Citation
The Pilgrim's progress, exhibited in a metamorphosis, or a transformation of pictures, for the entertainment and instruction of youth ..

Material Information

Title:
The Pilgrim's progress, exhibited in a metamorphosis, or a transformation of pictures, for the entertainment and instruction of youth ..
Creator:
Bunyan, John, 1628-1688
Barber, John Warner, 1798-1885 ( Publisher )
Loomis & Barnes ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
Hartford
Publisher:
Printed by Loomis & Barnes
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
5 fold. l. : illustrations ; 14 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Toy and movable books -- Specimens ( fast )
Genre:
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Books with movable illustrations ( fast )
1819 ( fast )
Metamorphosis books ( fast )
1819 ( fast )

Notes

General Note:
"Designed and published by J.W. Barber."
Citation/Reference:
Welch, D.A. American children's books, 63.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
20732274 ( OCLC )
ocm20732274
021879960 ( Aleph )

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Full Text
THE
HARTFORD:
Printed by Loomis Barnes.
18.19-.
Copy Right secured according to law.
EXHIBITED IN A
METAMORPHOSIS,
OR A
TRANSFORMATION OF PICTURES,
FOR THU EKTJSRTAXNMENT AND INSTRUCTION OF
YOUTH.
i
>
I
\ DESIGNED AND PUBLISHED BY J. W. BARBER.


This man who is clothed with rags, with a burden on his
back, represents the man who first sets out in the Divine
Life. The burden On his back represents his distressing
sense of guilt; his rags, his self-righteousness. The City
of Destruction represents this present evil world.


Christian leaves the city of Dcst^tioiT
m lo?k,M .ln s,eePs embrace I dreamt a dream
The Pilgrim s journey was the fruitful theme :
ir iW!!b rS,Sl .^embling with fear he went,
\\ bile Guilt and Grief his bursting bosom rent.
y*J*'**'VVWVWH/W*
> Christian in the Slough of Despond, |
* 2. While'thus with heedless steps fte. onward went,
| In deep thought of his journey was intent, $
| At once he fell, Ah little did he think £
5 So soon in miry clay and mud to sink ?
VU'WWU'VVWVWWM-W,
After Christian had began his journey to the
New Jerusalem, his friends and neighbors en
deavoured to prevent his going ; some mocked,
others threatened, and some cried after him to
return ; but he is determined to proceed, be
ing convinced, though fear is before, yet cer
tain destruction awaits him if he abides in the
City, But as he hurries along with more ea
gerness than* caution, he runs into a miry
Slough, called the Slough of Despond, This
Slough represents those discouraging and des
ponding fears which often harass new -con
verts.


Alter Christian set out upon his journey, his
two neighbours, Obstinate and Pliable, at
tempt to fetch him back by force, but not suc
ceeding, he prevailed upon Pliable to accom
pany him, by representing to him the glories of
the Celestial City to which he is going. He
proceeds with him till they both fall into the
Slough of Despond. This unwelcome ac
cident so discouraged Pliable, that he deter
mines to go no farther, and accordingly
gets out of the Slough, and returns to his own
house.
Pliable turns back.
3. Pliable floUndring forcd his passage through,
Regaind the ground, and home again he flew :
Bu: Christian struggled on without his mate,
And reachd the side towards the wicket gate.
^^H/VX | Christian in the Slough of Despond. |
2. Whily'tfius with heedless steps fife onward went, £
In deep thought of his journey was intent, f
At once he fell, Ah i little did he think
So soon in miry clay and mud to sink >
wii'vv,w\wv. w\'vvv'ws.'vvii,,vv\vv\v'vi.'vva'w> Ij?.
i
After Christian had began his journey to the
New Jerusalem, his friends and neighbors en
deavoured to prevent his going; some mocked,
others threatened, and some cried after him to
return ; but he is determined to proceed, be
ing convinced, though fear is before, yet cer
tain destruction awaits him if he abides in the
City. Betas he hurries along with more ea
gerness than' caution, he runs into a miry
Slough, called the Slough of Despond. This
Slough represents those discouraging and des
ponding fears which often harass new -con
verts.


Christian enters the Wicket Gate.
4. May I now enter here ? will he within,
Open to sorry me, though I have been
An undeserving rebel ? Then'shall I
Not fail to sing his lasting praise on high.
This gate or door represents Christ Inutseii as received
by the penitent sinner. It is the way by which he enters
into a state of reconciliation with God. Our Saviour says,
I am the door; by me if any man enter in, he shall be
saved. John x. 9.


Christian enters the Wicket Gate.
4. May I now enter here ? will he within,
Open to sorry me, though I have been
An undeserving rebel ? Then'shall I
Not fail to sing his lasting praise on high.
Christian iss^hown a Portrait.
5. First view that picture hung against a wall,
That man a minister of Christ we Call,
Grave are his looks, to Heaven he lifts his eyes,
Studies the best of books to make him wise.
V VWlfcW WVWV WftVM'V
Christian being admitted at the Wicket
Gate, continues his journey till he arrives at
the house of the Interpreter, who shows him a
picture of a grave person with a book in his
hand, the law of Truth written on his lips, the
world behind his back, and a dazzling crown
of gold over his head. TI)is Portrait repre
sents the true minister of Christ. Christian
is requested by the Interpreter to take particu
lar notice of this piece of painting, because
the person it represents is the only person
who is authorized to be his guide in any diffi
cult or dangerous situation.


When the Believer in a divine light views
the Redeemers Cross, and discerns clearly the
motive and efficacy of his extreme sufferings,
the perfect freeness, and sufficiency of this
blessed way of salvation, he is relieved from
his sorrow, the burden of his guilt is removed,
and he embraces his crucified Saviour with
faith and love* While he was here at the
cross, three shining ones suddenly presented
themselves before him, stripped him of his
rags, clothed him with a beautiful garment,
which signifies the righteousness of Christ; set
a mark on his forehead, and gave him a roll
which denotes assurance of salvation*
| Christians burden falls at the Cross. |
i b No sooner had he spoke, than strange to tell, <
I That moment from his back his burden fell : £
a Relievd at once from all his guilt and pain, £
£ He wept for joy, then ga^d and wept again. $
VW WWI/X Wto V\\ VW -v-vW^WV WtwVWVW!Wk*UV\^.
5$
Christian is^fiown a Portrait.
5. First view that picture hung against a wall,
That man a minister of Christ we call,
Grave are his looks, to Heaven he lifts his eyes,
Studies the best of books to make him wise.
VWtWWVWV
Christian being admitted at the Wicket
Gate, continues his journey till he arrive? at
the house of the Interpreter, who shows him a
picture of a grave person with a hook in his
hand, the law of Truth written on his lips, the
world behind his back, and a dazzling crown
of gold over his head. This Portrait repre
sents the true minister of Christ. Christian
is requested by the interpreter to take particu
lar notice of this piece of painting, because
the person it represents is the only person
who is authorized to be his guide in any diffi
cult or dangerous situation.


^
Christian ascends Hill Difficulty.
7. Then Christian, filld with lore and hope sublime, |
| The steep ascent addressd hitnself to climb ; $
j Till midway up the hill with joy he viewd <
l The Arbor,' which to welcome Pilgrims stood.
5$ wwww% w* wcwwwx vwvwvwvwwvwiwvwvvw^M^
v .^ie Hill Difficulty represents those situations in lift
$diich the Christian passes through, which require mucl:
jlelftderiial and exertion.
; iS Better, though difficult, the right way to go,
X Than wrong, though easy, where the end is woe.


^ wvvwwx
Christian ascends Hill Difficulty,
7. Then Christian, filld with lore and hope sublime,
The steep ascent addressd himself to climb ; $
Till midway up the hill with joy he viewd ^ $
The Arbor, which to welcome Pilgrims stood. ?
hnstian enters the Beautiful Palace.
When welcome spectacle at hand appeard
An edifice for entertainment reard :
The Palace Beautiful is designed to repre-
ent the privileges of Christian communion in
the ordinances of the (Sospei. Christian is ad
mitted by the Porter whose name is Watchful,
and is introduced to the maidens of the House,
Piety, Prudence and Charity, who welcome
him with joy. After being entertained in the
most agreeable manner, he is taken inio the
Armory and armed for the Christian warfare,
with the Sword of the Spirit, the helmet of
Salvation, the Shield of Faith, with his feet
shod with the preparation of the Gospel of
Peace. (See Eph. vi, 1418.)


After descending Hill Difficulty, Christian
enters the valley of Humiliation ; he had not
proceeded far, before a foul fiend met him in
the way and disputed his passage. After a
desperate struggle, Christian falls, and Apolly-
on pressed so hard" upon him that he began to
despair of life, but at length Christian gives
him a deadly thrust with his two edged sword
and gains the victory. This fight denotes
those severe trials and temptations which
some of the children of God experience from
Satan, the enemy of souls.
liV\ l Christian fights Appollyon. |
9. A more unequal match can hardly be,
Christian must fight an angel, but you see, |
The valiant man by handling sword and shield, >
Doth make him though a dragon quit the field.
i
H vwvwww
Christian enters the Beautiful Palace.
When welcome spectacle at hand appeard
An edifice for entertainment reard :
The palace Beautiful was justly namd,
For fellowship with Pilgrims greatly famd.
/WW*/H/WVW^1WWWWWWWVWWWW\%/%/>.iV^/.
*
The Palace Beautiful is designed to repre
sent the privileges of Christian communion in
the ordinances of the (Sospei. Christian is ad
mitted by the Porter whose name is Watchful,
and is introduced to the maidens of the House,
Piety, Prudence and Charity, who welcome
him with joy. After being entertained in the
most agreeable .manner, be is taken into the
Armory and armed for the Christian warfare,
with the Sword of the Spirit, the helmet of
Salvation, the Shield of Faith, with his feet
shod with the preparation of the Gospel of
Peace. (See Eph. vi. 1418.)


^^VWVW WVWVWV WVWVW^I 'W^'W'ik VW) w-^ vww%.vwvw
£ Faithful burnt at Vanity Fair.
a 10. When sorely scourgd hes-fastned to a stake, - \
5 And burnt to ashes for his Saviours sake : I
r Thus Faithful dies his spirit dear to God, i
Mounts swift to Heaven along the shining road, |
^ WV.'VVV'V''I.'W\/\'VV% <^/VWV%'V
In the course of his journey, Christian overtook a fellow -
traveller, whose name was Faithful. Passing through Van
ity Fair, they both are seized and imprisoned. After being
cruelly scourged, Faithful is burnt at the stake. Vanity
Fair represents the riches, honors, &c. of the world.


r
\WWV WW"WWX< VXX. WV WX< V'V-V 'WV WX VW WX
Faithful burnt at Vanity Fair.
10. When sorelv scourgd hes-fastned to a stake, 1
And biirnt to ashes for his Saviours sake :
Thus Faithful dies his spirit dear to God,
Mounts swift to Heaven along the shining road.
I
t
i
*
VWVVWVW/V'VM IVWW5. -v
After Faithful was burnt, Christian made
his escape, accompanied by a fellow pilgrim
named Hopeful, who was induced to become a
pilgrim by beholding the faith and conversa
tion of Faithful during his trial and execution.
The Pilgrims proceed on their journey, and
after some time find their way grow rough and
difficult; for the sake of ease they turn into a
forbidden path which went through by-path
meadows. After wandering about for some
time, there came on a storm of thunder,
lightning and rain. This represents the be
liever under the hidings of Gods countenance.
^ VX/XWX/WX/VX'X.VWWXiVX/VVX'VVV/XiVX'VVX/X/X/vVWX'VX/X/VWWxWX
| The Pilgrims in By-path Meadows.
g 11. Darkness came on, with thunder, lightning, rain,
Torrents pourd down, the waters rose amain :
The storm terrific, filled their souls with dread,
And vengeance seemd just bursting on their heads.
N JAAi W WiVV WVWIl/WV WVW\Wj wvwvvw wvvw w
$


The Pilgrims at length find a little shelter in
which they conclude to wait the approach of
morning, but being weary and overcome by fa
tigue soon fall asleep. Here they remain till
awakened by the voice of the formidable giant
Despair, who with a fierce and malignant
countenance drove them to the Doubting
Castle and there confined them in a dark and
filthy Dungeon. This may'represent the case
of those Christians who have wandered into
forbidden paths till they have sinned in such
a manner, that they begin to despair and
doubt of the mercy of God,
* The Pilgrims taken by Giant Despair,
12. What could they do ? to whom could they complain 7
Resistance to a giant was in vain, 5
Strait to the castle-yard he drove the men, ?
And lockd them in a deep and dirty den.
I
was burnt, Christian made
his escape, accompanied by a fellow pilgrim
named Hopeful, who was induced to become a
pilgrim by beholding the faith and conversa
tion of Faithful during his trial and execution.
The Pilgrims proceed on their journey, and
after some time find their way grow rough and
difficult; for the sake of ease they turn into a
forbidden path which went through by-path
meadows. After wandering about for some
time, there came on a storm of thunder,
lightning and rain. This represents the be
liever under the hidings of Gods countenance.
I he Pilgrims in By-path Meadows.
II. Darkness came on, with thunder, lightning, rain,
Torrents pourd down, the waters rose amain :
The storm terrific, filled their souls with dread,
And vengeance seemd ju3t bursting on their heads.
VV41VWWV WVWVWV


W*.WVWVWVVWimvWWVVWWVK ww ww wwww wo -.
$ Pilgrims escape from Giant Despair.
| J3. At length tfte Key of Promise they espy,
| Swift from the dread and hateful walls they fly :
* Giant Despair pursues with hellish ire
He falls : the Pilgrims then deli, erd are.
After being* kept for some time in cruel confinement in
the Doubting* Castle, Christian finds the Key of Promise,
and with it unlocks the door, and the Pilgrims make their
escape. The free Promise of Salvation by Christ, which
is made to believers, is meant by theKey of Promise.


$ Pilgrims escape from Giant Despair.
i 13. 'At length the Key of Promise they espy,
Swift from the dread and hateful walls they fly :
f Giant Despair pursues with hellish ire
* He falls : the Pilgrims then deli- erd are.
| The Pilgrims in the River of Death. \
< 14. The River Death, the Pilgrims stand aghast,
£ At this hard trial though it is the la9t, $
k No heavenly crown of life can they expect, <
5 Until they pass this dark and frightful deep.
V ?.-'^y%,yy.vwwvvwwwyvvwvv^vv\vww\vwwvwv
Death is here represented by a deep river,
separating the believer from his heavenly in
heritance, as the river Jordan separated the
Children of Israel from the promised land.
All that are born mast die. However distant
we may now think the day of our death, yet,
in a few years, and perhaps in a few days at
most, we must go the way of all the earth, and
these bodies of ours though now so active, will
moulder back to dust, and the morning of the
Resurrection will rise to eternal life, or sink in
endless woe.


The Pilgrims in their passage through the
river of Death, leave their mortal garments in
the river : are immediately clothed with im
mortality and soon conducted by tring spirits into the New-Jerusalem, the
Paradise of God, As they enter the heaven
ly City they are transfigured and clothed with
raiment which shone like gold. Here they
are welcomed by their dear Saviour and all
the heavenly host with joy; here they are to
dwell in the most perfect happiness forever
and ever. May the former and readers of
this, be received in like manner into the king
dom of God,
Pilgrims enter the New Jerusalem.
15. The river past, their heavenly home is near,
When lo two bright seraphic forms appear ;
To Zions hill with airy steps they soar,
With rapture filld I wakd and saw no more.
Death is here represented by a deep river,
separating the believer from his heavenly in
heritance, as the river Jordan separated the
Children of Israel from the promised land.
All that are born must die. However distant
rims in the JLiiver of Death. |
rne Kiver Death, the Pilgrims stand aghast,
this hard trial though it is the last, $
No heavenly crown of life can they expect, <
Until they pass this dark and frightful deep. $
'^Vys.VWVWW)WW VVVV*/'VVVVVV*iVVVVV\VVVVVVVV* WSs,^.
we may now think the day of our death, yet,
in a few years, and perhaps in a few days at
most, we must go the way of all the earth, and
these bodies of ours though now so active, will
moulder back to dust, and the morning of the
Resurrection will rise to eternal life, or sink in
endless woe.


^ VW VVVVVtiVV%.VV%iV'%;VM.VVVVVVVVVVWiVV%'VVVVV\Vft,iWV |j£
THE DYING CHRISTIAN TO HIS SOUL,
An Ode by Mr* Pope*
VITAL spark of heavenly flame !
Quit, O Quit this mortal frame ?
Trembling', hoping, lingering, flying j
Oh the pain, the bliss of dying !
Cease, fond nature cease thy strife.
And let me languish into life.
Hark they whisper : angels say,
Sister spirit, come away-
What is this absorbs me quite,
Steals my senses, shuts mv sight,
Drowns my spirit, draws my breath 7
Tell me, my soul 1 can this be death 7
The world recedes ;it disappears !
Heaun opens on my eyes my ears
With sounds seraphic ring :
Lend, lend your wings 1 mount! I fly
O grave where is thy victory t
O death where is thy sting ?
I V.WV VV'VVXVWVVVW*Wl-V'wV WMVW VWVW


VV\'VVVVV^VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV\VVVVV%VVVVVjvV\VV^VV\
THE CHRISTIAN CONSOLATION. \
Why art thou cast downwhy art thou f
disquieted within ? Are the consolations of \
| God small ? Look up, O Christian, and f
| cast thy eyes forward to the bright scenes |
| of futurity that await thee* Say, does it |
| become thee to mourn over the transitory |
| troubles of this mortal life ? Remember |
5 that this world is not thy continuing place. |
I I arose with the morning light, and went \
\ forth to view the works of God.1 looked f
| towards the morming sunand lo black \
| hovering clouds veiled him from my sight \
| a melancholy gloom brooded around, ^
| and darkness covered the hills I looked |
| again, and lo the sun shone forth in his |
j strength ; the shades of night fled from the $
l brightness of his glory, and all nature re- $
| vived, beautiful as the garden of Eden. |
I Thus will it be with thee, O Christian i
though the clouds of adversity may now \
gather thick around, darkening thy soul, |
| yet in the morning of the Resurrection, ^
| the Sun of Righteousness will shine forth \
| upon thy soul, and thou shalt awake to |
| eternal life ; like the earth, which has been |
3 desolated by the chilling breath of Winter, j
^ VVVV%/\'*k'V\-V%'*'VVVVV\'V'*AIVV*


CONTINUED.
\ yet in the springing of the year, returns to
\ renovated life, lovely and beautiful.
\ Here perhaps thou art drooping under
| the pressure of Sorrow; but in Heaven.
\ Sorrow and Sighing shall flee away : Here
i perhaps he whom thou thinkest thy best
l friend, may plunge a dagger in thy bosom ;
$ there ali love one another with perfect
| love : Here, Sin and Sorrow, Sickness and
| Death, spread a melancholy shade on the
^ sweetest enjoyments of human life ; there
| death itself shall die : Here thou desirest
$ and hast not, and thy soul is often pained
^ and perplexed at the dealings of thy Hea-
£ venly Father : There ali the vast desires
| of thy soul shall be fully satisfied, and thy
I breast shall forever swell with celestial
j rapture in the beatific vision of God.
| Submit thyself therefore with fortitude
^ to the various trials thou art called to pass
| through in this dark vale of tears, for a
| moment longer, and thy troubles will pass
^ away like the illusion of a morning dream ;
| the wicked cease from troubling ; and
| Death will come with his friendly mes-
I sage, and thy spirit will take her willing
l flight to the Paradise of God.


| A PROS PE CT OF H EAVEN MAKES DEATH EASY,
| By Br Watts*
npHER.E is a land of pare delight,
** Where saints immortal reign,
Infinite day excludes the night,
* And pleasures banitft pain.
There everlasting faring: abides.
And neveiowHh?ringdove-c-rs.,
Death, like aharrow sea divides
This he&vrdy land from our*.
Sweet fields beyond the swelling flood
Steed drest in living gre'en :
S,? to the'"Jews old'Caouan stood,
While Jordan rolld between.
But timrpus mortals start and shrink-
To cross this narrow, sea ;
And linger, ahivjrin'g'on the brick,
And. fear to launch away.
O could we make, our doubts remote,
Those gloomy fears that rise.
And see the Canaan that, we love,.
With unbeclouded eyes.
Could we but climb where Moses stood,
And view the landscape oer.
Not Jordans streams, nor deaths cold flood.
Should fright us from the shore.
VVVW* VVUVVW,tMM%VtfVVVVV^,^VVVW'VVW.'W%'li'VVVW(VV%^V/VVVVV4iVV'i/VV%


Full Text
THE
HARTFORD:
Printed by Loomis Barnes.
18.19-.
Copy Right secured according to law.
EXHIBITED IN A
METAMORPHOSIS,
OR A
TRANSFORMATION OF PICTURES,
FOR THU EKTJSRTAXNMENT AND INSTRUCTION OF
YOUTH.
i
>
I
\ DESIGNED AND PUBLISHED BY J. W. BARBER.

This man who is clothed with rags, with a burden on his
back, represents the man who first sets out in the Divine
Life. The burden On his back represents his distressing
sense of guilt; his rags, his self-righteousness. The City
of Destruction represents this present evil world.

Christian leaves the city of Dcst^tioiT
m lo?k,M .ln s,eePs embrace I dreamt a dream
The Pilgrim s journey was the fruitful theme :
ir iW!!b rS,Sl .^embling with fear he went,
\\ bile Guilt and Grief his bursting bosom rent.
y*J*'**'VVWVWH/W*
> Christian in the Slough of Despond, |
* 2. While'thus with heedless steps fte. onward went,
| In deep thought of his journey was intent, $
| At once he fell, Ah little did he think £
5 So soon in miry clay and mud to sink ?
VU'WWU'VVWVWWM-W,
After Christian had began his journey to the
New Jerusalem, his friends and neighbors en
deavoured to prevent his going ; some mocked,
others threatened, and some cried after him to
return ; but he is determined to proceed, be
ing convinced, though fear is before, yet cer
tain destruction awaits him if he abides in the
City, But as he hurries along with more ea
gerness than* caution, he runs into a miry
Slough, called the Slough of Despond, This
Slough represents those discouraging and des
ponding fears which often harass new -con
verts.

Alter Christian set out upon his journey, his
two neighbours, Obstinate and Pliable, at
tempt to fetch him back by force, but not suc
ceeding, he prevailed upon Pliable to accom
pany him, by representing to him the glories of
the Celestial City to which he is going. He
proceeds with him till they both fall into the
Slough of Despond. This unwelcome ac
cident so discouraged Pliable, that he deter
mines to go no farther, and accordingly
gets out of the Slough, and returns to his own
house.
Pliable turns back.
3. Pliable floUndring forcd his passage through,
Regaind the ground, and home again he flew :
Bu: Christian struggled on without his mate,
And reachd the side towards the wicket gate.
^^H/VX | Christian in the Slough of Despond. |
2. Whily'tfius with heedless steps fife onward went, £
In deep thought of his journey was intent, f
At once he fell, Ah i little did he think
So soon in miry clay and mud to sink >
wii'vv,w\wv. w\'vvv'ws.'vvii,,vv\vv\v'vi.'vva'w> Ij?.
i
After Christian had began his journey to the
New Jerusalem, his friends and neighbors en
deavoured to prevent his going; some mocked,
others threatened, and some cried after him to
return ; but he is determined to proceed, be
ing convinced, though fear is before, yet cer
tain destruction awaits him if he abides in the
City. Betas he hurries along with more ea
gerness than' caution, he runs into a miry
Slough, called the Slough of Despond. This
Slough represents those discouraging and des
ponding fears which often harass new -con
verts.

Christian enters the Wicket Gate.
4. May I now enter here ? will he within,
Open to sorry me, though I have been
An undeserving rebel ? Then'shall I
Not fail to sing his lasting praise on high.
This gate or door represents Christ Inutseii as received
by the penitent sinner. It is the way by which he enters
into a state of reconciliation with God. Our Saviour says,
I am the door; by me if any man enter in, he shall be
saved. John x. 9.

Christian enters the Wicket Gate.
4. May I now enter here ? will he within,
Open to sorry me, though I have been
An undeserving rebel ? Then'shall I
Not fail to sing his lasting praise on high.
Christian iss^hown a Portrait.
5. First view that picture hung against a wall,
That man a minister of Christ we Call,
Grave are his looks, to Heaven he lifts his eyes,
Studies the best of books to make him wise.
V VWlfcW WVWV WftVM'V
Christian being admitted at the Wicket
Gate, continues his journey till he arrives at
the house of the Interpreter, who shows him a
picture of a grave person with a book in his
hand, the law of Truth written on his lips, the
world behind his back, and a dazzling crown
of gold over his head. TI)is Portrait repre
sents the true minister of Christ. Christian
is requested by the Interpreter to take particu
lar notice of this piece of painting, because
the person it represents is the only person
who is authorized to be his guide in any diffi
cult or dangerous situation.

When the Believer in a divine light views
the Redeemers Cross, and discerns clearly the
motive and efficacy of his extreme sufferings,
the perfect freeness, and sufficiency of this
blessed way of salvation, he is relieved from
his sorrow, the burden of his guilt is removed,
and he embraces his crucified Saviour with
faith and love* While he was here at the
cross, three shining ones suddenly presented
themselves before him, stripped him of his
rags, clothed him with a beautiful garment,
which signifies the righteousness of Christ; set
a mark on his forehead, and gave him a roll
which denotes assurance of salvation*
| Christians burden falls at the Cross. |
i b No sooner had he spoke, than strange to tell, <
I That moment from his back his burden fell : £
a Relievd at once from all his guilt and pain, £
£ He wept for joy, then ga^d and wept again. $
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5$
Christian is^fiown a Portrait.
5. First view that picture hung against a wall,
That man a minister of Christ we call,
Grave are his looks, to Heaven he lifts his eyes,
Studies the best of books to make him wise.
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Christian being admitted at the Wicket
Gate, continues his journey till he arrive? at
the house of the Interpreter, who shows him a
picture of a grave person with a hook in his
hand, the law of Truth written on his lips, the
world behind his back, and a dazzling crown
of gold over his head. This Portrait repre
sents the true minister of Christ. Christian
is requested by the interpreter to take particu
lar notice of this piece of painting, because
the person it represents is the only person
who is authorized to be his guide in any diffi
cult or dangerous situation.

^
Christian ascends Hill Difficulty.
7. Then Christian, filld with lore and hope sublime, |
| The steep ascent addressd hitnself to climb ; $
j Till midway up the hill with joy he viewd <
l The Arbor,' which to welcome Pilgrims stood.
5$ wwww% w* wcwwwx vwvwvwvwwvwiwvwvvw^M^
v .^ie Hill Difficulty represents those situations in lift
$diich the Christian passes through, which require mucl:
jlelftderiial and exertion.
; iS Better, though difficult, the right way to go,
X Than wrong, though easy, where the end is woe.

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Christian ascends Hill Difficulty,
7. Then Christian, filld with lore and hope sublime,
The steep ascent addressd himself to climb ; $
Till midway up the hill with joy he viewd ^ $
The Arbor, which to welcome Pilgrims stood. ?
hnstian enters the Beautiful Palace.
When welcome spectacle at hand appeard
An edifice for entertainment reard :
The Palace Beautiful is designed to repre-
ent the privileges of Christian communion in
the ordinances of the (Sospei. Christian is ad
mitted by the Porter whose name is Watchful,
and is introduced to the maidens of the House,
Piety, Prudence and Charity, who welcome
him with joy. After being entertained in the
most agreeable manner, he is taken inio the
Armory and armed for the Christian warfare,
with the Sword of the Spirit, the helmet of
Salvation, the Shield of Faith, with his feet
shod with the preparation of the Gospel of
Peace. (See Eph. vi, 1418.)

After descending Hill Difficulty, Christian
enters the valley of Humiliation ; he had not
proceeded far, before a foul fiend met him in
the way and disputed his passage. After a
desperate struggle, Christian falls, and Apolly-
on pressed so hard" upon him that he began to
despair of life, but at length Christian gives
him a deadly thrust with his two edged sword
and gains the victory. This fight denotes
those severe trials and temptations which
some of the children of God experience from
Satan, the enemy of souls.
liV\ l Christian fights Appollyon. |
9. A more unequal match can hardly be,
Christian must fight an angel, but you see, |
The valiant man by handling sword and shield, >
Doth make him though a dragon quit the field.
i
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Christian enters the Beautiful Palace.
When welcome spectacle at hand appeard
An edifice for entertainment reard :
The palace Beautiful was justly namd,
For fellowship with Pilgrims greatly famd.
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*
The Palace Beautiful is designed to repre
sent the privileges of Christian communion in
the ordinances of the (Sospei. Christian is ad
mitted by the Porter whose name is Watchful,
and is introduced to the maidens of the House,
Piety, Prudence and Charity, who welcome
him with joy. After being entertained in the
most agreeable .manner, be is taken into the
Armory and armed for the Christian warfare,
with the Sword of the Spirit, the helmet of
Salvation, the Shield of Faith, with his feet
shod with the preparation of the Gospel of
Peace. (See Eph. vi. 1418.)

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£ Faithful burnt at Vanity Fair.
a 10. When sorely scourgd hes-fastned to a stake, - \
5 And burnt to ashes for his Saviours sake : I
r Thus Faithful dies his spirit dear to God, i
Mounts swift to Heaven along the shining road, |
^ WV.'VVV'V''I.'W\/\'VV% <^/VWV%'V
In the course of his journey, Christian overtook a fellow -
traveller, whose name was Faithful. Passing through Van
ity Fair, they both are seized and imprisoned. After being
cruelly scourged, Faithful is burnt at the stake. Vanity
Fair represents the riches, honors, &c. of the world.

r
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Faithful burnt at Vanity Fair.
10. When sorelv scourgd hes-fastned to a stake, 1
And biirnt to ashes for his Saviours sake :
Thus Faithful dies his spirit dear to God,
Mounts swift to Heaven along the shining road.
I
t
i
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After Faithful was burnt, Christian made
his escape, accompanied by a fellow pilgrim
named Hopeful, who was induced to become a
pilgrim by beholding the faith and conversa
tion of Faithful during his trial and execution.
The Pilgrims proceed on their journey, and
after some time find their way grow rough and
difficult; for the sake of ease they turn into a
forbidden path which went through by-path
meadows. After wandering about for some
time, there came on a storm of thunder,
lightning and rain. This represents the be
liever under the hidings of Gods countenance.
^ VX/XWX/WX/VX'X.VWWXiVX/VVX'VVV/XiVX'VVX/X/X/vVWX'VX/X/VWWxWX
| The Pilgrims in By-path Meadows.
g 11. Darkness came on, with thunder, lightning, rain,
Torrents pourd down, the waters rose amain :
The storm terrific, filled their souls with dread,
And vengeance seemd just bursting on their heads.
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$

The Pilgrims at length find a little shelter in
which they conclude to wait the approach of
morning, but being weary and overcome by fa
tigue soon fall asleep. Here they remain till
awakened by the voice of the formidable giant
Despair, who with a fierce and malignant
countenance drove them to the Doubting
Castle and there confined them in a dark and
filthy Dungeon. This may'represent the case
of those Christians who have wandered into
forbidden paths till they have sinned in such
a manner, that they begin to despair and
doubt of the mercy of God,
* The Pilgrims taken by Giant Despair,
12. What could they do ? to whom could they complain 7
Resistance to a giant was in vain, 5
Strait to the castle-yard he drove the men, ?
And lockd them in a deep and dirty den.
I
was burnt, Christian made
his escape, accompanied by a fellow pilgrim
named Hopeful, who was induced to become a
pilgrim by beholding the faith and conversa
tion of Faithful during his trial and execution.
The Pilgrims proceed on their journey, and
after some time find their way grow rough and
difficult; for the sake of ease they turn into a
forbidden path which went through by-path
meadows. After wandering about for some
time, there came on a storm of thunder,
lightning and rain. This represents the be
liever under the hidings of Gods countenance.
I he Pilgrims in By-path Meadows.
II. Darkness came on, with thunder, lightning, rain,
Torrents pourd down, the waters rose amain :
The storm terrific, filled their souls with dread,
And vengeance seemd ju3t bursting on their heads.
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W*.WVWVWVVWimvWWVVWWVK ww ww wwww wo -.
$ Pilgrims escape from Giant Despair.
| J3. At length tfte Key of Promise they espy,
| Swift from the dread and hateful walls they fly :
* Giant Despair pursues with hellish ire
He falls : the Pilgrims then deli, erd are.
After being* kept for some time in cruel confinement in
the Doubting* Castle, Christian finds the Key of Promise,
and with it unlocks the door, and the Pilgrims make their
escape. The free Promise of Salvation by Christ, which
is made to believers, is meant by theKey of Promise.

$ Pilgrims escape from Giant Despair.
i 13. 'At length the Key of Promise they espy,
Swift from the dread and hateful walls they fly :
f Giant Despair pursues with hellish ire
* He falls : the Pilgrims then deli- erd are.
| The Pilgrims in the River of Death. \
< 14. The River Death, the Pilgrims stand aghast,
£ At this hard trial though it is the la9t, $
k No heavenly crown of life can they expect, <
5 Until they pass this dark and frightful deep.
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Death is here represented by a deep river,
separating the believer from his heavenly in
heritance, as the river Jordan separated the
Children of Israel from the promised land.
All that are born mast die. However distant
we may now think the day of our death, yet,
in a few years, and perhaps in a few days at
most, we must go the way of all the earth, and
these bodies of ours though now so active, will
moulder back to dust, and the morning of the
Resurrection will rise to eternal life, or sink in
endless woe.

The Pilgrims in their passage through the
river of Death, leave their mortal garments in
the river : are immediately clothed with im
mortality and soon conducted by tring spirits into the New-Jerusalem, the
Paradise of God, As they enter the heaven
ly City they are transfigured and clothed with
raiment which shone like gold. Here they
are welcomed by their dear Saviour and all
the heavenly host with joy; here they are to
dwell in the most perfect happiness forever
and ever. May the former and readers of
this, be received in like manner into the king
dom of God,
Pilgrims enter the New Jerusalem.
15. The river past, their heavenly home is near,
When lo two bright seraphic forms appear ;
To Zions hill with airy steps they soar,
With rapture filld I wakd and saw no more.
Death is here represented by a deep river,
separating the believer from his heavenly in
heritance, as the river Jordan separated the
Children of Israel from the promised land.
All that are born must die. However distant
rims in the JLiiver of Death. |
rne Kiver Death, the Pilgrims stand aghast,
this hard trial though it is the last, $
No heavenly crown of life can they expect, <
Until they pass this dark and frightful deep. $
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we may now think the day of our death, yet,
in a few years, and perhaps in a few days at
most, we must go the way of all the earth, and
these bodies of ours though now so active, will
moulder back to dust, and the morning of the
Resurrection will rise to eternal life, or sink in
endless woe.

^ VW VVVVVtiVV%.VV%iV'%;VM.VVVVVVVVVVWiVV%'VVVVV\Vft,iWV |j£
THE DYING CHRISTIAN TO HIS SOUL,
An Ode by Mr* Pope*
VITAL spark of heavenly flame !
Quit, O Quit this mortal frame ?
Trembling', hoping, lingering, flying j
Oh the pain, the bliss of dying !
Cease, fond nature cease thy strife.
And let me languish into life.
Hark they whisper : angels say,
Sister spirit, come away-
What is this absorbs me quite,
Steals my senses, shuts mv sight,
Drowns my spirit, draws my breath 7
Tell me, my soul 1 can this be death 7
The world recedes ;it disappears !
Heaun opens on my eyes my ears
With sounds seraphic ring :
Lend, lend your wings 1 mount! I fly
O grave where is thy victory t
O death where is thy sting ?
I V.WV VV'VVXVWVVVW*Wl-V'wV WMVW VWVW

VV\'VVVVV^VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV\VVVVV%VVVVVjvV\VV^VV\
THE CHRISTIAN CONSOLATION. \
Why art thou cast downwhy art thou f
disquieted within ? Are the consolations of \
| God small ? Look up, O Christian, and f
| cast thy eyes forward to the bright scenes |
| of futurity that await thee* Say, does it |
| become thee to mourn over the transitory |
| troubles of this mortal life ? Remember |
5 that this world is not thy continuing place. |
I I arose with the morning light, and went \
\ forth to view the works of God.1 looked f
| towards the morming sunand lo black \
| hovering clouds veiled him from my sight \
| a melancholy gloom brooded around, ^
| and darkness covered the hills I looked |
| again, and lo the sun shone forth in his |
j strength ; the shades of night fled from the $
l brightness of his glory, and all nature re- $
| vived, beautiful as the garden of Eden. |
I Thus will it be with thee, O Christian i
though the clouds of adversity may now \
gather thick around, darkening thy soul, |
| yet in the morning of the Resurrection, ^
| the Sun of Righteousness will shine forth \
| upon thy soul, and thou shalt awake to |
| eternal life ; like the earth, which has been |
3 desolated by the chilling breath of Winter, j
^ VVVV%/\'*k'V\-V%'*'VVVVV\'V'*AIVV*

CONTINUED.
\ yet in the springing of the year, returns to
\ renovated life, lovely and beautiful.
\ Here perhaps thou art drooping under
| the pressure of Sorrow; but in Heaven.
\ Sorrow and Sighing shall flee away : Here
i perhaps he whom thou thinkest thy best
l friend, may plunge a dagger in thy bosom ;
$ there ali love one another with perfect
| love : Here, Sin and Sorrow, Sickness and
| Death, spread a melancholy shade on the
^ sweetest enjoyments of human life ; there
| death itself shall die : Here thou desirest
$ and hast not, and thy soul is often pained
^ and perplexed at the dealings of thy Hea-
£ venly Father : There ali the vast desires
| of thy soul shall be fully satisfied, and thy
I breast shall forever swell with celestial
j rapture in the beatific vision of God.
| Submit thyself therefore with fortitude
^ to the various trials thou art called to pass
| through in this dark vale of tears, for a
| moment longer, and thy troubles will pass
^ away like the illusion of a morning dream ;
| the wicked cease from troubling ; and
| Death will come with his friendly mes-
I sage, and thy spirit will take her willing
l flight to the Paradise of God.

| A PROS PE CT OF H EAVEN MAKES DEATH EASY,
| By Br Watts*
npHER.E is a land of pare delight,
** Where saints immortal reign,
Infinite day excludes the night,
* And pleasures banitft pain.
There everlasting faring: abides.
And neveiowHh?ringdove-c-rs.,
Death, like aharrow sea divides
This he&vrdy land from our*.
Sweet fields beyond the swelling flood
Steed drest in living gre'en :
S,? to the'"Jews old'Caouan stood,
While Jordan rolld between.
But timrpus mortals start and shrink-
To cross this narrow, sea ;
And linger, ahivjrin'g'on the brick,
And. fear to launch away.
O could we make, our doubts remote,
Those gloomy fears that rise.
And see the Canaan that, we love,.
With unbeclouded eyes.
Could we but climb where Moses stood,
And view the landscape oer.
Not Jordans streams, nor deaths cold flood.
Should fright us from the shore.
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