Citation
The life and adventures of Robinson Crusoe

Material Information

Title:
The life and adventures of Robinson Crusoe
Series Title:
Every child's library
Uniform Title:
Robinson Crusoe
Creator:
Defoe, Daniel, 1661?-1731
Brundage, Frances, 1854-1937
Saalfield Pub. Co ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Chicago ;
Akron Ohio ;
New York
Publisher:
Saalfield Pub. Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
250 p. : ill. ; 19 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Castaways -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Shipwrecks -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Survival after airplane accidents, shipwrecks, etc -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Imaginary voyages -- 1864 ( rbgenr )
Genre:
Imaginary voyages ( rbgenr )
fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Illinois -- Chicago
United States -- Ohio -- Akron
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Cover col. ill. with title: Robinson Crusoe; spine title: Robinson Crusoe.
General Note:
Date from edition cited in: Cumulative book index, 1933-37, p. 617.
General Note:
Part I of Robinson Crusoe.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Daniel Defoe ; illustrated by Frances Brundage.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
027913250 ( ALEPH )
30769380 ( OCLC )
AJH1203 ( NOTIS )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
EVERY CHILD’S LIBRARY







It would have made a stoic smile to have seen me and my
little family sit down to dinner.





nd Adventures
of
Robinson Crusoe



The Life a






BY
DANIEL DEFOE

o

ILLUSTRATED BY
FRANCES BRUNDAGE









THE SAALFIELD PUBLISHING COMPANY
CHICAGO AKRON, OHIO NEW YORK





MADE IN U. S&S A.







THE LIFE
AND ADVENTURES
OF ROBINSON CRUSOE

I was born in the year 1632, in the City of York,
of a good family, though not of that country, my
father being a foreigner of Bremen, who settled
first at Hull. He got a good estate by merchan-
dise, and leaving off his trade, lived afterward at
York, from whence he had married my mother,
whose relations were named Robinson, a very good
family in that country, and from whom I was
called Robinson Kreutznaer; but by the usual cor-
ruption of words in England we are now called,
nay, we call ourselves, and write our name Crusoe.

Being the third son of the family, and not bred to
any trade, my head began to be filled very early
with rambling thoughts. My father, who was very
ancient, had given me a competent share of
learning, as far as house education and a country
free school generally goes, and designed me for the
law; but I would be satisfied with nothing but
going to sea; and my inclination to this led me so
strongly against the will, nay, the commands, of
my father and all the entreaties and persuasions of
my mother, that there seemed to be something fatal
in that propension of nature tending directly to the
life of misery which was to befall me, 7

7



8 ROBINSON CRUSOE

Being one day at Hull, where I went casually,
and without any purpose of making an elopement
that time; but I say, being there, and one of my
companions being going by sea to London, in his
father’s ship, and prompting me to go with them,
with the common allurement of sea-faring men,
viz., that it should cost me nothing for my passage,
I consulted neither father nor mother, nor so much
as sent them word of it; but leaving them to hear of
it as they might, without asking God’s blessing, or
my father’s, without any consideration of circum-
stances or consequences, and in an ill hour, God
knows, on the first of September, 1651, I went on
board a ship bound for London. Never any young
adventurer’s misfortunes, I believe, began sooner,
or continued longer than mine. The ship was no
sooner gotten out of the Humber, but the wind be-
gan to blow, and the waves to rise in a most fright-
ful manner; and as I had never been at sea before,
I was most inexpressibly sick in body, and terrified
in my mind. I began now seriously to reflect upon
what I had done, and how justly I was overtaken
by the judgment of heaven for my wicked leaving
of my father’s house, and abandoning my duty; all
the good counsel of my parents, my father’s tears
and my mother’s entreaties, came now fresh into
my mind, and my conscience, which was not yet
come to the pitch of hardness which it has been
since, reproached me with the contempt of advice,
and the breach of my duty to God and my father.

All this while the storm increased. I expected





“I warrant you were frighted, wa’n’t you, last night, when
it blew but a capful of wind?”



10 ROBINSON CRUSOE

every wave would have swallowed us up, and
that every time the ship fell down, as I thought,
in the trough or hollow of the sea, we should never
rise more; and in this agony of mind I made many
vows and resolutions, that if it would please God
here to spare my life this one voyage, if ever I got
once my foot upon dry land again, I would go
directly home to my father, and never set it into a
ship again while I lived; and that I would take his
advice, and never run myself into such miseries as
these any more.

These wise and sober thoughts continued all the
while the storm continued, and indeed some time
after; but the next day the wind was abated and
the sea calmer, and I began to be a little inured to
it. However, I was very grave for all that day,
being also a little sea-sick still; but towards night
the weather cleared up, the wind was quite over,
and a charming fine evening followed; the sun went
down perfectly clear, and rose so the next morning.

I slept well in the night, and was now no more
sea-sick but very cheerful, looking with wonder up-
on the sea that was so rough and terrible the day
before, and could be so calm and so pleasant in so
little time after. And now lest my good resolu-
tions should continue, my companion, who had in-
deed enticed me away, comes to me: “Well, Bob,”
says he, clapping me on the shoulder, “how do you
do after it? I warrant you were frighted, wa’n’t
you, last night, when it blew but a capful of wind?”
“A capful, do you call it?” said I; “ ’twas a ter-





ROBINSON CRUSOE 11

rible storm.” “A storm, you fool you,” replies he;
“do you call that astorm? Why, it was nothing at
all; give us but a good ship and sea-room, and we
think nothing of such a squall of wind as that; but
you’re but a fresh-water sailor, Bob. Come, let us
make a bowl of punch, and we'll forget all that;
d’ye see what charming weather ’tis now?” To
make short this sad part of my story, we went the
old way of all sailors; the punch was made, and I
was made drunk with it, and in that one night’s
wickedness I drowned all my repentance, all my
reflections upon my past conduct, and all my reso-
lutions for my future.

The sixth day of our being at sea we came into
Yarmouth Roads; the wind having been contrary
and the weather calm, we had made but little way
Since the storm. Here we were obliged to come to
an anchor, and here we lay, the wind continuing
contrary, viz., at south-west, for seven or eight
days, during which time a great many ships from
Newcastle came into the same roads, as the com-
mon harbor where the ships might wait for a wind
for the river.

The eighth day in the morning the wind in-
creased, and we had all hands at work to strike our
top-masts, and make everything snug and close,
that the ship might ride as easy as possible. By
noon the sea went very high indeed, and our ship
rid forecastle in, shipped several seas, and we
thought once or twice our anchor had come home;
upon which our master ordered out the gheet-



12 ROBINSON CRUSOE

anchor, so that we rode with two anchors ahead,
and the cables veered out to the better end.

By this time it blew a terrible storm indeed, and
now I began to see terror and amazement in the
faces even of the seamen themselves. When the
master himself came by me, and said we should
be all lost, I was dreadfully frightened; I got up
out of my cabin, and looked out. But such a
dismal sight I never saw; the sea went mountains
high and broke upon us every three or four minutes;
when I could look about, I could see nothing but
distress round us. Two ships that rid near us we
found had cut their masts by the board, being deep
loaden; and our men cried out that a ship which
rid about a mile ahead of us was foundered.

Towards evening the mate and boatswain begged
the master of our ship to let them cut away the
fore-mast, which he was very unwilling to. But
the boatswain protesting to him that if he did not
the ship would founder, he consented; and when
they had cut away the fore-mast, the main-mast
stood so loose, and shook the ship so much, they
were obliged to cut her away also, and make a
clear deck.

But the worst was not come yet; the storm con-
tinued with such fury that the seamen themselves
acknowledged they had never known a worse. We
had a good ship, but she was deep loaden, and
wallowed in the sea, that the seamen every now
and then cried out she would founder. It was my
advantage in one respect, that I did not know what





ROBINSON CRUSOE 13

they meant by founder till I inquired. However,
the storm was so violent, that I saw what is not
often seen: the master, the boatswain, and some
others more sensible than the rest, at their prayers,
and expecting every moment when the ship would
go to the bottom. In the middle of the night, and
under all the rest of our distresses, one of the men
that had been down on purpose to see cried out we
had sprung a leak; another said there was four feet
of water in the hold. Then all hands were called
to the pump. At that very word my heart, as I
thought, died within me, and I fell backwards upon
the side of my bed where I sat, into the cabin.
However, the men aroused me, and told me that I;
that was able to do nothing before, was as well able
to pump as another; at which I stirred up and
went to the pump and worked very heartily.

The water increasing in the hold, it was apparent
that the ship would founder. The master fired
guns for help; and a light ship, who had rid it
| out just ahead of us, ventured a boat out to help
us. It was with the utmost hazard the boat came
near us, but it was impossible for us to get on
board, or for the boat to lie near the ship’s side,
till at last the men rowing very heartily, and
venturing their lives to save ours, our men cast
them a rope over the stern with a buoy to it, and
then veered it out a great length, which they after
great labor and hazard took hold of, and we hauled
them close under our stern, and got all into their
s boat. It was to no purpose for them or us after we



14 ROBINSON CRUSOE

were in the boat to think of reaching to their own
ship, so partly rowing and partly driving, our boat
went away to the norward, sloping towards the
shore almost as far as Winterton Ness.

We were not much more than a quarter of an
hour out of our ship but we saw her sink, and then
I understood for the first time what was meant by
a ship foundering in the sea.

We made but slow way towards the shore, and
walked afterwards on foot to Yarmouth, where, as
unfortunate men, we were used with great human-
ity and had money given us sufficient to carry us
either to London or back to Hull, as we thought fit.

As for me, having some money in my pocket, I
travelled to London by land; and there, as well as
on the road, had many struggles with myself and
whether I should go home, or go to sea.

It was my lot to fall into pretty good company in
London. I first fell acquainted with the master of
a ship who had been on the coast of Guinea, and
who, having had very good success there, was re-
solved to go again; and who, taking a fancy to my

conversation, told me if I would go the voyage with

him I should be at no expense; I should be his mess-

mate and his companion; and if I could carry any- |
thing with me, I should have all the advantage of |
it that the trade would admit, and perhaps I might —

meet with some encouragement.

I embraced the offer; and, entering into a strict '

friendship with this captain, who was an honest

and plain-dealing man, I went the voyage with him, |







ROBINSON CRUSOE 15

and carried a small adventure with me, which, by
the disinterested honesty of my friend the captain,
I increased very considerably, for I carried about
£40 in such toys and trifies as the captain directed
me to buy. This £40 I had mustered together by
the assistance of some of my relations whom I
corresponded with, and who, I believe, got my
father, or at least my mother, to contribute so
much as that to my first adventure.

This was the only voyage which I may say was
successful in all my adventures, and which I owe to
the integrity and honesty of my friend the captain ;
under whom also I got a competent knowledge of
the mathematics and rules of navigation, learned
how to keep an account of the ship’s course, take an
observation, and, in short, to understand some
things that were needful to be understood by a
sailor. For, as he took delight to introduce me, I
took delight to learn; and, in a word, this voyage
made me both a sailor and a merchant ; for I
brought him five pounds nine ounces of gold dust
for my adventure, which yielded me in London at
my return almost £300, and this filled me with
those aspiring thoughts which have since so com-
pleted my ruin.

I was now set up for a Guinea trader; and my
friend, to my great misfortune, dying soon after hig
arrival, I resolved to go the same voyage again,
and I embarked in the same vessel with one who
was his mate in the former voyage, and had now
got command of the ship. This was the unhappiest



16 ROBINSON CRUSOE

voyage that ever man made; for though I did not
carry quite £100 of my new-gained wealth, so that
I had £200 left, and which I lodged with my
friend’s widow, who was very just to me, yet I fell
into terrible misfortunes in this voyage; and the
first was this, viz., our ship making her course to-
wards the Canary Islands, or rather between those
islands and the African shore, was surprised in the
grey of the morning by a Turkish rover of Sallee,
who gave chase to us with all the sail she could
make. Finding the pirate gained upon us, we pre-
pared to fight, our ship having twelve guns, and the
rogue eighteen. About three in the afternoon he
came up with us, and bringing to, by mistake, just
athwart our quarter, instead of athwart our stern,
as he intended, we brought eight of our guns to
bear on that side, and poured in a broadside upon
him, which made him sheer off again, after re-
turning our fire and pouring in also his small-shot
from near 200 men which he had on board. How-
ever, we had not a man touched, all our men
keeping close. He prepared to attack us again,
and we to defend ourselves; but laying us on board
the next time upon our other quarter, he entered
sixty men upon our decks, who immediately fell to
cutting and hacking the decks and rigging. We
plied them with small-shot, half-pikes, powder-
chests, and such like, and cleared our deck of them
twice. However, to cut short this melancholy part
of our story, our ship being disabled, and three of
our men killed and eight wounded, we were obliged





ROBINSON CRUSOE 17

to yield, and were carried all prisoners into Sallee,
a port belonging to the Moors.

The usage I had there was not so dreadful as at
first I apprehended, being kept by the captain of
the rover as his proper prize, and made his slave,
being young and nimble and fit for his business.

After about two years an odd circumstance pre-
sented itself, which put the old thought of making
some attempt for my liberty again in my head.
My patron lying at home longer than usual without
fitting out his ship, which, as I heard, was for want
of money, he used constantly, once or twice a week,
sometimes oftener, if the weather was fair, to take
the ship’s pinnace, and go out into the road a-
fishing; and as he always took me and a young
Maresco with him to row the boat, we made him
very merry, and I proved very dexterous in catch-
ing fish; insomuch, that sometimes he would send
me with a Moor, one of his kinsmen, and the youth
the Maresco, as they called him, to catch a dish of
fish for him. It happened one time that, going a-
fishing in a stark calm morning, a fog rose so thick,
that though we were not a half a league from the
| Shore we lost sight of it; and rowing we knew not
whither or which way, we labored all day, and all
the next night, and when the morning came we
found we had pulled off to sea instead of pulling in
for the shore; and that we were at least two leagues
from the shore. However we got well in again,
though with a great deal of labor, and some danger,

for the wind began to blow pretty fresh in the



18 ROBINSON CRUSOE

morning; but particularly we were all very hungry.

But our patron, warned by this disaster, resolved
to take more care of himself for the future; and
having lying by him the long-boat of our English
ship which he had taken, he resolved he would not
go a-fishing any more without a compass and some
provision ; so he ordered the carpenter of his ship,
who also was an English slave, to build a little
state-room, or cabin, in the middle of the long-boat,
like that of a barge, with a place to stand behind it
to steer and haul home the main-sheet, and room
before for a hand or two to stand and work the
shoulder-of-mutton sail; and the boom jibbed over
the top of the cabin, which lay very snug and low.

We went frequently out with this boat a-fishing,
and as I was most dexterous to catch fish for him,
he never went without me. It happened that he
had appointed to go out in this boat with two or
three Moors of some distinction and had therefore
sent on board the boat overnight a larger store of
provisions than ordinary; and had ordered me to
get ready three fuzees with powder and shot, which
were on board his ship, for that they designed some
sport of fowling as well as fishing.

The next morning my patron came on board
alone, and told me his guests had put off going,
and ordered me with the man and the boy, as
usual, to go out with the boat and catch them some
fish, for that his friends were to sup at his house.

This moment my former notions of deliverance |
darted into my thoughts, for now I found I was



ROBINSON CRUSOE 19

like to have a little ship at my command; and my
master being gone I prepared to furnish myself,
not for a fishing business, but for a voyage.

My first contrivance was to make a pretence to
speak to this Moor, to get something for our sub-
sistence on board; for I told him we must not pre-
sume to eat of our patron’s bread. He said that
was true; so he brought a large basket of rusk or
biscuit of their kind, and three jars of fresh water,
into the boat. I knew where my patron’s case of
bottles stood, and I conveyed them into the boat
while the Moor was on shore, as if they had been
there before for our master. I conveyed also a
great lump of beeswax into the boat, which weighed
about half a hundredweight, with a parcel of twine
or thread, a hatchet, a saw, and a hammer. An-
other trick I tried upon him, which he innocently
came into also. “Moely,” said I, “our patron’s
guns are on board the boat; can you not get a little
powder and shot? it may be we may kill some
alcamies (a fowl like our curlews) for ourselves,
for I know he keeps the gunner’s stores in the ship.”
: “Yes,” says he, “I’ll bring some”; and accordingly
he brought a great leather pouch which held about
a pound and a half of powder, or rather more; and
another with shot, that had five or six pounds with
some bullets, and put all into the boat. Thus
furnished with everything needful, we sailed out of
the port to fish. The castle, which is at the en-
trance of the port, knew who we were, and took
no notice of us; and we were not above a mile



20 ROBINSON CRUSOE

out of the port before we set us down to fish.
After we had fished some time and catched
nothing, I said to the Moor, “This will not do; our
master will not thus be served; we must stand
farther off.” He, thinking no harm, agreed, and
being in the head of the boat set the sails; and as
I had the helm I run the boat out near a league
farther, and then I brought her to as if I would
fish; when giving the boy the helm, I stepped for-
ward to where the Moor was, and making as if I
stooped for something behind him, I took him by
surprise and tossed him clear overboard into the
sea. He rose immediately, for he swam like a
- cork, and called to me, begged to be taken in, told
me he would go all the world over with me. He
swam so strong after the boat, that he would have
reached me very quickly, there being but little
wind; upon which I stepped into the cabin, and
fetching one of the fowling pieces, I presented it at
him, and told him I had done him no hurt, and if
he would be quiet I would do him none. “But,”
said I, “you swim well enough to reach the shore,
and the sea is calm; make the best of your way to
shore, and I will do you no harm; but if you come
near the boat I’ll shoot you through the head, for
I am resolved to have my liberty.” So he swam
for the shore, and I make ne doubt but he reached
it with ease, for he was an excellent swimmer.
When he was gone I turned to the boy, whom
they called Xury, and said to him, “Xury, if you
will be faithful to me I’ll make you a great man;



ROBINSON CRUSOE 21

but if you will not stroke your face to be true to
me,” that is, swear by Mahomet and his father’s
beard, “I must throw you into the sea too.” The
boy smiled in my face, and swore to be faithful to
me, and go all over the world with me.

While I was in view of the Moor that was swim-
ming, I stood out directly to sea with the boat.
But as soon as it grew dusk, I changed my course,
and steered directly south and by east, bending
my course a little toward the east, that I might
keep in with the shore; and having a fair, fresh
gale of wind, and a smooth, quiet sea, I made such
sail that I believe by the next day at three o’clock
in the afternoon, when I first made the land, I
could not be less than 150 miles south of Sallee.

Yet such was the fright I had taken at the Moors,
and the dreadful apprehensions I had of falling in-
to their hands, that I would not stop, or go on
shore, or come to anchor, the wind continuing fair,
till I had sailed in that manner five days; and then
the wind shifting to the southward, I concluded
also that if any of our vessels were in chase of me,
they also would now give over; so I ventured to
come to ar anchor in the mouth of a little river,
I knew not what, or where; neither what latitude,
what country, what nations, or what river. I
neither saw, or desired to see, any people; the
principal thing I wanted was fresh water. We
came into this creek in the evening, resolving to
swim on shore as soon as it was dark, and discover
the country; but as soon as it was quite dark we



22 ROBINSON CRUSOE

heard such dreadful noises of the barking, roaring,
and howling of wild creatures, of we knew not what
kinds, that the poor boy was ready to die with fear,
and begged of me not to go on shore till day.
“Well, Xury,” said I, “then I won’t ; but it may be
we may see men by day, who will be as bad to us as
those lions.” “Then we give them the shoot gun,”
Says Xury, laughing; “make them run away.”
Such English Xury spoke by conversing among us
Slaves. However, I was glad to see the boy so
cheerful, and I gave him a dram (out of our pa-
tron’s case of bottles) to cheer him up. After all,
Xury’s advice was good, and I took it; we dropped
our little anchor and lay still all night. I say still,
for we slept none; for in two or three hours we saw
vast great creatures (we knew not what to call
them) of many sorts come down to the seashore
and run into the water, wallowing and washing
themselves for the pleasure of cooling themselves ;
and they made such hideous howlings and yellings,
that I never indeed heard the like.

The next morning we found we need not take
great pains for water, for a little higher up the
creek we found the water fresh when the tide was
out, which flowed but a little way up; so we filled
our jars, and feasted on a hare we had killed, and
prepared to go on our way, having seen no foot-
steps of any human creature.

After this stop we made on to the southward con-
tinually for ten or twelve days, living very sparing
on our provisions, which began to abate very much,



ROBINSON CRUSOE 23

and going no oftener into the shore than we were
obliged to for fresh water. My design in this was
to make the river Gambia or Senegal—that is to
Say, anywhere about the Cape de Verde—where I
was in hopes to meet with some European ship;
and if I did not, I knew not what course I had to
take, but to seek out for the islands, or perish there
among the negroes. I knew that all the ships
from Europe, which sailed either to the coast of
Guinea or to Brazil, or to the East Indies, made
this cape, or those islands; and in a word, I put the
whole of my fortune upon this single point, either
that I must meet with some ship, or must perish.

When I had pursued this resolution many days,
Xury having the helm suddenly cried out, “Master,
master, a ship with a sail!” I jumped out of the
cabin, and immediately saw it was a Portuguese
ship, and, as I thought, bound to the coast of
Guinea, for negroes. I stretched out to sea as
much as I could, resolved to speak with them if
possible. But after I had crowded to the utmost,
and began to despair, they, it seems, saw me by the
help of their perspective glasses, so they shortened
sail and lay by for me; and in about three hours’
time I came up with them.

They asked me what I was, in Portuguese, and
in Spanish, and in French, but I understood none
of them; but at last a Scots sailor, who was on
board, called to me, and I answered him, and told
him I was an Englishman, that I had made my es-
cape out of slavery from the Moors, at Sallee. -



24 ROBINSON CRUSOE

Then they bade me come on board, and very kindly
took me in, and all my goods.

It was an inexpressible joy to me that I was thus
delivered from such a miserable condition as I was
in; and I immediately offered all I had to the cap-
tain of the ship, as a return for my deliverance.
But he generously told me he would take nothing
from me, but that all I had should be delivered
safe to me when I came to the Brazils.

As to my boat, it was a very good one, and that
he saw, and told me he would buy it of me for the
ship’s use, and asked me what I would have for it?
I told him he had been so generous to me in every-
thing, that I could not offer to make any price for
the boat, but left it entirely to him; upon which he
told me he would give me a note of his hand to pay
me eighty pieces of eight for it at Brazil, and when
it came there, if any one offered to give more, he
would make it up. He offered me also sixty pieces
of eight more for my boy Xury, but I was very
loth to sell the poor boy’s liberty, who had assisted
me so faithfully in procuring my own. However,
when I let him know my reason, he owned it to be
just, and offered me this medium, that he would
give the boy an obligation to set him free in ten
years if he turned Christian. Upon this, and
Xury saying he was willing to go to him, I let the
captain have him. |

We had a very good voyage to the Brazils, and
arrived, in the Bay de Todos los Santos, or All
Saints’ Bay, in about twenty-two days after. And



ROBINSON CRUSOE 25

now I was once more delivered from the most
miserable of all conditions of life; and what to do
next with myself I was now to consider.

The generous treatment the captain gave me, I
Can never enough remember. He would take noth-
ing of me for my passage, and caused everything
I had in the ship to be punctually delivered me;
and what I was willing to sell he bought, such as
the case of bottles, two of my guns, and a piece of
the lump of beeswax—for I had made candles of
the rest; in a word, I made about 220 pieces of
eight of all my cargo, and with this stock I went
on shore in the Brazils.

I had not been long here, but being recommended
to the house of a good honest man like himself,
who had a plantation and a sugar-house, I lived
with him some time, and acquainted myself by
that means with the manner of their planting and
making of sugar; and seeing how well the planters
lived, and how they grew rich suddenly, I resolved,
if I could get a license to settle there, I would turn
planter among them, resolving in the meantime to
find out some way to get my money which I left in
London remitted to me. To this purpose, getting
a kind of a letter of naturalization, I purchased as
much land that was uncured as my money would
reach, and formed a plan for my plantation and
Settlement, and such a one as might be suitable to
the stock which I proposed to myself to receive
from England.

I had a neighbor, a Portuguese of Lisbon, but



26 ROBINSON CRUSOE

born of English parents, whose name was Wells,
and in much such circumstances as I was. My
stock was but low, as well as his; and we rather
planted for food than anything else, for about two
years. However, we began to increase, and our
land began to come into order; so that the third
year we planted some tobacco, and made each of us
a large piece of ground ready for planting canes in
the year to come. But we both wanted help; and
now I found more than before, I had done wrong
in parting with my boy Xury. I bought me a
negro slave, and two European servants also.

But as abused prosperity is oftentimes made the
very means of our greatest adversity, so was it
with me. I went on the next year with great suc-
cess in my plantation. I raised fifty great rolls
of tobacco on my own ground, more than I had dis-
posed of for necessaries among my neighbors; and
these fifty rolls, being each of above a hundred-
weight, were well cured, and laid by against the re-
turn of the fleet from Lisbon. And now, increas-
ing in business and in wealth, my head began to
be full of projects and undertakings beyond my
reach, such as are, indeed, often the ruin of the
best heads in business.

To come, then, by the just degrees to the particu-
lars of this part of my story. You may suppose,
that having now lived almost four years in the
Brazils, and beginning to thrive and prosper very
well upon my plantation, I had not only learned
the language, but had contracted acquaintance and



ROBINSON CRUSOE 27

friendship among my fellow-planters, as well as
among the merchants at St. Salvador, which was
our port, and that in my discourses among them I
had frequently given them an account of my two
voyages to the coast of Guinea, the manner of trad-
ing with the negroes there, and how easy it was to
purchase upon the coast for trifles—such as beads,
toys, knives, scissors, hatchets, bits of glass, and
the like—not only gold dust, Guinea grains, ele-
phants’ teeth, etc., but negroes, for the service of
the Brazils, in great numbers.

They listened always very attentively to my dis-
courses on these heads, but especially to that part
which related to the buying of negroes; which was
a trade, at that time, not only not far entered into,
but, as far as it was, had been carried on by the
assiento, or permission, of the Kings of Spain and
Portugal, and engrossed in the public, so that few
negroes were brought, and those excessive dear.

It happened, being in company with some mer-
chants and planters of my acquaintance in St. Sal-
vador, and talking of those things very earnestly,
three of them came to me one morning, and told
me they had been musing very much upon what I
had discoursed with them of, the last night, and
they came to make a secret proposal to me. And
after enjoining me secrecy, they told me that they
had a mind to fit out a ship to go to Guinea; that
they had all plantations as well as I, and were
straitened for nothing so much as servants; that as
it was a trade that could not be carried on because



28 ROBINSON CRUSOE

they could not publicly sell the negroes when they
came home, so they desired to make but one voy-
age, to bring the negroes on shore privately, and
divide them among their own plantations; and, in
a word, the question was, whether I would go their
supercargo in the ship, to manage the trading part
upon the coast of Guinea; and they offered me that
I should have my equal share of the negroes with-
out providing any part of the stock.

I told them I would go with all my heart, if they
would undertake to look after my plantation in my
absence, and would dispose of it to such as I should
direct if I miscarried. This they all engaged to
do, and entered into writings or covenants to do
so; I made a formal will, disposing of my planta-
tion and effects, in case of my death; making the
captain of the ship that had saved my life, before,
my universal heir, but obliging him to dispose of
my effects as I had directed in my will; one-half
of the produce being to himself, and the other to be
shipped to England.

Aceordingly, the ship being fitted out, and the
cargo furnished, and all things done as by agree-
ment by my partners in the voyage, I went on board
in an evil hour, the [first] of [September 1659],
being the same day eight year that I went from my
father and mother at Hull, in order to act the rebel
to their authority, and the fool to my own interest.

Our ship was about 120 tons burthen, carried
six guns and fourteen men, besides the master, his
boy, and myself. We had on board no large cargo



ROBINSON CRUSOE 29

of goods, except of such toys as were fit for our
trade with the negroes—such as beads, bits of
glass, shells, and odd trifles, especially little look-
ing-glasses, knives, scissors, hatchets, and the like.

The same day I went on board we set sail, stand-
ing away to the northward upon our own coast, ©
with design to stretch over for the African coast,
when they came about 10 or 12 degrees of northern
latitude, which, it seems, was the manner of their
course in those days. We had very good weather,
only excessive hot, all the way upon our own coast,
till we came to the height of Cape St. Augustino,
frem whence, keeping farther off at sea, we lost
sight of land, and steered as if we were bound for
the Isle Fernando de Noronha, holding our course
N.E. by N., and leaving those isles on the east,
In this course we passed the line in about twelve
days’ time, and were, by our last observation, in 7
degrees 22 minutes northern latitude, when a vio-
lent tornado, or hurricane, took us quite out of our
knowledge. It began from the south-east, came
about to the north-west, and then settled into the
north-east, from whence it blew in such a terrible
manner, that for twelve days together we could
do nothing but drive, and scudding away before it,
let it carry us wherever fate and the fury of the
winds directed; and during these twelve days, I
need not say that I expected every day to be swal-
lowed up, nor, indeed, did any in the ship expect
to save their lives.

In this distress, the wind still blowing very hard,



30 ROBINSON CRUSOE

one of our men early in the morning cried out,
“Land!” and we had no sooner ran out of our
cabin to look out, but the ship struck upon the sand,
and in a moment, her motion being so stopped,
the sea broke over her in such manner, that we ex-
pected we should all have perished immediately.

The mate of our vessel lay hold of the boat,
and with the help of the rest of the men they got
her slung over the ship’s side; and getting all into
her, let go, and committed ourselves, being eleven
in number, to God’s mercy and the wild sea.

After we had rowed, or rather driven, about a
league and a half, as we reckoned it, a raging
wave, mountainlike, came rolling astern of us, and
plainly bade us expect the coup de grace. Ina
word, it took us with such a fury, that it overset
the boat at once; and separating us, as well from
the boat as from one another, gave us not time
hardly to say, “O God?” for we were all swallowed.
up in a moment.

Nothing can describe the confusion of thought
which I felt when I sunk into the water ; for though
I swam very well, yet I could rot deliver myself
from the waves so as to draw breath, till that wave
having driven me, or rather carried me, a vast way
on towards the shore, and having spent itself, went
back, and left me upon the land almost dry, but
half dead with the water I tookin. I had so much
presence of mind, as well as breath left, that see-
ing myself nearer the mainland than I expected, I
got upon my feet and endeavored to make on to-



ROBINSON CRUSOE 31

wards the land as fast as I could, before another
wave should return and take me up again.

The wave that came upon me again buried me at
once twenty or thirty feet deep in its own body,
and I could feel myself carried with a mighty force.
and swiftness towards the shore a very great way;
but I held my breath and assisted myself to swim
still forward with all my might. The sea came
pouring in after me again and again and I was
lifted up by the waves and carried forward as be-
fore.

Now as the waves were not so high as at first,
being near land, I fetched another run, which
brought me to the mainland, where, to my great
comfort, I clambered up the cliffs and sat me down
upon the grass, free from danger, and quite out of
reach of the water. .

I was now landed, and safe on shore, and began
to look up and thank God that my life wags saved in
a case wherein there was some minutes before
Scarce any room to hope.

I walked about on the shore lifting up my hands,
and my whole being, as I may Say, wrapt up in the
contemplation of my deliverance, reflecting upon
all my comrades that were drowned, and that there
should not be one soul saved but myself; for, as for
them, I never saw them afterwards, or any sign of
them, except three of their hats, one cap, and two
shoes that were not fellows.

I cast my eyes to the stranded vessel, when the
breach and froth of the sea being so big, I could

3 .



32 ROBINSON CRUSOE

hardly see it, it lay so far off, and considered, Lord!
how was it possible I could get on shore?

After I had solaced my mind with the comfort-
able part:of my condition, I began to look round
me to see what kind of place I was in, and what
was next to be done, and I soon found my comforts
abate, and that, in a word, I had a dreadful de-
liverance ; for I was wet, had no clothes to shift me,
nor anything either to eat or drink to comfort me,
neither did I see any prospect before me but that
of perishing with hunger, or being devoured by
wild beasts; and that which was particularly af-
flicting to me was, that I had no weapon either to
hunt and kill any creature for my sustenance, or
to defend myself against any other creature that
might desire to kill me for theirs. In a word, I
had nothing about me but a knife, a tobacco-pipe,
and a little tobacco ina box. This was all my pro-
vision; and this threw me into terrible agonies of
mind, that for a while I ran about like a madman.
Night coming upon me, I began, with a heavy heart,
to consider what would be my lot if there were any.
ravenous beasts in that country, seeing at night
they always come abroad for their prey.

All the remedy that offered to my thoughts at
that time was, to get up into a thick bushy tree
like a fir, but thorny, which grew near me, and
where I resolved to sit all night, and consider the
next day what death I should die, for as yet I saw
no prospect of life. I walked about a furlong
from the shore, to see if I could find any fresh



ROBINSON CRUSOE 33

water to drink, which I did, to my great joy; and
having drank, and put a little tobacco in my mouth
to prevent hunger, I went to the tree, and getting
up into it, endeavored to place myself so as that
if I should sleep I might not fail; and having cut



me a short stick, like a truncheon, for my defence,
I took up my lodging.

When I waked it was broad day and when I came
down from my apartment in the tree the first thing
I found was the boat, which lay as the wind and
the sea had tossed her upon the land, about two



34. ROBINSON CRUSOE

miles on my right hand. I walked as far as I
could upon the shore to have got to her, but found
a neck or inlet of water between me and the boat,
which was about half a mile broad; so I came back
for the present, being more intent upon getting at
the ship, where I hoped to find something for my
present subsistence.

A little after noon I found the sea very calm, and
the tide ebbed so far out that I could come within
a quarter of a mile of the ship; and here I found
a fresh renewing of my grief, for I saw evidently
that if we had kept on board we had been all safe,
that is to say, we had all got safe on shore, and I
had not been so miserable as to be left entirely
destitute of all comfort and company.

I resolved, if possible, to get to the ship; so I
pulled off my clothes, for the weather was hot to
extremity, and took the water. I found that the
ship was bulged, and had a great deal of water in
her hold, but that she lay so on the side of a bank
of hard sand, or rather earth, that her stern lay
lifted up upon the bank, and her head low almost.
to the water. By this means all her quarter was
free, and all that was in that part was dry; for you
may be sure my first work was to search and to see
what was spoiled and what was free. And first I
found that all the ship’s provisions were dry and
untouched by the water; and being very well dis-
posed to eat, I went to the bread-room and filled
my pockets with biscuit and ate it as I went about
other things, for I had no time to lose. I also



ROBINSON CRUSOE 35

found some rum in the great cabin, of which I
took a large dram, and which I had indeed need
enough of, to spirit me for what was before me.
Now I wanted nothing but a boat, to furnish my-
self with many things which I foresaw would be
very necessary to me.

It was in vain to sit still and wish for what was
not to be had, and this extremity roused my appli-
cation. We had several spare yards, and two or
three large spars of wood, and a square top-mast
or two in the ship, and from this I made a raft
strong enough to bear any reasonable weight.

My next care was what to load it with, and how
to preserve what I laid upon it from the surf of
the sea; but I was not long considering this. I
first laid all the planks or boards upon it that I
could get, and having considered well what I most
wanted, I first got three of the seamen’s chests,
which I had broken open and emptied, and low-
ered them down upon my raft. The first of these I
filled with provisions, viz., bread, rice, three Dutch
cheeses, five pieces of dried goat’s flesh, which we
lived much upon, and a little remainder of Euro-
pean corn. As for liquors, I found several cases
of bottles belonging to our skipper. While I was
doing this, I found the tide began to flow, though
very calm, and I had the mortification to see my
coat, shirt, and waist-coat, which I had left on
shore upon the sand, swim away; as for my
breeches, which were only linen, and open-kneed,
IT swam on board in them, and my stockings.



36 ROBINSON CRUSOE

However, this put me upon rummaging for clothes,
of which I found enough, but took no more than I
wanted for present use. It was after long search-
ing that I found out the carpenter’s chest, which
was indeed a very useful prize to me.

My next care was for some ammunition and
arms; there were two very good fowling-pieces in
the great cabin, and two pistols; these I secured
first, with some powder-horns, and a small bag of
shot, and two old rusty swords. I knew there were
three barrels of powder in the ship, but knew not
where our gunner had stowed them; but with much
search I found them, two of them dry and good,
the third had taken water; those two I got to my
raft with the arms. And now I thought myself
pretty well freighted, and began to think how I
should get to shore with them, having neither sail,
oar, nor rudder; and the least capful of wind
would have overset all my navigation.

I had three encouragements. 1. A smooth, calm
sea. 2. The tide rising and setting in to the shore.
3. What little wind there was blew me towards
the land. And thus, having found two or three
broken oars belonging to the boat, and besides the
tools which were in the chest, I found two saws,
an axe and a hammer, and with this cargo I put to
sea. For a mile or thereabouts my raft went very
well, only that I found it drive a little distant from
the place where I had landed before, by which I
perceived that there was some indraft of the water,
and consequently I hoped to find some creek or



ROBINSON CRUSOE 37

river there, which I might make use of as a port to
get to land with my cargo.

As I imagined, so it was; there appeared before
me a little opening of the land, and I found a
strong current of the tide set into it, so I guided
my raft as well as I could to keep in the middle of
the stream.

At length I spied a little cove on the right shore
of the creek, to which, with great pain and diffi-
culty, I guided my raft, and at last got so near, as
that, reaching ground with my oar, I could thrust
her directly in; and here I lay till the water ebbed ©
away, and left my raft and all my cargo safe on
shore.

My next work was to view the country and seek a
proper place for my habitation, and where to stow
my goods to secure them from whatever might
happen. Where I was, I yet knew not; whether
on the continent, or on an island; whether inhab-
ited, or not inhabited; whether in danger of wild
beasts, or not. There was a hill, not above a mile
from me, which rose up very steep and high, and
which seemed to overtop some other hills, which
lay as in a ridge from it, northward. I took out
one of the fowling-pieces and one of the pistols, and
a horn of powder; and thus armed, I travelled for
discovery up to the top of that hill, where, after I
had with great labor and difficulty got to the top,
I saw my fate to my great affliction, viz., that I
was in an island environed every way with the
sea, no land to be seen, except some rocks which



38 ROBINSON CRUSOE

lay a great way off, and two small islands less than
this, which lay about three leagues to the west.

Contented with this discovery, I came back to
my raft, and fell to work to bring my cargo on
shore, which took me up the rest of that day; and
what to do with myself at night, I knew not, nor
indeed where to rest; for I was afraid to lie down
on the ground, not knowing but some wild beast
might devour me, though, as I afterwards found,
there was really no need for those fears. However,
as well as I could, I barricaded myself round with
the chests and boards that I had brought on shore,
and made a kind of a hut for that night’s lodging.

I now began to consider that I might yet get a
great many things out of the ship, which would be
useful to me. And as I knew that the first storm
that blew must necessarily break her all in pieces,
I resolved to set all other things apart till I got
everything out of the ship that I could get.

I got on board the ship as before when the tide
was down, and prepared a second raft. I neither
made this so unwieldy, nor loaded it so hard; but
yet I brought away several things very useful to
me; as, first, in the carpenter’s stores I found two
or three bags full of nails and spikes, a great
screw-jack, a dozen or two of hatchets, and above
all that most useful thing called a grindstone. All
these I secured, together with several things be-
longing to the gunner, particularly two or three
iron crows, and two barrels of musket bullets,
seven muskets, and another fowling-piece, with



ROBINSON CRUSOE 39

some small quantity of powder more; a large bag
full of small-shot, and a great roll of sheet lead.
Besides these things, I took all the men’s clothes



that I could find, and a spare fore-top sail, a ham-
mock, and some bedding.

Having got my second cargo on shore, though I
was fain to open the barrels of powder and bring
them by parcels, for they were too heavy, being
large casks, I went to work to make me a little tent
with the sail and some poles which I cut for that



‘40 ROBINSON CRUSOE

purpose; and into this tent I brought everything
that I knew would spoil either with rain or sun;
and I piled all the empty chests and casks up in
a circle round the tent, to fortify it from any sud-
den attempt, either from man or beast.



When I had done this I blocked up the door of
the tent with some boards within, and an empty
chest set up on end without; and spreading one of
the beds upon the ground, laying my two pistols
just at my head, and my gun at length by me, I
went to bed for the first time, and slept very



ROBINSON CRUSOE > 41

quietly all night, for I was very weary and heavy.

I had the biggest magazine of al] kinds now that
ever was laid up, I believe, for one man ; but I was
not satisfied still, for while the ship sat upright in
that posture, I thought I ought to get everything
out of her that I could. So every day at low water
I went on board, and brought away something or
other; but, particularly, the third time I went I
brought away as much of the rigging as I could,
as also all the small ropes and rope-twine I could
get, with a piece of spare canvas, which was to
mend the sails upon occasion, the barrel of wet
gunpowder; in a word, I brought away all the sails
first and last, only that I was fain to cut them in
pieces, and bring as much at a time as I could;
for they were no more useful to be Sails, but as
mere canvas only.

I had been now thirteen days on shore, and had
been eleven times on board the ship; in which time
I had brought away all that one pair of hands
could well be supposed capable to bring, though I
believe verily, had the calm weather held, I should
have brought away the whole ship piece by piece.
But preparing the twelfth time to go on board, I
found the wind begin to rise. However, at low
water I went on board, and though I thought I
had rummaged the cabin so effectually as that noth-
ing more could be found, yet I discovered a locker
with drawers in it, in one of which I found two or
three razors, and one pair of large scissors, with
Some ten or a dozen of good knives and forks; in



42 ROBINSON CRUSOE

another, I found about thirty-six pounds value in
money, some European coin, some Brazil, some
pieces of eight, some gold, some silver.

It blew very hard all that night, and in the morn-
ing, when I looked out, behold, no more ship was to
be seen.

My thoughts were now wholly employed about
securing myself against either savages, if any
should appear, or wild beasts, if any were in the
island.

I soon found the place I was in was not for my
settlement, particularly because it was upon a low
moorish ground near the sea, and I believed would
not be wholesome; and more particularly because
there was no fresh water near it. So I resolved to
find a more healthy and more convenient spot of
ground.

I consulted several things in my situation, which
I found would be proper for me. First, health
and fresh water, I just now mentioned. Secondly,
shelter from the heat of the sun. Thirdly, secu-
rity from ravenous creatures, whether men or
beasts. Fourthly, a view to the sea, that if God
sent any ship in sight I might not lose any advan-
tage for my deliverance, of which I was not willing
to banish all my expectation yet.

In search of a place proper for this, I found a
little plain on the side of a rising hill, whose front
towards this little plain was steep as a house-side,
so that nothing could come down upon me from the
top; on the side of this rock there was a hollow



ROBINSON CRUSOE 43

place, worn a little way in, like the entrance or
door of a cave; but there was not really any cave,
or way into the rock at all.

On the flat of the green, just before this hollow
place, I resolved to pitch my tent. This plain was
not above an hundred yards broad, and about twice
as long, and lay like a green before my door, and
at the end of it descended irregularly every way
down into the low grounds by the seaside. It was
on the N.N.W. side of the hill, so that I was shel-
tered from the heat every day, till it came to a W.
and by 8. sun, or thereabouts, which in those coun-
tries is near the setting.

Before I set up my tent, I drew a half circle be- ;
fore the hollow place, which took in about ten yards
in its semi-diameter from the rock, and twenty
yards in its diameter from its beginning and end-
ing. In this half circle I pitched two rows of
strong stakes, driving them into the ground till
they stood very firm like piles, the biggest end be-
ing out of the ground about five feet and a half,
and sharpened on the top. The two rows did not
stand above six inches from one another.

Then I took the pieces of cable which I had cut
in the ship, and laid them in rows one upon an-
other, within the circle, between these two rows of
Stakes, up to the top, placing other stakes in the
inside leaning against them, about two feet and a
half high, like a Spur to a post; and this fence was
So strong, that neither man nor beast could get
into it, or over it. This cost-me a great deal of



44 ROBINSON CRUSOE

time and labor, especially to cut the piles in the
woods, bring them to the place, and drive them
into the earth.

The entrance into this place I made to be not
by a door, but by a short ladder, to go over the top;
which ladder, when I was in, I lifted over after me,
and so I was completely fenced in, and fortified, as
I thought, from all the world, and consequently
slept secure in the night.

Into this fence or fortress, with infinite labor, I
carried all my riches, all my provisions, ammuni-
tion, and stores, of which you have the account
above; and I made me a large tent, which, to pre-
serve me from the rains that in one part of the
year are very violent there, I made double, viz.,
one smaller tent within, and one larger tent above
it, and covered the upper-most with a large tar-
paulin, which I had saved among the sails. And
now I lay no more for a while in the bed which I
had brought on shore, but in a hammock, which
was indeed a very good one, and belonged to the
mate of the ship.

Into this tent I brought all my provisions, and
everything that would spoil by the wet; and hay-
ing thus enclosed all my goods, I made up the en-
trance, which, till now, I had left open, and so
passed and repassed, as I said, by a short ladder.

When I had done this, I began to work my way
into the rock; and bringing all the earth and stones
that I dug down out through my tent, I laid them
up within my fence in the nature of a terrace, so



ROBINSON CRUSOE 45

that it raised the ground within about a foot and
a half; thus I made me a cave just behind my tent,
which served me like a cellar to my house.

It cost me much labor, and many days, before all
these things were brought to perfection, and there-
fore I must go back to some other things which
took up some of my thoughts. At the same time it
happened, after I had laid my scheme for the set-
ting up my tent, and making the cave, that a storm
of rain falling from a thick dark cloud, a sudden
flash of lightning happened, and after that a great
clap of thunder, as is naturally the effect of it. I
was not so much surprised with the lightning, as I
was with a thought which darted into my mind as
swift as the lightning itself. O my powder! My
very heart sunk within me when I thought that at
one blast all my powder might be destroyed, on
which, not my defence only, but the providing me
food, as I thought, entirely depended. I was noth-
ing near so anxious about my own danger; though
had the powder took fire, I had never known who
had hurt me.

Such impression did this make upon me that
after the storm was over I laid aside all my works,
my building, and fortifying, and applied myself to
make bags and boxes to separate the powder, and
keep it a little and a little ina parcel, in hope that
whatever might come it might not all take fire at
once, and to keep it so apart, that it should not be
possible to make one part fire another. I finished
this work in about a fortnight; and I think my



46 ROBINSON CRUSOE

powder, which in all was about 240 pounds weight,
was divided in not less than a hundred parcels.
As to the barrel that had been wet, I did not appre-
hend any danger from that, so I placed it in my
new cave, which in my fancy I called my kitchen,
and the rest I hid up and down in holes among
the rocks, so that no wet might come to it, mark-
ing very carefully where I laid it.

In the interval of time while this was doing, I
went out once, at least, every day with my gun, as
well to divert myself, as to see if I could kill
anything fit for food, and as near as I could to ac-
quaint myself with what the island produced. The
first time I went out, I presently discovered that
there were goats in the island, which was a great
satisfaction to me; but then it was attended with
this misfortune to me, viz., that they were so shy,
so subtle, and so swift of foot, that it was the diffi-
cultest thing in the world to come at them. But I
was not discouraged at this, not doubting but I
might now and then shoot one, as it soon hap-
pened.

The first shot I made among these creatures I
killed a she-goat, which had a little kid by her,
which she gave suck to, which grieved me heartily;
but when the old one fell, the kid stood stock still
by her till I came and took her up; and not only
so, but when I carried the old one with me upon
my shoulders, the kid followed me quite to my en-
closure; upon which I laid down the dam, and took
the kid in my arms, and carried it over my pale, in



ROBINSON CRUSOE 47

hopes to have bred it up tame; but it would not eat,
so I was forced to kill it, and eat it myself. These
two supplied me with flesh a great while, for I ate
sparingly, and saved my provisions, my bread espe-
cially, as much as possibly I could.



Having now fixed my habitation, I found it ab-
Solutely necessary to provide a place to make a
fire in, and fuel to burn; and what I did for that,
as also how I enlarged my cave, and what con-
veniences I made, I shall give a full account of in
its place. But I must first give some little ac-
count of myself, and of my thoughts about living,
which it may well be supposed were not a few.

4



48 ROBINSON CRUSOE

I had a dismal prospect of my condition; for as I
was not cast away upon that island without being
driven, as is said, by a violent storm, quite out of
the course of our intended voyage, and a great way,
viz., some hundreds of leagues out of the ordinary
course of the trade of mankind, I had great reason
to consider it asa determination of Heaven, that in
this desolate place, and in this desolate manner, I
should end my life. The tears would run plenti-
fully down my face when I made these reflections,
and sometimes I would expostulate with myself,
why Providence should thus completely ruin its
creatures, and render them so absolutely miser-
able, so without help abandoned, so entirely de-
pressed, that it could hardly be rational to be
thankful for such a life.

But something always returned swift upon me to
check these thoughts, and to reprove me; and par-
ticularly one day, walking with my gun in my hand
by the seaside, I was very pensive upon the subject
of my present condition, when Reason, as it were,
expostulated with me t’other wry, thus: “Well,
you are in a desolate condition, it is true, but pray
remember, where are the rest of you? Did not
you come eleven of you into the boat? Where are
the ten? Why were they not saved, and you lost?

And now being to enter into a melancholy rela-
tion of a scene of silent life, such, perhaps, as was
never heard of in the world before, I shall take it
from its beginning, and continue it in its order.
It was, by my account, the 30th of September when,



ROBINSON CRUSOE 49

in the manner as above said, I first set foot upon
this horrid island, when the sun being to us in its
autumnal equinox, was almost just over my head,
for I reckoned myself, by observation, to be in the
latitude of 9 degrees 22 minutes north of the line.

After I had been there about ten or twelve days,
it came into my thoughts that I should loge my



reckoning of time for want of books and pen and
ink, and should even forget the Sabbath days from
the working days; but to prevent this, I cut it
with my knife upon a large post, in capital letters;
and making it into a great cross, I set it up on the
shore where I first landed, viz., “I came on shore
here on the 30th of September, 1659.” Upon the
sides of this square post I cut every day a notch
with my knife and every seventh notch was as long
again as the rest, and every first day of the month



50 ROBINSON CRUSOE

as long again as that long one; and thus I kept
my calendar, or weekly, monthly, and yearly reck-
oning of time.

In the next place we are to observe, that among
the many things which I brought out of the ship in
the several voyages, which, as above mentioned, I
made to it, I got several things of less value, but
not all less useful to me, which I omitted setting
down before; as in particular, pens, ink, and paper,
several parcels in the captain’s, mate’s, gunner’s,
and carpenter’s keeping, three or four compasses,
Some mathematical instruments, dials, perspec-
tives, charts, and books of navigation, all which I
huddled together, whether I might want them or
no. Also I found three very good Bibles, which
came to me in my cargo from England, and which
I had packed up among my things; some Portu-
guese books also, and among them two or three
Popish prayer-books, and several other books, all
which I carefully secured. And I must not forget,
that we had in the ship a dog and two cats, of
whose eminent history I may have occasion to say
something in its place; for I carried both the cats
with me; and as for the dog, he jumped out of the
ship of himself, and swam on shore to me the day
after I went on shore with my first cargo, and was
a trusty servant to me many years. I wanted
nothing that he could fetch me, nor any company
that he could make up to me; I only wanted to
have him talk to me, but that he would not do.

The want of tools made every work I did go on





ROBINSON CRUSOE Bi

heavily ; and it was near a whole year before I had
entirely finished my little pale or surrounded habi-
tation. The piles of stakes, which were as heavy
as I could well lift, were a long time in cutting and
preparing in the woods, and more by far in bring-
ing home; so that I spent sometimes two days in
cutting and bringing home one of those posts, and
a third day in driving it into the ground.

But what need I have been concerned at the
tediousness of anything I had to do, seeing I had
time enough to do it in? nor had I any other em-
ployment, if that had been over, at least, that I
could foresee, except the ranging the island to seek
for food, which I did more or less every day.

I now drew up the state of my affairs in writing;
not so much to leave them to any that were to come
after me, for I was like to have but few heirs, as
to deliver my thoughts from daily poring upon
them, and afflicting my mind. And as my reason
began now to master my despondency, I stated it
very impartially, like debtor and creditor, the com-
forts I enjoyed against the miseries I suffered,
thus:

Evil. Good.

I am cast upon a hor- But I am alive, and
rible desolate island, not drowned, as all my
void of all hope of re- ship’s company was.
covery.

I am singled out and But I am singled out,
Separated, as it were, too, from all the ship’s



52 ROBINSON CRUSOE

from all the world to be
miserable.

I am divided from
mankind, a_ solitaire,
one banished from hu-
man society.

I have not elothes to
cover me.

I am without any de-
fence or means to resist
any violence of man or
beast.

I have no soul to
speak to, or relieve me.

crew to be spared from
death; and He that mi-
raculously saved me
from death, can deliver
me from this condition.

But I am not starved
and perishing on a bar-
ren place, affording no
sustenance.

But I am in a hot cli.
mate, where if I had
clothes I could hardly
wear them.

But I am cast on an
island, where I see no
wild beasts to hurt me,
as I saw on the coast of
Africa; and what if I
had been shipwrecked
there?

But God wonderfully
Sent the ship in near
enough to the _ shore,
that I have gotten out
SO. many necessary
things as will either
supply my wants, or en-
able me to supply my-
self even as long ag I
live.



ROBINSON CRUSOE BS

Having now brought my mind a little to relish
my condition, and given over looking out to sea, to
see if I could spy a ship; I say, giving over these
things, I began to apply myself to accommodate
my way of living, and to make things as easy to
me as I could.

I have already described my habitation, which
was a tent under the side of a rock, surrounded
with a strong pale of posts and cables; but I might
now rather call it a wall, for I raised a kind of wall
up against it of turfs, about two feet thick on the
outside, and after some time—I think it was a year
and a half—lI raised rafters from it leading to the
rock, and thatched it with boughs of trees and
such things as I could get to keep out the rain,
which I found at some times of the year very
violent.

I have already observed how I brought all my
goods into this pale, and into the cave which I had
made behind me. But I must observe, too, that at
first this was a confused heap of goods, which as
they lay in no order, so they took up all my place;
I had no room to turn myself. So I set myself
to enlarge my cave and works farther into the
earth ; for it was a loose sandy rock, which yielded
easily to the labor I bestowed on it. And so, when
I found I was pretty safe as to beasts of prey, I
worked sideways to the right hand into the rock;
and then, turning to the right again, worked quite
out, and made me a door to come out on the out-
side of my pale or fortification. This gave me not



54 ROBINSON CRUSOE

only egress and regress, as it were a back-way to
my tent and to my storehouse, but gave me room
to stow my goods.

And now I began to apply myself to make such
necessary things as I found I most wanted, as par-
ticularly a chair and a table.

So I went to work. I had never handled a tool
in my life; and yet in time, by labor, application,
and contrivance, I found at last that I wanted noth-
ing but I could have made it, especially if I had
had tools. However, I made an abundance of
things even without tools, and some with no more
tools than an adze and a hatchet, which, perhaps,
were never made that way before, and that with
infinite labor. For example, if I wanted a board,
I had no other way but to cut down a tree, set it
on an edge before me, and hew it flat on either side
with my axe, till I had brought it to be thin as a
plank, and then dub it smooth with my adze. It
is true, by this method I could make but one board
out of a whole tree; but my time or labor was little
worth, and so it was as well employed one way as
another.

However, I made me a table and a chair, as I
observed above, in the first place, and this I did out
of the short pieces of boards that I brought on my
raft from the ship. But when I had wrought out
some boards, as above, I made large shelves of the
breadth of a foot and a half one over another, all
along one side of my cave, to lay all my tools, nails,
and iron-work; and, in a word, to separate every-



ROBINSON CRUSOE 55

thing at large in their places, that I might come
easily at them.

And now it was when I began to keep a journal
of every day’s employment, of which I shall here
give you the copy ( though in it will be told all
these particulars over again) as long as it lasted;
for, having no more ink, I was forced to leave it
off.

THE JOURNAL

September 30, 1659.—I, poor miserable Robin-
son Crusoe, being shipwrecked, during a dreadful
storm, in the offing, came on shore on this dismal
unfortunate island, which I called the Island of
Despair, all the rest of the ship’s company being
drowned, and myself almost dead.

All the rest of that day I spent in afflicting my-
Self at the dismal circumstances I was brought to,
viz., I had neither food, house, clothes, weapon, or
place to fly to; and in despair to any relief, saw
nothing but death before me; either that I should
be devoured by wild beasts, murdered by savages,
or starved to death for want of food. At the ap-
preach of night, I slept in a tree for fear of wild
creatures, but slept soundly, though it rained all
night.

Oct. 1. In the morning I saw, to my great sur-
prise, the ship had floated with the high tide, and
was driven on shore again much nearer the island;
which, as it was some comfort on one hand, for see-



56 ROBINSON CRUSOE

ing her sit upright, and not broken to pieces, I
hoped, if the wind abated, I might get on board,
and get some food and necessaries out of her for
my relief; so, on the other hand, it renewed my
grief at the loss of my comrades, who, I imag-
ined, if we had all stayed on board, might have
saved the ship, or at least that they would not have
been all drowned as they were; and that had the
men been saved, we might perhaps have built us a
boat out of the ruins of the ship, to have carried us
to some other part of the world. Seeing the ship
almost dry, I went upon the sand as near as I
could, and then swam on board; this day also it
continued raining, though with no wind at all.

From the 1st of October to the 24th.—All these
days entirely spent in many several voyages to get
all I could out of the ship, which I brought on
Shore, every tide of flood, upon rafts. Much
rain.

Oct. 25.—It rained all night and all day, with
Some gusts of wind, during which time the ship
broke in pieces, and was no more to be seen, except
the wreck of her, and that only at low water. I
spent this day in securing the goods which I had
saved, that the rain might not spoil them.

Oct. 26.—I walked about the shore almost all
day to find out a place to fix my habitation. To-
wards night I fixed upon a proper place under a
rock, and marked out a semicirgle for my encamp-
ment, which I resolved to strengthen with a work.



ROBINSON CRUSOE 57

wall, or fortification made of double piles, lined
within with cables, and without with turf.

From the 26th to the 30th I worked very hard in
carrying all my goods to my new habitation,
though part of the time it rained exceeding hard.

The 31st, the morning, I went out with my gun
to see for some food, and discover the country ;
when I killed a she-goat, and her kid followed me
home, which I afterwards killed also, because it
would not feed.

Nov. 1—I set up my tent under a rock, and lay
there the first night, making it as large as I could,
with stakes driven in to swing my hammock upon.

Nov. 2.—I set up all my chests and boards, and
the pieces of timber which made my rafts, and with
them formed a fence round me, a little within the
place I had marked out for my fortification.

Nov. 3.—I went out with my gun, and killed two
fowls, like ducks, which were very good food. In
the afternoon went to work to make me a table.

Nov. 4.—This morning I began to order my times
of work, of going out with my gun, time of sleep,
and time of diversion, viz., every morning I walked
out with my gun for two or three hours, if it did
not rain; then employed myself to work till about
eleven o’clock; then eat what I had to live on; and
from twelve to two I lay down to sleep, the weather
being excessive hot; and then in the evening to
work again. The working part of this day and of
the next were wholly employed in making my table.



58 ROBINSON CRUSOE

Nov. 5.—This day went abroad with my gun and
my dog, and killed a wild cat; her skin pretty soft,
but her flesh good for nothing. Every creature I
killed, I took off the skins and preserved them.

Nov. 7.—Now it began to be settled fair weather.
The 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, and part of the 12th (for
the 11th was Sunday) I took wholly up to make
me a chair, and with much ado, brought it to a
tolerable shape, but never to please me; and even
in the making, I pulled it in pieces several times.
Note, I soon neglected my keeping Sundays; for,
omitting my mark for them on my post, I forgot
which was which.

Nov. 13.—This day it rained, which refreshed
me exceedingly, and cooled the earth, but it was
accompanied with terrible thunder and lightning,
which frightened me dreadfully, for fear of my
powder. As soon as it was over, I resolved to
Separate my stock of powder into as many little
parcels as possible, that it might not be in danger.

Nov. 14, 15, 16—These three days I spent in
making little square chests or boxes, which might
hold about a pound, or two pound at most, of
powder; and so putting the powder in, I stowed it
in places as secure and remote from one another as
possible. On one of these three days I killed a
large bird that was good to eat, but I know not
what to call it.

Nov. 17.—This day I began to dig behind my
tent into the rock, to make room for my farther
conveniency. Note, three things I wanted exceed-



ROBINSON CRUSOE 59

ingly for this work, viz., a pick-axe, a shovel, and a
wheel-barrow or basket; so I desisted from my
work, and made me some tools. As fora pick-axe,
I made use of the iron crows, which were proper
enough, though heavy; but the next thing was a
shovel or spade. What kind of one to make, I
knew not.

Nov. 18.—The next day, in searching the woods,
I found a tree which in the Brazils they call the
iron tree. Of this, with great labor, and almost
spoiling my axe, I cut a piece and brought it home
though it was exceeding heavy.

The excessive hardness of the wood made me a
long while upon this machine, for I worked it
effectually, by little and little, into the form of a
shovel or spade, the handle exactly shaped like
ours in England, only that the broad part having
no iron shod upon it at bottom, it would not last
‘me so long.

For carrying away the earth which I dug out of
the cave, I made me a thing like a hod which the
laborers carry mortar in, when they serve the
bricklayers.

Nov. 23.—My other work having now stood still
because of my making these tools, I spent eighteen
days entirely in widening and deepening my cave,
that it might hold my goods commodiously.

Note.—During all this time I worked to make
this room or cave spacious enough to accommodate
me as a warehouse or magazine, a kitchen, a din-
ing-room, and a cellar; as for my lodging, I kept



60 ROBINSON CRUSOE

to the tent, except that sometimes in the wet sea-
son of the year it rained so hard, that I could not
keep myself dry, which caused me afterwards to
cover all my place within my pale with long poles,
in the form of rafters, leaning against the rocks,
and load them with fiags and large leaves of trees,
like a thatch.

Dec. 10.—I began now to think my cave or vault
finished, when on a sudden a great quantity of
earth fell down from the top and one side, so much
that if I had been under it, I had never wanted a
grave-digger. Upon this disaster I had a great
deal of work to do over again; for I had the loose
earth to carry out; and, which was of more im-
portance, I had the ceiling to prop up, so that I
might be sure no more would come down.

Dec. 17—From this day to the twentieth I
placed shelves, and knocked up nails on the posts
to hang everything up that could be hung up; and
now I began to be in some order within doors.

Dec. 20.—Now I carried everything into the cave,
and began to furnish my house, and set up some
pieces of boards, like a dresser, to order my victuals
upon; but boards began to be very scarce with me;
also I made me another table.

Dec. 24.—Much rain all night and all day; no
stirring out.

Dec. 25.—Rain all day.

Dec. 26.—No rain, and the earth much coeler
than before, and pleasanter.

Dec. 27.—Killed a young goat, and lamed a



ROBINSON CRUSOE 61

other, so that I catched it. When I had it home,
I bound and splintered up its leg, which was broke.
N.B.—I took such care of it, that it grew well and
as strong as ever; but by my nursing it so long it
grew tame. This was the first time I entertained
a thought of breeding up some tame creatures, that
I might have food when my powder and shot was
all spent.

Dec. 28, 29, 30.—Great heats and no breeze, so
that there was no stirring abroad, except in the
evening, for food.

Jan. 1—vVery hot still. This evening, going
farther into the valleys which lay towards the cen-
tre of the island, I found there was plenty of goats,
though exceeding shy, and hard to come at.

Jan. 2.—I went out with my dog, and set him
upon the goats; but I was mistaken, for they all
faced about upon the dog; and he knew his danger
too well, for he would not come near them.

Jan. 3.—I began my fence or wall ; which, being
still jealous of my being attacked by somebody, I
resolved to make very thick and strong.

N.B—This wall being described before, I pur-
posely omit what was said in the journal. It ig
sufficient tv observe that I was no less time than
from the 3rd of J anuary to the 14th of April work-
ing, finishing, and perfecting this wall, though it
was no more than about twenty-four yards in
length.

During this time, I made my rounds in the woods
for game every day, when the rain admitted me,



62 ROBINSON CRUSOE

and made frequent discoveries to my advantage;
particularly I found a kind of wild pigeons, who
built in the holes of the rocks. I frequen*.y found
their nests, and got their young ones, which were
very good meat.

And now in the managing my household affairs I
found myself wanting in many things, which I
thought at first it was impossible for me to make.

I was at a great loss for candle; so that as soon
as ever it was dark, which was generally by seven
o’clock, I was obliged to go to bed. The only rem-
edy I had was, that when I had killed a goat I
saved the tallow, and with a little dish made of
clay, which I baked in the sun, to which I added a
wick of some oakum, I made me a lamp; and this
gave me light, though not a clear steady light like
a candle.

In rummaging my things, I found a little bag,
which had been filled with corn. What little re-
mainder of corn had been in the bag was all de-
voured with the rats, and I shook the husks of
corn out of it on one side of my fortification, un-
der the rock. It was a little before the great
rains that I threw this stuff away, ard, about a
month after I saw some few stalks ot something
green shooting out of the ground, which I fancied
might be some plant I had not seen; but I was
surprised, and perfectly astonished, when, after a
little longer time, I saw about ten or twelve ears
come out, which were perfect green barley of the
same kind as our European, nay, as our English



ROBINSON CRUSOE 63

barley. And because I saw near it, all along
by the side of the rock, some other straggling
stalks, which proved to be stalks of rice, and
which I knew, because I had seen it grow in
Africa.

Not doubting but that there was more in the
place, I went all over that part of the island where
I had been before, peering in every corner, and
under every rock, to see for more of it; but I could
not find any. At last it occurred to my thoughts
that I had shook the bag out on that place, and
then the wonder began to cease.

I carefully saved the ears of this corn, and I
resolved to sow them all again, hoping in time to
have some quantity sufficient to supply me with
bread. But it was not till the fourth year that I
could allow myself the least grain of this corn to
eat, and even then but sparingly, as I shall say
afterwards in its order.

I worked excessive hard these three or four
months to get my wall done; and the 14th of April
I closed it up, contriving to go into it, not by a
door, but over the wall by a ladder, that there
might be no sign in the outside of my habitation.

April 16.—I finished the ladder, so I went up
with the ladder to the top, and then pulled it up
after me, and let it down on the inside. This was
a complete enclosure to me; for within I had room
enough, and nothing could come at me from with-
out, unless it could first mount my wall.

The very next day after this wall was finished, I

5



64 ROBINSON CRUSOE

had almost had all my labor overthrown at once,
and myself killed. The case was thus: As I was
busy just in the entrance into my cave, all on a
sudden I found the earth come crumbling down
from the roof of my cave, and from the edge of the
hill over my head, and two of the posts I had set up
in the cave cracked in a frightful manner. I ran
forward to my ladder; and not thinking myself
safe there neither, I got over my wall for fear of
the pieces of the hill which I expected might roll
down upon me. I was no sooner stepped down
upon the firm ground, but I plainly saw it was a
terrible earthquake; for the ground I stood on
shook three times at about eight minutes’ distance,
and a great piece of the top of a rock, which stood
about half a mile from me next the sea, fell down
with such a terrible noise as I never heard in all
my life. I perceived also the very sea was put
into violent motion by it; and I believed the
shocks were stronger under the water than on the
island.

After the third shock was over, and I felt no
more for some time, I began to take courage; and
yet I had not heart enough to go over my wall
again, for fear of being buried alive, but sat still
upon the ground, greatly cast down and disconso-
late, not knowing what to do. All this while I
had not the least serious religious thought, nothing
but the common, “Lord, have mercy upon me!” and
when it was over, that went away too.

While I sat thus the wind rose by little and little,



ROBINSON CRUSOE 65

so that in less than half an hour it blew a most
dreadful hurricane. The sea was all on a sudden
covered over with foam and froth; the shore was
covered with the breach of the water; the trees were
torn up by the roots; and a terrible storm it was:
and this held about three hours, and then began to
abate; and in two hours more it was stark calm,
and began to rain very hard. The rain was 80
violent that my tent was ready to be beaten down
with it, and I was forced to go into my cave,
though very much afraid and uneasy, for fear it
should fall on my head.

It continued raining all that night and great
part of the next day, so that I could not stir
abroad; but my mind being more composed, I
began to think of what I had best do, concluding
that if the island was subject to these earthquakes,
there would be no living for me in a cave, but I
must consider of building me some little hut in an
open place, which I might surround with a wall,
as I had done here, and so make myself secure from
wild beasts or men.

With these thoughts I resolved to remove my
tent from the place where it stood, which was just
under the hanging precipice of the hill, and which,
if it should be shaken again, would certainly fall
upon my tent; and I spent the two next days, be-
ing the 19th and 20th of April, in contriving where
and how to remove my habitation.

In the meantime it occurred to me that it would
require a vast deal of time for me to do this, and



66 ROBINSON CRUSOE

that I must be contented to run the venture where
I was, till I had formed a camp for myself, and
had secured it so as to remove to it. So with this
resolution I composed myself for a time, and re-
solved that I would go to work with all speed to
build me a wall with piles and cables, etc., in a
circle as before, and set my tent up in it when it
was finished, but that I would venture to stay
where I was till it was finished, and fit to remove
to. This was the 21st.

April 22.—The next morning I began to consider
of means to put this resolve in execution; but I
was at a great loss about my tools. I had three
large axes, and abundance of hatchets (for we car-
ried the hatchets for traffic with the Indians), but
with much chopping and cutting knotty hard wood,
they were all full of notches and dull; and though
I had a grindstone, I could not turn it and grind
my tools too. At length I contrived a wheel with
a string, to turn it with my foot, that I might have
both my hands at liberty. Note, I had never seen
any such thing in England, or at least not to take
notice how it was done, though since I have ob-
served it is very common there; besides that, my
grindstone was very large and heavy. This ma-
chine cost me a full week’s work to bring it to per-
fection.

April 28, 29.—These two whole days I took up in
grinding my tools, my machine for turning my
grindstone performing very well.

April 30.—Having perceived my bread had been



ROBINSON CRUSOE 67

low a great while, now I took a survey of it, and re-
duced myself to one biscuit-cake a day.

May 1.—In the morning, looking towards the
seaside, I found the ship strangely removed. The
stern, which was broken to pieces, and parted from
the rest by the force of the sea soon after I had
left rummaging her, was tossed, as it were, up,
and cast on one side, and the sand was thrown
so high on that side next her stern, that whereas
there was a great place of water before, so that I
could not come within a quarter of a mile of the
wreck without swimming, I could now walk quite
up to her when the tide was out. I was surprised
with this at first, but soon concluded it must be
done by the earthquake.

This wholly diverted my thoughts from the de-
sign of removing my habitation; and I busied my-
self mightily, that day especially, in searching
whether I could make any way into the ship. But
I found nothing was to be expected of that kind,
for that all the inside of the ship was choked up
with sand. However, as I had learned not to
despair of anything, I resolved to pull everything
to pieces that I could of the ship.

I caught a young dolphin. I had made me a
long line of some rope-yarn, but I had no hooks ;
yet I frequently caught fish enough, as much as I
cared to eat; all which I dried in the sun, and ate
them dry.

May 24.—Every day to this day I worked on the
wreck, and with hard labor I loosened some things



68 ROBINSON CRUSOE

so much with the crow, that the first blowing tide
several casks floated out, and two of the seamen’s
chests.

I continued this work every day to the 15th of
June, except the time necessary to get food, which
I always appointed, during this part of my employ-
ment, to be when the tide was up, that I might be
ready when it was ebbed out. .

June 16.—Going down to the seaside, I found a
large tortoise, or turtle. This was the first I had
seen.

June 17.—I spent in cooking the turtle. I found
in her threescore eggs; and her flesh was to me, at
that time, the most savory and pleasant that ever
I tasted in my life, having had no flesh, but of
goats and fowls, since I landed in this horrid place.

June 18.—Rained all day, and I stayed within.
I thought the rain felt cold, and I was something
chilly, which I knew was not usual in that latitude.

June 19.—Very ill, and shivering, as if the
weather had been cold.

June 20.—No rest all night; violent pains in my
head, and feverish.

June 21.—Very ill, frighted almost to death
with the apprehensions of my sad condition, to be
sick, and no help. Prayed to God for the first
time since the storm off Hull, but scarce knew
what I said, or why.

June 22.—A little better, but under dreadful ap-
prehensions of sickness.



ROBINSON CRUSOE 69

June 23.—Very bad again; cold and shivering,
and then a violent headache.

June 24.—Much better.

June 25.—An ague very violent; the fit held me
seven hours; cold fit, and hot, with faint sweats
after it.

June 26.—Better; and having no victuals to eat,
took my gun, but found myself very weak. How-
ever, I killed a she-goat, and with much difficulty
got it home, and broiled some of it, and ate.

June 27.—The ague again so violent that I lay
abed all day, and neither ate nor drank. I was
ready to perish for thirst; but so weak, I had not
strength to stand up, or to get myself any water
to drink. Prayed to God again, and had this ter-
rible dream.

I thought that I was sitting on the ground, on
the outside of my wall, where I sat when the storm
blew after the earthquake, and that I saw a man
descend from a great black cloud, in a bright flame
of fire, and light upon the ground. He was all
over as bright as a flame, so that I could but just
bear to look towards him.

He moved forward towards me, and I heard a
voice so terrible that it is impossible to express the
terror of it. All that I can say I understood was
this: “Seeing all these things have not brought
thee to repentance, now thou shalt die”; at which
words I thought he lifted up the spear that was in
his hand to kill me.



70 ROBINSON CRUSOE

I had, alas! no divine knowledge; what I had re-
ceived by the good instruction of my father was
then worn out, by an uninterrupted series, for
eight years, of seafaring wickedness, and a con-
Stant conversation with nothing but such as were,
like myself, wicked and profane to the last degree.
I was all that the most hardened, unthinking,
wicked creature among our common sailors can be
supposed to be; not having the least sense, either
of the fear of God in danger, or of thankfulness to
God in deliverances.

In relating what is already past of my story,
this will be the more easily believed, when I shall
add, that through all the variety of miseries that
had to this day befallen me, I never had so much as
one thought of it being the hand of God, or that it
was a just punishment for my sin; my rebellious
behavior against my father, or my present sins,
which were great; or so much as a punishment
for the general course of my wicked life.

June 28.—Having been somewhat refreshed with
the sleep I had had, and the fit being entirely off,
I got up; and though the fright and terror of my
dream was very great, yet I considered that the fit
of the ague would return again the next day, and
now was my time to get something to refresh and
support myself when I should be ill. And the first
thing I did I filled a large square case-bottle with
water, and set it upon my table, in reach of my
bed ; and to take off the chill or aguish disposition
of the water, I put about a quarter of a pint of



ROBINSON CRUSOE 71

rum into it, and mixed them together. Then I got
me a piece of the goat’s flesh, and broiled it on the
coals, but could eat very little. I walked about,
but was very weak, and at night I made my supper
of three of the turtle’s eggs, which I roasted in the
ashes, and ate, as we call it, in the shell; and this
was the first bit of meat I had ever asked God’s
blessing to, as I could remember, in my whole
life.

After I had eaten, I tried to walk, but found
myself so weak that I could hardly carry the gun
(for I never went out without that) ; so I went but
a little way, and sat down upon the ground, look-
ing out upon the sea, which was just before me,
and very calm and smooth. As I sat there, some
such thoughts as these occurred to me.

What is this earth and sea, of which I have seen
So much? whence is it produced? And what am I,
and all the other creatures, wild and tame, human
and brutal, whence are we? Sure we are all made
by some secret Power, who formed the earth and
Sea, the air and sky. And who is that?

Then it followed most naturally, It ig God that
has made it all. Well, if God has made all these
things, He guides and governs them all, and all
things that concern them; for the Power that could
make things, must certainly have power to guide
and direct them.

If so, nothing can happen in the great circuit of

-His works, either without His knowledge or ap-
pointment. And if nothing happens without His



72 ROBINSON CRUSOE

Knowledge, He knows that I am here, and am in
this dreadful condition. And if nothing happens
without His appointment, He has appointed all
this to befall me.

Nothing occurred to my thoughts to contradict
any of these conclusions; and therefore it rested
upon me with the greater force, that it must needs
be that God had appointed all this to befall me,
that I was brought to this miserable circumstance
by His direction, He having the sole power, not of
me only, but of everything that happened in the
world. Immediately it followed, Why has God
done this to me? What have I done to be thus
used ?

My conscience presently checked me in that in-
quiry, as if I had blasphemed, and methought it
spoke to me like a voice: “Wretch! dost thou ask
what thou hast done? Look back upon a dreadful
misspent life, and ask thyself what thou hast not
done? Ask, Why is it that thou wert not long ago
destroyed? Why wert thou not drowned in Yar-
mouth Roads; killed in the fight when the ship
was taken by the Sallee man-of-war; devoured by
the wild beasts on the coast of Africa; or drowned
here, when all the crew perished but thyself?
Dost thou ask, What have I done?”

I was struck dumb with these reflections, as one
astonished and had not a word to say, no, not to
answer to myself, but rose up pensive and sad,
walked back to my retreat, and went up Over my
wall, as if I had been going to bed. But my



ROBINSON CRUSOE © 73

thoughts were sadly disturbed, and I had no in-
clination to sleep; so I sat down in my chair, and
lighted my lamp, for it began to be dark. Now, .
as the apprehension of the return of my distemper
terrified me very much, it occurred to my thought
that the Brazilians take no physic but their to-
bacco for almost all distempers; and I had a piece
of a roll of tobacco in one of the chests, which was
quite cured, and some also that was green.

I went, directed by Heaven no doubt; for in this
chest I found a cure for both soul and body. I
opened the chest, and found what I looked for, viz.,
the tobacco; and as the few books I had saved lay
there too, I took out one of the Bibles which I men-
tioned before, and which to this time I had not
found leisure, or so much as inclination, to look
into. I say, I took it out, and brought both that
and the tobacco with me to the table.

What use to make of the tobacco I knew not, as
to my distemper, or whether it was good for it or
no; but I tried several experiments with it, as if
I was resolved it should hit one way or other. I
first took a piece of a leaf, and chewed it in my
mouth, which indeed at first almost stupefied my
brain, the tobacco being green and strong, and that
I had not been much used to it. Then I took some
and steeped it an hour or two in some rum, and
resolved to take a dose of it when I lay down.
And lastly, I burnt some upon a pan of coals, and
held my nose close over the smoke of it, as long
as I could bear it.



74 ROBINSON CRUSOE

In the interval of this operation, I took up the
Bible, and began to read, but my head was too
much disturbed with the tobacco to bear reading,
at least that time; only having opened the book
casually, the first words that occurred to me were
these, “Call on Me in the day of trouble, and I will
deliver, and thou shalt glorify Me.”

It grew now late, and the tobacco had, as I said,
dozed my head so much that I inclined to sleep.
But before I lay down, I did what I never had
done in my life; I kneeled down and prayed to God
to fulfil the promise to me, that if I called upon
Him in the day of trouble, He would deliver me.
After my broken and imperfect prayer was over,
I drank the rum in which I had steeped the to-
bacco; which was so strong and rank of the
tobacco that indeed I could scarce get it down.

When I awaked I found myself exceedingly re-
freshed, and my spirits lively and cheerful. I was
stronger than I was the day before, and my stom-
ach better, for I was hungry; and, in short, I had
no fit the next day, but continued much altered
for the better. This was the 29th.

The 30th was my well day. I ate some more of
the turtle’s eggs, which were very good. This
evening I renewed the medicine, which I had sup-
posed did me good the day before, viz., the tobacco
steeped in rum; only I did not take so much as be-
fore, nor did I chew any of the leaf, or hold my
head over the smoke. However, I was not so well



ROBINSON CRUSOE 75

the next day, which was the first of July, as I
hoped I should have been; for I had a little spice
of the cold fit, but it was not much.

July 2.—I renewed the medicine all the three
ways; and dosed myself with it as at first, and
doubled the quantity which I drank.

July 3.—I missed the fit for good and all, though
T did not recover my full strength for some weeks
after. While I was thus gathering strength, my
thoughts ran exceedingly upon this Scripture, “I
will deliver thee”; and the impossibility of my
deliverance lay much upon my mind, in bar of my
ever expecting it. But as I was discouraging my-
self with such thoughts, it occurred to my mind
that I pored so much upon my deliverance from
the main affliction, that I disregarded the deliver-
ance I had received; and I was, as it were, made
to ask myself such questions as these, viz., Have I
not been delivered, and wonderfully too, from
Sickness? from the most distressed condition that
could be, and that was so frightful to me? and
what notice had I taken of it? Had I done my
part? God had delivered me, but I had not glor-
ified Him; that is to say, I had not owned and
been thankful for that as a deliverance; and how
could I expect greater deliverance?

This touched my heart very much; and immedi-
ately I kneeled down, and gave God thanks aloud
for my recovery from my sickness.

July 4.—In the morning I took the Bible: and



76 ROBINSON CRUSOE

beginning at the New Testament, I began seriously
to read it, and imposed upon myself to read awhile
every morning and every night, not tying myself
to the number of chapters, but as long as my
thoughts should engage me.

My condition began now to be, though not less
miserable as to my way of living, yet much easier
to my mind; and my thoughts being directed, by a
constant reading the Scripture, and praying to
God, to things of a higher nature, I had a great
deal of comfort within, which, till now, I knew
nothing of. Also, as my health and strength re-
turned, I bestirred myself to furnish myself with
everything that I wanted, and make my way of
living as regular as I could.

From the 4th of July to the 14th, I was chiens
employed in walking about with my gun in my
hand, a little and a little at a time, as a man that
was gathering up his strength after a fit of sick-
ness; for it is hardly to be imagined how low I
was, and to what weakness I was reduced.

I had been now in this unhappy island above ten
months; all possibility of deliverance from this
condition seemed to be entirely taken from me;
and I firmly believed that no human shape had
ever set foot upon that place.

It was the 15th of July that I began to take a
more particular survey of the island itself. I went
up the creek first, where, as I hinted, I brought
my rafts on shore. I found, after I came about
two miles up, that the tide did not flow any higher,



ROBINSON CRUSOE 7

and that it was no more than a little brook of run-
ing water, and very fresh and good.

On the bank of this brook I found many pleas-
ant savannas or meadows, plain, smooth, and cov-
ered with grass; and on the rising parts of them,
next to the higher grounds, where the water, as”
might be supposed, never overflowed, I found a
great deal of tobacco, green, and growing to a
great and very strong stalk.

The next day, the 16th, after going something
farther than I had the day before, I found the
brook and the savannas began to cease, and the
country became more woody than before. In this
part I found different fruits, and particularly I
found melons upon the ground in great abundance,
and great clusters of grapes were just now in their
prime, very ripe and rich. I found an excellent
use for these grapes; and that was, to cure or dry
them in the sun, and keep them as dried grapes or
raisins are kept, which I thought would be, as in-
deed they were, as wholesome as agreeable to eat,
when no grapes might be to be had.

I spent all that evening there, and went not back
to my habitation; which, by the way, was the first
night, as I might say, I had lain from home. In
the night, I took my first contrivance, and got up
into a tree, where I slept well; and the next morn-
ing proceeded upon my discovery, travelling near
four miles, as I might judge by the length of the
valley, keeping still due north, with a ridge of hills
on the south and north side of me.



78 ROBINSON CRUSOE

At the end of this march I came to an opening,
where the country seemed to descend to the west ;
and a little spring of fresh water, which issued out
of the side of the hill by me, ran the other way,
that is, due east; and the country appeared so
fresh, so green, so flourishing, everything being in
a constant verdure or flourish of spring, that it
looked like a planted garden.

I saw here abundance of cocoa trees, orange, and
lemon, and citron trees; but all wild, and very few
bearing any fruit, at least not then. However, the
green limes that I gathered were not only pleasant
to eat, but very wholesome.

I was so enamored of this place that I spent
much of my time there for the whole remaining
part of the month of July; and, though, upon sec-
ond thoughts, I resolved not to remove, yet I built
me a little kind of a bower, and surrounded it at a
distance with a strong fence, being a double hedge
as high as I could reach, well staked, and filled
between with brushwood. And here I lay very se-
cure, sometimes two or three nights together, al-
ways going over it with a ladder, as before; so that
I fancied now I had my country house and my sea-
coast house; and this work took me up to the be-
ginning of August.

I had but newly finished my fence, and began to
enjoy my labor, but the rains came on, and made
me stick close to my first habitation; for though
I had made me a tent like the other, with a piece
of a sail, and spread it very well, yet.I had not the



ROBINGON CRUSOE 79

shelter of a hill to keep me from storms, nor a eave
retreat when the rains were extraordinary.

About the beginning of August, as I said, I had
finished my bower and began to enjoy myself.
The 3rd of August, I found the grapes I had hung
up were perfectly dried, and indeed were excellent
good raisins of the sun; so I began to take them
down from the trees. And it was very happy that
I did so, for the rains whick followed would have
spoiled them, and I had lost the best part of my
winter food; for I had above two hundred large
bunches of them. No sooner had I taken them all
down, and carried most of them home to my cave,
but it began to rain; and from hence, which was
the 14th of August, it rained, more or less, every
day tilt the middle of October, and sometimes so
violently that I could not stir out of my cave for
several days.

From the 14th of August to the 26th, incessant
rain, so that I could not stir, and was now very
careful not to be much wet. In this confinement,
I began to be straitened for food; but venturing
out twice, I one day killed a goat, and the last day,
which was the 26th, found a very large tortoise,
which was a treat to me, and my food was regulated
thus: I ate a bunch of raisins for my breakfast, a
piece of the goat’s flesh, or of the turtle, for my
dinner, broiled; for, to my great misfortune, I had
no vessel to boil or stew anything; and two or three
of the turtle’s eggs for my supper.

During this confinement in my cover by the
6



80 ROBINSON CRUSOE

rain, I worked daily two or three hours at enlarg-
ing my cave, and by degrees worked it on towards
one side, till I came to the outside of the hill, and
made a door, or way out, which came beyond my
fence or wall; and so I came in and out this way.

Sept. 30.—I was now come to the unhappy anni-
versary of my landing. I cast up the notches on
my post, and found I had been on ghore three hun-
dred and sixty-five days. I kept this day as a
Solemn fast, setting it apart to religious exercise,
prostrating myself on the ground with the most se-
rious humiliation, confessing my sins to God, ac-
knowledging His righteous judgments upon me,
and praying to Him to have mercy on me through
Jesus Christ; and having not tasted the least re-
freshment for twelve hours, even till. the going
down of the sun, I then ate a biscuit-cake and a
bunch of grapes, and went to bed, finishing the day
as I began it.

I had all this time observed no Sabbath day, for
as at first I had no sense of religion upon my mind,
I had, after some time, omitted to distinguish the
weeks, by making a longer notch than ordinary for
the Sabbath day, and so did not really know what
any of the days were. But now, having cast up
the days, as above, I found I had been there a year,
so I divided it into weeks, and set apart every
seventh day for a Sabbath; though I found at the
end of my account, I had lost a day or two in my
reckoning.

A little after this my ink began to fail me, and so



ROBINSON CRUSOE 81

I contented myself to use it more sparingly, and to
write down only the most remarkable events of my
life, without continuing a daily memorandum of
other things.

I have mentioned that I had saved the few ears
of barley and rice, which I had so surprisingly
found spring up, as I thought, of themselves, and
believe there were about thirty stalks of rice, and
about twenty of barley. Now I thought it a
proper time to sow it after the rains, the sun being
in its southern position, going from me.

Accordingly I dug up a piece of ground as well
as I could with my wooden spade, and dividing it
into two parts, I sowed my grain; but as I was sow-
ing, it casually occurred to my thoughts that I
would not sow it all at first, because I did not
know when was the proper time for it, so I sowed
about two-thirds of the seed, leaving about a hand-
ful of each.

Finding my first seed did not grow, which I
easily imagined was by the drought, I sought for
a moister piece of ground to make another trial in,
and I dug up a piece of ground near my new bower,
and sowed the rest of my seed in February, a little
before the vernal equinox. And this having the
rainy months of March and April to water it,
sprung up very pleasantly, and yielded a very good
crop; but having part of the seed left only, and
not daring to sow all that I had, I had but a small
quantity at last, my whole crop not amounting to
above half a peck of each kind. But by this ex-



82 ROBINSON CRUSOE

periment I was made master of my business, and
knew I might expect two seed-times and two har-
vests every year.

While this corn was growing, I made a little dis-
covery, which was of use to me afterwards. As
soon as the rains were over, and the weather began
to settle, which was about the month of November,
I made a visit up the country to my bower, where,
though I had not been some months, yet I found
all things just as I left them. The circle or
double hedge that I had made was not only firm
and entire, but the stakes which I had cut out of
some trees that grew thereabouts were all shot out,
and grown with long branches, as much as a wil-
low-tree usually shoots the first year after lopping
its head. I could not tell what tree to call it that
these stakes were cut from. I was surprised, and
yet very well pleased to see the young trees grow,
and I pruned them, and led them up to grow as
much alike as I could. And it is scarce credible
how beautiful a figure they grew into in three
years; so that though the hedge made a circle of
about twenty-five yards in diameter, yet the trees,
for such I might now call them, soon covered it,
and it was a complete shade, sufficient to lodge
under all the dry season.

This made me resolve to cut some more stakes,
and make me a hedge like this, in a semicircle
round my wall (I mean that of my first dwelling),
which I did; and placing the trees or stakes in a
double row, at about eight yards distant from my



ROBINSON CRUSOE 83

first fence, they grew presently, and were at first a
fine cover to my habitation, and afterward served
for a defence also, as I shall observe in its order.

I found now that the seasons of the year might
generally be divided, not into summer and winter,
as in Europe, but into the rainy seasons and the
dry seasons; which were generally thus:

Half i \Rainy, the sun being then on,
Half April J or near the equinox.
Half April 7}
? re Dry, the sun being then to the
en north of the line.
July
Half August
Half August a ie
September Rainy, the sun being then come

Half October back.

Half October

November i

Dry, the sun being then to the
eee eer south of the line.
January |

Half February J

The rainy season sometimes held longer or
shorter as the winds happened to blow, but this was
the general observation I made. After I had found
by experience the ill consequence of being abroad
in the rain, I took care to furnish myself with pro-



84 ROBINSON CRUSOE

visions beforehand, that I might not be obliged
to go out; and I sat within doors as much as pos-
sible during the wet months.

In this time I found much employment; particu-
larly, I tried many ways to make myself a basket;
but all the twigs I could get for the purpose proved
so brittle that they would do nothing. It proved
of excellent advantage to me now, that when I was
a boy I used to take great delight in standing at a
basket-maker’s in the town where my father lived,
and sometimes lending a hand, I had by this means
full knowledge of the methods of it, that I wanted
nothing but the materials; when it came into my
mind that the twigs of that tree from whence I cut
my stakes that grew might possibly be as tough as
the sallows, and willows, and osiers in England.

Accordingly, the next day, I went to my country
house, as I called it; and cutting some of the
smaller twigs, I found them to my purpose as much
as I could desire; whereupon I came the next time
prepared with a hatchet to cut down a quantity.
These I set up to dry within my circle of hedge,
and when they were fit for use, I carried them to
my cave; and here during the next season I em-
ployed myself in making, as well as I could, a great
many baskets, both to carry earth, or to lay up
anything as I had occasion.

I mentioned before that I had a great mind to
see the whole island, and that I had travelled up
the brook, and so on to where I built my bower,
and where I had an opening quite to the sea, on



ROBINSON CRUSOE 85

the other side of the island. I now resolved to
travel quite across to the seashore on that side;
so taking my gun, a hatchet, and my dog, and a
larger quantity of powder and shot than usual, ~
with two biscuit-cakes and a great bunch of raisins
in my pouch for my store, I began my journey.
When I passed the vale where my bower stood, as
above, I came within view of the sea to the west;
and it being a very clear day, I fairly descried
land, whether an island or a continent I could not
tell; but it lay very high, extending from the west
to the W.S.W. at a very great distance; by my
guess, it could not be less than fifteen or twenty
leagues off.

I could not tell what pet of the world this might
be, otherwise than that I know it must be part of
America, and, as I concluded, by all my observa-
tions, must be near the Spanish dominions, and
perhaps was all inhabited by savages, where, if I
should have landed, I had been in a worse con-
dition than I was now; and therefore I acqui-
esced in the dispositions of Providence, which I
began now to believe ordered everything for the
best.

With these considerations I walked very lei-
surely forward. I found that side of the island,
where I now was, much pleasanter than mine, the
open or savanna fields sweet, adorned with flow-
ers and full of very fine woods.

I saw abundance of parrots, and I did, after some
painstaking, catch a young parrot, for I knocked



86 ROBINSON CRUSOE

it down with a stick, and having recovered it, I
brought it home; but it was some years before I
could make him speak. However, at last I taught
him to call me by my name very familiarly.

As soon as I came to the seashore, I was sur-
prised to see that I had taken up my lot on the
worst side of the island, for here indeed the shore
was covered with innumerable turtles; whereas, on
the other side, I had found but three in a year and
a half. |

I traveled along the shore of the sea towards the
east, I suppose about twelve miles, and then setting
up a great pole upon the shore for a mark, I con-
cluded I would go home again; and that the next
journey I took should be on the other side of the
island, east from my dwelling, and so round till
I came to my post again.

I took another way to come back than that I
went, thinking I could easily keep all the island so
much in my view, that I could not miss finding my
first dwelling by viewing the country. But I
found myself mistaken; for being come about two
or three miles, I found myself descended into a
very large valley, but so surrounded with hills, and
those hills covered with wood, that I could not see
which was my way by any direction but that of
the sun.

It happened to my farther misfortune that the
weather proved hazy for three or four days while
I was in this valley; and not being able to see the
sun, I wandered about very uncomfortably, and at



ROBINSON CRUSOE 87

last was obliged to find out the seaside, look for
my post, and come back the same way I went; and
then by easy journeys I turned homeward, the
weather being exceeding hot, and my gun, ammuni-
tion, hatchet, and other things very heavy.

In this journey my dog surprised a young kid,
and seized upon it, and I running in to take hold
of it, caught it, and saved it alive from the dog.

I made a collar to this little creature, and with
a string, which I made of some rope-yarn, which I
always carried about me, I led him along though
with some difficulty, till I came to my bower, and
there I enclosed him and left him, for I was very
impatient to be home, from whence I had been ab-
sent above a month.

I reposed myself here a week, to rest and regale
myself after my long journey; during which most
of the time was taken up in the weighty affair of
making a cage for my Poll, who began now to be a
mere domestic, and to be mighty well acquainted
with me. Then I began to think of the poor kid
which I had penned in within my little circle,
and resolved to go and fetch it home, or give it
some food. Accordingly I went, and found it was
so tame with being hungry, that I had no need to
tie it, for it followed me like a dog. And as I con-
tinually fed it, the creature became so loving, so
gentle, and so fond, that it became from that time
one of my domestics also, and would never leave
me afterwards.

The rainy season of the autumnal equinox was



88 ROBINSON CRUSOE

now come, and I kept the 30th of September in
the same solemn manner as before, being the anni-
versary of my landing on the island, having now
been there two years, and no more prospect of be-
ing delivered than the first day I came there. I
spent the whole day in humble and thankful ac-
knowledgments of the many wonderful mercies
which my solitary condition was attended with,
and without which it might have been infinitely
more miserable.

Thus I began my third year; and though I have
not given the reader the trouble of so particular
account of my works this year as the first, yet in
general it may be observed that I was very seldom
idle, but having regularly divided my time, accord-
ing to the several daily employments that were
before me, such as, first, my duty to God, and the
reading the Scriptures, which I constantly set
apart some time for, thrice every day; secondly,
the going abroad with my gun for food, which
generally took me up three hours in every morning,
when it did not rain; thirdly, the ordering, cur-
ing, preserving, and cooking what I had killed or
catched for my supply; these took up a great part of
the day; also, it is to be considered that the middle
of the day, when the sun was in the zenith, the vio-
lence of the heat was too great to stir out; so that
about four hours in the evening was all the time I
could be supposed to work in, with this exception,
that sometimes I changed my hours of hunting and



ROBINSON CRUSOE 89

working, and went to work in the morning, and
abroad with my gun in the afternoon. |

I was now, in the months of November and De-
cember, expecting my crop of barley and rice. The
ground I had manured or dug up for them was not
great; for as I observed, my seed of each was not
above the quantity of half a peck; for I had lost
one whole crop by sowing in the dry season. But
now my crop promised very well, when on a sud-
den I found I was in danger of losing it all again
by enemies of several sorts, which it was scarce
possible to keep from it; as, first the goats and
wild creatures which I called hares, who, tasting
the sweetness of the blade, lay in it night and day,
as soon as it came up, and ate it so close, that it
could get no time to shoot up into stalk.

This I saw no remedy for but by making an en-
closure about it with a hedge, which I did with a
great deal of toil, and the more, because it required
speed. However, as my arable land was but small,
Suited to my crop, I got it totally well fenced in
about three weeks’ time, and shooting some of the
creatures in the daytime, I set my dog to guard it
in the night.

But as the beasts ruined me before while my corn
was in the blade, so the birds were as likely to
ruin me now when it was in the ear; for going
along by the place to see how it throve, I saw my
little crop surrounded with fowls, of I know not
how many sorts, who stood, as it were, watching



90 ROBINSON CRUSOE

till I should be gone. I immediately let fly among
them, for I always had my gun with me. I had
no sooner shot, but there rose up a little cloud of
fowls, which I had not seen at all, from among the
corn itself. For as I walked off, as if I was gone,
I was no sooner out of their sight but they dropped
down, one by one, into the corn again. I was so
provoked, that I could not have patience to stay
till more came on, knowing that every grain that
they ate now was, as it might be said, a peck-loaf
to me in the consequence; but coming up to the
hedge, I fired again, and killed three of them.
This was what I wished for; so I took them up,
and served them as we serve notorious thieves in
England, viz., hanged them in chains, for a terror
to others. It is impossible to imagine almost that
this should have such an effect as it had, for the
fowls would not only not come at the corn, but, in
short, they forsook all that part of the island, and
I could never see a bird near the place as long as
my scare-crows hung there.

This I was very glad of, you may be sure; and
about the latter end of December, which was our
second harvest of the year, I reaped my crop.

I was sadly put to it for a scythe or a sickle to
cut it down, and all I could do was to make one as
well as I could out of one of the broadswords, or
cutlasses, which I saved among the arms out of
the ship. However, as my first crop was but small,
I cut nothing off but the ears, and carried it away



ROBINSON CRUSOE 91

in a great basket which I had made, and so rubbed
it out with my hands; and at the end of all my har-
vesting, I found that out of my half peck of seed
I had near two bushels of rice, and above two
bushels and a half of barley, that is to say, by my
guess, for I had no measure at that time.

However, this was a great encouragement to me,
and I foresaw that, in time, it would please God to
supply me with bread. And yet here I was per-
plexed again, for I neither knew how to grind or
make meal of my corn, or indeed how to clean it
and part it; nor, if made into meal, how to make
bread of it, and if how to make it, yet I knew not
how to bake it. These things being added to my
desire of having a good quantity for store, and to
secure a constant supply, I resolved not to taste
any of this crop, but to preserve it all for seed
against the next season, and in the meantime, to
employ all my study in hours of working to accom-
plish this great work of providing myself with corn
and bread.

It might be truly said, that now I worked for my
bread. ’Tis a little wonderful, and what I believe
few people have thought much upon, viz., the
strange multitude of little things necessary in the
providing, producing, curing, dressing, making,
and finishing this one article of bread.

I, that was reduced to a mere state of nature,
found this to my daily discouragement, and was
made more and more sensible of it every hour, even



92 ROBINSON CRUSOE

after I had got the first handful of seed-corn,
which, as I have said, came up unexpectedly, and
indeed to a surprise.

First, I had no plough to turn up the earth, no
spade or shovel to dig it. Well, this I conquered



by making a wooden spade, as I observed before,
but this did my work in but a wooden manner; and
though it cost me a great many days to make it,
yet, for want of iron, it not only wore out the
Sooner, but made my work the harder, and made it
be performed much worse.



ROBINSON CRUSOE 93

When the corn was sowed, I had no harrow, but
was forced to go over it myself, and drag a great
heavy bough of a tree over it, to scratch it, as it
may be called, rather than rake or harrow it.

When it was growing and grown, I have ob-
served already how many things I wanted to fence
it, secure it, mow or reap it, cure and carry it
home, thrash, part it from the chaff, and save it.
Then I wanted a mill to grind it, sieves to dress it,
yeast and salt to make it into bread, and an oven to
bake it, and yet all these things I did without, as
shall be observed; and yet the corn was an ines-
timable comfort and advantage to me, too. All
this, as I said, made everything laborious and te-
dious to me, but that there was no help for;
neither was my time so much loss to me, because,
as I Lad divided it, a certain part of it was every
day appointed to these works, and as I resolved
to use none of the corn for bread till I hada greater
quantity by me, I had the next six months to apply
myself wholly, by labor and invention, to furnish
myself with utensils proper for the performing all
the operations necessary for the making the corn,
when I had it, fit for my use.

But first I was to prepare more land, for I had
now seed enough to sow above an acre of ground.
Before I did this, I had a week’s work at least to
make me a spade, which, when it was done, was but
a sorry one indeed, and very heavy, and required
double labor to work with it. However, I went
through that, and sowed my seed in two large flat



94 ROBINSON CRUSOE

pieces of ground, as near my house as I could find
them to my mind, and fenced them in with a good
hedge, the stakes of which were all cut of that wood
which I had set before, and knew it would grow;
so that in one year’s time I knew I should have a
quick or living hedge, that would want but little
repair. This work was not so little as to take me
up less than three months, because a great part of
that time was of the wet season, when I could not
go abroad.

Within doors, that is, when it rained, and I
could not go out, I found employment on the fol-
lowing occasions; always observing, that all the
while I was at work, I diverted myself talking to
my parrot, and teaching him to speak, and I quickly
taught him to know his own name, and at last to
speak it out pretty loud, “Poll,” which wus the
first word I ever heard spoken in the island by any
mouth but my own. This, therefore, was not my
work, but an assistant to my work; for now, as I
said, I had a great employment upon my hands, as
follows, viz., I had long studied, by some means
or other, to make myself some earthen vessels,
which indeed I wanted sorely, but knew not where
to come at them. However, considering the heat
of the climate, I did not doubt but if I could find
out any such clay, I might botch up some such pot
as might, being dried in the sun, be hard enough
and strong enough to bear handling, and to hold
anything that was dry, and required to be kept so;
and as this was necessary in the preparing corn,



ROBINSON CRUSOE 95

meal, etc., which was the thing I was upon, I re-
solved to make some as large as I could, and fit
only to stand like jars, to hold what should be
put into them.

It would make the reader pity me, or rather
laugh at me, to tell how many awkward ways I
took to raise this paste; what odd, misshapen, ugly
things I made; how many of them fell in, and how
many fell out, the clay not being stiff enough to
bear its own weight; how many cracked by the
over-violent heat of the sun, being set out too
hastily; and how many fell in pieces with only re-
moving, as well before as after they were dried;
and, in a word, how, after having labored hard to
find the clay, to dig it, to temper it, to bring it
home, and work it, I could not make above two
large earthen ugly things (I cannot call them jars)
in about two months’ labor.

Though I miscarried so much in my design for
large pots, yet I made several smaller things with
better success; such as little round pots, flat dishes,
pitchers, and pipkins, and any things my hand
turned to; and the heat of the sun baked them
strangely hard. But all this would not answer my
end, which was to get an earthen pot to hold what
was liquid, and bear the fire, which none of these
could do. It happened after some time, making
a pretty large fire for cooking my meat, when I
went to put it out after I had done with it, I found
a broken piece of one of my earthenware vessels
in the fire, burnt as hard as a stone, and red as a

7



96 ROBINSON CRUSOE

tile. I was agreeably surprised to see it, and said
to myself, that certainly they might be made to
burn whole, if they would burn broken.





&

Uy
S$ Za




This set me to studying how to order my fire, so
as to make it burn me some pots. I had no notion



ROBINSON CRUSOE 97

of a kiln, such as the potters burn in, or glazing
them with lead, though I had some lead to do it
with; but I placed three large pipkins, and two or
three pots in a pile, one upon another, and placed
my firewood all round it, with a great heap of em-
bers under them. I plied the fire with fresh fuel
round the outside, and upon the top, till I saw the
pots in the inside red-hot quite through, and ob-
served that they did not crack at all. When I saw
them clear red, I Jet them stand in that heat about
five or six hours, till I found one of them, though it
did not crack, did melt or run, for the sand which
was mixed with the clay melted by the violence of
the heat, and would have run into glass, if I had
gone on; so I slacked my fire gradually till the pots
began to abate of the red color; and watching them
all night, that I might not let the fire abate too fast,
in the morning I had three very good, I will not
say handsome, pipkins, and two other earthen pots,
as hard burnt as could be desired, and one of them
perfectly glazed with the running of the sand.

No joy at a thing of so mean a nature was ever
equal to mine, when I found I had made an earthen
pot that would bear the fire; and had hardly pa-
tience to stay till they were cold, before I set one
upon the fire again, with some water in it, to boil
me some meat, which it did admirably well; and
with a piece of a kid I made some very good broth.

My next concern was to get me a stone mortar
to stamp or beat some corn in. I spent many a day
to find out a great stone big enough to cut hollow,



98 ROBINSON CRUSOE

and make fit fora mortar, and could find none at
all, except what was in the solid rock, and which I
had no way to dig or cut out; nor indeed were the
rocks in the island of hardness sufficient, but were
all of a sandy crumbling stone, which neither would
bear the weight of a heavy pestle, or would break
the corn without filling it with sand. So, after a
great deal of time lost in searching for a stone, I
gave it over, and resolved to look out for a great
block of hard wood, which I found indeed much
easier; and getting one as big as I had strength to
stir, I rounded it, and formed it in the outside with
my axe and hatchet, and then, with the help of fire,
and infinite labor, made a hollow place in it, as the
Indians in Brazil made their canoes. After this,
I made a great heavy pestle, or beater, of the wood
called the iron-wood; and this I prepared and laid
by against I had my next crop of corn, when I pro-
posed to myself to grind, or rather pound, my corn
into meal, to make my bread.

The baking part was the next thing to be con-
sidered, and how I should make bread when I
came to have corn; for, first, I had no yeast. As
to that part, as there was no Supplying the want,
so I did not concern myself much about it; but for
an oven I was indeed in great pain. At length I
found out an experiment for that also, which was
this: I made some earthen vessels very broad, but
not deep, that is to say, about two feet diameter,
and not above nine inches deep; these I burned
in the fire, as I had done the other, and laid them



ROBINSON CRUSOE 99

by; and when I wanted to bake, I made a great
fire upon my hearth, which I had paved with some
square tiles, of my own making and burning also;
but I should not call them square.

When the firewood was burned pretty much into
embers, or live coals, I drew them forward upon
this hearth, so as to cover it all over, and there I
let them lie till the hearth was very hot; then
sweeping away all the entbers, I set down my loaf,
or loaves, and whelming down the earthen pot upon
them, drew the embers all round the outside of the
pot, to keep in and add to the heat. And thus I
baked my barley-loaves.

It need not be wondered at if all these things
took me up most part of the third year of my abode
here; for it is to be observed, that in the intervals
of these things I had my new harvest and hus-
bandry to manage; for I reaped my corn in its sea-
son, and carried it home as well as I could, and
laid it up in the ear, in my large baskets, till I had
time to rub it out, for I had no floor to thrash it
on, or instrument to thrash it with.

And now, indeed, my stock of corn increasing, I
really wanted to build my barns bigger. I wanted
a place to lay it up in, for the increase of the corn
now yielded me so much that I had of the barley
about twenty bushels, and of the rice as much, or
more, insomuch that now I resolved to begin to
use it freely; for my bread had been quite gone a
great while.

Upon the whole, I found that the forty bushels



100 ROBINSON CRUSOE

of barley and rice was much more than I could
consume in a year; so I resolved to sow just the
sane quantity every year that I sowed the last, in
hopes that such a quantity would fully provide me
with bread, ete.

All the while these things were doing, you may
be sure my thoughts ran many times upon the
prospect of land which I had seen from the other
side of the island, and I was not without secret
wishes that I were on shore there, fancying the
Seeing the mainland, and in an inhabited country,
I might find some way or other to convey myself
farther, and perhaps at last find some means of
escape.

Now I wished for my boy Xury, and the long-
boat with the shoulder-of-mutton sail, with which
I sailed above a thousand miles on the coast of
Africa; but this was in vain.

This at length put me upon thinking whether it
was not possible to make myself a canoe, or peri-
agua, such as the natives of those climates make,
even without tools, or, as I might say, without
hand, viz., of the trunk of a great tree.

I went to work upon this boat the most like a
fool that ever man did who had any of his senses
awake. I pleased myself with the design, without
cetermining whether I was ever able to undertake
it. Not but that the difficulty of launching my
boat came often into my head; but I put a stop to
my own inquiries into it, by this foolish answer



ROBINSON CRUSOE 101

which I gave myself, “Let’s first make it; I’ll war-
rant P’ll find some way or other to get it along
when ’tis done.”

This was a most preposterous method; but the



eagerness of my fancy prevailed, and to work I
went. I felled a cedar tree: I question much
whether Solomon ever had such a one for the build-
ing of the Temple at Jerusalem. It was five feet
ten inches diameter at the lower part next the
stump, and four feet eleven inches diameter at
the end of twenty-two feet, after which it lessened



102 ROBINSON CRUSOE

for a while, and then parted into branches. It
was not without infinite labor that I felled this
tree. I was twenty days hacking and hewing at
it at the bottom; I was fourteen more getting the
branches and limbs, and the vast spreading head
of it cut off, which I hacked and hewed through
with axe and hatchet, and inexpressible labor.
After this, it cost me a month to shape it and dub
it to a proportion, and to something like the bot-
tom of a boat, that it might swim upright as it
ought to do. It cost me near three months more
to clear the inside, and work it so as to make an ex-
act boat of it. This I did, indeed, without fire,
by mere mallet and chisel, and by the dint of hard
labor, till I had brought it to be a very handsome
periagua and big enough to have carried six and
twenty men, and consequently big enough to have
carried me and all my cargo.

When I had gone through this work, I was ex-
tremely delighted with it. Many a weary stroke it
had cost, you may be sure; and there remained
nothing but to get it into the water.

But all my devices to get it into the water failed
me, though they cost me infinite labor too. It lay
about one hundred yards from the water, and not
more; but the first inconvenience was, it was up-
hill towards the creek. Well, to take away this
discouragement, I resolved to dig into the surface
of the earth, and so make a declivity. This I be-
gan, and it cost me a prodigious deal of pains; but
who grudges pains, that have their deliverance in



Full Text


EVERY CHILD’S LIBRARY




It would have made a stoic smile to have seen me and my
little family sit down to dinner.


nd Adventures
of
Robinson Crusoe



The Life a






BY
DANIEL DEFOE

o

ILLUSTRATED BY
FRANCES BRUNDAGE









THE SAALFIELD PUBLISHING COMPANY
CHICAGO AKRON, OHIO NEW YORK





MADE IN U. S&S A.

THE LIFE
AND ADVENTURES
OF ROBINSON CRUSOE

I was born in the year 1632, in the City of York,
of a good family, though not of that country, my
father being a foreigner of Bremen, who settled
first at Hull. He got a good estate by merchan-
dise, and leaving off his trade, lived afterward at
York, from whence he had married my mother,
whose relations were named Robinson, a very good
family in that country, and from whom I was
called Robinson Kreutznaer; but by the usual cor-
ruption of words in England we are now called,
nay, we call ourselves, and write our name Crusoe.

Being the third son of the family, and not bred to
any trade, my head began to be filled very early
with rambling thoughts. My father, who was very
ancient, had given me a competent share of
learning, as far as house education and a country
free school generally goes, and designed me for the
law; but I would be satisfied with nothing but
going to sea; and my inclination to this led me so
strongly against the will, nay, the commands, of
my father and all the entreaties and persuasions of
my mother, that there seemed to be something fatal
in that propension of nature tending directly to the
life of misery which was to befall me, 7

7
8 ROBINSON CRUSOE

Being one day at Hull, where I went casually,
and without any purpose of making an elopement
that time; but I say, being there, and one of my
companions being going by sea to London, in his
father’s ship, and prompting me to go with them,
with the common allurement of sea-faring men,
viz., that it should cost me nothing for my passage,
I consulted neither father nor mother, nor so much
as sent them word of it; but leaving them to hear of
it as they might, without asking God’s blessing, or
my father’s, without any consideration of circum-
stances or consequences, and in an ill hour, God
knows, on the first of September, 1651, I went on
board a ship bound for London. Never any young
adventurer’s misfortunes, I believe, began sooner,
or continued longer than mine. The ship was no
sooner gotten out of the Humber, but the wind be-
gan to blow, and the waves to rise in a most fright-
ful manner; and as I had never been at sea before,
I was most inexpressibly sick in body, and terrified
in my mind. I began now seriously to reflect upon
what I had done, and how justly I was overtaken
by the judgment of heaven for my wicked leaving
of my father’s house, and abandoning my duty; all
the good counsel of my parents, my father’s tears
and my mother’s entreaties, came now fresh into
my mind, and my conscience, which was not yet
come to the pitch of hardness which it has been
since, reproached me with the contempt of advice,
and the breach of my duty to God and my father.

All this while the storm increased. I expected


“I warrant you were frighted, wa’n’t you, last night, when
it blew but a capful of wind?”
10 ROBINSON CRUSOE

every wave would have swallowed us up, and
that every time the ship fell down, as I thought,
in the trough or hollow of the sea, we should never
rise more; and in this agony of mind I made many
vows and resolutions, that if it would please God
here to spare my life this one voyage, if ever I got
once my foot upon dry land again, I would go
directly home to my father, and never set it into a
ship again while I lived; and that I would take his
advice, and never run myself into such miseries as
these any more.

These wise and sober thoughts continued all the
while the storm continued, and indeed some time
after; but the next day the wind was abated and
the sea calmer, and I began to be a little inured to
it. However, I was very grave for all that day,
being also a little sea-sick still; but towards night
the weather cleared up, the wind was quite over,
and a charming fine evening followed; the sun went
down perfectly clear, and rose so the next morning.

I slept well in the night, and was now no more
sea-sick but very cheerful, looking with wonder up-
on the sea that was so rough and terrible the day
before, and could be so calm and so pleasant in so
little time after. And now lest my good resolu-
tions should continue, my companion, who had in-
deed enticed me away, comes to me: “Well, Bob,”
says he, clapping me on the shoulder, “how do you
do after it? I warrant you were frighted, wa’n’t
you, last night, when it blew but a capful of wind?”
“A capful, do you call it?” said I; “ ’twas a ter-


ROBINSON CRUSOE 11

rible storm.” “A storm, you fool you,” replies he;
“do you call that astorm? Why, it was nothing at
all; give us but a good ship and sea-room, and we
think nothing of such a squall of wind as that; but
you’re but a fresh-water sailor, Bob. Come, let us
make a bowl of punch, and we'll forget all that;
d’ye see what charming weather ’tis now?” To
make short this sad part of my story, we went the
old way of all sailors; the punch was made, and I
was made drunk with it, and in that one night’s
wickedness I drowned all my repentance, all my
reflections upon my past conduct, and all my reso-
lutions for my future.

The sixth day of our being at sea we came into
Yarmouth Roads; the wind having been contrary
and the weather calm, we had made but little way
Since the storm. Here we were obliged to come to
an anchor, and here we lay, the wind continuing
contrary, viz., at south-west, for seven or eight
days, during which time a great many ships from
Newcastle came into the same roads, as the com-
mon harbor where the ships might wait for a wind
for the river.

The eighth day in the morning the wind in-
creased, and we had all hands at work to strike our
top-masts, and make everything snug and close,
that the ship might ride as easy as possible. By
noon the sea went very high indeed, and our ship
rid forecastle in, shipped several seas, and we
thought once or twice our anchor had come home;
upon which our master ordered out the gheet-
12 ROBINSON CRUSOE

anchor, so that we rode with two anchors ahead,
and the cables veered out to the better end.

By this time it blew a terrible storm indeed, and
now I began to see terror and amazement in the
faces even of the seamen themselves. When the
master himself came by me, and said we should
be all lost, I was dreadfully frightened; I got up
out of my cabin, and looked out. But such a
dismal sight I never saw; the sea went mountains
high and broke upon us every three or four minutes;
when I could look about, I could see nothing but
distress round us. Two ships that rid near us we
found had cut their masts by the board, being deep
loaden; and our men cried out that a ship which
rid about a mile ahead of us was foundered.

Towards evening the mate and boatswain begged
the master of our ship to let them cut away the
fore-mast, which he was very unwilling to. But
the boatswain protesting to him that if he did not
the ship would founder, he consented; and when
they had cut away the fore-mast, the main-mast
stood so loose, and shook the ship so much, they
were obliged to cut her away also, and make a
clear deck.

But the worst was not come yet; the storm con-
tinued with such fury that the seamen themselves
acknowledged they had never known a worse. We
had a good ship, but she was deep loaden, and
wallowed in the sea, that the seamen every now
and then cried out she would founder. It was my
advantage in one respect, that I did not know what


ROBINSON CRUSOE 13

they meant by founder till I inquired. However,
the storm was so violent, that I saw what is not
often seen: the master, the boatswain, and some
others more sensible than the rest, at their prayers,
and expecting every moment when the ship would
go to the bottom. In the middle of the night, and
under all the rest of our distresses, one of the men
that had been down on purpose to see cried out we
had sprung a leak; another said there was four feet
of water in the hold. Then all hands were called
to the pump. At that very word my heart, as I
thought, died within me, and I fell backwards upon
the side of my bed where I sat, into the cabin.
However, the men aroused me, and told me that I;
that was able to do nothing before, was as well able
to pump as another; at which I stirred up and
went to the pump and worked very heartily.

The water increasing in the hold, it was apparent
that the ship would founder. The master fired
guns for help; and a light ship, who had rid it
| out just ahead of us, ventured a boat out to help
us. It was with the utmost hazard the boat came
near us, but it was impossible for us to get on
board, or for the boat to lie near the ship’s side,
till at last the men rowing very heartily, and
venturing their lives to save ours, our men cast
them a rope over the stern with a buoy to it, and
then veered it out a great length, which they after
great labor and hazard took hold of, and we hauled
them close under our stern, and got all into their
s boat. It was to no purpose for them or us after we
14 ROBINSON CRUSOE

were in the boat to think of reaching to their own
ship, so partly rowing and partly driving, our boat
went away to the norward, sloping towards the
shore almost as far as Winterton Ness.

We were not much more than a quarter of an
hour out of our ship but we saw her sink, and then
I understood for the first time what was meant by
a ship foundering in the sea.

We made but slow way towards the shore, and
walked afterwards on foot to Yarmouth, where, as
unfortunate men, we were used with great human-
ity and had money given us sufficient to carry us
either to London or back to Hull, as we thought fit.

As for me, having some money in my pocket, I
travelled to London by land; and there, as well as
on the road, had many struggles with myself and
whether I should go home, or go to sea.

It was my lot to fall into pretty good company in
London. I first fell acquainted with the master of
a ship who had been on the coast of Guinea, and
who, having had very good success there, was re-
solved to go again; and who, taking a fancy to my

conversation, told me if I would go the voyage with

him I should be at no expense; I should be his mess-

mate and his companion; and if I could carry any- |
thing with me, I should have all the advantage of |
it that the trade would admit, and perhaps I might —

meet with some encouragement.

I embraced the offer; and, entering into a strict '

friendship with this captain, who was an honest

and plain-dealing man, I went the voyage with him, |




ROBINSON CRUSOE 15

and carried a small adventure with me, which, by
the disinterested honesty of my friend the captain,
I increased very considerably, for I carried about
£40 in such toys and trifies as the captain directed
me to buy. This £40 I had mustered together by
the assistance of some of my relations whom I
corresponded with, and who, I believe, got my
father, or at least my mother, to contribute so
much as that to my first adventure.

This was the only voyage which I may say was
successful in all my adventures, and which I owe to
the integrity and honesty of my friend the captain ;
under whom also I got a competent knowledge of
the mathematics and rules of navigation, learned
how to keep an account of the ship’s course, take an
observation, and, in short, to understand some
things that were needful to be understood by a
sailor. For, as he took delight to introduce me, I
took delight to learn; and, in a word, this voyage
made me both a sailor and a merchant ; for I
brought him five pounds nine ounces of gold dust
for my adventure, which yielded me in London at
my return almost £300, and this filled me with
those aspiring thoughts which have since so com-
pleted my ruin.

I was now set up for a Guinea trader; and my
friend, to my great misfortune, dying soon after hig
arrival, I resolved to go the same voyage again,
and I embarked in the same vessel with one who
was his mate in the former voyage, and had now
got command of the ship. This was the unhappiest
16 ROBINSON CRUSOE

voyage that ever man made; for though I did not
carry quite £100 of my new-gained wealth, so that
I had £200 left, and which I lodged with my
friend’s widow, who was very just to me, yet I fell
into terrible misfortunes in this voyage; and the
first was this, viz., our ship making her course to-
wards the Canary Islands, or rather between those
islands and the African shore, was surprised in the
grey of the morning by a Turkish rover of Sallee,
who gave chase to us with all the sail she could
make. Finding the pirate gained upon us, we pre-
pared to fight, our ship having twelve guns, and the
rogue eighteen. About three in the afternoon he
came up with us, and bringing to, by mistake, just
athwart our quarter, instead of athwart our stern,
as he intended, we brought eight of our guns to
bear on that side, and poured in a broadside upon
him, which made him sheer off again, after re-
turning our fire and pouring in also his small-shot
from near 200 men which he had on board. How-
ever, we had not a man touched, all our men
keeping close. He prepared to attack us again,
and we to defend ourselves; but laying us on board
the next time upon our other quarter, he entered
sixty men upon our decks, who immediately fell to
cutting and hacking the decks and rigging. We
plied them with small-shot, half-pikes, powder-
chests, and such like, and cleared our deck of them
twice. However, to cut short this melancholy part
of our story, our ship being disabled, and three of
our men killed and eight wounded, we were obliged


ROBINSON CRUSOE 17

to yield, and were carried all prisoners into Sallee,
a port belonging to the Moors.

The usage I had there was not so dreadful as at
first I apprehended, being kept by the captain of
the rover as his proper prize, and made his slave,
being young and nimble and fit for his business.

After about two years an odd circumstance pre-
sented itself, which put the old thought of making
some attempt for my liberty again in my head.
My patron lying at home longer than usual without
fitting out his ship, which, as I heard, was for want
of money, he used constantly, once or twice a week,
sometimes oftener, if the weather was fair, to take
the ship’s pinnace, and go out into the road a-
fishing; and as he always took me and a young
Maresco with him to row the boat, we made him
very merry, and I proved very dexterous in catch-
ing fish; insomuch, that sometimes he would send
me with a Moor, one of his kinsmen, and the youth
the Maresco, as they called him, to catch a dish of
fish for him. It happened one time that, going a-
fishing in a stark calm morning, a fog rose so thick,
that though we were not a half a league from the
| Shore we lost sight of it; and rowing we knew not
whither or which way, we labored all day, and all
the next night, and when the morning came we
found we had pulled off to sea instead of pulling in
for the shore; and that we were at least two leagues
from the shore. However we got well in again,
though with a great deal of labor, and some danger,

for the wind began to blow pretty fresh in the
18 ROBINSON CRUSOE

morning; but particularly we were all very hungry.

But our patron, warned by this disaster, resolved
to take more care of himself for the future; and
having lying by him the long-boat of our English
ship which he had taken, he resolved he would not
go a-fishing any more without a compass and some
provision ; so he ordered the carpenter of his ship,
who also was an English slave, to build a little
state-room, or cabin, in the middle of the long-boat,
like that of a barge, with a place to stand behind it
to steer and haul home the main-sheet, and room
before for a hand or two to stand and work the
shoulder-of-mutton sail; and the boom jibbed over
the top of the cabin, which lay very snug and low.

We went frequently out with this boat a-fishing,
and as I was most dexterous to catch fish for him,
he never went without me. It happened that he
had appointed to go out in this boat with two or
three Moors of some distinction and had therefore
sent on board the boat overnight a larger store of
provisions than ordinary; and had ordered me to
get ready three fuzees with powder and shot, which
were on board his ship, for that they designed some
sport of fowling as well as fishing.

The next morning my patron came on board
alone, and told me his guests had put off going,
and ordered me with the man and the boy, as
usual, to go out with the boat and catch them some
fish, for that his friends were to sup at his house.

This moment my former notions of deliverance |
darted into my thoughts, for now I found I was
ROBINSON CRUSOE 19

like to have a little ship at my command; and my
master being gone I prepared to furnish myself,
not for a fishing business, but for a voyage.

My first contrivance was to make a pretence to
speak to this Moor, to get something for our sub-
sistence on board; for I told him we must not pre-
sume to eat of our patron’s bread. He said that
was true; so he brought a large basket of rusk or
biscuit of their kind, and three jars of fresh water,
into the boat. I knew where my patron’s case of
bottles stood, and I conveyed them into the boat
while the Moor was on shore, as if they had been
there before for our master. I conveyed also a
great lump of beeswax into the boat, which weighed
about half a hundredweight, with a parcel of twine
or thread, a hatchet, a saw, and a hammer. An-
other trick I tried upon him, which he innocently
came into also. “Moely,” said I, “our patron’s
guns are on board the boat; can you not get a little
powder and shot? it may be we may kill some
alcamies (a fowl like our curlews) for ourselves,
for I know he keeps the gunner’s stores in the ship.”
: “Yes,” says he, “I’ll bring some”; and accordingly
he brought a great leather pouch which held about
a pound and a half of powder, or rather more; and
another with shot, that had five or six pounds with
some bullets, and put all into the boat. Thus
furnished with everything needful, we sailed out of
the port to fish. The castle, which is at the en-
trance of the port, knew who we were, and took
no notice of us; and we were not above a mile
20 ROBINSON CRUSOE

out of the port before we set us down to fish.
After we had fished some time and catched
nothing, I said to the Moor, “This will not do; our
master will not thus be served; we must stand
farther off.” He, thinking no harm, agreed, and
being in the head of the boat set the sails; and as
I had the helm I run the boat out near a league
farther, and then I brought her to as if I would
fish; when giving the boy the helm, I stepped for-
ward to where the Moor was, and making as if I
stooped for something behind him, I took him by
surprise and tossed him clear overboard into the
sea. He rose immediately, for he swam like a
- cork, and called to me, begged to be taken in, told
me he would go all the world over with me. He
swam so strong after the boat, that he would have
reached me very quickly, there being but little
wind; upon which I stepped into the cabin, and
fetching one of the fowling pieces, I presented it at
him, and told him I had done him no hurt, and if
he would be quiet I would do him none. “But,”
said I, “you swim well enough to reach the shore,
and the sea is calm; make the best of your way to
shore, and I will do you no harm; but if you come
near the boat I’ll shoot you through the head, for
I am resolved to have my liberty.” So he swam
for the shore, and I make ne doubt but he reached
it with ease, for he was an excellent swimmer.
When he was gone I turned to the boy, whom
they called Xury, and said to him, “Xury, if you
will be faithful to me I’ll make you a great man;
ROBINSON CRUSOE 21

but if you will not stroke your face to be true to
me,” that is, swear by Mahomet and his father’s
beard, “I must throw you into the sea too.” The
boy smiled in my face, and swore to be faithful to
me, and go all over the world with me.

While I was in view of the Moor that was swim-
ming, I stood out directly to sea with the boat.
But as soon as it grew dusk, I changed my course,
and steered directly south and by east, bending
my course a little toward the east, that I might
keep in with the shore; and having a fair, fresh
gale of wind, and a smooth, quiet sea, I made such
sail that I believe by the next day at three o’clock
in the afternoon, when I first made the land, I
could not be less than 150 miles south of Sallee.

Yet such was the fright I had taken at the Moors,
and the dreadful apprehensions I had of falling in-
to their hands, that I would not stop, or go on
shore, or come to anchor, the wind continuing fair,
till I had sailed in that manner five days; and then
the wind shifting to the southward, I concluded
also that if any of our vessels were in chase of me,
they also would now give over; so I ventured to
come to ar anchor in the mouth of a little river,
I knew not what, or where; neither what latitude,
what country, what nations, or what river. I
neither saw, or desired to see, any people; the
principal thing I wanted was fresh water. We
came into this creek in the evening, resolving to
swim on shore as soon as it was dark, and discover
the country; but as soon as it was quite dark we
22 ROBINSON CRUSOE

heard such dreadful noises of the barking, roaring,
and howling of wild creatures, of we knew not what
kinds, that the poor boy was ready to die with fear,
and begged of me not to go on shore till day.
“Well, Xury,” said I, “then I won’t ; but it may be
we may see men by day, who will be as bad to us as
those lions.” “Then we give them the shoot gun,”
Says Xury, laughing; “make them run away.”
Such English Xury spoke by conversing among us
Slaves. However, I was glad to see the boy so
cheerful, and I gave him a dram (out of our pa-
tron’s case of bottles) to cheer him up. After all,
Xury’s advice was good, and I took it; we dropped
our little anchor and lay still all night. I say still,
for we slept none; for in two or three hours we saw
vast great creatures (we knew not what to call
them) of many sorts come down to the seashore
and run into the water, wallowing and washing
themselves for the pleasure of cooling themselves ;
and they made such hideous howlings and yellings,
that I never indeed heard the like.

The next morning we found we need not take
great pains for water, for a little higher up the
creek we found the water fresh when the tide was
out, which flowed but a little way up; so we filled
our jars, and feasted on a hare we had killed, and
prepared to go on our way, having seen no foot-
steps of any human creature.

After this stop we made on to the southward con-
tinually for ten or twelve days, living very sparing
on our provisions, which began to abate very much,
ROBINSON CRUSOE 23

and going no oftener into the shore than we were
obliged to for fresh water. My design in this was
to make the river Gambia or Senegal—that is to
Say, anywhere about the Cape de Verde—where I
was in hopes to meet with some European ship;
and if I did not, I knew not what course I had to
take, but to seek out for the islands, or perish there
among the negroes. I knew that all the ships
from Europe, which sailed either to the coast of
Guinea or to Brazil, or to the East Indies, made
this cape, or those islands; and in a word, I put the
whole of my fortune upon this single point, either
that I must meet with some ship, or must perish.

When I had pursued this resolution many days,
Xury having the helm suddenly cried out, “Master,
master, a ship with a sail!” I jumped out of the
cabin, and immediately saw it was a Portuguese
ship, and, as I thought, bound to the coast of
Guinea, for negroes. I stretched out to sea as
much as I could, resolved to speak with them if
possible. But after I had crowded to the utmost,
and began to despair, they, it seems, saw me by the
help of their perspective glasses, so they shortened
sail and lay by for me; and in about three hours’
time I came up with them.

They asked me what I was, in Portuguese, and
in Spanish, and in French, but I understood none
of them; but at last a Scots sailor, who was on
board, called to me, and I answered him, and told
him I was an Englishman, that I had made my es-
cape out of slavery from the Moors, at Sallee. -
24 ROBINSON CRUSOE

Then they bade me come on board, and very kindly
took me in, and all my goods.

It was an inexpressible joy to me that I was thus
delivered from such a miserable condition as I was
in; and I immediately offered all I had to the cap-
tain of the ship, as a return for my deliverance.
But he generously told me he would take nothing
from me, but that all I had should be delivered
safe to me when I came to the Brazils.

As to my boat, it was a very good one, and that
he saw, and told me he would buy it of me for the
ship’s use, and asked me what I would have for it?
I told him he had been so generous to me in every-
thing, that I could not offer to make any price for
the boat, but left it entirely to him; upon which he
told me he would give me a note of his hand to pay
me eighty pieces of eight for it at Brazil, and when
it came there, if any one offered to give more, he
would make it up. He offered me also sixty pieces
of eight more for my boy Xury, but I was very
loth to sell the poor boy’s liberty, who had assisted
me so faithfully in procuring my own. However,
when I let him know my reason, he owned it to be
just, and offered me this medium, that he would
give the boy an obligation to set him free in ten
years if he turned Christian. Upon this, and
Xury saying he was willing to go to him, I let the
captain have him. |

We had a very good voyage to the Brazils, and
arrived, in the Bay de Todos los Santos, or All
Saints’ Bay, in about twenty-two days after. And
ROBINSON CRUSOE 25

now I was once more delivered from the most
miserable of all conditions of life; and what to do
next with myself I was now to consider.

The generous treatment the captain gave me, I
Can never enough remember. He would take noth-
ing of me for my passage, and caused everything
I had in the ship to be punctually delivered me;
and what I was willing to sell he bought, such as
the case of bottles, two of my guns, and a piece of
the lump of beeswax—for I had made candles of
the rest; in a word, I made about 220 pieces of
eight of all my cargo, and with this stock I went
on shore in the Brazils.

I had not been long here, but being recommended
to the house of a good honest man like himself,
who had a plantation and a sugar-house, I lived
with him some time, and acquainted myself by
that means with the manner of their planting and
making of sugar; and seeing how well the planters
lived, and how they grew rich suddenly, I resolved,
if I could get a license to settle there, I would turn
planter among them, resolving in the meantime to
find out some way to get my money which I left in
London remitted to me. To this purpose, getting
a kind of a letter of naturalization, I purchased as
much land that was uncured as my money would
reach, and formed a plan for my plantation and
Settlement, and such a one as might be suitable to
the stock which I proposed to myself to receive
from England.

I had a neighbor, a Portuguese of Lisbon, but
26 ROBINSON CRUSOE

born of English parents, whose name was Wells,
and in much such circumstances as I was. My
stock was but low, as well as his; and we rather
planted for food than anything else, for about two
years. However, we began to increase, and our
land began to come into order; so that the third
year we planted some tobacco, and made each of us
a large piece of ground ready for planting canes in
the year to come. But we both wanted help; and
now I found more than before, I had done wrong
in parting with my boy Xury. I bought me a
negro slave, and two European servants also.

But as abused prosperity is oftentimes made the
very means of our greatest adversity, so was it
with me. I went on the next year with great suc-
cess in my plantation. I raised fifty great rolls
of tobacco on my own ground, more than I had dis-
posed of for necessaries among my neighbors; and
these fifty rolls, being each of above a hundred-
weight, were well cured, and laid by against the re-
turn of the fleet from Lisbon. And now, increas-
ing in business and in wealth, my head began to
be full of projects and undertakings beyond my
reach, such as are, indeed, often the ruin of the
best heads in business.

To come, then, by the just degrees to the particu-
lars of this part of my story. You may suppose,
that having now lived almost four years in the
Brazils, and beginning to thrive and prosper very
well upon my plantation, I had not only learned
the language, but had contracted acquaintance and
ROBINSON CRUSOE 27

friendship among my fellow-planters, as well as
among the merchants at St. Salvador, which was
our port, and that in my discourses among them I
had frequently given them an account of my two
voyages to the coast of Guinea, the manner of trad-
ing with the negroes there, and how easy it was to
purchase upon the coast for trifles—such as beads,
toys, knives, scissors, hatchets, bits of glass, and
the like—not only gold dust, Guinea grains, ele-
phants’ teeth, etc., but negroes, for the service of
the Brazils, in great numbers.

They listened always very attentively to my dis-
courses on these heads, but especially to that part
which related to the buying of negroes; which was
a trade, at that time, not only not far entered into,
but, as far as it was, had been carried on by the
assiento, or permission, of the Kings of Spain and
Portugal, and engrossed in the public, so that few
negroes were brought, and those excessive dear.

It happened, being in company with some mer-
chants and planters of my acquaintance in St. Sal-
vador, and talking of those things very earnestly,
three of them came to me one morning, and told
me they had been musing very much upon what I
had discoursed with them of, the last night, and
they came to make a secret proposal to me. And
after enjoining me secrecy, they told me that they
had a mind to fit out a ship to go to Guinea; that
they had all plantations as well as I, and were
straitened for nothing so much as servants; that as
it was a trade that could not be carried on because
28 ROBINSON CRUSOE

they could not publicly sell the negroes when they
came home, so they desired to make but one voy-
age, to bring the negroes on shore privately, and
divide them among their own plantations; and, in
a word, the question was, whether I would go their
supercargo in the ship, to manage the trading part
upon the coast of Guinea; and they offered me that
I should have my equal share of the negroes with-
out providing any part of the stock.

I told them I would go with all my heart, if they
would undertake to look after my plantation in my
absence, and would dispose of it to such as I should
direct if I miscarried. This they all engaged to
do, and entered into writings or covenants to do
so; I made a formal will, disposing of my planta-
tion and effects, in case of my death; making the
captain of the ship that had saved my life, before,
my universal heir, but obliging him to dispose of
my effects as I had directed in my will; one-half
of the produce being to himself, and the other to be
shipped to England.

Aceordingly, the ship being fitted out, and the
cargo furnished, and all things done as by agree-
ment by my partners in the voyage, I went on board
in an evil hour, the [first] of [September 1659],
being the same day eight year that I went from my
father and mother at Hull, in order to act the rebel
to their authority, and the fool to my own interest.

Our ship was about 120 tons burthen, carried
six guns and fourteen men, besides the master, his
boy, and myself. We had on board no large cargo
ROBINSON CRUSOE 29

of goods, except of such toys as were fit for our
trade with the negroes—such as beads, bits of
glass, shells, and odd trifles, especially little look-
ing-glasses, knives, scissors, hatchets, and the like.

The same day I went on board we set sail, stand-
ing away to the northward upon our own coast, ©
with design to stretch over for the African coast,
when they came about 10 or 12 degrees of northern
latitude, which, it seems, was the manner of their
course in those days. We had very good weather,
only excessive hot, all the way upon our own coast,
till we came to the height of Cape St. Augustino,
frem whence, keeping farther off at sea, we lost
sight of land, and steered as if we were bound for
the Isle Fernando de Noronha, holding our course
N.E. by N., and leaving those isles on the east,
In this course we passed the line in about twelve
days’ time, and were, by our last observation, in 7
degrees 22 minutes northern latitude, when a vio-
lent tornado, or hurricane, took us quite out of our
knowledge. It began from the south-east, came
about to the north-west, and then settled into the
north-east, from whence it blew in such a terrible
manner, that for twelve days together we could
do nothing but drive, and scudding away before it,
let it carry us wherever fate and the fury of the
winds directed; and during these twelve days, I
need not say that I expected every day to be swal-
lowed up, nor, indeed, did any in the ship expect
to save their lives.

In this distress, the wind still blowing very hard,
30 ROBINSON CRUSOE

one of our men early in the morning cried out,
“Land!” and we had no sooner ran out of our
cabin to look out, but the ship struck upon the sand,
and in a moment, her motion being so stopped,
the sea broke over her in such manner, that we ex-
pected we should all have perished immediately.

The mate of our vessel lay hold of the boat,
and with the help of the rest of the men they got
her slung over the ship’s side; and getting all into
her, let go, and committed ourselves, being eleven
in number, to God’s mercy and the wild sea.

After we had rowed, or rather driven, about a
league and a half, as we reckoned it, a raging
wave, mountainlike, came rolling astern of us, and
plainly bade us expect the coup de grace. Ina
word, it took us with such a fury, that it overset
the boat at once; and separating us, as well from
the boat as from one another, gave us not time
hardly to say, “O God?” for we were all swallowed.
up in a moment.

Nothing can describe the confusion of thought
which I felt when I sunk into the water ; for though
I swam very well, yet I could rot deliver myself
from the waves so as to draw breath, till that wave
having driven me, or rather carried me, a vast way
on towards the shore, and having spent itself, went
back, and left me upon the land almost dry, but
half dead with the water I tookin. I had so much
presence of mind, as well as breath left, that see-
ing myself nearer the mainland than I expected, I
got upon my feet and endeavored to make on to-
ROBINSON CRUSOE 31

wards the land as fast as I could, before another
wave should return and take me up again.

The wave that came upon me again buried me at
once twenty or thirty feet deep in its own body,
and I could feel myself carried with a mighty force.
and swiftness towards the shore a very great way;
but I held my breath and assisted myself to swim
still forward with all my might. The sea came
pouring in after me again and again and I was
lifted up by the waves and carried forward as be-
fore.

Now as the waves were not so high as at first,
being near land, I fetched another run, which
brought me to the mainland, where, to my great
comfort, I clambered up the cliffs and sat me down
upon the grass, free from danger, and quite out of
reach of the water. .

I was now landed, and safe on shore, and began
to look up and thank God that my life wags saved in
a case wherein there was some minutes before
Scarce any room to hope.

I walked about on the shore lifting up my hands,
and my whole being, as I may Say, wrapt up in the
contemplation of my deliverance, reflecting upon
all my comrades that were drowned, and that there
should not be one soul saved but myself; for, as for
them, I never saw them afterwards, or any sign of
them, except three of their hats, one cap, and two
shoes that were not fellows.

I cast my eyes to the stranded vessel, when the
breach and froth of the sea being so big, I could

3 .
32 ROBINSON CRUSOE

hardly see it, it lay so far off, and considered, Lord!
how was it possible I could get on shore?

After I had solaced my mind with the comfort-
able part:of my condition, I began to look round
me to see what kind of place I was in, and what
was next to be done, and I soon found my comforts
abate, and that, in a word, I had a dreadful de-
liverance ; for I was wet, had no clothes to shift me,
nor anything either to eat or drink to comfort me,
neither did I see any prospect before me but that
of perishing with hunger, or being devoured by
wild beasts; and that which was particularly af-
flicting to me was, that I had no weapon either to
hunt and kill any creature for my sustenance, or
to defend myself against any other creature that
might desire to kill me for theirs. In a word, I
had nothing about me but a knife, a tobacco-pipe,
and a little tobacco ina box. This was all my pro-
vision; and this threw me into terrible agonies of
mind, that for a while I ran about like a madman.
Night coming upon me, I began, with a heavy heart,
to consider what would be my lot if there were any.
ravenous beasts in that country, seeing at night
they always come abroad for their prey.

All the remedy that offered to my thoughts at
that time was, to get up into a thick bushy tree
like a fir, but thorny, which grew near me, and
where I resolved to sit all night, and consider the
next day what death I should die, for as yet I saw
no prospect of life. I walked about a furlong
from the shore, to see if I could find any fresh
ROBINSON CRUSOE 33

water to drink, which I did, to my great joy; and
having drank, and put a little tobacco in my mouth
to prevent hunger, I went to the tree, and getting
up into it, endeavored to place myself so as that
if I should sleep I might not fail; and having cut



me a short stick, like a truncheon, for my defence,
I took up my lodging.

When I waked it was broad day and when I came
down from my apartment in the tree the first thing
I found was the boat, which lay as the wind and
the sea had tossed her upon the land, about two
34. ROBINSON CRUSOE

miles on my right hand. I walked as far as I
could upon the shore to have got to her, but found
a neck or inlet of water between me and the boat,
which was about half a mile broad; so I came back
for the present, being more intent upon getting at
the ship, where I hoped to find something for my
present subsistence.

A little after noon I found the sea very calm, and
the tide ebbed so far out that I could come within
a quarter of a mile of the ship; and here I found
a fresh renewing of my grief, for I saw evidently
that if we had kept on board we had been all safe,
that is to say, we had all got safe on shore, and I
had not been so miserable as to be left entirely
destitute of all comfort and company.

I resolved, if possible, to get to the ship; so I
pulled off my clothes, for the weather was hot to
extremity, and took the water. I found that the
ship was bulged, and had a great deal of water in
her hold, but that she lay so on the side of a bank
of hard sand, or rather earth, that her stern lay
lifted up upon the bank, and her head low almost.
to the water. By this means all her quarter was
free, and all that was in that part was dry; for you
may be sure my first work was to search and to see
what was spoiled and what was free. And first I
found that all the ship’s provisions were dry and
untouched by the water; and being very well dis-
posed to eat, I went to the bread-room and filled
my pockets with biscuit and ate it as I went about
other things, for I had no time to lose. I also
ROBINSON CRUSOE 35

found some rum in the great cabin, of which I
took a large dram, and which I had indeed need
enough of, to spirit me for what was before me.
Now I wanted nothing but a boat, to furnish my-
self with many things which I foresaw would be
very necessary to me.

It was in vain to sit still and wish for what was
not to be had, and this extremity roused my appli-
cation. We had several spare yards, and two or
three large spars of wood, and a square top-mast
or two in the ship, and from this I made a raft
strong enough to bear any reasonable weight.

My next care was what to load it with, and how
to preserve what I laid upon it from the surf of
the sea; but I was not long considering this. I
first laid all the planks or boards upon it that I
could get, and having considered well what I most
wanted, I first got three of the seamen’s chests,
which I had broken open and emptied, and low-
ered them down upon my raft. The first of these I
filled with provisions, viz., bread, rice, three Dutch
cheeses, five pieces of dried goat’s flesh, which we
lived much upon, and a little remainder of Euro-
pean corn. As for liquors, I found several cases
of bottles belonging to our skipper. While I was
doing this, I found the tide began to flow, though
very calm, and I had the mortification to see my
coat, shirt, and waist-coat, which I had left on
shore upon the sand, swim away; as for my
breeches, which were only linen, and open-kneed,
IT swam on board in them, and my stockings.
36 ROBINSON CRUSOE

However, this put me upon rummaging for clothes,
of which I found enough, but took no more than I
wanted for present use. It was after long search-
ing that I found out the carpenter’s chest, which
was indeed a very useful prize to me.

My next care was for some ammunition and
arms; there were two very good fowling-pieces in
the great cabin, and two pistols; these I secured
first, with some powder-horns, and a small bag of
shot, and two old rusty swords. I knew there were
three barrels of powder in the ship, but knew not
where our gunner had stowed them; but with much
search I found them, two of them dry and good,
the third had taken water; those two I got to my
raft with the arms. And now I thought myself
pretty well freighted, and began to think how I
should get to shore with them, having neither sail,
oar, nor rudder; and the least capful of wind
would have overset all my navigation.

I had three encouragements. 1. A smooth, calm
sea. 2. The tide rising and setting in to the shore.
3. What little wind there was blew me towards
the land. And thus, having found two or three
broken oars belonging to the boat, and besides the
tools which were in the chest, I found two saws,
an axe and a hammer, and with this cargo I put to
sea. For a mile or thereabouts my raft went very
well, only that I found it drive a little distant from
the place where I had landed before, by which I
perceived that there was some indraft of the water,
and consequently I hoped to find some creek or
ROBINSON CRUSOE 37

river there, which I might make use of as a port to
get to land with my cargo.

As I imagined, so it was; there appeared before
me a little opening of the land, and I found a
strong current of the tide set into it, so I guided
my raft as well as I could to keep in the middle of
the stream.

At length I spied a little cove on the right shore
of the creek, to which, with great pain and diffi-
culty, I guided my raft, and at last got so near, as
that, reaching ground with my oar, I could thrust
her directly in; and here I lay till the water ebbed ©
away, and left my raft and all my cargo safe on
shore.

My next work was to view the country and seek a
proper place for my habitation, and where to stow
my goods to secure them from whatever might
happen. Where I was, I yet knew not; whether
on the continent, or on an island; whether inhab-
ited, or not inhabited; whether in danger of wild
beasts, or not. There was a hill, not above a mile
from me, which rose up very steep and high, and
which seemed to overtop some other hills, which
lay as in a ridge from it, northward. I took out
one of the fowling-pieces and one of the pistols, and
a horn of powder; and thus armed, I travelled for
discovery up to the top of that hill, where, after I
had with great labor and difficulty got to the top,
I saw my fate to my great affliction, viz., that I
was in an island environed every way with the
sea, no land to be seen, except some rocks which
38 ROBINSON CRUSOE

lay a great way off, and two small islands less than
this, which lay about three leagues to the west.

Contented with this discovery, I came back to
my raft, and fell to work to bring my cargo on
shore, which took me up the rest of that day; and
what to do with myself at night, I knew not, nor
indeed where to rest; for I was afraid to lie down
on the ground, not knowing but some wild beast
might devour me, though, as I afterwards found,
there was really no need for those fears. However,
as well as I could, I barricaded myself round with
the chests and boards that I had brought on shore,
and made a kind of a hut for that night’s lodging.

I now began to consider that I might yet get a
great many things out of the ship, which would be
useful to me. And as I knew that the first storm
that blew must necessarily break her all in pieces,
I resolved to set all other things apart till I got
everything out of the ship that I could get.

I got on board the ship as before when the tide
was down, and prepared a second raft. I neither
made this so unwieldy, nor loaded it so hard; but
yet I brought away several things very useful to
me; as, first, in the carpenter’s stores I found two
or three bags full of nails and spikes, a great
screw-jack, a dozen or two of hatchets, and above
all that most useful thing called a grindstone. All
these I secured, together with several things be-
longing to the gunner, particularly two or three
iron crows, and two barrels of musket bullets,
seven muskets, and another fowling-piece, with
ROBINSON CRUSOE 39

some small quantity of powder more; a large bag
full of small-shot, and a great roll of sheet lead.
Besides these things, I took all the men’s clothes



that I could find, and a spare fore-top sail, a ham-
mock, and some bedding.

Having got my second cargo on shore, though I
was fain to open the barrels of powder and bring
them by parcels, for they were too heavy, being
large casks, I went to work to make me a little tent
with the sail and some poles which I cut for that
‘40 ROBINSON CRUSOE

purpose; and into this tent I brought everything
that I knew would spoil either with rain or sun;
and I piled all the empty chests and casks up in
a circle round the tent, to fortify it from any sud-
den attempt, either from man or beast.



When I had done this I blocked up the door of
the tent with some boards within, and an empty
chest set up on end without; and spreading one of
the beds upon the ground, laying my two pistols
just at my head, and my gun at length by me, I
went to bed for the first time, and slept very
ROBINSON CRUSOE > 41

quietly all night, for I was very weary and heavy.

I had the biggest magazine of al] kinds now that
ever was laid up, I believe, for one man ; but I was
not satisfied still, for while the ship sat upright in
that posture, I thought I ought to get everything
out of her that I could. So every day at low water
I went on board, and brought away something or
other; but, particularly, the third time I went I
brought away as much of the rigging as I could,
as also all the small ropes and rope-twine I could
get, with a piece of spare canvas, which was to
mend the sails upon occasion, the barrel of wet
gunpowder; in a word, I brought away all the sails
first and last, only that I was fain to cut them in
pieces, and bring as much at a time as I could;
for they were no more useful to be Sails, but as
mere canvas only.

I had been now thirteen days on shore, and had
been eleven times on board the ship; in which time
I had brought away all that one pair of hands
could well be supposed capable to bring, though I
believe verily, had the calm weather held, I should
have brought away the whole ship piece by piece.
But preparing the twelfth time to go on board, I
found the wind begin to rise. However, at low
water I went on board, and though I thought I
had rummaged the cabin so effectually as that noth-
ing more could be found, yet I discovered a locker
with drawers in it, in one of which I found two or
three razors, and one pair of large scissors, with
Some ten or a dozen of good knives and forks; in
42 ROBINSON CRUSOE

another, I found about thirty-six pounds value in
money, some European coin, some Brazil, some
pieces of eight, some gold, some silver.

It blew very hard all that night, and in the morn-
ing, when I looked out, behold, no more ship was to
be seen.

My thoughts were now wholly employed about
securing myself against either savages, if any
should appear, or wild beasts, if any were in the
island.

I soon found the place I was in was not for my
settlement, particularly because it was upon a low
moorish ground near the sea, and I believed would
not be wholesome; and more particularly because
there was no fresh water near it. So I resolved to
find a more healthy and more convenient spot of
ground.

I consulted several things in my situation, which
I found would be proper for me. First, health
and fresh water, I just now mentioned. Secondly,
shelter from the heat of the sun. Thirdly, secu-
rity from ravenous creatures, whether men or
beasts. Fourthly, a view to the sea, that if God
sent any ship in sight I might not lose any advan-
tage for my deliverance, of which I was not willing
to banish all my expectation yet.

In search of a place proper for this, I found a
little plain on the side of a rising hill, whose front
towards this little plain was steep as a house-side,
so that nothing could come down upon me from the
top; on the side of this rock there was a hollow
ROBINSON CRUSOE 43

place, worn a little way in, like the entrance or
door of a cave; but there was not really any cave,
or way into the rock at all.

On the flat of the green, just before this hollow
place, I resolved to pitch my tent. This plain was
not above an hundred yards broad, and about twice
as long, and lay like a green before my door, and
at the end of it descended irregularly every way
down into the low grounds by the seaside. It was
on the N.N.W. side of the hill, so that I was shel-
tered from the heat every day, till it came to a W.
and by 8. sun, or thereabouts, which in those coun-
tries is near the setting.

Before I set up my tent, I drew a half circle be- ;
fore the hollow place, which took in about ten yards
in its semi-diameter from the rock, and twenty
yards in its diameter from its beginning and end-
ing. In this half circle I pitched two rows of
strong stakes, driving them into the ground till
they stood very firm like piles, the biggest end be-
ing out of the ground about five feet and a half,
and sharpened on the top. The two rows did not
stand above six inches from one another.

Then I took the pieces of cable which I had cut
in the ship, and laid them in rows one upon an-
other, within the circle, between these two rows of
Stakes, up to the top, placing other stakes in the
inside leaning against them, about two feet and a
half high, like a Spur to a post; and this fence was
So strong, that neither man nor beast could get
into it, or over it. This cost-me a great deal of
44 ROBINSON CRUSOE

time and labor, especially to cut the piles in the
woods, bring them to the place, and drive them
into the earth.

The entrance into this place I made to be not
by a door, but by a short ladder, to go over the top;
which ladder, when I was in, I lifted over after me,
and so I was completely fenced in, and fortified, as
I thought, from all the world, and consequently
slept secure in the night.

Into this fence or fortress, with infinite labor, I
carried all my riches, all my provisions, ammuni-
tion, and stores, of which you have the account
above; and I made me a large tent, which, to pre-
serve me from the rains that in one part of the
year are very violent there, I made double, viz.,
one smaller tent within, and one larger tent above
it, and covered the upper-most with a large tar-
paulin, which I had saved among the sails. And
now I lay no more for a while in the bed which I
had brought on shore, but in a hammock, which
was indeed a very good one, and belonged to the
mate of the ship.

Into this tent I brought all my provisions, and
everything that would spoil by the wet; and hay-
ing thus enclosed all my goods, I made up the en-
trance, which, till now, I had left open, and so
passed and repassed, as I said, by a short ladder.

When I had done this, I began to work my way
into the rock; and bringing all the earth and stones
that I dug down out through my tent, I laid them
up within my fence in the nature of a terrace, so
ROBINSON CRUSOE 45

that it raised the ground within about a foot and
a half; thus I made me a cave just behind my tent,
which served me like a cellar to my house.

It cost me much labor, and many days, before all
these things were brought to perfection, and there-
fore I must go back to some other things which
took up some of my thoughts. At the same time it
happened, after I had laid my scheme for the set-
ting up my tent, and making the cave, that a storm
of rain falling from a thick dark cloud, a sudden
flash of lightning happened, and after that a great
clap of thunder, as is naturally the effect of it. I
was not so much surprised with the lightning, as I
was with a thought which darted into my mind as
swift as the lightning itself. O my powder! My
very heart sunk within me when I thought that at
one blast all my powder might be destroyed, on
which, not my defence only, but the providing me
food, as I thought, entirely depended. I was noth-
ing near so anxious about my own danger; though
had the powder took fire, I had never known who
had hurt me.

Such impression did this make upon me that
after the storm was over I laid aside all my works,
my building, and fortifying, and applied myself to
make bags and boxes to separate the powder, and
keep it a little and a little ina parcel, in hope that
whatever might come it might not all take fire at
once, and to keep it so apart, that it should not be
possible to make one part fire another. I finished
this work in about a fortnight; and I think my
46 ROBINSON CRUSOE

powder, which in all was about 240 pounds weight,
was divided in not less than a hundred parcels.
As to the barrel that had been wet, I did not appre-
hend any danger from that, so I placed it in my
new cave, which in my fancy I called my kitchen,
and the rest I hid up and down in holes among
the rocks, so that no wet might come to it, mark-
ing very carefully where I laid it.

In the interval of time while this was doing, I
went out once, at least, every day with my gun, as
well to divert myself, as to see if I could kill
anything fit for food, and as near as I could to ac-
quaint myself with what the island produced. The
first time I went out, I presently discovered that
there were goats in the island, which was a great
satisfaction to me; but then it was attended with
this misfortune to me, viz., that they were so shy,
so subtle, and so swift of foot, that it was the diffi-
cultest thing in the world to come at them. But I
was not discouraged at this, not doubting but I
might now and then shoot one, as it soon hap-
pened.

The first shot I made among these creatures I
killed a she-goat, which had a little kid by her,
which she gave suck to, which grieved me heartily;
but when the old one fell, the kid stood stock still
by her till I came and took her up; and not only
so, but when I carried the old one with me upon
my shoulders, the kid followed me quite to my en-
closure; upon which I laid down the dam, and took
the kid in my arms, and carried it over my pale, in
ROBINSON CRUSOE 47

hopes to have bred it up tame; but it would not eat,
so I was forced to kill it, and eat it myself. These
two supplied me with flesh a great while, for I ate
sparingly, and saved my provisions, my bread espe-
cially, as much as possibly I could.



Having now fixed my habitation, I found it ab-
Solutely necessary to provide a place to make a
fire in, and fuel to burn; and what I did for that,
as also how I enlarged my cave, and what con-
veniences I made, I shall give a full account of in
its place. But I must first give some little ac-
count of myself, and of my thoughts about living,
which it may well be supposed were not a few.

4
48 ROBINSON CRUSOE

I had a dismal prospect of my condition; for as I
was not cast away upon that island without being
driven, as is said, by a violent storm, quite out of
the course of our intended voyage, and a great way,
viz., some hundreds of leagues out of the ordinary
course of the trade of mankind, I had great reason
to consider it asa determination of Heaven, that in
this desolate place, and in this desolate manner, I
should end my life. The tears would run plenti-
fully down my face when I made these reflections,
and sometimes I would expostulate with myself,
why Providence should thus completely ruin its
creatures, and render them so absolutely miser-
able, so without help abandoned, so entirely de-
pressed, that it could hardly be rational to be
thankful for such a life.

But something always returned swift upon me to
check these thoughts, and to reprove me; and par-
ticularly one day, walking with my gun in my hand
by the seaside, I was very pensive upon the subject
of my present condition, when Reason, as it were,
expostulated with me t’other wry, thus: “Well,
you are in a desolate condition, it is true, but pray
remember, where are the rest of you? Did not
you come eleven of you into the boat? Where are
the ten? Why were they not saved, and you lost?

And now being to enter into a melancholy rela-
tion of a scene of silent life, such, perhaps, as was
never heard of in the world before, I shall take it
from its beginning, and continue it in its order.
It was, by my account, the 30th of September when,
ROBINSON CRUSOE 49

in the manner as above said, I first set foot upon
this horrid island, when the sun being to us in its
autumnal equinox, was almost just over my head,
for I reckoned myself, by observation, to be in the
latitude of 9 degrees 22 minutes north of the line.

After I had been there about ten or twelve days,
it came into my thoughts that I should loge my



reckoning of time for want of books and pen and
ink, and should even forget the Sabbath days from
the working days; but to prevent this, I cut it
with my knife upon a large post, in capital letters;
and making it into a great cross, I set it up on the
shore where I first landed, viz., “I came on shore
here on the 30th of September, 1659.” Upon the
sides of this square post I cut every day a notch
with my knife and every seventh notch was as long
again as the rest, and every first day of the month
50 ROBINSON CRUSOE

as long again as that long one; and thus I kept
my calendar, or weekly, monthly, and yearly reck-
oning of time.

In the next place we are to observe, that among
the many things which I brought out of the ship in
the several voyages, which, as above mentioned, I
made to it, I got several things of less value, but
not all less useful to me, which I omitted setting
down before; as in particular, pens, ink, and paper,
several parcels in the captain’s, mate’s, gunner’s,
and carpenter’s keeping, three or four compasses,
Some mathematical instruments, dials, perspec-
tives, charts, and books of navigation, all which I
huddled together, whether I might want them or
no. Also I found three very good Bibles, which
came to me in my cargo from England, and which
I had packed up among my things; some Portu-
guese books also, and among them two or three
Popish prayer-books, and several other books, all
which I carefully secured. And I must not forget,
that we had in the ship a dog and two cats, of
whose eminent history I may have occasion to say
something in its place; for I carried both the cats
with me; and as for the dog, he jumped out of the
ship of himself, and swam on shore to me the day
after I went on shore with my first cargo, and was
a trusty servant to me many years. I wanted
nothing that he could fetch me, nor any company
that he could make up to me; I only wanted to
have him talk to me, but that he would not do.

The want of tools made every work I did go on


ROBINSON CRUSOE Bi

heavily ; and it was near a whole year before I had
entirely finished my little pale or surrounded habi-
tation. The piles of stakes, which were as heavy
as I could well lift, were a long time in cutting and
preparing in the woods, and more by far in bring-
ing home; so that I spent sometimes two days in
cutting and bringing home one of those posts, and
a third day in driving it into the ground.

But what need I have been concerned at the
tediousness of anything I had to do, seeing I had
time enough to do it in? nor had I any other em-
ployment, if that had been over, at least, that I
could foresee, except the ranging the island to seek
for food, which I did more or less every day.

I now drew up the state of my affairs in writing;
not so much to leave them to any that were to come
after me, for I was like to have but few heirs, as
to deliver my thoughts from daily poring upon
them, and afflicting my mind. And as my reason
began now to master my despondency, I stated it
very impartially, like debtor and creditor, the com-
forts I enjoyed against the miseries I suffered,
thus:

Evil. Good.

I am cast upon a hor- But I am alive, and
rible desolate island, not drowned, as all my
void of all hope of re- ship’s company was.
covery.

I am singled out and But I am singled out,
Separated, as it were, too, from all the ship’s
52 ROBINSON CRUSOE

from all the world to be
miserable.

I am divided from
mankind, a_ solitaire,
one banished from hu-
man society.

I have not elothes to
cover me.

I am without any de-
fence or means to resist
any violence of man or
beast.

I have no soul to
speak to, or relieve me.

crew to be spared from
death; and He that mi-
raculously saved me
from death, can deliver
me from this condition.

But I am not starved
and perishing on a bar-
ren place, affording no
sustenance.

But I am in a hot cli.
mate, where if I had
clothes I could hardly
wear them.

But I am cast on an
island, where I see no
wild beasts to hurt me,
as I saw on the coast of
Africa; and what if I
had been shipwrecked
there?

But God wonderfully
Sent the ship in near
enough to the _ shore,
that I have gotten out
SO. many necessary
things as will either
supply my wants, or en-
able me to supply my-
self even as long ag I
live.
ROBINSON CRUSOE BS

Having now brought my mind a little to relish
my condition, and given over looking out to sea, to
see if I could spy a ship; I say, giving over these
things, I began to apply myself to accommodate
my way of living, and to make things as easy to
me as I could.

I have already described my habitation, which
was a tent under the side of a rock, surrounded
with a strong pale of posts and cables; but I might
now rather call it a wall, for I raised a kind of wall
up against it of turfs, about two feet thick on the
outside, and after some time—I think it was a year
and a half—lI raised rafters from it leading to the
rock, and thatched it with boughs of trees and
such things as I could get to keep out the rain,
which I found at some times of the year very
violent.

I have already observed how I brought all my
goods into this pale, and into the cave which I had
made behind me. But I must observe, too, that at
first this was a confused heap of goods, which as
they lay in no order, so they took up all my place;
I had no room to turn myself. So I set myself
to enlarge my cave and works farther into the
earth ; for it was a loose sandy rock, which yielded
easily to the labor I bestowed on it. And so, when
I found I was pretty safe as to beasts of prey, I
worked sideways to the right hand into the rock;
and then, turning to the right again, worked quite
out, and made me a door to come out on the out-
side of my pale or fortification. This gave me not
54 ROBINSON CRUSOE

only egress and regress, as it were a back-way to
my tent and to my storehouse, but gave me room
to stow my goods.

And now I began to apply myself to make such
necessary things as I found I most wanted, as par-
ticularly a chair and a table.

So I went to work. I had never handled a tool
in my life; and yet in time, by labor, application,
and contrivance, I found at last that I wanted noth-
ing but I could have made it, especially if I had
had tools. However, I made an abundance of
things even without tools, and some with no more
tools than an adze and a hatchet, which, perhaps,
were never made that way before, and that with
infinite labor. For example, if I wanted a board,
I had no other way but to cut down a tree, set it
on an edge before me, and hew it flat on either side
with my axe, till I had brought it to be thin as a
plank, and then dub it smooth with my adze. It
is true, by this method I could make but one board
out of a whole tree; but my time or labor was little
worth, and so it was as well employed one way as
another.

However, I made me a table and a chair, as I
observed above, in the first place, and this I did out
of the short pieces of boards that I brought on my
raft from the ship. But when I had wrought out
some boards, as above, I made large shelves of the
breadth of a foot and a half one over another, all
along one side of my cave, to lay all my tools, nails,
and iron-work; and, in a word, to separate every-
ROBINSON CRUSOE 55

thing at large in their places, that I might come
easily at them.

And now it was when I began to keep a journal
of every day’s employment, of which I shall here
give you the copy ( though in it will be told all
these particulars over again) as long as it lasted;
for, having no more ink, I was forced to leave it
off.

THE JOURNAL

September 30, 1659.—I, poor miserable Robin-
son Crusoe, being shipwrecked, during a dreadful
storm, in the offing, came on shore on this dismal
unfortunate island, which I called the Island of
Despair, all the rest of the ship’s company being
drowned, and myself almost dead.

All the rest of that day I spent in afflicting my-
Self at the dismal circumstances I was brought to,
viz., I had neither food, house, clothes, weapon, or
place to fly to; and in despair to any relief, saw
nothing but death before me; either that I should
be devoured by wild beasts, murdered by savages,
or starved to death for want of food. At the ap-
preach of night, I slept in a tree for fear of wild
creatures, but slept soundly, though it rained all
night.

Oct. 1. In the morning I saw, to my great sur-
prise, the ship had floated with the high tide, and
was driven on shore again much nearer the island;
which, as it was some comfort on one hand, for see-
56 ROBINSON CRUSOE

ing her sit upright, and not broken to pieces, I
hoped, if the wind abated, I might get on board,
and get some food and necessaries out of her for
my relief; so, on the other hand, it renewed my
grief at the loss of my comrades, who, I imag-
ined, if we had all stayed on board, might have
saved the ship, or at least that they would not have
been all drowned as they were; and that had the
men been saved, we might perhaps have built us a
boat out of the ruins of the ship, to have carried us
to some other part of the world. Seeing the ship
almost dry, I went upon the sand as near as I
could, and then swam on board; this day also it
continued raining, though with no wind at all.

From the 1st of October to the 24th.—All these
days entirely spent in many several voyages to get
all I could out of the ship, which I brought on
Shore, every tide of flood, upon rafts. Much
rain.

Oct. 25.—It rained all night and all day, with
Some gusts of wind, during which time the ship
broke in pieces, and was no more to be seen, except
the wreck of her, and that only at low water. I
spent this day in securing the goods which I had
saved, that the rain might not spoil them.

Oct. 26.—I walked about the shore almost all
day to find out a place to fix my habitation. To-
wards night I fixed upon a proper place under a
rock, and marked out a semicirgle for my encamp-
ment, which I resolved to strengthen with a work.
ROBINSON CRUSOE 57

wall, or fortification made of double piles, lined
within with cables, and without with turf.

From the 26th to the 30th I worked very hard in
carrying all my goods to my new habitation,
though part of the time it rained exceeding hard.

The 31st, the morning, I went out with my gun
to see for some food, and discover the country ;
when I killed a she-goat, and her kid followed me
home, which I afterwards killed also, because it
would not feed.

Nov. 1—I set up my tent under a rock, and lay
there the first night, making it as large as I could,
with stakes driven in to swing my hammock upon.

Nov. 2.—I set up all my chests and boards, and
the pieces of timber which made my rafts, and with
them formed a fence round me, a little within the
place I had marked out for my fortification.

Nov. 3.—I went out with my gun, and killed two
fowls, like ducks, which were very good food. In
the afternoon went to work to make me a table.

Nov. 4.—This morning I began to order my times
of work, of going out with my gun, time of sleep,
and time of diversion, viz., every morning I walked
out with my gun for two or three hours, if it did
not rain; then employed myself to work till about
eleven o’clock; then eat what I had to live on; and
from twelve to two I lay down to sleep, the weather
being excessive hot; and then in the evening to
work again. The working part of this day and of
the next were wholly employed in making my table.
58 ROBINSON CRUSOE

Nov. 5.—This day went abroad with my gun and
my dog, and killed a wild cat; her skin pretty soft,
but her flesh good for nothing. Every creature I
killed, I took off the skins and preserved them.

Nov. 7.—Now it began to be settled fair weather.
The 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, and part of the 12th (for
the 11th was Sunday) I took wholly up to make
me a chair, and with much ado, brought it to a
tolerable shape, but never to please me; and even
in the making, I pulled it in pieces several times.
Note, I soon neglected my keeping Sundays; for,
omitting my mark for them on my post, I forgot
which was which.

Nov. 13.—This day it rained, which refreshed
me exceedingly, and cooled the earth, but it was
accompanied with terrible thunder and lightning,
which frightened me dreadfully, for fear of my
powder. As soon as it was over, I resolved to
Separate my stock of powder into as many little
parcels as possible, that it might not be in danger.

Nov. 14, 15, 16—These three days I spent in
making little square chests or boxes, which might
hold about a pound, or two pound at most, of
powder; and so putting the powder in, I stowed it
in places as secure and remote from one another as
possible. On one of these three days I killed a
large bird that was good to eat, but I know not
what to call it.

Nov. 17.—This day I began to dig behind my
tent into the rock, to make room for my farther
conveniency. Note, three things I wanted exceed-
ROBINSON CRUSOE 59

ingly for this work, viz., a pick-axe, a shovel, and a
wheel-barrow or basket; so I desisted from my
work, and made me some tools. As fora pick-axe,
I made use of the iron crows, which were proper
enough, though heavy; but the next thing was a
shovel or spade. What kind of one to make, I
knew not.

Nov. 18.—The next day, in searching the woods,
I found a tree which in the Brazils they call the
iron tree. Of this, with great labor, and almost
spoiling my axe, I cut a piece and brought it home
though it was exceeding heavy.

The excessive hardness of the wood made me a
long while upon this machine, for I worked it
effectually, by little and little, into the form of a
shovel or spade, the handle exactly shaped like
ours in England, only that the broad part having
no iron shod upon it at bottom, it would not last
‘me so long.

For carrying away the earth which I dug out of
the cave, I made me a thing like a hod which the
laborers carry mortar in, when they serve the
bricklayers.

Nov. 23.—My other work having now stood still
because of my making these tools, I spent eighteen
days entirely in widening and deepening my cave,
that it might hold my goods commodiously.

Note.—During all this time I worked to make
this room or cave spacious enough to accommodate
me as a warehouse or magazine, a kitchen, a din-
ing-room, and a cellar; as for my lodging, I kept
60 ROBINSON CRUSOE

to the tent, except that sometimes in the wet sea-
son of the year it rained so hard, that I could not
keep myself dry, which caused me afterwards to
cover all my place within my pale with long poles,
in the form of rafters, leaning against the rocks,
and load them with fiags and large leaves of trees,
like a thatch.

Dec. 10.—I began now to think my cave or vault
finished, when on a sudden a great quantity of
earth fell down from the top and one side, so much
that if I had been under it, I had never wanted a
grave-digger. Upon this disaster I had a great
deal of work to do over again; for I had the loose
earth to carry out; and, which was of more im-
portance, I had the ceiling to prop up, so that I
might be sure no more would come down.

Dec. 17—From this day to the twentieth I
placed shelves, and knocked up nails on the posts
to hang everything up that could be hung up; and
now I began to be in some order within doors.

Dec. 20.—Now I carried everything into the cave,
and began to furnish my house, and set up some
pieces of boards, like a dresser, to order my victuals
upon; but boards began to be very scarce with me;
also I made me another table.

Dec. 24.—Much rain all night and all day; no
stirring out.

Dec. 25.—Rain all day.

Dec. 26.—No rain, and the earth much coeler
than before, and pleasanter.

Dec. 27.—Killed a young goat, and lamed a
ROBINSON CRUSOE 61

other, so that I catched it. When I had it home,
I bound and splintered up its leg, which was broke.
N.B.—I took such care of it, that it grew well and
as strong as ever; but by my nursing it so long it
grew tame. This was the first time I entertained
a thought of breeding up some tame creatures, that
I might have food when my powder and shot was
all spent.

Dec. 28, 29, 30.—Great heats and no breeze, so
that there was no stirring abroad, except in the
evening, for food.

Jan. 1—vVery hot still. This evening, going
farther into the valleys which lay towards the cen-
tre of the island, I found there was plenty of goats,
though exceeding shy, and hard to come at.

Jan. 2.—I went out with my dog, and set him
upon the goats; but I was mistaken, for they all
faced about upon the dog; and he knew his danger
too well, for he would not come near them.

Jan. 3.—I began my fence or wall ; which, being
still jealous of my being attacked by somebody, I
resolved to make very thick and strong.

N.B—This wall being described before, I pur-
posely omit what was said in the journal. It ig
sufficient tv observe that I was no less time than
from the 3rd of J anuary to the 14th of April work-
ing, finishing, and perfecting this wall, though it
was no more than about twenty-four yards in
length.

During this time, I made my rounds in the woods
for game every day, when the rain admitted me,
62 ROBINSON CRUSOE

and made frequent discoveries to my advantage;
particularly I found a kind of wild pigeons, who
built in the holes of the rocks. I frequen*.y found
their nests, and got their young ones, which were
very good meat.

And now in the managing my household affairs I
found myself wanting in many things, which I
thought at first it was impossible for me to make.

I was at a great loss for candle; so that as soon
as ever it was dark, which was generally by seven
o’clock, I was obliged to go to bed. The only rem-
edy I had was, that when I had killed a goat I
saved the tallow, and with a little dish made of
clay, which I baked in the sun, to which I added a
wick of some oakum, I made me a lamp; and this
gave me light, though not a clear steady light like
a candle.

In rummaging my things, I found a little bag,
which had been filled with corn. What little re-
mainder of corn had been in the bag was all de-
voured with the rats, and I shook the husks of
corn out of it on one side of my fortification, un-
der the rock. It was a little before the great
rains that I threw this stuff away, ard, about a
month after I saw some few stalks ot something
green shooting out of the ground, which I fancied
might be some plant I had not seen; but I was
surprised, and perfectly astonished, when, after a
little longer time, I saw about ten or twelve ears
come out, which were perfect green barley of the
same kind as our European, nay, as our English
ROBINSON CRUSOE 63

barley. And because I saw near it, all along
by the side of the rock, some other straggling
stalks, which proved to be stalks of rice, and
which I knew, because I had seen it grow in
Africa.

Not doubting but that there was more in the
place, I went all over that part of the island where
I had been before, peering in every corner, and
under every rock, to see for more of it; but I could
not find any. At last it occurred to my thoughts
that I had shook the bag out on that place, and
then the wonder began to cease.

I carefully saved the ears of this corn, and I
resolved to sow them all again, hoping in time to
have some quantity sufficient to supply me with
bread. But it was not till the fourth year that I
could allow myself the least grain of this corn to
eat, and even then but sparingly, as I shall say
afterwards in its order.

I worked excessive hard these three or four
months to get my wall done; and the 14th of April
I closed it up, contriving to go into it, not by a
door, but over the wall by a ladder, that there
might be no sign in the outside of my habitation.

April 16.—I finished the ladder, so I went up
with the ladder to the top, and then pulled it up
after me, and let it down on the inside. This was
a complete enclosure to me; for within I had room
enough, and nothing could come at me from with-
out, unless it could first mount my wall.

The very next day after this wall was finished, I

5
64 ROBINSON CRUSOE

had almost had all my labor overthrown at once,
and myself killed. The case was thus: As I was
busy just in the entrance into my cave, all on a
sudden I found the earth come crumbling down
from the roof of my cave, and from the edge of the
hill over my head, and two of the posts I had set up
in the cave cracked in a frightful manner. I ran
forward to my ladder; and not thinking myself
safe there neither, I got over my wall for fear of
the pieces of the hill which I expected might roll
down upon me. I was no sooner stepped down
upon the firm ground, but I plainly saw it was a
terrible earthquake; for the ground I stood on
shook three times at about eight minutes’ distance,
and a great piece of the top of a rock, which stood
about half a mile from me next the sea, fell down
with such a terrible noise as I never heard in all
my life. I perceived also the very sea was put
into violent motion by it; and I believed the
shocks were stronger under the water than on the
island.

After the third shock was over, and I felt no
more for some time, I began to take courage; and
yet I had not heart enough to go over my wall
again, for fear of being buried alive, but sat still
upon the ground, greatly cast down and disconso-
late, not knowing what to do. All this while I
had not the least serious religious thought, nothing
but the common, “Lord, have mercy upon me!” and
when it was over, that went away too.

While I sat thus the wind rose by little and little,
ROBINSON CRUSOE 65

so that in less than half an hour it blew a most
dreadful hurricane. The sea was all on a sudden
covered over with foam and froth; the shore was
covered with the breach of the water; the trees were
torn up by the roots; and a terrible storm it was:
and this held about three hours, and then began to
abate; and in two hours more it was stark calm,
and began to rain very hard. The rain was 80
violent that my tent was ready to be beaten down
with it, and I was forced to go into my cave,
though very much afraid and uneasy, for fear it
should fall on my head.

It continued raining all that night and great
part of the next day, so that I could not stir
abroad; but my mind being more composed, I
began to think of what I had best do, concluding
that if the island was subject to these earthquakes,
there would be no living for me in a cave, but I
must consider of building me some little hut in an
open place, which I might surround with a wall,
as I had done here, and so make myself secure from
wild beasts or men.

With these thoughts I resolved to remove my
tent from the place where it stood, which was just
under the hanging precipice of the hill, and which,
if it should be shaken again, would certainly fall
upon my tent; and I spent the two next days, be-
ing the 19th and 20th of April, in contriving where
and how to remove my habitation.

In the meantime it occurred to me that it would
require a vast deal of time for me to do this, and
66 ROBINSON CRUSOE

that I must be contented to run the venture where
I was, till I had formed a camp for myself, and
had secured it so as to remove to it. So with this
resolution I composed myself for a time, and re-
solved that I would go to work with all speed to
build me a wall with piles and cables, etc., in a
circle as before, and set my tent up in it when it
was finished, but that I would venture to stay
where I was till it was finished, and fit to remove
to. This was the 21st.

April 22.—The next morning I began to consider
of means to put this resolve in execution; but I
was at a great loss about my tools. I had three
large axes, and abundance of hatchets (for we car-
ried the hatchets for traffic with the Indians), but
with much chopping and cutting knotty hard wood,
they were all full of notches and dull; and though
I had a grindstone, I could not turn it and grind
my tools too. At length I contrived a wheel with
a string, to turn it with my foot, that I might have
both my hands at liberty. Note, I had never seen
any such thing in England, or at least not to take
notice how it was done, though since I have ob-
served it is very common there; besides that, my
grindstone was very large and heavy. This ma-
chine cost me a full week’s work to bring it to per-
fection.

April 28, 29.—These two whole days I took up in
grinding my tools, my machine for turning my
grindstone performing very well.

April 30.—Having perceived my bread had been
ROBINSON CRUSOE 67

low a great while, now I took a survey of it, and re-
duced myself to one biscuit-cake a day.

May 1.—In the morning, looking towards the
seaside, I found the ship strangely removed. The
stern, which was broken to pieces, and parted from
the rest by the force of the sea soon after I had
left rummaging her, was tossed, as it were, up,
and cast on one side, and the sand was thrown
so high on that side next her stern, that whereas
there was a great place of water before, so that I
could not come within a quarter of a mile of the
wreck without swimming, I could now walk quite
up to her when the tide was out. I was surprised
with this at first, but soon concluded it must be
done by the earthquake.

This wholly diverted my thoughts from the de-
sign of removing my habitation; and I busied my-
self mightily, that day especially, in searching
whether I could make any way into the ship. But
I found nothing was to be expected of that kind,
for that all the inside of the ship was choked up
with sand. However, as I had learned not to
despair of anything, I resolved to pull everything
to pieces that I could of the ship.

I caught a young dolphin. I had made me a
long line of some rope-yarn, but I had no hooks ;
yet I frequently caught fish enough, as much as I
cared to eat; all which I dried in the sun, and ate
them dry.

May 24.—Every day to this day I worked on the
wreck, and with hard labor I loosened some things
68 ROBINSON CRUSOE

so much with the crow, that the first blowing tide
several casks floated out, and two of the seamen’s
chests.

I continued this work every day to the 15th of
June, except the time necessary to get food, which
I always appointed, during this part of my employ-
ment, to be when the tide was up, that I might be
ready when it was ebbed out. .

June 16.—Going down to the seaside, I found a
large tortoise, or turtle. This was the first I had
seen.

June 17.—I spent in cooking the turtle. I found
in her threescore eggs; and her flesh was to me, at
that time, the most savory and pleasant that ever
I tasted in my life, having had no flesh, but of
goats and fowls, since I landed in this horrid place.

June 18.—Rained all day, and I stayed within.
I thought the rain felt cold, and I was something
chilly, which I knew was not usual in that latitude.

June 19.—Very ill, and shivering, as if the
weather had been cold.

June 20.—No rest all night; violent pains in my
head, and feverish.

June 21.—Very ill, frighted almost to death
with the apprehensions of my sad condition, to be
sick, and no help. Prayed to God for the first
time since the storm off Hull, but scarce knew
what I said, or why.

June 22.—A little better, but under dreadful ap-
prehensions of sickness.
ROBINSON CRUSOE 69

June 23.—Very bad again; cold and shivering,
and then a violent headache.

June 24.—Much better.

June 25.—An ague very violent; the fit held me
seven hours; cold fit, and hot, with faint sweats
after it.

June 26.—Better; and having no victuals to eat,
took my gun, but found myself very weak. How-
ever, I killed a she-goat, and with much difficulty
got it home, and broiled some of it, and ate.

June 27.—The ague again so violent that I lay
abed all day, and neither ate nor drank. I was
ready to perish for thirst; but so weak, I had not
strength to stand up, or to get myself any water
to drink. Prayed to God again, and had this ter-
rible dream.

I thought that I was sitting on the ground, on
the outside of my wall, where I sat when the storm
blew after the earthquake, and that I saw a man
descend from a great black cloud, in a bright flame
of fire, and light upon the ground. He was all
over as bright as a flame, so that I could but just
bear to look towards him.

He moved forward towards me, and I heard a
voice so terrible that it is impossible to express the
terror of it. All that I can say I understood was
this: “Seeing all these things have not brought
thee to repentance, now thou shalt die”; at which
words I thought he lifted up the spear that was in
his hand to kill me.
70 ROBINSON CRUSOE

I had, alas! no divine knowledge; what I had re-
ceived by the good instruction of my father was
then worn out, by an uninterrupted series, for
eight years, of seafaring wickedness, and a con-
Stant conversation with nothing but such as were,
like myself, wicked and profane to the last degree.
I was all that the most hardened, unthinking,
wicked creature among our common sailors can be
supposed to be; not having the least sense, either
of the fear of God in danger, or of thankfulness to
God in deliverances.

In relating what is already past of my story,
this will be the more easily believed, when I shall
add, that through all the variety of miseries that
had to this day befallen me, I never had so much as
one thought of it being the hand of God, or that it
was a just punishment for my sin; my rebellious
behavior against my father, or my present sins,
which were great; or so much as a punishment
for the general course of my wicked life.

June 28.—Having been somewhat refreshed with
the sleep I had had, and the fit being entirely off,
I got up; and though the fright and terror of my
dream was very great, yet I considered that the fit
of the ague would return again the next day, and
now was my time to get something to refresh and
support myself when I should be ill. And the first
thing I did I filled a large square case-bottle with
water, and set it upon my table, in reach of my
bed ; and to take off the chill or aguish disposition
of the water, I put about a quarter of a pint of
ROBINSON CRUSOE 71

rum into it, and mixed them together. Then I got
me a piece of the goat’s flesh, and broiled it on the
coals, but could eat very little. I walked about,
but was very weak, and at night I made my supper
of three of the turtle’s eggs, which I roasted in the
ashes, and ate, as we call it, in the shell; and this
was the first bit of meat I had ever asked God’s
blessing to, as I could remember, in my whole
life.

After I had eaten, I tried to walk, but found
myself so weak that I could hardly carry the gun
(for I never went out without that) ; so I went but
a little way, and sat down upon the ground, look-
ing out upon the sea, which was just before me,
and very calm and smooth. As I sat there, some
such thoughts as these occurred to me.

What is this earth and sea, of which I have seen
So much? whence is it produced? And what am I,
and all the other creatures, wild and tame, human
and brutal, whence are we? Sure we are all made
by some secret Power, who formed the earth and
Sea, the air and sky. And who is that?

Then it followed most naturally, It ig God that
has made it all. Well, if God has made all these
things, He guides and governs them all, and all
things that concern them; for the Power that could
make things, must certainly have power to guide
and direct them.

If so, nothing can happen in the great circuit of

-His works, either without His knowledge or ap-
pointment. And if nothing happens without His
72 ROBINSON CRUSOE

Knowledge, He knows that I am here, and am in
this dreadful condition. And if nothing happens
without His appointment, He has appointed all
this to befall me.

Nothing occurred to my thoughts to contradict
any of these conclusions; and therefore it rested
upon me with the greater force, that it must needs
be that God had appointed all this to befall me,
that I was brought to this miserable circumstance
by His direction, He having the sole power, not of
me only, but of everything that happened in the
world. Immediately it followed, Why has God
done this to me? What have I done to be thus
used ?

My conscience presently checked me in that in-
quiry, as if I had blasphemed, and methought it
spoke to me like a voice: “Wretch! dost thou ask
what thou hast done? Look back upon a dreadful
misspent life, and ask thyself what thou hast not
done? Ask, Why is it that thou wert not long ago
destroyed? Why wert thou not drowned in Yar-
mouth Roads; killed in the fight when the ship
was taken by the Sallee man-of-war; devoured by
the wild beasts on the coast of Africa; or drowned
here, when all the crew perished but thyself?
Dost thou ask, What have I done?”

I was struck dumb with these reflections, as one
astonished and had not a word to say, no, not to
answer to myself, but rose up pensive and sad,
walked back to my retreat, and went up Over my
wall, as if I had been going to bed. But my
ROBINSON CRUSOE © 73

thoughts were sadly disturbed, and I had no in-
clination to sleep; so I sat down in my chair, and
lighted my lamp, for it began to be dark. Now, .
as the apprehension of the return of my distemper
terrified me very much, it occurred to my thought
that the Brazilians take no physic but their to-
bacco for almost all distempers; and I had a piece
of a roll of tobacco in one of the chests, which was
quite cured, and some also that was green.

I went, directed by Heaven no doubt; for in this
chest I found a cure for both soul and body. I
opened the chest, and found what I looked for, viz.,
the tobacco; and as the few books I had saved lay
there too, I took out one of the Bibles which I men-
tioned before, and which to this time I had not
found leisure, or so much as inclination, to look
into. I say, I took it out, and brought both that
and the tobacco with me to the table.

What use to make of the tobacco I knew not, as
to my distemper, or whether it was good for it or
no; but I tried several experiments with it, as if
I was resolved it should hit one way or other. I
first took a piece of a leaf, and chewed it in my
mouth, which indeed at first almost stupefied my
brain, the tobacco being green and strong, and that
I had not been much used to it. Then I took some
and steeped it an hour or two in some rum, and
resolved to take a dose of it when I lay down.
And lastly, I burnt some upon a pan of coals, and
held my nose close over the smoke of it, as long
as I could bear it.
74 ROBINSON CRUSOE

In the interval of this operation, I took up the
Bible, and began to read, but my head was too
much disturbed with the tobacco to bear reading,
at least that time; only having opened the book
casually, the first words that occurred to me were
these, “Call on Me in the day of trouble, and I will
deliver, and thou shalt glorify Me.”

It grew now late, and the tobacco had, as I said,
dozed my head so much that I inclined to sleep.
But before I lay down, I did what I never had
done in my life; I kneeled down and prayed to God
to fulfil the promise to me, that if I called upon
Him in the day of trouble, He would deliver me.
After my broken and imperfect prayer was over,
I drank the rum in which I had steeped the to-
bacco; which was so strong and rank of the
tobacco that indeed I could scarce get it down.

When I awaked I found myself exceedingly re-
freshed, and my spirits lively and cheerful. I was
stronger than I was the day before, and my stom-
ach better, for I was hungry; and, in short, I had
no fit the next day, but continued much altered
for the better. This was the 29th.

The 30th was my well day. I ate some more of
the turtle’s eggs, which were very good. This
evening I renewed the medicine, which I had sup-
posed did me good the day before, viz., the tobacco
steeped in rum; only I did not take so much as be-
fore, nor did I chew any of the leaf, or hold my
head over the smoke. However, I was not so well
ROBINSON CRUSOE 75

the next day, which was the first of July, as I
hoped I should have been; for I had a little spice
of the cold fit, but it was not much.

July 2.—I renewed the medicine all the three
ways; and dosed myself with it as at first, and
doubled the quantity which I drank.

July 3.—I missed the fit for good and all, though
T did not recover my full strength for some weeks
after. While I was thus gathering strength, my
thoughts ran exceedingly upon this Scripture, “I
will deliver thee”; and the impossibility of my
deliverance lay much upon my mind, in bar of my
ever expecting it. But as I was discouraging my-
self with such thoughts, it occurred to my mind
that I pored so much upon my deliverance from
the main affliction, that I disregarded the deliver-
ance I had received; and I was, as it were, made
to ask myself such questions as these, viz., Have I
not been delivered, and wonderfully too, from
Sickness? from the most distressed condition that
could be, and that was so frightful to me? and
what notice had I taken of it? Had I done my
part? God had delivered me, but I had not glor-
ified Him; that is to say, I had not owned and
been thankful for that as a deliverance; and how
could I expect greater deliverance?

This touched my heart very much; and immedi-
ately I kneeled down, and gave God thanks aloud
for my recovery from my sickness.

July 4.—In the morning I took the Bible: and
76 ROBINSON CRUSOE

beginning at the New Testament, I began seriously
to read it, and imposed upon myself to read awhile
every morning and every night, not tying myself
to the number of chapters, but as long as my
thoughts should engage me.

My condition began now to be, though not less
miserable as to my way of living, yet much easier
to my mind; and my thoughts being directed, by a
constant reading the Scripture, and praying to
God, to things of a higher nature, I had a great
deal of comfort within, which, till now, I knew
nothing of. Also, as my health and strength re-
turned, I bestirred myself to furnish myself with
everything that I wanted, and make my way of
living as regular as I could.

From the 4th of July to the 14th, I was chiens
employed in walking about with my gun in my
hand, a little and a little at a time, as a man that
was gathering up his strength after a fit of sick-
ness; for it is hardly to be imagined how low I
was, and to what weakness I was reduced.

I had been now in this unhappy island above ten
months; all possibility of deliverance from this
condition seemed to be entirely taken from me;
and I firmly believed that no human shape had
ever set foot upon that place.

It was the 15th of July that I began to take a
more particular survey of the island itself. I went
up the creek first, where, as I hinted, I brought
my rafts on shore. I found, after I came about
two miles up, that the tide did not flow any higher,
ROBINSON CRUSOE 7

and that it was no more than a little brook of run-
ing water, and very fresh and good.

On the bank of this brook I found many pleas-
ant savannas or meadows, plain, smooth, and cov-
ered with grass; and on the rising parts of them,
next to the higher grounds, where the water, as”
might be supposed, never overflowed, I found a
great deal of tobacco, green, and growing to a
great and very strong stalk.

The next day, the 16th, after going something
farther than I had the day before, I found the
brook and the savannas began to cease, and the
country became more woody than before. In this
part I found different fruits, and particularly I
found melons upon the ground in great abundance,
and great clusters of grapes were just now in their
prime, very ripe and rich. I found an excellent
use for these grapes; and that was, to cure or dry
them in the sun, and keep them as dried grapes or
raisins are kept, which I thought would be, as in-
deed they were, as wholesome as agreeable to eat,
when no grapes might be to be had.

I spent all that evening there, and went not back
to my habitation; which, by the way, was the first
night, as I might say, I had lain from home. In
the night, I took my first contrivance, and got up
into a tree, where I slept well; and the next morn-
ing proceeded upon my discovery, travelling near
four miles, as I might judge by the length of the
valley, keeping still due north, with a ridge of hills
on the south and north side of me.
78 ROBINSON CRUSOE

At the end of this march I came to an opening,
where the country seemed to descend to the west ;
and a little spring of fresh water, which issued out
of the side of the hill by me, ran the other way,
that is, due east; and the country appeared so
fresh, so green, so flourishing, everything being in
a constant verdure or flourish of spring, that it
looked like a planted garden.

I saw here abundance of cocoa trees, orange, and
lemon, and citron trees; but all wild, and very few
bearing any fruit, at least not then. However, the
green limes that I gathered were not only pleasant
to eat, but very wholesome.

I was so enamored of this place that I spent
much of my time there for the whole remaining
part of the month of July; and, though, upon sec-
ond thoughts, I resolved not to remove, yet I built
me a little kind of a bower, and surrounded it at a
distance with a strong fence, being a double hedge
as high as I could reach, well staked, and filled
between with brushwood. And here I lay very se-
cure, sometimes two or three nights together, al-
ways going over it with a ladder, as before; so that
I fancied now I had my country house and my sea-
coast house; and this work took me up to the be-
ginning of August.

I had but newly finished my fence, and began to
enjoy my labor, but the rains came on, and made
me stick close to my first habitation; for though
I had made me a tent like the other, with a piece
of a sail, and spread it very well, yet.I had not the
ROBINGON CRUSOE 79

shelter of a hill to keep me from storms, nor a eave
retreat when the rains were extraordinary.

About the beginning of August, as I said, I had
finished my bower and began to enjoy myself.
The 3rd of August, I found the grapes I had hung
up were perfectly dried, and indeed were excellent
good raisins of the sun; so I began to take them
down from the trees. And it was very happy that
I did so, for the rains whick followed would have
spoiled them, and I had lost the best part of my
winter food; for I had above two hundred large
bunches of them. No sooner had I taken them all
down, and carried most of them home to my cave,
but it began to rain; and from hence, which was
the 14th of August, it rained, more or less, every
day tilt the middle of October, and sometimes so
violently that I could not stir out of my cave for
several days.

From the 14th of August to the 26th, incessant
rain, so that I could not stir, and was now very
careful not to be much wet. In this confinement,
I began to be straitened for food; but venturing
out twice, I one day killed a goat, and the last day,
which was the 26th, found a very large tortoise,
which was a treat to me, and my food was regulated
thus: I ate a bunch of raisins for my breakfast, a
piece of the goat’s flesh, or of the turtle, for my
dinner, broiled; for, to my great misfortune, I had
no vessel to boil or stew anything; and two or three
of the turtle’s eggs for my supper.

During this confinement in my cover by the
6
80 ROBINSON CRUSOE

rain, I worked daily two or three hours at enlarg-
ing my cave, and by degrees worked it on towards
one side, till I came to the outside of the hill, and
made a door, or way out, which came beyond my
fence or wall; and so I came in and out this way.

Sept. 30.—I was now come to the unhappy anni-
versary of my landing. I cast up the notches on
my post, and found I had been on ghore three hun-
dred and sixty-five days. I kept this day as a
Solemn fast, setting it apart to religious exercise,
prostrating myself on the ground with the most se-
rious humiliation, confessing my sins to God, ac-
knowledging His righteous judgments upon me,
and praying to Him to have mercy on me through
Jesus Christ; and having not tasted the least re-
freshment for twelve hours, even till. the going
down of the sun, I then ate a biscuit-cake and a
bunch of grapes, and went to bed, finishing the day
as I began it.

I had all this time observed no Sabbath day, for
as at first I had no sense of religion upon my mind,
I had, after some time, omitted to distinguish the
weeks, by making a longer notch than ordinary for
the Sabbath day, and so did not really know what
any of the days were. But now, having cast up
the days, as above, I found I had been there a year,
so I divided it into weeks, and set apart every
seventh day for a Sabbath; though I found at the
end of my account, I had lost a day or two in my
reckoning.

A little after this my ink began to fail me, and so
ROBINSON CRUSOE 81

I contented myself to use it more sparingly, and to
write down only the most remarkable events of my
life, without continuing a daily memorandum of
other things.

I have mentioned that I had saved the few ears
of barley and rice, which I had so surprisingly
found spring up, as I thought, of themselves, and
believe there were about thirty stalks of rice, and
about twenty of barley. Now I thought it a
proper time to sow it after the rains, the sun being
in its southern position, going from me.

Accordingly I dug up a piece of ground as well
as I could with my wooden spade, and dividing it
into two parts, I sowed my grain; but as I was sow-
ing, it casually occurred to my thoughts that I
would not sow it all at first, because I did not
know when was the proper time for it, so I sowed
about two-thirds of the seed, leaving about a hand-
ful of each.

Finding my first seed did not grow, which I
easily imagined was by the drought, I sought for
a moister piece of ground to make another trial in,
and I dug up a piece of ground near my new bower,
and sowed the rest of my seed in February, a little
before the vernal equinox. And this having the
rainy months of March and April to water it,
sprung up very pleasantly, and yielded a very good
crop; but having part of the seed left only, and
not daring to sow all that I had, I had but a small
quantity at last, my whole crop not amounting to
above half a peck of each kind. But by this ex-
82 ROBINSON CRUSOE

periment I was made master of my business, and
knew I might expect two seed-times and two har-
vests every year.

While this corn was growing, I made a little dis-
covery, which was of use to me afterwards. As
soon as the rains were over, and the weather began
to settle, which was about the month of November,
I made a visit up the country to my bower, where,
though I had not been some months, yet I found
all things just as I left them. The circle or
double hedge that I had made was not only firm
and entire, but the stakes which I had cut out of
some trees that grew thereabouts were all shot out,
and grown with long branches, as much as a wil-
low-tree usually shoots the first year after lopping
its head. I could not tell what tree to call it that
these stakes were cut from. I was surprised, and
yet very well pleased to see the young trees grow,
and I pruned them, and led them up to grow as
much alike as I could. And it is scarce credible
how beautiful a figure they grew into in three
years; so that though the hedge made a circle of
about twenty-five yards in diameter, yet the trees,
for such I might now call them, soon covered it,
and it was a complete shade, sufficient to lodge
under all the dry season.

This made me resolve to cut some more stakes,
and make me a hedge like this, in a semicircle
round my wall (I mean that of my first dwelling),
which I did; and placing the trees or stakes in a
double row, at about eight yards distant from my
ROBINSON CRUSOE 83

first fence, they grew presently, and were at first a
fine cover to my habitation, and afterward served
for a defence also, as I shall observe in its order.

I found now that the seasons of the year might
generally be divided, not into summer and winter,
as in Europe, but into the rainy seasons and the
dry seasons; which were generally thus:

Half i \Rainy, the sun being then on,
Half April J or near the equinox.
Half April 7}
? re Dry, the sun being then to the
en north of the line.
July
Half August
Half August a ie
September Rainy, the sun being then come

Half October back.

Half October

November i

Dry, the sun being then to the
eee eer south of the line.
January |

Half February J

The rainy season sometimes held longer or
shorter as the winds happened to blow, but this was
the general observation I made. After I had found
by experience the ill consequence of being abroad
in the rain, I took care to furnish myself with pro-
84 ROBINSON CRUSOE

visions beforehand, that I might not be obliged
to go out; and I sat within doors as much as pos-
sible during the wet months.

In this time I found much employment; particu-
larly, I tried many ways to make myself a basket;
but all the twigs I could get for the purpose proved
so brittle that they would do nothing. It proved
of excellent advantage to me now, that when I was
a boy I used to take great delight in standing at a
basket-maker’s in the town where my father lived,
and sometimes lending a hand, I had by this means
full knowledge of the methods of it, that I wanted
nothing but the materials; when it came into my
mind that the twigs of that tree from whence I cut
my stakes that grew might possibly be as tough as
the sallows, and willows, and osiers in England.

Accordingly, the next day, I went to my country
house, as I called it; and cutting some of the
smaller twigs, I found them to my purpose as much
as I could desire; whereupon I came the next time
prepared with a hatchet to cut down a quantity.
These I set up to dry within my circle of hedge,
and when they were fit for use, I carried them to
my cave; and here during the next season I em-
ployed myself in making, as well as I could, a great
many baskets, both to carry earth, or to lay up
anything as I had occasion.

I mentioned before that I had a great mind to
see the whole island, and that I had travelled up
the brook, and so on to where I built my bower,
and where I had an opening quite to the sea, on
ROBINSON CRUSOE 85

the other side of the island. I now resolved to
travel quite across to the seashore on that side;
so taking my gun, a hatchet, and my dog, and a
larger quantity of powder and shot than usual, ~
with two biscuit-cakes and a great bunch of raisins
in my pouch for my store, I began my journey.
When I passed the vale where my bower stood, as
above, I came within view of the sea to the west;
and it being a very clear day, I fairly descried
land, whether an island or a continent I could not
tell; but it lay very high, extending from the west
to the W.S.W. at a very great distance; by my
guess, it could not be less than fifteen or twenty
leagues off.

I could not tell what pet of the world this might
be, otherwise than that I know it must be part of
America, and, as I concluded, by all my observa-
tions, must be near the Spanish dominions, and
perhaps was all inhabited by savages, where, if I
should have landed, I had been in a worse con-
dition than I was now; and therefore I acqui-
esced in the dispositions of Providence, which I
began now to believe ordered everything for the
best.

With these considerations I walked very lei-
surely forward. I found that side of the island,
where I now was, much pleasanter than mine, the
open or savanna fields sweet, adorned with flow-
ers and full of very fine woods.

I saw abundance of parrots, and I did, after some
painstaking, catch a young parrot, for I knocked
86 ROBINSON CRUSOE

it down with a stick, and having recovered it, I
brought it home; but it was some years before I
could make him speak. However, at last I taught
him to call me by my name very familiarly.

As soon as I came to the seashore, I was sur-
prised to see that I had taken up my lot on the
worst side of the island, for here indeed the shore
was covered with innumerable turtles; whereas, on
the other side, I had found but three in a year and
a half. |

I traveled along the shore of the sea towards the
east, I suppose about twelve miles, and then setting
up a great pole upon the shore for a mark, I con-
cluded I would go home again; and that the next
journey I took should be on the other side of the
island, east from my dwelling, and so round till
I came to my post again.

I took another way to come back than that I
went, thinking I could easily keep all the island so
much in my view, that I could not miss finding my
first dwelling by viewing the country. But I
found myself mistaken; for being come about two
or three miles, I found myself descended into a
very large valley, but so surrounded with hills, and
those hills covered with wood, that I could not see
which was my way by any direction but that of
the sun.

It happened to my farther misfortune that the
weather proved hazy for three or four days while
I was in this valley; and not being able to see the
sun, I wandered about very uncomfortably, and at
ROBINSON CRUSOE 87

last was obliged to find out the seaside, look for
my post, and come back the same way I went; and
then by easy journeys I turned homeward, the
weather being exceeding hot, and my gun, ammuni-
tion, hatchet, and other things very heavy.

In this journey my dog surprised a young kid,
and seized upon it, and I running in to take hold
of it, caught it, and saved it alive from the dog.

I made a collar to this little creature, and with
a string, which I made of some rope-yarn, which I
always carried about me, I led him along though
with some difficulty, till I came to my bower, and
there I enclosed him and left him, for I was very
impatient to be home, from whence I had been ab-
sent above a month.

I reposed myself here a week, to rest and regale
myself after my long journey; during which most
of the time was taken up in the weighty affair of
making a cage for my Poll, who began now to be a
mere domestic, and to be mighty well acquainted
with me. Then I began to think of the poor kid
which I had penned in within my little circle,
and resolved to go and fetch it home, or give it
some food. Accordingly I went, and found it was
so tame with being hungry, that I had no need to
tie it, for it followed me like a dog. And as I con-
tinually fed it, the creature became so loving, so
gentle, and so fond, that it became from that time
one of my domestics also, and would never leave
me afterwards.

The rainy season of the autumnal equinox was
88 ROBINSON CRUSOE

now come, and I kept the 30th of September in
the same solemn manner as before, being the anni-
versary of my landing on the island, having now
been there two years, and no more prospect of be-
ing delivered than the first day I came there. I
spent the whole day in humble and thankful ac-
knowledgments of the many wonderful mercies
which my solitary condition was attended with,
and without which it might have been infinitely
more miserable.

Thus I began my third year; and though I have
not given the reader the trouble of so particular
account of my works this year as the first, yet in
general it may be observed that I was very seldom
idle, but having regularly divided my time, accord-
ing to the several daily employments that were
before me, such as, first, my duty to God, and the
reading the Scriptures, which I constantly set
apart some time for, thrice every day; secondly,
the going abroad with my gun for food, which
generally took me up three hours in every morning,
when it did not rain; thirdly, the ordering, cur-
ing, preserving, and cooking what I had killed or
catched for my supply; these took up a great part of
the day; also, it is to be considered that the middle
of the day, when the sun was in the zenith, the vio-
lence of the heat was too great to stir out; so that
about four hours in the evening was all the time I
could be supposed to work in, with this exception,
that sometimes I changed my hours of hunting and
ROBINSON CRUSOE 89

working, and went to work in the morning, and
abroad with my gun in the afternoon. |

I was now, in the months of November and De-
cember, expecting my crop of barley and rice. The
ground I had manured or dug up for them was not
great; for as I observed, my seed of each was not
above the quantity of half a peck; for I had lost
one whole crop by sowing in the dry season. But
now my crop promised very well, when on a sud-
den I found I was in danger of losing it all again
by enemies of several sorts, which it was scarce
possible to keep from it; as, first the goats and
wild creatures which I called hares, who, tasting
the sweetness of the blade, lay in it night and day,
as soon as it came up, and ate it so close, that it
could get no time to shoot up into stalk.

This I saw no remedy for but by making an en-
closure about it with a hedge, which I did with a
great deal of toil, and the more, because it required
speed. However, as my arable land was but small,
Suited to my crop, I got it totally well fenced in
about three weeks’ time, and shooting some of the
creatures in the daytime, I set my dog to guard it
in the night.

But as the beasts ruined me before while my corn
was in the blade, so the birds were as likely to
ruin me now when it was in the ear; for going
along by the place to see how it throve, I saw my
little crop surrounded with fowls, of I know not
how many sorts, who stood, as it were, watching
90 ROBINSON CRUSOE

till I should be gone. I immediately let fly among
them, for I always had my gun with me. I had
no sooner shot, but there rose up a little cloud of
fowls, which I had not seen at all, from among the
corn itself. For as I walked off, as if I was gone,
I was no sooner out of their sight but they dropped
down, one by one, into the corn again. I was so
provoked, that I could not have patience to stay
till more came on, knowing that every grain that
they ate now was, as it might be said, a peck-loaf
to me in the consequence; but coming up to the
hedge, I fired again, and killed three of them.
This was what I wished for; so I took them up,
and served them as we serve notorious thieves in
England, viz., hanged them in chains, for a terror
to others. It is impossible to imagine almost that
this should have such an effect as it had, for the
fowls would not only not come at the corn, but, in
short, they forsook all that part of the island, and
I could never see a bird near the place as long as
my scare-crows hung there.

This I was very glad of, you may be sure; and
about the latter end of December, which was our
second harvest of the year, I reaped my crop.

I was sadly put to it for a scythe or a sickle to
cut it down, and all I could do was to make one as
well as I could out of one of the broadswords, or
cutlasses, which I saved among the arms out of
the ship. However, as my first crop was but small,
I cut nothing off but the ears, and carried it away
ROBINSON CRUSOE 91

in a great basket which I had made, and so rubbed
it out with my hands; and at the end of all my har-
vesting, I found that out of my half peck of seed
I had near two bushels of rice, and above two
bushels and a half of barley, that is to say, by my
guess, for I had no measure at that time.

However, this was a great encouragement to me,
and I foresaw that, in time, it would please God to
supply me with bread. And yet here I was per-
plexed again, for I neither knew how to grind or
make meal of my corn, or indeed how to clean it
and part it; nor, if made into meal, how to make
bread of it, and if how to make it, yet I knew not
how to bake it. These things being added to my
desire of having a good quantity for store, and to
secure a constant supply, I resolved not to taste
any of this crop, but to preserve it all for seed
against the next season, and in the meantime, to
employ all my study in hours of working to accom-
plish this great work of providing myself with corn
and bread.

It might be truly said, that now I worked for my
bread. ’Tis a little wonderful, and what I believe
few people have thought much upon, viz., the
strange multitude of little things necessary in the
providing, producing, curing, dressing, making,
and finishing this one article of bread.

I, that was reduced to a mere state of nature,
found this to my daily discouragement, and was
made more and more sensible of it every hour, even
92 ROBINSON CRUSOE

after I had got the first handful of seed-corn,
which, as I have said, came up unexpectedly, and
indeed to a surprise.

First, I had no plough to turn up the earth, no
spade or shovel to dig it. Well, this I conquered



by making a wooden spade, as I observed before,
but this did my work in but a wooden manner; and
though it cost me a great many days to make it,
yet, for want of iron, it not only wore out the
Sooner, but made my work the harder, and made it
be performed much worse.
ROBINSON CRUSOE 93

When the corn was sowed, I had no harrow, but
was forced to go over it myself, and drag a great
heavy bough of a tree over it, to scratch it, as it
may be called, rather than rake or harrow it.

When it was growing and grown, I have ob-
served already how many things I wanted to fence
it, secure it, mow or reap it, cure and carry it
home, thrash, part it from the chaff, and save it.
Then I wanted a mill to grind it, sieves to dress it,
yeast and salt to make it into bread, and an oven to
bake it, and yet all these things I did without, as
shall be observed; and yet the corn was an ines-
timable comfort and advantage to me, too. All
this, as I said, made everything laborious and te-
dious to me, but that there was no help for;
neither was my time so much loss to me, because,
as I Lad divided it, a certain part of it was every
day appointed to these works, and as I resolved
to use none of the corn for bread till I hada greater
quantity by me, I had the next six months to apply
myself wholly, by labor and invention, to furnish
myself with utensils proper for the performing all
the operations necessary for the making the corn,
when I had it, fit for my use.

But first I was to prepare more land, for I had
now seed enough to sow above an acre of ground.
Before I did this, I had a week’s work at least to
make me a spade, which, when it was done, was but
a sorry one indeed, and very heavy, and required
double labor to work with it. However, I went
through that, and sowed my seed in two large flat
94 ROBINSON CRUSOE

pieces of ground, as near my house as I could find
them to my mind, and fenced them in with a good
hedge, the stakes of which were all cut of that wood
which I had set before, and knew it would grow;
so that in one year’s time I knew I should have a
quick or living hedge, that would want but little
repair. This work was not so little as to take me
up less than three months, because a great part of
that time was of the wet season, when I could not
go abroad.

Within doors, that is, when it rained, and I
could not go out, I found employment on the fol-
lowing occasions; always observing, that all the
while I was at work, I diverted myself talking to
my parrot, and teaching him to speak, and I quickly
taught him to know his own name, and at last to
speak it out pretty loud, “Poll,” which wus the
first word I ever heard spoken in the island by any
mouth but my own. This, therefore, was not my
work, but an assistant to my work; for now, as I
said, I had a great employment upon my hands, as
follows, viz., I had long studied, by some means
or other, to make myself some earthen vessels,
which indeed I wanted sorely, but knew not where
to come at them. However, considering the heat
of the climate, I did not doubt but if I could find
out any such clay, I might botch up some such pot
as might, being dried in the sun, be hard enough
and strong enough to bear handling, and to hold
anything that was dry, and required to be kept so;
and as this was necessary in the preparing corn,
ROBINSON CRUSOE 95

meal, etc., which was the thing I was upon, I re-
solved to make some as large as I could, and fit
only to stand like jars, to hold what should be
put into them.

It would make the reader pity me, or rather
laugh at me, to tell how many awkward ways I
took to raise this paste; what odd, misshapen, ugly
things I made; how many of them fell in, and how
many fell out, the clay not being stiff enough to
bear its own weight; how many cracked by the
over-violent heat of the sun, being set out too
hastily; and how many fell in pieces with only re-
moving, as well before as after they were dried;
and, in a word, how, after having labored hard to
find the clay, to dig it, to temper it, to bring it
home, and work it, I could not make above two
large earthen ugly things (I cannot call them jars)
in about two months’ labor.

Though I miscarried so much in my design for
large pots, yet I made several smaller things with
better success; such as little round pots, flat dishes,
pitchers, and pipkins, and any things my hand
turned to; and the heat of the sun baked them
strangely hard. But all this would not answer my
end, which was to get an earthen pot to hold what
was liquid, and bear the fire, which none of these
could do. It happened after some time, making
a pretty large fire for cooking my meat, when I
went to put it out after I had done with it, I found
a broken piece of one of my earthenware vessels
in the fire, burnt as hard as a stone, and red as a

7
96 ROBINSON CRUSOE

tile. I was agreeably surprised to see it, and said
to myself, that certainly they might be made to
burn whole, if they would burn broken.





&

Uy
S$ Za




This set me to studying how to order my fire, so
as to make it burn me some pots. I had no notion
ROBINSON CRUSOE 97

of a kiln, such as the potters burn in, or glazing
them with lead, though I had some lead to do it
with; but I placed three large pipkins, and two or
three pots in a pile, one upon another, and placed
my firewood all round it, with a great heap of em-
bers under them. I plied the fire with fresh fuel
round the outside, and upon the top, till I saw the
pots in the inside red-hot quite through, and ob-
served that they did not crack at all. When I saw
them clear red, I Jet them stand in that heat about
five or six hours, till I found one of them, though it
did not crack, did melt or run, for the sand which
was mixed with the clay melted by the violence of
the heat, and would have run into glass, if I had
gone on; so I slacked my fire gradually till the pots
began to abate of the red color; and watching them
all night, that I might not let the fire abate too fast,
in the morning I had three very good, I will not
say handsome, pipkins, and two other earthen pots,
as hard burnt as could be desired, and one of them
perfectly glazed with the running of the sand.

No joy at a thing of so mean a nature was ever
equal to mine, when I found I had made an earthen
pot that would bear the fire; and had hardly pa-
tience to stay till they were cold, before I set one
upon the fire again, with some water in it, to boil
me some meat, which it did admirably well; and
with a piece of a kid I made some very good broth.

My next concern was to get me a stone mortar
to stamp or beat some corn in. I spent many a day
to find out a great stone big enough to cut hollow,
98 ROBINSON CRUSOE

and make fit fora mortar, and could find none at
all, except what was in the solid rock, and which I
had no way to dig or cut out; nor indeed were the
rocks in the island of hardness sufficient, but were
all of a sandy crumbling stone, which neither would
bear the weight of a heavy pestle, or would break
the corn without filling it with sand. So, after a
great deal of time lost in searching for a stone, I
gave it over, and resolved to look out for a great
block of hard wood, which I found indeed much
easier; and getting one as big as I had strength to
stir, I rounded it, and formed it in the outside with
my axe and hatchet, and then, with the help of fire,
and infinite labor, made a hollow place in it, as the
Indians in Brazil made their canoes. After this,
I made a great heavy pestle, or beater, of the wood
called the iron-wood; and this I prepared and laid
by against I had my next crop of corn, when I pro-
posed to myself to grind, or rather pound, my corn
into meal, to make my bread.

The baking part was the next thing to be con-
sidered, and how I should make bread when I
came to have corn; for, first, I had no yeast. As
to that part, as there was no Supplying the want,
so I did not concern myself much about it; but for
an oven I was indeed in great pain. At length I
found out an experiment for that also, which was
this: I made some earthen vessels very broad, but
not deep, that is to say, about two feet diameter,
and not above nine inches deep; these I burned
in the fire, as I had done the other, and laid them
ROBINSON CRUSOE 99

by; and when I wanted to bake, I made a great
fire upon my hearth, which I had paved with some
square tiles, of my own making and burning also;
but I should not call them square.

When the firewood was burned pretty much into
embers, or live coals, I drew them forward upon
this hearth, so as to cover it all over, and there I
let them lie till the hearth was very hot; then
sweeping away all the entbers, I set down my loaf,
or loaves, and whelming down the earthen pot upon
them, drew the embers all round the outside of the
pot, to keep in and add to the heat. And thus I
baked my barley-loaves.

It need not be wondered at if all these things
took me up most part of the third year of my abode
here; for it is to be observed, that in the intervals
of these things I had my new harvest and hus-
bandry to manage; for I reaped my corn in its sea-
son, and carried it home as well as I could, and
laid it up in the ear, in my large baskets, till I had
time to rub it out, for I had no floor to thrash it
on, or instrument to thrash it with.

And now, indeed, my stock of corn increasing, I
really wanted to build my barns bigger. I wanted
a place to lay it up in, for the increase of the corn
now yielded me so much that I had of the barley
about twenty bushels, and of the rice as much, or
more, insomuch that now I resolved to begin to
use it freely; for my bread had been quite gone a
great while.

Upon the whole, I found that the forty bushels
100 ROBINSON CRUSOE

of barley and rice was much more than I could
consume in a year; so I resolved to sow just the
sane quantity every year that I sowed the last, in
hopes that such a quantity would fully provide me
with bread, ete.

All the while these things were doing, you may
be sure my thoughts ran many times upon the
prospect of land which I had seen from the other
side of the island, and I was not without secret
wishes that I were on shore there, fancying the
Seeing the mainland, and in an inhabited country,
I might find some way or other to convey myself
farther, and perhaps at last find some means of
escape.

Now I wished for my boy Xury, and the long-
boat with the shoulder-of-mutton sail, with which
I sailed above a thousand miles on the coast of
Africa; but this was in vain.

This at length put me upon thinking whether it
was not possible to make myself a canoe, or peri-
agua, such as the natives of those climates make,
even without tools, or, as I might say, without
hand, viz., of the trunk of a great tree.

I went to work upon this boat the most like a
fool that ever man did who had any of his senses
awake. I pleased myself with the design, without
cetermining whether I was ever able to undertake
it. Not but that the difficulty of launching my
boat came often into my head; but I put a stop to
my own inquiries into it, by this foolish answer
ROBINSON CRUSOE 101

which I gave myself, “Let’s first make it; I’ll war-
rant P’ll find some way or other to get it along
when ’tis done.”

This was a most preposterous method; but the



eagerness of my fancy prevailed, and to work I
went. I felled a cedar tree: I question much
whether Solomon ever had such a one for the build-
ing of the Temple at Jerusalem. It was five feet
ten inches diameter at the lower part next the
stump, and four feet eleven inches diameter at
the end of twenty-two feet, after which it lessened
102 ROBINSON CRUSOE

for a while, and then parted into branches. It
was not without infinite labor that I felled this
tree. I was twenty days hacking and hewing at
it at the bottom; I was fourteen more getting the
branches and limbs, and the vast spreading head
of it cut off, which I hacked and hewed through
with axe and hatchet, and inexpressible labor.
After this, it cost me a month to shape it and dub
it to a proportion, and to something like the bot-
tom of a boat, that it might swim upright as it
ought to do. It cost me near three months more
to clear the inside, and work it so as to make an ex-
act boat of it. This I did, indeed, without fire,
by mere mallet and chisel, and by the dint of hard
labor, till I had brought it to be a very handsome
periagua and big enough to have carried six and
twenty men, and consequently big enough to have
carried me and all my cargo.

When I had gone through this work, I was ex-
tremely delighted with it. Many a weary stroke it
had cost, you may be sure; and there remained
nothing but to get it into the water.

But all my devices to get it into the water failed
me, though they cost me infinite labor too. It lay
about one hundred yards from the water, and not
more; but the first inconvenience was, it was up-
hill towards the creek. Well, to take away this
discouragement, I resolved to dig into the surface
of the earth, and so make a declivity. This I be-
gan, and it cost me a prodigious deal of pains; but
who grudges pains, that have their deliverance in
ROBINSON CRUSOE 103

view? But when this was worked through, and
this difficulty managed, it was still much at one,
for I could not stir the canoe.

Then I measured the distance of ground, and re-
solved to cut a dock or canal, to bring the water
up to the canoe, seeing I could not bring the canoe
down to the water. Well, I began this work; and
when I began to enter into it, and calculate how
deep it was to be dug, how broad, how the stuff to
be thrown out, I found that by the number of
hands I had, being none but my own, it must have
been ten or twelve years before I should have gone
through with it; for the shore lay high, so that at
the upper end it must have been at least twenty
feet deep; so at length, though with great reluc-
tancy, I gave this attempt over also.

This grieved me heartily; and now I saw, though
too late, the folly of beginning a work before we
count the cost, and before we judge rightly of our
own strength to go through with it.

In the middle of this work I finished my fourth
year in this place, and kept my anniversary with
the same devotion as before.

I had now been here so long, that many things
which I brought on shore for my help were either
quite gone, or very much wasted, and near spent.
My ink, as I observed, had been gone for some
time, all but a very little, which I eked out with
water, a little and a little, till it was so pale it
scarce left any appearance of black upon the paper.
As long as it lasted, I made use of it to minute
104 ROBINSON CRUSOE

down the days of the month on which any remark-
able thing happened to me.

My clothes began to decay, too, mightily. As to
linen, I had none a good while, except some check-
ered shirts which I found in the chests of the
other seamen, and which I carefully preserved, be-



cause many times I could bear no other clothes on
but a shirt; and it was a very great help to me that
I had, among all the men’s clothes of the ship, al-
most three dozen of shirts. There were also sev-
eral thick watch-coats of the seamen’s which were
ROBINSON CRUSOE 105

left indeed, but they were too hot to wear; and
though it is true that the weather was so violent
hot that there was no need of clothes, yet I could
not go quite naked, no, though I had been inclined
to it, which I was not nor could abide the thoughts
of it, though I was all alone.

The reason why I could not go quite naked was,
I could not bear the heat of the sun so well when
quite naked as with some clothes on; nay, the very
heat frequently blistered my skin; whereas, with a
shirt on, the air itself made some motion, and whis-
tling under that shirt, was twofold cooler than
without it. No more could I ever bring myself to
go out in the heat of the sun without a cap or hat.
The heat of the sun beating with such violence, as
it does in that place, would give me the headache
presently, by darting so directly on my head, with-
out a cap or hat on, so that I could not bear it.

Upon those views, I began to consider about put-
ting the few rags I had, which I called clothes,
into some order. I had worn out all the waist-
coats I had, and my business was now to try if I
could not make jackets out of the great watch-
coats which I had by me, and with such other ma-
terials as I had; so I set to work a-tailoring, or
rather, indeed, a-botching, for I made most piteous
work of it. However, I made shift to make me
two or three new waistcoats, which I hoped would
serve me a great while. |

I have mentioned that I saved the skins of all
the creatures that I killed, I mean four-footed ones,
106 ROBINSON CRUSOE

and I had hung them up stretched out with sticks
in the sun, by which means some of them were so
dry and hard that they were fit for little, but oth-
ers it seems were very useful. The first thing I
made of these was a great cap for my head, with
the hair on the outside, to shoot off the rain; and
this I performed so well, that after this I made
me a suit of clothes wholly of these skins, that is
to say, a waistcoat, and breeches open at the knees,
and both loose, for they were rather wanting to
keep me cool than to keep me warm. I must. not
omit to acknowledge that they were wretchedly
made; for if I was a bad carpenter, I was a worse
tailor. However, they were such as I made very
good shift with; and when I was abroad, if it hap-
pened to rain, the hair of my waistcoat and cap
being outermost, I was kept very dry.

After this I spent a great deal of time and pains
to make me an umbrella. I was indeed in great
want of one, and had a great mind to make one.
I had seen them made in the Brazils, where they
are very useful in the great heats which are there;
and I felt the heats every jot as great here, and
greater too, being nearer the equinox. Besides, as
I was obliged to be much abroad, it was a most
useful thing to me, as well for the rains as the
heats. I took a world of pains at it, and was a
great while before I could make anything likely to
hold; nay, after I thought I had hit the way, I
spoiled two or three before I made one to my mind;
but at last I made one that answered indifferently
ROBINSON CRUSOE 107

well. The main difficulty I found was to make it
to let down. I could make it to spread; but if it
did not let down too, and draw in, it was not
portable for me any way but just over my head,
which would not do. However, at last, as I said,
I made one to answer, and covered it with skins,

im Ma re

=



the hair upwards, so that it cast off the rains like
a pent-house, and kept off the sun so effectually
that I could walk out in the hottest of the weather
with greater advantage than I could before in the
coolest.

I cannot say that after this, for five years, any
extraordinary thing happened to me; but I lived on
in the same course, in the same posture and place,
just as before. The chief things I was employed
in, besides my yearly labor of planting my barley
108 ROBINSON CRUSOE

and rice, and curing my raisins, of ‘both which I
always kept up just enough to have sufficient stock
of one year’s provisions beforehand—I say, besides
this yearly labor, and my daily labor of going out
with my gun, I had one labor, to make me a canoe,
which at last I finished ; so that by digging a canal
to it of six feet wide, and four feet deep, I brought
it into the creek, almost half a mile. As for the
first, which was so vastly big, as I made it without
considering beforehand, as ‘T ought to do, how I
should be able to launch it; so, never being able to
bring it to the water, or bring the water to it, I
was obliged to let it lie where it was, as a memo-
randum to teach me to be wiser next time. In-
deed, the next time, though I could not get a tree
proper for it, and in a place where I could not get
the water to it at any less distance than near half
a mile, yet as I saw it was practicable at last, I
never gave it over; and though I was near two years
about it, yet I never grudged my labor, in hopes of
having a boat to go off to sea at last.

However, though my little periagua was finished,
yet the size of it was not at all answerable to the
design which I had in view when I made the first ;
I mean, of venturing over to the terra firma, where
it was above forty miles broad. Accordingly, the
smallness of my boat assisted to put an end to that
design, and now I thought no more of it. But as
I had a boat, my next design was to make a tour
round the island.

For this purpose, that I might do everything
ROBINSON CRUSOE 109

with discretion and consideration, I fitted up a
little mast to my boat, and made a sail to it out
of some of the pieces of the ship’s sail, which lay in
store, and of which I had a great stock by me.

Having fitted my mast and sail, and tried the
boat, I found she would sail very well. Then I
made little lockers, or boxes, at either end of my
boat, to put provisions, necessaries, and ammuni-
tion, etc., into, to be kept dry, either from rain
or the spray of the sea; and a little long hollow
place I cut in the inside of the boat, where I could
lay my gun, making a flap to hang down over it to
keep it dry.

I fixed my umbrella also in a step at the stern,
like a mast, to stand over my head, and keep the
heat of the sun off me, like an awning; and thus
T every now and then took a little voyage upon the
sea, but never went far out, nor far from the little
creek. But at last, being eager to view the circum-
ference of my little kingdom, I resolved upon my
tour; and accordingly I victualled my ship for the
voyage, putting in two dozen of my loaves (cakes I
should rather call them) of barley bread, an
earthen pot full of parched rice, a food I ate a great
deal of, a little bottle of rum, half a goat, and pow-
der and shot for killing more, and two large watch-
coats, of those which, as I mentioned before, I had
Saved out of the seamen’s chests; these I took, one
to lie upon, and the other to cover me in the night.

It was the 6th of November, in the sixth year of
my reign, or my captivity, which you please, that I
110 ROBINSON CRUSOE

set out on this voyage, and I found it much longer
than I expected; for though the island itself was
not very large, yet when I came to the east side
of it I found a great ledge of rocks lie out about
two leagues into the sea, some above water, some
under it, and beyond that a shoal of sand, lying
dry half a league more; so that I was obliged to
go a great way out to sea to double the point.

When first I discovered them, I was going to
give over my enterprise, and come back again, not
knowing how far it might oblige me to go out to
sea, and, above all, doubting how I should get back
again, so I came to an anchor; for I had made me
a kind of an anchor with a piece of a broken grap-
pling which I got out of the ship.

Waving secured my boat, I took my gun and
went on shore, climbing up upon a hill, which
Seemed to overlook that point, where I saw the
full extent of it, and resolved to venture.

In my viewing the sea from that hill, where I
stood, I perceived a strong, and indeed a most fu-
rious current, which ran to the east, and even came
close to the point; and I took the more notice of it,
because I saw that there might be some danger that
when I came into it I might be carried out to sea by
the strength of it, and not be able to make the
island again. And indeed, had I not gotten first
up upon this hill, I believe it would have been so;
for there was the same current on the other side
the island, only that it set off at a farther dis-
tance; and I saw there was a strong eddy under
ROBINSON CRUSOE 111

the shore; so I had nothing to do but to get in out
of the first current, and I should presently be in
an eddy.

I lay here, however, two days; because the wind,
blowing pretty fresh at E.S.E., and that being just
contrary to the said current, made a great breach
of the sea upon the point; so that it was not safe
for me to keep too close to the shore for the breach,
nor to go too far off because of the stream.

The third day, in the morning, the wind having
abated overnight, the sea was calm, and I ventured.
But I am a warning-piece again to all rash and
ignorant pilots; for no sooner was I come to the
point, when even I was not my boat’s length from
the shore, but I found myself in a great depth of
water, and a current like the sluice of a mill. It
carried my boat along with it with such violence
that all I could do could not keep her so much as
on the edge of it, but I found it hurried me farther
and farther out from the eddy, which was on my
left hand. There was no wind stirring to help me,
and all I could do with my paddles signified noth-
ing. And now I began to give myself over for lost;
for, as the current was on both sides the island, I
knew in a few leagues’ distance they must join
again, and then I was irrecoverably gone. Nor did
I see any possibility of avoiding it; so that I had
no prospect before me but of perishing; not by the
sea, for that was calm enough, but of starving for
hunger. I had indeed found a tortoise on the
shore, as big almost as I could lift, and had tossed

8
112 ROBINSON CRUSOE

it into the boat; and I had a great jar of fresh
water, that is to say, one of my earthen pots; but
what was all this to being driven into the vast
ocean, where there was no Shore, no mainland or
island, for a thousand leagues at least.

It is scarce possible to imagine the consternation
I was now in, being driven from my beloved island
(for so it appeared to me now to be) into the wide
ocean, almost two leagues, and in the utmost
despair of ever recovering it again. Ilowever, I
worked hard, till indeed my streneth was almost
exhausted, and kept my boat as much to the north-
ward, that is, towards the side of the current which
the eddy lay on, as possibly I could; when about
noon, as the sun passed the meridian, I thought I
felt a litle breeze of wind in my face, springing up
from the 8.8.6. This cheered my heart a little,
and especially when, in about half an hour more, it
blew a pretty small gentle gale. By this time I
was gotten at a frightful distance from the island;
and had the least cloud or hazy weather inter-
vened, I had been undone another way too; for I
had no compass on board, and should never have
known how to have steered towards the island if
I had but once lost sight of it. But the weather
continuing clear, I applied myself to get up my
mast again, and spread my sail, standing away to
the north as much as possible, to get out of the
current.

Just as I had set my mast and sail, and the boat
began to stretch away, I saw even by the clearness
ROBINSON CRUSOE 113

of the water some alteration of the current was
near; for where the current was so strong, the
water was foul. But perceiving the water clear, I
found the current abate, and presently I found to
the east, at about half a mile, a breach of the sea
upon some rocks. These rocks I found caused the
current to part again; and as the main stress of it
ran away more southerly, leaving the rocks to the
north-east, so the other returned by the repulse of
the rocks, and made a strong eddy, which ran back
again to the north-west with a very sharp stream.

They who know what it is to have a reprieve
brought to them upon the ladder, or to be rescued
from thieves just going to murder them, or who
have been in such like extremities, may guess what
my present surprise of joy was, and how gladly I
put my boat into the stream of this eddy; and the
wind also freshening, how gladly I spread my sail
to it, running cheerfully before the wind, and with
a strong tide or eddy under foot.

This eddy carried me about a league in my way
back again, directly towards the island, but about
two leagues more to the northward than the cur-
rent which carried me away at first; so that when
I came near the island, I found myself open to the
northern shore of it, that is to say, the other end of
the island, opposite to that which I went out from.

When I had made something more than a league
of way by the help of this current or eddy, I found
it was spent, and served me no farther. However,
I found that being between the two great currents,
114 ROBINSON CRUSOE

viz., that on the south side, which had hurried me
away, and that on the north, which lay about a
league on the other side; I say, between these two,
in the wake of the island, I found the water at least
still, and running no way; and having still a breeze
of wind fair for me, I kept on steering directly
for the island, though not making such fresh way
as I did before.

About four o’clock in the evening, being then
within about a league of the island, I found the
point of the rocks which occasioned this disaster
stretching out, as is described before, to the south-
ward, and casting off the current more south-
wardly had, of course, made another eddy to the
north, and this I found very Strong, but not di-
rectly setting the way my course lay, which was
due west, but almost full north. However, hav-
ing a fresh gale, I stretched across this eddy, slant-
ing north-west; and in about an hour came within
about a mile of the shore, where, it being smooth
water, I soon got to land.

When I was on shore, I fell on my knees, and
gave God thanks for my deliverance, resolving to
lay aside all thoughts of my deliverance by my
.boat; and refreshing myself with such things as I
had, I brought my boat close to the shore, in a little
cove that I had spied under some trees, and laid
me down to sleep, being quite spent with the labor
and fatigue of the voyage.

I was now at a great loss which way to get home
with my boat. I had run so much hazard, and
ROBINSON CRUSOE 115

knew too much the cause, to think of attempting it
by the way I went out; and what might be at the
other side (I mean the west side) I knew not, nor
had I any mind to run any more ventures. - So I
only resolved in the morning to make my way west-
ward along the shore, and to see if there was no
creek where I might lay up my frigate in safety,
So as to have her again if I wanted her. In about
three miles, or thereabouts, coasting the shore, I
came to a very good inlet or bay, about a mile over,
which narrowed till it came to a very little rivulet
or brook, where I found a very convenient harbor
for my boat, and where she lay as if she had been
in a little dock made on purpose for her. Here I
put in, and having stowed my boat very safe, I
went on shore to look about me, and see where I
was.

I soon found I had but a little passed by the
place where I had been before, when I travelled on
foot to that shore; so taking nothing out of my boat
but my gun and my umbrella, for it was exceed-
ingly hot, I began my march. The way was com-
fortable enough after such a voyage as I had been
upon, and I reached my old bower in the evening,
where I found everything standing as I left it.

I got over the fence, and laid me down in the
shade to rest my limbs, for I was very weary, and
fell asleep. But judge you, if you can, that read
my story, what a surprise I must be in, when I was
waked out of my sleep by a voice calling me by my ~
name several times, “Robin, Robin, Robin Crusoe,
116 ROBINSON CRUSOE

poor Robin Crusoe! Where are you, Robin
Crusoe? Where have you been?”

I was so dead asleep at first, being fatigued with
rowing, or paddling, as it is called, the first part of
the day, and with walking the latter part, that I
did not wake thoroughly ; but dozing between sleep-
ing and waking, thought I dreamed that somebody
spoke to me. But as the voice continued to repeat
“Robin Crusoe, Robin Crusoe,” at last I began to
wake more perfectly, and was at first dreadfully
frighted, and started up in the utmost consterna-
tion. But no sooner were my eyes open, but I saw
my Poll sitting on the top of the hedge, and imme-
diately knew that it was he that spoke to me; for
just in such bemoaning language I had used to
talk to him, and teach him; and he had learned it
so perfectly, that he would sit upon my finger, and
lay his bill close to my face, and ery, “Poor Robin
Crusoe! Where are you? Where have you been?
How came you here?” and such things as I had
taught him.

However, even though I knew it was the parrot,
and that indeed it could be nobody else, it was a
good while before I could compose myself. First,
I was amazed how the creature got thither, and
then, how he should just keep about the place, and
nowhere else. But as I was well satisfied it could
be nobody but honest Poll, I got it over; and hold-
ing out my hand, and calling him by his name,
Poll, the sociable creature, came to me, and sat
upon my thumb, as he used to do, and continued
ROBINSON CRUSOE 117

talking to me, “Poor Robin Crusoe! and how did
I come here; and where had I been?” just as if he
had been overjoyed to see me again; and so I car-
ried him home along with me.

I had now enough of rambling to sea and for
nearly a year lived a very sedate, retired life, as
you may well suppose; and my thoughts being very
much composed as to my condition, and fully com-
forted in resigning myself to the dispositions of
Providence, I thought I lived really very happily
in all things, except that of society.

I improved myself in this time in all the me-
chanic exercises which my necessities put me upon
applying myself to, and I believe could, upon oc-
casion, make a very good carpenter, especially con-
sidering how few tools I had. Besides this, I ar-
rived at an unexpected perfection in my earthen-
ware, and contrived well enough to make them
with a wheel, which I found infinitely easier and
better, because I made things round and shapable
which before were filthy things indeed to look on. —
But I think I was never more vain of my own per-
formance, or more joyful for anything I found out,
than for my being able to make a tobacco-pipe.
And though it was a very ugly, clumsy thing when
it was done, and only burnt red, like other earthen-
ware, yet as it was hard and firm, and would draw
the smoke, I was exceedingly comforted with it;
for I had been always used to smoke.

I began now to perceive my powder abated con-
siderably, and this was a want which it was impos-
118 ROBINSON CRUSOE

sible for me to supply, and I began seriously to
consider what I must do when I should have no
more powder; that is to say, how I should do to
kill any goats. I had, as is observed, in the third
year of my being here kept a young kid, and bred
her up tame, and I was in hope of getting a he-
goat. But I could not by any means bring it to
pass, till my kid grew an old goat; and I could
never find in my heart to kill her, till she died at
last of mere age.

But being now in the eleventh year of my resi-
dence, and, as I have said, my ammunition grow-
ing low, I set myself to study some art to trap and
snare the goats, to see whether I could not catch
some of them alive; and particularly, I wanted a
she-goat great with young.

To this purpose, I made snares to hamper them,
but my tackle was not good, for I had no wire,
and I always found them broken, and my bait de-
voured. At length I resolved to try a pitfall; so I
dug several large pits in the earth, in places where
I had observed the goats used to feed, and over
these pits I placed hurdles, of my own making too,
with a great weight upon them; and several times
I put ears of barley and dry rice, without setting
the trap, and I could easily perceive that the goats
had gone in and eaten up the corn, for I could see
the mark of their feet. At length I set three traps
in one night, and going the next morning, I found
them all standing, and yet the bait eaten and gone;
this was very discouraging. However, I altered




Fp" ASS

oe

x

Very often I would carry them some ears of barley or a
handful of rice, and feed them out of my hand.
120 ROBINSON CRUSOE

my trap; and, not to trouble you with particulars,
going one morning to see my trap, I found in one
of them a large old he-goat, and in one of the other
three kids, a male and two females.

As to the old one, I knew not what to do with
him, he was so fierce I durst not go into the pit to
him; so I even let him out, and he ran away, as if
he had been frightened out of his wits. But I had
forgotten then what I learned afterwards, that
hunger will tame a lion. Then I went to the three
kids, and taking them one by one, I tied them with
strings together, and with some difficulty brought
them all home. It was a good while before they
would feed, but throwing them some sweet corn, it
tempted them, and they began to be tame.

But then it presently occurred to me that I must
keep the tame from the wild, or else they would al-
ways run wild when they grew up; and the only
way for this was to have some enclosed piece of
ground, well fenced either with hedge or pale, to
keep them in so effectually that those within might
not break out, or those without break in.

This was a great undertaking for one pair of
hands; yet as I saw there was an absolute necessity
of doing it, my first piece of work was to find out a
proper piece of ground, viz., where there was likely
to be herbage for them to eat, water for them to
drink, and cover to keep them from the sun.

I resolved to enclose a piece of about 150 yards
in length, and 100 yards in breadth, and I went to
work with courage. I was about three months at
ROBINSON CRUSOE 121

the task, and, till I had done it, I tethered the three
kids in the best part of it, and used them to feed
as near me as possible, to make them familiar; and
very often I would go and carry them some ears of
barley, or a handful of rice, and feed them out of
my hand; so that after my enclosure was finished,
and I let them loose, they would follow me up and
down, bleating after me for a handful of corn.

This answered my end, and in about a year and
half I had a flock of about twelve goats, kids and
all; and in two years more I had three and forty,
besides several that I took and killed for my food.
And after that I enclosed five several pieces of
ground to feed them in, with little pens to drive
them into, to take them as I wanted, and gates out
of one piece of ground into another.

But this was not all, for now I not only had
goat’s flesh to feed on when I pleased, but milk too,
a thing which, indeed, in my beginning, I did not
so much as think of, and which, when it came into
my thoughts, was really an agreeable surprise.
For now I set up my dairy, and made both butter
and cheese.

It would have made a stoic smile to have seen
me and my little family sit down to dinner. There
was my majesty, the prince and lord of the whole
island; I had the lives of all my subjects at my ab-
solute command. I could hang, draw, give liberty,
and take it away; and no rebels among all my sub-
jects.

Then to see how like a king I dined, too, all
122 ROBINSON CRUSOE

alone, attended by my servants. Poll, as if he had
been my favorite, was the only person permitted to
talk to me. My dog, who was now grown very old
and crazy, and had found no species to multiply
his kind upon, sat always at my right hand, and
two cats, one on one side the table, and one on the
other, expecting now and then a bit from my hand,
as a mark of special favor.

But these were not the two eats which I brought
on shore at first, for they were both of them dead.
But one of them having multiplied by I know not
what kind of creature, these were two which I
had preserved tame, whereas the rest ran wild in
the woods, and became indeed troublesome to me
at last. With this attendance, and in this plenti-
ful manner, I lived; neither could I be said to want
anything but society; and of that in some time
after this, 1 was like to have too much.

I was something impatient, as T have observed,
to have the use of my boat, though very loth to run
ainy hazards; and therefore sometimes I sat con-
triving ways to get her about the island. This in-
clination increased upon me every day, and at
length I resolved to travel babi by land, follow-
ing the edge of the shore. I did so; but had any
one in England been to meet such a man as I was,
it must either have frighted them, or raised a great
deal of laughter. Be pleased to take a sketch of
my figure, as follows.

YT had a great high shapeless cap, made of a
goat's skin, with a flap hanging down behind, as
ROBINSON CRUSOE 123

well to keep the sun from me, as to shoot the rain
off from running into my neck.

I had a short jacket of goat's skin, the skirts
coming down to about the middle of my thighs;
and a pair of open-kneed breeches of the same.
The breeches were made of the skin of an old he-
goat, whose hair hung down such a length on
either side, that, like pantaloons, it reached to the
middle of my legs. Stockings and shoes I had
none, but had made me a pair of somethings, I
scarce knew what to call them, like buskins, to
flap over my legs and lace on either side like
spatterdashes,

I had on a broad belt of goat’s skin dried, and
in a kind of a frog on either side of this hung a
little saw and a hatchet. I had another belt, not
so broad, which hung over my shoulder; and at
the end of it, under my left arm, hung two pouches,
both made of goat’s skin too; in one of which hung
my powder, in the other my shot. At my back I
carried my basket, on my shoulder my gun, and
over my head a great clumsy ugly goat-skin um-
brella, but which, after all, was the most necessary
thing I had about me, next to my gun. As for my
face, the color of it was really not so mulatto-like
as one might expect from a man not at all careful
of it, and living within nineteen degrees of the
equinox. My beard I had cut pretty short, except
what grew on my upper lip, which I had trimmed
into a large pair of Mohometan whiskers, such as
I had seen worn by some Turks at Sallee.
124 ROBINSON CRUSOE

In this kind of figure I went my new journey,
and was out five or six days. I travelled first
along the sea-shore, directly to the place where I
first brought my boat to an anchor, to get up upon
the rocks. And having no boat now to take care
of, I went over the land, a nearer way, to the same
height that I was upon before; when, looking for-
ward to the point of the rocks which lay out, and
which I was obliged to double with my boat, as is
said above, I was surprised to see the sea all
smooth and quiet, no rippling, no motion, no eur-
rent, any more there than in other places.

lurther observations convinced me J] might
very easily bring my boat about the island again.
But when T began to think of putting it in prac-
tice, I had such a terror upon my spirits at the re-
membrance of the danger I had been in, that I
could not think of it again with any patience; but,
on the contrary, [ took up another resolution,
which was more safe, though more laborious; and
this was, that I would build, or rather make me
another periagua or canoe; and so have one for
one side of the island, and one for the other.

You are to understand that now I had, as I may
call it, two plantations in the island; one, my little
fortitication or tent, with the wall about it, under
the rock, with the cave behind me, which, by this
time, I had enlarged into several apartments or
caves, one within another.

As for my wall, made, as before, with long stakes
or piles, those piles grew all like trees, and were
ROBINSON CRUSOE 125

by this time grown so big, and spread so very much,
that there was not the least appearance, to any
one’s view, of any habitation behind them.

Besides this, I had my country seat, and I had
now a tolerable plantation there also; for, first, I
had my little bower, as I called it, which I kept in
repair; that is to say, I kept the hedge which cir-
cled it in constantly fitted up to its usual height,
the ladder standing always in the inside. In the
middle of this, I had my tent always standing and
under this I had made me a squab or couch, with
the skins of the creatures I had killed; and here,
whenever I had occasion to be absent from my
chief seat, I took up my country habitation.

Adjoining to this I had my enclosures for my
cattle, that is to say, my goats. And as I had
taken an inconceivable deal of pains to fence and
enclose this ground, so I was so uneasy to see it
kept entire, lest the goats should break through,
that I never left off till, with infinite labor, I had
stuck the outside of the hedge so full of small
stakes, and so near to one another, that it was
rather a pale than hedge, and there was scarce
room to put a hand through between them.

This will testify for me that I was not idle, and
that I spared no pains to bring to pass whatever
appeared necessary for my comfortable support;
for I considered the keeping up a breed of tame
creatures thus that at my hand would be a living
magazine of flesh, milk, butter, and cheese for me
as long as I lived in the place.
126 ROBINSON CRUSOE

In this place also I had my grapes growing,
which I principally depended on for my winter
store of raisins, and which I never failed to pre-
serve very carefully, as the best and most agreeable



Ree
QI LS

“>?

dainty of my whole diet. And indeed they were
not agreeable only, but physical, wholesome, nour
ishing, and refreshing to the last degree.

I used frequently to visit my boat, and I kept all
things about, or belonging to her, in very good
order. Sometimes I went out in her to divert my:
ROBINSON CRUSOE 127

self, but scarce ever above a stone’s cast or two
from the shore. But now I come to a new scene
of my life.

It happened one day about noon, going towards
my boat, I was exceedingly surprised with the
print of a man’s naked foot on the shore, which
was very plain to be seen in the sand. I stood
like one thunderstruck. I listened, I looked round
me, I could hear nothing, nor see anything. I
went up to a rising ground, to look farther. I.
went up the shore, and down the shore, but it was
all one; I could see no other impression but that
one. I went to it again to see if there were any
more, and to observe if it might not be my fancy;
but there was no room for that, for there was ex-
actly the very print of a foot—toes, heel, and every
part of a foot. But after innumerable fluttering
thoughts, like a man perfectly confused and out
of myself, I came home to my fortification, terri-
fied to the last degree, looking behind me at every
two or three steps, mistaking every bush and tree,
and fancying every stump at a distance to be a
man.

When I came to my castle, for so I think I
called it ever after this, I fled into it like one pur-
sued. Whether I went over by the ladder, as first
contrived, or went in at the hole in the rock, which
I called a door, I cannot remember; no, nor could
I remember the next morning, for never frighted
hare fled to cover, or fox to earth, with more terror
of mind than I to this retreat.

9
128 ROBINSON CRUSOE

I slept none that night. The farther I was from
the occasion of my fright, the greater my appre-
hensions were; which is something contrary to the
nature of such things, and especially to the usual



practice of all creatures in fear. Sometimes I
fancied it must be the devil, and reason joined in
with me upon this supposition; for how should any
other thing in human shape come into the place?
Where was the vessel that brought them? What
marks were there of any other footsteps? And
how was it possible a man should come there?
ROBINSON CRUSOE 129

I presently concluded then, that it must be some
more dangerous creature, viz., that it must be some
of the savages of the mainland over against me,
who had wandered out to sea in their canoes, and,
either driven by the currents or by contrary winds,
had made the island, and had been on shore, but
were gone away again to sea, being as loth, per-
haps, to have stayed in this desolate island as I
would have been to have had them.

While these reflections were rolling upon my
mind, I was very thankful in my thoughts that I
was so happy as not to be thereabouts at that time,
or that they did not see my boat, by which they
would have concluded that some inhabitants had
been in the place, and perhaps have searched far-
ther for me. Then terrible thoughts racked my
imagination about their having found my boat,
and that there were people here; and that if so, I
should certainly have them come again in greater
numbers, and devour me; and if it should happen
so that they should not find me, yet they would
find my enclosure, destroy all my corn, carry away
all my flock of tame goats, and I should perish at
last for mere want.

How strange a checker-work of Providence is
the life of man! and by what secret differing
springs are the affections hurried about as differ-
ing circumstances present! To-day we love what
to-morrow we hate; to-day we seek what to-morrow
we shun; to-day we desire what to-morrow we fear;
nay, even tremble at the apprehensions of. This
130 ROBINSON CRUSOE

was exemplified in me, at this time, in the most
lively manner imaginable; for I, whose only afflic-
tion was that I seemed banished from human go-
ciety, that I was alone, circumscribed by the
boundless ocean, cut off from mankind, and con-
demned to what I called silent life; that I was as
one whom Heaven thought not worthy to be num-
bered among the living, or to appear among the
rest of His creatures; that to have seen one of my
own species would have seemed. to me a raising me
from death to life, and the greatest blessing that
Ileaven itself, next to the supreme blessing of sal-
vation, could bestow; I say, that IT should now
tremble at the very apprehensions of seeing a
man, and was ready to sink into the ground at but
the shadow or silent appearance of a man’s having
set his foot in the island!

These thoughts took me up many hours, days,
nay, I may say, weeks and months; and one par-
ticular effect of my cogitations on this occasion I
cannot omit, viz., one morning early, lying in my
bed, and filled with thought about my danger
from the appearance of savages, I found it discom-
posed me very much; upon which those words of
the Scripture came into my thoughts, “Call upon
Me in the day of trouble, and I will deliver, and
thou shalt glorify Me.”

Upon this, rising cheerfully out of my bed, my
heart was not only comforted, but I was guided
and encouraged to pray earnestly to God for de-
liverance. When I had done praying, I took up
ROBINSON CRUSOE 131

my Bible, and opening it to read, the first words
that presented to me were, “Wait on the Lord, and
be of good cheer, and He shall strengthen thy
heart; wait, I say, on the Lord.” It is impossible
to express the comfort this gave me. In answer,
I thankfully laid down the book, and was no more
sad, at least, not on that occasion.

In the middle of these cogitations, apprehen-
sions, and reflections, it came into my thought one
day, that all this might be a mere chimera of my
own; and that this foot might be the print of my
own foot, when I came on shore from the boat.
This cheered me up a little too, and I began to per-
suade myself it was all a delusion, that it was
nothing else but my own foot.

Now I began to take courage, and to peep
abroad again, for I had not stirred out of my cas-
tle for three days and nights, so that I began to
starve for provision; for I had little or nothing
within doors but some barley-cakes and water.
Then I knew that my goats wanted to be milked
too, which usually was my evening diversion; and
the poor creatures were in great pain and incon-
venience for want of it; and, indeed, it almost
spoiled some of them, and almost dried up their
milk,

I went down to my flock two or three days, and
having seen nothing, I began to be a little bolder,
and to think there was really nothing in it but my
own imagination. But I could not persuade my- .
self fully of this till I should go down to the shore
132 ROBINSON CRUSOE

again, and when I came to measure the mark with
my own foot, I found my own foot not so large by
a great deal. This filled my head with new imag-
inations, and gave me the vapors again to the high-
est degree; so that I shook with cold, like one in
an ague; and I went home again, filled with the
belief that some man or men had been on shore
there. What course to take for my security, I
knew not.

This confusion of my thoughts kept me waking
all night, but in the morning I fell asleep; and
having, by the amusement of my mind, been, as it
were, tired, and my spirits exhausted, I slept very
soundly, and waked much better composed than I
had ever been before. And now I began to think
sedately; and upon the utmost debate with myself,
I concluded that this island, which was so exceed-
ing pleasant, fruitful, and no farther from the
mainland than as I had seen, was not so entirely
abandoned as I might imagine; that although there
were no stated inhabitants who lived on the spot,
yet that there might sometimes come boats off
from the shore, who, either with design, or perhaps
never but when they were driven by cross winds,
might come to this place; that I had lived here
fifteen years now, and had not met with the least
shadow or figure of any people yet; and that if at
any time they should be driven here, it was prob-
able they went away again as soon as ever they
could, seeing they had never thought fit to fix there
upon any occasion to this time; that the most I
ROBINSON CRUSOE 133

could suggest any danger from, was from any such
casual accidental landing of straggling people
from the main, who, as it was likely if they were
driven hither, were here against their wills; so
they made no stay here, but went off again with
all possible speed, seldom staying one night on
shore, lest they should not have the help of the
tides and daylight back again; and that, there-
fore, I had nothing to do but to consider of some
safe retreat, in case I should see any savages land
upon the spot.

Now I began sorely to repent that I had dug
my cave so large as to bring a door through again,
which door, as I said, came out beyond where my
fortification joined to the rock. Upon maturely
considering this, therefore, I resolved to draw me
a second fortification in the same manner of a
semicircle, at a distance from my wall, just where .
I had planted a double row of trees about twelve
years before, of which I made mention. These
trees having been planted so thick before, they
wanted but a few piles to be driven between them,
that they should be thicker and stronger, and my
wall would be soon finished.

So that I had now a double wall; and my outer
wall was thickened with pieces of timber, old
cables, and everything I could think of, to make
it strong, having in it seven little holes, about as
big as I might put my arm out at. In the inside
of this I thickened my wall to above ten feet thick, .
with coutinual bringing earth out of my cave, and
134 ROBINSON CRUSOE

laying it at the foot of the wall, and walking upon
it; and through the seven holes I contrived to
plant the muskets, of which I took notice that I got
seven on shore out of the ship. These, I say, I
planted like my cannon, and fitted them into
frames, that held them like a carriage, that so I
could fire all the seven guns in two minutes’ time.
This wall I was many a weary month a-finishing,
and yet never thought myself safe till it was done.
I also had a great concern upon me for my little
herd of goats and after long consideration, I could
think of but two ways to preserve them. One was,
to find another convenient place to dig a cave un-
der ground, and to drive them into it every night;
and the other was, to enclose two or three little
bits of land, remote from one another, and as much
concealed as I could, where I might keep about half
a dozen young goats in each place; so that if any
disaster happened to the flock in general, [ might
be able to raise them again with little trouble and
time. And this, though it would require a great
deal of time and labor, I thought was the most ra-
tional design. ;
Accordingly I spent some time to find out the
most retired parts of the island and I pitched upon
one which was as private indeed ag my heart could
wish for. It was a little damp piece of ground,
near three acres, so surrounded with woods that it
was almost an enclosure by Nature; at least, it did
not want near so much labor to make it so as the
other pieces of ground I had worked so hard at.
ROBINSON CRUSOE 185

I immediately went to work and in less than a
month’s time I had so fenced it round, that my
flock, or herd, call it which you please, who were
not so wild now as at first they might be supposed
to be, were well enough secured in it. So, without
any further delay, I removed ten young she-goats
and two he-goats to this piece.

After I had thus secured one part of my little
living stock, I went about the whole island, search-
ing for another private place to make such another
deposit; when, wandering more to the west point
of the island than I had ever done yet, and looking
out to sea, I thought I saw a boat upon the sea, at
a great distance. I had found a perspective glass
or two in one of the seamen’s chests, which I saved
out of our ship, but I had it not about me; and this
was so remote, that I could not tell what to make
of it, though I looked at it till my eyes were not
able to hold to look any longer. Whether it was a
boat or not, I do not know; but when I was come
down the hill to the shore, I was perfectly con-
founded and amazed; nor is it possible for me to
express the horror of my mind at seeing the shore
spread with skulls, hands, feet, and other bones of
human bodies; and particularly, I observed a place
where there had been a fire made, and a circle dug
in the earth, like a cockpit, where it is supposed
the savage wretches had sat down to their inhu-
man feastings upon the bodies of their fellow-
creatures.

I was so astonished with the sight of these
136 ROBINSON CRUSOE

things that I entertained no notion of any danger
to myself from it for a long while. Al] my appre-
hensions were buried in the thoughts of such a
pitch of inhuman, hellish brutality, and the horror
of the degeneracy of human nature, which though
I had heard of often, yet I never had so near a
view of before. In short, I turned away my face
from the horrid spectacle. My stomach grew sick,
and I was just at the point of fainting, when Na-
ture discharged the disorder from my stomach.
And having yomited with an uncommon violence,
I was a little relieved, but could not bear to stay in
the place a moment; so I got me up the hill again
with all the speed I could, and walked on towards
my own habitation.

I began to be much easier now, as to the safety
of my circumstances, than ever I was before; for
I observed that these wretches never came to this
island in search of what they could get; perhaps
not seeking, not wanting, or not expecting, any-
thing here; and having often, no doubt, been up in
the covered, woody part of it, without finding any-
thing to their purpose. I knew I had been here
now almost eighteen years, and never saw the least
footsteps of human creatures there before; and I
might be here eighteen more ag entirely concealed
as I was now, if I did not discover myself to them,
which I had no manner of occasion to do; it being
my only business to keep myself entirely concealed
where I was, unless I found a better sort of crea-
tures than cannibals to make myself known to.
ROBINSON CRUSOE 137

Yet I entertained such an abhorrence of the sav-
age wretches that I have been speaking of, and of
the wretched, inhuman custom of their devouring
and eating one another up, that I continued pen-
sive and sad, and kept close within my own circle
for almost two years after this. When I say my
own circle, I mean by it my three plantations, viz.,
my castle, my country seat, which I called my
bower, and my enclosure in the woods. Nor did I
look after this for any other use than as an enclo-
sure for my goats; for the aversion which Nature
gave me to these hellish wretches was such that I
was fearful of seeing them as of seeing the devil
himself. Nor did I so much as go to look after my
boat in all this time, but began rather to think of
making me another; for I could not think of ever
making any more attempts to bring the other boat
round the island to me, lest I should meet with
some of these creatures at sea, in which, if I had
happened to have fallen into their hands, I knew
what would have been my lot.

Time, however, and the satisfaction I had that I
was in no danger of being discovered by these peo-
ple, began to wear off my uneasiness about them ;
and I began to live just in the same composed man-
ner as before; only with this difference, that I used
more caution, and kept my eyes more about me,
than I did before, lest I should happen to be seen
by any of them; and particularly, I was more cau-
tious of firing my gun, lest any of them being on
the island should happen to hear of it.
138 ROBINSON CRUSOE

Only this I did, I went and removed my boat,
which I had on the other side the island, and car-
ried it down to the east end of the whole island,
where I ran it into a little cove, which I found
under some high rocks, and where I knew, by rea-
son of the currents, the savages durst not, at least
would not come, with their boats, upon any ac-
count whatsoever.

With my boat I carried away everything that I
had left there belonging to her, though not neces-
sary for the bare going thither, viz., a mast and sail
which I had made for her, and a thing like an an-
chor, but indeed which could not be called either
anchor or grappling; however, it was the best I
could make of its kind. All these I removed, that
there might not be the least shadow of any discov-
ery, or any appearance of any boat, or of any hu-
man habitation, upon the island.

I believe the reader of this will not think strange
if I confess that these anxieties, these constant dan-
gers I lived in, and the concern that was now upon
me, put an end to all invention, and to all the con-
trivances that I had laid for my future accommo-
dations and conveniences, I had the care of my
safety more now upon my hands than that of my
food. I cared not to drive a nail, or chop a stick
of wood now, for fear the noise I should make
should be heard; much less would I fire a gun, for
the same reason; and above all, I was intolerably
uneasy at making any fire, lest the smoke, which is
visible at a great distance in the day, should betray
ROBINSON CRUSOE | 139

me; and for this reason I removed that part of my
business ‘which required fire, such as burning of
pots and pipes, etc., into my new apartment in the
woods ; where, after I had been some time, I found,
to my unspeakable consolation, a mere natural
cave in the earth, which went in a vast way, and
where, I dare say, no savage, had he been at the
mouth of it, would be so hardy as to venture in;
nor, indeed, would any man else, but one who, like
me, wanted nothing so much as a safe retreat.

The mouth of this hollow was at the bottom of
a great rock, where, by mere accident I would say
[if I did not see abundant reason to ascribe all
such things now to Providence], I was cutting
down some thick branches of trees to make char-
coal; and before I go on, I must observe the reason
of my making this charcoal, which was thus.

I was afraid of making a smoke about my habi-
tation, as I said before; and yet I could not live
there without baking my bread, cooking my meat,
etc. So I contrived to burn some wood here, as I
had seen done in England under turf, till it became
chark, or dry coal; and then putting the fire out, I
preserved the coal to carry home, and perform
the other services which fire was wanting for at
home, without danger of smoke.

But this is by the bye. While I was cutting
down some wood here, I perceived that behind a
very thick branch of low brushwood, or underwood,
there was a kind of hollow place. I was curious
to look into it; and getting with difficulty into the
140 ROBINSON CRUSOE

mouth of it, I found it was pretty large; that is to
Say, sufficient for me to stand upright in it, and
perhaps another with me. But I must confess to
you I made more haste out than I did in when,
looking farther into the place, and which was per-
fectly dark, I saw two broad shining eyes of some
creature, whether devil or man I knew not, which
twinkled like two stars, the dim light from the
cave's mouth shining directly in, and making the re-
flection.

However, after some pause I recovered myself,
and began to call myself a thousand fools, and tell
myself that he that was afraid to see the devil was
not fit to live twenty years in an island all alone,
and that I durst to believe there was nothing in
this cave that was more frightful than myself.
Upon this, plucking up my courage, I took up a
great firebrand, and in I rushed again, with the
stick flaming in my hand. I had not gone three
steps in, but I was almost as much frighted as I
was before; for I heard a very loud sigh, like that
of a man in some pain, and it was followed by a
broken noise, as if of words half expressed, and
then a deep sigh again. I stepped back, and was
indeed struck with such a surprise that it put me
into a cold sweat; and if I had had a hat on my
head, I will not answer for it, that my hair might
not ‘have lifted it off. But still plucking up my
spirits as well as I could, and encouraging myself
a little with considering that the power and pres-
ence of God was everywhere, and was able to pro-
ROBINSON CRUSOE 141

tect me, upon this I stepped forward again, and
by the light of the firebrand, holding it up a little
over my head, I saw lying on the ground a mon-
strous, frightful, old he-goat, just making his will,
as we say, and gasping for life; and dying, indeed,
of mere old age.

I stirred him a little to see if I could get him out,
and he essayed to get up, but was not able to raise
himself; and I thought with myself he might even
lie there; for if he had frighted me so, he would
certainly fright any of the savages, if any of them
should be so hardy as to come in there while he had
any life in him.

I was now recovered from my surprise, and be-
gan to look round me, when I found the cave was
but very small; that is to say, it might be about
twelve feet over, but in no manner of shape, either
round or square, no hands having ever been em-
ployed in making it but those of mere Nature. I
observed also that there was a place at the farther
side of it that went in farther, but was so low that
it required me to creep upon my hands and knees
to go into it, and whither I went I knew not; so
having no candle, I gave it over for some time, but
resolved to come again the next day, provided with
candles and a tinder-box, which I had made of the
lock of one of the muskets, with some wild-fire in
the pan.

Accordingly, the next day I came provided with
six large candles of my own making, for I made
very good candles now of goat’s tallow; and going
142 ROBINSON CRUSOE

into this low place, I was obliged to creep upon
all fours, as I have said, almost ten yards; which,
by the way, I thought was a venture bold enough,
considering that I knew not how far it might go,
nor what was beyond it. When I was got through
the strait, I found the roof rose higher up, I believe
nearly twenty feet. But never was such a glorious
sight seen in the island, I dare Say, as it was, to
look round the sides and roof of this vault or cave;
the walls reflected a hundred thousand lights to me
from my two candles, What it was in the rock,
whether diamonds, or any other precious stones,
or gold, which I rather Supposed it to be, I knew
not.

The place I was in was a most delightful cavity
or grotto of its kind, as could be expected, though
perfectly dark. The floor was dry and level, and
had a sort of small loose gravel upon it, so that
there was no nauseous or venomous creature to be
Seen; neither was there any damp or wet on the
sides or roof. The only difficulty in it was the
entrance, which, however, as it was a place of se-
curity, and such a retreat ag I wanted, I thought
that was a convenience; so that I was really re-
joiced at the discovery, and resolved, without any
delay, to bring some of those things which I was
most anxious about to thig place; particularly, I
resolved to bring hither my magazine of powder,
and all my spare arms, viz., two fowling-pieces, for
I had three in all, and three muskets, for of them
I had eight in all. §o J kept at my castle only
ROBINSON CRUSOE 143

five, which stood ready-mounted, like pieces of can-
non, on my outmost fence; and were ready also to
take out upon any expedition.

Upon this occasion of removing my ammunition,
I took occasion to open the barrel of powder, which
I took up out of the sea, and which had been wet;
and I found that the water had penetrated about
three or four inches into the powder on every side,
which caking, and growing hard, had preserved the
inside like a kernel in a shell; so that I had near
sixty pounds of very good powder in the centre of
the cask. And this was an agreeable discovery to
me at that time; so I carried all away thither,
never keeping above two or three pounds of powder
with me in my castle, for fear of a surprise of any
kind. I also carried thither all the lead I had left
for bullets.

I fancied myself now like one of the ancient
giants, which were said to live in caves and holes
in the rocks, where none could come at them; for
I persuaded myself, while I was here, if five hun-
dred savages were to hunt me, they could never
find me out; or, if they did, they would not venture
to attack me here.

The old goat, whom I found expiring, died in the
mouth of the cave the next day after I made this
discovery; and I found it much easier to dig a
great hole there and throw him in and cover him
with earth, than to drag him out; so I interred
him there, to prevent the offence to my nose.

I was now in my twenty-third year of residence
10
144 ROBINSON CRUSOE

in this island; and was so naturalized to the place,
and to the manner of living, that could I have but
enjoyed the certainty that no savages would come
to the place to disturb me, I could have been con-
tent to have capitulated for spending the rest of
my time there, even to the last moment, till I laid
me down and died, like the old goat in the cave. I
had also arrived to some little diversions and
amusements, which made the time pass more pleas-
antly with me a great deal than it did before. As,
first, I had taught my Poll, as I noted before, to
speak; and he did it so familiarly, and talked so
articulately and plain, that it was very pleasant to
me; and he lived with me no less than six and
twenty years. How long he might live afterwards
I know not, though I know they have a notion in
the Brazils that they live a hundred years. Per-
haps poor Poll may be alive there still, calling after
poor Robin Crusoe to this day. I wish no Eng-
lishman the ill luck to come there and hear him;
but if he did, he would certainly believe it was the
devil. My dog was a very pleasant and loving
companion to me for no less than sixteen years of
my time, and then died of mere old age. As for
my cats, they multiplied, as I have observed, to
that degree, that I was obliged to shoot several
of them at first to keep them from devouring me
and all I had; but at length, when the two old ones
I brought with me were gone, and after some time
continually driving them from me, and letting
them have no provision with me, they all ran wild


My dog was a very pleasant and loving companion to me,
146 ROBINSON CRUSOE

into the woods, except two or three favorites, which
I kept tame, and whose young, when they had any,
I alway drowned; and these were part of my fam-
ily. Besides these, I always kept two or three
household kids about me, whom I taught to feed out
of my hand. And I had two more parrots, which
talked pretty well, and would all call “Robin Cru-
soe,” but none like my first; nor, indeed, did I take
the pains with any of them that I had done with
him. I had also several tame sea-fowls, whose
names I know not, whom I caught upon the shore,
and cut their wings; and the little stakes which I
had planted before my castle wall being now
grown up to a good thick grove, these fowls all
lived among these low trees, and bred there, which
was very agreeable to me; so that, as I said above,
I began to be very well contented with the life I
led, if it might but have been secured from the
dread of the savages.

It was now the month of December, in my
twenty-third year; and this, being the particular
time of my harvest, required my being pretty much
abroad in the fields; when, going out pretty early
in the morning, even before it was thorough day-
light, I was surprised with seeing a light of some
fire upon the shore, at a distance from me of about
two miles, towards the end of the island, where I
had observed some savages had been, as before.
But not on the other side; but, to my great afflic-
tion, it was on my side of the island.

I was indeed terribly surprised at the sight, and
ROBINSON CRUSOE 147

stopped short within my grove, not daring to go
out, lest I might be surprised; and yet I had no
more peace within, from the apprehensions I had
that if these savages, in rambling over the island,
should find my corn standing or cut, or any of my
works and improvements, they would immediately
conclude that there were people in the place, and
would then never give over till they had found me
out. In this extremity I went back directly to my
castle, pulled up the ladder after me, and made
all things without look as wild and natural as I
could.

Then I prepared myself within, putting myself
in a posture of defence. I loaded all my cannon,
as I called them, that is to say, my muskets, which
were mounted upon my new fortification, and all
my pistols, and resolved to defend myself to the
last gasp; not forgetting seriously to commend
myself to the Divine protection, and earnestly to
pray to God to deliver me out of the hands of the
barbarians. And in this posture I continued
about two hours; but began to be mighty impa-
tient for intelligence abroad, for I had no spies to
send out.

After sitting a while longer, and musing what I
should do in this case, I was not able to bear sitting
in ignorance any longer; so setting up my ladder to
the side of the hill where there was a flat place, as
I observed before, and then pulling the ladder up
after me, I set it up again, and mounted to the
top of the hill; and pulling out my perspective-
148 ROBINSON CRUSOE

glass, which I had taken on purpose, I laid me
down flat on my belly on the ground, and began to
look for the place. I presently found there was no
less than nine naked savages sitting round a small
fire they had made, not to warm them, for they had
no need of that, the weather being extreme hot,
but, as I supposed, to dress some of their barbarous
diet of human flesh which they had brought with
them, whether alive or dead, I could not know.

They had two canoes with them, which they had
hauled up upon the shore; and as it was then tide
of ebb, they seemed to me to wait for the return of
the flood to go away again. It is not easy to im-
agine what confusion this sight put me into, espe-
cially seeing them come on my side of the island,
and so near me, too.

As I expected, so it proved; for as soon as the
tide made to the westward, I saw them all take
boat, and row (or paddle, as we call it) all away.
I should have observed that for an hour and more
before they went off, they went to dancing; and I
could easily discern their postures and gestures
by my glasses. I could not perceive, by my nicest
observation, but that they were stark naked, and
had not the least covering upon them; but whether
they were men or women, that I could not distin-
guish.

This was a dreadful sight to me, especially when,
going down to the shore, I could see the marks of
horror which the dismal work they had been about
had left behind it, viz., the blood, the bones, and
ROBINSON CRUSOE 149

part of the flesh of human bodies, eaten and de-
voured by those wretches with merriment and
sport. I was so filled with indignation at the
sight, that I began now to premeditate the destruc-



tion of the next that I saw there, let them be who
or how many soever.

It seemed evident to me that the visits which
they thus made to this island are not very fre-
quent, for it was above fifteen months before any
more of them came on shore there again; that is to
say, I neither saw them, or any footsteps or sig-
nals of them, in all that time; for, as to the rainy
150 ROBINSON CRUSOE

seasons, then they are sure not to come abroad, at
least not so far. Yet all this while I lived uncom-
fortably, by reason of the constant apprehensions
I was in of their coming upon me by surprise;
from whence I observe that the expectation of evil
is more bitter than the suffering, especially if there
is no room to shake off that expectation, or those
apprehensions.

I spent my days now in great perplexity and
anxiety of mind, expecting that I should, one day
or other, fall into the hands of these merciless
creatures; and if I did at any time venture abroad,
it was not without looking round me with the
greatest care and caution imaginable. And now I
found, to my great comfort, how happy it was that
I provided for a tame flock or herd of goats; for I
durst not, upon any account, fire my gun, espe-
cially near that side of the island where they
usually came, lest I should alarm the savages. And
if they had fled from me now, I was sure to have
them come back again, with perhaps two or three
hundred canoes with them, in a few days, and then
I knew what to expect.

However, I wore out a year and three months
more before I ever saw any more of the savages,
and then I found them again, as I shall soon ob-
serve. It is true they might have been there once
or twice, but either they made no stay, or at least
I did not hear them; but in the month of May, as
near as I could calculate, and in my four and
ROBINSON CRUSOE 151

twentieth year, I had a very strange encounter
with them; of which in its place.

The perturbation of my mind during this fifteen
or sixteen months’ interval was very great. I
slept unquiet, dreamed always frightful dreams,
and often started out of my sleep in the night. In
the day great troubles overwhelmed my mind, and
in the night I dreamed often of killing the sav-
ages, and of the reasons why I might justify the
doing of it. But, to waive all this for a while, it
was in the middle of May, on the sixteenth day, I
think, as well as my poor wooden calendar would
reckon, for I marked all upon the post still; I say,
it was the sixteenth of May that it blew a very
great storm of wind all day, with a great deal of
lightning and thunder, and a very foul night it
was after it. I know not what was the particular
occasion of it, but as I was reading in the Bible,
and taken up with very serious thoughts about
my present condition, I was surprised with a noise
of a gun, as I thought, fired at sea.

This was, to be sure, a surprise of quite a differ- |
ent nature from any I had met with before; for the
notions this put into my thoughts were quite of an-
other kind. I started up in the greatest haste im-
aginable, and, in a trice, clapped my ladder to the
middle place of the rock, and pulled it after me;
and mounting it the second time, got to the top of
the hill the very moment that a flash of fire bid me
listen for a second gun, which accordingly, in about
152 ROBINSON CRUSOE

half a minute, I heard; and, by the sound, knew
that it was from that part of the sea where I was
driven down the current in my boat.

I immediately considered that this must be some
ship in distress, and that they had some comrade,
or some other ship in company, and fired these
guns for signals of distress, and to obtain help. I
had this presence of mind, at that minute, as to
think that though I could not help them, it may
be they might help me; so I brought together all
the dry wood I could get at hand, and, making a
good handsome pile, I set it on fire upon the hill.
The wood was dry, and blazed freely; and though
the wind blew very hard, yet it burnt fairly out;
so that I was certain, if there was any such thing
as a ship, they must needs see it, and no doubt
they did; for soon as ever my fire blazed up I heard
another gun, and after that several] others, all from
the same quarter. I plied my fire all night long
till day broke; and when it was broad day, and the
air cleared up, I saw something at a great distance
at sea, full east of the island, whether a sail or a
hull I could not distinguish, no, not with my
glasses, the distance was so great, and the weather
still something hazy also; at least it was so out at
sea.

I looked frequently at it all that day, and soon
perceived that it did not move; so I presently con-
cluded that it was a ship at an anchor. And being
eager, you may be sure, to be satisfied, I took my
ROBINSON CRUSOE 153

gun in my hand and ran toward the south side of
the island, to the rocks where I had formerly been
carried away with the current; and getting up
there, the weather by this time being perfectly
clear, I could plainly see, to my great sorrow, the
wreck of a ship, cast away in the night upon those
concealed rocks which I found when I was out in
my boat.

I cannot explain, by any possible energy of
words, what a strange longing or hankering of de-
sires I felt in my soul upon this sight, breaking out
sometimes thus: “Oh that there had been but one
or two, nay, or but one soul, saved out of this ship,
to have escaped to me, that I might but have had
one companion, one fellow-creature, to have spoken
to me, and to have conversed with!” In all the
time of my solitary life, I never felt so earnest, so
strong a desire after the society of my fellow-
creatures, or so deep a regret at the want of it.

I had a great mind to venture out in my boat to
this wreck, not doubting but I might find some-
thing on board that might be useful to me. But
that did not altogether press me so much as the
possibility that there might be yet some living
creature on board, whose life I might not only save,
but might, by saving that life, comfort my own to
the last degree.

Under the power of this impression, I hastened
back to my castle and prepared everything for my
voyage. Loading myself with everything neces-
154 ROBINSON CRUSOE

sary, I went down to my boat, got the water out
of her, and praying to God to direct my voyage, I
put out.

I went at a great rate directly for the wreck, and
in less than two hours I came up to it.

It was a dismal sight to look at. The ship,
which, by its building, was Spanish, stuck fast,
jammed in between two rocks. All the stern and
quarter of her was beaten to pieces with the sea;
and as her forecastle, which stuck in the rocks, had
run on with great violence, her mainmast and fore-
mast were brought by the board; that is to say,
broken short off; but her bowsprit was sound, and
the head and bow appeared firm. When I came
close to her a dog appeared upon her, who, seeing
me coming, yelped and cried; and as soon as I
called him, jumped into the sea to come to me,
and I took him into the boat, but found him al-
most dead for hunger and thirst. I gave him a
cake of my bread, and he ate it like a ravenous wolf
that had been starving a fortnight in the snow. I
then gave the poor creature some fresh water, with
which, if I would have let him, he would have burst
himself.

After this I went on board; but the first sight I
met with was two men drowned in the cook-room,
or forecastle of the ship, with their arms fast about
one another. Besides the dog, there was nothing
left in the ship that had life; nor any goods that I
could see, but what were spoiled by the water.
I saw several chests, which I believed belonged to
ROBINSON CRUSOE 155

some of the seamen; and I got two of them into
the boat, without examining what was in them.

Had the stern of the ship been fixed, and the
forepart broken off, I am persuaded I might have
made a good voyage; for by what I found in these
two chests, I had room to suppose the ship had a
great deal of wealth on board.

I took a fire-shovel and tongs, which I wanted ex-
tremely; as also two little brass kettles, a copper
pot to make chocolate, and a gridiron. And with
this cargo, and the dog, I came away, the tide be-
ginning to make home again; and the same eve-
ning, about an hour within night, I reached the
island again, weary and fatigued to the last degree.

I reposed that night in the boat; and in the
morning I resolved to harbor what I had gotten
in my new cave, not to carry it home to my castle.
After refreshing myself, I got all my cargo on
shore, and began to examine the particulars. When
I came to open the chests, I found several things
of great use tome. For example, I found in onea
fine case of bottles, of an extraordinary kind, and
filled with cordial waters, fine, and very good; the
bottles held about three pints each, and were tipped
with silver. I found two pots of very good suc-
cades, or sweetmeats, so fastened also on top that
the salt water had not hurt them; and two more of
the same, which the water had spoiled. I found
some very good shirts, which were very welcome
to me; and about a dozen and half of linen white
handkerchiefs and colored neckcloths. The former
156 ROBINSON CRUSOE

were also very welcome, being exceeding refresh-
ing to wipe my face in a hot day. Besides this,
when I came to the till in the chest, I found there
three great bags of pieces of eight, which held out
about eleven hundred pieces in all; and in one of
them, wrapped in a paper, six doubloons of gold,
and some small bars or wedges of gold. I suppose
they might all weigh near a pound.

Tbe other chest I found had some clothes in it,
put of little value. Upon the whole, I got very lit-
tle by this voyage that was of any use to me, for as
to the money, I had no manner of occasion for it;
’+was to me as the dirt under my feet; and I would
have given it all for three or four pair of English
shoes and stockings, which were things I greatly
wanted, but had not had on my feet now for many
years. I had indeed gotten two pairs of shoes
now, which I took off of the feet of the two drowned
men whom I saw in the wreck, and I found two
pair more in one of the chests, which were very
welcome to me; but they were not like our English
shoes, either for ease or service, being rather what
we call pumps than shoes.

Having now brought all my things on shore, and
secured them, I went back to my boat, and rowed or
paddled her along the shore to her old harbor,
where I laid her up, and made the best of my way
to my old habitation, where lI found everything
safe and quiet. So I began to repose myself, live
after my old fashion, and take care of my family
ROBINSON CRUSOE 157

affairs; and, for a while, I lived easy enough, only
that I was more vigilant than I used to be, looked
out oftener, and did not go abroad so much; and if
at any time I did stir with any freedom, it was al-
ways to the east part of the island, where I was
pretty well satisfied the savages never came, and
where I could go without so many precautions, and
such a load of arms and ammunition as I always
carried with me if I went the other way.

I lived in this condition nearly two years more;
but my unlucky head, that was always to let me
know it was born to make my body miserable, was
all this two years filled with projects and designs,
how, if it were possible, I might get away from this
island; for sometimes I was for making another
voyage to the wreck, though my reason told me that
there was nothing left there worth the hazard of
my voyage; sometimes for a ramble one way, some-
times another; and I believe verily, if I had had the
boat that I went from Sallee in, I should have ven-
tured to sea, bound anywhere, I knew not whither.

I have been in all my circumstances a memento
to those who are touched with the general plague of
mankind, whence, for aught I know, one-half of
their miseries flow; I mean, that of not being satis-
fied with the station wherein God and Nature has
placed them; for not to look back upon my primi-
tive condition, and the excellent advice of my fa-
ther, the opposition to which was, as I may call it,
my original sin, my subsequent mistakes of the
158 ROBINSON CRUSOE

same kind had been the means of my coming into
this miserable condition; for had that Providence,
which so happily had seated me at the Brazils as a
planter, blessed me with confined desires, and I
could have been contented to have gone on grad-
ually, I might have been, by this time, I mean in
the time of my being in this island, one of the most
considerable planters in the Brazils; nay, I am
persuaded that by the improvements I had made in
that little time I lived there, and the increase I
should probably have made if I had stayed, I might
have been worth an hundred thousand moidores.

But as this is ordinarily the fate of young heads,
so reflection upon the folly of it is as ordinarily the
exercise of more years, or of the dear-bought experi-
ence of time; and so it was with me now. And
yet, so deep had the mistake taken root in my tem-
per, that I could not satisfy myself in my station,
but was continually poring upon the means and
possibility of my escape from this place. And that
I may, with the greater pleasure to the reader,
bring on the remaining part of my story, it may not
be improper to give some account of my first con-
ceptions on the subject of this foolish scheme for
my escape, and how, and upon what foundation, I
acted.

I am now to be supposed retired into my castle,
after my late voyage to the wreck, my frigate laid
up and secured under water, as usual, and my con-
dition restored to what it was before. I had more
wealth, indeed, than I had before, but was not at
ROBINSON CRUSOE 159

all the richer; for I had no more use for it than the
Indians of Peru had before the Spaniards came
there.

It was one of the nights in the rainy season in
March, the four and twentieth year of my first set-
ting foot in this island of solitariness. I was ly-
ing in my bed, or hammock, awake, very well in
health, had no pain, no distemper, no uneasiness of
body, no, nor any uneasiness of mind, more than
ordinary, but could by no means close my eyes,
that is, so as to sleep; no, not a wink all night long,
otherwise than as follows.

It is as impossible, as needless, to set down the
innumerable crowd of thoughts that whirled
through that great thoroughfare of the brain, the
memory, in this night’s time. I ran over the whole
history of my life in miniature, or by abridgment,
as I may call it, to my coming to this island, and
also of the part of my life since I came to this
island. In my reflections upon the state of my
case since I came on shore on this island, | was
comparing the happy posture of my affairs in the
first years of my habitation here compared to the
life of anxiety, fear, and care which I had lived
ever since I had seen the print of a foot in the
sand; not that I did not believe the savages had
frequented the island even all the while, and might
have been several hundreds of them at times on
shore there; but I had never known it, and was
incapable of any apprehensions about it. My satis-
faction was perfect, though my danger was the

11
160 ROBINSON CRUSOE

same; and I was as happy in not knowing my dan-
ger, as if I had never really been exposed to it.
This furnished my thoughts with many very prof-
itable reflections, and particularly this one: how
infinitely good that Providence is which has pro-
vided, in its government of mankind, such narrow
bounds to his sight and knowledge of things; and
though he walks in the midst of so many thousand
dangers, the sight of which, if discovered to him,
would distract his mind and sink his spirits, he is
kept serene and calm, by having the events of
things hid from his eyes, and knowing nothing of
the dangers which surround him.

After these thoughts had for some time enter-
tained me, I came to reflect seriously upon the
real danger I had been in for so many years in this
very island, and how I had walked about in the
greatest security, and with all possible tranquil-
lity, even when perhaps nothing but a brow of a
hill, a great tree, or the casual approach of night
had been between me and the worst kind of de-
struction, viz., that of falling into the hands of
cannibals and savages, who would have seized on
me with the same view as I did of a goat or a turtle,
and have thought it no more a crime to kill and de-
vour me than I did of a pigeon or a curlew. I
would unjustly slander myself if I should say I
was not sincerely thankful to my great Preserver,
to whose singular protection I acknowledged, with
great humility, that all these unknown deliver-
ROBINSON CRUSOE 161

ances were due, and without which I must inevit-
ably have fallen into their merciless hands.

When these thoughts were over, my head was
for some time taken up in considering the nature
of these wretched creatures, I mean savages, and
how it came to pass in the world that the wise
Governor of all things should give up any of His
creatures to such inhumanity; nay, to something
so much below even brutality itself, as to devour
its own kind. But as this ended in some (at that
time fruitless) speculations, it occurred to me to
inquire what part of the world these wretches lived
in? how far off the coast was from whence they
came? what they ventured over so far from home’
for? what kind of boats they had? and why I might
not order myself and my business so that I might
be as able to go over thither as they were to come
to me.

I never so much as troubled myself to consider
what I should do with myself when I came thither;
what would become of me, if I fell into the hands
of the savages; or how I should escape from them,
if they attempted me; no, nor so much as how it
was possible for me to reach the coast, and not be
attempted by some or other of them, without any
possibility of delivering myself; and if I should
not fall into their hands, what I should do for pro-
vision; or whither I should bend my course.
None of these thoughts, I say, so much as came in
my way; but my mind was wholly bent upon the
162 ROBINSON CRUSOE

notion of my passing over in my boat to the main-
land. I looked back upon my present condition as
the most miserable that could possibly be; that I
was not able to throw myself into anything, but
death, that could be called worse; that if I reached
the shore of the main, I might perhaps meet with
relief, or I might coast along, as I did on the shore
of Africa, till I came to some inhabited country,
and where I might find some relief; and after all,
perhaps I might fall in with some Christian ship
that might take me in; and if the worse came to
the worst, I could but die, which would put an end
to all these miseries at once. Pray note, all this
was the fruit of a disturbed mind, an impatient
temper, made as it were desperate by the long con-
tinuance of my troubles, and the disappointments
I had met in the wreck I had been on board of,
and where I had been so near the obtaining what I
so earnestly longed for, viz., somebody to speak to,
and to learn some knowledge from the place where
I was, and of the probable means of my deliverance.
I say, I was agitated wholly by these thoughts.
All my calm of mind, in my resignation to Provi-
dence, and waiting the issue of the dispositions of
Heaven, seemed to be suspended; and I had, as it
were, no power to turn my thoughts to anything
but to the project of a voyage to the main, which
came upon me with such force, and such an impetu-
osity of desire, that it was not to be resisted.
When this had agitated my thoughts for two
hours, or more, with such violence that it set my
ROBINSON CRUSOE 163

very blood into a ferment, and my pulse beat as
high as if I had been in a fever, merely with the
extraordinary fervor of my mind about it, Nature,
as if I had been fatigued and exhausted with the
very thought of it, threw me into a sound sleep.
One would have thought I should have dreamed of
it, but I did not, nor of anything relating to it; but
I dreamed that as I was going out into the morn-
ing, as usual, from my castle, I saw upon the shore
two canoes and eleven savages coming to land,
and that they brought with them another savage,
whom they were going to kill in order to eat him ;
when, on a sudden, the savage that they were going
to kill jumped away, and ran for his life. And I
thought, in my sleep, that he came running into my
little thick grove before my fortification to hide
himself; and that I, seeing him alone, and not per-
ceiving that the other sought him that way, showed
myself to him, and smiling upon him, encouraged
him; that he kneeled down to me, seeming to pray
me to assist him; upon which I showed my ladder,
made him go up, and carried him into my cave, and
he became my servant; and that as soon as I had
gotten this man, I said to myself, “Now I may cer-
tainly venture to the mainland; for this fellow will
serve me as a pilot, and will tell me what to do,
and whither to go for provisions, and whither not
to go for fear of being devoured; what places to
venture into, and what to escape.” I waked with
this thought, and was under such inexpressible
impressions of joy at the prospect of my escape in
164 ROBINSON CRUSOE

my dream, that the disappointments which I felt
upon coming to myself and finding it was no more
than a dream were equally extravagant the other
way, and threw me into a very great dejection of
spirit.

Upon this, however, I made this conclusion: that
my only way to go about an attempt for an escape
was, if possible, to get a savage into my possession ;
and, if possible, it should be one of their prisoners
whom they had condemned to be eaten, and should
bring thither to kill. But these thoughts still
were attended with this difficulty, that it was im-
possible to effect this without attacking a whole
caravan of them, and killing them all; and this
was not only a very desperate attempt, and might
miscarry, but, on the other hand, I had greatly
scrupled the lawfulness of it to me; and my heart
trembled at the thoughts of shedding so much
blood, though it was for my deliverance.

However, at last, after many secret disputes
with myself, and after great perplexities about it,
for all these arguments, one way and another,
struggled in my head a long time, the eager prevail-
ing desire of deliverance at length mastered all
the rest, and I resolved, if possible, to get one of
those savages into my hands, cost what it would.
My next thing then was to contrive how to do it,
and this indeed was very difficult to resolve on.
But as I could pitch upon no probable means for
it, so I resolved to put myself upon the watch, to
see them when they came on shore, and leave the
ROBINSON CRUSOE 165

rest to the event, taking such measures as the
opportunity should present, let be what would be.
With these resolutions in my thoughts, I set my-
self upon the scout as often as possible, and indeed
so often, till I was heartily tired of it; for it was
above a year and half that I waited; and for great
part of that time went out to the west end, and to
the south-west corner of the island almost every
day, to see for canoes, but none appeared. This
was very discouraging, and began to trouble me
much; though I cannot say that it did in this case,
as it had done some time before that, viz., wear off
the edge of my desire to the thing. But the longer
it seemed to be delayed, the more eager I was for
it. Ina word, I was not at first so careful to shun
the sight of these savages, and avoid being seen by
them, as I was now eager to be upon them.
About a year and a half after I had entertained
these notions, and by long musing had, as it were,
resolved them all into nothing, for want of an occa-
sion to put them in execution, I was surprised, one
morning early, with seeing no less than five canoes
all on shore together on my side the island, and the
people who belonged to them all landed, and out of
my sight. The number of them broke all my meas-
ures; for seeing so many, and knowing that they
always came four, or six, or sometimes more, in a
boat, I could not tell what to think of it, or how
to take my measures to attack twenty or thirty men
single-handed; so I lay still in my castle, perplexed
and discomforted. However, I put myself into
166 ROBINSON CRUSOE

all the same postures for an attack that I had
formerly provided, and was just ready for action
if anything had presented. Having waited a good
while, listening to hear if they made any noise, at
length, being very impatient, I set my guns at the
foot of my ladder, and.clambered up to the top of
the hill, by my two stages, as usual, standing so,
however, that my head did not appear above the
hill, so that they could not perceive me by any
means. Here I observed, by the help of my per-
spective-glass, that they were no less than thirty
in number, that they had a fire kindled, that they
had had meat dressed. How they had cooked it,
that I knew not, or what it was; but they were all
dancing, in I know not how many barbarous ges-
tures and figures, their own way, round the fire.
While I was thus looking on them, I perceived by
my perspective two miserable wretches dragged
from the boats, where, it seems, they were laid by,
and were now brought out for the slaughter. I
perceived one of them immediately fell, being
knocked down, I suppose, with a club or wooden
sword, for that was their way, and two or three
others were at work immediately, cutting him open
for their cookery, while the other victim was left
standing by himself, till they should be ready for
him. In that very moment this poor wretch seeing
himself a little at liberty, Nature inspired him with
hopes of life, and he started away from them, and
ran with incredible swiftness along the sands di-
ROBINSON CRUSOE 167

rectly towards me, I mean towards that part of the
coast where my habitation was.

I was dreadfully frighted (that I must acknowl-
edge) when I perceived him to run my way, and
especially when, as I thought, I saw him pursued
by the whole body; and now I expected that part
of my dream was coming to pass, and that he would
certainly take shelter in my grove; but I could not
depend, by any means, upon my dream for the
rest of it, viz. that the other savages would not
pursue him thither, and find him there. How-
ever, I kept my station, and my spirits began to re-
cover when I found that there was not above three
men that followed him; and still more was I en-
couraged when I found that he outstripped them
exceedingly in running, and gained. ground of
them; so that if he could but bold it for half an
hour, I saw easily he would fairly get away from
them all.

There was between them and my castle the creek,
which I mentioned often at the first part of my
story, when I landed my cargoes out of the ship;
and this I saw plainly he must necessarily swim
over, or the poor wretch would be taken there. But
when the savage escaping came thither he made
nothing of it, though the tide was then up; but
plunging in, swam through in about thirty strokes
or thereabouts, landed, and ran on with exceeding
strength and swiftness. When the three persons
came to the creek. I found that two of them could

ae
168 ROBINSON CRUSOE

swim, but the third could not, and that, standing
on the other side, he looked at the other, but went
no further, and soon after went softly back, which,
as it happened, was very well for him in the main.

I observed that the two who swam were yet more
than twice as long swimming over the creek as the
fellow was that fled from them. It came now very
warmly upon my thoughts, and indeed irresistibly,
that now was my time to get me a servant, and
perhaps a companion or assistant, and that I was
called plainly by Providence to save this poor crea-
ture’s life. I immediately ran down the ladders
with all possible expedition, fetched my two guns,
for they were both but at the foot of the ladders,
as I observed above, and getting up again, with
the same haste, to the top of the hill, I crossed to-
ward the sea, and having a very short cut, and all
down hill, clapped myself in the way between the
pursuers and the pursued, hallooing aloud to him
that fled, who, looking back, was at first perhaps
as much frighted at me as at them; but I beckoned
with my hands to him to come back; and, in the
meantime, I slowly advanced towards the two that
followed; then rushing at once upon the foremost,
I knocked him down with the stock of my piece.
I was loth to fire, because I would not have the
rest hear; though, at that distance, it would not
have been easily heard, and being out of sight of
the smoke too, they would not have easily known
what to make of it. Having knocked this fellow
down, the other who pursued with him stopped, as
ROBINSON CRUSOE 169

if he had been frighted, and I advanced apace to-
wards him; but as I came nearer, I perceived pres-
ently he had a bow and arrow, and was fitting it
to shoot at me; so I was then necessitated to shoot
at him first, which I did, and killed him at the first
shot.

The poor savage who fled, but had stopped,
though he saw both his enemies fallen and killed,
as he thought, yet was so frighted with the fire and
noise of my piece that he stood stock-still, and
neither came forward nor went backward, though
he seemed rather inclined to fly still than to come
on. I hallooed again to him and made signs to
come forward, which he easily understood, and
came a little way, then stopped again, and then a
little further, and stopped again; and I could then
perceive that he stood trembling, as if he had been
taken prisoner, and had just been to be killed, as
his two enemies were. I beckoned him again to
come to me, and gave him all the signs of encour-
agement that I could think of; and he came nearer
and nearer, kneeling down every ten or twelve
steps, in token of acknowledgment for my saving
his life. I smiled to him, and looked pleasantly,
and beckoned to him to come still nearer. At
length he came close to me, and then he kneeled
down again, kissed the ground, and laid his head
upon the ground, and taking me by the foot, set my
foot upon his head. This, it seems, was a token of
swearing to be my slave for ever. I took him up,
and made much of him, and encouraged him all I
170 ROBINSON CRUSOE

could. But there was more work to do yet; for I
perceived the savage whom I knocked down was
not killed, but stunned by the blow, and began to
come to himself; so I pointed to him, and showing
him the savage, that he was not dead, upon this he
spoke some words to me; and though I could not
understand them, yet I thought they were pleasant
to hear; for they were the first sound of a man’s
voice that I had heard, my own excepted, for above
twenty-five years. But there was no time for such
reflections now. The savage who was knocked
down recovered himself so far as to sit up upon the
ground, and I perceived that my savage began to
be afraid; but when I saw that, I presented my
other piece at the man, as if I would shoot him.
Upon this my savage, for so I call him now, made
a motion to me to lend him my sword, which hung
naked in a belt by my side; soI did. He no sooner
had it but he runs to his enemy, and, at one blow,
cuts off his head as cleverly, no executioner in Ger-
many could have done it sooner or better; which I
thought very strange for one who, I had reason to
believe, never saw a sword in his life before, except
their own wooden swords. However, it seems, as
I learned afterwards, they make their wooden
swords so sharp, so heavy, and the wood is so hard,
that they will cut off heads even with them, ay,
and arms, and that at one blow too. When he had
done this, he comes laughing to me in sign of tri-
umph, and brought me the sword again, and with
abundance of gestures, which I did not understand,
ROBINSON CRUSOE 171

laid it down, with the head of the savage that he
had just killed before me.

But that which astonished him most, was to know
how I had killed the other Indian so far off; so
pointing to him, he made signs to me to let him go
to him; so I bade him go, as well as I could. When
he came to him, he stood like one amazed, looking
at him, turned him first on one side, then on t’other,
looked at the wound the bullet had made, which, it
seems, was just in his breast, where it had made a
hole, and no great quantity of blood had followed;
but he had bled inwardly, for he was quite dead.
He took up his bow and arrows, and came back;
so I turned to go away, and beckoned to him to
follow me, making signs to him that more might
come after them.

Upon this he signed to me that he should bury
them with sand, that they might not be seen by the
rest if they followed; and so I made signs again to
him to do so. He fell to work, and in an instant
he had scraped a hole in the sand with his hands
big enough to bury the first in, and then dragged
him into it, and covered him, and did so also by
the other. I believe he had buried them both in a
quarter of an hour. Then calling him away, I
carried him, not to my castle, but quite away to my
cave, on the farther part of the island; so I did not
let my dream come to pass in that part, viz., that
he came into my grove for shelter.

Here I gave him bread and a bunch of raisins to
eat, and a draught of water, which I found he was
172 ROBINSON CRUSOE

indeed in great distress for, by his running; and
having refreshed him, I made signs for him to go
lie down and sleep, pointing to a place where I had
laid a great parcel of rice-straw, and a blanket
upon it, which I used to sleep upon myself some-
times; so the poor creature lay down, and went to
sleep.

He was a comely, handsome fellow, perfectly well
made, with straight strong limbs, not too large,
tall, and well-shaped, and, as I reckon, about
twenty-six years of age. He had a very good coun-
tenance, not a fierce and surly aspect, but seemed
to have something very manly in his face; and yet
he had all the sweetness and softness of an Ieuro-
pean in his countenance too, especially when he
smiled. His hair was long and black, not curled
like wool; his forehead very high and large; and a
great vivacity and sparkling sharpness in his eyes.
The color of his skin was not quite black, but very
tawny; and yet not of an ugly, yellow, nauseous
tawny, as the Brazilians and Virginians, and other
natives of America are, but of a bright kind of a
dun olive color, that had in it something very agree-
able, though not very easy to describe. His face
was round and plump; his nose small, not flat like
the negroes; a very good mouth, thin lips, and his
fine teeth well set, and white as ivory.

After he had slumbered, rather than slept, about
half an hour, he waked again, and comes out of the
cave to me, for I had been milking my goats, which
I had in the enclosure just by. When he espied







\
q \

UY >\*
BT NUAY =

4



i




I understood him in many things, and let him know I was
very well pleased with him.
174 ROBINSON CRUSOE

me, he came running to me, laying himself down
again upon the ground, with all the possible signs
of an humble, thankful disposition, making many
antic gestures to show it. At last he lays his head
flat upon the ground, close to my foot, and sets my
other foot upon his head, as he had done before,
and after this made all the signs to me of subjec-
tion, servitude, and submission imaginable, to let
me know how he would serve me as long as he
lived. I understood him in many things, and let
him know I was very well pleased with him. In
a little time I began to speak to him, and teach him
to speak to me; and, first, I made him know his
name should be Friday, which was the day I saved
his life. I called him so for the memory of the
time. I likewise taught him to say master, and
then let him know that was to be my name. I like-
wise taught him to say Yes and No, and to know
the meaning of them. I gave him some milk in an
earthen pot, and let him see me drink it before
him, and sop my bread in it; and I gave him a cake
of bread to do the like, which he quickly complied
with, and made signs that it was very good for him.

I kept there with him all that night; but as soon
as it was day, I beckoned to him to come with me,
and let him know I would give him some clothes ;
at which he seemed very glad, for he was stark
naked. As we went by the place where he had
buried the two men, he pointed exactly to the place,
and showed me the marks that he had made to
find them again, making signs to me that we should
ROBINSON CRUSOE 175

dig them up again, and eat them. At this I ap-
peared very angry, expressed my abhorrence of it,
made as if I would vomit at the thoughts of it, and
beckoned with my hand to him to come away;
which he did immediately, with great submission.
I then led him up to the top of the hill, to see if
his enemies were gone; and pulling out my glass, I
looked, and saw plainly the place where they had
been, but no appearance of them or of their canoes;
so that it was plain that they were gone, and had
left their two comrades behind them, without any
search after them.

Thus we came back to our castle, and there I fell
to work for my man Friday; and, first of all, I
gave him a pair of linen drawers, which I had out
of the poor gunner’s chest I mentioned, and which
I found in the wreck; which, with a little altera-
tion, fitted him very well. Then I made him a
jerkin of goat’s skin, as well as my skill would al-
low, and I was now grown a tolerable good tailor;
and I gave him a cap, which I had made of a hare-
skin, very convenient and fashionable enough ; and
thus he was clothed for the present tolerably well,
and was mighty well pleased to see himself almost
as well clothed as his master. It is true he went
awkwardly in these things at first; wearing the
drawers was very awkward to him, and the sleeves
of the waistcoat galled his shoulders and the in-
side of his arms; but a little easing them where he
complained they hurt him, and using himself to
them, at length he took to them very well.

12
176 ROBINSON CRUSOE

The next day after I came home to my hutch
with him, I began to consider where I should lodge
him. And that I might do well for him, and yet
be perfectly easy myself, I made a little tent for
him in the vacant place between my two fortifica-
tions, in the inside of the last and in the outside of
the first; and as there was a door or entrance
there into my cave, I made a formal framed door-
case, and a door to it of boards, and set it up in
the passage, a little within the entrance; and caus-
ing the door to open on the inside, I barred it up
in the night, taking in my ladders too; so that
Friday could in no way come at me in the inside of
my innermost wall without making so much noise
in getting over that it must needs waken me; for
my first wall had now a complete roof over it of
long poles, covering all my tent, and leaning up to
the side of the hill, which was again laid cross with
smaller sticks instead of laths, and then thatched
over a great thickness with the rice-straw, which
was strong, like reeds; and at the hole or place
which was left to go in or out by the ladder, I had
placed a kind of trap-door, which, if it had been at-
tempted on the outside, would not have opened at
all, but would have fallen down, and made a great
noise; and as to weapons, I took them all into my
side every night.

But I needed none of all this precaution; for
never man had a more faithful, loving, sincere serv-
ant than Friday was to me; without passions, sul-
lenness, or designs, perfectly obliged and engaged;
ROBINSON CRUSOE 177

his very affections were tied to me, like those of a
child to a father; and I dare say he would have
sacrificed his life for the saving of mine upon any
occasion whatsoever. The many testimonies he
gave me of this put it out of doubt, and soon con-
vinced me that I needed to use no precautions as
to my safety on his account.

I was greatly delighted with him, and made it
my business to teach him everything that was
proper to make him useful, handy, and helpful;
put especially to make him speak, and understand
me when I spake. And he was the aptest scholar
that ever was; and particularly was so merry, so
constantly diligent, and so pleased when he could
but understand me, or make me understand him,
that it was very pleasant to me to talk to him.
And now my life began to be so easy, that I began
to say to myself, that could I but have been safe
from more savages, I cared not if I was never to
remove from the place while I lived.

After I had been two or three days returned to
my castle, I thought that, in order to bring Friday
off from his horrid way of feeding, and from the
relish of a cannibal’s stomach, I ought to let him
taste other flesh; so I took him out with me one
morning to the woods.. I went, indeed, intending
to kill a kid out of my flock, and bring him home
and dress it; but as I was going, I saw a she-goat
lying down in the shade, and two young kids sit-
ting by her. I catched hold of Friday. “Hold,”
says I, “stand still,” and made signs to him not to
178 ROBINSON CRUSOE

stir. Immediately I presented my piece, shot and
killed one of the kids. The poor creature, who
had, at a distance indeed, seen me kill the savage,
his enemy, but did not know, or could imagine, how
it was done, was sensibly surprised, trembled and
shook, and looked so amazed that I thought he
would have sunk down. He did not see the kid I
had shot at, or perceive I had killed it, but ripped
up his waistcoat to feel if he was not wounded ;
and, as I found presently, thought I was resolved
to kill him; for he came and kneeled down to
me, and embracing my knees, said a great many
things I did not understand ; but I could easily
see that the meaning was to pray me not to kill
him.

I soon found a way to convince him that I would
do him no harm; and taking him up by the hand,
laughed at him, and pointing to the kid which I
had killed, beckoned to him to run and fetch it,
which he did; and while he was wondering, and
looking to see how the creature was killed, I loaded
my gun again; and by and by I saw a great fowl,
like a hawk, sit upon a tree, within shot; 80, to
let Friday understand a little what I would do, I
called him to me again, pointing at the fowl, which
was indeed a parrot, though I thought it had been
a hawk; I say, pointing to the parrot, and to my
gun, and to the ground under the parrot, to let him
see I would make it fall, I made him understand
that I would shoot and kill that bird. Accord-
ingly I fired, and bade him look, and immediately
ROBINSON CRUSOE 179

he saw the parrot fall. He stood like one frighted
again, notwithstanding all I had said to him; and
I found he was the more amazed, because he did
not see me put anything into the gun, but thought
that there must be some wonderful fund of death
and destruction in that thing, able to kill man,
beast, bird, or anything near or far off; and the
astonishment this created in him was such as could
not wear off for a long time; and I believe, if I
would have let him, he would have worshipped me
and my gun. As for the gun itself, he would not
so much as touch it for several days after; but
would speak to it, and talk to it, as if it had an-
swered him, when he was by himself; which, as I
afterwards learned of him, was to desire it not to
kill him.

Well, after his astonishment was a little over at
this, I pointed to him to run and fetch the bird I
had shot, which he did, but stayed some time; for
the parrot, not being quite dead, was fluttered a
good way off from the place where she fell. How-
ever, he found her, took her up, and brought her to
me; and as I had perceived his ignorance about the
gun before, I took this advantage to charge the gun
again, and not let him see me do it, that I might
be ready for any other mark that might present.
But nothing more offered at that time; so I brought
home the kid, and the same evening I took the
skin off, and cut it out as well as I could; and hav-
ing a pot for that purpose, I boiled or stewed some
of the flesh, and made some very good broth; and
180 ROBINSON CRUSOE

after I had begun to eat some, I gave some to my
man, who seemed very glad of it, and liked it very
well; but that which was strangest to him, was to
see me eat salt with it. He made a sign to me that
the salt was not good to eat, and putting a little
into his own mouth, he seemed to nauseate it, and
would spit and sputter at it, washing his mouth
with fresh water after it.

Having thus fed him with boiled meat and broth,
I was resolved to feast him the next day with
roasting a piece of the kid. This I did by hang-
ing it before the fire in a string, as I had seen many
people do in England, setting two poles up, one
on each side of the fire, and one cross on the top,
and tying the string to the cross stick, letting the
meat turn continually. This Friday admired very
much. But when he came to taste the flesh, he
took so many ways to tell me how well he liked
it, that I could not but understard him; and at
last he told me he would never eat man’s flesh any
more, which I was very glad to hear.

The next day I set him to work to beating some
corn out, and sifting it in the manner I used to do,
as I observed before; and he soon understood how
to do it as well as I, especially after he had seen
what the meaning of it was, and that it was to
make bread of; for after that I let him see me make
my bread, and bake it too; and in a little time Fri- .
day was able to do all the work for me, as well as
I could do it myself.

I began now to consider that, having two mouths
ROBINSON CRUSOE 181

to feed instead of one, I must provide more ground
for my harvest, and plant a larger quantity of corn
than I used to do; so I marked out a larger piece
of land, and began the fence in the same manner as
before, in which Friday not only worked very will-
ingly and very hard, but did it very cheerfully ; and
I told him what it was for; that it was for corn to
make more bread, pecause he was now with me,
and that I might have enough for him and myself
too. He appeared very sensible of that part, and
let me know that he thought I had much more
labor upon me on his account, than I had for my-
self; and that he would work the harder for me,
if I would tell him what to do.

This was the pleasantest year of all the life I
led in this place. Friday began to talk pretty
well, and understand the names of almost every-
thing I had occasion to call for, and of every place
I had to send him to, and talk a great deal to me;
so that, in short, I began now to have some use for
my tongue again, which, indeed, I had very little
occasion for before, that is to say, about speech.
Besides the pleasure of talking to him, I had a
singular satisfaction in the fellow himself. His
simple, unfeigned honesty appeared to me more
and more every day, and I began really to love the
creature; and, on his side, I believe he loved me
more than it was possible for him ever to love any-
thing before.

I had a mind once to try if he had any hankering
inclination for his own country again; and having
182 ROBINSON CRUSOE

taught him English so well that he could answer
me almost any questions, I asked him whether the
nation that he belonged to never conquered in bat-
tle? At which he smiled, and said, “Yes, yes, we
always fight the better”; that is, he meant, always
get the better in fight; and so we began the follow-
ing discourse: “You always fight the better,”
said I. “How came you to be taken prisoner then,
Friday ?”

Friday. My nation beat much for all that.

Master. How beat? If your nation beat them,
how came you to be taken?

Friday. They more many than my nation in the
place where me was; they take one, two, three, and
me. My nation overbeat them in yonder place,
where me no was: there my nation take one, two,
great thousand.

Master. But why did not your side recover you
from the hands of your enemies then?

Friday. They run one, two, three, and me, and
make go in the canoe; my nation have no canoe
that time.

Master. Well, Friday, and what does your na-
tion do with the men they take? Do they carry
them away and eat them, as these did?

Friday. Yes, my nation eat mans too; eat all
up.

Master. Where do they carry them?

Friday. Go to other place, where they think.

Master. Do they come hither?
ROBINSON CRUSOE 188

Friday. Yes, yes, they come hither; come other
else place.

Master. Have you been here with them?

Friday. Yes, I been here. (Points to the N.W.
side of the island, which, it seems, was their side.)

By this I understood that my man Friday had
formerly been among the savages who used to come
on shore on the farther part of the island, on the
same man-eating occasions that he was now
brought for; and, some time after, when I took the
courage to carry him to that side, being the same
I formerly mentioned, he presently knew the place,
and told me he was there once when they ate up
twenty men, two women, and one child. He could
not tell twenty in English, but he numbered them
by laying so many stones on a row, and pointing to
me to tell them over.

I have told this passage, because it introduces
what follows; that after I had had this discourse
with him, I asked him how far it was from our
island to the shore, and whether the canoes were
not often lost. He told me that there was no
danger, no canoes were ever lost; but that, after a
little way out to the sea, there was a current and a
wind, always one way in the morning, and the
other in the afternoon.

This I understood to be no more than the sets of
the tide, as going out or coming in; but I after-
wards understood it was occasioned by the great
draught and reflux of the mighty river Oroonoko,
184 ROBINSON CRUSOE

in the mouth of the gulf of which river, as I found
afterwards, our island lay; and this land which I
perceived to the W. and N.W. was the great island
Trinidad, on the north point of the mouth of the
river. I asked Friday a thousand questions about
the country, the inhabitants, the sea, the coast, and
what nations were near. He told me all he knew,
with the greatest openness imaginable. I asked
him the names of the several nations of his sort
of people, but could get no other name than Caribs;
from whence I easily understood that these were
the Carribbees, which our maps place on the part
of America which reaches from the mouth of the
river Oroonoko to Guiana, and onwards to St.
Martha. He told me that up a great way beyond
the moon, that was, beyond the setting of the moon,
which must be W. from their country, there dwelt
white bearded men, like me, and pointed to my
great whiskers, which I mentioned before; anid that
they had killed much mans, those were his words;
by all which I understood he meant the Spaniards,
whose cruelties in America had been spread over
the whole countries, and was remembered by all
the nations from father to son.

I inquired if he could tell me how I might come
from this island and get among those white men.
He told me, “Yes, yes, I might go in two canoe.”
T could not understand what he meant, or make
him describe to me what he meant by two canoe;
till at last, with great difficulty, I found he meant
ROBINSON CRUSOE 185

it must be in a large great boat, as big as two
canoes.

This part of Friday’s discourse began to relish
with me very well; and from this time I enter-
tained some hopes that, one time or other, I might
find an opportunity to make my escape from this
place, and that this poor savage might be a means
to help me to do it.

During the long time that Friday had now been
with me, and that he began to speak to me, and un-
derstand me, I was not wanting to lay a foundation
of religious knowledge in his mind}; particularly I
asked him one time, Who made him? The poor
creature did not understand me at all, but thought
I had asked who was his father. But I took it by
another handle, and asked him who made the sea,
the ground we walked on, and the hills and woods?
He told me it was one old Benamuckee, that lived
beyond all. He could describe nothing of this
great person, but that he was very old, much older,
he said, than the sea or the land, than the moon or
the stars. I asked him then, if this old person had
made all things, why did all things worship him?
He looked very grave, and with a perfect look of
innocence said, “All things do say O to him.” I
asked him if the people who die in his country went
away anywhere? He said, “Yes, they all went to
Benamuckee.” Then I asked him whether these
they ate up went thither too? He said “Yes.”

From these things I began to instruct him in the
186 ROBINSON CRUSOE

knowledge of the true God. I told him that the
great Maker of all things lived up there, pointing
up towards heaven; that He governs the world by
the same power and providence by which He had
made it; that He was omnipotent, could do every-
thing for us, give everything to us, take everything
from us; and thus, by degrees, I opened his eyes.
He listened with great attention, and received with
pleasure the notion of Jesus Christ being sent to
redeem us, and of the manner of making our pray-
ers to God, and His being able to hear us, even into
heaven. He told me one day that if our God could
hear us up beyond the sun, He must needs be a
greater God than their Benamuckee, who lived but
a little way off, and yet could not hear till they
went up to the great mountains where he dwelt to
speak to him. I asked him if he ever went thither
to speak to him? He said, No; they never went
that were young men; none went thither but the
old men, whom he called their Oowokakee, that is,
as I made him explain it to me, their religious, or
clergy; and that they went to say O (so he called
saying prayers), and then came back, and told
them what Benamuckee said. By this I observed
that there is a priestcraft even amongst the most
blinded, ignorant pagans in the world; and the
policy of making a secret religion in order to pre-
serve the veneration of the people to the clergy is
not only to be found in the Roman, but perhaps
among all religions in the world, even among the
most brutish and barbarous savages.
ROBINSON CRUSOE 187

I had, God knows, more sincerity than knowl-
edge in all the methods I took for this poor crea-
ture’s instruction, and must acknowledge, what I
believe all that act upon the same principle will
find, that in laying things open to him, I really in-
formed and instructed myself in many things that
either I did not know, or had not fully considered
before, but which occurred naturally to my mind
upon my searching into them for the information
of this poor savage. And I had more affection in
my inquiry after things upon this occasion than
ever I felt before; so that whether this poor wild
wretch was the better for me or no, I had great rea-
son to be thankful that ever he came to me.

In this thankful frame I continued all the re-
mainder of my time, and the conversation which
employed the hours between Friday and me was
such as made the three years which we lived there
together perfectly and completely happy, if any
such things as complete happiness can be found
in a sublunary state. The savage was now a good
Christian, a much better than I; though I have
reason to hope, and bless God for it, that we were
equally penitent, and comforted, restored peni-
tents. We had here the Word of God to read, and —
no farther off from His Spirit to instruct than if
we had been in England.

After Friday and I became more intimately ac-
quainted, and he could understand almost all
I said to him, and speak fluently, though in broken
English, to me, I acquainted him with my own
188 ROBINSON CRUSOE

story, or at least so much of it as related to my
coming into the place; how I had lived there, and
how long. I let him into the mystery of gunpow-
der and bullet, and taught him how to shoot; I
gave him a knife, which he was wonderfully de-
lighted with, and I made him a belt, with a frog
hanging to it, such as in England we wear hangers
in; and in the frog, instead of a hanger, I gave him
a hatchet.

I described to him the country of Europe, and
particularly England, which I came from; how we
lived, how we worshipped God, how we behaved
to one another, and how we traded in ships to all
parts of the world. I gave him an account of the
wreck which I had beer on board of, and showed
him, as near as I could, the place where she lay;
but she was beaten in pieces before, and gone.

I showed him the ruins of our boat, which we
lost when we escaped, and which I could not stir
with my whole strength then, but was now fallen
almost all to pieces. Upon seeing this boat, Fri-
day stood musing a great while, and at last says
he, “Me see such ‘boat like come to place at my na-
tion. We save the white mans from drown. The
boat full of white mans.” I asked him how many.
He told upon his fingers seventeen. I asked him
then what became of them. He told me, “They
live, they dwell at my nation.”

This put new thoughts into my head; for I pres-
ently imagined that these might be the men belong-
ROBINSON CRUSOE 189

ing to the ship that was cast away in sight of my
island, as I now call it.

Upon this I inquired of him more critically what
was become of them. He assured me they lived
still there; that they had been there about four
years; that the savages let them alone, and gave
them victuals to live. I asked him how it came to
pass they did not kill them and eat them. He said,
“No, they make brother with them”; that is, as I
understood him, a truce; and then he added,
“They no eat mans but when make the war fight”;
that is to say, they never eat any men but such as
come to fight with them and are taken in battle.

It was after this some considerable time, that
being on the top of the hill, at the east side of the
island (from whence, .as I have said, I had in a
clear day discovered the main continent of Amer-
ica), Friday, the weather being very serene, looks
very earnestly towards the mainland, and, in a
kind of surprise, falls a-jumping and dancing, and
calls out to me, “O joy! O glad! there see my coun-
try, there my nation!”

I observed an extraordinary sense of pleasure
appeared in his face, and his eyes sparkled, and
his countenance discovered a strange eagerness,
as if he had a mind to be in his own country again;
and I made no doubt but that if Friday could get
back to his own nation again, he would not only
forget all his religion, but all his obligation to
me; and would be forward enough to give his coun-
190 ROBINSON CRUSOE

trymen an account of me, and come back perhaps
with a hundred or two of them, and make a feast
upon me, at which he might be as merry as he
used to be with those of his enemies, when they
were taken in war.

But I wronged the poor honest creature very
much, for which I was very sorry afterwards.
However, as my jealousy increased, and held me
some weeks, I was a little more circumspect, and
not so familiar and kind to him as before; in which
I was certainly in the wrong, too, the honest, grate-
ful creature having no thought about it but what
consisted with the best principles, both as a reli-
gious Christian and as a grateful friend, as
appeared afterwards to my full satisfaction.

One day, walking up the same hill, but the
weather being hazy at sea, so that we could not
see the continent, I called to him, and said, “Fri-
day, do not you wish yourself in your own country,
your own nation?” “Yes,” he said, “T be much
O glad to be at my own nation.” “What would
you do there?” said I. “Would you turn wild
again, eat men’s flesh again, and be a savage as
you were before?” He looked full of concern, and
shaking his head, said, “No, no; Friday tell them
to live good; tell them to pray God; tell them to
eat corn-bread, cattle-flesh, milk, no eat man
again.” “Why, then,” said I to him, “they will
kill you.” He looked grave at that, and then said,
“No, they no kill me, they willing love learn.” He
meant by this they would be willing to learn. He
ROBINSON CRUSOE 191

added, they learned much of the bearded mans
that come in the boat. Then I asked him if he
would go back to them? He smiled at that, and
told me he could not swim so far. I told him I
would make a canoe for him. He told me he would
go, if I would go with him. “I go?” says I; “why,
they will eat me if I come there.” “No, no,” says
he, “me make they no eat you; me make they much
love you.”

From this time I confess I had a mind to ven-
ture over, and see if I could possibly join with
these bearded men, not doubting we might find
some method to escape from thence, being upon
the continent, and a good company together, bet-
ter than I could from an island forty miles off the
shore, and alone, without help. So, after some
days, I took Friday to work again, by way of dis-
course, and told him I would give him a boat to
go back to his own nation. Accordingly I carried
him to my frigate on the other side of the island,
showed it him, and we both went into it.

I found he was a most dexterous fellow at man-
aging it, and would make it go almost as swift and
fast again as I could. So when he was in I said
to him, “Well now, Friday, shall we go to your
nation?” He looked very dull at my saying so,
which, it seems, was because he thought the boat
too small to go so far. I told him then I had a
bigger; so the next day I went to the place where
the first boat lay which I had made, but which I
could not get into the water. He said that was

13
192 ROBINSON CRUSOE

big enough; but then, as I had taken no care of it,
and it had lain two or three and twenty years
there, the sun had split and dried it, that it was
in a manner rotten. Friday told me such a boat
would do very well, and would carry “much enough
victual, drink, bread.”

I told him we would go and make one as big
as that, and he should go home in it. He an-
swered not a word, but looked very grave and sad.
I asked him what was the matter with him? He
asked me again thus, “Why you angry mad with
Friday? what me done?” I told him I was not
angry with him at all. “No angry! no angry!”
says he, repeating the words several times. “Why
send Friday home away to my nation?” “Why,”
says I, “Friday, did you not say you wished you
were there?” ‘Yes, yes,” says he, “wish we both
there, no wish Friday there, no master there.” In
a word, he would not think of going there without
me. “I go there, Friday!” says I; “what shall I
do there?” He turned very quick upon me at
this: “You do great deal much good,” says he;
“you teach wild mans to be good, sober, tame
mans; you tell them know God, pray God, and
live new life.’ “Alas! Friday,” says I, “thou
knowest not what thou sayest. I am but an ig-
norant man myself.” “Yes, yes,” says he, “you
teachee me good, you teachee them good.” “No,
no, Friday,” says I, “you shall go without me;
leave me here to live by myself, as I did before.”
He looked confused again at that word, and run-
ROBINSON CRUSOE 193

ning to one of the hatchets which he used to wear,
he takes it up hastily, comes and gives it me.
“What must I do with this?” says Ito him. “You
take kill Friday,” says he. “What must I kill you
for?” said I again. He returns very quick, “What
you send Friday away for? Take kill Friday, no
send Friday away.” This he spoke so earnestly
that I saw tears stand in his eyes. In a word, I
so plainly discovered the utmost affection in him
to me that I told him then, and often after, that I
would never send him away from me if he was
willing to stay with me.

But still I found a strong inclination to my at-
tempting an escape, founded on the supposition
that there were seventeen bearded men there; and,
therefore, without any more delay I went to work
with Friday to find out a great tree proper to fell,
and make a large periagua, or canoe, to undertake
the voyage.

At last Friday pitched upon a tree growing so
near the water we might launch it when it was
made. Friday was for burning the hollow or
cavity of this tree out, to make it for a boat, but I
showed him how rather to cut it out with tools;
and in about a month’s hard labor we finished it,
and made it very handsome. After this, it cost us
near a fortnight’s time to get her along, as it were
inch by inch, upon great rollers into the water; but
when she was in, she would have carried twenty
men with great ease.

When she was in the water, and though she was
194 ROBINSON CRUSOE

so big, it amazed me to see with what dexterity and
how swift my man Friday would manage her, turn
her, and paddle her along. So I asked him if he
would, and if we might venture over in her.
“Yes,” he said, “he venture over in her very well,
though great blow wind.” However, I had a far-
ther design that he knew nothing of, and that was
to make a mast and sail, and to fit her with an
anchor and cable. As to a mast, I pitched upon a
straight young cedar tree, and I set Friday to
work to cut it down, and gave him directions how
to shape and order it. But as to the sail, that was
my particular care. I knew I had pieces of old
sails enough; with a great deal of awkward tedious
stitching for want of needles, I made a three-
cornered ugly thing, like what we call in England
a shoulder-of-mutton sail.

I was near two months rigging and fitting my
mast and sails; and, which was more than all, I
fixed a rudder to the stern of her to steer with;
and though I was but a bungling shipwright, yet
as I knew the usefulness, and even necessity, of
such a thing, I applied myself with so much pains
to do it, that at last I brought it to pass!

After all this was done too, I had my man Fri-
day to teach as to what belonged to the navigation
of my boat; for though he knew very well how to
paddle a canoe, he knew nothing what belonged to
a sail and a rudder; and was the most amazed
when he saw me work the boat to and again in the
sea by the rudder, and how the sail jibbed, and
ROBINSON CRUSOE 195

filled this way, or that way, as the course we sailed
changed.

I was now entered on the seven and twentieth
year of my captivity in this place; though the three
last years that I had this creature with me ought
rather to be left out of the account, my habitation
being quite of another kind than in all the rest of
the time. I kept the anniversary of my landing
here with the same thankfulness to God for His
mercies as at first; and if I had such cause of ac-
knowledgment at first, now I had an invincible im-
pression upon my thoughts that my deliverance
was at hand, and that I should not be another
year in this place. However, I went on with my
husbandry, digging, planting, fencing, as usual.

When the settled season began to come in, as the
thought of my design returned with the fair wea-
ther, I was preparing daily for the voyage. I was
busy one morning upon something of this kind,
when Friday came running from the shore and
flew over my outer wall, and before I had time to
speak to him, he cries out to me, “O master! O
master! O sorrow! O bad!” ‘“What’s the matter,
Friday?” says I. ‘“O yonder, there,” says he, “one,
two, three canoe one, two, three?’ “Well, Fri-
day,” says I, “do not be frighted.” I comforted
him as well as I could, and told him I was in as
much danger as he, and that they would eat me as
well as him. “But,” says I, “Friday, we must re-
solve to fight them. Can you fight, Friday?” ‘Me
shoot,” says he; “but there come many great num-
196 ROBINSON CRUSOE

ber.” “No matter for that,” said I again; “our
guns will fright them that we do not kill.” So
I asked him whether, if I resolved to defend him,
he would defend me, and stand by me, and do just
as I bid him. He said, “Me die when you bid die,
master.” So I went and fetched a good dram of
rum, and gave him; for I had been so good a hus-
band of my rum, that I had a great deal left.
When he had drank it, I made him take the two
fowling-pieces, which we always carried, and load
them with large swan-shot, as big as small pistol-
bullets. Then I took four muskets, and loaded
them with two slugs and five small bullets each;
and my two pistols I loaded with a brace of bullets
each. I hung my great sword, as usual, naked by
my side, and gave Friday his hatchet.

When I had thus prepared myself, I went up
to the side of the hill to see what I could discover;
and I found quickly, by my glass, that there were
one and twenty savages, three prisoners, and three
canoes, and that their whole business seemed to be
the triumphant banquet upon these three human
bodies.

I entered the wood, and with all possible wa-
riness and silence, Friday following close at my
heels, I marched till I came to the skirt of the
- wood, on the side which was next to them; only
that one corner of the wood lay between me and
them. Here I called softly to Friday, and show-
ing him a great tree, which was just at the corner
of the wood, I bade him to go to the tree and bring
ROBINSON CRUSOE 197

me word if he could see there plainly what they
were doing. He came immediately back to me,
and told me they were all about their fire, eating
the flesh of one of their prisoners, and that another
lay bound upon the sand; and, which fired all the
very soul within me, he told me it was not one of
their nation, but one of the bearded men, that
came to their country in the boat. I was filled
with horror at the very naming the white, bearded
man; and going to the tree, I saw plainly, by my
glass, a white man, who lay upon the beach of the
sea, with his hands and his feet tied with flags,
or things like rushes, and that he was an Euro-
pean, and had clothes on.

There was another tree, and a little thicket be-
yond it, about fifty yards nearer to them than the
place where I was, which, by going a little way
about, I saw I might come at undiscovered, and
that then I should be within half shot of them; so
I withheld my passion, though I was indeed en-
raged to the highest degree; and going back about
twenty paces, I got behind some bushes, which
held all the way till I came to the other tree; and
then I came to a little rising ground, which gave
me a full view of them, at the distance of about
eighty yards.

I had now not a moment to lose, for nineteen of
the dreadful wretches sat upon the ground, all
close huddled together, and had just sent the other
two to butcher the poor Christian, and bring him,
perhaps limb by limb, to their fire; and they were
198 ROBINSON CRUSOE

stooped down to untie the bands at his feet. I
turned to Friday: “Now, Friday,” said I, “do
exactly as you see me do; fail in nothing.” So I
set down one of the muskets and the fowling-piece
upon the ground, and Friday did the like by his;
and with the other musket I took my aim at the
savages, bidding him do the like. Then asking
him if he was ready, he said, “Yes.” “Then fire
at them,” said I; and the same moment I fired also.

Iriday took his aim so much better than I that
he killed two of them, and wounded three more;
and on my side I killed one, and wounded two.
They were, you may be sure, in a dreadful con-
sternation; and all of them who were not hurt
jumped up upon their feet, but did not immedi-
ately know which way to run, or which way to
look, for they knew not from whence their destruc-
tion came. [T*riday kept his eyes close upon me,
that, as I had bid him, he might observe what I
did. He sees me cock and present; he did the
same again. “Are you ready, Friday?” said I.
“Yes,” says he. “Let fly, then,” says I, “in the
name of God!” and with that I fired again among
the amazed wretches, and so did Friday; and as
our pieces were now loaded with what I called
swan-shot, or small pistol-bullets, we found only
two drop, but so many were wounded that they
ran about yelling and screaming like mad crea-
tures, all bloody, and miserably wounded most of
them; whereof three more fell quickly after,
though not quite dead.
ROBINSON CRUSOE 199

“Now, Friday,” says I, laying down the dis-
charged pieces, and taking up the musket which
was yet loaded, “follow me,” upon which I rushed
out of the wood, and showed myself, and Friday
close at my foot. As soon as I perceived they
saw me, I shouted as loud as I could, and bade
Friday do so too; and running as fast as I could,
loaden with arms as I was, I made directly towards
the poor victim, who was, as I said, lying upon
the beach. The two butchers had left him at our
first fire, and fled in a terrible fright to the seaside,
and had jumped into a canoe, and three more of
the rest made the same way. I turned to Friday,
and bid him step forwards and fire at them. He
understood me immediately, he killed two of them,
and wounded the third, so that he lay down in the
bottom of the boat as if he had been dead.

While my man Friday fired at them, I pulled
out my knife and cut the flags that bound the
poor victim; and loosing his hands and feet, I
lifted him up, and asked him in the Portuguese
tongue what he was. He answered in Latin,
Christianus; but was so weak and faint that he
could scarce stand or speak. I took my bottle out
of my pocket and gave it him, making signs that
he should drink, which he did; and I gave him a
piece of bread, which he ate. Then I asked him
what countryman he was; and he said, Espagniole;
and being a little recovered, let me know by all the
signs he could possibly make how much he was
in my debt for his deliverance. ‘“Seignior,” said
200 ROBINSON CRUSOE

I, with as much Spanish as I could make up, “we
will talk afterwards, but we must fight now. If
you have any strength left, take this pistol and
sword, and lay about you.” He took them very
thankfully, and no sooner had he the arms in his
hands but, as if they had put new vigor into him,
he flew upon his murderers like a fury, and had
cut two of them in pieces in an instant; for the
truth is, as the whole was a surprise to them, so
the poor creatures were so much frighted with the
noise of our pieces, that they fell down for mere
amazement and fear, and had no more power to
attempt their own escape than their flesh had to
resist our shot.

I called to Friday, and bade him run up to the
tree from whence we first fired, and fetch the arms
which lay there that had been discharged, which
he did with great swiftness; and then giving him
my musket, I sat down myself to load all the rest
again, and bade them come to me when they
wanted. While I was loading these pieces, there
happened a fierce engagement between the Span-
iard and one of the savages, who made at him with
one of their great wooden swords. The Spaniard,
who was as bold and as brave as cou!d be imagined,
though weak, had fought this Indian a good while,
and had cut him two great wounds on his head;
but the savage being a stout lusty fellow, closing
in with him, had thrown him down, being faint,
and was wringing my sword out of his hand, when
the Spaniard, though undermost, wisely quitting
ROBINSON CRUSOE 201

the sword, drew the pistol from his girdle, shot the
savage through the body, and killed him upon the
spot, before I, who was running to help him, could
come near him.

Friday being now left to his liberty, pursued the
flying wretches with no weapon in his hand but his
hatchet; and with that he despatched those three
who were wounded at first, and fallen, and all the
rest he could come up with; and the Spaniard
coming to me for a gun, I gave him one of the
fowling-pieces, with which he pursued two of the
savages, and wounded them both; but as he was
not able to run, they both got from him into the
wood, where Friday pursued them, and killed one
of them; but the other was too nimble for him, and
though he was wounded, yet had plunged himself
into the sea, and swam with all his might off to
those two who were left in the canoe; which three
in the canoe, with one wounded, who we know not
whether he died or no, were all that escaped our
hands of one and twenty. The account of the rest
is as follows :—

3 killed at our first shot from the tree.
2 killed at the next shot.

2 killed by Friday in the boat.

2 killed by ditto, of those at first wounded.

1 killed by ditto in the wood.

3 killed by the Spaniard.

4 killed, being found dropped here and there of
202 ROBINSON CRUSOE

their wounds, or killed by Friday in his
chase of them.

4 escaped in the boat, whereof one wounded, if
not dead.

——

21 in all.

Those that were in the canoe worked hard to get
out of gun-shot. Running to one of their canoes,
I jumped in, and bade Friday follow me. But
when I was in the canoe, I was surprised to find
another poor creature there, alive, bound hand
and foot for the slaughter, and almost dead with
fear. I immediately cut the twisted flags or
rushes, which they had bound him with, and would
have helped him up; but he could not stand or
speak, but groaned most piteously, believing that
he was only unbound in order to be killed.

When Friday came to him, I bade him speak to
him, and tell him of his deliverance; and pulling
out my bottle made him give the poor wretch a
dram; which, with the news of his being delivered,
revived him, and he sat up in the boat. But when
Friday came to hear him speak, and look in his
face, it would have moved any one to tears to
have seen how Friday kissed him, embraced him,
hugged him, cried, laughed, hallooed, jumped
about, danced, and sung; but when he came a little
to himself, he told me that it was his father.

It is not easy for me to express how it moved me
to see what ecstasy and filial affection had worked
ROBINSON CRUSOE 203

in this poor savage at the sight of his father, nor,
indeed, can I describe half the extravagances of
his affection after this. When he went in to him,
he would sit down by him, open his breast, and
hold his father’s head close to his bosom half an
hour together to nourish it; then he took his arms
and ankles, which were numbed and stiff with the
binding, and chafed and rubbed them with his
hands; and I, perceiving what the case was, gave
him some rum out of my bottle to rub them with,
which did them a great deal of good.

This action put an end to our pursuit of the
canoe with the other savages, and it was happy for
us that we did not, for it blew so hard within two
hours after, and continued blowing so hard all
night, that I could not suppose their boat could
live, or that they ever reached to their own coast.

But to return to Friday. He was so busy about
his father, that I could not find in my heart to take
him off for some time; but after I thought he
could leave him a little, I called him to me, and
I asked him if he had given his father any bread.
He shook his head, and said, “None; ugly dog eat
all up self.” So I gave him a cake of bread. I
had in my pocket also two or three bunches of my
raisins, so I gave him a handful of them for his
father. He had no sooner given his father these
raisins, but i saw him come out of the boat and run
away at such a rate that he was out of sight, as
it were, in an instant; and though I called, and
hallooed after him, it was all one, away he went,
204 ROBINSON CRUSOE

and in a quarter of an hour I saw him come back
again.

I found he had been quite home for an earthen
jug, or pot, to bring his father some fresh water,
and that he had got two more cakes or loaves of
bread. This water revived his father more than
all the rum or spirits I had given him, for he was
just fainting with thirst.

When his father had drank, I called to him to
know if there was any water left. He said, “Yes” ;
and I bade him give it to the poor Spaniard, and
I sent one of the cakes that Friday brought to
the Spaniard too, who was indeed very weak, and
was reposing himself upon a green place under the
shade of a tree; and whose limbs were also very
stiff, and very much swelled with the rude band-
age he had been tied with. When I saw that upon
Friday’s coming to him with the water he sat up
and drank and took the bread, and began to eat,
I went to him, and gave him a handful of raisins.
He tried to stand two or three times, but was really
not able, his ankles were so swelled and so painful
to him; so I bade him sit still, and caused Friday
to rub his ankles, and bathe them with rum, as he
had done his father’s.

Presently I spoke to the Spaniard to let Friday
help him up, if he could, and lead him to the boat,
and then he should carry him to our dwelling,
where I would take care of him. But Friday, a
lusty strong fellow, took the Spaniard quite up
upon his back, and carried him away to the boat,
ROBINSON CRUSOE 205

and set him down softly upon the side of the
gunnel of the canoe, with his feet in the inside of
it, and then lifted him quite in, and set him close
to his father; and presently stepping out again,
launched the boat off, and paddled it along the
shore faster than I could walk, though the wind
blew pretty hard too. So he brought them both
safe into our creek, and leaving them in the boat,
ran away to fetch the other canoe. As he passed
me, I spoke to him, and asked him whither he
went. He told me, “Go fetch more boat.” So
away he went like the wind, for sure never man
or horse ran like him; and he had the other canoe
in the creek almost as soon as I got to it by land;
so he wafted me over, and then went to help our
new guests out of the boat, which he did; but they
were neither of them able to walk, so that poor
Friday knew not what to do. To remedy this, I
soon made a kind of handbarrow to lay them on,
and Friday and I carried them up both together
upon it between us.

I then began to enter into a little conversation
with my two new subjects; and first, I set Friday
to inquire of his father what he thought of the
escape of the savages in that canoe, and whether
we might expect a return of them, with a power
too great for us to resist. His first opinion was
that the savages must, of necessity, be drowned,
or driven south to those other shores, where they
were as sure to be devoured as they were to be
drowned if they were cast away. But as to what
206 ROBINSON CRUSOE

they would do if they came safe on shore, it was
his opinion that they would tell their people they
were all killed by thunder and lightning, not by
the hand of man; and that the two which appeared,
viz., Friday and me, were two heavenly spirits, or
furies, come down to destroy them, and not men
with weapons.

I was under continual apprehensions for a good
while, and kept always upon my guard, I and all
my army; for as we were now four of us, I would
have ventured upon a hundred of them, fairly in
the open field, at any time.

In a little time, however, no more canoes appear-
ing, the fear of their coming wore off, and I began
to take my former thoughts of a voyage to the
main into consideration. But my thoughts were
a little suspended when I had a serious discourse
with the Spaniard, and when I understood that
there were sixteen more of his countrymen and
Portuguese, who, having been cast away, and made
their escape to that side, lived there at peace, in-
deed, with the savages, but were very sore put to
it for necessaries, and indeed for life.

He told me they were all of them very civil, hon-
est men, and they were under the greatest distress
imaginable, having neither weapons nor clothes,
nor any food, but at the mercy and discretion of
the savages; out of all hopes of ever returning to
their own country; and that he was sure, if I
would undertake their relief, they would live and
die for me.
ROBINSON CRUSOE 207

Upon these assurances, I resolved to venture to
relieve them, if possible, and to send the old savage
and this Spaniard over to them to treat. But
when we had gotten all things in a readiness to go,
the Spaniard himself started an objection, which
had so much prudence in it on one hand, and so
much sincerity on the other hand, that I could not
but be very well satisfied with it, and by his ad-
vice put off the deliverance of his comrades for at
least half a year. The case was thus.

He had been with us now about a month, during
which time I had let him see what stock of corn
and rice I had laid up; which, as it was more than
sufficient for myself, so it was not sufficient, at
least without good husbandry, for my family, now
it was increased to number four; but much less
would it be sufficient if his countrymen, who were,
as he said, fourteen, still alive, should come over;
and least of all would it be sufficient to victual
our vessel, if we should build one, for a voyage to
any of the Christian colonies of America. So he
told me he thought it would be more advisable to
let him and the two others dig and cultivate some
more land, as much as I could spare seed to sow;
and that we should wait another harvest, that we
might have a supply of corn for his countrymen
when they should come; for want might be a temp-
tation to them to disagree, or not to think them-
selves delivered, otherwise than out of one diffi-
culty into another.

His caution was so seasonable, and his advice so
14
208 ROBINSON CRUSOE

good that we fell to digging all four of us, as well
as the wooden tools permitted; and in about a
month’s time, by the end of which it was seed-time,
we had gotten as much land cured and trimmed
up as we sowed twenty-two bushels of barley on,
and sixteen jars of rice; which was, in short, all
the seed we had to spare.

Having now society enough, and our number be-
ing sufficient to put us out of fear of the savages,
if they had come, unless their number had been
very great, we went freely all over the island,
wherever we found occasion; and as here we had
our escape or deliverance upon our thoughts, it
was impossible, at least for me, to have the means
of it out of mine. To this purpose I marked out
several trees which I thought fit for our work, and
I set Friday and his father to cutting them down;
and then I caused the Spaniard, to whom I im-
parted my thought on that affair, to oversee and
direct their work. I showed them with what in-
defatigable pains I had hewed a large tree into
single planks, and I caused them to do the like, till
they had made about a dozen large planks of good
oak, near two feet broad, thirty-five feet long,
and from two inches to four inches thick. What
prodigious labor it took up, any one may imag-
ine.

At the same time I contrived to increase my lit-
tle flock of tame goats by capturing twenty young
kids to breed up with the rest. But above all, I
caused such a prodigious quantity of grapes to be
ROBINSON CRUSOE 209

hung up in the sun, that I believe we could have
filled sixty or eighty barrels.

It was now harvest, and our crop in good order.
It was not the most plentiful increase I had seen
in the island, but, however, it was enough to an-
swer our end; for from our twenty-two bushels we
brought in and thrashed out above two hundred
and twenty bushels, and the like in proportion of
the rice; which was store enough for our food to
the next harvest, though all the sixteen Spaniards
had been on shore with me; or if we had been
ready for a voyage, it would very plentifully have
yictualled our ship to have carried us to any part
of the world, that is to say, of America.

And now having a full supply of food for all the
guests I expected, I gave the Spaniard leave to go
over to the main, to see what he could do with
those he had left behind him there.

The Spaniard and the old savage, the father of
Friday, went away in one of the canoes which they
were brought in when they came as prisoners to
be devoured by the savages.

I gave each of them a musket, with a firelock on
it, and about eight charges of powder and ball,
charging them to be very good husbands of both,
and not to use either of them but upon urgent
occasion.

This was a cheerful work, being the first meas-
ures used by me, in view of my deliverance, for
now twenty-seven years and some days. I gave
them provisions of bread and of dried grapes suf-
210 ROBINSON CRUSOE

ficient for themselves for many days, and sufficient
for all their countrymen for about eight days’ time;
and wishing them a good voyage, I saw them go,
agreeing with them about a signal they should
hang out at their return, by which I should know
them again, when they came back, at a distance,
before they came on shore.

It was no less than eight days I had waited for
them, and I was fast asleep in my hutch one morn-
ing, when my man Friday came running in to me,
and called aloud, “Master, master, they are come,
they are come!”

I jumped up, and, regardless of danger, I went
without my arms, which was not my custom to do;
but I was surprised when, turning my eyes to the
sea, I presently saw a boat at about a league and
a half’s distance standing in for the shore, with a
shoulder-of-mutton sail, as they call it, and the
wind blowing pretty fair to bring them in. Upon
this I called Friday in, and bid him lie close, for
these were not the people we looked for, and that
we might not know yet whether they were friends
or enemies.

In the next place I went in to fetch my perspec-
tive-glass, to see what I could make of them; and
having taken the ladder out, I had scarce set my
foot on the hill, when my eye plainly discovered a
ship lying at an anchor at about two leagues and
a half’s distance from me, south-south-east, but not
above a league and a half from the shore. By my
observation, it appeared plainly to be an English
ROBINSON CRUSOE | 211

ship, and the boat appeared to be an English long-
boat.

I saw them run their boat on shore upon the
beach, at about half a mile from me, which was
very happy for me; for otherwise they would have
landed just, as I may say, at my door, and would
soon have beaten me out of my castle, and perhaps
have plundered me of all I had.

When they were on shore, I was fully satisfied
that they were Englishmen, at least most of them.
There were in all eleven men, whereof three of
them I found were unarmed, and, as I thought,
bound; and when the first four or five of them
were jumped on shore, they took those three out
of the boat, as prisoners. One of the three I could
perceive using the most passionate gestures of en-
treaty, affliction, and despair, even to a kind of
extravagance; the other two lifted up their hands
sometimes, and appeared concerned, indeed, but
not to such a degree as the first.

I was perfectly confounded at the sight, and
stood trembling with horror, expecting every mo-
ment when the three prisoners should be killed;
nay, once I saw one of the villains lift up his arm
with a great cutlass, as the seamen call it, or
sword, to strike one of the poor men; and I ex-
pected to see him fall every moment, at which all
the blood in my body seemed to run chill.

After I had observed the outrageous usage of the
three men by the insolent seamen, I observed the
_ fellows run scattering about the land, as if they
212 ROBINSON CRUSOE

wanted to see the country. I observed that the
three other men had liberty to go also where they
pleased; but they sat down all three upon the
ground, very pensive, and looked like men in des-
pair.

It was just at the top of high-water when these
people came on shore; they had carelessly stayed
till the tide was spent, and the water was ebbed
considerably away, leaving their boat aground.

They had left two men in the boat, who, as I
found afterwards, having drank a little too much
brandy, fell asleep. However, one of them waking
sooner than the other, and finding the boat too fast
aground for him to stir it, hallooed for the rest,
who were straggling about, upon which they all
soon came to the boat; but it was past all their
strength to launch her, the boat being very heavy,
and the shore on that side being a soft oozy sand, ©
almost like a quicksand.

In this condition, like true seamen, who are per-
haps the least of all mankind given to forethought,
they gave it over, and away they strolled about the
country again; and I heard one of them say aloud
to another, calling them off from the boat, “Why,
let her alone, Jack, can’t. ye? she will float next
tide”; by which I was fully confirmed in the main
inquiry of what countrymen they were.

All this while I kept myself very close, not once
daring to stir out of my castle, any farther than to
my place of observation near the top of the hill;
and very glad I was to think how well it was forti-
ROBINSON CRUSOE 213

fied. I knew it was no less than ten hours before
the boat could be on float again, and by that time
it would be dark, and I might be at more liberty
to see their motions, and to hear their discourse,
if they had any.

It was my design not to have made any attempt
till it was dark; but about two o’clock, being the
heat of the day, I found that, in short, they were
all gone straggling into the woods, and, as I
thought, were laid down to sleep. The three poor
distressed men, too anxious for their condition to
get any sleep, were, however, set down under the
shelter of a great tree, at about a quarter of a mile
from me, and, as I thought, out of sight of any of
the rest.

Upon this I resolved to discover myself to them,
and learn something of their condition. I came
as near them undiscovered as I could, and then,
before any of them saw me, I called aloud to them
in Spanish, “What are ye, gentlemen?”

They started up at the noise, but were ten times
more confounded when they saw me, and the un-
couth figure that I made. They made no answer
at all, but I thought I perceived them just going.
to fly from me, when I spoke to them in English.
“Gentlemen,” said I, “do not be surprised at me;
perhaps you may have a friend near you, when you
did not expect it.” “He must be sent directly
from heaven then,” said one of them very gravely
to me, and pulling off his hat at the same time to
me, “for our condition is past the help of man.” |
214 ROBINSON CRUSOE

“All help is from heaven, sir,” said I. “But can
you put a stranger in the way how to help you,
for you seem to me to be in some great distress?
I saw you when you landed; and when you seemed
to make applications to the brutes that came with
you, I saw one of them lift up his sword to kill
you.”

The poor man, with tears running down his
face, and trembling, looking like one astonished,



returned, “Am I talking to God, or man? Is ita
real man, or an angel?” ‘Be in no fear about that,
sir,’ said I. “If God had sent an angel to relieve
you, he would have come better clothed, and armed
after another manner than you see me in. Pray
lay aside your fears; I am a man, an Englishman,
and disposed to assist you, you see. I have one
servant only; we have arms and ammunition; tell
us freely, can we serve you? What is your case?”

“Our case,” said he, “sir, is too long to tell you
while our murderers are so near; but in short, sir,
I was commander of that ship; my men have mu-
ROBINSON CRUSOE 215

tinied against me, they have been hardly prevailed
on not to murder me; and at last have set me on
shore in this desolate place, with these two men
with me, one my mate, the other a passenger, where
we expected to perish, believing the place to be un-
inhabited, and know not yet what to think of it.”

“Where are those brutes, your enemies?” said I.
“There they lie, sir,” said he, pointing to a thicket
of trees. “My heart trembles for fear they have
seen us, and heard you speak. If they have, they
will certainly murder us all.”

‘Have they any firearms?” said I. He answered,
“They had only two pieces, and one which they left
in the boat.”

“Well,” says I, “let us retreat out of their view
or hearing, lest they awake, and we will resolve
further.’ So they willingly went back with me,
till the woods covered us from them.

“Look you, sir,” said I, “if I venture upon your
deliverance, are you willing to make two condi-
tions with me?” He anticipated my proposals, by
telling me that both he and the ship, if recovered,
should be wholly directed and commanded by me
in everything; and if the ship was not recovered,
he would live and die with me in what part of the
world soever I would send him; and the two other
men said the same.

“Well,” says I, “my conditions are but two. 1.
That while you stay on this island with me, you
will not pretend to any authority here; and if I put
arms into your hands, you will, upon all occasions,
216 ROBINSON CRUSOE

give them up to me, and do no prejudice to me or
mine upon this island; and in the meantime, be gov-
erned by my orders. 2. That if the ship is, or may
be, recovered, you will carry me and my man to
england, passage free.”

He gave me all these assurances; and, besides,
would owe his life to me, and acknowledge it upon
all occasions, as long as he lived.

“Well, then,” said I, “here are three muskets for
you, with powder and ball; tell me next what you
think is proper to be done.” He showed all the
testimony of his gratitude that he was able, but
offered to be wholly guided by me. I told him I
thought it was hard venturing anything; but the
best method I could think of was to fire upon them
at once, as they lay; and if any was not killed at
the first volley, and offered to submit, we might
save them, and so put it wholly upon God’s provi-
dence to direct the shot.

In the middle of this discourse we heard some of
them awake, and soon after we saw two of them on
their feet. I asked him if either of them were of
the men who he had said were the heads of the
mutiny? He said, “No.” ‘Well then,” said I,
“you may let them escape; and Providence seems
to have wakened them on purpose to save them-
selves. Now,” says I, “if the rest escape you, it is
your fault.”

Animated with this, he took the musket I had
given him in his hand, and a pistol in his belt, and
his two comrades with him, with each man a piece
ROBINSON CRUSOE 217

in his hand. The two men who were with him go-
ing first made some noise, at which one of the sea-
men who was awake turned about, and seeing them
coming cried out to the rest; but it was too late
then, for the moment he cried out they fired; I
mean the two men, the captain wisely reserving his
own piece. They had so well aimed their shot at
the men they knew that one of them was killed on
the spot, and the other very much wounded; but
not being dead, he started up upon his feet, and.
called eagerly for help to the other. But the cap-
tain stepping to him, told him he should call upon
God to forgive his villainy; and with that word
knocked him down with the stock of his musket, so
that he never spoke more. There were three more
in the company, and one of them was also slightly
wounded. By this time I was come; and when
they saw it was in vain to resist, they begged for
mercy. The captain told them he would spare
their lives if they would give him any assurance of —
their abhorrence of the treachery they had been
guilty of, and would swear to be faithful to him in
recovering the ship, and afterwards in carrying her
back to Jamaica, from whence they came. They
gave him all the protestations of their sincerity
that could be desired, and he was willing to believe
them, and spare their lives, which I was not
against, only I obliged him to keep them bound
hand and foot while they were upon the island.
While this was doing, I sent Friday with the
captain’s mate to the boat, with orders to secure
218 ROBINSON CRUSOE

her, and bring away the oars and sail, which they
did; and by and by three straggling men, that were
(happily for them) part of the rest, came back
upon hearing the guns fired; and seeing their cap-
tain, who before was their prisoner, now their con-
queror, they submitted to be bound also, and so our
victory was complete.

It now remained that the captain and I should
inquire into one another’s circumstances. I first
told him my whole history, which he heard with
an attention even to amazement. But when he
reflected from thence upon himself, and how I
seemed to have been reserved there on purpose to
save his life, the tears ran down his face, and he
could not speak a word more.

After this I carried him and his two men into my
apartment, where I refreshed them with such pro-
visions as I had, and showed them all the con-
trivances I had made during my long, long in-
habiting that place.

But at present, our business was to consider how
to recover the ship. The captain agreed with me
as to that, but told me he was perfectly at a loss
what measures to take, for that there were still six
and twenty hands on board, who having entered
into a cursed conspiracy, by which they had all for-
feited their lives to the law, would be hardened in
it now by desperation, and would carry it on,
knowing that if they were reduced, they should be
brought to the gallows as soon as they came to Eng-
land, or to any of the English colonies; and that
ROBINSON CRUSOE 219

therefore there would be no attacking them with
so small a number as we were.

I told him the first thing we had to do was to
stave the boat, which lay upon the beach, so that
they might not carry her off; and taking every-
thing out of her, leave her so far useless as not to
be fit to swim. Accordingly we carried all the
things on shore (the oars, mast, sail, and rudder
of the boat were carried away before, as above),
and knocked a great hole in her bottom that if they
had come strong enough to master us, yet they
could not carry off the boat.

While we were thus preparing our designs, and
had first, by main strength, heaved the boat up
upon the beach so high that the tide would not
float her off at high-water mark; and besides, had
broke a hole in her bottom too big to be quickly
stopped, and were sat down musing what we should
do, we heard the ship fire a gun, and saw her make
a waft with her ancient as a signal for the boat to
come on board. But no boat stirred; and they
fired several times, making other signals for the
boat.

At last, when all their signals and firings proved
fruitless, and they found the boat did not stir, we
saw them, by the help of my glasses, hoist another
boat out, and row towards the shore; and we found,
as they approached, that there was no less than ten
men in her, and that they had firearms with them.

As the ship lay almost two leagues from the
shore, we had a full view of them as they came.
220 ROBINSON CRUSOE

The captain knew the persons and characters of
all the men in the boat, of whom he said that there
were three very honest fellows, who, he was sure,
were led into this conspiracy by the rest, being
overpowered and frighted; but that as for the boat-
swain, who, it seems, was the chief officer among
them, and all the rest, they were as outrageous as
any of the ship’s crew, and were no doubt made
desperate in their new enterprise; and terribly
apprehensive he was that they would be too power-
ful for us.

I smiled at him, and told him that men in our
circumstances were past the operation of fear;
“For my part,” said I, “there seems to be but one
thing amiss in all the prospect of it.” ‘“What’s
that?” says he. “Why,” said I, “’tis that, as you
say, there are three or four honest fellows among
them, which should be spared; had they been all of
the wicked part of the crew I should have thought
God’s providence had singled them out. to deliver
them into your hands; for depend upon it, every
man of them that comes ashore is our own, and
shall die or live as they behave to us.”

As I spoke this with a raised voice and cheerful
countenance, I found it greatly encouraged him;
So we set vigorously to our business. We had,
upon the first appearance of the boat’s coming from
the ship, considered of separating our prisoners,
and had, indeed, secured them effectually.

Two of them, of whom the captain was less as-
sured than ordinary, I sent with Friday and one
ROBINSON CRUSOE 221 |

of the three delivered men to my cave, where they
were left bound, but promised if they continued
there quietly, their liberty in a day or two; but
that if they attempted their escape, they should
be put to death without mercy.

The other prisoners had better usage. Two of
them were kept pinioned, indeed, because the cap-
tain was not free to trust them; but the other two
were taken into my service, upon their captain’s
recommendation, and upon their solemnly engag-
ing to live and die with us; so with them and the
three honest men we were seven men well armed;
and I made no doubt we should be able to deal well
enough with the ten that were a-coming, consider-
ing that the captain had said there were three or
four honest men among them also.

Being on shore, the first thing they did they ran
all to their other boat; and it was easy to see that
they were under a great surprise to find her
stripped, as above, of all that was in her, and a
great hole in her bottom.

After they had mused a while upon this, they set
up two or three great shouts, to try if they could
make their companions hear; but all was to no
purpose. Then they came all close in a ring, and
fired a volley of their small arms, and the echoes
made the woods ring. But it was all one; those in
the cave we were sure could not hear, and those in
our keeping, though they heard it well enough, yet
durst give no answer to them.

They were so astonished at the surprise of this,
222 ROBINSON CRUSOE

that, as they told us afterwards, they resolved to
go all on board again, to their ship, and let them
know there that the men were all murdered, and
the longboat staved. Accordingly, they imme-
diately launched their boat again, and gat all of
them on board.



The captain was terribly amazed, and even con-
founded at this, believing they would go on board
the ship again, and set sail, giving up their com-
rades for lost, and so he should still lose the ship,
which he was in hopes we should have recovered ;
but he was quickly as much frighted the other way.

They had not long been put off with the boat but
we perceived them all coming on shore again; but
ROBINSON CRUSOE 223

with this new measure in their conduct, which it
seems they consulted together upon, viz., to leave
three men in the boat, and the rest to go on shore,
and go up into the country to look for their fellows.

This was a great disappointment to us, for now
we were at a loss what to do; for our seizing those
seven men on shore would be no advantage to us if
we let the boat escape, because they would then
row away to the ship, and then the rest of them
would be sure to weigh and set sail, and so our re-
covering the ship would be lost. However, we had
no remedy but to wait and see what the issue of
things might present. The seven men came on
shore, and the three who remained in the boat put
her off to a good distance from the shore, and came
to an anchor to wait for them; so that it was im-
possible for us to come at them in the boat.

Those that came on shore kept close together,
marching towards the top of the little hill under
which my habitation lay; and we could see them
plainly, though they could not perceive us. We
could have been very glad they would have come
nearer to us, so that we might have fired at them,
or that they would have gone farther off, that we
might have come abroad.

But when they were come to the brow of the hill,
where they could see a great way into the valleys
and woods which lay towards the north-east part,
and where the island lay lowest, they shouted and
hallooed till they were weary; and not caring, it

seems, to venture far from the shore, nor far from
15
224 ROBINSON CRUSOE

one another, they sat down together under a tree,
to consider of it.

We waited a great while, and were very uneasy
when, after long consultations, we saw them start
all up, and march down toward the sea. As
soon as I perceived them go towards the shore, I
imagined it to be, as it really was, that they had
given over their search, and were for going back
again. I presently thought of a stratagem to fetch
them back again, and which answered my end to a
tittle.

I ordered Friday and the captain’s mate to go
over the little creek westward, and as soon as they
came to a little rising ground, at about half a mile
distance, I bade them halloo as loud as they could,
and wait till they found the seamen heard them;
that as soon as ever they heard the seamen answer
them, they should return it again; and then keep-
ing out of sight, take a round, always answering
when the other hallooed, to draw them as far into
the island and among the woods as possible, and
then wheel about again to me by such ways as I
directed them.

They were just going into the boat when Friday
and the mate hallooed; and answering, they ran
along the shore westward, towards the voice they
heard, when they were presently stopped by the
creek, where the water being up, they could not get
over, and called for the boat to come up and set
them over, as, indeed, I expected.

When they had set themselves over, I observed
ROBINSON CRUSOE 225

that the boat being gone up a good way into the
creek, and, as it were, in a harbor within the land,
they took one of the three men out of her to go
along with them, and left only two in the boat, hav-.
ing fastened her to the stump of a little tree on
the shore.

That was what I wished for; and immediately,
leaving Friday and the captain’s mate to their busi-
ness, I took the rest with me, and crossing the
creek out of their sight, we surprised the two men
before they were aware; one of them lying on shore,
and the other being in the boat. The fellow on
shore was between sleeping and waking, and going
to start up. The captain ran in upon him, and
knocked him down, and then called out to him in
the boat to yield, or he was a dead man.

There needed very few arguments to persuade a
single man to yield when he saw five men upon him
and his comrade knocked down; besides, this was, it
seems, one of the three who were not so hearty in
the mutiny as the rest of the crew, and therefore
was easily persuaded not only to yield, but after-
wards to join very sincerely with us.

In the meantime, Friday and the captain’s mate
so well managed their business with the rest, that
they drew them, by hallooing and answering, from
one hill to another, and from one wood to another,
till they not only heartily tired them, but left them
where they were very sure they could not reach
back to the boat before it was dark. We had noth-
ing now to do but to watch for them in the dark,
226 ROBINSON CRUSOE

and to fall upon them, so as to make gure work
with them.

It was several hours after Friday came back to
me before they came back to their boat; and we
could hear the foremost of them, long before they
came quite up, calling to those behind to come
along, and could also hear them answer and com-
plain how lame and tired they were, and not able
to come any faster; which was very welcome news
tO us.

At length they came up to the boat; but ’tis im-
possible to express their confusion when they
found the boat fast aground in the creek, the tide
ebbed out, and their two men gone.

They hallooed again, and called their two com-
rades by their names a great many times; but no
answer. After some time we could see them, by
the little light there was, run about, wringing their
hands like men in despair, and that sometimes they
would go and sit down in the boat to rest them-
selves; then come ashore again, and walk about
again, and so the same thing over again.

My men would fain have me give them leave to
fall upon them at once in the dark; but I resolved
to wait, to see if they did not separate; and, there-
fore, to make sure of them, I drew my ambuscade
nearer, and ordered Friday and the captain to
creep upon their hands and feet, as close to the
ground as they could, that they might not be dis-
covered, and get as near them as they could pos-
sibly, before they offered to fire.
ROBINSON CRUSOE . 227

They had not been long in that posture but that
the boatswain, who was the principal ringleader of
the mutiny, and had now shown himself the most
dejected and dispirited of all the rest, came walk-
ing towards them, with two more of their crew.
The captain was so eager, as having this principal
rogue so much in his power, that he could hardly
have patience to let him come so near as to be sure
of him, for they only heard his tongue before; but
when they came nearer, the captain and Friday,
starting up on their feet, let fly at them.

The boatswain was killed upon the spot; the next
man was shot into the body, and fell just by him,
though he did not die till an hour or two after;
and the third ran for it.

At the noise of the fire I immediately advanced
with my whole army, which was now eight men.
We came upon them, indeed, in the dark, so
that they could not see our number; and I made
the man we had left in the boat, who was now one
of us, call to them by name, to try if I could bring
them to a parley, and so might perhaps reduce
them to terms, which fell out just as we desired ;
for indeed it was easy to think, as their condition
then was, they would be very willing to capitulate.
So he calls out as loud as he could to one of them,
“Tom Smith! Tom Smith!” Tom Smith an-
swered immediately. ‘“Who’s that? Robinson?”
For it seems he knew his voice. The other an-
swered, “Ay, ay; for God’s sake, Tom Smith, throw
228 ROBINSON CRUSOE

down your arms and yield, or you are all dead men
this moment.”

“Who must we yield to? Where are they?” says
Smith again. ‘Here they are,” says he; “here’s
our captain and fifty men with him, have been
hunting you this two hours; the boatswain is killed,
Will Frye is wounded, and I am a prisoner; and if
you do not yield, you are all lost.”

“Will they give us quarter then,” says Tom
Smith, “and we will yield?” “I'll go and ask, if
you promise to yield,” says Robinson. So he
asked the captain, and the captain then calls him-
self out, “You, Smith, you know my voice, if you
lay down your arms, immediately, and submit, you
shall have your lives, all but Will Atkins.”

Upon this Will Atkins cried out, “For God’s
sake, captain, give me quarter; what have I done?
They have been all as bad as I.” The captain told
him he must lay down his arms at discretion, and
trust to the governor’s mercy; by which he meant
me, for they all called me governor.

In a word, they all laid down their arms, and
begged their lives; and I sent the man that had
parleyed with them and two more, who bound them
all; and then my great army of fifty men, which,
particularly with those three, were all but eight,
came up and seized upon them all, and upon their
boat; only that I kept myself and one more out of
sight for reasons of state.

Our next work was to repair the boat, and think
ROBINSON CRUSOE 229

of seizing the ship; and as for the captain, now he
had leisure to parley with them, he expostulated
with them upon the villainy of their practices with
him, and at length upon the farther wickedness of
their design, and how certainly it must bring them
to misery and distress in the end, and perhaps to
the gallows.

They all appeared very penitent, and begged
hard for their lives. As for that, he told them
they were none of his prisoners, but the comman-
der of the island; that they thought they had set
him on shore in a barren, uninhabited island; but
it had pleased God so to direct them that the
island was inhabited, and that the governor was
an Englishman; that he might hang them all there,
if he pleased ; but as he had given them all quarter,
he supposed he would send them to England, to be
dealt with there as justice required, except Atkins,
whom he was commanded by the governor to ad-
vise to prepare for death, for that he would be
hanged in the morning.

Though this was all fiction of his own, yet it had
its desired effect. Atkins fell upon his knees, to
beg the captain to intercede with the governor for
his life; and all the rest begged for him, for God’s
sake, that they might not be sent to England.

It now occurred to me that the time of our de-
liverance was come, and that it would be a most
easy thing to bring these fellows in to be hearty
in getting possession of the ship; so I retired in
the dark from them, that they might not see what
230 ROBINSON CRUSOE

kind of a governor they had, and called the captain
to me.

Upon the captain’s coming to me, I told him my
project for seizing the ship, which he resolved to
put in execution the next morning. But in order
to execute it with more art, I told him he should
take Atkins and two more of the worst of them,
and send them pinioned to the cave where the
others lay.

They conveyed them to the cave, as to a prison.
The others I ordered to my bower, and as it was
fenced in, and they pinioned, the place was secure
enough, considering they were upon their behavior.

To these in the morning I sent the captain, who
was to try them, and tell me whether he thought
they might be trusted or no to go on board and sur-
prise the ship. He talked to them of the injury
done him, of the condition they were brought to;
and that though the governor had given them quar-
ter for their lives as to the present action, yet that
if they were sent to England they would all be
hanged in chains, to be sure; but that if they would
join in so just an attempt as to recover the ship, he
would have the governor’s engagement for their
pardon. They fell down on their knees to the cap-
tain, and promised that they would be faithful to
him to the last drop.

“Well,” says the captain, “I must go and tell the
governor what you say, and see what I can do to
bring him to consent to it.” So he brought me
an account of the temper he found them in, and
ROBINSON CRUSOE 231

that he verily believed they would be faithful.

However, that we might be very secure, I told
him he should go back again and choose out five of
them, and tell them they might see that he did not
want men, that he would take out those five to be
his assistants, and that the governor would keep
the other two and the three that were sent prison-
ers to the castle, my cave, as hostages for the fidel-
ity of those five.

This looked severe, and convinced them that the
governor was in earnest. However, they had no
way left them but to accept it; and it was now the
business of the prisoners, as much as of the cap-
tain, to persuade the other five to do their duty.

Our strength was now thus ordered for the ex-
pedition. 1. The captain, his mate, and passen-
ger. 2. Then the two prisoners of the first gang,
to whom, having their characters from the captain,
I had given their liberty, and trusted them with
arms. 3. The other two whom I had kept till now
in my bower, pinioned, but upon the captain’s mo-
tion had now released. 4. These five released at
last; so that they were twelve in all, besides five we
kept prisoners in the cave for hostages.

I asked the captain if he was willing to venture
with these hands on board the ship; for as for me
and my man Friday, I did not think it was proper
for us to stir, having seven men left behind, and it
was employment enough for us to keep them asun-
der and supply them with victuals. As to the five
in the cave, I resolved to keep them fast; but Fri-
232 ROBINSON CRUSOE

day went in twice a day to them, to supply them
with necessaries, and I made the other two carry
provisions to a certain distance, where Friday was
to take it.

When I showed myself to the two hostages, it
was with the captain, who told them I was the
person the governor had ordered to look after them,
and that it was the governor’s pleasure they should
not stir anywhere but by my direction; that if they
did, they should be fetched into the castle, and be
laid in irons; so that as we never suffered them to
see me as governor, so I now appeared as another
person, and spoke of the governor, the garrison,
the castle, and the like, upon all occasions.

The captain now had no difficulty before him but
to furnish his two boats, stop the breach of one,
and man them. He made his passenger captain
of one, with four other men; and himself, and his
mate, and five more went in the other; and they
contrived their business very well, for they came
up to the ship about midnight. As soon as they
came within call of the ship, he made Robinson
hail them, and tell them they had brought off the
men and the boat, but that it was a long time be-
fore they had found them, and the like, holding
them in a chat till they came to the ship’s side;
when the captain and the mate entering first, with
their arms, immediately knocked down the second
mate and carpenter with the butt-end of their
muskets, being very faithfully seconded by their
men. They secured all the rest that were upon the


I was ready to sink down with the surprise, for I saw my
deliverance put into my hands.
234 ROBINSON CRUSOE

main and quarter-decks, and began to fasten the
hatches to keep them down who were below; when
the other boat and their men entering the fore-
chains, secured the forecastle of the ship, and the
scuttle which went down into the cookroom, mak-
ing three men they found there prisoners.

When this was done, and all safe upon deck, the
captain ordered the mate, with three men, to break
into the roundhouse, where the new rebel captain
lay, and having taken the alarm was gotten up, and
with two men and a boy had gotten firearms in
their hands; and when the mate with a crow split
open the door, the new captain and his men fired
boldly among them, and wounded the mate with a
musket-ball, which broke his arm, and wounded
two more of the men, but killed nobody.

The mate calling for help, rushed however into
the roundhouse, wounded as he was, and shot the
new captain through the head, so that he never
spoke a word; upon which the rest yielded, and the
ship was taken effectually, without any more lives
lost.

As soon as the ship was thus secured, the captain
ordered seven guns to be fired, which was the sig-
nal agreed upon with me to give me notice of his
success, which you may be sure I was very glad to
hear, having sat watching upon the shore for it
till near two of the clock on the morning.

Having thus heard the signal plainly, I laid me
down; and it having been a day of great fatigue to
ROBINSON CRUSOE 235

me, I slept very sound, till I was something sur-
prised with the noise of a gun; and presently start-
ing up, I heard a man call me by the name of
“Governor, Governor,” and presently I knew the
captain’s voice; when climbing up to the top of the
hill, there he stood, and pointing to the ship, he
embraced me in his arms. “My dear friend and
deliverer,” says he, “there’s your ship, for she is
all yours, and so are we, and all that belong to her.”
I cast my eyes to the ship, and there she rode within
little more than half a mile of the shore.

I was at first ready to sink down with the sur-
prise; for I saw my deliverance, indeed, visibly put
into my hands, all things easy, and a large ship
just ready to carry me away whither I pleased to
go. At first, for some time I was not able to an-
swer him one word; but as he had taken me in his
arms, I held fast by him, or I should have fallen to
the ground.

All this while the poor man was in as great an
ecstasy as I; he said a thousand kind things to me,
and we rejoiced together.

I forgot not to lift up my heart in thankfulness to
heaven; and what heart could forbear to bless Him,
who had not only in a miraculous manner provided
for one in such a wilderness, and in such a deso-
late condition, but from whom every deliverance
must always be acknowledged to proceed?

When we had talked a while, the captain told me
he had brought me some little refreshment, such as
236 ROBINSON CRUSOE

the ship afforded, and such as the wretches that
had been so long his masters had not plundered
him of.

First, he had brought me a case of bottles full of
excellent cordial waters, six large bottles of Ma-
deira wine (the bottles held two quarts apiece),
two pounds of excellent good tobacco, twelve good
pieces of the ship’s beef, and six pieces of pork,
with a bag of peas, and about a hundredweight of
biscuit.

He brought me also a box of sugar, a box of
flour, a bag full of lemons, and two bottles of lime-
juice, and abundance of other things; but besides
these, and what was a thousand times more useful
to me, he brought me six clean new shirts, six very
good neck-cloths, two pair of gloves, one pair of
shoes, a hat, and one pair of stockings, and a very
good suit of clothes of his own, which had been
worn but very little; in a word, he clothed me from
head to foot.

After these ceremonies passed, and after all his
good things were brought into my little apartment,
we began to consult what was to be done with the
prisoners we had; for it was worth considering
whether we might venture to take them away with
us or no, especially two of them, whom we knew to
be incorrigible and refractory to the last degree;
and the captain said he knew they were such
rogues, that there was no obliging them; and if he
did carry them away, it must be in irons, as male-
factors, to be delivered over to justice at the first
ROBINSON CRUSOE 23T

English colony he could come at; and I found that
the captain himself was very anxious about it.

Upon this I told him that, if he desired it, I
durst undertake to bring the two men he spoke of
to make it their own request that he should leave
them upon the island. “I should be very glad of
that,” says the captain, “with all my heart.”

“Well,” says I, “I will send for them up, and talk
with them for you.” So I caused Friday and the
two hostages, for they were now discharged, their
comrades having performed their promise; I say,
I caused them to go to the cave and bring up the
' five men, pinioned as they were, to the bower, and
keep them there till I came.

After some time I came thither, dressed in my
new habit; and now I was called governor again.
Being all met, and the captain with me, I caused
the men to be brought before me, and I told them I
had had a full account of their villainous behavior
to the captain, and how they had run away with
the ship, and were preparing to commit further
robberies, but that Providence had ensnared them
in their own ways, and that they were fallen into
the pit which they had digged for others.

I let them know that by my direction the ship
had been seized, that she lay now in the road, and
they might see, by and by, that their new captain
had received the reward of his villainy, for that
they might see him hanging at the yard-arm; that
as to them, I wanted to know what they had to say
238 ROBINSON CRUSOE

why I should not execute them as pirates, taken in
the fact, as by my commission they could not doubt
I had authority to do.

One of them answered in the name of the rest
that they had nothing to say but this, that when
they were taken the captain promised them their
lives, and they humbly implored my mercy. But I
told them I knew not what mercy to show them;
for as for myself, I had resolved to quit the island
with all my men, and had taken passage with the
captain to go for England. And as for the cap-
tain, he could not carry them to England other
than as prisoners in irons, to be tried for mutiny,
and running away with the ship; the consequence
of which, they must needs know, would be the gal-
lows; so that I could not tell which was best for
them, unless they had a mind to take their fate in
the island. If they desired that, I did not care, as
I had liberty to leave it. I had some inclination to
give them their lives, if they thought they could
shift on shore.

Upon this they appeared very thankful, and I
accordingly set them at liberty, and bade them re-
tire into the woods to the place whence they came,
and I would leave them some firearms, some am-
munition, and some directions how they should
live very well, if they thought fit.

Upon this I prepared to go on board the ship, but
told the captain that I would stay that night to
prepare my things, and desired him to go on board
in the meantime, and keep all right in the ship, and
ROBINSON CRUSOE 239

send the boat on shore the next day for me; order-
ing him, in the meantime, to cause the new captain,
who was killed, to be hanged at the yard-arm, that
these men might see him.

When the captain was gone, I sent for the men
to come to my apartment, and entered seriously
into discourse with them of their circumstances. I
told them I thought they had made a right choice;
that if the captain carried them away, they would
certainly be hanged. I showed them the new cap-
tain hanging at the yard-arm of the ship, and told
them they had nothing less to expect.

When they had all declared their willingness to
stay, I then told them I would let them into the
story of my living there, and put them into the way
of making it easy to them. Accordingly I gave
them the whole history of the place, and of my
coming to it, showed them my fortifications, the
way I made my bread, planted ay corn, cured my
grapes; and in a word, all that was necessary to
make them easy. I told them the story also of the
sixteen Spaniards that were to be expected, for
whom I left a letter, and made them promise to
treat them in common with themselves.

I left them my firearms, viz., five muskets, three
fowling-pieces, and three swords. I had above a
barrel and half of powder left; for after the first
year or two I used but little, ana wasted none. I
gave them a description of the way I managed the
goats, and directions to milk and fatten them, and

to make both butter and cheese.
16
240 ROBINSON CRUSOE

Having done all this, I went on board ship and
carried on board, for relics, the great goat-skin cap
I had made, my umbrella, and my parrot; also I
forgot not to take the money I formerly mentioned,
which had lain by me so long useless that it was
grown rusty or tarnished, and could hardly pass
for silver till it had been a little rubbed and han-
dled; as also the money I found in the wreck of the
Spanish ship.

And thus I left the island, the 19th of Decem-
ber, as I found by the ship’s account, in the year
1686, after I had been upon it eight and twenty
years, two months, and nineteen days, being de-
livered from this second captivity the same day of
the month that I first made my escape in the barco-
longo, from among the Moors of Sallee.

In this vessel, after a long voyage, I arrived in
England, the 11th of June, in the year 1687, having
been thirty and five years absent.

I went down into Yorkshire; but my father was
dead, and my mother and all the family extinct,
except that I found two sisters, and two of the
children of one of my brothers; and as I had been
long ago given over for dead, there had been no pro-
vision made for me; so that, in a word, I found
nothing to relieve or assist me; and that little
money I had would not do much for me as to set-
tling in the world.

With this view I took shipping for Lisbon, where
I arrived in April following; my man Friday ac-
companying me very honestly in all these ram-
ROBINSON CRUSOE 241

blings, and proving a most faithful servant upon
all occasions.

When I came to Lisbon, I found out, by inquiry,
and to my particular satisfaction, my old friend
the captain of the ship who first took me up at sea
off of the shore of Africa. He was now grown
old, and had left off the sea, having put his
son into his ship, and who still used the Brazil
trade.

After some passionate expressions of the old ac-
quaintance, I inquired, you may be sure, after my
plantation and my partner. The old man told me
he had not been in the Brazils for about nine years;
but that he could assure me that, when he came
away, my partner was living; but the trustees,
whom I had joined with him to take cognizance of
my part, were both dead.

He told me he could not tell exactly to what de-
gree the plantation was improved ; but this he
knew, that my partner was growing exceedingly
rich upon the enjoying but one-half of it; and that,
to the best of his remembrance, he had heard that
the king’s third of my part, which was, it seems,
granted away to some other monastery or religious
house, amounted to above two hundred moidores a
year. That as to my being restored to a quiet pos-
session of it, there was no question to be made of
that, my partner being alive to witness my title,
and my name being also enrolled in the register of
the country.

I showed myself a little concerned and uneasy at
242 ROBINSON CRUSOE

this account, and inquired of the old captain how it
came to pass that the trustees should thus dispose
my effects, when he knew that I had made my will
and had made him, the Portuguese captain, my uni-
versal heir, etc. He told me that was true; but
that as there was no proof of my being dead, he
could not act as executor until some certain ac-
count should come of my death.

When this was passed, the old man began to ask
me if he should put me into a method to make my
claim to my plantation? I told him I thought to
go over to it myself. He said I might do so if I
pleased; but that if I did not, there were ways
enough to secure my right, and immediately to ap-
propriate the profits to my use; and as there were
ships in the river of Lisbon just ready to go away
to Brazil, he made me enter my name in a public
register, with his affidavit, affirming, upon oath,
that I was alive, and that I was the same person
who took up the land for the planting the said plan-
tation at first.

This being regularly attested by a notary, and a
procuration affixed, he directed me to send it, with
a letter of his writing, to a merchant of his ac-
quaintance at the place, and then proposed my
staying with him till an account came of the re-
turn.

Never anything was more honorable than the
proceedings upon this procuration; for in less than
seven months I received a large packet from the
survivors-of my trustees, the merchants, for whose
ROBINSON CRUSOE 243

account I went to sea, in which were the following
particular letters and papers enclosed.

First, there was the account-current of the prod-
uce of my farm or plantation from the year when
their fathers had balanced with my old Portugal
captain, being for six years; the balance appeared
to be 1174 moidores in my favor.

Secondly, there was the account of four years
more, while they kept the effects in their hands, be-
fore the government claimed the administration,
as being the effects of a person not to be found,
which they called civil death; and the balance of
this, the value of the plantation increasing,
amounting to 38,892 crusadoes, which made 3241
moidores.

Thirdly, there was the prior of the Augustines’
account, who had received the profits for above
fourteen years; but not being able to account for
what was disposed to the hospital, very honestly
declared he had 872 moidores not distributed,
which he acknowledged to my account; as to the
king’s part, that refunded nothing.

There was a letter of my partner’s, congratulat-
ing me very affectionately upon my being alive,
giving me an account how the estate was improved,
and what it produced a year, concluding with a
hearty tender of his friendship, and. that of his
family. He sent me also five chests of excellent
sweetmeats, and a hundred pieces of gold uncoined,
not quite so large as moidores. By the same fleet,
my two merchant trustees shipped me 1200 chests
244 ROBINSON CRUSOE

of sugar, 800 rolls of tobacco, and the rest of the
whole account in gold.

I was now master, all on a sudden, of above
£5000 sterling in money, and had an estate, as I
might well call it, in the Brazils of above a thou-
sand pounds a year.

The first thing I did was to recompense my orig-
inal benefactor, my good old captain, who had
been first charitable to me in my distress, kind
to me in my beginning, and honest to me at the
end.

In the next place, my interest in the Brazils
seemed to summon me thither; but now I could not.
tell how to think of going thither till I had settled
my affairs, and left my effects in some safe hands
behind me. At first I thought of my old friend
the widow, who I knew was honest, and would be
just to me; but then she was in years, and but poor,
and for aught I knew might be in debt; so that, in
a word, I had no way but to go back to England
myself, and take my effects with me.

It was some months, however, before I resolved
upon this; and therefore, as I had rewarded the old
captain fully, and to his satisfaction, so I began to
think of my poor widow, whose husband had been
my first benefactor, and she, while it was in her
power, my faithful steward and instructor. So
the first thing I did, I got a merchant in Lisbon to
write to his correspondent in London, to go find
her out, and carry her in money an hundred pounds
from me, and to talk with her, and comfort her in
ROBINSON CRUSOE. 245

her poverty, by telling her she should, if I lived,
have a further supply. At the same time I sent
my two sisters in the country each of them an hun-
dred pounds, they being, though not in want, yet
not in very good circumstances; one having been
married, and left a widow; and the other having a
husband not so kind to her as he should be.

But among all my relations or acquaintances, I
could not yet pitch upon one to whom I durst com-
mit the gross of my stock, that I might go away to
the Brazils, and leave things safe behind me; and
this greatly perplexed me. So I resolved, at last,
to go to England with my wealth, where, if I
arrived, I concluded I should make some acquain-
tance, or find some relations, that would be faithful
to me; and accordingly I prepared to go for Eng-
land with all my wealth.

Having thus settled my affairs, sold my cargo,
and turned all ‘my effects into good bills of ex-
change, my next difficulty was which way to go to
England. I had been accustomed enough to the
sea, and yet I had a strange aversion to going to
England by sea at that time. In a word, I was so
prepossessed against my going by sea at ail, except
from Calais to Dover, that I resolved to travel all
the way by land; and as I have troubled you with
none of my sea journals, so I shall trouble you now
with none of my land journal.

I landed safe at Dover, the 14th of January,
after having had a severe cold season to travel in.

I was now come to the centre of my travels, and
246 ROBINSON CRUSOE

had in a little time all my new-discovered estate
safe about me, the bills of exchange which I
brought with me having been very currently paid.

My principal guide and privy councillor was my
good ancient widow; who, in gratitude for the
money I had sent her, thought no pains too much,
or care too great, to employ for me; and I trusted
her so entirely with everything, that I was per-
fectly easy as to the security of my effects; and in-
deed I was very happy from my beginning, and
now to the end, in the unspotted integrity of this
good gentlewoman.

And now I began to think of leaving my effects
with this woman and setting out for Lisbon, and
so to the Brazils. But now another scruple came
in my way, and that was religion; for as I had
entertained some doubts about the Roman religion
even while I was abroad, especially in my state of
solitude, so I knew there was no going to the Bra-
zils for me, much less going to settle there, unless
I resolved to embrace the Roman Catholic religion
without any reserve; unless on the other hand I
resolved to be a sacrifice to my principles, be a
martyr for religion, and die in the Inquisition.
So I resolved to stay at home, and if I could
find means for it, to dispose of my plantation.

To this purpose I wrote to my old friend at Lis-
bon, who in return gave me notice that he could
easily dispose of it there; but that if I thought fit
to give him leave to offer it in my name to the two
merchants, the survivors of my trustees. who lived
ROBINSON CRUSOE 247

in the Brazils, who must fully understand the
value of it, who lived just upon the spot, and whom
I knew were very rich, so that he believed they
would be fond of buying it, he did not doubt but I
should make 4000 or 5000 pieces of eight the more
of it.

Accordingly I agreed, gave him order to offer it
to them, and he did so; and in about eight months
more, the ship being then returned, he sent me an
account that they had accepted the offer, and had
remitted 33,000 pieces of eight to a correspondent
of theirs at Lisbon to pay for it. ;

In return, I signed the instrument of sale in the
form which they sent from Lisbon, and sent it to
my old man, who sent me bills of exchange for
32,800 pieces of eight to me, for the estate; re-
serving the payment of 100 moidores a year to him,
the old man, during his life, and 50 moidores after-
wards to his son for his life, which I had promised
them, which the plantation was to make good as a
rent-charge. And thus I have given the first part
of a life of fortune and adventure, a life of Provi-
dence’s chequer-work, and of a variety which the
world will seldom be able to show the like of; be-
ginning foolishly, but closing much more happily
than any part of it ever gave me leave so much as
to hope for.

Any one would think that in this state of compli-
cated good fortune I was past running any more
hazards; and so indeed I had been, if other circum-
248 ROBINSON CRUSOE

stances had concurred. But I was inured to a
wandering life, had no family, not many relations,
nor, however rich, had I contracted much acquaint-
ance; and though I had sold my estate in the Bra-
zils, yet I could not keep the country out of my
head, and had a great mind to be upon the wing
again; especially I could not resist the strong in-
clination I had to see my island, and to know if
the poor Spaniards were in being there, and how
the rogues I left there had used them.

My true friend, the widow, earnestly dissuaded
me from it, and so far prevailed with me, that for
almost’ seven years she prevented my running
abroad, during which time I took my two nephews,
the children of one of my brothers, into my care.
The eldest having something of his own, I bred up
as a gentleman, and gave him a settlement of some
addition to his estate after my decease. The other
I put out to a captain of a ship, and after five
years, finding him a sensible, bold, enterprising
young fellow, I put him into a good ship, and sent
him to sea; and this young fellow afterwards drew
me in, as old as I was, to farther adventures my-
self.

In the meantime, I in part settled myself here;
for, first of all, I married, and that not either to
my disadvantage or dissatisfaction, and had three
children, two sons and one daughter; but my wife
dying, and my nephew coming home with good
success from a voyage to Spain, my inclination to
go abroad, and his importunity, prevailed, and en-
ROBINSON CRUSOE 249

gaged me to go in his ship as a private trader to the
East Indies. This was in the year 1694. ;

In this voyage I visited my new colony in the
island, saw my successors the Spaniards, had the
whole story of their lives, and of the villains I left
there; how at first they insulted the poor Span-
iards, how they afterwards agreed, disagreed,
united, separated, and how at last the Spaniards
were obliged to use violence with them; how they
were subjected to the Spaniards; how honestly the
Spaniards used them; a history, if it were entered
into, as full of variety and wonderful accidents as
my own part; particularly also as to their battles
with the Caribbeans, who landed several times
upon the island, and as to the improvement they
made upon the island itself; and how five of them
made an attempt upon the mainland, and brought
away eleven men and five women prisoners, by
which, at my coming, I found about twenty young
children on the island.

Here I stayed about twenty days, left them sup-
plies of all necessary things, and particularly of
arms, powder, shot, clothes, tools, and two work-
men, which I brought from England with me, viz.,
a carpenter and a smith.

Besides this, I shared the island into parts with
them, reserved to myself the property of the whole,
but gave them such parts respectively as they
agreed on; and having settled all things with them,
and engaged them not to leave the place, I left
them there.
250 ROBINSON CRUSOE

From thence I touched at the Brazils, from
whence I sent a bark, which I bought there, with
more people, to the island; and in it, besides other
supplies, I sent seven women, being such as I
found proper for service, or for wives to such as
would take them. As to the Englishmen, I prom-
ised them to send them some women from England
with a good cargo of necessaries, if they would
apply themselves to planting; which I afterwards
performed; and the fellows proved very honest and
diligent after they were mastered, and had their
properties set apart for them. I sent them also
from the Brazils five cows, three of them being big
with calf, some sheep, and some hogs, which, when
I came again, were considerably increased.

But all these things, with an account how three
hundred Caribbees came and invaded them, and
ruined their plantations, and how they fought with
the whole number twice, and were at first defeated
and three of them killed; but at last a storm de-
stroying their enemies’ canoes, they famished or
destroyed almost all the rest, and renewed and re-
covered the possession of their plantation, and still
lived upon the island ;—all these things, with some
very surprising incidents in some new adventures
of my own, for ten years more, I may perhaps give
a farther account of hereafter.

THH END Ww. B.C.



xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20081113_AAAAQO' PACKAGE 'UF00074472_00001' INGEST_TIME '2008-11-15T10:41:33-05:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T17:37:23-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 299212; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-14T16:38:19-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '593473' DFID 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLIX' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00001.jp2'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' 03e354bceea5a60446ff99d61d5d59f1
'SHA-1' a6758ec45bc30d3f5922881701c68920c27b498d
EVENT '2011-10-27T16:50:40-04:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'34754' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLIY' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
7b8bbdf2d954eff5069781678b00a301
f1183e6d3efee644a68c1bc3ab6951de3a894c14
'2011-10-27T16:49:48-04:00'
describe
'882' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLIZ' 'sip-files00001.pro'
6f14cd66de0a4f79922be9548a09a0be
4c988aa4ee195942469a3324378e08fd679ef7d1
'2011-10-27T16:49:53-04:00'
describe
'8383' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLJA' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
b38dfa48007beb50a5f0843283767f14
105897eee16e010cc67fda010802a0a65c51964c
'2011-10-27T16:54:20-04:00'
describe
'4766096' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLJB' 'sip-files00001.tif'
03d43349e0171d9ffa4b03c117cae322
5b7260c43991df50b58dcb5c43a52341a6450d5a
'2011-10-27T16:51:00-04:00'
describe
'137' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLJC' 'sip-files00001.txt'
7fa1591cac0a6d83244788fa6be1b7d3
547f1385af32668d5bd550067e8564fc91bf5770
'2011-10-27T16:54:51-04:00'
describe
'2484' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLJD' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
426d4b2b86c7b986a0792d7aae42a833
3114c35feddb0980ba1772a8f39675d0d946cae9
'2011-10-27T16:54:21-04:00'
describe
'593978' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLJE' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
5213bcef759ccf5162b489e46d4edad5
f0b2da932607641f4fd7d99333233f2583f04871
'2011-10-27T16:51:51-04:00'
describe
'117870' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLJF' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
49aba13da912c8fa07fde00e54caa6af
6ae08aaba82672e6eab47c2f4b25940e84ddfbc6
'2011-10-27T16:54:38-04:00'
describe
'3410' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLJG' 'sip-files00002.pro'
b6c20a9f7b66c9d0da03c81ce8425476
3696efc180aac545f2f48d49edf9f4fd1f51c58b
'2011-10-27T16:52:15-04:00'
describe
'34608' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLJH' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
7b6a92b6d4ed84fe4cf23689b220d496
fbd5aa8a15c8235f9012daa9778dcc9d66345183
'2011-10-27T16:55:33-04:00'
describe
'4768808' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLJI' 'sip-files00002.tif'
3db0dde3f2ec168854e504c6376bef62
4fa4e00fde909584f973258e811155b28a53e1da
'2011-10-27T16:49:42-04:00'
describe
'173' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLJJ' 'sip-files00002.txt'
aa54ba8302c7bdd5c133c11ec46e2dfb
59ed4c62b26be345d2ade4b23ccdec9435f66ff2
'2011-10-27T16:50:17-04:00'
describe
'9557' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLJK' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
017e3cec97454e8e106bc69e31f7d1c2
6d7d41168450d2b2dae2588dc09e324592527987
'2011-10-27T16:52:50-04:00'
describe
'593643' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLJL' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
9a034524fff38c367fd0b70c80327c74
97e15ed009abcb9dff8a4bfc51d1048cf7c640b9
'2011-10-27T16:49:21-04:00'
describe
'62982' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLJM' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
ee898f7c508010d0b65ca313b82b9f62
92b97eb98cdbe8b981bf8fa713bdf4be1ccda920
'2011-10-27T16:50:16-04:00'
describe
'4954' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLJN' 'sip-files00003.pro'
d9acd0333ca56bfa8fbb8fb311092086
01741e31ef237e7944243571c55fdf528eee7721
'2011-10-27T16:54:19-04:00'
describe
'20282' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLJO' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
077b061421517ea5523f1e4b98471793
b96242fd9d154cbda223a20078c2b26005a339ef
'2011-10-27T16:56:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLJP' 'sip-files00003.tif'
483f5e0393d90458446936b4ee66814f
657e2379fda154553d138cc7c6caadd7b3f561d4
'2011-10-27T16:50:07-04:00'
describe
'261' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLJQ' 'sip-files00003.txt'
6bc9d20cbf558daf98512b7bc041be3a
8c6061e26f18afd7215fe01cfbed1b7e35f11416
'2011-10-27T16:54:18-04:00'
describe
'6293' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLJR' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
6f7ab8c020f135ebfb9127c7f6404569
b4a793e0f28434f6debd2b731fdb6b6f79346bc1
'2011-10-27T16:52:42-04:00'
describe
'593987' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLJS' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
73271433dd02f9bb7c0d1b40431b2219
0e77a099989a9b763590b71fcca465a320d78ab6
'2011-10-27T16:50:19-04:00'
describe
'18057' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLJT' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
815459e4fee22449dad66d7fecb8629f
0b857092edb22f6e44646187abba157ae10fbe1e
'2011-10-27T16:56:08-04:00'
describe
'4005' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLJU' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
6fc054fec6659416fb6219f63e55d602
e697c98247d6a62e345655d059fbd24af800fe65
'2011-10-27T16:55:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLJV' 'sip-files00004.tif'
2307324f2898e4126896cc5c4c902a3c
dcac9a70b7a168885eb9c051198e70f668e69c66
'2011-10-27T16:53:18-04:00'
describe
'1172' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLJW' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
22c281818c8b5f65709df635e43f791c
020fc21af6585a46c474fa4cb4dfc3470beecfed
'2011-10-27T16:49:09-04:00'
describe
'593425' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLJX' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
c74411d851f01445e4b17bfb57ad4403
5f6fd1560ff583b2ccf5f943cf969b8eb310885f
describe
'143381' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLJY' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
823e4b3cbe1a2a29c0a405c31e84ee95
85cec63c9459107033bb6a4a2a83209d1857f0d6
'2011-10-27T16:53:07-04:00'
describe
'31912' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLJZ' 'sip-files00005.pro'
bd443a1a6f9a22017906fcc7b8a3ba21
906e60338d69584091fa2ba75fce837856266e41
'2011-10-27T16:49:23-04:00'
describe
'45922' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLKA' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
fc638e7455b2c6c2fe399ded7dab51ab
0916ccf3f588f22042f8952a6114ea4a0b45818c
'2011-10-27T16:53:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLKB' 'sip-files00005.tif'
aa859963756b9516f43d79d0811f889f
f8e8d9f475b20a59cd946145d3c3f42c0f6f5ce7
'2011-10-27T16:51:05-04:00'
describe
'1324' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLKC' 'sip-files00005.txt'
946caac585b6f297efdf3051f22046ee
39a6255c6d90ac0ea93a79f0fa8942c80cde5057
'2011-10-27T16:54:30-04:00'
describe
'11157' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLKD' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
d33fad6a41c36bb81b3d1935bc5c70aa
603fcbde4b33c0dfb25f51260f903cf389e6d3b1
'2011-10-27T16:50:52-04:00'
describe
'594015' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLKE' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
431303a437f70d261877f39564dfac88
f66ae5e9037c05e90b1ac85884029672c7c74c39
'2011-10-27T16:50:06-04:00'
describe
'152029' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLKF' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
44fea864ba40d326b163abed0c453b97
41a0b9c687911e32a90764f277295314a14143b4
'2011-10-27T16:52:35-04:00'
describe
'40803' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLKG' 'sip-files00006.pro'
a39bd33309e90649765c4d8d2f3b2944
ad156f71fd31267e7d356cd612de07e2c3eaddc7
'2011-10-27T16:48:09-04:00'
describe
'49570' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLKH' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
2e74a112fec5277ad98e6db2ed39e023
335cb95eb248671e73c451e6a68fa130f1389fef
'2011-10-27T16:51:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLKI' 'sip-files00006.tif'
7214596f5c4be8a71ae96cf5e48e4c68
0063e75d9d76eb3b6f41957f7e7943e086052384
'2011-10-27T16:52:04-04:00'
describe
'1595' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLKJ' 'sip-files00006.txt'
1de59aeaa1a5b0e0024f4e54c59898de
83d950bad937292a2881a4c6b18a3571add19d58
'2011-10-27T16:50:53-04:00'
describe
'12033' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLKK' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
de5e2db350ded19554dae1f0f3d6385d
b42003668bc25edccca488dbaa9fabdf5b83b087
'2011-10-27T16:50:05-04:00'
describe
'593596' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLKL' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
3286ced2c13a7173ef93b6b9ab636f9e
4c4fcb44df62a3b6baedcabb19efbf9980f13383
'2011-10-27T16:50:55-04:00'
describe
'117517' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLKM' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
b22ae3ec8f6c5c72fc7ffb8251aaf7e9
1f06dc81b4580205381bc8243a90dfb06c092a74
'2011-10-27T16:54:23-04:00'
describe
'3840' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLKN' 'sip-files00007.pro'
1b4de76c15e3beaca75518f1a9841724
9b10e4f5c183a01e5c5af4dd5831714b16607cba
'2011-10-27T16:56:16-04:00'
describe
'36381' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLKO' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
2d7c25825664ec56c0a974ba534f5d6f
d1de1a8eb3b8c83e09b1aca76adbcb25a10fe95f
'2011-10-27T16:51:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLKP' 'sip-files00007.tif'
7c8ccf25eedeb683be7fb44551b91839
0fa040f584c1713068f64b200244addf65b14b6a
'2011-10-27T16:51:59-04:00'
describe
'230' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLKQ' 'sip-files00007.txt'
4f8386c51a8cafbbbc0104888a319455
015b38b067db00b7db3edbdd884a17b18b3632d5
'2011-10-27T16:55:24-04:00'
describe
'10421' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLKR' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
cfa3cedd4d60f339e7d7b644439d4c95
8d9590dc656fa667c35e1cec8f16ccbb9e97b22b
'2011-10-27T16:52:45-04:00'
describe
'594008' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLKS' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
9ddc300f3ab683e029fb8ef61673ae17
c588b35d7f3fa8fdbeda14ac5c0e890a12ec7caf
'2011-10-27T16:53:19-04:00'
describe
'152734' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLKT' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
55773fc0aeefe3b9180dd18809907cbf
c64aa944662cfbe7a4ef0284c4805b2a36b79dff
'2011-10-27T16:56:15-04:00'
describe
'40370' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLKU' 'sip-files00008.pro'
f651b5317308beacb75e471c45294ed8
f712a6a8994127785ba65a61e307c5ad674d39d5
'2011-10-27T16:52:56-04:00'
describe
'48435' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLKV' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
f9bd935da5036a6a09160c9c5825109e
27111f24274cbaea7dc9383c215cd694e1189d74
'2011-10-27T16:55:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLKW' 'sip-files00008.tif'
c5af622d41460c6a5c2bb2f613915e60
a49cc522286ee1d73e12e0c4a3ed12ed547c4c4f
'2011-10-27T16:55:17-04:00'
describe
'1577' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLKX' 'sip-files00008.txt'
321b7d72884428b9394f0af123661a6e
864140e088a4d09a17147d62946a3779cc10e134
'2011-10-27T16:49:56-04:00'
describe
'11876' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLKY' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
08ad28bf16a9889a725d96ef12067dab
6f8d4b0c81a63d7b49ba33610a923992150b296d
'2011-10-27T16:56:10-04:00'
describe
'593669' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLKZ' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
2e80f2038ee827cbcf005bffe7a4813c
b39c183235bd943b994974e57744807648bb4869
'2011-10-27T16:49:46-04:00'
describe
'155317' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLLA' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
a366c7e91ed8e45e1c7f6147e86bc5ce
2b332c814f3a83bac4a794cdba8851cff05c8400
'2011-10-27T16:51:49-04:00'
describe
'38520' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLLB' 'sip-files00009.pro'
a015dbf455d617cde6b5c4a8de0f207a
d76370289dc7f7d98e7e3b72f42e663126d387d6
'2011-10-27T16:51:07-04:00'
describe
'49681' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLLC' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
749f0cccf1e3ca42f4e5e7cbb870ffe3
58679abbf396b857dbfd30fedfa64e354254bbdd
'2011-10-27T16:50:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLLD' 'sip-files00009.tif'
254946072bc103c5b23d646f72df9961
ee3ce10fe12659916a85c1c7a3494ea896a68701
'2011-10-27T16:49:28-04:00'
describe
'1527' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLLE' 'sip-files00009.txt'
230400875fc86ac1b0619560cc944002
4a1397a60834dad65d8069ced5d8dda12004b672
'2011-10-27T16:53:42-04:00'
describe
'12296' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLLF' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
302d2df33422118080ef5cc9b0b8b08f
3b7ea5db94febd14eea96d7453ad970427765817
'2011-10-27T16:54:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLLG' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
b11ad3dbf232a953e2b50fcefe68fa67
5cc31a19c864154143d1ffb0e097368927430a16
describe
'156480' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLLH' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
1ebe4837eb1ace15ff5d4b2ff5e6a137
c2a3b806d8d0aca35bf4ca738228d32964d443a3
'2011-10-27T16:55:14-04:00'
describe
'38646' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLLI' 'sip-files00010.pro'
049b9e3837854a8e6b1213583120e95d
dc126aa9419156b3f034ae5d0f278eeaa45305c4
'2011-10-27T16:56:09-04:00'
describe
'50380' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLLJ' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
1b353ba936943f51e26a76702f1c5f41
6f9e8ffe5a90753dacda1ca1b1eee05654781771
'2011-10-27T16:55:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLLK' 'sip-files00010.tif'
631218fda3532168edb8061564f04a72
83f40675f36e6436cabff1e717fb2c5c2a37db8a
'2011-10-27T16:52:53-04:00'
describe
'1513' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLLL' 'sip-files00010.txt'
76d83393d12d0be18f8e4e5ce4ec904f
12907376345cf25225a9b46091ec5c264f017964
'2011-10-27T16:50:35-04:00'
describe
'12068' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLLM' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
584881bc5a6e654c034498743d9dff0b
62d2e487be626ef03193ba2cbb8970e806582164
'2011-10-27T16:55:49-04:00'
describe
'593646' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLLN' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
d58c42df9255bbef7864f71e090d051b
1b6c0a098c64135f7664e9a924fa66390b74a5ff
'2011-10-27T16:49:31-04:00'
describe
'167050' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLLO' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
c4d2ca9eace0b24b37d0b4fa8b371c8b
f34602474cd54631750a5c014b2b1337777c8128
'2011-10-27T16:53:57-04:00'
describe
'40570' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLLP' 'sip-files00011.pro'
8486bc6e3f5bd4ecbbd693fdf9df52b8
22e589ef7f9e215c9e6972199c74e3293693c93a
'2011-10-27T16:55:26-04:00'
describe
'53231' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLLQ' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
c6ebb9aab3475abc0c4e17b63798edd9
d76106b40fa83b20a0dd615b257776daef051610
'2011-10-27T16:52:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLLR' 'sip-files00011.tif'
1f6d7d85ceab6ca6792d27bbeb375b02
3d341b564b7b72bdc509aa56fb6efa75d2ee4f71
'2011-10-27T16:52:00-04:00'
describe
'1605' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLLS' 'sip-files00011.txt'
de5e0a3356f6e7edb7127f488d5185b4
b15c202ab0fdc66efbc98f19c514399450b3bfd5
describe
'12431' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLLT' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
d05406ec24df4fa50cbde81bd0c3a49b
abe8307e2cd635e62c2b66cac9f4821bd09752cb
'2011-10-27T16:49:59-04:00'
describe
'594016' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLLU' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
d6e7ea70553673ec34a5893a9231fb6a
4e76cb57cecfeff519eaa0bf6588665b9e51b984
'2011-10-27T16:55:44-04:00'
describe
'152233' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLLV' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
a72881a6a6af327353849e33b2ad845c
d761d652dbd95b167e9ea958ad00ca3769c4c2fe
'2011-10-27T16:55:41-04:00'
describe
'39452' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLLW' 'sip-files00012.pro'
84fd4651405a0063e759fd35a184a894
b1aee0bfb04164531330f36f3c4a3b8c95bc96c4
'2011-10-27T16:50:22-04:00'
describe
'49112' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLLX' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
967c11e64dfea6b1fa77507425450081
ae88c43cda1f035c141b5f304996785d9c35a264
'2011-10-27T16:49:41-04:00'
describe
'4768804' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLLY' 'sip-files00012.tif'
b23f827c044fffd21d7560a9dc657920
7a02582c706a7d873ba3ab08f027b9bbf5a6ca69
'2011-10-27T16:51:28-04:00'
describe
'1564' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLLZ' 'sip-files00012.txt'
3f06bde2b8067ba5327f49064f5c8fab
32ecef076aadec6e98c4d3e84fa9b3e532e9d663
'2011-10-27T16:50:57-04:00'
describe
'11893' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLMA' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
4d99093484642859c24df5e433f55f23
2440352447e107a8dd4e8663a9a0b36ae75596a3
'2011-10-27T16:49:40-04:00'
describe
'593981' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLMB' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
6f253b2e3a52ccc69d9ab91be87239d2
2a1b5678bd58842572b4a5fec360f8e94cdedaa9
'2011-10-27T16:54:56-04:00'
describe
'163648' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLMC' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
c48899ef0a41dcf581dcfe3117f49d48
446fe4745844593a7a5ccd2a194f66cee277d320
'2011-10-27T16:56:17-04:00'
describe
'38988' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLMD' 'sip-files00013.pro'
541bbb4e5ecf158ed9c993801bdf4b20
72784832f1fd7a0524d6eb5170a36c2f0526a0f5
'2011-10-27T16:51:29-04:00'
describe
'52424' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLME' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
2d3626ffd38581fc0b8765bb24fade7a
807a9e97b255a06dfa1842fc8b364d22ff2331c9
'2011-10-27T16:50:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLMF' 'sip-files00013.tif'
c66f4379c899aae86c1f365db9806d0c
6a6e1f708f4a6c3a87b6e7a02ddaff670ef60a63
'2011-10-27T16:51:36-04:00'
describe
'1574' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLMG' 'sip-files00013.txt'
2de5eeb45b965c5ddac27c88c5740a8a
983cb73df50d99929b06713c6ae3e8364ce3c5ac
'2011-10-27T16:49:39-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'12693' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLMH' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
a03098f3ccd3f8b1f6a99aff83f4bdfd
7c8ab3fc68462250af1b5d71a3dc70b2d7d6f5b8
'2011-10-27T16:54:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLMI' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
3e6ac07b0d3a449f7e61ac5350ded6a0
2a3c8dc3d49b9192ceb2904e78f7e8ed8db17c24
'2011-10-27T16:52:07-04:00'
describe
'159092' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLMJ' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
e25e4f0c3d7d236809626db663f16746
cdff3c405c21f9eea14d2bdbf8248d2a9a7e894f
'2011-10-27T16:48:31-04:00'
describe
'40989' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLMK' 'sip-files00014.pro'
14113fdc62f274d9434b5b2ef92db0da
78eb923f6e9ba9a891f937be93c402eb9e8074c5
'2011-10-27T16:49:45-04:00'
describe
'50597' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLML' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
52450e30a7bfd79e161772b3c785c55f
79d2363f65eaad54148fe2a7c60f7389ee3015d2
'2011-10-27T16:50:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLMM' 'sip-files00014.tif'
9d2053dfb442302beeb2effe5e048333
3fda1b0c09aefbb0ef8048149488934e50e52ccf
'2011-10-27T16:52:24-04:00'
describe
'1597' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLMN' 'sip-files00014.txt'
013724c4cbab426d7c4bec9a04a75ee3
50d2f60bd0b3177f916787cf0420283780fc05e7
'2011-10-27T16:55:07-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'12031' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLMO' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
b159c2fdcc642e46f24970aba5348032
8d2710871d5060ec29f82824cb86955c885c760d
'2011-10-27T16:51:15-04:00'
describe
'593933' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLMP' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
d393e3cb43ea6b29ee4644e01e7f09bf
d17443bb029c7f551ffc7285723467c13cba27fe
'2011-10-27T16:56:04-04:00'
describe
'173080' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLMQ' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
1c48b13d631bf9fe985ef8bab6e29647
234f3bbd9b344ada3e89f242d9808bccd701a6f0
'2011-10-27T16:50:30-04:00'
describe
'40460' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLMR' 'sip-files00015.pro'
77c480b5da0ca4058e80c4431716ca4f
6115db715146c909b737ffe0144615b32609ee1d
'2011-10-27T16:54:02-04:00'
describe
'52945' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLMS' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
4cadfc30981a76ebf6085a81fe098eb8
e2c981eb9f2568704e333d4a47f246dad97eaaa8
'2011-10-27T16:54:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLMT' 'sip-files00015.tif'
d1d643da96be2b229aa1a0e3621795b2
9941fb84d4404bf7c1bbd6231c130f72f54d3570
describe
'1588' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLMU' 'sip-files00015.txt'
36c0aaeff97a0f0860704522cf7efbdb
b1d4a1026e784cd2576cde388d49f533a7dda20a
'2011-10-27T16:49:54-04:00'
describe
'12310' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLMV' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
9e2413f7bae2387be8f8eb6a3964ee06
44e90c8c62d0f54e441c37ee49371baef7ae9510
'2011-10-27T16:49:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLMW' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
41686849934f1a28d0d92c0dbc320274
6c35543871b1ca7dd8de789129453265b8d15664
describe
'156635' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLMX' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
b6e260bec108d1a01264d9298b974a40
e976d79da82b495348334976884c7eabff5be585
'2011-10-27T16:55:28-04:00'
describe
'40533' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLMY' 'sip-files00016.pro'
232e705fac58ccb4fd36fd0dd927fa15
76ca7458a52e4eec823ba92285ffd2d99fa204c1
'2011-10-27T16:52:03-04:00'
describe
'49563' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLMZ' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
0a54dbf04b2cbff72c3abf00a726567c
81ce25a1d7e1ca9ad26d56bb3b542aa910763c6c
'2011-10-27T16:50:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLNA' 'sip-files00016.tif'
245d8a0300f934c825c6b2ca41a437ba
c6f394faea55a64d083abb2f1a64f513ec75f863
describe
'1606' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLNB' 'sip-files00016.txt'
b3a24dad5f5e38f4a4789eaa0c6803a2
21641c53430bb9832ef00090aaf66f8c9480219e
'2011-10-27T16:53:47-04:00'
describe
'12110' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLNC' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
886f961b75c5330bef8b486cd0286d13
747490dbf98362bbade8620c7fca46512c8a013f
'2011-10-27T16:56:23-04:00'
describe
'593982' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLND' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
70b6a03e396f6ae917942e7209db8579
78f33b301452c0ba5e88b5490fadc20e909cdacc
'2011-10-27T16:50:48-04:00'
describe
'153455' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLNE' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
82cd4176704eedac5e265b484197898c
20487a51416ac4cc95ea9e16c13bc5a8747ab03b
'2011-10-27T16:53:56-04:00'
describe
'40676' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLNF' 'sip-files00017.pro'
89a80dfba9586ce1a05064ab0934852c
8174d806b18b1bd7febf19a03b3f8f39b4a314fe
'2011-10-27T16:48:21-04:00'
describe
'50314' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLNG' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
7fe8925beb5f8ec8fe1a7363c562add6
bdbbfd7abcc38d6f2b8cf0a6ca884e08c8f7eba5
'2011-10-27T16:51:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLNH' 'sip-files00017.tif'
81d17a557bd330465168c2837a9bfb4e
cc7b67edd14778032e67ca315239535fae5decff
'2011-10-27T16:54:15-04:00'
describe
'1590' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLNI' 'sip-files00017.txt'
365ad04f46fd718954a29dab4461f7e3
eb781d17da4c6b8e448a8c76f468d51bf06084b1
describe
'11875' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLNJ' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
f5c5b22d2aebe0bc46046d777ac424aa
b767f666513d7b590b3cfab301873d0202991cef
'2011-10-27T16:55:05-04:00'
describe
'593676' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLNK' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
6baece2a933033e9cf8b646af53eb03a
03571c5395ac453e72aa6e6abbef27bd7315aab6
describe
'157678' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLNL' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
58a9cc971c262d8ab26637363570e2c6
b321a6af0b1aa175bd0672b0692c1074d9e5cf44
'2011-10-27T16:54:10-04:00'
describe
'40093' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLNM' 'sip-files00018.pro'
75f5886c49e87515b5721bc860ed7031
582c05bef9a7b8018db36daf1dfc0bf1561c701a
describe
'50939' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLNN' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
a65f7a8fbf20c527170ab08131bcc2dd
13edb53bc1ef06f1c62c6bcb6cbe424978095feb
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLNO' 'sip-files00018.tif'
26a6640f44f691736f8c69fcf94f32e7
b90a6f60a3dc5fe9552493caa9caa8599220dedc
'2011-10-27T16:55:02-04:00'
describe
'1593' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLNP' 'sip-files00018.txt'
0f4eeec0f8f68d4e4ed0fd8ffc5f1ba4
488cb5b5b7a3f95adf3d170c36e8f85592b5b206
'2011-10-27T16:48:29-04:00'
describe
'12160' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLNQ' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
10907f148b6a5402dc2dceab030938fd
70c2e993e1ccc3b4574eedf1a32c7481fa303bc2
describe
'594010' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLNR' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
86cb0c1de9d91c08e4b39566b6dbf10a
9c0938f3f745a60efd3d43c48cfa403529f105ef
'2011-10-27T16:54:16-04:00'
describe
'154242' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLNS' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
9023c9ced106a7ce9865b155d7ba6899
cdf86c6c8a2d217e160b61173045c160cb579dc5
'2011-10-27T16:53:37-04:00'
describe
'40712' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLNT' 'sip-files00019.pro'
3cd536fbcb77c5e769cf850112b9550e
ca7cead461d59289a7d6bc2e28dff32c81a10eeb
'2011-10-27T16:54:39-04:00'
describe
'52004' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLNU' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
e8879782a515ab3e19f40af4fca5e5ab
f562368345b37faa02def21aeb04d6b8411c46f9
'2011-10-27T16:55:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLNV' 'sip-files00019.tif'
df943f418e0a54e6baf1988ab9e77529
e4c764285125c0065b9d23b910db5456d334db8b
'2011-10-27T16:51:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLNW' 'sip-files00019.txt'
8e49c0cf13d4d36d3c2f0a5b5a861f05
6005aef135590a94510133568e442d09c30c3124
'2011-10-27T16:51:38-04:00'
describe
'12379' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLNX' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
9813acb39a4b0314c2edf0ed485e82ba
3c0750423e2a8dac7d53d88e980c11899b357df3
'2011-10-27T16:53:40-04:00'
describe
'592360' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLNY' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
b8f0c91aa8a1d97257cba821f591a25e
acf5906fbbc3d20b3769ca56ee736ddcacc5748f
describe
'154971' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLNZ' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
94397c26c420affe25d43661aaa2ce49
03001543705efb18687537dd27b419ec780e89ea
describe
'39871' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLOA' 'sip-files00020.pro'
22c27ce31d46ee53e8d166a379939120
de8f8b448e1050d92578055365b220cdae01c219
'2011-10-27T16:51:52-04:00'
describe
'50153' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLOB' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
581878919ecf6bca476f2b27c197f950
8a6f8cd4bf788f50e446a0d036f03ffa69ee6ff5
'2011-10-27T16:52:08-04:00'
describe
'4755600' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLOC' 'sip-files00020.tif'
d0a7691c30d3cc5671960ded128cd22d
0dcf6c198145e52eb60276544461baea6aa57609
'2011-10-27T16:52:54-04:00'
describe
'1562' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLOD' 'sip-files00020.txt'
ff4b52247216db984d508f802e3bf61d
dc9847f07448f7c39304df29f47f0dce65bccc1c
describe
'11770' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLOE' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
7b9c84ecf6d619cf420dabe5a46bc554
75afb3e162498162f1e0acd7af7636f5e5600874
describe
'593677' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLOF' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
81c8365d7a4a78892ede232067e0bef3
e5f76dd6f6dcabb2efbe0053ff9f217cb8d303b3
'2011-10-27T16:55:48-04:00'
describe
'159364' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLOG' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
dfc65dee14807ef3bbfb96394b93288f
25c62c9aedd5b9f7070384dbe12344533a17a6f6
'2011-10-27T16:56:02-04:00'
describe
'39788' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLOH' 'sip-files00021.pro'
6d620172efab24e5f36dde2039a79b0f
5413384dc456880bfdca24be37e051bf2cd63039
describe
'51016' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLOI' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
e0924a416a486c4275012bfe520f5baf
f44459fbf1e4deed77b081782117d37688f3062e
'2011-10-27T16:48:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLOJ' 'sip-files00021.tif'
4b5b7b126e4d523f0290950081cdfddc
928b76f1cfb025d8c185c99b16f18ec61e029e7b
'2011-10-27T16:50:44-04:00'
describe
'1557' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLOK' 'sip-files00021.txt'
955d9aa22c033ecac5e00a1df75ebb59
6d96f5d20d1b7e621843dc38b90c8824931ac1fb
'2011-10-27T16:52:05-04:00'
describe
'12456' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLOL' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
9d4e052c5479380b977d8875d071eb1c
cd5d376537409b0c9b50ebf91d52a3b73e27a5cd
'2011-10-27T16:50:15-04:00'
describe
'593675' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLOM' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
029a254d28c9be874cb63c2f46768f70
b44cbcd1920e78abb03819883fab428dac9cef94
'2011-10-27T16:52:38-04:00'
describe
'156668' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLON' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
f56ecd0cd7a3abbed057be20702bbcb3
40d2c80e09dfbe7f33d31cbb795742dbdeeaff14
'2011-10-27T16:52:47-04:00'
describe
'39536' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLOO' 'sip-files00022.pro'
fa6a313d0f95115e4a0e6bafab145613
b19438af03ae0456bf07000fc757add1c5b6af26
describe
'51010' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLOP' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
7edb47c717d93dd285120065c3ac51c5
12d05b99067f6ce2cda9053e23796f015a29e991
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLOQ' 'sip-files00022.tif'
ecd5425525420c91938167eba60fd85d
933d7cc60eef6dcb83c8da11bc126912a990c441
'2011-10-27T16:51:09-04:00'
describe
'1545' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLOR' 'sip-files00022.txt'
ce43c089cb41592ce2c20d7250ab8e47
2978438499f488470fca34ec00562156dd90e04b
'2011-10-27T16:49:20-04:00'
describe
'12193' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLOS' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
4f6802d1edfe4d8adb43406c2d7dc50f
884be89ab616e4cbdf63e472d337af062b446c4e
'2011-10-27T16:53:10-04:00'
describe
'593665' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLOT' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
752e411b80948f469be12ae88b4d37df
46906360a403df98af4fc325a28854ad6e2c5630
describe
'154393' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLOU' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
b9886a270591ceb7f7c3c67943cbeec3
e0d19921cf73400e0067ad0cbd99ba9eace9c42e
'2011-10-27T16:54:04-04:00'
describe
'38481' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLOV' 'sip-files00023.pro'
38d7436039153efe9e8a7cf264b18e4d
1ea194dce9ab81860a6fee55381f09d66bcb27f9
'2011-10-27T16:54:50-04:00'
describe
'50508' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLOW' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
06293229778498622c113b233ddff397
5312dac4d14f1541597d0c74e9069e28a9d04491
'2011-10-27T16:54:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLOX' 'sip-files00023.tif'
c3caa926881bdaea07666863ee4d7b54
170c17e4d902a4b4a89064fd128c9255ad55c841
'2011-10-27T16:53:46-04:00'
describe
'1534' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLOY' 'sip-files00023.txt'
4a6a4ceae31ed1a1a435902232880ab9
4f08953a28126e8c728b45770edbefe03eaa0de1
'2011-10-27T16:55:13-04:00'
describe
'12107' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLOZ' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
3e4a00814d23145672b460a1b421c86e
a3d8b3884f7b0fb3412fd6859a766c449282b874
'2011-10-27T16:49:57-04:00'
describe
'593671' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLPA' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
0e207694fd2706596b837a48b7b5cca7
9183fac1eb4e53f47fcaedb90587bd9384b13312
'2011-10-27T16:56:00-04:00'
describe
'148439' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLPB' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
44af5f5ecce6b3bca6bb766c1d7efdf7
70e8a19a836a86dfea326b2d8e76b7c93017964b
'2011-10-27T16:49:00-04:00'
describe
'39593' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLPC' 'sip-files00024.pro'
ffd64ed3cc6b62950b3562bb2593c90b
0665338dfb637273af68cc79c01fed8a413b09ca
'2011-10-27T16:55:52-04:00'
describe
'49711' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLPD' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
877e8cfe115c41c2a54296676df945b0
1f8758b64365056384f5f4d650e048d95c98db0a
'2011-10-27T16:53:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLPE' 'sip-files00024.tif'
1bc653408ac05d30fd5770e7896ac93e
754f15f6e5458bb5a874ed972350bb79ba034a71
'2011-10-27T16:50:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLPF' 'sip-files00024.txt'
f9277e9077812434df99921afb0cef61
c95aab0129dca95db8fdea5f236cfcf66479e13a
describe
'12103' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLPG' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
1b715204b2da6a5aeebb495778f147d7
8c8be5bab1d18423423578ff222d73e5981e8111
'2011-10-27T16:49:34-04:00'
describe
'593963' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLPH' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
510418ff9e3b9501b94cb48d0a705dad
63d940614e8101fbeb5e20cd1e25f12fc991ba46
describe
'161100' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLPI' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
3f9757457ad704b6715dd30d9bd2210f
a59fe5df06a1c3197fc43e53181d0b37a60d39d8
'2011-10-27T16:48:44-04:00'
describe
'40732' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLPJ' 'sip-files00025.pro'
9381ed3819d9b75a3c4b4162eef3219f
ed955e02cda8c373e62545e5ca7a8082b948e99d
describe
'51699' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLPK' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
2d26b4f9f09d18fe5fd2332578f2523f
439c5491457248f4b9989dd230ea0ca948cb9cd4
'2011-10-27T16:50:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLPL' 'sip-files00025.tif'
e1974c4ebcb84333663e532bbd0c3e32
03d9ec41d89e8cdc91611288a081554510677441
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLPM' 'sip-files00025.txt'
bf41b281f535b335df8a0afd88c98def
65db5d62b94b15a01ba32af42fd8fc2ef67a7e35
'2011-10-27T16:52:36-04:00'
describe
'11976' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLPN' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
44f055999f18eccbb5c82d91c0fa8766
4e724e811442c8fe247c0a17710f4f7d4d61271c
describe
'593655' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLPO' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
4c0ef52ca528a033ad4ce4df8f38615a
a43b8497c31738f7001db0f0f7fc525aaf2e94a2
'2011-10-27T16:51:10-04:00'
describe
'154618' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLPP' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
723686a81024e2bc71d9557192100d9e
0a6ef695e9f7f5bbef58b8fb9f19b043cc88ce85
describe
'40399' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLPQ' 'sip-files00026.pro'
bf83e5f14d223e2961856309b65691a5
948d63bda891a672584cc6015a2cadcb02c6ea5e
'2011-10-27T16:50:28-04:00'
describe
'50766' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLPR' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
87eeb0009ba706c56375d5041fbb3244
8e975df8e078577706683f03a42e579e8814bfe9
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLPS' 'sip-files00026.tif'
4e8fbc42e4d65a67bbbfcd5e274caf73
5469bc618794639172162afad1a172d4ff616a59
'2011-10-27T16:52:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLPT' 'sip-files00026.txt'
70b54fd34da5aca1a27fbadb0bf9f5f7
17e1f7d8b3d54e6a1214b364617f5b4b22afa3e6
'2011-10-27T16:49:13-04:00'
describe
'12000' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLPU' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
287ca1c54ead6714b38a6657c0df82ef
68bfc89ce83ae227dc6be46e608ea9c3f78e17ea
'2011-10-27T16:53:58-04:00'
describe
'593991' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLPV' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
efc5597f6cff1154c78013c8c4478413
c21f1af5e01ddba249e8b445ee9bba072a47057e
'2011-10-27T16:51:08-04:00'
describe
'161424' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLPW' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
9d29c4ab0f07e6c9e924be5eaa9d090a
861284e338a6686a81a6ff4479b0c76bcdff34ef
'2011-10-27T16:53:55-04:00'
describe
'40510' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLPX' 'sip-files00027.pro'
54209c4e0741c1bdda29a352ff696e64
5c997f84df7f7608a47e953aa9fa6ef192ab0189
'2011-10-27T16:52:22-04:00'
describe
'51287' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLPY' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
38802ebeee2f4f7002c86a2cb3155302
dffe1fc599829168796cefbe01fc7194bdbe4775
'2011-10-27T16:48:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLPZ' 'sip-files00027.tif'
cf41ce4fdb0970aee21a415a4340fca0
e24af2d13dcedad048e6a85cf9da3dcc81a8f19a
'2011-10-27T16:49:36-04:00'
describe
'1612' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLQA' 'sip-files00027.txt'
dfea2f8ef20bb47910913965e2f0d349
cd459b5fe43265a41bc8ae09d99b4cae68475053
'2011-10-27T16:53:02-04:00'
describe
'12399' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLQB' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
39cb5b5e350f389577ddae50e120a3c5
f895623d0ae835321ef7b1ee71c8e6d2a7856cf1
describe
'593632' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLQC' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
d2c0d7523ea128269c10b6e58a548227
e6564bb4a7b56c8e7ffdca40fcf626073751f82d
'2011-10-27T16:50:29-04:00'
describe
'151864' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLQD' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
ad4ac42573fea249ce55e8a3b0c230f2
c1629f072cebeac601c41fd8ba7df216a7d00923
'2011-10-27T16:49:07-04:00'
describe
'39722' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLQE' 'sip-files00028.pro'
8d0c0f443a801f880bbe7f50f4f9e424
93aaea6921f04b21cbba5d8148fd6c3b1cc62ae1
'2011-10-27T16:49:43-04:00'
describe
'49798' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLQF' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
ae11b1b6bca051c65ba88ab52ff46002
61cfc5145987d39ef29b0ae36d7aa790f4a7480e
'2011-10-27T16:53:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLQG' 'sip-files00028.tif'
4c7a43ea782cf71a18e72c814665156f
82b13a1388924d9dba537e849598f2c6ae1ffb05
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLQH' 'sip-files00028.txt'
ac206767d8721e7e58787e079b686574
623cf2492b47f694bdea9f7956a6738586f46774
describe
'12084' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLQI' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
63a696c6cebe9ada6e3596706d9c5843
98a1594abf9b649d270cf3b9d5f68c4c6491c32d
describe
'593971' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLQJ' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
fd6e207120c2ec6e0a4865bda024ad6d
24a2dfb2584c94f45023d52dddfd18273d830bd2
describe
'154528' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLQK' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
8e0c92db2b233d37f52561e8acf5302f
a564f24fcfb565cffa3b0974cabe2da446fcebf6
describe
'37439' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLQL' 'sip-files00029.pro'
f97e7bb02950245639eef25e4939dfcc
555e6605d70e8e0ddfd09627326de834440c1fe9
'2011-10-27T16:51:30-04:00'
describe
'48498' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLQM' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
2dc1a23e63c97735dbc191c04893d7c7
de46d90a39756ecbaa1347aec8b91df3a8c498fb
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLQN' 'sip-files00029.tif'
dc7f2a021dedf26fba112c140025d39f
ef85458fe556af29cc47f60d612e55411dd50e2e
'2011-10-27T16:51:21-04:00'
describe
'1496' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLQO' 'sip-files00029.txt'
3cd60c47c76d9017b035f530a111f344
4ad7af970cbfa60b36682b6aa77614457f2cce43
describe
'12201' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLQP' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
d97102f05c809e8ac4606d8f26e085f8
cbde82059703fde5dcf14246b331fe9013b16387
'2011-10-27T16:48:14-04:00'
describe
'594017' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLQQ' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
8c1eda66be045ac6dd74c276b871582d
6bb2fa9dbc86660c6933f22fa8cf51995fc8932b
describe
'155194' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLQR' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
fea3392662c4e9543149853d95c21805
06c6355316cda63732f61bd0d3fc4c06e4f4165e
describe
'40617' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLQS' 'sip-files00030.pro'
6fd7052e76b93322ca54db4929240505
6ad73999353729c021039506493850b83093c195
describe
'50100' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLQT' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
8dff1f01030a6183880f70320f865814
4a8f98f6353f61e54a73ebed8d8f055743f58ce3
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLQU' 'sip-files00030.tif'
4e2439b93fb565970fc999e51c493074
840d01d84c16933a74cbbdadde4a3dd4a882ce45
describe
'1596' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLQV' 'sip-files00030.txt'
cc48a2fbaaf9d8159cadf913f18b37dd
e6219f3cdc60ac121aac344965aee788a8719e6b
'2011-10-27T16:53:20-04:00'
describe
'11693' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLQW' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
56ece5539e42794ab5068b55d8e2bfe4
481b2ed7e352350b9a8a94d52e8fcdda93496e77
'2011-10-27T16:51:12-04:00'
describe
'593673' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLQX' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
b25f973d6e3c04df131fcc602c7664f8
17bf002f9c0d2b6a42cad2f3111e07000cd2fa2c
'2011-10-27T16:55:00-04:00'
describe
'122808' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLQY' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
75eedc1f55d48f31e8c39dfbd581ff4c
4da13cfb49f2fcfe28a3034dcea0e7899d7b151a
'2011-10-27T16:51:39-04:00'
describe
'14891' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLQZ' 'sip-files00031.pro'
c12afe588aedc20c79c86721a8c6322e
c0900a581643ef0c4935e58cea7be8e0833db063
'2011-10-27T16:53:04-04:00'
describe
'36921' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLRA' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
b7e8b8fbbdab68d6009d6e7423fa518c
2c6335ca738abfd33f01b883f79e70b408be640c
'2011-10-27T16:55:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLRB' 'sip-files00031.tif'
d25c1f717142b97ee1aad5e0ac87cae8
31802311a221bed8fc801efa96182a114bf3ec6a
'2011-10-27T16:53:11-04:00'
describe
'598' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLRC' 'sip-files00031.txt'
649d00d6c402966511e9b01988e5ae26
34c570d1c45d97fd293054cd001b0eff98239572
'2011-10-27T16:54:35-04:00'
describe
'9637' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLRD' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
2e45a8e88968209a2404e622ddd537ba
49f82e048f2f542c784b7152ffe0c66f316145ed
'2011-10-27T16:54:47-04:00'
describe
'593642' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLRE' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
a1d2eb723885afa7bdeef96282e77ca5
81e41c176bb5cbb6a7f24b53b424752698d41150
'2011-10-27T16:51:43-04:00'
describe
'154104' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLRF' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
59beb9139b746f1f598859a4f8b2ccf3
4399e383e279b1a11bd52850a3167fb43d050768
'2011-10-27T16:50:41-04:00'
describe
'40117' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLRG' 'sip-files00032.pro'
b19e9db3382ee9d0387f1688a9fa37da
e219bc4aa20a9ba9627e9664e390e0ae3b8f4f4c
'2011-10-27T16:52:02-04:00'
describe
'50496' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLRH' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
2451d1698a8546a19a8c36b82fb4b47f
7e5a8e7eb0e923e3c3e3c0f796e199534f0e88be
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLRI' 'sip-files00032.tif'
11368619a787ce771f350db560d731d5
8c9a9596a8790a6278bed6163f71cb65df28d4c3
'2011-10-27T16:50:31-04:00'
describe
'1573' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLRJ' 'sip-files00032.txt'
7f8cdaeaeeeb849f0f550bae978411b6
5edfb2cbd39e8a1239ccf67f093fc85b41f17be7
describe
'12002' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLRK' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
4cd784b49e3ee64fae0f41245c3816a8
f36378f8514f5360fab3f496667debeb442e737c
'2011-10-27T16:53:03-04:00'
describe
'593622' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLRL' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
4dece9562d409244402ab4c17daeba6c
230dadda989d2aeb996bc691162d1c3717bafb70
'2011-10-27T16:52:39-04:00'
describe
'157934' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLRM' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
a017b6ec99712fe662850bc51cf71cd1
54b2f396017246b78cf243955e71ab3ac171d746
'2011-10-27T16:48:30-04:00'
describe
'39358' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLRN' 'sip-files00033.pro'
8cab9f0b078cbe7788d905bb0b9a781c
fae746bbc9c014554ef4cd94bcec8b288d0b28f8
'2011-10-27T16:55:37-04:00'
describe
'50293' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLRO' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
6e1e8addd4aaf1ef07bf5ed959e688cc
0f597acc1cfe0531bfbf17061bd055cddd70f270
'2011-10-27T16:51:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLRP' 'sip-files00033.tif'
c701a346c558c05983981c8b882ad7c7
c1f15b4f6745a3a1a1e279971fa6efb71fa595fe
'2011-10-27T16:52:29-04:00'
describe
'1540' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLRQ' 'sip-files00033.txt'
f3a30286836700036af0063bc699055b
493e6e011c219793268cabb122c1dd9654f3b036
describe
'12240' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLRR' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
7eaa5e03b7b0b9687f44e387f2d5e1f4
7c716cf5066e49799f8830f5d8e684ed731d11ef
'2011-10-27T16:51:26-04:00'
describe
'594002' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLRS' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
b9cd2db5308bf7e055ef997982c45506
32566026e4cc33d0e0953568370eb6a454d6c278
'2011-10-27T16:55:39-04:00'
describe
'153513' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLRT' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
d1a1129025211787d820bc15e3ade085
d5b391a47d60e17fe499a49eea7520757fc00bfe
'2011-10-27T16:50:38-04:00'
describe
'39751' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLRU' 'sip-files00034.pro'
d521c18b1d1c40923dca5ee6a0d142df
56a44dbb1dbc8667cefda5d862c086252ffe70b7
'2011-10-27T16:54:14-04:00'
describe
'49153' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLRV' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
2929151243b60f7d70dee496577ee177
0d90099665d759f9e23a4a9b37849333237b00e1
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLRW' 'sip-files00034.tif'
6382c0af472cb7e355ce6ff9ef88b59c
fc25cf510ced17a9aeb435800189148d09584ca6
'2011-10-27T16:55:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLRX' 'sip-files00034.txt'
56fce7370090ae1764ab64d6fc3e051a
7a9f9091a124c76b2dbf12fbff11472fdfaa5d73
'2011-10-27T16:53:29-04:00'
describe
'12058' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLRY' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
80caaf0ab3ac7918407fff98b9c5a696
d7469d64a3501ba785c554224fc4799356c02822
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLRZ' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
4eeda72d691cbb577fa779c2559ebde0
80e1d73140a6ec4b85f64298e370621a1070e00f
'2011-10-27T16:56:13-04:00'
describe
'151608' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLSA' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
ab13f04fdd4efaf74a8335b87983e8ee
d525761dbcc36aa1e8e749d6d38039a71fae5284
'2011-10-27T16:50:49-04:00'
describe
'38458' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLSB' 'sip-files00035.pro'
99f51eb0f3528abf9ec3fb204d3181a4
e4d16ee47fd7870ec371e8087d91ca903c856db7
describe
'49412' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLSC' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
fe62950413195379ec72512e9bb6795d
8ad9ee71a02d9f33f9be7f2437796fa1863c5c33
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLSD' 'sip-files00035.tif'
80bb3ef2c79ac09bf6b3908d9277c62c
e6e16fdc044c356908971d2199f12005a102bb3d
'2011-10-27T16:53:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLSE' 'sip-files00035.txt'
ee5ef4a9da9c31fcf743d9cbc84e933f
2a7b83a9101245d886f01887fc111a19f17498f6
describe
'11587' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLSF' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
1551af049c12f7dcf71e17607233825f
99c42da12d7f9a85cc3a152bdcc76f17603f79c9
describe
'593667' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLSG' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
5cc7bf016dea7f1a1aa8d88976adb9d1
a6ac4f629dfbcc7d3ed7c8edb7955e50136b0c52
'2011-10-27T16:51:20-04:00'
describe
'159849' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLSH' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
0029758706509ea7799ca75ced40faef
dd41054028e9c052a7c75821a3128f11d6051054
describe
'40719' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLSI' 'sip-files00036.pro'
770c6479c40102caaf14ff7d0a41365b
919c463d6a775083e83bb0ad5cecf69dbb36f105
describe
'51131' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLSJ' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
d37a66b59750621a6d6ee9c63ef95a7f
0fd73c041d2643164aaf48d554fc720145e85424
'2011-10-27T16:55:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLSK' 'sip-files00036.tif'
c5073db62a1b408725a676c7b501e5d9
efcb9f5cfe5d854bb4da406f66a646b1550846f7
'2011-10-27T16:51:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLSL' 'sip-files00036.txt'
90649d5ea170ddc92a5f51f50f9ee4b1
a4f33d997e2a4bccdf04545f55a04f4370b3cec4
describe
'12114' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLSM' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
1017c9cfa37fade22bcbe3806275dcc6
92e53860fa8b40459c3ee0b7071ed5dd407e7adf
'2011-10-27T16:55:22-04:00'
describe
'593599' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLSN' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
e290906ced88e106e8e82c6deba5d368
448153a7a84767ae4074b671c710cfb507f140ea
'2011-10-27T16:51:44-04:00'
describe
'128293' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLSO' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
f3a7cddfb7c4a720e8e3d0092e074522
1f7a5647b6a82f86729f0aa258c05bf1a8015b4f
'2011-10-27T16:52:14-04:00'
describe
'13620' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLSP' 'sip-files00037.pro'
6b037814902d07b099f097e068c423c2
88949e8b7a1f1190e7cdfe2fb7bf608e479083dd
'2011-10-27T16:54:03-04:00'
describe
'38631' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLSQ' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
5adc9a0412da696328f9e7904d1607df
9492f78dfd2960031ef0d74b20c0f71f894efeb0
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLSR' 'sip-files00037.tif'
a0a11b12e92af835f4f8629ba691f574
4035166afdbc0109cf442c32b7a98cf0b9f87bd6
'2011-10-27T16:51:34-04:00'
describe
'540' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLSS' 'sip-files00037.txt'
ccd25a0fbe2528a82f40b7da72b1984b
5ca0166d963e398c31025d91f192a612692d5bf6
'2011-10-27T16:52:20-04:00'
describe
'10325' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLST' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
6d99339481f884d4e65c67aa70014ede
d02dc7c0dcbafafccfc5f76252f84397a1b6f2a9
'2011-10-27T16:49:24-04:00'
describe
'593581' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLSU' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
5d56d2ac41b040156d441d7eefc63b49
a21a83fef492b081685502d83c127b097c0367b1
describe
'125648' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLSV' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
6b9c93875ec9320e22c81ed9d0c2b8f8
05a181fe3dfc033f7e06a7fd58b277ec68cb6bc9
describe
'15120' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLSW' 'sip-files00038.pro'
33ff8646392bd0d35b3ff2588f0210d6
009099bc627a7f9245798fda3fc63888fc9cf3c0
describe
'39032' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLSX' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
372a117bb3048a2b512cfea5031205ff
ec8c062561f395769707003298b9cd5f356295c3
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLSY' 'sip-files00038.tif'
8ff8f0adeda4f9024b511408103558ba
50c335aab90fa0affcf29e78d4dcf605924ebb50
describe
'608' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLSZ' 'sip-files00038.txt'
57b120e17beb99a6de6ad82d7a3fa4d6
027f25932dc1f3b0da63e450a8958b64dbe0c35a
'2011-10-27T16:50:04-04:00'
describe
'10410' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLTA' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
fdbbb0523783173907ea8b8fac53c697
15ef30d97514cfebd89ebacf42ad2353c682bfb1
'2011-10-27T16:55:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLTB' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
9963fc09390de4148fca8b5ac710aab6
4e913f4cc74d8a8016cd68ff974cb421e0cde5ef
describe
'158778' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLTC' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
1e3b14f1e0da279956b86deaf764150e
2d8542e13f2a82b4dedb6f29ed5bcd28cf6eb4c5
'2011-10-27T16:51:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLTD' 'sip-files00039.pro'
a8a12b9b55961e25dc6be758c59bcd0a
53612b9fe7aced49cd027cf5a7960ce17cbcebbf
describe
'50708' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLTE' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
f017249756d4c6d82e5e2f50ea7fad76
03893d47f1b7542ae3f6abcb8e02c29c4632d663
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLTF' 'sip-files00039.tif'
acf0e7e70256e6db127fed925dce03a8
8b54e7ea0abde6f8f650b7a0a1b7092322b5d7c7
describe
'1619' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLTG' 'sip-files00039.txt'
6e1aa45328dfd8626f60d6e394e7924f
7304599a241ab5c90e9f89cc21d52e3e7bf14a5a
'2011-10-27T16:51:56-04:00'
describe
'12286' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLTH' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
6aae028a0b090fc48121f98e9fe10a02
589a37e7365ea9a07a9bd3613a1093ea2044b28a
'2011-10-27T16:49:01-04:00'
describe
'593633' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLTI' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
8b9f7dfdfd2949551d29ac6cb42c0ab6
0bc5f163ae3fc1f07b30a32eb51fd23a12738b92
'2011-10-27T16:52:06-04:00'
describe
'144202' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLTJ' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
5370b62abc3d3f95ab1354a8b0954591
81e8af523bdb48292db1615859d4eab4522efca4
'2011-10-27T16:51:27-04:00'
describe
'36856' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLTK' 'sip-files00040.pro'
944ede83d96fbe9c08744f2ffc03a848
ab811a6fae71bb319a86c1811838e99095f8d1b9
'2011-10-27T16:51:33-04:00'
describe
'46640' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLTL' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
12c72716b191bf9903e1574ce07e7c78
a575bfde426243da968ad64185e9c699808f1ce7
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLTM' 'sip-files00040.tif'
176a0ab759eb4f554094f7ef351b9774
905b2bae8de683c27fbd5de3649e34878f90d04e
'2011-10-27T16:55:54-04:00'
describe
'1449' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLTN' 'sip-files00040.txt'
0a667b73fa32ff1f7e6c6aee9bc4cbeb
6f5cd402e5e5a09e6dcbcd9a64a4702ed5abdc5b
describe
'11470' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLTO' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
747447b21826198124c73c3916135850
3e48a52d33154caf66700005c1d1ff8e5d8618e8
describe
'594009' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLTP' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
d8a9af0f1e9556d597e38cbcf8ad185d
512479ff8ed459fc065711c48b7420ce2367acef
describe
'157384' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLTQ' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
657355e81c3f9f0a6c98bde57bbd7300
c2bfe40c8e45757e3e010a113a2f17695a208434
'2011-10-27T16:50:13-04:00'
describe
'39910' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLTR' 'sip-files00041.pro'
3ee57c8f3d88285d2571e12b77046473
eac9b506f03edca5cf6c983616d100a007a0861d
describe
'50425' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLTS' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
75c05b532435558dd255ab1b80670e09
6259c1d2c11a070610623e902bfd6380e322543a
'2011-10-27T16:54:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLTT' 'sip-files00041.tif'
d3a55ca8342067f1c49ade3fb3143744
e38846fbb0ef47388becb2f71f425d3b764acd4b
'2011-10-27T16:52:58-04:00'
describe
'1607' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLTU' 'sip-files00041.txt'
45d56d32d948720b809de1e7d4a9ac90
2ff7f75bf57f568d6d03bddb31976eddc74ca83c
'2011-10-27T16:52:32-04:00'
describe
'12117' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLTV' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
00f005cffe7cb0091e2c55ea6e874503
aa67efcba03b5f2c9a1e35a55673d644beee2108
'2011-10-27T16:54:17-04:00'
describe
'593626' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLTW' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
5c1a7dafbcc63eb128a46e8630f1e104
33aa40bdc599f6f5b45298472399d2cc1acd775b
'2011-10-27T16:54:31-04:00'
describe
'143973' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLTX' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
7857cd89c357474f517dc0142fa83930
f24149990fe0ab04f1ecf1385a58bc38834910a4
'2011-10-27T16:54:58-04:00'
describe
'38656' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLTY' 'sip-files00042.pro'
8c7946f9569f4eb9f80131860027c978
1ec8e24a7e94d7eac73429aac657ae7b8e3b8d1e
describe
'47520' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLTZ' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
acaa54ae8bb71ccd3b75eff53c3af010
42c299f92e8c5e2fce99f5f8fcf8851b17df6ede
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLUA' 'sip-files00042.tif'
fb4798a1f69ce12cf1d87e546cf7658c
2f1467ad43791f3a8746ea7605f3bb362060b626
'2011-10-27T16:55:09-04:00'
describe
'1514' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLUB' 'sip-files00042.txt'
ef70f8e1864304589801639d47570be6
a5fabdfc896be7d866506ea241fe848610623357
describe
'11716' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLUC' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
d641d5821003ed02f7b09353a7a85f0a
d806f8e75c08573fe01a385b924f0d2bbe03dd95
describe
'593986' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLUD' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
17e2a4ea11e695026d754ac0ce1b07d3
641712237dbd62270dd46e2b6471213a39fcacff
describe
'157069' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLUE' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
172ce32c9500d658663a23443640cc51
0722126558b864527b8e29fc958127c402c98fef
describe
'39874' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLUF' 'sip-files00043.pro'
b578bfca3ceeeca9562e73c6146cffe5
db8348e0f1f05f0ece2d807568e51ecabdc55761
'2011-10-27T16:50:02-04:00'
describe
'50359' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLUG' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
0d32cbb8cc30b9ee0f08ad599c89a0b5
d09c3564a24539ea4b857b8a0314b94958770478
'2011-10-27T16:51:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLUH' 'sip-files00043.tif'
c5abfb70db664108ca3d001570a550b4
b1410f44cfa01e34f4f1b88f23910466a0de2186
'2011-10-27T16:50:33-04:00'
describe
'1584' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLUI' 'sip-files00043.txt'
2b4b78a7aab90e644152ec2676e128ad
d5a722df9853246d7733845ccca3519599ecf392
'2011-10-27T16:55:55-04:00'
describe
'12247' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLUJ' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
6cb5da6bdbc990f481b40a2cb91c1794
972f466ed289d5a744eb1522a6dea0aae71a514c
describe
'593670' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLUK' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
8af63e1951b043193a2a444c963ad13a
852582cb9871da536a4a830c1bc56e7c71899e46
'2011-10-27T16:55:56-04:00'
describe
'155289' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLUL' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
778a8bec4b95b7119ca6e2697cede27a
f72386681b96c0c8810972f0f15c0edf754aef5f
describe
'39763' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLUM' 'sip-files00044.pro'
c721fd80e2d3339b4c233247d905ffa9
5685835a5c39962c380a23537bb9e12057237ea5
'2011-10-27T16:55:57-04:00'
describe
'48164' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLUN' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
0ef8421b44817c508d1adb7d5e9e8b56
220b044ed6c981df36fe7caa1024babb422fe4ab
'2011-10-27T16:54:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLUO' 'sip-files00044.tif'
cf716e7368cdf5c0a8a2d4b74ac5f979
60941fb4b2d0360f7daa4212dd713392b3aa507b
'2011-10-27T16:55:21-04:00'
describe
'1554' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLUP' 'sip-files00044.txt'
aa6b4b7a273010e8dcf81a1a085e52c7
989746de9a4467f7ecbbbafd94ffd2255a4be49e
describe
'11488' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLUQ' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
d4e73073b6a3b76ea552cff724973f9f
c53d21c980e8850c8eeb095211a73bbd0f880262
'2011-10-27T16:55:19-04:00'
describe
'593969' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLUR' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
cfcfe8e54984fe7410f6320a5767a015
22f2092c08c2ea198ad54feaa9e39ea2c7cf281f
'2011-10-27T16:48:57-04:00'
describe
'125504' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLUS' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
06478c3d407307f8123ac15760fa6a19
0ec585bea284e7e202638a65c0b12014868be1f9
describe
'17444' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLUT' 'sip-files00045.pro'
c66e73978c1971d59db41f0eb37303a6
e55082a9572d40d120f29b75eac03fecc9bde246
'2011-10-27T16:49:49-04:00'
describe
'38709' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLUU' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
084f5fbc0ad84ab8cb7a2189a60b2c43
a710ab14b8448048b3af8520a34afdfce7b8a796
'2011-10-27T16:52:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLUV' 'sip-files00045.tif'
7d8c456518e0a43e93e5078b0167bc1a
0395b48a8c2cdde85cfe0fa315df0f992f36dbf0
'2011-10-27T16:54:25-04:00'
describe
'688' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLUW' 'sip-files00045.txt'
999a869ae265fbe326ec02c106890326
4801653e9978e4f1c5eafc01c62e7330987f0b07
describe
'10455' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLUX' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
7a47c2056955adfc54da7fe4182c3837
0dbc7e3ecd080cb6d20b2af022e6019b1f79899b
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLUY' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
0b720eb1b56965fb2d7595bec9e1317c
118bd33aded3d388d091d5514a4f4e7ad52e869a
describe
'151150' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLUZ' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
69262bbd45c27bd53b68804629a472ce
dffb37bc5e0b767faa356ea7cadf57373c29014d
describe
'40536' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLVA' 'sip-files00046.pro'
feeeba72c5bd663dfdecdd051e986c5e
ef6515d2cea5dd5a4ebe5dff506b4edcad029243
describe
'49801' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLVB' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
82fde05a80d9fa5c2e22f118c65eb670
2f2c4767e0f000a793a063fa89353dbc525c68a7
'2011-10-27T16:56:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLVC' 'sip-files00046.tif'
15e115e77ab223f1952fe6413b7e38ab
fb39bec94aadf8b0fab7c2c7e2ce6dcec2a8d164
'2011-10-27T16:52:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLVD' 'sip-files00046.txt'
5300ed6f80aadd8bfd490d6feb9362c4
d289e18b17c2664358cb7ba5f8cca3dcd49fd6b1
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLVE' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
ebfb1e3472a541a9acd3bc6a28a99541
7df30fd3d57d6f3e799875bee04c32a36f04784c
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLVF' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
eebd0729088b927d5f82029739080057
1e895b92531b83b6cfd199990f4a448618cc0aff
describe
'131111' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLVG' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
fe34e34153836c99fa7e73324e0b9622
6a35748fa55611af6ccae252edcc04e6f7127fca
'2011-10-27T16:52:44-04:00'
describe
'23200' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLVH' 'sip-files00047.pro'
6a2083a74b1736d211db1d4ee26d1ede
3c1297f1d9c1491a800c923bdb831271b0b30eeb
'2011-10-27T16:53:43-04:00'
describe
'40264' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLVI' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
d6b6d8106ae150e1497e612a29e195dc
ac6184ee3684a310ce2617e0a6c157bf1d2b6d3c
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLVJ' 'sip-files00047.tif'
cb99485a104e1a7624267e573e6739a9
89a7838570e31ebef4ea5dc37d6f293e62c75bdb
describe
'975' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLVK' 'sip-files00047.txt'
b9b2c98e5e72e83353b00ee280b0fab6
ebd99801000202a03e7c2f2368c3f67effbbb94f
'2011-10-27T16:55:15-04:00'
describe
'10370' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLVL' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
9ef01853b306d9c86b9bb4229cf9cc4e
31b2afd57861405eb52089c188c6fab30370d84c
'2011-10-27T16:54:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLVM' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
52a28dd1ca386cb918cf98e67993d77c
52a92d78a3bd2097f98a11f3506677f81151ea60
'2011-10-27T16:53:00-04:00'
describe
'157579' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLVN' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
22939189ef35e69f5ba0d53a752d547a
59f6d5138c697433be07206ab72f3148e91a39cf
describe
'39566' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLVO' 'sip-files00048.pro'
c4b7ed35fbd7b9d1151bf7d659699b0b
a973cbbdd440e8bac616e330d9ccc87665e4ddf4
'2011-10-27T16:50:14-04:00'
describe
'50746' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLVP' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
cb7f4b27834bbd1e853a8e448c53aade
8b0d1540fea5f5b594e112ff90097ddb9109319f
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLVQ' 'sip-files00048.tif'
7d444a90225df321595eb71ff92a7545
7a7fee1bf976ab729843b6f990138ec8d8657292
'2011-10-27T16:53:49-04:00'
describe
'1569' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLVR' 'sip-files00048.txt'
95c990a86d3015dda6cdaddff22cebe5
4671592436fd27ff7c6caa1ff512e8302c57500c
'2011-10-27T16:48:50-04:00'
describe
'12279' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLVS' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
a2e4825fecaa4d6e496ce8fd86f8c9c3
6a803b9cc3c3116a51c9ce445f0f56b62650b48f
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLVT' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
24d2190ac178fea82351277aa76eb3f2
7fa4fdf8b0f5c4c8dcda753b9289cf300a4056b9
describe
'143730' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLVU' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
623a59a4f4d9c54380bc6b246ecef9de
37fdbe1c22b700e4e89e87b89e06dd3c213b564c
'2011-10-27T16:53:15-04:00'
describe
'35881' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLVV' 'sip-files00049.pro'
31bca57dc947f969f1e4524f1176a52a
2317f23cacb38ed80fd3af0a95c020f700c5b27f
'2011-10-27T16:53:30-04:00'
describe
'46960' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLVW' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
edfef5c1c1f7d8afd53f3f4dedadd304
5a4042e96c7bb465608131e148ddc9cf89a66831
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLVX' 'sip-files00049.tif'
6024d43611bc7cfdd703a1c5bf064dbc
1bcb31982d7334ca865404018164bb48bf7de070
describe
'1445' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLVY' 'sip-files00049.txt'
666ccd2667d9b02328b366000e2e4973
412781eabf9c01d2e3bd4eb37ed9235fc689cc35
describe
'11974' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLVZ' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
f69597fe690b8faefcbcc97b4e803fbf
c9a06a6e8b8c013c439dc97c544d6dc65f6f7840
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLWA' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
b4b9404eda81473ea91fb94d9c89316a
d05ea994c480dd4092ce97a87ceed925c483b40d
describe
'96854' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLWB' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
b32cc22e061b9c877366da5d72953fdd
820ef3e489c7e036e1597a494ddb88642af3f1ef
describe
'24350' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLWC' 'sip-files00050.pro'
d9f8d6822b3f5939839037ffcbc99284
dac41cc475cef70dbc3004d2ecfb72ad86b2c0b5
'2011-10-27T16:51:04-04:00'
describe
'31905' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLWD' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
911e385ecf13c624319f0dd936791de9
db7b08d5f63735364a35de65e7e7c8f96b57202b
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLWE' 'sip-files00050.tif'
ca216b266fc6b63f4e8401c004293924
b4570cdf6df2c86dde726d1e631a17e2161aac1a
'2011-10-27T16:53:35-04:00'
describe
'1005' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLWF' 'sip-files00050.txt'
63cc16e7abc3486c95692cb0a35fe8e9
9b21a56e42c5797994211e59ec6300e648056faf
'2011-10-27T16:50:45-04:00'
describe
'8548' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLWG' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
c1f49e56cfa694120d1bdb7d5c4aee25
5a62e1110229e1e19f1340b8e369e90f4f70ab98
describe
'593913' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLWH' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
6aad354c2a0e1beef140a358c2c28b51
9d16c8f362a6d1b965159aa4ed7e22c8f34500f1
'2011-10-27T16:49:17-04:00'
describe
'152403' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLWI' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
eac197ac79210760835bcb240ad4f901
6137284e20f8a5e44087f4c74ec7e5b4ee2ef159
describe
'38860' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLWJ' 'sip-files00051.pro'
77de8488f33156de73d3342c868988a2
6ca3d0219f9991da00029d1b2bee40d3f3ad1299
'2011-10-27T16:52:49-04:00'
describe
'49362' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLWK' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
429f7c720e8201ebe3dbced9e9a09415
b0f72a6ccff149ee6ae752e826073bd7819e665a
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLWL' 'sip-files00051.tif'
e99df45e14e4f32459d5c6b241d6f530
13426a28a608547ce84b79e822a2e37130a09958
describe
'1546' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLWM' 'sip-files00051.txt'
ca7a4dd43693b1d5d56490125f36bcbd
ec1ccf0bb197710ae98e10cc8e5e844b2b7f606d
'2011-10-27T16:50:50-04:00'
describe
'12455' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLWN' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
ccd0ad3b788e9fd8026ed59d4b9935fe
d4dd4c9a02fed23a12dfcdcdbb6dce9895af253c
describe
'593600' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLWO' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
9c7151f33d2643e2de5c7894f5544f1e
d01b5a9da41e262631408de5ec86ab90e99001a5
describe
'151346' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLWP' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
cb3af39c39177cbfae0e173753418dd0
a76cf96768ab0b1431f54482681f0c6f61f41cba
'2011-10-27T16:49:05-04:00'
describe
'38694' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLWQ' 'sip-files00052.pro'
adfc1a5c03e3059ed66e8b22c863686f
0ab2111f0aaa47380d5d97f6f166d9a12647ff75
describe
'48708' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLWR' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
1942e8b0782b4410e2c1cb73d9e41af2
1bff2326a28626ca22ea8a793234cdc0927ce249
'2011-10-27T16:55:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLWS' 'sip-files00052.tif'
0f644f72049d0d1477d25948cf3fc6ac
9b3c453d6118134c3dd332df45bba3e956803544
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLWT' 'sip-files00052.txt'
edc6f8ec9f11e74cfefc25286947de3e
829e985d192a7f29057cd8fba7beb239523ea18d
'2011-10-27T16:52:57-04:00'
describe
'11516' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLWU' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
db545c1d365bac798bf3376ea8c7d50b
386448f53fa7511225ce21cb67309c45ce2faa53
describe
'593649' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLWV' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
880dfab16e99eac49e00c03e5d2af2c4
74bb6952bcc3ab60ba3c2b2bc425bf68d459d97e
'2011-10-27T16:51:17-04:00'
describe
'139794' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLWW' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
318acbfc828d738399a51f43c483edb0
33da3ee419fadc54e75b117ad58f03d02374d4a2
'2011-10-27T16:55:53-04:00'
describe
'33936' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLWX' 'sip-files00053.pro'
348ba5d00481616bcb7d00e9b51ff513
4c695a6005a7b4156da23835cdab6006ab73471e
describe
'44753' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLWY' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
b4bf918a39ab3e0c993f439b12315687
43eb4d25a0e0726e05996f808e6b952f6b030440
'2011-10-27T16:48:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLWZ' 'sip-files00053.tif'
1996f6f83767fee378f8205fea856211
90e21a2ac0c334131b4db7d3cfeef86ded1f5162
'2011-10-27T16:49:35-04:00'
describe
'1377' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLXA' 'sip-files00053.txt'
6f1528c0515f595cf7e3864d958997b0
e3d2153d526510fe5475dd8e59fec89b4882dd74
'2011-10-27T16:52:31-04:00'
describe
'11289' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLXB' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
813206ef5fa6021ea7a62030b38e78b6
248c455c4f2508e8d4988f4e32ddb83a51a3b23b
describe
'593636' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLXC' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
85caa2fe3b752490b3167aa74ffdc4e5
bd8fd5e54a8402de3783a0235ed7353d23caf4a4
'2011-10-27T16:52:48-04:00'
describe
'142450' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLXD' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
8793ee12f630b26f588f96762175d096
ae4757f66d7cb984d08b73c7c4f2038caeb06f16
describe
'37677' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLXE' 'sip-files00054.pro'
ccd416b6c28399eaf768aea4350b2bdd
aeae5bbff4172bfcdaf711b60cd37ec78c8ce0c2
'2011-10-27T16:54:52-04:00'
describe
'47459' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLXF' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
e30ed0c4aba3fda96be5f264fd8b659d
60043fbd71f8593ff4632a38e00524b8165788a8
'2011-10-27T16:53:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLXG' 'sip-files00054.tif'
b85b3922b45e13f91443c374a949bd81
7f9531bc8870a0e933b13a98406904e331a313be
'2011-10-27T16:50:25-04:00'
describe
'1476' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLXH' 'sip-files00054.txt'
cf6d7bc5d6aa3c3bdd990a87901067fa
347352b302afb1820faa29213b8eb30c78c779d7
describe
'11241' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLXI' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
f4618b010208437580170c50d3720e9d
a51d0d9d389a67727e0659901c6876927a0dfcac
describe
'593949' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLXJ' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
44bfbd619e760bb8eb8b88304345091c
6100b7ed09aca46dbe76194d3f437ecd55b39735
describe
'150441' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLXK' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
16b8ed38227ae3da39aa633fbc2c9cdb
a6dabe80173bdc581982b9ea6936dcd4c7769b21
'2011-10-27T16:53:13-04:00'
describe
'38096' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLXL' 'sip-files00055.pro'
3c4a453ffad4a5dbc6e5137e0fb4882c
89da888a7c5cb94e4cc2e83f970468a7993c72a3
'2011-10-27T16:52:51-04:00'
describe
'47755' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLXM' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
50ff8266904b5cb44b70d4c9e8ce2604
4b1dbf70749ca193f54e4defe805a8bfa27e7e24
'2011-10-27T16:51:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLXN' 'sip-files00055.tif'
2d229e72a01884125054f762d96717b1
b6dea0aef079a04383bd7dd6c070bbae1be98655
'2011-10-27T16:50:56-04:00'
describe
'1510' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLXO' 'sip-files00055.txt'
b8118838ceebcf11aa0bb7fb8f3ea196
9e58021ef393f1601269d2521357eba771698e3c
describe
'11743' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLXP' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
f530409387197205da89ff0fdeafff32
ec17e014941dc8c620fc0d34d7be3fa9984da7e4
describe
'593573' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLXQ' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
4817250c169e995fddd17764c519e9ac
e4bdcfe1ace0664034662eb09af4db61e81acba5
describe
'146907' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLXR' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
7232b7878de15dfbca54a5c70b7b9c2a
860f9fd4a187a5b0e22bed98f7776a50e1cdc3ed
describe
'38315' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLXS' 'sip-files00056.pro'
54288c7c406bdc67d3a975a26aed9ff1
7fe72563422af315a6be766666527259ae42d58b
'2011-10-27T16:55:46-04:00'
describe
'47881' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLXT' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
f6831c78c3b5b0c5e92bb6afff977bb4
c34efdd6a63af42c4e3b6cb746606110580c2198
'2011-10-27T16:53:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLXU' 'sip-files00056.tif'
39239316ec0a07c236bb504f8fe84047
5271edc902969012817e49af28d391f7b26b6769
'2011-10-27T16:52:59-04:00'
describe
'1531' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLXV' 'sip-files00056.txt'
bf52bf102c5ed651c39ada5080d22a1b
e00125e5700dfba2ef3b65629f6f3ca234547187
'2011-10-27T16:51:24-04:00'
describe
'11577' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLXW' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
f240a51e12560812cb7480e64624524b
ad2e61cc93ffd8ef800cb5931182634f03c2198c
'2011-10-27T16:54:08-04:00'
describe
'593924' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLXX' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
2aca0ef6124fb8c2839806dc0b88aba6
15b7fdba4f50f927dcf497d231d7396928a1b71a
describe
'149165' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLXY' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
38e38082ac1a63c7dc4c46531a98f780
9a0ac04d535029d5b7677106f2a841aab9df486b
describe
'36485' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLXZ' 'sip-files00057.pro'
cb94b6402405b29e51feb79c017ddc68
a0bdcd497844f728c99857ca6f28c21b9b4c068d
describe
'47861' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLYA' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
b53aeb3074f13a65ff6a6f3bf3314957
85b01f5571a5935a99b36d5e831062b82cdfa29b
'2011-10-27T16:52:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLYB' 'sip-files00057.tif'
f84118b8788b7b3c8f77661d74ac725b
09d309f0d688508253c240e34bf2087163dc3b88
'2011-10-27T16:54:11-04:00'
describe
'1453' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLYC' 'sip-files00057.txt'
87f6efbb47963396860296d10db76d97
5ac302add640deed621ec5d91a91a079efb2332e
'2011-10-27T16:49:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLYD' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
b8f5739201d7ad8ef2d45e75a3fdffd3
3f9032782bbd9c27738815148ca59dd7ccaa2e26
describe
'593658' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLYE' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
b996b48f31ca82226f5d5f8772c79666
8910b9e05dd6b2e5d77a956c4a840b97feb06b71
'2011-10-27T16:52:55-04:00'
describe
'135313' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLYF' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
6fbaec6703a28d1d4a308d30ea2ddcf2
9b507b892c641e803360e900dc152cdc6114d09f
'2011-10-27T16:56:01-04:00'
describe
'36444' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLYG' 'sip-files00058.pro'
b30a535edf88f96d1d0805ba86db74e6
4b33e8efb6487d7b6234c04d8ddd3e2e3fa52f9b
describe
'45829' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLYH' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
e0628973a5badac0132daf341ff813b3
d3b596320424d24e8de9bdfbcd6862721b53731c
describe
'4766088' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLYI' 'sip-files00058.tif'
a18dc7ffafc9d49feeac6a0317a9c718
454869423be2f968dd7ceec93644278e3b91e86c
describe
'1439' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLYJ' 'sip-files00058.txt'
1ce1c68e1059bf83d9857eff700ee6c7
ddae9d5ecd4ec79153725f42148098c4bb5e6942
'2011-10-27T16:49:26-04:00'
describe
'11607' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLYK' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
fef7a59c667e8a22098a0141d05abdbe
10476a8e5d7b88222162d0d37a9866313150989d
describe
'593998' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLYL' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
73021a8350efcffe94a6208807cf15d5
2876d13a866d2a8a72b6e6ba60969d2302348d54
'2011-10-27T16:55:50-04:00'
describe
'148831' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLYM' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
43a134d551ae9e370506f8173610e8c6
5fb96da420685aa9a0c5c9f84f03feedf09dd46b
describe
'36886' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLYN' 'sip-files00059.pro'
27816e30ba61cc6378fdd1912d8cc52a
398804be1cf750f95f428770f870dcd723abb22c
describe
'47518' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLYO' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
0c742a8f6e6e2a6d2c67e906a68a3048
e290f25987f69cc880d6751797f16f521178526a
'2011-10-27T16:55:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLYP' 'sip-files00059.tif'
09289169af78c7506c8570c46e0fb9ca
07201ea0a34008ecceb9fddb7fc2f20dccbe5892
describe
'1470' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLYQ' 'sip-files00059.txt'
dd6c09761693c3184d8609dc6d98cf9c
f18411efa985196690a550c43469ae9cea57b303
describe
'11734' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLYR' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
42c0516e9f2169a440b0486a72cba7e4
716602e3510ad891efcf3fae638d1eb832290b1b
describe
'593637' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLYS' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
c0a02a6bdb738ee566782f6dad033067
fdfd5c5ad8c8098f215884d17c60a04ea6121fea
'2011-10-27T16:52:26-04:00'
describe
'150844' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLYT' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
ae97a5fdde092dcec613c5167b30d33a
365d6cc4f573ae380dc15bc60d941826326946a3
'2011-10-27T16:53:52-04:00'
describe
'38540' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLYU' 'sip-files00060.pro'
1ed17f31a933754d9ab334603cb5959f
433a246eb48f6035b85dcd909b82fdd018e1a2e1
describe
'48426' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLYV' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
37e8150dfdebd9c85202da361769dd7a
0fd8cec6b31a007ae09ee7b648f3601e6afe0b89
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLYW' 'sip-files00060.tif'
c9a4efb7cbe7b67b29bb098ad3c6cc29
d3e4682e58e8fcb5f2743e0982948435e834c688
'2011-10-27T16:49:27-04:00'
describe
'1509' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLYX' 'sip-files00060.txt'
41123a461a4c777dc19ae64cf018909a
9383455f48945d5027fafa47c3a1db59d466494c
describe
'11939' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLYY' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
4dcd500f591032635f896d48d5cd138f
adb5fec7b28d68ba7903f809b049c69efa5d0809
describe
'593591' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLYZ' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
fe296486e45d311bb0bf2d670183d953
45fbe132adcbf98c2ed145dc1a1327eba3051c91
describe
'146512' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLZA' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
cd0ba5a97617a655003f9557cb060581
274671089cdad6f2f8a6dc7cca803d37d7129f7a
describe
'37892' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLZB' 'sip-files00061.pro'
5c392e14c7f5541dca026f6126bc65c8
4e490ecb31dd3eb06423c315f468daf27b08d99f
describe
'48675' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLZC' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
a59d55945e6c4f7f7e1328ab016a5a32
0492539d922cf4af0161627a660d7cd25cf27c73
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLZD' 'sip-files00061.tif'
99f00966e03061ea3c4e0fa9629edd89
315e1afb9874f1aae7d974e9dbecc1cde9090559
describe
'1494' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLZE' 'sip-files00061.txt'
714bf8352488bf2749d08f6e3243cee3
837ba241ff118a8c285d307d1c6cad8c2bb76272
describe
'12298' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLZF' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
5a185609c01ef1a82decd32129d7ee0e
fdf88c1dc5b366d745b6ad66081d21a9114ccc60
'2011-10-27T16:54:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLZG' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
5ba62f8b22005c52c40a1c2b05ad1db3
04e243ca56fea0a6aeca613c626440ffc7bfd625
'2011-10-27T16:51:23-04:00'
describe
'150196' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLZH' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
42b21c41897aa2a1682ba799b3b09501
6b626359e7fbf5ba770eb399ae1caf8f388a4979
'2011-10-27T16:50:54-04:00'
describe
'39245' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLZI' 'sip-files00062.pro'
1c053d1def2e8ffa19f547d4805cda68
556199e4e839c5a258d32adead8604c2741d0f99
describe
'49437' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLZJ' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
f850b3ec2cdfc80706063460d73fe19a
3d1c8480a50859b8021ed4537325fff3b252f115
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLZK' 'sip-files00062.tif'
488920dbd7ac4103ec9dbb75aaceddf0
9865cf5ff56aca89bb79c7b4a38ab23b72676da7
describe
'1537' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLZL' 'sip-files00062.txt'
398bdfdd4e9327385ff7d2ca04391529
701fb69c363b270357c0659366d124d8cb60dbc7
'2011-10-27T16:55:03-04:00'
describe
'11536' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLZM' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
49d7313d650277f19d797c2cf143cd8b
7a070879b1d1571e46528f27a845d3ef517f0891
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLZN' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
6432e00d1eaa01d4c02a3d365c6ea49c
9b7b78685d586a29e5c33e0c84150a4620fa2d0c
'2011-10-27T16:52:18-04:00'
describe
'150470' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLZO' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
107ed8e9c0513ae45f2d7680b9dfe3dd
84b7256ecec4c9d0dba89466b711b8079ea551a0
describe
'38593' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLZP' 'sip-files00063.pro'
aa0a6f2ae9dfbb713f13080a0e664cc4
91ece58c48368506abe073649f64a417bb44db2e
describe
'49729' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLZQ' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
306499787c7d7c5fa8772b6b358ab1d0
1c088506d07b2a3c8df51cb8e3c3422b094fb61d
'2011-10-27T16:56:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLZR' 'sip-files00063.tif'
6277325ce5ed589510169414fad155be
0f5167410c14f4fa3a020ff3151d336f8047f635
'2011-10-27T16:51:13-04:00'
describe
'1524' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLZS' 'sip-files00063.txt'
1754230eda9891a64788e903d535fb2e
ca9572ecdc9c315bbfd5e32c33c6fdaa001bea0b
describe
'12295' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLZT' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
0f499b21226d9d9d214843418f624f11
afde12ddc7544b3465f61d6868767a6ea6154127
'2011-10-27T16:56:18-04:00'
describe
'593666' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLZU' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
62181e9076f85dc0e1f6d881c53e61c5
7f023153237b4dc1f9140c533107ade2893ed84c
'2011-10-27T16:50:00-04:00'
describe
'148918' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLZV' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
af811aa3176ae565a70f66b0b0582d8f
c9def02b494d4bc47df1787a5fd5c30b52dec76c
'2011-10-27T16:52:21-04:00'
describe
'38682' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLZW' 'sip-files00064.pro'
23202438bb4b0a208e0703fc10936dd4
5d7c1f916898d1b217c00a7f669a8cc2577abe8b
describe
'49124' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLZX' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
1ae6aa04baaf3db11983fb3069a0039c
b0f75bc8dbb05df18220d637284e55e30bb92a03
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLZY' 'sip-files00064.tif'
21266e8b9356868bbb82591085f833f9
b12a16c9e697c908fccaeb920ae8687d8e2ad199
'2011-10-27T16:50:59-04:00'
describe
'1530' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABLZZ' 'sip-files00064.txt'
aa5376e4ccd1153a3957971aa5cee707
2270fae7b054cbb4b38c6e95587f5651a3889d42
describe
'12198' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMAA' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
ef70ae923bfc4bde85540ea101f9f8a3
c3d9231079f13040d0faa11b0cbc7b8a318cd039
describe
'593630' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMAB' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
9888999034225b92153f47fd4cb11814
6aeac40049a4a973827a73e96bace84dff6022f1
'2011-10-27T16:51:31-04:00'
describe
'150223' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMAC' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
d2ff3ad9f6333e3afa2f4205e307b857
99b0ff2c11bd1c96f5078295b1f0dc918e770afe
describe
'37920' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMAD' 'sip-files00065.pro'
91975a3d560cfaac16e32a04cde904d4
decf5c7a6deb28826d820efc4bfb074bd4915611
'2011-10-27T16:55:12-04:00'
describe
'50074' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMAE' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
cef27528769d0a3ea1483902fd5fd95f
59ee9929171e1a3478fd3e451ba9ee9144b59d5a
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMAF' 'sip-files00065.tif'
d24da29afb0ef38b72069bb50b374fec
d0fefad564cd6e36cc26095f019b90c0c7e7d8b0
describe
'1507' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMAG' 'sip-files00065.txt'
ca2a5e2b19c3df8d5de9aaf210e6c7ec
ac2b57a72b23933e69a3872f5000aebc536a0fe1
'2011-10-27T16:53:31-04:00'
describe
'12367' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMAH' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
26271f98c69dfe5ecc8b484e4878e8c5
dca92916ff76c0363b13d9d118aa7c3f89e7160b
describe
'593631' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMAI' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
953d289ba7a8632a12beb48f1689e9cd
759b25aefe3cc704d8d81f894115f2c38d11aef6
describe
'135452' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMAJ' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
8fe8388aafe5183ed85ce8f65bfddabb
48220bf59c98055c33e0065e8e4d37fb7dba21bc
describe
'33836' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMAK' 'sip-files00066.pro'
405250676094d074c8e8d832f4fc4f55
8275b45c3e6027360da680cab19a69e30aad0f95
describe
'44536' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMAL' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
8aaf0dd2200a4a77bb27282041b7929f
2e7f0b52ed73e33f53ddea44d8ecf6492ef89dbf
'2011-10-27T16:52:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMAM' 'sip-files00066.tif'
9e4e40b71e23514575046970a9e1dc2c
ce9decf03299423f1f26358e477e1d30a433ec7a
describe
'1350' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMAN' 'sip-files00066.txt'
359ad09d5d3042fda9977e055e4f42db
db98d947baef616221456b5128848bd4a938fbf5
describe
'11127' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMAO' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
a3a6559a46f1a5c55594c50ae0797b3c
aaf39d279062964f71727e5624af31971d7919a9
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMAP' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
39f09027f9c8780b767748918529d52e
c0771d0d0b5a87f90e923788a5f2952b38dd60bc
'2011-10-27T16:52:17-04:00'
describe
'140792' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMAQ' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
5c840828f60baadb8212b67129c501e5
4ccf6feea9eeddeb6097fc9ce5487cc40f733e0c
describe
'34559' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMAR' 'sip-files00067.pro'
27feefe11f052d67276c2181d6710c6b
b0b8b580d2da9cfdfd79a2331ace1d2b5353e6cc
describe
'45956' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMAS' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
44bf98d07deaaad355423ef801949779
8c7f31833b4d1ce47fc0e38430c4c1eeae5dd631
'2011-10-27T16:51:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMAT' 'sip-files00067.tif'
00a2c3ddc70b032f353a64f6f77dfe69
2ea14349f74a4c29e60afe83cc899a010335cc46
'2011-10-27T16:54:59-04:00'
describe
'1365' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMAU' 'sip-files00067.txt'
2a46c4136207f298cf46de053704aed8
1d20c4584934ae7652bd2e3e64a1d2b6c4448707
describe
'10909' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMAV' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
1c29c77f385b9a796f01bc5758613f5d
27197e5c880ca69cdd5b1ebc633f28c62bb46696
'2011-10-27T16:50:18-04:00'
describe
'593628' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMAW' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
35f48aacb93d24626b262a7f8d6219ce
24e3d8c3a3669403b3bfbed22c14428be1893e0a
'2011-10-27T16:48:54-04:00'
describe
'156582' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMAX' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
42c422e9a6443c99e6cce2435e110a7b
a9d9103f0921e28b3e358ecab64bb0f783b539db
describe
'39934' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMAY' 'sip-files00068.pro'
5f087cf4ee88149d1de9beeaa9964f97
6a689f02dcc080d8a9db6578a21375778e728ee0
describe
'51179' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMAZ' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
216beb86530b1259f7407865b4280821
ba1bcdb7612e4ceca425c0a594184e1ac04884b2
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMBA' 'sip-files00068.tif'
15baf2a183044f583fe9cf68e9e68145
bb339196eb8a831733cec83e07215dc2323862f9
'2011-10-27T16:49:51-04:00'
describe
'1591' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMBB' 'sip-files00068.txt'
f75e8485bb7593a82c7545612b9b74fe
1bcf3fd405e1035f9fc7bc6dda1e552bb9981764
'2011-10-27T16:52:12-04:00'
describe
'12233' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMBC' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
e32cc88fe07034cc0fb4be4fc811d524
8655ebbcc170950427d6cc574ac5640d78d21ffb
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMBD' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
f9f408a28f551948239bc42eed2b8067
e104b0e5ec50267cbda84057f9e0674c3e4034cb
'2011-10-27T16:51:25-04:00'
describe
'153478' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMBE' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
f3751b06eb7bbc159b8f746f0addc0c1
4dfa1121a4620cfa0dbe6a369755b4e9c7da3b9d
describe
'37992' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMBF' 'sip-files00069.pro'
aa593ea02d0fdd0a24744b49bb551753
ff6281b428da5be9cad46cf60e8143571de771ae
describe
'49515' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMBG' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
461b9c05b1e0a907535d510d90d3e3c4
afeb038fda9193608d4cf1940633f6d1e6726d67
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMBH' 'sip-files00069.tif'
2c31b6b4998bee1b4138065866e8bea5
3c51dd08caef617f9613dc643b9241947fe48b51
describe
'1535' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMBI' 'sip-files00069.txt'
d3a0f27ef93effd8d4585328a5cea31e
9cb2944950346bce7c28750ca9796f0b1929da28
describe
'12181' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMBJ' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
b7e10ce1e84d95f609795b85642d3e68
b1989f727f9c819410c4aacd569f338e7279fbf7
describe
'593629' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMBK' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
4e0b94d71adc5867efeac8a874409df1
cd5927252811a09ee01abdb4eb3ad90e0c9e0610
describe
'152774' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMBL' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
77e4926d22548e7b0c3792a82a8f7274
0fe8f526efcdc949e10f38e4a01eaa4193b5e5af
'2011-10-27T16:52:19-04:00'
describe
'37369' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMBM' 'sip-files00070.pro'
379fdd5299d8fae89196f5f439cd8113
693491f14092fdb9a09aa86f220ff5754ce6cab3
'2011-10-27T16:53:25-04:00'
describe
'50133' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMBN' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
2f92831a6ac4c1a4c7a5ffced184c3d9
4222dfa301e55009be47b6afa7bf56496a1466e5
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMBO' 'sip-files00070.tif'
19cdc62e0b3604c9c64bcf2464cec458
58209cc307cb0a4cb97cc78eddf1a4db23989b55
describe
'1485' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMBP' 'sip-files00070.txt'
023e9e032b7501a8f95468272880f079
a10c90e52d141dcab2540cc07f6b54200e29ebf9
describe
'12340' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMBQ' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
8c2c8fe29808e3bab9bd030467b836ec
f057f67b09f50c905db4c86b5689c3b30b71c15d
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMBR' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
977f4e80a1a1cb64a029c2e216cd55c1
b8cc90e92955700702a8b7d5674be699e9da4d64
'2011-10-27T16:55:34-04:00'
describe
'158070' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMBS' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
e7b17accd33a39bd0a07a76117471ec5
759dd127b61ff06edc89a67c5cba867186ee5699
describe
'39690' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMBT' 'sip-files00071.pro'
0165c913a7047917e756686a68486a28
d0102f2988517390666449aa95844a10efb898ba
describe
'50460' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMBU' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
8afd138ac4331c0aa193e7fcf55c75df
09028c34158d2d905741db1b9e5998e499a63a64
'2011-10-27T16:51:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMBV' 'sip-files00071.tif'
6baca833a455b63986b3d6ee4a9e1a6b
aae68e96f9e4bdbb277ae61d5b8a4c0b989f71b3
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMBW' 'sip-files00071.txt'
2db0c5bd71fe7af51dbfe34850193266
8b0d39ec00eb4e685658effad72588959b262347
'2011-10-27T16:50:51-04:00'
describe
'12075' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMBX' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
2925dfb6924af5d2f8749b6230a0627b
b58e6cc8036678174830e775dd50a00895be99d4
describe
'593571' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMBY' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
85688acd5b489df88417f25aa5b4454b
4cc92f35709e16eb025fc3dcbf0096ec0f16dfba
describe
'148231' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMBZ' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
2a46153fc5c6e4520f6719eb5b5a119a
1e6c9cbe9a5d5ae6908198a7d02a9ad2ea079275
describe
'38166' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMCA' 'sip-files00072.pro'
405b4adbf99fc47c28bcc8c717831fd0
b32ba089d79d8618d5cd7d43d4249c06d003659a
'2011-10-27T16:48:20-04:00'
describe
'48484' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMCB' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
7d6db62714b3cb75674f789f4b2dca40
cc3fbe3ad9dcc9422b4d6b3263064d839405462f
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMCC' 'sip-files00072.tif'
7b2f8a7c3a0487ea8f0362b4ee8b3df8
e2211306864c4993b6ff8231e00b48bdbf840b20
'2011-10-27T16:51:47-04:00'
describe
'1498' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMCD' 'sip-files00072.txt'
394f501ee2f1143431a87c3f1670e609
0c08cb031b55786903ee3337fdc080462185b605
describe
'11334' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMCE' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
0d7d259b1e1ee8100ed738c7d94d77f3
c72338596fced20b98d9813517f8bfd495c44ce2
'2011-10-27T16:48:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMCF' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
8ef7ed78c91827a6fcaa9788e5853d19
93ac7f9d73b635a379db52e2f1cb621bf740b7a4
'2011-10-27T16:52:10-04:00'
describe
'152031' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMCG' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
b830b725b705cdffa787792afce1a2a1
e53c7905fac004a37d5945891fad46f5b2e6a5f5
'2011-10-27T16:53:05-04:00'
describe
'37281' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMCH' 'sip-files00073.pro'
46532d9944bbd3f89b83fb48cf8f2e99
32a10504a870f9f7ab3ef5e12da53befc6b4ce01
describe
'48925' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMCI' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
289a59cd4a29fade782312e63714b0a0
0427588fee067433882fd221238e99ad2e75090a
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMCJ' 'sip-files00073.tif'
8f9161cda7517a376eee9118c05fa9a5
96e3f5ffcf79948be7e785890c9c8c329e35abc6
describe
'1503' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMCK' 'sip-files00073.txt'
d52aded957a24b0a797a41ec5ae7d917
800d8d9e5cae5bf28cfd6ea12be49cbd2696a2ff
describe
'12079' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMCL' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
7e8219bfd68e12a7fec32a34506eea91
688682f77fbd7394317830676ba06d7fb68a9d08
'2011-10-27T16:55:23-04:00'
describe
'593845' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMCM' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
8dbd195726330b1a60c6c6466e9a0411
a76b19989b90ea15eecaa5f0e5ceb47a4b68ac94
describe
'152389' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMCN' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
d40f2dad37458f4207155dd48ea5eeab
6c2e39c5fd520bf23191c31ca2d6a12193b16026
describe
'38388' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMCO' 'sip-files00074.pro'
f47ad4dac85babbd111c4ac1fe38d22a
047c4934457e8f9b9c62f720ccb5c307e36384d8
'2011-10-27T16:53:26-04:00'
describe
'48251' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMCP' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
ddee250d66991eb22a92fea4b31a5887
255aaa736fea95dbbd9443ff3e864c75bcf28a82
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMCQ' 'sip-files00074.tif'
d56f344d53596029202b068c79b1fa65
789cfaa476ecc9713677599ece0ba69ead209f84
'2011-10-27T16:53:09-04:00'
describe
'1508' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMCR' 'sip-files00074.txt'
7abc911a3de19623966a1c6d5bbefa06
2a3e6c367358f1b18d622941562cffc8d4f32048
describe
'11882' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMCS' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
1be582cac5d1f073f7bb5af34b1af653
b130eabd1c50f9936165e81e8583cd1ca6430937
describe
'593654' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMCT' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
5783d7542c3715e184519ed921bc8384
23f857839ed14640595c2933f55062f3941266cd
'2011-10-27T16:52:11-04:00'
describe
'155306' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMCU' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
759eb8b4536a47b9bbb549353ad3ea09
2afcc379400e3acf4ee3052f95f062f8e9f58da1
describe
'38952' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMCV' 'sip-files00075.pro'
983833e3db9a5334c2088cb84783a4e6
cabe6f5bf5c74889ddf45bfe8ea6d37c6b19f72a
describe
'49374' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMCW' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
a16851ccfbdc670038cb8cf59af94421
c78648fcbce515921ed6c74f831092972a3163b1
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMCX' 'sip-files00075.tif'
074e672d6b8cd47db2b3c9cdef9b9412
3b3a1ba30e6332fadbc13f90a53dba3d11cba05a
'2011-10-27T16:49:19-04:00'
describe
'1560' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMCY' 'sip-files00075.txt'
878a732daa140b18c2fd8ec3840c3221
36cd6cbc89091fb3a4bb0b8bc223212d9e177dd6
describe
'11648' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMCZ' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
3bbb19c36bc2ea9a04e5fc22d83735fd
c78686b4d56cf4e1ac1b1c3c6f71f6040ff76427
'2011-10-27T16:54:36-04:00'
describe
'593616' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMDA' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
6c6be24e5df82c306f7bf4038d7a592a
0268a9eb21a08477294ffc8ae64996497b7464f5
describe
'150288' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMDB' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
2646efb8764d7e61c03bb46bea0cb6e5
c5f78b03bbc62bf809e15f1670afa140d4c03382
describe
'39429' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMDC' 'sip-files00076.pro'
84718837a078900cc32945dfa0893e4d
5882ce0b9157da40658c3e68e73f9ec6d006df4e
describe
'49176' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMDD' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
f27147c340386cfdc5c722fae12b11c9
c8ae2264cbb887c489ae69676817cc1eb0bde4ac
'2011-10-27T16:55:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMDE' 'sip-files00076.tif'
f6c9766a1447d3c28e5a8ee35a725ed0
f2bf41400f5f3553dc1bbbad5ff2d36a260c1905
'2011-10-27T16:51:01-04:00'
describe
'1571' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMDF' 'sip-files00076.txt'
1de8769a571338e631b31b66a6f9a3f5
df92ad71d502d7085668eeab964fb3842705a043
'2011-10-27T16:53:24-04:00'
describe
'12024' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMDG' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
1dd5320d81dd7d68eda286f1acde37d8
418778c637cd5a09264a2a72a0b939ae9a63da34
describe
'594012' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMDH' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
d22deb876170943c17880026ab2f748d
2b03d1fe06a3b90a22ca708dfea12ba60965b30a
'2011-10-27T16:54:05-04:00'
describe
'157139' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMDI' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
cca1e29d37826f8bf5d5ceca895b26d3
3fb2a71a655ff48ea3528eb840e0ace6af53f0a3
describe
'39311' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMDJ' 'sip-files00077.pro'
52fc25f642e705c342be4e8dd161a731
fd85147303f2d2570541cb72f63af88126485fe5
describe
'50812' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMDK' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
d0b635d822d238389f2825ef15762184
d10833e29949fb09994a975bff9ffae8ad94732f
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMDL' 'sip-files00077.tif'
cd5f8c9237af3d6a070f278ad6d64e63
94dc66de29fe47936c8aa13e0216c1cfc5b2784f
'2011-10-27T16:48:52-04:00'
describe
'1567' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMDM' 'sip-files00077.txt'
4e7abfa8c6af6a1d402784a4c14d9f20
4700141e283053f26b5af63a3da93339d3d93c6a
describe
'12204' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMDN' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
a63cdd08df455ee377d3b84f2512a123
4174026a7d120910b846a1ac10844dbecda4a439
describe
'594007' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMDO' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
9ff82f05c41cc7e977b1fd8beb2b18d2
ac9fb3de2bf509c7d04ef174f93d4455ff16b654
'2011-10-27T16:51:02-04:00'
describe
'150513' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMDP' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
4820e93996acbe7b0b73468914384843
3db8c47e5ad73e9cf628834d570735483d9308e7
'2011-10-27T16:49:32-04:00'
describe
'39005' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMDQ' 'sip-files00078.pro'
e1bd8230761d6d984d0c2a397710aa21
17fcec19936112394693e9db00d7d40862e991e4
describe
'48253' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMDR' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
6625a477da4559d2294520b056e43e02
ecc0c1b5dab847422b58781635f54068a1c67a6b
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMDS' 'sip-files00078.tif'
dcf78eca8e2960408105321062478660
50c1fcf5b85c754d4e60c82972448f4e79f3fb96
'2011-10-27T16:53:41-04:00'
describe
'1548' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMDT' 'sip-files00078.txt'
6c43aaaadb801ada17fa0fc892238867
04f7184585776ae5464c1e347ea8ea2e4af9f8fc
'2011-10-27T16:54:13-04:00'
describe
'11402' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMDU' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
5d6e8f4d41999f773963dc16f211653a
d8ed6262daa21d4a96e24098fac466e9d9f0f92d
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMDV' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
bdf26003ce95c26cb08703125421185d
8a65b41f8d3f521217c8e3cd011575d23870606c
describe
'155042' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMDW' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
8f432d94fa7e40ebb985fd69f9d1bd16
d2b2c97c522f048a3ce5cfc424d935cd8791493b
describe
'38365' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMDX' 'sip-files00079.pro'
4ead023b0c77afd9909248762b821727
5c5402369e385224a3c90438814f74cc41fa9ea7
describe
'48791' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMDY' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
d9bf1cdf6e622b0fbcd23b61cf233cf1
f68f51f9670903604835655ea0098a691c44f59d
'2011-10-27T16:51:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMDZ' 'sip-files00079.tif'
1536079ec561e9b3f3e22da6a2cc3705
0142d831b5d1de27251b0d021b8766c90b819099
'2011-10-27T16:48:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMEA' 'sip-files00079.txt'
af43327cc7a4dd7cf76363efcfcc6967
5ac1e9ee4377a08d0bffeff13261f5a2275c9564
describe
'11466' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMEB' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
c233e660c745ffe279c2389465b7c03e
223de58afc710de8ccd1d41c7691010aafb14391
'2011-10-27T16:50:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMEC' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
93dffa82d98a7548aa666963bf5c08cd
56efa620a7f31b7242fbd5a68a44a5ed3f54109b
describe
'152775' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMED' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
69b85f0cb5159ae685de20f7150146bb
7a647b6dbd0c9d45a443e57cc9266c594209702b
describe
'39152' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMEE' 'sip-files00080.pro'
0685a5befc9f30fa91609d096bde96b6
b026761be21f3b4fbc7afd6f22b72e3bdcc19a3d
describe
'48949' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMEF' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
f941d6e3c67e4197933fd24bf8087a1c
d55ed63dd10be8d6358db1815373c7d1b9e37286
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMEG' 'sip-files00080.tif'
2ba60e355c63e00cd133cfe9667f9dab
f2aa19767e1b7309dfb521b9270243fb064f7e83
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMEH' 'sip-files00080.txt'
924fee9b7b5194234eb40993e5fdf6ce
fddf725f12387a696c5901193d211c1d1c3bae47
'2011-10-27T16:51:14-04:00'
describe
'11658' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMEI' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
a8cd6de2637f44f6b2dd7ffded46ca34
4753461112e79710e483112b6d4f799652b7476c
describe
'593975' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMEJ' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
cf423f910e5d3c61a89342104e253c3b
71fb12e32b69da68fb9b4b797d4ad094c7988cf3
describe
'113062' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMEK' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
cfea7878baa2616a4c9317ec1f5c7ed8
cd75673dc52afb2bf65e3275f7472e42ba46fa40
'2011-10-27T16:51:54-04:00'
describe
'25661' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMEL' 'sip-files00081.pro'
f5246667cb0dbce14b0b86abe44a63b7
32a62354c375a8bd74512569883db58b7a56d36d
describe
'35265' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMEM' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
64c2c44b51f2ec0e053fdc12041d6b10
9a2b888d45dce93ab5bfc09d0d7509bb3531cfab
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMEN' 'sip-files00081.tif'
e6e12450b5f320bb6d48bddaed2d1ab6
082d833892bc7f76f048553552988ae12f7d44ad
describe
'1084' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMEO' 'sip-files00081.txt'
5600e32ccf1248dd7487a47c22f34e0b
f7de88f4d7b94c2a3aaf5576b4d45cf85715cdf4
'2011-10-27T16:50:11-04:00'
describe
'9810' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMEP' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
618bb49a83debdaaaf180037040b4b49
adf26d1f197121c3ecb523fb74a0201d31cc0c3d
'2011-10-27T16:53:45-04:00'
describe
'593662' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMEQ' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
3fb17f281ac95cc1c1dc809eec50bd22
213d0588d98af6e8e7e68d55c6e6f6c45ac3c384
'2011-10-27T16:51:35-04:00'
describe
'155527' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMER' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
44252599246c8b73d2034500991905db
e4f236fc8f57bb6d9c16d9df0bdce38f909c588b
describe
'39740' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMES' 'sip-files00082.pro'
afb170be98fba641aee709349f92097a
298a9ea3f4bffc979fa4b904bf28ee8437eae60a
describe
'50112' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMET' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
4943a444947cd1c16971a24a7a84e3c4
fe026ed4f91749a4e2293f0542f56eb086f974e1
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMEU' 'sip-files00082.tif'
c6c7206b19c1b04abd11aa0426584012
6c2e1e56b3e79bbfa2edf48f6b6503dc0a679128
'2011-10-27T16:54:09-04:00'
describe
'1578' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMEV' 'sip-files00082.txt'
ca3eb9f07d207c13eb4a4c96a1b28f42
7bdd1fb6b1329b482fd2420c79360ac673a5038b
'2011-10-27T16:54:06-04:00'
describe
'11890' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMEW' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
a711d1691db8e57f85f36c24f831645f
7dd693140eccd6b2517ec0a46671a9010863e145
describe
'594006' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMEX' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
3a59c13047e7823919ac093ce8a179a3
388408a6f8e2358f0dfac8f54fa21038742d451c
describe
'156269' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMEY' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
60b824797a5e407850f9247bb705d99b
89ef6746abbdb65175a8d38f3443e2fc85e45d3d
'2011-10-27T16:53:16-04:00'
describe
'37814' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMEZ' 'sip-files00083.pro'
2061a83ab102600391579364e8fbc6c6
66d5b6be8f5a223b5c76a378616584a83cc5795a
'2011-10-27T16:48:51-04:00'
describe
'48742' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMFA' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
4b3f37faa4eabd80cb6f83846e172249
6a48af8a5a3dd9734d1c6fd4ce3b1aaa916d9141
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMFB' 'sip-files00083.tif'
338861c1fb3436749a851c54394370e8
6a86de6feb9a70e0d79b02a92538a28d2f94cd3c
'2011-10-27T16:49:47-04:00'
describe
'1484' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMFC' 'sip-files00083.txt'
602fbba60d0829500c07798032532d5a
3cf3852c6cab1e0ebeec9bf10585000972cc09e8
'2011-10-27T16:52:40-04:00'
describe
'12477' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMFD' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
42f1d82daea17ef7f16758573f4cf0c4
288dfc4adec137e059fbe30d24f37c8981b39393
describe
'593651' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMFE' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
5aa8fca0419cdacabc0c8db1c6873ec0
9cd408906e7d18723c881def1f511d192d6b76c7
describe
'140652' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMFF' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
b5beb2965e4ca7aa223414825be4587a
c1b2b6ffcc8220ace4a6647aa48db083b93aadf4
describe
'37693' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMFG' 'sip-files00084.pro'
cff2c80c59f207544414689d3ff008b0
786171d04d4c955f75807c8155670e420133ad66
describe
'46958' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMFH' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
dba3689aa5fdec91ac9379831ebbd6df
c17816c2268eb732abe80f5b6d941866a0a310e9
'2011-10-27T16:48:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMFI' 'sip-files00084.tif'
420874c5d023609274fd4bce72cb7116
39e36f353faddb325651d5efb4039e11816c2bd6
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMFJ' 'sip-files00084.txt'
e7447b19d9d563e47d65aabfbfd3c773
0abc149b123a0d34a0c5be2c61c1e2ae5bffb12f
describe
'11517' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMFK' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
a0f57ecab5eec65c4f187c2361f85729
74b4c5c13e61ce4e40dbcf941fc7dcfea0d612a3
describe
'594013' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMFL' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
3982a5657c1f4787fcff5020e42a479a
ce3dfe262da79620b55418cfb473d44c1edb6193
describe
'153589' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMFM' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
5a02dc31ce1d470e8552984ab918be49
3a2d21d3caa5c32423b03e84aa4ae838e982a82e
'2011-10-27T16:54:57-04:00'
describe
'38641' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMFN' 'sip-files00085.pro'
71ac1b83f50056ec2663190d0756b7d6
7edaec6f38bc73cd13d3509a79de88b65550d8a8
'2011-10-27T16:51:42-04:00'
describe
'50206' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMFO' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
a5d784383b4c0e0e0c3e0c765772905c
cedc7e6b4061438dfc780ef6038e7de946927bdc
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMFP' 'sip-files00085.tif'
41d79aa8b9083e5fa9379733ada8e712
6cdddc9d8b30d02456095ccf6a5914a255ad2e43
describe
'1529' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMFQ' 'sip-files00085.txt'
234e183209ed4774c561a165683fb9f8
b9cfb622e1fb3bd8e0002dda7a2bd387df5c8c63
describe
'12290' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMFR' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
41d57b0fe9ae87a2965168a925ed6ad9
a113ba451538e1d2a59e21617b377974179aa613
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMFS' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
73d96b5c4c43223c2e59dacda7c113eb
f82a546c530d8b9181db384f9d549b4b336767a8
describe
'151633' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMFT' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
efac16a49ffe81024e4f93d30bee251a
23fa00669a629247da6fae413c7199b345f97ae5
describe
'38613' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMFU' 'sip-files00086.pro'
f568eb2bdc210b12ad6d99a3b745d6ec
c3857c980706f1637af7345b761c54c526d31e04
'2011-10-27T16:56:19-04:00'
describe
'48390' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMFV' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
8375e9d7a049228feeaf71cc3002bbb8
797f0d56033b08926dea088bf97c2c8bd8123ce0
'2011-10-27T16:55:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMFW' 'sip-files00086.tif'
be12adda7944571813490780e3dcdb22
bffec6400e52d95432392cbe459e25dace938158
describe
'1511' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMFX' 'sip-files00086.txt'
826b75b246a56fd9478063f57168c6b8
ae7d774ccbd39464021bb931361ccecf4e7aeef1
describe
'11331' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMFY' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
1f2e3c4ae35523ec45becd24d855fb6d
100724b3e6d6fe227b6851b3048bfd1f0c274cbe
describe
'593989' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMFZ' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
1cf2e5e0fbdb9147e6065a3c568cbd13
8204186d40f8f41c89df1651d154232e4eb0e0cd
describe
'151697' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMGA' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
65c9b6bacbf3c67e120e05f78ea592c9
3c3999fbeb6bd8a5b1d000c7946169e4b66d4d71
describe
'38023' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMGB' 'sip-files00087.pro'
437dbaf49571967288c8dcfc08f090b1
31e5f1ed0e307e210d47d8221257fa7b2f50e081
describe
'48537' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMGC' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
be64b775137244a34b7e428fafc73f91
eb087fd5074e9897f9fe484ae4195e10139085a7
'2011-10-27T16:56:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMGD' 'sip-files00087.tif'
520267b32d5bd65203a668477a201477
eefda0738a647c5461b864d60d5f8fe0c1ea110d
describe
'1512' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMGE' 'sip-files00087.txt'
060abd3fae7196882e5d8f55aa176aa8
4eec1a01dd858bc9482cd5da36f464065f8b4795
describe
'11732' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMGF' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
f0e60c4ec7aca4a8925b30e14b2ed200
ca28b0d47622a5f053af477d2d35d09374cc33c3
'2011-10-27T16:53:06-04:00'
describe
'593609' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMGG' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
33136d27c67501c46a9af6ceb1d818c6
d5e6a5db6400920a601ef87b35b82fd352353ea1
describe
'147666' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMGH' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
4bc82787939af1a89e8e501621e92e01
97dffd1e8ba7888bba3d92c2f1fbe4ce3f435d34
describe
'39089' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMGI' 'sip-files00088.pro'
6db587c5e9555f8363468c861a12498a
9354bf659a23453e1726895c79a36ba8b9862a97
describe
'47813' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMGJ' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
4e0610d04c354357354c27ac252bb0b5
cd6e5b4038b2c8db032bcfc413d80ea410767a87
'2011-10-27T16:48:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMGK' 'sip-files00088.tif'
367cdf94f8364131df5720bed73f269a
923b1dcb2c2fd96ae06c738156db14ea1132eb22
'2011-10-27T16:48:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMGL' 'sip-files00088.txt'
63029d8fec277daa172c1b47c68dbf8a
a397ccd3146af20995dd81ee65b08fcd0f018779
describe
'11546' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMGM' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
daf99360dfb80d33f0578564b58a8998
1576252337c7528bb7bd7ef2e5997ba0a73dd47a
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMGN' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
d65b6618cc60aea8202f5115bffe03a6
53c035327be241b6ba24627b557536b3de0ea6e4
describe
'152346' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMGO' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
35de55add6fc74c3aaae6b6c467ea639
4eb1e533d34f9413f7fd346a9a827f4a2b488a26
describe
'37977' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMGP' 'sip-files00089.pro'
1e44eb8905a69c7950d10e1bb46003d5
9b0c2dbaa4836802b89865db0c8c9b04f0063710
describe
'48715' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMGQ' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
13750115d101a3b9588faaa6915c2291
1ced3543747e03c99e1dfe8f29265c4e9db86d5d
'2011-10-27T16:54:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMGR' 'sip-files00089.tif'
9341c0fb30545d4085cc53e240abac25
33ccd2061eefe3997ab8dacaed2f99cb7f99b57e
'2011-10-27T16:52:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMGS' 'sip-files00089.txt'
41bbc44d2b56a6139ab0630b831aa160
4d0b301b4abf186be026503549cdf932c741e64e
'2011-10-27T16:55:18-04:00'
describe
'12177' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMGT' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
f130e3cef14095336d5e18a5b9a53f1f
665e2b16060fef910a7b6666c1c5a635d68cf214
'2011-10-27T16:53:36-04:00'
describe
'593668' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMGU' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
9c7f9690547270385b5ea2957f0e3d6e
472488fc4b46b04340e88a9ea1c1182857721a37
describe
'115934' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMGV' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
e6e12d86aa0ef746a1e10576110065f7
36e638920fcb4154f52eea6c8729a4d1725e378b
'2011-10-27T16:56:24-04:00'
describe
'13465' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMGW' 'sip-files00090.pro'
f4499621f567383a46ffe3d83fd5f008
4d36119ea7238b3ecf3bb4e28e2907db1207aefe
'2011-10-27T16:50:10-04:00'
describe
'36536' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMGX' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
32903ed94ff1e32532ecb5798ed750a8
344e02f50a45756e267cb8b7ce8ebf599666e689
'2011-10-27T16:56:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMGY' 'sip-files00090.tif'
cf5014081dbfa9a228fcb585636ef9a4
111dbacce8c39b6a71d42ae5d98409270e67bd4a
'2011-10-27T16:56:22-04:00'
describe
'531' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMGZ' 'sip-files00090.txt'
cf9d917e750da57637bdb79144383a02
5d5deb30483fe2998aff9936daccb0979686bd2d
describe
'9643' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMHA' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
f16de9e8779e20f77edfa7a815d99177
9a381f6f340bec9b5d82b4817b839b9b39ef4382
describe
'593672' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMHB' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
965f35c0d0fc91e3f667bbbcfe5a261b
57063e07f489baf60454f5dd28846fd6f284a12c
'2011-10-27T16:54:33-04:00'
describe
'157546' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMHC' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
777a33c28bc2883320920f90683c700b
1a5da076c21ef2ee9b62f9d91bdd1e3316377bcb
'2011-10-27T16:49:38-04:00'
describe
'40192' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMHD' 'sip-files00091.pro'
8e399024c117f1a989b7f9bc3fed7d2c
5ac73027b3744544626bc901ac52ed8d6b1a9938
describe
'51333' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMHE' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
62407166a3286d7fc15af50a9852a977
10e2e614bfa37564618bf687aa2c203ebca0112b
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMHF' 'sip-files00091.tif'
790aaf2aa59fe052a7305e35989b05c4
b0146b5d62c761aa28ef7145f7da4f4fb7ecf983
describe
'1579' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMHG' 'sip-files00091.txt'
27293d3512b96a15a3a5e948c45abbdb
e66d17655e31e462701d23106ed6051e6c84f006
describe
'12005' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMHH' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
5d4dfffb24541c9ebe4d1cf60b83bec2
fe3ea5ab14ba541015edef85ce7b79fef61364be
describe
'593674' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMHI' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
896eed6433adeb474260052ebf0a3007
e4894b2e95330f5fb921d9308f4800cd6c1aec65
describe
'150785' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMHJ' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
e001770195dc1a4297dc658373d63fff
3db47700426bb16acfab6bc7cd557bb3ab898658
describe
'39834' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMHK' 'sip-files00092.pro'
8a3764fef4a391363310576ab1f9f29d
8e524b681a782815e3869c69a75bd5bbda60eccf
describe
'48746' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMHL' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
a44d90d2c5d66fad78132eecaefe3e88
8e4ec4403958abe94380272ab3aaa2e662ac8f52
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMHM' 'sip-files00092.tif'
1e196f28583168e7656408e21d4dbddd
58654dd6138c2c1eec2a12d043a254eddf78311d
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMHN' 'sip-files00092.txt'
022a2b44b793f8ac85b3e21fdea775f3
da8be1b3777ebf2ed7842e9bc19fbdb1c38ac4b3
describe
'12044' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMHO' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
57429ab12dcf2266ad497b2250980764
cc4e5f667678e1763816d6ebdca4b4ac69f3add3
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMHP' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
663ce37de628578498d0e1e73c790eba
ad5d88e1b53c4d221db6de72f9c92b93d2f481bf
describe
'148512' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMHQ' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
3f54728bd003e3cda2f5bb4113c105ad
a69458e7e65dee2a7e0618cb600b408d9c5de0b1
describe
'38915' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMHR' 'sip-files00093.pro'
f9b385ad06521949b25fa1cd9aebad72
383c24f54ee7f5b3c1d48dbbf79fefe9803669dd
'2011-10-27T16:49:30-04:00'
describe
'48448' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMHS' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
1fd4f908f23a3bbe0b7138a6ea8044b7
fbc343ddfff19b64fb06ea6b1847f2b3fe5bbdf0
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMHT' 'sip-files00093.tif'
08e6c9eb2fdf63fe5707b9b26b357d9f
6d815e735e1f851d0fe737c9f020fd1145196ce6
'2011-10-27T16:49:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMHU' 'sip-files00093.txt'
60909acd95b5a8996abd643bf1342b88
dc4a8c7e7eda6c24b2173d70b89fef133fbfa9c8
describe
'11945' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMHV' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
47187a4cae8207d822643b8149287941
7a035b3dce5397a77151f53bff6389d4891f4ba6
describe
'593927' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMHW' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
09a48d8b4acde01964275f27768722c2
b4e965dd7600bf368ae35a2ebd39cb72144828ec
describe
'96757' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMHX' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
3828d2ccdbb1b99de0d44771034baf4d
1d05f93ff63f6d8d3b51419f32436f37ef983968
describe
'7487' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMHY' 'sip-files00094.pro'
9bbf4589ea6107f4e1a6f02be9a753ec
22b8296d27c33201ab11f4f41f85a21647fcdddc
describe
'31757' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMHZ' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
f23587de965b98ff53fae418daba31e1
0ff60fe110481bed8e7e8079c46baae0e22d39fa
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMIA' 'sip-files00094.tif'
50eea9507af194ec5f76ec7db1690818
f4d304bd20b022cdebfe5bee17c15236a101427f
describe
'307' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMIB' 'sip-files00094.txt'
afef8c6e71c4987cbc88239a46abc2bd
fc7def15063ebfd26c6df3f54ed4259cc92e1498
'2011-10-27T16:49:02-04:00'
describe
'9189' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMIC' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
247f904b352cb1a4d76c77e2fb635e4c
82a7906d75cdbedf6ebfd500fa76391b7bc9c745
describe
'593814' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMID' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
bcad03797240003f48705700a1c0e1f2
0286a4ef2d9808672448f642661ccf8d7500530d
describe
'154981' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMIE' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
13a39a2160d7bcb5208f3a8e58bdd6f4
da6ae89276cce932d7481ef6417a6c0babcbda21
describe
'41710' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMIF' 'sip-files00095.pro'
dcffe835e0e3dc602aefeb336fc35c13
20b3c97c103c81b03eeb42ca2840ad447502c2c5
describe
'49842' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMIG' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
0274db269634cc872b9fbc0035ee5e47
47098aec14ecad55a8d6d0dd8eacb357e11cfe71
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMIH' 'sip-files00095.tif'
9017d73d50614b7f5cc34227ba09d729
e2b7fbd27100474b89839d0fbdd0752703668852
describe
'1637' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMII' 'sip-files00095.txt'
0a9ad3ab65c944989d2c882f6f094f53
374711e2f6f0b40925ebea0ad19cd7b976b298d2
describe
'11759' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMIJ' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
b0eba039884d0e65ba5a41eb4d225a1c
2c60f85139e36558f437d852f5dd76db422c491e
describe
'593956' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMIK' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
dadeef087173e03d0828ad79badb0fd2
3640b11e317776234d6904109d0f1490577a816c
describe
'153227' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMIL' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
74d15f8f208452d30bb67867ae9ac791
d70fefbc7068704d870af186c34bc7290e3f3b3d
'2011-10-27T16:51:58-04:00'
describe
'40971' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMIM' 'sip-files00096.pro'
9acbbd0b5d97673d0f285bde94702372
69c2517033e6ffd19c9dcbc4f8b6e04ee2def892
describe
'49906' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMIN' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
bb1ffcb7583bfe06d0173d297e477ae3
f2b9dc96184e3fd196f615fb688cdb213a9a0d0f
'2011-10-27T16:55:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMIO' 'sip-files00096.tif'
7d40808fd031a6422f5df4fcf64cbefa
0f7c99e0360e6c7423c1bbaa1d56e0f9722ee47c
'2011-10-27T16:52:41-04:00'
describe
'1646' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMIP' 'sip-files00096.txt'
20126e945bdebff5172ba16050ef8a76
bb7100a6bacfe7d0451eb3277cada5b2f85ffa24
describe
'12060' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMIQ' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
b3d526f533acce1507ca4abbd29a4803
c9e7111d85a10f6ccc5efd304309962414de4522
'2011-10-27T16:52:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMIR' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
5ac1c2829165bdc14a4dcf5d599688fa
9c88509ccafbd8ea5b53d417d7b421f0478c06e9
describe
'159740' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMIS' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
e343165f1f8cfb453210b1a33d09b9ae
571d9f4873164dca0eb0e4ce4b92c0360df6bd0e
describe
'38612' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMIT' 'sip-files00097.pro'
ae436e340bc8682fc8cb577f8f36e1ac
5109d16d5d519996d2ea13ce93f3a649260737d3
describe
'48942' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMIU' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
3c6a3569d4203eb662d5b88541a98e43
83a2b0b960b3c8fb729293f77e4c0c601dcf961f
'2011-10-27T16:48:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMIV' 'sip-files00097.tif'
4164721d2b2bf20bb3221f87b3c780b8
3f4d4d8b1e618b2e70e0b0af2eaceaa99727f331
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMIW' 'sip-files00097.txt'
023f8c8a10811c9934a5ee82bae2c863
2a6e50e66ccbd704d9a54c1e07b7056e68f2361d
'2011-10-27T16:48:07-04:00'
describe
'11821' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMIX' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
c81e1396b4ece5c5dc86b103aeff1749
43ad7c859e9c1b2dba1d134a142d45f95f5c0760
'2011-10-27T16:54:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMIY' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
29e49ce783129a7ae00fbb43df70217f
b83c9816be319b88b46ecc9eae9261fbe138840f
'2011-10-27T16:55:45-04:00'
describe
'135361' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMIZ' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
9147b2659e8d0dcb33824cec86dfcd71
10a99ea9cad3d20518445c89f3664e7e7d7b4c9e
describe
'36250' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMJA' 'sip-files00098.pro'
a86b9a5743a9399a736587def7d67f60
4d582e6d5cf6650b96c3b9adf3a0a6aa3970e85a
'2011-10-27T16:53:22-04:00'
describe
'45163' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMJB' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
7d75b3868cb1fc040cb46ae2b2750335
a5f69753c5c2bbf350323d1e023261378e16e647
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMJC' 'sip-files00098.tif'
049016788f4a48bc92d0596605127164
10df0d7763d3cce3753ac5107bbe1c36b3817bcf
'2011-10-27T16:52:27-04:00'
describe
'1444' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMJD' 'sip-files00098.txt'
349a0c6fc4eb2852dd83389e1e0f1fc3
ee9befb3cbd9c0b333516851797fe56822ee207d
describe
'11617' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMJE' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
375dc9e5a1a963f8faa8aca4a24b88b7
e86b24fc629df48b368049c88e3d112131b2077c
'2011-10-27T16:53:23-04:00'
describe
'593775' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMJF' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
1bfd369a450291152fa29e9e93ebd577
cfac4864db2f8eeffa8b4f52f8c210cb2e27cf51
describe
'108690' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMJG' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
806d73a2a5f54b37e0cedb1a978b5065
9bee38726975fa1cdb38a4b0973a2a5d567c1d4a
'2011-10-27T16:52:16-04:00'
describe
'14012' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMJH' 'sip-files00099.pro'
89cfe5583f0f63da0a1450199c90a456
fecb92510b52ab7975341731737b9188179526b9
describe
'33583' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMJI' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
4fe6028fb439b1619cdd4573e37baf72
b30f183131ccb0093f293a0a2b6d5cbcd82366b9
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMJJ' 'sip-files00099.tif'
def5fcf05e26273db6821d5d815210a3
65c75be0c6fb4376cd4859d76fd74b8392c4bfc6
describe
'593' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMJK' 'sip-files00099.txt'
51b84f1763d3fd9606c87728ef2f036c
86d528ac8f6ebb243791d9ef5c9f0827a44a3409
describe
'9151' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMJL' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
45f608af9603327e5cd1e5d2bfd4265b
874af8b5ecffa54b1546db94b2a16629c373f7c4
describe
'593647' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMJM' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
6efc49f44acfd2bc6b9cde403ef33b01
57db21a1257cead9041657def7ff23c8577ae2c4
'2011-10-27T16:52:30-04:00'
describe
'150832' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMJN' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
5ffae294a16da96efd59e536d9c2b9c7
3e47dd85822c087fe1baecce28282d850d7e5698
describe
'40041' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMJO' 'sip-files00100.pro'
cb1e72339992723f14c77168599b404e
52e6cc44d013b46c2264771a894e2ca9a917c1ba
describe
'49664' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMJP' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
023a0c2bba88a3ca69042be6b726f95f
0e3976ba8867947733a7e603b02ce88eb351117e
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMJQ' 'sip-files00100.tif'
422fad1ba7aed2d0e48dab6512d36957
656fc15986f618a96c387aafaf6e449cb531b1d0
'2011-10-27T16:50:47-04:00'
describe
'1568' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMJR' 'sip-files00100.txt'
5aa26c9d1699d076713be6b6f2cbb406
d0cbf734df2a03c7be6447e886344751c9a493ae
describe
'11871' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMJS' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
cccaaa7d7822f7795ea3aec275ff642c
9ea9d6260c2915ae99d32c3e7aa937eb2a8a9b93
describe
'597063' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMJT' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
64930570c3d78c3ba08d48c95d8c7608
2ed48d59dc9c0ab9ddffa6ccf6165efceae6df4e
'2011-10-27T16:51:55-04:00'
describe
'154046' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMJU' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
7ba656a9c27d9587b0bfd8e6b1954c7c
0375038b966d6d9f1acc5ac6e86a9338915339e9
'2011-10-27T16:51:40-04:00'
describe
'39342' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMJV' 'sip-files00101.pro'
1cb917fb8807a729f7ddde4fe7127f79
26111280ac449ee1813ab4db2e34e17d9ae3e95a
'2011-10-27T16:55:43-04:00'
describe
'50344' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMJW' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
8ecbcf877f2438a9fb0a838525b962ad
5a7111ca0b349f3eb5737c89399b89054ea18701
describe
'4794080' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMJX' 'sip-files00101.tif'
cc980f9dfe2a75f3d4c03ee5e7949b04
e414b69b73e85f558394972b2dc6a60721710d80
describe
'1563' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMJY' 'sip-files00101.txt'
19192c8e40e7794779d5cfe358b9b4f6
56cdf420cd3d3b7148aa630cb23b5f9d35f73f94
describe
'12015' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMJZ' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
1cfbecf297c028e54888219d239afc0d
63d50f51f25a02e444e4c803700d440edf4e74d2
describe
'593868' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMKA' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
f038484c588ee50acb727cd7e6ddf1f3
9e482f995df6ca6eee58ff9f684c3d019e64cc55
'2011-10-27T16:49:37-04:00'
describe
'107549' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMKB' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
374d31d53be82fb121a915f8a0f92310
56bf8afe09e781a88c009322dfce43803e3358c5
describe
'14599' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMKC' 'sip-files00102.pro'
4fa33c94ed89337a565fbb346c7014e4
fd74afc4b508e4e68349f084f72c39476a784156
describe
'34491' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMKD' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
96ca0294051f8266f9de2d1c8f73d489
6f08174713733ef8e143002162e68012c244fd4d
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMKE' 'sip-files00102.tif'
485d9c495067ddd554e7dd763674676b
2ce088ddccb1a00546393a66205c9261c10c22c8
'2011-10-27T16:53:50-04:00'
describe
'622' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMKF' 'sip-files00102.txt'
8cd8c2531f70cb0fa5ea142812e26bf6
e6b13d33300ab7d489e9bff0164a2c6dea7d363c
describe
'9404' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMKG' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
06c7dd85a47d1a80ead7a2c558909426
88b377d44134057a1021062a3666aeca787e2dd2
describe
'593656' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMKH' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
bc23eca7f60bbe9ccfc163d5539f0bc1
4aea411c5702aa9c0489a03f698e8f3472267971
describe
'151567' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMKI' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
2114e8702a038ca1f658e1b94ebe95b6
a4f7e6b150a0eb1b74b5bbe725cff60a5e565191
describe
'40124' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMKJ' 'sip-files00103.pro'
d4198e6fb6d25f6089ee3ff4fe2b8bbe
56aebb49c379eb0b803390ae95e7a279e0ec3c89
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMKK' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
52746dd5cf9fb3fb1f151b6e68fa6dfe
6387fb21c4a3ae85492c1168cb3cfdba0da98f2a
'2011-10-27T16:51:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMKL' 'sip-files00103.tif'
e02c74f86b79391a36a006d0cda0ee23
4fdd899ee972e7d3daea4a4226a840e16c8e376d
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMKM' 'sip-files00103.txt'
a844d40f3f1efe4436c71dac8bdfbbe5
8dff139d60f1096a269600b4551665b55eae9d68
describe
'12259' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMKN' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
a3f83933dffb09229bde2007c602c4e9
35bbb00cde422645eddf9288a7c682146836162c
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMKO' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
dd1b316d317c133c83064b4238dbc4bf
6ef41091b0b3f6edbca493bbda54866896270f2c
describe
'140049' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMKP' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
5f0e384cfd497a470dfe93ec96cab3a1
08b0ff94215ca376bb404a7efcceff9e14390415
describe
'40535' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMKQ' 'sip-files00104.pro'
e6b8ed2a54eaadb8db2e5d4997af11b4
f189bf0389f8392185d9d03ba8afa2143e7cb719
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMKR' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
1f4a7bfd4d8d7eea3b539fe9db9bc265
346b66f401b9d0fa944fe9120de02f7cac4cd5a5
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMKS' 'sip-files00104.tif'
bb36b99b3a081c284fa2cf0046238230
4193361c896e48058798f4c9cd70b1f12c3373e9
'2011-10-27T16:54:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMKT' 'sip-files00104.txt'
8311aacd6ac73d484621a6baaf0c7319
4f34502f458832dd6de02a4f25496373096a3d4d
describe
'11602' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMKU' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
28b6609bdc6d57b46f1292c7acc7bbe1
e0ab1ac5b404b27ec7bb35f0af4bfbb0f0da15f2
describe
'593565' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMKV' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
5c664cd371163e6c03ff909f4d4c5715
e5ebddf807c72f1229959edebcde10a50608881a
'2011-10-27T16:49:44-04:00'
describe
'127254' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMKW' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
67551246c9f90bcfd696c2dc718b0282
17e32762ef8d6341caada2c9b1415fff0937a9d3
describe
'20584' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMKX' 'sip-files00105.pro'
58f2fe0575c4dec254270eb1f0e409ab
9539dd8babfd466c84ea7a9b2146a1ff16aa4a0b
describe
'40498' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMKY' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
5ab5afd93264f073ffef293eedfa3f75
212bda332b60b2d4ef79669532cc4bcd528daab8
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMKZ' 'sip-files00105.tif'
1521ffc08e86ec78ba7ef45612d87b49
bc3ef1371898243cfb5d52059068f2483d221b8a
'2011-10-27T16:53:39-04:00'
describe
'845' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMLA' 'sip-files00105.txt'
d7214daf5b252344583763ea0166fd67
d2add18867de3a6cbe1d614017026cde61ee3bd2
describe
'10691' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMLB' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
a4fa7381f5ec747a6163c36683e8fd44
4ef771a7f10ababf042aa08f3627b2277dcd2edf
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMLC' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
7c5cd98c38d9c4949fa9591335bd3c53
532ecd6dc414582ad2697ee6a9d3878ec8a9857e
describe
'141116' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMLD' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
0f09d061dd31963ff0ba042683ab6a70
ed26670f92cf98197c0209086776a1ae0504e78f
describe
'40875' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMLE' 'sip-files00106.pro'
8f2d201a61783d3ccd41eb6df4729786
8b610cdff6b06a6d0e090335df868bb65609b369
describe
'48090' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMLF' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
d415612685d1088d4d8520bb22720c0d
a9c17b05f4016db3a074fea1b5176bbe9e3eb2dc
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMLG' 'sip-files00106.tif'
fed4f2a169d5e71b0339eecdc95d1919
cbfbafa7a89e42608adabe11b88c220d38436cdb
'2011-10-27T16:53:44-04:00'
describe
'1600' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMLH' 'sip-files00106.txt'
4749abfce7b87b7fb8fc155e3c878ea2
db50f677417cabe964db89c14b03014891a6989e
'2011-10-27T16:55:51-04:00'
describe
'11178' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMLI' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
69d02c81846d4d0af95178c1734998f0
61b3e7a4dee346c59da178d1a3666223491e59d7
describe
'593979' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMLJ' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
130d7bf2b5d52d956ec3ff6e1c3767f2
9098f78feec1af49cc3805b42d7b034daf3ae865
describe
'153921' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMLK' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
e3254d2c00b992c2c28e3fdc98ed1d3f
ee180ee2ad99fa84c68107da8faf084f5bf960c7
describe
'40942' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMLL' 'sip-files00107.pro'
6c12e00e3cb02c8b55c97263f558bfb7
a860b0fd5515f0f16f5410252351966ba8c9af7e
describe
'49940' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMLM' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
c1165f6675193da2d8876d7074709903
a3fae9da9631780b2eef42d50bece73d0267b1bc
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMLN' 'sip-files00107.tif'
04d17de5a288a73573cfc55130e4386d
ab19ddabbf1d237af6194c06ba549b6c9b010d7b
describe
'1617' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMLO' 'sip-files00107.txt'
7ce118462dd82226170774ddb66e5a88
51b4cdf62999c183e6cd51d112b671677a0d9422
describe
'12268' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMLP' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
f23c5b96b4e72a60c9f3ee2c074f8c6c
96bf74c323f0f42235a80686c51b1d8e604ae198
describe
'593985' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMLQ' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
db11292a8abb05d0085ec4ec8c11d229
f2a4df06536fc4933fcb0e25d2d9dcd6d79c23b3
describe
'145052' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMLR' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
6aa89ac5e73b23f102f21287ab7d6c6a
4b1991184156cf23b34d65736470f7fd6e2f1f9a
describe
'40299' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMLS' 'sip-files00108.pro'
947881a089a0d6aab7b7ec0d6da0d5f6
0300025566dcc4c9f4ea785e8dfbf82a435d3cbf
'2011-10-27T16:54:28-04:00'
describe
'48827' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMLT' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
b71a7a3b0af17e8e29f655f3544e3a75
98906555b52b8cbdacaf581d1ecf4c3cadac7204
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMLU' 'sip-files00108.tif'
02c9384f292c05a2f2370f97004474c7
7f8a3e4cf0166f87bd4df4b5d3b35473100cb6d4
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMLV' 'sip-files00108.txt'
39a7c5f0935cda87657da91f59ec7fbb
41d36b64b8f4f99bf6a320d0ba8e641fd80a2b0d
describe
'11698' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMLW' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
ff749d83b725bea93018c7a357608627
b7e293632ccb085daedb3533a8ff164fec51dee9
describe
'593525' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMLX' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
f34c3ea4171fc9b429324d09c2f71be4
c3e05e427dcbb83062a569ebe2e3afa1d86d8fdb
'2011-10-27T16:51:50-04:00'
describe
'154897' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMLY' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
6ca09d4f3caf596e9bea3dde80c051d2
8fb033a6f20284ed728de62e6106b0736cc0113a
describe
'40368' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMLZ' 'sip-files00109.pro'
1b8e6df68305353badb148b6b7479972
dcefb96da5ecd0c65d964cff7c8cb356475cdcd4
describe
'49159' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMMA' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
d4301ed7385fabe27c71d86591b273b4
a4ebfb4ed298dbdc6b604a34aeda713fbaf180f2
'2011-10-27T16:56:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMMB' 'sip-files00109.tif'
59323242d87e0570e4b624f90044c16b
ed771e5c4b5860ce5560ece4380d834bde0e1568
describe
'1589' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMMC' 'sip-files00109.txt'
e8ae06f70c9c73bd606b4b5ea74d7250
9ad60b488b258543b658d1fd0efe0d52586110ff
describe
'12063' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMMD' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
c4c9bc83934dff7abd4b3bf53c28faa0
c2e3ed24b507af1c627617812a042dad5e185a0d
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMME' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
5b7713ad274b74bfd64b500bcb3f2872
61243d5f9f6f5c015a6aceae2c19dc3001eefa9b
describe
'137086' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMMF' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
e924a9373024ff4ebc3a70d58676b2ad
514c2c13fd2f93f2dbb4aceb353813978672a09f
describe
'40020' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMMG' 'sip-files00110.pro'
cce8e71336b4011327470dd3c1819fb3
a19e85ebc48998fde0a1558424266e7a6ef43662
describe
'46263' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMMH' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
7bfdc66e660799828248ea0464b2d12c
879b743935c0bf9e9d549927950c47eeee1867d2
describe
'4766092' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMMI' 'sip-files00110.tif'
24ad7ab9e58ef4c89f202544cf68cccc
32e54e176c9d5f0777a8f6e6b109a29c63b3ef68
describe
'1614' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMMJ' 'sip-files00110.txt'
afd931a031b553d13d6b8e67cafddf44
f82c919db00ef2858d301e7328efd1a563a68959
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMMK' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
607b464ddc5630db6a0fcd2509935a4b
3d794ac933dbbde000e2f40ed5974a49a26929c5
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMML' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
43b568b47e6af55f374711100ad3f791
0abf35c05a4d4a362d81d495500b0041b90a96a7
describe
'153767' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMMM' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
3ce0e5b191a91659010ed77721908db9
e41bcc518b5d014536a4e8e88774b376cbb7c5c3
describe
'40758' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMMN' 'sip-files00111.pro'
3cb6b71cc68f68802f6b19112cd9d2cc
a69dabfc26810430920378954feedc77da211494
describe
'49714' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMMO' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
0361a5ed507e72436cef07ff2d43b028
2bcdf7c377fb28afa34593a1ac5ae1020adfc356
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMMP' 'sip-files00111.tif'
ee9f093cc33d6ea9e5b8c6b3b69fe39b
841af51ce805060c783fa6c7195804cd4c3cc178
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMMQ' 'sip-files00111.txt'
b5d0cf8a791d5f1f1d25b55aa9b0499f
5f877aa11ce4e24bf76156d6878c96586ae5c0ee
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMMR' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
d956be1d174bcd359d680b6e2bdf963e
55e2146ac0ba008d3ed62bc41bf129d04f2872c2
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMMS' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
40bb82594867b71e2a1bd3f4d37735f7
b93adb55ac159d5ad17a915ca7aaab2718926c1b
describe
'143750' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMMT' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
5b8dc817e40dc31b6b60e889f2aeb400
24fda1f525888b99ac68dcc5bce356e832c7def8
describe
'39013' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMMU' 'sip-files00112.pro'
15b5d91259a7ae0e924a241ea289ec53
0f1bb3360cac0176833892ad50b00becc2a57ff3
'2011-10-27T16:50:23-04:00'
describe
'47475' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMMV' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
e3b089ca8cd523e45d1c57e2baa7638f
97a2c686ebfe29ef87dfd8398d08feb9b80b326b
'2011-10-27T16:54:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMMW' 'sip-files00112.tif'
6ebf1872879a12169ace602d0c50810c
6d7a49e9cf28c72237bd23012c16b03603c35d48
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMMX' 'sip-files00112.txt'
8cc540bd4b0433c0c5cea011cf24c4e9
2923e30fc42f31b82424a89baf06c43634144c3e
'2011-10-27T16:50:39-04:00'
describe
'11310' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMMY' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
6eee6382cde16ec1e01be7a654087dbc
20f0d2d4340fd50c6a47df2648cc989f578cd38b
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMMZ' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
7e00e4ee8a8af638698e86e5cd77f8a9
079d52c02ed82bef4a629006186239edd1bdc3c9
describe
'150235' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMNA' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
e0d5b283e411cc20749c6df99e1bc495
0fe243eb54f2d23cd4d1bb8b1e71179abcd21b05
describe
'39823' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMNB' 'sip-files00113.pro'
9ac4e5a6ec30934ac2388907374c5a9d
d49bb9c93a722b82a513b58b3e4d54952a519b57
describe
'49932' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMNC' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
10cfc949285e55e31d91d5124162256a
f0ca941c5e19e2d8fcea0ab14300e6c8e1acd47b
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMND' 'sip-files00113.tif'
118ceb69e87bb0a8a86514e62401bec7
be2d4efb512dcf2181c45b5e59394d3e055ba14a
describe
'1561' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMNE' 'sip-files00113.txt'
18c58e5cc6db1316710d4e3e18be1373
90e43a420080c05c8a2d6c8c9bc3cec55dcc1392
describe
'11664' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMNF' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
b200f9466fc34d18fba2469a1a819cab
fb792945f306e7a5dc37072bac249d41f7d2b11a
describe
'593973' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMNG' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
431cacc0300e6f7380e8c03fae53e64b
1f82201831b480f4ea1aa1f01167b7204061a565
describe
'142533' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMNH' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
f30d5ee55425d9f4df90c491d30a1d44
475eebebbf901fdd3d04b55c0490e564001ac547
describe
'39196' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMNI' 'sip-files00114.pro'
a720d4dcef3c279bcd1596f1aae9e2fe
350a41ec799c85d81dca3d33f2e86268de781f44
'2011-10-27T16:54:44-04:00'
describe
'46633' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMNJ' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
504e86585a7db44a523b3cc1a09d51fb
883b50257572eccdd1badb871259562bd1aaf821
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMNK' 'sip-files00114.tif'
7dc0de5a100b68a5e0095eb1f41037a5
377a0cb29b8b34975c883b28404387453dd26095
'2011-10-27T16:53:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMNL' 'sip-files00114.txt'
aba42ea869310d14f965db605d9fd2ce
72ac5b22667452305f5459511e2e8a5f7a809fbb
describe
'11643' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMNM' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
e80ed1012750491cadb9f8ecf51ca558
8312d41245892b2459c0a03e8bc241aaea1c81f9
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMNN' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
e3cc7d2a20446f344f860cc20b40c0ab
32122141e918a508ed29b02b4777d8906ab0eef1
describe
'155246' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMNO' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
86e743e4a97eb337d66edff63a004d97
13b3d58efe9f32dcaa33c8401a05c5e20d9f3d87
describe
'39689' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMNP' 'sip-files00115.pro'
a6727612af8785a36e00188c85e10dd6
4c5cf1d3aae68fa6dde34c9216f4bc672628005b
describe
'49447' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMNQ' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
39930ee58ea8442d2bbe4e847d96066f
f593856da4e5e6c170c3e59fe743f2ad81df3e46
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMNR' 'sip-files00115.tif'
e170e9384c9d5f10b7f329fa3d08e822
054af06552729bf3ed1854f17d24664415acf608
'2011-10-27T16:54:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMNS' 'sip-files00115.txt'
891248452ae8cc4bb2688b679cadbaa9
3e2c5e86567661ead1bd79d514344cdfe0dcf0b0
describe
'12220' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMNT' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
caab431a52995f309ea031e83892baf2
0f466d41f7b7aa55716932a899f9d42ddff36397
describe
'593592' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMNU' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
325635c7081445086fcebceff997c279
8d5ef8bd844d87b265326551884edd12f17dff24
describe
'142143' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMNV' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
ac77d9a1573d1e4ae7e4a93023f9b4f9
88913d9cd36463b7a631fde2ccbc9ac8fd6384f5
describe
'39733' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMNW' 'sip-files00116.pro'
657ec00e1068dd6e2a251b53737b6626
4aafea1493a94d7212077c166d3bc2881bb2a6c6
describe
'47558' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMNX' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
14bd0d62e4315670df869b0a076e3e53
6502cb21ddd9fe95f1b20d2cc34c4a0b10b8cfd2
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMNY' 'sip-files00116.tif'
7a75e18b676fc43e82b9212d46a32713
3dc5f69a63f77f3903d35c48d5a76e7da40232aa
describe
'1556' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMNZ' 'sip-files00116.txt'
63acc0f364736d3b54b49e89eaef3f48
01bbed16ab910d595c852c7e9e34a59979b162b8
'2011-10-27T16:52:25-04:00'
describe
'11469' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMOA' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
b80be2d751b987fdc5faeb94218218f0
c3730d626da465ddef58536cbe74b9f7306d999e
describe
'593597' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMOB' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
3557c1b992ef11efb62427d3a55c7ab6
b7fb4f04258d6d525dfd9fae8421c83bebbc3c4f
describe
'125557' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMOC' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
b0354bab02eaa86cc84995b5af36a23c
960782cef87cdbe5cb2ad1c263f8c866a89e650d
describe
'2962' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMOD' 'sip-files00117.pro'
34e390a0df6d8385752fdeb2874eafe1
5334e0dbbc9c10cf171b19ead2a4df8e9a69400a
describe
'38157' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMOE' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
efce311c79287bec10fdf0fcd157612f
c8d8cdfddbec9ef58df07bcf3bb251997a5564e2
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMOF' 'sip-files00117.tif'
14e58e122eaf74333a99c90a66702d92
9789b299df2cb09a91d645de8cd7497e5158d18d
describe
'200' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMOG' 'sip-files00117.txt'
a0d7377396671df6a42ad3f64a4e7d5d
3fff41e29dfe246fef3ca77104a5602fe06e9310
describe
'10210' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMOH' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
076fcf35a0e773f2b8999c290d1d35d7
1f68f45d62df4a396125cabf3308e7739a042170
describe
'594005' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMOI' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
1713f42292157eb615957327c1deea72
7eebf1ef6cc71631d8c564e35c7dfb1af13c959a
describe
'145603' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMOJ' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
2cf73d65617884cdfac6ad406edc0434
501a9810f3f7acd0c51b4e4825bba77e37767612
describe
'40325' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMOK' 'sip-files00118.pro'
43f58ba8071ec90d6c4535663edf6632
329d00dde55e68c8b6c463b780e2fd6ca9413748
describe
'48463' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMOL' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
b7103149b3241da5f47ba7f5999572f8
f20fd2b13eabfd8a0f6ccca28c50942d378c0fcf
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMOM' 'sip-files00118.tif'
fa873a7ce92c4f7aa3e253460a2a4c19
1e0d12de70e6a892efa59d4b16f9ddca6e75ec20
describe
'1608' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMON' 'sip-files00118.txt'
baa3ad57ad950c49f610a1dfeeca75ef
9308ef37845d302218b075283aaf22bc6f804170
describe
'11899' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMOO' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
507683db1b0bcd5a34435c14def7bf27
23b35ae5c8f8cb27fd5ba16a102affa242882fdb
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMOP' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
51673fa8af02d54ddec08c2ca0d77335
dbba4342bc5d459ded1eec73d228f3ea40d9bfb3
describe
'152083' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMOQ' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
f014fe5ef355a21e57dd18c80a3430f8
9c54719c273dfeedc2e796bc6368a4b29a36ec10
describe
'38827' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMOR' 'sip-files00119.pro'
620bde79d5265c7343e7a9bb05d5dee7
92f8797a011ee36a1d8dc92db401eec60d7b2510
describe
'48238' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMOS' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
82e7bb3d0b48dd4146825fef19a702d1
c56e8628375ae22f352488e1c06c9a7a4fbc33f8
'2011-10-27T16:53:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMOT' 'sip-files00119.tif'
41810b00688610d15eda55de79ef4884
6c813e73137cef9780df34d62b419049eadbe590
describe
'1528' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMOU' 'sip-files00119.txt'
ca75d6c151c0a62cb525f72d5b198258
34f9df89d18878a67a27eaba3e3f792c3b1c3d9e
describe
'11959' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMOV' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
978ca9623e59f9b16f04bfd9f02d6cdb
fd6bae1648ce7ad0205ddcc902208d07d9734fd9
describe
'593984' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMOW' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
ae1b405d90df5a96cba4b184449008ea
9a9b0f1e5578ee0593a14367dd6970a757161625
'2011-10-27T16:50:42-04:00'
describe
'133455' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMOX' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
ee7c0347cb7f369ae66eeff87dd4d6d3
d96893fa65a2200131e7e675d72d6c0c477a0099
describe
'39569' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMOY' 'sip-files00120.pro'
7c9752558b5b00728437c44d5ee10290
7c3247a9055be80bd23a746e707b2ef8babf5328
describe
'46051' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMOZ' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
dd8a625df41d339db5008e673b14b8f6
114d2d4b41c2b23ea87cd4186b73863ed8f7cdc8
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMPA' 'sip-files00120.tif'
29af139dc29659452c1c4550e681abe6
d52c0d17669606fac9d738cc244c25240eed7817
'2011-10-27T16:54:00-04:00'
describe
'1565' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMPB' 'sip-files00120.txt'
3092a7d8d048aa9111b3ffa6151dfdad
6007f9e2ab082074aafd20d13f22182e92c3b977
describe
'11396' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMPC' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
c72a66ae6d9eac0e5c330e9ddfa3e488
9e7cf9b2f5199aff42d3649174f0910de2254c43
'2011-10-27T16:50:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMPD' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
7ad3985ff8302f138f3c5e8c8eafb49f
8363ae0b5aa8e2bed6fa587fa75c821db03a1e88
describe
'141736' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMPE' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
9bc8cc982664dd112398e7077545db54
c985d3324435c3e7e94d771ab3b2ea50cff921f2
describe
'38672' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMPF' 'sip-files00121.pro'
2feabb7ea82489b9449ca3ffb2208d26
8ffc30fb8c5dca69953d6891e56475f37eccd0ac
describe
'47737' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMPG' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
99fd2e820532ffdca183ad9569fdaba1
a95fcd23d92fb109d1e3f5981a2aadc1ccf900fc
'2011-10-27T16:50:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMPH' 'sip-files00121.tif'
120d1c346b5c32b68c2897fb469af153
ec9ae0ef0e7a1508b5239c10d9db829e792c7bde
describe
'1521' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMPI' 'sip-files00121.txt'
443e320c937d6458706d9b823b3fe282
4732346d47ba1942647d771cb7ae08451f97cd54
describe
'11987' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMPJ' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
abfa4649f0c0c09f0f0faeeea01cd416
2b2e3cd5185ed8c236992988a27cc86e836f9a76
describe
'593572' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMPK' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
ffaefec5da611b84bca5a1c7a7312163
1cec06d02c5dc96defc280bd61a6385ba5765410
describe
'134253' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMPL' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
c0ee9a0e8057f8e547e1292929db1140
16bc9821db6e781dc8c3b0949c8e5224415a2d1f
'2011-10-27T16:50:24-04:00'
describe
'40253' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMPM' 'sip-files00122.pro'
4f1464a783c8d984cd36a28095c4adca
71644e3c8513214fb5e17499bfc95342885591fb
describe
'45534' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMPN' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
361b7cdee2e70fe078d9187be8376c82
83cc6906160337021016d9354c604584a7c7fbba
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMPO' 'sip-files00122.tif'
6370806831c00657a7a0ab781c167ed3
39201e92888d311ecd75da29f82ec2338735279f
describe
'1592' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMPP' 'sip-files00122.txt'
2ac6e56eda54220caf4056f4044402fa
5c08dde05c92aa728d968d21a32be7f8cbb9105d
describe
'11199' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMPQ' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
822329fe812895fc6fadc199823fd11d
b07d304098bb3715093e50f819e43b91c83826a0
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMPR' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
8d187ace6e65e5bbba898b95ebd65297
92bd2acf5e56234503746b50d22f739bdf110a9c
'2011-10-27T16:56:07-04:00'
describe
'148061' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMPS' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
1028d741a8e446bcceeefe5dda991959
d36f1381ac4824391eb5204c2b7a6227992e65db
describe
'40070' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMPT' 'sip-files00123.pro'
c036fd174bcadc82eb780da8c8fe188e
2116c2b1b34ba48653265d22a10bba101b181a3b
'2011-10-27T16:50:36-04:00'
describe
'48983' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMPU' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
be12f834a058c647e09a179b1f9d24bb
0a129a8335c35e46307004c2f9c5ebb7c8449eaa
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMPV' 'sip-files00123.tif'
f95c89a1bc5a9a1b6b1c14be8fb5c28e
a8a7d3c64ba7160d898731384493a8fae0b3364b
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMPW' 'sip-files00123.txt'
404d119e027a826fd767a07456c91035
d13e2ea64d7b602ec5e96049f02c88832429a4e0
describe
'11842' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMPX' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
09daf1c2c589ccb4797aa8695f791177
d5feb63fb6f870f6af12e3bd069f016cdb53e785
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMPY' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
bc6e800e3f065c900633c5c1fa3e6e28
0dafd02b346caf12d257389d6771b94e95fabebb
describe
'108199' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMPZ' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
eb33e4c4ec0823620dfeb0de0ab7636d
eaccdf635181dfb89b40a773a3136184791619fb
describe
'13806' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMQA' 'sip-files00124.pro'
f3063be03b79f21ff89c2f6453210536
84ff620eb0911e055cb31bf2d06736dce1f7e47b
describe
'35353' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMQB' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
a24a0cccf839703e1b0ba27c6ca8e48a
c617de3eca6fe62d7b425bf34ac298eac499ae0d
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMQC' 'sip-files00124.tif'
c4b295cf9da71442cf9749472a908186
03ffe540235ac66092b64c0bc0a81fefc530e875
describe
'552' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMQD' 'sip-files00124.txt'
951d73eb2359ff10b4810186a7d525a3
5ab78db7d9b9cc3421b4e838d8e82c7946780ee4
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMQE' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
7d640bb7ba7f43f90a0c6a042ba1217c
7ca9b929b414907b6cef00d1e43484e742919bee
describe
'593615' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMQF' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
68db5276bab4216499c1e47a5c17013f
d0ad067b9be73dfd6962783ba8c53b27cd966776
describe
'145427' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMQG' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
8dbefdf319ee192d1282ceeb0f665a4b
6abcd1d7ce9ae6d351669dddd8ed9064e9eb4c9c
describe
'38471' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMQH' 'sip-files00125.pro'
47b6952def99fd3056f1dd4c2d2e8d71
e344b3a4d443c35d7a9ba9b1c2ed4894bfe5fbbf
describe
'48356' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMQI' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
d788ebd9a571f530ac54ab8960c55b1f
4f47a091109fe025573af296dabc2c15102dea08
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMQJ' 'sip-files00125.tif'
cb21ac283f49c49d6f317e7066878796
4ae98bc1ec2933885fcf0a2607b127dd3a3f31d0
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMQK' 'sip-files00125.txt'
5f529431cfe1232af23e294f0b5b8faa
847b31d8c18cb16402f1453c084a43c82d8f5363
describe
'11969' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMQL' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
e7d3492ff1ce8829694c5eea6beb0007
8b5e8c37c86bfaeb9f54e6f5690c146a025a4870
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMQM' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
2d81951d2eff0e7a3e1b0f24e69a6873
dba7a89afef653cc992dad6f4161415a71433a1f
describe
'121615' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMQN' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
2e34e94e4d63469bb3f27b57dd542e6a
bdf78aa7a93b756ae9868718bdf4bfa1bd117aaa
describe
'15141' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMQO' 'sip-files00126.pro'
87bfd054c2e29abd2062fb2772513fe3
8444842f0a01662e637da3d09368bb2cf385908d
describe
'39275' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMQP' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
662c21da5595f6ca2729db973f33e352
162e38bc1e87d817bdb7d04fb01eaed29a26b3aa
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMQQ' 'sip-files00126.tif'
553aecc3bb820fa09bfa19e924c0de68
404c49e45ab736d178159fdab672fa0c44c65572
describe
'604' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMQR' 'sip-files00126.txt'
61d717d45dc2886e9b5251749fdd3853
ce5493632533aa7728f92ab591e68b2d74b93719
describe
'10403' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMQS' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
5bc9e4a9f486fb410d418abe2014e134
36a5e52e3c1826e5704b4dd497f871d480ecfea5
describe
'593584' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMQT' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
6766221b08fbf4cecad1cb9a9320872f
066126e186e840027c320ed6686e23d8027868cf
describe
'154097' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMQU' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
688ad859571125fc265c8edd883cf447
d69c353bd0fa2dcadcf9be008dce951b2471a371
describe
'39211' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMQV' 'sip-files00127.pro'
d46d4a24183de0b8baa3462407b59851
f529e390a32ee264a08c6abd2ca8d5adebd02d55
'2011-10-27T16:53:17-04:00'
describe
'50627' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMQW' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
bce6f91d2f3d7655e993f5c0ac10f221
560cd86b27c09e71066079da30e0f416a20bf5b8
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMQX' 'sip-files00127.tif'
87637c82fa2da2c81948e79e2ad108d4
c6dbd76d99108162a5a8620d9db810f8d6dc18c0
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMQY' 'sip-files00127.txt'
1269fe56b25c2b6c337ea2440fbed715
1981affd468eb861973d8884bcf4b090a99be0de
describe
'12183' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMQZ' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
6dedd8e195a1ec8df224c1f7fb485f37
1b3f07a2f2eb9c1923027d65f017d9b65377c18b
describe
'593914' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMRA' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
b1149b51e3bd803a712622539a9bc7fa
c22fcbaefcdc7efedd17911ffbb68984c866b48b
'2011-10-27T16:55:25-04:00'
describe
'133996' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMRB' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
fe82e6b703ae6c5fcbd5ef94cfd33e6e
49623356f8125925d4d65c79b8e83df870bf8d3f
describe
'39199' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMRC' 'sip-files00128.pro'
0d151ca29fd470ed8f9308108680ffd3
692aaf83130d597cf2b6250632772fc9ba3397dc
describe
'46138' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMRD' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
063d8ba340270040279d8094da6c942c
c5dce08330affd51ff13f099780b4d487c157f98
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMRE' 'sip-files00128.tif'
5782e40e9ca3cc46d86529081b3687cb
5e06a9d289fbf6a061eec9ad532b41013a0064dc
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMRF' 'sip-files00128.txt'
cc809c0119f8a81009b487c6a0a52990
d4cbcd16a3f7e0796ad15b78a81c3aa7402e35a4
describe
'11707' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMRG' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
e3dd9ca4672b4959237abd9d782fc22e
b62356a0fde6862e792acdb138732c091280093d
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMRH' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
23c552a98f1e317034f63d37fedb9430
5f1a319f56de6af0b4b2c68dd67507d3a83cdcbf
describe
'141022' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMRI' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
4ea024442c2001e3570f768212929dc0
ac5afb15a7094432ed41f5ac2477ca62b714e748
describe
'38529' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMRJ' 'sip-files00129.pro'
a5f902ec2d9871ce8b9c14cf05637c71
2b9b238493d344f6145b9941732264814d07ac53
describe
'47386' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMRK' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
6602153021ef997acaa32d2adfc16071
6f95456920921307ea6c63c9eba7352daa5df25e
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMRL' 'sip-files00129.tif'
41adeca5a4e75d5b70bc4732d7c09e3d
c352749df96e464d820c38be619a463e9788178e
describe
'1523' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMRM' 'sip-files00129.txt'
648a0d4e8f7cdc80feeb82416ea112f2
4d695cc69b1f1d71e9db00e615dc3bce4ff20d5f
describe
'12176' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMRN' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
bb141fb49436d99c353d4ac51e9238e9
5fc5f7952056c31b820d482186e432e0d9c75c4f
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMRO' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
6704a0fbba36d5ef3eb2e224af46fd9e
342893da9fe74ee1e5a9eba16ce8262d23ff1ca3
describe
'151553' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMRP' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
18b2e1d61ea89a8b342a670652cf1b27
fe5fc53a0a2a48e96c0c8ebc8795678445c3023c
'2011-10-27T16:48:08-04:00'
describe
'39712' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMRQ' 'sip-files00130.pro'
b49675d098f9ee9b183debed5bb5cfc0
0091108280a73f0a043ded96028ed44666cfe7cc
describe
'49920' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMRR' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
ae79b995a561062ab739da2e257ddd12
b74369aed8981abdc234f1ea584dc694ec2be652
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMRS' 'sip-files00130.tif'
ccd4a8dd67346916804dc904f5923ef4
b48827f0ce9252c1dd09ed741b8e0364e2b8809f
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMRT' 'sip-files00130.txt'
03e3daeb6562eb671ded0ed9833c88e0
1ac43bbcaec34154df48ccaf4c82c31062c55aed
describe
'12148' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMRU' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
6f70c0d7bc027e5481061bb257f3fb31
01d75112ce9a942d5677a3fa979dcfb0926e288e
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMRV' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
facbc34c60f577b8a03daf69ca079dda
d73b9bad2125b19f54249f8b1759abafedd3144a
describe
'156402' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMRW' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
3accfef15efd605ce26004c48e151df3
4bfff58e0beb1ceb7a23a7fa7f3f402c5c5a48c6
describe
'39154' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMRX' 'sip-files00131.pro'
f1a13d3333158ee4ab422c8f987f93f7
8a87c64cd8b55764724e77d7209e7c2d2cd4920b
describe
'50629' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMRY' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
ca1bb284fbdec522ec081e07c0a05840
9d12bc0aff22587238126f29e357142c73cbc1de
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMRZ' 'sip-files00131.tif'
ddd3a5f87196ad5ef418c82b85912ab8
7433438406028bf93abecc87de6f5db4449eb42d
describe
'1551' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMSA' 'sip-files00131.txt'
5d4bd8b93f11005ea1d7c0999a4b849f
50151f3d3127ec033373a12e71ace9285fb098bf
describe
'12108' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMSB' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
f861c527d7d4bbd7b7dc4b5d67410dec
429cbd77ee30b4aac75455ace6141cf6010348bd
describe
'594014' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMSC' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
5ab969d3ead28bcf23ae03a91c02c1d7
9721e79440cfa429aa82ee40e0c344c5b8a5b11d
describe
'138970' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMSD' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
1ac78b1b6c5d7d4871f54f029f789dfe
fcd745b2382b9a752ea491c5e505def1131df135
describe
'40429' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMSE' 'sip-files00132.pro'
6efd60c63fb38b20fa61b8cdfb18520e
aea2c0de2634f45e2eaa46a9b9fbe129c2b53587
describe
'47303' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMSF' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
00a1149542b68924edbc92ef7e3c2dd5
185f0ba45f6f8a5d00243dbf8eb326d9e1d6a5ee
'2011-10-27T16:52:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMSG' 'sip-files00132.tif'
c7a3f2e7e3e524d3d87d8626b4288298
f53df74df6e28986ca76f01fa89157027c0666f9
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMSH' 'sip-files00132.txt'
bbdb20fca48a68edf7b28202cd897619
1b53c170eef80047356e63f6b28ee636b27bfa35
describe
'11515' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMSI' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
0fe1e51a342c8b726d9cee348163e749
5af9a6ac6124ee57d99ac25ded23e7bf28f151ff
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMSJ' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
3bdf36b0dc3a547b3e318f8ae8a80175
3cba122b83391cbd9175a5918ceee2b327f84a97
describe
'147629' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMSK' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
3aa330dc6e19c30fecb9ad6a3dcc430d
75196b01d985f47263629e24d85991bb18f0a2d0
describe
'39680' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMSL' 'sip-files00133.pro'
be67ef1f6d53813e0bb59e57c5154794
978f77a61ed0166255a06120ee59e2fe06773cda
describe
'49654' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMSM' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
83206212634e4d2d3252da23f22307d0
a7d8566086f6a0ba419055fe7c8ee7ac5a69c918
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMSN' 'sip-files00133.tif'
48a01cd93e04c1a689cb21a804eb1ed2
54082f9c8d4e89907f6521841e915209db56011b
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMSO' 'sip-files00133.txt'
03792794a7c75c86fcf9098a2a935de4
c9c29b03ba26feb0286ee3c6d0cb2f1ed1bdfe61
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMSP' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
446a1953bdcc9bd0fb5dc33e54c31b14
593fc9f4b41b927b92635cbd1be42cb144e52cff
describe
'593995' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMSQ' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
f15009cc390c8ec10ef8f27b31c12a04
b5d47e25df46987841efffbfc1ef74feb55922d7
describe
'150053' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMSR' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
3bf124ab96e900c91162cdead9c7b7ed
c5c92cda7a3b54755a94a0e4f8a6ce7e8b78c14c
describe
'40283' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMSS' 'sip-files00134.pro'
264bffbb4efa3af76fecca07af92fd52
3f4a6ddb25985f3c58f2c482492b1ead5c744607
describe
'49338' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMST' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
9b6075d791c3824d5890b63b0b9b7ffd
f764aa307a1aa9e0c68e9c37fae0cc1ca1db7b47
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMSU' 'sip-files00134.tif'
101775d24a5b852ef916f8dc500c3c00
8e5347771bb2a680ba9c56d08fcf37bf79a89244
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMSV' 'sip-files00134.txt'
16e867369e6f2fb4cd97503719e9e499
dfd97234119650c08559a0286599e507ff3c5039
describe
'11835' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMSW' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
f6813cff49fb9678a76a61dd548470ad
0517345d758cbd0e217b6fbe8647a0fc5d37d437
describe
'593848' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMSX' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
cf2c8fa0311689ec289cda65359f27be
b38e15de9b54f0d3a5cb9a210b703b512d1c7c34
describe
'154967' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMSY' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
50df8afab863a0634e1011b1b79248c8
5d0a29020700da9bf81cd911ce934c3d05cbaf7e
'2011-10-27T16:54:49-04:00'
describe
'40495' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMSZ' 'sip-files00135.pro'
c18780a32c90dc5e551d5b37b3a7f425
d238725130ce9102e8f317f65ede2f0182a27ca8
describe
'50738' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMTA' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
e1f5a37cc47271d42fdea730513f0899
f16ae3c02de26ac5d95cf1bd44be93a93bec96b5
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMTB' 'sip-files00135.tif'
89ec7d7f4928e268fc73732e692bac2c
6dfbe268c76faf25549070469b5d6d87847da2b1
describe
'1609' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMTC' 'sip-files00135.txt'
d672ca94c2325e35b46970394cb3509f
7fee9f93073dd470d44b7f0f1561c19b97998558
describe
'12142' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMTD' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
e230de22d210e904257d92a76f7de559
e9ef9d69ca039942d644e551f61bf83d49db2036
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMTE' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
da0176f0ed02dbc2f47d95d76052bcf9
cfa3350dda8ed604eb462f53b8003d2e0c660155
describe
'152037' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMTF' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
4eb96fad94330fd3c7d52d3504ed15fc
e0aeb105e1c79b7a7ac0a5405ea09a7a8b9e5fcf
describe
'40216' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMTG' 'sip-files00136.pro'
b5f6266c48a33692bd77481e7bad05e7
805fd4425b2eec1ba7f224e7410914cb1f38bffa
describe
'49550' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMTH' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
f0a85a8148669fd3876894c2bd21ccd6
939c6ee17f200f267205321594c3b8a2a2dd60a0
'2011-10-27T16:53:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMTI' 'sip-files00136.tif'
0089f952c95e5739d8ec005b0960476f
0dfe1227ce7f110af760cf4779a2591d66789ba9
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMTJ' 'sip-files00136.txt'
e609612ff387ffc023df0ee6196ed5d8
af0b29247ec7a03cfd14dc2798d981ed364e3c4d
describe
'11998' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMTK' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
fe7bac5791035fa1da938401903f9c80
560c9c83bdc777f0a66a41573aeba9ea8a166f2d
'2011-10-27T16:49:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMTL' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
d8b29b6ffda33a13093fa9265bd978fb
ec79a1abf0509c6fef9ee2ff12a02e96c311fe6c
describe
'157636' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMTM' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
d186b10c8f2fb1ec7fdd89c91aefc31f
8616843869815474d6f3ff7a2ccff51c2b12f2d4
describe
'39997' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMTN' 'sip-files00137.pro'
16ee38e4383b509d801290bfabaae644
13767ead5b1ad0aed4c4ef0dcdf0bf9b0c67b2e4
'2011-10-27T16:51:03-04:00'
describe
'51484' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMTO' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
3ad5cd21ea615a1392ad76e9e47f93c6
cbcdd4a2626faba5c2cec6f71eccc152d34e77a1
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMTP' 'sip-files00137.tif'
921d01e85d47c912b01328bb62f45cb5
5b3750bd46af43a73eab76e91ed6f52c50373ed3
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMTQ' 'sip-files00137.txt'
6e5762cc69d5f96c871b2ec05be7a25a
64c9aedc761ff9241e49cb2bdb0856f7efcac283
describe
'12614' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMTR' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
a2ab7a7489b423b1e8cf546d2f45ec02
7814ea19af3ffbbf14ca21d701863f26128bd8ce
describe
'593988' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMTS' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
e759f6be91b2edaedff0f029624c8e19
062c5166e97213ffe09503accb9c358d8667b637
describe
'140862' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMTT' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
d46866dd99da35f41779ea950d761afc
818877b099c35fb5448317107006f0768f27667a
describe
'40052' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMTU' 'sip-files00138.pro'
072218dd7abdfae373c1ba14462b9d35
e1c5d5fa0b70615b5b7e81f77d94bb4a49db913e
describe
'47747' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMTV' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
b54052c6cf0e47eadf7abafd9e828c3a
d2cdb568585111feec1c6c9c720aea4838f10fdf
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMTW' 'sip-files00138.tif'
18b588adedb9fb62fa38d8b101c958df
be830da6b35ea749f707aa19edc4f31ae46a8466
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMTX' 'sip-files00138.txt'
5f3a739a76171ab33af6a92da9c0203b
5fe6a88e5389b0a8efb9770fb1dad4d9c05e4900
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMTY' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
5abeb94bd52b86a7448fb9592a0300fc
9ff9fa9b57b3d59ccb181659aa1b0855c4377e39
describe
'593640' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMTZ' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
0aab119bf4dd5c73743d62b474271c43
661b7a18bebcdaf2add80f76113ea5bf729812e3
describe
'148113' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMUA' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
c575edd498ffe590a92e9b0fd1fab791
d97d1dfe73bffba3be6f45e4c4922c53ac849709
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMUB' 'sip-files00139.pro'
4af65621710ea690623a281813d67f36
9ea7878b0864cf4cdc89903f1bdeefb624e0aed8
describe
'48557' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMUC' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
7582539da474ad1c83e3ee0a31f6df87
27764e1b7e9d1fad497421ad4ef985670458e8e7
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMUD' 'sip-files00139.tif'
80186e258f2664ff4323190c798de9d7
2480e50a6717180ea7c309586038705dc0069829
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMUE' 'sip-files00139.txt'
efd30382ef159fb7258d172466a28847
7073527752bd7f02ae90aa1646f38bdc1cb701ed
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMUF' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
5dd1e15c21ff911f700af2a7d9c36af3
897c558f08f225b9b207911faf696069abaef2b7
'2011-10-27T16:54:43-04:00'
describe
'593968' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMUG' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
1dd09300f7f27540cd386f77d9d12978
2fce490db4624fc15a027f3ab5b7235fba3ddd49
describe
'141728' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMUH' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
7a2c2ab87a967fad947fd518a3ead585
fe79b1d442ac60ba886cebe72149e35d18b57eae
describe
'40323' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMUI' 'sip-files00142.pro'
5b95aa87e89ccfb176c1f1dcc5fe0c4c
79bf4fedd37b08c5a9d9db55e53d428ebd8cf189
describe
'48440' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMUJ' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
7a98bd4b4af3706eb826d3778444d0ea
60224839720201ef8c987a7852ee53f10d33af97
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMUK' 'sip-files00142.tif'
20eddd05d5db06013d80c7754998f37e
8f214e160f6387715deb53fa81f014cd4c660114
'2011-10-27T16:53:59-04:00'
describe
'1618' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMUL' 'sip-files00142.txt'
5c0d53ca9fb003cb2f236f555e21b164
14aedf75a968266333c021fd733555edcc093c02
describe
'12091' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMUM' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
8b9d7e5f4baa5a69082fb8605e2ae145
f555705c9a0b282c4f2edd34efac99e1919c344e
describe
'593590' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMUN' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
163de52036671037cfc5432b4eb8241e
34f7236b83dcc271b7c40fc4343a4017596898bd
describe
'143936' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMUO' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
e18c0e798b4b9131a8732055044a3280
717b2e9915a935ad0870e8a97a97739387f66277
describe
'38751' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMUP' 'sip-files00143.pro'
762e6a09b73ad28a1e76540c64740c8e
6d0479554b75c40d9763245c11533b9862539e12
describe
'48168' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMUQ' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
2b813560cd92971da7838de400a841f7
b3e98331c5fe6bb77fb4a4cfff101003189cb3c7
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMUR' 'sip-files00143.tif'
9a6ec55429ff696a250256363c10580b
bd8c468368f7d55eeb456c8f4b46ca81e9ca9c55
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMUS' 'sip-files00143.txt'
19f319ad5948ab86cafe43af210b0c18
051fbdf9d1890484fb413cefb559dd38ba157034
describe
'11758' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMUT' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
6fefde10a2e1714e9cf02c21b3d61dde
4d80e375fea5548a6d1c2fa3f2ba419518e3fe29
describe
'593652' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMUU' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
adfa61bb2d2dfd11e56f0690f40806aa
857f08b54e00a9987df3fae3a9d30149a89602ad
describe
'153933' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMUV' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
e573e20d2e4ff23f89eba0d4bd2459d0
b778a9860559477b9a3612a6ce2f94c8103353ba
describe
'41112' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMUW' 'sip-files00144.pro'
559d4ec06f68f2cba47197edc3986f80
54f2a7441e8dc8261f63adc85c10fac30a6ee0b0
describe
'51135' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMUX' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
f1d30daba7339420084dd0a118aa9c36
85960684a97ccf7ff380cf9bdbbc311d19efc971
'2011-10-27T16:52:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMUY' 'sip-files00144.tif'
0773fa7d61926be4b941818a72933cf1
a8445b360918bfde6676f75d178b089d68b4ac53
'2011-10-27T16:49:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMUZ' 'sip-files00144.txt'
bf223fb6ce3c18b8341aa25307c4232b
b2bf20cb56767117005356bb9400ca8562f2f021
describe
'11739' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMVA' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
c858031a0b9af22feaca16a0f05a2052
39c8bc1f63ccee7a4e207e8928463299b95bafb8
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMVB' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
98b5be80f746f6ad1ded67a386af9593
454addde4aec6ae5d715bd7e02c26ba845912150
describe
'111538' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMVC' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
2b9f07ea724c307305169402ec52a132
23c6547692dd6b1683cc669eb082551cbed6cbc8
'2011-10-27T16:55:27-04:00'
describe
'2170' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMVD' 'sip-files00145.pro'
8c7803305aece8972444be87187d0ae4
2c2e78d7b4ff4e811032ca93e90d84f744ff36aa
describe
'33935' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMVE' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
17ed7266d1a609d49274eebbc2318b47
75c4f769c4c60896c45873b012653137a1eb9a47
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMVF' 'sip-files00145.tif'
264a01598951de4517e231e0fd19f1ff
0d66ca590cda36bfca1a05c19a09f55e408e71b0
describe
'100' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMVG' 'sip-files00145.txt'
a28e85f4bbf21653ac4a3e7ca8bdc941
4e8a43eb833c060ea274335c225b767e6bac52f3
describe
'9423' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMVH' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
5c684a80b8561d40736adb9fdd3ab265
d390d00755aa3b97a7970011abbaa78a8bbcc8f8
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMVI' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
089a00f176fda86f7397f3d20360364b
0bd039df2202eede66b7c2518a0f5f5a1834acfc
describe
'159808' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMVJ' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
64f67bbbe33e23c4e023806f09fc0bf3
dfdb321af14b43009dc10f20df77abff942a065f
describe
'39929' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMVK' 'sip-files00146.pro'
6f447abf5e6b89bf1e1b3a43f4e9fa4b
bfe8145c1badb3acd5f68f0edc3a45f78d16ca68
describe
'49534' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMVL' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
088fc9fb2e22c84282df71d26fa74328
f56ee34d01b9ec533b1b5414194aa811ce046fdd
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMVM' 'sip-files00146.tif'
901a164c19b8968d6ead94230ccf86b3
2bb0e86426b3857fe40276d9394fde3e3286275d
'2011-10-27T16:49:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMVN' 'sip-files00146.txt'
8cf7e0bd66ad9b9170d3473284c43941
c16f60bda0f183d8f583da58ba89e353ad748fcf
describe
'11973' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMVO' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
606b769395da88bcdee5a4cb2c74f2ae
5380e1ea199928f7e07521396aa3a2f7792cccba
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMVP' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
0a1f396e29bc28bedf7edd533a6df64a
dfe5e8355c217149dea7e98c7db7fa7ab134a8df
describe
'153505' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMVQ' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
d0a7eaa9a9a65da1bbe4c84764710bea
4889a5de1dc85636eeeed24134257f34123159fa
describe
'38788' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMVR' 'sip-files00147.pro'
5036b5f4247e766efc99741567980875
015c2ea01184cb0d49a033d288e67377f666209a
describe
'48226' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMVS' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
6c96b2e8402ff25eefc6d4f059c178e2
023b424b00f13293ac67b5ff039422a0fec9225f
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMVT' 'sip-files00147.tif'
f81b7f55f9801fb844954d0723633128
26ca8b6d9af968a383ee90569f12836a6cf04215
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMVU' 'sip-files00147.txt'
9b47af75b2973d51c19db8699b039ff5
1146f9d7c4999b52047c6770f1f2e9916f0e3ddf
describe
'11841' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMVV' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
87ef5245863a75b79b50e2f2e9286969
ec2eb3450e77f6209c9e1769ba07548f1d2f8edf
describe
'593888' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMVW' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
052e5ec6d396be05f516f882e38afc90
d4239154241028a6cee7fcc6203e8bc30abc57a2
describe
'142887' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMVX' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
f8f4775f0bbb8c1bcf85cd82c47b38ba
be5fe0a203bc68d22c52c6c5fa4b1322badbb24b
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMVY' 'sip-files00148.pro'
e0d55bb3426d0326d70471d559505860
149d2a385b48ae91bf1896a89eaa6adee0b3a57f
'2011-10-27T16:53:48-04:00'
describe
'46877' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMVZ' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
464650cdb6556a7d9c49bf676db34189
f8207b3254e35185851f24ab8ebfbcfba1901368
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMWA' 'sip-files00148.tif'
537d9010d23259f49e8d517d124449d8
9125d749117d9d8e75debfac2bc13ffd64f93d60
'2011-10-27T16:49:25-04:00'
describe
'1543' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMWB' 'sip-files00148.txt'
dc23fd6aaab41e119c6e4a575e4d1eed
87a7623d41465a1545e835489f6f26c95c6fee0b
'2011-10-27T16:55:10-04:00'
describe
'11255' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMWC' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
0ec00e6e776e7f9a3f784c82189cabe2
bf23675ef23dea0e5a16227ea9f13e9ae3b88ac6
describe
'593659' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMWD' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
71228df113ea511f0328ad66f6e6e7b5
d147632d7c9d3f4c3f004a1480c0367b5957a45c
'2011-10-27T16:48:13-04:00'
describe
'129645' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMWE' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
663147ee75ae755994ca3d4bf028be63
6ee61f7bb80538c8e1358d696f6269418dc83295
'2011-10-27T16:49:18-04:00'
describe
'15961' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMWF' 'sip-files00149.pro'
d82bd391e13583207a8a519a95c65808
0e07ca5d67ac53372ae99d12191d6fda27bc5125
describe
'41046' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMWG' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
d0721006e748f34679d7f779344df5cf
0344ed19b5302c1d48abff06e89181086b7d2231
'2011-10-27T16:53:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMWH' 'sip-files00149.tif'
ddb1093723ae10c4b19d8391ffc3f136
8e6e333e26ba7ca7baa5dfce16cbbf99b17e1042
'2011-10-27T16:50:43-04:00'
describe
'633' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMWI' 'sip-files00149.txt'
afe944f81a23396287a619277250c6a4
5b3a9be75db15a17ba1a1c7d2e3fd9ebe32183e3
describe
'10842' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMWJ' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
30ec6ead680e7ce6db0e1d045cc569c9
a4d49a0d4fba13715301dc8cfd5d81d109f4af97
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMWK' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
9d4a206358539d15acdcb575f14e18c4
6c09301ba3c456cd69f6ba55e66608269b98427e
describe
'140379' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMWL' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
b599e06a2ff0db77621156c8bb3a6a3e
b9e46b5da7acf7bebf7ae951efffcd5a25f11722
describe
'37908' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMWM' 'sip-files00150.pro'
1a09693190734b02ba4a92712cfa4ad1
2ecb9c6b652bc56f2fee63e228e74275dc9ac95d
describe
'47039' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMWN' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
1ec27ac02f382f3ddc3db74ab7e48255
ee3fd38f8de12ee3b048fa59781da106c6f2b01c
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMWO' 'sip-files00150.tif'
4d6620fd8c39aae24a33bce838dfb44d
4ec4fa694c47948430cdc1800e1f9afce222218f
describe
'1490' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMWP' 'sip-files00150.txt'
4961d6d0a5d9f0da51929ae52aecf0d3
551884ad1fd8eabecd1b68c0960e5ad2b6ce961c
describe
'11450' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMWQ' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
7a579dda327ba85be3739a06749e5bf3
6a31e7c23a8fbf541e6c9d9c9137fa8ffe6c0c4e
describe
'593663' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMWR' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
85da00705542e05055aa3f44d6bc25c6
d0a1be92c82b33d81c986e50f6107c87bc9124a9
describe
'151730' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMWS' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
5ad3940b3b41f92be68ad728fe163d1e
80cb211af2d604b7b2f3232819a700b69188ebf8
describe
'39385' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMWT' 'sip-files00151.pro'
0c895a4da8a6ea044c483ba909a1915e
a1647b286980ed6d7baeb9463c1414d0bb443b02
describe
'49514' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMWU' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
5fd80ef9924aa5c9ef52faac8504193e
a64828decb40184010085af5f035fd80315a2478
'2011-10-27T16:54:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMWV' 'sip-files00151.tif'
d29ba2c5daa4c794ee1e41fbd0616f8d
163bb0ad40a17bf61ecd23e53e8e21e1ed68ae95
describe
'1542' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMWW' 'sip-files00151.txt'
4cf411f1c0535bd94a25dedc75b7e415
6de4f0bb1806122f98d1c72bdbc56c35fafd714c
describe
'11482' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMWX' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
7fc54b26d819c23b5090bb1c997d6579
60a654c33b1f944694df6b2649fc289e746826cb
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMWY' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
f4c72b7678953cd68b30c0c4ffc1bfdf
a39b1ace56434e0f647f41043be064ac1306f966
'2011-10-27T16:55:59-04:00'
describe
'150014' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMWZ' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
239a1a5ea7330d05a571fa1bce9d7553
11cda4ea5e3ea406975a857b880dacb48acbd21c
describe
'38735' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMXA' 'sip-files00152.pro'
82c8710313f3c8468b6ed020e5f879e2
903c373489184797c8fd646eb909b231147f9de8
describe
'47378' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMXB' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
18a9ae7a34779ebeabacf5916a170591
655fc2db69688cc73bff4fa6fc52ed42cf52cfea
'2011-10-27T16:55:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMXC' 'sip-files00152.tif'
e7a36f2a75276557b0ac68b14e3d586a
b8fdaa03376b891f31949ed75b1b822492e0dbb7
describe
'1522' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMXD' 'sip-files00152.txt'
b946e5cb8fcb3f5f28fbbeb4caaabbca
c5de84d4bf60139e787dc4cebb7e4bfbda5e57be
describe
'11179' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMXE' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
0c238b34332a2fa54abb24a1cd3a9aef
9723e3f3c485ea1449820a0f2ae2666cc638e428
describe
'593661' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMXF' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
8ed9a66664f01ddfefa38070a380f09b
d5bfc9789e73902235a6f7177835d5f25acc9995
describe
'148386' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMXG' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
6458d52b587ed933cc167288442b1e48
d4c48815ba8e7b91ac3160335a459a767f2f34fe
describe
'37713' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMXH' 'sip-files00153.pro'
c6375875af303d32beb31b80b32fce24
1a69c2128548ddcf07e8ea7847b5d7bec7eac6f3
describe
'48497' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMXI' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
40bdf7fbacd030320fcf68f745809d82
b5743a673345aa59b90a9e1d73af06f74ff661f4
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMXJ' 'sip-files00153.tif'
eaa26e77f1d8cdacae047b61ab955cb4
b8b8bbd0d753bae33f48ae71ce84b95a107904fa
describe
'1500' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMXK' 'sip-files00153.txt'
9b1795b2e882894e7c26b9bccdc3a855
c9e24e03703e54ede6e7ba77551df0961a7ccbc9
describe
'11389' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMXL' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
f3ecf954f1cb64cb06d5b5fc15aaa091
3377ed6f30a896227202e41c9c8b55ee6a9fb328
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMXM' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
1cf74ca7e497ffc76df10d2b3d1d83a0
a99427e5f019ff347126b82286124bd8db540854
'2011-10-27T16:49:12-04:00'
describe
'146665' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMXN' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
c1f061a05a1d9b3eb5c93f6994d5856d
ec9376d312994de9132f297cad85213db6015944
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMXO' 'sip-files00154.pro'
5c9f91381b0da59602816779cd9d5bae
fd4ab67a891459fe7fcd9f85af0d1b6905206253
describe
'48553' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMXP' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
ae22ef09e80b41e7b4ed6062911feaf0
4879b10eca10aa8f5b51998740cbac7f06d68943
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMXQ' 'sip-files00154.tif'
9e6d0207fdb259384b67ef39d7d4f453
b4f7627fc1b3094502752bb245c67f43ae90adea
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMXR' 'sip-files00154.txt'
a4b6941ab4f6feb3179f78c8a1187d93
cbab578373526bd7bd235352ecad1af1a66f6ca5
describe
'11521' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMXS' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
9b7e82fa45a1a5519408bb6a5b030b87
644e4f39e643a21d5c548b18626d939fa729d152
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMXT' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
3aa29116c6ab53661add33b4437907a4
e74e7829d544542db0b7827d77db6b6559fd675c
describe
'155110' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMXU' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
cbd5c28b19a68790123eb9927b41b526
6033f0e15997f08ef1e996b58772bb9fd707b9df
describe
'40360' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMXV' 'sip-files00155.pro'
5c6b6b5f12235b2514bd18a722ed4092
bea12c0345588e39cb05fa0d41783e2ddd6859f0
describe
'50951' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMXW' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
901d43f333c64609a4d2384181d6a001
3089c6a5217fbca0ce1cec70b3b9a0d2b69bc6e8
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMXX' 'sip-files00155.tif'
6499221a0811833dd186ec3730ca8d25
178ff90ef65b72f9e615ccf5970b6d5a37297069
describe
'1581' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMXY' 'sip-files00155.txt'
d57863f8c7461c3f3a21246b7e98bf96
8b994abc3695d4c7eced92a311c4c03e9b46d362
describe
'11965' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMXZ' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
3deb9a82017f463706556af3038989f4
1ea273de03eddae1b1c7ed5e9e2e5f0efdd36af3
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMYA' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
4a4f976d055bb5d33bc9ffe7642b8980
ab59379c67d645d6a7961310e0f9482fd20d434a
describe
'144738' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMYB' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
96c284f605c61b73378a084ea8846415
0cccc90d34302dc1a965033bd53927430dcb96bb
describe
'38823' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMYC' 'sip-files00156.pro'
df68e37afde988cc11ffeb9c83901812
857d8b07e0ed375449e83e21034519f40b5a478f
describe
'47568' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMYD' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
b9f252a78bb41d9586faddd62a2cc43e
e2b8fb0cab38e3a99ea59b591d1a675aac5ece4a
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMYE' 'sip-files00156.tif'
aeb50f067ba6fa26b2f7f67762ac75d3
bfcc5607dbb6d060ed522acda8e7aca63693b567
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMYF' 'sip-files00156.txt'
b5350c109c6ffc75a5a8022a695c8158
c6db1026ff6c4226901f54fd46dc2648badf408e
describe
'11547' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMYG' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
d01b37aa7b9ac216d11f363cda2b43d6
bb1916482a62217b4f08211fa367c30ce06f1925
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMYH' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
5834904bbe5b5443c23205db03342a27
c329ff9f411a6e11e8234cdeb5ddef4fc4cb239a
describe
'161746' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMYI' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
3a5237ca2e1ea7f8cc348d226f1b635c
f4ab8a23909cb3889b7e77c80a9fd5c0c90c52a8
describe
'39918' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMYJ' 'sip-files00157.pro'
58836562d499aff6dc57bcccea89bd5a
e99417a33e0df745e2f9290fb34652ae5df04ea7
describe
'49693' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMYK' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
14a0c8506f8226eb8711078611de231d
9b12ab127985fd475680da885d2a9570b9f2f51d
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMYL' 'sip-files00157.tif'
b677d1a73b767468f6a52f1433a2284e
076a9213bb8f03508a94288e47ad171e36eb6625
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMYM' 'sip-files00157.txt'
77179641dba5060dd1a3f989f5e449c1
8d021db93bfee6d9034a007bd1c6b0729709992b
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMYN' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
1c80a10ed1dd47c30b2282115f50291c
980d8817c781202928e6757403b334403012c809
describe
'593624' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMYO' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
a25d68da814b285b585f2d57f45940ce
786226b8cd30291b888e23b66dcd4a8e5afd5e68
describe
'142664' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMYP' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
eb68d94afb842812f3d4d91807f3a70f
eb1403be3a6cdb79a2f63e659b2da50cc1c10b97
describe
'40412' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMYQ' 'sip-files00158.pro'
786e509fd0dba3ca89a5f67c55145d4b
1bb9863e2e722745423138eb4dbcee11efcc77e4
'2011-10-27T16:54:07-04:00'
describe
'47212' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMYR' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
13697ae40510a4c0616a40bfbe3e7edb
10f8b2e843bfc51540acdb8a4e904e874d4529e2
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMYS' 'sip-files00158.tif'
d14a110029f645d1f6e5f8f5741f379f
2d7a3021020aa81ab6aaee2e91111c9574ade1fe
describe
'1586' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMYT' 'sip-files00158.txt'
e8747173db152f9fdd7c6d24fadf1486
883846790c7800aef6cb1acb419afb5b177aee78
describe
'11705' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMYU' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
7ec9f36a21b4ec8bada8c054e8c919b5
33e3dffa3a77730fe59e55286034a2a1a9b3606b
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMYV' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
e5cacb7c6532b86d5a83707a18361723
cf5a42cdf4b0959759aeb2e1bf5b1d73ccbd0d47
describe
'145186' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMYW' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
85d1bdb3ace7a1996a935057d99a5758
d110276d5f643cbb338b70d153685583f9bda9bf
describe
'39227' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMYX' 'sip-files00159.pro'
5555fb5214f427774b513c2d10159810
d323107c3fce389ddb7152e4c4e64e4355580a00
describe
'48113' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMYY' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
04f55e9663d95fda59fb09cf7568bcff
215072ddfc01b60d7975149a571e495b14ae74da
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMYZ' 'sip-files00159.tif'
ad66dc69ead725af4e179c03aa503609
023b023df559f72c2f6bfa31d7bc2a1a91ee2b5e
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMZA' 'sip-files00159.txt'
3a48a6c697cbabb46231e5fb859fe0a3
5a55790acd54179dad43e05071e4ba6aa32141bd
'2011-10-27T16:49:06-04:00'
describe
'11912' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMZB' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
9e7348db20074d80ae1cc9fa7fba87e4
6e35b6f1a60dc8fb4b72ec7e44a95bed792f863c
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMZC' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
be1e9f9fbfb139c19808926bac25539b
f861c275bbd03317af34382851884fcf81715ca1
describe
'144180' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMZD' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
b27464a1c10865c30be0a76d770ebbe2
a09ee44532fe46b202c2b2cff544302f5e0b8da2
describe
'39321' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMZE' 'sip-files00160.pro'
18c3f901f09225e079dc7cd4297fd317
e0b67e6b325ac6f890cf153980b1a77f728e185e
describe
'47307' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMZF' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
ffa119f11abc9ccee7803949fbfbe292
91382db918099387ce5ec1f26ae0c92999bbb903
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMZG' 'sip-files00160.tif'
d7465693d64cf7a275712ffc114c378e
0b93f35e20475d2a7709ea225a076640bfe208d9
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMZH' 'sip-files00160.txt'
4300283cf2d2cb219ddc488eb6b016e3
955136b705280412fe4b7faac23e4ca7380916e2
describe
'11399' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMZI' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
17f780bf07e3df5875505a352748ef21
f940b1443ac8a238b6a08f027bfc144b16c5fc03
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMZJ' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
dff97b0578afc68935fdadd3cb6c221b
c1f68e9905efec4cc0d77567729344e715140dd6
describe
'148557' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMZK' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
d4055ca21d4bd28a59d017d8117a7df4
dfd27cdf48b9a17a7066d574e4a75c57854f614c
describe
'37957' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMZL' 'sip-files00161.pro'
1e2510df19d179616126fd001f20cc91
e4993f4bd7e0e33bb0d2e472602731d88356354b
'2011-10-27T16:52:23-04:00'
describe
'48042' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMZM' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
589b38e02001de82eed2fb81668f30d4
e78ceb63aed076619863cfa3071a932675d21888
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMZN' 'sip-files00161.tif'
48cc626dd7514be3e14cfea6ebdc4d74
fa8c4ff12db068b887659905f261f48f4fc6f6da
describe
'1504' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMZO' 'sip-files00161.txt'
e02197ac9f8bbd3b00aade498ea19dbd
dd7408ded13fd4cc703bf20066ae774c1ff49c14
describe
'11852' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMZP' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
ba9d2de04118329bbf5667bcf8bfcff5
32699c95e9cce4eadfeb6adb12a6179b4fe58d19
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMZQ' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
3ad7c8c57b2fc17a19c9fa1170572dbc
93c96d911689bd7c802339f2fb9d498dc280ee7d
describe
'149189' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMZR' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
81ec0b72cccfe24006abed8a6ef4960c
6f60cf67e0991ac23e9b199312fe72d9b174d1b3
describe
'41354' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMZS' 'sip-files00162.pro'
fff10e5b395d11d5544054ace611efe1
3596062b03e9f5be86a6302ee1d0f1c30bbc04f9
'2011-10-27T16:53:12-04:00'
describe
'49908' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMZT' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
e7dfb5f0da94090d80c3a1f0112828e9
3006a9d34aa0ead4e5179f74d1510ee15d58ed73
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMZU' 'sip-files00162.tif'
f4dd7e4e874976a1aff8c42f2a2201cf
4d24b886c106771e0dd33b9a3a561d4cebadacea
describe
'1613' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMZV' 'sip-files00162.txt'
68ff1acdb8515f5e33d9ee880b59e283
0f443186c472c8bac0e36248f8123ae8b4c190af
describe
'11902' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMZW' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
1d8675cd22b96df0892ed04123ccbc4f
090f08bd5b316d7ccf1980483f6f36177721b1ef
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMZX' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
9d925d494ff48c71ed2f4e4ae015bdd9
35795fc7c8bf1585d617b790cf54c25f4bf31a4a
describe
'160186' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMZY' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
82d8e3aa8e116fb6f3d36dc7c61a0048
175e8f2755e9e46218d8789928e2913d03ddb2e0
describe
'41199' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABMZZ' 'sip-files00163.pro'
ed8ceb6041550861b482c4a52b69d8ce
049d76343d2bf71d703f9a9f306c45c3502b8774
describe
'51870' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNAA' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
a3f07343441bb554fc12eeeb0f6cf97f
e3154502a17a67f1329c756b70f5c76c31193f91
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNAB' 'sip-files00163.tif'
6a50cf754cbd391f514e06e3a559ab20
a2e66893c6765dc4526928e9682663e0383691c4
'2011-10-27T16:53:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNAC' 'sip-files00163.txt'
5eeb42d2c2eeb272afc4cdaab6406560
106953e3829b5c8edbbe726b24ac10e42f6f349e
describe
Invalid character
'12430' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNAD' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
54c0a3c4758808749dc9ab687bff2c50
cb2404e96f6cdc1b94c0e74804c60eb78fc67b0c
describe
'593967' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNAE' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
de37620a938d3e8a0e7fbc5594048933
267aad9d5f05f8b42b4d978c1c8e94450e2150b4
describe
'142943' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNAF' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
1a2a071e80dffbb117d5d1f9c0ddb641
bbd9b2cba7724922426fd1c4d543031a539ce2be
describe
'39717' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNAG' 'sip-files00164.pro'
4eb2585c858a903c9ab4c96207adb349
9bad61eb34acacc126555c0fd3e42548560efd58
describe
'48733' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNAH' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
57e30f5606b3fda2d1d349319af13d74
d1e5701748a9c132d08470dbda2bd994d67f9d45
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNAI' 'sip-files00164.tif'
70cfe41973703371b2976a212b15def0
d1491269a3fb62f9eebe17cee6d4577a07b16fd0
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNAJ' 'sip-files00164.txt'
abc10361ff93a6083db807af9ccb3627
5218eda72cf771b24d8522c95adc70bffdbfcf11
describe
'11786' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNAK' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
4f5ee3f00cc971e0e2b29d4b0dc0c79e
415b1e99ce5695d63a927a337988ca966e98d9cd
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNAL' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
92d2b3bf82dd99161c53b1f85e1b9a9e
748b52ca8dcce6bf446bf3b4688139c2fb214c59
describe
'162131' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNAM' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
633b4fe116ccd9efb90b77261d595b5c
68b79a1288d7c847182d36b2c56465609ac3bc7b
describe
'41671' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNAN' 'sip-files00165.pro'
eef205c071e6a6869017231a81b5ebd1
0cd237ca8972a4e3d2ecd03811488da2e9239838
describe
'51689' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNAO' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
c0ae71886541a9d2ac1b439c71504f1a
556bf0a7ec00424de92c9e4ca47bad02d77436f8
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNAP' 'sip-files00165.tif'
5d136e1200b4896f989a6a9c69274d76
ec36b6aaab4855af5668b05505dd42dca571cfb6
describe
'1661' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNAQ' 'sip-files00165.txt'
c91c9f16b3748d94695de11f1752e58c
fce826b1483fd9340db4c0ff3f684ad3d7c2ba76
describe
'12475' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNAR' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
33578064d25425f7c7f886ba35f238aa
5e1a0cd864387d6df499310ad23aa19ca8efb4a3
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNAS' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
2205dbbfd815b0f6eeb97a042b3534a7
ebd92a100e7fca7779a12e1f0254c979df18e2a2
describe
'145669' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNAT' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
2cb34fc24bd7c8316472bbf0aaed73ee
d50f3a1bf92699de91dadf5cb997b36a740083c3
describe
'39512' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNAU' 'sip-files00166.pro'
7f5e0514330cff5f8eab06a34c709f37
96934fb4814308f65e2cb12a8ad5495545b0fd97
describe
'48851' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNAV' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
e6c98fb54b612d77a1d413bd5881eeb1
13742e0ab905e641c4d51a8f09c1a0500caf2563
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNAW' 'sip-files00166.tif'
02aa21526d9a39504e1e0a745e65e1ce
e6ddad6802aa5bd02d6600151426e02b6591824e
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNAX' 'sip-files00166.txt'
98d837a8371710915b0935893f851b10
8cd5ca808e4cdb75178f9496a08a4f28acc6a69f
describe
'11264' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNAY' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
59ad160b445cba558c9a9b51763bf899
925eef6420a00de894447fec8df3e23f54725669
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNAZ' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
a8f6d344e59405f1143712d48003b77e
d25cc77bf70834a14010856cf9801a1078fc4d39
describe
'149328' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNBA' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
73aed3ecd8da4f8a07403e0adf0165da
5c437cfd5f1700206247f08136e389ae02a14b5c
describe
'37586' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNBB' 'sip-files00167.pro'
d81b2718724187cde6a9882eaf252231
a06630f3bc3ce8508fbd65988ed8b0822bba9798
describe
'48778' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNBC' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
dfbdd54fc905a9bbd826c84da9f3208a
b4a386dceb7f1b060f34d633bfe916b4e2b883e7
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNBD' 'sip-files00167.tif'
6d187ffc4aac2531f1a9c3185be63475
8f5dcf4904e6c48415b975024951d4dd04ce2f29
describe
'1487' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNBE' 'sip-files00167.txt'
48d794d5167a84b0a6cd4169bbfcfa1d
740602cd650532008118c8df794bb10f0fe33cf1
describe
'11949' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNBF' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
4227ea4edc4065a9fc1ba42fa83075f6
8c39b075fe2bdb9042f00b96ec4f6efbb734967a
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNBG' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
134a72cd8ea1c5071c878852048c17b7
6b92fa456a41c04136abaf8fbffe47a32fb23b9f
describe
'155897' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNBH' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
f30b541a142e35fe8b01d122f7b9576c
c65641e5dc06d97d84d330bc6ab2d310dd71db9a
describe
'41150' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNBI' 'sip-files00168.pro'
15316938020cc91466e4e828ed5140ec
46f52f8f0f1ea1b543421ac8347439053485e5af
describe
'51411' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNBJ' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
e33c57c39087f9a19b793752960bb9ad
8fe08ec8ba94740513d1415fd3eb9ba306730f57
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNBK' 'sip-files00168.tif'
5cf50a52051f7f1b4b81d23f4684de95
054ef12eb6ee7670b7d3b2dd1d3f3b1e2c60f9c2
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNBL' 'sip-files00168.txt'
4f27d13eac1a3b749573ded57a1e952a
bc4c781269eb47d18c8e792feceb28140b2ac282
describe
'11694' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNBM' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
7a4eb9936cdd6c32547346f0ed08976e
0cc00435652a1914b9af7d5545bffd7f829579a0
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNBN' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
e6a776d26a3457fbfb061cf516c94482
fb0f42ff4bfe336ddf0764f39f5a704d5c7f4479
describe
'152917' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNBO' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
46d14b32956148642a1e6eca02802596
837717030bdddca5d1db82f7923a1a6bfc4defe2
describe
'39716' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNBP' 'sip-files00169.pro'
6a46b03b2fe51cc40c89e1bf2475735f
937e80251d44256edafc8e379cc5767509ebfef8
describe
'49558' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNBQ' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
d6a7ec96aa35e27cf564b9d4bcd785bc
4b9f501741cca42e0fe9d774c45d1d1a859bb52b
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNBR' 'sip-files00169.tif'
80647173ff3676702f67e8f74eb2d16d
d4abe71b30022797b97759a5980fd98ef2de6e3b
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNBS' 'sip-files00169.txt'
7387435f9abdeb22ecb871bce306b0af
34e0dbf5647bd33f40ff90879c96af8dcb580e36
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNBT' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
6c75e3eb2dff391da8d7613874d670d3
89c7e14ccd845d53e080ae00156da29b927a4df3
describe
'593612' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNBU' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
1a2f98b7c881a604ce69f1eed895de11
4a1d4e696408a9eab7ef532b3fa10c695f5c5bf2
describe
'156666' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNBV' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
3d4e1ad418ad47552a004fcea1adbb51
ce1d5de0de134a6f59e9c34e888c4aaff765e68e
describe
'40915' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNBW' 'sip-files00170.pro'
2b672d53ef9e7723a40d6221fe93bcab
32e6aa0145ff15fec82732e8252f76d2a51b86eb
describe
'50808' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNBX' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
73e7f6aa1447f3da0aad1deb3469ca04
046579b410439bd1531eb3d9ac3865f37cd2167f
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNBY' 'sip-files00170.tif'
454b108bd5988009be7c88ffcd30f377
d5b6ed7073c91fdced7f595a22a70ebebb849f7e
'2011-10-27T16:49:33-04:00'
describe
'1599' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNBZ' 'sip-files00170.txt'
ee6a3e00860a9254bb0e7c4965dc6af3
01935bf4fcf4b67c958a862b4b32436839e40597
describe
'11826' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNCA' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
69664d8528e319cf97ebc7c1c23e9a45
faf9fe04399032008dec855963a11140a3a6fa34
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNCB' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
24f5d7e1e638aa8b23b6697475ca3051
c4a7e327709ef5ef414f5a91094d1ac093be988f
describe
'158010' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNCC' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
53b6807a8012d10a9e07656c82f5d16b
ade8a830ce31588d60279eccf025c9b43639e444
describe
'39442' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNCD' 'sip-files00171.pro'
2afdc303bb8f460cd2b646cd9bea2eeb
6f8dcbe681aa7d0cc65a9ec6a60c4cb02d48138e
describe
'51382' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNCE' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
1b446b65bc544808498aa230cd2a1e94
761b1bc255bb94fdba3165a44597d07f1ff89bc4
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNCF' 'sip-files00171.tif'
56add3486b92d46be5a0e78239e5dae5
8b2bfe48a56bd35c32a49d39115d18b1ac0e43b3
'2011-10-27T16:51:06-04:00'
describe
'1547' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNCG' 'sip-files00171.txt'
33f01fb59ce75e6d1a6f1ca9019d089c
872cb611a725544ab809ba0f310a6762af4f279d
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNCH' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
91c5a897fb9b502d24c42431f5490b68
d998ef4e825f2fac5fd1dd3ce451d63259b734c0
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNCI' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
fbf180664e6ec51ad7c0e981103d0221
c9e256e83b07aeb1cb1aae5a19ed558dfbd4296c
'2011-10-27T16:54:37-04:00'
describe
'143282' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNCJ' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
565d4bde7e34a171b4a8b65163633f08
3bb8df47efc7cfcd95cf8850584dcfbadffb1a56
describe
'40196' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNCK' 'sip-files00172.pro'
740060026ea95c6fa04bc371881ee18e
e5d9e94adf12485329bd9d8a31ea9e15dbdb429e
describe
'47486' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNCL' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
1515c060d5e483cbadc0b736f9c59a89
fcc819e4031dad79db073bfba1e5aec1c7323ad6
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNCM' 'sip-files00172.tif'
821d8fb51b25b529d1ccc1945078d892
69081791c4e467194179ebe29b468101c94c4cd7
describe
'1602' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNCN' 'sip-files00172.txt'
d8f60227b89629c14f9bc1d924fa9051
f4d12ececb85ed901eb0e52d47df3161b9a4cd78
describe
'11202' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNCO' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
3aff8c3831308b2a67ca26bd6b92bd48
0584c289753ad08a4516ea84659517b92f29245d
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNCP' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
1479d40333d83e876637134003452c23
a73bd5d50f8395149aa3e9c03a95407ff6e3bd66
describe
'119090' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNCQ' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
e4a013c687376a583d77e3ed088e59de
5b7159c176e06d00c9df4f7e87af49650556407b
'2011-10-27T16:55:01-04:00'
describe
'2999' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNCR' 'sip-files00173.pro'
e9f137b32b99b9e8ce27fefcd6463f49
8cc1e29c5808404f29f5837419fbefdbf9c4e4e2
describe
'34651' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNCS' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
69fee3a026a89aa1414e351260a51b74
ff83a87bf1e31a094c91862e532f250a76fc02c5
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNCT' 'sip-files00173.tif'
9ff568d9a3fc6e753d6da4c6f4c0f2ae
88f8b6b05b373c7946b233eacb931adde9856ba1
describe
'163' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNCU' 'sip-files00173.txt'
19bb0a906dd2c212378a1126f3e7f976
a0d1cd6a830b62486b6c6b84ba6da0daf4a8c0dc
describe
Invalid character
'9129' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNCV' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
127ad47c5e6ae6455526beeed88852fe
ee5f100990112c780438f4932a1466a4943a2b96
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNCW' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
7a1b92bd236ccd4bc2d99fb6080b3992
3e7216c36f0c5bcbfa3b18fe03362e66511917e0
describe
'148798' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNCX' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
4b6c7cf5b36954663725cdca714b5405
0f17b50da19d8da1edeed84d1da4ca40718103f1
describe
'40658' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNCY' 'sip-files00174.pro'
9ad65792f476d648e826b4b87bd1e71f
1897b593197cd948b7f61dbd24dec3cb4703f3a1
describe
'49464' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNCZ' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
b59dd7841850d818a99b4028899c552e
d8824fd47d7e052c46e6a411043e2754ef8707d8
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNDA' 'sip-files00174.tif'
ffda9f5a6a34f5391b449d97a30cc667
54d0dfa5d871446e5a529ca4b71b06a56a055db1
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNDB' 'sip-files00174.txt'
fa9a97806821551c9f2cec6e02efdd41
4348b21667a41d6a47920bb757584e97254937ec
describe
'11580' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNDC' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
042e2992ab572dc7d1651dca2efc86cf
59dd0d1ac5686ee814ffec4f62430fccef607e41
describe
'593648' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNDD' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
25e9f3e585d1f0e30a2c61a1958c3b05
229495696e141355b31d9223ea3e67b803697fab
describe
'152605' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNDE' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
169f94d042bac12a20846ff82613afd8
687d761b6a3d1611990473233b46fd36b8930125
describe
'40274' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNDF' 'sip-files00175.pro'
3c7db0faa0225b2fb24f91bbaf6fb061
57631c09078db3dfb8ce3b78743085324899fa56
describe
'50259' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNDG' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
bfb4654b7d4e2774d5c3a76e094ac4f0
e0e6750b5610eb8a3914e17919b530f7ad66ffc3
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNDH' 'sip-files00175.tif'
9eb3224148250c8053ed719d2e2c9ab2
e3ec3bc3fd70b8c9aacfd4d8f33f0b704fded9ac
describe
'1601' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNDI' 'sip-files00175.txt'
dee258caa799447042f4ac7a2206aff4
2e301e478a4b743d3b17fc5aa32582b49c4b16ec
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNDJ' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
2d84bcae7db31390ae7447e1fcf308b8
f42a23b822df86a203ea5e2e6d7f7baf9d8cea28
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNDK' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
129e6302f04e544e72a32497e3767747
0b87b01acd2a20d5f14a3ba2b04d6ac8deec9340
describe
'147315' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNDL' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
5d82eff346af4a6964cf24de29accf72
cff54d703a8bac88fcf46b4c9c5870ac1e2a2608
describe
'40896' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNDM' 'sip-files00176.pro'
967c960406ee291a690dd174a95318f0
d71ad447e9e06c348319bd9569a3d632298482f9
describe
'48587' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNDN' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
5db12291e8ee16294cc5fee54870e794
fdd84ac707d591ba2606f9b15109635775e21335
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNDO' 'sip-files00176.tif'
2721dd71e557f29ec935363f8f733ea3
e7c8d6a9d476b2a06629529fe0271cfd678dff1f
'2011-10-27T16:49:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNDP' 'sip-files00176.txt'
d83df57586bf167882f0c1b148144028
ca589b29e5d9e6c71887bc86a60a7e4108e1131a
describe
'11823' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNDQ' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
18740b19a768d560c25f4db29ca1a0aa
94c00ad0a58cc024e7ff75b5834e84cca5541af4
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNDR' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
6afd97b4a9934481c88e319deadcb1c1
54ace655fe149484962db0fdf201d87722f74949
describe
'153480' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNDS' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
d511710b37dede2da4d7a9fd47e6c16d
8c01e69d388bcbc017f1a8ba9f67171c216cd14c
describe
'39706' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNDT' 'sip-files00177.pro'
503fb56afaa6ad113fec19ba64c58d8a
f3894dcebaaa2cae104fa21be8282c2c265d1804
describe
'50602' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNDU' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
e584b629a013ab4e355123bc26f63b0a
a40cbef8e33956929b9a1df1db71a12bbe8d1a6f
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNDV' 'sip-files00177.tif'
cd09ad9a7e19a2e3fd48a5d803f723eb
d89b6a4903f7c448a80c3a8ad99f8ecaf30c7240
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNDW' 'sip-files00177.txt'
58904fe52778b95e6b98901d903fffc7
043d6d75c0d927dcbb79f934834de1b5800ee7b8
describe
'12373' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNDX' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
9addc6804d02f2efd2c4b8456a01c077
ee5c50a371c9b721b6681a739ea8b2383946055a
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNDY' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
3bdfd914642da9d8424675d8d344e164
aad1960505094dfbf88cadca0b1d43e01d604b32
describe
'141217' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNDZ' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
ceb5da63f26b850f8734e4a3bcb7028f
57d69c51b3c52e7ac326f840a03ff69faea9e53a
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNEA' 'sip-files00178.pro'
ef1791b3626f623296f4419eb855a333
95e8dc919afcb0b9c684963dcb7040b1e492d876
describe
'47359' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNEB' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
03e6afd8f27711433fb06fa42690f93d
f56d6bb0b780ba9be72162d6f16fab716e7d1518
'2011-10-27T16:48:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNEC' 'sip-files00178.tif'
d034aa21f776b6a1063fc95dde043437
545c2e65e41aa1c1e0ea9414883be1a62f997e01
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNED' 'sip-files00178.txt'
ff23be5361f856afaa912589a9b69a7a
5dc580d0b27d4ddcfeb7b860a452082f51692276
describe
'11653' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNEE' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
c7db8c5eaad77f2145d6b93eb6b74817
e1c9e186cb6d378751fe6e9d2c865301f96f1daa
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNEF' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
2ed1ca824bc5ce7d862f8cff57f67ac0
801872eb576df33b1f677268f89e032855d574f3
describe
'152682' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNEG' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
1e1e9adaac961031ddb9d635bac0f4c1
d860739dc700f1195b52072ab2d1ca98face63aa
describe
'40050' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNEH' 'sip-files00179.pro'
c265793b36cd8a0528c9cfcda0046c5b
0a48a57f7b0d302e3ea3dd72b64ac2aee059dc5f
describe
'49520' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNEI' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
e3a4ad2ec569661333b49e22103adec9
70ee394922dfba10dd911725ec07e5193947da75
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNEJ' 'sip-files00179.tif'
30b989ccad33e2e1314367edffe4fb7a
89a35c8358d17e527dace0f6c4c2b14d5fa63129
describe
'1585' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNEK' 'sip-files00179.txt'
1dacaf8c79559fff850b39494104229b
cef409e4d691ae4ac3d9a85cb8f429f6d1ede3c2
describe
'11895' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNEL' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
997366832ff5b9f26ca14928754cbadb
592dbbfdf73e416a725358bc4bd7d8d34097a3bf
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNEM' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
1f505980d24868cafa82a534c255695b
26450e145c8b617f5a95e8c11c61d6044a4887fc
describe
'148573' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNEN' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
984256cd15369ab315d7c0713d66c0f2
ae31bb5ca87b82ad9b98be6235d0a9288259a07c
describe
'39656' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNEO' 'sip-files00180.pro'
26d46cbb9be3dc6d16ceb9739632db3c
5c264c71a5f912ca1add42de059671d8f27720d8
describe
'48022' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNEP' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
b1d9057668893c1a2e25361ab65685a8
b2eb974cca732834bb595f7db98614d5bce3fb79
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNEQ' 'sip-files00180.tif'
0af8335daa83e223ac072e835d8903df
c9a34a931a865b7b259efe1f8a67b8a29e82ba43
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNER' 'sip-files00180.txt'
739d94f8a18a3b5617628e2fdf640016
72350f7401c816af738c36094aa5fb1bb5990c40
describe
'11137' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNES' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
21265c8be6ad701a4eb8b291d4e353be
5d1fcd56ce53b8294390481ff700f873468b6438
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNET' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
73f97ec320f216917d7b05cb47223090
4f8f11fac0bd445df8857eee26d5f74dde3bdfb2
describe
'158641' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNEU' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
9633bcf6cfaf8ea77a0c687f2c649f56
22f57aac72120fb24d681b96b6254527040bfe9a
describe
'39662' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNEV' 'sip-files00181.pro'
b92022694575e70368bc7485220c58e5
cf8a8183a7bb3faf0e0e1911818a275fff74829f
describe
'49131' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNEW' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
9810e1410c39e06014529dc4e4c5e049
0207d0c88b837377bc276b3ecda1a436233fd9f5
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNEX' 'sip-files00181.tif'
b44494d5b1dfc8253c6d318182e8135a
819fa1893b5fb7391bffb63ca2ebf4d71e77826d
'2011-10-27T16:55:06-04:00'
describe
'1559' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNEY' 'sip-files00181.txt'
0707ca4031fa2814aa9ec4f07505f457
4232c90dd1ed252a0894b14a8d954e193db550f5
describe
'12159' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNEZ' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
f83c7fe318259e569ea14d8196d21fde
19e2763aa166681bdaf12ae984a7d8cdfdcd7556
describe
'594003' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNFA' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
13a78b19462786fc880558616784fb8d
b8ad729bc7461ca82a53552858f56bb920c55359
describe
'125719' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNFB' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
d4aa3ad71ef9db3dceed57775d991553
e382913e98cf72730079367a9de1500dc21fafe5
describe
'32353' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNFC' 'sip-files00182.pro'
9080c6fd54d63dab1f60cc0aadc31ba6
a4c5fc16430af8c3d36e5dd36c2262b4357b022d
describe
'41424' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNFD' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
89a82026b6cbe0a02697928861179259
aa9b067a73ca581d6d3be7636cc6a1126b6e6570
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNFE' 'sip-files00182.tif'
2ae20d4cf65e478ada42b994818d70cd
7cf742542fb3fd3935a3ab93c202971ae1f91ac8
describe
'1295' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNFF' 'sip-files00182.txt'
b774f88a244809a943569e35e75c7861
f46a57baa2fbb69cb382bd413c156056e504f805
describe
'10631' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNFG' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
c940f8ff528ef555c0d042aef5dc3e68
78b4070a852d276e968f72e693d0c9d40941df12
describe
'593604' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNFH' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
5a035fdc107b5a91c6c77e241bbbfefd
82b288d7e43455b8c3e4ccd159bb463d1f86948e
describe
'142253' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNFI' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
7e859f4f87348adbe0a67dbaf744a0a9
4fa92f494580e535ea7e0f5d1baed843e367378f
describe
'36478' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNFJ' 'sip-files00183.pro'
153ade22ead0fedf30aa73447526592b
17dd647f9113444b62856cc6085705b6c56e3cff
describe
'47092' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNFK' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
61fb922a56d3e7a803d49db636a001c7
6422d5a38fa132c5bf26afa3fc3454c8118b2347
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNFL' 'sip-files00183.tif'
e5954446879ae1dffaf7205d132f92fd
b734da6a62e0ef59dcbfccb49876e2771df2401b
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNFM' 'sip-files00183.txt'
5506a9f9202e0536aeb64e64bf42e4cd
ea15ccd3a16f3aaba6026d40e289214f5c92ff3b
describe
'11788' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNFN' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
b65cd50e409b4f70e4daafcf2cb6f031
484841a536c483cae9d1f2f12bc3133b897d7724
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNFO' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
6a8be569fcb38c249e89f678990d6276
bd5345cbf55af1421176ff414a6936a83c835c17
describe
'150169' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNFP' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
0fae986aed9a31cec1f451c63191f4dd
31de406b3f361caf8318122c3e82830abf37d277
describe
'38914' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNFQ' 'sip-files00184.pro'
db518e716b59946ccfc97ddbffdd7595
76faef72c26acaed9f552f2bf40d94d4085c09ef
describe
'47516' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNFR' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
38e1ec6038ce16eafd26041314dfd4d1
737422d23f636e370320807774aad9a5c529ffba
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNFS' 'sip-files00184.tif'
4f1cb3a089f25652b1a22a1208bfe876
fc4736d72230eb84c605062a3c37d8fc1c2101ee
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNFT' 'sip-files00184.txt'
28615cd5e5e088ce5de52f1bd10bbe8a
c97604ad354c4c01795adf754df4352c6cb94753
describe
'11224' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNFU' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
276fcec5f1ec70db30db538f0e64b734
44320673048f974a08a0491d1c18932c38eef76a
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNFV' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
ef90a0d68b396c32405e3b9fc1e521cd
46b145c86a3528eab32884e9dc5019f410ffbfeb
describe
'140687' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNFW' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
ca71fe4162e4518b4f78e5167ec05f10
f635156980662273b84f61615a2816a63d881af7
describe
'37405' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNFX' 'sip-files00185.pro'
5343c5c5617d6e896d41b4a3d1ee4d24
0f60cebd8828e4d567c1070a7d5229b20b336427
describe
'48047' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNFY' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
e491013a15233306ce058a5c336e587f
b58b3376394aaeb282873674c49dce48b66edfdc
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNFZ' 'sip-files00185.tif'
136ba207938705752d154919e81e6a1e
2c03ab5fa8aac0008aeb09e603f7ac2929c7b749
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNGA' 'sip-files00185.txt'
c74be73e28041ed5be5cf6525f1a59d1
ff2416f16567a100484c2776749a533a1f1f5639
describe
'12008' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNGB' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
ad26dc3e8bd35087e13a06e66d47c340
5986f4332d08510a38fb060c413351c679d6ccbb
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNGC' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
464ebeb6e84c72139c3f6e8456a7f235
b63724c0838631686786576cba6691ace0dd4915
describe
'153563' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNGD' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
4396af88791f53dc6a36c2e5cc21cc82
56d4a2296ac12af42fa03b24cbf6697bdc92c5c2
describe
'40515' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNGE' 'sip-files00186.pro'
22b7bb378137c10fd060da5f0f33eccd
9265265bfe9c36dd188e3c82b7e51f23cdf172e9
describe
'49536' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNGF' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
98d75ec2afd01f20daeb37212815e5df
c4337d75ee9552467a24fb48654051df1e77caa3
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNGG' 'sip-files00186.tif'
9ca4e1acb8ddd3aa381c70cb9cb0264f
1bc8cb731e5ebc28efa2c4cdad1bb21d58672cb1
describe
'1582' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNGH' 'sip-files00186.txt'
b05eb2033b649e728872df4ef2881012
7b02acac5883767c01939fef11434edf223126fa
describe
'11624' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNGI' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
58fa0da696a140f3d25f17f3570b1c09
aacea74c432d90d238d625867936d2f20d125d34
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNGJ' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
95908cb58ed0c7f389686fc04bfbcc4f
32fdd20ea8725870d6871dc263ced0850339015d
describe
'156678' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNGK' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
f7a82f42349a549b3fa222e38efdd3d1
5f466670849938e6c2415d08cb716ea072d3117a
describe
'39497' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNGL' 'sip-files00187.pro'
70e52753635ed2951b03aea315d066c0
a668c7c4bf49ba2ac92769e827485d21ed7adbc7
describe
'51088' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNGM' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
8c8b295b2e10cccf38b87924b024ba7b
d1db25ce579a80a2136cc7befd839743c6a94954
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNGN' 'sip-files00187.tif'
f97da7cedaa8af77c911c2e2192f75ca
68dbd7da491a67c97b887b77be518b4a43f25dcd
describe
'1555' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNGO' 'sip-files00187.txt'
f46cc8f806e1c5502406c23f57d5a018
c3f2e7f015d5b70c31df0aa19bbd919c670cf711
describe
'12328' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNGP' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
9530839e28243ce1ff5a6b026a37f4c6
c323c878e414982d02e1a1db509f4502f6d67dc1
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNGQ' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
43fd7cb1318b868030e9c374ebe99e9e
f40dc0ab871bdc843125860f882a2537942fa39c
describe
'144160' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNGR' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
4a9a01ce7cfcc82f84e939a1f60ed1b3
6eb8a632bc984e98ef6d31ae629fbccae0f1ab8e
describe
'37487' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNGS' 'sip-files00188.pro'
65dd08491edaeb689548e12ded40d80f
bb1dec3c267ee97589b314df4ee13055ce3d42f4
describe
'46607' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNGT' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
1706a37abcb9ae5e22d1920536588470
ad6549169401353eae4518e0f2b63c6d3eb20f61
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNGU' 'sip-files00188.tif'
2ba0373e6aec0ae6c3545c3686494da4
c83bdc1e5c9da2e2b4dea0893f1d2138e86a334d
describe
'1474' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNGV' 'sip-files00188.txt'
c7b975a1bd33e3c7564c6ecf5f67c76c
ba53f66a18b568e1ea25bdcb05d5f548e4b27396
describe
'11193' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNGW' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
67ffb3abe943f399e8814e34ece01923
d8f0ae6fb1333ccd1762f35bfc87ad46f2f07f13
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNGX' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
ef4654864604dfdfcb6a4f42526d1099
e0cbe52b6344388a7317adcd10a2414c7f6b482e
describe
'148784' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNGY' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
fd32fec7e0ef9f12db3b1bbe4d9316c0
4625bc3166dac8c20f9572b4266cf1da372fe611
describe
'38079' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNGZ' 'sip-files00189.pro'
f5226705f702b2145d34e3728b4d2e5d
2ea31e5f93dd95a2f51d3036dd50f8b3de1e24a2
describe
'48265' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNHA' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
2d0725db66d970536db1468ad7aa09e7
9e4d6dce0c453106cd45e41694f1091e97531caf
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNHB' 'sip-files00189.tif'
4dfca4e8fd84d623980fb2573ff4e340
db0bc9016418f9b1d403f721345e8e03128b2a0f
'2011-10-27T16:54:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNHC' 'sip-files00189.txt'
6e2c45c2e61229a9a34f712ba58be37d
f479f17e3ef37d93523fbcdacc179074c3efd86e
describe
'11911' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNHD' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
5c35590c8d31f49b8fe0cd22712f7586
9f87d6d35472f8f3d04340e29be187896697cbf1
describe
'583492' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNHE' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
39bfa0d42c194735396902ab369c9607
85140293920b37b38ad3fcf516f66120476b573b
describe
'147321' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNHF' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
74cf97b4a2a1fcb7e1f960308035b478
a77f1e29900151644fad6730a136fd6fa3922e69
describe
'39278' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNHG' 'sip-files00190.pro'
f4dd9f6c789155da0db950fdbeb036af
5b0efcf68bf958c0b4534c55b940f83bea03bb71
describe
'48024' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNHH' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
3db732ecf612c79fdb914c1104c95a0b
65b1d18d6796de7e3402b699fb17e54d3c96f4b2
describe
'4684808' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNHI' 'sip-files00190.tif'
bbf60976c9e025136ca790ca7cf5807f
ae76f59616e5c5ac7572b180ea8676d490ac4b0c
describe
'1552' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNHJ' 'sip-files00190.txt'
5677841c188af3fbb33ed1ce6e4af18b
50ccb58a9a7eb3dfd8a2390e803eabd74f6308ba
describe
'11908' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNHK' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
74a104db18db66fa37fe87978cfca7d4
5021e28454b5c4094d536aa7d8a5e52f5d74e160
describe
'583157' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNHL' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
e70fd54a087c3525c34c17d53c6df086
a585659946f6ea2d188fef502b2b5e313a112f5b
describe
'153457' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNHM' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
bc01d7cda76222305b1cf1e771416e4c
0d7e5b00e9d0ca369b123080f47626793c677d2f
describe
'38789' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNHN' 'sip-files00191.pro'
8ec93d3f114b4008ac32851ff1e005e6
f99dd690ec02e8654117d59560548843802ee1d3
describe
'50062' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNHO' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
85402a4a27dd911509de42ea3d828f49
f15d9c65cc5ec4b45159418020d42a2c17418f7b
describe
'4682144' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNHP' 'sip-files00191.tif'
6ce74f66ecc3f64c17b43f8bd8b0880e
c5b6b934c924cff26d67cf987248d743d697f11c
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNHQ' 'sip-files00191.txt'
9ed793887e3289d32a5bd1c10054da59
4e9bc3a27730929ecfb4f6ee77c89a1d564d85fe
describe
'12212' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNHR' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
514ed7b73e88e50e5ec3e0fa5c765591
5c7a22a1bdc72ddb83336ecb3cf842b5e6982eb2
describe
'583130' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNHS' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
739fcbfb508807fc5c0151693ddf03c7
2456e177a0045ae56c496135ca278a0d7fdc3c35
describe
'146616' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNHT' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
ad35b64b93cf8feaa54aac6cce5164c1
a239ab8e8ab44020567acf9f6c40cc1fcfeb2491
describe
'38398' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNHU' 'sip-files00192.pro'
981ee656c2d744a8e6083531224b33d0
492c127afa949139e3e8dd177c4ad5b935192212
describe
'49529' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNHV' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
2d9623e6afbc004c3e7139b8e0be7406
9898951c7cd79a4db6283a1561decfb1cc0416bc
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNHW' 'sip-files00192.tif'
2e158ed90399346cc221b9444e4b9268
a046a518bab852e985c6348e3f0abdb6db650b79
'2011-10-27T16:54:54-04:00'
describe
'1505' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNHX' 'sip-files00192.txt'
25a03586c4002b30dcc0e4f1b656ee51
11e09572a65ac659bb81e4949d57722f7bc666ee
describe
'11710' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNHY' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
ff4013b8f6ccaa09673084d34ec64383
b85343de8b0eb21e4874761972296ed248d81fac
describe
'583179' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNHZ' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
4de1e55745c2e63fcf9eb3559cda6dcf
29e71a937274d853797f720b6ffa3b782ffe9f9e
describe
'151257' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNIA' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
fe32217dc39886e5cdd6f0f6acceb797
1748f7aab714b74e742984c5e7cdc3596df4cc67
describe
'38101' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNIB' 'sip-files00193.pro'
e9421341e74be97681c9102fea646e05
4a648a4ee01fb4bb311e6268d69bc8bb0ce98207
describe
'50030' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNIC' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
369405bb2ab6dfa2a06e240283eb5f1f
dea6453337a978177aca1666a1e72f5ae0f36ec2
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNID' 'sip-files00193.tif'
d6fe98d480bf4885373f6f94e3d7d423
02ef5bcc4aa8a15086b8f5964a9122a475fc4a34
describe
'1520' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNIE' 'sip-files00193.txt'
9260b6285e754e79d52b946df28073d0
e984856046d4651910be6c0ea0049c74761569f0
'2011-10-27T16:50:37-04:00'
describe
'12185' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNIF' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
c0cc9fcb6734ce8d310a0bf98cba80c5
34509f4176f97b724cca861fab2f767ac83e34c5
describe
'583181' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNIG' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
6bab00b91e05739b8c8ef0ca60be2f44
e18c449ca4a811a3d188b5058ae07e3d46896041
describe
'146824' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNIH' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
30170c9c97f78a0bd7966fb39bab243e
72f0bfeeac0e32887fa1125fa7143e61de99641b
describe
'39720' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNII' 'sip-files00194.pro'
1f10b0487cc942254c3af3cec9a433a4
718e7069db5313d5ed7f01b76b1856e8af687740
describe
'49487' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNIJ' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
91cb41c2f33a18f5a779b292c3179688
28658d73c680d64d4c9748f8f278a556c8af6b3a
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNIK' 'sip-files00194.tif'
b1fda39a67acd1c6d44ce2cf871cf6a4
881977ace1488bb917128a2c741b2c0196acb461
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNIL' 'sip-files00194.txt'
9ebd0ea194c3af067eb2a25f66fda622
3918252c50a03c7bf260b6f4f4114a1d7c958804
describe
'12023' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNIM' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
4ce7cccb27523d9c7089d8664f03d8bc
bf17c810a339f81b97d73ba1c33db9c869da16d6
describe
'583183' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNIN' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
cc55c4d02905e742984d206c438f1cff
332e0e299a15ff34b11a29cae8170cbe5016ed72
describe
'154049' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNIO' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
05c4bf5725a003ee46ba8b23b02031d3
60994c6d5b49328aabf5e2ee3e0bb2260239e5f4
describe
'39369' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNIP' 'sip-files00195.pro'
e38562173ac0150a8fa691341970f49a
2edbe9b7c6cc2bc628d8c2fe9df8d0ba1a3da201
describe
'50903' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNIQ' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
5e116ecf21461f5f90287786188a203b
1b6e69d9dc2f89adc28dac1c0e0403dad9e20423
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNIR' 'sip-files00195.tif'
bb3a344ca79c299f528891a6990678d1
b32f8cc567a9655c5cdf6a749104758dcfb8429f
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNIS' 'sip-files00195.txt'
cbb29c9c82317f804cfd41de9c4af356
45547f4a691cfec86ee473a54e6adf399691d636
describe
'12303' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNIT' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
87a58dac08df1b65878273c225eeff2e
9c7602139093ecad32bbf5cbc5f002020b36f70d
describe
'583135' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNIU' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
a5b601950a4e782108e713f35f653945
67a7e4cf2f89dbf131df8b1c6203c02ecc655c66
describe
'142158' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNIV' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
a7d01778aee98cab4c0ac98c97a40e54
b3e967d2522fb5994cf94895c22f1c6f764bf5cb
describe
'39106' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNIW' 'sip-files00196.pro'
0059a34491b627575014070552c1b275
f6d4079dbb0a49cb8067a33a28d31135388d9a5f
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNIX' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
0a9ba03fbc0f2bcded039d96c11ef852
0575dfeb073a9c59ce0c378184fc4f958aee342a
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNIY' 'sip-files00196.tif'
270f635fa2bfb43c21a413bca1b301c4
5cd90f6813a5ef4536aa723515cb84b34cecedef
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNIZ' 'sip-files00196.txt'
15d4a409dd02f43f66fba10089f7b40d
19b9a22ed588097571042dd15708687815a99f72
describe
'11956' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNJA' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
0946840163bfa10a93808b4fcee9fa3a
060c6063bcc10d1eabbcd598fc2dbaeb959098aa
describe
'583138' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNJB' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
dcc7be6fdea3d6c84472f98620704bff
b7bd9882bf217b8dcb471494ee6ca67ad0d784bc
describe
'152661' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNJC' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
b832e9d5f1701aad7f03ee86658b7cfc
673267863ff775b0a95551dcebd0e38b666f9f17
describe
'39289' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNJD' 'sip-files00197.pro'
3ccabe113714fd7a86be96dafaab4c97
ba9eed0485e77f0e49a1b5fd82b5d3c5b3784a7a
describe
'50145' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNJE' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
67094ffdc7aa1dc9378cf1f0c2074fb6
2fec23abe35f35fee37ce26d12dbcea62f15fb47
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNJF' 'sip-files00197.tif'
40225596cd850a5f4add92b8eedf8b2e
6e36befdeb5f52887bcc3f6ce4f75555e3f20e9e
describe
'1558' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNJG' 'sip-files00197.txt'
53a4a11afa5272bd6b164a1ebe686473
f7a86aae548e67de1805e2daa5951864600234ac
describe
'12125' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNJH' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
b48b4dfa6ae29a845a63e54224191733
4380f13b2ee2b00584c0ab7c70f6d4b2c7a70d6b
describe
'583165' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNJI' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
a1fba101a01bd4bfd6f94b47051fb837
3cf8803c9d786bb8221f41cfbec8bbeb512ed1ab
describe
'145172' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNJJ' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
8b02e39e64389bd4c740ef9082d1cef2
57d7bb0372d4cc4967f54cd0183c1ddf9729df11
describe
'38681' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNJK' 'sip-files00198.pro'
d09054a04cc93383ef67320a3b4fa75f
f1bb1db0754818924c31505ef01f9655452e2386
describe
'49022' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNJL' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
2e4209fd79d0c14265b45bc50f44d3f3
8fe9f3a26ea6f459f3c595d1b3bbe5f7072a306f
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNJM' 'sip-files00198.tif'
6c99d45c19ec1c3bca2f993e9fb29182
1d15df9539e20145ff3f29f3de11a5f1e80772bd
describe
'1515' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNJN' 'sip-files00198.txt'
35770c2fb44057e68e89e7fdc0a9b9fb
e8b52daea24632529df9663efc1efed8b2cdb352
describe
'12045' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNJO' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
36fb23a3493bb7ebc2c8eab3770a6f45
fa7517fa237020c4904a775ba3e7d249569a0c0a
describe
'583182' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNJP' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
105c71756101ab201fab80d94dc4727b
aaf46dcfd394cc6dd53ee27c91609033735b188d
describe
'158577' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNJQ' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
afaa39ad56214eea705dc6cdc1986efa
1395a674553b397a8fdb28aff8c44ba3f6bfeec7
describe
'39598' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNJR' 'sip-files00199.pro'
38f1a24e975219ca503b6cc02e60dd88
f5d8d78792c35201050d60c6026ea1cc4d309985
describe
'52431' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNJS' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
b5a47a23fdb796174400e21804ccfd0a
3ff5f66068342bc7611936ab2ae35e185b92b0cf
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNJT' 'sip-files00199.tif'
7468b559f77b951a293a7887c6965be0
ab86fc56a6a5cecbd50cc754530bd10f68dd6b14
describe
'1570' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNJU' 'sip-files00199.txt'
13e1ef2b3c61e21280efd6117903ef32
a35875d84feb9b3fc2a12e9b0b6607d5442fae05
describe
'12736' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNJV' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
5ca018ed7093dcda6d524df5f68816a5
59ceafd06a88aaa2e1775aa60b8851a1ec324d46
describe
'583129' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNJW' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
dad23fe61ba394d1a1802f04c79d9048
1cc98471a2e7c1c2871c4284a042ee579ce05e24
describe
'154742' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNJX' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
ee8832437df13038cc7c62b2419cd5ab
9c929c09f4b79dabbc30c73bb14ea894602ead6a
describe
'39467' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNJY' 'sip-files00200.pro'
882f8dabe989350e4e1b6838299d4b50
71c325f7fbe04efe2f804d19cde23ef11912a473
describe
'50954' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNJZ' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
32e48a9c1de901119a67adb9e3ea946f
30ab99cb8fea1a87c07eaf0688629402be505486
'2011-10-27T16:48:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNKA' 'sip-files00200.tif'
b7acdd0ce49efaab6a4d89eef6a7c2be
cf6f6c4da169258b00d90e2884cd33b29eded3ed
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNKB' 'sip-files00200.txt'
c49f779599c0cb8da0f92b48b7becb9e
226ec4c805a9aea650e3dd6720b70442437587e4
describe
'12507' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNKC' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
7973864c1047c65d6298c741cba6d21c
343202b9953e7a94b1e2bbfb79ba43722b6a92ae
describe
'583117' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNKD' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
1db4793a513a306b234ac726518b5f41
ec7933b53552ffe392ad904a96f05fd8efb38020
describe
'141854' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNKE' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
b3837207d5b676544addbda1baff59b9
76ec7b3252895a4b90e216737108df559d1fea31
describe
'33995' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNKF' 'sip-files00201.pro'
9acf67a7e1fa714c729af58680296e2b
337d081bfb577e6e5429abf89af544c2472c3082
describe
'43308' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNKG' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
deb6188b742dbd8007209f3eab91a2bf
a454194b65ce1748799644be8ea77e7ad3d77f65
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNKH' 'sip-files00201.tif'
69513006183ba6b1d95d0d70fd8d41ca
857942e5a1b533a72cb74e1cc2d3cda43f84666b
describe
'1351' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNKI' 'sip-files00201.txt'
144be66fa602ca92fdf9457a0e10d967
cd6881308ee9683b1174bc6ebd85260a470c00ee
describe
'10961' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNKJ' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
db1f7a76442df21350e302e81e689a81
3edf726075cd0e85bbe98564c3ca5bcef558a6cb
describe
'583122' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNKK' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
0285e09990fa39d90ebaecafaaf00e72
c0fa11dc956f2ae80dabbc543807cac8c3b09e9b
describe
'129681' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNKL' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
0c60c7599aa3d5d419ebdeb7fff4e72a
38ab54b3881f63cee41b21d67c83bc628fad479b
describe
'34200' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNKM' 'sip-files00202.pro'
1b00d1a8314dc94d92b3ddbd6ce684a3
6cfa498d82622a69bfcce341fcd5c70e3af28995
describe
'44243' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNKN' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
f6d63039d737bf2d4b463e2608a84c63
7f22e09f6ff23eb5ba2b67f94d3ae8f6639df5fd
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNKO' 'sip-files00202.tif'
feeac18cac5a57da3fb35a58b53935a9
cb43250ad9ddffa16f7f7482e1519e2a052839db
'2011-10-27T16:48:32-04:00'
describe
'1370' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNKP' 'sip-files00202.txt'
8bea49b027002b834ffade265d8bc608
d82d2e6bc7d3a610bf77d06d8c387780009bb093
describe
'10841' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNKQ' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
6dfdd3b516ed3e95636768be96c8b411
7733cdd3ffbfeafc771a0151c4685643902cc4bc
describe
'583162' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNKR' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
b3c3cc0857fd897345c5763abac57174
3db33b4ac750c9bc5918ac87d67b87b869e2f8a8
describe
'150458' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNKS' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
5f39c9443253172a7b4634767135ced7
2750926ff5b9ab203011158a18a13a52b7cab167
describe
'40388' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNKT' 'sip-files00203.pro'
a347794b2c84a03b1eea16a1afef7cb8
dee22bcf09d702c442fc93be8ef9a86aec095036
describe
'51431' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNKU' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
4151950ca18af1a58411ca8b6e6bbed3
8a84b547882e0e28b9014db98cb3995cba9c3b3a
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNKV' 'sip-files00203.tif'
4b9bac8c57e1724c37489166b8ab6769
e4e280f6d28ce49c659d44bf4811ba9b427b037c
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNKW' 'sip-files00203.txt'
95e2212aaaf070d0eb6b65da04051cd2
a12b4374fe7603682c2c6793da731c0d5be0cc95
describe
'12454' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNKX' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
cde6e4bf369474d5e41d6540b0e8f906
c22925165d1a48fdbb2f190174ea95e2a4585609
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNKY' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
16988dad17403d45dae498d0a6c8b44e
2168173838283d19d9b38fb2433e99fdcb96fdde
describe
'143639' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNKZ' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
11b4b4b6b8f48adf1a6a886f6f6acbd2
f0d615da490bb2df239ff1f4cb30496ebf3b8b84
describe
'38249' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNLA' 'sip-files00204.pro'
bcd0a083fd81a51e64f884eac0e4eec6
56c9e99e69eb2af0dc5aa433fd2294bd8b6d8492
describe
'49331' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNLB' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
7d79a3b3d925096d7f52311dded6d52b
074bbe1bd5c32d82bfd046d35f70beb9f96f071f
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNLC' 'sip-files00204.tif'
b5077a026b3be57b8aab8e4c9c3b24d3
d193636814aacaf59d0afa68f3170562ca80a5c4
describe
'1506' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNLD' 'sip-files00204.txt'
e4930fefa01598e2559c1992f0a0a480
1a47ebd2634a2e274c7633a542a87374e2501057
describe
'11733' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNLE' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
fc9454c8a0b66d4f39e5440e26c544d0
251cc46b02c9012f2290b8d0ec8dc68cc4234a17
describe
'583164' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNLF' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
55ae27ff3afa1cdfafa1d1d65f036e8c
8877065916851740c236f4fa75a1b07e6e63390b
describe
'152999' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNLG' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
3fb59f78ae4be3b18f002a3e7c5a7aa6
f121512b0ac40774792cf25c5e47009e68241f6f
describe
'39222' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNLH' 'sip-files00205.pro'
6c9476b3ba7315506a259bbc93e8747c
39ebce191c8a3af18a1e7f03fc43d8e12db32b9b
describe
'51886' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNLI' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
74de4e1058a7a63fbe1b8c430ff24570
dbb2c38f244aa79db3655b74bc2ef4cedfd5c193
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNLJ' 'sip-files00205.tif'
9efb1ded8eb8351d1b4c9d74c8d288a5
f99c028ba97cfcae5fce7f5bbbfe9fcc349061de
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNLK' 'sip-files00205.txt'
b80b38dbb7f6b45a3d9a871d6ee04641
b2db4c7a3918a27506b937d7184ee7e571c715b4
describe
'12388' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNLL' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
698d7f5a59a5995df346c68805e80de7
5e8429d15344e8509785872d9d2c394356fec16c
'2011-10-27T16:48:46-04:00'
describe
'583102' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNLM' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
293fa898218e7a85a416039bb6e98640
6db0fef360af6fbac2bb25293e01dd511abc34a0
describe
'143097' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNLN' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
362fdce8f7ccf1980c663ba472353cdf
214c4593a7c72fa9f6d69825188ab887a72a9a8c
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNLO' 'sip-files00206.pro'
7a05196af2392f5efa9a1b4a9b8c6ddd
2242b1455b065eb8aa25e7bd512ff4976d9acd1d
describe
'47707' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNLP' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
1c41a5676bab5e954091ea7eca32c0db
5cfebf754a6098ef61ce5e57497ed44cfe4c9336
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNLQ' 'sip-files00206.tif'
76ed6901343663f58483dd19139f1978
135b233e02eb1221f383b6af16f96b1daea72910
'2011-10-27T16:49:55-04:00'
describe
'1501' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNLR' 'sip-files00206.txt'
b418801875861e4a0c5cf881d833f4d1
00af16a75118a7854ea80831b7bc23b456e5f636
describe
'11635' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNLS' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
42fa2dfa62c50f05712c4714016c89b0
59926c7d4ae4f5c05db597aa859c5ba785dcece7
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNLT' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
a71e4b56fc25a989dd1eba960a346b92
8e04a666decea78086571103fbb30cd2565b6cc5
describe
'162612' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNLU' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
028dd49fcf79313686231fc1adf8c33e
348f4ccb7ba34e2889701e0222f71de19100ac9b
describe
'40023' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNLV' 'sip-files00207.pro'
30d2e4755cbe377219d579a458ce567f
a14645ae3746e992c0ebab4ad4d28abd865491cb
describe
'50267' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNLW' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
8e621a864b3f17b1af15a0e0af5a0c4e
4cba99de5a24fca2ba54287d0db76108da6601d1
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNLX' 'sip-files00207.tif'
81b20b7fc5a730e960a716e6cd6b53ba
d9ff489b6914e8e9dc55cea917bb1da5f8ebe2f3
describe
'1576' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNLY' 'sip-files00207.txt'
4123c860c3b5693f2471ca2748f1b8bf
21b429136c555fd0a137f947dd5217c0f937d837
describe
'12612' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNLZ' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
1d0ea2c98035674917ae868567deb6f9
0fe182d1a939363cd573d978044fe73016d59f84
describe
'583159' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNMA' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
d038726130b13f80b843376fa682a4a5
5f089990909c63019d700092a323a512d7cc6a1a
describe
'147618' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNMB' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
5059c1e1cab250b06a871e801d70455e
97beafa7e31c288bb9d6bbb94a47444ed483a325
describe
'38970' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNMC' 'sip-files00208.pro'
2f686a03c357566b116b2865f67fa887
db3933a88882215c7f4e7213a966e2eb7910e47f
describe
'50252' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNMD' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
22322b762dd51366b7a7f495cf8cbfde
f715cf8fa126f3010a57b7d3eb536ac2082084fe
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNME' 'sip-files00208.tif'
0efaa2d5cc6c2bc7f0e7fcd983c67f37
504c1def6a123e1029b62fa626c098a81ee84d4b
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNMF' 'sip-files00208.txt'
d00572aba5a5aa94ba338ee558676989
2ba4475bf586e0baf2f6e9c7aeb1d1ea36f0453f
describe
'12422' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNMG' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
39f2d522f7cb75ae9a49dd838fa2af30
b4b2303fc71b6c182866a8f39f8b26b70297a9c4
describe
'583149' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNMH' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
22029df692ed32bc3d382c2a898762f9
1e4932d5ba51ac806d6a3f6906b96023d0cc5dd9
describe
'145349' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNMI' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
9bd4f5b0216233cbffbdbcfc64831173
e5e0c2634bf2aeb06c5facc6644ace9ffd1b03d2
describe
'37749' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNMJ' 'sip-files00209.pro'
8d28c1b8801d7d75b75ef41698028f66
a6c77bd91cb86a96538037fdd1e918ca8a1269e6
describe
'48684' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNMK' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
73cb78201bc917659fed0f963af2305e
be57929225dad5333c2464c5e6873fb93a31b050
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNML' 'sip-files00209.tif'
a75bc0d3032f2c40d389f27b4c9a4daf
a4cdd0d7dd5bdd930f5965281b711fcff643dd64
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNMM' 'sip-files00209.txt'
60e40a35ffe05229e43df1a242eee2af
2b4c20ca5d3b14a0d662b7448a98a3f0251abe8b
describe
'12069' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNMN' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
cb6a419db4c15e3028ef37ef8a40d7ca
3e2c5823c352991c41055ba8d45ae913f32e62d2
describe
'583120' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNMO' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
675d227ba2f8fa83090213d4e0b5276c
c2833554d883c637ab97e136758a8b144eb10c3e
describe
'140941' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNMP' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
31c0eec0c0711792e2d81cbf3659b239
875f5211ebd4dbedf7c22b651acef9425ecb5bed
describe
'38726' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNMQ' 'sip-files00210.pro'
68bb663a5b3adea2849ae8db0803a91e
689019c51fa6da86994deb95a9414f6fdefeceb5
describe
'46917' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNMR' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
528e7be5fb296df6d08c4744f04a6ed0
34afc6f2d3f09b8a21a31b447b22fdf23afe6482
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNMS' 'sip-files00210.tif'
7cfa8bd5cf94c062c2435ec5746fde6c
3301a8b5ba8a2dd662ca5e7e7fbe6d91f67264c5
describe
'1517' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNMT' 'sip-files00210.txt'
9a488ed76afda4c1986d67358bd2bb46
063cbee9747d5838cb358dae1d6c470a5e3be441
describe
'11591' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNMU' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
be35f84a81a68ffe2c64831ca80336d8
687e37be5391fec2bf1cbb60efc6ae37c7da577a
describe
'583151' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNMV' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
0727ecfe485b3be1a6b9c68907285206
2e811a261cda9e40b3e2b65658e9b7901692c7cf
describe
'150000' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNMW' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
bb0839710fbec628785d2ae59a4e7568
0a261531ce15aa1b78c47626ea35144508a02bc3
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNMX' 'sip-files00211.pro'
61c9085304b4de7132bf09884fddf78b
6e747d7846cfb7d3f878834d3e4e0ab235ac557b
describe
'48318' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNMY' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
2bf8251826a712763450f6581ceb337a
98a077c6c02f28f300f0b32a6a9f9f0844c22d91
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNMZ' 'sip-files00211.tif'
5a1d9fe138df90167010cebd7019dc9e
4016d48520fd5d7f00a8f113cd0b7bc0b362360a
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNNA' 'sip-files00211.txt'
b6c43027df7abdf92c3f50fd9fc40b10
b78e91f13b386bf9d84ddfb765b6e5f3733a044a
describe
'12093' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNNB' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
77c60462efe9dc1ebd73af39437e5b56
decf51e2d7e093d2c91e28bdc054bf613e301ce8
describe
'583170' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNNC' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
6a2ffb562df355d3d92040b25d7364c5
174a986d98537e19ac6c55a151ed60afd3ad3ca3
describe
'148704' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNND' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
2c7c1ed5830edb3b93632b0fea69dc9e
18b73de130ddcba0f4d0d162271e1db689a44721
describe
'39228' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNNE' 'sip-files00212.pro'
85f31a76b3e153645235191085c8292d
263968e149c1411dc99e57e984b92d888109ece3
describe
'47537' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNNF' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
3fa4bd890165ee122e55ca8930a8ddbc
866c1226e34673e4fa85fe1b6df35d93cafbf13b
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNNG' 'sip-files00212.tif'
afd2acd8f1bf694192f1e61daa0264e1
fce0d9220a805557ecc98e349c2a3da94ddd642b
describe
'1538' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNNH' 'sip-files00212.txt'
621b76da8da2d2f2da8aec4786356524
0ef29efd7f17c26e98bdf32483597dc96825662c
describe
'11727' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNNI' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
1a688978b5e6eac942e59f25df4272ca
1feb885f94b94d2c8110055d7166e8d80002d82e
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNNJ' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
f88df654900654c44825242d9a56fbe7
ef29d4e7fa7250b27e9d7ae9017005ab55606fac
describe
'150818' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNNK' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
6c66730dfd54d1455dc3d6d184df2373
e651eb092bd4c5661848edb2a41c12fd127061db
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNNL' 'sip-files00213.pro'
8af01af7763415ec391bee01b344b29c
398a3e2a5ce90813be6e8820e032e38b911496cd
describe
'49997' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNNM' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
9b2184dd37ab69bb53e496971141c763
5eb3168b88dc32865a6ffc812af7664d68a2fd34
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNNN' 'sip-files00213.tif'
ad9b35d8961f60fefebaaca1c508b97a
c628f796af18ea37383ceaf2875ffc9704219603
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNNO' 'sip-files00213.txt'
2c0937f1ffe568454d86f0716e3f931b
c8b48deba443dfa7fe5a104ab97ba2456177e727
describe
'11964' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNNP' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
101f96988c1b23069b940c6fae504e08
f9bc7dcffe7a38b1877cbf1e529a72f8ebc898c2
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNNQ' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
e4f6b9b92cf46d2c0b04f35a819ae0ee
42fa5222bc71cf6a6f9690d39716ca4984caa929
describe
'127641' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNNR' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
1e5afe8ce1b21183464b5a8e5c8eb962
c2306eae2c4e655b99be7dfede9f28c42e4111fd
describe
'26578' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNNS' 'sip-files00214.pro'
57d5f59daf4613fd5e13bf28133cb196
353bbe19f16ab9819a0d035c07f6bb60dae654ef
describe
'42181' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNNT' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
04540c91605346de98b02462678e1dcf
55f80c4041bff7cf54df4209d582be27dfd3c5ae
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNNU' 'sip-files00214.tif'
851cf0fed6be5d0fb370033e01042bde
51e560a0991323b419dc9cef2b7a051e2b25f405
describe
'1081' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNNV' 'sip-files00214.txt'
ee19152349eb1c6cd6e3e2898bb0328e
6c8dea8c18e4cf82ff8dfcddadfa156c479c077c
describe
'11266' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNNW' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
11b08808b0a5e36a817180d96df1daaa
7889738fb65560e0fa199ea89b1b5b380be8b8af
describe
'583169' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNNX' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
0ffb71d865ea5fc2b7de5668edf71f84
ed63c97f30c2a9837e4c8f94df2d868184c73920
describe
'154638' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNNY' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
e91be9d59cec769779e1084be8464510
317f2f07aff004a0459c564971098cf981b137e0
describe
'38495' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNNZ' 'sip-files00215.pro'
bb0710b9ed5692c7d45d5748609e3da3
07542324d6119ecd1d480745e6a68c512f34ea17
'2011-10-27T16:50:08-04:00'
describe
'49899' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNOA' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
c480e56cf488556023951a62e6c9ee3a
3577cbbdda1a95c151edb709d762808d1faa168a
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNOB' 'sip-files00215.tif'
310f4d8e2bb9ecc7de31016ead1258fd
ec964f70a44d984acb4c6b2e62a59c758ff3a562
describe
'1532' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNOC' 'sip-files00215.txt'
ccb5be2faa436b35c968fda4c6d291c5
44db5dea08e1e7593fe6553d79854dc4b9bdbe9f
describe
'12708' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNOD' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
864f136264b78a71933e52c98da5b600
8f73c4b1d3bc0ab6b13657930cef3f6a4dae8072
describe
'583176' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNOE' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
b715b98e4be2fab690db9b4807d2b38c
42e239b21de3ed2f52a5486ab131dd20372d23a0
describe
'140589' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNOF' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
d71f199d5033a898318e0b571a4e2d5d
da7fba3ded6181d1028e5f3b5a88e58aa42e1260
describe
'38162' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNOG' 'sip-files00216.pro'
c7682e08de47ede3abc6a615eb42706b
01873b28b95388b5151a4c121ba44552b332b1b0
describe
'47251' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNOH' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
2a269cd8791f2a3059e57065f23b3e80
7ea359957271bb29f6c530b7a639798cd42c02f8
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNOI' 'sip-files00216.tif'
5300ed12c1cfe68efcea705ed2711ca3
3e699d67a57de044c6c68d32a36b7d42b7f143b5
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNOJ' 'sip-files00216.txt'
160a3d826889ace249ddf6d2de7d7f79
6affb7c4c271a420de427ee07f444ad185a89466
describe
'11916' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNOK' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
92c7190b846c4afe31afa1af0a6744f6
7f538d2e42432ce07ce324e1f0e5024738596c0e
describe
'583178' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNOL' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
918c6f41fe51e4be7c2e49b0289e623d
d528cc8898d73f3764fa1f7ed30c1b6906ce2d48
describe
'150541' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNOM' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
569a5ef02e2c3517104e41259a14a357
e8b779ff0048edb9defa68d7d44966f992c1a080
'2011-10-27T16:48:10-04:00'
describe
'40446' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNON' 'sip-files00217.pro'
f2a61b341e8132e01f8e4138a9f1a790
8c8af9e6b3c2366a40d217438c8067cb1d52802d
describe
'50771' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNOO' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
13bb0843589ea5614d3b07f0b8388df1
eb3b5f194e241b1afc370107bc3afffd634ef600
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNOP' 'sip-files00217.tif'
7e0bef1a79e616c85da8cd621b774fd8
41c4f46c2bb54fbc125d545ddb7674a1506b67d5
describe
'1583' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNOQ' 'sip-files00217.txt'
2c4bbeb33f75ffa6855ea34a807a4a54
7706a9f4f6913e394b04accbfdcf324872e756f3
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNOR' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
ad9a3cf26f91aff098f87d686d6197ae
2890a1635887fa32b9ac0fcd831bf42d1a839766
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNOS' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
f3afc39dd068f5209d7ebf6ce6fbbd74
b226f0d075f6d4ed701c873545bbe68733ddd0c0
describe
'141012' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNOT' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
b4230525a3126511ce2ad6565034cf51
95dbbea072f8f0b65ba75cf4049df5ceec1f6f0d
describe
'38879' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNOU' 'sip-files00218.pro'
78fc6ef23f27bf8519611233eb64fc63
fb964db9edc043f15f448fca00d4de6054a36d90
describe
'47362' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNOV' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
77984440750030ca1a32c43465a7bec2
d49eb0da5a63263df28767a61ea716b61fa95f33
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNOW' 'sip-files00218.tif'
d13c105d3d5c1bb328224342e613ecef
ce2423d8c29bf153b9d9d0822627215acf397501
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNOX' 'sip-files00218.txt'
a7accd3dee1693b60a25d9140fb07477
dc7585fb4c1692b5639a1987101a6eb4a2cb23d6
describe
'11507' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNOY' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
97111cad5235afee1721a7ed32b1c7bd
7cbbd824b92b59c6ca4f624707031833e0e94975
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNOZ' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
ff1bc63fc5d195f04b489b628e3d0375
b1b4f0a052d857c397601e094193a6d81757ec77
describe
'149798' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNPA' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
6d6c50c6bcfaa239859c3504cf5e98e1
324bffdc10c54900bfcfcfabc3492734d1f9f1f6
describe
'38662' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNPB' 'sip-files00219.pro'
b5f32c4ab884b46867aeaf2b1149f4c9
e2342dba274f82a8018896334b54615e4923f6f2
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNPC' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
6f9b42b9fa0c150893e4bd1400c850bd
1c927c0425ebc6881308826cfe0f91a717db8488
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNPD' 'sip-files00219.tif'
6571c4a8ade1930e71332e61ee5f8d23
30798ee000964c7c4304ff8450bebec00d44efde
describe
'1553' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNPE' 'sip-files00219.txt'
8ef3c3659d7cff3f3f03fd0f569c4eb2
9bfa6c81573225cbda127d653998ade7396273bc
describe
'12049' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNPF' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
d6f34afa8ca0c72f71c7f73d19b064de
df95427376ddde2cdacca59f53c988640f58af84
describe
'583180' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNPG' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
8d45638cf5e1435ae7beff99d51704e3
79d054ffa3a5a07157a5003bf8a6899521db0c04
describe
'141020' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNPH' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
b6937e83fae310e15d894e16ab31f299
ff8446ac4df50d376090ee2773d6a8066b018869
describe
'39351' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNPI' 'sip-files00220.pro'
f594ce1420c296265987a52268128419
86cf5df4c6dcab9e6236c3ea94e4e266156d21ee
describe
'47950' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNPJ' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
d593229ca0cba6a23ac77b5d3e64ed41
c837d14ce7275f08db194cf322fa2de3a262bbfa
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNPK' 'sip-files00220.tif'
0db88c02d503a53f8a1eabae2d7fbcd5
a5668c15c7cc38535a667bf4f16dcef95d1e2d55
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNPL' 'sip-files00220.txt'
58a4a8365942a1dcf865732a8ac17cfa
a44d1f009c11eac0cf4ef56efbdd60c93ea6ef18
describe
'11069' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNPM' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
14a28550ef10b4d798a4aaf35a7a7a04
8b022f556f56e0f8f155479ea84c4bdf73add537
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNPN' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
6b15b056d9bfa053f002940dfc52ba7b
56f87a5462c64ce8e5b5424cbc2efd5f59ef1eae
describe
'150435' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNPO' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
ca6c5c290ecab7f5600e00be9d006817
b74937b305502eb5d69bd942f733ed0daf3d8522
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNPP' 'sip-files00221.pro'
2c44cda6edf5b42bea29403b6dbeeb89
1185980483a5570696140cd385999b45fe5e1016
describe
'49380' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNPQ' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
1fb28b52af090172d8474988d52ea477
5472a5575c74640c0d5c0833b1f1bf267b48d393
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNPR' 'sip-files00221.tif'
2f4c00b42932119473edae321026cfe4
731002fb1ecf11933aac286c79e3d449af4eb759
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNPS' 'sip-files00221.txt'
609fb09d689e4ba327878750d250fc8b
1503aaa3dbe595a7999da65998d6da58c955fb48
describe
'12127' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNPT' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
51061772e47b31f03e749b12831eb3f5
524b6f28670c33ecec43e1ceafbee9322fe02d2b
describe
'583156' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNPU' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
6cea4ed9a798a2f1e7b81c233fa21f16
f0ab3d9bc68ad47ee2e0af2716fa5a4c56dfd638
describe
'135757' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNPV' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
9e564c6d038a410053d88ee10013d004
89ee77cc9468b508c2cb42c39c729831ee145106
describe
'19209' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNPW' 'sip-files00222.pro'
2f99bb1ba969b9fafa3d9187a12ff1e9
0560d568d958e22632fe1ee6d2e043acaac5bd8f
describe
'42262' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNPX' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
cd500d294dd40c9168fd1d566cbf4eec
07db29bb80c407a4092f1404ebacb202c08f5ec7
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNPY' 'sip-files00222.tif'
32d22fe3462e5f4254d7a58f665fcd5c
bce63f65f7603a0b3214e3dd3118cd6ab9e92c2c
describe
'829' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNPZ' 'sip-files00222.txt'
cadc325118e3e10d4ab23ba217a539b9
9fa3ef1a47763f24f5a10bbdf277ddcbb39e0ab7
describe
Invalid character
'10874' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNQA' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
56d875bc70368e83a9f48a61fe10de46
ceaa6e89d20db0194ef4a395f71a2c74dbe75ec9
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNQB' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
8331cf2e2e8fec87da741cd367d60786
300ab7a1da4ab6fb127b1930c7a816ecef8f7fed
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNQC' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
aee82379b6cc48b50865de38bd235bf3
883939f91f9f10ccc7830322f117c3e0f95f95d9
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNQD' 'sip-files00223.pro'
dcfa9fb99bb987f40264acbb27a96369
6aa0cb8a645029553516e9b236a1e1bec6c772f7
describe
'50716' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNQE' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
be0af7ea1c725a2a4a77f64bb5b3ba0b
911674f235e38d540a10cd8a3ec01e7f09947e24
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNQF' 'sip-files00223.tif'
27c60144c3f8ed2097b709ac5ba37bd9
c2368ede4bd1797a3b195b4bdaad6e57f57c1a80
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNQG' 'sip-files00223.txt'
36cddd761d1c9abea7cab2da6b363164
652df0cd385f568a675155b1b2be173a4eec08cf
describe
'12291' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNQH' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
88a3d48a6d0764c10be258f4af20e62d
de898391e261d5dbf96fd15e42b76c5a807bb3a0
describe
'583140' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNQI' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
569eaa1f71a686bce08543e8163a7d34
9f237d6f9b620f923ee9e299c4e1d5dd7c92c8a8
describe
'143859' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNQJ' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
a3c3a8bf76b7af2653cec01a23a41e99
2aca4d72f5891c8ebddb9601ffa0f8f65029427c
describe
'37544' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNQK' 'sip-files00224.pro'
0713760a1270a47f87890deec4b187b2
d0b13b8d1265197d03cea4422b18a4e11dec33db
describe
'47409' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNQL' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
64463dd40b9bd3ec7bb9fe493b5d705e
7aec6189b8c32c054b33c86865f4a280f06c9a46
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNQM' 'sip-files00224.tif'
8d52c3ec8babe773302c011d9186686a
95ea61eae2ebe3c9c1cfe9a0d9def2a88f23b36e
describe
'1473' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNQN' 'sip-files00224.txt'
a71c15a94080d777b55791da76ba6922
235368878c7b864de61d9f77c749f94c67d9e64d
describe
'12078' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNQO' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
5257fc0594c18a8ddeb8c6b7cf9b577b
94d6054e65e8255efdc0f1a20c6791d1f87a9e5f
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNQP' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
ba64c79491273f33a5c900b08651096a
2cbb80738f28295d6fe930d800f95c3efbbe406b
describe
'155995' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNQQ' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
057a4cb2c45e578834369adf4d38ecc1
63fc8329a5e0a820055e5e78128e77d170b209cd
describe
'39572' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNQR' 'sip-files00225.pro'
f791baf9661c734277112610d4f2c39e
fc6279cac48ea4888040286eb5574f5e80a326c8
describe
'50247' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNQS' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
66d27b09693b935f906d2dd303893784
4d8c7e423c93baee6a595c2af9072c406b4bfbd3
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNQT' 'sip-files00225.tif'
463f5d385a608ee7f6e64afc71eef4ea
98ea95a369e296c553b23140cbf287cb2e779a5c
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNQU' 'sip-files00225.txt'
4176d7fde2632b590c690cd0f482bd3d
349df9fdaa96daf564de39a79d878b11059db100
describe
'12360' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNQV' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
c377da2b28304b1e909e1cbb8b3f2d78
d4cffbda959a13a7229d656c2992a52125d9dbe7
describe
'583155' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNQW' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
6c552cd1d922a0e6de005579d95e5a75
f1bbba82129a0cb3f2c7bc48067e7baffe650f42
describe
'143068' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNQX' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
d78256e1ab338f68c3c9e2fe8d8428e4
8f199817f565763ec7f561581b2f1d4149d3c890
describe
'37454' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNQY' 'sip-files00226.pro'
f80dbba473214bb1e35a34e279af1440
eacc9fc41f4f28d9e557a318cd06b02e46d4776c
describe
'46574' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNQZ' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
2b4299bab23beb7dec3599c2cec4373d
9c4111e62b9a6909881400176b0899fc2e9a8840
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNRA' 'sip-files00226.tif'
5c82c92f0a47dccde8e2477f6b088374
3af7045a0be08cbc66d1ea45432f202c40d0dd4e
describe
'1480' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNRB' 'sip-files00226.txt'
d31ed9fca25b7ce6b38f23160ced7bd5
301584ba3ac0a06837f7261b8087eba822bada96
describe
'11840' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNRC' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
baa63cd05732c0609e3e129a4153bd81
684308dd93ab0d97f84dfc2f36e22a4c3a76ddd5
describe
'583174' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNRD' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
dcac2c0a50650c1319f651c2a129d211
859ce74f02f5b8af18275d17eeb1dc2aee9359fe
describe
'149257' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNRE' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
22666c3f4f3b69ccdbb44a25d718a09e
d99423891e1c1639fe8676dd2d7376b147887cbf
describe
'38353' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNRF' 'sip-files00227.pro'
259346714f07a37acd6d990424eb8893
983c96d037692f4d7e2ee8937875af829774db2f
describe
'48964' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNRG' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
bb8bd27df93d94e7fdd91f130b14e75f
40138bb09923fcaec7d7f662e2603f17c2191b31
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNRH' 'sip-files00227.tif'
6dac9f8d2e9d0c5190217be1562dbc2d
d203102e89b8521edb4bff21f43e7c33ace9b441
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNRI' 'sip-files00227.txt'
8279ecf8ceb941c1726056f34ecacfd3
90622be43eb9bc8c1f232678e467afebbc5324b3
describe
'12039' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNRJ' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
3da0c7dc4cad2b24e042912285aca17e
57a3226f810bad18165e2e0b186a1d40f74b9515
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNRK' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
b40d80bf02e6bd96a5b62b8394e92449
95df04c13faa1da8b4c3cb1d5ffd4233a9a97f73
describe
'141745' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNRL' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
f9768981bfd740d0e487787c0ae7097c
c293ec20694be2ae955bb07d805abb68943db2d8
describe
'36831' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNRM' 'sip-files00228.pro'
e57ac444b9ad072fc3373abe789044cd
9fc45abb9659a3d653340921c145c412986970c4
describe
'45562' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNRN' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
107e992628fa4a6a09d83ab967de57a2
54c2a577269b0e130ae43f3976142f431a905085
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNRO' 'sip-files00228.tif'
c2574f49aae0ecd5daa06e4cf5e67d59
eb287c1a5d9a23240991dc70f0fb2cd8d705801e
describe
'1447' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNRP' 'sip-files00228.txt'
431258ab6640e80bdcf5c7484ce1f1af
bf79c1a5d676db5b7bdd0fee66c96ba5e24807d5
describe
'11560' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNRQ' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
0c274a4ad238a7caf1e35021a8afa687
3e61593c6f311c58bf0e84bc9b1bab00b1ee4186
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNRR' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
4013b2c901d45342213d2b0732e839cf
1eed07cb3a3b8e54ab91e03d99bd54914d8c2f5c
describe
'154158' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNRS' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
2238d36d3668743323eb91e40b0cda09
1b1a6eb5c7474346a6c24b10be69aaa2dd5cf3dc
describe
'39280' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNRT' 'sip-files00229.pro'
9f41bd89debc4fed8c371a6cae539330
007feb321143dea2c78ce010216201dae5294653
describe
'50164' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNRU' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
273e20e1713505682a056ac16db87812
c9bd869bb49e5fffd216bcdb6a8ab10a8745f3bb
'2011-10-27T16:48:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNRV' 'sip-files00229.tif'
14512d4ec4a0e5b8b589a48058c17464
69429088344a1a58eb17b06bba7db41f92a32346
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNRW' 'sip-files00229.txt'
26ad9a5c604033904ef666e2acff8cfd
8a9d321abc26bc8e47dedc4379ea0781ffb977ef
describe
'12080' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNRX' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
4068491692328ea0302ac1ff6170a590
79f62515a87c18c2ab625cc1788d2a73e0ecae21
describe
'583136' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNRY' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
3d6e23850de04dc58ae3e01543ef4c27
51316a6808bc7c8f0f5d0ad86b05ca36d6e8aa6d
describe
'135095' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNRZ' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
7962e634681864822c9458d7b029b4ff
4231b5fdf49884c47797128d4ce46d8d27ee641f
describe
'38168' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNSA' 'sip-files00230.pro'
67950eb76c709e8d24f3d915dd1a0e50
69f8e3370e362286a692679daa11f891e3828340
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNSB' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
4bd115b348ca58b277c523950a6c931e
1016894c712e64a7d07ce192c21bbe8aa0753790
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNSC' 'sip-files00230.tif'
9da7090ae6894e6500dddf9c8d909d82
873ed369726b38468ee39cdbfc2a01dc3f1d2129
describe
'1499' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNSD' 'sip-files00230.txt'
2b4146e293bda9c704034e404b7d5709
79eeca86052d06530d5906dae6108d34f367bcc3
describe
'11701' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNSE' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
e0ad3267fcc2c2649ac42b833677f62f
e5eec37915be199f91029b9bd36eaba8a2fb83d2
describe
'583175' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNSF' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
e58b4029d8fb4ac5f6f59fb4db3e26ea
75f364b975b8ba3e040a600eae38b599896444b3
describe
'153613' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNSG' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
700a55b47fa928b5b5239d8e066c8b6e
38c41a49bbfb95f52220b6a0a957322dd08ef33d
describe
'40234' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNSH' 'sip-files00231.pro'
972478145fb1c06ceea3f2b8b5638004
4edfc6d8ea4dcb3b47bfcd533551e96c077fb68b
describe
'49247' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNSI' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
76a891ac5b92815dc797722fce744578
9642a38cd63b30132af92067e975a13818c064d2
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNSJ' 'sip-files00231.tif'
d3bde230c8636adb98b1c3a45855ab4a
e9076ad02a5c63b6489e9fde798989e319ec9b1b
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNSK' 'sip-files00231.txt'
1aa1675fbbb3a4d76e18ba499c71d258
a4af0e97cbe0916dec1b7073aa507ac2d2f6c9ac
'2011-10-27T16:48:25-04:00'
describe
'12191' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNSL' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
8bd2c5832c5c6b3bb518396d41966661
18b186f14952f85edcc38a08dbce2ffa90988c58
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNSM' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
12ee7b3520ce1453a6d5c54be5ebd7cb
dc0f0af61a676288d8f81ff8630982ab006b8ac6
'2011-10-27T16:50:12-04:00'
describe
'144833' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNSN' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
c0fbe6e23218088a463bb6a74cdd3d43
7165676058965789eeae65e4799a3ba112522c45
describe
'39827' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNSO' 'sip-files00232.pro'
c8ec629295fbadda7778e60c0c9a7c2a
1981314608632351090beee2576a503fc91b3567
describe
'48786' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNSP' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
ee88ada56ea77065a1429677a7e41920
290654e21b0adfd2cc13e299e4a890bed9e36178
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNSQ' 'sip-files00232.tif'
3fde9ea362ef10a35e29d0639ca2684d
0a458757c42ae75f1ad21790eff8321a618427a8
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNSR' 'sip-files00232.txt'
4fe8425472b6b6208ba4c6c606038007
346e9d5a820b7780d77196ddf5d9fbd783827744
describe
'12194' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNSS' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
fda949ad8d8caeba03ca7196fbef3b71
646f2776e12d971412aed5abf8b88bce70b48cbb
'2011-10-27T16:55:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNST' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
eaa5f74c1628831906c1d02ebd004185
0c7abda09b686407ebe30bbbef71aa8163521c04
describe
'93067' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNSU' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
0f9238be5e081e83396afc9a449fdf31
070861c427449ece90ad96e1682681460aaa1ec2
describe
'4493' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNSV' 'sip-files00233.pro'
d5a3d2c0d3ea3e3551b13a86fd6450d5
15521c7028ebefb4a333b1a77f4a5ae845cad45d
describe
'28028' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNSW' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
42115d42251945467eeaf4f68280f6e8
08f5df00ed11da8881925fafc56a80e842817bdc
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNSX' 'sip-files00233.tif'
fa060e4f88bf0376e4c6222b5742c122
9f299b870f4beb39ab6999610e767bd09b344aed
describe
'264' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNSY' 'sip-files00233.txt'
3265f675d27e3efd182ab2c0eb54b67c
3b7a8b61ad680938f357d9fce55c333b89498dd9
describe
Invalid character
'7925' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNSZ' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
e0228d1376084e0b82d86838a6506ba6
b2c7823ff65e499ee63cddb8fd5a6821f4d1b738
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNTA' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
f5adb62cb3fe4ee90b6c4db00485bd91
aa894080b0d808952813a3d51434bd48affa6ab4
describe
'138897' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNTB' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
77014c65616a5b174e828f5d2ba9e6d2
fd7209b016ea01ec563db560d65dced564e448da
describe
'37625' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNTC' 'sip-files00234.pro'
16b90da5bf8fce92dfa50bfe4f18fed6
123745e1ca3307b3bc8677e3d7afb58f8dd016fc
describe
'46934' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNTD' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
34f59f207fbcf6e9db0436c7e29cb13a
51768a09c2010c347d3b841ca6ab5f5f539959ad
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNTE' 'sip-files00234.tif'
afc1599249aff69cdee4161b119beb74
ecf36f5f48aadad4ac61c70594c2987eb4d93731
describe
'1492' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNTF' 'sip-files00234.txt'
a644c343ae3f6883172f8dd4d140e900
a55e019d487c84a98fe1dd10b451d2b60589436c
describe
'11164' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNTG' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
1efd00d9a73bec62975508960daaf623
c03ab8f1bc5d3d8f6b6a9c64b0e56b426676d709
describe
'593595' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNTH' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
be424923457cf1e0e133a1df55417699
329915764c061e1ea1a0e07872fbab58d062eb16
describe
'144368' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNTI' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
ec4ed17425e0fb54a55eced941bead13
67da3bb134df87e5104c0c0e9184ec8c08c83fe4
describe
'38123' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNTJ' 'sip-files00235.pro'
34ff05c0d10a55d15c3ef5cdacc1aa05
eb56dc979098c2538fb5fd88bd901744a4dfe8ec
describe
'48401' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNTK' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
a1431368643b8acfd6aaf7b339c16578
1383ee5a131d800bf6673ee3d49437706fcd2133
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNTL' 'sip-files00235.tif'
50d5852b8b7f9f3571c72f1179460f49
e2b5558c9b561c92f5a70103419df86c5d410131
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNTM' 'sip-files00235.txt'
d839e5d31b4fd7f3d87b072ec31a4eb5
a283e25055349edb547ce2b183175a2961158c41
describe
'12322' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNTN' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
d57c1f07a3603b7af0dc4799b1527a45
edfb5034391201483ba1695849264b76af562262
describe
'593938' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNTO' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
073d9bccdae40d3690029c47fadedbad
3d47b31868800acfa98aa9165519d5fbcd0c53ca
describe
'140896' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNTP' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
8029aa596e032b74db192cbcd630ed63
29c228c183192319b146011a14787a2ce17cc74a
describe
'38300' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNTQ' 'sip-files00236.pro'
73b45efe8bfb3184d5c5118e5a43fe4d
add5f3d3ee9683390419e462360f2e5bea1e3667
describe
'46553' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNTR' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
fdfd06555fa7868bf0a97d18aecc1cfa
b3044805bee551cb778c229e010990d9ad8c2622
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNTS' 'sip-files00236.tif'
8cf39f2ad90f87814030b57376ab3783
75f7c824109184b127f60efe90cb5c35c684edd6
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNTT' 'sip-files00236.txt'
bb954ab4ff0cf43915b1ad246e34635e
bfb12eacd148ca3f39597848f9acfab5143c675f
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNTU' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
7b810697766c7a4bf6df3b672da96ad2
021325f7356576babcbf3b7afecd6187d3b72ee9
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNTV' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
282996e071320a14b5315821023edb09
f2b6a55be590a818272b1956b3dfff7dd523d3f2
describe
'150688' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNTW' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
e193b5773e1ceac024a3e237a86dce84
47b04b1bd798a5d25de2d9e340b324023f22f20e
describe
'38433' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNTX' 'sip-files00237.pro'
a72f87242d0f46a2c4a45eb6a8190176
c0fd47c63ea6d1c98cd0ff032f0d888ab51d395f
describe
'49286' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNTY' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
05ff8be7bec20ece7ff306054fbb35ec
89b2532587fa2aecb8318cc839b0d81f127ce287
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNTZ' 'sip-files00237.tif'
6b0bb0f2fd86f89b4133793c4904b58d
4595437ca1871276557e6de06101d096547df3da
describe
'1516' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNUA' 'sip-files00237.txt'
1aeb3a8ef1699b12dd2e3417676685e3
582da87895d80209b25cb3bc4100741b7f13a074
describe
'11687' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNUB' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
b8ac36d0bc5a764eaf9a1457bc737598
ce0d30a57c665b5c97a9950f336fe8d4c8e342b7
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNUC' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
ab46d7f6b049331cfe5844bc652cd208
ac95646be4d55fa2c01f3fb6881b5f923a006cb7
describe
'144807' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNUD' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
f44a3210f37b2718b5a71afdbd768b31
dff8e8380c4542c6a010e0c1da88d93c5fbddd16
describe
'39139' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNUE' 'sip-files00238.pro'
87e0217c9bfc97a576b1bb24ea5fd969
51c2426634fdbad9b0e3af81b28e697538cafed1
describe
'48493' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNUF' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
547a9a31a56a35374998cc0142494340
7744ec0fa1a11e70d1719e8e3cae31dbb32616bb
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNUG' 'sip-files00238.tif'
5eb598a8ba18f8fe38d5a9878998b7b5
1a2776ac27c8f8771e3836c2f81f64fb03bced3b
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNUH' 'sip-files00238.txt'
3bf1720b4bf766f8f3429e52c209aa48
007a70cf3d6092f467509c55b1e0401827032a65
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNUI' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
f6856e0528795444a6a12964fa0b9f35
a14caf40bf164a1a5d6217121bca27c1e7894634
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNUJ' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
b4cf0fc310c24f9054c795cb2b1a4f9d
53dbeddde382d3782893494ca73a1136f083dd28
describe
'156273' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNUK' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
a0f2f1043b4560f28502cc6bc532ac97
1e9fdaad4981c43611de02259b4964af7c45c8da
describe
'39263' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNUL' 'sip-files00239.pro'
7bfadebe2f86d1e4a146b3e715a8c6f0
d4aa1e84b98548f5659280c00f8f6aad0a38f458
describe
'49892' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNUM' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
77e15e3f83d215b59221b435ca0f3973
6f5ee6228b594b675675892c4c747f5fcb062db3
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNUN' 'sip-files00239.tif'
080589077f8aafa4060d0d2e8a8f801d
9cedf4cb5955c2a3495d9b8a4a7cf3c16b6f5cfc
'2011-10-27T16:56:20-04:00'
describe
'1566' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNUO' 'sip-files00239.txt'
51291a7ecd549be74077533dd7f3276a
f0ad92c2e6a595a8e668acf573b450886b26cb2d
describe
'12357' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNUP' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
f13ae7ab111acc49148c4f8b99e51e66
622c4efb47a3415afaf41d4b1f064628eb7f261f
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNUQ' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
c3f80ca3fb598878d94c9c0dd878c198
e14b6beba24cfc1f1b513b4cee239607072e702d
describe
'143765' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNUR' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
d4dd2826c9237cef79b40fa29eb5c1e4
da4843e9fdf03f75091df2d9c30918326dd5faed
describe
'38714' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNUS' 'sip-files00240.pro'
0b5c97907fdc1e0217cbe5b0333a13a7
9d7cf4c9f8e1f83451f305f2e2582618933f9b2e
describe
'48522' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNUT' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
d44c78ef561a55229b04edf01f182af5
6ce6ef8e9f0503ec51ba84823924251ffd248fca
describe
'4682136' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNUU' 'sip-files00240.tif'
47214a00d2a12a5ff52079245560d38a
317379742df9288d72e88413ed7dfda108366af1
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNUV' 'sip-files00240.txt'
e1141870a80875d616f5339d3e232fb6
6956cab23593d8e138420667d7b9751b8f5710f1
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNUW' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
73587f8639ddd281b3c7ae7f1e7cbf4b
424915a17b01acf01aeee9ed3c438a2dd456de29
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNUX' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
da82b2dbe807e0fe4e7b492ed45b8172
edcc6b1a46d3d17aae37216680e4ac2e9d993932
describe
'148412' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNUY' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
0c088e978eff810263eb39c1b54078b5
7d7615f7f7c32164035cced285f7b4077516770a
describe
'37140' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNUZ' 'sip-files00241.pro'
4a2a64f06e9dccc86b854d17dd680082
50a72e8c1aa24e29b6c340c6681d8b5f6907d3f7
describe
'47706' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNVA' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
ee9500f0b9dc6c90a925d31c8cdc31dc
11b7965e4bd9d173e77eec4d5e6fc8cf0bfef2d7
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNVB' 'sip-files00241.tif'
8fe6b9273fd9fb39d799a2ba572a167d
f1e7ddf86720ed85c11e40c11a7ef015109c457f
describe
'1478' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNVC' 'sip-files00241.txt'
b13a7ec56d2ae3d74b75cf0b922ca707
ba4114a8327b2d31253d073b3a23cb5c396b68b1
describe
'12216' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNVD' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
fa7ea3ba840fda9fca72a1459f45182f
d381e06791296a14faa68fa95c00edafe6405e00
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNVE' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
001a102c8e895dfa585f118d500cb1ed
e55caa4b3660f92564ca7c9d5229e7d872c7c5ac
describe
'140707' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNVF' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
1cc5dbf8ee0fb638a5257053f2129851
5578bf4a8e2e626cb13aa7e22609b42b3775d838
describe
'38586' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNVG' 'sip-files00242.pro'
db1aa4857f30efdf2159ac5381505e9a
f92f874b19cb52d9dd0a62a4baaa6eb61280fc60
describe
'47620' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNVH' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
b47545211ecf5f37ead9f999419062a8
bab56c59fa138b3188b3d0492fc0b122d969b2d2
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNVI' 'sip-files00242.tif'
33f5a8d4532840e49e31ed435db72a3b
a883037e42ee799a9a4b690dd22435beab2a01c7
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNVJ' 'sip-files00242.txt'
a663240df3b6ff418e52f250f81f4c54
0c43c7d223a85a00bbd39b0bfab2f929dd9c99ee
describe
'11671' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNVK' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
19e3f36e9390217b7bc8c479037256e9
2d5c5df0e6d864aca841bbb2558e0e8bd96381e3
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNVL' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
e379bc4b88d494ff64041d25136a05b0
4a4804441d45f70b9f6403f0dbd9ee306cb51be1
describe
'151892' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNVM' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
2bb054e35fc12647a7daf532925ed4e8
67a366ce6d477ac29d5861752d9545c0fdd393af
describe
'38602' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNVN' 'sip-files00243.pro'
5542e5689a498036c5295d503c8d82b3
27767be6c4e3e629612c92bf8b0c5bca488bb7dd
describe
'48846' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNVO' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
e6637ae793935cf8b1c1346ff701fe52
7c4cba4f25cd2ec065789c1bfa6c252eeeecd45a
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNVP' 'sip-files00243.tif'
32113f223f3bbd59e1bb2b089a889172
ff16385560b0ffae745ad1d65269303e2c330bc5
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNVQ' 'sip-files00243.txt'
363be0b2bf007d8d1655ab6f6e21efc0
85f2c99b6c5d7d9438711441f6915839fe20606d
describe
'11881' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNVR' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
fcbf3aab053151c0fd3f7da802ebfded
102547c91280fd3dd58643784db707f3927a5393
describe
'583457' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNVS' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
441e412b3d778dccea8cc7f7510abfc7
ede1bc624eace22b3f1f4604a12a385154b85c3b
describe
'138320' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNVT' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
710e4b42b58d851c766368ba0a258f9d
5da31db2b470104ded8cc279dffae33db309ba0b
describe
'38078' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNVU' 'sip-files00244.pro'
390a5720927317cbe82c5e5b58f83556
f7020740c4ec36c4e577eed2e69ffadac6a3dd48
describe
'47396' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNVV' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
30a72f6d801de809f998c40db8675e49
dab71372822cccc8adff263302e6aebdbf13871e
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNVW' 'sip-files00244.tif'
9fa927144c29be9cec0991c7f384818f
80175bea85d31b8102d034b1fdf44b9b69045675
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNVX' 'sip-files00244.txt'
44e67c852885e91654238ec5185aa00b
16060dd676fd20416a4b818330823d58be6d8948
describe
Invalid character
'11700' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNVY' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
eccbd80f294eaf2bf448728860f5faee
3d1c5f9a422906cf25dcf8addc8b4388a6f7ed8e
describe
'583166' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNVZ' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
ecbd7c93633a89b2a1788d432196ae4a
a824316e7cd57eac824af57c1c5f4a31ac5abb80
describe
'155621' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNWA' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
b3e60385633342cb2bf5353694f68e2c
c0e3c515cc06d8f8f55e55aa67d996d0cacc6eab
describe
'39757' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNWB' 'sip-files00245.pro'
1926199d7ac9e20c3aeb347f79cbc6a7
f1131d4c51792a6f0ea5b4692572dcdfaf697344
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNWC' 'sip-files00245.QC.jpg'
4d362f21120ef61f12cbd7bd257000d3
ebdd002521bd99a9ac0828c0a9327e2fb21f9c61
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNWD' 'sip-files00245.tif'
6a6867dc0c2da29d30287e716a2effac
0bd1c621fc0a23cc8e5591476f370d3c66410367
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNWE' 'sip-files00245.txt'
78e90e01ee67c87a823fe61a0b038715
76f83afbad1c6dec688ca26e709750ddb48d9676
describe
'11880' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNWF' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
a3fd9c747344a0e1ee100f1477ed0204
33ce89026ffbac1bb9adf907a5367e9e68a529f0
describe
'583497' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNWG' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
228b9c7470030b9b6ecaec8f4622967c
69e0bb8c05bc36cb0d8b04ec4c0782d68c3134e4
describe
'144219' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNWH' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
f439ec9b29dcad273c2c08739039078c
35a89f46c77513e28fbae538be3cecf1246e8b05
describe
'39994' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNWI' 'sip-files00246.pro'
3122bf2b2c469a8c7f4c989bbe249cd0
160841544fafd3dcbe68166c8014e0d387596ef1
describe
'49539' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNWJ' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
78ef690c6db80d4651a285f5ba67b94e
daf9f7ea8d292eb60e2616902bc4015bc048fd1c
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNWK' 'sip-files00246.tif'
50d17bb5adbf35231f1048ffc4099e3d
275f9b05ac5fb083829883761131de98a20f27f9
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNWL' 'sip-files00246.txt'
ca2cafddbd517c700a89b0eef452f45f
7a5025fc9ce68843fd99a596a5f3446458272943
describe
'11327' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNWM' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
96252b522350387ec46aada9ab9dc297
4c4bb466c92ae110be9cf3d1fdb2ba2733ebc201
describe
'583167' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNWN' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
eb4da446d936c5429248ddb45d5915fa
842c93ba9cb2616436b147f2ba9ebfac6e40420d
describe
'145656' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNWO' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
9b21ab1eb782afe7d22c7dcf597470a0
6de48416e17f5799550a4ebd2e5ea48c6c356c50
describe
'37629' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNWP' 'sip-files00247.pro'
43e0ca13afb605e3469eb3904ca398b7
990618e6842f688bd0548eba31f28fcf02033b4b
describe
'47125' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNWQ' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
35a7ebe45386074d0d0ad77787a1e69c
a85d905f58c998b10426b8706c40f72b56382fa7
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNWR' 'sip-files00247.tif'
90ff2ee6be7600651b63158363604269
40c95c27bdbdb9b9a3c6057882b0d9d32fa178ab
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNWS' 'sip-files00247.txt'
ff5c62afa98f3b42654081c017426e57
45108bddd4fbfa87a131dd263668962e693f7f6f
describe
'11590' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNWT' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
cebc4e8f71df498cd861b1b4fdc10e91
4b4d985d2965924147fddb76014ed69e96def945
describe
'583510' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNWU' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
4e7a29286cf4d7689780fcdc3af02e3d
8d3512407cf0e0279979fb8c9460d0e43f34d0e8
describe
'150833' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNWV' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
b8f8c3dba7b483f31b7e35700e888b4f
c3c59ca57727791da740dbe236e19404ade8b818
describe
'39529' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNWW' 'sip-files00248.pro'
cccc0175fcb59e40095030b9e569c08d
331cbc65232958acce526415c8ecfdd0d95fdfbe
describe
'47919' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNWX' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
fd96b9852ed3deea7397598bd5290010
29547ea3901ea55e216bab58458ba424097ad70d
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNWY' 'sip-files00248.tif'
324cd97fe0c46273c48b54ea7113399b
7680b5afa34d67cc553832054fd30aff5f1393cb
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNWZ' 'sip-files00248.txt'
d20babede3c06407c3473b991ac32869
4cebc45ebdf7feabcf5ac15f7b282e4493b97da1
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNXA' 'sip-files00248thm.jpg'
fdec8b847681a4ceef38fe5a34067dac
49c8b9d7ee23be7aedcaada9e8467398624a0ac2
describe
'583121' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNXB' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
eb97329a6be2c78430f2aa205f80994a
7c11befe78b88cad9c7c228d152cb91ff4c543a9
describe
'152611' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNXC' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
dbefaa817daaf483c2c6e7dbb043ab04
a6a9634d5eac69b6ecaefcb7007928a70c075bec
describe
'38438' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNXD' 'sip-files00249.pro'
d0fe1951d19282010e589aec558fc25a
21309d97f504d17ce37e66c22d3ca059975fa82f
describe
'49108' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNXE' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
18d9b4ae630b819125d1449140a61822
06dd98508c64489cd070ec94bf1f00682afc8c03
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNXF' 'sip-files00249.tif'
39edf178b536501768c9ba7c96259977
6d5d00f9a097148bbd9101aa2eb45c147325f703
describe
'1519' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNXG' 'sip-files00249.txt'
615452825a94a44946d642007a0e07d7
c978971aa114539783338093906b5fc0faeb67f5
describe
'11794' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNXH' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
afd05a130b5270f85835298df815af3d
219328f0065659b1657103dae3981d2ea9cc147a
describe
'583482' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNXI' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
f839e55235dde5239cebfe13a363e28a
3699293560d344178e3ec89771bf732e2dd15f53
describe
'134463' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNXJ' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
801dc34a8cfec23240d78f90939005e7
92c3dab4135ea10105c21c02f69b036aa2ff1420
describe
'35653' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNXK' 'sip-files00250.pro'
e9b510f6368340b011504606a7de37bc
5028dc5191f1443534634e7a634565969fb5d3f8
describe
'43927' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNXL' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
a8f4595474d8465150e2dd2ea958c82b
0c1214f28d00571f4825a1d65b37b98e31c9c2a8
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNXM' 'sip-files00250.tif'
d526d27495707f9d8d82d9c521f9b651
8611a904fe54e8f668abc422bf6ccecfa71245d0
describe
'1431' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNXN' 'sip-files00250.txt'
784a6d7e294af8752ba3d2a859abca42
17980278c4b9e2ef7e1fbad158c1fa34902a209c
describe
'10634' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNXO' 'sip-files00250thm.jpg'
7d18eeba757d1212dc85dda4e8503e55
c36bf9907fbbe32cf9e46a22bf4def661f0656f7
describe
'8' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNXP' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
095cd9cd5c2970c936c019bdff8ca83d
24003965d8c90859b23b399fe8801132d62778cd
describe
'411013' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNXQ' 'sip-filesUF00074472_00001.mets'
a9d53c8d36c3b1161ca7db8e9c4be6d3
0782a527a3ee77a3a668ebf37613957c910fb78c
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-14T16:23:52-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'532184' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQOfileF20081115_AABNXT' 'sip-filesUF00074472_00001.xml'
b7555aaa7f0130314abb49f131954d69
172e49a906fa9822c71db3c319009b4dbd7185df
describe
'2013-12-14T16:23:48-05:00'
xml resolution