Citation
Gender issues in farming systems research and extension

Material Information

Title:
Gender issues in farming systems research and extension
Series Title:
Westview special studies in agricultural science and policy
Creator:
Poats, Susan V
Schmink, Marianne
Spring, Anita
University of Florida -- Women in Agricultural Development Program
Place of Publication:
Boulder
Publisher:
Westview Press
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
xxi, 450 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Agricultural systems -- Research -- Congresses ( lcsh )
Women in agriculture -- Congresses ( lcsh )
Agricultural extension work -- Congresses ( lcsh )
Farms, Small -- Congresses ( lcsh )
Agricultural systems -- Research -- Congresses -- Developing countries ( lcsh )
Women in agriculture -- Congresses -- Developing countries ( lcsh )
Agricultural extension work -- Congresses -- Developing countries ( lcsh )
Farms, Small -- Congresses -- Developing countries ( lcsh )
Mujeres en la agricultura -- Congresos
Extensiâon agrâicola -- Congresos
Granjas pequeänas -- Congresos
Productividad agrâicola -- Congresos
Systáemes agricoles -- Recherche -- Congráes ( rvm )
Femmes en agriculture -- Congráes ( rvm )
Agriculture -- Vulgarisation -- Congráes ( rvm )
Petites exploitations agricoles -- Congráes ( rvm )
Agriculture -- Productivitâe -- Congráes ( rvm )
Genre:
bibliography ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
conference publication ( marcgt )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographies.
General Note:
"Published in cooperation with the Women in Agricultural Development Program, University of Florida"--Page opposite t.p.
General Note:
Based on an international conference, held Feb. 26-Mar. 1, 1986 at the University of Florida.
Funding:
Electronic resources created as part of a prototype UF Institutional Repository and Faculty Papers project by the University of Florida.
Statement of Responsibility:
edited by Susan V. Poats, Marianne Schmink, and Anita Spring.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. This item may be protected by copyright but is made available here under a claim of fair use (17 U.S.C. §107) for non-profit research and educational purposes. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
17386097 ( OCLC )
87034315 ( LCCN )
0813373999 (pbk. : alk. paper) ( ISBN )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text

Gender Issues
in Farming Systems Research and Extension














Published in cooperation with the
Women in Agricultural Development Program,
University of Florida









Gender Issues
in Farming Systems
Research and Extension


EDITED BY
Susan V. Poats, Marianne Schmink,
and Anita Spring


Westview Press
BOULDER G LONDON
PB281


182






























Westview Special Studies in Agriculture Science and Policy


Figures 28.1 and 28.2 are reprinted by permission of Lynne Rienner Publishers, Inc., from Peter E. Hildebrand and Federico Poey, On-Farm Agronomic Trials in Farming Research and Extension. Copyright C 1985 Lynne Rienner Publishers, Inc.


This Westview softcover edition is printed on acid-free paper and bound in softcovers that carry the highest rating of the National Association of State Textbook Administrators, in consultation with the Association of American Publishers and the Book Manufacturers' Institute.


All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.

Copyright ( 1988 by Westview Press, Inc.

Published in 1988 in the United States of America by Westview Press, Inc; Frederick A. Praeger, Publisher; 5500 Central Avenue, Boulder, Colorado, 80301


Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Gender issues in farming systems research and extension.
(Westview special studies in agriculture science and policy)
"Based on the 1986 University of Florida conference"-"Published in cooperation with the Women in Agricultural Development Program, University of Florida"-1. Agricultural systems--Research--Congresses.
2. Women in agricultural--Congresses. 3. Agricultural extension work--Congresses. 4. Farms, Small--Congresses.
5. Agricultural productivity--Congresses. I. Poats, Susan V. II. Schmink, Marianne. III. Spring, Anita. IV. University of Florida. Women in agricultural Development. V. Series.
$494.5.$95G46 1988 630'.88042 87-34315
ISBN 0-8133-7399-9


Printed and bound in the United States of America

OThe paper used in this publication meets the requirements
of the American National Standard for Permanence of Paper
for Printed Library Materials Z39.48-1984

6 5 4 3 2 1





















Contents


List of Tables and Figures . ix
Preface
Marianne Schmink and Susan V. Poats . xv

PART I EOE ICAL AND METHODOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS
OF THE INCUSION OF GENDER IN FARMI SYSTEMS
RESEARCH AND rMMiSION (FSR/E)

71,l Linking FSR/E and Gender: An Introduction
Susan V. Poats, Marianne Schmink, and
Anita Spring . 1

2 Integration of Intra-Household Dynamics
into Farming Systems Research and Extension:
A Survey of Existing Projects
Rosalie Huisinga Norem . 19

3 Gender Relations and Technological Change:
The Need for an Integrative Framework of Analysis
Alison Evans . 37

4 Problems of Understanding and Communication
at the Interface of Knowledge Systems
Janice Jiggins . 49

5 From Recommendation Domains to Intra-Household
Dynamics and Back: Attempts at Bridging the
Gender Gap
Amalia M. Alberti . 61











6 Research, Recommendation and Diffusion Domains:
A Farming Systems Approach to Targeting
Peter Wotowiec, Jr., Susan V. Poats,
and Peter E. Hildebrand . 73

7 Incorporating Women into Monitoring and Evaluation
in Farming Systems Research and Extension
Jonice Louden . 87

8 A Comparison of Rural Women's Time Use and
Nutritional Consequences in Two Villages in Malawi
Lila E. Engberg, Jean H. Sabry,
and Susan A. Beckerson. . 99

9 Correcting the Underestimated Frequency of the
Head-of-Household Experience for Women Farmers
Art Hansen . 111

10 An Evaluation of Methodologies Used in Time
Allocation Research
Eva Wollenberg . 127

11 Gender, Resource Management and the Rural
Landscape: Implications for Agroforestry
and Farming Systems Research
Dianne E. Rocheleau M . 149


PART II LIATIN APRICA AND THE CARIBBEAN

V2 Farming Systems Research in the Eastern Caribbean:
An Attempt at Analyzing Intra-Household Dynamics
Vasantha Chase . 171

13 Economic and Normative Restraints on Subsistence
Farming in Honduras
Eunice R. McCulloch and Mary Futrell . 183

14 Phases of Farming Systems Research: The Relevance
of Gender in Ecuadorian Sites
Patricia Garrett and Patricio Espinosa . 199

15 Technological Domains of Women in Mixed Farming
Systems of Andean Peasant Communities
Maria E. Fernandez . 213










PART III ASIA AM THE MILE EAST

16 The Household Enterprise and Farming System
Research: A Case Study from Taiwan
Rita S. Gallin and Anne Ferguson . 223

17 The Contribution of Women to Agriculture in Taiwan
Jane E. Gleason . 237

18 Gender-Differentials in the Impact of Technological
Change in Rice-Based Farming Systems in India
Bahnisikha Ghosh and Sudhin K. Mukhopadhyay . 253

19 Women in a Crop-Livestock Farming Systems Project
in Santa Barbara, Pangasinan, Philippines
Thelma R. Paris . 269
20 Gender Related Aspects of Agricultural Labor
in Northwestern Syria
Andr6e Rassam and Dennis Tully . 287

PART IV AFRICA

21 The Women's Program of the Gambian Mixed
Farming Project
Margaret Norem, Sandra Russo, Marie Sambou,
and Melanie Marlett . 303

<22 Intra-Household Dynamics and State Policies as
Constraints on Food Production: Results of a 1985
Agroeconomic Survey in Cameroon
Jeanne Koopman Henn . 315

-_23 Intra-Household Gender Issues in Farming Systems
in Tanzania, Zambia, and Malawi
Jean M. Due. 331

24 Institutional and Policy Parameters Affecting Gender
Issues in Farming Systems Research in Tanzania
ManasseTimmy Mtoi. 345

25 The Impact of Modern Changes in the Chitemene
Farming System in the Northern Province of Zambia
Mary N. Tembo and Elizabeth Chola Phiri . 361

26 A Diagnostic Survey of Female-Headed Households
in the Central Province of Zambia
Robert E. Hudgens . 373






viii



27 The Gender Factor and Technology Options for
Zambia's Subsistence Farming Systems
Alistair J. Sutherland. 389

28 using male Research and Extension Personnel to
Target Women Farmers V
Anita Spring . 407

-29 The Role of Women Farmers in Choosing Species
for Agroforestry Farming Systems in Rural
Areas of Ghana
Kofi owusu-Bempah. 427



OmmRiBuIns . 444














Tables and Figures


MLES

2.1 Projects Responding to Survey . 22

2.2 Types of Intra-Household Data Collected by
Projects Responding to Survey . 25

2.3 Uses of Types of Intra-Household Data by
Projects Responding to Survey . 27

2.4 Most Frequently Used Methods of Data Collection
by Type of Data . 29 2.5 Constraints Influencing Projects . 33 8.1 Production Activities . 103

8.2 Mean Time Spent in Hours by Husbands and Wives in
Two Seasons in Each Farming System . 105

8.3 Mean Amount of Traditional Foods Stored by Type
of Farming Household in Two Seasons . 107

8.4 meals and maize Flour Consumed and Percent of
Children with Normal Weight for Height by Type
of Farming Household and Season . 108

9.1 marital Changes as Expressed in migration
of Women in and out of Rural Areas of
Northwestern Zambia, 1971 to 1972 . 116

9.2 Changes in Gender of Household Head in
Lilongwe Rural Development Project, Malawi
1980/81 to 1982 . 119

9.3 Patterns of Changes of Gender of Household
Heads in Intensively Surveyed Sub-sample . 121










10.1 Distribution of Time by Activity and Gender . 139 10.2 Percent of Time Spent by Gender, Location,
and Field Types . 141 12.1 Communities Sampled by Area Focused Study
in M.aJouya Valley . 176 12.2 AgroecologiCal Characteristics of
the Mabouya Valley . 177 12.3 Socioeconomic Characteristics of
the mabouya Valley . 178 13.1 Annual Average Yields for Upland Intercropping
of Maize, Sorghum and Beans. 187 13.2 Recommended Daily and Yearly Intakes of Nutrients
for Average Family . 190 13.3 Subsistence Activities and Nutritional
Adeuacy . 191 13.4 Foods and Their Contribution to Low Cost Diet .194 16.1 Population of Hsin Hsing by Period and Age,
1958-79 . 226 16.2 occupations of Hsin Hsing Households, 1979 . 229 16.3 Land Use of 61 Farming Households,
Hsin Hsing, 1978-79 . 230 17.1 Income Earned from Off-Farm Employment .241 17.2 Labor Usage (in hours) by Gender and Crop .245 17.3 Crops and Total Hectarage of Farms without
Female Family Labor . 248 17.4 Crops and Total Hectarage of Farms with
Female Family Labor . 249 17.5 Diversification Indices of 30 Farms .250

18.1 Time Allocation of male and Female Population:
Hours per Person per Day. 257










18.2 Male-Female Differences in Labor Input in
Rice Cultivation . 258

18.3 Time Allocation by Male and Female Population
in Economic and Home Production Activities:
Bhandarkona (hours per person per day) . 262

18.4 Labor use Functions: Household Survey Data (Nadia):
Pooled (Log Linear) . 265

18.5 Labor use Functions: FMS Data (Hooghly and Birbhum)
(Log Linear)
Dependent Variable: Share of Women in Total
Labor Use . 266

19.1 Percentages of men, women, and Children in Sample
Households Providing Different Sources of Labor by
Specific Activity in Rice Production . 275

19.2 Percentages of Men, Women, and Children Providing
Different Sources of Labor by Specific Activities
in Mungbean Production . 276

19.3 Percentages of men, Women, and Children Providing
Different Sources of Labor by Specific Activities in Cowpea Production . 277

19.4 Sample Households Using Different
Sources of Labor by Specific Activities
in Squash Production . 278

19.5 Percentages of Men, Women, and Children in Sample
Households Providing Different Sources of
Labor in Specific Activities in Cattle
and Carabao Production . 279

19.6 Percentages of men, Women, and Children within
Households Using Different Sources of
Labor by Specific Activities in Poultry
and Swine Production . 281

20.1 Contribution of males and Females as Percentages of
the Total Timd Spent in On-Farm Agricultural
Production . 291

20.2 Contribution of Males and Females as Percentages
of Hours Spent in Legume and
Cereal Production . 292









20.3 contributions of Males and Females
as Percentages of Hours Spent in Summer Crop
and Tree Crop Production . 293

20.4 Mean Hours of Labor in Cereal Harvest:
Differences Between Farms Using mechanical and
Manual Techniques . 294

20.5 Regression Results on Labor variables . 298

21.1 Maize/Cowpea Yields of Participating Villages . 310

22.1 Men's and Women's Average Labor Hours . 320

23.1 Percentage of Labor Days Contributed by Females
by operation by Crop, Sazpled Families,
Kilosa, Tanzania, 1980 . 335

23.2 Comparison of Crop Acreage, Income, and
Extension Visits Between Contact, Non-Contact,
and Female-Headed Households, Tanga Region,
Tanzania, 1985 . 342

24.1 Monthly Labor Requirement for Farm Operations
for major Crops in Eastern Uluguru mountains . 347

24.2 Tasks Performed by Gender, by Crop,
and by Activity in the Farming Systems of
Eastern Uluguru Mountains, 1984 . 350

24.3 Estimation of Effective Adult-Equivalent
work-Days Available per month for Farm Work . 352

24.4 Labor Requirements and Yield on the
Alternative System of Production . 353

24.5 Expected Returns and Standard Deviation
of the Two Systems of Production . 354

25.1 Adequate Nutritional Status of Children . 368

25.2 Percentage of Female-Headed Households
by Province . 369

26.1 Main Characteristics of Male and Female-Headed
Households in TRD#3 (Mkushi District) . 378






xiii


26.2 Comparison of Female-Headed Households in
TRD#3 (Mkushi District) by Presence of Males
in the Household, oxen ownership, and Size of
Acreage Cultivated. 380

26.3 Comparison of Statistics on Female-Headed
Households in 'Three Recommendation Domains
in the Central Province. 384

28.1 Graduates of Malawi Agricultural Training
Institutions: Bunda College of Agriculture, Colby College of Agriculture, and Thuchila
Farm Institute (Farm Home Assistants),
by Year and sex . 410

28.2 Type of Extension Contacts for Male Household
Heads (MMH), Female Household Heads (FHH), and
Wives from the NSSA Extension Survey, Malawi
(in percentages), 1980-81 . 414

28.3 maize Yields from Farmer-Managed On-Farm Trials
Phalombe, Malawi, 1981-82. 417

29.1 Farmers, Household Type and the Average Number of
Forest Products They Know By Age Group .431

29.2 Goals of Farmers in the Forest Savannah
Transitional Zone of Ghana. 433

29.3 Agricultural Systems (Farm Types) in the Forest
ITransitional zone of Ghana. 434

29.4 Types of Deforestation and Land Degradation
Activities in the Forest Savannah
Transitional zone of Ghana. 436


FIGURES

3.1 A Conceptual Map for Looking at the Farm-Household
System from a Gender Perspective. 46

11.1 Pananao Sierra, Dominican Republic . 154

11.2 Fakot Village, Mhaintain Watershed, India .158

11.3 Sources of Livelihood (Cash & Kind)
in Fakot. 159










11.4 Misamfu, N.E. Zambia . 162

12.1 Agroecological Transect of the Mabouya Valley
of St. Lucia . 175

13.1 Conceptual Model of Subsistence FarmingNutrition System . 188

14.1 Phases of Farming Systems Research: A Synthesis
of INIAP and ICTA Procedures . 201

18.1 Allocation of Time to Different Activities:
Male-Female Differential . 260

18.2 Gender Differential in Allocation of Time
to Different Activities by Socioeconomic
Groups and by Technology . 263

24.1 Conceptual Framework of Institutional,
Cultural and Policy Factors Affecting
Intra-Household Dynamics in FSR . 348

24.2 E,J- Relationships Generated by Traditional
and Alternative Farm Production Systems . 355

26.1 Busiest Months for Male and Female-Headed
Households . 382

28.1 Grain Yield Response for Local Maize (L) and
CCA Composite (C) to Environment, without
Fertilizer, Phalombe Project, Malawi . 419

28.2 Grain Yield Response of Local Maize (L) and
CCA Composite (C) to Environment, with
Fertilizer, Phalombe Project, Malawi . 419

29.1 Diagrammatic Presentation of a Woman Farmer's
Traditional Agroforestry Farm in the Forest
Savannah Transitional Zone of Ghana . 432

29.2 Proposed Field Layout of On-Farm Agroforestry
Research Plots for a Typical Village in the
Forest Savannah Transitional Zone of Ghana . 438


















Preface





This book is the product of an international conference hosted by the Women in Agricultural Development (WIAD) Program at the University of Florida from February 26 to March 1, 1986. The WIAD Program's general purpose is to promote an understanding of gender and its relevance for agricultural development processes. Women are critical to agricultural production in many places, but access to resources and research technologies may be constrained by gender and this may lead to detrimental effects on the design and implementation of sound agricultural programs. The Program seeks to support and develop expertise related to the roles of women and intra-household dynamics in agricultural production, research, and extension in order to improve the design and implementation of agricultural programs. The Program's primary audience is the faculty and students of the University of Florida, but the Conference and this book permitted us to reach out to a wider national and international audience.
The Women in Agricultural Development Program began as the Women in Agriculture (WIA) group at the University of Florida (UF) in 1983 after five years of informal activities related to women and development. It became an official University of Florida program in 1984 and the name was changed to Women in Agricultural Development in 1986. During early years, several initiatives emerged from the International Programs office and from social scientists, especially those in the Centers for African and Latin American Studies. Momentum built up as a critical mass of faculty came to the UF with experience in the WID field. A group that formed in the fall of 1983, with Anita Spring as Director and Marianne Schmink as Co-Director, served as an ad hoc committee to promote awareness of issues related to WID and, more










specifically, to women's role in agricultural production. The WIAD group received support from the USAID Program Support Grant funds administered by the International Programs office and from other on-campus sources including the Centers for Latin American and African Studies and the Graduate School. Principal program activities include a bi-weekly speaker series and a bibliographic compilation of readings on women in agriculture, as well as work in curriculum development and in technical assistance.
From the beginning, the WIAD Program sought to focus its efforts specifically on the realm of agriculture, in recognition of the UP's strengths in this area. It took advantage of the opportunity to interface directly with a major USAID-funded project, the Farming Systems Support Project (FSSP) that had a worldwide mandate for technical assistance, training, and networking activities. As Associate Director of the FSSP based at the UP, Susan Poats was in a key position to facilitate that linkage. In addition to the institutional presence of the FSSP, the general philosophy and methodology of the "farming systems" approach provided promising avenues for attention to women. Yet gender had not been incorporated effectively and systematically as a variable in most farming systems work. The WIAD Program hoped to stimulate the development of conceptual and methodological approaches that could improve the incorporation of gender issues into farming systems activities. These ideas are discussed in more detail in Chapter 1.
In early 1984, the WIAD Program hosted a visit to the UP by several colleagues involved in an effort by the Population Council to produce useful case studies of gender issues in development projects. This meeting led to the creation of the FSSP/Population Council IntraHousehold Dynamics Case Studies Project, co-managed by Susan Poats and Judith Bruce of the Population Council, with funding from USAID and from the Ford Foundation. The FSSP created a new task force to focus on the integration of household and family concerns into the farming systems perspective. In 1984, Cornelia Butler Flora (a member of both the FSSP's Technical Committee and of the task force on the family) visited UF. She also wrote a position paper on "Intra-Household Dynamics in Farming Systems Research: The Basis of whole Farm Monitoring of Farming Systems Research and Extension." She and other task force members were instrumental in supporting the proposal to develop case study training materials through the PSSP/Population Council project.






Xvii


The case study project, initially launched from a WIAD activity, generated further momentum. In February of 1985 the project's advisory committee contacted those individuals and projects around the world who might be interested in developing case study materials from their own experiences in farming systems work. A survey questionnaire requested more detailed information from those who responded. The results of this questionnaire provided some indication of the current state of knowledge on intra-household dynamics in on-going farming systems projects (see Chapter 2). The FSSP/Population Council project selected eight proposals to receive support for the development of case study materials. Yet the more than 75 respondents who expressed interest in the project indicated that the incorporation of intrahousehold variables was a greater concern to farming systems practitioners than had been anticipated.
Parallel to the case studies project, the WIAD Program proposed bringing together farming systems practitioners to a conference on the UF campus. The focus of the event would be purposely narrow in order to maximize the potential for improving the integration of gender into the farming systems approach, taking advantage of the interest aroused by the case studies initiative. Sessions would address specific issues of theory, method, and policy related to Farming Systems Research and Extension (FSR/E) in developing areas, systematically comparing African, Latin American, and Asian experiences. Marianne Schmink volunteered to organize the conference and Susan Poats coordinated the format of the program. WIAD's Steering Committee served as an advisory body and a conference task force was appointed. Funding came from the Center for Latin American Studies, the Center for Tropical Agriculture, and the Center for African Studies, as well as from the Ford Foundation and the Rockefeller Foundation. A call for papers circulated in July of 1985 defined specific topical areas of concern and asked potential participants to summarize the data they would present, its relation to FSR/E, the geographic focus, and its relevance to the designated themes.
The response was overwhelming. over a hundred paper proposals arrived from all over the world, expanding the geographic focus of the conference. In an effort to accommodate as many participants as possible, the organizers structured a comprehensive program of concurrent sessions and explored as many sources as possible for travel support, giving priority to visitors from developing countries. over 40 participants received full or






Xviii


partial funding to attend the Conference. There were 91 speakers in fifteen formal paper sessions, three roundtable discussions, and an after-lunch lecturer. Carmen Diana Deere of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst delivered the keynote address on "Rural Women and State Policy: An Evaluation of the Decade" (later published in revised form in her book with Magdalena Leon, Rural Women and State Policy, Westview, 1987). Films and recent publications on FSR/E and gender were available for review during the Conference and several social events facilitated a high level of information exchange and networking. Attendance at conference sessions was consistently high. A total of 298 persons were registered or on the formal program and many others from the campus and local area attended without registering. The magnitude and complexity of the Conference demanded the assistance of many volunteer helpers. Special thanks are due to Carol Brown, Donna Epting, Jean Gearing, Janet Hickman, Patricia Kuntz, Cindy Lewis, Greg Moreland, Bill Reynolds, Barbara Rogers, Robin Sumner, and Darla Wilkes. Assistance was also provided by Wharton Williams Travel, Classique Cuisine, Renaissance Printing, Farming Systems Support Project, International Programs, International Food and Agricultural System (IFAS), and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
Chris Andrew, Director of the FSSP, formally opened the Conference on behalf of the University of Florida. In his opening remarks he said:

The intellectual capacity assembled in this
room to address gender-related issues in on-farm,
research is second to none. We are fortunate this week to have presentations by people who have traveled from more than twenty countries,
from forty universities (eleven non-U.S.), from
three International Agricultural Research Centers, and many other national, donor, private voluntary organizations, and private entities.
The titles in the conference program mention
twenty-two countries and we know that more will be discussed. Nearly every region of the world
is represented.
The intra-household concept, as an integral
and dynamic part of the farm system, must consider gender issues. I emphasize integral and dynamic because we must take care not to establish artificial boundaries to accommodate
conventional simplicity. with a broad view of the household, third world food security can be










addressed in a national framework. We need a
conceptual focus that recognizes the farm household as a critical element in successful agricultural policy for research and development.
To enunciate and address the interdependent
needs of women and men in farming systems as
they interact with the bio-physical environment
is an important goal.
The critical importance of agriculture to the
vitality and strength of many of the world's countries is widely recognized. At the same
time, the increasing diversity, complexity, and
intractability of the problems facing agricultural development make it imperative that agricultural research systems change and adapt to
address specific realities. one of these is the
role of women in agriculture. Another is that
gender issues are being considered together with
the farming systems approach, an agenda that
likely could not have found a platform ten years
ago. In the ebb and flow of agricultural
research, this Conference represents something
of a revolution in agriculture and in
communications.

The Conference offered an excellent opportunity for exploring and testing new ideas and successful approaches for incorporating gender sensitivity in agricultural research and development. The FSSP/Population Council project used the Conference to test a case study based on FSR/E project activities in Zambia. The two authors of the case, Charles Chabala and Robert Nguiru, were present to view how the case worked in a training context. Hilary Feldstein, Rosalie Norem, Kate Cloud, Susan Poats, Nadine Horenstein, and Mary Rojas conducted the abbreviated training sessions with approximtely sixty conference participants. Their detailed evaluations and suggestions were used to improve the case. Highlighted
repeatedly during the Conference was the need to inventory and assess the usefulness of various methodologies used in dealing with gender issues. An ad hoc special methodology workshop held on Saturday afternoon
following the close of the formal sessions was attended by more than seventy-five people. Janice Jiggins and Hilary Feldstein are using this session as the basis for developing a methodologies handbook to accompany the FSSP/Population Council case studies.










Aside from the high level of interest in the formal and ad hoc sessions, informal networking was intense among those present. These interactions underscored the remarkable level of interest in the practical aspects of integrating attention to gender issues into agricultural research and extension. The Conference provided a meeting place for people with diverse disciplinary and area expertise to learn from one another. The most exciting outcome of the Conference was the discovery of uch a broad base of research already underway on gender issues in agriculture.
A total of sixty-four written papers were available in a three-volume set at the Conference. In order to make conference materials more widely available, the W M Program decided to organize a selection of the international papers for publication as a book. Although the quality of most of the papers presented was high, space considerations made it impossible to publish all of them. This volume includes less than half of the papers presented at the Conference. In making the difficult decision as to which papers to include, the editors used several criteria. Most important was adherence to the original thematic focus on farming systems work, as outlined in the call for papers. Secondly, preference was given to papers that presented new ideas or methodological approaches for the integration of gender into FSR/E projects. Finally, regional balance and the inclusion of non-U.S. authors who might not otherwise find an audience for their work in this country was sought. The overall goal was to produce a coherent reader with a comparative perspective, that would be both stimulating and helpful to people trying to implement gender-aware farming systems projects. we hope the many excellent papers that could not be included in this volume will find publication outlets elsewhere.
This book, and the WIAD Program's overall effort,
have depended on the hard work and support of a dedicated group of faculty, students, and staff from the UF. A special thanks is due to Jean Gearing, who was responsible for much of the editing, correspondence, typing, and organizational tasks associated with the book. The editors are also grateful to Pamela Shaw for her editorial work, to Kathy Gladden for bibliographic and clerical assistance, to Sharon Leslie and Barbara Rogers for their assistance in artwork, and to Lana Bayles, Kenna Hughey, Shirlene Washington, Sabrina Byron, and Dana Whitaker who provided additional help with the word processing. The book and the Conference that produced it are, in turn, part of a larger effort in which the MAD organizers have






xxi


been privileged to collaborate with many colleagues, some of whom are mentioned above. It is hoped that the ideas and experiences discussed by the authors of the following chapters will help to stimulate and improve the consideration of gender as a crucial issue in agricultural production and development.

Susan V. Poats
Marianne Schmink






PART 1. THEORETICAL AND METHODOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS
OF THE INCLUSION OF GENDER IN FARMING SYSTEMS RESEARCH AND EXTENSION (FSR/E)









Linking FSR/E and Gender:
An Introduction

Susan V. Poats, Marianne Schmink, and Anita Spring

The title of this book is like a code. The two terms t'gender issues" and "farming systems research and extension" are shorthand. Each represents an extensive field of research and practice: women and development or WID, and farming systems or FSR/E, respectively. The two fields have much in common. Both emerged relatively recently in response to dissatisfaction with the results of technological change in agriculture in developing countries. Whereas in the 1950s and 1960s development theory andpractice emphasized growth in productivity, by the 1970s there was a renewed concern to implement programs that conceived of development more broadly, to mean the possibility of better lives for most people. This perspective challenged a development field dominated by technical and economic expertise. Efforts to develop more comprehensive approaches that would bring together technical, economic, and social considerations led to the two interdisciplinary fields of WID and FSR/E.
In this brief introduction, justice cannot be done to either field in its own terms. Rather, the historical and practical considerations that favor their interaction and the conceptual problems such a union can help to overcome are reflected. The discussion will indicate how the following chapters in this book contribute theoretical and methodological insights that can help to make agricultural development programs more efficient and equitable.

FARMING SYSTEMS RESEARCH AM EXTENSION

most farms in developing countries are small scale, with few resources other than family labor. Their subsistence activities are multifaceted and their goals









complex, including both market and non-market considerations. Minimizing risk is especially important when family survival is at stake. Given the constraints they face, small farmers actively seek ways to improve their productivity and to maximize the few resources at their disposal. Agricultural technologies (including equipment, inputs such as fertilizers and pesticides, and management practices) are often designed for farmers with greater resources and market orientation based on an essentially economic calculation of costs and benefits. By the 1970s, development practitioners became concerned that the benefits of agricultural innovation accrued most easily to these wealthier farmers. Yet small ' farmers constituted the majority of .producers and, ultimately, those most directly responsible for the welfare of rural families and communities. What were the social and economic costs of neglecting them? The design of technologies appropriate to the majority of lowresource farmers required an understanding of their particular constraints, goals, and practices that went beyond strictly technical and economic criteria. The farming systems concept emerged as a response to this challenge.
FSR/E is not a single approach, but an array of different perspectives and methods. This diversity is a source of debate and dialogue that continually enriches the field. In this book there is likewise no orthodoxy, but rather a collection of different points of view as to how to conceptualize and carry out farming systems work. The common elements that underlay most versions of farming systems include: an explicit commitment to low-resource producers; a systems approach that recognizes the complexity of small farm enterprises; a focus on the farm family or household; and a recognition of the importance of including farmers in the research and extension process. The concept of "domains" is used to denote the specific client group (defined by environmental, ecological, and/or socioeconomic criteria) to whom the project is oriented.

WOMEN IN DEVELOPMENT

The WID field, similar to FSR/E, began with a concern for the distribution of development benefits. Like farming systems, women and development is far from a unified field of knowledge. Not only does it include many strands of research and practice, but the field has evolved rapidly over the approximately 20 years of its existence, since economist Ester Boserup published her ground-breaking work Women's Role in Economic Development in 1970. Boserup's work challenged the preval-REng notion that economic









development, or modernization, would automatically improve women's status by replacing traditional values and economic backwardness with new opportunities and an egalitarian ethos. She argued instead that economic innovations often replaced women's traditional economic activities with more efficient forms of production controlled by men. Examples included the decline of women's cottage industries due to competition from factories hiring predominantly men and, in some parts of the world, the growth of modern service and commerce sectors in which men predominated, in place of women's traditional marketing practices. The recognition that development, as practiced, might actually worsen women's position relative to men's crystallized the new field of women and development around a concern with equity.
By the late 1970s, however, a growing research base on women's economic activities showed that equity was intimately related to more technical problems of efficiency and productivity. If development undermined women's traditional economic contributions, was this loss compensated by the output of new forms of production? Were new economic opportunities opening up for women? What was the impact of these shifts on the welfare and productivity of the poor populations of the world? The new emphasis on the poor focused attention on women's importance as household producers and providers in addition to their domestic roles. No longer were they to be viewed simply as potential welfare beneficiaries whose needs might be neglected by development efforts. Instead, women were a mainstay of family and community welfare, active producers whose potential contributions were often overlooked or undermined. A clearer understanding of changes in women's role in production therefore was essential for the success of agricultural development projects.
A decade of theoretical experimentation and empirical research on women's role in development moved the field from the stage of raising awareness and clarifying issues to a search for practical applications. How could the WID insights be applied to development work? One solution was to create special projects or components devoted to women. while sometimes successful, these all too often emphasized women's domestic responsibilities rather than their productive work. They also distracted from the more general problem of improving the effectiveness of "mainstream" development projects by making them more responsive to gender differences among the client population. By what practical means could such a formidable task be undertaken?









The first attempts to answer this question produced an array of checklists of questions to be asked and data to be gathered in each project setting. A series of case studies were published as examples of how gender affected development projects. Various institutions compiled handbooks that specified how gender issues could be addressed at each step of the project cycle. But there were not enough experts trained in the analysis of such complex and variable matters as household division of labor, decisionmaking, and income management. Some of the basic issues could be specified in advance, but each setting required a unique assessment of their relevance and of the interaction with other important variables. While hiring more women as project staff members appeared to be a good idea, the gender of the researcher or practitioner turned out to be no guarantee of the requisite analytical skills.
In response to this dilemma, WID efforts in the 1980s sought to develop the tools of "gender analysis" and the methods by which development practitioners could learn and adopt them. USAID fostered a major effort to adapt the Harvard Business School's case study teaching method to training on gender issues in development projects. The office of Women in Development sponsored the writing of several new analytical case studies that were compiled in a handbook that also provided a framework and set of basic concepts to be used in the case study analysis (Overholt et al.,1985). The cases and the training method have been widely used in training workshops that provide practice in tackling a set of questions that might otherwise seem hope-lessly complicated. The strength of this approach is its emphasis on the link between project or development goals and gender differences in the client population. This focus helps to clarify the relevant issues and to indicate priorities for research and action.

GENDER ISSUES IN FARMING SYSTEMS RESEARCH AND D[TENSION (FSR/E)

The farming systems perspective is especially appropriate for such a process-oriented approach to gender analysis. The FSR/E methodology consists of a series of stages (diagnosis, planning and design of technology, experimentation and evaluation, and dissemination) that facilitate the specification of steps to be taken to address particular aspects of research and extension and how to make the best use of different kinds of data. But






5


FSR/E is also conceived to be an iterative, adaptive process in which, once the project is well underway, the various stages of research take place simultaneously. This philosophy is intended to maximize the potential impact of on-going farmer evaluations on the design and dissemination of future technological changes. The research process allows time to learn about the intricacies of farming systems and to incorporate new insights into more refined measures and project adaptations. Other characteristics of the farming systems approach especially important for gender analysis include its-focus,.on.small farm households and on the participation of farmers in the research and extension process.

Disaggregating Development Beneficiaries

The farming systems emphasis on reaching specific lowincome groups helped to illuminate women's roles in agricultural development. Identifying small farmer constituencies required the disaggregation of society into "target" or "client" groups which brought women's activities into greater focus. The interaction of socioeconomic standing and gender was brought home by the growing recognition that women in poor families played essential economic roles that bore little resemblance to the activities of middleclass and elite women in the same societies. These observations were confirmed by mounting evidence from research that documented poor women's multiple economic activities, low earnings and long work hours, and restricted access to productive resources. women pl , ayed a central role in the low-resource farm households that were the focus of farming systems work.
The surprisingly high and growing proportions of
female-headed households dramatized women's economic importance in poor populations and revealed the extra constraints under which they often labored to achieve family welfare (Buvinic and Youssef 1979). Rural out-migration of men was rising in many parts of the world as a result of development, leaving many women either temporarily or permanently in charge of their households (Palmer 1986). Their efforts were often undermined by labor constraints or by lack of access to productive resources, in part because research and extension services were primarily oriented to male farmers. The focus on female-headed households illustrated how disaggregation of beneficiary populations could more precisely delineate appropriate interventions for specific social groups. It also undermined the assumption that development projects focused on male farmers always would have the most effective impact on family welfare.









The Whole Farm Syst

The systems approach endorsed by the FSR/E constituency lent itself well to illuminating women's economic importance. Small farm enterprises encompass multiple activities whose interaction is key to understanding management decisions and practices. The configuration of a given system changes readily over time in response to both internal and external factors. This holistic, dynamic perspective on small farming enterprises provided a framework within which the family division of labor could be a key focus. Social definitions of which tasks would be carried 6xit-by men or women vary from one society, region, class, or ethnic group to another. This variability indicates that the division of labor is determined not by the physical difference between the sexes, but by the social definitions of proper relations between women and men. The concept of "gender" serves to distinguish the social character of these relationships, and the "sexual division of labor" describes the allocation of tasks and responsibilities to men and women in a particular situation. In practice, farming systems practitioners may disaggregated only so far, stopping short at the analysis of the division of labor within the household or family. Agricultural research has historically focused on specific connodities whose production is market-oriented. FSR/E recognized that small farm enterprises combine crops and animals. Yet the perspective still overlooked other essential activities carried out by farm families, including off-farm work, home-based production for use or exchange, and the work Required to maintain the home and its inhabitants. WID research revealed that women were often predominant in these activities, especially those based in the home that Cnded to be overlooked or viewed as merely "domestic" qrk. While men often specialized in income-generating activities, women typically combined household management, child care, and work to generate earnings (both on and off the fam). These competing demands on their time could serve as a significant constraint to the adoption of new forms of production that relied on women's labor.
In small farm households, decisions reflected priorities and constraints related to a variety of activities and goals, not just to those related to cash crop production. The potential trade-offs between resources devoted to agricultural production and investments in improved family nutrition were of particular concern to farming systems practitioners whose objective was to stabilize or enhance rural welfare. The systems approach adopted by FSR/E practitioners provided a starting point for integrating the









diversity of farm and non-farm activities within a more complex model of the whole farm-household system. WID practitioners collaborated by focusing attention on women's importance in agricultural production, but also in focusing on activities not generally defined as "production" that are nevertheless essential to the well-being and economic livelihood of rural households and communities.

Intra-Household Dynamic

The focus on farm families brought development work much closer to the realities of poor families than was possible using the country level statistics. The concept of "household", sometimes used to denote a residential unit, sometimes synonymous with the nuclear family, was useful in the field of development and in the social sciences in general (Schmink 1984). It provided an intermediate level of analysis (between the individual and the aggregate society) and a convenient unit for the collection of empirical data. The existence of such primary domestic units in virtually all societies implied an attractive universality for the concept of household that was familiar to researchers and practitioners from-their own personal existence. These perceived advantages, however, had hidden drawbacks. Development practitioners often generalized from their own experience, presuming that households elsewhere were similar to those in which they lived, when in fact household structure and functioning is highly variable. Whereas in advanced industrial society productive work is largely separated from the home, the same is not true for agrarian communities. Home-based food processing, handicrafts, care of animals, kitchen gardens, and manufacturing of such useful items as soap and clothing for a peasant family are not analogous to the domestic chores of a middle-class urban housewife. They are productive tasks essential to household welfare. Whereas a U.S. household typically depends on one or two monetary wages for its sustenance, rural families in the developing world rely on a diverse set of paid and non-paid activities for survival.
In many societies women and men have quite separate responsibilities, access to distinct resources, and differentiated control over returns from their own activities. In fact, households are themselves systems of resource allocation (Guyer 1981). The unitary neoclassical view of household income inherited from the advanced industrial nations is especially inappropriate for









such complex situations in which household members have access to different resources and work opportunities, and exercise differing degrees of control over separate income streams that flow through the household. Household decision-making is neither necessarily unitary nor harmonious. Different members may decide about production strategies, contribute labor to specific tasks, or bear responsibility for the use of the commodities produced. The complexity of intra-household dynamics implies that the possibility of competing goals or priorities may require negotiation among household members. Households are also fluid; variability stems from responses to exogenous changes (such as male out-migration), from internal differentiation based on class, income, ethnicity, and culture, and from demographic variables within the household unit (that is, the pattern of family formation, or the "life cycle" of the family).

Farmer Participati

The internal dynamics of small farm households affect the process of client involvement in the research and extension process. If work responsibilities, control over resources, and decision-making are fragmented within the family unit, who are the appropriate partners in the research process and potential beneficiaries of the 'proposed technologies? Since male household heads are typically the public representatives of family groups, it is often assumed that information and resources conveyed to them will "trickle across" to others in their household. But indirect communications strategies are inefficient and may omit the actual "user" from the process of FSR/E. This omission represents a loss of valuable indigenous knowledge and may lead to inadequate or incomplete application of technological innovations. Since women and men may know about different factors relevant to agricultural production, the labor of one may not necessarily substitute for the other. If farming systems projects are to succeed in forging effective collaborative ties with their client population, they must include both women and men farmers as partners in the research process.

CONTENTS OF THIS BOOK

The chapters of this book are a selection of the papers concerned with developing countries in Latin America, Asia, middle East, and Africa presented at the Conference in 1986 at the University of Florida (see Preface). The









Conference's primary objective was to bring together scholars and practitioners with expertise and interest in FSR/E to discuss state-of-the-art issues related to gender in FSR/E. In order to maximize coherence, participants were asked to prepare papers that would address specific issues of theory, method, and policy related to FSR/E across developing regions. The following questions were posed under several topical areas:
The Whole Farming System. How can key components of a farming system, including non-farm activities, livestock, secondary crops, food storage, and food processing, be identified? How does the division of labor by age and gender constrain or facilitate specific economic or productive goals? What is the potential impact of improved agricultural technology on-each of these goals and on household members responsible for specific production activities?
Intra-Household Dynamics. What are the key aspects of internal heterogeneity of household units: differential access and use of resources within households; multiple enterprises and their interactions; substitutability and specialization of labor in agricultural activities; marketing outlets and their relationship to differing or conflicting priorities and needs within farm units; and how might proposed interventions alter the balance of power and advantage?
Institutional and Policy Concerns. How does the surrounding environment beyond the farm gate at household, community, and other social levels differ for men and women? What specific constraints to production are posed by these gender differences? How can FSR/E address constraints such as legal status, restrictions on mobility, domestic obligations, property rights, access to credit, markets, and employment?
Definition of Research Domains. How can the key
components and actors within household and farming systems be identified? What are key constraints to productive activities and how does access to production inputs differ by gender? What is the significance of, and interactions between, multiple enterprises within the farm household and how do they create different labor requirements, goals, incentives, markets, and priorities for different family members?
On-Farm Research and Extension. Who are the specific audiences for direct involvement in on-farm research and extension? How do labor constraints affect proposed solutions and how do labor patterns impact on household members who differ in their access to resources? How can









extension strategies be devised that are responsive to the productive activities of both women and men? Which extension mechanisms are most effective in reaching both male and female farmers?
Monitoring and Evaluation. How can strategies be
designed for monitoring the differential impact of FSR/E interventions on different individuals and enterprises within the farming system? What are the unanticipated effects of technological change? In what ways does misunderstanding of gender issues lead to inadequate planning and design or diminished returns to FSR/E projects? How can these effects be minimized?
The papers contained in this book do not exhaust the answers to these questions, but they do provide a beginning. Authors were asked to include a common "minimum data set" in their case study material to facilitate comparison. The following chapters contain many innovative approaches to conceptualizing and carrying out farming systems projects that effectively take gender into account. They highlight several features of the farming systems approach that could be improved by more attention to gender, and they suggest practical ways that this could be done. The book presents a comparative perspective on.the relevance of gender to farming systems work in the developing regions. Two dimensions run throughout the various chapters: the presentation of site-specific data that will permit in-depth analysis of specific cases and the search for conceptual and methodological innovations.
Part I presents a set of articles that focus on key theoretical and methodological issues relevant to the farming systems approach. In Chapter 2, Rosalie Norem. summarizes the results of a survey ofGrming systems projects that collected data on intra-household dynamics and gender differences. Project staff expressed a need for more intra-household data, especially on the factors determining household variability (such as out-migration and the family "life cycle"), on specific labor constraints stemming from the gender division of labor, and on income management within the household. Her findings also reveal that different kinds of information are useful at each phase of a project. In Chapter 3, Alison Evans discusses some of the problems with FSR/E procedures that impede the effective integration of gender considerations, including the emphasis on market criteria and measure, and the assumed homogeneity of the farm household. She presents a framework of ideas to help in constructing a broader, more dynamic model of farm-household systems. She also discusses the relevance of gender at different points in the FSR/E









process, and institutional constraints that must be overcome to improve attention to gender.
Janice Jiggins, in Chapter 4, continues the discussion by focusing on the problems of communication between researchers, farmers, and extension workers, using examples from Zambia and Lesotho that show the rationality and flexibility within the domestic domain. She explores the difficulties of reconciling scientific knowledge systems with those of indigenous people in the course of conducting on-farm research. Lessons drawn from her examples point to the need for establishing key field-household interactions at an early stage of the diagnostic process and to developing methods for mutual communication of key concepts across researchers and female producers, distinct knowledge systems. She proposes the use of situation-analysis based on critical incident technique and peer group workshops as appropriate methodologies for improving communication and diagnosis.
Amalia Alberti focuses in Chapter 5 on the problem of generating data sufficiently sensitive to gender differences to guide the definition of client groups during the initial phases of a project. Echoing Evans' point that a priority for wealthier, more market-oriented farmers will tend to exclude women, she discusses the pros and cons of different sources of techniques for data collection in FSR/E projects. The following chapter, by Peter Wotowiec, Jr., Susan Poats, and Peter Hildebrand, explores in more detail how definitions of client populations need to be modified in accordance with the problems posed at different stages of the project cycle. They offer a refinement of the conventional FSR/E concept of "domains" to distinguish between "research domains" (that maintain variability), "recommendation domains" (homogeneous for technology testing), and "diffusion domains" (for disseminating new technologies). In Chapter 7, Jonice Louden summarizes the compelling reasons for incorporating gender issues into FSR/E monitoring and evaluation systems, especially in a country such as Jamaica where women play key roles in agricultural production. The FSR/E process presents an opportunity to collect systematically valuable information that can help to inform project implementation and refine gender-sensitive measures of key indicators of development.
Chapters 8, 9, and 10 take up conceptual and methodological issues beyond the farming systems universe. Dissatisfied with the market bias of standard economic models of the household, authors Lila Engberg, Jean Sabry and Susan Beckerson propose an alternative production activity model based on measures of time allocated to









income-generation, subsistence, and home production. The more integrated model suggests trade-off s between labor allocated to cash and to subsistence activities in M~alawi that could have nutritional implications. Also concerned with the concept of household Art Hansen presents data, in Chapter 9, from Africa that suggests caution in conceptualizing and measuring the frequency of female-headed households. His findings show that static surveys may underestimate the probability that a woman will be a head of household at some moment or moments in her life, thereby reinforcing the importance of involving both men and women in development efforts. Eva Wollenberg's Chapter 10 discusses the strengths and weaknesses of various time allocation methodologies and their relevance to farming systems work. She explores how four different approaches to the collection of time use data were used in a Philippine project. Her discussion emphasizes the dynamic nature of the FSR/E process, a theme common to all of the chapters in this section. Gender patterns and intra-household relationships become relevant to different degrees and in different ways at each point in the project cycle. These chapters, and others following, provide concrete suggestions as to how an unfolding farming systems project team can collect and analyze the information that will enable it to develop and adapt production technologies to the needs of different users.
Diane Rocheleau, in Chapter 11, draws upon experience from a broad range of countries; she details a land user perspective as an appropriate method for incorporating women as clients and active participants in agroforestry projects. Her paper and that of Owusu-Bempa (Chapter 29) pliyk an important role in expanding the horizon of FSR/E to consider the rural landscape as the context and focus for projects in order to address the gap between natural resource management and farming systems research. The role and domain of women in the interface of these two areas is clearly laid out as the next critical frontier for expansion of household research and gender-based analysis.
Beginning with Part II, the Chapters explore gender issues in FSR/E on a regional basis. Women's roles in agricultural production are less visible in Latin America than id-6jieri 'developing -regions.- The -same is not true in the Caribbean nations such as St. LUCia,-desaribed in Chapter 12 by Vasantha Chase. While (island womeiin\play a significant role in farm work and decisi-making, they receive less income and fewer extension services than do male farmers. Informal data collection methods reveal that female-headed households face particular labor and input constraints that limit their output, choice of crops, and









amount of land planted. A concern with integrating food consumption into the farming systems approach led the Caribbean Agricultural Research and Development Institute (CARDI) to recommend labor-saving methods of backyard garden production, oriented to improvement of family nutrition. The link between nutrition and agricultural change is also the focus of Eunice McCulloch and Mary Futrell's Chapter 13. Their measures of the nutritional output of cropping activities reveal the "low level steady state" farming system that maintains Honduran families at risk of persistent malnutrition.
In Chapter 14, Patricia Garrett and Patricio Espinosa describe the steps taken by the Bean/Cowpea Collaborative Research Project in Ecuador to adapt project activities to gender and social class differentiation. Their rich discussion of the FSR/E process demonstrates the importance of women's participation in production and decision-making, even in Andean Latin America where farming commonly is assumed to be the domain of men. The same is true in the Peruvian highland community described in Chapter 15 by Maria Fernandez, were women are responsible for most tasks associated with livestock production. Recognizing women as a key source of knowledge on traditional livestock production practices, the project team experimented with a variety of strategies to draw them into active participation. Fernandez' argument reflects the emphasis in Rocheleauls and Owusu-Bempah's papers on agroforestry of the importance of women's knowledge about traditional resource management practices.
Part III presents five case studies from Asia and the Middle East. Chapter 16 by Rita Gallin and Anne Ferguson and Chapter 17 by Jane Gleason present case studies from Taiwan. Gallin and Ferguson use longitudinal data from one village to show that a limited focus on farming activities ignored off-farm work and failed to analyze the interactions between the agricultural and industrial sectors of society. The authors propose the term "household enterprise" as a way of dealing with interrelated farming and off-farm work, and encourage researchers to view off-farm activities as "central rather than tangential to FSR/E analysis." Gallin and Ferguson discuss farm mechanization and note that it did not displace women, but rather concentrated certain tasks among some male specialists and caused some women to assume managerial positions previously restricted to men. Older women also took over tasks of younger women who then sought off-farm employment.
Gleason's detailed labor study in Southern Taiwan
complements the previous work, and together they present a good example of why generalizations about gender and









agriculture should not be made for an entire country. Gleason argues that in Southern Taiwan, as agricultural mechanization increased, more women than men were displaced and forced to other sectors of the economy. In her study, availability of female labor increased the variety of crops grown and the level of diversification, indicating that women will be the users of modern vegetable technology and will be most affected by changes in vegetable production.
Chapter 18 by Bahnisikha Ghosh and Sudhin Mukhopadhyay
studies time allocation by men and women in a rice-based ,- arming system in West Bengal, India. Though female labor
is subject to sociological confitanCs, the contribution of women is often larger than men's. A change-tonew rice
technb-Logy-incrxe 0tfem-ale-labor, however the authors show
that the increased workload falls within the home production sector and was largely unaccounted for in the traditional economic literature.
Chapters 19 and 20 are based on work conducted at two
of the International Agricultural Research Centers. Thelma Paris, in Chapter 19, describes how women were successfully
integrated into a crop-livestock project of the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), in the Philippines.
Beginning as observers and slowly integrating themselves by collecting and disaggregating data on household and production activities, the section members of the Women in Rice
Farming Systems were able to produce useful information and
become fully participatory members of the project. As a
result of their efforts, the whole team began to recognize that specific production activities are the responsibility
of women and that on-farm research needed to target them.
Women's livestock, particularly swine, rootcrops, and
vegetables that had not been previously addressed by the
project, were proposed as new areas of research as a result
of the incorporation of women's concerns. In addition,
subsequent training courses included a significant number
of women participants, and the course addressed women's
production problems.
~Andree Rassam and Dennis Tully in Chapter 20, discuss
research at the International Centre for Agricultural
Research in Dry Areas (ICARDA) on gender and agricultural
labor in Syria. They find that though male and female time
contributions to crop production are similar, males are
more often involved in new technologies, especially mechanization, while females are more involved in more traditional ones such as hand labor. The authors expect continuing









mechanization to further reduce female agricultural activities and they propose additional research to determine the impact of these changes.
Part IV contains a number of case studies from Africa that includes the descriptions of cropping systems, labor patterns, and work in on-farm, farmer-managed trials. Some themes that emerge from the papers are: the separate economies of men and women within households; the variability of the sexual division of labor in farm tasks; and increasing numbers of households headed by women and the concomitant increase in work burden due to male migration and divorce. Concerning the sexual division of labor, tasks may be the same or different for both sexes; in
female-headed households the so-called "male tasks" are performed by women out of necessity. Concomitantly, the authors report that researchers and extensionists have failed to recognize women's roles in farming, ignored gender in the design of FSR/E projects, and not included women much as trial cooperators. Women, especially female heads of households, are often low-resource farmers who may have special problems that research and extension need to address. (Indeed, there are male low-resource farmers who have many of the same constraints.) The question as to whether or not gender accounts for separate recommendation domains finds different answers in the papers due to differential ecologies, social organization, and cropping systems.
Chapter 21 by Margaret Norem, Sandra Russo, Marie
Sambou, and Melanie Marlett provides an example from The Gambia of how a women's component was formulated and operationalized as part of a larger, FSR/E project. Existing women's societies were used as a basis for organizing women and a maize-cowpea intercropping package was developed. The women experienced difficulties with the package related to pests, seed varieties, and labor patterns. The project was able to use women's participation in the trials and the problems they encountered to argue for the need to include women in subsequent research and extension efforts.
Jeane Henn in chapter 22, examines how government policies and environmental constraints impact on intrahousehold dynamics in Cameroon. Labor patterns, proximity to roads and urban areas, and farm gate prices affected incomes, differently in two villages. Food sales were very important to women's incomes but marginal to men's incomes that were mostly derived from cash crops. In one village, men withdrew labor from food crops resulting in an increase in women's work. However, the women close to roads and









urban markets were able to increase their labor output and foodstuffs produced, and double their income while women in the other village were not.
Jean Due provides data in Chapter 23 from Tanzania,
Zambia, and Malawi on how gender is important to FSR/E work arguing that unless there are person(s) on the FSR/E team who are sensitive to the issues, important information will be missed. In Tanzania, a diagnostic survey for bean/cowpea research revealed that women select seed and contribute more labor on the crop than men. FSR/E work in Zambia would be hindered by not knowing the extensive labor contribution of women on the one hand, and the extent of offfarm and non-crop income, some of which is generated by women, on the other. Data on extension agents contacts with farmers in Tanzania and farmers, farm income are correlated and show that male contact farmers have seven times the income of female heads of households, who are rarely contacted by extensionists.
,In Chapter 24, Timothy Mtoi discusses labor patterns in one region of Tanzania and uses a model to test the significance of female labor on expected risk and productivity under two cropping systems connected to a FSR project. The analysis shows that farm income would increase if the new alternative farming system had female labor transferred to it. However, policy decisions affect whether or not women can participate in the new technology (i.e., be trial cooperators) and obtain extension advice on the packages.
--Chapters 25, 26, and 27 focus on Zambia and provide a more detailed set on the farming systems there and on the results of FSR/E diagnostic surveys. Mary Tembo and Elizabeth Chola Phiri discuss the traditional chitemene system of shifting agriculture and its sexual division of labor, the results of the colonial period that drained off male labor, and the lack of extension credit services to women. The result of these conditions has affected the diet and nutritional status of the population because women have taken to growing cassava (a crop that is less labor intensive, but also less nutritious than millet or maize), and farmers neglect food crops for household consumption because of growing cash crops.
Chapters by Robert Hudgens and Alistar Sutherland
examine FSR/E diagnostic survey work of Adaptive Research Planning Teams that became sensitized to the need to ta 'rget women farmers in research activities and in the determination of recommendation domains. Hudgens details the charactaristics of male and female-headed households in terms of land holdings, draft power, source of inputs, and cash









sales. The comparisons show that there are both similarities and differences between the two household types and that the female-headed households experience labor shortages. Women tend to be isolated from government services and their production is constrained by lack of exposure to new ideas, inputs, and capital.
As part of the diagnostic phase of FSR work, Sutherland compares women's and men's roles in three regions of Zambia and argues that even within one country, gender roles are influenced by cultural, economic, political, and ecological factors. Labor, cash availability, and draft power tend to divide households into recommendation domains. Gender is a distinguishing factor in one region, but not in the others.
In Chapter 28, Anita Spring reports on two different on-farm, farmer-managed trials in Malawi. In the first, the inclusion of low-resource female farmers along with high-resource male farmers generated two recommendation domains. Improved maize cultivars and use of fertilizer worked well in the better environments and with high resource farmers, but would be disastrous in the lowresource environments and with low-resource farmers. on the other hand, the traditional cultivar was better in -\ these situations. The second set of trials involved all
female cooperators to solve a technical problem of inocul-\ ating soybeans as well as the issue of whether or not male\ extensionists could work with female farmers. It was found that the women could do trials with precision and that male extension and research staff could work with women farmers in terms of training and credit programs.
Kofi Owusu-Bempah, in the final paper, argues for inclusion of farmers in the planning and design of projects, and particularly calls for the involvement of women in the selection of species to be included in agroforestry projects in Ghana. His work represents a largely private sector effort and, like Rocheleau, calls for expanding the framework of analysis to include the landscape perspective and the intersection of crops, livestock and forest enterprizes.
In conclusion, the papers in this volume contribute to an understanding of how gender affects farming systems and the way that FSR/E operates. The papers demonstrate that by linking the two codes - gender and FSR/E - the agricultural research and extension system can become more efficient and effective in dealing with different groups of farmers. The papers provide details of specific cases and the methods used to incorporate gender perspectives and analysis.









There is no single recipe for action. Instead, these studies from an array of ecological, social, and political contexts demonstrate that it is both possible and practical to use gender analysis as a tool in the work of agricultural development.

REFERENCES

Boserup, E.
1970 Women's Role in Economic Development. New York:
St. Martin's Press.
Guyer, J.
1981 Household and Community in African Studies.
African Studies Review 24: 2/3.
Overholt, C., M. Anderson, K. Cloud, and J. Austin
1985 Gender Roles in Development Projects: A
Casebook. W. Hartford, CN: Kumarian Press. Palmer, I.
1985 The Impact of Male out-migration on Women in
Farming. W. Hartford, CM: Kumarian Press. Schmink, M.
1984 Household Economic Strategies: Review and
Research Agenda. Latin American Research Review
19:3:87-101.













2
Integration of Intra-Household
Dynamics into Farming Systems
Research and Extension:
A Survey of Existing Projects

Rosalie Huisinga Norem

This paper reports the results of a survey designed to study farming systems projects that include an intrahousehold focus in data collection, design, or implementation. Farming systems models (Shaner et al. 1982) have recognized the importance of the household as a component of the farming system, but until recently little has been done to systematically "open the black box" of the household component in those systems models. Projects responding to the survey being reported here are among those
attempting to gain a more systematic understanding of the inter and intra-household factors influencing farming systems.
The primary purposes of the present survey are to assess the types of information collected and used by projects, to evaluate the methods used for obtaining the information, and to gain some insight into how and why the intra-household information is helpful. In addition, project managers were asked to identity types of information they would like to have, but are not available and the constraints affecting various phases of their projects.

RATIONALE

This study evolved from on-going work relating household concerns to farming systems work. When the Farming Systems Support Project (University of Florida/JSAID) was first initiated, a family task force was organized to focus on the integration of household and family concerns into the farming systems perspective. one of the recommendations of this group was to develop case studies and training materials that would promote such integration. In a position paper on "Intra-household Dynamics in Farming Systems Research: The Basis of Whole Farm Monitoring of








Farming Systems Research and Extension," Cornelia Butler-Flora (1984) set the stage for an intra-household dynamics and farming systems case studies project that was subsequently funded and implemented.
Concurrent with the effort to develop training materials that will sensitize people to the importance of intrahousehold factors in farming systems work as well as in other development efforts, there is a need for more knowledge about the kinds of data being collected and the methods used by existing projects that are attempting to focus on intra-household factors. As an attempt is made to understand the complexity of household dynamics, ways to obtain and analyze information within reasonable time and other resource limits also must be found. Questions about how much information on aspects of the household should be obtained from whom have yet to be answered (Norem 1983).
This is not to suggest that one "right" way of focusing on household dynamics and farming systems can be identified. Rather it is to suggest that by examining what is being done and how effective researchers and practitioners involved find current efforts, some guidelines can be identified that will be helpful in future planning.
It may be helpful to consider how information relating to households can be broken into different units depending on the purposes of the individual study. overall, the unit of interest in intra-household dynamics is the household. The unit of data collection might be one or more household members, other informants, or other existing information. The unit of analysis can be an individual, the household or subsystems thereof, a work group, or the farming system, among other possibilities. Designing parsimonious data collection and analysis procedures requires an understanding of how these units relate in various situations.
For example, it may be possible to obtain good data on the unit of interest from only one person if what is required is basic demographic information such as age, gender, and education of household members. The household is also the unit of analysis in this example. Information about the tasks performed in the household is more likely to require data collection from more than one person, or extensive observation or record keeping to permit the collection of enough information to focus on the household as a unit of analysis. As a clearer picture of the state of the art develops, it is hoped a clearer set of guidelines will evolve. The survey summary presented in this paper is a first step.







DESIGN OF THE STUDY

The Farming Systems Support Project and Population
Council Intra-household Dynamics and Farming Systems Case Studies Project was initiated with support from USAID and the Ford Foundation in late 1984. In February of 1985, a request for expressions of interest was sent to projects and individuals on a variety of international mailing lists. over seventy-five expressions of interest were received in response to the request. These expressions of interest were used to develop initial lists of types of data and data collection methods being used in projects. The lists were used in conjunction with the case studies project conceptual framework to draft a survey questionnaire. The questionnaire was reviewed by the case studies project advisory committee and revised using the comittee's suggestion.
The questionnaire was mailed to all projects that had responded to the original request for expressions of interest in the case study project, since those projects had self-selected themselves in terms of interest in intrahousehold concerns. A few other projects were also included in the survey. All questionnaires received (n--19) are included in the summary, regardless of type of project. most are farming systems oriented, with one project being specifically focused on women in farming systems. Seven projects from Asia, seven from Africa, two from the Middle East, and three from Latin America are included. The titles and identifying information about the projects are presented in Table 2.1.
Each project has a different specific target group, but all projects have target groups of farms with multiple crop systems. Fifteen projects report farms in their project also have livestock, most for multiple use, including cash income, food, traction, wealth, and prestige. The average land holdings for farmers in the projects ranged from .89 hectares to 30 hectares, with an overall mean of 6.34 hectares.

RESULTS

Types of Intra-household Data

Each project was asked to indicate whether or not it has data about five general categories: (1) demographic information, (2) household members' participation in activities, (3) household members' access to production resources, (4) household members' participation in decision making, and (5) income and expenditure data, benefits from








TABLE 2.1

PROJECTS RESPONDING TO SURVEY


PR~wv .r TTThFR


COUNTRY ASIA

Indonesia Philippines




Nepal




Bangladesh


India Philippines Philippines


CONTRACTOR AND UNIT IN CHARGE SOURCEE OF FUNDS)


University of Hawaii with University of N. Carolina & Center for Soils Research (USAID)

Ministry of Agriculture and Food and the Virginia State University (USAID)



Winrock International & Ministry of Agriculture (USAID)



Bangladesh Agricultural University (Bangladesh Agricultural Research Council)

Haryana Agricultural University (Haryana)


Silliman University Research Center (Ford Foundation)


Cornell University, Ministry of Agriculture & Food, & the Visayas State College of Agriculture (USAID)


TROPSOILS
Soil Management CRSP

Farming Systems Development Project Eastern Visayas Non-Farm & Resource Management Institute

Agricultural Research & Production Project
Farming System Development Division

Women in Farming Systems

Role of Farm Women in Decision

Making Related to Farm Business

Balinsasayao Agroforestry

Project

Farming Systems Development Project Eastern Visayas Non - Farm & Resource Management Institute


PROJECT TITLE CONTRACMR AND UNIT IN CHARGE (SOURCE OF FUNDS)






AFRICA
Burkina Faso Burkina Faso Sierra Leone Extension Ghana Botswana Kenya Sierre Leone


Fulbe Agropastoral Production
in Southern Burkina Faso for USAID Agric. Sector Grant

Income & Agric. Investment in a Bobo Village

Adaptive Crop Research of Sierre Leone


REDECASH/BIRD


Agricultural Technology Improvement Project


Dryland Farming Research


Phase I: Land Resources Survey Project Phase II: Strengthening Land & Water Division


(continued)


Frederick Sowers, Univ. of California, Berkeley SAIDI)


University of Illinois, (Wenner Gren Foundation, NSF)


Southern Ill. University, Louisiana State University & Ministry of Agriculture & Natural Resources (USAID, and Government of Sierra Leon) Bureau of Integrated Rural Development (BIRD, REDECASH)


Midwest Int'l Agricultural Consortium (MIAC) (USAID, Kansas State University)

Ministry of Agric. National Dryland Farming Research Station, (FAO/UNDP, Kenya Gov't. ) FAO/Ministry of Agriculture (UNDP)








TABLE 2.1 (continued)


COUNTRY MIDDLE EAST
Israel Syria


LATIN AMERICA
Mexico Honduras Panama


PROJECT TITLE


Irrigation Innovation and Family Farming Strategies in Israel

Syrian Households: Women's Labor & Impact of Technologies


Livestock Production Systems in Central State of Veracruz


Honduras Agricultural Research Project

EMPARAD: Socio-economic (Agricultural Development Bank) Case Study


CONTRACTOR AND UNIT IN CHARGE (SOURCE OF FUNDS)


City Univ. of New York, (Faculty Research Grant)


Andree Rassam, (ICARDA & MEAWARDS)



Centro de Investigacion Ensenanza en Granaderia Tropical, CIEEGT, Facultad de Medicina & Zootechnia (Universidad Nacional Autonomo de Mexico, UNAM) Consortium for International Development, New Mexico State Univ. (USAID)

Miriam Reyes, Martinez Elba, Rosa Hernandes








farm production, food consumption and nutrition information. Each of these categories include several specific kinds of data. Table 2.2 shows the types of data collected and the number of projects that collected each type. Table 2.3 summarizes the ways each type of information was or is used by the projects that responded to the survey.


TABLE 2.2

TYPES OF INTRA-HOUSEHOLD DATA COLLECTED BY
PROJECTS RESPONDING TO SURVEY



Type of Information (N=19) Number of projects

Demographic
Household Structure, Membership, and Size 19
Education 17
Ethnic Identity 16
Migration Patterns 9
Variation in Household Structure Over the Life Cycle 7 Household members' Participation in Activities
Cash Crops by Crop 13
Subsistence Crops by Crop 12
Livestock Production 11
Other Primary Income Generating Activities 8
Major Tasks of Household Reproduction 11
Household Member's Access to Production Resources
Land
In General 13
By Tenure Category 9
By Production Potential (Irrigated, Non-Irrigated) 8
Labor
Family 12
Hired 15
Exchanged 11
Capital
Seeds 14
Tools 15
Equipment 15
Animals 14

(Continued)














Type of Information (N=19) Number of projects

Household members' Access to Production Resources
innovations or Improved Production Inputs
Information (Extension Contacts, Training, Etc.) 14 Technology Inputs Requiring Cash or Credit 10
Credit
Informal 12
Formal 12
other 1
Household member's Participation in Decision-making
Land use 13
Use of Family Labor 13
Use of Hired Labor 11
Use of Exchange Labor 9
Use of Technology inputs 14
Use of Credit 12
Cropping Choices 13
Cultivation Practices 13
Uses of Harvested Crop and Residue 13
Marketing 12
Income and Expenditure Data
Each Household member's Sources of Income 7
Each Household Member's Expenditures 7
Benefits frm Farm Production
Use of End Products From Crop Production 11
Desirable Characteristics of Each Crop
or Crop Product 8
Each Household Member's Access to or
Control of End Products 6
Food Consumption and Nutrition Information
Diet Survey 4Nutritional Adequacy Analysis 4
Food Preparation Practices 6
Food Preferences 6
On-FaM Household Food Production 7


TABLE 2.2 (cont'd.)
TYPES OF INTRA-HOUSEHOLD DATA COLLECTED BY
PROJECTS RESPONDING TO SURVEY
















Number of Projects Reporting Use of Information by Type of Information*

Use 1 2 3 4 5 6

Initial Project Design 11 5 5 3 3
Selection of a Target Group 11 4 8 3 4 Identification of
Recommendation Domains 4 5 5 1 4
Choice of Research Topic 7 6 8 3 6
Designing Trials 6 4 6 3 4
Selection of Participating
Farmers for Field Trials 6 5 6 2 4 3 Evaluation of Field Trials 2 3 6 2 4 2 Redesign of Trials 3 6 6 6 4 2
Technology Recommendations 8 5 5 4 6 2 Extension Efforts 7 4 5 6 4
Project Evaluation Design 5 2 4 1 3 1
Assessing Time and Labor
Constraints 13 11 7 8 1 1
Assessing Opportunity Costs
for Innovation 7 5 5 3 3


Note: *Type of Information:

1 Demographic Information
2 Household members, Participation in Activities
3 Household Members, Access to Production Resources
4 Household Members' Participation in Decision-making
5 Income and Expenditure Data, Benefits from Farm
Production, Food Consumption, and Nutrition
6 other kinds of information collected include:
religious affiliation, inheritance data, and
information gathered from husband and wife
together.


TABLE 2.3

USES OF TYPES OF INTRA-HOUSEHOLD DATA
BY PROJECTS RESPONDING TO SURVEY









Demographic Information

The most frequently used methods for obtaining demographic information are pre-existing national surveys, formal project surveys, participant observation, and sondeos (rapid reconnaissance surveys). This information is summarized in Table 2.4 for all types of data. Demographic information is also available through pre-existing anthropological studies and local village records for some projects. other projects collected information through farmer records, community informants, time allocation studies, team members' personal knowledge, and in-depth case studies.
Nine projects collected demographic data before the project began, five during the diagnosis stage, and seven parallel with on-farm testing. Ten projects collected demographic data on an on-going basis.
All projects collected demographic data on household structure, membership, and size. most also have information about education and ethnic identity. Nine projects have data on migration patterns and seven have them on variation in household structure over the life cycle. Table 2.3 shows that demographic information was most useful in the early planning stages of projects.
Respondents were asked to identify the most helpful
information for each type and to give an explanation of how or why the information was helpful to their project. They were also asked to indicate any information in each category that they did not have but wished they did. These open-ended questions provide more detail related to intrahousehold concerns than the tabulated results shown in the tables.
The specific demographic information identified as most helpful to a project varies by project, however, some generalizations can be made. Gender and age structure of the household is mentioned by several respondents, sometimes alone and sometimes in conjunction with other information such as labor and income. This information was useful in identifying target groups and in designing trials that ascertain labor bottlenecks and total household activity patterns. Household structure is also reported as an important consideration in designing extension efforts. Ethnic information is mentioned second most frequently as the most helpful demographic information, because farming practices and values about female participation vary according to ethnicity.








TABLE 2.4 MOST F M GENTLY USED METHODS OF DATA COLLECTION
BY TYPE OF DATA


TvDe of Data Data Collection Mefhm


The two kinds of demographic information least often available, migration patterns and variation in household structure over the life cycle, are the ones most frequently named in response to the question, "Are there demographic data you do not have that you wish you had collected?."

Household Members' Participation in Activities

Formal surveys, participant observation, and community informants are the methods most frequently used to obtain information about the participation of household members in various activities (see Table 2.4). As with demographic information, projects obtained this information in a variety of ways. Each of the methods listed above for demographic information is used by at least one project to


Demographic Information


National Surveys Formal Survey Participant observation Sondeo

Formal Survey Participant observation Community Informants

National Surveys Formal Surveys Participant observation

Formal Survey Team Member's Personal Knowledge; Participant Observation

Formal Surveys Participant Observation


Household members,
in Activities


Participation


Household Members, Access to
Production Resources


Household Members, Participation
in Decision-making



Income and Expenditure Data, Benefits from Farm Production, Food Consumption, and Nutrition








obtain activity data, group meetings provide an additional source of information about household members' activities.
Three projects collected activity data before the project began, six during initial diagnosis, and six parallel with on-farm trials. Nine projects collect activity data on an on-going basis.
Specific questions were asked about type of activity data collected and method of disaggregation. Twelve projects collected task assignment data disaggregated by gender and age. Nine projects disaggregated by position in the household as well. Five projects have information about time allocation.
Thirteen projects report collecting some information about the participation of household members in various activities. Most frequently collected information (n-13) is about activities related to production of cash crops, with subsistence crops and livestock production information available for twelve out of nineteen projects. Other activities within the household receive less attention as indicated in Table 2.2. Table 2.3 indicated that projects use activity data less often than demographic data. Activity data are used most often to assess time and labor constraints.
Information on household members' activities was most helpful in designing research and targeting interventions. Respondents would like more detailed information about nonproduction activities and several express a desire for activity data covering a period of time up to a year. The complexity of activity data is pointed out and difficulties with processing such data are mentioned.

Household Members, Access to Production Resources

This study breaks production resources into subcategories of land, labor, capital, innovations, and credit. The projects represented use a variety of methods to obtain resource information; the most frequent are pre-existing national surveys, project-conducted formal surveys, participant observation, and team members, personal knowledge.
Six projects collected data on access to resources
before the project began, seven during initial diagnosis, and seven during on-farm trials. Five projects collect these data on an on-going basis.
As indicated in Table 2.2, fourteen of the seventeen projects have some resource information. But examination of Table 2.3 suggests that fewer projects overall use this information than use demographic data. more projects use resource information than activity data for most purposes,








but more projects use activity data to assess time and labor constraints
The answers t questions about the most useful resource data and why and how it is useful indicate that land resource information is perceived as most helpful for more projects than other kinds of resource data. The responses also indicate that the usefulness of resource access data is very project specific. Data on access to resources is likely to be helpful in research design and in selection of field trial locations. There is a pattern among responses about the kind of resource information respondents would like to have had but that was not available. More information about monetary income, including gifts and remittances, is mentioned in several contexts, including credit, opportunity costs for innovations, and access to capital.

Household members, Participation in Decision-Making

Fourteen projects in the survey have some data about decision-making within households. These data are collected most frequently through formal surveys, team members' personal knowledge, and participant observation. other methods are used, but in a project-specific manner. only three projects report having decision-making data to use in initial project design. one project collected data during the initial diagnosis and four collected data parallel with on-farm trials. Six projects are continuing to collect decision-making data.
Table 2.2 indicates that projects which have decisionmaking data also have information about most of the subcategories identified, including land use, labor use, technology use, cropping and cultivation practices, and use of production outputs. Table 2.3 suggests that projects are not using decision-making data extensively. Eight projects use decision-making data to assess time and labor constraints, and this is the most frequent use reported.
Responses to open-ended questions about the usefulness of decision-making data express the theme that a better understanding of household dynamics permits more knowledgeable identification of target groups. Eight respondents indicate their projects could use more detailed decisionmaking data that would reveal more about the effect of decision patterns.

Income and Ejc4nditure Data, Benefits From Production, and food Consumption and NutritioF Information

Seven projects have information about these categories of data. Formal surveys and participant observation are








the most common methods of obtaining the information. There are some differences among he categories. Participant observation is most likely to be the source of information about food consumption and nutrition information, and is not as likely to be a source of production benefits data. Formal surveys are used by several projects for all three categories.
Only one project had data in these categories before the project began. Three projects collected the data during the initial diagnosis, four collected the data parallel with on-fam testing, and eight collect the information on an on-going basis.
Table 2.2 details that eleven projects have information in at least one of these three categories. Income and expenditure data are least frequently available. Table 2.3 shows a fairly equal distribution of the use of specific kinds of data available in these categories over the various phases of the projects, especially in the design and implementation of field trials.
Since this section of the survey combines three
categories, the answers to questions about which information was most helpful, why so, and how, are somewhat complex, but they also point out the need to integrate information about overall production and consumption patterns in the household. For example, respondents noted the importance of looking at off-fam income and cash income from food crops and of understanding the households' reliance on local markets both for food and income. They also mention the need to assess the opportunity costs of innovations based on total inputs and total income generating possibilities.
Respondents answering the question about information they wish they had collected, mention primarily better income data for individual household members monitored over time. Several note the difficulty of obtaining reliable income data and state the importance of finding better ways of obtaining such information.

Most Effective methodologies

Respondents were asked to select the study or activity of their project that was most effective in collecting information about intra-/inter-household variables relevant to farm production and the ones that were most useful in determining project decisions concerning research priorities, cooperating farmers, technology acceptance, etc. Nine respondents name the formal survey as most helpful. This is usually done at the beginning of the project. Eight respondents identify participant observation as the








most useful activity for obtaining household information. This tends to be on-going, Four respondents state that the sondeo as most useful. The sondeo took place anywhere from the beginning to the third year of the project. Ten respondents report the head of household as the primary informant, whether male or female. Seven projects tried to include at least one other adult household member. Three relied on whoever was at home with a preference for the head of household. one case study involved all members of the household.

Constraints to Project

Respondents were asked to identify constraints that
affected the study design, sample selection, conduct of the study, data analysis, or applications of the data to their project or activity. These responses are summarized in Table 2.5. Ten respondents report physical, logistical or resource constraints on sample selection for their projects. Detailed answers to open-ended questions about these constraints show the most common one is transportation, either because of the lack of means or because of the difficulties of the terrain.


TABLE 2.5

CONSTRAINTS INFLUENCING PROJECTS


Number of Projects Reporting Physical/ Cultural/
Logistical/ Social
Phase of Project (N=19) Resource Political

Study Design 9 5
Sample Selection 11 4
Conduct of Study/Activity 7 6
Data Analysis 7 1
Application of Data to
Project/Activity 3 1

In order of descending frequency, other constraints
mentioned are funds, language, personnel, political situations, and ethnic group considerations. In many instances the constraints are named in conjunction with one another, such as ethnic concerns and language difficulties.








SUMMARY

Several summary points can be made from the information provided in the survey. First, there is a wide variation in the kind of data being collected about households with a comon focus on the household as a unit of interest. The data are most often collected from heads of household, so for some kinds of data there may be difficulty in using the household as a unit of analysis. For example, data about decision-making describe a dynamic intra-household process, but data involving several household members require complex data collection procedures. It is important to examine alternatives in determining which information is important for which stage of a project and how to obtain it as efficiently as possible. one respondent pointed out that designing more standardized methods of data collection and analysis is difficult because of the unique aspects of each project, but the same respondent also emphasized that efforts to move in this direction will save significant resources and hopefully eliminate the need for each future project to make the same mistakes.
There was general agreement among respondents that more information about intra-household concerns was important. one project is collecting additional information in most of the categories in the final stages of the project with the hope that it can be used in future planning.
This survey gives us one measure of what projects are currently doing and assesses perceptions of the importance of intra-household data. The next step is to suggest a household minimum data set that projects could collect. This would not eliminate the need for specific data for specific projects, but would provide the potential for comparative analysis and the beginning of theoretical generalization.






35

REFERENCES

Flora, C. B.
1984 Intra-HoUsehold Dynamics in Farming Systems
Research: The Basis of Whole Farm Monitoring of
Farming Systems Research and Extension. A Position
Paper. Manhattan, KS: Department of Sociology,
Kansas State University. Norem, R. H.
1983 The Integration of a Family Systems Perspective
into Farming Systems Projects. Conference
Proceedings, Family Systems and Farming Systems
Conference. Blacksburg, VA: Virginia Polytechnic
Institute and State University.
Shaner, W. W., P. F. Philipp and W.R. Schmehl
1982 Farming Systems Research and Development:
Guidelines for Developing Countries. Boulder, CO:
Westview Press.

















Gender Relations and Technological Change:
The Need for an Integrative Framework
of Analysis

Alison Evans

BACKGROUND

Over the past decade, agricultural research has focused on the rural poor and the need to strengthen the production systems of small farms. In sub-Saharan Africa a substantial proportion of agricultural activity and food production continues to be organized at the household-farm level, and with concern increasing over the region's food producing capabilities, researchers and policy makers have sought to identify ways of raising the productivity and incomes of self-provisioning farming households (Henn 1983; World Food Council 1982).
Farming systems in sub-Saharan Africa are extremely diverse, but a number of shared conditions and characteristics permit some generalizations. First, household members typically comprise the main source of on-farm labor, but households also require large amounts of labor for nonfarm and reproductive tasks. Second, rural women, especially poor rural women, make a substantial contribution to all types of agricultural activity, and in most cases have responsibility for the production, preparation, and distribution of food for the household and for sale, and for the reproduction of family labor (FAO 1984). Thus, if agricultural research and policy is to have a positive ipacft on food prouctio#i-and ecityin sub-Saharah Africa,--reserchrs_.and policy7makers must link new technology and extension advice more directly to the needsandpriorities of smallholder producers-in general and'wome Poduer i particular.'
The record of technological intervention in sub-Saharan Africa has been very variable and the literature contains many examples of the contradictory and unintended effects of technology change for traditional farming households (Dey 1984; Bryceson 1984; Agarwal 1981). It is always the poorest and smallest farming households that are most









vulnerable to the "unplanned" effects of "modernization," but it is the effectiveness and well-being of women producers in poor households that appears to be most at risk (Agarwal 1981; Kisseka 1984; Whitehead 1981).
The fact that technological changes have complex, differential, or even perverse effects on the productivity of small farm systems indicates that agricultural research and extension must be reoriented to identify and deliver solutions to on-farm problems that are reliable and predictable within the whole farm system and above all consistent with the needs and interests of both women and men (CGIAR 1985; Hahn 1985; Fresco 1985; Maxwell 1984).

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

The driving force behind recent research and development in small farm agriculture has been Farming Systems Research and Extension (FSR/E). Although FSR/E does not follow one model it does tend to pursue a single aim: to develop technology that helps small farmers improve output (yield) and increase marketed food supplies while protecting the natural environment (FSSP 1984). A major advantage distinguishing FSR/E from earlier research and development approaches is its potential for integrating comprehensive, interdisciplinary knowledge about small farmers' technical needs with the wider systemic implications of technological change (Shaner et al. 1982).
The FSR/E approach tries to identify the distinctive components and parameters of the "total" farm system in which a small farm-household functions. In most FSR/E models, the family labor unit or household is at the center of the conceptual framework and the farming system is defined as:

a unique and reasonably stable arrangement of farming
enterprises that the household manages according to well defined practices in response to the physical,
biological and social environments and in accordance
with the household's goals, preferences and resources
(Shaner et al. 1982).

In their functionalist approach to farm systems analysis, FSR/E practitioners try to understand how factors
-under the control of household members (end6ngeous-factors) like family labor and the techniques obf-p-r6du-ctio-njint!eract witphysical,, biological, and so-cioeconomicf actors beyond household-control (exogenous factors) ilkie cli-mate, prices, and the availablity of credit, affect the agricultural welfare of the farm household. By combining









knowledge of the whole farm system with extensive on-farm research and experimentation, systems researchers should be able to recommend technological alternatives that meet the priority needs and preferences of small farmers and evaluate which technologies fit where and why, and monitor who benefits.
In practice, the FSR/E approach is used primarily to
reduce the degree of error in finding the appropriate technical "fix" for market-based problems of agricultural production. Thus, FSR/E practitioners have restricted themselves to finding technological solutions to a limited range of crop and livestock production problems, using mainly market criteria to measure the costs and benefits to farm-households. The methodology used to identify farming households' needs has been implicitly restricted and the choice of recommendations has been limited to suit a narrowly defined, technocratic approach to on-farm development. FSR/E practitioners have not yet built a broad understanding of the diverse needs and preferences of small farms or of the differential effects of technological change for members of farm-households. The FSR/E approach is particularly limiting when considering gender issues in agricultural development. In particular, FSR/E is ill equipped to:

(1) understand the distribution of costs and benefits of
alternative technological choices and extension projects between men and women within farm households and
under what conditions technological change benefits men
but not women, or in fact harms women, individually or
as a group or
(2) identify and meet the technical needs of women as
farmers, particularly as producers and consumers of
food.

FSR/E has not accomplished what it set out to achieve at the-s6-ci-economic level.--Researchers- have -failed to. c(6isd&how_ far rig 'systems are consti-tuted alongeider h-1i-iriad to analyze the influence that gender differenifati'on-haiin shaping technological and economic ouEc6miii-s"in agricultur~al- develomet Th methoUidology contains procedures and assumptions that have tended to reinforce gender blindness.
First, FSR/E uses market or monetary criteria to identify productive components in the farm syte and toNi measure their contribution to household-income-and welfare. Manf-of the value-adding or service activities that are not directly comparable in monetary terms are left out or are considered costless in the economic equation. For example,









FSR/E does not value non-monetized, household-based activities such as food production (especially secondary foods),
processing and preparation for direct consumption, fuel and
water collection, and house maintenance and repair.
From micro-level research, it is shown that preferences
or market criteria have important gender implications
because while men, women, and children all perform some of these non-market tasks, it is women who contribute most of
the labor, energy, and resources (as well as exchanging
labor and resources with other households) to get this work
ttdone. By treating non-market, home-based work as
complementary to the farm unit rather than an essential component of it (Fernandez 1985; Lele 1985), production economists have neglected important links between market
and non-market enterprises. For example, the linkages
ignored include those between water and fuel collection,
that in sub-Saharan Africa is almost always non-monetized,
with crop and livestock production, food production, and
food processing. More importantly, economists have
neglected the significance of gender differentiation, the
division of labor, and resources by gender in shaping
relations between food and non-food production, market and
household-based enterprises, and consequent responses to
economic incentives and new technology.
Second, production economists and technicians have
concentrated on ways of improving-yields_ and-the:evolie-of
marketed output to increase household incomeand welfare.
In this-tprocess-they te-nd to focus on specific sub-stems
like the cropping system, and within that, particular crops with obvious market potential. This selective approach has
often been pursued without carefW~cnsideration of-hepssibilt that-production constraints stem from other
Parts of te farming systemn or that fair e6191Thb-making has 'to -do with- the-6operaioo the7 farminq-systemal
whole anfd niot w4ith isoated-par ts of i-t.
This implies that planned changes within the cropping 1lsystem, for example, that should increase aggregate output rpdand income, may have unanticipated and differential effects
;on individual household members' production. The welfare
effects of planned changes can be predicted only if the
full extent of household members' involvement in the farming system is known, and more importantly, if it is known
how the activities of men, women, and children fit together
within the prevailing technical and social relations of
production.
Systems researchers have often overlooked appropriate
indirect or non-farm solutions to farm-based problems. For
instance, farm output may increase if the productivity of
household-based activities, many of which are women's









responsibility, were to improve. Higher productivity in these tasks may have a positive impact on the amount or quality of labor available for market-oriented production. It has been demonstrated empirically that women's household-based activities will feed directlyinto-the satisfactio-n 6f household basic needs whereas the link between market-based activities and income and household welfare is more spurious (Hart and Popkin 1975). If women can colle-t-ibe-r 6r-fuel more easily, they could expend more time and energy in directly productive activities. Or by raising the productivity of subsistence food crop production and processing women could improve the health and efficiency of labor, especially during the low energy or "hungry" seasons.
Third, the FSR/E approach is based on a stereotyped model of "the household" as a homogeneous unit of production and consumption that is at variance with the reality in many rural areas.
Furthermore, it is assumed that the distributional effect of technological change on farm household members can be read off from shifts in the demand curve for family labor within a specific sub-system. Technical_change, however, does not effect the division of labor and /
resources in any stea ic-way (Whitehed -e98TL The relations between-women ahd-men in farming households are not solidifiedwithinthe technical division of labor nor are their interests and-needs necessarily complementary. Households are nothomogeneous units and the needs and preferences-of women_and men are not easily definecf with respe ct - to, a -singl e household produ-ction -function. Even more importantly, the household decision-making process can be only partially explained by economic factors. The choices of men and women in the household and beyond are the outcome of an intricate bargaining process mediated by normative relations of power and control.
In many West African countries, men and women occupy different positions within the farm economy, not only in terms of task allocation, but also in terms of their different access to factors of production - inputs, credit, others' labor time, off-farm employment opportunities, and markets. In polygynous households, senior wives also have structurally different economic positions from junior wives. In a number of decisions, men and women have a joint economic interest; in many others, often those associated with direct welfare activities, their interests conflict or their economic and technical needs are different. For example in Sierra Leone, women's interests in improving swamp rice farming and intercropping to produce a marketable surplus have been in conflict with









men's interests in upland farming and their use of work gangs and household labor in the production of market crops. Polygyny also compels wives to have independent access to cash income that involves management of non-farm income generating enterprises such as palm oil processing, soap and pottery making, and dyeing cloth. These enterprises are kept separate from men's and require women to maintain separate budgets and resources even when living with men in the same extended household (Richards et al. 1981).

THE SEARCH FOR A NEW FRAMEWORK

Most FSR/E models take a selective and comparatively static view of the farming system. There is a need for more searching concepts and methods to look at gender in farm-household systems, to understand the gender distribution of costs and benefits of technological choices, and to identify women's technical needs. Unfortunately, due to a lack of empirical evidence this paper can only offer some analytical suggestions on how such a framework might be built.

Conceptual Issues

First, a conceptual model that treats the small farming unit as an interlocking system of market production, subsistence, and reproductive activities performed at farm and household levels should be developed. Reproductive activities include primarily the domestic services necessary for family survival. Central to this inter-related model are the multi-activity household and the different sets of economic and social conditions that shape the economic participation and welfare of women, men, and children. These sets of conditions are not immutable. Depending on the total matrix of productive and reproductive activities that comprise any one farm-household system, they are likely to alter with seasonal shifts, the life cycle development of the household, and emerging employment and market opportunities in the local economy.
Such a framework should be able to generate data on the key sets of conditions that shape the differential participation of household members and give explicit attention to the most important interactions between enterprises that vary by gender.
The anthropological literature for sub-Saharan Africa suggests that data needed center on intrahousehold resource allocation and on the relative weights of market, nonmarket, social, and economic forces in shaping the









differential distribution of women's and men's labor, resources, management, and control within the total farmhousehold system. Such information could be used to investigate the possibility for productivity gains in nonmonetarized enterprises that have either a direct or an indirect productive impact on household members. Agricultural researchers and extension personnel also need such information to understand why planned changes in the technological and economic balance of farming systems can have unanticipated and sometimes detrimental effects on other enterprises outside of the production arena.
In Africa, a commonly cited problem for women farmers, particularly in the poorest households (Dey 1984; Guyer 1980; Whitehead 1981), is that technological changes have intensified women's workloads without adequate compensation or have eroded their access to land and non-farm income. without understanding exactly how women's multiple activities interlock with each other and with other enterprises in the-system, neither the aggregate net effect of technological change upon the total workload or returns to labor of individual household members, nor the differential productivity and welfare effects on women and men can be established clearly.

Methodological Issues

A broader conceptual model raises a number of important methodological considerations for farming systems research.
Recommendation domains. while agronomic, topographic, and general socio-economic data will continue to be crucial in selecting recommendation domains, different household forms, family structures and composition must be increasingly incorporated. In Africa, it is essential to consider polygynous households, consensual family structures, female-headed households, and the complex variation in authority and power structures that determine the location of decision-making and access to resources in household units (Allison 1985). At this stage it is important that researchers be aware of the different economic and social positions that women and men occupy in African households and haw these are manifested in different decision-making processes, separate budget and production functions, and different access to inputs and markets, incentives and off-farm employment opportunities.
Problem identification. Information about the different positions of women and men in the farming household must be linked to precise data about patterns of resource allocation, labor utilization, and the multiple fit of women's and men's responsibilities in order to identify









major constraints and bottlenecks as they vary by gender. The degree of flexibility and substitutability of the organization of farm-household activity must be taken into account as well as the potential trade-offs or conflicts that might emerge between the genders when a constraint within one sub-system creates another elsewhere in the system. Further research should focus on:

(1) the degree of flexibility and substitutability between
the role of women's labor in farm production and
household-based production relative to men's;
(2) the substitutability between women's labor and capital
(productivity enhancing technologies) relative to other
household members; and
(3) the flexibility and substitutability between women's
labor and that of other family or household members,
including husbands, children, neighbors, or hired labor
(Lele 1985).

Much of the information that can be gathered about
these points will be qualitative rather than quantitative, but is nonetheless valuable. Researchers and extension personnel should resist the temptation to devalue the importance of qualitative data in planning on-fam research and in evaluating responses by farm-households.
on-Farm Research, Extension, and Evaluation. Gender differences must be an integral criterion woven- into the analysis of technological constraints and the recomnendation of solutions and must also be considered when choosing target farmers with whom to conduct on-fam trials. It is particularly important that researchers recognize the mixed strategies that women employ to meet basic household needs and consider the potential impact that trade-offs or curtailments within these strategies have for individual and household welfare.
It is also important to trace the distribution of male and female labor time and resources within total production cycles. Thus, crop production from cultivation to processing, consumption, or sale should be disaggregated to understand the possible welfare implications of changes within the cycle. For example, changes in cropping patterns may intensify women's unpaid labor during weeding, harvesting, and processing stages and conflict with their labor needs elsewhere in the farm-household system. Despite creating a greater workload, a new crop variety may offer women potential income gains through the processing and sale of crop by-products over which they have marketing control. The dominant effect cannot be established a priori.









Finally, it is necessary to acknowledge that household services play an economic role in maintaining the productive function of the farming system and to identify the non-pecuniary costs borne by individual household members (usually women) in providing such low productivity services under time-consuming and arduous conditions.

CONCLUSIONS
If gender issues are to be given explicit attention within agricultural research and technology development, then an alternativ-e analytical framewQk i s required. Such a framework should identify the, different se ts.-of. cinditions. that characerze- theeconQmi c participation. of-women and men in small farm .systems.and, view .the ,,integratedfarming systems as a rendered system of production and repf_ociion. -The purpose of such a framework is not only o examine existing evidence with greater rigor, but also to generate specific hypotheses, data, and methods that break down gender biases within agricultural research and extension. A number of problems that must be addressed to build an alternative framework include:
(1) Overcoming the methodological division between technocratic and social science research that challenges
the integration of quantitative and qualitative methods
and data;
(2) Resolving time conflicts, such as the time scale that
agricultural research institutes or donors demand for
FSR/E but that cannot accommodate the amount of time that sociological or socioeconomic research usually
requires; and
(3) Channelling research funds and personnel into more extensive data collection and methodological approaches.
(Funding for scientific research into minor food crops and technologies for non-farm activities is extremely
scarce.)

Despite these problems, to have a clear understanding of the relationship between gender relations and the economics of farming systems and technological choice it is important to question the conceptual basis of existing methodological approaches in agricultural research and development (see Figure 3.1) and to build alternative frameworks for gathering empirical data and testing hypotheses in which gender relations are an explicit variable.







Extra H.H. Intra H.H.
Resources Resources


H.H Farm Components


Off-farm Components


I PROCESSES


Raw materials ' I ~oa1
jManagement I _: ISJ._L e ent ter [ --IVEST cash ii

Male labor Fode I
JFemale labor
Child labor (lab

H.H. REPROXUTION
-Consumption
-Maintenance/
repair wa9
-Childcare non-i
-Domestic chores ino
-Social obligations

Consumption goods Payments
(food, durables) (interest, tax)
and services. t
NET INCOME _ GROSS IMXM
EXPEDITURES (wages, cash, kind)

Human Icapital I
investment ICredit
security I(formal, informal)
I
Producer goods,
factors, investment
& savings.


KEY: . flows of family labor in/outside the F-H.H. system.
- flows of non-labor inputs & outputs (& payments).

PLEASE NOTE: For clarity, the elements of the system have not been disaggregated along gender and age lines. These variations are captured when the framework is applied to the situation of each family member in turn and then compared.

Acknowlegement: Many of the ideas for this diagram come from C.D. Deere and A. de Janvry "A Conceptual Framework for the Empirical Analysis of Peasants" American Journal of Agricultural Economics. 1979.

FIGURE 3.1

A CONCEPTUAL MAP FOR LOOKING AT THE FARM-HOUSEHOLD SYSTEM FROM A GENDER PERSPECTIVE










REFERENCES

Agarwal, B.
1981 Agricultural Modernization and Third World
Women: Pointers From the Literature: An Empirical Analysis. WEP Research Working Paper WEP/1O/WP21.
Geneva: International Labor organization. Allison, C.
1985 Women, Land, Labour and Survival: Getting Some
Basic Facts Right. IDS Bulletin 16:3:24-29. Bryceson, D.
1984 Women and Technology in Developing Countries:
Women's Capabilities and Bargaining Positions.
Prepared for INSTRAW, United Nations.
CGIAR
1985 Women and Agricultural Technology. Bellagio,
Italy: Rockefeller Foundation and International
Service for National Agricultural Research. Dey, J.
1984 Women in Food Production and Food Security in
Africa. Women in Agriculture 3. FAQ: Rome. FAQ
1984 Women in Agricultural Production. Women in
Agriculture 1.
Fernandez, M.
1985 Social Components in Peasant Farming Systems: a
Research Proposal. Unpublished. Flora, C. B.
1984 Intra-Household Dynamics in Farming Systems
Research: The Basis of Whole Farm Monitoring of
Farming Systems Research and Extension. A Position
Paper. Manhattan, KS: Department of Sociology,
Kansas State University. Fresco, L.
1985 Food Security and Women: Implications for Agricultural Research. Presented at the International Workshop on Women's Role in Food Self-Sufficiency and Food Security Strategies. Paris: ORSIOM/CIE,
January.
FSSP
1984 Newsletter 2:3.
Guyer, J.
1980 Female Farming and the Evolution of Food
Production Patterns amongst the Beti--of-South-Central Cameroon. Africa 50:4:341-356.









Hart, G. and B. Popkin
1985 A Note on the Interdependence between Ecroomic
and Welfare Factors in Rural Filipino Households.
University of the Philippines, Institute of Economnic
Development and Research. Pp. 75-5. Henr, J.
1983 Feeding the Cities and Feeding the Peasants:
What Role for Africa's Women Farmers? World
Development 11:12:1043-1055. Kisseka, N.
1984 Implications of Structural Changes for African
Women's Economic Participation. Unpublished. Lele, Uma
1985 Women and Structural Transformation. Economic
Development and Cultural Change 34:2:192-221. Maxwell, S.
1984 I. Farming Systems Research: Hitting a Moving
Target. II. The Social Scientist in Farming SystexwS
Research. Institute of Development Studies
Discussion Paper 199.
Richards, P., J. Karimu, et al.
1981 Upland and Swamp Land Rice Farming in Sierra
Leone: The Social Context of Technological Change.
Africa 51:2
Shaner, W.W., P.F. Philipp and W.R. Schmehl
1982 Farming Systems Research and Development
Consortium for International Development. Boulder,
CO: Westview Press.
Whitehead, A.
1981 A Conceptual Framework for the Analysis of the
Effects of Technological Change on Rural Women.
Technology and Employment Program working Papers WEP
2-22/WP79. Geneva: International Labor
Organization.
world Food Council
1982 National Strategies to Eradicate Hunger. New
York, NY: World Food Council, United Nations.















Problems of Understanding and
Communication at the Interface
of Knowledge Systems

Janice Jiggins

One of the fundamental justifications for the practice of FSR/E is that its methodologies promote a desirably close relationship between farmers, researchers, and extensionists in the determination of research criteria and the design and choice of interventions. Considerable effort is going into persuading researchers and extensionists to understand that:

The goals and motivations of farmers, which will
affect the degree and type of effort they will be
willing to devote to improving the productivity of, their farming systems, are essential inputs to the'
process of identifying or designing potentially appropriate improved technologies (Norman et al.
1982:25).

much less effort is being devoted to helping farmers to understand the values, rationales, and objectives that lie behind research and extension behaviors. As FSR/E becomes more involved with on-farm trials, particularly farmerdesigned and managed ones, the more important it is for FSR/E practitioners to find ways of articulating their own rationality and making it accessible to farmers.
Some of the FSR/E practitioner rationality is conveyed implicitly in the course of working closely with farmers. A 1985 circular on the Agricultural Technology Improvement Project (ATIP) program, distributed to local agricultural staff in Mahalapaye, Botswana, notes:

In explaining these meetings, it is important the
farmers understand this is a new approach to research in which we want to work together with them to discuss
and evaluate alternatives, rather than just rely on
collecting information from them (ATIP 1985).








But conversations with farmers in areas where FSR/E
teams have been working, reveal that farmers remain greatly puzzled by such things as to why researchers insist that fields or plots be measured in certain ways and what those measurements mean. Or, what it is in the logic of the researchers' world that makes them value, for example, certain livelihood activities such as field cropping above other activities that seem to the farmers themselves ,equally necessary components of their livelihood. The Breakdown of communication and understanding seems greater between women -- as farmers, food processors, traders and consumers - and male researchers. This is due not only to sociocultural distances between them. Male researchers may understand little of the rationality of the domestic domain in their own worlds. The researchers' lack of an explicit frame of reference in this sphere - or use of a partial or biased one -- influences their own set of mental constructs by which they perceive and interpret the world of women within farming systems. Communication difficulties thus ',-'are compounded.
There are a number of threads that might be disentangled here. This-paper will pull out and untwist only one: the logic of flexibility within the domestic domain, illustrated by examples from Lesotho and northern Zambia
(1). The data are not complete from the FSR/E point of
view, having been collected for other purposes, but they do highlight a number of points that FSR/E theory and practice needs to take into account. The paper concludes with suggestions about how this might be done.
The data are drawn from two areas of acute seasonal stress. In the Lesotho site, a longitudinal study of energy flows suggests a bimodal pattern of stress (HussAshmore 1982) while the second area in northern Zambia has a short period of moderately erratic, within-season rainfall and a long, dry, cool period of six to seven or even
seven and a half months, with the time of acute hunger
falling in the January-February period after weeks of heavy labor and declining food stocks (author's unpublished field
notes, 1979-80).
Both are areas of high male out-migration and income
insecurity. Risk and loss minimization figure highly in farming system strategies. Women, as household heads and
as farmers within male-headed enterprises, respond to
climatic and income uncertainties by trying to maintain
flexibility, typically in four spheres of the domestic
economy:

(1) in production, by maintaining reserve crops and
varieties in household gardens and in wild habitats;








(2) in the timing of operations, volume of product handled,
and technique used, in the spheres of food processing,
storage and food preparation;
(3) by altering the mix, timing, and quality of performance
of their multiple roles; and
(4) by manipulating whatever room there might be for
substitutability of labor and obligation between men and
women.

For reasons of space, the following illustrations are taken from only the first two spheres.

LESOTHO

In the peculiarly distorted economic situation of Lesotho, the day to day survival of rural households is largely a matter of how women maintain themselves and their children. The rationality of the farming system is not determined by physical and climatic features - these only set limits to what is possible. It is determined by the rationality of women's lives, that is centered in (though by no means confined to) the domestic domain. Within that domain, there is one resource which is critical: fuel supply. It could be said to be the key both to cropping choices and household food availability. Huss-Ashmore writes:

Because fuel is essential for processing almost all
foods, it can be considered a critical resource for the
maintenance of health and nutritional status. In
Mokhotlong the type of fuel used and the time spent to
procure it, vary according to the seasonal availability
of dung (1982:156).

The preferred fuel is compacted dung, readily available during the winter from the kraal close to the homestead, that, when dried in uniform slabs, burn with the slow, even heat necessary for the long cooking of dried grains and pulses. In households without a kraal, women have to purchase the dung or manipulate k7i-nrelations to obtain it. When the cattle are moved in the summer to the high pastures, women must use horse and cattle dung, picked up from the fields and trails, that is less dense and takes more time to gather. Both sorts are kindled with resinous, woody shrubs that become scarcer as the summer passes but may be the only source of summer fuel if insufficient dung can be gathered. For a short period, kraal dung may be kindled with maize cobs as they are thresFed in the winter.








It is fuel availability rather than food availability that determines which foods are eaten at different seasons:

The supply of slow-cooking protein sources is not used equally throughout the year but is depleted during the
cold season when appropriate fuels are available.
During the summer the population relies heavily on wild
vegetable protein sources, which require more time to
locate and gather but which can be rapidly cooked
(Huss-Ashmore 1982:157).

one might think that these interactions - and their further entwining with the water/fuel/grain seasonalities of sorghum beer-brewing, a source of income and wage work that is important for being one of the few available to women - are not so terribly difficult for a researcher to discover. However, single visits to households during an exploratory survey may fail to discover seasonalities that are both interdependent across disciplinary boundaries (fuel-forestry; cropping; post-harvest domestic food technology) as well as across gender boundaries (cattle are men's business). The fact that a critical key to the functioning of the farming system operates within the domestic domain may continue to conceal its significance during a verification phase of FSR/E work as well.
A further difficulty arises when researchers try to
measure the quantities involved such as the cooking time of various foodstuffs using different fuels. A~n anthropological study of Sesotho measurement concepts points out:

A woman knows how long to cook vegetables because she
knows when they are ready. One woman, preparing
bread, was asked how she would cook it: Until it is
ready (bo butson). Pressed for precision, she thought carefully -and then said: Five or six hours (li-hora
again the English word). In fact, she cooked the bread
for an hour and a quarter and saw that it was perfect
when she took it from the steam oven. It was ready
both in English terms and her own. At no time did she refer to any kind of time, not even in the sun. It was
not the time that made it ready. It was the cooking
(Wallman 1965:240).

The researcher is concerned with the measurement of time but the woman is concerned with the measurement of "readiness" and there is no reason why the measurement process should not begin with readiness (What does it look like? Is it hard or stiff or does it run? etc.). Instruments such as time allocation studies, useful as they are








as indicators of the range of activities and claims on labor, make invisible whatever it is that women themselves see themselves as allocating or conserving. In HussAshmore's case, women collect wild vegetable proteins not because they are a preference food nor because there is nothing else available, but because women primarily wish to conserve fuel.
The difficulty does not lie in using the measurement units that make sense within the rationality of the user. Researchers and extensionists alike are trained in the concepts of scientific agriculture and these concepts may have no equivalents in the knowledge system of the woman while the woman is trained in the concepts of her indigenous knowledge system and may have no way of knowing the significance of the concepts used by the researcher and extensionist. This has little to do with any differences in ethnic background of the actors and a great deal to do with the difficulty of articulating the rationality of one system in the terms of the rationality of another.

NORTHERN ZAMBIA

In the northern Zambia location, the fact that local
vegetables and fruits form an important part of the diet is well-established and there are even a few research programs investigating the more important species (MAWD 1983). What is not so readily accepted is that these may have characteristics that yield benefits not provided by modern varieties of the main food crops, however abundant they might be. Interventions that make their production more difficult by switching labor or land use, for example, may also make the seasonal management of diets more difficult, unless the market provides substitutes at affordable prices.
The question of the timing of agricultural innovations with respect to the role of market provision of those goods and services previously supplied within domestic and local economies merits a short digression here. In agriculture in industrial countries and albeit to a lesser degree in irrigated agriculture in developing countries, research organizations work within and for production and knowledge systems that are well-defined, well-organised, and highly interactive. There are at least four main components:

(1) farmers, who are organised and able to contribute to
research progranning through a variety of channels;
(2) powerful industrial organizations engaged in the
business of transforming primary production into a
range of consumer and industrial goods, who are well








able to signal to researchers their own technical requirements or even, by paying for research, to
determine what crop characteristics meet the needs of
their own technical processes;
(3) powerful commercial organizations engaged in the business of wholesaling and retailing produce and processed
foodstuffs, that are able to insist on high quality standards in defence of existing and new sales; and
(4) consumers, who, either through their purchasing power
or through consumer organizations and lobbies, also
signal their preferences to researchers.

The case is quite different in most dryland areas in developing countries. Except perhaps for the richest farmers, producers are not organized nor politically powerful and have few if any links with researchers. The range of transformation processes occurs largely within the domestic domain using local technologies. wholesalers and retailers operate in fragmented and often non-competitive arenas in which the overall level of sales is depressed and quality carries no premium. Finally, consumers have weak purchasing power and few, if any, organized channels for expressing their preferences.
If the inherent yield potential of many dryland areas is judged to be low, with scant chance that the value of the marketed output will ever pay for or induce the kind of infrastructural developments witnessed in irrigated environments, then presumably, it will be necessary to preserve a continuing capacity to derive benefits from the goods and services presently obtained from the biomass through transformation within the local community and the household economy. The challenge becomes that of raising capacity without displacing too many of the benefits presently obtained from within the micro-economy rather than in raising capacity by concentrating on only a few benefits (higher yield) and externalizing the provision of the rest. Varietal characteristics must continue to an unknown extent to meet the demands of domestic transformation processes, technologies, and end uses. The following example describes just such a situation.
The local vegetables (fruits not included here for the sake of simplicity) being produced on one farm during February 1980 at Sambwa in rMpika District of Northern Zambia include: four cassava varieties (masanga uko, matutumushi, muntulunga, ucogo); three finger mle varieties (mwaangwe, mutui a, mwambe); two varieties of groundnuts; and ToalTm-e Eachh~as a very specific
place in seasonal production and food management. For example, mwaangw is a sweet, very early maturing finger








millet that provides one of the first new food crops in the year and a sweet beer for working parties as the main harvesting period approaches. Two of the cassava varieties have palatable leaves (masanga uko and matutumushi - the latter much sought after by the wild pig) but these fall in the cold season (June, July), so some are dried early in the season for later consumption.
In addition to these main food crops, there were five distinct production sites around the compound (and one further away in the dambo or wide valley bottom) tended by the two adult resident women, on which were grown a mix of wild and semi-wild plants and "crops" promoted and officially marketed by the government. A number of the wild plants, such as busoshi (Sesamum alatum) and chimamba (Sphenostylis erecta), also occur n-aturalTy(respectively on disturbed soi and around anthills) but on this farm could be considered as true crops, for they were deliberately planted on chosen sites, protected from chickens and weeds, fertilized with household rubbish, and the product traded in Mpika market. Their utility is partly a reflection of the low and erratic yield of groundnuts but, they have a utility as snack foods at a time of the year when women may cook only once a day or even once in two days. The perennial chimamba ensures that some kind of snack is always going to e available. It would only lose its utility if alternative snack foods were to become available at the critical time of the year when women are busiest or the preparation and cooking time of cassva and millet were to become less or women's cultivation labor were to be reduced.
Another example is provided by the great care the women took to maintain the balance between the availability of the staples (millet, cassava) and the availability of oily or slippery foods for the relish that are added to the nsima or thick, coarse porridge. The nsima is almost ineible in sufficiently large quantitle-swithout such a relish to ease it down. In conditions of scarce and expensive commercial cooking oils, unreliable groundnut harvests in the face of erratic rains, and the time required for shelling and pounding groundnuts, the softness and slipperiness of some local vegetables were highly desired characteristics. P (Fagara chalydea) is an important dry
season resource in this respect. Slippery local vegetables have the additional advantage of needing no blanching or treatment with potash when they are dried for preservation.
Both the men and the women had been experimenting with vegetable production, as the following examples illustrate.








The male head of the compound had been trying white cabbage, tomatoes, and cucumbers from seeds supplied through the Horticultural Marketing Board in Mpika, in a dambo garden at the end of the rainy season. He found Uat the cucumbers grew best but were the least needed for domestic use as they already grew a satisfactory range of cucurbits. The tomatoes were well-liked for their flavor and the softness of the flesh but were tiresome to eat because of their tough skins, the very characteristic that made them suitable for the rough marketing conditions. The women had been experimenting for many years with luManga (Cleome qvnandra) selecting for larger leaf size out7sacri?icing ny of the tenderness. They reported, too, that they could get a higher price in the local market for the larger-leaf variety.
The men in the compound scored consistently lower than the women on the following tests using vegetable sources: identification by sight; recall of the main physical descriptors and husbandry, processing techniques and length of storage; and preparation for eating. Zambian and expatriate members of the nearby agricultural college who were engaged in conducting and supervising trainee extension workers in farm surveys, were asked to share their views of the role of local vegetables in the farming system. They all referred the question to the home economic staff, who were trained to work with "western" vegetables, and with few resources to work in the field, knew only those local vegetables that had been used in the household in their own home areas.
There are further.problems, of communicating knowledge between distinct knowledge systems. The production sites where the local vegetables were grown changed shape and size as women took advantage of rainfall patterns in the advancing season to make additional sowings. At the same time, neither the market value of the product traded nor the opportunity cost of female labor (based on market wage rate) would seem adequate measures of the value of either women's labor time or of the local vegetables to the farming systems. The women themselves used a notion of convenience that appeared to be a combination of characteristics such as: ease of growing near the house; availability (fresh or dried) at moments critical from the point of view of diet management; ease of processing and preparation; timing of labor inputs; and substitutability for other crops. The notion encompassed the principle of flexibility. In this respect, they were reluctant to choose paramount characteristics either for any one crop or between the range of crops. Instead, local vegetables were








viewed as a bundle of biomass that enabled them to manage their resources and responsibilities to the best advantage.

THE IMPLICATIONS FOR FS,/E


There are a number of important "lessons" that can be drawn from this brief review. To summarize, these are reduced to two:

(1) the need to develop methodologies for establishing
the key field-household interactions at an early stag
of the diagnostic process, and
(2) the need to develop methodologies for mutual communication of key concepts across the boundaries of
researchers' and female producers, distinct knowledge_,
systems.

Two techniques that might prove to be useful diagnostic instruments for researchers of any background are situation analysis based on the critical incident technique and peer group workshops.
The former is widely used in diagnostic sessions
between researchers and carefully drawn panels of users in industrial and commercial practice. It involves informal but structured interviewing which, as users identify problem areas and describe the boundary conditions, focuses on a "critical incident" that exemplifies one of the problems. The incident is then analyzed in depth, leading into discussion of desirable ways to deal with it. Each of the problems is similar treated in turn.
Peer group workshops are widely used throughout the ESCAP region in the development of local, self-managing groups and income-generating projects and by the Food and Agriculture organization's (FAO) Marketing and Credit division in the promotion of female entrepreneurship. They are based on the understanding that knowledge and expertise exists among local communities, together with a diagnostic capacity attuned to local realities. They draw on the expertise of those who are locally recognized as knowledgeable within the subject problem area by facilitating the preparation of case studies of their successes. These cases are exchanged and analyzed at workshop sessions, leading to identification of interventions that would allow these successes to be replicated. A great deal of experience now exists to guide the preparation and implementation of workshops with those who have little formal education and to facilitate the participation of service officers (agricultural researchers or extension workers).
































NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS


(1) The research was carried out between January 1979 and September 1980 in the Central, Northern and Luapula Provinces of Zambia by members of the Rural Development Studies Bureau, University of Zambia, Lusaka.


REFERENCES

Huss-Ashmore, R.
1982 Seasonality in Rural Highland Lesotho: Method
and Policy. In A Report on the Regional Workshop on Seasonal variations in the Provisioning, Nutrition and Health of Rural Families, pp. 147-161. Nairobi:
AMREF.
ministry of Agriculture and Water Development (MAWD)
1983 Handbooks for Agricultural Field workers,
Zambian Local Vegetables and Fruits. Lusaka:
Department of Agriculture, Ministry of Agriculture
and Water Development.


58

Both these techniques have the added advantage that
they eliminate some of the stages of "translation" of knowledge concepts and, with careful preparation, it is not too
difficult to identify those items which, though denoted
differently, refer to a standard unit. Returning for example, to the case of the cake that is "ready", the
researcher can measure the hours it takes to cook and the
baker the cooking that is needed to make it "ready". Both
are referring to a standard referent, although the baker might be interested in the number of mouths it feeds and
the researcher in its unit weight and composition. The
difficulty comes when one is using a knowledge concept that
has no referent in the knowledge system of the other. The
-,",,,-difficulty is, in a sense, one-sided. Researchers are
ften keen to learn about and understand the concepts of
producers but have little awareness of the constructs and alues inherent in their own knowledge system. Where the
knowledge system of male agricultural researchers and
extension officers does not encompass either an experiential nor trained understanding of the domestic economy,
the problem seriously undermines FSR/E practitioners,
claims to be conducting systems based technology
development.


1)ko
A,






59

Norman, D., E. Simmons, H. Hays
1982 Farming Systems in the Nigerian Savanna,
Research and Strategies for Development. Boulder,
CO: Westview Press. Waliman, S.
1965 The Communication of measurement in Basutoland.
Human organization 3:4:236-243.


















5
From Recommendation Domains to
Intra-Household Dynamics and Back:
Attempts at Bridging the Gender Gap

Arnalia Al. Albert!

One of the concepts to emerge from the Farming Systems approach to agricultural research and extension is that of the recommendation domain. Defined as "a group of roughly homogeneous farmers with similar circumstances for whom we can make more or less the same recommendation" (Byerlee, et al. 1980), the underlying assumption is that farmers of households within the same recommendation domain will have similar responses to proposed technology (Shaner, et al. 1982: 44). Recommendation domains are used to focus the research process and expedite dissemination of the technology thereby facilitating the extension phase.
The debate continues in the farming systems literature and among farming systems practitioners about both the more relevant criteria and the preferred timetable to identify and to elaborate recommendation domains. The position of those who maintain that the early delineation of recommendation domains precludes considerations that are not readily evident or initially salient (Cornick and Alberti 1985), is countered by others who maintain that the early identification of recommendation domains permits their progressive refinement (Franzel 1984). Still others (Norman and Baker 1984) point out that in the last analysis both the target groups identified and the nature of the technology recommended tend to reflect the expertise of the team members in a particular Farming Systems Research/ Extension (FSR/E) project.
This paper argues that, first, recommendation domains sensitive to gender issues are difficult to develop due to scant documentation of women's participation in agricultural and farm-related activities in local areas, and second, if developed, they are difficult to implement due to several features commonto many FSR/E projects. Indeed, it seems that the greater the pressure for prompt








elaboration of recommendation domains, the greater is the likelihood that women's roles, as well as their concerns within the FSR/E context, will be overlooked because of insufficient time to draw them out. The long term solution to satisfactorily addressing gender issues in farming systems, however, lies less in attempts to develop appropriate recommendation domains and more in efforts to revise the FSR/E framework so that gender issues are deliberately and self-consciously entertained. Until these changes occur, several key questions are proposed to assist FSR/E practitioners in assessing what gender related issues are potentially relevant in a particular FSR/E site and whether or not they can be addressed feasibly within the existing project framework.

OBSTACLES TO DEVELOPING
GENDER SENSITIVE RECOMMENDATION DOMAINS

Among the more common techniques suggested for the initial stages of problem diagnosis leading to the formation of recommendation domains are reviews of secondary data, informal interviews with persons such as local officials, residents, and extension workers, and an exploratory survey of farmers sometimes combined with or followed by a formal survey (Harrington and Tripp 1984; Shaner, et al. 1982). The obstacles to uncovering the extent of women's involvement in the total or select phases of a farming system embedded in each of these techniques are discussed briefly.

Secondary Data Reviews

Much of the literature on women in agriculture published within the last ten years underscores the extent to which the involvement and contributions of women in this area have been underrepresented (Deere and Leon 1981; Lewis 1981). Nevertheless, secondary sources such as census data and local agricultural reports that continue to ignore or underestimate female contributions abound. When FSR/E staff consult these materials they are likely to accept the data as factual unless they are aware of the possibility that female participation in agriculture may be masked or otherwise distorted. only when sensitized to this bias may they be persuaded to seek additional corroboration before dismissing gender as a potentially relevant variable.








Informal Interviews'and Exploratory Surveys

Local officials and extension agents can often provide site-specific information that a FSR/E project staff member would be hard-pressed to obtain so efficiently otherwise. Information on female involvement in agriculture, however, is less likely to be obtained for several reasons. First, cultural values may intervene. When female agricultural activity is associated with poverty, not only are male officials unlikely to discuss such activity on the part of female members in their own household, but they may well be reluctant to discuss such activity on the part of female residents in general presuming that it would reflect negatively on the socioeconomic status of the community.
Assuming that these local officials and extension agents are almost always exclusively male, attempts to adjust for these gender-related "blind-spots" by speaking with their wives or other female household members may not yield substantially different results (Alberti 1980). To the extent that these women partake of the elevated social status of their households, they are unlikely to make public their own involvement in farm-related tasks or to imply difficult socioeconomic conditions within the community by referring to such activity on the part of other women unless it is to demean them.
Second, it has been found that male farmers routinely underestimate the degree and undervalue the importance of female involvement in farm-related activities in which they too participate (Bourque and Warren 1981; Deere and Leon 1981; Alberti 1986) and ignore or are unaware of the extent of female involvement in farming activities in which they do not share. Hence asking male farmers about the participation of females in agriculture will not necessarily elicit accurate information.
Finally, the reluctance of the national male FSR/E
staff members, especially if they are from the local area, to ask questions that are deemed inappropriate by local standards must be considered . moreover, cultural norms may restrict male field staff members' access to women for interviews. As yet another possibility, male FSR/E staff members may resist interviewing women because of their own attitudes about female participation in agriculture.

Formal Survey

The advantages and limitations of formal surveys have been widely discussed. Within the farming systems literature, Chambers (1981, 1983) Chambers and Ghildyal (1985) is








perhaps the most outspoken and graphic critic as he conjures up visions of "30 pages of questionnaire . which if asked are never coded, or if coded never punched, or if punched never processed . examined . or analyzed. that a number of us have also seen (1980: 4).
Two points about formal surveys on women's involvement in agriculture must be raised. The first is that preparing a questionnaire assumes knowing what is necessary and how to design the queries. While this ought eventually to be true for initial surveys conducted during project development, this is not always the case for women's issues precisely as a consequence of some of the limitations just discussed. Secondly, many formal surveys are designed to be administered to either the male or female head of household, but not to both. Generally, the household member available when the interviewer arrives responds. However, the survey form frequently lacks an item to indicate who was actually interviewed and whether or not that person was male or female. Hence, even if relevant questions about women's involvement in agriculture and farm-related activities are included, it is impossible to disaggregated male and female responses and to analyze them for consistency and comparability.

LOCATING WOMEN IN THE FARMING SYSTEMS CONTEXT

Given these constraints what site-specific information might be readily available that would expedite developing recommendation domains sensitive to gender differences? Readily available refers to information that could be elicited over a few days through informal conversations with local residents, teachers, and other persons working in the area. Rapid Rural Appraisal procedures recommend doing this in conjunction with a field trip around the project area (Chambers 1980; Beebe 1985). The field trip is essential to provide visual information to accompany verbal accounts. Lines of inquiry otherwise not considered may be opened when the information from these two sources does not concur.
The information obtained from responses to the following questions ought to enable FSR/E practitioners to contextualize the situation of women in the FSR/E setting in broad strokes. At the same time, it would facilitate a quick assessment of whether or not the FSR/E project, as it exists or could feasibly be modified, can viably address the gender issues relevant to that site. Where addressing those issues is possible,








collecting the kind of information needed should follow ideally to inform analyses of intra-household dynamics in FRS/E (See for example, Flora 1984; Feldstein 1987).

What Are the Local Cultural Norms Regarding Female Agricultural Activ Is Mo e Than One Culture Represented in the Project Area?

In many parts of Latin America, particularly indigenous regions of the Andes, women work side by side with men in the fields. In other areas, such as Honduras, women are seldom seen working in the fields beneath the direct rays of the sun and may well be embarrassed if they are seen. Asian women such as those from Bangladesh are rarely field workers while many of their Indian counterparts assume the major role in most if not all phases of rice production.
The differences are largely the result of cultural variations whose dominant mode of expression may be religious or ethnic or some combination of the two. What is important is that when a certain portion or subportion of the population of an area shares a particular cultural orientation, it is possible to make certain assumptions about the kinds of roles women are likely to assume within an agricultural setting and to be forthcoming with information about those roles. For example, if visible agriculturally productive activity on the part of women is highly circumscribed, it can be expected that even when women do engage in such endeavors, they will be extremely difficult to document.
When more than one cultural group is represented in an area, additional factors may come to bear on the situation. Is one group dominant and the other subordinate? Is the participation of women in agricultural and farm-related tasks the same for both groups? Are the norms regarding such involvement the same? If the norms vary, which norms do agricultural extensionists and field workers represent?
In culturally complex settings, it is important to specify the cultural group or groups to which a recommendation domain applies. This should help clarify and explain what would otherwise be unanticipated responses to a recommended technology. Factors that might be involved include differential access to extra-household labor by ethnic group or different production objectives despite use of the same traditional technologies.








Does Women's Participatio in Agriculture Vary by Socia CTass? If so, in What Ways?

There is an ever-growing consensus that participation by households, and by women within those households, in the farming system is highly contingent on social class. Women from land-poor households who engage in farming tasks tend to work longer hours at those tasks and generate proportionately lower returns than other women. Often they are the women who have been left behind while their male partners migrate in search of wage employment. Women from landless households are clearly the most vulnerable as they are increasingly dependent on an ever more tenuous agricultural wage labor market that relegates them to more restricted and marginal employment opportunities even as it expands commercially (Hart 1978; Stoler 1977; Sen 1985; Stolcke n.d.; Young 1985; Horn and Nkambule-Kanyima, 1984; Chaney and Lewis 1980).
While these trends may be widespread, they are not universal. Knowing whether or not they are valid for a particular setting should provide some clue as to how candid men or women are likely to be about female involvement in agricultural and farm-related activities.

Do women Specialize in Food Production and Subsistence Agriculture?

Despite broad variations in patterns, the preeminent role of women in the production of food for home consumption appears to cross continental bounds (Chaney and Lewis 1980).
In Latin America the evidence is widespread that the majority of women who directly engage in agricultural production at the household level primarily raise basic crops intended for home consumption though they may also market small portions of those crops. If the household also raises a cash crop, it is likely to be under the control of the male head of household, even when women contribute labor to its cultivation. The more the household's agricultural activities are commercially oriented, the less likely it is that women of the household will be directly involved in agricultural production. However, when hired laborers are present, women of the household are usually expected to provide support services such as food preparation and are occasionally called upon for managerial activities (Deere and Leon 1981; Bourque and Warren 1981; Alberti 1986).








In Asia, the scenario is distinctly different. Despite broad variations in the extent of women's direct involvement in rice-based agricultural economies due to ethnic and religious differences, women are always involved in the processing of rice and frequently bear major responsibility for its transplanting, weeding, and harvesting. When the household's access to rice fields is insufficient to meet its own consumption needs, women as well as men are likely to seek work as agricultural laborers with rice as the preferred medium of payment. Participation in the harvest of kin and neighbors, if not in the planting as well, is another strategy geared to insure a ration of rice (Hart 1978; Sen 1985; Dey 1985). In each instance, the overarching objective is to obtain food that can be immediately used by the household.
In contrast with rice cultivating areas, in the Philippines for example, the cultivation of cash crops such as coconut, tobacco, and commercial varieties of root crops such as cassava and sweet potato, is dominated by men. Root crops grown for home use, however, are often under the immediate control of women (Cornick and Alberti 1985).
Until recently, the situation in Africa presented what had probably been the most consistent association between crops and gender. Even now, food crops are grown almost exclusively by women, though some women, particularly those near urban areas, have begun to cultivate cash crops as well (Ferguson and Horn 1985). In contrast, men continue to concentrate their efforts in cash crop production. Getting a sense of the pattern that predominates for a given FSR/E project should help us identify the crops and animals that women tend to work with as well as to assess the FSR/E project's capabilities in those areas.

UTILIZING THE INFORMATION
WITHIN A FARMING SYSTEMS FRAMEWORK

After a discussion of how this information may be
fruitfully used, the following areas must be considered. First, the knowledge gained should enable researchers to better identify the variables that are particularly relevant in relation to women in farming systems in the project area. Second, it can provide guidelines to estimate the validity of the information and data that does exist. Third, it highlights the kind of information that is available while giving some indication of what is lacking. This should help to assess what additional information is needed and to appraise how sensitive its collection may be.









For example, the knowledge that there are two ethnic groups within the FSR/E project area should immediately prompt the question as to whether or not their attitudes toward agriculture and women's involvement in agriculture are the same. If they differ, ways of systematically distinguishing responses by ethnic group becomes important.
The shortcoming of these illustrations is that real
life situations rarely fall into compartments that vary so neatly along a single dimension. Rather, multiple variables combine and fuse, whether systematically or erratically, resulting in ever more complex relationships. Their salience is heightened as they interact with some of the more common features of farming systems projects. Let us examine some of these characteristics and the way they interact with gender concerns.

FARMING SYSTEMS CONSTRAINTS
AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS FOR GENDER ISSUES

Site selection for farming systems projects often
results from political and economic decisions that occur outside project bounds (Shaner et al. 1982; Harrington and Tripp 1984). marginal areas are less likely to be selected. Not only do they tend to lack political leverage, but projects in such areas are more prone to failure due to their residents' restricted access to resources. women who engage in agricultural and farm-related activities, however, are frequently concentrated among the resource poor who are commonly located in more marginal areas.
Despite occasional efforts to the contrary, farming systems projects are frequently commodity-oriented either as the result of project mandate, team member expertise, or a combination of these factors (Norman and Baker 1984). Furthermore, a commodity orientation is frequently aligned with a commercial orientation. As has been discussed, women are more likely to cultivate food crops with a view to household consumption. Hence, when a FSR/E project has a commodity orientation it may implicitly ignore women by excluding crops of most concern to them.
Another constraint is that FSR/E projects tend to adapt already existing technology, or "shelf technology," to a particular situation, rather than to develop new technology for a specific situation. They justify their approach on the basis of insufficient resources and a time frame inadequate to allow for additional research. However, existing technologies have tended to be capital intensive, and until recently, to give demonstrated results only when adopted as








an entire package, rather than in steps over time. To the extent that the women who engage in agricultural and farmrelated activities are concentrated among the resource poor, they may be unable to adopt the new technology because of insufficient cash resources, or if they have the resources, they may be unwilling to adopt the new technology because it is inappropriate to their goals when they are subsistence rather than commercially oriented.
Finallyto paraphrase Chambers, these factors interlock (1980:3). As Harrington and Tripp note: "domains are formed so that researchers can effectively deal with the majority of farmers in a particular area" (1984: 14). However, the only majority that women tend to constitute as household level agriculturalists is that of the rural poor. Nevertheless, even among these, some women have partners, others are single, some are the only farmer in the household, and still others are the only sources of labor. Though women who directly engage in farming and farmrelated activities are unlikely to be wealthy, it is likely that there is considerable variation in their access to resources, even among those broadly labelled as "poor."
Women in agriculture tend to share a disadvantaged
position in male-oriented agricultural research and development programs: The way they experience that disadvantage, however, is mediated by their culture, resources, and civil status. It is difficult for recommendation domains that depend on homogeneous circumstances in key variables to locate issues that relate to "women" equally despite their diversity. what a true incorporation of gender issues in farming systems implies is a revision of the farming systems unit of analysis from the household to the male and female members within the farming systems household for the stages of problem diagnosis and design. The information thus provided would enable farming systems practitioners to make conscious though difficult choices about where the FSR/E resources will be channelled, knowing full well and in advance how those choices are likely to affect men and women differentially.








REFERENCES

Alberti, A. M.
1979 Metodologia Apropriada para el Estudio de la
Mujer Rural en los Andes del Ecuador. Presented at the workshop Metodologia Apropriada para Estudiar a
la Mujer Rural. Quito: CEPLAES/Ford Foundation.
1982 Observations on the Productive Role of Women and
Development Efforts in the Andes. Proceedings of
the First Women in Development Workshop sponsored by HIID/MIT. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
1986 Gender, Ethnicity, and Resource Control in the
Andean Highlands of Ecuador. Ph.D. Dissertation.
Stanford, CA: Stanford University. Beebe, J.
1985 Rapid Rural Appraisal: The Critical First Step
in a Farming Systems Approach to Research. FSSP
Networking Paper No. 5.
n.d. Factoring New Information into Decisions About
On-Farm Trials. USAID Mission, The Philippines. Bourque, S. C. and K. B. Warren
1981 Women of the Andes: Patriarchy and Social
Change in Two Peruvian Towns. Ann Arbor, MI:
University of Michigan Press. Chambers, R.
1981 Rapid Rural Appraisal: Rational and Repertoire.
Public Administration and Development 1:95-106.
1983 Rural Development: Putting the Last First.
London: Longman.
Chambers, R. and B.P. Ghildyal
1985 Agricultural Research for Resource-Poor Farmers:
The "Farmer-First-And-Last" Model. Agricultural
Administration 20:1-30.
Chaney, E. M. and M. W. Lewis
1980 Women, Migration, and the Decline of Smallholder
Agriculture. Washington, D.C.: USAID Office of
Women in Development.
Cornick, T. R. and A. M. Alberti
1985 Recommendation Domains Reconsidered. Presented
at the Farming Systems Symposium: Farming Systems
Research and Extension: Management and Methodology,
Kansas State University, Kansas.








Deere, C. D. and M. Leon de Leal.
1981 Women in Agriculture: Peasant Production and
Proletarianization in Three Andean Regions. ILO
Rural Employment Policy Research Program:
Unpublished Working Paper. Dey, J. M.
1985 The Concept and Organization of a Research
Network on Women in Rice Farming Systems. In the Report of the Project Design Workshop on Women in
Rice Farming Systems. Los Banos, Philippines:
IRRI.
Feldstein, H., S. Poats, K. Cloud, R. Norem
1987 Intra-Household Dynamics and Farming Systems
Research and Extension Conceptual Framework.
Population Council/FSSP-University of Florida
Working Document.
Ferguson, A. and N. Horn
1985 Situating Agricultural Research in a Class and
Gender Context: The Bean/Cowpea Collaborative
Research Support Program. Culture and Agriculture
26:1-10.
Flora, C. B.
1984 Intra-Household Dynamics in Farming systems
Research: The Basis of Whole Farm Monitoring of
Farming Systems Research and Extension: A Position
Paper. Mimeograph.
Frankenberger, T. R.
1985 Adding a Food Consumption Perspective to Farming
Systems Research. Prepared for the Nutrition
Economics Group, Technical Assistance Division,
Office of International Cooperation and Development,
United States Department of Agriculture. Franzel, S. C.
1984 Modeling Farmers' Decisions in a Farming Systems
Research Exercise: The Adoption of an Improved
Maize Variety in Kirinyaga District, Kenya. Human
Organization 43:3:199-207. Harrington, L. W. and R. Tripp
1984 Recommendation Domains: A Framework for On-Farm
Research. CIMMYT Economics Program Working Paper.
CIMMYT: Mexico.
1985 Formulating Recommendations for Farmers,
Researchers and Policy-Makers: Issues in the Design
and Use of Socio-Economics Research. Presented at
the ESCAP CGRPT Center Conference "Towards
Recommendations for Research, Policy and Extension: Methodological Issues in Socioeconomics Analysis of
Coarse Grains and Food Legumes," Bandung, 18-23
November.








Hart, G.
1978 Labor Allocation Strategies in Rural Javanese
Households. Ph.D. Dissertation, NY: Cornell
University.
Horn, N. and B. Nkambule-Kanyima
1984 Resource Guide: Women in Agriculture in
Botswana. Michigan: Bean/Cowpea Collaborative
Research support Program. Lewis, B. C.
1981 Invisible Farmers: women and The Crisis in
Agriculture. Washington, D.C.: USAID Office of
Women in Development.
Norman, D. W. and D. C. Baker1984 Components of Farming Systems Research FSR
Credibility and Experience in Botswana.
Agricultural Technology Improvement Project,
Department of Agricultural Research. Botswana,
Africa: ministry of Agriculture. Sen, G.
1985 Women Workers and the Green Revolution. In
Lourdes Beneria, ed., Women and Development: The Sexual Division of Labor in Rural Societies. NY:
Praeger Publishers.
Shaner, W. W., P. F. Philipp, and W. R. Schmehl
1982 Farming Systems Research and Development.
Boulder, CO: Westview Press. Stolcke, V.
n.d. Social Inequality and Gender Hierarchy in Latin
America. Position paper presented at the SSRC
Workshop.
Stoler, A.
1977 Class Structure and Female Autonomy in Rural
Java. Signs 3:74-89.,
Young, K.
1985 The Creation of a Relative Surplus Population:
A Case Study from Mexico. In Lourdes Beneria, ed.,
Women and Development: The Sexual Division of Labor
in Rural Societies. NY, NY: Praeger Publishers.













Research, Recommendation and
Diffusion Domains: A Farming Systems
Approach to Targeting

Peter Wotowiec, Jr., Susan V Poats, and Peter E. Hildebrand

TARGETING FARMING SYSTEMS ACTIVITIES: HOMOGENIZING VARIABILITY?

Inherent in the farming systems approach is the recognition of the variability of the complex circumstances farmers face while managing farms that are comprised of inter-related crop, animal, household, and off-farm enterprises. Diversity in farming systems must be recognized in developing appropriate technologies for the farmers that manage those systems. However, it is not practical to conduct research tailored specifically to a few individual farmers. Targeting entails the grouping together of similiar clientele so efforts can be sufficiently focused. Although the concept of targeting might seem contrary to the recognition of heterogeneity among farms, it is an essential component of the farming systems approach. when Farming Systems Research and Extension (FSR/E) practitioners target a group of farming systems as relatively homogeneous based on a few simple factors, the existing variability among farms is often not sufficiently considered. How can FSR/E teams define and target homogeneous groups of farming systems without losing sight of the heterogeneity among them? Farming systems practitioners take different positions on this issue (Cornick and Alberti 1985).
One perspective stresses the early definition of homogeneous groups of farmers using the recommendation domain concept to guide subsequent research activities. Collinson (1979, 1980), Gilbert et al. (1980), and Franzel (1985) advocate ex ante delineation of recomendation domains based on secondary data and preliminary surveys, followed by a formal survey to refine the domain boundaries. Both Collinson and Franzel describe a technique of defining recomendation domains through interviews with extension agents and local authorities before actually initiating activities with farmers. Early definition of








recommendation domains is usually based upon a few relatively easily identifiable factors such as soil type, agroecological zones, crop type, and management (Harrington and Tripp 1985). These authors note the importance of continuing the refinement of domain boundaries.throughout the sequence of on-farm adaptive research, but the subsequent reassessment of recommendation domains is often not vigorously pursued.
A more recent view states that grouping farming systems should not take place until the researchers have an adequate understanding of the variability inherent in local farming systems, usually not accomplished early in the work in an area. Cornick and Alberti argue that recommendation domains established early are frequently poorly conceived and lead to a premature assumption of homogeneity. The failure to consider potential variability'from factors such as long-term climate induced trends in cropping patterns, household decision-making and labor allocation, or relationships between on- and off-farm activities, may bias subsequent technology development. For example, Cornick and Alberti (1985:1) note:

. the roles of women and children that can be critical
factors in the development and subsequent adoption of technologies are often explicitly excluded from consideration in recommendation domains. This occurs because
the usual time frame for development of recommendation
domains is inadequate to the task of understanding intrahousehold dynamics and the importance they hold in the
system.

In particular, socioeconomic factors are often not
fully integrated into domains defined early, either because of the longer period of time necessary to gather this information, or because of the absence of trained social scientists as part of farming systems teams. One area often poorly covered in early definitions of domains is the different agricultural roles of men and women. Proceeding with on-farm research and other activities on the basis of a hastily achieved assumption of homogeneity could result in inefficient subsequent research and the promotion of solutions that are not appropriate to farmers (Cornick and Alberti 1985:25) or technologies that may favor some farmers (male) while causing disadvantages for others (female).
In this paper the issue of variability versus
homogeneity in the targeting of farming systems research and extension activities is explored. After a brief review








of targeting in FSR/E using recommendation domains, problems in the conventional use domains in FSR/E are described in an attempt to bring together the two differing viewpoints and to begin to resolve the question. The refined concept of targeting allows for better inclusion of gender variables in the definition of domains.

OVERVIEW OF TARGETING AND RECOMMENDATION DOMAINS

Targeting for Efficiency and Social Equity

FSR/E must differentiate between various potential
farmer-client groups and determine the particular needs of each, if technologies are to be developed that clearly meet those needs (Byerlee and Hesse de Polanco 1982). Most literature on the subject of targeting in farming systems has stressed the increase in efficiency of FSR/E activities made possible through focusing upon specific, relatively homogeneous farmer groups.
Efficiency in allocation of research resources is
essential if a program is to reach and benefit a maximum number of farmers. By focusing scarce resources upon roughly similar groups of farmers, research programs are able to carry out investigations on a selected number of representative farms and later can transfer the findings to the comparable situations faced by other farmers.
Targeting is also important in justifying the farming systems approach to institutional policy makers who are concerned about social equity in the distribution of resulting benefits. Farming systems practitioners use targeting concepts to assist them in making decisions which increase the likelihood of an optimal distribution of research results among the members of a community.

Conventional Concept of Recommendation Domains

The concept of "recommendation domains" has been widely used in targeting farming systems research since Perrin et al. (1976) first introduced the idea. It is described and defined by Byerlee et al. (1980:899) in the following
manner:

. a recommendation domain (RD) is a group of farmers with roughly similar practices and circumstances for whom a given recommendation will be broadly appropriate. It is a stratification of farmers, not area: farmers, not fields, make decisions on technology.








Socioeconomic criteria may be just as important as
agroclimatic variables in delineating domains. Thus
resulting domains are often not amenable to geographical mapping because farmers of different domains may be
interspersed in a given area.

Using this definition, neighboring farm households
might be placed in different recommendation domains because of differences in availability of family labor. In societies where women cultivate different crops than those of the men, female farmers could comprise a recommendation domain separate from male farmers even if they are from the same household.

Expanding Upon the Definition of Recommendation Domain

Perrin et al. (1976) originally conceived of the notion of recommendation domains as an aid to researchers for targeting the development of technologies to specific audiences. The concept has been expanded since then to include a number of additional situations and purposes. Some of the most common applications of recommendation domains include the following gleaned from current literature on the topic:

(1) making policy decisions;
(2) identifying priority issues for research;
(3) specifying clientele for developing recommendations;
(4) selecting representative sites and famercooperators;
(5) focusing analysis of surveys and on-farm trials;
(6) orienting extensionists to groups of similar
farmers;
(7) transferring adapted technology to appropriate
farmers; and,
(8) enhancing equitable distribution of FSR/E benefits.

AS Harrington and Tripp (1985) point out, the domain concept is vital to every stage of the on-fam research process. However, it is apparent from reviewing the literature on the subject that the definition of "recommendation domain" not only changes at each stage, but also varies according to the individual who applies it as well as to the end result. The wide variability among farmers and farms, and the dynamic nature of the farming systems development sequence, contribute to the confusion that








exists among FSR/E practitioners as to the general meaning and use of the term recommendation domain.

On-Farm variability and Conventional Recommendation Domains

The emphasis by Byerlee et al. (1980) upon "farmers,
not fields" as the sole basis for the delineation of recom mendation domains is not always warranted because of the
variability found in some field situations. Cornick and Alberti (1985) cite the case of farmers in the community of
Quimiaq in the mountains of Ecuador who manage different cropping patterns in different agro-ecological zones, a product of altitude, temperature, and rainfall variation on the mountain slopes. Not only does each farm cross agroecological zones, but the cropping patterns found in each field vary greatly from year to year. For example, depending upon a farmer's perception of trends and yearly changes in climatic conditions, bean or fava bean intercrops will be assigned to maize fields located at varying elevations along the slope.
Gender and intra-household variables are often
neglected in the process of defining a recommendation domain because of the relatively more difficult and time consuming task of collecting and analyzing data on these variables. Existing information on gender and household variables often offers few useful insights for defining recommendation domains when compared to the secondary data available on agroecological characteristics. In addition, the gender and household data that may exist may be unobtainable locally. Nevertheless, superficial understanding of these variables or the transfer of erroneous assumptions without continued investigation can hamper design and delivery of appropriate technology.

Refining the Concept of Domains

The argument here is that the issue of targeting in FSR/E has become confusing because the definition of the term "recommendation domain" has been stretched to cover too many situations and too many different purposes. Farming systems practitioners must develop a common understanding of how the use and definition of "domains" change as the farming systems sequence progresses from initial characterization through problem diagnosis, testing, adaptation, evaluation, and finally, to the delivery of the new technology to farmers.
It is essential to account for the heterogeneity in farming systems, even while delineating relatively.








homogeneous groups. Refinement and expansion of the use of domains in targeting will enable researchers to distinguish applications of the domain concept, while still recognizing the diversity among farm households and farming systems.
This can be accomplished by recognizing a problem focus in the definition of the domains, by tying the changing concept of domain more closely to the farming systems sequence, and by stressing a greater inclusion of socioeconomic considerations into the targeting process. The refinements outlined below are a sharpening of focus not a changing of terminology, that will lead to increased utility of this method of targeting in the field.
Any of the three types of domains described below may be defined within specific geographic boundaries for ease in conceptualization, but it is imperative to realize that domains do not necessarily include all the area within the boundaries prescribed. Because domains are based upon a specified problem focus and upon socioeconomic considerations in addition to the more geographically mappable factors of climate, altitude, and soil, they are actually interspersed intermittently in a discontinuous pattern throughout a geographic area.
The examples here will emphasize gender as a key factor in delineating domains; other factors, such as class, education, .language use, or food preferences, could also be used.

Research Domains: Targeting for Variabilit

A "research domain" is a problem-focused environmental (agro-ecological and socioeconomic) range throughout which it is expected that hypothesized solutions to a defined problem could have potential applicability and therefore should be tested. Research domains are determined during the initiation of research activities, largely by consideration of biophysical (agro-ecological) factors, with some attention to socioeconomic and gender issues.

Recommendation Domains: Targeting for Homogeneity

Research domains are comprised of one or more agrosocioeconomic "recommendation domains", that are tentatively defined based upon the response of a specific technology to the actual agro-socioeconomic conditions found on farms. A recommendationn domain" is a group of farmers (or farmers and their fields) with a common problem for whom a tested solution meets their biophysical and socioeconomic requirements for adoption.








In the Ecuadorian case cited by Cornick and Alberti, recommendation domains would be based not only upon farm households, but also upon their separate fields that are not contiguous but widely dispersed in location and altitude. Each household might fall into several recommendation domains depending upon: (1) where their fields are located along the agroecological gradient of the mountainside; (2) the climate-related crop management decisions made for each of those fields; and, (3) the particular problem solutions to be tested.
other examples from West Africa demonstrate how gender can be used to differentiate recommendation domains. in many areas, men and women have separate fields, often inherited from their same sex parent, that are not managed communally by the household. Women traditionally grow rice on their lands while men produce upland crops such as groundnuts or sorghum on their own fields. In this system, fields managed by a household pertain to different recommendation domains depending upon both the cropping system and the gender of the farmer manager. In one area of the Ivory Coast, men plant yams in a cleared field. Women will often care for the yam plants by weeding them while they plant their vegetable crops in the space between the yam plants. In this system, fields are neither men's nor women's, nor would entire fields fall into a single problem-focused recommendation domain. Rather, domains would be determined by crops and their managers, male or female, and contain pieces of many fields.
Recommendation domains are seen as tentative in nature throughout the on-farm adaptive research process. Recommendation domains are initially hypothesized by the FSR/E team on the basis of on-farm exploratory and refinement trials, information collected through directed surveys, and subsequent on-farm verification trials. Over time, as more information is gathered, the recommendation domains are refined and redefined to closer approach reality.

Diffusion Domains: Targeting for Communication

"Diffusion domains" are interpersonal communication networks through which newly acquired knowledge of agricultural technologies naturally flows (Hildebrand 1985). Informal flow of information through a community grapevine is substantial (Rogers 1983). From farmer to farmer, neighbor to neighbor, store operator to patron, information about new ideas moves through a farming community. Awareness of a new technology being verified in on-farm trials




Full Text


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8 standalone no
fcla fda yes
!-- Gender issues in farming systems research and extension ( Book ) --
METS:mets OBJID UF00076562_00001
xmlns:METS http:www.loc.govMETS
xmlns:xlink http:www.w3.org1999xlink
xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance
xmlns:daitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss
xmlns:mods http:www.loc.govmodsv3
xmlns:sobekcm http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcm
xmlns:lom http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcm_lom
xsi:schemaLocation
http:www.loc.govstandardsmetsmets.xsd
http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss.xsd
http:www.loc.govmodsv3mods-3-4.xsd
http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcmsobekcm.xsd
METS:metsHdr CREATEDATE 2020-04-14T15:11:47Z ID LASTMODDATE 2020-04-14T07:46:35Z RECORDSTATUS COMPLETE
METS:agent ROLE CREATOR TYPE ORGANIZATION
METS:name UF,University of Florida
OTHERTYPE SOFTWARE OTHER
Go UFDC - FDA Preparation Tool
INDIVIDUAL
UFAD\renner
METS:dmdSec DMD1
METS:mdWrap MDTYPE MODS MIMETYPE textxml LABEL Metadata
METS:xmlData
mods:mods
mods:accessCondition type restrictions on use displayLabel Rights The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. This item may be protected by copyright but is made available here under a claim of fair use (17 U.S.C. §107) for non-profit research and educational purposes. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
mods:genre authority marcgt bibliography
non-fiction
conference publication
mods:identifier OCLC 17386097
LCCN 87034315
ISBN 0813373999 (pbk. : alk. paper)
mods:language
mods:languageTerm text English
code iso639-2b eng
mods:location
mods:physicalLocation University of Florida
UF
mods:url access object context http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076562/00001
mods:name personal
mods:namePart Poats, Susan V
given Susan V
family Poats
Schmink, Marianne
Marianne
Schmink
Spring, Anita
Anita
Spring
corporate
University of Florida -- Women in Agricultural Development Program
mods:note bibliography Includes bibliographies.
"Published in cooperation with the Women in Agricultural Development Program, University of Florida"--Page opposite t.p.
Based on an international conference, held Feb. 26-Mar. 1, 1986 at the University of Florida.
funding Electronic resources created as part of a prototype UF Institutional Repository and Faculty Papers project by the University of Florida.
statement of responsibility edited by Susan V. Poats, Marianne Schmink, and Anita Spring.
mods:originInfo
mods:publisher Westview Press
mods:place
mods:placeTerm marccountry cou
mods:dateIssued 1988
marc 1988
point start 1988
mods:recordInfo
mods:recordIdentifier source sobekcm UF00076562_00001
mods:recordCreationDate 880107
mods:recordOrigin Imported from (OCLC)17386097
mods:recordContentSource University of Florida
marcorg DLC
OCL
EL$
NLGGC
BTCTA
LVB
YDXCP
mods:languageOfCataloging
English
eng
mods:relatedItem original
mods:physicalDescription
mods:extent xxi, 450 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
series
mods:titleInfo
mods:title Westview special studies in agricultural science and policy
mods:subject SUBJ650_1 lcsh
mods:topic Agricultural systems
Research
Congresses
SUBJ650_2
Women in agriculture
Congresses
SUBJ650_3
Agricultural extension work
Congresses
SUBJ650_4
Farms, Small
Congresses
SUBJ650_5
Agricultural systems
Research
mods:geographic Developing countries
Congresses
SUBJ650_6
Women in agriculture
Developing countries
Congresses
SUBJ650_7
Agricultural extension work
Developing countries
Congresses
SUBJ650_8
Farms, Small
Developing countries
Congresses
SUBJ650_9
Mujeres en la agricultura
Congresos
SUBJ650_10
Extensiâon agrâicola
Congresos
SUBJ650_11
Granjas pequeänas
Congresos
SUBJ650_12
Productividad agrâicola
Congresos
SUBJ650_13 rvm
Systáemes agricoles
Recherche
Congráes
SUBJ650_14
Femmes en agriculture
Congráes
SUBJ650_15
Agriculture
Vulgarisation
Congráes
SUBJ650_16
Petites exploitations agricoles
Congráes
SUBJ650_17
Agriculture
Productivitâe
Congráes
Gender issues in farming systems research and extension
mods:typeOfResource text
DMD2
OTHERMDTYPE SOBEKCM SobekCM Custom
sobekcm:procParam
sobekcm:Aggregation ALL
SCIENCES
FAO1
UFIR
IFSA
IUF
sobekcm:MainThumbnail 00001thm.jpg
sobekcm:Wordmark UF
PETE
FLAG
IFAS
sobekcm:bibDesc
sobekcm:BibID UF00076562
sobekcm:VID 00001
sobekcm:EncodingLevel #
sobekcm:Publisher
sobekcm:Name Westview Press
sobekcm:PlaceTerm Boulder
sobekcm:Source
sobekcm:statement UF University of Florida
sobekcm:SortDate 725736
METS:amdSec
METS:digiprovMD DIGIPROV1
DAITSS Archiving Information
daitss:daitss
daitss:AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT PROJECT UFDC
METS:techMD TECH1
File Technical Details
sobekcm:FileInfo
sobekcm:File fileid JP21 width 1589 height 2509
JPEG1 630 995
JPEG2
JP22
JPEG3
JP23 2510
JPEG4
JP24
JPEG5 985
JP25 1605
JPEG6
JP26
JPEG7
JP27
JPEG8
JP28
JPEG9
JP29
JPEG10
JP210
JPEG11
JP211
JPEG12
JP212
JPEG13
JP213
JPEG14
JP214
JPEG15
JP215
JPEG16
JP216
JPEG17
JP217
JPEG18
JP218
JPEG19
JP219
JPEG20
JP220
JPEG21
JP221 1617 2527
JPEG22
JP222
JPEG23
JP223
JPEG24
JP224
JPEG25
JP225
JPEG26 981
JP226 1627 2533
JPEG27
JP227
JPEG28
JP228
JPEG29
JP229
JPEG30
JP230
JPEG31
JP231
JPEG32
JP232
JPEG33
JP233
JPEG34
JP234
JPEG35
JP235
JPEG36
JP236
JPEG37
JP237
JPEG38
JP238
JPEG39
JP239
JPEG40
JP240
JPEG41 991
JP241 1591 2503
JPEG42
JP242
JPEG43 401
JP243 2495
JPEG44
JP244 1590
JPEG45 396
JP245 2507 1577
JPEG46
JP246
JPEG47 984
JP247 1611 2516
JPEG48
JP248
JPEG49
JP249
JPEG50 628 1000
JP250 1579 2515
JPEG51
JP251
JPEG52
JP252
JPEG53
JP253
JPEG54
JP254
JPEG55
JP255
JPEG56 982
JP256 2461
JPEG57 960
JP257 2407
JPEG58 978
JP258 2451
JPEG59 989
JP259 2479
JPEG60
JP260
JPEG61
JP261 2458
JPEG62
JP262
JPEG63
JP263
JPEG64
JP264
JPEG65
JP265
JPEG66
JP266
JPEG67
JP267
JPEG68
JP268
JPEG69
JP269
JPEG70
JP270
JPEG71
JP271
JPEG72
JP272
JPEG73
JP273
JPEG74
JP274
JPEG75
JP275
JPEG76
JP276
JPEG77
JP277
JPEG78
JP278
JPEG79
JP279 1599
JPEG80
JP280
JPEG81
JP281
JPEG82
JP282
JPEG83
JP283
JPEG84
JP284
JPEG85
JP285
JPEG86
JP286
JPEG87
JP287
JPEG88
JP288
JPEG89
JP289
JPEG90
JP290
JPEG91
JP291
JPEG92
JP292
JPEG93
JP293
JPEG94
JP294
JPEG95
JP295
JPEG96
JP296
JPEG97
JP297
JPEG98
JP298
JPEG99
JP299
JPEG100
JP2100
JPEG101
JP2101
JPEG102
JP2102
JPEG103
JP2103
JPEG104
JP2104
JPEG105
JP2105
JPEG106
JP2106
JPEG107
JP2107
JPEG108
JP2108
JPEG109
JP2109
JPEG110
JP2110
JPEG111
JP2111
JPEG112
JP2112
JPEG113
JP2113
JPEG114
JP2114
JPEG115
JP2115
JPEG116
JP2116
JPEG117
JP2117
JPEG118
JP2118
JPEG119
JP2119
JPEG120
JP2120
JPEG121
JP2121
JPEG122
JP2122
JPEG123
JP2123
JPEG124
JP2124
JPEG125
JP2125
JPEG126
JP2126
JPEG127
JP2127
JPEG128
JP2128
JPEG129
JP2129
JPEG130
JP2130
JPEG131
JP2131
JPEG132
JP2132
JPEG133
JP2133
JPEG134
JP2134
JPEG135
JP2135
JPEG136
JP2136
JPEG137
JP2137
JPEG138
JP2138
JPEG139
JP2139
JPEG140
JP2140
JPEG141
JP2141
JPEG142
JP2142
JPEG143
JP2143
JPEG144
JP2144
JPEG145
JP2145
JPEG146
JP2146
JPEG147
JP2147
JPEG148
JP2148
JPEG149
JP2149
JPEG150 994
JP2150
JPEG151
JP2151
JPEG152
JP2152
JPEG153
JP2153
JPEG154
JP2154
JPEG155
JP2155
JPEG156
JP2156
JPEG157
JP2157
JPEG158
JP2158
JPEG159
JP2159
JPEG160 399
JP2160
JPEG161
JP2161
JPEG162
JP2162
JPEG163
JP2163
JPEG164
JP2164
JPEG165
JP2165
JPEG166
JP2166
JPEG167
JP2167
JPEG168
JP2168
JPEG169
JP2169
JPEG170
JP2170
JPEG171
JP2171
JPEG172
JP2172
JPEG173
JP2173
JPEG174
JP2174
JPEG175
JP2175
JPEG176
JP2176
JPEG177
JP2177
JPEG178
JP2178
JPEG179
JP2179
JPEG180
JP2180
JPEG181
JP2181
JPEG182
JP2182
JPEG183
JP2183
JPEG184
JP2184
JPEG185
JP2185
JPEG186
JP2186
JPEG187
JP2187
JPEG188
JP2188
JPEG189
JP2189
JPEG190
JP2190
JPEG191
JP2191
JPEG192
JP2192
JPEG193
JP2193
JPEG194
JP2194
JPEG195
JP2195
JPEG196
JP2196
JPEG197
JP2197
JPEG198
JP2198 1597
JPEG199
JP2199 2530 1603
JPEG200
JP2200
JPEG201
JP2201
JPEG202
JP2202
JPEG203
JP2203
JPEG204
JP2204 1593 2505
JPEG205
JP2205
JPEG206
JP2206
JPEG207
JP2207
JPEG208
JP2208
JPEG209
JP2209
JPEG210
JP2210
JPEG211
JP2211
JPEG212
JP2212
JPEG213
JP2213
JPEG214
JP2214
JPEG215
JP2215
JPEG216
JP2216
JPEG217
JP2217
JPEG218
JP2218
JPEG219
JP2219 1595
JPEG220
JP2220
JPEG221
JP2221
JPEG222
JP2222
JPEG223
JP2223
JPEG224
JP2224
JPEG225
JP2225
JPEG226
JP2226
JPEG227
JP2227
JPEG228
JP2228
JPEG229
JP2229
JPEG230
JP2230
JPEG231
JP2231
JPEG232
JP2232
JPEG233
JP2233
JPEG234
JP2234
JPEG235
JP2235
JPEG236
JP2236
JPEG237
JP2237
JPEG238
JP2238
JPEG239
JP2239
JPEG240
JP2240
JPEG241
JP2241
JPEG242
JP2242
JPEG243
JP2243
JPEG244
JP2244
JPEG245
JP2245
JPEG246
JP2246
JPEG247
JP2247
JPEG248
JP2248
JPEG249
JP2249
JPEG250
JP2250
JPEG251
JP2251
JPEG252
JP2252
JPEG253
JP2253
JPEG254
JP2254
JPEG255
JP2255
JPEG256
JP2256
JPEG257
JP2257
JPEG258
JP2258
JPEG259
JP2259
JPEG260
JP2260
JPEG261
JP2261
JPEG262
JP2262 2506
JPEG263
JP2263
JPEG264
JP2264
JPEG265
JP2265
JPEG266
JP2266 1618 2521
JPEG267
JP2267
JPEG268
JP2268
JPEG269
JP2269
JPEG270
JP2270
JPEG271
JP2271
JPEG272
JP2272
JPEG273
JP2273
JPEG274
JP2274
JPEG275
JP2275
JPEG276
JP2276
JPEG277
JP2277
JPEG278
JP2278
JPEG279
JP2279
JPEG280
JP2280
JPEG281
JP2281
JPEG282
JP2282
JPEG283
JP2283
JPEG284
JP2284
JPEG285
JP2285
JPEG286
JP2286
JPEG287
JP2287
JPEG288
JP2288
JPEG289
JP2289
JPEG290
JP2290
JPEG291
JP2291
JPEG292
JP2292
JPEG293
JP2293
JPEG294
JP2294
JPEG295
JP2295
JPEG296
JP2296
JPEG297
JP2297 2491 1587
JPEG298 404
JP2298 2508 1608
JPEG299
JP2299
JPEG300
JP2300 2502
JPEG301
JP2301
JPEG302
JP2302
JPEG303
JP2303
JPEG304
JP2304
JPEG305
JP2305
JPEG306
JP2306
JPEG307
JP2307
JPEG308
JP2308
JPEG309
JP2309
JPEG310
JP2310
JPEG311
JP2311
JPEG312
JP2312
JPEG313 406
JP2313 2501 1613
JPEG314 403
JP2314 2517
JPEG315
JP2315
JPEG316
JP2316
JPEG317
JP2317
JPEG318
JP2318
JPEG319
JP2319
JPEG320
JP2320
JPEG321
JP2321
JPEG322
JP2322
JPEG323
JP2323
JPEG324
JP2324
JPEG325
JP2325
JPEG326
JP2326
JPEG327
JP2327
JPEG328
JP2328
JPEG329
JP2329
JPEG330
JP2330
JPEG331
JP2331
JPEG332
JP2332
JPEG333
JP2333
JPEG334
JP2334
JPEG335
JP2335
JPEG336
JP2336
JPEG337
JP2337
JPEG338
JP2338
JPEG339
JP2339
JPEG340
JP2340
JPEG341
JP2341
JPEG342
JP2342
JPEG343
JP2343
JPEG344
JP2344
JPEG345
JP2345
JPEG346
JP2346
JPEG347
JP2347
JPEG348
JP2348
JPEG349
JP2349
JPEG350
JP2350
JPEG351
JP2351
JPEG352
JP2352
JPEG353
JP2353
JPEG354
JP2354
JPEG355
JP2355
JPEG356
JP2356
JPEG357
JP2357
JPEG358
JP2358
JPEG359
JP2359
JPEG360
JP2360
JPEG361
JP2361
JPEG362
JP2362
JPEG363
JP2363
JPEG364
JP2364
JPEG365
JP2365
JPEG366
JP2366
JPEG367
JP2367
JPEG368
JP2368
JPEG369
JP2369
JPEG370
JP2370
JPEG371
JP2371
JPEG372
JP2372
JPEG373
JP2373
JPEG374
JP2374
JPEG375
JP2375
JPEG376
JP2376
JPEG377
JP2377
JPEG378
JP2378
JPEG379
JP2379
JPEG380
JP2380
JPEG381
JP2381
JPEG382
JP2382
JPEG383
JP2383
JPEG384
JP2384
JPEG385
JP2385
JPEG386
JP2386
JPEG387
JP2387
JPEG388
JP2388
JPEG389
JP2389
JPEG390
JP2390
JPEG391
JP2391
JPEG392
JP2392
JPEG393
JP2393
JPEG394
JP2394
JPEG395
JP2395
JPEG396
JP2396
JPEG397
JP2397
JPEG398
JP2398
JPEG399
JP2399
JPEG400
JP2400
JPEG401
JP2401
JPEG402
JP2402
JPEG403
JP2403
JPEG404
JP2404
JPEG405
JP2405
JPEG406
JP2406
JPEG407
JP2407
JPEG408
JP2408
JPEG409
JP2409
JPEG410
JP2410
JPEG411
JP2411
JPEG412
JP2412
JPEG413
JP2413
JPEG414
JP2414
JPEG415
JP2415
JPEG416
JP2416
JPEG417
JP2417
JPEG418
JP2418
JPEG419
JP2419
JPEG420
JP2420
JPEG421
JP2421
JPEG422
JP2422
JPEG423
JP2423
JPEG424
JP2424
JPEG425
JP2425
JPEG426
JP2426
JPEG427
JP2427
JPEG428
JP2428
JPEG429 983
JP2429
JPEG430
JP2430
JPEG431
JP2431
JPEG432
JP2432
JPEG433
JP2433
JPEG434
JP2434
JPEG435
JP2435
JPEG436
JP2436
JPEG437
JP2437
JPEG438
JP2438
JPEG439
JP2439
JPEG440
JP2440
JPEG441
JP2441
JPEG442
JP2442
JPEG443
JP2443
JPEG444
JP2444
JPEG445
JP2445
JPEG446
JP2446
JPEG447
JP2447
JPEG448
JP2448
JPEG449
JP2449
JPEG450
JP2450
JPEG451
JP2451
JPEG452
JP2452
JPEG453
JP2453
JPEG454
JP2454
JPEG455 407
JP2455 2531 1634
JPEG456
JP2456
JPEG457
JP2457 2528 1630
JPEG458
JP2458
JPEG459
JP2459
JPEG460
JP2460
JPEG461
JP2461
JPEG462
JP2462
JPEG463
JP2463
JPEG464
JP2464
JPEG465
JP2465
JPEG466
JP2466
JPEG467
JP2467
JPEG468
JP2468
JPEG469
JP2469
JPEG470
JP2470
JP2471
JPEG471
METS:fileSec
METS:fileGrp USE archive
METS:file GROUPID G1 TIF1 imagetiff CHECKSUM 3576bf12264667ce8af83fdc3987f6c7 CHECKSUMTYPE MD5 SIZE 4005536
METS:FLocat LOCTYPE OTHERLOCTYPE SYSTEM xlink:href 00001.tif
G2 TIF2 424a45d0d1f116ff91ded03752b2f097 4005408
00002.tif
G3 TIF3 adfc781e0807a43f0a5a17a7e3e27267 4008280
00003.tif
G4 TIF4 b68beb1877351695f601a85ee044b7a6 4007764
00004.tif
G5 TIF5 ea21cf1e357dc3ba59e5324c110ccaf5 4048372
00005.tif
G6 TIF6 abd0901060642d34a459365f1d3927b9 4010180
00006.tif
G7 TIF7 36936f3ee56a5d11222972b355380c6a 4010412
00007.tif
G8 TIF8 204266693a5e23516b9a32adc2704c92 4006796
00008.tif
G9 TIF9 4eed9e7648b7e16aff8457fc14d44644 4008924
00009.tif
G10 TIF10 0404cad79a2a1e5dc35f3b4cb595d753 4010360
00010.tif
G11 TIF11 374cb0da114594b1d9475bc628f72fa3 4009980
00011.tif
G12 TIF12 0accfee4fb6d62b22e3ded443e2b8491 4010292
00012.tif
G13 TIF13 0f2739ee96a66abc3ab803a6bbba6bc1 4010436
00013.tif
G14 TIF14 e5a963326b4859d6b1d05a861732ce6b 4010264
00014.tif
G15 TIF15 b126c01492db75d19a7ec248b6c890ec 4009008
00015.tif
G16 TIF16 e05eebffd1ef5f8f6558d755b0eed903 4010828
00016.tif
G17 TIF17 9c14f7cecc3cd54c2db0dad0bc9c6e9b 4010804
00017.tif
G18 TIF18 e902f20b9f72c9096833dad92fde7cf0 4010708
00018.tif
G19 TIF19 472ec461257455d21a3cad2e59f97457 4010440
00019.tif
G20 TIF20 55b7f90e5a2df4e802d5bf1103c50774 4011216
00020.tif
G21 TIF21 9e4ac6e8b3b78ac7ec39627e96ff562b 4105548
00021.tif
G22 TIF22 598f0ac97f3a4f5d54ea381476db2ff6 4009772
00023.tif
G23 TIF23 4f61df55d1b219035a66b39d341a68a8 4011256
00024.tif
G24 TIF24 ea41fd8c975f59a003eba0d395a4cd31 4010664
00025.tif
G25 TIF25 abcd0465cd0508a5df4447712136df35 4010980
00026.tif
G26 TIF26 9d5ccaffca9b1dc7a66455c8bb73a335 4145236
00027.tif
G27 TIF27 854f2df5ad80c0f8abbfd8369d17fcc7 4011360
00028.tif
G28 TIF28 4d0b64636f3e478272c996b0a3779935 4010720
00029.tif
G29 TIF29 c14bfe9b4e08676ec931a138fdc55b4d 4010832
00030.tif
G30 TIF30 60acd77cf1ff25aa02be14ed11e16c35 4010808
00031.tif
G31 TIF31 be3e248523f900308961b163c966bee6 4011460
00032.tif
G32 TIF32 e10bf955885bf1134126d35eb0cf2422 4010932
00033.tif
G33 TIF33 d37745c8f2078a259b805a065fd94fea
00034.tif
G34 TIF34 f61afec2394ce126e91de6ab2c8ffcb9 4010976
00035.tif
G35 TIF35 abeaf0e504906b46da1855f8207e9170 4011016
00036.tif
G36 TIF36 14941189e1ccbb150fe9325e228ef776 4010984
00037.tif
G37 TIF37 88e7b8d63961aaf8623c14a32a0d6f1e 4011080
00038.tif
G38 TIF38 fa82ce37ddce0fe21bdc97b67c88b59a 4010824
00039.tif
G39 TIF39 bff0085c3cbeec24c22dba650964509f 4007608
00040.tif
G40 TIF40 d453814aad73a95c40cd1ac79521301d 4009664
00041.tif
G41 TIF41 86ae21cb6e3672c14ba5c9de5b6bea0a 4006512
00042.tif
G42 TIF42 efaea6a1b18225375693cb68fb072eb2 4006284
00043.tif
G43 TIF43 588eda41f1dec92dd76931db89801c13 3986436
00044.tif
G44 TIF44 280e5d9703a8fab6af6240345e0c514a 3988356
00045.tif
G45 TIF45 63509e96a141d9f426257a8fdf9f9039 3974652
00046.tif
G46 TIF46 bcbcf10d980f282cec8d70f4082b6905 4004452
00047.tif
G47 TIF47 22cfe01d388d3c2f154ca0b400d4bbd1 4075284
00048.tif
G48 TIF48 c0bd8d1ac7349610f12730a6f017d1aa 4004356
00049.tif
G49 TIF49 2344f02966f8bcf9ac788b92d8eda73a 4010620
00050.tif
G50 TIF50 ece25f7fe01a202aed54ef616e944125 3993928
00051.tif
G51 TIF51 504410ad6088ed1f2c81f60ad0a40fc9 3995508
00052.tif
G52 TIF52 f5d65dcbbffd85e1765b38fab7ddeb05 3995224
00053.tif
G53 TIF53 36611d3fbf84e33188c44bef37881803 3995512
00054.tif
G54 TIF54 18b7938c540ac1eb79ee7cc4025519f1 3994068
00055.tif
G55 TIF55 474c19c7a33eb64c165fa0b5303462b7 3993604
00056.tif
G56 TIF56 86250138f2da7bc159c578169dacc721 3906072
00057.tif
G57 TIF57 cd05b0a59d29ff425b0826b83bf82ccf 3818956
00058.tif
G58 TIF58 e83016e592710243058c622ecff57fdd 3893376
00059.tif
G59 TIF59 66f798cc389d668175e58f98a7ff0721 3938700
00060.tif
G60 TIF60 dbd5fea40100dfc96d05a60fd258bfb2 3995316
00061.tif
G61 TIF61 f586c9c51e50599bb7a9fac4c81b2ee1 3905928
00062.tif
G62 TIF62 528ac5a305ae3f91a5eb684fd158119d 3995396
00063.tif
G63 TIF63 51d65ecf049651ad1cc56d60c71978f5 3995116
00064.tif
G64 TIF64 9f845f76f235b7bd8f83cd54dbfa3ba6 3995088
00065.tif
G65 TIF65 293321e5f1ef15c42557561c85c4516a 3995404
00066.tif
G66 TIF66 56dd7a529240d9d2583156ed2100ff4f 3994588
00067.tif
G67 TIF67 2aca1299249697051cec5fd3511ea0e7 3993672
00068.tif
G68 TIF68 0fc0458ed063406a63ac3d35c2eaf767 3994080
00069.tif
G69 TIF69 e87b985eb250c558c3c7160b0a4a13d5 3993632
00070.tif
G70 TIF70 e599e20a7ec6d2bf17a1bbe940ae0427 3993968
00071.tif
G71 TIF71 0488f36761e04276550f08710f2561e4 3995696
00072.tif
G72 TIF72 13231d6190bd4b076063215224d5eee2
00073.tif
G73 TIF73 1e69d9dd881a06520f659613e66b967f 3995428
00074.tif
G74 TIF74 fd32bb6023c186d15fe32342e66f9314 3995524
00075.tif
G75 TIF75 dec0e0564ee1e458f0fdce1d2e5837d3 3995588
00076.tif
G76 TIF76 6b3058303f32f3ff5b69d073d3c04801 3995624
00077.tif
G77 TIF77 d00e300dffa58582278b055d1e4c7b59 3995632
00078.tif
G78 TIF78 3f8315c77130e6aa90c44cd85c87bb61 3995120
00079.tif
G79 TIF79 55cee94f333078344b259058d0aa7042 4045224
00080.tif
G80 TIF80 e80c07156c07c27458a14b57fb281871 3990396
00081.tif
G81 TIF81 343df6ba713a5f91b630152b751e0b77 3989480
00082.tif
G82 TIF82 dd9b6f3a037f3e140e6199ea0e689fe3 3994264
00083.tif
G83 TIF83 b7cb06bc7ae9434aa1d253257b15ff4c 3994832
00084.tif
G84 TIF84 a16042fcbfc456aa367cd8f476c020c8 3995040
00085.tif
G85 TIF85 df8366d919c693d096ac364481fe3e37 3995276
00086.tif
G86 TIF86 fe1596719ba8668c83e5a672e8d774a9 3994992
00087.tif
G87 TIF87 5a668efc7339289ed6c2905e0098a83b 3995124
00088.tif
G88 TIF88 d6d238a63706372fcc613996f560d235 3995096
00089.tif
G89 TIF89 899aa61828d0c78d8547730717720520 3995388
00090.tif
G90 TIF90 43d32fe412ca0ff1600a8e13c0ef453e 3994368
00091.tif
G91 TIF91 33e795c94957adc86fa4331759f352af 3994012
00092.tif
G92 TIF92 d77faa59762c24ab614f56b66218799e 3994672
00093.tif
G93 TIF93 b1b714e7584c42ade846bacbc70448a2 4009304
00094.tif
G94 TIF94 cc541b1e2532a399975c7dc2004f60e3 4009836
00095.tif
G95 TIF95 776e02413f0243cf2ac3f1fbd4163637 4010920
00096.tif
G96 TIF96 63fe8e5dff35fdc811dda86909d5d050 4010688
00097.tif
G97 TIF97 f23ab4feb0d3b5c0082a3a7d9fd7aa3f 4010420
00098.tif
G98 TIF98 461f4602b97ddea230cafd15f13a3694 4010536
00099.tif
G99 TIF99 2eb7bfa3a44885bf980ad9def17b9e67 3995184
00100.tif
G100 TIF100 63fab9f4f6c718afeda8ffff9bdac23a 3995204
00101.tif
G101 TIF101 58e22630a1f1f46c026533b29a9330de 3995468
00102.tif
G102 TIF102 4ef60ac0b52898b050f865efdaeab692
00103.tif
G103 TIF103 6f6d6369335f6e57471747db2d4ad664 3995432
00104.tif
G104 TIF104 2da5116df3896352601194dbcbb5a72a 3995448
00105.tif
G105 TIF105 efe2c34ab6e98a9e8fe580194b9a9256
00106.tif
G106 TIF106 1ba83f4df49009807d08cb13b9020c15 3994572
00107.tif
G107 TIF107 a750621994eab8843297f24807a144f1 3992284
00108.tif
G108 TIF108 c7f17aaf98d3905f25e87ea246dface1 3994360
00109.tif
G109 TIF109 b3826decf8b2c24ba7885e6db1d73c26 3994740
00110.tif
G110 TIF110 9089145af7f6b87d6b809e66cf775853 3994964
00111.tif
G111 TIF111 19a54d9a426ad1e98cd497e56a7f2af7
00112.tif
G112 TIF112 3c0e7a209a0e398ad96d093cbd7a070d 3994792
00113.tif
G113 TIF113 544e6d430be708c1d64406e98ed7cc53 3994952
00114.tif
G114 TIF114 194b98d8a8052bfe6236d862282997e5 3995212
00115.tif
G115 TIF115 3fac08a98b35b53163e37dcb0e256b76 3994756
00116.tif
G116 TIF116 e0eaa8ebac3e116f9c6d58c332267538 3994332
00117.tif
G117 TIF117 c9fd1efcd1a138bf5eb706a931ad6d53 3994644
00118.tif
G118 TIF118 a5674bc4175a0d163584c45f27ee99fa 3990640
00119.tif
G119 TIF119 f73a89d4719f9eb57b23a048fc1608c5 3989476
00120.tif
G120 TIF120 57eca344cda525e47fb653e00571d166 3993548
00121.tif
G121 TIF121 75500e52b7946bf5cd044c6b126edf44
00122.tif
G122 TIF122 d3ee8a183feb92a66b8eca2c79f7478d 3995036
00123.tif
G123 TIF123 d01129bc47887d6031013eb8ad22a114 3995436
00124.tif
G124 TIF124 5a804fcc002ae780555711aff57da96c 3994260
00125.tif
G125 TIF125 804b0353670d5b5a1edb07585a5f36f8 3994796
00126.tif
G126 TIF126 dee0beba89baac4e18d4ff8730c704f0 3991992
00127.tif
G127 TIF127 a9ae1907ac3edf3af84ed6702ef433cb 3994732
00128.tif
G128 TIF128 05d4cdebaf19632186f9934a342c0c13 3994460
00129.tif
G129 TIF129 f74d85475165715af73e3eb115ece9dd 3994440
00130.tif
G130 TIF130 3b44897f203e4fe5a881dcac31931f73 3994608
00131.tif
G131 TIF131 293edc0340307fa74b57f4c92f234e6f 3993464
00132.tif
G132 TIF132 4eb9420c4e4574999b582e6e52f454ba 3993980
00133.tif
G133 TIF133 d0fdd2814255384274b884cc76857e59
00134.tif
G134 TIF134 0928cf49a7fcf83c5aa46310eb100669 3995400
00135.tif
G135 TIF135 ff86f06caeaea983a8c8e3f76571dda3
00136.tif
G136 TIF136 2c6ed083bcdbd03982af9936c7923ee1 3995488
00137.tif
G137 TIF137 6c94dadc9bd3cafdf366d8be94b6d8a1 3993528
00138.tif
G138 TIF138 a0f5954c9875f2cb8bddfe0daedcc9a7 3995656
00139.tif
G139 TIF139 1b616bd252a84b93581a7720095b9c01 3995484
00140.tif
G140 TIF140 bdf95f2e36887780779dc14e168fea81 3993432
00141.tif
G141 TIF141 86ab211324bcb09031ad46b4d25798d2 3995380
00142.tif
G142 TIF142 01abce62d0c648f5a8e402d2205726e5 3994364
00143.tif
G143 TIF143 d1d443454216b4267a243103af510938 3995652
00144.tif
G144 TIF144 6f7b881c060ce4252f6492c1fe6a2ee7
00145.tif
G145 TIF145 de8d43f05aa8ebaf3ac5b8098c1ecd4c 3994288
00146.tif
G146 TIF146 702668b54633e76b4f2a5e57a00cae5e 3994640
00147.tif
G147 TIF147 56cc93b27d09ac886ead51b6ddcf9ba6 3991392
00148.tif
G148 TIF148 c59cdbc7db0f9a170cf20f1827e9a732 3993988
00149.tif
G149 TIF149 721439e913560d41041de3f39701238a 3995216
00150.tif
G150 TIF150 03b86114a77c3d6a8e5dc4f6c4aee20f 4015896
00151.tif
G151 TIF151 b0eef9dc0bd907843cd59c22d8446d93 4015932
00152.tif
G152 TIF152 34ec81bf069e0daced1bcdba7f97b08e 4015868
00153.tif
G153 TIF153 09c1c6c755922d4ed05a2bec995dbc6f 4016064
00154.tif
G154 TIF154 24f7fc9ff36e375d822dc2b85e8032b9 4015532
00155.tif
G155 TIF155 5fa58042fb6cfb8fcfc900d4f60b5986 4016000
00156.tif
G156 TIF156 3e288787bf8d8eb71dd1fc9fe1456883 4016244
00157a.tif
G157 TIF157 6d3be8b44e5c91a24f45a0b88064e09a 4016080
00157b.tif
G158 TIF158 be393dbf1d89cf4014114e4ac2b6600a 4015844
00157c.tif
G159 TIF159 505ae0e484937e49530bcb83a15601d3 4015936
00157d.tif
G160 TIF160 7efd53c3762b194fdea7b271960dd714 4014172
00157e.tif
G161 TIF161 b8e30df367e0abf99cde2a266ae59ca6 4016084
00157f.tif
G162 TIF162 5ed63e238d48c1e789e6eea362b1e414 4015056
00159.tif
G163 TIF163 662223d526ba3f060c7127facef25ea1 4016092
00160.tif
G164 TIF164 c6afef2937328ff9be043eb95a59021d 4016336
00161.tif
G165 TIF165 e4ce37e8d99eaaa8bcbb09dd735245ab 4015276
00162.tif
G166 TIF166 bf9ad6b2d2870431c1a3b0c205b4bfe4 4015256
00163.tif
G167 TIF167 a52f0a90645d4760c2ae4eed40b29b81 4015180
00164.tif
G168 TIF168 f7bd5bffb7931ea770ceb937b2031d3c 4012580
00165.tif
G169 TIF169 df1f63528930041b34b9aadf61ba8fa1 4010100
00166.tif
G170 TIF170 9d09321b48e5b7f9684c984e0e82043e 4015092
00167.tif
G171 TIF171 978ac69cc6bc1c2c4e4f3bc6edc88b78 4016456
00168.tif
G172 TIF172 c7e1ae5d43db3935e4da8944cc3ef856 4016228
00169.tif
G173 TIF173 08100a6f4dfe98a63047681cd3866001 4015840
00170.tif
G174 TIF174 a701b75a27416ae8f146860a89336405 4015832
00171.tif
G175 TIF175 8524757ac112ce92575aa7611aaaf869 3993356
00172.tif
G176 TIF176 49dd2d3526dc6fe17eba2669ca3a0ef7 3995600
00173.tif
G177 TIF177 d11d66b5b9df0d9170ae1b38b5cae14f 3995628
00174.tif
G178 TIF178 30610dadee49dc3ad9b3369a8ccdc5e0 3995416
00175.tif
G179 TIF179 b915ae4d89a8eec3b4e959c799a40fe0 3992272
00176.tif
G180 TIF180 a2d1e16b4f5f94e8e809869fc10fab67 3992064
00177.tif
G181 TIF181 76f8925f84e2cb030d14a6b1f80d2857 3995756
00178.tif
G182 TIF182 74fd564932a0f1c0c54d41fae299f66b 3995736
00179.tif
G183 TIF183 3482b24ed4834a607a2d3f900d5d5f36 3993240
00180.tif
G184 TIF184 ac0afd47284440ae5c36edc95ddefabe 3995640
00181.tif
G185 TIF185 b55d6cb8c79fc5c7b7c488592434207f 3995636
00182.tif
G186 TIF186 dc835f5efce8f13760199492ca4649e1 3994668
00183.tif
G187 TIF187 08b5e7050f69a02e654a2ea70e9ac86b
00184.tif
G188 TIF188 3ebbddbaf2fcbebe82d0c7e54b09a7a4 3994212
00185.tif
G189 TIF189 139c5fd5a6d698335b0ed49c7dcfd481 3994548
00186.tif
G190 TIF190 f9107033f622d4f4b628fb2625795f95 3990320
00187.tif
G191 TIF191 aaaa321425615a671213e14ea3da5d4b 3989468
00188.tif
G192 TIF192 0d88452b6e4a50b769ba04b7de5e52f5 3994392
00189.tif
G193 TIF193 dedeae6e17168aedeb396eaf456e50ce 3995552
00190.tif
G194 TIF194 dcff0fc980514aa2c8b925dfd869376d 3995128
00191.tif
G195 TIF195 c6740a34a20cf2344f607b236cc920df 3995832
00192.tif
G196 TIF196 10402896718ff2cf7ee596b1f7223381 3991912
00193.tif
G197 TIF197 6a773499514a8ce5c76b484019678cf0 3992028
00194.tif
G198 TIF198 49680c5dd4a9f5bee9c56695992e29fa 4025472
00195.tif
G199 TIF199 b32d57745d450d1facf73019f7614294 4077804
00196.tif
G200 TIF200 c8e9bb39f820ae617c8fcc9365dd7231 3995728
00197.tif
G201 TIF201 972c04b49f05c0aef04afdbe3b500853
00198.tif
G202 TIF202 eabaf4e50fe431834f2bd542246b353c 3994972
00199.tif
G203 TIF203 648b700c75941b8b28a8f22901c447d1 4011720
00200.tif
G204 TIF204 938f42271703fc1411aafd8af7ad2e15 4012752
00201.tif
G205 TIF205 faaeb47d854cfcfa25de1cb18dff16a4 4014120
00202.tif
G206 TIF206 5e0691718ee2338f8faecb91b0d111be 4014336
00203.tif
G207 TIF207 f38257f39495702002015870e2d9da41 4014132
00204.tif
G208 TIF208 b89b4ca14cdcf8d300c18eec72c98887 4013164
00205.tif
G209 TIF209 33e6cb63e8bf16fedb761f7c901b6de4 4010168
00206.tif
G210 TIF210 93c6cef643cf17c9688a3ac07110ebf5 4013492
00207.tif
G211 TIF211 4825b4c3e962274ecfbeb2adbe4bc2eb 4012192
00208.tif
G212 TIF212 7889f25f7615bc79256638e9c6286b16 4011876
00209.tif
G213 TIF213 17442389d20baca20531cc7e4a6beaf2 4014416
00210.tif
G214 TIF214 338bd5938359939291f068d82ecd8882 4013524
00211.tif
G215 TIF215 730ead1056be0b1863aca58a6ba079aa 4011576
00212.tif
G216 TIF216 76005ce4f32839d9b84918dade162e47 4013696
00213.tif
G217 TIF217 aa07c2e9e27e76f56842c92fc4773d68 4013552
00214.tif
G218 TIF218 058e68c04efa64dbacf8d10e7740ecd3
00215.tif
G219 TIF219 d49093f9196cc2cea560a25245daaea6 4009876
00216.tif
G220 TIF220 b5080c0c068649125dcb95cbd8d0c975 4014720
00217.tif
G221 TIF221 455bf6cab8809914d485f3b6c1284490 4016068
00218.tif
G222 TIF222 716114cdeec685d538aa1ba7cacd801d 4012276
00219.tif
G223 TIF223 7b3a4ab1319928f9ad089bd4e6f9266a 4016320
00220.tif
G224 TIF224 bb554359c4bc48d8e434de373888a2c9 4015876
00221.tif
G225 TIF225 bc23935c5db8c9a6195045d7d34362ec 4016164
00222.tif
G226 TIF226 3caaa85a2acb9164eb0d9a5435e324b8 4015988
00223.tif
G227 TIF227 710d725e69810dc1ed3f20e9969413b0 4016024
00224.tif
G228 TIF228 182cce20a0267e2096ccb54892c05e6f 4015996
00225.tif
G229 TIF229 f152e4bc8d258ecc1699d18aa97989fa 4016224
00226.tif
G230 TIF230 ed40dd6c15574c2407a388df603f7955 4016012
00227.tif
G231 TIF231 c155d9441f7610a7ffc620ff52834cb1 4015244
00228.tif
G232 TIF232 c8ef153283918cd85fc6ac6c09671a2f 4015164
00229.tif
G233 TIF233 308819d359ee377d0d00e67ecee66fdf 4011936
00230.tif
G234 TIF234 fed4570f3904025465df5d69dd71724c 4014876
00231.tif
G235 TIF235 4eb934b9c7ca0ed5c6c86eef4e220e11 4016308
00232.tif
G236 TIF236 a27a16d9751cce64309c0a7ca7f64d07
00233.tif
G237 TIF237 f5db6b035dcdd5ebf1de2a18dd0bd89e 4016368
00234.tif
G238 TIF238 16e7b202f32177924b8972f2ff3b2167 4016376
00235.tif
G239 TIF239 b40a9971db859bdc287ff4c12d0dee6b 4016248
00236.tif
G240 TIF240 7cf826c7087363b0d48f41bd0eec3893 4016584
00237.tif
G241 TIF241 06185c1c66d705114ffa73c6233f1e51 4016136
00238.tif
G242 TIF242 b522e61bb98d701a39e64d8417c01c39 4013892
00239.tif
G243 TIF243 570b469955f2440a3bca7a61e6547411
00240.tif
G244 TIF244 0dfaf612db3a2353376f1f8f4c98d32e 4014532
00241.tif
G245 TIF245 ad54efd03cfa934e7edfc4c77837bf88
00242.tif
G246 TIF246 ee3a2900b6815fe1826a75fb32c5c624 4016052
00243.tif
G247 TIF247 10a1f596a9a73f7d2d77a524269b2b1b 4014668
00244.tif
G248 TIF248 36b4104157f4f73ae0a307b033a64d1f
00245.tif
G249 TIF249 0968ad1bc269d924cdc6476eb414dd00 4015736
00246.tif
G250 TIF250 c388a1de915bba37ea48691b32fcae28 4014884
00247.tif
G251 TIF251 fbb8cff0b44a688e1d3fc23dac3aa849 4014428
00248.tif
G252 TIF252 3c808b544d8c27abb6db070cbc137be5 4015560
00249.tif
G253 TIF253 d66db714105d6ad1048b77f49791ac67 4014288
00250.tif
G254 TIF254 63af5482dfcf1507cee6773153f69955 4013548
00251.tif
G255 TIF255 71d1ad45ae562dad931201162d34554f 4012980
00252.tif
G256 TIF256 1f11689e401b93ac0bff7e0a1fb3dc5f 4009796
00253.tif
G257 TIF257 4e29abd7b528cf7938d0638d73c8d99e 4008056
00254.tif
G258 TIF258 9876a5fcf5757b2cde5d2aa6d68fa8f9 4012476
00255.tif
G259 TIF259 14aeaf840b523f5e5a4fc0293ca86fd6 4014476
00256.tif
G260 TIF260 50eece2f42882f1d184311b33bb15df9 4013976
00257.tif
G261 TIF261 58a327b3d6d0facbd8b37c5e4657edfa 4013916
00258.tif
G262 TIF262 90de5ab8d4fde3bb4634fbf91b25bad9 4013032
00259.tif
G263 TIF263 ee9c4a9b00be71f58f16b21027f1afb3 4014108
00260.tif
G264 TIF264 a74afa0db7bec5bc851bbd1c77e69828 4015664
00261.tif
G265 TIF265 2066a29b17e2fe6ae24f2b4a2477c0af 4016168
00262.tif
G266 TIF266 fab45256a8ca5098dc7a3d69fb617aeb 4099992
00263.tif
G267 TIF267 4388998538a10342b38a6efb56c2b823 4014228
00264.tif
G268 TIF268 d27bd2347875a8c395ff5b47fe352ef5
00265.tif
G269 TIF269 acb78aa98bbb6c3aa0a232ef1eefe75c 4011864
00266.tif
G270 TIF270 79fb01dc3e94910614974ae226ff4aea 4012144
00267.tif
G271 TIF271 40689e9f5c13f8ae426e0c481d651caf 4012236
00268.tif
G272 TIF272 118c2da4893f411df98444f8bb68b906 4013960
00269.tif
G273 TIF273 4bbe482bb394e5dd3e9ad07d8ab0ee31
00270.tif
G274 TIF274 d6928fa26777fece9b52ce043fe4fe63 4012964
00271.tif
G275 TIF275 4d46fa0fcbdaee5137c05bdec10fbaec 4014296
00272.tif
G276 TIF276 412520b5ddc991b258d734efd7ec86fc 4014064
00277.tif
G277 TIF277 0390260e46d06cb77143ebf88a6ca0a1 4014168
00278.tif
G278 TIF278 896b8b602acafdf082c10082a0e3d8c9
00279.tif
G279 TIF279 3301139aee9ff47488ac57cae6a5a590 4012988
00280.tif
G280 TIF280 cd98d9c1b4a1417eddd8638ff77ab8ae 4014052
00281.tif
G281 TIF281 21def940e9ef474158610188750a0fab 4010704
00282.tif
G282 TIF282 4acafeabc2fb64b2ec6dc19f53216472 4013940
00283.tif
G283 TIF283 a53a6e69b8be234f78e4734c5f1090fd 4011748
00284.tif
G284 TIF284 d1facf96251eadd69bf7e2bd47bd7f0b 4012384
00285.tif
G285 TIF285 8f42aa6bf2ea3c61d2e72a5a469a3628 4013792
00286.tif
G286 TIF286 122fddbfa6e64a994c33ea4edc1fa56f 4012080
00287.tif
G287 TIF287 ecc94c9895c6c1661fbb77d7d29de127 4012692
00288.tif
G288 TIF288 d7fa0fd4ccb7155cbcfd7d1db652eab9 4013044
00289.tif
G289 TIF289 c41ceea00d76ca01f7ae22d38427a078 4010448
00290.tif
G290 TIF290 9ca36a250a5bf89a89d2f8776dedb254 4012668
00291.tif
G291 TIF291 df7aff5414ab3866e6b85547de91bbd9
00292.tif
G292 TIF292 f175bebbb798ef89ae4b3d9c7c44e14e 4014360
00293.tif
G293 TIF293 4e2914e14f2e42754f42b28a744b6198 4014236
00294.tif
G294 TIF294 cb30239c16e449ae70ad55452a7d6a96 4014104
00295.tif
G295 TIF295 c40345fd98cb985fb0aa64a8767da4e3 4014112
00296.tif
G296 TIF296 c10992c9bd6e31babb06bd039a25a73f 4011740
00297.tif
G297 TIF297 2141508f78618d3512cb5f18bee366ee 3973424
00298.tif
G298 TIF298 7a5a7c15d6095bf76b8b3a9737a0c6eb 4052600
00299.tif
G299 TIF299 7781ae8ccbc0dded21d0d9822f2ab6ed 4012376
00300.tif
G300 TIF300 fc8cc5dad780ccf1bb113488a584af28 4031572
00301.tif
G301 TIF301 161aad6876efd99d749b34133c46f18f 4014924
00302.tif
G302 TIF302 43a52ed4ad7652a58c9fb1c5569b172f 4013148
00303.tif
G303 TIF303 63d7c45274225cf08481e8539e1c258e 4014548
00304.tif
G304 TIF304 14b1893bd8686449412f711e79601f1b 4014712
00305.tif
G305 TIF305 d99d2f98073df768e1cd40d603c199c6 4015104
00306.tif
G306 TIF306 a0516b012702a736a4b0142ad4d3aa9b 4013736
00307.tif
G307 TIF307 7e4e195597cd6101b818a45b2ca11df5 4011516
00308.tif
G308 TIF308 43512c3a068d5df8f8ce4cc9a536df93 4013576
00309.tif
G309 TIF309 db0000cc09f3b9ea31133de853c73227 4015396
00310.tif
G310 TIF310 3f6956a1c6c523c646055a34cdfb8000 4014988
00311.tif
G311 TIF311 5dda4d899e679bf3e7e68b7d89bbd5d6 4015136
00312.tif
G312 TIF312 87f38ce0b31f4e73ec37af62242ff41b 4013468
00313.tif
G313 TIF313 2e3301d2e89cf26c5a847620822dd79d 4055528
00314.tif
G314 TIF314 e47aec76c272dfe91c7268993806df24 4076104
00315.tif
G315 TIF315 7865837c931f108a354d75fd40866e3e 4012976
00316.tif
G316 TIF316 b1755aa0e4f6f3f26f67674a049b4d13 4014604
00317.tif
G317 TIF317 6686c228932270d085b2fa89b6b6760f 4015068
00318.tif
G318 TIF318 d4b687f702876e35b583cdc3b30f7cb0 4014916
00319.tif
G319 TIF319 8df60fc590310da08446dc63d3ceaeb7 4012944
00320.tif
G320 TIF320 2400a29ec41244f590d3f377440e3718 4014700
00321.tif
G321 TIF321 57264a0ea58f1dee9485434f2da15919 4013692
00322.tif
G322 TIF322 f62188e44e1d95f68606da0f47dd8fda 4011868
00323.tif
G323 TIF323 160edcafa5660db88605a6fbd89240e9 4008744
00324.tif
G324 TIF324 ff74dad62b3b1e3e0090b06dd88c8a45 4013760
00325.tif
G325 TIF325 228cb5f206d9a02b4313648629e95a7b
00326.tif
G326 TIF326 5d57255dded96b8ba51d39beee708326 4014744
00327.tif
G327 TIF327 2009e356371ac4af9a6ba1007732673b 4014908
00328.tif
G328 TIF328 e3f8464d80fb34458cf5e500c933b8e0 4014728
00329.tif
G329 TIF329 0e12b08229a46b5081dc00e40192179d 4014452
00330.tif
G330 TIF330 62c3a5c9469d840b9e00b21d6e44ae0e
00331.tif
G331 TIF331 da54596acbee21062fe6dfbc9b765a29
00332.tif
G332 TIF332 2497b2a1977e30a741a3cea059d65b4b
00333.tif
G333 TIF333 da7298f11f99b18309fe1fd417dde442 4014264
00334.tif
G334 TIF334 b2fd1cbf5aad61e4c4f6861643eb98b6 4012800
00335.tif
G335 TIF335 506ac9e9d2b426108545ad68e9dc9fea 4008740
00336.tif
G336 TIF336 6bd4233681013d642661d6ce8185b2d6 4013680
00337.tif
G337 TIF337 9ef598c56f0a478e09a1176e0adc191f
00338.tif
G338 TIF338 2115d3be6b6a7d6bd8cbc504ede04c74 4015048
00339.tif
G339 TIF339 7c1deeca6d3bd62b8d945daa9cec675a 4014832
00340.tif
G340 TIF340 48a55b72f1548fe77ce6bf26d455f5c9 4015044
00341.tif
G341 TIF341 b7e690732fc075edfe4ec0afce37b87c 4012516
00342.tif
G342 TIF342 c6190fe891146b798f8c43a2cc1a1a2e 4015148
00343.tif
G343 TIF343 35beb3f2aaf634a07bb9e7b7c2fcc7ca 4015312
00344.tif
G344 TIF344 0587e3064a2725d3c7e9dce522908285 4014968
00345.tif
G345 TIF345 65bc9b93053df5e1001ec616d4002c48 4015428
00346.tif
G346 TIF346 95079bc4dc642e66e2f0870544f36c78 4014948
00347.tif
G347 TIF347 966f61bcc9786a50c6450e1962d114f6 4015248
00348.tif
G348 TIF348 de95d3dba4006bebd922cf1cfff4b8b5
00349.tif
G349 TIF349 d631b28c46cfb38ba4c02099354aa4a0 4014524
00350.tif
G350 TIF350 24fad8dd1bc9eec9f6a1325bfb2d03be 4013668
00351.tif
G351 TIF351 2b7450aa99a4cdb9b4f6991b8650ab9d 4010104
00352.tif
G352 TIF352 9015be1554cc028c1b313432b9c28279 4013260
00353.tif
G353 TIF353 4ca3f0f644f4b0d91088bb031e88326f
00354.tif
G354 TIF354 9dd34eca69854769c1d1715bec3baea5 4014808
00355.tif
G355 TIF355 6c701f188ddcc220d21961907ea9b16b 4014616
00356.tif
G356 TIF356 3bbfe185bf48e784e6d4d70443d6a373 4010896
00357.tif
G357 TIF357 9186bd9de766a6b4f8e9c7c20149cb94 4014956
00358.tif
G358 TIF358 5e1a725abb834e57222e295537b1f1c0 4015100
00359.tif
G359 TIF359 d1904472d02b9d9137db632df9f5ee13 4015112
00360.tif
G360 TIF360 e5da37074000e95af99fedb8d5f3e1c9 4015060
00361.tif
G361 TIF361 09095191bfada54bcc925e1ab8838b22 4014760
00362.tif
G362 TIF362 4b9b7043891dd5929610fffd36ab9410 4014868
00363.tif
G363 TIF363 45a316dc1a37651237693fde095a5d9a 4012928
00364.tif
G364 TIF364 9cc3e1016fbe8282e7b9a4520f9f971c 4013508
00365.tif
G365 TIF365 f3728403f6e869e5569184529d29ad92
00366.tif
G366 TIF366 ea716123fb5a3cee6d47c48a23a9cc90 4013248
00367.tif
G367 TIF367 3b87579df9984a0ea99b70b379d9b180 4014368
00368.tif
G368 TIF368 68b69350dfe541b3b712937a971e402f 4011828
00369.tif
G369 TIF369 117fd87f6a0187c44bdd096145bb335a
00370.tif
G370 TIF370 83c3171f8d480fd95bc2ea228e0a55b3 4014676
00371.tif
G371 TIF371 dbcc0b8ded3c95a68f4a06a9c7630c56
00372.tif
G372 TIF372 3a6d6e35c88bab30b2ece256b075269b 4014708
00373.tif
G373 TIF373 13c6be25112b4670107b45062e29347d 4011976
00374.tif
G374 TIF374 a5fbd77e9ab4b5c469091b582aa355da 4012212
00375.tif
G375 TIF375 35606825c9bff48f0f63927928c7eda4
00376.tif
G376 TIF376 7e6102b50b1a0f20b6f7dfbb7905f51f 4010936
00377.tif
G377 TIF377 174add04c83ff00e307a8a378a9c9054 4014460
00378.tif
G378 TIF378 c2ebea0707373889a4a95f40da45ac9e 4014784
00379.tif
G379 TIF379 4f4f03cd719efdaeb5bc01ca39094307 4013344
00380.tif
G380 TIF380 e1a1ff91772811ecfc762931b33c0bfa 4012720
00381.tif
G381 TIF381 071585724bf6e5e2399bc56efd2ceb58
00382.tif
G382 TIF382 61b7ac924ddf1afddc20c311aa451b49 4013284
00383.tif
G383 TIF383 23567e42c59f6c7472866c7d90b5f4a1 4014940
00384.tif
G384 TIF384 acec7750f5472f93e4ae24aa164ab4d9
00385.tif
G385 TIF385 2588f04a381626084651a9d601b79fe8 4014664
00386.tif
G386 TIF386 bf3bd01d588282969ef4a9058b08f73e 4014860
00387.tif
G387 TIF387 fcd0950dee2d4978a1055098b8d60b3a 4014892
00388.tif
G388 TIF388 edf5e8ffaa25e712bad7ae9f4aa3c45a 4014856
00389.tif
G389 TIF389 2ee5ae3545d695921d24ab09d45e4412
00390.tif
G390 TIF390 5c014c9e463cac7b754aa82ce7f5795e 4013860
00391.tif
G391 TIF391 40d37486e702beeea57ce158c8bf4138
00392.tif
G392 TIF392 455bcc80ac507dbddeaba3b30039bf8c 4014468
00393.tif
G393 TIF393 57bc84b2320280c65549c3fbf8024393
00394.tif
G394 TIF394 887b239045e3ab5880307b912944e184 4013436
00395.tif
G395 TIF395 88fdc760b7711d08414c5343e757772b 4014600
00396.tif
G396 TIF396 244eb9f477cf0a7939e6e7800b9ee51d
00397.tif
G397 TIF397 eff1650b62b84d6f25c31b8c28ada477
00398.tif
G398 TIF398 b4267798c902b40317ff5217124888a7 4014796
00399.tif
G399 TIF399 7669c33cd7dc3a46c12902f679b76897 4013708
00400.tif
G400 TIF400 809a4681ad98416cbf02c465deef1b2d
00401.tif
G401 TIF401 3e779f7c200e17e064b0dc40f10eaa70 4012632
00402.tif
G402 TIF402 638abfe0d2ac191de9d9ed0f46561e75 4014844
00403.tif
G403 TIF403 388d5d7aeedcf7e1dfcbc2bb23804849 4010368
00404.tif
G404 TIF404 392001109c9cb9f7716bc67b27be1b02 4014688
00405.tif
G405 TIF405 c3a90156c5b91ab0458a33f34a0b6568 4013312
00406.tif
G406 TIF406 9fa9f56000c49a311c0ad6321d8fbd0d 4014772
00407.tif
G407 TIF407 1028533bfdfe77a6cc13036037cd6c4b
00408.tif
G408 TIF408 5e9087e064f48102fdd6a1214393cee9 4011060
00409.tif
G409 TIF409 6f44a54d335b233a498936f3c27137ec 4008768
00410.tif
G410 TIF410 a46fd6a4993bbbf56838be23f840bf61 4013872
00411.tif
G411 TIF411 cc895690ddc5e1a7a6c032bce06e5463 4014912
00412.tif
G412 TIF412 af41e82e12cfd90d3055baeccbf247f9 4014724
00413.tif
G413 TIF413 b83e34d30644d37aa72882ba42f7a85e
00414.tif
G414 TIF414 933194c75bda9da18d1821a65318503d 4014736
00415.tif
G415 TIF415 8418e35f0b8fb1565265ffe5b8bb1f3c 4015040
00416.tif
G416 TIF416 65a1a755fdb69de708cd59c973c60bed 4014936
00417.tif
G417 TIF417 f5ec175b19fe07b1695cce918a6f0ef5
00418.tif
G418 TIF418 5d327cc8d02222b9f52e6bc6160b799d
00419.tif
G419 TIF419 039463bc6d7d07bfdabf0677bc30fa56
00420.tif
G420 TIF420 cf5fd6fb7ec18251b047ce6f6c7b316c 4015156
00421.tif
G421 TIF421 25b4e28017b1d9103548d3f83afc367d 4014704
00422.tif
G422 TIF422 e9ae6ae620c69984518b33e9b91bd374
00423.tif
G423 TIF423 f8ba18a3de7d52960d7b90a49988ea1a 4014992
00424.tif
G424 TIF424 4eae5db6e415a025d02ceb227cd38d04 4013628
00425.tif
G425 TIF425 5f5b302a687697757e72bbbf74374eba 4014444
00426.tif
G426 TIF426 4c19bcd60388dc9a8624cc7bd69f8026 4014164
00427.tif
G427 TIF427 4c0d76ff9f392bd9c6ad99eb36c5f7d2 4009340
00428.tif
G428 TIF428 a8dc91c24bbf94aadc762e5efdc7d6e5 4013400
00429.tif
G429 TIF429 526b964ba5ba997da3cbbc9beb6ce635 4045200
00430.tif
G430 TIF430 03bb6419e1878d9d80bc8a6a2e158e41 4015284
00431.tif
G431 TIF431 b6c0ea3ac7bb09a6d71b2ec364b4b439 4013404
00432.tif
G432 TIF432 554522195785dea16c21607f4f7679cd
00433.tif
G433 TIF433 93f33408b6f100fa7acbe662577c78bd 4014692
00434.tif
G434 TIF434 4b7217859283c2375ab2a46d8bcc2c9e 4015036
00435.tif
G435 TIF435 ec66efda2056daf443e82fac57a855fe 4011404
00436.tif
G436 TIF436 29fd6625b288c2cfd0c7039fe883aa2a
00437.tif
G437 TIF437 07a3f567ad0cfa656b1f23643967eb4b
00438.tif
G438 TIF438 596b4ee3032ca1a083aeb342b5b53f0f 4013756
00439.tif
G439 TIF439 6ca2e39c10723b07b7f904424fe9c2ad
00440.tif
G440 TIF440 789730c40b8241e748e38de96feb51ee
00441.tif
G441 TIF441 02ce57ae7d94ff745d85904a346a6ac6
00442.tif
G442 TIF442 a93a5d2bd20ef2500343d38f25d8cc5d 4015192
00443.tif
G443 TIF443 08b0cde3fca9a2a95be8da8278c688a2 4014696
00444.tif
G444 TIF444 b8ad939a157aa245b78a0b28459b92e4 4014660
00445.tif
G445 TIF445 7602337319c8769830c441a4d8c3127c
00446.tif
G446 TIF446 4aa695fb8e3b0695779a1a4b32f6a9e2 4014176
00447.tif
G447 TIF447 c00c21468906b0e72db29afa217f41d8
00448.tif
G448 TIF448 24d66c9989e00d3d2ca8c2e3ec65c688 4013836
00449.tif
G449 TIF449 89e972a73115c1be68f8a90a52e296b0 4015484
00450.tif
G450 TIF450 9e116ea7485a47863986cb838e1d2895 4015000
00451.tif
G451 TIF451 c29dfbfee8e2098b6e1ca8a43d29bd86 4015152
00452.tif
G452 TIF452 b9b602bc7c887b87de714c004c682499 4012320
00453.tif
G453 TIF453 d58fa0b4ce590d4f90f3bed6f5629d0d 4012136
00454.tif
G454 TIF454 fffa20323e674cd4439a684021bcebf8
00455.tif
G455 TIF455 b005587a601d32a7b1e244dc997a93c7 4157244
00456.tif
G456 TIF456 5f131553be1dafb927afc60a8fcc7305 4014984
00457.tif
G457 TIF457 f42597cd521510681be3cdc91edc32b1 4142756
00458.tif
G458 TIF458 9e5e7fe17fd7f94893c454021a20208e 4014376
00459.tif
G459 TIF459 77957f17138b0f34df625e9b76c67f3d 4011796
00460.tif
G460 TIF460 349ac7a5603d30af71641ab641987a65
00461.tif
G461 TIF461 8e2ab6c33d59139e336ba1c4fa3dd004
00462.tif
G462 TIF462 de6eee915573310704cfe8b4467f681e 4013700
00463.tif
G463 TIF463 c2a39d8d9d3ebccc4d4595a670e81361 4014160
00464.tif
G464 TIF464 2768a94b08636e274a4781cadaab9904 4013208
00465.tif
G465 TIF465 a5a4eb42cd400781ebcec83ebd87b147
00466.tif
G466 TIF466 0d9ca6797d6e48a8f056b7fa535bdb89 4014252
00467.tif
G467 TIF467 7af623bec65281fe0cb7816b6fb239ad
00468.tif
G468 TIF468 a86c43e8ad4df4e1ad084b662ec3f2c3 4014272
00469.tif
G469 TIF469 262455e0fbbc23eb85ff853ebbd91f92 4014904
00470.tif
G470 TIF470 ad52f0d82a1a7de2ba6da3832bf0f88e 4014508
00471.tif
G471 TIF471 18b09a242f9b045ddb25974ca29a1541 4014388
00472.tif
reference
imagejp2 bbdce142b4b7826d18db0b620bf8c8ea 80936
00001.jp2
c09e0ccfa05acde30073b53ecb17e404 72884
00002.jp2
87a3e81bb9b6055f6865c63bae03dd89 225441
00003.jp2
9f1d2b142d7513f9c83ed9a642bb3393 498445
00004.jp2
80e291b9e3dfe67ad60718918e8f0c23 503457
00005.jp2
7a7ee068dff0f846a7fbf089af6e246a 498456
00006.jp2
85019e7f8ca4c319e22922294d1a6b51 498388
00007.jp2
3afecbbd7c330e18e21338b450fa7fc7 296000
00008.jp2
21cab02ecb896c2a710d654c8d0cd6a3 498411
00009.jp2
3e175085eed87a6c8d0f14989d9491d0 498386
00010.jp2
47c9beaeee8a4aa73b5a5e16ceec41af 498422
00011.jp2
b41e964b352ddb00c397291b4fdc518a 498460
00012.jp2
97cf7591a3ff7c75059d8247f32ec407 498404
00013.jp2
d5bca94d9712e640aae7f9254d643410 498300
00014.jp2
f00ecbf173bf23c61e231bb2a61ab41f 498399
00015.jp2
0b9a4c9bd2f713749064e348196e5794 498346
00016.jp2
a1928eb70c8ff422c576639cafca6972 498449
00017.jp2
60bd5ad0ef8b62f3d87a457e0d6d72f5 498412
00018.jp2
51652f5c9732ab3219404f6ce96dd5ae
00019.jp2
561f4b42628bec7ac68fdb20b52ffe14 498436
00020.jp2
3994b1585eb62ddbaf956afa44a52212 227906
00021.jp2
b070ada09f2c0266c02de8975123094b
00023.jp2
bdf0e085bbff5a7d76d5362ccf55a5e2 498431
00024.jp2
77d6928c6e6b3c07a13343ea9ceb03ba 498365
00025.jp2
7fe9f653a486bae9b648b260ada172d3 498435
00026.jp2
224badb4a4614b6c1fdc50640d586131 515141
00027.jp2
923025d12ab44af1eaf15479de4d2ffd 498437
00028.jp2
cd631d7d5b4180739bfe5c6a4d5505f0
00029.jp2
888259236ca7f783f5723192760ed2e3
00030.jp2
6a7ee3f464b83cbf2bcc68ca40edfe39
00031.jp2
e5067ab5b15b73cb1633e5b8b519b745 498425
00032.jp2
e4d72e1debed20664e9e7400ed05a90e 498360
00033.jp2
1c5c5536d08b69c5b30e9c54ec70b48d 498392
00034.jp2
ea456a6224b919ec03461d3f6f13368a
00035.jp2
21df9d1ebfd7cde7c21062d8589ca4e4
00036.jp2
11050352a70254a3a003e89901eaf054 498301
00037.jp2
a1d66b44133464f871c7864e331cc5ac 498423
00038.jp2
2bb5e71e534d55fc50be0006317ca9cc 498385
00039.jp2
088221057c0d0d2e8c677d9056531a67 489659
00040.jp2
e1dc11b307990de35535eb28c62e76ed 498442
00041.jp2
2cdb0911c3cfe976b7beb9c29db1e689 497831
00042.jp2
671dee0c113cdc6ffcf8725035ea949e 497855
00043.jp2
6428989634f512615d25bdcd3e0306fe 495678
00044.jp2
55f76ad69ad20d4c1b4c0adfd40fb04f 495930
00045.jp2
ececdae3e5374179803f7ab540bccc7b 461854
00046.jp2
a32a3c716d14028ec21563d2f8582f2f 497890
00047.jp2
448d7070b9f1c78331d0212434d5bef3 506767
00048.jp2
aebffd8bcd2e47f8d2d4e8b60820e614 497853
00049.jp2
c5f4c548ee9a76b9f6667b862c1652ba 498424
00050.jp2
79e5bb925ff8733756550220f3ea894b 496479
00051.jp2
91a761710688af54d56343603ef8a871 496450
00052.jp2
02337ba6fc40e897c6797ecd728b61ad 496503
00053.jp2
25eafa513b1a54634b7b98d62c0195a1 496441
00054.jp2
a93488fd2e3aa1ef53982d79eb74b1a7 496495
00055.jp2
e9f393a0948f203bdb8e8fe4ef6af29d 496509
00056.jp2
8a94e2bd2a99869a1bea0dad595fcc5a 397216
00057.jp2
978cb49353988384cc6c6e5325c9678b 20250
00058.jp2
fba09f74059befa1d89c40e1d9f8dcad 483860
00059.jp2
e864e34fc31ce485fef95e5147ddfaf6 489341
00060.jp2
87b04efd210890dc6bc4f190a106a637 496460
00061.jp2
41f74c1c350f22b0e12320363fabf744 485225
00062.jp2
168ea6e35649703a07151822836f4020 496500
00063.jp2
89a1d86ce69c327a57ff94d6e4a3b2d5
00064.jp2
303d78788f3862599d9fd23b7e4f6d28 496407
00065.jp2
c1eff6d58094776bffa092e7329b5113 496426
00066.jp2
cdbec9c908889d2471bcba94f1e88887 496470
00067.jp2
1248b03035afd5bdab1dd7c92494bcae 496504
00068.jp2
bffea48ebd77de75632936cfa3868c08 496493
00069.jp2
f74753aa4e87239849727184d6e518a7 496498
00070.jp2
408227b2187216dea712463ccc381341 496478
00071.jp2
c35f9700e621900dd28b2c9403003d21 496484
00072.jp2
e5f979371865172e93055827e545cf06 496508
00073.jp2
d2d6f1a0eb2efd1a90830d1ca8e06a42
00074.jp2
7847526680013026990ba0a3c6c91dfb
00075.jp2
c594dbfba7ed8d998bfbf4cab8e2b3fc 496506
00076.jp2
e1ab8b768088408c4c46a3d61b6e4ae6
00077.jp2
613279c309ac55b27966e138884b2f32 496449
00078.jp2
6c73bc7f14b79bebeb759b340bab953a 496462
00079.jp2
8bb20839d989fa7dc7f998a4d0a41798 502762
00080.jp2
d6ea51394f9c430e695773698692eb6a 165416
00081.jp2
5e15179b3e1293ae3bf1aebc5f05cd2d 16383
00082.jp2
716f4924197f2344f8b6bcb7c28a2216
00083.jp2
80fce26c3bb03805f745f2d22cd8a3c6 496487
00084.jp2
ae0c98da3ef9985e43879868e1e3609b 496486
00085.jp2
8dc33c38f85f12dc15ec73946b3c3a46 496483
00086.jp2
dc5b58c1dc16565826ffb3f2ec75f4ee 496482
00087.jp2
545b68a2fe8c55c6b6ad9eedcf3ec086 496507
00088.jp2
669ebbbaedc69d1f590dbf0fd6876a02
00089.jp2
a8a37f27766eefdb0af415dbfac840a8 496473
00090.jp2
eea962358526c6d14831358ede7a604d 496502
00091.jp2
de6658d69e8dc1750046185f071d4b74 496413
00092.jp2
e193b3b269936bcc149e374aee495400 496499
00093.jp2
0f0960288dd33903dbf39e2b6091c7e4 498448
00094.jp2
601701bce04a3d742c5c4b2710b50f48 498461
00095.jp2
b7ff4775757fc32aa576dbe44bc8f201 498459
00096.jp2
712c7ba37705c3f0b76dc954b64339b6
00097.jp2
59d44c559ca0b22e40d29e29c5dd6f0d
00098.jp2
e2cf54d53eb011447bcc3320952c94d9 498384
00099.jp2
9e7c00aabe1980a3d1c9d7f7958b885d
00100.jp2
c728d812daf9f1b411763bad6d0d5488 496477
00101.jp2
5b3368884c38c46a65db69d9cce38f70 496420
00102.jp2
d58a6c446d5eb932855b33e2a5c0d14c
00103.jp2
937beb5de95507d4aba944052d315c45 496447
00104.jp2
886ca1a99bdfd54e6daa1c91b27ad9d6
00105.jp2
04a345494964346484e67c482e332dd0
00106.jp2
b741b52b69be4f25f4adb131305f9a0a 496404
00107.jp2
5b6d1969cf4b443c6ff071a2ea442b7c 496490
00108.jp2
d05b1b3c5611623bdc6a8a4c56f77ef3 496436
00109.jp2
4cd527f35269948c2099c2470d905c0c
00110.jp2
00cad58d747d960d59f9ef4fd6eec80c 496468
00111.jp2
a1e4dfe96e5cb6d4dd6e1fa7dcfbebc9 496497
00112.jp2
6b142f5543eaf3f0012e90f2c0a07a9e 496481
00113.jp2
1d389bdbed41a4f892c84bd92eab94c3 496464
00114.jp2
f7e0386677a74d0a81de07821c796bc2
00115.jp2
6345361be7fac42676f861b6069d2bda 496501
00116.jp2
12fcf39bb6ca4b1d6c5851e5782db0e6 496422
00117.jp2
b892ec7e92fdcd21bfbf3a7e87a78b31 496491
00118.jp2
c448dfeaf7571350846649fa6fad4b1a 248613
00119.jp2
17b07ea5a38c541bd92259ac4268e54b 15760
00120.jp2
d9f94df1a589ded45c72af11d3395153 496471
00121.jp2
76431d0d97d5be47c79d548f820f294d
00122.jp2
079fff1015595164b9cd5c3f5c60273b
00123.jp2
0deaa108f473d197b5f82e2801c8577e 496485
00124.jp2
94cc46e9e5e849b8d1f7d2fab1ab117b 496452
00125.jp2
7d5ff7b7c75078d8c8ec932b4bbeacc1 496440
00126.jp2
4438000628652ee28918064c2e4deb54 321287
00127.jp2
1aa3db7317934ce83130af2bc52bb987
00128.jp2
1bf69156c8f6d373096db45715a6a4b1 496389
00129.jp2
c169693c5578eba275bad9bbad009179 496476
00130.jp2
1ded77b617e43ebf54ad44c07306b008
00131.jp2
a45cf30def47ad31b9b2f3a6da61a480 496399
00132.jp2
22ad8496fc6b29e82920e466cddec753 496458
00133.jp2
c566e4add69247cbfb9c4bfda901d698 496437
00134.jp2
c2b2470e24863ab55807100db083c969
00135.jp2
a87f99a43479111b88c42838c50170af 496467
00136.jp2
20c4e161cd18aff7a353aa8d4af4b989 496415
00137.jp2
2787af773d2ca6d01a3ed146bbd6b32a 496414
00138.jp2
1c112b90b2b594d63ab162a3afb26113 496398
00139.jp2
5da99620e0e63a40dcfc57222b895941
00140.jp2
0095e178baebd948355c7918d16b4f6e 496463
00141.jp2
3959ccea6af454f9f4e1d23d36556415
00142.jp2
bedb3c14a93d9e37bd6be9f5ac3d2c30
00143.jp2
90dcc2d06593be4184b1840756163243 496403
00144.jp2
9e36109fa645af31d00fe096938e15f3
00145.jp2
76d1728dc27f8184f444da5bfb34f971
00146.jp2
e53326b6bc2133f538a98e3932f7325f 496474
00147.jp2
c9800b20fd7e23bcaedabbbac6714d92 366288
00148.jp2
343ec367b7292f2edf6fc270cd636fe6 496427
00149.jp2
098b140287371c2995392bdb1556ab55
00150.jp2
8ca86a99962dd976c2e913e4e0c50f4a 499073
00151.jp2
58f2be22ea17756862b11065f4ee70f0 499057
00152.jp2
b712af8e4ece6cdb11d944b50bd0a5f5 499077
00153.jp2
44a7b81b24f4278abb77fdb698c274d6 499032
00154.jp2
2c092c5ac54467afe3231ba3e1eda8bf 499086
00155.jp2
a14f463c1f1b69b3dd3eec07417fe30b 498988
00156.jp2
c52fb4faa5d4fb4acf94322c61d9d8c3 498936
00157a.jp2
5c43369e3cdb0ab657f7cb2c82a40732 499066
00157b.jp2
056e365f621db1860cf5b55d5466b9c2 499084
00157c.jp2
f33e4281ca0d0302ba06c9fb1f651bcd 499063
00157d.jp2
28018584f3bf4c30df61440bb3d8ec65 499047
00157e.jp2
22e308029119c45798e40b42041ddcd6 499062
00157f.jp2
28668f7635c3ef34195e62953cf7705e 499082
00159.jp2
3932a6a130bf69ef537f8704030d772c 499079
00160.jp2
084146f7dad2fcdc4073a358d7b1d19c 498961
00161.jp2
7585b05d77bad282fa0217d88dcdf9ab 499075
00162.jp2
c9aede00d15f0e0fa107613ed8308e89 499051
00163.jp2
39b0eeac17159581555d09352295e4fa 499061
00164.jp2
104549568d09c403a0c76e5871d0e757 493943
00165.jp2
0746c9e84dbdf5d00386dba60f36382c 11804
00166.jp2
83b7f8a920bf7bb5396e1080ba04669e
00167.jp2
262f87c889ee6b082fd8203e2ed58723 499078
00168.jp2
fb535d64249ea5784cd068b499634166 498974
00169.jp2
16b22a25709be3c882d1da2e48270471 499031
00170.jp2
6065e91cdf49e927a17f9959a8d9bb6c 498971
00171.jp2
8484adad8900b58b64b75b3ae851076a
00172.jp2
587da4c3b8962f32335dc8a9a2d53f07 496435
00173.jp2
323f2b10c3811246e34e2cd237b73058 496360
00174.jp2
08d89f8469bef9c24c6c016e9bf38dcb 496434
00175.jp2
5b04708e16ab277536ec18990b5a5d0b 496419
00176.jp2
a2d10d7aedd350a756f5e1a61a6554a3 322488
00177.jp2
994ed6ce68a584bdee9a035f9137fc02
00178.jp2
64d16524ab20dcbf2219b73f55726f64 496429
00179.jp2
0fd46018819f5b530faee4095ffd52e3 496457
00180.jp2
27e24742ea45ece77a51e8937d33e37c 496396
00181.jp2
4c31cdb25ea88b2f2d1e6b152075a9f4
00182.jp2
612526210187b85395fee19d1dee1853
00183.jp2
36e3932406d19fdfe61934af65602b6e
00184.jp2
a453716fcc948e6f3ce4d1be1004316e
00185.jp2
fb03fd3aa125c4cfaebe585d4b7de556
00186.jp2
f30e7b9ebd0bc934166310fc2398e8d3 159853
00187.jp2
c8563673276c494a0452dd558ede7fae 15554
00188.jp2
86cd4190b200b39b0471a0606428ef41
00189.jp2
6a53eda045939fe98c1353c816583284 496494
00190.jp2
683ac2acd2d8ad53a6ff2f4757270d5f 496350
00191.jp2
eef9801ad01b87a1053b7a26674001e5
00192.jp2
8bc99da99d9beaf4eed27f3f3e7fbf27 340152
00193.jp2
b9430d6f26d2c973d6447b6c8097efed 391714
00194.jp2
b112a1c9231955ad41d8b90201635559 500535
00195.jp2
5ebb0997e6650bf5ffaf14215328f300 507041
00196.jp2
2d8cbe72f98960979adceea9dc3c5b9d
00197.jp2
30a8d844f53ba5e5641a466d215060af
00198.jp2
640a07aa4007c9f44e473ba1462a22f7
00199.jp2
74c975eb243f4b6a392c08e8333cee58 336647
00200.jp2
9a1658bb9000283ebd912f63dff42345 498919
00201.jp2
65b1206746586291fe77c53917e37bbb 498880
00202.jp2
fdc9eb9b8370b5ac0f5cfc1957b8d821 498901
00203.jp2
fa3a6b363cb0f24a7f5d2a618fdb1268 498900
00204.jp2
afe7eb4ce16daa49d04eaaa167af40bd 498856
00205.jp2
df51c2f7301209008f993efe848e6b5c 350378
00206.jp2
e223fd3af2aedea06ef551e0b0029ba5 498843
00207.jp2
70edfc6548c5e693b2ba7e2c126e44ed 498889
00208.jp2
d37e373dea6acf85a8fc7ad48fa8611b 498890
00209.jp2
a6cedb5440a4cafb7a47f17ebe45835c 498905
00210.jp2
c280be2cb3c2b09793553090dec7645d 498827
00211.jp2
9ba4b1a980b587dc1c1806cb575389d2 498882
00212.jp2
33bfbc0a7e95294b5bd22508fbe21d3a 498874
00213.jp2
93bf0a39c96661ae10a9e58994c6238c 498841
00214.jp2
b053c6a25754648d4546a5b59a5ad988 474544
00215.jp2
903cf102c1813c6fbd0b8368aff4b4cf 28256
00216.jp2
53bf599467a3976806455e7c7062d215 499037
00217.jp2
ddf184de7a1280dcae80b0d31688c8c6 499109
00218.jp2
fbcff1bbd9f1ffb82f5152f7a80060b9 351150
00219.jp2
a404863143f7da58b72ea5057610e41d 499119
00220.jp2
1197de9ce56b9ccd62d2072b7f905d93 499012
00221.jp2
e9b19ffccc208c26154beb49da9e9003 499137
00222.jp2
89b41e04853fb1ee9fb1537e71ad4190 499106
00223.jp2
947622c365b343b04e0723b54a0d0bb3 499114
00224.jp2
476c52acf5da680fac89b4706cc336c6 499093
00225.jp2
7106f7961a4f60365299a8bde5e65965 499113
00226.jp2
03de04b28938c4e398599186a968982d 499027
00227.jp2
5704499e9a7199455c5a6e04339fea11 499089
00228.jp2
a6545d84cb6c641a6b47f4017c678586 499136
00229.jp2
d0ade22259a62f7ab7a1e6c228a84ccd 470073
00230.jp2
9c3dde42a2fd4ca31559e30894ab0e78 499139
00231.jp2
9f2390acf06b674bd2e79f6aaf12e23c 499145
00232.jp2
9c44cc3206660a30b05ce030b6e0ae45 499043
00233.jp2
b2803fef426c4a794fe4648ab95a5f0d 499015
00234.jp2
dcce8f116d9d9065ed2ad69a8a046312 499009
00235.jp2
e35b34e9e3fbf459c479237df66b16b1 499010
00236.jp2
679d0f8dbd03fa5137116886c7fae404 499141
00237.jp2
ef043e41f8ee0844edf4d2fbaeddbaa0 499115
00238.jp2
7c0bd15ccf152b768430bdd4b1b9e964 499099
00239.jp2
b15a4cc15b828cced7a2e05ea242f163 15496
00240.jp2
8a81940b1eac880fc47df12730cf726b 499123
00241.jp2
c40a95251537b5276b1876edd492343e 499120
00242.jp2
d3d96ac54ab6ed5a8e7d900ed938cabf 499144
00243.jp2
6ffe5a7c6b073eeabd4e9abbca3896e3
00244.jp2
b28dd729382af4c00d84f4ae5b801560 499110
00245.jp2
a8753d110f2bb86c581ac0e6015e8626 499074
00246.jp2
a7bc383c9a4e53d90692648fafc2f45a 499072
00247.jp2
d9f200a38be8e035ab9872597cd8103f
00248.jp2
25ee5815325c372e9300db41297abb04 499083
00249.jp2
55382db7b6d51917489601ce1c20cb76
00250.jp2
849cac82f59b4a33da90b69c6ab17b03 498887
00251.jp2
d22f74c0e3e1ffccae0c6c0d47c84ad1 498913
00252.jp2
ed89332ec8a2952603b65ce1f729dc61 378601
00253.jp2
abd19de65b11afc22901de8af1fa3653 13971
00254.jp2
9b2807d88f7b5e1112df21e95ceb3b64 498807
00255.jp2
589e4e6683501cc3de59e3c5ea7a111a 498815
00256.jp2
08f38adcd58206349a07aa9c154a7b9a 498831
00257.jp2
342602de747a1a33c02890e495dc148b 498842
00258.jp2
b5fb028eda657c35df9652a765eb0bda 499094
00259.jp2
024afe081cf7f4cc526090b4acea6244 498909
00260.jp2
afbc33cd82c8dd87c7244798515f15db 499019
00261.jp2
0cdcd30001a8fd715207f3131aab23b1 499002
00262.jp2
b77400de23f0ce44b20d1796355d1824 509934
00263.jp2
b6ed54d9bbb26e201f539c093e5c58c8 498849
00264.jp2
c1c98e3e256601c250cb5dc63076ee73
00265.jp2
1bb5e70ddfaa0e801badba765c19ed1f 498894
00266.jp2
37eedaf1aed02ff01173c439c72cf295
00267.jp2
a886bbb22af8679a1260774cfa045a6f 498918
00268.jp2
d661a874aac6fd757d314a703844adf3 498857
00269.jp2
c1fe50e61d9641621f258c1af231e487 26417
00270.jp2
26866771d594c03d5955e303dcb3c158
00271.jp2
9976524b1560da6d8315998a773baabb 498802
00272.jp2
5727a9e40aa545ae179a3e2fdf1a1261
00277.jp2
92ca6feeeab80fe46458aa7db87afc8d 498778
00278.jp2
e832843facbd50cf509b64ab494d446c 419952
00279.jp2
1449e8d0528e08d823dfaaf0bed83d22 498895
00280.jp2
22519322a5087a14fc4e46b180fd3aa9
00281.jp2
c92f8fa4053c37dad2069b74a12554e5 475911
00282.jp2
0920d3684d882198cd44640ce91f0c1b 498864
00283.jp2
6c54878adaac7abcbf686a2c4af7e591 498911
00284.jp2
9bf96874ee5e5931ce61684bf2a472bf
00285.jp2
c02c5cef4a0501ef01527db2f2c22be9 498910
00286.jp2
8c8aec4027b6aad5aa23ee2ea8cd1bed
00287.jp2
5acda7c5953e31153e00b7c82ae7b90a
00288.jp2
faba55391d56d7eb80f791d9f735b40f 498845
00289.jp2
8a7fdb06cf0e967135d40fc51b9549bd 482979
00290.jp2
2646415caa1a1452ba281cffcd2a29f3 498788
00291.jp2
3cc7676de0d8334fd6df405a9ae87331
00292.jp2
88dc4de2e3d046562e1ae2b85723508e
00293.jp2
1917e7f784dc18e5ba08fdac692394cf 498851
00294.jp2
07276f5c6994e683990a1ee6daafbd10 498811
00295.jp2
e138c7540d2de075b458363ad44798bf 498855
00296.jp2
c180590722e801147ce3c289bdb9ad26 498908
00297.jp2
14c38f82fa60ba485f2c8ff4ab19b3cd 405662
00298.jp2
3360868737955df5db9495ef73a0464c 334815
00299.jp2
e9352761b4e98c1e098a022625688d65 498917
00300.jp2
fdcafe166318339ee8655f931121c3a9 426398
00301.jp2
96c88321d5cfc640f981749dad755fe2 498801
00302.jp2
911d00306416bc8d7effe3ba56d215f5 498897
00303.jp2
1d3bc3d13a883a5e227122b221b764d2 498896
00304.jp2
e1cc7efab314f7245debcb1ecac361c7 498848
00305.jp2
0ef6786e5c0a65cdfdb32a6b1ef8049a
00306.jp2
8dd7e355dfd912cf534e7d148c77bf0c
00307.jp2
eb27790d5ca1aafa6326765d1719924b 498899
00308.jp2
9d28b486a9214dd4f3542571efda6224
00309.jp2
fe2fb720b06240e4d6863d8d63ba3248 498833
00310.jp2
d5c1e667f556ff4973c6fb8b4a31eed1 498837
00311.jp2
e83d6329049a2e9fa31c74ecc2358931
00312.jp2
8287c8b7c05ccd24ed49e795f373fc94 498915
00313.jp2
1018961a2e5c7952902fad6274d10267 504359
00314.jp2
b7f3432ee1a445c8b5c66d167ea0bc5d 453552
00315.jp2
4ddcb746a0d5650dfbfb98519e376d7b 498854
00316.jp2
63dd0eeaa015a39893b6fe9231593df9 498769
00317.jp2
0031a05708a2762058a1f25eb6190b61 498898
00318.jp2
5d71dda3d95e1be58f6e2c7bac56ed40
00319.jp2
c55be2de5f622a9402118bd49e695479
00320.jp2
e18c96805c19288fc92f64bb5a86c28a 498862
00321.jp2
f17eac758b684a7d42910954761e6e5b
00322.jp2
3d14222b694c70c8adf3402e389579a4 498912
00323.jp2
0ae0a7be321a0237bdedc3de88d278f8 18770
00324.jp2
96e285110f439775549f20112a7a389e 498870
00325.jp2
4fcfa88c821c78d571169e7a75692f25
00326.jp2
6b128a02c80fd78ac8b7a517f671a54d 498876
00327.jp2
e4fac1e199eef3db63ded8bde68b2dc4 498858
00328.jp2
c94b444cf50640cd34f0065aabd27c47
00329.jp2
3ea0e6a2f3fafd343bdeb356ff3753ea 498805
00330.jp2
befca7f06354fadafa729277c5e701ed 498789
00331.jp2
9a3dd8499b22f34b2119e5593f5c6b7b 498859
00332.jp2
d4bac382b306db5bacbef5505b87445c 498903
00333.jp2
5b89da63d6e0393fc7b32287d167c3e4 498869
00334.jp2
bcda87764a7a34613a2d017376929007
00335.jp2
cf5601b1ee8f16d15cfe476287817f16 15988
00336.jp2
a6df9d65141edd990390887d71c00e06 498865
00337.jp2
f1d1c63491c9e20521b44f4e3b7bd940 498871
00338.jp2
0171c1cff36cd52928ca867f75c8a870 498794
00339.jp2
d472c610014479a50e0a8a084d3dd59d 498891
00340.jp2
500e4ceb1eb77cc3983cb117f469c65a 498906
00341.jp2
e5641c033edc689b3c2b935985c51d4b 498809
00342.jp2
733273e641a3dfed1bfe88b70efdc53b 498772
00343.jp2
c07cc9eb860b7cb8a0ab7dc43d20e56b 498835
00344.jp2
0ba8b078a27ec053de327ce76798de12 498881
00345.jp2
2237676a06e9c78fbbed5c92e3c00114
00346.jp2
88e93790e8de2d56a9b67cf17ac9625e 498907
00347.jp2
59b158814686624dea06fb88e22226eb
00348.jp2
e5f9653dadba594a622978d0879d7c93 498879
00349.jp2
5f27fa34f98c63f4a6fc029e6e951e55
00350.jp2
4a02296005101078c17e10badda8030b 498916
00351.jp2
d71a3137b82d5fb6540e7b8aaa64eec0 263706
00352.jp2
527305816774669864b4cb4f4652df12 498839
00353.jp2
387c37cf30d1fa24304bcb785842c14f 498885
00354.jp2
af24a91d844ff014a25685e75a9fe322
00355.jp2
d6b107f410a13dae4c1cc701c1e3ea22
00356.jp2
c089f2ebc20421be7be62bb3c7402bed 331862
00357.jp2
2506e85bcc5a02ef4bac9e36e65f9803 498863
00358.jp2
49b468406a9e3641b711fe732c81ea10
00359.jp2
1ea811b2775b0bf98c151595169b1b08 498861
00360.jp2
090963286f9853e5522e231b5139a9bb 498770
00361.jp2
e60273f3547ce338ac9b1ebb320fc412
00362.jp2
fcfe7eea8f21b8c1f5785081138ef920 498813
00363.jp2
0c92344f75d44f897e742ae4889032d2
00364.jp2
5854b9a45d3b1a84c69a070ae58700eb 498844
00365.jp2
55808b7894d27cf9012d3d75018915c0 438037
00366.jp2
cc5eabfbe539539943673312a0f68732 498819
00367.jp2
940c0dddcc894e7b10b968588ed0681e
00368.jp2
e835e7ceb980a5d6e5ef31b74a2ca54d
00369.jp2
fbf92a387a0bf0811e84ef51af01a1f3
00370.jp2
632c6abaf2da4cedd179a2d1cbba7012 498821
00371.jp2
62cd6b673909a42abe86e1eb950682ec
00372.jp2
c78e9a85d0537cf902ebd74d90d7e57f
00373.jp2
3acf57d2140d30a37386283dc12a81e4
00374.jp2
ae960be9a4024efe608dbfb6dde242f3
00375.jp2
cb6515af373334901e93ba5a2ce68d69
00376.jp2
b7228a897ea8925064e8c1b1a0ca24a4 248402
00377.jp2
b28b4ad8606e62ad19bc0fbd632e5267
00378.jp2
7cfb9532ba051633346cff2c72481a79 498875
00379.jp2
01e4a7ffec1f54d107101f96babcdafa
00380.jp2
639643dff7a39e8e25874b2e08bdf03c 498893
00381.jp2
d43272cb0b04624cec33bfcaae797168 14139
00382.jp2
722e8a0ddd5314c7a49638d637233e9a 498838
00383.jp2
a38d2cc41c640c8e174901695c61391e 498782
00384.jp2
bc4f98ee80a179a148bcacb54e3739cc 498823
00385.jp2
46ef82d73cded6cb42af2ebccfcfc7f6
00386.jp2
f7ad5d1c973023d3a32395350e588eea
00387.jp2
3881c7b20b54fa3cb901c640b5f2d875 498829
00388.jp2
b0062808a649cd3adb8f35291e4bed4c
00389.jp2
818cbda1cad8914018bcd4a439392216
00390.jp2
c08139f7714569bb32a3a710c2052cbd
00391.jp2
83e7bd884fbd2740ede96d902d9efa90
00392.jp2
2402b49d784dd417287deb8c88291124 498902
00393.jp2
e9126f24504ca8a5000ab7f658fb9b10
00394.jp2
f98be3f33c164bb9dfe559c7bf493669 498853
00395.jp2
917d9c15eeadb5feca21907a704b45ff
00396.jp2
60cf2b3b0d6e23ac972e664b46e18eee 498847
00397.jp2
8a0df70bb2a54dd44042dc779e8e9ae5
00398.jp2
a3fb3f6a51632e8f2e0e6fa3f625837d
00399.jp2
c408d26c4a9fdd69c906ab6620d43037
00400.jp2
0cb355aebb8433da73df2b321d9928ef 498768
00401.jp2
4d609a402c5994e8c19aacaea5085c83
00402.jp2
b2888a9c6ded0257a9812d82bb4898a2 498824
00403.jp2
19b7c2fbd25f83a83635be64da6a2ef5 191793
00404.jp2
bfa3c9ab79f6a3021dd8dba41d711d3b
00405.jp2
4f86da41e0e9656ddd5f25788ae31ce2
00406.jp2
c18308b3935a115459746617376d3d30
00407.jp2
75c26a98932915fb18a37059108225c7 498888
00408.jp2
a1ba8265bd77f005801d27cef5de50bb 460894
00409.jp2
a3ef9976cafdef7ac4bc4ec200a5e475 16659
00410.jp2
d75187c7aa5a8bb77a8ee132e4ec0593
00411.jp2
2b78df4f224dd2407906a188e2975192
00412.jp2
f841b3c0e6a917cbd0fe128cff992320 498846
00413.jp2
40ae4663f55602e8c29e79c9f902af6e 498867
00414.jp2
a383df1b3c912c309552e9bfade89210
00415.jp2
f073d1294f9217a5a69a8cc3fa6dbcb0
00416.jp2
6ece1f1809ed7e9aeec5d340d08b8726
00417.jp2
b1d12ba5af2ba4ee4f783a63001f1ca8
00418.jp2
07b56d111ed5ab971a330f4c0ed751a1 498808
00419.jp2
992cf5e5b57ddffed52d690e5faf8d97
00420.jp2
34ecff1e88f065b640494a2a059037a3
00421.jp2
8e2e101dfde0e61e8edba96a9c0b85b1
00422.jp2
54445ab9fc85c4022545b2a831358792
00423.jp2
65062502fe8c5da1c9414b026527ba5c
00424.jp2
7dbba6ec2d84e5ef2d1da6b3455bbd93
00425.jp2
f704369de2bb5786237beafdaf5ff9a2 498877
00426.jp2
9e4a8fb5dc8669877ece6d082cfcf12a
00427.jp2
92431d61b3e8e25c4036ad328ac10cd8 137361
00428.jp2
8bf58a2fdebf57b07bccbabe6b7a3dd1
00429.jp2
593c44004f0c2fa5810446735c0ea94d 502675
00430.jp2
6fc5ebcaf0c8ad40cd70293ff93c8b2d
00431.jp2
c395cc10aa76fd46e66ccace71be175e
00432.jp2
32155446da9f027983518b8aac7e2065
00433.jp2
7a847d1f3498ee31e1df4d4a927d05f2 498816
00434.jp2
9e1d7e0470e9b5229ce275c36321873d 498785
00435.jp2
0f89467f4952a6f1a47fb53dc1ead0e4 401250
00436.jp2
02f31dfb352749e05a0cfe5064638818
00437.jp2
abe8349148dfc09b0005ceee8495202c
00438.jp2
a3b5b74ff15580d246481fe51454fc5b 498914
00439.jp2
ebe423b8f846d58a2d41b8cc91ea2305
00440.jp2
acf987389c1e714f335fd11ed3f2e42a 474095
00441.jp2
17a5e9c502107cd8ce427a7eed645686
00442.jp2
402d28908a43b172d500cf6bc3de2b26
00443.jp2
f4b9e08aaa1698dcf2539d2064dc1fb3
00444.jp2
0d7a1a56baa8da61a985f6bf4216f671
00445.jp2
2d57474cd285bdadfeed6a0dadf3a113
00446.jp2
9649b1e8b8d2a64eecc67fcaf47c8037
00447.jp2
238223d817d6a22725719fd98fddc3a1 498803
00448.jp2
5aaa4f59ad565b9c910a649871bfaa40
00449.jp2
5da247e8402ba16df215a08699870768
00450.jp2
cb5405337f6ca36493ead397d65a1c44
00451.jp2
006aa4949fb3fe7324aa75b58d6f9155
00452.jp2
cd13d8a03d0e14c335e7b49bada6cd6f
00453.jp2
4d5d6c64fddaf778f8e4686100cc4f3d
00454.jp2
a0f5b6353e3b8a818016c8922f08232d
00455.jp2
58119520510e37598a4d083d0b9c3af7 517043
00456.jp2
abf9f81ba135ca8b943476bf4faeef94
00457.jp2
a7049106c94b7215a2ef2be7e72f4ae2 515019
00458.jp2
a98eaae63737f6e326c3d3249dceb781
00459.jp2
b8fdb63399c6901b69fe498958ee3d31 478561
00460.jp2
6d7c80b50a63cabd9bdc31b88ac36e7a
00461.jp2
fbae3573d42ad13b660acfcc6d381746
00462.jp2
bce90d0f6388756e14cb45aff34d53ee
00463.jp2
a6e0be609b0c85ac1598344712246770
00464.jp2
051ab9434ced8d8bf96c3398162d07e5
00465.jp2
6652c3483e8df52832ba9dd1b4bf206c
00466.jp2
d259a665463f4c8b7f0260aca3271591
00467.jp2
44eafd535a8180099061436270ee9921
00468.jp2
1f830a607b03b05886796a9c21d0263c
00469.jp2
12cddd5db83416e2a9abc41583424985
00470.jp2
1fb3baa1f49efe37f5851d682c530d27
00471.jp2
fc18664b28d0be884bf7650e5e856c5f
00472.jp2
imagejpeg 75a3e791ae77fc10199987d2623de857 36267
00001.jpg
JPEG1.2 ed3236bc7bac5e67494372cb2b2c5e87 24571
00001.QC.jpg
c6617795ca8f2a738c9afdd5102ca096 33150
00002.jpg
JPEG2.2 d09c88808c90b5f46f47d9ed336584a6 23041
00002.QC.jpg
5eeb63ceab58ab669f2149aea096ae22 64247
00003.jpg
JPEG3.2 47a1ee448329263df93c18e7b7d987d4 35255
00003.QC.jpg
ab613838255fa51924d48364c3a09d4c 143211
00004.jpg
JPEG4.2 abc9925e121d23083e6a1d53e0068b4a 55702
00004.QC.jpg
2ce7e333a24639d07491d75b241ec7da 126640
00005.jpg
JPEG5.2 c3d7748307fda21390b94111ed9eac71 55652
00005.QC.jpg
2a0dad87e2decb83abf9b9e96c18d847 183552
00006.jpg
JPEG6.2 0d6933c7fafcaab05d971086590577a7 78107
00006.QC.jpg
b93e78281c5c754861e27923b8d67f71 195097
00007.jpg
JPEG7.2 00b53cb868fbfc8a29c95b25e4f2e83d 81243
00007.QC.jpg
f6fe2738f0ccf1983f6391cf326c4935 76774
00008.jpg
JPEG8.2 660d81a222e3c69664e9139457168a89 38577
00008.QC.jpg
c58c95f1daef9209c923cfc73407e9f5 149209
00009.jpg
JPEG9.2 6132e29d01ba2fb00ac06e70351259bb 65917
00009.QC.jpg
d18c0417b8da01ff66ee43077a27e348 179723
00010.jpg
JPEG10.2 215a308a3108982590dc36027d9b5549 81195
00010.QC.jpg
fbb17f88559fa96c5df6448b7ee4f8aa 203416
00011.jpg
JPEG11.2 25423b71e35353ad7e233ef15e01167c 83077
00011.QC.jpg
48355c96b6f2e201bfa2ac1bda42bf81 186051
00012.jpg
JPEG12.2 8a62ab9ad44b9be1d1d407e87ae83de5 79505
00012.QC.jpg
6518810ee24f4b2239a58d807bbd028a 191381
00013.jpg
JPEG13.2 5844bb027958ecb32a2c156347e52702 80472
00013.QC.jpg
0b3127604a7edfd2b9974514f8d2a008 181591
00014.jpg
JPEG14.2 6e074612152cc5d03f2e12143f2c6137 76927
00014.QC.jpg
e78b6f0704e9246d07fbe20c0d2f4489 209959
00015.jpg
JPEG15.2 a656431f9cac0bdd8bbd9d0ba4728d08 74693
00015.QC.jpg
a9f83c6ea3fd72d110408ffccbfed7d5 285597
00016.jpg
JPEG16.2 f056111c16915f6e5235546cdfa76e72 98084
00016.QC.jpg
d851160024bd6cab93638c14ce9a7011 289647
00017.jpg
JPEG17.2 946385c9057e24ab992a97632c110ec3 98651
00017.QC.jpg
2b979d5f458f982bc1ec42339cfd5b6f 269185
00018.jpg
JPEG18.2 e35edaa0558ff979f5f883ea4927d6e2 95128
00018.QC.jpg
6555cfafe6755a26b96f14663b3c0aa7 252432
00019.jpg
JPEG19.2 26a3cd9cd98d2b81b065ae8256294edf 89839
00019.QC.jpg
afe83fc93cfaf90bf4a1c14bcfd1a521 292204
00020.jpg
JPEG20.2 6f5362565b8cba4b3a8a339a33a8d42c 100344
00020.QC.jpg
2fb16f025c25075f16e4418670f5d0c9 60492
00021.jpg
JPEG21.2 5f5b3bcf532f9ecb643d5499cf4eaad7 32160
00021.QC.jpg
179336ebb4f04f2abf4a63c9c44c8b3d 214860
00023.jpg
JPEG22.2 9d85c186abc021468e628cf49f4ed0fe 79083
00023.QC.jpg
b63cf00096b5fa746983089631029099 289849
00024.jpg
JPEG23.2 921b9b1af9f13a7382bf45361d92ebec 100715
00024.QC.jpg
26b44670086b31f072b549d606d2779f 291475
00025.jpg
JPEG24.2 5620c9b7bb93c062b7ed0f3c91cdd913 98081
00025.QC.jpg
04e42bf7374853d43ebb2fdc7bd76d4c 274438
00026.jpg
JPEG25.2 e875562673f5e9c18bc53bc047f0f5cf 96879
00026.QC.jpg
1be5a6ebeac043f66579b612c850ee03 280842
00027.jpg
JPEG26.2 3e827cc5bd6ff83408157bc09cff91da 95318
00027.QC.jpg
678dfbb51e299937d827d9a9ea9c609e 299885
00028.jpg
JPEG27.2 fd8151799062dc9bd3f45ce4a17afbb1 102915
00028.QC.jpg
2d932bbf515eb9a9ae27d99788f8f700 275430
00029.jpg
JPEG28.2 3ab4c3682fbea4c4d136f624799ccc70 96512
00029.QC.jpg
27bae76e52eb631a58af602fef5bd7b4 268592
00030.jpg
JPEG29.2 1cad5fd6996ce9809755fb4be651777c 94464
00030.QC.jpg
d59dd1014ea0c80cd4072ff3039f0a6b 280620
00031.jpg
JPEG30.2 3ac9b12916d892d98c7ea04eb5812aca 98166
00031.QC.jpg
75664784c21866f7b35b5d65a61461a9 296035
00032.jpg
JPEG31.2 2a0e53a2834c57dbff353b13af3132c7 102633
00032.QC.jpg
61aba96c974c59bbfa3e69fc18ef9b29 296813
00033.jpg
JPEG32.2 0d7d2996ccebf40111c46ca46c786343 101089
00033.QC.jpg
9c37b79a403baf36a13eda74e1665c38 304326
00034.jpg
JPEG33.2 f645ab39425e26ecf22266ee477e4a8c 104264
00034.QC.jpg
0e635dc1d995770747c9935899fa04a7 300118
00035.jpg
JPEG34.2 097dc51917a39e213ad0594321265ec0 101505
00035.QC.jpg
c9d1c0f50d7fbb76d07aa55973e85da0 283565
00036.jpg
JPEG35.2 d6530d29a993432a724b705549c8a56b 98396
00036.QC.jpg
5d7d6df9db659d8f94efcebc350b43f1 287717
00037.jpg
JPEG36.2 49c7ec224ab8b7d12ee1af7c9755f812 99626
00037.QC.jpg
1f5a862753cec36929aeeaacc24504b6 291575
00038.jpg
JPEG37.2 6863926ce36a06778a50aef4790ba397 101063
00038.QC.jpg
b1ba43db8014b04f9cfbb4ec608f1a7f 282094
00039.jpg
JPEG38.2 1678b47af53cf8ccd7214fcf727342eb 97388
00039.QC.jpg
89936b2fda921225c827d48c553ca7c3 110215
00040.jpg
JPEG39.2 3e187dbad09dcc8ec4a6b11fb5ae47d6 49418
00040.QC.jpg
ad21983efdcc9dfabac6014b4e811d4d 213134
00041.jpg
JPEG40.2 2334506c7b01e44be76078db838cfd52 78427
00041.QC.jpg
8a4326066162bdd16c1ba63c31f3e383 283156
00042.jpg
JPEG41.2 d040f4e8b8940f56b94561c0f187b41c 98462
00042.QC.jpg
a59fbd649cf132af4e11f90f0e7b3dc7 261259
00043.jpg
JPEG42.2 2b076f689fef7d8c1784cc0efbf212b8 92510
00043.QC.jpg
4a3c6cd8792cfe06c225429de255cef0 72944
00044.jpg
JPEG43.2 2c9f06f62466ffacbaea451ace0185a1 37947
00044.QC.jpg
f0d69736101e3e4da8116ed642ccb9db 65983
00045.jpg
JPEG44.2 31beed30d0e72850b41b0862e0f3d9d4 34868
00045.QC.jpg
7e023b25d4a5f34175bdb84b48a7f257 62824
00046.jpg
JPEG45.2 cc7d2b32cad531c56e271cf9c0b3811d 33631
00046.QC.jpg
1c351bd315aa61ec286fbb9c2f5c6681 147553
00047.jpg
JPEG46.2 317883fe9e8493cda964da2a07eb63ee 62276
00047.QC.jpg
325fd449f075219dba7187056f769249 149055
00048.jpg
JPEG47.2 8293066f041a65a58d12c486ad2a30dc 61703
00048.QC.jpg
36b734c8fecb4f7ffb51dfc838faa535 150578
00049.jpg
JPEG48.2 a6471ede95558f15851a44f65faac84a 64360
00049.QC.jpg
d8c056b4232bbe0a6ec5f94c85e2e912 264869
00050.jpg
JPEG49.2 a18097988b56ebecb5699002d8f26fc4 92726
00050.QC.jpg
f0420b7601893e584e60172c7c21d1ad 181931
00051.jpg
JPEG50.2 ab20e0d8746670c252e5dc9be30ca4a2 72955
00051.QC.jpg
e0d87e5fe23b0be859d418202bbd60cb 279726
00052.jpg
JPEG51.2 5b58d7c815a90ae020afbc8f0b329a5f 98994
00052.QC.jpg
ab8e61941c0e7a9e2017311e189e7e09 277198
00053.jpg
JPEG52.2 91a6f27b016bfbd4ebaba597082962cd 98763
00053.QC.jpg
3540ef2456c27811a5738dc1786f54a4 279769
00054.jpg
JPEG53.2 ad5a50370f4e83fb89c9486fabe8b6e7 98189
00054.QC.jpg
32eba5237d30e2edf2c51cfa7f672cb7 204446
00055.jpg
JPEG54.2 26421b9fc43a5f5f9562ad6c2a8b9d80 78936
00055.QC.jpg
b7eb4ca378812f5f44ba890d1e6926b4 205520
00056.jpg
JPEG55.2 0d16ff7f402b629e230c36d6d55edc00 74442
00056.QC.jpg
06a7cb1da1802fec5bd1ac98163409e1 94072
00057.jpg
JPEG56.2 3045952c3c491590e4d8a017737cd8e8 42317
00057.QC.jpg
5f200084f3032a020b84a036cf203855 22490
00058.jpg
JPEG57.2 1b9f8987bf8529ca61b00d36ba9ad2f9 19329
00058.QC.jpg
1a4d5ec5b5ee11bded098f6ca6721e62 230967
00059.jpg
JPEG58.2 d28568720416d1b6ffcc58ccd7048696 83386
00059.QC.jpg
af62b93001d79424afec1aea1520ea38 274789
00060.jpg
JPEG59.2 f077963a3f1d86e3d7700ec9074632e0 97608
00060.QC.jpg
d71f3515cd712c9982aeb54afc1fa766 279941
00061.jpg
JPEG60.2 3c23dc2c966253348a9d54d7b5622222 97733
00061.QC.jpg
12657e65fca3764b6bed2dadf8056f12 306724
00062.jpg
JPEG61.2 64d8e89cc9852e5f06056c9534f905bf 104400
00062.QC.jpg
54d175896629bff33c5ec22c07a4ed9c 298439
00063.jpg
JPEG62.2 323565ab8cc08cde89f7d94cdc6ab850 101400
00063.QC.jpg
a8204293f3c5da45b4b7fa1e5992dd97 266026
00064.jpg
JPEG63.2 10376bd679b17396fac906cfa80e2957 94671
00064.QC.jpg
10d9021d0daec1da433188a88c1948a9 288604
00065.jpg
JPEG64.2 dc73e08e9b3cf09607cf9e0ac87ff372 99630
00065.QC.jpg
0424ca75ce3feb4640960f0e43cf12b4 279998
00066.jpg
JPEG65.2 a95ad1f78ced8c7937137675a0649ee6 98463
00066.QC.jpg
22e8d5859e874c7e6b019d8ecb8f31b9 248973
00067.jpg
JPEG66.2 a12aed0d7f349988527691675e36a480 88783
00067.QC.jpg
a44ac4c6e19ede51d00ce104e170c28d 152855
00068.jpg
JPEG67.2 c5dac1a0dd532560f3670a110dd482e7 65029
00068.QC.jpg
5ce4d5c3c5b8c61fd870fff79e098db6 185625
00069.jpg
JPEG68.2 afe91101bfdd8285cf69a253bb2af009 75303
00069.QC.jpg
4794d5b7988761d5aea2452c44d6ed39 170990
00070.jpg
JPEG69.2 3ee558b1a5314dca7907217f01ba5a12 68738
00070.QC.jpg
0106c7d591d9005eaa2f58a753f275e5 202837
00071.jpg
JPEG70.2 f6329822b30afbd37c62203afa6b4528 76417
00071.QC.jpg
619a4d358c5403c9fd47fa88b2448913 287426
00072.jpg
JPEG71.2 508e317310070adcdccc1d49a1afdf57 100997
00072.QC.jpg
e0d76d1afd1171985a8eb90410720a0a 246359
00073.jpg
JPEG72.2 adbf5767d332e27abe85ea01dc0145ba 90799
00073.QC.jpg
29c5aba9a926bc7ac336781fde595d82 269846
00074.jpg
JPEG73.2 fdb3f63a109d95e98b74d7fa8feef80c 96566
00074.QC.jpg
805f46a5bcfef98ef078bc88620f12db 278290
00075.jpg
JPEG74.2 1878b57e03f8f6433aa66586349e660f 97773
00075.QC.jpg
4209f8c2028d37aa8e565a738a496b69 289000
00076.jpg
JPEG75.2 ef87704505029b4e4a5063f04482f3db 100239
00076.QC.jpg
57b2998a61b7d28d9ce03fec2291eaa0 291278
00077.jpg
JPEG76.2 191cc6bb5e97582137ad058662e0d7ca 101474
00077.QC.jpg
8a0ebee09445a018cf195749a1330740 294779
00078.jpg
JPEG77.2 9c804692affe584de567fccd691a9a33 102247
00078.QC.jpg
e2da78b8d2e994f9bfdb368756a353c8 261840
00079.jpg
JPEG78.2 e453663840f055f1b0d895dce1d3e7c1 94903
00079.QC.jpg
2300a5373c15f3eda134a12b1084156f 248634
00080.jpg
JPEG79.2 e65e065e7fb11c467cd259a0e35c565d 89883
00080.QC.jpg
1a1c12f4dd0f3fcb2828f21ae0bc894a 50470
00081.jpg
JPEG80.2 4797a281ef90bbea30e47310b9381193 28541
00081.QC.jpg
fa1f52033411bf87086e06a28c2cb9a5 22072
00082.jpg
JPEG81.2 3d7e1524ee7176880a10c05b174626ee 19174
00082.QC.jpg
5e6bf4f9ef6cc68cb0d2e01a7625a52f 229557
00083.jpg
JPEG82.2 1b5878da533bc3f6a3a79781d7ed2d94 82490
00083.QC.jpg
78da1aa9bc47db32e68bd1d2869b3674 249986
00084.jpg
JPEG83.2 4b195f1c547423dda771fc322ea587b1 90247
00084.QC.jpg
cc159c65f154425c3cdebe9ff58ca664 277067
00085.jpg
JPEG84.2 656a5a663c7c286b4c76e2513115e288 97477
00085.QC.jpg
624293d31de8c2a97d2be07f4acb88ca 273338
00086.jpg
JPEG85.2 2f0064be61c7dac27dee75f03fb5a4af 95706
00086.QC.jpg
ea0fc54ec8eecd463504fbf17d428b20 259930
00087.jpg
JPEG86.2 0913a52de4722c5702577fec31fd65ba 91771
00087.QC.jpg
aeac2b8969ec7447cff2649efe778f9a 262775
00088.jpg
JPEG87.2 0da97cac45cc8db2b740f76f10ed901c 94377
00088.QC.jpg
7038daaba9a4f845f108b249e967cd73 276872
00089.jpg
JPEG88.2 147713fd6a1f06b872c2721ae099ed64 95931
00089.QC.jpg
c2b767036b515d2faed737111160036e 276860
00090.jpg
JPEG89.2 34f1db25886c97ed92f799721d9e493c 95922
00090.QC.jpg
8933fc4c65f7c1118ebbddfc4a5430f4 240499
00091.jpg
JPEG90.2 5dd9f7c8b3f5a8ba678be35c690433e5 85517
00091.QC.jpg
4c75e74cb0f619198344c4df2287b8ea 198009
00092.jpg
JPEG91.2 581c5dbf16df34cc35d94476f939eda0 76345
00092.QC.jpg
c15ac9148b4737b3603c54f4b9289a6a 226159
00093.jpg
JPEG92.2 12af3816e3dcefbc5dc9d308d60b72d7 84720
00093.QC.jpg
397463a07a2d75342f03100ccd51646d 166231
00094.jpg
JPEG93.2 69795359b61ea773a91ac3a956aa582b 68121
00094.QC.jpg
ed2a227458bc99c8258b3728fd5a1168 235495
00095.jpg
JPEG94.2 3e7c07a210cbd106ee5062abb8a8661a 85238
00095.QC.jpg
941faad0bb39a5d6382df022029a75af 272613
00096.jpg
JPEG95.2 cc2b594a9344b2dc7d0917cd83ee5d8b 96215
00096.QC.jpg
24ef72ed461cc6a4e2e75bb9a0297b82 248972
00097.jpg
JPEG96.2 fa141253dce71426e28ceb780bd7804f 91349
00097.QC.jpg
9a430c744ca3e203016ba540421428be 231509
00098.jpg
JPEG97.2 fab9acf0f8f17b31a306980119508602 87043
00098.QC.jpg
f82f3063fd103d2542ab6a38e5499cfc 270049
00099.jpg
JPEG98.2 23d2b348700a908c0c5f97874bb88340 96462
00099.QC.jpg
dc58dcd55e7fd8bf027ecb370178a7b1 268895
00100.jpg
JPEG99.2 d57b2c023c6f13a77f1e5a7682205a37 94534
00100.QC.jpg
fc0fe846df7c0bc0a70f8c8107fceef3 280121
00101.jpg
JPEG100.2 3668dd845308268eb4cde855aac9ad64 96781
00101.QC.jpg
ef0bfa8f53a668b476fb67ac0ee8a40b 286038
00102.jpg
JPEG101.2 ffb73a9a186aecb424f1aec9482cd135 99326
00102.QC.jpg
b527e1166428ae9d588696a00f07a161 287200
00103.jpg
JPEG102.2 a30d0b0b56b62d32097a4b0bb8323199 97919
00103.QC.jpg
f18fd99c81e0a96c22054d1a360ff30c 282453
00104.jpg
JPEG103.2 6b6ca6f162f718fdc4936d52ae03b493 98351
00104.QC.jpg
71c3bb047fc8e6d9a6d6eb5a037b3d02 292523
00105.jpg
JPEG104.2 a5167eaf256ac487cddcbb9e106050e0 99952
00105.QC.jpg
084334c776baa72b75bbb9d57b8010ca 280164
00106.jpg
JPEG105.2 347047049997dbdfca31640b72df0c45 97565
00106.QC.jpg
5acffc77b70ca8886aa8294ff0ebaf32 227928
00107.jpg
JPEG106.2 e5ecda4ec9933a4f8bb9a37f2697bd4d 83485
00107.QC.jpg
01c00e578237775f7d9ba3f1cdeb3a2f 126200
00108.jpg
JPEG107.2 9ed39ed497d213447d9d1854d67b2b3a 54642
00108.QC.jpg
b15f0008b1a97975ce87896fc8cbbc5d 239029
00109.jpg
JPEG108.2 0ac6d59cc9d1579a5cfe96c47ed9e2b4 85457
00109.QC.jpg
8c99c51be6e612b28170b35678d7432e 243805
00110.jpg
JPEG109.2 69271a3ec23d57040db71128d705fc36 87938
00110.QC.jpg
2408329b5976331250d4514b54c51f33 282892
00111.jpg
JPEG110.2 a6962febdb818613a2831ef18feaf0fd 98514
00111.QC.jpg
ea39e6dcc770ff34b3a4bed788f98a63 273462
00112.jpg
JPEG111.2 2e5474214777cf92e188f8acdc6509cb 96617
00112.QC.jpg
21228ae4008d7bec2544800329361d7c 263095
00113.jpg
JPEG112.2 84c11bd7aa6cbb257337b3f65550860c 91552
00113.QC.jpg
4643e2a9a2c22df35747bb9163055508 257629
00114.jpg
JPEG113.2 8f0d8dd8842708254a3a231908c42c04 91703
00114.QC.jpg
36c12a49283943350c6b258183161cc7 281408
00115.jpg
JPEG114.2 bd1b7e0779534fabc2112b6eb1abce8f 98622
00115.QC.jpg
9f3762dfa6d29fdb84562d130841ad76 246217
00116.jpg
JPEG115.2 c7e4e653481b117420446d61acb5374b 88386
00116.QC.jpg
3b1617ac3b915e53e0b06a006cbe2e29 223365
00117.jpg
JPEG116.2 06995af48a741b6cd69c38c8714efb00 82419
00117.QC.jpg
800fb6bf77df2a6e0a78fdea8e6b37f7 218232
00118.jpg
JPEG117.2 141cc5f054549f8d082aa46012c0f529 83897
00118.QC.jpg
eee4f51fb9e65fd82c756129370e9959 65751
00119.jpg
JPEG118.2 452a017fbb9c1a2cce1971d25399f648 34253
00119.QC.jpg
a0c16aa789d7e94876f4e6bb0d7a6df1 22196
00120.jpg
JPEG119.2 dd183f3cd1dd2f13a972b40ce44fdf04 19310
00120.QC.jpg
b33abedd922e26c1728aae55420dd57b 205430
00121.jpg
JPEG120.2 ceecac591de4b7ffc93c8c2a20f3d60c 76175
00121.QC.jpg
576e511c54bd6088114b5324d6c67a45 274343
00122.jpg
JPEG121.2 c392191b8c09900a30ed08d669189b9a 96077
00122.QC.jpg
64637e61b0e68e57a66c3ebaaec78fda 268310
00123.jpg
JPEG122.2 c9a797b6ebeb5939dd31cbc12e679701
00123.QC.jpg
9d9ed6a5e6a3c700674f76b12ad15574 298709
00124.jpg
JPEG123.2 4006c4b8a1a3480448fe83cebbc483d7 102701
00124.QC.jpg
44df99bf73ca83038483ff56cb754d42 221520
00125.jpg
JPEG124.2 0cc00f9b446f5a34303cedfd5f99378a 82749
00125.QC.jpg
2d72cf8fc5c81eff2f82c818e6409aae 236584
00126.jpg
JPEG125.2 eac054f63fd1a9ab53aab7ddf0140bd8 87570
00126.QC.jpg
a64130ba238ddfcba2bb7d8e74b22c05 50780
00127.jpg
JPEG126.2 2efbd5204670f9980c07fbad890588b6 31327
00127.QC.jpg
12d192b32c96927c92fa74bf8901f1f0 247176
00128.jpg
JPEG127.2 ac43a5d9c930f0af60f958f985911c89 89349
00128.QC.jpg
9a8c55b0c71d17b7b4e4b02ea97eef6d 225297
00129.jpg
JPEG128.2 e8b0e6ed399a5c6145ca82abf386c08c 85727
00129.QC.jpg
0e85befc673ba5586915933b0a758f67 223118
00130.jpg
JPEG129.2 8431cb989bf9832e373d284dddc7622f 82420
00130.QC.jpg
6e03ed070641c4890e6fab5b516b5b7c 222267
00131.jpg
JPEG130.2 b2278ff023040c138fdf9f6475fca233 83942
00131.QC.jpg
4b319ad2d558ed294114b80a9e930031 159538
00132.jpg
JPEG131.2 bd6862b1f6d576318b57055b8ad5ce0a 65778
00132.QC.jpg
789650ff70394be8f4ea705c499b7d36 231035
00133.jpg
JPEG132.2 2a0e486706ae11872ea2e3b7e0a30dea 81177
00133.QC.jpg
ab26fd002731c9d71aeb59a1fedcaf6a 294006
00134.jpg
JPEG133.2 2b2565bfe24dd6c79f9191695c947857 101255
00134.QC.jpg
9bf3e5a07972d107225f1c8a8fd2f269 288325
00135.jpg
JPEG134.2 f4481fbd06173769c82d43b2259b707b 98880
00135.QC.jpg
89e049118c246ca6c839d95fbf49e8ab 275237
00136.jpg
JPEG135.2 a33aed033345e5b25cc3f329b3d4b2d1 94868
00136.QC.jpg
6816663d551cdd6a9199a68464293d15 288172
00137.jpg
JPEG136.2 26454b65c16717e9b71fd048ed0ee41d 99860
00137.QC.jpg
52d54fb606a8276ff452240e78aa68d1 166210
00138.jpg
JPEG137.2 cd6faf4ffebe4617b3a75af10283634c 67181
00138.QC.jpg
19d016a652c3e033ee1825b389e8de97 298655
00139.jpg
JPEG138.2 4c2a55c12535d0757206e08bb61ff0b0 101712
00139.QC.jpg
b6e7bf5829744923cf93b19f72b7c231 284531
00140.jpg
JPEG139.2 033cb67fcb5fbfe9596dd93685ce1555 99490
00140.QC.jpg
5eda023429966c460768de5d904a7d75 162031
00141.jpg
JPEG140.2 2678bf558ea0eec93fa228c88559d94b 65906
00141.QC.jpg
7dd3806e1a6b0fea844cb3f7d11acf33 283606
00142.jpg
JPEG141.2 335878ad8f7ab845df3d68965a1b352c 97447
00142.QC.jpg
a3c4c6321c3fc0f0cba23d1d68293d8d 221245
00143.jpg
JPEG142.2 1d253d3d780f8b26e38e5f96f5d59217 81057
00143.QC.jpg
9ac18d7814d804f7dfc898754c774bdb 300047
00144.jpg
JPEG143.2 ee036250331fff82fa6f648600bd59b7 102767
00144.QC.jpg
fcf5db9b64ae4e372c8ade13cdef26af 206273
00145.jpg
JPEG144.2 573fad09661f00aa5aae865ef8475546 79668
00145.QC.jpg
0d70e2fb0e05dc3066895c0076e0210a 206369
00146.jpg
JPEG145.2 d061575d2f44cc9c35ba519c5507987e 78857
00146.QC.jpg
cf6614478789cf287f315660a9956aa0 220754
00147.jpg
JPEG146.2 a66612b9d7c2052c103f199748246519 83413
00147.QC.jpg
1e3da544e296d64d3cfdd5aa97cb1a62 87380
00148.jpg
JPEG147.2 c38b09486e6a71d16e97102ca7047468 41624
00148.QC.jpg
25971b3b03f51683d3873214ed2a39d2 220999
00149.jpg
JPEG148.2 6deabe02f2ddf9e58504b72352c29b8e 79384
00149.QC.jpg
84d5f195b0fcb85dd02ff627fcdf7f44 274105
00150.jpg
JPEG149.2 e7a6b5f9fe3c20ff00a8e68db5043603 96587
00150.QC.jpg
aa689a9e2df332ed986ff7a138c255d1 283818
00151.jpg
JPEG150.2 938ed7a4e12d1a5c0ababccaf8e0169f 97871
00151.QC.jpg
fd6607f2099a645f6e554325a5f4e82e 282466
00152.jpg
JPEG151.2 200e10b637018332b8f141a231b57ec2 97336
00152.QC.jpg
8bb7118805fdde09ec60bb6353b2a1bc 273904
00153.jpg
JPEG152.2 f3045672c88bddf0eab446a62d8b861d 96606
00153.QC.jpg
f2c5cec5debbdc67213c6639351705a8 284267
00154.jpg
JPEG153.2 6e133c96c11eb860beb66bee83661723 98261
00154.QC.jpg
54b9d2fb3b24f1c02e492c7a86363f4e 248193
00155.jpg
JPEG154.2 55d6fa87b72ec2cdf510373474edd48f 88847
00155.QC.jpg
9154e63cfcc2c18cac2d695a0d2419ab 281216
00156.jpg
JPEG155.2 5172c71870589a501059d926cb749ebf 98096
00156.QC.jpg
79c7fc37f4aa6c806a06aa9d72ba6265 277726
00157a.jpg
JPEG156.2 e58ab1f40e63699d9e2675b491ec3e9a 98297
00157a.QC.jpg
099ed3172512631d6e269204f9d09b36 281384
00157b.jpg
JPEG157.2 5b01e9f6cb767f78858b9a59640d28da 98593
00157b.QC.jpg
636f750804476148c4cd1f1c3f15db52 257688
00157c.jpg
JPEG158.2 7937dc803666ebf7f2f629b62baf499a 93321
00157c.QC.jpg
760c6cdefbebf638deac9c217b06265a 273822
00157d.jpg
JPEG159.2 f8acb0dbd62cbd69829519f97884c272 95664
00157d.QC.jpg
5e69de5377cf2a0d1c23277899f79341 79694
00157e.jpg
JPEG160.2 c5bca279d08d3b9d3b9237a981b75c1d 39806
00157e.QC.jpg
bf50a39ee4feabab462e345e4661b4b4 289732
00157f.jpg
JPEG161.2 b36d5de5d490240eb3fdde56f702abc5 99486
00157f.QC.jpg
754db0ec81748a3514bd1eddc0221df0 182871
00159.jpg
JPEG162.2 5e0c2104dbefe225f5ac8a65506c3df7 73541
00159.QC.jpg
cb41a2b5b00ed7a64dff7cff7b3e1efc 269102
00160.jpg
JPEG163.2 f616d73d3779b4f7fbddf543a8f3d31c 95404
00160.QC.jpg
7f48b19db0d50ef0c191d41fcd261dfd 295607
00161.jpg
JPEG164.2 28a88cccc52b9a36aab9161f22d0978c 101637
00161.QC.jpg
16de41b6e1bc06f8037cdea4eeb77f7a 215797
00162.jpg
JPEG165.2 d5533bcaee8aea47713e4189243ba283 81321
00162.QC.jpg
d3ecda6bd12ba7c00d62f9a1d6f941a2 212366
00163.jpg
JPEG166.2 af3a4915a8c5fb827d9bb8ca6db1e95b 82074
00163.QC.jpg
4d2a250bbeec3c6db4766d6eb310b81f 206045
00164.jpg
JPEG167.2 04fc17be836f7469b482bff3efa538ab 80810
00164.QC.jpg
c21eef240b39ab2a921a40e80f3164e9 110121
00165.jpg
JPEG168.2 72e4fd098a0bbca5cb775b5845fc9986 48755
00165.QC.jpg
5ee917fded7b79613bcadb114c379299 21749
00166.jpg
JPEG169.2 46aa1105ce7c22731a596452fbfd8c4c 19148
00166.QC.jpg
4698c68875400b2685535d21bdcdb022 238894
00167.jpg
JPEG170.2 ee1a97ae1a610136ede48d5c5a3d56b9 85627
00167.QC.jpg
4807155950dc472abba698d120a3931c 297789
00168.jpg
JPEG171.2 27606e6660b4501ca837673ebfa197b7 103387
00168.QC.jpg
9c645a9a6d10d71d736955204fb9f052 297915
00169.jpg
JPEG172.2 caa0041cbceabc9ecf53a8982c9b64de 103149
00169.QC.jpg
cafd8874f28d73ae246029683ad63d5f 265949
00170.jpg
JPEG173.2 8cef88b2fa6215f38292d89e358f48e6 95057
00170.QC.jpg
393539670b0fe74d44b563d81f51846b 272165
00171.jpg
JPEG174.2 bb819ab4be6cd1e492879403097fc4e9 95322
00171.QC.jpg
a0768bcde380c738f39189fb6856b0a3 137261
00172.jpg
JPEG175.2 8debedca2711453f7f4e6787b0ad754f 61308
00172.QC.jpg
fee7a2e8ad77d4ac8d8b64b088c1ef4e 286797
00173.jpg
JPEG176.2 03310a88d89e2d858e7559291f2fab4c 99736
00173.QC.jpg
f4bf91bf80045eade556ae017d3e284c 299284
00174.jpg
JPEG177.2 28f92c0d391f26cd7dd6ae8adaa34df5 102966
00174.QC.jpg
6ed881b4d27c83bd30ec186ffffe034c 277975
00175.jpg
JPEG178.2 ffd87376f07c462cfda7ba2ec6a778a4 98578
00175.QC.jpg
92c596941e62ba84441ab45cf0ef4e68 116913
00176.jpg
JPEG179.2 0969d52e59cf89ed39aee1c0e718597a 52796
00176.QC.jpg
c8d4a0ee17e8d03a979899a99c424dbd 82237
00177.jpg
JPEG180.2 30b5aea1fa936286c415f2b96934b946 44306
00177.QC.jpg
7971628061f836efbb41397084f4a9fc 299730
00178.jpg
JPEG181.2 a9200e37856286ce642f2d43fc758cba 102659
00178.QC.jpg
56df7cf2bc07f9df51320c4a49bc09ad 293890
00179.jpg
JPEG182.2 77b4bd7481eae828864dbe5850a7e3ff 102114
00179.QC.jpg
8f1449ed66f67525de9284d10bb67114 140283
00180.jpg
JPEG183.2 9ec7446cebcc77b1d937846149b65c26 61631
00180.QC.jpg
cababa08e747e946584f79e85884f2c8 300297
00181.jpg
JPEG184.2 9511fb499c530706bb5ef6fd0aaead56 102908
00181.QC.jpg
f71e10369135737982cc9e2e6832583c 299330
00182.jpg
JPEG185.2 91fb73c4db2c3c2bdd2efd2806da8148 103607
00182.QC.jpg
e9ed48fadb0ec0bd3e4b0a838c1d3700 249280
00183.jpg
JPEG186.2 273f4f44470d27eacb47ebbea04eb032 89455
00183.QC.jpg
1630b63984848afc7087010ca0c5b7bd 199194
00184.jpg
JPEG187.2 af1ea06ca0a27d599ef79bc3d070fe83 78314
00184.QC.jpg
e151e06544404528a8434656f52a6d88 204242
00185.jpg
JPEG188.2 f482f4735b36acd092055b31022135b5 78230
00185.QC.jpg
f6a73eebaba3c9973bc095b4bf793313 217080
00186.jpg
JPEG189.2 5777d2812bb608bebdce77ac8f6e47a6 82062
00186.QC.jpg
82496e85eb4960f0d3cf1cc48ed0f976 49862
00187.jpg
JPEG190.2 377751ce0756c5e989eacde2cc222e7c 29523
00187.QC.jpg
29c5c5532a8a5f2f7841880c167004c0 22122
00188.jpg
JPEG191.2 3919c42630084c4268d51e7bcece3322 19290
00188.QC.jpg
839f66e1c9251a0267e4384c3a3b265d 233353
00189.jpg
JPEG192.2 685f8dbd8ba35fa2287a63b1f2e578d1 84888
00189.QC.jpg
1a43ae9684918bf3ad12fa97eac4b7a5 287006
00190.jpg
JPEG193.2 d48297cc3c3c15043655509a8c0cd07b 101301
00190.QC.jpg
9e4e017fc395208e1390981345a704de 276365
00191.jpg
JPEG194.2 04b05c21dac3736f26452bce0a1ba9f1 97263
00191.QC.jpg
246e58a32b4365921031f64c0c434dba 300461
00192.jpg
JPEG195.2 ce44b7790e16367a35599d31b29f4f92 104431
00192.QC.jpg
85921acd41a8a77a985ea8f8b4084962 83830
00193.jpg
JPEG196.2 6f49acfd073ca29477f127bf301a9757 42722
00193.QC.jpg
ce77c39799157603aebf7facfbaadc27 55844
00194.jpg
JPEG197.2 1d4896123dc12ef14c182079adfc3520 32497
00194.QC.jpg
35db5e54025a76824159ec010d60c666 70962
00195.jpg
JPEG198.2 46eff71e350e99c990dc0c50fa40e340 36856
00195.QC.jpg
021a7c92d68958a549b9dfb83003a087 85190
00196.jpg
JPEG199.2 953aca16c9bd17440f1aae608baa69f5 41322
00196.QC.jpg
132622c597e59ee446fc6fd4a82095fa 293821
00197.jpg
JPEG200.2 a7608467547c2d126c59db2ffeb56ead 101475
00197.QC.jpg
b2dd8cb6c7e9f959439c7bc99399d906 285715
00198.jpg
JPEG201.2 012315585424c436fd6015d5cd563285 99469
00198.QC.jpg
c5e46956c23fe5285b6ef5e399b351f3 251782
00199.jpg
JPEG202.2 bc8ea59ef82949d553af3223c9812860 89815
00199.QC.jpg
33381158aa89bad748b2b8431f6c9fcf 81628
00200.jpg
JPEG203.2 312eb9b0ad329c6b4eefa6ed181226fd 39570
00200.QC.jpg
427a66aa1313f081d08c35156e53933a 223791
00201.jpg
JPEG204.2 4e00bb05fc852660c7d8f3ba38ded293 80548
00201.QC.jpg
a62174ee3fcbde6c8b18ca5550b1f6a2 272922
00202.jpg
JPEG205.2 052afae74021f004cf08ad2d62571beb 94985
00202.QC.jpg
3413aa6071b7377b1962df04d885a85d 279909
00203.jpg
JPEG206.2 087183f8a863236f54c6e70c1480ea5e 98158
00203.QC.jpg
effbfc9f6ad424a390f81daa34fb329a 270417
00204.jpg
JPEG207.2 5935b180814a266a901264e2707f7aff 95560
00204.QC.jpg
0300457ddca6afc62dc292f1e789ae39 215146
00205.jpg
JPEG208.2 ea33bd6b18a04093181594ed2fe7fd09 81422
00205.QC.jpg
064e73418dbe2a20b8af9cabd796f192 85174
00206.jpg
JPEG209.2 e6428fe16023273ff7d77fd9d32a778b 41274
00206.QC.jpg
2f02992671470d88244d6bc73c611cd7 253445
00207.jpg
JPEG210.2 7bc53b70ca1cdc628bf9fb5a548d48c5 90929
00207.QC.jpg
1ddf89fc7df1514a3952ae005c780f74 80705
00208.jpg
JPEG211.2 9bac3a3916e0b098b86610fa10ab7b06 39927
00208.QC.jpg
39548ab6a96cf3dcb916f77d1aa34891 134125
00209.jpg
JPEG212.2 ffad073142968714e8eeda3d86c088e5 57245
00209.QC.jpg
f55f715dd5be8c16c5b94b7cd376732e 266623
00210.jpg
JPEG213.2 13e065328dbab478ef1ca0a1c62a1c5f 95510
00210.QC.jpg
5ca8e0771625665fc617354c4a238cac 242932
00211.jpg
JPEG214.2 7a99806ef00b44a8be4143c206fd5574 86881
00211.QC.jpg
38f3532ab9c38776ba4f2aa3d626ba96 71884
00212.jpg
JPEG215.2 7dae201f4467357722e9925b1e66b942 36700
00212.QC.jpg
6a50961d3692546e653451f1dc88d793 262062
00213.jpg
JPEG216.2 be3becadf24de0a9f0014d231de48717 92017
00213.QC.jpg
3018384e501db2102203f1074fe4f9af 243258
00214.jpg
JPEG217.2 44df9d259b2c27c2cb17da56e5256d86 87816
00214.QC.jpg
d1627e2e001ca9968a2aff77a24375ef 104196
00215.jpg
JPEG218.2 f72918015275853e32b2fd8294e60e9b 45888
00215.QC.jpg
e97c1c064256c72a65908949080ac11a 23334
00216.jpg
JPEG219.2 5a945d154e8cc9c7172e72f4aa94ba1b 19084
00216.QC.jpg
a3822ecc6b891040a614237aa78fa711 216109
00217.jpg
JPEG220.2 46196780212a20ee17cbd5932a11746b 78961
00217.QC.jpg
6226653b036722b10b779bc9d0f36734 276339
00218.jpg
JPEG221.2 fe071c02f1bde7e713c4c025fd3fffad 96038
00218.QC.jpg
0fea6f835ba1ca3d96b188b1367057b0 81373
00219.jpg
JPEG222.2 aab2a665b61918285923829ac26e7241 40294
00219.QC.jpg
236d941246af1ea32ab28f06d3ed43c8 290613
00220.jpg
JPEG223.2 fc17ff549f4ac1e82e38b6bbbb9da634 100416
00220.QC.jpg
4e833433ebd3dbf4a90223808c97f9a9 283320
00221.jpg
JPEG224.2 3b8bd46cf7362ff81edd6477f2bf855d 98878
00221.QC.jpg
1f486122716cd647a3e1e0baac1971b6 292019
00222.jpg
JPEG225.2 1656191859189cc39fb0d5be3673c388 100676
00222.QC.jpg
35e3010044aadc338b3d9e3b7621ec55 279307
00223.jpg
JPEG226.2 6c6a7f7c5654be749a514a8105e34754 96814
00223.QC.jpg
6b3ba6a373729e66daad6520e92f0ad7 285218
00224.jpg
JPEG227.2 690ddf1761a7b436e4302e36f872dee4 97432
00224.QC.jpg
6c564866886800c0f3ffc602e5b2fa4b 274732
00225.jpg
JPEG228.2 78d46ff3ed2e25738a08b628cbf326d5 95616
00225.QC.jpg
5794ca24e30ef1898706e4e2f4608c75 288247
00226.jpg
JPEG229.2 785aea4e4bee5505d2776f12ff526e88 98672
00226.QC.jpg
304eb8148ad7b41da0a71ea61d92d94e 274340
00227.jpg
JPEG230.2 7a00fdc7fd1be3ef3bcda921d4fc41a9 97252
00227.QC.jpg
ba70b0aac1de6f5fd58cc035591133f3 235401
00228.jpg
JPEG231.2 50f9e197960f103799e239dd47c4dd20 85343
00228.QC.jpg
26e1c489d5da028ddb9842265cccf7de 212786
00229.jpg
JPEG232.2 61b0a309de859617fc723bebe529c9d5 82086
00229.QC.jpg
67ecb7a5dc09fbd06767d2af6fe6ddc3
00230.jpg
JPEG233.2 8ee84ef963a6e6c7d415a59bb7fabb16 44476
00230.QC.jpg
e77ae59feadcf348e281e1cca89d3be2 228301
00231.jpg
JPEG234.2 b93a0c1918244930be042be03388810d 82990
00231.QC.jpg
6e8181222970c96f80a3444044922d07 289193
00232.jpg
JPEG235.2 515631bfa3855f36c98a8e874fe9a50f 99814
00232.QC.jpg
d3e714991d78d7ce113887f9548d0ea7 281211
00233.jpg
JPEG236.2 4e46cae6d68697f8155267a5d490576f 97127
00233.QC.jpg
3408549573c1f8026a507a6f268b1d3d 290128
00234.jpg
JPEG237.2 6aa6b554db2a3be49768175a56cc85fa 100645
00234.QC.jpg
bb7c132e4511095e58c707ea19b729b0 297337
00235.jpg
JPEG238.2 65142930915460f2af1edeb7d161c89d 101097
00235.QC.jpg
5d063a6ba0742ba701d61a002ebde52b 280152
00236.jpg
JPEG239.2 f228addfd6acda4341a930825e8e6a0f 97340
00236.QC.jpg
a98f116c61a7a83f7f66b96e59dbdef5 299395
00237.jpg
JPEG240.2 9c67d69d3016499ede927055e441a42a 102704
00237.QC.jpg
fa8f5b5123ed5f2b83a6b620375132ee 274133
00238.jpg
JPEG241.2 cef440bc9e4907c3484cf42122fa2eb4 96259
00238.QC.jpg
beec1ee25b9a8a97cb8831dc93c38aac 167140
00239.jpg
JPEG242.2 d3cbda0ba966b9791524e6a357ac9f8d 66262
00239.QC.jpg
fd262a5ee8fbf987db491f767e496aab 21271
00240.jpg
JPEG243.2 dd8191439a54d9ed43a55bc6e5ed59e1 18407
00240.QC.jpg
25305475a6e6912bb11c1d73d225f236 217196
00241.jpg
JPEG244.2 76b27a64f07949e433927c9de3d00dad 77381
00241.QC.jpg
c3ae6d549a71cc6ba773a8bdd3cc8a58 286201
00242.jpg
JPEG245.2 c89ab9d63efad772093de8b19146a13a 99669
00242.QC.jpg
c0ee53290f4736980506283c9f738a2d 279999
00243.jpg
JPEG246.2 0180cb0f988a0eb3a0c0b50b712f49f3 97007
00243.QC.jpg
e693398fbb2e97cec9ec002b1f44f658 187288
00244.jpg
JPEG247.2 bfc5ab4436f058bb27f34de9098f790c 74586
00244.QC.jpg
9c69e823baa670e2391b759403cbd682 288341
00245.jpg
JPEG248.2 5cd8fcf7bb4d2755031d6fc834571c2f 98969
00245.QC.jpg
71f2bdecafc10f2d5e077f613aa00572 302041
00246.jpg
JPEG249.2 a2ac5fef0523dbc6228cbef2bfa0ef26 103256
00246.QC.jpg
4fca10cb346c75a7c5bc4da3a3f0f4ae 239901
00247.jpg
JPEG250.2 91b91863efa51bc7a0a25b4c1a36767f 88471
00247.QC.jpg
d2fc38ff30cfd91b9285b74a9dceaf0b 204340
00248.jpg
JPEG251.2 bdbc9c02232fa0d55f00e6265656e5b9 77541
00248.QC.jpg
a72f008c8a5540ebbaf1e51f5418f9ad 282966
00249.jpg
JPEG252.2 6135b03fb0fb29bd0ee90aa6f846126b 98599
00249.QC.jpg
bb8fc0649d929aacdc5e1f61e386bd14 278004
00250.jpg
JPEG253.2 a36c887d5e045f698c459756dfae0b06 95976
00250.QC.jpg
65a3561400e5240984411863f1cc7c0b 260125
00251.jpg
JPEG254.2 15a987ccfdb807baf69b531ba73c5843 90034
00251.QC.jpg
06d7cedfff137a0e9e4aa1a3ff12bcb5 190276
00252.jpg
JPEG255.2 a5e3af6cd9c5c35074a43ed17d12c15c 75074
00252.QC.jpg
72ba3635937137ff52eb8b071770e476 87741
00253.jpg
JPEG256.2 e47aea5e8bcc74bb213ba576929915c4 40633
00253.QC.jpg
2881a13bba8ac93cb44c34502e676b51 21219
00254.jpg
JPEG257.2 81a2a00f6b48cf8315930a5feed235f9 18509
00254.QC.jpg
c8aa8db289142a5dd20c38932c7ac214 204429
00255.jpg
JPEG258.2 ea2d266ae18c82b6bae0afaac070b26f 75240
00255.QC.jpg
aa7f3d1e6d33c08a3947b1570c633a50 288709
00256.jpg
JPEG259.2 e1bef92e3e3bf8867f4487199c1e8b5f 100646
00256.QC.jpg
f50b2928fa91bf53c333b137c1ede47f 267896
00257.jpg
JPEG260.2 5a97d279a82160f8ba9b2767c9e3934f 94728
00257.QC.jpg
ad34a3fefa229cca896c531d64c245d1 284125
00258.jpg
JPEG261.2 8cbd606f878f19c9f0b97d841f32ce24 96696
00258.QC.jpg
48ce4a0a3711cce2053e9438310f8c17 120400
00259.jpg
JPEG262.2 19dc754f60d1aadb6c1c84ac5a960add 56143
00259.QC.jpg
0bc4211fc9a8f60ed3fe03e440cb6224 280394
00260.jpg
JPEG263.2 fd983848bdbeb5be67c16a4c6e3bdd79 96593
00260.QC.jpg
6f37262728b9c96fe8784a7ac7b7e93d 278039
00261.jpg
JPEG264.2 0e40f5e6761dd6c16e3d1189013bb841 97238
00261.QC.jpg
98e30f93dafb7e97d13e8affcede21a8 288661
00262.jpg
JPEG265.2 f9ed41307aabd2471f8437382fc65886 101145
00262.QC.jpg
3ed4872f7007f68eea543f0295200f7f 119902
00263.jpg
JPEG266.2 e23512095e7c323c2f1476f06a4f41b0 52205
00263.QC.jpg
c0d936ffbf831ab0fcfaee7a9d576d49 274862
00264.jpg
JPEG267.2 1598ba5ff5df90ade810b21608b58a5e 95985
00264.QC.jpg
31d1af024c31d05f517a301ae3475deb 286077
00265.jpg
JPEG268.2 d12a55284268864f960e52f1483613be 98850
00265.QC.jpg
1919d400d8bca0cfb7c41874795ca6ee 135862
00266.jpg
JPEG269.2 c6b32052f137b2add02344264c065ba9 59757
00266.QC.jpg
cd88f4e3f938db68c4aa01c4e9d610c5 156729
00267.jpg
JPEG270.2 46f9b5e9aae1c196b6529f9062785909 66013
00267.QC.jpg
a699b8db90de844c5c7117a57ece60c2 159732
00268.jpg
JPEG271.2 46aba9a93173acb245e5fd352f798265 63391
00268.QC.jpg
d9c275bcf03e86da4b14a8211823bf6d 263677
00269.jpg
JPEG272.2 27c02c2dca7b9dc52d316fd36805ac66 94786
00269.QC.jpg
8e3bd4fdf32bb04b2deb3ebd281fa691 23181
00270.jpg
JPEG273.2 db703c5b52acd40e41788099d35a79af 18979
00270.QC.jpg
8c54d80a1ab302aee59893a906734b74 233227
00271.jpg
JPEG274.2 dbdf60ee990e6c03803f7bf4617cf9cf 85187
00271.QC.jpg
fb3d421e734fb3b6696f809ea53382c9 275951
00272.jpg
JPEG275.2 853371dc8591a79df41cfe0bef8783f3 98101
00272.QC.jpg
12c045217f16038170d06311fbd52a90 285245
00277.jpg
JPEG276.2 9e1a4643a49e81723bff64753961881b 98361
00277.QC.jpg
2fc4faa056069bb99c05c0097b1e3b8f 283804
00278.jpg
JPEG277.2 4a43f58a4c0edd27c3e33589a62a76b5 98250
00278.QC.jpg
eee36d4ea5a2764e4a44f75c28ff8382 60053
00279.jpg
JPEG278.2 230fc05042e4ed884672864cd49cbfa8 33956
00279.QC.jpg
b76a3a911d3c85e64cb0fadfa89b90cb 179411
00280.jpg
JPEG279.2 502dd4a1de5ed13dab30ab1bf9a95ecb 73379
00280.QC.jpg
44b5b87dce2de37623e9e7d08b822a57 293188
00281.jpg
JPEG280.2 ab4daaaadff0d1f263a0fdc1bb53f8ca 100296
00281.QC.jpg
ad0108fed752b334e1a6fff2f03d7588 102327
00282.jpg
JPEG281.2 ad16048fb55f58bb375087fc35ee6469 46423
00282.QC.jpg
ec3fcc09d45ce231edd0fe4b9be20efb 282350
00283.jpg
JPEG282.2 0b947e1cc175d8333c2551e8c7c16877 96768
00283.QC.jpg
58a7bb5e1d1f1159ed68cac6f6aa3ddc 74019
00284.jpg
JPEG283.2 4244119b7c665e69781b90808c1797d1 38077
00284.QC.jpg
ee5a6d553ef614c91e8edb77a69b4aaf 163294
00285.jpg
JPEG284.2 ea4ab6e2b89f8b34f3343c55b507c7d6 66122
00285.QC.jpg
528f00c348d165a31eb987e8f899fc30 266180
00286.jpg
JPEG285.2 55df0ba74c125fccb9698a31ff4a7041 92305
00286.QC.jpg
0de1ebc3831ed46d141cc526902ecc19 159122
00287.jpg
JPEG286.2 cbb7c4066fff36ec0535d1ffa2427a09 65898
00287.QC.jpg
340454c014008fe724d9bfcdff0baf1c 172083
00288.jpg
JPEG287.2 931fa3f9b5cfd876d8bcf63e3cf29e8b 69990
00288.QC.jpg
66dce06ccc281a528efd4a43848be78f 236764
00289.jpg
JPEG288.2 64ad2d3e81e06d186080019eef715c38 84428
00289.QC.jpg
c60bbd8ca7e60323d896519179542efa 105833
00290.jpg
JPEG289.2 16140c1d82fc56cdaad7a2bf3bbeaf25 46184
00290.QC.jpg
95c5e1e1e0922e4e336337616a147f2a 216834
00291.jpg
JPEG290.2 687df4f189da397d59b1c0bcec65300a 77976
00291.QC.jpg
32832b788e7e741989ba73de6cc6066f 259052
00292.jpg
JPEG291.2 29264e58f9a3d430bb21cd4bc3c7f9f4 93772
00292.QC.jpg
8e73549dc1b34b585807d6a22cb70305 287947
00293.jpg
JPEG292.2 3ba0031f1a4da230fcea254c775656da 99716
00293.QC.jpg
8bda1e32434f7d9c237d51f9c3097903 277940
00294.jpg
JPEG293.2 50b510fb94fa3443ee030d27a73514bb 98570
00294.QC.jpg
10fbc626cd8861cb85e2804b188b1379 289289
00295.jpg
JPEG294.2 a0781a4e9d6f8856115c325bad957fbc 98381
00295.QC.jpg
572e9fad81c5abc8f4810be6f6d3a03d 254827
00296.jpg
JPEG295.2 5b47a580b497f2a075ce056de7a5257e 92391
00296.QC.jpg
baff63eefe746dc2cbd54dc97539d31c 71844
00297.jpg
JPEG296.2 68a3f56267244704cd090872413d5703 38024
00297.QC.jpg
dfa4968bc58605f947a97410d86853e2 56514
00298.jpg
JPEG297.2 e0946d676e4e23146deb1d7d315172df 32445
00298.QC.jpg
03f5ea247054e0bb36652b376e16935c 52062
00299.jpg
JPEG298.2 0bc93c1850e67a64aedda9fbf769a7ba 29684
00299.QC.jpg
ab1d4164d533cd856923b81397995d3d 183688
00300.jpg
JPEG299.2 2896ec0d3646500d9c765a592683d906 71328
00300.QC.jpg
f9e3fe7babf0cb96a2c4eb283f29bcf5 59148
00301.jpg
JPEG300.2 00275f5e2843caddfff83fed37b669f1 33031
00301.QC.jpg
ac3f613b58ef4e25c6b329095df82bbd 263175
00302.jpg
JPEG301.2 76d7833e177d7e3e03b0edcd4053984c 95157
00302.QC.jpg
4d93c45d94368599ce531f6835d791c0 170676
00303.jpg
JPEG302.2 9467d64be0c2cdac6b9a2c654e2c7954 70396
00303.QC.jpg
35902293d96ee8a931171ce883d3b851 255195
00304.jpg
JPEG303.2 05616c08b51919c31ae852671ad44925 90156
00304.QC.jpg
8fa6c81912c73b3076b51cb9b56dbea7 278892
00305.jpg
JPEG304.2 4e4c9ba0f1e66db2560c2afcdb1c6ff7
00305.QC.jpg
1cfc1412ffb78e48e9ec95ed0f004ba2 283987
00306.jpg
JPEG305.2 90746a76a951698673ff75afc214249d 100207
00306.QC.jpg
5becc496f8ed36e4cb25d03b6e978fba 205753
00307.jpg
JPEG306.2 9699fd3c198fafba9d8635e121905553 79414
00307.QC.jpg
6b25b5105b57ab5fc25d1e643514f298 134547
00308.jpg
JPEG307.2 e31d9c0ad57af38134f55171b21df4e9 54445
00308.QC.jpg
6b1830915eb5b222e8d0e1a0e5a53f43 221955
00309.jpg
JPEG308.2 7fb4de6d71e82ab1e5d607f5094eb9d3 82032
00309.QC.jpg
d74a80cb3d650c135d4e056571865104 286237
00310.jpg
JPEG309.2 147446e742fe056fcbc6a61f0df50073 99246
00310.QC.jpg
c6cc2a30c6bc571ad4c6b20d36df208d 270924
00311.jpg
JPEG310.2 5f64383e2a9867f501139db4f5e24417 96307
00311.QC.jpg
d6eac7ca26bb2e1fa31fcd68f87a9aaf 287561
00312.jpg
JPEG311.2 0fa2b697095c3e5919b0dbad3b7ee67e 99370
00312.QC.jpg
8897e84092176a01c4e31d070bfb08aa 161458
00313.jpg
JPEG312.2 128fb3df147b7ca4c5d8d8726d9fc6e6 67952
00313.QC.jpg
48c1fc1c1850476cb85281edc24c45a9 68856
00314.jpg
JPEG313.2 b695997016c4e9430e5ee80e088472b6 35657
00314.QC.jpg
6013dec2414b6faede6a27dde3f668af 61188
00315.jpg
JPEG314.2 e1db3486804e851f0070eeaf2f13ad90 34350
00315.QC.jpg
c970b57bddb762cea25f1c81cad98972 163907
00316.jpg
JPEG315.2 ea7f78fdd66b31c9961de9f4f27c711e 66307
00316.QC.jpg
6d6e59f9aa8307d9aa0e9fec6c4c8c60 265622
00317.jpg
JPEG316.2 ec03f702b2dc6c519bccaf101f07ef12 94820
00317.QC.jpg
21ed4c4497d87dd301d56313ca43f807 285535
00318.jpg
JPEG317.2 546992d84188cde3cbb30daa3ff6396d 99068
00318.QC.jpg
ed9583a9b4b17105015356aaa5bbb3a1 281927
00319.jpg
JPEG318.2 cc01898b2692b2879b9f4369e3501063 98884
00319.QC.jpg
7d4385013d60c690223b5de048c56853 131853
00320.jpg
JPEG319.2 55103427e4804f27251c1be199d9aa3f 61528
00320.QC.jpg
417bf99c87491de1e901ae22c0cd3d16 266472
00321.jpg
JPEG320.2 cdc9ee3c9fd77a9dd1182827816f53d5 93798
00321.QC.jpg
73e33c842ff1d755e80f62705ad070ea 200472
00322.jpg
JPEG321.2 a5b9e9c066c46277bac7fbc5786d755e 78061
00322.QC.jpg
571362996f55e36025c21f6225f1c3f0 134518
00323.jpg
JPEG322.2 672e94f24501d7db2c950273ba6b184f 56363
00323.QC.jpg
da8d06ccac67eccc7b2f2069f0cf3f78 22408
00324.jpg
JPEG323.2 ba25826873bbb4140a267cd20c5325d0 19385
00324.QC.jpg
85f2ae6d7426543ad206d2e20fb76d95 220713
00325.jpg
JPEG324.2 ea1575856b126a20b63602d918db1777 82898
00325.QC.jpg
d0ed3a3b434b432b9e44bd98a3b8ee53 266003
00326.jpg
JPEG325.2 51bbd559903db7a4ba2ea0e8962cbc68 93765
00326.QC.jpg
ba356bf76d718c2cdabaf5c38436e614 273578
00327.jpg
JPEG326.2 094256c5f1ab5c6de3466b55bacf1f60
00327.QC.jpg
bbad5b3f55eb6753c7b5ef8c4c8ecb72 273036
00328.jpg
JPEG327.2 c952b460a89c4da6a8097cc5dc505b59 96505
00328.QC.jpg
c772f796e0af0aeaa24f80c4fb4b10e1 285414
00329.jpg
JPEG328.2 e974092fd47f916139b7e39543d88f41 98825
00329.QC.jpg
ba759a396adbd02def2de4aa686fc0ab 267399
00330.jpg
JPEG329.2 d95459c705a64667fbecf0ef7854433e 93100
00330.QC.jpg
38d75aedbd4e369204c8e0445fb8f885 287998
00331.jpg
JPEG330.2 eca560501e07cdf83c132aa658b7252b 100133
00331.QC.jpg
f941137b6b214e880ebe22362d7b1bbd 67687
00332.jpg
JPEG331.2 0a700ea6f96a0870f5552f94a9a5154f 35386
00332.QC.jpg
f53224ef1359fc0ad5f026d277e1485e 271934
00333.jpg
JPEG332.2 2e05764575005c99671e33eb67796c40 95584
00333.QC.jpg
70f6af9e795a5c0cd249fdb6b27e0181 228430
00334.jpg
JPEG333.2 64b828bf9874851ace7b69a632dad7d3 83573
00334.QC.jpg
c954e23571fcccb5c32b2c79bc16a0d0 166938
00335.jpg
JPEG334.2 228d6c3e6b22093ce8cdd2614a59fa7e 67673
00335.QC.jpg
af047b9f03e1ead9b5624194d7b29e8c 22100
00336.jpg
JPEG335.2 3a5f4be812e8b1c6ba87a5f7380be982 19172
00336.QC.jpg
9f796c4a1e70e5bf037c7185f871740f 235519
00337.jpg
JPEG336.2 762463e7a3fc6306c67ce36290325ba4 85824
00337.QC.jpg
63cee800f96ea78644c345a4006cd5a0 278854
00338.jpg
JPEG337.2 4337cf3f866a357b5445a40b4dfcb56d 97216
00338.QC.jpg
4280aa76f577659d6f1be9adb0dafb79 299231
00339.jpg
JPEG338.2 f60cdb2ff1f4a9b61eb564b38769c701 102569
00339.QC.jpg
5ba639c4e831accf873765b17cbb7f17 275762
00340.jpg
JPEG339.2 a7fa43ad9314a1277d5359da765e981c 96148
00340.QC.jpg
9fb8edb9fe7bf8f550b64622fdbf5388 291014
00341.jpg
JPEG340.2 2348709b1cc92a678aa19a14b20e4859 100320
00341.QC.jpg
7a2d88ac8c09589d80ff1173e94e7433 74181
00342.jpg
JPEG341.2 0fc8992576a30567b94d12cbf317bbba 38361
00342.QC.jpg
30fa45be89133a624598d34730ebf9ec 303338
00343.jpg
JPEG342.2 68ce891967cf6e8a4f0257104988215c 104016
00343.QC.jpg
e867476ab6458f715e63cd30f729d28b 290358
00344.jpg
JPEG343.2 1d6d8c34b6af1176c3be51a52fcf6710 101033
00344.QC.jpg
635df8375547f363b27be9cd6122ca4a 284135
00345.jpg
JPEG344.2 a34bbd68edb0ba37b1586bfe445757f0 99086
00345.QC.jpg
4c3eb9365a01413f11f57aea39a9fef0 308129
00346.jpg
JPEG345.2 f41f79ea0f99e89586c7c64c337805f8 104363
00346.QC.jpg
087c683a44970d6462f1720176704c12 278799
00347.jpg
JPEG346.2 5c1dbf033708e0dbad0502775992b444 98086
00347.QC.jpg
5e1a151340ce8a5756f1965c5c577fbc 304915
00348.jpg
JPEG347.2 d2f8e6dc8ca71724f7482c9e57552c9e 103384
00348.QC.jpg
b0a7571a8856d4353bdfcaf17e98e0d7 264116
00349.jpg
JPEG348.2 1fa7fe9941a806c4b82d8d1a017e22fc 92945
00349.QC.jpg
9d275ddbb49f0ae4599a46983ac30bf0 255520
00350.jpg
JPEG349.2 74b308640590e787d31a4381ea921874 91496
00350.QC.jpg
19c75cae21f9463469447227e0d50055 204068
00351.jpg
JPEG350.2 4dc0cbac5b9dc285b9fe2d1c1fde2f87 78112
00351.QC.jpg
91bef72e8ef3e32f7844f8f546da7b65 68375
00352.jpg
JPEG351.2 c6217c8e922b321f09a80efd2658d6ad 35901
00352.QC.jpg
bd586ec79e57b1971db2a3bc31718e0f 219469
00353.jpg
JPEG352.2 5eca3340bcceb56e3258803d0387ca45 79699
00353.QC.jpg
78706a9746327e3a630306a11961edaa 269035
00354.jpg
JPEG353.2 925cb8302d4d9479c20ee47d150d0d2e 93624
00354.QC.jpg
864d453e004657f4fa9c9d6a092c3e46 290319
00355.jpg
JPEG354.2 8aaf6f2b15aebdc87daa2d81c765f5c9 100347
00355.QC.jpg
e6f6ed0891bc210e016d5f582d5b38ec 267339
00356.jpg
JPEG355.2 4de7a3e02012629e25461cedff0a07b4 94050
00356.QC.jpg
62673f47cdf15426bd9411ce10ea17f6 51407
00357.jpg
JPEG356.2 5749d09d4c6a1092e152fd35c06f7fbd 30989
00357.QC.jpg
06243d76421d1323d99598536ece63dd 276490
00358.jpg
JPEG357.2 aa29fba0075a6448bba6789dcb080110 98100
00358.QC.jpg
c8d091e7cf12d0dc054b544cf5e7b35f 296432
00359.jpg
JPEG358.2 157528ceba311983e7861f5d1b32db08 102833
00359.QC.jpg
1a6b5ac31b2a864e18d0ebad67a8ac63 286142
00360.jpg
JPEG359.2 d07f06fa6b4e5239082fd13a6665a7f7 100167
00360.QC.jpg
6e0d4ba7d79fddf883253aa1b98eda37 298936
00361.jpg
JPEG360.2 68c6861b6343bf62b167229adaac2b89 103701
00361.QC.jpg
fdb32c6f0d375f1d4ebaefd85289b85e 284400
00362.jpg
JPEG361.2 1bdb8aa76181649e436959a22cda0786 98384
00362.QC.jpg
807745d5e6a6af44e7380ff90ca17fda
00363.jpg
JPEG362.2 92886feb8580fcd0a33896d9acf3f293 98719
00363.QC.jpg
1b6fc260966d759fc9873b2cbcd3ed74 168147
00364.jpg
JPEG363.2 78dcd90b59bfedfccb31160e198fb685 68433
00364.QC.jpg
b596176c596eb37d2cf62d3f5dd50748 200540
00365.jpg
JPEG364.2 7392ed15a293e6ae7466d60bf92aa395 77373
00365.QC.jpg
ad3152e5078f111f7bdf4aa98552301c 99591
00366.jpg
JPEG365.2 6baa9e57f2a9b55844fc2b310da3f27a 44979
00366.QC.jpg
b12687bb6989e5470764bb4b0d238167 210248
00367.jpg
JPEG366.2 c70f7d54f9e77410bbb48606bc9bf443 78657
00367.QC.jpg
a9f7be02175228ca8ef00eb3960b4df6 249033
00368.jpg
JPEG367.2 0ffb77c2315987a4733786bf73d8c76a 89536
00368.QC.jpg
b1a1eb46ed03960422b899297b923636 70169
00369.jpg
JPEG368.2 ada85806a4fa68b31e76fe4a36ab08d8 36351
00369.QC.jpg
548be39ee91388eef562856e9e4a6c4e 127850
00370.jpg
JPEG369.2 22857769cb4d49a5a1ef183bd49a67d6 55683
00370.QC.jpg
7819b254d17f98a66c03ca871ff9832a 270959
00371.jpg
JPEG370.2 3d1c5c895b0b74b4057d11ed9ad4a64b 96219
00371.QC.jpg
53599beac85764b3ab2139112265e0cd 131491
00372.jpg
JPEG371.2 c6544b7d56b7d3f8729d668dd2df2a4c 56712
00372.QC.jpg
e671503eb7a557758095d65b90311de6 282974
00373.jpg
JPEG372.2 399ab63e16db39aff1e1d4f91a1d262a 99889
00373.QC.jpg
e0f0ae6cc2a0fa1f1a9497363e4503ae 69389
00374.jpg
JPEG373.2 c90ffa9a2f974f505ce6edb70ec6fb4a 36193
00374.QC.jpg
61ac7985d2bcde14b7d5b1919822c400 70903
00375.jpg
JPEG374.2 d1b7d19005cf65bb9bbe60bb512d8a98 37493
00375.QC.jpg
efe50c0ac6e9b0f7d2cc1212e74f350c 176905
00376.jpg
JPEG375.2 da2dcf74c9552402a6fc87bb86e330e0 71032
00376.QC.jpg
27e66fed6b51e909c52a9846c55fbef1 45007
00377.jpg
JPEG376.2 2d91564b44d631b50483a156a3e9b548 28901
00377.QC.jpg
6b6e88c5df8c44006013146efcf71776 255356
00378.jpg
JPEG377.2 aa0161ee14dbbc32db7f50e0a1d03839 92280
00378.QC.jpg
86991bbcb7d503588c4fe86404e36732 266529
00379.jpg
JPEG378.2 c0e80f8d518ce486a9ac2c389f9b1dbc 94915
00379.QC.jpg
a429fe51ba0a277f4593fcab6106a52a 185662
00380.jpg
JPEG379.2 850bde16c4a51b3a973035b8062e9500 72409
00380.QC.jpg
78caeec729e90f19fde54677acb9a0f1 165934
00381.jpg
JPEG380.2 8a9a2c940f4fccfa4d34af6e934487f0 67508
00381.QC.jpg
280c56411b524ee8a88ff36f9dc0cd48 21813
00382.jpg
JPEG381.2 ecf6f0e80e572aa9f0c78fd5db3c938c 19156
00382.QC.jpg
0bdb0fd76ea730fab732017ce769b9ba 204005
00383.jpg
JPEG382.2 a8ca29a221df81f7e83888a8daef8c3b 76555
00383.QC.jpg
e87c451514b515902bff86d22ae7d3ff 281979
00384.jpg
JPEG383.2 7d19d303ad29068b6903da9df18bad8e 98765
00384.QC.jpg
619348e7b162edc7d5eebafc6a05cd2a 275082
00385.jpg
JPEG384.2 b5e71c518a4adef0e8ffb3cc69b0b897 96661
00385.QC.jpg
d23746c7057f50ef87f33cab25b2172e 261766
00386.jpg
JPEG385.2 2ddaf6b5e580ae0b7f9bebeb71153b36 93317
00386.QC.jpg
590f795bad217b61093f57d9f1144ce5 291241
00387.jpg
JPEG386.2 ba4440577493fbcc82cf460933c3f579 100842
00387.QC.jpg
793f20aed78234e7ec19fc5a3acfbded 274602
00388.jpg
JPEG387.2 d3c7eba8c64e0359c3ffa38c7b13aba1 97795
00388.QC.jpg
858347a222f83771150c4182bade9c14 288115
00389.jpg
JPEG388.2 d6693cfa4e376ef3327bfbae689febdf 99789
00389.QC.jpg
37c097b9343c7131e7fb5d9b9797d698 203298
00390.jpg
JPEG389.2 00a4f85de7edae3adfe686b799ce1362 77360
00390.QC.jpg
10e899c6df429ecf63737c68c8ba7aac 219302
00391.jpg
JPEG390.2 c0a33a4ac67362926921b3162cdd92ef 81438
00391.QC.jpg
695482273b2d3b069987c47c83f00115 278564
00392.jpg
JPEG391.2 b77cafc90cd3a27309273b743b344cb5 96631
00392.QC.jpg
fce952769c1dc5746fe1c4d0ed5cd1b5 246101
00393.jpg
JPEG392.2 f31f9fb7210dd666d567ebe7d3499e66 89105
00393.QC.jpg
f2fe0864d83fbcc217a7476bf9d65ed4 169135
00394.jpg
JPEG393.2 55dfcfe0dd89af0aa156ce000a659f46 69635
00394.QC.jpg
43ad7aa14d15514b166eae7a5ea94b52 228384
00395.jpg
JPEG394.2 4ce6793b0eb1ee9e820fc9cfc1bde23e 82094
00395.QC.jpg
48c84d31f84fc92ff4d8c78f41c127ad 273201
00396.jpg
JPEG395.2 3bc4b32e46a1486e5746e96992a7282f 96413
00396.QC.jpg
2219b84bc736636aa82e485c59bd5608 290261
00397.jpg
JPEG396.2 95a5353f1f733d590c943bfa2c573dd8 100548
00397.QC.jpg
e935fa555c7c94ecebcab47eb91eb3b8 265864
00398.jpg
JPEG397.2 a078b985f5adb89d9a8b5019b260eb02 96080
00398.QC.jpg
0eca568f4d5075a9fde20909ff0bb483 287841
00399.jpg
JPEG398.2 8c253b8924807fa869763728dc4333ff 100090
00399.QC.jpg
cb785da53d89173b52c6185995bd3685 205840
00400.jpg
JPEG399.2 c4d3e3c3e7becc0f56134f1f15e85362 78237
00400.QC.jpg
bb480797d9808c3616a6164172502bd7 298279
00401.jpg
JPEG400.2 151d30de0bff569285725b07dc6766e3 102614
00401.QC.jpg
f714eb568e397d5121c6979ffc55b58e 77572
00402.jpg
JPEG401.2 c56dde3f1e99b0ffc3d4ffe8cb106b12 39054
00402.QC.jpg
778fb66ac3bc45b3ab8951d7aace55a3 283768
00403.jpg
JPEG402.2 33d9f9ecdfd9a6be768292a66be11f61 99009
00403.QC.jpg
a9960295d92c286869a609b57231d6e1 39301
00404.jpg
JPEG403.2 08f77af5c82b56d46390103b2f3db080 26622
00404.QC.jpg
8289958fd32e359924380fab535dcf74 274562
00405.jpg
JPEG404.2 ddfe2b9ea7a87302161c3643c4b8e082 97451
00405.QC.jpg
801158038be05d9d6f6ee777a82bb8b3 170046
00406.jpg
JPEG405.2 c815f541cb975f3047a0488427639d53 70477
00406.QC.jpg
9fedef1d73d33c1840c6960aa7e630d7 275133
00407.jpg
JPEG406.2 22a2bb1e791af1ceb23226290eed203b 97529
00407.QC.jpg
03213bc9f71cc3aa46ad194c67ffcd91 207440
00408.jpg
JPEG407.2 ac177b1892abacfbc0f00939821e864d 77300
00408.QC.jpg
2b7b128f43b9db11cc97881241f1e00a 104346
00409.jpg
JPEG408.2 ff6eda94ca4dc3601207de5e0bc1e82a 46371
00409.QC.jpg
07081f48eb017791b7432651f862a553 22239
00410.jpg
JPEG409.2 c64552225842edceac611862b271fe57 19295
00410.QC.jpg
554eb7d67897877b301185c5cb8125d2 229656
00411.jpg
JPEG410.2 be7e77aca9c4d45d949a5537bbc2d139 83711
00411.QC.jpg
32b7bb46c28cc5364d75bba7a3465bc1 281679
00412.jpg
JPEG411.2 601f77e0f984f5cd22dfa95c1cf0b2b6 99506
00412.QC.jpg
f72005667f2ae08edcf4962ccc7a653e 287677
00413.jpg
JPEG412.2 40b7be00f90a2443eb67d5d7db87a699
00413.QC.jpg
6ff7697b5866163f06d4061a3a13b2cd 298535
00414.jpg
JPEG413.2 6f9c70277a9c57e9ed8de7a04a704104 101100
00414.QC.jpg
da9fa60e53705d3abfa9b448c0810eb0 273226
00415.jpg
JPEG414.2 855f2132f66185dcca26455186aecfd6 97426
00415.QC.jpg
0f6f951796e8c20cba98b8f55e61dd90 295652
00416.jpg
JPEG415.2 bde1caa5f73fe54a7568e9837982fadc 101375
00416.QC.jpg
c4e1b7b3aa2a25e80135c49605bdf6d6 291516
00417.jpg
JPEG416.2 dae075ffe2db2ccad46fabb981f8ed11 102141
00417.QC.jpg
77035505d3b055c658554a5c063a9bf5 280297
00418.jpg
JPEG417.2 b8d638356f30ec9afd846159c7f0f5e7 97604
00418.QC.jpg
73c8aa004e3b5202c003edd09a130d8d 294445
00419.jpg
JPEG418.2 6df44722592a7ef488246e525dac3933 101755
00419.QC.jpg
ecaf5ffade475e8d424b4fc38c813999 287648
00420.jpg
JPEG419.2 01aa0cd41c2014d9092b8b978d7a7016 99916
00420.QC.jpg
5e3188d569282a3e61d3d3c2d77cd224 293508
00421.jpg
JPEG420.2 b48db79eef38a0f481882c2be6702a72 100278
00421.QC.jpg
d6638b3214ca284012d6f8f569256027 279661
00422.jpg
JPEG421.2 bcadc9b28ee0a3bafa2ff0ac8170b573 98012
00422.QC.jpg
48564fd36c382e3748b8f8cf4f1c7670 282545
00423.jpg
JPEG422.2 dafcc3ed86685265fa0c0d9c5f4c6476 98894
00423.QC.jpg
234d1793a9d66c57d83fd1802c5e3130 293340
00424.jpg
JPEG423.2 efaf2cb3624e0da0c3cd214cd7e72797 100808
00424.QC.jpg
42a4e5d00f0a40eb2317c9fe15b47621 206003
00425.jpg
JPEG424.2 a9f81c13a5233c811125a791c9249291 76930
00425.QC.jpg
bdec108f7d1476c6e33552c70d265844 231535
00426.jpg
JPEG425.2 6602b0c7a56ed0e6698de9dc684c373e 86463
00426.QC.jpg
db96deb1135fa0a89f2de56dad28dd02 226428
00427.jpg
JPEG426.2 848958bf79f8bd0457561b134bcb70f1 85144
00427.QC.jpg
7b9b09d8a01eddbfc17e5a4fcee028d8 45881
00428.jpg
JPEG427.2 f92e078d7ff9c2c0afc285fa3431dc04 27099
00428.QC.jpg
cf307028e5c9926bcd973d3f44658b15 225333
00429.jpg
JPEG428.2 07059dbb0a7a24bbdade9e879c93d0db 81804
00429.QC.jpg
9624c9309e0469acd34b97064c0d6671 300019
00430.jpg
JPEG429.2 8ed88896392269e7745b4d34a5ba5408 102910
00430.QC.jpg
b5c5e239e467fca1cae4e197b31cde4e 281664
00431.jpg
JPEG430.2 d8e8bfae6d2c6af4b9bf5677190c9bc5 98893
00431.QC.jpg
bf7bf80a69794a081c3db9085220dcf3 200646
00432.jpg
JPEG431.2 61e79f25d443cf688b1882b3d4f1904e 75903
00432.QC.jpg
f94fdbf568eecbda9de6df6f52a9c90e 301225
00433.jpg
JPEG432.2 aeb54f9d3bb93296ad5403db35e80fb0 102940
00433.QC.jpg
fabc9e9d6b13d04ccaa6d3054c3f8a51 275632
00434.jpg
JPEG433.2 91a0f708e41eca5fb4a128afd80b3298 96241
00434.QC.jpg
b991b055dbfe6a45a468f32516c51baa 283360
00435.jpg
JPEG434.2 874de0b24f8c505e50eae98e2c94fc21 99248
00435.QC.jpg
97b3b1dea21510c4e52128cb844a2068 57926
00436.jpg
JPEG435.2 5a439f720f87e466d2693a715f398bf2 33204
00436.QC.jpg
c3694358e58f0428d8302c2be4a13801 270070
00437.jpg
JPEG436.2 3a091056baed8a1370c977d7f5e54835 95600
00437.QC.jpg
35e45b1e6acffd84517201ed9dfdf8a9 256267
00438.jpg
JPEG437.2 634cb3f649fd992ff7ebe8824ae78ee7 89615
00438.QC.jpg
d43dc28945df3e282237ca53dc4b8a43 179545
00439.jpg
JPEG438.2 188e78e6bc49ae8c46c2f74b58cc36e4 75103
00439.QC.jpg
9fd45a4ca21ff5dfd53ae069d20fabdf 301384
00440.jpg
JPEG439.2 b967af7475148f5bff9373b43012d88e 101721
00440.QC.jpg
15ecafa7fc4ff39493ca77bc415db40a 108494
00441.jpg
JPEG440.2 17da12b311533f808e4f447bc64b97f8 53754
00441.QC.jpg
88535950f81ec5a52d010eee20ffdfc3 296645
00442.jpg
JPEG441.2 ed866fb22f185d9aeb17bc4a8368a5ef 102034
00442.QC.jpg
93b6933956f5b6656b3e5b6ca4bba36f 303499
00443.jpg
JPEG442.2 4355d634a5523ce6140e12df090872eb 103739
00443.QC.jpg
4acde1facf46cecd23fa601b8e3b3471 282107
00444.jpg
JPEG443.2 7876a57bfbeec1a7fdf51b6d79c974dd 97464
00444.QC.jpg
b7bc90b8d7123d195ad5384e64a15fcb 272261
00445.jpg
JPEG444.2 8deab9e524433876f090600a96a91bbf 95501
00445.QC.jpg
3f9625d034391291a08def722e5fe123 203073
00446.jpg
JPEG445.2 662cace7b07ecfb9164ae76517fd46e3 77749
00446.QC.jpg
92065892fe7a625c6498f5ef48c343a5 215820
00447.jpg
JPEG446.2 241cc263aeea3f23b46432f2d644089b 83748
00447.QC.jpg
80c9a40878b20031c8b32da4cdaff83b 111406
00448.jpg
JPEG447.2 03b8331de342323804976dd496f531b7 47909
00448.QC.jpg
d7d55e33290d0266399120ec26145317 240608
00449.jpg
JPEG448.2 9c9c4bad6f5b43c3721c071cb9f744ad 86325
00449.QC.jpg
4ae7892a46a17f5ad75450795963d24e 306796
00450.jpg
JPEG449.2 cf9b6da209d106979fcc7555a6e7117b 103903
00450.QC.jpg
fa7e6c0a20cedda89eeb48f7063e9a48 276067
00451.jpg
JPEG450.2 2ba38bd45c82d5956d747898dd71e8b9 97177
00451.QC.jpg
158bec82976e584368b706a5fe47d65c 283074
00452.jpg
JPEG451.2 75b0120343b91c9c6815617cd1162158 99055
00452.QC.jpg
7d03226a244bc711c4d0b58a71a98584 73007
00453.jpg
JPEG452.2 7b45375e82664e5fd875403016f76b9f 39084
00453.QC.jpg
9742180e139b8762fdc467b02be0bc5d 75002
00454.jpg
JPEG453.2 d77225349935deea1188c985727bdbe1 37298
00454.QC.jpg
75d7ba2aedc730a8a70592a076c2f244 162625
00455.jpg
JPEG454.2 7c7686f7ba0ed95857f56c92be77256f 67540
00455.QC.jpg
819a22bab6e7f8c03241f0fab01881cc 73992
00456.jpg
JPEG455.2 8a693b145f975f97569d2383ce86c824 37126
00456.QC.jpg
61a33feedc5fbc23b8814bf17f739f2e 280447
00457.jpg
JPEG456.2 7b6eb7c0f24b320b31ae2a71bb361ff2 97683
00457.QC.jpg
190215d3d7c2621fc3b71dfc22647ff3 77960
00458.jpg
JPEG457.2 fa555db74742a939b15d35f124bbd707 39142
00458.QC.jpg
f223b69536fe8c79c32596ec64a8dba8 259844
00459.jpg
JPEG458.2 fbc0719425f768a2f97a69653625262d 91669
00459.QC.jpg
c6e089c72439f184c61f9dff4666a591 64575
00460.jpg
JPEG459.2 8d804411bc350948964d9758960b033d 35369
00460.QC.jpg
f96906f116d3b96a90b9f7c4e58b93ad 270821
00461.jpg
JPEG460.2 1a0a360c55f53dc15994d5f653ea889a 94040
00461.QC.jpg
ef4601931b9e1bf5840aa0fef4f504bd 260113
00462.jpg
JPEG461.2 f85c85034386c79edac0d6fc2572193a 93004
00462.QC.jpg
36264bf35456d270d8491eb6a8a336e3 189788
00463.jpg
JPEG462.2 413f9b015410c33a80cd7a4da1d00f45 75844
00463.QC.jpg
4d6f99cfe0eecb7584a7bec547b89b53 192658
00464.jpg
JPEG463.2 2c0ac04a0ea5fa7fbde2919283b3835b 78008
00464.QC.jpg
597c6ce3ae4d36f507d02fec038849bc 166872
00465.jpg
JPEG464.2 c57159232dcd706e4984c89b3399ece2 68356
00465.QC.jpg
9a191ceed4aab345a7c184cf49e3afc8 197857
00466.jpg
JPEG465.2 883e2cab058608b596a431cf46d936e7 74326
00466.QC.jpg
7b5e6a70fb52b60a5fd66fe4cbde2a1d 240996
00467.jpg
JPEG466.2 e24c2f7e9bbcd96ed86b6fcb6c831490 88419
00467.QC.jpg
320b8c0093e48b3ed1cc1c03e152e15e 237406
00468.jpg
JPEG467.2 b521ee80c44a99404ac93cb794e01d6f 88522
00468.QC.jpg
bb96283c6c317256e68a0f28bf7596e8 238185
00469.jpg
JPEG468.2 6926d534de0a107f77a0fd92be325265 87733
00469.QC.jpg
36ae71971270b415f793b66f7f8a5801 256149
00470.jpg
JPEG469.2 fabbeb246c9a74780cde10dfe8ab62d7 93225
00470.QC.jpg
d4b36b34c63cb87b231408f8cf096920 251361
00471.jpg
JPEG470.2 37d07fea0bd18c76d1d8a50d3dbf3396 91223
00471.QC.jpg
7c696dceb314d9ad8513d34091e2b4fd 235723
00472.jpg
JPEG471.2 30702a4fe8e7069a8ded19f5fb9e1e43 86878
00472.QC.jpg
THUMB1 imagejpeg-thumbnails 378a628796631abd376030f49762d991 20170
00001thm.jpg
THUMB2 8f6967f6e64980cd4fd0575de9724ac5 19574
00002thm.jpg
THUMB3 11c5f3a2208e0861642ecf4c7b276160 23848
00003thm.jpg
THUMB4 1d44d7c2f912f070ed00249137295794 29144
00004thm.jpg
THUMB5 89608029605a6ee8e39aab2332ce15b9 30557
00005thm.jpg
THUMB6 c11d184856c6ffd849edd0890606a7a9 36832
00006thm.jpg
THUMB7 2774caaa28bfbb7b1f3cc8573d86b7f9 38350
00007thm.jpg
THUMB8 a861b7a7453d3a93a54ea505d30a1977 25299
00008thm.jpg
THUMB9 37e3930810ff3b3afa29ab572a0e1d8a 33342
00009thm.jpg
THUMB10 62989b6eee34ab4e2b699d60aa9fa90e 38666
00010thm.jpg
THUMB11 a2b61f50bb3a5a45824e09c2882007b2 37664
00011thm.jpg
THUMB12 dc3cae9e3b17ec6ee3596e2649503925 37869
00012thm.jpg
THUMB13 f9e3035836a8b6da0914294bfa5af523 38213
00013thm.jpg
THUMB14 ac5e956bf4f354a0288b9fa3b8cf7fcc 37473
00014thm.jpg
THUMB15 e5bbf301331fdd1e9935dacde27ad7ea 33660
00015thm.jpg
THUMB16 c750bc2d351cc33e6f7cd9f5ed7b1e4c 39626
00016thm.jpg
THUMB17 bb7b936a45451709d30a88bedd07a4d2 40303
00017thm.jpg
THUMB18 33c8b57b52043db34cd1d9f2a91a94b2 39598
00018thm.jpg
THUMB19 eeebc5c5e84b20ed92c8276f59bf91d4 38291
00019thm.jpg
THUMB20 9d0192c810e6b802a08a8dacde30292c 41131
00020thm.jpg
THUMB21 f6a41feba5eb4ed180533a37960b500c 22337
00021thm.jpg
THUMB22 b66d993c46ab0d7ab826c400547ade1d 36002
00023thm.jpg
THUMB23 058a0706dedd7b2e927c67ce916d5f8e 40947
00024thm.jpg
THUMB24 a2b2eb0838803d9803f2cc0b8a28f032 39942
00025thm.jpg
THUMB25 c5886869458d874d739004ec5b4486b8 39963
00026thm.jpg
THUMB26 49778ce88fb3413ea1d65df0d032961b 39523
00027thm.jpg
THUMB27 db1eb30f163b5464d6c6159baca19c60 41185
00028thm.jpg
THUMB28 8668d6d041a7eea7401d1f0668245d75 39446
00029thm.jpg
THUMB29 b63bedaa208b9e79ff9f1e92b97a7cfd 39479
00030thm.jpg
THUMB30 f834e58cb880578c78ca284fb2f57f54 40371
00031thm.jpg
THUMB31 ba91c0602673d824c9d61d83c8bbf379 41304
00032thm.jpg
THUMB32 fe7083333edbe7577ef25fe0f5cae6bd 40567
00033thm.jpg
THUMB33 3c794aac696d1b8661bcca02f520e3fe 41166
00034thm.jpg
THUMB34 c707b5db283bb5be7384a988b810220b 40714
00035thm.jpg
THUMB35 febb606c84862a005d08cad5807b6418 39944
00036thm.jpg
THUMB36 9e188abe457a44ddb011ea2acc5f0283 40469
00037thm.jpg
THUMB37 b47f3f4cc2dc48ed9298c6d1eea0aa8a 40509
00038thm.jpg
THUMB38 669da52440c72ed3e3a50b5a7e57dfa6 39593
00039thm.jpg
THUMB39 9310973549e62867ea628bbe908be1fe 27708
00040thm.jpg
THUMB40 633abe0c3a868fb1e780dc7bdf47dea1 35463
00041thm.jpg
THUMB41 c255a566e1c24ec576fca6d06928d7bb 40082
00042thm.jpg
THUMB42 27d27fa8a8a33bc1ceec374bbb796d66 38924
00043thm.jpg
THUMB43 dce9608c6993dcdb166a60ce46ec2d97 26389
00044thm.jpg
THUMB44 bc2014cb7598c75af7bd2b95426a8f8e 24886
00045thm.jpg
THUMB45 602d93403d04128aa5e99e73090069c2 24350
00046thm.jpg
THUMB46 a27e112cc43a18e410aee87594699878 32286
00047thm.jpg
THUMB47 a470b525ad207b7deb3dc15ff695f8f6 31857
00048thm.jpg
THUMB48 117a5e9124eb22820e8fe3b2557def30 33019
00049thm.jpg
THUMB49 ef7b4d10acb970c439ff7eea07de74c8 38833
00050thm.jpg
THUMB50 bb55a0fa0cfe3e9a0a08880e5171c29b 35558
00051thm.jpg
THUMB51 9a60bae7fbc698dd7f90b038a8b567e9 40891
00052thm.jpg
THUMB52 b835c24a324a956a33453eb0089a68b7 40495
00053thm.jpg
THUMB53 14efa512e1f183496d69bf67af3d733d 40511
00054thm.jpg
THUMB54 6c5c4e6e91055a433801565dc290571d 36054
00055thm.jpg
THUMB55 18154b9cee9e97eddf6415dbbf1e0e01 33860
00056thm.jpg
THUMB56 fce027c0d733b8a8fd567686061834e4 25298
00057thm.jpg
THUMB57 2688b5b8400a2aee68eb591651e4e8d5 18315
00058thm.jpg
THUMB58 46c3008f0be71e84403fe3206546485b 36494
00059thm.jpg
THUMB59 1338f51ea818b351742d009dcd0e72ba 40340
00060thm.jpg
THUMB60 978bad241e7c15f569adabbd3fb503b3 40359
00061thm.jpg
THUMB61 2f0eb94c8a5226d93c5233e96a7baa34 42023
00062thm.jpg
THUMB62 570cc100041e7f31a3c1bec5c4ee5eb6
00063thm.jpg
THUMB63 089fc27bda3107a57795bf5c86e3b6fe 40101
00064thm.jpg
THUMB64 4e3e83fb289bc86d0bba16da640e5386 40030
00065thm.jpg
THUMB65 c09b38bbb789ed8c55589508f87eb189 40553
00066thm.jpg
THUMB66 e3e046aef1bf4cf57a5d310ab4c4bec0 38272
00067thm.jpg
THUMB67 6e9193e1ed5e90a622e06afb1190a797 34316
00068thm.jpg
THUMB68 cd2c95a90721868e26ecb5fcd60ee64a 35624
00069thm.jpg
THUMB69 58eb0837c48815506da76ac1df6c56f5 33768
00070thm.jpg
THUMB70 e5c284b68cc83d067ea7603e5327248a 35032
00071thm.jpg
THUMB71 40cfbce5d9e7ad8930df525b4cb02051 41480
00072thm.jpg
THUMB72 8c0a7fc85acc1f69452681f4f19273d5 39431
00073thm.jpg
THUMB73 e63eeb62182757cdc53623208415ac32 40820
00074thm.jpg
THUMB74 be9c236884a8fa3712bdd3dcd660fcfa 40655
00075thm.jpg
THUMB75 4503d492a189e06f0b9cd0a31aebbd2a 41173
00076thm.jpg
THUMB76 1fd15e0e9db53a3266e31eabcdc68537 40954
00077thm.jpg
THUMB77 ad09b9cb4ee9b85ab6b54758da151cd4 41517
00078thm.jpg
THUMB78 9fbe13cf0af18b83343a47337ca44c55 40308
00079thm.jpg
THUMB79 77966e94eea0ab51813808d013191351 38654
00080thm.jpg
THUMB80 65dbdd5f08df2621b5ab8822ecdbbf45 22031
00081thm.jpg
THUMB81 5e16826a8e05d596b3ce5bb0b0984201 18283
00082thm.jpg
THUMB82 ac7e5b1c970974fe128481bce3625d39 35863
00083thm.jpg
THUMB83 cf7c60f646af507141650119615d136f 38223
00084thm.jpg
THUMB84 cfb94ec33190c5daa58d2512b5b2a0f5 39791
00085thm.jpg
THUMB85 83f4cb741c3282f7ae77cd31ebe7f57a 39915
00086thm.jpg
THUMB86 584e4d0f907a55d4aa12b18be0bdfe9c 38830
00087thm.jpg
THUMB87 2ed5c671ad9caf08f943e17ba7e959b4 39628
00088thm.jpg
THUMB88 66d33cbdf73e46ff065495d7be8c3e91 39608
00089thm.jpg
THUMB89 8669668216010d63d9f5d45a146e3afa 40599
00090thm.jpg
THUMB90 fb6ccd12d9fde77838415a9e46e92ec3 36629
00091thm.jpg
THUMB91 98df8c974770847dde122a57e6f317db 35554
00092thm.jpg
THUMB92 63536af7ae285a692369096642189a47 38074
00093thm.jpg
THUMB93 df9dd364dad073293be117b01b8174f8 33853
00094thm.jpg
THUMB94 adf4df28a4e931b4892a2983583a98a0 36582
00095thm.jpg
THUMB95 7ad8e7e87a1dbb778e9009bcbb539e7c 40073
00096thm.jpg
THUMB96 231ba7ade600d9891e153838731555b8 39087
00097thm.jpg
THUMB97 496903c7f7ba8c8b04b3611c1c952a99 38518
00098thm.jpg
THUMB98 2c79d0bb2f329aa866cc47b5b4cfd036 39462
00099thm.jpg
THUMB99 c9b06ef74e06668556e2ffe93f9208d8 40056
00100thm.jpg
THUMB100 476b0252a8869dcb1a032846ceca7c9b 39785
00101thm.jpg
THUMB101 439b5c3d728644521fe88dd598dae2ed 40394
00102thm.jpg
THUMB102 207409ee1f37e0067c6361debf6e69b2 40157
00103thm.jpg
THUMB103 b7489e5de77828c20b5234d6784c6b74 40407
00104thm.jpg
THUMB104 8440513564927663a797f5f040c174cd 40632
00105thm.jpg
THUMB105 386d3cf25c8454b2f4d5536876e5a5a4 39921
00106thm.jpg
THUMB106 1102d7aa7c53970b0fc62a0974ba745b 37990
00107thm.jpg
THUMB107 0dbb3b5718cdf7ebb3d1cc17afd920a3 28928
00108thm.jpg
THUMB108 9e709870267e1ef75f5ad2b7c60094dd 36923
00109thm.jpg
THUMB109 87ecaebe8447c3fc11e3b53836cf7da4 38571
00110thm.jpg
THUMB110 1b35af6ca3186c26ee96a644c185d45c 40042
00111thm.jpg
THUMB111 738cb5b6122f7866c45cacb0e5de2d34 40095
00112thm.jpg
THUMB112 566c27e397e1dde34a4611338282ab34 38955
00113thm.jpg
THUMB113 b1082a7d2446eec97889e5c965dffd67 39175
00114thm.jpg
THUMB114 f9eb94cc16498700ce663136a70fa2f5 40418
00115thm.jpg
THUMB115 45ccb6925b598d3f099aed02b3c5dab8 38549
00116thm.jpg
THUMB116 1526e5b96d7503d8cadd610740279564 36538
00117thm.jpg
THUMB117 d2fadf508a522c866ac5ae691d0904b6 38015
00118thm.jpg
THUMB118 ab8ee877b50df2ac2406eb4f9ffc75d2 23073
00119thm.jpg
THUMB119 9eff028c3a606906785ddab2bb0f33c6 18341
00120thm.jpg
THUMB120 4e7a5b40218646a17bfa4c7054220a8e 34229
00121thm.jpg
THUMB121 823e0ab99d9eb2e7a133721f0da06cc5 39351
00122thm.jpg
THUMB122 a37cdb99b80ea6fc365e7d374e94e0ea 39740
00123thm.jpg
THUMB123 dc9de51a80e3916f2701f7e0ca71747b 40715
00124thm.jpg
THUMB124 1fbdd1622645fddaf5378033d1341163 37166
00125thm.jpg
THUMB125 f0682bc4560f1a8a7f9a023b84507fec 38260
00126thm.jpg
THUMB126 12448bff04cd0957ee69303bea811b25 24064
00127thm.jpg
THUMB127 983f8ff41bab1b22ec2d6d8bee5de0b5 38519
00128thm.jpg
THUMB128 db76bc22fb64b29daf1bcba861fc42ea 38166
00129thm.jpg
THUMB129 b6c993b72fd67b2321e00c3865b0cb3d 36893
00130thm.jpg
THUMB130 b9e3611158e6272e811cb50d4320f80d 37401
00131thm.jpg
THUMB131 38d235f1a08d9441bc143b621d9c9ed3 32769
00132thm.jpg
THUMB132 3b52b19c0e8eedce65f692570e5d67fd 36077
00133thm.jpg
THUMB133 db247b298c63aa5f2ccfc70ef72bc7e5 40998
00134thm.jpg
THUMB134 2432cd6911b3e088e147aafd22521e12 40813
00135thm.jpg
THUMB135 15b0bc8dd572c906eefd4018c2c623cb 39580
00136thm.jpg
THUMB136 1346a74422ee68c17503ae44df0836aa 41031
00137thm.jpg
THUMB137 69a433ae9f3eb2276a7cf50cb7f0f9fe 33851
00138thm.jpg
THUMB138 cb5b3cef2f2aee1b1efd1a56d9b08fd1 41718
00139thm.jpg
THUMB139 0ec151348754ca91ae20f714e331f4a2 40616
00140thm.jpg
THUMB140 c89086606278c3c31e6e7574523b6b5a 33016
00141thm.jpg
THUMB141 e002b806144a97c33ae75c22faf40fbf 40090
00142thm.jpg
THUMB142 90c7d79c332477623c56577d095bae90 36979
00143thm.jpg
THUMB143 9ecc5a1f1d7b899ba307b72c5d454950 41481
00144thm.jpg
THUMB144 0fc67743a4907aba57b0af204a3ced02 36462
00145thm.jpg
THUMB145 a8b58b29f1f6d5210cf639ac7acc55c2 36793
00146thm.jpg
THUMB146 a3cc2cafc8c8b0ead758b7c0780977ea 37820
00147thm.jpg
THUMB147 756232c3928b54d75e38e7079a50e7be 25828
00148thm.jpg
THUMB148 0c319204efa624e47f645b74b9cef462 35334
00149thm.jpg
THUMB149 a1829e50e0448b4c6d6d9b299457bbeb 40546
00150thm.jpg
THUMB150 cc95e2e8f7f8801c319685a3e0d46ad0 40382
00151thm.jpg
THUMB151 32b8dcebc872bb8c36b4800b424fa478 40110
00152thm.jpg
THUMB152 bf1f1970b4cec5392d81fca1503bc378 40310
00153thm.jpg
THUMB153 b5ce471d1e37c4b1f1d66ea478b1d158 40160
00154thm.jpg
THUMB154 859202b8530f266d5ac7cdebfb771135
00155thm.jpg
THUMB155 0719b6ff4e2b45721500c59800ce5ad6 40080
00156thm.jpg
THUMB156 b9936da074dca686c5ac08304b496c7a 41029
00157athm.jpg
THUMB157 1b7109595d71cc020b6059f8821d03bf 40408
00157bthm.jpg
THUMB158 1a52cc8e4a848837ad690a382b48ea51 39544
00157cthm.jpg
THUMB159 71488c289322f44748af8fdba65333d4 39657
00157dthm.jpg
THUMB160 95dcda78e6f3cf4671351194698d9e0d 27007
00157ethm.jpg
THUMB161 9a98391fc14e8d07f156a0d4af50466f 40672
00157fthm.jpg
THUMB162 4bc6297eebb475880cae4f2092011981 36615
00159thm.jpg
THUMB163 03f4dd3364358d8f0d88b43acb40967b 39917
00160thm.jpg
THUMB164 fd3f7e91b9ffa2020b4b3758f4d2d60a 41707
00161thm.jpg
THUMB165 478a23ab85b621619ce9b783712c1c64 37229
00162thm.jpg
THUMB166 82cdc0a0ac4707761116e4ed709203a0 37580
00163thm.jpg
THUMB167 93f1a0fce4679fd62cd1830acbe018c9 37982
00164thm.jpg
THUMB168 497ba574baca4d5bae487b567a2037c1 27860
00165thm.jpg
THUMB169 9a3bcea7460d562482f5ffeb6066170d 18302
00166thm.jpg
THUMB170 39cc8aa89beadd95f7c34c944f8352cf 36775
00167thm.jpg
THUMB171 01cd3159498b5e4e0ed5ca855b4ebdbb 41374
00168thm.jpg
THUMB172 ef5aaddac98c68e08660035bbe5d2342 41003
00169thm.jpg
THUMB173 1ee5b9c52b3105309fa5e2fc3d957e89 40179
00170thm.jpg
THUMB174 d38a855c4763fc2a22a9c53ea3832ff7 39809
00171thm.jpg
THUMB175 db7808c01f984e30be5b9761c0e823ec 32709
00172thm.jpg
THUMB176 b054701940130972542e45c91cf662a5 41244
00173thm.jpg
THUMB177 a937c2d7ef69a083c31029f3effef133 41137
00174thm.jpg
THUMB178 4e1ea791f004c14105bfab806f23b489 40733
00175thm.jpg
THUMB179 38b87f24345a457f9bc976b4e8d60597 29090
00176thm.jpg
THUMB180 3cd80c77c35e328d8b0078e166b34110 27936
00177thm.jpg
THUMB181 0f0f37ffac3aa3958c712bc52bf02e8b 41493
00178thm.jpg
THUMB182 65488dd2f250ba1d10f83568db329727 41749
00179thm.jpg
THUMB183 bc280b4993a158a55ddab98eb953d4c9 32633
00180thm.jpg
THUMB184 749bbf57062d3a5e480ce014e150957e 41328
00181thm.jpg
THUMB185 54df7ca2a5f11ef8a164cf95b76b7edf 41105
00182thm.jpg
THUMB186 8c99757f483ca7fcd37e24cface60e97 37687
00183thm.jpg
THUMB187 899aecc950602b4bca7d185f13035d15 37068
00184thm.jpg
THUMB188 eb9c3ade6ca8d831ad11b766e1298902 36439
00185thm.jpg
THUMB189 22cb456b42a18f3b63e0de3b112f48fb 36710
00186thm.jpg
THUMB190 3cbd73df21a0a60d1840d0dbd76ee77c 21481
00187thm.jpg
THUMB191 a95df1cdb85539d3a4b420ced3288c59 18323
00188thm.jpg
THUMB192 53d81c52e4197f2cb28c119f68a84c9d 36910
00189thm.jpg
THUMB193 6e19401815b13c4f3fa7884a692c1eda 41233
00190thm.jpg
THUMB194 8b4911c0cc7599f0a30ac94d4e73719c 39967
00191thm.jpg
THUMB195 4fa2a5d199db922a2b55d3ae40f4fc0c 41919
00192thm.jpg
THUMB196 f801e4183dc52a458cc4307b3490c28c 27166
00193thm.jpg
THUMB197 f792fd0177430c26262b795aa18a2dab 23984
00194thm.jpg
THUMB198 3d971da1243a2f37e4509dd6e34c6fe7 25931
00195thm.jpg
THUMB199 846e41c87d87c25ef5ca54d9d49b04dd 26885
00196thm.jpg
THUMB200 b825c96e323ab6d9da2add7cf51cc61a 41637
00197thm.jpg
THUMB201 801810ba8173861e0c73aec67dd8ea5d
00198thm.jpg
THUMB202 66e8d1ec8fc3339852ddf976208a4dca 39110
00199thm.jpg
THUMB203 9970f6da8066e510fcd832ee80515f25 24522
00200thm.jpg
THUMB204 d8a7bbdb8b83b81cac5f6ba3864eb95b 35196
00201thm.jpg
THUMB205 7beab91142abb861854a4af87c6058c0 39155
00202thm.jpg
THUMB206 80040e1aeb03c8aae51ded399b9c62ae 39874
00203thm.jpg
THUMB207 7a4ff5a33b035fddc3ab340a6508c8dc 39497
00204thm.jpg
THUMB208 ebac4eb4e1bbe8da8810642a1b0cdf90 36616
00205thm.jpg
THUMB209 5613eacaccaec694250482af83bb6fa8 25882
00206thm.jpg
THUMB210 c9c5afd9ab4f6a4b5f7504f04a5e9f0a 38150
00207thm.jpg
THUMB211 fa0b48b0e29a0be74cd516f6c94a1568 26276
00208thm.jpg
THUMB212 056f72379b5384c011866f848533c6ae 31618
00209thm.jpg
THUMB213 f1336d795d1f039960d4c3b733fc6cd5 39687
00210thm.jpg
THUMB214 784bfafdb02726feb646454edafe3b5d 37357
00211thm.jpg
THUMB215 4e31fef1f69c1df51117bf3ccf828b04 25078
00212thm.jpg
THUMB216 a57361a55dc6ee591decbc4ae820bede 38129
00213thm.jpg
THUMB217 ecc9941318f0aefcba319a6683ca56e0 37659
00214thm.jpg
THUMB218 0791ae5506eec01196f63aed3d5a2cd1 26558
00215thm.jpg
THUMB219 902f4f828b1342268cfdea8a54c8667b 17691
00216thm.jpg
THUMB220 d4932eb3efe73080b7dfba1b5886f6fd 35039
00217thm.jpg
THUMB221 cf43c7de8e8130fc3927b4da30e51ff8 40031
00218thm.jpg
THUMB222 68c262377be9bd234461d78c2c9b430f 26299
00219thm.jpg
THUMB223 c45d98ab54aec38201e22eecc98457d4 40561
00220thm.jpg
THUMB224 d420152e5a3b82af4f6eed4e4e4517be 39169
00221thm.jpg
THUMB225 28645cc97e59d6fd77df155efa84a2ed 39808
00222thm.jpg
THUMB226 4f33e48c66116899a42a537a4a32d14a 39653
00223thm.jpg
THUMB227 d9cb2ef0dc02e5b5c67d6b9a5b0fe12d 40221
00224thm.jpg
THUMB228 ffceea50012bbecca94bcad6daaa13b6 39182
00225thm.jpg
THUMB229 09c0e22954f7787f89da20bafa5013a8 40324
00226thm.jpg
THUMB230 fac13bcffed19ce74b02db8d85a60da0 39878
00227thm.jpg
THUMB231 f9d178010d64c46c4709af95cc380e2a 37205
00228thm.jpg
THUMB232 e72ff979812f79c36da01faed2a5694a 36371
00229thm.jpg
THUMB233 58f155cc5e6ec0153ee4f4782f3308b4 25391
00230thm.jpg
THUMB234 be59d7dfb6d3671d593f62bff4d44dd2 35769
00231thm.jpg
THUMB235 c7ebfcc1b712406e903e151d312835f2 41167
00232thm.jpg
THUMB236 bf39d8c3363341f6894d5ca753b82221 39515
00233thm.jpg
THUMB237 4076f5c3b8ee4163a921f757c0f509f4 40708
00234thm.jpg
THUMB238 586d781b3e553393cba67e4fd7ed3833 40651
00235thm.jpg
THUMB239 8fb3740c1977dbb5a34bb8917a6b98c5 39605
00236thm.jpg
THUMB240 6caccd776b65a445f5a2f8a9e7968a4d 41228
00237thm.jpg
THUMB241 5fab21fdc08ff9e1f9eae46f3c6b4ef1 39427
00238thm.jpg
THUMB242 9599c0eb415839e908dfac545be018ea 31476
00239thm.jpg
THUMB243 13a4c71f0af5b03fbc317010591172e2 17571
00240thm.jpg
THUMB244 6ed10d6e647342dee0cbff0a027a2ed1 34408
00241thm.jpg
THUMB245 e15440b8112cebf92b95761f95c0c742 40147
00242thm.jpg
THUMB246 f6c03c1b7edadcfc211fc8fa289a59e5 39761
00243thm.jpg
THUMB247 a8fec88dcccc0f3f3ead1cf1e7b6b69b 35305
00244thm.jpg
THUMB248 2989cda2119372d9674044ba21686721 39652
00245thm.jpg
THUMB249 1e7c2fc1ab8e6febde2b587b960fbaf7 40562
00246thm.jpg
THUMB250 6e216d4e5dc4717372d0f004dfadd48b 37667
00247thm.jpg
THUMB251 059f037090163e926c29548366010d8e 35296
00248thm.jpg
THUMB252 c9a481a66a4f9c87cdc8c75f5e4e781a 40188
00249thm.jpg
THUMB253 bcab8c121e5be2b8211cf15e1a6d5220 39769
00250thm.jpg
THUMB254 2c8fa0c0d13db07673b15757f0c7de06 38050
00251thm.jpg
THUMB255 ed3f42535b8d1cddbbbd2f3ebea15385 35404
00252thm.jpg
THUMB256 d8eaed561651bcfbcba2ed44742469c3 24252
00253thm.jpg
THUMB257 c57507fb97043a7ff2b6cc7d0d3ba7c3 17611
00254thm.jpg
THUMB258 090160d2a1b508a17a1377a4dcdcf153 34394
00255thm.jpg
THUMB259 8c6074134cf6a29bce865f7c45273eab 40558
00256thm.jpg
THUMB260 a8d85f6b8ae5704acd9ef4c029db3248 39036
00257thm.jpg
THUMB261 c0d2e1a908a2ac72347949fd3c6bcd68 39021
00258thm.jpg
THUMB262 cbe7a17a1699e298f6361cd6301660df 30485
00259thm.jpg
THUMB263 1aecaab16009e1c677b44b2f255ccfbb 39459
00260thm.jpg
THUMB264 09d853dd285fb96efd20140c21461f4f 39982
00261thm.jpg
THUMB265 a6336f417cdb4ad1e4556429972df122 40772
00262thm.jpg
THUMB266 561eec0691f9604e811d5941638f9f2e 29801
00263thm.jpg
THUMB267 0117bfdb261a5b72937d5b2bc9383865 39478
00264thm.jpg
THUMB268 7685ac761db3db7b52f7d0b10da501c8 40283
00265thm.jpg
THUMB269 bb19b115014e1f463de49d03da9cc0de 31620
00266thm.jpg
THUMB270 6141892f8f8dbcfd8e5761f8e66292ce 32766
00267thm.jpg
THUMB271 981d37ee9cebe3b616a85ec5ee9d1360 31859
00268thm.jpg
THUMB272 8be40a7fbbdecf41aa45ea6f5b47a26b 39090
00269thm.jpg
THUMB273 9ff152f8156d2bf916e93cda21708a8a 17635
00270thm.jpg
THUMB274 95cd3076989fc8da09e222114ea55609 36043
00271thm.jpg
THUMB275 514aadf5c1b1b96049046579cfc935b3 40006
00272thm.jpg
THUMB276 c4237051022d523bbef4732639df3ff1 40050
00277thm.jpg
THUMB277 1d75ff8374cfc1db6b947216f7e7ec65 40087
00278thm.jpg
THUMB278 fb5b428c8e5a1e86e2a6c55400f2dde2 24240
00279thm.jpg
THUMB279 7c7366ecc642b4cb7e15f7f41fd7a0ab 35499
00280thm.jpg
THUMB280 fdb3d6517eaf7b3b0c3aa31592a45376 39989
00281thm.jpg
THUMB281 1f1e0e446b81582ac0fd7477f0c153c1 27261
00282thm.jpg
THUMB282 bf83d09cc2b136c567d258833c66c011 39284
00283thm.jpg
THUMB283 5fb7e779819359afd9c54736de3f87d4 25643
00284thm.jpg
THUMB284 96492e86a78cce5746f1c4d3b1effddd 33189
00285thm.jpg
THUMB285 7593d26fd5740528773e4c951a2f4ede 38239
00286thm.jpg
THUMB286 2be21839dfabb40a1f7b494f1f607e61 32995
00287thm.jpg
THUMB287 8c076ce055bef21364663b3d409dc1d7 34817
00288thm.jpg
THUMB288 08de09e5f0bf832230a6c16d4c752a9d 35911
00289thm.jpg
THUMB289 16eb56664b40c4fd00c8802543ec089f 26383
00290thm.jpg
THUMB290 ae6a1e281fb344eea1ae8f49ce029f1a 34610
00291thm.jpg
THUMB291 8e66f5e3eda79e3c622da730f00e1a09 39006
00292thm.jpg
THUMB292 71c73198593da43139f02e1f2acc27a1 40393
00293thm.jpg
THUMB293 0c728072ed67c877c71674f77e68477f 39822
00294thm.jpg
THUMB294 c066a783d511e8dd2ce98544edbc2658 40165
00295thm.jpg
THUMB295 a8d4603f59178356dfc6082c4e0e70c1 39297
00296thm.jpg
THUMB296 05c07ee7c25fe5deddca870eb137132c 25812
00297thm.jpg
THUMB297 d9858e0afa1e00b3231c74e7e0e704f8 23494
00298thm.jpg
THUMB298 69c50b20f988688946dc503056e26d0a 22427
00299thm.jpg
THUMB299 414a189a381ff5c9ca772daef91fb8c2 34004
00300thm.jpg
THUMB300 d9ebc97badb81a345e56c6715b5d5e10 24173
00301thm.jpg
THUMB301 befd56990368d4b222e41e77f4c8959f 39973
00302thm.jpg
THUMB302 753c6c0770bbe1fe59a4fbaba724644b 35146
00303thm.jpg
THUMB303 d98b885289d684b687da90bdb4527822 39279
00304thm.jpg
THUMB304 07c48fea95fdd41882a02625ca7cf13a 40339
00305thm.jpg
THUMB305 5e2280ed1172c168cb29f0a7d9813c9c 41091
00306thm.jpg
THUMB306 16b2c9ec7ddd09634b386c4772392372 35904
00307thm.jpg
THUMB307 b3943fc437ae44ca705d05d0fe25e79c 28936
00308thm.jpg
THUMB308 11a808497bcd48c4c6ec10c049568ad0 35868
00309thm.jpg
THUMB309 adc0072796fc4ef15e812e63e4311bb2 41403
00310thm.jpg
THUMB310 2ddb0e0ea2b85888d18fedff0269afee 40579
00311thm.jpg
THUMB311 3ac310aaed70c673b9e5a309da8e4d6a 40830
00312thm.jpg
THUMB312 f75866cce9674a657d5e84669ed926c5 34777
00313thm.jpg
THUMB313 15ae1d1dc418cb6cb50a23683bd878b2 25168
00314thm.jpg
THUMB314 d33961abe49902e88ef9c34bddf30ebc 24621
00315thm.jpg
THUMB315 0a4d837eaadf789804927d560341e8d7 33554
00316thm.jpg
THUMB316 baa7f3a71520a619c72abfd06e0d1b06 39707
00317thm.jpg
THUMB317 a0b995675cf53b879ba5934a4744c3c1 40709
00318thm.jpg
THUMB318 29a579d98349af7d524ad3dbce0c0acc 40661
00319thm.jpg
THUMB319 f8e1e78bcea84d4a5fa89654fc7b86f3 34094
00320thm.jpg
THUMB320 759560717b84d8771261db74dfd73106 39513
00321thm.jpg
THUMB321 d5655230e0cb107743f01d02923b8731 36181
00322thm.jpg
THUMB322 6b0255fff2bf66c59c3e5b7c78f0fec6 29499
00323thm.jpg
THUMB323 e7ecbc9c99fc8cf8e8a26512d4a2e4fe 18351
00324thm.jpg
THUMB324 a35350dfce0fce7ea47b94f01c06fa85
00325thm.jpg
THUMB325 168131fe9c630033f6df4b08f24f13c9 40379
00326thm.jpg
THUMB326 4ab6f64c0dd428e3b0243f9e645a63a0 40121
00327thm.jpg
THUMB327 dc5f8836226b0d344b05d9d7de176c6c 39763
00328thm.jpg
THUMB328 73333396163424f19092952f93b25817 40317
00329thm.jpg
THUMB329 bfab57493325a89e1feb547c8246c2c7 39546
00330thm.jpg
THUMB330 8318c368b73ef0664c8deb212096dec1 40948
00331thm.jpg
THUMB331 65dd998dba1eaa0c79815e34f5e389cf 25035
00332thm.jpg
THUMB332 226def76b30485d417895558225492dd 39930
00333thm.jpg
THUMB333 6dd421d294680c410f5b4b7de6476cea 37616
00334thm.jpg
THUMB334 ff01756361e99e56a3b5b1fc66581dd1 33428
00335thm.jpg
THUMB335 38f0d7f6aa6366538876e3dc2112c9ba 18262
00336thm.jpg
THUMB336 cd5b88c77a8150d82073f35a2289511e 36781
00337thm.jpg
THUMB337 f01c5ef2a377dd0829ae4033bd9ca429 40187
00338thm.jpg
THUMB338 a62f6d6fe47d79ce2935dac847b894b3 41325
00339thm.jpg
THUMB339 f274ed503348b782e6a635272b3baf2e 40037
00340thm.jpg
THUMB340 b451e4019ff182a27a58dd0c905bf7e1 40797
00341thm.jpg
THUMB341 5fdd89ae27877cd0fa7aac5f57e8b33b 26880
00342thm.jpg
THUMB342 a22e52bd8dbce3271e8c23932368166f 41330
00343thm.jpg
THUMB343 69ab71feede79ecc605d9e655a66bb9c 41344
00344thm.jpg
THUMB344 1b5871602faa4ff828030065c7af6464 41385
00345thm.jpg
THUMB345 3fd994c7932f304b1908ed7f3b95e945 42223
00346thm.jpg
THUMB346 5255bd0591219936a462afd1566b0d78 40737
00347thm.jpg
THUMB347 4d0743c86e70e354d96679803256212a 41732
00348thm.jpg
THUMB348 05e94aea469799ea90fe4310aa3b1ef1 38181
00349thm.jpg
THUMB349 ad45ca732ed4d2a24a482d30e4182552 39287
00350thm.jpg
THUMB350 95ba7b9eea54812e04ac1b6fd29f7139 36017
00351thm.jpg
THUMB351 84915a5aed6bc10f6c82a29e28eb04f0 23316
00352thm.jpg
THUMB352 35ad677e429cec21276038719e61c25d 35071
00353thm.jpg
THUMB353 2104dbcb0675b0c3274538f33a6520c3 40013
00354thm.jpg
THUMB354 e04cf1388c6a57afabe274600b5e6881 40414
00355thm.jpg
THUMB355 e61c566c46258936fadbe880b3cb98bb 39533
00356thm.jpg
THUMB356 c9e712713d9e1f33f0de2e1b8931e104 23000
00357thm.jpg
THUMB357 160402ac0e06a6181dffc3b24e35b71b 40729
00358thm.jpg
THUMB358 1160238e291ee36c6fbf70aa28d83e37 41408
00359thm.jpg
THUMB359 b0277f560ad41fb0b4b2604db4babebc 40935
00360thm.jpg
THUMB360 290bae1fc5b766a371e4c32bcabc9349 41364
00361thm.jpg
THUMB361 eb2e34f295d0bb6e880b888ae5560352 40398
00362thm.jpg
THUMB362 76e390155ff66575e1c4380b33735ae2 40724
00363thm.jpg
THUMB363 f3ea6694fa8b3111b273737585e19949 33891
00364thm.jpg
THUMB364 cb449d12605fc93f9316a1280d8a2e5f 35498
00365thm.jpg
THUMB365 33a353033be8f981243bc30c448dfa28 26439
00366thm.jpg
THUMB366 9077d978b0c3b0ccbf8524226b6512ab 35234
00367thm.jpg
THUMB367 21daa53ca2f6849daae942f485cf466b 38617
00368thm.jpg
THUMB368 a09e91d72150ace6961877363d61d42d 24938
00369thm.jpg
THUMB369 b99d2d4a49955b4d4a88d25c1b543b74 30952
00370thm.jpg
THUMB370 3c69b164c16acf377aea6404f0953fbb 40018
00371thm.jpg
THUMB371 df2918b1a12de57544a9f844af14503c 31433
00372thm.jpg
THUMB372 6faf1bf9aa7f515b796cf9f19b561e7d 40153
00373thm.jpg
THUMB373 ca45bebf5712bd88242e310e6aa9d7fa 25560
00374thm.jpg
THUMB374 758e68ac3f3774e90b2837656339a02f 26000
00375thm.jpg
THUMB375 b5f25d21b4e3081a3e392d589cf1635b 34673
00376thm.jpg
THUMB376 41b9c5ff38ca14677562b3e4c4577c35 23200
00377thm.jpg
THUMB377 ac0ba99789c8ac7a8f82d683a9e689b4 39045
00378thm.jpg
THUMB378 86c754fba0bdd7418a7ce4b7c3afaedd 40277
00379thm.jpg
THUMB379 2caee781beb99e0c49934e6bff38e04d 34476
00380thm.jpg
THUMB380 8a33f7ce692c1055437adebb196ef81a 33056
00381thm.jpg
THUMB381 8e2973bb7802d47f594b11f0aa9f1a75 18288
00382thm.jpg
THUMB382 b6ef359176eaa350e27508f0b8fd00b9 35027
00383thm.jpg
THUMB383 81155600a2251087b255a7059cf8740f 40654
00384thm.jpg
THUMB384 461ab7696f6b2408c70b932f22b5d288 40213
00385thm.jpg
THUMB385 ed6c847bf9a542c68e659f394f835cc3 39529
00386thm.jpg
THUMB386 cfa236abd3d13ad11bfd0a2780ce3aaa
00387thm.jpg
THUMB387 af6e50ec6c37f4813cc937bb413115fe 40291
00388thm.jpg
THUMB388 42677acdedff83f11e00a6eb77e8e596 40507
00389thm.jpg
THUMB389 c34fd7ad74e0fff20d9aa56d95c00d55 35163
00390thm.jpg
THUMB390 33a957517fa9e3400b4feedc19f1a885
00391thm.jpg
THUMB391 f97ad41a9ba60b739382ad25bb1c9def 40586
00392thm.jpg
THUMB392 0f28c80d3b06b87758d0f3a9b32f2381 39147
00393thm.jpg
THUMB393 173cb00885288b0a2e187145bf6a1378 34129
00394thm.jpg
THUMB394 4525b5b36638c8f1a5c02725134300d2 35514
00395thm.jpg
THUMB395 2dde114ae243a8b11ef48e6b64458f5c 39656
00396thm.jpg
THUMB396 13d16aa4054eef3c250c3a6a7d8f4082
00397thm.jpg
THUMB397 769992c136f65a180f9cb3777bfc0da7 39882
00398thm.jpg
THUMB398 78d84e7b73943beff36613f17f12310f
00399thm.jpg
THUMB399 bb4b09e0b149d6419a3fafb26c1cc9ec 35951
00400thm.jpg
THUMB400 0e823cda1ac3b5d66b823a003fd96077 41134
00401thm.jpg
THUMB401 714c39f4d5c59567316f9d279670cb37 26532
00402thm.jpg
THUMB402 9e61295bda92585f4d128b590922b2b3 40903
00403thm.jpg
THUMB403 6cd9b71cc4da3bfdaa3bb0a6ef14daf5 21887
00404thm.jpg
THUMB404 540475b1e58d7707f968a380056a08ee 39938
00405thm.jpg
THUMB405 5a04dc562752204394c2d812c02da82f 35175
00406thm.jpg
THUMB406 d312ca321ae0f60eb7f71286f9e085a9 40100
00407thm.jpg
THUMB407 930e78bb8769d7ad23d10586989eb12b 35417
00408thm.jpg
THUMB408 47a9762553163a919d353a029c4c7754 26908
00409thm.jpg
THUMB409 17a3802c068755bfc8124197a0e0586b
00410thm.jpg
THUMB410 086af66b0161de1fb25e24c9f3bea809 36291
00411thm.jpg
THUMB411 a04f06c1bdd664af33cbab1c288f5fa5 40568
00412thm.jpg
THUMB412 9769f500869c6f447ecd0bfbf9361db9 40460
00413thm.jpg
THUMB413 55efbd8eba40d6fd689a8475fb46896d 40610
00414thm.jpg
THUMB414 75f7a4c9b5a3da79f00e4fc674683b49 40356
00415thm.jpg
THUMB415 1ddedeb9c92f68e5af2dd05fb7a82346 41160
00416thm.jpg
THUMB416 5b5cf947a801646d7afe166c8f2a8dd3 41017
00417thm.jpg
THUMB417 fc0def14f0257c78ce46908adeaa4ffd 40208
00418thm.jpg
THUMB418 e5505d30e32bf2882178778be4955593 41307
00419thm.jpg
THUMB419 aecf6468733b446e75f66cd581a587cf 40481
00420thm.jpg
THUMB420 dd1e8a421f5365f2682b1cbd1c1576fa 41188
00421thm.jpg
THUMB421 bb80137c3f3f31140c3efa5e2d4baecf
00422thm.jpg
THUMB422 b553310e3b22aaa22a722a212d654f39 40846
00423thm.jpg
THUMB423 7eee3e980351d8619457eef8f7618427 41035
00424thm.jpg
THUMB424 352c810758ca25c5a9cdaa56d5379dc4 35252
00425thm.jpg
THUMB425 47e9feafa59f32268d8f537cc63bae0f 38838
00426thm.jpg
THUMB426 0ac0ea1ed7f8e24368949e6aaf52799d 37988
00427thm.jpg
THUMB427 f9108c1e62e461b9d5f067c727f083db 20784
00428thm.jpg
THUMB428 e8f4fdb77f4ad2a103e1a50f262eb48c 35374
00429thm.jpg
THUMB429 49887fdcda2dc5c56d8e7eafb177df7c 41331
00430thm.jpg
THUMB430 3cc1876fa6a28c594887dba02a9eaf06 40996
00431thm.jpg
THUMB431 91ea4caf17fd3c01af81ca33b31900c9 36145
00432thm.jpg
THUMB432 008966cf1d4855078f7246ca82d24f0f 41618
00433thm.jpg
THUMB433 3c29b0ab24594aee8a2cea4fafdcb245 39661
00434thm.jpg
THUMB434 99f5132d701f47c3de203de06be2ef1f 40894
00435thm.jpg
THUMB435 39d4865ce325d64e4fb530e21f3f98ce 24039
00436thm.jpg
THUMB436 c33a4d0db66690108cec240128ef3782 39880
00437thm.jpg
THUMB437 61302fd6c54ba6550069940197ebd8e7 37909
00438thm.jpg
THUMB438 6e7bdf7102cab9e1e1a336cac574db0e 35527
00439thm.jpg
THUMB439 2ac7c164a62e17b30d989f215438142f 41324
00440thm.jpg
THUMB440 0164c03ad467741744eb8881fb475bac 31214
00441thm.jpg
THUMB441 c6a40558ebb53d61c7ab04811c1b9737 40943
00442thm.jpg
THUMB442 2f9c0bac5ce23a606dc9d9fa07ace557 41598
00443thm.jpg
THUMB443 4354791ecc327e0be2c0cc98f9eb8148 39999
00444thm.jpg
THUMB444 86f2bff1b666520c4c1b99b4071994b4 39388
00445thm.jpg
THUMB445 c21695dd816c55065434afe7f2aa4d8b 36230
00446thm.jpg
THUMB446 75a915c4b246eed406a721f625a90298 37614
00447thm.jpg
THUMB447 4a3dfab419212f8b53458afd1442e3c7 26799
00448thm.jpg
THUMB448 af07011937f4f47b7cc6d59f7b09786e 36689
00449thm.jpg
THUMB449 6c280ad7b3e29a807330b74c9df59511 41643
00450thm.jpg
THUMB450 cafb0aeda5de5ae9cd24687ca3e3e9b6
00451thm.jpg
THUMB451 e46a869518e4a3014efaa20360241b29 40682
00452thm.jpg
THUMB452 fc4c76fa249ef27fb98aae4d0d4f5d34 26578
00453thm.jpg
THUMB453 08e457d378e3997d2c7fd1172b6de29d 25673
00454thm.jpg
THUMB454 6f6ea89818d364112a1eb5660a44cecd 35093
00455thm.jpg
THUMB455 4bbc73ab5692c514b8b5a779c3e157af 25903
00456thm.jpg
THUMB456 9eac0a5cff0e7eda8516d52ed8af715f 40799
00457thm.jpg
THUMB457 8f2b404ddb777a3e741d2e37355c9996 26442
00458thm.jpg
THUMB458 fd3e4c532481fa9cfbcd59a91467c1cd 38726
00459thm.jpg
THUMB459 220a056f146cd0fd5cf359a6f2b4acf3 25044
00460thm.jpg
THUMB460 2302ae0bc641541f50904c342b0f04dc 39077
00461thm.jpg
THUMB461 635331429f18ab91167ecb710b24d6ef 39787
00462thm.jpg
THUMB462 f3b5da79fb95fe8b6fdab8b96b9d0144 36491
00463thm.jpg
THUMB463 8fefbef6d5f6ffb39d596e4f9e3244f7 37801
00464thm.jpg
THUMB464 91a6ec3bf5462bb35958bd35b3e1ec16 34336
00465thm.jpg
THUMB465 ce1c2148caef3c250e68c70e7d982516 34192
00466thm.jpg
THUMB466 4d9b6408250dd9bbceb7729eb5c9e2cc 38675
00467thm.jpg
THUMB467 3b444c2fbf13bd857a8095d8cecfe8bb 39146
00468thm.jpg
THUMB468 e99672ef80eab1e1464b737457168ba5 38584
00469thm.jpg
THUMB469 0f234d066e5177ffcfdc65095365ef21 39746
00470thm.jpg
THUMB470 e63e36690bab2064d518db6addc7d5ab 39296
00471thm.jpg
THUMB471 e05b456cbdcc37935182ed7454aad776 37902
00472thm.jpg
TXT1 textplain 9e5178712e44f145868d949dfbfaea96 70
00001.txt
TXT2 da94c90a8f1f7f6b02acefc5d877a0d2 144
00002.txt
TXT3 39cd6abb77ff272a08023dde0577063a 226
00003.txt
TXT4 926af52712e33e18e381a0cacb277b10 2121
00004.txt
TXT5 d197753a5cff579dd5fe1391614c9e65 1061
00005.txt
TXT6 032b66b6db74d19ce3e91e55eae7bc9d 1541
00006.txt
TXT7 69a35eb62e71929eccb04ca544a55c90 1665
00007.txt
TXT8 7096c49f6c24fb574d6b0669c3000ba6 478
00008.txt
TXT9 f0be2b24c7c8ef31009c35fe0bfa9206 1222
00009.txt
TXT10 79ae19d1abc8763a6607e83f38873e76 1266
00010.txt
TXT11 99e1c9c63213cf575fd8e7e25582b566 1754
00011.txt
TXT12 b0794721a29165fe11e1a1242304f84d 1535
00012.txt
TXT13 2451fbc009a54c8ab0a6fd7e78f68b62 1568
00013.txt
TXT14 790a5b8b9f592244d7dbe750f4cb0b3f 1490
00014.txt
TXT15 8ca6fb4005bab3e7f0f30f55f321ea76 1901
00015.txt
TXT16 be3079d15aedbc7e6afcd84292e241af 2591
00016.txt
TXT17 0007834122ddec2f59dbb81640aa585e 2636
00017.txt
TXT18 813c69169a12693c343eeb84a39f214e 2471
00018.txt
TXT19 75ba15d4d672a01b581e5aa9d3e3613b 2362
00019.txt
TXT20 9c59c702b3e6c6fc595de0b56a8dfd89 2663
00020.txt
TXT21 e8f0d56dd94a2457d32f798a173ad669 498
00021.txt
TXT22 f683dcd0d1c4d2c30f5c85135ad3fb41 1941
00023.txt
TXT23 d36f045eeafa50fd45aa7ae78ac5c93e 2627
00024.txt
TXT24 c911925741eca97fd87ee996629a6c25 2622
00025.txt
TXT25 04755ab32d60fe410a242d3455d43766 2441
00026.txt
TXT26 c596bd36ffc8d6691211478aaea7ce54 2671
00027.txt
TXT27 895f50d6b5275107284606a092802d6f 2694
00028.txt
TXT28 8851d435838f41e2386b33f17a3747a6 2473
00029.txt
TXT29 8c938453db7e3e5e55aa26f39646ee02 2414
00030.txt
TXT30 0f71bc50634cdc1c2a68f5227d39fdcb
00031.txt
TXT31 2f4d375082c2fd864db3dac14091b18f 2660
00032.txt
TXT32 13cbede43c037a616706369a01a3daf6 2686
00033.txt
TXT33 92e914bb9a03366fe6bef9b14f376c7c 2774
00034.txt
TXT34 12fe40480bbefbd186b88cb71bf8da5d 2730
00035.txt
TXT35 fa60bbba762b9d765d316a7f779f6635 2632
00036.txt
TXT36 459906d151c9812bddf83e19a8625f59 2615
00037.txt
TXT37 c198110261aa32ef721efd227435d041 2639
00038.txt
TXT38 316316fe3f5d1b8342f82c82f7fcadae 2585
00039.txt
TXT39 c7e6778da68a6443d284aeef36f31f67 930
00040.txt
TXT40 58701bb9b629c936d2c36ad0abcc8ac0 1856
00041.txt
TXT41 b7afce2a037aaea5ee830aa7a82bdee0 2577
00042.txt
TXT42 f87267f17ea1ef0d3b6a010a57aec13d 2398
00043.txt
TXT43 fc4d182b3fb3c603acce328726daea97 1319
00044.txt
TXT44 ad1b49bfc842169eebf4e846fe0dceec 1013
00045.txt
TXT45 ef451e98d78b883ecf2712f519d14752 863
00046.txt
TXT46 6acccf8442504fc337d605632d506998 1919
00047.txt
TXT47 8efb494875e3f0a9f64dbf2a8409b774 1988
00048.txt
TXT48 aa1a0339e201a9885049dcd3464e26ea 1655
00049.txt
TXT49 cd8f95fd19dd7ffc156416a515e7e21e 2375
00050.txt
TXT50 0d5728dcc7aadbd027d3f9e36f39bc2a 1540
00051.txt
TXT51 2f39032924b0a5d5852351b82c2d8bcc 2494
00052.txt
TXT52 83f80bf0e53e60315ea122b925f02584 2468
00053.txt
TXT53 46404c23665a73f7159ead745df63a08 2500
00054.txt
TXT54 a5755584d6da82ad9d53d375628d1687 2037
00055.txt
TXT55 eb83fd9c36fdb7696040d118fc76cdbd 1819
00056.txt
TXT56 43b52dc924b6ae07e1b93787da5c05a0 843
00057.txt
TXT57 81051bcc2cf1bedf378224b0a93e2877 2
00058.txt
TXT58 420352dfe4d1588361421251f2c44ff1 1990
00059.txt
TXT59 5680302445e6ae6e3cb37bd7143e79e7 2475
00060.txt
TXT60 c65d28e86dbaaf85fd66a447417e0459
00061.txt
TXT61 749309573d934d62300a8c75ae500e6d 2903
00062.txt
TXT62 d5aca08f0d8b3f5cb5eca8c3aa2d0c5a 2695
00063.txt
TXT63 99e12c04ef652a845ddc79d9634de574 2383
00064.txt
TXT64 e9b3f6b7636aa3c19fe91e1b32957919 2597
00065.txt
TXT65 f33036c4096d1f9327e4e900426bffdc
00066.txt
TXT66 7b1207fcb0b57b91d6e92847cca5379e 2248
00067.txt
TXT67 6a24e32f9359e426cb8cd42009733ff4 1854
00068.txt
TXT68 e5b18daa83214bc7b2df68f461279b39 1762
00069.txt
TXT69 d73d9087414c21a1119b4abe37e17799 1626
00070.txt
TXT70 26b908ba0b7d59b892aa9192dcbc521f 1781
00071.txt
TXT71 6fb4df4a0b99bc1f23fdd4b14bd0701e 2651
00072.txt
TXT72 9577fe43362a2e9bdea1030528615985 2282
00073.txt
TXT73 b659159bc09c17d7f2eaa378d6be35ac
00074.txt
TXT74 a965ae2eaeb893c3dee91f703756bedd
00075.txt
TXT75 7d40f4577d6c3d51a302c87e4a4b8aa0 2640
00076.txt
TXT76 7ef3b6788495ea3ab36020a9ab5f80aa
00077.txt
TXT77 76f3113756171c2dfdea6c02441c9554 2668
00078.txt
TXT78 c0c74e0bf8a1120e40c7438ca85920d6 2357
00079.txt
TXT79 c4a2d6f49d35ae04edbb7fd47d2306b4 2239
00080.txt
TXT80 818d16d0e13fff9d569bc9eab5f53de2 357
00081.txt
TXT81
00082.txt
TXT82 939b7e97db71535bb94907f45e5692b3 2006
00083.txt
TXT83 4fae7c32225ee9f75ff86c046474f175 2234
00084.txt
TXT84 c38ee5fa3adc47ecedc0a84b6fbedb22 2499
00085.txt
TXT85 95a0006fc2d08a13ca3bce7758ad4984 2460
00086.txt
TXT86 6abad9d4360d5841c8d6cf126e73fd55 2319
00087.txt
TXT87 fde6d9a812f240573785701db36288fa 2318
00088.txt
TXT88 d5f7872e9ae6064cfa918a7587f359af
00089.txt
TXT89 40360f3037b81be115550cd0119519e5 2538
00090.txt
TXT90 9ac2dac1ad899b70525891c6c68ef72f 2142
00091.txt
TXT91 1af6745fedae403dd2d5c23cb7114590 1970
00092.txt
TXT92 d095d5a5e5322e003f52e77ab1b04333 2254
00093.txt
TXT93 98122d2b4898d9b67166a3f6e964faee
00094.txt
TXT94 26a3e0e97437df2483cf4c5ef7012579 2061
00095.txt
TXT95 87148edf1cc43b923d35dbd0b6caf5a1 2472
00096.txt
TXT96 3155866f987ca896649c27ac70c7a8b0 2213
00097.txt
TXT97 0c121825858b84bf8d22bcd2845a5da2 2099
00098.txt
TXT98 6a8b818a46f146e23b3907e9fd74c435 2406
00099.txt
TXT99 add6585dd1017d7d828c7a978891ecf3 2404
00100.txt
TXT100 5233b12fdce5954af2145606cb923431 2520
00101.txt
TXT101 3314720921c5c0cc721471f212c6e5e1 2599
00102.txt
TXT102 c5989c8513306cd20faa014ebf321411 2607
00103.txt
TXT103 94a6a96e1a280a5f15663a1cff27c192 2557
00104.txt
TXT104 9f3c64f2867c89ef06a86b1d864a4d6d 2648
00105.txt
TXT105 85c31d0b9427572cba2c47ccd5d931ee
00106.txt
TXT106 945863ad916235e36cb24ccd6bd40c4a 2208
00107.txt
TXT107 bd46bd540994086391712333fb5d9236 1077
00108.txt
TXT108 0d295cd31ccd4dc5f02cc7fd45ec8ef8 2085
00109.txt
TXT109 42e4ef16df35c98a60cc129861083233 2346
00110.txt
TXT110 c0fdfe21cf3998a36668fd53c0082651 2553
00111.txt
TXT111 278aafc020e34d92f1dcade16728356b 2464
00112.txt
TXT112 58080c6c8049f50a9eee653c1c1ed3d9 2387
00113.txt
TXT113 d7724264cc208e6d6f7ebdf3f0360d38 2371
00114.txt
TXT114 7f27fa0b14867f34d516d5b671bdafe1 2558
00115.txt
TXT115 0b1773d7b7ac2eceb1aeb668585b6a57
00116.txt
TXT116 b78c99747df7ed84ef89c0edff8e319c 2046
00117.txt
TXT117 2b8b72373e0fdd7e7d71febbd31b0bd2 2195
00118.txt
TXT118 eaadfc2b20fc12dc2fb8f8e326192d10 516
00119.txt
TXT119
00120.txt
TXT120 55ec0d28a51c595fe78a49d2cd791656 1791
00121.txt
TXT121 44a4fd833cb5b8f560b21f6c8614c51b
00122.txt
TXT122 abf2265239c4d61bf836f42245a02fc8 2421
00123.txt
TXT123 f34e02dd4f673a13eafe797c74c0e192 2741
00124.txt
TXT124 4312ba20191ffa4f6ebfd475a81de451 2108
00125.txt
TXT125 16f7bba95d9459f6e64c03c2d13ed81e 2151
00126.txt
TXT126 4d1d727836f941a08fc7554d7d74f8bc 1476
00127.txt
TXT127 fd96e4c6d8c07917e4e07437f43b00d2 2253
00128.txt
TXT128 2d9dc00e83459ed03fa11d82ee178ba1 2117
00129.txt
TXT129 1a560e73441590156995448cf57c6fcb 2086
00130.txt
TXT130 2f74824ecca6fe3751cf810c76a01aee 2062
00131.txt
TXT131 18c04920675a439a6d9ba9d40da446c5 1502
00132.txt
TXT132 4303e7629fe13c22d179a67523800949 1997
00133.txt
TXT133 aec0acde5604dda7d5aedd51768c29e6 2675
00134.txt
TXT134 56dc777933df5d3f4e78ee5d66d81d98 2592
00135.txt
TXT135 140c65e1d295ac131da2178f76ec7df1 2474
00136.txt
TXT136 f3b19158743d944003cc2e0781747299 2609
00137.txt
TXT137 8dc7692588c9a97dfda758c219a3e8a9 1723
00138.txt
TXT138 3f3779117a00615b631982d052bfbd1b 2722
00139.txt
TXT139 ae411c9d5b072b74af6b2d929cecd9a4 2575
00140.txt
TXT140 9ae5c2bae764527a560890872c20e2a5 1792
00141.txt
TXT141 98d2d2a2ec95d59ac6e2047e7b8eecd3 2569
00142.txt
TXT142 0c0add8ccb28051602f56bdb361ebb45 2188
00143.txt
TXT143 89424c321982ac10f9f0eb10d1854f19 2737
00144.txt
TXT144 e67ebd23b9dbeb0768ef40b836e41f83 2041
00145.txt
TXT145 9a00fb77a60e3215dffa545bf35f2d80 2028
00146.txt
TXT146 7f82dbcf7656fd3cee193037a277d77f 2227
00147.txt
TXT147 6ec70f02726bb3a8cfea9af028fde588 707
00148.txt
TXT148 22de0555d6387c3bf7d8208b9380e63e 1926
00149.txt
TXT149 3fbd3362f2ae239585902be0d90d3eb3 2483
00150.txt
TXT150 d159f68bc8fa89a939cc4d6fc5707821 2571
00151.txt
TXT151 bbd8bf35d2360833e988fb8c980cd9d9 2546
00152.txt
TXT152 c1513a6c17dc7d415791714a7ca57f01 2456
00153.txt
TXT153 d520e1bed05f9840ee51ba186b620765 2583
00154.txt
TXT154 b670446b732244edf8ec42dc6c80d7fc 2223
00155.txt
TXT155 228d470f4fbde1872dd2529389155235 2566
00156.txt
TXT156 2e2d889b02a8929a238000e1518a641c
00157a.txt
TXT157 d2a2df3c33fb2b1493c58580dddcf0fa 2539
00157b.txt
TXT158 2b549ece1fa2931ac24eb7513f3f6192 2366
00157c.txt
TXT159 d46822cd9f8d8c05110fa7b757a46bac 2477
00157d.txt
TXT160 d589141ecc11641dee962c9f92ad69f9 2209
00157e.txt
TXT161 643d38ac5d38b63d874eb9d018d6cc9e 2617
00157f.txt
TXT162 b6e90beb2995fad760f41c1c7dfb333e 2071
00159.txt
TXT163 1d1d915cbae43c0fc9b21f48c15bd5fa 2463
00160.txt
TXT164 fa30630497755aecb53901404ce93057 2697
00161.txt
TXT165 2f2f57e999daf3c07e07c088a6bf62f1 2087
00162.txt
TXT166 49d13de8921410d3e35fcdab7d32d2c5
00163.txt
TXT167 0e40b504b85d05d4c618c293d91aa3b8 2048
00164.txt
TXT168 f4423d0d909d7cbc206126b0dbb8d9bc
00165.txt
TXT169
00166.txt
TXT170 d32c5d8ac1d6fc07fc2f4e63f954657d 2088
00167.txt
TXT171 d765b19c8b3fa6a646b41a942a3237c2 2727
00168.txt
TXT172 3e5a33552f652144a8b327e6c790fd1c 2705
00169.txt
TXT173 e98e9c302d872a321979790825a5214c 2428
00170.txt
TXT174 92af21bb18d3bb57e6e91d9259b4fe10 2462
00171.txt
TXT175 c56d19cdc2a6b409970f03d684bb20e7 722
00172.txt
TXT176 7cf782513b9fed9a68339ef852ecefef 2596
00173.txt
TXT177 8021fc403f5d60af2b39a3677cfa28cb 2734
00174.txt
TXT178 80b91da0c15c0c65beb2197fe7c8f9e2 2529
00175.txt
TXT179 a570f13f59b1d4da2c878f9a06b03ef0 278
00176.txt
TXT180 5527a84208db701f6418652298350116 267
00177.txt
TXT181 3eb7aa794344b6ad0cbd46e607bd6216 2715
00178.txt
TXT182 5512ec1cd386285943a07f1f663fa86d
00179.txt
TXT183 dfba4b5554fd59003a556d331fb6258d 444
00180.txt
TXT184 cf0cc72f7e81fda5f79c2c27eee884de 2729
00181.txt
TXT185 759ba12c4b7c078c1d460b2da93118ed
00182.txt
TXT186 8cc06414ef7d450626b51847f192873c 2241
00183.txt
TXT187 941b4cfd8fed2a99e5a983bdaf329627 1971
00184.txt
TXT188 75f9e5f22dc251118864b9000a3b56bb 1996
00185.txt
TXT189 c847fcee037fe87a3746f64c2df58cb5 2170
00186.txt
TXT190 a8ea6aea452e3e11fb01fb5682fc91ea 337
00187.txt
TXT191
00188.txt
TXT192 7d78f332053ee37535125dcaf4eca018 2111
00189.txt
TXT193 d9dba3ae74b910dd9ca6071c3398d5b7 2601
00190.txt
TXT194 8900a2ace0693fe7ba35a43ff6d0fe8c
00191.txt
TXT195 b163a928990c584ca54ee82293587e35 2883
00192.txt
TXT196 6fae1df98434211e0a62e3e4ead69367 150
00193.txt
TXT197 4985396b8e87706e18402341c6e49c13 1186
00194.txt
TXT198 38bf52226c7cc0ee9e044f1413671c37 1009
00195.txt
TXT199 b5690d4b0ef661c3914e12408c1bad35 1455
00196.txt
TXT200 fa1715654949c88bfe1b8d240f5b7d46
00197.txt
TXT201 619119ad0b7314b0ff5a5a801d0ddb67 2567
00198.txt
TXT202 6cfd99165d8436d71545c9cad3859690 2327
00199.txt
TXT203 58dec38000f24c1c0fe63709688f83f2 602
00200.txt
TXT204 fac4badad630dac8f999e5545c9e3494 1965
00201.txt
TXT205 9bba8388edfc6743564f1c864d0f59d7 2488
00202.txt
TXT206 3905374ccbd0e2a3496ced4faae1ece3
00203.txt
TXT207 936b518268184ae410f943963393fc9a 2490
00204.txt
TXT208 59fb5a6a913978159899066bb1e807ec 2018
00205.txt
TXT209 0631e2036c468cc2198367eb55569484 214
00206.txt
TXT210 df147df9f9fa19aecee2d9bea7bcbad0 2269
00207.txt
TXT211 8ce2e2949fe00e68fc090f2bf7c80ba4 2408
00208.txt
TXT212 088563b48fca59a4a825e3ca000660cb 1740
00209.txt
TXT213 d4d146b7ab272f0190c5ad8bae042f3b 2410
00210.txt
TXT214 00323683fe419ab58fc751ef881ce30c 2187
00211.txt
TXT215 da37cd29c925e10f5203b9bab3a6acae 1947
00212.txt
TXT216 8cb284b7a16aa44ae51898c81abffd9e 2400
00213.txt
TXT217 7e19b7e576d3567c1b80157e4578c12c
00214.txt
TXT218 35d0ca7198dd82abc716c442c33770e8 894
00215.txt
TXT219
00216.txt
TXT220 c331ccece1cdca4c66f4c1b73f6970ed 1883
00217.txt
TXT221 f12b18c655b46f1e980bbee0b1bbcb2e 2541
00218.txt
TXT222 c1c4e027671d6859d5264a10ae3d6b25 877
00219.txt
TXT223 41a626287ae11e288fedf534d75f3c86 2644
00220.txt
TXT224 96bdd14feb890678a617920de5ed2aba 2561
00221.txt
TXT225 e41fc13978b83315a959aba22a455026
00222.txt
TXT226 010abe732d62ae1034e9e5dc99f1d3b5 2562
00223.txt
TXT227 854dd9254e8364b27bdb83e0548f081a 2613
00224.txt
TXT228 2ba0543facbf8703e111584495941d95 2513
00225.txt
TXT229 79b5ec7d3269802e1c855727f895e7bc
00226.txt
TXT230 5e50668663b9e68551c881d0f4c04d6f
00227.txt
TXT231 c7f6bd36bdb47378efef8e62f9c22846 2115
00228.txt
TXT232 7793f417db48d69fd589ad775962192d 2145
00229.txt
TXT233 153c1e4e2a6b5e5a64aff13262dd9403 867
00230.txt
TXT234 3019a0b79bbf74f1d88d5dcbeb039014 2016
00231.txt
TXT235 f5acac81b6e6999dc048128b5fd6a09f
00232.txt
TXT236 f7027866a2a46e5822271a59708eb5e6 2540
00233.txt
TXT237 1a4f20ad8d8f40d34306f9915022eb48 2665
00234.txt
TXT238 e75336b07de63a4a3abc687644bcbf1b 2712
00235.txt
TXT239 dda75a9af6051857c8f37fb8a105d254 2588
00236.txt
TXT240 b6097154388a0644201d563988411809
00237.txt
TXT241 18e93275aa941c83bfac97c624cedf23
00238.txt
TXT242 19b64194b2afdcd4fdc6820f93a72316 1537
00239.txt
TXT243
00240.txt
TXT244 ea8460a0074cff90c9cfb60981d8444c 1993
00241.txt
TXT245 a552a86c08f4421c642a714ef921c0b0 2630
00242.txt
TXT246 245546f9ee087c330cb70bd615f16c50
00243.txt
TXT247 d326b27f30704fd99120e42d4c2311fa 1878
00244.txt
TXT248 fcccf988e78a3e5c7f2af4739f200341
00245.txt
TXT249 3122e6e60d294ea29876877956083643 2795
00246.txt
TXT250 31727f58f9fe25648b75a90c44d9161a 2307
00247.txt
TXT251 2618f506e631807d5ad916f04677f9c2 2042
00248.txt
TXT252 3ae018c581000988022e7d5f3621f710 2580
00249.txt
TXT253 49795d2bc04f5455b97e774811395e94
00250.txt
TXT254 03c29cbb1debd6d1f597cb2f126d52d7 2359
00251.txt
TXT255 f93e4f4eb769422197500cf81cbc2399 1925
00252.txt
TXT256 3d539a8df9e3aa3d007c93495f51a3ca 767
00253.txt
TXT257
00254.txt
TXT258 833f31a9e59f7e2dab46968e892c829e 1817
00255.txt
TXT259 c96f2e13e92790ee2d060f8f93c0ec06 2650
00256.txt
TXT260 844c3cb770c7a7244d9559b9f916d2cd 2419
00257.txt
TXT261 128eb258b4b48856ecf0ca3be2d1d823 2641
00258.txt
TXT262 25bd6319a1016dbb170a46518e7d5305 2153
00259.txt
TXT263 053bf0efa126718f08cb7737abe37d77 2559
00260.txt
TXT264 d1183d6650bcb225cbb5bff8788955d6 2552
00261.txt
TXT265 8c203091a900444bb7104fe97580a05e
00262.txt
TXT266 348e8a564ae5c9d09377c43e29839799 1069
00263.txt
TXT267 65fefaf563620e1505a67813cdfec2ed 2511
00264.txt
TXT268 2a8aa2cc62ef277d0bf4b790a30173c8 2621
00265.txt
TXT269 48d77b16053de6c1e5ae642aa796fed8 1467
00266.txt
TXT270 af0dd54c632334ac3e68feb36ff90c50 2175
00267.txt
TXT271 bdb4998febd817bb02d048b0a5c5975c 1569
00268.txt
TXT272 ee4b315da7d36a92e88cada12e12e223 2425
00269.txt
TXT273
00270.txt
TXT274 1d8bc19e193877a1cb961ad7828d0abe 2056
00271.txt
TXT275 dab9c9b228749b6c607f41d9347e839f 2524
00272.txt
TXT276 1e12084a833ccd349112dff6c45116c7
00277.txt
TXT277 5e3fe92cdbf0ba94b46389bbe31d698c
00278.txt
TXT278 0b19ba1e5b5d76be940230c0ba641100 785
00279.txt
TXT279 9b500a0696de58f67861321a0d2887a4 1756
00280.txt
TXT280 87f534fc342223011a4775d21087e4ac 2670
00281.txt
TXT281 0f94a27767d562496be9488851caebb3 521
00282.txt
TXT282 001d0ce02436d8aaefc19cfa5cbde3c6
00283.txt
TXT283 a829ed5f39bcc5dd8a9380e943e8f7ca 1234
00284.txt
TXT284 4af46cd34332e30369f0d2454017f592 952
00285.txt
TXT285 b68c3f175c1a1dbeed614b5c38ce7e69 2418
00286.txt
TXT286 29e3d0a2d1849b16233e1044fbfaaa9e 1804
00287.txt
TXT287 e039a9b3801b3eb718fa75b955140067 1957
00288.txt
TXT288 5c5b9dfb0079f360f6e0a936a50ab6eb 2130
00289.txt
TXT289 540fab6eb5daffb321b206fa5d01f7bb 928
00290.txt
TXT290 e05b302def59a196b7835bbec503a5cc 1911
00291.txt
TXT291 c349c45154e22aa952e62111bd99b9e6 2374
00292.txt
TXT292 e6a09e227445226f92dd00db82899978 2653
00293.txt
TXT293 1f331359eaa6149b1028905a40d91f8e 2535
00294.txt
TXT294 f307071cf55b6be14160830b9b7acbc1
00295.txt
TXT295 b56127b37412bad15b326fb0f7533e06 2288
00296.txt
TXT296 cd7d0cd030592e8f928c556e65048d07 2263
00297.txt
TXT297 8c73117f59b03f0a4a9744e3bb62d135 1093
00298.txt
TXT298 acf47b04a93c6d41a14cffb37b8cbd47 1527
00299.txt
TXT299 3b7cb56a8bf608669916f755ce54b405 1935
00300.txt
TXT300 2d20ca365ecabc56a530dfe3678f18fc 1702
00301.txt
TXT301 d22d03204579740aeb64c4fc1a4554c3 2367
00302.txt
TXT302 0a041b3472c6f95a0c1c5b7e8e4965d2 2005
00303.txt
TXT303 14c70c732f92bb97a37aac41b25852d8 2297
00304.txt
TXT304 e21faebc9aa5305fc59b4a61e885aa7f 2550
00305.txt
TXT305 cc6bbd50c465f2d8f4e1378c24e2ad76 2605
00306.txt
TXT306 d594bf0b83a3e302b81791bdba6d09c1
00307.txt
TXT307 45845cb1b9ecb2bc717f776a514b96af 1196
00308.txt
TXT308 abefc7885c166f6d7f6846a563491858 1948
00309.txt
TXT309 8b4d9da8778913f0fb40f6be45b461c9
00310.txt
TXT310 42ed7978fa2e549b4bc3a364c95dcb62 2482
00311.txt
TXT311 05baa12f9795c57fb07392abcdbb48ae 2618
00312.txt
TXT312 f0e6f96724b761c2da826d9c4efcd29b 1749
00313.txt
TXT313 11f16bb4d1f79ebfc388d987cb3b1162 1914
00314.txt
TXT314 5363ea00455ed42c9b2c78dd5b7aec17 1667
00315.txt
TXT315 1def6f122c0e2ce68483815e64954e1b
00316.txt
TXT316 371b892cafe27ae894980de17614c16a
00317.txt
TXT317 152578b630728165f774df0f1a04126f
00318.txt
TXT318 ef1364273232b792b34c0da30f87d2e0
00319.txt
TXT319 3def6cf317800fb68608e7b882e593aa 1292
00320.txt
TXT320 f9467993b2f54c822dc1a4568523b5a4 2431
00321.txt
TXT321 5a3e7f5a2c4602180b2c1e93d46fce6b 1952
00322.txt
TXT322 646f51076f0db6c49f9acce6e25729a9 1245
00323.txt
TXT323
00324.txt
TXT324 3b6eda50edee4d79ca8bfd9664a40342 2072
00325.txt
TXT325 2f2bb13745ee0c83f590e67d6ab76418 2424
00326.txt
TXT326 22278050974ff5881a5f54f8bb6bcbe9
00327.txt
TXT327 6e8bb4deebfefd69c074b403bb1695b7 2469
00328.txt
TXT328 4e8c7cb809db556f8013e3742cc830d7 2655
00329.txt
TXT329 79635c0617636b860a27986f1560fb88 2457
00330.txt
TXT330 d4af4d0ddf420ea5345f03d52f9d5ae0 2624
00331.txt
TXT331 f4ebc0e9857b8482a9a521a2c1abe617
00332.txt
TXT332 b44c2c498709564a752af10d3d64a89c 2476
00333.txt
TXT333 6777ea540e02188063983ffffbb62c4a 2136
00334.txt
TXT334 7b55cb6913558b706dbd9d7148615f08 1560
00335.txt
TXT335
00336.txt
TXT336 b4c8283e37d00291708ac09b3ee1816b 2058
00337.txt
TXT337 3d84473562fbebbbd56924208960b3a0
00338.txt
TXT338 5044a06e0aea155903d44e0de8613a8e 2748
00339.txt
TXT339 1185d5f27e24937e2578cd40c2a8010e 2518
00340.txt
TXT340 14f459d570d6a2ae6a2ec00f10c0a685
00341.txt
TXT341 7fe1d83190bf4d98383fb309cc58ca0e 2413
00342.txt
TXT342 4f07759927b2e10ff49837065a9295ce 2781
00343.txt
TXT343 8f63c2e34e6ee57e39821af043fc547e 2656
00344.txt
TXT344 c708f189987d8630efdbd04af02df711 2584
00345.txt
TXT345 75c6bcdcdf45aa661c327fadab59212a 2817
00346.txt
TXT346 3fa28be9a46c2af5ba05bc736abfd012
00347.txt
TXT347 de79c3eb55b5509b1f8eb1d0f006dfe0
00348.txt
TXT348 ab98d4cb0aa7edd2c5d12b375c45a8ea 2388
00349.txt
TXT349 c6b80b52e5b3fa280577b6e2124708fa 2313
00350.txt
TXT350 7416aa594d8b30401c89cadd1e201014 1942
00351.txt
TXT351 dae387bd34780e531b3768c0c2cb3b4b 484
00352.txt
TXT352 520f3dd6c88443008a3c7e7b4b31f4a6 1912
00353.txt
TXT353 747b5d9b7983b02206fc3e66f980092b
00354.txt
TXT354 04cdd3ffaa9183b2be32842e19dfdc7a 2631
00355.txt
TXT355 ea7a46536d0d1b7f5443b75777856f22
00356.txt
TXT356 6d806fb42d51e99ad175e3ac2cc9b603
00357.txt
TXT357 225ae19dbb1155bcd50e2eacd2956203 2652
00358.txt
TXT358 54dc7782b317f044e864630fefa6cf1f 2716
00359.txt
TXT359 8579920f92465f9e701c827d6e67cd0c 2714
00360.txt
TXT360 49fe6babc671365f26b3b518e4791546 2717
00361.txt
TXT361 30fdbf8c937c5f911f87890bbd1d4c9e 2604
00362.txt
TXT362 847a272235f6f2e042c086bec449e744 2595
00363.txt
TXT363 3f49dc7439fbb17a5949cd5bb0562668 1842
00364.txt
TXT364 f9f49b980d1e3cb658891a23a4ea749f 1933
00365.txt
TXT365 2e9d96505b1bf69f03d9014688af67e7 840
00366.txt
TXT366 a9fe94bf521d2f96ad6e963dfb36dfab 1807
00367.txt
TXT367 7d74adf394a35e32b5e08c82a17c21f4 2271
00368.txt
TXT368 38cdca351cf2beba203faaf64cd9e1c0
00369.txt
TXT369 b325d14242cc35db87c39eb614491e9e 809
00370.txt
TXT370 9c1161c763f09e0b83b1e58fbec0d95d 2412
00371.txt
TXT371 59086990c0c07c25071f68cc4e1c588e 1070
00372.txt
TXT372 6cd8ef88ea0349e8fad2c461e64ceab4 2556
00373.txt
TXT373 c73bb4eb201f15be770e8e239d137c16 2137
00374.txt
TXT374 d9cdc932469519da3e907dd37bddd34e
00375.txt
TXT375 b3a5bda1713ef176c1cfbabb6c300f00 1602
00376.txt
TXT376 d6a74b9a73f672cb204761c90443607d 790
00377.txt
TXT377 e80a60eca8d884fbcc953501845eb031 2285
00378.txt
TXT378 752a15cd339d27ac2ef8590b1a94aa09 2415
00379.txt
TXT379 4b5bc867df4bf7e6bd316ed96856aa5c 1732
00380.txt
TXT380 58d04fea731796fef3fa427196662517 1564
00381.txt
TXT381
00382.txt
TXT382 fa820334280ee08d08e8bf009fa19420 1806
00383.txt
TXT383 5fb3651c9d239a79a7090077a0b2aa81
00384.txt
TXT384 86ddb44684f8c035cd7530cd44e7e305 2532
00385.txt
TXT385 aeabd4a9abc639317151f9cb2c04cac7
00386.txt
TXT386 f166b2e0997c47334819434201ad88ec 2680
00387.txt
TXT387 a24e985dbd8db4775998b866e0afe8bb 2548
00388.txt
TXT388 b14f9838b358efaa0585efae11193a0c 2634
00389.txt
TXT389 f442d9e0b03e30b5645f78ce8ae0fc00 1892
00390.txt
TXT390 be1bc9b778930b80acc634e39df5460c
00391.txt
TXT391 0666afc0b0cac3a8578d0b3ed6d21370
00392.txt
TXT392 7648fdc33ecf1632f313971aad150481
00393.txt
TXT393 a508b4e4688ac65676a55898b717e349 1615
00394.txt
TXT394 eb18fbedf8d3f23360bab56d6a9ce4f0 2003
00395.txt
TXT395 bea160603d65c7b25d3ab032a083d4a9
00396.txt
TXT396 dd49f9f9fbdccee9012d7f2910a1fd06
00397.txt
TXT397 c29578d210b5ef104d7f9b14847d9a87 2403
00398.txt
TXT398 95b9a77604fa7ca05caf2a3eb5736221 2620
00399.txt
TXT399 118aaa8223419477eac50534e49879a3 1999
00400.txt
TXT400 eb7f99eb506942dd31f2ea3045244ef1
00401.txt
TXT401 a8b65041192af1c627584b3a793dc354 1400
00402.txt
TXT402 03188e6e8653a04d77ff36d5fb258150
00403.txt
TXT403 7f8aac4f23954275075fd50624fe3bc0 194
00404.txt
TXT404 61b5aed919c94692896dd3aea439f68d
00405.txt
TXT405 f9716b56fa06fd66e48f2aa92c69006d 1561
00406.txt
TXT406 d05c80d58ef51a0b969b469e80ea49ed
00407.txt
TXT407 09ef75c34d43db7ca2feafd5bbd99106 1906
00408.txt
TXT408 d6712acec8ea922e346f447b5b2eb16d 934
00409.txt
TXT409
00410.txt
TXT410 b847785ee0a5a0768d858870dc1170a6
00411.txt
TXT411 4892672741f4d65ed888e6c6aefb9151 2574
00412.txt
TXT412 4d587f4697fe794bcd3c279cb464341d 2614
00413.txt
TXT413 53121dbd89969c395dc984d1e5f4cf4e 2721
00414.txt
TXT414 354320b4a5a4ed862539f42ef4601b8c 2485
00415.txt
TXT415 9c527aa43385acd4636fc9aa6628629c 2709
00416.txt
TXT416 f2bf20436f9c215cb31fadfd7c54f0e9
00417.txt
TXT417 3dfac4675d98dbc19b54c112e6a48a1b 2554
00418.txt
TXT418 efdb01e18df777c063be35c92dc4c0a4 2669
00419.txt
TXT419 4c34a2fc6b643304fa227c083c4d753d 2608
00420.txt
TXT420 981912c20b52a0fb7aca1b616caa116b 2658
00421.txt
TXT421 b03e5fbd193401d9e5e1eae4e6189566 2586
00422.txt
TXT422 41eda8b0b5887eb5af84bcfbbded0c80
00423.txt
TXT423 a9e6968ac30eff9bd4cfa29699ea3b47
00424.txt
TXT424 2b36c383bdb84f1204efa15afb733d50 1880
00425.txt
TXT425 ab5e123b1924c3e859185e1f9f20755e 2324
00426.txt
TXT426 c7546391747a0e2abbd9be486c62efde
00427.txt
TXT427 3870d41445a2bfa101d77c61db8140f0 242
00428.txt
TXT428 d08d70b1a717b98f5130a71ac4e20864 1975
00429.txt
TXT429 f87d0d6411b91c2a891b2b5979262f5c 3024
00430.txt
TXT430 cb9cd4fdb238fce95d204927059a09b5
00431.txt
TXT431 e17687f842e904472d08aa530b697902 1859
00432.txt
TXT432 425ffef8644cebaa69b8334dbbdb5a76 2769
00433.txt
TXT433 7379b968eb0d96ac0d111afd21f56b6c 2525
00434.txt
TXT434 1cdb0b1f6d81c0b8d513db88d37cd091
00435.txt
TXT435 a93e2698fb79715547641cf37792824c 832
00436.txt
TXT436 155bcdd2907ecb601a7cf066283ad023 2401
00437.txt
TXT437 a920701f248401dde8d5df2a71848eef 2368
00438.txt
TXT438 6a449eba5fa0668045398c1b2ef12d7a 1830
00439.txt
TXT439 6206abd9d307c5444c5338c6e947ac50 2759
00440.txt
TXT440 e8f66b518b9c396529046b32340e5c2f 811
00441.txt
TXT441 0aa8783c15723987ba5c3aa19ad17013
00442.txt
TXT442 c4582221b91035bc839eab238ec442e3 2728
00443.txt
TXT443 8ab3ede9d55ba1cadd50d2d4680aa73d
00444.txt
TXT444 3026c82a813f570f88143bb44bef489a
00445.txt
TXT445 cede1f4be71e7e4a537ffdd57d7e9b21 2052
00446.txt
TXT446 899dd71a6f5e53f08ef05fcbfe2dee27 2129
00447.txt
TXT447 c7ad78d42cf8f3acbfb7e8851ce0c5a5 937
00448.txt
TXT448 619d133a28cea3c9fde30cadf6d6b652 2097
00449.txt
TXT449 164c448821ec2bc98852bcbb179c9c59 2778
00450.txt
TXT450 9c8273b5b56a8f57ff474849fac7b41e 2547
00451.txt
TXT451 680bc10b9323e30cd46413367fd8976c
00452.txt
TXT452 0c72b43157f7b3f8c38eeb15fe33d6de 1388
00453.txt
TXT453 fb814d8bc42cd572bd753bdc63fba668 2000
00454.txt
TXT454 0d8bc468955b592c748832d0e2561cd0 1563
00455.txt
TXT455 37caf169bd41badea9f68ec8bf00a532 1869
00456.txt
TXT456 5c8df5d38214d245fbf3fa61821a4b2b
00457.txt
TXT457 28a6beabc69d70da616ba7169bd04a6e 1011
00458.txt
TXT458 78a97215e0832713d3a6d18cb19afa7b 2335
00459.txt
TXT459 2e6ee25f78c1fca8eacbf6fe5bb6b911 959
00460.txt
TXT460 a16c9c912461ff2a5a61b3466d75c3f8
00461.txt
TXT461 913abf426183f10687a00bc726a5e16b 2402
00462.txt
TXT462 1004c7dc6f60158a70a73dc3d8be2270 1875
00463.txt
TXT463 aa5b714ef65ca50412bfaf4a5f90ac62 1850
00464.txt
TXT464 20d0ca343d03db878daaf8cf085e677c 1584
00465.txt
TXT465 3e2b4a5b527f93611eacad8ddd35a9ba 1727
00466.txt
TXT466 1cc72d0087bdf53b567c2d5bba79eafc
00467.txt
TXT467 2c8d043a356cc85bfa9c896f01f64156 2094
00468.txt
TXT468 3b06e3177cfccc32f41d787efedfcf2f 2100
00469.txt
TXT469 8b15de5dec555a47cba8704d2d7f1fdf 2270
00470.txt
TXT470 dfaf37777202aaabe0347b3c2029935c 2218
00471.txt
TXT471 a00df6b72716a4ae5250f2106067b3f4 2063
00472.txt
PDF1 applicationpdf 32b9c33c257f5f2a87369e718e431d3b 22480297
UF00076562.pdf
METS2 unknownx-mets 72e07d7550c160ec311a0d6cd6da8f2c 462539
UF00076562_00001.mets
METS:structMap STRUCT1 physical
METS:div DMDID ADMID ORDER 0 main
PDIV1 1 Front Cover
PAGE1 Page i
METS:fptr FILEID
PAGE2 ii
PDIV2 Title
PAGE3 iii
PAGE4 iv
PDIV3 3 Table Contents
PAGE5 v
PAGE6 vi
PAGE7 vii
PAGE8 viii 4
PDIV4 List tables figures Chapter
PAGE9 ix
PAGE10 x
PAGE11 xi
PAGE12 xii
PAGE13 xiii 5
PAGE14 xiv 6
PDIV5 Preface
PAGE15 xv
PAGE16 xvi
PAGE17 xvii
PAGE18 xviii
PAGE19 xix
PAGE20 xx
PAGE21 xxi 7
PDIV6 Part I. Theoretical methodological implications the inclusion gender (FSRE)
PAGE22
PAGE23
PAGE24
PAGE25
PAGE26
PAGE27
PAGE28
PAGE29 8
PAGE30 9
PAGE31 10
PAGE32 11
PAGE33 12
PAGE34 13
PAGE35 14
PAGE36 15
PAGE37 16
PAGE38 17
PAGE39 18
PAGE40 19
PAGE41 20
PAGE42 21
PAGE43 22
PAGE44 23
PAGE45 24
PAGE46 25
PAGE47 26
PAGE48 27
PAGE49 28
PAGE50 29
PAGE51 30
PAGE52 31
PAGE53 32
PAGE54 33
PAGE55 34
PAGE56 35
PAGE57 36
PAGE58 37
PAGE59 38
PAGE60 39
PAGE61 40
PAGE62 41
PAGE63 42
PAGE64 43
PAGE65 44
PAGE66 45
PAGE67 46
PAGE68 47
PAGE69 48
PAGE70 49
PAGE71 50
PAGE72 51
PAGE73 52
PAGE74 53
PAGE75 54
PAGE76 55
PAGE77 56
PAGE78 57
PAGE79 58
PAGE80 59
PAGE81 60
PAGE82 61
PAGE83 62
PAGE84 63
PAGE85 64
PAGE86 65
PAGE87 66
PAGE88 67
PAGE89 68
PAGE90 69
PAGE91
PAGE92 71
PAGE93 72
PAGE94 73
PAGE95 74
PAGE96 75
PAGE97 76
PAGE98 77
PAGE99 78
PAGE100 79
PAGE101 80
PAGE102 81
PAGE103 82
PAGE104 83
PAGE105 84
PAGE106 85
PAGE107 86
PAGE108 87
PAGE109 88
PAGE110 89
PAGE111 90
PAGE112 91
PAGE113 92
PAGE114 93
PAGE115 94
PAGE116 95
PAGE117 96
PAGE118 97
PAGE119 98
PAGE120 99
PAGE121 100
PAGE122 101
PAGE123 102
PAGE124 103
PAGE125 104
PAGE126 105
PAGE127 106
PAGE128 107
PAGE129 108
PAGE130 109
PAGE131 110
PAGE132 111
PAGE133 112
PAGE134 113
PAGE135 114
PAGE136 115
PAGE137 116
PAGE138 117
PAGE139 118
PAGE140 119
PAGE141 120
PAGE142 121
PAGE143 122
PAGE144 123
PAGE145 124
PAGE146 125
PAGE147 126
PAGE148 127
PAGE149 128
PAGE150 129
PAGE151 130
PAGE152 131
PAGE153 132
PAGE154 133
PAGE155 134
PAGE156 135
PAGE157 136
PAGE158 137
PAGE159 138
PAGE160 139
PAGE161 140
PAGE162 141
PAGE163 142
PAGE164 143
PAGE165
PAGE166 145
PAGE167 146
PAGE168 147
PAGE169 148
PAGE170 149
PAGE171
PAGE172 151
PAGE173 152
PAGE174 153
PAGE175 154
PAGE176 155
PAGE177 156
PAGE178 157
PAGE179 158
PAGE180 159
PAGE181 160
PAGE182 161
PAGE183 162
PAGE184 163
PAGE185 164
PAGE186 165
PAGE187 166
PAGE188 167
PAGE189 168
PAGE190 169
PAGE191 170
PDIV7 II. Latin America Caribbean
PAGE192 171
PAGE193 172
PAGE194 173
PAGE195 174
PAGE196 175
PAGE197 176
PAGE198 177
PAGE199 178
PAGE200 179
PAGE201 180
PAGE202 181
PAGE203 182
PAGE204 183
PAGE205 184
PAGE206 185
PAGE207 186
PAGE208 187
PAGE209 188
PAGE210 189
PAGE211 190
PAGE212 191
PAGE213 192
PAGE214 193
PAGE215
PAGE216 195
PAGE217 196
PAGE218 197
PAGE219 198
PAGE220 199
PAGE221 200
PAGE222 201
PAGE223 202
PAGE224 203
PAGE225 204
PAGE226 205
PAGE227 206
PAGE228 207
PAGE229 208
PAGE230 209
PAGE231 210
PAGE232 211
PAGE233 212
PAGE234 213
PAGE235
PAGE236 215
PAGE237 216
PAGE238 217
PAGE239 218
PAGE240 219
PAGE241 220
PAGE242 221
PAGE243 222
PDIV8 III. Asia Middle East
PAGE244 223
PAGE245 224
PAGE246 225
PAGE247
PAGE248 227
PAGE249 228
PAGE250 229
PAGE251 230
PAGE252 231
PAGE253 232
PAGE254 233
PAGE255 234
PAGE256 235
PAGE257 236
PAGE258 237
PAGE259 238
PAGE260 239
PAGE261 240
PAGE262 241
PAGE263
PAGE264 243
PAGE265 244
PAGE266 245
PAGE267 246
PAGE268 247
PAGE269 248
PAGE270 249
PAGE271 250
PAGE272 251
PAGE273 252
PAGE274 253
PAGE275 254
PAGE276 255
PAGE277 256
PAGE278 257
PAGE279 258
PAGE280 259
PAGE281 260
PAGE282 261
PAGE283 262
PAGE284 263
PAGE285 264
PAGE286 265
PAGE287 266
PAGE288
PAGE289 268
PAGE290 269
PAGE291 270
PAGE292 271
PAGE293 272
PAGE294 273
PAGE295 274
PAGE296 275
PAGE297 276
PAGE298 277
PAGE299
PAGE300 279
PAGE301 280
PAGE302 281
PAGE303 282
PAGE304 283
PAGE305 284
PAGE306 285
PAGE307 286
PAGE308 287
PAGE309 288
PAGE310 289
PAGE311 290
PAGE312 291
PAGE313 292
PAGE314 293
PAGE315 294
PAGE316 295
PAGE317 296
PAGE318 297
PAGE319 298
PAGE320 299
PAGE321 300
PAGE322 301
PAGE323 302
PDIV9 IV. Africa
PAGE324 303
PAGE325 304
PAGE326 305
PAGE327 306
PAGE328 307
PAGE329 308
PAGE330 309
PAGE331 310
PAGE332 311
PAGE333 312
PAGE334 313
PAGE335 314
PAGE336 315
PAGE337 316
PAGE338 317
PAGE339 318
PAGE340 319
PAGE341 320
PAGE342 321
PAGE343 322
PAGE344 323
PAGE345 324
PAGE346 325
PAGE347 326
PAGE348 327
PAGE349 328
PAGE350 329
PAGE351 330
PAGE352 331
PAGE353 332
PAGE354 333
PAGE355 334
PAGE356 335
PAGE357 336
PAGE358
PAGE359 338
PAGE360 339
PAGE361 340
PAGE362 341
PAGE363 342
PAGE364 343
PAGE365 344
PAGE366 345
PAGE367 346
PAGE368 347
PAGE369 348
PAGE370 349
PAGE371 350
PAGE372 351
PAGE373 352
PAGE374 353
PAGE375 354
PAGE376 355
PAGE377 356
PAGE378
PAGE379 358
PAGE380 359
PAGE381 360
PAGE382 361
PAGE383 362
PAGE384 363
PAGE385 364
PAGE386 365
PAGE387 366
PAGE388 367
PAGE389 368
PAGE390 369
PAGE391 370
PAGE392 371
PAGE393 372
PAGE394 373
PAGE395 374
PAGE396 375
PAGE397 376
PAGE398 377
PAGE399 378
PAGE400 379
PAGE401 380
PAGE402 381
PAGE403 382
PAGE404 383
PAGE405 384
PAGE406 385
PAGE407 386
PAGE408 387
PAGE409 388
PAGE410 389
PAGE411 390
PAGE412 391
PAGE413 392
PAGE414 393
PAGE415 394
PAGE416 395
PAGE417
PAGE418 397
PAGE419 398
PAGE420
PAGE421 400
PAGE422
PAGE423 402
PAGE424
PAGE425
PAGE426 405
PAGE427
PAGE428
PAGE429 408
PAGE430 409
PAGE431 410
PAGE432 411
PAGE433 412
PAGE434 413
PAGE435 414
PAGE436 415
PAGE437 416
PAGE438 417
PAGE439 418
PAGE440 419
PAGE441 420
PAGE442 421
PAGE443 422
PAGE444 423
PAGE445 424
PAGE446 425
PAGE447 426
PAGE448 427
PAGE449 428
PAGE450 429
PAGE451 430
PAGE452 431
PAGE453 432
PAGE454 433
PAGE455 434
PAGE456 435
PAGE457 436
PAGE458 437
PAGE459 438
PAGE460 439
PAGE461 440
PAGE462 441
PAGE463 442
PAGE464 443
PDIV10 Contributors
PAGE465
PAGE466 445
PAGE467 446
PAGE468 447
PAGE469 448
PAGE470 449
PAGE471 450
STRUCT2 other
ODIV1 Main
FILES1
FILES2