Citation
Beauty and the Beast

Material Information

Title:
Beauty and the Beast
Creator:
Haslewood, Constance ( Illustrator )
White & Allen ( Publisher )
Emrik & Binger ( Lithographer )
Place of Publication:
London ;
New York
Publisher:
White and Allen
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Magic -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Fathers and daughters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Jealousy -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Princes -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Self-sacrifice -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Love -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Fairy tales -- 1890 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1890
Genre:
Fairy tales ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
Netherlands -- Haarlem
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication from inscription.
General Note:
"Chromolith at Haarlem by Emrik & Binger, 21 Berners Street, London"--t.p. verso.
General Note:
Baldwin Library copy lacks front cover.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
illustrated by Constance Haslewood.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
027260925 ( ALEPH )
ALK2281 ( NOTIS )
173660801 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


| Mart A, 2









Chromolith:

at Haar! lem

by Qmrik& a

212Bérners street







RmB

The Baldwin Library





neo

Heise









ite

Beauty Wes the youngest of ie tree daughters
ef a merchant. She had, been called Beauty from
her birth on account of her great loveliness. Ker

father was very fond of her. Jt happened on one

occasion that the merchant was obliged to leave













ro

cnc eae eee TL te Le ee en del alae las ateere







three daughters together and asked them what

presents he should tring them on his return. The

eldest asked for a splendid diamond necklace, the y
a














second for a lovely silk dress, but the youngest
said, “ Bring me a sweet pink rose.” Us the
merchant was returning home he was overtaken
by a violent storm and lest his way. Seeing
before him : mag=
nificent paiace, he
entered it. Levery:

thing seemed to



have been provided

for his comfort.





Son Oe eer oe nme EN eer rt SS
retired to his sleeping apartment. The next

merning he awoke quite refreshed from his
fatigue. Having breakfasted he walked in the

gardens of the palace. The flowers made him

could not see one for some time. He
last he saw a large bush of lovely
pink roses. @ne of these he |
plucked, when suddenly he felt a

heavy paw on his shoulder

T
think of Beauty; he searched for a rose tree but.
|

and leoking round






|
|
|
|
:
|
J

\







hideous animal had hold of him. “Ungrateful

man,’ said the Beast, ‘‘is this the way you repay

the Kindness you have received?

Uour life is

e forfeited : 4 will, however, allow you to return
home to take leave of your children, but you must

come back here in a week, or send one of them in /





i)

Ny

Le place. Take the rese and go.” Having



so spoken he instantly disappeared. 9n the
evening the merchant, almost broken-hearted,
reached his home.

“When her father related to Beauty all that

rN had, occurred she said, “Oh!
EN .

©




father, you shall not re-





turn, J alone will bear
the punishment!” No
entreaties could alter her

The merchant







insisted on accompanying her and seeing her

safely to the monster’s palace. They mounted

their herses and set eff and very soon arrived at
the gates of the palace, which instantly flew epen.
‘Having dismounted her father led Beauty on to
the terrace, where the Beast met them and gave
Beauty a large bouquet of lovely

flowers. ‘Her father then took

her into the palace, kissed







good bye to her; she watched
hie ge, and waved her head:
kerchief until he was aut of
sight. Then a number of beau-

tiful Little humming-bdirds guided







‘Beautu te some rooms, evidentlu meant purpeselu
7] ~

i
\
}
i
}
;
i
|
|

d

for her, for over each deer was written ‘ Beauty’

in precious stones. - She entered one of the rooms

and laid down on some soft cushions, fer she was

at

tired and very unhappy, then the little birds came
\ to her, and sang and told pretty taies untii she fet
\
\

\.

ae






16



happy again, they then took her through the palace




till she came to a large hall, where the Beast was




waiting to take her inte dinner.




Beauty stayed at the palace a long time, then





the Beast gave her permission to go home for three
days te see herfather. But as

soon as she was gone the





Beast did not know

what te de without




her and wished her



back again. When












oe

Beauty returned no east met her on the terrace,
nor could she see him; n vain she looked through
the palace, at last she went into the parden and
there she found the Beast lying on the ground,

she knelt beside him, and tenderly took his paw, he








opened his eyes and, seeing Beauty,
said, “ Ah! you have only come
to see me die.” “What can §

do te save you?”’ she asiked.



NMG you marry me?”









VAP

x ; yeas TS 1
Lili Ng, te save your Lite, JDe2aucy answered.

y she said these words she saw at ner feet
one of the handsemest princes she had ever seen.
The Prince told her a wicked fairy changed him
inte a beast until some one should love him, al-

though he was so frightful, and as beauty jad

done so he could assume his proper term again.

The Prince and Beauty were Soon married and




lived happi.y together to a very cla age.

oe





19









Full Text


| Mart A, 2






Chromolith:

at Haar! lem

by Qmrik& a

212Bérners street







RmB

The Baldwin Library





neo

Heise






ite

Beauty Wes the youngest of ie tree daughters
ef a merchant. She had, been called Beauty from
her birth on account of her great loveliness. Ker

father was very fond of her. Jt happened on one

occasion that the merchant was obliged to leave










ro

cnc eae eee TL te Le ee en del alae las ateere




three daughters together and asked them what

presents he should tring them on his return. The

eldest asked for a splendid diamond necklace, the y
a











second for a lovely silk dress, but the youngest
said, “ Bring me a sweet pink rose.” Us the
merchant was returning home he was overtaken
by a violent storm and lest his way. Seeing
before him : mag=
nificent paiace, he
entered it. Levery:

thing seemed to



have been provided

for his comfort.


Son Oe eer oe nme EN eer rt SS
retired to his sleeping apartment. The next

merning he awoke quite refreshed from his
fatigue. Having breakfasted he walked in the

gardens of the palace. The flowers made him

could not see one for some time. He
last he saw a large bush of lovely
pink roses. @ne of these he |
plucked, when suddenly he felt a

heavy paw on his shoulder

T
think of Beauty; he searched for a rose tree but.
|

and leoking round






|
|
|
|
:
|
J

\




hideous animal had hold of him. “Ungrateful

man,’ said the Beast, ‘‘is this the way you repay

the Kindness you have received?

Uour life is

e forfeited : 4 will, however, allow you to return
home to take leave of your children, but you must

come back here in a week, or send one of them in /


i)

Ny

Le place. Take the rese and go.” Having



so spoken he instantly disappeared. 9n the
evening the merchant, almost broken-hearted,
reached his home.

“When her father related to Beauty all that

rN had, occurred she said, “Oh!
EN .

©




father, you shall not re-





turn, J alone will bear
the punishment!” No
entreaties could alter her

The merchant




insisted on accompanying her and seeing her

safely to the monster’s palace. They mounted

their herses and set eff and very soon arrived at
the gates of the palace, which instantly flew epen.
‘Having dismounted her father led Beauty on to
the terrace, where the Beast met them and gave
Beauty a large bouquet of lovely

flowers. ‘Her father then took

her into the palace, kissed




good bye to her; she watched
hie ge, and waved her head:
kerchief until he was aut of
sight. Then a number of beau-

tiful Little humming-bdirds guided







‘Beautu te some rooms, evidentlu meant purpeselu
7] ~

i
\
}
i
}
;
i
|
|

d

for her, for over each deer was written ‘ Beauty’

in precious stones. - She entered one of the rooms

and laid down on some soft cushions, fer she was

at

tired and very unhappy, then the little birds came
\ to her, and sang and told pretty taies untii she fet
\
\

\.

ae
16



happy again, they then took her through the palace




till she came to a large hall, where the Beast was




waiting to take her inte dinner.




Beauty stayed at the palace a long time, then





the Beast gave her permission to go home for three
days te see herfather. But as

soon as she was gone the





Beast did not know

what te de without




her and wished her



back again. When









oe

Beauty returned no east met her on the terrace,
nor could she see him; n vain she looked through
the palace, at last she went into the parden and
there she found the Beast lying on the ground,

she knelt beside him, and tenderly took his paw, he








opened his eyes and, seeing Beauty,
said, “ Ah! you have only come
to see me die.” “What can §

do te save you?”’ she asiked.



NMG you marry me?”






VAP

x ; yeas TS 1
Lili Ng, te save your Lite, JDe2aucy answered.

y she said these words she saw at ner feet
one of the handsemest princes she had ever seen.
The Prince told her a wicked fairy changed him
inte a beast until some one should love him, al-

though he was so frightful, and as beauty jad

done so he could assume his proper term again.

The Prince and Beauty were Soon married and




lived happi.y together to a very cla age.

oe


19