Citation
Little Red Riding Hood and Cinderella

Material Information

Title:
Little Red Riding Hood and Cinderella : with surprise pictures
Series Title:
Dean's surprise picture books
Added title page title:
Cinderella
Creator:
Dean & Son ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Dean & Son
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
12 p. : ill. ; 20 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Toy and movable books -- Specimens ( lcsh )
Fairy tales -- 1877 ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1877 ( rbgenr )
Metamorphic pictures -- 1877 ( rbgenr )
Baldwin -- 1877 ( local )
Genre:
Fairy tales ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
metamorphic pictures ( aat )
fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Includes publisher's advertisement, back cover.
General Note:
Date from inscription.
General Note:
Contains six pictures, each with four fold out flaps to create different pictures.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
028726468 ( ALEPH )
38728074 ( OCLC )
ALT4446 ( NOTIS )

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Full Text




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LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.

Many years ago, there lived in a village, a pretty and sweet-tempered
little girl, whose parents loved her very dearly; but her Grandmother
quite doated on her, and she made her a pretty red-coloured hood;
and you may be sure that the child looked quite charming im it.
“What do you say for it?” said her Grandmother, as she stood by her
spinning-wheel and looked lovingly at the little maiden, who answered
her with many kisses, and said, “Since I have had this fine new cloak,
Grandmother, people call me Livrin Rep Rivne Hoop.”

Red Riding Hood had the funniest little dog you ever saw. It liked
nothing so well as a scamper with its little mistress through the green
woods, ‘Tiny was the dog’s name; and wherever Little Red Riding Hood
went, there went Tiny also, One day, her mother having made some
cheesecakes, said to her, “ Your Grandmother is ill, I fear; so carry her
this little pot of fend butter and a few of these cheesecakes; but,
mind, do not stop to talk with any one you meet on the road, and

come back before sundown.”











Delighted with her errand, dear Little Red Riding Hood set out for
her Grandmother’s cottage, Tiny by her side, trying to make believe
that he did. not want to chase the squirrels in the wood. As she
was crossing a thick wood, which lay in her road, she met a Wolf, who
had a great mind to eat her, but dared not, because of some woodcutters,
who were at work near them. So, wagging his tail, he asked her, however,
where she was going. Not knowing how very dangerous, nor thinking
how naughty it was to stop on the road to talk to any one, especially
to a Wolf, she said, “I am going to see my Grandmother, who is not
very well, and take her these cakes and this pot of butter.” “Does she
live very far off?” said the Wolf. ‘Oh, yes,” said Little Red Riding
Hood ; “beyond the mill which you see yonder, at the very first house
you come to in the village.” “Very well,” said the Wolf, “I will go
there too: let us see which will be there first.”

Away went the Wolf running at full speed, and taking the
nearest road; but the little girl did not hurry there, for she amused
herself with singing songs and gathering some wild flowers which grew
in the wood, and making them up into a pretty nosegay for her
Grandmother, who she knew was very fond of flowers.

The Wolf, who had run all the way, and had leaped over hedges
and ditches, that he might get there quickly, soon arrived at the cottage

of Red Riding Hood’s Grandmother, and knocked at the door. “Who
2





is there?” asked the Grandmother. “It is your grandchild, Red Riding
Hood,” said the Wolf, trying to imitate her voice; “Mother has sent you
some cheesecakes and a pot of fresh butter.”

The good old woman, who was ill and in bed, called out, “ Pull
the bobbin, and the door will open.” Accordingly, the Wolf did as he
was told, opened the door and entered the cottage, where he found all
very quiet; so he softly closed the door after him, and stealthily crept
towards the bed, where the good old lady was laying, for she was too
unwell to rise and dress herself that morning.

Alas! poor old woman, instead of beholding her pretty grandchild,
it was a ravenous and wicked Wolf, who, not having tasted any food
for three days, sprang upon her, and ate her all up. He then tried to
put the room a little in order, that Red Riding Hood might not see
the things in confusion; for he had knocked over her table and the things
that were on it, ‘Then he put on the old lady’s night-cap and bed-gown,
looked at himself in the glass, smiled, and went to bed, to wait for the. |
little girl’s a*rival. :

He listened to every sound that broke the silence; for he thought
that every footstep he heard approaching must be the step of Little
Red Riding Hood. At last he felt rather drowsy, after his very hearty
meal, and would have gone to sleep; but the fear of any stranger coming

to the cottage, kept him wide awake.
3



In about an hour, Little Red Riding Hood came, and gently
tapped two or three times at the door; but Tiny kept on barking and
pulling at his little mistress’s frock, to prevent her going im, and then
ran away. ‘Who is there?” said the Wolf. She replied, supposing of
course that it was her Grandmother who spoke, “It is me, — your own
grandchild, Little Red Riding Hood. Mother has sent you some
cheesecakes and a pot of nice fresh butter, that she has made this
morning especially for you.” The Wolf, softening his voice as much as
he possibly could, as: well as trying to imitate the Grandmother’s voice,
said, “Pull the bobbin, and the door will open.” Having pulled the
bobbin, Red Riding Hood went into the house; when the Wolf said,
softly, “Put the basket down, my dear child, and come into bed with
me; for you must be very tired.”

“Yes, I will, Grandmother,’ said the poor little innocent, “as
soon as I have put these pretty flowers, which I have gathered for you,
into the pots. See, dear Grandmother, how nicely I have decorated your
chimney-piece.”

The Wolf, however, declined looking at the flowers, pretending that
his head ached so sadly, that he could not raise it.

“T am very sorry you are so ill,” said Little Red Riding Hood,
‘‘and mother will be much grieved to hear it. Shall I hand you some

nice white cake?’ ‘No, thank you, my dear,’ answered the Wolf, “I
4,



cannot eat just now; for I made a hearty meal just before you came,
and therefore I do not feel at all hungry.”

Tittle Red Riding Hood soon after this got into bed, but declined
taking her dress off; and in talking, said, “Do you know, Grandmother,
as I came along, | met a Wolf in the wood; at first I was frightened,
but he spoke so kindly, that my fears ended. I hope you are not angry
with me for speaking to him.” “No,” said the Wolf, “I am quite
pleased.”

Little Red Riding Hood being tired from her walk, soon fell asleep.
The Wolf was so pleased at having her in his power, that in pressing
her rather tightly, she awoke, and thinking how very much altered her
Grandmother looked, she could not tel saying, “How rough and long
your arms have grown!” “‘Ihe better to fondle you with, my dear child.”
«But Grandmother, how your ears stand up.” “The better to hear
your sweet voice, my love.” “How large and bright your eyes a
Grandmother!’ The better to gaze upon you, my love.” “But how
ee and frightful your teeth are” “All the better to —”

The Wolf was going to say, “Better to eat you with,” and was
ready to seize on the little girl, and kill her, when suddenly there was
the bark of a dog outside, and the voices of men; and, the next minute,
im rushed Red Riding Hood’s Father, and her elder Brother, and two

or three villagers. The dog Tiny had alarmed them all by his barking
6



and being separated from his mistress; they had followed him, and
arrived just in time to save her life. The old Wolf. leapt out of bed,
with the night-cap on, and tried to escape; but Red Riding Hood’s
Brother gave him a sharp rap over the nose, and sent him back again.
“Kall the Wolf! kill him!” said all the men together.. But Little Red
Riding Hood’s Father said, “No; let us do better than that. Let us
sell him to the master of a wild beast show.” So they put a chain
round his neck, and made him fast. :

Little Red Riding Hood was very sorry that she had disobeyed
her Mother, and talked with a stranger by the way, when she was told
not to do so. She never did so again. As for Tiny, you never saw a
dog so boisterous as he was when he found his little mistress all right;
and, as for the Wolf, he was sold for a lump of money, which was safely

kept and given to Red Riding Hood on her twenty-first birthday.

MOA LL.

We may see by this story how very wrong it is for children not
to do exactly as they are desired by their parents; and what great evil
and suffermg they bring upon themselves, and upon those they love,

even by a little error.





















THE AMUSING HISTORY OF CINDERELLA:

OR,

Dae LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER.

Lone ago, there lived a gentleman of fortune and his wife, a
very amiable and beautiful lady. But, unfortunately, the mother died.
before their little girl was nine years of age. When the father’s grief
was a little abated, he resolved to look for some prudent lady, who
might be a mother to his child, and a companion to himself. Unfortu-
nately, his choice fell on a widow lady, of a proud and tyrannical
disposition, who had two daughters, both haughty, like their mother.

Though the gentleman thought this lady was amiable, the marriage
was scarcely over, when his wife appeared in her real character. She
treated his sweet little girl with great harshness, and paid no attention
to her husband, who remonstrated with her on her conduct to his dearly
loved daughter; and at last, unable to resist her violence and unkindness,
he fell into low spirits, which brought him to an early grave. After
the death of her father, the young orphan’s hardships greatly increased :
she had to do the meanest work about the kitchen. At night, she
was forced to sleep in a garret on a straw bed, and she had not clothes
enough to protect her from the cold.

Although she was so badly used, the sweet girl did not repine;
but when her work was done, she would sit down in the corner of the

i



chimney among the cinders; which made some of the family call her
Cinderwench. However, the younger sister gave her the more genteel
name of Cinderella, and all the rest followed her example: Notwithstanding
all that she endured, Cinderella, as she grew up, became every day more
beautiful, far surpassing the two sisters, with all their fine clothes.

About this time, a splendid ball was to be given at court by the king’s -
son, to which all the nobility and gentry were invited; and, among
others, the two sisters received an invitation. ‘These haughty girls, quite
delighted with the thought of being at a ball given by the king’s son,
proceeded to arrange their dresses for the stately occasion.

As the two sisters knew Cinderella had good taste, they conde-
scended to employ her to dress them on this grand occasion.

At length the wished-for moment arrived, and these proud girls drove
away to the palace. Cinderella returned to the kitchen in tears. She
continued sobbing in the corner of the chimney, until a noise aroused
her, and looking up, to her surprise, she saw a beautiful fairy, with
a wand in her hand, appear. Cinderella thought that her eyes deceived
her, as she had never seen the fairy before; who, with a good-natured
smile on her countenance, thus accosted her:

“My dear Cinderella, I am your fairy godmother, and know the
desire you have to go to this fine ball. Therefore, dry up your tears;
and as you are a good girl, you shall go there.

The fairy took Cinderella by the hand, and said, “Now, my dear,
you must go into the garden and fetch me a pumpkin.” Cinderella
almost flew to execute her commands, and returned with one of the
_ finest she could meet with. Her god-mother took the pumpkin, and
then striking it with her wand, it instantly became one of the most
elegant carriages possible to behold.

Cinderella was next desired to go to the pantry for the mouse-trap.
She did so, and found four little mice alive in the trap, which

8



she brought to the fairy. Cinderella raised the trap door, and as the
mice came out one by one, a touch of the fairy’s wand transformed them
into four beautiful carriage horses.

““N ow, dear girl,” said the fairy “here you have a coach and horses,
much handsomer than your sisters; but, as we have not a coachman
to take care of them, run quickly to the stable, where the rat-trap is
placed, and bring it to me.’’ Cinderella, soon returned with the trap,
in which there was a large rat. The fairy touched it with her wand, and
immediately it was changed into a fine jolly-looking coachman.

Her godmother then said, ‘‘Cinderella, you must go to the garden
again, and close to the wall you will see the watering-pot standing;
look behind it, and there you will find six lizards; bring them to me
immediately.’’ Cinderella ran to the garden and found the six lizards,
which she brought to the fairy. Another touch of the wonderful wand
converted these animals into six spruce footmen, in dashing liveries,
who immediately jumped up behind the carriage.

The coachman haying likewise taken his place, the fairy said to
Cinderella, ‘“‘ Well, my dear girl, is not this as fine an equipage as you
could desire to goto the ball with! ‘Tell me, now, are you pleased with it?’

“OQ yes! dear godmother,’ replied Cinderella; and then, with a good
deal of hesitation, added, “but how can I make my appearance among
so many finely-dressed people in these mean-looking clothes?”

“Give yourself no uneasiness about that, my dear,” said the fairy, with
a good-humoured smile; ‘it will be hard if I cannot make your dress
correspond with your equipage.’”” On saying this, she touched Cinder-
ella with the magic wand, and her clothes, were instantly changed into
magnifice nt apparel, ornamented with the most costly jewels. ‘Then taking
from her pocket a beautiful pair of elastic glass slippers, she caused
Cinderella to put them on, and get into the carriage with all expedition,
as the ball had already commenced.

9



Cinderella instantly stepped into the carriage; and her godmother,
before she took leave, strictly charged her on no account to stay at the
ball after the clock had struck twelve; telling her, that if she stopped a
single moment beyond that time, all would return to their original state.
Cinderella promised to attend to every thing the fairy had said; and
then, quite overjoyed, drove off to the ball.

The arrival of so splendid an equipage as Cinderella’s could not fail
to attract general notice; and information having reached the king’s son,
that a beautiful princess was in waiting, he hastened to meet her, and
led her gracefully into the ball-room.

When Cinderella made her appearance, both music and dancing were
suspended for a few minutes; and the company seemed to be struck
dumb with admiration. Then they began in whispers: “How beautiful
she is!” “How elegantly she is dressed |”

The king’s son conducted Cinderella to one of the most distinguished
seats; and, placing himself by her side, handed her some refreshments.
He then requested to have the honour of dancing with her. Cinderella
gave a smiling consent, and the delighted prince led her into the midst
of the dancers.

The music played and the dance commenced; but if the beauty and
elegant figure of Cinderella had before drawn the admiration of every
one, the astonishment excited by her dancing it is impossible to describe.
The graceful and airy lightness of her motions, for she seemed scarcely
to touch the ground, drew forth general admiration.

During dancing, Cinderella heard the clock strike a quarter to twelve,
and she immediately took a hurried leave of the company, and returned
safely home in her carriage. On entering, she found her godmother,
the fairy, to whom she related all that had taken place at the ball, and
thanked her a thousand times for the pleasure she had enjoyed. She then
told the fairy, that there was to be another ball on the following evening,

10



to which the prince had given her a very pressing invitation; and modestly
gnc the happiness it would afford her to be present,

- Her godmother had just promised to gratify her wishes, when a loud
knocking announced the arrival of her sisters. On their entrance, Cin-
derella, who pretended to be just awakened out of a sound sleep, said,
“Oh dear, how late aon have stopped! I thought you would never have
come home.”

Next evening, the two sisters went to the ball; and so did Cinder-
ella. The prince, who was delighted to see her, did not leave her the
whole evening.

The evening passed away before Cinderella was aware of it; and
the clock struck twelve, when she supposed it could scarcely be eleven.
Alarmed, she almost flew out of the ball-room. ‘The prince pursued her,
which made Cinderella run the faster; and, in the hurry, she dropped
one of her glass slippers, which he picked up. Fatigued and breathless,
it was with difficulty that Cinderella reached home in her old clothing,
without the coach or attendants, with which she had set out there, and
with only one glass slipper. ‘The prince inquired of all the guards if
they had seen the magnificent princess pass through the palace gates;
but they said that no person had gone out except a poor beggar girl.

When the sisters returned, they told Cinderella that a beautiful
princess had lost her glass slipper at the ball; she having run away as
the clock struck twelve.

_ A few days after the ball, it was proclaimed that the prince would
marry the lady whom the slipper fitted. The slipper was carried by
the prince’s order to all the ladies of his dominions; it betng brought to the
two sisters, they tried to squeeze the slipper on, but all to no purpose.
Cinderella who was present, knowing her slipper, said, ‘“‘ Pray sir, may
I be allowed to try it on?’ The two sisters burst out in laughter, but
the officer, seeing that Cinderella was yery beautiful,.desired her to try

Il



it on. Cinderella, sitting down on a chair, put it on her foot with
the greatest ease. ‘The two sisters were astonished at seeig it fit so
exactly; but were more astonished, when she pulled its fellow from her
pocket, and put it on likewise. At that moment the fairy godmother
entered, and touching Cinderella with her wand, changed her poor clothes
into a more magnificent dress than she had yet appeared in.

The officer then conducted her to the prince, who was again so
struck with her beauty, that he solicited her hand in marriage. Cinder-
ella gave her consent, and the ceremony took place a few days afterwards,
with great pomp and rejoicing. Although Cinderella had been so cruelly
used by her two stepsisters, she was far from resenting their ill-treatment;
she sent for them to court, and by her influence they were married to
two noblemen; and Cinderella spent a long life of happiness which sel-
dom falls to the lot of mortals.

12



















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- 4









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( TLLUSTRATED as this BOOK.

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1. THE TRANSFORMING: PERFORMERS.
.2.ROBINSON CRUSOE.
3.PUNCH AND JUDY with true account

of the MARIAGE of Mis JUDY and Master PUNCH.
4.RED RIDING HOOD and CINDERELLA.

5.CLOWN AnD PANTALOON’S PANTOMIMIC:
FUN AND TRICKS
6.THE SURPRISE PICTURE ALPHABET.

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with words as played before the queen at the CRISTAL PALACE.

LONDON. DEAN & SON. Publishers, Manufacturers of Christmas

e Birthday, and Easter Cards. 160° Fleet Street, E.C. e.
x \



Emrik & Binger Jith: printers Haarlem, 31 King William street London F ©



Full Text






PES
i

Ss STR GN ES eS







Fleet Street.

g

“TONDON, DEAN & SON, Publishers. 160






The Baldwin Library

University
Ria
Florida




ees TOES ,

ee


PHB HS rOR YY: © hf

LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.

Many years ago, there lived in a village, a pretty and sweet-tempered
little girl, whose parents loved her very dearly; but her Grandmother
quite doated on her, and she made her a pretty red-coloured hood;
and you may be sure that the child looked quite charming im it.
“What do you say for it?” said her Grandmother, as she stood by her
spinning-wheel and looked lovingly at the little maiden, who answered
her with many kisses, and said, “Since I have had this fine new cloak,
Grandmother, people call me Livrin Rep Rivne Hoop.”

Red Riding Hood had the funniest little dog you ever saw. It liked
nothing so well as a scamper with its little mistress through the green
woods, ‘Tiny was the dog’s name; and wherever Little Red Riding Hood
went, there went Tiny also, One day, her mother having made some
cheesecakes, said to her, “ Your Grandmother is ill, I fear; so carry her
this little pot of fend butter and a few of these cheesecakes; but,
mind, do not stop to talk with any one you meet on the road, and

come back before sundown.”


Delighted with her errand, dear Little Red Riding Hood set out for
her Grandmother’s cottage, Tiny by her side, trying to make believe
that he did. not want to chase the squirrels in the wood. As she
was crossing a thick wood, which lay in her road, she met a Wolf, who
had a great mind to eat her, but dared not, because of some woodcutters,
who were at work near them. So, wagging his tail, he asked her, however,
where she was going. Not knowing how very dangerous, nor thinking
how naughty it was to stop on the road to talk to any one, especially
to a Wolf, she said, “I am going to see my Grandmother, who is not
very well, and take her these cakes and this pot of butter.” “Does she
live very far off?” said the Wolf. ‘Oh, yes,” said Little Red Riding
Hood ; “beyond the mill which you see yonder, at the very first house
you come to in the village.” “Very well,” said the Wolf, “I will go
there too: let us see which will be there first.”

Away went the Wolf running at full speed, and taking the
nearest road; but the little girl did not hurry there, for she amused
herself with singing songs and gathering some wild flowers which grew
in the wood, and making them up into a pretty nosegay for her
Grandmother, who she knew was very fond of flowers.

The Wolf, who had run all the way, and had leaped over hedges
and ditches, that he might get there quickly, soon arrived at the cottage

of Red Riding Hood’s Grandmother, and knocked at the door. “Who
2


is there?” asked the Grandmother. “It is your grandchild, Red Riding
Hood,” said the Wolf, trying to imitate her voice; “Mother has sent you
some cheesecakes and a pot of fresh butter.”

The good old woman, who was ill and in bed, called out, “ Pull
the bobbin, and the door will open.” Accordingly, the Wolf did as he
was told, opened the door and entered the cottage, where he found all
very quiet; so he softly closed the door after him, and stealthily crept
towards the bed, where the good old lady was laying, for she was too
unwell to rise and dress herself that morning.

Alas! poor old woman, instead of beholding her pretty grandchild,
it was a ravenous and wicked Wolf, who, not having tasted any food
for three days, sprang upon her, and ate her all up. He then tried to
put the room a little in order, that Red Riding Hood might not see
the things in confusion; for he had knocked over her table and the things
that were on it, ‘Then he put on the old lady’s night-cap and bed-gown,
looked at himself in the glass, smiled, and went to bed, to wait for the. |
little girl’s a*rival. :

He listened to every sound that broke the silence; for he thought
that every footstep he heard approaching must be the step of Little
Red Riding Hood. At last he felt rather drowsy, after his very hearty
meal, and would have gone to sleep; but the fear of any stranger coming

to the cottage, kept him wide awake.
3
In about an hour, Little Red Riding Hood came, and gently
tapped two or three times at the door; but Tiny kept on barking and
pulling at his little mistress’s frock, to prevent her going im, and then
ran away. ‘Who is there?” said the Wolf. She replied, supposing of
course that it was her Grandmother who spoke, “It is me, — your own
grandchild, Little Red Riding Hood. Mother has sent you some
cheesecakes and a pot of nice fresh butter, that she has made this
morning especially for you.” The Wolf, softening his voice as much as
he possibly could, as: well as trying to imitate the Grandmother’s voice,
said, “Pull the bobbin, and the door will open.” Having pulled the
bobbin, Red Riding Hood went into the house; when the Wolf said,
softly, “Put the basket down, my dear child, and come into bed with
me; for you must be very tired.”

“Yes, I will, Grandmother,’ said the poor little innocent, “as
soon as I have put these pretty flowers, which I have gathered for you,
into the pots. See, dear Grandmother, how nicely I have decorated your
chimney-piece.”

The Wolf, however, declined looking at the flowers, pretending that
his head ached so sadly, that he could not raise it.

“T am very sorry you are so ill,” said Little Red Riding Hood,
‘‘and mother will be much grieved to hear it. Shall I hand you some

nice white cake?’ ‘No, thank you, my dear,’ answered the Wolf, “I
4,
cannot eat just now; for I made a hearty meal just before you came,
and therefore I do not feel at all hungry.”

Tittle Red Riding Hood soon after this got into bed, but declined
taking her dress off; and in talking, said, “Do you know, Grandmother,
as I came along, | met a Wolf in the wood; at first I was frightened,
but he spoke so kindly, that my fears ended. I hope you are not angry
with me for speaking to him.” “No,” said the Wolf, “I am quite
pleased.”

Little Red Riding Hood being tired from her walk, soon fell asleep.
The Wolf was so pleased at having her in his power, that in pressing
her rather tightly, she awoke, and thinking how very much altered her
Grandmother looked, she could not tel saying, “How rough and long
your arms have grown!” “‘Ihe better to fondle you with, my dear child.”
«But Grandmother, how your ears stand up.” “The better to hear
your sweet voice, my love.” “How large and bright your eyes a
Grandmother!’ The better to gaze upon you, my love.” “But how
ee and frightful your teeth are” “All the better to —”

The Wolf was going to say, “Better to eat you with,” and was
ready to seize on the little girl, and kill her, when suddenly there was
the bark of a dog outside, and the voices of men; and, the next minute,
im rushed Red Riding Hood’s Father, and her elder Brother, and two

or three villagers. The dog Tiny had alarmed them all by his barking
6
and being separated from his mistress; they had followed him, and
arrived just in time to save her life. The old Wolf. leapt out of bed,
with the night-cap on, and tried to escape; but Red Riding Hood’s
Brother gave him a sharp rap over the nose, and sent him back again.
“Kall the Wolf! kill him!” said all the men together.. But Little Red
Riding Hood’s Father said, “No; let us do better than that. Let us
sell him to the master of a wild beast show.” So they put a chain
round his neck, and made him fast. :

Little Red Riding Hood was very sorry that she had disobeyed
her Mother, and talked with a stranger by the way, when she was told
not to do so. She never did so again. As for Tiny, you never saw a
dog so boisterous as he was when he found his little mistress all right;
and, as for the Wolf, he was sold for a lump of money, which was safely

kept and given to Red Riding Hood on her twenty-first birthday.

MOA LL.

We may see by this story how very wrong it is for children not
to do exactly as they are desired by their parents; and what great evil
and suffermg they bring upon themselves, and upon those they love,

even by a little error.






THE AMUSING HISTORY OF CINDERELLA:

OR,

Dae LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER.

Lone ago, there lived a gentleman of fortune and his wife, a
very amiable and beautiful lady. But, unfortunately, the mother died.
before their little girl was nine years of age. When the father’s grief
was a little abated, he resolved to look for some prudent lady, who
might be a mother to his child, and a companion to himself. Unfortu-
nately, his choice fell on a widow lady, of a proud and tyrannical
disposition, who had two daughters, both haughty, like their mother.

Though the gentleman thought this lady was amiable, the marriage
was scarcely over, when his wife appeared in her real character. She
treated his sweet little girl with great harshness, and paid no attention
to her husband, who remonstrated with her on her conduct to his dearly
loved daughter; and at last, unable to resist her violence and unkindness,
he fell into low spirits, which brought him to an early grave. After
the death of her father, the young orphan’s hardships greatly increased :
she had to do the meanest work about the kitchen. At night, she
was forced to sleep in a garret on a straw bed, and she had not clothes
enough to protect her from the cold.

Although she was so badly used, the sweet girl did not repine;
but when her work was done, she would sit down in the corner of the

i
chimney among the cinders; which made some of the family call her
Cinderwench. However, the younger sister gave her the more genteel
name of Cinderella, and all the rest followed her example: Notwithstanding
all that she endured, Cinderella, as she grew up, became every day more
beautiful, far surpassing the two sisters, with all their fine clothes.

About this time, a splendid ball was to be given at court by the king’s -
son, to which all the nobility and gentry were invited; and, among
others, the two sisters received an invitation. ‘These haughty girls, quite
delighted with the thought of being at a ball given by the king’s son,
proceeded to arrange their dresses for the stately occasion.

As the two sisters knew Cinderella had good taste, they conde-
scended to employ her to dress them on this grand occasion.

At length the wished-for moment arrived, and these proud girls drove
away to the palace. Cinderella returned to the kitchen in tears. She
continued sobbing in the corner of the chimney, until a noise aroused
her, and looking up, to her surprise, she saw a beautiful fairy, with
a wand in her hand, appear. Cinderella thought that her eyes deceived
her, as she had never seen the fairy before; who, with a good-natured
smile on her countenance, thus accosted her:

“My dear Cinderella, I am your fairy godmother, and know the
desire you have to go to this fine ball. Therefore, dry up your tears;
and as you are a good girl, you shall go there.

The fairy took Cinderella by the hand, and said, “Now, my dear,
you must go into the garden and fetch me a pumpkin.” Cinderella
almost flew to execute her commands, and returned with one of the
_ finest she could meet with. Her god-mother took the pumpkin, and
then striking it with her wand, it instantly became one of the most
elegant carriages possible to behold.

Cinderella was next desired to go to the pantry for the mouse-trap.
She did so, and found four little mice alive in the trap, which

8
she brought to the fairy. Cinderella raised the trap door, and as the
mice came out one by one, a touch of the fairy’s wand transformed them
into four beautiful carriage horses.

““N ow, dear girl,” said the fairy “here you have a coach and horses,
much handsomer than your sisters; but, as we have not a coachman
to take care of them, run quickly to the stable, where the rat-trap is
placed, and bring it to me.’’ Cinderella, soon returned with the trap,
in which there was a large rat. The fairy touched it with her wand, and
immediately it was changed into a fine jolly-looking coachman.

Her godmother then said, ‘‘Cinderella, you must go to the garden
again, and close to the wall you will see the watering-pot standing;
look behind it, and there you will find six lizards; bring them to me
immediately.’’ Cinderella ran to the garden and found the six lizards,
which she brought to the fairy. Another touch of the wonderful wand
converted these animals into six spruce footmen, in dashing liveries,
who immediately jumped up behind the carriage.

The coachman haying likewise taken his place, the fairy said to
Cinderella, ‘“‘ Well, my dear girl, is not this as fine an equipage as you
could desire to goto the ball with! ‘Tell me, now, are you pleased with it?’

“OQ yes! dear godmother,’ replied Cinderella; and then, with a good
deal of hesitation, added, “but how can I make my appearance among
so many finely-dressed people in these mean-looking clothes?”

“Give yourself no uneasiness about that, my dear,” said the fairy, with
a good-humoured smile; ‘it will be hard if I cannot make your dress
correspond with your equipage.’”” On saying this, she touched Cinder-
ella with the magic wand, and her clothes, were instantly changed into
magnifice nt apparel, ornamented with the most costly jewels. ‘Then taking
from her pocket a beautiful pair of elastic glass slippers, she caused
Cinderella to put them on, and get into the carriage with all expedition,
as the ball had already commenced.

9
Cinderella instantly stepped into the carriage; and her godmother,
before she took leave, strictly charged her on no account to stay at the
ball after the clock had struck twelve; telling her, that if she stopped a
single moment beyond that time, all would return to their original state.
Cinderella promised to attend to every thing the fairy had said; and
then, quite overjoyed, drove off to the ball.

The arrival of so splendid an equipage as Cinderella’s could not fail
to attract general notice; and information having reached the king’s son,
that a beautiful princess was in waiting, he hastened to meet her, and
led her gracefully into the ball-room.

When Cinderella made her appearance, both music and dancing were
suspended for a few minutes; and the company seemed to be struck
dumb with admiration. Then they began in whispers: “How beautiful
she is!” “How elegantly she is dressed |”

The king’s son conducted Cinderella to one of the most distinguished
seats; and, placing himself by her side, handed her some refreshments.
He then requested to have the honour of dancing with her. Cinderella
gave a smiling consent, and the delighted prince led her into the midst
of the dancers.

The music played and the dance commenced; but if the beauty and
elegant figure of Cinderella had before drawn the admiration of every
one, the astonishment excited by her dancing it is impossible to describe.
The graceful and airy lightness of her motions, for she seemed scarcely
to touch the ground, drew forth general admiration.

During dancing, Cinderella heard the clock strike a quarter to twelve,
and she immediately took a hurried leave of the company, and returned
safely home in her carriage. On entering, she found her godmother,
the fairy, to whom she related all that had taken place at the ball, and
thanked her a thousand times for the pleasure she had enjoyed. She then
told the fairy, that there was to be another ball on the following evening,

10
to which the prince had given her a very pressing invitation; and modestly
gnc the happiness it would afford her to be present,

- Her godmother had just promised to gratify her wishes, when a loud
knocking announced the arrival of her sisters. On their entrance, Cin-
derella, who pretended to be just awakened out of a sound sleep, said,
“Oh dear, how late aon have stopped! I thought you would never have
come home.”

Next evening, the two sisters went to the ball; and so did Cinder-
ella. The prince, who was delighted to see her, did not leave her the
whole evening.

The evening passed away before Cinderella was aware of it; and
the clock struck twelve, when she supposed it could scarcely be eleven.
Alarmed, she almost flew out of the ball-room. ‘The prince pursued her,
which made Cinderella run the faster; and, in the hurry, she dropped
one of her glass slippers, which he picked up. Fatigued and breathless,
it was with difficulty that Cinderella reached home in her old clothing,
without the coach or attendants, with which she had set out there, and
with only one glass slipper. ‘The prince inquired of all the guards if
they had seen the magnificent princess pass through the palace gates;
but they said that no person had gone out except a poor beggar girl.

When the sisters returned, they told Cinderella that a beautiful
princess had lost her glass slipper at the ball; she having run away as
the clock struck twelve.

_ A few days after the ball, it was proclaimed that the prince would
marry the lady whom the slipper fitted. The slipper was carried by
the prince’s order to all the ladies of his dominions; it betng brought to the
two sisters, they tried to squeeze the slipper on, but all to no purpose.
Cinderella who was present, knowing her slipper, said, ‘“‘ Pray sir, may
I be allowed to try it on?’ The two sisters burst out in laughter, but
the officer, seeing that Cinderella was yery beautiful,.desired her to try

Il
it on. Cinderella, sitting down on a chair, put it on her foot with
the greatest ease. ‘The two sisters were astonished at seeig it fit so
exactly; but were more astonished, when she pulled its fellow from her
pocket, and put it on likewise. At that moment the fairy godmother
entered, and touching Cinderella with her wand, changed her poor clothes
into a more magnificent dress than she had yet appeared in.

The officer then conducted her to the prince, who was again so
struck with her beauty, that he solicited her hand in marriage. Cinder-
ella gave her consent, and the ceremony took place a few days afterwards,
with great pomp and rejoicing. Although Cinderella had been so cruelly
used by her two stepsisters, she was far from resenting their ill-treatment;
she sent for them to court, and by her influence they were married to
two noblemen; and Cinderella spent a long life of happiness which sel-
dom falls to the lot of mortals.

12




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