Citation
Aunty's elfin land, or, The astonishing doings of Mildred, Tom and Harry

Material Information

Title:
Aunty's elfin land, or, The astonishing doings of Mildred, Tom and Harry
Portion of title:
Astonishing doings of Mildred, Tom and Harry
Creator:
Parker, Maria Hildreth
Murphy, Hermann Dudley, 1867-1945 ( Illustrator )
J.G. Cupples Co ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publisher:
J.G. Cupples Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
223 p., [1] leaf of plates : ill. ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Elves -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Fairies -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Diligence -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Success -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Dressmakers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Architects -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Animal trainers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Fantasy literature -- 1890 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1890
Genre:
Fantasy literature ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Title page printed in red and black.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
chronicled by Maria Hildreth Parker ; with illustrations drawn on the spot by Hermann D. Murphy.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
023518402 ( ALEPH )
AHL3883 ( NOTIS )
03291163 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

E20080605_AAAAOL.xml

UF00077426_00001.pdf

UF00077426_00001.txt

00199.txt

00206.txt

00026.txt

00047.txt

00080.txt

00058.txt

00105.txt

00060.txt

00054.txt

00092.txt

00233.txt

00051.txt

00177.txt

00231.txt

00055.txt

00061.txt

00153.txt

00162.txt

00137.txt

00205.txt

00183.txt

00067.txt

00142.txt

00181.txt

00037.txt

00033.txt

00215.txt

00100.txt

00224.txt

00096.txt

00145.txt

00108.txt

E20080605_AAAAOL_xml.txt

00174.txt

00062.txt

00002.txt

00112.txt

00146.txt

00076.txt

00057.txt

00148.txt

00182.txt

00158.txt

00087.txt

00066.txt

00186.txt

00073.txt

00075.txt

00194.txt

00127.txt

UF00077426_00001_pdf.txt

00027.txt

00063.txt

00114.txt

00221.txt

00091.txt

00071.txt

00120.txt

00059.txt

00223.txt

00136.txt

00150.txt

00042.txt

00012.txt

00201.txt

00156.txt

00125.txt

00023.txt

00167.txt

00039.txt

00218.txt

00122.txt

00163.txt

00133.txt

00210.txt

00072.txt

00081.txt

00020.txt

00038.txt

00213.txt

00188.txt

00179.txt

00193.txt

00151.txt

00101.txt

00011.txt

00190.txt

00160.txt

00034.txt

00010.txt

00083.txt

00157.txt

00143.txt

00024.txt

00110.txt

00093.txt

00234.txt

00152.txt

00184.txt

00022.txt

00204.txt

00119.txt

00189.txt

00168.txt

00111.txt

00154.txt

00207.txt

00019.txt

00203.txt

00126.txt

00135.txt

00172.txt

00191.txt

00170.txt

00220.txt

00169.txt

00070.txt

00032.txt

00138.txt

00068.txt

00241.txt

00107.txt

00217.txt

00128.txt

00140.txt

00212.txt

00064.txt

00035.txt

00095.txt

00200.txt

00090.txt

00196.txt

00016.txt

00222.txt

00116.txt

00103.txt

00208.txt

00166.txt

00197.txt

00017.txt

00139.txt

00178.txt

00097.txt

00050.txt

00121.txt

00085.txt

00195.txt

00018.txt

00227.txt

00098.txt

00209.txt

00113.txt

00052.txt

00144.txt

00084.txt

00069.txt

00134.txt

00088.txt

00187.txt

00240.txt

00029.txt

00175.txt

00226.txt

00074.txt

00132.txt

00077.txt

00219.txt

00041.txt

00053.txt

00164.txt

00198.txt

00229.txt

00104.txt

00185.txt

00115.txt

00078.txt

00149.txt

00141.txt

00131.txt

00021.txt

00028.txt

00216.txt

00031.txt

00009.txt

00230.txt

00046.txt

00147.txt

00044.txt

00228.txt

00001.txt

00109.txt

00225.txt

00099.txt

00102.txt

00180.txt

00040.txt

00129.txt

00094.txt

00159.txt

00014.txt

00086.txt

00232.txt

00130.txt

00049.txt

00079.txt

00048.txt

00165.txt

00211.txt

00123.txt

00065.txt

00106.txt

00214.txt

00015.txt

00056.txt

00192.txt

00045.txt

00161.txt

00171.txt

00176.txt

00173.txt

00202.txt

00030.txt

00089.txt

00082.txt

00155.txt

00036.txt

00124.txt

00043.txt

00025.txt


Full Text




No el

The Baldwin Library

University
Git oe
Florida









Aunty’s Elfin Land

OR THE

ASTONISHING DOINGS OF MILDRED, TOM AND HARRY,



Chronicled by MARIA HILDRETH
PARKER with tllustrations drawn
on the spot by HERMANN D.
MURPHY.



BOSTON:
SH. G, Cupples Co, Publishers.



Copyrighted 1890.

By MARIA HiILpRETH PARKER.



‘The dear children



how can we better please them ?

M.. P.






ERHAPS you may have
heard of Elfin Falls. But
why should you? It was
only the people who lived
in the quiet little hill village
€ that knew there were any
such Falls in existence.

Elfin Falls! A very romantic name, surely.
And: no wonder that their reputation was
simply local; for there was no magnificent
cascade or romantic waterfall supplied by
broad river or placid lake; only a purling,
brawling brook, ever hurrying onward and
downward to the mighty river in the valley
below.



The Falls were hardly worthy the name.
There were a few gray rocks around which
the water splashed with a great to-do, and
there were other rocks less prominent over
which the water tumbled in the most rapid
and disorderly fashion.

It was brown and sparkling water from the
meadow beyond, and was said to be in great
favor with certain elves and sprites which
had their dwellings up among the great rocks
on the mountain side.

There were graceful silver birches bending
over the brook and weaving golden shadows
which danced in time with the flashing spray.

There were alders, too, and witch hazels
which put forth their weird and yellow blos-
soms when the birches were bare and the
brook lay sealed in ice.

An old and gnarled cedar stump, gray with
years and covered with hoary lichens, was
all that remained of the forest which had
fallen before the axe of the pioneer.

There was cool, green moss everywhere
beneath the trees; and feathery ferns, purple
violets, orange jewel flowers and modest

6



gentians lent their decoration to the murmur-
ing retreat.

But the glory of the Falls was the clethra,
the sweet pepperbush with its snowy blos-
soms and its dainty perfume.

It grew in such profusion that strangers
passing along the neighboring road on a dewy
evening wondered what it was that made the
air so fragrant.

But the villagers would have said : —‘‘ the
fairies are out to-night ;” for they called the
sweet odor ‘‘ the fairies perfume.”

It was a very small copse which surrounded
the Falls; but it was such a place as well
disposed goblins and respectable fairies would
select for their revels.

I cannot say how much there is of truth in
the statement, but I have been told by several
persons of excellent reputation for veracity,
that the little people from the unseen world
came to the Falls at each new moon and there
elected their elfin prime minister and the gob-
lin guard of the fairy queen.

Ihave never met or spoken to anyone who
had seen this strange gathering; but many
have said that they heard of it, and so I will

4



not dispute what is so thoroughly established
in fact.

What I have set out to do, is to teil you
something of the strange adventures which
befel three children— Mildred, Tom and
Harry by name — who made the acquaintance
of the elves and fairies that gathered at Elfin
Falls.

Mildred the youngest of the three, was just
twelve years of age at the time this history
begins. Tom was thirteen, and Harry was
a few months older.

Mildred was a sunny-haired and blue-eyed
orphan who lived with her aunt, a practical
woman of no sentiment at all, and who, with-_
out being positively harsh, managed to find
enough of work for her little neice to do.

But Mildred had a contented and cheerful
disposition, and it never entered her mind to
either grumble or rebel. Nor did she ever
dream that her lot wasany harder than that of
the other children in the village on the hillside.

She had but little time for play, so that she
always enjoyed the few hours which gave her
opportunity to forget her tasks in the com-
pany of her merry schoolmates.

8



Tom was a light-hearted sturdy little fel-
low, whose one ambition in life was to own
a horse such as carried Mr. Chauncey every
day to and from the railroad station.

Harry was a more thoughtful boy. He
was fond of drawing; and it was his hope
that some day he might build a house as fine
as that in which Mr. Chauncey lived among
the trees at the top of the hill.

They were both very gallant little fellows
and were very proud when Mildred was at
liberty to join them in their play.







THE MYSTERY OF ELFIN FALLS.

One of their favorite resorts was Elfin
Falls, and many happy hours had they spent
together in the cool shades of the birches.
Often had they wished that they might see
some of the elves and goblins which gathered
there; although they were not without a cer-
tain sense of fear that their wishes would be
gratified.

On one particular summer afternoon, when
the air was luminous with the golden sun-
shine and fragrant with the perfume of the
fields, they went to the Falls, and removing
their shoes and stockings, sailed their boats
of bark in the tumbling waters.

How long they played I cannot say; but
at last they grew weary of the sport and,
each selecting a gray rock, lay down to rest
and talk about the fairies.

I



And they were still talking when the sha-
dows deepened and the soft twilight touched
the grove with a mystic tenderness.

A thrush burst into song among the trees ;
and then the children ceased their talk and
listened to the melody.

And the longer they listened the less dis-
posed were they to talk; for as the bird sang,
a vapor arose from the water and clothed the
trees and the rocks and the ferns with a purple
veil.

The perfume of the clethra was every-
where; the crickets chirruped a merry chorus
in the distant pasture, and the soft wind gently
rustled among the leaves as if hushing the
flowers to sleep.

And still the children did not stir.

The moon came over the hill and sent a
few stray beams into the copse to make the
purple misty veil a silvery one.

It was then that Tom thought he saw the
drollest little figure perched upon the stump
of the old cedar tree; but he was much too
lazy to say anything about it to his com-
panions.

At the same time Mildred saw, or thought

12



she saw, the loveliest and the tiniest little
woman seated on a fern and surrounded by a
troop of most graceful and fantastic dancers ;
while Harry was dreamily conscious that a
goblin in the most grotesque attire, was sit-
ting on his foot, which hung over the rock
and almost touched the water.

But the children were under a spell; for
though great was their surprise, they found
themselves more clisposed to lie and watch
than they were to talk of what they saw.

And so they lay, a dreamy look in their
eyes, until at last sleep closed them alto-
gether.

Then the vapor thickened into a fog, and
the rocks upon which the sleepers were
stretched sank slowly out of sight.







And now, if you please, we will follow
these schoolmates, three, and discover, if we
can, what befel them in the land of the water
sprites ; for it is said that those little creatures
were directly responsible for all that T am
going to relate.

And first we will learn of Tom’s adven-
tures.







TOM’S INTRODUCTION TO THE
GENIE.









OM awoke, to
find himself in a
strange place, indeed. It
was a vast hall with walls
of gray stone in huge
blocks and a high arch-
ing roof supported by
great pillars of glittering
ore.

The light was dim and
Tom’s first thought was
that he had fallen into
one of the natural caves
he had read about in
school.

But as his eyes became

accustomed to the half gloom, he saw a

gigantic figure seated in a massive chair of

19

















It was that
of a man of
venerable ap-
pearance, at-
tired in a long
robe, and on
his head was a
most peculiar

cover-

ing which =
heightened the natural
dignity of his features.
His beard was white,
and as he sat up there
with his hands upon his
knees, Tom thought he looked for all the

20



world like the pictures of the statues of the
kings who had ruled in Egypt many cen-
turies ago.

Tom was rather startled when the figure
moved; for he had thought it to be a monu-
ment of some kind. But he was a courageous
little fellow, and putting his hands into his
trouser’s pockets he boldly said: ‘* Good day,
sir!

‘¢ Good day,” the figure replied in a voice
which rang through the hall like the tone of
a mellow bell; ‘¢ you are welcome here.

‘* Behold in me the Genie of this place.
Say what you most desire in life and that
desire will I gratify.”

Tom thought for a moment, and then he
said: ‘*V’d like to have a horse and to be
able to ride like Mr. Chauncey.”

‘6 Think well,” said the Genie, ‘‘ for if this
is your desire a horseman shall you be when
you return to the mortal world.”

“Tl risk it,” cried Tom, his curiosity all
aroused. :

‘+ It will be as you have chosen,” the Genie
said, and taking a silver key from his girdle
he gave it to Tom and directed him to open

21



and pass threugh a great door, studded with
bolts of brass, at the further end of the hall.

**Go, and at the end of thirty days return
to me here in this hall,” the Genie said; and
when Tom looked up to thank his venerable
patron, behold the figure and the chair had
both disappeared.

Full of wonderment, Tom went down the
vast hall, and although the door was larger
than any he had ever seen, he had no diffi-
ty to open it.

22



WHAT TOM FOUND IN ELFIN
LAND.







HAT a scene was
that which met
Tom’s gaze when he
stepped upon the
threshold of the great
doorway. Before
him lay a_ broad





plain. The green sward extended far as the
eye could reach, as level as a lawn, but
broken in many places by clumps of trees
and shrubs, and spreading beds of the most
gorgeous flowers.

There were also miniature lakes scattered
here and there; and rockeries where foun-
tains and tiny cascades merrily splashed in
the rosy light.

For the light was not like the light of the
sun. Nor was there any sky at all. In its
place was a great pink dome from which the
light streamed in radiating rosy rays.

25



Tom was filled with admiring astonish-
ment. He had never dreamed of anything
like it; it was so beautiful and yet so un-
earthly.

As he walked down the broad steps toward
one of the lakes, quite near the gray castle
of the Genie, he gave a passing thought to
his companions, and he wondered where
they were and what they were doing, but
had no desire whatsoever to look for them.

There was a sparkling cascade tumbling in
a creamy turmoil over a vine-covered bowlder
into this particular lake; and seeing a golden
cup at hand Tom filled it and quenched his
thirst.

As he drained the cup he read on the in-
side: ‘+The Fountain of Knowledge is
Sweet,” and he was quite ready to -endorse
the inscription; for never had he drank a
beverage so delicious.

But great as was his delight, it was nothing
compared with the joy he felt when, lifting
his eyes from the lake, he saw standing close
by, a troop of the most beautiful ponies he
had ever seen.

There were six handsome heads erected

26



and twelve bright eyes flashed the query:
‘© Who are you?” And every pony was as
black as ebony.

Tom approached them very carefully ; but
the ponies were not at all afraid of him, and
they stood and sniffed at his clothes while
they permitted him to smooth and pat their
glossy sides.

Each one was bridled with a silver rein;
and their saddles were trimmed with the same
precious metal.

Tom lost no time in selecting one which
seemed to be the most docile of the troop,
and when he had mounted its back somewhat
awkwardly, it sped away at a rattling gallop
across the grassy plain.

It was a rare ride; and Tom, who had
never ridden anything but the old mare in
the pasture, was fairly wild with excited
delight.

But he was strange to the saddle, and by
and by he turned the pony toward the great
gray castle and retraced his way at a more
moderate pace.

As he passed The Fountain of Knowledge
he stopped to let the pony drink. But the

27



pony had no relish for water of that kind ; it
was accustomed to drink at quite another
fountain, and so it shook its head and started
off to join its fellows.

Now, Tom, with all his good qualities, was
a little stubborn, and he was determined that
the pony should drink.

But the pony was no less stubborn; and
it wheeled about and pranced in such re-
monstrance that its rider found it a difficult
thing to retain his seat.

Finally Tom lost his temper and struck the
pony a sharp blow with his hand.

That was more than the pony could en-
dure; so down went its head, up went its
heels and Tom went flying through the air to
fall plump into the middle of the lake from
which he emerged a very wet and sorry boy.

As for the pony it wheeled about and
trotted back to its companions, who tossed
their heads as if they all understood and en-
joyed the joke.

Very much discomfited Tom returned to
the castle of the Genie. But the door was
locked and knock as loud as he would he
could not arouse a respénse.

28



And then it came to him that he was alone

in this strange place.



Across the plain, embowered in a magnolia

grove was a pavilion of pink transparent
quartz. Toward this Tom made his way,
wondering the while if he should find anyone

29



at home; for he was quite hungry and very
wet and weary.

The crystal door of the beautiful pavilion
stood wide in open welcome, and there in the
middle of aroom, most luxuriantly furnished,
Tom saw a table spread with most tempting
fare.

A silk embroidered robe hung over a screen
of peacock’s feathers. This Tom exchanged
for his sodden clothes, and, when he had
eaten, he flung himself upon a soft and
inviting couch and fell fast asleep.

30



TOM’S NEW QUARTERS.

When Tom awoke next morning there was
a touch of gold in the rosy light which filtered
through the tapestry with which the walls of
the crystal chamber were hung; and when
he had bathed in a pool of sweet-scented
water that stood in the centre of the room,
he donned his clothes, now quite dry, and
set out to see what manner of house it was
that sheltered him.

He had never even read of anything so
magnificent. There were two chambers. The
ceiling of one was arched and decorated with
mosaics in colored quartz. The walls were
iridescent and hung with rich stuffs in all
varieties of soft colors. The floors were of
exquisite marble, covered with thick and
heavy rugs, and the furniture was massive,
of quaint design and wonderfully carved.

31



There were no pictures anywhere; but in
their place were tall vases of jasper and
other precious stones, filled with the
most beautiful flowers.

If Tom loved horses he also loved









flowers; and he went from vase
to vase and inhaled their per-
fume with a keen delight.

Ona peculiar green table with
curving legs, Tom found
a book bound in silver
with his name written
in blue enamel across the
cover,

6
52



He hurridly opened it and found upon the
title page, the single inscription: ‘* To the
Lover of Horses.”

‘© Ah,” he said, ‘*now [ will learn how to
manage the ponies.”

And indeed it was to him a most interest-
ing book; and so absorbed did he become in
its contents, that he quite forgot where he
was and how he ever got there.

When he had looked at all the pictures and
read several chapters, it occurred to Tom
that he had better take his lessons in sections ;
and so putting his book under his arm he
drew aside the curtains, which hung before
an archway, and entered the next apartment.

It was somewhat smaller than the one he
had just left; but it was, if anything, more
beautiful; and what delighted him most was
to find in the centre a great jar filled with
the fragrant pepperbush he had_ so_ often
gathered at Elfin Falls.

In an alcove, behind a crimson curtain, Tom
found ever so many suits of clothes. Some
were of velvet, some of silk and others of
soft and pliant leather.

He selected one of the latter and putting

33



it on surveyed himself with no little pride in
one of the tall mirrors with which the cham-
ber was lined.

It was certainly a tidy and becoming suit ;
and the leggings, and the jaunty cap and all
that made Tom look quite smart and natty.

And when he had turned about and looked
on all sides; when he had walked from one
end of the crystal pavilion to the other;
when he had sat inall the chairs, and thrown
himself upon all the couches, Tom pinched
his arms and pulled his ears to make quite
sure that he was really ‘Tom the blacksmith’s
son, and that he was not dreaming.

He had never known any luxury. A scanty
living and shelter had been his only experi-
ence. He had indulged in boyish dreams
and cherished hopes of future fortune; these
had been his only riches, the treasures of
youth which not even adversity can steal
away.

But, now, here was realization beyond his
most Javish expectations, and he wondered
that he could be so calm and so much at
home.

There was no excitement in his pleasure;

34



indeed it was so rational that Tom very soon
remembered he was hungry, and went to see
what he could find of the meal he had eaten
before he fell asleep.

But the remains had been removed and in
their place was a repast even more generous
than the other, to which the hungry boy ap-
plied himself with a vigorous relish.

35







TRAINING THE PONIES.

When Tom had finished his breakfast he
went out to look for the ponies. He found
them peacefully standing in a_ paddock;
their saddles and bridles hanging on the
wall of a long, low building which, on ex-
amination, Tom found to be a stable fitted
with marble stalls.

Tom’s first duty was to groom the ponies,
so the book had toid him. This he did in a
clumsy way; and the ponies were rather in-
clined to resent the rough application of the
curry comb and brush.

But they were finally groomed and fed,
and, then, selecting that which stood next to
the one which had pitched him into the lake,
Tom saddled it and mounting its back, set
- off for a ride.

They cantered far across the plain until

37



they came to a lake of black and turbulent
water, from the depths of which proceeded
a murmuring noise very much like the rush
of the waters at Elfin Falls.

Tom was impelled to advance and to dis-
cover, if he could, the cause of the noise;
but the pony, with a snort, wheeled about
and started off in the other direction.

Nor could Tom, by pulling on the bridle,
induce the animal to approach within a hun-
dred yards of the lake.

The pony’s obstinacy provoked the boy,
and he was about to strike it when he re-
membered the sousing he got on the previous
day. So he wisely let the pony have its own
way; and it lost no time in speeding back to
its companions.

That afternoon Tom thought he would try
his hand at teaching the ponies to perform
certain movements. He was quite confident
of his ability to do so; and he felt that his
pupils would be intelligent ones.

He began with the pony that had thrown
him into the lake. He had read in the book
with the silver cover, that patience and kind-
ness would overcome all things, and even

o8



subdue the spirits of the horses ; so he decided

to be both kind and patient.
Taking the

pony, which he

had named Mil-



ly, in honor of his sepa-
rated playmate, he led it
~ slowly around in a circle,
led it until he himself grew dizzy.

Every time he stopped he called out ‘+ stop !”
in a low, clear voice; and before he started
he always cried ‘* go!”

By and by, the pony began to comprehend
that there was an action suited to the word,

39







and soon Tom had the pleasure of seeing his
patience rewarded ; for the pony stopped and
started when told to do so.

It was slow work; but it interested Tom
and the pony seemed to like it; for it pricked
up its ears, and its eyes plainly showed that
it was making an effort to distinguish between
the words and the actions they represented.

Before he had finished Tom had the pony
so far under his control that it galloped around
a circle of which Tom was the centre, and
stopped at the word of command.

Tom had once admired the man who, in a
gorgeous coat and shining top boots, had
managed the performing horses in the circus,
and he was quite proud to find himself ina
position of similar, if more limited power.

The golden tint had all gone out of the
rosy light when Tom, somewhat reluctantly
gave up his fascinating occupation and walked
toward the pavilion where he was very sure
to find supper awaiting him.

And it was such a supper as he had never
seen; and the occupations of the day having
sharpened his appetite he ate with a hearty
and boyish relish.

40



But after supper it was rather lonely there
in the midst of all the grandeur and luxury,
and Tom found himself wishing that he could
see Mildred and Harry, and even longing for
the sweet scented dampness of Elfin Falls.

And as he sat buried among the silken
cushions in a porphery chair, he became
conscious that there was a bright green light
playing in a panel above the entrance to the
chamber of the mirrors.

And as he looked with keen curiosity at

the illumination, the light formed these words :
“The weary find relief in pleasure!
Say, what shall your pleasure be?”’

Now, Tom had once heard an orchestra
play on the lawn when Mr. Chauncey’s
daughter was matvried, and he had never
heard anything so delightful. So, when he
had made out the nature of the luminous
invitation, he cried out: ‘¢I’d like to hear
that band again.”

Then the green light faded and disappeared,
and instantly the pavilion was flooded with
the most heavenly music.

Tom was entranced, and lay quite still

41



among the cushions and listened with all his
soul.

The harmony, loud at first, gradually he-
came softer and softer until it sounded like
the music of another sphere. And, Tom,
lulled by the soothing sounds, fell fast asleep.
And

such







was
‘Tom’s
experi-



ence for several days, training the ponies
to come and go, and listening to the music
which came from nowhere and yet was every-
where.

At the end of the first week all the ponies

42



were subject to the word of command, and
then Tom began to give them instruction in
more difficult performances.

By patient effort he succeeded in making
Milly stand on its hind legs; while all six
would canter around the ring, stop and turn
and do ever so many clever things when told
to do so,

43,







TOM HAS AN EXPERIENCE.

One day a strange thing happened. Tom
had been teaching his ponies to stand on their
hind legs, and selecting one he had named
Harry, a bright eyed little creature, Tom
mounted its back and set off to explore this
strange land of the beautiful flowers and the
rosy light.

He had ridden for a long time through
groves of trees ladened with the most tempt-
ing fruits, and great beds of flowers, when
he suddenly remembered that he had_ not
heard a bird sing since he came to this land
of mystery. Not a bird; nor had he seen
anything at all resembling one. And yet he
had partridges and quail for dinner very
frequently.

And when he realized that there were no
birds there, when he counted up and found

45



that he and the six ponies were the only
living visible things in this beautiful place,
he for the first time experienced a pang of
loneliness.

While he had been thinking of this, the
pony kept on its way unguided, along a
smooth white path which wound in and out
among the great trees of a mighty forest, and
when it suddenly stopped Tom was recalled
to himself, and very much surprised was he.

Before him rose a gigantic gateway set ina
massive arch guarded by two mighty figures
in bronze.

The gate was also of bronze, and between
it and the place where the pony stood with
Tom on its back, was a broad stream over
which. hung a drawbridge.

The drawbridge was up, however, so that
Tom was unable to cross; but as there was a
gray stone house beside the gateway he hol-
loed in the hope that he might attract the
attention of some one inside.

But the echo of his own voice was the only
response ; and with his curiosity more keenly
aroused by disappointment, Tom turned and
rode away.

46



At last he came to the murmuring lake;
and as he sat on the pony’s back looking at
the swirling water, he wondered if it were
possible to teach the ponies to swim. He
had read in the book that all horses could
swim; but.that it was necessary to train them
to swim with a rider on their backs.

So, being in the mood for a new experi-
ment, he urged the pony forward toward the
border of the lake. But nothing he could do
would make the pony enter the water. The
more Tom urged the more the pony resisted ;
and at last the impatient rider lost his temper
and struck the animal a sharp blow on the
neck with the silver rein.

And it was lucky for Tom that this: pony
did not do as that other one had done and
throw him into the water. But, instead of
doing anything of the kind, it wheeled about
and started at a mad galop for the stables.

And a very ndignified figure did Tom
present as he lay, for all the world like a
frog, sprawling on the pony’s back, his arms
around its neck and his eyes big and distended
with fear.

But there was no one to see or laugh at his

47



ridiculous plight, and when he finally stood
on the stable floor he was very much ashamed
that he should have forgotten all that he had
read in the book about kindness.

When he had quenched his thirst at the
Fountain of Knowledge, he had no trouble
at all to devise a way to accomplish his
end.

And it was always so. Whenever he was
verplexed or at a loss what to do, he would
drink from the golden cup, and then every-
thing he sought to know came into his mind
just as if he had thought it all out himself.

After he had drank he went into the pavil-
ion and filled one of his pockets with sugar.
‘¢ We'll see,” said he to himself, ‘¢if sugar
won't make you swim my beauty.”

So he mounted Harry’s back again and
rode away to the edge. of the murmuring
lake. There the pony stopped, as before,
and planting its fore feet in the sand refused
to move another step.

But Tom did not lose his temper this
time. Dismounting, he gently patted the
timid animal, and after a while he gave it a
lump of sugar. This the pony seemed to

48



relish very much; and it poked its nose into
Tom’s pocket and followed him all round the
lake very much as a favorite dog would have
done.

After a while Tom succeeded in making
the pony wet its feet, and then he mounted
its back and waited to see what it would do
next. It sniffed the water, but it did not
drink ; and by and by, of its own accord, it
waded further out until the water touched
the soles of Tom’s feet as they hung in the
stirrups.

That was doing very well; and Tom was
congratulating himself upon the results of
his experiment when — souse! the pony
and its rider went down over their heads into
the water, very much as if the bottom had
dropped out of the lake, so sudden was the
plunge.

When they came to the surface Tom was
still on the pony’s back, and the animal was
swimming as if it had never done anything
else. Tom was delighted, as the pony,
seeming to enjoy the situation, swam round
and round the lake.

But as it swam, the water in the centre

49



swirled and foamed like a great whirlpool.
The murmuring sound grew into a roar which
completely














| drowned Tom’s
voice as he tried
to speak en-
couragement to
Herry.

Tom was
_really alarmed.
>, He expected
- that both he and
~ the pony
é would sure-
ly be drawn

down into the —
hole about
which the se
water swirled —the ~-
vortex — but pull as :
he would on the reins he could ~
not guide the pony away from
the yawning danger.

Round and round they went, the uproar
ever increasing and just when it seemed that

50






nothing could save them, the noise ceased,
the water was still and the pony and its rider
reached the shore.

The latter was glad to have come so safely
out of such an exciting experience; and I
have no doubt but that if the pony could
have expressed its feelings it would have
said it was equally pleased.

And as Tom listened to the murmuring
sound which had succeeded the roar he
fancied he heard a voice saying:

“ Here in the swirling water,
Here in the Joud uproar,
Timid hearts are strengthened

With courage to the core.”

And Tom thought of that as he rode toward
the pavilion and supper, and determined that
some day he would take all six ponies for a
swim in the Lake of Courage.







STRANGE DEPARTURE OF THE
PONIES.

The thirty days were almost completed
when Tom decided one morning that he
would take all six ponies to the Lake of
Courage for a swim in its turbulent waters.
He had taken them one by one into the lake
and had learned that it was much better to
let a horse have its own way while swim-
ming than it was to attempt to guide it.

Indeed, Tom had learned a great deal since
he came into the strange land. He had read
the book very thoroughly, and had found it
to contain a vast amount of information re-
garding the horse and other things. In fact,
the little fellow became quite a philosopher,
and vowed that when he returned to the
upper world he would tell the people there
that kindness was ever so much better than

53



force; and.that patience would accomplish
more than haste could possibly do.

He had also learned that perseverance al-
ways brought a satisfactory reward.

On this particular morning he rode Harry ;
and all the rest followed in procession. When
they came to the lake it was with the utmost
difficulty that Tom could restrain the animals,
so eager were they to plunge into the water.

But he succeeded at last in forming them
into line; and then, standing with a foot on
the back of Milly and another foot on the
back of Harry, he gave the word and off
they went swimming around the lake like so
many seals. For they were wonderfully ex-
pert; and although the water swirled and
boiled and the murmuring grew into a
roar, they were not the least alarmed; nor
did they once break the compact line they
formed.

It was great sport; and Tom laughed and
shouted in his glee and never once thought
of the vortex. And why should he have
thought of it? For would it not always at the
very moment when it seemed as if the ponies
and their rider would have been engulphed,

54



suddenly close and permit them to reach the
shore in safety?

But the vortex did not close that day. On
the contrary, it expanded and was much
larger than it ever was before, and if Tom
had not made so much noise himself, he would
have noticed that the roar was intensified and
almost deafening.

And so the ponies swam round and round ;
and when they had reached the centre a huge
column of glittering water shot out of the
vortex and lifted the animals and their rider
into the air.

Tom lost his footing upon the ponies’ backs
and fell into the water. When he came to
the surface again the colunin had disappeared
and overhead was a vapory mass in which
the swimming boy discovered the dainty forms
of laughing and vanishing fairies.

A few strokes brought him to the shore,
and then Tom realized that his ponies had
not been ponies at all; but only fairies that
had masqueraded as ponies to afford him
pleasure and teach him to have respect for
intelligence, whether in man or in beast.
And Tom, though grieved to lose his beauti-

55



ful black companions, was glad that he had
treated them so kindly.

It was very lonely that night in the pavil-
ion, even though the music was more lively
than usual; and Iam afraid that Tom cried
himself to sleep among the silken cushions of
the great porphery chair.



TOM RETURNS TO EARTH.







OON after Tom awoke next
morning he was startled by the
sounding boom of a great gong
in the gray castle of the Genie.
Quickly, he ran to the calendar
in the Chamber of Mirrors, and
there he learned what he had
quite forgotten, that it was the
thirtieth day and the day upon
which he was to appear before
the great figure in the stone
chair. :
He did not stop to think of
what he would say to the Genie, so anxious



was he to learn what was next to befall him.
But his heart thumped quite loudly as he
mounted the broad stairs and put his shoulder
to the great door.

59



There was the hall, gray as before; and at
the further end, in his massive chair, the
robed and bearded Genie himself.

He greeted Tom with a kindly smile and
beckoned him to approach. Tom’s courage
was strengthened by the Genie’s reassuring
manner, and doffing his cap he said quite
cheerily : ‘* Good morning, sir! Here I am.”

‘‘ Good morning!” said the Genie. ‘‘ And
now, will you tell me all you have done since
you came into Elfin Land! Have you been
happy; have you been contented; have you
wished for anything that was not yours?
Answer me these things and answer me truly
and then you shall have greater pleasure
than has yet been yours.”

‘*T have been very happy,” said Tom,
‘¢more happy, I guess, than I ever was be-
fore. V’ve had a most delightful time, ?m
sure; and I’m very much obliged to you.
I’m sorry, though, I lost the dear ponies ; but
now that I know they were only make-believe
ponies and really fairies, I don’t think I could
ride and teach them as I used to do. I’ve
been very contented ; for that was a splendid
book; and the music every night was just

60



lovely. I’ve had about everything I wished
for, but”? —and here Tom’s voice quavered
and the tears stood in his eyes.

*¢ But what?” asked the Genie in a gentle
voice.

“¢ But Pd like to see my mother again, and
Harry and Mildred. If they were here I
wouldn’t mind staying; but if you’ve no
objections, Mr. Genie, perhaps you will let
me go home.”

“And if I let you go, what will you do?”
asked the Genie.

‘©Oh, Pil train horses and make a lot of
money; and build mother a nice house, and
buy her a carriage and a pony that she can
drive herself.”

‘* And will you teach your fellow mortals
to be kind to the horses that serve them so
faithfully? You have scen that the ponies
you rode and trained had gentle spirits within
them; and so have the horses in your world
—gentle spirits that are obedient, gentle
spirits, that are sensible to kindness and sensi-
tive to pain.”

And Tom said he would tell everybody to
be kind; and as he thought of the way Farmer

61



Grigson used to beat his horses with a thick
stick, he grew valiantly zealous and said he’d
*¢ punch his head” if he ever saw him doing
it again.

The Genie looked very much as if he might
have laughed outright at Tom’s valor: but
then that would never have done; for genies,
you know, are always very grave and reserved
personages. So he smothered the laugh with
a little cough behind his hand, and nodded
his approval.

Then, taking a very small golden key from
the ring on his belt, he gave it to Tom, say-
ing: ‘*‘Lhis is the key to your reward. You
have been a very patient and a very diligent
pupil, and you deserve all that it will open to
you. Remember the Jesson you have learned ;
and farewell!”

As he uttered the last word there was a
crash as of thunder, and a bright light flashed
through the hall and dazzled Tom’s eyes so
that he covered them with his hands.

When at last he ventured to peep between
his fingers, Tom was amazed. And no
wonder ; for the Genie and his castle had dis-
appeared; and there in front of the bewil-

62



dered boy, was the great gate between the
sculptured figures,
and the drawbridge
he had seen that
day he rode Milly
4 out through the
>» forest.

' But now the














down; and with
hurrying feet and
a beating heart b
Tom ran across
and up the steps
to the gate with
the golden bolts.
It was a very
small keyhole
Tom found; but A
it was fitted by

63



the golden key; and then Tom pushed with
all his might and slowly and noiselessly the
gate swung open its hinges and disclosed a
wonderous sight.

A plain studded with trees that bore most
tempting fruits in red and golden hues.
Arbors covered with vines on which the
purple grapes hung in large and luscious
bunches. Fountains there were that spouted
sparkling waters, and birds of brilliant plum-
age that filled the perfumed air with their
melody.

Under the trees were troops of the most
beautiful creatures weaving garlands of flow-
ers or dancing to the music of the pipe. It
was surely a fairy scene, the most beautiful
that fancy could picture; and Tom looked on
_ with open mouth and wondered again if he
were asleep. :

But no; he was very wide awake; for be-
fore he had recovered from his astonishment
he found himself wound round about with gar-
lands of flowers. The fairies had laughingly
made him their prisoner, and with merry glee
they dragged him to a mossy bank where their
dainty Queen sat holding her gracious court.

6+



She welcomed Tom to her kingdom, which
she said was much more pleasant than the
kingdom of the Genie, and indeed, Tom did
not need to be told that, for he could see that
it was quite a different place.

But when the Queen said he could stay
there and be a fairy like those around him,
Tom laughed at the idea and said he guessed

‘he was too big and too rough to be much of
a fairy. At which they all laughed; and one
‘funny little gnome laughed so hard that he
doubled up into a ball and went bounding
across the plain as lightly as a thistle down.

Then the little Queen became serious and
said:

‘Of all in this domain [ am the Queen,
Although a simple fairy I have been;

And simple fairy I again will be
When flowers begin to bud on yonder tree : —

For you must understand
That queens-elected: are in Elfin Land.

Since then in Elfin Land yon will not stay,
To bask in pleasure ’neath my gentle sway,
The Genie, whom I serve, he doth command
That you returned be to Mortal Land: —
For you must understand
That mortals do not live in Elfin Land.

She had scarcely ceased speaking when
Tom saw approaching, a pair of snow-white

65



horses with waving manes and flying tails.
They were magnificent creatures, and they
pranced as proudly and as daintily as if they
‘knew very well that they were being admired
by this mortal.

They were harnessed with slender chains
and bands of gold to a chariot of the most
exquisite description. It was oval in shape,
and over it was a canopy which looked very
much like a rose-tinted Jack-in-the-pulpit,
and the body of the chariot was like mother-
of-pearl. The spokes of the wheels might
have been cat-tails of silver, and above the
canopy was a star which shed a white and
searching light.

There was nobody in the chariot and no-
body driving or leading the horses; but they
stopped and impatiently pawed the ground
. when they reached the Queen’s mossy throne.

Tom had no sooner seen the Queen wave
her hand and bow her head than he jumped
into the chariot, and gathering the white reins
shook them once over the horses’ backs, and
away they went like the wind.

And so they rode out of sight and Tom no
more was seen in Elfin Land.

66



HARRY’S ASTONISHING DOINGS.










ARRY never knew how
it happened ; but when he
‘awoke he found he was
AU ne Se lying in an arbor on the
iN AY \ \ terrace of a great building.
It was such a building as he had never seen.
He had often seen pictures of the capitol
at Washington with its great dome; but this
building was grander than the picture of the
capitol. At least, so Harry thought. It was
more like a castle than a capitol; for there

69



were turrets with pointed roofs and narrow
windows, and it was built of blocks of
polished stone that glistened in the sunlight.

I say sunlight—for of course there was no
sunlight there such as Harry had seen on the
earth—but instead, a mellow light which
came from a great globe high up in the
arching dome which was all the sky there
was in this subterranean land.

And there was a great statue in a niche
over the porch of the door; and the floor of
the terrace was inlaid with red and black and
yellow marbles.

Near the arbor in which Harry awoke was
a fountain, in the basin of which gold and
silver fish disported themselves; and around
the terrace was a railing of onyx, over which
clambered a vine covered with white and
yellow flowers. It was a beautiful place, and
Harry lay half awake and felt very sure that
he was at home in bed and only dreaming.

But the splash of the water in the fountain
was too distinct to be the splash in a dream ;
and when a bird began to sing such a song as
he had never heard, Harry, wondering, real-
ized that he was awake.

70



And when he arose and looked over the
vine clad railing, he gazed upon a country
fair to see.

There was a garden with shaded walks and
flowers of the most gorgeous hue ; and beyond
the wall which enclosed the garden there
were hills and lakes and brooks and then a
forest which encircled everything. Beyond
the forest there was nothing to see.

When he had recovered from his surprise
Harry thought he would discover if he could,
where he was. But there was no one in
sight, not a living creature save the fish and
the birds and himself.

That was very strange, and still wondering,
Harry crossed the terrace and went up the
steps to the great door beneath the statue.

It was a grim statue with a globe on its
knee and a pair of compasses in its hand.
It might have been the statue of Christopher
Columbus for all Harry knew, had it not
happened that as he was looking for the
bell he felt something touch his head, and
glancing up he saw the statue drawing back
the hand which held the compasses.

Then surely Harry was frightened; nor

71



was he at all reassured when the statue opened
its bronze lips and said : —

‘‘T am the guardian of the Palace of In-
dustry. You have come into Elfin Land
‘where your every wish will be gratified if
your wishes are good. You are young and
you are ambitious. To be an architect and a
builder of structures is your desire. You
shall have every opportunity to be both.”

Harry was dumb. To think that this statue
should know what he only knew, and that it
should tell him he would have opportunity to
do what he most desired to do, was enough
to make him speechless with surprise.

He tried to thank the statue; but his tongue
refused to express his thoughts, and the statue
was so silent and so fixed. that Harry really
began to question if it had ever moved or
spoken.

He waited quite a while, but there was no
movement on the part of the figure; so he
laid his hand upon the door, and lo! it opened
at his touch.



THE PALACE AND IVS KEEPER.

There was a great hall inside. and many
pillars of green stone. The walls were
paneled in yellow marble, and over the arches
were statuettes and busts most exquisitely
carved.

‘¢ Well,” said Harry to himself, ‘this is
the strangest and the grandest place I’ve ever
seen. I wonder where it is and who owns

But there was nobody there to answer his
questions, and so he set out to see what there
was to see, and who.

There were many rooms leading from the
beautiful hall, each differing in form and
furniture from the other, and when. he had
visited all but one, the door of which was
locked, Harry went up the wide and winding
stairs to the second floor.

73



Here was a hall finished in wood of a rich
color. The columns were chastely carved,
and in the ceiling were great beams which
were also carved.

In the panels made by the beams which
crossed and recrossed each other was a series
of beautiful paintings.

Here, in the rooms, there were drawings of
_every kind and models of every conceivable
description.

But there was still another flight, and Harry
was delighted to find that it led to a great
workshop where there were implements of
all kinds and machinery and an engine too.

But still was-there nobody visible, and
Harry was so anxious to find someone to tell
him what to do and when to do it.

So down he went to the lower hall again,
and walking directly to the door he had found
locked, he rapped upon it with his knuckles
as loudly as he could.

The door was instantly opened and Harry
found himself in a sort of ante-chamber.
Through an open door of that he could see
a vista of roonts beyond.

But still there was no-one visible.

TA



So he passed into another room, and
there he found a table set with sparkling
crystal and shining silver on a cloth as white
as any he had ever seen in Mr. Chauncey’s
dining room. For Harry had been at the
squire’s house more than once to carry mes-
sages; and the squire’s wife had. given him
grapes and apples from a great silver dish on
the dining room table.

There was only one plate on the table and.
— could he believe his eyes — there was some-
thing living and moving in the room besides
himself.

It was evidently a human being although
it looked for all the world like a monkey. It
was small and it had a peculiar face and most
peculiar clothes. On its head was a yellow
cap through which protruded two locks of
stiff black hair, very much like a pair of
horns. |

Its face was the color of mahogany and its
features looked as if they might have been
hewn out of that wood. But its eyes were
black and twinkling and were the eyes of in-
telligence and kindness.

Its stubby figure was clothed in a russet

75



leather jerkin and as Ka Waa, :
upon its crooked Y)y QiNQRe
little legs were
hose of scarlet hue.
A long white apron coast
descending from

its chin to its toes,

completed the attire of this strange
being.













It neither moved nor spoke, but
held the chair as if inviting Harry to
sitdown. So Harry sat and wondered



i .
of waiter

| | ‘ es

af it was
i that brought
“Win all the

{ dainties with
which the
table was
speedily cov-
ered.

But before



i f

he began to eat Harry said: —‘‘Is all this
supper for me?” The dwarf did not seem
to comprehend, so Harry added: — I’m much .
obliged to you, I’m sure, for Pm_ pretty
hungry.”

And the way he did eat showed that his
strange experiences had not disturbed his
appetite.

“1
“I







OUR FRIEND, HORNS.

During the dessert, which included a great
many dainty fruits of which Harry did not
know the names, he tried to engage his
attendant in conversation, but without suc-
cess. The little black eyes twinkled in an
intelligent way; but otherwise, there was
nothing to show that the dwarf understood
what Harry was trying to make him under-
stand. A
So, in despair, the wondering boy con-
~ cluded that his attendant was deaf and dumb,
and he said: ‘I will teach him by signs
after a while.” :

Having finished his meal without in the
' least knowing what he had eaten, but feeling
very sure that he had never eaten anything
-so good, Harry walked about the room with
_ its, richly inlaid amber walls, its long pointed
windows filled with colored glass, the high

79



arched ceiling with its beautiful paintings,
the inlaid floor, the massive and antique
furniture, the tall sideboards and closets filled
with all manner of curious dishes wrought in
gold and silver and fragile glass, and while
he admired he wondered to whom it all
belonged, and wondered what sort of man
it was that lived amid all this splendor.

Harry, a poor boy, reared in the humblest
way, had no idea of luxury such as he found
in this place; and it was all so like a story
book or something he had dreamed one night
so long ago, that he quite expected to see
the room and the castle disappear and to find
himself lying again on the rock at Elfin
Falls. ;

But as he heard his footsteps ring upon the
floor he was reassured; and then his thoughts
took a new turn. .

He had read some fairy tales, but had never
believed there was anything real about them.
They were written to please children and
that was all. But now that he found him-
self so suddenly transported into another
world, a world so unlike the world he had
lived in, he began to think there must have

80



been some truth in what he read, and that
he was one of the favored mortals whose
ambitions and desires the fairies so much
delight to foster.

And he came to this conclusion as he sat
in a chair before an open window and looked
out upon the marvellous scene. And it was
marvellous in the twilight, a peculiar light
which gave the flowers a new beauty and
filled the shadows with a mystery.

The fountain made soft music on the ter-
race below, and a gentle breeze ladened with
the exquisite perfume of a hundred flowers
stole into the room and filled the boy with a’
sense of most delightful repose.

And there were birds singing in a grove in
the garden, singing so sweetly that Harry, in
a dreamy way, thought they must be the
nightingales he had read about, but which
he had never heard.

And so he sat quietly enjoying the scene
and the sounds; and it was no wonder that
he was startled when he felt a touch at his
elbow and, turning hastily about, found his
little attendant standing by his chair with a
silver candlestick in his hand.

gl



‘¢Oh, it’s you, Horns!” said Harry in a
relieved sort of way. You see, he did not
know just what to call the little attendant;
so for lack of a better name he thought
‘¢ Horns” would do very well until he found
out what the creature’s name really was.

Now, ‘‘ Horns” is not a very elegant name ;
but as places and animals are often named
because of some peculiarity they possess,
the tufts of hair which stuck up through the
dwart’s yellow cap suggested that name to
Harry.

And ‘‘ Horns” it was so long as Harry

‘remained in this land of wonders.

The little fellow bowed as Harry left his
chair and pointing across the room to the
door, laid his cheek upon one hand and closed
his eyes.

‘¢] see,” said Harry, ‘it’s time to go to
bed, eh? Well, I’m ready if you ’ll lead the
way.”

With this, the dwarf trotted on before and
led Harry out of the room and into the cor-
ridor, the great pillars of which threw many
flickering shadows across the floor. Horns
mounted the stairs with. Harry at. his heels,

82



and entered a chamber more beautiful than
the one they had left below. en

It was an oriental chamber, and in XY, i
one corner was a bed with a silken










coverlet and.cur-
tains of the same —
material... There
were soft rugs on

the floor, Zs
===






stools and
tables. all
carved and
inlaid with
mother-of-
pearl, and in
=e the centre
hung a golden lamp shedding
a soft light over everything.
Harry. had been amazed
83



when he saw the splendor of the dining room ;
but now he was more than amazed; he was
almost frightened. Was he a prince without
knowing it? What had he ever done to
deserve all this? Or was it a punishment
for some boyish offence? Tle had often
wished to be rich; he had often envied the
squire ; and now here was luxury such as the
squire had never known; but -there was
nobody to enjoy it, nobody but himself.
Could it be that he was to have all his
envious wishes gratified and to lose the com-
panionship of his dear playmates for ever?

And there were tears in Harry’s eyes when

‘he turned to the dwarf, who stood motionless
by the door and said: —‘* Horns, why am I
here? There must be some mistake. This
is no place for me. Look at my clothes. I’m
like an ugly toad in a beautiful flower bed.”
The bead-like eyes glittered, but Horns simply
bowed and pointed to the bed.

‘Yes, go to bed! is what you want to
say,” said Harry, with a sigh. ‘* Well, Pll
go, no matter what 1 am or what happens.
Good night Horns !”

And the dwarf bowed himself out, and
Harry went to bed and soon fell asleep.

84



A YOUNG MAN OF MUSCLE.







O sound disturbed
the sleeper under the
silken coverlet. He
slept a -dreamless
sleep all night until
the light from the
great globe in the
sculptured sky outside renewed itself, and
the deep boom of a great bell echoed through
the halls and corridors of the palace. Then
Harry awoke, and rubbing his eyes. remem-
bered where he was and all that had per
the night before.

As he sprang out of bed he found his faith-
ful Horns standing by a curtain and beckoning
him to enter an ante-chamber. It was a

87





_ dressing room
with a marble
bath, a great
mirror, and
everything that
was necessary
AN to the toilet.

Harry bathed

i in the perfumed

2] i \ water and when

\\\ \\\ \ hecameto dress

ANY SHAAN i he found a suit
\er new clothes

\in the place of




his old one, an easy
fitting suit suchasone !
would wear who had |
active business to
perform:
It became him very well; and
as he stood surveying himself
in the mirror, he thought :—
‘* What a big fellow I am, and
what a muscle I’ve got.
88






“Tf I only get a chance I’ll go to work and
learn something; for the statue said if my
desires were good they would be gratified.
And Id like to know if there is anything
better than desiring to learn something? And
Harry whistled a merry tune as he left the
dressing room and went out to look for
Horns. But Horns had gone; so still whistl-
ing, Harry went down stairs and into one of ©
the rooms where he had seen the drawings
and models the night before.

Here he found a row of books numbered
in their order, and taking number 1 from the
shelf, what was his delight to find that it
contained minute and simple instructions for
a beginner in architecture.

On the other side of the room were a
number of other books which contained in-
structions for the practical builder. These
were the very books that Harry would have
wished for, and he was so delighted to find
them that he sat down at once and began to
read.

He was very much engrossed in an explan-
ation of the effect of curved lines, when
Horns made his appearance and beckoned

89



him to the dining room where breakfast was ~
served. And such a breakfast! eggs and
chops and coffee and toast. It was a simple
meal and Harry enjoyed it, as he also enjoyed
the view from the windows and the singing
of the birds.

When he had finished, he arose and said:
—‘* Horns, I’m .going to work, and hope to
‘be able to do all I try to do as well as you
can do it.” And Horns bowed and looked
pleased; and Harry, whistling again, went
down the corridor and opening the great
door, stepped out upon the terrace.

90



ALL IN A BOAT.

It was a sweet air that greeted him, an air
which refreshed and stimulated, and made
him feel that there was not anything that he
could not do that could be done. He went
down the marble steps two at a time and ran
into the garden where there were roses in the
loveliest profusion, and such roses as never
before were seen. They were so large and
of such glorious color.

Out of the garden Harry went into a park
under the spreading trees of which were
herds of mottled deer, so tame that they came
and sniffed the hand he held out to them.

Then there were peacocks there with their
dazzling tails, and the trees were full of birds
of the most brilliant plumage.

In a small lake black and white swans

91



sailed majestically about, and they, too, were
tame and readily ate the berries Harry plucked
for them. There was a boat at one end of
this lake, but there were no oars in it; and
Harry was thinking what a pity it was, when
a little fellow that might have been brother
to Horns, made his appearance and by signs
invited Harry to take a seat in the boat.

This little fellow was clothed entirely in
scarlet, and he had no horns nor anything
that looked like them. He had a merry face
and large blue eyes that fairly danced in his
head, they were so full of fun.

Harry, wondering what would hapnere
stepped into the boat and took his seat in the
stern. It was a beautiful boat with an awn-
ing overhead and what Harry had not noticed
before, a little copper box in the bottom.

As soon as Harry was seated among the
cushions, the little red man jumped aboard
and touching a spring in the copper box,
away they went through the water at a
great speed. There was no noise and so
far as Harry could make out, there was no
machinery of any kind propelling the boat.
That something moved it was evident; but

92



what it was only the little man in red could
tell.

But he was quite as mute as Horns was,
and never answered a single one of Harry’s
questions.

93







THE BLACK JOURNEY.

When they reached the other side of the
lake, the boat entered a sort of canal over
which the trees bent like an arch, and darting
around its many curves and winding turns
its course was suddenly and to all appearances
stopped by a great frowning cliff that rose
sheer out of the water.

When his eves had become accustomed to
the gloom of the shadow at the base of this
great barrier, Harry discovered an opening
that looked like the entrance to a cave; and
while he was wondering if the little craft
would. go any further, his eye fell on this
inscription :

Let not my dark forbidding mouth,
Possess your mortal heart in fear;

Tho’ black without I’m gay within:
With safety you may enter here.

When Harry had read he looked at the

95



elf, for that was what the little man really
was, and the elf nodded his head as if he
were waiting for instructions. So Harry,
“with some misgiving said: ‘' Go ahead.”

In an instant the boat was out of the light
and in the midst of the blackest darkness
Harry had ever seen. It was so dark that
try as he would he could not see his hand
before his face.

And the boat was going at a furious rate.
Harry, poor boy, clung to its sides, for in
spite of what the inscription said, he fully
expected that every moment they would run
into something and be smashed to pieces.
But: there was no danger of anything of the
kind; for if Harry couldn’t see, the elf
could; as Harry might have known had he
but thought that elves are never supposed to
visit the-earth except-at.night.

So they went through the darkness until
all at once a green light came out of the
water, and floating on the surface, illuminated
the cave. With this light to guide him, Harry
steered the boat toward a gate which was
raised above the water. As the boat passed
through there was a crash as of thunder, and

96



the solid wall slowly parted and opened a
channel which led into the golden light which
was all the sunshine that there was in E}fin
Land.







Full Text

No el

The Baldwin Library

University
Git oe
Florida



Aunty’s Elfin Land

OR THE

ASTONISHING DOINGS OF MILDRED, TOM AND HARRY,



Chronicled by MARIA HILDRETH
PARKER with tllustrations drawn
on the spot by HERMANN D.
MURPHY.



BOSTON:
SH. G, Cupples Co, Publishers.
Copyrighted 1890.

By MARIA HiILpRETH PARKER.
‘The dear children



how can we better please them ?

M.. P.



ERHAPS you may have
heard of Elfin Falls. But
why should you? It was
only the people who lived
in the quiet little hill village
€ that knew there were any
such Falls in existence.

Elfin Falls! A very romantic name, surely.
And: no wonder that their reputation was
simply local; for there was no magnificent
cascade or romantic waterfall supplied by
broad river or placid lake; only a purling,
brawling brook, ever hurrying onward and
downward to the mighty river in the valley
below.
The Falls were hardly worthy the name.
There were a few gray rocks around which
the water splashed with a great to-do, and
there were other rocks less prominent over
which the water tumbled in the most rapid
and disorderly fashion.

It was brown and sparkling water from the
meadow beyond, and was said to be in great
favor with certain elves and sprites which
had their dwellings up among the great rocks
on the mountain side.

There were graceful silver birches bending
over the brook and weaving golden shadows
which danced in time with the flashing spray.

There were alders, too, and witch hazels
which put forth their weird and yellow blos-
soms when the birches were bare and the
brook lay sealed in ice.

An old and gnarled cedar stump, gray with
years and covered with hoary lichens, was
all that remained of the forest which had
fallen before the axe of the pioneer.

There was cool, green moss everywhere
beneath the trees; and feathery ferns, purple
violets, orange jewel flowers and modest

6
gentians lent their decoration to the murmur-
ing retreat.

But the glory of the Falls was the clethra,
the sweet pepperbush with its snowy blos-
soms and its dainty perfume.

It grew in such profusion that strangers
passing along the neighboring road on a dewy
evening wondered what it was that made the
air so fragrant.

But the villagers would have said : —‘‘ the
fairies are out to-night ;” for they called the
sweet odor ‘‘ the fairies perfume.”

It was a very small copse which surrounded
the Falls; but it was such a place as well
disposed goblins and respectable fairies would
select for their revels.

I cannot say how much there is of truth in
the statement, but I have been told by several
persons of excellent reputation for veracity,
that the little people from the unseen world
came to the Falls at each new moon and there
elected their elfin prime minister and the gob-
lin guard of the fairy queen.

Ihave never met or spoken to anyone who
had seen this strange gathering; but many
have said that they heard of it, and so I will

4
not dispute what is so thoroughly established
in fact.

What I have set out to do, is to teil you
something of the strange adventures which
befel three children— Mildred, Tom and
Harry by name — who made the acquaintance
of the elves and fairies that gathered at Elfin
Falls.

Mildred the youngest of the three, was just
twelve years of age at the time this history
begins. Tom was thirteen, and Harry was
a few months older.

Mildred was a sunny-haired and blue-eyed
orphan who lived with her aunt, a practical
woman of no sentiment at all, and who, with-_
out being positively harsh, managed to find
enough of work for her little neice to do.

But Mildred had a contented and cheerful
disposition, and it never entered her mind to
either grumble or rebel. Nor did she ever
dream that her lot wasany harder than that of
the other children in the village on the hillside.

She had but little time for play, so that she
always enjoyed the few hours which gave her
opportunity to forget her tasks in the com-
pany of her merry schoolmates.

8
Tom was a light-hearted sturdy little fel-
low, whose one ambition in life was to own
a horse such as carried Mr. Chauncey every
day to and from the railroad station.

Harry was a more thoughtful boy. He
was fond of drawing; and it was his hope
that some day he might build a house as fine
as that in which Mr. Chauncey lived among
the trees at the top of the hill.

They were both very gallant little fellows
and were very proud when Mildred was at
liberty to join them in their play.

THE MYSTERY OF ELFIN FALLS.

One of their favorite resorts was Elfin
Falls, and many happy hours had they spent
together in the cool shades of the birches.
Often had they wished that they might see
some of the elves and goblins which gathered
there; although they were not without a cer-
tain sense of fear that their wishes would be
gratified.

On one particular summer afternoon, when
the air was luminous with the golden sun-
shine and fragrant with the perfume of the
fields, they went to the Falls, and removing
their shoes and stockings, sailed their boats
of bark in the tumbling waters.

How long they played I cannot say; but
at last they grew weary of the sport and,
each selecting a gray rock, lay down to rest
and talk about the fairies.

I
And they were still talking when the sha-
dows deepened and the soft twilight touched
the grove with a mystic tenderness.

A thrush burst into song among the trees ;
and then the children ceased their talk and
listened to the melody.

And the longer they listened the less dis-
posed were they to talk; for as the bird sang,
a vapor arose from the water and clothed the
trees and the rocks and the ferns with a purple
veil.

The perfume of the clethra was every-
where; the crickets chirruped a merry chorus
in the distant pasture, and the soft wind gently
rustled among the leaves as if hushing the
flowers to sleep.

And still the children did not stir.

The moon came over the hill and sent a
few stray beams into the copse to make the
purple misty veil a silvery one.

It was then that Tom thought he saw the
drollest little figure perched upon the stump
of the old cedar tree; but he was much too
lazy to say anything about it to his com-
panions.

At the same time Mildred saw, or thought

12
she saw, the loveliest and the tiniest little
woman seated on a fern and surrounded by a
troop of most graceful and fantastic dancers ;
while Harry was dreamily conscious that a
goblin in the most grotesque attire, was sit-
ting on his foot, which hung over the rock
and almost touched the water.

But the children were under a spell; for
though great was their surprise, they found
themselves more clisposed to lie and watch
than they were to talk of what they saw.

And so they lay, a dreamy look in their
eyes, until at last sleep closed them alto-
gether.

Then the vapor thickened into a fog, and
the rocks upon which the sleepers were
stretched sank slowly out of sight.

And now, if you please, we will follow
these schoolmates, three, and discover, if we
can, what befel them in the land of the water
sprites ; for it is said that those little creatures
were directly responsible for all that T am
going to relate.

And first we will learn of Tom’s adven-
tures.

TOM’S INTRODUCTION TO THE
GENIE.



OM awoke, to
find himself in a
strange place, indeed. It
was a vast hall with walls
of gray stone in huge
blocks and a high arch-
ing roof supported by
great pillars of glittering
ore.

The light was dim and
Tom’s first thought was
that he had fallen into
one of the natural caves
he had read about in
school.

But as his eyes became

accustomed to the half gloom, he saw a

gigantic figure seated in a massive chair of

19














It was that
of a man of
venerable ap-
pearance, at-
tired in a long
robe, and on
his head was a
most peculiar

cover-

ing which =
heightened the natural
dignity of his features.
His beard was white,
and as he sat up there
with his hands upon his
knees, Tom thought he looked for all the

20
world like the pictures of the statues of the
kings who had ruled in Egypt many cen-
turies ago.

Tom was rather startled when the figure
moved; for he had thought it to be a monu-
ment of some kind. But he was a courageous
little fellow, and putting his hands into his
trouser’s pockets he boldly said: ‘* Good day,
sir!

‘¢ Good day,” the figure replied in a voice
which rang through the hall like the tone of
a mellow bell; ‘¢ you are welcome here.

‘* Behold in me the Genie of this place.
Say what you most desire in life and that
desire will I gratify.”

Tom thought for a moment, and then he
said: ‘*V’d like to have a horse and to be
able to ride like Mr. Chauncey.”

‘6 Think well,” said the Genie, ‘‘ for if this
is your desire a horseman shall you be when
you return to the mortal world.”

“Tl risk it,” cried Tom, his curiosity all
aroused. :

‘+ It will be as you have chosen,” the Genie
said, and taking a silver key from his girdle
he gave it to Tom and directed him to open

21
and pass threugh a great door, studded with
bolts of brass, at the further end of the hall.

**Go, and at the end of thirty days return
to me here in this hall,” the Genie said; and
when Tom looked up to thank his venerable
patron, behold the figure and the chair had
both disappeared.

Full of wonderment, Tom went down the
vast hall, and although the door was larger
than any he had ever seen, he had no diffi-
ty to open it.

22
WHAT TOM FOUND IN ELFIN
LAND.

HAT a scene was
that which met
Tom’s gaze when he
stepped upon the
threshold of the great
doorway. Before
him lay a_ broad





plain. The green sward extended far as the
eye could reach, as level as a lawn, but
broken in many places by clumps of trees
and shrubs, and spreading beds of the most
gorgeous flowers.

There were also miniature lakes scattered
here and there; and rockeries where foun-
tains and tiny cascades merrily splashed in
the rosy light.

For the light was not like the light of the
sun. Nor was there any sky at all. In its
place was a great pink dome from which the
light streamed in radiating rosy rays.

25
Tom was filled with admiring astonish-
ment. He had never dreamed of anything
like it; it was so beautiful and yet so un-
earthly.

As he walked down the broad steps toward
one of the lakes, quite near the gray castle
of the Genie, he gave a passing thought to
his companions, and he wondered where
they were and what they were doing, but
had no desire whatsoever to look for them.

There was a sparkling cascade tumbling in
a creamy turmoil over a vine-covered bowlder
into this particular lake; and seeing a golden
cup at hand Tom filled it and quenched his
thirst.

As he drained the cup he read on the in-
side: ‘+The Fountain of Knowledge is
Sweet,” and he was quite ready to -endorse
the inscription; for never had he drank a
beverage so delicious.

But great as was his delight, it was nothing
compared with the joy he felt when, lifting
his eyes from the lake, he saw standing close
by, a troop of the most beautiful ponies he
had ever seen.

There were six handsome heads erected

26
and twelve bright eyes flashed the query:
‘© Who are you?” And every pony was as
black as ebony.

Tom approached them very carefully ; but
the ponies were not at all afraid of him, and
they stood and sniffed at his clothes while
they permitted him to smooth and pat their
glossy sides.

Each one was bridled with a silver rein;
and their saddles were trimmed with the same
precious metal.

Tom lost no time in selecting one which
seemed to be the most docile of the troop,
and when he had mounted its back somewhat
awkwardly, it sped away at a rattling gallop
across the grassy plain.

It was a rare ride; and Tom, who had
never ridden anything but the old mare in
the pasture, was fairly wild with excited
delight.

But he was strange to the saddle, and by
and by he turned the pony toward the great
gray castle and retraced his way at a more
moderate pace.

As he passed The Fountain of Knowledge
he stopped to let the pony drink. But the

27
pony had no relish for water of that kind ; it
was accustomed to drink at quite another
fountain, and so it shook its head and started
off to join its fellows.

Now, Tom, with all his good qualities, was
a little stubborn, and he was determined that
the pony should drink.

But the pony was no less stubborn; and
it wheeled about and pranced in such re-
monstrance that its rider found it a difficult
thing to retain his seat.

Finally Tom lost his temper and struck the
pony a sharp blow with his hand.

That was more than the pony could en-
dure; so down went its head, up went its
heels and Tom went flying through the air to
fall plump into the middle of the lake from
which he emerged a very wet and sorry boy.

As for the pony it wheeled about and
trotted back to its companions, who tossed
their heads as if they all understood and en-
joyed the joke.

Very much discomfited Tom returned to
the castle of the Genie. But the door was
locked and knock as loud as he would he
could not arouse a respénse.

28
And then it came to him that he was alone

in this strange place.



Across the plain, embowered in a magnolia

grove was a pavilion of pink transparent
quartz. Toward this Tom made his way,
wondering the while if he should find anyone

29
at home; for he was quite hungry and very
wet and weary.

The crystal door of the beautiful pavilion
stood wide in open welcome, and there in the
middle of aroom, most luxuriantly furnished,
Tom saw a table spread with most tempting
fare.

A silk embroidered robe hung over a screen
of peacock’s feathers. This Tom exchanged
for his sodden clothes, and, when he had
eaten, he flung himself upon a soft and
inviting couch and fell fast asleep.

30
TOM’S NEW QUARTERS.

When Tom awoke next morning there was
a touch of gold in the rosy light which filtered
through the tapestry with which the walls of
the crystal chamber were hung; and when
he had bathed in a pool of sweet-scented
water that stood in the centre of the room,
he donned his clothes, now quite dry, and
set out to see what manner of house it was
that sheltered him.

He had never even read of anything so
magnificent. There were two chambers. The
ceiling of one was arched and decorated with
mosaics in colored quartz. The walls were
iridescent and hung with rich stuffs in all
varieties of soft colors. The floors were of
exquisite marble, covered with thick and
heavy rugs, and the furniture was massive,
of quaint design and wonderfully carved.

31
There were no pictures anywhere; but in
their place were tall vases of jasper and
other precious stones, filled with the
most beautiful flowers.

If Tom loved horses he also loved









flowers; and he went from vase
to vase and inhaled their per-
fume with a keen delight.

Ona peculiar green table with
curving legs, Tom found
a book bound in silver
with his name written
in blue enamel across the
cover,

6
52
He hurridly opened it and found upon the
title page, the single inscription: ‘* To the
Lover of Horses.”

‘© Ah,” he said, ‘*now [ will learn how to
manage the ponies.”

And indeed it was to him a most interest-
ing book; and so absorbed did he become in
its contents, that he quite forgot where he
was and how he ever got there.

When he had looked at all the pictures and
read several chapters, it occurred to Tom
that he had better take his lessons in sections ;
and so putting his book under his arm he
drew aside the curtains, which hung before
an archway, and entered the next apartment.

It was somewhat smaller than the one he
had just left; but it was, if anything, more
beautiful; and what delighted him most was
to find in the centre a great jar filled with
the fragrant pepperbush he had_ so_ often
gathered at Elfin Falls.

In an alcove, behind a crimson curtain, Tom
found ever so many suits of clothes. Some
were of velvet, some of silk and others of
soft and pliant leather.

He selected one of the latter and putting

33
it on surveyed himself with no little pride in
one of the tall mirrors with which the cham-
ber was lined.

It was certainly a tidy and becoming suit ;
and the leggings, and the jaunty cap and all
that made Tom look quite smart and natty.

And when he had turned about and looked
on all sides; when he had walked from one
end of the crystal pavilion to the other;
when he had sat inall the chairs, and thrown
himself upon all the couches, Tom pinched
his arms and pulled his ears to make quite
sure that he was really ‘Tom the blacksmith’s
son, and that he was not dreaming.

He had never known any luxury. A scanty
living and shelter had been his only experi-
ence. He had indulged in boyish dreams
and cherished hopes of future fortune; these
had been his only riches, the treasures of
youth which not even adversity can steal
away.

But, now, here was realization beyond his
most Javish expectations, and he wondered
that he could be so calm and so much at
home.

There was no excitement in his pleasure;

34
indeed it was so rational that Tom very soon
remembered he was hungry, and went to see
what he could find of the meal he had eaten
before he fell asleep.

But the remains had been removed and in
their place was a repast even more generous
than the other, to which the hungry boy ap-
plied himself with a vigorous relish.

35

TRAINING THE PONIES.

When Tom had finished his breakfast he
went out to look for the ponies. He found
them peacefully standing in a_ paddock;
their saddles and bridles hanging on the
wall of a long, low building which, on ex-
amination, Tom found to be a stable fitted
with marble stalls.

Tom’s first duty was to groom the ponies,
so the book had toid him. This he did in a
clumsy way; and the ponies were rather in-
clined to resent the rough application of the
curry comb and brush.

But they were finally groomed and fed,
and, then, selecting that which stood next to
the one which had pitched him into the lake,
Tom saddled it and mounting its back, set
- off for a ride.

They cantered far across the plain until

37
they came to a lake of black and turbulent
water, from the depths of which proceeded
a murmuring noise very much like the rush
of the waters at Elfin Falls.

Tom was impelled to advance and to dis-
cover, if he could, the cause of the noise;
but the pony, with a snort, wheeled about
and started off in the other direction.

Nor could Tom, by pulling on the bridle,
induce the animal to approach within a hun-
dred yards of the lake.

The pony’s obstinacy provoked the boy,
and he was about to strike it when he re-
membered the sousing he got on the previous
day. So he wisely let the pony have its own
way; and it lost no time in speeding back to
its companions.

That afternoon Tom thought he would try
his hand at teaching the ponies to perform
certain movements. He was quite confident
of his ability to do so; and he felt that his
pupils would be intelligent ones.

He began with the pony that had thrown
him into the lake. He had read in the book
with the silver cover, that patience and kind-
ness would overcome all things, and even

o8
subdue the spirits of the horses ; so he decided

to be both kind and patient.
Taking the

pony, which he

had named Mil-



ly, in honor of his sepa-
rated playmate, he led it
~ slowly around in a circle,
led it until he himself grew dizzy.

Every time he stopped he called out ‘+ stop !”
in a low, clear voice; and before he started
he always cried ‘* go!”

By and by, the pony began to comprehend
that there was an action suited to the word,

39




and soon Tom had the pleasure of seeing his
patience rewarded ; for the pony stopped and
started when told to do so.

It was slow work; but it interested Tom
and the pony seemed to like it; for it pricked
up its ears, and its eyes plainly showed that
it was making an effort to distinguish between
the words and the actions they represented.

Before he had finished Tom had the pony
so far under his control that it galloped around
a circle of which Tom was the centre, and
stopped at the word of command.

Tom had once admired the man who, in a
gorgeous coat and shining top boots, had
managed the performing horses in the circus,
and he was quite proud to find himself ina
position of similar, if more limited power.

The golden tint had all gone out of the
rosy light when Tom, somewhat reluctantly
gave up his fascinating occupation and walked
toward the pavilion where he was very sure
to find supper awaiting him.

And it was such a supper as he had never
seen; and the occupations of the day having
sharpened his appetite he ate with a hearty
and boyish relish.

40
But after supper it was rather lonely there
in the midst of all the grandeur and luxury,
and Tom found himself wishing that he could
see Mildred and Harry, and even longing for
the sweet scented dampness of Elfin Falls.

And as he sat buried among the silken
cushions in a porphery chair, he became
conscious that there was a bright green light
playing in a panel above the entrance to the
chamber of the mirrors.

And as he looked with keen curiosity at

the illumination, the light formed these words :
“The weary find relief in pleasure!
Say, what shall your pleasure be?”’

Now, Tom had once heard an orchestra
play on the lawn when Mr. Chauncey’s
daughter was matvried, and he had never
heard anything so delightful. So, when he
had made out the nature of the luminous
invitation, he cried out: ‘¢I’d like to hear
that band again.”

Then the green light faded and disappeared,
and instantly the pavilion was flooded with
the most heavenly music.

Tom was entranced, and lay quite still

41
among the cushions and listened with all his
soul.

The harmony, loud at first, gradually he-
came softer and softer until it sounded like
the music of another sphere. And, Tom,
lulled by the soothing sounds, fell fast asleep.
And

such







was
‘Tom’s
experi-



ence for several days, training the ponies
to come and go, and listening to the music
which came from nowhere and yet was every-
where.

At the end of the first week all the ponies

42
were subject to the word of command, and
then Tom began to give them instruction in
more difficult performances.

By patient effort he succeeded in making
Milly stand on its hind legs; while all six
would canter around the ring, stop and turn
and do ever so many clever things when told
to do so,

43,

TOM HAS AN EXPERIENCE.

One day a strange thing happened. Tom
had been teaching his ponies to stand on their
hind legs, and selecting one he had named
Harry, a bright eyed little creature, Tom
mounted its back and set off to explore this
strange land of the beautiful flowers and the
rosy light.

He had ridden for a long time through
groves of trees ladened with the most tempt-
ing fruits, and great beds of flowers, when
he suddenly remembered that he had_ not
heard a bird sing since he came to this land
of mystery. Not a bird; nor had he seen
anything at all resembling one. And yet he
had partridges and quail for dinner very
frequently.

And when he realized that there were no
birds there, when he counted up and found

45
that he and the six ponies were the only
living visible things in this beautiful place,
he for the first time experienced a pang of
loneliness.

While he had been thinking of this, the
pony kept on its way unguided, along a
smooth white path which wound in and out
among the great trees of a mighty forest, and
when it suddenly stopped Tom was recalled
to himself, and very much surprised was he.

Before him rose a gigantic gateway set ina
massive arch guarded by two mighty figures
in bronze.

The gate was also of bronze, and between
it and the place where the pony stood with
Tom on its back, was a broad stream over
which. hung a drawbridge.

The drawbridge was up, however, so that
Tom was unable to cross; but as there was a
gray stone house beside the gateway he hol-
loed in the hope that he might attract the
attention of some one inside.

But the echo of his own voice was the only
response ; and with his curiosity more keenly
aroused by disappointment, Tom turned and
rode away.

46
At last he came to the murmuring lake;
and as he sat on the pony’s back looking at
the swirling water, he wondered if it were
possible to teach the ponies to swim. He
had read in the book that all horses could
swim; but.that it was necessary to train them
to swim with a rider on their backs.

So, being in the mood for a new experi-
ment, he urged the pony forward toward the
border of the lake. But nothing he could do
would make the pony enter the water. The
more Tom urged the more the pony resisted ;
and at last the impatient rider lost his temper
and struck the animal a sharp blow on the
neck with the silver rein.

And it was lucky for Tom that this: pony
did not do as that other one had done and
throw him into the water. But, instead of
doing anything of the kind, it wheeled about
and started at a mad galop for the stables.

And a very ndignified figure did Tom
present as he lay, for all the world like a
frog, sprawling on the pony’s back, his arms
around its neck and his eyes big and distended
with fear.

But there was no one to see or laugh at his

47
ridiculous plight, and when he finally stood
on the stable floor he was very much ashamed
that he should have forgotten all that he had
read in the book about kindness.

When he had quenched his thirst at the
Fountain of Knowledge, he had no trouble
at all to devise a way to accomplish his
end.

And it was always so. Whenever he was
verplexed or at a loss what to do, he would
drink from the golden cup, and then every-
thing he sought to know came into his mind
just as if he had thought it all out himself.

After he had drank he went into the pavil-
ion and filled one of his pockets with sugar.
‘¢ We'll see,” said he to himself, ‘¢if sugar
won't make you swim my beauty.”

So he mounted Harry’s back again and
rode away to the edge. of the murmuring
lake. There the pony stopped, as before,
and planting its fore feet in the sand refused
to move another step.

But Tom did not lose his temper this
time. Dismounting, he gently patted the
timid animal, and after a while he gave it a
lump of sugar. This the pony seemed to

48
relish very much; and it poked its nose into
Tom’s pocket and followed him all round the
lake very much as a favorite dog would have
done.

After a while Tom succeeded in making
the pony wet its feet, and then he mounted
its back and waited to see what it would do
next. It sniffed the water, but it did not
drink ; and by and by, of its own accord, it
waded further out until the water touched
the soles of Tom’s feet as they hung in the
stirrups.

That was doing very well; and Tom was
congratulating himself upon the results of
his experiment when — souse! the pony
and its rider went down over their heads into
the water, very much as if the bottom had
dropped out of the lake, so sudden was the
plunge.

When they came to the surface Tom was
still on the pony’s back, and the animal was
swimming as if it had never done anything
else. Tom was delighted, as the pony,
seeming to enjoy the situation, swam round
and round the lake.

But as it swam, the water in the centre

49
swirled and foamed like a great whirlpool.
The murmuring sound grew into a roar which
completely














| drowned Tom’s
voice as he tried
to speak en-
couragement to
Herry.

Tom was
_really alarmed.
>, He expected
- that both he and
~ the pony
é would sure-
ly be drawn

down into the —
hole about
which the se
water swirled —the ~-
vortex — but pull as :
he would on the reins he could ~
not guide the pony away from
the yawning danger.

Round and round they went, the uproar
ever increasing and just when it seemed that

50



nothing could save them, the noise ceased,
the water was still and the pony and its rider
reached the shore.

The latter was glad to have come so safely
out of such an exciting experience; and I
have no doubt but that if the pony could
have expressed its feelings it would have
said it was equally pleased.

And as Tom listened to the murmuring
sound which had succeeded the roar he
fancied he heard a voice saying:

“ Here in the swirling water,
Here in the Joud uproar,
Timid hearts are strengthened

With courage to the core.”

And Tom thought of that as he rode toward
the pavilion and supper, and determined that
some day he would take all six ponies for a
swim in the Lake of Courage.

STRANGE DEPARTURE OF THE
PONIES.

The thirty days were almost completed
when Tom decided one morning that he
would take all six ponies to the Lake of
Courage for a swim in its turbulent waters.
He had taken them one by one into the lake
and had learned that it was much better to
let a horse have its own way while swim-
ming than it was to attempt to guide it.

Indeed, Tom had learned a great deal since
he came into the strange land. He had read
the book very thoroughly, and had found it
to contain a vast amount of information re-
garding the horse and other things. In fact,
the little fellow became quite a philosopher,
and vowed that when he returned to the
upper world he would tell the people there
that kindness was ever so much better than

53
force; and.that patience would accomplish
more than haste could possibly do.

He had also learned that perseverance al-
ways brought a satisfactory reward.

On this particular morning he rode Harry ;
and all the rest followed in procession. When
they came to the lake it was with the utmost
difficulty that Tom could restrain the animals,
so eager were they to plunge into the water.

But he succeeded at last in forming them
into line; and then, standing with a foot on
the back of Milly and another foot on the
back of Harry, he gave the word and off
they went swimming around the lake like so
many seals. For they were wonderfully ex-
pert; and although the water swirled and
boiled and the murmuring grew into a
roar, they were not the least alarmed; nor
did they once break the compact line they
formed.

It was great sport; and Tom laughed and
shouted in his glee and never once thought
of the vortex. And why should he have
thought of it? For would it not always at the
very moment when it seemed as if the ponies
and their rider would have been engulphed,

54
suddenly close and permit them to reach the
shore in safety?

But the vortex did not close that day. On
the contrary, it expanded and was much
larger than it ever was before, and if Tom
had not made so much noise himself, he would
have noticed that the roar was intensified and
almost deafening.

And so the ponies swam round and round ;
and when they had reached the centre a huge
column of glittering water shot out of the
vortex and lifted the animals and their rider
into the air.

Tom lost his footing upon the ponies’ backs
and fell into the water. When he came to
the surface again the colunin had disappeared
and overhead was a vapory mass in which
the swimming boy discovered the dainty forms
of laughing and vanishing fairies.

A few strokes brought him to the shore,
and then Tom realized that his ponies had
not been ponies at all; but only fairies that
had masqueraded as ponies to afford him
pleasure and teach him to have respect for
intelligence, whether in man or in beast.
And Tom, though grieved to lose his beauti-

55
ful black companions, was glad that he had
treated them so kindly.

It was very lonely that night in the pavil-
ion, even though the music was more lively
than usual; and Iam afraid that Tom cried
himself to sleep among the silken cushions of
the great porphery chair.
TOM RETURNS TO EARTH.

OON after Tom awoke next
morning he was startled by the
sounding boom of a great gong
in the gray castle of the Genie.
Quickly, he ran to the calendar
in the Chamber of Mirrors, and
there he learned what he had
quite forgotten, that it was the
thirtieth day and the day upon
which he was to appear before
the great figure in the stone
chair. :
He did not stop to think of
what he would say to the Genie, so anxious



was he to learn what was next to befall him.
But his heart thumped quite loudly as he
mounted the broad stairs and put his shoulder
to the great door.

59
There was the hall, gray as before; and at
the further end, in his massive chair, the
robed and bearded Genie himself.

He greeted Tom with a kindly smile and
beckoned him to approach. Tom’s courage
was strengthened by the Genie’s reassuring
manner, and doffing his cap he said quite
cheerily : ‘* Good morning, sir! Here I am.”

‘‘ Good morning!” said the Genie. ‘‘ And
now, will you tell me all you have done since
you came into Elfin Land! Have you been
happy; have you been contented; have you
wished for anything that was not yours?
Answer me these things and answer me truly
and then you shall have greater pleasure
than has yet been yours.”

‘*T have been very happy,” said Tom,
‘¢more happy, I guess, than I ever was be-
fore. V’ve had a most delightful time, ?m
sure; and I’m very much obliged to you.
I’m sorry, though, I lost the dear ponies ; but
now that I know they were only make-believe
ponies and really fairies, I don’t think I could
ride and teach them as I used to do. I’ve
been very contented ; for that was a splendid
book; and the music every night was just

60
lovely. I’ve had about everything I wished
for, but”? —and here Tom’s voice quavered
and the tears stood in his eyes.

*¢ But what?” asked the Genie in a gentle
voice.

“¢ But Pd like to see my mother again, and
Harry and Mildred. If they were here I
wouldn’t mind staying; but if you’ve no
objections, Mr. Genie, perhaps you will let
me go home.”

“And if I let you go, what will you do?”
asked the Genie.

‘©Oh, Pil train horses and make a lot of
money; and build mother a nice house, and
buy her a carriage and a pony that she can
drive herself.”

‘* And will you teach your fellow mortals
to be kind to the horses that serve them so
faithfully? You have scen that the ponies
you rode and trained had gentle spirits within
them; and so have the horses in your world
—gentle spirits that are obedient, gentle
spirits, that are sensible to kindness and sensi-
tive to pain.”

And Tom said he would tell everybody to
be kind; and as he thought of the way Farmer

61
Grigson used to beat his horses with a thick
stick, he grew valiantly zealous and said he’d
*¢ punch his head” if he ever saw him doing
it again.

The Genie looked very much as if he might
have laughed outright at Tom’s valor: but
then that would never have done; for genies,
you know, are always very grave and reserved
personages. So he smothered the laugh with
a little cough behind his hand, and nodded
his approval.

Then, taking a very small golden key from
the ring on his belt, he gave it to Tom, say-
ing: ‘*‘Lhis is the key to your reward. You
have been a very patient and a very diligent
pupil, and you deserve all that it will open to
you. Remember the Jesson you have learned ;
and farewell!”

As he uttered the last word there was a
crash as of thunder, and a bright light flashed
through the hall and dazzled Tom’s eyes so
that he covered them with his hands.

When at last he ventured to peep between
his fingers, Tom was amazed. And no
wonder ; for the Genie and his castle had dis-
appeared; and there in front of the bewil-

62
dered boy, was the great gate between the
sculptured figures,
and the drawbridge
he had seen that
day he rode Milly
4 out through the
>» forest.

' But now the














down; and with
hurrying feet and
a beating heart b
Tom ran across
and up the steps
to the gate with
the golden bolts.
It was a very
small keyhole
Tom found; but A
it was fitted by

63
the golden key; and then Tom pushed with
all his might and slowly and noiselessly the
gate swung open its hinges and disclosed a
wonderous sight.

A plain studded with trees that bore most
tempting fruits in red and golden hues.
Arbors covered with vines on which the
purple grapes hung in large and luscious
bunches. Fountains there were that spouted
sparkling waters, and birds of brilliant plum-
age that filled the perfumed air with their
melody.

Under the trees were troops of the most
beautiful creatures weaving garlands of flow-
ers or dancing to the music of the pipe. It
was surely a fairy scene, the most beautiful
that fancy could picture; and Tom looked on
_ with open mouth and wondered again if he
were asleep. :

But no; he was very wide awake; for be-
fore he had recovered from his astonishment
he found himself wound round about with gar-
lands of flowers. The fairies had laughingly
made him their prisoner, and with merry glee
they dragged him to a mossy bank where their
dainty Queen sat holding her gracious court.

6+
She welcomed Tom to her kingdom, which
she said was much more pleasant than the
kingdom of the Genie, and indeed, Tom did
not need to be told that, for he could see that
it was quite a different place.

But when the Queen said he could stay
there and be a fairy like those around him,
Tom laughed at the idea and said he guessed

‘he was too big and too rough to be much of
a fairy. At which they all laughed; and one
‘funny little gnome laughed so hard that he
doubled up into a ball and went bounding
across the plain as lightly as a thistle down.

Then the little Queen became serious and
said:

‘Of all in this domain [ am the Queen,
Although a simple fairy I have been;

And simple fairy I again will be
When flowers begin to bud on yonder tree : —

For you must understand
That queens-elected: are in Elfin Land.

Since then in Elfin Land yon will not stay,
To bask in pleasure ’neath my gentle sway,
The Genie, whom I serve, he doth command
That you returned be to Mortal Land: —
For you must understand
That mortals do not live in Elfin Land.

She had scarcely ceased speaking when
Tom saw approaching, a pair of snow-white

65
horses with waving manes and flying tails.
They were magnificent creatures, and they
pranced as proudly and as daintily as if they
‘knew very well that they were being admired
by this mortal.

They were harnessed with slender chains
and bands of gold to a chariot of the most
exquisite description. It was oval in shape,
and over it was a canopy which looked very
much like a rose-tinted Jack-in-the-pulpit,
and the body of the chariot was like mother-
of-pearl. The spokes of the wheels might
have been cat-tails of silver, and above the
canopy was a star which shed a white and
searching light.

There was nobody in the chariot and no-
body driving or leading the horses; but they
stopped and impatiently pawed the ground
. when they reached the Queen’s mossy throne.

Tom had no sooner seen the Queen wave
her hand and bow her head than he jumped
into the chariot, and gathering the white reins
shook them once over the horses’ backs, and
away they went like the wind.

And so they rode out of sight and Tom no
more was seen in Elfin Land.

66
HARRY’S ASTONISHING DOINGS.




ARRY never knew how
it happened ; but when he
‘awoke he found he was
AU ne Se lying in an arbor on the
iN AY \ \ terrace of a great building.
It was such a building as he had never seen.
He had often seen pictures of the capitol
at Washington with its great dome; but this
building was grander than the picture of the
capitol. At least, so Harry thought. It was
more like a castle than a capitol; for there

69
were turrets with pointed roofs and narrow
windows, and it was built of blocks of
polished stone that glistened in the sunlight.

I say sunlight—for of course there was no
sunlight there such as Harry had seen on the
earth—but instead, a mellow light which
came from a great globe high up in the
arching dome which was all the sky there
was in this subterranean land.

And there was a great statue in a niche
over the porch of the door; and the floor of
the terrace was inlaid with red and black and
yellow marbles.

Near the arbor in which Harry awoke was
a fountain, in the basin of which gold and
silver fish disported themselves; and around
the terrace was a railing of onyx, over which
clambered a vine covered with white and
yellow flowers. It was a beautiful place, and
Harry lay half awake and felt very sure that
he was at home in bed and only dreaming.

But the splash of the water in the fountain
was too distinct to be the splash in a dream ;
and when a bird began to sing such a song as
he had never heard, Harry, wondering, real-
ized that he was awake.

70
And when he arose and looked over the
vine clad railing, he gazed upon a country
fair to see.

There was a garden with shaded walks and
flowers of the most gorgeous hue ; and beyond
the wall which enclosed the garden there
were hills and lakes and brooks and then a
forest which encircled everything. Beyond
the forest there was nothing to see.

When he had recovered from his surprise
Harry thought he would discover if he could,
where he was. But there was no one in
sight, not a living creature save the fish and
the birds and himself.

That was very strange, and still wondering,
Harry crossed the terrace and went up the
steps to the great door beneath the statue.

It was a grim statue with a globe on its
knee and a pair of compasses in its hand.
It might have been the statue of Christopher
Columbus for all Harry knew, had it not
happened that as he was looking for the
bell he felt something touch his head, and
glancing up he saw the statue drawing back
the hand which held the compasses.

Then surely Harry was frightened; nor

71
was he at all reassured when the statue opened
its bronze lips and said : —

‘‘T am the guardian of the Palace of In-
dustry. You have come into Elfin Land
‘where your every wish will be gratified if
your wishes are good. You are young and
you are ambitious. To be an architect and a
builder of structures is your desire. You
shall have every opportunity to be both.”

Harry was dumb. To think that this statue
should know what he only knew, and that it
should tell him he would have opportunity to
do what he most desired to do, was enough
to make him speechless with surprise.

He tried to thank the statue; but his tongue
refused to express his thoughts, and the statue
was so silent and so fixed. that Harry really
began to question if it had ever moved or
spoken.

He waited quite a while, but there was no
movement on the part of the figure; so he
laid his hand upon the door, and lo! it opened
at his touch.
THE PALACE AND IVS KEEPER.

There was a great hall inside. and many
pillars of green stone. The walls were
paneled in yellow marble, and over the arches
were statuettes and busts most exquisitely
carved.

‘¢ Well,” said Harry to himself, ‘this is
the strangest and the grandest place I’ve ever
seen. I wonder where it is and who owns

But there was nobody there to answer his
questions, and so he set out to see what there
was to see, and who.

There were many rooms leading from the
beautiful hall, each differing in form and
furniture from the other, and when. he had
visited all but one, the door of which was
locked, Harry went up the wide and winding
stairs to the second floor.

73
Here was a hall finished in wood of a rich
color. The columns were chastely carved,
and in the ceiling were great beams which
were also carved.

In the panels made by the beams which
crossed and recrossed each other was a series
of beautiful paintings.

Here, in the rooms, there were drawings of
_every kind and models of every conceivable
description.

But there was still another flight, and Harry
was delighted to find that it led to a great
workshop where there were implements of
all kinds and machinery and an engine too.

But still was-there nobody visible, and
Harry was so anxious to find someone to tell
him what to do and when to do it.

So down he went to the lower hall again,
and walking directly to the door he had found
locked, he rapped upon it with his knuckles
as loudly as he could.

The door was instantly opened and Harry
found himself in a sort of ante-chamber.
Through an open door of that he could see
a vista of roonts beyond.

But still there was no-one visible.

TA
So he passed into another room, and
there he found a table set with sparkling
crystal and shining silver on a cloth as white
as any he had ever seen in Mr. Chauncey’s
dining room. For Harry had been at the
squire’s house more than once to carry mes-
sages; and the squire’s wife had. given him
grapes and apples from a great silver dish on
the dining room table.

There was only one plate on the table and.
— could he believe his eyes — there was some-
thing living and moving in the room besides
himself.

It was evidently a human being although
it looked for all the world like a monkey. It
was small and it had a peculiar face and most
peculiar clothes. On its head was a yellow
cap through which protruded two locks of
stiff black hair, very much like a pair of
horns. |

Its face was the color of mahogany and its
features looked as if they might have been
hewn out of that wood. But its eyes were
black and twinkling and were the eyes of in-
telligence and kindness.

Its stubby figure was clothed in a russet

75
leather jerkin and as Ka Waa, :
upon its crooked Y)y QiNQRe
little legs were
hose of scarlet hue.
A long white apron coast
descending from

its chin to its toes,

completed the attire of this strange
being.













It neither moved nor spoke, but
held the chair as if inviting Harry to
sitdown. So Harry sat and wondered



i .
of waiter

| | ‘ es

af it was
i that brought
“Win all the

{ dainties with
which the
table was
speedily cov-
ered.

But before
i f

he began to eat Harry said: —‘‘Is all this
supper for me?” The dwarf did not seem
to comprehend, so Harry added: — I’m much .
obliged to you, I’m sure, for Pm_ pretty
hungry.”

And the way he did eat showed that his
strange experiences had not disturbed his
appetite.

“1
“I

OUR FRIEND, HORNS.

During the dessert, which included a great
many dainty fruits of which Harry did not
know the names, he tried to engage his
attendant in conversation, but without suc-
cess. The little black eyes twinkled in an
intelligent way; but otherwise, there was
nothing to show that the dwarf understood
what Harry was trying to make him under-
stand. A
So, in despair, the wondering boy con-
~ cluded that his attendant was deaf and dumb,
and he said: ‘I will teach him by signs
after a while.” :

Having finished his meal without in the
' least knowing what he had eaten, but feeling
very sure that he had never eaten anything
-so good, Harry walked about the room with
_ its, richly inlaid amber walls, its long pointed
windows filled with colored glass, the high

79
arched ceiling with its beautiful paintings,
the inlaid floor, the massive and antique
furniture, the tall sideboards and closets filled
with all manner of curious dishes wrought in
gold and silver and fragile glass, and while
he admired he wondered to whom it all
belonged, and wondered what sort of man
it was that lived amid all this splendor.

Harry, a poor boy, reared in the humblest
way, had no idea of luxury such as he found
in this place; and it was all so like a story
book or something he had dreamed one night
so long ago, that he quite expected to see
the room and the castle disappear and to find
himself lying again on the rock at Elfin
Falls. ;

But as he heard his footsteps ring upon the
floor he was reassured; and then his thoughts
took a new turn. .

He had read some fairy tales, but had never
believed there was anything real about them.
They were written to please children and
that was all. But now that he found him-
self so suddenly transported into another
world, a world so unlike the world he had
lived in, he began to think there must have

80
been some truth in what he read, and that
he was one of the favored mortals whose
ambitions and desires the fairies so much
delight to foster.

And he came to this conclusion as he sat
in a chair before an open window and looked
out upon the marvellous scene. And it was
marvellous in the twilight, a peculiar light
which gave the flowers a new beauty and
filled the shadows with a mystery.

The fountain made soft music on the ter-
race below, and a gentle breeze ladened with
the exquisite perfume of a hundred flowers
stole into the room and filled the boy with a’
sense of most delightful repose.

And there were birds singing in a grove in
the garden, singing so sweetly that Harry, in
a dreamy way, thought they must be the
nightingales he had read about, but which
he had never heard.

And so he sat quietly enjoying the scene
and the sounds; and it was no wonder that
he was startled when he felt a touch at his
elbow and, turning hastily about, found his
little attendant standing by his chair with a
silver candlestick in his hand.

gl
‘¢Oh, it’s you, Horns!” said Harry in a
relieved sort of way. You see, he did not
know just what to call the little attendant;
so for lack of a better name he thought
‘¢ Horns” would do very well until he found
out what the creature’s name really was.

Now, ‘‘ Horns” is not a very elegant name ;
but as places and animals are often named
because of some peculiarity they possess,
the tufts of hair which stuck up through the
dwart’s yellow cap suggested that name to
Harry.

And ‘‘ Horns” it was so long as Harry

‘remained in this land of wonders.

The little fellow bowed as Harry left his
chair and pointing across the room to the
door, laid his cheek upon one hand and closed
his eyes.

‘¢] see,” said Harry, ‘it’s time to go to
bed, eh? Well, I’m ready if you ’ll lead the
way.”

With this, the dwarf trotted on before and
led Harry out of the room and into the cor-
ridor, the great pillars of which threw many
flickering shadows across the floor. Horns
mounted the stairs with. Harry at. his heels,

82
and entered a chamber more beautiful than
the one they had left below. en

It was an oriental chamber, and in XY, i
one corner was a bed with a silken










coverlet and.cur-
tains of the same —
material... There
were soft rugs on

the floor, Zs
===






stools and
tables. all
carved and
inlaid with
mother-of-
pearl, and in
=e the centre
hung a golden lamp shedding
a soft light over everything.
Harry. had been amazed
83
when he saw the splendor of the dining room ;
but now he was more than amazed; he was
almost frightened. Was he a prince without
knowing it? What had he ever done to
deserve all this? Or was it a punishment
for some boyish offence? Tle had often
wished to be rich; he had often envied the
squire ; and now here was luxury such as the
squire had never known; but -there was
nobody to enjoy it, nobody but himself.
Could it be that he was to have all his
envious wishes gratified and to lose the com-
panionship of his dear playmates for ever?

And there were tears in Harry’s eyes when

‘he turned to the dwarf, who stood motionless
by the door and said: —‘* Horns, why am I
here? There must be some mistake. This
is no place for me. Look at my clothes. I’m
like an ugly toad in a beautiful flower bed.”
The bead-like eyes glittered, but Horns simply
bowed and pointed to the bed.

‘Yes, go to bed! is what you want to
say,” said Harry, with a sigh. ‘* Well, Pll
go, no matter what 1 am or what happens.
Good night Horns !”

And the dwarf bowed himself out, and
Harry went to bed and soon fell asleep.

84
A YOUNG MAN OF MUSCLE.

O sound disturbed
the sleeper under the
silken coverlet. He
slept a -dreamless
sleep all night until
the light from the
great globe in the
sculptured sky outside renewed itself, and
the deep boom of a great bell echoed through
the halls and corridors of the palace. Then
Harry awoke, and rubbing his eyes. remem-
bered where he was and all that had per
the night before.

As he sprang out of bed he found his faith-
ful Horns standing by a curtain and beckoning
him to enter an ante-chamber. It was a

87


_ dressing room
with a marble
bath, a great
mirror, and
everything that
was necessary
AN to the toilet.

Harry bathed

i in the perfumed

2] i \ water and when

\\\ \\\ \ hecameto dress

ANY SHAAN i he found a suit
\er new clothes

\in the place of




his old one, an easy
fitting suit suchasone !
would wear who had |
active business to
perform:
It became him very well; and
as he stood surveying himself
in the mirror, he thought :—
‘* What a big fellow I am, and
what a muscle I’ve got.
88



“Tf I only get a chance I’ll go to work and
learn something; for the statue said if my
desires were good they would be gratified.
And Id like to know if there is anything
better than desiring to learn something? And
Harry whistled a merry tune as he left the
dressing room and went out to look for
Horns. But Horns had gone; so still whistl-
ing, Harry went down stairs and into one of ©
the rooms where he had seen the drawings
and models the night before.

Here he found a row of books numbered
in their order, and taking number 1 from the
shelf, what was his delight to find that it
contained minute and simple instructions for
a beginner in architecture.

On the other side of the room were a
number of other books which contained in-
structions for the practical builder. These
were the very books that Harry would have
wished for, and he was so delighted to find
them that he sat down at once and began to
read.

He was very much engrossed in an explan-
ation of the effect of curved lines, when
Horns made his appearance and beckoned

89
him to the dining room where breakfast was ~
served. And such a breakfast! eggs and
chops and coffee and toast. It was a simple
meal and Harry enjoyed it, as he also enjoyed
the view from the windows and the singing
of the birds.

When he had finished, he arose and said:
—‘* Horns, I’m .going to work, and hope to
‘be able to do all I try to do as well as you
can do it.” And Horns bowed and looked
pleased; and Harry, whistling again, went
down the corridor and opening the great
door, stepped out upon the terrace.

90
ALL IN A BOAT.

It was a sweet air that greeted him, an air
which refreshed and stimulated, and made
him feel that there was not anything that he
could not do that could be done. He went
down the marble steps two at a time and ran
into the garden where there were roses in the
loveliest profusion, and such roses as never
before were seen. They were so large and
of such glorious color.

Out of the garden Harry went into a park
under the spreading trees of which were
herds of mottled deer, so tame that they came
and sniffed the hand he held out to them.

Then there were peacocks there with their
dazzling tails, and the trees were full of birds
of the most brilliant plumage.

In a small lake black and white swans

91
sailed majestically about, and they, too, were
tame and readily ate the berries Harry plucked
for them. There was a boat at one end of
this lake, but there were no oars in it; and
Harry was thinking what a pity it was, when
a little fellow that might have been brother
to Horns, made his appearance and by signs
invited Harry to take a seat in the boat.

This little fellow was clothed entirely in
scarlet, and he had no horns nor anything
that looked like them. He had a merry face
and large blue eyes that fairly danced in his
head, they were so full of fun.

Harry, wondering what would hapnere
stepped into the boat and took his seat in the
stern. It was a beautiful boat with an awn-
ing overhead and what Harry had not noticed
before, a little copper box in the bottom.

As soon as Harry was seated among the
cushions, the little red man jumped aboard
and touching a spring in the copper box,
away they went through the water at a
great speed. There was no noise and so
far as Harry could make out, there was no
machinery of any kind propelling the boat.
That something moved it was evident; but

92
what it was only the little man in red could
tell.

But he was quite as mute as Horns was,
and never answered a single one of Harry’s
questions.

93

THE BLACK JOURNEY.

When they reached the other side of the
lake, the boat entered a sort of canal over
which the trees bent like an arch, and darting
around its many curves and winding turns
its course was suddenly and to all appearances
stopped by a great frowning cliff that rose
sheer out of the water.

When his eves had become accustomed to
the gloom of the shadow at the base of this
great barrier, Harry discovered an opening
that looked like the entrance to a cave; and
while he was wondering if the little craft
would. go any further, his eye fell on this
inscription :

Let not my dark forbidding mouth,
Possess your mortal heart in fear;

Tho’ black without I’m gay within:
With safety you may enter here.

When Harry had read he looked at the

95
elf, for that was what the little man really
was, and the elf nodded his head as if he
were waiting for instructions. So Harry,
“with some misgiving said: ‘' Go ahead.”

In an instant the boat was out of the light
and in the midst of the blackest darkness
Harry had ever seen. It was so dark that
try as he would he could not see his hand
before his face.

And the boat was going at a furious rate.
Harry, poor boy, clung to its sides, for in
spite of what the inscription said, he fully
expected that every moment they would run
into something and be smashed to pieces.
But: there was no danger of anything of the
kind; for if Harry couldn’t see, the elf
could; as Harry might have known had he
but thought that elves are never supposed to
visit the-earth except-at.night.

So they went through the darkness until
all at once a green light came out of the
water, and floating on the surface, illuminated
the cave. With this light to guide him, Harry
steered the boat toward a gate which was
raised above the water. As the boat passed
through there was a crash as of thunder, and

96
the solid wall slowly parted and opened a
channel which led into the golden light which
was all the sunshine that there was in E}fin
Land.

THE CITY OF THE ELVES.

It was a wonderful sight Harry beheld.
Here was a broad lake and on the shores,
cities of miniature houses, castles, towers and
pinnacles, and there were wharves with tiny
ships at anchor in the harbors, and a perfect
swarm of. little folk in the funniest caps and
clothes.

When Harry landed from the boat he must
have stepped over a dozen streets and at least
four public squares, to say nothing about the
castles and other buildings that lay between
them. He had read all about Gulliver and
the Lilliputians, and he was very much de-
lighted to find himself in the position of that
eminent traveller.

The elves, for such they were, regarded
him with great curiosity ; and ran to the tops
‘of their houses and their towers, and there,

99
through their telescopes, tried to make out
what manner of being he was. Their king
had told them that he was coming, so they
were prepared to meet him and to do all they
could to impress him with their friendly
spirit.

There was a banquet prepared outside one
of the cities on a broad plain. What was to
them a high table, had been erected ; and there
was a procession which was the funniest pro-
cession Harry had ever seen.

But it was all very seriously conducted and
after the banquet which did no more than
tempt Harry’s appetite, one of the elves who
was evidently an elf of some distinction,
mounted a tower and read an address in a
little treble voice.

It sounded to Harry very much like the
squeak of a mouse; and to see this grotesque
old man with his little spectacles on his little
nose, looking so grave and dignified was
enough to make a serious person laugh out-
right.

But Harry kept a sober face and although
he did not understand the elve language, he

100
gathered enough from the address to know
that he was to call upon the inhabitants of
the kingdom whenever he needed their assist-
ance. And he further learned that they were
all skilled workmen, and that there was not
anything he wanted done that they could
not do.

So, he told them that he desired to be
instructed in architecture and building, and
the little old man on the tower nodded his
head and squeaked out : — ‘‘Alla lite.” Which

was his way of saying ‘‘all right.”

When Harry went back to the boat he car-
ried the band in his cap and was highly amused
to see the efforts the little musicians made to
make a noise. Buta cricket could have made
more din, and an ordinary frog would have
drowned the faint music completely.

It was late when the little red man and
Harry returned that evening ; but when Harry
went to the palace he found Horns there
waiting to serve the dinner which the boy
enjoyed ; for he was very hungry.

That night in his room, when he was fast
asleep, two little elves, one in green and the

101
other in blue, hopped out of his pockets and
secreted themselves in the library down stairs.
One was an expert in architecture and the
other was a master in building.
BUILDING MADE EASY.

For two days Harry was busily engaged
preparing plans for a little house he desired
to build in the woods. He had no difficulty
at all, and small wonder; for was not the
architectural elf there, invisible at his elbow,
directing his hand as it traced the plan and
figured out the dimensions!
To be sure, Harry read a great deal in the
~ books and really knew what he was doing;
but what surprised him most, was to find it
such an easy thing to do. But that was be-

‘cause everything is so easy in Elfin Land
where everything is known.

At the end of the two days the plans were
completed, and Harry and Horns set out on
the third to select the site and secure the
timber. Harry had brought an axe and a
‘shovel along, the one to cut down the trees
and the other to dig for the foundation.

103
When they had gone quite a distance into
the forest, they came to a very pretty lake, on
a knoll on the border of which Harry decided
to build his house. Horns, with a nod, ex-
pressed satisfaction at the choice.

So together they staked out the boundaries,
and Harry, thinking aloud for the benefit of
Horns said: ‘¢ This is a mighty pretty place;
and when I’ve finished the house I think Ill
come and live here most of the time. I can
feel more at home here than I can in the big
castle.” Sos:

When the boundaries had been staked they
went to select the wood. But the builder
elf had been there before them; for soon
they came upon a building which was filled
with lumber in boards and sills and posts and
stringers, and there.were doors and window
sashes and every conceivable thing necessary °
to equip a house.

Harry would have been surprised had not
experience taught him to accept every strange
thing as a matter of course; so he simply

“looked at Horns in a quizzical way as much
as to say: ‘* Which of your friends did this?”
and Horns—? Well, he came as near grinning

104
as he ever did; for as I have said, his features
were immovable, but his eyes were quick and
_ full of life.

Now that the question of obtaining Jumber
was so happily settled, Harry thought of his
foundation, and was wondering of what he
should build it, when Horns waved him aside
and led him into a shed-like structure in

~ which were blocks of granite all nicely trim-
med and ready for setting. Vhey were small
blocks, too, such as Harry, with the aid of
Horns, might handle with ease; for you
know, Harry wasa very strong and sturdy
boy.

‘© Why,” he cried, ‘it will be just fun
building this house! Here's everything I
need, and all the tools are in the castle.”

So back they went to the knoll, and taking
the shovel, Harry began to dig out the cellar.
He worked quite hard; but the task seemed
strangely easy. He didn’t perspire, nor did
he feel at all fatigued.

But after a while, as he paused to examine
what he had done, he looked up, and there
' at the other end of the lot was Horns digging
away as if his life depended on his completing

105
the excavation before sean With his
long arms he seemed
to exert a leverage
Harry could not ex- —
pect to wield; and
although silently dig- ,
ging he had already
done more than twice












as much as Harry had
accomplished.

Harry watched the
busy and faithful dwarf
for a short time, and
then he said to him-
self: ‘Surely I'am in great luck to have a

106 —
chap like Horns to help me. It would -have
taken me quite a while to dig it all out
myself; but at this rate I guess we ought to
finish it to-morrow.”

' But Harry never knew, for his eyes were
only mortal eyes; but while he was digging,
all around Horns there was a little army of
elves working away like ants; and long be-
fore the light in the great globe began to
wane, the excavation was completed.

That night after supper, Harry and Horns
went into the architectural library and when
the former had made. several changes in the
the plans, putting a piazza on three instead
of two sides, he said to the dwarf: ‘* Horns,
you are a little fellow, but you know a lot,
you can do almost anything but talk, and I
wish you could do that, so that I might know
who you are and where you come from; for
you are much larger than the tiny little chaps
I saw the other day. What queer little chaps
they were, to be sure. You're the best friend
I ever had anyway ; and we’ll build the house

_ together, won’t we?” i

The little eyes danced and Horns bowing,

expressed his pleasure.

107
Z ‘ :
oe a
: fe ee


When Harry was fast asleep under the
silken coverlet, the lower corridor of the
castle was filled with a swarming throng of
elves; and Horns, the dumb and impassive
Horns was actually addressing them! He
spoke in the Elfin tongue and spoke it fer-
vently; for the grotesque little féllows gave
all he said the closest attention. And when
he had finished his speech, they poked each
other in the ribs and chuckled as they tumbled
down stairs and out of the great door, across
the terrace and through the garden into the
black shadow of the forest.

109

SOME VERY STRANGE DOINGS.
ianaempstenteacernsapatntnitsetemeninanmaruirisdussates ek


AYLIGHT, such as
it was, found Harry
wide awake and
eager to be at work
that morning. He
was filled with en-



thusiasm for his new
vocation, it was so fascinating and presented
so many possibilities which he had not even
thought of in his first desire to be an archi-
tect.

So, when he had eaten breakfast, he set out
with Horns trotting at his heels for the knoll
by the lake side. But why did he stop when
he got there? Yes—! No—! It could not be!
But it was! There was the foundation neatly

113
laid, and the frame of the house firmly
fastened upon it! All the heavy work was
completed ; nothing now remained to be done
but the finishing! That was strange!

Harry thought he heard a chuckle behind
him ; but on turning he saw only Horns sit-
ting on a rock and looking as innocent of any
chuckle as a stone monkey might have done.

‘¢ Horns doesn’t know how to chuckle,”
thought Harry, but Harry little knew; for
the merry Horns had several times been in
great danger of falling backward off the rock,
so hard had he struggled to restrain the laugh-
ter which possessed him.

So Harry and Horns together finished the
house ; and strange to say it was all completed
within a week. And they also built a boat
and a boat house, and while they still con-
tinued to sleep at the castle they spent a great
deal of time in the *‘ hunting lodge,” as Harry
delighted to call his first attempt at building.

Of course, Harry could never have done
what he did, had it not been for the kindly
offices of the little folk, who every night as-
sembled to lend a hand in the building of the
houses and the boat.

1l4
And it is very much like that upon the
earth where we live. If we are eager to do
anything and do it cheerfully, how much the
more easy it is to do it than if we were com-
pelled to do it, and did it grumblingly.

Harry continued to read and to develop
new ideas. He designed a pagoda for the
garden, and built an observatory, from the
top of which he could look away over the
forests and see nothing but a misty grayness,
a veil which cut off the view on every side and
made him wonder what there was beyond it.

He read all about the architecture of the
Egyptians, the Greeks and the Romans; and
very interesting he found it was to read of
such things ; for instead of being dry and dull,
the histories of the ancient and world-famed
structures were as full of life and exciting
adventure as any dime: novel he had ever
read. And Harry, I am sorry to say, like
many another boy, had read a great many of
them; but even as stories they were weak and
washy when compared with these stirring
stories of ancient Egypt where they built
palaces long before there was any mention of
Rome in the world.

115



A CONSCIENTIOUS GUN.

But to apply the old saying: ‘* AJl work
and no play makes Jack a dull boy.” Harry
had been working hard for two weeks, when
it occurred to him that he ought to take a
little vacation of some kind. What should
it be? He would go hunting with Horns.
He did not know if Horns went hunting, but
he supposed that he did; for there was
scarcely a day that they did not have game
of some kind for dinner.

So he said: ‘*We7’ll take a day off and
go hunting to-morrow. Eh? What do you
say Horns?”

Horns, of course, said nothing; but he
nodded his head; and the very next morning
after breakfast he led Harry into a room he
had not before visited, in which were guns
and rifles and fishing rods of every kind.

117





These rifles needed no cartridges whatever.
All that was neces-
sary was to take aim

_and touch a spring.
The bird or what-
ever creature it was

oa aimed at fell dead,

Z-but was not outward-

iy
_ AAT a
ly marked. It was an electric "'\’ | N N A
bolt of some sort that produced NSW
a death which was absolutely
painless.



118
So they went out together and a gloriots
time they had of it. Harry took aim and
fired at a very gorgeous bird ; but to his great
surprise the bird did not seem at all dis-
turbed. Indeed, it remained pluming itself
on the branch of an oleander.

‘That was queer,” Harry thought as he
examined his gun more closely, and sunk in
the end of the butt he found a silver plate on
which were engraved these words of expla-
nation :

“If ata hare
You aim me fair,
I'll do my best to kill it;
But birds of song
I never wrong;
They still have leave to trill it.”

Harry was indeed ashamed ; and thereafter
he took note of the birds and animals Horns
shot at, and made ‘no further mistakes.

It is a most brutal thing that men and boys
should kill the song birds which make the
summer time so sweet with their melodies;
and it is also a shame that wicked man
_ should so ruthlessly .destroy any creature
simply to gratify a love of slaughter.

119
On this particular day, Harry and Horns
came across many strange animals; indeed,
the woods were full of them, such animals
as Harry had never seen in natural history
books or elsewhere.

There were two very familiar ones, a fox
like one he had seen near Elfin Falls early
one morning, and the red squirrel so common
to all the woods about the village. The sight
of them filled Harry with a remembrance of
his old home and his playmates; and Iam
very sure that could he have captured one of
the bright-eyed nimble squirrels he would
have hugged and petted it as something dearly
familiar.

There was one particularly noticable anim-
al which excited Harry’s curiosity, it was so
rarely seen and was so beautiful and so fleet.
It was striped in black and white very much
like a zebra, with slender legs, a proud head
and ears much larger than those of a horse.
It had no mane whatever, and its neck was
long and curved which gave it a somewhat
peculiar appearance, but which did not detract
in the least fron: its beauty. This lively
creature would dart like a streak of light-

120
ning through the forest and disappear in an
instant.

It was the only thing resembling a horse

‘that Harry had seen since he came into the
land of the elves.

When they returned from the hunt that
night, Horns carried two brace of partridges,
a couple of hares, a woodcock. or two and a
very handsome duck in his game bag. And
all these things were duly eaten; nor was
there any more hunting until Horns gave
signs that the larder was nearly empty.

121

THE ELVES AT THEIR TRICKS.

Harry now found time to wander into the
woods, of which he was very fond. He loved
their solitudes, their grassy glades, their per-
fume and their music. His mental sense was
gratified by what he saw and heard just as
the physical sense was delighted by the varied
fruits, the luscious berries and the nuts of
every kind that grew in such profusion every-
where.

He delighted to pick out the various
woods, the live oak all draped with pen-
dant moss, the towering pine, the glossy
beech, the stalwart ash, the graceful wal-
nut, the dense mahogany and many more,
the names of which he had no means of
learning. And another thing he could not
help noticing was the neatness and the preci-
sion with which the roads and paths were

123
made, and the great care that had been exer-
cised in cutting the timber. The wood
cutters in mortal land cut down everything
that stands in the way of a tree they want
for lumber; but the elves cut with economy
and spare the young growth, so that there
are no unsightly spots in their forests.

One day, when Horns had gone off to
catch some fish for supper, Harry strayed
into a glade where the grass grew lush and
vainly strove to smother the yellow, blue and
purple flowers that grew so thickly, and threw
himself down in the midst of the perfumed
mass. What delight it was to lie there and
listen to the birds; almost as delightful as
lying in a hay field at home beneath the
apple trees with nothing to do and nothing
particular to think about.

The air, the singing and the fragrance of ©
the flowers had a soothing effect; and it was
no wonder that Harry fell asleep as he did,
fast asleep. ;

How long he had been asleep I cannot say,
but when he awoke it was with a conscious-
ness that something had happened. And
something had happened with a vengeance ;

124
for there, all about him
in a circle, was the most
grotesque collection of
animals the imagination
could picture. Such crea-
tures! Some with trunks
like an elephant, some
long necksand some with













short ones, some with
tails and some without’ ;//
them, some with green



vt f
‘i ve di
curl

eyes and some with
yellow ones, all star-





\"
\ ing at the prostrate
\ \ .
i \ WN boy as if he were the great-
WR ary 6 NaN oe
eA (MPH AE OS. est curiosity they had ever
Nomad

Se 125
seen. They did not come too near, but they
stood so closely together that Harry could see
no way of escape even if he had dared to
try; for he did not know but that they might
all be vicious and simply waiting for an
opportunity to devour him.

He had read that even lions could be de-
ceived by men who lay and feigned death;
for it is a well-known fact that lions always
kill their prey. So he lay very still, so still
that he could hear his heart beat; and it beat
so loudly that he was in a dreadful fear least
some of the ferocious beasts would hear it
and come and eat him up.

But they were not that sort of animals.
Indeed they were not animals at all; only the
elves at their fun, as Harry soon discovered
when Horns made his appearance, and with
a wave of his arms sent the whole troop
scampering with merry chuckling into the
woods.

If Horns could have laughed he would no
doubt have done so; but he simply chuckled
to himself, while Harry, feeling that he was
not the bravest boy in the world, returned very
meekly to the castle.

126
THE GENIE IN THE CLOUD.
VERY day passed more
pleasantly than another.
It was work so many hours
in the drafting room, and



work so many hours in
the park, where in the course of time, Harry,
with the invisible aid of the Elfin mechanics,
built a church, a town hall and a library, just
for practice ; for, of course, there was no use
for any such buildings in that place.

After work there was recreation. Harry’s
natural taste for drawing had enabled him to
thoroughly master the details of his profes-
sion, and he could make a front elevation and

129
put the horses and
carriages and men









and women and
even children and
dogs in the fore-
ground, until you

of a sketch of imagin- ~
ation. So he did some
sketching of scenes near
the lake; and when he

130
did not care to sketch he went bunting with
his electric gun or fishing with Horns.

He had liked very much to fish in the
stream at Elfin Falls; but the fish he caught
in Elfin Land were a very different sort of
fish from those he caught at home. Often,
while he. and Horns were silently fishing on
opposite banks of a stream, he would look
at the faithful dwarf and wonder what man-
ner of being he was. He had read all about
satyrs and fauns; but Horns had human feet, ©
very large ones for his size, to be sure; but
he was too good, too kind, too human to be
vicious. And besides, who ever heard of
a deaf and dumb satyr?

One day while they were fishing in a small
lake some distance from the castle, catching
silver fish, Harry noticed that the bottom of
the lake was covered with pebbles of the
most brilliant colors. Some were like rubies,
some like sapphires, some like amethysts
some like emeralds, and there were iridescent
stones that might have been diamonds. It
was a beautiful sight, and Harry forgot all
about his fishing and thought how rich he
would be if he could only fill his pockets

181
with the largest stones and go back to earth
again.

So he said to Horns: ‘ Are these jewels?”

Horns nodded.

‘“¢Can I take some?”

Horns held up a single finger.

“What! Only one? Why, there’s a
million here.”

Horns held up the finger again and shook
his head.

Harry thought that was hard luck; so he
walked into the water which was quite shal-
low, and selected a beautiful green stone
which sparkled like the planet Jupiter. It
was an emerald, and all these stones were
really precious stones and worth untold mil-
lions of money.

The sight of this enormous wealth was
more than Harry could bear. He was filled
with an envious desire to gather more than
one of the jewels; but Horns stood watching
him on the shore with a serious look in his
kindly eyes. He knew that the boy was
being sorely tried, and he anxiously awaited
the result of the test.

Harry put the emerald in his pocket and

132
waded ashore; but said never a word, nor
did he speak at all until he was seated at
supper, when he said: ‘* You need n’t come
to the park tomorrow morning, Horns; I’ve
got some changes to make in the plan of the
school house I’m working on, and I won't
be ready for your assistance until afternoon.”

It was nothing new for Harry to tell Horns
he would not want him in the morning; but
Harry had never before tried to deceive his
faithful dwarf.

133

HARRY LEARNS A LESSON.

Soon after breakfast, which Harry hur-
riedly disposed of next morning, he started
with an effected leisure toward the park;
but the instant he was out of sight of the
palace he ran with breathless haste toward
the Lake of the Precious Stones. . He was
quite exhausted when he reached the shore ;
but he hardly paused to remove his shoes
and stockings, so eager was he to rush into
the water and fill with jewels the leather bag
had brought with him.

He had gathered many, and the bag which
hung around his neck began to ‘grow quite
heavy ; but Harry’s eagerness seemed to give
him additional strength. Indeed, I very much
fear that the good in-his nature was com-
pletely overcome by the avarice which nerved
him to deceive the faithful dwarf, and which

135
alsoblinded him to all sense of moral conscious-
ness. For these jewels were not his to take;
he was merely a guest, as it were, in the
land of the elves. But he never thought of
that; for if he had I am quite sure he would
not have touched a single one of the glitter-
ing baubles.

At first. he gathered only the emeralds and
diamonds; than he gathered the topaz and
sapphires until he came to where the rubies
and the carbuncles gleamed crimson in the
water. A ruby of enormous size, almost as
large as an apple, attracted his attention, and
after wading with some difficulty, for the
water was becoming gradually’ deeper, he
reached it and bending over he took it in his
hand.

But what was this? The instant his
fingers closed upon the jewel he received
a shock throughout his entire body. There
was a noise as of rushing steam, and all the
water in the lake began to seethe and to boil.
Harry could not move; and in his stooping
condition the waves broke over him in
such rapid succession that he had scarcely
time to breathe.

136
Then there was a rumble in the air which
rapidly grew into a roar, and all the water in
the lake arose in a great mass of vapor and
left the jeweled bed as dry as the terrace be-
fore the palace.

Harry was then able to stand erect, but he
could not move more than a few steps from
the mighty ruby which. began to. burn with
an intense flame. Slowly it opened and gave
forth a black smoke which ascended in a
column until it reached a height of fifty feet,
and then it spread out like a huge umbrella
and darkened the luminous globe that hung
in the sculptured sky.

Crimson flashes ascended from time to time
and illuminated the black and threatening
wave; and Harry’s heart stood still with
terror. The noise was fearful and the air
seemed full of angry voices. Suddenly all
sound ceased and Harry, looking up, saw in

‘the smoke a dreadful Genie with eyes that
flashed a white and dazzling light. Its long
arms were extended, and its hands like huge
weird shadowy claws, hung threateningly over
the head of the cowering boy.

And then it spoke and said: ‘+ These

137


















are my jewels pre-
served by me as a -
reward for those who
_ are content with the
‘ fruits of honest toil.
A single jewel is all
that leaves my store.
That you had earned,
and with that you
should have been con-
tent. To be content
’s? with enough is one of
‘the virtues I most love
to reward; but to be
envious for more than

enough is
a vice that
brings its
own pun-
ishment.
You have
been tempt-
ed to avarice, and you have yielded to
temptation. You shall be punished, and
let the lesson your punishment brings keep
you in all your doings free from the love
of gain and the envy which fills the human
world with bitterness and deceit.”

When he ceased speaking the crimson
lightnings flashed; and from his nose and
mouth and gleaming eyes a green flame of
blinding brilliancy came forth and seemed to
sear the black and overshadowing cloud, and
change it into a white and fleecy vapor.
Then there was a crash as of a thousand
thunder bolts and Harry turned and fled
with his hands covering his eyes. When
his feet touched the grass he fell prone and
lost all consciousness,

When his senses returned, the faithful
Horns was dashing water from a large lily,
upon his face.

139
Sith
za

oe


GOOD BY TO ELFIN LAND.

with but little va-

riation. The

school house was

finished. Harry
had finally mastered a problem in ventilation
which he was quite sure would make him
famous when he returned to earth, if he ever
did. He had never so much as referred to
his experience at the Lake of the Precious
Stones, for, to tell the truth, he was very
much ashamed of himself, and he knew that
Horns knew all about it.

143

Foooce flew by
om |


So he worked away very dilligently; but
he could not help wondering at times what
his punishment was to be. | It :
hung over his head, and the

prospect made him feel very J






uneasy. He would have liked 4 /
to ask Horns what he Zz
Be



Y

Ci a

SS

Sss










N)

thought of it ; but he was afraid
to learn the truth and so put off
the question.

. But one evening after dinner
at the lodge, while he and

144
Horns were strolling in the park he said
to Horns: ‘* What do you think the Genie
at the Lake of Precious Stones will do to
me. I’m afraid I’m in for something
pretty hard; and [ suppose I deserve it,
for I had no business to take more than
the jewel you said I might.”

Horns replied and said — ‘‘But Horns was
dumb,” you say. So he was, and I have
quite forgotten to tell you that Harry had
taught him to express himself by signs.

So Horns said: —‘* You will be punished
when you leave Elfin Land and return to the
upper world. You will never be a wealthy
man, and you will work all your life. But
you will enjoy working because it will bring
you fame; and you will have comfort but
never great riches like the men for whom
you will build palaces and castles.”

That. relieved Harry very much, and he
did not think. it such a great punishment
after all. So he whistled again as merry
as he used to do, and went hunting and
fishing with a light heart.

He had tried several times to find the
Elfin city again; but his red-jacketed boat-

145
}
|
|
i



man never returned, and Horns told him
that it was hopeless to ever expect to see
that place again. It was the city of Good
Resolutions, he said, and once seen could
never be revisited. But the kindly little folk
had lived all about Harry, had sat on his
head while he was studying, had hammered
new ideas into his brain, and when he was
puzzled had deftly made everything quite
clear and satisfactory.

146
ON THE ZEBRA’S BACK.

INALLY, at the end
of three years, during
which time Harry had
grown to be a strap-
ping young man, he began to
long with an intense longing
NI, for the world he had lived in
before he came to Elfin Land.
One morning Horns signed and said: ‘‘Do
not go to the Lodge this morning, but come
with me into the ‘* Bogy Glade” —for so
Harry had called the glade where the animals
gathered to frighten him. And they went to
the glade, and Horns, blowing a silver whistle,
waited and listened for the patter of feet which
soon were heard beating softly on the turf.




149
It was the zebra, and it cameas gently and
as tamely as a favorite horse and put its nose
in Harry’s hand.

Harry wondered what this could mean, and
was about to ask when Horns opened his
mouth for the first time in three years and
spoke : —

‘¢My duty is done,” he said. ‘* For three
years it has been my pleasure to watch over
your knowledge and your understanding.
The time has come and we must part. Here
you have had no master and all that you have
learned has been through your own desire.
You are now equipped as the Genie promised.
Your good desires have been fulfilled. Go
and do not forget him you called ‘ Horns.’ ”

Harry heard his speech, first with surprise,
and then with emotion.

‘¢ And so you are not deaf and dumb,” he
stammered. ‘* Why did you pretend to be
so?”

‘¢To try you. My dumbness left you to
your own resources ; the result has been very
satisfactory. You were a more than com-
monly clever boy, and bright, and such we
sometimes take under our guidance. You

150
Bae are pining for
; your old associa-
tions; go and
prove the wisdom
you have here ac-
quired.”

‘But my dear
Horns, how can I









much for me; you
to whom I owe all
I know; what can I do to |
show my gratitude?”

151
‘¢ Live an upright life, be honorable among
men, be industrious and above all be con-
tented. What you do for those in the other
world you do for me.

‘“¢ And now, mount this swift steed. He
will carry you back to your world where
everything changes. Quick, the light from
the swinging globe is growing dim; beyond
yonder mist the sun is eetafhica 24

Harry mounted the zebra, and bending
over said : —‘‘ Shake hands, old friend ; good
bye!”

Horns grasped the boy’s hand, and then he
took the emerald from his pouch and said : —
“¢ Take this, the jewel you have earned; and
now farewell.” On, Zany!”

And with a bound the zebra sprang up the
glade, and as. Harry turned to wave another
farewell, he saw, not Ilorns, but the tall and
benignant form of a venerable man who re-
garded him with tender interest. For Horns .
had been no other than the Genie of the
place.

The zebra plunged into the forest and flew
with lightning speed until it came toa steep
hill.. There it slackened its pace; and as the

152
darkness was now complete Harry concluded
that it would not be safe to proceed farther
until daylight. So he lay down in the grass
and fell asleep.

And when he awoke he heard a robin sing-
ing, and the sun, the glorious sun! was

shining in his face. There was no zebra
anywhere. around ; .but..there,. beyond,- was
Squire Chauncey’s house, and down in the
valley the dear little village in which’ he had
spent his childhood. With a bound Harry
cleared the stone wall and ran down the road
until he was lost to sight in the copse that
surrounded Elfin Falls.

THE DOINGS OF MILDRED.



wf i ILDRED awoke to find
ee. herself lying on a_ soft
bed of feathery white
poppies; and there she lay very comfortable
and very quiet for a short time, her great blue
eyes full of wonder, gazing upward at the
high vaulted roof frescoed in the most deli-
cate tints with a cloud effect that was almost

157
real. The light came from a great star, and
it was a strange light unlike any other light
’ Mildred had ever seen.

When she fully realized that she was wide
awake, Mildred sat up and rubbing her eyes
exclaimed: ‘‘ Where am I? How lovely
everything appears.”

She found herself on what appeared to be
an island rising but a little above the water
which surrounded it. Beyond the water there
was a hedge covered with pink and white
blossoms, and there were other islands stretch-
ing away into the distance on some of which
were trees and others of which seemed like
floating parterres of the most gorgeous flow-
ers.

But the object which most attracted Mil-
dred’s attention was a small temple in the
centre of the island and quite near the spot
where she awoke. The walls and turrets
and pointed roof were covered with a thick
green vine, and all the windows were filled
with stained glass and opened outward, so
that Mildred could see the soft silk curtains
hanging inside.

The path to the temple led through a great

158
expanse of white and fragrant lilies. Mil-
dred, filled with an eager delight, passed up
the path and paused on the marble threshold
of the building, for there in the wall wasa
bronze plate on which was this inscription :

“Come gladly, come quickly, come heeding my call;

Come into my chamber come into my hall;

Come pleading for favor, you ’ve nothing to lose,

But all things to gain in the trade you may choose.”

‘¢ Well,” said Mildred, ‘‘ I can easily choose
atrade. I’d like to be a dressmaker.” The
inscription disappeared, a bell rang some-
where in the distance, and the burnished
door swung open and Mildred entered.

Here she. was in a large circular chamber
with a ceiling of stained glass through which
the light came in many colored rays. It was
not luxuriantly furnished, but it was much
more handsomely furnished than anything
Mildred had ever seen; for if you remember,
I told you Mildred did not live the sweetest
life on earth. -

Behind a curtain on the farther side of the
room, Mildred found six figures almost life-
size. They had beautiful faces and beautiful
hair and all were very handsomely dressed.

159
Indeed, they were simply huge dolls, and
Mildred clapped her hands with delight, and
said: ‘what fun it will be dressing them every
day.” For Mildred, although she was quite a
large girl, was exceedingly fond of dolls and
loved to dress them.

Upon the walls of this room were painted —
delicate vines so naturally that Mildred went
to gather one of the flowers and was surprised
to find it a painted one. There were long
mirrors in the room and on the floor a velvet
carpet that looked like the softest green moss.
There were a few chairs filled with silken
cushions,’ and a lounge of golden brown
material. It was an elegant room and so
Mildred thought as she sat in one of the
chairs and surveyed herself in a mirror.

There was one of the figures, which, as
she looked in the glass, Mildred thought bore
a resemblance to herself —a lovely figure
‘with a pink and white complexion, and shin-
ing golden hair. Mildred was not vain, but
the resemblance pleased her, and as she looked
at the becoming dress the figure wore she
said: —‘* I must make a dress like that for
myself if I can only get the material.”

160
Then she remembered that the inscription
said she should have aid, and she arose and
went about the room looking for a door that
would lead her into that part of the temple
where the owner lived, for Mildred never fora
moment doubted that there were people some-
where about even if it was in a strange land.

161

CHOOSING A DRESS.

But there was no door visible and she was
just about to give up the search when she dis-
covered a knob by the side of a mirror, and
when she turned it, lo! the mirror swung in-
wardly and revealed another room. Here
Mildred’s wishes were fully gratified.

Polished tables of various sizes were
arranged about the room; shelves upon the
walls held materials of every kind; also
patterns of every description of dresses,
fashion plates with explanations and direc-
tions attached, scissors, needles, threads, in
short, every necessary article was there for
the dress maker’s profession.

Mildred was in her element. She examined
piece after piece of dainty silken material,

163
yet all so different in texture and color, for
the purpose of selecting some one of them
for her own dress. Finally, after wrapping
herself in one after another of the exquisite
draperies, she decided upon an azure blue
silk, the mirror before which she arrayed
herself showing this to her naturally good
taste, to be a most becoming tint.

‘¢ That’s right,” saida voice which startled
her, so sudden and unexpected was it. Mil-
dred looked about to see from whence it
came, and up in one corner of the room near
to the ceiling, a deep red parrot sat com-
placently looking down upon her from its
lofty perch.

‘‘Oh! what a pretty bird!” cried Mildred,
clapping her hands. ‘*Did you speak? I
know parrots can talk. How nice to have
one here! and I shall be so glad to take care
of you!”

The parrot made no reply and Mildred
consoled herself with the thought that it .
would talk more when it became better ac-
quainted with her. So she kept on with her
work.

Having chosen material, she looked the

164
various fashion plates over for a style that
suited her. This she was not long in doing,
for although young she had her own ideas,
combined with a rare artistic feeling and an
intense love of the beautiful. She selected
the style, read the directions printed thereon,
and readily found among the pile of patterns
the number indicated for this particular cos-
tume.

‘¢Go to supper,” said the voice again, and
Mildred looking up at the parrot said, ‘* Oh!
it’s you, is it? you sly rogue; but where
shall I find my supper?”

*¢ Look for it,” said the parrot.

Mildred did as commanded, and soon dis-
covered another door which she quickly
opened. This led into a room of moderate
dimensions where a little table was arranged
in the center with a most tempting repast
upon it.

‘s This must be for me,” said Mildred, seat-
ing herself in the one chair at the table, and
like a dainty little lady, helping herself
sparingly to several of the many delicacies
before her.

The dishes were of green and gold trans-

165
parant ware, and Mildred, rosy with happi-
ness, lingered long at the table sipping the
delicious tea. While sitting thus, she had
time to observe the kind of room she was in,
and its furnishings. It was octagon in shape,
and the walls were composed of fine trellis
work in gilt wire, through which the waning
light from the immense star outside, now
shone but faintly. The vines which covered
it helped also to exclude the light, but not
the sweet music of the birds, which were
gathering in multitudes to settle upon their
perches among the leaves for the night. The
walls were capped with a pointed roof or
ceiling, and tinted in pale blue, from the apex
of which many gold chains were hung and
attached to the golden trellised walls. The
floor seemed of white unpolished stone, but
glittered in the light as if studded with minute
diamond points.

Mildred was charmed with the birds and
with everything about her, and her face grew
more lovely than ever. Her heavily fringed
blue eyes were filled with a happy dreamy
wonderment. Her round white arms were
resting upon the table, and now. her head

166
almost unconsciously sank upon them as the
songs of the birds ceased, and like them, she,
too, seemed sinking to rest.

‘“*Go to bed,” called the strange, harsh
voice and she instantly arose, and went in the
direction of the sound. There sat the bird
upon his perch, quiet as if asleep. It was so
red in the fading light, that ‘‘ Firebrand” was
instantly suggested, as the old open fire-place
at her aunt’s with burning logs came to Mil-
dred’s mind. ‘A good name for him,” she
said, half aloud.

‘Yes; that’ll do;” said the parrot.

“¢T’m glad you like it,” said Mildred, ‘* but
where is my bed, Mr. Firebrand!”

‘* Search,” was the laconic reply.

Promptly obeying the command she dis-
covered another door, and opening it found
herself in a cosy little apartment fitted up in
the daintiest and most convenient manner.
Pale blue hangings, fine and soft as vapor,
floated over the two windows, and also formed _
a canopy over the neat little bed standing in
one corner of the room, a bed that looked
most inviting with its white silk coverlet and
pillow slips embroidered in blue. Upon the

167
floor were white furry skins which buried the
visitor’s small feet quite out of sight as she
trod upon them.

‘*¢ How lovely,” murmured Mildred, ‘* who
can be so good to me? Am I in a dream?
No; I have my senses; I can see myself ;
feel myself; but surely this is a world I have
never seen before exceptin dreams!”

The small easy chairs, toilet table, etc.,
were upholstered in pale blue velvet, with
odd shaped frames filagreed in silver. Ex-
quisite pictures of nymphs and fairies peeped
through the softly tinted walls smiling a
welcome to the bewildered maiden. curtained alcove contained a bath of purest
alabaster, into which the water constantly
poured from the bill of a swan carved in the
same material.

A small globe-like lamp suspended by
silver chains hung in a narrow niche in the
wall throwing ‘a moon-like radiance over
all.

Mildred, peculiarly observant and apprecia-
tive, had fully taken in the beauty of her
surroundings and sat down to ponder in her
mind what it all meant.

168
‘©Go to bed!” screamed the bird outside.

Mildred arose immediately and without
delay obeyed, and on the luxurious fairy-like
couch was soon lost in sleep.

169
THE PARROT AND THE DRESS.

EXT morning Mildred lay half

- asleep and half awake, listening
quite a while to the melodious
concert of the birds, charmed and
perfectly content with no thought
beyond the present. Finally the
music ceased; and, ‘‘Get up!
Get up;” the parrot cried.

‘Yes; that I will,” Mildred
responded, ‘‘ for I have work to
do, and I long to be at it.

She quickly arose and before the
toilet mirror with a jewelled brush
smoothed out her yellow silken
curls, and thought the snowy
cambric night dress with its pro-

fusion of frills and ruffles was very becoming ;
much more so indeed, than the plain gray



173
dress she was obliged to substitute. ‘* Never
mind, I will soon have a better one,” she
gayly said; and having made herself as neat
as possible she entered the work-room ad-
joining.

‘¢ Breakfast is waiting,” said the parrot
from his perch.

‘Oh! yes; I had forgotten. Thank you,
Firebrand! Why not come down and keep
me company? Come now, quick.” She
clapped her hands and danced up and down
as if to scare it from its perch, until, with a
great to do, it flapped its wings and alighted
on her shoulder.

‘“¢Qh! you dear, darling bird!” she said,
caressing him: — ‘‘ you shall have a nice
breakfast with. your little mistress.”

Its big claws clasped her delicate little
wrist, and stroking its bent head with the
other hand, she carried it into the adjoining
room and placed it tenderly on a high stool
at the table. Rare fruits, toast, and many
other tempting dishes were before them, to
which Mildred did full justice, for she had
a very good appetite after her refreshing
sleep.

174
Firebrand was not
forgotten and many
delicacies were
urged upon it by the
pretty little hostess,
but a fruit some-
what resembling a
small melon and

some plain dark
: bread was all it










could be {induced to eat. _. neaamiifiil
Mildred was in the best of
spirits, talking and trying
to joke with her solemn 'j!!
at the round ball it held in its claw. Fire-
brand behaved very properly at the table,
looking so wise and dignified without know-
ing it and always waiting to be helped just
like any other visitor.

‘You ’re a darling Firebrand,” she repeat-
edly said, ‘and we’re going to be the best
of friends; aren’t we? You cunning little
rogue, to look so sober when I’m sure you ’re
full of fun and mischief.” She arose from
the table and playfully ruffling the smooth,
soft plumage upon its head, an operation it
rather seemed to enjoy, said: —‘* You are
very nice; but do you know I must waste no
more time on you? I’m going to run away
from you now; do you care? Speak, quick.
I’m going ; good-by!”

She went off some distance and was look-
ing archly back to-see ‘the effect of her
movements upon his birdship, when all of a
sudden it set up sucha screech that almost
frightened her out of her wits. ‘*Oh! be
quiet, Firebrand!” she cried with both hands
over her ears, ‘* 1 ‘ll come right back if you'll
only stop.”

At this the parrot became quiet and Mil-

176
dred ran back to it saying as she held out
her wrist to which it immediately flew : —
“No; he didn’t want his mistress to leave
him ; poor little fellow! He shall come right
along, so he shall!” and taking and patting
the now satisfied bird she carried it into the
work room.

‘¢ What will I do with you now,” she said.
But without giving her time to consider, it
lifted its red flashing wings and sailed directly
to its perch where it settled down as quietly
as if it had never left it.

Mildred was soon earnestly engaged in
the, to her, delightful work of cutting and
planning the blue silk dress selected for her-
self. She worked steadily all day, and would
have even neglected or forgotten to partake
of the regularly prepared meals, had not
Firebrand promptly reminded her to do so.
And each time at her call, with outspread
wings, the parrot fluttered down to her
shoulder and was carried in triumph to the
dining room.

The dress was nearly completed, and Mil-
dred tried it on to see what finishing touches
it would need. She had followed the direc-

177
tions very closely and was quite pleased with
the result of her first attempt. She had
arranged and fitted the dress upon the wax
figure which she thought resembled her, and
which was very near her own size, for Mil-
dred was slight and tall for her age, and. the
figure proved most useful to the young and
inexperienced dress maker.

She surveyed herself from head to foot in
one of the long mirrors; and could you have
looked at her, you would have said there never
was a prettier picture than that the glass dis-
closed. The full baby waist and short sleeves
headed with a puffing of soft white lace, and
the simple skirt of graceful fullness suited
her dainty girlish figure, and the tender shade
of blue perfected the coloring of hair and
complexion. But the young artist did not
note any of these points, she was engrossed
in the dress.

Was her work all right? Could she im-
prove it in any point? Yes; she thought she
could. The skirt was an inch too long. She
pinned it up the desired height. ‘* There,
now, it’s all right!” she exclaimed triumph-
antly. 5

178
“« All right,” echoed the parrot.

‘©Oh, you funny Firebrand!” said Mil-
dred, dancing over to the corner where it sat
so silent, ‘‘ and so you think it all right?”

‘* New slippers,” says the parrot.

‘‘Oh, yes; that is true; but where shall I
get them?” asked Mildred.

‘¢ Look for them,” says the parrot.

‘¢ That ’s what you said before,” said Mil-
dred, as she went peering round the room;
but not seeing the slippers, she thought to
herself they might be in her bedroom; that
would be the proper place for them. ‘*Ah, you
naughty Firebrand, not to tell me where they
are,” she said, shaking her finger at the bird
in mock anger as she left the room and
entered her sleeping apartment.

Here she searched diligently, and at last,
thoroughly concealed by a picture, she dis-
covered a small panel which yielded to her
pressure and flew aside, revealing a pretty
little cabinet fitted into the wall. And there,
before her eyes, were the daintiest slippers
she ever saw. They had silver heels and
were a shade darker than her blue dress,
Mildred slipped off her clumsy leather boot

1
to try the pretty slipper, but hesitated when
she saw her rough brown stocking. }

‘“¢ Oh, that will never do,” she said aloud!
‘¢ Beautiful slippers must have beautiful stock-
ings. Who sent me the slippers? Who sent
all the beautiful things around me? And who
sent me here? Cinderella had a fairy god-
mother. I never had any god-mother. But
somebody cares for me, somebody must love
me, and I love that somebody. Who knows
but I may find some stockings too. I will
look for them as Firebrand says.” So she
went to the cabinet again and at the right,
upon one of the small shelves, she found
stockings of every shade. She selected a pair
of pale pink, ‘and with natural curiosity ex-
amined the articles upon the other shelves.
There was linen and silken underwear of the
finest texture, and Mildred selecting what
she needed said: ‘How nice of them to
leave the dresses for me to make.”

180
THE FAIRIES OF THE MIST.

&% OR several days a happier mortal could
‘not be found than our busy little seams-
tress. She arose early every morning
at the call of the parrot, and worked
‘diligently all day with ever increasing
pleasure at her chosen profession. A
second dress for herself was nearly
completed, of an entirely différent pattern
from the first, of finer material, and’ of*a rich
ruby color. The jaunty little suit with gilt
buttons and braid, red boots with gilt heels
and cap of the same shade, resting lightly:
upon, her blonde hair, was exceedingly pretty
and picturesque. :

‘ So intent had she been uponher occupation



183
that she had not even thought of going out-
side the building, and but for the warnings
of Firebrand would probably have forgotten
to partake of the meals so promptly furnished.
Another demand of Firebrand’s was a reason-
able degree of attention to itself. With the
closest scrutiny and interest it would watch
the little maiden at her work, and when she
was in doubt regarding anything, Firebrand
would settle the question with an emphatic:
— ‘Not right,” or ‘all right.” But when it
did descend from its lofty perch, no spoiled
child enjoyed petting more thoroughly.

The second suit being at length finished,
and our little artist becomingly attired. in it,
cap, boots and all, Firebrand suddenly ut-
tered a new command : — ‘¢ Come out; come
out,” it cried, poising its flaming wings and
quickly descending to her side where it began .
to pull with its beak at the new frock.
“Oh! I’ll come without force, you saucy
Firebrand!” said Mildred playfully, taking
it up and petting it while she went forth into
the delightful surroundings of her temple-
like home,

The one great star above her head glowed

184
more and more softly as the close of the day
drew near, and.the air was. filled with frag-
rance of flowers and the song and twittering
of birds as they gathered among the groves
and vines. and Mildred chatted away to Fire-
brand as she roamed hither and thither, or
lingered to enjoy more fully some bewitching
nook,

She had now approached the border of this
island upon which nothing grew to intercept
the view of the water lying beautifully clear
and tranquil around it. And Mildred, charmed
and attracted by it beyond anything she had
ever seen, wandered along the smooth white
beach sloping to the water, stopping now
and then to pick up a brilliant shell from
among the many that lay along the shore, or
gazing with rapture upon the magnificent
hedge of impenetrable pink and white blos-
soms that completely lined the opposite shore.
‘¢ Sometime I will walk quite around the
island,” she said; but coming upon a group
of gray rocks, she climbed upon the largest
and seated herself upon a projecting shelf.
A dainty little figure she was clothed in red
from head to foot, and Firebrand of the same

185
shade, perched contentedly upon her shoul-
der. :

‘¢Oh, Firebrand!” she exclaimed, ‘‘ was
there ever anything so lovely as this?” Fire-
brand gently pecked her cheek in reply.

‘¢ Firebrand, were you ever here before?”

‘* Here before,” echoed: Firebrand.

‘‘ Firebrand, did you ever fly over the
water?”

‘*¢ Over the water,” echoed again.

‘Oh! Ewould so like to go,” said Mildred.

“To-morrow,” said Firebrand.

“Truly?” said Mildred.

* Truly.”

“Oh, you dear pet!” she said, patting
it lovingly, ‘* I shall not forget the promise.
Look at the water, Firebrand, how dark and
sparkling it is getting, and now it seems to
be boiling. And the opposite shore! Look!
look! you can no longer see the flowers.”

And sure enough they were now veiled
completely by a pure white mist rising from
the water and assuming a density and shape
like vapory figures. In silent wonder Mil-
dred watched these strange visions of men,
women, children and curious animals con+

186
tinually form-
ing and rising







one above an-
other till the
whole air above
and around
seemed peopled




with them; and like
dew, the old familiar
odor of the clethera
exhaled from their
flowing robes as they
arose above the
water’s edge. ‘Oh,

Elfin Falls!” ex- A, / fi!
claimed Mildred, as the familiar fragrance
aroused her.

“This must be the bottom of them, and
how loud the roar. Firebrand, are you asleep?
Don’t you see it’s getting dark and time to
go home?”

“Go home,” echoed the parrot.

“Well, hop upon my wrist and come
along.” Directly the bird hopped down
from her shoulder to her extended wrist,
Mildred with another glance at the black,
boiling water and the figures in the mist on
the opposite shore, hastened homeward, filled
with wonder, not unmixed with terror.

188
FIREBRAND, THE PILOT.

N the following morning, after the usual
- bird concert which she enjoyed so much,
Mildred arose at the call of Firebrand,
and as the pale light from the great star
outside shone faintly through her win-
dow, she thought of the white visions



and black water and ran to the window
to see if they were still there. She could
trace a dim outline of them as they seemed
to melt away in the increasing light, and she
thought to herself: ‘* They have been there
all through the night.” And the water was
regaining its tranquility, and the lovely hedge
surrounding it became visible, and peace
reigned as the morning broke.

She dressed herself in her favorite blue
silk, saying as she went into the next room:
‘¢T71l commence a new piece of work to-day ;

191
I’ll make a costume for one of these big
dolls ; for my head is full of ideas, and I long
to put them in practice.”

Approaching the tallest, for no two were
of the same height or style, she said: ‘I
will begin with you, my lovely lady, and ‘see
if I can make you even prettier than you are.
You were all placed here to help me, and
I shall do my best to improve you and
myself at the same time. Now, for another
color.”

From the well supplied shelves many pieces
of elegant and rare material were quickly
spread upon the table and one after another
thrown around the model and matched against
its rich chestnut curls and blooming peace-
like complexion, till the taste of the young
artist was suited. Here Firebrand pounced
down from its perch and lighting upon Mil-
dred’s shoulder took her small ear in its beak
and pinched until she cried out, ‘*‘ Oh, Fire-
brand! you naughty bird! What is the
matter?”

‘* Breakfast,” was the only answer.

‘Oh! yes; I quite forgot; you wise old
pet. Nearly starved. I know he is; well,

192
come along with its mistress we did n’t
mean to neglect him.”

The meal being over and Firebrand petted
to its heart’s content, our little dressmaker
worked steadily on for several hours never
caring to stop, so deeply was she absorbed
in her task.

‘«Come out,” again screeched the parrot,
sailing down and settling in its favorite place.

‘¢ You frightened me with your loud scream-
ing,” said Mildred, pressing its soft head
against her cheek ;”” you must be more polite
to your little mistress. But no matter, Pet
always knows, and he always says what is
best for her. Will he wait until she changes
her dress?”

‘« Changes her dress,” assents the parrot.

In a few minutes, clad in her pretty red
gown, with the bird upon her wrist, Mildred
went forth into the perfumed air and made
her way to the rock by the water side. The
astral light was softly glowing in its place in
the tinted dome, and the birds were singing
in most melodious chorus. She had not for-
gotten that Firebrand had said she should
visit the land beyond the water, and as she

193
sat revolving the matter in her mind she
said: + ‘‘ Firebrand, how am I to fly over the
water; I have no wings, and you are not
large enough to carry me?

Find the boat,” said Firebrand, with a
quick jerk of its head as if just roused from
sleep.

Mildred, ashamed of her suspicions, said :
‘¢Forgive me, Firebrand, you never deceive
your little mistress, do you? Come now,
and help me find the boat.”

So down the large rough rock, under the
ledge she clambered, and there upon the
water, in a cosy nook completely shadowed
by the jutting stone, a dainty boat with gold
trimmings lay moored. Into this she lightly
stepped, and unfastening the chain from its
moorings, took the gold tipped oars, and
began to row.

Firebrand perched upon the tiller seemed
to enjoy the situation.

‘Mildred was a clumsy oarsman and she
splashed and floundered and rocked the boat,
while Firebrand, its plumage ruffled and its
eyes sparkling like emeralds, shrieked in
harsh and discordant laughter.

194
The color deep- ae :
ened on Mil-
dred’s cheek, for







she knew she was
cutting anything






but. a graceful

iOher one On eahe GLE
gure; so she — ap% Ziaiggs *

3 CW er Aa, 4 my,
said: * You may jrusy, ys









= laugh, Firebrand.
~but I will) show
that Iocan
learn to row,” and
with firmly com-
pressed lips the
little maiden
began with slow
and measured

195 ‘
stroke to send the tiny boat through the
waters.

“*Good! good! Firebrand cried, and then
it clacked with its tongue for all the world
as a boy would have done with his hands.

The novel exercise stimulated Mildred and
she was herself surprised at the mastery she
so speedily obtained over the oars. She
turned the boat in every direction, and by
by, Firebrand, spreading its wings, steered
the little craft for the opposite shore and the
hedge with the mass of pink and white blos-
soms.

196
A STORM ON THE FAIRY SEA.

The perfume of the flowers was delicate
and very grateful to the sense, and when she
had gathered and filled the boat with blos-
soms, Mildred rested upon the oars to enjoy
the scene. Firebrand was dozing, and there
was such a tranquil influence in the air that
Mildred herself sat as one in a reverie. Her
sweet face was suffused with a look of ineffable
peace, and she felt that there was nothing
more to be desired in life, nothing but to float
forever in a boat under the flowering branches
of the lovely hedge.

But even as she sat a change was being
wrought. The white mist was rising; the

197
soft light was fading; and the water was
losing its brilliant color. (A murmur was
heard in the distance, at the sound of which
Firebrand aroused from its doze, and flapping
its. wings, flew from its perch on the tiller to
the shoulder of its mistress.

Mildred, thus recalled, looked burridly
around and saw the blackening water and the
rising mist, and grasping the oars she began
to row toward the island.

It was a difficult task, for the water boiled
and seethed, and rose in billows which tossed
the little boat about as if it were a bouquet
adrift upon the ocean.

But Mildred had courage, and although
the murmur became a roar, and the: air was
filled with those shadowy forms she had seen
hefore, she never flinched, but steadily pulled
the oars.

The mist thickened, and the light had al-
most disappeared when Mildred found that
she was out of her course and steering for
an island, in the centre of which was a high
conical hill. But any port in a storm, and
soon Mildred espied a cove into which she

198
ran her frail craft, and leaping out upon the
sandy beach was heartily thankful to be on
dry land again.

199

WHERE THE FAIRIES DANCED.

But here Mildred was a stranger. It was
dark and she could not see beyond the beach
which seemed to be composed of phosphor-
escent sand. Firebrand, to keep her courage
up sang out ‘‘ never mind, this is the Fairies
Isle and nothing will harm you!”

‘¢ The Fairies Isle,” indeed, said Mildred,
‘Cand will I see the fairies?”

She hardly ceased speaking when the side
of the conical hill was opened and from the
interior streamed a bright light and a troop
of the most graceful little creatures with
shimmering wings and flowing robes of sea
green gauze. Mildred was delighted, and
sat on a mossy bank and watched the fairies
at their merry revels; for they were dancing

201
‘in the light which came out of the hill, and
the music seemed to come from the dome
overhead, so soft was it and so sweet.

After the dance there came a procession of
fairies and their attendant gnomes, the fun-
niest little chaps, and then the queen came
and smiled so sweetly on Mildred, that the
little miss was almost tempted to gather her
majesty in her arms and give her a kiss.
What would have happened had she done
so, I’m. sure I cannot. say; but it was just
as well perhaps that Mildred did not let her
feelings lead her into any affectionate demon-
stration.

When the fairies had all re-entered the
hill, the soft soothing music lulled Mildred to
sleep, and when she awoke next morning,
lo! she was lying in her own bed, in the
temple. How she ever got there she never
knew ; but Firebrand’s eyes twinkled and it
was plain that the bird knew more than it
was disposed to tell.

202
HOW SHE LEFT ELFIN LAND.

EEK S:had passed and Mil-
dred had made much progress
in her art. Indeed, she was as
perfect a dressmaker as one
could find for she had clothed
the models in the most becom-



ing garments all cut and made
with her own hands.

One day while putting the finishing
touches on the last of the six she said:
‘¢ There my lady, I think you will do now.
I can’t say which of you is the most beauti-
ful, but I am very sure that could you see
yourselves as I see you, you would be proud,
and you would thank your dressmaker.”

205
‘*We do thank you,” came in reply, and
Mildred thought at first that one of these in-
animate figures had spoken; but it was only
Firebrand perched behind them.

‘Oh, you funny bird!” she cried, ‘you
are always playing tricks upon your mistress.
But come here now and answer my ques-
tions.”

So seating herself upon a divan she began:
‘Firebrand, I have been here for. many
months. I have learned many things. I
have dressed these pretty figures, as you see,
but I do not feel that they are quite right.
Will you tell me what you think?”

‘¢ They are quite right” was the parrot’s
brief reply.

‘¢Oh, thank you very much for that. I
was afraid to think so; but now that you say
so, I feel very much encouraged. I have
tried to make the most of my opportunities,
and I would like very much to dress real
ladies and make them look as handsome as
the figures do. Do you think I can do it
now?”

‘¢' You can do it,” was all the parrot said.

206
Mildred scratched his head and said: ‘¢ Thank
you again. You have been my only critic
and adviser and I am very proud to know
that you think me capable of doing what I
so much wish to do. And now that you have
said this to me, don’t you think I ought to go
back to my home in the valley. I have been
away for a whole year and I would so like to
see Harry and Tom ; and—yes, I think I would
be glad to see aunty too, for now that I know
so much I would not have to scrub the floor
and do the chores.”

Firebrand cocked its eye, and reflecting a
while said: ‘* You ought to go.”

*¢ And will you go with me? she asked.

The parrot was silent.

‘¢ Won't you?” Mildred pleaded.

And still Firebrand refused to answer ; but
instead a voice came from somewhere, a voice
unlike anything Mildred has ever heard in
this strange place and it said: ‘* Firebrand is
not of your world; Firebrand’s mission is
here.

This strange voice alarmed Mildred very
much and the information it imparted gave

207
her great disappointment, and I’m afraid
she shed a few tears that night as she stroked
her crimson pet and told it ** good night.”

208
MILDRED MUST GO.

Next morning, Firebrand called its mistress
at an earlier hour than usual, and after break-
fast it said in very good English: ‘* My dear
mistress, your time in Elfin Land has almost
passed. We must now part.”

Mildred said nothing at first for she was

very sad; but when she had became more
composed she asked if she might be per-
mitted to carry away any of the things she
had used in her effort to become a dress-
maker.
'*. Firebrand shook its head and said: ‘¢There
is only one thing you can take from Elfin
Land that will remain the same in your
mortal world. All these books and patterns
would disappear if they were taken into the
sunlight; and even I would change and be
no more the bird I am.”

209
‘©Oh, but if that is the case, what am I to
do about my clothes ; for these you know, are
Elfin clothes and I don’t think I could pos-
sibly squeeze into my old frock, I have grown
so much since I first came here?”

Firebrand scratched its head with its claw
and seemed to be sorely puzzled. It would
not do to send the young lady back without
clothing of some kind, so it finally decided,
by some magical means such as elves only
know, that Mildred’s clothes would be con-
verted into mortal attire before she reached
the border line.

The assurance made Mildred feel more at
ease; and so she asked Firebrand when she
would set out upon her journey and who
would accompany her.

‘¢T will go with you as far as I dare,” said
the bird, ‘‘and we will start as soon as you

?

have gone to the recess in your room and
brought the casket you will find there.”

: Away Mildred skipped, for now that she
was prepared to leave, she began to feel a
sense of joy that she would see the sun again,
the trees, the birds and the people, Tom and
Harry, and even the severe old aunt.

210 |
She found the casket, a strange affair in
carved ebony, and brought it to the bird who
bade her open it. Great was her delight to find
it filled with precious stones of every kind.
This box she tied ina handkerchief, and put-
ting on her hat, went out with Firebrand on
her shoulder and took her seat in the boat.

MILDRED, THE GENIE AND THE
BIRD.

Over the water the boat in which Mildred
had spent many happy hours, glided under
the stroke of her oars; for she was now quite
expert, and was not at all afraid when the
water was rough as it sometimes was. Fire-
brand sat in its accustomed place on the tiller
and guided the boat toward a narrow opening
in the hedge of Perpetual Bloom. Mildred
had never, during her stay, been behind that
hedge, nor had she any idea at all what it
hid from her; so when the boat glided into.
this narrow canal she naturally thought she
was going to see what the hedge had so long
concealed from her.

But she was sadly disappointed, for the
hedge continued on both sides of the canal,
and so close were the flowers that their frag-
rance seemed to thicken the air.

213
And so Mildred rowed in silence. She did
not feel disposed to speak, for she was sad at
the thought of parting from her only com-
panion, even while she rejoiced that she was
to be restored to liberty.

- Firebrand was also silent; but its eye was
bright and full of a strange and unnatural
interest.

After a time, the hedge was flanked by
‘trees that met over the canal, and through
this arch of greenery the boat went until it
came to a mountain that rose abruptly from
the banks.

Firebrand steered the boat toward a white
beach, and when the keel grated on the sand,
it flew ashore and rested on a bough.

Mildred also left the boat and asked, with
some curiosity, where she was and what she
was going to do. To all of which the par-
rot replied: ‘* Follow me and all will be well
with you.”

So, grasping her handkerchief which con-
tained the box of jewels, Mildred followed
the parrot up a steep and narrow path which
led to a great bronze gate. Here, at Fire-
brand’s suggestion, she knocked, and the gate

214
was opened by an invisible hand. She en-
tered with the bird upon her shoulder into a
great and gloomy yard surrounding a mighty
castle. As the bird still urged her on, she
ascended a winding stair which led to the
door of the castle and knocked again.

Over the door there was an opening. Into
this Firebrand flew, and a minute later, Mil-
dred was welcomed to the castle by a very
nice old gentleman in flowing robes, who said
he was glad to see her and that he would be
pleased to do anything he could to equip her
for her journey to mortal land.

‘¢ The way is long” he said; ‘tbut if you have
courage you will reach there in time to see
the sun you love so much go down.”

Mildred felt very certain that this was her
good familiar, the Genie of the Elfin Land;
but she did not ask him any questions. In-
deed, she was far too busily engaged looking
everywhere for a glimpse of Firebrand to
think of anything else.

But when the old man took her by the
hand and led her into the great hall with its
mighty roof and gigantic columns, she plucked
up courage to ask where Firebrand had gone.

215
The old man smiled and patting her head
said, Firebrand had gone, but had left a
message saying that it would always remem-
ber her and would visit her in mortal land.
She would not see it, but it would be there
to help her out of any difficulty; for Fire-
brand was not a parrot at all, but the Spirit
of Understanding which had silently instructed
Mildred in all she had accomplished.

This information did not particularly please
Mildred at first, for she remembered that she
had said many silly things to this sage guard-
ian and counsellor.

However, she had little time to grieve, for
the old man led her up the winding stairs to
the roof of the castle, and from there she
saw for the first time, what it was that lay
behind the hedge of Perpetual Bloom. It
was a sterile plain, covered with thorns and
rocks, a dreary dismal place. The light
from the pendant star failed to dispel its
gloom, and there were black shadows and
yawning pits everywhere about.

Mildred was shocked to find that the para-
dise she had lived in so long should have
been so near this dreadful solitude, and the

216
Genie divining her thoughts said: ‘+ This is
the Plain of Discontent. When those who
have come to Elfin Land as you have come,
fail to make good use of the opportunities
they have received, or when they are lazy or
discontented, they are turned adrift on this
plain to find their way back into the world
where they forever afterwards live in misery.

‘¢ But those who have been diligent as you
have been, are carried over the dismal Plain
of Discontent and landed on the border line
across which the sun never shines. You have
been faithful, you have been industrious, and
your reward lies in the future, and in the
world.”

When he had said this he lifted his hand,
and a huge bird of purest white came stalking
across the roof,.and mounting the parapet,
stood there with its wings poised in a grace-
ful attitude of expectancy. Upon its back
was a seat into which the Genie handed Mil-
dred, and when she was comfortably settled
he said: ‘+ Farewell!” waved his hand
again, and the bird rose in the air so steadily
and yet so swiftly, that Mildred felt no sense
of fear whatever.

217
And so they sailed and sailed through the
gray mist and the black shadows, the bird
never faltering while its fair passenger won-
dered when the journey would end and where.
And wondering thus, the gentle motion lulled
her to sleep, and she awoke to find herself
lying among the clover in the meadow through
-which the brook meandered before it tumbled
over Elfin Falls.

218
WHAT BECAME OF THEM.



—— AVING told you what befell
these children in Elfin Land,
you will be anxious to know
something of their experiences
in the world. 1 would like very
much to tell you their names
and whee they live and all about them; but
I do not think they would thank me for doing
so; for you see they lost all memory of what
happened in Elfin Land, and only retained
the knowledge they had acquired while there.

Mildred, when she had visited her aunt,
went into the city where with the proceeds
of some. of the jewels she retained, she set
up in business as a ‘* modiste ”—as T believe it
is the fashion now-a-days to call a dress-
maker. Her art was so perfect that she did

221
not lack for patronage, and soon she had to
extend her establishment and employ many
assistants. She grew rich, so rich that she
decided to build a magnificent house in the
fashionable quarter of the city.

So she sought out an architect who was
famous, and whose name was similar to that
of her old playmate; and great indeed was
her surprise to learn that it was really her
old playmate, who soon after.his return from
Elfin Land went to the city and earned a great
reputation.

Of course, they were very much delighted
to meet each other again, although Mildred
blushed a little and Harry stammered. He
drew the plans for the house, and one even-
ing he invited her to go and see a wonderful
exhibition which was all the rage in the town.
‘¢ Signor Tomasso,”’ the great horse trainer,
was giving performances in the amphithea-
ter, crowding it to the doors every night. Of
course, you know already that ‘‘ Signor
Tomasso” wasour old friend Tom, but Mildred
and Harry did not know it until they went to
the performance and saw him subdue vicious
animals and exhibit those he had trained.

222
They made haste to make themselves
known, and Tom was delighted. He had
been around the world and was now rich
enough to retire had he been disposed to do
so; but the public demanded his exhibition
and so he continued to give it.

Often did the three playmates meet. Al-
though years had passed none of them had
married. It would have been difficult to say
which of the two loved Mildred most; and
still more difficult to say which of the two
Mildred preferred. But a time came when
the preference was made and Mildred became
—well, who do you think; Mrs. Harry or
Mrs. Tom?



22%





xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20080605_AAAAOL' PACKAGE 'UF00077426_00001' INGEST_TIME '2008-06-06T05:49:58-04:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T17:15:51-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 298415; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-17T20:22:49-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '359680' DFID 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBMM' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-filesUF00077426_00001.xml'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' 507675382426b72974b1e5985653f30f
'SHA-1' 8f675740d502d36185a7ab2527bcc8962172c8f7
EVENT '2011-12-17T12:45:33-05:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'2013-12-17T20:14:42-05:00'
xml resolution
'406463' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBMO' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
a5b7562aa0f7c355ebb7393c9e3631d8
ef41dab54e9466805ba481dbe0cfbac32fd3a535
'2011-12-17T12:48:10-05:00'
describe
'401718' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBMP' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
971c11a6bf1fb6b2f85a05c175a69739
ce15aaa72d98d865b54dd31b8e2e9e2d40b6561c
'2011-12-17T12:45:48-05:00'
describe
'342042' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBMQ' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
4aeed8f0debe4aeb27a3fbdaf01a4fb2
fd1ad4b0b545f9f5b8ae0fd3f764dc1129e4d25f
'2011-12-17T12:48:35-05:00'
describe
'331260' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBMR' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
fbc5bf6452186683279158080c80b32c
b69eed06efa73b1d39cecbcb7f3f1f47adb41dc3
'2011-12-17T12:45:44-05:00'
describe
'342101' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBMS' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
de6b1f7066f4f4945e4712725ba24757
ebddb5900a4375f786fbedc61171e0b76b39809d
'2011-12-17T12:46:47-05:00'
describe
'356936' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBMT' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
114278f5f7df63e95693e56139919d1b
e9a67929c1e0b80568703e22f557c1aa89073c51
'2011-12-17T12:48:15-05:00'
describe
'342030' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBMU' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
3e9349800720fe916382ffe0f13d342e
40c67bf22da08f45103b1c2d79e7b7bb644ddff3
'2011-12-17T12:47:00-05:00'
describe
'346285' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBMV' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
d369701e551c965308ab222de1171b69
f68f7aa223ecb42e56fc30d1f0e6714f5c77590b
'2011-12-17T12:49:55-05:00'
describe
'346371' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBMW' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
fccb4eecf413936d849f68bc7fd26880
84aac3a897897703c398e69d75e89190cd625dd3
'2011-12-17T12:46:16-05:00'
describe
'346392' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBMX' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
e0060a4974dc1a6d6f12325c53ca9514
9f8bf1202c49c2ff01f07d241be1c5f362698795
'2011-12-17T12:48:38-05:00'
describe
'346386' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBMY' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
f03d582b25975242aa29817858ec5742
904b5d508617e1b47536e3a106b4e3addcecfef1
'2011-12-17T12:49:27-05:00'
describe
'346359' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBMZ' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
530fb1b268d6b7ee9c235e12b0460e09
1f4557b8fe6d1578c450d5934501a8b1fd38e8b9
describe
'346381' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBNA' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
346596bf42ae5a268a4fbdf01f211c20
26b2802ebf73c2a2f56257c5b810383d54a3336f
'2011-12-17T12:50:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBNB' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
20630df998874a25c350f6e143168d93
d10d421d11787d85bf33cd743489486162c99230
'2011-12-17T12:48:57-05:00'
describe
'346045' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBNC' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
881755387c2c638ab8706649394c9c68
e19311e651e2f29926109fe24d6b1420f932a233
'2011-12-17T12:51:35-05:00'
describe
'346388' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBND' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
520642b41c06424c52c5455af637ac28
56ac8f4e2dd69ae7eb4178fdbad89515c90b2091
'2011-12-17T12:45:46-05:00'
describe
'346380' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBNE' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
abe450ea01f772798735595800841360
3bb6cfe0d2de37ee6069ca49247956bc0bc1ac75
'2011-12-17T12:50:11-05:00'
describe
'346577' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBNF' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
dbb1bfae51b833ebd6fa803d54726af0
f8b73ddfb03858d4c41146824352a8de212cfc65
'2011-12-17T12:48:21-05:00'
describe
'346158' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBNG' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
84727b0bbd72eac1150cd9d86a1a3f78
242ae4217e25df5275490d97e4ab73aaa6b06dcc
'2011-12-17T12:48:24-05:00'
describe
'346580' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBNH' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
e749de21424c4a1d6fd62c9d34e0a352
00fefd3fdde3a3998578e598861f9afa5554383a
'2011-12-17T12:48:06-05:00'
describe
'346376' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBNI' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
5da57341f459d8926b481f086f7f36f8
948e6d1915fb11ceaa7f90e5b2b9e3b6b20981d7
'2011-12-17T12:48:36-05:00'
describe
'346384' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBNJ' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
da3c60caaefaa8bc5a7c09e375b6fd3a
1ec1b1f111aa716bfbbe40c6f51bbc680a359eff
'2011-12-17T12:49:15-05:00'
describe
'346210' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBNK' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
1ddfd91dc5daa9a23c06b9aa858a7c18
88bc8b9b2c0c5d03822a6177b157a9d5c7e0dedc
'2011-12-17T12:51:37-05:00'
describe
'346334' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBNL' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
dc89189af8f99a4150a56b2f83654a45
11f2c1517c937b0aa4db2db74e79f22620865127
'2011-12-17T12:49:06-05:00'
describe
'346117' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBNM' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
f9f114f903dca936a04a7254f7cf1e24
c26df023dc0c503831c63f67de099316a6d23d85
'2011-12-17T12:47:09-05:00'
describe
'346328' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBNN' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
d567bf71f4b0b79e8a9fc1dc0b4c7625
723c06bc087d7780227a6471b2b051b2a21cfb4c
'2011-12-17T12:46:10-05:00'
describe
'357031' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBNO' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
b118ab3edc79cff364aae594e1c2c59d
cd602e00b5a147a4347c23ba8bf8ee187f0945d7
'2011-12-17T12:48:28-05:00'
describe
'346325' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBNP' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
7b3ba3c1e4733d4f2838be268192d7e2
93b6df1c1452559cf9a889bbd70e3de0cfc9c551
'2011-12-17T12:47:01-05:00'
describe
'346218' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBNQ' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
244af31257d1f1aca40c5e207edef44d
46e19aaee6514a96762095fb8703f7af3ffafb1c
'2011-12-17T12:46:46-05:00'
describe
'346312' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBNR' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
35d2aeab6b5baebbf984030898ba4d7d
ec473ec9942356a07f1dbb851b57b6d710b6d6aa
describe
'346252' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBNS' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
2a7d6c105775f11c3cb64242f6638749
214b2dfa1cb4a1f0afbfe5cc63c5c0e91e597ae5
'2011-12-17T12:47:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBNT' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
b64cb0ae31bd40bbb32f199124caaeb2
0d3f7bb7d6610b25c2afa145f28317388da4a466
'2011-12-17T12:47:48-05:00'
describe
'346368' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBNU' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
ebd29c6750fe5df6a24bcf14a44405fe
d27e15b7b220625df7e6c87e2d6be97c8b6a4282
'2011-12-17T12:49:40-05:00'
describe
'346491' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBNV' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
621b935ef187263c2d70d5036f791e4f
4531dc79df72a7ba787b23ebfa97a4767fbf90a2
'2011-12-17T12:48:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBNW' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
0299a840c38b790267a25aabaa551009
827542dfe9cf57709a2740f95099a9d72a251584
'2011-12-17T12:48:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBNX' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
2f1d3ddcf2bc671213b12b19c8d824bc
25935b80aa494b11e8f1b5cd628c48a978d710a2
'2011-12-17T12:46:15-05:00'
describe
'346309' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBNY' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
04ee07a1ad1928b858e11fd94a1fd26b
07c9f161796d4e3a803242822e498c373c3090c0
'2011-12-17T12:47:29-05:00'
describe
'346372' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBNZ' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
300abfbf984e8cc19b695e4d7c6f8f0c
864911a12ea03346d87966ebc686170393759ac9
'2011-12-17T12:48:44-05:00'
describe
'346314' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBOA' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
7f5727eeb00c7f9ed0d7eb716c9731bd
48b30cadbb03fb6353b9154d27106bfc7502dcef
'2011-12-17T12:48:41-05:00'
describe
'346635' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBOB' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
658af49154f1a4f51f44ffe508f2c71d
f4a6bbcc68396b9f1c8ff29475281f4bc106e633
'2011-12-17T12:45:35-05:00'
describe
'346227' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBOC' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
22a1fb27dd6049b4fb8ff582e22998fa
b55c6589689b4dbc8af7906c0498846c3f053317
'2011-12-17T12:48:02-05:00'
describe
'346355' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBOD' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
c63c775f6b60e9d194744023d61fdee4
85a32ddc644fc18437ddb79d6dedd7efc059abb8
'2011-12-17T12:46:48-05:00'
describe
'346344' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBOE' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
05b8fd89accf823b6295f4864bdc8c52
4edfc080ad2e08707a4e0b9f12b974364369d2b5
'2011-12-17T12:50:25-05:00'
describe
'346559' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBOF' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
3895f5f5b963320b1aebdd362bf0e2db
a69ecbdcc186d4352e5f3ef3e6b03117b2481bc2
'2011-12-17T12:50:06-05:00'
describe
'346116' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBOG' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
266c310215cf6f3636d45de2ed35df24
4996e278f03caa004366586b3db0dedaa77781ca
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBOH' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
d27b9c829edeed60a76a3181cb01d1dd
8a1f483933f815d70c6d8798164b358b8adeb279
'2011-12-17T12:47:31-05:00'
describe
'346341' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBOI' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
ef087860fc13025c9c85b44125e1b2fd
65ac1b2342bee27cb823cbbf5d7d959c15b89d4c
'2011-12-17T12:46:01-05:00'
describe
'346636' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBOJ' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
7f2266ba31de3481c397089609625ae1
bc3146850a6f2dfb13df6add1b775ed2bfbc3907
'2011-12-17T12:46:49-05:00'
describe
'346182' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBOK' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
ebdaf26966ec4bce4167094f06b0bdd7
e1936c965e7736382ab0687b0f9bbc0f7a777a33
'2011-12-17T12:47:53-05:00'
describe
'346553' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBOL' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
9b3fc5537c178b66fefc7f9672f234d6
b80efb78dd36487263f29da42ccf9a072b0fed72
'2011-12-17T12:48:31-05:00'
describe
'346310' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBOM' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
90088ffd9212a0833d6f660157f4e184
7e09d7772758644e976add24964d1ca7eea41bba
'2011-12-17T12:51:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBON' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
7c227f03c8b0343477cab635283266ef
8390318ef6fc719252617b7c6fe0a5189b0b33e2
'2011-12-17T12:47:37-05:00'
describe
'346202' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBOO' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
7e72340c6ae254a793b60aa2fc0ca8c3
1a62331a1a20b8e22adfec50782c07ce4f44653f
'2011-12-17T12:51:26-05:00'
describe
'346321' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBOP' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
113196fa01db5addcf5eb73689ea32c3
e93079f93aadb76e3c0b926c30193a122fd1d4a6
'2011-12-17T12:49:42-05:00'
describe
'346374' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBOQ' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
015c7fb835bd07450797662616ddab04
fbcfb5a385946be91f6e2b4ecd1393524e783c40
describe
'346248' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBOR' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
1cbc746c1e71482c488bb71bf82533f5
7094be305abbeee337d7af5a116516bca445f946
'2011-12-17T12:51:00-05:00'
describe
'346313' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBOS' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
3246d45d479598633643f377e97ad9af
d4cf59324aae5b48ebdb3bf0ce66c69bea0646cb
'2011-12-17T12:50:20-05:00'
describe
'346205' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBOT' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
ad9366dc1345c99001a8e54daf8fe74b
b12999d742349524e45fec206836f1fe18865fb7
'2011-12-17T12:48:51-05:00'
describe
'346213' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBOU' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
4f039d586ab70989510b286c5da58ada
e87f375c508915688f6896e456c8dda954c41960
'2011-12-17T12:51:16-05:00'
describe
'346151' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBOV' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
18cc11f3c0c6e92c593621df6c9b34dc
1bb0c105cb16def2b2bc1499c78a960b053a7a02
'2011-12-17T12:51:24-05:00'
describe
'346174' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBOW' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
557b9ed914efd17a534f39a5f4992327
40a618d4c535a32133d636bb644d088c03bf25f7
'2011-12-17T12:47:39-05:00'
describe
'346614' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBOX' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
78ea121861c488947f9095de904bb2a9
67e05e3ae6ef831451efffd1c966db3add882f21
'2011-12-17T12:46:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBOY' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
c162bf67f032e3d1271967fab970bc37
aa5f57378ebb9504c34de2dc636a40f6f5f1231b
'2011-12-17T12:46:38-05:00'
describe
'346518' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBOZ' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
ca37a24cb5c1e92eec9037de036d9d03
246c6635970714348aa3148d0068c1c9a278ba37
'2011-12-17T12:49:54-05:00'
describe
'346389' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBPA' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
cea914d0bb2898fada14f4f2518e0f31
f7d83f360df1331527be8a8159c0a2d97990b4e0
'2011-12-17T12:46:20-05:00'
describe
'346297' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBPB' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
332c6d2531455aed338c5f8043f38fb3
24c61c119cb1431d2b106aa9771654ff1bcd9832
describe
'346391' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBPC' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
98f69a68f17e7ad20f2d399841d637ce
0b36b3e803927d397bc5d2eb4f0530728a6a8377
'2011-12-17T12:50:55-05:00'
describe
'346525' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBPD' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
8a7c3478bcfbf66035e8e7b0854c2365
b06d440830a04d3dd02af2ebc720713be26ab8d5
'2011-12-17T12:47:08-05:00'
describe
'346092' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBPE' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
6fef930b5ac8ff19bbf75ef7d1bd089e
d23255643f2b6bd6a5cb983ac82914b9d52f4dac
'2011-12-17T12:45:51-05:00'
describe
'346624' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBPF' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
dae5d33332086f90d6a476d70b6fa17d
238cfbbbe83a221eaca0b707c8c4c2a455c19aba
'2011-12-17T12:51:30-05:00'
describe
'346185' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBPG' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
eabacb9244c12956ac9309f5894fdfc9
980de2aef725878b960432460360082ca0c93591
'2011-12-17T12:46:09-05:00'
describe
'346590' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBPH' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
63d6d440c911ee8770e034ff4564b6b0
ac9f29cbc5bfb8b205c36ff320ac5a86eddcda26
describe
'346195' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBPI' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
c7debd8ee84b65e668540bc56743d531
e518e844012e8b2da20b4da0371d2f2379ee2544
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBPJ' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
3bd4682d1eebfe63b87e5faf194daa40
e1367678296534264122ae0b7513a2063dc0ef11
'2011-12-17T12:46:25-05:00'
describe
'346353' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBPK' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
ee4b1ab09011a86b38c968437776c83a
fb5a0dfad262a24f073ab23611ce8dee53a189eb
'2011-12-17T12:47:17-05:00'
describe
'346354' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBPL' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
eada8023a34304ea44bd1e6ae17d222e
8f762f3b8da8ab62a068abee0e642ffd78fb533d
'2011-12-17T12:45:40-05:00'
describe
'346197' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBPM' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
97d57ed5311cdf01004da704c44554c3
18c78731476d5edee5856f61f61e28bb5f9ae5a8
'2011-12-17T12:46:28-05:00'
describe
'346638' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBPN' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
f6a7abd1f7a52e0623f9735251a0fdf7
b7b2bdac60625f66d992fdedfc00fa1bf25574da
'2011-12-17T12:49:25-05:00'
describe
'346137' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBPO' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
81471a98bece22bbd86b0c1744748162
35dfc5011b1c4aab81a2f84de379050d796f56e9
'2011-12-17T12:50:40-05:00'
describe
'346640' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBPP' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
0ab3be87d2ff1cc4b4a1732a0a26740f
ec17f242529ec9d9c069a94fd079515e07a71b64
describe
'346340' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBPQ' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
6c00b7668bb5a8bcbb47ccdbce638f19
2465614d14f68e27b7988164edd7ac719c21fb4d
'2011-12-17T12:45:36-05:00'
describe
'346639' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBPR' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
3eaafb0323738ed6454aef362e4ee56d
051372d0b0cd53cd3f75b414ded9cacf3be3655d
'2011-12-17T12:50:22-05:00'
describe
'346013' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBPS' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
f07c9bb6dd90fb412951f076324703fd
7ab18600c68682f597093ddf5852e06ac48a0ad4
'2011-12-17T12:46:37-05:00'
describe
'346253' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBPT' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
2eb3012be6da137c1ae5517ca7a0e943
03e5f6812683bd55e40471d914b718663a31c057
'2011-12-17T12:48:23-05:00'
describe
'346370' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBPU' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
8891d40aa4a7f615955ed47f71e03fd8
8e926fda3438350b0ad2ec1b5582f3f90c30e492
'2011-12-17T12:48:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBPV' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
05c91b2bf3e7ce49b4b0a7ac71a88995
863058a3bd7581c6993a1291c9914b4884d5ba6d
'2011-12-17T12:50:21-05:00'
describe
'346175' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBPW' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
b9c090d0b12a40529dfb5e462bfef998
d9c4e19cd91bc28507efa6cf6f3f31b8e3670c91
'2011-12-17T12:48:56-05:00'
describe
'346565' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBPX' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
d1921abb48e8559659ca35be155e4bbc
ee4e7acfc78a379d58e54e6c69a09c42d1588b6a
'2011-12-17T12:47:14-05:00'
describe
'346201' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBPY' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
5cd57016de3caa8636699dcdf8319562
c6053eb012767ab66d20cd7e3778974d7894b442
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBPZ' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
7d2e639065cdfcc0b27d5c8be4c8db8e
328d76919804a3541b6c73f254024fbb0187a6c7
'2011-12-17T12:47:50-05:00'
describe
'346193' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBQA' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
2a501b31b254c45bc3b209269874fdab
61d1e7da219ca43f9c3b365ebfa7cd03b7bab40e
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBQB' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
bd8e12465be8354cbbced9982815e0b7
e226f329ca001c3629faf8bbc4110284863dc00a
'2011-12-17T12:49:10-05:00'
describe
'345942' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBQC' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
7ac35b4366e4f6b48a4383211a753a70
0bfc697b478e57f78412311693881adbf8f80f9c
describe
'346390' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBQD' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
e57fd04126ee4884a9b81d8c51578cf7
a8c021d7009bfee195c35a46ebfb26321da1c03d
'2011-12-17T12:48:14-05:00'
describe
'346184' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBQE' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
0cc8a69856291dd5d87e0c33c5fbf49f
67d513234c9677e932f4a14fc962534f7629e7f0
'2011-12-17T12:50:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBQF' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
9576a4d7a5c31d1da82bab36bd13b1b0
be8744f8f42e216425385f3aada2a387a4b28272
describe
'346383' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBQG' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
155329ceb6dd952ec45a5a4fb5f441c3
8af24786b8de2c4d757502cdd52b21792eae8c5b
describe
'346600' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBQH' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
d69a76337c438be995027649a32246e4
412c908af6f3161bdb19accc3ad8c849964c9248
describe
'346375' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBQI' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
ae317ae349289f8d2874e613cd028862
082c0ebdfbce571689e130b675d606f7e5a07dfd
'2011-12-17T12:47:32-05:00'
describe
'346554' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBQJ' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
426695b1813772be2c12279946c4a61b
0f5f034de94702987248da1918781f392ea9e919
'2011-12-17T12:49:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBQK' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
513f72cc6ef3bbf43a01b5798db1c494
865f289141d7ffacc924df54e6b4eb7c506b3ad7
'2011-12-17T12:50:42-05:00'
describe
'346500' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBQL' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
4ec099e1ae8933aee1a8b25bc8be7726
a89b2a294194b63d32e72c82685ac820c6ab4290
'2011-12-17T12:51:07-05:00'
describe
'346196' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBQM' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
49c6ba99aa2a4c55420b580da9696d11
699682b2218e246e05dd205e17eb583b123e869c
'2011-12-17T12:51:14-05:00'
describe
'346330' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBQN' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
6d3bad09a8b71653dfade445184f8dbc
d05bbb2df0ea48be73311e13f66169fe8b16c13e
'2011-12-17T12:47:34-05:00'
describe
'346296' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBQO' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
b965d4c4aedfa6b33153bf41f9e82644
8ada29b999e44f48c4060e97efcb05c4a9f0a3ab
'2011-12-17T12:47:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBQP' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
88847e3a25d5d9423fdd394e6f25a51c
859bdb643572e8477d651e57a7851d27e48fdf13
describe
'346149' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBQQ' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
c5c339a897b2034e60a7990cb67ddbe8
0d6f5376af836694211c98aa89080918d05614e4
'2011-12-17T12:45:47-05:00'
describe
'346604' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBQR' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
6ad7b37e9b5cd64a47114dbba4a47a13
d820d2470b8350c20e39a3c7fa07959897d7c73d
'2011-12-17T12:49:50-05:00'
describe
'346212' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBQS' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
3da72b58d9b537d02593b599a81ec444
f159d3137429ab30073f1456d1354cceed20de57
'2011-12-17T12:45:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBQT' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
17877126b1c7abb6ac7ac7f62df4ba7a
00cacaa3dac6c755ed21af9d3cf2b485a845039e
'2011-12-17T12:49:45-05:00'
describe
'346445' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBQU' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
21a7edf5bdcc2d8c8b234e8fa7f9b0d1
7e5bc1d758d1f003272f85aca19d7ad165995efd
'2011-12-17T12:50:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBQV' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
bdd43cd4356c2e0e9ad0e49d760e187f
8464b637c178463c798d213aa2e42188c8616fd9
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBQW' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
5a25ffcb326f432657b50ee19ea8ac6b
561fe94cdb990b71507bb52ed1667b796c2314d3
'2011-12-17T12:48:50-05:00'
describe
'346622' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBQX' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
58695425939ad0166b78f7d805caa375
7a83591799573021fcdb838160a3b44c38c2d262
'2011-12-17T12:45:43-05:00'
describe
'346349' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBQY' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
da3a901cb8bd525090e73af4a4af3a5c
a75c031c63e2fa2f3ff24f13f3032289fc073b7e
'2011-12-17T12:47:30-05:00'
describe
'346628' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBQZ' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
8589c33ba5ec7d4927e1d04c73d33a22
75936567ff1659642ad90f254f048a51bf85c895
describe
'346156' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBRA' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
f64de98b22218326e3280319779312e5
f61aaf5c11a9d32739230b4b2511ce141424b7fc
'2011-12-17T12:48:47-05:00'
describe
'346617' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBRB' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
1cfe53430a10b37ce3a974751f4453e9
f61c86a8104c6d230afdac8be81c25f6f196cfcc
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBRC' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
062ca48ff850add50689fea5b8d8a349
a09938d36964ab75e6f2137cca12cd322e304de3
'2011-12-17T12:45:41-05:00'
describe
'338414' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBRD' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
463d3407d82fcf9c8b8de1e5a40082e3
0886c184b09e804a5a86008c1d0adbc2e279e9b9
'2011-12-17T12:45:45-05:00'
describe
'346356' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBRE' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
080d234875fc974c1a182eac77f2b7eb
876a7003f9c0914f950cc24ca9763c255315843f
'2011-12-17T12:49:26-05:00'
describe
'346581' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBRF' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
6498eb2879cf613440b72f5e5a335607
34a5b75215cba3a1656ecc691bcd736a490bc424
'2011-12-17T12:48:45-05:00'
describe
'346216' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBRG' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
4f1f327fbe7a5b7ae0a18e83b964825b
7e612d7b96b646b32799c3f1afbef17064c2034e
'2011-12-17T12:49:28-05:00'
describe
'346452' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBRH' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
a0f305d671912b70ecc6f5818a7d026e
87da30d7012890be79f51031f35dea301b01f9f3
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBRI' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
b9396bead57c397769f2fa8ec377fb9d
a5bbbef63815e75404a8326032f7b3813a020312
'2011-12-17T12:49:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBRJ' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
13a9808ae236ab02d950b0801a51caa8
60f3b35bf16642849066a2f4a4d792a0b36e8047
'2011-12-17T12:50:33-05:00'
describe
'346377' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBRK' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
430ee04286b85c05a3de037df5717dd5
f14730d2625804e4bf2157e711ebdda1fa85aea7
'2011-12-17T12:47:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBRL' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
1bdec575e983335cddb782bed9726369
d4dd67c2324eea740e3127348b5188286f070ffe
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBRM' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
4eb3e72ea9fe3c7b2489451ad03cc90e
f7303c1830470db14e88966a7e285bb48c1789ce
'2011-12-17T12:45:37-05:00'
describe
'346524' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBRN' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
33335ef363e32cd66d30d5bece604f7d
92683ed992ddac7a4a2fc22b2a4c30cdc503c4c3
'2011-12-17T12:48:01-05:00'
describe
'346200' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBRO' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
884218c63e71ac6b8832179f3da9da50
4f14a2c90305b3f0a42a9d6967d35fee066f4583
'2011-12-17T12:49:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBRP' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
86b906b470ebb48f14fe08408e6ce7c8
34683ac2ad74178b848a40f2ce9f812c66112844
describe
'346100' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBRQ' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
94c154be3bebb6112097ed3e22912f45
77f4936aa536afcece83104c5d12e33607d5a612
'2011-12-17T12:51:01-05:00'
describe
'346627' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBRR' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
3cb52a81328b0b0977119f0e58a48b25
2350629639e239074c7091148fb0087598077e77
describe
'346131' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBRS' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
e99288af272c287c22953d92d3f246d1
df46f6521667f1dec48073f2f15830272d6b6234
'2011-12-17T12:46:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBRT' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
5489759f742f81e5528fb7da05b21c7a
bcda3761b7ad2bd6e0325e106fa2ae35a4928bbc
'2011-12-17T12:48:43-05:00'
describe
'346007' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBRU' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
2c5030452c7917ae03bea9582a8a7b23
f82c9f983ada46a85d89b33daea1d29e2733e578
'2011-12-17T12:47:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBRV' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
cae53a8fde7e90936ac406305fc92198
0fe1878e0a2c45b42d06c20b9081576b1bf6ba93
'2011-12-17T12:45:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBRW' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
68508a229f65344deb8f14f02fcbfc22
9fa0775e0edbb1c68f1e53daec94e6495d4bfbcd
describe
'346629' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBRX' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
345db8bddbdf1fcbc0ddae5101a2e5f5
bf9ff0fc70790eac8cc4ca644585fd48fe0c1af0
'2011-12-17T12:50:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBRY' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
6c4a017ee18ac48f209b923182589626
d0cd6e4bc51b8460cb6f1a2d5107ffc13be614e2
describe
'346556' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBRZ' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
e67e7917d598ad04151b7fd2e27eff8b
9e96dc5edafc3dacdfac9dc2a30ad677868f19b5
'2011-12-17T12:48:52-05:00'
describe
'346188' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBSA' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
dfc3a8ba98e3dc771ded58dc8c38ce6a
6c2a820f54e673dc3541eac63b417426156392c9
'2011-12-17T12:50:32-05:00'
describe
'346399' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBSB' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
004ce167e7729c773f1ba656b59262e5
27e7abda6826bb36bebeb5aebfbe647d10e36feb
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBSC' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
cdfbb02f5eba40bc8d38d202f4d604fd
569cbe47ae477ff07635853d27b4488d3a1b67da
'2011-12-17T12:49:34-05:00'
describe
'346620' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBSD' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
b6814b53cda21ba4683c6f2f7cd9ae79
09d9ea7a78cf1fb47c636c1b6baa7fa518d5dff7
'2011-12-17T12:48:08-05:00'
describe
'346217' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBSE' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
2b687860b1a7bb7ebed95f6822da6de4
8bd416f618de9150efe86aaaeaef101bd8d99721
describe
'346362' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBSF' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
97c1e928d652582a85dbe775b9e8f759
34f813ff2a15682c3d57b27fc78c919c85b9e978
'2011-12-17T12:49:14-05:00'
describe
'346093' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBSG' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
e9a7109b86ada70e715ebdfc59cd19c3
604fb452eebd4d346b0d854ee74288438a4ce1fa
'2011-12-17T12:49:01-05:00'
describe
'346350' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBSH' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
624bd6d45830e3362f94b1ff497f973c
9e3e73b554125050bb2e1749e367a5ecc52b59b6
'2011-12-17T12:49:16-05:00'
describe
'346302' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBSI' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
fdccd32a1e2b10bd35541745a5906cac
4020fab18186ed91959003ae07a34a1104fcd8f7
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBSJ' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
8463537f88e471ca2814394704d5ec58
2757f4a98abd6d586318ba320fddb7cbb80ede67
'2011-12-17T12:46:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBSK' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
05814c1fe8d13aa6a4fe0f6a1bce00d7
ff17b9dd1c81ded9b1492343705c65691a1effaa
describe
'345927' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBSL' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
6590bdc168586f4c74e867f9420eeb80
aac2a545cac002cc3c404a6451766ffdd12fcd0c
describe
'346385' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBSM' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
73dabdfc69aaf72cae634d07b32cb615
cc6a3e3fbf7796e72b42a16e53229a2c11d60c17
'2011-12-17T12:49:30-05:00'
describe
'346458' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBSN' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
ad969177859f72e9098478351ce54498
5f5e468f6ee8531709aa70da4be7c902f94fea7e
'2011-12-17T12:47:49-05:00'
describe
'346335' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBSO' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
53a2816e56d18bd451859a1c2b3130b1
cd08f3bf72f0e7784ab230f92c5fa8f2b9f3bbd1
'2011-12-17T12:49:44-05:00'
describe
'346571' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBSP' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
5b4856bc334750ecdde1956da3fa3892
b2c06127bb81467a50bfa9a155641c8fe61b67de
'2011-12-17T12:48:27-05:00'
describe
'346324' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBSQ' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
521a1c0f085b79d1252c9c171ac21b46
02f279fe1739d0a9eb9c73ad1345b05d47ffeab3
'2011-12-17T12:50:49-05:00'
describe
'346619' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBSR' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
13ddda783d06b1907f52cb74424de782
6321ca91664e81dd8c216cf200c821b5a523f5d1
'2011-12-17T12:49:47-05:00'
describe
'346337' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBSS' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
fdcd0e739083e5ca498ca70334e17744
9f7fd6dc551fddb347f7d1017d794d716891640d
'2011-12-17T12:49:53-05:00'
describe
'346632' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBST' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
589809f02e05fe013d1eb8567ec14732
b33ddabce34b5b1936f8344cd824aa0efa826097
describe
'346209' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBSU' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
6038da96f7b87bf21d5242390af7691d
2c04ccd8051712895c5add790046bab5e3af429d
'2011-12-17T12:47:55-05:00'
describe
'346589' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBSV' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
fff5af5e827d052e3dab9bbdc77ea7ff
f73538e35c4e90607e1555f74f50c547dd321641
'2011-12-17T12:50:27-05:00'
describe
'346366' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBSW' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
1cab465cd71762951f0a6c8cea0bf90b
9242d5ff638166d4afa2b4c836983edb2d8ceabf
'2011-12-17T12:45:59-05:00'
describe
'346257' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBSX' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
4e593d419d5dcf4fce6c0b52978bd0ff
30132a484b460f267428f7d29100c6d611c1ec10
'2011-12-17T12:48:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBSY' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
b71138302b441671b66cc28195ee3d06
91b3b8f178c014bcf314bdd119d5ee868aedaeaa
'2011-12-17T12:46:11-05:00'
describe
'346295' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBSZ' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
ea98173f0313627277d417617a7601ab
8005188cd4edde7710943a4871a95b386b90894e
'2011-12-17T12:51:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBTA' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
2c7512dc785b9369fef6880184774ccb
f3042d649958612021e3170c4616b8c270e86cba
'2011-12-17T12:46:42-05:00'
describe
'346593' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBTB' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
b5f1f6a0c485ce5d30980d03b098c139
eddc8ab54be6651dd591c4e5833e2ff9cae9ee3a
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBTC' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
629d388f0cce42a8279c4db0073b0945
985a9fe1ccb5f491216f5457dad229703ae6704d
'2011-12-17T12:48:20-05:00'
describe
'346637' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBTD' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
89d19b8ebb1aacad9965cb38ba645ebc
fe4ab91511b121e7a58d8ec84cf841eb00c959e0
'2011-12-17T12:47:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBTE' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
0ce40d8c21006bcd5d05742bdbbed0f7
215b233caa8fa5e6a6376f888a6fe32753f9f3de
'2011-12-17T12:50:13-05:00'
describe
'346304' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBTF' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
a6aef4f5acc78469318e116b6a1fea5f
e3fb8db1eb35b4d496dfbc120ec8e2e2895eb563
'2011-12-17T12:47:03-05:00'
describe
'346339' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBTG' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
bbfb7eda288adcdc6e118e559ba14946
74004964ede07113be94dcfe0511752afaa23994
'2011-12-17T12:51:33-05:00'
describe
'346378' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBTH' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
d4bf6fd4a307fcf4d57b6506bfa1279d
1b3cedfb37e40ca1a9ae30a7d31d1ac7babfbed7
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBTI' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
1a76f32c7adc360808efd29d161cb850
95d460f9adcd4efd3cc7c8f0630517acb46c23d1
describe
'346333' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBTJ' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
9fd6fbb608a6c9f99e6834a031ff8f32
cf349b9d00b5719946b30b1c468458463143078e
'2011-12-17T12:49:24-05:00'
describe
'346332' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBTK' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
4fd6006b73a522902db56077dd863490
d64530afc81a8634f5e9960177604c81f5e807fa
describe
'346329' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBTL' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
d2fad50b7b1efbf1ec8836ae99d137aa
7a7700a15784ab4e2b8b672bef6eee23e6f944b6
'2011-12-17T12:49:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBTM' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
0aa7cac2be5c2f005bff43de9c33b734
808d0a58c71e57e89012f7921a4e1201c6ec9f5d
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBTN' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
8ec7790b22ad84a3617ab3299b6d7b84
21b5e38e1434393bf2d68f7a602f3d8203ae671e
'2011-12-17T12:48:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBTO' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
5e9baec6f3b83082005f27915e388249
e8874bdbe213ed4f22c2d617242f00a034ac9e51
'2011-12-17T12:45:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBTP' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
12845b056a71b5fee07912ee9fa07bc3
d73254eb703d75381b0e1e199e2b1d39212b24a9
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBTQ' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
02069f43ba40828e4310643c4c24f5f2
efbcd32c10b2c515978ff4c4008e1de350a50a19
'2011-12-17T12:49:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBTR' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
a88d04588624c989fa9558bfb445dd8a
e64bda9f01721e956652f8b0e866447c0e9e31b2
'2011-12-17T12:47:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBTS' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
ee0b593e7688210cfd26795c5d481b32
c73c54238ac9bc736aebdefe6a7a8c1ce8539e0f
'2011-12-17T12:45:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBTT' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
5dc7eebac7d9aa380be9350eb79a6fde
24edff9c7a5a37e4429a3064ab9d37ddf50e2ad8
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBTU' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
a40c78ee4946ba679ebb756eb1cd7c35
f3cd9ddae120b604d5f47f3556c36eb9f45c621e
'2011-12-17T12:50:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBTV' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
03eea07d72aa350ff0797e6903f40a7d
e79ea3be367ffd24e5fc43f03f03cc25d5f85c4c
'2011-12-17T12:49:03-05:00'
describe
'346059' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBTW' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
e9618ea4fdf4a3926877ce355672a33a
458f4dc46aa421c7d21d80ad4c1f08dcccf07bc2
'2011-12-17T12:50:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBTX' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
db3f6f8300d4221a4787d709ff4137bb
823053a04a471d0e36d8c55f4e971ad31682e151
'2011-12-17T12:51:41-05:00'
describe
'346289' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBTY' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
9c1dea5024335e51f1e2dcc7829a6b4d
68522680b4e3f963d6e55480678951a15d842ecf
'2011-12-17T12:49:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBTZ' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
01c73079fcf2f6dd77188e6b54d7318a
2b051e5ace6185964caee601e08920028ac69bcf
describe
'346387' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBUA' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
c0ce09bd3cbd44e1223d769073484039
81da961089ab2c86d43a61c973fe61df7d868403
'2011-12-17T12:49:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBUB' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
d84b6519f4b9c8a3e25f71bef3a6f7fd
9d23c62990158886b2436b0e94d49b7e42ae1bc0
describe
'346143' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBUC' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
e06ca392af49593f44934ee6dd5ec75d
cc8392a340a7b5ca2d2c3e4710c265ba91c6298a
'2011-12-17T12:51:09-05:00'
describe
'346560' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBUD' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
3c22725f6f666daa60c0add39ef23972
92b541b0fb0eed183adbbb1bd781b2f44239cd88
'2011-12-17T12:50:14-05:00'
describe
'346382' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBUE' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
4597d375aaafcf66271e30918d1ac4ab
b405fc1cdfdf4142715681852c733d0a036abe6d
describe
'346533' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBUF' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
9d642748492f8f45fe2504df450103b8
6d6fc9b89e0f8d6030c6e94efacdac8abc9a5f47
describe
'346327' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBUG' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
95c71a971957792de99c3514918ce3f2
9db2aa9c0e41ce57e32d62f54d09f9445088b5c7
'2011-12-17T12:51:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBUH' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
bd6bcdfedef101e65179f32a7dd5134e
d3eda9564fe2b9ef9aa640164e027f71798a23bc
describe
'346294' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBUI' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
63314282842547787355a821873d53db
b1bdb7e8513df4a4fc3ded5898aa8d05a1269852
describe
'346587' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBUJ' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
61a0f801a3258719347aaa4206d93f65
6193a2516bfe7c743045171640fc0536bcfb20cc
'2011-12-17T12:46:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBUK' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
8b6946a736ae23f11044d034bc581d91
7f7b739efab2107b24a4070a025c2f46f76f6801
describe
'346598' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBUL' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
40ee2044d75c39d8ae53c57dc15e1d61
a80d83350d8bd8bec1918453b837c72735fd497d
'2011-12-17T12:49:17-05:00'
describe
'346342' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBUM' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
326a52bb948e2f35873d9acaa4e1dc1c
c7f8788bdd403e5616a38180c13d56552d171089
'2011-12-17T12:48:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBUN' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
ae04e48788a9930ddf844855b8d7bcbe
4ce973853d9e6439abb1461ec70a87d8adc7ac3e
'2011-12-17T12:46:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBUO' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
c7ad4ad134446ec421ed3b4eb3cceba5
ae8d085b2628415136bf549ffb807339e8926117
describe
'346243' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBUP' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
dc4ad465263b2c8e2df43dd73151d3ba
325c33569a631c191ad1bc8eb04b63a34ce61b2d
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBUQ' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
6373aed277ce91aaeda78e7aae652d8f
28f2e12957a312ab4183a11c2e18d12fe9cb2e4c
describe
'346625' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBUR' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
243deaeb5aec0562c128d2f8be7dce3d
d0afec9a771734b8c4b98f10adec51c464c0af7f
'2011-12-17T12:47:57-05:00'
describe
'346225' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBUS' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
46136976c527f8e968477ec10afd85ad
26edd3add149a10469dfa8e9d43528787020f65f
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBUT' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
d2a9cba82ea19e0874cb950721550383
87769e2fcefa311abfdf908629101ab258ab7d21
'2011-12-17T12:49:04-05:00'
describe
'346357' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBUU' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
d62f00132a412a0e08db413641a86c3a
84e1de0f5823d8b4067d1d255837b1f4bc7dfe58
'2011-12-17T12:49:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBUV' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
f76330530ce4a641dd50fdce0a9001c5
bfb45f970b57cde63008a78060b7a63a3b1d14ba
'2011-12-17T12:51:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBUW' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
6cc8e4eb5493c017f5bf770fa46f1805
9235a545f4850514ffc06510b80581870f9c4c09
describe
'346576' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBUX' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
ab58b78d688152186a9eb12600b69ba6
6aa3337553d411aeef00a110bae605ac60496d4d
'2011-12-17T12:47:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBUY' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
40534598fd4091333cf8bcc2c43a7f00
26d14e73522bfcdda6b58cd2109f06c9485f6d2d
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBUZ' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
6d4fda04a29f74411b0a361c9d937f05
1e9c78b47f8f1a39b1b958404b15d4ad80b8d4a5
'2011-12-17T12:47:25-05:00'
describe
'346130' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBVA' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
c67334844ba8a00b6c8cb094695ad81b
feb704dea12f55a040ad5d242e624450786e8395
describe
'346418' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBVB' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
1b40e46856f4920b83dbd6f50d81c653
c355250c2213739889a1de4b79efab9c7f6be9c2
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBVC' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
1eaabbb21548b1ef201c2344edbb127d
9334196c8daeecb542eddc5ec1b8312bff231a50
'2011-12-17T12:46:05-05:00'
describe
'346369' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBVD' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
8fe5c4e2e07b7210c134b450c3169bab
2377754c42cea8c29b481386cbf45aeef92980f3
'2011-12-17T12:51:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBVE' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
600468e3432de6763da05625814088fb
3311b310b2d5df8abccd46f9c47694de07171703
describe
'401849' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBVF' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
7c63d1ef1a26702522c1b496ac218293
f677c44f5d0089cf8c4bd2a8dd4914f85daf50b5
describe
'384939' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBVG' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
c34da48ffd82d54134ff8350d35dce5b
502683daa37643a056f0742bd064f4a6844fc25f
describe
'9775724' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBVH' 'sip-files00001.tif'
9ea97acf892424ed25e6e7bce256e152
55ccdd686844a4208e84c4f1f43b5c7116577209
'2011-12-17T12:47:40-05:00'
describe
'9658624' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBVI' 'sip-files00002.tif'
0b8c0a1f3c2e0bed83f3b72c52d91328
621eec12d40de307450b8c854947b09eb133647e
describe
'2757836' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBVJ' 'sip-files00009.tif'
9d2468d5bea6a3d9c3bc6166a48e6e7f
08b61a35c106b3e3616654b94c551acab7b1680c
describe
'7969424' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBVK' 'sip-files00010.tif'
ac84681c1afd196947636985f2e8584b
97e83085338bbc0f932b162c8883e044bab6a415
describe
'2754764' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBVL' 'sip-files00011.tif'
e973d532ceba86ff4bcdc1da5866724b
a21122bbca93ca4a4a3fdf3fe2ad39454a8cdf02
'2011-12-17T12:48:29-05:00'
describe
'2873864' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBVM' 'sip-files00012.tif'
6953de19e881a4f9e681d0dc1ab4f658
71873fd79b1259c821fc62aae982dbc2492de668
'2011-12-17T12:45:34-05:00'
describe
'2757080' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBVN' 'sip-files00014.tif'
1dec430554e0a1d8cc1abb07eb44cfe3
9dbe1d52eb2d610d547f3cd29f4859db8c93e850
'2011-12-17T12:47:44-05:00'
describe
'2791128' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBVO' 'sip-files00015.tif'
59805cccbfdbc8a59ce6612e14b4d587
d17b7e5045d1ab1729383bb4dfe8801aec820fc3
'2011-12-17T12:46:52-05:00'
describe
'2791024' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBVP' 'sip-files00016.tif'
4c54354da6ccc32ccaf27bf4afc0197d
591cb48656351a7c18db4e7b456c97fff6c88427
describe
'2791336' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBVQ' 'sip-files00017.tif'
30b4b422bfe3339fef6ce89abf559d80
1a858528ed3f3a393b024d91cfbbf73dccf4b9d5
'2011-12-17T12:45:42-05:00'
describe
'2789680' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBVR' 'sip-files00018.tif'
8dab03fd5059231feaa04e7a2401a352
86ac3b4e8e3171853ed64705376b3ec756506cfa
'2011-12-17T12:46:26-05:00'
describe
'2788344' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBVS' 'sip-files00019.tif'
0cf3d439e8a76134d631b46711916598
bf74e5b06577297d8d033cf04bae5cb340489c4c
'2011-12-17T12:49:38-05:00'
describe
'2790544' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBVT' 'sip-files00020.tif'
a76900a79b28dc7a3f135af141d40c28
447f579af11c5c8cec7c66063d4e75930201ddb2
describe
'2791164' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBVU' 'sip-files00021.tif'
de5e032f927ac5fdc44ac874b69f196b
3e6495a5a97e76449a183d2e596f5309477f1146
'2011-12-17T12:49:00-05:00'
describe
'2788784' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBVV' 'sip-files00022.tif'
4e63094aa554233f05fbc7138cff2cc0
edf44e57fc47ae52e8ae2f0260ee901a2871379c
'2011-12-17T12:47:56-05:00'
describe
'2788356' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBVW' 'sip-files00023.tif'
66a819f0104951e1b81326f583ece119
59d0ca1015290cd9e32fc6c7f9765407c27417bf
'2011-12-17T12:46:19-05:00'
describe
'2789296' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBVX' 'sip-files00024.tif'
6c57cd5ffaa3a90bf07fa54f4d3d767d
6a9ff0d3d1936c70dd832f364a33bf41fe8ed150
describe
'2790392' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBVY' 'sip-files00025.tif'
c3231ea7ab3d7c550bf1992a2d47a50c
fff9ffa9141091fdaf4535b4d145ae48f16d0ba9
'2011-12-17T12:48:58-05:00'
describe
'2788636' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBVZ' 'sip-files00026.tif'
a48d179350d03e9117de1a7434ed44ce
0a6d6459091c6d521881df3e1e51329bf592f1bc
'2011-12-17T12:51:34-05:00'
describe
'2790356' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBWA' 'sip-files00027.tif'
abc4a1d011b592590132075a80bc13fe
c7671814393e6dc01d48347795444f88ffc30717
'2011-12-17T12:46:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBWB' 'sip-files00028.tif'
ea932e5e23de5e6b18bb61aaa2de663a
5327da63535e6a5681456715abe5c4fef69c9699
'2011-12-17T12:45:55-05:00'
describe
'2791556' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBWC' 'sip-files00029.tif'
aa1038af2c98106eb04fab8f60e261dd
0cb680bfa5997751d1cb8b61b820f60c403f2c1e
describe
'2789768' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBWD' 'sip-files00030.tif'
bee6f5130bc4efae335fd84ab98abff8
f680f731cc993c6a3df1ea4516d6bd833edeadf0
'2011-12-17T12:48:48-05:00'
describe
'2789676' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBWE' 'sip-files00031.tif'
eb261df3043f786e6325ba1d97126596
7907b0272895ce612a8850b11961c08fa839942a
'2011-12-17T12:45:52-05:00'
describe
'2788512' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBWF' 'sip-files00032.tif'
a066be28f4c6b26ff319f3afd29f69ae
ce385954f184b9cf65f32781389104483514f7cd
'2011-12-17T12:51:46-05:00'
describe
'2788408' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBWG' 'sip-files00033.tif'
2ce0d0aa96f43dd25f6825d602ee8b04
4cc4f0984a986adeb5b82ea115634a0673e98e6d
describe
'2876296' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBWH' 'sip-files00034.tif'
99bdeb7f915b9a2f458b9ada2763984b
fb92e861cd0779f869d7c60febad16fbbcd3e5f9
'2011-12-17T12:50:28-05:00'
describe
'2791532' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBWI' 'sip-files00035.tif'
1bdd40061b4ac6712181b9ca27436073
128321c2a8789b23797dd3df60d28f57e62bc8b8
'2011-12-17T12:47:46-05:00'
describe
'2791388' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBWJ' 'sip-files00036.tif'
e4bc784e17a4f27ca3deb374aa565cf4
b86fb425e561b7d4d274318aa8ce9650425255d8
'2011-12-17T12:51:22-05:00'
describe
'2793020' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBWK' 'sip-files00037.tif'
77ca9cc54cacbd9f49a65bb742f24d47
b384dbfddfb5f3a142e764101dd02f8129222f62
'2011-12-17T12:45:31-05:00'
describe
'2790496' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBWL' 'sip-files00038.tif'
faba766a170b7b6d195d45e532bdf9bd
27d4637040f84c71319c0b70aa05f173385e3231
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBWM' 'sip-files00039.tif'
6e506126b2b186a2c3066f09b786f947
7daa4e105b6e7822563198c9817e1821311b14bf
'2011-12-17T12:48:49-05:00'
describe
'2790492' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBWN' 'sip-files00040.tif'
1e6b2d0fe10410bc2d7e19aaacee06e3
f30131173d1396ce4df21deb0af27e67b21bf82d
describe
'2793544' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBWO' 'sip-files00041.tif'
4ade76b0b49d7b73992aa8e5db9342be
9ba2fdae013de10d0193901264211c1d4052e3bb
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBWP' 'sip-files00042.tif'
fef2ecf5cbf9555b614014c9d105b14a
86ba66c784e25abd9e329979566bab2ce6d1ae0d
'2011-12-17T12:46:06-05:00'
describe
'2793104' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBWQ' 'sip-files00043.tif'
f8fc0072697bf357dd0dade9adb9d76c
fe08cf55d8eb06a2edaf0fc8c1b5803bd6b197a9
'2011-12-17T12:51:36-05:00'
describe
'2789300' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBWR' 'sip-files00044.tif'
2be992d10b0c3ce5bf443544888842cf
265f470d68dde547ffb6105d1d6c7ade42f5fca8
describe
'2788384' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBWS' 'sip-files00045.tif'
0492aa184fe09be9de18520812c18b49
a2475a8845c24a3e70a8638cad6b6ddd32480d3c
describe
'2790652' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBWT' 'sip-files00046.tif'
30333c3dc0b971e3ebc07b754186a5f6
2d232a4c12279acca502c251d6dc10d5df6c15fc
describe
'2793100' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBWU' 'sip-files00047.tif'
9ccb1e69d361d7118848e70f64879a8c
6d1434cc4a522334ec88821ca81a60f2d9a4e967
'2011-12-17T12:49:18-05:00'
describe
'2790816' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBWV' 'sip-files00048.tif'
39c4a0d7ec5a5b4128ed78ff98ddc3cc
671ad0e942194f6415c32ed7f899f0eb66b45358
describe
'2793156' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBWW' 'sip-files00049.tif'
ccc418ab8b45b84d974b5b99fa30d0dd
c32f482a902fb939941b06483fb8dfb9f3fc5317
'2011-12-17T12:50:07-05:00'
describe
'2791132' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBWX' 'sip-files00050.tif'
79b196d205432d1f3157b6eb8293102e
e14376b1ed40a31a4003fb52ea9478f0f63dfd41
'2011-12-17T12:50:30-05:00'
describe
'2793788' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBWY' 'sip-files00051.tif'
d27afe64f1e5f8735f2b12f169ac3b6e
1bb5295129a2946e1b7ad4e9366c64b816d4fefd
'2011-12-17T12:48:37-05:00'
describe
'2789248' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBWZ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
efc8a8181a8c6485ac4633a46d4d4de5
d119df9b9141f542ba64398a02bfbf557c1f5b8d
describe
'2788392' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBXA' 'sip-files00053.tif'
0c40e792203082e26d0b7c6abc0d3af5
3cf5014231006c01328831ccc3925ec3948dbe64
'2011-12-17T12:46:17-05:00'
describe
'2790444' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBXB' 'sip-files00054.tif'
8a9ccf62bad0f2f741571ee14b58340c
f421ccfe3934622bdcae2ffe58b0cacf60ad6514
describe
'2793348' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBXC' 'sip-files00055.tif'
e290fea59e8cbc35c2400aa3773005a2
42c9fc4bd93c176c4c686b79e0809aad7542ff9e
'2011-12-17T12:50:34-05:00'
describe
'2789988' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBXD' 'sip-files00056.tif'
3ac21e267802c058a67ca3cdeffe1089
f5cc9f47e9834e0f5969fd539ce12d39afcd55b0
'2011-12-17T12:49:32-05:00'
describe
'2793324' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBXE' 'sip-files00057.tif'
118e2b4b77aa21e79a7b7d4d14e498e8
34052602f6327e3007142b7e89a4e8e1ccce09b1
'2011-12-17T12:48:46-05:00'
describe
'2791244' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBXF' 'sip-files00058.tif'
bdf092180f8ec0024cc842af659d04d5
156995fc998c12ff9242b5772c4baa06c86cc38e
'2011-12-17T12:46:14-05:00'
describe
'2791076' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBXG' 'sip-files00059.tif'
48824ae9931c891fca98918dcb0059b5
bc7fc3dce939580b50feb30e3ecd9580490d283b
'2011-12-17T12:49:07-05:00'
describe
'2788896' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBXH' 'sip-files00060.tif'
8bfd7212862bbca961385fd1759daca8
62d48555f42a829ee1d791b20a314dc69dbc672b
'2011-12-17T12:46:29-05:00'
describe
'2788404' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBXI' 'sip-files00061.tif'
63acc290a09b76b26079ffb6e6a4e2b2
cf52842e767b7c3a425f083bc46d9b6ddb411426
describe
'2790736' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBXJ' 'sip-files00062.tif'
0de3721c8a399cc504810c6e83dc2e6c
999910b4ba503f1f39b9af2733c8e256c3b68476
describe
'2791420' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBXK' 'sip-files00063.tif'
a65d616f61fd6ff91735af299327a5a9
006a50f1c3b1b0dcabfdba478ba3d779dc702add
describe
'2791232' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBXL' 'sip-files00064.tif'
a34e7925437c45d6c7f4f6f409179000
6021d17cb695156c817f51abaac54ad18f42cfc6
'2011-12-17T12:51:39-05:00'
describe
'2789208' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBXM' 'sip-files00065.tif'
a26f153942a4309ecf7c893f000ade03
8940add982eae89f3a7640c0ead86ea577f5e163
describe
'2788532' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBXN' 'sip-files00066.tif'
af5fda214ce2445263d231c6e02d8f3a
7248d73b0bf552d80cd211124d808c2d51f4a693
'2011-12-17T12:51:18-05:00'
describe
'2788388' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBXO' 'sip-files00067.tif'
9b18800bde8f0ed5f976e8f11bcb1e58
5fda6c8bc00f45b6c6c934538bc9dbdee832ae18
'2011-12-17T12:48:42-05:00'
describe
'2788876' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBXP' 'sip-files00068.tif'
40cd8cc464c3f74200c13aa595d5012d
2b156b521d7861de266453257fc883b410389cfa
describe
'2793628' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBXQ' 'sip-files00069.tif'
2d47c5a5a4be556086a9473aeb3df9c2
3c50b928bafd2318fec6b6c8d784dd40aa72d314
describe
'2791196' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBXR' 'sip-files00070.tif'
e9f4729a405c70160a4e97836230a15d
285433e9a5be61b0d0e31a6e39ea13d4573f1fcd
describe
'2793244' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBXS' 'sip-files00071.tif'
6ed1d3aec9bc32a58b1716862600acc4
720ee362d4afce89f5c731de0562076fb40d2439
describe
'2791444' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBXT' 'sip-files00072.tif'
7d8ced90cf00bf72ec3ce3145445772e
e6273ebd7a2156b6142d61008f9f9898792f0cb4
describe
'2791380' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBXU' 'sip-files00073.tif'
b7f5a367385260d81409b44fa0394f71
ab2c378aa373d2dffb629384684b4b4f3ca1544e
'2011-12-17T12:49:23-05:00'
describe
'2791268' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBXV' 'sip-files00074.tif'
d72ea16505e6b2e166e46b23081fe3d8
ddadbad924cdac6b7f4f741ae4590905d483ac4e
describe
'2793476' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBXW' 'sip-files00075.tif'
1a4655174b0f89e511c2d4e4c510dd6c
92661528ca477b1204d967465a792f51e7941367
describe
'2787156' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBXX' 'sip-files00076.tif'
6331510b6605cd9617c7bcc6a22252c0
5afaa9bf8d9688bb847f120d59fe89313593540d
'2011-12-17T12:48:55-05:00'
describe
'2790388' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBXY' 'sip-files00077.tif'
6cff802827d9d1a5782a5672e0a0365a
7e1ac0b07cac3c3c764c3043d2d26988314e227e
describe
'2790696' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBXZ' 'sip-files00078.tif'
136835d17124b75f47dbf1bb77a00338
13df445c494f0bcb9b2ab6c89f9adbb095fec326
'2011-12-17T12:49:36-05:00'
describe
'2793732' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBYA' 'sip-files00079.tif'
c959a948d11b90b80f2ec72ba9da056e
d5a23bd1cb1bd576d69734e5a45158bbb9c54745
describe
'2791636' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBYB' 'sip-files00080.tif'
5b53aa259b0d25ed79c7797f92d1ad81
1483f21f234ebdeafc38b5754471bd98243ba3d8
describe
'2793212' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBYC' 'sip-files00081.tif'
8f7124699bd683064b5541184fe466df
42412257787ff089893f28faee59fc565b38fd9a
describe
'2790636' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBYD' 'sip-files00082.tif'
961e3e84b110597a1b17526694fdcabc
e0d1b2478bf289c53894f80b6bc3834881f9086e
'2011-12-17T12:46:30-05:00'
describe
'2793572' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBYE' 'sip-files00083.tif'
1a7af44e5054a01b3f73e481f94c6c63
3dc0b573689ae7518d4c1fc7f57a232f766b7fba
'2011-12-17T12:46:02-05:00'
describe
'2791488' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBYF' 'sip-files00084.tif'
f29b1094acc2a705674df00a62803e65
1569c6dc0a89b75fd3cebfaa1c1b02719528d4d9
'2011-12-17T12:48:07-05:00'
describe
'2794248' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBYG' 'sip-files00085.tif'
5753c8dbf1adce21e9b6184a1a1d881f
ee19f7b19e31a9a34da9c90e824f5765e3cdd5af
'2011-12-17T12:50:37-05:00'
describe
'2787908' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBYH' 'sip-files00086.tif'
c552a7c602b86a7034cf3bc37244af81
1160c93282bcbfab32ffdb51c6764e4475717e96
'2011-12-17T12:48:03-05:00'
describe
'2790376' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBYI' 'sip-files00087.tif'
8b9d549058f013302d566e62abd71d43
28bc01032da7e4e9c70f1560f2a0f00ab549cc00
'2011-12-17T12:48:16-05:00'
describe
'2790936' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBYJ' 'sip-files00088.tif'
493732c3f971e3ab0825b1909604605d
d754c72082791256aa6536cda800399eda663908
describe
'2793284' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBYK' 'sip-files00089.tif'
9695bdbf64e3f508315e0fa2736b13b9
45046f9efbdcc77e4a6d85c70aa652a99a99e079
'2011-12-17T12:46:13-05:00'
describe
'2790168' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBYL' 'sip-files00090.tif'
d85e1911a1bf7d328fd346b92615c6e7
695e714a3650b9b10cc6f0190c57a8f9939ab05a
describe
'2791752' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBYM' 'sip-files00091.tif'
bc507046dfe4d8325f96b063ec42e9b3
81839c5b189ed4154a58c08534822d0575ce4ded
describe
'2792348' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBYN' 'sip-files00092.tif'
29de07b2e46f755893754cb3355603f3
a8088162d63b2379abc2e80f2d12e95af5c7caff
'2011-12-17T12:50:05-05:00'
describe
'2793856' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBYO' 'sip-files00093.tif'
15429f673cc34065b7267241c8d353dc
ded8ad170375d2f15a6433547a9ad583ff65c73e
'2011-12-17T12:47:45-05:00'
describe
'2787168' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBYP' 'sip-files00094.tif'
ce57eea871a5331ad39f5f2db157e23a
caa66fef5e015a14aef60212d251781b9663338b
'2011-12-17T12:50:09-05:00'
describe
'2790340' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBYQ' 'sip-files00095.tif'
8663b4b066d719ae365b2a3ac79ad807
564c20fe2890afe6fb8636213874b27f315cc5eb
describe
'2789112' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBYR' 'sip-files00096.tif'
210a2069b87869750cad808acd92c7b2
6711e22089ce3a5ba88dc63b0ded0ede5a7a6416
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBYS' 'sip-files00097.tif'
a958af655117f67bbd8858c913ef3171
fb3c643d28539caf004b0f2809d1e19f941dc943
describe
'2790216' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBYT' 'sip-files00098.tif'
820a6f517e02413501ae49646b1f3075
31f6395a0d16fad6d1d5b07751b5f75ccf9cd7d4
'2011-12-17T12:50:44-05:00'
describe
'2792096' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBYU' 'sip-files00099.tif'
4b07af33fe1cd114ade7acd6d583fa0c
8f1cb7c8526702249e008ebce0a0004be04f7033
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBYV' 'sip-files00100.tif'
8dbd50fe9566da4deeec0731c720cf7e
7df67e0f497828a32833f4f7e0266706e4b9007a
describe
'2791860' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBYW' 'sip-files00101.tif'
285aa2d2ea3abcf4ebd94b17bb4b239f
2290d179894035487654a25a3c0d020661a85056
describe
'2787536' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBYX' 'sip-files00102.tif'
29870095834612456467f3c1ee62d1d9
385655d490f03590f0ebda8e61576182ab678e8e
describe
'2788400' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBYY' 'sip-files00103.tif'
4ecc6f2ace49d1848c6cb6f8ec6d9229
4edf5919b7d94d8c7fe9e9adde673db2fa715835
describe
'2790720' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBYZ' 'sip-files00104.tif'
1cba658315a6b51a250964489a556b13
7af79e636f79ad7854445e8573593c26168edba0
describe
'2793744' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBZA' 'sip-files00105.tif'
44bfb94ceb59fdf74069f8e2bf9ed4a9
d04214c3c888dd65d30f22e05faaa85f755bcdcf
describe
'2788900' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBZB' 'sip-files00106.tif'
5b63f38adefeb645f6a130738ba545d3
e013205961ce91fbbf65132ee40842aa639bedef
'2011-12-17T12:51:12-05:00'
describe
'2790368' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBZC' 'sip-files00107.tif'
accd04605a41a2f5a2ddbaada1edbb91
dd3fad811283fada9f9758bfaf48b6b907e11802
describe
'2790740' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBZD' 'sip-files00108.tif'
391487d66dea28c318a04e3636f716ff
47c54a829ede9e7dacdef7abfc1504a82849fa2e
'2011-12-17T12:46:36-05:00'
describe
'2793556' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBZE' 'sip-files00109.tif'
760fdb9152d240af73d425315ee995d3
22da6b21de12cbabae15b384895a9a62ec3f204c
describe
'2791520' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBZF' 'sip-files00110.tif'
6bb4d3e6f446f257f5ae6c7798497a3c
b1d04ed4f2c0c04a5fb61ae94f4c4657f2d615ed
'2011-12-17T12:46:21-05:00'
describe
'2788916' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBZG' 'sip-files00111.tif'
77c68b8712856c809655959b238a0f32
dc9f712eca930a1d4737c980cffc2c563d99f2ca
'2011-12-17T12:48:17-05:00'
describe
'2790972' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBZH' 'sip-files00112.tif'
fdb1042f7dba9797be837551e12eb4cb
22c7daccc86bf786d58222134c2b23a11b708555
'2011-12-17T12:49:20-05:00'
describe
'2793608' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBZI' 'sip-files00113.tif'
0b2a35823d48be6be2dd140a12908aba
67627a5275024044a6424827a0dd3a4d52dc7632
describe
'2791688' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBZJ' 'sip-files00114.tif'
86181f59aeb4d42d6f4e0eb6123c4829
02d9dc5523d222a644d5e9d65d9744a91855c7e7
'2011-12-17T12:47:42-05:00'
describe
'2793968' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBZK' 'sip-files00115.tif'
664f89f9b36bd35e40027aeee41113cf
dfc14367acb2b6d87f29c5e37be1ab1d01e448eb
'2011-12-17T12:49:52-05:00'
describe
'2790260' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBZL' 'sip-files00116.tif'
698565504cfbf3f4e8c4cd691e10dade
a15e216d3e9ec1198cb16710c4f84dca28dd0f25
describe
'2790316' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBZM' 'sip-files00119.tif'
88294f89cf9a182b5f5d6fbb13588ec2
d6ce6b26b29cdeca9e6996b5ca3fdaad7b13feec
'2011-12-17T12:51:13-05:00'
describe
'2790592' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBZN' 'sip-files00120.tif'
c078fe3a26e8b847d9cd419defbf1e43
42414509354331a9a782dd344790d4d30185d169
describe
'2788340' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBZO' 'sip-files00121.tif'
d74e502755717a9b87b9ffaf6685f432
10e47b41821e4aa649477b643c377836d4adb4fb
'2011-12-17T12:51:31-05:00'
describe
'2788476' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBZP' 'sip-files00122.tif'
7a8c53e074819ab590bf15214e06567a
abcc192fb419d1258b3dc4d19865b7c0b510ebd2
'2011-12-17T12:50:36-05:00'
describe
'2790408' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBZQ' 'sip-files00123.tif'
77cc7f7a26fb6e3b0e8dc258a39a8d15
ed37e7b8be665c5e3ab17d234a8224c245fb3856
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBZR' 'sip-files00124.tif'
3fe7dca5596ce96dd400387d235d1b54
6107c87ac796aca525c40f417f00b7ec652cd9bd
describe
'2793428' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBZS' 'sip-files00125.tif'
c08ee61877fb8d74f5a150369c619c1a
b767785a79599a67e2647d632f95734f6e2c608d
'2011-12-17T12:48:04-05:00'
describe
'2791364' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBZT' 'sip-files00126.tif'
12eec67bbaa20845e7981b60b324d52c
db70bae66d04b0e9358ea185ffc5cc3c5d391be4
describe
'2790404' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBZU' 'sip-files00127.tif'
743f7d730ab29b2961b336b49e3b3254
fa124422bdacabe2f6e052b541f06371c9be9380
describe
'2790560' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBZV' 'sip-files00128.tif'
1bf070e4e21402f5b8333ae891418cc2
2458f27beb7baa1b5ea1e874eaccd11e8ceb87e4
'2011-12-17T12:47:59-05:00'
describe
'2728504' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBZW' 'sip-files00129.tif'
ca45c0bdbca0010f4f10b705b73eb9d3
3fc30ff7ffea9e4cd65068dff39c0ccd02758328
'2011-12-17T12:49:49-05:00'
describe
'2791176' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBZX' 'sip-files00130.tif'
19c445e00285f20206d37cc5b00b067f
3aad02fee3b591d2efb14f1a78ad88fde1e3a4d4
describe
'2793464' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBZY' 'sip-files00131.tif'
b1937980b290ebc191d1c051f56bfb17
2833901c7b0c22f5f0360ca9340f332bb72ed7b5
describe
'2788244' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABBZZ' 'sip-files00132.tif'
6f458aec42bfe2118ee7fbe257cc9a5f
7ba36ab646a01cfae3e451a1ea9d5ca58a060ba6
describe
'2790320' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCAA' 'sip-files00133.tif'
388f49635e232daa0483f056807fc0f1
5fd87460f58a8b83a7d06ccba206ee0a916eacd1
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCAB' 'sip-files00134.tif'
473236b8c96597623d645aa1a5f17248
808a7508d4b76196d57d28e0f4f91b54efda1226
'2011-12-17T12:48:25-05:00'
describe
'2793228' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCAC' 'sip-files00135.tif'
a458f997b91e6e811bcb50232ffb968a
f682b847f23fcd15d3049a5f0e4cc91722d24a91
'2011-12-17T12:48:12-05:00'
describe
'2791672' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCAD' 'sip-files00136.tif'
5ef73506a2393a83e340e2a57e36f230
305fcc9ae3c3f720745bf623e05450e5b81275d1
describe
'2793452' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCAE' 'sip-files00137.tif'
1f0b3eea8517a7a624d4028820042a74
2d100deb2431a013ea682ade36aa077a70fcc107
describe
'2788516' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCAF' 'sip-files00138.tif'
f93f49b772807e55db5d58483b3c9f76
d2cef2ba32b2d853fbab54211f57b93a41e5428a
'2011-12-17T12:47:18-05:00'
describe
'2790364' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCAG' 'sip-files00139.tif'
f846c79f80b25299d7cda2acdba5f6d0
418d3c44ef71f0422f15c1dd867ff91cc3688a0d
describe
'2788964' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCAH' 'sip-files00140.tif'
372547ce3c188357a138b78a686fb6e4
49ff40469986f6804f32bff3cd114c1d63bb35b5
describe
'2792148' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCAI' 'sip-files00141.tif'
74afb7c36a74846dcba10bd19aa8b162
117d67b65f19d24ba0ba48b6a6731d1575ab7348
'2011-12-17T12:49:46-05:00'
describe
'2790268' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCAJ' 'sip-files00142.tif'
19590f4d0b0f239f05eb678ef309f17d
18965f56b4aa59af01a5d9aeb41a9c8b1066b05c
describe
'2793288' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCAK' 'sip-files00143.tif'
27d6cc1547f8b37f3d684f910428658f
964795bce18e270f5e722000e75428eff5061d30
'2011-12-17T12:47:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCAL' 'sip-files00144.tif'
4d1ef5ba2e9275275a3af5d7c0a1351e
0b2313b9bc9eb5f9696c6c508902a9f39cd63c4e
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCAM' 'sip-files00145.tif'
abc6c8f7a5e371cb6cab7d265d67ecf9
2767d3460c52b495564fca4224873d78a21ea709
describe
'2789348' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCAN' 'sip-files00146.tif'
4ba69d1e9e6f91e7885452b8c3ec0b5a
648e6480e660bdb63cec9168808e71ab98162f66
'2011-12-17T12:45:30-05:00'
describe
'2793764' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCAO' 'sip-files00147.tif'
f2aff8ab9dd5b52e499cb0d46cd6262e
3771d56cdb63cf678138ccda28f5f275d0143167
'2011-12-17T12:45:53-05:00'
describe
'2790280' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCAP' 'sip-files00148.tif'
4dafe7ea36c1528b6cc322905f292c96
fcb8422b0efd4e4ae6d6ba66678522cb7814856d
describe
'2793720' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCAQ' 'sip-files00149.tif'
07b3c826e989290904f690ff95bcbd04
a3b7d3ea21cc9201d0c8ddfa5867c1294aed05ef
'2011-12-17T12:48:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCAR' 'sip-files00150.tif'
530b5ac96b15da91479c0cfa8c78bed1
16e4a3cebbeb3a2a609181bcf54e46e3b592b5b7
describe
'2790304' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCAS' 'sip-files00151.tif'
cb7953e126193d4064ed4c2f6c3d5200
b0d87f63f6f8c2498f36728e65f4cc8d44832110
'2011-12-17T12:47:33-05:00'
describe
'2787148' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCAT' 'sip-files00152.tif'
66a09e8d6efd0ca7e26300cf658309ec
5e476488b985535a325e44c22c2d8e13b4e76b57
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCAU' 'sip-files00153.tif'
7faa91d37407ae6c7857432881a28cea
14ffa7f8ece8933e610b372f53ba8aceec79c1a8
'2011-12-17T12:51:19-05:00'
describe
'2788836' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCAV' 'sip-files00154.tif'
803400f3d7a2abf4aade2fac9c254da2
005a448cfb9f94387acce19050999b394a1ed122
'2011-12-17T12:49:33-05:00'
describe
'2794032' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCAW' 'sip-files00155.tif'
005d79d9e9d9ae9209bd64c355186657
71b1b8c60e62c1e0d4150bb4109a4498d0339256
describe
'2790236' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCAX' 'sip-files00156.tif'
7db2adc8d45f83715de2705964235a98
87da161facb836e7ef616ac4d43ee6209a912929
describe
'2791848' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCAY' 'sip-files00157.tif'
65c2ee339292e17179ffa6c1154d4aae
f263cbc5c2423ab2cc6786ae3ae77cbfdfe779a1
'2011-12-17T12:49:51-05:00'
describe
'2788500' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCAZ' 'sip-files00158.tif'
0e1773e1b58e2236a7b0649a00edbf0c
65e5a5491cc71349f3275ac29564494151ce7a5a
describe
'2790452' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCBA' 'sip-files00159.tif'
76a488b8046342e5a4bbfe3c7a3a3c06
be0649121832328fdde06c8e10414ad8fdceaec5
describe
'2790700' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCBB' 'sip-files00160.tif'
8f5e629704c7d8ce6e1c42f3b0e9013b
e63b66ef142f91d0a9d1f0c284220ddbb8a93e64
describe
'2793736' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCBC' 'sip-files00161.tif'
4066d4c085162a4f64800fea4bfae358
f4034ff4198cbdbd52309a92773362d5d4bd2253
describe
'2792328' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCBD' 'sip-files00162.tif'
502fd3129bb41fd20dc70e53d1a26037
110bb946db4cec624d7d6c060565372ba2353eb2
describe
'2790488' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCBE' 'sip-files00163.tif'
212efe4425e5b6e5709da03e56bcce64
d8d1812c44a4ca9758cf1df71acb55a7f2d20ccc
'2011-12-17T12:50:31-05:00'
describe
'2790156' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCBF' 'sip-files00164.tif'
e65ab8ef00b7db8e2f5c00c4e7084ba9
785518761684fb55380e72993bb54536d6f22838
'2011-12-17T12:50:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCBG' 'sip-files00165.tif'
924b682e7a6a6db0026b125feab573e4
4c9aa9e3b8aa16fe6c2f3f066ff938c09c038076
describe
'2788620' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCBH' 'sip-files00166.tif'
247a8ccd3e63aee52052c706393af356
b57e896d95a06d6b9d6827d71f064e4b9653c82a
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCBI' 'sip-files00167.tif'
53dfd2d673b369856383b7fa2ba1503b
93457e1cfb5ef8f97d0cfe23b4c2bf3ffdbe25bb
describe
'2790540' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCBJ' 'sip-files00168.tif'
34afc7602fb199bdf7f932e4b80a7a15
552da7b33b0626b9c0cfe304128439e47c23b4c5
'2011-12-17T12:45:50-05:00'
describe
'2793648' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCBK' 'sip-files00169.tif'
d09edae284e9e4743bf208f3c4f74d2f
aebc5eca290165104101ca40411c9bde96a71d2d
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCBL' 'sip-files00170.tif'
8ea9ca1b48c7f636e464f94dbc4b5d06
873c92d7609f47657edfe502db8d36a8f4277588
describe
'2793528' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCBM' 'sip-files00171.tif'
2a42a5a8a1f44a3607932ab8f0d36d34
54527c1cfe70cbe72124083b4dba889ed5f66660
describe
'2789380' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCBN' 'sip-files00172.tif'
6f20a082e8deba7c8ed4da91fd29d87b
38eb87e900cf1531f640d3c4b4aa0aec8598a53a
'2011-12-17T12:46:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCBO' 'sip-files00173.tif'
6a8789ea9c2b79d4e41e14a3f4373491
b5a0283f2604fcf5571064c94a6e6a861ecb972d
describe
'2790372' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCBP' 'sip-files00174.tif'
a8615c00bb321badd7042c5ddba736de
c369fdcbd3eb92796f9daca3e8e7f2378da126a9
describe
'2791280' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCBQ' 'sip-files00175.tif'
1abacd27ccc2bdc8b8c3fa4010012582
d0484d3a985cf4ea3e3de0d7db2f6a92204033a8
'2011-12-17T12:50:02-05:00'
describe
'2791588' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCBR' 'sip-files00176.tif'
ffddd30bfe6baaacd044131ee2ca0b97
87205571ed96218f03171c7833649b96c8612027
'2011-12-17T12:51:21-05:00'
describe
'2791288' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCBS' 'sip-files00177.tif'
cad46a4813c9d3dbf27614cfd886a09a
4e94c1fd35477d3d73a3f9a40dc19fb948783ebb
'2011-12-17T12:46:58-05:00'
describe
'2791536' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCBT' 'sip-files00178.tif'
7a243fa259b3e29bef7beb71b8ccd20f
ba3c1bc754f5b82a87cf1aef39a2cbb080812a54
describe
'2793596' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCBU' 'sip-files00179.tif'
437b9018a1bcf9b1232fe9d81f4568fe
fa4744c4163edada705c71cae90340e044275b30
'2011-12-17T12:49:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCBV' 'sip-files00180.tif'
29c79e68b07e684cc4e41c0b6e5c5410
a447a90e3e5e9de081f5548eac8915004e97b5c3
describe
'2790332' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCBW' 'sip-files00181.tif'
31caac80d39b9320e8e4648f6245f3c9
1205bf6bc58a2bf31ea77527314870e9dcbe6e17
'2011-12-17T12:48:09-05:00'
describe
'2788656' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCBX' 'sip-files00182.tif'
757393ffb6a688f60dce04b46ae6759f
86bf5c7af2df0aaaaf682b9ce952c0893f1cda91
'2011-12-17T12:49:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCBY' 'sip-files00183.tif'
62a120f6715443bcf10190ce80d884f3
ba88c6b2ee0f257ecb8dd27f2b7541045884de68
describe
'2790752' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCBZ' 'sip-files00184.tif'
1d327286ff233b82a105c7fc3d420af7
3ee40452c6676d93c990e6f73806fa931b9ec073
describe
'2791464' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCCA' 'sip-files00185.tif'
71b518ca6512e7ca0f1c3c197500c170
d332fc16282edbc5975eb8d0cbb9d62ec8c511fe
describe
'2791984' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCCB' 'sip-files00186.tif'
55b10436fd8620e37eb576257eab25ce
46097716612f112b1245555e45495c771fd4669a
'2011-12-17T12:45:54-05:00'
describe
'2791192' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCCC' 'sip-files00187.tif'
31e5502f0b5227b14fbf128c59615f57
295e27065dfac9a107de4db8b89f33a70c740682
describe
'2791604' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCCD' 'sip-files00188.tif'
fa0411668057949d87c79d63341f74e9
81d2d2c41ce692ba2fb84adb1ba3382c1eea5564
'2011-12-17T12:50:19-05:00'
describe
'2791440' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCCE' 'sip-files00189.tif'
5895183f8509a429a0a3686b303b7aca
c56383f1286afe98e318e1cc6a76d3e21baa3620
describe
'2791252' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCCF' 'sip-files00190.tif'
23a0aef83cc1c61105b6202cde04a885
6b8f37614004666324567f6fa037f722cd72b978
describe
'2790808' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCCG' 'sip-files00191.tif'
146176907df8f0968f14405280a31214
ed4af9200172e1a49e1a8a4495bffd27666743cd
describe
'2788488' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCCH' 'sip-files00192.tif'
4cc651fe99b39ba93f6e4721bd0922a5
b1971442e4a26214ff8feb11cc44aba1ec3ab25a
describe
'2788336' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCCI' 'sip-files00193.tif'
29b8d679278572b23f0bdd354f05646a
4c7827fa50ce2ff70079abb74078637078d0599c
'2011-12-17T12:46:44-05:00'
describe
'2790384' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCCJ' 'sip-files00194.tif'
b42b274ce9a6b6d5cbfaa4be16431cca
248d90e2276058e971256c99281beab72b394f6c
'2011-12-17T12:46:35-05:00'
describe
'2791784' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCCK' 'sip-files00195.tif'
ac473bb5009f299a63bda51039d19750
6afa8c1a02f689e9ed18162a78fe1ae819a2c4fc
describe
'2791772' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCCL' 'sip-files00196.tif'
6cc8e0c397c68ebd3f9459d5d044edcb
5f3ce6bde0b80668afbf17157f1d1ec02125b5e2
describe
'2791204' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCCM' 'sip-files00197.tif'
ee6c8049c45e4cc5a5c9a05f1c516e90
1ddba4a5e9365e0d2ecf0379e358cd5f618d3868
describe
'2791936' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCCN' 'sip-files00198.tif'
44e3d561df92706e80ad0de92ac3f030
dfb0bc0f069495ab9bd05e70216a047e7f39d8a2
'2011-12-17T12:50:15-05:00'
describe
'2791944' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCCO' 'sip-files00199.tif'
262e3a2e07b19860b42391a7f149b9c1
4869b7983474ac081991201b39d47f422989d8a6
'2011-12-17T12:50:18-05:00'
describe
'2788508' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCCP' 'sip-files00200.tif'
64f9221968c6fc6b617f65831bbfbe9c
6391e67793ad71156d8f278ef2d942d449fcc73d
'2011-12-17T12:50:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCCQ' 'sip-files00201.tif'
28514d06a4abe0b6340eca848200c632
bd2f4128582251c20151603a435386ad37b690a1
describe
'2790940' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCCR' 'sip-files00202.tif'
ecef96158338f803b1f4767d260a74e9
01b31cbb891b5394a09b9733717c8b1ca12205bd
describe
'2791304' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCCS' 'sip-files00203.tif'
2ce3c90fa3f29c5215a3f54cf6331c16
4d1815c8c051116fd00d0273df23ea5996ddaa00
describe
'2791408' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCCT' 'sip-files00204.tif'
2c056179e05103bc3e77c13b517d9844
eb84098179fa0d8eba1a8cee21923ded419643fc
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCCU' 'sip-files00205.tif'
8b4d885f58f23ba561a6dac3aa65eef2
b2d4585f1873954db742bb0a74ee39465482fa8c
describe
'2791724' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCCV' 'sip-files00206.tif'
8d5f76838a57fc03e7b07ef1d00e3c61
a5ddf3e619b571c68731d425b3c5d3539bca9f58
'2011-12-17T12:50:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCCW' 'sip-files00207.tif'
4b34a7cbb0a19d85cadb252f23c46265
432eaa782a75cc30e33c0f8d50a1bd371c3487f6
describe
'2790148' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCCX' 'sip-files00208.tif'
e962994a723760fad2370fd00d9be00b
c1c36284e5dd210bd89e3b21ee446673e681b6cd
'2011-12-17T12:47:47-05:00'
describe
'2793108' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCCY' 'sip-files00209.tif'
0e3d24b4b3e674c10d446831ad7da378
e126adffd93edfb0526c2d067264a8f9f1174608
'2011-12-17T12:50:16-05:00'
describe
'2788644' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCCZ' 'sip-files00210.tif'
e2064a15a6b5b4c579968f9d2bc05868
77fa3392f947fcd57babda1389d0912ed2294d93
'2011-12-17T12:48:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCDA' 'sip-files00211.tif'
e3b97e2abd1878651c1724636ae237a6
6f16c6c13c8d6506027a860452aca97831281a47
'2011-12-17T12:49:29-05:00'
describe
'2790436' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCDB' 'sip-files00212.tif'
55d283977f45716585958676d61c1201
73d6cf9ff2850f912afa91d029029666a2fb51a6
describe
'2792784' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCDC' 'sip-files00213.tif'
a24f24c6082dbc9ea06b8a59af450596
b136d70ab706ba347d65eb4b0426bdbaeaeb2117
describe
'2788504' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCDD' 'sip-files00214.tif'
37f7a08980f0c3dc97e8b66e99bfb096
3e922a6f7d5e452d5caf2d5f0cef47e916e093f8
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCDE' 'sip-files00215.tif'
a1a795b3126e5608d7948b9c6f5a9d7b
39a1b32e778018537b86507be87054704fdf62dd
'2011-12-17T12:50:08-05:00'
describe
'2790728' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCDF' 'sip-files00216.tif'
1342bb7f4b97883ee2f6a2351f7d970b
1b4ee7b9216317df98cd3b836ee7535be7624ce7
'2011-12-17T12:46:55-05:00'
describe
'2791396' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCDG' 'sip-files00217.tif'
79a3bc277f84f29a0be6e567bff964c3
52bdb684493a6851fea88a952ac8662dd24d1d9b
'2011-12-17T12:46:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCDH' 'sip-files00218.tif'
30948a503730f9951f30ea602925dcbb
6ee86aad55650884cca27ad7ee6fe107a145a112
'2011-12-17T12:46:33-05:00'
describe
'2788828' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCDI' 'sip-files00219.tif'
b33dbde4d106b089cf9c29ace3bbdd57
fad77dc8beb0f14a095aade12856bb57aae26c5e
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCDJ' 'sip-files00220.tif'
c8e8ff240516c0e24c89c735e0a27bb1
13a20cc9e7445c2fa9e518875c40a8414279e5c6
describe
'2793364' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCDK' 'sip-files00221.tif'
234d1606ca303d5760a8d34b3d4e5364
bbb4899f0df6b38007935c38b0ae2ee24276df64
'2011-12-17T12:47:52-05:00'
describe
'2789236' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCDL' 'sip-files00222.tif'
5a167cb2ce5255c6e99dad6593ad66cb
8de23c46dc84ec625eb1766a40493c98193c62d2
'2011-12-17T12:48:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCDM' 'sip-files00223.tif'
ada442b714a1624f7bfc447598a8af84
06dfc31dfee64105809164d430cdfaf819e788c3
describe
'2790828' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCDN' 'sip-files00224.tif'
604ed1bdddf335981a6213cffc3a3d31
9b986e69550b6cb724e1cdc0b1eec6d2e7f9cf2f
describe
'2793048' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCDO' 'sip-files00225.tif'
06e255b2a1187a4e48347c845565b194
a5be411f384914144f8ca49e2ef5475502298b5d
describe
'2791340' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCDP' 'sip-files00226.tif'
42de8445fb7cf2a399e4a743ce917180
0b7c12590984bf8083c8367ef29eb8e7a603175a
describe
'2793728' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCDQ' 'sip-files00227.tif'
b7d738dd64939efcc42eb937fbdd3051
db71c7baacf4154dd66c5512ea1a64aeba07fe38
describe
'2791512' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCDR' 'sip-files00228.tif'
99b3ab6d2c0e121d71434926386532f7
66c17e4434201d5f4a5fa8f0aee52271ca62efdc
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCDS' 'sip-files00229.tif'
2983c7aa3abff92277643ab1ae0fe2ab
59181e716a83f73609a69c675084f4c90c27e53c
describe
'2788520' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCDT' 'sip-files00230.tif'
7c25e42483f3dddf2079e941bd06ffaa
fd9c481120202a0e7e18a6f56230c35344566f0e
'2011-12-17T12:49:02-05:00'
describe
'2790324' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCDU' 'sip-files00231.tif'
bb87ef90b33f488d62dd8a1c74e15c80
666d676d7334d789cdb1867b41cc2fbd1c92ae91
'2011-12-17T12:49:48-05:00'
describe
'2790672' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCDV' 'sip-files00232.tif'
722ac5f0d50b8f80c03acad858377ade
4f60b804429fb62f79c1c32cdef6aa4e1dfb17a9
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCDW' 'sip-files00233.tif'
a86642cb579fce223e95e72cf19297ed
af10ffacb26dfc9e490cc77ef52a33212f9bdb8e
describe
'2790796' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCDX' 'sip-files00234.tif'
2c27d4271de950cf4379a96127dca808
8690562f208e2e735bab079866bf9b351bbda28d
describe
'9669344' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCDY' 'sip-files00240.tif'
27f776e96bdfa8a0a163a0378bd4e29c
a5f5610d0c2c325176a792b8baf806534f3e4fa7
'2011-12-17T12:48:53-05:00'
describe
'9262996' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCDZ' 'sip-files00241.tif'
a04e35b1f3bbd41974efbd3f864c0e0f
afcf852146bb26c18c05fa07e0ba2bebe2b55e5a
describe
'602153' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCEA' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
9c12ab1f513a68709a88321823ad761b
e03d15dd5fd3d8c8c859da71c0f65b915444d1b5
'2011-12-17T12:46:53-05:00'
describe
'380149' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCEB' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
09c0056f5ab6a3418a081338732fd893
bfa1f2a6a847b7bde3aad4ee20caf81530cf7a2b
'2011-12-17T12:47:04-05:00'
describe
'404425' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCEC' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
a07222845233d60b265eee0097ebc7b6
18c65d25f632095e368672c57e8eec8e9e877918
describe
'350525' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCED' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
9660e38b05dcdbdaec6fe750ca6b93af
762921ec4ed08d52703e7f4bd69c4df78d5839d8
describe
'202805' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCEE' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
a7546192b5ff9f1440242921842aeb92
c84fcb8077005955f62f8b5aae81de04dcfa4a80
'2011-12-17T12:48:19-05:00'
describe
'226180' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCEF' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
f59cd1bc8207c117ce94bbe920db081a
83eda80c63cf9cca3934e60e2d905e5d8f3462f7
describe
'319160' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCEG' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
f76b99f36123a96be1474c85009a76e7
6ee0a61d24e0c71a2dff04eb22eb4bc1482b8e00
describe
'341143' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCEH' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
81e99673e7126c0d176b82cae8f861dd
632119f4baf6a481eca278b7ba3e9085c61872fa
'2011-12-17T12:46:18-05:00'
describe
'345178' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCEI' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
16d0350a647c6383021a6dadf3b49293
7030dd28270e18d98265e8d68bdaa24aedcf98dd
'2011-12-17T12:48:40-05:00'
describe
'340184' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCEJ' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
4321166c74ab88a911e704f3d3d210b4
6681f863ea13d94f67db34947157149a5725154c
describe
'268137' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCEK' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
e1676d202bcd6e93703d4dc92f83e8a5
1689191f325c1ffa4de00e44d4453ac2ba7bd6f8
'2011-12-17T12:45:58-05:00'
describe
'198921' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCEL' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
59f01032d9329d5823b3375639dd2d37
1181e0f6aed0b61df550c84670e1f93dd8b1554a
describe
'305036' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCEM' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
4d27d18940234497f78c501964298cec
361bcd6f3faf65d028c4cea7ba2415bb7e4b02bf
'2011-12-17T12:46:27-05:00'
describe
'338081' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCEN' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
f148918df4d40b563ea8f6d8736f21bb
094310ecef280ff0c0a3671cb93af754d16f57d5
describe
'315270' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCEO' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
a55ca4010925e3380c5682d30204a2ce
deb8d6e25bfadf5f72c7b69c9d84e2c36103d2b9
describe
'232101' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCEP' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
f67917efcec97151556b8089a4996fb2
810c72ba3072906b93c45884a287b31aac5d96ea
'2011-12-17T12:49:22-05:00'
describe
'279158' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCEQ' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
66ca21725a6cddd4699962c17206c45c
7e657fe1a33b5f33baf175d3c9f5aed19f82d7da
describe
'242825' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCER' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
74ee1904b6bcebe8cce89baa2ffcdaa6
42e5d5d12c3970a93c5f21240c82e0c08b1f8818
describe
'245018' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCES' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
0c4aed4a039177612e2f5ce0731ba52b
57b78700d73c41aabf93ee94e6751c0a6e5d6f09
describe
'223035' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCET' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
c5ac511b60742f387ab81b54da9cf0bd
86d17dbe78e9d408f546adc04798087ace35ba6a
'2011-12-17T12:50:52-05:00'
describe
'326243' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCEU' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
9bad3fecac0867300e6c62dd1c0912e6
155b1c13ea73cb092701246aaf0a3273c610643c
describe
'377448' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCEV' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
e298b6d8567cad8db736f6700440bfb9
3925a283233b1a8b6513f6f2090f5525ff8e60da
describe
'339192' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCEW' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
67d604fbd69f66b930f2005ac20866bc
f42e0187e41b0f6f8ebbba8ac6c4dfa23cf8b27c
describe
'278199' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCEX' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
31af2c74cc8e5a72a44ee5b341264104
5f283a0f03983b0f970abaafca64d67c79ac1c66
describe
'230921' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCEY' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
e1a06d89f3ae076b1f01a25c198ef922
134e9318b58847479d8cba7f73e8e83442e58f40
describe
'204368' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCEZ' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
776a59bf677f9efc0558a280b2d62c91
a64869842e1000566288fcfb47c096ea4200eb66
describe
'305586' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCFA' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
364c42ccf2f5c41bac2e4bbd7eedd12e
65333fe3331f5510e7d0298c26b311a177f89b04
'2011-12-17T12:47:15-05:00'
describe
'338642' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCFB' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
c0c4597e66a423ee004506db91f855c1
d4274fcdc6a51e7080284e2a7c13e8dcb5cf0b71
'2011-12-17T12:48:34-05:00'
describe
'348777' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCFC' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
151c1b75f3e9693ac75589dcb3652605
3abd7065a10fb7a69a0830ef2be74e20c0c297b1
'2011-12-17T12:50:10-05:00'
describe
'347129' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCFD' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
07051740e9140daed70de9928920057f
1ca431ce9a876a4649f30a2ba7d6564b94c0b80e
describe
'328291' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCFE' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
4fe4f5fa2cd924073d68f31fd0228e15
fa69dfd5b3ef95e526989c8d6bf04b46496ba484
describe
'281691' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCFF' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
d0711b7af8bf22510b04d217db5e2d12
84e9cda26aed02ec2d752bd85fa3ff3cc263abb3
describe
'323505' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCFG' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
1dfd646526f733bf80e479aec1cf9dd2
fc435093664220dbb8fb90908cf5f13eedd887d8
describe
'359052' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCFH' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
658bf40c21858b2697a80c938f6c2953
67b6ebf8949cee03b565fb6346b12f156e26868e
describe
'354712' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCFI' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
6b71c4d09dea134030767eab5cbcddc2
286262a4d42dce0f6345d0a7e1eec693d9b1fb5e
describe
'330579' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCFJ' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
45320df286eeb0f35f1aa85f016a8f78
3348237aa101f25378d27e55b7fe5812bd1b0b19
'2011-12-17T12:45:38-05:00'
describe
'261459' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCFK' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
cd74bea6abd27f4f429f14c1d28776d4
6dbd8f8dcddd4c1e34605b161deeeb21932b1750
describe
'207215' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCFL' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
c83fa66620195f96d80b7062e772bb17
81c1133c627bcf10415d3ab60f7ec4f8afda3fd7
describe
'312888' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCFM' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
7a08756761613901aa88caf35d51a6c2
f7593ac16c8508a92096773b1471d4aedfe2e4a4
describe
'336394' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCFN' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
e08d8d653be8f804c4b726f7b35a7a2e
a64567eae3f007efe32657b8e477555d38f9f65c
'2011-12-17T12:47:13-05:00'
describe
'319670' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCFO' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
fa9b465a00201090a0a013c48fc3fa07
564dd16613675a224e5e9690f711202781d0cf87
describe
'344079' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCFP' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
7f3f81a8a1255ec17a27b194b3d87848
e92ff9a6d32dd6e5f2e9bfa9cab7dfad338b110b
describe
'342420' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCFQ' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
f295841057aedd69fec95feb19a3fd28
ce26c7c38360b00e3649261f4b541ca80c9b4207
describe
'349401' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCFR' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
f1b53084d090bb35ab12a71e0b228c8d
c418b50f0569872f0b840f7255090b1722fcf9e4
'2011-12-17T12:49:09-05:00'
describe
'251913' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCFS' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
8c7efd17410b93b86daf7c52f75d93f6
6f8be6549895a6b529bd6aeee5a4fe8cb38da6a6
'2011-12-17T12:51:27-05:00'
describe
'209144' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCFT' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
cf6e0b8e5c99c955236d4b0f34d7faa9
4d03bcf407a2c20ff8951249e55b2fbd0cf2559a
'2011-12-17T12:46:57-05:00'
describe
'310935' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCFU' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
f9f690863651533a6d83ea1f11af1677
d234551cf6528e89bc68e2bf30a7fee226ad9f8e
describe
'337566' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCFV' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
039771b9956e95a5768e322bf33a082d
595541f85f308c22a2841dfdc0040fc9c08e9966
describe
'337286' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCFW' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
02ed81cb031a115811ececd347b54c40
fec506c5a02c886bfb08b37ba8054989af05ce5b
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCFX' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
e1fc2dfbafa35b8675d01dce876a7418
1370cd6811f2b4c07403e33522e37fd2f73f82c4
'2011-12-17T12:46:22-05:00'
describe
'328171' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCFY' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
9ccf36770132f08d2fbb28fbd4576087
45e655cdba0990a1fa80ae8b161f75eb721105e3
describe
'335901' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCFZ' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
7a0fcdd486ff9261698a96127b0d1a05
0a7e123a2d2e5539ab50b06511f7f3ac32bf2270
describe
'293876' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCGA' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
46c327b3cc29a43bc813e5fffa9eec35
0207c4621da7d130d2eb3ae020642b3386a6e2a2
describe
'208708' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCGB' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
c1698de1276b75a7ab48aef4483cb253
3c640c65bfc72b4926a0b9481f0d7bb89a1e3723
'2011-12-17T12:49:43-05:00'
describe
'311480' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCGC' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
59b2e3fc6e6427d72ff3736ef82b49a8
2effde9b6e8eaf4ecd49b4f202e7fea3e9962f12
describe
'345439' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCGD' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
6a25eaa2ec4fcadc70373155c3782259
7313a882a19f43d1723136fa6444e2a5c69e5181
describe
'334510' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCGE' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
be96654d80245b36560e852adec1c78b
52e80a4e3423ba71f7d3ff8fb015416e2f3e56ed
describe
'249329' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCGF' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
93a9d655c03181f929d01eeab60e53a3
0a44b69e4472895167e74081999d9e74161abc88
describe
'211136' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCGG' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
7862da5fd05bdfcf04811af27f4f0ed6
a0a159df2c6aefb55b95565cd80d6d1141e9106c
describe
'210448' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCGH' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
6e7e1bee2d9184129a62edced7641aab
9bd65ab4f226c6c0315ca9e24c25321596174bf6
describe
'291368' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCGI' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
216eabebabedc40eb60faefde6d8eeea
de7b25dd5789a3ed47ffe63a5fa47a2dcf6a392f
'2011-12-17T12:48:18-05:00'
describe
'358706' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCGJ' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
a1c15334d99f152acbeb2483fa2e6b78
ab137d04aa842012608e6d05116262b29475dc85
'2011-12-17T12:47:35-05:00'
describe
'328873' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCGK' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
332746ef69b585c9fc20b556a181d325
653483e296cc040a6399854e4d2d1717f4bf24e8
describe
'335590' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCGL' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
3f9b8f315904e4e44e00643cd82199d3
b3633704e4a379f69f0ff6c8b68fe5cbbbf2415e
describe
'356520' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCGM' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
a0ee70a451a33bdaa930970d6969d412
f36e829605e161dccf2d9f48341c017b1f4d1e04
describe
'356482' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCGN' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
32bff5e8d3b0e83b1d1f957160d30987
d7711bd4d02acc7615199cc980097f02249d7123
describe
'351814' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCGO' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
4b8cff4a2cf00e1f188d9911f531e8bf
89f82b0419f92420cae9161f9d40441c3d79dedb
describe
'344661' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCGP' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
90ca958c79a36181d15d707c8a4f947b
8695cd0f27e7ba195875b43358760384899be0a7
describe
'225228' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCGQ' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
ba501c7c95a697a5fbdfb362c6660afc
6d3d0283655f2d4b8f96dc51d2e722160b55ba0d
describe
'220364' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCGR' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
1408de0e9968c11f38d638c4d5396e06
e25069aa38e78134256a45fd8c9d2c71060a3835
describe
'322595' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCGS' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
29a2e61d0f7aca944f8220932bf9f4d2
8b3de136ee7c1f99d129cac09956761fb0fa06a6
describe
'356802' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCGT' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
935b7ddd52e8e3bcb84b052e352d7e9e
d1f5259f87103e4134515375ac7886aebbf88f76
describe
'350609' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCGU' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
6c3f45b933a5a94b137f952529b109ea
f17c4ba91aaf99ce38eff0d2b2a3e27b4b011beb
'2011-12-17T12:51:38-05:00'
describe
'349108' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCGV' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
70a4f8c1c16885a4753e4b4ae0f515bf
7e72c12f3c3635953294f60af925e65708168254
'2011-12-17T12:47:36-05:00'
describe
'321167' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCGW' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
a4c76bcacabdcb8630cc68f7754b37ef
51101102c91d9d9e99bb0a28b3af65b3a61d0073
describe
'351106' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCGX' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
382776dbedca48485230e0af24891cd2
34b3a642356861661a77c2c7d4fd969608d48c82
describe
'345117' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCGY' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
b5463a29dbb9829718628312f8dd01bb
de699303583b9d9974eec0ba57c165230a113e7f
describe
'382862' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCGZ' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
41dad0d3f35bd6265a3a9538d1241e7e
05f3a5fbc9521bc582b3b34ecdf5df8af6fbaa25
'2011-12-17T12:51:43-05:00'
describe
'271506' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCHA' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
5e52e1d729e9be3e315097c177db20e5
0acc3b05072c3c51e67972176ebc80a3249a4a61
describe
'230096' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCHB' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
9a22fbd8eccc54287e011a7fd3eb9fdf
3d3eeccc8e6bc7661d8f079d24376e1e6b838772
'2011-12-17T12:48:00-05:00'
describe
'332186' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCHC' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
c9308eac48e52f155b68ad821ae4eda8
6a8aac97005a98dc74def07d4786389eda70146e
describe
'358338' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCHD' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
9cfb2896d8e6bcfad5fa304b025fcb6d
3036c499cc9156f61981a2dbeb9c6537d629d296
describe
'353956' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCHE' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
2a2acce6d8735065e60818e258ca3b18
ff8f99a8423dd5dba7b4d8da784ff0cdb2c02d65
describe
'362194' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCHF' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
e3579cdd8cfac65d9b652e7efaf7002f
d0e21f6519b98628038a96d0458a159aff46a855
'2011-12-17T12:47:58-05:00'
describe
'440086' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCHG' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
4665a107f3e7cb2c929818d3dd3752f0
f638c23d8d766ae3e317b63423c7d019eeba611a
'2011-12-17T12:50:46-05:00'
describe
'361653' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCHH' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
094c8438e356af96a5c68fc6abfff95e
500c887825bfc38908a49233b125287dc2879640
describe
'219101' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCHI' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
e5b9c91ea57c76c955672e259dfa3c43
c8327243ca6344e996dfa8f4134021fab189e522
'2011-12-17T12:47:51-05:00'
describe
'211778' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCHJ' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
e2890875144d706d28d7d9c0f7709a6d
c0b54951e4bd7cea543298177e026b01acc2fb34
'2011-12-17T12:50:04-05:00'
describe
'309668' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCHK' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
0108ba13b303044c1dffc43b63dde2a3
6f8e61efb4e9cf2bfcc0ff440eec9fb0ef024a83
describe
'357344' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCHL' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
d7b004cd0e447eaac35ca3392688b055
96f6b42d236d64f35e4e82e6baf9ee6f0b20788f
describe
'349658' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCHM' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
0acafaea6a3e56ad4fca390517fe7c10
dd983e39b212e21ea82b573ae774f7d208c29794
describe
'300234' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCHN' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
928ad68acf58adc2a38176f00d15491c
3b0318a2fb2fe32753448c6a1640096b38f1b8c6
describe
'319766' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCHO' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
e4546f301d67a6741e0a1011066d6a4a
a8ca215a15b689ab2e21f3c8eecdccb13ffb9dc7
describe
'362152' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCHP' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
7bfc2ee0234bac27d381aadf6b448361
8517b2ee193eb7f76c1b2791333057df326d5d6d
describe
'238667' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCHQ' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
f5b2ed4e4e366fe18fbfca0b79416478
00ab23e62038278c6346d3f65bcfb0a3347fde8c
describe
'248197' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCHR' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
f4c1cdafd90f21d957cf8fdc99ae252a
851e54d9d25ee8da5895ff8be821c105985c7130
describe
'328398' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCHS' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
8aa3f5017a3d16648656c35d096dea73
8a4564690c254f9fe5c989c3c3993050b9397338
describe
'365316' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCHT' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
56e49330a87993d9587add0740c5d273
260d34005e801672530ff514d5100985c76ec0c2
describe
'244357' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCHU' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
4e5f90bc486fbe8f1a33ace5054e739e
ce68f78b5872f0df12a8a66ff2b15368708b0d2c
describe
'239564' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCHV' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
933b98cb0470a5e2a756d2d18cc4d5f1
66b64417bce26303f05ed4cb4f8aed3e1477b29c
describe
'333220' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCHW' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
25c1d82c9a98e207c1930aa6677fc21f
e919c84d16bf32f7aa7501525f7dd224eafa720a
describe
'345440' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCHX' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
e309396343d7c9221b4a40964cb89978
ded2e07189307155cb473c910b8e5c3cccc9c5fd
'2011-12-17T12:46:43-05:00'
describe
'344138' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCHY' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
b060a6c423379e683876634edb65e8a7
24afc4c6bf4d07a08c438525f54c5d1f1688b740
'2011-12-17T12:46:31-05:00'
describe
'261631' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCHZ' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
490300324d9abd0a413e955a9f6d1a88
3f1a454cc63f0e07674188159d4f02c2dac479f8
describe
'334947' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCIA' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
b59629ec2bbde8f872c4f63f2440d0a1
0485f297ec153f17d642eac2ea1b91d0fdf6e49a
'2011-12-17T12:45:39-05:00'
describe
'359832' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCIB' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
044f09e436cd51198cb90441b59286c7
d170419fdc665bad2216a44500f7f417c7823857
describe
'347136' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCIC' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
2e7da6cd5601bdf0f7c269b1b6461956
aab9ceeb38d29ab549162ff39fae8b971134bbce
'2011-12-17T12:49:31-05:00'
describe
'380436' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCID' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
ca886612a58912889cd34b3f08a3cf86
70b8f735151de98c947991547f2d516994f647dd
describe
'362355' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCIE' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
e9388cad7f325b039ddd567ce2d667fd
0e3b2c3d3181cc6481adcf2f0847e9099abe256c
describe
'158812' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCIF' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
bc63e87352b90179aaa5a38a8fdd480a
288475e51e621d95590c41dfa311d4d45d0a00a9
describe
'251630' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCIG' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
8cb395339ffb0e3a25bb61ff1f786e59
0c1249bfd3912316ffda4eaa66d5c42f997d6c90
describe
'180931' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCIH' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
19f0e454b511f087b12215738ab7916f
fc44c6cf4e4daf81e005ba284db5c091573c01a3
'2011-12-17T12:51:44-05:00'
describe
'196998' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCII' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
7d4fe709779b2d59be191e8d9bff13da
cf9cab50d7d355fd11219c9a1cb775527fa0366c
describe
'165342' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCIJ' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
bfd5f6cbe5a142102ec93c883a2b850d
ad1d1be189626e22e984ab87b3dfbf1eb3ffe645
describe
'273076' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCIK' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
b3dfe3ddcf925f4c664a4542ef46941f
8afb4ef1103968642ccf4ab42e31607493b4fa28
describe
'323793' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCIL' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
0f032eca223935b7a7102516bdda1590
939104b1a97c3056a6e3be7dab085bd66d5f3f7d
describe
'325890' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCIM' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
e7bdb51199925cec17e60ac59b3fbd83
3804fffcfaca8c16128ca61e56323b41bb1690f8
describe
'176043' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCIN' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
e9c2a59c95b8a4f366502f0e60085d96
1b832ebd7493c26b42e06dd8db7d28c5b65259dc
describe
'288549' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCIO' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
3ce0582bb6a92ed53bbd1e05e603b8ad
8406f15de02c3104fa7b9e0dedb7d948075a5a5e
'2011-12-17T12:48:26-05:00'
describe
'345976' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCIP' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
c6630b9d69cc0d06ec7d601363d7657a
e2193330555af4b26528589b409afc1d80261fa2
'2011-12-17T12:49:11-05:00'
describe
'333664' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCIQ' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
3e52416989278cf0d873ddf6e3566acd
6109da627ca0f53abbe72cce23176d15256fd489
describe
'319289' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCIR' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
13604c5922aa6d4151a6f411b90d1cbc
483dbbdd459c9a7d38315657b4fbc4815c02012e
describe
'249873' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCIS' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
8a9243ff7a44766b5cfcd1010101f018
5816634797b0f3614892fc8d6722af995623a53e
'2011-12-17T12:47:23-05:00'
describe
'157595' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCIT' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
e49e4238b31695654bbd5a13f5c416b0
b41fadb3a35ae3407880cbd35b254f16aadff0f3
describe
'278803' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCIU' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
d7967329f82b635d67d8e6cc90e44315
b95aaf060efc312148464f8c714459a5bdab4808
'2011-12-17T12:50:12-05:00'
describe
'319142' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCIV' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
750944a8ee4d804907c466dbcd74808d
b39e9192c349ae55b3e99c5c5d33d0c86b1461f5
describe
'334661' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCIW' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
65a08b7733305615c489009dc24b85ca
034157f9f241691ce4373f973e926c0a11d223cd
describe
'307289' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCIX' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
338a2f055eb1fdf5e08c30e34d37e5b0
38901c2c04c40a6e97647989769bce8259029f3a
describe
'165527' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCIY' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
5ebadd0bcbf82cb2ee1989b8f590d67d
6b7e9e4e9531ed5014c3ee92f54325ceb98b78c1
describe
'167886' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCIZ' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
32c6427e6d8bb07429c95d267cbe3165
906ac0a5bc0578968d93b5b7ee68089a4c725400
describe
'258889' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCJA' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
93d5d064d63e0445b8f705f395446f02
bd76220fa9ef044f314c47aeceff1a79a5dd5fa4
describe
'348183' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCJB' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
9d64d7e4b823277a999b564d9e4e5bcf
ca0c0670156b79e2f3e5ef78c1e4e027f7b569fc
describe
'316692' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCJC' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
949408e822f765c9a3ded68b1a4a8375
f70d7abf977d8b498aff0cbaf6c3bb93466a7eb3
describe
'293733' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCJD' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
9564eae05ebd4117554d50c32710e0f6
939987c8acb421658c6396db0215d24267af5521
'2011-12-17T12:47:02-05:00'
describe
'242316' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCJE' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
ba104d1178140aa73c0b7a4b77b18f76
59bf9b5425a81577b1e215be9718a83ac467ffd2
describe
'181935' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCJF' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
d4acc32ca0e64fcc70ed27b914419faf
14757480abd71189f8492e166a8e086727a6b9af
describe
'281474' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCJG' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
c7dfba958a678f749aad35f022a209ed
b66b4a912dd96ebfca62d7d008b709cf8519ce9b
describe
'312283' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCJH' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
1f489ac2b3fe435bfd2ab882b49b5c45
b6f02bdcc1f6120b51f7568c45b3779d516b8a67
'2011-12-17T12:47:07-05:00'
describe
'319239' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCJI' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
94f7476dbfe941b5430f2f2889899cbe
17babd009d5addd570dbd9c77c618720d3805e4d
'2011-12-17T12:51:40-05:00'
describe
'327626' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCJJ' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
a4db2550b80c8eed41bb697ee4674ddd
c1f8d38f3cfc637941dd47349d28e29611dbee05
describe
'276210' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCJK' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
4a7fea6d875bb8f2dcaa01e3754b2d1c
8000c4ec9598f3cd8545a27924eed989f584c0ef
describe
'165186' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCJL' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
2fed16fb89ec76de64a8b6c925ae5570
e8b1d92a0d5a86fa8aeb1eb510180f5f60c67ccf
describe
'171688' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCJM' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
3b9f4792374f148d224a9b6e28103213
18f8c78bceff155229b9e77973b4de0fe35f01a2
describe
'154496' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCJN' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
983a8d106eb04e289a5ecbb027a71851
763f1a7bde5696af9d9dc4b351283ab726acb9b1
describe
'248353' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCJO' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
83a113a07a722748ec8e5333fe97c538
86fa794c3e492779d2ff788c3c36ca38dd546a61
describe
'350667' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCJP' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
0e4023ddec52e832fff91969e8199d9b
3c749a2f76987cf3586fc3102632bba9fa8cdfc7
describe
'316013' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCJQ' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
94572ae9c305584e425e609a7595dbf0
de63c27766d6f49a9fa6be90b09ef4f55cd4e637
describe
'236165' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCJR' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
a33928df16f5ccf78bfc172863b51539
09ec064275e8f3d484c5329a1ffaa991ae58d019
describe
'162918' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCJS' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
c749c803f6b1e2dd918d8b712bc1fbc0
1fccc0347d00d41814d88e9e1b387294e91f7c66
describe
'265737' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCJT' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
d0048dcede43a0bea42765d92b9a6d6f
a1d62fb8183827abd955d24e6e3ddd879428ba53
'2011-12-17T12:49:59-05:00'
describe
'327259' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCJU' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
fa25adb563f7a2d8d1ae88309ae7f288
33d11b136e6ff064bd2a6521d8b5bcffb54b6f98
'2011-12-17T12:49:21-05:00'
describe
'312340' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCJV' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
aad1a73157d96d2dda44e3b2f713f67a
5fb9a993c5a2cd5e0b947df122f1c519da8d5863
describe
'334800' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCJW' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
6c67ac76ffcc2c81a1da581b7cfa16d5
6977e6e5fc7f905c77897b2dbf7864dee0dd1f5d
describe
'350109' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCJX' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
bf45b2003d9c9c48ee4d87a782f13082
f678b36a6534a3208fb7b1668f595bbda98ca550
describe
'267515' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCJY' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
89301ac74d91f10e25a95fb610061af9
91018a7e24c0d660e4b2fd6055eadc7427b825fc
describe
'170087' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCJZ' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
ff71251320b66d9008038321b17af8db
cac17a4ed5bf67fcbffe6e4a56d9e31eb4183c10
describe
'169418' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCKA' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
1fee0389827532fcc20efbf976ca6475
23a3ba33352aaea372a6df6974a24009286bf6c4
describe
'167538' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCKB' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
53416b6c56afb1b035ac7114400d9c79
0dedeb336f230f769948a83d7ed3eac95c6a1d1b
'2011-12-17T12:49:39-05:00'
describe
'294485' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCKC' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
9400bad6b4f54df3c0a61e18c57af4bc
6a8efb376719b13e7afd5b9f44e888061b1fdfc0
describe
'314017' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCKD' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
d072772fe0a5402c0f9a067a66babfdf
3a015d0d6d09b610f330bacef7c2789efb2689b8
describe
'324517' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCKE' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
2f19d2e72e0e67b97d7e524518f12349
f137da91cb52d4caf69a347dc5101e316998cb83
describe
'319852' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCKF' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
48c66a2751996489059c66cdfcc087f0
2d34af4aadc54c47a5674e0410dc9a3cf914693b
describe
'222047' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCKG' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
676e31b403334df70e3434e522d91c89
2cc535973ec3109ed6e0e5b0e5d1e8821c9a4640
describe
'186201' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCKH' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
152b41577f0c57310f399b588ceefb0a
3b2ee45b6eab34e44c5b15a6b8b552faee4389ed
describe
'282927' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCKI' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
a5ff276077c58803f8c5c901f7553e74
5d8fd2425e3424b7d80936e803f828b8700d51c9
describe
'308954' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCKJ' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
f4b103f9a5546e995281865a56db42b9
069c21fd56cbead9cee324904edca6e8e6906370
describe
'315977' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCKK' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
922a5cd7fe2c6f82c78e2eafacd898d1
de3637b6cc93e63b156a9c15e114adbb4b786403
'2011-12-17T12:49:57-05:00'
describe
'328441' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCKL' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
36c56e4e5731f05efa1114f74dd74b7a
f981d4c199185eae7bbabbac6e1067cf8bcee7d7
'2011-12-17T12:51:04-05:00'
describe
'323515' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCKM' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
011bfd41e96f12532e4c82d63df0be92
149743301d176687c8fb55b8eff1df1b77c9dfa4
describe
'307583' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCKN' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
b56cc25c963488cdd3c8f4bf39b59a69
c8249d7e57417536753c1e0cecf891174175259a
describe
'207764' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCKO' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
130ab973bfa063cd19ba501ee7efec03
6b9b4ffdfd22057e733fa1d8a7be16bc9f5ff056
describe
'166453' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCKP' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
7fef60d03ef0746ce19b7ae81e71b12e
b238344f77ea3f972bce00ffc8ae909c006aa4f0
'2011-12-17T12:50:01-05:00'
describe
'178893' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCKQ' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
be6332a38c2159c8ad8ca6b11c1b42c1
ba743b25be2698e30bc5d27db346703569d93d88
describe
'163452' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCKR' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
2dbf64af3e442697ab7ba7b71c18abf0
dd3bbe75bc135fcefb8e3b5b4237165d8ec72668
describe
'281915' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCKS' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
f3457987b6ad76acc8d94603f4e1d2d8
7a13cde1c9f2ad59aed702c96cad740e23cf7d5b
describe
'305472' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCKT' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
3e745472a6169e9859f568f78d2d89fb
2e90d4752dfc522372f6d8992f4748738381e5d8
describe
'339708' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCKU' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
661eb5bb10442ff3ceaf0878e663ff2a
383234d3d9bb07941873b0c4e6a97441bb70061b
describe
'314706' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCKV' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
020c3845493ce364d65db087b8ba36d4
27f8a9aa467335512858225829e2298ef2e3b5e4
describe
'328078' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCKW' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
3ef10518f7357f39b242ca6f5d454b13
636c5319fdd67bd916809c2d015cbccb12f22d60
'2011-12-17T12:47:10-05:00'
describe
'322543' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCKX' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
8d97bba55eaa824518c698648dc0e66b
98e577552f9cf809eeefc6ce58847cc6673ddb66
describe
'326037' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCKY' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
8ae19dbb262cddb2fd10920cfff032d3
01b6f95c30ed9da92867cfa9d427344919b990ad
describe
'302920' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCKZ' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
cb0fdad36d503ec494d90f5210a8be73
cc6c9e61d42260f9b693375ef756b29e8f8f70fb
describe
'189544' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCLA' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
7b735658c284d8d83431bea26ef57b19
6b9c050121ec59702d041064c131b5203c61f702
describe
'166832' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCLB' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
96c3d90a6ecbe4879cf709b3d1cfc90e
1626397dd202a27685d6738e42e9104721acad37
describe
'271445' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCLC' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
b17cded36b08ca0fed52fe59723707ab
7130a846d96f4672635aabf60a5efc591e931212
describe
'353591' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCLD' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
d552449059c852759db9991e6f324c61
944c317ff4e4530ea12d46d16cfb7647c4f3753c
describe
'328511' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCLE' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
5d132b3a500e211c2be46e75cc1416d2
a5b64cf5ad4dbcb56bcb097ca8130666627859df
describe
'303515' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCLF' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
3b0f19537a6e6f71b06656674a82fe65
197744eef75e31dd936e65daea06cc62597848ea
describe
'333326' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCLG' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
591863ce7961e53599c6ca0fd83f1455
0418710ca8af001dbc4c5944f9a5f7183ce25a45
describe
'251226' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCLH' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
8c112d2fbb3fcf838a1fb6eb00286cb5
869ee8ecba26335be672d4e090e34c05e16792a3
describe
'188092' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCLI' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
6e9e736b640d8b37b92232d29e5b33cf
5bec94d461e4e7d7f65b4f3ed4af25053184337b
describe
'167720' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCLJ' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
8688bbfd26d14a5e4671182fbdd82306
5f56b40908c2de4db7018d93d64750927e35b7d1
describe
'297428' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCLK' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
ed7f4cbeb40033b555e02151b1e11ff8
c4287130f5277521a34eb9942b96792370785270
describe
'317785' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCLL' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
23002224e64d955173d1b91c58c8b639
7e0b85077f93acc3deffe975ce1a012dde528329
describe
'326634' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCLM' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
5bb883ccf2f63c80c6abfd98105d375e
4e55079e912bc299c0db54644649796ad062ef60
'2011-12-17T12:50:50-05:00'
describe
'307132' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCLN' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
1bc4a8f315cfd494c35b5d7106b48509
c8dc3a5db28db11185fba3697542600d7cc57e56
'2011-12-17T12:50:51-05:00'
describe
'338600' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCLO' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
48df6afbe147d822718a8b855bebc83d
d8c10d3a462c8995703fb0fc48a48f2f85c2c2e6
describe
'246036' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCLP' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
c5eca7aff062428d06bd716e8f8d83b6
89100721d3723dda9867daaf8f2b4396195ca44a
describe
'270924' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCLQ' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
dd495b885f846a8801050423740e03f5
6ff61fa262153222a081590003e19eb7389a9132
describe
'304980' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCLR' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
923efaff01f4f34061d7abc29869965e
d268e168c13dbb00797918a927c4555e96cb7761
describe
'201443' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCLS' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
17c50cacc5c4f00d048a2d5cd1b28c10
eace937d38ca7396e277be7bfd385717493fde53
describe
'174319' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCLT' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
fbef720f9907c3563a489cdc1da19c37
c297e205fabd48396ba0d66687c8b5bfb78ab889
describe
'284284' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCLU' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
096a7c49c97bc21621ed573d90bb1faa
1f1e7d8a6e3422e79bfe8aa1067f7535c038189a
describe
'290743' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCLV' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
35e0d6e31e68a51dd60bb6730291462c
dc52f9feb38633a7c0a501afa901c3e2d2936a9d
describe
'181840' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCLW' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
4e28a752c29e053e320be8a915da922e
4b7f7bcc1b700fd9e0655e5038419224c6b78596
describe
'166691' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCLX' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
8aa9f878a060c0cb5e1167390b21d8ab
b8ce308a00d265e34a67bc72641872df02ad5bcb
describe
'286773' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCLY' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
303dc59a36eb1b0c7501356925f1a679
fbe13d69df9039804a9ced10331009ce279ec2d8
describe
'302493' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCLZ' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
b1112a62dbf5f0062ed635c2d85101a3
ac676acb62d762d41f3a83fbd5984b0cfb4250a6
'2011-12-17T12:46:23-05:00'
describe
'303059' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCMA' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
09b8bfa69145241502e20f24df86321f
5a0ac1642e47b5cb10293564657873ab5468dd7c
describe
'196693' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCMB' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
4fec7da5d291f5eb9b76b79e4c2723f4
731a22197d05e1569bf74f4941efbfa8b95105ee
describe
'292373' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCMC' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
4ad4be56a466143a4bce4725ce428f03
ef7a16f38913adfca74eac405fd004fe45a19928
describe
'325367' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCMD' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
a4d60c85f0e5af3357ee14639a3429e3
27c27bfbe28185575b5edc1007edc9683fe959b4
describe
'240706' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCME' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
5a810cdd3256f15a2a8ce305e407c53c
46d540ea1c6701dcf96ec273fe9e80d37170fba1
describe
'176973' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCMF' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
9bd983f0c0f0007b74dcc5483fe6cc7f
26c234d62521fcd3517c025b8d7e153076479500
describe
'301273' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCMG' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
bfadb975adcedf46dab3b2d3d81287bb
8cf0985fa6ea43bf54e3dc61c20eb664e2aa777a
describe
'307506' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCMH' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
d1183871eab3a653b0a0be890d1c0418
ec82ac37d42ed01bce479b7d2eb2bbd8e406cb04
describe
'305531' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCMI' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
523e1114f6b4443d5bfc740e35e7449b
cdaa885d1cd8b2ae34b8bb4d8205c79702d211ea
describe
'323355' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCMJ' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
f05d85107989253a8be52a509bcafe9e
d66b979d549ae256f5b06a8be20b431d6f81362d
describe
'322699' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCMK' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
481eb537c683e233499296af5c5e9746
ed29c3bb087c74408bef4f339abe8669d81828df
'2011-12-17T12:50:26-05:00'
describe
'233365' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCML' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
fd5ad6c3dd7b5ba388816f189366105a
1a11604bb7eb90dcb9259a8963f9e62aace5e223
describe
'177146' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCMM' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
1a522a6352ac640d1630690886c5c095
5ce708f1d96b687e1ea239993a51ad19e6c0abb5
describe
'175465' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCMN' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
766bc32f038f17ad001d989a3a13e722
649fd018062c381d4f63d5f8cb398585ffc80e8c
describe
'297944' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCMO' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
ef676cc676644fed98848ddf6b38fee2
e9632392141f8e914b5b9fd69f4e2d387cad1f57
describe
'317601' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCMP' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
1cbcbf1b1c201f702b0c3d80b2105e5b
ad1de6f3e0ebd5635509f82077b40e0959798cb1
describe
'289974' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCMQ' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
10ed2e0ef28d1cc63e8217d6549fe025
e4dd6a376394ddce187c24c82a141743f1ca38f4
describe
'358046' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCMR' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
934afac69c9a10f343993a8d666670c1
2b0e2e7f4e231e230f6a195f11d5b34c5932872a
describe
'577137' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCMS' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
eb0a2e531e77eafce830e5f9213c5b52
c50687aadcb4cd28bd0c5460b44e49c5d916598c
'2011-12-17T12:47:41-05:00'
describe
'141360' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCMT' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
2657a69bda45032659905517c2fa752b
32bf86735f0491c0f3d848a7a81c52f38fac0371
describe
'35082' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCMU' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
8a92e4fb4d6b0e830f9351bf913cf6d4
cebe1a56061e8283f4ed7117ee3563ddf3241884
describe
'83081' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCMV' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
99314671124027e4871b7461d4c7d283
50e9302eed62a5a781f8efbb323e5d3efbf6b386
describe
'20763' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCMW' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
6dece127dc04767c02ca8d812ee69dc4
7e110f329bd2f2ac58cdbf7ea98aadcdc57de27e
describe
'14069' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCMX' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
9f3dd7d6bb33c68f6bd8b32c4a69559a
3bbe48e52e89c300e22e7253ff6468d5f732820f
describe
'7945' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCMY' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
738fb8a44dd13d3ef6fb3de80fb6ef6e
115fd41d29a227606b2af05b310afad6552e15ec
describe
'8379' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCMZ' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
d0fbe16cdd8d9b8b7860adfde1cd975e
684ae757b9e77720fb846059675f02bfca5e52b3
describe
'8231' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCNA' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
b17654c7bafdf5cdca4747d09ed213d8
6ae31c072a95c6f7a5893c3cd178656b3d27d526
describe
'7084' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCNB' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
b15584657a09aebdd9c0460d2747b038
0e5fb5882a91f8eef30751bfcca988db34255c03
describe
'6999' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCNC' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
5596ee4d9012bec82d0b55c43bb1f80b
b1670cbedfebc609a3b6a11d46d49b47a179546c
'2011-12-17T12:50:53-05:00'
describe
'99632' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCND' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
8265ebb3496d83490cd348c3f86dc687
5f4c8ffd461e85dff031f2fa8ec6cf126f6e8f05
describe
'25522' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCNE' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
0f820fe385d207e30e37e21548e7f9d5
d5fc365501e0ac8b9796555ba49b9caefadb2394
describe
'83365' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCNF' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
38055b554f1ad75ff48756f33a1d0e7a
1965ad554e71b21a5f6e48895d81f8d4ad56fcb4
describe
'20684' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCNG' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
2b07b03815100e835276a271dbaf2083
9ec979e10b93590881851755501169f709b52ad2
describe
'42751' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCNH' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
8ab79d48bbba20f7779bf1523e57a9f5
87fbc4608cb4b5cffda52f4b3cca7c90bcef0c99
describe
'9774' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCNI' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
7cf05cd7e353f7def6cd365ee0b9e793
0361b57b60ce45dce1fead98d6b3598e4637bec6
describe
'47542' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCNJ' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
e8aac372636f25bc590c2875ddce71f3
6ef5c91776820a4213bf5d27113d0f38955753cb
describe
'10744' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCNK' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
1b7bc609c286e3a85906631de848a735
b37ac0cf81e7617da55f3d414fe4aaeab6379e10
describe
'9262' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCNL' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
0f012a6f9d75f781138169a3465aded7
737a50a5382c380c7a694505d9e909eb7d187f13
'2011-12-17T12:46:24-05:00'
describe
'79418' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCNM' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
1469bc96db8b20fd4ee0a1fe7057bfa8
6065d5aa63a7769310e8916283944a20549e683d
describe
'20174' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCNN' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
232d32277b91749835ec8cade103e00e
bd6c9fd120459b3aca3ecc3bae06ace2091417ac
describe
'89035' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCNO' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
42e42bafaf8c22614a8d73be7a9a6aff
78ff30a4ec77f10ff1bf2306d9abe990c924bc5a
describe
'22779' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCNP' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
2e2d905822cf904bcf6ee818ef1d4ef7
eec646e02a3e2dd1b959ca6b5aee182eaa5c0846
describe
'89906' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCNQ' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
c3a628ec54be41caa82751be2e60be09
df2b64984625e3cbe4596e6705cb9a59bb74aa50
describe
'22608' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCNR' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
f9ba6cc187f33c698b6a694cae9ea1a4
3245d47c305505114f357d0893e20e4d94358143
describe
'90748' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCNS' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
8c30baccc0c812befd8c1ddb9b6e73ae
938f6ba20ac19374934c36182c5fa0a290e4b64a
describe
'23161' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCNT' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
d09d6616cf011508088eecc2c1b9837a
e69759bba96b20b2231038448ef62f787b0363fa
describe
'65746' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCNU' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
b6a2034208acee4b3658ee6d5c859447
d83c65ea52014dfc8c74b699e7a11b40d8bee721
describe
'15502' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCNV' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
e3038729e65a7d17072e2729c055bbbd
2a17c1ed97af7ba991a6ea3f00ac43351fee7bb6
describe
'39689' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCNW' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
c984f5ca6617a3118d2d140c44dad431
ca93aadcf3e6f396b4b0bf830311d50f832cb4fe
describe
'9009' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCNX' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
caab2477dc569326dfaeb824f6474a23
66cdf021a1acd3823ed16542ee9273d18b69b93e
describe
'76293' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCNY' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
ee05dd3408216e4284f6c6dd2368dabb
4d73b76af288031fc9bb91d5e370f19c7a9438b3
describe
'19098' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCNZ' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
9758592b0bdfd2a95a3f4cf8f59317fd
a057b96663dde9364b9dbda40e416d1606ab7c86
describe
'89184' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCOA' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
57e8fb15ed7044865ad67a19986ebbb3
ff8f716a510114b3dfd2867a3408a64dbc4be355
describe
'22539' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCOB' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
eef834f3ec77e5209011f965f6f1beb0
c1524dd40239f07bfacd849a3e39a48160211069
describe
'79160' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCOC' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
8ee02984cdfb5dd42f91ec345e9be81c
88087e160f0800024efce05440f3d3afaba63518
describe
'18747' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCOD' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
7ffe47ea16e30f69cd84937f4c2cd363
9f4f198b17aec0145eb387f6b13ee0fbc40d6a45
describe
'47174' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCOE' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
13d0f64203dc17f727b80fed94442b94
0af3f384fa1b65cd7b7960ca796390ce5cbe0597
describe
'10253' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCOF' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
f455f16474f4c4e53bfe2864f847da14
17413b2e4a0cc5f012d05d187b6a39d6ba7965c4
describe
'63989' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCOG' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
f0d462cb482b8f98e442556f5419920b
5662959d9dd1d90403ba1c097e09a8a0a2185436
describe
'14960' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCOH' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
b10bf35d5533b89fb3f348f2095f398b
a24188e88d4e43dbfe4a195ca4591c9ee115b6a6
describe
'50525' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCOI' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
9b4cdf0cfeaa0ddb5b0c55d824932131
f6845c93bddd5cc6e7095f8f8a5b63f2421e0252
'2011-12-17T12:51:25-05:00'
describe
'10953' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCOJ' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
dbe0a7b7ae5fc4a7fddf00ca83b535e5
f4ab1c827794cf467f7339cd74c04dc0eaa1eda1
describe
'51818' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCOK' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
c0338c261f81b01b75b4f7a717eaa965
6b47769b028f539a370524e237c92d96b82b06de
describe
'11695' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCOL' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
0e1996725f8449761e41538ed13cd02e
e7c1f46307504098b9cb71eb818bc167a299c71d
describe
'45073' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCOM' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
989f47cff69d2bc82af48c64adf72640
0170272afa5ee9e4f557476f855e5584bd8bd463
describe
'9936' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCON' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
af059233b087c23f489f0945be772323
30f9e7ebed07c5cb6a2376e5575f42c49d487f18
describe
'82724' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCOO' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
c3bb5db6555dd1369bcaa975321da4dc
3099b1bfa10d2efc627bd71ae24519bb992a5f9f
describe
'22155' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCOP' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
1786d346e868c11a0660ad71e41e464e
923322678fb5ef949591df6ec348ebf0e3ba4e5a
'2011-12-17T12:50:03-05:00'
describe
'92901' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCOQ' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
dee5e14c4de424afb7751157b35abf9f
6b5e1dbbcc68d50dd0a2e74ac968aacc2514d9e6
describe
'23892' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCOR' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
8da4a01e8d507ed373657b910211c4f0
389256a788ff72defd61164554a1c5159ffe0e68
describe
'89409' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCOS' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
9af14c36036f896fd816322841c9302e
a2fad362a937eedfbefb52a7308cfce67297610f
describe
'22242' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCOT' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
63f19cdf9356d806dc53faad1d8b045b
6b1cf76b65e2d551de611c499edfafd9d451c26a
describe
'66778' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCOU' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
3e29ef5e879d44b1b7034b42e9255b57
e80a4e99d91a0078fbe1860f7ea88d27ef1f934a
describe
'16237' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCOV' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
a9ec7d8f11a4e3dd5dc9c437902e690e
f02965d3b209a91e0bb8be45eab2869ae8477348
describe
'48115' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCOW' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
00fb8b57caee88042de4130bd45a4701
51463297301ff0177965fe819ef39eb8dfd96751
describe
'10727' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCOX' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
f5bdfbfd14b8d6ec8e659f11f092a19e
fca9bbb99dc2adc2fefeb52f995c721569b330fc
describe
'41157' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCOY' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
80a664f77d2778e6cbd438ead5976d3b
01d7def2105c9acfe94fda55f598111433e62b8d
describe
'9294' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCOZ' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
cd5d579ad0a89a83cabb8a20523c9e26
b21799b50ffdcded7918aa223f5568899e158eae
describe
'78163' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCPA' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
1884f9eb7948941bc7fdaf9262a575fc
3a5873233f8afbeadff665a981f5c441811dd3b2
describe
'20712' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCPB' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
e712c5abeb8ccd6f2a404a711e965940
3c1fe12f159a352d099bf17a71c9bfb03216c9ad
describe
'89076' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCPC' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
47b6bb2ba9c751bef6622d719a0d5d9c
8a616dd7e44b58ff3c7a0f43deb6c97ac0ce2128
describe
'23340' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCPD' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
cade22c1d8b1db0919b7fd6249962234
360099189b7e8b0982ba656340a903252f23f230
describe
'91346' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCPE' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
7c0878ff6bfadaa6baafe33a34b2c85f
c53a2e4b5f2d4274a275f66d57178c2ef4db2096
'2011-12-17T12:48:39-05:00'
describe
'24003' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCPF' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
b807dbebc8d53d6c0d87ce9468b25437
20c757e8f7888ef1d3b0f10f6c6295c2d0000d91
describe
'91142' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCPG' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
166c6df7531b107c6e57df1402d613ac
558723fc85b7c5ebdb958335c5c49740c471480c
describe
'22578' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCPH' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
f869ba25a2d79a2df4f889395e9badaa
6ef41f83ce684ff573f9561d5325dd5748343a37
describe
'81409' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCPI' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
4d3d17e43c182a571609d8f336fab165
4127afdde05e53843fcf45e43a1741bb5c9b919d
'2011-12-17T12:50:43-05:00'
describe
'20975' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCPJ' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
1f80d24e7717eabd2678c8fcdef8f368
7df5114f05114d9045cf21ae38ee1b705288a67e
describe
'68942' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCPK' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
c361b490486adaf46c387dece0a126df
5e0449f823370c00bec0a828bd063e14ca0a2686
describe
'16565' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCPL' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
ae13e7162351068d61e3de8498446716
ae750803ec5b3eb77119ae47a681de1789a40124
describe
'82783' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCPM' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
1b7c641baf3ad3d7234b4fb3a2ec0d2a
df41828c3a557118309c0007c90649c0cc7f0539
describe
'20286' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCPN' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
fb2aa648ddd9232efb4b3445fd9d4a65
c8f956c60969d2d2cb9c2802a71a329fb7181968
'2011-12-17T12:46:07-05:00'
describe
'90934' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCPO' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
6f1d21aed6a30d342b2deb49512f36b5
2ec4bd37ca3f873f2931a9d265950e044f8ed7b5
describe
'23679' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCPP' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
00412d87e3d06f4b4e385270d20f989a
177e9bdfe1dc7f916061560236ff1d33d7abfba0
describe
'92528' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCPQ' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
9b5bf35ffc890c44fe5b44862611f8ce
6b2e8fd54028e1f6cb24e60c97a2ca876f73fdad
describe
'23237' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCPR' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
d543ef74afbc6e988aa04eb0442b312f
b773cd8ff5cb9def8f62c384faef1d3cb4c6778c
describe
'87063' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCPS' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
fc478d0581b16b50a7fa4131f9292eff
59900d809f90ca1b535e67a91b93e2d77c65a6d1
describe
'21691' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCPT' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
5d73801430a4e5d7c80a1f1c3daf0504
6681f0459fd4631f5a0ed7fa00ab80b493b3d08d
describe
'59568' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCPU' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
e29c6a385b55ae18fc57d6d07ddde304
a0b33d2a3b9f13f0602c078c88da042be3939611
describe
'14351' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCPV' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
4c6e8ee8e14c5fb6cbe52472e52d2dfb
1c376ab505faa67f376b4a40ee88a214e3ef231f
describe
'41786' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCPW' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
17fb605098d599dccebccba1ca1b6b63
ca821386618f5e9a26029ba78d9a3825dc2f695c
describe
'9312' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCPX' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
c45f277b3d9094ed0ffb7576e6ae5879
071d14e02e61a2ab9ce171fa88378e58a7f6317a
describe
'80251' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCPY' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
8cdd0d8a66d0419d31237590522b0012
5a9bcde76165d84c218f79a5e70119e842849614
describe
'20229' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCPZ' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
47441fcece571b73bc7a0f4595115422
240be17eec40c748cc5cd64ef2e87028c374c1bc
describe
'87766' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCQA' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
e92a8f696c8ac38d75b2193a5b1e116f
5597ecb1b0f67ed149b9425a3eb4ea9b8a123739
describe
'22476' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCQB' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
8f01846175ef65167adf6d70183fd7aa
e665fc70a456b62b3351cf167bdb75f4845ddc15
describe
'80502' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCQC' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
c022ecd7d0e93d6c491a2e36cb46a38a
7e9661bf698bf76dcbea64e6fbaa92f7586ade77
describe
'21257' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCQD' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
5927b025d865a17a13369b58127d9fad
937c657e0fb094e6f226f5882d07acd7f5bc212f
describe
'90058' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCQE' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
3fd35dec53645dedda78894d44a9f9fb
0c9d24848579a354b4f17dfc269948251689a07b
describe
'22565' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCQF' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
1bc1ad43123784383520b2c97e952cee
e8d2099788b1b1353a36c997879e93dd0886676c
'2011-12-17T12:50:56-05:00'
describe
'90570' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCQG' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
21ddca222e39582589d3365adb532a8a
d02f93c9bc812e822f98e7772470d12a4f9a4c0c
describe
'22817' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCQH' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
05c6ba5e0ea396d2add0f9aa846581d5
8c31bcbd64cc72d9bd09fb35831b24bd76cdfde4
describe
'89350' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCQI' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
1116cbea3ab06dfae213e21bd14d714f
58d8e680bcc2af1a87573c5aefb2e1709873ea84
describe
'23995' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCQJ' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
037c1c805d05761d689e84e6fa79c822
e67a888e9a66e2ee61102c90fc331182df03934c
describe
'57949' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCQK' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
b0ffafd22a3c206e3ab6ac99079818fe
b06d000a1547b90af7791c89727dfe32488c70eb
describe
'13573' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCQL' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
1ed9670ee2c478068d4a545e75320375
aaeaa5e4009f0d873b9f46d7be0ceb5484359f0f
describe
'42904' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCQM' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
f6a1a4953ecdb2097f5b5d80142734d3
08246a68499ab07fef707e04929e806db7df5427
describe
'9587' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCQN' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
4950cdd0560ff7df776e0731f03cb94e
83c978b0f49267285535cc5598a0cf0de0ae7588
describe
'79664' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCQO' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
5bcd90a5c0ca438139d4dffde87928ef
5dbe713ad3b4350f889095d1e6a83c3deb4a1d50
describe
'19562' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCQP' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
d758ea3f26ff9fa5f217dade01bbc1fb
6e2fe6240a9b111474f4b931df7f78f79e644c7d
describe
'88278' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCQQ' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
754d155656793540fb721588faf7cca2
8ca2b1482b23987c3fcbcc6ab56f4bd5dfd7a3fb
describe
'22690' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCQR' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
5d5062f90049ac749babb7c8e73d146e
c6e0afbeb707da3e6a87125c63079eed4a0f60fc
'2011-12-17T12:50:59-05:00'
describe
'89317' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCQS' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
a0d732121b5ae7fb301eb7779d02f150
b23354c21bae634ce7f261a5c5b1650b9a72810f
describe
'22445' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCQT' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
718447d402ac048afd8fd6bca96b6d17
8bd28f83f2e1e08d9461bcc735b1495114a6abb0
describe
'90991' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCQU' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
99458a976b1ae867fa7ad4a3965d95ed
d3133b049fb528a653d34165ad6fb68d3eab2432
describe
'23504' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCQV' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
217137eb3e42affccbdf2a915fe1bc3a
241977ee8ab4cefbd0c669b62fa2929976af0830
describe
'87743' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCQW' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
61e264acbce2e3add3aefb3cd4c8ae06
53eff1f9b4a7286e50f57d9b81eb61f28e4926f6
describe
'22225' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCQX' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
8173b0f93391542e9726a7ada122c291
0043dc57095c62ac71947cfc7594f857462e0b8b
describe
'86577' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCQY' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
481f990b6a5971a5635f64350be9a2cd
55e4eabff24784bb0a589dd71f7b2933c7817998
describe
'22331' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCQZ' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
bc78f8051669eadfa001d673f8367361
b8dd827506d62d87825812b5aefa689c22b4555f
describe
'72690' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCRA' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
45802cbd83fd606da4d9b9d102e98b99
1dc2252265e452bc9447efb3c719e0c27f95789e
describe
'18701' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCRB' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
7de21362dc653824a65e8b9170e60f64
96ba4d4e27bf0171c3d1609c0c7bb054e941dcae
describe
'42510' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCRC' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
94abf22af688cede67d0c592fa1090ed
150ecd5e829f8a25ebb3ac8cda9f0e977b3ac089
describe
'9625' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCRD' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
2a07208cde014aefcd690ea6ec758864
ff542801311b1f0905dbcdbcfe8db1d854cebdd8
describe
'80055' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCRE' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
ee97919adc9f1fddb120f182ad830884
7be091c307d67da99db5d87538d338caa3face71
describe
'20202' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCRF' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
f03831a4191fb77531ed205329e3ce8a
628cbdb90afbac67e57fc86dffbaa15f75247caf
describe
'92108' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCRG' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
5a4d994a4c225ae149e64babcf460984
ae606709768418be02a555fdbb9932b1c59e4206
describe
'23000' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCRH' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
105e89013ca7bdc4f324207bb2eefbd7
a9d7eedb0a686ae81bb31f4edcea8abf4d805f30
describe
'87421' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCRI' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
750c6bf8ccdcd17d7bddf1dade35c419
36d2fdfcd4a0155da625c6a507f23723961ad6e5
describe
'22507' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCRJ' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
327e1740dc3659d54dee24e1e6f16fc3
444316af789580a5c2399c8a81d3df4881678503
describe
'57930' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCRK' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
2decffef4593503ff9e7d06898cfcf65
ac5049e2c525b5c6bb60e66ced9d052fbfc85468
describe
'13871' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCRL' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
b98199e9d11211c63a60cc41b64de5b1
f90fc513de12f3dfe9bf3a2a56e8132899dbf66c
describe
'43971' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCRM' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
e0d73a9f7c4393979634b170d390ce16
93e15dbb86508f762d0b63e9cc9e0a5beb10e77b
describe
'10625' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCRN' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
12ce0ea6377c19b8e947bd221cbb5953
7c1b3890501dca0dbc85d4d80f9ecc4c71a38527
describe
'42577' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCRO' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
642170b597c707fe9357ea1789bc27c6
daecdd385e7815fe653e58911693cb621dd3cb4f
describe
'9289' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCRP' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
ffc5c68b1f244fac00c93cff8a5c1bbc
6f98298265420313f2e659ed4f542dd10fce983d
describe
'72842' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCRQ' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
8b22f483560f341c365eee9d733c0ac6
97dd395dad79162ba48d7d225fffed697e7582a6
describe
'18453' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCRR' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
4bc83af38af975ab91d8bdbb3b8d3c2c
390494deabb770f39a7504435e51eec207ecbd6f
describe
'95069' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCRS' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
3e2c834db4ebb4d7d8a389721267c26b
e02ae80c61956f616039e988c8e8cc6860002213
describe
'24306' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCRT' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
3feafac4557d3cc32ab1cd777b68e9d6
005180c147751f99dcd4f4b9dfed55d37a97e834
describe
'87195' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCRU' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
3009cd9458316bdf14ff024ba24050c8
55cd37b918504d72d608cca81ddf23aa3c08dced
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCRV' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
515ca4f6cff6eb57d0b43f1418f0dfc5
ce36287b5e4e924493801c23db56413025418a73
describe
'88183' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCRW' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
715a29f6f2f45a959679087ff639c376
d9bf8411dec6e6e544757a1c6b503b979a7d43bb
describe
'22731' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCRX' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
1e19641e1e0799831e7b1a0af2f3f654
810a0b1ad7976019354ebe46910847caaa1098dd
describe
'90218' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCRY' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
b97a38547600e8bf5b344d631ecb875b
8d00cf471642ffcde15326ef396ef2fcf00679a3
describe
'23743' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCRZ' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
633bfbce1dccdc1189ada731de4d0163
30a4ad30a9bc220e459ebb51652dc6a7864e4ca5
describe
'94309' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCSA' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
8169bbcfd7ab16326b83c7d5b4083d87
cedb9f1a4511b1afadc624edbd71da17331233e0
describe
'23811' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCSB' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
6afe003a9dddc802e8459c4c4826365d
8ebef9f14373d1e6cd12e84e6866516c665a8343
describe
'91100' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCSC' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
3152939c934bb70bfc4b4bfd21b32f00
7fe14d5d8e3b15ec7319d791da3801c1c054f007
describe
'23378' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCSD' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
63fcdf2d47a9bd812d1f0e91cb30438e
9acb465950b870f028ad36048638c8f836c8dbc9
describe
'91872' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCSE' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
6cb40424bfb149b2e9fbbbe1867afa33
61fec0bc6436464120c40d895531c892880f7184
describe
'23352' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCSF' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
f7b0547d68333e92e82e493cab3a46f2
a8f81646a640b0a07f5029d25354cac93db1d988
describe
'48005' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCSG' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
5e2cf48800c4e5d68a1c7d4c2687e793
3925546f253c1ac018481fff7f9b1ba5a2cc3376
describe
'11437' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCSH' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
60863ed0e0eb252b29d76d446ae3fbec
351367875e3d7eae2a30108efc717bb3cf2d0a41
describe
'45708' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCSI' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
331570e72e7c07a179dd869e46833257
4aa9aa181f6aba85f63c44f493082b4bead4ccaf
describe
'10385' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCSJ' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
f76add4327dd8380c7083c5992aa838a
7c2f97742b5e36003076b1ef3f32d7aa41a2a656
'2011-12-17T12:51:47-05:00'
describe
'79157' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCSK' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
eb52dd01a0923f1feb4c0e450023b242
9e97ae8f8fd82962d191d3b44f7a4cbfde7b63ce
describe
'19793' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCSL' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
6c33e72ac437238283a23e11d4510901
4dab40e35ea605111bf143b2e30b4ba878ddd604
describe
'95283' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCSM' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
ff782facf9f024de56ba5b2b291fd26b
353b86fbce49ecb50e61339249175e56345f2094
describe
'24421' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCSN' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
87ed511477f98fda10669b58b8916354
d53971b456ee6b8d783ea083e4bbd951aaa11851
describe
'92693' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCSO' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
ff0d7174ca309d4d0bbaedbe125f36fc
3e60a401cbe10417ae272c477e5ce3b06d25824f
describe
'24439' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCSP' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
17d6f89352189518b99f40ebf7029cfe
c2b1c386ffbd39ce332c098a6414f521fc5ac08c
describe
'92000' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCSQ' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
370fc0c72f997205015028161e9f157a
9c05ed5bcab0b36ec9edd255546a65cece47fdfb
'2011-12-17T12:46:56-05:00'
describe
'23553' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCSR' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
5e1ff9f2f7ecd1358b41dd582ad3c3d8
363dd1bfd43b84d453e79d0b086051841a5d72a0
describe
'83792' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCSS' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
7de07064f31413374e6b91a04e368cb2
175cda0ce525402b602fcc64ba7fab906f6c6138
describe
'21364' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCST' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
0d33ef9c4646fa659dff22d970cfff0c
225362d88f89557b964b69c92de66958c89fde9b
describe
'93367' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCSU' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
634b0dc2233f2c3350d2eb2275763026
d2322edd390cbf43342ad91c9f142c2187322fb3
describe
'23885' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCSV' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
e679b9b1c44097d3a9d0bc0c065f1437
9d672c1e080d3ec7f4f92082fe6a91692a00463f
describe
'92358' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCSW' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
929907a89382200abf09181a70e1fa40
1131025c447608b4cbd920d444a45ca997160e73
describe
'24001' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCSX' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
2a024b8556d67df7c36df00c1ad6cf40
3f8da93dae5a63e81b4869950e937976e36df643
describe
'98641' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCSY' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
8626fd986050802ce46d5bfbdacd0810
3e7aa292bfe8e4cc5776f85e34506351588a3c50
describe
'26742' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCSZ' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
3414ca094549951688dda170032aec96
b06cd062aec6b208ccf8ad830a0894c72515c904
describe
'64748' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCTA' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
037275b5fb0488c936da6d19916ed53e
758b1fe4b7bcf35b72289f97deaf06ff56c17e7a
describe
'15587' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCTB' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
bfe0e62874471e191b5de58899603787
d20b46ff812f5da05e90ccf81b86a343f4ea48d5
describe
'47761' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCTC' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
127d873283af910fdcc5ac1d9e3466fc
25ba09fb8d7fcadd72b485a803a363bd378ada64
describe
'10591' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCTD' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
93832b578492469803c5321028797d7f
db698df0e6e66be930a4fce41312a298f1370774
describe
'86292' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCTE' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
230d802da02940e45fba1c2cfff1d0c2
1d18018a0c2c471dc62c1a5ad8a042b5897e8896
describe
'22035' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCTF' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
3fbdb4388c67ee306e0aeca7e40c2bec
068673acfd4669dfbdf9893c8b828b2e82bb8eec
describe
'95662' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCTG' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
328f9dc1428463d024e2d3e55f151f5b
0211934fe9dca4bf4cc104c121a670df23153b0d
describe
'23872' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCTH' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
7e4c13680aefa01f0b16555b48ce36ae
6724f2c34bf46eb314401b9d14abaf284b14b2dc
describe
'93465' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCTI' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
d105bf70b9a5de888536375318f7688b
1dc9e8a0d7fb20a78782065f17dedcd2ea47d04f
describe
'23856' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCTJ' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
7bb7731a17b7412876aea3b71e3b75b6
c518f4c5f68cbd5b541e64e7530c5f339accf637
describe
'98381' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCTK' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
f6d8837dd975b45e2ce297d666f1a6d1
71736135acaafc91a73b67799a98d74a2fe21c23
describe
'25449' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCTL' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
9773819d7724c66d2e95436cfeaeb14f
1c433d6867989d8b77f51f2a372054b046fb6a96
describe
'112274' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCTM' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
bc989041638e4f4d93d995b279625e35
85bfec292af9f7378797e6727778a4b44d35b829
describe
'28739' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCTN' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
d4892f230306ea38ba34e8a458db5aad
2df912a6205788bfc8da969f5f11c8968087461e
describe
'97592' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCTO' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
3ffa5c67bc8b22525a60a6e2188f4002
3b62b2e9c44dd55a8e414b90a276f6e136aa7a5d
describe
'24988' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCTP' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
b1f997d202cc704a8296b537df5c4e25
0ad6959c714416787b98bb9ec22b52dc541828c3
describe
'46467' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCTQ' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
f8351c799bcdc45f391b4b58a862c14b
ebb8ea63e5844665710a0239caf2849fcc5e2b2d
describe
'11146' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCTR' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
e77137d37e49b6baf1c593eb06ed15a6
842f7fd7b3a3bec9d324c5165f6bbbe67c41b2f5
describe
'42853' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCTS' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
a6e5d91d6d6d10899d4e55b38b10fe45
90a9f8bde44a1f3c0b5fda3c8bc4a091b5306192
describe
'9597' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCTT' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
9513d250baca9213803020fa6cf9dc53
6b20bcce1f43e1c7101b0914348244b0571bd068
describe
'78514' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCTU' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
518ed9da4f2e743814850eaeaed0194e
14328a76ac8c5d1eddb00fa87371c2ef80aa53eb
describe
'20240' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCTV' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
85227c3e4839a4747020084cb018a6eb
a096d03a428bda33663b797f8c8031a812bde760
describe
'91413' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCTW' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
1a095dee87e496ddac8d8296a6c45a68
b061091e6e2591b7e9c82f7c403970dbdfe77b53
describe
'24164' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCTX' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
bfb5288a088deaf17f090b078b508df7
e176112ba7caa4a70c7f3a63d309e27bd77fcebc
describe
'92598' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCTY' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
68111e621d3e8aeb1f05c37e9ebb910f
f1d56daccf8d07171cd5ddaa9d1a96423d661b42
describe
'24165' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCTZ' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
364cf77c9f2d9905f25a519b909f11e9
71a4655cda1b2869316c6759e3b1537647915521
describe
'75537' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCUA' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
81642752e42cbb6a3aef151c0098effc
2fd89d26c4a1520112c4f04d3786d502270bab9d
describe
'18724' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCUB' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
13d3b87f861d6bf41a2f8a0c61585ac1
8530317ac9dd94bfd26b9532ada048814f763457
describe
'82583' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCUC' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
5f2f2e7fdaddddb3a6101499d0dabb7b
71fe3f6034d8265bb647fa8c56e663ffd2442c85
describe
'20848' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCUD' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
6d4904d9af1e825bfe6685f1d1441217
16b35d8237b067f96b2c617cf8a99b5fa8fcb004
describe
'96372' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCUE' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
aec25443b03f5474b8c193142afbb7fb
a1e98c0811513ce2f9cfbcc56936882f71df4648
describe
'24518' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCUF' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
a693e2053f30c2adde8930bc02df486b
f4f3e9f710f0e4439ccea54b019cd736835bc7de
describe
'53588' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCUG' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
707be87cd9b75805855459040eb405bc
5b3d69f9b1f4358b503d65f9bb16057b22ac9e48
describe
'12919' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCUH' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
466bb52b4fd12010c26e8e1ea0a331c0
4bf67715a7a3bcf3708816ce9c70571592958cae
describe
'53995' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCUI' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
e7ed4e34c94314f655ef8433f035c30d
2efa442e983f4a72d562c05fd361779908a7b12d
describe
'11723' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCUJ' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
eb231313d35612635fea71f499cbc3d9
81f9b37c8b76af995fd6c53f762fd6ec17b5e31a
'2011-12-17T12:47:22-05:00'
describe
'86382' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCUK' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
18c29321b5cb89e75eff7e633969d1b1
383dd04c3e613aaea3bfec4edbb5bbed135cfd1c
describe
'21767' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCUL' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
83e442cbdf272cfbacd334dd0c3df3c2
545a5ecc86434eae6a115ded47625ef150934e8e
describe
'96395' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCUM' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
b66f014e936c94641ec81cdfd124fd71
ac47b91f4ae47fec701e5598cfa34714065ddb9c
describe
'25040' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCUN' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
b59b6d3242a86142e4421c18f56ef163
30a53416c8101c2c51b4ed0a980fa176586bf0c9
describe
'54465' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCUO' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
c0bc2a9c28013b41ca967da767336039
3f847577d5c3952391d6d042ae8a4837d5c7e574
describe
'12976' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCUP' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
1be919a193eda90da0ddc1db585f2b69
267c701f1ddb5582e2b3b84d3dee61f7142c050c
describe
'50885' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCUQ' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
78c096ead511947da73c786ecf1e1fbf
082f895873d9bebf3c91956b0f5e40b5cd801c6d
'2011-12-17T12:47:11-05:00'
describe
'11289' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCUR' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
6e234d573fb302d646707303298c0af1
90fceb2a23029c5d39d1b458f3ccdc3aaed3e5f1
describe
'86403' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCUS' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
0a28c6ff097772fe4b2a5e391c55f831
5a430205a5df5409d2be5c2ce6b70a69fee98196
describe
'21596' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCUT' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
27f642977508cb50c7e8aedae78bf2b0
43b3511d779e6779ad33875305686eae4305e14c
describe
'91512' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCUU' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
9368c676218475f59585fcee4ece1cec
ff816e95d96b3f032206b62956255f382f8ffb08
'2011-12-17T12:50:39-05:00'
describe
'24154' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCUV' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
349fd29b96d0e1228f6100a094f2ae4e
97fa36ca4af801dc0cba475611daadcd758a18c6
'2011-12-17T12:51:32-05:00'
describe
'91163' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCUW' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
3ae3baa256bfe73e4482018b0052e17a
eca5b83e07d847a89ad447f336ea117f5eb2999a
describe
'23776' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCUX' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
92aa6f3d5cf74be48074f03da352702d
cc1b84dfc40a21ae9ef6b57db941e4afb3cd007e
describe
'60043' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCUY' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
2802013b6619fd461e6e8d045d946d3c
3b9c53d619ee9836d4c481d62240f38de7083975
describe
'14159' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCUZ' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
f5d57bf894a99986c1e479cc511a6164
04dd9d996c703749af66a25125dcf964abb4751c
describe
'87886' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCVA' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
be202cd7fcafaa78c8f13112e0ee7d4b
c10482ddbdf247b90797938f09fe61df2f95a937
describe
'22428' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCVB' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
b1e9c0112877ee5ee7644a91f0b7ab37
9f0eee6efa32a482deeaa42980b37ece50b6d551
describe
'94414' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCVC' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
358d6cfcbefcedcbdb643102bc5168ae
fc00cc76d5086b36fb0b320358d5ab313ba0f7bc
describe
'24706' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCVD' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
74e772093dbd1970587602c4a38f5f62
68267e0f85baa4c39c9893015320c5588b92d1a4
describe
'92129' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCVE' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
f5577ec9321c877e3516e1d15abda126
6da49e85fd269696a220a7bd938e3990fa241f02
describe
'24336' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCVF' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
77aa7a8c07e129d6aea6b82cf0bcd3cc
f899d1b199477e0fc2595ee0055f574a737160a5
describe
'96288' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCVG' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
7974491ffa73e1b6120234000baa7c56
1216f7ac211813a9ece366d5fc425e14f18c324a
describe
'25958' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCVH' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
0795aab2febe7c03146ffde6fc35208e
197ad28f8980874d2ad473867edbc3ea414ef760
describe
'96704' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCVI' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
37cd10c4d5ee9d22556e611f10beb56f
b4aa8479a2d19d77faa21e922aa5250578a77d2b
describe
'24889' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCVJ' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
d82e54461a1a69a7b9e45b8e463ba4ad
90c30e5a72475fa1ff95c1748b35078ffab29f8b
describe
'9832' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCVK' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
83b5011256440b942cfed35fe0469196
e4c28c131f5d97f3b5121977d1ec8ac9710a87bd
describe
'287310' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCVL' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
8a5ce7c376c9966496c517b4b4ced79b
9bd85a4479b529817243e32823a38b9a93c7c97f
describe
'68826' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCVM' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
731b9258717983f68505b03025f5640c
4e29f247b46fe7d7ee2bf3aec277d7107ed47dbe
describe
'2790416' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCVN' 'sip-files00118.tif'
212790e97b830ef4c2f2c6d782c4279f
dee6b0a4c90855561f1c9cf3ef37e7a4d42f6458
describe
'18422' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCVO' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
ab046d6a557ea8677eb143f8eb0a376a
7cc07d980330f9189ba8790de0f4019019d93245
describe
'32116' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCVP' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
ecd0b07171b0d93fbc345119e01fbcf9
36f8e2709fca436e3aafef399a0bdd9058aaa634
describe
'7445' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCVQ' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
0c6cd8584433bc22a7de482d4598eba9
0d84fb3ac481340e3744569924275888fedff6dd
describe
'61390' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCVR' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
ba8802f32fd35ee17ff755841a5088d7
0321839569a918d1316d725484fcd20f952eb54b
describe
'15407' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCVS' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
a6b4ba7d1a31a50e502388c2d98d0508
0f0139e8eb64d6ee71b062c4ee0d51b2a6d0de49
describe
'36641' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCVT' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
4ce5afbdea7ff82dfa20e56aa2d86efa
decd333f052ca3b40f851f0ab12f1f1ce9e46ac5
describe
'8527' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCVU' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
b5f96f726cd183d1350bd82e2935bc8f
20dac0ae44e6a3c3839a8a207cb5263a0b9899ee
describe
'40640' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCVV' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
63c10ac760bbd8424d12a08456738376
f88fd90ad72127cc684e039026c4e60fb60bc4d8
describe
'9293' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCVW' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
d167da38626d2385d81b117fa249b88a
739bedf942f161dc37cbca6a61ab1cf395b9e863
describe
'33990' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCVX' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
5a696dd1632b30a60b5d8860bffbb68e
de3d9059822b8b43be16054a6f41f2585c40924d
describe
'8139' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCVY' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
068b9c765e976f822cf6d48166c569a5
99c5076b2c4d6afa20423e3b39785517ae57f007
describe
'69281' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCVZ' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
4e0be05d6d48fe61f494943a666aa724
424530e2fda3cb8461873ce874afbf25d0e52225
describe
'17994' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCWA' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
5a2c62ace8444f6a968b51f791dbe4f6
dee0b49da68a961a4bcbf07620e7d0679efb5be0
describe
'85593' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCWB' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
bdef2b8b8127dbccd1f28671bac67c22
82a24070d63668fe7c633d4ca6c89aa430d72ac2
describe
'22086' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCWC' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
632dabf3022ecf148d21faab7e403971
7bf9aafc10743bbc2a745714ce18a00329a30786
describe
'85279' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCWD' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
5adecdf95b92c755a86f78c44cdf20a3
44a3945312541c38346a675baa84531557de7f70
describe
'21912' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCWE' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
bf88bf95a2ab18e9ceebe996d32f650d
813547ea6e2d797ff5a6950179b08ba6125a71d2
describe
'36355' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCWF' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
2821527a19928342a050b371d9edb232
dc3e7793d86f86cff96ccd76ff00fe38ddeb610e
describe
'8564' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCWG' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
3421924c584221fe52065f51df62999d
3228713a23924bde2ca873146e3396a4742c1bb8
describe
'73706' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCWH' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
cff46f5d8996e66457aabf4abd6161a1
96a2032fb96aa9295c961656098abb3143d729ac
describe
'18953' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCWI' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
f480f29b0e9e5964035d6684f3da8a14
5c6d8a64caf8f853420a81baa82f79e0fdef1120
describe
'87594' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCWJ' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
764910231345b737cf2e75df27d59e84
a2686f2033657736c5ff60808cce7975ac9267f3
describe
'24229' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCWK' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
3dcdfa0c1713adc918c2cc08829a8e69
3fc145306ddca78ffac431ecd8c3c82eaf4c35de
describe
'87101' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCWL' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
1dde07a945fec97cb8967e6cf3e19cb3
9c50fa7dc83f7e378826076d2cb5dc1882497379
describe
'22532' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCWM' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
4a9e8baefd4d45733b38beb963c58786
0d34d38332e2eacdc627fa6f86aee5e240dc77f4
describe
'85284' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCWN' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
27ac27a12d6450aa5b7168856167ff57
f1f9fac263f5e5bf233a1dde3a8415274c6d624a
describe
'22434' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCWO' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
cc8cdd29fa470d664d4356417e58bbd1
b6e37ff1350e79be937956f33587da8328104f93
describe
'61046' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCWP' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
f5a9859cae7674998c91bf8b56e594ef
acdd07daa1007f3dfe6b0614019ac8ba364471d2
describe
'15338' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCWQ' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
e5f749c06c5e2b45f3fd904fc6a09c99
3fd203d71f86e47e260b94461aa9d5e10507a13f
describe
'31444' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCWR' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
9cbcadff564f0270c3b39036c6d654a2
326ba04099a63ac483c94906dc82022f22e52199
describe
'7451' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCWS' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
6fc5e8f19e245f407968c60cdd1569f6
74ec778c82fc324585a9a0ee6a847deb3c00ca23
describe
'72194' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCWT' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
874ab2ba4c79712ca87025cfa4724510
780f14cb0fff68463921919f339b58c0f906c931
describe
'18278' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCWU' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
addbef2f17dea800d59db24e73940c8d
007676934400d830b7c9a079719ed906a55bad88
describe
'87867' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCWV' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
81c3172684ef9b8cf05106db28c9e1ca
ea9e1a81986a55114dddb0f82a7cf38e0015b218
describe
'22811' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCWW' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
f97114fe66a6661c628427f357c55668
449d9cf46b4f9e29351e7f2b5e5dbd04a2aaf90b
describe
'86037' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCWX' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
d9c43d64ebcaadeb53d693c8a84559ec
2aafded984b32857215f09667fab52cdc11aa8e8
describe
'23130' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCWY' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
d2d869f0f402cc516c68eeb835e3a6b3
48b0980437d55e6a4ff3c6689e0be83b7989044c
describe
'83208' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCWZ' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
1ac682c649b745a5e0cdcad6291094a1
17d6e1b69079180195142782de354b34a3cc5c3d
describe
'22100' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCXA' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
1c8fe739cf2fe576cbd8cccc8aa45ff7
04f8e9d8b732a1c15914e0bd7490ac4e541ea9cd
describe
'34909' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCXB' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
d2dd06b45ac0c65b7718ddc22400470e
ef3de0378f9fe1c33c979bf01a57c46577a17ce0
describe
'9045' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCXC' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
c732d26c53e6e2901caaa6422e6c91c6
cb5e3aca0007bd3d5a6743f5694c5c65fd2a9e29
describe
'34817' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCXD' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
106a1a690dbd53636e6cd233ddd94a52
b0756f92ff7a951dce33e0a5c4b96074e3fb4d4b
describe
'8295' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCXE' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
49c3876b340f014c44491050fd0e1b41
8de350953a597524162ef91211cfd81fddf6bff1
describe
'64896' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCXF' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
4bb2e544bae55ea588f8f80fba7d55fb
6b6881f792064118c02816692fb4eae791c99c57
describe
'17165' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCXG' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
c98c433df4fac56ac9e842f4da277aae
d32093c227a8d542d4d19647b331a4df8206731a
describe
'87493' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCXH' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
adf8199a6c88b02c94c590e2f7652b58
f56b05834c85a4f400f7057ffa327522ecaae472
describe
'23404' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCXI' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
76b1958d72851fe2042eb905355b3135
0100ef34ec35a996de373c5940d0acce64b0f70e
describe
'84788' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCXJ' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
56ae15f9390236b28d4a9060e5954ef2
3557eb0cb30eac6f0fa9edeea492f966d1faabcf
describe
'22420' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCXK' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
e8ffcb43a67eab2f878335cc435e2ccf
65e0e54f2280ac284d47d0fc7854bf456d51e1c5
describe
'79416' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCXL' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
5435ed069363af883045c19d9c87e197
de96bbba0ef80e31f3e116be9937028c385b462c
describe
'21466' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCXM' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
99c627c5d10fdc47fa3fb0cf37a80605
aeba52d036f504d3473621e5ec383508572d0cf8
describe
'59178' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCXN' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
e78e6dadd9c10302dc1772d7d5e67df2
3942a920696bace0c2db0195c7ee33aa36c01c02
describe
'15187' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCXO' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
7158b2a635db3e0f3ade82784e5475eb
c2a25275c3f615d6df20cb26e0c7f993361df761
describe
'38849' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCXP' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
4d0680f8c50f9d511c4e00c510e8ea7d
be30f52ddc32a87472498f8cf1d6e2c62de53d27
describe
'9170' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCXQ' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
368e44f14b3d3ac6942aef89c8bc8087
b71c1b337707b4fc4851dd3d4c5ca6df2efe617a
describe
'73248' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCXR' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
2c54dbe572da2d34f2b4125f1579ce54
86a66504307ebecf2ff21cc237b1a317882ba9f6
describe
'19221' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCXS' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
1bb66304147124761d554ee99622a9d3
72a944494b56cda1f8ff774b38681fb19cc450b6
describe
'84929' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCXT' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
f9a5b11ac21eb3620853ab165c85c1bc
0028cd7b872ddc8055a1f5c7b868f94aab9513cc
describe
'23042' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCXU' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
9b69acf793d69a33376dc7a8524bb29d
285bd940f407b0ca68514ec15b3eab6e53095898
'2011-12-17T12:51:45-05:00'
describe
'86906' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCXV' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
8e6373019a19e3267bde6508cc0c4eba
82142eee69f6410513ffc218448a735b20466eec
describe
'23038' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCXW' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
1f1a122fbf714cb120a997109c397a6d
f57abe267527e323150cc5a93b4bdce336e7ad3e
describe
'85611' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCXX' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
367830baa0546f217d01e0f98648808c
2e911be6241b298018cfee1a9c0e610e119c86cd
describe
'23471' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCXY' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
d660c1412feb73a4e078f8ac33249072
80fd5e45ae821e49631ce1389d5cf18242931533
describe
'72599' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCXZ' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
93807ff79e9c66c14e80b0abbdd31e86
9680c22cf2c1df548102a636d4400d2952249c2b
describe
'18457' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCYA' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
6bcaa5a6cbbfd5482c9cb582507520c0
35dd3299ac3a7abff2ffd9a5d54fffc86ebd364b
describe
'34736' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCYB' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
7258c625fac0d48d49e241c142e0c9cc
c9e1770d35b1630fb99ee031daf6bf6760a0cd13
describe
'8076' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCYC' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
268719165944411bd11822f5fc7be6b1
370fe5bc43a4552c501ea1e1cf0855300552652c
describe
'37010' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCYD' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
b7b67fb82a2f350c7fe21b2cbe66af33
e7d3911d2911c4de3bc0df929d8bfe25d4e38df1
describe
'9383' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCYE' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
6c23596c5c40cbd7572e30cd625f7df4
8c41bc276c68889e7ce8edc654d19dff8714623c
describe
'31502' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCYF' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
343b9e16e4bc47025af9b0fbc8208b30
7e8b960fd74d51138519aaccced24b6ed0503d6c
describe
'7402' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCYG' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
6cc3ea1f4e181325777fc4a616b0f527
edb84e8319295efd98426c6f5d7752b8be86030a
describe
'62327' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCYH' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
00abdc2066ca996ea0dd02e3129006fa
7f04258247acc4a91f361386ec42d697aa229d40
describe
'16542' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCYI' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
47b5b5124f934a8a489413fea40768b7
77388ea225513e7d5f976df59102ce1b4b1e47a0
'2011-12-17T12:50:23-05:00'
describe
'90018' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCYJ' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
c28c6694d191fb3e25d18b9555963735
781a9fd61eec993f2abf961c5ec35c2c2dcbcf01
describe
'24364' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCYK' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
319dc875205a8f5fdd32c99d330eec1d
c4057878e6199538ef76a029ddcc72dfce9c191a
describe
'85963' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCYL' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
a15883d7e6d2e047733902c1fd56dd31
0f841f27deb2bb2fc521e48918e798e55c404e3d
describe
'22617' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCYM' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
5e093c6408b540157524e5c6852d7b8e
e6d7027eb3842d760358796d62f9151fced0dcfe
describe
'58409' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCYN' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
2a27363aee6e18518d135e6ac1afdf23
a58e621b273f4280af80498691f76b275fa2a43d
describe
'15592' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCYO' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
926197aeabe383fe7df979f15c0ebbd0
7a19fc96e6e147d1021ce75865c509bc0419f406
describe
'34564' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCYP' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
b1ef6b30e423479c6479a3830c60ae67
93a0b7668a5c0a0ee08473cf3b286518296b6b22
describe
'8786' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCYQ' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
6e976c73e00dbfe17b29acd2039524e7
c5d84a490b0a2db1788c9abd8c7473a9b978f64d
describe
'57973' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCYR' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
f4e070598f2d3b460e42200713c9068f
2a3cddaab9742ac441908c5f47eae90eed784753
describe
'12845' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCYS' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
e4c2395a127bfe552634f716f3a4a6d4
903a6195c983316a531b7e0f252e733b0a9ce14a
describe
'84153' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCYT' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
5705131f7bde19603997eb5e8b558818
e8a1779f2933dcdda8354dbc919079aa14fa5ddc
describe
'21392' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCYU' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
2a7064ece99c9d88b53b1ce85332830f
ad41848e912b45e4bffe98591f591d0bed022452
describe
'85119' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCYV' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
936ee6c85e872c0a91dd1dce91b84562
c678a89ab7e9dc869990d17ad8dde1d6c47babc7
describe
'22932' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCYW' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
c42377d8a87a10790882e15045185b81
fa893df21f56126aefa4deb30e63b5b2ad309d8f
describe
'87471' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCYX' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
54603e6218fed4481520769b5f5cebe0
8344823550cc764789b64a55f38adae5bec75de5
describe
'24545' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCYY' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
7409395cbb7077be3738b64feee85bf5
1c0608f9ab893a61b1bea0082d97a6e764b0c244
describe
'94150' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCYZ' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
10b9797ac3ab4fccaf200588bd11368d
1b29518ca57fab976b7e83f8af2d9e7db39b86ef
describe
'25309' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCZA' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
7ac185f7f90e7eb40b210b336305aa53
79e8b85dbf2698a9753c650c9b22a3c22aaae5a3
'2011-12-17T12:51:02-05:00'
describe
'68506' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCZB' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
5b62a50cc58a0798a908f0d791e1812a
c8162cccaff3552b25a4388ceed6f634956e02c8
describe
'17231' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCZC' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
583a7373b9af2a2a7a3d174ed85a9ab3
cef6312d1af8524c3560257e016e650dcbd6e4f5
describe
'34140' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCZD' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
aabc0d8ecafa9057a3408a314f8af668
d0ad34dd28ccfa7ba681d6337dde00789e576e41
describe
'8193' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCZE' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
e23770dd442c133d734277a77ecdc282
ad69dca75f5e4a49ee46882ad1f163ac0642fe2f
describe
'36227' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCZF' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
5aa7596e0f9c850e3860ebc397622527
730f291fd5c51c8f1a8e81e2bf73b92a3582968f
describe
'8818' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCZG' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
495ffbb9e1aaa06bf5d35cf316d8c055
65321da40b218aac9d4f2245b9c1c2e03da3907f
describe
'34055' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCZH' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
db5344909c92ade64ed76bfe6a188f96
1cd33b00d07d7bafde40503b0321e9937ef8a507
describe
'8128' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCZI' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
93026ad4d847e5ed575f59643e889337
c46f12639aab1fd2f7806ea8e40312586fdc7afc
describe
'70850' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCZJ' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
583fa7f5a2b031e80930a2d13fe6dc53
7090db76c13562631093ba6c1c59f2a8282b06df
'2011-12-17T12:51:28-05:00'
describe
'18367' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCZK' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
0bcb566824247a71d04bd02098e62306
0d5284e285ba84f8adffdfbfc4e0677a89bb7d4f
describe
'84541' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCZL' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
8855de0b11244f32af188e3d0c84e494
b42f67eb5f624492e95c2b5c77c95dc8e5443383
describe
'22583' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCZM' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
cc0c69efcd399a6e30189cd495b8f465
de7965be269e34bc24739f165fbf8af83c83899f
describe
'86240' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCZN' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
ec3ba2594cf95e8e5e0b07f1bb03a3f8
f2d60a2532d04767d6c9cef6a2608bad05add614
describe
'22442' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCZO' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
7efc8b405d0ecb82f286d8c9c8297da0
0bca919882f8a2f44b61bdc35a4f8e57b6dab7e2
describe
'86570' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCZP' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
e88c27246804c087a4b787aeb60a596c
cdeb820f1114b954f4d203e2f7162811e94ee5c7
describe
'22698' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCZQ' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
5b664e7abe1588dfc70ba009dfaad828
80db840fb612c24e5b226409624ffb6f8b443e33
describe
'51849' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCZR' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
6497bf0c736b3f96ccd167eace64f85b
be70452bf55691fb3ca5298f3a520de0021e9f94
describe
'12843' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCZS' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
76aa4dc219957c8bc3ab31d3e8333ec8
ad1a2bd8834b39da051e5e8eacf034cf6e72817a
describe
'37616' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCZT' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
e5a4e4d242622430c692dc3f0fd3d12f
dbef8a9388dfeb7e000455f5e886456e5b3fc06a
describe
'8683' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCZU' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
bd7834411d84f8bd22700635ab34d169
f7f6d1bec899c53c749882e6a2d13834d89d31f0
describe
'72737' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCZV' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
1adcb64cc82623f470067e3df16cbfc4
7938598e937b32d9c026323275df779e8c670aa4
describe
'18691' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCZW' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
1e875f185a8d055013d83e8cb2f03bb0
7fa256d36d6dc6c30b41f87714ec2676ff273eae
'2011-12-17T12:51:10-05:00'
describe
'83443' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCZX' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
be385a9f80017e896d3e70bf0866a1ee
b9ee82f839df75ef06c71435a6a6b89a5a98a237
describe
'22191' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCZY' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
e92d7a185f8fad24a0cbad178bd2bc10
a05ea96917c8fbeffc4262662003f575f51a1cd7
describe
'85324' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABCZZ' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
db56db0654a29326d6eef4d96b391a35
35915272220c14b86ab64650d360b53abff7236b
describe
'22347' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDAA' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
a0f0cb5a9dbff41b6eb85460f8806ad5
62a0c7b684b260ce9dd2c3a13d71e73a823f52b0
describe
'89192' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDAB' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
08e360c37b65cfd0bcb5d44ce746492a
33ec339117c0c379d056a9606a3090bb15ed7009
describe
'23037' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDAC' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
fc863ed004995411ef1aa2af798409fc
c7216cee4258b25f74526d89e0232c2e94e37af9
describe
'85728' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDAD' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
b5e39398d2e2b3e95fcc60db091b96a7
7263c86e3895ea5d41e1dd5ea8cf52c7735794c9
describe
'22546' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDAE' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
08d10af141f98499c56c61f4dcb69ba3
8bef05d0f9e45035a4ac049d8809438fc1c613b2
describe
'82928' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDAF' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
c0d0ff36315e02f0b40d02094dc6424f
573fe9a8e8197c4be64e496925464b8e8c15e5f9
describe
'22076' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDAG' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
61d6e9a78485c3d60602636ab70a4e1b
794d37d2337d2ac3ed3606d056928d66d5eaa5ee
describe
'46412' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDAH' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
27f25ffbb882a3915a88cde28ab543e0
a7c29e5fb1822607b561163f50f81a31f4d23579
describe
'11075' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDAI' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
7d6ed925d8ec565c23164b5770c9784b
af33cef1f4fb3289141f714b220358fc6ab762db
describe
'34434' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDAJ' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
fc54b3a6c143fdb09e469545f84d99fd
4d2a6a2c02bebc164874c9470da5abb7381d9b6d
describe
'8006' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDAK' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
d6e0a144665fa784fff8f6dca0735a8f
7abcc45d7e7ff3396de2f1e064d43c4cbd93c8ce
describe
'38292' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDAL' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
39ccf64536dea94a0486855525590840
5938f9718efaddbf85e32ce28333fa8fe4460b16
describe
'9401' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDAM' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
05154871cda6b3aec530b392e8fd7345
010b0c3b2515c308b36bc70603e339436fcc747b
describe
'33236' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDAN' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
e2c1e51e49b14db5df9f45e7d7efabf3
0e9ce0a9df5dabe1532d8ddf75cc327843625435
describe
'7510' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDAO' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
c4c6369a80944fc76f59cf4c82b5fb2b
6f6b7d872e83f94e9593b0f77e247f30911cace6
describe
'72130' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDAP' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
5c79aec722519452dd4e3af97303d68c
92312372505e7e4bd18ca306d2d70b7ff04cc835
describe
'19383' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDAQ' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
2eb1e8fa3b3a8d7e3bf9399195d9b92d
8d5836541f78696bfa8188a5c01ab244e7b1cde7
describe
'82782' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDAR' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
66c7283a7c787eedbcd589d8af4793cd
5106440885be7d8bba5fc4110b418623b600d991
describe
'22145' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDAS' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
5dd02152c6e67a84e2d7cc650440cb63
341b6d44746635face78ef0b8c497673a0be22af
describe
'86071' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDAT' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
1efc9ad6fc8ca8c6025cd66971a6fa4f
f7e14d470b78d6cb894400ec46ba8276bcaec815
describe
'23619' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDAU' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
49b12cb97261ca95fb1b00030554f16a
f6167e9c15891ae49ac7dec6a53cb14303484684
describe
'84383' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDAV' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
33e62cbf96cd0fd007b5f0f0b00c9952
b7a62f508d67e90ac88dd2e438a4cc829d282f0e
'2011-12-17T12:50:58-05:00'
describe
'21894' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDAW' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
a9a428e32377708e2b4f4382d70a35b9
d40d25eb1bcbc3af278de4bd51c069f9b94f4c95
describe
'87762' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDAX' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
d97dba67a9bc2b19f0eef99beff69df4
8aebf1f172c6d99cd8595ba57b5f5feace860c8f
describe
'23018' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDAY' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
e4c0e4ea38206c7d915950c62331b930
5e051817fd8772068d25b949ffe8a614314187bd
describe
'86962' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDAZ' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
1e791e6385ee937fc6738d7bbce63d0c
8b115bb07509d9cfabc87c108881d73b97cd6257
describe
'22114' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDBA' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
4dc3c8c615714fd6c9ed68c019b1af4d
6e6810a2289e4a2cf999f575776ae2d7f52b39f0
describe
'86860' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDBB' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
3bfb6f64422d7759f9aba795a32e07aa
a332dc4ae91220c2140d8ec803905efbefba20f5
describe
'22348' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDBC' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
74ca0083989015b567d0811b514e756a
3a50ae6381bdebf96fd3495ce5843331de380605
describe
'80735' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDBD' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
243cc1671446685958d4a29a0d2ac9fa
dcdbd76603a4b4503b3a28625ceba150ad10e560
describe
'20055' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDBE' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
00322dcccb341150fa206b5a2c00fff9
27c1e29690862f7464468ec17a249a3b1d080fe6
describe
'39637' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDBF' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
d15c634d7eabf786408e68fa5f10b072
70ba05401f938e41477c295383cc4dc4c41bc2e7
describe
'9963' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDBG' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
a81606f985b96f9f87b8186db3222a04
daf3e6bf2133c4d096e381602b4f964ae7cf3a84
describe
'34485' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDBH' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
f86e103fef6f1cb06a09fc6a90505ab1
a4d32ae1353c0039984e0f02ba8ea5c0a010eb83
describe
'7751' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDBI' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
699b15db3e7b6276489cb35d678a5d14
c01f733368005aad7d0716d20afd7fc1af916235
describe
'68334' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDBJ' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
520105b24babd5f09039181f4329b923
7d1eb0b819c561d5cfb3d4f7d843579831b3649b
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDBK' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
22ea550badef03e86130b146171c6c76
742e276393d76775348b1a8e71c73a0e997a6e81
describe
'95112' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDBL' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
b4eda470f2d8cd4f9bc96262c61d3095
537f007902a440fd02d29b9dc6d37fdd4d74052e
describe
'24626' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDBM' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
64dbf7b60fd48e90baafd7200d4a5a08
93a03a542975ba9d33e0153909163c6b8d86afff
describe
'88721' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDBN' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
917591856a96687015b3712144407794
ed6b0449d2d8128d4e5a45ebc3f66d9ec2202058
describe
'23452' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDBO' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
27a05a2fcec90736b9f6cdf76f50149c
d4a7903dac5c769a571e558f8071706f80e0c17b
describe
'79630' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDBP' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
97ef72566b16efc4c0d126c703dd86e4
e75b7ebe40b4288efdb83bbd4a776accf34b5294
describe
'21554' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDBQ' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
0c925a028a990fbad875b891161aecdc
50c97feedaa29de35f2e679ce7218c1a0330041e
describe
'85133' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDBR' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
e79e97ef969114726eb48c40653a5492
352f84a059165bd471d7481363cd0c247e4d4d76
'2011-12-17T12:46:34-05:00'
describe
'23576' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDBS' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
7cd043a9ee2abad97cc0e01449143b6a
43ca9df3863230e47570c3af8f461f9097c3fb0d
describe
'61913' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDBT' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
991b2877c838b477b685850eb45d9559
0bf2b07b41eaf05d565f0f57b279eb99a102542f
describe
'16049' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDBU' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
bc3e5e7e02c86b3b00f83a0447fefab7
b99012d52b2f0c395a38aa70a1cfc9025627147e
describe
'38476' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDBV' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
540c49950b70b8d0939e1e18e9b4dabb
85c93afd923f80c3c128f42e3e930cd4bffb9555
describe
'9676' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDBW' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
143f7e4c897a5c5578ff4de8efb46679
f09b7bf856fbd8ce995b9dcad0200b996e70ae26
describe
'33162' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDBX' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
e5027d2b46d65615337133a09b3e6682
71ec0573458bb89d563013b6215cbf1f57ce112e
describe
'7919' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDBY' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
42e5e80f9144f68b95a16a68180ae4f3
b7562fb6a71235db2ec453ed9e047f05141f0661
describe
'77014' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDBZ' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
e54986a0eea85b69ca8b0344fd06c5e2
1c80598b6a749831ebd69fd2a079c3530fc6bff6
describe
'19712' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDCA' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
f18bde69a60d91cdcf7660c59b703b1f
dea0026ff35ddbc0f80321a2f663e507d24b2993
describe
'84805' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDCB' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
3f00497e0a5431fa821ad86c1d4ffac0
b3b773dae2f0bcb99d54cb19b3648a62c7abe7f2
describe
'22330' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDCC' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
28cd714e5a56cf0643d2f1bf95766768
21bc6fda9728d8912d6edf9a5c6fce010ebc52b6
describe
'87429' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDCD' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
69c06d216ee42b21912e6432b3425b30
45c2f2e1546aade52b19376b7be0a688f5e1176e
describe
'22652' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDCE' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
1d55f5fd80918c7d61332ae187f41ebc
a05b8de6b198981af51eaad17bfb1def79bda809
describe
'82912' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDCF' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
74fc7dc3c9b83368ac53b031b0ffc4ee
934615be05e9447bda849d36335da59920289738
describe
'22007' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDCG' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
63cdf632f3f237e4c970d153c44fb6e6
854c75765e08fbe0ac73844fa71aaf0415fd7c72
describe
'85635' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDCH' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
365fe1dd833866de2f49572a62e3fef5
f2273ebf46d734aeb3a9867d438375a3005ddff8
describe
'22566' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDCI' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
5b59e85a39fa0bcf71ac4d102b1da5a5
e704e087a7b241bda787b941c0089db6a9e64884
describe
'60785' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDCJ' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
265f24a389fa1e53c96229fcb5f12730
709633e69e91495d5e420ef34a12d276704b9db2
describe
'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDCK' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
df0c66832a053aab1de5e6f42c14bbeb
c354397ff43c23dff7cc8d95c73accd80e84236b
describe
'68044' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDCL' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
8b021d1dcb144b8e7cca7fb6269af391
194c13979565ce53fd5a656cbde0203fd74862b8
describe
'17461' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDCM' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
6f65587f2c50f2e86ece6e9a01cba593
1ad4e2790b3fb72cc6a73c9c2defddd880580f6a
describe
'82415' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDCN' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
432dee05655056ecbfbbbdd13b00d143
94ab70b443c57bcc6f265360c9b22fe4276a1666
describe
'21482' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDCO' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
a765b420467381611c905dd2d5b40313
1aae23ee1663ec941c2643071398df9eca143ce0
describe
'43623' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDCP' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
8ca5c148001fda0bd02c853a9ebfb9b9
fcba6d8e54a0c55f94a241bd623cdb145cff7969
describe
'10103' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDCQ' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
e42d29cc77374e7caf1259f70cc5fb07
62e912b4e1887283719f428fb0a7ce9c3a08e045
describe
'35247' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDCR' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
c4b444060e9facace5d036647cd9c80d
4b9e2feb9bc08445a1805af5e3c8c1f9c0765a3b
'2011-12-17T12:51:11-05:00'
describe
'8430' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDCS' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
3553c52c1381c9ba710638863e56495b
6999800183a723e2c8fe3d1b7edff76ec2211f89
describe
'72519' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDCT' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
e5bf2d2d75bd62b8f6285b087a869455
733e238f5cc6e0821240e70deb96ec79823019b9
describe
'18464' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDCU' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
a8e93e9b1eb6f1cd06835d5afe86a2c9
dfbf6eb67a73c82d7885680cef86e684990f13da
describe
'76228' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDCV' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
e1f528a4824fcf8da6571e71748e6cc8
88ff4c5ed7d5dc7602ba6f690faea7db7356d323
describe
'19846' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDCW' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
ac7817f3a1c26f5e6279b05ee88caa62
62ee7d298d0fde4d8b28c9ab6ff5a5b0d0e7e9e5
describe
'36981' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDCX' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
a5b6821531aaa5bdf5d03fa14ef85689
06ac622ffefdb649a2c1b2d6c75723e14df3ba34
describe
'9553' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDCY' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
084392e0647be1b450e945931eacfba9
20b3034bbfc3910d0f851cd31761243bba7989ee
describe
'33526' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDCZ' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
2ae307e3bf715e5fba1bc4c6671613e3
af995e0551d3426d858d34137b1cc471eed894e0
describe
'7799' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDDA' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
38d689b577f449415564475a2fe2ce72
ccbb73078837ee7dbce6b23e69ec9167ec9a05af
describe
'72703' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDDB' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
559e48b9bbc4f080fa8dbc823602345f
079da598a99ea7bea903cdbfd095b4e3c7d11fe7
describe
'19306' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDDC' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
6f9ba3b4b7598eb4021d49211e946944
bd75ca333a5f6be9d9bde4b33c038dd36f5f3041
describe
'80862' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDDD' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
f0ea45bb1b3cb8615b7b4f9dc3c5adc6
6a3067e527ff26cdf1b7f1698c9d37a75a5cd809
describe
'21936' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDDE' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
f7707c9b4ab04d92f7f3996c87face28
fce4f83f120ff64bb4680c87a0295d17aa198081
describe
'81989' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDDF' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
3ca8f0b1c982535e159699f7656cc3a3
8db63f7abc0e1f861e0ca1298e94cbeb7444485c
describe
'21484' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDDG' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
d6211697eea40d513fe32b993756ba95
e937a86b87db54571d260c5f80aa4751620f059f
describe
'43998' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDDH' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
18b3e4e194d43d9b4b1b4bb493e6e702
3aee6b4796b2a6bb40f316d44ee5633d39797cf6
describe
'10565' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDDI' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
642a1d9574adb6770739f83f9f3f1689
cb74e2a0a2eadf7971d167607d898466c4843b73
describe
'75662' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDDJ' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
9a3dab2c8dbf7f66c4d4c6c69ef23546
9e3916e4296155507e5fa639414c39b88d39d4f6
'2011-12-17T12:51:48-05:00'
describe
'19659' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDDK' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
1c6bf9b9b002412c0d455246f03d55c4
05d737dc0444f746045bd2aec0facd3163b1f081
describe
'86636' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDDL' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
885b1310a573799e6299b273d1ccda08
fb327437a54b726a26d826f1693027e51e83cbb2
describe
'22610' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDDM' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
fad3f9f4a0bb886a4637dee0b10aeb0e
7b967ca5ae8918efade047d1bf2182db657ac91e
describe
'56118' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDDN' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
c0e2bb33f04cff834a2f2bb10422cc58
594d5eba5e1e7c6ec52baaf8a6a407ebdf93fb36
describe
'13410' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDDO' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
3ed16d1a1b92598a7ad2cb1e37b1bd86
4b56af098096452765943eedb13eba3d36b2f908
describe
'36387' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDDP' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
9c4b3324c5352c7c3ef13c9802ccfc4d
c8560ebdd0b7253942739fa0b831483b336374bf
describe
'8541' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDDQ' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
7198f3e2e12b89712d9d4ea6a1c3ecaa
d6c05d3af4958fededd69427edd9042b279293c2
describe
'78579' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDDR' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
30022e389c5ea6696f29a31b58204f10
6284a8f3226d83fcaa506532957f921b1c2df1bd
describe
'19680' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDDS' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
e897d2e37ec346b4deec8317abff7e67
fe6f53d1c4d3e1de2b67886117fa14db89bbf976
describe
'82802' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDDT' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
5c72a6a8cd6c3aced7a461b456722778
83ea33e80bb1591c0701a33195abfd55d81568c0
describe
'21609' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDDU' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
1f328ae4c6711402b36551430c5ebb83
71d7cff2f37b0b032eae237ffa3fb370c0065173
describe
'84508' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDDV' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
597362f7d7b276bda401ea7aaac9f283
0be33edc4bd22aa32215066110845a348c9c4c8e
describe
'22357' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDDW' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
cba9d14c1abff6ef24a040d261eb329f
27894fe251b3b4c2ba37ccf704846ba4e8f9cf8c
describe
'88784' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDDX' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
6897e475bcf861419f9fa5baac8c5fe4
bc05b3741647ded80ed92c8aecf55f596bfaa302
describe
'23011' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDDY' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
f831938f30500d144e8473cc1ac33106
d471b537045fec19bbb8ca9b8eec9e26a58fbf5f
describe
'86669' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDDZ' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
5d9fed4aae57a821f6d42dca5365753e
e868144c345a7f8a09a5c6d2de777376f53fc5a4
describe
'22285' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDEA' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
a0075e8488d2c0f6d55d2e850ccc4f69
21f78a3fa2b24983a5681043e752649cec88bb1e
describe
'55988' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDEB' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
049eee1578834795e8b13f0a0e35c0fa
050d15421b358bbf88c63b3fcee2a9c7ce79c055
describe
'13564' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDEC' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
aba100568160e59c7323262d398872ba
db8804659a350fe8ac2a8128b426edb3ceebe143
describe
'36796' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDED' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
9a4a80ad9ecb6c2de83f4841b16a74a8
67563fafae425acc59d7331cac787e1fe3320259
describe
'9471' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDEE' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
4706c06cb3434e17bb98a25363ee3cd7
f333a0af6024b86268cbf6ee805dd7387271dcb9
describe
'35290' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDEF' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
ea99f48035febf7e0cd797e77d586d8b
d41da17757b608f6c076c2b219d2eb4c53516ca2
describe
'8409' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDEG' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
a2e4c571864e5b84740b403c4222f150
26043e7a2c41b9f5540ab3839df9d97215857f38
describe
'76720' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDEH' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
8af78795ec31cbf15159289d7ccf3754
dd3487d2d4862296170bb31331dd9685813cd3b4
describe
'19617' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDEI' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
70b86a611df4d44461f518f306a422ee
a1569679e4cb9d1055e6561d5d78cc23b91effe4
describe
'86514' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDEJ' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
41c7d3e9c4f75424820a1f1745efac9b
2bf0707d8762bffce20364c14f8822fb923e26fb
describe
'22172' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDEK' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
320f928deafffe0bfbdabfc82a2f9bef
1d889135120fada1c54eb435a62f076f18a7b9aa
describe
'74680' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDEL' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
8e50aa790eeb5a383dfa9e9ac9420e6a
11e876d6852312b0e1bd38a47bde035be44153a5
describe
'19778' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDEM' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
a48c5dcd2ba06096f04668570b982148
8fab9c572b3bb9ae16f9e910a5b108776ad7296b
describe
'9089' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDEN' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
746afb135bea0c6107009026d8371677
0ccf444dd526bfe9b77b0b824187f4beba42da86
describe
'10395' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDEO' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
b2215e2701747de9edc98f2217d433a3
ee8601b2cbbab519889d6f014db778419bc7b83c
describe
'10845' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDEP' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
cf8cce5086305c3b80b057cafe33fd62
d0817215c84d538735d73c15227ee2b430b33157
describe
'10551' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDEQ' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
35acd7b6d9dd1cd4ae76951f8d599c49
029dcd8ac500a5b022c3403399af7d75a770e733
describe
'16045' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDER' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
929cb9e25751b38d464868fe639b1e7e
15327b1672f747cfc33a8babf02d14d0c2010594
describe
'75785' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDES' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
9d960026c852f2624973aeb0f161641b
c06d663715d77f9a8cc8186913e4a3ab80d10ac7
describe
'17584' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDET' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
7a8af47696555f2cbceea3be106e1287
c592214d3fa1b16dfc0b13ca6551b2ce12097f2e
describe
'128533' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDEU' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
43cb1284773f633d7daaf2363ee9cd8f
b4c870f951555cf4c2aaf53a34a17086cb9915b9
describe
'28958' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDEV' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
6001d40929d840cc4bdd212cfb098d3b
736db3aee02ec1b2014e9874086196fbe0fffd04
describe
'8300' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDEW' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
5ccc1efca75abfcc2525387932701e55
b6873228d72bc0aaa89ad9264c00d576d78d6119
describe
'320' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDEX' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
fc22037a766ab2db3696f35cf6450d83
5768e35f37af0e13d0e677548d6442b6087c1626
describe
'244409' 'info:fdaE20080605_AAAAOLfileF20080606_AABDEY' 'sip-filesUF00077426_00001.mets'
8c7bae2d56de7d49d9dc13c229b99085
3c51e044d311d003a2322e2c01e69ddf1a25296c
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-17T20:14:44-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.