Citation
Alice in Wonderland

Material Information

Title:
Alice in Wonderland
Uniform Title:
Alice's adventures in wonderland
Creator:
Carroll, Lewis, 1832-1898
Attwell, Mabel Lucie, 1879-1964 ( Illustrator )
Raphael Tuck & Sons ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Tuck
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
148 p. : illus. (part col.) ;

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Bldn -- 1910
Genre:
fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
by Lewis Carrol [pseud.] Pictured by Mabel Lucie Attwell.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026767644 ( ALEPH )
12622751 ( OCLC )
ALG9989 ( NOTIS )

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All in the golden afternoon
Full letsurely we glide ;

For both our oars, with little skill,
By litile arms are plied,

While little hands make vain pretence
Our wanderings to guide.

Ah, cruel Three! In such an hour,
Beneath such dreamy weather,

To beg a tale of breath too weak
To stir the tiniest feather !

Yet what can one poor voice avail

Against three tongues together ?

Imperious Prima flashes forth
Fler edict “to begin it” —

In gentler tone Secunda hopes

“ There will be nonsense tn tt !”—
While Tertia interrupts the tale
Not more than once a minute.

Anon, to sudden silence won,
Ln fancy they pursue

The dream-child moving through a lane
Of wonders wild and new.

In friendly chat with bird or beast—
And half believe it true.



6 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

And ever, as the story drained Thus grew the tale of Wonderland ;
The wells of fancy ary, Thus slowly, one by one,

And faintly strove that weary one Its quaint events were hammered out—
To put the subject by, And now the tale is done,

“ The rest next time—” “Itis next time!” And home we steer, a merry crew,
The happy votces cry. Beneath the setting sun.

Alice! a childish story take,
And with a gentle hand
Lay it where Childhood's dreams are twined

In Memory’s mystic band.
Like pilgrim’s wither'd wreath of flowers
Pluck'd in a far-off land,





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CHAPTER

I,

II.
II.
IV.
Vv.
VI.
VII.
VIII.
IX.

XI.
XII.

CONTENTS

DOWN THE RABBIT-HOLE . : . :
THE POOL OF TEARS

A CAUCUS-RACE AND A LONG TALE
THE RABBIT SENDS IN A LITTLE BILL
ADVICE FROM A CATERPILLAR . . .
PIG AND PEPPER. ’ : : ‘ :
A MAD TEA-PARTY. | .

THE QUEEN’S CROQUET-GROUND.

THE MOCK TURTLE'’S STORY

THE LOBSTER QUADRILLE .

WHO STOLE THE TARTS? . : . .
ALICE’S EVIDENCE . . : . .



PAGE

20
30
40
52
63
77
89
102
114
125
137












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LIST OF COLOURED PLATES

“QOH DEAR! OH DEAR! I SHALL BE TOO LATE!” . . Frontispiece
THE RABBIT STARTED VIOLENTLY . ; : . facing page 22
THE. POOL. OF TEARS: 4.00 2 Fe et A ee gs eee
THE: MOUSE’S TALE © 5 20.0 45 ce) hag! fed, aes ace 56
THE WHITE RABBIT HOUSE . . . . .. eae
ADVICE FROM A CATERPILLAR . . . .. . a ae eg
IN THE DUCHESS'S KITCHEN: 202 0 Rill 6a
THE PIG BABY vic: Ge ee ay eee Ge ea oe eee
THE MAD-HATTER’S TEA-PARTY . . «we Seng 86
THE CHESHIRE (CAT +i ven tit. ea ey eee ee Bae Os
THE MOCK TURTLE’S STORY. aa ee ei ao

THE TRIAL OF THE KNAVE OF HEARTS . . . 7 » 138





ALICE IN WONDERLAND

CHAPTER I

DOWN THE RABBIT-HOLE

ALICE was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister
on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she
had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had
no pictures or conversations in it, ‘“‘and what is the use of a
book,” thought Alice, “without pictures or conversations ?”

So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she
could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid)
whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be
worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies,
when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close
by her.



10 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did
Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit
say to itself, ‘Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be too late!” (when








she thought it over after-
wards, it occurred to her
that she ought to have won-
dered at this, but at the
time it all seemed quite
natural); but when the rab-

bit actually Zook a
watch out of tts
watstcoat - pocket,
and looked at it,
and then hurried
on, Alice started
to her feet, for
it flashed across
her mind that she
had never before
seen a rabbit with
either a waistcoat-
pocket, or a watch
to take out of
it, and burning
with curiosity, she
ran across’ the
field after it, and
was just in time



DOWN THE RABBIT-HOLE II

to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the
hedge.

In another moment down went Alice after it, never once
considering how in the world she was to get out again.

The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some
way, and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that
Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself
before she found herself falling down what seemed to be a
very deep well.

Either the well was very deep, or she fell very slowly, for
she had plenty of time as she went down to look about her,
and to wonder what was going to happen next. First, she
tried to look down and make out what she was coming to,
but it was too dark to see anything; then she looked at the
sides of the well, and noticed that they were filled with
cupboards and book-shelves: here and there she saw maps
and pictures hung upon pegs. She took down a jar from
one of the shelves as she passed: it was labelled ORAN GE
MARMALADE, but to her great disappointment it was
empty: she did not like to drop the jar for fear of killing
somebody underneath, so managed to put it into one of the
cupboards as she fell past it.

“Well!” thought Alice to herself. ‘After such a fall as
this, I shall think nothing of tumbling down stairs! How
brave they'll all think me at home! Why I wouldn't say
anything about it, even if I fell off the top of the house!”
(Which is very likely true.)

Down, down, down. Would the fall never come to an



12 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

end? ‘I wonder how many miles I’ve fallen by this time?”
she said aloud. ‘I must be getting somewhere near the
centre of the earth. Let mesee: that would be four thousand
miles down, I think—” (for, you see, Alice had learnt several
things of this sort in her lessons in the schoolroom, and
though this was not a very good opportunity for showing off
her knowledge, as there was no one to listen to her, still it
was good practice to say it over) ‘‘—yes, that’s about the right
distance—but then I wonder what Latitude or Longitude
I've got to?” (Alice had no idea what Latitude was, or
Longitude either, but thought they were nice grand words
to say.)

Presently she began again: ‘I wonder if I shall fall right
through the earth! How funny it'll seem to come out among
the people that walk with their heads downwards! The
Antipathies, I think—” (she was rather glad there was no one
listening, this time, as it didn’t sound at all the right word)
‘“— but I shall have to ask them what the name of the country
is, you know. ‘Please, Ma’am, is this New Zealand or
Australia?’”—(and she tried to curtsey as she spoke—fancy
curtseyimg as you're falling through the air! Do you think
you could manage it?) ‘And what an ignorant little girl
she'll think me! No, it'll never do to ask; perhaps I shall
see it written up somewhere.”

Down, down, down. There was nothing else to do, so
Alice soon began talking again. “ Dinah’ll miss me very
much to-night, I should think!” (Dinah was the cat.) “I~
hope they’ll remember her saucer of milk at tea-time. Dinah,



DOWN THE RABBIT-HOLE 13

my dear,
I wish
you were
down here
with me!
There are
no mice
in the air,
I’m afraid, but you
might catch a bat,
and that’s very
like a mouse, you
know. But docats
eat bats, I won-
der?” And here
Alice began to get
rather sleepy, and
went on saying to
herself, in a dreamy sort
of way, ‘‘ Do cats eat bats ?
Do cats eat bats?” and
sometimes, ‘‘Do bats eat
cats?” for, you see, as
she couldn’t answer either
question, it didn’t much matter which way she put it. She
felt that she was dozing off, and had just begun to dream
that she was walking hand in hand with Dinah, and saying
to her very earnestly, ‘‘ Now, Dinah, tell me the truth: did







14 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

you ever eat a bat?” when suddenly, thump! thump! down
she came upon a heap of sticks and dry leaves, and the fall
was over.

Alice was not a bit hurt, and she jumped up on to her feet
in a moment: she looked up, but it was all dark overhead ;
before her was another long passage, and the White Rabbit
was still in sight, hurrying down it. There was not a
moment to be lost: away went Alice like the wind, and was
just in time to hear it say, as it turned a corner, ‘‘Oh my ears
and whiskers, how late it’s getting!” She was close behind
it when she turned the corner, but the Rabbit was no longer
to be seen: she found herself in a long, low hall, which was
lit up by a row of
lamps hanging from
the roof.

There were doors
all round the hall,
but they were all
locked; and when
Alice had been all
the way down one
side and up the
other trying every
| | door, she walked
| sadly down the
middle wondering
how she was ever
to get out again.





DOWN THE RABBIT-HOLE 15

Suddenly she came upon a little three-legged table, all
made of solid glass; there was nothing on it but a tiny
golden key, and Alice’s first idea was that this might belong
to one of the doors of the hall; but alas! either the locks
were too large, or the key was too small, but at any rate it
would not open any of them. However, on the second time
round, she came upon a low curtain she had not noticed
before, and behind it was a little door about fifteen inches
high : she tried the little golden key in the lock, and to her
great delight it fitted |

Alice opened the door and found that it led to a small
passage, not much larger thana rat-hole: she knelt down and
looked along the passage into the loveliest garden you ever
saw. Howshe longed to get out of that dark hall, and wander
about among those beds of bright flowers and those cool
fountains, but she could not even get her head through the
doorway; ‘‘and even if my head would go through,” thought
poor Alice, ‘it would be of very little use without my
shoulders. Oh, how I wish I could shut up like a telescope!
I think I could, if I only knew how to begin.” For, you
see, SO many out-of-the-way things had happened lately, that
Alice had begun to think that very few things indeed were
really impossible.

There seemed to be no use in waiting by the little door,
so she went back to the table, half hoping she might find
another key on it, or at any rate a book of rules for shutting
people up like telescopes: this time she found a little bottle
on it (“which certainly was not here before,” said Alice), and



16 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

: : tied round the neck of the bottle
was a paper label, with the words
DRINK ME beautifully printed
on it in large letters.

It was all very well to say
“Drink me,” but the
wise little Alice was
not going to do fhat
in a hurry. “No, I'll
¢ look first,” she said,
f ~_ and see whether.

y ivs marked
= ~~ poison or not”;
| € 2 for she had. read
several nice little
| stories about
children who had got burnt,
and eaten up by wild beasts,
and other unpleasant things, —
all because they would not
remember the simple rules
their friends had taught them: such as, that a red-hot poker
will burn you if you hold it too long; and that, if you cut
your finger very deeply with a knife it usually bleeds; and
she had never forgotten that, if you drink much from a bottle

marked “poison,” it is almost certain to disagree with you,
sooner or later.






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However, this bottle was zof marked “poison,” so Alice



DOWN THE RABBIT-HOLE I

ventured to taste it, and finding it very nice (it had, in fact, a
sort of mixed flavour of cherry-tart, custard, pine-apple, roast
turkey, toffee, and hot buttered toast), she very soon finished
it off.

* * * * * *
* * * * % % *
* * * * * *
“What a curious feeling!” said Alice. ‘I must be shut-

ting up like a telescope.”

And so it was indeed : she was now only ten inches high ;
and her face brightened up at the thought that she was now
the right size for going through the little door into that
lovely garden. First, however, she waited for a few minutes
to see if she was going to shrink any further : she felt a little
nervous about this; “for it might end, you

know,” said Alice to herself, “in my going
out altogether, like a candle. I wonder
what I should be like then?” And she

tried to fancy what the flame of a candle ¢
looks like after the candle is ?
blown out, for she could not
remember ever having seen
such a thing.

After a while, finding that
nothing more happened, she
decided on

going into Waser :
the garden









18 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

at once; but, alas, for poor Alice! when she got to the door,
she found she had forgotten the little golden key, and when
she went back to the table for it, she found she could not
possibly reach it: she could see it quite plainly through the
glass, and she tried her best to climb up one of the legs of
the table; but it was too slippery ; and when she had tired
herself out with trying, the poor little thing sat down and
cried.

“Come, there’s no use in crying like that!” said Alice
to herself, rather sharply. “I advise you to leave off this.
minute!” She generally gave herself very good advice
(though she very seldom followed it), and sometimes she
scolded herself so severely as to bring tears into her eyes;
and once she remembered trying to box her own ears for
having cheated herself in a game of croquet she was playing
against herself, for this curious child was very fond of pre-
tending to be two people. “ But it’s no use now,” thought
poor Alice, ‘to pretend to be two people! Why, there's
hardly enough of me left to make owe respectable person |”

Soon her eye ‘fell on a little glass box that was lying
under the table: she opened it, and found in it a very small
cake, on which the words EAT ME were beautifully
marked in currants. ‘ Well, I'll eat it,” said Alice, ‘‘and if it
makes me grow larger, I can reach the key ; and if it makes
me grow smaller, I can creep under the door; so either way
I'll get into the garden, and I don’t care which happens!”

She ate a little bit, and said anxiously to herself, ‘‘ Which
way ? Which way?” holding her hand on the top of her head



DOWN THE RABBIT-HOLE 19

to feel which way it was growing, and she was quite
surprised to find that she remained the same size; to be
sure, this is what generally happens when one eats cake, but
Alice had got so much into the way of expecting nothing
but out-of-the-way things to happen, that it seemed quite
dull and stupid for life to go on in the common way.

So she set to work, and very soon finished off the cake.







THE POOL OF TEARS

“CuRIOUSER and curiouser!” cried Alice (she was so much
surprised, that for the moment she quite forgot how to
speak good English); “now I’m opening out like the largest
telescope that ever was! Good-bye, feet!” (for when she
looked down at her feet, they seemed to be almost out of
sight, they were getting so far off). ‘‘Oh, my poor little feet,
I wonder who will put on your shoes and stockings for you
now, dears? I’m sure J sha’n’t be able! I shall be a great
deal too far off to trouble myself about you: you must



THE POOL OF TEARS 21

manage the best way you can—but I must be kind to them,”
thought Alice, ‘or perhaps they won't walk the way I want
to go! Let me see: I'll give them a new pair of boots every
Christmas.”

And she went on planning to herself how she would
manage it. ‘‘They must go by the carrier,” she thought;
‘and how funny it'll seem, sending presents to one’s own
feet!) And how odd the directions will look |

Alice's Right Foot, Esq.,
flearthrug,
near the Fender
(with Alice's love).

Oh dear, what nonsense I’m talking!”

Just then her head struck against the roof of the hall: in
fact she was now rather more than nine feet high, and she at
once took up the little golden key and hurried off to the
garden door.

Poor Alice! It was as much as she could do, lying
down on one side, to look through into the garden with one
eye; but to get through was more hopeless than ever: she
sat down and began to cry again.

“You ought to be ashamed of yourself,” said Alice, “a
great girl like you” (she might well say this), “to go on
crying in this way! Stop this moment, I tell you!” But
she went on all the same, shedding gallons of tears, until
_ there was a large pool all round her, about four inches deep
and reaching half down the hall.

After a time she heard a little pattering of feet in the



22



ALICE IN WONDERLAND

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distance, and she hastily
dried her eyes to see what
was coming. It was the
White Rabbit returning,
splendidly dressed, with a
pair of white kid gloves in
one hand and a large fan in
the other: he came trotting
along in a great hurry,
muttering to himself as he
came, ‘‘Oh! the Duchess,
the Duchess! Oh! won't
she be savage if I’ve kept
her waiting!” Alice felt so
desperate that she was ready
to ask help of any one; so,

yews when the Rabbit came near
A\_ her she began, in a low,

timid voice, ‘If you please,
sir——’ The Rabbit started
violently, dropped the white
kid gloves and the fan, and
scurried away into the dark-
ness as hard as he could go.

Alice took up the fan and
gloves, and as the hall was
very hot, she kept fanning
herself all the time she went





“CURIOUSER AND CURIOUSER I”





THE POOL OF TEARS 23

on talking: ‘‘ Dear, dear! How queer everything is to-day |!
And yesterday things went on just as usual. I wonder if
I’ve been changed in the night? Let me think: was I the
same when I got up this morning? I almost think I can
remember feeling a little different. But if I’m not the same,
the next question is, Who in the worldamI! Ah, ¢ha?'s
the great puzzle!” And she began thinking over all the
children she knew that were of the same age as herself, to see
if she could have been changed for any of them.

‘Tm sure I’m not Ada,” she said, “for her hair goes in
such long ringlets, and mine doesn’t go in ringlets at all ;
and I’m sure I can’t be Mabel, for I know all sorts of things,
and she, oh! she knows sucha very little! Besides, she’s she,
and J’ I, and—oh dear, how puzzling it all is! I'll try if I
know all the things I used to know. Let me see: four times
five is twelve, and four times six is thirteen, and four times
seven is—oh dear! I shall never get to twenty at that rate |
However, the Multiplication Table doesn’t signify: let’s try
Geography. London is the capital of Paris, and Paris is the
capital of Rome, and Rome—no, ¢/a?’s all wrong, I’m certain |
I must have been changed for Mabel! I'll try and say,
‘How doth the little’”—and she crossed her hands on her
lap as if she were saying lessons, and began to repeat it, but
her voice sounded hoarse and strange, and the words did not
come the same as they used to do :—

“ How doth the little crocodile
Improve his shining tail,
And pour the waters of the Nile
On every golden scale!



24 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

“ How cheerfully he seems to grin,
How neatly spreads his claws,
And welcomes little fishes in,
With gently smiling jaws!”

“I’m sure those are not the right words,” said poor Alice,
and her eyes filled with tears again as she went on. “I must
be Mabel, after all, and I shall have to go and live in that
poky little house, and have next to no toys to play with,
and oh! ever so many lessons to learn! No, I’ve made up
my mind about it; if I’m Mabel, I'll stay down here! It'll
be no use their putting their heads down and saying, ‘Come
up again, dear!’ I shall only look up and say ‘Who
am I, then? Tell me that first, and then, if I like being that
person, I'll come up: if not, I’ll stay down here till I’m
somebody else’—but, oh dear!” cried Alice, with a sudden
' burst of tears, “I do wish they would put their heads down |!
I am so very tired of being all alone here!”

As she said this she looked down at her hands, and was
surprised to see that she had put on one of the Rabbit's little
white kid gloves while she was talking. ‘‘ How can I have
done that?” she thought. ‘I must be growing small again.”
She got up and went to the table to measure herself by it,
and found that, as nearly as she could guess, she was now
about two feet high, and was going on shrinking rapidly ;
she soon found out that the cause of this was the fan she was
holding, and she dropped it hastily, just in time to avoid
shrinking away altogether.

“That was a narrow escape!” said Alice, a good deal



THE POOL OF TEARS 25

frightened at the sudden change, but very glad to find herself
still in existence ; “and now for the garden!” And she ran
with all speed back to the little door; but, alas! the little
door was shut again, and the little golden key was lying on
the glass table as before, ‘“‘and things are worse than ever,”
thought the poor child, ‘for I never was so small as this
before, never! And I declare it’s too bad, that it is!”

As she said these words her foot slipped, and in another
moment, splash! she was up to her chin in salt water. Her
first idea was that she had somehow fallen into the sea, ‘and
in that case I can go back by railway,” she said to herself.
(Alice had been to the seaside once in her life, and had come
to the general conclusion that wherever you go to on the
English coast you find a number of bathing machines in the
sea, some children digging in the sand with wooden spades,
then a row of lodging-houses, and behind them a railway
station.) However, she soon made out that she was in the

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26 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

pool of tears which she had wept when she was nine feet
high.

‘“T wish I hadn’t cried so much!” said Alice, as she swam
about, trying to find her way out. ‘I shall be punished for
it now, I suppose, by being drowned in my own tears!
That we// be a queer thing, to be sure! However, every-
thing is queer to-day.”

Just then she heard something splashing about in the
pool a little way off, and she swam nearer to make out what
it was: at first she thought it must be a walrus or hippo-
potamus; but then she remembered how small she was now,
and she soon made out that it was only a mouse that had
slipped in like herself. _

“Would it be of any use now,” thought Alice, “to speak
to this mouse? Everything is so out-of-the-way down here,
that I should think very likely it can talk: at any rate,
there’s no harm in trying.” So she began: ‘‘O Mouse, do
you know the way out of this pool? I am very tired of
swimming about here, O Mouse!” (Alice thought this must
be the right way of speaking to a mouse: she had never
done such a thing before, but she remembered having seen
in her brother’s Latin Grammar, ‘‘A mouse—of a mouse—to
a mouse—a mouse—O mouse!”) The Mouse looked at her
rather inquisitively, and seemed to her to wink with one of
its little eyes, but it said nothing.

‘‘ Perhaps it doesn’t understand English,” thought Alice ;
“‘T daresay it’s a French mouse, come over with William the
Conqueror.” (For, with all her knowledge of history, Alice



THE POOL OF TEARS 27



had no very clear notion how long ago anything had
happened.) So she began again: ‘Ot est ma chatte?”
which was the first sentence in her French lesson-book.
The Mouse gave a leap out of the water, and seemed to
quiver all over with fright. ‘Oh, I beg your pardon!” cried
Alice hastily, afraid that she had hurt the poor animal’s
feelings. “I quite forgot you didn’t like cats.”

‘ Not like cats!” cried the Mouse, in a shrill, passionate
voice. ‘‘ Would you like cats if you were me?”

‘Well, perhaps not,” said Alice in a soothing tone: “don’t
be angry about it. And yet I wish I could show you our cat
Dinah: I think you'd take a fancy to cats if you could only
see her. She is such a dear quiet thing,” Alice went on half



28 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

to herself, as she swam lazily about in the pool, ‘‘and she
sits purring so nicely by the fire, licking her paws and
washing her face—and she is such a nice soft thing to nurse
—and she’s such a capital one for catching mice oh, I
beg your pardon!” cried Alice again, for this time the
Mouse was bristling all over, and she felt certain it must be
really offended. ‘We won't talk about her any more if
you'd rather not.”

“We, indeed!” cried the Mouse, who was trembling
down to the end of its tail. ‘Asif 7 would talk on such
a subject! Our family always Lazed cats : nasty, low, vulgar
things! Don’t let me hear the name again!”

“T won't indeed!” said Alice, in a great hurry to change
the subject of conversation. ‘Are you—are you fond—of
—of dogs?” The Mouse did not answer, so Alice went on
eagerly: ‘‘ There is such a nice little dog near our house I
should like to show you! A little bright-eyed terrier, you
know, with oh, such long curly brown hair! And it'll fetch
things when you throw them, and it'll sit up and beg for its
dinner, and all sorts of things—I can’t remember half of
them—and it belongs to a farmer, you know, and he says
it’s so useful, it’s worth a hundred pounds! He says it kills
all the rats and—oh dear!” cried Alice in a sorrowful tone,
“I’m afraid I’ve offended it again!” For the Mouse. was
swimming away from her as hard as it could go, and making
quite a commotion in the pool as it went. So she called
softly after it. ‘‘ Mouse dear! Do come back again, and
we won't talk about cats or dogs either, if you don’t like









THE POOL OF TEARS.



THE POOL OF TEARS 29

them!” When the Mouse heard this, it turned round and
swam slowly back to her: its face was quite pale (with
passion, Alice thought), and it said in a low, trembling voice,
“Let us go to the shore, and then I'll tell you my history,
and you'll understand why it is I hate cats and dog's.”

It was high time to go, for the pool was getting quite
crowded with the birds and animals that had fallen into it:
there were a Duck and a Dodo, a Lory and an Eaglet, and
several other curious creatures. Alice led the way, and the
whole party swam to the shore.







CHAPTER III

A CAUCUS-RACE AND A LONG TALE

TuHeEy were indeed a queer-looking party that assembled on
the bank—the birds with draggled feathers, the animals with
their fur clinging close to them, and all dripping wet, cross,
and uncomfortable.

The first question of course was, how to get dry again:
they had a consultation about this, and after a few minutes
it seemed quite natural to Alice to find herself talking
familiarly with them, as if she had known them all her life.
Indeed, she had quite a long argument with the Lory, who
at last turned sulky, and would only say “I am older than
you, and must know better” ; and this Alice would not allow
without knowing how old it was, and, as the Lory positively
refused to tell its age, there was no more to be said.



A CAUCUS-RACE AND A LONG TALE © 31

At last the Mouse, who seemed to be a person of
authority among them, called out ‘Sit down, all of you, and
listen to me! /’2/ soon make you dry enough!” They all sat
down at once in a large ring, with the Mouse in the middle.
Alice kept her eyes anxiously fixed on it, for she felt sure
she would catch a bad cold if she did not get dry very
soon.

“ Ahem!” said the Mouse with an important air. “Are
you all ready? This is the driest thing I know. Silence
all round, if you please! ‘William the Conqueror, whose
cause was favoured by the Pope, was soon submitted to by
the English, who wanted leaders, and had been of late much
accustomed to usurpation and conquest. Edwin and Morcar,
the Earls of Mercia and Northumbria——'”

“Ugh!” said the Lory, with a shiver.

“T beg your pardon!” said the Mouse, frowning, but very
politely. ‘‘ Did you speak ?”

“Not I!” said the Lory hastily.

“T thought you did,” said the Mouse. “I proceed—
‘Edwin and Morcar, the Earls of Mercia and Northumbria,
declared for him : and even Stigand, the patriotic Archbishop
of Canterbury, found it advisable——’”

“Found what?” said the Duck.

“Found 27,” the Mouse replied rather crossly : “ of course
you know what ‘it’ means.”

“T know what ‘it’ means well enough, when J/ find a
thing,” said the Duck; “it’s generally a frog or a worm.
The question is, what did the Archbishop find ?”



32 ALICE IN WONDERLAND



The Mouse did not notice this question, but hurriedly
went on—‘‘‘ found it advisable to go with Edgar Atheling
to meet William and offer him the crown. William’s
conduct at first was moderate. But the insolence of his
Normans How are you getting on now, my dear ?” it
continued, turning to Alice as it spoke.

“As wet as ever,” said Alice, in a melancholy tone; “it
doesn’t seem to dry me at all.”

“In that case,” said the Dodo solemnly, rising to its feet,
“T move that the meeting adjourn, for the immediate
adoption of more energetic remedies ,







A CAUCUS-RACE AND A LONG TALE 33

“Speak English!” said the Eaglet. “I don’t know the
meaning of half those long words, and, what’s more, I don't
believe you do either!” And the Eaglet bent down its head
to hide a smile; some of the other birds tittered audibly.

“What I was going to say,” said the Dodo, in an
offended tone, ‘‘ was, that the best thing to get us dry would
be a Caucus-race.”

“What zs a Caucus-race?” said Alice, not that she much
wanted to know; but the Dodo had paused as if it thought
that somebody ought to speak, and no one else seemed
inclined to say anything.

“Why,” said the Dodo, “the best way to explain it is
to do it.” (And, as you might like to try the thing your-
self some winter day, I will tell you how the Dodo
managed it.)

First it marked out a race-course in a sort of circle (“the
exact shape doesn’t matter,” it said), and then all the party
were placed along the course, here and there. There was no
“One, two, three, and away,” but they began running when
they liked, and left off when they liked, so that it was not
easy to know when the race was over. However, when they
had been running half an hour or so, and were quite dry
again, the Dodo suddenly called out ‘The race is over!”
and they all crowded round it, panting, and asking “But
who has won?”

This question the Dodo could not answer without a great
deal of thought, and it stood for a long time with one finger
pressed upon its forehead (the position in which you usually

Cc



34 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

see Shakespeare, in the pictures of him), while the rest
waited in silence. At last the Dodo said ‘ Everybody has
won, and a// must have prizes.”

“But who is to give the prizes?” quite a chorus of
voices asked.

“Why, she, of course,” said the Dodo, pointing to Alice
with one finger; and the whole party at once crowded round
her, calling out in a confused way, ‘‘ Prizes! Prizes |”

Alice had no idea what to do, and in despair she put her
hand in her pocket, and pulled out a box of comfits (luckily
the salt water had not got into it), and handed them round
as prizes. There was exactly one apiece all round.

“But she must have a prize herself, you know,” said the
Mouse.

‘Of course,” the Dodo replied very gravely.

‘What else have you got in your pocket?” it went on,
turning to Alice.

“Only a thimble,” said Alice sadly.

‘‘Hand it over here,” said the Dodo.

Then they all crowded round her once more, while the
Dodo solemnly presented the thimble, saying, ‘‘ We beg your
acceptance of this elegant thimble”; and, when it had
finished this short speech, they all cheered.

Alice thought the whole thing very absurd, but they all
looked so grave that she did not dare to laugh; and, as she
could not think of anything to say, she simply bowed, and
took the thimble, looking as solemn as she could.

The next thing was to eat the comfits; this caused some



A CAUCUS-RACE AND A LONG TALE — 35

noise and confusion, as the large birds complained that they
could not taste theirs, and the small ones choked and had to
be patted on the back. However, it was over at last, and
they sat down again in a ring, and begged the Mouse to tell
them something more.

‘You promised to tell me your history, you know,” said
Alice, ‘and why it is you hate—C and D,” she added in a
whisper, half afraid that it would be offended again.

‘Mine is a long and sad tale!” said the Mouse, turning
to Alice and sighing.

“It zs a long tail, certainly,” said Alice, looking down



X





Oe ALICE IN WONDERLAND

with wonder at the Mouse’s tail; ‘‘but why do you call it
sad?” And she kept on puzzling about it while the Mouse
was speaking, so that her idea of the tale was something

like this :—
“Fury said to
a mouse, That
he met in the
house, ‘Let
us both go
to law: J
will prose-
cute you.—
Come, I'll
take no de
nial: We
must have
the trial;
For really
this morn-
ing I’ve
nothing
to do.’
Said the
mouse to
the cur,
‘Such a
trial, dear
sir, With
no jury
or judge,
would
be wast-
ing our
breath,’
‘Tl be
judge,
Pll be
jury,’
said
cun-
ning
old
Fury;
‘Tl
try
the
whole
cause
and
con-
demn

you to
death.’”



Ue

soe

Day
yd)



THE MOUSE’S TALE.



A CAUCUS-RACE AND A LONG TALE 34

“You are not attending!” said the Mouse to Alice
severely. ‘‘ What are you thinking of?”

“I beg your pardon,” said Alice very humbly: “you
had got to the fifth bend, I think ?”

“Thad zot!” cried the Mouse, angrily.

“A knot!” said Alice, always ready to make herself
useful, and looking anxiously about her. ‘Oh, do let me
help to undo it |”

“TI shall do nothing of the sort,” ” said the Mouse, getting
up and walking ayey “You insult me by talking such
nonsense |”

‘‘T didn’t mean it!” pleaded poor Alice. ‘‘ But you’re so
easily offended, you know!”

The Mouse only growled in reply.

‘Please come back and finish your story!” Alice called
after it. And the others all joined in chorus, ‘Yes, please
do!” But the Mouse only shook its head impatiently and
walked a little quicker.

“What a pity it wouldn't stay!” sighed the Lory, as soon
as it was quite out of sight; and an old Crab took the
opportunity of saying to her daughter, ““Ah, my dear! Let
this be a lesson to you never to lose your temper!” ‘ Hold
your tongue, Ma!” said the young Crab, a little snappishly.
“You're enough to try the patience of an oyster!”

“T wish I had our Dinah here, I know I do!” said Alice
aloud, addressing nobody in particular. ‘She'd soon fetch
it back |”

“ And who is Dinah, if I might venture to ask the
question?” said the Lory.



38 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

Alice replied eagerly, for she was
always ready to talk about her pet:
““Dinah’s our cat. And she’s such a
capital one for catching mice, you can’t
think! And oh, I wish you
could see her after the birds!
Why, she'll eat a little bird as
soon as look at it!”

This speech caused a
remarkable sensation among
the party. Some of the











I Op a eN} s
: Ce TTT) 1
Oe

et Oe OC

birds hurried off at once;
one old Magpie began
wrapping itself up very
carefully, remarking, “I
really must be getting
home; the night air
doesn’t suit my throat!”
And a Canary called out
in a trembling voice to its
children, ‘‘Come away,
Ma: . my dears! It’s high
tS time you were all in bed!” On various
Sree pretexts they all moved off, and Alice
aay was soon left alone.





A CAUCUS-RACE AND A LONG TALE 39

“T wish I hadn’t mentioned Dinah,” she said to herself
in a melancholy tone. ‘Nobody seems to like her, down
here, and I’m sure she’s the best cat in the world! Oh, my
dear Dinah! I wonder if I shall ever see you any more!”
And here poor Alice began to cry again, for she felt very
lonely and low-spirited. In a little while, however, she
again heard a little pattering of footsteps in the distance,
and she looked up eagerly, half hoping that the Mouse
had changed his mind, and was coming back to finish his
story.







CHAPTER IV

THE RABBIT SENDS IN A LITTLE BILL

Ir was the White Rabbit, trotting slowly back again, and
looking anxiously about as it went, as if it had lost some-
thing; and she heard it muttering to itself, ‘‘ The Duchess !
The Duchess! Oh my dear paws! Oh my fur and whiskers |
She'll get me executed, as sure as ferrets are ferrets! Where
caw I have dropped them, I wonder?” Alice guessed in a
moment that it was looking for the fan and the pair of white
kid gloves, and she very good-naturedly began hunting
about for them, but they were nowhere to be seen—every-
thing seemed to have changed since her swim in the pool,
and the great hall, with the glass table and the little door,
had vanished completely.



THE RABBIT SENDS IN A LITTLE BILL 41

Very soon the Rabbit noticed Alice, as she went hunting
about, and called out to her in an angry tone, ‘“ Why, Mary
Ann, what ave you doing out here? Run home this
moment, and fetch mea pair of gloves and a fan! Quick,
now!” And Alice was so much frightened that she ran off
at once in the direction it pointed to, without trying to
explain the mistake it had made.

“ He took me for his housemaid,” she said to herself as
she ran. ‘How surprised he'll be when he finds out who
Iam! But Id better take him his fan and gloves—that is,
if I can find them.” As she said this, she came upon a
neat little house, on the door of which was a bright brass
plate with the name ‘‘W. RABBIT” engraved upon it. She
went in without knocking, and hurried upstairs, in great
fear lest she should meet the real Mary Ann, and be turned
out of the house before she had found the fan and gloves.

‘‘ How queer it seems,” Alice said to herself, “to be going
messages for a rabbit! I suppose Dinah’ll be sending me on
messages next!” And she began fancying the sort of thing
that would happen: ‘ ‘Miss Alice! Come here directly, and
get ready for your walk!’ ‘Coming in a minute, nurse!
But I’ve got to watch this mouse-hole till Dinah comes back,
and see that the mouse doesn’t get out.’ Only I don’t think,”
Alice went on, “that they’d let Dinah stop in the house if it
began ordering people about like that!”

By this time she had found her way into a tidy little room
with a table in the window, and on it (as she had hoped) a
fan and two or three pairs of tiny white kid gloves; she took



42 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

up the fan and a pair of the gloves, and was just going to
leave the room, when her eye fell upon a little bottle that
stood near the looking-glass. There was no label this time
with the words DRINK ME, but nevertheless she un-
corked it and put it to her lips. ‘I know sometheng interest-
ing is sure to happen,” she said to herself, “‘ whenever I eat or
drink anything; so I'll just see what this bottle does. I do
hope it'll make me grow large again, for really I’m quite
tired of being such a tiny little thing!”

It did so indeed, and much sooner than she had expected ;
before she had drunk half the bottle she found her head
pressing against the ceiling, and had to stoop to save her
neck from being broken. She hastily put down the bottle,
saying to herself: ‘‘ That’s quite enough—I hope I sha’n't
grow any more—as it is, I can’t get out at the door—I do
wish I hadn't drunk quite so much!”

Alas! it was too late to wish that! She went on grow-
ing, and growing, and very soon had to kneel down on the
floor: in another minute there was not even room for this,
and she tried the effect of lying down with one elbow against
the door, and the other arm curled round her head. Still she
went on growing, and, as a last resource, she put one arm
out of the window, and one foot up the chimney, and said to
herself : ‘‘ Now I can do no more, whatever happens. What
will become of me?”

Luckily for Alice, the little magic bottle had now had its
full effect, and she grew no larger; still it was very un-
comfortable, and, as there seemed to be no sort of chance of



THE RABBIT SENDS IN A LITTLE BILL 43

her ever getting out of the room again,

no wonder she felt unhappy.
“Tt was much pleasanter at home,”

thought poor
TV
i

Alice, ‘ when |







one wasn’t
always grow-
ing larger and
smaller, and
being ordered
about by mice
and rabbits.
I almost
wish I hadn't
gone down
that rabbit-




r. << +
hole — and ee pies
: FI BS a Rh 5? 2
et—an et ye: oc 2
es a
—it’s rather eS FH
Ey ees

- know, this sort of life! I do
wonder what can have happened to me!
When I used mia to read fairy-tales I fancied
that kind of thing never happened, and now here I am in
the middle of one! There ought to be a book written about
me, that there ought! And when I grow up, I’ll write one
—but I’m grown up now,” she added in a sorrowful tone ;
‘at least there’s no room to grow up any more here.”
“But then,” thought Alice, ‘shall I zever get any older

OH

curious, you

Ve
¢

Â¥

§ 0



44 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

than Iam now? That'll be a comfort, one way—never to be
an old woman—but then—always to have lessons to learn |
Oh, I shouldn’t like ¢Zat!”

“Oh, you foolish Alice!” she answered herself. ‘“ How
can you learn lessons in here? Why, there’s hardly room for
you, and no room at all for any lesson-books!”

And so she went on, taking first one side and then the
other, and making quite a conversation of it altogether; but
after a few minutes she heard a voice outside, and stopped to
listen.

“Mary Ann! Mary Ann!” said the voice. ‘ Fetch me
my gloves this moment!” Then came a little pattering of
feet on the stairs. Alice knew it was the Rabbit coming
to look for her, and she trembled till she shook the house,
quite forgetting that she was now about a thousand times as
‘large as the Rabbit, and had no reason to be afraid of it.

Presently the Rabbit came up to the door, and tried
to open it; but as the door opened inwards, and Alice’s
elbow was pressed hard against it, that attempt proved a
failure. Alice heard it say to itself, ‘ Then I'll go round and
get in at the window.”

“That you won't!” thought Alice ; and after waiting till
she fancied she heard the Rabbit just under the window, she
suddenly spread out her hand, and made a snatch in the air.
She did not get hold of anything, but she heard a little
shriek and a fall, and a crash of broken glass, from which
she concluded that it was just possible it had fallen into a
cucumber-frame, or something of the sort.





THE WHITE RABBIT’S HOUSE,



THE RABBIT SENDS IN A LITTLE BILL 45

Next came an angry voice—the Rabbit’s— Pat, Pat!
Where are you?” And then a voice she had never heard
before, ‘‘Sure, then, I’m here! Digging for apples, yer
honour |”

“Digging for apples, indeed!” said the Rabbit angrily.
‘Here, come and help me out of ¢#zs!” (Sounds of more
broken glass.)

“ Now tell me, Pat, what’s that in the window?”

‘“Sure, it's an arm, yer honour!” (He pronounced it
“arrum,”)

“An arm, you goose! Who ever saw one that size?
Why, it fills the whole window!”

‘Sure it does, yer honour; but it’s an arm for all
that.”

“Well, it’s got no business there, at any rate: goand take
it away!”

There was a long silence after this, and Alice could only
hear whispers now and then; such as, “ Sure, I don’t like it,
yer honour at all, atall!” ‘“Doas I tell you, you coward !”
And at last she spread out her hand again, and made another
snatch in the air. This time there were /wo little shrieks,
and more sounds of broken glass. ‘What a number of
cucumber-frames there must be!” thought Alice. “I wonder
what they'll do next! As for pulling me out of the window,
I only wish they could! I’m sure / don’t want to stay in
here any longer!”

She waited for some time without hearing anything
more; at last came a rumbling of little cart-wheels, and



46 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

the sound of a good many voices all talking together; she
made out the words: “ Where's the other ladder ?—Why I
hadn’t to bring but one; Bill’s got the other—Bill! Fetch
it here, lad!—Here, put ’em up at this corner—No, tie ’em
together first—they don’t reach half high enough yet—Oh!
they'll do well enough ; don’t be particular—Here, Bill! catch
hold of this rope—Will the roof bear ?—Mind that loose
slate—Oh, it’s coming down! Heads below!” (a loud crash)
—“ Now, who did that 2—It was Bill, I fancy—Who’s to go
down the chimney?—Nay, / sha’n’t! You do it!—That
I won't, then! Bill’s to go down—Here, Bill! the master
says you've to go down the chimney! ”

“Oh! So Bill's got to come down the chimney, has
he?” said Alice to herself. ‘Why, they seem to put every-
thing upon Bill! I wouldn't be in Bill’s place for a good
deal: this fireplace is narrow, to be sure; but I 44241 can
kick a little!”

She drew her foot as far down the chimney as she could,
and waited till she heard a little animal (she couldn’t guess
of what sort it was) scratching and scrambling about in the
chimney close above her ; then, saying to herself, “ This is
Bill,” she gave one sharp kick, and waited to see what would
happen next.

The first thing she heard was a general chorus of “ There
goes Bill!” then the Rabbit’s voice alone—‘ Catch him, you
by the hedge!” then silence, and then another confusion of
voices—‘‘ Hold up his head—Brandy now—Don’t choke him.
—How was it, old fellow? What happened to you? Tell
us all about it!”



THE RABBIT SENDS IN A LITTLE BILL 47

At last came a little,
feeble, squeaking voice
—(‘‘That’s Bill,” thought
Alice.) ‘Well, I hardly
know—No more, thank
ye; Im better now—
but I’m a deal too flus-
tered to tell you—all
I know is, something
comes at me like a Jack-
in-the-box, and up I goes
like a sky-rocket ! ”

“So you did, old fel-
low!” said the others.

“We must burn the
house down!” said the
Rabbit’s voice. And
Alice called out as loud
as she could, ‘If you do
I'll set Dinah at you!”

There was dead
silence instantly, and
Alice thought to her-
self: ‘‘I wonder what
they w7/ do next! If
they had any sense
they’d take the roof off.”
After a minute or two





48 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

they began moving about again, and Alice heard the Rabbit
say: “A barrowful will do, to begin with.”

“A barrowful of what?” thought Alice. But she had not
long to doubt, for the next moment a shower of little pebbles
came rattling in at the window, and some of them hit her in
the face. “I'll put a stop to this,” she said to herself, and
shouted out ‘‘ You'd better not do that again |” which pro-
duced another dead silence. | ;

Alice noticed with some surprise that the pebbles were all
turning into little cakes as they lay on the floor, and a bright
idea came into her head. “If I eat one of these cakes,” she
thought, ‘‘it’s sure to make some change in my size; and, as
it can’t possibly make me larger, it must make me smaller, I
suppose.” |

So she swallowed one of the cakes, and was delighted to
find that she began shrinking directly. As soon as she was
small enough to get through the door, she ran out of the
house, and found quite a crowd of little animals and birds
waiting outside. The poor little Lizard, Bill, was in the
middle, being held up by two guinea-pigs, who were giving
it something out of a bottle. They all made a rush at Alice
the moment she appeared; but she ran off as hard as she
could, and soon found herself safe in a thick wood.

“The first thing I’ve got to do,” said Alice to herself, as
she wandered about in the wood, “is to grow to my right
size again; and the second thing is to find my way into
that lovely garden. I think that will be the best plan.”

It sounded an excellent plan, no doubt, and very neatly



THE RABBIT SENDS IN A LITTLE BILL 49



and simply arranged; the only difficulty was, that she had
not the smallest idea how to set about it; and, while she
was peering about anxiously among the trees, a little sharp
bark just over her head made her look up in a great hurry.

An enormous puppy was looking down at her with large
round eyes, and feebly stretching out one paw, trying to
touch her. “Poor little thing!” said Alice, in a coaxing
tone, and she tried hard to whistle to it; but she was
terribly frightened all the time at the thought that it might
be hungry, in which case it would be very likely to eat her
up in spite of all her coaxing.

Hardly knowing what she did, she picked up a little bit
of stick, and held it out to the puppy; whereupon the puppy
jumped into the air off all its feet at once, with a yelp of
delight, and rushed at the stick, and made believe to worry
it; then Alice dodged behind a great thistle, to keep herself
from being run over; and, the moment she appeared on the

D



50 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

other side, the puppy made another rush at the stick, and
tumbled head over heels in its hurry to get hold of it; then
Alice, thinking it was very like having a game of play with
a cart-horse, and expecting every moment to be trampled
under its feet, ran round the thistle again; then the puppy
began a series of short charges at the stick, running a very
little way forwards each time and a long way back, and
barking hoarsely all the while, till at last it sat down a good
way off, panting, with its tongue hanging out of its mouth,
and its great eyes half shut.

This seemed to Alice a good opportunity for making her
escape ; so she set off at once, and ran till she was quite tired
and out of breath, and till the puppy’s bark sounded quite
faint in the distance.

“And yet what a dear little puppy it was!” said Alice,
as she leant against a buttercup to rest herself, and fanned
herself with one of the leaves. ‘I should have liked teach-
ing it tricks very much, if—if I’d only been the right size to
do it! Oh, dear! I'd nearly forgotten that I’ve got to grow
up again! Let me see—how zs it to be managed ? I suppose
I ought to eat or drink something or other; but the great
question is what?”

The great question certainly was, what? Alice looked all
round her at the flowers and the blades of grass, but she
could not see anything that looked like the right thing to eat
or drink under the circumstances. There was a large mush-
room growing near her, about the same height as herself;
and when she had looked under it, and on both sides of it,



THE RABBIT SENDS IN A LITTLE BILL 51

and behind it, it occurred to her that she might as well look
and see what was on the top of it.

She stretched herself up on tiptoe, and peeped over the
edge of the mushroom, and her eyes immediately met those
of a large blue caterpillar that was sitting on the top with its
arms folded, quietly smoking a long hookah, and taking not
the smallest notice of her or of anything else.







CHAPTER V

ADVICE FROM A CATERPILLAR

Tue Caterpillar and Alice looked at each other for some time
in silence ; at last the Caterpillar took the hookah out of its
mouth, and addressed her in a languid, sleepy voice :

“Who are you?” said the Caterpillar.

This was not an encouraging opening for a conversation.
Alice replied, rather shyly, ““I—I hardly know, sir, just at



ADVICE FROM A CATERPILLAR 53

present—at least I know who I was when I got up this
morning, but I think I must have been changed several
times since then.”

“What do you mean by that?” said the Caterpillar
sternly. “ Explain yourself!”

“I can’t explain myself, I’m afraid, sir,” said Alice,
“because I’m not myself, you see.”

‘‘T don’t see,” said the Caterpillar.

“I’m afraid I can’t put it more clearly,” Alice replied
very politely, “for I can’t understand it myself to begin
with; and being so many different sizes in a day is very
confusing.”

“It isn’t,” said the Caterpillar.

“Well, perhaps you haven’t found it so yet,” said Alice;
‘but when you have to turn into a chrysalis—you will some
day, you know—and then after that into a butterfly, I should
think you'll feel it a little queer, won’t you?”

‘‘Not a bit,” said the Caterpillar.

‘Well, perhaps your feelings may be different,” said
Alice; ‘‘all I know is, it would feel very queer to se.”

“You!” said the Caterpillar contemptuously. ‘Who are
you?”

Which brought them back again to the beginning of
the conversation. Alice felt a little irritated at the Cater-
pillar’s making such very short remarks, and she drew
herself up and said, very gravely, “I think you ought to
tell me who you are, first.”

“Why?” said the Caterpillar.



54 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

Here was another puzzling question; and as Alice
could not think of any good reason, and as the Caterpillar
seemed to be in a very unpleasant state of mind, she turned
away.

“Come back!” the Caterpillar called after her. ‘I've
something important to say!”

This sounded promising, certainly; Alice turned and
came back again.

‘Keep your temper,” said the Caterpillar.

“Ts that all?” said Alice, swallowing down her anger as
well as she could.

“No,” said the Caterpillar.

Alice thought she might as well wait, as she had nothing
else to do, and perhaps after all it might tell her something
worth hearing. For some minutes it puffed away without
speaking, but at last it unfolded its arms, took the hookah
out of its mouth again, and said, “So you think you're
changed, do you?”

“T’m afraid I am, sir,” said Alice; “I can’t remember
things as I used—and I don’t keep the same size for ten
minutes together !”

“Can’t remember what things?” said the Caterpillar.

“Well, I’ve tried to say ‘ How doth the little busy bee,
but it all came different!” Alice replied in a_ very
melancholy voice.

“Repeat ‘You are old, Father William, said the
Caterpillar.

Alice folded her hands, and began :—





ADVICE FROM A CATERPILLAR.



ADVICE FROM A CATERPILLAR 55

“You are old, Father William,” the young man said,
“ And your hair has become very white ;
And yet you incessantly stand on your head—
Do you think, at your age, it is right?”

“In my youth,” Father William replied to his son,
“T feared it might injure the brain ;
But, now that I’m perfectly sure I have none,
Why, I do it again and again.”

“You are old,” said the youth, “as I mentioned before,
And have grown most uncommonly fat ;
Yet you turned a back-somersault in at the door—
Pray, what is the reason of that?”

“In my youth,” said the sage, as he shook his grey locks,
“T kept all my limbs very supple
By the use of this ointment—one shilling the box—
Allow me to sell you a couple?”

“ You are old,” said the youth, “and your jaws are too weak
For anything tougher than suet ;
Yet you finished the goose, with the bones and the beak—
Pray, how did you manage to do it?”

“In my youth,” said his father, “I took to the law,
And argued each case with my wife ;
And the muscular strength, which it gave to my jaw,
Has lasted the rest of my life.”

“You are old,” said the youth, “one would hardly suppose
That your eye was as steady as ever ;
Yet you balanced an eel on the end of your nose —
What made you so awfully clever?”

“T have answered three questions, and that is enough,”
Said his father ; “don’t give yourself airs |
Do you think I can listen all day to such stuff?
Be off, or I'll kick you down stairs!”



56 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

“That is not said right,” said the Caterpillar.

“Not gutfe right, I’m afraid,” said Alice, timidly ; “ some
of the words have got altered.”

“It is wrong from beginning to end,” said the Caterpillar
decidedly, and there was silence for some minutes.

The Caterpillar was the first to speak.

‘What size do you want to be?” it asked.

‘Oh, I’m not particular as to size,” Alice hastily replied ;
“only one doesn’t like changing so often, you know.”

‘“T don't know,” said the Caterpillar,

Alice said nothing: she had never been so much contra-
dicted in all her life before, and she felt that she was losing
her temper.

“ Are you content now?” said the Caterpillar.

“Well, I should like to be a &f#/e larger, sir, if you
wouldn’t mind,” said Alice: “three inches is such a wretched
height to be.”

“It is a very good height indeed!” said the Caterpillar
angrily, rearing itself upright as it spoke (it was exactly
three inches high).

‘But I’m not used to it!” pleaded poor Alice in a piteous
tone. And she thought to herself, “I wish the creatures
wouldn’t be so easily offended!”

“You'll get used to it in time,” said the Caterpillar; and
it put the hookah into its mouth and began smoking again.

This time Alice waited patiently until it chose to speak
again. In a minute or two the Caterpillar took the hookah
out of its mouth and yawned once or twice, and shook itself.



_ ADVICE FROM A CATERPILLAR 57

Then it got
down off the
mushroom,
and crawled
away into the
grass, merely
remarking as
it went, ‘One
side will make you
grow taller, and the
other side will make






ae
you grow shorter.” so
“One side of oe a
what? The other side yh : Ss
SS

PACT
i ALAC
»




of what?” thought
Alice to herself.

‘Of the mushroom,” said the Caterpillar, just as if she had
asked it aloud; and in another moment it was out of sight.

Alice remained looking thoughtfully at the mushroom for
a minute, trying to make out which were the two sides of it ;
and as it was perfectly round, she found this a very difficult
question. However, at last she stretched her arms round it
as far as they would go, and broke off a bit of the edge with
each hand.

“And now which is which?” she said to herself, and
nibbled a little of the right-hand bit to try the effect; the
next moment she felt a violent blow underneath her chin—it
had struck her foot!



53 : ALICE IN WONDERLAND

She was a good deal frightened by this very sudden
change, but she felt that there was no time to be lost, as she
was shrinking rapidly; so she set to work at once to eat
some of the other bit. Her chin was pressed so closely
against her foot that there was hardly room to open her
mouth; but she did it at last, and managed to swallow a
morsel of the left-hand bit.

* *% * * ® *

* * * % * *

“Come, my head’s free at last!” said Alice, in a tone of
delight, which changed into alarm in another moment, when
she found that her shoulders were nowhere to be found; all
she could see, when she looked down, was an immense length
of neck, which seemed to rise like a stalk out of a sea of
green leaves that lay far below her.

“What can all that green stuff be?” said Alice, “and
where “ave my shoulders got to? And oh, my poor hands,
how is it I can’t see you?” She was moving them about as
she spoke, but no result seemed to follow, except a little
shaking among the distant green leaves.

As there seemed to be no chance of getting her hands up
to her head, she tried to get her head down to them, and was
delighted to find that her neck would bend about easily in
any direction, like a serpent. She had just succeeded in
curving it down into a graceful zigzag, and was going to
dive in among the leaves, which she found to be nothing
but the tops of the trees under which she had been wander-



ADVICE FROM A CATERPILLAR 59



ing, when a sharp hiss made her draw back in a hurry; a
large pigeon had flown into her face, and was beating her
violently with its wings.

‘‘ Serpent!” screamed the Pigeon.

“T’m ot a serpent!” said Alice indignantly. ‘‘ Let me
alone |”

“Serpent, I say again!” repeated the Pigeon, but in a
more subdued tone, and added, with a kind of sob, ‘I’ve
tried every way, and nothing seems to suit them!”

‘“‘T haven't the least idea what you're talking about,” said
Alice.

“T’ve tried the roots of trees, and I’ve tried banks, and
I’ve tried hedges,” the Pigeon went on, without attending to
her; “but those serpents! There’s no pleasing them!”

Alice was more and more puzzled, but she thought there
was no use in saying anything more till the Pigeon had
finished.



60 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

AS lies it
wasn’t trouble
enough hatch-
ing the eggs,”
Said”. the
Pigeon, but
I must be on
the look - out
for serpents
night and day! Why, I haven't
had a wink of sleep these three
weeks |”

“Tm very sorry you've been
annoyed,’ said Alice, who was
beginning to see its meaning.

“And just as I’d taken the highest tree in the wood,”
continued the Pigeon, raising his voice to a shriek, ‘and
just as I was thinking I should be free of them at last, they
must needs come wriggling down from the sky! Ugh,
Serpent!”

“But I’m ot a serpent, I tell you!” said Alice. ‘I’m

”






a—— I’m a——

“Well! What are you?” said the Pigeon. “I can see
you're trying to invent something |”

‘“T—I’m a little girl,” said Alice, rather doubtfully, as she
remembered the number of changes she had gone through
that day.

‘‘A likely story, indeed!” said the Pigeon, in a tone of the



ADVICE FROM A CATERPILLAR OI

deepest contempt. ‘I’ve seen a good many little girls in
my time, but never ove with such a neck as that! No, no!
You're a serpent; and there’s no use denying it. I suppose
you'll be telling me next that you never tasted an egg!”

“T have tasted eggs, certainly,” said Alice, who was a very
truthful child; “but little girls eat eggs quite as much as
serpents do, you know.”

‘‘T don’t believe it,” said the Pigeon ; “ but if ney do, why
then they’re a kind of serpent, that’s all I can say.”

This was such a new idea to Alice, that she was quite
silent for a minute or two, which gave the Pigeon the
opportunity of adding: “You're looking for eggs, I know
that well enough; and what does it matter to me whether
you're a little girl or a serpent?”

“Tt matters a good deal to me,” said Alice hastily; ‘ but
I’m not looking for eggs, as it happens; and if I was, I
shouldn’t want yours : I don’t like them raw.”

“Well, be off, then!” said the Pigeon, in a sulky tone, as
it settled down again into its nest. Alice crouched down
among the trees as well as she could, for her neck kept
getting entangled among the branches, and every now and
then she had to stop and untwist it. After a while she
remembered that she still held the pieces of mushroom in
her hands, and she set to work very carefully, nibbling first
at one and then at the other, and growing sometimes taller
and sometimes shorter, until she had succeeded in bringing
herself down to her usual height.

It was so long since she had been anything near



62 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

the right size, that it felt quite strange at first; but she
got used to it in a few minutes, and began talking to
herself, as usual. ‘Come, there’s half my plan done now!
How puzzling all these changes are; I’m never sure
what I’m going to be, from one minute to another!
However, I’ve got back to my right size; the next thing
is, to get into that beautiful garden—how zs that to be
done, I wonder?” As she said this, she came suddenly
upon an open place, with a little house in it about four
feet high. ‘“ Whoever lives there,” thought Alice, “it'll never
do to come upon them ¢#is size; why I should frighten
them out of their wits!” So she began nibbling at the
right-hand bit again, and did not venture to go near
the house till she had brought herself down to nine inches
high.







CHAPTER VI

PIG AND PEPPER

For a minute or two she stood looking at the house
and wondering what to do next, when suddenly a footman
in livery came running out of the wood—(she considered
him to be a footman because he was in livery; otherwise,
judging by his face only, she would have called him a
fish)—and rapped loudly at the door with his knuckles.
It was opened by another footman in livery, with a round
face and large eyes like a frog; and both footmen, Alice
noticed, had powdered hair that curled all over their heads.
She felt very curious to know what it was all about, and
crept a little way out of the wood to listen.

The Fish-Footman began by producing from under
his arm a great letter, nearly as large as himself, and this
he handed over to the other, saying, in a solemn tone,
“For the Duchess. An invitation from the Queen to
play croquet.” The Frog-Footman repeated, in the same



64 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

solemn tone, only changing the order of the words a little,
“From the Queen. An invitation for the Duchess to play
croquet.”

Then they both bowed low, and their curls got entangled
together.

Alice laughed so much at this, that she had to run back
into the wood for fear of their hearing her; and, when she
next peeped out, the Fish-Footman was gone, and the other
was sitting on the ground near the door staring stupidly up
into the sky.

Alice went timidly up.to the door and knocked.

‘There's no sort of use in knocking,” said the Footman,
“and that for two reasons. First, because I’m on the same
side of the door as you are; secondly, because they’re
making such a noise inside no one could possibly hear you.”
And certainly there was a most extraordinary noise going
on within—a constant howling and sneezing, and every now
and then a great crash, as if a dish or kettle had been
broken to pieces.

‘‘ Please, then,” said Alice, ‘how am I to get in?”

“There might be some sense in your knocking,” the
Footman went on, without attending to her, “if we had the
door between us. For instance, if you were inside, you
might knock, and I could let you out, you know.” He was
looking up into the sky all the time he was speaking, and
this Alice thought decidedly uncivil. ‘But perhaps he
can’t help ¢t,” she said to herself; “his eyes are so very
neatly at the top of his head. But at any rate he





S KITCHEN

IN THE DUCHESS



PIG AND PEPPER 65

might answer questions.” How am I to get in?” she
repeated, aloud.

“T shall sit here,” the Footman remarked, ‘‘till to-
morrov !

At this moment the door of the house opened, and a
large plate came skimming out, straight at the Footman’s
head; it just grazed his nose, and broke to pieces against
one of the trees behind him.

“_____ or next day, maybe,” the Footman continued in the
same tone, exactly as if nothing had happened.

“How am I to get in?” asked Alice again in a louder
tone.

“ Ave. you to get in at all?” Fee

said the Footman. “That's the










first ques-
tion, you aa.
know.” SEN |

It LE ea

no



66 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

only Alice did not like to be told so. “It’s really dreadful,”
she muttered to herself, “the way all the creatures argue.
It’s enough to drive one crazy !”

The Footman seemed to think this a good opportunity for
repeating his remark, with variations. ‘I shall sit here,” he
said, ‘“‘on and off, for days and days.”

“But what am / to do?” said Alice.

“Anything you like,” said the Footman, and began
whistling.

“Oh, there’s no use in talking to him,” said Alice,
desperately ; “he’s perfectly idiotic!” And she opened the
door and went in.

The door led right into a large kitchen, which was full of
smoke from one end to the other; the Duchess was sitting
on a three-legged stool in the middle, nursing a baby; the
cook was leaning over the fire, stirring a large cauldron
which seemed to be full of soup.

There’s certainly too much pepper in that soup!” Alice
said to herself, as well as she could for sneezing.

There was certainly too much of it in the air. Even the
Duchess sneezed occasionally; and the baby was sneezing
and howling alternately without a moment's pause. The
only things in the kitchen that did not sneeze were the cook,
and a large cat which was sitting on the hearth and grinning
from ear to ear.

‘Please would you tell me,” said Alice, a little timidly,
for she was not quite sure whether it was good manners for
her to speak first, ‘‘ why your cat grins like that ?”



PIG AND PEPPER 67



“ It’s a Cheshire cat,” said
the Duchess, ‘and that’s
why, Pig!”

She said the last words
with such sudden violence that Alice quite jumped; but she
saw in another moment that it was addressed to the baby,
and not to her, so she took courage, and went on again :

“I didn’t know that Cheshire cats always grinned ; in fact,
I didn’t know that cats could grin.”

“They all can,” said the Duchess ; ‘‘and most of ’em do.”

E 2



68 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

“T don’t know of any that do,” Alice said very politely,
feeling quite pleased to have got into a conversation.

“You don’t know much,” said the Duchess; ‘and that’s
a fact.”

Alice did not at all like the tone of this remark, and thought
it would be as well to introduce some other subject of
conversation. While she was trying to fix on one, the cook
took the cauldron of soup off the fire, and at once set to work
throwing everything within her reach at the Duchess and the
baby—the fire-irons came first; then followed a shower of
saucepans, plates, and dishes. The Duchess took no notice
of them even when they hit her; and the baby was howling
so much already that it was quite impossible to say whether
the blows hurt it or not.

“Oh, A/ease mind what you're doing!” cried Alice, jumping
up and down in an agony of terror. ‘Oh, there goes his
precious nose” ; as an unusually large saucepan flew close by
it, and very nearly carried it off.

“Tf everybody minded their own business,” the Duchess
said, in a hoarse growl, ‘‘the world would go round a deal
faster than it does.”

‘Which would mot be an advantage,” said Alice, who felt
very glad to get an opportunity of showing off a little of her
knowledge. “ Just think what work it would make with the
day and night! You see the earth takes twenty-four hours
to turn round on its axis 4

‘Talking of axes,” said the Duchess, “chop off her head.”

Alice glanced rather anxiously at the cook, to see if she





PIG AND PEPPER 69

meant to take the hint; but the cook was busily engaged in
stirring the soup, and did not seem to be listening, so she
ventured to go on again: “Twenty-four hours, I ¢#imk; or
is it twelve? I——”

‘Oh, don’t bother me,” said the Duchess; ‘I never could
abide figures!” And with that she began nursing her child
again, singing a sort of lullaby to it as she did so, and
giving it a violent shake at the end of every line:

“ Speak roughly to your little boy,
And beat him when he sneezes :
He only does it to annoy,
Because he knows it teases.”

CHORUS,

(In which the cook and the baby joined) :—

“Wow ! wow! wow!”

While the Duchess sang the second verse of the song
she kept tossing the baby violently up and down, and the
poor little thing howled so that Alice could hardly hear the
words:

“T speak severely to my boy,
I beat him when he sneezes ;
For he can thoroughly enjoy
The pepper when he pleases |”
CHORUS.

“ Wow ! wow! wow!”

“Here, you may nurse it a bit, if you like!” the Duchess
said to Alice, flinging the baby at her as she spoke. “I
must go and get ready to play croquet with the Queen,” and



70




ALICE IN WONDERLAND

2

re

Rem

of

ld
aU

od
0



@



she hurried out of the
room. The cook threw a
frying-pan after her as
she went out, but it just
missed her.

Alice caught the baby
with some difficulty, as it
was a queer-shaped little
creature, and held out
its arms and legs in all

directions, “just like a star-fish,” thought Alice. The poor
little thing was snorting like a steam-engine when she
caught it, and kept doubling itself up and straightening
itself out again, so that altogether, for the first minute or
tivo, it was as much as she could do to hold it.

As soon as she had made out the proper way of nursing
it (which was to twist it up into a sort of knot, and then
keep tight hold of its right ear and left foot, so as to prevent
its undoing itself) she carried it out into the open air.

“Tf I don’t take this child away with me,” thought Alice,



PIG AND PEPPER 71

“they're sure to kill it in a day or two; wouldn't it be
murder to leave it behind?” She said the last words out
loud, and the little thing grunted in reply (it had left off
sneezing by this time). ‘‘Don't grunt,” said Alice ; “that’s
not at all a proper way of expressing yourself.”

The baby grunted again, and Alice looked very anxiously
into its face to see what was the matter with it. There could
be no doubt that it had a very turn-up nose, much more like
a snout thana real nose; also its eyes were getting extremely
small for a baby; altogether Alice did not like the look of
the thing at all. ‘But perhaps it was only sobbing,” she
thought, and looked into its eyes again, to see if there were
any tears.

No, there were no tears. “If you're going to turn into a
pig, my dear,” said Alice, seriously, “I'll have nothing more
to do with you. Mind now!” The poor little thing sobbed
again (or grunted, it was impossible to say which), and they
went on for some while in silence. |

Alice was just beginning to think to herself, ‘‘ Now, what
am I to do with this creature when I get it home?” when it
grunted again, so violently that she looked down into its
face in some alarm. This time there could be zo mistake
about it; it was neither more nor less than a pig, and she felt
that it would be quite absurd for her to carry it any further.

So she set the little creature down, and felt quite relieved
to see it trot quietly away into the wood. “If it had grown
up,” she said to herself, “it would have made a dreadfully
ugly child; but it makes rather a handsome pig, I think.”



72 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

And she began thinking over other children she knew, who
might do very well as pigs, and was just saying to herself,
“if one only knew the right way to change them ” when
she was a little startled by seeing the Cheshire Cat sitting
on a bough of a tree a few yards off.

The Cat only grinned when it saw Alice. It looked
good-natured, she thought ; still it had very long claws anda
great many teeth, so she felt that it ought to be treated with
respect. ‘Cheshire Puss,” she began, rather timidly, as she
did not at all know whether it would like the name; however,
it only grinned a little wider. ‘Come, it’s pleased, so far,”
thought Alice, and she went on: ‘Would you tell me,
please, which way I ought to go from here?”

“That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,”
said the Cat.



“‘T don’t much care where——.” said Alice.

“Then it doesn’t matter which way you go,” said the Cat.

“__. so long as I get somewhere,” Alice added as an
explanation.

“Oh, you're sure to do that,” said the Cat, “if you only
walk long enough.”

Alice felt that this could not be denied, so she tried
another question. ‘What sort of people live about here?”

“In ¢haé direction,” the Cat said, waving his right paw
round, “lives a Hatter; and in ¢a¢ direction,” waving the
other paw, “lives a March Hare. Visit either you like:
they’re both mad.”

“But I don’t want to go among mad people,” Alice
remarked.





Ch

[ee

ton

Aus

E PIG BABY,

TH



PIG AND PEPPEK 73

“Oh, you can’t help that,” said the Cat; ‘‘we'’re all mad
here. TYm mad. You're mad.”

“ How do you know I’m mad?” said Alice.

“You must be,” said the Cat, “or you wouldn’t have
come here.”

Alice didn’t think that proved Ee
it at all; however, she went on: , y
“And how do you know that ST
you're mad?”

“To begin with,” said : 2 Le
the Cat, ‘‘a dog’s not
mad. You ,
grant that 2?”

“TT sup-
pose so,”said
Alice.

“Well,
then,” the
Cat went on,
“‘you see a








SSG

SST

Se




dog growls
when it’s
angry, and

wags its
tail when
it’s pleased.

w= A
Now/ growl -~=2S2 ne
’ SR
when I’m CS >



FE} ALICE IN WONDERLAND

pleased, and wag my tail when I’m angry. Therefore
I’m mad.”

“TZ call it purring, not growling,” said Alice.

“Call it what you like,” said the Cat. ‘Do you play
croquet with the Queen to-day ?”

“TI should like it very much,” said Alice, ‘but I haven't
been invited yet.”

“You'll see me there,” said the Cat, and vanished.

Alice was not much surprised at this, she was getting
so used to queer things happening. While she was looking
at the place where it had been it suddenly appeared again.

“ By-the-bye, what became of the baby?” said the Cat.
“Td nearly forgotten. to ask.”

‘Tt turned into a pig,” Alice quiétly said, just as if it had
come back in a natural way. —

“I thought it would,” said the Cat, and vanished again.

Alice waited a little, half expecting to see it again, but it
did not appear, and after a minute or two she walked on in
the direction in which the March Hare was said to live.
“‘T’ve seen hatters before,” she said to herself; ‘the March
Hare will be much the most interesting, and perhaps, as this
is May, it won't be raving mad—at least not so mad as it
was in March.” As she said this, she looked up, and there
was the Cat again, sitting on a branch of a tree.

“ Did you say pig, or fig?” said the Cat. _

“T said pig,” replied Alice; ‘and I wish you wouldn't
keep appearing and vanishing so suddenly: you make one
quite giddy.” :



PIG AND PEPPER 76

“All right,” said
the Cat; and this
time it vanished
quite slowly, begin-
ning with the end
of the tail and end-
ing with the grin,
which remained
some time after the
rest of it had gone.

“Well! I’ve often
seen a cat without
a grin,” thought
Alice, ‘“‘but a grin
without a cat! It’s
the most curious
thing I ever saw in
all my life.” ;

She had _ not
gone much farther
before she came in
sight of the house
of the March Hare;
she thought it must
be the right house .
because the chim-
neys were shaped
like ears, and the





76 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

roof was thatched with fur. It was so large a house that
she did not like to go nearer till she had nibbled some
more of the left-hand bit of mushroom, and raised herself
to about two feet high; even then she walked up towards
it rather timidly, saying to herself: ‘‘Suppose it should be
raving mad after all! I almost wish I’d gone to see the
Hatter instead!”




YAW |
I aS







CHAPTER VII

A MAD TEA-PARTY

THERE was a table set out under a tree in front of the
house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea
at it; a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep,
and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their
elbows on it, and talking over its head. ‘‘ Very uncomfort-
able for the Dormouse,” thought Alice; ‘only as it’s asleep
I suppose it doesn’t mind.’



78 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

The table was a large one, but the three were all
crowded together at one corner of it. ‘No room! No
room!” they cried out, when they saw Alice coming.
‘“There’s plenty of room!” said Alice indignantly ; and she
sat down in a large armchair at one end of the table.

“Have some wine?” the March Hare said, in an
encouraging tone.

Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing
on it but tea. ‘I don’t see any wine,” she remarked.

“There isn’t any,” said the March Hare.

“Then it wasn’t very civil of you to offer it,” said Alice
angrily.

“Tt wasn’t very civil of you to sit down without being
invited,” said the March Hare.

“J didn’t know it was your table,” said Alice; “it’s laid
for a great many more than three.”

“Your hair wants cutting,” said the Hatter. He had
been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity,
and this was his first speech.

“You should learn not to make personal remarks,” Alice
said, with some severity; “it’s very rude.”

The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this ;
but all he sazd was: ‘“ Why is a raven like a writing-desk ?”

“Come, we shall have some fun now!” thought Alice.
“I’m glad they've begun asking riddles—I believe I can
guess that,” she added aloud.

_ “Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer
to it?” said the March Hare.



A MAD TEA-PARTY 79

“Exactly so,” said
Alice.

“Then you should
say what you mean,”
the March Hare went







on.

“T do,” Alice has-
tily replied ; .
“at least—at
least I mean

=

om $b

what I say
—that’s the
same thing,
you know.”

“Not the
same thing a bit!” said the Hatter. ‘Why, you might just
as well say that ‘I see what I eat’ is the same thing as
‘T eat what I see’!”

“You might just as well say,’ added the March Hare,
“that ‘I like what I get’ is the same thing as ‘I get what
I like’ !”

“You might just as well say,” added the Dormouse, which
seemed to be talking in his sleep, “that ‘I breathe when I
sleep’ is the same thing as ‘I sleep when I breathe’!”

“Tt ds the same thing with you,” said the Hatter; and here
the conversation dropped, and the party sat silent for a
minute, while Alice thought over all she could remember
about ravens and writing-desks, which wasn’t much.



80 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

The Hatter was the first to break the silence. ‘‘ What
day of the month is it?” he said, turning to Alice; he had
taken his watch out of his pocket, and was looking at it
uneasily, shaking it every now and then, and holding it to
his ear.

Alice considered a little, and then said, ‘“‘ The fourth.”

“Two days wrong!” sighed the Hatter. ‘I told you
butter wouldn’t suit the works!” he added, looking angrily at
the March Hare. :

“It was the des¢ butter,” the March Hare meekly replied.

“Ves, but some crumbs must have got in as well,” the
Hatter grumbled; “you shouldn't have put it in with the
bread-knife.”

The March Hare took the watch and looked at it
gloomily ; then he dipped it into his cup of tea, and looked
at it again; but he could think of nothing better to say
than his first remark: “It was the des¢ butter, you know.”

Alice had been looking over his shoulder with some
curiosity. ‘What afunny watch!” she remarked. “It tells
the day of the month, and doesn’t tell what o’clock it is!”

“Why should it?” muttered the Hatter. ‘ Does your
watch tell you what year it is?”

“Of course not,” Alice replied very readily; ‘but that’s
because it stays the same year for such a long time together.”

‘““Which is just the case with mzne,” said the Hatter.

Alice felt dreadfully puzzled. The MHatter’s remark
seemed to have no meaning in it, and yet it was certainly
English. ‘I don’t quite understand,” she said, as politely
as she could.





THE MAD TEA PARTY.



A MAD TEA-PARTY 81

‘“The Dormouse is asleep again,” said the Hatter, and he
poured a little hot tea upon its nose.

The Dormouse shook its head impatiently, and_ said,
without opening its eyes, ‘Of course, of course: just what I
was going to remark myself.”

‘‘Have you guessed the riddle yct?” the Hatter said,
turning to Alice again.

‘“No, I give it up,” Alice replied; ‘‘what’s the answer ?”

‘IT haven't the slightest idea,” said the Hatter.

“Nor I,” said the March Hare.

Alice sighed wearily. “TI think you might do something
oetter with the time,” she said, “than waste it asking riddles
with no answers,”

“If you knew Time as well as I do,” said the Hatter, “ you
wouldn’t talk about wasting z#. It’s Azm.”

‘‘T don’t know what you mean,” said Alice.

‘‘ Of course you don’t!” the Hatter said, tossing his head
contemptuously. ‘I dare say you never even spoke to
Time!”

‘Perhaps not,” Alice cautiously replied; “ but I know I
have to beat time when I learn music.”

“Ah! that accounts for it,” said the Hatter. ‘“ He won't
stand beating. Now, if you only kept on good terms with
him he’d do almost anything you liked with the clock. For
instance, suppose it were nine o'clock in the morning, just
time to begin lessons: you’d only have to whisper a hint to
Time, and round goes the clock in a twinkling! Half-past
one, time for dinner!” —

P



82 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

‘“‘T only wish it was,” the March Hare said to itself in a
whisper.

‘That would be grand, certainly,” said Alice thoughtfully ;
“but then—I shouldn’t be hungry for it, you know.”

“Not at first, perhaps,” said the Hatter; “ but you could
keep it to half-past one as long as you liked.”

“Ts that the way you manage?” Alice asked.

The Hatter shook his head mournfully. “Not I!” he
replied. ‘We quarrelled last March—just before Ze went
mad, you know—” (pointing with his teaspoon at the March
Hare), ‘‘—it was at the great concert given by the Queen
of Hearts, and I had to sing

‘Twinkle, twinkle, little bat !
How I wonder what you're at!’

You know the song, perhaps?”
“I’ve heard something like it,” said Alice.
“Tt goes on, you know,” the Hatter continued, “in this

way:
‘Up above the world you fly
Like a tea-tray in the sky.

Twinkle, twinkle—~ ”

Here the Dormouse shook itself, and began singing in
its sleep, ‘‘ Twinkle, twinkle, twinkle, twinkle——’ and went
on so long that they had to pinch it to make it stop.

‘Well, I’d hardly finished the first verse,” said the
Hatter, ‘when the Queen jumped up and bawled out, ‘ He’s
murdering the time! Off with his head!’”

‘How dreadfully savage!” exclaimed Alice.



A MAD TEA-PARTY 83



“And ever since that,” the
Hatter went on, in a mournful tone,
‘‘he won’t do a thing Iask! It’s
always six o’clock now.”

A bright idea came into Alice’s
head. ‘Is that the reason so many
tea-things are put out here?” she
asked.

“Yes, that’s it,” said. the Hatter, with a sigh : “it’s always
tea-time, and we've no time to wash the things between
whiles.”

“Then you keep moving round, I suppose?” said
Alice.

‘Exactly so,” said the Hatter; ‘as the things get used

”

Up.



F2



84 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

‘But what happens when you come to the beginning
again?” Alice ventured to ask.

‘Suppose we change the subject,” the March Hare
interrupted, yawning. ‘I’m getting tired of this. I vote the
young lady tells us a story.”

“I’m afraid I don’t know one,” said Alice, rather alarmed
at the proposal.

‘“Then the Dormouse shall!” they both cried. ‘Wake
up, Dormouse!” And they pinched it on both sides at
once.

The Dormouse slowly opened his eyes. “I wasn't
asleep,” he said in a hoarse, feeble voice ; “I heard every word
you fellows were saying.”

“Tell us a story!” said the March Hare.

“Yes, please do!” pleaded Alice.

‘And be quick about it,” added the Hatter, “or you'll be
asleep again before it’s done.”

“Once upon a time there were three little sisters,” the
Dormouse began in a great hurry; “and their names were
Elsie, Lacie, and Tillie; and they lived at the bottom of a
well :

‘What did they live on?” said Alice, who always took a
great interest in questions of eating and drinking.

‘They lived on treacle,” said the Dormouse, after thinking
a minute or two. |

‘They couldn’t have done that, you know,” Alice gently
remarked ; “ they'd have been ill.”

‘So they were,” said the Dormouse; “ very ill.”





A MAD TEA-PARTY 85

Alice tried a little to fancy to herself what such an
extraordinary way of living would be like, but it puzzled her
too much, so she went on: “ But why did they live at the
bottom of a well?”

‘Take some more tea,” the March Hare said to Alice very
earnestly.

“I’ve had nothing yet,” Alice replied, in an offended tone,
“so I can’t take more.”

“You mean you can’t take /ess,” said the Hatter: ‘‘it’s
__very easy to take more than nothing.”

“ Nobody asked your opinion,” said Alice.

‘Who's making personal remarks now?” the Hatter
asked triumphantly.

Alice did not quite know what to say to this, so she
helped herself to some tea and bread-and-butter, and then
turned to the Dormouse, and repeated her question: “Why
did they live at the bottom of a well?”

The Dormouse again took a minute or two to think
about it, and then said: “ It was a treacle-well.”

“There’s no such thing!” Alice was beginning very
angrily; but the Hatter and the March Hare went “Sh! sh!”
and the Dormouse sulkily remarked: ‘If you can’t be civil,
you'd better finish the story for yourself.”

‘No, please go on!” Alice said very humbly. ‘I won't
interrupt you again. I daresay there may be one.”

“One, indeed!” said the Dormouse, indignantly. How-
ever, he consented to go on. ‘And so these three little
sisters—they were learning to draw, you know





86 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

“What did they draw?” said Alice, quite forgetting her
promise.

“Treacle,” said the Dormouse, without considering at all
this time. ee

“T want a clean cup,” interrupted the Hatter; “let’s all
move one place on.”

He moved on as he spoke, and the Dormouse followed
him: the March Hare moved into the Dormouse’s place, and
Alice, rather unwillingly, took the place of the March Hare.
The Hatter was the only one who got any advantage from
the change; and Alice was a good deal worse off than before,
as the March Hare had just upset the milk-jug into his
plate.

Alice did not wish to offend the Dormouse again, so she
began very cautiously : ‘‘ But I don’t understand. Where
did they draw the treacle from ?”

“You can draw water out of a water-well,” said the
Hatter; ‘‘so I should think you could draw treacle out of a
treacle-well—eh, stupid ?”

“But they were zz the well,” Alice said to the Dormouse,
not choosing to notice this last remark.

“Of course they were,” said the Dormouse ; ‘‘“——well, in.”

This answer so confused poor Alice that she let the
Dormouse go on for some time without interrupting it. -

“They were learning to draw,” the Dormouse went on,
yawning and rubbing its eyes, for it was getting very sleepy ;
‘‘and they drew all manner of things—everything that begins:
with an M——”



A MAD TEA-PARTY 84

“Why with
an M?” said
Alice.

“Why not?”
said the March
Hare.

Alice was
silent.

The Dor-
mouse had.

closed its eyes
by this time
and was going
off into a doze ;
but, on being
pinched by the
Hatter, it woke
up again with
a little shriek,
and went on: “—— that begins with an M, such as mouse-
traps, and the moon, and memory, and muchness—you know
you say things are ‘much of a muchness’—did you ever
see such a thing as a drawing of a muchness ?”

“Really, now you ask me,” said Alice, very much con-
fused, ‘“ I don’t think——”

“Then you shouldn’t talk,” said the Hatter.

This piece of rudeness was more than Alice could bear ;
she got up in great disgust, and walked off. The Dormouse





88 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

fell asleep instantly, and neither of the others took the least
notice of her going, though she looked back once or twice,
half hoping that they would call after her; the last time she
saw them they were trying to put the Dormouse into the
teapot. :

“At any rate, I'll never go ¢heve again!” said Alice, as she
picked her way through the wood. ‘“‘It’s the stupidest tea-
party I ever was at in all my life!”

Just as she said this she noticed that one of the trees
had a door leading right into it. ‘‘ That’s very curious!” she
thought. ‘‘ But everything’s curious to-day. I think I may
as well go in at once.” And in she went.

Once more she found herself in the long hall, and close to
the little glass table. ‘‘ Now, I’ll manage better this time,”
she said to herself, and began by taking the little golden key,
and unlocking the door that led into the garden. Then she
set to work nibbling at the mushroom (she had kept a piece
of it in her pocket) till she was about a foot high; then she
walked down the little passage, and ¢4en—she found herself
at last in the beautiful garden, among the bright flower-beds
and the cool fountains.



Full Text


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fedd9e692716f8c97b991abc10457b77
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e65269a81020e62a2e7bad8ffb5810a0
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Invalid character
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1cdac63fa857b04a73346850b73f52d6
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bd2788b2649f550e1c31e0b21447b22e
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Invalid character
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3a602554ab735919c7c45047c36cc31b
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Invalid character
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describe
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describe
Invalid character
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describe
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describe
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describe
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'2011-12-04T05:51:10-05:00'
describe
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b514f392f9becdd92a1578de5ae32221
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'2011-12-04T05:53:00-05:00'
describe
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'2011-12-04T05:53:46-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'635' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEHN' 'sip-files00039.txt'
9413880f4ea05583c035bdcc807c098c
a0ff9d8d78bd57b09b735891d4673bd67c507a06
describe
'847' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEHO' 'sip-files00040.txt'
92e0d2764d16bda9906fb96f38097ecb
1ae23b4e0bd00d872b8ab359ec3907657ef8418f
'2011-12-04T05:49:18-05:00'
describe
'1495' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEHP' 'sip-files00041.txt'
d7514a7c1ebf04169e6931e8fe179be4
a27709283cbfb4d740d581225e2f18a5f0406fc9
'2011-12-04T05:53:33-05:00'
describe
'616' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEHQ' 'sip-files00042.txt'
6a587613cca9cf61e299222f784a7b48
e0a079e093f56603aa738d20ce017297ddd514a1
'2011-12-04T05:50:34-05:00'
describe
'1582' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEHR' 'sip-files00043.txt'
847d06476e29aa0959210d874eb81201
7c7be22b34021e734d75134dc2d9e8d02d0c79e3
'2011-12-04T05:54:57-05:00'
describe
'1450' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEHS' 'sip-files00044.txt'
75953acfb0997c4d4e2f653d752758d1
18d21bf1cd0b45c4609b51668a86f39ae2e951b2
'2011-12-04T05:52:20-05:00'
describe
'659' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEHT' 'sip-files00045.txt'
d03a61cfc50bfe1ca6a8e775031ac6bf
60c4966e4c6f1c18c701bd89ac0d7c5068277651
'2011-12-04T05:50:11-05:00'
describe
'1972' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEHU' 'sip-files00046.txt'
ac03ddc8877ad997c72937b334fa121b
4bc8e5e2c7d039db48502c1de7651b79aafd7f99
'2011-12-04T05:53:57-05:00'
describe
'173' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEHV' 'sip-files00047.txt'
03294fb407e717c8962e0a0a351cb1b8
16d2536c9428cac07b3e2072764eeb7bf057a7a9
'2011-12-04T05:51:04-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1458' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEHW' 'sip-files00049.txt'
1c45f9874102b6d72da2cce9ebf7ec9f
e9eece4e8fa7398d60830657fe075e44f1c32cdb
'2011-12-04T05:53:30-05:00'
describe
'971' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEHX' 'sip-files00050.txt'
d48476f08ee7ea2bffc43895e8b3acdc
29bf2ddb551225145ad19dd3aae83b716106acf9
'2011-12-04T05:51:53-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'609' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEHY' 'sip-files00051.txt'
c7389973b582c493e9a209a6496799bb
4680943fb331b66354348816c106bef0359cab64
'2011-12-04T05:51:51-05:00'
describe
'789' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEHZ' 'sip-files00052.txt'
2b9014d8d9b9f906d1b4ede2064acd1c
7cba9186804af15d348a140a4f0c3b48e52b28df
'2011-12-04T05:55:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEIA' 'sip-files00053.txt'
5884663dc38c7ab6b4e99d48dd3d27f2
bb7d6212263daa2777fd6503abb58d8a9fc0d7cf
'2011-12-04T05:49:52-05:00'
describe
'1646' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEIB' 'sip-files00054.txt'
bfef621e8c1dfda657f1ed90ca05e38f
8a91ea167a3d4421e6086de6970158c254c8966b
'2011-12-04T05:50:13-05:00'
describe
'1039' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEIC' 'sip-files00055.txt'
2836ffca834f0f578dada5d30f8c4770
e4b21a93bf8d152798901d0ab16f6a41bfd7271e
'2011-12-04T05:51:54-05:00'
describe
'1587' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEID' 'sip-files00056.txt'
e05d6cf53deded2518c1eab7fc95ac74
4f9a41cfe84109a8baeb006fbdfdfe1daed8148a
describe
'121' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEIE' 'sip-files00057.txt'
43ff94aade39c650fe1e9619654c7f3f
8a4926aa76386c1d48c112a607bc5b62abeb4ff0
'2011-12-04T05:52:39-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1404' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEIF' 'sip-files00059.txt'
05b35d1c5f0af080cfea9010409b19f7
c22b15bffa083cb0075133fe4b6724b949f484d3
'2011-12-04T05:49:51-05:00'
describe
'1599' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEIG' 'sip-files00060.txt'
48839bd3ba13503a823573e5107f7faf
b6c6acbe3754148728855ab189a4ab45e6d4b452
'2011-12-04T05:52:09-05:00'
describe
'749' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEIH' 'sip-files00061.txt'
f960dcaf9b81e7f5be99f93cc7cf940f
e15d4e763022dfa5c4ea8240f6b18dd7390e96d8
'2011-12-04T05:49:41-05:00'
describe
'1631' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEII' 'sip-files00062.txt'
73b11ccf766034281e44b860aa0281b8
61b56f5634bf6d315cf7ef5f7a3bb8b28a485df4
describe
'1051' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEIJ' 'sip-files00063.txt'
d45ea7b05fb800b89c8913d2ab815b77
02c04fc2c9939fd392d0364ed18c1f00210ce041
'2011-12-04T05:54:22-05:00'
describe
'1632' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEIK' 'sip-files00064.txt'
a9354efa7ceb9e78c1da49e2a53e1473
a732bf7ecc4e4d4d66c90975cb72179c36dd5fd1
'2011-12-04T05:50:54-05:00'
describe
'445' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEIL' 'sip-files00065.txt'
c1f17e40d071873a92bde95f7de8ae25
5160e02078767f7a8e1a9c81f9e5ba184773e10b
'2011-12-04T05:53:40-05:00'
describe
'482' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEIM' 'sip-files00066.txt'
72b08d88aa053191c57f7adcc1f593cb
0cc742e03f94596ae9b859364c5687409d6c86db
'2011-12-04T05:54:00-05:00'
describe
'1391' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEIN' 'sip-files00067.txt'
6130806da532a83386cda34d471da418
e893550a347e0d1cf574e6613e7d8058f6b982e9
describe
'1306' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEIO' 'sip-files00068.txt'
fb9bf096d99ed4fd57a6e52f93b21d72
59932a575ff111f228ecd43e154a27a7e72fd424
'2011-12-04T05:54:38-05:00'
describe
'177' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEIP' 'sip-files00069.txt'
b01149cf84b824f367159fd217191668
b16cf5ef76d78b472302504502d4a33c93171a62
describe
Invalid character
'1584' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEIQ' 'sip-files00071.txt'
3585909d8f7600a548d162a08f46e2c4
6f484bb635c292af7e9c74c1a0278cb9b0919330
'2011-12-04T05:53:27-05:00'
describe
'1498' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEIR' 'sip-files00072.txt'
3e62ae263a88ed5cb93045008a1b3bdd
0ed9eb5188cae24a73ef80ae089505f29ab91734
'2011-12-04T05:55:02-05:00'
describe
'1041' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEIS' 'sip-files00073.txt'
a28ad3e3d63f58eb92ed2727f3dcb51f
217e6067901cba4e62ee4616f6cc73e446dc5da3
'2011-12-04T05:54:47-05:00'
describe
'1502' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEIT' 'sip-files00074.txt'
ba9bcbb6cd30d39d6e20b0b6dbaa38ce
dd03fb816f2f36a542f60eb93f6c2295fa210fb5
'2011-12-04T05:54:17-05:00'
describe
'836' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEIU' 'sip-files00075.txt'
69cea06dde1f4e6aea0d8f4f3679440f
30a0a8a214e2569be5603b85a8a972331419d771
'2011-12-04T05:54:51-05:00'
describe
'1455' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEIV' 'sip-files00076.txt'
1607f0630cefbf1049864b2403fff417
4d37270f782d6653fd81b74dfd2d683e9f9f5a21
'2011-12-04T05:54:02-05:00'
describe
'1613' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEIW' 'sip-files00077.txt'
562ad07c4b6f2c63a115e4f52c32df1e
9054b71cb8cf55accc3a00e38d69c91f77706a57
'2011-12-04T05:53:18-05:00'
describe
'855' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEIX' 'sip-files00078.txt'
62778b8e323294244d6ffc53f90ab2e3
3a61c9a7e661c411f68ef1419002585db62c1db3
'2011-12-04T05:54:52-05:00'
describe
'980' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEIY' 'sip-files00079.txt'
4f90f4243214f4bf4fdda7c647bf36d5
3bcfd25c00073ae34cc424d1ecb2ef9d0fb42dee
describe
Invalid character
'1497' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEIZ' 'sip-files00080.txt'
fa60499d388b2f225e35731022306964
020b44bd1de4587c4b59f29502984b23907e63ac
'2011-12-04T05:50:36-05:00'
describe
'292' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEJA' 'sip-files00081.txt'
acec79ccf3b2eabfbe6d04b95b5efee0
6a219821d186752f90ea61bf4b9312e59595066a
'2011-12-04T05:51:59-05:00'
describe
'865' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEJB' 'sip-files00083.txt'
5d01e8ec93a1c485005e33e1d08c190f
d8cda362862a8ea1f12d8fb3c9e0eaa2a6fd7981
'2011-12-04T05:50:27-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1490' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEJC' 'sip-files00084.txt'
2ba36cdff8e4fd3325a51fb8132eeb2a
7c295886de6747ae351b4be462d681f9f1e67179
'2011-12-04T05:53:04-05:00'
describe
'607' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEJD' 'sip-files00085.txt'
ad512dea94fadfd7f7d2ec83fbd15358
d5a2f62d9854afd0bb942defc284db349c05341a
'2011-12-04T05:52:46-05:00'
describe
'1558' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEJE' 'sip-files00086.txt'
024688575d98ede4d6705cef1d8241c0
6519488119065c48c63f7999ac6ac90fc24920db
'2011-12-04T05:50:26-05:00'
describe
'1447' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEJF' 'sip-files00087.txt'
e8e826d90beb620722fac3f3457900b0
d6443c8cf17213573dd20d14ff6c7ee14bd57b77
'2011-12-04T05:51:01-05:00'
describe
'1171' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEJG' 'sip-files00088.txt'
138f80cdb18f73890787b8d845e133b2
faf0fad6209b707061c37435da34de032b9c3b90
describe
'1655' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEJH' 'sip-files00089.txt'
adab1cc38005264f0310edf60d978610
1a3647e27247bfc295577b71700492cd214ac798
'2011-12-04T05:49:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEJI' 'sip-files00090.txt'
ec3dda595c158125c9188ebd10d7cfff
73b3dbf32c94e1053861b724bc9d6704c2f63c11
'2011-12-04T05:49:46-05:00'
describe
'204' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEJJ' 'sip-files00091.txt'
3441103bc7cf51e29bbf80544329223e
72e4136d33e9ee0df3dc6cb8ab5b08ed24815778
'2011-12-04T05:54:43-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'758' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEJK' 'sip-files00093.txt'
b3c0555fb6255abc3d5779b24ac90225
4dee093a3ad90dd572cd7be5365b71ae00a43c70
'2011-12-04T05:53:50-05:00'
describe
'1462' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEJL' 'sip-files00094.txt'
1316824b2614138e5e6892fa968f49c6
cbcc081553707805fab3ba3d739f30be4182976c
'2011-12-04T05:49:37-05:00'
describe
'597' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEJM' 'sip-files00095.txt'
b0be362580ab703703ec35f609a547f0
a992095730984fcf649f2e454ab1b6f5647af8f8
describe
'547' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEJN' 'sip-files00096.txt'
68fa3a0ee97e9d52e9da310a8a5ab9c9
f9efc3d3ae0447bcfa5d3b74545b00f5fe2033e1
describe
'513' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEJO' 'sip-files00097.txt'
a3fb945e84dae85a03bbfee25e454f3b
de231daaf8b416663a407a9f41ed309271ea936a
'2011-12-04T05:53:37-05:00'
describe
'1429' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEJP' 'sip-files00098.txt'
1cd19030a739f56b04bac83d2e4bdd26
b13d060adf69fd2ed124daf6d8ee0748c2c16748
'2011-12-04T05:50:12-05:00'
describe
'1002' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEJQ' 'sip-files00099.txt'
1d662ee34be6d2e3b037c9db5ba90c13
bb9dbf9d44431f36c13752d115f06fb5fc7263ec
'2011-12-04T05:51:46-05:00'
describe
'1537' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEJR' 'sip-files00100.txt'
2d99548e608260359cbcdc08d41b8095
3ff43648fd17bd3e9598003677a3d1cb819a0bf4
describe
'185' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEJS' 'sip-files00101.txt'
f5f8ff46bd5045ea912b2c32bc4d5407
6efd63ef27984deb1233e9575fef7455c1b6387a
'2011-12-04T05:49:30-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1431' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEJT' 'sip-files00103.txt'
74d050a01d62f283ff675d36df60df3d
5da904e57930d74e5e7bd60c6603ebe2907b5710
'2011-12-04T05:50:17-05:00'
describe
'1411' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEJU' 'sip-files00104.txt'
7e768f58beb61dc8b7bb89aef90a2cb3
53aa7d93cba40570a58d81cc5dcf486356043fd5
describe
'679' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEJV' 'sip-files00105.txt'
7561ce457545667aa9058704968fd504
dd3526756f8bf21019eaaecae9bf419b8a62a7d8
describe
'1324' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEJW' 'sip-files00106.txt'
8ad869ee11a0e1af4d56f1ab7e41aff3
be524ebf61876db8e1ec59fbaf2fb23ee973d2b5
'2011-12-04T05:52:11-05:00'
describe
'1433' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEJX' 'sip-files00107.txt'
038c3c1fe27a14cc6c13aa6e40aa1673
6603736994156743c0b948b1e3202830a0df7e54
'2011-12-04T05:54:09-05:00'
describe
'1387' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEJY' 'sip-files00108.txt'
a03bf74147e35d64d9494434777e79d9
ee4335fb35e6c9ce0c3108094fd3654b0ba725f6
'2011-12-04T05:53:38-05:00'
describe
'808' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEJZ' 'sip-files00109.txt'
396a774999881cf4998c8ccb76029580
10622e9f7551aed81b2ffe73d31724dbd0100cb5
'2011-12-04T05:53:01-05:00'
describe
'1204' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEKA' 'sip-files00110.txt'
00623af452b611905d46aba48077324b
184b0b2ae300a352c9c277d0653f13e81cd21abb
describe
'743' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEKB' 'sip-files00111.txt'
a287a877bb4d628db0aff8ccfdb1854f
e7dbef024766613873de0395b390d3da4ecc7c71
describe
'1606' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEKC' 'sip-files00112.txt'
65db7f28664c174e9f9326683924226c
d14bf4b7f128fbe21f11c53361b543c12e16af19
'2011-12-04T05:49:34-05:00'
describe
'726' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEKD' 'sip-files00113.txt'
bc9f48630002df9e071123ba3afd15f0
6e171e4c080b56834d855cdd0f89d60254493946
'2011-12-04T05:55:06-05:00'
describe
'1408' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEKE' 'sip-files00114.txt'
f6f36143865a21b310e0c147ebe32259
6de53fdfd1d0394a2ddb625cd31fffdb6afe1a60
describe
'162' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEKF' 'sip-files00115.txt'
73f907c07204a0751a17af9d3b6a96ce
4415a7d09df3a039ac5f6b28c1a10e9ec82d30ea
'2011-12-04T05:53:09-05:00'
describe
'1409' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEKG' 'sip-files00116.txt'
dc19ad2780531d78936c7624c676a21a
db634a2e65183172132120396c2b707b7d873f7d
'2011-12-04T05:52:32-05:00'
describe
'1538' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEKH' 'sip-files00117.txt'
9c22d40ab6ed03246fd9b9976c7e48d5
d952c4458b81ee244fdab2d1788461d414390d38
describe
'1217' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEKI' 'sip-files00118.txt'
fb84d20fdd3facff5b34632baeac8197
f8db69d19837977b7daa8fb94809d9df6b77d1c5
'2011-12-04T05:50:35-05:00'
describe
'1628' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEKJ' 'sip-files00119.txt'
340cc0e2753b860456cf94f37570c2f4
8a0e13bfca486104d3c155632595e1f097200e2d
describe
'1402' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEKK' 'sip-files00120.txt'
9ead880fb0029c9c400dc5de2b05fecf
fbc999bb4b79d2a18ae37087ffcb88a66eff908a
'2011-12-04T05:54:41-05:00'
describe
'99' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEKL' 'sip-files00121.txt'
81b81f77402b2f2c2262a3001e9efc4d
f696708585df29b11ea7396764378df7c697f6c6
'2011-12-04T05:51:09-05:00'
describe
'649' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEKM' 'sip-files00123.txt'
31fca787438c6669b86a138b54d8fd16
583a41c9ae0ce6c798af77d334faab45bb7243e2
'2011-12-04T05:54:39-05:00'
describe
'1630' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEKN' 'sip-files00124.txt'
544a99d5e43c879284bb515f2b680811
28a23ca1f22e2736f113279ed42c7333bc3c7095
describe
'1290' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEKO' 'sip-files00125.txt'
419133c26772c7628e719b3b80f861f5
639d6cd87b113254788ae22b9eebf8dd0dbb54aa
'2011-12-04T05:51:26-05:00'
describe
'928' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEKP' 'sip-files00126.txt'
e216d1f293af4bdf4d2b2cc3f5c86bd7
29879b2b582f2a546aaf32036aa5de4a87a93cd5
'2011-12-04T05:52:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEKQ' 'sip-files00127.txt'
d7f1f0da87a13b97d7f0c80b8a0e9d10
a385990fe648b86dfab4f46c47332b65e02718f8
'2011-12-04T05:52:28-05:00'
describe
'1466' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEKR' 'sip-files00128.txt'
2149523a0039b51eaf89218ee854b67f
6461f5b3a605edde934fe0703b37f6231e5a8d30
'2011-12-04T05:54:21-05:00'
describe
'224' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEKS' 'sip-files00129.txt'
57b7f896e18ab873ec1740ead1f0d97b
db84ab1c9bf324acce8ec7090e443ec2a7e14f14
'2011-12-04T05:51:24-05:00'
describe
'1336' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEKT' 'sip-files00130.txt'
a34245d2fccdc40e057664b2bf66f741
1a2c869cbd123ac67d89522406ac86afbcb670e0
'2011-12-04T05:54:05-05:00'
describe
'1514' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEKU' 'sip-files00131.txt'
35d17306ef9dda66cd1d403c6589fbb5
2eb2ad1296996cd1035129451c5e933f80670ffb
'2011-12-04T05:50:56-05:00'
describe
'947' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEKV' 'sip-files00132.txt'
0d3fe3fc29edf4b639defbec9617a12f
638f4194d12daee6b65eb049512bf4ef94ee16f5
'2011-12-04T05:52:37-05:00'
describe
'1499' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEKW' 'sip-files00133.txt'
090364b0a42407dc989f42c08d9e9508
a509acfc625ec66e249618a909e3506a4b2f75e0
'2011-12-04T05:52:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEKX' 'sip-files00134.txt'
b97c4e8b584ec39d9cbba3f660db8e11
713e8f0c3106df91c8adb9b9208b413466b420a3
'2011-12-04T05:51:32-05:00'
describe
'167' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEKY' 'sip-files00135.txt'
3bfb86cb745e6f2ab2be502a5db236d9
7a7b3b2fcfc43bdf07200519ae076e9dffe95ba3
'2011-12-04T05:53:35-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEKZ' 'sip-files00137.txt'
1c16a0299f76ec2952ccfb95878dccca
62ddff5f0af5fffbfbe719b164cdb9877bb5da08
describe
'1475' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAELA' 'sip-files00138.txt'
873544c4d03620b948cf8ad5a3f7a939
e721a1b092ede689e3e9b1c95161f74c33b8f569
'2011-12-04T05:54:54-05:00'
describe
'298' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAELB' 'sip-files00139.txt'
6a69525a2fecd669b7b11ccc6fcfdf3b
105344d9ecb2f92a2128cd9b5bdd3e13f49d0253
'2011-12-04T05:52:08-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAELC' 'sip-files00140.txt'
dce5e87264d57a46b508cfcbe305a144
47708a0a5ded99c29d8b7dd684721eb5eacdee79
'2011-12-04T05:53:58-05:00'
describe
'1244' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAELD' 'sip-files00141.txt'
6706d832050a7b6a339d0ead726d8884
791bd7940d5788bb59923e74a9081ec94e98beac
'2011-12-04T05:50:31-05:00'
describe
'1520' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAELE' 'sip-files00142.txt'
900957104afdcb78f7db35f21f72d327
30386dbd31073bb783a2789a588f0d284d40ed96
'2011-12-04T05:52:52-05:00'
describe
'889' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAELF' 'sip-files00143.txt'
038cd752828866439f11746695846a62
16fb194279c57f880d78723be6c41a41f9150a43
'2011-12-04T05:50:44-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1440' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAELG' 'sip-files00144.txt'
f46a5f44592afc5984e553add213befe
1e8337ad616d2e780af1eb56628c1ca9c17f91c6
'2011-12-04T05:54:32-05:00'
describe
'1405' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAELH' 'sip-files00145.txt'
ae2c1de8f5a090c9c1c9332f76d501a5
9adb24b78d33a7553b1fbf2a80bb1292c4f28469
describe
'1753' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAELI' 'sip-files00146.txt'
f1f7c7d442e25c6460c301b29fd1c057
f0a32c02db89dac5f7a10bcc06a30e335df4ea64
'2011-12-04T05:49:29-05:00'
describe
'999' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAELJ' 'sip-files00147.txt'
569f597730a23dba55485967c84e0298
70cf3e2f5f1ad2f0e891d4c05c702e1915f2f903
'2011-12-04T05:51:27-05:00'
describe
'1717' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAELK' 'sip-files00148.txt'
bdf05b5721d79914d05dcb0a2906db27
603853d44f0fe6ee561422f3689d285dcc62212a
describe
'169' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAELL' 'sip-files00149.txt'
a4dd0116420c43f9d1b0529817493543
2cebd84926c077b4dbe7ac1d1d93f4cc244d6d17
'2011-12-04T05:50:30-05:00'
describe
'1104' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAELM' 'sip-files00150.txt'
2761a596df8ad68c20b20fdccb7bb029
e81e9b57a6bc36552640b669703120e8a2b439b4
'2011-12-04T05:54:15-05:00'
describe
'849' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAELN' 'sip-files00151.txt'
bdf96a3a443f10b42d3214a46b870ab2
658789b40221aa18f4b6c391c09ece7b1e8a573a
describe
'1478' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAELO' 'sip-files00152.txt'
c4ae1d863695cadfa70391325bf41c4d
64cf71a93b97fb09980c8a77433de3b1f17f5904
'2011-12-04T05:49:49-05:00'
describe
'1013' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAELP' 'sip-files00153.txt'
3d4cb9b01097433b75fd59b3935fc9d8
d0d4ace606085e9238329183530f3b72d87c0c8c
'2011-12-04T05:51:57-05:00'
describe
'1397' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAELQ' 'sip-files00154.txt'
dc5c98188c741981929df27a585179d1
6db15a7637316300403455996cf11bc889f11d99
'2011-12-04T05:52:21-05:00'
describe
'251' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAELR' 'sip-files00155.txt'
cf848da8d0f3533bdf95300d3daf9758
6cbda29f788d831fb52661366ce660968fa35638
'2011-12-04T05:49:48-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAELS' 'sip-files00156.txt'
6ef9441e0b508ac3d3de087e8b0e7a07
a4a604e2be50aee48fd42b8a931baa1193b2f03c
describe
'191' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAELT' 'sip-files00157.txt'
d5c4c99cdfdd9a9993f22733009c0539
905400a27cc800529e2964c8de8113029ea0d7fa
describe
Invalid character
'1430' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAELU' 'sip-files00158.txt'
c5b70080d07b4d31ab66853554452bad
7819da4797720febbb9af9a4d1a483833c2733c6
'2011-12-04T05:55:08-05:00'
describe
'1401' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAELV' 'sip-files00159.txt'
a7a646c6f20fcbc4c5d4a25c03854aba
4e9c668f0514aa49959146adc8f65cf5028d3c98
'2011-12-04T05:50:58-05:00'
describe
'271' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAELW' 'sip-files00160.txt'
65c9a8c6542a0aff560b6fdcfafc1210
d826d772e67ebc66a65113fd33c19ee2f5093236
'2011-12-04T05:53:59-05:00'
describe
'1535' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAELX' 'sip-files00161.txt'
c63b6bf147e2b64f95940b2943145acb
ae3d6ce93a025344e411eb79e3cc31add1008db0
describe
'468' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAELY' 'sip-files00162.txt'
b00ec38156c9f230270d70aa2c27fdf3
5683bf4d7cc71dce3542253c0a76c746ed386057
'2011-12-04T05:52:05-05:00'
describe
'773' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAELZ' 'sip-files00163.txt'
93dbb296485a52364555c05029cfda54
b333c93653d71b0d974a174f35c0a392d8c7fea5
describe
'985' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEMA' 'sip-files00164.txt'
1ae698f01c6cce8df7866e6f4d1485ac
4c489becc607cb52cf39f1c0a6987fdab5b77d08
'2011-12-04T05:53:29-05:00'
describe
'155' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEMB' 'sip-files00165.txt'
5bdd9b89f3825c32f684e233345645da
4c22392c2b535d5902fb665623899ce5a25c9894
describe
Invalid character
'1460' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEMC' 'sip-files00167.txt'
cc70979ce8ecadc8ed9f33bdb325f202
312766c416946cf46d7cf29362e8604bd44512b8
describe
'1432' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEMD' 'sip-files00168.txt'
7a332aefe5e30dc9f0372dd505eb43b5
e3553f244bc63df3ca838a63dfad852376143e8c
'2011-12-04T05:50:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEME' 'sip-files00169.txt'
5e3b3da25288650d0345c9c32c70108b
809f32507ef4aeb8d2002483fc2f3202a5931c4a
'2011-12-04T05:50:01-05:00'
describe
'558' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEMF' 'sip-files00170.txt'
c0e673d6800417ccdde2c0a2cbc00bdd
03240454ac7d37f6ace18dd9d0712296ee4f98b3
'2011-12-04T05:52:02-05:00'
describe
'1483' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEMG' 'sip-files00171.txt'
8dd96b5ec9bbac93e91e636c6ac542ff
a5db9b0532b30d53fd9cf7181ce6768bf1ae692e
'2011-12-04T05:51:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEMH' 'sip-files00172.txt'
d479a78e30d014b2114e0a2b81e64b55
6d049b06f8cb95c5f2aa238dd7407c69a579546a
'2011-12-04T05:49:38-05:00'
describe
'934' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEMI' 'sip-files00173.txt'
f4567681d48f3f681510a60776f04c02
e3ea3020b354d924900d423d67e08f1a8e58f42c
'2011-12-04T05:50:04-05:00'
describe
'1701' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEMJ' 'sip-files00174.txt'
83d82a3b96e0dfe88d3eb6248a2fbe5c
5e9aff61a93e1e8d19e02b264e0087bb1293dd84
describe
'461' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEMK' 'sip-files00175.txt'
95d6212c1afabe69324450c6449de949
53ce9c03c13ea1162e22eebce698317a5e1dac00
'2011-12-04T05:54:42-05:00'
describe
'698' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEML' 'sip-files00176.txt'
133d8807402165c311d850fbd6a6aa4b
ace26fe68b610544c961c5a98c07cb83462a34a2
describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEMM' 'sip-files00181.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2011-12-04T05:51:58-05:00'
describe
'334' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEMN' 'sip-files00001.pro'
61fde5d06970b8ec65aa5087c7d20244
0c00cee35f73d756ab009e044d4055d1512073a1
'2011-12-04T05:50:43-05:00'
describe
'2771' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEMO' 'sip-files00002.pro'
9327c32fde795beeb074f056059d6805
98f6eebca649007bd43d37709390f53a2eb1c32c
describe
'552' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEMP' 'sip-files00003.pro'
6e9fd5b33fd3f09cfd68c65340db774a
9b4aa04ddb1ddd7537d84a11ec591393e6b36c1a
'2011-12-04T05:51:45-05:00'
describe
'533' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEMQ' 'sip-files00005.pro'
7ab1b5c3ce5da44887bffbb7ba9d18e3
7600a617d0bfdf78cbc040a483589334752cf6cf
describe
'2893' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEMR' 'sip-files00008.pro'
ad27d02c4e5233bee3cc5e9446ecae15
c8bb53f4a862a413218d94af385c2589543d2945
describe
'5196' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEMS' 'sip-files00009.pro'
0fdbfecf55b2773566b564f593eb1f2d
a0ccc94c673120cf4171fef3d0ffdb9b0706cccf
describe
'394' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEMT' 'sip-files00010.pro'
f48423990629e2836cfedf1fe97bcb75
824bbc7aa7b228dcd179eff98f59a681753c612b
describe
'19696' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEMU' 'sip-files00011.pro'
cccd8e7f22e6ab3c248f5154cdb17c6c
b1a8f9fab9cbccee521f61323a9b195e8fd93ddb
'2011-12-04T05:49:35-05:00'
describe
'16254' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEMV' 'sip-files00012.pro'
b046af625a8f8126f8fdd48901781817
194da1a5567652b0cdd23e9ab1d9e60c2ec9030a
'2011-12-04T05:53:19-05:00'
describe
'17885' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEMW' 'sip-files00013.pro'
dfd479a17f5a40d733cfa220cc6dc612
43b017f9e92e6247abde61665f36e62cbd4bfa28
describe
'14166' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEMX' 'sip-files00014.pro'
a1c109a6a6d101a82da5563fc25247ec
75772305236a98c70fd715da0afbff4205842c99
'2011-12-04T05:52:41-05:00'
describe
'17374' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEMY' 'sip-files00015.pro'
c7cb0453f9bda0d536fcb3dec31375ef
42c37ae54142597a86eb7af3a7e38c3be53deb71
'2011-12-04T05:52:31-05:00'
describe
'22209' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEMZ' 'sip-files00016.pro'
b1e2ae87ebf24f6dea8717172abdcc23
592ca201fc769c4094d76c651fddd8b82dcb08ca
'2011-12-04T05:50:28-05:00'
describe
'38400' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAENA' 'sip-files00017.pro'
7434739ee0163385349a525484e8513d
6db0445591c321cc8b3e4f9ff38b28ba420d498e
'2011-12-04T05:49:22-05:00'
describe
'41670' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAENB' 'sip-files00018.pro'
0f1bb548be25b4e9dd3ada4c66b7111b
c3755154570e5c2c2fade743e30c8066712f9ec0
'2011-12-04T05:51:42-05:00'
describe
'21594' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAENC' 'sip-files00019.pro'
9e34330ffda0ca2d48f228bcd94498c1
908993c25aad41620e030ef61abbc0234ba24dd9
describe
'28065' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEND' 'sip-files00020.pro'
45568fe5d1eaa37be5c93341845f38eb
d7c1956cbc61f2de3a256805086e038ddcb1b19f
describe
'42269' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAENE' 'sip-files00021.pro'
b14b4aabd9fb017206732c497f44e87a
b9797e148daf2bcf94d5e4fead66176c13697146
describe
'25899' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAENF' 'sip-files00022.pro'
4a03ca95fa807037917207f9c45241a9
9063eaf0381e8757e1b8d1dafe9247a1c29ae51b
describe
'28996' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAENG' 'sip-files00023.pro'
58f9f8cb96b2d23afda2d13697eb842b
91e8d85499ce0bd0a5a1bc3612c9d4db1b0b6574
describe
'42787' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAENH' 'sip-files00024.pro'
cb9275e12a7dde2cdcb355620f129843
adaa0fce41814a9a17903ffc1993eae7e8988bbb
'2011-12-04T05:50:24-05:00'
describe
'11180' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAENI' 'sip-files00025.pro'
299ef0f541da72b188ba4ced91c2df2e
dd246f35bf9db0e42acd6e2d47ed26d8bb085b78
'2011-12-04T05:52:30-05:00'
describe
'14723' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAENJ' 'sip-files00026.pro'
3a63197b80878ecbe32effba62c4ac38
4601e63eb24cf997f168ed8347e2de6649467790
'2011-12-04T05:54:27-05:00'
describe
'34367' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAENK' 'sip-files00027.pro'
15bc816468da7907d59c082d41aef909
1a7f4e0b258c144bc6d7ab6c394b5835d4a3f44f
'2011-12-04T05:54:46-05:00'
describe
'23162' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAENL' 'sip-files00028.pro'
464d3f830673f78b0bd217c19dbc6f44
bf86316ee5c6e97720fa9f1f8c97abd45b04ee19
describe
'5658' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAENM' 'sip-files00029.pro'
c243f3f3d4a0495ad36031594ec38d1a
dbd351aea5d6fe778b0eeec568b499e912a5743c
describe
'41946' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAENN' 'sip-files00031.pro'
4ed4db103582a48d85c9643464a90978
0d1832273489d2cc98208c930f163aa2b8b9417c
describe
'39990' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAENO' 'sip-files00032.pro'
a47e1c33f1d62331ccda4f022901b5e8
aa9022b8d2ca9ec7c18e70958a46e622378c5600
'2011-12-04T05:50:00-05:00'
describe
'28975' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAENP' 'sip-files00033.pro'
a4a399ba36339a325109eea073e82116
3b9168c02dded0bf74c94406e28a93737394b362
'2011-12-04T05:49:31-05:00'
describe
'39096' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAENQ' 'sip-files00034.pro'
e23806b9ac219860cf221c585d51fd0e
76cd85425703f574235cdef48d40ebfab9f06928
'2011-12-04T05:50:33-05:00'
describe
'21764' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAENR' 'sip-files00035.pro'
89db44598014633cec752ec05115aa44
dff61738805c4d78ac053aa7d69f21df1ace6dbc
'2011-12-04T05:53:23-05:00'
describe
'41873' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAENS' 'sip-files00036.pro'
d35bf978abdee5619ed36f1e0e633820
16785179f9d72da885eb5a2c922772646532e232
describe
'5152' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAENT' 'sip-files00037.pro'
6ab6def7447025015f68a86b7355b0ed
252963339e98fe04e4a048832ee65b198cc17fa3
describe
'15486' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAENU' 'sip-files00039.pro'
a954b40c6c9c9c4e3735f5096d6fbd2d
08b3803b3e0fdb0973d25e4bc75b40b42a32b6eb
describe
'20380' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAENV' 'sip-files00040.pro'
29a6a7f9dd787872d3a7500643c96fc4
c86b78ad333c8560855024fab094b2972c314f01
describe
'37284' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAENW' 'sip-files00041.pro'
8785031ef708b5dd19a9b131671a56fa
9fed606527610a5364e916425c9b59a2145189a2
'2011-12-04T05:49:19-05:00'
describe
'15394' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAENX' 'sip-files00042.pro'
6d5f192981ee354af1ae36216f5205de
513b9fd7527a8588daa772765d5bf33650952a31
'2011-12-04T05:53:56-05:00'
describe
'39293' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAENY' 'sip-files00043.pro'
7ed52ddfac6d91ec4cf4d3b1bfb267a5
45af772874b313ce12f147d0e3a5d657310b7cbf
'2011-12-04T05:52:16-05:00'
describe
'36399' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAENZ' 'sip-files00044.pro'
29e9a043214fb7112c12e901e73df96e
c34b447ae142c0a84be1368ab10b9131b285e6e9
describe
'16177' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEOA' 'sip-files00045.pro'
1590b7c6654bb5f0ba96ba0ea5ba9fac
bcb1044860729dd2e5aed7b79bcb1d99b9f9a3bb
'2011-12-04T05:50:05-05:00'
describe
'17171' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEOB' 'sip-files00046.pro'
063e8db5c326f47c67c836daaea89ac3
62464cfd69c423c8231a98d08643636a03637df3
describe
'2819' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEOC' 'sip-files00047.pro'
6c2cedad97463af7fc4b70579d5a27f0
b2be9054d239de40e03b2762f3ed9863c206061d
describe
'36100' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEOD' 'sip-files00049.pro'
1311bd2f228c0cbc9e7cb38a243b8f03
187148af62037a32ec773e082c9bb8d752ca032f
describe
'20985' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEOE' 'sip-files00050.pro'
81b4df50b712054961455e59651dc9ff
273beacd08b0b133a7a1e112f081912712195397
'2011-12-04T05:51:12-05:00'
describe
'15177' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEOF' 'sip-files00051.pro'
9a96a8480c4ce47ec6f3562feb695956
92ffe654a1c037daa612e48e8b7c63da1e8d50ab
describe
'18931' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEOG' 'sip-files00052.pro'
e95e7839ce65bd982a96539dab695a3a
784a5033e0bbda18fea64a943ff90cb365f4ea45
describe
'42690' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEOH' 'sip-files00053.pro'
2e5845d89cbe7d0412532a11a1d2f291
e29c397a36e353baed6be8794c90a3f89895aeb0
'2011-12-04T05:51:19-05:00'
describe
'41872' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEOI' 'sip-files00054.pro'
35b59c34ec11b9534b11241147ff32fe
11c72e83ce60c410ca2f0faaa260db9eee7351f9
describe
'24752' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEOJ' 'sip-files00055.pro'
289ea4b98a0c79c2bb54ba80d5473e2e
078f68c4f6b26c0eb8ca5282468facafd0ad56c1
describe
'39802' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEOK' 'sip-files00056.pro'
841849c3050c61e9815d5f8ad40a2d7b
97e751cc5df684e0d3eb42b9424d73c92d1960b1
'2011-12-04T05:52:43-05:00'
describe
'2455' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEOL' 'sip-files00057.pro'
5edfe1de71c8f6b2ceb89dc632f87d49
9f24c20e2d95e89f9fda7a28aad187e382ffeef8
describe
'34918' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEOM' 'sip-files00059.pro'
e0eecde45c11b163d59497b49831e83b
e1c1c9a2d33397986299b3d42cee7968b002789e
'2011-12-04T05:54:28-05:00'
describe
'40782' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEON' 'sip-files00060.pro'
fd293f4c6ef1af448fcc42ba818768e1
fa88b4717ff30567c468482c23109c8c8b3234ba
describe
'18486' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEOO' 'sip-files00061.pro'
1fd9354962a5308195c021812351d4be
727422327d3bd639c3de79b5598fbfacec8b6cc9
'2011-12-04T05:53:41-05:00'
describe
'41358' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEOP' 'sip-files00062.pro'
a77d3aa0462ed6d81e1cf29b2d275604
a94814dfa9296f982245a8636d276d446acd7b99
describe
'26751' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEOQ' 'sip-files00063.pro'
1723c3195280d3a85356ff6730266373
63eeaaf3f852d615564bf0e7f6a91857a4c32941
'2011-12-04T05:50:39-05:00'
describe
'41755' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEOR' 'sip-files00064.pro'
fdfb3178a0599a8d758a9e92cdc69f0a
5b66fe0778a64b4c6fb822929c98967b4f26ea27
describe
'11221' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEOS' 'sip-files00065.pro'
555c42fcf60efe13d884ee3722d2f8d5
2324e8b1459ae275bb22da2740dcdac0361a9492
describe
'9885' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEOT' 'sip-files00066.pro'
6e4d0ffe41908cb48361fa60cb4d7b80
e67508ae88404bdd2bd4cea04ade586eb4845b59
'2011-12-04T05:52:45-05:00'
describe
'34328' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEOU' 'sip-files00067.pro'
4609e15c68fd37b4a68ddb1e047df676
32b936996ea114faae8b39fe8bf5c65c01172013
describe
'32326' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEOV' 'sip-files00068.pro'
7e06a6c8689a154b398d98dc504e29da
8397cf0a85e36b939e3b0b4a2327101a02d55382
describe
'1774' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEOW' 'sip-files00069.pro'
9e9430b11d33d7f1372daddffe41868d
a5fe0144b64e3b896859ff605e2454de3f596164
'2011-12-04T05:52:48-05:00'
describe
'38365' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEOX' 'sip-files00071.pro'
7aa2ee99958af57292b567203bab2a13
80b3c9d91f789da37cdd8e206682797b532cd7c4
describe
'36971' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEOY' 'sip-files00072.pro'
703cbe75a56d4cbc9fb9098f16e981d1
d4c41983fe9f7669d059518c42a33b731adf5792
'2011-12-04T05:52:57-05:00'
describe
'25477' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEOZ' 'sip-files00073.pro'
93d59ddeb9710894ad6bed856cd8cff3
f29b5d2d7d3cf526cc8bbabd9a9da4f23cb795bd
'2011-12-04T05:51:38-05:00'
describe
'37313' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEPA' 'sip-files00074.pro'
aa3968c70be7dc89b89b54b91be6a098
48a969029a52428878d0524df37d9e8c1c029b44
'2011-12-04T05:50:29-05:00'
describe
'20940' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEPB' 'sip-files00075.pro'
42627f0439f2c3053b6587f9fdac528c
24fa2668d505500bf1e4d4d23ce149e164b0da31
describe
'24488' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEPC' 'sip-files00076.pro'
a16b4b93752f038ec63ab16019e0cb9a
b855728b9ccadd8e51583a9f978f4627b3507628
describe
'40813' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEPD' 'sip-files00077.pro'
794ac366e4d84db1de42bd7f0a255e92
f014775f2da770975298910407d5da9f24eda1db
describe
'21705' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEPE' 'sip-files00078.pro'
781dec05c337b8c863268027fb84871b
4c69704e15363fa9be8f74f7211f32f4e171e6b1
describe
'24161' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEPF' 'sip-files00079.pro'
717158dbfdfdc053d85077f55f0ebf15
d7caffbd00cb6a9b51c4ff45d545b5b527c21ab7
describe
'37487' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEPG' 'sip-files00080.pro'
d86072a2420162466fc381407bf6f86e
f1b13c570f03b5ec8c165d1dc2f5f94943e66337
describe
'2327' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEPH' 'sip-files00081.pro'
374fc22319caf62e46c53468dbd3745d
65433c9881b728df07dd8aeb3bf85b52c329e8a8
describe
'18027' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEPI' 'sip-files00083.pro'
b4f2db969c17db2c2738e70f573f51c5
e3b496fc00593e24f0002b25855fb2d380bd6a30
'2011-12-04T05:52:54-05:00'
describe
'37465' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEPJ' 'sip-files00084.pro'
b958766ba6035686b9a21cd9dfdfd320
9e3e671f6882deec519c1f767b4f47a9f2e14bc3
describe
'12010' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEPK' 'sip-files00085.pro'
f25f1a40988a2231e36ae126aea3b722
a3b101dba5bd7e0720cab8f048bfea6744a0a5b2
'2011-12-04T05:53:48-05:00'
describe
'39256' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEPL' 'sip-files00086.pro'
afe3afa3a32e811e21d2feffd5dd05a4
ca1573e6d30d0363c7ac3cc1f9b8994b5accb227
describe
'29853' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEPM' 'sip-files00087.pro'
2b675a928e58a781c5a46e323f65eb16
b263a53e93229f652d75c090972149eee4967eda
'2011-12-04T05:53:53-05:00'
describe
'22555' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEPN' 'sip-files00088.pro'
27327024c6a4448379ce4f543daba384
f086bff1c53e551b89162e63382f631eb73d6ef4
'2011-12-04T05:53:17-05:00'
describe
'42295' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEPO' 'sip-files00089.pro'
6c5fd0c84f8071c9d10ba94ca109b206
476fae1aa2728e574643177c0ddc68d724441907
'2011-12-04T05:51:18-05:00'
describe
'37591' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEPP' 'sip-files00090.pro'
307d41aa8cabe42f830d12d775dee2dd
458738a36ca4a61ba8d3b30e3ed09c6f52ce8950
'2011-12-04T05:50:07-05:00'
describe
'4046' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEPQ' 'sip-files00091.pro'
eda6d401721b3a1dd82c3125a7a318fa
dad5113889a6bc9dc60bfd44e64c067c6234fb07
describe
'17136' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEPR' 'sip-files00093.pro'
fa4bc17200865e0b17044d5d01e702ee
68b0e4fce669d0bccd603bff312353835d87731a
describe
'36429' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEPS' 'sip-files00094.pro'
31e5ba932055a9edca9e4fee1a427da7
a7b466e0b6606eec42c2368ddc901d45790032a3
'2011-12-04T05:53:47-05:00'
describe
'14641' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEPT' 'sip-files00095.pro'
438454ad5b48e7a874ec67172de83ec4
8a22e90ee368e7e1064529ebde573b66ae1019f8
describe
'12035' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEPU' 'sip-files00096.pro'
0c60b35070039c698d94e8db64932e35
6396dfc5b2dbb9ede012d7bb7f3d22c805b6c92e
describe
'10822' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEPV' 'sip-files00097.pro'
3a4928a97478a9e1f5c60a9f2e5e20cb
dd961c6dc1b03c3bbfc66860a1d28f985bdcfcc2
'2011-12-04T05:52:04-05:00'
describe
'35454' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEPW' 'sip-files00098.pro'
ab806d2f344ba576705f09f1b480fa16
8deb8df7dd6ebd62904b7f5254a6d099916f3952
'2011-12-04T05:52:26-05:00'
describe
'24412' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEPX' 'sip-files00099.pro'
10c14505ca445328d1f908b3f474cdf5
e0fe7a1a654421d05ac9ff2a7a46d32b840977bb
'2011-12-04T05:52:14-05:00'
describe
'38595' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEPY' 'sip-files00100.pro'
1b147392e5868331683caaab4d239a73
5cb04722b90c026f2ff2a9df1fb3af0eec959f14
'2011-12-04T05:49:56-05:00'
describe
'2763' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEPZ' 'sip-files00101.pro'
7c009a5d029e20324c77e16600a27820
8fa3e4d43dcb291e754b516468db37105f8cdab9
describe
'35337' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEQA' 'sip-files00103.pro'
4b421b4d00b5c3cc9154816f78adba43
c845e5a4ba12dac9749a11c4efabc17e0773754d
describe
'32874' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEQB' 'sip-files00104.pro'
af8aa5e044dd0d93bd276420ff001554
cea13d0fbd5dc4c86115ed83c3c8a3ff714bd8d4
describe
'14315' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEQC' 'sip-files00105.pro'
ac8674d4975d45134b3b8995e20b4576
ee7ce3dc975697edbeca55fd9bc599343e65638d
'2011-12-04T05:51:29-05:00'
describe
'32741' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEQD' 'sip-files00106.pro'
6068d8ba4e96033fd7819bc4e4bd1465
613cd485639c336804b7e4306920732818251485
describe
'35938' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEQE' 'sip-files00107.pro'
e5c04b6994838466cb4384697e2eca24
1ba677931a3da6612ff34a0304a81bdb336cbedb
'2011-12-04T05:49:44-05:00'
describe
'34733' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEQF' 'sip-files00108.pro'
99df1e6d95fc4894e8ac30cbde084c57
e36876e584beda5e88a01883082556d4e30bb43c
'2011-12-04T05:51:41-05:00'
describe
'19310' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEQG' 'sip-files00109.pro'
eb3f83f5e7102bfdcc1e38d2f3ff364a
59c8059aafe7fc80f57dd29dac73571a4e68a84a
describe
'30657' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEQH' 'sip-files00110.pro'
7bf1ec23396d0512cb6785a091d7e829
f7bd14d58e5ace6439635d5f1f2993d128ad7a4a
describe
'17932' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEQI' 'sip-files00111.pro'
a05ff99503ed1df1f7a0daeb38848f20
70c437ebb49baf81cf5388cf3169393d923ef747
describe
'40413' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEQJ' 'sip-files00112.pro'
6efd10a5daa6befed656018e3987c9a9
f25091989492804c78d9e14cd6065c05207f3bdb
describe
'18265' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEQK' 'sip-files00113.pro'
bc533f20566295919c9754366dc09141
d2ddd0edb646b4145355126d49f9a9bd2cd323ae
describe
'35532' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEQL' 'sip-files00114.pro'
0624f69f2f1c615981e463e48c2097eb
1b70c71b8bc817f8ebb99c25694105c5ea009258
describe
'3894' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEQM' 'sip-files00115.pro'
280e1ac7e3e4c7b1e3b53839735ec035
7898281ee0cc329241ff2076bbb125308a176d03
describe
'35238' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEQN' 'sip-files00116.pro'
7a77a9d16b8f97168ccf7892ce69d091
5bdfe750a3fb5f54f95de858b5265ae853df9e6b
describe
'38530' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEQO' 'sip-files00117.pro'
e429f107458cde4676376b8575229d64
2dc4df428f753695a74374707ed9763c676e3333
describe
'19832' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEQP' 'sip-files00118.pro'
02ab10ea4f277d881382638c1e2e730b
3c54614aa238444c2eeba5710c3d9a007d94027f
describe
'39927' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEQQ' 'sip-files00119.pro'
e8e2c9ede97cce2cfeab67a98da900ae
38a94df9be813b5f9793dc9315141c139aa0444a
'2011-12-04T05:52:06-05:00'
describe
'35081' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEQR' 'sip-files00120.pro'
6845503bd824e2692c9f6f120bc20692
d5beb050a1aee762385c5ca91143e3e69f4874b2
describe
'1894' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEQS' 'sip-files00121.pro'
1499396965d9d1962ed99b982a24c722
7d85755dac69fe05767a43a535dcab60a8a63338
'2011-12-04T05:50:41-05:00'
describe
'15636' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEQT' 'sip-files00123.pro'
2b140c4d79813e306172ec627e0425d0
ab3363be44f994beba8551e88bc40e8c4dd0c850
describe
'41098' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEQU' 'sip-files00124.pro'
78be3e7360b40293245f461283c4bde2
4dc6e6d71258257e25c17ccd22a4dc7eecc78536
'2011-12-04T05:50:23-05:00'
describe
'32351' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEQV' 'sip-files00125.pro'
3cddbe5420296e122c8d067b32755650
70286c12a6058bdbff5b4c021c6ebf203f374e89
'2011-12-04T05:53:05-05:00'
describe
'21967' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEQW' 'sip-files00126.pro'
bba00c4290cd3978dea2ce16be6ec95b
1c1fff8644a1310d72199e70fc5b20b7c5befafc
describe
'39797' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEQX' 'sip-files00127.pro'
1802e45bb02d892bbb4fa9d5161ca7d3
e3a216b1818c4af7af39eddb64da91c573c43b38
'2011-12-04T05:50:32-05:00'
describe
'36769' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEQY' 'sip-files00128.pro'
a7953da07aa18191e8e29e9e3ba3ff39
5c0b30579310bec013a351594ae440a134cf89b5
'2011-12-04T05:51:22-05:00'
describe
'5534' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEQZ' 'sip-files00129.pro'
5aee3dff4fce8951aede01139d0ceb30
9bd522314921bdb9f815cab3df8906d421f3fe21
'2011-12-04T05:52:40-05:00'
describe
'33219' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAERA' 'sip-files00130.pro'
91a60834b50ef05b5256eff0c3e99d59
0d7ec0118d44baa173ade8eab8260703d5a62dde
describe
'37750' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAERB' 'sip-files00131.pro'
14e43ec6bc47bf8e8e421d7da997e644
d70fa601fd1ee00496fdf81216945a6994eb368e
'2011-12-04T05:54:59-05:00'
describe
'20246' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAERC' 'sip-files00132.pro'
de1a7cbab1ee613af4ba22915ad5dddd
7a4178eb7d0bed883b82a5299ab2f0e396a639f4
describe
'37716' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAERD' 'sip-files00133.pro'
af663d6e1e9e3ea143d9368833f11803
721b0193eccd4d0decded6003ea48b1bc45d964c
describe
'34835' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAERE' 'sip-files00134.pro'
dba129f033012eb5028e0dbc43da4a0c
7ac4ba5d74b89f4298dc39a506669a37e9107c03
describe
'2239' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAERF' 'sip-files00135.pro'
ef1652e4e7b63151f0438311969b6c5d
2373fd4ac6b2b6e241a2085d66eae20247eae140
'2011-12-04T05:54:56-05:00'
describe
'32470' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAERG' 'sip-files00137.pro'
bb0331fa5c09079c9052f59299d12187
cbd895078f307ff6db9b2f539d9c9932b78fce90
describe
'36810' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAERH' 'sip-files00138.pro'
7133accbf10309cf410699c99b12b346
8eef7a03158fa310d113d942c25f5a95a8564708
describe
'6583' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAERI' 'sip-files00139.pro'
23b95cb4f90fdb025d4f3f6e50652067
4e98faaffb1fdab9717f0efd43a516eee7e5483b
describe
'18883' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAERJ' 'sip-files00140.pro'
0a29ea225cefc5d66e2a9d48e713816d
cc5bbf2e2f49816ee352f56e72d754625fba2035
describe
'30575' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAERK' 'sip-files00141.pro'
f36bb096d79ae0cc755bf4fa68395035
f37b2a4e2c626d7c3ecef174414f3b956de2d3ee
describe
'36735' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAERL' 'sip-files00142.pro'
1806c9019e6efd01375a4d40f47e88ba
0b7f7b0c7e95d3f6eb570f7d23fa516949e841c4
'2011-12-04T05:54:49-05:00'
describe
'21348' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAERM' 'sip-files00143.pro'
6ab06dfba5b4950fbf19f3c8d8012c34
85397cb569711588d2a49e6133bb0393a481c83d
'2011-12-04T05:52:35-05:00'
describe
'35947' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAERN' 'sip-files00144.pro'
257e93358ff3baaa31e6369097c182f6
995fc8cddd767ef57c771b649203095e4af054a8
'2011-12-04T05:52:19-05:00'
describe
'35015' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAERO' 'sip-files00145.pro'
b49ae1c252c7e746ffaf1e5151df81d6
5a3c3264e3e77a27059d78aaaf81092f3501c49e
describe
'42792' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAERP' 'sip-files00146.pro'
0dd26a0731695f30a69b226d8c414e88
eaabc845c8eb7da11652fa67dfcf8241f91af468
describe
'24620' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAERQ' 'sip-files00147.pro'
01c6f454a3f2b4dd3c753190fb778afb
48216e6cf11a92246deacd49a6c60e551f3eb5e6
describe
'37414' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAERR' 'sip-files00148.pro'
12e799365cab81ee5c4e5a7bbc3e5bf5
02a0171285607f12df72111ea14211186be29cee
describe
'3970' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAERS' 'sip-files00149.pro'
37d5dc76bba2004a5d06589358d75a19
3a4766f14a08652a1bf68bdbd32dc316746355b6
describe
'22532' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAERT' 'sip-files00150.pro'
f218cb8331b9a434f8c1d3a819afb2be
09d9936320782af42f3dda4edc8fe19c63552772
describe
'19979' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAERU' 'sip-files00151.pro'
07552d71f586d1fb2d6e509596cc5920
a68bf622dab481c99822aa8736eeccfe668eca44
describe
'37380' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAERV' 'sip-files00152.pro'
577d71b4f41d00f3153af80596c123a0
ecdfa89cd465ac4d3424769f59660016119917fc
describe
'25368' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAERW' 'sip-files00153.pro'
b09bd3d7a66252692baf35d71fde9683
18e3b3c7e050a84495d0cb815dc59e9fe78eaaa2
describe
'33116' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAERX' 'sip-files00154.pro'
0608b6fcad1b39716b32ed6bffe5f28e
a1ccc774720adebba6d7096185cce0f9cabc328b
'2011-12-04T05:53:15-05:00'
describe
'5973' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAERY' 'sip-files00155.pro'
0284ab222944daed70b2ac65acf5cf04
225ee22e474d15cf642cc2fdef15040be9b9b0ef
describe
'38369' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAERZ' 'sip-files00156.pro'
9ae51a8805bbe60642d674d6c16336f5
7c9198fa1b3871caeedfd00e20cd9c40830b2e39
'2011-12-04T05:52:17-05:00'
describe
'4134' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAESA' 'sip-files00157.pro'
d7d93e9f29808e91d9e88b4f7e8faa79
0868f4d29e3ad0ecdf83871d545ab07feb1979d7
describe
'35310' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAESB' 'sip-files00158.pro'
dab4a64923ba9a67aa0d59b651f034fc
016149e95e4249872a9583f98fe95560e51b0090
describe
'34591' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAESC' 'sip-files00159.pro'
20197b3788fded17a69a078432c51b53
17d1c421f7b9e129d8e6389f2f8aea931021ab4e
'2011-12-04T05:53:54-05:00'
describe
'3604' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAESD' 'sip-files00160.pro'
c549e881a852ef6c8e7297793a805e0e
5d6e37df0ec8bf9e23110b0efa3b21d3d4be12ab
describe
'38343' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAESE' 'sip-files00161.pro'
c2777b34bc4babd145f0af20fcc6cbfc
ce20a2bcefd1fe58ce1d0e734f46916cf5cdad9c
describe
'11678' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAESF' 'sip-files00162.pro'
55f813af02002829737df874ec6bf495
002d6fef94a623839efb02f525701f58e3859d59
describe
'17715' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAESG' 'sip-files00163.pro'
3296aeb2530183d4c7e5bcddd75cf98a
1135d47202d06851f48b266ca569e49f75494b20
'2011-12-04T05:52:29-05:00'
describe
'20901' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAESH' 'sip-files00164.pro'
ee6d8a883ba08f36336217f83478c6fa
672428f1314dbf44bf19d32738ac7c94c3a14321
describe
'2564' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAESI' 'sip-files00165.pro'
212b64a4db0eb8636c7da9999acdfbe3
eaa91e8d5246e5b8d337f53cedd3dda525b71420
describe
'36586' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAESJ' 'sip-files00167.pro'
343309547132c88d95a5034b9f0fe824
9caf5daebe8ebc9d14ef73b0373f56c4a3757129
'2011-12-04T05:53:24-05:00'
describe
'35149' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAESK' 'sip-files00168.pro'
06304d1edcc6025d2ed2c489cb27b8d1
c1efed3befa3a447a72a8a5aaa0027a68a29f609
describe
'33171' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAESL' 'sip-files00169.pro'
61b32edb7d5a573395ef48f824c275e2
a327f851eeeea14c566624d17a32eaa4993a2be8
describe
'13772' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAESM' 'sip-files00170.pro'
1553d77868e5212adacbbb111d1b87e5
5c6b5b1f5c5be81c431a57a04074ae9c94942e21
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAESN' 'sip-files00171.pro'
c31816155eae3cd0248041e29297f924
b322c121967e6c1f28ce716f4603a1eda3e75e58
'2011-12-04T05:54:48-05:00'
describe
'35875' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAESO' 'sip-files00172.pro'
88eccdca681e4ed21696be9e3da11591
9561d3f98fed1ceae74137b377c2f925981a009a
describe
'22477' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAESP' 'sip-files00173.pro'
9b6f9f16c6d7d57d612a0e45214f5e9a
948aecf59d53b15ca0265e67cfcf657bfb81e0b6
describe
'43413' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAESQ' 'sip-files00174.pro'
3d29913675529d8dd0914ed5cb0a72f5
e39a0c132baf67e0260bec6f8b4fce2167bad18d
describe
'11665' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAESR' 'sip-files00175.pro'
cc9141626fe2f5a7831387b1c2346032
777bf42164c0332b029147383a5bfe27074e575d
describe
'17656' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAESS' 'sip-files00176.pro'
0e45037e9ae1068e2426f899ce5670ad
0b6d591ffe6d8cd8ffe0091de7f34aa68f046087
'2011-12-04T05:49:45-05:00'
describe
'211' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEST' 'sip-files00181.pro'
b551d04be2e9268c245e24a1d0185b9f
495bd9ef823ac4ec660a1dfd63c0bfe2f98260b2
describe
'869962' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAESU' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
24c648eb3d3f5ba59ca545e9b34923b3
e20d2ea7afad1ea327c44fbcd6868a6ad24363a9
'2011-12-04T05:54:33-05:00'
describe
'836440' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAESV' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
3c2f871b51faa81e29dbf0e9cbc97c35
277e3fc1795f0320bc8e58b8a500a72a3387da6c
describe
'824840' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAESW' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
43011f1c8c49b00891a0c3eaaf5d1fbe
606f34b46d032d38264399c8e22508672dc537b6
'2011-12-04T05:51:06-05:00'
describe
'694325' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAESX' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
dcfc1f8f94f9d6edbd744c735912f11c
955b4615bfafb432683e46c3de659db8038c431f
describe
'694108' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAESY' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
3e0ef6c563971d64c833d277b726dcf8
0b2356736c96c8ad4dbaeedbcc61a223d841c438
describe
'718007' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAESZ' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
1683ccaea8ae307b3a26b3b2efd32fe9
916166bf489881d52dfdfbd9c1125a6d467a3d34
describe
'694319' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAETA' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
ee9a14efdd30108abb5797284cd09da5
97d09dda842de0882b4ef1850b0f88e975296f08
'2011-12-04T05:52:51-05:00'
describe
'693934' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAETB' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
7303057c1ce7097ba9ff1c08fd015ab3
96d3fc7c9f99d5d9bcec5ee9203333a611654079
describe
'694310' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAETC' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
374749da44bd03dbeeda0137d1a8abec
345a8928d16e353868d1209e594906483ccb1efb
'2011-12-04T05:53:49-05:00'
describe
'693982' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAETD' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
a3f2ee64c14be82d60586912df5c6905
a1a597615df918720707dd3dae5cf3dd2392b711
describe
'694330' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAETE' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
055f73a49d8e249c533a55f9c5ba095a
ba3102b002642baf31fd4abd5cdafcb8c34ad15d
describe
'694253' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAETF' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
6cb0a6597f2c1778072c1f66ab531f68
a9f1b848f860c207c258d83de78aa725b1d9a174
'2011-12-04T05:51:44-05:00'
describe
'694337' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAETG' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
83b379149e5481dbd801b6802673d6b1
b92e230af2a95c365323bcf56eb380fb82296807
describe
'693979' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAETH' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
f32ff4fee66ac121b64b4cc66d90df5d
b7dc0a248e999047e7467d8e606baf19166b6a3f
'2011-12-04T05:55:01-05:00'
describe
'694331' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAETI' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
33e50ad02b1dd0499d775bb7765ae217
eee5037cbfc6a86a755c0ab5ba133cd1d2c7de5d
'2011-12-04T05:53:51-05:00'
describe
'693817' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAETJ' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
e48157a0fc4ae7fe2bb9ad40fe061494
129f22764fe5c3e0d244117815b691ac50bb78db
describe
'694332' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAETK' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
acc1f0f5c6a8ee1753bfd61fe9af48da
8dc160cd9c13a1c5f73975612437442c7c753642
'2011-12-04T05:53:02-05:00'
describe
'694322' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAETL' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
61802028f937cfb3421956406e0bcdce
b1d5a726e5de70279cbe60ed27ac80d343557064
'2011-12-04T05:54:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAETM' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
b190042da7332592b804ebd53213a195
a9fface6c4e39f994d77f54da607259610752854
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAETN' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
7029fa9e3b5f8ca1e39a6dede6f6a615
babe0e014ff5e376cfc0dec8a960a6eee14a7a4e
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAETO' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
04f13f7d09ba268b6fcda120d6442f11
348dcccb0d00e6e869f16dd4d57f383685b1f651
'2011-12-04T05:54:08-05:00'
describe
'694194' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAETP' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
35941f819b08ec418150043dd44962e6
755afb7867270dac4e68ad0f0f0695a563900bf9
describe
'694153' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAETQ' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
5924de4ee969fc10fcaa4c7c5008bfdc
bb3ffa1b4b1e2e9a6cd4c19fbd1ce95537b175ce
'2011-12-04T05:55:07-05:00'
describe
'694258' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAETR' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
16cd3b22f4902e970bbd4803336abeab
fdff22045c6c5b6d497b80dab3f5f2b20b186ac0
'2011-12-04T05:51:36-05:00'
describe
'694329' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAETS' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
5cd14c9fa8658c28e14a395e17d97205
1f4ac3efba9de9411d40219dadb81137dc6e3c24
describe
'693894' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAETT' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
6bfb1f6e847f4f038c3737bc32ebcf2a
4c042005a5eac938ef9bb080abc593cf8cfd2de5
'2011-12-04T05:54:04-05:00'
describe
'718205' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAETU' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
28e4435522176b640fa3e1d2669bd989
92d13c904b1893f7c58bb3774d7728ddd34dbb3f
'2011-12-04T05:51:13-05:00'
describe
'693732' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAETV' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
ce22b38b91569acc1a4695fb7a09d9c5
47c853d3003d8bd436b4a74c3e4cae490cb72217
describe
'693996' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAETW' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
2f37bf6a1a64952e7a3c4ddd682e46ab
a2ffce2be10d421cf52d31aa2d59bd44b496470e
describe
'693985' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAETX' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
c45e763fd6491f3a0b22b79d119471cd
492711c4c6c9096e5090a619f3c915aad4a2631b
'2011-12-04T05:49:42-05:00'
describe
'694311' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAETY' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
456abc26996ce28731d1de774e98982d
fb38e9e74ce342b27217950e3d7554d34dbc4324
'2011-12-04T05:54:23-05:00'
describe
'694080' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAETZ' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
ec3066228df15ec67ef7de6a5aac484d
d1ea27f4e00e338b7f89165732a3825266709dd8
describe
'694308' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEUA' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
3d50edf6f3b6c6b9ff1266374a68bb36
31ac806741653dfd34bf77ef20449c612eeef532
describe
'718173' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEUB' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
a1f45763e4ed31236300162625900f9f
1be4b4c12ede69c0ec754d132cba0cc06c096941
describe
'694217' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEUC' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
a872424b1b6092fb4fdaaedd78dc3ac4
1b8473c68d09370482a955d48f76dac5a5e66c09
describe
'694323' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEUD' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
3f895900cfc9ed83d6dbccc5fa08967f
f5a93e6fdc652dc64dd02a3eecab445724f40792
'2011-12-04T05:49:40-05:00'
describe
'694342' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEUE' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
2e7e703083f2ccb49c4ca11d5309b81e
a28465759fea93450ae3c8105732426cfeaa2f79
describe
'694295' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEUF' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
0e70f41fc3172959cd4eaf103b2afd35
f471542e1fcf26fffa95ff2809d7477694712358
describe
'694320' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEUG' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
ab619f589c5a3cc8f5bfc557a4dbd35d
6b7a1cedf1abd61efada2828e8fd87a282027db2
'2011-12-04T05:49:50-05:00'
describe
'693954' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEUH' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
74ceee823a63a5b7843ad03bb207033e
6ccb10fdd9dd3a33243ac1d338c22ae1a10160b8
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEUI' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
33f94ff7e622b9084950507e6fdb610a
d0f75bcaffbd3fad26b5ffff7663fcca7e498d39
'2011-12-04T05:54:58-05:00'
describe
'693534' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEUJ' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
30359c68d7f54db1083f4d78607d66ce
72d2e41ec883741b0e195de69c023f28fadcd6c0
'2011-12-04T05:50:55-05:00'
describe
'718224' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEUK' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
2467577a9692d3c349d643c12530f374
3bb237e661e5ab6e7ba75510dea44c8abca327cf
describe
'693740' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEUL' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
1aceaae882034cca022521ca62d53902
2d7d3d5f4aaaead985d4553a3c9a973c16a36d59
describe
'693966' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEUM' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
f52ad469a610c67d4384dbd11599bec8
a9c7f5ce3c38035b6c28d7b31639e9d6fb8332a4
describe
'693912' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEUN' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
06c4e65a95594591fdcfaddbf2973f10
aeca9b411a477ccc427a772f4cfdff32471f466b
describe
'693987' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEUO' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
84162ef6093e620b347a3500569701e4
61fbc09d5727977da9cdea62dc692ec15b1c2a93
'2011-12-04T05:52:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEUP' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
4b667025d503c9e5ada23d111690876a
1605c470cee2213c2d27b010a5b1d0a67a834599
describe
'693973' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEUQ' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
62ed9bdc582283240470de168984c500
654eee1e9eb3c99eb9edacfb06f00f7397301cce
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEUR' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
ff4e94a0b4376bf75309747447c28fd8
2fa40723042e63a9894056be74569b42ff9d4984
describe
'694301' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEUS' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
6b959c617e9a5da1a8c4f65cd67ae1f5
6b82316110416976ae46bedfd12e49fdd602c784
describe
'707459' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEUT' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
2330047401dce87a75617efd47b913c0
8a22dc91c70d0413e9feabb264dd8d4e7c98ff6d
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEUU' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
3908b5bf46506cf28bd6c80a26b5dc15
891eaa86951946ba058f5d42eb6aaca8bd6770e0
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEUV' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
1d5a0f0eb5bb0e36ef1964523be59db9
4a3131d4032ec65e5375228d769a8e784556843c
describe
'694326' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEUW' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
13f43759ff5c49f7654352f0854b4649
b6ae092037a59c5da879a2961881c84b60352c5e
describe
'694247' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEUX' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
0cba93d25117f129eb4c874607f195c7
87261e67e157e23a8f4856747ca5b77a3116f657
'2011-12-04T05:49:27-05:00'
describe
'694335' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEUY' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
c633785dfd37233f8f756632469c9f17
a16d1df5ee6e84993f51c19ac543ce5080c80b1a
describe
'693972' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEUZ' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
5e963b8091fec582ec0575bf06564ca4
ca166bc5aff93eb584d2718c1ed4d09c9c12a95b
describe
'694244' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEVA' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
29b55b1030970ba65864929a0ae5d75c
ee04be5d796863fe47170e02a0de54d11979532c
'2011-12-04T05:50:50-05:00'
describe
'693988' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEVB' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
9c35847bce7e9a892a033a863dfb1b77
6ec6c02641a7dd5df2e82c209f57824821677dbc
'2011-12-04T05:52:25-05:00'
describe
'694257' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEVC' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
5299b0443fd925bd743c4e3d9873bd00
079d11c09a72a7467067c986507fbb8a9cfb479e
'2011-12-04T05:53:14-05:00'
describe
'694275' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEVD' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
fe21da71651464ee4b3f3042cf04923e
5829adceb48aa566ec039ce09e93bbe88ae8c62d
'2011-12-04T05:54:50-05:00'
describe
'718212' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEVE' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
5b2a8d04b5d0789eb60dd9d327ba5ead
96c3848282a3b86c6a838eb35b9ce7add6121d45
'2011-12-04T05:51:15-05:00'
describe
'637370' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEVF' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
6c44606b6f93e20e9ba328752f6590c2
eab2324fbd923089042a4ba585876116b11bd2f6
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEVG' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
9cabeb90b217b59900c8a7dd6ef1559f
7e3a626621d2ca38a44200be5b61f03b1bd5c32e
describe
'694223' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEVH' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
5710d7342ec4c092c210f79df860ad01
8c6e0783ea5f1a4857d4c3e3ed339bec5167b69b
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEVI' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
71e0b24492464a4d1ad94a0beb3b7787
cbec36a40c39cc5d3c1cfbc7568c11ada86ce19e
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEVJ' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
46f81d81473d6d6936308bf5bd881f37
f488f4a38e1ed81e5b474af5c01926cd40d8af4f
describe
'694066' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEVK' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
a71983ae65be20f8c1f1ab5763106c22
2d1fc17d23f386b29ef4ce72bae6b21728558ee9
describe
'693872' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEVL' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
c1ec3322d36add513cd39455be1ce003
26a8e1b61577249c109ef179f4a85f17905c7a97
describe
'693627' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEVM' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
2cae32ac430954f221dc004f88f9d04a
e0866cdddde932b6145ea61b6b7863aa554299bc
describe
'693946' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEVN' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
3df26ab33372b5eb94dcf549e85aba61
17dde0f55577b67f73ddb74c856d63b9dce1081e
describe
'694306' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEVO' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
608b9b3b709567751d936d625cc0c18e
e873ccbb18ebd5bc70283a3f0b978049aa785cbb
'2011-12-04T05:52:55-05:00'
describe
'718194' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEVP' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
d87aff1c24f9473ad7a867ec76f27c05
7c4d69e52797938f17bcaf7a40d709974516367c
'2011-12-04T05:49:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEVQ' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
5b46560a7bef46cb31c3dfcd599c27d9
c06e2e95787c65253dcde684cff8b6dc0293dd20
describe
'693736' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEVR' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
47892252fe6394fcda267af13394cd50
aebb2044f28d6db1ec7517fd314108cb3953205f
'2011-12-04T05:52:36-05:00'
describe
'694075' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEVS' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
f2dc98d3413456bba48c5f73ab78bf8e
8612e2abb8284fc295b871bb53a1f43bc6de2001
'2011-12-04T05:54:24-05:00'
describe
'693744' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEVT' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
b711c41a5bebb4dd2ddf26d56a562e12
10377f5ba484a38fd389491d1b2bb4196c328cda
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEVU' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
3ff2d10e2b4c3db54463e4c82e4ba87d
bffb7e4a7c664c0ba511df4d1b59b3c4c7602c91
describe
'693876' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEVV' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
6ed6cc3755c6ffb31e412809ca11babf
745aa76406eeacf56d6b133fd32a2028ef932d71
describe
'694086' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEVW' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
3918952f593599e639f8da0da81e2629
c4a1ff0b152a4c88d219754ee0e3580a0be7ad91
describe
'694307' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEVX' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
058eeeec001357832284d12e82b5207e
174c3d66363b1cc29999ef4ffe591e36d1b623a4
describe
'718115' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEVY' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
1d1f06c6efabc7dfdd9569e7490b245e
7caaf0f16db50e4bef3cfac1ad8acda460c63c21
describe
'694282' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEVZ' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
0c91393a333468be54ddf86ee83c77a6
365f2f0dfdcf96b8fb660c155740c4ba937cd77c
'2011-12-04T05:54:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEWA' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
edf75b14d69b6d134dab7702e7600257
fadfd9d934ee4fccc729b4ca59e8a9a2638a3159
describe
'694296' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEWB' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
96c03771398364bcc4681c1fc736ac25
3cf49071e6faacc52d6dcceee7a392d48b9ead23
'2011-12-04T05:52:23-05:00'
describe
'693723' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEWC' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
cca2dbf55d2f83ff498f2442864f15bf
67ca6d73324ac11c33ec0c8a3d9d06ad43da8529
describe
'693847' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEWD' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
9e3eda628038c8ba618935def83f350c
77ce91f529a5e7d0f63b71b72e6a458f78c2f152
describe
'694336' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEWE' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
ed71ea8a19a26b0f72bdae9807a4fe05
fa0d63b5932fbf8894f47f9e7f573786f7d63561
describe
'694340' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEWF' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
d8d8a4f8194fa4fe240dcb502edb9943
15f93b17e7bb962adb03eff0f16b157e047d2710
describe
'693552' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEWG' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
65cd6a6e6a18022cc043fbc2c826dd3d
f29c3d912145ebb2376a3f75905876e7c40a08f4
describe
'718198' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEWH' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
1587a9cb2f445f5d131052a925ca8333
d552f29e9b5392679231a4c13df189da9b878795
describe
'694327' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEWI' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
fb45cea3a969169f684c6a43067b317e
2bca3a1a13aef66e041acdea60d68ae76d036ce8
'2011-12-04T05:53:45-05:00'
describe
'694013' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEWJ' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
8eb41ee08799b31a7c428135c323a20a
4734c98ec61a61c570f2c539a6ecd107fc459de0
'2011-12-04T05:50:09-05:00'
describe
'694087' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEWK' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
c61d94c7724c227661d385108c65dd05
26bcffa134741c3f412332e7440fe23d0202b952
describe
'693991' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEWL' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
c1eb79c18ec75fade974bf93d82552e4
809d54ecc0b6013dac3b832ff9bdba8e6e6aa5a1
'2011-12-04T05:51:20-05:00'
describe
'694317' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEWM' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
88974ba904842fb8fafe770f57a4482a
586f12cd93ac8931b8607978ff2c6f062e127144
describe
'693745' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEWN' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
2292bd9e29fe7f600b8ac6a79d16227c
c613f90f44f9b66dddc44949cb8abcdb2db2834e
describe
'693826' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEWO' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
30a2b21823317d4656d8f09447d48dde
d02b3fe088582e1b60471d5db9a3322a06af5edc
describe
'693713' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEWP' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
01a6634d16c92121f4113c4c9369fcbe
4304e9dda4f8ccede55c17397018aa60d648e59a
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEWQ' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
a10ea2be7bda93818e38b64e055915e1
50f099888bbb7ddc14738ca35353ca5b0855da60
describe
'693738' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEWR' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
33fc6f58b4d201ecb221a8a40ae791e8
224184f0227cc968c513a99c37c7fab0d1a840a5
describe
'694012' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEWS' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
4e1005d0980f65cb4c9f5dafeddf834f
c9b9f4d598aaf0facc4e53ce8c4316705b84def4
describe
'694068' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEWT' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
3c06d4a68207b6d3a2178feb0191ccc2
43f1004f7e045879228fe695d9800f527b9ad29e
describe
'694076' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEWU' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
d4259d860ca1cbb64757038764f3d030
c6b925304b0becbc4a6db722b4d3168da80df5b9
describe
'693585' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEWV' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
e4902d69e0ab5bfa9b5488174342a565
11c52e1c133e28fd3ef8bafe48b3eac443817f80
describe
'694072' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEWW' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
57cc3468a5ebf9f2d0219d6ebb134dcc
74d795f0727ca52e02844e1b380f28a1bdfe020e
describe
'693441' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEWX' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
3767eb032f5727e1d666f589008298cf
9130e226f8531959d35c9ec29f25e4c7d773fd45
'2011-12-04T05:51:00-05:00'
describe
'694235' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEWY' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
b3e8e7bef94cbc22c314762d51cc5237
9ecd56ce5b14029e6db60d02ae9f81cf6586b2ce
'2011-12-04T05:53:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEWZ' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
9ff9c15be3142df955e9b1a83f64f24d
ae84acd201ce02ac5085f04de4fb90110982c082
describe
'718191' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEXA' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
8888da022cc6518ec4fddcdc8dfaabae
9f32897f5e52701e738fcdf0e3a1a67cb6cfd4fb
describe
'693824' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEXB' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
8dba3f665150f79ae7e32594f160126e
81511a2ebdb745797f8f84d08a47b760bd5dc52b
describe
'693626' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEXC' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
6b0cc8fe2e5dfa114428f7f876cbe76a
735c6e1a52178543cf3a8a1ae0692d118416e170
describe
'694074' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEXD' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
00098be83f92dd94cca5d92630c9ab05
3fce63bcbb351b2b1746d14fd5b77169ffcca598
describe
'693741' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEXE' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
f961eaa5946dad369b9ed2a66bb31d11
ad23fb14b01f17729bbcf7019cbd4ecd095c659b
'2011-12-04T05:51:28-05:00'
describe
'694042' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEXF' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
dadf1e8b724c19b5008db95e788a8e0e
2dd3f8ddb1e4cf3fb6ef418c477534b5fadcd69e
'2011-12-04T05:51:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEXG' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
f7dcb4904e1f17b21bcbc8af1e374fd9
9d2d8d6e84bdd76d8552071482437bde4b3915d9
describe
'694078' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEXH' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
91ecf8aa51a23fb088bc85bcd3a32fc7
de2ff4c44c0f6bd5402c85ba92c42c7feffb7500
'2011-12-04T05:53:42-05:00'
describe
'693698' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEXI' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
4611cae483485d8a67fc51cf2be90ce5
ac5d65e1c3d4c094beab772c02d47d3606547d4f
describe
'694046' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEXJ' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
210b4e31313fc29030a64d2a82f7df8e
aac331b352edc9ce4f6ea15479e2ad5459c6fcff
describe
'693622' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEXK' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
a92f1f16ee8e4e96f0ef7d8bcaf7edbf
44afa7185e40a99316fa8d8317ab4273824d02ad
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEXL' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
cd3f71a4a99e56e8fc128eb9b0ec8fb4
94f11fdbf87ef515d4585dfab2c413ed10ecd46c
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEXM' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
2c42d399a2256889041a070415892b45
20c10898d545612fb70b3ae09afb0488901e1950
describe
'718214' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEXN' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
cb37c7daba5eb1168efeb7483b0d9931
dff084bf87a6c4255b2ada15792dcb1ae376d585
describe
'694279' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEXO' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
71c990eaef4112405f15c14c0929d0f0
286cd083382d561b2fe1a61fbd7971188c177325
describe
'693655' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEXP' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
616533ed909ccdbac2b4e13c8b50cc13
210706630a5d81f50d44489c5a9f37eb67a8378e
describe
'693981' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEXQ' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
a179fe910baedb2d81d6ca4558b12246
22353a67f660156f65f2bbe3f4844470e4691e27
describe
'693725' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEXR' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
36ca4a8d8666467b2c038ec79c5a0cf7
47a76b02511cb6d2412ce9098be9b5770c9767e8
'2011-12-04T05:53:16-05:00'
describe
'693839' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEXS' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
5e77bf465499af7fc52b426feda2d253
44263bdca2028c68ed65972f2bddb0c20a0a228f
'2011-12-04T05:51:16-05:00'
describe
'694091' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEXT' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
2fefdc147bf6e52dc1e309a57e53e4c1
40f5fe7663a9dd45c3a418e759148a590642a753
describe
'694084' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEXU' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
705d4c0f6e5ca01744ebc2270a37b9e4
50ae2e5435f059505bbb1dcd5e9f39203a2f4cd4
'2011-12-04T05:53:32-05:00'
describe
'693905' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEXV' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
6db61b92f80602155c4ee272244185a5
6b09016a871e2ec411508147755c113ac31dff8d
describe
'694061' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEXW' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
394edb7bb7a3cadd35b5ad361829ddf9
9fb4c9dd54896aa793fec74f7f9fc9a6233d73d8
'2011-12-04T05:53:28-05:00'
describe
'694288' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEXX' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
bfa1c5490a13b702a7626aebab27e360
6b5f45e3e729e85a2d9dc8fcffb2ac3fdf22f2f4
'2011-12-04T05:52:03-05:00'
describe
'694055' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEXY' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
170c57a19c2f6af48131c916fe7b6bff
35af57a71a746b25b0d044cfffee13c26d276f6f
describe
'693686' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEXZ' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
71daceb57b87f497b76403a4c5ab8457
72560f579709fd8e56ad36882b04c41bb79a848b
'2011-12-04T05:54:03-05:00'
describe
'693971' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEYA' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
ac07be06b9c56755ad949efb3f9216d7
908cf15854743f449208f1f57ecf794dd1805f15
describe
'693727' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEYB' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
2e6a88df5e15604d05510e36be53bc54
7858420593108bd2300a1ba89a895ba387ee6db3
describe
'694018' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEYC' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
d59c634dd010c239491a9d84f9b8ddf5
6cd11eb966e1adae12373d5290c418604dea95bd
'2011-12-04T05:53:06-05:00'
describe
'693940' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEYD' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
4e71772e35b8233ce526e54d06836226
a462b6230ae88dd407c3d054c799234130f0b257
describe
'694060' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEYE' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
4e6839adc08281efd603dde6c09041a7
3141b8f7728085af41fbf0cbcd53cca2c043aed6
'2011-12-04T05:51:30-05:00'
describe
'694057' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEYF' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
8233553f68ae3f28a5bf6a82d324dcfb
25068c8c7d8024c4aa435119c07a6c2356ffc22f
describe
'693941' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEYG' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
c9724569f237d7a915ad9fb53a179b76
6fe983caf44f9a43273bba05b2f08b6d20059eda
describe
'694036' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEYH' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
0b3f51190ee9f35f712c6cc881f09bd4
04ffec498368387cd9dd6481b53bd398c4b57c45
'2011-12-04T05:50:19-05:00'
describe
'694083' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEYI' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
007eea6305cbb05d95fdecaaa980c25e
0d966daab41046436beae48def2893369a8b415b
describe
'693932' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEYJ' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
02526a409470835919cd804c323221b0
0945923d2902f397e51f17593d507f91ba82b3bc
describe
'693978' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEYK' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
56b887129caa8d834c5a9ab45e71f4ae
80fd06bf50ebff14595ca7e9d878bb0ae3c37ae6
describe
'693708' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEYL' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
80c035daf7bb43bb40232d4df1f5338e
d59e032df528a7109de1c98cb14afec816300801
describe
'693939' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEYM' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
6b2241a663d0addd5d3fad491d1e3279
d08a1525d7efbef13b0019f1c59c1f50269723bc
'2011-12-04T05:51:33-05:00'
describe
'694228' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEYN' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
a9a28c744e66a581685101378e27b608
b2aa646a3f417725d68160859e8ed79cfbd15caf
'2011-12-04T05:55:09-05:00'
describe
'694285' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEYO' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
6a339ab41421382ee4a1a3a6791f5938
f94caaf333231ef5735858b287451c338badcaa8
'2011-12-04T05:51:56-05:00'
describe
'694209' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEYP' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
3e65e44a15a9cb812af8e82f9e4d1a32
e1976d3b4b4f2fa5bffc862dd37101954b1c177b
describe
'716154' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEYQ' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
a770757b9b2ba7f05be933a67b7c987b
bd1b35683510c25564d928ed3bedb0bee38a0f07
describe
'694271' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEYR' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
54383301c9bb22de94cce562e26c7a76
40b40c2ad2efd35e1b6b93befbf45c6206af605f
'2011-12-04T05:54:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEYS' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
f173dd453b1272ddec268f225530c00c
dc57a2d25aa39c467a47ff481726543285145d3a
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEYT' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
39e37507c99afe1f9941ea144ab7ff30
576f4d47f1142f17d7b99a6b5de711fb58ca7d28
describe
'693728' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEYU' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
f584434d16739497eda03f85750ae98e
440626c157bec62e08da7d8adb1c6967da453120
describe
'694088' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEYV' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
fa67756d0408bbb4f3e0166f4d009c8a
b07e8bf7920e00dc6f286f786292a8a0b3b5c3f8
describe
'694073' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEYW' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
913471d035e2055f5a59d7a1fdb326b2
ace75e6f1fc85a105329c91c5931ef4a88ded828
'2011-12-04T05:50:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEYX' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
ef42e437d79b6a07507e7fea7b8f1024
48821d7026aaf91534acc53f34b83e0d29d1cb8a
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEYY' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
451bb4253fd0031b7bf1b438764467e0
89870e24125396cf738833c9b7bb4179a734d533
'2011-12-04T05:51:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEYZ' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
f056e078c7aef1bccbc5ed132a3f7d4a
3a340a5fc0dd83eb8ba17f79419c6d2cfc1604ff
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEZA' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
e969083103ad1e74236ebe4287bbdf1c
1088e4fffd403c297f35c09909b119791591fe4f
describe
'784582' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEZB' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
f99ebb7fa11f37eb4df3ebf1a6fe0118
6cbafc693182eb541b615663490c51e6161aa200
describe
'984630' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEZC' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
222e7de71adfd5f47336fcaf922bb6fa
5b256e5a76363628877f3ad14da3bcad6c79d8d9
describe
'869970' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEZD' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
4dc6345d1f96e4a45f63333e1e76688b
fab2e44725ad7d930369630fbb223221ac8fbd77
describe
'129769' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEZE' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
09e3ef0cde7f35d5ad1e6b93957a115b
f8052f8c48e7b50982ef2a68c7dca60b1e2732a6
describe
'20886136' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEZF' 'sip-files00001.tif'
b5362ce13887bc66e3961da5f01cd046
dba443224708132c93f99097c2b677940b818d35
'2011-12-04T05:52:24-05:00'
describe
'20082332' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEZG' 'sip-files00002.tif'
c569594c84a9af1d49a4b10221f86df7
fe477d7d2f0b46e6eeb0a42048ab99a5d237c031
'2011-12-04T05:50:22-05:00'
describe
'19805532' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEZH' 'sip-files00003.tif'
65ed06930f030cdf74d95ac126d16e9c
a09278a9b2d5798d0215b04553c236983b8bea1d
describe
'5562500' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEZI' 'sip-files00005.tif'
cf55ee3083a9a38cc0d77f9e30025634
9e17d2f2135c66127390dbb71581ebfd5ebfdb1e
'2011-12-04T05:54:34-05:00'
describe
'5562568' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEZJ' 'sip-files00006.tif'
27f7c9cde309420829eeb53fa527f3c8
f02947b3c9fbbcc651cff878492740e3a1577bce
describe
'17245264' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEZK' 'sip-files00008.tif'
03d3cffb0ee40ab5ffa7e075b85541c9
140f69d86601ee0374c7b19425429a6f2c4d50ab
describe
'5564672' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEZL' 'sip-files00009.tif'
436ab1587c0161ca5e5ab1a9ff393add
44e6c99581dac69a7704552c1dc7ab1f7598f7f2
describe
'5562232' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEZM' 'sip-files00010.tif'
dadb0f8c278525d840f06c91d04f6c9c
c55133391cd5d64d55477fbacfc76c1ad0f6fee5
describe
'5563276' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEZN' 'sip-files00011.tif'
04dad5c8b4a5ca09d865960860dfbfba
402a169d5b47ee5a6b7146ef58c00d630983cbe6
describe
'5560424' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEZO' 'sip-files00012.tif'
82836faa51cef3a41d5fa0042e1da2ba
af847d3c7bc4a121efcf73c9436f021fa3360fdf
describe
'5563424' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEZP' 'sip-files00013.tif'
82a3714e37e472ea90d8bc302f5d02aa
2d21e5bfba29903a22ab519088d923c8bb68dabf
describe
'5563716' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEZQ' 'sip-files00014.tif'
73933c1654a88a19b8a1ecb94b36ef28
4c3c8de8a553620dc3e321d1e87a41f8708a3d8b
describe
'5563484' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEZR' 'sip-files00015.tif'
bd4e1d9a19c628c44368a2f84fa07c8a
ee121f8519f9274163b50b09e44814cde79a1e19
describe
'5561548' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEZS' 'sip-files00016.tif'
6d2d4867e658f2e0b61acc605286c761
18f36409e7e3edd00c8c7420b3d78e3d2da53efa
describe
'5564552' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEZT' 'sip-files00017.tif'
335d637c8865bb83d9b350f3e80a2bd7
602045c4264e477efbe888027839612e62b39b34
describe
'5561636' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEZU' 'sip-files00018.tif'
3ea801013bdcb6337cb54d0057b5db70
28222d512eb309f42f0abf7800494c0b75cfa2da
describe
'5564612' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEZV' 'sip-files00019.tif'
443171517352931fed73c5dac5815962
dff109c5c5ec1bfaf12a8119e69b36f58f66b999
describe
'5564604' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEZW' 'sip-files00020.tif'
636439f25d6b89c9bd95a02f8acbed8e
88e013be3615a392a10b31e55773cbf45250cee1
'2011-12-04T05:51:40-05:00'
describe
'5564592' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEZX' 'sip-files00021.tif'
da3bab9910c2868f829b9d29081a1a13
18987bc58255dfd173a5e88301c80a514fe28bb5
describe
'5564356' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEZY' 'sip-files00022.tif'
78500a79cb3b4144c711842de95ab5d5
43de7bc2644b947a5cfddaea81eda6b862781931
describe
'5564392' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAEZZ' 'sip-files00023.tif'
b06a80dfde0260259b836d8b70cb97f5
d09361c93a697033b612917cd9b9a023a3b61ec0
'2011-12-04T05:50:51-05:00'
describe
'5564564' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFAA' 'sip-files00024.tif'
d39d10dab342344c7b1e3b0555f41e35
c68cd065b3162426a5bddf5c1810dd6dc051bcc7
'2011-12-04T05:49:58-05:00'
describe
'5562840' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFAB' 'sip-files00025.tif'
5f28eab345f95cf43d82915e5a9eeb62
c6a166ee7e4db15531dca9a26285400fb2931f0c
describe
'5563480' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFAC' 'sip-files00026.tif'
42b2bf98dd1f7849cdab19c1a4224874
a43982314883480a197e7204452b097af4868b2f
describe
'5564140' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFAD' 'sip-files00027.tif'
cbac18a246533fdd23520274f69de712
a62fc80c6a6c28126a8ff7f0e2957eb0e9684d69
'2011-12-04T05:54:20-05:00'
describe
'5561724' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFAE' 'sip-files00028.tif'
5886b22a8b30b03d8d94f4c70e094d2d
6dc6b34de522a00aaf0045064a47da108acfd9b7
describe
'17244832' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFAF' 'sip-files00029.tif'
3c5dc418ef2dbe06c4b2bebb9f6c4048
ca1683afbcee3025e374aac2af901e3439458c0c
'2011-12-04T05:53:12-05:00'
describe
'5562264' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFAG' 'sip-files00031.tif'
62232d5060584182e2cf003accd1ee06
898252ac982050cd2d7d7dff0463a8b54236ba6e
describe
'5561472' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFAH' 'sip-files00032.tif'
7222e0763b90fe919a03c21a3cb6c3c2
bacdbee9ffb7cd820ed5d244558462f15dc822e9
describe
'5561008' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFAI' 'sip-files00033.tif'
1f9fc34e05fe0ac5397fdd862b660c4b
5e687015c46578f223d24fe65b6d49eaa68b9fae
describe
'5564416' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFAJ' 'sip-files00034.tif'
a26a731a2fc44a16db9adcd8e4658f26
b195d9eb3e275e4353b26ce93a6f87815112f035
describe
'5563844' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFAK' 'sip-files00035.tif'
a5395e3239a7daf33ff8ba2bb097e2fc
56d993a11cb1dfe34d3831ff2274457d6626a5d9
'2011-12-04T05:49:20-05:00'
describe
'5564520' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFAL' 'sip-files00036.tif'
ec94d3a9d70d015559c37dd28a10bc15
e869e3db03df87a29db6b21d3979603cab5aacb4
describe
'17244776' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFAM' 'sip-files00037.tif'
b84ff3f786a81b42138886f3e96ef88e
49da86708ceacf4ab6522637cf11c5144a1298ce
describe
'5563496' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFAN' 'sip-files00039.tif'
ba29aaaf540944e7ccfb3ef4b9043a4e
f6e4ec8e77280ab4be8723aab29ed453340d9571
'2011-12-04T05:54:53-05:00'
describe
'5563608' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFAO' 'sip-files00040.tif'
605b934f0835fb7739647dbfc4d4bbed
0a306876607606ec07559658eb581b2bfb16aba4
describe
'5564376' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFAP' 'sip-files00041.tif'
22eade2d6658ba60f25a101f49266c46
43d51226fdfbca434d2d6642f7d79c14ac9bb42e
'2011-12-04T05:52:18-05:00'
describe
'5564156' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFAQ' 'sip-files00042.tif'
8d971edc061c6e06fa0170c01a0a05e7
fb5260d107bbaf755c0f20c83ad383ad855989e3
describe
'5564444' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFAR' 'sip-files00043.tif'
016557513c47bb48346f216b395ebd7d
27292de4ed7e911b4b752225502d36b082b8fd09
describe
'5561652' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFAS' 'sip-files00044.tif'
8eccbdb9187bfe55ff8eaccf0d4db7d6
9f0e8ce088fd8bbf8889d66a53152a7bf5ff3892
describe
'5564360' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFAT' 'sip-files00045.tif'
6d7257eee623132265588863e512e90d
bee690bf1e5477de8e797e82928badec3fff0bcf
describe
'5559552' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFAU' 'sip-files00046.tif'
c54e1ecd20044f3d39edb8b760b85e47
b526a38ef363abbc2c32fc72b94a6f10e4238c65
describe
'17245504' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFAV' 'sip-files00047.tif'
4156846961d688aa4a4b0af0a9d92630
4de9f66a50fec2660091ecb3443fc6d31f3a466f
describe
'5559508' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFAW' 'sip-files00049.tif'
9c5777a0da4989f964e8d293ca094831
5f0379c0c2896ff01627d886e5b16e2734453a0b
describe
'5561740' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFAX' 'sip-files00050.tif'
c9680cb070e02aad86daf079d709c13e
b59c89e7d0b737e15e22c57d4f117d329d161233
describe
'5560440' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFAY' 'sip-files00051.tif'
c4f94e59a8739f0940f3892beb7470ca
7ce23c68c0dbd72fd01d0e5c0abc9c43c0134710
describe
'5560612' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFAZ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
80db7cbf08100ec7776ef920512481b5
54b7868a2026a9422f5d2c8618ddd059e90bdbe4
describe
'5561536' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFBA' 'sip-files00053.tif'
495720666fcb6678cdb8ee29865158a1
d1b95be36df79c75a447eab62fdf630c2e9978ac
describe
'5561788' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFBB' 'sip-files00054.tif'
83c9267858dae4959b51bc8a012dee3e
3879e645a040b1cc50431637a8545c3d0a8db9f1
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFBC' 'sip-files00055.tif'
0f14e360d80cb446ea0164ac107a5c2a
e73b05b2586f7adb5bd59f3ac784ce59d261b5b7
'2011-12-04T05:52:10-05:00'
describe
'5564252' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFBD' 'sip-files00056.tif'
d1220b7386176ae865692f8361daeb44
9f0d40fe57cd3796355f35624ca4f322ba20c2bc
describe
'16988100' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFBE' 'sip-files00057.tif'
f6266b1fe783db35e1c55faa421dd251
517bedbe1b193fe3d0f2ce613dc52d272b062388
'2011-12-04T05:55:03-05:00'
describe
'5564224' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFBF' 'sip-files00059.tif'
299a452d9c5c5b304022812abdef7cc0
9643e43e97185f6ed297e3d884b75d88e8e9d08c
describe
'5564468' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFBG' 'sip-files00060.tif'
154d769c6ae4586e222442c53e3910a2
80bdd9de54befa11abd6d07acc8e728a5461573d
'2011-12-04T05:51:05-05:00'
describe
'5563972' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFBH' 'sip-files00061.tif'
baaa34221a5dee13344f4d0d91722b61
8e7b85995266756fd43be73eab86249e5fde6fc9
describe
'5564372' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFBI' 'sip-files00062.tif'
eab6498cc752ae9c8347aeb76d01613a
85e5dc3b1ca9bbb9c0d7a9ecbfb79810ac966fa0
'2011-12-04T05:50:38-05:00'
describe
'5564276' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFBJ' 'sip-files00063.tif'
deb7e84ffc2b78d22d186b6e72a2258c
3557bacae54c47fa88e944a6056d6533f998ab22
describe
'5561620' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFBK' 'sip-files00064.tif'
f5c5241788c3f586b13d93f7a237d4c6
2f57990a3518bf1ff57c9499770b6ebfd9b921f6
describe
'5563488' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFBL' 'sip-files00065.tif'
502a8a64c172b7eed4fd576b3cedb4b5
4066f081bf30738b3483ad17e30f14ba2a4de2bc
describe
'5560292' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFBM' 'sip-files00066.tif'
3eab877de9d25c5f1125c067fd536d8d
40143289e9faef424c2ce97e655db505d6c56691
describe
'5564168' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFBN' 'sip-files00067.tif'
0949249e80b8f16e75609ec1785e9bed
962dc43217b0d9ba89aa734d8a19019e1d39604f
describe
'5564128' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFBO' 'sip-files00068.tif'
a149639a9f7ab96f1a2d4cde5a2a1766
cd0b0dec1055ac22b65cff9bbbaa0f1232b90933
describe
'17245332' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFBP' 'sip-files00069.tif'
36cbc95dfc31cbab85adc62f3c838a41
ae69eadafc33ad78dc7c133a3a514571c52a8141
describe
'5107664' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFBQ' 'sip-files00071.tif'
d926117b21df44525c4253d6315311a2
5ba7ff88f3d3589748dba23211570a1fced9923a
describe
'5561356' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFBR' 'sip-files00072.tif'
6ff8158af748f6a7ae2b0e3fa61094dd
b588cfdc0eee7fdf10cc2082e85266f015a51285
describe
'5564120' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFBS' 'sip-files00073.tif'
6ac19eef46f775141898dd85780a4e87
4f23958905c1267b0c853888ae560253efe2c76d
describe
'5564216' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFBT' 'sip-files00074.tif'
443e572cc6e9938dd6d44a0af44adee6
a26cbfc4400aefd2eb46bc0c8c9bb49462b48bbd
describe
'5564172' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFBU' 'sip-files00075.tif'
de765d7dab7804de70974e53ce57de59
849f6911fc690760cafd3f68a4f7e1c4216d9ace
'2011-12-04T05:54:13-05:00'
describe
'5562180' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFBV' 'sip-files00076.tif'
6e4b1423326d33705bdcbae26186fe44
3623680cc5f2b6984b7f3c58286b0b476cfeaf0e
'2011-12-04T05:54:07-05:00'
describe
'5561428' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFBW' 'sip-files00077.tif'
bec47d71d95527a549fa334b7b6b221a
2cd188b943b76b8a7f0cfa770a9a9c72b48ec7ce
'2011-12-04T05:51:43-05:00'
describe
'5558976' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFBX' 'sip-files00078.tif'
f5b6add5ab93824918968b57f0387596
868d9ea524df4d0ab38571d0c01eb4d3ec956e8b
'2011-12-04T05:51:48-05:00'
describe
'5561712' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFBY' 'sip-files00079.tif'
3ba302e57e7b4d1e75c6d58f6844cde1
31379a97afa78065e307bf60fc3c66bf2f980ce0
describe
'5564292' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFBZ' 'sip-files00080.tif'
d6133abed8f63deaadc6202f63f1352b
c2d7d4e9d982583882a57f58b70161f32d4cac56
describe
'17245484' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFCA' 'sip-files00081.tif'
fc50303a85e9d4a1e277b9f58713ea74
9425c92dd3b9550c1a68f6682bf9071c549b8dde
'2011-12-04T05:52:33-05:00'
describe
'5564452' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFCB' 'sip-files00083.tif'
dca451da10472b351c1c9ef7bb62a02e
6ce05a7550d4d7f39186bd3f9083ad41f8b3f73b
'2011-12-04T05:50:15-05:00'
describe
'5559548' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFCC' 'sip-files00084.tif'
0942a260bdd4f5e1af0bccb1e8544702
7d47a2d172ed192c71bb9b90af2efea8dc9468f4
describe
'5562060' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFCD' 'sip-files00085.tif'
ba7f4d1ba1d1b5ddc2b2d72a38f1550e
703dded0205d53db8dd58910ce638a404397f1d5
describe
'5559648' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFCE' 'sip-files00086.tif'
f84c4f351010d9dd25abb143bb6111d5
9797c0a0cfaddf378800968594938fc6b6111eaa
describe
'5561644' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFCF' 'sip-files00087.tif'
3bf3b3093ed223cafad36ff987c6b4d9
d08e8b1a81c8076fca83b035938f078bd3f48c5b
describe
'5561260' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFCG' 'sip-files00088.tif'
fcbcad31154d9057f81f5f635983d0fc
765fe8878e05491ab2825a5bfafae6a6a8f7a246
describe
'5562424' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFCH' 'sip-files00089.tif'
4ae95a35cb4164c0808289fe232eef71
25137f33a80371146590a868a49dfd7e8d6f1a9e
describe
'5564664' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFCI' 'sip-files00090.tif'
06d3aed2a463f1ea35ca5b0696c93c7a
12b1bc2e1a75cb40befab752bfbd14968ee0dcc3
describe
'17245096' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFCJ' 'sip-files00091.tif'
5ffcbe3bfb60866bbfee89c30ea35c5a
f4b6bddb8729fb9fbfef3ac3a04bbe817996fcc8
describe
'5564512' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFCK' 'sip-files00093.tif'
8d960b6a839a43f935b9ffdc3c039f5e
ac654f5792d8912326a9487dfd024c097c9f0ea6
describe
'5564180' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFCL' 'sip-files00094.tif'
145836dce7dbbaf9f18893e0e11fbc00
a845efc2c0c39287714a68f8d1b6711fe9f71426
describe
'5563744' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFCM' 'sip-files00095.tif'
11a7b0396f5dc58dd4cc75e20aad86fd
12aeee57224a7fc11d3e0102a9fc0f7a84e161a3
'2011-12-04T05:50:40-05:00'
describe
'5558440' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFCN' 'sip-files00096.tif'
dd46d98907f5f6e9e364a1d15859c036
4955fc244bda01a7d46dc4da6fcc2cce7df42863
describe
'5561424' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFCO' 'sip-files00097.tif'
6b6a20c64709b267fd4a671ea9df74a7
400e1829bbec81a671f0e88e2e2c5a8239fa4f71
describe
'5564076' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFCP' 'sip-files00098.tif'
885cccdbe17bf5d5332a9923c4c23561
981a10d7248133c0b2c157881b0aff37d732521e
describe
'5564436' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFCQ' 'sip-files00099.tif'
11f25eefe21e74f80f9d2e37016a9b2f
2a06f8c9084030fe07333af0e51307fd89fae14a
describe
'5559988' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFCR' 'sip-files00100.tif'
f069da05fe1c27517350651da8d4637d
5997ecb6f56fc3a46b6cbc11a312054078767aaa
describe
'17245416' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFCS' 'sip-files00101.tif'
bf4306d950da762caddd58874edb30aa
051e60761f85f858d9365aef9f90defd3309e06a
describe
'5564288' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFCT' 'sip-files00103.tif'
3d07454e7104f93015de21e983f27c24
99563041ef00b9cfedac7e6bfa76379536d4c57c
describe
'5562108' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFCU' 'sip-files00104.tif'
697d47bf83a1fc37191d4987ccafc239
eadfacd37befc1afb20e80a74c08e484abfead45
describe
'5562040' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFCV' 'sip-files00105.tif'
ef3f5df8d8d19b3ad4c4c85e218463b7
3133d82267def34eebd7e0afe6e5031a73421687
describe
'5561732' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFCW' 'sip-files00106.tif'
afb6dcab48ebc292050f099328c664db
dace4cc1d34b7c1e219e7ed97a1699c29aeb6912
describe
'5564484' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFCX' 'sip-files00107.tif'
d9e00fc63c76fe7021c645e6254fb04f
598159883424848a2208459cdd27f2e0901fc7b4
describe
'5559440' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFCY' 'sip-files00108.tif'
932ffadb6292fa7edf3775fd85dd4c7e
59d9d4291401b4849a3019da8907d9c4e96b2fa6
describe
'5562268' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFCZ' 'sip-files00109.tif'
4ece6318a0a0545e6e2924d648fe74b8
d1daaf87e016e2524171287bb147537aa79efa9e
describe
'5558844' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFDA' 'sip-files00110.tif'
cbdd1ae8a0fd9c02b43ed3571c44708c
01f4707092979710d5dd6c1a854007329ed49b73
'2011-12-04T05:54:37-05:00'
describe
'5561920' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFDB' 'sip-files00111.tif'
2673dc1fc25422a7a778d4ab2a4344d5
95020632d6830239fcbae085606b773e933ccc9d
describe
'5559676' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFDC' 'sip-files00112.tif'
97dbe10fc5bd907f5d460e0d5e64ca05
6d422d2e6371a88ab06893f15142fdb8287a69df
'2011-12-04T05:50:02-05:00'
describe
'5562588' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFDD' 'sip-files00113.tif'
a74558125db08772406dfa7f8d7abf59
abce4841564febf2056e0b1a1fa52ab272e687ad
describe
'5562488' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFDE' 'sip-files00114.tif'
f018ab375a87596602ef6f2d40d54a0c
ab171fb71100f7d81e6b34be0eb7f4d54632a8dd
describe
'5562284' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFDF' 'sip-files00115.tif'
ca99fec99d2ba414cf4b356d968d269c
bf53426d6104c928dd6226de6751932ccdd0d04d
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFDG' 'sip-files00116.tif'
2282fff2d65ae67440397afefc12820c
31cdfdd4589a97fc5015e8b7528c1500f83be7e8
describe
'5562540' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFDH' 'sip-files00117.tif'
9e422446fb4da6d5587e5d7f48cc5d7c
46d46f9ef817e6e8f18625a6fab81355d57b8bc1
describe
'5559448' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFDI' 'sip-files00118.tif'
79b2a1f17b01034deae13141e9e0a073
78daffba5ad2043a4c3c018294b3f83f40778458
describe
'5564440' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFDJ' 'sip-files00119.tif'
16cefbe74826ba3c5efe0a27886eb26b
b6ad9975150700dbfa601d6b98fe253706811cc9
describe
'5561592' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFDK' 'sip-files00120.tif'
cd0a63b1796f35ebb65441d78d1e85de
368289bea65097652326cedb36c88da60b8db1e7
describe
'17245364' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFDL' 'sip-files00121.tif'
3cbab1a9ee5ce1df6bf35eabc564d58a
14ac42b411342059a3ac72076a3397deb9d3ccd1
'2011-12-04T05:54:01-05:00'
describe
'5561940' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFDM' 'sip-files00123.tif'
59c582003bbdfe8db26e6a1628eacba0
270eb6aad9574d4218e8384226dd275119b65d52
describe
'5559564' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFDN' 'sip-files00124.tif'
72a7b14c92160e57e3c636fc38045055
84949dbe73df6f1c164e1f8eb07ffbe1e6096578
describe
'5561700' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFDO' 'sip-files00125.tif'
31bf790ca9216622251576de314e7b4e
808ae44f9cddef272da4746c765d6631ca127e7c
describe
'5558712' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFDP' 'sip-files00126.tif'
2171aa48957c32f9a0a034073610f8ba
e0bd3fff476bc1743e9f6f6a1fab9a9024cc091f
describe
'5562312' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFDQ' 'sip-files00127.tif'
5b0e819758e971a2723b3bc5febd6634
459bedc03cf65efe14a40bcc0806f458bc7ced7c
describe
'5559500' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFDR' 'sip-files00128.tif'
a93840080e20f03e3f7b95401e4611c8
ee0a1267888735195e7a144fcd1dbca745944172
describe
'5562124' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFDS' 'sip-files00129.tif'
b7f170615ed1c6d6e1f3572334e19e60
bd002a1fbf84ecf6d2d5ddf2b5d21e7f1c5c9a1d
describe
'5559344' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFDT' 'sip-files00130.tif'
2ed1ab6bb050d248e46b8deff1d959c8
96b227e2ae3744333e3fb56798b336901e23f88e
describe
'5562444' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFDU' 'sip-files00131.tif'
7463cb386e146274153a31370776e971
82ec30acd068a9401f4196892c6349e8aa50c50d
describe
'5559764' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFDV' 'sip-files00132.tif'
b061ca674c83366a3a7aafb37522be70
3f4dcd2bf8e1289dd304721f1ef7a733b84b222e
describe
'5562344' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFDW' 'sip-files00133.tif'
fe9986dd2016b74f2079b9173aa49ed9
2c4863d50ce65647201939d6638eee7800191878
'2011-12-04T05:54:10-05:00'
describe
'5559460' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFDX' 'sip-files00134.tif'
c2bd131723f1be5fc8dcbc4605de057e
ac4c89852f83206028f04d5040534504d5c12235
describe
'17245248' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFDY' 'sip-files00135.tif'
39f14b2ec7e9e281ed3f02dbf4a291c8
db59682ec5bb05512f867cdce8f87e7640dfe299
describe
'5564004' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFDZ' 'sip-files00137.tif'
af52d71acdb8fb60af1de2a0330dd913
674009547ee06e416c602b3479b94cad5e31efd5
describe
'5559592' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFEA' 'sip-files00138.tif'
73a9691b002be94bc575d133280c97e3
e94e99ddb430e4c8214b96e7c7d7d9b49c7d8408
describe
'5560584' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFEB' 'sip-files00139.tif'
f5baf6fa859435d6f647bf24990ad9d6
dd6888aed04d6622d5ba980703cac59f0bb85ac9
'2011-12-04T05:49:24-05:00'
describe
'5558664' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFEC' 'sip-files00140.tif'
ff575790893bfec9bd6fc5c7ebc30b90
76c8649e6aa3ebe069ac807aced5b40447ab77e1
describe
'5562000' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFED' 'sip-files00141.tif'
d24298d7571aba3447df1809d17596e2
68336084eaa718aa724d20197cdde14338c16eb9
describe
'5561848' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFEE' 'sip-files00142.tif'
8d77a0652652f8e6f3c90c3974a00c98
053439d76c42515faeed5c126c90e95cc0997af8
'2011-12-04T05:51:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFEF' 'sip-files00143.tif'
5112aacf3ecd214e3703821cc214d6c0
fd68f77dbeb3478ad07c273f7abd2afd67318fd8
describe
'5561528' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFEG' 'sip-files00144.tif'
f9b9a76d1b3ea30c8df22129e0b1740d
e928d00316409e08d684e470de8fa2bb031067d4
'2011-12-04T05:51:31-05:00'
describe
'5562076' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFEH' 'sip-files00145.tif'
6b1da3448c81e5451006f3ce8160617a
48a921d0dd48fc9ede1819b2079ca1766d48073e
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFEI' 'sip-files00146.tif'
a64335418be80116666bcde0c9b51c00
1ac9062866b163a6ecc1bda220dc647f957ef21f
'2011-12-04T05:53:10-05:00'
describe
'5561944' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFEJ' 'sip-files00147.tif'
61d40deedf98c09e6a508b90fd672e59
a773795f8c0c50635140ffa5ef07d0c64d0f74d2
'2011-12-04T05:54:36-05:00'
describe
'5558924' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFEK' 'sip-files00148.tif'
69412c3bb2f6e95733104fc79e821fa2
19c585a39d2f91bda53977e339c3587dd979e293
describe
'5561988' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFEL' 'sip-files00149.tif'
c3410321243168eb9232effc46c0de81
cd1b5e8b277022502b0f69caeaed1c6bbc16fd70
describe
'5558828' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFEM' 'sip-files00150.tif'
463376a4143216e03dd3c9212e49fcfe
1c1a864e84dd6e4678be9a201c920acb97eb7bdd
describe
'5561348' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFEN' 'sip-files00151.tif'
2634bd7fbf2ce9c90e1aa60ee79f724f
02b6ae821a5f97e09800a16694d6ca83a7ae276b
describe
'5561580' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFEO' 'sip-files00152.tif'
dfbca2f5e335593e35b98cc8f516a92d
549126b726259cea4df9e8fc190f42e410605b9b
'2011-12-04T05:50:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFEP' 'sip-files00153.tif'
268695c85614c11a5999092ff7422274
e361fcec623b6e2adb947ad9f86dbb51d3c052c4
describe
'5562112' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFEQ' 'sip-files00154.tif'
973d2aad148f8c34c7523105d31063b0
48d3f54fc2824aa8103a34186328a47e90e20606
'2011-12-04T05:49:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFER' 'sip-files00155.tif'
6c5b14700c4bd0ff642660d5e6cc4357
772d6ed1ce5ca9d17c59c2dc363be4c0c509763f
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFES' 'sip-files00156.tif'
b111602c55c460a73a8e8930fd9ef564
083a9bc8a0686a69716db5bced2056e5ae679b8d
describe
'5561596' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFET' 'sip-files00157.tif'
cfce5318fa919eeccc4f86584473c5c5
8061b8f2c7f8ea066d2011335986b73eea2ab74e
describe
'5562328' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFEU' 'sip-files00158.tif'
2bf1e74440aea2642551dcfb563e427a
6142e101e1a9f37586d13c8bf91fad0c4b7c74ec
describe
'5562280' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFEV' 'sip-files00159.tif'
3db20c58f57d9d70821d9b9699c0cf3d
50b2c79188221dd7d3d4df3f724485f7eacadcb0
describe
'5558824' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFEW' 'sip-files00160.tif'
ecb5140b0e07e2dd667374ab03ea74ca
318f5dfa4fadc48dea35cdf2aa749dfd5b678144
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFEX' 'sip-files00161.tif'
f5fb382f7d8cc59affc937c32d557272
d8942b212c2ee8031878aa2f0fcef289672fcbc9
describe
'5564332' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFEY' 'sip-files00162.tif'
495e3652abfc28cb29e645621166a175
d080b4196fda08e96d488f3488846f9cd3b7981f
describe
'5563560' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFEZ' 'sip-files00163.tif'
d151d64c4b8b1f95efce009eaef082e0
fac71a62742688c9418a8faf1f99bc3e9479220d
describe
'5564624' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFFA' 'sip-files00164.tif'
adab3e85a69b55ac9cef188e5b27e3ae
f5b1cbf491f5d5abb7fd136e23127c723f6c0711
'2011-12-04T05:53:07-05:00'
describe
'17196816' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFFB' 'sip-files00165.tif'
1667c79b31029cfd0fd7252227afef91
6b3aff9dba6ff08b6d88f1f8ba6a3f847d05bad1
'2011-12-04T05:50:10-05:00'
describe
'5564412' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFFC' 'sip-files00167.tif'
7efde09ab071adffc275d7c27b8e5dde
ffcaa8b2a67ec619c89f5c302104f48f1d8fd383
describe
'5561292' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFFD' 'sip-files00168.tif'
e347d037170e2f600de1c3e6febbfd5c
4869f2a7a77f1505fb4da728264a56a95eeacbb9
describe
'5561908' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFFE' 'sip-files00169.tif'
c658ba37c673589a0aa09ea7ef321f14
22354903487f4b051f21bb311fe0cbbda5accc80
'2011-12-04T05:52:15-05:00'
describe
'5559468' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFFF' 'sip-files00170.tif'
a723618b1e93f8045851f4b80ada273e
59a9868c5fb19e2c44685c4559b6cfa14f8c8f68
'2011-12-04T05:54:11-05:00'
describe
'5562472' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFFG' 'sip-files00171.tif'
52abfd5539630466368362fe69c60e62
db8934b6f0768bf19570c3893e0c28a08fad6db4
describe
'5562428' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFFH' 'sip-files00172.tif'
b16f7e3b2484c397335f7282ced69ae4
5da114d094a7aefe85ba30e94c9c542d9dbe92ed
describe
'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFFI' 'sip-files00173.tif'
cc1abf85d14e85995bb6cb0c56131b79
3ee030e313249f8c4578937b14cdff37c7748384
describe
'5564708' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFFJ' 'sip-files00174.tif'
08ef2eb679dd9882214d6b2264ef5405
28ab4ca6b34a6f990c23adadec9c8536f3d62011
describe
'5563808' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFFK' 'sip-files00175.tif'
4a358d261fd7ee752fd70f8890d076bc
aaff479deeeb83c12e0cf8026dc343d4d1ad5be3
describe
'5561800' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFFL' 'sip-files00176.tif'
67349d61df15cf4cab861c4dacb170b5
4d20bc2e4b127f2b88bcc65b8e5111184bb4d004
describe
'18837948' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFFM' 'sip-files00178.tif'
23409e6593279ef5b3908fdbd9d30fcb
d9676c2181073954879e7f2a44396a80066e785f
'2011-12-04T05:53:20-05:00'
describe
'23632939' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFFN' 'sip-files00179.tif'
a3692ac0116af2ccb7228edc53deacd8
0760a28f7c6161c72a8458d86e9c82293a34a2fa
'2011-12-04T05:50:59-05:00'
describe
'20884812' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFFO' 'sip-files00180.tif'
f38363e75c88f6355334804127248388
dbffa98ec186a5071ad997bcb4e042e095cfd3dc
'2011-12-04T05:51:39-05:00'
describe
'3123264' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFFP' 'sip-files00181.tif'
8bff965461aad21cc37ec07272089af0
352ae221fd314f2a9529bd52d1d6c5d4032abe6a
describe
'212632' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFFQ' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
3a8b892936a8d8f7a0ad5e81b949fa07
9bc280ad6d6ce1fbffb334d9b53849791c4629f6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'255705' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFFR' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
2197aa72709d7bb7198a0354a8363c8c
079a8fcb25ad320aa736eec815db09a8497756b8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'245728' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFFS' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
95f84a44711af6670dc5c05990eb09b2
5e4f8b4223849f55b251e0684bba1e5577c1e06f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'151869' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFFT' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
71f9917774f2bbb2ddeede741ce9e2e8
b7aba2851ca5dcd5c88590646732e43d47ff625f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'112489' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFFU' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
afb3e0f064a58cadc35bc4958b990d9f
fb6cbe4edf4445b6731e72e114c36302d9b5fe0e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'274633' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFFV' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
ddfe7a26fbe936349f45100aa3a5bfca
797f57f33b95dc9c44efa385f928817b5aaf1a54
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'194705' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFFW' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
313baa64f3483f9db2e16ea7809e94ae
71c1637117e34573ca63ef5e88f388d459df77e5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'107387' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFFX' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
56f9b8ee2bc7981b85626ab852d85ada
0143c96191d040c3883b327c70653beb3b713fb0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'163650' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFFY' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
ffeac1db8410ad3c41294d84eab172be
06a9f062f62c8c03a59b754948af8cb3925feb03
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'129502' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFFZ' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
92dccbb5abe5ff966340750d38e1676e
4ba07020a7f97d5ae7397730f19b3690722f696a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'128519' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFGA' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
3969e27d4c1ff2f2a755c05471586970
baebdcb932d7efe7ec85b4f846db554bd29e6f70
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'179582' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFGB' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
83b0b0ede2707ff68cfa9d1fa9ab1f70
5154c71d71074451195f39708333fb6fb43de7dd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'185310' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFGC' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
0a0a8a4af907afbe39ee814f031344a5
7aa62536bd585e699baf974f3f9a933c4f822d17
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'178180' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFGD' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
568a97f55a971f4d38b5a9e38b8c586d
bc7194512ec5afe5e48d72f2ec36a1eb827b762c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'228678' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFGE' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
83b69b4a0601d2e4a32c638f67391ea9
57e098994683aea768e0f7f09e876cb019375a3f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'244425' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFGF' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
9971bf5e69bb870bf7744aad78c95ade
3ae9512185e80d21bb772eb95e42041f8faf710f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'219378' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFGG' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
6118798e6472217dbb50db6b7f67ce50
1cc4f411b0ecadc9a9228ee9aa436ac0c2ae63de
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'215206' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFGH' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
382a0e9fa99bebffce1f1c84b49ba023
9aef45bb1ce6365f09b45ed8e631b428c59ecc8d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'239662' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFGI' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
0a7721f4eb41fab611efb053c82d6c91
de4d33178d4427291ecdd75213e98a31f6e7d0de
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'222358' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFGJ' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
0c42c673154fbdcaa67a234b3878cc69
7dc40b07907f483644133b844eb1b19388b7ad11
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'209622' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFGK' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
c6050cc1b49bd3f732ead8de4e935a40
8a2555cf5c44ac55811ac19011853f8db09934b4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'247232' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFGL' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
5ef6c7abe06a8a0cdadeae6a9868d766
06616670188b59937394e100079b195e6828f60c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'136781' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFGM' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
36a8bde06017ecc92f7cbc6213193f88
6732fd8a7169c1574c8a62342567b43faf89b04f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'173786' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFGN' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
b3c540552af6abec9d23dd7c40405c14
79ebdfa5599b16296e6c6b69803611a5cff9ee60
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'213180' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFGO' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
5e189200326528b1e6f97dcdfeae9d0c
46b4b44442ee43592744b2b80a4516e95faac5ea
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'219221' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFGP' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
e5a7910e22d4c7c7fc68861b3256e74a
0f12796ee02844e0ab3ee478d06ab2170ee384a4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'260603' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFGQ' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
36c533c899eb9b46bca8d683ec6bfcd7
f39ba30a3146e09e91e19ab640cec32d281b2b23
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'241350' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFGR' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
1c461ddb9bd600feac2a062da636236b
a7e63ff6af448679d277493c0c526be669ca76a2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'225884' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFGS' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
27e2171ff2cb4663df7c257bf57de7f3
31a5a0ae47517dbf2dc2d82238d8c9bab2616860
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'196264' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFGT' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
007088d7625908cbb2513d895fbb22f3
36ac46d8bf109fd1c1c5228eb9e7d3a943bc1687
'2011-12-04T05:50:46-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'218282' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFGU' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
b846ab257986d43c96a1608425d52826
59f61af690517723356dba54d00cbf7593dceebe
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'171220' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFGV' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
98c4bff67eac2b4d9ab3e04a1b0b35ac
7aad131831ee0e6c3ee6b08cde64ec3c3d1c9ff2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'248001' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFGW' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
89f1f56335e5b41a80690996df2bcea4
23abada6cff5598d14475be2dd374317d2a384c2
'2011-12-04T05:54:25-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'247673' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFGX' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
94dfbb760463f9f8fe1c7b19992bde7a
c8cdd53aa428258dca2624071b6fbea7d950471a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'184041' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFGY' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
2caa94c2c7e585cfcfa6419b7c3eb5e0
22b0a152af728ed532ef71a6f7906879f029417e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'183210' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFGZ' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
f9671d0d371e21b6561c2499349e2abb
7489283da9be733c0795ac33cab775b08a6f6ce3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'223550' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFHA' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
c0aaafd4044ac5ad43dba421bccff506
1769c4b915d27dba9a925e94f78c43d281d00946
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'188187' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFHB' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
463e99574484b419b58c988011a12740
4a9d330b836cec9ca8861c90d34fa34e4c2734b8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'234083' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFHC' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
bf99c82d51418a0a8e804a2b1107d765
95fc6eeb70e83c55909d254e52f08a2127ae1d90
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'225688' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFHD' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
936a9c16986f3815b32a620c440ea4ab
e197b61a357f2ebf0037afc7a692e163f9f24388
'2011-12-04T05:53:52-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'197876' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFHE' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
eb0a33658389f70f6884763c2b803b1b
85d54c9e7c466df4adfd8b40d1bf45b87222121a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'122734' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFHF' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
5e557a0c5e14d065815662a209c92163
7e4a9807f3dd3233c5455fe9818ac28ede444a23
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'287684' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFHG' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
b53b2775548c5d268088e05ec13866ed
a557d6e5a608e28c693bd4b9e3a519b90b0ad011
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'227302' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFHH' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
ef0928107af39e9e3feb77ccab4b7613
9375f1377b77f35d1e15c32a263600a313f013f0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'199474' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFHI' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
44e6a09461003d24f3125bfa332ff82b
3a9fd3cbfedc6874552dbd7e2cd14a37420cc5d4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'141922' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFHJ' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
20fd849c9bd8321dbd5bf705a5b0a6a7
476b59fc28f22ff78801c1096fe6b1003ba2b4ba
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'165392' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFHK' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
ac40845dec2f137d4a90e61daaab8126
052c5e5ebf765058ffea856d6e8697ab3c295a94
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'234550' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFHL' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
49d1ea3ad029698409ce53009c0cdae9
fe21fcaaf634d9d96370bd5c92f69a94d680fe8e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'236419' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFHM' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
a8b9e5de48114da731ce6107424f1e21
fe418f2c32e10bd2b2428b17eb12a3dae020be71
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'211049' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFHN' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
56a15109e8ec932ed520d2b10fea329c
62547a1ef63e25f55f8a7088f965e6d16b7b4654
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'239324' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFHO' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
f335a0a93452fb74903d522e07259a6f
cc2884382a256c0e08c013a8cb026561f9e03bc6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'279622' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFHP' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
fd4392d7445599fdb434386ae2b1fd22
63166918b34c87ccec1aae0e2689833c64eb8aea
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'215932' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFHQ' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
79b5963e9b22af39472b8969800ac0e2
59b3b224e1e028c674cfa22f2c536748d75d7872
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'228342' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFHR' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
71e24af2ad990b1e5b97404ed8e161af
a8e6c9462438e3e07fdbe0807ca3cc16ee5c9c5b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'162705' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFHS' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
b30f22f1a29c8b4b5d2c0fe83897e917
360a1ef51db1787e0fcf16828bfbc5efa3cf5e60
'2011-12-04T05:54:16-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'243901' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFHT' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
7e88ee3aa9a254589992b207db6d2e17
5462d01511a51beb64dc8091008d6b667cfea24e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'222357' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFHU' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
693f6462f380fca1db39d9b9b08b9e69
680220fee973ec6d53b9915bcf433d5f3c68941a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'230602' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFHV' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
5c3c3f218ee5b4920ac0652428b75ca6
07511a3b2fc585cb058e0712b414798c0b2f9aed
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'147847' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFHW' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
259720a9405b858b64510b4d8e941454
9107933d42adb67ed8281f6dd7ca1ffeafc0b9bc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'142917' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFHX' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
698c80d6fb0c111f12a4ffd4e64bb33e
44a44397dc1cc88428d4dec6c025444e38946d73
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'202297' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFHY' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
474e43b36ff546f80a0da39c24121b21
59114a854f8d0aa9fbe045143bf8328840621f72
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'209755' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFHZ' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
d9d06acd06237ec1ec69e5b94535ff81
60d82874cdadb6959ebbb0886d68f8f3beda76c0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'258699' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFIA' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
fb3bee09328187f4b52925f883e92d3e
f188c9bff3c1505eabad9c183340a83b105f6ef4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'203006' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFIB' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
3a006bf8aebd6f098d39c91fa8fd1def
023e729bd6f21d445324f3f3337718afe4fb8593
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'220652' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFIC' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
28dae56d8cd3b4ac23faa224aaf3b4b0
9c21984434afe68e4766203f7a30d5705d4874b9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'202257' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFID' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
a8f6da6a5143a0591e583fef9af4783e
1486dbdc4ac70d5e549f960a1f9f493a11ba200b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'224838' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFIE' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
5cb339504f9a61bf74969a8159be3d34
804a148762fc886fadff29c1106c820403c419d5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'197608' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFIF' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
701c12436f70489b18e66c7d31f69657
031f6289849f14bf1dbd838e6407b6101b490a73
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'211511' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFIG' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
b2b3b87002cf495301a9981b702a8fc5
9fdbfd38ce91cb5d7967b977da1caecd3f940ea9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'239954' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFIH' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
60efbcda3c25c1606d7198209253dc37
a7ae477d2dcfff6120794fe58852d7c1a7c3fbb2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'183651' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFII' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
768743ae6fba3eb144dbd93dd98558f6
500c27bea7f23b5c9fd6c95681c39e33c682d34b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'187388' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFIJ' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
d35ac6320ede146699f9fed7bdf87dc5
adf2dce9552b051a744094ba8c18a723a6313f6d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'230232' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFIK' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
c1533127717e0af22799df05a52c28ca
278eb15e0a41edb65ad99d5d0639e9d9b3e2be27
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'256387' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFIL' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
d3966120a73734aa8786820b4781f23e
3be2f016f759ae93553856cc2c7adf607bb4a178
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'202191' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFIM' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
a1fe3ccd1b39e142c09e84ea7369c40c
921afcb6d3252198229b5f923325aca55995a21c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'223531' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFIN' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
8e96a039078e4d51133c049a7304124d
603a952f9468bab5f76e3bb0e7cb1fe768f65f6c
'2011-12-04T05:53:39-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'200484' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFIO' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
9bad59eb8b45f070477e3ba6d9d7a260
fdff354b02fb3869a4adc8bb6f3ea9395a8cf987
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'231940' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFIP' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
1deafb1b5d2b595ff95af1a139f49dae
8f2988eafdc29f6c82afcd5777f8dd400362d957
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'186057' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFIQ' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
46ccf86c762fec5e13dcdce130c8d421
8fdb1751b23f3a87f0d1d24cded5b706c4c9d3b5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'204537' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFIR' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
9461b8b111364487034526d11ee50fd7
b527421e0cbe84e72c80a533b58644c2de191b5c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'241905' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFIS' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
f5b86330679bb9e1b3fa4b63ba29cc76
4f290484a4c4e62f19f3fb2ab15e7818062bb14c
'2011-12-04T05:50:45-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'229114' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFIT' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
2ce9b7901181f3e6fc1450d84741e71e
33c7dc27f87f22778484edd899cdf71090bafd77
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'241719' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFIU' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
8d078c87e4b379f140ec0ed2330be6e6
fa47a94e43f3c12d96ca023bd4a8ab69561b3735
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'208315' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFIV' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
777de8bc0535fec9cd78ed57916bcbcf
32c462dccd73c5f0a9df39f522564222c2b3730e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'222295' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFIW' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
35f560c1f67b81d5589bf5197b35b3ba
f0067b453e8900b22381dc9aad5a37f85e8acde9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'195470' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFIX' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
ee61210b0d7db407037e1d3b8ab7d968
ccfaf24f400da5b6b22cc194eab25aa5e881089c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'160560' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFIY' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
1a3165b63ab6087bf6afc453cf268d4e
0eaea0a25e048ec3244406577c814d26dc100b22
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'167147' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFIZ' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
fd803f82721419c206c066e0c9f27e39
0317b036189367fcabc2e45741eb64858520f5d3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'212786' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFJA' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
d33e6407e4cbb3901b5192e482ba7490
4999de2af2a2db3bd76b437884c0e1565d3366cf
'2011-12-04T05:49:39-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'210700' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFJB' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
42412d92806229598f1518af500037fc
91541138dbb450253186d4c23c1dd46a97e25fd4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'241281' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFJC' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
838693f8ab2e07004a30f690f815fd20
30bf5af76429aa7725dc585a4af67086af97eceb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'264606' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFJD' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
fb03c36f6d6707c49eb2599faf5237a1
1539aab7acec2a0f92871df40617279379e2f83c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'221460' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFJE' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
c761226edc102a0a0e9418d3c529758b
8a67f1a08a7a71f855281532ad0f6ba410e5ee55
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'209008' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFJF' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
a5bec4072d0dc692ae1a69659fb0ce37
0335501616c66702348d07514d4a1bc3ecf9595e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'185340' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFJG' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
fbbd0ca7252fddbf3b14bc498bab0f94
eaad22b1ea52163e142ad914b92d0cd14832356e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'210566' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFJH' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
53bc3abaa1ae3ba69b54f6ba07ca6de6
194fb7e41b72cf2c0ee96684f33fe06ea0fafb6a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'221147' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFJI' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
b8259e0c0d5a84590130f46db5723a8b
fe0e866bcb5fde83473ab0298c2e0134d607ab8e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'205771' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFJJ' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
489f7ebe902afca05ebeb7b8db9498e2
40135d972c2a1085fccf980bac6400fb69e28fb8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'192143' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFJK' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
45f94fdde3c2ba7235759a13bdf16260
f3312672ab09cc47bd340b8aa1ee5799092312a9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'187003' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFJL' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
40fbf15ffa68b1d2f652db898dcf5d5f
d2b99f40724c82ccf4f1d344512ab9654bcdf5f4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'177739' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFJM' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
0fc07de92ae8524797672617ce70f6cc
01be3f436efabc6a7b37f24c8320286673cba478
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'227398' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFJN' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
3cf63a1bb4872dd90718d19e19a77af2
0c46ab4a762f979665706bc959998f4224467dff
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'215175' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFJO' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
12330baf74863257f6b67d7f6c44d896
e021972ede2f7fbf3d4d996d4a0654ed984d32fe
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'218862' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFJP' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
46ca9af2d03e4979c824978dbc5204af
a1943971adc1620f65ab5ccc655ce2794eab5465
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'182266' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFJQ' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
2527b381873b24c23535f8bfac05f909
518c7dc08921906125317f07b385f45556ab0390
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'206775' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFJR' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
3b4a4a33325fea33a9b1413bc46ea33c
7284e00e2b77855fdd18f1bd366b04beb6c04a9d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'223525' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFJS' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
bbfb4e083445f90d85d6967458172a90
8499d1faad9ffdcc5835cc2cee590f16d67e63c2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'190254' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFJT' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
42025469e295f77070d0b5199e45baba
588dde5471523d5dab2bcaf6abf0f564287e6b8e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'229400' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFJU' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
f0122d09fe9ecf003c3cc13a7b2ecedd
04da96aab4f60e183fc4e07803b2315091bea83b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'219498' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFJV' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
64d3b12bb572565ec0dedc96dd6c269a
08ef1bbca3f141065f2a6c9e0c9e32fa18fd4f8a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'287838' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFJW' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
34644dad30458d62a21ecf25596ddd2c
94b9b7a68f80accc78876cf7cffa8d85461a42f2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'183246' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFJX' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
00e5589bcd2ef8fee226a92f124121bb
53519291be57b3824f61115dbfd88a2eebc61d74
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'236263' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFJY' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
880efd5df0f2ba13ba01ccd23d165f8d
dc16aa6375edb268b707250c81ab6aafb69e0dd7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'202888' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFJZ' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
d0c98e367fae254cdbf1d25267ba1966
630d92c90b5fc13b8b1749b9662067d6538f5d3f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'174947' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFKA' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
6ba9639e14b12b974bfe35ab9b68fb48
b6841d62e7cb9738513a9d658840e53f6a1d0d35
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'222836' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFKB' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
0becb8189865d8b91ba8163e0fd16fbe
65b8946f1286c4262dee6115147fb49828b80910
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'220120' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFKC' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
036b96417ad9152c972d0151621614a2
ccfca89cddccfce03fae5d7c67616333106d5ea5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'176006' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFKD' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
dcea804cc8437892496d9b21df0477d7
8f753ba12d6bca9eb5ed133995698752ece72f7f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'194606' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFKE' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
6bdc86132bf939dcd20cabbbbc25689d
455c65809ec12e67706d159d3d672b93548fec0b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'213364' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFKF' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
e60bb59662657ed32f15bf4c1c306beb
e325af8a4965c987c8c68f9f86d65eb222609634
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'222829' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFKG' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
8591720d4d1a21751e3be1d06ad3de70
9e965ff01b832fcc578d2bdc16199b9ede16c07b
'2011-12-04T05:50:03-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'221942' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFKH' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
9b9c144de8079b19e85007aefcb4b8bf
733f348320af680e88562f59ebf1859469c876e3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'218439' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFKI' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
3f724323c5be9e46c48b10fd6edf9941
b5f95a09a84afdd714de1f142b59065a424f4229
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'251654' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFKJ' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
4e49b7ac2f438855d688313de7d00c70
c3cc91e521a31c8321e6a7eca4e562d9cf874eb3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'207126' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFKK' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
ae2d94706ac86b4608988a561a4a7674
ecfaf708076686c2737ffc0715900366fe17f65d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'219544' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFKL' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
c1957ccb9d39d3b35a7ea634bf9cebd5
5e770e5ea5e74937e7042b12694cbabade922a0e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'121225' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFKM' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
9e25296b50c80551b2aff8565c4a2fdf
c831315bbfa765a8c9fc5f292fb476c9bdc586c3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'162577' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFKN' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
dd431bf5b0e5be7cba3f5978d8ff2a5e
be886515a855b1da754514facf97f443b2ba1496
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'187149' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFKO' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
8cb8f449e5fe5610f1ce95a5be7a6e4d
ed2374f71b76082b05fab6ec5b5619454049af54
'2011-12-04T05:49:59-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'183458' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFKP' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
6d3da4b5cd0894eaabff5af803784281
a0af07859ddec84ef4fcfbe027d328b576b003dc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'162051' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFKQ' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
9a9ea0ca5256703b61fabaae57b01e4e
b5fb1ac14b4a8119507b0d131882203fafb78f5a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'212555' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFKR' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
2cb0b406ac8c62c4ef8d679f97ee56ae
eae29a04b364761e5244ada899209802d0fa90c7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'204748' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFKS' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
9ec5e041af378ff5edc80e60418929af
9b0e0e639e08da1b7774de761db06837d9d05f2f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'219595' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFKT' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
bf61b0e5b8e2351e8a633dd589cb2bdb
5b4776236e0f939a09224e23b5eb0de320d5c222
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'181482' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFKU' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
f90b2d2664bea4bd08f256ac0fdec4cd
2662f2df3c7004418ca5b662ae3d093bdd129f9e
'2011-12-04T05:50:42-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'178396' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFKV' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
4451a4b13aa4f3622c0943895a65ca3e
56d36272c6a48414bc60bece3a663b64dece7658
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'151515' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFKW' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
01e280bdcf45ae52dcea670cdbd047ca
74350192e10166dbbfcb8cb0debf1f67b05bcb1f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'159733' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFKX' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
0c80df66abbd7acc342463ffd5be8aed
d2e3578386cb411f63fcc3c49f5bf643a397fea7
'2011-12-04T05:51:35-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'151775' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFKY' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
d91a817a427a149454a7a913a4169ff0
e3f0b371ec212dd521fa1fde586f5d7fbed1786f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'218564' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFKZ' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
f847156c689991a2421eca443045f5f1
95bb89ecd4958ee19808380489abcd3c050f507d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'201286' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFLA' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
65cb1d91ad4f50a66637175665882468
026c9919c613565e229a9ff7cd1a21cf1a24e656
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'181011' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFLB' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
9fbde606849e0cadf48a299fffaaf9b7
ea53cf5cd19b908e68401439bc6e9c8c127b5c20
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'134858' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFLC' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
95aa297be9ca34a2cda1a26dd7c023a0
1985e98ba65004427c2c0c06e666087e41d4031b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'217218' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFLD' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
ef166a113ac84955d614a96442cc387c
7048fc8f473029a6abcb8a18eeaf48d166cc369b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'159287' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFLE' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
d314a1668024c3c291cff3324cafbf92
58debbf174a70d25495c23b8d471e61e0b48dfe6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'198312' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFLF' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
2f9761b511a7597034cca56618b7f32a
ccb67e45af605d14d1a4f5b579ae683afd23bfe5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'194249' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFLG' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
28edfbb26647847c9163f4ce8287e183
06ba3abf1e6b079a64793f0c3cc786d79c595a70
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'141275' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFLH' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
167378033e0b001de1919066d3a58ca5
7d9080895989a7c533b6a19a4b10910d969b8737
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'210549' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFLI' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
2a7965606a754f98c782c2b18bf0b9b2
aa2e179182be24d16a2da94b0ac4dc1774d9212d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'193648' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFLJ' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
024cbd25a54f90b5177ac77507bdbd48
06244842b8d538d180807cd5e2f01d3444296891
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'180063' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFLK' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
991be7181ef373624880c3519832d0e3
11fba1e523747511fcc262461b8b21d33c8ea6c8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'229086' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFLL' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
0c3178c73fe05d6a3c938687fac7398b
e5591435e70632a5459fbe68db1961d775ef3234
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'300842' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFLM' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
5af5fe162fbf822e2213d2fb9989002b
247e8fe0dc171d766f34b0746eca4561028b33c3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'226984' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFLN' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
4bab8049a5bc74f4496fc1216d6276e0
81ad5a8696df76612fc4044ee4b4598fdf6046f4
'2011-12-04T05:50:48-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'197639' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFLO' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
4921cf289f0bb63d0e53e28da67d6b40
837146cd1d73fb8df4a56977ff39fdf3939a5724
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'186196' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFLP' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
a34448c650d364cfe76d8de726586221
2403d9d6e1b7a9390e7f84cd45e01963c04c5312
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'169185' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFLQ' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
97a959bd603c5678a66246d4ebd11e14
97313543fd55c12f64cf591b2b75735b09e3ffac
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'202384' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFLR' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
48552a58a860d032264414f004c7aaf5
cacc764fb7ed28b01091f47cac740857836d8ecd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'198899' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFLS' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
3b3f752cb4aea76f0245f72d525e5fa5
165a3803f7ea07a97d75f798d64d1f6e000b2256
'2011-12-04T05:54:12-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'172154' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFLT' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
e600a54d1389478326769cb2ea6a417d
952fec925ecf55e6758f7db067085ffa1a2122dc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'235827' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFLU' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
0ecb298f5a387c80ffdb5476b8c6af0c
12862bfe6200f0beb056d131bbab70fcfa8751ed
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'167937' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFLV' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
2923662a312e579018d6516018a710db
9e7355608dee9c9895f829a9f429b83ca493b141
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'158429' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFLW' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
7bf8a33be3b742f8c8df1bab9ed41220
062cb5fb42fb9f300bd0a7cebbccc250ca3573a3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'241025' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFLX' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
ef70a057d846fd3a5c37aaa9d3282b7d
e24583d4cf1e7db527386e7d11e30d68443c2078
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'213875' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFLY' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
afc5b160d500ae5c102e418481373c1d
21ed2aafa5c7e58c194275275e2a2318b808fd00
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'152010' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFLZ' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
277a1d6b45bdcd77df16a0c33d3953a4
ab943e6f5c07d5fd8ebb1f534a16296cc11e293b
'2011-12-04T05:53:55-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'63526' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFMA' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
af0f842291bff155ac2ee2c8530af854
fb88667860e8a3135c099abb1217c8cf1c0ea941
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'26520' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFMB' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
70504251232ce2241f76f36880f4d634
ddcddddd4aa318fef2e2847a545c11b7a83f67c4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'58014' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFMC' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
a6c2d50974f3ea53f9cbb62b29fa1ae5
5c1b80837aacde6aa4702643b0457c69621a85db
'2011-12-04T05:51:17-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'78874' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFMD' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
1d71371e7df97237688f21a4101cfa67
647e45f92ee669f4c814929b65471f5c0ca00f3c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'71604' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFME' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
94d607a82a93c208ac0c342e64dfac63
6c270dc2b533f3e3d979695ec5a79913b760f981
'2011-12-04T05:51:49-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'43891' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFMF' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
e0d4079e053287562cadf5e503a11e7a
fe0f2cd0c293519c962eb135d7209ab6c3db5626
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38747' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFMG' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
89e461ea6a5658efe440abeebeb24cc7
658751a6de9e1b9ae038028166df60d674339aeb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'84533' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFMH' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
825318cb592743c5f70608a39e677520
d6235569e364d3b70b4a46707606b40a7180eb91
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'68606' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFMI' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
6f59cd5c6b2d9ce49e29e9fd67ae9afb
377c63eb1d7bf04a2ed899021358cd38e4d8bea4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35678' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFMJ' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
bdad4d78297d4e26bf0901ff008544c2
8245957622d1bf6267708875f828ff4858711d2c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'55239' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFMK' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
34ebc3233338fe3114e04f5a4ffc2cf9
0ef34cddfad7605715dd19f6458875106543ab5a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'49009' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFML' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
552bfb2a7e4c39a35c8004934c852ccd
d1394ca4a3da036a3bcd8f542b6e8b47ab0bb9ff
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'53445' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFMM' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
7e444ca4440d8b22db62e01bed7ea9f7
8ae880f70d8f7ba223bcfb0331a610e4230a25c2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'61024' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFMN' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
ccee3570b7e4dff8776dcb7f8a326af4
13e78032b51e1eda0153c972f369a91cd3d35cb5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'61605' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFMO' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
6f20f94b861f05bd2f7da4c4f221cfd9
2705de9fe4e8a224817ee7199a5b8b3f265ba8f9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'68090' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFMP' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
31b34bc47bfc563792cb08bb1f585a38
acf2489522551b9efe4e1a2c7ba5123bde5d73be
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'82978' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFMQ' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
84d837972be62ba65b4a5fa5b6fc4ed7
456a662279593a26d3118b9cc080ec8a6dfa62ea
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'84082' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFMR' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
e31e360d81dfa9d49a2dc3324c1e18bd
10838e1ec021781b219b41b96db81c958cc5544e
'2011-12-04T05:53:31-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'76855' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFMS' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
28cd310b0d4681f9ca3fff8a5178e811
25ec0267947c06fb862ff194255ab0b949df59cf
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79570' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFMT' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
f42de057884dc8a1ae74393479f8634c
6f5ace6233b75d48aebf4efa1e6c78798600df2e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'86196' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFMU' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
e3490d3408080fc3402d7fe8c9945ec9
7bcf8921ae255cbad9f331e1ae246cc7a9ead94f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'76669' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFMV' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
dd075a14508907efac597d5a394c8dd8
a3b2775574c17b363f14f840079ba9858942abf9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'74679' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFMW' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
3ca11a976e7cc4409ba23dae55caab87
90b58738d649abd49b2ad21b44566c76e2f70af4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'86837' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFMX' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
23a9ed26e5ffc54f7fee4108347b596d
71d69ac7f55af462289a7b8bf5541f83b57a6651
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'48155' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFMY' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
8d702a459739c8ab3bd7195ca87748e0
970e5d929e52714e955c78bb92d17abfab8bc8fb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'59875' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFMZ' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
e474a38c87c406738eef0b1699f3609a
e6964cc836cedbe03de29b7ce18d3a16e12bf8ec
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'74678' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFNA' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
7da70a8b7d18c339b909416600e76e7b
19b27ce14aed7d3aa06b78249ce9eb2c9dc5ac90
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'77174' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFNB' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
c17415da0895bcb311dedbe4323c481b
17762488dbed92be5bc4f8ab50d6186f4fc5197e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'77521' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFNC' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
dc63c14a6f3852380b8a92962603b377
144c687036421cb2c8433f0e76589327b14e8458
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'81579' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFND' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
3b8d8549c247b405b0cb9ea4efae9f92
2b83d960989b53f22125c3fd6554352aa05a84b1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80320' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFNE' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
19171549087b902f9d1a1c3ed13633e8
5f50bf21102e0bf0cdc474f2e4c7027729eea8b6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'69170' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFNF' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
c8cf44fece61df4e77f266e28868af33
0c39ac1aaf8667a58cf17d39323697202d51a9c1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80932' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFNG' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
a5e0591e566ddd631fe56540c6a44515
686d778cf2710dfb81ca69a9c68f63362f37a82a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'64798' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFNH' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
1f420146e83fff5a2200d429cb4881b5
5b2c077397931f73f2237039603973ca9fd24d3d
'2011-12-04T05:52:49-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'85488' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFNI' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
b3afef4725af3a3826e1e4544f4d14a1
658a691096a9356bb3ffb4516d5ddc05d9b907e5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'74367' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFNJ' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
99f3ae6a0c6432fa9303648995d2bd42
8d4c8a8afd54b8855586e6ef6e2d74d927bb187b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'61318' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFNK' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
7f4c1427a1b05c253d4d7d9b46181fdc
42163e848a9f5e1630510d134b9cb4504b88b9f7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'65262' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFNL' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
b1c90969a4bd2c068596b018007fb644
4dc12d638fcf31c88e48c99029ead51584f05c1e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80828' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFNM' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
3bec31c82d0bc1217999b2b7fcf223d3
4fffa9a3b4af225bbf3cf472b011f6cb2e13213c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'66447' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFNN' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
e1602567362979d5e1d598e2086b2903
aa8cc5121a59d7d89c894310fb164fe881e85226
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'82513' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFNO' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
657d5857b9f04987512076c86792c811
052fc932a7f926375d766131459f7a6a21e2dbb6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79609' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFNP' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
b0e947e242d4a14669c9f4da8eb80914
09c271a223568d38f6060fa7462d487b64286977
'2011-12-04T05:54:14-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'70980' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFNQ' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
01bf3ed1e07a85259610647704c3783a
a780392d0687dd4eb7be3ee48bad96c01fcc16f1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39670' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFNR' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
e3eafdcbbb538870f158e5a1437b1a38
7b86eb592a047e41a736300dd6b64c6d484ed5c6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'88450' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFNS' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
8ab55232637d1a61e58a3e0fcd2158ea
b300c954d51865c5f9c97a550d303f70907b2445
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'77809' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFNT' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
90a0da641a2a42e32d801ad3f3cd1ac1
521f6f76814132f62457995fac2bcb858c1eef3a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'74193' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFNU' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
e38833c08e0f37fc693a859d49aa9595
97556f8a9fc905bf519ff92deec4dbc150a447c6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'53253' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFNV' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
e3797db294777e0c9894dcde8761fca3
28251b8e0a584aa86941730f430c4133629b3e33
'2011-12-04T05:51:34-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'59490' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFNW' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
90f38241c4af5598a5773188bf7fb2a4
6ba1d10a6ea7f93e6dd79db9cfb05af8f1499bb5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'82873' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFNX' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
58bb79b57464de37eed857adf6e0b338
bd85d2bcb26b9c0f09f033378ff251ed73d236f2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'86756' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFNY' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
57f2c78de77b52ce2ca1cf72095142f9
5674e03b50b0542a87fd70e8e97f1d5c653cdc4f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'77050' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFNZ' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
7a4eabe563c1c70821678f06579d324c
3cf70b5bd0b2dd9ccf459dd2485f05e2811abf45
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'81630' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFOA' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
4014e8d063014809b2520eb0d41c360e
58ec199311e478bb973023ca9b37c4fb32539f28
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'88189' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFOB' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
72a8a44eef7d874c6badd65faa0c4004
04a76bfdf0385a2be9c766411401fa711bedaf77
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'75649' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFOC' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
d2883333d2f9acf3b78f41005b039123
4a223a2227ca6eee4682474b3d17d5d441ac8a60
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'84415' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFOD' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
82a62b28cbacca485a6689e7f4d33009
7002f6ad15eb7b58eb4e876df26fd357eaa4f496
'2011-12-04T05:52:27-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'62613' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFOE' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
3f311de1a4cb238f4d68e45a87a21ee9
cada16263c04e9af862bc8b770036f560858218d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'84856' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFOF' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
ce8bc6fbbdb67ca2623796bae45bbe1d
fb6eef066268d24b5b164993dd62886c3a51f21a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'76351' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFOG' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
fa350cbb37c9128074b0b32ea422230c
769eff13bf54d4730afabbc0a9f89329620393d3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'83020' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFOH' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
ae233dc3f3b4f21638ec74bb8820520a
8089a7461828f24342e13b6ef4593e5b94bb2a42
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'56435' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFOI' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
5f40a407e658ed8db170767867bcce45
1dc9497253d0d144c81c9134dc822bd608b4bdd1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'50711' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFOJ' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
c5746f7080137bd074a771242ad7d91e
97d399be62d9994af641cd6595d3219123d0b6bc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'74123' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFOK' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
8267f5805dc776bfb09646ec6b33dedd
409c80953e5526c8c4c592c20ecbb8045eaaab11
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'73978' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFOL' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
1b3397fbff699966e090d1ede6193777
dd4dad61f52cee24e837b9048c3e465d729e8708
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'82599' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFOM' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
e69187e16e82fa751416b78ea048b751
007ada03e1ba02049466b3604554a11d3a289d14
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'64955' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFON' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
48dfc31893a2f58d78e84568b849a299
03ac9755685b2cd57fb563f38c5b46316509f9a5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'75965' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFOO' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
6bb963bfc3cba80525152ab44136dece
0e57c87b008e89b0ef2e214ddff8cf425d5cb727
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'70638' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFOP' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
7423480abb8ca78b9c10fee8e289acf2
a92a30abf59ec617973f90b46c6e85a8881e7290
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'78818' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFOQ' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
214568e04a337b1ddf4c7ae4cf52d8c6
22adec50f24d5569b6d14dcc38f42efb35cfe144
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'68640' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFOR' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
70fe5aedf40e0c28828f8afe69c97c0f
84738415707e54c626c6b3f07d47013d50b524ea
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'71466' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFOS' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
d8e4a3ae649c3b112b87413571dd4f7b
7f05d74d1526ae1ac14fa8a11bb09b5e347178a9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'81646' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFOT' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
7f4e62f3b3d5eb544c4066a673249adb
8eb2b2a1d97a0e39a8d0b2d85add49e5777d00d0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'66817' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFOU' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
d5eca6a6d73b9711899e39a256edb5bb
6b96508db43ed9a02e68049400da4b3d213962fe
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'68425' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFOV' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
d4e1344a09776be1dcf3177fe6cb7768
234ee7b3ce7b2d846ce4baf95e7758e3ebc1e023
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'78929' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFOW' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
f3cf2313df554a486af2eaba198df058
4891754a91afa801558ed868204b5d03a5276dc2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'82700' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFOX' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
64bc94067e8824d2af63dcd2211c16e6
160c7069d164ff4510461df50fbfcc7344db5233
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'69769' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFOY' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
7e672149fe991cd3d49137be2aaf8a67
b79b90b16cd10f578b45f5ca531de71f6550c523
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'77710' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFOZ' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
ee63c3cdaec0e896c6eb7f91c77025bb
b1605389a89eea499f18a52c21459eca081f3187
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'68422' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFPA' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
c03596a56bfc2cbafc66724aca359713
cbe1176c2cd6470f788c3135e77b15d042c63e99
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'81605' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFPB' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
3aad8124b1a8002c504d25a06c6638ce
323f12081c4b14a62e735807d36fe45658152271
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'64296' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFPC' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
9ef9a8c8e42b2a0fe34bb1755dfeecdd
3d64cba93a4b3c757f159774c6697948bab22fba
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'70527' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFPD' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
1c237f9840d671fa67c0641be56555db
8a0ba1992fc0b7366c93a00348982f0cbc1a4602
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'84661' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFPE' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
43bad64d9dbed762cfb893ce831015f4
667a59dea0e398843cf1cea14b86c3ae2e6cbc1a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'81639' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFPF' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
b0644a04fd50cb7e5c49552ceb8a5cd6
5137e83caec7055b5f3485673fc369b43a028cdf
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'74788' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFPG' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
e2bf456aae23eaf79c1ad55f4cebabeb
7415a66be489354e055cbfd08e8b64f88949e07a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'73029' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFPH' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
3d21a341dfa538a9f41f55217ca205b4
1da95126dc4831b810a5ea92fe0a00eecdd0b35f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'75694' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFPI' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
88a484c5cf66c0616633040468dc1c6c
8a1f64c9eb82b2b158e7b480801f0382915d581c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'66333' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFPJ' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
a2e66a10497219b586fc522759de2ae9
58e43cd999e4b402d7f121d5a24d4854f32aafdb
'2011-12-04T05:49:26-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'54024' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFPK' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
81301aa7c5b2f119870c93783a8b1e8d
aaa0c660ad31ad6cea9096530352be3d932280e9
'2011-12-04T05:50:16-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'56825' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFPL' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
1a08246c80d274d81f5de5296f171b3b
dd6d3997a64495808359697262b795bcbde2a1c8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'75313' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFPM' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
0753875c515970c16a5b078e4e28034d
8e286cc6ea53360edc54845571086d9ced9c34a0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'75200' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFPN' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
eb2fd9c85e6a8c6ed06246efd59b0915
dcc2596cc5c020892b9b02889c22f9ed7a4dbcae
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'84489' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFPO' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
eea9a1b6ffbba776ddec81f727e4ab6e
c702dc1171e77f9d9928f7a22df329d3e07ea120
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'83675' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFPP' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
2489bea412ca4441bf29d5b2badbe5c2
bda35eb8d8f4e3e234ec14a79b4f9a9465ee26a2
'2011-12-04T05:52:53-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'77253' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFPQ' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
e0df2a6d899cd9f3ca0bbaeb19e9d6c1
fc1e75475fbe13c14520c2f0b4b3f9fc0091abb4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'73396' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFPR' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
dd867eb70fccf2554fff023de3cb91ea
089c1c01c01566eb2ecd3dffc8f18c023a056dbe
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'65436' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFPS' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
b00329c3574a3857639d6bb733650c70
2f2e22ece793f187d401dda837fcb60bd10c467e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'75550' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFPT' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
69e88cbde9895b163dd453c4bc871047
d394f9af84e05e57e5c7f0a1d8b18fb7152b0b1f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79732' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFPU' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
d4cc2ef9c064bb29ed420fd9625f9bd8
505d3731028927926dc0b74916629cc46247e27c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'75097' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFPV' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
ba54af1b962ef99cbc1e677e228f360f
4003feb4d70cb143e7ff5fd14863aeed66e96c6f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'69335' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFPW' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
e12177a4551bf7af97ac54d627f020c0
67f33a67ea7240167f85d25b10b9be9b61e52e77
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'66956' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFPX' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
08bf3fdb81b31368fc318db3688734be
2ae4a4dd792008b5312c7ae2275a7d60ee719b48
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'63091' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFPY' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
b024f04f9a3837caabc6caa23e0ac198
ed6948c17d6cc9bc4f709a915c7fab3ee50ccde7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'82138' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFPZ' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
f0a1b7c00125f4736600e1e0ea8807fc
6a7ae5d57339c5c953f19966e45dcdb362f30698
'2011-12-04T05:52:13-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'77214' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFQA' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
69961c5ff1f3b7c4e6aa460f19566beb
5edef351bf7e0ed7d95fe6328068a27028ab3072
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79210' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFQB' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
19d048721e1d47bce06cbe13482845bf
9c35591e84cbe72dbba1996ad9e6e5770a1ce75c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'64619' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFQC' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
e567866d75aa4f70d99c9881672e2433
e32e772aa10c33ab89889331833462ddd2eabba7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'77362' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFQD' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
56b5a6e6d17f2c72e6e09f998b2d1492
e6f8d2724262ad8220d28a7f842d1d5601774624
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80584' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFQE' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
4fbf9fd38a3c615a364f85c06f74a0d4
750d23735a9c62ed657295e68f17f06a399cd48d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'68802' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFQF' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
ff071a3057f52742a0429499439004bd
b5cecee9b87aa9ae3170029d1bc10c1e8b7043dc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'82388' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFQG' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
b3dadc55e65e541ef139935f989f5881
44310ad03b933e0e8e45fbf28efb7af82f974d30
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'77128' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFQH' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
2430f8266a2df38cf53e969208dfe205
99cab394dffe8b0eff3f944997f2b2f5e2687f43
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'87930' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFQI' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
283baafac2385fc9ac776b48c985705c
dd9d3cf9fd89831e328a9ea262bdf82b683f6aa8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'66001' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFQJ' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
8fa34afdb18ac8f7fe12629733c2bf57
814bc345216add1e77487408ce3166dba10be35e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'81918' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFQK' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
93ec5091cb2a603a414adf21529d6642
1b1bf54e08efd20b54fd6ce9670f0d513919b63a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'69322' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFQL' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
a382f67790c9482f5947d3484accaa77
339b2fe708e722272c0880e3e7c7de409372dd16
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'61031' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFQM' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
93ebe50652ad8259d1cd1674baefe3ab
6ce569df40d9f352de8cb2e8d6c28871867a888a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'78945' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFQN' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
ebb944feb2885d0edf7c581c53d0dc0e
a0374249eb014e15b9f6b75db198b3d0aec4a35b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'78637' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFQO' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
38349ddacc72345b400dcdf536b32aae
42cb7371e18ec8ad9a2bf1c8f56ed07de6eedf77
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'61688' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFQP' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
248bce3ef82dcde4b29fe28762687912
85169f9f8d11bd15b653ff1c30f7d203c7aecd57
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'74370' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFQQ' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
d07d9c2eb3c45eeb86bea75bc4f817dd
c59424cada91d284809b1ec6267639005e86db76
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79289' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFQR' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
df1fbd5e3b2a3b12b8b147c99f2f4433
b1272a0bd4fe82238953c9c2583e4c0c5706addf
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'77693' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFQS' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
36dbaafdbfb7421c143285c1590cea73
0f29dc4177b72b661714914c72ee8e0f8b5c0ddb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'77662' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFQT' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
91d9f30485ca94947d355568b3d06f12
22edb13cae210c8e41c0b3822ea580f0290846b4
'2011-12-04T05:51:52-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'76748' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFQU' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
c9dab24dd6ace279ac84c62a95199cc6
bf2a9229ab0725e0cb31a0a773e1d46d32153854
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79985' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFQV' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
235b0bbece1289db959486d3d4bdc8d4
0cd860f2727386bea5edfd9926712c99c853de37
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'72553' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFQW' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
f56bc2e1ffb65e72676ebea08849a547
cfbd8ee8b74888d05046a95b2daf4ad61c9ebcab
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79756' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFQX' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
63a52e902e76f75ab258b5880625d285
58af08cf7d08d47bc85bc4b2edacb6b4d591f846
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'40646' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFQY' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
ca501a704478ba7ceb5af2ac8c5c0547
ae76de30f7902c595e2e3792683424332aef7198
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'58515' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFQZ' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
5d6fa4f6160cb7aa8ad0fb1afcb5e1c7
2f52adfc1699b351b77775fabb4859a433c3dffc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'69676' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFRA' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
8e15e9fabc2fa65411b881e778ef0934
0ed349d8b24ff0b16897ff784c4e693a97a03271
'2011-12-04T05:53:25-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'67467' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFRB' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
05ab3ceb91a941a4045d771212abdf9a
2570a3de5c959615bea945127db51e5bb2b72bd2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'58579' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFRC' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
94664661ff094b57f636d14c2ccde6f5
53cd10ba67ce86d6ccb9d6c48d58609a4f81eb33
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'75877' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFRD' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
995607326869235ce55b07fb8610376c
c6ea20c58224cdd515d6629610c2dbbcf9653ac2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'72720' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFRE' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
ea7d73f49ed5e04332e278e8dbdd59d0
4cf13e58ca6f6acdb94773b9ad9c02f79614801c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'77457' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFRF' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
f9a91ff46c910faf55b3ebd67cac31cb
7141af0e8f8adf09fbf74c9aa653cd188c83ce1e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'65914' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFRG' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
23254a2d512405201f713aa5ade277d2
55994c83603a9415ef55ee63b415980f66864f50
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'65095' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFRH' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
db0ab48462ed5335d822823982b68340
6e2a609da518a62091c381354f33d2f12152163c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'57750' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFRI' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
2068c69373b53b7c6805ced3fd2d2004
b5e2a38b301e2a7a7df7ce09ebf15e20f5d1a0b4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'59650' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFRJ' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
98e261e116c47858eae8885e58a39f17
324a0a812af491891a0ca73da10fd67f77545ddd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'55926' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFRK' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
d77c1c7ba5cc981f6f65fd77f68298ec
f2ea5999e5b13bc4e62e11f07e5bf8f21ba20769
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'78845' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFRL' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
4f1013932e91fbdf97854cd2895a101b
423d6722aab9cfe150d3739244e2fd6b30d7e1b9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'72109' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFRM' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
dc9119e80bfaff32129f17da34e32872
f2188dfa48db63f894bd421204216bdce6c236fc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'69481' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFRN' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
5d33ad37e462978645293b72f7c8b291
fd49fd8b876c776799a7481b8fce798e0726e1ed
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'50763' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFRO' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
e15049ed004406296988ca7ddb979333
d2d1bdb92ef6370acf5f26bf1ee911af4ed7baab
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79136' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFRP' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
fd8f701e15d046e52f7e8aaab2663059
0e661e07cb7aa1f3431464175ca68feb3fedc18d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'56258' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFRQ' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
6641f699992da4d24afa37e61a0936fd
e8f0c7b88f47139b7cd5c1684be466b91eb63b8e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'74529' 'info:fdaE20080426_AAAALAfileF20080427_AAAFRR' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
cd190abb4f61633456568589c43d77b7
fe2bfa2b666977b22d1479d2366f6677858981ca
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
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“OH DEAR! OH DEAR! I SHALL BE TOO LATE!”








ar y , .
=| ALICE IN

“WONDERLAND



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BY LEWIS =

CARROLL ate:
ODO OD se

PICTURED

RAPHAEL TUCK & SONS, LTP
LONDON : PARIS : BERLIN : NEW YORK: MONTREAL

Prinved in England





All in the golden afternoon
Full letsurely we glide ;

For both our oars, with little skill,
By litile arms are plied,

While little hands make vain pretence
Our wanderings to guide.

Ah, cruel Three! In such an hour,
Beneath such dreamy weather,

To beg a tale of breath too weak
To stir the tiniest feather !

Yet what can one poor voice avail

Against three tongues together ?

Imperious Prima flashes forth
Fler edict “to begin it” —

In gentler tone Secunda hopes

“ There will be nonsense tn tt !”—
While Tertia interrupts the tale
Not more than once a minute.

Anon, to sudden silence won,
Ln fancy they pursue

The dream-child moving through a lane
Of wonders wild and new.

In friendly chat with bird or beast—
And half believe it true.
6 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

And ever, as the story drained Thus grew the tale of Wonderland ;
The wells of fancy ary, Thus slowly, one by one,

And faintly strove that weary one Its quaint events were hammered out—
To put the subject by, And now the tale is done,

“ The rest next time—” “Itis next time!” And home we steer, a merry crew,
The happy votces cry. Beneath the setting sun.

Alice! a childish story take,
And with a gentle hand
Lay it where Childhood's dreams are twined

In Memory’s mystic band.
Like pilgrim’s wither'd wreath of flowers
Pluck'd in a far-off land,


@

te
wt 7

CHAPTER

I,

II.
II.
IV.
Vv.
VI.
VII.
VIII.
IX.

XI.
XII.

CONTENTS

DOWN THE RABBIT-HOLE . : . :
THE POOL OF TEARS

A CAUCUS-RACE AND A LONG TALE
THE RABBIT SENDS IN A LITTLE BILL
ADVICE FROM A CATERPILLAR . . .
PIG AND PEPPER. ’ : : ‘ :
A MAD TEA-PARTY. | .

THE QUEEN’S CROQUET-GROUND.

THE MOCK TURTLE'’S STORY

THE LOBSTER QUADRILLE .

WHO STOLE THE TARTS? . : . .
ALICE’S EVIDENCE . . : . .



PAGE

20
30
40
52
63
77
89
102
114
125
137









«a
wer











NY
TQ

i



(
\







mr

TE
ATO

LIST OF COLOURED PLATES

“QOH DEAR! OH DEAR! I SHALL BE TOO LATE!” . . Frontispiece
THE RABBIT STARTED VIOLENTLY . ; : . facing page 22
THE. POOL. OF TEARS: 4.00 2 Fe et A ee gs eee
THE: MOUSE’S TALE © 5 20.0 45 ce) hag! fed, aes ace 56
THE WHITE RABBIT HOUSE . . . . .. eae
ADVICE FROM A CATERPILLAR . . . .. . a ae eg
IN THE DUCHESS'S KITCHEN: 202 0 Rill 6a
THE PIG BABY vic: Ge ee ay eee Ge ea oe eee
THE MAD-HATTER’S TEA-PARTY . . «we Seng 86
THE CHESHIRE (CAT +i ven tit. ea ey eee ee Bae Os
THE MOCK TURTLE’S STORY. aa ee ei ao

THE TRIAL OF THE KNAVE OF HEARTS . . . 7 » 138


ALICE IN WONDERLAND

CHAPTER I

DOWN THE RABBIT-HOLE

ALICE was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister
on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she
had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had
no pictures or conversations in it, ‘“‘and what is the use of a
book,” thought Alice, “without pictures or conversations ?”

So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she
could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid)
whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be
worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies,
when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close
by her.
10 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did
Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit
say to itself, ‘Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be too late!” (when








she thought it over after-
wards, it occurred to her
that she ought to have won-
dered at this, but at the
time it all seemed quite
natural); but when the rab-

bit actually Zook a
watch out of tts
watstcoat - pocket,
and looked at it,
and then hurried
on, Alice started
to her feet, for
it flashed across
her mind that she
had never before
seen a rabbit with
either a waistcoat-
pocket, or a watch
to take out of
it, and burning
with curiosity, she
ran across’ the
field after it, and
was just in time
DOWN THE RABBIT-HOLE II

to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the
hedge.

In another moment down went Alice after it, never once
considering how in the world she was to get out again.

The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some
way, and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that
Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself
before she found herself falling down what seemed to be a
very deep well.

Either the well was very deep, or she fell very slowly, for
she had plenty of time as she went down to look about her,
and to wonder what was going to happen next. First, she
tried to look down and make out what she was coming to,
but it was too dark to see anything; then she looked at the
sides of the well, and noticed that they were filled with
cupboards and book-shelves: here and there she saw maps
and pictures hung upon pegs. She took down a jar from
one of the shelves as she passed: it was labelled ORAN GE
MARMALADE, but to her great disappointment it was
empty: she did not like to drop the jar for fear of killing
somebody underneath, so managed to put it into one of the
cupboards as she fell past it.

“Well!” thought Alice to herself. ‘After such a fall as
this, I shall think nothing of tumbling down stairs! How
brave they'll all think me at home! Why I wouldn't say
anything about it, even if I fell off the top of the house!”
(Which is very likely true.)

Down, down, down. Would the fall never come to an
12 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

end? ‘I wonder how many miles I’ve fallen by this time?”
she said aloud. ‘I must be getting somewhere near the
centre of the earth. Let mesee: that would be four thousand
miles down, I think—” (for, you see, Alice had learnt several
things of this sort in her lessons in the schoolroom, and
though this was not a very good opportunity for showing off
her knowledge, as there was no one to listen to her, still it
was good practice to say it over) ‘‘—yes, that’s about the right
distance—but then I wonder what Latitude or Longitude
I've got to?” (Alice had no idea what Latitude was, or
Longitude either, but thought they were nice grand words
to say.)

Presently she began again: ‘I wonder if I shall fall right
through the earth! How funny it'll seem to come out among
the people that walk with their heads downwards! The
Antipathies, I think—” (she was rather glad there was no one
listening, this time, as it didn’t sound at all the right word)
‘“— but I shall have to ask them what the name of the country
is, you know. ‘Please, Ma’am, is this New Zealand or
Australia?’”—(and she tried to curtsey as she spoke—fancy
curtseyimg as you're falling through the air! Do you think
you could manage it?) ‘And what an ignorant little girl
she'll think me! No, it'll never do to ask; perhaps I shall
see it written up somewhere.”

Down, down, down. There was nothing else to do, so
Alice soon began talking again. “ Dinah’ll miss me very
much to-night, I should think!” (Dinah was the cat.) “I~
hope they’ll remember her saucer of milk at tea-time. Dinah,
DOWN THE RABBIT-HOLE 13

my dear,
I wish
you were
down here
with me!
There are
no mice
in the air,
I’m afraid, but you
might catch a bat,
and that’s very
like a mouse, you
know. But docats
eat bats, I won-
der?” And here
Alice began to get
rather sleepy, and
went on saying to
herself, in a dreamy sort
of way, ‘‘ Do cats eat bats ?
Do cats eat bats?” and
sometimes, ‘‘Do bats eat
cats?” for, you see, as
she couldn’t answer either
question, it didn’t much matter which way she put it. She
felt that she was dozing off, and had just begun to dream
that she was walking hand in hand with Dinah, and saying
to her very earnestly, ‘‘ Now, Dinah, tell me the truth: did




14 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

you ever eat a bat?” when suddenly, thump! thump! down
she came upon a heap of sticks and dry leaves, and the fall
was over.

Alice was not a bit hurt, and she jumped up on to her feet
in a moment: she looked up, but it was all dark overhead ;
before her was another long passage, and the White Rabbit
was still in sight, hurrying down it. There was not a
moment to be lost: away went Alice like the wind, and was
just in time to hear it say, as it turned a corner, ‘‘Oh my ears
and whiskers, how late it’s getting!” She was close behind
it when she turned the corner, but the Rabbit was no longer
to be seen: she found herself in a long, low hall, which was
lit up by a row of
lamps hanging from
the roof.

There were doors
all round the hall,
but they were all
locked; and when
Alice had been all
the way down one
side and up the
other trying every
| | door, she walked
| sadly down the
middle wondering
how she was ever
to get out again.


DOWN THE RABBIT-HOLE 15

Suddenly she came upon a little three-legged table, all
made of solid glass; there was nothing on it but a tiny
golden key, and Alice’s first idea was that this might belong
to one of the doors of the hall; but alas! either the locks
were too large, or the key was too small, but at any rate it
would not open any of them. However, on the second time
round, she came upon a low curtain she had not noticed
before, and behind it was a little door about fifteen inches
high : she tried the little golden key in the lock, and to her
great delight it fitted |

Alice opened the door and found that it led to a small
passage, not much larger thana rat-hole: she knelt down and
looked along the passage into the loveliest garden you ever
saw. Howshe longed to get out of that dark hall, and wander
about among those beds of bright flowers and those cool
fountains, but she could not even get her head through the
doorway; ‘‘and even if my head would go through,” thought
poor Alice, ‘it would be of very little use without my
shoulders. Oh, how I wish I could shut up like a telescope!
I think I could, if I only knew how to begin.” For, you
see, SO many out-of-the-way things had happened lately, that
Alice had begun to think that very few things indeed were
really impossible.

There seemed to be no use in waiting by the little door,
so she went back to the table, half hoping she might find
another key on it, or at any rate a book of rules for shutting
people up like telescopes: this time she found a little bottle
on it (“which certainly was not here before,” said Alice), and
16 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

: : tied round the neck of the bottle
was a paper label, with the words
DRINK ME beautifully printed
on it in large letters.

It was all very well to say
“Drink me,” but the
wise little Alice was
not going to do fhat
in a hurry. “No, I'll
¢ look first,” she said,
f ~_ and see whether.

y ivs marked
= ~~ poison or not”;
| € 2 for she had. read
several nice little
| stories about
children who had got burnt,
and eaten up by wild beasts,
and other unpleasant things, —
all because they would not
remember the simple rules
their friends had taught them: such as, that a red-hot poker
will burn you if you hold it too long; and that, if you cut
your finger very deeply with a knife it usually bleeds; and
she had never forgotten that, if you drink much from a bottle

marked “poison,” it is almost certain to disagree with you,
sooner or later.






Al

(7

mec
ecuccat(

R
On

{|

N
fy
if
t
Y

oO
00
Q

However, this bottle was zof marked “poison,” so Alice
DOWN THE RABBIT-HOLE I

ventured to taste it, and finding it very nice (it had, in fact, a
sort of mixed flavour of cherry-tart, custard, pine-apple, roast
turkey, toffee, and hot buttered toast), she very soon finished
it off.

* * * * * *
* * * * % % *
* * * * * *
“What a curious feeling!” said Alice. ‘I must be shut-

ting up like a telescope.”

And so it was indeed : she was now only ten inches high ;
and her face brightened up at the thought that she was now
the right size for going through the little door into that
lovely garden. First, however, she waited for a few minutes
to see if she was going to shrink any further : she felt a little
nervous about this; “for it might end, you

know,” said Alice to herself, “in my going
out altogether, like a candle. I wonder
what I should be like then?” And she

tried to fancy what the flame of a candle ¢
looks like after the candle is ?
blown out, for she could not
remember ever having seen
such a thing.

After a while, finding that
nothing more happened, she
decided on

going into Waser :
the garden






18 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

at once; but, alas, for poor Alice! when she got to the door,
she found she had forgotten the little golden key, and when
she went back to the table for it, she found she could not
possibly reach it: she could see it quite plainly through the
glass, and she tried her best to climb up one of the legs of
the table; but it was too slippery ; and when she had tired
herself out with trying, the poor little thing sat down and
cried.

“Come, there’s no use in crying like that!” said Alice
to herself, rather sharply. “I advise you to leave off this.
minute!” She generally gave herself very good advice
(though she very seldom followed it), and sometimes she
scolded herself so severely as to bring tears into her eyes;
and once she remembered trying to box her own ears for
having cheated herself in a game of croquet she was playing
against herself, for this curious child was very fond of pre-
tending to be two people. “ But it’s no use now,” thought
poor Alice, ‘to pretend to be two people! Why, there's
hardly enough of me left to make owe respectable person |”

Soon her eye ‘fell on a little glass box that was lying
under the table: she opened it, and found in it a very small
cake, on which the words EAT ME were beautifully
marked in currants. ‘ Well, I'll eat it,” said Alice, ‘‘and if it
makes me grow larger, I can reach the key ; and if it makes
me grow smaller, I can creep under the door; so either way
I'll get into the garden, and I don’t care which happens!”

She ate a little bit, and said anxiously to herself, ‘‘ Which
way ? Which way?” holding her hand on the top of her head
DOWN THE RABBIT-HOLE 19

to feel which way it was growing, and she was quite
surprised to find that she remained the same size; to be
sure, this is what generally happens when one eats cake, but
Alice had got so much into the way of expecting nothing
but out-of-the-way things to happen, that it seemed quite
dull and stupid for life to go on in the common way.

So she set to work, and very soon finished off the cake.




THE POOL OF TEARS

“CuRIOUSER and curiouser!” cried Alice (she was so much
surprised, that for the moment she quite forgot how to
speak good English); “now I’m opening out like the largest
telescope that ever was! Good-bye, feet!” (for when she
looked down at her feet, they seemed to be almost out of
sight, they were getting so far off). ‘‘Oh, my poor little feet,
I wonder who will put on your shoes and stockings for you
now, dears? I’m sure J sha’n’t be able! I shall be a great
deal too far off to trouble myself about you: you must
THE POOL OF TEARS 21

manage the best way you can—but I must be kind to them,”
thought Alice, ‘or perhaps they won't walk the way I want
to go! Let me see: I'll give them a new pair of boots every
Christmas.”

And she went on planning to herself how she would
manage it. ‘‘They must go by the carrier,” she thought;
‘and how funny it'll seem, sending presents to one’s own
feet!) And how odd the directions will look |

Alice's Right Foot, Esq.,
flearthrug,
near the Fender
(with Alice's love).

Oh dear, what nonsense I’m talking!”

Just then her head struck against the roof of the hall: in
fact she was now rather more than nine feet high, and she at
once took up the little golden key and hurried off to the
garden door.

Poor Alice! It was as much as she could do, lying
down on one side, to look through into the garden with one
eye; but to get through was more hopeless than ever: she
sat down and began to cry again.

“You ought to be ashamed of yourself,” said Alice, “a
great girl like you” (she might well say this), “to go on
crying in this way! Stop this moment, I tell you!” But
she went on all the same, shedding gallons of tears, until
_ there was a large pool all round her, about four inches deep
and reaching half down the hall.

After a time she heard a little pattering of feet in the
22



ALICE IN WONDERLAND

or i



SS
Ss
@

Cd

(CANA

( ca



S

Pa

(







a

—_—_—_——_.

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distance, and she hastily
dried her eyes to see what
was coming. It was the
White Rabbit returning,
splendidly dressed, with a
pair of white kid gloves in
one hand and a large fan in
the other: he came trotting
along in a great hurry,
muttering to himself as he
came, ‘‘Oh! the Duchess,
the Duchess! Oh! won't
she be savage if I’ve kept
her waiting!” Alice felt so
desperate that she was ready
to ask help of any one; so,

yews when the Rabbit came near
A\_ her she began, in a low,

timid voice, ‘If you please,
sir——’ The Rabbit started
violently, dropped the white
kid gloves and the fan, and
scurried away into the dark-
ness as hard as he could go.

Alice took up the fan and
gloves, and as the hall was
very hot, she kept fanning
herself all the time she went


“CURIOUSER AND CURIOUSER I”


THE POOL OF TEARS 23

on talking: ‘‘ Dear, dear! How queer everything is to-day |!
And yesterday things went on just as usual. I wonder if
I’ve been changed in the night? Let me think: was I the
same when I got up this morning? I almost think I can
remember feeling a little different. But if I’m not the same,
the next question is, Who in the worldamI! Ah, ¢ha?'s
the great puzzle!” And she began thinking over all the
children she knew that were of the same age as herself, to see
if she could have been changed for any of them.

‘Tm sure I’m not Ada,” she said, “for her hair goes in
such long ringlets, and mine doesn’t go in ringlets at all ;
and I’m sure I can’t be Mabel, for I know all sorts of things,
and she, oh! she knows sucha very little! Besides, she’s she,
and J’ I, and—oh dear, how puzzling it all is! I'll try if I
know all the things I used to know. Let me see: four times
five is twelve, and four times six is thirteen, and four times
seven is—oh dear! I shall never get to twenty at that rate |
However, the Multiplication Table doesn’t signify: let’s try
Geography. London is the capital of Paris, and Paris is the
capital of Rome, and Rome—no, ¢/a?’s all wrong, I’m certain |
I must have been changed for Mabel! I'll try and say,
‘How doth the little’”—and she crossed her hands on her
lap as if she were saying lessons, and began to repeat it, but
her voice sounded hoarse and strange, and the words did not
come the same as they used to do :—

“ How doth the little crocodile
Improve his shining tail,
And pour the waters of the Nile
On every golden scale!
24 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

“ How cheerfully he seems to grin,
How neatly spreads his claws,
And welcomes little fishes in,
With gently smiling jaws!”

“I’m sure those are not the right words,” said poor Alice,
and her eyes filled with tears again as she went on. “I must
be Mabel, after all, and I shall have to go and live in that
poky little house, and have next to no toys to play with,
and oh! ever so many lessons to learn! No, I’ve made up
my mind about it; if I’m Mabel, I'll stay down here! It'll
be no use their putting their heads down and saying, ‘Come
up again, dear!’ I shall only look up and say ‘Who
am I, then? Tell me that first, and then, if I like being that
person, I'll come up: if not, I’ll stay down here till I’m
somebody else’—but, oh dear!” cried Alice, with a sudden
' burst of tears, “I do wish they would put their heads down |!
I am so very tired of being all alone here!”

As she said this she looked down at her hands, and was
surprised to see that she had put on one of the Rabbit's little
white kid gloves while she was talking. ‘‘ How can I have
done that?” she thought. ‘I must be growing small again.”
She got up and went to the table to measure herself by it,
and found that, as nearly as she could guess, she was now
about two feet high, and was going on shrinking rapidly ;
she soon found out that the cause of this was the fan she was
holding, and she dropped it hastily, just in time to avoid
shrinking away altogether.

“That was a narrow escape!” said Alice, a good deal
THE POOL OF TEARS 25

frightened at the sudden change, but very glad to find herself
still in existence ; “and now for the garden!” And she ran
with all speed back to the little door; but, alas! the little
door was shut again, and the little golden key was lying on
the glass table as before, ‘“‘and things are worse than ever,”
thought the poor child, ‘for I never was so small as this
before, never! And I declare it’s too bad, that it is!”

As she said these words her foot slipped, and in another
moment, splash! she was up to her chin in salt water. Her
first idea was that she had somehow fallen into the sea, ‘and
in that case I can go back by railway,” she said to herself.
(Alice had been to the seaside once in her life, and had come
to the general conclusion that wherever you go to on the
English coast you find a number of bathing machines in the
sea, some children digging in the sand with wooden spades,
then a row of lodging-houses, and behind them a railway
station.) However, she soon made out that she was in the

oO 2

o

Ss O
©

Oo
eo


26 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

pool of tears which she had wept when she was nine feet
high.

‘“T wish I hadn’t cried so much!” said Alice, as she swam
about, trying to find her way out. ‘I shall be punished for
it now, I suppose, by being drowned in my own tears!
That we// be a queer thing, to be sure! However, every-
thing is queer to-day.”

Just then she heard something splashing about in the
pool a little way off, and she swam nearer to make out what
it was: at first she thought it must be a walrus or hippo-
potamus; but then she remembered how small she was now,
and she soon made out that it was only a mouse that had
slipped in like herself. _

“Would it be of any use now,” thought Alice, “to speak
to this mouse? Everything is so out-of-the-way down here,
that I should think very likely it can talk: at any rate,
there’s no harm in trying.” So she began: ‘‘O Mouse, do
you know the way out of this pool? I am very tired of
swimming about here, O Mouse!” (Alice thought this must
be the right way of speaking to a mouse: she had never
done such a thing before, but she remembered having seen
in her brother’s Latin Grammar, ‘‘A mouse—of a mouse—to
a mouse—a mouse—O mouse!”) The Mouse looked at her
rather inquisitively, and seemed to her to wink with one of
its little eyes, but it said nothing.

‘‘ Perhaps it doesn’t understand English,” thought Alice ;
“‘T daresay it’s a French mouse, come over with William the
Conqueror.” (For, with all her knowledge of history, Alice
THE POOL OF TEARS 27



had no very clear notion how long ago anything had
happened.) So she began again: ‘Ot est ma chatte?”
which was the first sentence in her French lesson-book.
The Mouse gave a leap out of the water, and seemed to
quiver all over with fright. ‘Oh, I beg your pardon!” cried
Alice hastily, afraid that she had hurt the poor animal’s
feelings. “I quite forgot you didn’t like cats.”

‘ Not like cats!” cried the Mouse, in a shrill, passionate
voice. ‘‘ Would you like cats if you were me?”

‘Well, perhaps not,” said Alice in a soothing tone: “don’t
be angry about it. And yet I wish I could show you our cat
Dinah: I think you'd take a fancy to cats if you could only
see her. She is such a dear quiet thing,” Alice went on half
28 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

to herself, as she swam lazily about in the pool, ‘‘and she
sits purring so nicely by the fire, licking her paws and
washing her face—and she is such a nice soft thing to nurse
—and she’s such a capital one for catching mice oh, I
beg your pardon!” cried Alice again, for this time the
Mouse was bristling all over, and she felt certain it must be
really offended. ‘We won't talk about her any more if
you'd rather not.”

“We, indeed!” cried the Mouse, who was trembling
down to the end of its tail. ‘Asif 7 would talk on such
a subject! Our family always Lazed cats : nasty, low, vulgar
things! Don’t let me hear the name again!”

“T won't indeed!” said Alice, in a great hurry to change
the subject of conversation. ‘Are you—are you fond—of
—of dogs?” The Mouse did not answer, so Alice went on
eagerly: ‘‘ There is such a nice little dog near our house I
should like to show you! A little bright-eyed terrier, you
know, with oh, such long curly brown hair! And it'll fetch
things when you throw them, and it'll sit up and beg for its
dinner, and all sorts of things—I can’t remember half of
them—and it belongs to a farmer, you know, and he says
it’s so useful, it’s worth a hundred pounds! He says it kills
all the rats and—oh dear!” cried Alice in a sorrowful tone,
“I’m afraid I’ve offended it again!” For the Mouse. was
swimming away from her as hard as it could go, and making
quite a commotion in the pool as it went. So she called
softly after it. ‘‘ Mouse dear! Do come back again, and
we won't talk about cats or dogs either, if you don’t like






THE POOL OF TEARS.
THE POOL OF TEARS 29

them!” When the Mouse heard this, it turned round and
swam slowly back to her: its face was quite pale (with
passion, Alice thought), and it said in a low, trembling voice,
“Let us go to the shore, and then I'll tell you my history,
and you'll understand why it is I hate cats and dog's.”

It was high time to go, for the pool was getting quite
crowded with the birds and animals that had fallen into it:
there were a Duck and a Dodo, a Lory and an Eaglet, and
several other curious creatures. Alice led the way, and the
whole party swam to the shore.




CHAPTER III

A CAUCUS-RACE AND A LONG TALE

TuHeEy were indeed a queer-looking party that assembled on
the bank—the birds with draggled feathers, the animals with
their fur clinging close to them, and all dripping wet, cross,
and uncomfortable.

The first question of course was, how to get dry again:
they had a consultation about this, and after a few minutes
it seemed quite natural to Alice to find herself talking
familiarly with them, as if she had known them all her life.
Indeed, she had quite a long argument with the Lory, who
at last turned sulky, and would only say “I am older than
you, and must know better” ; and this Alice would not allow
without knowing how old it was, and, as the Lory positively
refused to tell its age, there was no more to be said.
A CAUCUS-RACE AND A LONG TALE © 31

At last the Mouse, who seemed to be a person of
authority among them, called out ‘Sit down, all of you, and
listen to me! /’2/ soon make you dry enough!” They all sat
down at once in a large ring, with the Mouse in the middle.
Alice kept her eyes anxiously fixed on it, for she felt sure
she would catch a bad cold if she did not get dry very
soon.

“ Ahem!” said the Mouse with an important air. “Are
you all ready? This is the driest thing I know. Silence
all round, if you please! ‘William the Conqueror, whose
cause was favoured by the Pope, was soon submitted to by
the English, who wanted leaders, and had been of late much
accustomed to usurpation and conquest. Edwin and Morcar,
the Earls of Mercia and Northumbria——'”

“Ugh!” said the Lory, with a shiver.

“T beg your pardon!” said the Mouse, frowning, but very
politely. ‘‘ Did you speak ?”

“Not I!” said the Lory hastily.

“T thought you did,” said the Mouse. “I proceed—
‘Edwin and Morcar, the Earls of Mercia and Northumbria,
declared for him : and even Stigand, the patriotic Archbishop
of Canterbury, found it advisable——’”

“Found what?” said the Duck.

“Found 27,” the Mouse replied rather crossly : “ of course
you know what ‘it’ means.”

“T know what ‘it’ means well enough, when J/ find a
thing,” said the Duck; “it’s generally a frog or a worm.
The question is, what did the Archbishop find ?”
32 ALICE IN WONDERLAND



The Mouse did not notice this question, but hurriedly
went on—‘‘‘ found it advisable to go with Edgar Atheling
to meet William and offer him the crown. William’s
conduct at first was moderate. But the insolence of his
Normans How are you getting on now, my dear ?” it
continued, turning to Alice as it spoke.

“As wet as ever,” said Alice, in a melancholy tone; “it
doesn’t seem to dry me at all.”

“In that case,” said the Dodo solemnly, rising to its feet,
“T move that the meeting adjourn, for the immediate
adoption of more energetic remedies ,




A CAUCUS-RACE AND A LONG TALE 33

“Speak English!” said the Eaglet. “I don’t know the
meaning of half those long words, and, what’s more, I don't
believe you do either!” And the Eaglet bent down its head
to hide a smile; some of the other birds tittered audibly.

“What I was going to say,” said the Dodo, in an
offended tone, ‘‘ was, that the best thing to get us dry would
be a Caucus-race.”

“What zs a Caucus-race?” said Alice, not that she much
wanted to know; but the Dodo had paused as if it thought
that somebody ought to speak, and no one else seemed
inclined to say anything.

“Why,” said the Dodo, “the best way to explain it is
to do it.” (And, as you might like to try the thing your-
self some winter day, I will tell you how the Dodo
managed it.)

First it marked out a race-course in a sort of circle (“the
exact shape doesn’t matter,” it said), and then all the party
were placed along the course, here and there. There was no
“One, two, three, and away,” but they began running when
they liked, and left off when they liked, so that it was not
easy to know when the race was over. However, when they
had been running half an hour or so, and were quite dry
again, the Dodo suddenly called out ‘The race is over!”
and they all crowded round it, panting, and asking “But
who has won?”

This question the Dodo could not answer without a great
deal of thought, and it stood for a long time with one finger
pressed upon its forehead (the position in which you usually

Cc
34 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

see Shakespeare, in the pictures of him), while the rest
waited in silence. At last the Dodo said ‘ Everybody has
won, and a// must have prizes.”

“But who is to give the prizes?” quite a chorus of
voices asked.

“Why, she, of course,” said the Dodo, pointing to Alice
with one finger; and the whole party at once crowded round
her, calling out in a confused way, ‘‘ Prizes! Prizes |”

Alice had no idea what to do, and in despair she put her
hand in her pocket, and pulled out a box of comfits (luckily
the salt water had not got into it), and handed them round
as prizes. There was exactly one apiece all round.

“But she must have a prize herself, you know,” said the
Mouse.

‘Of course,” the Dodo replied very gravely.

‘What else have you got in your pocket?” it went on,
turning to Alice.

“Only a thimble,” said Alice sadly.

‘‘Hand it over here,” said the Dodo.

Then they all crowded round her once more, while the
Dodo solemnly presented the thimble, saying, ‘‘ We beg your
acceptance of this elegant thimble”; and, when it had
finished this short speech, they all cheered.

Alice thought the whole thing very absurd, but they all
looked so grave that she did not dare to laugh; and, as she
could not think of anything to say, she simply bowed, and
took the thimble, looking as solemn as she could.

The next thing was to eat the comfits; this caused some
A CAUCUS-RACE AND A LONG TALE — 35

noise and confusion, as the large birds complained that they
could not taste theirs, and the small ones choked and had to
be patted on the back. However, it was over at last, and
they sat down again in a ring, and begged the Mouse to tell
them something more.

‘You promised to tell me your history, you know,” said
Alice, ‘and why it is you hate—C and D,” she added in a
whisper, half afraid that it would be offended again.

‘Mine is a long and sad tale!” said the Mouse, turning
to Alice and sighing.

“It zs a long tail, certainly,” said Alice, looking down



X


Oe ALICE IN WONDERLAND

with wonder at the Mouse’s tail; ‘‘but why do you call it
sad?” And she kept on puzzling about it while the Mouse
was speaking, so that her idea of the tale was something

like this :—
“Fury said to
a mouse, That
he met in the
house, ‘Let
us both go
to law: J
will prose-
cute you.—
Come, I'll
take no de
nial: We
must have
the trial;
For really
this morn-
ing I’ve
nothing
to do.’
Said the
mouse to
the cur,
‘Such a
trial, dear
sir, With
no jury
or judge,
would
be wast-
ing our
breath,’
‘Tl be
judge,
Pll be
jury,’
said
cun-
ning
old
Fury;
‘Tl
try
the
whole
cause
and
con-
demn

you to
death.’”
Ue

soe

Day
yd)



THE MOUSE’S TALE.
A CAUCUS-RACE AND A LONG TALE 34

“You are not attending!” said the Mouse to Alice
severely. ‘‘ What are you thinking of?”

“I beg your pardon,” said Alice very humbly: “you
had got to the fifth bend, I think ?”

“Thad zot!” cried the Mouse, angrily.

“A knot!” said Alice, always ready to make herself
useful, and looking anxiously about her. ‘Oh, do let me
help to undo it |”

“TI shall do nothing of the sort,” ” said the Mouse, getting
up and walking ayey “You insult me by talking such
nonsense |”

‘‘T didn’t mean it!” pleaded poor Alice. ‘‘ But you’re so
easily offended, you know!”

The Mouse only growled in reply.

‘Please come back and finish your story!” Alice called
after it. And the others all joined in chorus, ‘Yes, please
do!” But the Mouse only shook its head impatiently and
walked a little quicker.

“What a pity it wouldn't stay!” sighed the Lory, as soon
as it was quite out of sight; and an old Crab took the
opportunity of saying to her daughter, ““Ah, my dear! Let
this be a lesson to you never to lose your temper!” ‘ Hold
your tongue, Ma!” said the young Crab, a little snappishly.
“You're enough to try the patience of an oyster!”

“T wish I had our Dinah here, I know I do!” said Alice
aloud, addressing nobody in particular. ‘She'd soon fetch
it back |”

“ And who is Dinah, if I might venture to ask the
question?” said the Lory.
38 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

Alice replied eagerly, for she was
always ready to talk about her pet:
““Dinah’s our cat. And she’s such a
capital one for catching mice, you can’t
think! And oh, I wish you
could see her after the birds!
Why, she'll eat a little bird as
soon as look at it!”

This speech caused a
remarkable sensation among
the party. Some of the











I Op a eN} s
: Ce TTT) 1
Oe

et Oe OC

birds hurried off at once;
one old Magpie began
wrapping itself up very
carefully, remarking, “I
really must be getting
home; the night air
doesn’t suit my throat!”
And a Canary called out
in a trembling voice to its
children, ‘‘Come away,
Ma: . my dears! It’s high
tS time you were all in bed!” On various
Sree pretexts they all moved off, and Alice
aay was soon left alone.


A CAUCUS-RACE AND A LONG TALE 39

“T wish I hadn’t mentioned Dinah,” she said to herself
in a melancholy tone. ‘Nobody seems to like her, down
here, and I’m sure she’s the best cat in the world! Oh, my
dear Dinah! I wonder if I shall ever see you any more!”
And here poor Alice began to cry again, for she felt very
lonely and low-spirited. In a little while, however, she
again heard a little pattering of footsteps in the distance,
and she looked up eagerly, half hoping that the Mouse
had changed his mind, and was coming back to finish his
story.




CHAPTER IV

THE RABBIT SENDS IN A LITTLE BILL

Ir was the White Rabbit, trotting slowly back again, and
looking anxiously about as it went, as if it had lost some-
thing; and she heard it muttering to itself, ‘‘ The Duchess !
The Duchess! Oh my dear paws! Oh my fur and whiskers |
She'll get me executed, as sure as ferrets are ferrets! Where
caw I have dropped them, I wonder?” Alice guessed in a
moment that it was looking for the fan and the pair of white
kid gloves, and she very good-naturedly began hunting
about for them, but they were nowhere to be seen—every-
thing seemed to have changed since her swim in the pool,
and the great hall, with the glass table and the little door,
had vanished completely.
THE RABBIT SENDS IN A LITTLE BILL 41

Very soon the Rabbit noticed Alice, as she went hunting
about, and called out to her in an angry tone, ‘“ Why, Mary
Ann, what ave you doing out here? Run home this
moment, and fetch mea pair of gloves and a fan! Quick,
now!” And Alice was so much frightened that she ran off
at once in the direction it pointed to, without trying to
explain the mistake it had made.

“ He took me for his housemaid,” she said to herself as
she ran. ‘How surprised he'll be when he finds out who
Iam! But Id better take him his fan and gloves—that is,
if I can find them.” As she said this, she came upon a
neat little house, on the door of which was a bright brass
plate with the name ‘‘W. RABBIT” engraved upon it. She
went in without knocking, and hurried upstairs, in great
fear lest she should meet the real Mary Ann, and be turned
out of the house before she had found the fan and gloves.

‘‘ How queer it seems,” Alice said to herself, “to be going
messages for a rabbit! I suppose Dinah’ll be sending me on
messages next!” And she began fancying the sort of thing
that would happen: ‘ ‘Miss Alice! Come here directly, and
get ready for your walk!’ ‘Coming in a minute, nurse!
But I’ve got to watch this mouse-hole till Dinah comes back,
and see that the mouse doesn’t get out.’ Only I don’t think,”
Alice went on, “that they’d let Dinah stop in the house if it
began ordering people about like that!”

By this time she had found her way into a tidy little room
with a table in the window, and on it (as she had hoped) a
fan and two or three pairs of tiny white kid gloves; she took
42 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

up the fan and a pair of the gloves, and was just going to
leave the room, when her eye fell upon a little bottle that
stood near the looking-glass. There was no label this time
with the words DRINK ME, but nevertheless she un-
corked it and put it to her lips. ‘I know sometheng interest-
ing is sure to happen,” she said to herself, “‘ whenever I eat or
drink anything; so I'll just see what this bottle does. I do
hope it'll make me grow large again, for really I’m quite
tired of being such a tiny little thing!”

It did so indeed, and much sooner than she had expected ;
before she had drunk half the bottle she found her head
pressing against the ceiling, and had to stoop to save her
neck from being broken. She hastily put down the bottle,
saying to herself: ‘‘ That’s quite enough—I hope I sha’n't
grow any more—as it is, I can’t get out at the door—I do
wish I hadn't drunk quite so much!”

Alas! it was too late to wish that! She went on grow-
ing, and growing, and very soon had to kneel down on the
floor: in another minute there was not even room for this,
and she tried the effect of lying down with one elbow against
the door, and the other arm curled round her head. Still she
went on growing, and, as a last resource, she put one arm
out of the window, and one foot up the chimney, and said to
herself : ‘‘ Now I can do no more, whatever happens. What
will become of me?”

Luckily for Alice, the little magic bottle had now had its
full effect, and she grew no larger; still it was very un-
comfortable, and, as there seemed to be no sort of chance of
THE RABBIT SENDS IN A LITTLE BILL 43

her ever getting out of the room again,

no wonder she felt unhappy.
“Tt was much pleasanter at home,”

thought poor
TV
i

Alice, ‘ when |







one wasn’t
always grow-
ing larger and
smaller, and
being ordered
about by mice
and rabbits.
I almost
wish I hadn't
gone down
that rabbit-




r. << +
hole — and ee pies
: FI BS a Rh 5? 2
et—an et ye: oc 2
es a
—it’s rather eS FH
Ey ees

- know, this sort of life! I do
wonder what can have happened to me!
When I used mia to read fairy-tales I fancied
that kind of thing never happened, and now here I am in
the middle of one! There ought to be a book written about
me, that there ought! And when I grow up, I’ll write one
—but I’m grown up now,” she added in a sorrowful tone ;
‘at least there’s no room to grow up any more here.”
“But then,” thought Alice, ‘shall I zever get any older

OH

curious, you

Ve
¢

Â¥

§ 0
44 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

than Iam now? That'll be a comfort, one way—never to be
an old woman—but then—always to have lessons to learn |
Oh, I shouldn’t like ¢Zat!”

“Oh, you foolish Alice!” she answered herself. ‘“ How
can you learn lessons in here? Why, there’s hardly room for
you, and no room at all for any lesson-books!”

And so she went on, taking first one side and then the
other, and making quite a conversation of it altogether; but
after a few minutes she heard a voice outside, and stopped to
listen.

“Mary Ann! Mary Ann!” said the voice. ‘ Fetch me
my gloves this moment!” Then came a little pattering of
feet on the stairs. Alice knew it was the Rabbit coming
to look for her, and she trembled till she shook the house,
quite forgetting that she was now about a thousand times as
‘large as the Rabbit, and had no reason to be afraid of it.

Presently the Rabbit came up to the door, and tried
to open it; but as the door opened inwards, and Alice’s
elbow was pressed hard against it, that attempt proved a
failure. Alice heard it say to itself, ‘ Then I'll go round and
get in at the window.”

“That you won't!” thought Alice ; and after waiting till
she fancied she heard the Rabbit just under the window, she
suddenly spread out her hand, and made a snatch in the air.
She did not get hold of anything, but she heard a little
shriek and a fall, and a crash of broken glass, from which
she concluded that it was just possible it had fallen into a
cucumber-frame, or something of the sort.


THE WHITE RABBIT’S HOUSE,
THE RABBIT SENDS IN A LITTLE BILL 45

Next came an angry voice—the Rabbit’s— Pat, Pat!
Where are you?” And then a voice she had never heard
before, ‘‘Sure, then, I’m here! Digging for apples, yer
honour |”

“Digging for apples, indeed!” said the Rabbit angrily.
‘Here, come and help me out of ¢#zs!” (Sounds of more
broken glass.)

“ Now tell me, Pat, what’s that in the window?”

‘“Sure, it's an arm, yer honour!” (He pronounced it
“arrum,”)

“An arm, you goose! Who ever saw one that size?
Why, it fills the whole window!”

‘Sure it does, yer honour; but it’s an arm for all
that.”

“Well, it’s got no business there, at any rate: goand take
it away!”

There was a long silence after this, and Alice could only
hear whispers now and then; such as, “ Sure, I don’t like it,
yer honour at all, atall!” ‘“Doas I tell you, you coward !”
And at last she spread out her hand again, and made another
snatch in the air. This time there were /wo little shrieks,
and more sounds of broken glass. ‘What a number of
cucumber-frames there must be!” thought Alice. “I wonder
what they'll do next! As for pulling me out of the window,
I only wish they could! I’m sure / don’t want to stay in
here any longer!”

She waited for some time without hearing anything
more; at last came a rumbling of little cart-wheels, and
46 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

the sound of a good many voices all talking together; she
made out the words: “ Where's the other ladder ?—Why I
hadn’t to bring but one; Bill’s got the other—Bill! Fetch
it here, lad!—Here, put ’em up at this corner—No, tie ’em
together first—they don’t reach half high enough yet—Oh!
they'll do well enough ; don’t be particular—Here, Bill! catch
hold of this rope—Will the roof bear ?—Mind that loose
slate—Oh, it’s coming down! Heads below!” (a loud crash)
—“ Now, who did that 2—It was Bill, I fancy—Who’s to go
down the chimney?—Nay, / sha’n’t! You do it!—That
I won't, then! Bill’s to go down—Here, Bill! the master
says you've to go down the chimney! ”

“Oh! So Bill's got to come down the chimney, has
he?” said Alice to herself. ‘Why, they seem to put every-
thing upon Bill! I wouldn't be in Bill’s place for a good
deal: this fireplace is narrow, to be sure; but I 44241 can
kick a little!”

She drew her foot as far down the chimney as she could,
and waited till she heard a little animal (she couldn’t guess
of what sort it was) scratching and scrambling about in the
chimney close above her ; then, saying to herself, “ This is
Bill,” she gave one sharp kick, and waited to see what would
happen next.

The first thing she heard was a general chorus of “ There
goes Bill!” then the Rabbit’s voice alone—‘ Catch him, you
by the hedge!” then silence, and then another confusion of
voices—‘‘ Hold up his head—Brandy now—Don’t choke him.
—How was it, old fellow? What happened to you? Tell
us all about it!”
THE RABBIT SENDS IN A LITTLE BILL 47

At last came a little,
feeble, squeaking voice
—(‘‘That’s Bill,” thought
Alice.) ‘Well, I hardly
know—No more, thank
ye; Im better now—
but I’m a deal too flus-
tered to tell you—all
I know is, something
comes at me like a Jack-
in-the-box, and up I goes
like a sky-rocket ! ”

“So you did, old fel-
low!” said the others.

“We must burn the
house down!” said the
Rabbit’s voice. And
Alice called out as loud
as she could, ‘If you do
I'll set Dinah at you!”

There was dead
silence instantly, and
Alice thought to her-
self: ‘‘I wonder what
they w7/ do next! If
they had any sense
they’d take the roof off.”
After a minute or two


48 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

they began moving about again, and Alice heard the Rabbit
say: “A barrowful will do, to begin with.”

“A barrowful of what?” thought Alice. But she had not
long to doubt, for the next moment a shower of little pebbles
came rattling in at the window, and some of them hit her in
the face. “I'll put a stop to this,” she said to herself, and
shouted out ‘‘ You'd better not do that again |” which pro-
duced another dead silence. | ;

Alice noticed with some surprise that the pebbles were all
turning into little cakes as they lay on the floor, and a bright
idea came into her head. “If I eat one of these cakes,” she
thought, ‘‘it’s sure to make some change in my size; and, as
it can’t possibly make me larger, it must make me smaller, I
suppose.” |

So she swallowed one of the cakes, and was delighted to
find that she began shrinking directly. As soon as she was
small enough to get through the door, she ran out of the
house, and found quite a crowd of little animals and birds
waiting outside. The poor little Lizard, Bill, was in the
middle, being held up by two guinea-pigs, who were giving
it something out of a bottle. They all made a rush at Alice
the moment she appeared; but she ran off as hard as she
could, and soon found herself safe in a thick wood.

“The first thing I’ve got to do,” said Alice to herself, as
she wandered about in the wood, “is to grow to my right
size again; and the second thing is to find my way into
that lovely garden. I think that will be the best plan.”

It sounded an excellent plan, no doubt, and very neatly
THE RABBIT SENDS IN A LITTLE BILL 49



and simply arranged; the only difficulty was, that she had
not the smallest idea how to set about it; and, while she
was peering about anxiously among the trees, a little sharp
bark just over her head made her look up in a great hurry.

An enormous puppy was looking down at her with large
round eyes, and feebly stretching out one paw, trying to
touch her. “Poor little thing!” said Alice, in a coaxing
tone, and she tried hard to whistle to it; but she was
terribly frightened all the time at the thought that it might
be hungry, in which case it would be very likely to eat her
up in spite of all her coaxing.

Hardly knowing what she did, she picked up a little bit
of stick, and held it out to the puppy; whereupon the puppy
jumped into the air off all its feet at once, with a yelp of
delight, and rushed at the stick, and made believe to worry
it; then Alice dodged behind a great thistle, to keep herself
from being run over; and, the moment she appeared on the

D
50 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

other side, the puppy made another rush at the stick, and
tumbled head over heels in its hurry to get hold of it; then
Alice, thinking it was very like having a game of play with
a cart-horse, and expecting every moment to be trampled
under its feet, ran round the thistle again; then the puppy
began a series of short charges at the stick, running a very
little way forwards each time and a long way back, and
barking hoarsely all the while, till at last it sat down a good
way off, panting, with its tongue hanging out of its mouth,
and its great eyes half shut.

This seemed to Alice a good opportunity for making her
escape ; so she set off at once, and ran till she was quite tired
and out of breath, and till the puppy’s bark sounded quite
faint in the distance.

“And yet what a dear little puppy it was!” said Alice,
as she leant against a buttercup to rest herself, and fanned
herself with one of the leaves. ‘I should have liked teach-
ing it tricks very much, if—if I’d only been the right size to
do it! Oh, dear! I'd nearly forgotten that I’ve got to grow
up again! Let me see—how zs it to be managed ? I suppose
I ought to eat or drink something or other; but the great
question is what?”

The great question certainly was, what? Alice looked all
round her at the flowers and the blades of grass, but she
could not see anything that looked like the right thing to eat
or drink under the circumstances. There was a large mush-
room growing near her, about the same height as herself;
and when she had looked under it, and on both sides of it,
THE RABBIT SENDS IN A LITTLE BILL 51

and behind it, it occurred to her that she might as well look
and see what was on the top of it.

She stretched herself up on tiptoe, and peeped over the
edge of the mushroom, and her eyes immediately met those
of a large blue caterpillar that was sitting on the top with its
arms folded, quietly smoking a long hookah, and taking not
the smallest notice of her or of anything else.




CHAPTER V

ADVICE FROM A CATERPILLAR

Tue Caterpillar and Alice looked at each other for some time
in silence ; at last the Caterpillar took the hookah out of its
mouth, and addressed her in a languid, sleepy voice :

“Who are you?” said the Caterpillar.

This was not an encouraging opening for a conversation.
Alice replied, rather shyly, ““I—I hardly know, sir, just at
ADVICE FROM A CATERPILLAR 53

present—at least I know who I was when I got up this
morning, but I think I must have been changed several
times since then.”

“What do you mean by that?” said the Caterpillar
sternly. “ Explain yourself!”

“I can’t explain myself, I’m afraid, sir,” said Alice,
“because I’m not myself, you see.”

‘‘T don’t see,” said the Caterpillar.

“I’m afraid I can’t put it more clearly,” Alice replied
very politely, “for I can’t understand it myself to begin
with; and being so many different sizes in a day is very
confusing.”

“It isn’t,” said the Caterpillar.

“Well, perhaps you haven’t found it so yet,” said Alice;
‘but when you have to turn into a chrysalis—you will some
day, you know—and then after that into a butterfly, I should
think you'll feel it a little queer, won’t you?”

‘‘Not a bit,” said the Caterpillar.

‘Well, perhaps your feelings may be different,” said
Alice; ‘‘all I know is, it would feel very queer to se.”

“You!” said the Caterpillar contemptuously. ‘Who are
you?”

Which brought them back again to the beginning of
the conversation. Alice felt a little irritated at the Cater-
pillar’s making such very short remarks, and she drew
herself up and said, very gravely, “I think you ought to
tell me who you are, first.”

“Why?” said the Caterpillar.
54 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

Here was another puzzling question; and as Alice
could not think of any good reason, and as the Caterpillar
seemed to be in a very unpleasant state of mind, she turned
away.

“Come back!” the Caterpillar called after her. ‘I've
something important to say!”

This sounded promising, certainly; Alice turned and
came back again.

‘Keep your temper,” said the Caterpillar.

“Ts that all?” said Alice, swallowing down her anger as
well as she could.

“No,” said the Caterpillar.

Alice thought she might as well wait, as she had nothing
else to do, and perhaps after all it might tell her something
worth hearing. For some minutes it puffed away without
speaking, but at last it unfolded its arms, took the hookah
out of its mouth again, and said, “So you think you're
changed, do you?”

“T’m afraid I am, sir,” said Alice; “I can’t remember
things as I used—and I don’t keep the same size for ten
minutes together !”

“Can’t remember what things?” said the Caterpillar.

“Well, I’ve tried to say ‘ How doth the little busy bee,
but it all came different!” Alice replied in a_ very
melancholy voice.

“Repeat ‘You are old, Father William, said the
Caterpillar.

Alice folded her hands, and began :—


ADVICE FROM A CATERPILLAR.
ADVICE FROM A CATERPILLAR 55

“You are old, Father William,” the young man said,
“ And your hair has become very white ;
And yet you incessantly stand on your head—
Do you think, at your age, it is right?”

“In my youth,” Father William replied to his son,
“T feared it might injure the brain ;
But, now that I’m perfectly sure I have none,
Why, I do it again and again.”

“You are old,” said the youth, “as I mentioned before,
And have grown most uncommonly fat ;
Yet you turned a back-somersault in at the door—
Pray, what is the reason of that?”

“In my youth,” said the sage, as he shook his grey locks,
“T kept all my limbs very supple
By the use of this ointment—one shilling the box—
Allow me to sell you a couple?”

“ You are old,” said the youth, “and your jaws are too weak
For anything tougher than suet ;
Yet you finished the goose, with the bones and the beak—
Pray, how did you manage to do it?”

“In my youth,” said his father, “I took to the law,
And argued each case with my wife ;
And the muscular strength, which it gave to my jaw,
Has lasted the rest of my life.”

“You are old,” said the youth, “one would hardly suppose
That your eye was as steady as ever ;
Yet you balanced an eel on the end of your nose —
What made you so awfully clever?”

“T have answered three questions, and that is enough,”
Said his father ; “don’t give yourself airs |
Do you think I can listen all day to such stuff?
Be off, or I'll kick you down stairs!”
56 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

“That is not said right,” said the Caterpillar.

“Not gutfe right, I’m afraid,” said Alice, timidly ; “ some
of the words have got altered.”

“It is wrong from beginning to end,” said the Caterpillar
decidedly, and there was silence for some minutes.

The Caterpillar was the first to speak.

‘What size do you want to be?” it asked.

‘Oh, I’m not particular as to size,” Alice hastily replied ;
“only one doesn’t like changing so often, you know.”

‘“T don't know,” said the Caterpillar,

Alice said nothing: she had never been so much contra-
dicted in all her life before, and she felt that she was losing
her temper.

“ Are you content now?” said the Caterpillar.

“Well, I should like to be a &f#/e larger, sir, if you
wouldn’t mind,” said Alice: “three inches is such a wretched
height to be.”

“It is a very good height indeed!” said the Caterpillar
angrily, rearing itself upright as it spoke (it was exactly
three inches high).

‘But I’m not used to it!” pleaded poor Alice in a piteous
tone. And she thought to herself, “I wish the creatures
wouldn’t be so easily offended!”

“You'll get used to it in time,” said the Caterpillar; and
it put the hookah into its mouth and began smoking again.

This time Alice waited patiently until it chose to speak
again. In a minute or two the Caterpillar took the hookah
out of its mouth and yawned once or twice, and shook itself.
_ ADVICE FROM A CATERPILLAR 57

Then it got
down off the
mushroom,
and crawled
away into the
grass, merely
remarking as
it went, ‘One
side will make you
grow taller, and the
other side will make






ae
you grow shorter.” so
“One side of oe a
what? The other side yh : Ss
SS

PACT
i ALAC
»




of what?” thought
Alice to herself.

‘Of the mushroom,” said the Caterpillar, just as if she had
asked it aloud; and in another moment it was out of sight.

Alice remained looking thoughtfully at the mushroom for
a minute, trying to make out which were the two sides of it ;
and as it was perfectly round, she found this a very difficult
question. However, at last she stretched her arms round it
as far as they would go, and broke off a bit of the edge with
each hand.

“And now which is which?” she said to herself, and
nibbled a little of the right-hand bit to try the effect; the
next moment she felt a violent blow underneath her chin—it
had struck her foot!
53 : ALICE IN WONDERLAND

She was a good deal frightened by this very sudden
change, but she felt that there was no time to be lost, as she
was shrinking rapidly; so she set to work at once to eat
some of the other bit. Her chin was pressed so closely
against her foot that there was hardly room to open her
mouth; but she did it at last, and managed to swallow a
morsel of the left-hand bit.

* *% * * ® *

* * * % * *

“Come, my head’s free at last!” said Alice, in a tone of
delight, which changed into alarm in another moment, when
she found that her shoulders were nowhere to be found; all
she could see, when she looked down, was an immense length
of neck, which seemed to rise like a stalk out of a sea of
green leaves that lay far below her.

“What can all that green stuff be?” said Alice, “and
where “ave my shoulders got to? And oh, my poor hands,
how is it I can’t see you?” She was moving them about as
she spoke, but no result seemed to follow, except a little
shaking among the distant green leaves.

As there seemed to be no chance of getting her hands up
to her head, she tried to get her head down to them, and was
delighted to find that her neck would bend about easily in
any direction, like a serpent. She had just succeeded in
curving it down into a graceful zigzag, and was going to
dive in among the leaves, which she found to be nothing
but the tops of the trees under which she had been wander-
ADVICE FROM A CATERPILLAR 59



ing, when a sharp hiss made her draw back in a hurry; a
large pigeon had flown into her face, and was beating her
violently with its wings.

‘‘ Serpent!” screamed the Pigeon.

“T’m ot a serpent!” said Alice indignantly. ‘‘ Let me
alone |”

“Serpent, I say again!” repeated the Pigeon, but in a
more subdued tone, and added, with a kind of sob, ‘I’ve
tried every way, and nothing seems to suit them!”

‘“‘T haven't the least idea what you're talking about,” said
Alice.

“T’ve tried the roots of trees, and I’ve tried banks, and
I’ve tried hedges,” the Pigeon went on, without attending to
her; “but those serpents! There’s no pleasing them!”

Alice was more and more puzzled, but she thought there
was no use in saying anything more till the Pigeon had
finished.
60 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

AS lies it
wasn’t trouble
enough hatch-
ing the eggs,”
Said”. the
Pigeon, but
I must be on
the look - out
for serpents
night and day! Why, I haven't
had a wink of sleep these three
weeks |”

“Tm very sorry you've been
annoyed,’ said Alice, who was
beginning to see its meaning.

“And just as I’d taken the highest tree in the wood,”
continued the Pigeon, raising his voice to a shriek, ‘and
just as I was thinking I should be free of them at last, they
must needs come wriggling down from the sky! Ugh,
Serpent!”

“But I’m ot a serpent, I tell you!” said Alice. ‘I’m

”






a—— I’m a——

“Well! What are you?” said the Pigeon. “I can see
you're trying to invent something |”

‘“T—I’m a little girl,” said Alice, rather doubtfully, as she
remembered the number of changes she had gone through
that day.

‘‘A likely story, indeed!” said the Pigeon, in a tone of the
ADVICE FROM A CATERPILLAR OI

deepest contempt. ‘I’ve seen a good many little girls in
my time, but never ove with such a neck as that! No, no!
You're a serpent; and there’s no use denying it. I suppose
you'll be telling me next that you never tasted an egg!”

“T have tasted eggs, certainly,” said Alice, who was a very
truthful child; “but little girls eat eggs quite as much as
serpents do, you know.”

‘‘T don’t believe it,” said the Pigeon ; “ but if ney do, why
then they’re a kind of serpent, that’s all I can say.”

This was such a new idea to Alice, that she was quite
silent for a minute or two, which gave the Pigeon the
opportunity of adding: “You're looking for eggs, I know
that well enough; and what does it matter to me whether
you're a little girl or a serpent?”

“Tt matters a good deal to me,” said Alice hastily; ‘ but
I’m not looking for eggs, as it happens; and if I was, I
shouldn’t want yours : I don’t like them raw.”

“Well, be off, then!” said the Pigeon, in a sulky tone, as
it settled down again into its nest. Alice crouched down
among the trees as well as she could, for her neck kept
getting entangled among the branches, and every now and
then she had to stop and untwist it. After a while she
remembered that she still held the pieces of mushroom in
her hands, and she set to work very carefully, nibbling first
at one and then at the other, and growing sometimes taller
and sometimes shorter, until she had succeeded in bringing
herself down to her usual height.

It was so long since she had been anything near
62 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

the right size, that it felt quite strange at first; but she
got used to it in a few minutes, and began talking to
herself, as usual. ‘Come, there’s half my plan done now!
How puzzling all these changes are; I’m never sure
what I’m going to be, from one minute to another!
However, I’ve got back to my right size; the next thing
is, to get into that beautiful garden—how zs that to be
done, I wonder?” As she said this, she came suddenly
upon an open place, with a little house in it about four
feet high. ‘“ Whoever lives there,” thought Alice, “it'll never
do to come upon them ¢#is size; why I should frighten
them out of their wits!” So she began nibbling at the
right-hand bit again, and did not venture to go near
the house till she had brought herself down to nine inches
high.




CHAPTER VI

PIG AND PEPPER

For a minute or two she stood looking at the house
and wondering what to do next, when suddenly a footman
in livery came running out of the wood—(she considered
him to be a footman because he was in livery; otherwise,
judging by his face only, she would have called him a
fish)—and rapped loudly at the door with his knuckles.
It was opened by another footman in livery, with a round
face and large eyes like a frog; and both footmen, Alice
noticed, had powdered hair that curled all over their heads.
She felt very curious to know what it was all about, and
crept a little way out of the wood to listen.

The Fish-Footman began by producing from under
his arm a great letter, nearly as large as himself, and this
he handed over to the other, saying, in a solemn tone,
“For the Duchess. An invitation from the Queen to
play croquet.” The Frog-Footman repeated, in the same
64 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

solemn tone, only changing the order of the words a little,
“From the Queen. An invitation for the Duchess to play
croquet.”

Then they both bowed low, and their curls got entangled
together.

Alice laughed so much at this, that she had to run back
into the wood for fear of their hearing her; and, when she
next peeped out, the Fish-Footman was gone, and the other
was sitting on the ground near the door staring stupidly up
into the sky.

Alice went timidly up.to the door and knocked.

‘There's no sort of use in knocking,” said the Footman,
“and that for two reasons. First, because I’m on the same
side of the door as you are; secondly, because they’re
making such a noise inside no one could possibly hear you.”
And certainly there was a most extraordinary noise going
on within—a constant howling and sneezing, and every now
and then a great crash, as if a dish or kettle had been
broken to pieces.

‘‘ Please, then,” said Alice, ‘how am I to get in?”

“There might be some sense in your knocking,” the
Footman went on, without attending to her, “if we had the
door between us. For instance, if you were inside, you
might knock, and I could let you out, you know.” He was
looking up into the sky all the time he was speaking, and
this Alice thought decidedly uncivil. ‘But perhaps he
can’t help ¢t,” she said to herself; “his eyes are so very
neatly at the top of his head. But at any rate he


S KITCHEN

IN THE DUCHESS
PIG AND PEPPER 65

might answer questions.” How am I to get in?” she
repeated, aloud.

“T shall sit here,” the Footman remarked, ‘‘till to-
morrov !

At this moment the door of the house opened, and a
large plate came skimming out, straight at the Footman’s
head; it just grazed his nose, and broke to pieces against
one of the trees behind him.

“_____ or next day, maybe,” the Footman continued in the
same tone, exactly as if nothing had happened.

“How am I to get in?” asked Alice again in a louder
tone.

“ Ave. you to get in at all?” Fee

said the Footman. “That's the










first ques-
tion, you aa.
know.” SEN |

It LE ea

no
66 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

only Alice did not like to be told so. “It’s really dreadful,”
she muttered to herself, “the way all the creatures argue.
It’s enough to drive one crazy !”

The Footman seemed to think this a good opportunity for
repeating his remark, with variations. ‘I shall sit here,” he
said, ‘“‘on and off, for days and days.”

“But what am / to do?” said Alice.

“Anything you like,” said the Footman, and began
whistling.

“Oh, there’s no use in talking to him,” said Alice,
desperately ; “he’s perfectly idiotic!” And she opened the
door and went in.

The door led right into a large kitchen, which was full of
smoke from one end to the other; the Duchess was sitting
on a three-legged stool in the middle, nursing a baby; the
cook was leaning over the fire, stirring a large cauldron
which seemed to be full of soup.

There’s certainly too much pepper in that soup!” Alice
said to herself, as well as she could for sneezing.

There was certainly too much of it in the air. Even the
Duchess sneezed occasionally; and the baby was sneezing
and howling alternately without a moment's pause. The
only things in the kitchen that did not sneeze were the cook,
and a large cat which was sitting on the hearth and grinning
from ear to ear.

‘Please would you tell me,” said Alice, a little timidly,
for she was not quite sure whether it was good manners for
her to speak first, ‘‘ why your cat grins like that ?”
PIG AND PEPPER 67



“ It’s a Cheshire cat,” said
the Duchess, ‘and that’s
why, Pig!”

She said the last words
with such sudden violence that Alice quite jumped; but she
saw in another moment that it was addressed to the baby,
and not to her, so she took courage, and went on again :

“I didn’t know that Cheshire cats always grinned ; in fact,
I didn’t know that cats could grin.”

“They all can,” said the Duchess ; ‘‘and most of ’em do.”

E 2
68 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

“T don’t know of any that do,” Alice said very politely,
feeling quite pleased to have got into a conversation.

“You don’t know much,” said the Duchess; ‘and that’s
a fact.”

Alice did not at all like the tone of this remark, and thought
it would be as well to introduce some other subject of
conversation. While she was trying to fix on one, the cook
took the cauldron of soup off the fire, and at once set to work
throwing everything within her reach at the Duchess and the
baby—the fire-irons came first; then followed a shower of
saucepans, plates, and dishes. The Duchess took no notice
of them even when they hit her; and the baby was howling
so much already that it was quite impossible to say whether
the blows hurt it or not.

“Oh, A/ease mind what you're doing!” cried Alice, jumping
up and down in an agony of terror. ‘Oh, there goes his
precious nose” ; as an unusually large saucepan flew close by
it, and very nearly carried it off.

“Tf everybody minded their own business,” the Duchess
said, in a hoarse growl, ‘‘the world would go round a deal
faster than it does.”

‘Which would mot be an advantage,” said Alice, who felt
very glad to get an opportunity of showing off a little of her
knowledge. “ Just think what work it would make with the
day and night! You see the earth takes twenty-four hours
to turn round on its axis 4

‘Talking of axes,” said the Duchess, “chop off her head.”

Alice glanced rather anxiously at the cook, to see if she


PIG AND PEPPER 69

meant to take the hint; but the cook was busily engaged in
stirring the soup, and did not seem to be listening, so she
ventured to go on again: “Twenty-four hours, I ¢#imk; or
is it twelve? I——”

‘Oh, don’t bother me,” said the Duchess; ‘I never could
abide figures!” And with that she began nursing her child
again, singing a sort of lullaby to it as she did so, and
giving it a violent shake at the end of every line:

“ Speak roughly to your little boy,
And beat him when he sneezes :
He only does it to annoy,
Because he knows it teases.”

CHORUS,

(In which the cook and the baby joined) :—

“Wow ! wow! wow!”

While the Duchess sang the second verse of the song
she kept tossing the baby violently up and down, and the
poor little thing howled so that Alice could hardly hear the
words:

“T speak severely to my boy,
I beat him when he sneezes ;
For he can thoroughly enjoy
The pepper when he pleases |”
CHORUS.

“ Wow ! wow! wow!”

“Here, you may nurse it a bit, if you like!” the Duchess
said to Alice, flinging the baby at her as she spoke. “I
must go and get ready to play croquet with the Queen,” and
70




ALICE IN WONDERLAND

2

re

Rem

of

ld
aU

od
0



@



she hurried out of the
room. The cook threw a
frying-pan after her as
she went out, but it just
missed her.

Alice caught the baby
with some difficulty, as it
was a queer-shaped little
creature, and held out
its arms and legs in all

directions, “just like a star-fish,” thought Alice. The poor
little thing was snorting like a steam-engine when she
caught it, and kept doubling itself up and straightening
itself out again, so that altogether, for the first minute or
tivo, it was as much as she could do to hold it.

As soon as she had made out the proper way of nursing
it (which was to twist it up into a sort of knot, and then
keep tight hold of its right ear and left foot, so as to prevent
its undoing itself) she carried it out into the open air.

“Tf I don’t take this child away with me,” thought Alice,
PIG AND PEPPER 71

“they're sure to kill it in a day or two; wouldn't it be
murder to leave it behind?” She said the last words out
loud, and the little thing grunted in reply (it had left off
sneezing by this time). ‘‘Don't grunt,” said Alice ; “that’s
not at all a proper way of expressing yourself.”

The baby grunted again, and Alice looked very anxiously
into its face to see what was the matter with it. There could
be no doubt that it had a very turn-up nose, much more like
a snout thana real nose; also its eyes were getting extremely
small for a baby; altogether Alice did not like the look of
the thing at all. ‘But perhaps it was only sobbing,” she
thought, and looked into its eyes again, to see if there were
any tears.

No, there were no tears. “If you're going to turn into a
pig, my dear,” said Alice, seriously, “I'll have nothing more
to do with you. Mind now!” The poor little thing sobbed
again (or grunted, it was impossible to say which), and they
went on for some while in silence. |

Alice was just beginning to think to herself, ‘‘ Now, what
am I to do with this creature when I get it home?” when it
grunted again, so violently that she looked down into its
face in some alarm. This time there could be zo mistake
about it; it was neither more nor less than a pig, and she felt
that it would be quite absurd for her to carry it any further.

So she set the little creature down, and felt quite relieved
to see it trot quietly away into the wood. “If it had grown
up,” she said to herself, “it would have made a dreadfully
ugly child; but it makes rather a handsome pig, I think.”
72 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

And she began thinking over other children she knew, who
might do very well as pigs, and was just saying to herself,
“if one only knew the right way to change them ” when
she was a little startled by seeing the Cheshire Cat sitting
on a bough of a tree a few yards off.

The Cat only grinned when it saw Alice. It looked
good-natured, she thought ; still it had very long claws anda
great many teeth, so she felt that it ought to be treated with
respect. ‘Cheshire Puss,” she began, rather timidly, as she
did not at all know whether it would like the name; however,
it only grinned a little wider. ‘Come, it’s pleased, so far,”
thought Alice, and she went on: ‘Would you tell me,
please, which way I ought to go from here?”

“That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,”
said the Cat.



“‘T don’t much care where——.” said Alice.

“Then it doesn’t matter which way you go,” said the Cat.

“__. so long as I get somewhere,” Alice added as an
explanation.

“Oh, you're sure to do that,” said the Cat, “if you only
walk long enough.”

Alice felt that this could not be denied, so she tried
another question. ‘What sort of people live about here?”

“In ¢haé direction,” the Cat said, waving his right paw
round, “lives a Hatter; and in ¢a¢ direction,” waving the
other paw, “lives a March Hare. Visit either you like:
they’re both mad.”

“But I don’t want to go among mad people,” Alice
remarked.


Ch

[ee

ton

Aus

E PIG BABY,

TH
PIG AND PEPPEK 73

“Oh, you can’t help that,” said the Cat; ‘‘we'’re all mad
here. TYm mad. You're mad.”

“ How do you know I’m mad?” said Alice.

“You must be,” said the Cat, “or you wouldn’t have
come here.”

Alice didn’t think that proved Ee
it at all; however, she went on: , y
“And how do you know that ST
you're mad?”

“To begin with,” said : 2 Le
the Cat, ‘‘a dog’s not
mad. You ,
grant that 2?”

“TT sup-
pose so,”said
Alice.

“Well,
then,” the
Cat went on,
“‘you see a








SSG

SST

Se




dog growls
when it’s
angry, and

wags its
tail when
it’s pleased.

w= A
Now/ growl -~=2S2 ne
’ SR
when I’m CS >
FE} ALICE IN WONDERLAND

pleased, and wag my tail when I’m angry. Therefore
I’m mad.”

“TZ call it purring, not growling,” said Alice.

“Call it what you like,” said the Cat. ‘Do you play
croquet with the Queen to-day ?”

“TI should like it very much,” said Alice, ‘but I haven't
been invited yet.”

“You'll see me there,” said the Cat, and vanished.

Alice was not much surprised at this, she was getting
so used to queer things happening. While she was looking
at the place where it had been it suddenly appeared again.

“ By-the-bye, what became of the baby?” said the Cat.
“Td nearly forgotten. to ask.”

‘Tt turned into a pig,” Alice quiétly said, just as if it had
come back in a natural way. —

“I thought it would,” said the Cat, and vanished again.

Alice waited a little, half expecting to see it again, but it
did not appear, and after a minute or two she walked on in
the direction in which the March Hare was said to live.
“‘T’ve seen hatters before,” she said to herself; ‘the March
Hare will be much the most interesting, and perhaps, as this
is May, it won't be raving mad—at least not so mad as it
was in March.” As she said this, she looked up, and there
was the Cat again, sitting on a branch of a tree.

“ Did you say pig, or fig?” said the Cat. _

“T said pig,” replied Alice; ‘and I wish you wouldn't
keep appearing and vanishing so suddenly: you make one
quite giddy.” :
PIG AND PEPPER 76

“All right,” said
the Cat; and this
time it vanished
quite slowly, begin-
ning with the end
of the tail and end-
ing with the grin,
which remained
some time after the
rest of it had gone.

“Well! I’ve often
seen a cat without
a grin,” thought
Alice, ‘“‘but a grin
without a cat! It’s
the most curious
thing I ever saw in
all my life.” ;

She had _ not
gone much farther
before she came in
sight of the house
of the March Hare;
she thought it must
be the right house .
because the chim-
neys were shaped
like ears, and the


76 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

roof was thatched with fur. It was so large a house that
she did not like to go nearer till she had nibbled some
more of the left-hand bit of mushroom, and raised herself
to about two feet high; even then she walked up towards
it rather timidly, saying to herself: ‘‘Suppose it should be
raving mad after all! I almost wish I’d gone to see the
Hatter instead!”




YAW |
I aS




CHAPTER VII

A MAD TEA-PARTY

THERE was a table set out under a tree in front of the
house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea
at it; a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep,
and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their
elbows on it, and talking over its head. ‘‘ Very uncomfort-
able for the Dormouse,” thought Alice; ‘only as it’s asleep
I suppose it doesn’t mind.’
78 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

The table was a large one, but the three were all
crowded together at one corner of it. ‘No room! No
room!” they cried out, when they saw Alice coming.
‘“There’s plenty of room!” said Alice indignantly ; and she
sat down in a large armchair at one end of the table.

“Have some wine?” the March Hare said, in an
encouraging tone.

Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing
on it but tea. ‘I don’t see any wine,” she remarked.

“There isn’t any,” said the March Hare.

“Then it wasn’t very civil of you to offer it,” said Alice
angrily.

“Tt wasn’t very civil of you to sit down without being
invited,” said the March Hare.

“J didn’t know it was your table,” said Alice; “it’s laid
for a great many more than three.”

“Your hair wants cutting,” said the Hatter. He had
been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity,
and this was his first speech.

“You should learn not to make personal remarks,” Alice
said, with some severity; “it’s very rude.”

The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this ;
but all he sazd was: ‘“ Why is a raven like a writing-desk ?”

“Come, we shall have some fun now!” thought Alice.
“I’m glad they've begun asking riddles—I believe I can
guess that,” she added aloud.

_ “Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer
to it?” said the March Hare.
A MAD TEA-PARTY 79

“Exactly so,” said
Alice.

“Then you should
say what you mean,”
the March Hare went







on.

“T do,” Alice has-
tily replied ; .
“at least—at
least I mean

=

om $b

what I say
—that’s the
same thing,
you know.”

“Not the
same thing a bit!” said the Hatter. ‘Why, you might just
as well say that ‘I see what I eat’ is the same thing as
‘T eat what I see’!”

“You might just as well say,’ added the March Hare,
“that ‘I like what I get’ is the same thing as ‘I get what
I like’ !”

“You might just as well say,” added the Dormouse, which
seemed to be talking in his sleep, “that ‘I breathe when I
sleep’ is the same thing as ‘I sleep when I breathe’!”

“Tt ds the same thing with you,” said the Hatter; and here
the conversation dropped, and the party sat silent for a
minute, while Alice thought over all she could remember
about ravens and writing-desks, which wasn’t much.
80 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

The Hatter was the first to break the silence. ‘‘ What
day of the month is it?” he said, turning to Alice; he had
taken his watch out of his pocket, and was looking at it
uneasily, shaking it every now and then, and holding it to
his ear.

Alice considered a little, and then said, ‘“‘ The fourth.”

“Two days wrong!” sighed the Hatter. ‘I told you
butter wouldn’t suit the works!” he added, looking angrily at
the March Hare. :

“It was the des¢ butter,” the March Hare meekly replied.

“Ves, but some crumbs must have got in as well,” the
Hatter grumbled; “you shouldn't have put it in with the
bread-knife.”

The March Hare took the watch and looked at it
gloomily ; then he dipped it into his cup of tea, and looked
at it again; but he could think of nothing better to say
than his first remark: “It was the des¢ butter, you know.”

Alice had been looking over his shoulder with some
curiosity. ‘What afunny watch!” she remarked. “It tells
the day of the month, and doesn’t tell what o’clock it is!”

“Why should it?” muttered the Hatter. ‘ Does your
watch tell you what year it is?”

“Of course not,” Alice replied very readily; ‘but that’s
because it stays the same year for such a long time together.”

‘““Which is just the case with mzne,” said the Hatter.

Alice felt dreadfully puzzled. The MHatter’s remark
seemed to have no meaning in it, and yet it was certainly
English. ‘I don’t quite understand,” she said, as politely
as she could.


THE MAD TEA PARTY.
A MAD TEA-PARTY 81

‘“The Dormouse is asleep again,” said the Hatter, and he
poured a little hot tea upon its nose.

The Dormouse shook its head impatiently, and_ said,
without opening its eyes, ‘Of course, of course: just what I
was going to remark myself.”

‘‘Have you guessed the riddle yct?” the Hatter said,
turning to Alice again.

‘“No, I give it up,” Alice replied; ‘‘what’s the answer ?”

‘IT haven't the slightest idea,” said the Hatter.

“Nor I,” said the March Hare.

Alice sighed wearily. “TI think you might do something
oetter with the time,” she said, “than waste it asking riddles
with no answers,”

“If you knew Time as well as I do,” said the Hatter, “ you
wouldn’t talk about wasting z#. It’s Azm.”

‘‘T don’t know what you mean,” said Alice.

‘‘ Of course you don’t!” the Hatter said, tossing his head
contemptuously. ‘I dare say you never even spoke to
Time!”

‘Perhaps not,” Alice cautiously replied; “ but I know I
have to beat time when I learn music.”

“Ah! that accounts for it,” said the Hatter. ‘“ He won't
stand beating. Now, if you only kept on good terms with
him he’d do almost anything you liked with the clock. For
instance, suppose it were nine o'clock in the morning, just
time to begin lessons: you’d only have to whisper a hint to
Time, and round goes the clock in a twinkling! Half-past
one, time for dinner!” —

P
82 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

‘“‘T only wish it was,” the March Hare said to itself in a
whisper.

‘That would be grand, certainly,” said Alice thoughtfully ;
“but then—I shouldn’t be hungry for it, you know.”

“Not at first, perhaps,” said the Hatter; “ but you could
keep it to half-past one as long as you liked.”

“Ts that the way you manage?” Alice asked.

The Hatter shook his head mournfully. “Not I!” he
replied. ‘We quarrelled last March—just before Ze went
mad, you know—” (pointing with his teaspoon at the March
Hare), ‘‘—it was at the great concert given by the Queen
of Hearts, and I had to sing

‘Twinkle, twinkle, little bat !
How I wonder what you're at!’

You know the song, perhaps?”
“I’ve heard something like it,” said Alice.
“Tt goes on, you know,” the Hatter continued, “in this

way:
‘Up above the world you fly
Like a tea-tray in the sky.

Twinkle, twinkle—~ ”

Here the Dormouse shook itself, and began singing in
its sleep, ‘‘ Twinkle, twinkle, twinkle, twinkle——’ and went
on so long that they had to pinch it to make it stop.

‘Well, I’d hardly finished the first verse,” said the
Hatter, ‘when the Queen jumped up and bawled out, ‘ He’s
murdering the time! Off with his head!’”

‘How dreadfully savage!” exclaimed Alice.
A MAD TEA-PARTY 83



“And ever since that,” the
Hatter went on, in a mournful tone,
‘‘he won’t do a thing Iask! It’s
always six o’clock now.”

A bright idea came into Alice’s
head. ‘Is that the reason so many
tea-things are put out here?” she
asked.

“Yes, that’s it,” said. the Hatter, with a sigh : “it’s always
tea-time, and we've no time to wash the things between
whiles.”

“Then you keep moving round, I suppose?” said
Alice.

‘Exactly so,” said the Hatter; ‘as the things get used

”

Up.



F2
84 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

‘But what happens when you come to the beginning
again?” Alice ventured to ask.

‘Suppose we change the subject,” the March Hare
interrupted, yawning. ‘I’m getting tired of this. I vote the
young lady tells us a story.”

“I’m afraid I don’t know one,” said Alice, rather alarmed
at the proposal.

‘“Then the Dormouse shall!” they both cried. ‘Wake
up, Dormouse!” And they pinched it on both sides at
once.

The Dormouse slowly opened his eyes. “I wasn't
asleep,” he said in a hoarse, feeble voice ; “I heard every word
you fellows were saying.”

“Tell us a story!” said the March Hare.

“Yes, please do!” pleaded Alice.

‘And be quick about it,” added the Hatter, “or you'll be
asleep again before it’s done.”

“Once upon a time there were three little sisters,” the
Dormouse began in a great hurry; “and their names were
Elsie, Lacie, and Tillie; and they lived at the bottom of a
well :

‘What did they live on?” said Alice, who always took a
great interest in questions of eating and drinking.

‘They lived on treacle,” said the Dormouse, after thinking
a minute or two. |

‘They couldn’t have done that, you know,” Alice gently
remarked ; “ they'd have been ill.”

‘So they were,” said the Dormouse; “ very ill.”


A MAD TEA-PARTY 85

Alice tried a little to fancy to herself what such an
extraordinary way of living would be like, but it puzzled her
too much, so she went on: “ But why did they live at the
bottom of a well?”

‘Take some more tea,” the March Hare said to Alice very
earnestly.

“I’ve had nothing yet,” Alice replied, in an offended tone,
“so I can’t take more.”

“You mean you can’t take /ess,” said the Hatter: ‘‘it’s
__very easy to take more than nothing.”

“ Nobody asked your opinion,” said Alice.

‘Who's making personal remarks now?” the Hatter
asked triumphantly.

Alice did not quite know what to say to this, so she
helped herself to some tea and bread-and-butter, and then
turned to the Dormouse, and repeated her question: “Why
did they live at the bottom of a well?”

The Dormouse again took a minute or two to think
about it, and then said: “ It was a treacle-well.”

“There’s no such thing!” Alice was beginning very
angrily; but the Hatter and the March Hare went “Sh! sh!”
and the Dormouse sulkily remarked: ‘If you can’t be civil,
you'd better finish the story for yourself.”

‘No, please go on!” Alice said very humbly. ‘I won't
interrupt you again. I daresay there may be one.”

“One, indeed!” said the Dormouse, indignantly. How-
ever, he consented to go on. ‘And so these three little
sisters—they were learning to draw, you know


86 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

“What did they draw?” said Alice, quite forgetting her
promise.

“Treacle,” said the Dormouse, without considering at all
this time. ee

“T want a clean cup,” interrupted the Hatter; “let’s all
move one place on.”

He moved on as he spoke, and the Dormouse followed
him: the March Hare moved into the Dormouse’s place, and
Alice, rather unwillingly, took the place of the March Hare.
The Hatter was the only one who got any advantage from
the change; and Alice was a good deal worse off than before,
as the March Hare had just upset the milk-jug into his
plate.

Alice did not wish to offend the Dormouse again, so she
began very cautiously : ‘‘ But I don’t understand. Where
did they draw the treacle from ?”

“You can draw water out of a water-well,” said the
Hatter; ‘‘so I should think you could draw treacle out of a
treacle-well—eh, stupid ?”

“But they were zz the well,” Alice said to the Dormouse,
not choosing to notice this last remark.

“Of course they were,” said the Dormouse ; ‘‘“——well, in.”

This answer so confused poor Alice that she let the
Dormouse go on for some time without interrupting it. -

“They were learning to draw,” the Dormouse went on,
yawning and rubbing its eyes, for it was getting very sleepy ;
‘‘and they drew all manner of things—everything that begins:
with an M——”
A MAD TEA-PARTY 84

“Why with
an M?” said
Alice.

“Why not?”
said the March
Hare.

Alice was
silent.

The Dor-
mouse had.

closed its eyes
by this time
and was going
off into a doze ;
but, on being
pinched by the
Hatter, it woke
up again with
a little shriek,
and went on: “—— that begins with an M, such as mouse-
traps, and the moon, and memory, and muchness—you know
you say things are ‘much of a muchness’—did you ever
see such a thing as a drawing of a muchness ?”

“Really, now you ask me,” said Alice, very much con-
fused, ‘“ I don’t think——”

“Then you shouldn’t talk,” said the Hatter.

This piece of rudeness was more than Alice could bear ;
she got up in great disgust, and walked off. The Dormouse


88 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

fell asleep instantly, and neither of the others took the least
notice of her going, though she looked back once or twice,
half hoping that they would call after her; the last time she
saw them they were trying to put the Dormouse into the
teapot. :

“At any rate, I'll never go ¢heve again!” said Alice, as she
picked her way through the wood. ‘“‘It’s the stupidest tea-
party I ever was at in all my life!”

Just as she said this she noticed that one of the trees
had a door leading right into it. ‘‘ That’s very curious!” she
thought. ‘‘ But everything’s curious to-day. I think I may
as well go in at once.” And in she went.

Once more she found herself in the long hall, and close to
the little glass table. ‘‘ Now, I’ll manage better this time,”
she said to herself, and began by taking the little golden key,
and unlocking the door that led into the garden. Then she
set to work nibbling at the mushroom (she had kept a piece
of it in her pocket) till she was about a foot high; then she
walked down the little passage, and ¢4en—she found herself
at last in the beautiful garden, among the bright flower-beds
and the cool fountains.



THE QUEEN’S
CROQUET-GROUND

A LARGE rose-tree stood near the entrance of the garden:
the roses growing on it were white, but there were three
gardeners at it, busily painting them red. Alice thought
this a very curious thing, and she went nearer to watch
them, and just as she came up to them she heard one of
them say, ‘‘Look out now, Five; don’t go splashing paint
over me like that!”

“T couldn't help it,” said Five, ina sulky tone. ‘ Seven
jogged my elbow.”

On which Seven looked up and said : ‘ That’s right, Five,
always lay the blame on others!”

“ You'd better not talk!” said Five. ‘I heard the Queen
say only yesterday you deserved to be beheaded!”
60 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

‘What for?” said the one who had first spoken.

““That’s none of your business, Two!” said Seven.

“Ves, it zs his business!” said Five. ‘And I'll tell him
—it was for bringing the cook tulip-roots instead of onions.”

Seven flung down his brush, and had just begun: “ Well,
of all the unjust things——,” when his eye chanced to fall
upon Alice, as she stood watching them, and he checked
himself suddenly; the others looked round also, and all of
them bowed low.

“Would you tell me,” said Alice, a little timidly, ‘‘ why
you are painting those roses ?” ’

Five and Seven said nothing, but looked at Two. Two
began in a low voice: ‘“‘ Why, the fact is you see, Miss, this
here ought to have been a ved rose-tree, and we put a white
one in by mistake; and if the Queen was to find it out we
should all have our heads cut off, you know. So you see,
Miss, we're doing our best afore she comes, to——” At this
moment Five, who had been anxiously looking across the
garden, called out, ‘‘The Queen! The Queen!” and the three
gardeners instantly threw themselves flat upon their faces.
There was a sound of many footsteps, and Alice looked
round, eager to see the Queen.

First came ten soldiers carrying nee these were all
shaped like the three gardeners, oblong ai flat, with their
hands and feet at the corners; next the ten courtiers; these
were ornamented all over with diamonds, and walked two
and two, as the soldiers did. After these came the royal
children; there were ten of them, and the little dears came
THE QUEEN'S CROQUET-GROUND ot



jumping merrily along, hand
in. hand, in couples; they
were all ornamented with
hearts. Next came the
guests, mostly Kings and Queens, and among them Alice
recognised the White Rabbit; it was talking in a hurried,
nervous manner, smiling at everything that was said, and
went by without noticing her. Then followed the Knave
of Hearts, carrying the King’s crown on a crimson velvet
cushion; and, last of all this grand procession, came THE
KING AND QUEEN OF HEARTS.

Alice was rather doubtful whether she ought not to lie
down on her face like the three gardeners, but she could not
remember ever having heard of such a rule at processions ;
92 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

‘and besides, what would be the use of a procession,” thought
she, “if people had all to lie down upon their faces, so that
they couldn't see it?” So she stood still where she was, and
waited.

When the procession came opposite to Alice they all
stopped and looked at her, and the Queen said severely:
“Who is this?” She said it to the Knave of Hearts, who
only bowed and smiled in reply.

“Tdiot !” said the Queen, tossing her head impatiently ;
and, turning to Alice, she went on, ‘‘What’s your name,
child?”

‘‘My name is Alice, so please your Majesty,” said Alice
very politely; but she added, to herself, ‘‘Why, they're
only a pack of cards, after all. I needn’t be afraid of
them !”

‘“And who are ¢hese>?” said the Queen, pointing to the
three gardeners who were lying round the rose-tree ; for, you
see, as they were lying on their faces, and the pattern on
their backs was the same as the rest of the pack, she could
not tell whether they were gardeners, or soldiers, or courtiers,
or three of her own children.

‘How should / know?” said Alice, surprised at her own
courage. ‘It’s no business of mzxe.”

The Queen turned crimson with fury, and after glaring at
her for a moment like a wild beast, screamed, ‘Off with her
head! Off——”

“Nonsense!” said Alice, very loudly and decidedly, and
the Queen was silent.
THE QUEEN’S CROQUET-GROUND

f

Se
SS

Mi ff
G

anllly
|



The King laid his hand upon her arm,

“Consider, my dear; she is only a child

and timidly said
| ”
94 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

The Queen turned angrily away from him, and said to
the Knave: ‘“ Turn them over!”

The Knave did so, very carefully, with one foot.

“Get up!” said the Queen, in a shrill, loud voice, and the
three gardeners instantly jumped up, and began bowing to
the King, the Queen, the royal children, and everybody else.

“Leave off that!” screamed the Queen. ‘You make me
giddy.” And then, turning to the rose-tree, she went on,
“What “ave you been doing here?”

“May it please your Majesty,” said Two, in a very
humble tone, going down on one knee as he spoke, “we
were trying 2

“7 see!” said the Queen, who had meanwhile been
examining the roses. ‘‘Off with their heads!” and the
procession moved on, three of the soldiers remaining behind
to execute the unfortunate gardeners, who ran to Alice for
protection.

“You sha'n’t be beheaded!” said Alice, and she put them
into a large flower-pot that stood near. The three soldiers
wandered about for a minute or two, looking for them, and
then quietly marched off after the others.

‘Are their heads off?” shouted the Queen.

“Their heads are gone, if it please your Majesty!” the
soldiers shouted in reply. ,

“That’s right!” shouted the Queen. ‘Can you play
croquet ?”

The soldiers were silent, and looked at Alice, as the
question was evidently meant for her.


THE QUEEN’S CROQUET-GROUND 95

“Yes!” shouted Alice.

‘Come on, then!” roared the Queen, and Alice joined the
procession, wondering very much what would happen next.

“Tt’s—it’s a very fine day!” said a timid voice at her
side. She was walking by the White Rabbit, who was
peeping anxiously into her face.

“Very,” said Alice ; ““-—-where’s the Duchess ?”

“Hush! hush!” said the Rabbit, in a low, hurried tone.
He looked anxiously over his shoulder as he spoke, and
then raised himself upon tiptoe, put his mouth close to her
ear, and whispered, ‘‘She’s under sentence of execution.”

‘What for?” said Alice..

“Did you say, ‘What a pity?’” the Rabbit asked.

‘No, I didn’t,” said Alice ; ‘‘I don’t think it’s at all a pity.
I said, ‘What for?’”

‘She boxed the Queen’s ears,” the Rabbit began,—Alice
gave a little scream of laughter. ‘Oh, hush!” the Rabbit
whispered in a frightened tone. |The Queen will hear you!
You see she came rather late, and the Queen said——”

_ “Get to your places!” shouted the Queen in a voice of
thunder, and people began running about in all directions,
tumbling up against each other; however, they got settled
down in a minute or two, and the game began.

Alice thought she had never seen such a curious croquet-
ground in all her life: it was all ridges and furrows; the
balls were live hedgehogs, the mallets live flamingoes, and
the soldiers had to double themselves up and to stand upon
their hands and feet to make the arches.
96 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

The chief difficulty Alice found at first was in managing
her flamingo; she succeeded in getting its boly tucked
away comfortably enough under her arm, with its legs
hanging down, but generally, just as she had got its neck
nicely straightened out, and was going to give the hedgehog
a blow with its head, it woz/d twist itself round and look up
in her face, with such a puzzled expression that she could
not help bursting out laughing; and when she had got its
head down, and was going to
begin again, it was very pro-
voking to find that the hedgehog
had unrolled
itself, and was
in the act of
crawling away ;
besides all
this, there was
generally a
ridge or a fur-
row in the way














gs
oD
ws


THE QUEEN'S CROQUET-GROUND 97

wherever she wanted to send the hedgehog to, and as the
doubled-up soldiers were always getting up and walking
off to other parts of the ground, Alice soon came to the
conclusion that it was a very difficult game indeed.

The players all played at once without waiting for turns,
quarrelling all the while, and fighting for the hedgehogs ; and
in a very short time the Queen was in a furious passion, and
went stamping about, and shouting “ Off with his head!” or
‘Off with her head!” about once in a minute.

Alice began to feel very uneasy; to be sure she had not
as yet had any dispute with the Queen, but she knew that it
might happen any minute, ‘‘and then,” thought she, ‘“ what
would become of me? They're dreadfully fond of beheading
people here: the great wonder is that there's anyone left
alive |”

She was looking about for some way of escape, and
wondering whether she could get away without being
seen, when she noticed a curious appearance in the air;
it puzzled her very much at first, but, after watching it a
minute or two, she made it out to be a grin, and she said to
herself, ‘It’s the Cheshire Cat; now I shall have somebody
to talk to.” :

‘‘ How are you getting on?” said the Cat, as soon as there
was mouth enough for it to speak with.

Alice waited till the eyes appeared, and then nodded.
‘‘Tt’s no use speaking to it,” she thought, “till its ears have
come, or at least one of them.” In another minute the
whole head appeared, and then Alice put down her

G
98 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

flamingo and began an account of the game, feeling very
glad she had someone to listen to her. The Cat seemed to
think that there was enough of it now in sight, and no more
of it appeared.

“T don’t think they play at all fairly,” Alice began in
rather a complaining tone, ‘and they all quarrel so
dreadfully one can’t hear oneself speak—and they don’t
seem to have any rules in particular; at least, if there
are, nobody attends to them—and you've no idea how
confusing it is all the things being alive; for instance, there’s
the arch I’ve got to go through next, walking about at the
other end of the ground—and I should have croqueted the
Queen's hedgehog just now, only it ran away when it saw
mine coming.’

‘How do you like the Queen?” said the Cat in a low
voice.

‘Not at all,” said Alice; ‘she’s so extremely——” Just
then she noticed that the Queen was close behind her,
listening ; so she went on, “ ——likely to win that it’s hardly

worth while finishing the game.”

The Queen smiled and passed on.

“Whom ave you talking to?” said the King, coming
up to Alice, and looking at the Cat’s head with great
curiosity.

“It’s a friend of mine, a Cheshire Cat,” said Alice ; “allow
me to introduce it.”

“I don’t like the look of it at all,” said the King; ‘“ how-
ever, it may kiss my hand if it likes.”


THE CHESHIRE CAT.
FAIRY Pll Re Ee



THE QUEEN’S CROQUET-GROUND 99

‘“‘T’d rather not,” the Cat remarked.

“Don’t be impertinent,” said the King, “and don’t look
at me like that!” He got behind Alice as he spoke.

“A cat may look at a king,” said Alice. ‘I’ve read that
in some book, but I don’t remember where.”

‘‘Well, it must be removed,” said the King, very
decidedly, and he called to the Queen, who was passing at the
moment, ‘‘My dear! I wish you would have this cat
removed |”

The Queen had only one way of settling all difficulties,
great or small. ‘Off with his head!” she said, without
even looking round.

wie"


100 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

“Tl fetch the executioner myself,” said the King eagerly,
and he hurried off.

Alice thought she might as well go back and see how the
game was going on, as she heard the Queen’s voice in the
distance, screaming with passion. She had already heard
her sentence three of the players to be executed for having
missed their turns, and she did not like the look of things
at all, as the game was in such confusion that she never
knew whether it was her turn or not. So she went in search
of her hedgehog.

The hedgehog was engaged in a fight with another
hedgehog, which seemed to Alice an excellent opportunity for
croqueting one of them with the other: the only difficulty
was, that her flamingo was gone across to the other side of
the garden, where Alice could see it trying in a helpless sort
of way to fly up into one of the trees.

By the time she had caught the flamingo and brought it
back, the fight was over, and both of the hedgehogs were out
of sight ;“ but it doesn’t matter much,” thought Alice, “as
all the arches are gone from this side of the ground.” So
she tucked it under her arm, that it might not escape again,
and went back for a little more conversation with her friend.

When she got back to the Cheshire Cat she was sur-
prised to find quite a large crowd collected round it; there
was a dispute going on between the executioner, the King,
and the Queen, who were all talking at once, while all the
rest were quite silent and looked very uncomfortable.

The moment Alice appeared she was appealed to by all
THE QUEEN’S CROQUET-GROUND 101

three to settle the question, and they repeated their argu-
ments to her, though, as they all spoke at once, she found it
very hard indeed to make out exactly what they said.

The executioner’s argument was that you couldn't cut
off a head unless there was a body to cut it off from; that
he had never had to do such a thing before, and he wasn't
going to begin at Azs time of life.

The King’s argument was that anything that had a head
could be beheaded, and that you weren’t to talk nonsense.

The Queen’s argument was that if something wasn’t
done about it in less than no time, she’d have everybody
executed all round. (It was. this last remark that had made
the whole party look so grave and anxious.)

Alice could think of nothing else to say but ‘“ It belongs
to the Duchess ; you'd better ask Aer about it.”

“She’s in prison,” the Queen said to the executioner ;
“fetch her here.” And the executioner went off like an
arrow.

The Cat's head began fading away the moment he was
gone, and, by the time he had come back with the Duchess,
it had entirely disappeared ; so the King and the executioner
ran wildly up and down looking for it, while the rest of the
party went back to the game.


CHAPTER Ix

THE MOCK TURTLE’S STORY

‘You can’t think how glad I am tosee you again, you
dear old thing!” said the Duchess, as she tucked her arm
affectionately into Alice’s, and they walked off together.

Alice was very glad to find her in such a pleasant temper,
and thought to herself that perhaps it was only the pepper
that had made her so savage when they met in the kitchen.

‘When /’ma Duchess,” she said to herself (not in a very
hopeful tone, though), “I won’t have any pepper in my
kitchen af all. Soup does very well without—maybe it’s
always pepper that makes people hot-tempered,” she went on,
very much pleased at having found out a new kind of rule,
“and vinegar that makes them sour—and camomile that
makes them bitter—and—and barley-sugar and such things
that make children sweet-tempered. I only wish people
THE MOCK TURTLE’S STORY 103

knew ¢hat: then they wouldn't be so stingy about it, you
know.”

She had quite forgotten the Duchess by this time, and
was a little startled when she heard her voice close to her
ear. “You're thinking about something, my dear, and that
makes you forget to talk. I can’t tell you just now what the
moral of that is, but I shall remember it in a bit.”

‘Perhaps it hasn’t one,” Alice ventured to remark.

“Tut, tut, child!” said the Duchess. ‘‘ Everything’s got
a moral, if only you can find it.” And she squeézed herself
up closer to Alice’s side as she spoke.

Alice did not much like her keeping so close to her;
first, because the Duchess was very ugly; and secondly,
because she was exactly the right height to rest her chin on
Alice’s shoulder; and it was an uncomfortably sharp chin.
‘However, she did not like to be rude, so she bore it as well
as she could. ‘‘The game’s going on rather better now,” she
said, by way of keeping up the conversation a little.

“Tis so,” said the Duchess: ‘and the moral of that is—
‘Oh, ’tis love, ’tis love, that makes the world go round !’”

“Somebody said,” Alice whispered, “that it’s done by
everybody minding their own business!”

“Ah, well! It means much the same thing,” said the
Duchess, digging her sharp little chin into Alice’s shoulder
as she added, ‘“‘and the moral of ¢#a¢ is—‘ Take care of the
sense, and the sounds will take care of themselves.’”’

‘‘How fond she is of finding morals in things!” Alice
thought to herself.
104 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

“T daresay you're wondering why I don’t put my arm
round your waist,” the Duchess said, after a pause; ‘‘the
reason is, that I’m doubtful about the temper of your
flamingo. Shall I try the experiment ?”

“He might bite,” Alice cautiously replied, not feeling at
all anxious to have the experiment tried.

‘Very true,” said the Duchess ; ‘‘ flamingoes and mustard
both bite. And the moral of that is—‘ Birds of a feather
flock together.’”

‘‘Only mustard isn’t a bird,” Alice remarked. .

‘Right, as usual,” said the Duchess: “ what a clear way
you have of putting things!”

“It’s a mineral, I ¢hinxk,” said Alice.

‘‘Of course it is,” said the Duchess, who seemed ready to
agree to everything that Alice said; “there's a large mustard-
mine near here. And the moral of that is—‘ The more there
is of mine, the less there is of yours.’”

“Oh, I know!” exclaimed Alice, who had not attended
to this last remark, ‘it’s a vegetable. It doesn’t look like
one, but it is.”

“T quite agree with you,” said the Duchess; “and the
moral of that is—‘ Be what you would seem to be’—or if
you'd like it put more simply—‘ Never imagine yourself
not to be otherwise than what it might appear to others that
what you were or might have been was not otherwise than
what you had been would have appeared to them to be
otherwise.’ ” :

“I think I should understand that better,” Alice said very
105

THE MOCK TURTLE’S STORY

=)
) /



|

'

politely, ‘if I had it written down : but I can’t quite follow it

”

“That's nothing to what I could say if I chose,” the

Duchess replied in a pleased tone.

as you Say it.
106 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

“Pray don’t trouble yourself to say it any longer than
that,” said Alice.

“Oh, don’t talk about trouble!” said the Duchess. “I
make you a present of everything I’ve said as yet.”

“A cheap sort of present!” thought Alice. ‘I’m glad
they don’t give birthday presents like that!” But she did
not venture to say it out loud.

“Thinking again?” the Duchess asked, with another dig
of her sharp little chin.

“T’ve a right to think,” said Alice sharply, for she was
beginning to feel a little worried.

‘Just about as much right,” said the Duchess, “‘as pigs —
have to fly; and the m——”

But here, to Alice’s great surprise, the Duchess’s voice
died away, even in the middle of her favourite word
‘‘moral,” and the arm that was linked into hers began to
tremble. Alice looked up, and there stood the Queen in
front of them, with her arms folded, frowning likea thunder-
storm.

‘A fine day, your Majesty!” the Duchess began in a low,
weak voice. ;

“Now, I give you fair warning,” shouted the Queen,
stamping on the ground as she spoke; ‘either you or your
head must be off, and that in about half no time! Take
your choice!”

The Duchess took her choice, and was gone in a
moment.

‘‘Let’s go on with the game,” the Queen said to Alice ;
THE MOCK TURTLE’S STORY 107

and Alice was.too much frightened to say a word, but slowly
followed her back to the croquet-ground.

The other guests had taken advantage of the Queen’s
absence, and were resting in the shade; however, the moment
they saw her they hurried back to the game, the Queen
merely remarking that a moment’s delay would cost them
thetmelives: 5

All the time they were playing the Queen never left off
quarrelling with the other players, and shouting “ Off with
his head!” or “Off with her head!” Those whom she
sentenced were taken into custody by the soldiers, who
of course had to leave off being arches to do this, so that
by the end of half an hour or so there were no arches left,
and all the players, except the King, the Queen, and Alice,
were in custody and under sentence of execution.

Then the Queen left off, quite out of breath, and said to
Alice, ‘‘ Have you seen the Mock Turtle yet ?”

“No,” said Alice, “I don’t even know what a Mock
Turtle is.”

“It’s the thing Mock Turtle Soup is made from,” said the
Queen.

‘‘T never saw one or heard of one,” said Alice.

“Come on, then,” said the Queen, “and he shall tell you
his history.”

As they walked off together, Alice heard the King say
in a low voice, to the company generally, ‘You are al] ‘
pardoned.” ‘Come, ¢ha?’s a good thing!” she said to herself,
for she had felt quite unhappy at the number of executions
the Queen had ordered.
108 ALICE IN WONDERLAND



eA 3
Vegi
oe ep.



They very soon came upon a
Gryphon, lying fast asleep in the
sun. (If you don’t know what a
Gryphon is, look at the picture.)
‘““Up, lazy thing!” said the Queen,
“and take this young lady to see
the Mock Turtle, and to hear his history. I must go back
and see after some executions I have ordered.” And she
walked off, leaving Alice alone with the Gryphon. Alice
did not quite like the look of the creature, but on the whole
she thought it would be quite as safe to stay with it as to go
after that savage Queen; so she waited.

The Gryphon sat up and rubbed its eyes; then it
watched the Queen till she was out of sight ; then it chuckled.
“What fun!” said the Gryphon, half to itself, half to Alice.

“What zs the fun?” said Alice.
THE MOCK TURTLE’S STORY 109

“Why, sHe,” said the Gryphon. ‘‘It’s all her fancy, that ;
they never executes nobody, you know. Come on!”

‘“‘ Everybody says ‘come on!’ here,” thought Alice, as she
went slowly after it; ‘‘I never was so ordered about in all my
life, never!”

They had not gone far before they saw the Mock Turtle
in the distance, sitting sad and lonely on a little ledge of
rock, and, as they came nearer, Alice could hear him sighing
as if his heart would break. She pitied him deeply. ‘‘ What
is his sorrow?” she asked the Gryphon, and the Gryphon
answered, very nearly in the same words as before, “‘ It’s all
his fancy, that; he hasn’t got no sorrow, you know. Come
on!”

So they went up to the Mock Turtle, who looked at them
with large eyes full of tears, but said nothing.

“This here young lady,” said the Gryphon, ‘“ she wants
for to know your history, she do.”

“Tl tell it her,” said the Mock Turtle in a deep, hollow
tone; ‘sit down, both of you, and don’t speak a word till
I've finished.”

So they sat down, and nobody spoke for some minutes.
Alice thought to herself, ‘‘I don’t see how he can ever finish
if he doesn’t begin.” But she waited patiently.

“Once,” said the Mock Turtle at last, with a deep sigh, “I
was a real Turtle.”

These words were followed by a very long silence, broken
only by an occasional exclamation of ‘‘ Hjckrrh!” from the
Gryphon, and the constant heavy sobbing of the Mock
110 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

Turtle. Alice was very nearly getting up and saying,
“Thank you, sir, for your interesting story,” but she could
not help thinking there #us¢ be more to come, so she sat
still and said nothing.

‘When we were little,” the Mock Turtle went on at last,
more calmly, though still sobbing a little now and then, “ we
went to school in the sea. The master was an old Turtle— ©
we used to call him Tortoise——’”

‘Why did you call him Tortoise, if he wasn’t one?” Alice
asked.

‘We called him Tortoise because he taught us,” said the
Mock Turtle angrily; ‘really you are very dull!”

‘You ought to be ashamed of yourself for asking such a
simple question,” added the Gryphon; and then they both
sat silent and looked at poor Alice, who felt ready to sink
into the earth. At last the Gryphon said to the Mock
Turtle, ‘‘Drive on, old fellow; don’t be all day about it!”
And he went on in these words :

“Yes, we went to school in the sea, though you mayn't
believe it——”

‘‘T never said I didn’t!” interrupted Alice.

“You did,” said the Mock Turtle.

‘Hold your tongue!” added the Gryphon, before Alice
could speak again. The Mock Turtle went on:

“We had the best of educations—in fact, we went to
school every day.” :

‘‘7’ve been to aday-school, too,” said Alice; “you needn’t
be so proud as all that.” :


THE MOCK TURTLE’S SONG.
THE MOCK TURTLE’S STORY is

“With extras ?” asked the Mock Turtle a little anxiously.
“Yes,” said Alice, ‘‘ we learned French and music.”
‘And washing?” said the Mock Turtle.

‘Certainly not!” said Alice indignantly.

_ “Ah, then, yours wasn’t a really good school,” said the
Mock Turtle, in a tone of great relief. ‘“ Now at ours they
had at the end of the bill, ‘French, music, avd washing
extra.’ ”

‘You couldn't have wanted it much,” said Alice, “living
at the bottom of the sea.”

‘“‘T couldn’t afford to learn it,” said the Mock Turtle, with
asigh. ‘I only took the regular course.”

‘What was that?” inquired Alice.

‘Reeling and writhing, of course, to begin with,” the
Mock Turtle replied; “and then the different branches
of Arithmetic—Ambition, Distraction, Uglification, and
Derision.”

“T never heard of ‘Uglification,’” Alice ventured to
say. ‘‘ What is it ?”

The Gryphon lifted up both its paws in surprise.
‘Never heard of uglifying!” it exclaimed. ‘You know
what to beautify is, I suppose?”

“Yes,” said Alice, doubtfully ; “it means—-to—make—
anything—prettier.”

“Well, then,” the Gryphon went on, “if you don’t know
what to uglify is, you are a simpleton.”

Alice did not feel encouraged to ask any more questions
112 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

about it, so she turned to the Mock Turtle, and said, ‘‘ What
else had you to learn ?”

‘Well, there was Mystery,” the Mock Turtle replied,
counting off thesubjects on his flappers, ‘—Mystery,
ancient and modern, with Seaography; then Drawling—_
the Drawling-master was an old conger-eel that used to
come once a week; /e taught us Drawling, Stretching, and
Fainting in Coils.”

“What was ¢hat like?” said Alice.

“Well, I can’t show it you myself,” the Mock Turtle said:
‘I'm too stiff. And the Gryphon never learnt it.”

“Hadn't time,” said the Gryphon; ‘I went to the
Classical master, though. He was an old crab, 4e was.”

‘“‘T never went to him,” the Mock Turtle said with a sigh ;
“he taught Laughing and Grief, they used to say.”

‘‘So he did, so he did,” said the Gryphon, sighing in his
turn ; and both creatures hid their faces in their paws.

“And how many hours a day did you do lessons ?” said
Alice, in a hurry to change the subject.

‘Ten hours the first day,” said the Mock Turtle: ‘nine
the next, and so on.”

‘“What a curious plan!” exclaimed Alice.

“That's the reason they're called lessons,” the Gryphon
remarked ; ‘‘ because they lessen from day to day.”

This was quite a new idea to Alice, and she thought it
over a little before she made her next remark. ‘‘Then the
eleventh day must have been a holiday?”

‘Of course it was,” said the Mock Turtle.
THE MOCK TURTLE'’S STORY 113

‘‘And how did you manage on the twelfth?” Alice went
on eagerly.

‘“‘That’s enough about lessons,” the Gryphon interrupted
in a very decided tone; ‘tell her something about the games

”

now.




THE Mock Turtle sighed deeply, and drew the back of
one flapper across his eyes. He looked at Alice, and tried to
speak, but, for a minute or two, sobs choked his voice.
“Same as if he had a bone in his throat,” said the Gryphon :
and it set to work shaking him and punching him in the
back. At last the Mock Turtle recovered his voice, and with
tears running down his cheeks, went on again:

“You may not have lived much under the sea "—(« T
haven't,” said Alice)—“and perhaps you were never even
introduced to a lobster—(Alice began to say “I once
tasted ” but checked herself hastily, and said “ No, never”)
“—so you can have no idea what a delightful thing a Lobster
Quadrille is!”


THE LOBSTER QUADRILLE 115

‘No, indeed,” said Alice. ‘‘ What sort of a dance is it?”

“Why,” said the Gryphon, “you first form into a line
along the sea-shore——”

‘“Two lines!” cried the Mock Turtle. ‘Seals, turtles
and so on; then, when you've cleared the jelly-fish out of the
way: i

‘That generally takes some time,” interrupted the
Gryphon.

i you advance twice

“ Each with a lobster as a partner!” cried the Gryphon.

“ Of course,” the Mock Turtle said, ‘advance twice, set to
Ue a

‘change lobsters, sa retire in same order,” continued
the Gryphon.

“Then, you know,” the Mock Turtle went on, “you
throw the

‘The lobsters |!” shouted the Gryphon, with a bound into
the air.

‘“‘__as far out to sea as you can

‘“ Swim after them!” screamed the Gryphon.

“Turn a somersault in the sea!” cried the Mock Turtle,
capering wildly about. -

‘Change lobsters again!” yelled the Gryphon.

‘Back to land again, and that’s all the first figure,” said
the Mock Turtle, suddenly dropping his voice; and the two
creatures, who had been jumping about like mad things all
this time, sat down again very sadly and quietly, and looked
at Alice.











H2
116 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

“Tt must be a very pretty dance,” said Alice timidly.

“Would you like to see a little of it?” said the Mock
Turtle.

“Very much indeed,” said Alice.

‘Come, let’s try the first figure!” said the Mock Turtle to
the Gryphon. ‘ We can do it without lobsters, you know.
Which shall sing ?”

“Oh, you sing,” said the Gryphon. “I’ve forgotten the
words.”

So they began solemnly dancing round and round
Alice, every now and then treading on her toes when
they passed too close, and waving their forepaws to mark
the time, while the Mock Turtle sang this very slowly and
sadly :

“ Will you walk a little faster?” said a whiting toa snail,

“There's a porpoise close behind us, and he’s treading on my tail.

See how eagerly the lobsters and the turtles all advance!

They are waiting on the shingle—will you come and join the dance?
Will you, won’t you, will you, won’t you, will you join the dance?

Will you, won’t you, will you, won’t you, won’t you join the dance ?

“You can really have no notion how delightful it will be,

When they take us up and throw us, with the lobsters, out to sea

But the snail replied “ Too far, too far!” and gave a look askance—

Said he thanked the whiting kindly, but he would not join the dance.
Would not, could not, would not, could not, would not join the dance

Would not, could not, would not, could not, could not join the dance.
THE LOBSTER QUADRILLE 119
‘What matters it how far ne go?” his scaly friend replied,
“There is another shore, you know, upon the other side.
The further off from England the nearer is to France—
Then turn not pale, beloved snail, but come and join the dance.
Will you, won't you, will you, won’t you, will you join the dance?

Will you, won’t you, will you, won’t you, won’t you join the dance ?”

“Thank you, it’s a very interesting dance to watch,” said
Alice, feeling very glad that it was over at last: ‘‘and I do
so like that curious song about the whiting!”

‘Oh, as to the whiting,” said the Mock Turtle, ‘ they—
you've seen them, of course?”

“Ves,” said Alice, ‘I’ve often seen them at dinn
she checked herself hastily.

”



“I don’t know where Dinn may be,” said the Mock


118 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

Turtle; ‘“‘but if you've seen them so often, of course you
know what they’re like.”

“T believe so,” Alice replied thoughtfully. ‘‘ They have
their tails in their mouths-—and they’re all over crumbs.”

“You're wrong about the crumbs,” said the Mock Turtle ;
“crumbs would all wash off in the sea. But they Aave their
tails in their mouths; and the reason is—’ here the Mock
Turtle yawned and shut his eyes. ‘Tell her about the
reason and all that,” he said to the Gryphon.

“The reason is,” said the Gryphon, ‘that they would go
with the lobsters to the dance. So they got thrown out to
sea. So they had to fall a long way. So they got their
tails fast in their mouths. So they couldn’t get them out
again. That's all.”

“Thank you,” said Alice, ‘it’s very interesting. I never
knew so much about a whiting before.”

“T can tell you more than that, if you like,” said the
Gryphon. ‘Do you know why it’s called a whiting?”

‘‘T never thought about it,” said Alice. ‘ Why?”

“ Tt does the boots and shoes,’ the Gryphon replied, very
solemnly.

Alice was thoroughly puzzled. ‘‘ Does the boots and
shoes?” she repeated in a wondering tone.

“Why, what are your shoes done with?” said the

Gryphon. ‘I mean, what makes them so shiny ?”
Alice looked down at them, and considered a little before
she gave her answer. ‘They're done with blacking, I

believe.”
THE LOBSTER QUADRILLE 119

‘Boots and shoes under the sea,” the Gryphon went on,
in a deep voice, ‘‘are done with whiting. Now you know.”

‘““And what are they made of?” Alice asked in a tone
of great curiosity.

‘‘Soles and eels, of course,” the Gryphon replied, rather
impatiently ; ‘‘any shrimp could have told you that.”

‘Tf P'd been the whiting,” said Alice, whose thoughts were
still running on the song, ‘“‘I’d have said to the porpoise,
‘Keep back, please: wedon’t want you with us!’”

‘““They were obliged to have him with them,” the Mock
Turtle said; ‘‘no wise fish would go anywhere without a
porpoise.”

‘Wouldn't it really?” said Alice, in a tone of great
surprise.

‘Of course not,” said the Mock Turtle; “why, if a fish
came to me, and told me he was going a journey, I should
say ‘With what porpoise ?’”

‘Don’t you mean ‘ purpose ?’” said Alice.

“T mean what I say,” the Mock Turtle replied, in an
offended tone. And the Gryphon added, “Come, let’s hear
some of your adventures.”

“T could tell you my adventures—beginning from this
morning,” said Alice, a little timidly; ‘‘ but it’s no use going
back to yesterday, because I was a different person then.”

‘Explain all that,” said the Mock Turtle.

‘““No, no! The adventures first,” said the Gryphon, in
an impatient tone; ‘explanations take such a dreadful
time.”
120 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

So Alice began telling them her adventures from the time
when she first saw the White Rabbit. She was a little
nervous about it just at first, the two creatures got so close
to her, one on each side, and opened their eyes and mouths
so very wide, but she gained courage as she went on. Her
listeners were perfectly quiet till she got to the part about her
repeating ‘‘ You ave old, Father William,’ to the Caterpillar,
and the words all coming different, and then the Mock
Turtle drew a long breath, and said, ‘‘ That’s very curious.”

“It’s all about as curious as it can be,” said the Gryphon.

“Tt all came different!” the Mock Turtle repeated
thoughtfully. ‘I should like to hear her repeat something
now. Tell her to begin.” He looked at the Gryphon as if
he thought it had some kind of authority over Alice.

“Stand up and repeat ‘’Zzs the voice of the sluggard, ”
said the Gryphon.

‘‘ How the creatures order one about, and make one repeat
lessons!” thought Alice. ‘I might as well be at school at
once.” However, she got up, and began to repeat it, but
her head was so full of the Lobster Quadrille, that she
hardly knew what she was saying, and the words came very
queer indeed :

“?Tis the voice of the Lobster; I heard him declare,

‘ You have baked me too brown, I must sugar my hair.’
As a duck with its eyelids, so he with his nose
Trims his belt and his buttons, and turns out his toes.
When the sands are all dry, he is gay as a lark,
And will talk in contemptuous tones of the Shark:
But, when the tide rises and sharks are around,
His voice has a timid and tremulous sound.”
THE LOBSTER QUADRILLE 121

“That's different from
what J used to say when
I was a child,” said the
Gryphon.

‘Well, 7 never heard it :
before,” said the Mock
Turtle; ‘but it sounds
uncommon nonsense.”

Alice said nothing ; she
had sat down with her
face in her hands, won-
dering if anything would.
ever happen in a natural
way again.

“T should like to have it explained,” said the Mock
Turtle.

‘She can’t explain it,” hastily said the Gryphon. ‘Go on
with the next verse.”

‘But about his toes?” the Mock Turtle persisted.
“How coul/d he turn them out with his nose, you know ?”

_“Tt’s the first position in dancing,” Alice said; but was
dreadfully puzzled by the whole thing, and longed to change
the subject.

‘Go on with the next verse,” the Gryphon repeated; ‘it
begins ‘/ passed by his garden.”

Alice did not dare to disobey, though she felt sure it
would all come wrong, and she went on, in a trembling
voice :—


122 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

“I passed by his garden, and marked, with one eye,
How the Owl and the Panther were sharing a pie :
The Panther took pie-crust, and gravy, and meat,
While the Ow! had the dish as its share of the treat.
When the pie was all finished, the Owl, as a boon,
Was kindly permitted to pocket the spoon:
While the Panther received knife and fork with a growl,
And concluded the banquet by i



“What zs the use of repeating all that stuff,” the Mock
Turtle interrupted, ‘if you don’t explain it as you go on?
It’s by far the most confusing thing / ever heard!”

“Yes, I think you’d better leave off,” said the Gryphon ;
and Alice was only too glad to do so.

‘Shall we try another figure of the Lobster Quadrille ?”
the Gryphon went on. ‘Or would you like the Mock Turtle
to sing you another song?”

‘Oh, a song, please, if the Mock Turtle would be so
kind,” Alice replied, so eagerly that the Gryphon said, ina
rather offended tone: ‘‘H’m! No accounting for tastes.
Sing her ‘ Turtle Soup,’ will you, old fellow?”

The Mock Turtle sighed deeply, and began, in a voice
choked with sobs, to sing this:

“Beautiful Soup, so rich and green,

Waiting in a hot tureen !

Who for such dainties would not stoop?

Soup of the evening, beautiful Soup !

Soup of the evening, beautiful Soup !
Beau—ootiful Soo—oop!
Beau—ootiful Soo—oop ?

Soo—oop of the e—e—evening,
Beautiful, beautiful Soup!
123

THE LOBSTER QUADRILLE

{ Pro %





a a

“Come on!” said the Gryphon, and,

a, it hurried off,

without waiting for the end of the song.

taking Alice by the han
124 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

* Beautiful Soup! Who cares for fish,

Game, or any other dish ?

Who would not give all else for two p

ennyworth only of beautiful Soup ?

Pennyworth only of beautiful Soup ?
Beau— ootiful Soo—oop !
Beau—ootiful Soo—oop !

Soo—oop of the e—e—evening,
Beautiful, beauti—FUL SOUP!”

“ Chorus again!” cried the Gryphon, and the Mock Turtle
had just begun to repeat it, when a cry of ‘The trial’s
beginning !” was heard in the distance.

‘““Come on!” cried the Gryphon, and, taking Alice ea the
hand, it hurried off, without waiting for the end of the song.

“What trial is it?” Alice panted as she ran; but the
Gryphon only answered ‘Come on!” and ran the faster, while
more and more faintly came, carried on the breeze that
followed them, the melancholy words:

“ Soo—oop of the e—e—evening,
Beautiful, beautiful Soup !”




CHAPTER XI

WHO STOLE THE TARTS?

Tue King and Queen of Hearts were seated on their throne
when they arrived, with a great crowd assembled about them
—all sorts of little birds and beasts, as well as the whole
pack of cards: the Knave was standing before them, in
chains, with a soldier on each side to guard him; and near
the King was the White Rabbit, with a trumpet in one hand,
and a scroll of parchment in the other. In the very middle
of the court was a table, with a large dish of tarts upon it:
they looked so good, that it made Alice quite hungry to look
at them—‘“I wish they'd get the trial done,” she thought,
‘‘and hand round the refreshments!” But there seemed to
be no chance of this, so she began looking about her, to pass
away the time.
126 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

Alice had never been in a court of justice before, but she
had read about them in books, and she was quite pleased
to find that she knew the name of nearly everything there.
‘“‘That’s the judge,” she said to herself, ‘‘ because of his great
wig.”

The judge, by the way, was the King, and as he wore
his crown over the wig, he did not look at all comfortable,
and it was certainly not becoming.

‘And that’s the jury-box,” thought Alice, ‘‘and those
twelve creatures —(she was obliged to say ‘‘creatures,” you
see, because some of them were animals, and some were
birds)—“I suppose they are the jurors.” She said this last
word two or three times over to herself, being rather proud
of it; for she thought, and rightly too, that very few little
girls of her age knew the meaning of it at all. However,
“jurymen” would have done just as well.

The twelve jurors were all writing very busily on slates.
‘What are they all doing?” Alice whispered to the Gryphon.
“They can’t have anything to put down yet, before the trial’s
begun.”

“They're putting down their names,” the Gryphon whis-
pered in reply, “for fear they should forget them before the .
end of the trial.”

“Stupid things!” Alice began, in a loud indignant
voice, but she stopped hastily, for the White Rabbit
cried out ‘Silence in the court!” and the King put on
his spectacles and looked anxiously round, to see who was
talking.
WHO STOLE THE TARTS? 127

Alice could see, as well as if she were looking over their
shoulders, that all the jurors were writing down “stupid
things!” on their slates, and she could even make out that
one of them didn’t know how to spell “stupid,” and that
he had to ask his neighbour to tell him. “A nice muddle
their slates will be in before the trial’s over!” thought Alice.

One of the jurors had a
pencil that squeaked. This,
of course, Alice could zof
stand, and she went round
the court and got behind
him, and very soon found
an opportunity of taking it
away. She did it so quickly
that the poor little juror (it
was Bill, the Lizard) could
not make out at
all what had be-
come of it; So,
after hunting all
about for it, he was obliged to
write with one finger for the rest
of the day; and this was of very
little use, as it left no mark on
the slate.

“ Herald, read the accusa-
tion!” said the King.

On this the White Rabbit —


128 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

blew three blasts on the trumpet, and then unrolled the
parchment scroll, and read as follows :—
“The Queen of Hearts, she made some tarts,
All on a summer day:

The Knave of Hearts, he stole those tarts,
And took them quite away!”

“Consider your verdict,” the King said to the jury.

‘Not yet, not yet!” the Rabbit hastily interrupted
‘There's a great deal to come before that!”

‘Call the first witness,” said the King; and the White
Rabbit blew three blasts on the trumpet and called out
‘First witness |”

The first witness was the Hatter. He came in with a
tea-cup in one hand and a piece of bread-and-butter in the
other. “I beg pardon, your Majesty,’ he began, “ for
bringing these in; but I hadn't quite finished my tea when I
was sent for.”

“You ought to have finished,” said the King. ‘When
did you begin?”

The Hatter looked at the March Hare, who had followed
him into the court, arm-in-arm with the Dormouse. “ Four-
* teenth of March, I ¢hink it was,” he said.

“ Fifteenth,” said the March Hare.

“‘ Sixteenth,” said the Dormouse.

“Write that down,” the King said to the jury, and the
jury eagerly wrote down all three dates on their slates, and
then added them up, and reduced the answer to shillings and
pence.
WHO STOLE THE TARTS? 129
















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“Take off your hat,” the King said to the Hatter.

‘‘It isn’t mine,” said the Hatter.

‘‘ Stolen /” the King exclaimed, turning to the jury, who
instantly made a memorandum of the fact.
130 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

“I keep them to sell,” the Hatter added as an explanation ;
“T’ve none of my own. I’m a hatter.”

Here the Queen put on her spectacles, and began staring
hard at the Hatter, who turned pale and fidgeted.

‘Give your evidence,” said the King ; ‘“‘and don’t be
nervous, or I’ll have you executed on the spot.”

This did not seem to encourage the witness at all; he
kept shifting from one foot to the other, looking uneasily at
the Queen, and in his confusion he bit a large piece out of
his tea-cup instead of the bread-and-butter.

Just at this moment Alice felt a very curious sensation,
which puzzled -her a good deal until she made out what it
was; she was beginning to grow larger again, and she
thought at first she would get up and leave the court. But
on second thoughts she decided to remain where she was as
long as there was room for her.

“I wish you wouldn’t squeeze so,” said the Dormouse,
who was sitting next to her. ‘I can hardly breathe.”

“T can’t help it,” said Alice very meekly : ‘‘’'m growing.”

“ You've no right to grow kere,” said the Dormouse.

“Don’t talk nonsense,’ said Alice, more boldly; ‘‘you
know you're growing too.”

“Ves, but Z grow at a reasonable pace,” said the
Dormouse; ‘not in that ridiculous fashion.” And he got
up very sulkily and crossed over to the other side of the
court.

All this time the Queen had never left off staring at the
Hatter, and, just as the Dormouse crossed the court, she
WHO STOLE THE TARTS? 131



“7 wish you wouldn't squeeze so,” said the Dormouse, who was sitting next

to her. “I can hardly breathe.”
12
132 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

said to one of the officers of the court, ‘‘ Bring me the list of
the singers in the last concert!” On which the wretched
Hatter trembled so, that he shook off both his shoes.

“Give your evidence,” the King repeated angrily, “or I'll
have you executed, whether you're nervous or not.”

“I’m a poor man, your Majesty,” the Hatter began, in a
trembling voice,—‘‘and I hadn't begun my tea—not above
a week or so—and what with the bread-and-butter getting
so thin—and the twinkling of the tea——”

“The twinkling of what?” said the King.

“It degan with the tea,” the Hatter replied.

“Of course twinkling Jegéns with a T!” said the King
sharply. ‘Do you take me for a dunce? Go on!”

“T’m a poor man,” the Hatter went on, ‘and most things
twinkled after that—only the March Hare said———”

“JT didn’t!” the March Hare interrupted in a great hurry.

“Vou did!” said the Hatter.

“TI deny it!” said the March Hare.

“ He denies it,” said the King: ‘leave out that part.”

“Well, at any rate, the Dormouse said ” the Hatter
went on, looking anxiously round to see if he would deny
it too; but the Dormouse denied nothing, being fast
asleep.

“After that,” continued the Hatter, ‘‘I] cut some more
bread-and-butter a

“But what did the Dormouse say?” one of the jury
asked.

.“ That I can’t remember,” said the Hatter.




WHO STOLE THE TARTS? 133

“You must remember,” remarked the King, “ or I'll have
you executed.”

The miserable Hatter dropped his tea-cup, and bread-and-
butter, and went down on one knee. “I’ma poor man, your
Majesty,” he began.

“You're a very poor speaker,” said the King.

Here one of the guinea-pigs cheered, and was immediately
suppressed by the officers of the court. (As that is rather
a hard word, I will just explain to you how it was done.
They had a large canvas bag, which tied up at the mouth
with strings: into this they slipped the guinea-pig, head
first, and then sat upon it.) _

“I’m glad I’ve seen that done,” thought Alice. “I’ve
so often read in the newspapers, at the end of trials, ‘There
was some attempt at applause, which was immediately sup-
pressed by the officers of the court,’ and I never understood
what it meant till now.”

“If that’s all you know about it, you may stand down,”
continued the King.

‘“T can’t go no lower,” said the Hatter : “I’m on the floor
as it is.”

‘Then you may sz¢ down,” the King replied.

Here the other guinea-pig cheered, and was suppressed.

‘Come, that finishes the guinea-pigs!” thought Alice,
‘‘ Now we shall get on better.”

“Td rather finish my tea,” said the Hatter, with an
anxious look at the Queen, who was reading the list of
singers.

13
134 ALICE IN WONDERLAND



“ Give your evidence,”
said the King.
“ Sha’n't,” said the cook.

THE DUCHESS’S COOK
WHO STOLE THE TARTS? 135

“You may go,” said the King; and the Hatter hurriedly
left the court, without even waiting to put his shoes-on.

“And just take his head off outside,’ the Queen added,
to one of the officers; but the Hatter was out of sight before
the officer could get to the door.

“Call the next witness!” said the King.

The next witness was the Duchess’s cook. She carried
the pepper-box in her hand, and Alice guessed who it was,
even before she got into court, by the way the people near
the door began sneezing all at once.

‘Give your evidence,” said the King.

“ Sha’n’t,” said the cook. -

The King looked anxiously at the White Rabbit, who
said in a low voice, “ Your Majesty must cross-examine ¢/zs
witness.”

“Well, if I must, I must,” the King said with a
melancholy air, and, after folding his arms and frowning at
the cook till his eyes were nearly out of sight, he said ina
deep voice: ‘‘ What are tarts made of ?”

“Pepper, mostly,” said the cook.

“Treacle,” said a sleepy voice behind her.

“Collar that Dormouse,” the Queen shrieked out. ‘‘ Be-
head that Dormouse! Turn that Dormouse out of court!
Suppress him! Pinch him! Off with his whiskers.”

For some minutes the whole court was in confusion
getting the Dormouse turned out, and, by the time they had
settled down again, the cook had disappeared.

‘““Never mind!” said the King, with an.air of great relief.
‘‘Call the next witness.” And he added, in an undertone to
136 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

the Queen, ‘Really, my dear, you must cross-examine the
next witness. It quite makes my forehead ache !”

Alice watched the White Rabbit as he fumbled over the
list, feeling very curious to see what the next witness would
be like—“ for they haven’t got much evidence yer,” she said
to herself. Imagine her surprise, when the White Rabbit
read out, at the top of his shrill little voice, the name
“Alice!”




CHAPTER XII

ALICE'S EVIDENCE

“Here!” cried Alice, quite forgetting, in the flurry of the
moment, how large she had grown in the last few minutes,
and she jumped up in such a hurry that she tipped over the
jury-box with the edge of her skirt, upsetting all the jurymen
on to the heads of the crowd below, and there they lay
sprawling about, reminding her very much of a globe of
gold-fish she had accidentally upset the week before.

“Oh, I deg your pardon!” she exclaimed, in a tone of
great dismay, and began picking them up again as quickly as
she could, for the accident of the gold-fish kept running in
her head, and she had a vague sort of idea that they must




138 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

be collected at once and put back into the jury-box, or they
would die.

‘The trial cannot proceed,” said the King in a very grave
voice, ‘until all the jurymen are back in their proper places—
all,” he repeated with great emphasis, looking hard at Alice
as he said so.

Alice looked at the jury-box, and saw that, in her haste,
she had put the Lizard in head downwards, and the poor
little thing was waving its tail about in a melancholy way,
being quite unable to move. She

fy ooN soon got it out again, and put it
(\< 7 0S right; ‘‘not that it signifies much,”







J SG ff she said to herself; ‘I should think
CH af it Id b ft h use i
ro, it wou e guite as much use in
y p the trial one way up as the other.”

As soon as the jury had a little
recovered from the shock of being
Nn ng SP TRON



TRIAL OF THE KNAVE OF HEARTS.
ALICE’S EVIDENCE 139

upset, and their slates and pencils had been found and
handed back to them, they set to work very diligently to
write out a history of the accident, all except the Lizard, who
- seemed too much overcome to do anything but sit with its
mouth open, gazing up into the roof of the court.

‘“What do you know about this business?” the King said
to Alice.

“Nothing,” said Alice.

‘Nothing whatever?” persisted the King.

‘‘ Nothing whatever,” said Alice.

‘“‘That’s very important,” the King said, turning to the
jury. They were just beginning to write this down on their
slates, when the White Rabbit interrupted: “ Uimportant,
your Majesty means, of course,” he said in a very respectful
tone, but frowning and making faces at him as he spoke.

‘‘ Unimportant, of course, I meant,” the King hastily said,
and went on to himself in an undertone, “important—un-
important—unimportant—important—” as if he were trying
which word sounded best.

Some of the jury wrote it down “important,” and some
“unimportant.” Alice could see this, as she was near enough
to look over their slates; ‘but it doesn’t matter a bit,” she
thought to herself.

At this moment the King, who had been for some time
busily writing in his note-book, called out “Silence!” and
read out from his book, ‘‘ Rule Forty-two. Ad persons more
than a mile high to leave the court.”

Everybody looked at Alice.
140 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

‘Tm not a mile high,” said Alice, |

‘You are,” said the King.

‘‘ Nearly two miles high,” added the Queen.

‘Well, I sha’n’t go, at any rate,” said Alice; ‘besides,
that’s not a regular rule: you invented it just now.”

‘It’s the oldest rule in the book,” said the King.

“Then it ought to be Number One,” said Alice.

The King turned pale, and shut his note-book hastily.
“Consider your verdict,” he said to the jury, in a low,
trembling voice.

‘“There’s more evidence to come yet, please your Majesty,”
said the White Rabbit, jumping up ina great hurry; ‘this
paper has just been picked up.”

‘“What’s in it 2?” said the Queen.

‘“‘T haven't opened it yet,” said the White Rabbit, “ but it
seems to be a letter, written by the prisoner to—to some-
body.”

“It must have been that,” said the King, “unless it was
written to nobody, which isn’t usual, you know.”

“Whom is it directed to?” said one of the jurymen.

“Tt isn’t directed at all,” said the White Rabbit ; “in fact,
there's nothing written on the outside.” He unfolded the
paper as he spoke, and added: “ It isn’t a letter, after all: it’s
a set of verses.”

“Are they in the prisoner’s handwriting ?” asked another
of the jurymen.

‘“No, they’re not,” said the White Rabbit,’ “and that’s the
queerest thing about it.” (The jury all looked puzzled.)
_ALICE’S EVIDENCE 141

“He must have imitated somebody else’s hand,” said the
King. (The jury all brightened up again.)

‘Please your Majesty,” said the Knave, ‘I didn’t write
it, and they can’t prove that I did: there’s no name signed
at the end.”

“If you didn’t sign it,” said the King, “that only makes
the matter worse. You must have meant some mischief, or
else you'd have signed your name like an honest man.”

There was a general clapping of hands at this: it was the
first really clever thing the King had said that day.

“That proves his guilt, of course,” said the Queen; “so,
off with—— ”

‘It doesn’t prove anything of the sort!” said Alice.
“Why, you don’t even know what they’re about !”

‘Read them,” said the King.

The White Rabbit put on his spectacles. ‘‘ Where shall
I begin, please your Majesty?” he asked.

“Begin at the beginning,” the King said gravely, ‘and
go on till you come to the end; then stop.”

There was dead silence in the court, whilst the White
Rabbit read out these verses :

“ They told me you had been to her,
And mentioned me to him:

She gave me a good character,
But said I could not swim.

“ He sent them word I had not gone,
(We know it to be true) :
If she should push the matter on,
What would become of you?
142 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

“I gave her one, they gave him two,
You gave us three or more;
They all returned from him to you,
Though they were mine before.


















“Tf I or she should chance to be
Involved in this affair,
He trusts to you to set them free,
Exactly as we were.

“My notion was that you had been
(Before she had this fit)
An obstacle that came between
Him, and ourselves, and it.

“Don’t let him know she liked them best,
For this must ever be
A secret, kept from all the rest,
Between yourself and me.”
ALICE'S EVIDENCE 143

‘““That’s the most important piece of evidence we've heard
” said the King, rubbing his hands; “so now let the

x”

yet,
jur



“Tf any one of them can explain it,” said Alice (she had
grown so large in the last few minutes that she wasn’t a bit
afraid of interrupting him), “I'll give him sixpence. J don’t
believe there’s an atom of meaning in it.”

The jury all wrote down on their slates, ‘Se doesn’t
believe there’s an atom of meaning in it”; but none of them
attempted to explain the paper.

‘Tf there’s no meaning in it,” said the King, “ that saves
a world of trouble, you know, as we needn't try to find any.
And yet I don’t know,” he went on, spreading out the verses
on his knee, and looking at them with one eye; ‘I seem to
see some meaning in them, after all. ‘——satd I could not
swim’—you can’t swim, can you?” he added, turning to the
Knave.

The Knave shook his head sadly. “Do I look like it?”
he said. (Which he certainly did wo¢, being made entirely of
cardboard.) |

“All right, so far,” said the King, and he went on mutter-
ing over the verses to himself: “‘We know it to be true—
that’s the jury, of course—' /f she should push the matter on’
—that must be the Queen. ‘ What would become of you ?’—
What, indeed! ‘J gave her one, they gave him two’—why,
that must be what he did with the tarts, you know.”

“But it goes on: ‘they all returned from him to you,”
‘said Alice. :


144 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

“Why, there they are!” said the King triumphantly,
pointing to the tarts on the table. ‘‘ Nothing can be clearer
than ¢hat. Then again: ‘before she had this fit’—you never
had fits, my dear, I think ?” he said to the Queen.

“ Never!” said the Queen furiously, throwing an inkstand
at the Lizard as she spoke. (The unfortunate little Bill had
left off writing on his slate with one finger, as he found it
made no mark; but he now hastily began again, using the
ink that was trickling down his face, as long as it lasted.)

“Then the words don’t fi¢ you,” said the King, looking
round the court with a smile. There was a dead silence.

“Its a pun!” the King added, in an angry tone, and
everybody laughed. .

“Let the jury consider their verdict,” the King said, for
about the twentieth time that day.

“No, no!” said the Queen. ‘Sentence first—verdict
afterwards.” :

“Stuff and nonsense!” said Alice loudly. ‘The idea of
having the sentence first |”

“Hold your tongue!” said the Queen, turning purple.

‘‘T won't,” said Alice.

“Off with her head!” the Queen shouted at the top of
her voice. Nobody moved.

‘“Who cares for you?” said Alice (she had grown to her .
full size by this time). ‘Youre nothing but a pack of |
cards!”

At this the whole pack rose up into the air, and came
flying down upon her; she gave a little scream, half of
ALICE’S EVIDENCE 145

fright and half
of anger, and
tried to beat
‘them off, and
found herself
lying on the
bank, with her
head in the {
lap of her sis-
ter, who was
gently brush-





ing away some ——
dead leaves = =O as
that had flut- NV
tered down Gre =n

from the trees on to her face. i]

‘““Wake up, Alice dear!” said her sister.
‘‘Why, what a long sleep you've had!”

“Oh, I’ve had such a curious dream!”
said Alice, and she told her sister, as well as she could
remember them, all these strange Adventures of hers that
you have just been reading about; and when she had
finished, her sister kissed her, and said: “It was a curious
dream, dear, certainly; but now run in to your tea; it’s
getting late.” So Alice got up and ran off, thinking while
she ran, as well she might, what a wonderful dream it had

been.
% * * *
146 ALICE IN WONDERLAND

But her sister sat still just as she had left her, leaning her
head on her hand, watching the setting sun, and thinking of
little Alice and all her wonderful Adventures, till she too
began dreaming after a fashion, and this was her dream :—

First, she dreamed of little Alice herself, and once again
the tiny hands were clasped upon her knee, and the bright
eager eyes were looking up into hers—she could hear the
very tones of her voice, and see that queer little toss of her
head to keep back the wandering hair that would always get
into her eyes—and still as she listened, or seemed to listen,
the whole place around her became alive with the strange
creatures of her little sister’s dream.

The long grass rustled at her feet as the White Rabbit
hurried by—the frightened Mouse splashed his way through
the neighbouring pool—she could hear the rattle of the
tea-cups as the March Hare and his friends shared their
never-ending meal, and the shrill voice of the Queen ordering
off her unfortunate guests to exccution—once more the pig
baby was sneezing on the Duchess’s knee, while plates and
dishes crashed around it—once more the shriek of the
Gryphon, the squeaking of the Lizard’s slate-pencil, and the
choking of the suppressed guinea-pigs filled the air, mixed
up with the distant sobs of the miserable Mock Turtle.

So she sat on, with closed eyes, and half believed herself
in Wonderland, though she knew she had but to open them
again, and all would change to dull reality—-the grass would
be only rustling in the wind, and the pool rippling to the
waving of the reeds—the rattling tea-cups would change to
ALICE'S EVIDENCE 147



the tinkling sheep-bells, and the Queen’s shrill cries to the
voice of the shepherd boy—and the sneeze of the baby,
the shriek of the Gryphon, and all the other queer noises,
would change (she knew) to the confused clamour of the
busy farm-yard—while the lowing of the cattle in the dis-
tance would take the place of the Mock Turtle’s heavy sobs.
Lastly, she pictured to herself how this same little sister
148 —

ALICE IN WONDERLAND

of hers would, in the after-time, be herself a grown woman ;

and how she would keep, through all her riper years, the
simple and loving heart of her childhood; and how she
would gather about her other little children, and make ¢hezr
eyes bright and eager with many a strange tale, perhaps
even with the dream of Wonderland of long ago: and how
she would feel with all their simple sorrows, and find a
pleasure in all their simple joys, remembering her own

child-life, and the happy summer days.

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title Alice in Wonderland
author Alice in Wonderland
publicationStmt
date 2013
distributor University of Florida Digital Collections
email ufdc@uflib.ufl.edu
idno http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076829/00001
availability status restricted
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sourceDesc
biblFull
Alice in Wonderland
Carroll, Lewis, 1832-1898
role Illustrator Attwell, Mabel Lucie, 1879-1964
Publisher Raphael Tuck & Sons
extent 148 p. : illus. (part col.) ;
publisher Tuck
pubPlace London
type ALEPH 002229660
OCLC 19578200
NOTIS ALG9989
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
notesStmt
note anchored true by Lewis Carrol [pseud.] Pictured by Mabel Lucie Attwell.
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
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div Front Cover
pb n 1 facs 00001.jpg
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3 00003.jpg
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Half Title
4 00005.jpg
IN
\LAND /
Frontispiece
5 00006.jpg
6 00008.jpg
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"OH DEAR I OH DEAR I 1 SHALL BE TOO LATE!"
Page
7 00009.jpg
ALICE IN
N WONDERLAND
BY LEWS
CARROLL
PICTURED
BY Q>-c MABEL- o
LUGCIE o.
ATTWELL
RAPHAEL TUCK & SONS, LP
- LONDON PARIS BERLIN NEW YORK MONTREAL
WKihdC In Erglld
8 00010.jpg
W,
a,
Introduction
9 00011.jpg
All in the golden afternoon
Full leisurely we glide;
For'both our oars, with little skill,
By little arms are plied,
While little hands make vain pretence
Our wanderings to guide.
Ah, cruel Three! In such an hour,
Beneath such dreamy weather,
To beg a tale of breath too weak
To stir the tiniest feather !
Yet what can one poor voice avail
Against three tongues together?
Imperious Prima flashes forth
Her edict to begin it"-
In gentler tone Secunda hopes
There will be nonsense in it "-
While Tertia interrupts the tale
Not more than once a minute.
Anon, to sudden silence won,
In ancy they pursue
The dream-child moving through a lane
Of wonders wild and new.
In friendly chat with bird or beast-
And half believe it true.
10 00012.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
And ever, as the story drained
The wells offancy dry,
Andfaintly strove that weary one
To put the subject by,
" The rest next time-" It is next time "
The happy voices cry.
Thus grew the tale of Wonderland;
Thus slowly, one by one,
Its quaint events were hammered out-
And now the tale is done,
And home we steer, a merry crew,
Beneath the setting sun.
Alice! a childish story take,
And with a gentle hand
Lay it where Childhood's dreams are twined
In Memory's mystic band.
Like pilgrim's withered wreath of flowers
Pluck'd in a far-off land.
- ,i ._
Table of Contents
11 00013.jpg
ti A'sl
- 0
CONTENTS
PAGE
DOWN THE RABBIT-HOLE 9
THE POOL OF TEARS 20
A CAUCUS-RACE AND A LONG TALE 30
THE RABBIT SENDS IN A LITTLE BILL 40
ADVICE FROM A CATERPILLAR 52
PIG AND PEPPER. 63
A MAD TEA-PARTY .. . 77
THE QUEEN'S CROQUET-GROUND. 89
THE MOCK TURTLE'S STORY 102
THE LOBSTER QUADRILLE 114
WHO STOLE THE TARTS? 125
ALICE'S EVIDENCE 137
CHAPTER
I.
II.
III.
IV.
VI.
VII.
VIII.
IX.
X.
XI.
XII.
!R
List Illustrations
12 00014.jpg
LIST OF COLOURED PLATES
"OH DEAR! OH DEAR! I SHALL BE TOO LATE!".
THE RABBIT STARTED VIOLENTLY.
THE POOL OF TEARS .
THE MOUSE'S TALE
THE WHITE RABBIT'S HOUSE
ADVICE FROM A CATERPILLAR
IN THE DUCHESS'S KITCHEN
THE PIG BABY. .
THE MAD-HATTER'S TEA-PARTY .
THE CHESHIRE CAT .
THE MOCK TURTLE'S STORY. .
THE TRIAL OF THE KNAVE OF HEARTS
facing age 22
* ,, 28
,, ,, 36
S,, ,, 44
,, ,, 54
S. ,, ,, 64
,, ,, 72
S ,, ,, 80
,, ,, 98
S ,, ,,
,, ,, 138
. Frontispiece
Chapter
head Down the rabbit-hole
13 00015.jpg
I.. -
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
CHAPTER I
DOWN THE RABBIT-HOLE
ALICE was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister
on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she
had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had
no pictures or conversations in it, "and what is the use of a
book," thought Alice, "without pictures or conversations?"
So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she
could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid)
whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be
worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies,
when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close
by her.
14 00016.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did
Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit
say to itself, "Oh dear I Oh dear I shall be too late 1 (when
she thought it over after-
wards, it occurred to her
that she ought to have won-
dered at this, but at the
time it all seemed quite
natural); but when the rab-
bit actually took a
watch out of its
-^ waistcoat pocket,
and looked at it,
and then hurried
on, Alice started
to her feet, for
a *'" it flashed across
her mind that she
t had never before
seen a rabbit with
either a waistcoat-
S pocket, or a watch
Sto take out of
S-- *' it, and burning
with curiosity, she
[ ran across the
L afield after it, and
was just in time
15 00017.jpg
DOWN THE RABBIT-HOLE
to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the
hedge.
In another moment down went Alice after it, never once
considering how in the world she was to get out again.
The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some
way, and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that
Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself
before she found herself falling down what seemed to be a
very deep well.
Either the well was very deep, or she fell very slowly, for
she had plenty of time as she went down to look about her,
and to wonder what was going to happen next. First, she
tried to look down and make out what she was coming to,
but it was too dark to see anything; then she looked at the
sides of the well, and noticed that they were filled with
cupboards and book-shelves: here and there she saw maps
and pictures hung upon pegs. She took down a jar from
one of the shelves as she passed: it was labelled ORANGE
MARMALADE, but to her great disappointment it was
empty: she did not like to drop the jar for fear of killing
somebody underneath, so managed to put it into one of the
cupboards as she fell past it.
Well I" thought Alice to herself. "After such a fall as
this, I shall think nothing of tumbling down stairs I How
brave they'll all think me at home Why I wouldn't say
anything about it, even if I fell off the top of the house I"
(Which is very likely true.)
Down, down, down. Would the fall never come to an
16 00018.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
end ? "I wonder how many miles I've fallen by this time ? "
she said aloud. "I must be getting somewhere near the
centre of the earth. Let me see: that would be four thousand
miles down, I think-" (for, you see, Alice had learnt several
things of this sort in her lessons in the schoolroom, and
though this was not a very good opportunity for showing off
her knowledge, as there was no one to listen to her, still it
was good practice to say it over) "-yes, that's about the right
distance-but then I wonder what Latitude or Longitude
I've got to?" (Alice had no idea what Latitude was, or
Longitude either, but thought they were nice grand words
to say.)
Presently she began again: I wonder if I shall fall right
through the earth! How funny it'll seem to come out among
the people that walk with their heads downwards! The
Antipathies, I think-" (she was rather glad there was no one
listening, this time, as it didn't sound at all the right word)
"- but I shall have to ask them what the name of the country
is, you know. 'Please, Ma'am, is this New Zealand or
Australia?'"-(and she tried to curtsey as she spoke-fancy
curtseying as you're falling through the air! Do you think
you could manage it?) "And what an ignorant little girl
she'll think me I No, it'll never do to ask; perhaps I shall
see it written up somewhere."
Down, down, down. There was nothing else to do, so
Alice soon began talking again. "Dinah'll miss me very
much to-night, I should think I (Dinah was the cat.) I
hope they'll remember her saucer of milk at tea-time. Dinah,
17 00019.jpg
DOWN THE RABBIT-HOLE 13
my dear, A r r r T
I wish -
you were J '
down here
with me I
There are
no mice
in the air,
I'm afraid, but you
might catch a bat,
and that's very
like a mouse, you
know. But do cats
eat bats, I won- o
der?" And here |
Alice began to get
rather sleepy, and t y-
went on saying to
herself, in a dreamy sort
of way, Do cats eat bats ? I C Y .- 5 9 _
Do cats eat bats?" and
sometimes, "Do bats eat '
cats?" for, you see, as
she couldn't answer either
question, it didn't much matter which way she put it. She
felt that she was dozing off, and had just begun to dream
that she was walking hand in hand with Dinah, and saying
to her very earnestly, "Now, Dinah, tell me the truth: did
18 00020.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
you ever eat a bat?" when suddenly, thump I thump I down
she came upon a heap of sticks and dry leaves, and the fall
was over.
Alice was not a bit hurt, and she jumped up on to her feet
in a moment: she looked up, but it was all dark overhead;
before her was another long passage, and the White Rabbit
was still in sight, hurrying down it. There was not a
moment to be lost: away went Alice like the wind, and was
just in time to hear it say, as it turned a corner, Oh my ears
and whiskers, how late it's getting I She was close behind
it when she turned the corner, but the Rabbit was no longer
to be seen: she found herself in a long, low hall, which was
lit up by a row of
lamps hanging from
the roof.
There were doors
LJ all round the hall,
but they were all
S locked; and when
S ,7 \Alice had been all
the way down one
side and up the
/ .0 other trying every
Door, she walked
S 4 sadly down the
middle wondering
o -how she was ever
to get out again.
19 00021.jpg
DOWN THE RABBIT-HOLE
Suddenly she came upon a little three-legged table, all
made of solid glass; there was nothing on it but a tiny
golden key, and Alice's first idea was that this might belong
to one of the doors of the hall; but alas I either the locks
were too large, or the key was too small, but at any rate it
would not open any of them. However, on the second time
round, she came upon a low curtain she had not noticed
before, and behind it was a little door about fifteen inches
high : she tried the little golden key in the lock, and to her
great delight it fitted I
Alice opened the door and found that it led to a small
passage, not much larger than a rat-hole: she knelt down and
looked along the passage into the loveliest garden you ever
saw. How she longed to get out of that dark hall, and wander
about among those beds of bright flowers and those cool
fountains, but she could not even get her head through the
doorway; "and even if my head would go through," thought
poor Alice, "it would be of very little use without my
shoulders. Oh, how I wish I could shut up like a telescope I
I think I could, if I only knew how to begin." For, you
see, so many out-of-the-way things had happened lately, that
Alice had begun to think that very few things indeed were
really impossible.
There seemed to be no use in waiting by the little door,
so she went back to the table, half hoping she might find
another key on it, or at any rate a book of rules for shutting
people up like telescopes: this time she found a little bottle
on it (" which certainly was not here before," said Alice), and
20 00022.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
tied round the neck of the bottle
was a paper label, with the words
DRINK ME beautifully printed
on it in large letters.
It was all very well to say
"Drink me," but the
wise little Alice was
not going to do that
.K ..... .... in a hurry. No, I'll
\ g look first," she said,
( and see whether
S' it's marked
/ S-- oison or not";
for she had read
several nice little
stories about
children who had got burnt,
and eaten up by wild beasts,
S and other unpleasant things,
all because they would not
remember the simple rules
their friends had taught them : such as, that a red-hot poker
will burn you if you hold it too long; and that, if you cut
your finger very deeply with a knife it usually bleeds; and
she had never forgotten that, if you drink much from a bottle
marked poison," it is almost certain to disagree with you,
sooner or later.
However, this bottle was not marked "poison," so Alice
21 00023.jpg
DOWN THE RABBIT-HOLE
ventured to taste it, and finding it very nice (it had, in fact, a
sort of mixed flavour of cherry-tart, custard, pine-apple, roast
turkey, toffee, and hot buttered toast), she very soon finished
it off.
*
*
"What a curious feeling I" said Alice. "I must be shut-
ting up like a telescope."
And so it was indeed: she was now only ten inches high;
and her face brightened up at the thought that she was now
the right size for going through the little door into that
lovely garden. First, however, she waited for a few minutes
to see if she was going to shrink any further : she felt a little
nervous about this; for it might end, you
know," said Alice to herself, "in my going
out altogether, like a candle. I wonder
what I should be like then?" And she
tried to fancy what the flame of a candle
looks like after the candle is
blown out, for she could not
remember ever having seen
such a thing.
After a while, finding that
nothing more happened, she
decided on
going into
the garden ,
22 00024.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
at once; but, alas, for poor Alice I when she got to the door,
she found she had forgotten the little golden key, and when
she went back to the table for it, she found she could not
possibly reach it: she could see it quite plainly through the
glass, and she tried her best to climb up one of the legs of
the table; but it was too slippery; and when she had tired
herself out with trying, the poor little thing sat down and
cried.
"Come, there's no use in crying like that I" said Alice
to herself, rather sharply. "I advise you to leave off this
minute 1" She generally gave herself very good advice
(though she very seldom followed it), and sometimes she
scolded herself so severely as to bring tears into her eyes;
and once she remembered trying to box her own ears for
having cheated herself in a game of croquet she was playing
against herself, for this curious child was very fond of pre-
tending to be two people. "But it's no use now," thought
poor Alice, "to pretend to be two people l Why, there's
hardly enough of me left to make one respectable person I "
Soon her eye -fell on a little glass box that was lying
under the table: she opened it, and found in it a very small
cake, on which the words EAT ME were beautifully
marked in currants. Well, I'll eat it," said Alice, and if it
makes me grow larger, I can reach the key; and if it makes
me grow smaller, I can creep under the door; so either way
I'll get into the garden, and I don't care which happens 1"
She ate a little bit, and said anxiously to herself, "Which
way ? Which way ? holding her hand on the top of her head
23 00025.jpg
DOWN THE RABBIT-HOLE
to feel which way it was growing, and she was quite
surprised to find that she remained the same size; to be
sure, this is what generally happens when one eats cake, but
Alice had got so much into the way of expecting nothing
but out-of-the-way things to happen, that it seemed quite
dull and stupid for life to go on in the common way.
So she set to work, and very soon finished off the cake.
The pool of tears
24 00026.jpg
CHAPTER II
THE POOL OF TEARS
"CURIOUSER and curiouser I" cried Alice (she was so much
surprised, that for the moment she quite forgot how to
speak good English); now I'm opening out like the largest
telescope that ever was 1 Good-bye, feet (for when she
looked down at her feet, they seemed to be almost out of
sight, they were getting so far off). Oh, my poor little feet,
I wonder who will put on your shoes and stockings for you
now, dears ? I'm sure I sha'n't be able I shall be a great
deal too far off to trouble myself about you: you must
25 00027.jpg
THE POOL OF TEARS
manage the best way you can-but I must be kind to them,"
thought Alice, "or perhaps they won't walk the way I want
to go I Let me see: I'll give them a new pair of boots every
Christmas."
And she went on planning to herself how she would
manage it. "They must go by the carrier," she thought;
"and how funny it'll seem, sending presents to one's own
feet! And how odd the directions will look I
Alice's Right Foot, Esq.,
Hearthrug,
near the Fender
(with Alice's love).
Oh dear, what nonsense I'm talking I "
Just then her head struck against the roof of the hall: in
fact she was now rather more than nine feet high, and she at
once took up the little golden key and hurried off to the
garden door.
Poor Alice! It was as much as she could do, lying
down on one side, to look through into the garden with one
eye; but to get through was more hopeless than ever: she
sat down and began to cry again.
"You ought to be ashamed of yourself," said Alice, "a
great girl like you (she might well say this), "to go on
crying in this way! Stop this moment, I tell you But
she went on all the same, shedding gallons of tears, until
there was a large pool all round her, about four inches deep
and reaching half down the hall.
After a time she heard a little pattering of feet in the
26 00028.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
distance, and she hastily
S \. dried her eyes to see what
S-0 was coming. It was the
A White Rabbit returning,
splendidly dressed, with a
pair of white kid gloves in
Sone hand and a large fan in
the other: he came trotting
along in a great hurry,
muttering to himself as he
came, "Oh the Duchess,
'l \the Duchess I Oh I won't
she be savage if I've kept
I her waiting Alice felt so
desperate that she was ready
S' \ to ask help of any one; so,
S.' when the Rabbit came near
'- o her she began, in a low,
Stimid voice, If you please,
sir--" The Rabbit started
Violently, dropped the white
| kid gloves and the fan, and
scurried away into the dark-
ness as hard as he could go.
Alice took up the fan and
-'o gloves, and as the hall was
very hot, she kept fanning
herself all the time she went
U;
27 00029.jpg
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ais
is~
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7s "D'
k^u
WINr;'
C
"CURIOUSER AND CURIOUSER I"
c~c~i~ -~-~c.
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:.'r r .r --
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P' O
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28 00031.jpg
THE POOL OF TEARS
on talking: Dear, dear I How queer everything is to-day I
And yesterday things went on just as usual. I wonder if
I've been changed in the night ? Let me think: was I the
same when I got up this morning ? I almost think I can
remember feeling a little different. But if I'm not the same,
the next question is, Who in the world am II Ah, that's
the great puzzle I" And she began thinking over all the
children she knew that were of the same age as herself, to see
if she could have been changed for any of them.
"I'm sure I'm not Ada," she said, "for her hair goes in
such long ringlets, and mine doesn't go in ringlets at all;
and I'm sure I can't be Mabel, for I know all sorts of things,
and she, oh I she knows such a very little! Besides, she's she,
and I'm I, and-oh dear, how puzzling it all is I'll try if I
know all the things I used to know. Let me see: four times
five is twelve, and four times six is thirteen, and four times
seven is-oh dear II shall never get to twenty at that rate 1
However, the Multiplication Table doesn't signify: let's try
Geography. London is the capital of Paris, and Paris is the
capital of Rome, and Rome-no, that's all wrong, I'm certain I
I must have been changed for Mabel I I'll try and say,
'How doth the little '"-and she crossed her hands on her
lap as if she were saying lessons, and began to repeat it, but
her voice sounded hoarse and strange, and the words did not
come the same as they used to do :-
How doth the little crocodile
Improve his shining tail,
And pour the waters of the Nile
On every golden scale!
29 00032.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
How cheerfully he seems to grin,
How neatly spreads his claws,
And welcomes little fishes in,
With gently smiling jaws !"
"I'm sure those are not the right words," said poor Alice,
and her eyes filled with tears again as she went on. I must
be Mabel, after all, and I shall have to go and live in that
poky little house, and have next to no toys to play with,
and oh I ever so many lessons to learn I No, I've made up
my mind about it; if I'm Mabel, I'll stay down here I It'll
be no use their putting their heads down and saying, 'Come
up again, dear I shall only look up and say 'Who
am I, then ? Tell me that first, and then, if I like being that
person, I'll come up: if not, I'll stay down here till I'm
somebody else'-but, oh dear I cried Alice, with a sudden
burst of tears, I do wish they would put their heads down I
I am so very tired of being all alone here I "
As she said this she looked down at her hands, and was
surprised to see that she had put on one of the Rabbit's little
white kid gloves while she was talking. How can I have
done that ?" she thought. "I must be growing small again."
She got up and went to the table to measure herself by it,
and found that, as nearly as she could guess, she was now
about two feet high, and was going on shrinking rapidly;
she soon found out that the cause of this was the fan she was
holding, and she dropped it hastily, just in time to avoid
shrinking away altogether.
"That was a narrow escape 1" said Alice, a good deal
30 00033.jpg
THE POOL OF TEARS 25
frightened at the sudden change, but very glad to find herself
still in existence; "and now for the garden I And she ran
with all speed back to the little door; but, alas! the little
door was shut again, and the little golden key was lying on
the glass table as before, "and things are worse than ever,"
thought the poor child, "for I never was so small as this
before, never I And I declare it's too bad, that it is I "
As she said these words her foot slipped, and in another
moment, splash I she was up to her chin in salt water. Her
first'idea was that she had somehow fallen into the sea, "and
in that case I can go back by railway," she said to herself.
(Alice had been to the seaside once in her life, and had come
to the general conclusion that wherever you go to on the
English coast you find a number of bathing machines in the
sea, some children digging in the sand with wooden spades,
then a row of lodging-houses, and behind them a railway
station.) However, she soon made out that she was in the
o
0 0
0 o
C) o
0
31 00034.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
pool of tears which she had wept when she was nine feet
high.
I wish I hadn't cried so much I" said Alice, as she swam
about, trying to find her way out. I shall be punished for
it now, I suppose, by being drowned in my own tears 1
That will be a queer thing, to be sure I However, every-
thing is queer to-day."
Just then she heard something splashing about in the
pool a little way off, and she swam nearer to make out what
it was: at first she thought it must be a walrus or hippo-
potamus; but then she remembered how small she was now,
and she soon made out that it was only a mouse that had
slipped in like herself.
"Would it be of any use now," thought Alice, to speak
to this mouse? Everything is so out-of-the-way down here,
that I should think very likely it can talk: at any rate,
there's no harm in trying." So she began: "0 Mouse, do
you know the way out of this pool? I am very tired of
swimming about here, 0 Mouse! (Alice thought this must
be the right way of speaking to a mouse: she had never
done such a thing before, but she remembered having seen
in her brother's Latin Grammar, "A mouse-of a mouse-to
a mouse-a mouse-O mouse I ") The Mouse looked at hei
rather inquisitively, and seemed to her to wink with one of
its little eyes, but it said nothing.
"Perhaps it doesn't understand English," thought Alice;
"I daresay it's a French mouse, come over with William the
Conqueror." (For, with all her knowledge of history, Alice
32 00035.jpg
THE POOL OF TEARS
_0
_0
0
'.-.------c
-- 0
0
had no very clear notion how long ago anything had
happened.) So she began again: "Ofi est ma chatte?"
which was the first sentence in her French lesson-book.
The Mouse gave a leap out of the water, and seemed to
quiver all over with fright. Oh, I beg your pardon I cried
Alice hastily, afraid that she had hurt the poor animal's
feelings. I quite forgot you didn't like cats."
Not like cats cried the Mouse, in a shrill, passionate
voice. Would you like cats if you were me ? "
"Well, perhaps not," said Alice in a soothing tone : don't
be angry about it. And yet I wish I could show you our cat
Dinah: I think you'd take a fancy to cats if you could only
see her. She is such a dear quiet thing," Alice went on half
33 00036.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
to herself, as she swam lazily about in the pool, "and she
sits purring so nicely by the fire, licking her paws and
washing her face-and she is such a nice soft thing to nurse
-and she's such a capital one for catching mice- oh, I
beg your pardon cried Alice again, for this time the
Mouse was bristling all over, and she felt certain it must be
really offended. "We won't talk about her any more if
you'd rather not."
"We, indeed I" cried the Mouse, who was trembling
down to the end of its tail. "As if I would talk on such
a subject 1 Our family always hated cats : nasty, low, vulgar
things Don't let me hear the name again I "
I won't indeed I said Alice, in a great hurry to change
the subject of conversation. "Are you-are you fond-of
-of dogs?" The Mouse did not answer, so Alice went on
eagerly: There is such a nice little dog near our house I
should like to show you! A little bright-eyed terrier, you
know, with oh, such long curly brown hair! And it'll fetch
things when you throw them, and it'll sit up and beg for its
dinner, and all sorts of things-I can't remember half of
them-and it belongs to a farmer, you know, and he says
it's so useful, it's worth a hundred pounds! He says it kills
all the rats and-oh dear I" cried Alice in a sorrowful tone,
"I'm afraid I've offended it again For the Mouse was
swimming away from her as hard as it could go, and making
quite a commotion in the pool as it went. So she called
softly after it. Mouse dear I Do come back again, and
we won't talk about cats or dogs either, if you don't like
34 00037.jpg
I -
b
r
a
..
t
: i
1: Y:: i ;
/' I~
K
'I
THE POOL OF TEARS.
I
f~il nl. Y '~ ii
"
;1.
.?! ,- r
... LS ij
I
~ i ;.-:
C/-
5
I
_.)
* ** t'"8';r'"
/r3
35 00039.jpg
THE POOL OF TEARS 29
them When the Mouse heard this, it turned round and
swam slowly back to her: its face was quite pale (with
passion, Alice thought), and it said in a low, trembling voice,
" Let us go to the shore, and then I'll tell you my history,
and you'll understand why it is I hate cats and dogs."
It was high time to go, for the pool was getting quite
crowded with the birds and animals that had fallen into it:
there were a Duck and a Dodo, a Lory and an Eaglet, and
several other curious creatures. Alice led the way, and the
whole party swam to the shore.
A caucus-race and a long tale
36 00040.jpg
CHAPTER III
A CAUCUS-RACE AND A LONG TALE
THEY were indeed a queer-looking party that assembled on
the bank-the birds with draggled feathers, the animals with
their fur clinging close to them, and all dripping wet, cross,
and uncomfortable.
The first question of course was, how to get dry again:
they had a consultation about this, and after a few minutes
it seemed quite natural to Alice to find herself talking
familiarly with them, as if she had known them all her life.
Indeed, she had quite a long argument with the Lory, who
at last turned sulky, and would only say "I am older than
you, and must know better ; and this Alice would not allow
without knowing how old it was, and, as the Lory positively
refused to tell its age, there was no more to be said.
37 00041.jpg
A CAUCUS-RACE AND A LONG TALE 31
At last the Mouse, who seemed to be a person of
authority among them, called out Sit down, all of you, and
listen to me I'll soon make you dry enough I" They all sat
down at once in a large ring, with the Mouse in the middle.
Alice kept her eyes anxiously fixed on it, for she felt sure
she would catch a bad cold if she did not get dry very
soon.
"Ahem I said the Mouse with an important air. "Are
you all ready? This is the driest thing I know. Silence
all round, if you please 1 'William the Conqueror, whose
cause was favoured by the Pope, was soon submitted to by
the English, who wanted leaders, and had been of late much
accustomed to usurpation and conquest. Edwin and Morcar,
the Earls of Mercia and Northumbria--'"
Ugh I said the Lory, with a shiver.
I beg your pardon I said the Mouse, frowning, but very
politely. "Did you speak ?"
Not II said the Lory hastily.
"I thought you did," said the Mouse. "I proceed-
'Edwin and Morcar, the Earls of Mercia and Northumbria,
declared for him : and even Stigand, the patriotic Archbishop
of Canterbury, found it advisable--'"
"Found what? said the Duck.
"Found it," the Mouse replied rather crossly : "of course
you know what it' means."
"I know what 'it' means well enough, when I find a
thing," said the Duck; "it's generally a frog or a worm.
The question is, what did the Archbishop find ?"
38 00042.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
The Mouse did not notice this question, but hurriedly
went on-"'found it advisable to go with Edgar Atheling
to meet William and offer him the crown. William's
conduct at first was moderate. But the insolence of his
Normans- How are you getting on now, my dear ?" it
continued, turning to Alice as it spoke.
"As wet as ever," said Alice, in a melancholy tone; "it
doesn't seem to dry me at all."
In that case," said the Dodo solemnly, rising to its feet,
"I move that the meeting adjourn, for the immediate
adoption of more energetic remedies- "
39 00043.jpg
A CAUCUS-RACE AND A LONG TALE 33
"Speak English I" said the Eaglet. I don't know the
meaning of half those long words, and, what's more, I don't
believe you do either I" And the Eaglet bent down its head
to hide a smile; some of the other birds tittered audibly.
"What I was going to say," said the Dodo, in an
offended tone, was, that the best thing to get us dry would
be a Caucus-race."
"What is a Caucus-race ?" said Alice, not that she much
wanted to know; but the Dodo had paused as if it thought
that somebody ought to speak, and no one else seemed
inclined to say anything.
"Why," said the Dodo, "the best way to explain it is
to do it." (And, as you might like to try the thing your-
self some winter day, I will tell you how the Dodo
managed it.)
First it marked out a race-course in a sort of circle (" the
exact shape doesn't matter," it said), and then all the party
were placed along the course, here and there. There was no
" One, two, three, and away," but they began running when
they liked, and left off when they liked, so that it was not
easy to know when the race was over. However, when they
had been running half an hour or so, and were quite dry
again, the Dodo suddenly called out "The race is over l"
and they all crowded round it, panting, and asking "But
who has won?"
This question the Dodo could not answer without a great
deal of thought, and it stood for a long time with one finger
pressed upon its forehead (the position in which you usually
40 00044.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
see Shakespeare, in the pictures of him), while the rest
waited in silence. At last the Dodo said "Everybody has
won, and all must have prizes."
"But who is to give the prizes?" quite a chorus of
voices asked.
"Why, she, of course," said the Dodo, pointing to Alice
with one finger; and the whole party at once crowded round
her, calling out in a confused way, Prizes I Prizes !"
Alice had no idea what to do, and in despair she put her
hand in her pocket, and pulled out a box of comfits (luckily
the salt water had not got into it), and handed them round
as prizes. There was exactly one apiece all round.
"But she must have a prize herself, you know," said the
Mouse.
"Of course," the Dodo replied very gravely.
"What else have you got in your pocket ?" it went on,
turning to Alice.
Only a thimble," said Alice sadly.
"Hand it over here," said the Dodo.
Then they all crowded round her once more, while the
Dodo solemnly presented the thimble, saying, "We beg your
acceptance of this elegant thimble"; and, when it had
finished this short speech, they all cheered.
Alice thought the whole thing very absurd, but they all
looked so grave that she did not dare to laugh; and, as she
could not think of anything to say, she simply bowed, and
took the thimble, looking as solemn as she could.
The next thing was to eat the comfits; this caused some
41 00045.jpg
A CAUCUS-RACE AND A LONG TALE 35
noise and confusion, as the large birds complained that they
could not taste theirs, and the small ones choked and had to
be patted on the back. However, it was over at last, and
they sat down again in a ring, and begged the Mouse to tell
them something more.
"You promised to tell me your history, you know," said
Alice, "and why it is you hate-C and D," she added in a
whisper, half afraid that it would be offended again.
Mine is a long and sad tale 1" said the Mouse, turning
to Alice and sighing.
"It is a long tail, certainly," said Alice, looking down
S2
42 00046.jpg
36 ALICE IN WONDERLAND
with wonder at the Mouse's tail; "but why do you call it
sad ?" And she kept on puzzling about it while the Mouse
was speaking, so that her idea of the tale was something
like this:-
"Fury said to
a mouse, That
he met in the
house, 'Let
us both go
to law: I
will prose-
cute you.-
Come, I'll
take no de
nial: We
must have
the trial;
For really
this morn-
ing I've
nothing
to do.'
Said the
mouse to
the cur,
'Such a
trial, dear
sir, With
no jury
or judge,
would
be wast.
ing our
breath.'
'I'll be
judge,
I'll be
jury,
said
cun-
ning
old
Fury;
I'll
try
the
whole
cause
and
con-
demn
you to
deth.'"
43 00047.jpg
2,J 11 f
THE MOUSE'S TALE.
**^ -*; ~ ~ '.I^^
P;-JI T
/.^ \
^^^ ^^
THE MOUSE'S TALE.
44 00049.jpg
A CAUCUS-RACE AND A LONG TALE 37
"You are not attending said the Mouse to Alice
severely. "What are you thinking of?"
"I beg your pardon," said Alice very humbly: "you
had got to the fifth bend, I think ?"
"I had not 1" cried the Mouse, angrily.
"A knot!" said Alice, always ready to make herself
useful, and looking anxiously about her. "Oh, do let me
help to undo it!"
I shall do nothing of the sort," said the Mouse, getting
up and walking away. "You insult me by talking such
nonsense!"
I didn't mean it 1" pleaded poor Alice. "But you're so
easily offended, you know I"
The Mouse only growled in reply.
"Please come back and finish your story Alice called
after it. And the others all joined in chorus, "Yes, please
do I" But the Mouse only shook its head impatiently and
walked a little quicker.
What a pity it wouldn't stay sighed the Lory, as soon
as it was quite out of sight; and an old Crab took the
opportunity of saying to her daughter, "Ah, my dear I Let
this be a lesson to you never to lose your temper I Hold
your tongue, Ma!" said the young Crab, a little snappishly.
"You're enough to try the patience of an oyster I "
I wish I had our Dinah here, I know I do said Alice
aloud, addressing nobody in particular. "She'd soon fetch
it back I "
And who is Dinah, if I might venture to ask the
question ? said the Lory.
45 00050.jpg
38 ALICE IN WONDERLAND
Alice replied eagerly, for she was
always ready to talk about her pet:
"Dinah's our cat. And she's such a
capital one for catching mice, you can't
think I And oh, I wish you
could see her after the birds I
Why, she'll eat a little bird as
soon as look at it! I
This speech caused a* '
remarkable sensation among
the party. Some of the
""' --~C-----l-~
( r birds hurried off at once;
one old Magpie began
wrapping itself up very
-carefully, remarking, I
/ really must be getting
home; the night air
doesn't suit my throat I"
And a Canary called out
in a trembling voice to its
children, "Come away,
my dears! It's high
time you were all in bed I" On various
pretexts they all moved off, and Alice
was soon left alone.
46 00051.jpg
A CAUCUS-RACE AND A LONG TALE 39
"I wish I hadn't mentioned Dinah," she said to herself
in a melancholy tone. Nobody seems to like her, down
here, and I'm sure she's the best cat in the world I Oh, my
dear Dinah I I wonder if I shall ever see you any more I "
And here poor Alice began to cry again, for she felt very
lonely and low-spirited. In a little while, however, she
again heard a little pattering of footsteps in the distance,
and she looked up eagerly, half hoping that the Mouse
had changed his mind, and was coming back to finish his
story.
LA
The rabbit sends in a little bill
47 00052.jpg
CHAPTER IV
THE RABBIT SENDS IN A LITTLE BILL
IT was the White Rabbit, trotting slowly back again, and
looking anxiously about as it went, as if it had lost some-
thing; and she heard it muttering to itself, "The Duchess I
The Duchess I Oh my dear paws Oh my fur and whiskers I
She'll get me executed, as sure as ferrets are ferrets I Where
can I have dropped them, I wonder?" Alice guessed in a
moment that it was looking for the fan and the pair of white
kid gloves, and she very good-naturedly began hunting
about for them, but they were nowhere to be seen-every-
thing seemed to have changed since her swim in the pool,
and the great hall, with the glass table and the little door,
had vanished completely.
48 00053.jpg
THE RABBIT SENDS IN A LITTLE BILL 41
Very soon the Rabbit noticed Alice, as she went hunting
about, and called out to her in an angry tone, Why, Mary
Ann, what are you doing out here? Run home this
moment, and fetch me a pair of gloves and a fan I Quick,
now I" And Alice was so much frightened that she ran off
at once in the direction it pointed to, without trying to
explain the mistake it had made.
He took me for his housemaid," she said to herself as
she ran. How surprised he'll be when he finds out who
I am But I'd better take him his fan and gloves-that is,
if I can find them." As she said this, she came upon a
neat little house, on the door of which was a bright brass
plate with the name "W. RABBIT" engraved upon it. She
went in without knocking, and hurried upstairs, in great
fear lest she should meet the real Mary Ann, and be turned
out of the house before she had found the fan and gloves.
How queer it seems," Alice said to herself, "to be going
messages for a rabbit! I suppose Dinah'll be sending me on
messages next I" And she began fancying the sort of thing
that would happen : Miss Alice I Come here directly, and
get ready for your walk!' 'Coming in a minute, nurse
But I've got to watch this mouse-hole till Dinah comes back,
and see that the mouse doesn't get out.' Only I don't think,"
Alice went on, that they'd let Dinah stop in the house if it
began ordering people about like that 1"
By this time she had found her way into a tidy little room
with a table in the window, and on it (as she had hoped) a
fan and two or three pairs of tiny white kid gloves; she took
49 00054.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
up the fan and a pair of the gloves, and was just going to
leave the room, when her eye fell upon a little bottle that
stood near the looking-glass. There was no label this time
with the words DRINK ME, but nevertheless she un-
corked it and put it to her lips. I know something interest-
ing is sure to happen," she said to herself, "whenever I eat or
drink anything; so I'll just see what this bottle does. I do
hope it'll make me grow large again, for really I'm quite
tired of being such a tiny little thing! "
It did so indeed, and much sooner than she had expected;
before she had drunk half the bottle she found her head
pressing against the ceiling, and had to stoop to save her
neck from being broken. She hastily put down the bottle,
saying to herself: "That's quite enough-I hope I sha'n't
grow any more-as it is, I can't get out at the door-I do
wish I hadn't drunk quite so much I "
Alas it was too late to wish that! She went on grow-
ing, and growing, and very soon had to kneel down on the
floor: in another minute there was not even room for this,
and she tried the effect of lying down with one elbow against
the door, and the other arm curled round her head. Still she
went on growing, and, as a last resource, she put one arm
out of the window, and one foot up the chimney, and said to
herself: Now I can do no more, whatever happens. What
will become of me ?"
Luckily for Alice, the little magic bottle had now had its
full effect, and she grew no larger; still it was very un-
comfortable, and, as there seemed to be no sort of chance of
50 00055.jpg
THE RABBIT SENDS IN A LITTLE BILL 43
her ever getting out ,of the room again,
no wonder she felt unhappy.
It was much pleasanter at home,"
thought poor
Alice, "when C" .. V "
one wasn't
always grow-
ing larger and Y I
smaller, and .
being ordered
about by mice
and rabbits.
I almost
wish I hadn't
gone down
that rabbit-
hole and i.',". <
yet-and yet o
-it's rather
curious, you -." know, this sort of life! I do
wonder what can have happened to me I
When I used ,..A to read fairy-tales I fancied
that kind of thing never happened, and now here I am in
the middle of one 1 There ought to be a book written about
me, that there ought! And when I grow up, I'll write one
-but I'm grown up now," she added in a sorrowful tone;
"at least there's no room to grow up any more here."
"But then," thought Alice, "shall I never get any older
51 00056.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
than I am now? That'll be a comfort, one way-never to be
an old woman-but then-always to have lessons to learn I
Oh, I shouldn't like that "
"Oh, you foolish Alice !" she answered herself. How
can you learn lessons in here? Why, there's hardly room for
you, and no room at all for any lesson-books I "
And so she went on, taking first one side and then the
other, and making quite a conversation of it altogether; but
after a few minutes she heard a voice outside, and stopped to
listen.
Mary Ann I Mary Ann !" said the voice. "Fetch me
my gloves this moment! Then came a little pattering of
feet on the stairs. Alice knew it was the Rabbit coming
to look for her, and she trembled till she shook the house,
quite forgetting that she was now about a thousand times as
-large as the Rabbit, and had no reason to be afraid of it.
Presently the Rabbit came up to the door, and tried
to open it; but as the door opened inwards, and Alice's
elbow was pressed hard against it, that attempt proved a
failure. Alice heard it say to itself, Then I'll go round and
get in at the window."
That you won't I thought Alice; and after waiting till
she fancied she heard the Rabbit just under the window, she
suddenly spread out her hand, and made a snatch in the air.
She did not get hold of anything, but she heard a little
shriek and a fall, and a crash of broken glass, from which
she concluded that it was just possible it had fallen into a
cucumber-frame, or something of the sort.
52 00057.jpg
44C
'j~FrlJv
.
THE WHITE RABBIT'S HOUSE.
LA
P
- ".
x^-I
Ii .
53 00059.jpg
THE RABBIT SENDS IN A LITTLE BILL 45
Next came an angry voice-the Rabbit's-" Pat, Pat
Where are you?" And then a voice she had never heard
before, "Sure, then, I'm here Digging for apples, yer
honour I"
"Digging for apples, indeed I" said the Rabbit angrily.
Here, come and help me out of this (Sounds of more
broken glass.)
Now tell me, Pat, what's that in the window ?"
".Sure, it's an arm, yer honour I" (He pronounced it
arrum.")
"An arm, you goose! Who ever saw one that size?
Why, it fills the whole window I "
"Sure it does, yer honour; but it's an arm for all
that."
Well, it's got no business there, at any rate: go and take
it away I "
There was a long silence after this, and Alice could only
hear whispers now and then; such as, Sure, I don't like it,
yer honour at all, at all I Do as I tell you, you coward I "
And at last she spread out her hand again, and made another
snatch in the air. This time there were two little shrieks,
and more sounds of broken glass. "What a number of
cucumber-frames there must be thought Alice. I wonder
what they'll do next I As for pulling me out of the window,
I only wish they could l I'm sure I don't want to stay in
here any longer I "
She waited for some time without hearing anything
more; at last came a rumbling of little cart-wheels, and
54 00060.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
the sound of a good many voices all talking together; she
made out the words: "Where's the other ladder?-Why I
hadn't to bring but one; Bill's got the other-Bill Fetch
it here, lad !-Here, put 'em up at this corner-No, tie 'em
together first-they don't reach half high enough yet-Oh I
they'll do well enough; don't be particular-Here, Bill I catch
hold of this rope-Will the roof bear ?-Mind that loose
slate-Oh, it's coming down Heads below! (a loud crash)
-" Now, who did that ?-It was Bill, I fancy-Who's to go
down the chimney?-Nay, I sha'n't! You do it !-That
I won't, then Bill's to go down-Here, Bill! the master
says you've to go down the chimney I "
Oh I So Bill's got to come down the chimney, has
he?" said Alice to herself. "Why, they seem to put every-
thing upon Bill! I wouldn't be in Bill's place for a good
deal: this fireplace is narrow, to be sure; but I think I can
kick a little "
She drew her foot as far down the chimney as she could,
and waited till she heard a little animal (she couldn't guess
of what sort it was) scratching and scrambling about in the
chimney close above her; then, saying to herself, This is
Bill," she gave one sharp kick, and waited to see what would
happen next.
The first thing she heard was a general chorus of "There
goes Bill !" then the Rabbit's voice alone-" Catch him, you
by the hedge !" then silence, and then another confusion of
voices-" Hold up his head-Brandy now-Don't choke him.
-How was it, old fellow? What happened to you? Tell
us all about it 1 "
55 00061.jpg
THE RABBIT SENDS IN A LITTLE BILL 47
At last came a little,
feeble, squeaking voice
-("That's Bill," thought
Alice.) "Well, I hardly
know-No more, thank
ye; I'm better now-
but I'm a deal too flus-
tered to tell you-all
I know is, something
comes at me like a Jack-
in-the-box, and up I goes
like a sky-rocket 1 "
"So you did, old fel-
low I" said the others.
"We must burn the
house down I" said the
Rabbit's voice. And
Alice called out as loud
as she could, If you do
I'll set Dinah at you I "
There was dead
silence instantly, and
Alice thought to her-
self: "I wonder what
they will do next 1 If
they had any sense
they'd take the roof off."
After a minute or two
c ,,
56 00062.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
they began moving about again, and Alice heard the Rabbit
say: "A barrowful will do, to begin with."
A barrowful of what ?" thought Alice. But she had not
long to doubt, for the next moment a shower of little pebbles
came rattling in at the window, and some of them hit her in
the face. I'll put a stop to this," she said to herself, and
shouted out "You'd better not do that again I" which pro-
duced another dead silence.
Alice noticed with some surprise that the pebbles were all
turning into little cakes as they lay on the floor, and a bright
idea came into her head. If I eat one of these cakes," she
thought, it's sure to make some change in my size; and, as
it can't possibly make me larger, it must make me smaller, I
suppose."
So she swallowed one of the cakes, and was delighted to
find that she began shrinking directly. As soon as she was
small enough to get through the door, she ran out of the
house, and found quite a crowd of little animals and birds
waiting outside. The poor little Lizard, Bill, was in the
middle, being held up by two guinea-pigs, who were giving
it something out of a bottle. They all made a rush at Alice
the moment she appeared; but she ran off as hard as she
could, and soon found herself safe in a thick wood.
"The first thing I've got to do," said Alice to herself, as
she wandered about in the wood, "is to grow to my right
size again; and the second thing is to find my way into
that lovely garden. I think that will be the best plan."
It sounded an excellent plan, no doubt, and very neatly
57 00063.jpg
THE RABBIT SENDS IN A LITTLE BILL 49
and simply arranged; the only difficulty was, that she had
not the smallest idea how to set about it; and, while she
was peering about anxiously among the trees, a little sharp
bark just over her head made her look up in a great hurry.
An enormous puppy was looking down at her with large
round eyes, and feebly stretching out one paw, trying to
touch her. Poor little thing I" said Alice, in a coaxing
tone, and she tried hard to whistle to it; but she was
terribly frightened all the time at the thought that it might
be hungry, in which case it would be very likely to eat her
up in spite of all her coaxing.
Hardly knowing what she did, she picked up a little bit
of stick, and held it out to the puppy; whereupon the puppy
jumped into the air off all its feet at once, with a yelp of
delight, and rushed at the stick, and made believe to worry
it; then Alice dodged behind a great thistle, to keep herself
from being run over; and, the moment she appeared on the
58 00064.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
other side, the puppy made another rush at the stick, and
tumbled head over heels in its hurry to get hold of it; then
Alice, thinking it was very like having a game of play with
a cart-horse, and expecting every moment to be trampled
under its feet, ran round the thistle again; then the puppy
began a series of short charges at the stick, running a very
little way forwards each time and a long way back, and
barking hoarsely all the while, till at last it sat down a good
way off, panting, with its tongue hanging out of its mouth,
and its great eyes half shut.
This seemed to Alice a good opportunity for making her
escape ; so she set off at once, and ran till she was quite tired
and out of breath, and till the puppy's bark sounded quite
faint in the distance.
"And yet what a dear little puppy it was!" said Alice,
as she leant against a buttercup to rest herself, and fanned
herself with one of the leaves. "I should have liked teach-
ing it tricks very much, if-if I'd only been the right size to
do it I Oh, dear I'd nearly forgotten that I've got to grow
up again I Let me see-how is it to be managed ? I suppose
I ought to eat or drink something or other; but the great
question is what ? "
The great question certainly was, what ? Alice looked all
round her at the flowers and the blades of grass, but she
could not see anything that looked like the right thing to eat
or drink under the circumstances. There was a large mush-
room growing near her, about the same height as herself;
and when she had looked under it, and on both sides of it,
59 00065.jpg
THE RABBIT SENDS IN A LITTLE BILL 51
and behind it, it occurred to her that she might as well look
and see what was on the top of it.
She stretched herself up on tiptoe, and peeped over the
edge of the mushroom, and her eyes immediately met those
of a large blue caterpillar that was sitting on the top with its
arms folded, quietly smoking a long hookah, and taking not
the smallest notice of her or of anything else.
Advice from a caterpillar
60 00066.jpg
CHAPTER V
ADVICE FROM A CATERPILLAR
THE Caterpillar and Alice looked at each other for some time
in silence; at last the Caterpillar took the hookah out of its
mouth, and addressed her in a languid, sleepy voice:
"Who are you ?" said the Caterpillar.
This was not an encouraging opening for a conversation.
Alice replied, rather shyly, I-I hardly know, sir, just at
61 00067.jpg
ADVICE FROM A CATERPILLAR
present-at least I know who I was when I got up this
morning, but I think I must have been changed several
times since then."
"What do you mean by that?" said the Caterpillar
sternly. Explain yourself I "
I can't explain myself, I'm afraid, sir," said Alice,
"because I'm not myself, you see."
I don't see," said the Caterpillar.
I'm afraid I can't put it more clearly," Alice replied
very politely, "for I can't understand it myself to begin
with; and being so many different sizes in a day is very
confusing."
"It isn't," said the Caterpillar.
"Well, perhaps you haven't found it so yet," said Alice;
"but when you have to turn into a chrysalis-you will some
day, you know-and then after that into a butterfly, I should
think you'll feel it a little queer, won't you ?"
"Not a bit," said the Caterpillar.
"Well, perhaps your feelings may be different," said
Alice; all I know is, it would feel very queer to me."
You said the Caterpillar contemptuously. Who are
you ?"
Which brought them back again to the beginning of
the conversation. Alice felt a little irritated at the Cater-
pillar's making such very short remarks, and she drew
herself up and said, very gravely, "I think you ought to
tell me who you are, first."
"Why?" said the Caterpillar.
62 00068.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
Here was another puzzling question; and as Alice
could not think of any good reason, and as the Caterpillar
seemed to be in a very unpleasant state of mind, she turned
away.
Come back I the Caterpillar called after her. "I've
something important to say I"
This sounded promising, certainly; Alice turned and
came back again.
"Keep your temper," said the Caterpillar.
Is that all ?" said Alice, swallowing down her anger as
well as she could.
No," said the Caterpillar.
Alice thought she might as well wait, as she had nothing
else to do, and perhaps after all it might tell her something
worth hearing. For some minutes it puffed away without
speaking, but at last it unfolded its arms, took the hookah
out of its mouth again, and said, "So you think you're
changed, do you ? "
"I'm afraid I am, sir," said Alice; "I can't remember
things as I used-and I don't keep the same size for ten
minutes together I"
"Can't remember what things?" said the Caterpillar.
"Well, I've tried to say' How doth the little busy bee,'
but it all came different I" Alice replied in a very
melancholy voice.
Repeat You are old, Father William,' said the
Caterpillar.
Alice folded her hands, and began :-
63 00069.jpg
a'
ADVICE FROM A CATERPILLAR.
''
I.
%
, Ix Tip
64 00071.jpg
ADVICE FROM A CATERPILLAR
"You are old, Father William," the young man said,
"And your hair has become very white;
And yet you incessantly stand on your head-
Do you think, at your age, it is right ? "
In my youth," Father William replied to his son,
I feared it might injure the brain;
But, now that I'm perfectly sure I have none,
Why, I do it again and again."
"You are old," said the youth, as I mentioned before,
And have grown most uncommonly fat;
Yet you turned a back-somersault in at the door-
Pray, what is the reason of that ?"
" In my youth," said the sage, as he shook his grey locks,
I kept all my limbs very supple
By the use of this ointment-one shilling the box-
Allow me to sell you a couple? "
" You are old," said the youth, "and your jaws are too weak
For anything tougher than suet;
Yet you finished the goose, with the bones and the beak-
Pray, how did you manage to do it? "
In my youth," said his father, I took to the law,
And argued each case with my wife;
And the muscular strength, which it gave to my jaw,
Has lasted the rest of my life."
"You are old," said the youth, "one would hardly suppose
That your eye was as steady as ever;
Yet you balanced an eel on the end of your nose -
What made you so awfully clever ?"
"I have answered three questions, and that is enough,"
Said his father; "don't give yourself airs I
Do you think I can listen all day to such stuff?
Be off, or I'll kick you down stairs "
65 00072.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
"That is not said right," said the Caterpillar.
Not quite right, I'm afraid," said Alice, timidly; some
of the words have got altered."
"It is wrong from beginning to end," said the Caterpillar
decidedly, and there was silence for some minutes.
The Caterpillar was the first to speak.
"What size do you want to be?" it asked.
Oh, I'm not particular as to size," Alice hastily replied;
"only one doesn't like changing so often, you know."
I don't know," said the Caterpillar.
Alice said nothing: she had never been so much contra-
dicted in all her life before, and she felt that she was losing
her temper.
"Are you content now? said the Caterpillar.
"Well, I should like to be a little larger, sir, if you
wouldn't mind," said Alice : three inches is such a wretched
height to be."
It is a very good height indeed I" said the Caterpillar
angrily, rearing itself upright as it spoke (it was exactly
three inches high).
But I'm not used to it pleaded poor Alice in a piteous
tone. And she thought to herself, "I wish the creatures
wouldn't be so easily offended I "
"You'll get used to it in time," said the Caterpillar; and
it put the hookah into its mouth and began smoking again.
This time Alice waited patiently until it chose to speak
again. In a minute or two the Caterpillar took the hookah
out of its mouth and yawned once or twice, and shook itself.
66 00073.jpg
ADVICE FROM A CATERPILLAR
Then it got
down off the
mushroom,
and crawled
away into the
grass, merely
remarking as -0a1
it went, One
side will make you
grow taller, and the a
other side will make
you grow shorter."
"One side of M .,
what ? The other side
of what ?" thought
Alice to herself.
"Of the mushroom," said the Caterpillar, just as if she had
asked it aloud; and in another moment it was out of sight.
Alice remained looking thoughtfully at the mushroom for
a minute, trying to make out which were the two sides of it ;
and as it was perfectly round, she found this a very difficult
question. However, at last she stretched her arms round it
as far as they would go, and broke off a bit of the edge with
each hand.
"And now which is which?" she said to herself, and
nibbled a little of the right-hand bit to try the effect; the
next moment she felt a violent blow underneath her chin-it
had struck her foot I
67 00074.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
She was a good deal frightened by this very sudden
change, but she felt that there was no time to be lost, as she
was shrinking rapidly; so she set to work at once to eat
some of the other bit. Her chin was pressed so closely
against her foot that there was hardly room to open her
mouth; but she did it at last, and managed to swallow a
morsel of the left-hand bit.
m
"Come, my head's free at last I" said Alice, in a tone of
delight, which changed into alarm in another moment, when
she found that her shoulders were nowhere to be found; all
she could see, when she looked down, was an immense length
of neck, which seemed to rise like a stalk out of a sea of
green leaves that lay far below her.
"What can all that green stuff be?" said Alice, "and
where have my shoulders got to? And oh, my poor hands,
how is it I can't see you? She was moving them about as
she spoke, but no result seemed to follow, except a little
shaking among the distant green leaves.
As there seemed to be no chance of getting her hands up
to her head, she tried to get her head down to them, and was
delighted to find that her neck would bend about easily in
any direction, like a serpent. She had just succeeded in
curving it down into a graceful zigzag, and was going to
dive in among the leaves, which she found to be nothing
but the tops of the trees under which she had been wander-
68 00075.jpg
ADVICE FROM A CATERPILLAR
ing, when a sharp hiss made her draw back in a hurry; a
large pigeon had flown into her face, and was beating her
violently with its wings.
"Serpent screamed the Pigeon.
"I'm not a serpent!" said Alice indignantly. "Let me
alone 1"
"Serpent, I say again repeated the Pigeon, but in a
more subdued tone, and added, with a kind of sob, "I've
tried every way, and nothing seems to suit them I "
"I haven't the least idea what you're talking about," said
Alice.
"I've tried the roots of trees, and I've tried banks, and
I've tried hedges," the Pigeon went on, without attending to
her; "but those serpents 1 There's no pleasing them I "
Alice was more and more puzzled, but she thought there
was no use in saying anything more till the Pigeon had
finished.
69 00076.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
"As if it
wasn't trouble
enough hatch-
ing the eggs,"
( a" said the
l Pigeon, "but
I must be on
the look out
for serpents
Night and day Why, I haven't
.J had a wink of sleep these three
weeks 1"
I'm very sorry you've been
annoyed," said Alice, who was
beginning to see its meaning.
"And just as I'd taken the highest tree in the wood,"
continued the Pigeon, raising his voice to a shriek, "and
just as I was thinking I should be free of them at last, they
must needs come wriggling down from the sky I Ugh,
Serpent I"
But I'm not a serpent, I tell you I" said Alice. "I'm
a-- I'm a--"
Well 1 What are you ?" said the Pigeon. "I can see
you're trying to invent something I"
I-I'm a little girl," said Alice, rather doubtfully, as she
remembered the number of changes she had gone through
that day.
"A likely story, indeed I said the Pigeon, in a tone of the
70 00077.jpg
ADVICE FROM A CATERPILLAR
deepest contempt. "I've seen a good many little girls in
my time, but never one with such a neck as that No, no I
You're a serpent; and there's no use denying it. I suppose
you'll be telling me next that you never tasted an egg "
"I have tasted eggs, certainly," said Alice, who was a very
truthful child ; "but little girls eat eggs quite as much as
serpents do, you know."
I don't believe it," said the Pigeon; but if they do, why
then they're a kind of serpent, that's all I can say."
This was such a new idea to Alice, that she was quite
silent for a minute or two, which gave the Pigeon the
opportunity of adding: "You're looking for eggs, I know
that well enough; and what does it matter to me whether
you're a little girl or a serpent ? "
It matters a good deal to me," said Alice hastily; but
I'm not looking for eggs, as it happens; and if I was, I
shouldn't want yours: I don't like them raw."
"Well, be off, then !" said the Pigeon, in a sulky tone, as
it settled down again into its nest. Alice crouched down
among the trees as well as she could, for her neck kept
getting entangled among the branches, and every now and
then she had to stop and untwist it. After a while she
remembered that she still held the pieces of mushroom in
her hands, and she set to work very carefully, nibbling first
at one and then at the other, and growing sometimes taller
and sometimes shorter, until she had succeeded in bringing
herself down to her usual height.
It was so long since she had been anything near
71 00078.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
the right size, that it felt quite strange at first; but she
got used to it in a few minutes, and began talking to
herself, as usual. "Come, there's half my plan done now!
How puzzling all these changes are; I'm never sure
what I'm going to be, from one minute to another I
However, I've got back to my right size; the next thing
is, to get into that beautiful garden-how is that to be
done, I wonder?" As she said this, she came suddenly
upon an open place, with a little house in it about four
feet high. "Whoever lives there," thought Alice, it'll never
do to come upon them this size; why I should frighten
them out of their wits!" So she began nibbling at the
right-hand bit again, and did not venture to go near
the house till she had brought herself down to nine inches
high.
-0.
I,
Pig and pepper
72 00079.jpg
CHAPTER VI
PIG AND PEPPER
FOR a minute or two she stood looking at the house
and wondering what to do next, when suddenly a footman
in livery came running out of the wood-(she considered
him to be a footman because he was in livery; otherwise,
judging by his face only, she would have called him a
fish)-and rapped loudly at the door with his knuckles.
It was opened by another footman in livery, with a round
face and large eyes like a frog; and both footmen, Alice
noticed, had powdered hair that curled all over their heads.
She felt very curious to know what it was all about, and
crept a little way out of the wood to listen.
The Fish-Footman began by producing from under
his arm a great letter, nearly as large as himself, and this
he handed over to the other, saying, in a solemn tone,
"For the Duchess. An invitation from the Queen to
play croquet." The Frog-Footman repeated, in the same
cszp
73 00080.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
solemn tone, only changing the order of the words a little,
"From the Queen. An invitation for the Duchess to play
croquet."
Then they both bowed low, and their curls got entangled
together.
Alice laughed so much at this, that she had to run back
into the wood for fear of their hearing her; and, when she
next peeped out, the Fish-Footman was gone, and the other
was sitting on the ground near the door staring stupidly up
into the sky.
Alice went timidly up.to the door and knocked.
"There's no sort of use in knocking," said the Footman,
"and that for two reasons. First, because I'm on the same
side of the door as you are; secondly, because they're
making such a noise inside no one could possibly hear you."
And certainly there was a most extraordinary noise going
on within-a constant howling and sneezing, and every now
and then a great crash, as if a dish or kettle had been
broken to pieces.
"Please, then," said Alice, "how am I to get in?"
"There might be some sense in your knocking," the
Footman went on, without attending to her, if we had the
door between us. For instance, if you were inside, you
might knock, and I could let you out, you know." He was
looking up into the sky all the time he was speaking, and
this Alice thought decidedly uncivil. "But perhaps he
can't help it," she said to herself; "his eyes are so very
nearly at the top of his head. But at any rate he
74 00081.jpg
IN THE DUCHESS'S KITCHEN
07f
COS
to.
h At
A
.... ....
CL ~ rl g
75 00083.jpg
PIG AND PEPPER
might answer questions." How am I to get in?" she
repeated, aloud.
"I shall sit here," the Footman remarked, "till to-
morrow-
At this moment the door of the house opened, and a
large plate 'came skimming out, straight at the Footman's
head; it just grazed his nose, and broke to pieces against
one of the trees behind him.
"-- or next day, maybe," the Footman continued in the
same tone, exactly as if nothing had happened.
"How am I to get in?" asked Alice again in a louder
tone.
"Are you to get in at all?"
said the Footman. "That's the
first ques- Co
tion, you
know."
It was,
no doubt;
"' aiL?
^~> ZZ 2 ,_
b
76 00084.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
only Alice did not like to be told so. It's really dreadful,"
she muttered to herself, "the way all the creatures argue.
It's enough to drive one crazy I "
The Footman seemed to think this a good opportunity for
repeating his remark, with variations. "I shall sit here," he
said, "on and off, for days and days."
"But what am I to do ?" said Alice.
"Anything you like," said the Footman, and began
whistling.
"Oh, there's no use in talking to him," said Alice,
desperately; "he's perfectly idiotic I" And she opened the
door and went in.
The door led right into a large kitchen, which was full of
smoke from one end to the other; the Duchess was sitting
on a three-legged stool in the middle, nursing a baby; the
cook was leaning over the fire, stirring a large cauldron
which seemed to be full of soup.
"There's certainly too much pepper in that soup I Alice
said to herself, as well as she could for sneezing.
There was certainly too much of it in the air. Even the
Duchess sneezed occasionally; and the baby was sneezing
and howling alternately without a moment's pause. The
only things in the kitchen that did not sneeze were the cook,
and a large cat which was sitting on the hearth and grinning
from ear to ear.
Please would you tell me," said Alice, a little timidly,
for she was not quite sure whether it was good manners for
her to speak first, why your cat grins like that ?"
77 00085.jpg
PIG AND PEPPER
QL t)
S" It's a Cheshire cat," said
the Duchess, "and that's
why, Pig I"
S7She said the last words
with such sudden violence that Alice quite jumped; but she
saw in another moment that it was addressed to the baby,
and not to her, so she took courage, and went on again:
I didn't know that Cheshire cats always grinned; in fact,
I didn't know that cats could grin."
"They all can," said the Duchess; "and most of 'em do."
E2
78 00086.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
I don't know of any that do," Alice said very politely,
feeling quite pleased to have got into a conversation.
"You don't know much," said the Duchess; "and that's
a fact."
Alice did not at all like the tone of this remark, and thought
it would be as well to introduce some other subject of
conversation. While she was trying to fix on one, the cook
took the cauldron of soup off the fire, and at once set to work
throwing everything within her reach at the Duchess and the
baby-the fire-irons came first; then followed a shower of
saucepans, plates, and dishes. The Duchess took no notice
of them even when they hit her; and the baby was howling
so much already that it was quite impossible to say whether
the blows hurt it or not.
Oh,please mind what you're doing I "cried Alice, jumping
up and down in an agony of terror. "Oh, there goes his
precious nose "; as an unusually large saucepan flew close by
it, and very nearly carried it off.
If everybody minded their own business," the Duchess
said, in a hoarse growl, the world would go round a deal
faster than it does."
Which would not be an advantage," said Alice, who felt
very glad to get an opportunity of showing off a little of her
knowledge. Just think what work it would make with the
day and night 1 You see the earth takes twenty-four hours
to turn round on its axis- "
"Talking of axes," said the Duchess, "chop off her head."
Alice glanced rather anxiously at the cook, to see if she
79 00087.jpg
PIG AND PEPPER
meant to take the hint; but the cook was busily engaged in
stirring the soup, and did not seem to be listening, so she
ventured to go on again: "Twenty-four hours, I think; or
is it twelve? I--"
"Oh, don't bother me," said the Duchess; "I never could
abide figures 1" And with that she began nursing her child
again, singing a sort of lullaby to it as she did so, and
giving it a violent shake at the end of every line :
a Speak roughly to your little boy,
And beat him when he sneezes:
He only does it to annoy,
Because he knows it teases."
CHORUS.
(In which the cook and the babyjoined):-
"Wow! wow! wow !"
While the Duchess sang the second verse of the song
she kept tossing the baby violently up and down, and the
poor little thing howled so that Alice could hardly hear the
words:
I speak severely to my boy,
I beat him when he sneezes;
For he can thoroughly enjoy
The pepper when he pleases !"
CHORUS.
Wow I wow! wow !"
"Here, you may nurse it a bit, if you like 1 the Duchess
said to Alice, flinging the baby at her as she spoke. "I
must go and get ready to play croquet with the Queen," and
80 00088.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
".. jshe hurried out of the
room. The cook threw a
Sfrying-pan after her as
she went out, but it just
missed her.
Alice caught the baby
with some difficulty, as it
Swas a queer-shaped little
creature, and held out
its arms and legs in all
directions, "just like a star-fish," thought Alice. The poor
little thing was snorting like a steam-engine when she
caught it, and kept doubling itself up and straightening
itself out again, so that altogether, for the first minute or
twvo, it was as much as she could do to hold it.
As soon as she had made out the proper way of nursing
it (which was to twist it up into a sort of knot, and then
keep tight hold of its right ear and left foot, so as to prevent
its undoing itself) she carried it out into the open air.
If I don't take this child away with me," thought Alice,
81 00089.jpg
PIG AND PEPPER
"they're sure to kill it in a day or two; wouldn't it be
murder to leave it behind?" She said the last words out
loud, and the little thing grunted in reply (it had left off
sneezing by this time). "Don't grunt," said Alice; "that's
not at all a proper way of expressing yourself."
The baby grunted again, and Alice looked very anxiously
into its face to see what was the matter with it. There could
be no doubt that it had a very turn-up nose, much more like
a snout than a real nose; also its eyes were getting extremely
small for a baby; altogether Alice did not like the look of
the thing at all. But perhaps it was only sobbing," she
thought, and looked into its eyes again, to see if there were
any tears.
No, there were no tears. "If you're going to turn into a
pig, my dear," said Alice, seriously, I'll have nothing more
to do with you. Mind now I The poor little thing sobbed
again (or grunted, it was impossible to say which), and they
went on for some while in silence.
Alice was just beginning to think to herself, "Now, what
am I to do with this creature when I get it home?" when it
grunted again, so violently that she looked down into its
face in some alarm. This time there could be no mistake
about it; it was neither more nor less than a pig, and she felt
that it would be quite absurd for her to carry it any further.
So she set the little creature down, and felt quite relieved
to see it trot quietly away into the wood. If it had grown
up," she said to herself, "it would have made a dreadfully
ugly child; but it makes rather a handsome pig, I think."
82 00090.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
And she began thinking over other children she knew, who
might do very well as pigs, and was just saying to herself,
" if one only knew the right way to change them- when
she was a little startled by seeing the Cheshire Cat sitting
on a bough of a tree a few yards off.
The Cat only grinned when it saw Alice. It looked
good-natured, she thought; still it had very long claws and a
great many teeth, so she felt that it ought to be treated with
respect. "Cheshire Puss," she began, rather timidly, as she
did not at all know whether it would like the name; however,
it only grinned a little wider. Come, it's pleased, so far,"
thought Alice, and she went on: "Would you tell me,
please, which way I ought to go from here?"
"That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,"
said the Cat.
I don't much care where--" said Alice.
"Then it doesn't matter which way you go," said the Cat.
"-- so long as I get somewhere," Alice added as an
explanation.
"Oh, you're sure to do that," said the Cat, if you only
walk long enough."
Alice felt that this could not be denied, so she tried
another question. "What sort of people live about here ?"
"In that direction," the Cat said, waving his right paw
round, "lives a Hatter; and in that direction," waving the
other paw, "lives a March Hare. Visit either you like:
they're both mad."
"But I don't want to go among mad people," Alice
remarked.
83 00091.jpg
11
/ Al i
^IL; J' 111
r^~ jtei
JS '^ y*
l^'-^^e
'~-;g t
*i M
4L'.r. _
CjTxt.-
THE PIG BABY.
.dmp- ML 14
Wom"aiiie"
84 00093.jpg
PIG AND PEPPER
"Oh, you can't help that," said the Cat; "we're all mad
here. I'm mad. You're mad."
How do you know I'm mad? said Alice.
"You must be," said the Cat, "or you wouldn't have
come here."
Alice didn't think that proved
it at all; however, she went on:
"And how do you know that .
you're mad?"
STo begin with," said ..
the Cat, "a dog's not
mad. You
grant that ?" "..
I sup-
pose so,"said s
Alice. o-
"We 11, m
then," the
Cat went on,
" you see a 9
dog growls 9 "
when it's
angry, and
wags its
tail when ,.
it's pleased.
Nowlgrowl
when I'm "
85 00094.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
pleased, and wag my tail when I'm angry. Therefore
I'm mad."
"I call it purring, not growling," said Alice.
"Call it what you like," said the Cat. "Do you play
croquet with the Queen to-day ?"
I should like it very much," said Alice, "but I haven't
been invited yet."
You'll see me there," said the Cat, and vanished.
Alice was not much surprised at this, she was getting
so used to queer things happening. While she was looking
at the place where it had been it suddenly appeared again.
"By-the-bye, what became of the baby?" said the Cat.
"I'd nearly forgotten to ask."
It turned into a pig," Alice quietly said, just as if it had
come back in a natural way.
"I thought it would," said the Cat, and vanished again.
Alice waited a little, half expecting to see it again, but it
did not appear, and after a minute or two she walked on in
the direction in which the March Hare was said to live.
"I've seen hatters before," she said to herself; "the March
Hare will be much the most interesting, and perhaps, as this
is May, it won't be raving mad-at least not so mad as it
was in March." As she said this, she looked up, and there
was the Cat again, sitting on a branch of a tree.
Did you say pig, or fig?" said the Cat.
I said pig," replied Alice; "and I wish you wouldn't
keep appearing and vanishing so suddenly: you make one
quite giddy."
86 00095.jpg
PIG AND PEPPER
"All right," said
the Cat; and this
time it vanished
quite slowly, begin-
ning with the end
of the tail and end-
ing with the grin,
which remained
some time after the
rest of it had gone.
"Well I've often
seen a cat without
a grin," thought
Alice, "but a grin
without a cat It's
the most curious
thing I ever saw in
all my life."
She had not
gone much farther
before she came in
sight of the house
of the March Hare;
she thought it must
be the right house
because the chim-
neys were shaped
like ears, and the
o
87 00096.jpg
76 ALICE IN WONDERLAND
roof was thatched with fur. It was so large a house that
she did not like to go nearer till she had nibbled some
more of the left-hand bit of mushroom, and raised herself
to about two feet high; even then she walked up towards
it rather timidly, saying to herself: "Suppose it should be
raving mad after all I I almost wish I'd gone to see the
Hatter instead I "
0 ,A,
Sr 7
\\ \ S31 -f~eiJl<.
A mad tea-party
88 00097.jpg
CHAPTER VII
A MAD TEA-PARTY
THERE was a table set out under a tree in front of the
house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea
at it; a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep,
and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their
elbows on it, and talking over its head. "Very uncomfort-
able for the Dormouse," thought Alice; "only as it's asleep
I suppose it doesn't mind.'
89 00098.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
The table was a large one, but the three were all
crowded together at one corner of it. "No room! No
room I" they cried out, when they saw Alice coming.
" There's plenty of room I" said Alice indignantly; and she
sat down in a large armchair at one end of the table.
"Have some wine?" the March Hare said, in an
encouraging tone.
Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing
on it but tea. I don't see any wine," she remarked.
"There isn't any," said the March Hare.
Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it," said Alice
angrily.
"It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being
invited," said the March Hare.
I didn't know it was your table," said Alice; "it's laid
for a great many more than three."
Your hair wants cutting," said the Hatter. He had
been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity,
and this was his first speech.
"You should learn not to make personal remarks," Alice
said, with some severity; it's very rude."
The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this;
but all he said was : Why is a raven like a writing-desk ? "
"Come, we shall have some fun now!" thought Alice.
" I'm glad they've begun asking riddles-I believe I can
guess that," she added aloud.
Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer
to it? said the March Hare.
90 00099.jpg
A MAD TEA-PARTY
"Exactly so," said
Alice.
"Then you should
say what you mean,"
the March Hare went
on.
"I do," Alice has- 3 '
tily replied;
"at least-at
least I mean
what I say
-that's the S .
same thing, --
you know."
Not the
same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "Why, you might just
as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same thing as
'I eat what I see'! "
You might just as well say," added the March Hare,
"that 'I like what I get' is the same thing as 'I get what
I like' "
"You might just as well say," added the Dormouse, which
seemed to be talking in his sleep, that I breathe when I
sleep' is the same thing as 'I sleep when I breathe' "
It is the same thing with you," said the Hatter; and here
the conversation dropped, and the party sat silent for a
minute, while Alice thought over all she could remember
about ravens and writing-desks, which wasn't much.
91 00100.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
The Hatter was the first to break the silence. "What
day of the month is it ?" he said, turning to Alice; he had
taken his watch out of his pocket, and was looking at it
uneasily, shaking it every now and then, and holding it to
his ear.
Alice considered a little, and then said, "The fourth."
"Two days wrong sighed the Hatter. "I told you
butter wouldn't suit the works 1" he added, looking angrily at
the March Hare.
"It was the best butter," the March Hare meekly replied.
"Yes, but some crumbs must have got in as well," the
Hatter grumbled; "you shouldn't have put it in with the
bread-knife."
The March Hare took the watch and looked at it
gloomily; then he dipped it into his cup of tea, and looked
at it again; but he could think of nothing better to say
than his first remark : It was the best butter, you know."
Alice had been looking over his shoulder with some
curiosity. What a funny watch I" she remarked. It tells
the day of the month, and doesn't tell what o'clock it is I "
"Why should it?" muttered the Hatter. "Does your
watch tell you what year it is ?"
"Of course not," Alice replied very readily; "but that's
because it stays the same year for such a long time together."
"Which is just the case with mine," said the Hatter.
Alice felt dreadfully puzzled. The Hatter's remark
seemed to have no meaning in it, and yet it was certainly
English. I don't quite understand," she said, as politely
as she could.
92 00101.jpg
V
3Tj,
THE MAD TEA PARTY.
WII~II~S~iPTL~:
1 \I
r
--
*P
L
3~C6;j( ~qpd
93 00103.jpg
A MAD TEA-PARTY
"The Dormouse is asleep again," said the Hatter, and he
poured a little hot tea upon its nose.
The Dormouse shook its head impatiently, and said,
without opening its eyes, "Of course, of course: just what I
was going to remark myself."
"Have you guessed the riddle yet?" the Hatter said,
turning to Alice again.
"No, I give it up," Alice replied; "what's the answer?"
"I haven't the slightest idea," said the Hatter.
"Nor I," said the March Hare.
Alice sighed wearily. I think you might do something
better with the time," she said, "than waste it asking riddles
with no answers."
If you knew Time as well as I do," said the Hatter, "you
wouldn't talk about wasting it. It's him."
I don't know what you mean," said Alice.
Of course you don't I the Hatter said, tossing his head
contemptuously. "I dare say you never even spoke to
Time I"
"Perhaps not," Alice cautiously replied; "but I know I
have to beat time when I learn music."
"Ah I that accounts for it," said the Hatter. He won't
stand beating. Now, if you only kept on good terms with
him he'd do almost anything you liked with the clock. For
instance, suppose it were nine o'clock in the morning, just
time to begin lessons : you'd only have to whisper a hint to
Time, and round goes the clock in a twinkling I Half-past
one, time for dinner I "
94 00104.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
"I only wish it was," the March Hare said to itself in a
whisper.
That would be grand, certainly," said Alice thoughtfully;
"but then-I shouldn't be hungry for it, you know."
Not at first, perhaps," said the Hatter; but you could
keep it to half-past one as long as you liked."
Is that the way you manage ? Alice asked.
The Hatter shook his head mournfully. "Not II" he
replied. "We quarrelled last March-just before he went
mad, you know-" (pointing with his teaspoon at the March
Hare), "-it was at the great concert given by the Queen
of Hearts, and I had to sing
'Twinkle, twinkle, little bat 1
How I wonder what you're at I'
You know the song, perhaps ?"
"I've heard something like it," said Alice.
It goes on, you know," the Hatter continued, "in this
way:
'Up above the world you fly
Like a tea-tray in the sky.
Twinkle, twinkle-'"
Here the Dormouse shook itself, and began singing in
its sleep, Twinkle, twinke, twinkle, twinkle--" and went
on so long that they had to pinch it to make it stop.
"Well, I'd hardly finished the first verse," said the
Hatter, when the Queen jumped up and bawled out, He's
murdering the time I Off with his head I '"
How dreadfully savage I" exclaimed Alice.
95 00105.jpg
A MAD TEA-PARTY 83
a
I--- *^y f V^ I .
"And ever since that," the
Hatter went on, in a mournful tone,
"he won't do a thing I ask It's
always six o'clock now."
A bright idea came into Alice's
head. Is that the reason so many
tea-things are put out here?" she
asked.
Yes, that's it," said the Hatter, with a sigh : "it's always
tea-time, and we've no time to wash the things between
whiles."
"Then you keep moving round, I suppose?" said
Alice.
Exactly so," said the Hatter; "as the things get used
up."
96 00106.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
But what happens when you come to the beginning
again?" Alice ventured to ask.
"Suppose we change the subject," the March Hare
interrupted, yawning. I'm getting tired of this. I vote the
young lady tells us a story."
"I'm afraid I don't know one," said Alice, rather alarmed
at the proposal.
"Then the Dormouse shall I" they both cried. "Wake
up, Dormouse 1" And they pinched it on both sides at
once.
The Dormouse slowly opened his eyes. "I wasn't
asleep," he said in a hoarse, feeble voice; I heard every word
you fellows were saying."
"Tell us a story I said the March Hare.
"Yes, please do I pleaded Alice.
"And be quick about it," added the Hatter, "or you'll be
asleep again before it's done."
"Once upon a time there were three little sisters," the
Dormouse began in a great hurry; "and their names were
Elsie, Lacie, and Tillie; and they lived at the bottom of a
well "
"What did they live on?" said Alice, who always took a
great interest in questions of eating and drinking.
They lived on treacle," said the Dormouse, after thinking
a minute or two.
"They couldn't have done that, you know," Alice gently
remarked; "they'd have been ill."
So they were," said the Dormouse; very ill."
97 00107.jpg
A MAD TEA-PARTY
Alice tried a little to fancy to herself what such an
extraordinary way of living would be like, but it puzzled her
too much, so she went on: "But why did they live at the
bottom of a well ?"
Take some more tea," the March Hare said to Alice very
earnestly.
I've had nothing yet," Alice replied, in an offended tone,
"so I can't take more."
"You mean you can't take less," said the Hatter: "it's
very easy to take more than nothing."
Nobody asked your opinion," said Alice.
"Who's making personal remarks now?" the Hatter
asked triumphantly.
Alice did not quite know what to say to this, so she
helped herself to some tea and bread-and-butter, and then
turned to the Dormouse, and repeated her question: "Why
did they live at the bottom of a well ? "
The Dormouse again took a minute or two to think
about it, and then said : It was a treacle-well."
"There's no such thing Alice was beginning very
angrily; but the Hatter and the March Hare went Sh I sh I "
and the Dormouse sulkily remarked : "If you can't be civil,
you'd better finish the story for yourself."
No, please go on I" Alice said very humbly. I won't
interrupt you again. I daresay there may be one."
"One, indeed I" said the Dormouse, indignantly. How-
ever, he consented to go on. "And so these three little
sisters-they were learning to draw, you know- "
98 00108.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
"What did they draw?" said Alice, quite forgetting her
promise.
"Treacle," said the Dormouse, without considering at all
this time.
"I want a clean cup," interrupted the Hatter; "let's all
move one place on."
He moved on as he spoke, and the Dormouse followed
him: the March Hare moved into the Dormouse's place, and
Alice, rather unwillingly, took the place of the March Hare.
The Hatter was the only one who got any advantage from
the change; and Alice was a good deal worse 6ff than before,
as the March Hare had just upset the milk-jug into his
plate.
Alice did not wish to offend the Dormouse again, so she
began very cautiously : But I don't understand. Where
did they draw the treacle from ?"
"You can draw water out of a water-well," said the
Hatter; "so I should think you could draw treacle out of a
treacle-well-eh, stupid?"
But they were in the well," Alice said to the Dormouse,
not choosing to notice this last remark.
Of course they were," said the Dormouse ; "---well, in."
This answer so confused poor Alice that she let the
Dormouse go on for some time without interrupting it.
"They were learning to draw," the Dormouse went on,
yawning and rubbing its eyes, for it was getting very sleepy;
"and they drew all manner of things-everything that begins
with an M--"
99 00109.jpg
A MAD TEA-PART' 87
"Why with
an M?" said
Alice.
"Why not?"
said the March
Hare.
Alice was
silent.
The Dor-
mouse had
closed its eyes -
by this time
and was going
off into a doze;
but, on being
pinched by the
Hatter, it woke
up again with
a little shriek,
and went on: "-- that begins with an M, such as mouse-
traps, and the moon, and memory, and muchness-you know
you say things are 'much of a muchness'-did you ever
see such a thing as a drawing of a muchness ? "
"Really, now you ask me," said Alice, very much con-
fused, I don't think--"
"Then you shouldn't talk," said the Hatter.
This piece of rudeness was more than Alice could bear;
she got up in great disgust, and walked off. The Dormouse
100 00110.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
fell asleep instantly, and neither of the others took the least
notice of her going, though she looked back once or twice,
half hoping that they would call after her; the last time she
saw them they were trying to put the Dormouse into the
teapot.
At any rate, I'll never go there again I said Alice, as she
picked her way through the wood. It's the stupidest tea-
party I ever was at in all my life! "
Just as she said this she noticed that one of the trees
had a door leading right into it. That's very curious I she
thought. But everything's curious to-day. I think I may
as well go in at once." And in she went.
Once more she found herself in the long hall, and close to
the little glass table. Now, I'll manage better this time,"
she said to herself, and began by taking the little golden key,
and unlocking the door that led into the garden. Then she
set to work nibbling at the mushroom (she had kept a piece
of it in her pocket) till she was about a foot high; then she
walked down the little passage, and then-she found herself
at last in the beautiful garden, among the bright flower-beds
and the cool fountains.
The queen's croquet-ground
101 00111.jpg
THE QUEEN'S
CROQUET-GROUND
A LARGE rose-tree stood near the entrance of the garden:
the roses growing on it were white, but there were three
gardeners at it, busily painting them red. Alice thought
this a very curious thing, and she went nearer to watch
them, and just as she came up to them she heard one of
them say, "Look out now, Five; don't go splashing paint
over me like that "
I couldn't help it," said Five, in a sulky tone. Seven
jogged my elbow."
On which Seven looked up and said : That's right, Five,
always lay the blame on others I "
You'd better not talk I said Five. I heard the Queen
say only yesterday you deserved to be beheaded I "
c~
102 00112.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
What for ? said the one who had first spoken.
"That's none of your business, Two I" said Seven.
Yes, it is his business I said Five. "And I'll tell him
-it was for bringing the cook tulip-roots instead of onions."
Seven flung down his brush, and had just begun: "Well,
of all the unjust things--," when his eye chanced to fall
upon Alice, as she stood watching them, and he checked
himself suddenly; the others looked round also, and all of
them bowed low.
"Would you tell me," said Alice, a little timidly, "why
you are painting those roses ?"
Five and Seven said nothing, but looked at Two. Two
began in a low voice : "Why, the fact is you see, Miss, this
here ought to have been a red rose-tree, and we put a white
one in by mistake; and if the Queen was to find it out we
should all have our heads cut off, you know. So you see,
Miss, we're doing our best afore she comes, to--" At this
moment Five, who had been anxiously looking across the
garden, called out, The Queen I The Queen I and the three
gardeners instantly threw themselves flat upon their faces.
There was a sound of many footsteps, and Alice looked
round, eager to see the Queen.
First came ten soldiers carrying clubs; these were all
shaped like the three gardeners, oblong and flat, with their
hands and feet at the corners; next the ten courtiers; these
were ornamented all over with diamonds, and walked two
and two, as the soldiers did. After these came the royal
children; there were ten of them, and the little dears came
103 00113.jpg
THE QUEEN'S CROQUET-GROUND
jumping merrily along, hand 1
in hand, in couples; they
were all ornamented with .
hearts. Next came the
guests, mostly Kings and Queens, and among them Alice
recognized the White Rabbit; it was talking in a hurried,
nervous manner, smiling at everything that was said, and
went by without noticing her. Then followed the Knave
of Hearts, carrying the King's crown on a crimson velvet
cushion; and, last of all this grand procession, came THE
KING AND QUEEN OF HEARTS.
Alice was rather doubtful whether she ought not to lie
down on her face like the three gardeners, but she could not
remember ever having heard of such a rule at processions;
104 00114.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
" and besides, what would be the use of a procession," thought
she, if people had all to lie down upon their faces, so that
they couldn't see it ? So she stood still where she was, and
waited.
When the procession came opposite to Alice they all
stopped and looked at her, and the Queen said severely:
"Who is this ?" She said it to the Knave of Hearts, who
only bowed and smiled in reply.
Idiot I" said the Queen, tossing her head impatiently;
and, turning to Alice, she went on, "What's your name,
child?"
My name is Alice, so please your Majesty," said Alice
very politely; but she added, to herself, "Why, they're
only a pack of cards, after all. I needn't be afraid of
them I"
"And who are these?" said the Queen, pointing to the
three gardeners who were lying round the rose-tree; for, you
see, as they were lying on their faces, and the pattern on
their backs was the same as the rest of the pack, she could
not tell whether they were gardeners, or soldiers, or courtiers,
or three of her own children.
How should I know? said Alice, surprised at her own
courage. "It's no business of mine."
The Queen turned crimson with fury, and after glaring at
her for a moment like a wild beast, screamed, "Off with her
head I Off- "
Nonsense 1" said Alice, very loudly and decidedly, and
the Queen was silent.
105 00115.jpg
THE QUEEN'S CROQUET-GROUND
The King laid his hand upon her arm, and timidly said :
"Consider, my dear ; she is only a child I "
IXIt.
106 00116.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
The Queen turned angrily away from him, and said to
the Knave: "Turn them over l"
The Knave did so, very carefully, with one foot.
Get up I said the Queen, in a shrill, loud voice, and the
three gardeners instantly jumped up, and began bowing to
the King, the Queen, the royal children, and everybody else.
Leave off that 1 screamed the Queen. You make me
giddy." And then, turning to the rose-tree, she went on,
"What have you been doing here? "
"May it please your Majesty," said Two, in a very
humble tone, going down on one knee as he spoke, "we
were trying- "
"I see 1" said the Queen, who had meanwhile been
examining the roses. "Off with their heads 1" and the
procession moved on, three of the soldiers remaining behind
to execute the unfortunate gardeners, who ran to Alice for
protection.
You sha'n't be beheaded I said Alice, and she put them
into a large flower-pot that stood near. The three soldiers
wandered about for a minute or two, looking for them, and
then quietly marched off after the others.
"Are their heads off?" shouted the Queen.
"Their heads are gone, if it please your Majesty I" the
soldiers shouted in reply.
"That's right 1" shouted the Queen. "Can you play
croquet ?"
The soldiers were silent, and looked at Alice, as the
question was evidently meant for her.
107 00117.jpg
THE QUEEN'S CROQUET-GROUND
Yes shouted Alice.
"Come on, then I roared the Queen, and Alice joined the
procession, wondering very much what would happen next.
"It's-it's a very fine day said a timid voice at her
side. She was walking by the White Rabbit, who was
peeping anxiously into her face.
"Very," said Alice; "--where's the Duchess ?"
"Hush I hush I" said the Rabbit, in a low, hurried tone.
He looked anxiously over his shoulder as he spoke, and
then raised himself upon tiptoe, put his mouth close to her
ear, and whispered, "She's under sentence of execution."
"What for ?" said Alice..
Did you say, 'What a pity?'" the Rabbit asked.
No, I didn't," said Alice; I don't think it's at all a pity.
I said, 'What for?'"
"She boxed the Queen's ears," the Rabbit began,-Alice
gave a little scream of laughter. "Oh, hush I" the Rabbit
whispered in a frightened tone. The Queen will hear you!
You see she came rather late, and the Queen said--"
Get to your places I" shouted the Queen in a voice of
thunder, and people began running about in all directions,
tumbling up against each other; however, they got settled
down in a minute or two, and the game began.
Alice thought she had never seen such a curious croquet-
ground in all her life: it was all ridges and furrows; the
balls were live hedgehogs, the mallets live flamingoes, and
the soldiers had to double themselves up and to stand upon
their hands and feet to make the arches.
108 00118.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
The chief difficulty Alice found at first was in managing
her flamingo; she succeeded in getting its boly tucked
away comfortably enough under her arm, with its legs
hanging down, but generally, just as she had got its neck
nicely straightened out, and was going to give the hedgehog
a blow with its head, it would twist itself round and look up
in her face, with such a puzzled expression that she could
not help bursting out laughing; and when she had got its
head down, and was going to
begin again, it was very pro-
1 m voking to find that the hedgehog
had unrolled
itself, and was
in the act of
crawling away;
besides all
S this, there was
generally a
ridge or a fur-
row in the way
-0
109 00119.jpg
THE QUEEN'S CROQUET-GROUND
wherever she wanted to send the hedgehog to, and as the
doubled-up soldiers were always getting up and walking
off to other parts of the ground, Alice soon came to the
conclusion that it was a very difficult game indeed.
The players all played at once without waiting for turns,
quarrelling all the while, and fighting for the hedgehogs; and
in a very short time the Queen was in a furious passion, and
went stamping about, and shouting Off with his head I" or
"Off with her head I" about once in a minute.
Alice began to feel very uneasy; to be sure she had not
as yet had any dispute with the Queen, but she knew that it
might happen any minute, "and then," thought she, "what
would become of me ? They're dreadfully fond of beheading
people here: the great wonder is that there's anyone left
alive 1 "
She was looking about for some way of escape, and
wondering whether she could get away without being
seen, when she noticed a curious appearance in the air;
it puzzled her very much at first, but, after watching it a
minute or two, she made it out to be a grin, and she said to
herself, "It's the Cheshire Cat; now I shall have somebody
to talk to."
How are you getting on ? said the Cat, as soon as there
was mouth enough for it to speak with.
Alice waited till the eyes appeared, and then nodded.
"It's no use speaking to it," she thought, till its ears have
come, or at least one of them." In another minute the
whole head appeared, and then Alice put down her
G
110 00120.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
flamingo and began an account of the game, feeling very
glad she had someone to listen to her. The Cat seemed to
think that there was enough of it now in sight, and no more
of it appeared.
"I don't think they play at all fairly," Alice began in
rather a complaining tone, "and they all quarrel so
dreadfully one can't hear oneself speak-and they don't
seem to have any rules in particular; at least, if there
are, nobody attends to them-and you've no idea how
confusing it is all the things being alive; for instance, there's
the arch I've got to go through next, walking about at the
other end of the ground-and I should have croqueted the
Queen's hedgehog just now, only it ran away when it saw
mine coming.'
"How do you like the Queen?" said the Cat in a low
voice.
".Not at all," said Alice; she's so extremely--" Just
then she noticed that the Queen was close behind her,
listening; so she went on, "- likely to win that it's hardly
worth while finishing the game."
The Queen smiled and passed on.
"Whom are you talking to?" said the King, coming
up to Alice, and looking at the Cat's head with great
curiosity.
It's a friend of mine, a Cheshire Cat," said Alice; "allow
me to introduce it."
I don't like the look of it at all," said the King; "how-
ever, it may kiss my hand if it likes."
111 00121.jpg
..
- L
L, .t
111T v
'iil~
THE CHESHIRE CAT.
C,
112 00123.jpg
THE QUEEN'S CROQUET-GROUND
"I'd rather not," the Cat remarked.
"Don't be impertinent," said the King, and don't look
at me like that I He got behind Alice as he spoke.
"A cat may look at a king," said Alice. "I've read that
in some book, but I don't remember where."
"Well, it must be removed," said the King, very
decidedly, and he called to the Queen, who was passing at the
moment, "My dear I wish you would have this cat
removed I"
The Queen had only one way of settling all difficulties,
great or small. "Off with his head I" she said, without
even looking round.
<
113 00124.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
I'll fetch the executioner myself," said the King eagerly,
and he hurried off.
Alice thought she might as well go back and see how the
game was going on, as she heard the Queen's voice in the
distance, screaming with passion. She had already heard
her sentence three of the players to be executed for having
missed their turns, and she did not like the look of things
at all, as the game was in such confusion that she never
knew whether it was her turn or not. So she went in search
of her hedgehog.
The hedgehog was engaged in a fight with another
hedgehog, which seemed to Alice an excellent opportunity for
croqueting one of them with the other: the only difficulty
was, that her flamingo was gone across to the other side of
the garden, where Alice could see it trying in a helpless sort
of way to fly up into one of the trees.
By the time she had caught the flamingo and brought it
back, the fight was over, and both of the hedgehogs were out
of sight ;" but it doesn't matter much," thought Alice, "as
all the arches are gone from this side of the ground." So
she tucked it under her arm, that it might not escape again,
and went back for a little more conversation with her friend.
When she got back to the Cheshire Cat she was sur-
prised to find quite a large crowd collected round it; there
was a dispute going on between the executioner, the King,
and the Queen, who were all talking at once, while all the
rest were quite silent and looked very uncomfortable.
The moment Alice appeared she was appealed to by all
100
114 00125.jpg
THE QUEEN'S CROQUET-GROUND
three to settle the question, and they repeated their argu-
ments to her, though, as they all spoke at once, she found it
very hard indeed to make out exactly what they said.
The executioner's argument was that you couldn't cut
off a head unless there was a body to cut it off from; that
he had never had to do such a thing before, and he wasn't
going to begin at his time of life.
The King's argument was that anything that had a head
could be beheaded, and that you weren't to talk nonsense.
The Queen's argument was that if something wasn't
done about it in less than no time, she'd have everybody
executed all round. (It was this last remark that had made
the whole party look so grave and anxious.)
Alice could think of nothing else to say but It belongs
to the Duchess ; you'd better ask her about it."
"She's in prison," the Queen said to the executioner;
"fetch her here." And the executioner went off like an
arrow.
The Cat's head began fading away the moment he was
gone, and, by the time he had come back with the Duchess,
it had entirely disappeared ; so the King and the executioner
ran wildly up and down looking for it, while the rest of the
party went back to the game.
IO
The mock turtle's story
115 00126.jpg
CHAPTER IX
THE MOCK TURTLE'S STORY
"You can't think how glad I am to see you again, you
dear old thing I" said the Duchess, as she tucked her arm
affectionately into Alice's, and they walked off together.
Alice was very glad to find her in such a pleasant temper,
and thought to herself that perhaps it was only the pepper
that had made her so savage when they met in the kitchen.
"When I'm a Duchess," she said to herself (not in a very
hopeful tone, though), I won't have any pepper in my
kitchen at all. Soup does very well without-maybe it's
always pepper that makes people hot-tempered," she went on,
very much pleased at having found out a new kind of rule,
" and vinegar that makes them sour-and camomile that
makes them bitter-and-and barley-sugar and such things
that make children sweet-tempered. I only wish people
116 00127.jpg
THE MOCK TURTLE'S STORY
knew that: then they wouldn't be so stingy about it, you
know."
She had quite forgotten the Duchess by this time, and
was a little startled when she heard her voice close to her
ear. "You're thinking about something, my dear, and that
makes you forget to talk. I can't tell you just now what the
moral of that is, but I shall remember it in a bit."
Perhaps it hasn't one," Alice ventured to remark.
Tut, tut, child I" said the Duchess. Everything's got
a moral, if only you can find it." And she squeezed herself
up closer to Alice's side as she spoke.
Alice did not much like her keeping so close to her;
first, because the Duchess was very ugly; and secondly,
because she was exactly the right height to rest her chin on
Alice's shoulder; and it was an uncomfortably sharp chin.
However, she did not like to be rude, so she bore it as well
as she could. "The game's going on rather better now," she
said, by way of keeping up the conversation a little.
"'Tis so," said the Duchess: "and the moral of that is-
'Oh, 'tis love, 'tis love, that makes the world go round I'"
"Somebody said," Alice whispered, "that it's done by
everybody minding their own business I "
"Ah, well I It means much the same thing," said the
Duchess, digging her sharp little chin into Alice's shoulder
as she added, "and the moral of that is-' Take care of the
sense, and the sounds will take care of themselves.' "
"How fond she is of finding morals in things I" Alice
thought to herself.
1o3
117 00128.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
"I daresay you're wondering why I don't put my arm
round your waist," the Duchess said, after a pause; "the
reason is, that I'm doubtful about the temper of your
flamingo. Shall I try the experiment?"
He might bite," Alice cautiously replied, not feeling at
all anxious to have the experiment tried.
Very true," said the Duchess ; flamingoes and mustard
both bite. And the moral of that is-' Birds of a feather
flock together.'"
"Only mustard isn't a bird," Alice remarked.
"Right, as usual," said the Duchess : "what a clear way
you have of putting things I"
It's a mineral, I think," said Alice.
"Of course it is," said the Duchess, who seemed ready to
agree to everything that Alice said; there's a large mustard-
mine near here. And the moral of that is-' The more there
is of mine, the less there is of yours.' "
"Oh, I know I" exclaimed Alice, who had not attended
to this last remark, "it's a vegetable. It doesn't look like
one, but it is."
"I quite agree with you," said the Duchess; "and the
moral of that is-' Be what you would seem to be'-or if
you'd like it put more simply-'Never imagine yourself
not to be otherwise than what it might appear to others that
what you were or might have been was not otherwise than
what you had been would have appeared to them to be
otherwise.'"
"I think I should understand that better," Alice said very
104
118 00129.jpg
THE MOCK TURTLE'S STORY
politely, "if I had it written down : but I can't quite follow it
as you say it."
"That's nothing to what I could say if I chose," the
Duchess replied in a pleased tone.
105
119 00130.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
"Pray don't trouble yourself to say it any longer than
that," said Alice.
Oh, don't talk about trouble said the Duchess. "I
make you a present of everything I've said as yet."
"A cheap sort of present thought Alice. "I'm glad
they don't give birthday presents like that But she did
not venture to say it out loud.
"Thinking again ?" the Duchess asked, with another dig
of her sharp little chin.
"I've a right to think," said Alice sharply, for she was
beginning to feel a little worried.
Just about as much right," said the Duchess, "as pigs
have to fly; and the m--"
But here, to Alice's great surprise, the Duchess's voice
died away, even in the middle of her favourite word
"moral," and the arm that was linked into hers began to
tremble. Alice looked up, and there stood the Queen in
front of them, with her arms folded, frowning like a thunder-
storm.
"A fine day, your Majesty I the Duchess began in a low,
weak voice.
Now, I give you fair warning," shouted the Queen,
stamping on the ground as she spoke; "either you or your
head must be off, and that in about half no time Take
your choice "
The Duchess took her choice, and was gone in a
moment.
Let's go on with the game," the Queen said to Alice;
io6
120 00131.jpg
THE MOCK TURTLE'S STORY 107
and Alice was too much frightened to say a word, but slowly
followed her back to the croquet-ground.
The other guests had taken advantage of the Queen's
absence, and were resting in the shade; however, the moment
they saw her they hurried back to the game, the Queen
merely remarking that a moment's delay would cost them
their lives.
All the time they were playing the Queen never left off
quarrelling with the other players, and shouting Off with
his head or "Off with her head I" Those whom she
sentenced were taken into custody by the soldiers, who
of course had to leave off being arches to do this, so that
by the end of half an hour or so there were no arches left,
and all the players, except the King, the Queen, and Alice,
were in custody and under sentence of execution.
Then the Queen left off, quite out of breath, and said to
Alice, Have you seen the Mock Turtle yet ?"
"No," said Alice, "I don't even know what a Mock
Turtle is."
It's the thing Mock Turtle Soup is made from," said the
Queen.
I never saw one or heard of one," said Alice.
Come on, then," said the Queen, and he shall tell you
his history."
As they walked off together, Alice heard the King say
in a low voice, to the company generally, "You are all
pardoned." Come, that's a good thing I" she said to herself,
for she had felt quite unhappy at the number of executions
the Queen had ordered.
121 00132.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
They very soon came upon a
Gryphon, lying fast asleep in the
sun. (If you don't know what a
Gryphon is, look at the picture.)
Up, lazy thing I said the Queen,
"and take this young lady to see
the Mock Turtle, and to hear his history. I must go back
and see after some executions I have ordered." And she
walked off, leaving Alice alone with the Gryphon. Alice
did not quite like the look of the creature, but on the whole
she thought it would be quite as safe to stay with it as to go
after that savage Queen; so she waited.
The Gryphon sat up and rubbed its eyes; then it
watched the Queen till she was out of sight; then it chuckled.
"What fun I" said the Gryphon, half to itself, half to Alice.
"What is the fun?" said Alice.
io8
122 00133.jpg
THE MOCK TURTLE'S STORY
"Why, she," said the Gryphon. It's all her fancy, that;
they never executes nobody, you know. Come on "
Everybody says' come on I' here," thought Alice, as she
went slowly after it; "I never was so ordered about in all my
life, never !"
They had not gone far before they saw the Mock Turtle
in the distance, sitting sad and lonely on a little ledge of
rock, and, as they came nearer, Alice could hear him sighing
as if his heart would break. She pitied him deeply. "What
is his sorrow?" she asked the Gryphon, and the Gryphon
answered, very nearly in the same words as before, It's all
his fancy, that; he hasn't got no sorrow, you know. Come
on "
So they went up to the Mock Turtle, who looked at them
with large eyes full of tears, but said nothing.
"This here young lady," said the Gryphon, she wants
for to know your history, she do."
"I'll tell it her," said the Mock Turtle in a deep, hollow
tone; "sit down, both of you, and don't speak a word till
I've finished."
So they sat down, and nobody spoke for some minutes.
Alice thought to herself, "I don't see how he can ever finish
if he doesn't begin." But she waited patiently.
Once," said the Mock Turtle at last, with a deep sigh, I
was a real Turtle."
These words were followed by a very long silence, broken
only by an occasional exclamation of Hjckrrh!" from the
Gryphon, and the constant heavy sobbing of the Mock
Io9
123 00134.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
Turtle. Alice was very nearly getting up and saying,
"Thank you, sir, for your interesting story," but she could
not help thinking there must be more to come, so she sat
still and said nothing.
"When we were little," the Mock Turtle went on at last,
more calmly, though still sobbing a little now and then, we
went to school in the sea. The master was an old Turtle-
we used to call him Tortoise--"
"Why did you call him Tortoise, if he wasn't one ?" Alice
asked.
"We called him Tortoise because he taught us," said the
Mock Turtle angrily; "really you are very dull I "
You ought to be ashamed of yourself for asking such a
simple question," added the Gryphon; and then they both
sat silent and looked at poor Alice, who felt ready to sink
into the earth. At last the Gryphon said to the Mock
Turtle, "Drive on, old fellow; don't be all day about it!"
And he went on in these words:
"Yes, we went to school in the sea, though you mayn't
believe it--"
I never said I didn't !" interrupted Alice.
".You did," said the Mock Turtle.
"Hold your tongue added the Gryphon, before Alice
could speak again. The Mock Turtle went on:
"We had the best of educations-in fact, we went to
school every day."
've been to a day-school, too," said Alice ; "you needn't
be so proud as all that."
IIO
124 00135.jpg
J .wA U
-'., -~-
THE MOCK TURTLE'S SONG.
rr
I
~ 111
w
,,
rsr~ :
125 00137.jpg
THE MOCK TURTLE'S STORY
With extras ? asked the Mock Turtle a little anxiously.
"Yes," said Alice, "we learned French and music."
"And washing?" said the Mock Turtle.
"Certainly not 1" said Alice indignantly.
"Ah, then, yours wasn't a really good school," said the
Mock Turtle, in a tone of great relief. Now at ours they
had at the end of the bill, 'French, music, and washing
extra.' "
"You couldn't have wanted it much," said Alice, "living
at the bottom of the sea."
I couldn't afford to learn it," said the Mock Turtle, with
a sigh. I only took the regular course."
"What was that?" inquired Alice.
"Reeling and writhing, of course, to begin with," the
Mock Turtle replied; "and then the different branches
of Arithmetic-Ambition, Distraction, Uglification, and
Derision."
"I never heard of 'Uglification,'" Alice ventured to
say. "What is it?"
The Gryphon lifted up both its paws in surprise.
"Never heard of uglifying it exclaimed. "You know
what to beautify is, I suppose?"
"Yes," said Alice, doubtfully; "it means--to-make-
anything-prettier."
"Well, then," the Gryphon went on, "if you don't know
what to uglify is, you are a simpleton."
Alice did not feel encouraged to ask any more questions
III
126 00138.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
about it, so she turned to the Mock Turtle, and said, "What
else had you to learn ?"
"Well, there was Mystery," the Mock Turtle replied,
counting off thesubjects on his flappers, "-Mystery,
ancient and modern, with Seaography; then Drawling-
the Drawling-master was an old conger-eel that used to
come once a week; he taught us Drawling, Stretching, and
Fainting in Coils."
"What was that like ?" said Alice.
Well, I can't show it you myself," the Mock Turtle said:
"I'm too stiff. And the Gryphon never learnt it."
Hadn't time," said the Gryphon; "I went to the
Classical master, though. He was an old crab, he was."
I never went to him," the Mock Turtle said with a sigh ;
"he taught Laughing and Grief, they used to say."
So he did, so he did," said the Gryphon, sighing in his
turn ; and both creatures hid their faces in their paws.
"And how many hours a day did you do lessons ?" said
Alice, in a hurry to change the subject.
"Ten hours the first day," said the Mock Turtle : "nine
the next, and so on."
"What a curious plan I exclaimed Alice.
"That's the reason they're called lessons," the Gryphon
remarked ; because they lessen from day to day."
This was quite a new idea to Alice, and she thought it
over a little before she made her next remark. "Then the
eleventh day must have been a holiday?"
Of course it was," said the Mock Turtle.
112
127 00139.jpg
THE MOCK TURTLE'S STORY 113
"And how did you manage on the twelfth?" Alice went
on eagerly.
"That's enough about lessons," the Gryphon interrupted
in a very decided tone; "tell her something about the games
now.
0"
0
0
C5
U
The lobster quadrille
128 00140.jpg
THE LOBSTER QUADRILLE
THE Mock Turtle sighed deeply, and drew the back of
one flapper across his eyes. He looked at Alice, and tried to
speak, but, for a minute or two, sobs choked his voice.
"Same as if he had a bone in his throat," said the Gryphon:
and it set to work shaking him and punching him in the
back. At last the Mock Turtle recovered his voice, and with
tears running down his cheeks, went on again:
"You may not have lived much under the sea"-(" I
haven't," said Alice)-" and perhaps you were never even
introduced to a lobster- (Alice began to say "I once
tasted-" but checked herself hastily, and said No, never ")
"-so you can have no idea what a delightful thing a Lobster
Quadrille is "
129 00141.jpg
THE LOBSTER QUADRILLE
No, indeed," said Alice. What sort of a dance is it ? "
"Why," said the Gryphon, "you first form into a line
along the sea-shore--"
"Two lines cried the Mock Turtle. "Seals, turtles
and so on ; then, when you've cleared the jelly-fish out of the
way--
That generally takes some time," interrupted the
Gryphon.
"- you advance twice- "
"Each with a lobster as a partner cried the Gryphon.
"Of course," the Mock Turtle said, "advance twice, set to
partners--"
"-change lobsters, and retire in same order," continued
the Gryphon.
"Then, you know," the Mock Turtle went on, "you
throw the- "
The lobsters !" shouted the Gryphon, with a bound into
the air.
-as far out to sea as you can- "
Swim after them !" screamed the Gryphon.
Turn a somersault in the sea I cried the Mock Turtle,
capering wildly about.
"Change lobsters again !" yelled the Gryphon.
Back to land again, and that's all the first figure," said
the Mock Turtle, suddenly dropping his voice; and the two
creatures, who had been jumping about like mad things all
this time, sat down again very sadly and quietly, and looked
at Alice.
II5
130 00142.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
It must be a very pretty dance," said Alice timidly.
"Would you like to see a little of it?" said the Mock
Turtle.
Very much indeed," said Alice.
"Come, let's try the first figure said the Mock Turtle to
the Gryphon. We can do it without lobsters, you know.
Which shall sing?"
"Oh, you sing," said the Gryphon. "I've forgotten the
words."
So they began solemnly dancing round and round
Alice, every now and then treading on her toes when
they passed too close, and waving their forepaws to mark
the time, while the Mock Turtle sang this very slowly and
sadly:
"Will you walk a little faster ?" said a whiting to a snail,
"There's a porpoise close behind us, and he's treading on my tail.
See how eagerly the lobsters and the turtles all advance!
They are waiting on the shingle-will you come and join the dance ?
Will you, won't you, will you, won't you, will you join the dance?
Will you, won't you, will you, won't you, won't you join the dance ?
"You can really have no notion how delightful it will be,
When they take us up and throw us, with the lobsters, out to sea
But the snail replied Too far, too far !" and gave a look askance-
Said he thanked the whiting kindly, but he would not join the dance.
Would not, could not, would not, could not, would not join the dance
Would not, could not, would not, could not, could not join the dance.
116
131 00143.jpg
THE LOBSTER QUADRILLE
'What matters it how far we go? his scaly friend replied.
"There is another shore, you know, upon the other side.
The further off from England the nearer is to France-
Then turn not pale, beloved snail, but come and join the dance.
Will you, won't you, will you, won't you, will you join the dance?
Will you, won't you, will you, won't you, won't you join the dance ?"
"Thank you, it's a very interesting dance to watch," said
Alice, feeling very glad that it was over at last: "and I do
so like that curious song about the whiting I "
"Oh, as to the whiting," said the Mock Turtle, "they-
you've seen them, of course ?"
"Yes," said Alice, "I've often seen them at dinn- "
she checked herself hastily.
"I don't know where Dinn may be," said the Mock
ftt
, 5
132 00144.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
Turtle; "but if you've seen them so often, of course you
know what they're like."
"I believe so," Alice replied thoughtfully. "They have
their tails in their mouths--and they're all over crumbs."
"You're wrong about the crumbs," said the Mock Turtle;
" crumbs would all wash off in the sea. But they have their
tails in their mouths; and the reason is-" here the Mock
Turtle yawned and shut his eyes. "Tell her about the
reason and all that," he said to the Gryphon.
"The reason is," said the Gryphon, "that they would go
with the lobsters to the dance. So they got thrown out to
sea. So they had to fall a long way. So they got their
tails fast in their mouths. So they couldn't get them out
again. That's all."
"Thank you," said Alice, "it's very interesting. I never
knew so much about a whiting before."
I can tell you more than that, if you like," said the
Gryphon. Do you know why it's called a whiting?"
"I never thought about it," said Alice. "Why ?"
"It does the boots and shoes," the Gryphon replied, very
solemnly.
Alice was thoroughly puzzled. "Does the boots and
shoes ? she repeated in a wondering tone.
"Why, what are your shoes done with?" said the
Gryphon. I mean, what makes them so shiny ?"
Alice looked down at them, and considered a little before
she gave her answer. "They're done with blacking, I
believe."
133 00145.jpg
THE LOBSTER QUADRILLE
"Boots and shoes under the sea," the Gryphon went on,
in a deep voice, are done with whiting. Now you know."
"And what are they made of?" Alice asked in a tone
of great curiosity.
"Soles and eels, of course," the Gryphon replied, rather
impatiently; "any shrimp could have told you that."
If I'd been the whiting," said Alice, whose thoughts were
still running on the song, I'd have said to the porpoise,
'Keep back, please: we don't want you with us !'"
"They were obliged to have him with them," the Mock
Turtle said; "no wise fish would go anywhere without a
porpoise."
"Wouldn't it really?" said Alice, in a tone of great
surprise.
"Of course not," said the Mock Turtle; "why, if a fish
came to me, and told me he was going a journey, I should
say 'With what porpoise?'"
"Don't you mean purpose ?' said Alice.
"I mean what I say," the Mock Turtle replied, in an
offended tone. And the Gryphon added, Come, let's hear
some of your adventures."
"I could tell you my adventures-beginning from this
morning," said Alice, a little timidly; but it's no use going
back to yesterday, because I was a different person then."
"Explain all that," said the Mock Turtle.
"'No, no! The adventures first," said the Gryphon, in
an impatient tone; "explanations take such a dreadful
time."
II9
134 00146.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
So Alice began telling them her adventures from the time
when she first saw the White Rabbit. She was a little
nervous about it just at first, the two creatures got so close
to her, one on each side, and opened their eyes and mouths
so very wide, but she gained courage as she went on. Her
listeners were perfectly quiet till she got to the part about her
repeating You are old, Father William," to the Caterpillar,
and the words all coming different, and then the Mock
Turtle drew a long breath, and said, "That's very curious."
It's all about as curious as it can be," said the Gryphon.
"It all came different the Mock Turtle repeated
thoughtfully. "I should like to hear her repeat something
now. Tell her to begin." He looked at the Gryphon as if
he thought it had some kind of authority over Alice.
"Stand up and repeat ''Tis the voice of the sluggard,'"
said the Gryphon.
How the creatures order one about, and make one repeat
lessons I" thought Alice. I might as well be at school at
once." However, she got up, and began to repeat it, but
her head was so full of the Lobster Quadrille, that she
hardly knew what she was saying, and the words came very
queer indeed :
"'Tis the voice of the Lobster; I heard him declare,
'You have baked me too brown, I must sugar my hair.'
As a duck with its eyelids, so he with his nose
Trims his belt and his buttons, and turns out his toes.
When the sands are all dry, he is gay as a lark,
And will talk in contemptuous tones of the Shark:
But, when the tide rises and sharks are around,
His voice has a timid and tremulous sound."
120
135 00147.jpg
THE LOBSTER QUADRILLE
"That's different from
what I used to say when
I was a child," said the
Gryphon.
"Well, I never heard it "
before," said the Mock
Turtle; "but it sounds
uncommon nonsense.
Alice said nothing; she
had sat down with her
face in her hands, won-
dering if anything would.
ever happen in a natural
way again.
"I should like to have
it explained," said the Mock
Turtle.
She can't explain it," hastily said the Gryphon. Go on
with the next verse."
"But about his toes?" the Mock Turtle persisted.
"How could he turn them out with his nose, you know ?"
It's the first position in dancing," Alice said; but was
dreadfully puzzled by the whole thing, and longed to change
the subject.
"Go on with the next verse," the Gryphon repeated; "it
begins I passed by his garden.' "
Alice did not dare to disobey, though she felt sure it
would all come wrong, and she went on, in a trembling
voice:-
121
136 00148.jpg
122
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
I passed by his garden, and marked, with one eye,
How the Owl and the Panther were sharing a pie :
The Panther took pie-crust, and gravy, and meat,
While the Owl had the dish as its share of the treat.
When the pie was all finished, the Owl, as a boon,
Was kindly permitted to pocket the spoon:
While the Panther received knife and fork with a growl,
And concluded the banquet by- "
"What is the use of repeating all that stuff," the Mock
Turtle interrupted, "if you don't explain it as you go on ?
It's by far the most confusing thing I ever heard "
Yes, I think you'd better leave off," said the Gryphon;
and Alice was only too glad to do so.
Shall we try another figure of the Lobster Quadrille ?"
the Gryphon went on. Or would you like the Mock Turtle
to sing you another song ?"
"Oh, a song, please, if the Mock Turtle would be so
kind," Alice replied, so eagerly that the Gryphon said, in a
rather offended tone: H'm! No accounting for tastes.
Sing her Turtle Soup,' will you, old fellow? "
The Mock Turtle sighed deeply, and began, in a voice
choked with sobs, to sing this:
"Beautiful Soup, so rich and green,
Waiting in a hot tureen !
Who for such dainties would not stoop?
Soup of the evening, beautiful Soup !
Soup of the evening, beautiful Soup !
Beau-ootiful Soo-oop !
Beau-ootiful Soo-oop ?
Soo-oop of the e-e-evening,
Beautiful, beautiful Soup!
137 00149.jpg
THE LOBSTER QUADRILLE 123
"Come on I". said the Gryphon, and,
a making Alice by the hand, it hurried of
without waitingfor the end of the song.
138 00150.jpg
124 ALICE IN WONDERLAND
'Beautiful Soup! Who cares for fish,
Game, or any other dish ?
Who would not give all else for two p
ennyworth only of beautiful Soup ?
Pennyworth only of beautiful Soup ?
Beau-ootiful Soo-oop !
Beau-ootiful Soo-oop !
Soo-oop of the e-e-evening,
Beautiful, beauti-FUL SOUP !"
"Chorus again I" cried the Gryphon, and the Mock Turtle
had just begun to repeat it, when a cry of "The trial's
beginning I" was heard in the distance.
Come on I cried the Gryphon, and, taking Alice by the
hand, it hurried off, without waiting for the end of the song.
"What trial is it?" Alice panted as she ran; but the
Gryphon only answered Come on I" and ran the faster, while
more and more faintly came, carried on the breeze that
followed them, the melancholy words:
"Soo-oop of the e-e-evening,
Beautiful, beautiful Soup "
^2
Who stole the tarts?
139 00151.jpg
CHAPTER XI
WHO STOLE THE TARTS?
THE King and Queen of Hearts were seated on their throne
when they arrived, with a great crowd assembled about them
-all sorts of little birds and beasts, as well as the whole
pack of cards: the Knave was standing before them, in
chains, with a soldier on each side to guard him; and near
the King was the White Rabbit, with a trumpet in one hand,
and a scroll of parchment in the other. In the very middle
of the court was a table, with a large dish of tarts upon it:
they looked so good, that it made Alice quite hungry to look
at them-" I wish they'd get the trial done," she thought,
"and hand round the refreshments But there seemed to
be no chance of this, so she began looking about her, to pass
away the time.
140 00152.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
Alice had never been in a court of justice before, but she
had read about them in books, and she was quite pleased
to find that she knew the name of nearly everything there.
"That's the judge," she said to herself, because of his great
wig."
The judge, by the way, was the King, and as he wore
his crown over the wig, he did not look at all comfortable,
and it was certainly not becoming.
"And that's the jury-box," thought Alice, "and those
twelve creatures "-(she was obliged to say "creatures," you
see, because some of them were animals, and some were
birds)-" I suppose they are the jurors." She said this last
word two or three times over to herself, being rather proud
of it; for she thought, and rightly too, that very few little
girls of her age knew the meaning of it at all. However,
jurymenn" would have done just as well.
The twelve jurors were all writing very busily on slates.
"What are they all doing ?" Alice whispered to the Gryphon.
"They can't have anything to put down yet, before the trial's
begun."
"They're putting down their names," the Gryphon whis-
pered in reply, for fear they should forget them before the
end of the trial."
"Stupid things!" Alice began, in a loud indignant
voice, but she stopped hastily, for the White Rabbit
cried out "Silence in the court 1" and the King put on
his spectacles and looked anxiously round, to see who was
talking.
126
141 00153.jpg
WHO STOLE THE TARTS?
Alice could see, as well as if she were looking over their
shoulders, that all the jurors were writing down "stupid
things !" on their slates, and she could even make out that
one of them didn't know how to spell "stupid," and that
he had to ask his neighbour to tell him. "A nice muddle
their slates will be in before the trial's over !" thought Alice.
One of the jurors had a
pencil that squeaked. This,
of course, Alice could not
stand, and she went round -
the court and got behind
him, and very soon found
an opportunity of taking it
away. She did it so quickly
that the poor little juror (it
was Bill, the Lizard) could
not make out at
all what had be-
come of it; so,
after hunting all
about for it, he was obliged to
write with one finger for the rest
of the day; and this was of very
little use, as it left no mark on
the slate.
Herald, read the accusa-
tion I said the King.
On this the White Rabbit
127
142 00154.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
blew three blasts on the trumpet, and then unrolled the
parchment scroll, and read as follows :-
"The Queen of Hearts, she made some tarts,
All on a summer day:
The Knave of Hearts, he stole those tarts,
And took them quite away !"
"Consider your verdict," the King said to the jury.
"Not yet, not yet!" the Rabbit hastily interrupted
"There's a great deal to come before that! "
"Call the first witness," said the King; and the White
Rabbit blew three blasts on the trumpet and called out
"First witness 1"
The first witness was the Hatter. He came in with a
tea-cup in one hand and a piece of bread-and-butter in the
other. "I beg pardon, your Majesty," he began, "for
bringing these in; but I hadn't quite finished my tea when I
was sent for."
"You ought to have finished," said the King. "When
did you begin?"
The Hatter looked at the March Hare, who had followed
him into the court, arm-in-arm with the Dormouse. Four-
teenth of March, I think it was," he said.
Fifteenth," said the March Hare.
Sixteenth," said the Dormouse.
Write that down," the King said to the jury, and the
jury eagerly wrote down all three dates on their slates, and
then added them up, and reduced the answer to shillings and
pence.
128
143 00155.jpg
WHO STOLE THE TARTS?
"Take off your hat," the King said to the Hatter.
"It isn't mine," said the Hatter.
"Stolen/ the King exclaimed, turning to the jury, who
instantly made a memorandum of the fact.
129
4x
144 00156.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
I keep them to sell," the Hatter added as an explanation;
"I've none of my own. I'm a hatter."
Here the Queen put on her spectacles, and began staring
hard at the Hatter, who turned pale and fidgeted.
"Give your evidence," said the King; "and don't be
nervous, or I'll have you executed on the spot."
This did not seem to encourage the witness at all; he
kept shifting from one foot to the other, looking uneasily at
the Queen, and in his confusion he bit a large piece out of
his tea-cup instead of the bread-and-butter.
Just at this moment Alice felt a very curious sensation,
which puzzled -her a good deal until she made out what it
was; she was beginning to grow larger again, and she
thought at first she would get up and leave the court. But
on second thoughts she decided to remain where she was as
long as there was room for her.
"I wish you wouldn't squeeze so," said the Dormouse,
who was sitting next to her. "I can hardly breathe."
"I can't help it," said Alice very meekly: I'm growing."
You've no right to grow here," said the Dormouse.
"Don't talk nonsense," said Alice, more boldly; "you
know you're growing too."
"Yes, but I grow at a reasonable pace," said the
Dormouse; "not in that ridiculous fashion." And he got
up very sulkily and crossed over to the other side of the
court.
All this time the Queen had never left off staring at the
Hatter, and, just as the Dormouse crossed the court, she
130
145 00157.jpg
WHO STOLE THE TARTS?
t11 4-f,
"I wish you wouldn't squeeze so," said the Dormouse, who was sitting next
to her. "I can hardly breathe."
rF
146 00158.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
said to one of the officers of the court, Bring me the list of
the singers in the last concert On which the wretched
Hatter trembled so, that he shook off both his shoes.
"Give your evidence," the King repeated angrily, "or I'll
have you executed, whether you're nervous or not."
I'm a poor man, your Majesty," the Hatter began, in a
trembling voice,-" and I hadn't begun my tea-not above
a week or so-and what with the bread-and-butter getting
so thin-and the twinkling of the tea--"
"The twinkling of what ? said the King.
"It began with the tea," the Hatter replied.
"Of course twinkling begins with a T!" said the King
sharply. "Do you take me for a dunce ? Go on I "
I'm a poor man," the Hatter went on, "and most things
twinkled after that-only the March Hare said--"
I didn't I" the March Hare interrupted in a great hurry.
"You did !" said the Hatter.
I deny it I" said the March Hare.
He denies it," said the King: leave out that part."
"Well, at any rate, the Dormouse said- the Hatter
went on, looking anxiously round to see if he would deny
it too; but the Dormouse denied nothing, being fast
asleep.
"After that," continued the Hatter, "I cut some more
bread-and-butter "
"But what did the Dormouse say?" one of the jury
asked.
S"That I can't remember," said the Hatter.
132
147 00159.jpg
WHO STOLE THE TARTS?
133
You must remember," remarked the King, or I'll have
you executed."
The miserable Hatter dropped his tea-cup, and bread-and-
butter, and went down on one knee. I'm a poor man, your
Majesty," he began.
"You're a very poor speaker," said the King.
Here one of the guinea-pigs cheered, and was immediately
suppressed by the officers of the court. (As that is rather
a hard word, I will just explain to you how it was done.
They had a large canvas bag, which tied up at the mouth
with strings: into this they slipped the guinea-pig, head
first, and then sat upon it.)
I'm glad I've seen that done," thought Alice. I've
so often read in the newspapers, at the end of trials, 'There
was some attempt at applause, which was immediately sup-
pressed by the officers of the court,' and I never understood
what it meant till now."
If that's all you know about it, you may stand down,"
continued the King.
"I can't go no lower," said the Hatter: I'm on the floor
as it is."
"Then you may sit down," the King replied.
Here the other guinea-pig cheered, and was suppressed.
"Come, that finishes the guinea-pigs thought Alice.
" Now we shall get on better."
"I'd rather finish my tea," said the Hatter, with an
anxious look at the Queen, who was reading the list of
singers.
148 00160.jpg
134 ALICE IN WONDERLAND
"Give your evidence,"
0 0 M said the King.
Sa'n't," said the cook.
THE DUCHESS'S COOK
149 00161.jpg
WHO STOLE THE TARTS?
"You may go," said the King; and the Hatter hurriedly
left the court, without even waiting to put his shoes.on.
"And just take his head off outside," the Queen added,
to one of the officers; but the Hatter was out of sight before
the officer could get to the door.
"Call the next witness said the King.
The next witness was the Duchess's cook. She carried
the pepper-box in her hand, and Alice guessed who it was,
even before she got into court, by the way the people near
the door began sneezing all at once.
"Give your evidence," said the King.
Sha'n't," said the cook.
The King looked anxiously at the White Rabbit, who
said in a low voice, Your Majesty must cross-examine this
witness."
"Well, if I must, I must," the King said with a
melancholy air, and, after folding his arms and frowning at
the cook till his eyes were nearly out of sight, he said in a
deep voice: What are tarts made of ?"
Pepper, mostly," said the cook.
"Treacle," said a sleepy voice behind her.
"Collar that Dormouse," the Queen shrieked out. "Be-
head that Dormouse Turn that Dormouse out of court
Suppress him Pinch him I Off with his whiskers."
For some minutes the whole court was in confusion
getting the Dormouse turned out, and, by the time they had
settled down again, the cook had disappeared.
Never mind I said the King, with an air of great relief.
"Call the next witness." And he added, in an undertone to
135
150 00162.jpg
136 ALICE IN WONDERLAND
the Queen, "Really, my dear, you must cross-examine the
next witness. It quite makes my forehead ache !"
Alice watched the White Rabbit as he fumbled over the
list, feeling very curious to see what the next witness would
be like-" for they haven't got much evidence yet," she said
to herself. Imagine her surprise, when the White Rabbit
read out, at the top of his shrill little voice, the name
"Alice I"
Alice's evidence
151 00163.jpg
CHAPTER XII
ALICE'S EVIDENCE
"HERE !" cried Alice, quite forgetting, in the flurry of the
moment, how large she had grown in the last few minutes,
and she jumped up in such a hurry that she tipped over the
jury-box with the edge of her skirt, upsetting all the jurymen
on to the heads of the crowd below, and there they lay
sprawling about, reminding her very much of a globe of
gold-fish she had accidentally upset the week before.
"Oh, I beg your pardon I" she exclaimed, in a tone of
great dismay, and began picking them up again as quickly as
she could, for the accident of the gold-fish kept running in
her head, and she had a vague sort of idea that they must
152 00164.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
be collected at once and put back into the jury-box, or they
would die.
"The trial cannot proceed," said the King in a very grave
voice, until all the jurymen are back in their proper places-
all," he repeated with great emphasis, looking hard at Alice
as he said so.
Alice looked at the jury-box, and saw that, in her haste,
she had put the Lizard in head downwards, and the poor
little thing was waving its tail about in a melancholy way,
being quite unable to move. She
soon got it out again, and put it
right; "'not that it signifies much,"
Sshe said to herself; "I should think
-lg it would be quite as much use in
the trial one way up as the other."
SAs soon as the jury had a little
S\ recovered from the shock of being
ewt i f t
414
138
153 00165.jpg
', "
V v
1 -0
TRIAL OF THE KNAVE OF HEARTS.
er~r~
ffi~--~
r
J t~~`~F;:C-':
154 00167.jpg
ALICE'S EVIDENCE
upset, and their slates and pencils had been found and
handed back to them, they set to work very diligently to
write out a history of the accident, all except the Lizard, who
seemed too much overcome to do anything but sit with its
mouth open, gazing up into the roof of the court.
"What do you know about this business ?" the King said
to Alice.
"Nothing," said Alice.
Nothing whatever? persisted the King.
"Nothing whatever," said Alice.
"That's very important," the King said, turning to the
jury. They were just beginning to write this down on their
slates, when the White Rabbit interrupted: Unimportant,
your Majesty means, of course," he said in a very respectful
tone, but frowning and making faces at him as he spoke.
Unimportant, of course, I meant," the King hastily said,
and went on to himself in an undertone, "important-un-
important-unimportant-important-" as if he were trying
which word sounded best.
Some of the jury wrote it down "important," and some
"unimportant." Alice could see this, as she was near enough
to look over their slates; "but it doesn't matter a bit," she
thought to herself.
At this moment the King, who had been for some time
busily writing in his note-book, called out "Silence and
read out from his book, Rule Forty-two. All ersons more
than a mile high to leave the court."
Everybody looked at Alice.
139
155 00168.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
"I'm not a mile high," said Alice.
You are," said the King.
Nearly two miles high," added the Queen.
"Well, I sha'n't go, at any rate," said Alice; "besides,
that's not a regular rule : you invented it just now."
It's the oldest rule in the book," said the King.
"Then it ought to be Number One," said Alice.
The King turned pale, and shut his note-book hastily.
"Consider your verdict," he said to the jury, in a low,
trembling voice.
"There's more evidence to come yet, please your Majesty,"
said the White Rabbit, jumping up in a great hurry; "this
paper has just been picked up."
"What's in it ?" said the Queen.
I haven't opened it yet," said the White Rabbit, but it
seems to be a letter, written by the prisoner to-to some-
body."
"It must have been that," said the King, "unless it was
written to nobody, which isn't usual, you know."
"Whom is it directed to ? said one of the jurymen.
"It isn't directed at all," said the White Rabbit; in fact,
there's nothing written on the outside." He unfolded the
paper as he spoke, and added: It isn't a letter, after all: it's
a set of verses."
"Are they in the prisoner's handwriting?" asked another
of the jurymen.
No, they're not," said the White Rabbit,' and that's the
queerest thing about it." (The jury all looked puzzled.)
140
156 00169.jpg
ALICE'S EVIDENCE
He must have imitated somebody else's hand," said the
King. (The jury all brightened up again.)
"Please your Majesty," said the Knave, "I didn't write
it, and they can't prove that I did: there's no name signed
at the end."
If you didn't sign it," said the King, "that only makes
the matter worse. You must have meant some mischief, or
else you'd have signed your name like an honest man."
There was a general clapping of hands at this: it was the
first really clever thing the King had said that day.
"That proves his guilt, of course," said the Queen; "so,
off with--"
It doesn't prove anything of the sort I" said Alice.
"Why, you don't even know what they're about I"
Read them," said the King.
The White Rabbit put on his spectacles. "Where shall
I begin, please your Majesty ?" he asked.
"Begin at the beginning," the King said gravely, "and
go on till you come to the end; then stop."
There was dead silence in the court, whilst the White
Rabbit read out these verses:
"They told me you had been to her,
And mentioned me to him :
She gave me a good character,
But said I could not swim.
He sent them word I had not gone,
(We know it to be true) :
If she should push the matter on,
What would become of you ?
141
157 00170.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
" I gave her one, they gave him two,
You gave us three or more;
They all returned from him to you,
Though they were mine before.
" If I or she should chance to be
Involved in this affair,
He trusts to you to set them free,
Exactly as we were.
"My notion was that you had been
(Before she had this fit)
An obstacle that came between
Him, and ourselves, and it.
"Don't let him know she liked them best,
For this must ever be
A secret, kept from all the rest,
Between yourself and me."
142
158 00171.jpg
ALICE'S EVIDENCE
"That's the most important piece of evidence we've heard
yet," said the King, rubbing his hands; "so now let the
jury-"
If any one of them can explain it," said Alice (she had
grown so large in the last few minutes that she wasn't a bit
afraid of interrupting him), I'll give him sixpence. I don't
believe there's an atom of meaning in it."
The jury all wrote down on their slates, "She doesn't
believe there's an atom of meaning in it"; but none of them
attempted to explain the paper.
If there's no meaning in it," said the King, that saves
a world of trouble, you know, as we needn't try to find any.
And yet I don't know," he went on, spreading out the verses
on his knee, and looking at them with one eye; I seem to
see some meaning in them, after all. '- said I could not
swim'-you can't swim, can you ?" he added, turning to the
Knave.
The Knave shook his head sadly. "Do I look like it ?"
he said. (Which he certainly did not, being made entirely of
cardboard.)
All right, so far," said the King, and he went on mutter-
ing over the verses to himself: 'We know it to be true-
that's the jury, of course-' If she should push the matter on'
-that must be the Queen. 'What would become ofyou '-
What, indeed I 'I gave her one, they gave him two'-why,
that must be what he did with the tarts, you know."
But it goes on: 'they all returned from him to you, "
said Alice.
I43
159 00172.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
"Why, there they are said the King triumphantly,
pointing to the tarts on the table. Nothing can be clearer
than that. Then again: before she had thisfit'-you never
hadfits, my dear, I think ?" he said to the Queen.
Never said the Queen furiously, throwing an inkstand
at the Lizard as she spoke. (The unfortunate little Bill had
left off writing on his slate with one finger, as he found it
made no mark; but he now hastily began again, using the
ink that was trickling down his face, as long as it lasted.)
"Then the words don't fit you," said the King, looking
round the court with a smile. There was a dead silence.
"It's a pun!" the King added, in an angry tone, and
everybody laughed.
"Let the jury consider their verdict," the King said, for
about the twentieth time that day.
"No, no !" said the Queen. "Sentence first-verdict
afterwards."
"Stuff and nonsense said Alice loudly. "The idea of
having the sentence first !"
"Hold your tongue !" said the Queen, turning purple.
"I won't," said Alice.
Off with her head I" the Queen shouted at the top of
her voice. Nobody moved.
"Who cares for you? said Alice (she had grown to her.
full size by this time). "You're nothing but a pack of
cards!"
At this the whole pack rose up into the air, and came
flying down upon her; she gave a little scream, half of
144
160 00173.jpg
ALICE'S EVIDENCE
fright and half
of anger, and
tried to beat
them off, and
found herself
lying on the
bank, with her
head in the .
lap of her sis-
ter, who was .
gently brush-
ing away some
dead leaves
that had flut-
tered down
from the trees on to her face.
"Wake up, Alice dear!" said her sister.
"Why, what a long sleep you've had I"
"Oh, I've had such a curious dream "
said Alice, and she told her sister, as well as she could
remember them, all these strange Adventures of hers that
you have just been reading about; and when she had
finished, her sister kissed her, and said: It was a curious
dream, dear, certainly; but now run in to your tea; it's
getting late." So Alice got up and ran off, thinking while
she ran, as well she might, what a wonderful dream it had
been.
*
145
161 00174.jpg
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
But her sister sat still just as she had left her, leaning her
head on her hand, watching the setting sun, and thinking of
little Alice and all her wonderful Adventures, till she too
began dreaming after a fashion, and this was her dream :-
First, she dreamed of little Alice herself, and once again
the tiny hands were clasped upon her knee, and the bright
eager eyes were looking up into hers-she could hear the
very tones of her voice, and see that queer little toss of her
head to keep back the wandering hair that would always get
into her eyes-and still as she listened, or seemed to listen,
the whole place around her became alive with the strange
creatures of her little sister's dream.
The long grass rustled at her feet as the White Rabbit
hurried by-the frightened Mouse splashed his way through
the neighboring pool-she could hear the rattle of the
tea-cups as the March Hare and his friends shared their
never-ending meal, and the shrill voice of the Queen ordering
off her unfortunate guests to execution-once more the pig
baby was sneezing on the Duchess's knee, while plates and
dishes crashed around it-once more the shriek of the
Gryphon, the squeaking of the Lizard's slate-pencil, and the
choking of the suppressed guinea-pigs filled the air, mixed
up with the distant sobs of the miserable Mock Turtle.
So she sat on, with closed eyes, and half believed herself
in Wonderland, though she knew she had but to open them
again, and all would change to dull reality-the grass would
be only rustling in the wind, and the pool rippling to the
waving of the reeds-the rattling tea-cups would change to
146
162 00175.jpg
ALICE'S EVIDENCE
the tinkling sheep-bells, and the Queen's shrill cries to the
voice of the shepherd boy-and the sneeze of the baby,
the shriek of the Gryphon, and all the other queer noises,
would change (she knew) to the confused clamour of the
busy farm-yard-while the lowing of the cattle in the dis-
tance would take the place of the Mock Turtle's heavy sobs.
Lastly, she pictured to herself how this same little sister
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ALICE IN WONDERLAND
of hers would, in the after-time, be herself a grown woman;
and how she would keep, through all her riper years, the
simple and loving heart of her childhood; and how she
would gather about her other little children, and make their
eyes bright and eager with many a strange tale, perhaps
even with the dream of Wonderland of long ago: and how
she would feel with all their simple sorrows, and find a
pleasure in all their simple joys, remembering her own
child-life, and the happy summer days.
Raphael Tuck &6 Sons, Ltd., London, Paris, Berlin, New York, Montreal.
Publishers by special appointment to Their Majesties the King and Queen.
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