Prem Das was the
only work in which poor young Hartley could take any
interest at all. His Latin, his Greek books were looked at
with an effort. Harold could not fix his mind on any
study, far less on any amusement. But there was interest,
nay, something of pleasure, in conveying the first ideas of
Truth to a mind gradually opening to receive them.

And not the least of the “sweet uses of adversity” was
the increasing value which Harold now set on Scripture
study. The Epistles of St. Paul were indeed becoming to
the lad as a mine of gems. Knowing something of the
history of the Apostle—persecuted, afflicted, imprisoned,
and falsely accused; exposed to the extremity of both
mental and bodily pain—Harold loved to trace the work-
ings of St. Paul’s mind in his inspired letters. Harold
was, as it were, imprisoned within the narrow limits of
the Willowdale grounds, for he shrank from going beyond
them. He was thus tied down to one spot, where, unable
to roam, he was forced to dig deep, and so lighted on
priceless treasures.

It was all this which enabled young Hartley to pean up
under his cross in a way that surprised his mother and
Ida. His mind and spirit had ripened more in the last
three weeks of pain than, had the furnace never been
heated, they might have done in as many years. It was
with no look of gloomy despair, but one of manly endur-
ance, that Harold took his place at the table for the usual
Scripture reading.

Lady I. We are going to read an account of one of the
most striking scenes of the life of the great Apostle. We
are going to see the splendour of royalty on the one side;
on the other, the grandeur of Faith, which could make a
poor tent-maker, a worn-out prisoner, wear a dignity and
glory far superior to that of a king. Let us read from the
twenty-fifth chapter of Acts.
PAUL BEFORE AGRIPPA. 305



Reading.
Now when Festus was come into the province, after
three days he ascended from Cesarea to Jerusalem. Then
tbe High Priest, and the chief of the Jews, informed him
against Paul, and besought him that he would send for
him to Jerusalem, laying wait in the way to kill him.
Robin. Oh! these cruel people! they hated St. Paul all
those two years; they never gave up their wicked plans,
they never learned to forget and forgive! What did the
new governor say? I hope that the good chief captain
told him all the truth, and put him on his guard!

Reading.

But Festus answered that Paul should be left at
Cesarea, and that he himself would depart shortly thither.
Let them therefore, said he, which among you are able, go
down with me and accuse this man, if there be any wicked-
ness in him. And when he had tarried among them more
than ten days, he went down to Cesarea; and the next
day, sitting on the judgment-seat, commanded Paul to be
brought.

‘Robin. The very next day? that was good. This man
does not put off, like Felix.

Lady L. Festus bears a better character in history than
his predecessor, and seems to have been disposed to act
more fairly towards his noble prisoner. Still, we find him
willing to send Paul to Jerusalem, which, as the Apostle
well knew, would be to send him to almost certain death.
In this danger, St. Paul availed himself of his privilege as
a Roman citizen. He would not be tried at Jerusalem,
the city so full of his murderous enemies. “I stand at
Ceesar’s judgment-seat !” he cried, “where I ought to be
judged. I appeal unto Cesar.”

Robin. Who was Cesar, mother? and what did St.

Paul mean when he said, “I appeal” ?
u
306 - PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Lady L. Cesar was the title given to the mighty
emperor of Rome, then the greatest of all earthly monarchs.
To appeal, in this case, meant that the prisoner wished
his cause to be brought into a yet higher court than that
of Festus. Paul, as a Roman, claimed to be tried at the
grandest tribunal in the world.

Harold. St. Paul had carried his cause already to a
higher tribunal than that of Cesar; and the King of
kings, the Lord of emperors, had pronounced him—not
guilty.

Reading.

Then Festus, when he had conferred with the council,
said, Hast thou appealed unto Cesar ?—unto Cesar shalt
thou go.

Ida. Doubtless St. Paul remembered that the Lord had
said unto him, “Thou must bear witness to Me in Rome.”

Robin. I hope that Festus sent him off directly.

Lady L. No; had Festus sent the Apostle away directly,
one of the noblest opportunities would have been lost that
ever was granted to man of declaring the truth in a royal
presence.

Reading.

And after certain days, Agrippa and Bernice came unto
Cesarea to salute Festus. And when they had been there
many days, Festus declared Paul’s cause unto the king,
saying, There is a certain man left in bonds by Felix,
about whom, when I was at Jerusalem, the chief priests
and the elders of the Jews informed me, desiring to have
judgment against him. To whom I answered, It is not
the manner of the Romans to deliver any man to die,
before that he which is accused have the accusers face to
face, and have license to answer for himself concerning the
crime laid against him.

Harold, The Romans were like the English in that.
PAUL BEFORE AGRIPPA, 307



We would condemn no man without letting him face his-
accusers. But let us go on with the speech of Governor
Festus.

Reading.

Therefore when they were come hither, without any
delay, on the morrow I sat on my judgment-seat, and
commanded the man to be brought forth. Against whom,
when the accusers stood up, they brought none accusation
of such things as I supposed, but had certain questions
against him of their own superstition, and of one Jesus,
whom Paul affirmed to be alive.

Ida. How contemptuously the proud governor speaks of
both Jewish and Christian religions !

Lady L. Festus took the view which a Roman would
naturally take. He despised the Jews as a subject but
turbulent race; and as for Christianity,—he probably
knew next to nothing about it. But he had roused the
curiosity of King Agrippa, who was far better informed
than himself about Jewish customs and creeds.

Reading.

Then Agrippa said unto Festus, [ would also hear the
man myself. To-morrow, said he, thou shalt hear him.

Harold. Then it was mere curiosity upon the king’s
part that brought St. Paul before Agrippa. Perhaps the
royal pair had grown a little tired of the amusements of
Czesarea, after being there many days, and wanted a new
one ?

Lady L. Yet there had been a good deal to see at
Cesarea, which was the Roman capital of the subject
province. Czsarea was a fine city, built by Herod the
Great—

Robin. That cruel king who killed the Bethlehem
babies!
308 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Lady L. Cesarea had a magnificent harbour and break-
water, which, of course, King Agrippa would be taken to
see. It had also a theatre and a circus.

Ida. Then probably the royal couple had been
entertained with grand shows, fights of wild beasts, and
fights of gladiators in the arena. We know that the
Romans delighted in such cruel sports.

Lady L. Agrippa, who was not a Roman, may have
thought that the sight of a brave man in chains, ready to
maintain a struggle against the world in defence of his
faith, was nobler than that of lions and tigers tearing each
other to pieces, or of gladiators dying “to make a Roman
holiday.”

Ida. And now we will picture to ourselves Agrippa,
Bernice, and Festus, magnificently dressed, sitting on
thrones of state, and surrounded by courtiers and ladies in
splendid array. We see the entrance-door thrown open,
and up the marble-paved, gilded hall, between rows of
stately pillars, comes a weak, infirm man in fetters.

Harotd. And that weak, infirm man in his fetters was
by far the greatest man present! There was probably a
band of soldiers around him-—

Ida. And an escort of angels above!

Lady L. We will now read the account of St. Paul’s
address to Agrippa, noticing the quiet majesty and gentle
courtesy with which the Apostle spake. Paul was neither
dazzled by Agrippa’s grandeur, nor forgetful of the respect
due to a king. He gives the third account of his own
conversion contained in the Book of Acts.

The twenty-siath chapter is read as far as the 23rd verse.

Ida. How quietly St. Paul mentions the murderous
attacks of the Jews, and he says not a word of their plots.

Harold. And how the Apostle forgets himself in his
message! As he did when brought for the second time
before Felix, Paul, instead of standing on his defence,
PAUL BEFORE AGRIPPA. 309



carries his attack into the enemy’s country, and tries to
win for Christ even King Agrippa himself!

Ida. Yes, St. Paul preaches Christ and the resurrection
even before Festus and his royal guests.

Lady L. It is very interesting to notice the different
effect which the Apostle’s preaching had on the mind of
the idolatrous Roman governor, and on that of the king,
who knew the Scriptures.

Reading.

And as he thus spake for himself Festus said with a
loud voice, Paul, thou art beside thyself, much learning
doth make thee mad! But he said, Iam not mad, most
noble Festus, but speak forth the words of truth and
soberness. For the king knoweth of these things, before
whom also I speak freely: for Tam persuaded that none
of these things are hidden from him, for this thing was
not done in a corner. King Agrippa, believest thou the:
prophets? I know that thou believest. Then Agrippa
said unto Paul, Almost thou persuadest me to be a
Christian. And Paul said, I would to God that not only
thou, but all that hear me this day, were both almost and
altogether such as I am,—except these bonds.

Robin, with animation. Now I know what is coming;
the king will be baptised like the jailor!

Lady L. No, alas! as with Felix, the good impression
seems to have passed away! Agrippa might have had the
glory of being the first Christian king in the world, per-
haps a royal martyr! But his title, his dignity, his power
were more to him than the crown of life which the Lord
hath prepared for them that love him!

Robin. But I hope that though the king was not a
Christian, he spoke a kind word for St. Paul.

Lady L. All that we know on the subject is contained
in the last verses of this very interesting chapter.
310 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



Reading.

And when he had thus spoken the king rose up, and
the governor, and Bernice, and they that sat with them,
and when they were gone aside they talked between them-
selves, saying, This man doeth nothing worthy of death or
of bonds. Then said Agrippa unto Festus, This man might
have been set at liberty, if he had not appealed unto
Ceesar.
CHAPTER XL
ONE SMALL SEED.

“MoTHER has good news, I see it in her face!” exclaimed
Robin, as Lady Laurie read to herself at the breakfast-
table on the Friday morning, a letter directed in Mrs. El-
wyn’s bold hand.

“This is kind, most kind!” said Lady Laurie, and she
read the short note aloud.

“Dear Lady Laurie, I have set my heart on carrying
you all off with me on Monday next to Southampton, not
far from which I have taken a house a great deal too large
' for our party. You must not disappoint me by refusing
to come for six weeks. Prem Das will be required to
prevent our young folk from being drowned when picking
up shells, a labour in which your Robin will delight to join
them. A little boating and fishing will be pleasant for
Harold. I expect to see you all with your luggage at the
station when the Monday two-o’clock train stops at Fore-
ham. I write in haste to catch the post.— Yours, E. E.”

Robin could hardly wait to hear the end of the letter.
He shouted, clapped his hands, capered about the room,
and tried to go head over heels in his joy.

“Mamma, won’t you accept the invitation?” said Ida,
much pleased, though not so violent as Robin in her
expression of pleasure.

“T look on the invitation as Providential,” said Lady
Laurie, her eyes filling with tears.

Harold felt this as much as herself, so much that he

311
312 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



was unable to speak. Here—in the first place—was a
proof that Mrs. Elwyn did not suspect him of being guilty
of stealing the twenty-pound note. This in itself was a
powerful solace. Then to be removed from the scene of
his painful disgrace, to be freed from a kind of confinement,
to go where no one would suspect him; to be by the
glorious sea, inhale its breezes and ride on its waves, was
a relief beyond expression to the burdened mind of the
youth.

“JT shall have a busy time of it before Monday,” said
Lady Laurie almost playfully; “setting the house in order,
bidding good-bye to my friends, paying bills, putting by,
packing up, and seeing that Robin’s clothes are in a pre-
sentable state, his toes neither peeping through his socks,
nor his elbows through his jacket.”

“ Hurrah ! hurrah! for the sea!” cried Robin.

“Mamma, I will help you in preparations,” said Ida.

“Look over your own wardrobe, my love ; and just give
a glance at mine. I am now going out to see poor Miss
Petty.”

Robin saw Harold going towards the staircase, and ran
after his brother.

“ Harold, aren’t you glad that poor Prem Das won’t be
left behind?” said the child.

“ Very glad,” was Harold’s reply.

“Youll have plenty of time to teach him at the sea-
side ; and—do you know, Harold, I really want to help a
little.”

“ What can you do, little chap?” asked Harold. “You
know that the Hindu can’t understand you.”

“ But I told you that I wanted to learn a verse, and you
can teach me. I thought that God is love would suit me,
because it is short. But then”—Robin laid his hand on
Harold’s arm as they stood together at the bottom of the
stairs, and looked up in his face with an earnest inquiring
ONE SMALL SEED. 313



expression, “ but then God is love isn’t the verse to begin
with. When the jailor was frightened by the earthquake,
and feared for his soul, he did not say God is love; he
said What must I do to be saved !”

“You are a sensible little fellow,’ observed Harold ;
“the jailor would learn that God 1s love after—not before
—-finding that Christ is a Saviour.”

“So I want you to teach me to say in Urdu, What must
L do to be saved? It is not very long, you know; and
then when I’ve taught it to poor Prem Das, and he knows
it by heart, then you will be able to teach him the answer
which St. Paul gave to the jailor.”

“T’ll teach you, Robin,” said Harold kindly ; “it would
be a shame not to help you to begin mission work in your
own little way. Run up and bring me my Urdu Bible ;
I will go out into the garden. You shall have your lesson
in the open air in the shrubbery, amongst the lilacs.”

And there for nearly half-an-hour sat the two brothers
together, Robin bravely battling against the difficulty of
learning six words in a foreign tongue. Harold patiently
went over and over again, syllable by syllable, the sentence,
Main hya karun ki najdt paun ? till Robin could say it
without a blunder. Then Robin, tired with the mental
effort, ran off to trundle his hoop, then have a look at the
chickens, then gather cherries from his own particular
tree. But at every pause in his amusements the child
repeated his lesson aloud to himself, so as to be certain
not to forget it. At last Robin caught sight of Prem Das,
returning from an errand, and darting up to him, the little
learner soon entered on his new office of teacher, too
impatient to wait till Prem Das entered the house.

“He understood my Urdu,—I’m sure that he did!” ex-
claimed Robin in delight to his brother when next they
met. “Prem Das can say it quite right; he learned ever
so much faster than I did!”
314 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



There are many English in India who have never taken
the trouble to do what the little child did.

“T’ve sown one seed—one very little seed!” said Robin;
_ “and now, you know, I must pray to God to make it
grow.”

“We will pray together,” said Harold; “and I’m going
to follow your plan, Robin, my boy; I’ll teach Prem Das
one little Bible prayer to-night before I go to rest.”

While the brothers had been thus employed, Lady
Laurie had been employed on the more painful task of
visiting the house of unsanctified sorrow. In vain she
attempted to bring anything like spiritual comfort to poor
Theresa. The mourner gave way to passionate sorrow
and bitter complaints, only varied by speaking of the pre-
parations for the funeral on the following Monday. The
dressmaker’s visit, and the mourning required, were topics
more interesting to Theresa than any on which her visitor
entered; how wide should be the tucks on her dress, and
whether crape flowers were “the thing” for her bonnet.
Poor Theresa, though a regular attendant at church services,
and a supporter of parish charities to a limited extent, knew
just as little of heart religion as Prem Das, whom she
despised as a heathen.

It was like leaving a close, unwholesome atmosphere for
a pure one when Lady Laurie left Foreham Villa and
visited her cottage friends. There she saw peace cheering
poverty, and patience conquering pain. There were the
bereaved who were solaced by hope, and those who were
rich in faith, though poor in all things besides.

Robin came to the evening reading with a face brighter
than usual.

“T want so much to hear of St. Paul going to sea, for
T saw in the map that he had a long voyage to get from
Casarea to Rome. And we’re going to the sea too on
Monday. Oh! Monday seems such a long way off!”
ONE SMALL SEED. 315



“You forget, Robin, that we are going to the seaside,
not to be on the sea,” observed Ida.

“Oh! if I get as far as the seaside, I’m sure to go on
the sea!” cried Robin. “ Mother, won’t you let me get
into a boat and go and fish with Harold? ’Twould be
such glorious fun, ’specially if the waves were very rough,
and we went tossing up and down. I’d like it a hundred
times better than picking up shells with the children.”

“T suspect that you would not enjoy the tossing up and
down quite so much as you think,” observed Ida.

“T should like to be in a storm!” cried Robin boldly,
“a grand storm; only not to be drowned, you know,” he
added, in a less boisterous tone.

“We are going to read of a storm—a grand storm,”
observed Lady Laurie; “get out the atlas, Robia, and
have the map ready. Let us imagine ourselves embarking
with St. Paul on his long voyage to Rome.”

“Ts any Christian brother with him?” asked Harold.

“The faithful Luke accompanies his friend, as we see’
by the little word ‘ we.’”
CHAPTER XLII.
ST. PAUL’S SHIPWRECK.

Harold. ONE would like to know with what feelings
St. Paul embarked on his voyage to Rome, the queen of
cities, the capital of the world.

Lady L. And the place of his own future martyrdom,
too. .

Ida. I hope that the noble prisoner was kindly treated
on board.

Lady L. St. Paul was committed to the charge of a very
courteous centurion whose name was Julius. When the
ship, after going northwards, touched at Sidon, St. Paul
was allowed to go on shore and refresh himself with his
friends. Then again the sails were spread, and the vessel
sped on with her precious freight past the isle of Cyprus.

Idu. That was the birthplace of Barnabas, and the
island in which Elymas, the sorcerer, was struck blind.
But it does not seem by the line on the map that St. Paul
landed this time. The first place touched at seems to be
Myra, in Lycia.

Lady L. Here the centurion changed the vessel for one
that was bound for Italy. The voyage now became very
tedious,—the ship made her way but slowly; it appears
that she was heavily laden. After a weary passage to
the large island of Crete, the travellers reached a place
called Fair Havens, where they remained for some time.

Ida. Wow very slow voyages appear to have been in
the time of St. Paul.

316
ST. PAULDS SHIPWRECK. 317



Lady L. It was only at some times of the year that
navigation was safe. When Paul found that the centurion
and the rest were about to start from the sheltering Fair
Havens, he gave an earnest—but unheeded—warning.

Reading.

And said unto them, Sirs, I perceive that this voyage
will be with much hurt and damage, not only of the
lading and ship, but also of our lives. Nevertheless, the
centurion believed the master and the owner of the ship
more than those things which were spoken by Paul.

Harold. One can imagine the ship captain mocking at
the notion of a landsman—a Jew—a prisoner—presuming
to give advice to him in seafaring matters.

Lady L. The captain was deceived by the softly blowing
south wind. He weighed anchor, and set sail for Crete. But .
presently there burst on the vessel a furious blast, lashing
the waves into foam, and driving the ship before it.
Night and day, night and day, continued the awful storm;
the heavens were black with clouds, the sun seemed
blotted from the sky! Night and day, night and day,
helplessly sped on the ship, like a nut-shell borne on the
‘heaving, rolling, dashing waters.

Onwards the vessel flies

Pursued by the shrieking blast,
Now mounts—as she would scale the skies,
Then down the dark abyss that lies
Before her—madly plunging hies

With shivering beams, aud straining mast ;
Will she again in the billows rise,

Or was that plunge—her last ?

The cargo is flung out, everything to lighten the ship.
The tackling follows; St. Paul and St. Luke seem to have
given active help. Only those who have witnessed a
tempest at sea can imagine the rolling, the pitching—
wave after wave dashing over the vessel, deluging the
318 PICTURES OF ST, PAUL.



deck, perhaps smashing the bulwarks, and carrying away
mast and sails! No regular meal could be taken, far less
cooked; it was difficult for the strongest seaman to keep
his feet. “We shall all go the bottom! no ship can out-
live such a storm as this!” such is the general impression
amongst the haggard, tempest-tossed, exhausted crew, and
the Roman soldiers feel that death, in one of its most
terrible forms—is before them. Perhaps those who had
often fearlessly faced human foes regarded with terror the
wild waste of roaring billows, under which they expected
soon to find a watery grave.

Robin. Even St. Paul might be frightened in such a
terrible storm.

Lady L. The winds and waves had lost their terrors for
Paul. We see him, pale from exhaustion and fasting,
dripping with sea-water, perhaps with difficulty holding
on, and making his voice heard in partial lulls of the
wind. He cries out; but let us read his own words.

Reads. Sirs, ye should have hearkened unto me, and not
have loosed from Crete, to have gained this harm and loss.
And now I exhort you to be of good cheer, for there shall
be no loss of any man’s life amongst you, but of the ship.
For there stood beside me this night the angel of God,
whose I am, and whom I serve, saying, Fear not, Paul, for
thou must be brought before Cesar. And lo! God hath
given thee all them that sail with thee. Wherefore, Sirs,
be of good cheer, for I believe God, that it shall be even
as it was told me.

Ida. Mamma, does not St. Paul here seem like a type
of the Saviour? The Lord said, of those whom Thow
gavest Me I have lost none. Paul’s companions were to be
saved for his sake.

Robin. Oh! I like that thought, that God has given us,
me, Robin, to the Lord Jesus Christ! I am quite—quite
His own, and He won’t let me go!
ST. PAUL'S SHIPWRECK. 319





Lady L.—

He will keep what he has sought,
Perfect that which He hath wrought,
Dearly prize—the dearly bought.

Harold. I do not wonder that St. Paul was afraid of
nothing. I found such golden words of his to-day that
I have learned them by heart; they are from the Epistle
tothe Romans. For I am persuaded that neither death
nor life, nor principalities, nor powers, nor things
present nor things to come; nor height, nor depth, nor
any other creature, shall be able to separate us from the
love of God which is in Christ Jesus our Lord.

Robin. Nobody should be so braveasa Christian! But
do go on with the story, I want to hear more of the storm.

Lady L. For thirteen terrible days the ship was driven
up and down the stormy Adriatic. The sea-captain him-
self had lost reckoning, and could not tell where he was.
St. Luke writes thus :—

Reads. But when the fourteenth night was come, about
midnight the shipmen deemed that they drew near to some
country, and sounded and found it twenty fathoms; and
when they had gone a little further they sounded again
and found it fifteen fathoms; then fearing lest they should
have fallen upon rocks, they cast four anchors out of the
stern, and wished for the day.

Robin. What is this “sounding”; I don’t understand
it at all.

Lady £. Seamen had then, and have still, a way of
measuring the depth of the sea by throwing into it a line,
marked into lengths, and with a lead at the end. This is
called sounding. When the sailors in the ship found that
the sea was growing more shallow—that its depth had
changed from 120 to 90 feet—they dreaded lest they should
come to dangerous rocks, against which, if the vessel
should be dashed, it might go to pieces. Then the sailors
320 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL,



threw out four anchors to stop, if possible, the ship from
being driven on further. And then how they longed for
daylight that they might see if there were any shore near,
on which they might possibly land!

Ida. It must have seemed a terribly long night.

Lady L. Some of the sailors formed a selfish, ungener-
ous plan of saving themselves in the boat belonging to the
ship, as they evidently expected the vessel to be lost. It
not unfrequently happens in a shipwreck, when people
have to leave the ship and take to the boats, that so many
persons crowd in that the boat may be swamped.

Harold. That was what happened when the White
Ship was lost, in which Henry IL.’s only son was passenger.
The prince was almost saved in’ the boat, when he had it
put back to save his sister, whom he had left in the sinking
ship. ‘Then so many persons jumped into the boat to save
their lives—that down it went!

Lady L. There were two hundred and seventy-six
persons in St. Paul’s tempest-tossed ship, and it was clear
that one boat could not save them all. The sailors, there-
fore, formed a plan to steal off secretly in the boat, which
they actually let down into the sea, pretending that they
needed it to enable them to cast out more anchors. It
was St. Paul who gave notice to the centurion Julius of
this base plot of the seamen. “Except these abide in the
ship,” he said, “ ye cannot be saved.”

Reads. Then the soldiers cut off the ropes of the boat,
and let her fall off.

Robin. Then no one could be saved in the boat !

Lady L. The voyagers were not to rely upon the boat,
but on God’s promise made to St. Paul.

Reads. And while the day was coming on, Paul besought
them all to take food, saying, this day is the fourteenth day
that ye have tarried and continued fasting, having taken
nothing. Wherefore I pray you to take some meat; for this
ST. PAUL'S SHIPWRECK. 321



is for your health: for there shall not a hair fall from the
head of any of you. And when he had thus spoken, he
took bread, and gave thanks to God in presence of all, and
when he had broken it, he began to eat. Then were they
all of good cheer, and they also took some meat.

Robin. St. Paul did not forget to say grace, though he
was so very hungry, and the sea was roaring around him.

Lady L. That meal, eaten with thanksgiving, was the
last of which the voyagers were to partake on board that
ill-fated vessel. To lighten the ship, the very corn was
now flung out on the waves. At last the longed-for dawn
appeared; gradually objects became more distinct ‘to the
view. There was certainly land in front; and to the sea-
men’s joy they saw a creek into which they thought it

















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Sr. Paur’s Bay, Maura.

possible that the ship might be steered. The anchors
were drawn up, or,as we read in the margin, cu¢; that
is their ropes were cut, and the anchors themselves left in

the sea. The main-sail was hoisted to the wind, and the
x
322 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



vessel again went dashing on in the direction of the shore.
But it never reached the creek—it ran on sunken rocks, and
no efforts could make it move, it was fixed, as it were, to
a stake, while the furious waves dashed around—and over
it too! There was an awful crash! The hinder part of the
ship was carried away; the rest would soon go to pieces!

Robwm. But the poor people would be saved,—God
had promised that every one should be saved !

Lady L. In this exciting moment of mingled hope and
terror we meet with another instance of the selfish cruelty
of man.

feads, And the soldiers’ counsel was to kill the prisoners,
lest any of them should swim out and escape.

Robin. What,—kill St. Paul, when they were only
saved for his sake !

Reads. But the centurion, willing to save Paul, com-
manded that they which could swim should cast them-
selves first into the sea and get to land.

Ida. But they who could not swim,—were they lost?

Robin. Do you forget that God had promised that not
a hair of their head should be hurt?

Lady L. They who could not swim seized boards, or broken
bits of the ship; they too had to commit themselves to
the waves, for the vessel was breaking up fast. See the
two hundred and seventy-six men swimming, struggling,
buffeted by the waves, yet borne on by them to the land;
one after another springing, panting and breathless, to land.
And when the dripping, half-drowned company of sailors,
soldiers, prisoners and passengers were counted, lo! there
were two hundred and seventy-six! If women and children
‘had been on board, not even one babe’s life would have
been lost.

Harold. So all God’s people will land safe on the heavenly
shore at last! But what a hard hard struggle amongst
the waves of trouble some have before they reach it!
CHAPTER XLIL
THE KALEIDOSCOPE.

LET us now take a passing glimpse within the goodly
mansion in Grosvenor Square, where we left Mrs. Elwyn
and her party. The lady of the house is usually too busy
with her various works of beneficence to spend her morning
hours in the drawing-room ; but Saturday is a half-holiday
even to the energetic Mrs. Elwyn. She has made all her
arrangements about the Trident: pictures are on the walls,
and books on the shelves, and in the evening the new
coffee-room will be opened with a service of thanksgiving
and prayer. So Mrs. Elwyn can fold her hands, usually
so busy, and for a time give herself up to the pleasure of
conversation.

Delia looks delicate still, but she is no longer on the
sofa. She has been preparing scores of nosegays for the
opening of the Trident, each with a text tied round the
stalks. And Delia has also written a kind little note of
sympathy to her cousin Theresa, enclosing something
which Miss Petty will prefer to the note. The officer’s
young wife has but slender means, and cannot spare much,
but her present is a token of kindliness to one from whom
she has received little but unkindness.

After finishing preparing the nosegays, and writing the
note, Delia amused herself playing with her children, till
the nurse came and carried them off for their noonday
sleep, leaving the floor strewed with their toys.

“ Here’s a nice litter! cried Mrs. Elwyn goodhumouredly.

223
324 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.



all the contents of Noah’s Ark and a box of nine-pins
scattered over the carpet.”

“Oh! I’m ashamed,” ae Delia, making a slight
attempt to gather some of the toys together.

“ Never mcd them, dear; I’ll ring for Thomas presently.
But now let us have a little talk together. Will you feel
able to be present at my little festival this evening ?”

“TI think so—I hope so—I am so much stronger, and it
will cheer me to see so many happily gathered together.
Oh! Mrs. Elwyn, a few weeks ago it seemed to me as if
there were no joy in the world, as if all were dark and
gloomy, everything going against me. I felt myself feebly
struggling against a current of trouble which was carrying
me down,”

“ And you needed a friendly hand just to keep your head
above water. But no!” added Mrs. Elwyn in a more
serious tone, “what you needed, dear child, was to get
your feet firm on the Rock, and then you could smile on
the waves, and feel that there was no danger whatever of
drowning.”

“But do you not think that there are many things
which must sadden our hearts, even if we are true
believers? There is so much which passes around us that
we cannot understand. Look at the terrible events in
India. Look at Lady Laurie’s poor boys deprived of a
father! Then this strange disappearance of the twenty-
pound note; a fine lad’s prospects blighted and his heart
broken by a false accusation,—for false it certainly must
be! How can we account for the Lord’s permitting such
disorders and troubles in this beautiful world ?”

Mrs. Elwyn, instead of at once replying, stooped and
picked up from the carpet a kaleidoscope which she had
given to Lily. It had already lost all pretensions to out-
ward beauty, for Lily had amused herself by picking off
most of the gilded paper which had ornameuted the cover.
THE KALEIDOSCOPE. 325



“This toy may preach to us a little sermon,” said
Mrs. Elwyn, drawing her chair nearer to that of Delia.
“We see in it no bad type of providential arrangements.
We behold nothing to admire till we raise it to the light,
and then that light reveals beauty and order of which the
outside view gives no sign.”

Delia took the kaleidoscope from the hand of her friend,
and looked through the tube. “The pattern is fit for the
oriel window of a cathedral,” she said smiling.

“T’ll destroy it!” exclaimed Mrs. Elwyn, suddenly
jogging the delicate hand that held the kaleidoscope.
“See your oriel window smashed to pieces!”

“There is another pattern yet lovelier than the last,”
observed Delia.

“ And so it isin the kaleidoscope of life, if it contain
the gem-like graces of faith, love, patience, and hope, the
blue, the red, the violet, and green. Satan is ever shaking
the glass, but though there is change there is not confusion.
' The Spirit is ever bringing order out of chaos, and beauty

out of the most complicated trials.” :

“Not all can see this,” observed Delia.

“Not all can see it now, but all will see it hereafter,
when we look not through a glass darkly, but know even
as we are known. But even now, if we let more of
heaven’s pure light stream in, what glorious combinations
do we behold! See how St. Paul, in the midst of sore
tribulations, could look on the mystery of his own life.
We are troubled on every side, yet not distressed, we are
perplexed, but not im desparr, persecuted, but not forsaken,
cast down, but not destroyed. And then, let Satan do his
worst, the Apostle could say,—Our light affliction, which
is but for a moment, worketh for us a far more exceeding
and eternal weight of glory. The hope of that glory
overbalanced the troubles which were pressing him down,
and St. Paul could speak of all his afflictions as light /”
826 PICTURES OF ST. PAUL.







“But there are few, very few like St. Paul,” observed
Delia.

“The same Fountain of Comfort from which he received
joy and strength is open to us,” said Mrs. Elwyn. “The
difference is that where he brought a large vessel of Faith
to receive the living waters, we bring a comparatively
small one.”

“ Mine is a very small one indeed,” said Delia, relapsing
a little into her old plaintive tone, and ending the sentence
with a sigh.

“Then ask for a larger!” cried Mrs. Elwyn. “ We must
not be satisfied to remain as children, satisfied with such
a, toy-measure as this,” she glanced at an acorn-cup which
lay at her feet. “We must plead for the enlargement of
the faith that carries the blessing, and we shall not plead
in vain.”

Delia’s reply was a smile. Then, laying her slender
fingers on Mrs. Elwyn’s larger and stronger hand, she said |
softly, “It does me so much good to be scolded by you!”
CHAPTER XLII.
ST. PAUL AT MELITA.

Lady L. THE account of St. Paul’s shipwreck which we
read yesterday reminds me so much of the perilous
adventures at sea encountered by the great and good
missionary, Dr. Duff, now* labouring in Calcutta, that
I must tell you about one of them. Twice was Dr. Duff
wrecked on his first journey to India! The first time, like
St. Paul, he and his companions were thrown destitute
upon an island, and it was a desert island, a trial which
the Apost