Citation
Little Jarvis

Material Information

Title:
Little Jarvis
Series Title:
Young heroes of our navy
Creator:
Seawell, Molly Elliot, 1860-1916
Edwards, George Wharton, 1859-1950 ( Illustrator )
Davidson, Julian Oliver, 1853-1894 ( Illustrator )
D. Appleton and Company ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
D. Appleton and Company
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
64 p., [6] leaves of plates : ill. ; 20 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Ship captains -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Sailing -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Seafaring life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Sailors -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Combat -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Courage -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1890
Genre:
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Illustrated by George Wharton Edwards and J.O. Davidson.
General Note:
"This story received a prize of five hundred dollars offered by the Youth's companion."--t.p.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
by Molly Elliot Seawell.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026951789 ( ALEPH )
ALH7748 ( NOTIS )
03196249 ( OCLC )
04016154 ( LCCN )

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Full Text
Scheie.
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LITTLE JARVIS.









Little Jarvis and the captain of the maintop.



JITTLE JARVIS

‘cAs his life was without fear, so
was his death without reproach.”

BY
MOLLY ELLIOT SEAWELL

THIS STORY RECEIVED A PRIZE OF FIVE HUNDRED DOLLARS
OFFERED BY THE YOUTH’S COMPANION

NEW YORK
D. APPLETON AND COMPANY
1890



CopyYRIGHT, 1890,
By D. APPLETON AND COMPANY.



ILLUSTRATIONS.

FACING
ae i PAGE
Little Jarvis and the captain of

the maintop. GrorcE WHARTON EDWARDS

Frontispiece.

The Constellation. J. O. Davipson. II
The challenge. GEORGE WHARTON EDWARDS 22
“ For three long hours of the moon-

lit night the battle raged.” J. O. Davipson. 52
“With a steady eye he looked ¢

down below.” GEORGE WHARTON EDWARDS 58

“He has well defended that flag
and he shall be buried in it.” GEORGE WHARTON EDWARDS 62



LITTLE JARVIS.

Jarvis, being only thirteen years old,
was the youngest midshipman on board
the Constellation, but the most trouble-
some; and although this was a good while
ago—in 1800—scapegraces like Jarvis are
still common enough on board naval ships
to this day. If the officer of the deck
were out of sight for five minutes, Jarvis
was certain to be turning a double hand-
spring, or standing on his head, or engaged
in some similar iniquity on the quarter-
deck. As for going aloft for punishment,
Jarvis spent most of his time on the cross-



8 LITTLE JARVIS.



trees, and was always prepared for it, by
carrying a book in one pocket and a piece
of hard-tack in the other. When one of
the lieutenants would catch Jarvis at his
tricks and would shout, in a thundering
voice,

“Up to the mast-head, sir—up, sir—
you'll learn some fine day that the quarter-
deck isn’t a bear-garden!” Jarvis would
go up like a cat, and soon be swinging
about as merry as a bird on a bough. The
officers, though, after giving Jarvis a ter-
rific blowing up, would smile at each other
on the sly. The boy was such a merry,
active, honest-hearted lad, and his mis-
doings were so free from anything like
meanness, that, although for the sake of
discipline they punished him, every one
of them liked him. Even Captain Trux-



LITTLE JARVIS. 9



tun, who had once come upon Jarvis and
his chum, Brookfield, unawares, and had
caught Jarvis in the act of saying in the
captain’s own voice, which was rasping
and very much through his nose, “Mr.
Brookfield, you young gentlemen in the
steerage can make the most devilish noises
and more of them—’” the captain, on hear-
ing this, moved quietly away, laughing to
himself—nobody could help laughing at
little Jarvis, he was so comical. At first
Jarvis stood in holy awe of Captain Trux-
tun, owing to various blood-curdling tales
told him by Brookfield, such as the cap-
tain’s flogging the whole starboard watch
if the ship made less than eleven knots
an hour; but in course of time he dis-
covered the imaginative character of these

romances. The sailors all approved of



10 LITTLE JARVIS.



Jarvis, after their fashion. Sitting around
the fok’sle, Jack Bell, the captain of the
maintop, chewing his quid, solemnly re-
marked to his mates:

“That ’ere little reefer, he ain’t afeerd
o nothin’; and as for gittin’ into trouble—
Lord love you, if he had a chance to git
into trouble and didn’t do it, ’twould break
his heart.” And so it would.

Jarvis had a mop of tow-colored hair,
a wide, roguish, laughing mouth, a snub
nose, and a pair of the softest, shyest,. gray-
blue eyes that could be imagined, with a
strange, sweet look of innocence, such as
babies sometimes bring from heaven with
them, but soon lose in this work-a-day
world. However, it invariably turned out
that when Jarvis looked most angelic he

was sure to be plotting some deed of









onl





i

TT errs









== EEE” 7
= adavasy

The Constellation.

(Now the training ship at Annapolis.)



LITTLE JARVIS. II



. darkness, and whenever he was caught red-
handed in mischief, he always wore the
look of a seraph rudely awakened.

The Constellation was a trim and lovely
frigate and a perfect beauty of a ship. She
was not very big, and carried only thirty-
eight guns; but she was one of the
cut-and-come-again kind. She could both
fight and run away. When she chose to
fight, she was a match for any frigate afloat;
and when her enemies were too many
for her, she could make off from a whole
squadron, ripping it so fast that she would
be hull down before they had got fairly
started in chase. She was a good sailer
in a light breeze and a better one in half
a gale. She liked.a smooth sea, but she
didn’t mind a heavy one, and took the
water like a cork. She was a lucky ship,



12 LITTLE JARVIS.





too, and such a prime favorite with old .
Neptune that nothing amiss ever happened
to her. She would go through a roaring
gale “walking Spanish,” as the sailors said,
and come out of it with nothing worse
than a good wetting. When she lay ma-
jestically at anchor, outlined against the
clear blue of sea and sky, the broad white
ribbon around her hull revealing the beauti-
ful run of her lines, her tall masts and
graceful spars dipping slightly and proudly
as the waves eagerly caressed her, Jarvis
thought her the most beautiful thing in
the world. But when she spread all her
white wings and rushed before the wind
with the bold, free sweep of an ocean-
bird, dashing the dark and curling water
impatiently from her sharp bows, Jarvis
wondered how he had thought her beauti-



LITTLE JARVIS. 13



ful any other way. And Jarvis loved her
with all his boyish heart, and thought to
be Midshipman Jarvis, of the United States
ship Constellation, lifted him several pegs
above the rest of humanity.

But although Jarvis was always laugh-
ing and joking and cutting up, and getting
punished for his pranks—which last he
seemed to enjoy as much as anything else
—he had his troubles. The fact is, he was
consumed with envy. He was the only
midshipman on board who had never smelt
powder; and as the United States was then
at war with France, and the Constellation
had already done glorious things, this was
a heavy load for Jarvis to carry. It was
nearly a year since the Constellation had
come across the great French frigate, the
Insurgente, which was said to be the smart-



14 LITTLE JARVIS.



est frigate and to have the finest captain
in the French navy; and although the In-
surgente was bigger and carried sixteen
more guns, the Constellation -had borne
down on her and opened fire with that
terrible and well-directed broadside for
which the American gunners were famous,
had outsailed and outfought her, and, in
spite of the greatest gallantry and skill
on the French ship’s part, had made her
haul down her colors with her decks strewn
with her dead and dying. And Jarvis wasn’t
even a midshipman then! _

To make it worse, Brookfield, who was
the tallest, the oldest, and the handsomest
midshipman on board, and cock of the
walk generally between decks, had been
one of the midshipmen sent aboard of the

Insurgente, who, with only eleven sailors,



LITTLE JARVIS. 15



had kept nearly two hundred of the French-
men below the hatches, and, separated by
a gale from the Constellation, had man-
aged to bring the dismasted and _half-
wrecked Insurgente into St. Kitt’s, where
the victorious Constellation awaited her.
It made little Jarvis very down-hearted
when Brookfield, who gave himself the airs
of a lord-high admiral of the seas, would
tell of those glorious days. Jarvis, hang-
ing over the rail, as he gazed dolefully at
the dancing sunlit water, would wonder
if he would ever have any share in such
brave doings; and then, cocking his smart
_ gold-trimmed cap rakishly over his left eye,
would promise himself that the next brush
the Constellation had with a Frenchman
something would be heard of Jarvis sure.

It was the delight of little Jarvis’s heart,



16 LITTLE JARVIS.

when he could spare time from making
mischief, to get Jack Bell, the captain of
the main-top, to sing him the song of
“The Constellation and the Insurgente.”
Jack was immensely proud of this perform-
ance of his, and would drone away, with-
out moving a muscle of his face and in
reckless defiance of time and tune, a won-
derful account of the fight, beginning :

“°Twas in the month of February, off Montserrat

we lay,

And there we spied the Insurgente—”

“But, Bell,’ said Jarvis, “it was the
Lusurgente—"

“Well, Mr. Jarvis, you may call her the
Ann Sargent, if you likes, but in the fok’sle
we calls her the Insurgent—and mighty
insurgent she looked, let me tell you, sir,

when she come bearin’ down on us, like she



LITTLE JARVIS. 17



was a-goin’ to eat the little Constellation up,
with all them long twenty-four pounders
pokin’ their ugly noses out o’ her ports, and
her decks just alive with them horse-marine
French sailors, that uses their bag’nets for
belayin’ pins, 7 reckon. But, Mr. Jarvis, the
mounseers fights like the devil. They can
wallop a Portygee or a Spaniard as easy as
winkin’—or drinkin’, that’s easier.”

“Tm glad of one thing, Bell,” said Jar-
vis, giving his cap an extra twirl and finger-
ing his midshipman’s dirk, as he began to
strut up and down like a young game-cock.
“Tm glad the French are such good fight-
ers, because the next fight we have I’d like
amazingly to have a regular hand-to-hand
tussle with a French officer.”

Jack surveyed Jarvis’s four feet and a

half of boyish figure without smiling in the
3



18 LITTLE JARVIS.

least, although there was a twinkle in one
corner of his eye.

“Youre right, Mr. Jarvis,” said he, chew-
ing away as solemnly as ever; “but if I was
you, sir, I wouldn't bother with none o’
them French midshipmen—Id fall foul of a
leftenant, sir.” Here Jack winked to him-
self. “May be the fust leftenant, hearin’ you
was aboard of us, will be a-waitin’ for you on
the quarter-deck when we grapples ’em.
’Tain’'t likely they'd risk their cap’n”—at
which Jarvis perceived that Jack Bell was
making game of him, and turned scarlet,
from his dimpled chin up to his tousled tow
head. |

While Jarvis was considering whether it
comported with his dignity to notice the
wink or not, Jack began to sing again in the

same curious, cracked voice:



LITTLE JARVIS. 19

« All hands were called to quarters, as we pursued in
chase,

With well-primed guns and tompions out, well splic-ed
the main brace.”

There was one specially realistic verse,
though, in which it was represented of the
French ship—

“The blood did from their scuppers run,

Their captain cried, ‘We are undone !’”’
“Bell,” asked Jarvis, thoughtfully, “do
you really believe the scuppers ran with
blood ?”
| “T dunno, sir,” answered Jack, stolidly.
“May be they did, and may be they didn’t.
May be the Frenchmen didn’t know what
the scuppers was rightly meant for. They’re
droll sailors, Mr. Jarvis.”

“And do you suppose the captain said
‘We are undone!’”



20 LITTLE JARVIS.



“JY dunno that neither, sir, ‘cause I
don’t understand the lingo. But, Lord!
them Frenchmen says all sorts o’ things
when they is at sea. They're that ornnat-
eral they'd ruther be ashore than afloat any
time—even when it’s blowin’ great guns,
and trees is bein’ uprooted, and bricks is
a-flyin’ and roofs is comin’ off—instid o’
bein’ safe in a tight little frigate like this
ere, with everything snug aloft, and just as
safe as a baby in the cradle. Landsmen
leads a deal more riskier life nor sailors,
Mr. Jarvis. They risks their carcasses on
horses that keeps on bowsin’, bowsin’ at
the bowline, and in carriages that only has
one man alow and aloft, and he’s got to
mind the e/lum and be lookout besides.
The reason I follows the sea, Mr. Jarvis,

is ‘cause I wants to live out my days,



LITTLE JARVIS. 21



and I knows I ain’t safe a minute on
shore.”

Jarvis adopted Jack Bell’s theory that
nothing was as safe in a storm as being
at sea; and the next hard blow they had,
Captain Truxtun caught sight of Jarvis
perched on the cross-trees, while the wind
bent the mast like a reed, and the spray
dashed over the forecastle at every lurch
the ship gave. The captain bawled so loud
through his speaking-trumpet that he al-
most broke a blood-vessel, and Jarvis, who
thought the storm was great fun, was so
perfectly terrified when he stood trembling
before the angry captain, that he couldn't
say a word to save his life. Here was a
pretty kettle of fish, indignantly thought
Jarvis, when, after a terrific wigging, he was

ordered below, if an officer can’t risk his



22 LITTLE JARVIS.

life any time he wants to. Another one
of Jarvis’s troubles was, that everybody on
board called him “ Little Jarvis”; and when
he remonstrated with the other young gen-
tlemen who shared the luxuries of the steer-
age with him, he usually got a licking
for it. At last this got so intolerable,
especially from Brookfield—for this was be-
fore he and Jarvis became such cronies
—that Jarvis fiercely resolved his honor
(which he spelled with a big H) required
he should puta stop to it. Therefore, one
day he sat down and penned a formal chal-
lenge to mortal combat as soon as they
made a port, and, addressing it to Brook-
field, wrathfully awaited developments. The
grammar wasn’t unexceptionable, and the
spelling was very weak in spots, but there

was no sort of doubt about Jarvis’s mean-





The challenge.





LITTLE JARVIS. 23

ing, and that he was full of fight. He also
mentioned that he would not consent to
fight at less than twenty paces, and ten
would be more to his taste; and he hoped
Mr. Brookfield would not consider this sug-
gestion an infringement of “the coad.” To
this alarming missive Brookfield returned
the following reply:

“Mr. Brookfield presents his compli-
ments to Mr. Jarvis, and declines absolutely
sacrificing his life in the manner proposed
by Mr. Jarvis. Mr. Brookfield, being five
feet eleven, and weighing a hundred and
fifty pounds, would be an excellent target
for Mr. Jarvis at twenty paces—while Mr.
Jarvis would be invisible to the naked
eye at twenty paces—and if Mr. Jarvis
buzzes about Mr. Brookfield any more,
Mr. Brookfield promises Mr. Jarvis the



24 LITTLE JARVIS.

handsomest drubbing he ever had in his
life.”

When Jarvis read this letter he fairly
danced with rage. Brookfield, down in the
steerage, stretched out on a locker, reading,
happened to glance up, and there stood
Jarvis, glaring at him, and evidently red-
hot. As Jarvis was not actually five feet
high, Brookfield could easily have settled
him with one hand tied behind his back,
so that Jarvis’s ferocious air didn’t frighten
him particularly.

“Mr. Brookfield,” asked Jarvis, in a trem-
bling voice, which he in vain tried to make
cool and composed, “did you write this
letter, sir?”

“I did, you young rapscallion,” calmly
answered Brookfield, laying down his book.

“ Then, sir,” continued Jarvis, nearly burst-



LITTLE JARVIS. 25





ing with wrath, “all I have to say, sir, is,
that your conduct, sir—your conduct is
unbecoming an officer and a gentleman,
and you are a c—c—coward, sir—”

By the time the word was out of his
mouth, Brookfield had jumped two feet in
the air, and seizing Jarvis by the collar of
his jacket, was shaking him up and down
as a mastiff shakes a terrier, while he beat
the devil’s tattoo on Jarvis’s unfortunate
ribs. When Brookfield put him down,
Jarvis was blind and breathless, but per-
fectly undaunted.

“Will you take that back?” roared
Brookfield, now as angry as Jarvis, “and
if you don’t, by the Lord Harry, V'il—’

“ N—n—no,” gasped Jarvis, “I won't
take it back—”

In another minute Jarvis was again
4 .



26 LITTLE JARVIS.

dangling in the air at the end of Brookfield’s
brawny arm. The first shaking wasn’t a
patch on the second one.

“ Now will you take it back?” howled
Brookfield, stamping his foot.

“No—confound you!” shouted Jarvis,
game to the backbone, and stamping his
foot back at Brookfield. |

Brookfield, breathing very hard, looked
intently at Jarvis, who, with folded arms
and a scowl that was meant to be appalling
on his pink and white face, stood awaiting
his fate. Half a dozen grinning midship-
men had crowded round by that time, and
somebody called out, “ Hooray for Jarvis!”

“Look here, you fellows,” said Brook-
field, turning to them, “did you ever see
anything like the little beggar’s pluck?
Drat my eyes, but I’ve got half a mind to



LITTLE JARVIS. 27

fight the brat anyhow”—and at this he
seized Jarvis again, but, instead of shaking
him, he threw the boy across his shoulder
and began to parade up and down, accom-
panied by a crew of yelling, cheering mid-
shipmen, all hurrahing for Jarvis, who was
kicking and pounding with all his might.
In the midst of the hullabaloo, a lieutenant,
unobserved, came running down the gang-
way, and, the first the howling mob of mid-
dies knew, was standing in the midst, shout-
ing, angrily :

“What is the meaning of this infernal
racket ?”

The lieutenant was in a boiling rage.
His cap was askew, and when he tried to
straighten it he slammed it down on his
head so hard that the peak was nearly over

his left ear.



28 LITTLE JARVIS.



An instant hush fell upon the crowd,
every one of whom stood bolt upright at
“ Attention!” including little Jarvis, who,
half in and half out of his jacket, had slipped
down from Brookfield’s shoulder, and stood
red and trembling before the peppery lieu-
tenant.

Brookfield was the first to recover. his
composure.

“T can not tell a lie, sir,” he said, with
much suavity—for nothing on earth could
upset Brookfield’s composure. “It was all
Mr. Jarvis’s fault. Mr. Jarvis objects point-
edly to being called ‘Little Jarvis,’ and be-
cause I happened to allude to him in those
terms he challenged me to mortal combat,
as soon as we make a port. I declined,
sir, upon the ground that the contest was
unequal, Mr. Jarvis being perfectly invisible -







“ For three long hours of the moonlit night the battle raged.”



_ LITTLE JARVIS. 29

at the distance he proposed to fight, while I
can be easily seen half a mile off. Then
Mr. Jarvis came up and called me a coward,
and, although I almost walloped the life out
of him for it, Mr. Jarvis declined to apolo-
gize, and I had to repeat the operation.
Mr. Jarvis still persisting in his remarks,
though I nearly killed him, I and the other
midshipmen present concluded that Mr. Jar-
vis ought to be rewarded for his gallantry ;
and we were testifying our respect for him,
sir, when you appeared.”

The lieutenant, during all this rigmarole,
coughed once or twice, put his cap on
straight, and managed to keep from grin-
ning, like the midshipmen.

“Mr. Jarvis,” he said, in a very meek,
mild voice, “I regret very much that I shall

have to report you for language unbecom-



30 LITTLE JARVIS.

ing an officer and a gentleman. Mean-
while, it will give me a great deal of pleas-
ure if you will dine in the ward-room with
me to-night.”

Little Jarvis could hardly believe his
ears. What was it all about, any how?
He had called Brookfield a coward, and
Brookfield had licked him, and here were
all the midshipmen hurrahing for Jarvis,
and the lieutenant inviting him to dinner in
the ward-room.

“« Th—th—thank you, sir!” he managed
to stammer, when prodded by Brookfield ;
and then the lieutenant bowed formally and
went off, and the noise began exactly where
it had been before.

Jarvis had never dined in the ward-
room, and was nearly frightened to death at

the prospect. Nevertheless, he appeared



LITTLE JARVIS. 31



punctually in the evening, blushing very
much, his face shining with the scrubbing
he had given it, and his hair carefully soaped
up. He also had on his newest jacket.
Brookfield had carefully coached him in
ward-room etiquette, and Jarvis promised
faithfully to remember it all; but, unluckily,
he forgot every word of it the moment he
entered the ward-room. However, he man-
aged to stow away a remarkably good din-
ner, partly from inclination and partly from
Brookfield’s warning that if a midshipman
refused any dish that was offered him in the
ward-room it was taken as a reflection on
ward-room fare, and an affront to his su-
periors; and the officers drew lots as to
which one should call him out.

The officers all treated Jarvis with great

respect, although there were several sly al-



32 LITTLE JARVIS.

lusions to duels to: the death, and a lively
discussion as to whether “code” or “coad”
were the proper spelling of a word very
much in use among midshipmen in those
days. It was generally agreed that “coad”
was right, to Jarvis’s infinite relief, who re-
membered he had spelled it that way in his
letter to Brookfield. During it all Jarvis,
however, maintained perfect silence and
great dignity. The lieutenant was very
kind to him, although a twinkle in the eye
_ revealed that there was a joke abroad con-
nected with Jarvis ; but, on the whole, Jarvis
enjoyed himself hugely, and returned to the
steerage with wonderful tales of the im-
mense attention, consideration, and admira-
tion bestowed upon him by the ward-room
officers. According to Jarvis’s account, he

had come off victorious in a stout argument



LITTLE JARVIS. 33



with the first lieutenant, and had browbeat
several other officers who ventured to differ
with him. Nobody believed him, of course;
but as all the midshipmen brought back
similar yarns when they dined in the ward-
room, it was a point of steerage etiquette to
profess unqualified belief in them; so Jar-
vis’s account was received with perfect
gravity. !

After that, Brookfield and Jarvis be-
came inseparable. Jarvis got no more
lickings, although he was still called Little
Jarvis. ;

It was February, and they were cruis-
ing among the West India Islands. The
weather was beautiful, everybody was in
good spirits and hoping to get a whack at
a Frenchman, and little Jarvis was so full

of pranks and mischief that it seemed as
5



34 LITTLE JARVIS.



if he only came down from the tops to get
his meals and sleep.

One golden afternoon Jarvis seemed
possessed. The officer ot the deck hap-
pened to be his friend, the lieutenant, who
winked at everything, until he suddenly
turned around and caught Jarvis in the
act of a sword - swallowing performance,
which wasn’t exactly suited to an officer and
a gentleman on the quarter-deck. So, in
five minutes, Jarvis was enjoying as usual
the fine view afforded from the cross-trees.
At first it was quite jolly up there, the
sun shone so bright, and the salt air was
so clear and fresh as the ship flew before
the wind. Besides, Jarvis had a pencil and
paper and some lead bullets in his pocket,
and, having a knack of drawing, he drew a

number of pictures of his whilom friend,



LITTLE JARVIS. OTe



the lieutenant, representing him in numer-
ous grotesque and humiliating situations.
These he rolled carefully up into a wad
with a bullet in it, and dropped at Brook-
field’s feet as that young gentleman strolled
leisurely along the deck. But, strangely
enough, Brookfield did not see the wad,
and not ten minutes afterward the lieuten-
ant came briskly along and picked it up.
At that, little Jarvis uttered a long and dis-
mal whistle, and looked far across the danc-
ing water.

“Tm in for it now,’ he groaned to
himself.

_ Down in the ward-room that night the
lieutenant suddenly remembered little Jar-
vis’s pictures. He took the wad out of
his pocket and spread the scraps of paper
carefully out on the table. There was the



36 LITTLE JARVIS.

lieutenant on his knees before a prepos-
terous young lady in ringlets. Again he
was bestriding a very lean donkey, who
was in the act of shooting him into space,
and underneath was scrawled, in a big,
boyish hand, “Aint he a grate luetenant
now.” :

The lieutenant got to laughing, and the
other officers around the table joined in.

“Clever little rascal, that Jarvis,” they
all said.

“By Jove!” suddenly exclaimed the
lieutenant, “I sent the little scamp aloft
about five o'clock and forgot all about
him!”

The lieutenant was a kind-hearted fel-
low, and he hurried up on deck, feeling re-
morseful for all the long hours that little
Jarvis had been aloft.



LITTLE JARVIS. 37



The night had fallen, and with it had
come that vast loneliness which only the
ocean knows. Little Jarvis for once got
a little down-hearted and forgot to whistle.
It was quite dark, and the moon had not
risen, although the stars were kindled in the
blue-black sky. The ship was cutting fast
through the water, the breeze was fresh, and
as a gust occasionally struck the great main-
sail, it flapped loudly, with a weird, rever-
berating sound. And besides being dark
and dismal on little Jarvis’s perch, it was
cold and very lonesome. Jarvis began to
think what a jolly time the other fellows
were having down in the steerage, where
it was warm and light, and it was getting
to be supper-time, too. They were all sky-
larking, no doubt; the steward was proba-
bly begging them to let him have the table



38 LITTLE JARVIS.



to serve supper; but as it was a favorite
amusement to turn the table bottom up-
ward, while the reefers piled in and slid
up and down as the ship lurched, some-
times it was half an hour before they would
let the much-badgered steward have it.
Presently, though, as Jarvis looked about,
he saw in the half darkness, a long way
off, a mere speck. It might be a sail.
Jarvis, who had the sharpest eyes on board,
concluded to watch that speck, and mean-
while try and keep his mind off his sup-
per, of which there was at present a very
slim prospect. The lieutenant, presently,
hurrying along the deck, heard a sweet
boyish voice far up aloft singing:
“ Strike eight bells, call the watch,
Relieve the wheel and chain ;

Won't we have a jolly time
When we get home again.”



LITTLE JARVIS. 30



The “home again” had a little pathetic
sound. Jarvis’s song wasn’t as merry as
usual; it was sad, and chimed in with the
time—night upon the ocean.

“Poor little chap!” thought the lieuten-
ant, and calling out very loud, “Jarvis!”
got a cheery “All right, sir,” as if the boy
had not been swinging up there for hours
and hours in the darkness, and seeing the
night descend upon the sea.

It seemed scarcely a moment before
Jarvis had landed on deck. He went up
to the lieutenant eagerly.

“If you please, sir,” he said, saluting,
“there’s a sail off the port-quarter. [
tried to call out, but nobody heard me—
and I believe it’s a big frigate.”

At that moment the lookout on the
quarter sung out, “Sail, ho!”



40 LITTLE JARVIS.



The officers came running up from be-
low. A sail might mean a French ship-of-
war. None of them could make out any-
thing but a shadow, like the ghost of a
ship, moving on the dim horizon; but Jar-
vis stuck to it stoutly that it was a frigate;
and sure enough, within an hour, when the
silver moon rose in the heavens and flooded
the sea with its white radiance, the stranger
was near enough for her port-holes to be
counted. She was the Vengéance, one of
the great fifty-four-gun frigates of the
French navy.

Oh, what joy and exultation there was |
among the brave fellows on the Constella-
tion! What a trouncing they meant to
give the Vengéance, just as they had given
the Insurgente the year before! And it
would be no child’s play either, but a fair



LITTLE JARVIS. 4t



and square fight, for the French were not
easily beaten at the guns, and fought like
good men and true; and this suited the
Constellation’s men exactly. From the cap-
tain down to little Jarvis, all were as merry
as grigs, and when the orders were given to
shorten sail the men sprang into the rigging
with a ringing “ Ay, ay, sir!” such as sailors
only give when there is a prospect of glory
and prize-money ahead. And then the
Constellation, with three ensigns flying, as
she hauled by the wind, and stood boldly
for the French ship, seemed to be saying,
“Do you want to see the ship that whipped
the Insurgente? Well, here I am. And
am I not a beauty? And my brave lovers
—see what gallant sailor-men they are, and
every one of them would die for me!”

The Vengéance, however, did not appear
6



42 LITTLE JARVIS.

to know half as much about the Constella-
tion as the Constellation knew about the
Vengéance; and when she got a good look
at the American frigate, she seemed to re-
member the fate of the Insurgente, for she
took to her heels, and the Constellation had
to crowd on sail to overhaul her. And then
began a chase in which the Constellation,
standing up beautifully under a cloud of
canvas, went bounding over the sea after
the flying frigate. But it was plain, from
the start, that the Vengéance could not
escape; the Constellation had “too much
foot for her,” as Jack Bell dryly remarked.
While they were still chasing the French
ship, and it was yet an hour before they
could get within fighting distance, the lieu-
tenant, who was Jarvis’s friend, found him

sitting in the gangway, with a piece of paper



LITTLE JARVIS. 43

on his knee anda pencil in his hand. But
Jarvis wasn’t writing—he was leaning his
head on his hands, and the lieutenant sus-
pected that Jarvis was crying.

“What! my man!” he said, kindly, for
the boy was so young that the prospect of
going into battle might well be terrifying to
him ; and, besides, the lieutenant knew well
enough that brave men, much less brave
boys, are sometimes subject to these tremors.
Little Jarvis raised his head, and made no
pretense of concealing that he had been
crying.

“JT was thinking, sir,” he said, trying to
steady his voice and wiping his eyes on his
jacket-sleeve, “that—that—may be I'd never
see my mother again, and I’d better write
her a letter; and then, when a fellow gets

to thinking about his mother—”



44 LITTLE JARVIS.

Jarvis stopped short..

“That's all right,’ said the fewer
cheerily. ‘“ But you won't think about that
when the music begins that we are going
to make the Frenchmen dance to. And, ©
my lad, don’t—don’t let your fears get the
upper hand—’”

“Fears!” answered little Jarvis, in a
surprised voice, and opening his round, in-
nocent eyes very wide indeed—for it had
never dawned upon him that anybody could
think he was scared, “I ain’t afraid, sir!”

The lieutenant looked at Jarvis and
smiled, the boy’s surprise was so genuine, .
and the idea of fear was so novel to him;
and he smiled more than ever when Jarvis,
giving his capa particularly fierce and war-
like. cock, continued in a tone of savage
determination: “And I ain't going to ask



LITTLE JARVIS. 45

for quarter either, sir, not if I see ten
Frenchmen coming at me at once when
we board ’em—because it says in the regu-
lations, ‘If an officer ask for quarter, he shall
suffer death’; and that ain’t the way / want
to die!”

The lieutenant, still smiling, raised his
cap and shook little Jarvis’s hand.

“JT don’t think you will die that way,” he
said, briefly.

But then, seeing they were gaining fast
on the Vengéance, Captain Truxtun called
his officers around him and made them a
short speech before they took their stations.
Now, Jarvis had known all the time, of
course, that his station was in the maintop;
but although whenever they went to quar-
ters he found himself aloft, he had always
cherished a wild dream that at the actual



46 LITTLE JARVIS.

time of battle, by some sort of hocus-pocus,
he would be able to be on deck, cutting
down French officers with his midshipman’s
dirk, or sparing their lives, perhaps, while
taking their swords. But all of these splen-
did visions melted away, when, without any
of the startling breaks in the routine that
Jarvis fondly hoped would keep him on
deck, he had to march off to go aloft. If
Jarvis had not been an officer and a gentle-
man, and if boohooing at the moment of
going into action had not been decidedly
unbecoming, Jarvis would certainly have
cried right out at the doleful idea that he
wasn't to be in the thick of the fight.
And, to make it worse, he heard Captain
Truxtun, who was careful of his younger
officers, say something to Jack Bell, who
was a very steady, reliable old man-of-



LITTLE JARVIS. 47



war’s-man, about keeping an eye on Mr.
Jarvis; and Brookfield, who had a splendid
station, grinned at Jarvis, and, thrusting out
his tongue in a very exasperating manner,
remarked that Jarvis would be taken fora
fly on the mast. When Jarvis, looking very
sulky and disappointed, passed the lieuten-
ant, his face was so dismal that the lieuten-
ant patted him on the back to comfort him,
and said, kindly: “Never mind, Mr. Jarvis,
you won't miss all the fun.” |

“Yes, I will,” answered little Jarvis, al-
most crying. “I can’t do any fighting, and
I can’t join the boarders ; the captain thinks,
because I’m such a little fellow, I can’t fight,
and—and—it’s deuced hard, that it is!”

For the first time in his life little Jarvis
went aloft very slowly and _ unwillingly.
The men were already in the top, and there



48 LITTLE JARVIS.

was Jack Bell, who was to take care of him
as if he were a baby; and this was almost
more than poor little Jarvis could stand.
But just before midnight, when the
moon shone brilliantly, seeing the Constel-
lation was right upon her, the Vengéance
sullenly hove to and hoisted her ensign.
Then the Constellation hove to as well,
and on both ships the drums beat to quar-
ters at the same moment. On board the
Constellation the sailors went to their guns
dancing, and every gun captain turned a
handspring over his gun for good luck.
The ship was cleared for action, her decks
sanded to prevent their becoming slippery
with blood, her battle-lanterns lighted, and
Captain Truxtun, standing in the lee-gang-
way, spoke the Vengéance and demanded
her surrender to the United States. A



LITTLE JARVIS. 49

fresh breeze was blowing, enabling both
ships to manoeuvre, and the sea was as light
as day. The Vengéance came up a little
to the wind, and the Constellation doubled
on her quarter. As the two frigates neared
each other, each stripped to her fighting
canvas, both crews cheered loudly. The
Constellation was now close upon the
Vengéance, and the French ship opened
the ball with her heavy stern and quarter-
guns. The American gunners, with lighted
matches, awaited the order to fire, which
seemed long in coming. But Captain Trux-
tun, paying no more attention to the terrific
cannonade than if it had been bird-shot,
deliberately ranged up within half a pistol-
shot of the Vengéance, and, taking up a
position on her weather quarter, suddenly

burst upon her with the fire of eighteen
7



50 LITTLE JARVIS.

guns at once. When the first broadside
struck the Vengéance it was like the shock
of an earthquake. The whole side of the
Constellation seemed a mass of flame, and
the American gunners loaded and fired
so fast that the people on the Vengéance
thought the Constellation was afire. The
Frenchman answered back, directing his fire
toward the spars and rigging of the Con-
stellation. Little Jarvis, hanging on to the
top, had a queer sensation when the first
round-shot passed close to him; but Jack
Bell made him laugh by saying, gravely:

“Them Frenchmen ain’t pertickler where
they puts their shot. If that ’ere one had
been in the hull now, ’twould ’a done some
good.”

But presently it began to get lively up
there. The smoke was so thick that nothing



LITTLE JARVIS. 5

could be seen on deck except the constant —
deadly flash of the guns as they were rap-
idly fired. Up on his perch Jarvis could
hear the frightful thunder of the guns, the
hoarse orders of the officers, the fierce cheer-
ing of the men as every shot struck the
Frenchman’s hull, the sudden, wild shriek
of a wounded man, and the cries of the
Frenchmen, who fought their ship bravely
and skillfully, but who found, as others did
later, that there was no standing up against
the matchless gunnery of the Americans.
“T allers said that ’ere little reefer didn’t
have no more dodge in him than the main-
mast,” said Jack Bell to the men in the top,
watching little Jarvis, who couldn't do any
fighting, but who was cheering as loud as
anybody and waving his dirk frantically.

“Give it to her, men!” bawled Jarvis,



52 LITTLE JARVIS.

entirely forgetting that there was no more
chance of his chirp being heard than of a
sea-gull’s cry in the roar of battle. “Let
her have it! Hooray, hooray!”

For three long hours of the moonlit
night the battle raged. The Frenchmen
had the loss of the Insurgente to avenge,
and the Americans were inspired by remem-
bering that, with the same ship and the same
captain, they had been victorious in one of
the greatest single-ship fights ever fought,
and against one of the most gallant enemies
in the world. Part of the time both ships
were running free, side by side, exchanging
broadsides, but at last the Constellation shot
ahead, and, luffing up short under the bows
of the Vengéance, was ready with every gun
to rake her. The Frenchman, terribly dis-
abled and his decks encumbered with his



LITTLE JARVIS. 53

wounded, made a desperate effort to sheer
off, but the Constellation only moved up
closer for a yard-arm-and-yard-arm fight.
One by one the guns of the Vengéance were
being silenced, her decks were running with
blood, and she rolled a helpless hulk in the
trough of the sea. But the brave French-
men gave no sign of surrender, and appar-
ently were determined to go down with
their ship. Three times had her ensign
been shot away, and twice had a young
French sailor sprung aloft, braving the fire
of the American sharp-shooters, to lash an-
other tricolor to the mast, for there were
no halyards left to run a flag up on. As he
went up the first time, with the flag wrapped
round his neck, the sulphurous smoke was
drifted off in a sudden gust of wind, and
Jarvis, with all the men in the top, saw him



54 LITTLE JARVIS.

plainly in the bright moonlight. Jack Bell
raised his musket to fire at him, but Jarvis
laid his hand upon the sailor’s shoulder.

“Don't, Bell! he’s such a brave fellow,”
he said.

“It would be a pity to kill that ’ere
chap now,” said Jack, nevertheless keeping
his musket at his shoulder. “’E’ll be a
sailor sure enough one o’ these days, when
he’s growed up, if I let him be.”

The young sailor, who saw Jack Bell
deliberately taking aim at him, took off his
cap and waved it defiantly before he lashed
the flag to the mast, amid wild cheering from
his comrades on the Vengéance. But when
he saw Jarvis’s gesture, and that Jack Bell
did not fire, he lifted his cap, and bowed
and smiled. Jarvis was delighted, and lifted

his cap too.



LITTLE JARVIS. 55

“Lord, Lord!” said Jack Bell, shaking
his head solemnly, “ may be we ain't a-fight-
in’ for our lives and our countries, and
these ‘ere planks that is all we've got
between we and Davy Jones’s. May be
we're at a dancing-school, where we larns
manners and sich.”

The second time the ensign was shot
away the young sailor climbed up again to
replace it. This time he waved the flag at
Jarvis, and Jarvis took off his cap and waved
it round and round a dozen times in re-
sponse. The third time the flag disap-
peared there was no one to replace it. The
young sailor lay dead in his blood on the
deck of the Vengéance, and so many of her
men were killed and wounded that there
were scarcely enough left to work those of
her guns that were not disabled. But the



56 LITTLE JARVIS.



Frenchmen stood gallantly to their ship, the
officers encouraging the men by word and
by example. Little Jarvis saw a grizzled
officer, bareheaded, his face grimed with
blood and powder, and one epaulet gone,
rush up to a gun, of which half the crew lay
dead around it, and with the help of several
other officers the gun was manned, and well
manned, for an instant later a double shot
came crashing through the Constellation’s
rigging and struck the mainmast. A shout
went up from below as the mast tottered,
and the men rushed aloft to secure it. But
it was too late. As the tall mast swayed
frightfully, Jack Bell turned to little Jarvis
and said, coolly :

“Mr. Jarvis, she’s a-goin’!”

It was now three o’clock in the morn-

ing. The moon was going down, and there



LITTLE JARVIS. 57

was a kind of ghostly half-light, through
which little Jarvis’s face could be seen.
The Vengéance at that moment increased
her fire, the men inspired by the example
of their officers; and the Constellation
answered her loudly.

“We can hold on awhile yet, can’t we,
Bell?” asked Jarvis, with a coolness equal
to the veteran sailor’s.

“No, sir,” said Jack Bell, shaking his
head. They were now being tossed fear-
fully about, and the awful crackling of the
mast, to which they clung desperately, had
begun. “And ’tain’t no shame for a man
to leave his post when he can’t stay there
no longer, Mr. Jarvis.”

“Not for a man—but I’m—I’m—an
officer—and an officer must die at his

st—”
ea



58 LITTLE JARVIS.

Jarvis jerked the words out above the
frightful crashing and swaying of the mast,
the furious uproar of the fight.. With a
steady eye and a smile on his handsome,
boyish face, he looked down below; but
the black and drifting smoke was so thick
he could not see the captain. The men,
at that ominous breaking and swaying,
without waiting for orders, were climbing
down, catching at anything in their way.

“For God’s sake!” cried Jack Bell, pre-
paring to leap. His face was white and
desperate, and his harsh voice was implor-
ing. But little Jarvis, with all of his in-
trepid soul shining out of his unflinching
eyes, did not move an inch. There was a
strange light upon his face, and a manly
and heroic calmness had taken the place

of his boyish excitement.





‘With a steady eye he looked down below.”







LITTLE JARVIS. 59

“ No,” he said, “I can not leave my sta-
tion; if the mast goes, I must go with it.”

Then a terrible cry went up from below.
The wind had cleared the heavy smoke
away for a moment, and those on deck
saw the great mainmast, after the grinding
sound of breaking, reel like a drunken
man and topple over with a crash that made
every timber in the Constellation tremble.
It was as if the noble ship groaned and
shuddered with the agony of that blow.
The men in the top had managed to save
themselves by leaping and hanging on to
the shrouds and rigging. But little Jarvis
came down with the mast.

The captain ran to him, and lifted the
boy’s head upon his knee—but he was
quite dead, wearing still on his young face
the brave smile with which he had faced



60 LITTLE JARVIS.

death when glory beckoned him upward.
By this time Jack Bell came running up,
wiping the blood from his face and head.
He stood close to the captain’s elbow, and
half sobbed, half shouted:

“He could ’a saved hisself, sir. I told
him she was a-goin—but he said as he
were a officer, he couldn't leave his post.
He done his duty like a man, sir—and he
were the bravest little chap I ever see!”

And when the day broke and the splen-
did sunrise of the tropics came blushing
over the sea, the Vengéance had her great
hull battered and broken, her fifty-four guns
silenced, and nearly two hundred of her
men lay dead or wounded on her decks.
The Constellation, her mainmast gone, her
sails torn to ribbons, but sound and whole

in her hull, and with every gun as good as



LITTLE JARVIS. 61

when she went into action, had lost forty
men and only one officer — little Jarvis.
They buried him at sea that night, just at
the solemn hour that he had been swinging
about aloft the night before, singing so
cheerily :
_ “Won't we have a jolly time
When we get home again?”

The officers and men, standing on the
quarter-deck with uncovered heads, gazed
with a sort of reverence at the small body
wrapped in the flag—for he was little Jarvis
even in death. He was only a little mid-
shipman, but he had done his duty so as to
merit immortal fame. The words, terrible
yet consoling, were uttered over him, “ And
the sea shall give up its dead.” As the
words of the burial service were finished, two

of the oldest sailors were unloosing the flag,



62 LITTLE JARVIS.

when the captain, his gray head bared, mo-
tioned with his hand.

“No,” he said, “make it fast. He has
well defended that flag, and he shall be
buried in it.”

The sailors, with deft fingers, made fast
the flag, the tears from their hard and
weather-beaten faces dropping upon little
Jarvis. In another moment the small body
slid gently over the rail, and sunk swiftly
and peacefully into the untroubled depths of
the ocean. Little Jarvis was forever at rest
in the sea he loved so well.

In the midst of the death-like pause,
_ when every breath was stilled, the captain
spoke in a husky voice:

“Gentlemen,” said he, turning to his
officers, “Little Jarvis has indeed gone
aloft—”



LITTLE JARVIS. 63

He stopped suddenly, and his voice
seemed to leave him. He had meant to
say something further—that every officer
and man on that ship, when his time came,
might well envy little Jarvis the manner of
his going. But he could say no more.
What need was there for words? And in
the midst of the deep silence Jack Bell, who
stood by the rail, with his head and his arm
bound up, raised his bandaged arm to his
eyes and uttered a loud sob. The captain
put his cap to his face and hurried silently
below. The drums beat merrily, the bugles
blared out. All was over; but to every
heart came back the words, “He was the
bravest little chap!”

When the story of that splendid fight
was told at home, the Congress of the
United States, after passing a resolution of



64 LITTLE JARVIS.

thanks to the officers and men of the Con-
stellation, and awarding Captain Truxtun a
gold medal, passed a separate and special
resolution in honor of little Jarvis; and it
said :

“Be it further resolved: That the con-
duct of James Jarvis, a midshipman on said
frigate, who gloriously preferred certain
death to an abandonment of his post, is de-
serving of the highest praise; and the loss
of so promising an officer is a subject of

national regret.”

THE END.

agers















Full Text


Scheie.
SH



LITTLE JARVIS.



Little Jarvis and the captain of the maintop.
JITTLE JARVIS

‘cAs his life was without fear, so
was his death without reproach.”

BY
MOLLY ELLIOT SEAWELL

THIS STORY RECEIVED A PRIZE OF FIVE HUNDRED DOLLARS
OFFERED BY THE YOUTH’S COMPANION

NEW YORK
D. APPLETON AND COMPANY
1890
CopyYRIGHT, 1890,
By D. APPLETON AND COMPANY.
ILLUSTRATIONS.

FACING
ae i PAGE
Little Jarvis and the captain of

the maintop. GrorcE WHARTON EDWARDS

Frontispiece.

The Constellation. J. O. Davipson. II
The challenge. GEORGE WHARTON EDWARDS 22
“ For three long hours of the moon-

lit night the battle raged.” J. O. Davipson. 52
“With a steady eye he looked ¢

down below.” GEORGE WHARTON EDWARDS 58

“He has well defended that flag
and he shall be buried in it.” GEORGE WHARTON EDWARDS 62
LITTLE JARVIS.

Jarvis, being only thirteen years old,
was the youngest midshipman on board
the Constellation, but the most trouble-
some; and although this was a good while
ago—in 1800—scapegraces like Jarvis are
still common enough on board naval ships
to this day. If the officer of the deck
were out of sight for five minutes, Jarvis
was certain to be turning a double hand-
spring, or standing on his head, or engaged
in some similar iniquity on the quarter-
deck. As for going aloft for punishment,
Jarvis spent most of his time on the cross-
8 LITTLE JARVIS.



trees, and was always prepared for it, by
carrying a book in one pocket and a piece
of hard-tack in the other. When one of
the lieutenants would catch Jarvis at his
tricks and would shout, in a thundering
voice,

“Up to the mast-head, sir—up, sir—
you'll learn some fine day that the quarter-
deck isn’t a bear-garden!” Jarvis would
go up like a cat, and soon be swinging
about as merry as a bird on a bough. The
officers, though, after giving Jarvis a ter-
rific blowing up, would smile at each other
on the sly. The boy was such a merry,
active, honest-hearted lad, and his mis-
doings were so free from anything like
meanness, that, although for the sake of
discipline they punished him, every one
of them liked him. Even Captain Trux-
LITTLE JARVIS. 9



tun, who had once come upon Jarvis and
his chum, Brookfield, unawares, and had
caught Jarvis in the act of saying in the
captain’s own voice, which was rasping
and very much through his nose, “Mr.
Brookfield, you young gentlemen in the
steerage can make the most devilish noises
and more of them—’” the captain, on hear-
ing this, moved quietly away, laughing to
himself—nobody could help laughing at
little Jarvis, he was so comical. At first
Jarvis stood in holy awe of Captain Trux-
tun, owing to various blood-curdling tales
told him by Brookfield, such as the cap-
tain’s flogging the whole starboard watch
if the ship made less than eleven knots
an hour; but in course of time he dis-
covered the imaginative character of these

romances. The sailors all approved of
10 LITTLE JARVIS.



Jarvis, after their fashion. Sitting around
the fok’sle, Jack Bell, the captain of the
maintop, chewing his quid, solemnly re-
marked to his mates:

“That ’ere little reefer, he ain’t afeerd
o nothin’; and as for gittin’ into trouble—
Lord love you, if he had a chance to git
into trouble and didn’t do it, ’twould break
his heart.” And so it would.

Jarvis had a mop of tow-colored hair,
a wide, roguish, laughing mouth, a snub
nose, and a pair of the softest, shyest,. gray-
blue eyes that could be imagined, with a
strange, sweet look of innocence, such as
babies sometimes bring from heaven with
them, but soon lose in this work-a-day
world. However, it invariably turned out
that when Jarvis looked most angelic he

was sure to be plotting some deed of






onl





i

TT errs









== EEE” 7
= adavasy

The Constellation.

(Now the training ship at Annapolis.)
LITTLE JARVIS. II



. darkness, and whenever he was caught red-
handed in mischief, he always wore the
look of a seraph rudely awakened.

The Constellation was a trim and lovely
frigate and a perfect beauty of a ship. She
was not very big, and carried only thirty-
eight guns; but she was one of the
cut-and-come-again kind. She could both
fight and run away. When she chose to
fight, she was a match for any frigate afloat;
and when her enemies were too many
for her, she could make off from a whole
squadron, ripping it so fast that she would
be hull down before they had got fairly
started in chase. She was a good sailer
in a light breeze and a better one in half
a gale. She liked.a smooth sea, but she
didn’t mind a heavy one, and took the
water like a cork. She was a lucky ship,
12 LITTLE JARVIS.





too, and such a prime favorite with old .
Neptune that nothing amiss ever happened
to her. She would go through a roaring
gale “walking Spanish,” as the sailors said,
and come out of it with nothing worse
than a good wetting. When she lay ma-
jestically at anchor, outlined against the
clear blue of sea and sky, the broad white
ribbon around her hull revealing the beauti-
ful run of her lines, her tall masts and
graceful spars dipping slightly and proudly
as the waves eagerly caressed her, Jarvis
thought her the most beautiful thing in
the world. But when she spread all her
white wings and rushed before the wind
with the bold, free sweep of an ocean-
bird, dashing the dark and curling water
impatiently from her sharp bows, Jarvis
wondered how he had thought her beauti-
LITTLE JARVIS. 13



ful any other way. And Jarvis loved her
with all his boyish heart, and thought to
be Midshipman Jarvis, of the United States
ship Constellation, lifted him several pegs
above the rest of humanity.

But although Jarvis was always laugh-
ing and joking and cutting up, and getting
punished for his pranks—which last he
seemed to enjoy as much as anything else
—he had his troubles. The fact is, he was
consumed with envy. He was the only
midshipman on board who had never smelt
powder; and as the United States was then
at war with France, and the Constellation
had already done glorious things, this was
a heavy load for Jarvis to carry. It was
nearly a year since the Constellation had
come across the great French frigate, the
Insurgente, which was said to be the smart-
14 LITTLE JARVIS.



est frigate and to have the finest captain
in the French navy; and although the In-
surgente was bigger and carried sixteen
more guns, the Constellation -had borne
down on her and opened fire with that
terrible and well-directed broadside for
which the American gunners were famous,
had outsailed and outfought her, and, in
spite of the greatest gallantry and skill
on the French ship’s part, had made her
haul down her colors with her decks strewn
with her dead and dying. And Jarvis wasn’t
even a midshipman then! _

To make it worse, Brookfield, who was
the tallest, the oldest, and the handsomest
midshipman on board, and cock of the
walk generally between decks, had been
one of the midshipmen sent aboard of the

Insurgente, who, with only eleven sailors,
LITTLE JARVIS. 15



had kept nearly two hundred of the French-
men below the hatches, and, separated by
a gale from the Constellation, had man-
aged to bring the dismasted and _half-
wrecked Insurgente into St. Kitt’s, where
the victorious Constellation awaited her.
It made little Jarvis very down-hearted
when Brookfield, who gave himself the airs
of a lord-high admiral of the seas, would
tell of those glorious days. Jarvis, hang-
ing over the rail, as he gazed dolefully at
the dancing sunlit water, would wonder
if he would ever have any share in such
brave doings; and then, cocking his smart
_ gold-trimmed cap rakishly over his left eye,
would promise himself that the next brush
the Constellation had with a Frenchman
something would be heard of Jarvis sure.

It was the delight of little Jarvis’s heart,
16 LITTLE JARVIS.

when he could spare time from making
mischief, to get Jack Bell, the captain of
the main-top, to sing him the song of
“The Constellation and the Insurgente.”
Jack was immensely proud of this perform-
ance of his, and would drone away, with-
out moving a muscle of his face and in
reckless defiance of time and tune, a won-
derful account of the fight, beginning :

“°Twas in the month of February, off Montserrat

we lay,

And there we spied the Insurgente—”

“But, Bell,’ said Jarvis, “it was the
Lusurgente—"

“Well, Mr. Jarvis, you may call her the
Ann Sargent, if you likes, but in the fok’sle
we calls her the Insurgent—and mighty
insurgent she looked, let me tell you, sir,

when she come bearin’ down on us, like she
LITTLE JARVIS. 17



was a-goin’ to eat the little Constellation up,
with all them long twenty-four pounders
pokin’ their ugly noses out o’ her ports, and
her decks just alive with them horse-marine
French sailors, that uses their bag’nets for
belayin’ pins, 7 reckon. But, Mr. Jarvis, the
mounseers fights like the devil. They can
wallop a Portygee or a Spaniard as easy as
winkin’—or drinkin’, that’s easier.”

“Tm glad of one thing, Bell,” said Jar-
vis, giving his cap an extra twirl and finger-
ing his midshipman’s dirk, as he began to
strut up and down like a young game-cock.
“Tm glad the French are such good fight-
ers, because the next fight we have I’d like
amazingly to have a regular hand-to-hand
tussle with a French officer.”

Jack surveyed Jarvis’s four feet and a

half of boyish figure without smiling in the
3
18 LITTLE JARVIS.

least, although there was a twinkle in one
corner of his eye.

“Youre right, Mr. Jarvis,” said he, chew-
ing away as solemnly as ever; “but if I was
you, sir, I wouldn't bother with none o’
them French midshipmen—Id fall foul of a
leftenant, sir.” Here Jack winked to him-
self. “May be the fust leftenant, hearin’ you
was aboard of us, will be a-waitin’ for you on
the quarter-deck when we grapples ’em.
’Tain’'t likely they'd risk their cap’n”—at
which Jarvis perceived that Jack Bell was
making game of him, and turned scarlet,
from his dimpled chin up to his tousled tow
head. |

While Jarvis was considering whether it
comported with his dignity to notice the
wink or not, Jack began to sing again in the

same curious, cracked voice:
LITTLE JARVIS. 19

« All hands were called to quarters, as we pursued in
chase,

With well-primed guns and tompions out, well splic-ed
the main brace.”

There was one specially realistic verse,
though, in which it was represented of the
French ship—

“The blood did from their scuppers run,

Their captain cried, ‘We are undone !’”’
“Bell,” asked Jarvis, thoughtfully, “do
you really believe the scuppers ran with
blood ?”
| “T dunno, sir,” answered Jack, stolidly.
“May be they did, and may be they didn’t.
May be the Frenchmen didn’t know what
the scuppers was rightly meant for. They’re
droll sailors, Mr. Jarvis.”

“And do you suppose the captain said
‘We are undone!’”
20 LITTLE JARVIS.



“JY dunno that neither, sir, ‘cause I
don’t understand the lingo. But, Lord!
them Frenchmen says all sorts o’ things
when they is at sea. They're that ornnat-
eral they'd ruther be ashore than afloat any
time—even when it’s blowin’ great guns,
and trees is bein’ uprooted, and bricks is
a-flyin’ and roofs is comin’ off—instid o’
bein’ safe in a tight little frigate like this
ere, with everything snug aloft, and just as
safe as a baby in the cradle. Landsmen
leads a deal more riskier life nor sailors,
Mr. Jarvis. They risks their carcasses on
horses that keeps on bowsin’, bowsin’ at
the bowline, and in carriages that only has
one man alow and aloft, and he’s got to
mind the e/lum and be lookout besides.
The reason I follows the sea, Mr. Jarvis,

is ‘cause I wants to live out my days,
LITTLE JARVIS. 21



and I knows I ain’t safe a minute on
shore.”

Jarvis adopted Jack Bell’s theory that
nothing was as safe in a storm as being
at sea; and the next hard blow they had,
Captain Truxtun caught sight of Jarvis
perched on the cross-trees, while the wind
bent the mast like a reed, and the spray
dashed over the forecastle at every lurch
the ship gave. The captain bawled so loud
through his speaking-trumpet that he al-
most broke a blood-vessel, and Jarvis, who
thought the storm was great fun, was so
perfectly terrified when he stood trembling
before the angry captain, that he couldn't
say a word to save his life. Here was a
pretty kettle of fish, indignantly thought
Jarvis, when, after a terrific wigging, he was

ordered below, if an officer can’t risk his
22 LITTLE JARVIS.

life any time he wants to. Another one
of Jarvis’s troubles was, that everybody on
board called him “ Little Jarvis”; and when
he remonstrated with the other young gen-
tlemen who shared the luxuries of the steer-
age with him, he usually got a licking
for it. At last this got so intolerable,
especially from Brookfield—for this was be-
fore he and Jarvis became such cronies
—that Jarvis fiercely resolved his honor
(which he spelled with a big H) required
he should puta stop to it. Therefore, one
day he sat down and penned a formal chal-
lenge to mortal combat as soon as they
made a port, and, addressing it to Brook-
field, wrathfully awaited developments. The
grammar wasn’t unexceptionable, and the
spelling was very weak in spots, but there

was no sort of doubt about Jarvis’s mean-


The challenge.


LITTLE JARVIS. 23

ing, and that he was full of fight. He also
mentioned that he would not consent to
fight at less than twenty paces, and ten
would be more to his taste; and he hoped
Mr. Brookfield would not consider this sug-
gestion an infringement of “the coad.” To
this alarming missive Brookfield returned
the following reply:

“Mr. Brookfield presents his compli-
ments to Mr. Jarvis, and declines absolutely
sacrificing his life in the manner proposed
by Mr. Jarvis. Mr. Brookfield, being five
feet eleven, and weighing a hundred and
fifty pounds, would be an excellent target
for Mr. Jarvis at twenty paces—while Mr.
Jarvis would be invisible to the naked
eye at twenty paces—and if Mr. Jarvis
buzzes about Mr. Brookfield any more,
Mr. Brookfield promises Mr. Jarvis the
24 LITTLE JARVIS.

handsomest drubbing he ever had in his
life.”

When Jarvis read this letter he fairly
danced with rage. Brookfield, down in the
steerage, stretched out on a locker, reading,
happened to glance up, and there stood
Jarvis, glaring at him, and evidently red-
hot. As Jarvis was not actually five feet
high, Brookfield could easily have settled
him with one hand tied behind his back,
so that Jarvis’s ferocious air didn’t frighten
him particularly.

“Mr. Brookfield,” asked Jarvis, in a trem-
bling voice, which he in vain tried to make
cool and composed, “did you write this
letter, sir?”

“I did, you young rapscallion,” calmly
answered Brookfield, laying down his book.

“ Then, sir,” continued Jarvis, nearly burst-
LITTLE JARVIS. 25





ing with wrath, “all I have to say, sir, is,
that your conduct, sir—your conduct is
unbecoming an officer and a gentleman,
and you are a c—c—coward, sir—”

By the time the word was out of his
mouth, Brookfield had jumped two feet in
the air, and seizing Jarvis by the collar of
his jacket, was shaking him up and down
as a mastiff shakes a terrier, while he beat
the devil’s tattoo on Jarvis’s unfortunate
ribs. When Brookfield put him down,
Jarvis was blind and breathless, but per-
fectly undaunted.

“Will you take that back?” roared
Brookfield, now as angry as Jarvis, “and
if you don’t, by the Lord Harry, V'il—’

“ N—n—no,” gasped Jarvis, “I won't
take it back—”

In another minute Jarvis was again
4 .
26 LITTLE JARVIS.

dangling in the air at the end of Brookfield’s
brawny arm. The first shaking wasn’t a
patch on the second one.

“ Now will you take it back?” howled
Brookfield, stamping his foot.

“No—confound you!” shouted Jarvis,
game to the backbone, and stamping his
foot back at Brookfield. |

Brookfield, breathing very hard, looked
intently at Jarvis, who, with folded arms
and a scowl that was meant to be appalling
on his pink and white face, stood awaiting
his fate. Half a dozen grinning midship-
men had crowded round by that time, and
somebody called out, “ Hooray for Jarvis!”

“Look here, you fellows,” said Brook-
field, turning to them, “did you ever see
anything like the little beggar’s pluck?
Drat my eyes, but I’ve got half a mind to
LITTLE JARVIS. 27

fight the brat anyhow”—and at this he
seized Jarvis again, but, instead of shaking
him, he threw the boy across his shoulder
and began to parade up and down, accom-
panied by a crew of yelling, cheering mid-
shipmen, all hurrahing for Jarvis, who was
kicking and pounding with all his might.
In the midst of the hullabaloo, a lieutenant,
unobserved, came running down the gang-
way, and, the first the howling mob of mid-
dies knew, was standing in the midst, shout-
ing, angrily :

“What is the meaning of this infernal
racket ?”

The lieutenant was in a boiling rage.
His cap was askew, and when he tried to
straighten it he slammed it down on his
head so hard that the peak was nearly over

his left ear.
28 LITTLE JARVIS.



An instant hush fell upon the crowd,
every one of whom stood bolt upright at
“ Attention!” including little Jarvis, who,
half in and half out of his jacket, had slipped
down from Brookfield’s shoulder, and stood
red and trembling before the peppery lieu-
tenant.

Brookfield was the first to recover. his
composure.

“T can not tell a lie, sir,” he said, with
much suavity—for nothing on earth could
upset Brookfield’s composure. “It was all
Mr. Jarvis’s fault. Mr. Jarvis objects point-
edly to being called ‘Little Jarvis,’ and be-
cause I happened to allude to him in those
terms he challenged me to mortal combat,
as soon as we make a port. I declined,
sir, upon the ground that the contest was
unequal, Mr. Jarvis being perfectly invisible -




“ For three long hours of the moonlit night the battle raged.”
_ LITTLE JARVIS. 29

at the distance he proposed to fight, while I
can be easily seen half a mile off. Then
Mr. Jarvis came up and called me a coward,
and, although I almost walloped the life out
of him for it, Mr. Jarvis declined to apolo-
gize, and I had to repeat the operation.
Mr. Jarvis still persisting in his remarks,
though I nearly killed him, I and the other
midshipmen present concluded that Mr. Jar-
vis ought to be rewarded for his gallantry ;
and we were testifying our respect for him,
sir, when you appeared.”

The lieutenant, during all this rigmarole,
coughed once or twice, put his cap on
straight, and managed to keep from grin-
ning, like the midshipmen.

“Mr. Jarvis,” he said, in a very meek,
mild voice, “I regret very much that I shall

have to report you for language unbecom-
30 LITTLE JARVIS.

ing an officer and a gentleman. Mean-
while, it will give me a great deal of pleas-
ure if you will dine in the ward-room with
me to-night.”

Little Jarvis could hardly believe his
ears. What was it all about, any how?
He had called Brookfield a coward, and
Brookfield had licked him, and here were
all the midshipmen hurrahing for Jarvis,
and the lieutenant inviting him to dinner in
the ward-room.

“« Th—th—thank you, sir!” he managed
to stammer, when prodded by Brookfield ;
and then the lieutenant bowed formally and
went off, and the noise began exactly where
it had been before.

Jarvis had never dined in the ward-
room, and was nearly frightened to death at

the prospect. Nevertheless, he appeared
LITTLE JARVIS. 31



punctually in the evening, blushing very
much, his face shining with the scrubbing
he had given it, and his hair carefully soaped
up. He also had on his newest jacket.
Brookfield had carefully coached him in
ward-room etiquette, and Jarvis promised
faithfully to remember it all; but, unluckily,
he forgot every word of it the moment he
entered the ward-room. However, he man-
aged to stow away a remarkably good din-
ner, partly from inclination and partly from
Brookfield’s warning that if a midshipman
refused any dish that was offered him in the
ward-room it was taken as a reflection on
ward-room fare, and an affront to his su-
periors; and the officers drew lots as to
which one should call him out.

The officers all treated Jarvis with great

respect, although there were several sly al-
32 LITTLE JARVIS.

lusions to duels to: the death, and a lively
discussion as to whether “code” or “coad”
were the proper spelling of a word very
much in use among midshipmen in those
days. It was generally agreed that “coad”
was right, to Jarvis’s infinite relief, who re-
membered he had spelled it that way in his
letter to Brookfield. During it all Jarvis,
however, maintained perfect silence and
great dignity. The lieutenant was very
kind to him, although a twinkle in the eye
_ revealed that there was a joke abroad con-
nected with Jarvis ; but, on the whole, Jarvis
enjoyed himself hugely, and returned to the
steerage with wonderful tales of the im-
mense attention, consideration, and admira-
tion bestowed upon him by the ward-room
officers. According to Jarvis’s account, he

had come off victorious in a stout argument
LITTLE JARVIS. 33



with the first lieutenant, and had browbeat
several other officers who ventured to differ
with him. Nobody believed him, of course;
but as all the midshipmen brought back
similar yarns when they dined in the ward-
room, it was a point of steerage etiquette to
profess unqualified belief in them; so Jar-
vis’s account was received with perfect
gravity. !

After that, Brookfield and Jarvis be-
came inseparable. Jarvis got no more
lickings, although he was still called Little
Jarvis. ;

It was February, and they were cruis-
ing among the West India Islands. The
weather was beautiful, everybody was in
good spirits and hoping to get a whack at
a Frenchman, and little Jarvis was so full

of pranks and mischief that it seemed as
5
34 LITTLE JARVIS.



if he only came down from the tops to get
his meals and sleep.

One golden afternoon Jarvis seemed
possessed. The officer ot the deck hap-
pened to be his friend, the lieutenant, who
winked at everything, until he suddenly
turned around and caught Jarvis in the
act of a sword - swallowing performance,
which wasn’t exactly suited to an officer and
a gentleman on the quarter-deck. So, in
five minutes, Jarvis was enjoying as usual
the fine view afforded from the cross-trees.
At first it was quite jolly up there, the
sun shone so bright, and the salt air was
so clear and fresh as the ship flew before
the wind. Besides, Jarvis had a pencil and
paper and some lead bullets in his pocket,
and, having a knack of drawing, he drew a

number of pictures of his whilom friend,
LITTLE JARVIS. OTe



the lieutenant, representing him in numer-
ous grotesque and humiliating situations.
These he rolled carefully up into a wad
with a bullet in it, and dropped at Brook-
field’s feet as that young gentleman strolled
leisurely along the deck. But, strangely
enough, Brookfield did not see the wad,
and not ten minutes afterward the lieuten-
ant came briskly along and picked it up.
At that, little Jarvis uttered a long and dis-
mal whistle, and looked far across the danc-
ing water.

“Tm in for it now,’ he groaned to
himself.

_ Down in the ward-room that night the
lieutenant suddenly remembered little Jar-
vis’s pictures. He took the wad out of
his pocket and spread the scraps of paper
carefully out on the table. There was the
36 LITTLE JARVIS.

lieutenant on his knees before a prepos-
terous young lady in ringlets. Again he
was bestriding a very lean donkey, who
was in the act of shooting him into space,
and underneath was scrawled, in a big,
boyish hand, “Aint he a grate luetenant
now.” :

The lieutenant got to laughing, and the
other officers around the table joined in.

“Clever little rascal, that Jarvis,” they
all said.

“By Jove!” suddenly exclaimed the
lieutenant, “I sent the little scamp aloft
about five o'clock and forgot all about
him!”

The lieutenant was a kind-hearted fel-
low, and he hurried up on deck, feeling re-
morseful for all the long hours that little
Jarvis had been aloft.
LITTLE JARVIS. 37



The night had fallen, and with it had
come that vast loneliness which only the
ocean knows. Little Jarvis for once got
a little down-hearted and forgot to whistle.
It was quite dark, and the moon had not
risen, although the stars were kindled in the
blue-black sky. The ship was cutting fast
through the water, the breeze was fresh, and
as a gust occasionally struck the great main-
sail, it flapped loudly, with a weird, rever-
berating sound. And besides being dark
and dismal on little Jarvis’s perch, it was
cold and very lonesome. Jarvis began to
think what a jolly time the other fellows
were having down in the steerage, where
it was warm and light, and it was getting
to be supper-time, too. They were all sky-
larking, no doubt; the steward was proba-
bly begging them to let him have the table
38 LITTLE JARVIS.



to serve supper; but as it was a favorite
amusement to turn the table bottom up-
ward, while the reefers piled in and slid
up and down as the ship lurched, some-
times it was half an hour before they would
let the much-badgered steward have it.
Presently, though, as Jarvis looked about,
he saw in the half darkness, a long way
off, a mere speck. It might be a sail.
Jarvis, who had the sharpest eyes on board,
concluded to watch that speck, and mean-
while try and keep his mind off his sup-
per, of which there was at present a very
slim prospect. The lieutenant, presently,
hurrying along the deck, heard a sweet
boyish voice far up aloft singing:
“ Strike eight bells, call the watch,
Relieve the wheel and chain ;

Won't we have a jolly time
When we get home again.”
LITTLE JARVIS. 30



The “home again” had a little pathetic
sound. Jarvis’s song wasn’t as merry as
usual; it was sad, and chimed in with the
time—night upon the ocean.

“Poor little chap!” thought the lieuten-
ant, and calling out very loud, “Jarvis!”
got a cheery “All right, sir,” as if the boy
had not been swinging up there for hours
and hours in the darkness, and seeing the
night descend upon the sea.

It seemed scarcely a moment before
Jarvis had landed on deck. He went up
to the lieutenant eagerly.

“If you please, sir,” he said, saluting,
“there’s a sail off the port-quarter. [
tried to call out, but nobody heard me—
and I believe it’s a big frigate.”

At that moment the lookout on the
quarter sung out, “Sail, ho!”
40 LITTLE JARVIS.



The officers came running up from be-
low. A sail might mean a French ship-of-
war. None of them could make out any-
thing but a shadow, like the ghost of a
ship, moving on the dim horizon; but Jar-
vis stuck to it stoutly that it was a frigate;
and sure enough, within an hour, when the
silver moon rose in the heavens and flooded
the sea with its white radiance, the stranger
was near enough for her port-holes to be
counted. She was the Vengéance, one of
the great fifty-four-gun frigates of the
French navy.

Oh, what joy and exultation there was |
among the brave fellows on the Constella-
tion! What a trouncing they meant to
give the Vengéance, just as they had given
the Insurgente the year before! And it
would be no child’s play either, but a fair
LITTLE JARVIS. 4t



and square fight, for the French were not
easily beaten at the guns, and fought like
good men and true; and this suited the
Constellation’s men exactly. From the cap-
tain down to little Jarvis, all were as merry
as grigs, and when the orders were given to
shorten sail the men sprang into the rigging
with a ringing “ Ay, ay, sir!” such as sailors
only give when there is a prospect of glory
and prize-money ahead. And then the
Constellation, with three ensigns flying, as
she hauled by the wind, and stood boldly
for the French ship, seemed to be saying,
“Do you want to see the ship that whipped
the Insurgente? Well, here I am. And
am I not a beauty? And my brave lovers
—see what gallant sailor-men they are, and
every one of them would die for me!”

The Vengéance, however, did not appear
6
42 LITTLE JARVIS.

to know half as much about the Constella-
tion as the Constellation knew about the
Vengéance; and when she got a good look
at the American frigate, she seemed to re-
member the fate of the Insurgente, for she
took to her heels, and the Constellation had
to crowd on sail to overhaul her. And then
began a chase in which the Constellation,
standing up beautifully under a cloud of
canvas, went bounding over the sea after
the flying frigate. But it was plain, from
the start, that the Vengéance could not
escape; the Constellation had “too much
foot for her,” as Jack Bell dryly remarked.
While they were still chasing the French
ship, and it was yet an hour before they
could get within fighting distance, the lieu-
tenant, who was Jarvis’s friend, found him

sitting in the gangway, with a piece of paper
LITTLE JARVIS. 43

on his knee anda pencil in his hand. But
Jarvis wasn’t writing—he was leaning his
head on his hands, and the lieutenant sus-
pected that Jarvis was crying.

“What! my man!” he said, kindly, for
the boy was so young that the prospect of
going into battle might well be terrifying to
him ; and, besides, the lieutenant knew well
enough that brave men, much less brave
boys, are sometimes subject to these tremors.
Little Jarvis raised his head, and made no
pretense of concealing that he had been
crying.

“JT was thinking, sir,” he said, trying to
steady his voice and wiping his eyes on his
jacket-sleeve, “that—that—may be I'd never
see my mother again, and I’d better write
her a letter; and then, when a fellow gets

to thinking about his mother—”
44 LITTLE JARVIS.

Jarvis stopped short..

“That's all right,’ said the fewer
cheerily. ‘“ But you won't think about that
when the music begins that we are going
to make the Frenchmen dance to. And, ©
my lad, don’t—don’t let your fears get the
upper hand—’”

“Fears!” answered little Jarvis, in a
surprised voice, and opening his round, in-
nocent eyes very wide indeed—for it had
never dawned upon him that anybody could
think he was scared, “I ain’t afraid, sir!”

The lieutenant looked at Jarvis and
smiled, the boy’s surprise was so genuine, .
and the idea of fear was so novel to him;
and he smiled more than ever when Jarvis,
giving his capa particularly fierce and war-
like. cock, continued in a tone of savage
determination: “And I ain't going to ask
LITTLE JARVIS. 45

for quarter either, sir, not if I see ten
Frenchmen coming at me at once when
we board ’em—because it says in the regu-
lations, ‘If an officer ask for quarter, he shall
suffer death’; and that ain’t the way / want
to die!”

The lieutenant, still smiling, raised his
cap and shook little Jarvis’s hand.

“JT don’t think you will die that way,” he
said, briefly.

But then, seeing they were gaining fast
on the Vengéance, Captain Truxtun called
his officers around him and made them a
short speech before they took their stations.
Now, Jarvis had known all the time, of
course, that his station was in the maintop;
but although whenever they went to quar-
ters he found himself aloft, he had always
cherished a wild dream that at the actual
46 LITTLE JARVIS.

time of battle, by some sort of hocus-pocus,
he would be able to be on deck, cutting
down French officers with his midshipman’s
dirk, or sparing their lives, perhaps, while
taking their swords. But all of these splen-
did visions melted away, when, without any
of the startling breaks in the routine that
Jarvis fondly hoped would keep him on
deck, he had to march off to go aloft. If
Jarvis had not been an officer and a gentle-
man, and if boohooing at the moment of
going into action had not been decidedly
unbecoming, Jarvis would certainly have
cried right out at the doleful idea that he
wasn't to be in the thick of the fight.
And, to make it worse, he heard Captain
Truxtun, who was careful of his younger
officers, say something to Jack Bell, who
was a very steady, reliable old man-of-
LITTLE JARVIS. 47



war’s-man, about keeping an eye on Mr.
Jarvis; and Brookfield, who had a splendid
station, grinned at Jarvis, and, thrusting out
his tongue in a very exasperating manner,
remarked that Jarvis would be taken fora
fly on the mast. When Jarvis, looking very
sulky and disappointed, passed the lieuten-
ant, his face was so dismal that the lieuten-
ant patted him on the back to comfort him,
and said, kindly: “Never mind, Mr. Jarvis,
you won't miss all the fun.” |

“Yes, I will,” answered little Jarvis, al-
most crying. “I can’t do any fighting, and
I can’t join the boarders ; the captain thinks,
because I’m such a little fellow, I can’t fight,
and—and—it’s deuced hard, that it is!”

For the first time in his life little Jarvis
went aloft very slowly and _ unwillingly.
The men were already in the top, and there
48 LITTLE JARVIS.

was Jack Bell, who was to take care of him
as if he were a baby; and this was almost
more than poor little Jarvis could stand.
But just before midnight, when the
moon shone brilliantly, seeing the Constel-
lation was right upon her, the Vengéance
sullenly hove to and hoisted her ensign.
Then the Constellation hove to as well,
and on both ships the drums beat to quar-
ters at the same moment. On board the
Constellation the sailors went to their guns
dancing, and every gun captain turned a
handspring over his gun for good luck.
The ship was cleared for action, her decks
sanded to prevent their becoming slippery
with blood, her battle-lanterns lighted, and
Captain Truxtun, standing in the lee-gang-
way, spoke the Vengéance and demanded
her surrender to the United States. A
LITTLE JARVIS. 49

fresh breeze was blowing, enabling both
ships to manoeuvre, and the sea was as light
as day. The Vengéance came up a little
to the wind, and the Constellation doubled
on her quarter. As the two frigates neared
each other, each stripped to her fighting
canvas, both crews cheered loudly. The
Constellation was now close upon the
Vengéance, and the French ship opened
the ball with her heavy stern and quarter-
guns. The American gunners, with lighted
matches, awaited the order to fire, which
seemed long in coming. But Captain Trux-
tun, paying no more attention to the terrific
cannonade than if it had been bird-shot,
deliberately ranged up within half a pistol-
shot of the Vengéance, and, taking up a
position on her weather quarter, suddenly

burst upon her with the fire of eighteen
7
50 LITTLE JARVIS.

guns at once. When the first broadside
struck the Vengéance it was like the shock
of an earthquake. The whole side of the
Constellation seemed a mass of flame, and
the American gunners loaded and fired
so fast that the people on the Vengéance
thought the Constellation was afire. The
Frenchman answered back, directing his fire
toward the spars and rigging of the Con-
stellation. Little Jarvis, hanging on to the
top, had a queer sensation when the first
round-shot passed close to him; but Jack
Bell made him laugh by saying, gravely:

“Them Frenchmen ain’t pertickler where
they puts their shot. If that ’ere one had
been in the hull now, ’twould ’a done some
good.”

But presently it began to get lively up
there. The smoke was so thick that nothing
LITTLE JARVIS. 5

could be seen on deck except the constant —
deadly flash of the guns as they were rap-
idly fired. Up on his perch Jarvis could
hear the frightful thunder of the guns, the
hoarse orders of the officers, the fierce cheer-
ing of the men as every shot struck the
Frenchman’s hull, the sudden, wild shriek
of a wounded man, and the cries of the
Frenchmen, who fought their ship bravely
and skillfully, but who found, as others did
later, that there was no standing up against
the matchless gunnery of the Americans.
“T allers said that ’ere little reefer didn’t
have no more dodge in him than the main-
mast,” said Jack Bell to the men in the top,
watching little Jarvis, who couldn't do any
fighting, but who was cheering as loud as
anybody and waving his dirk frantically.

“Give it to her, men!” bawled Jarvis,
52 LITTLE JARVIS.

entirely forgetting that there was no more
chance of his chirp being heard than of a
sea-gull’s cry in the roar of battle. “Let
her have it! Hooray, hooray!”

For three long hours of the moonlit
night the battle raged. The Frenchmen
had the loss of the Insurgente to avenge,
and the Americans were inspired by remem-
bering that, with the same ship and the same
captain, they had been victorious in one of
the greatest single-ship fights ever fought,
and against one of the most gallant enemies
in the world. Part of the time both ships
were running free, side by side, exchanging
broadsides, but at last the Constellation shot
ahead, and, luffing up short under the bows
of the Vengéance, was ready with every gun
to rake her. The Frenchman, terribly dis-
abled and his decks encumbered with his
LITTLE JARVIS. 53

wounded, made a desperate effort to sheer
off, but the Constellation only moved up
closer for a yard-arm-and-yard-arm fight.
One by one the guns of the Vengéance were
being silenced, her decks were running with
blood, and she rolled a helpless hulk in the
trough of the sea. But the brave French-
men gave no sign of surrender, and appar-
ently were determined to go down with
their ship. Three times had her ensign
been shot away, and twice had a young
French sailor sprung aloft, braving the fire
of the American sharp-shooters, to lash an-
other tricolor to the mast, for there were
no halyards left to run a flag up on. As he
went up the first time, with the flag wrapped
round his neck, the sulphurous smoke was
drifted off in a sudden gust of wind, and
Jarvis, with all the men in the top, saw him
54 LITTLE JARVIS.

plainly in the bright moonlight. Jack Bell
raised his musket to fire at him, but Jarvis
laid his hand upon the sailor’s shoulder.

“Don't, Bell! he’s such a brave fellow,”
he said.

“It would be a pity to kill that ’ere
chap now,” said Jack, nevertheless keeping
his musket at his shoulder. “’E’ll be a
sailor sure enough one o’ these days, when
he’s growed up, if I let him be.”

The young sailor, who saw Jack Bell
deliberately taking aim at him, took off his
cap and waved it defiantly before he lashed
the flag to the mast, amid wild cheering from
his comrades on the Vengéance. But when
he saw Jarvis’s gesture, and that Jack Bell
did not fire, he lifted his cap, and bowed
and smiled. Jarvis was delighted, and lifted

his cap too.
LITTLE JARVIS. 55

“Lord, Lord!” said Jack Bell, shaking
his head solemnly, “ may be we ain't a-fight-
in’ for our lives and our countries, and
these ‘ere planks that is all we've got
between we and Davy Jones’s. May be
we're at a dancing-school, where we larns
manners and sich.”

The second time the ensign was shot
away the young sailor climbed up again to
replace it. This time he waved the flag at
Jarvis, and Jarvis took off his cap and waved
it round and round a dozen times in re-
sponse. The third time the flag disap-
peared there was no one to replace it. The
young sailor lay dead in his blood on the
deck of the Vengéance, and so many of her
men were killed and wounded that there
were scarcely enough left to work those of
her guns that were not disabled. But the
56 LITTLE JARVIS.



Frenchmen stood gallantly to their ship, the
officers encouraging the men by word and
by example. Little Jarvis saw a grizzled
officer, bareheaded, his face grimed with
blood and powder, and one epaulet gone,
rush up to a gun, of which half the crew lay
dead around it, and with the help of several
other officers the gun was manned, and well
manned, for an instant later a double shot
came crashing through the Constellation’s
rigging and struck the mainmast. A shout
went up from below as the mast tottered,
and the men rushed aloft to secure it. But
it was too late. As the tall mast swayed
frightfully, Jack Bell turned to little Jarvis
and said, coolly :

“Mr. Jarvis, she’s a-goin’!”

It was now three o’clock in the morn-

ing. The moon was going down, and there
LITTLE JARVIS. 57

was a kind of ghostly half-light, through
which little Jarvis’s face could be seen.
The Vengéance at that moment increased
her fire, the men inspired by the example
of their officers; and the Constellation
answered her loudly.

“We can hold on awhile yet, can’t we,
Bell?” asked Jarvis, with a coolness equal
to the veteran sailor’s.

“No, sir,” said Jack Bell, shaking his
head. They were now being tossed fear-
fully about, and the awful crackling of the
mast, to which they clung desperately, had
begun. “And ’tain’t no shame for a man
to leave his post when he can’t stay there
no longer, Mr. Jarvis.”

“Not for a man—but I’m—I’m—an
officer—and an officer must die at his

st—”
ea
58 LITTLE JARVIS.

Jarvis jerked the words out above the
frightful crashing and swaying of the mast,
the furious uproar of the fight.. With a
steady eye and a smile on his handsome,
boyish face, he looked down below; but
the black and drifting smoke was so thick
he could not see the captain. The men,
at that ominous breaking and swaying,
without waiting for orders, were climbing
down, catching at anything in their way.

“For God’s sake!” cried Jack Bell, pre-
paring to leap. His face was white and
desperate, and his harsh voice was implor-
ing. But little Jarvis, with all of his in-
trepid soul shining out of his unflinching
eyes, did not move an inch. There was a
strange light upon his face, and a manly
and heroic calmness had taken the place

of his boyish excitement.


‘With a steady eye he looked down below.”




LITTLE JARVIS. 59

“ No,” he said, “I can not leave my sta-
tion; if the mast goes, I must go with it.”

Then a terrible cry went up from below.
The wind had cleared the heavy smoke
away for a moment, and those on deck
saw the great mainmast, after the grinding
sound of breaking, reel like a drunken
man and topple over with a crash that made
every timber in the Constellation tremble.
It was as if the noble ship groaned and
shuddered with the agony of that blow.
The men in the top had managed to save
themselves by leaping and hanging on to
the shrouds and rigging. But little Jarvis
came down with the mast.

The captain ran to him, and lifted the
boy’s head upon his knee—but he was
quite dead, wearing still on his young face
the brave smile with which he had faced
60 LITTLE JARVIS.

death when glory beckoned him upward.
By this time Jack Bell came running up,
wiping the blood from his face and head.
He stood close to the captain’s elbow, and
half sobbed, half shouted:

“He could ’a saved hisself, sir. I told
him she was a-goin—but he said as he
were a officer, he couldn't leave his post.
He done his duty like a man, sir—and he
were the bravest little chap I ever see!”

And when the day broke and the splen-
did sunrise of the tropics came blushing
over the sea, the Vengéance had her great
hull battered and broken, her fifty-four guns
silenced, and nearly two hundred of her
men lay dead or wounded on her decks.
The Constellation, her mainmast gone, her
sails torn to ribbons, but sound and whole

in her hull, and with every gun as good as
LITTLE JARVIS. 61

when she went into action, had lost forty
men and only one officer — little Jarvis.
They buried him at sea that night, just at
the solemn hour that he had been swinging
about aloft the night before, singing so
cheerily :
_ “Won't we have a jolly time
When we get home again?”

The officers and men, standing on the
quarter-deck with uncovered heads, gazed
with a sort of reverence at the small body
wrapped in the flag—for he was little Jarvis
even in death. He was only a little mid-
shipman, but he had done his duty so as to
merit immortal fame. The words, terrible
yet consoling, were uttered over him, “ And
the sea shall give up its dead.” As the
words of the burial service were finished, two

of the oldest sailors were unloosing the flag,
62 LITTLE JARVIS.

when the captain, his gray head bared, mo-
tioned with his hand.

“No,” he said, “make it fast. He has
well defended that flag, and he shall be
buried in it.”

The sailors, with deft fingers, made fast
the flag, the tears from their hard and
weather-beaten faces dropping upon little
Jarvis. In another moment the small body
slid gently over the rail, and sunk swiftly
and peacefully into the untroubled depths of
the ocean. Little Jarvis was forever at rest
in the sea he loved so well.

In the midst of the death-like pause,
_ when every breath was stilled, the captain
spoke in a husky voice:

“Gentlemen,” said he, turning to his
officers, “Little Jarvis has indeed gone
aloft—”
LITTLE JARVIS. 63

He stopped suddenly, and his voice
seemed to leave him. He had meant to
say something further—that every officer
and man on that ship, when his time came,
might well envy little Jarvis the manner of
his going. But he could say no more.
What need was there for words? And in
the midst of the deep silence Jack Bell, who
stood by the rail, with his head and his arm
bound up, raised his bandaged arm to his
eyes and uttered a loud sob. The captain
put his cap to his face and hurried silently
below. The drums beat merrily, the bugles
blared out. All was over; but to every
heart came back the words, “He was the
bravest little chap!”

When the story of that splendid fight
was told at home, the Congress of the
United States, after passing a resolution of
64 LITTLE JARVIS.

thanks to the officers and men of the Con-
stellation, and awarding Captain Truxtun a
gold medal, passed a separate and special
resolution in honor of little Jarvis; and it
said :

“Be it further resolved: That the con-
duct of James Jarvis, a midshipman on said
frigate, who gloriously preferred certain
death to an abandonment of his post, is de-
serving of the highest praise; and the loss
of so promising an officer is a subject of

national regret.”

THE END.

agers






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describe
'442379' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATVK' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
9dcabcdedfa975a36655a014c7459b1c
77054c58f869a017b875e61f332b8830269bad5b
describe
'442490' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATVL' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
fbf188edc611ce6f85bf161199a1087b
000aa2dff6915f91a3df94fc2a2b85dabeb248b0
'2011-12-04T12:27:20-05:00'
describe
'442273' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATVM' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
1607eff94dad8417812defa89bfe77be
caeb23bb5b73f0e8e1935b83d641b0beb135f9f3
'2011-12-04T12:28:01-05:00'
describe
'442445' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATVN' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
b56a43f7af60b2fb1153689ff2bb446f
c4b340507bbee1b8c68d9065cfa9eb9b6732431e
'2011-12-04T12:27:34-05:00'
describe
'442488' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATVO' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
8c5b960814fe690efac3cb8d49b09ed9
ae183556eed9a85098cbd5b928370ec78cb7650d
'2011-12-04T12:27:16-05:00'
describe
'442480' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATVP' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
8104f8caccfc4cecc6c4992bcd0a7ff5
a2a47ec50a879b00a819de5dd5f0fcd51f1d344e
'2011-12-04T12:29:12-05:00'
describe
'442478' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATVQ' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
926b422b967d90c761c93fb8e4b3ccd0
dde3c689e3f5998e3ce18cda4863587e12ca8877
describe
'442426' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATVR' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
18b878a3a18f40bb4fbc24e3a4ce457e
67084794fb23d881ec6f600ddc3c17848205495f
describe
'442348' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATVS' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
f3840c0ef61c5e0ad6ec953e54c04468
ab551a6acccbaa8da25cf749e6f9228264e345db
'2011-12-04T12:28:54-05:00'
describe
'442402' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATVT' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
df4760c33271517ff8db019f39c4f95e
2c14e688e7dafe83ad8119e7e093690acb949311
'2011-12-04T12:27:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATVU' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
a1fc434882e7413dff3e67fb5168b851
adef568f37d7348c5dcc9c1548440bdb2e92d4cc
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATVV' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
f2e82afca02c1ad7071a8cb5d14086d3
3491514bbf4bf7a7504ee36e11d681d75a0ec24d
'2011-12-04T12:28:09-05:00'
describe
'442472' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATVW' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
2035d53883f1bd850a5e8d2e46ed9728
c1cf963308028ccf73ac3fc4f64edde44d1d9d25
'2011-12-04T12:28:23-05:00'
describe
'442459' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATVX' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
fa8b5ae14d083f9715575499e11c666b
ffbac4f05efd3df132420673a9ffbfa1a9c74845
'2011-12-04T12:28:05-05:00'
describe
'442428' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATVY' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
b394342b6c3c91543e05927f7fdc78d5
73c37253171f1b48980eb4751a5da989ad74459a
describe
'442305' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATVZ' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
d689512c4f574f6f2b4755fe6623ebb0
c07569baccb95ff3db43c6dd882fee176190014a
describe
'442489' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATWA' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
9782a8478e62ff84ec09202bd0c6f6c1
af2d22cc9b0b34a1947e805b67bbe3f9198d0ba1
'2011-12-04T12:28:19-05:00'
describe
'442355' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATWB' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
9c2db46b1b6e4a4aa7864057fd4fdd69
0fb4ead0a298e80a9653560234ee71d8dee78fa9
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATWC' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
9d775b82379cf3335ec6d2b9f13c7ba1
0b83097401ada45a228f8f777cbffbdaf669073c
'2011-12-04T12:28:10-05:00'
describe
'442117' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATWD' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
44bf86f8dc7dde0eaeb95cce02b9deaf
7696e78d71cd3c6096b6426fd2926887d9b66fd0
describe
'442304' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATWE' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
b9923a3040f962b291f4e593495fe228
ab44b2435119411f499201248729b009c5877ba0
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATWF' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
76a55bd5c934bc95a0c0c45ef1043c2f
34e23f7ffcc8753855b8a2a0c9239242a6269d76
describe
'442362' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATWG' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
2d4c4804e9347db06ae8abf808a60a67
3e36165456669565cc32cfa98bdd3341e2a59be4
'2011-12-04T12:28:18-05:00'
describe
'442438' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATWH' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
f4f6c0d427d4074195f3ccf27f55847c
389bf510861c2569a89c64ee63303ec274e18ab5
'2011-12-04T12:28:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATWI' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
d940262aa3c81b7c60cd1b0711f5b913
98cf3d5667b175fb4ab5ec60ad6bbe4de14fc464
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATWJ' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
a892f623ee9efa955208c02bafd01be6
8ff97bde19040f8d9b8324303983b5c8b8d6837b
'2011-12-04T12:27:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATWK' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
4a837ce5d662c77e47150ff2f642e155
4ce1269b1db571e0a438946045cce0c32d3dc857
describe
'442302' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATWL' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
c598ac4515b9b6fb15537577a478cdc5
46e6104349f1d7d62b6ce10f5d02c8dc2724c55e
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATWM' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
abc9cad93f2411fb74a5e324c26f1cf6
d63e7f79d5950d9a5033095440202f72fc2cf057
'2011-12-04T12:27:36-05:00'
describe
'442481' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATWN' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
e530439366bf9392a5cfaa652aaecc80
3e02ee31f0ae3324d85af1f5b0df370015667ef3
'2011-12-04T12:27:37-05:00'
describe
'442443' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATWO' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
e5ea729b1f81d7e7fe24018461c6daca
e75c9781b84e6cd8dc3ac997f02fa5eddb2b707f
'2011-12-04T12:28:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATWP' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
b37efbcc27837e3aff37b2500426bb73
749c18a97e6cd16426c31bd6fb1fa4a74d6b8903
'2011-12-04T12:28:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATWQ' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
15d930c0e44c6fd103ef29c971cd41f9
aa9893ab33e3da62c37a0c2443a8df6758a2cada
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATWR' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
a63e9b7a2ce26694fe5706da01457819
23c473738ac7f9f32adad183736add79a9d57a16
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATWS' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
a435c48054afaa6f57294982072c39ad
3c21440b7d38770623155c6c0d1aff267407880b
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATWT' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
1aaaa89cb535974f4e8f9e21c438ee68
051c54fbbcee9a2ff36ae0f3525db5ba4057d015
'2011-12-04T12:28:33-05:00'
describe
'442484' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATWU' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
ec8d0557ca7e69752681bbdf9ad8607d
4e3bc26bc65e000def9c01af6afe40a1e2251087
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATWV' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
57b9eb08dba08c72f18dd65e48d21263
e04a70e717f6a192beee009d09f68eb17e994564
'2011-12-04T12:28:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATWW' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
d6bd581228734bd7edc7d736ef4bff8a
a399992ff4b12106f103bc44ff22cb799f9355e9
'2011-12-04T12:27:29-05:00'
describe
'442424' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATWX' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
f1e92bfbe7be1bde656ae45934bd24d2
4929bb3074180924a2af60d1a20f05f50bc1c319
'2011-12-04T12:28:56-05:00'
describe
'442403' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATWY' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
fdff2be12607f92d03038c1e0048bbee
b46da9614f7a3c60642a651d56cb2cf667e10521
describe
'499235' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATWZ' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
0c529be04a2f876bc61f07f9f77a39b6
b9b6e56262b2d4585f9e82bc1d0f1526a4fc2324
'2011-12-04T12:27:22-05:00'
describe
'466523' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATXA' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
d9b6d270c6e475de17d647bc8ca63f07
ebd59edad9d8e25e73f17b9aba1dbf2bcee2f27a
describe
'62077' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATXB' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
4aa25c2dd540af0525f062fa47f7f11b
a7120c3faeb8180893b533da3cc914beaca2b28b
'2011-12-04T12:29:00-05:00'
describe
'11701740' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATXC' 'sip-files00001.tif'
7d8e152d9975b7c26314a1b2ea463b14
da6ad1c7e5d2d311e3774f9f52d605c4dba61341
'2011-12-04T12:28:34-05:00'
describe
'12056592' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATXD' 'sip-files00002.tif'
0a172a3330a9d03cb2c5c192ca5383c1
ef32391dedc3eec9b19973563abff4017cbd1849
'2011-12-04T12:27:39-05:00'
describe
'3557500' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATXE' 'sip-files00007.tif'
e30392c0baf88735b2831f611e5ae2c9
9b2692805067ec0185aaebcc9bf54bb426cb38e0
describe
'3557228' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATXF' 'sip-files00009.tif'
b2133dbe325b30f7cd9199914c7011dc
48912d77c5efffc28baa9d09067e60d959c12b16
describe
'3561092' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATXG' 'sip-files00010.tif'
4b98968ee8f3aace64e53b273e0b7813
d51604e32cc7a8b1a8f87861a3852c490e97dce5
describe
'10704844' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATXH' 'sip-files00011.tif'
843e4bcabb52ba964f9298f752bb08cd
d68f39ea85111b0d22398d36c357a86d1be6120b
'2011-12-04T12:27:50-05:00'
describe
'3557236' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATXI' 'sip-files00012.tif'
b148c1525aadfba74605f3d86992ab31
950884423eb97308dceeab6cd4dbaf63c28a6361
describe
'3558716' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATXJ' 'sip-files00013.tif'
f78fe2ecf93e76378f6c6a14793e739c
8e336a8877880bbe2efa9be401f3ffe754a320a6
describe
'3559956' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATXK' 'sip-files00015.tif'
9ca0bf6b35b240aff73095c8bc719256
407b20d877b079a15def436af330bb21d521f50e
'2011-12-04T12:29:02-05:00'
describe
'3561392' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATXL' 'sip-files00016.tif'
6d5ddbc6869528e9df281c35a8f71e2a
227c6868451d24b3d75f32346dfe1b6796e13fe6
'2011-12-04T12:27:33-05:00'
describe
'3561152' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATXM' 'sip-files00017.tif'
9bb3fd75590e0f2cc6a93e92c50da0a8
8319684894f9ced6e033aad551e25a7e8f1a848a
'2011-12-04T12:28:43-05:00'
describe
'3561416' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATXN' 'sip-files00018.tif'
5228bc522d5ec6c00a675a54c859368f
c3fcf9ae30679d34cfe5e0e8350d908a6a146471
'2011-12-04T12:29:03-05:00'
describe
'3559920' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATXO' 'sip-files00020.tif'
759a7975c00459a950433029667aef1b
1447aee2da19c6dba24edff79cc7cba5692036af
'2011-12-04T12:27:14-05:00'
describe
'3561036' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATXP' 'sip-files00021.tif'
6582b8e9b757b66df2a4d1707b833c82
4230a4090d989bd7e779347b7692ab437df76bed
describe
'3561676' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATXQ' 'sip-files00022.tif'
bd7b1c417011b4e3a0d542330e7ae425
7887896dbbf3e4291a36d2f49e7176cba08684b4
describe
'3561376' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATXR' 'sip-files00023.tif'
7600f6c6dc3e8ef11da22a7809320709
a6717459149e1e0052a79bea86772c69fda282bc
describe
'3561316' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATXS' 'sip-files00024.tif'
05b7d70043abfb75e33610d96e06f98b
bb09f19262a05fc6a39366cc44046a7e9f81e137
'2011-12-04T12:27:27-05:00'
describe
'3561228' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATXT' 'sip-files00025.tif'
4c1583254767647c404d01a5040099c3
21bf3d97eae10607f08ea827e0843b8a0d65811f
describe
'3561000' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATXU' 'sip-files00026.tif'
28b0028efc060c5ebcc12c9c5ea9c03f
9bc7af0f82d053ece459a9c4a9c0354467b61c7f
'2011-12-04T12:28:28-05:00'
describe
'3561212' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATXV' 'sip-files00027.tif'
a31536347109c6cd649607cedde42194
39aa9a663da586aaee57244c8bc7987a927175db
describe
'3559164' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATXW' 'sip-files00028.tif'
93772d4a0f3a8ec58b1fdbf4b2860235
def4f84332e3c26b1c9ef3684f79c949d108e356
describe
'3560788' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATXX' 'sip-files00029.tif'
3466ff280679a85c535362ad7271534b
411e931a3fc5d6fae219fce6573dbd5454a64aa1
'2011-12-04T12:27:59-05:00'
describe
'3559284' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATXY' 'sip-files00030.tif'
a2e2b3f847a7ad9bef658000fbba7abb
f316f9bf139cf749255d8eb3bf267d302e8e00d3
describe
'3561436' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATXZ' 'sip-files00031.tif'
77a460bd47db319ca599bd83b28f785c
0ad9804f851d62e654b2425cbe334fb03a4d8192
describe
'3559332' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATYA' 'sip-files00032.tif'
d44024ecfbb1e6274036e35a2ba97050
e94b871e7adc5f1a64402ddb18475b5d9629b35e
'2011-12-04T12:27:52-05:00'
describe
'3560868' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATYB' 'sip-files00033.tif'
e8e34df31347fa5ecb974caa5f57c83e
59b73cbeb19f9fd0391dd441eb1a5d5a91aa973e
describe
'3561432' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATYC' 'sip-files00035.tif'
70f8dd8c1b6633436c672264fd3d275b
7bf95172d844e172ebc1ce9dc448618192ede6b0
describe
'3561360' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATYD' 'sip-files00036.tif'
edc82ace74bf9913a21edfb1e356d6c7
58705702b17cad0c5fc45cb2f0045223f4f0f386
describe
'3561156' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATYE' 'sip-files00037.tif'
463764d53d528f1caa7c003d445dfc0c
f51f26d7ff8294d119e550855c7f253fc2bbb0a3
'2011-12-04T12:28:08-05:00'
describe
'3561180' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATYF' 'sip-files00038.tif'
036772fdc6de62f1d55dd6797cb76292
f3dd955475a2714ec8be8e0027cd934aeca0862e
describe
'3560988' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATYG' 'sip-files00039.tif'
1e0038f18ce0b7e4f57f5d7b79faa11c
5ffec389bf45e6bda6f54423f237f9a79acd6934
'2011-12-04T12:27:30-05:00'
describe
'3561044' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATYH' 'sip-files00040.tif'
105dcf0f30398d98d17335e2b6dade5d
477e24ed15184475b5fcdcd36b82ab77ef7a3ac3
'2011-12-04T12:28:36-05:00'
describe
'3560920' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATYI' 'sip-files00041.tif'
e8d3524f660e3173df3426a6f530bb38
2816d3decd8c3382995d8df20be6b36fa375a639
'2011-12-04T12:27:53-05:00'
describe
'3561240' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATYJ' 'sip-files00043.tif'
f99b3b3edebd71e70cbffe3cccd7a60e
013531d7dcdb29308510f1b35910092b079f1bd4
describe
'3561352' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATYK' 'sip-files00044.tif'
513e3ea235fa67ffbb0946e50542db76
efefc514f5bf4b30ec62b05f08419f8eff929cdd
'2011-12-04T12:28:07-05:00'
describe
'3561464' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATYL' 'sip-files00045.tif'
befee2c3f078eaa70cac9917daa2d080
6fb39c6f91c94ed11079a9930a77f3ebf441d3fe
'2011-12-04T12:28:13-05:00'
describe
'3561148' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATYM' 'sip-files00046.tif'
8abbbc7b78b168595e7ca04a482b21eb
0bdc0b1429a9b77f0c615ff2d9f10fa854fcbc37
'2011-12-04T12:27:42-05:00'
describe
'3561264' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATYN' 'sip-files00047.tif'
82c7ccb0c47e4f53f286ba9085152973
4116ca55d49a75b71fe7243616502b38451cab5b
'2011-12-04T12:28:04-05:00'
describe
'3561140' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATYO' 'sip-files00048.tif'
9bd66c62e959df397acbe34958513ded
dde1216ae247431ee513618002d7bf84ae232d12
describe
'3561136' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATYP' 'sip-files00049.tif'
c28e8fb9609ca3fce7f3f38f013fff24
2b2f9fe1ecfec86cf7d6104feb140524871b13fa
describe
'3560904' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATYQ' 'sip-files00050.tif'
1fd2f3c4a880851d1fcd13a6cd63e1a1
4b6409087f416b161f0d321eb6b1d57cb57d9ebd
'2011-12-04T12:27:17-05:00'
describe
'3561312' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATYR' 'sip-files00051.tif'
d709ea0a301ca2f02894620ee08b3fa3
f4bab06de166aebb0f28ec7a4d4f023625b25201
describe
'3560888' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATYS' 'sip-files00052.tif'
e3d34d33b3874066f87990a478fb3784
01f2b18881ca623cd647b26e7f0a70886f30e915
describe
'3560932' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATYT' 'sip-files00053.tif'
070a4917c4df888bc1c46ed5ff1f18dd
949ae86f4549563e1a63cc426ce249882e21d369
'2011-12-04T12:28:25-05:00'
describe
'3561320' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATYU' 'sip-files00054.tif'
e4fc1bee9ef51cd31714a64fa9f584e5
caa0dc9421c7c1f9bc2b4ac153efd2489d822af0
'2011-12-04T12:27:54-05:00'
describe
'3561396' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATYV' 'sip-files00055.tif'
fa755ad0aa1db707a17ad4cbff0c3f4c
03b5598800926af403db6d65061bdd662f67b351
describe
'3561452' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATYW' 'sip-files00056.tif'
0a2dc43940e517de2ed7996b66561256
8e2c12f25fd133eedc6f3228fc2ff080e0de625f
'2011-12-04T12:28:21-05:00'
describe
'3561340' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATYX' 'sip-files00057.tif'
217eace84b4ad9cca8ef702301b0f017
d3412e5bbc35810c2cf2509c82b443f6a3ef61d0
describe
'3559244' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATYY' 'sip-files00058.tif'
4cefee9500a2f521dd26a86332c360eb
75ccffca9fa85c06ac7264f9ee1ea02dda80e079
'2011-12-04T12:27:32-05:00'
describe
'3561564' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATYZ' 'sip-files00059.tif'
bec977412dfd872a9506a33b057f1bf5
60f0a6572343edd8e17df172dc3c94b7f271cb35
'2011-12-04T12:29:05-05:00'
describe
'3561404' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATZA' 'sip-files00060.tif'
834648bc8304956121a2242161bb3376
08d8b39e3a5be3e445520361a3f90850763fff3e
describe
'3561336' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATZB' 'sip-files00061.tif'
9171c1e401d5879d44a325563fb9fb2d
aa0c030536090bb3a88a35af098c4936feef3d65
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATZC' 'sip-files00062.tif'
92e3785119faaf9ac1cf6efbad7f93f1
63e15e3c00df4a0a81638cccd84ac308a207a29d
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATZD' 'sip-files00063.tif'
a7d0e6cc5b47afcc175a1a98f9897a6d
282fe607288e8e2fce5626ee96fc16e885f60021
describe
'3561192' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATZE' 'sip-files00064.tif'
6abe0ee490df97c97d450ba6a2cb53dc
a0e4bd3cc8236c1625f2e7eac19b72b8c0198461
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATZF' 'sip-files00065.tif'
fdaca9f5cb3b1cf806015b3d54673e4f
057844022767b36a5011a5c08755b9a3d498a23a
describe
'3561480' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATZG' 'sip-files00066.tif'
e8faf6d41a8e8fc9e2690d212b420593
4517b6cfb64ec233f5bf9b0462cb154a46b08f32
describe
'3561500' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATZH' 'sip-files00067.tif'
0a2fd67224ea502d1f9a813cbf0f2535
4e98daf3576e5b089ddd61d09bf3a8c66738c7df
'2011-12-04T12:27:40-05:00'
describe
'3561284' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATZI' 'sip-files00068.tif'
01e73416f3ae3448dbd4bae510a024cd
59816bf440f714c9aa7395d17ddb997acb30efab
'2011-12-04T12:29:11-05:00'
describe
'3561356' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATZJ' 'sip-files00069.tif'
24431396d46b98d8db09043095ffcdb9
cd782b13145913852107f575df3f006564bd98a8
describe
'3561520' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATZK' 'sip-files00070.tif'
6808caf4a9ea7eef40769eda0fdea973
53df9bde43c846f39068d04f761408ea91970de1
describe
'3560916' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATZL' 'sip-files00071.tif'
147981defff8ad7ddbb7f05657e44472
ec0f479c0ea6bc8b8d18f1b17cfcf7146c382580
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATZM' 'sip-files00072.tif'
b43295c484a8de4bb1bb204b79dde27b
a5e081237c92c7103b039d34993a2d3978b62d1e
'2011-12-04T12:28:37-05:00'
describe
'3561076' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATZN' 'sip-files00073.tif'
dc18e97912aa7b0a6ace3516e8d14cda
969645a0533590210ab2ffa094f028337b6e390a
describe
'3561440' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATZO' 'sip-files00075.tif'
73342b1c39cde9b28007d03dc26fca97
b188523461cb7d698e84440861fbd9b6374044fe
describe
'3561532' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATZP' 'sip-files00076.tif'
52ace7d7d2d37d49d969eed4b82a1338
4692ec5e3c4f841f880080a3581cba12b3b51bee
describe
'3561272' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATZQ' 'sip-files00077.tif'
f359ee2f17f6e83b4691b0056c328bd6
dc6a3bdb80493bcca6f82481c3d36602d509bc52
'2011-12-04T12:28:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATZR' 'sip-files00078.tif'
651292844a951652916c093ec3cfc7d3
d4b43fd7b59a44cd034534bcd9428ba6f1a5840c
'2011-12-04T12:27:58-05:00'
describe
'3561516' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATZS' 'sip-files00079.tif'
7fbc3af1fb962ac2d013b08cd7686d47
0ceaffe2c8d74a7ef9afdf969ff0175f8fb82728
describe
'3559840' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATZT' 'sip-files00080.tif'
43992bd06cec7d1996a2110faab5a9f9
9acc3b605a83d56fdcfb75fe28578daf13a8456a
describe
'12001356' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATZU' 'sip-files00085.tif'
9fe101b7b5191416a926f5d7a71c42a1
2cc637caf4d71ba70cb66d8ffa745cde592aba8e
'2011-12-04T12:29:09-05:00'
describe
'11213360' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATZV' 'sip-files00086.tif'
74925f7d534cebe4b612968fb632c794
4f3dd3c8e9b0fe3fadb384c18ad21d0e17b5eaa7
'2011-12-04T12:27:51-05:00'
describe
'1506432' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATZW' 'sip-files00087.tif'
f8f642f61dc799f6fbacb3be41cb661e
67d9dabc16cbfcb53609b6bf1d82f630ccf6a322
describe
'637488' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATZX' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
338f7ac2d03a1fb3d7ff4cf97f9697d0
2f444316ff20b17079873a6c9327be2f3fc2e8cf
describe
'363530' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATZY' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
03da2430087ff34761ba34db76080149
779bebb3805c02f48d0e3bba15ad33cf05eaaf06
describe
'216991' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAATZZ' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
5fd6f64fd4e9abc5d5fdc10024faed01
bd33834715646e2557ac7b3997e089ff3ed86a4f
'2011-12-04T12:28:24-05:00'
describe
'188336' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUAA' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
a3335110eddca45452f98d619645ced4
8ac5b7af84a86321ef4bb6ece05d6fbc86eb682c
describe
'388377' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUAB' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
6ade0f70723d4079aa00d9029d48c35f
753ba2509968f01ed7b9ad8acf9e8a9e695be026
describe
'284023' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUAC' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
7aa53537f6756b4c523677bb071bbd00
845e7d51f05b6e620a84f2419f807dbc39d20f72
'2011-12-04T12:28:14-05:00'
describe
'129096' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUAD' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
7a57b3c663a33b3a68be2bc5bcaa128e
253cf972f74a6af62aa2cee3fa36fd0c8fb09158
'2011-12-04T12:27:55-05:00'
describe
'202442' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUAE' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
8880b4b30783fe8cf7f8e8bb88ecdfbe
cfd3217ec0a8a0763b44ce8b72379468c0b104fa
describe
'282720' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUAF' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
118b5f5a200351a5d5d767ea5891bc50
5991da5af3094ef156bebee58802c54908a6d9e5
describe
'299892' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUAG' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
389afdeefc96c88b36afc23895cfa2a6
3ff6fffdf6e225ddc5fd75fa2afb020288e403c2
describe
'319484' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUAH' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
921f801c31e2c402306ab38ece6517e7
7ee30e4fc42694fadbf1d7db9ccf498d1bde1a4a
describe
'317239' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUAI' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
dbadb4b47fe7d71233f4aa4ba220ca54
3fb82b12ea7b86686d456f0fb30e36292b7e0246
describe
'162251' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUAJ' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
06ce195077d36a528c49e514dfd16b0c
1ff4c22160f386160c51d1d0468e1a31148d67de
describe
'330996' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUAK' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
ea592bb25ae3c6422f63e17bb78df526
665c16efdda6695c5c611c233281247772d087a0
describe
'316002' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUAL' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
6b54552bbe3e7520daa379ac69a92664
33ff351b77dd000ef4cefbbece8395b0cad013a2
'2011-12-04T12:27:57-05:00'
describe
'325749' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUAM' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
648518ffed9aa8323b56f7858eb9b62a
37ffc1211d4b70107e68d252662926bc20302a35
describe
'333657' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUAN' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
74487192da009d09e4eba27b0337b080
bb84c8a968b3b88ece0a0acd43a03a91fcb28262
describe
'350520' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUAO' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
ac2e43d2d52889d63ebef081efa2f1c7
7720bbe31763d4e37a722a519c88818413e616fa
describe
'299867' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUAP' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
d2a48bbb4873b2c59270ad3267c7cfc0
570beae8859e2814111c4272e5be37c57dd1bbc3
describe
'353168' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUAQ' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
ca224326969e22ac91e4b93263798c0c
6874ace1c0c4e2b0256043752982a9076a06f3b7
describe
'306627' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUAR' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
b248cd21eebeb4601ff49e41f3e5ab8e
b8a436e433ee0951b27d763b6984a6d41f886a86
describe
'297964' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUAS' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
3404ba2b4519366c7ceb46052b066dbd
e3bb1b3cf1641843fd9145ac508668b8ab8112bf
'2011-12-04T12:28:52-05:00'
describe
'336861' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUAT' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
371a5e8296ab47d420c357a4f9495873
93eec30480b2581f1f505c7b2fe1d4c0289f8a67
describe
'343926' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUAU' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
552062981759a3c2ebd78966eb4d4802
53b84845693f2faf3f647042dd3b6b626993b08e
describe
'316533' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUAV' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
a3332ab7879672072f290579d61fc07f
5646179ed24f156511f9b5eee8559df0fe69aad9
describe
'402779' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUAW' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
6637cfa81304f5975428cef83b0fe6fc
ba3fb5a7c1ab4218142553a79ecbd28baa56e39c
'2011-12-04T12:28:45-05:00'
describe
'297866' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUAX' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
c05330d1c7fd48bcbf8a3e66cbfc4896
2c4d5d783d7f040c364e290d01176c4b5cf0d473
describe
'309994' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUAY' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
1ed0a0bc95fe15dafc276943ac1be250
873c6dcf671af9366c8066fadab0ba1991076965
describe
'318478' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUAZ' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
e540cf25b40637ec734669a1b8e37250
251cff29d0392dc1152a3bf49d466999c9957698
describe
'317032' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUBA' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
18dca8665f34f5405bb71c96a800bc07
6835a1711cbc917f3a6bb1e3ceaab997f852f983
describe
'328899' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUBB' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
d625268a184ae87cea65b838974afdc7
804df922ed12802a06ec57a89bfe3413bb23531d
describe
'326876' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUBC' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
0477d0735ec94c041a0d03a07cdbc045
fd974ac4ddbb7cb7334910ead1280a33596d159d
describe
'180092' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUBD' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
31872e9ce1fab08d84e81a4f5601e3f5
2d4011ac0689b9e5845900f9f2b422fadddde5f5
describe
'315482' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUBE' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
52253f07a3ec813a0bf9d385a7f6aaad
13cf9732d03d5562fb5c5bb64cc37cc376b4476a
describe
'313014' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUBF' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
de5d8fa04413ff90885ec37a798339ca
f5fd8fc478751788581bad54fb7305e336682ec6
'2011-12-04T12:28:49-05:00'
describe
'341053' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUBG' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
d351145feb76807aa7fe3c5576a1a724
a3fbb9681819f5492d70dc540dbabd84ab1a2006
'2011-12-04T12:28:17-05:00'
describe
'329603' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUBH' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
cd2e8a15dbc7eddd772e4c71ea19d8cc
94992472d279d87c991c118fab79d4e108bd276a
describe
'334644' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUBI' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
476f3cbcb85c8e447dc04d5fade0a47b
cae49e2aaf21392dbe85786f2871418abf4ebebb
describe
'318354' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUBJ' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
ba3c2daff871a3b5f941b718fc785987
b4469e0743e48e20daf9f7c5e0d5640f03688dee
describe
'328600' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUBK' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
70080055ad49206c055d3c5ebd9ab48a
545c5c98ae53415e135b26f0b3d6b82141717a82
'2011-12-04T12:28:03-05:00'
describe
'318032' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUBL' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
4679e1a0527fdb0cbb220d59841b2344
090d66f2d02f129b62fd3e1523f321693cbe2c0a
describe
'352903' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUBM' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
0910249d8918878524a737872ae459f4
cfffa98578c2a83abd91b1d7b5758375908dd6cb
describe
'313057' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUBN' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
56724115a66effb769cca852b58b70b8
164c8b83518a38a4e8efa16123e5b0fb147ba6eb
describe
'323666' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUBO' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
f616481a1bd481922324b0e52409fbfc
7b49c7088dd1f9b3b451a9519585144babf75599
'2011-12-04T12:28:50-05:00'
describe
'333295' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUBP' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
14164549da7b7157fe274ef87f26fcba
9d69eb322abc1f81894d7ca382e0b8925fe98370
'2011-12-04T12:28:00-05:00'
describe
'337591' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUBQ' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
29fd4bb2b8a6736bb43f0b76cc1915db
c2584ed807cd6e06c8bfbc701677370b27e79378
'2011-12-04T12:29:08-05:00'
describe
'342079' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUBR' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
bdb342a932229e09d67a4a55852b2631
892da6654cd55fc09e2997934d9674a496b49dbe
describe
'345998' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUBS' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
075b1beee8181ae821ea977a07ff44f1
b530f7f51cb38ef19ea57e3e0f4f0aad32dbfd0b
describe
'356510' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUBT' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
f9fcc71363482e38561a6886c70943a0
8b54d2e6e1328f0b81a5187d2e5aa7a22c90ca41
'2011-12-04T12:27:46-05:00'
describe
'334639' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUBU' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
0b5e99131b348d5db9a6f452918cb466
dac21d8f99581feafa2084e564fdb533b57c2d9d
describe
'321235' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUBV' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
167be066538c1db50772d225ad90066c
cc3c1bdf526dfa18abe04313a75a149f0d8cabe2
describe
'338666' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUBW' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
006ce9316d552e700cbc9e2104fc2f20
ff400e65b289a7f92d2f8e4acbe1e7eff8df850b
'2011-12-04T12:27:35-05:00'
describe
'320483' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUBX' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
7453a87d3a134671833e50194a0ee82a
91dc9f760a922ce5f0d36b64ccd3d495ecb989d1
describe
'352430' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUBY' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
7a1070731f1075acd6eca77006f3e3cf
26f7fa2bf04abd173a0d96510626c7f4e12a570c
describe
'314409' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUBZ' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
8deafca1676ca099af28bf9062c2c694
c9df11fd9c1a419217c5a355fade7af4abef775a
describe
'334799' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUCA' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
8cfc9371c40bfe01dd365e744229a0d0
45cb190cc7e39f27a1b275b0fefbff0e699187e7
describe
'337158' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUCB' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
34a2f6e51c055b0629e9e31c3a0d46ea
efb7aa59d3ab314ba106aa0f3898b5bf01bee800
describe
'351850' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUCC' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
7fc039acf02e8e380873ef3ed3200e0d
c8afe7da2dc0c5e76c8e738892617eba2ad2991b
describe
'297907' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUCD' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
c247ab9526fbe30b550dcb8135a26bbe
bc64acd6513550b93a6d4a399ab1cd8d21a9913e
describe
'321581' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUCE' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
529f022043fca59e47da30f2f0787925
d7a0b62d517f350795e0826c0738d2e55f396eb3
describe
'322855' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUCF' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
30efcb1c5a763cf18107348e4172c1bb
483ff1ddc6c3a47de892a2f43bab603777666a30
describe
'333432' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUCG' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
544aea2399635d3c274e3b73ecfc4a5a
edba21790de73e055f4eb692dda3bb552b2d39db
describe
'301401' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUCH' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
476027293b944f448273ec185147daa4
962b13aab9a7bc960c58eff0b74515a4143b210e
describe
'395135' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUCI' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
cabaded2ab983683ab0b23c4d63f9fb6
18beae737f15dea88faae7e8e84b6e385a3053ff
describe
'304644' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUCJ' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
db9d825269ef239879196d63fecc4624
03af7e3bcedf3d10e55363b5b6f24de9cb67d854
describe
'309952' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUCK' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
d6308e16f51db050a370f70d8efe0ac2
79dc2d1f4637d7150868787605939dba857957df
describe
'320017' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUCL' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
ce14133958fc7e00d7412a40eb98a44f
b57a1e22a5f9f61eabcf84f0e74b07fe8e0fdc68
describe
'287630' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUCM' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
4536b3022d86c5a4ecb12b3541d6dc16
06a3b63f0f8168deca43900d975b385c74e2e2e2
describe
'318049' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUCN' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
4c42652e14c90d2ffc644d9a60d39f42
fbd0107b20a440dfe6bfe64e036f515b7c791863
describe
'271643' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUCO' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
ce3ee210ddd1741b923d015bbb6e2822
a1d71684a5fa5b75640925159473d13211c5146c
describe
'362565' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUCP' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
86321eaa27c01468ab94dccaa830eba4
1be7299318e4562815ddd0596e09af8fcd049c93
'2011-12-04T12:28:20-05:00'
describe
'536075' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUCQ' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
90433aa305428f20bb1c9aeeda4fc33c
803d5f887399e6845eb3180e566fd753b030510f
describe
'96587' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUCR' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
dcecdca28e926c80652453e2b6150c53
c73b01e769b94a42c7d1e3a542753abc354a7e94
describe
'155894' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUCS' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
b2a29fb2447fd89b1d91a53b4d6d2062
75c2fad25556f74cc33a8617c3fed034676fa576
describe
'41408' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUCT' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
1899a4fe257ba4748022d949d70c975d
0874007d65c4d86a0109dd5a543c5b08bb20610d
'2011-12-04T12:27:15-05:00'
describe
'78677' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUCU' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
c5be52a963e8e4305823d11cc984e891
459e416532422a4c2c4b175a457c8f1eaef3d3dd
describe
'19116' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUCV' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
1a2d84dac84d275e28c22a19bed0e94d
092aa5718b3ff1cc1767c46bdaebba98afcebf65
describe
'16056' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUCW' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
746b83425fc196ef7a3a1d9bb6de2cb3
120e8bcc3a918e9ee4249baadf5240b2e79039a1
describe
'6764' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUCX' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
d41b4422e0d7c00fc341b0f58b92f892
359890881404cd30242e9e1ec4f9eca74f1d21a0
'2011-12-04T12:27:45-05:00'
describe
'10841' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUCY' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
19969031092913d87926403d51cf499f
37f0c38cbf2dcead9aeee618acf9de72495bccc9
describe
'9843' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUCZ' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
5ef664384481dadfff6f51d31a09ed01
b6ba3e70d7e34a45cef9638914ab93d838d16619
describe
'43899' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUDA' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
542ea5a7c5baa5127c68d56b553d2a56
e096ec81631874f8320991b7909af2d8086cc4c1
describe
'10474' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUDB' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
ee486bf9dd288deb2a1094e59d00acc0
12a7bfc5381d52bdd586a238c2a1bf746dfedf39
describe
'7627' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUDC' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
b2b08ef7a8c2bdca831e3198861f5fd1
c04b5db0f9c3c412bf8cca317f4e8a945c429791
describe
'37729' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUDD' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
ec92b69493dc05bc2afde59bdf8bc164
a14ef5ad9e0a0a7c73773ee3e0bce4d824a8e056
describe
'8499' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUDE' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
237d523ed704707fa7aa861220d7656f
3cf7f41b54090a8b428289b5d68c62809e17e9a7
describe
'93572' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUDF' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
f7cb095bad4a08d4ca06ca19e8035e91
b47c6b5ab6f52994cfcbac837404990dfb146dba
'2011-12-04T12:27:56-05:00'
describe
'25416' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUDG' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
879693fd744614aa6eb33b080d16da5b
7c1473489cf60495a3c16e47094499e277e064b0
describe
'65542' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUDH' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
c18cc33e6eaa6ab9fbcae50344753f9b
a21ad6990a642335f8576eef5041e8766405a2a0
describe
'17747' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUDI' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
27fa53cc593da82842a24f4c2e63bb5e
94313e9512d7514cd6a0ff4ba59f29099cee47d2
describe
'26449' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUDJ' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
e60c25380b62f1128a1551868581545a
c4cb2029a4b1bbf69ac2010a3282252a366998ff
describe
'7314' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUDK' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
8b21f97a29274430080873f996dc14af
388d74a899ef77d5dc523607a9d70f8989a1c196
describe
'50740' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUDL' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
cb61ba1ab7e7bace4500b65f44ce8970
c853d7edac687cf43f417f2c8338b4479bfbfb56
describe
'15346' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUDM' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
67cfde845ac0c236bbdb262c7252cd9c
ba3d6c62286a58fd964866f04fb3cc0a3ee84573
describe
'7211' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUDN' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
aae5d4c54b290b2017b986ea2c628c10
b825244ca2a60a0e90afb8847a7b0ff392240152
'2011-12-04T12:29:07-05:00'
describe
'76863' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUDO' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
ca4222d4f49d150920dbce91f099a7e9
891c11399c529754a5a34d0af25bd745d2bafc80
describe
'20944' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUDP' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
54e3c26c8fee8ba61d9e67e054ba1c89
b5b877108dc33548362801bdee9c6c3c3eda9f5a
describe
'88327' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUDQ' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
7d2617994f9adfad247fd5adfd0b2189
82e4fa55f4b021100a14a79ec62649d483c5338d
describe
'25488' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUDR' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
23a056723b4eedc329aafa6e1f525fd3
069a57c54795337a99db2f9536605b0f25f00ae6
'2011-12-04T12:27:43-05:00'
describe
'93782' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUDS' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
0b9c440cbbeed86f798135c9f4d53ec4
091effcf0ad088ea58a08e2611973d2c421f628b
describe
'25887' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUDT' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
a335de69e247f84b82aef14abe970901
159ca988eb6482b0f7c3b6776b0fd7ce7c811336
describe
'91480' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUDU' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
60b3d1176434f054164f3cbe84807df1
bf0f7f9afbcccddc85916c2964c63ff5aac8b731
describe
'26282' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUDV' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
6e70d71c9524f8f737b5f9eca803b934
0d916491cfc78605036e91caead93ce8350fe154
describe
'10730' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUDW' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
c71565d5224ee677a188a38256c07d16
b8aee7dc3fa34d330fe7045908eb9be68780b9f3
describe
'42045' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUDX' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
b08e305089574d2c1b65ef671aca798e
f10f5f252f741e906953bb6e7cbec7cfe2057eda
describe
'13782' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUDY' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
9225f3a800d4f3cf05e72fa33285d513
3e68180c2b4410b9f010f9581aa8bd750d91e7ff
describe
'94394' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUDZ' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
fc3f665d3132b39abf3ca5189d5666b8
b7ef92ebe6367cd897f5baa2887020ac5035fdbb
describe
'26090' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUEA' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
731c3f85f8aaafce9605d82358044496
8e5569fa79410ebf4a97fc323f744fbeb31d1d08
describe
'94966' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUEB' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
3c720dc4b21583a57c9bd574031de20b
4508c0bad36b3ffa842923fe8763d81cddba63c7
describe
'26800' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUEC' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
56eed07f3596969b13ff7cb0bceea74a
3c40878f5a982456e7d50e5b9e88ea82876a5a2d
describe
'94918' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUED' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
05325779b226c8ac9930c878e570b16b
66af05449c69b446506d32d36415b57fa9ce2589
describe
'26385' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUEE' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
ef53322b27660325211d5bfe1d840a4c
23529a9f34dc8a8ff90450ce9d88b9149111be77
describe
'94709' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUEF' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
d227f5b0ca80e08342dbd876019f53a5
e8e1ad1f856fb238aea843f08ed9634e283add5e
describe
'26298' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUEG' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
756b8e885373bcc5c47cb5a33774e552
54d6f281b8f01c466c6f3204b1e14289ce0f2e16
describe
'98444' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUEH' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
9917d0f6026cb6b2cdee8e6225fb7672
067031b2306033c2bcdf00f003394215d4e61d0c
describe
'26955' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUEI' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
355b6eb061ae065f181fa079184d919a
fdd550d6468ced33af61e4ee6bc7020de8a74860
describe
'86459' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUEJ' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
800ea51631ca2063d5f3e4b56b29f6a5
bb601ad1ad32a95db055ece213c8a16ac3099069
describe
'25328' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUEK' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
4fdf92880ae5a43222ee9a899eebdfca
12e3663b0349893f7022e5c6994705221785efcb
describe
'98759' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUEL' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
cdddcc250fc3ee47be33fe2a86595dee
1b2549d0bc36e18250602d0e170f3612aec19244
describe
'26825' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUEM' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
7b92ceb2da4c2276d6acebd212e38c7f
828dad2234b6fb8e3b7c8157745c4f4b8a51eb9c
describe
'90502' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUEN' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
b867c9031d80d5ef4fa5754cfb5ee0a9
ae3a8aefeb5719625037e841c8476f9449b628d1
describe
'26208' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUEO' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
acb1ac880cb7229be7a2050768a3eaf0
4017ee29f9a830cab19924af9fb05554e1ac7cff
describe
'81582' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUEP' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
c4dbd295cfb71a96433260180a2d86b3
333cd4a0d622c3cef53b40078337432ea25b593f
describe
'23853' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUEQ' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
214438a0b91c521e08980fad76065707
ce67155f0913d6eab88e5d777c34cfb1c9dc6719
describe
'96121' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUER' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
28b63ef22bfa6ab0624682a80850c87a
e0db1cc3c05b9452a15b950a16d672e9728d8600
describe
'27034' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUES' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
0f00fbf380bbce2de2d664335c60edef
5c185ef7e193ee62a1259315c032512b4264ea39
describe
'95461' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUET' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
6c8370dd0af36bde75bd4fc24ac53bb4
1d774a46547ece28ac5b68a58ee169262bb98ffc
describe
'26921' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUEU' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
c30e72b4677228cb8b16980dddaf3979
aa93ec76cb51595b04f506d69889e20516b91da2
describe
'94609' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUEV' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
3d9cc0ff1645b5f2f2bb2728ba90d072
b4cc56a8f60b7df79f5c248f246d39e2affb8493
describe
'26587' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUEW' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
8ed7ae9b61d9fda561d20421409f562c
8e85b35fba44c46e8dd90d13191a20707c5a9b0b
describe
'96215' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUEX' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
fe0cfd0bf60275240571cf4dee7021c6
e830aa9edfbc094c1eb3f55f9d25b2a5c4af5122
describe
'26102' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUEY' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
c3d7a0d6f5aa1465a9ff79cf206f7b85
0d506043a166ac5ae36ca17fca0e2714ab9215e1
describe
'8134' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUEZ' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
b19a877dd985ad4a1d3477a8175907b7
11002e64a20a29e175cf15d4ac13a2a289c8d613
describe
'90361' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUFA' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
2d3fac9e3603b16675586d3a416c5ee1
495114c7e47c78ce5cf06f444e7f683829d9c310
describe
'26669' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUFB' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
358fc41341c88620e11cf6fb7cd43348
692a4a479c096b797d420714db898a482e5dcd59
describe
'87795' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUFC' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
f32c5c9c5674200046660eb4b7b59dd5
0dcaf2e7c8c468cca22c5f3ac9c6108395ca2a24
describe
'25469' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUFD' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
dd189bea39014629a04d1d2c7522bb79
8796a9fde063fe1f52f0c3bb15ca45d1c750628d
describe
'91241' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUFE' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
dcc8d2213bd3448a2a5863b9a9dcbae8
353cc04b04cfde2320dba96336ba611211bcb24d
describe
'25837' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUFF' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
1171dd2ac99c150c8810c918d20e1cb9
375d0777f597612bca557339b03953e25b4ef879
describe
'90320' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUFG' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
1ca5e6007313d3c5038027a7e94addeb
5c2eb99bd5c05faad9afa5fe72b628113bb36136
describe
'25760' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUFH' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
d522dda07c47eb7929e0e597fb9ead0f
b12a7c2f55da00b106589a4b867fcdad9ed52e21
describe
'91514' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUFI' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
ff3f1e3b93224a4353c4a5d05f83391c
715f7f882c82b01d3ad0e5b96bc59b7b700b77ae
describe
'25207' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUFJ' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
1298d02cd8943310653b65cf5aa09296
e7c0cf3b00a002e9412c769dcca707176e572086
describe
'92482' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUFK' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
d99f6526e0832554ca8eabcc16df776d
4ce3d4631ed6fe69c91c58cae6beef76d1490159
'2011-12-04T12:28:31-05:00'
describe
'25705' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUFL' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
1397bd0fed4e3336933510d415090183
cc950de2ce87211c3c2dfeab5d8c1f2170e65b84
describe
'47677' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUFM' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
5ef321534ce7667241677a64d0204d61
74b5e14e59142212ad5299e2c96c18f5ba56063f
describe
'16113' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUFN' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
a4f6cb1261d2f8e24ad6da5111587ed4
264cdb3273278eb3f005f8695c498efbdef07da0
describe
'7326' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUFO' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
5cd5c893f4736235f7e2e41229b414bd
d1515ab20d9e6f28d2231cae1b0f9187b4cfce18
describe
'92502' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUFP' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
c8a18ee14184489acce2de29e8d18783
4d059e4bd9e95d1cae512023fd8aa2aeb2a2389e
describe
'25934' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUFQ' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
9f507545d2e28b6c3919af147b150b39
e01be079728b298019eb6989d76051080953258f
describe
'90852' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUFR' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
fb2c99e1ddf7a864e5fb8f8229bd5fb1
8e2c1f3a4b6775a5813a5567196bec5ed00cc4e0
describe
'25762' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUFS' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
173b3ac8fb2a37f0560e8fb5799887cf
5082fe2b72cdeb585649f1f25c14752c8a134758
describe
'96521' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUFT' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
4e039c844dcf4429574ae126c0a210e0
622d7003a04b9b5c42f77420b68b808976f9966c
describe
'26903' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUFU' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
eb01eabc89220d827caa1c93b991b3fb
4095acfd7fc60cf4420febbe9a29e04114c955cd
'2011-12-04T12:28:51-05:00'
describe
'93646' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUFV' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
5724f9124471ddac3ac4d89fdc4a024d
c26c27715b8869014da2bf284255130f6cbacb38
describe
'26443' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUFW' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
3c2be82c69cb905664fd41e833e8ab47
8c100fa6596c744f536dd1e9550c6f8e7e7b4de4
describe
'93399' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUFX' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
d18fee59c8fdd2a60ef3db06279f68cc
afdda4e8d485a9002f2f48dff05de71c2d54bbed
describe
'26213' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUFY' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
2f2baec472a31909ca136bb25338dbdc
d14e171b87d00b8279f6c47f2adca7ddb32140b3
describe
'91589' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUFZ' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
7a03b02d44b204204a25b3460c1a09bf
8e11560faf9980a23058542d57849eac96b7f970
describe
'26075' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUGA' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
cd1d5633084a396da44fcac2f2d9f380
b0b048a8732d769567a82f6adeee012900234a07
describe
'93277' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUGB' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
911af3d50f322349850a23111c5d99ed
62517d72fa86fe81ae10be5d3f4ce036180c073e
describe
'25468' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUGC' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
57f56fd38b16e6ef9f75c28ec8ed44cb
96a9362060ee54ecd0d2eb7fcbaec8bce8bd4973
describe
'88906' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUGD' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
ce2b83c2e85dbbfa3b4527c2ecd8b0d7
130f64b29929db8d823fc9786c6ebb0c2dd29d83
describe
'24921' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUGE' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
82cd505756a8ff7015e856369280f59e
f4c2833e08cef0878a63a7b6c25abc96417d36e7
describe
'99720' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUGF' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
2ffc70cfb359cb263bc77262847881df
fb5aa42fd9c1925e9f9d9725c60b5c33e9060755
describe
'27157' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUGG' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
97f78497d18507503be4119f9931c465
64dc073a65b10adeb1e3424658939fe4bcf9a461
describe
'89009' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUGH' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
61ca04081f71f25c1db733bfc7b1095e
3240840702a5143e0a5d7c31910c1767a4a82004
describe
'25320' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUGI' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
a04a48ff5ff09223b1e97ab0afdf963a
e5813c7203b90f103a02ead766e578ce0c56a90b
describe
'92021' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUGJ' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
c3e190252ed70e86598699ade36615d0
08daf54322936d018631a6b76cac260ed49bcdaa
describe
'25545' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUGK' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
9d5134ec5057d1e991d5b83bc6bf1f3d
c8ca4da33585cd9f78af53815801f9b253f91fdf
describe
'92810' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUGL' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
d2b324f944fe6fe2031a3ff7b20590e1
882fb075b5b508c565032fc372f4e4bf2c6df6a1
describe
'26757' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUGM' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
f6686611ac4393d6be15c0ea8c24ab10
effc3357f3bbe750941704af7268df4ff324dac1
describe
'96310' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUGN' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
065f2cb6c32619edfff3eeb7482431f8
481e2432a0fc37f38df4109003fd48da6b8eb837
describe
'26874' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUGO' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
fd41ac3bbc0ed3523c70e216cda122fa
caf05eb76496cc09dfb79bc7f549f2ec4d5f6b3b
describe
'96395' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUGP' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
a522af6fbfed4bd8fc5e25e30643d9ee
8fe120a733bbc5243718756cee7e9c220faeeeda
describe
'27093' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUGQ' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
ea9c2251ac4c8e2945bf05fa6a2fed38
a3ae9a7ea0202f898c05327ad6f433e17b76f3f2
'2011-12-04T12:27:49-05:00'
describe
'96774' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUGR' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
3d07ad481ed6ddc9facb1f196a0f5416
cd1ec6379c9554f9eba5cab0aa40f1aa66eb3d94
describe
'26641' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUGS' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
53adfcc2c92e90fc62d4ebc71f52837b
9ec09772fc8a4f5e8dccc4e30b2b0afec34862cf
describe
'105452' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUGT' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
333d2340788b7ca40cdeca6a458185bf
03c1d6ad1a6342e5ef0c37d0b9b29be4a72e4307
describe
'29258' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUGU' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
ad5a220f40e0218f60df28295cbdcc35
c20540c4c037e6aa3b6c02fc9176c7bf6cfa0a8b
describe
'101835' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUGV' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
c4b6aacc36d901ee1fd50a2b95d30e66
53da294497291d5ab8b60e3a3736a5e47e62432a
describe
'28629' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUGW' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
1c5ccfab237e9d33d6386fd07e534201
9bd718d5542ec97e4063a9149e418863f7f75b50
describe
'91927' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUGX' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
9696ffeb2c9755ca684ee37e5f59ee53
37a93b48371f6725e323ef4a332efb008010a795
describe
'26480' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUGY' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
cfaf4685c0b09d21caedc4d85367653f
f466a6df658c618f0e0db331ac84a2e64059faab
describe
'96380' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUGZ' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
2cbea7db03958dac81a6070d790666dc
da64639b429191c406f1c0423ee1b190dbaa7b27
describe
'26554' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUHA' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
ed80141ddc9d20eafa54844d05e965a0
bb820a4941feec67e6a1ddab5a05164e0731f043
describe
'94058' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUHB' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
64708e509a36c724ec370f427e4790a5
0af1abce114bde700f998d26cddfa2a713849f0e
describe
'26001' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUHC' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
addccc4b3784d9fb6be4ab45b0ba6986
dea70bcfa0cffd88426ea8db094f820b749a69eb
describe
'98766' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUHD' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
fd304390c491e5d0739fea8f39acac0e
deae65a36223a57b4c00a6d5fff8479ee09b7c23
describe
'27025' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUHE' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
ada1bf9ac905c337ace37d151bb0886d
80d7f3c92e26d3c7791401b40500dd6de7b9d7f9
describe
'89956' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUHF' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
5740829f847271e2a833a9685f04dba2
f5a26cf2f67a330ed9496e0d23ff61806fd8822c
describe
'25587' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUHG' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
fd8eac5048e3428c356903cee5d0566b
18026d44fbc8f96933b4b80a7f4d1eaa38cc323c
describe
'95756' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUHH' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
9c0b93caf5ca92c136da8a2bfa03d97c
f8394b15d05de06f20b6fa6ae4a904f1faa0d7f4
describe
'26185' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUHI' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
f01ea9b83406bdad2122fa9c9e409fb4
a2fec29c2f3764313720c9b10055740823e0c46e
describe
'96672' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUHJ' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
0a80e567ded7855c93cd0bd2c6262679
4e30c003489fb3e814b4c5fa7d283b836aa4609d
describe
'26723' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUHK' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
243c8d5e15e22615e5f29634f54e1a98
baab716b2ac24df5102bc1cf8549d2655335d29a
'2011-12-04T12:28:55-05:00'
describe
'99221' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUHL' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
9892cd81c44ba4506fd2b1d4531237fc
c83b85f79e0a441151df222b46d96f7f8a1e038d
describe
'27333' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUHM' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
42f8a3041805b644bd818ec99a724cb7
026e4e605e656f680257aba9f90366c895f378cf
describe
'87421' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUHN' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
ecdfc478119d488340180b1e7765b3df
f86321fc2f8824fe83bfa45f9a374e3ea3243732
describe
'25221' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUHO' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
7fd79509da79571133f88ea099dc20ad
b7c4eac1d7fa5b28a8e38af6a54b387eda80ea31
describe
'93787' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUHP' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
19d275e5fdafdce13a999b30613c641b
be276c4790690803191053ece33c0e66752953d0
describe
'25986' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUHQ' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
2b8bc364135e040f5ddd7fcfdc2c9797
5a43c461172bbaddee969d3ae27fa1bc71ef0f38
describe
'92738' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUHR' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
cfa792d2f7f8eed1bb2c37b4b2636dea
543fd8df245c6c999e80e753429add1bcbe87890
describe
'26167' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUHS' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
9abbbd471228c7758cb9aa7909cfb752
65c535d34ad4b85b06c5cb44946959ad953b78f4
describe
'92618' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUHT' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
fc0dc7ff567063f69b35288b44ca845c
01519d35c96adc2b833377c6948c9c34c6c7d637
describe
'25407' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUHU' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
72d4416b7c948dc578c006fc5372e32d
5d986ad9f70863fd1f1a206948d178ddd197e7ee
describe
'90534' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUHV' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
3d9fd68380b7a5fb11988ac4e471839c
6b7b1b1558a3681629568bf64324e807dd9d5fb5
describe
'25854' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUHW' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
89c1af1d0fe646da0310128125ec18a5
35d25479c7876969aa429231aff2bc26f7cbf5ed
describe
'95729' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUHX' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
5d49614ea30dd67991971022627d081a
7d049b7c46ab6cb7cfa10ac491aae23e1d75f95f
describe
'26391' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUHY' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
434198cd81fa62a354b760c315499aaa
d7e64aff1010e6dd1246a2131face2ccfd1b234d
describe
'7862' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUHZ' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
3532bd51901534143981958da0b45242
9a02474add523d76a1696c507852e25d66c5adf3
describe
'92537' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUIA' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
d04a824fc2e4128580ebcfd2d321fa92
497175a36488b8452996f3d6a91b4dc7e39e851c
describe
'26665' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUIB' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
2b3351fd66aacd7f34d1ea4bbc063137
fbdf75438528b5d3e1dce8aeddc73cedce4f9bca
describe
'91165' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUIC' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
cc91fd6ea55ae7a1605f1f50b300f865
3a3224e8731f69c8c2f1fdb25eef8a0ffd554fd0
describe
'25992' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUID' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
b5c4895011c92e31febae53e2ce98319
0f3809b987df7844a39b13ebb75c6aefd8f91612
describe
'90125' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUIE' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
7ffae657cc0ee52323fb4b6905d4c46a
193af444f742b6771ddfb13e601ca7f3c36a6436
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUIF' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
58d82ef14ef58f03dc1c3b0d574ae327
abd79650f963c143a053fc96ba6925db377c92d5
describe
'85170' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUIG' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
880e767d9af3209e1a234ebbcd135956
0d2a7808950a2ac08e15c5958386b613333126ee
describe
'24865' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUIH' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
8c2efc530e7287acbfc7ebcefd60b7b7
65b055a7313e8100e229600b51f7f6b6b2c21fae
describe
'93350' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUII' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
d41c7b9f6ebb98685a5a3ba9223a4bb7
cb58042664c5449de8ff37842412b0a4965c2e2c
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUIJ' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
31a1f77cef1c8ea04d091ea9caa77fda
84c7f7e0adc28c1582bbbe85c91fd54b009c78f4
describe
'71515' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUIK' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
2cee56aa4e14cb605be03555871aaccc
184b60c8d3ede481ca8eaea6e4392a2cd8f6f4fc
describe
'20599' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUIL' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
dbb418123f8e51c3ed73dd51b8bf4dc5
eb0fc334151481ff31e6fdc8adaac83a0ef92a11
describe
'8847' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUIM' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
1dba4f1e98e8fd6611de9691383cf14e
1214347cef5116665224ee95a1ee93733ac0044e
describe
'8359' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUIN' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
603ba5b9abcdb16dd0810685d9e21be5
5741a01c8943fd8fc3ffd2a484466730e5b10a40
describe
'8950' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUIO' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
ad1c37d4b086e2aa79fd0914273f21ec
9fbbc38ae1b642b14b03d9f108fb5840b13d1ed6
describe
'15468' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUIP' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
a7125a7a896538e0cec894f557209b61
73f49c6fb9d583aac9422dfb675c53062b54cea2
describe
'78572' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUIQ' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
2a3aa9cea9bde25ae5f1e113e4be90c9
706bd4b2a7c58cf8638ae478e6aa5fe339168e52
describe
'18775' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUIR' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
790585c79283b850a09a126ce2ac9e4b
12bd45ea16c6f6eee4ff117d4c21561c66796756
describe
'113396' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUIS' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
b2430a456ab77313be82898eaafea691
8b05cebf3892d935a94c3d4f86ecbd082112c69e
describe
'23835' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUIT' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
7d5088e7fbe730ccf2db2b251f2e5d4a
82e9aca6480ce65c526a6d54ac87b4bbf6d2c30a
describe
'26278' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUIU' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
b119b21550578caee0e19bd2b7d9178b
8a41c0aede30204352196cf95606479773cd42a5
describe
'11594' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUIV' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
8f4b91f8b78303c8f03c38498e2297e5
99a47f66f13c81e9ec5c06784231d90f9cba8ef4
describe
'48' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUIW' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
cb0b879db41ddbf0150484520a866ba0
4b61d47ed0772033ad94c5102980c4ee94cdd0a3
describe
'84672' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAANLfileF20080427_AAAUIX' 'sip-filesUF00077428_00001.mets'
88cdac8a661a01d7aab289a01948d313
b3ebe6dbc13fb9abaa03ee122b0f3473bc69ca8c
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-18T19:54:18-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.