Citation
The Pilgrim's progress, exhibited in a metamorphosis, or a transformation of pictures

Material Information

Title:
The Pilgrim's progress, exhibited in a metamorphosis, or a transformation of pictures for the entertainment and instruction of youth
Creator:
Pope, Alexander, 1688-1744
Watts, Isaac, 1674-1748
Barber, John Warner, 1798-1885 ( illustrator )
Bunyan, John, 1628-1688
Place of Publication:
Hartford
Publisher:
Printed by Loomis & Barnes.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 online resource (1 sheet ([10] pages)) : illustrations ;

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Toy and movable books ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Picture books for children ( lcsh )
Children's poetry ( fast )
Children's stories ( fast )
Picture books for children ( fast )
Toy and movable books ( fast )
Genre:
Children's literature ( fast )
metamorphic pictures ( aat )
Poems ( aat )
Allegories ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Connecticut -- Hartford
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
Shaw & Shoemaker, 47462
Citation/Reference:
Welch, d'A.A. Amer. children's books, 63
Citation/Reference:
Hamilton, S. Amer. book illustrators (1958 ed.), 360
General Note:
Contains illustrations which may be transformed from one scene to another by unfolding flaps of paper, forming in all 15 numbered scenes with accompanying verses and prose explanations. On verso: The dying Christian to his soul. An ode by Mr. Pope -- The Christian consolation -- A prospect of Heaven makes death easy. By Dr. Watts.
General Note:
Based on Pilgrim's progress, by John Bunyan.
Citation/Reference:
Shaw & Shoemaker, 47461
Statement of Responsibility:
designed and published by J.W. Barber.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
426120422 ( OCLC )
037513563 ( ALEPH )
Classification:
Z1215 .E37 Second series no. 47462 ( lcc )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
= :
ENON SATE YOLEN NNSA UINNTA AUS AN IY, oo

Faithful burnt at Vanity Fair. a

10. When sorely scourg’d he’s-fast’ned to a stake, ~ Z
And burnt to ashes for his Saviour’s sake : é
Thus Faithful dies! his spirit dear to God,

Mounts swift to Heaven along the shining road. é

42 vy veer

WALATPREA VA RADAUT ET EAADENWER VE CAUMINCAIARA UY
eo S Bf















:
Be es
toher * o
re ee PS PAT} URE Raa eS ae - . a ane eS BRE = cz - Em CME OE TEBE SAEs rmbale ween aoe
-. In the course of his journey, Christian overtook a fello’

traveller, whose name was Faithful. Passing throu gh Van ae
ity Fair, they both are seized and imprisoned. After being —
cruelly scourged, Faithful is burnt at the stake. Vanity
Fair represents the riches, honors, &c. of the world. ©

a





a

Christian ascends Hill Difficulty.

$
$ 4. Then Christian, fill’d with leve and hope sublime, €
8 The steep ascent address’d himself to climb ; oe g
g Till midway up the hill with joy he view’d ‘ 3
2 ee
% %

fe
«.
Fe

oS

The Arbor, which to welcome Pilgrims stood.
WWVUVAWE WS WAR ARWRAAR BAA VYUVYRUBAUA WRBUA/UBBAVEN





i CERIO ATES AA PAY ‘7

io ee aoe those situations in life
hieh te aristian passes through, which require
jeli-denial and exertion. — ee
at. s es e

ate Better, though difficult, - the right way to 2°05

Than wrong, though easy, where the end:is woe.”

A







After ccenaitp Hill Difficulty, Christian
enters the valley of Humiliation; he bad not
proceeded far, before a foul fiend met him in
the way and disputed his passage. After a
desperate struggle, Christian falls, and Apolly-
on pressed so hard upon him that he began to
despair of life, but at length Christian gives
him a deadly thrust with his two edged sword
and gains ‘the victory. This fight denotes
those severe trials and temptations which
some of the children of God experience from —
Satan, the enemy of souls.

i

e aa sS eee ?
- ARanaaan BAA RA RATAN AARAARRAA RAN AAA CAAAATAARRAAATIAA so

Christian fights Appollyon. se
9, A more unequal match can hardly be, :
é Christian must fightan angel, but you see,
3 The valiant man Y by handling sword and shield, :
Doth make him though a dragon quit the field. 3










hristian enters the Beautiful Palace Fi
‘When welcome spectacle ! at hand appear’d

: Au edifice for entertainment rear’d: .-
- hé palace Beautiful) was justly nam’d, e
oY with Pilgrims greatly fam’d.



i he sities of Christian communion in
inances of the Gospel. Christian is ad-
tted by the Porter whose name is Watchful,
and is introduced to the maidens of the House,
Piety, Prudence and Charity, who welcome
“him with joy. After being entertained. in the —
/ most agreeable manner, be is taken into the
y Armory and armed for the Christian warfare,
with the Sword of the Spirit, the helmet of
: Salvation, the Shield of Faith, with his feet
shod with the preparation of the Sy
Peace. (See ee NY 14—18. eS



Fs ee Se:

SNM Fics



The Pili at length find a little shelter | in
which they conclude. to wait the approach of
morning, but being weary and overcome by fa-
tigue. soon fall asleep. Here they remain till
awakened by the voice of the formidable giant
Despair, who with a fierce and malignant
countenance drove them to the Doubting
Castle and there confined them in a dark and
filthy Dangeon. This may ‘represent the case
of those Christians. who have wandered into
forbidden paths till they have sinned in such
a manner, that they begin to despair and
doubt of the merey of God.

Sa

~

RP he ial er pees 2

Alun WYRE VU UUUVYVAVYUVUVEERGUUN VOR Se eae

- The Pilgrims taken by Giant Despair. Y
12, What could they do ? to whom could they complain ?
é Resistance to a giant was in vain, $
: Strait to the castle-yard he drovethe men, -
And lock’d them in a deep and dirty den. ~ o
* SS ee eee

een een







§ The Pilgrims in By-path Mesdows.

3 11. Darkness came on, with thunder, lightning, rain,
Torrents pour’d down, the waters rose amain :

@ The storm terrific, filled their souls with dread,

x And vengeance seem’d just bursting on their heads.

After Faithful was burnt, Christian - |
his escape, accompanied by a fellow pilgrim
named Hopeful, who was induced to become a@
pilgrim by beholding the faith and conversas
tion of Faithful during his trial and execution.
The Pilgeims proceed on their. journey, and
after some time find their way grow rough and

difficult; for the sake of ease they turn into a.
Ce forbidden path which went through by-path
meadows. Alter wandering about for some
time, there - came. on a storm: of thunder,
lightning and rain. — : ‘This. represents. the be-

harer under the bidings of God's countenance, :



ae

v0 SE she a ; nesta Speak





Bs
, £

rigs

Be oH
back, represents the man who first sets out

Ga kh 7s SSF Pe Seren

-'t WA sininnne . ;
VV Vane can
Weyer vern Yee

3 Christian leaves the city of Destruction. 7

“1. Fast lock’d in sleep’
1 t loc : p’s embrace I dre
3 eo ene journey was the fruitful ieee :
3 a aa rags, trembling with fear he went 5
ve Guilt and Grief his bursting bosom rent. 2
%

A VER VUU NUE MEA ened ae

Ver VU VYUUB TARA LE,
















oon, SPN N AEST fil. f Se
a if [san (ieee tah praeity
ie

ny





k
Hi
ens
EF
ee





SS SSN wo —————
re LEAN |=
$e b= RS) [meena RNY ) TELE
oy ee Paro G8 ln am

ON aa : is












SS pp Se ae

:3 clothed with rags, with a burden on his
in the Divine

“Life. The burden on his back represents his distressing

sense of guilt; his rags, his self-righteousness. ‘The City

_ of Destruction represents this present evil world..

re

&!

'. ‘Ths man wh

eae





wr

bg wereuwe ren rrr urereneananneyennneanannunnnnnns fb

Pilgrims escape from Giant Despair.

$
§ 13. ae length the Key of Promise they espy;
¢ Swift from: the dread and hateful walls they fly:

Giant Despair pursues with hellish ire—
He falls: the Pilgrims then deliver’d are.

3 The Pilgrims in’ the Fa cac of Death.

14. The River Death, the Pilgrims stand aghast,
At this hard trial though it is the last,

No heavenly crown of life can they expect, =
Until they pass this dark and pneo) ee



__ Death is here represented by a deep river,
separating the believer from his heavenly in-
heritance, as the river Jordan separated the
Children. ‘of Israel. from the promised land.
All that are born must die. However distant
we may now think’ the day. of. our death, ‘yet,
in a few years, and perbaps: in afew days at
most, we must go the way ofa i the earth,and
these bodies of ours though 80 active, will
moulder back to dust, and th norning of the |
Resurrection will rise to : terval life, oF sink ine

endless | woe.
























HERE | is 8 ae fire detignt

- 8 Where saints immortal reign,
ipbtites day excludesthe night, -

ae ‘And ae beniths Aen po

* ee

ae “there Sisthees ae
Se | i Aid. rede ease Se

weet. . sees ‘the selling flood
ou figest in livin
. tie Sows: meric £



Could s we: ‘But ‘climb: Sick. Mews stove

> And View the landscape Beh ss s

* Not Jordan's streams, nor death's ead food,
Should suk as: oS we shores .







ae







PN Sew Et he) are

The Pilgrims i in their passage eucion the

river. of Death, leave their mortal garments. in
the river: are ‘immediately: clothed with im-

mortality and soon conducted. by.two minis-
tring. spirits. into the New- Jerusalem, the ©

Paradise of God. As they enter the heaven-
ly City they are transfigured. and clothed with
raiment which shone like gold. Here they
are welcomed by their dear Saviour and all
the heavenly host with joy; bere they are to
dwell in the most perfect happiness forever

and ever. May the former and readers of.

this, be received in like manner Anto the king-
dom of God. |

Ay rn uiirin mnie ett clans ted

; Pilgrims enter the New Jerusalem.

, 15. The river past, their heavenly home is near, — ¢

When lo! two bright seraphic forms appear ; é :
To Zion’s hill with airy steps they soar,

é With rapture fill’d { wak’d and saw no more. 8

<< CPIEVOS PCPA VY WUE BABEL veeemennnnanncnnannennnnn








: Tamers
c Sane” re

Reg Soe ae Paes

set, eer <

- | The Pilgdias in’ the River of Death. §
» ¢. 4. The River Death, the Pilgrims stand aghast,

BR At this hard trial though it is the last, ; é
>. No heavenly crown of life can they expect, = -
é beget they pass this dark and frightfal ees 3




=



arating the believer from his heavenly in-

| _ heritance, as the river Jordan separated the | .

Children of Israel. from the promised land.

All that are born must die. However distant

we may now think the day. of our. death, yet,

in a few years, and perbaps - in afew days. ate

ne we must go the way of qe ae and
ese bodies ee



& Death i is here represented by a deep river, :



f : : : \ hd eS
on 7 5

os Pilgrims escape from Giant Despair. ; |
$ 13. At length tne Key of Promise they espy, :

g ; Swift from the dread and hateful walls they fly: . 4
Giant Despair puroves with hellish ire— . 5 |

: He falls: the Pilgrims then deli. er’d are. i

By .



TA

=

SOMLOVINST ELE Bs












. . Sis are
lis
en

ee








\

RAR RSS











SoS PRIN ALY





SSRN SRT SSR ESO TOT SO RRR TT

__ &iter being kept for some time in cruel confnementin -

the Doubting Castle, Christian finds the Key of Promise, — |
and with it unlocks the door, and the Pilgrims make their —_-
escape. The free Promise of Salvation by Christ, which
is made to believers, is meant by theKey of Promise,









i



She any ew Unveweaye even viniavunniis gp

Christian enters the Wicket Gate,

4. May ! now enter here ? will he within, :
— - Open to sorry me, though I have been ° .
$ 4n undeserving rebel. ? Then shali I
‘Not fail to sing his lasting praise on high, -
# WVU Anatainaemnaven RAR WB are WEBI VE WOE VAR *








Been Veer WA

: Christian isghown a Portrait.
ef “Pirst view that picture hung against a wali, 4

g That-man a minister of Christ we éall,

é Grave are his looks, to Heaven he lifts his eyes, :

Studies the pee of books to make him wise.

| Chaar being admitted af the Wicket

Gate, continues his journey till he arrives at |
the house of the Interpreter, who shows Him &

‘picture of a grave person with a book in his
hand, the law of Truth written on his lips, the
world behind bis back, and a dazzling crown

of gold over his head. This Portrait repre-
sen{s the true minister of Christ. Christian
is requested by the Interpreter to ake particu-
lar notice of this piece of painting, because
the person it represents | is the only person
whol is. ‘authorized to be his ee in 1 any: auth
cult. or dangerou tion. oe

















VITAL ek ofheavenly flame
Quit, oO Quint thi: tnorta frge ys

_ Trembling, re flying
Ob the pat the bliss. ‘of dying ! ices
Cease, fond nature ! cease thy strife, a
And. fet me = languish: into life







3 Caigian ascends Hill Difficulty. ee
2 ”. Then Christian, fill’d with love and hope sublime,

8 : The steep ascent address’d himself to climb ; . 2
: “Till midway up the hill with joy he view’d j ;
2 The Arbor, which to welcome Pilgrims stood.
bs weuyervuer WADA WE Hd PAW VYUVBUVAA UE VA Eenaen ie





hristian enters the Beautiful Palace.
When welcome spectacle ! at hand appear’d 5







ss Aw edifice for entertainment rear’d:
The palace Beautiful was justly nam’d,
For: ellowahip with Pilgrims greatly fam’d.

Bo He Ee ee EA Tt OO
ig : wate






he 2 Reaslenes of Christian communion in
er nances of the Gospel. Christian is ad-
itted by the Porter whose name is Watchful,
is introduced to the maidens of the. Hoke;
, Prudence and Charity, who welcome
“him wits jOye After being entertained in the |
» most. agreeable | manner, he is taken into the
~ Armory and armed for the Christian warfare,”

- with the Sword of the Spirit, the helmet of
Salvation, the Shield of Faith, with his feet
shod with the preparation of the ee
Peace. (See ee Vi, oe y |

X

v8
ip



AMON eae ey



SNES aren NaeteNVEN SAN e toy AAR ~e

CONTINUED.
ee a springing of the year,. returns to
, renovated life, lovely and beautiful.

Here perhaps thou art drooping under.
the pressure of Sorrow ; but in Heaven,
Sorrow and Sighing shall flee away : Here
perhaps he whom thou thinkest thy best
- friend, may plunge a dagger in thy bosom;
there all love one another with- perfec —
love: Here, Sin and Sorrow, Sickness and_
Death, spread a melancholy shade on the
sweetest enjoyments of human life ; there
death iteelf shall die: Here thou desirest
and hast not, and thy soul is often pained ¢
and perplexed at the dealings of thy Hea- 3
gvenly Father: There all the vast desires
of thy soul shall be*fully satisfied, and. thy ¢
‘breast shall forever swell with celestial |
rapture i in the beatific vision of God.

y
=
a
¢
}
bE
a
4.






Submit thyself. therefore with forte.
a the various trials thou art called to eee
, through in this dark vale of tears, fora -
moment longer, and thy troubles will pass
away like the illusion of a morning area
¢ the wicked cease from troubling ; ahe
Death will come with his friendly.
sage, and thy spirit will take her will
¢ Hight to the Paradise of God.









VAAL PAPUA VW Ve BAY VA DAW UDR VAM VY RULry

2 Faithful burnt at Vanity Fair. 3

s 10. When sorely scourg’d he’s fast’ned to a sta ke, “a3 :

8 And burnt to ashes for his Saviour’s sake : é
This Faithful dies ! his spirit dear to God,

é Mounts swift to Heaven along the shining road. é

x vnenpenemieen oes PARADA Vanna











The Pilgrims in By- path Meadows.

11. Darkness came on, with thunder, lightning, rain,
Torrents pour’d down, the waters rose amain :
The storm terrific, filled their souls with dread,
And vengeance seem’d just bursting on their heads.

After Faithful was burnt, Christian mee Ye
his escape, accompanied by afellow pilgrim ©
named Hopeful, who was induced to become &
pilgrim by beholding the faith and conversa:
tion of Faithful during his trial and execution.”
The Pilgrims proceed on their journey, and
after some time find their way grow rough and

difficult; for the sake of ease they turn into a
eee forbidden path which went through by- path
meadows. After wandering about for some
time, there. came on a storm of thunder,
lightning and rain This. represents. the be- |
lever uilde yah dings ¢ of God's countenance.









After Chitietian set out upon his jourtiey, his

. two neighbours, Obstinate and Pliable, at-
tempt to fetch him back by force, but not suc-
ceeding, be prevailed upon Phiable to accom-
pany him, by representing to him the glories of
the Celestial City to which he is going. He
proceeds with him till they both fall into the
Slough of Despond. This unwelcome ac-
cident so discourayed Pliable, that he deter-
mines to go no farther, and accordingly
gets out of the Slough, and returns to his own
house. e.



Phahle turns back.

3. Pliable flound’ring fore’d his passage through,
Reeain’d the cround. and home again he flew :

Bui Christian struggled on without his mate,
And reach’d the side towards the wicket gate. $

a a UN ware ree VeeeyrenMs VOPeeweuwe be





= Bwerrerr renner ure meun merenienr anes aes





: S Christian in the jeune h of Despond. =

€ 2, While’thus with heedless steps. onward went, at ee
aie . In deep thought of his journey was ee ea ie g

; MG ». Atonce he fell, Anh! little did he think — -

ae So soon in miry — and ne to sink. oe =
am 9 ee a
- _. After Christian had beeen hisjourney tothe = =

New-Jerusalem, his friends and neighbors en-
= deavouredito prevent his going; some mocked,
| others threatened, and some cried after him to’
return ; but he is determined to proceed, be-
ing convinced, though fear is. before, yet cer-
tain destruction awaits him if he abides in the
City. But as he hurries along with more €a-
gerness than caution, he runs into a miry.
Slough, called the Slough of Despond. This.
Slough represents those discouraging and des-
-. ponding fears which often harass. new -con-
VE.



Wet

On sb

TRANSFORMATION OF PICTURES,
on THE RNTENTAINHANT AND INSTRUCTION OF

cy

WYVWAARTVORUAEVREBYLUYA

&

gps

ef

Â¥





£

se
;
z
$
%

ave been

‘ Then shalj T-
his lasting praise on high.

y me, though Ih
rebel.?

y {now enter here ? will he within,
An undeserving
oo.
.— J

4. Ma
Open to sorr
-Not fail to sin

: SARI VU IARI Uterine
Christian enters the Wicket Gate.

Apes
+

e08

$
Aue

Christ hinisclt as received.

VRP VUU VU LY UYU WU UH AW BYU Len VEU VOR BABU,

This gate or door rep



resents | ee
-Itis the way by whichhe enters” —

¢

sinner.



t

freconciliation with God. Our Saviour says,

by the peniten



“1am the door; by me if any man enter in, he shail bes
gohn Ko 9, : : sete

into a state o
- saved.”



“When the Believer’t ina dine sehee views:
_ > the Redeemer’s Cross, and discerns clearly the
motive and efficacy of his extreme sufferings,
the perfect freeness. and ‘sufficiency of this
blesséd way of salvation, he is relieved from.
' his sorrow, the burden of his guilt is removed,
and he embraces his cracified Saviour. with
faith and love. While he was here at the
cross, three shining ones suddenly presented
themselves before him, stripped him of his_
rags, clothed him with a beautiful garment,
which signifies the righteousness of Christ ; set
a mark on his forehead, and gave him a roll
which denotes assurance of salvation. —

7 *
th t
a Ss w
" ‘ : 3 a AS GheE ¥
a 3 a Serres ¥ = rte a Spoke p etaarsmameitweptey coe nearer na ee = 3
s %
ve s

BD WwRAAAAATOA RAARAAATA CB DUNSA NAMA AANA TEAC ORIEL

3 Christian’s burden falls at the Cross. —

__#. Ne sooner had he spoke, than strange to tell, ;
o That moment from his back his burden fell: §
| Reliev’d at once from all his guilt and pain,
a tie wept for joy, then gae’d and wept again. 4 3
VUES EE ee ee ee

PChictan mae a Paid

5. First view that picture hung againsta wall, *
That-man a minister of Christ we call,
Grave are his looks, to Heaven he lifts his eyes, :
aeeee ee peer: of | books: to make him wise.



: Christian feciie admitted af the Wicket | :
Gate, continues his journey till he arrives af
the house of the Interpreter, who shows tim a
picture of a grave person with a book in his
hand, the law of Truth wriiten on his lips, the
world behind bis back, and a dazzling crown
of gold over his head. This Portrait repre-
sen{s the true minister of Christ. Christian
is requested by the Interpreter to take particu-
lar notice of this piece of painting, because
the person it represents Is the only person |

who i is: authorized t ope ee in my difft-








aS RUN Un i nnntin f

THE CHRISTIAN CONSOLATION. |

Way art thou ae iouaeeh, art thou
disquieted within ? Are the consolations of
God small? Look up, O Christian, and
cast thy eyes forward to‘the bright scenes
of futurity that awaitthee. Say, does it”
become thee to mourn over the transitory
troubles of this mortal life ? Remember
that this world is not thy continuing place.

I arose with the morning light, and went
¢ forth to view the works of God.—I looked
towards the morming sun—and lo! black
; hovering clouds veiled him from my sight
—a melancholy gloom brooded around,
and darkness covered the hills :—I looked
again, and lo! the sun shone forth in his
strength ; the shades of night fled from the
brightness of his glory, and all natare re-
vived, beautiful as the garden of Eden.

Thus will it be with thee, O Christian
—though the clouds ofadversity may now

2 gather thick around, darkening thy soul,
-e& yet in the morning of the Resurrection,
$the Sun of Righteousness will shine forth
_pepon thy soul, and thou shalt awake to.
eternal life ; like the earth, which has been

: a desolated by the chilling breath of ——

— VA CAACVURRAACON WA RALUA AAA TAAUARAA TAN TAN }





eee WORLD CAE VUULVEUET EE" Be ese dak obo eo ee Ge eda Ae





Ad wenusmusndinns

3 Christian leaves

<1. Fast lock’d in sleep’s embrace I dreamt a dream—
§ The Pilgrim’? S$ journey was the fruitful theme :
a Cover’d with rags, trembling with fear he went,
3 While Guilt and G

Grief his bursting bosom rent.









f -

a

. 3 Christian in the Slough oF FDeagond,
| s 2, While’thus with heedless steps Re onward went,
Re é In deep thought of his j journey was He
Atonce he fell, Ah! little did be think —
.,. So soon in miry clay and mud ‘to sink.







WE AAA TAR Ae

the city of Destruction,

Wises ck peirin a iin > i a oe

| LOIRE BI
hs vesnincananannernntsign neal iaenaitnnncn



After Christian had pha his journey to the.

| New. Jerusalem, his friends and neighbors en-
- deavouredito prevent his going; some mocked,
| others threatened, and some cried after him to’

return ; but he is determined to proceed, be-
ing convinced, though fear is before, yet cer-
tain destruction awaits him*if he abides in the
City. Butas he hurries’ along with more ea-
gerness than caution, he runs into a ye

Slough, called the Slough of Despond.

Slough represents those discouraging and es! |
', ponding fears which often, harass new :con-

7 vere.





Full Text
THE
HARTFORD:
Printed by Loomis Barnes.
18.19-.
Copy Right secured according to law.
EXHIBITED IN A
METAMORPHOSIS,
OR A
TRANSFORMATION OF PICTURES,
FOR THU EKTJSRTAXNMENT AND INSTRUCTION OF
YOUTH.
i
>
I
\ DESIGNED AND PUBLISHED BY J. W. BARBER.

This man who is clothed with rags, with a burden on his
back, represents the man who first sets out in the Divine
Life. The burden On his back represents his distressing
sense of guilt; his rags, his self-righteousness. The City
of Destruction represents this present evil world.

Christian leaves the city of Dcst^tioiT
m lo?k,M .ln s,eePs embrace I dreamt a dream
The Pilgrim s journey was the fruitful theme :
ir iW!!b rS,Sl .^embling with fear he went,
\\ bile Guilt and Grief his bursting bosom rent.
y*J*'**'VVWVWH/W*
> Christian in the Slough of Despond, |
* 2. While'thus with heedless steps fte. onward went,
| In deep thought of his journey was intent, $
| At once he fell, Ah little did he think £
5 So soon in miry clay and mud to sink ?
VU'WWU'VVWVWWM-W,
After Christian had began his journey to the
New Jerusalem, his friends and neighbors en
deavoured to prevent his going ; some mocked,
others threatened, and some cried after him to
return ; but he is determined to proceed, be
ing convinced, though fear is before, yet cer
tain destruction awaits him if he abides in the
City, But as he hurries along with more ea
gerness than* caution, he runs into a miry
Slough, called the Slough of Despond, This
Slough represents those discouraging and des
ponding fears which often harass new -con
verts.

Alter Christian set out upon his journey, his
two neighbours, Obstinate and Pliable, at
tempt to fetch him back by force, but not suc
ceeding, he prevailed upon Pliable to accom
pany him, by representing to him the glories of
the Celestial City to which he is going. He
proceeds with him till they both fall into the
Slough of Despond. This unwelcome ac
cident so discouraged Pliable, that he deter
mines to go no farther, and accordingly
gets out of the Slough, and returns to his own
house.
Pliable turns back.
3. Pliable floUndring forcd his passage through,
Regaind the ground, and home again he flew :
Bu: Christian struggled on without his mate,
And reachd the side towards the wicket gate.
^^H/VX | Christian in the Slough of Despond. |
2. Whily'tfius with heedless steps fife onward went, £
In deep thought of his journey was intent, f
At once he fell, Ah i little did he think
So soon in miry clay and mud to sink >
wii'vv,w\wv. w\'vvv'ws.'vvii,,vv\vv\v'vi.'vva'w> Ij?.
i
After Christian had began his journey to the
New Jerusalem, his friends and neighbors en
deavoured to prevent his going; some mocked,
others threatened, and some cried after him to
return ; but he is determined to proceed, be
ing convinced, though fear is before, yet cer
tain destruction awaits him if he abides in the
City. Betas he hurries along with more ea
gerness than' caution, he runs into a miry
Slough, called the Slough of Despond. This
Slough represents those discouraging and des
ponding fears which often harass new -con
verts.

Christian enters the Wicket Gate.
4. May I now enter here ? will he within,
Open to sorry me, though I have been
An undeserving rebel ? Then'shall I
Not fail to sing his lasting praise on high.
This gate or door represents Christ Inutseii as received
by the penitent sinner. It is the way by which he enters
into a state of reconciliation with God. Our Saviour says,
I am the door; by me if any man enter in, he shall be
saved. John x. 9.

Christian enters the Wicket Gate.
4. May I now enter here ? will he within,
Open to sorry me, though I have been
An undeserving rebel ? Then'shall I
Not fail to sing his lasting praise on high.
Christian iss^hown a Portrait.
5. First view that picture hung against a wall,
That man a minister of Christ we Call,
Grave are his looks, to Heaven he lifts his eyes,
Studies the best of books to make him wise.
V VWlfcW WVWV WftVM'V
Christian being admitted at the Wicket
Gate, continues his journey till he arrives at
the house of the Interpreter, who shows him a
picture of a grave person with a book in his
hand, the law of Truth written on his lips, the
world behind his back, and a dazzling crown
of gold over his head. TI)is Portrait repre
sents the true minister of Christ. Christian
is requested by the Interpreter to take particu
lar notice of this piece of painting, because
the person it represents is the only person
who is authorized to be his guide in any diffi
cult or dangerous situation.

When the Believer in a divine light views
the Redeemers Cross, and discerns clearly the
motive and efficacy of his extreme sufferings,
the perfect freeness, and sufficiency of this
blessed way of salvation, he is relieved from
his sorrow, the burden of his guilt is removed,
and he embraces his crucified Saviour with
faith and love* While he was here at the
cross, three shining ones suddenly presented
themselves before him, stripped him of his
rags, clothed him with a beautiful garment,
which signifies the righteousness of Christ; set
a mark on his forehead, and gave him a roll
which denotes assurance of salvation*
| Christians burden falls at the Cross. |
i b No sooner had he spoke, than strange to tell, <
I That moment from his back his burden fell : £
a Relievd at once from all his guilt and pain, £
£ He wept for joy, then ga^d and wept again. $
VW WWI/X Wto V\\ VW -v-vW^WV WtwVWVW!Wk*UV\^.
5$
Christian is^fiown a Portrait.
5. First view that picture hung against a wall,
That man a minister of Christ we call,
Grave are his looks, to Heaven he lifts his eyes,
Studies the best of books to make him wise.
VWtWWVWV
Christian being admitted at the Wicket
Gate, continues his journey till he arrive? at
the house of the Interpreter, who shows him a
picture of a grave person with a hook in his
hand, the law of Truth written on his lips, the
world behind his back, and a dazzling crown
of gold over his head. This Portrait repre
sents the true minister of Christ. Christian
is requested by the interpreter to take particu
lar notice of this piece of painting, because
the person it represents is the only person
who is authorized to be his guide in any diffi
cult or dangerous situation.

^
Christian ascends Hill Difficulty.
7. Then Christian, filld with lore and hope sublime, |
| The steep ascent addressd hitnself to climb ; $
j Till midway up the hill with joy he viewd <
l The Arbor,' which to welcome Pilgrims stood.
5$ wwww% w* wcwwwx vwvwvwvwwvwiwvwvvw^M^
v .^ie Hill Difficulty represents those situations in lift
$diich the Christian passes through, which require mucl:
jlelftderiial and exertion.
; iS Better, though difficult, the right way to go,
X Than wrong, though easy, where the end is woe.

^ wvvwwx
Christian ascends Hill Difficulty,
7. Then Christian, filld with lore and hope sublime,
The steep ascent addressd himself to climb ; $
Till midway up the hill with joy he viewd ^ $
The Arbor, which to welcome Pilgrims stood. ?
hnstian enters the Beautiful Palace.
When welcome spectacle at hand appeard
An edifice for entertainment reard :
The Palace Beautiful is designed to repre-
ent the privileges of Christian communion in
the ordinances of the (Sospei. Christian is ad
mitted by the Porter whose name is Watchful,
and is introduced to the maidens of the House,
Piety, Prudence and Charity, who welcome
him with joy. After being entertained in the
most agreeable manner, he is taken inio the
Armory and armed for the Christian warfare,
with the Sword of the Spirit, the helmet of
Salvation, the Shield of Faith, with his feet
shod with the preparation of the Gospel of
Peace. (See Eph. vi, 1418.)

After descending Hill Difficulty, Christian
enters the valley of Humiliation ; he had not
proceeded far, before a foul fiend met him in
the way and disputed his passage. After a
desperate struggle, Christian falls, and Apolly-
on pressed so hard" upon him that he began to
despair of life, but at length Christian gives
him a deadly thrust with his two edged sword
and gains the victory. This fight denotes
those severe trials and temptations which
some of the children of God experience from
Satan, the enemy of souls.
liV\ l Christian fights Appollyon. |
9. A more unequal match can hardly be,
Christian must fight an angel, but you see, |
The valiant man by handling sword and shield, >
Doth make him though a dragon quit the field.
i
H vwvwww
Christian enters the Beautiful Palace.
When welcome spectacle at hand appeard
An edifice for entertainment reard :
The palace Beautiful was justly namd,
For fellowship with Pilgrims greatly famd.
/WW*/H/WVW^1WWWWWWWVWWWW\%/%/>.iV^/.
*
The Palace Beautiful is designed to repre
sent the privileges of Christian communion in
the ordinances of the (Sospei. Christian is ad
mitted by the Porter whose name is Watchful,
and is introduced to the maidens of the House,
Piety, Prudence and Charity, who welcome
him with joy. After being entertained in the
most agreeable .manner, be is taken into the
Armory and armed for the Christian warfare,
with the Sword of the Spirit, the helmet of
Salvation, the Shield of Faith, with his feet
shod with the preparation of the Gospel of
Peace. (See Eph. vi. 1418.)

^^VWVW WVWVWV WVWVW^I 'W^'W'ik VW) w-^ vww%.vwvw
£ Faithful burnt at Vanity Fair.
a 10. When sorely scourgd hes-fastned to a stake, - \
5 And burnt to ashes for his Saviours sake : I
r Thus Faithful dies his spirit dear to God, i
Mounts swift to Heaven along the shining road, |
^ WV.'VVV'V''I.'W\/\'VV% <^/VWV%'V
In the course of his journey, Christian overtook a fellow -
traveller, whose name was Faithful. Passing through Van
ity Fair, they both are seized and imprisoned. After being
cruelly scourged, Faithful is burnt at the stake. Vanity
Fair represents the riches, honors, &c. of the world.

r
\WWV WW"WWX< VXX. WV WX< V'V-V 'WV WX VW WX
Faithful burnt at Vanity Fair.
10. When sorelv scourgd hes-fastned to a stake, 1
And biirnt to ashes for his Saviours sake :
Thus Faithful dies his spirit dear to God,
Mounts swift to Heaven along the shining road.
I
t
i
*
VWVVWVW/V'VM IVWW5. -v
After Faithful was burnt, Christian made
his escape, accompanied by a fellow pilgrim
named Hopeful, who was induced to become a
pilgrim by beholding the faith and conversa
tion of Faithful during his trial and execution.
The Pilgrims proceed on their journey, and
after some time find their way grow rough and
difficult; for the sake of ease they turn into a
forbidden path which went through by-path
meadows. After wandering about for some
time, there came on a storm of thunder,
lightning and rain. This represents the be
liever under the hidings of Gods countenance.
^ VX/XWX/WX/VX'X.VWWXiVX/VVX'VVV/XiVX'VVX/X/X/vVWX'VX/X/VWWxWX
| The Pilgrims in By-path Meadows.
g 11. Darkness came on, with thunder, lightning, rain,
Torrents pourd down, the waters rose amain :
The storm terrific, filled their souls with dread,
And vengeance seemd just bursting on their heads.
N JAAi W WiVV WVWIl/WV WVW\Wj wvwvvw wvvw w
$

The Pilgrims at length find a little shelter in
which they conclude to wait the approach of
morning, but being weary and overcome by fa
tigue soon fall asleep. Here they remain till
awakened by the voice of the formidable giant
Despair, who with a fierce and malignant
countenance drove them to the Doubting
Castle and there confined them in a dark and
filthy Dungeon. This may'represent the case
of those Christians who have wandered into
forbidden paths till they have sinned in such
a manner, that they begin to despair and
doubt of the mercy of God,
* The Pilgrims taken by Giant Despair,
12. What could they do ? to whom could they complain 7
Resistance to a giant was in vain, 5
Strait to the castle-yard he drove the men, ?
And lockd them in a deep and dirty den.
I
was burnt, Christian made
his escape, accompanied by a fellow pilgrim
named Hopeful, who was induced to become a
pilgrim by beholding the faith and conversa
tion of Faithful during his trial and execution.
The Pilgrims proceed on their journey, and
after some time find their way grow rough and
difficult; for the sake of ease they turn into a
forbidden path which went through by-path
meadows. After wandering about for some
time, there came on a storm of thunder,
lightning and rain. This represents the be
liever under the hidings of Gods countenance.
I he Pilgrims in By-path Meadows.
II. Darkness came on, with thunder, lightning, rain,
Torrents pourd down, the waters rose amain :
The storm terrific, filled their souls with dread,
And vengeance seemd ju3t bursting on their heads.
VV41VWWV WVWVWV

W*.WVWVWVVWimvWWVVWWVK ww ww wwww wo -.
$ Pilgrims escape from Giant Despair.
| J3. At length tfte Key of Promise they espy,
| Swift from the dread and hateful walls they fly :
* Giant Despair pursues with hellish ire
He falls : the Pilgrims then deli, erd are.
After being* kept for some time in cruel confinement in
the Doubting* Castle, Christian finds the Key of Promise,
and with it unlocks the door, and the Pilgrims make their
escape. The free Promise of Salvation by Christ, which
is made to believers, is meant by theKey of Promise.

$ Pilgrims escape from Giant Despair.
i 13. 'At length the Key of Promise they espy,
Swift from the dread and hateful walls they fly :
f Giant Despair pursues with hellish ire
* He falls : the Pilgrims then deli- erd are.
| The Pilgrims in the River of Death. \
< 14. The River Death, the Pilgrims stand aghast,
£ At this hard trial though it is the la9t, $
k No heavenly crown of life can they expect, <
5 Until they pass this dark and frightful deep.
V ?.-'^y%,yy.vwwvvwwwyvvwvv^vv\vww\vwwvwv
Death is here represented by a deep river,
separating the believer from his heavenly in
heritance, as the river Jordan separated the
Children of Israel from the promised land.
All that are born mast die. However distant
we may now think the day of our death, yet,
in a few years, and perhaps in a few days at
most, we must go the way of all the earth, and
these bodies of ours though now so active, will
moulder back to dust, and the morning of the
Resurrection will rise to eternal life, or sink in
endless woe.

The Pilgrims in their passage through the
river of Death, leave their mortal garments in
the river : are immediately clothed with im
mortality and soon conducted by tring spirits into the New-Jerusalem, the
Paradise of God, As they enter the heaven
ly City they are transfigured and clothed with
raiment which shone like gold. Here they
are welcomed by their dear Saviour and all
the heavenly host with joy; here they are to
dwell in the most perfect happiness forever
and ever. May the former and readers of
this, be received in like manner into the king
dom of God,
Pilgrims enter the New Jerusalem.
15. The river past, their heavenly home is near,
When lo two bright seraphic forms appear ;
To Zions hill with airy steps they soar,
With rapture filld I wakd and saw no more.
Death is here represented by a deep river,
separating the believer from his heavenly in
heritance, as the river Jordan separated the
Children of Israel from the promised land.
All that are born must die. However distant
rims in the JLiiver of Death. |
rne Kiver Death, the Pilgrims stand aghast,
this hard trial though it is the last, $
No heavenly crown of life can they expect, <
Until they pass this dark and frightful deep. $
'^Vys.VWVWW)WW VVVV*/'VVVVVV*iVVVVV\VVVVVVVV* WSs,^.
we may now think the day of our death, yet,
in a few years, and perhaps in a few days at
most, we must go the way of all the earth, and
these bodies of ours though now so active, will
moulder back to dust, and the morning of the
Resurrection will rise to eternal life, or sink in
endless woe.

^ VW VVVVVtiVV%.VV%iV'%;VM.VVVVVVVVVVWiVV%'VVVVV\Vft,iWV |j£
THE DYING CHRISTIAN TO HIS SOUL,
An Ode by Mr* Pope*
VITAL spark of heavenly flame !
Quit, O Quit this mortal frame ?
Trembling', hoping, lingering, flying j
Oh the pain, the bliss of dying !
Cease, fond nature cease thy strife.
And let me languish into life.
Hark they whisper : angels say,
Sister spirit, come away-
What is this absorbs me quite,
Steals my senses, shuts mv sight,
Drowns my spirit, draws my breath 7
Tell me, my soul 1 can this be death 7
The world recedes ;it disappears !
Heaun opens on my eyes my ears
With sounds seraphic ring :
Lend, lend your wings 1 mount! I fly
O grave where is thy victory t
O death where is thy sting ?
I V.WV VV'VVXVWVVVW*Wl-V'wV WMVW VWVW

VV\'VVVVV^VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV\VVVVV%VVVVVjvV\VV^VV\
THE CHRISTIAN CONSOLATION. \
Why art thou cast downwhy art thou f
disquieted within ? Are the consolations of \
| God small ? Look up, O Christian, and f
| cast thy eyes forward to the bright scenes |
| of futurity that await thee* Say, does it |
| become thee to mourn over the transitory |
| troubles of this mortal life ? Remember |
5 that this world is not thy continuing place. |
I I arose with the morning light, and went \
\ forth to view the works of God.1 looked f
| towards the morming sunand lo black \
| hovering clouds veiled him from my sight \
| a melancholy gloom brooded around, ^
| and darkness covered the hills I looked |
| again, and lo the sun shone forth in his |
j strength ; the shades of night fled from the $
l brightness of his glory, and all nature re- $
| vived, beautiful as the garden of Eden. |
I Thus will it be with thee, O Christian i
though the clouds of adversity may now \
gather thick around, darkening thy soul, |
| yet in the morning of the Resurrection, ^
| the Sun of Righteousness will shine forth \
| upon thy soul, and thou shalt awake to |
| eternal life ; like the earth, which has been |
3 desolated by the chilling breath of Winter, j
^ VVVV%/\'*k'V\-V%'*'VVVVV\'V'*AIVV*

CONTINUED.
\ yet in the springing of the year, returns to
\ renovated life, lovely and beautiful.
\ Here perhaps thou art drooping under
| the pressure of Sorrow; but in Heaven.
\ Sorrow and Sighing shall flee away : Here
i perhaps he whom thou thinkest thy best
l friend, may plunge a dagger in thy bosom ;
$ there ali love one another with perfect
| love : Here, Sin and Sorrow, Sickness and
| Death, spread a melancholy shade on the
^ sweetest enjoyments of human life ; there
| death itself shall die : Here thou desirest
$ and hast not, and thy soul is often pained
^ and perplexed at the dealings of thy Hea-
£ venly Father : There ali the vast desires
| of thy soul shall be fully satisfied, and thy
I breast shall forever swell with celestial
j rapture in the beatific vision of God.
| Submit thyself therefore with fortitude
^ to the various trials thou art called to pass
| through in this dark vale of tears, for a
| moment longer, and thy troubles will pass
^ away like the illusion of a morning dream ;
| the wicked cease from troubling ; and
| Death will come with his friendly mes-
I sage, and thy spirit will take her willing
l flight to the Paradise of God.

| A PROS PE CT OF H EAVEN MAKES DEATH EASY,
| By Br Watts*
npHER.E is a land of pare delight,
** Where saints immortal reign,
Infinite day excludes the night,
* And pleasures banitft pain.
There everlasting faring: abides.
And neveiowHh?ringdove-c-rs.,
Death, like aharrow sea divides
This he&vrdy land from our*.
Sweet fields beyond the swelling flood
Steed drest in living gre'en :
S,? to the'"Jews old'Caouan stood,
While Jordan rolld between.
But timrpus mortals start and shrink-
To cross this narrow, sea ;
And linger, ahivjrin'g'on the brick,
And. fear to launch away.
O could we make, our doubts remote,
Those gloomy fears that rise.
And see the Canaan that, we love,.
With unbeclouded eyes.
Could we but climb where Moses stood,
And view the landscape oer.
Not Jordans streams, nor deaths cold flood.
Should fright us from the shore.
VVVW* VVUVVW,tMM%VtfVVVVV^,^VVVW'VVW.'W%'li'VVVW(VV%^V/VVVVV4iVV'i/VV%



xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20080120_AAAACQ' PACKAGE 'UF00076772_00001' INGEST_TIME '2008-01-21T10:58:15-05:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T17:05:31-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 297868; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-19T10:18:27-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '230422' DFID 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACAU' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00001_0001.jp2'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' 4f0b4edc311128baf6868631a438b25e
'SHA-1' 60a1fd2d5f9c0fbacbaec90b9faf6220c344d460
EVENT '2011-08-07T10:53:02-04:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'228124' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACAV' 'sip-files00001_0001.jpg'
e3d6b9edd81674d89ae5824eed8b8e39
9993b19d88546d20182534500ad7c1e97001eef6
'2011-08-07T10:53:11-04:00'
describe
'9210' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACAW' 'sip-files00001_0001.pro'
f136cb527f45ca6107e7bee8abadf74b
ee86ae450228739b7bed0cfba27194e87b52e895
'2011-08-07T10:53:13-04:00'
describe
'75583' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACAX' 'sip-files00001_0001.QC.jpg'
526ad0278c3f11cb3a48977b0ec262a8
7c191ecdf64fea0e3a6fcff2b9b2a986b9f18397
'2011-08-07T10:53:23-04:00'
describe
'1866600' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACAY' 'sip-files00001_0001.tif'
0f0d3c1f5cdceadd5fe741ad4e2e4c2b
41b82456f6da100429520df4b1b0c93a6aa95034
'2011-08-07T10:53:22-04:00'
describe
'476' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACAZ' 'sip-files00001_0001.txt'
abcf9f182777c38c73a75ff80505aaa7
cc68f445393bac6fee44a7b88949aa5eb296a496
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'34404' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACBA' 'sip-files00001_0001thm.jpg'
1e181cd789cac578147f8a639230e6f4
be2c784b3f4eb028466b315b5bfe3246faf046ae
'2011-08-07T10:53:08-04:00'
describe
'229920' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACBB' 'sip-files00001_0002.jp2'
409a3752ca4b0f48bae1b519a87cb297
66327d46d16b1512b02662de71af7c6e8a4256dd
'2011-08-07T10:53:25-04:00'
describe
'259973' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACBC' 'sip-files00001_0002.jpg'
ebc539303a9604136bdd7d703a5efc14
7bb6e9a51c9776f06b53f40df2873fb638d71969
'2011-08-07T10:53:07-04:00'
describe
'12958' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACBD' 'sip-files00001_0002.pro'
9ec6e9d733c7b0cafb22ae4a7ff07a01
7c574c84bfba57020abcf17721046d4490617646
'2011-08-07T10:53:01-04:00'
describe
'82454' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACBE' 'sip-files00001_0002.QC.jpg'
41fcabcad06e8d1f2ab6e8af9b067106
95fdf7e6f07a69cae05440835ff98a215aef1b38
describe
'1862872' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACBF' 'sip-files00001_0002.tif'
87a8bf17ae67f36b71757d5585a23c5f
577253aadd44866dfcf5015594ea75387e387505
'2011-08-07T10:53:04-04:00'
describe
'722' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACBG' 'sip-files00001_0002.txt'
39f5aab5ccb85c18df377a38239bf728
96856da96f1a8cc378af2f86dda9073d6e81158a
'2011-08-07T10:53:10-04:00'
describe
'35843' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACBH' 'sip-files00001_0002thm.jpg'
b431e361d1ce8ef40f67b4b37e74420c
e1b6a4257497e9b6e92458926340cbbe1bdc646f
'2011-08-07T10:53:03-04:00'
describe
'216208' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACBI' 'sip-files00001_0003.jp2'
0ab7a092b354fdf50f4e29e24a6c895f
16b231f1063e6e4c1d11784f374602f9bb092f2e
describe
'219115' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACBJ' 'sip-files00001_0003.jpg'
98061b1e449e717293c069b35f17cdda
b9a82188223a01155c6dad0b3cd810ddebf0cff0
'2011-08-07T10:53:09-04:00'
describe
'4990' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACBK' 'sip-files00001_0003.pro'
05e4b7f10e39d0495fde1f5867244a01
3347ce35de0ab41fc7c3762fae38bdff7cfae721
'2011-08-07T10:53:06-04:00'
describe
'71788' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACBL' 'sip-files00001_0003.QC.jpg'
0da480226b5f2ff86a24cd0d50274c43
71275ce4393b5fb7339d836c04afa175ecf484ce
'2011-08-07T10:53:12-04:00'
describe
'1751652' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACBM' 'sip-files00001_0003.tif'
655a2b2e42b41002d791f1139b4802c0
69a1f4cb3c00b77d42ef01b9eb20fb20d534d657
describe
'449' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACBN' 'sip-files00001_0003.txt'
b7e2f20e779683956c3066bf82e80ad3
19bdf7a0f9d1c62097c0193672f2359d36ae8ee1
'2011-08-07T10:53:18-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'31797' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACBO' 'sip-files00001_0003thm.jpg'
b66aba7584a8616fa1e56af641aea2d1
eea29aa40bbe1ff1905e7904b20be62f4c3f63f1
'2011-08-07T10:53:24-04:00'
describe
'452997' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACBP' 'sip-files00001_0004.jp2'
2c8bde02c9b0061002f66cf2d93ceb76
dafc98c4a88dd56abdfb7a3de42b413726d18068
describe
'143160' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACBQ' 'sip-files00001_0004.jpg'
fcf98841e5d53377b5d6ad99f7eeb37a
d2f740e9140b21c8f9d88bc49ea624b413bf273e
'2011-08-07T10:53:05-04:00'
describe
'39825' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACBR' 'sip-files00001_0004.pro'
84216ce364e0634c0081748661a0c3a0
76557ff198ee5e71a16b5bb46307625cd5e44382
'2011-08-07T10:53:15-04:00'
describe
'49072' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACBS' 'sip-files00001_0004.QC.jpg'
aa7a9ab876b71c2c69f68e1f36c8f8b6
499095f83292f523bab00210c77d3d505c63bd51
describe
'3643716' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACBT' 'sip-files00001_0004.tif'
4cc3859edbaeeacbd92307c89994b640
2ff254c81122ab81d86569bd5d95ef0a1dce1aec
describe
'1717' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACBU' 'sip-files00001_0004.txt'
be2dc92bbb014caa3239a9800bcff568
2a12cedce1f4098b9045b44287e285cdc3d8e77f
describe
Invalid character
'30200' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACBV' 'sip-files00001_0004thm.jpg'
b21df695ae4ffe6dffa6d95bae78ccd9
5a0f96d6039c48a28efb82298b534c2fda93e1b7
describe
'229906' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACBW' 'sip-files00001_0006.jp2'
235b15e31fc6479d620059b1778a3aba
5644d00194052f91752094cbd477c70ebedcb3eb
describe
'257504' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACBX' 'sip-files00001_0006.jpg'
6c57d9f8806362f7c7e8f45a98935b7f
faa069ed322af78a305b6dcad68a4c815d866dc7
'2011-08-07T10:53:14-04:00'
describe
'14209' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACBY' 'sip-files00001_0006.pro'
dcb46d0019cca45fa363b663f85cf44e
177eae6254339baccdc9d2333a1de28f778abe06
describe
'80670' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACBZ' 'sip-files00001_0006.QC.jpg'
982c7d244523006f5821001d6a79c908
ce14c680407a1330b1caf827b3d4eb030a57f5e3
'2011-08-07T10:53:16-04:00'
describe
'1862572' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACCA' 'sip-files00001_0006.tif'
3d1ad7675fb2a628c885a3d7d54f5c34
d2d04187a561780cf5ca65ab849cf0a96965462f
'2011-08-07T10:53:19-04:00'
describe
'648' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACCB' 'sip-files00001_0006.txt'
21df6463e06c41532c4c0ead75c44bda
98b9112e23494731a1a1337b03705258ead1da73
describe
'35226' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACCC' 'sip-files00001_0006thm.jpg'
d4f1d1362a2473ecbf8bd7cbb3ea2599
76a552882177cd24e8e5a7bcb6a633e9d2366e94
describe
'206320' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACCD' 'sip-files00001_0007.jp2'
3dba2b2f6914421b4025f61a1c4cbd65
41dcb47ef9d6eff676a61784e03a3c411db7cd91
'2011-08-07T10:53:00-04:00'
describe
'265340' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACCE' 'sip-files00001_0007.jpg'
5b77342e9e438ceaa6b5918c2342f269
357db5ac331f403fafd2577dbfef19427e19dbc9
describe
'12836' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACCF' 'sip-files00001_0007.pro'
66e7be6a1f55dfe369b836eaba3b1171
df958eb91bf8b27b025491fafe44289771d0268f
describe
'84645' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACCG' 'sip-files00001_0007.QC.jpg'
9ab4baaa70694593f20c25810bf733b1
11bdc1ba6b2f1aa79f2c5e4b20dcc02b6595434d
describe
'1673832' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACCH' 'sip-files00001_0007.tif'
5d8fa1e9db5bc16ea3164a4698bbb43f
10dabffb684dab22f277044cb75aa65e5a5a152f
describe
'607' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACCI' 'sip-files00001_0007.txt'
5ca1ecb8e6b3128374ba5e156e5ff8e6
08049483a9aa9a0e1911b41029733778b84b6180
describe
Invalid character
'36446' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACCJ' 'sip-files00001_0007thm.jpg'
36e4fbb116de68171c20a3bc6b238365
8ca38ad5aa158425f9aeedf8e42a5a69302a6e44
describe
'458389' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACCK' 'sip-files00001_0008.jp2'
7ae61575014c209ea8e40c227d6fed72
c455c16af2a2cdc130fbd141685e2e52b6413a75
'2011-08-07T10:53:20-04:00'
describe
'144555' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACCL' 'sip-files00001_0008.jpg'
586fcace7d95ca66acdcfc53afe7a20a
c9c06a30d76a89c815002cb81af44f2144944575
describe
'46209' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACCM' 'sip-files00001_0008.pro'
103917cd289e8f5548b60af6f0eb0ebe
55d64fb19c14486546d0bb204f7af0858e7ed192
describe
'48866' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACCN' 'sip-files00001_0008.QC.jpg'
1e05f4cc56b38dea5700543717fce61a
e1b3b94a2c4b997b1c8a7d044c1633fb017185b0
describe
'3687088' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACCO' 'sip-files00001_0008.tif'
880d70602f3b9fea6fa8c958c149f9a7
b8462c0560be9f52d079a93c7479206b8e6ddbc4
describe
'1849' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACCP' 'sip-files00001_0008.txt'
e9c5d39062be1388dde14d4f3d47e953
a4950e58768f011ff03b5e5a1e3e8fa896aa9353
describe
'30573' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACCQ' 'sip-files00001_0008thm.jpg'
b243fea40cdf7ba0855a6c1feb7bf54b
4746224bf26923ade97daf146f0a482aaa393a32
describe
'414329' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACCR' 'sip-files00001_0009.jp2'
bfc559f77d307754e350a7f9c444a323
4f3e854edde1f975565d32ff80b8acf4b59ae183
describe
'140223' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACCS' 'sip-files00001_0009.jpg'
4c35c24b28a3dc3bbb6abb56b0181924
c3b0cf07609f870c618f54f6828113bc0df1761e
describe
'40274' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACCT' 'sip-files00001_0009.pro'
334d2e19e1b54bef8356ac31360bf373
b39821d7b0b297bcd95a0d484b71708c5f68b89d
describe
'47333' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACCU' 'sip-files00001_0009.QC.jpg'
02a6a7419532a082b3d1fd44cd67f69d
cebfd27b21c9cb292ac14e581658ff673cff46c1
describe
'3334172' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACCV' 'sip-files00001_0009.tif'
c87e3b9442476c288964810b5912b86f
cbde1803b5d170e98d5f1bb6cfdc4f562f479011
describe
'1637' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACCW' 'sip-files00001_0009.txt'
136902207dc3f1f004af08028ffdf5b7
bf668a6d541b459515ae4fda9f86a002ab3f0e02
describe
Invalid character
'29338' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACCX' 'sip-files00001_0009thm.jpg'
d4eef01195b0117562cdcf6a1b2af3e5
25161873f0aa8f45aef6c3d81fdf3dbc33180705
describe
'229939' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACCY' 'sip-files00001_0010.jp2'
c3b32002ba8a73d3739023e96740cccc
e969dff7f4a1da76aed3cbfeb25801e90e200114
describe
'273674' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACCZ' 'sip-files00001_0010.jpg'
d85fd7ba233c8901e2c2155d746c7cf2
6e3d3598ff5462c3cef0a380922216f08b7bc96d
describe
'14399' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACDA' 'sip-files00001_0010.pro'
3e39ea447a2eb5698f394058d8b4474c
ab99982e11201b7f5912bb3cd9375960109ce998
describe
'84900' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACDB' 'sip-files00001_0010.QC.jpg'
6c5105edd83a44f4438695029c41d405
459bc22f2b69081b1f252e54234e7f18c870ffcb
describe
'1862868' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACDC' 'sip-files00001_0010.tif'
d266c5a9e6ce511684e8a6842dc25a1c
c431d8351427bd58e5f5314b67732c6c974cce9e
describe
'632' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACDD' 'sip-files00001_0010.txt'
3136a0939ed1397cec1d898d444cae04
a89c5f69bbb2df90038562a1b9ace035bcf5518d
describe
Invalid character
'36148' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACDE' 'sip-files00001_0010thm.jpg'
6b54a9d08eb6477b9c3915441d6166eb
30e4aaa42f0c44ce87f6d53597fb439408f01041
describe
'211720' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACDF' 'sip-files00001_0011.jp2'
1e097fba28728f06d6e97242bf1c5908
d042e5ac761b5bd6a2a8db2de6a9e92cc08b3623
describe
'281460' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACDG' 'sip-files00001_0011.jpg'
0baf7f11d94421a797eeeb53691f7e9f
00c238c5ec0dd3fca7915a8aac968ec7d2bffa93
describe
'14063' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACDH' 'sip-files00001_0011.pro'
6393935b069f0887df136f66976724d1
cea0e03426a2cf5a5e524207cb5e6958a288a5e0
describe
'88516' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACDI' 'sip-files00001_0011.QC.jpg'
00d8ae13250ba373efc5c1833fea0c5e
ddba037a250dbb2fd0a1a1e95e7817ed18d4823e
describe
'1716680' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACDJ' 'sip-files00001_0011.tif'
05afac71520d9c386f9c8b112a6d57c6
1bc8279af98f578871d46585c9ac93f0d19370c6
describe
'627' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACDK' 'sip-files00001_0011.txt'
a2360e205a5965e38fa9913a0e8732ef
c39c0d1a3eace982a5f7fa9f28e047ed1b34285b
describe
Invalid character
'36716' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACDL' 'sip-files00001_0011thm.jpg'
6d65e0d8fb158541c44a4af8a1be6ec8
6e6eef228973a8ace8be14fa039f697c89305631
describe
'456615' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACDM' 'sip-files00001_0012.jp2'
dbb45d98ef6c34607d3b3d84843bc3a7
ae03be79dfd977e64363d5686b86fcb0b2ecee60
describe
'150926' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACDN' 'sip-files00001_0012.jpg'
ae618cf721f9987da0c64539957b36ad
69fcc7ec2bead0d6eec03b804f24a1c6b00b4656
describe
'48803' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACDO' 'sip-files00001_0012.pro'
cafb4b19f47a5b1d00cd582b8ef3f152
7d5e1b4bd9ca46415cfcf26bc237957a60b146de
describe
'50995' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACDP' 'sip-files00001_0012.QC.jpg'
e68dc92a0038f406ec493975045684c8
da69bc569f5ea459aae0a5378f30006771ee041d
describe
'3673684' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACDQ' 'sip-files00001_0012.tif'
809e756102870488a6968d4156eb1c80
91f7b5fe570c25798fe5cd5e28c3ba064e74908f
describe
'2011' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACDR' 'sip-files00001_0012.txt'
81ac81636e426d7a4dae5042b96efca5
3a689dfe0d25c475a79e11607005882c6c1b7426
describe
Invalid character
'31072' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACDS' 'sip-files00001_0012thm.jpg'
fc93708d433ec3792241c074f2b2644f
d81578363b5e6511417adec65ce8827a1e6dd40e
'2011-08-07T10:53:17-04:00'
describe
'419374' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACDT' 'sip-files00001_0013.jp2'
572717a48dcd058e28d44552c71cc06e
9784fa8aa48a13843ef541e8cd6be411564c527f
describe
'143657' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACDU' 'sip-files00001_0013.jpg'
49e69f6c6b8f9ff1dee87f4fccd66864
388a34649fc2b97ef8fcc714444ac36ea51ddecc
describe
'43542' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACDV' 'sip-files00001_0013.pro'
ab4c302148b2a6c45e24b40d356882d7
2fcaacd239fec4ea3c78f3db3b08a03cb9c26180
describe
'48110' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACDW' 'sip-files00001_0013.QC.jpg'
71b1f846c4fbecf13603d6db7f759eea
1b5358fbaac3db80b56f6f1d3db87349936aaaaa
describe
'3375176' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACDX' 'sip-files00001_0013.tif'
0f6f18714a957486f6771153d0645454
5e64f279c3059780d014de217d359593a009b309
describe
'1756' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACDY' 'sip-files00001_0013.txt'
7732ce811894061613711792ebd8838d
1c28ec36834e9ab06221950967875767db6e0190
describe
Invalid character
'29817' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACDZ' 'sip-files00001_0013thm.jpg'
07dbc5a2449e0cc828e953c815ec800e
156e819eb6c391dc643c02252f925f67409246fb
describe
'229813' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACEA' 'sip-files00001_0014.jp2'
74b4694059c614b93abcab4f8cbe27bc
d671df7db968de50e0604ed7244112b658e3b985
describe
'199132' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACEB' 'sip-files00001_0014.jpg'
d3841771b2e322d245e6eb7707189fcf
88ec583faba8f064070654a0c768eb5d06d1a61f
describe
'23012' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACEC' 'sip-files00001_0014.pro'
a001ec8b4de0dbeb7e318b2ca0f808ad
9c82c847bc40bc84b3dae6b7c7509d7faabea79b
describe
'65489' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACED' 'sip-files00001_0014.QC.jpg'
91fc9b2edbd23e610f62d481cf23dd46
6326180ccd3c7c4c875f40b742c780e9748a646d
describe
'1860904' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACEE' 'sip-files00001_0014.tif'
dacab3dfbaa9a74078d77fb710de74cd
163c742535e0b82093ffaf0500f9957ca0d60b61
describe
'1290' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACEF' 'sip-files00001_0014.txt'
74943e7efa108b9b2f3e9ee68a98006b
ce05aabc729e2f05c5031eed969e7767ad685381
describe
Invalid character
'31037' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACEG' 'sip-files00001_0014thm.jpg'
261435b2a605af062a17a79be4dc89a7
1e172f2629929e720f0eea99593c16292b2389d4
describe
'26794' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACEH' 'sip-filesUF00076772_00001.mets'
011033a231555c1101bceeeb0e559df2
02183716016399829a246d795fd4750cf129c7a3
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-19T10:17:49-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'31838' 'info:fdaE20080120_AAAACQfileF20080121_AAACEK' 'sip-filesUF00076772_00001.xml'
287d9118aa539671eeb43a9f23e1e8bd
b0809dcb6e90f1f8785f87eeac2e912abcbcf33c
describe
'2013-12-19T10:17:48-05:00'
xml resolution


= :
ENON SATE YOLEN NNSA UINNTA AUS AN IY, oo

Faithful burnt at Vanity Fair. a

10. When sorely scourg’d he’s-fast’ned to a stake, ~ Z
And burnt to ashes for his Saviour’s sake : é
Thus Faithful dies! his spirit dear to God,

Mounts swift to Heaven along the shining road. é

42 vy veer

WALATPREA VA RADAUT ET EAADENWER VE CAUMINCAIARA UY
eo S Bf















:
Be es
toher * o
re ee PS PAT} URE Raa eS ae - . a ane eS BRE = cz - Em CME OE TEBE SAEs rmbale ween aoe
-. In the course of his journey, Christian overtook a fello’

traveller, whose name was Faithful. Passing throu gh Van ae
ity Fair, they both are seized and imprisoned. After being —
cruelly scourged, Faithful is burnt at the stake. Vanity
Fair represents the riches, honors, &c. of the world. ©

a


a

Christian ascends Hill Difficulty.

$
$ 4. Then Christian, fill’d with leve and hope sublime, €
8 The steep ascent address’d himself to climb ; oe g
g Till midway up the hill with joy he view’d ‘ 3
2 ee
% %

fe
«.
Fe

oS

The Arbor, which to welcome Pilgrims stood.
WWVUVAWE WS WAR ARWRAAR BAA VYUVYRUBAUA WRBUA/UBBAVEN





i CERIO ATES AA PAY ‘7

io ee aoe those situations in life
hieh te aristian passes through, which require
jeli-denial and exertion. — ee
at. s es e

ate Better, though difficult, - the right way to 2°05

Than wrong, though easy, where the end:is woe.”

A




After ccenaitp Hill Difficulty, Christian
enters the valley of Humiliation; he bad not
proceeded far, before a foul fiend met him in
the way and disputed his passage. After a
desperate struggle, Christian falls, and Apolly-
on pressed so hard upon him that he began to
despair of life, but at length Christian gives
him a deadly thrust with his two edged sword
and gains ‘the victory. This fight denotes
those severe trials and temptations which
some of the children of God experience from —
Satan, the enemy of souls.

i

e aa sS eee ?
- ARanaaan BAA RA RATAN AARAARRAA RAN AAA CAAAATAARRAAATIAA so

Christian fights Appollyon. se
9, A more unequal match can hardly be, :
é Christian must fightan angel, but you see,
3 The valiant man Y by handling sword and shield, :
Doth make him though a dragon quit the field. 3










hristian enters the Beautiful Palace Fi
‘When welcome spectacle ! at hand appear’d

: Au edifice for entertainment rear’d: .-
- hé palace Beautiful) was justly nam’d, e
oY with Pilgrims greatly fam’d.



i he sities of Christian communion in
inances of the Gospel. Christian is ad-
tted by the Porter whose name is Watchful,
and is introduced to the maidens of the House,
Piety, Prudence and Charity, who welcome
“him with joy. After being entertained. in the —
/ most agreeable manner, be is taken into the
y Armory and armed for the Christian warfare,
with the Sword of the Spirit, the helmet of
: Salvation, the Shield of Faith, with his feet
shod with the preparation of the Sy
Peace. (See ee NY 14—18. eS



Fs ee Se:

SNM Fics
The Pili at length find a little shelter | in
which they conclude. to wait the approach of
morning, but being weary and overcome by fa-
tigue. soon fall asleep. Here they remain till
awakened by the voice of the formidable giant
Despair, who with a fierce and malignant
countenance drove them to the Doubting
Castle and there confined them in a dark and
filthy Dangeon. This may ‘represent the case
of those Christians. who have wandered into
forbidden paths till they have sinned in such
a manner, that they begin to despair and
doubt of the merey of God.

Sa

~

RP he ial er pees 2

Alun WYRE VU UUUVYVAVYUVUVEERGUUN VOR Se eae

- The Pilgrims taken by Giant Despair. Y
12, What could they do ? to whom could they complain ?
é Resistance to a giant was in vain, $
: Strait to the castle-yard he drovethe men, -
And lock’d them in a deep and dirty den. ~ o
* SS ee eee

een een







§ The Pilgrims in By-path Mesdows.

3 11. Darkness came on, with thunder, lightning, rain,
Torrents pour’d down, the waters rose amain :

@ The storm terrific, filled their souls with dread,

x And vengeance seem’d just bursting on their heads.

After Faithful was burnt, Christian - |
his escape, accompanied by a fellow pilgrim
named Hopeful, who was induced to become a@
pilgrim by beholding the faith and conversas
tion of Faithful during his trial and execution.
The Pilgeims proceed on their. journey, and
after some time find their way grow rough and

difficult; for the sake of ease they turn into a.
Ce forbidden path which went through by-path
meadows. Alter wandering about for some
time, there - came. on a storm: of thunder,
lightning and rain. — : ‘This. represents. the be-

harer under the bidings of God's countenance, :



ae

v0 SE she a ; nesta Speak


Bs
, £

rigs

Be oH
back, represents the man who first sets out

Ga kh 7s SSF Pe Seren

-'t WA sininnne . ;
VV Vane can
Weyer vern Yee

3 Christian leaves the city of Destruction. 7

“1. Fast lock’d in sleep’
1 t loc : p’s embrace I dre
3 eo ene journey was the fruitful ieee :
3 a aa rags, trembling with fear he went 5
ve Guilt and Grief his bursting bosom rent. 2
%

A VER VUU NUE MEA ened ae

Ver VU VYUUB TARA LE,
















oon, SPN N AEST fil. f Se
a if [san (ieee tah praeity
ie

ny





k
Hi
ens
EF
ee





SS SSN wo —————
re LEAN |=
$e b= RS) [meena RNY ) TELE
oy ee Paro G8 ln am

ON aa : is












SS pp Se ae

:3 clothed with rags, with a burden on his
in the Divine

“Life. The burden on his back represents his distressing

sense of guilt; his rags, his self-righteousness. ‘The City

_ of Destruction represents this present evil world..

re

&!

'. ‘Ths man wh

eae


wr

bg wereuwe ren rrr urereneananneyennneanannunnnnnns fb

Pilgrims escape from Giant Despair.

$
§ 13. ae length the Key of Promise they espy;
¢ Swift from: the dread and hateful walls they fly:

Giant Despair pursues with hellish ire—
He falls: the Pilgrims then deliver’d are.

3 The Pilgrims in’ the Fa cac of Death.

14. The River Death, the Pilgrims stand aghast,
At this hard trial though it is the last,

No heavenly crown of life can they expect, =
Until they pass this dark and pneo) ee



__ Death is here represented by a deep river,
separating the believer from his heavenly in-
heritance, as the river Jordan separated the
Children. ‘of Israel. from the promised land.
All that are born must die. However distant
we may now think’ the day. of. our death, ‘yet,
in a few years, and perbaps: in afew days at
most, we must go the way ofa i the earth,and
these bodies of ours though 80 active, will
moulder back to dust, and th norning of the |
Resurrection will rise to : terval life, oF sink ine

endless | woe.





















HERE | is 8 ae fire detignt

- 8 Where saints immortal reign,
ipbtites day excludesthe night, -

ae ‘And ae beniths Aen po

* ee

ae “there Sisthees ae
Se | i Aid. rede ease Se

weet. . sees ‘the selling flood
ou figest in livin
. tie Sows: meric £



Could s we: ‘But ‘climb: Sick. Mews stove

> And View the landscape Beh ss s

* Not Jordan's streams, nor death's ead food,
Should suk as: oS we shores .







ae




PN Sew Et he) are

The Pilgrims i in their passage eucion the

river. of Death, leave their mortal garments. in
the river: are ‘immediately: clothed with im-

mortality and soon conducted. by.two minis-
tring. spirits. into the New- Jerusalem, the ©

Paradise of God. As they enter the heaven-
ly City they are transfigured. and clothed with
raiment which shone like gold. Here they
are welcomed by their dear Saviour and all
the heavenly host with joy; bere they are to
dwell in the most perfect happiness forever

and ever. May the former and readers of.

this, be received in like manner Anto the king-
dom of God. |

Ay rn uiirin mnie ett clans ted

; Pilgrims enter the New Jerusalem.

, 15. The river past, their heavenly home is near, — ¢

When lo! two bright seraphic forms appear ; é :
To Zion’s hill with airy steps they soar,

é With rapture fill’d { wak’d and saw no more. 8

<< CPIEVOS PCPA VY WUE BABEL veeemennnnanncnnannennnnn








: Tamers
c Sane” re

Reg Soe ae Paes

set, eer <

- | The Pilgdias in’ the River of Death. §
» ¢. 4. The River Death, the Pilgrims stand aghast,

BR At this hard trial though it is the last, ; é
>. No heavenly crown of life can they expect, = -
é beget they pass this dark and frightfal ees 3




=



arating the believer from his heavenly in-

| _ heritance, as the river Jordan separated the | .

Children of Israel. from the promised land.

All that are born must die. However distant

we may now think the day. of our. death, yet,

in a few years, and perbaps - in afew days. ate

ne we must go the way of qe ae and
ese bodies ee



& Death i is here represented by a deep river, :
f : : : \ hd eS
on 7 5

os Pilgrims escape from Giant Despair. ; |
$ 13. At length tne Key of Promise they espy, :

g ; Swift from the dread and hateful walls they fly: . 4
Giant Despair puroves with hellish ire— . 5 |

: He falls: the Pilgrims then deli. er’d are. i

By .



TA

=

SOMLOVINST ELE Bs












. . Sis are
lis
en

ee








\

RAR RSS











SoS PRIN ALY





SSRN SRT SSR ESO TOT SO RRR TT

__ &iter being kept for some time in cruel confnementin -

the Doubting Castle, Christian finds the Key of Promise, — |
and with it unlocks the door, and the Pilgrims make their —_-
escape. The free Promise of Salvation by Christ, which
is made to believers, is meant by theKey of Promise,









i
She any ew Unveweaye even viniavunniis gp

Christian enters the Wicket Gate,

4. May ! now enter here ? will he within, :
— - Open to sorry me, though I have been ° .
$ 4n undeserving rebel. ? Then shali I
‘Not fail to sing his lasting praise on high, -
# WVU Anatainaemnaven RAR WB are WEBI VE WOE VAR *








Been Veer WA

: Christian isghown a Portrait.
ef “Pirst view that picture hung against a wali, 4

g That-man a minister of Christ we éall,

é Grave are his looks, to Heaven he lifts his eyes, :

Studies the pee of books to make him wise.

| Chaar being admitted af the Wicket

Gate, continues his journey till he arrives at |
the house of the Interpreter, who shows Him &

‘picture of a grave person with a book in his
hand, the law of Truth written on his lips, the
world behind bis back, and a dazzling crown

of gold over his head. This Portrait repre-
sen{s the true minister of Christ. Christian
is requested by the Interpreter to ake particu-
lar notice of this piece of painting, because
the person it represents | is the only person
whol is. ‘authorized to be his ee in 1 any: auth
cult. or dangerou tion. oe














VITAL ek ofheavenly flame
Quit, oO Quint thi: tnorta frge ys

_ Trembling, re flying
Ob the pat the bliss. ‘of dying ! ices
Cease, fond nature ! cease thy strife, a
And. fet me = languish: into life




3 Caigian ascends Hill Difficulty. ee
2 ”. Then Christian, fill’d with love and hope sublime,

8 : The steep ascent address’d himself to climb ; . 2
: “Till midway up the hill with joy he view’d j ;
2 The Arbor, which to welcome Pilgrims stood.
bs weuyervuer WADA WE Hd PAW VYUVBUVAA UE VA Eenaen ie





hristian enters the Beautiful Palace.
When welcome spectacle ! at hand appear’d 5







ss Aw edifice for entertainment rear’d:
The palace Beautiful was justly nam’d,
For: ellowahip with Pilgrims greatly fam’d.

Bo He Ee ee EA Tt OO
ig : wate






he 2 Reaslenes of Christian communion in
er nances of the Gospel. Christian is ad-
itted by the Porter whose name is Watchful,
is introduced to the maidens of the. Hoke;
, Prudence and Charity, who welcome
“him wits jOye After being entertained in the |
» most. agreeable | manner, he is taken into the
~ Armory and armed for the Christian warfare,”

- with the Sword of the Spirit, the helmet of
Salvation, the Shield of Faith, with his feet
shod with the preparation of the ee
Peace. (See ee Vi, oe y |

X

v8
ip
AMON eae ey



SNES aren NaeteNVEN SAN e toy AAR ~e

CONTINUED.
ee a springing of the year,. returns to
, renovated life, lovely and beautiful.

Here perhaps thou art drooping under.
the pressure of Sorrow ; but in Heaven,
Sorrow and Sighing shall flee away : Here
perhaps he whom thou thinkest thy best
- friend, may plunge a dagger in thy bosom;
there all love one another with- perfec —
love: Here, Sin and Sorrow, Sickness and_
Death, spread a melancholy shade on the
sweetest enjoyments of human life ; there
death iteelf shall die: Here thou desirest
and hast not, and thy soul is often pained ¢
and perplexed at the dealings of thy Hea- 3
gvenly Father: There all the vast desires
of thy soul shall be*fully satisfied, and. thy ¢
‘breast shall forever swell with celestial |
rapture i in the beatific vision of God.

y
=
a
¢
}
bE
a
4.






Submit thyself. therefore with forte.
a the various trials thou art called to eee
, through in this dark vale of tears, fora -
moment longer, and thy troubles will pass
away like the illusion of a morning area
¢ the wicked cease from troubling ; ahe
Death will come with his friendly.
sage, and thy spirit will take her will
¢ Hight to the Paradise of God.






VAAL PAPUA VW Ve BAY VA DAW UDR VAM VY RULry

2 Faithful burnt at Vanity Fair. 3

s 10. When sorely scourg’d he’s fast’ned to a sta ke, “a3 :

8 And burnt to ashes for his Saviour’s sake : é
This Faithful dies ! his spirit dear to God,

é Mounts swift to Heaven along the shining road. é

x vnenpenemieen oes PARADA Vanna











The Pilgrims in By- path Meadows.

11. Darkness came on, with thunder, lightning, rain,
Torrents pour’d down, the waters rose amain :
The storm terrific, filled their souls with dread,
And vengeance seem’d just bursting on their heads.

After Faithful was burnt, Christian mee Ye
his escape, accompanied by afellow pilgrim ©
named Hopeful, who was induced to become &
pilgrim by beholding the faith and conversa:
tion of Faithful during his trial and execution.”
The Pilgrims proceed on their journey, and
after some time find their way grow rough and

difficult; for the sake of ease they turn into a
eee forbidden path which went through by- path
meadows. After wandering about for some
time, there. came on a storm of thunder,
lightning and rain This. represents. the be- |
lever uilde yah dings ¢ of God's countenance.






After Chitietian set out upon his jourtiey, his

. two neighbours, Obstinate and Pliable, at-
tempt to fetch him back by force, but not suc-
ceeding, be prevailed upon Phiable to accom-
pany him, by representing to him the glories of
the Celestial City to which he is going. He
proceeds with him till they both fall into the
Slough of Despond. This unwelcome ac-
cident so discourayed Pliable, that he deter-
mines to go no farther, and accordingly
gets out of the Slough, and returns to his own
house. e.



Phahle turns back.

3. Pliable flound’ring fore’d his passage through,
Reeain’d the cround. and home again he flew :

Bui Christian struggled on without his mate,
And reach’d the side towards the wicket gate. $

a a UN ware ree VeeeyrenMs VOPeeweuwe be





= Bwerrerr renner ure meun merenienr anes aes





: S Christian in the jeune h of Despond. =

€ 2, While’thus with heedless steps. onward went, at ee
aie . In deep thought of his journey was ee ea ie g

; MG ». Atonce he fell, Anh! little did he think — -

ae So soon in miry — and ne to sink. oe =
am 9 ee a
- _. After Christian had beeen hisjourney tothe = =

New-Jerusalem, his friends and neighbors en-
= deavouredito prevent his going; some mocked,
| others threatened, and some cried after him to’
return ; but he is determined to proceed, be-
ing convinced, though fear is. before, yet cer-
tain destruction awaits him if he abides in the
City. But as he hurries along with more €a-
gerness than caution, he runs into a miry.
Slough, called the Slough of Despond. This.
Slough represents those discouraging and des-
-. ponding fears which often harass. new -con-
VE.
Wet

On sb

TRANSFORMATION OF PICTURES,
on THE RNTENTAINHANT AND INSTRUCTION OF

cy

WYVWAARTVORUAEVREBYLUYA

&

gps

ef

Â¥


£

se
;
z
$
%

ave been

‘ Then shalj T-
his lasting praise on high.

y me, though Ih
rebel.?

y {now enter here ? will he within,
An undeserving
oo.
.— J

4. Ma
Open to sorr
-Not fail to sin

: SARI VU IARI Uterine
Christian enters the Wicket Gate.

Apes
+

e08

$
Aue

Christ hinisclt as received.

VRP VUU VU LY UYU WU UH AW BYU Len VEU VOR BABU,

This gate or door rep



resents | ee
-Itis the way by whichhe enters” —

¢

sinner.



t

freconciliation with God. Our Saviour says,

by the peniten



“1am the door; by me if any man enter in, he shail bes
gohn Ko 9, : : sete

into a state o
- saved.”
“When the Believer’t ina dine sehee views:
_ > the Redeemer’s Cross, and discerns clearly the
motive and efficacy of his extreme sufferings,
the perfect freeness. and ‘sufficiency of this
blesséd way of salvation, he is relieved from.
' his sorrow, the burden of his guilt is removed,
and he embraces his cracified Saviour. with
faith and love. While he was here at the
cross, three shining ones suddenly presented
themselves before him, stripped him of his_
rags, clothed him with a beautiful garment,
which signifies the righteousness of Christ ; set
a mark on his forehead, and gave him a roll
which denotes assurance of salvation. —

7 *
th t
a Ss w
" ‘ : 3 a AS GheE ¥
a 3 a Serres ¥ = rte a Spoke p etaarsmameitweptey coe nearer na ee = 3
s %
ve s

BD WwRAAAAATOA RAARAAATA CB DUNSA NAMA AANA TEAC ORIEL

3 Christian’s burden falls at the Cross. —

__#. Ne sooner had he spoke, than strange to tell, ;
o That moment from his back his burden fell: §
| Reliev’d at once from all his guilt and pain,
a tie wept for joy, then gae’d and wept again. 4 3
VUES EE ee ee ee

PChictan mae a Paid

5. First view that picture hung againsta wall, *
That-man a minister of Christ we call,
Grave are his looks, to Heaven he lifts his eyes, :
aeeee ee peer: of | books: to make him wise.



: Christian feciie admitted af the Wicket | :
Gate, continues his journey till he arrives af
the house of the Interpreter, who shows tim a
picture of a grave person with a book in his
hand, the law of Truth wriiten on his lips, the
world behind bis back, and a dazzling crown
of gold over his head. This Portrait repre-
sen{s the true minister of Christ. Christian
is requested by the Interpreter to take particu-
lar notice of this piece of painting, because
the person it represents Is the only person |

who i is: authorized t ope ee in my difft-





aS RUN Un i nnntin f

THE CHRISTIAN CONSOLATION. |

Way art thou ae iouaeeh, art thou
disquieted within ? Are the consolations of
God small? Look up, O Christian, and
cast thy eyes forward to‘the bright scenes
of futurity that awaitthee. Say, does it”
become thee to mourn over the transitory
troubles of this mortal life ? Remember
that this world is not thy continuing place.

I arose with the morning light, and went
¢ forth to view the works of God.—I looked
towards the morming sun—and lo! black
; hovering clouds veiled him from my sight
—a melancholy gloom brooded around,
and darkness covered the hills :—I looked
again, and lo! the sun shone forth in his
strength ; the shades of night fled from the
brightness of his glory, and all natare re-
vived, beautiful as the garden of Eden.

Thus will it be with thee, O Christian
—though the clouds ofadversity may now

2 gather thick around, darkening thy soul,
-e& yet in the morning of the Resurrection,
$the Sun of Righteousness will shine forth
_pepon thy soul, and thou shalt awake to.
eternal life ; like the earth, which has been

: a desolated by the chilling breath of ——

— VA CAACVURRAACON WA RALUA AAA TAAUARAA TAN TAN }





eee WORLD CAE VUULVEUET EE" Be ese dak obo eo ee Ge eda Ae


Ad wenusmusndinns

3 Christian leaves

<1. Fast lock’d in sleep’s embrace I dreamt a dream—
§ The Pilgrim’? S$ journey was the fruitful theme :
a Cover’d with rags, trembling with fear he went,
3 While Guilt and G

Grief his bursting bosom rent.









f -

a

. 3 Christian in the Slough oF FDeagond,
| s 2, While’thus with heedless steps Re onward went,
Re é In deep thought of his j journey was He
Atonce he fell, Ah! little did be think —
.,. So soon in miry clay and mud ‘to sink.







WE AAA TAR Ae

the city of Destruction,

Wises ck peirin a iin > i a oe

| LOIRE BI
hs vesnincananannernntsign neal iaenaitnnncn



After Christian had pha his journey to the.

| New. Jerusalem, his friends and neighbors en-
- deavouredito prevent his going; some mocked,
| others threatened, and some cried after him to’

return ; but he is determined to proceed, be-
ing convinced, though fear is before, yet cer-
tain destruction awaits him*if he abides in the
City. Butas he hurries’ along with more ea-
gerness than caution, he runs into a ye

Slough, called the Slough of Despond.

Slough represents those discouraging and es! |
', ponding fears which often, harass new :con-

7 vere.





xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EZVREHDU8_RHF0YV INGEST_TIME 2015-02-10T20:27:42Z PACKAGE UF00076772_00001
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES