Citation
The Adventures of Robinson Crusoe

Material Information

Title:
The Adventures of Robinson Crusoe
Uniform Title:
Robinson Crusoe
Creator:
Defoe, Daniel, 1661?-1731
Defoe, Daniel,
Leitch, R. P ( Richard Pettigrew )
Macquoid, Thomas Robert, 1820-1912
Marriott, R. S
Thomas, William Luson, 1835-1900
Wentworth, Frederick
Defoe, Daniel, 1661?-1731
McLoughlin Bros., inc
Place of Publication:
Springfield, Mass
Publisher:
McLoughlin Bros.
Language:
English
Physical Description:
190 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Castaways -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Survival after airplane accidents, shipwrecks, etc -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Shipwrecks -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Imaginary voyages -- 1927 ( rbgenr )
Genre:
Children's literature ( fast )
Imaginary voyages ( rbgenr )
fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Massachusetts -- Springfield
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Cover col. ill. with title: Robinson Crusoe.
General Note:
Date from inscription.
General Note:
Some illustrations signed R.P. Leitch or MacQuoid. Engravers include R.S. Marriott, W.L. Thomas, and Wentworth.
General Note:
Parts I and II of Robinson Crusoe. Pt. II originally published under title: Farther adventures of Robinson Crusoe.
General Note:
"2353"--Cover.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Daniel Defoe.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
SN01273 ( lccn )
26812736 ( oclc )

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THE ADVENTURES O

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OBINSON CRUSOE
By Daniel Defoe







































































































































































































































































































WITH SIXTY-THREE ILLUSTRATIONS

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ROBINSON CRUSOE



WAS born in the year 1632, in the city of York, of a good family, though not
I of that country, my father being a foreigner, of Bremen, who settled first
at Hull: he got a good estate by merchandise, and leaving off his trade, lived
afterwards at York; from whence he had married my mother, whose relations
were named Robinson, a very good family in that country, and from whom I
was called Robinson Kreutznaer; but, by the usual corruption of words in Eng-
land, we are now called, nay, we call ourselves, and write our name, Crusoe;
and so my companions always called me.

Being the third son of the family, and not bred to any trade, my head began
to be filled very early with rambling thoughts: my father had given me a com-
petent share of learning, and designed me for the law; but I would be satisfied
with nothing but going to sea; and my inclination to this led me so strongly
- against the will, nay, the commands, of my father, and against all the entreaties
and persuasions of my mother and other friends, that there seemed to be some-
thing fatal in that propension of nature, tending directly to the life of misery
which was to befall me.

My father, a wise and grave man, gave me excellent counsel against what
he foresaw was my design. He called me one morning into his chamber, where
he was confined by the gout, and expostulated very warmly with me upon this
subject: he asked me what reasons, more than a mere wandering inclination,
I had for leaving my father’s house and my native country, where I might be
well introduced, and had a prospect of raising my fortune by application and



4 ROBINSON CRUSOE

industry, With a life of ease and pleasure. He told me it was men of despérate
fortunes on one hand, or of aspiring, superior fortunes on the other, who went
abroad upon adventures, to make themselves famous in undertakings of a
nature out of the common road; that these things were all either too far above
me or too far below me; that mine was the middle state, or what might be called
the upper station of low life, which he had found by long experience was the
best state in the world, the most suited to human happiness, not exposed to the
misery and hardships, the labor and sufferings of the mechanic part of man-
kind, and not embarrassed with pride, luxury, ambition, and envy of the upper
part of mankind. He told me, I might judge of the happiness of this state by
this one thing, viz., that this was the state of life which all other people envied;
that kings have frequently lamented the miserable consequence of being born
to great things, and wished they had been placed in the middle of the two exe
tremes, between the mean and the great; that the wise man gave his testimony
to this, as the just standard of true felicity, when he prayed to have neither
poverty nor riches,

After this he pressed me earnestly, and in the most affectionate manner, not
to play the young man, nor to precipitate myself into miseries which Nature,
and the station of life I was born in, seemed to have provided against; that I
was under no necessity of seeking my bread; that he would do well for me, and
endeavor to enter me fairly into the station of life which he had just been re-
commending to me; and that if I was not very easy and happy in the world, it
vaust be my mere fate or fault that must hinder it; and that he should have

nothing to answer for, having thus discharged his duty in warning me against

measures which he knew would be to my hurt.
I was sincerely affected with this discourse, as indeed who could be other-
wise ? and I resolved not to think of going abroad any more, but to settle at

home according to my father’s desire. But, alas! a few days wore it all off;

and, in short, to prevent any of my father’s further importunties, in a few weeks
after I resolved to run quite away from him. However, I did not act quite so



ROBINSON CRUSOE 5

hastily as the first heat of my resolution prompted, but I took my mother at a
time when I thought her a little more pleasant than ordinary, and told her that
my thoughts were so entirely bent upon seeing the world, that I should never
settle to anything with resolution enough to go through with it, and my father
had better give me his consent than force me to go without it. This put my
mother into a great passion; she told me she knew it would be to no purpose
to speak to my father upon any such subjects; that for her part, she would not
have so much hand in my destruction; and I should never have it to say that my
mother was willing when my father was not.

It was not till almost a year after this that I broke loose. Being one day at
Hull, and one of my companions being going by sea to London in his father’s
ship, and prompting me to go with them, I consulted neither father or mother
any more, nor so much as sent them word of it; but leaving them to hear of it
as they might, without asking God’s blessing, or my father’s, without any con-
sideration of circumstances or consequences, and in an ill hour, God knows,
on the Ist of September, 1651, I went on board a ship bound for London.

Never any young adventurer’s misfortunes began sooner or continued longer
than mine. ‘The ship was no sooner got out of the Humber than the wind began
to blow, and the sea to rise in a most frightful manner; and, as I had never been
at sea before, I was most inexpressibly sick in body, and terrified in mind. In
this agony I made many vows and resolutions, that if it would please God to
spare my life in this one voyage, if ever I got once my foot upon dry land again,
I would go directly home to my father, and never set it into a ship again while
1 lived.

These wise and sober thoughts continued all the while the storm lasted, and
indeed some time after; but the next day the wind was abated, and the sea
calmer, and I began to be a little inured to it. A charming evening followed;
the sun went down perfectly clear, and rose so the next morning; and having
little or no wind, and a smooth sea, the sun shining upon it, the sight was, as I
thought, the most delightful that ever I saw.



6 ROBINSON CRUSOE

I had slept well in the night, and was no more sea-sick; but very cheerful,
looking with wonder upon the sea that was so rough and terrible the day before,
and could be so calm and so pleasant in so little a time after. And now, lest
my good resolutions should continue, my companion who had enticed me away
comes to me.

“Well, Bob,” says he, clapping me upon the shoulder, “how do you do after |
it? I warrant you were frighted, wern’t you, last night, when it blew but a
capful of wind ?”

“A capful d’you call it?” said i ‘twas a terrible storm.”

“A storm, you fool, you!” replies he; “do you call that a storm? why, it was
; nothing at all; give us but a good ship and sea-room, and we think nothing of
such a squall of wind as that; but you’re but a fresh-water sailor, Bob. Come,
let us make a bowl of punch, and we'll forget all that; d’ye see what charming
weather ’tis now ?” :

To make short this sad part of my story, we went the way of all sailors; the
punch was made, and J was made half drunk with it; and in that one night’s
wickedness I drowned all my reflections upon my past conduct, all my. resolu-
tions for the future.

The sixth day of our being at sea we came into Yarmouth Roads. Here we
were obliged to come to anchor, and here we lay, the wind continuing contrary,
viz., at south-west, for seven or eight days. ‘The eighth day, in the morning,
the wind increased, and we had all hands at work to strike our top-masts, and
make everything snug and close, that the ship might ride as easy as’ possible.
By uoon the sea went very high indeed, and our ship rode forecastle in, shipped
several seas, and we thought once or twice our anchor had come home; upon
which our master ordered out the sheet-anchor, so that we rode with two anchors
ahead, and the cables veered out to the better end.

By this time it blew a terrible storm indeed; and now I began to see terror
and amazement in the faces even of the seamen themselves. ‘Towards evening
the mate and boatswain begged the master of our ship to let them cut away the



ROBINSON CRUSOE - . 7

foremast, which he was very unwilling to do; but the boatswain protesting to
him that if he did not, the ship would founder, he consented ; and when they had
cut away the foremast, the main-mast stood so loose, and shook the ship so
much, they were obliged to cut that away also, and make a clear deck.
And one must judge what a condition I must be in at all this, who was but a
young sailor, and who had been in such a fright before at but a little. In the
middle of the night, and under all the rest of our distresses, one of the men that
had been down to see, cried out we had sprung aleak; another said there was
four feet of water in the hold. ‘Then all hands were called to the pump.
We worked on; but the water increasing in the hold, it was apparent that the
ship would founder; and though the storm began to abate a little, yet as it was
not possible she could swim till we might run into any port, so the master fired
guns for help; and a light ship, who had rid it out just ahead of us, ventured a
boat out to help us. Our men cast a rope over the stern with a buoy to it, and
then veered it out a great length, which they, after much labor and hazard,
took hold of, and we hauled them close under our stern, and got all into their
boat. It was to no purpose for them or us, after we were in the boat, to think
of reaching to their own ship; so all agreed to let her drive, and only to pull her
in towards shore as much as we could. |
We were not much more than a quarter of an hour out of our ship till we saw |
her sink, and then I understood for the first time what was meant by a ship
foundering in the sea. I must acknowledge I had hardly eyes to look up when
the seamen told me she was sinking. While we were in this condition, the men
yet laboring at the oar to bring the boat near the shore, we could see a great
“many people running along the strand, to assist us when we should come near;

but we made but slow way towards the shore; nor were we able to reach the
_ shore till being past the lighthouse at Winterton, the shore falls off to the west-
ward, towards Crome. Here we got all safe on shore, and walked afterwards
on foot to Yarmouth, where, as unfortunate men, were were used with great
humanity.



8 ROBINSON CRUSOR

Had I now had the sense to have gone back to Hull, and have gone home, I
had been happy. But my ill fate pushed me on now with an obstinacy that
nothing could resist. Having some money in my pocket, I travelled to London
by land; and there, as well as on the road, had many struggles with myself what
course of life I should take, and whether I should go home or go to sea.

It was my lot first of all to fall into pretty good company in London, which
does not always happen to such loose and misguided young fellows as I then
was. I first got acquainted with the master of a ship who had been on the coast
of Guinea; and who having had very good success there, was resolved to go
again; this captain taking a fancy to my conversation, told me if I would go the
voyage with him, I should be at no expense; I should be his messmate and his
companion; and if I could carry anything with me, I should have all the ad-
vantage of it that the trade would admit.

I embraced the offer; and entering into a strict friendship with this captain,
who was an honest, plain-dealing man, I went the voyage with him, and carried ©
about £40 in such toys and trifles as the captain directed me to buy. This £40
T had mustered together by the assistance of some of my relations whom I cor-
responded with, and who, I believe, got my father, or at least my mother, to
contribute so much as that to my first adventure.

‘This was the only voyage which I may say was successful in all my adventures,
and which I owe to the integrity and honesty of my friend the captain; for I
brought home five pounds nine ounces of gold-dust for my adventure, which
yielded me in London, at my return, almost £300; and this filled me with those
aspiring thoughts which have since so completed my ruin.

I was now set up for a Guinea trader; and my friend, to my great misfortune,
dying soon after his arrival, I resolved to go the same voyage again. I em-
barked in the same vessel with one who was his mats in the former voyage, and
had now got the command of the ship. ‘This was the unhappiest voyage that
ever man made; for though I did not carry quite £100 of my new-gained wealth,
so that I had £200 left which I had lodged with my friend’s widow, who was very



ROBINSON CRUSOE . 9

just to me, yet I fell into terrible misfortunes in this voyage; and the first was :

this, viz., our ship making her course towards the Canary Islands, was surprised.”

in the gray of the morning by a Moorish rover of Sallee, who gave chase to us
with all the sail he could make. About three in the afternoon he came up with









































































































































































































































































THH ATTACK BY THE SALLEE ROVER

us, and to cut short this melancholy part of our story, our ship being disabled,
and three of our men killed and eight wounded, we were obliged to yield,
and were carried all prisoners into Sallee, a port belonging to the Moors.

The usage I had there was not so dreadful as at first I apprehended; nor was
Y carried up the country to the Emperor’s court, as the rest of our men were,
but was kept by the captain of the rover as his proper prize, and made his slave,
being young and nimble, and fit for his business. When he went to sea, he left
me on shore to look after his little garden, and do the common drudgery of

peeeiene



10 ROBINSON CRUSOE

slaves about his house; and when he came home again from his cruise, he
ordered me to lie in the cabin to look after the ship.

Here I meditated nothing but my escape, and what method I might take to
effect it; but found no way that had the least probability in it. After about two
years, an odd circumstance presented itself, which put the thought of making
some attempt for my liberty, again in my head. My patron lying at home longer
than usual without fitting out his ship, he used constantly to take the ship’s
pinnace, and go out into the road a-fishing; and as he always took me and a
young Moresco with him to row the boat, we made him very merry, and I
proved very dexterous in catching fish, insomuch that sometimes he would send
me with a Moor, one of his kinsmen, and the youth, the Moresco, as they called
him, to catch a dish of fish for him. |

It happened one time that, going a-fishing with him in a calm morning, a fog
rose so thick, that though we were not half a league from the shore, we lost
sight of it; and rowing we knew not whither or which way, we labored all day
and all the next night; and when the morning came, we found we had pulled
out to sea instead of pulling in for the shore. However, we got well in again, :
though with a great deal of labor, and some danger.

But our patron resolved he would not go a-fishing any more without a com-
pass and some provision; so he ordered the carpenter of his ship to build a little
state-room or cabin, in the middle of the long-boat, which had in it room for
him to lie with a slave or two, and a table to eat on, with some lockers to put
in some bottles of such liquor as he uaa fit to drink; and particularly his
bread, rice, and coffee.

It happened that he appointed to go out in this boat, with two or three Moors
of some distinction in that place, and he had provided a larger store of provi-
sions than usual; and had ordered me to get ready three fusils with powder
and shot, which were on board his ship, for that they designed some sport of
fowling as well as fishing. I got all things ready as he had directed; and waited
the next morning with the boat, when by-and-by my patron came on board



ROBINSON CRUSOE 11

















































































CRUSOE A SLAVE

alone, and told me his guests had put off going, and ordered me, with the man
as usual, to go out with the boat and catch them some fish.

This moment, my former notions of deliverance darted into my thoughts,
for now I found I was likely to have a little ship at my command; and my master
being gone, I prepared to furnish myself, not for fishing business, but for a
voyage. My first contrivance was to make a pretence to speak to the Moor,
to get something for our subsistence on board; for I told him we must not pre-
sume to eat of our patron’s bread. He said, that was true; so he brought a
large basket of rusk or biscuit of their kind, and three jars with fresh water,
into the boat. I knew where my patron’s case of bottles stood, and I conveyed
them into the boat while the Moor was on shore. I conveyed also a great lump



12 : _ ROBINSON CRUSOE

of beeswax into the boat, with a parcel of twine or thread, a hatchet, 4 saw, and
a hammer, all of which were of great use to us afterwards, especially the wax
to make candles. Thus furnished with everything needful we sailed out of
the port to fish.

After we had fished some time and caught nothing, for when I had fish op
my hook I would not pull them up, that he might not see them, I said to the
Moor, “‘This will not do; we must stand farther off.” He, thinking no harm, .
agreed, and I ran the boat out near a league farther, and then brought her to
as if I would fish; when, giving the boy the helm, I stepped to where the Moor
was, and making as if I stooped for something behind him, I took him by sur-
prise with my arm under his waist, and tossed him clear overboard into the sea.

Â¥ He rose immediately, for he swam like a cork, and called to me; begged to be
taken in, telling me he would go all over the world with me. He swam so strong
after the boat, that he would have reached me very quickly, there being but
little wind; upon which I stepped into the cabin, and fetching one of the fowl-
ing-pieces, I presented it at him, and told him I had done him no hurt, and if
he would be quiet I would do him none; “But,” said IT, “you swim well enough
to reach the shore, and the sea is calm; make the best of your way to shore, and
T will do you no harm; but if you come near the boat, I'll shoot you through the
head, for I am resloved to have my liberty.” So he turned himself about,
and swam for shore, and I make no doubt but he reached it with ease, for he
was an excellent swimmer.

When he was gone, I turned to the boy, whom they called “‘Xury,” and said,
“Xury, if you will be faithful to me, Pll make you a great man; but if you will
not stroke your face to be true to me” (that is, swear by Mahomet and his

father’s beard), ““I must throw you into the sea too.” The boy smiled in my
face, and spoke so innocently, that I could not mistrust him, and he swore to be
faithful to me, and go all over the world with me.

While I was in the view of the Moor that.was swimming, I stood directly out
to sea, that they might think me gone towards the Straits’ mouth. But as



ROBINSON CRUSOE 13

soon as it grew dusk in the evening, I changed my course, that I might keep in
with the shore; and having a fair, fresh gale of wind, and a smooth, quiet sea,
T made such sail that I believed by the next day at three o’clock in the afternoon,
when I first made land, I could not be less than one hundred and fifty miles
beyond the Emperor of Morocco’s dominions. |











































































































































































































































































































































CRUSOE ESCAPES WITH XURY

Yet such was the fright IT had taken at the Moors, that I would not stop till
T had sailed in that manner five days; and then, the wind shifting to the south-
ward, I concluded also that if any of our vessels were in chase of me, they also
would now give over; so I ventured to make to the coast, and came to an anchor
in the mouth of a little river, I knew not what nor where. TI neither saw nor
desired to see any people; the principal thing I wanted was fresh water. We

came into this creek in the evening, resolving to swim on shore as soon as it



14 ROBINSON CRUSOE

was dark, and discover the country. But as soon as it was quite dark, we heard
such dreadful noises of the barking, roaring, and howling of wild creatures, of
we knew not what kinds, that the poor boy was ready to die with fear, and
begged of me not to go on shore till day. “Well, Xury,” said I, “then I won’t,
but it may be we may see men by day, who will be as bad to us as those lions.”
“Then we give them the shoot-gun,” says Xury, laughing, “make them run
way.”’. Such English Xury spoke by conversing among us slaves. However,
T was glad to see the boy so cheerful, and as his advice was good, I took it. We
dropped our little anchor, and lay still all night. I say still, for we slept none;
for in two or three hours we saw vast, great creatures (we knew not what to call
them), of many sorts, come down to the sea-shore, and run into the water,
wallowing and washing themselves and they made such hideous howlings and
yellings that I never indeed heard the like.

Xury was dreadfully frighted, and indeed so was I too; but we were both
more frighted when we heard one mighty creature come swimming towards our
boat. Xury cried to me to weigh the anchor and row away. “No,” says I,
“Xury, we can slip our cable, with the buoy to it, and go to sea; they cannot
follow us far.” I had no sooner said so but I perceived the creature, within two
oars’ length. I immediately stepped to the cabin-door, and taking up my gun,
fired at him; upon which he turned about and swam towards the shore again.

But it is impossible to describe the horrid noises and hideous cries and howl-
ings that were raised, as well upon the edge of the shore as higher within the
country, upon the noise or report of the gun. This convinced me that there
was no going on shore for us in the night upon that coast; and how to venture
on shore in the day was another question too; for to have fallen into the hands
of any of the savages, had been as bad as to have fallen into the paws of lions
and tigers.

Be that as it would, we were obliged to go on shore somewhere or other for
water. Xury said, if I would let him go on shore with one of the jars, he would
find if there was any water, and bring some to me. I asked him why he would



ROBINSON CRUSOE 15

go? why T should not go, and he stay in the boat? ‘The boy answered with so
much affection, that made me love him ever after. Says he, “If wild mans
come, they eat you, and go wey.” “Well, Xury,” said I, “we will both go, and
if the wild men come, we will kill them, they shall eat neither of us.” So we
hauled the boat in as near the shore as we thought was proper, and waded on
shore, carrying nothing but our arms, and two jars for water.

I did not care to go out of sight of the boat, but the boy, seeing a low place
about a mile up the country, rambled to it, and by and by I saw him come run-
ning towards me. I thought he was pursued, and I ran forward towards him
to help him; but when I came nearer to him, I saw something hanging over his
shoulders, which was a creature that he had shot, like a hare, but different in
color, and longer legs; however, we were very glad of it, and it was very good
meat; but the great joy that poor Xury came with, was to tell me he had found
good water, and seen no wild mans. !
- But we found afterwards that we need not take such pains for water, for a
little higher up the creek where we were, we found the water fresh when the
tide was out, so we filled our jars, and prepared to go on our way.

T knew very well that the Islands of the Canaries, and the Cape de Verd
Tslands also; lay not far off from the coast. But I knew not where to look for
them. My hope was that if I stood along this coast till I came to that part
where the English traded, I should find some of their vessels upon their usual
design of trade, that would relieve and take us in.

Once or twice in the day-time, I thought I saw the Pico of Teneriffe, being
the high top of the mountain Teneriffe in the Canaries and had a great mind to
venture out, in hopes of reaching thither; but having failed twice, I was forced
in again by contrary winds, the sea also going too high for my little vessel; so I
resolved to pursue my first design; and keep along the shore.

Several times I was obliged to land for fresh water, and once in particular,
being early in the morning, we came to an anchor under a little point of land,
which was pretty high; and the tide beginning to flow, we lay still to go farther



16 ROBINSON CRUSOE

in. Xury, whose eyes were more about him than it seems mine were, calls
softly to me, and tells me that we had best go farther off the shore; “for,” says
he, “look, yonder lies a dreadful monster on the side of that hillock, fast asleep.”
I looked where he pointed, and saw a terrible great lion that lay on the side of
the shore. “Xury,” says I, “ you shall go on shore and kill him.” Xury looked
frighted, and said, “‘ Me kill! he eat me at one mouth;” one mouthful he meant.
However, I said no more to the boy, but bade him be still, and took our biggest
gun, and aimed as well as I could with the first piece to have shot him in the
head, but the slug hit his leg about the knee, and broke the bone. He started
up growling at first, but finding his leg broke, gave the most hideous roar that
ever I heard. I fired again, and shot him in the head, and had the pleasure 7
to see him drop.

This was game indeed to us, but this was no food; and I was very sorry to lose
the charges of powder and shot upon a creature that was good for nothing to us.
T bethought myself, however, perhaps the skin of him might be of some value
to us; and I resolved to take off his skin if I could. So Xury and I went to work
with him. It took us up both the whole day, but at last we got off the hide of
him, and spreading it on the top of our cabin, the sun effectually dried it in two
days’ time, and it afterwards served me to lie upon.

After this stop, we made on to the southward continually for ten or twelve
days. My design in this was to make the River Gambia or Senegal; that isto
say, anywhere about the Cape de Verd, where I was in hopes to meet with ~
_ some European ship; and if I did not, I knew not what course I had to take,
but to seek for the islands, or perish there among the negroes. When I had
pursued this resolution about ten days longer, as I have said, I began to see
that the land was inhabited; and in two or three places, we saw people stand
upon the shore to look at us; we could also perceive they were quite black, and —
stark naked. I was once inclined to have gone on shore to them; but Xury said
to me, “No, go, no go.” However, I hauled in nearer the shore, and I found

they ran along the shore by me a good way: they had no weapons in their hands,



ROBINSON CRUSOE 1?

except one, who had a long stick, which Xury said was a lance, and that they
could throw them a great way with good aim; so I kept at a distance, but talked
with them by signs as well as I could; and particularly made signs for something
to eat: they beckoned to me to stop my boat, and they would fetch me some
meat. Upon this, I lay by, and two of them ran up into the country, and in
less than half an hour came back, and brought with them two pieces of dry
flesh and some corn, but how to come at it was our next dispute, for I would
not venture on shore to them, and they were as much afraid of us, but they took
a safe way for us all, for they brought it to the shore and laid it down, and went
and stood a great way off till we fetched it on board, and then came close to
us again.

We made signs of thanks to them, for we had nothing to make them amends;
but an opportunity offered that very instant to oblige them wonderfully: for
while we were lying on the shore, came two mighty creatures, one pursuing the
other from the mountains towards the sea. The man that had the lance or dart
did not fly from them, but the rest did. ‘The two creatures ran directly into the
water, and swam about; at last one of them began to come nearer our boat than
at first I expected; but I lay ready for him, for I had loaded my gun with all
possible expedition. As soon as he came fairly within my reach, I fired, and
shot him directly in the head: he immediately made to the shore; but between
the wound, which was his mortal hurt, and the strangling of the water, he died
just before he reached the shore.

It is impossible to express the astonishment of these poor creatures at the
noise and fire of my gun. But when they saw the creature dead, and that I
made signs to them to come to the shore, they took heart, and came to the
shore, and began to search for the creature. I found him by his blood staining
the water; and by the help of a rope, they dragged him on shore, and found that
it was a most curious leopard.

The other creature, frighted with the flash of fire and the noise of the gun,
swam to the shore, and ran up directly to the mountains from whence they came.



18 ROBINSON CRUSOE

I found quickly the negroes were for eating the flesh of this creature, so I was
willing to have them take it as a favor from me; which, when I made signs te
them that they might take it, they were very thankful for. Then I made signs
to them for some water, and held out one of my jars to them, turning its bottom
upward, to show that it was empty, and that I wanted to have it filled. ‘They
called immediately to some of their friends, and there came two women, and
brought a great vessel made of earth, and burnt, as I suppose in the sun; this
they set down for me, as before, and I sent Xury on shore with my jars and filled
them all three.

I was now furnished with roots and corn, such as it was, and water; and leav-
ing my friendly negroes, I made forward for about eleven days more, till I came
in sight of the Cape de Verd Islands. On’‘a sudden, Xury cried out, “Master,
master, a ship with a sail!” and the foolish boy was frighted out of his wits,
thinking it must needs be some of his master’s ships sent to pursue us. I
immediately saw that it was a Portuguese ship; upon which I stretched out to
the sea as much as I could, resolving to speak with them if possible.

With all the sail I could make, I found I should not be able to come in their
way, but that they would be gone by before I could make any signal to them;
they, it seems, saw me by the help of their perspective glasses, so they shortened
sail to let me come up. I was encouraged with this, and as I had my patron’s
ensign on board, I made a waft of it to them for a signal of distress, and fired
a gun. Upon these signals they very kindly brought to, and lay by for me;
and in about three hours’ time I came up with them.

They asked me what I was, in Portuguese, and in Spanish, and in French,
but I understood none of them; but at last a Scotch sailor, who was on board,
called to me; and I answered him, and told him I was an Englishman, that had
made my escape out of slavery from the Moors at Sallee; they then bade me
come on board, and very kindly took me in, and all my goods.

It was an inexpressible joy to me, which any one will believe, that I was thus i

delivered, as T esteemed it, from such a miserable and almost helpless condition



ROBINSON CRUSOE 19

as I was in; and I immediately offered all I had to the captain of the ship, as a
return for my deliverance; but he generously told me, he would take nothing
from me, but that all I had should be delivered safe to me, when I came to the
Brazils. 3 .

As he was charitable in this proposal, so he was just in the performance to a
tittle; for he ordered the seamen that none should offer to touch anything I had:
then he took everything into his own possession, and gave me back an exact
inventory of them, that I might have them, even to my three earthen jars.

As to my boat, it was a very good one; and that he saw, and'told me, he would
buy it of me for the ship’s use. He offered me also sixty pieces of eight for my
boy Xury, but I was very loath to sell the poor boy’s liberty, who had assisted
me so faithfully in procuring my own. However, when I let him know my
' reason, he owned it to be just, and offered me this medium, that he would give
‘the boy an obligation to set him free in ten years, if he turned Christian: upon

this, and Xury saying he was willing to go to him, I let the captain have him.

We had a very good voyage to the Brazils, and J arrived in the Bay de Todos
los Santos, or All Saints Bay, in about twenty-two days after. The generous
treatment the captain gave me, I can never enough remember: he would take
nothing of me for my passage, and what I was willing to sell, he bought of me:
in a word, I made about two hundred and twenty pieces of eight of eh my
cargo; and with this stock, I went on shore in the Brazils

I had not been long here, but being recommended to the house of a good,
honest planter, I lived with him some time, and acquainted myself, by that
means, with the manner of their planting and making of sugar; and seeing how
well the planters lived, and how they got rich suddenly, I resolved, I would turn
planter among them; resolving, in the meantime, to find out some way to get
my money, which I had left in London, remitted to me. ‘To this purpose, I
purchased as much land as my money would reach, and formed a plan for my
plantation and settlement. ,

T had a neighbor, a Portuguese of Lisbon, but born of English parents, whose



20 < ROBINSON CRUSOE

name was Wells, and in much such circumstances as I was. My stock was
but low, as well as his; and we rather planted for food than anything else, for
about two years. However, we began to increase, so that the third year we
planted tobacco, and made each of us a large piece of ground ready for planting
canes in the year to come.

I was in some measure settled before the captain departed from the Brazils.
One day I went to him and told him what stock I had in London, desiring his
help in getting it remitted; to which he readily consented, but would ony have
me send for half of my money lest it should miscarry.

His kindness to me was great, for he not only procured the money I had
drawn for, but sent me over a servant, with a cargo of salable goods, together
with tools, iron work, and utensils necessary for my plantation. I found means
to sell the goods at a very ereat advantage, so that I was now infinitely beyond
my poor neighbor, and the first thing I did, I bought me a negro slave, and a
European servant also: I mean another besides that the captain sent me.

I went on with great success in my plantation, and had I continued in the
station I was now in, I had room for all the happy things to have yet befallen
me, for which my father so earnestly recommended a quiet, retired life. But
T must go and leave the happy view I had of being a rich and thriving man in
ray new plantation, only to pursue a rash and immoderate desire of rising faster

than the nature of the thing admitted; and thus I cast myself down again into | ~

the deepest gulf of human misery that ever man fell into.

Having lived almost four years in the Brazils, and beginning to thrive and
prosper very well upon my plantation, I had contracted acquaintance and
friendship among my fellow-planters, and, in my discourse among them, I
had frequently given them an account of my two voyages to the coast of Guinea,
the manner of trading with the negroes there, and how easy it was to purchase
upon the coast for trifles—such as beads, toys, knives, scissors, hatchets, bits
of glass, and the like—not only gold-dust, Guinea grains, elephants’ teeth, etc.,

but negroes, for the service of the Brazils, in great numbers.



ROBINSON CRUSOE Q1

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CRUSOE AND THE PLANTERS

It happened, being in company one day with some merchants and planters
of my acquaintance, and talking of those things very earnestly, three of them
came to me the next morning, and told me that they had a mind to fit out a ship
to go to Guinea; that they had all plantations as well as I, and were straitened
for nothing so much as servants; that they could not publicly sell the negroes
when they came home, so they desired to make but one voyage, to bring the
negroes on shore privately, and divide them among their own plantations; and
the question was, whether I would go their supercargo in the ship, to manage
the trading part; and they offered me that I should have my equal share of the



ae ROBINSON CRUSOE

negroes, without providing any part of the stock. I could not resist the offer,
and told them I would go if they would look after my plantation in my ab- |
sence, and would dispose of it as I should direct, if I miscarried. This they
all engaged to do. |

The ship being fitted out, I went on board in an evil hour again, the Ist of
September, 1659, being the same day eight years that I went from my father
and mother at Hull. The same day I went on board, we set sail, standing away
to the northward upon our own coasts, with design to stretch over for the
African coast. We had very good weather, all the way upon our own coast till
we came to the keight of Cape St. Augustino; from whence, keeping farther off
at sea, we lost sight of land, and steered as if we were bound for the isle Fer-
nando de Noronha. In this course we passed the line in about twelve days’
time, and were, by our last observation, in seven degrees twenty-two minutes
northern latitude, when a violent tornado, or hurricane, took us quite out of
our knowledge. For twelve days together we could do nothing but drive, and
during these twelve days, I need not say that I expected every day to be swallow-
ed up; nor did any in the ship expect to save their lives. 2

About the twelfth day, the weather abating a little, the master made an ob-
servation as well as he could, and found that he was in about eleven degress of
north latitude, but that he was twenty-two degrees of longtitude difference west
from Cape St. Augustino; so that he found he was gotten upon the coast of
Guiana, and now he began to consult with me what course he should take, for
the ship was leaky, and very much disabled, and he was for going directly back
to the coast of Brazil.

I was positively against that; and looking over the charts of the sea-coast of
America with him, we resolved to stand away for Barbadoes; which we might
easily perform, as we hoped, in about fifteen days’ sail; whereas we could not
possibly make our voyage to the coast of Africa without some assistance both
to our ship and to ourselves.

With this design we exchanged our course, in order to reach some of our



ROBINSON CRUSOE 98

English islands, where I hoped for relief; but our voyage was otherwise deter-
mined; for a second storm came upon us, which carried us away with the same
impetuosity westward, and drove us out cf the way of all human commerce.

In this distress, the wind still blowing very hard, one of our men early one
morning cried out, “Land!” and we had no sooner run out of the cabin to look
out, in hopes of seeing whereabouts in the world we were, than the ship struck
upon a sand, and in a moment, the sea broke over her in such a manner that we
expected we should all have perished immediately.

We knew nothing where we were, and we could not so much as hope to have
the ship hold many minutes without breaking in pieces, unless the winds, by a
kind of miracle, should turn immediately about.

In this distress, the mate of our vessel lays hold of the ship’s boat, and with --
the help of the rest of the men, they got her flung over the side: and getting all
into her, let go, and committed ourselves, being eleven in number, to God’s
mercy and the wild seas. ©

After we had rowed, or rather driven, about a league and a half, a raging
wave, mountain-like, came rolling astern of us, and took us with such a fury
that it overset the boat at once. Though I swam very well, yet I could not deliver
myself from the waves so as to draw breath, till that wave having driven me, or
rather carried me, a vast way on towards the shore, and having spent itself,
_ went back, and left me upon the land almost dry, but half dead with water I
took in. Seeing myself nearer the mainland than I expected, I got upon my
feet, and endeavored to make on towards the land as fast as I could, before
another wave should return and take me up again; but I soon found it was im-
possible to avoid it; for I saw the sea come after me as high as a great hill.

The wave that came upon me again buried me at once twenty or thirty feet
deep in its own body, and I could feel myself carried with a mighty force and
- swiftness towards the shore a very great way. J was covered with water a good
while, but not so long but I held it out, and felt ground again with my feet. I

stood still a few moments to recover breath, and then took to my heels. and ran



Q4, ROBINSON CRUSOE

with what strength I had, farther towards the shore. But neither would this
deliver me from the fury of the sea, which came pouring in after me again; and
twice more I was lifted up by the waves and carried forwards as before, the
shore being very flat.

The last time of these two had well-nigh been fatal to me; for the sea dashed
me against a piece of a rock, but I recovered a little, and resolved to hold fast by
the rock, till the wave went back. Now, as the waves were not so high as at
first, being nearer land, I held my hold till the waves abated, and then fetched
another run, which brought me so near the shore that the next run I took I got
to the mainland; where I clambered up the cliffs of the shore, and sat me down
upon the grass, quite out of reach of the water. |

I was now landed, and safe on shore, and began to look up and thank God
that my life was saved, in a case wherein there was some minutes before scarce
any room to hope. I walked about on the shore, lifting up my hands, and my
whole being, as I may say, wrapt up in a contemplation of my deliverance;
reflecting upon all my comrades that were drowned, and that there should not
be one soul saved but myself; for, as for them, I never saw them aftefwards,
or any sign of them, except three of their hats, one cap, and two shoes that were
not fellows. ;

After I had solaced my mind with the comfortable part of my condition, I
began to look round me, to’see what kind of place I was in, and what was next
to be done; and I soon found my comforts abate, for I was wet, had no clothes
to shift me, nor anything either to eat or drink, to comfort me; neither did I see
any prospect before me but that of perishing with hunger, or being devoured
by wild beasts. In a word, I had nothing about me but a knife, a tobacco-
pipe, and a little tobacco in a box. Night coming upon me, I began, with a
heavy-heart, to consider what would be my lot if there were any ravenous beasts
in that country. All the remedy that offered to my thoughts, at that time, was
to get up into a thick, bushy tree, which grew near me, and where I resolved to

sit all night, and consider the next day what death should die, for as yet I saw



ROBINSON CRUSOE Q5

no prospect of life. Being excessively fatigued, I fell fast asleep, and slept as
comfortably as, I believe, few could have done in my condition.

When I waked it was broad day, the weather clear, and the storm abated,
but that which surprised me most was, that the ship was lifted off in the night
from*the sand where she lay, by the swelling of the tide, and was driven up
almost as far as the rock which I at first mentioned, where I had been so bruised
by the wave dashing me against it.

When I came down from my apartment in the tree, I looked about me again,
and the first thing I found was the boat, which lay about two miles off on
my right hand. I walked as far as I could upon the shore to have got to her;
but found a neck, or inlet, of water between me and the boat; so I came
back for the present, being more intent upon getting at the ship, where I hoped
to find something for my present subsistence.

A little after noon I found the sea very calm, and the tide ebbed so far out,
that I could come within a quarter of a mile of the ship. I pulled off my clothes,
for the weather was hot to extremity, and took the water. When I came to
the ship, I espied a small piece of rope, hanging down, and by the help of that
rope got up into the forecastle of the ship. I found that all the ship’s provisions
were dry, and being very well disposed to eat, I went to the bread-room, and
filled my pockets with biscuit, and ate it as I went about other things.

Now I wanted nothing but a boat, to furnish myself with many things I fore-
saw would be very necessary to me.

We had several spare yards, and a spare topmast or two in the ship; and I
flung as many of them overboard as I could manage, tying every one with a
rope, that they might not drive away. When this was done I went down the
ship’s side, and tied four of them together at both ends, as in the form of a raft,
and laying two or three short pieces of plank upon them, crossways, I found I
could walk upon it very well, but that it was not able to bear any great weight.
So I went to work, and with the carpenter’s saw, I cut a spare top-mast into three
lengths, and added them to my raft, with a greal deal of labor and pains. 7

¢



26 | ROBINSON CRUSOE

My next care was what to load it with, but I was not long considering this.
I first laid all the planks or boards upon it that I could get, and three of the
seamen’s chests, which IT had broken open and emptied. The first of these I
filled with bread, rice, three Dutch cheeses, five pieces of dried goat’s flesh,
and a little remainder of European corn. I found several cases of bottles
‘ belonging to our skipper, in which were some cordial waters; and, in all, about
five or six gallons of arrack. These I stowed by themselves. While I was
doing this, I found the tide began to flow, though very calm; and I had the
mortification to see my coat, shirt, and waistcoat, which I had left on shore
upon the sand, swim away. As for my breeches, which were only linen, and
open-kneed, I swam on board in them and my stockings. However, this put
me upon rummaging for clothes, of which I found enough, but took no more
than I wanted for present use, for I had other things which my eye was more
upon; as, first, tools to work with on shore, and it was after long searching that
I found out the carpenter’s chest, which was indeed a very useful prize to me.

My next care was for some ammunition and arms. There were two very
good fowling pieces in the great cabin, and two pistols. ‘These I secured first,
with some powder-horns, a small bag of shot, and two old, rusty swords. I
knew there were three barrels of powder in the ship, but knew not where our
gunner had stowed them; but with much search I found them.

Having found two or three broken oars, belonging to the boat, and besides
the tools which were in the chest, two saws, an axe, and a hammer, with this
cargo I put to sea. For a mile, or thereabouts, my raft went very well, only that
I found it drive a little distant from the place where I had landed before.

Then there appeared before me a little opening of the land. I found a strong
current of the tide set into it; so I guided my raft as well as I could, to keep in
the middle of the stream.

But here I had like to have suffered a second shipwreck, for, knowing nothing
of the coast, my raft ran aground at one end of it upon a shoal, and not being
aground at the other end, it wanted but a little that all my cargo had slipped



ROBINSON CRUSOE Qy



CRUSOE LOADING HIS RAFT

off towards the end that was afloat, but holding up the chests with all my might,
T stood in that manner near half an hour, in which time the rising of the water

brought me a little more upon a level; and a little after, the water still rising,



28 ROBINSON CRUSOE

my raft floated again, and I thrust her off, and then driving up higher, I at
length found myself in the mouth of a little river. I looked on both sides for a
proper place to get to shore, and at length I spied a little cove on the right shore
of the creek, to which, with great pain and difficulty, I guided my raft, near a
fiat piece of ground, which I expected the water would flow over; and so it did.
As soon as I found water enough, I thrust her upon that flat piece of ground,
and there fastened or moored her, by sticking my two oars into the ground—
one on one side, near one end, and one on the other side, near the other end:
_and thus I lay till the water ebbed away, and left my raft and all my cargo safe
on shore.

My next work was to view the country, and seek a proper place for my habita-
tion. There was a hill not above a mile from me, which rose up very steep and
high. I took out one of the fowling-pieces, and one of the pistols, and a horn
of powder; and thus armed, I travelled for discovery up to the top of that hill,
where I saw that I was in an island environed every way with the sea; no land
to be seen except some rocks, which lay a great way off, and two small islands,
less than this, which lay about three leagues to the west.

T found also that the island I was in was barren, and uninhabited, except by
wild beasts. Yet I saw abundance of fowls, but knew not their kinds; neither,
when I killed them; could I tell what was fit for food, and what not. At my
coming back, I shot at a great bird, which I saw sitting upon a tree, on the side
of a great wood. I had no sooner fired but from all parts of the wood there
arose an innumerable number of fowls of many sorts, making a confused
screaming and crying, every one according to his usual note, but not one of them
of any kind that I knew. As for the creature I killed, I took it to be a kind of
hawk. Its flesh was carrion, and fit for nothing. I came back to my raft,
and fell to work to bring my cargo on shore, which took me up the rest of the
day. What to do with myself at night I knew not. However, as well as I
could, I barricaded myself round with the chests and boards that I had brought
on shore, and made a kind of hut for that night’s lodging.



ROBINSON CRUSOE 29

I now began to consider that I might yet get a great many things out of the
ship which would be useful to me, and I resolved to make another voyage on
board the vessel, if possible.

T got on board the ship as before, and prepared a second raft; and brought
away several things very useful to me; as, first, in the carpenter’s stores I found

- two or three bags full of nails and spikes, a great screw-jack, a dozen or two of
hatchets, and, above all, that most useful thing called a grindstone. Besides
these things, I took all the men’s clothes that I could find, and a spare fore-top-
sail, a hammock, and some bedding; and with this I loaded my second raft,
and brought them all safe on shore, to my very great comfort.

I was under some apprehension during my absence from the land, that at

_ least my provisions might be devoured on shore; but when I came back I found
no sign of any visitor; only there sat a creature like a wild cat upon one of the
chests, which, when I came towards it, ran away a little distance, and stood
still. I presented my gun to her, but, as she did not understand it, she was
perfectly unconcerned at it, nor did she offer to stir away; upon which I tossed
her a bit of biscuit, and she went to it, smelled at it, and ate it, and looked (as
pleased) for more; but I thanked her, and could spare no more; so she marched
off, = :

Having got my second cargo on shore, I went to work to make me a little
tent, with the sail, and some poles which I cut for that purpose ; and into this
tent I brought everything that I knew would spoil either with rain or sun; and
T piled all the empty chests and casks up in a circle round the tent, to fortify
it from any sudden attempt, either from man or beast.

When I had done this, I blocked up the door of the tent with some boards
within, and an empty chest set up on end without; and spreading one of the
beds upon the ground, I went to bed for the first time, and slept very quietly

_all night. I was very weary and heavy; for the night before I had slept little,
and had labored very hard all day.

While the ship sat upright in that posture, I thought I ought to get everything



80 ROBINSON CRUSOE

gut of her that I could; so every day, I went on board, and brought away some-
thing or other. After I had made five or six such voyages as these, and thought
I had nothing more to expect from the ship that was worth my meddling with
—I say, after all this, I found a great hogshead of bread, three large runlets of
tum, or spirits, a box of fine sugar, and a barrel of fine flour. I got all this ~*
safe on shore also, though at several times.

The next day I made another voyage, and got two cables and a hawser on
shore, with all the iron-work I could get: and having cut down the spritsail
yard, and the mizzen yard, and everything I could to make a large raft, I loaded
it with all those heavy goods and came away. But my good luck began to leave
me, for this raft was so unwieldy, and so overladen, that after I was entered
the little cove, where I had landed the rest of my goods, it overset, and threw
_ me and all my cargo into the water. However, when the tide was out, I got
most of the pieces of cable ashore, and some of the iron, though with infinite _
labor. After this, I went every day on board, and brought away what I could
get.

Preparing the twelfth time to go on pnoara, I found the wind began to rise.
However, at low water I went on board, and though I thought I had rummaged
the cabin so efiectually that nothing more could be found, yet I discovered a
locker with drawers in it, in one of which I found two or three razors, and one
pair of large scissors, with some ten or a dozen of good knives and forks; in
another I found about thirty-six pounds value in money. I smiled to myself
at the sight of this money. “Oh, drug!” said I aloud, “what art thou good
for? ‘Thou art not worth to me—no, not: the taking off the ground; one of
those knives is worth all this heap. However, upon second thoughts, I took it
away; and wrapping all in a piece of canvas, I began to think of making another
raft; but while I was preparing this, I found the sky overcast, and the wind
began to rise, and in a quarter of an hour it blew a fresh gale from the shore.
It presently occurred to me that it was in vain to pretend to make a raft with
the wind off shore. Accordingly, I let myself down into the water, and swam



























































































































































































































































THE WRECK



82 ROBINSON CRUSOE

across the channel which lay between the ship and the sands, and even that with
- difficulty enough, partly with the weight of the things I had about me, and
partly from the roughness of the water.

But I was gotten home to my little tent, where I lay with all my wealth Ebel
me very secure. It blew very hard all that night, and in the morning, when I
looked out, behold, no more ship was to be seen.

My thoughts were now wholly employed about securing myself against either
savages, or wild beasts, if any were in the island; and I had many thoughts of
the method how to do this, and whether I should make me a cave in the earth,
or a tent upon the earth; and, in short, I resolved upon both.

[ found a little plain on the side of a rising hill, whose front towards this little
plain was steep as a house-side, so that nothing could come down upon me from
the top. On the side of the rock there was a hollow space, worn a little way in,
like the entrance or door of a cave; but there was not really BEY cave, or way
into the rock, at all.

On the flat of the green, just below this hollow place, I resolved to pitch my
tent. Before I set up my tent, I drew a half-circle before the hollow place,
which took in about ten yards in its semi-diameter from the rock, and twenty
yards in its diameter from its beginning and ending.

In this half-circle I pitched two rows of strong stakes, driving them into the
ground till they stood very firm like piles. Then I ‘took the pieces of cable
which I cut in the ship, and laid them in rows between these two rows of stakes,
up to the top, placing other stakes in the inside, leaning against them, about two
feet and a half high, like a spur to a post; and this fence was so strong that
neither man nor beast could get into it or over it.

T’he entrance into this place I made to be, not by a door, but by a short ladder
to go over the top; which ladder, when I was in, I lifted over after me; and so
I was completely fenced in and fortified, as I thought, from all the world.

Into this fence, or fortress, with infinite labor, I carried all my riches, all my

provisions, ammunition, and stores, of which you have the account above;







‘'GRUSOE MAKES A LITTLE TENT WITH A SAIB

e



84 : ROBINSON CRUSOE

and I made mé a large tent also, to preserve me from the rains, that in one part
of the year are very violent there.

Into this tent I brought all my provisions, and loca: that would spoil
by the wet; and having thus inclosed all my goods, I made up the entrance, and
so passed and re-passed, as I said, by a short ladder. -

When I had done this, I began to work my way into the rock, and bringing all
the earth and stones that I dug down out through my tent, I laid them up within
my fence, in the nature of a terrace, so that it raised the ground within about a
foot and a half; and thus I made me a cave, just behind my tent, which served
me like a cellar to my house.

While this was doing, I went out at least once every day with my gun, to see
if I could kill anything fit for food; and I presently discovered that there were
goats in the island. ‘The first shot I made among these creatures, I killed a
she-goat, which had a little kid by her. When the old one fell, the kid stood
stock-still by her, till I came and took her up; and not only so, but when I
carried the old one with me upon my shoulders, the kid followed me quite to
my inclosure; upon which I laid down the dam, and took the kid in my arms,
and carried it over my pale, in hopes to have bred it up tame; but it would not
eat; so I was forced to kill it and eat it myself. ‘These two supplied me with
flesh a great while.

It came into my thoughts that I should lose my Tole of time for want of .
books, and pen, and ink, and should even forget the Sabbath-day from the
working-days; but to prevent this, I cut it with my knife upon a large post,
in capital letters; and making it into a great cross, I set it up on the shore where
. ] first landed, viz., “I came on shore here on the 30th of September, 1659.”

Upon the sides of this square post I cut every-day a notch with my knife, and
every seventh notch was as long again as the rest, and every first day of the
month as long again as that long one; and thus I kept my calendar.

In the next place, we are to observe that among the many things which I

brought from the ship in the several voyages which, as above mentioned, I



ROBINSON CRUSOE 35

nade to it, I got several things of less value, but not at all less useful to me,
which I omitted setting down before; as, in particular, pens, ink, and paper;
several parcels in the captain’s, mate’s gunner’s, and carpenter’s keeping;
three or four compasses, some mathematical instruments, charts, and books of
navigation, three Bibles, and several other books ; all which T carefully secured.
And I must not forget that we had in the ship a dog and two cats, of whose
history I must have occasion to say something in its place, for I carried both
the cats with me; and as for the dog, he jumped out of the ship of himself, and
swam on shore to me the day after I went on shore with my first cargo, and was
a trusty servant to me many years. ‘I wanted nothing that he could fetch me, nor
any company that he could make up to me.

The want of tools made every work I did go on heavily; and it was near a
whole year before I had entirely finished my little pale, or surrounded habita-
tion. But what need I have been concerned at the tediousness of anything I
had to do, seeing I had time enough to do it in? nor had I any other employ-
ment, except the ranging the island to seek for food. I have already described
this habitation, which was a tent under the side of a rock, surrounded with a
strong pale of posts and cables; but I might now rather call it by a wall, for I
raised a kind of wall up against it of turfs, about two feet thick, on the outside;
and after some time (I think it was a year and a half) I raised rafters from it,
leaning to the rock, and thatched or covered it with boughs of trees, and such
things as I could get to keep out the rain, which I found at some times of the
year very violent. -

IT have already observed how I brought all my goods into this pale, and into
the cave which I had made behind me. But I must observe, too, that at first
this was a confused heap of goods, which, as they lay in no order, so they took
up all my place; I had no room to turn myself: so I set myself to enlarge my
cave, and worked farther into the earth; for it was a loose, sandy rock, which
yielded easily to the labor I bestowed on it: and so when I found I was pretty
safe as to beasts of prey, I worked sideways, to the right hand, into the rock,



36 ROBINSON CRUSOE

and then turning to the right again, worked quite out, and made me a door to
come out on the outside of my paie or fortification.

And now I began to apply myself to make such necessary things as I found
I most wanted, particularly a chair and a table. I had never handled a tool
in my life; and yet, in time, by labor, application, and contrivance, I found,
at last, that I wanted nothing but I could have made it, especially if I had had
tools. However, I made abundance of things even without tools; and some
with no more tools than an adze and hatchet, which, perhaps, were never made
that way before, and that with infinite labor. For example, if I wanted a board,
I had no other way but to cut down a tree, set it on an edge before me, and hew
it flat on either side with my axe, till 1 had brought it to be as thin as a plank
and then dub it smooth with my adze.

I made me a table and a chair, as I observed above, in the first place; and this
I did out of the short pieces of boards that I brought on my raft from the ship.
But when I had wrought out some boards as above, I made large shelves, of
the breadth of a foot and an half, one over another, all along one side of my
cave, to lay all my tools, nails, and iron-work on; and, in a word, to separate
everything at large into their places, that I might come easily at them: also I
knocked pieces into the wall of the rock, to hang my guns and all things that
would hang up: so that had my cave been to be seen, it looked like a general
magazine of all necessary things; and I had everything so ready at my hand,
that it was a great pleasure to me to see all my goods in such order, and especial-
ly to find my stock of all necessaries so great.

And now it was when I began to keep a journal of every day’s employment;
for, indeed, at first, I was in too much hurry, and not only a hurry as to labor,
but in too much discomposure of mind; and my journal would have been full
of many dull things: for example, I must have said thus: “Sept. the 30th.
After I had got to shore, and had escaped drowning, instead of being thankful
to God for my deliverance, having first vomited, with the great quantity of salt

water which was gotten into my stomach, and recovering myself a litile, I ran



z ROBINSON CRUSOB 37



CRUSOE WRITING HIS JOURNAL

about the shore wringing my hands and beating my head and face, exclaiming
at my misery, and crying out I was undone, undone! till, tired and faint, I was
forced to lie down on the ground to repose, but durst not sleep, for fear of being
devoured.” :

Some days after this, and after I had been on board the ship, and had got all
T could out of her, yet I could not forbear getting up to the top of a little moun-
tain, and looking out to sea, in hopes of seeing a ship: then fancy at a vast
distance I spied a sail, please myself with the hopes of it, and then, after looking
steadily, till I was almost blind, lose it quite, and sit down and weep like a child,
and thus increase my misery by my folly.



38 ROBINSON CRUSOB

But having gotten over these things in some measure, and having settled my
household stuff and habitation, made me a table and a chair, and all as hand-
some about me as I could, I began I say to keep my journal, as long as it lasted;
for at last, having no more ink, I was forced to leave it off.

During this time I made rounds in the woods for game every day, when the
rain permitted me, and made frequent discoveries in these walks of something
or other to my advantage; particularly I found a kind of wild pigeons, which
build, not as wood-pigeons in a tree, but rather as house-pigeons, in the holes
of the rocks; and taking some young ones, I endeavored to breed them up tame,
and did so; but when they grew older they flew all away, which perhaps was at
first for want of feeding them, for I had nothing to give them. However, I fre-
quently found their nests and got their young ones, which were very good meat.

It happened that, rummaging my things, I found a little bag which had
been filled with corn for the feeding of poultry, I saw nothing in the bag
but husks and dust; and being willing to have the bag for some other use, I
shook the husks of corn out of it on one side of my fortification, under the rock.

I threw this stuff away, taking no notice of anything, and not so much as
remembering that I had thrown anything there, when, about a month after,
or thereabouts, I saw some few stalks of something green shooting upon the
eg .ground, which I fancied might be some plant I had not seen; but I was sur-
; prised and perfectly astonished when, after a little longer time, I saw about ten
or twelve ears come out which were perfectly green barley, of the same kind as
our European—nay, as our English barley.

It is impossible to express the astonishment and confusion of my thoughts
on this occasion, and I began to suggest that God had miraculously caused this
grain to grow without any help of seed sown, and that it was so directed purely
for my sustenance in that wild, miserable place.

This touched my heart a little, and brought tears out of my eyes, and I began
to bless myself that such a prodigy of Nature should happen upon my account;

and this was the more strange to me because I saw near it still, all along by the



ROBINSON CRUSOE 3S



CRUSOE DISCOVERS THE BARLEY

side of the rock, some other straggling stalks, which proved to be stalks of rice,
and which I knew, beeause I had seen it grow in Africa when I was ashore there.
Not doubting but that there was more in the place, I went all over that part of
the island, peering in every corner and under every rock, to see for more of it,
but I could not find any. At last it occurred to my thoughts that I had shaken
the bag of chickens’ meat out in that place; and the wonder began to cease.

T carefully saved the ears of this corn, you may be sure, in their season, which
was about the end of June; and laying up every corn, I resolved to sow them
all again, hoping in time to have some quantity, sufficient to supply me with
bread. Butit was not till the fourth year that I would allow myself the least
grain of this corn to eat, and even then but sparingly.

Besides this barley, there were, as above, twenty or thirty stalks of rice,



40 ROBINSON CRUSOE

which I preserved with the same care, and whose use was of the same kind,
or to the same purpose, viz., to make me bread, or rather food; for I found ways
to cook it up without baking, though I did that also after some time.

Not long after the wall of my castle was finished, I had almost had all my
labor overthrown at once, and myself killed. The case was thus:—As I was
busy just in the entrance into my cave, I was terribly frightened with a most
dreadful surprising thing indeed: for, all on a sudden, I found the earth came
tumbling down from the roof of my cave, and two of the posts I had set up in
the cave cracked in a frightful manner. Iran forwards to my ladder, and not
thinking myself safe there either, I got over my wall. I was no sooner stepped
down upon the firm ground, than I plainly saw it was a terrible earthquake;
for the ground I stood on shook three times at about eight minutes’ distance,
with three such shocks as would have overturned the strongest building that
could be supposed to have stood upon the earth. I was like one dead or stupi-
fied; and the motion of the earth made my stomach sick like one that was tossed
al sea.

After the third shock was over, and I felt no more for some time, I began to
take courage; and yet I had not heart enough to get over my wall again, but
still sat upon the ground, greatly cast down and disconsolate, not knowing what
to do. While I sat thus, it grew cloudy, as if it would rain; soon after that,
the wind arose so that in less than half an hour it blew a most dreadful hurri-
cane of wind. This held about three hours, and then began to abate; and then
in two hours more it was calm, and began to rain very hard. All this while I
sat upon the ground very much terrified and dejected; when on a sudden it
came into my thought that these winds and rain being the consequences of the
earthquake, the earthquake itself was spent and over, and I might venture
into my cave again. I went in and sat down in my tent; but the rain was so
violent that my tent was ready to be beaten down with it; and I was forced to
go into my cave, though very much afraid it should fall on my head. It con-

tinued raining all that night, and great part of the next day, so that I could not



ROBINSON CRUSOE 41

stir abroad; but my mind being more composed, I began to think of what I had
best to do; concluding that I must consider of building me some little hut in an
open place which I might surround with a wall. In the meantime it occurred
~ to me that it would require a vast deal of time for me to do this, and that I must
be contented to run the venture where I was, till I had formed a camp for myself,
and had secured it so as to remove it. !

The next morning I began to consider of means to put this resolve in execu-
tion; but I was at a great loss about my tools. I had three large axes, and
abundance of hatchets, but with much chopping and cutting knotty, hard wood,
they were all full of notches, and dull; and though I had a grindstone, I could
not turn it and grind my tools too. At length I contrived a wheel with a string
to turn it with my foot, that I might have both my hands at liberty.

On the morning of the first of May, I found a barrel of gunpowder and some
pieces of the wreck of the ship, which were driven on shore by the late hurri-
cane; and looking towards the wreck, I thought it seemed to lie higher out of
the water than it used to. I went out on the sands as near as I could to the
wreck, and found that the forecastle had parted from the stern, and that where-
as before I could not come within a quarter of a mile of the wreck without
swimming, I could now walk quite up to her when the tide was out. As the
ship was more broken open than formerly, many things came daily on shore.

This wholly diverted my thoughts from the design of moving my habitation,
and I busied myself in searching whether I could make any way into the ship;
but I found nothing was to be expected of that kind, for all the inside of it was
choked up with sand. However, as I had learned not to despair of anything,
T resolved to pull everything to pieces that I could of the ship, concluding that
everything I could get from her would be of some use or other to me.

T continued this sian every day to the 15th of June, except the time necessary
to get food; and by this time I had gotten timber, and plank, and iron-work
enough to have built a good boat, if I had known how; and I also got, at several

times, and in several pieces, near one hundredweight of sheet lead.



42 ROBINSON CRUSOE

One day during this time 1 went a-fishing, but caught not one fish that I
durst eat of, till 1 was weary of my sport; when, just going to leave off, I caught
a young dolphin. I had made me a long line of some rope-yarn, but had no ~
hooks; yet frequently I caught fish enough, as much as I cared to eat; all which
I dried in the sun, and ate them dry.

Going down to the sea-side on the 16th of June, I Pind a large tortoise or
turtle. This was the first I had seen. Tfound in her three score eggs; and
her flesh was to me, at that time, the most savory and pleasent that ever I tasted
in my life.

The rain fell for some days, and I felt ill and shivering, as if the weather had
been celd. I had no rest all night; had violent pains in my head, and feverish.
The next day I was very ill; frighted almost to death with the apprehensions
of my sad condition—to be sick and no help: prayed to God, for the first time
since the storm off Hull, but scarce knew what I said or why; my thoughts being
all confused.

The next day I was a little Bene: but on She next dey after that I was very
bad again, and so It went, turn about, for several days. One day that I felt
somewhat better, having no victuals to eat, I took my gun, but found myself
very weak; however, I killed a she-goat, and with much difficulty, got it home,
and beiled some of it, and ate it. : :

On June 27th, I had the ague again so violent that I lay abed all day and
neither ate nor drank. I was ready to perish for thirst; but so weak I had no
strength to stand up, or to get myself any water to drink. Prayed to God again,
but was light-headed; and when I was not, I was so ignorant that I knew not
what to say; only I lay and cried, “Lord, look upon me! Lord, pity me! Lord,
have mercy upon me!” I suppose I did nothing else for two or three hours:
till the fit wearing off, I fell asleep, and did not awake till far in the night.
When I awoke, I found myself much refreshed, but weak, and exceeding thirsty;
however, as I had no water in my whole habitation, I was forced to lie till morn-

ing, and went to sleep again. In this second sleep, I had this terrible dream:



ROBINSON CRUSOE ~ “ 43

I thought that I was sitting on the ground, on the outside of my wall, where I
sat when the storm blew after the earthquake, and that I saw a man descend
trom a great black cloud, in a bright flame of fire, and light upon the ground.
He was all over as bright as a flame, so that I could but just bear to look towards
him: his countenance was most inexpressibly dreadful, impossible for words to





; CRUSOE FINDS A TURTLE ;
describe; when he stepped upon the ground with his feet, I thought the earth
trembled, just as it had done before in the earthquake, and all the air looked,
to my apprehension, as if it had been filled with flashes of fire. He was no
sooner landed upon the earth but he moved forward towards me, with a long
spear or weapon in his hand to kill me; and when he came to a rising ground,
at some distance, he spoke to me—or I heard a voice so terrible that it is im-
possible to express the terror of it. All that I can say I understood was this:—



44 ROBINSON CRUSOE

“Seeing all these things have not brought thee to repentance, now thou shalt
die;” at which words, I thought he lifted up the spear that was in his hand to
kill me. ne |

No one that shall ever read this account will expect that I should be able to
describe the horrors of my soul at this terrible vision. Nor is it any more
possible to describe the impression thatremained upon my mind when I awaked,
and found it was but a dream.

I had, alas! no divine knowledge. What I had received by the good instruc-
tion of my father was then worn out by an uninterrupted series, for eight years,
of sea-faring wickedness, and a constant conversation with none but such as
were, like myself, wicked and profane to the last degree. I do not remember
that I had, in all that time, one thought that so much as tended either to loo
ing upwards towards God, or inwards towards a reflection upon my own wai %}
but a certain stupidity of soul, without desire of good, or conscience of evil,
had entirely overwhelmed me. _ ; ‘

“Now,” said I aloud, “my dear father’s words are come to pass; God’s justice
has overtaken me, and I have none to help or hear me. I rejected the voice
of Providence, which had mercifully put me in a posture or station of life where-
in I might have been happy and easy; but I would neither see it myself, nor
learn to know the blessing of it from my parents. I left them to mourn over
my folly; and now I am left to mourn under the consequences of it. I refused
their help and assistance, who would have lifted me into the world, and would
have made everything easy to me; and now I have difficulties to struggle with
too great for even nature itself to support, and no assistance, no help, no com-
fort, no advice.” ‘Then I cried out, “Lord, be my help, for I am in great dis-
tress.” ‘This was the first prayer, if I might call it so, that I had made for
many years.

Having been somewhat refreshed with the sleep I nad had, and the fit being
entirely off, I got up; and though the fright and terror of my dream was very
great, yet I considered that the fit of the ague would return again the next day,



e

ROBINSON CRUSOE 45

- and now was my time to get something to refresh and support myself when I
should be ill: and the first thing I did, I filled a large square case-bottle with
water, and set it upon my table, in reach of my bed; and to take off the chill or
aguish disposition of the water, I put about a quarter of a pint of rum into it,
and mixed them together. Then I got me a piece of the goat’s flesh and
broiled it on the coals, but could eat very little, I walked about, but was very
weak, and withal very sad and heavy-hearted in the sense of my miserable con-
_ dition, dreading the return of my distemper the next day.

~ After I had eaten, I tried to walk, but found myself so weak that I could
hardly carry the gun, for I never went out without that; so I went out but a
little way, and sat down upon the ground, looking out upon the sea, which was
just before me, and very calm and smooth. As I sat there, some thoughts such
as these occurred to me:—“ What is the earth and sea, of which I have seen so
much? Whence is it produced? And what am I, and all the other creatures,
wild and tame, human and brutal? Whence are we? Sure we are all made
by some secret Power, who formed the earth and sea, and air and sky. And
who is that?” Then it followed most naturally—“It is God that has made it
all. Well, but then,” it came on strongly, “if God has made all these things,
He guides and governs them all, and all things that concern them; for the Being
that could make all things must certainly have power to guide and direct them.
If so, nothing can happen, in the great circuit of his works, either without His
' knowledge or appointment.

“ And if nothing happens without His knowledge, He knows that I am here,
aud am in this dreadful condition; and if nothing happens without His appoint-
ment, He has appointed all this to befall me.” Immediately it followed—
_ “Why has God done this to me? What have I-done to be thus used?” My
conscience presently checked me in that inquiry, as if I had blasphemed, and
methought it spoke to me like a voice, “ Wretch, dost thou ask what thou hast
done? Look back upon a dreadful mispent life, and ask thyself, what thou
hast not done? Ask, why is it that thou wert not long ago destroyed? Why



46 , ROBINSON, CRUSOE

wert thou not drowned in Yarmouth Roads? killed in the fight, when the ship
was taken by the Sallee man-of-war ? devoured by the wild beasts off the coast
of Africa? or drowned here, when all the crew perished but thyself? Dost
thou ask, ‘What have I done?’” I was struck dumb with these reflections, as
one astonished, and had not a word to say, but rose up pensive and sad, walked
back to my retreat, and went up over my wall, as if I had been going to bed;
but my thoughts were sadly disturbed, and I had no inclination to sleep;
so I sat down in my chair, and lighted my lamp, for it began to be dark. Now,
as the apprehensions of the return of my distemper terrified me very much, it
occurred to my thought that the Brazilians take no physic but their tobacco for
almost all distempers, and I had a piece of a roll of tobacco in one of the chests.

T went, directed by Heaven, no doubt; for in this chest I found a cure both
for soul and body. I opened the chest, and found what I looked for, viz., the
tobacco; and as the few books I had saved lay there too, I took out one of the
Bibles which I mentioned before, and which to this time I had not found leisure, —
or so much as inclination, to look into. Having opened the book casually, the
first words that occurred to me were these, “Call, upon Me in the day of trouble,
and I will deliver thee, and thou shalt glorify Me.” ‘These words were very
apt to my case, and made some impression upon my thought at the time of
reading them, though not so much as they did afterwards; for, as for being
delivered, the thing was so remote that I began to say, as the children of Israel
did when they were promised flesh to eat, ““Can God spread a table in the
wilderness ?”’ so I began to say, “Can God Himself deliver me from this place ?”’
However, the words made a great impression upon me, and I mused upon them
very often. ,

It grew now late, and the tobacco had, as I said, dozed my head so much that
T inclined to sleep: so I went to bed. But before I lay down, I kneeled and
prayed to God to fulfill the promise to me, that if I called upon Him in the day
of trouble, He would deliver me. After my broken and imperfect prayer was
over, I drank the rum in which I had steeped the tobacco; immediately upon





CRUSOE ILL, READING THE BIBLE



48 ROBINSON CRUSOE

this I went to bed; and ¥ found presently it flew up into my head violently; but I
fell into a sound sleep, and waked no more till, by the sun, it must necessarily
be near three o’clock in the afternoon the next day; nay, to this hour I am partly
of opinion that I slept all the next day and night, and till almost three the day
after; for otherwise I know not how I should lose a day out of my reckoning
in the days of the week, as it appeared some years after I had done. When I
awaked I found myself exceedingly refreshed, and my spirits lively and cheer-
ful; when I got up I was stronger than I was the day before, and my stomach
better, for I was hungry; and, in short, I had no fit the next day, but continued
much altered for the better.

I had now been in this unhappy island above ten months; all possibility of
deliverance from this condition seemed to be entirely taken from me; and I
firmly believed that no human shape had ever set foot upon that place. Havy-
ing now secured my habitation, as I thought, fully to my mind, I had a great
desire to make a more perfect discovery of the island, and to see what other
productions I might find, which yet I knew nothing of.

Tt was the 15th of July that I began a more particular survey of the island
itself. I went up the creek first, where, as I hinted, I brought my rafts on
shore. I found, after I came about two miles up, that the tide did not flow any
higher; and that it was no more than a little brook of running water, and very
fresh and good. On the banks of this brook, I found many pleasant savannahs
or meadows, plain, smooth, and covered with grass; and on the rising parts of
them, next to the higher grounds, where the water, as it might be supposed,
never overflowed, I found a great deal of tobacco, green, and growing to a great
and very strong stalk; there were divers other plants, which I had no notion
of or understanding about, and might, perhaps, have virtues of their own,
which I could not find out. I searched for the cassava root, which the Indians
in all that climate made their bread of, but I could find none. I saw large
plants of aloes, but did not then understand them. I saw several sugar-canes,
but wild and, for want of cultivation, imperfect. I contented myself with these
discoveries for this time, and came back.



ROBINSON CRUSOE 49

The next day, I went up the same way again; and after going something
further than I had gone the day before, I found the country became more woody
than before. In this part I found different fruits, and particularly I found
melons upon the ground, in great abundance, and grapes upon the trees: the
vines had spread indeed over the trees, and the clusters of grapes were just now
in their prime, very ripe and rich. This was a surprising discovery, and I found
an excellent use for these grapes: and that was, to cure or dry them in the sun,
and keep them as dried grapes or raisins are kept, which I thought would be,
as indeed they were, as wholesome and as agreeable to eat, when no grapes
might be had.

T spent all that evening there, and went not back to my habitation, but took
my first contrivance, and got up into a tree, where I slept well; and the next
morning proceeded upon my discovery, travelling nearly four miles, as I might
judge by the length of the valley, keeping still due north. At the end of this
march I came to an opening, where the country seemed to descend to the west;
_ and alittle spring of fresh water, which issued out of the side of the hill by me,
ran the other way, that is, due east; and the country appeared so fresh, so green,
so flourishing, everything being in a constant verdure, or flourish of spring,
that it looked like a planted garden. I descended a little on ‘the side of that
delicious valley, and I saw here abundance of cocoa-trees, orange and lemon,
and citron-trees; but all wild, and few bearing any fruit, at least, not then.
However, the green limes that T gathered were not only pleasant to eat, but very
wholesome; and I mixed their juice afterwards with water, which made it very
wholesome, and very cool and refreshing. I found now I had business enough
to gather and carry home; and I resolved to lay up a store, as well of grapes as
limes and lemons, to furnish myself for the wet season, which I knew was ap-
proaching. .

I contemplated with great pleasure the fruitfulness of that valley, and the
pleasantness of the situation; the security from storm on that side of the water,
and the wood; and concluded that I had pitched upon a place to fix my abode

\



50 e . ROBINSON CRUSOE

which was by far the worst part of the country. Upon the whole, I began to
consider of removing my habitation, and to look out for a place equally safe as
where now I was situate, if possible, in that pleasant, fruitful part of the island.

This thought ran along in my head, but when I came to a nearer view of it,
I considered that I was now by the sea-side, where it was at least possible that
some thing might happen to my advantage; and that the same ill fate that
brought me hither, might bring some other unhappy wretches to the same
place; and to inclose myself among the hills and woods in the center of the
island was to anticipate my bondage, and to render such an affair not only
improbable but impossible; and that therefore I ought not by any means to
remove. However, I was so enamored with this place that I spent much of
my time there for the whole remaining part of the month of July; and though,
upon second thoughts, I resolved as above not to remove, yet I built me a
little kind of a bower, and surrounded it at a distance with a strong fence; and.
here I lay very secure, sometimes two or three nights together.

I had but newly finished my fence, and began to enjoy my labor, but the
rains came on, and made me stick close to my first habitation; for though I
had made me a tent like the other, with a piece of a sail, and spread it very well,
yet I had not the shelter of a hill to keep me from storms, nor a cave behind me
to retreat into when the rains were extraordinary.

On September 30th I cast up the notches on my post, and found I had been
on shore three hundred and sixty-five days. I kept this day as a solemn fast,
setting it apart for religious exercise, confessing my sins to God, and praying ©
to Him to have mercy on me through Jesus Christ; and not having tasted the
least refreshment for twelve hours, even till the going down of the sun, I then
ate a biscuit-cake and a bunch of grapes, and went to bed, finishing the day
as I began it.

I have mentioned that I had saved the few ears of ee and rice which I
had so surprisingly found spring up, and now I thought it a proper time to sow
it, after the rains. Accordingly, I dug up a piece of ground as well as I could,



CRUSOE IN HIS BOWER





e
52 : ROBINSON CRUSOE

and dividing it into two parts, I sowed my grain; but as I was sowing, it casually
occurred to my thoughts that I would not sow it all at first, because I did not
know when was the proper time for it, so 1 sowed about two-thirds of the seed.
It was a great comfort to me afterwards that I did so, for not one grain of that
I sowed this time came to anything; for the dry months following, it had no
moisture to assist its growth, and never came up at all till the wet season had
come again, and then it grew as if it had been newly sown. Finding my first
seed did not grow, which I easily imagined was by the drought, I sought for a
moister piece of ground, to make another trial in, and I dug up a piece of
ground near my new bower, and sowed the rest of my seed in February, a little
before the vernal equinox; and this, having the rainy months of March and
April to water it, sprang up very pleasantly, and yielded a very good crop; but
having part of the seed left only, and not daring to sow all that I had got, I had
but a small quantity at last, my whole crop not amounting to above half a peck
of each kind. But by this experiment I was made master of my business, and
knew exactly when the proper season was to sow, and that I might expect two
seed-times and two harvests every year. While this corn was growing I made
a little discovery, which was of use to me afterwards. As soon as the rains were
over, I made a visit up the country to my bower. ‘The fence or double hedge
that I had made was not only firm and entire, but the stakes which I had cut
off of some trees that grew thereabouts were all shot out and grown with long
branches. I was surprised, and yet very well pleased, to see the young trees
grow; and I pruned them, and led them up to grow as much alike as I could;
and it is scarcely credible how beautiful a figure they grew into, in three years;
so that it was complete shade, sufficient to lodge under all the dry season. ‘This
made me resolve to cut some more stakes, and.make me a hedge like this in a
semicircle round my wall (I mean that of my first dwelling), which I did; and
placing the trees or stakes in a double row, at about eight yards distance from
my first fence, they grew presently, and were at first a fine cover to my habita-
tion, and afterwards served for a defense also, as I shall observe in its order.



~

“ROBINSON CRUSOB 53



CRUSOE MAKING BASKETS

T found now that the seasons of the year might generally be divided, not into
‘summer and winter, as in Europe, but into the rainy seasons and the dry seasons.
After I had found, by experience, the ill consequence of being abroad in the
rain, I took care to furnish myself with provisions beforehand, that I might not
be obliged to go out, and I sat within doors as much as possible during the wet
months. In this time I found much employment, and very suitable also to
the time. I found great occasion of many things which I had no way to furnish
myself with but by hard labor and constant application; particularly, I tried
many ways to make myself a basket, but all the twigs I could get for the pur-
pose proved so brittle that they would do nothing. It proved of excellent ad-
vantage to me now that when I was a boy I used to take great delight in



54 - ROBINSON CRUSOE

standing at a basket-maker’s, in the town where my father lived, to see them
make their wicker-ware; and, I had by this means so full knowledge of the
methods of it, that I wanted nothing but the materials; when it came into my
mind that the twigs of that tree from whence I cut my stakes that grew might
possibly be as tough as the osiers in England, and I resolved to try. Accord-
ingly, the next day I went to my country house, and cutting some of the
smaller twigs, I found them to my purpose as much as I could desire, where-
upon I came the next time prepared with a hatchet to cut down a quantity,
which I soon found. ‘These I set up to dry, and when they were fit for use, I
carried them to my cave; and here, during the next season, I employed myself
in making, as well as I could, a great many baskets, and though I did not
finish them very handsomely, yet I made them sufficiently serviceable for
my purpose.

T mentioned before that I had a great mind to see the whole island, and that
I had travelled up the brook, and so on to where I built my bower. I now
resolved to travel quite across to the sea-shore on that side; so, taking my gun,
« hatchet, and my dog, 1 began my journey. When I had passed the vale where
my bower stood, I came within view of the sea to the west, and it being a very
clear day, I fairly descried land—whether an island or a continent I could not
tell; but it lay very high, at a very great distance; by my Boers, it could not be
less than fiftee or twenty leagues off.

T saw abundance of parrots on that side of the island where I now was, and
fain would I have caught one, if possible, to have kept it to be tame, and taught
it to speak to me. I did, after some painstaking, catch a young parrot, for I
knocked it down with a stick, and having recovered it, I brought it home; but
it was some years before I could make him speak ; however, at last, I taught him
to call me by name very familiarly. ie

I was exceedingly diverted with this journey. I found in the low ground

_ hares and foxes; but they differed greatly from all the other kinds I had met with,
nor could I satisfy myself to eat them. But I had no need to be venturous, for



ROBINSON CRUSOE 55

T had no want of food and of that which was very good, too, especially these
three sorts, viz., goats, pigeons, and turtle, or tortoise, which, added to my
grapes, Leadenhall Market could not have furnished a table better than I in
proportion to the company. As soon as J came to the sea-shore I was surprised
to see that I had taken up my lot on the worst side of the island, for here, indeed,

‘the shore was covered with innumerable turtles, whereas, on the other side I
had found but.three in a year and a half. Here was also an infinite number
of fowls of many kinds, some of which I had not seen before, and many of them
very good meat, but such asI knew not the names of, except those called pen-
guins.

Although T confess this side of the country was much pleasanter than mine;
yet I had not the least inclination to remove, for as I was fixed in my habitation,
it became natural to me, and I seemed all the while I was here to be as it were
upon a journey, and from home. However, I travelled along the shore of the
sea towards the east, I suppose about twelve miles, and then setting up a great
pole upon the shore for a mark, I concluded I would go home again, and that the
next journey I took should be on the other side of the island east from my
dwelling, and so round till I came to my post again.

Tn this journey my dog surprised a young kid, and seized upon it, and I run-
ning in to take hold of it, caught, and saved it alive from the dog. I had a great
mind to bring it home if I could, for I had often been musing whether it might
not be possible to get a kid or two, and so raise a breed of tame goats, which
might supply me when my powder and shot should be spent. I made a collar
for this little creature, and with a string, which I made of some rope-yarn, which
I always carried about me, I led him along, though with some difficulty, till
Â¥ came to my bower, and there I inclosed him and left him, for I was very im-~
patient to be at home, from whence I had been absent above a month.

I cannot express what a satisfaction it was to me to come into my old hutch,
and lie down in my hammock-bed. I reposed myself here a week, to rest

and regale myself after my long journey; during which, most of the time was'



56 ROBINSON CRUSOB



CRUSOE LEADING THE YOUNG KID

taken up in the weighty affair of making a cage for my Poll. ‘Then I began to
think of the poor kid which I had pent in within my little circle, and resolved to
go and fetch it home, or give it some food; accordingly I went and found it was
almost starved for want of food. Having fed it, I tied it as I did before, to lead
it away; but it was so tame with being hungry that I had no need to have tied
it, for it followed me like a dog; and as I continually fed it, the creature became
so loving, so gentle, and so fond, that it became from that time one of my

domestics also, and would never leave me afterwards.



ROBINSON CRUSOE &7

My third crop of barley and rice was promising very well, when on a sudden
T found I was in danger of losing it all again by enemies of several sorts, which
it was scarcely possible to keep from it; as, first, the goats and hares, which,
tasting the sweetness of the blade, ate it so close that it could get no time to shoot
up into stalk. ‘This I saw no remedy for but by making an inclosure about it
with a hedge, which I did with a great deal of toil; and shooting some of the
creatures in the day time, I set my dog to guard it in the night, tying him up to
a stake at the gate, where he would stand and bark all night long; so in a little
time the enemies forsook the place, and the corn grew very strong and well,
and began to ripen apace.

But as the beasts ruined before, while my corn was in the blade, so the birds
were as likely to ruin me now, when it was in the ear; for going along by the
place to see how it throve, I saw my little crop surrounded with fowls, of I know
not how many sorts, who stood, as it were, watching till I should be gone. I
immediately let fly among them, for I always had my gun with me. I had no
sooner shot but there rose up'a little cloud of fowls, which I had not seen atall,
from among the corn itself. :

T stayed by it to load my gun, and then coming away, I was no sooner out of
their sight but the thieves dropped down one by one into the corn again. I fired
again, and killed three of them. ‘This was what I wished for; so I took them
up, and served them as we serve notorious thieves in England, viz., hanged
them in chains, for a terror to others. It is impossible to imagine almost that
this should have had such an effect as it had, for the fowls would not only not
come at the corn, but, in short, they forsook all that part of the island. This I
was very glad of, and about the latter end of December, I reaped my corn.

I was sadly put to it for a scythe or a sickle to cut it down, and all I could do
was to make one out of one of the broad-swords which I saved among the arms
out of the ship. However, I reaped it in my way, for I cut nothing off but the
ears, and carried it away in a great basket which I had made, and so rubbed it
out with my hands; and at the end of all my harvesting, I found that out of my



58 ROBINSON CRUSOE

half-peck of seed I had near two bushels of rice, and above two bushels and a
half of barley. .

It is a little wonderful, and what I believe few people have thought much
upon, viz., the strange multitude of little things necessary in providing the one
atticle of bread. I, that was reduced to a mere state of nature, found this to
my daily discouragement.

First, I had no plough to turn up the earth; no spade or shovel to dig it. Well,
this I conquered by making me a wooden spade, but this did my work but in a
- wooden manner. When the corn was sown, I had no harrow, but was forced
to drag a great heavy bough of a tree over it. When it was growing, or grown,
I wanted many things to fence it, secure it, mow or reap it, cure and carry it
home, thrash, part it from the chaff, and save it. Then I wanted a mill to grind
it, sieves to dress it, yeast and salt to make it into bread, and an oven to bake it
in; and all these things I did without, as shall be observed; and yet the corn
was an inestimable comfort and advantage to me too. I had now seed enough
to sow above an acre of ground. I sowed my seed in two large flat pieces of
ground, and fenced them in with a good hedge. ‘This work was not so little as
to take me up less than three months, because a great part of that time was of
the wet season, when I could not go abroad. Within-door—that is, when it
rained and I could not go out—I had a great employment upon my hands, as
follows—viz., I had long studied, by some means or other, to make myself
some earthern vessels, which, indeed, I wanted sorely. However, considering
the heat of the climate, I did not doubt but if I could find out any clay, I might
botch up some such pot as might, being dried by the sun, be strong enough to
bear handling, and to hold anything that was dry and required to be kept so.

The clay I found, but it would make the reader laugh at me to see what odd,
misshapen, ugly things I made; how many cracked by the heat of the sun, and
fell in pieces when they were removed, so that with about two months’ labor I
could not make above two large earthen ugly things (I cannot call them jars).

Although I miscarried so much in my design for large pots, yet I made several



ROBINSON CRUSOB 59



€RUSOE TEACHES HIS PARROT TO TALK:

small things with better success, such as little round pots, flat dishes, pitchers,
and pipkins, the sun baking them very hard. Getting a hint by finding a
broken piece of one of my earthenware vessels in the fire, burnt as hard as a
stone, I afterwards managed to bake several pots so hard that I could boil
meat and make broth in them. |
All the while I was at work, I diverted myself with talking to my parrot,
and teaching him to speak; and I quickly learnt him to know his own name,
and at last to speak it out pretty loud, “Poll,” which was the first word |

ever heard spoken in the island by any mouth but my own.



60 | Poon CRUSOE

My next concern was to get me a stone mortar to beat some corn in, a mill
to grind it being out of the question. But all the stones of the island being of a
sandy, crumbling nature, I resolved to look out a great block of hard wood,
which having found I formed it with my axe and hatchet, and then with the
help of fire made a hollow in it. After this I made a heavy pestle of iron-wood,
and then laid them by in readiness for my next crop of corn.

The next thing to be made was a sieve, to sift my meal. Linen I had none
left but what was mere rags. I had goat’s hair, but I could not weave or spin
it. At last I remembered that I had some neck-cloths of calico or muslin of
the sailors, which I had saved from the ship, and with these I made three sieves,
small, but proper enough for the work. | Ee

The want of an oven I supplied by making some earthen vessels very broad,
but not deep. When I wanted to bake, I made a great fire upon the hearth,
and when the wood was burned into live coals, I drew them forward upon the
hearth so as to cover it all over till it became very hot; then, sweeping them
away, I set down my loaves, and turning down an earthen pot upon them, drew
the coals all around the outside of the pot to keep in and add to the heat, and in
this way I baked my barley loaves as well as if I had been a complete pastry-
cook. 3

These things took me up the most part of a year, and what intervals T had
were given to managing my new harvest; for I reaped my corn in season, and
carried it home, and laid it up in the ear in my large baskets, till I had time to
rub it out. ; Lt

All the while these things were doing, you may be sure my thoughts ran many
times upon the prospect of land which I had seen from the other side of the
island; and I was not without secret wishes that I was on shore there, fancying
that, seeing the mainland and an inhabited country, I might find some way or
other to convey myself farther, and perhaps at last find some means of escape. ~

Then I thought I would go and look at our ship’s boat, which lay on the high
ridge of beachy rough sand, where it had been thrust by the storm, when we were





GRUSQE MARES A BOAT

—



+
62 ROBINSON CRUSOE

first cast away. But it lay bottom upward, so I had to dig the sand from unde1
it and turn it over with the help of wooden levers. When I had done this, I
found it was all in vain, for I had not the strength to get it to the water to launch
it.

This at length set me upon thinking whether it was not possible for me to
make a canoe, such as the Indians make of the trunk of a tree. I found one
that was just fit for it which grew not far from the shore. ‘Twenty days was I
hacking and hewing this tree at the bottom to fell it; I was fourteen more get-
ting the branches off, and a whole month shaping it like the bottom of a boat.
As for the inside I was three weeks with a mallet and chisel clearing it.

Nothing remained but to get it to the water, but all my devices to get it into
the water failed me. JI first dug the ground to make a smooth declivity from
the boat to the sea, so as to let it slide down; but I could then no more stir this
boat than the other. Then I resolved to dig a canal to bring the water up to
the boat. I began the work, but on calculating how deep and broad it would
have to be, I found it would take me ten or twelve years to dig it, so I gave it’over,
seeing too late the folly of beginning a work before we count the cost.

In the middle of this work I finished my fourth year in this place, and kept
my anniversary with even greater devotion than ever before, for now I had so
little hope of ever leaving the island, that I looked upon the world as a thing
with which I had nothing todo. But I was separated from its wickedness, too;
I had nothing to covet; I might call myself king or emperor of the whole country
of which I had possession. I had timber enough to have built a fleet of ships;
and I had grapes enough to have made wine, or to have cured into raisins, to
have loaded that fleet when it had been built.

But all that I could make use of was all that was valuable; I had encugh to
eat and to supply my wants, and what was all the rest to me. The money I
had lay by me as sorry, useless stuff, which I would have freely given for a hand-
ful of peas or beans.

My clothes began to decay mightily, and of linen I had had none for a good



ROBINSON CRUSOE 68

while except some shirts which I found in the seamen’s chests. There were
also several thick watch coats of the seamen’s, but they were too hot to wear
till I make jackets out of them. - I had saved all the skins of the four-footed
creatures that I killed, and out of these, I made, first, a great cap for my head,
with the hair on the outside to shoot off the rain, and afterwards I made me a
suit of clothes wholly of these skins—that it to say, a waistcoat, and breeches



CRUSOE MAKING A COAT

open at the knees, and both loose; for they were rather wanting to keep me cool]
than to keep me warm. After this I spent a great deal of time and pains to
make an umbrella, covering it with skins; which was a most useful thing to me,
as well for the heat of the sun as for the rain.

I cannot say that after this, for five years, any extraordinary thing happened
to me, but I lived on in the same course as before, My chief employment,
besides my yearly labor of planting my barley and rice and curing my raisins,



64 ROBINSON CRUSOE

was to make me a canoe, this time of such a size that by digging a canal to it ot
six feet wide and four feet deep, I brought it into the creek. =

The design I had in view when I made the first boat was to venture over to
the other shore, but the size of this was not at all suitable to that purpose, so
my next design was to make a tour round the island. I put up a little mast in
my boat, and made a sail for it out of some of the ship’s sails which I had in
store. ‘Then I made lockers to hold food and keep it dry, and a rest for my
gun with a flap to hang down over it to keep it dry.

It was the 6th of November, in the sixth year of my reign, or my captivity,
that I set out on this voyage, and I found it much longer than I expected; for
though the island itself was not very large, yet when I came to the east side of it,
I found a great ridge of rocks lie out about two leagues into the sea; and beyond
that a shoal of sand lying dry half a league more, so that I was obliged to go a
great way out to sea to double that point.

I am a warning to all rash and ignorant pilots, for I was no sooner come to
that point but I found myself in a great depth of water, running like the sluice
ofa mill. It hurried me farther and farther out, there was no wind stirring to
help me, and all I could do with my paddles signified nothing. I began to give
myself over for lost, and looked upon my solitary island as the most pleasant
place in the world, to be in which was all the happiness my heart could wish for.
However, I worked as hard as I could, and, to my joy, about noon, a breeze
sprang up. I spread my sail and stood away to the north as much as T could,
and in a few hours came within a mile of the shore, where soon after I got te
land. When I was on shore, I fell on my knees, and gave God thanks for my
deliverance, resolving to lay aside all thoughts of my deliverance by boat.

I found a convenient harbor for my boat, and taking nothing but my gun
and umbrella, I began my march homeward. On my way I lay down to rest,
being quite spent with fatigue, and fell:into a deep sleep. But judge, if you
can, what a surprise I must have been in when a voice woke me out of my sleep,
and called my name severa) times, “Robin, Robin, Robin Crusoe! poor Robin



ROBINSON CRUSOB 65



CRUSOE SAILS OUT OF HIS CREEK

Crusoe!” At first I was dreadfully frightened, but as soon as I awoke tho-
roughly, I saw my Poll sitting at the top of the hedge, and I knew that it was he
that spoke, and did but say the words I had taught him. Calling him by name,
the sociable creature came to me, antl sat on my thumb as he used to do, and
kept on talking to me as if he were overjoyed to see me; and so I carried him
home with me.

T had now had enuugh of rambling to sea, and for near a year IJ led a very



66 ROBINSON CRUSOE

sedate, retired life, feeling resigned to the decrees of Providence, and wanting
nothing but society.

My powder beginning to fail, I set myself to study some art to trap and snare
the goats alive, for I saw that. if I expected to sapply myself with goat’s flesh,
when I had no powder or shot left, breeding some up tame was my only way;
when, perhaps, I might have them about my house like a flock of sheep. At |
last I had my desire, for making pitfalls and traps, baited with barley and rice,
I found one morning, in one of them, an old he-goat, and in another, three kids,
one male and two females. The old goat was much too fierce for me, so I let
him go; then I took the kids home. It was a good while before they would
feed; but throwing them some sweet corn, it tempted them, and they began to
be tame.

I saw that I must keep the tame from the wild, or else they would always run
wild when they grew up, and that the only way for this was to have some in-
closed piece of ground well fenced. I began with the idea of inclosing such a
space that my fence must have been at least two miles about, but it struck me
that in so great a space, the kids would soon be as wild as if they had the whole .
island to run in, so I inclosed a piece of ground about one hundred and fifty
yards in length, and one hundred in breadth, which would maintain as many
as I should have in any reasonable time. .

It took me three months to hedge in this piece. In about a year and a half
T had a flock of twelve goats, and in two years more I had three-and-forty, and
after that I inclosed five pieces of ground to feed them in, with gates and pens
to take them as I wanted them.

I had now not only goat’s flesh to feed on, but milk too, for now I set up my
dairy, and had sometimes a gallon or two of milk in aday. What a table was
here spread for me in a wilderness where I saw nothing at first but to perish
for hunger! How like a king I dined, too, attended by my servants! Poll, as
if he had been my favorite, was the only person permitted to talk to me; my dog,
old, but faithful, sat always at my right hand, while my two cats sat at each





€RUSOE AT DINNER



68 . . ROBINSON CRUSOE

side of the table, expecting a bit from my hand now and then as a mark of
special favor. With this attendance and in this plentiful manner I lived;
neither could I be said to want anything but society; and of that, in a short
time after this, I was likely to have too much.

T had now two plantations in the island, one my little fortification, under the
rock, with the cave behind it, and the wall about it. The piles with which I
had made the wall were grown so large that there was not the least appearance
of any habitation behind them. Besides this I had my country seat, or little
bower, as I-called it, where = grapes flourished, and where I had my enclosures
for my goats.

As this was also about half-way between my other habitation and the ae
where I had laid up my boat, I generally stayed and lay here in my way thither,
for I used frequently to visit my boat. Sometimes I went out in her to divert
myself, but no more hazardous voyages would I go, scarcely ever above a stone’s
cast or two from the shore, I was so apprehensive of being hurried out of my
knowledge again by the currents or winds, or any other accident. But now I
came to a new scene of my life.

Tt happened one day, about noon, going towards my boat, I was exceedingly
surprised with the print of a man’s naked foot on the shore, which was very
plain to be seen on the sand. I stood like one thunderstruck, or as if I had
seen an apparition. I listened, I looked round me, but I could hear nothing
nor see anything; I went up to a rising ground, to look farther; I went up the
shore, and down the shore, but it was all one: I could see no other impression
but that one. I went to it again to see if there were any more, and to observe
if it might not be my fancy; but there was no room for that, for there was ex-
actly the print of a foot—toes, heel, and every part of a foot. How it came there I
knew not, nor could in the least imagine. But after innumerable fluttering
thoughts, like a man perfectly confused and out of myself, I came to my forti-
fication, terrified to the last degree. |

When I came to my castle (for so I think I called it ever after this), I fled into

























































































































CRUSOW SPES 4 FOOTPRINT IN THE SAND



70 ROBINSON CRUSOE

it like one pursued. I had no sleep that night; and I formed nothing but dismal
imaginations to myself. Sometimes I fancied it must be the devil; and reason
joined in with me upon this supposition: for how should any other thing in
human shape come into the place? But then to think that Satan should take
human shape upon him in such a place, where there could be no manner of
occasion for it, but to leave the print of his foot behind him, and that even for no
purpose too, for he could not be sure I should see it—this was an amazement
the other way. I easily argued myself out of all fear of its being the devil; and
I presently concluded then that it must be some more dangerous creature, viz.,
that it must be some of the savages of the mainland over against me, w 4o had
wandered out to sea in their canoes, and either driven by the currents or by con-
trary winds, had made the island, and had been on shore, but were gone away
again to sea; being as loath, perhaps, to have stayed in this desolate island as I
would have been to have had them.

While these reflections were rolling upon my mind, I was very thankful in
my thought that I was so happy as not to be thereabouts at that time, or that
they did not see my boat, by which they would have concluded that some in-
habitants had been in the place, and perhaps have searched farther for me.
Then terrible thoughts racked my imagination about their having found my
boat, and that there were people here; and that, if so, I should certainly have
them come again in greater numbers, and devour me; that if it should happen
that they should not find me, yet they would find my inclosure, destroy all my
corn, and carry away all my flock of tame goats, and I should perish at last
for mere want.

Thus my fear banished all my religious hope; all that former confidence in
God, which was founded upon such wonderful experience as I had had of His
goodness, now vanished; as if He that had fed me by miracle hitherto, could not
preserve by His power the provision which he had made for me by His goodness.

How strange a checker-work of Providence is the life of man! and by what

secret, differing springs are the affections hurried about, as differing circum-



ROBINSON CRUSOR : 71

stances present! ‘To-day we love what to-morrow we hate: to-day we seek
what to-morrow we shun; to-day we desire what to-morrow we fear, nay, even

tremble at the apprehensions of. ‘This was exemplified in me at this time in
the most lively manner imaginable; for I, whose only affliction was, that I
seemed banished from human society, was now ready to sink into the ground
at but the shadow or silent appearance of a man having set his foot on the
island. :

One morning early, lying in my bed, and filled with thoughts about my
- danger from the appearance of savages, I found it discomposed me very much;
upon which those words of the Scripture came into my thoughts: “Call upon
Me in the day of trouble: I will deliver thee, and thou shalt glorify Me.”” Upon
this, rising cheerfully out of bed, my heart was not only comforted, but I was
guided and encouraged to pray earnestly to God for deliverance: when I had
done praying, I took up my Bible, and opening it to read, the first words that
presented -to me were, “Wait on the Lord: be of good courage, and He shall -
strengthen thy heart: wait, I say, on the Lord.” It is impossible to express
the comfort this gave me, and in return, I thankfully laid down the book, and
was no more sad, at least, not on that occasion. ;
In the middle of these reflections, it came into my thoughts one day that this
foot might be the print of my own foot, when I came on shore from my boat.
I considered that I could by no means tell for certain where I had trod, and
where I had not; and that if, at last, this was only the print of my own foot, I
had played the part of those fools who try to make stories of specters and
apparitions, and then are themselves frighted at them more than anybody else.

Now I began to take courage, and to peep abroad again, for I had not stirred
out of my castle for three days and nights, so that I began to starve for provision;
for I had little or nothing within doors but some barley-cakes and water. Then
I knew that my goats wanted to be milked too, -vhich usually was my evening
_ diversion; and the poor creatures were in great pain and inconvenience for
want of it. |



72 ROBINSON CRUSOE

Heartening myself, therefore, with the belief that this was nothing but the
print of-one of my own feet, I began to go abroad again, and went to my country-
house to milk my flock; and having seen nothing, I began to be a little bolder,
and to think there was really nothing in it but my own imagination; but I could
not persuade myself fully of this till I should go down to the shore again, and
see this print of a foot, and measure it by my own. But when I came to the
place—first, it appeared evidently to me that when I laid up my boat, I could
not possibly be on shore anywhere thereabouts; secondly, when I came to
measure the mark with my own foot, I found my foot not so large by a great
deal. Both these things filled my head with new imaginations, and I went
home again, filled with the belief that some man or men had been on shore
there; or, in short, that the island was inhabited, and I might be surprised be-
fore I was aware.

Now I began sorely to repent that I had dug my cave so large as.to bring a
door through again, which door, as I said, came out beyond where my fortifica-
tion joined to the rock. Upon maturely considering this, therefore, I resolved
to draw me a second fortification, in the same manner of a semicircle, at a
distance from my wall, just where I had planted a double row of trees about
twelve years before, these trees having been planted so thick before, there
wanted but few piles to be driven between them, that they should be thicker
and stronger, and my wall would be soon finished. ‘Through seven holes in
this wall I contrived to plant muskets, of which I had got seven on shore out of
the ship; these, I say, I planted like cannon, so that I could fire all the seven
guns in two minutes’ time.

When this was done, I stuck all the ground without my wall, for a great way,
full with sticks of the osier-like wood, which I found so apt to grow, leaving a
pretty large space between them and my wall, that I might have room to see
an enemy, and they might have no shelter from the young trees, if they at-
tempted to approach my outer wall. _

Thus, in two year’s time, I had a thick grove; and in five or six years’ time



ROBINSON CRUSOE 79



CRUSOE MILKING HIS GOATS

T had a wood before my dwelling grown so monstrous thick and strong that it
was indeed perfectly impassable: and no man, of what kind soever, would ever
imagine that there anything beyond it, much less a habitation.

Another measure of prudence that I took was to seek out some retired spots
on the island, where I might inclose a few of my goats, half a dozen in each
place, so that if any disaster happened to the flock in general, I might be able
to raise them again. I completed one such inclosure, and went about the

whole island, searching for another place to make such another deposit, when,



74, ROBINSON CRUSOE

wandering more to the west point of the island than I had ever done yet, and
looking out to sea, I thought I saw a boat upon the sea, at a great distance.
I had found a perspective glass or two in one of the seamen’s chests, which I
saved out of our ship, but I had it not about me; and this was so remote that I
could not tell what to make of it, though I looked at it till eyes were not able
to hold to look any longer. I was presently convinced that the seeing the print
of a man’s foot was not such a strange thing in the island as I imagined; and but
that it was a special providence that I was cast upon the side of the island where
the savages never came, I should easily have known that nothing was more
frequent than for the canoes from the main, when they happened to be a little
too far out at sea, to shoot over to that side of the island for harbor: likewise,
as they often met and fought in their canoes, the victors, having taken their
prisoners, would bring them over to this shore, where, according to their dread-
ful customs, being all cannibals, they would kill and eat them; of which here-
after.

When I was come down the hill to the shore, as I said above, being the S. W.
point of the island, I was perfectly confounded and amazed; nor is it possible
for me to express the horror of my mind, at seeing the shore spread with skulls,
hands, feet, and other bones of human bodies; and particularly, I observed a
place where there had been a fire made, and a circle dug in the earth, where I
supposed the savage wretches had sat down to their inhuman feastings upon the
bodies of their fellow-creatures. I could not bear to stay in the place a moment;
so I got up the hill again with aJl the speed I could, and walked on towards
my own habitation.

I continued pensive and sad, and kept close within my own circle for almost
two years after this: when I say my own circle, I mean by it my three planta-
tions, viz., my castle, my county-seat (which I called my bower), and my in-
closure in the woods. ‘Time, however began to wear off my uneasiness, and I
began to live just in the same composed manner as before, only with this dif-

ference, that I used more caution, and kept my eyes more about me than I did



ROBINSON CRUSOE "5



CRUSOHB IN HIS FORT

before, lest I should happen to be seen by any of these people; and particularly
I was more cautious in firing my gun, lest any of them, being on the island,
should happen to hear it; though I never went out without it, and carried in
addition two pistols and a broadsword.



"6 ROBINSON CRUSOR

The terror I had been in about the savages diverted my invention from my
own conveniences, and now my thoughts were all of how I might destroy some
of these cannibals when they were at their bloody entertainments, and if possible’
save the victims they should bring hither to destroy. ‘lo put my design into
execution, I sought a place where unseen I might behold every action of the
savages. I found such a place in the side of a hill, and here I bestowed two
muskets, each of which was loaded with a brace of slugs and four or five small
bullets; a fowling-piece, charged with a handful of the largest shot; and my
pistols, with about four bullets in each. Every morning I made a tour to the
top of the hill, which was about three miles from my castle, to see if I could
observe any boats on the sea. But after having watched in vain for two or
three months, I not only grew tired of this hard duty, but began to doubt that
Thad a right to meditate the killing of the savages, and to fear that in attempting
it I might only bring upon myself certain destruction. Religion joined in with
this prudent consideration, and I concluded that I would be going quite beyond
my duty in destroying creatures who were innocent as to me, however guilty
they might be towards one another. This appeared so clear to me now, that
nothing was a greater satisfaction to me than that I had not been suffered to
do a thing which I now saw so much reason to believe would have been sinful
murder, and I gave most humble thanks to God that He had thus delivered
me from blood-guiltiness.

In this state of mind I continued for near a year after this. I removed my
boat which was on the other side of the island to a little cave under some high
rocks on the east end of the island, that there might not be near the place where
the savages landed any shadow of human presence. Besides this I kept my-
self more retired than ever, and seldom left my cell except when I went out to
milk my goats, and manage my little flock in the wood, which was quite out of
danger on the other side of the island.

T now cared not to drive a nail, chop a stick, fire a gun, or make a fire, lest
either the noise be heard, or the smoke betray me. For this reason I did all



ROBINSON CRUSOE a7

















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































CRUSOE ON THE LOOK-OUT ON THE HILL

the work requiring fire at my new apartment in the woods, when, after a while,
I found by accident a natural cave in the earth, which proved to be a great
convenience to me.

It was while I was cutting some wood to make charcoal that I discovered

this cave; and before I go on I must observe the reason for my making the



18 ROBINSON CRUSOE

charcoal, which was that I could use it to bake and cook without making a
smoke. While I was cutting wood one day, I perceived, behind a very thick
branch of brushwood, a kind of hollow place. I looked into the mouth of it,
and found it was so large that I could stand upright in it. But T made more
haste out than I did in, for I saw two shining eyes of some creature which
twinkled like stars. When I recovered a little from my surprise, I plucked up
courage, and taking a flaming firebrand, I rushed in again, and found there
was no cause for fear, for the eyes were those of an old goat, which was dying,
indeed, of old age. I stirred him a little to see if I could get him out, but he
was not able to raise himself, so I let him lie there.

I found the cave to be about twelve feet wide, but there was a place at the
farther side of it that went in still farther, but so low that I had to creep on my
hands and feet to goin, I gave up my search for that time, but came the next
day provided with candles, and when I got to the end of the low passage, I
found the roof rose to the height of near twenty feet.

As the light of my two candles shone on the sides and roofs of this cave, it
made a most glorious sight, for the walls reflected a hundred thousand lights
to me, as if they had been made of diamonds and other precious stones. What
-was in the rock to cause this, I knew not. ‘The place was a most delightful
grotto, and I resolved to bring here some of the things I was most anxious about,
particularly my magazine of powder, and my spare arms. The old goat died
in the mouth of the cave the next day after I discovered it, and I found it easier
to bury him on the spot where he expired than to drag him out.

I was now in the twenty-third year of residence in this island, and was so
naturalized to the place and the manner of living that, could I but have enjoyed
the certainty that no savages would come to the place to disturb me, I could have
been content to spend the rest of my time there. I had some little amusements,
which made the time pass more pleasantly with me a great deal than it did
before: first, I had taught my Poll, as I noted before, to speak; and he did it. so

familiarly, and talked so articulately and plain, that is was very pleasant to me.



ROBINSON CRUSOE 79

My dog was a pleasant and loving companion to me for no less than sixteen years
of my time, and then died of mere old age. As for my cats, they multiplied to
that degree, that I was obliged to shoot or drive them into the woods, except
two or three favorites. Besides these I always kept two or three household kids
about me, whom I taught to feed out of my hand; and I had two more parrots,
which talked pretty well, and would all call “Robin Crusoe,” but none like
my first. I had also several tame sea-fowls, that I caught upon the shore,
and cut their wings; and the little stakes which I had planted before my castle-
wall being now grown up to a good thick grove, these fowls all lived among
these low trees, and bred there, which was very agreeable to me.

Tt may not be amiss for all people who shall meet with my story to make this
just observation from it: viz., how frequently, in the course of our lives, the
evil which in itself we seek most to shun, and which, when we are fallen into,
is the most dreadful to us, is oftentimes the very means or door of our deliver-
ance, by which alone we can be raised again from the affliction we are fallen
into. I could give many examples of this in the course of my unacountable
life, but in nothing was it more particularly remarkable than in the circum-
stances of my last years of solitary residence in this island.

It was now the month of December, as I said above, in my twenty-third year;
and this, being the southern solstice, was the particular time of my harvest,
and required me to be pretty much abroad in the fields, when, going out pretty
early in the morning, even before it was thorough daylight, I was surprised with
seeing a light of some fire upon the shore at a distance from me about two miles
towards the end of the island where I had observed some savages had been,
as before, and not on the other side, but, to my great affliction, it was on my
side of the island. :

I was indeed terribly surprised with the sight, and filled with my usual ap-
prehension that the savages would find my works and improvements. In this
extremity I returned directly to my castle and pulled the ladder after me, mak-
ing all things look as wild and natural as I possibly could. Then I prepared
myself within for defense, loaded my muskets and pistols, and commended



- 80 ROBINSON CRUSOE |

myself to the Divine protection, resolved to defend myself to the last gasp.
Two hours after, impatient for intelligence, I mounted to the top of the hill,
where, laying myself down, with my perspective glass I perceived no less than
nine naked savages, sitting round a small fire, eating, as I supposed, human
flesh, with their two canoes hauled on shore, waiting for the flood of the tide
to carry them off again.

It is not easy to imagine what confusion this sight put me into, but when I
considered that their coming must always be with the current of the ebb, I
became more easy, being fully satisfied that I might go abroad with safety all
the time of the flood, if they were not before landed. Before they went off, I
could see by their postures and gestures that they were dancing, and they kept
this up for an hour or more.

When I saw them gone, I took two guns upon my shoulders, and placing a
couple of pistols in my belt, with my great sword hanging by my side, I went
to the hill where I had discovered the first appearance of all, and then saw that
there had been three canoes more of the savages on shore at that place, which
with the rest were now making over to the mainland.

Going down to the shore, I could see the marks of horror which the dismal
work they had been about had left behind it;and so filled was I with indignation,
that I began again to premeditate taking revenge on the first that came there,
let them be as many soever. It then appeared to me that the visits they made
to this island are not very frequent, it being fifteen months before they came ~
again; yet all this while I was very uneasy, lest they should come upon me by
surprise.

It was in the middle of May, on the sixteenth day, I think, as well as my poor
wooden calendar would reckon, that it blew a very great storm of wind all day,
with a great deal of lightning and thunder, and a very foul night it was after it.
As I was reading in the Bible, and taken up with serious thoughts about my
present condition, I was stirprised with the noise of a gun, as I thought, fired at

sea. I started up in the greatest haste imaginable; and, mourting my ladder,



ROBINSON CRUSOE 81

got to the top of the hill the very moment that a flash of fire bade me listen for a
second gun, which, accordingly, in about a half a minute, I heard; and by the
sound knew that it was from that part of the sea where I was driven out with
the current in my boat- I immediately considered that this must be some
ship in distress. I had the presence of mind, at that minute, to think that
though TI could not help them, it might help me; so I brought together all the
dry wood I could get at hand, and set it on fire upon the hill. As soon as
ever my fire blazed up, I heard another gun, and after that several others. I
piled my fire all night long, till daybreak; and, when the air cleared up, I saw
something at a great distance at sea, full east of the island, whether a sail or a
hull T could not distinguish.

T looked frequently at it all that day, and presently concluded that it was a
ship at anchor; and being eager to be satisfied, I ran towards the south side of
the island, to the rocks where I had formerly been carried away with the current;
_ and getting up there, I could plainly see the wreck of a ship cast away in the
night upon those concealed rocks which I found when I was out in my boat.

It was now calm, and I had a great mind to venture out in my boat to this
wreck, not doubting but I might find something on board that might be useful
tome. But that did not altogether press me so much as the possibility that
there might be yet some living creature on board, whose life I might not only
save, but might, by saving that life, comfort my own to the last degree; and this
thought clung so to my heart that I could not be quiet night or day, but I must
venture out in my boaf on board this wreck; and committing the rest to God’s
providence, I thought the impression was so strong upon my mind that it could
not be resisted. ;

Under the power of this impression, I hastened back to my castle, and load-
ing myself with everything necessary, went down to my boat, got the water out
of her, got her afloat, and loaded all my cargo in her. Praying to God to direct
my voyage, I put out, and rowing or paddling the canoe along the shore, came
at last to the utmost point of the island on the north-east side. And now I was



82 ROBINSON CRUSOE

to faunch out into the ocean, and either to venture or not to venture. I looked
on the rapid currents which ran constantly on both sides of the island at a
distance, and my heart began to fail me; for I foresaw that if I was driven into
either of those currents, I should be carried perhaps out of reach or sight of
the island again.

These thoughts so oppressed my mind that I began to give over my enterprise;
and having hauled my boat into a little creek on the shore, I stepped out, and .
sat down upon a rising bit of ground, very pensive and anxious. As I was
musing, I could perceive that the tide was turned, and the flood came on; upon
which, my going was impracticable for many hours. Upon this, presently it
occurred to me that I should go up to the highest piece of ground I could find,
and observe, if I could, how the sets of the tide or currents lay. I cast my eye
upon a little hill from whence I had a clear view of the currents, or sets of the
tide, and which way I was to guide myself in my return. Here I found that as
the current of ebb set out close by the south point of the island, so the current
of the flood set in close by the shore of the north side; and that I had nothing to
do but to keep to the north of the island in my return, and I should do well
enough. | se

Encouraged with this observation, I resolved, the next morning, to set out
with the first of the tide. I first made a little out to sea, full north, till I began
to feel the benefit of the current, which set eastward, and having a strong steer-
age with my paddle, I went, at a great rate, directly for the wreck, and in less
than two hours I came up to it. The ship, which was Spanish, stuck fast,
jammed in between two rocks: all the stern and quarter of her were beaten to
pieces by the sea; and her mainmast and foremast were broken short off; but
her head and bow appeared firm. When I came close to her, a dog appeared
upon her, who, seeing me coming, yelped and cried; and, as soon as I called him,
jumped into the sea to come to me; I took him into the boat, but found him
almost dead with hunger and thirst. I gave him a cake of my bread, and he

devoured it like a ravenous wolf that had starved a fortnight in the snow; I



ROBINSON CRUSOE 83

then gave the poor creature some fresh water, with which, if I would have let
him, he would have burst himself. After this I went on board; but the first
sight I met with was two men drowned in the cook-room, or forecastle of the
ship, with their arms fast about one another. I concluded, that when the ship
struck, the sea broke so continually over her, that the men were strangled with
the constant rushing in of the water. Besides the dog, there was nothing left
in the ship that had life. I saw several chests, which I believed belonged to
some of the seamen; and I got two of them into the boat, without examining
what was in them. Had the stern of the ship been fixed, and the fore-part
broken off, I am persuaded I might have made a good voyage; for, by what I
found in these two chests, I had room to suppose the ship had a great deal of
wealth on board.

T found, besides these chests, a little cask full of liquor, which I got into my
boat with much difficulty. There were several muskets in the cabin, and a
great powder-horn, with about four pounds of powder in it. As for the muskets,
I had no occasion for them, so I left them, but took the powder-horn. I took
a fire-shovel and tongs, which I wanted extremely, as also two little brass kettles,
a copper pot to make chocolate, and a gridiron; and with this cargo, and the
dog, I came away, the tide beginning to make home again; and the same even-
ing, about an hour within night, I reached the island again, weary and fatigued
to the last degree. I reposed that night in the boat; and in the morning I re-
solved to harbor what I had got in my new cave, and not carry it home to my
castle. After refreshing myself, I got all my cargo on shore, and began to
examine the particulars. :

When I came to open the chests, I found several things of great use to me:
for example, I found in one a fine case of bottles, filled with cordial waters. I
found some very good shirts, and about a dozen and a half of white linen hand-
kerchiefs and colored neck-cloths. Besides this, when, I came to the till in
the chest, I found there three great bags of pieces of eight, which held about

eleven hundred pieces in all; and in one of them, wrapped up in a paper six



84 ROBINSON CRUSON





CRUSOE SLEEPING IN HIS BOAT

doubloons of gold, and some small bars or wedges of gold; I suppose they might
all weigh near a pound. In the other chest were some clothes, but of little

value; but, by the circumstances, it must have belonged to the gunner’s mate;



ROBINSON CRUSOE 85

though there was no powder in it, except two pounds of fine glazed powder,
_ in three small flasks, kept, I suppose, for charging their fowling-piece on oc-
casion. Upon the whole, I got very little by this voyage that was of any use
to me; for as to the money, I had no manner of occasion for it; it was to me as
the dirt under my feet; however, I lugged this money home to my cave, and laid
it up, as I had done that before which I had brought from our own ship.

Having now brought all my things on shore, and secured them, I went back
to my boat, and rowed or paddled her along the shore to her old harbor, where
T laid her up, and made the best of my way to my old habitation, where I found
everything safe and quiet. J never knew whether any were saved out of that
ship or no; and had only the affliction, some days after, to see the corpse of a
drowned boy come on shore at the end of the island which was next to the
shipwreck. He had no clothes on but a seaman’s waistcoat, a pair of open-
kneed linen drawers, and a blue linen shirt; but nothing to direct me so much
as to guess what nation he was of.

I began now to repose myself, live after my old fashion, and take care of my
family affairs; and for a while I lived easy enough, only that I was more vigilant
than I used to be, looked out oftener, and did not go abroad so much; and if,
at any time, I did stir with any freedom, it was always to the east part of the
island, where I was pretty well satisfied the savages never came, and where I
could go without so many precautions, and such a load of arms and ammunition
as I always carried with me if I went the other way. I lived in this condition
near two years more; but my unlucky head, that was always to let me know it
was born to make my body miserable, was all these two years filled with projects
and designs, how, if it were possible, I might get away from this island.

On one of the nights in the rainy season in March, the four-and-twentieth
year of my first setting foot in this island of solitude, I was lying in my bed or
hammock, awake, very well in health, but could by no means close my eyes, that
is, so as to sleep. It is impossible and needless to set down the innumerable

crowd of thoughts that whirled through that great thoroughfare of the brain—

-



86 ROBINSON CRUSOE

the memory—in this night’s time: I ran over the whole history of my life in
miniature, to my coming to this island, and also of that part of my life since I
came to this island. In my reflections upon the state of my case since I came
on shore on this island, I was comparing the happy posture of my affairs in the
first years of my habitation here, with the life of anxiety, fear, and care, which
T had lived in ever since I had seen the print of a foot in the sand. Then I came
to reflect seriously upon the real danger I had been in for so many years, and
how I had walked about in the greatest security, and with all possible tran-
quillity, even when perhaps nothing but the brow of a hill, a great tree, or the
casual approach of night, had been between me and the worst kind of des-
truction, viz., that of falling into the hands of cannibals and savages, who would |
have seized on me with the same view as I would on a goat or a turtle.

When these thoughts were over, my head was for some time taken up in
considering the nature of these savages; and it occurred to me to inquire what
part of the world these wretches lived in ? how far off the coast was from whence
they came? and why I might not order myself and my business so that I might
be as able to go over thither as they were to come to me? | never so much as -
troubled myself to consider what I should do with myself when I went thither;
but my mind was wholly bent upon the notion of my passing over in my boat
to the mainland. I looked upon my present condition as the most miserable
that could possibly be; that I was not able to throw myself into anything, but
death, that could be called worse; and if I reached the shore of the main, J
might perhaps meet with relief; or I might coast along, as I did on the African
shore, till I came to some inhabited country, and where I might find some relief;
and, after all, perhaps I might fall in with some Christian ship that might take
me in; and if the worst came to the worst, I could but die, which would put an
end to all these miseries at once. I was agitated greatly by these thoughts; |
all my calm of mind seemed to be suspended; and I had, as it were, no power to
turn my thoughts to anything but the project of a voyage to the main.

When this had agitated my thoughts for two hours or more, with such violence



ROBINSON CRUSOE 87

that it set my very blood into a ferment, Nature, as if I had been fatigued and
exhausted with the very thoughts of it, threw me into a sound sleep. One
would have thought I should have dreamed of it, but I did not, nor of anything
relating to it: but I dreamed that as 1 was going out in the morning as usual,
from my castle, I saw upon the shore two canoes and eleven savages, coming to
land, and that they brought with them another savage, whom they were going
to kill, in order to eat him; when, on a sudden, the savage that they were
going to kill jumped away, and ran for his life; then I thought, in my sleep,
that he came running into my little grove before my fortification, to hide him-
self; and that I, seeing him alone, and not perceiving that the others sought him
that way, showed myself to him, and smiling upon him encouraged him: that
he kneeled down to me, seeming to pray me to assist him; upon which I showed .-
him my ladder, made him go up it, and carried him into my cave, and he be-
came my servant; and that as soon as I had got this man, I said to myself,
“Now I may certainly venture to the mainland, for this fellow will serve me as
a pilot, and will tell me what to do, and whither to go for provisions, and whither
_ not to go for fear of being devoured; what places to venture into, and what to
escape. I waked with this thought: and was under such inexpressible im-
pressions of joy at the prospect of my escape in my dream, that the disappoint-
ments which I felt upon coming to myself, and finding that it was no more than
a dream, were equally extravagant the other way, and threw me into a deep
dejection of spirits.

Upon this, however, I made this conclusion: that my only way to go about
an attempt for an escape was, if possible, to get a savage into my possession ;
and, if possible, it should be one of their prisoners, whom they had condemned
to be eaten, and should bring hither to kill. I resolved, if possible, to get one of
these savages into my hands, cost what it would. My next thing was to con-
trive how to do it, and this indeed was very difficult to resolve on; but as I could
pitch upon no probable means for it, so I resolved to put myself upon the watch,
to see them when they came on shore, and leave the rest to the event; taking
such measures as the opportunity should present.



88 ROBINSON CRUSOE

About a year and a half after I entertained these notions (and by long musing
had, as it were, resolved them all into nothing, for want of an occasion to put
them in execution), I was surprised one morning early by seeing no less than
five canoes all on shore together on my side of the island, and the people who
belonged to them all landed and out of my sight. Seeing so many, and know-
ing that they always came four or six, or sometimes more, in a boat, I could
not tell how to take my measures, to attack twenty or thirty men single-handed;
so lay still in my castle, perplexed and discomforted. However, I put myself
into all the same postures for an attack that I had formerly provided, and was
just ready for action, if anything had pee: Having waited a good while,
at length, being very impatient, I set my guns at the foot of my ladder, and
clambered up to the top of the hill; standing so, however, that my head did not
appear above the hill, so that they could not perceive me. Here I observed,
by the help of my perspective glass, that they were no less than thirty in number;
that they had a fire kindled, and that they had meat dressed. How they had
cooked it, I knew not, or what it was; but they were all dancing round the fire.

While I was thus looking on them, I perceived, by my perspective, two miser-
able wretches dragged from the boats. I perceived one of them immediately
fall; being knocked down, I suppose, with a club, or wooden sword, for that
was their way; and two or three others were at work immediately, preparing
him for their cookery, while the other victim was left standing by himself,
till they should be ready for him. In that very moment, this poor wretch, see-
ing himself a little at liberty, started away from them, and ran with incredible
swiftness along the sands, directly towards me. I was dreadfully frightened,
that I must acknowledge, when I perceived him run my way; and especially
when, as I thought, I saw him pursued by the whole body. However, I kept
my station, and my spirits began to recover when I found that not above three
men followed him; and still more was I encouraged when I found that he out-
stripped them exceedingly in running, and gained ground on them.

There was between them and my castle, the creek, which I mentioned often





CRUSOH AND FRIDAY



90 ROBINSON CRUSOE

in the first part of my story, where I landed my cargoes out of the ship; and this
I saw plainly he must necessarily swim over; but when the savage escaping
came thither, he made nothing of it; but, plunging in, swam through in about
thirty strokes, or thereabouts, landed, and ran with exceeding strength and
swiftness. When the three persons came to the creek, I found that two of them
could swim, but the third could not, and that, standing on the other side, he
looked at the others, but went no farther, and soon after went softly back again.
I observed that the two who swam were yet more than twice as long swimming
over the creek than the fellow was that fled from them. It came very warmly
upon my thoughts, and indeed irresistibly, that now was the time to get me a
servant, and perhaps a companion or assistant; and that I was plainly called
by Providence to save this poor creature’s life. I immediately ran down the
ladder with all possible expedition, fetched my two guns, and getting up again,
I crossed towards the sea; and having a very short cut, and all down hill, clapped
myself in the way between the pursuers and the pursued, hollooing aloud to
him that fled, who, looking back, was at first perhaps as much frightened at
me as at them; but I beckoned with my hand to him to come back; and, in the
meantime, I slowly advanced towards the two that followed; then rushing at
once upon the foremost, I knocked him down with the stock of my piece. I
was loath to fire, because I wouldinot havethe rest hear; though, at that distance,
it would not have been easily heard. Having knocked this fellow down, the
other who pursued him stopped, as if he had been frightened, and I advanced
towards him; but as I came nearer, I perceived presently he had a bow and
arrow, and was fitting it to shoot at me; so I was then obliged to shoot at him
first, which I did, and killed him at the first shot. ‘The poor savage who fled
was so frightened with the fire and noise of my piece that he stood stock still.
I made signs to come forward, which he easily understood, and came a little
way; then stopped again, and then a little farther, and stopped again; and 1
could then perceive that he stood trembling. I smiled at him, and looked

pleasantly, and beckoned to him to come still nearer; at length, he came close



ROBINSON CRUSOE 91

to me; and then he kneeled down, laid his head upon the ground, and, taking
me by the foot, set my foot upon his head; this, it seems, was in token of swear-
ing to be my slave forever. I took him up, and made much of him, and en-
couraged him all I could. But there was more work to do yet; for I perceived
the savage whom I had knocked down was not killed, but stunned with the
blow, and began to come to himself; so I pointed to him, and showed him the
savage, that he was not dead; upon this he spoke some words to me and though
I could not understand them, yet I thought they were pleasant to hear; for they
were the first sound of a man’s voice that I had heard, my own excepted, for
above twenty-five years. But there was no time for such reflections now; the
savage who was knocked down recovered himself so far as to sit up on the
ground, and I perceived that my savage began to be afraid. He made a motion
to me to lend him my sword, which I did. He no sooner had it but he runs to
his enemy, and at one blow cut off his head as cleverly, no executioner in Ger-
many could have done it sooner or better; which I thought very strange for one
who, I had reason to believe, never saw a sword in his life before, except their
own wooden swords: however, it seems, as I learned afterwards, they make their
wooden swords so sharp, so heavy, and the wood is so hard, that they will even
cut off heads with them. When he had done this, he comes laughing to me in
sign of triumph, and brought me the sword again, and laid it down, with the
head of the savage that he had killed, just before me. But that which as-
tonished him most was to know how I killed the other Indian so far off; so
pointing to him, he made signs to me to let him go to him; and I bade him go,
as well as I could. When he came to him, he stood like one amazed, looking at
him, turning him first on one side, then on the other. He took up his bow
and arrows, and came back; so I turned to go away, and beckoned him to follow
me, making signs to him that more might come after them.

Upon this he made signs to me that he should bury them with sand, that they
might not be seen by the rest, if they followed; and so I made signs to him again

todo so. He fell to work; and in an instant he had scraped a hole in the sand



92 ROBINSON CRUSOE

with his hands, big enough to bury the first in, and then dragged him into it,
and covered him; and did so by the other also. I believe he had buried them
both in a quarter of an hour.

IT carried him, not to my castle, but quite away to my cave, on the farther
part of the island; so I did not let my dream come to pass in that part, that he
came into my grove for shelter. Here I gave him bread and a bunch of raisins
to eat, and a draught of water, which I found he was indeed in great distress
for from his running; and having refreshed him, I made signs for him to go and
lie down to sleep.

He was a comely, handsome Fllog? perfectly well made, with straight, strong
limbs, not too large, tall and well shaped; and, as I reckon, about twenty-six
years of age. He had a very good countenance, not a fierce and surly aspect,
but seemed to have something very manly in his face; and yet he had all the
' sweetness and softness of a European in his countenance, too, especially when
he smiled. His hair was long and black, not curled like wool; his forehead
very high and large; and a great vivacity and sparkling sharpness in his eyes.
The color of his skin was not quite black, but very tawny.

After he had slumbered about half an hour, he awoke and came out of the
cave to me; for I had been milking my goats, which I had in the inclosure just
by: when he espied me, he came running to me, laying himself down upon the
ground, with all the possible signs of an humble, thankful disposition, making
- a great many gestures to show it. I understood him in many things, and let
him know I was very well pleased with him. In a little time I began to speak
to him, and teach him to speak to me; and, first, I let him know his name should
be Fripay, which was the day I saved his life: I called him so for the memory
of the time. I likewise taught him to say Master, and then let him know that
was to be my name; I likewise taught him to say Yes and No, and to know the
meaning of them. I gave him some milk in an earthen pot, and let him see
me drink it before him, and sop my bread in it; and gave him a cake of bread
to do the like, which he quickly complied with, and made signs that it was very



ROBINSON CRUSOB 93























































FRIDAY BURYING THE DEAD:

good for him. I kept there with him all that night; but, as soon as it was day,
I beckoned to him to come with me, and let him know I would give him some
clothes; at which he seemed very glad, for he was stark naked. I then led him
‘up to the top of the hill, to see if his enemies were gone, and, pulling out my
glass, I looked, and saw plainly the place where they had been, but no appear-
ance of them or their canoes; so that it was plain they were gone, and had left
their two comrades behind them, without any search after them.

We came back to our castle, and there I fell to work for my man Friday; and,
first of all, I gave him a pair of linen drawers, which I had out of the poor
gunner’s chest I mentioned, which I found in the wreck, and which, with a little
alteration, fitted him very well; and then I made him a jerkin of goat’s skin,
as well as my skill would allow (for I was now grown a tolerably good tailor) ;
_and I gave him a cap which I made of hare’s skin, very convenient, and fashion-
able enough; and thus he was clothed, for the present, tolerably well.



94 ROBINSON CRUSOE

The next day, I began to consider where I should lodge him; and, that I
might do well for him, and yet be perfectly easy myself, I made a little tent for
him in the vacant place between my two fortifications. As there was a door
or entrance there into my cave, I made a formal framed door-case, and a door
to open in the inside, which I barred up in the night, taking in my ladders, too;
so that Friday could no way come at me in the inside of my innermost wall,
without making so much noise in getting over that it must needs awaken me.
But I needed none of all this precaution; for never man had a more faithful,
loving, sincere servant than Friday was to me; without passion, sullenness, or
design, his affections were tied to me, like those of a child to a father.

I was greatly delighted with my new companion, and made it my business
to teach him everything that was proper to make him useful, handy, and helpful;
but especially to make him speak, and understand me when I spoke; and he
was the aptest scholar that ever was; and particularly was so merry, so con-
stantly diligent, andso pleased when he could but understand me, or make me
understand him, that it was very pleasant to me to talk to him. And now my |
life began to be so easy that I began to say to myself, that could I but have been
safe from more savages, I cared not if I was never to remove from the place
while I lived. .

One morning I took him out with me to the woods. I went, indeed, intend-
ing to kill a kid out of my own flock, and bring it home and dress it; but as I
was going, I saw a she-goat lying down in the shade, and two young kids sitting
by her. I caught hold of Friday: “Hold,” said I, “stand still;”? and made
signs to him not to stir: immediately I presented my piece, shot, and killed one
of the kids. ‘The poor creature was sensibly surprised; trembled and, shook,
and looked so amazed that I thought he would have sunk down. He did not
see the kid I shot at, or perceive I had killed it, but ripped up his waistcoat, to
feel whether he was not wounded; and, as I found, presently, thought I was
resolved to kill him; for he came and kneeled down to me, and embracing my
knees, said a great many things I did not understand; but I could easily see

the meaning was to pray me not to kill him.





CRUSOD AND FRIDAY OUT SHOOTING



96 ROBINSON CRUSOE

T soon found a way to convince him that I would do him no harm; and tak-
ing him up by the hand, laughed at him, and pointing to the kid which I had
killed, beckoned to him to run and fetch it, which he did.

He would not so much as touch the gun for several days after; but he would
speak to it and talk to it, as if it had answered him, when he was by himself;
which, as I afterwards learned of him, was to desire it not to kill him. I brought
home the kid, and the same evening I took the skin off, and stewed some of

the flesh, and made some very good broth. After I had begun to eat some, i
: gave some to my man, who seemed very glad of it, and liked it very well. Hav-
ing thus fed him with broiled meat and broth, I was resolved to feast him the
next day with roasting a piece of the kid: this I did by hanging it before the fire
on a string, setting two poles up, one on each side of the fire, and one across
on the top, and tying the string to the cross-stick, letting the meat turn con-
tinually. This Friday admired very much; but when he came to taste the
flesh, he took so many ways to tell me how well he liked it, that I could not but
«understand him.

The next day I set him to work to beating some corn out, and sifting it in
the manner I used to do, as I observed before; and he soon understood how to
do it as wellasI. After that I let him see me make my bread, and bake it, too;
and in a little time Friday was able to do all the work for me, as well as I could
do it myself.

I began now to consider that, having two mouths to feed instead of one I
must plant a largertquantity of corn than I used to do; so I marked out a larger
piece of land, and began the fence in the same manner as before, in which Friday
worked very willingly and very hard; and I told him that it was for corn to make
more bread, because he was now with me, and that I might have enough for
him and myself too. He let me know that he thought I had much more labor
upon me on his account than I had for myself; and that he would work the
harder for me, if I would tell him what to do.

This was the pleasantest year of all the life I led in this place. Friday began



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THE ADVENTURES O

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OBINSON CRUSOE
By Daniel Defoe







































































































































































































































































































WITH SIXTY-THREE ILLUSTRATIONS

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SPRINGFIELD . MASSACHUSETTS
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SPRINGFIELD
MASS.



ROBINSON CRUSOE



WAS born in the year 1632, in the city of York, of a good family, though not
I of that country, my father being a foreigner, of Bremen, who settled first
at Hull: he got a good estate by merchandise, and leaving off his trade, lived
afterwards at York; from whence he had married my mother, whose relations
were named Robinson, a very good family in that country, and from whom I
was called Robinson Kreutznaer; but, by the usual corruption of words in Eng-
land, we are now called, nay, we call ourselves, and write our name, Crusoe;
and so my companions always called me.

Being the third son of the family, and not bred to any trade, my head began
to be filled very early with rambling thoughts: my father had given me a com-
petent share of learning, and designed me for the law; but I would be satisfied
with nothing but going to sea; and my inclination to this led me so strongly
- against the will, nay, the commands, of my father, and against all the entreaties
and persuasions of my mother and other friends, that there seemed to be some-
thing fatal in that propension of nature, tending directly to the life of misery
which was to befall me.

My father, a wise and grave man, gave me excellent counsel against what
he foresaw was my design. He called me one morning into his chamber, where
he was confined by the gout, and expostulated very warmly with me upon this
subject: he asked me what reasons, more than a mere wandering inclination,
I had for leaving my father’s house and my native country, where I might be
well introduced, and had a prospect of raising my fortune by application and
4 ROBINSON CRUSOE

industry, With a life of ease and pleasure. He told me it was men of despérate
fortunes on one hand, or of aspiring, superior fortunes on the other, who went
abroad upon adventures, to make themselves famous in undertakings of a
nature out of the common road; that these things were all either too far above
me or too far below me; that mine was the middle state, or what might be called
the upper station of low life, which he had found by long experience was the
best state in the world, the most suited to human happiness, not exposed to the
misery and hardships, the labor and sufferings of the mechanic part of man-
kind, and not embarrassed with pride, luxury, ambition, and envy of the upper
part of mankind. He told me, I might judge of the happiness of this state by
this one thing, viz., that this was the state of life which all other people envied;
that kings have frequently lamented the miserable consequence of being born
to great things, and wished they had been placed in the middle of the two exe
tremes, between the mean and the great; that the wise man gave his testimony
to this, as the just standard of true felicity, when he prayed to have neither
poverty nor riches,

After this he pressed me earnestly, and in the most affectionate manner, not
to play the young man, nor to precipitate myself into miseries which Nature,
and the station of life I was born in, seemed to have provided against; that I
was under no necessity of seeking my bread; that he would do well for me, and
endeavor to enter me fairly into the station of life which he had just been re-
commending to me; and that if I was not very easy and happy in the world, it
vaust be my mere fate or fault that must hinder it; and that he should have

nothing to answer for, having thus discharged his duty in warning me against

measures which he knew would be to my hurt.
I was sincerely affected with this discourse, as indeed who could be other-
wise ? and I resolved not to think of going abroad any more, but to settle at

home according to my father’s desire. But, alas! a few days wore it all off;

and, in short, to prevent any of my father’s further importunties, in a few weeks
after I resolved to run quite away from him. However, I did not act quite so
ROBINSON CRUSOE 5

hastily as the first heat of my resolution prompted, but I took my mother at a
time when I thought her a little more pleasant than ordinary, and told her that
my thoughts were so entirely bent upon seeing the world, that I should never
settle to anything with resolution enough to go through with it, and my father
had better give me his consent than force me to go without it. This put my
mother into a great passion; she told me she knew it would be to no purpose
to speak to my father upon any such subjects; that for her part, she would not
have so much hand in my destruction; and I should never have it to say that my
mother was willing when my father was not.

It was not till almost a year after this that I broke loose. Being one day at
Hull, and one of my companions being going by sea to London in his father’s
ship, and prompting me to go with them, I consulted neither father or mother
any more, nor so much as sent them word of it; but leaving them to hear of it
as they might, without asking God’s blessing, or my father’s, without any con-
sideration of circumstances or consequences, and in an ill hour, God knows,
on the Ist of September, 1651, I went on board a ship bound for London.

Never any young adventurer’s misfortunes began sooner or continued longer
than mine. ‘The ship was no sooner got out of the Humber than the wind began
to blow, and the sea to rise in a most frightful manner; and, as I had never been
at sea before, I was most inexpressibly sick in body, and terrified in mind. In
this agony I made many vows and resolutions, that if it would please God to
spare my life in this one voyage, if ever I got once my foot upon dry land again,
I would go directly home to my father, and never set it into a ship again while
1 lived.

These wise and sober thoughts continued all the while the storm lasted, and
indeed some time after; but the next day the wind was abated, and the sea
calmer, and I began to be a little inured to it. A charming evening followed;
the sun went down perfectly clear, and rose so the next morning; and having
little or no wind, and a smooth sea, the sun shining upon it, the sight was, as I
thought, the most delightful that ever I saw.
6 ROBINSON CRUSOE

I had slept well in the night, and was no more sea-sick; but very cheerful,
looking with wonder upon the sea that was so rough and terrible the day before,
and could be so calm and so pleasant in so little a time after. And now, lest
my good resolutions should continue, my companion who had enticed me away
comes to me.

“Well, Bob,” says he, clapping me upon the shoulder, “how do you do after |
it? I warrant you were frighted, wern’t you, last night, when it blew but a
capful of wind ?”

“A capful d’you call it?” said i ‘twas a terrible storm.”

“A storm, you fool, you!” replies he; “do you call that a storm? why, it was
; nothing at all; give us but a good ship and sea-room, and we think nothing of
such a squall of wind as that; but you’re but a fresh-water sailor, Bob. Come,
let us make a bowl of punch, and we'll forget all that; d’ye see what charming
weather ’tis now ?” :

To make short this sad part of my story, we went the way of all sailors; the
punch was made, and J was made half drunk with it; and in that one night’s
wickedness I drowned all my reflections upon my past conduct, all my. resolu-
tions for the future.

The sixth day of our being at sea we came into Yarmouth Roads. Here we
were obliged to come to anchor, and here we lay, the wind continuing contrary,
viz., at south-west, for seven or eight days. ‘The eighth day, in the morning,
the wind increased, and we had all hands at work to strike our top-masts, and
make everything snug and close, that the ship might ride as easy as’ possible.
By uoon the sea went very high indeed, and our ship rode forecastle in, shipped
several seas, and we thought once or twice our anchor had come home; upon
which our master ordered out the sheet-anchor, so that we rode with two anchors
ahead, and the cables veered out to the better end.

By this time it blew a terrible storm indeed; and now I began to see terror
and amazement in the faces even of the seamen themselves. ‘Towards evening
the mate and boatswain begged the master of our ship to let them cut away the
ROBINSON CRUSOE - . 7

foremast, which he was very unwilling to do; but the boatswain protesting to
him that if he did not, the ship would founder, he consented ; and when they had
cut away the foremast, the main-mast stood so loose, and shook the ship so
much, they were obliged to cut that away also, and make a clear deck.
And one must judge what a condition I must be in at all this, who was but a
young sailor, and who had been in such a fright before at but a little. In the
middle of the night, and under all the rest of our distresses, one of the men that
had been down to see, cried out we had sprung aleak; another said there was
four feet of water in the hold. ‘Then all hands were called to the pump.
We worked on; but the water increasing in the hold, it was apparent that the
ship would founder; and though the storm began to abate a little, yet as it was
not possible she could swim till we might run into any port, so the master fired
guns for help; and a light ship, who had rid it out just ahead of us, ventured a
boat out to help us. Our men cast a rope over the stern with a buoy to it, and
then veered it out a great length, which they, after much labor and hazard,
took hold of, and we hauled them close under our stern, and got all into their
boat. It was to no purpose for them or us, after we were in the boat, to think
of reaching to their own ship; so all agreed to let her drive, and only to pull her
in towards shore as much as we could. |
We were not much more than a quarter of an hour out of our ship till we saw |
her sink, and then I understood for the first time what was meant by a ship
foundering in the sea. I must acknowledge I had hardly eyes to look up when
the seamen told me she was sinking. While we were in this condition, the men
yet laboring at the oar to bring the boat near the shore, we could see a great
“many people running along the strand, to assist us when we should come near;

but we made but slow way towards the shore; nor were we able to reach the
_ shore till being past the lighthouse at Winterton, the shore falls off to the west-
ward, towards Crome. Here we got all safe on shore, and walked afterwards
on foot to Yarmouth, where, as unfortunate men, were were used with great
humanity.
8 ROBINSON CRUSOR

Had I now had the sense to have gone back to Hull, and have gone home, I
had been happy. But my ill fate pushed me on now with an obstinacy that
nothing could resist. Having some money in my pocket, I travelled to London
by land; and there, as well as on the road, had many struggles with myself what
course of life I should take, and whether I should go home or go to sea.

It was my lot first of all to fall into pretty good company in London, which
does not always happen to such loose and misguided young fellows as I then
was. I first got acquainted with the master of a ship who had been on the coast
of Guinea; and who having had very good success there, was resolved to go
again; this captain taking a fancy to my conversation, told me if I would go the
voyage with him, I should be at no expense; I should be his messmate and his
companion; and if I could carry anything with me, I should have all the ad-
vantage of it that the trade would admit.

I embraced the offer; and entering into a strict friendship with this captain,
who was an honest, plain-dealing man, I went the voyage with him, and carried ©
about £40 in such toys and trifles as the captain directed me to buy. This £40
T had mustered together by the assistance of some of my relations whom I cor-
responded with, and who, I believe, got my father, or at least my mother, to
contribute so much as that to my first adventure.

‘This was the only voyage which I may say was successful in all my adventures,
and which I owe to the integrity and honesty of my friend the captain; for I
brought home five pounds nine ounces of gold-dust for my adventure, which
yielded me in London, at my return, almost £300; and this filled me with those
aspiring thoughts which have since so completed my ruin.

I was now set up for a Guinea trader; and my friend, to my great misfortune,
dying soon after his arrival, I resolved to go the same voyage again. I em-
barked in the same vessel with one who was his mats in the former voyage, and
had now got the command of the ship. ‘This was the unhappiest voyage that
ever man made; for though I did not carry quite £100 of my new-gained wealth,
so that I had £200 left which I had lodged with my friend’s widow, who was very
ROBINSON CRUSOE . 9

just to me, yet I fell into terrible misfortunes in this voyage; and the first was :

this, viz., our ship making her course towards the Canary Islands, was surprised.”

in the gray of the morning by a Moorish rover of Sallee, who gave chase to us
with all the sail he could make. About three in the afternoon he came up with









































































































































































































































































THH ATTACK BY THE SALLEE ROVER

us, and to cut short this melancholy part of our story, our ship being disabled,
and three of our men killed and eight wounded, we were obliged to yield,
and were carried all prisoners into Sallee, a port belonging to the Moors.

The usage I had there was not so dreadful as at first I apprehended; nor was
Y carried up the country to the Emperor’s court, as the rest of our men were,
but was kept by the captain of the rover as his proper prize, and made his slave,
being young and nimble, and fit for his business. When he went to sea, he left
me on shore to look after his little garden, and do the common drudgery of

peeeiene
10 ROBINSON CRUSOE

slaves about his house; and when he came home again from his cruise, he
ordered me to lie in the cabin to look after the ship.

Here I meditated nothing but my escape, and what method I might take to
effect it; but found no way that had the least probability in it. After about two
years, an odd circumstance presented itself, which put the thought of making
some attempt for my liberty, again in my head. My patron lying at home longer
than usual without fitting out his ship, he used constantly to take the ship’s
pinnace, and go out into the road a-fishing; and as he always took me and a
young Moresco with him to row the boat, we made him very merry, and I
proved very dexterous in catching fish, insomuch that sometimes he would send
me with a Moor, one of his kinsmen, and the youth, the Moresco, as they called
him, to catch a dish of fish for him. |

It happened one time that, going a-fishing with him in a calm morning, a fog
rose so thick, that though we were not half a league from the shore, we lost
sight of it; and rowing we knew not whither or which way, we labored all day
and all the next night; and when the morning came, we found we had pulled
out to sea instead of pulling in for the shore. However, we got well in again, :
though with a great deal of labor, and some danger.

But our patron resolved he would not go a-fishing any more without a com-
pass and some provision; so he ordered the carpenter of his ship to build a little
state-room or cabin, in the middle of the long-boat, which had in it room for
him to lie with a slave or two, and a table to eat on, with some lockers to put
in some bottles of such liquor as he uaa fit to drink; and particularly his
bread, rice, and coffee.

It happened that he appointed to go out in this boat, with two or three Moors
of some distinction in that place, and he had provided a larger store of provi-
sions than usual; and had ordered me to get ready three fusils with powder
and shot, which were on board his ship, for that they designed some sport of
fowling as well as fishing. I got all things ready as he had directed; and waited
the next morning with the boat, when by-and-by my patron came on board
ROBINSON CRUSOE 11

















































































CRUSOE A SLAVE

alone, and told me his guests had put off going, and ordered me, with the man
as usual, to go out with the boat and catch them some fish.

This moment, my former notions of deliverance darted into my thoughts,
for now I found I was likely to have a little ship at my command; and my master
being gone, I prepared to furnish myself, not for fishing business, but for a
voyage. My first contrivance was to make a pretence to speak to the Moor,
to get something for our subsistence on board; for I told him we must not pre-
sume to eat of our patron’s bread. He said, that was true; so he brought a
large basket of rusk or biscuit of their kind, and three jars with fresh water,
into the boat. I knew where my patron’s case of bottles stood, and I conveyed
them into the boat while the Moor was on shore. I conveyed also a great lump
12 : _ ROBINSON CRUSOE

of beeswax into the boat, with a parcel of twine or thread, a hatchet, 4 saw, and
a hammer, all of which were of great use to us afterwards, especially the wax
to make candles. Thus furnished with everything needful we sailed out of
the port to fish.

After we had fished some time and caught nothing, for when I had fish op
my hook I would not pull them up, that he might not see them, I said to the
Moor, “‘This will not do; we must stand farther off.” He, thinking no harm, .
agreed, and I ran the boat out near a league farther, and then brought her to
as if I would fish; when, giving the boy the helm, I stepped to where the Moor
was, and making as if I stooped for something behind him, I took him by sur-
prise with my arm under his waist, and tossed him clear overboard into the sea.

Â¥ He rose immediately, for he swam like a cork, and called to me; begged to be
taken in, telling me he would go all over the world with me. He swam so strong
after the boat, that he would have reached me very quickly, there being but
little wind; upon which I stepped into the cabin, and fetching one of the fowl-
ing-pieces, I presented it at him, and told him I had done him no hurt, and if
he would be quiet I would do him none; “But,” said IT, “you swim well enough
to reach the shore, and the sea is calm; make the best of your way to shore, and
T will do you no harm; but if you come near the boat, I'll shoot you through the
head, for I am resloved to have my liberty.” So he turned himself about,
and swam for shore, and I make no doubt but he reached it with ease, for he
was an excellent swimmer.

When he was gone, I turned to the boy, whom they called “‘Xury,” and said,
“Xury, if you will be faithful to me, Pll make you a great man; but if you will
not stroke your face to be true to me” (that is, swear by Mahomet and his

father’s beard), ““I must throw you into the sea too.” The boy smiled in my
face, and spoke so innocently, that I could not mistrust him, and he swore to be
faithful to me, and go all over the world with me.

While I was in the view of the Moor that.was swimming, I stood directly out
to sea, that they might think me gone towards the Straits’ mouth. But as
ROBINSON CRUSOE 13

soon as it grew dusk in the evening, I changed my course, that I might keep in
with the shore; and having a fair, fresh gale of wind, and a smooth, quiet sea,
T made such sail that I believed by the next day at three o’clock in the afternoon,
when I first made land, I could not be less than one hundred and fifty miles
beyond the Emperor of Morocco’s dominions. |











































































































































































































































































































































CRUSOE ESCAPES WITH XURY

Yet such was the fright IT had taken at the Moors, that I would not stop till
T had sailed in that manner five days; and then, the wind shifting to the south-
ward, I concluded also that if any of our vessels were in chase of me, they also
would now give over; so I ventured to make to the coast, and came to an anchor
in the mouth of a little river, I knew not what nor where. TI neither saw nor
desired to see any people; the principal thing I wanted was fresh water. We

came into this creek in the evening, resolving to swim on shore as soon as it
14 ROBINSON CRUSOE

was dark, and discover the country. But as soon as it was quite dark, we heard
such dreadful noises of the barking, roaring, and howling of wild creatures, of
we knew not what kinds, that the poor boy was ready to die with fear, and
begged of me not to go on shore till day. “Well, Xury,” said I, “then I won’t,
but it may be we may see men by day, who will be as bad to us as those lions.”
“Then we give them the shoot-gun,” says Xury, laughing, “make them run
way.”’. Such English Xury spoke by conversing among us slaves. However,
T was glad to see the boy so cheerful, and as his advice was good, I took it. We
dropped our little anchor, and lay still all night. I say still, for we slept none;
for in two or three hours we saw vast, great creatures (we knew not what to call
them), of many sorts, come down to the sea-shore, and run into the water,
wallowing and washing themselves and they made such hideous howlings and
yellings that I never indeed heard the like.

Xury was dreadfully frighted, and indeed so was I too; but we were both
more frighted when we heard one mighty creature come swimming towards our
boat. Xury cried to me to weigh the anchor and row away. “No,” says I,
“Xury, we can slip our cable, with the buoy to it, and go to sea; they cannot
follow us far.” I had no sooner said so but I perceived the creature, within two
oars’ length. I immediately stepped to the cabin-door, and taking up my gun,
fired at him; upon which he turned about and swam towards the shore again.

But it is impossible to describe the horrid noises and hideous cries and howl-
ings that were raised, as well upon the edge of the shore as higher within the
country, upon the noise or report of the gun. This convinced me that there
was no going on shore for us in the night upon that coast; and how to venture
on shore in the day was another question too; for to have fallen into the hands
of any of the savages, had been as bad as to have fallen into the paws of lions
and tigers.

Be that as it would, we were obliged to go on shore somewhere or other for
water. Xury said, if I would let him go on shore with one of the jars, he would
find if there was any water, and bring some to me. I asked him why he would
ROBINSON CRUSOE 15

go? why T should not go, and he stay in the boat? ‘The boy answered with so
much affection, that made me love him ever after. Says he, “If wild mans
come, they eat you, and go wey.” “Well, Xury,” said I, “we will both go, and
if the wild men come, we will kill them, they shall eat neither of us.” So we
hauled the boat in as near the shore as we thought was proper, and waded on
shore, carrying nothing but our arms, and two jars for water.

I did not care to go out of sight of the boat, but the boy, seeing a low place
about a mile up the country, rambled to it, and by and by I saw him come run-
ning towards me. I thought he was pursued, and I ran forward towards him
to help him; but when I came nearer to him, I saw something hanging over his
shoulders, which was a creature that he had shot, like a hare, but different in
color, and longer legs; however, we were very glad of it, and it was very good
meat; but the great joy that poor Xury came with, was to tell me he had found
good water, and seen no wild mans. !
- But we found afterwards that we need not take such pains for water, for a
little higher up the creek where we were, we found the water fresh when the
tide was out, so we filled our jars, and prepared to go on our way.

T knew very well that the Islands of the Canaries, and the Cape de Verd
Tslands also; lay not far off from the coast. But I knew not where to look for
them. My hope was that if I stood along this coast till I came to that part
where the English traded, I should find some of their vessels upon their usual
design of trade, that would relieve and take us in.

Once or twice in the day-time, I thought I saw the Pico of Teneriffe, being
the high top of the mountain Teneriffe in the Canaries and had a great mind to
venture out, in hopes of reaching thither; but having failed twice, I was forced
in again by contrary winds, the sea also going too high for my little vessel; so I
resolved to pursue my first design; and keep along the shore.

Several times I was obliged to land for fresh water, and once in particular,
being early in the morning, we came to an anchor under a little point of land,
which was pretty high; and the tide beginning to flow, we lay still to go farther
16 ROBINSON CRUSOE

in. Xury, whose eyes were more about him than it seems mine were, calls
softly to me, and tells me that we had best go farther off the shore; “for,” says
he, “look, yonder lies a dreadful monster on the side of that hillock, fast asleep.”
I looked where he pointed, and saw a terrible great lion that lay on the side of
the shore. “Xury,” says I, “ you shall go on shore and kill him.” Xury looked
frighted, and said, “‘ Me kill! he eat me at one mouth;” one mouthful he meant.
However, I said no more to the boy, but bade him be still, and took our biggest
gun, and aimed as well as I could with the first piece to have shot him in the
head, but the slug hit his leg about the knee, and broke the bone. He started
up growling at first, but finding his leg broke, gave the most hideous roar that
ever I heard. I fired again, and shot him in the head, and had the pleasure 7
to see him drop.

This was game indeed to us, but this was no food; and I was very sorry to lose
the charges of powder and shot upon a creature that was good for nothing to us.
T bethought myself, however, perhaps the skin of him might be of some value
to us; and I resolved to take off his skin if I could. So Xury and I went to work
with him. It took us up both the whole day, but at last we got off the hide of
him, and spreading it on the top of our cabin, the sun effectually dried it in two
days’ time, and it afterwards served me to lie upon.

After this stop, we made on to the southward continually for ten or twelve
days. My design in this was to make the River Gambia or Senegal; that isto
say, anywhere about the Cape de Verd, where I was in hopes to meet with ~
_ some European ship; and if I did not, I knew not what course I had to take,
but to seek for the islands, or perish there among the negroes. When I had
pursued this resolution about ten days longer, as I have said, I began to see
that the land was inhabited; and in two or three places, we saw people stand
upon the shore to look at us; we could also perceive they were quite black, and —
stark naked. I was once inclined to have gone on shore to them; but Xury said
to me, “No, go, no go.” However, I hauled in nearer the shore, and I found

they ran along the shore by me a good way: they had no weapons in their hands,
ROBINSON CRUSOE 1?

except one, who had a long stick, which Xury said was a lance, and that they
could throw them a great way with good aim; so I kept at a distance, but talked
with them by signs as well as I could; and particularly made signs for something
to eat: they beckoned to me to stop my boat, and they would fetch me some
meat. Upon this, I lay by, and two of them ran up into the country, and in
less than half an hour came back, and brought with them two pieces of dry
flesh and some corn, but how to come at it was our next dispute, for I would
not venture on shore to them, and they were as much afraid of us, but they took
a safe way for us all, for they brought it to the shore and laid it down, and went
and stood a great way off till we fetched it on board, and then came close to
us again.

We made signs of thanks to them, for we had nothing to make them amends;
but an opportunity offered that very instant to oblige them wonderfully: for
while we were lying on the shore, came two mighty creatures, one pursuing the
other from the mountains towards the sea. The man that had the lance or dart
did not fly from them, but the rest did. ‘The two creatures ran directly into the
water, and swam about; at last one of them began to come nearer our boat than
at first I expected; but I lay ready for him, for I had loaded my gun with all
possible expedition. As soon as he came fairly within my reach, I fired, and
shot him directly in the head: he immediately made to the shore; but between
the wound, which was his mortal hurt, and the strangling of the water, he died
just before he reached the shore.

It is impossible to express the astonishment of these poor creatures at the
noise and fire of my gun. But when they saw the creature dead, and that I
made signs to them to come to the shore, they took heart, and came to the
shore, and began to search for the creature. I found him by his blood staining
the water; and by the help of a rope, they dragged him on shore, and found that
it was a most curious leopard.

The other creature, frighted with the flash of fire and the noise of the gun,
swam to the shore, and ran up directly to the mountains from whence they came.
18 ROBINSON CRUSOE

I found quickly the negroes were for eating the flesh of this creature, so I was
willing to have them take it as a favor from me; which, when I made signs te
them that they might take it, they were very thankful for. Then I made signs
to them for some water, and held out one of my jars to them, turning its bottom
upward, to show that it was empty, and that I wanted to have it filled. ‘They
called immediately to some of their friends, and there came two women, and
brought a great vessel made of earth, and burnt, as I suppose in the sun; this
they set down for me, as before, and I sent Xury on shore with my jars and filled
them all three.

I was now furnished with roots and corn, such as it was, and water; and leav-
ing my friendly negroes, I made forward for about eleven days more, till I came
in sight of the Cape de Verd Islands. On’‘a sudden, Xury cried out, “Master,
master, a ship with a sail!” and the foolish boy was frighted out of his wits,
thinking it must needs be some of his master’s ships sent to pursue us. I
immediately saw that it was a Portuguese ship; upon which I stretched out to
the sea as much as I could, resolving to speak with them if possible.

With all the sail I could make, I found I should not be able to come in their
way, but that they would be gone by before I could make any signal to them;
they, it seems, saw me by the help of their perspective glasses, so they shortened
sail to let me come up. I was encouraged with this, and as I had my patron’s
ensign on board, I made a waft of it to them for a signal of distress, and fired
a gun. Upon these signals they very kindly brought to, and lay by for me;
and in about three hours’ time I came up with them.

They asked me what I was, in Portuguese, and in Spanish, and in French,
but I understood none of them; but at last a Scotch sailor, who was on board,
called to me; and I answered him, and told him I was an Englishman, that had
made my escape out of slavery from the Moors at Sallee; they then bade me
come on board, and very kindly took me in, and all my goods.

It was an inexpressible joy to me, which any one will believe, that I was thus i

delivered, as T esteemed it, from such a miserable and almost helpless condition
ROBINSON CRUSOE 19

as I was in; and I immediately offered all I had to the captain of the ship, as a
return for my deliverance; but he generously told me, he would take nothing
from me, but that all I had should be delivered safe to me, when I came to the
Brazils. 3 .

As he was charitable in this proposal, so he was just in the performance to a
tittle; for he ordered the seamen that none should offer to touch anything I had:
then he took everything into his own possession, and gave me back an exact
inventory of them, that I might have them, even to my three earthen jars.

As to my boat, it was a very good one; and that he saw, and'told me, he would
buy it of me for the ship’s use. He offered me also sixty pieces of eight for my
boy Xury, but I was very loath to sell the poor boy’s liberty, who had assisted
me so faithfully in procuring my own. However, when I let him know my
' reason, he owned it to be just, and offered me this medium, that he would give
‘the boy an obligation to set him free in ten years, if he turned Christian: upon

this, and Xury saying he was willing to go to him, I let the captain have him.

We had a very good voyage to the Brazils, and J arrived in the Bay de Todos
los Santos, or All Saints Bay, in about twenty-two days after. The generous
treatment the captain gave me, I can never enough remember: he would take
nothing of me for my passage, and what I was willing to sell, he bought of me:
in a word, I made about two hundred and twenty pieces of eight of eh my
cargo; and with this stock, I went on shore in the Brazils

I had not been long here, but being recommended to the house of a good,
honest planter, I lived with him some time, and acquainted myself, by that
means, with the manner of their planting and making of sugar; and seeing how
well the planters lived, and how they got rich suddenly, I resolved, I would turn
planter among them; resolving, in the meantime, to find out some way to get
my money, which I had left in London, remitted to me. ‘To this purpose, I
purchased as much land as my money would reach, and formed a plan for my
plantation and settlement. ,

T had a neighbor, a Portuguese of Lisbon, but born of English parents, whose
20 < ROBINSON CRUSOE

name was Wells, and in much such circumstances as I was. My stock was
but low, as well as his; and we rather planted for food than anything else, for
about two years. However, we began to increase, so that the third year we
planted tobacco, and made each of us a large piece of ground ready for planting
canes in the year to come.

I was in some measure settled before the captain departed from the Brazils.
One day I went to him and told him what stock I had in London, desiring his
help in getting it remitted; to which he readily consented, but would ony have
me send for half of my money lest it should miscarry.

His kindness to me was great, for he not only procured the money I had
drawn for, but sent me over a servant, with a cargo of salable goods, together
with tools, iron work, and utensils necessary for my plantation. I found means
to sell the goods at a very ereat advantage, so that I was now infinitely beyond
my poor neighbor, and the first thing I did, I bought me a negro slave, and a
European servant also: I mean another besides that the captain sent me.

I went on with great success in my plantation, and had I continued in the
station I was now in, I had room for all the happy things to have yet befallen
me, for which my father so earnestly recommended a quiet, retired life. But
T must go and leave the happy view I had of being a rich and thriving man in
ray new plantation, only to pursue a rash and immoderate desire of rising faster

than the nature of the thing admitted; and thus I cast myself down again into | ~

the deepest gulf of human misery that ever man fell into.

Having lived almost four years in the Brazils, and beginning to thrive and
prosper very well upon my plantation, I had contracted acquaintance and
friendship among my fellow-planters, and, in my discourse among them, I
had frequently given them an account of my two voyages to the coast of Guinea,
the manner of trading with the negroes there, and how easy it was to purchase
upon the coast for trifles—such as beads, toys, knives, scissors, hatchets, bits
of glass, and the like—not only gold-dust, Guinea grains, elephants’ teeth, etc.,

but negroes, for the service of the Brazils, in great numbers.
ROBINSON CRUSOE Q1

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CRUSOE AND THE PLANTERS

It happened, being in company one day with some merchants and planters
of my acquaintance, and talking of those things very earnestly, three of them
came to me the next morning, and told me that they had a mind to fit out a ship
to go to Guinea; that they had all plantations as well as I, and were straitened
for nothing so much as servants; that they could not publicly sell the negroes
when they came home, so they desired to make but one voyage, to bring the
negroes on shore privately, and divide them among their own plantations; and
the question was, whether I would go their supercargo in the ship, to manage
the trading part; and they offered me that I should have my equal share of the
ae ROBINSON CRUSOE

negroes, without providing any part of the stock. I could not resist the offer,
and told them I would go if they would look after my plantation in my ab- |
sence, and would dispose of it as I should direct, if I miscarried. This they
all engaged to do. |

The ship being fitted out, I went on board in an evil hour again, the Ist of
September, 1659, being the same day eight years that I went from my father
and mother at Hull. The same day I went on board, we set sail, standing away
to the northward upon our own coasts, with design to stretch over for the
African coast. We had very good weather, all the way upon our own coast till
we came to the keight of Cape St. Augustino; from whence, keeping farther off
at sea, we lost sight of land, and steered as if we were bound for the isle Fer-
nando de Noronha. In this course we passed the line in about twelve days’
time, and were, by our last observation, in seven degrees twenty-two minutes
northern latitude, when a violent tornado, or hurricane, took us quite out of
our knowledge. For twelve days together we could do nothing but drive, and
during these twelve days, I need not say that I expected every day to be swallow-
ed up; nor did any in the ship expect to save their lives. 2

About the twelfth day, the weather abating a little, the master made an ob-
servation as well as he could, and found that he was in about eleven degress of
north latitude, but that he was twenty-two degrees of longtitude difference west
from Cape St. Augustino; so that he found he was gotten upon the coast of
Guiana, and now he began to consult with me what course he should take, for
the ship was leaky, and very much disabled, and he was for going directly back
to the coast of Brazil.

I was positively against that; and looking over the charts of the sea-coast of
America with him, we resolved to stand away for Barbadoes; which we might
easily perform, as we hoped, in about fifteen days’ sail; whereas we could not
possibly make our voyage to the coast of Africa without some assistance both
to our ship and to ourselves.

With this design we exchanged our course, in order to reach some of our
ROBINSON CRUSOE 98

English islands, where I hoped for relief; but our voyage was otherwise deter-
mined; for a second storm came upon us, which carried us away with the same
impetuosity westward, and drove us out cf the way of all human commerce.

In this distress, the wind still blowing very hard, one of our men early one
morning cried out, “Land!” and we had no sooner run out of the cabin to look
out, in hopes of seeing whereabouts in the world we were, than the ship struck
upon a sand, and in a moment, the sea broke over her in such a manner that we
expected we should all have perished immediately.

We knew nothing where we were, and we could not so much as hope to have
the ship hold many minutes without breaking in pieces, unless the winds, by a
kind of miracle, should turn immediately about.

In this distress, the mate of our vessel lays hold of the ship’s boat, and with --
the help of the rest of the men, they got her flung over the side: and getting all
into her, let go, and committed ourselves, being eleven in number, to God’s
mercy and the wild seas. ©

After we had rowed, or rather driven, about a league and a half, a raging
wave, mountain-like, came rolling astern of us, and took us with such a fury
that it overset the boat at once. Though I swam very well, yet I could not deliver
myself from the waves so as to draw breath, till that wave having driven me, or
rather carried me, a vast way on towards the shore, and having spent itself,
_ went back, and left me upon the land almost dry, but half dead with water I
took in. Seeing myself nearer the mainland than I expected, I got upon my
feet, and endeavored to make on towards the land as fast as I could, before
another wave should return and take me up again; but I soon found it was im-
possible to avoid it; for I saw the sea come after me as high as a great hill.

The wave that came upon me again buried me at once twenty or thirty feet
deep in its own body, and I could feel myself carried with a mighty force and
- swiftness towards the shore a very great way. J was covered with water a good
while, but not so long but I held it out, and felt ground again with my feet. I

stood still a few moments to recover breath, and then took to my heels. and ran
Q4, ROBINSON CRUSOE

with what strength I had, farther towards the shore. But neither would this
deliver me from the fury of the sea, which came pouring in after me again; and
twice more I was lifted up by the waves and carried forwards as before, the
shore being very flat.

The last time of these two had well-nigh been fatal to me; for the sea dashed
me against a piece of a rock, but I recovered a little, and resolved to hold fast by
the rock, till the wave went back. Now, as the waves were not so high as at
first, being nearer land, I held my hold till the waves abated, and then fetched
another run, which brought me so near the shore that the next run I took I got
to the mainland; where I clambered up the cliffs of the shore, and sat me down
upon the grass, quite out of reach of the water. |

I was now landed, and safe on shore, and began to look up and thank God
that my life was saved, in a case wherein there was some minutes before scarce
any room to hope. I walked about on the shore, lifting up my hands, and my
whole being, as I may say, wrapt up in a contemplation of my deliverance;
reflecting upon all my comrades that were drowned, and that there should not
be one soul saved but myself; for, as for them, I never saw them aftefwards,
or any sign of them, except three of their hats, one cap, and two shoes that were
not fellows. ;

After I had solaced my mind with the comfortable part of my condition, I
began to look round me, to’see what kind of place I was in, and what was next
to be done; and I soon found my comforts abate, for I was wet, had no clothes
to shift me, nor anything either to eat or drink, to comfort me; neither did I see
any prospect before me but that of perishing with hunger, or being devoured
by wild beasts. In a word, I had nothing about me but a knife, a tobacco-
pipe, and a little tobacco in a box. Night coming upon me, I began, with a
heavy-heart, to consider what would be my lot if there were any ravenous beasts
in that country. All the remedy that offered to my thoughts, at that time, was
to get up into a thick, bushy tree, which grew near me, and where I resolved to

sit all night, and consider the next day what death should die, for as yet I saw
ROBINSON CRUSOE Q5

no prospect of life. Being excessively fatigued, I fell fast asleep, and slept as
comfortably as, I believe, few could have done in my condition.

When I waked it was broad day, the weather clear, and the storm abated,
but that which surprised me most was, that the ship was lifted off in the night
from*the sand where she lay, by the swelling of the tide, and was driven up
almost as far as the rock which I at first mentioned, where I had been so bruised
by the wave dashing me against it.

When I came down from my apartment in the tree, I looked about me again,
and the first thing I found was the boat, which lay about two miles off on
my right hand. I walked as far as I could upon the shore to have got to her;
but found a neck, or inlet, of water between me and the boat; so I came
back for the present, being more intent upon getting at the ship, where I hoped
to find something for my present subsistence.

A little after noon I found the sea very calm, and the tide ebbed so far out,
that I could come within a quarter of a mile of the ship. I pulled off my clothes,
for the weather was hot to extremity, and took the water. When I came to
the ship, I espied a small piece of rope, hanging down, and by the help of that
rope got up into the forecastle of the ship. I found that all the ship’s provisions
were dry, and being very well disposed to eat, I went to the bread-room, and
filled my pockets with biscuit, and ate it as I went about other things.

Now I wanted nothing but a boat, to furnish myself with many things I fore-
saw would be very necessary to me.

We had several spare yards, and a spare topmast or two in the ship; and I
flung as many of them overboard as I could manage, tying every one with a
rope, that they might not drive away. When this was done I went down the
ship’s side, and tied four of them together at both ends, as in the form of a raft,
and laying two or three short pieces of plank upon them, crossways, I found I
could walk upon it very well, but that it was not able to bear any great weight.
So I went to work, and with the carpenter’s saw, I cut a spare top-mast into three
lengths, and added them to my raft, with a greal deal of labor and pains. 7

¢
26 | ROBINSON CRUSOE

My next care was what to load it with, but I was not long considering this.
I first laid all the planks or boards upon it that I could get, and three of the
seamen’s chests, which IT had broken open and emptied. The first of these I
filled with bread, rice, three Dutch cheeses, five pieces of dried goat’s flesh,
and a little remainder of European corn. I found several cases of bottles
‘ belonging to our skipper, in which were some cordial waters; and, in all, about
five or six gallons of arrack. These I stowed by themselves. While I was
doing this, I found the tide began to flow, though very calm; and I had the
mortification to see my coat, shirt, and waistcoat, which I had left on shore
upon the sand, swim away. As for my breeches, which were only linen, and
open-kneed, I swam on board in them and my stockings. However, this put
me upon rummaging for clothes, of which I found enough, but took no more
than I wanted for present use, for I had other things which my eye was more
upon; as, first, tools to work with on shore, and it was after long searching that
I found out the carpenter’s chest, which was indeed a very useful prize to me.

My next care was for some ammunition and arms. There were two very
good fowling pieces in the great cabin, and two pistols. ‘These I secured first,
with some powder-horns, a small bag of shot, and two old, rusty swords. I
knew there were three barrels of powder in the ship, but knew not where our
gunner had stowed them; but with much search I found them.

Having found two or three broken oars, belonging to the boat, and besides
the tools which were in the chest, two saws, an axe, and a hammer, with this
cargo I put to sea. For a mile, or thereabouts, my raft went very well, only that
I found it drive a little distant from the place where I had landed before.

Then there appeared before me a little opening of the land. I found a strong
current of the tide set into it; so I guided my raft as well as I could, to keep in
the middle of the stream.

But here I had like to have suffered a second shipwreck, for, knowing nothing
of the coast, my raft ran aground at one end of it upon a shoal, and not being
aground at the other end, it wanted but a little that all my cargo had slipped
ROBINSON CRUSOE Qy



CRUSOE LOADING HIS RAFT

off towards the end that was afloat, but holding up the chests with all my might,
T stood in that manner near half an hour, in which time the rising of the water

brought me a little more upon a level; and a little after, the water still rising,
28 ROBINSON CRUSOE

my raft floated again, and I thrust her off, and then driving up higher, I at
length found myself in the mouth of a little river. I looked on both sides for a
proper place to get to shore, and at length I spied a little cove on the right shore
of the creek, to which, with great pain and difficulty, I guided my raft, near a
fiat piece of ground, which I expected the water would flow over; and so it did.
As soon as I found water enough, I thrust her upon that flat piece of ground,
and there fastened or moored her, by sticking my two oars into the ground—
one on one side, near one end, and one on the other side, near the other end:
_and thus I lay till the water ebbed away, and left my raft and all my cargo safe
on shore.

My next work was to view the country, and seek a proper place for my habita-
tion. There was a hill not above a mile from me, which rose up very steep and
high. I took out one of the fowling-pieces, and one of the pistols, and a horn
of powder; and thus armed, I travelled for discovery up to the top of that hill,
where I saw that I was in an island environed every way with the sea; no land
to be seen except some rocks, which lay a great way off, and two small islands,
less than this, which lay about three leagues to the west.

T found also that the island I was in was barren, and uninhabited, except by
wild beasts. Yet I saw abundance of fowls, but knew not their kinds; neither,
when I killed them; could I tell what was fit for food, and what not. At my
coming back, I shot at a great bird, which I saw sitting upon a tree, on the side
of a great wood. I had no sooner fired but from all parts of the wood there
arose an innumerable number of fowls of many sorts, making a confused
screaming and crying, every one according to his usual note, but not one of them
of any kind that I knew. As for the creature I killed, I took it to be a kind of
hawk. Its flesh was carrion, and fit for nothing. I came back to my raft,
and fell to work to bring my cargo on shore, which took me up the rest of the
day. What to do with myself at night I knew not. However, as well as I
could, I barricaded myself round with the chests and boards that I had brought
on shore, and made a kind of hut for that night’s lodging.
ROBINSON CRUSOE 29

I now began to consider that I might yet get a great many things out of the
ship which would be useful to me, and I resolved to make another voyage on
board the vessel, if possible.

T got on board the ship as before, and prepared a second raft; and brought
away several things very useful to me; as, first, in the carpenter’s stores I found

- two or three bags full of nails and spikes, a great screw-jack, a dozen or two of
hatchets, and, above all, that most useful thing called a grindstone. Besides
these things, I took all the men’s clothes that I could find, and a spare fore-top-
sail, a hammock, and some bedding; and with this I loaded my second raft,
and brought them all safe on shore, to my very great comfort.

I was under some apprehension during my absence from the land, that at

_ least my provisions might be devoured on shore; but when I came back I found
no sign of any visitor; only there sat a creature like a wild cat upon one of the
chests, which, when I came towards it, ran away a little distance, and stood
still. I presented my gun to her, but, as she did not understand it, she was
perfectly unconcerned at it, nor did she offer to stir away; upon which I tossed
her a bit of biscuit, and she went to it, smelled at it, and ate it, and looked (as
pleased) for more; but I thanked her, and could spare no more; so she marched
off, = :

Having got my second cargo on shore, I went to work to make me a little
tent, with the sail, and some poles which I cut for that purpose ; and into this
tent I brought everything that I knew would spoil either with rain or sun; and
T piled all the empty chests and casks up in a circle round the tent, to fortify
it from any sudden attempt, either from man or beast.

When I had done this, I blocked up the door of the tent with some boards
within, and an empty chest set up on end without; and spreading one of the
beds upon the ground, I went to bed for the first time, and slept very quietly

_all night. I was very weary and heavy; for the night before I had slept little,
and had labored very hard all day.

While the ship sat upright in that posture, I thought I ought to get everything
80 ROBINSON CRUSOE

gut of her that I could; so every day, I went on board, and brought away some-
thing or other. After I had made five or six such voyages as these, and thought
I had nothing more to expect from the ship that was worth my meddling with
—I say, after all this, I found a great hogshead of bread, three large runlets of
tum, or spirits, a box of fine sugar, and a barrel of fine flour. I got all this ~*
safe on shore also, though at several times.

The next day I made another voyage, and got two cables and a hawser on
shore, with all the iron-work I could get: and having cut down the spritsail
yard, and the mizzen yard, and everything I could to make a large raft, I loaded
it with all those heavy goods and came away. But my good luck began to leave
me, for this raft was so unwieldy, and so overladen, that after I was entered
the little cove, where I had landed the rest of my goods, it overset, and threw
_ me and all my cargo into the water. However, when the tide was out, I got
most of the pieces of cable ashore, and some of the iron, though with infinite _
labor. After this, I went every day on board, and brought away what I could
get.

Preparing the twelfth time to go on pnoara, I found the wind began to rise.
However, at low water I went on board, and though I thought I had rummaged
the cabin so efiectually that nothing more could be found, yet I discovered a
locker with drawers in it, in one of which I found two or three razors, and one
pair of large scissors, with some ten or a dozen of good knives and forks; in
another I found about thirty-six pounds value in money. I smiled to myself
at the sight of this money. “Oh, drug!” said I aloud, “what art thou good
for? ‘Thou art not worth to me—no, not: the taking off the ground; one of
those knives is worth all this heap. However, upon second thoughts, I took it
away; and wrapping all in a piece of canvas, I began to think of making another
raft; but while I was preparing this, I found the sky overcast, and the wind
began to rise, and in a quarter of an hour it blew a fresh gale from the shore.
It presently occurred to me that it was in vain to pretend to make a raft with
the wind off shore. Accordingly, I let myself down into the water, and swam
























































































































































































































































THE WRECK
82 ROBINSON CRUSOE

across the channel which lay between the ship and the sands, and even that with
- difficulty enough, partly with the weight of the things I had about me, and
partly from the roughness of the water.

But I was gotten home to my little tent, where I lay with all my wealth Ebel
me very secure. It blew very hard all that night, and in the morning, when I
looked out, behold, no more ship was to be seen.

My thoughts were now wholly employed about securing myself against either
savages, or wild beasts, if any were in the island; and I had many thoughts of
the method how to do this, and whether I should make me a cave in the earth,
or a tent upon the earth; and, in short, I resolved upon both.

[ found a little plain on the side of a rising hill, whose front towards this little
plain was steep as a house-side, so that nothing could come down upon me from
the top. On the side of the rock there was a hollow space, worn a little way in,
like the entrance or door of a cave; but there was not really BEY cave, or way
into the rock, at all.

On the flat of the green, just below this hollow place, I resolved to pitch my
tent. Before I set up my tent, I drew a half-circle before the hollow place,
which took in about ten yards in its semi-diameter from the rock, and twenty
yards in its diameter from its beginning and ending.

In this half-circle I pitched two rows of strong stakes, driving them into the
ground till they stood very firm like piles. Then I ‘took the pieces of cable
which I cut in the ship, and laid them in rows between these two rows of stakes,
up to the top, placing other stakes in the inside, leaning against them, about two
feet and a half high, like a spur to a post; and this fence was so strong that
neither man nor beast could get into it or over it.

T’he entrance into this place I made to be, not by a door, but by a short ladder
to go over the top; which ladder, when I was in, I lifted over after me; and so
I was completely fenced in and fortified, as I thought, from all the world.

Into this fence, or fortress, with infinite labor, I carried all my riches, all my

provisions, ammunition, and stores, of which you have the account above;




‘'GRUSOE MAKES A LITTLE TENT WITH A SAIB

e
84 : ROBINSON CRUSOE

and I made mé a large tent also, to preserve me from the rains, that in one part
of the year are very violent there.

Into this tent I brought all my provisions, and loca: that would spoil
by the wet; and having thus inclosed all my goods, I made up the entrance, and
so passed and re-passed, as I said, by a short ladder. -

When I had done this, I began to work my way into the rock, and bringing all
the earth and stones that I dug down out through my tent, I laid them up within
my fence, in the nature of a terrace, so that it raised the ground within about a
foot and a half; and thus I made me a cave, just behind my tent, which served
me like a cellar to my house.

While this was doing, I went out at least once every day with my gun, to see
if I could kill anything fit for food; and I presently discovered that there were
goats in the island. ‘The first shot I made among these creatures, I killed a
she-goat, which had a little kid by her. When the old one fell, the kid stood
stock-still by her, till I came and took her up; and not only so, but when I
carried the old one with me upon my shoulders, the kid followed me quite to
my inclosure; upon which I laid down the dam, and took the kid in my arms,
and carried it over my pale, in hopes to have bred it up tame; but it would not
eat; so I was forced to kill it and eat it myself. ‘These two supplied me with
flesh a great while.

It came into my thoughts that I should lose my Tole of time for want of .
books, and pen, and ink, and should even forget the Sabbath-day from the
working-days; but to prevent this, I cut it with my knife upon a large post,
in capital letters; and making it into a great cross, I set it up on the shore where
. ] first landed, viz., “I came on shore here on the 30th of September, 1659.”

Upon the sides of this square post I cut every-day a notch with my knife, and
every seventh notch was as long again as the rest, and every first day of the
month as long again as that long one; and thus I kept my calendar.

In the next place, we are to observe that among the many things which I

brought from the ship in the several voyages which, as above mentioned, I
ROBINSON CRUSOE 35

nade to it, I got several things of less value, but not at all less useful to me,
which I omitted setting down before; as, in particular, pens, ink, and paper;
several parcels in the captain’s, mate’s gunner’s, and carpenter’s keeping;
three or four compasses, some mathematical instruments, charts, and books of
navigation, three Bibles, and several other books ; all which T carefully secured.
And I must not forget that we had in the ship a dog and two cats, of whose
history I must have occasion to say something in its place, for I carried both
the cats with me; and as for the dog, he jumped out of the ship of himself, and
swam on shore to me the day after I went on shore with my first cargo, and was
a trusty servant to me many years. ‘I wanted nothing that he could fetch me, nor
any company that he could make up to me.

The want of tools made every work I did go on heavily; and it was near a
whole year before I had entirely finished my little pale, or surrounded habita-
tion. But what need I have been concerned at the tediousness of anything I
had to do, seeing I had time enough to do it in? nor had I any other employ-
ment, except the ranging the island to seek for food. I have already described
this habitation, which was a tent under the side of a rock, surrounded with a
strong pale of posts and cables; but I might now rather call it by a wall, for I
raised a kind of wall up against it of turfs, about two feet thick, on the outside;
and after some time (I think it was a year and a half) I raised rafters from it,
leaning to the rock, and thatched or covered it with boughs of trees, and such
things as I could get to keep out the rain, which I found at some times of the
year very violent. -

IT have already observed how I brought all my goods into this pale, and into
the cave which I had made behind me. But I must observe, too, that at first
this was a confused heap of goods, which, as they lay in no order, so they took
up all my place; I had no room to turn myself: so I set myself to enlarge my
cave, and worked farther into the earth; for it was a loose, sandy rock, which
yielded easily to the labor I bestowed on it: and so when I found I was pretty
safe as to beasts of prey, I worked sideways, to the right hand, into the rock,
36 ROBINSON CRUSOE

and then turning to the right again, worked quite out, and made me a door to
come out on the outside of my paie or fortification.

And now I began to apply myself to make such necessary things as I found
I most wanted, particularly a chair and a table. I had never handled a tool
in my life; and yet, in time, by labor, application, and contrivance, I found,
at last, that I wanted nothing but I could have made it, especially if I had had
tools. However, I made abundance of things even without tools; and some
with no more tools than an adze and hatchet, which, perhaps, were never made
that way before, and that with infinite labor. For example, if I wanted a board,
I had no other way but to cut down a tree, set it on an edge before me, and hew
it flat on either side with my axe, till 1 had brought it to be as thin as a plank
and then dub it smooth with my adze.

I made me a table and a chair, as I observed above, in the first place; and this
I did out of the short pieces of boards that I brought on my raft from the ship.
But when I had wrought out some boards as above, I made large shelves, of
the breadth of a foot and an half, one over another, all along one side of my
cave, to lay all my tools, nails, and iron-work on; and, in a word, to separate
everything at large into their places, that I might come easily at them: also I
knocked pieces into the wall of the rock, to hang my guns and all things that
would hang up: so that had my cave been to be seen, it looked like a general
magazine of all necessary things; and I had everything so ready at my hand,
that it was a great pleasure to me to see all my goods in such order, and especial-
ly to find my stock of all necessaries so great.

And now it was when I began to keep a journal of every day’s employment;
for, indeed, at first, I was in too much hurry, and not only a hurry as to labor,
but in too much discomposure of mind; and my journal would have been full
of many dull things: for example, I must have said thus: “Sept. the 30th.
After I had got to shore, and had escaped drowning, instead of being thankful
to God for my deliverance, having first vomited, with the great quantity of salt

water which was gotten into my stomach, and recovering myself a litile, I ran
z ROBINSON CRUSOB 37



CRUSOE WRITING HIS JOURNAL

about the shore wringing my hands and beating my head and face, exclaiming
at my misery, and crying out I was undone, undone! till, tired and faint, I was
forced to lie down on the ground to repose, but durst not sleep, for fear of being
devoured.” :

Some days after this, and after I had been on board the ship, and had got all
T could out of her, yet I could not forbear getting up to the top of a little moun-
tain, and looking out to sea, in hopes of seeing a ship: then fancy at a vast
distance I spied a sail, please myself with the hopes of it, and then, after looking
steadily, till I was almost blind, lose it quite, and sit down and weep like a child,
and thus increase my misery by my folly.
38 ROBINSON CRUSOB

But having gotten over these things in some measure, and having settled my
household stuff and habitation, made me a table and a chair, and all as hand-
some about me as I could, I began I say to keep my journal, as long as it lasted;
for at last, having no more ink, I was forced to leave it off.

During this time I made rounds in the woods for game every day, when the
rain permitted me, and made frequent discoveries in these walks of something
or other to my advantage; particularly I found a kind of wild pigeons, which
build, not as wood-pigeons in a tree, but rather as house-pigeons, in the holes
of the rocks; and taking some young ones, I endeavored to breed them up tame,
and did so; but when they grew older they flew all away, which perhaps was at
first for want of feeding them, for I had nothing to give them. However, I fre-
quently found their nests and got their young ones, which were very good meat.

It happened that, rummaging my things, I found a little bag which had
been filled with corn for the feeding of poultry, I saw nothing in the bag
but husks and dust; and being willing to have the bag for some other use, I
shook the husks of corn out of it on one side of my fortification, under the rock.

I threw this stuff away, taking no notice of anything, and not so much as
remembering that I had thrown anything there, when, about a month after,
or thereabouts, I saw some few stalks of something green shooting upon the
eg .ground, which I fancied might be some plant I had not seen; but I was sur-
; prised and perfectly astonished when, after a little longer time, I saw about ten
or twelve ears come out which were perfectly green barley, of the same kind as
our European—nay, as our English barley.

It is impossible to express the astonishment and confusion of my thoughts
on this occasion, and I began to suggest that God had miraculously caused this
grain to grow without any help of seed sown, and that it was so directed purely
for my sustenance in that wild, miserable place.

This touched my heart a little, and brought tears out of my eyes, and I began
to bless myself that such a prodigy of Nature should happen upon my account;

and this was the more strange to me because I saw near it still, all along by the
ROBINSON CRUSOE 3S



CRUSOE DISCOVERS THE BARLEY

side of the rock, some other straggling stalks, which proved to be stalks of rice,
and which I knew, beeause I had seen it grow in Africa when I was ashore there.
Not doubting but that there was more in the place, I went all over that part of
the island, peering in every corner and under every rock, to see for more of it,
but I could not find any. At last it occurred to my thoughts that I had shaken
the bag of chickens’ meat out in that place; and the wonder began to cease.

T carefully saved the ears of this corn, you may be sure, in their season, which
was about the end of June; and laying up every corn, I resolved to sow them
all again, hoping in time to have some quantity, sufficient to supply me with
bread. Butit was not till the fourth year that I would allow myself the least
grain of this corn to eat, and even then but sparingly.

Besides this barley, there were, as above, twenty or thirty stalks of rice,
40 ROBINSON CRUSOE

which I preserved with the same care, and whose use was of the same kind,
or to the same purpose, viz., to make me bread, or rather food; for I found ways
to cook it up without baking, though I did that also after some time.

Not long after the wall of my castle was finished, I had almost had all my
labor overthrown at once, and myself killed. The case was thus:—As I was
busy just in the entrance into my cave, I was terribly frightened with a most
dreadful surprising thing indeed: for, all on a sudden, I found the earth came
tumbling down from the roof of my cave, and two of the posts I had set up in
the cave cracked in a frightful manner. Iran forwards to my ladder, and not
thinking myself safe there either, I got over my wall. I was no sooner stepped
down upon the firm ground, than I plainly saw it was a terrible earthquake;
for the ground I stood on shook three times at about eight minutes’ distance,
with three such shocks as would have overturned the strongest building that
could be supposed to have stood upon the earth. I was like one dead or stupi-
fied; and the motion of the earth made my stomach sick like one that was tossed
al sea.

After the third shock was over, and I felt no more for some time, I began to
take courage; and yet I had not heart enough to get over my wall again, but
still sat upon the ground, greatly cast down and disconsolate, not knowing what
to do. While I sat thus, it grew cloudy, as if it would rain; soon after that,
the wind arose so that in less than half an hour it blew a most dreadful hurri-
cane of wind. This held about three hours, and then began to abate; and then
in two hours more it was calm, and began to rain very hard. All this while I
sat upon the ground very much terrified and dejected; when on a sudden it
came into my thought that these winds and rain being the consequences of the
earthquake, the earthquake itself was spent and over, and I might venture
into my cave again. I went in and sat down in my tent; but the rain was so
violent that my tent was ready to be beaten down with it; and I was forced to
go into my cave, though very much afraid it should fall on my head. It con-

tinued raining all that night, and great part of the next day, so that I could not
ROBINSON CRUSOE 41

stir abroad; but my mind being more composed, I began to think of what I had
best to do; concluding that I must consider of building me some little hut in an
open place which I might surround with a wall. In the meantime it occurred
~ to me that it would require a vast deal of time for me to do this, and that I must
be contented to run the venture where I was, till I had formed a camp for myself,
and had secured it so as to remove it. !

The next morning I began to consider of means to put this resolve in execu-
tion; but I was at a great loss about my tools. I had three large axes, and
abundance of hatchets, but with much chopping and cutting knotty, hard wood,
they were all full of notches, and dull; and though I had a grindstone, I could
not turn it and grind my tools too. At length I contrived a wheel with a string
to turn it with my foot, that I might have both my hands at liberty.

On the morning of the first of May, I found a barrel of gunpowder and some
pieces of the wreck of the ship, which were driven on shore by the late hurri-
cane; and looking towards the wreck, I thought it seemed to lie higher out of
the water than it used to. I went out on the sands as near as I could to the
wreck, and found that the forecastle had parted from the stern, and that where-
as before I could not come within a quarter of a mile of the wreck without
swimming, I could now walk quite up to her when the tide was out. As the
ship was more broken open than formerly, many things came daily on shore.

This wholly diverted my thoughts from the design of moving my habitation,
and I busied myself in searching whether I could make any way into the ship;
but I found nothing was to be expected of that kind, for all the inside of it was
choked up with sand. However, as I had learned not to despair of anything,
T resolved to pull everything to pieces that I could of the ship, concluding that
everything I could get from her would be of some use or other to me.

T continued this sian every day to the 15th of June, except the time necessary
to get food; and by this time I had gotten timber, and plank, and iron-work
enough to have built a good boat, if I had known how; and I also got, at several

times, and in several pieces, near one hundredweight of sheet lead.
42 ROBINSON CRUSOE

One day during this time 1 went a-fishing, but caught not one fish that I
durst eat of, till 1 was weary of my sport; when, just going to leave off, I caught
a young dolphin. I had made me a long line of some rope-yarn, but had no ~
hooks; yet frequently I caught fish enough, as much as I cared to eat; all which
I dried in the sun, and ate them dry.

Going down to the sea-side on the 16th of June, I Pind a large tortoise or
turtle. This was the first I had seen. Tfound in her three score eggs; and
her flesh was to me, at that time, the most savory and pleasent that ever I tasted
in my life.

The rain fell for some days, and I felt ill and shivering, as if the weather had
been celd. I had no rest all night; had violent pains in my head, and feverish.
The next day I was very ill; frighted almost to death with the apprehensions
of my sad condition—to be sick and no help: prayed to God, for the first time
since the storm off Hull, but scarce knew what I said or why; my thoughts being
all confused.

The next day I was a little Bene: but on She next dey after that I was very
bad again, and so It went, turn about, for several days. One day that I felt
somewhat better, having no victuals to eat, I took my gun, but found myself
very weak; however, I killed a she-goat, and with much difficulty, got it home,
and beiled some of it, and ate it. : :

On June 27th, I had the ague again so violent that I lay abed all day and
neither ate nor drank. I was ready to perish for thirst; but so weak I had no
strength to stand up, or to get myself any water to drink. Prayed to God again,
but was light-headed; and when I was not, I was so ignorant that I knew not
what to say; only I lay and cried, “Lord, look upon me! Lord, pity me! Lord,
have mercy upon me!” I suppose I did nothing else for two or three hours:
till the fit wearing off, I fell asleep, and did not awake till far in the night.
When I awoke, I found myself much refreshed, but weak, and exceeding thirsty;
however, as I had no water in my whole habitation, I was forced to lie till morn-

ing, and went to sleep again. In this second sleep, I had this terrible dream:
ROBINSON CRUSOE ~ “ 43

I thought that I was sitting on the ground, on the outside of my wall, where I
sat when the storm blew after the earthquake, and that I saw a man descend
trom a great black cloud, in a bright flame of fire, and light upon the ground.
He was all over as bright as a flame, so that I could but just bear to look towards
him: his countenance was most inexpressibly dreadful, impossible for words to





; CRUSOE FINDS A TURTLE ;
describe; when he stepped upon the ground with his feet, I thought the earth
trembled, just as it had done before in the earthquake, and all the air looked,
to my apprehension, as if it had been filled with flashes of fire. He was no
sooner landed upon the earth but he moved forward towards me, with a long
spear or weapon in his hand to kill me; and when he came to a rising ground,
at some distance, he spoke to me—or I heard a voice so terrible that it is im-
possible to express the terror of it. All that I can say I understood was this:—
44 ROBINSON CRUSOE

“Seeing all these things have not brought thee to repentance, now thou shalt
die;” at which words, I thought he lifted up the spear that was in his hand to
kill me. ne |

No one that shall ever read this account will expect that I should be able to
describe the horrors of my soul at this terrible vision. Nor is it any more
possible to describe the impression thatremained upon my mind when I awaked,
and found it was but a dream.

I had, alas! no divine knowledge. What I had received by the good instruc-
tion of my father was then worn out by an uninterrupted series, for eight years,
of sea-faring wickedness, and a constant conversation with none but such as
were, like myself, wicked and profane to the last degree. I do not remember
that I had, in all that time, one thought that so much as tended either to loo
ing upwards towards God, or inwards towards a reflection upon my own wai %}
but a certain stupidity of soul, without desire of good, or conscience of evil,
had entirely overwhelmed me. _ ; ‘

“Now,” said I aloud, “my dear father’s words are come to pass; God’s justice
has overtaken me, and I have none to help or hear me. I rejected the voice
of Providence, which had mercifully put me in a posture or station of life where-
in I might have been happy and easy; but I would neither see it myself, nor
learn to know the blessing of it from my parents. I left them to mourn over
my folly; and now I am left to mourn under the consequences of it. I refused
their help and assistance, who would have lifted me into the world, and would
have made everything easy to me; and now I have difficulties to struggle with
too great for even nature itself to support, and no assistance, no help, no com-
fort, no advice.” ‘Then I cried out, “Lord, be my help, for I am in great dis-
tress.” ‘This was the first prayer, if I might call it so, that I had made for
many years.

Having been somewhat refreshed with the sleep I nad had, and the fit being
entirely off, I got up; and though the fright and terror of my dream was very
great, yet I considered that the fit of the ague would return again the next day,
e

ROBINSON CRUSOE 45

- and now was my time to get something to refresh and support myself when I
should be ill: and the first thing I did, I filled a large square case-bottle with
water, and set it upon my table, in reach of my bed; and to take off the chill or
aguish disposition of the water, I put about a quarter of a pint of rum into it,
and mixed them together. Then I got me a piece of the goat’s flesh and
broiled it on the coals, but could eat very little, I walked about, but was very
weak, and withal very sad and heavy-hearted in the sense of my miserable con-
_ dition, dreading the return of my distemper the next day.

~ After I had eaten, I tried to walk, but found myself so weak that I could
hardly carry the gun, for I never went out without that; so I went out but a
little way, and sat down upon the ground, looking out upon the sea, which was
just before me, and very calm and smooth. As I sat there, some thoughts such
as these occurred to me:—“ What is the earth and sea, of which I have seen so
much? Whence is it produced? And what am I, and all the other creatures,
wild and tame, human and brutal? Whence are we? Sure we are all made
by some secret Power, who formed the earth and sea, and air and sky. And
who is that?” Then it followed most naturally—“It is God that has made it
all. Well, but then,” it came on strongly, “if God has made all these things,
He guides and governs them all, and all things that concern them; for the Being
that could make all things must certainly have power to guide and direct them.
If so, nothing can happen, in the great circuit of his works, either without His
' knowledge or appointment.

“ And if nothing happens without His knowledge, He knows that I am here,
aud am in this dreadful condition; and if nothing happens without His appoint-
ment, He has appointed all this to befall me.” Immediately it followed—
_ “Why has God done this to me? What have I-done to be thus used?” My
conscience presently checked me in that inquiry, as if I had blasphemed, and
methought it spoke to me like a voice, “ Wretch, dost thou ask what thou hast
done? Look back upon a dreadful mispent life, and ask thyself, what thou
hast not done? Ask, why is it that thou wert not long ago destroyed? Why
46 , ROBINSON, CRUSOE

wert thou not drowned in Yarmouth Roads? killed in the fight, when the ship
was taken by the Sallee man-of-war ? devoured by the wild beasts off the coast
of Africa? or drowned here, when all the crew perished but thyself? Dost
thou ask, ‘What have I done?’” I was struck dumb with these reflections, as
one astonished, and had not a word to say, but rose up pensive and sad, walked
back to my retreat, and went up over my wall, as if I had been going to bed;
but my thoughts were sadly disturbed, and I had no inclination to sleep;
so I sat down in my chair, and lighted my lamp, for it began to be dark. Now,
as the apprehensions of the return of my distemper terrified me very much, it
occurred to my thought that the Brazilians take no physic but their tobacco for
almost all distempers, and I had a piece of a roll of tobacco in one of the chests.

T went, directed by Heaven, no doubt; for in this chest I found a cure both
for soul and body. I opened the chest, and found what I looked for, viz., the
tobacco; and as the few books I had saved lay there too, I took out one of the
Bibles which I mentioned before, and which to this time I had not found leisure, —
or so much as inclination, to look into. Having opened the book casually, the
first words that occurred to me were these, “Call, upon Me in the day of trouble,
and I will deliver thee, and thou shalt glorify Me.” ‘These words were very
apt to my case, and made some impression upon my thought at the time of
reading them, though not so much as they did afterwards; for, as for being
delivered, the thing was so remote that I began to say, as the children of Israel
did when they were promised flesh to eat, ““Can God spread a table in the
wilderness ?”’ so I began to say, “Can God Himself deliver me from this place ?”’
However, the words made a great impression upon me, and I mused upon them
very often. ,

It grew now late, and the tobacco had, as I said, dozed my head so much that
T inclined to sleep: so I went to bed. But before I lay down, I kneeled and
prayed to God to fulfill the promise to me, that if I called upon Him in the day
of trouble, He would deliver me. After my broken and imperfect prayer was
over, I drank the rum in which I had steeped the tobacco; immediately upon


CRUSOE ILL, READING THE BIBLE
48 ROBINSON CRUSOE

this I went to bed; and ¥ found presently it flew up into my head violently; but I
fell into a sound sleep, and waked no more till, by the sun, it must necessarily
be near three o’clock in the afternoon the next day; nay, to this hour I am partly
of opinion that I slept all the next day and night, and till almost three the day
after; for otherwise I know not how I should lose a day out of my reckoning
in the days of the week, as it appeared some years after I had done. When I
awaked I found myself exceedingly refreshed, and my spirits lively and cheer-
ful; when I got up I was stronger than I was the day before, and my stomach
better, for I was hungry; and, in short, I had no fit the next day, but continued
much altered for the better.

I had now been in this unhappy island above ten months; all possibility of
deliverance from this condition seemed to be entirely taken from me; and I
firmly believed that no human shape had ever set foot upon that place. Havy-
ing now secured my habitation, as I thought, fully to my mind, I had a great
desire to make a more perfect discovery of the island, and to see what other
productions I might find, which yet I knew nothing of.

Tt was the 15th of July that I began a more particular survey of the island
itself. I went up the creek first, where, as I hinted, I brought my rafts on
shore. I found, after I came about two miles up, that the tide did not flow any
higher; and that it was no more than a little brook of running water, and very
fresh and good. On the banks of this brook, I found many pleasant savannahs
or meadows, plain, smooth, and covered with grass; and on the rising parts of
them, next to the higher grounds, where the water, as it might be supposed,
never overflowed, I found a great deal of tobacco, green, and growing to a great
and very strong stalk; there were divers other plants, which I had no notion
of or understanding about, and might, perhaps, have virtues of their own,
which I could not find out. I searched for the cassava root, which the Indians
in all that climate made their bread of, but I could find none. I saw large
plants of aloes, but did not then understand them. I saw several sugar-canes,
but wild and, for want of cultivation, imperfect. I contented myself with these
discoveries for this time, and came back.
ROBINSON CRUSOE 49

The next day, I went up the same way again; and after going something
further than I had gone the day before, I found the country became more woody
than before. In this part I found different fruits, and particularly I found
melons upon the ground, in great abundance, and grapes upon the trees: the
vines had spread indeed over the trees, and the clusters of grapes were just now
in their prime, very ripe and rich. This was a surprising discovery, and I found
an excellent use for these grapes: and that was, to cure or dry them in the sun,
and keep them as dried grapes or raisins are kept, which I thought would be,
as indeed they were, as wholesome and as agreeable to eat, when no grapes
might be had.

T spent all that evening there, and went not back to my habitation, but took
my first contrivance, and got up into a tree, where I slept well; and the next
morning proceeded upon my discovery, travelling nearly four miles, as I might
judge by the length of the valley, keeping still due north. At the end of this
march I came to an opening, where the country seemed to descend to the west;
_ and alittle spring of fresh water, which issued out of the side of the hill by me,
ran the other way, that is, due east; and the country appeared so fresh, so green,
so flourishing, everything being in a constant verdure, or flourish of spring,
that it looked like a planted garden. I descended a little on ‘the side of that
delicious valley, and I saw here abundance of cocoa-trees, orange and lemon,
and citron-trees; but all wild, and few bearing any fruit, at least, not then.
However, the green limes that T gathered were not only pleasant to eat, but very
wholesome; and I mixed their juice afterwards with water, which made it very
wholesome, and very cool and refreshing. I found now I had business enough
to gather and carry home; and I resolved to lay up a store, as well of grapes as
limes and lemons, to furnish myself for the wet season, which I knew was ap-
proaching. .

I contemplated with great pleasure the fruitfulness of that valley, and the
pleasantness of the situation; the security from storm on that side of the water,
and the wood; and concluded that I had pitched upon a place to fix my abode

\
50 e . ROBINSON CRUSOE

which was by far the worst part of the country. Upon the whole, I began to
consider of removing my habitation, and to look out for a place equally safe as
where now I was situate, if possible, in that pleasant, fruitful part of the island.

This thought ran along in my head, but when I came to a nearer view of it,
I considered that I was now by the sea-side, where it was at least possible that
some thing might happen to my advantage; and that the same ill fate that
brought me hither, might bring some other unhappy wretches to the same
place; and to inclose myself among the hills and woods in the center of the
island was to anticipate my bondage, and to render such an affair not only
improbable but impossible; and that therefore I ought not by any means to
remove. However, I was so enamored with this place that I spent much of
my time there for the whole remaining part of the month of July; and though,
upon second thoughts, I resolved as above not to remove, yet I built me a
little kind of a bower, and surrounded it at a distance with a strong fence; and.
here I lay very secure, sometimes two or three nights together.

I had but newly finished my fence, and began to enjoy my labor, but the
rains came on, and made me stick close to my first habitation; for though I
had made me a tent like the other, with a piece of a sail, and spread it very well,
yet I had not the shelter of a hill to keep me from storms, nor a cave behind me
to retreat into when the rains were extraordinary.

On September 30th I cast up the notches on my post, and found I had been
on shore three hundred and sixty-five days. I kept this day as a solemn fast,
setting it apart for religious exercise, confessing my sins to God, and praying ©
to Him to have mercy on me through Jesus Christ; and not having tasted the
least refreshment for twelve hours, even till the going down of the sun, I then
ate a biscuit-cake and a bunch of grapes, and went to bed, finishing the day
as I began it.

I have mentioned that I had saved the few ears of ee and rice which I
had so surprisingly found spring up, and now I thought it a proper time to sow
it, after the rains. Accordingly, I dug up a piece of ground as well as I could,
CRUSOE IN HIS BOWER


e
52 : ROBINSON CRUSOE

and dividing it into two parts, I sowed my grain; but as I was sowing, it casually
occurred to my thoughts that I would not sow it all at first, because I did not
know when was the proper time for it, so 1 sowed about two-thirds of the seed.
It was a great comfort to me afterwards that I did so, for not one grain of that
I sowed this time came to anything; for the dry months following, it had no
moisture to assist its growth, and never came up at all till the wet season had
come again, and then it grew as if it had been newly sown. Finding my first
seed did not grow, which I easily imagined was by the drought, I sought for a
moister piece of ground, to make another trial in, and I dug up a piece of
ground near my new bower, and sowed the rest of my seed in February, a little
before the vernal equinox; and this, having the rainy months of March and
April to water it, sprang up very pleasantly, and yielded a very good crop; but
having part of the seed left only, and not daring to sow all that I had got, I had
but a small quantity at last, my whole crop not amounting to above half a peck
of each kind. But by this experiment I was made master of my business, and
knew exactly when the proper season was to sow, and that I might expect two
seed-times and two harvests every year. While this corn was growing I made
a little discovery, which was of use to me afterwards. As soon as the rains were
over, I made a visit up the country to my bower. ‘The fence or double hedge
that I had made was not only firm and entire, but the stakes which I had cut
off of some trees that grew thereabouts were all shot out and grown with long
branches. I was surprised, and yet very well pleased, to see the young trees
grow; and I pruned them, and led them up to grow as much alike as I could;
and it is scarcely credible how beautiful a figure they grew into, in three years;
so that it was complete shade, sufficient to lodge under all the dry season. ‘This
made me resolve to cut some more stakes, and.make me a hedge like this in a
semicircle round my wall (I mean that of my first dwelling), which I did; and
placing the trees or stakes in a double row, at about eight yards distance from
my first fence, they grew presently, and were at first a fine cover to my habita-
tion, and afterwards served for a defense also, as I shall observe in its order.
~

“ROBINSON CRUSOB 53



CRUSOE MAKING BASKETS

T found now that the seasons of the year might generally be divided, not into
‘summer and winter, as in Europe, but into the rainy seasons and the dry seasons.
After I had found, by experience, the ill consequence of being abroad in the
rain, I took care to furnish myself with provisions beforehand, that I might not
be obliged to go out, and I sat within doors as much as possible during the wet
months. In this time I found much employment, and very suitable also to
the time. I found great occasion of many things which I had no way to furnish
myself with but by hard labor and constant application; particularly, I tried
many ways to make myself a basket, but all the twigs I could get for the pur-
pose proved so brittle that they would do nothing. It proved of excellent ad-
vantage to me now that when I was a boy I used to take great delight in
54 - ROBINSON CRUSOE

standing at a basket-maker’s, in the town where my father lived, to see them
make their wicker-ware; and, I had by this means so full knowledge of the
methods of it, that I wanted nothing but the materials; when it came into my
mind that the twigs of that tree from whence I cut my stakes that grew might
possibly be as tough as the osiers in England, and I resolved to try. Accord-
ingly, the next day I went to my country house, and cutting some of the
smaller twigs, I found them to my purpose as much as I could desire, where-
upon I came the next time prepared with a hatchet to cut down a quantity,
which I soon found. ‘These I set up to dry, and when they were fit for use, I
carried them to my cave; and here, during the next season, I employed myself
in making, as well as I could, a great many baskets, and though I did not
finish them very handsomely, yet I made them sufficiently serviceable for
my purpose.

T mentioned before that I had a great mind to see the whole island, and that
I had travelled up the brook, and so on to where I built my bower. I now
resolved to travel quite across to the sea-shore on that side; so, taking my gun,
« hatchet, and my dog, 1 began my journey. When I had passed the vale where
my bower stood, I came within view of the sea to the west, and it being a very
clear day, I fairly descried land—whether an island or a continent I could not
tell; but it lay very high, at a very great distance; by my Boers, it could not be
less than fiftee or twenty leagues off.

T saw abundance of parrots on that side of the island where I now was, and
fain would I have caught one, if possible, to have kept it to be tame, and taught
it to speak to me. I did, after some painstaking, catch a young parrot, for I
knocked it down with a stick, and having recovered it, I brought it home; but
it was some years before I could make him speak ; however, at last, I taught him
to call me by name very familiarly. ie

I was exceedingly diverted with this journey. I found in the low ground

_ hares and foxes; but they differed greatly from all the other kinds I had met with,
nor could I satisfy myself to eat them. But I had no need to be venturous, for
ROBINSON CRUSOE 55

T had no want of food and of that which was very good, too, especially these
three sorts, viz., goats, pigeons, and turtle, or tortoise, which, added to my
grapes, Leadenhall Market could not have furnished a table better than I in
proportion to the company. As soon as J came to the sea-shore I was surprised
to see that I had taken up my lot on the worst side of the island, for here, indeed,

‘the shore was covered with innumerable turtles, whereas, on the other side I
had found but.three in a year and a half. Here was also an infinite number
of fowls of many kinds, some of which I had not seen before, and many of them
very good meat, but such asI knew not the names of, except those called pen-
guins.

Although T confess this side of the country was much pleasanter than mine;
yet I had not the least inclination to remove, for as I was fixed in my habitation,
it became natural to me, and I seemed all the while I was here to be as it were
upon a journey, and from home. However, I travelled along the shore of the
sea towards the east, I suppose about twelve miles, and then setting up a great
pole upon the shore for a mark, I concluded I would go home again, and that the
next journey I took should be on the other side of the island east from my
dwelling, and so round till I came to my post again.

Tn this journey my dog surprised a young kid, and seized upon it, and I run-
ning in to take hold of it, caught, and saved it alive from the dog. I had a great
mind to bring it home if I could, for I had often been musing whether it might
not be possible to get a kid or two, and so raise a breed of tame goats, which
might supply me when my powder and shot should be spent. I made a collar
for this little creature, and with a string, which I made of some rope-yarn, which
I always carried about me, I led him along, though with some difficulty, till
Â¥ came to my bower, and there I inclosed him and left him, for I was very im-~
patient to be at home, from whence I had been absent above a month.

I cannot express what a satisfaction it was to me to come into my old hutch,
and lie down in my hammock-bed. I reposed myself here a week, to rest

and regale myself after my long journey; during which, most of the time was'
56 ROBINSON CRUSOB



CRUSOE LEADING THE YOUNG KID

taken up in the weighty affair of making a cage for my Poll. ‘Then I began to
think of the poor kid which I had pent in within my little circle, and resolved to
go and fetch it home, or give it some food; accordingly I went and found it was
almost starved for want of food. Having fed it, I tied it as I did before, to lead
it away; but it was so tame with being hungry that I had no need to have tied
it, for it followed me like a dog; and as I continually fed it, the creature became
so loving, so gentle, and so fond, that it became from that time one of my

domestics also, and would never leave me afterwards.
ROBINSON CRUSOE &7

My third crop of barley and rice was promising very well, when on a sudden
T found I was in danger of losing it all again by enemies of several sorts, which
it was scarcely possible to keep from it; as, first, the goats and hares, which,
tasting the sweetness of the blade, ate it so close that it could get no time to shoot
up into stalk. ‘This I saw no remedy for but by making an inclosure about it
with a hedge, which I did with a great deal of toil; and shooting some of the
creatures in the day time, I set my dog to guard it in the night, tying him up to
a stake at the gate, where he would stand and bark all night long; so in a little
time the enemies forsook the place, and the corn grew very strong and well,
and began to ripen apace.

But as the beasts ruined before, while my corn was in the blade, so the birds
were as likely to ruin me now, when it was in the ear; for going along by the
place to see how it throve, I saw my little crop surrounded with fowls, of I know
not how many sorts, who stood, as it were, watching till I should be gone. I
immediately let fly among them, for I always had my gun with me. I had no
sooner shot but there rose up'a little cloud of fowls, which I had not seen atall,
from among the corn itself. :

T stayed by it to load my gun, and then coming away, I was no sooner out of
their sight but the thieves dropped down one by one into the corn again. I fired
again, and killed three of them. ‘This was what I wished for; so I took them
up, and served them as we serve notorious thieves in England, viz., hanged
them in chains, for a terror to others. It is impossible to imagine almost that
this should have had such an effect as it had, for the fowls would not only not
come at the corn, but, in short, they forsook all that part of the island. This I
was very glad of, and about the latter end of December, I reaped my corn.

I was sadly put to it for a scythe or a sickle to cut it down, and all I could do
was to make one out of one of the broad-swords which I saved among the arms
out of the ship. However, I reaped it in my way, for I cut nothing off but the
ears, and carried it away in a great basket which I had made, and so rubbed it
out with my hands; and at the end of all my harvesting, I found that out of my
58 ROBINSON CRUSOE

half-peck of seed I had near two bushels of rice, and above two bushels and a
half of barley. .

It is a little wonderful, and what I believe few people have thought much
upon, viz., the strange multitude of little things necessary in providing the one
atticle of bread. I, that was reduced to a mere state of nature, found this to
my daily discouragement.

First, I had no plough to turn up the earth; no spade or shovel to dig it. Well,
this I conquered by making me a wooden spade, but this did my work but in a
- wooden manner. When the corn was sown, I had no harrow, but was forced
to drag a great heavy bough of a tree over it. When it was growing, or grown,
I wanted many things to fence it, secure it, mow or reap it, cure and carry it
home, thrash, part it from the chaff, and save it. Then I wanted a mill to grind
it, sieves to dress it, yeast and salt to make it into bread, and an oven to bake it
in; and all these things I did without, as shall be observed; and yet the corn
was an inestimable comfort and advantage to me too. I had now seed enough
to sow above an acre of ground. I sowed my seed in two large flat pieces of
ground, and fenced them in with a good hedge. ‘This work was not so little as
to take me up less than three months, because a great part of that time was of
the wet season, when I could not go abroad. Within-door—that is, when it
rained and I could not go out—I had a great employment upon my hands, as
follows—viz., I had long studied, by some means or other, to make myself
some earthern vessels, which, indeed, I wanted sorely. However, considering
the heat of the climate, I did not doubt but if I could find out any clay, I might
botch up some such pot as might, being dried by the sun, be strong enough to
bear handling, and to hold anything that was dry and required to be kept so.

The clay I found, but it would make the reader laugh at me to see what odd,
misshapen, ugly things I made; how many cracked by the heat of the sun, and
fell in pieces when they were removed, so that with about two months’ labor I
could not make above two large earthen ugly things (I cannot call them jars).

Although I miscarried so much in my design for large pots, yet I made several
ROBINSON CRUSOB 59



€RUSOE TEACHES HIS PARROT TO TALK:

small things with better success, such as little round pots, flat dishes, pitchers,
and pipkins, the sun baking them very hard. Getting a hint by finding a
broken piece of one of my earthenware vessels in the fire, burnt as hard as a
stone, I afterwards managed to bake several pots so hard that I could boil
meat and make broth in them. |
All the while I was at work, I diverted myself with talking to my parrot,
and teaching him to speak; and I quickly learnt him to know his own name,
and at last to speak it out pretty loud, “Poll,” which was the first word |

ever heard spoken in the island by any mouth but my own.
60 | Poon CRUSOE

My next concern was to get me a stone mortar to beat some corn in, a mill
to grind it being out of the question. But all the stones of the island being of a
sandy, crumbling nature, I resolved to look out a great block of hard wood,
which having found I formed it with my axe and hatchet, and then with the
help of fire made a hollow in it. After this I made a heavy pestle of iron-wood,
and then laid them by in readiness for my next crop of corn.

The next thing to be made was a sieve, to sift my meal. Linen I had none
left but what was mere rags. I had goat’s hair, but I could not weave or spin
it. At last I remembered that I had some neck-cloths of calico or muslin of
the sailors, which I had saved from the ship, and with these I made three sieves,
small, but proper enough for the work. | Ee

The want of an oven I supplied by making some earthen vessels very broad,
but not deep. When I wanted to bake, I made a great fire upon the hearth,
and when the wood was burned into live coals, I drew them forward upon the
hearth so as to cover it all over till it became very hot; then, sweeping them
away, I set down my loaves, and turning down an earthen pot upon them, drew
the coals all around the outside of the pot to keep in and add to the heat, and in
this way I baked my barley loaves as well as if I had been a complete pastry-
cook. 3

These things took me up the most part of a year, and what intervals T had
were given to managing my new harvest; for I reaped my corn in season, and
carried it home, and laid it up in the ear in my large baskets, till I had time to
rub it out. ; Lt

All the while these things were doing, you may be sure my thoughts ran many
times upon the prospect of land which I had seen from the other side of the
island; and I was not without secret wishes that I was on shore there, fancying
that, seeing the mainland and an inhabited country, I might find some way or
other to convey myself farther, and perhaps at last find some means of escape. ~

Then I thought I would go and look at our ship’s boat, which lay on the high
ridge of beachy rough sand, where it had been thrust by the storm, when we were


GRUSQE MARES A BOAT

—
+
62 ROBINSON CRUSOE

first cast away. But it lay bottom upward, so I had to dig the sand from unde1
it and turn it over with the help of wooden levers. When I had done this, I
found it was all in vain, for I had not the strength to get it to the water to launch
it.

This at length set me upon thinking whether it was not possible for me to
make a canoe, such as the Indians make of the trunk of a tree. I found one
that was just fit for it which grew not far from the shore. ‘Twenty days was I
hacking and hewing this tree at the bottom to fell it; I was fourteen more get-
ting the branches off, and a whole month shaping it like the bottom of a boat.
As for the inside I was three weeks with a mallet and chisel clearing it.

Nothing remained but to get it to the water, but all my devices to get it into
the water failed me. JI first dug the ground to make a smooth declivity from
the boat to the sea, so as to let it slide down; but I could then no more stir this
boat than the other. Then I resolved to dig a canal to bring the water up to
the boat. I began the work, but on calculating how deep and broad it would
have to be, I found it would take me ten or twelve years to dig it, so I gave it’over,
seeing too late the folly of beginning a work before we count the cost.

In the middle of this work I finished my fourth year in this place, and kept
my anniversary with even greater devotion than ever before, for now I had so
little hope of ever leaving the island, that I looked upon the world as a thing
with which I had nothing todo. But I was separated from its wickedness, too;
I had nothing to covet; I might call myself king or emperor of the whole country
of which I had possession. I had timber enough to have built a fleet of ships;
and I had grapes enough to have made wine, or to have cured into raisins, to
have loaded that fleet when it had been built.

But all that I could make use of was all that was valuable; I had encugh to
eat and to supply my wants, and what was all the rest to me. The money I
had lay by me as sorry, useless stuff, which I would have freely given for a hand-
ful of peas or beans.

My clothes began to decay mightily, and of linen I had had none for a good
ROBINSON CRUSOE 68

while except some shirts which I found in the seamen’s chests. There were
also several thick watch coats of the seamen’s, but they were too hot to wear
till I make jackets out of them. - I had saved all the skins of the four-footed
creatures that I killed, and out of these, I made, first, a great cap for my head,
with the hair on the outside to shoot off the rain, and afterwards I made me a
suit of clothes wholly of these skins—that it to say, a waistcoat, and breeches



CRUSOE MAKING A COAT

open at the knees, and both loose; for they were rather wanting to keep me cool]
than to keep me warm. After this I spent a great deal of time and pains to
make an umbrella, covering it with skins; which was a most useful thing to me,
as well for the heat of the sun as for the rain.

I cannot say that after this, for five years, any extraordinary thing happened
to me, but I lived on in the same course as before, My chief employment,
besides my yearly labor of planting my barley and rice and curing my raisins,
64 ROBINSON CRUSOE

was to make me a canoe, this time of such a size that by digging a canal to it ot
six feet wide and four feet deep, I brought it into the creek. =

The design I had in view when I made the first boat was to venture over to
the other shore, but the size of this was not at all suitable to that purpose, so
my next design was to make a tour round the island. I put up a little mast in
my boat, and made a sail for it out of some of the ship’s sails which I had in
store. ‘Then I made lockers to hold food and keep it dry, and a rest for my
gun with a flap to hang down over it to keep it dry.

It was the 6th of November, in the sixth year of my reign, or my captivity,
that I set out on this voyage, and I found it much longer than I expected; for
though the island itself was not very large, yet when I came to the east side of it,
I found a great ridge of rocks lie out about two leagues into the sea; and beyond
that a shoal of sand lying dry half a league more, so that I was obliged to go a
great way out to sea to double that point.

I am a warning to all rash and ignorant pilots, for I was no sooner come to
that point but I found myself in a great depth of water, running like the sluice
ofa mill. It hurried me farther and farther out, there was no wind stirring to
help me, and all I could do with my paddles signified nothing. I began to give
myself over for lost, and looked upon my solitary island as the most pleasant
place in the world, to be in which was all the happiness my heart could wish for.
However, I worked as hard as I could, and, to my joy, about noon, a breeze
sprang up. I spread my sail and stood away to the north as much as T could,
and in a few hours came within a mile of the shore, where soon after I got te
land. When I was on shore, I fell on my knees, and gave God thanks for my
deliverance, resolving to lay aside all thoughts of my deliverance by boat.

I found a convenient harbor for my boat, and taking nothing but my gun
and umbrella, I began my march homeward. On my way I lay down to rest,
being quite spent with fatigue, and fell:into a deep sleep. But judge, if you
can, what a surprise I must have been in when a voice woke me out of my sleep,
and called my name severa) times, “Robin, Robin, Robin Crusoe! poor Robin
ROBINSON CRUSOB 65



CRUSOE SAILS OUT OF HIS CREEK

Crusoe!” At first I was dreadfully frightened, but as soon as I awoke tho-
roughly, I saw my Poll sitting at the top of the hedge, and I knew that it was he
that spoke, and did but say the words I had taught him. Calling him by name,
the sociable creature came to me, antl sat on my thumb as he used to do, and
kept on talking to me as if he were overjoyed to see me; and so I carried him
home with me.

T had now had enuugh of rambling to sea, and for near a year IJ led a very
66 ROBINSON CRUSOE

sedate, retired life, feeling resigned to the decrees of Providence, and wanting
nothing but society.

My powder beginning to fail, I set myself to study some art to trap and snare
the goats alive, for I saw that. if I expected to sapply myself with goat’s flesh,
when I had no powder or shot left, breeding some up tame was my only way;
when, perhaps, I might have them about my house like a flock of sheep. At |
last I had my desire, for making pitfalls and traps, baited with barley and rice,
I found one morning, in one of them, an old he-goat, and in another, three kids,
one male and two females. The old goat was much too fierce for me, so I let
him go; then I took the kids home. It was a good while before they would
feed; but throwing them some sweet corn, it tempted them, and they began to
be tame.

I saw that I must keep the tame from the wild, or else they would always run
wild when they grew up, and that the only way for this was to have some in-
closed piece of ground well fenced. I began with the idea of inclosing such a
space that my fence must have been at least two miles about, but it struck me
that in so great a space, the kids would soon be as wild as if they had the whole .
island to run in, so I inclosed a piece of ground about one hundred and fifty
yards in length, and one hundred in breadth, which would maintain as many
as I should have in any reasonable time. .

It took me three months to hedge in this piece. In about a year and a half
T had a flock of twelve goats, and in two years more I had three-and-forty, and
after that I inclosed five pieces of ground to feed them in, with gates and pens
to take them as I wanted them.

I had now not only goat’s flesh to feed on, but milk too, for now I set up my
dairy, and had sometimes a gallon or two of milk in aday. What a table was
here spread for me in a wilderness where I saw nothing at first but to perish
for hunger! How like a king I dined, too, attended by my servants! Poll, as
if he had been my favorite, was the only person permitted to talk to me; my dog,
old, but faithful, sat always at my right hand, while my two cats sat at each


€RUSOE AT DINNER
68 . . ROBINSON CRUSOE

side of the table, expecting a bit from my hand now and then as a mark of
special favor. With this attendance and in this plentiful manner I lived;
neither could I be said to want anything but society; and of that, in a short
time after this, I was likely to have too much.

T had now two plantations in the island, one my little fortification, under the
rock, with the cave behind it, and the wall about it. The piles with which I
had made the wall were grown so large that there was not the least appearance
of any habitation behind them. Besides this I had my country seat, or little
bower, as I-called it, where = grapes flourished, and where I had my enclosures
for my goats.

As this was also about half-way between my other habitation and the ae
where I had laid up my boat, I generally stayed and lay here in my way thither,
for I used frequently to visit my boat. Sometimes I went out in her to divert
myself, but no more hazardous voyages would I go, scarcely ever above a stone’s
cast or two from the shore, I was so apprehensive of being hurried out of my
knowledge again by the currents or winds, or any other accident. But now I
came to a new scene of my life.

Tt happened one day, about noon, going towards my boat, I was exceedingly
surprised with the print of a man’s naked foot on the shore, which was very
plain to be seen on the sand. I stood like one thunderstruck, or as if I had
seen an apparition. I listened, I looked round me, but I could hear nothing
nor see anything; I went up to a rising ground, to look farther; I went up the
shore, and down the shore, but it was all one: I could see no other impression
but that one. I went to it again to see if there were any more, and to observe
if it might not be my fancy; but there was no room for that, for there was ex-
actly the print of a foot—toes, heel, and every part of a foot. How it came there I
knew not, nor could in the least imagine. But after innumerable fluttering
thoughts, like a man perfectly confused and out of myself, I came to my forti-
fication, terrified to the last degree. |

When I came to my castle (for so I think I called it ever after this), I fled into






















































































































CRUSOW SPES 4 FOOTPRINT IN THE SAND
70 ROBINSON CRUSOE

it like one pursued. I had no sleep that night; and I formed nothing but dismal
imaginations to myself. Sometimes I fancied it must be the devil; and reason
joined in with me upon this supposition: for how should any other thing in
human shape come into the place? But then to think that Satan should take
human shape upon him in such a place, where there could be no manner of
occasion for it, but to leave the print of his foot behind him, and that even for no
purpose too, for he could not be sure I should see it—this was an amazement
the other way. I easily argued myself out of all fear of its being the devil; and
I presently concluded then that it must be some more dangerous creature, viz.,
that it must be some of the savages of the mainland over against me, w 4o had
wandered out to sea in their canoes, and either driven by the currents or by con-
trary winds, had made the island, and had been on shore, but were gone away
again to sea; being as loath, perhaps, to have stayed in this desolate island as I
would have been to have had them.

While these reflections were rolling upon my mind, I was very thankful in
my thought that I was so happy as not to be thereabouts at that time, or that
they did not see my boat, by which they would have concluded that some in-
habitants had been in the place, and perhaps have searched farther for me.
Then terrible thoughts racked my imagination about their having found my
boat, and that there were people here; and that, if so, I should certainly have
them come again in greater numbers, and devour me; that if it should happen
that they should not find me, yet they would find my inclosure, destroy all my
corn, and carry away all my flock of tame goats, and I should perish at last
for mere want.

Thus my fear banished all my religious hope; all that former confidence in
God, which was founded upon such wonderful experience as I had had of His
goodness, now vanished; as if He that had fed me by miracle hitherto, could not
preserve by His power the provision which he had made for me by His goodness.

How strange a checker-work of Providence is the life of man! and by what

secret, differing springs are the affections hurried about, as differing circum-
ROBINSON CRUSOR : 71

stances present! ‘To-day we love what to-morrow we hate: to-day we seek
what to-morrow we shun; to-day we desire what to-morrow we fear, nay, even

tremble at the apprehensions of. ‘This was exemplified in me at this time in
the most lively manner imaginable; for I, whose only affliction was, that I
seemed banished from human society, was now ready to sink into the ground
at but the shadow or silent appearance of a man having set his foot on the
island. :

One morning early, lying in my bed, and filled with thoughts about my
- danger from the appearance of savages, I found it discomposed me very much;
upon which those words of the Scripture came into my thoughts: “Call upon
Me in the day of trouble: I will deliver thee, and thou shalt glorify Me.”” Upon
this, rising cheerfully out of bed, my heart was not only comforted, but I was
guided and encouraged to pray earnestly to God for deliverance: when I had
done praying, I took up my Bible, and opening it to read, the first words that
presented -to me were, “Wait on the Lord: be of good courage, and He shall -
strengthen thy heart: wait, I say, on the Lord.” It is impossible to express
the comfort this gave me, and in return, I thankfully laid down the book, and
was no more sad, at least, not on that occasion. ;
In the middle of these reflections, it came into my thoughts one day that this
foot might be the print of my own foot, when I came on shore from my boat.
I considered that I could by no means tell for certain where I had trod, and
where I had not; and that if, at last, this was only the print of my own foot, I
had played the part of those fools who try to make stories of specters and
apparitions, and then are themselves frighted at them more than anybody else.

Now I began to take courage, and to peep abroad again, for I had not stirred
out of my castle for three days and nights, so that I began to starve for provision;
for I had little or nothing within doors but some barley-cakes and water. Then
I knew that my goats wanted to be milked too, -vhich usually was my evening
_ diversion; and the poor creatures were in great pain and inconvenience for
want of it. |
72 ROBINSON CRUSOE

Heartening myself, therefore, with the belief that this was nothing but the
print of-one of my own feet, I began to go abroad again, and went to my country-
house to milk my flock; and having seen nothing, I began to be a little bolder,
and to think there was really nothing in it but my own imagination; but I could
not persuade myself fully of this till I should go down to the shore again, and
see this print of a foot, and measure it by my own. But when I came to the
place—first, it appeared evidently to me that when I laid up my boat, I could
not possibly be on shore anywhere thereabouts; secondly, when I came to
measure the mark with my own foot, I found my foot not so large by a great
deal. Both these things filled my head with new imaginations, and I went
home again, filled with the belief that some man or men had been on shore
there; or, in short, that the island was inhabited, and I might be surprised be-
fore I was aware.

Now I began sorely to repent that I had dug my cave so large as.to bring a
door through again, which door, as I said, came out beyond where my fortifica-
tion joined to the rock. Upon maturely considering this, therefore, I resolved
to draw me a second fortification, in the same manner of a semicircle, at a
distance from my wall, just where I had planted a double row of trees about
twelve years before, these trees having been planted so thick before, there
wanted but few piles to be driven between them, that they should be thicker
and stronger, and my wall would be soon finished. ‘Through seven holes in
this wall I contrived to plant muskets, of which I had got seven on shore out of
the ship; these, I say, I planted like cannon, so that I could fire all the seven
guns in two minutes’ time.

When this was done, I stuck all the ground without my wall, for a great way,
full with sticks of the osier-like wood, which I found so apt to grow, leaving a
pretty large space between them and my wall, that I might have room to see
an enemy, and they might have no shelter from the young trees, if they at-
tempted to approach my outer wall. _

Thus, in two year’s time, I had a thick grove; and in five or six years’ time
ROBINSON CRUSOE 79



CRUSOE MILKING HIS GOATS

T had a wood before my dwelling grown so monstrous thick and strong that it
was indeed perfectly impassable: and no man, of what kind soever, would ever
imagine that there anything beyond it, much less a habitation.

Another measure of prudence that I took was to seek out some retired spots
on the island, where I might inclose a few of my goats, half a dozen in each
place, so that if any disaster happened to the flock in general, I might be able
to raise them again. I completed one such inclosure, and went about the

whole island, searching for another place to make such another deposit, when,
74, ROBINSON CRUSOE

wandering more to the west point of the island than I had ever done yet, and
looking out to sea, I thought I saw a boat upon the sea, at a great distance.
I had found a perspective glass or two in one of the seamen’s chests, which I
saved out of our ship, but I had it not about me; and this was so remote that I
could not tell what to make of it, though I looked at it till eyes were not able
to hold to look any longer. I was presently convinced that the seeing the print
of a man’s foot was not such a strange thing in the island as I imagined; and but
that it was a special providence that I was cast upon the side of the island where
the savages never came, I should easily have known that nothing was more
frequent than for the canoes from the main, when they happened to be a little
too far out at sea, to shoot over to that side of the island for harbor: likewise,
as they often met and fought in their canoes, the victors, having taken their
prisoners, would bring them over to this shore, where, according to their dread-
ful customs, being all cannibals, they would kill and eat them; of which here-
after.

When I was come down the hill to the shore, as I said above, being the S. W.
point of the island, I was perfectly confounded and amazed; nor is it possible
for me to express the horror of my mind, at seeing the shore spread with skulls,
hands, feet, and other bones of human bodies; and particularly, I observed a
place where there had been a fire made, and a circle dug in the earth, where I
supposed the savage wretches had sat down to their inhuman feastings upon the
bodies of their fellow-creatures. I could not bear to stay in the place a moment;
so I got up the hill again with aJl the speed I could, and walked on towards
my own habitation.

I continued pensive and sad, and kept close within my own circle for almost
two years after this: when I say my own circle, I mean by it my three planta-
tions, viz., my castle, my county-seat (which I called my bower), and my in-
closure in the woods. ‘Time, however began to wear off my uneasiness, and I
began to live just in the same composed manner as before, only with this dif-

ference, that I used more caution, and kept my eyes more about me than I did
ROBINSON CRUSOE "5



CRUSOHB IN HIS FORT

before, lest I should happen to be seen by any of these people; and particularly
I was more cautious in firing my gun, lest any of them, being on the island,
should happen to hear it; though I never went out without it, and carried in
addition two pistols and a broadsword.
"6 ROBINSON CRUSOR

The terror I had been in about the savages diverted my invention from my
own conveniences, and now my thoughts were all of how I might destroy some
of these cannibals when they were at their bloody entertainments, and if possible’
save the victims they should bring hither to destroy. ‘lo put my design into
execution, I sought a place where unseen I might behold every action of the
savages. I found such a place in the side of a hill, and here I bestowed two
muskets, each of which was loaded with a brace of slugs and four or five small
bullets; a fowling-piece, charged with a handful of the largest shot; and my
pistols, with about four bullets in each. Every morning I made a tour to the
top of the hill, which was about three miles from my castle, to see if I could
observe any boats on the sea. But after having watched in vain for two or
three months, I not only grew tired of this hard duty, but began to doubt that
Thad a right to meditate the killing of the savages, and to fear that in attempting
it I might only bring upon myself certain destruction. Religion joined in with
this prudent consideration, and I concluded that I would be going quite beyond
my duty in destroying creatures who were innocent as to me, however guilty
they might be towards one another. This appeared so clear to me now, that
nothing was a greater satisfaction to me than that I had not been suffered to
do a thing which I now saw so much reason to believe would have been sinful
murder, and I gave most humble thanks to God that He had thus delivered
me from blood-guiltiness.

In this state of mind I continued for near a year after this. I removed my
boat which was on the other side of the island to a little cave under some high
rocks on the east end of the island, that there might not be near the place where
the savages landed any shadow of human presence. Besides this I kept my-
self more retired than ever, and seldom left my cell except when I went out to
milk my goats, and manage my little flock in the wood, which was quite out of
danger on the other side of the island.

T now cared not to drive a nail, chop a stick, fire a gun, or make a fire, lest
either the noise be heard, or the smoke betray me. For this reason I did all
ROBINSON CRUSOE a7

















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































CRUSOE ON THE LOOK-OUT ON THE HILL

the work requiring fire at my new apartment in the woods, when, after a while,
I found by accident a natural cave in the earth, which proved to be a great
convenience to me.

It was while I was cutting some wood to make charcoal that I discovered

this cave; and before I go on I must observe the reason for my making the
18 ROBINSON CRUSOE

charcoal, which was that I could use it to bake and cook without making a
smoke. While I was cutting wood one day, I perceived, behind a very thick
branch of brushwood, a kind of hollow place. I looked into the mouth of it,
and found it was so large that I could stand upright in it. But T made more
haste out than I did in, for I saw two shining eyes of some creature which
twinkled like stars. When I recovered a little from my surprise, I plucked up
courage, and taking a flaming firebrand, I rushed in again, and found there
was no cause for fear, for the eyes were those of an old goat, which was dying,
indeed, of old age. I stirred him a little to see if I could get him out, but he
was not able to raise himself, so I let him lie there.

I found the cave to be about twelve feet wide, but there was a place at the
farther side of it that went in still farther, but so low that I had to creep on my
hands and feet to goin, I gave up my search for that time, but came the next
day provided with candles, and when I got to the end of the low passage, I
found the roof rose to the height of near twenty feet.

As the light of my two candles shone on the sides and roofs of this cave, it
made a most glorious sight, for the walls reflected a hundred thousand lights
to me, as if they had been made of diamonds and other precious stones. What
-was in the rock to cause this, I knew not. ‘The place was a most delightful
grotto, and I resolved to bring here some of the things I was most anxious about,
particularly my magazine of powder, and my spare arms. The old goat died
in the mouth of the cave the next day after I discovered it, and I found it easier
to bury him on the spot where he expired than to drag him out.

I was now in the twenty-third year of residence in this island, and was so
naturalized to the place and the manner of living that, could I but have enjoyed
the certainty that no savages would come to the place to disturb me, I could have
been content to spend the rest of my time there. I had some little amusements,
which made the time pass more pleasantly with me a great deal than it did
before: first, I had taught my Poll, as I noted before, to speak; and he did it. so

familiarly, and talked so articulately and plain, that is was very pleasant to me.
ROBINSON CRUSOE 79

My dog was a pleasant and loving companion to me for no less than sixteen years
of my time, and then died of mere old age. As for my cats, they multiplied to
that degree, that I was obliged to shoot or drive them into the woods, except
two or three favorites. Besides these I always kept two or three household kids
about me, whom I taught to feed out of my hand; and I had two more parrots,
which talked pretty well, and would all call “Robin Crusoe,” but none like
my first. I had also several tame sea-fowls, that I caught upon the shore,
and cut their wings; and the little stakes which I had planted before my castle-
wall being now grown up to a good thick grove, these fowls all lived among
these low trees, and bred there, which was very agreeable to me.

Tt may not be amiss for all people who shall meet with my story to make this
just observation from it: viz., how frequently, in the course of our lives, the
evil which in itself we seek most to shun, and which, when we are fallen into,
is the most dreadful to us, is oftentimes the very means or door of our deliver-
ance, by which alone we can be raised again from the affliction we are fallen
into. I could give many examples of this in the course of my unacountable
life, but in nothing was it more particularly remarkable than in the circum-
stances of my last years of solitary residence in this island.

It was now the month of December, as I said above, in my twenty-third year;
and this, being the southern solstice, was the particular time of my harvest,
and required me to be pretty much abroad in the fields, when, going out pretty
early in the morning, even before it was thorough daylight, I was surprised with
seeing a light of some fire upon the shore at a distance from me about two miles
towards the end of the island where I had observed some savages had been,
as before, and not on the other side, but, to my great affliction, it was on my
side of the island. :

I was indeed terribly surprised with the sight, and filled with my usual ap-
prehension that the savages would find my works and improvements. In this
extremity I returned directly to my castle and pulled the ladder after me, mak-
ing all things look as wild and natural as I possibly could. Then I prepared
myself within for defense, loaded my muskets and pistols, and commended
- 80 ROBINSON CRUSOE |

myself to the Divine protection, resolved to defend myself to the last gasp.
Two hours after, impatient for intelligence, I mounted to the top of the hill,
where, laying myself down, with my perspective glass I perceived no less than
nine naked savages, sitting round a small fire, eating, as I supposed, human
flesh, with their two canoes hauled on shore, waiting for the flood of the tide
to carry them off again.

It is not easy to imagine what confusion this sight put me into, but when I
considered that their coming must always be with the current of the ebb, I
became more easy, being fully satisfied that I might go abroad with safety all
the time of the flood, if they were not before landed. Before they went off, I
could see by their postures and gestures that they were dancing, and they kept
this up for an hour or more.

When I saw them gone, I took two guns upon my shoulders, and placing a
couple of pistols in my belt, with my great sword hanging by my side, I went
to the hill where I had discovered the first appearance of all, and then saw that
there had been three canoes more of the savages on shore at that place, which
with the rest were now making over to the mainland.

Going down to the shore, I could see the marks of horror which the dismal
work they had been about had left behind it;and so filled was I with indignation,
that I began again to premeditate taking revenge on the first that came there,
let them be as many soever. It then appeared to me that the visits they made
to this island are not very frequent, it being fifteen months before they came ~
again; yet all this while I was very uneasy, lest they should come upon me by
surprise.

It was in the middle of May, on the sixteenth day, I think, as well as my poor
wooden calendar would reckon, that it blew a very great storm of wind all day,
with a great deal of lightning and thunder, and a very foul night it was after it.
As I was reading in the Bible, and taken up with serious thoughts about my
present condition, I was stirprised with the noise of a gun, as I thought, fired at

sea. I started up in the greatest haste imaginable; and, mourting my ladder,
ROBINSON CRUSOE 81

got to the top of the hill the very moment that a flash of fire bade me listen for a
second gun, which, accordingly, in about a half a minute, I heard; and by the
sound knew that it was from that part of the sea where I was driven out with
the current in my boat- I immediately considered that this must be some
ship in distress. I had the presence of mind, at that minute, to think that
though TI could not help them, it might help me; so I brought together all the
dry wood I could get at hand, and set it on fire upon the hill. As soon as
ever my fire blazed up, I heard another gun, and after that several others. I
piled my fire all night long, till daybreak; and, when the air cleared up, I saw
something at a great distance at sea, full east of the island, whether a sail or a
hull T could not distinguish.

T looked frequently at it all that day, and presently concluded that it was a
ship at anchor; and being eager to be satisfied, I ran towards the south side of
the island, to the rocks where I had formerly been carried away with the current;
_ and getting up there, I could plainly see the wreck of a ship cast away in the
night upon those concealed rocks which I found when I was out in my boat.

It was now calm, and I had a great mind to venture out in my boat to this
wreck, not doubting but I might find something on board that might be useful
tome. But that did not altogether press me so much as the possibility that
there might be yet some living creature on board, whose life I might not only
save, but might, by saving that life, comfort my own to the last degree; and this
thought clung so to my heart that I could not be quiet night or day, but I must
venture out in my boaf on board this wreck; and committing the rest to God’s
providence, I thought the impression was so strong upon my mind that it could
not be resisted. ;

Under the power of this impression, I hastened back to my castle, and load-
ing myself with everything necessary, went down to my boat, got the water out
of her, got her afloat, and loaded all my cargo in her. Praying to God to direct
my voyage, I put out, and rowing or paddling the canoe along the shore, came
at last to the utmost point of the island on the north-east side. And now I was
82 ROBINSON CRUSOE

to faunch out into the ocean, and either to venture or not to venture. I looked
on the rapid currents which ran constantly on both sides of the island at a
distance, and my heart began to fail me; for I foresaw that if I was driven into
either of those currents, I should be carried perhaps out of reach or sight of
the island again.

These thoughts so oppressed my mind that I began to give over my enterprise;
and having hauled my boat into a little creek on the shore, I stepped out, and .
sat down upon a rising bit of ground, very pensive and anxious. As I was
musing, I could perceive that the tide was turned, and the flood came on; upon
which, my going was impracticable for many hours. Upon this, presently it
occurred to me that I should go up to the highest piece of ground I could find,
and observe, if I could, how the sets of the tide or currents lay. I cast my eye
upon a little hill from whence I had a clear view of the currents, or sets of the
tide, and which way I was to guide myself in my return. Here I found that as
the current of ebb set out close by the south point of the island, so the current
of the flood set in close by the shore of the north side; and that I had nothing to
do but to keep to the north of the island in my return, and I should do well
enough. | se

Encouraged with this observation, I resolved, the next morning, to set out
with the first of the tide. I first made a little out to sea, full north, till I began
to feel the benefit of the current, which set eastward, and having a strong steer-
age with my paddle, I went, at a great rate, directly for the wreck, and in less
than two hours I came up to it. The ship, which was Spanish, stuck fast,
jammed in between two rocks: all the stern and quarter of her were beaten to
pieces by the sea; and her mainmast and foremast were broken short off; but
her head and bow appeared firm. When I came close to her, a dog appeared
upon her, who, seeing me coming, yelped and cried; and, as soon as I called him,
jumped into the sea to come to me; I took him into the boat, but found him
almost dead with hunger and thirst. I gave him a cake of my bread, and he

devoured it like a ravenous wolf that had starved a fortnight in the snow; I
ROBINSON CRUSOE 83

then gave the poor creature some fresh water, with which, if I would have let
him, he would have burst himself. After this I went on board; but the first
sight I met with was two men drowned in the cook-room, or forecastle of the
ship, with their arms fast about one another. I concluded, that when the ship
struck, the sea broke so continually over her, that the men were strangled with
the constant rushing in of the water. Besides the dog, there was nothing left
in the ship that had life. I saw several chests, which I believed belonged to
some of the seamen; and I got two of them into the boat, without examining
what was in them. Had the stern of the ship been fixed, and the fore-part
broken off, I am persuaded I might have made a good voyage; for, by what I
found in these two chests, I had room to suppose the ship had a great deal of
wealth on board.

T found, besides these chests, a little cask full of liquor, which I got into my
boat with much difficulty. There were several muskets in the cabin, and a
great powder-horn, with about four pounds of powder in it. As for the muskets,
I had no occasion for them, so I left them, but took the powder-horn. I took
a fire-shovel and tongs, which I wanted extremely, as also two little brass kettles,
a copper pot to make chocolate, and a gridiron; and with this cargo, and the
dog, I came away, the tide beginning to make home again; and the same even-
ing, about an hour within night, I reached the island again, weary and fatigued
to the last degree. I reposed that night in the boat; and in the morning I re-
solved to harbor what I had got in my new cave, and not carry it home to my
castle. After refreshing myself, I got all my cargo on shore, and began to
examine the particulars. :

When I came to open the chests, I found several things of great use to me:
for example, I found in one a fine case of bottles, filled with cordial waters. I
found some very good shirts, and about a dozen and a half of white linen hand-
kerchiefs and colored neck-cloths. Besides this, when, I came to the till in
the chest, I found there three great bags of pieces of eight, which held about

eleven hundred pieces in all; and in one of them, wrapped up in a paper six
84 ROBINSON CRUSON





CRUSOE SLEEPING IN HIS BOAT

doubloons of gold, and some small bars or wedges of gold; I suppose they might
all weigh near a pound. In the other chest were some clothes, but of little

value; but, by the circumstances, it must have belonged to the gunner’s mate;
ROBINSON CRUSOE 85

though there was no powder in it, except two pounds of fine glazed powder,
_ in three small flasks, kept, I suppose, for charging their fowling-piece on oc-
casion. Upon the whole, I got very little by this voyage that was of any use
to me; for as to the money, I had no manner of occasion for it; it was to me as
the dirt under my feet; however, I lugged this money home to my cave, and laid
it up, as I had done that before which I had brought from our own ship.

Having now brought all my things on shore, and secured them, I went back
to my boat, and rowed or paddled her along the shore to her old harbor, where
T laid her up, and made the best of my way to my old habitation, where I found
everything safe and quiet. J never knew whether any were saved out of that
ship or no; and had only the affliction, some days after, to see the corpse of a
drowned boy come on shore at the end of the island which was next to the
shipwreck. He had no clothes on but a seaman’s waistcoat, a pair of open-
kneed linen drawers, and a blue linen shirt; but nothing to direct me so much
as to guess what nation he was of.

I began now to repose myself, live after my old fashion, and take care of my
family affairs; and for a while I lived easy enough, only that I was more vigilant
than I used to be, looked out oftener, and did not go abroad so much; and if,
at any time, I did stir with any freedom, it was always to the east part of the
island, where I was pretty well satisfied the savages never came, and where I
could go without so many precautions, and such a load of arms and ammunition
as I always carried with me if I went the other way. I lived in this condition
near two years more; but my unlucky head, that was always to let me know it
was born to make my body miserable, was all these two years filled with projects
and designs, how, if it were possible, I might get away from this island.

On one of the nights in the rainy season in March, the four-and-twentieth
year of my first setting foot in this island of solitude, I was lying in my bed or
hammock, awake, very well in health, but could by no means close my eyes, that
is, so as to sleep. It is impossible and needless to set down the innumerable

crowd of thoughts that whirled through that great thoroughfare of the brain—

-
86 ROBINSON CRUSOE

the memory—in this night’s time: I ran over the whole history of my life in
miniature, to my coming to this island, and also of that part of my life since I
came to this island. In my reflections upon the state of my case since I came
on shore on this island, I was comparing the happy posture of my affairs in the
first years of my habitation here, with the life of anxiety, fear, and care, which
T had lived in ever since I had seen the print of a foot in the sand. Then I came
to reflect seriously upon the real danger I had been in for so many years, and
how I had walked about in the greatest security, and with all possible tran-
quillity, even when perhaps nothing but the brow of a hill, a great tree, or the
casual approach of night, had been between me and the worst kind of des-
truction, viz., that of falling into the hands of cannibals and savages, who would |
have seized on me with the same view as I would on a goat or a turtle.

When these thoughts were over, my head was for some time taken up in
considering the nature of these savages; and it occurred to me to inquire what
part of the world these wretches lived in ? how far off the coast was from whence
they came? and why I might not order myself and my business so that I might
be as able to go over thither as they were to come to me? | never so much as -
troubled myself to consider what I should do with myself when I went thither;
but my mind was wholly bent upon the notion of my passing over in my boat
to the mainland. I looked upon my present condition as the most miserable
that could possibly be; that I was not able to throw myself into anything, but
death, that could be called worse; and if I reached the shore of the main, J
might perhaps meet with relief; or I might coast along, as I did on the African
shore, till I came to some inhabited country, and where I might find some relief;
and, after all, perhaps I might fall in with some Christian ship that might take
me in; and if the worst came to the worst, I could but die, which would put an
end to all these miseries at once. I was agitated greatly by these thoughts; |
all my calm of mind seemed to be suspended; and I had, as it were, no power to
turn my thoughts to anything but the project of a voyage to the main.

When this had agitated my thoughts for two hours or more, with such violence
ROBINSON CRUSOE 87

that it set my very blood into a ferment, Nature, as if I had been fatigued and
exhausted with the very thoughts of it, threw me into a sound sleep. One
would have thought I should have dreamed of it, but I did not, nor of anything
relating to it: but I dreamed that as 1 was going out in the morning as usual,
from my castle, I saw upon the shore two canoes and eleven savages, coming to
land, and that they brought with them another savage, whom they were going
to kill, in order to eat him; when, on a sudden, the savage that they were
going to kill jumped away, and ran for his life; then I thought, in my sleep,
that he came running into my little grove before my fortification, to hide him-
self; and that I, seeing him alone, and not perceiving that the others sought him
that way, showed myself to him, and smiling upon him encouraged him: that
he kneeled down to me, seeming to pray me to assist him; upon which I showed .-
him my ladder, made him go up it, and carried him into my cave, and he be-
came my servant; and that as soon as I had got this man, I said to myself,
“Now I may certainly venture to the mainland, for this fellow will serve me as
a pilot, and will tell me what to do, and whither to go for provisions, and whither
_ not to go for fear of being devoured; what places to venture into, and what to
escape. I waked with this thought: and was under such inexpressible im-
pressions of joy at the prospect of my escape in my dream, that the disappoint-
ments which I felt upon coming to myself, and finding that it was no more than
a dream, were equally extravagant the other way, and threw me into a deep
dejection of spirits.

Upon this, however, I made this conclusion: that my only way to go about
an attempt for an escape was, if possible, to get a savage into my possession ;
and, if possible, it should be one of their prisoners, whom they had condemned
to be eaten, and should bring hither to kill. I resolved, if possible, to get one of
these savages into my hands, cost what it would. My next thing was to con-
trive how to do it, and this indeed was very difficult to resolve on; but as I could
pitch upon no probable means for it, so I resolved to put myself upon the watch,
to see them when they came on shore, and leave the rest to the event; taking
such measures as the opportunity should present.
88 ROBINSON CRUSOE

About a year and a half after I entertained these notions (and by long musing
had, as it were, resolved them all into nothing, for want of an occasion to put
them in execution), I was surprised one morning early by seeing no less than
five canoes all on shore together on my side of the island, and the people who
belonged to them all landed and out of my sight. Seeing so many, and know-
ing that they always came four or six, or sometimes more, in a boat, I could
not tell how to take my measures, to attack twenty or thirty men single-handed;
so lay still in my castle, perplexed and discomforted. However, I put myself
into all the same postures for an attack that I had formerly provided, and was
just ready for action, if anything had pee: Having waited a good while,
at length, being very impatient, I set my guns at the foot of my ladder, and
clambered up to the top of the hill; standing so, however, that my head did not
appear above the hill, so that they could not perceive me. Here I observed,
by the help of my perspective glass, that they were no less than thirty in number;
that they had a fire kindled, and that they had meat dressed. How they had
cooked it, I knew not, or what it was; but they were all dancing round the fire.

While I was thus looking on them, I perceived, by my perspective, two miser-
able wretches dragged from the boats. I perceived one of them immediately
fall; being knocked down, I suppose, with a club, or wooden sword, for that
was their way; and two or three others were at work immediately, preparing
him for their cookery, while the other victim was left standing by himself,
till they should be ready for him. In that very moment, this poor wretch, see-
ing himself a little at liberty, started away from them, and ran with incredible
swiftness along the sands, directly towards me. I was dreadfully frightened,
that I must acknowledge, when I perceived him run my way; and especially
when, as I thought, I saw him pursued by the whole body. However, I kept
my station, and my spirits began to recover when I found that not above three
men followed him; and still more was I encouraged when I found that he out-
stripped them exceedingly in running, and gained ground on them.

There was between them and my castle, the creek, which I mentioned often


CRUSOH AND FRIDAY
90 ROBINSON CRUSOE

in the first part of my story, where I landed my cargoes out of the ship; and this
I saw plainly he must necessarily swim over; but when the savage escaping
came thither, he made nothing of it; but, plunging in, swam through in about
thirty strokes, or thereabouts, landed, and ran with exceeding strength and
swiftness. When the three persons came to the creek, I found that two of them
could swim, but the third could not, and that, standing on the other side, he
looked at the others, but went no farther, and soon after went softly back again.
I observed that the two who swam were yet more than twice as long swimming
over the creek than the fellow was that fled from them. It came very warmly
upon my thoughts, and indeed irresistibly, that now was the time to get me a
servant, and perhaps a companion or assistant; and that I was plainly called
by Providence to save this poor creature’s life. I immediately ran down the
ladder with all possible expedition, fetched my two guns, and getting up again,
I crossed towards the sea; and having a very short cut, and all down hill, clapped
myself in the way between the pursuers and the pursued, hollooing aloud to
him that fled, who, looking back, was at first perhaps as much frightened at
me as at them; but I beckoned with my hand to him to come back; and, in the
meantime, I slowly advanced towards the two that followed; then rushing at
once upon the foremost, I knocked him down with the stock of my piece. I
was loath to fire, because I wouldinot havethe rest hear; though, at that distance,
it would not have been easily heard. Having knocked this fellow down, the
other who pursued him stopped, as if he had been frightened, and I advanced
towards him; but as I came nearer, I perceived presently he had a bow and
arrow, and was fitting it to shoot at me; so I was then obliged to shoot at him
first, which I did, and killed him at the first shot. ‘The poor savage who fled
was so frightened with the fire and noise of my piece that he stood stock still.
I made signs to come forward, which he easily understood, and came a little
way; then stopped again, and then a little farther, and stopped again; and 1
could then perceive that he stood trembling. I smiled at him, and looked

pleasantly, and beckoned to him to come still nearer; at length, he came close
ROBINSON CRUSOE 91

to me; and then he kneeled down, laid his head upon the ground, and, taking
me by the foot, set my foot upon his head; this, it seems, was in token of swear-
ing to be my slave forever. I took him up, and made much of him, and en-
couraged him all I could. But there was more work to do yet; for I perceived
the savage whom I had knocked down was not killed, but stunned with the
blow, and began to come to himself; so I pointed to him, and showed him the
savage, that he was not dead; upon this he spoke some words to me and though
I could not understand them, yet I thought they were pleasant to hear; for they
were the first sound of a man’s voice that I had heard, my own excepted, for
above twenty-five years. But there was no time for such reflections now; the
savage who was knocked down recovered himself so far as to sit up on the
ground, and I perceived that my savage began to be afraid. He made a motion
to me to lend him my sword, which I did. He no sooner had it but he runs to
his enemy, and at one blow cut off his head as cleverly, no executioner in Ger-
many could have done it sooner or better; which I thought very strange for one
who, I had reason to believe, never saw a sword in his life before, except their
own wooden swords: however, it seems, as I learned afterwards, they make their
wooden swords so sharp, so heavy, and the wood is so hard, that they will even
cut off heads with them. When he had done this, he comes laughing to me in
sign of triumph, and brought me the sword again, and laid it down, with the
head of the savage that he had killed, just before me. But that which as-
tonished him most was to know how I killed the other Indian so far off; so
pointing to him, he made signs to me to let him go to him; and I bade him go,
as well as I could. When he came to him, he stood like one amazed, looking at
him, turning him first on one side, then on the other. He took up his bow
and arrows, and came back; so I turned to go away, and beckoned him to follow
me, making signs to him that more might come after them.

Upon this he made signs to me that he should bury them with sand, that they
might not be seen by the rest, if they followed; and so I made signs to him again

todo so. He fell to work; and in an instant he had scraped a hole in the sand
92 ROBINSON CRUSOE

with his hands, big enough to bury the first in, and then dragged him into it,
and covered him; and did so by the other also. I believe he had buried them
both in a quarter of an hour.

IT carried him, not to my castle, but quite away to my cave, on the farther
part of the island; so I did not let my dream come to pass in that part, that he
came into my grove for shelter. Here I gave him bread and a bunch of raisins
to eat, and a draught of water, which I found he was indeed in great distress
for from his running; and having refreshed him, I made signs for him to go and
lie down to sleep.

He was a comely, handsome Fllog? perfectly well made, with straight, strong
limbs, not too large, tall and well shaped; and, as I reckon, about twenty-six
years of age. He had a very good countenance, not a fierce and surly aspect,
but seemed to have something very manly in his face; and yet he had all the
' sweetness and softness of a European in his countenance, too, especially when
he smiled. His hair was long and black, not curled like wool; his forehead
very high and large; and a great vivacity and sparkling sharpness in his eyes.
The color of his skin was not quite black, but very tawny.

After he had slumbered about half an hour, he awoke and came out of the
cave to me; for I had been milking my goats, which I had in the inclosure just
by: when he espied me, he came running to me, laying himself down upon the
ground, with all the possible signs of an humble, thankful disposition, making
- a great many gestures to show it. I understood him in many things, and let
him know I was very well pleased with him. In a little time I began to speak
to him, and teach him to speak to me; and, first, I let him know his name should
be Fripay, which was the day I saved his life: I called him so for the memory
of the time. I likewise taught him to say Master, and then let him know that
was to be my name; I likewise taught him to say Yes and No, and to know the
meaning of them. I gave him some milk in an earthen pot, and let him see
me drink it before him, and sop my bread in it; and gave him a cake of bread
to do the like, which he quickly complied with, and made signs that it was very
ROBINSON CRUSOB 93























































FRIDAY BURYING THE DEAD:

good for him. I kept there with him all that night; but, as soon as it was day,
I beckoned to him to come with me, and let him know I would give him some
clothes; at which he seemed very glad, for he was stark naked. I then led him
‘up to the top of the hill, to see if his enemies were gone, and, pulling out my
glass, I looked, and saw plainly the place where they had been, but no appear-
ance of them or their canoes; so that it was plain they were gone, and had left
their two comrades behind them, without any search after them.

We came back to our castle, and there I fell to work for my man Friday; and,
first of all, I gave him a pair of linen drawers, which I had out of the poor
gunner’s chest I mentioned, which I found in the wreck, and which, with a little
alteration, fitted him very well; and then I made him a jerkin of goat’s skin,
as well as my skill would allow (for I was now grown a tolerably good tailor) ;
_and I gave him a cap which I made of hare’s skin, very convenient, and fashion-
able enough; and thus he was clothed, for the present, tolerably well.
94 ROBINSON CRUSOE

The next day, I began to consider where I should lodge him; and, that I
might do well for him, and yet be perfectly easy myself, I made a little tent for
him in the vacant place between my two fortifications. As there was a door
or entrance there into my cave, I made a formal framed door-case, and a door
to open in the inside, which I barred up in the night, taking in my ladders, too;
so that Friday could no way come at me in the inside of my innermost wall,
without making so much noise in getting over that it must needs awaken me.
But I needed none of all this precaution; for never man had a more faithful,
loving, sincere servant than Friday was to me; without passion, sullenness, or
design, his affections were tied to me, like those of a child to a father.

I was greatly delighted with my new companion, and made it my business
to teach him everything that was proper to make him useful, handy, and helpful;
but especially to make him speak, and understand me when I spoke; and he
was the aptest scholar that ever was; and particularly was so merry, so con-
stantly diligent, andso pleased when he could but understand me, or make me
understand him, that it was very pleasant to me to talk to him. And now my |
life began to be so easy that I began to say to myself, that could I but have been
safe from more savages, I cared not if I was never to remove from the place
while I lived. .

One morning I took him out with me to the woods. I went, indeed, intend-
ing to kill a kid out of my own flock, and bring it home and dress it; but as I
was going, I saw a she-goat lying down in the shade, and two young kids sitting
by her. I caught hold of Friday: “Hold,” said I, “stand still;”? and made
signs to him not to stir: immediately I presented my piece, shot, and killed one
of the kids. ‘The poor creature was sensibly surprised; trembled and, shook,
and looked so amazed that I thought he would have sunk down. He did not
see the kid I shot at, or perceive I had killed it, but ripped up his waistcoat, to
feel whether he was not wounded; and, as I found, presently, thought I was
resolved to kill him; for he came and kneeled down to me, and embracing my
knees, said a great many things I did not understand; but I could easily see

the meaning was to pray me not to kill him.


CRUSOD AND FRIDAY OUT SHOOTING
96 ROBINSON CRUSOE

T soon found a way to convince him that I would do him no harm; and tak-
ing him up by the hand, laughed at him, and pointing to the kid which I had
killed, beckoned to him to run and fetch it, which he did.

He would not so much as touch the gun for several days after; but he would
speak to it and talk to it, as if it had answered him, when he was by himself;
which, as I afterwards learned of him, was to desire it not to kill him. I brought
home the kid, and the same evening I took the skin off, and stewed some of

the flesh, and made some very good broth. After I had begun to eat some, i
: gave some to my man, who seemed very glad of it, and liked it very well. Hav-
ing thus fed him with broiled meat and broth, I was resolved to feast him the
next day with roasting a piece of the kid: this I did by hanging it before the fire
on a string, setting two poles up, one on each side of the fire, and one across
on the top, and tying the string to the cross-stick, letting the meat turn con-
tinually. This Friday admired very much; but when he came to taste the
flesh, he took so many ways to tell me how well he liked it, that I could not but
«understand him.

The next day I set him to work to beating some corn out, and sifting it in
the manner I used to do, as I observed before; and he soon understood how to
do it as wellasI. After that I let him see me make my bread, and bake it, too;
and in a little time Friday was able to do all the work for me, as well as I could
do it myself.

I began now to consider that, having two mouths to feed instead of one I
must plant a largertquantity of corn than I used to do; so I marked out a larger
piece of land, and began the fence in the same manner as before, in which Friday
worked very willingly and very hard; and I told him that it was for corn to make
more bread, because he was now with me, and that I might have enough for
him and myself too. He let me know that he thought I had much more labor
upon me on his account than I had for myself; and that he would work the
harder for me, if I would tell him what to do.

This was the pleasantest year of all the life I led in this place. Friday began
ROBINSON CRUSOE 97

to talk pretty well, and understand the names of almost everything I had occa
sion to call for, and of every place I had to send him to, and talk a great deal
to me; so that, in short, I began to have some use for my tongue again, which,
indeed, I had very little occasion for before; that is to say, about speech. Be-
sides the pleasure of talking to him, I had a singular satisfaction in the fellow
himself: his simple, unfeigned honesty appeared to me more and more every
day, and I began really to love the creature; and on his side I believe he loved
me more than it was possible for him ever to love anything before.

I once asked him if the nation he be onged to never conquered in battle, and
when he told me that they did, I asked whether they ate the men they took.
“Yes, my nation eat mans too,” he answered. He told me then that he had
been among the savages who used to come on shore on the farther part of the
island. I asked him how far it was from our island to the shore, and whether
the canoes were not often lost. He told me there was no danger; no canoes were
ever lost. He told me that up a great way beyond the moon (that was, beyond
the setting of the moon) there dwelt white bearded men, like me; by which I
understood he meant the Spaniards. .

I inquired if he could tell me how I might come from this island, and get
among those white men. He told me, “Yes, yes, you may go in two canoe.”
T could not understand what he meant by “two canoe,” till at last, with
great difficulty, I found he meant it must be in a large, great boat, as big as
two canoes. This part of Friday’s discourse began to relish with me very well;
and from this time I entertained some hopes that, one time or other, I might
find an opportunity to make my escape from this place, and that this poor
savage might be a means to help me to do it.

During the long time that Friday had now been with me, and that he began
to speak to me, and understand me, I was not wanting to lay a foundation of
religious knowledge in his mind; particularly I asked him one time who made
him. ‘The poor creature did not understand me, but thought I had asked who
was his father: but I took it by another handle, and asked him who made the
98 ROBINSON CRUSOE

sea, the ground we walked on, and the hills and woods. He told me, “It was
one Benamuckee, that lived beyond all.’’ He could describe nothing of this great
- person, but that he was very old, “much older,” he said, “than the sea or the
land, than the moon or the stars.” I asked him, then, if this old person had
made all things, why did not all things worship him? He ooked very grave,
and, with a perfect look of innocence, said, “All things said ‘O!’ to him.” I
asked him if the people who die in his country went away anywhere. He said,
“Yes; they all go to Benamuckee.” Then I asked him whether those they
ate up went thither too. He said, “ Yes.”

From these things I began to instruct him in the knowledge of the true God:
I told him that the great Maker of all things lived there, pointing up towards
heaven; that He governed the world by the same power and providence by
which He made it; that He was omnipotent, and could do everything for us, give
everything to us, take everything from us; and thus, by degrees, I opened his
eyes. He listened with great attention, and received with pleasure the notion
of Jesus Christ being sent to redeem us, and of the manner of making our
prayers to God, and His being able to hear us, even into heaven.

I had, God knows, more sincerity than knowledge in all the menage T took
for this poor creature’s instruction, and must acknowledge, what I believe all
that act upon the same principle will find, that, in laying things open to him, I
really informed and instructed myself in many things that I either did not
know, or had not fully considered before, but which occurred naturally in my
mind upon searching into them, for the information of this poor savage. The
conversation which employed the hours between Friday and me was such as
made the three years which we lived there together perfectly and completely
happy, if any such thing as complete happiness can be found in a sublunary
state. ‘This savage became a good Christian, a much better than I; though
I have reason to hope, and bless God for it, that we were equally penitent, and
comforted, restored penitents. We had here the Word of God to read, and were

no farther off from His Spirit to instruct than if we had been in England.
ROBINSON CRUSOE 99



CRUSOE INSTRUCTING FRIDAY

I also acquainted Friday with my own story, or at least so much of it as.
related to my coming into this place; how I had lived there, and how long. I
let him into the mystery, for such it was to him, of gunpowder and bullet, and
100 ROBINSON CRUSOE

taught him how to shoot. I gave him a knife, with which he was wonderfully
delighted; and I made him a belt, with a frog hanging to it, such as in England
we wear hangers in; and in the frog, instead of a hanger, I gave him a hatchet,
which was not only as good a weapon in some cases, but much more useful upon
many occasions. :

T gave him an account of the wreck which I had been on board of, and showed
him the ruins of our boat, which we lost when we escaped, and which was now
fallen almost all to pieces. Upon seeing this boat, Friday stood musing a great
while, and said nothing. I asked him what it was he studied upon. At last,
says he, “ Me see such boat like come to place at my nation.” I did not under-
stand him for a good while; but at last I understood by him that a boat, such as
that had been, came on shore upon the country where he lived. I presently
imagined that some European ship must have been cast away.upon their coast,
and the boat might get loose and drive ashore; but I never once thought of
men making their escape from a wreck thither, so I only inquired after the des-

‘cription of the boat.

Friday described the boat to me well enough; but brought me better to under-
stand him when he added with some warmth, “‘ We save the white mans from
drown.” Then I presently asked if there were any white mans, as he called
them, in the boat. “Yes,” he said; “the boat full of white mans.” I asked
him how many. He told upon his fingers seventeen. I asked him then what
became of them. He told me that they lived there still; that they had been
there about four years; that the savages let them alone, and gave them victuals
to live. I asked him how it came to pass that they did not kill them and eat
them. He said, “No,-they make brother with them.” That is, as I understood
him, a truce; and then he added, “They no eat mans but when make the war-
fight.” ‘That is to say, they nevereat any men butsuchascome to fight with them,
and are taken in battle. : ae

It was after this some considerable time, that being upon the top of the hill, |
at the east side of the island, from whence, as I have said, I had, in a clear day,
ROBINSON CRUSOE 101

discovered the main or continent of America, Friday, the weather being very
serene, looks very earnestly towards the mainland, and, in a kind of surprise,
falls a-jumping and dancing, and calls out to me, for 1 was at some distance
from him. I asked him what was the matter. “Oh, joy!” says he; “oh, glad!
there see my country, there my nation!” I observed an extraordinary sense of
pleasure appeared in his face, as if he had a mind to be in his own country
again. ‘This observation of mine made me, at first, not so easy about my new
man Friday as I was before; and I made no doubt but that, if Friday could get
back to his own nation again, he would not only forget all his religion, but all
his obligation to me, and would be forward enough to give his countrymen an
account of me, and come back, perhaps, with a hundred or two of them, and
make a feast upon me. But I wronged the poor, honest creature very much,
for which I was very sorry afterwards. While my jealousy of him lasted, you
may be sure I was every day pumping him, to see if he would discover any of
the new thoughts which I suspected were in him; but I found everything he
said was so honest and so innocent, that I could find nothing to nourish my
suspicion; and, in spite of all my uneasiness, he made me at last entirely his own.

One day, walking up the same hill, but the weather being hazy at sea, so that
we could not see the continent, I called to him, and said, “Friday, do not you
wish yourself in your own country, your own nation ?” “Yes,” he said, “I be
much O glad to be at my own nation.” “What would you do there?” said I.
“Would you turn wild again, eat men’s flesh again, and be a savage, as you
were before?” He looked full of concern, and shaking his head, said, “No,
no; Friday tell them to live good; tell them pray God; tell them to eat corn-
bread, cattle-flesh, milk; no eat man again.” “Why, then,” said I to him,
“they will kill you.” He looked grave at that, and then said, “No, no, they
no kill me, they willing love learn.” He meant by this, they would be willing
to learn. He added, they learned much of the “bearded mans” that came in
the boat. ‘Then I asked him if he would go back to them. He smiled at that,
and told me he could not swim so far. I told him 1 would make a canoe for
102 a ROBINSON CRUSOE

him. He told me he would go, if I would go with him. “I go!” says I. “Why,
they will eat me if I come there.” “No, no,” says he, “me make them no eat
you; me make them much love you.” ‘Then he told me, as well as he could,
how kind they were to seventeen white men, or bearded men, as he called them,
who came on shore in distress.
From this time, I confess, I had a mind to venture over, and see if T could —
possibly join with those bearded men, who, I made no doubt, were Spaniards
or Portuguese. So, after some days, I took Friday to work again, by way of
discourse, and told him I would give him a boat to go back to his own nation;
and I, accordingly, carried him to my frigate, and showed it him, and we both
-went into it. I found he was a most dexterous fellow at managing it, and
would make it go almost as swift and fast again as I could. So when he was in,
T said to him, “Well, now, Friday, shall we go to your nation ?” He looked
very dull at my saying so; which it seems was because he thought the boat too
small to go so far. I then told him I had a bigger; so the next day I went to
the place where the first boat lay which I had made, but which I could not get
into the water. He said that was big enough; but then, as I had taken no
care of it, and it had lain two or three and twenty years there, the sun had split
and dried it, so that it was rotten.

Upon the whole, I was by this time so fixed upon my design of going over with
him to the continent, that I told him we would go and make one as big as that,
and he should go home in it. He answered not one word, but looked very
grave and sad. I asked him what was the matter with him. He asked me
again, “Why you angry mad with Friday ?>—what me done?” I asked him what
he meant. I told him I was not angry with him at all. “No angry!” says he, |
repeating the words several times; “why send Friday home away to my na-
nation?” “Why,” says I, “Friday, did not you say you wished you were

99

there?” “Yes, yes,” says he, “wish we both there; no wish Friday there,
no master there.” In a word, he would not think of going there without me.

“T go there, Friday ?” says I. “ What shall I do there?” He turned very quickly
103

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says he;

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pray God

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ROBINSON CRUSOE

z Wy :



CRUSOE AND FRIDAY ON THE HILL

“You do great deal much good

1s.

upon me at th

.
?

tame mans

sober,

>

mans be good

you tell them know God

live new life.”

“Alas, Friday!” says I, “thou knowest not what thou sayest
104 ROBINSON CRUSOE

IT am but an ignorant man myself.” “Yes, yes,” says he, “you teachee me good,
you teachee them good.”

So I found all the foundation of his desire to go to his own country was laid
in his ardent affection to the people, and his hopes of my doing them good; a
thing which I had no notion of myself. But still I found a strong inclination
to my attempting an escape, founded on the supposition that there were seven-
teen bearded men there; and therefore, without any more delay, I went to work
with Friday to find out a great tree proper to fell, and make a large periagua, or
canoe, to undertake the voyage. At last, Friday pitched upon a tree, for I
found he knew much better than I what kind of wood was fittest for it. Friday
was for burning the hollow or cavity of this tree out, to make it into a boat, but
T showed him how rather to cut it with tools; which, after I had showed him
how to use, he did very handily, and in about a month’s hard labor, we finished
it and made it very handsome. After this, however, it cost us near a fort-
night’s time to get her along, as it were, inch by inch, upon great rollers into
the water.

When she was in the water, though she was so big, it amazed me to see with
what dexterity and how swift my man Friday could manage her, turn her, and
paddle her along. So I asked him if he would, and if we might venture over
in her. “Yes,” he said; “we venture over in her very well, though great blow
wind.” However, I had a farther design that he knew nothing of, and that
was to make a mast and a sail, and to fit her with an anchor and cable. I was
near two months rigging and fitting my mast and sail, and a rudder to the
stern of her to steer with, After all this was done, I had my man Friday to
teach as to what belonged to the navigation of my boat; for, though he knew
very well how to paddle the canoe, he knew nothing of what belonged to a sail
and a rudder; and was amazed when he saw.me work the boat to and again in
the sea. However, with a little use, I made all these things familiar to him,
and he became an expert sailor.

T was now entered on the seven-and-twentieth year of my captivity in this

4
ROBINSON CRUSOE — 105

place, and I kept the anniversary of my landing here with the same thankfulness
to God for His mercies as at first. The rainy season was in the meantime upon
me, when I kept more within doors than at other times. I had stowed our new
vesse. as secure as I could, bringing her up into the creek, where I made my
man Friday dig a little dock, just big enough to hold her, and when the tide was
out, we made a strong dam across the end of it, to keep the water out. Thus
we waited for the months of November and December, in which I designed to
make my adventure.

When the settled season began to come in, I was preparing daily for the
voyage, and the first thing I did was to lay by a certain quantity of provisions,
being the stores for our voyage; and intended, in a week or a fortnight’s time,
to open the dock, and launch out our boat. I was busy one morning upon
something of this kind, when I called to Friday, and bid him go to the sea-shore,
and see if he could find a turtle or a tortoise, a thing which we generally got
once a week, for the sake of the eggs, as well as the flesh. Friday had not been
gone long when he came running back, and flew over my outer wall, or fence,
like one that felt not the ground, or the steps he set his feet on; and before I had
time to speak to him, he cries out to me, “O master! O master! O sorrow!
O bad!” “ What’s the matter, Friday?” said I. “Oh! yonder, there,” says
he; “one two, three canoes; one, two, three!” “Well, Friday,” says I, “do
not be frightened.”’ I saw the poor fellow was most terribly scared, for nothing
ran in his head but that they were come back to look for him, and would cut him
_in pieces, and eat him. Said I, “Friday, we must resolve to fight them. Can
you fight, Friday ?” “Me shoot,” says he; “but there come many great number.”
“No matter for that,” said I, again; “our guns will fright those we do not kill.”
So I asked him whether, if I resolved to defend him, he would defend me, and
stand by me, and do just as I bid him. He said, “Me die, when you bid die,
master.” I made him take the two fowling-pieces and load them with large
swan-shot as big as small pistol-bullets. ‘Then I took four muskets, and loaded
them with two slugs and five small bullets each; and my two pistols I loaded

x
ao

~
106 - ROBINSON CRUSOE

with a brace of bullets each. I hung my great sword by my side, and gave
Friday his hatchet. When I had thus prepared myself, I took my persepective
glass, and went up to the side of the hill, to see what I could discover; and I
found quickly by my glass that there were one-and-twenty savages, three
prisoners, and three canoes; and that their whole business seemed to be the
triumphant banquet upon these three human bodies. I observed also that they
landed not where they had done when Friday made his escape, but nearer to
my creek, where the shore was low, and where a thick wood came close almost
down to the sea. ‘This, with the abhorrence of the inhuman errand these
wretches came about, filled me with such indignation that I resolved to go
down to them, and kill them all.

In this bit of fury I took first and divided the arms, which I had charged, be-
tween us. I gave Friday one pistol to stick in his girdle, and three guns upon ~
his shoulder, and I took one pistol, and the other three myself; and in this
posture we marched out. I took a small bottle of rum in my pocket, and gave
Friday a large bag with more powder and bullets. I made a circle to my right
hand of near a mile, as well to get over the creek as to get into the wood, so that
T might come within shot of them before I should be discovered.

While 1 was making this march, my former thoughts returning, I began to
ask myself what occasion, much less what necessity, I was in to go and dip my
hands in blood, to attack people who, as to me, were innocent, and whose bar-
barous customs were their own disaster, being in them a token, indeed, of God’s
having left them to such inhuman courses, but did not call me to take upon me ~
to be a judge of their actions, much less an executioner of His justice. These
things were so warmly pressed upon my thoughts all the way as I went, that I
resolved I would only go and place myself near them that I‘might observe their
barbarous feast, and that I would act then as God should direct.

With this resolution I entered the wood, and marched till I came to the skirt
of the wood on the side which was next to them. Here I called softly to Friday,
and showing him a great tree which was just at the corner of the wood, I bade
ROBINSON CRUSOE : 107

him go to the tree, and bring me word if he could see there plainly what they
were doing. He did so, and came immediately back to me, and told me that

they were all about their fire eating the flesh of one of their prisoners, and that
another lay bound upon the sand a little from them, whom he said they would
kill next. He told me he was not one of their nation, but one of the bearded
men whom he had told me of, that came to their country in the boat, and this
fired the very soul within me.

There was another tree, which, by going a little way about, I saw I might
come at undiscovered, and that then I should be within half a shot of them.
So going back about twenty paces, I got behind some bushes, which held all the
way till I came to the other tree, and then came to a little rising ground, which
gave me a full view of them at the distance of about eighty yards.

T had now not a moment to lose, for nineteen of the dreadful wretches sat on
the ground, all close huddled together, and had just sent the other two to butcher
the poor Christian, and bring him, perhaps limb by limb, to their fire, and they
were stooping down to untie the bands at his feet. I turned to Friday; “Now,
Friday,” said I, “do exactly as you see me do; fail in nothing.” So I set down
one of the muskets and the fowling-piece upon the ground, and Friday did the
like by his, and with the other musket I took my aim at the savages, bidding
him do the like; then, asking him if he was ready, he said, “Yes.” “Then
fire at them,” said I; and at the same moment I fired also.

Friday killed two of them, and wounded three more; and I killed one, and
wounded two. ‘They were you may be sure, in a dreadful consternation. I
threw down the piece, and took up the fowling piece, and Friday did the like.
“Are you ready, Friday?” said I. “Yes,” says he. “Let fly, then,” said I,
“in the name of God!” and with that I fired again among the amazed wretches,
and so did Friday; and so many were wounded, that they ran about yelling and
screaming like mad creatures.

I rushed out of the wood and showed myself, and Friday close at my foot.

T shouted as loud as I could, and bade Friday do so too, and running as fast, as
108. ~ ROBINSON CRUSOE

T could, I made directly towards the poor victim, who was lying upon the beach.
The two butchers who were just going to work with him had jumped into a
canoe, and three more of the rest made the same way. I turned to Friday,
and bade him step forwards and fire at them.

While Friday fired at them, I pulled out my knife and cut the rushes that
bound the poor victim; and loosing his hands and feet, I lifted him up.. He
was so weak and faint he could scarcely stand or speak. I took my bottle out
of my pocket, and gave it him, making signs that he should drink, which he did;
and I gave him a piece of bread, which he ate. ‘Then I asked him what coun-
tryman he was, and he said Espagnole; and being a little recovered, let me know,
by all the signs he could possibly make, how much he was in debt for his de-
liverance. “Seignior,” said I, with as much Spanish as I could make up, “we
will talk afterwards, but we must fight now; if you have any strength left, take
- this pistol and sword, and lay about you.” He took them very thankfully;
and no sooner had he the arms in his hands, but, as if they had put new vigor
into him, he flew upon his murderers like a fury, and had cut two of them in
pieces in an instant. :

I kept my piece in my hand still without firing, and called to Friday, and
bade him run up to the tree from whence we first fired, and fetch the arms
which lay there that had been discharged, which he did with great swiftness;
and then giving him my musket, I sat down myself to load all the rest again,
and bade them come to me when they wanted. While I was loading these
pieces, there happened a fierce engagement between the Spaniard and one of
the savages, who made at him with one of their great wooden swords. The
Spaniard had fought this Indian a good while, but the savage being a stout,
_ lusty fellow, had thrown him down, being faint, and was wringing my sword
out of his hand; when the Spaniard wisely quitted the sword, drew the pistol
from his girdle, shot the savage through the body, and killed him upon the
spot. .

Friday, being now left his liberty, pursued the flying wretches, with no weapon
ROBINSON CRUSOE 109\

in his hand but his hatchet; and with that he dispatched all he could come up
with; and the Spaniard coming to me for a gun, I gave him one of the fowling-
pieces, with which he pursued two of the savages, and wounded them both;
but, one of them plunged himself into the sea, and swam with all his might off
to the two who were in the canoe; which three in the canoe, with one wounded,
that we knew not whether he died or no, were all that escaped our hands, of
one-and-twenty.° .

hose that were in the canoe worked hard to get out of gunshot, and Friday
would fain have had me take one of their canoes, and pursue them; and, indeed,
I was very anxious about their escape, lest,-carrying the news home to their
_ people, they should come back perhaps with two or three hundred of the canoes,
and devour us by mere multitude; so I consented to pursue them by sea, and
running to one of their canoes, I jumped in, and bade Friday follow me; but
when I was in the canoe, I was surprised to find another poor creature lie
there, bound hand and foot.

T immediately cut the twisted flags or rushes, which they had bound him with,
and would have helped him up; but he could not stand or speak. When Friday
came to him, I bade him speak to him, and tell him of his deliverance; and
pulling out my bottle, made him give the poor wretch a dram; which, with the
news of his being delivered, revived him, and he sat up in the boat. But when
Friday came to hear him speak, and look in his face, it would have moved any
one to tears to see how Friday kissed him, embraced him, hugged him, cried,
laughed, hallooed, and jumped about like a distracted creature. It wasa good
while before I could make him tell me what was the matter, but when he
came a little to himself, he told me that it was his father.

Tt is not easy for me to express how it moved me to see what filial affection
had worked in this poor savage at the sight of his father, and of his being de-
livered from death; nor, indeed, can I describe half the extravagances of his
. affection after this; for he went into the boat, and out of the boat,.a great many
times: when he went ia to him, he would sit down by him, open his breast, and
110 _ ROBINSON CRUSOE

hold his father’s head. close to his bosom half an hour together, to nourish it;
then he took his arms and ankles, which were numbed and stiff with the bind-
ing and chafed and rubbed them with his hands; and I, perceiving what the
case was, gave him some rum out of my bottle to rub them with, which did them
a great deal of good.

This action put an end to our pursuit of the canoe with the other savages,
and it was happy for us that it did, for it blew so hard within two hours after,
that I could not suppose their pout © oe live, or that they ever reached their
own coast.

But to return to Friday. I asked him if he had given his father any bread.
He shook his head, and said, “None; ugly dog eat all up self.” I then gave
him a cake of bread, out of a little pouch I carried on purpose. I had in my
pocket two or three bunches of raisins, so I gave him a handful of them for his
father. He had no sooner given his father these raisins, but I saw him come
out of the boat, and run away as if he had been bewitched. In a quarter of an
hour I saw him come back again, though not so fast as he went; and, as he
came nearer, I found he had been quite home for an earthen jug, or pot, to bring
his father some fresh water, and that he had got two more cakes of bread: the
bread he gave me, but the water he carried to his father.

When his father had drunk, I called to him to know if there was any water
left; he said “ Yes;” and I bade him give it to the poor Spaniard, and I sent one
of the cakes, that Friday brought, to the Spaniard too, who was indeed very
weak, and was reposing himself upon a green place under the shade of a tree;
and whose limbs were also very stiff. I went to him and gave him a handful of
_ raisins: he looked up in my face with all the tokens of gratitude and thankfulness
that could appear in any countenance; but was so weak, that he could not stand
upon his feet; so I bade him sit still, and caused Friday to rub his ankles with
rum, as he had done his father’s.

I then spoke to the Spaniard to let Friday help him up, if he pile and lead
him to the boat, and then he should carry him to our dwelling, where I would
ROBINSON CRUSOE 111

take care of him. But Friday, a lusty young fellow, took the Spaniard quite
up on his back, and carried him away to the boat, and then lifted him quite in,
and set him close to his father; and presently stepping out again, launched the
boat off, and paddled it along the shore till he brought them both safe into our
creek, and leaving them in the boat, runs away to fetch the other canoe. He
had it in the creek almost as soon as I got to it by land, and then I made a kind
of hand-barrow to lay our guests on, and Friday and I carried them up both
together upon it between us.

But when we got them to the outside of our wall, or fortification, it was im-
possible to get them over; so I set to work, and Friday and I, in about two hours’
time, made a tent, covered with old sails, in the space without our outward
fence; and here we made them two beds. As soon as I had given my two weak,
rescued prisoners a place to rest them upon, I began to think of making some
provision for them. I ordered Friday to kill a yearling goat, and cutting off
the hinder quarter, and chopping it,into small pieces, I made them a very good
dish of flesh and broth. I carried it all into the new tent, and having set a
table there for them, I sat down, and ate my own dinner also with them, and,
as well as I could, cheered them and encouraged them. Friday was my inter-
preter, especially to his father, and, indeed, to the Spaniard too; for the Spaniard |
spoke the language of the savages pretty well.

I set Friday to inquire of his father what he thought of the escape of the
savages in that canoe, and whether we might expect a return of them, with a
power too great to resist. His first opinion was, that the savages in the boat
never could live out the storm which blew that night they went off; but as to
what they would do if they came on shore, it was his opinion that they were so
dreadfully frightened with the manner of their being attacked, the noise and
the fire, that he believed they would tell the people they were all killed by thun-
der and lightning, not by the hand of man. And this old savage was in the
right; for, as I understood since, by other hands, the savages never attempted
to go over te the island afterwards; they were so terrified with the accounts
112 - - ROBINSON CRUSOE

given by those four men (for it seems they did escape the sea), that they believed
whoever went to that enchanted island would be destroyed with fire from the
gods. z

In a little time, I began to take my former thoughts of a voyage to the main
into consideration; being assured, by Friday’s father, that I might depend upon
good usage from their nation, on his account, if I would go. But my thoughts
were a little suspended when I had a serious discourse with the Spaniard, and
when I understood that there were sixteen more of his countrymen and Portu-
guese, who, having been cast away and made their escape to that side, lived
there at peace, indeed, with the savages, but were very sore put to it for neces-
saries, and, indeed, for life.

I asked him if they had formed no design of making any escape. He said

they had many consultations about it; but having neither vessel, nor tools to
build one, nor provisions of any kind, their councils always ended in tears and
despair. I asked him how he thought they would receive a proposal from me,
which might tend towards an escape; and whether, if they were all here, it
‘might not be done. I was persuaded, I said, that we might, with so many
hands, build a bark large enough to carry us all away. I told him with free-
dom, I feared mostly their treachery and ill-usuage of me, if I put my life in
their hands; for that gratitude was no inherent virtue in the nature of man, nor
did men always square their dealings by the obligations they had received, so
much as they did by the advantages they expected.

He answered that their condition was so miserable, and that they were so
sensible of it, that he believed they would abhor the thought of using any man
unkindly that should contribute to their deliverance; and that, if I pleased,
he would go to them, with the old man, and discourse with them about it and
return again, and bring me their answer; that he would make conditions with
them upon their solemn oath, that they they should be absolutely under my
direction, as their commander and captain; and be guided wholly and absolutely
by my orders, till they were landed safely in such country as I intended; and that
ROBINSON CRUSOE 118

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CRUSOE CONFERRING WITH THE SPANIARD

he would bring a contract from them, under their hands, for that purpose.
Upon these assurances, I resolved to venture to relieve them, if possible, and
to send the old savage and this Spaniard over to them to treat. But when we
had got all things in readiness to go, the Spaniard himself started an objection
which had so much prudence in it that T could not but be very well satisfied
in it; and, by his advice, put off the deliverance of his comrades for at least half

ee

’
114 ; ROBINSON CRUBOE

a year. The case was thus: he saw what stock of corn and rice I had laid up;
which was not sufficient, without good husbandry, for my family, now it was
increased to four; and much less would it be sufficient if his countrymen should
come over. So he told me he thought it would be more advisable to let him
and the other two. dig and cultivate some more land, as much as I could spare
seed to sow, and that we should wait another harvest, that we might have a
supply of corn for. his countrymen, when they should come.

His advice was so good, that I could not but be very well pleased with his
proposal, as well as satisfied with his fidelity; so we fell to digging, all four of
us, and in about a month’s time, we had got as much land cured and trimmed
up as we sowed two-and-twenty bushels of barley on, and sixteen jars of rice.

While waiting for the harvest, I marked out several trees which I thought fit
for our work, and I set Friday. and his father to cut them down. I showed
them with what pains I had hewed a large tree into a single plank, and I caused
them to do the like, till they had made about a dozen large planks of good oak.
At the same time, I contrived to increase my little stock of tame goats as much as
IT could; and the season for curing the grapes coming on, I caused such a pro-
digious quantity to be hung up in the sun, that we could have filled sixty or
eighty barrels.

It was now harvest, and our crop in good order; it was not the most plentiful
increase I had seen in the island, but, however, it was enough to answer our end,
though all the sixteen Spaniards had been on shore with me. So now, having
a full supply of food for all the guests expected, the Spaniard and the old savage
went away in one of the canoes which they were brought in, when they came
as prisoners to be devoured by the savages. I gave them provisions of bread,
. and of dried grapes, sufficient for themselves for many days, and sufficient for
all the Spaniards for about eight days’ time; and wishing them a good voyage,
T saw them go, agreeing with them about a signal they should hang out at their
return, by which I should know them again when they came back, at a distance,
before they came on shore. |
ROBINSON CRUSOE 115

It was no less than eight days I had waited for them, when a strange and
unforseen accident intervened. I was fast asleep in my hutch one morning,
when Friday came running into me, and called aloud, “ Master, master, they are ~
come, they are come!” Upon which, regardless of danger, I jumped up, put
on my clothes, and hurried through my little grove; when, looking toward the
sea, I saw a boat about a league and a half distant, standing n for the shore,
with the wind fair. I observed that they did not come from the side on which
the land lay, but from the southernmost end of the island. I bade Friday to
lie still, for these were not the people we looked for. Then I climbed to the
top of the hill to take a better view. With the help of my perspective glass, I
plainly discovered a ship lying at anchor at about two leagues and a half distance
from me. It seemed to be an English ship, and the boat appeared to be an Eng-
lish long-boat.

The joy of seeing a ship was such as I cannot describe, and yet some secret .
doubts hung about me—I cannot tell from whence they came—bidding me
keep on my guard. It was not long before I saw the boat draw near the shore,
as if they looked for a place where they might conveniently land; and at last
they ran their boat on shore upon the beach at about a half a mile from me.
Now I was fully satisfied they were Englishmen, in all eleven men, three of
whom were unarmed and bound. When the first four or five jumped on shore,
they took these three out of the boat as prisoners; and one of the three, I could
perceive, used the most passionate gestures of entreaty, affliction, and despair,
while the other two showed great concern.

I knew not the meaning of this sight, and was greatly perplexed. Friday
called out to me, “O master! you see English mans eat prisoner as well as
savage mans.” “Why, Friday,” says I, “do you think they are going to eat
them then?” “Yes,” says Friday, “they will eat them.” “No, no,” says I,
“Friday; I am afraid they will murder them, indeed; but you may be sure ney
will not eat them.”

All this while I had no thought of what the matter really was, but stood tremb-
116 ROBINSON CRUSOE

ling with the horror of the sight, expecting every moment when the three prison-
ers should be killed; nay, once I saw one of the villains lift up his arm with a
great sword, to strike one of the poor men. After I had observed the out-
rageous usage of the three men by the insolent seamen, I observed the fellows
run scattering about the land, as if they wanted to see the country. I observed
also that the other men had liberty to go where they pleased; but they sat down
all three upon the ground very pensive, and looked like men in despair.

It was at the top of high water when these people came on shore; and while
they rambled about, the water ebbed considerably away, leaving their boat
aground. When they attempted to launch her, they found it past their strength,
and I heard one of them say aloud to another, calling them off from the boat,
“Why, let her alone, Jack, can’t you? she’ll float next tide.” I knew it was
no less than ten hours before the boat could float again, and by that time it
would be dark, and I might be at more liberty to see their motions, and to hear ,
their discourse, if they had any. In the meantime, I fitted myself up for a
battle, as before, though with more caution, knowing that I had to do with
another kind of enemy than I had at first.

It was my design, as I said above, not to have made any attempt till it was
dark; but about two o’clock, being the heat of the day, I found they were all
gone straggling into the woods, and, as I thought, were all lain down to sleep.
The three poor distressed men, too anxious for their condition to get any sleep,
had, however, sat down under the shelter of a great tree, at about a quarter of
a mile from me, and, as I thought, out of sight of any of the rest. Upon this
I resolved to discover myself to them, and learn something of their condition;
immediately I marched, my man Friday at a good distance behind me. I came,
as near them undiscovered as I could, and then, before any of them saw me, I
called aloud to them in Spanish, “What are ye, gentlemen ?” ‘They started
up at the noise, but were ten times more confounded when they saw me, and the
uncouth figure that I made. They made no answer at all, but I thought I
perceived them just going to fly from me, when I spoke to them in English:
4 4 ~

ROBINSON CRUSOE : 117



THE MUTINEERS

“Gentlemen,” said I, “do not be surprised at me: perhaps you may have a
friend near, when you did not expect it.’ “He must be sent directly from
heaven, then,” said one of them very gravely to me, “for our condition is past
the help of man.” “All help is from heaven, sir,” said I: “but can you put a
stranger in the way to help you? for you seem to be in some great distress. I
saw you when you landed; and when you seemed to make application to the
brutes’ that came with you, I saw one of them lift up his sword to kill you.”
The poor man looked like one astonished, and returned, “Am JI talking to
God, or man? Is it a real man, or an angel?” “Be in no fear about that,
sir,” said I; “if God had sent an angel to relieve you, he would have come better
clothed, and armed after another manner than you see me in; pray lay aside
your fears; I am a man, an Englishman, and disposed to assist you; you see I
have one servant only; we have arms and ammunition; tell.us freely, can we
118 ROBINSON CRUSOE

serve you? What is your case?” “Our case, sir,” said he, “is too long to
~ tell you, while our raurderers are so near us; but, in short, sir, I was commander
of that ship; my men have mutinied against me; they have been hardly prevailed
on not to murder me, and, at last, have set me om shore in this desolate place,
with these two men with me—one my mate, the other a passenger—where we
expected to perish.” “Where are your enemies?” said I; “do you not know
where they are gone?” “There they lie, sir,” said he, pointing to a thicket of
trees; “my heart trembles for fear they have seen us, and heard you speak; if
they have, they will certainly murder us all. “Have they any fire-arms ?”’ said
I. He answered, “They had only two pieces, one of which they left in the boat.”
“Well then,” said I, “leave the rest to me; I see they are all asleep; it is an easy
thing to kill them all; but shall we rather take them. prisoners?”’ He told me
there were two desperate villains among them that it was scarce safe to show
any mercy to; but if they were secured, he believed all the rest would return to
their duty. I asked him which they were. He told me he could not at that
distance distinguish them, but he would obey my orders in anything I would
direct. “Well,” says I, “let us retreat out of their view or hearing, lest they
awake, and we will resolve further.”’ So they willingly went back with me till
the woods covered us from them.

“Look you, sir,” said I; “if I venture upon your deliverance, are you willing
to make two conditions with me?” He anticipated my proposals by telling
me that both he and the ship, if recovered, should be wholly directed and com-
manded by me in everything. “Well,” said I, “my conditions are but two:
: first,—that while you stay on this island with me, you will not pretend to any
, authority here; secondly,—that if the ship is recovered, you will carry me and
my man to England passage free.”

He gave me all the assurance that a man could devise that he-would comply
with these most reasonable demands. “Well, then,” said I, “here are three
muskets for you, with powder and ball; tell me next what you think is proper
te be done.” He offered to be wholly guided by me, and I told him I thought
ROBINSON CRUSOE ‘ 119

the best method was to fire on them at once as they lay, and if any were not
- killed at the first volley, and offered to submit, we might save them. He said
that he was loath to kill them, if he could help it; but that those two were incor-
rigible villains, and if they escaped, we should be undone still, for they would
go on board and bring the whole ship’s company, and destroy us all. |

In the middle of this discourse we heard some of them awake, and soon after
we saw two of them on their feet. I asked him if either of them were the men
who he had said were the heads of the mutiny. Hesaid,“No.” “Well, then,”
said I, “you may-let them escape. Now, if the rest escape you, it is your fault.”
The two men who were with him then made some noise, at which one of the
seamen, who was awake, turned about, and seeing them coming, cried out to
. the rest;but it was too late then, for the moment he cried out, they fired—I mean
the two men, the captain wisely reserving his piece. They had so well aimed
their shot at the men they knew, that one of them was killed on the spot, and
the other very much wounded; but not being dead, he started up on his feet,
and called eagerly for help to the other; but the captain, stepping to him, told
him it was too late to cry for help, he should call upon God to forgive his villainy,
and with that word knocked him down with the stock of his musket, so that
he never spoke more: there were three more in the company, and one of thém
was slightly wounded. By this time I was come; and when they saw their»
danger, and that it was in vain to resist, they begged for mercy. The captain
told them he would spare their lives if they would swear to be faithful to him
in recovering the ship, and afterwards in carrying her back to Jamaica, from
whence they came. ‘They gave him all the protestations of their sincerity that
could be desired; and he was willing to believe them, and spare their lives,
which I was not against, only I obliged him to keep them bound hand and
foot while they were upon the island.

While this was doing, I sent Friday with the captain’s mate to the boat, with
orders to secure her, and bring away the oars and sails, which they did; and by
and by three straggling men, that were (happily for them) parted from the rest,
120 ROBINSON CRUSOE

came back upon hearing the guns fired; and seeing the captain, who before
was their prisoner, now their conqueror, they submitted to be bound also; and
so our victory was complete. te

It now remained that the captain and I should inquire into one another’s
circumstances. I began first, and told him my whole history, which he heard
with an attention even to amazement. After this communication was at an
end, I carried him and his two men into my apartments, where I refreshed him
with such provision as I had, and showed them all the contrivances I had
made during my long, long inhabiting that place.

I told him this was my castle and my residence, but that I had a seat in the
country, as most princes have, whither I could retreat upon occasion, and I
would show him that too another time; but at present our business was to con-
sider how to recover the ship. He agreed with me as to that, but told me he was
perfectly at a loss what measures to take, for that there were still six-and-twenty
hands on board, who, having entered into a cursed conspiracy, by which they
had all forfeited their lives to the law, would be‘hardened in it now by despera-
tion, and would carry it on, knowing that if they were subdued they should be
brought to the gallows as soon as they came to England, or to any of the English
colonies, and that, therefore, there would be no attacking them with so small a
number as we were. .

I mused for some time upon what he said, and found it was a very rational
conclusion, and that therefore something was to be resolved on very speedily,
as well to draw the men on board into some snare for their surprise, as to prevent
their landing upon us, and destroying us. Upon this, it presently occurred
to me that in a little while the ship’s crew, wondering what was become of their
comrades and of the boat, would certainly come on shore in their other boat to
look for them, and that then, perhaps, they might come armed, and be too
strong for us: this he allowed to be rational. Upon this, I told him the first
thing we had to do was to stave the boat, which lay upon the beach, so that
they might not carry her off, and taking everything out of her, leave her so far


































NN =

ANY



THE MUTINEERS OVERPOWERED
122 ROBINSON CRUSOE

useless as not to be fit to swim. Accordingly we went on board, took the arms
which were left on board out of her, and knocked a great hole in her bottom.
Then we heaved the boat upon the beach, so high that the tide would not float
her off at high water mark. Presently we heard the ship fire a gun, and make.
a waft with her ensign as a signal for the boat to come on board; but no boat
stirred; and they fired several times, making other signals for the boat. At
last, when all their signals and firing proved fruitless, and they found the boat
did not stir, we saw them, by the help of my glasses, hoist another hoat out, and
row towards the shore; and we found, as they approached, that there were no
less than ten men in her, and that they had fire-arms with them.

The captain knew the persons and characters of all the men in the boat, of
whom, he said, there were three very honest fellows, who, he was sure, were led
into this conspiracy by the rest, being overpowered and frightened; but that as
for the boatswain, who it seems was the chief officer among them, and all the
rest, they were as outrageous as any of the ship’s crew.

We had, upon the first appearance of the boats coming from the ship, con-
sidered of separating our prisoners; and had, indeed, secured them effectually.
Two of them, of whom the captain was less assured than ordinary, I sent with
Friday and one of the three delivered men to my cave, where they left them’
bound. The other prisoners had better usage; two of them were kept pinioned,
indeed, because the captain was not free to trust them; but the other two were
taken into my service, upon the captain’s recommendation, and upon their
solemnly engaging to live and die with us; so with them and the three honest
men we were seven men, well armed; and T made no doubt we should be able
to deal well enough with the ten that were coming, considering that the captain
had said there were three or four honest men among them also. As soon as
they got to the place where their other boat lay, they ran their boat into the
beach and came all on shore, hauling the boat up after them.

Being on shore, the first thing they did, they ran all to their other boat; and

it was easy to see they were under a great surprise to find her stripped, as above,
ROBINSON CRUSOE 123

of all that was in her, and a great hole in her bottom. After they had mused
a while upon this, they set up two or three shouts, hallooing with all their might,

to try if they could make their companions hear; but all was to no purpose:

then they jired a volley of their small arms. They were so astonished at re-
ceiving no answer to this, that, as they told us afterwards, they resolved to go
all on board again to their ship, and let them know that the men were all mur-
dered, and the long-boat staved; accordingly, they te launched their |
boat again, and got all of them on board. |

They had not been long put off with the boat, when we perceived them all
coming on shore again; but with this new measure in their conduct, which it
seems they consulted together upon, viz., to leave three men in the boat, and the
rest to go on shore, and go up into the country to look for their fellows. The
seven men came on shore, and the three who remained in the boat put her off
to a good distance from the shore, and came to an anchor to wait for them; so
that it was impossible for us to come at them in the boat. ‘Those that came
on shore kept close together, marching towards the top of the little hill under
which my habitation lay. When they were come to the brow of the hill where
they could see a great way into the valleys and woods, which lay towards the
north-east part, and where the island lay lowest, they shouted and hallooed
till they were weary: and not caring, it seems, to venture far from the shore, they
sat down together, under a tree, to consider of it.

At length, we saw them all start up, and march down towards the sea: it
seems they had such dreadful apprehensions of the danger of the place, that
they resolved to go on board the ship again, give their companions over for lost,
_ and so go on with their intended voyage with the ship.

As soon as I perceived them go towards the shore, I imagined it to be as it
really was, that they were for going back again; and the captain, as soon as I
told him my thoughts, was ready to sink at the apprehension of it: but I present-
ly thought of a stratagem to fetch them back again, and which answered my
end to a tittle. I ordered Friday and the captain’s mate to go over the little
124 fe oe ROBINGON CRUSOE é

creek westward, and halloo out, as loud as they could, and that as soon as they

heard the seamen answer them, they should return it again; and, then keeping

out of sight, take a round, always answering when the others hallooed, to draw

them far into the island, and then wheel about again to me by such ways as I |
directed.

They were just going into the boat when Friday and the mate hallooed; and
they presently heard them, and, answering, ran along the shore towards the
voice they heard, when they were presently stopped by the creek, where, the
water being up, they could not get over, and called for the boat to come up and
set them over; as, indeed, I expected. When they had set themselves over, I
observed that they took one of the three men out of her, to go along with them,
and left only two in the boat. This was what I wished for; and I took the rest
with me, and crossing the creek, we surprised the two men before they were
aware. One of them was not so hearty in the mutiny as the rest of the crew;
and, therefore, was easily persuaded not only to yield, but afterwards to join
very sincerely with us. In the meantime, Friday and the captain’s mate so well
managed their business with the rest that they drew them on till they left them
where they could not reach back to the boat before it was dark.

We had nothing now to do but to watch for them in the dark, and to fall
upon them, so as to make sure work with them. It was several hours after
Friday came back to me before they came back to their boat; and we could hear
the foremost of them complain how lame and tired they were; which was very
welcome news tous. At length they came up to the boat; but it was impossible
to express their confusion when they found their boats fast aground in the creek,
the tide ebbed out, and their two men gone. We could hear them call to one
another in the most lamentable manner, telling one another they were got into
an enchanted island; that they should all be murdered, or else carried away
and devoured. After some time, we could see them by the little light there was,
running about, wringing their hands like men in despair. My men would fain
have had me give them leave to fall upon them at once in the dark; but to make
ROBINSON CRUSOE 125

sure of them, I ordered Friday and the captain to creep upon their hands and
feet, as close as they could possibly, before they offered to fire. _ |

They had not been long in that posture, when the boatswain, who was the
principal ringleader of the mutiny, came walking towards them, with two more
of the crew; and the captain and Friday, starting up on their feet, let fly at them.
The boatswain was killed upon the spot; the next man was shot in the body,
and fell just by him, though he did not die till an hour or two after; and theâ„¢
third ran for it. At the noise of the fire, I immediately advanced with my
whole army, and I made the man they had left in the boat, and who was now
one of us, call them by name, to try if I could bring them to a parley. So he
calls out as loud as he could to one of them, “Tom Smith! Tom Smith!”” Tom
Smith answered immediately, “Who’s that? Robinson ?” for it seems he knew
the voice, ‘The other answered, “Ay, ay; for God’s sake, Tom Smith, throw
down your arms and yield, or you are all dead men this moment.” “Who
must we yield to? Where'are they?” says Smith again. “Here they are,”
“says he; “here’s our captain and fifty men with him, have been hunting you
these two hours; the boatswain is killed, Will Frye is wounded, and I am a
prisoner; and if you do not yield, you are all lost.” “ Will they give us quarter
then ?” says Tom Smith, “and we will yield.” “T’ll go and ask, if you promise
to yield,” said Robinson: so he asked the captain; and the captain himself calls
out, “You, Smith, you know my voice; if you lay down your arms immediately,
and submit, you shall have your lives, all but Will Atkins.”

Upon this, Will Atkins cried out, “For God’s sake, captain, give me quarter;
what have I done? ‘They have been all as bad as I:” which, by the way, was
not true; for, it seems, this Will Atkins was the first man that laid hold of the
captain, when they first mutinied, and used him barbarously, in tying his hands
and giving him injurious language. However, the captain told him he must
lay down his arms at discretion, and trust to the governor’s mercy: by which
he meant me, for they called me governor. In a word, they all laid down their
arms, and begged their lives; and I sent the man that had parleyed with them,
2 } ‘
126 ROBINSON CRUSOE

and two more, who bound them all; and then my great army of fifty men, which,
with those three, were in all but eight, came up and seized upon them, and upon
their boat: only that I kept myself and one more out of sight, for reasons of
state. ae

T ordered Atkins and two more of the worst of them to be confined separately
_ from the others, and in the morning the captain entered into a parley with these
latter, saying that though the governor had given them quarter for the present,
yet if they were sent to England they would all be hanged; but that if they would
join in an attempt to recover the ship, he would have the governor’s engagement
for their pardon.

Any one may guess how such a proposal would be received by men in their
position; they fell down on their knees to the captain, and promised, with the
deepest imprecations, that they would be faithful to him to the last drop, and
would go with him all over the world.

We now made our arrangements for the expedition. ‘The captain furnished
his two boats, stopped the breach of one, and manned them. ‘That we might
be very secure, I told him to choose out five of the seven men of the gang last
captured, and tell them that the governor would keep the other two and the
three already confined, as hotages for the fidelity of the others, and that if they
proved unfaithful, the five hostages should be hanged in chains ashore. Friday
and I remained ashore to take charge of the prisoners, while the captain put his
passenger in command of one boat, with four men under him; and himself,
his mate, and five more, went in the other. The attack was made at midnight.
As soon as they came within call of the ship, the captain made Robinson hai!
them, holding them in a chat till they came to the ship’s side; when they entered
her, and completely surprised those on board. The rebel captain was shot
through the head, so that he never spoke a word more; upon which the rest
yielded, and the ship was taken effectually without any more lives lost.

As soon as the ship was thus secured, the captain ordered seven guns to be
~ fired, which was the signal agreed upon with me to give me notice of his success.
SG
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=>
——
ae



DEATH OF THE REBEL CAPTAIN
128 ROBINSON CRUSOE

Having heard the signal plainly, I laid me down; and it having been a day of
great fatigue to me, I slept very sound, till I was something surprised with the
noise of a gun; and presently starting up, I heard a man calling me by the name
of “ Governor! Governor!” and presently I knew the captain’s voice; when
climbing up to the top of the hill, there he stood, and, pointing to the ship, he
embraced me in his arms: “My dear friend and deliverer,” says he, “there’s
your ship; for she is all yours, and so are we, and all that belongs to her.” I
cast my eyes to the ship, and there she rode, within little more than half a mile
of the shore. I was at first ready to sink down with surprise; for I saw my
deliverance, indeed, visibly put into my hands, all things easy, and a large ship
just ready to carry me away whither I pleased to go. At first, for some time, I
was not able to answer one word; but as he had taken me in his arms, I held
fast by him, or I should have fallen to the ground. In a little while after, I
recovered my speech; then I took my turn, and embraced him as my deliverer.

Nothing remained now but to determine what to do with the prisoners, for
I found that the captain was uneasy about taking them on board, even bound
in irons as malefactors. I told him that I would undertake to bring them to

~ make it their own request that he should leave them upon the island. “TI should
‘be very glad of that,” said he.

So I dressed myself in one of the captain’s suits of clothes, and caused the
prisoners to be brought before me. I told them I had got a full account of
their villainous behavior, and pointed out to them how Providence had ensnared
them in their own ways; that they thought that they had set the captain on
shore in a barren, uninhabited island, but it had pleased God so to direct them
that it was inhabited, and that the governor was an Englishman. I asked them
what they had to say why I should not execute them as pirates, as they could
not doubt I had authority to do. They said they had nothing to say but that
the captain had promised them their lives when they were taken, and they
implored for mercy. I told them I had resolved to take passage with the
captain to go to England; and as for him, he could carry them only as prisoners,
ROBINSON CRUSOE 129

























THE CAPTAIN HUNG AT THE YARD-ARM

to be tried for mutiny, the penalty for which would be the gallows. The only
way that I could see by which they might escape this fate was for them to remain
on the island. If they desired that, I had some inclination to give them their
lives, if they thought they could shift on shore. They said they would much
rather venture to remain there than be carried to England to be hanged, and
seemed thankful to have the liberty of choosing.

T told the captain I would stay that night to prepare my things, and desired
him to go on board the ship; telling him to cause the new captain, who was
killed, to be hanged at the yard-arm, that these men might see him.
130 . ROBINSON CRUSOR

&

When this had been done, I sent again for the men, and talked with them
seriously of their circumstances. I showed them the new captain hanging at
the yard-arm, and told them that they had nothing less than that to expect if
they were carried to England. When they had all declared their willingness
to stay, I told them my whole story, charging them to be kind to the Spaniards
that were expected, giving them all my arms and informing them of everything
necessary for their subsistence.

Having done all this, I went on board ship the next day, Friday going with
me. We prepared to sail, but did not weigh anchor that night. The next
morning early, two of the five men came swimming to the ship’s side, desiring
the captain to take them on board, even though he hanged them afterwards,
so barbarously had the other three used them. Upon which I prevailed upon
the captain to take them in, and being severely whipped, they proved more
honest for the future. Thus I bade farewell to this island, carrying along with

‘me my money, my parrot, umbrella, and goat’s skin cap; setting sail December
the 19th, 1686, after twenty eight years, two months, and nineteen days’
residence, that same day and month that I escaped from Sallee. I landed in Eng-
land, June 11, 1687, after five-and-thirty years absence from my country,
which rendered me altogether a stranger there.

I found my first captain’s widow alive, but in very poor circumstances. Soon
after, I went down to Yorkshire, where I found that all of my family had died,
except two sisters, and two of the children of one of my brothers. I learned
that no provision had been made for me, as it was concluded that I had long
since been dead. Thus it appeared that my circumstances would be very poor.
for the little money I had would not do much for me as to settling me in the
world.

- I resolved to go to Lisbon, to see if I might not come by some information
of the state of my plantation in the Brazils. Taking shipping for that port, —
I agrived there in April following, my man Friday accompanying me, and .

proving a most faithful servant upon all occasions.
ROBINSON CRUSOE 7 131
When I came to Lisbon, I found out my old friend, the ship captain who.
_ first took me up at sea off the coast of Africa. When I inquired after my plant-
ation and former partner, the old man told me that my partner was living, and
that he believed I would have a very good account of the plantation, as my
partner had grown exceedingly rich upon enjoying but one-half of it.

My old friend put me in the way of a method of making my claim to my
plantation without going over to it myself. My partner had conducted affairs
in the most honorable manner during my absence, and I found myself pos-
sessed of £50,000, besides an income of £1,000 a year.

Having settled my affairs, and shown my gratitude to my excellent friend
the captain by settling on him a yearly allowance of money sufficient to support
him, I was ready to return to England. I had a strong aversion to going by —
sea at that time, and resolved to travel all the way by land, except from Calais
to Dover.

I met an English gentleman who was willing to travel with me, and we picked
up two more English merchants, and two young Portuguese gentlemen, so that
in all there were six of us, besides five servants, including Friday.

When we came to the mountains between Spain and France, so much snow
had fallen that it appeared hazardous to pass over. We found a guide, however,
who told us that he could take us by such ways that there would be no danger
from the snow, although there might be from wild beasts, unless we were armed
sufficiently to protect ourselves. We were well enough prepared to such
creatures, and readily agreed to follow him.

Our guide led us by such winding roads that we insensibly passed the height
of the mountains without being much encumbered with snow, and beginning
to descend upon the other side, we saw the green and flourishing provinces of
Languedoc and Gascony, though, indeed, at a great distance, and we had some
rough way to pass still.

It was about two hours before night, when, our guide being something before
us, one not just in sight, out rushed three monstrous wolves, and after them a
132 ROBINSON CRUSOE

bear, from a hollow way adjoining to a thick wood. ‘Two of the wolves flew
upon the guide; one of them fastened upon his horse, and the other attacked
the man with such violence that he had not time or presence of mind enough to
draw his pistol, but hallooed and cried out to us most lustily. My man Friday
being next me, I bade him ride up, and see what was the matter. As soon as
Friday came in sight of the man, he hallooed out as loud as the other, “Oh,
master! Oh, master!’ but like a bold fellow, rode directly up to the man, and
with his pistol shot the wolf, that attacked him, in the head. :

When Friday had killed this wolf, the other that had fastened upon the horse
left him immediately, and fled. But the man was hurt; for the raging creature
had bitten him twice. It is easy to suppose that at the noise of Friday’s pistol we
all mended our pace, and rode up as fast as the way, which was very difficult,
would give us leave, to see what was the matter. As soon as we came clear of
the trees, which blinded us before, we saw plainly what had been the case, and
how Friday had disengaged the poor guide.

But never was a fight managed so hardily, and in such a surprising manner,
as that which followed between Friday and the bear, which gave us all, though
at first we were surprised and afraid for him, the greatest diversion imaginable.
Friday had delivered our guide, and when we came up to him, he was helping
him off from his horse, when on a sudden we espied the bear come out of the
wood, and a vast, monstrous one it was, the biggest by far that ever I saw.
When Friday saw him, it was easy to see joy and courage in the fellow’s coun-
tenance. “Oh, oh, oh!” says Friday, three times, pointing to him; “Oh, master!
you give me te leave, me shakee te hand with him; me makee you good laugh.”

T was surprised to see the fellow so pleased: “You fool,” said I, “he will eat
you up.” —“Eatee me up! eatee me up!” says Friday, twice over again; “me
eatee him up; me makee you good laugh; you all stay here, me show you good
laugh.” So down he sits, and gets his boots off in a moment, and puts on a pair
of pumps (as we call the flat shoes they wear, and which he had in his pocket),
“ gives my other servant his horse, and with his gun away he flew, like the wind.
Contains
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ROBINSON CRUSOE

The bear was walking softly on, and offered to meddle with nobody, till
Friday came pretty near, calls to him, as if the bear could understand him.
“ark ye, hark ye,” says Friday, “me speakee with you.” We followed at a
distance, for now being come down to the Gascony side of the mountains,
we were entered a vast, great forest, where the country was plain and pretty |
open, though it had many trees in it scattered here and there. Friday, who had,
as we say, the heels of the bear, came up with him quickly, and took up a great
stone, and threw it at him, and hit him just on the head, but did him no more
harm than if he had thrown it against a wall; but it answered Friday’s end, for
the rogue was so void of fear that he did it purely to make the bear follow him,
- and show us some laugh,.as he called it. As soon as the bear felt the stone,
and saw him, he turns about, and comes after him. Away runs Friday, and takes
his course as if he ran towards us for help. So we all resolved to fire
upon the bear, and deliver my man. Though I was angry at him heartily for
bringing the bear back upon us, I called out, “Is this your making us laugh?
Come away, and take your horse, that we may shoot the creature.” He heard
me, and cried out, “No shoot, no shoot; stand still, you get much laugh;” and
as the nimble creature ran two feet for the beast’s one, he turned on a sudden
‘on one side of us, and seeing a great oak-tree fit for his purpose, he beckoned
‘us to follow, and doubling his pace, he got nimbly up the tree, laying his gun

down upon the ground. The bear soon came to the tree, and we followed at a
distance. The first thing he did, he stopped at the gun, smelled at it, but let it
lie, and up he scrambles into the tree.

Friday got out to thesmall end of a large limb of the tree, and the bear got about
half way to him. As soon as the bear got out to that part where the limb of
the tree was weaker—“ Ha!”’ says he to us, “now you see me teachee the bear
dance;”’ so he began jumping and shaking the bough, at which the bear began
to totter, but stood still, and began to look behind him, to see how he should
get back; then, indeed, we did laugh heartily. We thought now was a good time
to knock the bear on the head, and called to Friday to stand still, and we would
ROBINSON CRUSOE

shoot; but he cried out earnestly, “Oh, pray! oh, pray! no shoot, me shoot by
and then;” he would have said by-and-by. However, to shorten the story,
Friday danced so much, and the bear stood so ticklish, that we had laughing
enough indeed, but still could not imagine what the fellow would do. But
Friday put us out of doubt quickly: for he went out to the smaller end of the
bough where it would bend with his weight, and gently let himself down by it,
sliding down the bough till he came near enough to jump down on his feet, and
away he ran to his gun, took it up, and stood still. “Well,” said I to him,
“Friday, what will you do now? Why don’t you shoot him ?”—“ No shoot,”
says Friday, “no yet; me shoot now, me no kill; me stay, give you one more
laugh:” and, indeed, so he did, as you will see presently; for when the bear saw
_ his enemy gone, he came back from the bough where he stood, but did it very
cautiously, looking behind him every step, and coming backward till he got
~ into the body of the tree; then, with the same hinder end foremost, he came down
the tree, grasping it with his claws, and moving one foot at a time, very leisurely.
At this juncture, and just before he could set his ‘hind feet upon the ground,
Friday stepped up close to him, clapped the muzzle of his piece into his ear,
and shot him dead as a stone. ‘Then the rogue turned about to see if we did
not laugh; and when he saw we were pleased, by our He he began to laugh
very loud.

I have nothing uncommon to take notice of in my passage eek France—
nothing but what other travellers have given an account of with much more
advantage thanI can. I travelled to Paris, and without any considerable stay

came to Calais, and landed safe at Dover, the 14th of January, after having a
severe cold season to travel in. :

In a short time I had all my newly discovered estate safe about me, the bills
of exchange which T brought with me being very promptly paid. I took my
two nephews, the children of one of my brothers, into my care. The eldest,
having something of his own, I bred up as a gentleman; the other I placed with

the captain of a ship, and after five years, finding him a sensible, enterprising
ROBINSON CRUSOE





CRUSOE MARRIED

young fellow, I put him into a good ship, and sent him to sea. This young
: fellow afterwards drew me in, as old as I was, to farther adventures myself.
In the mean time, I married, and that neither to my disadvantage or dis-
satisfaction, and had three children, two sons and one daughter. I bought a
little farm in the county of Bedford, and removed myself thither. It had a

convenient house upon it, and the land about it, I found, was capable of great
improvement.

Here I setttled down with my family, and led the life of a country gentleman.

My thoughts were entirely taken up in managing my servants, cultivating the
ROBINSON CRUSOE

ground, enclosing, planting, and so forth; and I lived, as I thought, the most
agreeable life that nature was capable of affording.

But in the midst of this my happiness, I was suddenly plunged into the
greatest sorrow by the loss of my dear wife. She had been the stay of all my
affairs, and the centre of all my enterprises, and I was to the last degree deso-
late in the world by the loss of her. I was like a ship without a pilot that could
only run before the wind; my country delights had no longer a relish, and were
like music to one that has no ear, or food to one that has no taste. In a word,
I left my farm, and in a few months returned to London.

When I came to London I was still as uneasy as I was before. I had nothing
to do but saunter about like an idle.person, and this was the sort of life which
was most specially my aversion. It was now the beginning of the year 1694;
and at this time one of my nephews who had been brought up to the sea,
and for whom I had obtained command of a ship, was returned from a voyage
to Bilboa. He came to me one morning, telling me that some merchants of his
acquaintance had proposed to him to go on a voyage for them to the East Indies
and China, in the manner of private traders, “‘and now, uncle,” said he, “if
you'll go thither with me, I’ll engage to land you upon your own island to see
the state of your little kingdom.”

I had an irresistible desire for the voyage, and the scheme hit so exactly with
my temper, that I told him I would go with him. He was ready to sail about
the beginning of January 1694; and I, with my man Friday, went on board
on the 8th. We took along a considerable cargo of all kinds of things necessary
for my colony, and some workmen whom I proposed to place there as inhabi-
tants: viz., two carpenters, a smith, a tailor, and a very handy, ingenious fellow
who was a general mechanic, whom we called our Jack- of-all-Trades.

When we set sail we had a fair wind for some time, but one night the mate,
having the watch, told us he saw a flash of fire, and heard a gun fired. At this
we all ran on deck, from whence we saw a great light, and as there was no land —
that way, we knew it must be some ship on fire at sea, which could not be far
off, as we had heard the sound of the gun.
ROBINSON CRUSOE

















































































































CRUSOE’S FARM AT BEDFORD

‘The wind being fair, we stood toward it, and in half an hour we could plainly
see that it was a great ship on fire in the middle of the sea. I immediately
ordered that five guns should be fired, and we then lay by, waiting for daylight.
On a sudden, to our great terror, the ship blew upin the air;and in a few minutes
all the fire was out, and the rest of the ship sunk. I caused lights to be hung
ROBINSON CRUSOE

out, and we kept firing guns all night, to let the survivors, if there should be any,
know that help was not far off. At eight o’clock the next morning, we found
by the aid of our glasses, that two of the ship’s boats were out at sea, both
thronged with people. ‘They had seen us, and had done their utmost to make
us see them, and in half an hour we came up with them. We took them all
aboard, sixty-four persons in all.

On inquiry we found that it was a French ship. It would e hard to describe
the scene that took place when these poor people came on board. ‘There were
some in tears, some raving like lunatics; some ran about stamping their feet,
others wringing their hands; some were singing and laughing, many quite dimb;
several were swooning, and others ready ‘to faint; a few were crossing them-

selves, and giving God thanks.

Among them there was a young French priest who labored to compose those
around him; persuaded, entreated, argued with them, and did him utmost to
keep them within the exercise of their reason; and with some he had success,
though others were for a time out of all control of themselves. ee

The next day they had calmed, and were quite another sort of people. We
began to consult with their captain what had best be done with them, and after
considering different plans, it was at last settled that we should take them to
Newfoundland. It was about a week after this that we made the banks of
Newfoundland, where, to shorten my story, we put the French people on board
a bark, which they hired there to carry them to France; that is, all except five
who, with the priest, wished to join me.

We had not set sail long, when we fell in with a ship that had been blown out
to sea by a storm, and had lost her masts, and worse than all, her crew were al-
most starved for want of provisions. The mate, who was in command, came
on board our ship, and brought six men with him. The poor wretches were so
weak that they could hardly sit to their oars. I ordered food to be given them,
and they rather devoured than ate it. I also forgot not the starving crew that
were left on board but sent them a supply of bread and meat.
ROBINSON CRUSOE





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142 ROBINSON CRUSOE

they were faint for the want of fooa, and at the very brink of death, but on being
fed carefully they soon recovered. At their own request, I took them on board
with us, so that now we had eight more on board than when we set out.

In three months from the time when I left home, I came fair on the south
side of my island, and brought the ship safe to an anchor, broadside with the
little creek where my old habitation was. _

I called Friday and asked him if he knew where he was. He looked about a
little, and presently, clapping his hands, cried, “Oh, yes; oh, there—oh, yes; oh,
there!’’ and fell dancing and capering like a mad fellow; and I had much ado
to keep him from jumping into the sea, to swim ashore to the place.

“Well, Friday,” says I, “ do you think we shall find anybody here? Do you
think we shall see your father?” When I named his father, the poor affection- _
ate creature looked dejected. ‘‘ No, no; said he, shaking his head, “he long ago
die, long ago; he much old man.” “But shall we see any one else then?” I
said. He had better eyes than I, it seems, for he pointed to the hill above my
house, and cried, “‘ Yes, yes, me see much man there and there!” I looked, but
T saw nobody, but the fellow was right, as I found upon inquiry the next day;
and there were five or six men all together, who stood to look at the ship, not
knowing what to think of us.

As soon as Friday told me he saw people, I caused three guns to be fired,
to give them notice we were friends, and soon we perceived a smoke arise from
the side of the creek. I then went on shore in a boat, with the priest and
Friday, and hung out a white flag of peace. The first man I fixed my eye upon
was the Spaniard whose life I had saved. I ordered nobody to leave the boat at
first but myself, but there was no keeping Friday on it, for he had spied his
father at a distance. It would have made any man shed tears to have seen this
poor fellow’s joy when he came to his father. He kissed him, took him up in
his arms, set him down by a tree, then stood and looked at him, as one would
look at a picture, and all the while he would be talking to him, and telling him

one story or another of his travels.
ROBINSON CRUSOE. 143



CRUSOE WELCOMED BY THE SPANIARD

As to my friend, the Spaniard, whose life I had saved, he came attended by
one more, carrying a flag of truce also. He had no notion of its being me till
I spoke to him. “Seignior,” said I, “do you not know me?” Then he came
144 ROBINSON CRUSOE

forward and embraced me, and took me to my old habitation. I could no
more have found the place than if I had never been there; for they had planted |
so many trees, and these had grown so big, that the place was inacessible, except
by such winding as they themselves only, who made them, could find.

I inquired the reason for all these fortifications, and he told me I would say
there was need enough of it, when they had given me an account of how they
had passed their time since their arriving in the island.

He had sent the man who attended him to call his comrades, and this man
now came with eleven more. My friend, pointing to them, said, “These gentle-
men, sir, all owe their lives to you;”’ upon which they all came up to me, one by
one, not as if they had been sailors, and the like, but as if they had been noble-
men, and I a monarch receiving their homage.

Then there was a long story to hear of all that had been done in the island
since I left it. But I must first tell of something that happened at the time of
my departure which I omitted in my previous account. When we were on the
point to set sail there happened a quarrel on board of our ship, which could not
be suppressed till we laid two of the most refractory fellows in irons. ‘The next
day these two men stole each of them a musket and some other weapons, and
took the ship’s pinnace and ran away with it to join their companion rogues
ashore. As soon as we found this, I ordered the long-boat on shore with twelve
men and the mate, and away they went to seek the rogues; but they could find
neither them nor any of the rest, for they all fled into the woods when they saw
the boat. ‘These two men made their number five; but the other three villains
were so much more wicked than they, that in two or three days they turned the
new-comers out of doors, nor could they, for a good while, be persuaded to give
them any food. ;

When the Spaniards came, the three gave them provisions, and other relief,
as I had ordered them to do, and they agreed very well for some time. ‘The
Spaniards had to do all the work, however, while the Englishmen did nothing
but ramble about the island, shooting parrots and catching tortoises. The
ROBINSON CRUSOE | 145



THE PIRATE FIRING THE HUT

Spaniards would have been satisfied with this, had the others but let them alone;
but like the dog in the manger, they would not eat themselves, neither would
they let others eat. ‘Their differences were at first trivial, but at last it broke
out into open war, and went beyond the bounds of reason and common sense.
The Spaniards, when they first came, would have persuaded the three English
brutes to take their countrymen in again, but they would not hear of it; so the
two lived by themselves, in huts which they built on the north shore of the
island. The Spaniards gave them some corn for seed, and some of the peas
I had left them; and they dug, planted, and inclosed after the pattern I had set
for them all, and began to live pretty well.
- 146 ROBINSON CRUSOE

But when the three rogues saw this, they came, in mere bad humor, to insult —
and bully them. ‘They said that the island was theirs, and that they should
build no houses on their land unless they would pay rent. The two men, think-
ing they were jesting at first, asked them to comé in and sit down, and see what
fine houses they had built, and tell them what rent they demanded. But one
of the three said they should see they were not in jest, and taking a firebrand he
put it to the side of their hut, and would have set it on fire if one of the honest
- man, as I shall call him for distinction, had not trod it out with his feet. ‘The
fellow was in such a rage at this, that he ran at him with a pole he had in his
hand, and would have killed him if he had not run into the hut. His comrade
followed, and both seized their muskets and came out again. Before the other
two could help him, the fellow that began the quarrel was knocked down with
the stock of a musket, and then the two honest men stood together, and pre-
senting their pieces, bade the others stand off. ‘Then the others began to parley,
and at last consented to take their wounded man and begone. |

They afterwards came back and trod- down the corn, and shot the goats and
kids, and plagued them night and day in this manner.. One day, when the
two men were out, they: came and pulled down both huts, and tore up all their
household stuff, and, in a word, sacked and plundered everything as completely
as a horde of Tartars would have done. ‘Then they came back to the Spaniards,
and told them what they had done, and one of them, stepping up to one of the
Spaniards, insulted him grossly. The Spaniard was a brave man, and a strong
one as well, and having no weapon, knocked him down with a blow of his fist.
The rest of the Spaniards then interfered, secured the other two, and took the
arms from them. ‘Then the fellows began to cool, and gave the Spaniards ©
better words, but the Spaniards told them that if they would live peaceably they
would do them no harm, but that they could not have their arms again. ©

The fellows went raving away, and for five days wandered about the woods.
But at the end of that time, the vagrants came back almost starved, and begged
to be received again into the family. ‘They were told that they must first go
ROBINSON ‘CRUSOB - 147



THE VAGRANTS IN THE WOODS

and rebuild the huts they had destroyed, and repair as far as possible the other
damage they had done. They submitted to this, and were orderly for a while.
After a month or two, the Spaniards gave them arms again, and it was not above
a week after they had these arms before they were as insolent and troublesome
as ever. An accident happened presently, however, which endangered the
safety of all, and they were obliged to lay aside private grudges and look to the
preservation of their lives.
148 ROBINSON CRUSOE

It happened one night that the Spanish governor, as I shall call him—that
is, the Spaniard whose life I had saved, and who was now leader of the rest—
found himself uneasy and could get no sleep; though he was perfectly well in
health. He lay still for some time, but as he did not feel at ease, he got up and
took a look out. But as it was too dark to see far, and he heard no noise, he
returned and laid him down again; but it was all one, he could not sleep; his
thoughts were to the last degree uneasy, and he knew not for what.

The noise he made waked up another of them, whom the governor told how

-it had been with him. “Say you so?” said he. “What if some mischief were
brewing near us! Let us go and look abroad.” ‘They then set off to the top
of the hill where I used to go, and from thence were surprised with seeing a
light as of fire, and hearing the voices of a great number of men.

The governor and the man with him, surprised at this sight, ran back im-
mediately and raised their fellows, and when they heard the news, they could not
be persuaded to stay within, but must all run out to see how things stood. They
were in great perplexity what to do, but at last resolved to send the old savage,
Friday’s father, out as a spy, while it. was still dark, to learn who they were and

-what they meant to do. After he had been gone an hour or two, he brought
word that he had been among them undiscovered ; that they were of two nations,
who were at war with one another, and had had a battle in their own country;
and that both sides had come, by mere chance, with their prisoners, whom they
intended to devour, to the same place. He believed that they would have
another battle as soon as it was daylight; and so it was, for in a short time we
could perceive, by the noise, that the two little armies were engaged in a bloody
fight. |

The battle went on for two hours; and then that party which was nearest our

people’s habitation began to appear weakest, and some of them took to flight.

This put our men into great consternation, lest any of them should discover

their place. It fell out as they feared, for three of the routed army ran directly

into the grove in front of the wall. Our men observed, to their great satisfac-
ROBINSON CRUSOE

tion, that the conquerors had not pursued them. Upon this, the Spaniard :
governor, a man of humanity, would not suffer them to kill the three fugitives;
but ordered them to take them prisoners, which was done. The remainder
of the conquered people fled to their canoes and got off to sea. The victors
made little pursuit, but drawing themselves into a body gave two great scream-
ing shouts by way of triumph. ‘The same day, about three o’clock in the after-
noon, they also marched to their canoes. And thus the Spaniards had the island
again free to themselves, their fright was over, and they saw no savages for
several years after.

The three savages that had been taken prisoners, being lusty, stout young
fellows, were made servants, and taught to work. As slaves they did well
enough, but measures were not taken with them such as I took with my man
Friday, to civilize them by kind usage and affectionate arguments. Some
time after they had been captured, one of them was the occasion of another
broil with the three Englishmen; one of whom, being in a rage at the fellow
because he had not done something right which he bid him do, fell upon the
poor savage with a hatchet, not to correct him, but to kill him. One of the
Spaniards, who was by, placed himself between the Englishman and the savage
to prevent mischief, which enraged the fellow the more, and he struck at the
Spaniard with his hatchet. This fray set the whole family in an uproar, and
the result was that the three turbulent Englishmen were disarmed and turned
out of the society to live where they would and how they could, by themselves.

About three quarters of a year after this separation, a whim took the three
reprobates that they would go over to the main land, whence the savages came,
to seek their fortunes. The Spaniards were glad enough to get rid of them,
and let them take one of the boats, and gave them arms, and provisions enough
for a month. When they bade them “Bon veyajo!” no man ever thought of
seeing them any more. But behold, after twenty-two days’ absence, one of
the two honest Englishmen, being engaged in his planting work, sees three
strange men coming towards him with guns upon their shoulders. ‘They proved
ROBINSON CRUSOE



THE SPANIARD PROTECTING THE SAVAGE

to be the three wanderers, and gave an account of their voyage in a few words.
They said they had reached land in two days, and that the savages were very
courteous and friendly to them and that they gave them roots and dried fish
to eat, and were so kind as to press on them a gift of some prisoners whom
they were feeding to make them fat for the next feast. ‘The Englishmen, bar-
barous as they were, did not care for a feast of this sort, but dared not refuse
the gift for fear of offending the savages, so they brought the prisoners back
with them—three men and five women.

The governor asked them what they intended to do with the women, and
ROBINSON CRUSOE

how they intended to use them, whether as servants or wives. They answered
that they would use them as both, and the end of the matter was that the
. Englishmen, the two more honest ones included, took them every one a wife,
and the savage men were kept as slaves to do the harder kinds of work. To
avoid quarrelling, the Englishmen drew lots among them to decide which
should have first choice of the women for his wife.

When they had settled this business, the men went to work, and the Spaniards
came and helped them; and in a few hours they had built them every one a new
hut or tent for their lodging apart; for those they had already were crowded
with their tools, household stuffs, and provisions. ‘The three wicked ones had
pitched farthest off, and the two honest ones nearer, but both on the north shore
of the island, so that they continued separated as before: and thus my island
was peopled in three places.

As often happens in the world, the two honest fellows had the two worst wives;
and the three reprobates had three clever, diligent, careful, and ingenious wives;
not that the first two were bad wives, as to their temper or humor, for all the five
were most willing, quiet, passive, and subjected creatures, rather like slaves
than wives; but my meaning is, they were not alike capable, ingenious, or in-
dustrious, or alike cleanly and neat.

As to the three reprobates, as I justly call them, though they were much
civilized by their settlement compared to what they were before, and were not
so quarrelsome, having not the same opportunity, yet one of the certain com-
panions of a profligate mind never left them, and that was their idleness. It is
true, they planted corn, and made fences; but Solomon’s words were never
better verified than in them—“I went by the vineyard of the slothful, and it was
all overgrown with thorns;”’ fon when the Spaniards came to view their crop,
they could not see it in some places for weeds, the hedge had several gaps in it,
where the wild goats had got in and eaten up the corn; perhaps here and there
a dead bush was crammed in, to stop them out for the present, but it was only
shutting the stable door after the steed was stolen: whereas, when they looked
ROBINSON CRUSOE

on the colony of the other two, there was the very face of industry and success
upon all they did; there was not a weed to be seen in all their corn, or a gap in —
any of their hedges; and they, on the other hand, verified Solomon’s words in
another place, that “the diligent hand maketh rich;” for srerenine grew and
thrived, and they had plenty within and without.

Some time after this, there came on shore, early one morning, five or six
canoes full of savages. Our men all kept within doors, as was prudent, till
after the canoes had gone off. Then some of them peeped abroad again, and
going to the place where the savages had been, they found three savages left
behind, and lying fast asleep on the ground. ‘This was a surprise, and what
to do with them was a troublesome question, but the governor’s advice was to
keep them as prisoners, and set them at labor, although there was little for
them to'do. This was done, but through negligence in guarding them, one
ran away to the woods, and they could never hear of him any more.

They had good reason to believe he found his way home, in the cance of
some savages who came to the island in a few days, and after carrying on their
revels as usual, went away. So they might well fear that if this fellow got home
safe, he would certainly give his comrades an account that there were people
in the island, and where they might be found. . And so it came to pass, for in
less than two months, six canoes full of savages, with seven or eight men in a
canoe, came to the north side of the island, where they never used to come
before. They landed about an hour after sunrise, at a convenient place, about
a mile from the habitation of the Englishmen, where this escaped man had been
kept. By good luck they had never let him see any of the other habitations,
and he did not know that there were so many people on the island. ‘The two
Englishmen saw the canoes while they were a long way off, so that it was above
an hour before they landed. Now, having great reason to believe they were
betrayed, the first thing they did was to bind the two slaves which were leit,
and cause two of the three men whom they brought with the women (who, it

seems, proved very faithful to them) to lead them, with their two wives, and
ROBINSON CRUSOE



SEIZURE OF THE SLEEPING SAVAGES

whatever they could carry with them, to a retired place in the woods. ‘Then
they opened the fences, leaving their goats to straggle in the woods whither
they pleased, and sent the other slave they had of the three who came with the
women, away to the Spaniards to give them the alarm and ask for help. In
the meantime, they took their arms and retreated towards the place in the wood
where their wives were, but keeping a watch on the savages to see which way
they went. They had not gone far, when they could see from a rising ground

the army of their enemies come on directly to their habitation, and in a moment
ROBINSON CRUSOE

more, could see all their huts and household stuff flaming up together, to their
great grief and mortification. ‘They kept their station for a while, till they found
the savages spread themselves all over the place, like wild beasts looking for
prey. Then they went on and did not halt till they came to a thick-grown part
of the wood, where an old trunk of a tree stood, which was hollow and large,
and in this tree they both took their post.

They had not been there long when two of the Soe ran that way, and a
little way farther they espied three more coming after them, and five more beyond
them, all running as if they knew where they stood. ‘The poor men made up
their minds to let the first two pass, and then take the three and the five in line,
as they came up, but to fire only one at a time, as perhaps the first shot might
hit them all three. ,

So the man who was to fire put three or four bullets into his piece, and from
a hole in the tree took a sure aim, and waited till the three savages came so near
that he could not miss them. They soon saw that one of the three was the
runaway savage, and they resolved that he should not escape. At the first
shot two of the savages fell dead, and the third had a scratch in the shoulder,
and being dreadfully frightened, though not so much hurt, sat down upon the
ground, screaming and yelling. When the five men that were behind heard
the sound of the gun, and the savage’s cries, they stood still at first, as if bewil-
dered. So our two men both shot off their guns into the midst of them, and
_ then ran up, and finding only one of them alive, bound him with rope toa
tree. =

They then ran to the place where their wives and slaves were, to see if all was
well there, and found that though the savages had been quite near that place,
they had not found it. While they were here, seven of the Spaniards came to
their assistance, and told them that the others were gone in a body to defend
their bower, in case the savages should have roved over to that side of the
country. ‘They then went back, with all possible caution, to their ruined
plantation; but when they came in sight of the sea-shore, they found the savages
ROBINSON CRUSOE



THE ENGLISHMEN BIND THE SAVAGE TO A TREE

all embarked and gone to sea. The savage whom they had bound had escaped,
having probably been freed by his comrades.

They set to work to rebuild their huts, and as all the rest helped them, they
were soon in a way to thrive once more. For five or six months they saw no
more of the savages. But one day a fleet appeared of no less than eight-and-
twenty canoes, full of savages armed with bows and arrows, great clubs, wooden
swords, and such like implements of war, and our people were put into the
utmost consternation.

As they came on shore in the evening, and at the easternmost side of the
island, our men had that night to consult and consider what todo. And as they
knew that their being concealed was their only safety, they resolved first of all
to take down the huts which were built for the two Englishmen, and drive away

ROBINSON CRUSOE

their goats to the old cave, for they supposed the savages would go straight
there as soon as it was day, to play the old game over again.

The next morning they posted themselves near the plantation of the two
men, to await for their coming. As they guessed, so it happened: these new
invaders, leaving their canoes at the east end of the island, came ranging along

the shore, directly to the place. Our army was small indeed, and, what was

worse, had not arms for all of their members either. The Spaniard governor

commanded the whole, and Will Atkins, one of the Englishmen, who, though
a dreadful fellow for wickedness, was a most daring bold fellow, commanded
under him. When the savages came within range of the guns, our men let
fly among the thickest of the crowd, with six or seven bullets in each charge.
he surprise among the savages was inexpressible; they were frightened to the
last degree to hear such a dreadful noise, and see their men killed and hurt,
but see nobody that did it. 7

Our men then fell on them in three bodies, using the butt-ends of their |

muskets, their swords, armed staves, and hatchets, and laid about them so well
that their foes set up a dismal screaming, and fled to save their lives which way
soever they could. As our men did not care to pursue them, they all got to-
gether to the seaside, where they landed, and where their canoes lay.

But their disaster was not yet at an end, for it blew a terrible storm that even-
ing from the sea, so that it was impossible for them to go off; nay, the storm

continuing all night, their canoes were most of them driven so high upon the

shore that it required infinite toil to get them off; and some of them were even.

dashed to pieces.

At daybreak our men went forth to find them, and when they saw the state
of affairs, they got Sonne dry wood together and set fire to the boats. At the
sight of this the savages raised a hideous cry, after which they ran about the
island like distracted men, so that our men did not know what at first to do with
them, for they trod all the corn under foot, tore up the vines and grapes, which

were then almost ripe, and did our men an immense amount of damage.
ROBINSON CRUSOE



CRUSOD AND THE SPANIARDS CONVERSING TOGETHER

At last they brought old Friday to them, who told them how kind the others
would be to them; that they would spare their lives, and give them part of the
island to live in, if they would keep in their own bounds; and that they should
have corn to plant and make it grow for their bread. The poor wretches closed
with the proposal at once, and were the most faithful fellows to their words that

could be thought of; for except when they came to beg victuals and directions,
ROBINSON CRUSOE

they never came out of their bounds, and were the most subjected, innocent
creatures that ever were heard of.

From this time the colony enjoyea perfeci wanquillity till I came to visit
them. After hearing the governor’s account of all these occurrences, I told
them that I had not come to carry any of them off, but to establish them there;
and that I had brought a supply of all things necessary, as well for their con-
venience as their defense; and that persons were with me who could assist them
in those things in which at present they were in want.

They were all together when I talked thus to them; and before I delivered
to them the stores I had brought, I asked them if they had entirely forgot and
buried the animosities that had been among them, and would shake hands,
and engage in a strict friendship and union of interest.

Will Atkins, with abundance of frankness and good humor, said they had met
with affliction enough to make them all sober, and enemies enough to make
them all friends; and that for his part he was desirous of living on terms of
entire friendship and union with the rest of the company.

The Spaniards said that they had disarmed and excluded Will Atkins and his
two countrymen for their ill-conduct, but that Will Atkins had behaved himself
so bravely in the great fight they had with the savages, and had since shown
himself so faithful to the general interest, that they had forgotten all that had
passed, and were glad to give an assurance that they would never have any
interest separate one from another. |

Upon these frank declarations of friendship, we appointed the next day to
dine all together; and we made a splendid feast. ‘The ship’s cook and his mate
came on shore to dress it. We brought on shore our salt beef and pork, some
French claret, and some English beer; and the Spaniards added to our feast
five whole kids, which the cooks roasted; and three of them were sent to the
seamen that they might feast on fresh meat as we did on salt.

T brought my cargo of goods, and divided equally among them the goods for
wearing that I had brought; among them a large quantity of linen to make shirts,
ROBINSON CRUSOE



CRUSOE AND THE PRIEST
and some thin English stuffs for coats, which I judged fittest for the heat of
the climate. Then I presented the tailor, the smith, the two carpenters, and
above all my Jack-of-all-Trades. The tailor, to show his concern for them,
-went to work at once, and made them every one a light coat.

In the way of tools, I gave every man a spade, a shovel, and a rake, and to
ROBINSON CRUSOE

each separate place a pickaxe, a crow, a broad axe, and a saw. Besides these
there were general stores of all sorts of ironwork, which they were to use as
they were required.

I carried on shore with me the young man and the maid whom we had brought
from the ship where they were near starving; and when they saw things so well
ordered, both of them desired to be left on the island. The girl had been well .
brought up, and every one on the ship gave her a good word. They had a
little plot of ground allotted to them, on which they had habitations built.

One day the French priest that I had brought with me out of the ship’s crew
whom I took up at sea, came to me and expressed his great concern over some
of the conditions which existed among the people of my colony. The things
which grieved him were, first, that the Englishmen had taken women from
among the savages as wives, and yet were not married to them in any legal
manner, as the laws of God and man require; second, that neither these women
nor any of the conquered savages had been taught anything of the Christian
religion, or even so much as that there was a God whom men ought to worship
- and serve. He said that he would be glad to remain on the island, and en-
deavor to be the instrument of saving the souls of these poor creatures, but that
he could do nothing without an interpreter, and he asked if I would leave my
man Friday to serve in this office.

T was troubled at his requesting Friday, because, for many reasons, I could
not think of parting with him. A sudden thought relieved me of this difficulty.
I told him that even if I were willing to part with Friday, 1 was quite sure that
Friday would by no means agree to part with me, and I could not force him to
_it against his wish without manifest injustice.

He seemed very much concerned at this, for he had no rational access to these
poor people, seeing he did not understand one word of their language, nor they
one of his. ‘To remove this difficulty, I told him Friday’s father had learned
Spanish, which I found he also understood, and he should serve him as inter-
preter. So he was much better satisfied, and nothing could persuade him but
7

ROBINSON CRUSOE

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CRUSOE REPROVING THD ENGLISHMEN

he would stay and endeavor to convert them; but Providence gave another
happy turn to all this.

To deal with the first of the evils to which the priest had made objection, 1
sent for the Englishmen all together, and after giving some account of what I
had done for them, I began to talk to them of the scandalous life they led, and
gave them a full account of the notice the clergyman had taken of it.

They all gave me the answer I had expected, which was that there was no-
body to marry them, and that as they had agreed before the governor to main-
tain the women as their wives, they thought they were as legally married as if
they had been united with all the formalities in the world.

They told me, especially Will Atkins, who now seemed to speak for the rest,
that they loved their wives, and would not leave them on any account whatever,

‘
ROBINSON CRUSOE

and that if there were a clergyman on the ship, they would be italy willing
to be married at once.

This was just as I would have it, and I told the clergyman what answer the ©
men had given me. He was very ready to perform the ceremony, and it was
appointed to take place the next morning,

The matter was explained to the women, and they were very well satisfied;
so they failed not to attend at my apartment next morning, where I brought
out my clergyman, for whom I acted as interpreter. Before he would marry
them, he insisted on talking to the men, urging them to be better Christians,
and endeavoring to exact a promise from them that they would strive to per-
suade their wives also to be Christians.

Atkins looked very serious all the while, and we could easily perceive that he
was much affected by the words of the clergyman. He asked leave to go and
have some private talk with his wife, so he went awhile, and we talked to the
rest. I found that they were very ignorant of religion, and yet there were none
of them backward to hear what had been said, and all seriously promised to
talk to their wives about it, and do all they could to persuade them to turn
Christians.

The clergyman smiled when I interpreted their answers, and -said with a
shake of his head, “I will not despair of them, but I greatly fear that the man
you call Will Atkins is the only sincere convert among them. That man is
apparently struck with the sense of his past life, and I doubt not, when he comes |
to talk religion to his wife, he will talk himself effectually into it; for attempting
to teach others is sometimes the best way of teaching ourselves.”

Upon this discourse, however, and their promising, as above, to endeavor
to persuade their wives to embrace Christianity, he married the other couples,
but Will Atkins and his wife were not yet come in. After this, my clergyman
waiting awhile, was curious to know where Atkins was gone, and turning to
me, said, “TI entreat you, sir, let us walk out of your labyrinth here, and look.

I daresay we shall find this poor man somewhere or other talking seriously to
166. ROBINSON CRUSOE

his wife, and teaching her already something of religion.” I began to be of
the same mind; so we went out together, and I carried him a way which none
knew but myself, and coming to the edge of the wood, I saw Atkins and his
tawny wife sitting under the shade of a bush, very eager in discourse. We stood
and looked very steadily at them a good while. We observed him very earnest
with her, pointing up to the sun, and to every quarter of the heavens, and then
down to the earth, then out to sea, then to himself, then to her, to the woods,
to the trees. “Now,” says the clergyman, “you see my words are made good,
the man preaches to her; mark him now, he is telling her that our God has made
him and her, and the heavens, the earth, the sea, the woods, the trees, etc.” “I
believe he is,” said I. Immediately, we perceived Will Atkins start upon his
feet, fall down on his knees, and lift up both his hands. He did not continue
kneeling half a minute, but comes and sits down again by his wife, and talks
to her again; we perceived then the women very attentive, but whether she said —
anything to him we could not tell. While the poor fellow was upon his knees,
T could see the tears run plentifully down my clergyman’s cheeks, and I could
hardly forbear myself: but it was a great affliction to us both that we were not
near enough to hear anything that passed between them. Well, however, we
could come no nearer for fear of disturbing them; so we resolved to see an end
of this piece of still conversation, and it spoke loud enough for us without the
help of voice. He sat down again, as I have said, close by her, and talked again
earnestly to her, and two or three times we could see him embrace her most
passionately; another time we saw him take out his handkerchief and wipe
her eyes, and then we saw him on a sudden jump up again, and lend her his
hand to help her up, when immediately leading her by the hand a step or two,
they both kneeled down together, and continued so about two minutes.

My friend could bear it no longer, but cries out aloud, “St. Paul! St. Paul!
behold, he prayeth!” After the poor man and his wife were risen again from
their knees, we observed he stood talking still eagerly to her, and we observed
by her motions that she was greatly affected with what he said, by her frequently
_“ROBINSON CRUSOB 167



WILL ATKINS, CRUSOE, AND PRIEST

lifting up her hands, laying her hands to her breast, and such other postures as
express the greatest seriousness and attention; this continued about half a

quarter of an hour; and then they walked away, so we could see no more of them
in that situation. |
168 ROBINSON CRUGOB

As Will Atkins and his wife were gone, our business there was over, so we
went back to our own way; and when we came back, we found them waiting to
be called in: observing this, I asked my clergyman if we should discover to him
that we had seen him under the bush or not; and it was his opinion we should
not, but that we should talk to him first, and hear what he would say to us;
so we called him in alone, nobody being in the place but ourselves. When I
began to question him, he said tome, “Sir, you have set me about a work that
has struck a dart through my very soul. I have been talking about God and
religion to my wife, in order, as-you directed me, to make a Christian of her,
and she has preached such a sermon to me as I shall never forget while I live.”

Then he gave us an account of what had passed between him and his wife,
which was very affecting but too long to be set down here. The poor woman
had shown a great readiness to receive the saving knowledge of God and of
Jesus Christ, and he had been so moved to observe a poor, untaught creature
so eager to learn that which he was so unfit to teach, that he had resolved to
amend and reform his life, if it were not already too late to do so.

When I laid this before the young clergyman, he told me he believed there
must be more to do with this woman than to marry her. I did not understand
him at first, but at length he explained that he meant she should be baptized.
T agreed with him, and wished it to be done directly, but he desired first that
she should receive some more adequate instruction in the elements of the
Christian faith than her husband had been able to give her.

Accordingly, I called her in, and placing myself as interpreter between my
religious priest and the woman, I entreated him to begin with her; and sure
such a sermon was never preached in these latter ages of the world. Ina word,
he brought the poor woman to embrace the knowledge of Christ, and of re-
demption by Him, not with wonder and astonishment only, as she did the first
notions of a God, but with joy and faith; with an affection, and a surprising
degree of understanding, scarce to be imagined, much less to be expressed ;

and, at her own request, she was baptized.
ROBINSON CRUSOB 169

As soon as this was over, he married them; and after the marriage was over,
he turned to Will Atkins, and in a very affectionate manner exhorted him, not
only to persevere in that’ good disposition he was in, but to support the con-
victions that were upon him by a resolution to reform his life, and represented
to him how God had honored. him with being the instrument of bringing his
wife to the knowledge of the Christian religion. He said a great many good
things to them both; and then, recommending them to God’s goodness, gave
them the benediction again, and thus ended the ceremony. I think it was the
most pleasant and agreeable day that ever I passed in my whole life.

But my clergyman had not done yet: his thoughts hung continually upon the
conversion of the thirty-seven savages, and fain he would have stayed upon the
island to have undertaken it; but I convinced him, first, that his undertaking
was impracticable in itself; and, secondly, that perhaps I would put it into a
way of being done in his absence to his satisfaction.

Having brought the affairs of the island into good order, I was preparing to
depart, when one day the young man I had taken out of the famished ship’s
company came to me and said that if it would not be objectionable to me, he
desired to have the clergyman perform a marriage ceremony before I went
away. I guessed that it was the wish of the young man to wed the maid who
had been saved along with himself from the ship, and I began to persuade him
not to do anything of the kind rashly, as the girl was not in the same rank of

__ life as he had been brought up in, and was considerably older than he. But he
told me with a smile that I was mistaken in my guess, for it was the Jack-of-all-
‘Trades that wished to wed the maid. I was pleased when he named the match,
for I thought highly of the man, and the maid was an excellent young woman.
We married them the same day, and I appointed her and her husband a hand-
some, large space of ground for their plantation.

The island was now allotted in this manner: ‘The Spaniards had my original
habitation, with its plantations along the side of the creek; the English lived in
the north-east part; while all the extreme east end of the island was left unip~
170 ROBINSON CRUSOE











GROUP OF HUTS UNDER THE HILL

habited, so that if the savages should land on it, they might come and go without
disturbing anybody; and if they were ever afterward ashore, they went away
again, for I never heard that the planters were attacked or disturbed any more.

It now came into my thoughts that I had hinted to my friend the clergyman,
that the work of converting the savages might perhaps be set on foot in his
absence to his satisfaction, and I told him that now I thought that it was put
in a fair way; for the savages; being divided among the Christians, if they would
-ROBINSON CRUSOB 171

but.every one of them do their part with those who came under their hands,
I hoped it might have a very good effect.

He agreed presently in that, if they did their part. “But how,” says he,
“shall we obtain that of them ?”’

T told him we would call them all together, and este it in charge with them,
or go to them, one by one, which he thought best; so we divided it,—he to speak
to the Spaniards, and I speak to the English, and we recommended it earnestly
to them, and made them promise to exhort the savages to turn Christians,
and to teach them the general knowledge of the true God, an of their Saviour
Jesus Christ.

When I came to Will Atkins’s house, there I found the young woman I have
mentioned above and Will Atkins’s wife were become intimates; and this prudent,
religious woman had perfected the work Will Atkins had begun; and though
it was not above four days after what I have related, yet the new-baptized sav-
age woman was made such a Christian as I have seldom heard of in all my
observation or conversation in.the world.

It came into my mind in the morning before I went to them, that amongst
all the needful things I had to leave with them, I had not left them a Bible, so
T took one in my pocket. When I came to Will Atkins’s house, and found the
young woman and Atkins’s baptized ‘wife had been discoursing of religion
together—for Will Atkins told it me with a great deal of joy—I asked if they
were together now, and he said, yes; so I went into the house and he with me,
and we found them together very earnest in discourse.

We talked a little, and I did not perceive that they had any book among them,
though I did not ask; but I put my hand into my pocket, and pulled out my
Bible. “Here,” said I to Atkins, “I have brought you an assistant that perhaps
you had not before.”

Surely no man was ever more thankful in the world for anything of its kind
than Will Atkins was for the Bible. ‘Though he had been a desperately wicked
man, he was the son of a good father, who had sought earnestly to instruct him

~
172 ROBINSON CRUSOE

in religion; and he remembered how this father used to insist so much on the |
inexpressible value of the Bible, and the privilege and blessing of it to nations,
families, and persons; but he never entertained the least notion of the worth of
it till now, when having to talk to heathens, savages, and barbarians, he wanted
the help of the written oracle for his assistance.

Having now done with the island, I left them all i in a flourishing condition,
and went on board my ship again on the 6th of May; and as they were all re-
solved to stay on the island, I promised to send them further relief when I could
find an opportunity. |

The next day, giving them a salute of five gun at parting, we set sail, and
arrived at the bay of All Saints in the Brazils in about twenty-two days, meeting
nothing remarkable in our passage but this: that about three days after we had
sailed, we were driven something out of our course, and once or twice our men
cried out, “Land to the eastward!” but whether it was the continent or islands
we could not tell by any means. But the third day, towards evening, we saw
the sea, as it were, covered towards the land with something very black; not
being able to discover what it was, till after some time, our chief mate, going
up the mainshrouds a little way, and looking at them with a perspective, cried
out it was an army. I could not imagine what he meant by an army, and
thwarted him a little hastily. “ Nay, sir,” says he, “don’t be angry, for ’tis
an army, and a fleet too; for I believe there are a thousand canoes.”

We were becalmed and the current was bearing us toward them; so I. gave
orders to come to an anchor and furl all our sails. As for the savages, I told
them they had nothing to fear but fire, and therefore they should get their boats
out, and fasten them, one close by the head, and the other by the stern, and
man them both well, and wait the issue in that posture; this I did, that the men _
in the boats might be ready with sheets and buckets to put out any me these
savages might endeavor to fix to the outside of the ship.

In this posture we lay by for them, and in a little while they came up with
us. When they came nearer to us, they seemed to be struck with wonder and.
ROBINSON CRUSOE 173



CRUSOE GIVES ATKINS A BIBLE

astonishment, and seemed to intend to row round us; but we called to our men
in the boats not to let them come too near them. This very order brought us
to an engagement with them, without our designing it; for five or six of the

large canoes came so near our long-boat, that our men beckoned with their
174 ROBINSON CRUSOE

hands to keep them back, which they understood very well, and went back;
but at their retreat about fifty arrows came on board us from those boats, and
one of our men in the long-boat was very much wounded. However, I called
to them not to fire by any means; but we handed down some deal boards into
the boat, and the carpenter presently set up a kind of fence, like waste boards,
to cover them from the arrows of the savages, if they should shoot again.

About half an hour afterwards they all came up in a body astern of us, and
so near that I easily found they were some of my old friends, the same sort of
savages that I had been used to engage with; and in a short time more they
rowed a little farther out to sea, till they came directly broadside with us, and
then rowed down straight upon us, till they came so near that they could hear
us speak; upon this I ordered all my men to keep close, lest they should shoot
any more arrows, and made all our guns ready; but being so near as to be within
hearing, I made Friday go out upon the deck, and call out aloud to them in his
~ language, to know what they meant; which accordingly he did. Whether they
understood him or not, that I knew not; but as soon as he had called to them,
six of them, who were in the foremost or nighest boat to us, turned their canoes
from us, and stooping down, showed us their naked backs. Whether this was
a defiance or challenge we knew not, or whether it was done in mere con-
tempt, or as a signal to the rest: but immediately Friday cried out they |
were going to shoot, and, unhappily, for him, poor fellow, they let fly about
three hundred of their arrows, and, to my inexpressible grief, killed poor Friday,
no other man being in their sight. ‘The poor fellow was shot with no less than
three arrows, and about three more fell very near him; such unlucky marksmen
they were! |

T was so enraged at the loss of my old trusty servant and companion, that I
immediately ordered five guns to be loaded with small shot, and four with great,
and gave them such a broadside as they had never heard in their lives before,
to be sure.

I can neither tell how many we killed nor how many we wounded at this
ROBINSON CRUSOE 175





















































































































































FAREWELL TO THE ISLAND

broadside, but sure such a fright and hurry never were seen among such a mul-
titude; there were thirteen or fourteen of their canoes split and overset in all,
and the men all set a-swimming: the rest, frightened out of their wits, scoured
away as fast as they could, taking but little care to save those whose boats were
split or spoiled with our shot; so I suppose that many of them were lost; and
our men took up one poor fellow swimming for his life, above an hour after
they were all gone.

A breeze soon springing up, we weighed anchor, and set sail for the Brazils.
The prisoner whom we took on board would not eat or speak at first, and we
all fancied he would starve himself to death.

But when we had taught him to say a few words, he told us that the savages
had come out with their king to have a great battle, and all they wished was to
have us look at the grand sight. And it was for this that Friday was killed!
176 ROBINSON CRUSOE

Now that I name the poor fellow once more, I must take leave of him, the most
graceful, faithful, and affectionate servant that man ever had! |

We went on with a fair wind to All Saints’ Bay. Here I had a sloop set up
which I had brought with me from England, in order to send to my island the
further relief I had promised.

One of our seamen offered to go with the sloop and setile there if the governor
would give him land for a plantation. I encouraged him to go, and gave him
the prisoner for his slave. I found another man, too, who would like to go, hav-
Ing been unjustly presecuted by the authorities of this place. I put him on board,
with his wife, two daughters, and his small stock of goods. Along with them,
besides stores and tools, I sent three milch cows, five calves, two mares, and a
horse, all of which, as I heard, arrived safe and sound.

I have now no more to say of my island, as I had left it for the last time,
but my travels were not yet at an end. From the Brazils we went directly to
the Cape of Good Hope, and from there sailed for the coast of India. On the
way we touched at the island of Madagascar, to furnish ourselves with provi-
sions. The people were fierce and treacherous, yet we fared well enough with
them for a while. But it happened one evening, when some of our men were
on shore, that one of them was rude to a native woman. An outcry was raised,
and a swarm of natives gathered for an attack on our men, who escaped to their
boats, all except the fellow who was the cause of the mischief.

Although the wind was favorable, we did not leave the next day, but sailed
, up shore and down shore several leagues, hoping that the missing man might
present himself, but we saw nothing of him. Late at night, under cover of
darkness, a stout force of our men went on shore, and made their way to the
native village, where they found the people all asleep, and discovered the body
of their missing comrade hanging up with his throat cut. The sight so mad-
dened them, that they swore they would be revenged, and started at once to
set fire to the village. As soon as the fire began to blaze, the poor frightened
creatures began to rush out to save their lives, but met their fate in the attempt;
ROBINSON CRUSO# 177





THD CAPE OF GOOD HOPH *

for the men were in such a fury that they slaughtered them without mercy.
The people were so surprised and frightened that they made little defense; nor
did any of our men receive the least hurt, except one that sprained his foot,
and another that had one of his hands burned.

The next day we set sail, and never heard any more of the matter. How-
ever just our men thought this action, I was against them in it, and looked upon
what they had done that night to be unjustifiable murder. _

When we reached the Bay of Bengal, I parted from the ship in which I came,
178 - HOBINGON CRUSOE

and with two of the crew for servants remained on fede Here I made the
acquaintance of several merchants, some French, two Italians, or rather Jews,
and one Englishman. I had some English goods with me of value, which I
disposed of to advantage. |

When I had been here about nine months, my English friend made a proposal
to me to hire a ship, and go on a trading voyage to the Spice Islands and Cochin
China. I agreed and we got a ship and men to work her, and set out. - When
we had exchanged our wares we came back, and soon made another voyage,

which also turned out very profitably.

A little while after this there came in a Dutch ship from Batavia, of about two
hundred tons burden. ‘The men, as they pretended, having been so sickly that
the captain had not hands enough to go to sea with, he lay by at Bengal; and
having, it seems, got money enough, or being willing, for other reasons, to go
to: Europe, he gave public notice that he would sell his ship. This came to my
ears before my partner heard of it, and I had a great mind to buy it; so I went to
him and I told him of it. He considered awhile, for he was ‘no rash man either;
but musing some time, he replied, “She is a little too big: but, however, we will
have her.” Accordingly, we bought the ship, and agreeing with the master,
we paid for her, and took possession. When we had done so, we resolved to
engage the men, if we could, to join with those we had, for the pursuing our
business; but, on a sudden, they having received not their wages, but their
share of the money, as we afterwards learned, not one of them was to be found.
A few days after, I learned that the man they called captain was gunner only,
not the commander; that they had been a trading voyage, in which they had
been attacked on shore by some of the Malays, who had killed the captain and .
three of his men; and ihat, after the captain was killed, these men, eleven in
number, had resolved to run away with the ship, which they did, and brought
her to Bengal, leaving the mate and five men more on shore.

Well, let them get the ship how they would, we came honestly by her, as we
thought, though ‘we did not, I confess, examine into things so exactly as we
ROBINSON CRUSOE 179



BURNING THE VILLAGH

ought. We picked up some English sailors and some Dutch; and now we re-
solved on a second voyage to the south-east for cloves, etc; that is to say, among
the Philippine and Molucca isles; and, in short, not to fill up this part of my
story with trifles, when what is to come is so remarkable, I spent, from first to
180 ROBINSON CRUSOE

last, six years in this country, trading from port to port, backward and forward,
and with very good success, and was now the last year with my new partner, -
going in the ship above mentioned, on a voyeee to China, but aes Jn
to go to Siam, to buy rice.

Tn this voyage, being by contrary winds obliged to beat up and down a great
while in the Straits of Malacca, and among the islands, we were no sooner got
clear of those difficult seas, than we found our ship had sprung a leak, and we
were not able, by all our industry, to find out where it was. This forced us to
make some port; and my partner, who knew the country better than I did,
directed the captain to put into the river Cambodia; While we were here, and
going often on shore for refreshment, there came to me one day an Englishman,
and he was, it seems, a gunner’s mate on board an English East India ship,
which rode in the same river. “Sir,” says he, “you are a stranger to me, and I
to you; but I have something to tell you that very nearly concerns Yous ias

The short of nis story was that we had been preceded to this place by a report
that the ship was still in the possession of those who had run away with her,
and that they had turned pirates. So we were in danger of being seized as
pirates, and executed with little ceremony, for there were several merchant
ships in the port, and it was well known that they showed but little law to
pirates if they got them in their power.

I immediately went on board, and finding that the leak had been stopped,
I ordered the anchor to be got up, and we stood out to sea. While I was in
the cabin relating to my partner what I had heard, a seaman came to the door
to tell us we were being chased by five boats. I ordered all our men to be called
up, and told them there was a design to seize the ship and take us as pirates,
and asked them if they would stand by us and by one another. The men
answered cheerfully, one and all, that they would live and die with us.

We made ready for fighting, but all the while kept out to sea, with wind
enough, and could see the boats at a distance following with all the sail they
could make. Two of them gained upon the others, and came so near that we
ROBINSON CRUSOB ; 181















































































































SAILING THROUGH THE STRAIT OF MALACCA

fired a gun without ball, and put out a flag of truce as a signal for parley; but
they crowded after us till they came within shot, when we took in our white flag,
they having made no answer to it, and hung out a.red flag, and fired at them with
ashot. ‘They still crowded after us, and gave no answer to our calls for parley,
so we brought the ship to, and began to fire broadsides at them. It was not
long before the foremost boat was almost split to pieces, and the second quite
disabled. When the other three boats came up to the first two, they had full
182 : ROBINSON CRUSOH

occupation picking up the men in the water to save them from drowning, and ~
had to give over the chase, while we crowded all sail, and stood far out to sea.

I must confess I was now very uneasy, and did not know what port or place
we should go to. My partner thought we had better put in on the coast of
Cochin China, to obtain provisions, and from thence sail to some port in the
north of China, where European vessels seldom came. ‘This course was settled ©
upon, and after a tedious sail, we came in sight of the coast, and put into a
small river. ‘The place was wild, the people thievish, and except getting a few
provisions, we cared not how little we had to do with them.

I have observed already that our ship sprung a leak, and although we had
stopped it after a fashion, we did not find the ship so perfectly tight as we de-
sired. In order to discover where the leaks were, we thought we would examine
the ship’s bottom while at this place. Accordingly we laid her in shallow
water, and shifted all our guns and. other movables, so as to bring her down
and expose the other side. The inhabitants, who-had never beheld such a sight,
came wandering down the shore to look at us; and seeing the ship lie down on
one side in such a manner, and not seeing our men, who were at work on her
bottom with stages, and with their boats on the off-side, they presently con-
cluded that the ship was cast away, and lay fast on the ground. On this sup-
position, they all came about us in two or three hours’ time, with ten or twelve
large boats, having some of them eight, some ten men in a boat, intending, no
doubt, to come on board and plunder the ship, and if they found us there, to
carry us away for slaves to their king, for such is their barbarous custom when
any vessel has the misfortune to be shipwrecked on their coast.

When they came up to the ship, and began to row round her, they discovered
us all hard at work on the outside of the ship’s bottom and side, washing, and
graving, and stopping, as every seafaring man knows how. They stood for
awhile gazing at us, and we could not imagine what their design was; but being
willing to be sure, we took this opportunity to get some of us into the ship, aid’
. others to hand down arms and ammunition to those that were at work, to de-
5 ROBINSON CRUSOE 183





















































































































































































































































STOPPING LEAKS IN THE SHIP

fend themselves with, if there should be occasion; and it was no more than need!
—for in less than a quarter of an hour’s consultation, they agreed, it seems, that
the ship was really a wreck, and that we were all at work endeavoring to save
her, or to save our lives by the help of our boats; and when we handed our arms
into the boat, they concluded by that motion, that we were endeavoring to save
some of our goods; upon this, they took it for granted we all belonged to them,
184 ROBINSON CRUSOB

and away they came directly upon our men, as if it had been in a line of battle. ©
Our men, seeing so many of them, began to be frightened, for we lay but in |
an ill posture to fight, and cried out to us to know what they should do. I
immediately called to the men that worked upon the stages, to slip down them,
and get up the side into_the ship, and bade those in the boat to row round and
come on board; and the few who were on board worked with all the strength
and hands we had to bring the ship to rights; but, however, neither the men
upon the stages nor those in the boats could do as they were ordered before
the Cochin-Chinese were upon them; and two of their boats boarded our long-
boat, and began to lay hold of the men as their prisoners.

The first man they laid hold of was an English seaman, a stout, strong fellow,
who grappled the pagan, and dragged him by main force out of their boat into
ours, where, taking him by the ears, he beat his head so against the boat’s
gunnel, that the fellow died in his hands; and, in the meantime, a Dutchman
with the butt-end of a musket so laid about him, that he knocked down five °
_ of them who attempted to enter the boat. But this was doing little towards
resisting thirty or forty men, who, fearless because ignorant of their danger,
began to throw themselves into the long boat where we had but five men in all .
to defend it; however, the following accident, which deserved our laughter,
gave our men a complete victory.

Our carpenter being prepared to grave the outside of the ship, as well as to
pay the seams where he had caulked her to stop the leaks, had got two kettles
just led down into the boat, one filled with boiling pitch, and the other with
resin, tallow,-and oil, and such stuff as the shipwrights use for that work; and
the man that attended the-carpenter had a great iron ladle in his hand, witb
which he supplied the men that were at work with the hot stuff. Two of the
enemy's men entered the boat just where this fellow stood; he immediately
saluted them with a ladleful of the stuff, boiling hot, which so burned and
scalded them, being half-naked, that they roared out like bulls, and, enraged
with the fire, leaped both into the sea. The carpenter saw it, and cried out,
= 7 \

ROBINSON CRUSOE - 185

“Well done, Jack! give them some more of it:” and stepping forward himself,

_takes one of the mops, and dipping it into the pitch-pot, he and his men threw

it among them so plentifully that, in short, of all the men in the three boats,
there was not one who escaped being scalded and burned with it, in a most
frightful, pitiful manner, and made such a howling and crying that I never

heard a worse noise. All the while this was doing, my partner and I, who

managed the rest of the men'on board, had with great dexterity brought the ©
ship almost to rights. The enemy was so terrified with what they had met
with in their first attack, that they would not come on again; and some of them
who were farthest off, seeing the ship swim, as it were, upright, began, as we
suppose, to see their mistake, and gave over the enterprise, finding it was not
as they expected. Thus we got clear of jthis merry fight. We got all our
things on board the same evening, and the next morning, having finished our
work within board, and finding our ship was perfectly healed of all her leaks,
we set sail. Yo

We took a'course to the north, keeping well away from the coasts till we were
beyond all the ports of China usually visited by English or Dutch ships. Hav-
ing come to the latitude of 30 degrees, we went into the next trading port. Here
an old Portuguese pilot came on board to offer his services, and on the informa-
tion obtained from him, we decided to sail for Nanquin. After about thirteen
days’ sail we came to anchor at the south-west point of the great Gulf of Nan-
quin, where we were alarmed to learn that two Dutch ships had arrived just
in advance of us. I asked our old pilot if there was no harbor which we might

put into and pursue our business with the Chinese privately. He told us of

a little port which he called Quinchang, where at certain times they had a kind
of fair, when the merchants of Japan came over thither to buy Chinese goods.
We all agreed to go to this place, and at once weighed anchor. When we ar-

rived in the little port, the fair had been over for some time, but we found that

tLere were three or four junks in the river, and two ships from Japan, having
some Japanese merchants on board. One of these we found to be a willing
186 ‘ROBINSON CRUSOE

eustomer for our cargo, and he paid us a good price for it. While we were
dealing with him for our goods, it came into my head that he might perhaps
~ deal for the ship too. He shrunk up his shoulders at it, when it was first pro-
posed to him, but in a few days he came after me, and in the end the matter
was arranged very satisfactorily.

We were now on shore in China, about a thousand leagues farther off from
home than I had been at Bengal, where indeed I had thought myself banished.
As there was no immediate prospect of return, we resolved to divert ourselves
by taking journeys into the interior of the country. We went first to the city
of Nanquin, which is well worth seeing indeed. It is regularly built and they
say it has a million of people in it. After returning from Nanquin we went to
Pekin, the journey taking twenty-five days. Here we had an opportunity to
join a large caravan of traders who were going to make a journey overland to
“Moscow in Russia. As we could readily make our way thence to England,
and by laying in a stock of Chinese goods to take with us could make the journey
very profitable, the project suited us well, and we decided to go.

It was the beginning of February when we set out. Our cargo loaded
eighteen camels, and we had six horses besides. ‘The company numbered
upward of one hundred and twenty men, well armed to protect themselves
from the Tartar hordes who pillage defenseless travellers in those regions.
Some of our party were Scots, whose company we were very glad to have, as
they were men of large experience in this business.

Our guides were five in number, and we put all our money in a common
stock, to pay the expenses of the road. We named officers to draw us all up,
and give the word of command in case of an attack, and this we found needful
when the time came.

The road on this side of the country is full of potters, and clay-makers—that
_ is people who temper the clay for the China ware. One of our guides said he
would show me one thing which was not to be seen in all the world beside. I
wished to know what it was, and he told me it was a gentleman’s house built
ROBINSON CRUSOE 18%







































THE CITY OF NANKIN

of China ware. “How big is it?” said I. “Can we carry it in a box upon a

camel?” ‘Upon a camel!” said he; “why there is a family of thirty people
lives in it.”

I was curious to see it, and when I came to it I found that it was a timber
house, but was plastered with the clay that makes China ware. The outside
upon which the sun shone, was glazed, and painted with blue figures on a white
ground, and looked very »well. ‘The inside walls were lined with tiles of the
188 ROBINSON CRUSOE

finest China, painted handsomely in a variety of colors. The floors were of
the same composition, and the roof also was covered with tiles, but these were
of a deep shining black. I should have been glad to see more of this house if I
had not been on the journey, for there ‘were fountains and fish-ponds in the
garden, all paved with the same, and porcelain statues set up on the walks.
This odd sight kept me two hours behind the caravan, for which the leader made
me pay a fine.

In two days more we passed the great China wall, made for a, fortification
against the Tartars; and a very great work it is, going over hills and mountains
in a needless track, where the rocks are impassable, and the precipices such as
no enemy could possibly enter, or indeed climb up, or where, if they did, no
wall could hinder them. ‘They tell us its length is near a thousand English
miles, but that the country is five hundred in a straight measured line, which
the wall bounds, without measuring the windings and turnings it takes; it is
about four fathoms high, and as many thick in some places.

I stood still about an hour or so, (without trespassing our orders, for the
caravan was that long in passing the gate), to look well at it; and the guide of
the caravan, who had been extolling it for the wonder of the world, was eager
to hear my opinion of it. I told him it was an excellent thing to keep out the
Tartars; which he happened not to understand as I meant it, and So took it for
a compliment. What I really meant was that it was good for nothing but to
keep out Tartars; for an army of our people, with a good train of artillery,
would batter it down in ten days. ©

A few days further travel brought us to a more thinly nopalatel part of the .
country, and here I began to see the need of the caravan keeping together, for

_we observed troops of the Tartar robbers roving about. We first caught sight
_ of them one day that our leader gave some of us leave to go hunting—or what
they call hunting in this country, which is really but driving off sheep. The
creatures go in large flocks, and are wild and swift of foot, but will not run far.
In pursuit of this game, it was our hap to meet with about forty of the Tartars,

’
ROBINSON CRUSOE 189













































































































































































































THE GREAT WALL OF CHINA

and we found they were a mere horde of wild fellows, on poor, lean horses and
with little skill in fighting. As soon as they saw us, one of them blew a horn
very loud. It seemed that this was to call their friends about them, for another
troop of the same size appeared.

One of the Scots was with us, and he said that we had nothing to do but

‘
390 _ ROBINSON CRUSOE

charge on them at once. We told him to lead, and we would follow. The
Tartars stood gazing at us like a mere mob; but as soon as they saw us advance,
they let fly their arrows at us, which fell short. We halted and fired, and then
galloped up at full speed with swords in hand. As soon as we came up to them,
they fled in great confusion. ‘The only stand was made by three of them on our
right, who did all they could by signs to call to the rest of them to come back.
The brave Scot, our leader, galloped up close to the three, and with his gun
knocked one of them from his horse, killed the second with his pistol, and the
third ran away; and thus endeed our fight.. We had not a man hurt; but as
for the Tartars, five of them were killed, several wounded, and the rest driven
off simply by the noise of our guns.

Thus we went on our way, now and then meeting other hordes of Tartars,
with whom we had to fight, and whom we always overcame-with little difficulty.
When we reached Tobolski, the capital of Siberia, my partner and I concluded
to winter there, instead of going on with the rest of the caravan to Moscow.

Late in the following spring, we made our way to Archangel, on the White
Sea. We were obliged to wait at this place six weeks for the arrival of a ship.
The first that sailed was bound for Hamburg, and we took passage for that
port. ‘There we found a good sale for our goods, and had a large sum of money
to divide between us.

To conclude: having stayed near four months in Hamburg, I came from
thence by land to the Hague, where I embarked in the packet, and arrived in
London the 10th of January, 1795, having been absent from England ten years
and nine months. And here I resolved to prepare for a longer journey than all
these, having lived a life of infinite variety seventy-two years, and learned
sufficiently to know the value of retirément, and the blessing of ending our

days in peace.

ane

“

2





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AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T18:16:01-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 300571; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
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FILES
FILE SIZE '322' DFID 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQKL' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-filesvid00001_00143.txt'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' 432c4194f48d03c5709f403cd9706235
'SHA-1' c254867657b08dae2f0ae9c8ab3aa94a55685c9d
EVENT '2012-09-14T09:43:05-04:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
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1f23931afe22aa717d8d4e96968052ed
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'2012-09-14T09:36:15-04:00'
describe
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cde2491c106d42960afaa66f77f65fdf
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'2012-09-14T09:36:54-04:00'
describe
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484fb3cd9d3e442830be55cc72ee23ff
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'2012-09-14T09:40:52-04:00'
describe
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7ced88bad01dfd95ec1fe1ed25fc73c2
72f946aa4772c7b442597c830bea5eed0515ca1d
'2012-09-14T09:38:06-04:00'
describe
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74999af77e961ee126c10d50552a9470
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'2012-09-14T09:38:37-04:00'
describe
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44f4a8f76ba5aa2dc573eabfd88c9e1d
5d7329df00cb4ad6b3e8a6c274b4fa4c86e7f590
'2012-09-14T09:38:13-04:00'
describe
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1cfaa23b58893d146cbc9b654c2b7d6f
c98b0ad6830a56cd8290533a7fc40ef56ef1fdcd
'2012-09-14T09:42:19-04:00'
describe
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e5e3ac233f437e4e86dccc0fd3b304f7
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'2012-09-14T09:36:10-04:00'
describe
'2298' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQKU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00080.txt'
e443b8400405fb94e4ac44965fbf2790
0d62b4169772644d284ff501e45d1345532c6409
'2012-09-14T09:41:55-04:00'
describe
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f6152ba37e39f54f4e14fc76086deeb2
7f3514a3ffdc822324778ddf52022f152ee2265b
'2012-09-14T09:36:17-04:00'
describe
'56061' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQKW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00103.QC.jpg'
7c60461f000b6c7f9367bba40a5613bd
51b9b3a9e9549f07cf122d9ca678239c606e183c
'2012-09-14T09:42:47-04:00'
describe
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d91a86bf4fea1386b23f0de1d2dc289c
b2cd47dd4f6bd4f4fefb8d95766f6188e4fe73ea
'2012-09-14T09:35:51-04:00'
describe
'59501' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQKY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00163.QC.jpg'
b0aee3cbae03aaaa9fdd21ed985d3ab7
b41fb8ce283101c6e6ed08f006595bdf1d7f9206
'2012-09-14T09:40:43-04:00'
describe
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b43f22f029c76adfa93448d47fde5cee
e8620cd5971a528392aeddef4b1ee513eb219250
'2012-09-14T09:40:38-04:00'
describe
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c52d6a4100ee48c127e9ea48c16ead75
f700dd5bbfb34db466f2214cff7e93424b634e90
'2012-09-14T09:40:28-04:00'
describe
'633' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQLB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00170.txt'
a65238ea1da876877abe078d9c4dd4a6
18b6892eac67f56bae7ecf8655f3c4a3371be852
'2012-09-14T09:36:56-04:00'
describe
'59664' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQLC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00116.QC.jpg'
939f4f1235feea963a5d9a28c905ed6e
cf8781578ca2a3582d9c40e46ed8c6b49448390f
'2012-09-14T09:38:28-04:00'
describe
'5810948' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQLD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00149.tif'
7f9673a4bfe467d30837b705178fdb4b
13ceede89a428ff6b192d4c3ee2723c54d0ac698
'2012-09-14T09:41:34-04:00'
describe
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e67f79c9f38f4b0b425d334221e8ba2d
444f32f790f72edd6f2332826ba38704fb9ff114
'2012-09-14T09:36:13-04:00'
describe
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c55c9a9a4a135f9429da8bca4926242e
c5a7da47132ab7d18ac26b0d9e9794d3984e2aa4
'2012-09-14T09:42:52-04:00'
describe
'59092' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQLG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00080.pro'
2346dcf102add0250bd5866a99a36b39
0849684774da528202cc90e2251ba5db11044f65
'2012-09-14T09:36:07-04:00'
describe
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7a3324b19807489fdb63c4e6cab2eb51
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'2012-09-14T09:38:49-04:00'
describe
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185fdef31c0af3045b88a88d615d042f
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'2012-09-14T09:37:25-04:00'
describe
'5806168' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQLJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00004.tif'
9e277558c62dc3f0a2c71a158996506f
e8b2a135fb74fc89d8f2eb30919b789113bcce2e
'2012-09-14T09:42:55-04:00'
describe
'24333' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQLK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00022thm.jpg'
eaa970b4a5dd071e934a7356e4c4e5c7
2bb1c69b600f6317f960fef7c1a2bce720acb02a
'2012-09-14T09:38:29-04:00'
describe
'5812028' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQLL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00134.tif'
7ecd8033f8e3527a90894a9b6fae62c6
89cdcc8ad1d1abfa8591e72ad4b80b0b4613119c
'2012-09-14T09:37:19-04:00'
describe
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0bd370c2a8ee30df680ba7a12f32d825
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'2012-09-14T09:35:37-04:00'
describe
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7f8c223e7cfb5fddaf8207f945401e1f
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'2012-09-14T09:41:14-04:00'
describe
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514657e71c370d98b7b4a8f712fc41e7
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'2012-09-14T09:41:10-04:00'
describe
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5cffdee3ce4b41c9bceb713e1eb4ef46
6968c7d96adbb8e936dfa06df0cec458142c8a9c
'2012-09-14T09:35:44-04:00'
describe
'61247' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQLQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00061.QC.jpg'
8365a50403c16fc5b08f704d35cec9bb
ea2458a0be20ce2f595797931b89189883f0bf53
'2012-09-14T09:38:23-04:00'
describe
'59813' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQLR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00140.QC.jpg'
6c3b74462e06f81440a6d04ad3be4a83
eebdf8541e653102ded5c9192faed1352cdc3e3e
'2012-09-14T09:40:13-04:00'
describe
'169126' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQLS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00121.jpg'
1daa30a01effc1b6e2c91395c7567acf
9998f85d30100e77f5050ee342010a3ec25b0508
'2012-09-14T09:38:11-04:00'
describe
'724726' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQLT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00136.jp2'
b42d49990c4f467df99e388c9bd69014
18cd07f5455755f9fe9a76d31cf6b02d00a42d7b
'2012-09-14T09:35:45-04:00'
describe
'63621' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQLU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00083.QC.jpg'
f2fdc04cc1848d6a581f7161f8be7432
5c01d0f7dde37a69a4c82c5386d826b706da3161
'2012-09-14T09:36:32-04:00'
describe
'23901' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQLV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00153thm.jpg'
e2b9c9f2c4523c2240da5558b6366c74
c766d1d3fa8a500f60ed9909e95f767c547880f5
'2012-09-14T09:35:55-04:00'
describe
'48956' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQLW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00187.QC.jpg'
d3ad88e15feb7d3241dba86470a57292
057028c88d57adc5d1c2ac49bac774e4ab7243a8
'2012-09-14T09:40:02-04:00'
describe
'167183' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQLX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00164.jpg'
0ce2323530d0b8c7b80370d4af7724f3
ab9c9395a0d467350751af54021efac03b33556b
'2012-09-14T09:38:50-04:00'
describe
'24048' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQLY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00136thm.jpg'
d343fd07f1da9f21f4c9f78a1bce9f33
cb3092cb69654436d25d63dc02e4457d0a989fd2
'2012-09-14T09:36:34-04:00'
describe
'52839' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQLZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00037.QC.jpg'
450c3b052d71c2ead17dcc396ecc6892
f8fe2b154a72cf7d921a182fe02fee1fcd72d1a2
'2012-09-14T09:42:26-04:00'
describe
'177661' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQMA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00055.jpg'
17ad6229d736334e45739d56e6abd3a5
b1ff3e8cddfbacaaca53cb959e3c3a5633d4912f
describe
'724766' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQMB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00026.jp2'
6f31bc013e9c6baa158358ac66fdfee2
5dc36299eb6a87d0790f4a43fac5213401f57b3f
'2012-09-14T09:40:54-04:00'
describe
'24575' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQMC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00122thm.jpg'
f8c2dec37794ddfe09bcb60ef24f9d4a
33266a5b1d49c0424950c3d7e18bf288b403fbcf
'2012-09-14T09:41:27-04:00'
describe
'724770' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQMD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00050.jp2'
9ae65ca09397a0e3320f5190d56f041a
5fc63ee4f955b252e5baa6baecb8217cd3e1dae0
'2012-09-14T09:39:46-04:00'
describe
'2403' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQME' 'sip-filesvid00001_00176.txt'
8a65215d49f83d25f9f7dcf53958e712
74839048cb800a142ab416fadffad2875953ddd0
'2012-09-14T09:40:57-04:00'
describe
'724803' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQMF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00120.jp2'
855edd9c2dd8ebb110bfe6160bd5dd5a
7df15bd040a61d5a2aace45c3712c1ef1645fa97
'2012-09-14T09:38:39-04:00'
describe
'49672' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQMG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00088.QC.jpg'
78bb0fcda11eb6a045252d8bc5b670ef
cc2fd752d4b4de23c21b4c672e6d648b3008496e
'2012-09-14T09:36:19-04:00'
describe
'5812248' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQMH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00027.tif'
e1a7182349d9f4d534978d74e9cb8d40
a9de8cb93c94908709578885c41af092b83e2645
'2012-09-14T09:41:18-04:00'
describe
'724702' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQMI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00080.jp2'
2a7b6fe2caee4700636a81cf6931ed5e
c620bd7d9e6cb1277702727c4d6076f598e966ff
'2012-09-14T09:41:20-04:00'
describe
'22978' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQMJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00025thm.jpg'
d7f67635b0ce3ba63de00407b01f53b0
9f20e258e0b0f9ce4f73f909aad67c51047ac38c
'2012-09-14T09:35:46-04:00'
describe
'788240' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQMK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00001.jp2'
bc1bcc7adf4d7461dac3ce7b5e5dc0a9
ab78feb5645167b311f4b6fadff725be05e3c262
'2012-09-14T09:42:09-04:00'
describe
'2323' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQML' 'sip-filesvid00001_00050.txt'
da9227df86470e2089bea469cc2ba3a3
b33f989cd7865fe9a4984fdc060533a0ee9567ca
'2012-09-14T09:38:10-04:00'
describe
'2288' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQMM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00022.txt'
c3398c836ecd8274372b3aba31e15f30
aff9ba233c5aadc3866713d20c3143df4fcc480e
'2012-09-14T09:40:39-04:00'
describe
'1038' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQMN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00047.txt'
70b58329ef85819ff572a567c63630b1
76467568e99b6b12d8e3a102e1cae339e50e2bef
'2012-09-14T09:41:05-04:00'
describe
'23587' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQMO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00061thm.jpg'
b7a9487c443e7b9f8106d12651b5e835
95098616413e77c63dec38594891195837d57b50
'2012-09-14T09:42:54-04:00'
describe
'58730' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQMP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00022.pro'
44be6860febcf9176faf5af3efd2f4d0
7540952e3deca875dfa9e1c19c71f35a8c71f514
'2012-09-14T09:39:01-04:00'
describe
'724706' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQMQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00131.jp2'
e9f6cf1f44743bcd5d4e3e4f05ac4498
b0c75f75f84ab785555c80b2a6358004b4eaf615
'2012-09-14T09:40:33-04:00'
describe
'60447' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQMR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00095.pro'
7d74e551398ec2a9e6d8850ea162a92f
26ac1914d88c4d04904af1c24eb459f34a83c26e
describe
'724405' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQMS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00020.jp2'
3719f565cae5ed1ac2095060be2934dd
2a3963975bf9cac6acde6246b9aa90b16e2e2990
'2012-09-14T09:40:53-04:00'
describe
'168506' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQMT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00030.jpg'
acb7202ed8d8699d363e9c1f574b75ff
1879ac20e5f23c313fa398e1fe0259f0e7308ec1
'2012-09-14T09:39:44-04:00'
describe
'724782' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQMU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00046.jp2'
f094a4a77abb6fbe908e54d2d6a13548
11a1a802cda8c0b6910e4b851748f5e1570db74b
describe
'724616' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQMV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00004.jp2'
a7ec137cd4c879f7a1d7c2817703efca
496dac9d72463a7f575bd52d7fe461dc95e6d8a1
describe
'5812192' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQMW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00023.tif'
1b143e71b125a89689c99544230ae4d7
de22ac4a10a1591a203777a4c22287f618111487
'2012-09-14T09:38:40-04:00'
describe
'5812128' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQMX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00188.tif'
58dff25b30b63c13d0af611012c94798
861ef708735dc4db8b785814d160e595dd7874df
'2012-09-14T09:39:34-04:00'
describe
'24195' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQMY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00118thm.jpg'
38f3ccb4b07544484746579d607c3480
702b9a248d7c2a46d8cf40a42f6cf95dd161d3de
'2012-09-14T09:38:24-04:00'
describe
'5810556' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQMZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00133.tif'
58d7de8d7dce3d7425b28a5d31e50e0f
7aa08d9100f0a81fa5111429a6d84a83d977af13
'2012-09-14T09:39:12-04:00'
describe
'23560' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQNA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00029thm.jpg'
60e9c148acc55982b6bb041dd8313cf4
51c838503ca6c6717a2f0329c813459e0659922f
'2012-09-14T09:39:20-04:00'
describe
'59845' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQNB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00159.QC.jpg'
304901ebcf88e88bb63d0485d15942e0
cf1f2a89507464a06a5860192ffbad2e52847175
'2012-09-14T09:41:35-04:00'
describe
'724427' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQNC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00102.jp2'
b19ce42ec33a070ad8a8c65c8a51dec6
ee7e7128365613812e7cf4cc54a9af6dfe6c2713
describe
'37175' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQND' 'sip-filesvid00001_00125.QC.jpg'
8a1d3a015842a4431a32192362a0126c
eed16d04e75f6e8d59a3a2dc0ca041f4d3ff832f
'2012-09-14T09:43:09-04:00'
describe
'5812156' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQNE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00157.tif'
591754ac21b6e9541d38b18f71a81dd4
b241a6563bf5d7524484cac83db2cc1d7dab34a0
describe
'5811004' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQNF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00057.tif'
0bac0ebec1a14da10ce074e2a02ae7d5
c0ec3c02908b758e8a08bd32758a2fd191c53130
'2012-09-14T09:42:22-04:00'
describe
'1206' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQNG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00121.txt'
4212f63b905f5b8242d81793a9717cc5
10162540b5fabfd82c453757201d42b76126e277
'2012-09-14T09:39:02-04:00'
describe
'724758' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQNH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00012.jp2'
a0ebf7aef4e713c7e4dbda2c4c49005b
6f2e648cca0fc89a1b1416462bc64a1d4d7336be
'2012-09-14T09:37:32-04:00'
describe
'178136' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQNI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00061.jpg'
17afc9cc666e2b153cb1217b214181ad
4e00810cef875a31f63bd424bd1826b9c67371c3
'2012-09-14T09:40:03-04:00'
describe
'56165' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQNJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00065.QC.jpg'
d73ba3aa33663a27886359ad2caf0559
c6ea6b6466552c9a22e88eee2de1dfc7fa8ce3a8
'2012-09-14T09:42:59-04:00'
describe
'24705' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQNK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00027thm.jpg'
50d9fe3ed8a2e365c49dd19b54986925
84ac72ffbda980a230abd14e52e134ddc576a82c
'2012-09-14T09:41:46-04:00'
describe
'5809692' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQNL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00089.tif'
c19d31e2a0a46d01fb3ed46d8a94cfe7
964caf97b15f8621bdb486ae7252060f415a5206
'2012-09-14T09:43:10-04:00'
describe
'724785' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQNM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00150.jp2'
c7b1a955c97e0987f2e1da273b3eb489
0e55888682a7d30bbf1ae1038f5c78fa95836062
'2012-09-14T09:38:21-04:00'
describe
'724773' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQNN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00157.jp2'
de62f109e0d57d7b5ff98f82b7d76006
ffdb2cea19fe39006bbc8bdc071f8c30fb74d9b3
'2012-09-14T09:37:20-04:00'
describe
'20667' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQNO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00173thm.jpg'
08da77a4b06792f7accbca40398e21a4
0ecd26e4cc7a39e6a8eeb4d005fad479eef734c3
describe
'724499' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQNP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00085.jp2'
d5b03129440a9ab81d906f9a45c26400
17c6cf2c25f383557c93146f98b527c9f814478c
describe
'23640' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQNQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00016thm.jpg'
964b17737cfb40cf21ed219fea1e384f
f53caf6a6b634a4edc9fcfab730ea5533c0823b8
'2012-09-14T09:38:46-04:00'
describe
'202847' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQNR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00001.jpg'
f2e6e9bd6e4efb41344ea39203a27605
565429674221abaca6aef7dd827801a4767b5df0
'2012-09-14T09:37:50-04:00'
describe
'55589' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQNS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00067.QC.jpg'
707b64e8769ac2efe90a5fea628a8d05
29a3d9c2dbca4a58302c69a62a60625372a7a1dd
'2012-09-14T09:39:13-04:00'
describe
'178999' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQNT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00149.jpg'
ed4a289eceac1c815423b7f1264d0879
7d616fcfd0e0df984ca63b76a03e6a512afb9af7
'2012-09-14T09:36:14-04:00'
describe
'724501' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQNU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00166.jp2'
34538619126dded02a40ee70b7a04d2d
66f8e6ff5e23f3144f77ab599e7c412160e785cc
'2012-09-14T09:39:07-04:00'
describe
'57752' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQNV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00058.pro'
174d622c113c43156eec6b6d0feb501d
05c5f771a3bd44b466af3855d210d5dc5b9557a9
'2012-09-14T09:36:11-04:00'
describe
'170330' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQNW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00075.jpg'
dbc8fb99a5a47f9bf92a350784ae13b4
dfbf9054f84ccf35634923952667612c38222212
'2012-09-14T09:39:18-04:00'
describe
'2175' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQNX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00048.txt'
3f38f3426d62064fbfabd73d74f0e182
7ebd513c96d5f1cf895b5bb3b6d5bddcd22874b9
'2012-09-14T09:39:58-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'5812212' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQNY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00122.tif'
1cfe5e5bcbcb4ae28224bd389f0d4d65
9c5c45d28b63cd4e522350e5e742440ff33daf5e
'2012-09-14T09:37:18-04:00'
describe
'19557' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQNZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00183thm.jpg'
0f4ae8d6496b803eb759a7ee21ce254d
a13aa405822845390a46e5262814747da0a5f8e2
'2012-09-14T09:41:49-04:00'
describe
'61349' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQOA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00129.QC.jpg'
70de322ef7e52d506a19d49f4c0d65d4
2c59f8686b59a6281a15188f3acb38994dd28b3e
'2012-09-14T09:37:11-04:00'
describe
'65220' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQOB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00123.QC.jpg'
b9a8d717b1072626a9329f775bd5e5a9
82a344ce911a9ca36f10e3c592baefd80658ee0f
'2012-09-14T09:36:37-04:00'
describe
'2350' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQOC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00105.txt'
019c0933cf285f4ed3b28f58dc2ae9dd
0fa57e35934e2bff9bfb75a204fe0fe39183b79f
'2012-09-14T09:37:28-04:00'
describe
'724753' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQOD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00023.jp2'
3b361e13fd0a3452c5da2daf0a8a1545
41958ead526a752d552358f392493de943539aeb
'2012-09-14T09:40:15-04:00'
describe
'55430' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQOE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00060.QC.jpg'
c4fb2ff731243cf8ec1bd6bb7c2136c1
3a67be7f78599ea3342045c86ddae1ecad2ac277
'2012-09-14T09:39:49-04:00'
describe
'11907' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQOF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00141.pro'
1ae3473a5290fd95cbe0df150726b4fa
c2078fefb6ea03aab5cb10c2ce12137cc2f85402
'2012-09-14T09:40:12-04:00'
describe
'21347' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQOG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00073thm.jpg'
f3158d9995bfc070237eebe9b0fb4a89
0793a6780ba0cac1183c2c0be46f2e1302d858c9
'2012-09-14T09:39:30-04:00'
describe
'164370' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQOH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00013.jpg'
e6a72620c617c52ba82165a17637d40e
e3b5e01f3a14837b3fb347f1daeba2fc444e2db7
'2012-09-14T09:37:55-04:00'
describe
'724431' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQOI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00147.jp2'
3e44e397cf1bdc96b9ac0aead07fc509
42cef121cf7bab3bd3cd150db2259b0a28f1719e
'2012-09-14T09:38:00-04:00'
describe
'5811308' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQOJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00071.tif'
82731677683da0e22045e2ca33bd3576
c3ced5b8a56f65067be42840f1c6f119803a4fcf
'2012-09-14T09:39:14-04:00'
describe
'22691' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQOK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00002thm.jpg'
b8819a8b53a273924c9adf6cdef7cef9
61fd64c08986e286ad24ec043f91bb36d6550718
'2012-09-14T09:36:50-04:00'
describe
'724781' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQOL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00025.jp2'
8887518d879dca775075219d5f2a2cb6
25606c8406c816d6c57fefa146531061b9baab20
'2012-09-14T09:39:25-04:00'
describe
'5811528' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQOM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00067.tif'
20149ba2617b41112ff9a627c890f272
40dff64d2e156cfa07fe21e8795ba17f65289535
describe
'5810660' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQON' 'sip-filesvid00001_00179.tif'
6d8b930a11ac7692e5aabec9397dffe5
42d87db6c0a3a7b4e2c75e2fb758a8cbc5b64d0e
'2012-09-14T09:42:58-04:00'
describe
'5811648' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQOO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00029.tif'
f1497da7c0b182906a26906e06a9ac53
99fd2a459fde35462dc7e4f363f4f3bd35dd32e9
'2012-09-14T09:42:24-04:00'
describe
'5812116' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQOP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00132.tif'
3d38b4d16f4da49dd05f67bb3ab4a88d
e3eafd43681260653c9c07b4577bb114b336f0d0
'2012-09-14T09:41:11-04:00'
describe
'61443' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQOQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00075.QC.jpg'
8b671df5879f3ad765c598081d62a828
153bd97b0f804d8896b4394d48542a5f9a5cc736
describe
'60318' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQOR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00113.QC.jpg'
dd8210a4889cc6010491928f5e99b72b
d284102297c897a7d0d4e89df99b0359b3c192b3
'2012-09-14T09:43:07-04:00'
describe
'19685' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQOS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00025.pro'
1ddc5943fe9ae2e82f298cb2f8335ebf
a3397dd461d5a62216f137617d2c79659094fa3a
'2012-09-14T09:36:53-04:00'
describe
'171042' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQOT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00172.jpg'
a8007f3a76a6bb5842f871ceac2f463b
800c3050320f4be7d99e807f97fbf16a33b3ef05
'2012-09-14T09:41:09-04:00'
describe
'161762' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQOU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00177.jpg'
acb4962e4b7833abc01cacb12eb34662
bec836069a4f9cfaf35d43d44212487a8e80986c
'2012-09-14T09:39:21-04:00'
describe
'26416' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQOV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00136athm.jpg'
108d7d44e11f7d2f5ad4f4348b174967
fdcd25b19474bb8e4c07b818833995af5671c52f
'2012-09-14T09:35:53-04:00'
describe
'22851' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQOW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00160thm.jpg'
b977d51fb69b05a16a09d094661b4d7c
e7b42a04b79475fb9bc99ef56e26bf02429a4020
'2012-09-14T09:36:58-04:00'
describe
'27139' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQOX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00067.pro'
efa047d07d87dac0d3f0ddfeea2001e9
877c727c51229b51357585f08c24466f6c186928
'2012-09-14T09:42:10-04:00'
describe
'5811588' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQOY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00024.tif'
61f25ee1192d128811659b0333ea0dcb
e67f1e705391bc84bdd000d4fcbedfd84399237b
'2012-09-14T09:38:04-04:00'
describe
'19396324' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQOZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00136a.tif'
f3f444147eb1308ee775ec45a588dc57
bedde56431912e5806e4f1ba4bdff93d243dce9f
'2012-09-14T09:37:04-04:00'
describe
'1850' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQPA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00003.pro'
19e049e2d947488d9e5181b661890894
f32776d19d643ac21fd06d5044d4cfa7c70769b2
'2012-09-14T09:41:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQPB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00094.jp2'
ffc34ce1e8dc278830d6372d52618d25
47620f3c12d7b5946ce019a6e4bb71f32a46c9a8
'2012-09-14T09:39:00-04:00'
describe
'2304' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQPC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00012.txt'
3c8ab4902468d749fef2add208f193f8
1f05c4bdb0ccf9dd96f56814f165cbf24260ac29
'2012-09-14T09:39:04-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'24710' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQPD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00023thm.jpg'
0cd960ea1a3e0a34e390c8815371e37d
db2eacf8735f702c9b719f7e329c5f8177473e22
describe
'724720' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQPE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00177.jp2'
d5269302abd5f2d7e063d079b71dc11c
b1126ffdec893cad345614ce70b38161524c3d87
'2012-09-14T09:37:02-04:00'
describe
'60095' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQPF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00068.QC.jpg'
5583821199afccd84bfc4565acea2dd6
a733ef6d3ca46deadad5655b9180c7e00113c9d4
describe
'23242' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQPG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00009thm.jpg'
7114d3701973cf3d81d737b50eae909d
0963f886c5a38a5d2ffbf3b5dafea068230ce7f1
'2012-09-14T09:39:11-04:00'
describe
'382' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQPH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00173.txt'
d792d470a127a8f86865578d0d495c93
8aac1bf66d8cd09d6a607b2fcc7d71041a0c4be5
'2012-09-14T09:42:02-04:00'
describe
'61078' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQPI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00018.QC.jpg'
88b4da3fe78badef4863a3cc4037f31c
8b12e21dd89f5fe7766755b7dae1fec904f49889
'2012-09-14T09:37:36-04:00'
describe
'5811680' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQPJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00046.tif'
5d0c002dee86f71d572b83292a98c6d9
f43bb1c44d057385dc926791cd39f0f3909ed9dc
'2012-09-14T09:40:23-04:00'
describe
'2368' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQPK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00044.txt'
fe4633084d924437af7a0d508814e235
549ea2d0a4f63ab6a58253ee77b8ed0e9442f394
describe
'59524' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQPL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00150.pro'
37b0aab2049c2ec270a31df69ab3d5ae
dc6d49a44dab5d9b1d06807d1f30e0605a108427
'2012-09-14T09:37:43-04:00'
describe
'168625' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQPM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00129.jpg'
751f36928260268b32828495ff2c30f5
33eb71e08e13c0bb159a3bdf3f173bb89d02a5f2
'2012-09-14T09:38:20-04:00'
describe
'724794' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQPN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00122.jp2'
907b92448806f7236c8179cac79a93bc
8c9ea1ea23758498e7111996842ba4bb141986c4
'2012-09-14T09:40:00-04:00'
describe
'58603' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQPO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00027.pro'
114c859e71af7554386f505426ec097b
0014075530ef4aeb447aac72ce94e9801173b1b6
'2012-09-14T09:41:39-04:00'
describe
'7540' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQPP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00103.pro'
be637289fa0cf5c75e054cea87c48171
cadd4688035336876da26121289a8ef63727f86d
'2012-09-14T09:36:59-04:00'
describe
'5811860' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQPQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00111.tif'
7b8ca884908ef9b823f28b9f3221d90e
695f7ce3a8c907d70788a5853722fcf05e328c64
'2012-09-14T09:38:32-04:00'
describe
'161672' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQPR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00134.jpg'
9485257e401f0997047db79632a65f5b
3eb103f197698e2ed9623c85e9df6269f6af3568
'2012-09-14T09:37:09-04:00'
describe
'23810' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQPS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00096thm.jpg'
1e429595bd7547f3b8a46ff03ca5303e
b2eeaf8d044c9f610af690a4f35cfb35a0fafc77
'2012-09-14T09:36:38-04:00'
describe
'214043' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQPT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00136a.jp2'
515a94ce5d8a591454e3e3e54ec902c9
db24bed340033e41c7b2f3993aa88277fbab8d2a
'2012-09-14T09:40:19-04:00'
describe
'56133' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQPU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00134.pro'
6a0280c5742a0eb9b13fd24bede2f9f6
518457fba0a83a4fd2cfdf6a3bb52bd04b4c97a4
'2012-09-14T09:40:17-04:00'
describe
'56729' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQPV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00161.pro'
b113b9147c98b81e8f3950d9a62ef360
62bb0c0b458620293de28c4e19e8395d97f0b0bc
'2012-09-14T09:39:15-04:00'
describe
'724795' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQPW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00132.jp2'
9bc5d3d56674c8e6cd494e5bb866fd1b
8c2732408d206d7d3178ee7c7fb163c950820bf6
describe
'724368' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQPX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00125.jp2'
3186b1eefab37bb90a3efb915fe5a18a
c21456b558818fb29565880afe57e7933922ed04
'2012-09-14T09:40:09-04:00'
describe
'418' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQPY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00189.txt'
b8093bb07218952582a279b83ec1e2eb
aeae446d48215d014f3cd4d896625ecac75d11f4
'2012-09-14T09:37:52-04:00'
describe
'2283' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQPZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00027.txt'
befb3778331deb0235de4c50f3c7e9c9
d4601deffb15c8adb30c8416648f1519e3c29bdc
'2012-09-14T09:40:59-04:00'
describe
'19569' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQQA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00006.QC.jpg'
2f8ab63818b89eee0cb5400b4acec171
abcfd84719866fef0c8adaa50536d588f077ef77
'2012-09-14T09:41:25-04:00'
describe
'59688' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQQB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00050.pro'
3ad54c015cb6ed44f4cfa0d540df5ce8
20659ac5081b89fe5ac403a3bedd986e6cc446ca
'2012-09-14T09:36:00-04:00'
describe
'179949' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQQC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00019.jpg'
1ee6b558907b72e0b7f8d8101b790537
4bea10077df501a0b82ea59e46399efdc32360e8
'2012-09-14T09:41:02-04:00'
describe
'9770' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQQD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00173.pro'
a8ca1013d981ca0c70fe3d57a561258d
c7cbf4d29379ef7316100ebd4bd4cdd357e6a025
'2012-09-14T09:39:03-04:00'
describe
'2225' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQQE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00038.txt'
d347d3eac64037ef84d88e7f464a848d
4f0fa57197cd154e03bd37a460cce560d3d087a9
'2012-09-14T09:37:44-04:00'
describe
'58557' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQQF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00153.pro'
0c062061e087460356bed611dc907b20
6c072c5b015d3c85ca10b7c48a1d87a44eb19592
'2012-09-14T09:35:54-04:00'
describe
'58404' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQQG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00009.pro'
b70ffa50c609f9c66993f609e9de2044
1c00c4487ead81b4ab5ef6bf894f32ab83c7a962
'2012-09-14T09:41:36-04:00'
describe
'724784' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQQH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00140.jp2'
630bd17f26817ab023d82dd700d42150
37c4731f3f0d8ea7b6dac24047f25f179051b6d6
'2012-09-14T09:41:26-04:00'
describe
'50733' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQQI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00190.pro'
4eec01c752ed02b9adc2494b17418979
fc8e8a98aa6327a3ad3051dec8d1e489be526cbb
'2012-09-14T09:35:40-04:00'
describe
'22189' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQQJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00065thm.jpg'
38d02b5eb5bbc76cd313aa18418080de
4520572d64ed3cfacdc1ed4ca8ad50bf925e33bf
'2012-09-14T09:38:09-04:00'
describe
'177630' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQQK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00126.jpg'
e6524f0709193a2b36f2dde0093669ca
2839843da906cd4792fa57308c05978c0ab32cdb
'2012-09-14T09:41:37-04:00'
describe
'5811724' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQQL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00066.tif'
b4b2b8be381d6c097982281d439b5de6
9d9e53f69ca90b09a5fd8d7abe8a301861d051d0
'2012-09-14T09:40:31-04:00'
describe
'170433' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQQM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00148.jpg'
8f06a2522f5b19cee7e1584f870b50d3
78bb91de7dd9d6cf54f9ab650ebbdb8fecdb07ef
'2012-09-14T09:42:39-04:00'
describe
'61807' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQQN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00109.QC.jpg'
36cddee3d39276745ecf7318443066d0
47e40a49747f71d898d4cc332b7d50bea5a1cf08
'2012-09-14T09:43:01-04:00'
describe
'24850' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQQO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00105thm.jpg'
17494af52045d77b2247a1d5ccf0a55a
16ddeea1a16d216af1436ed81293500b930f4a9d
'2012-09-14T09:42:29-04:00'
describe
'23204' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQQP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00033thm.jpg'
3b0d2fd3ab2e7d8e74779b9719b02bcb
e86ebe2ceaa4039d747a6dc90cc649ffd9816133
describe
'5812252' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQQQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00049.tif'
410a4c906da917aa587aabe8c8d811c2
e2b29f00dc571c941e041447435931bc1fcf8566
'2012-09-14T09:37:39-04:00'
describe
'24405' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQQR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00074thm.jpg'
cd93dadce89bbd52d886b12c23192ca8
63e6b28256cb07583925df2a1e81641994a3f9a7
'2012-09-14T09:36:24-04:00'
describe
'167106' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQQS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00187.jpg'
cffd2f16bca0a859b2257c6ed6997397
6a5190c80d1fd650c3f25dae067721fde4bcaccb
describe
'2265' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQQT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00029.txt'
0b98dd22b843bd3b0ff3950912e77830
54ee9140f62c524a28ca5080af36bcd29dcf67a3
'2012-09-14T09:37:56-04:00'
describe
'5812364' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQQU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00185.tif'
ec5ecc48c641dffcd69cb9406b0bcba6
d78c50dbcba8ce53bff9753132bd6697c628121f
'2012-09-14T09:37:31-04:00'
describe
'5811884' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQQV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00062.tif'
5d15607fe6d952c7a699e1993f276dd1
6e7243e8821657cbfcbb11324658590435896c99
'2012-09-14T09:39:06-04:00'
describe
'57679' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQQW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00016.pro'
daea9a3c235d83a6c3b4caead3ab190e
c969d14c12142b489cbbd21a038117bcedd13bac
'2012-09-14T09:40:29-04:00'
describe
'1004' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQQX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00043.txt'
32b52ea0e64f3dc813e4d54c71d20620
de21b3c78903a235e1f5a50f74a5014a4cb2cace
'2012-09-14T09:40:42-04:00'
describe
'20460' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQQY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00177thm.jpg'
fd9aa5da95efc698be4dd710f25972b3
1cd80bc85f1c7a8d3ec99967e6027dff0feae18e
describe
'61984' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQQZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00128.QC.jpg'
7266717de7d7e215456367335e6fbd34
72869c76681215b939fd7bab2efa5a26e455ed45
'2012-09-14T09:37:40-04:00'
describe
'274' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQRA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00002.txt'
ac9719de5617509f536fb023f6d9250f
e22aa1f4fc90f2d9a6b4a7a5b1b478baf90aaf66
'2012-09-14T09:42:30-04:00'
describe
'724629' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQRB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00051.jp2'
9b18c7650f5a029da025013317153798
d3145211c8b51c6a30147de6aaeea8c1a28b1c3e
'2012-09-14T09:36:20-04:00'
describe
'724701' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQRC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00184.jp2'
c35975d08803e89e535530bc1a2e8fcf
c43c02ffe1a6382678ed869ace17acc20b66c37f
'2012-09-14T09:39:54-04:00'
describe
'5812056' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQRD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00070.tif'
1101437510393c18bf4f1061c9848b85
bd69c3f84ae5ca7ec905bd2f8057d8001431ed81
describe
'724696' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQRE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00086.jp2'
2e8f2c9b4fab21ebf2465b970f1a7a7c
2a2efcdd1f28ae86438f48c2dbfef5b7c0eea2a0
'2012-09-14T09:41:28-04:00'
describe
'5809820' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQRF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00172.tif'
5b49ae2e8e32a3cdb1de3de06c9ef121
8fefbe4bb857094aad687bfc8de79668f6fe3295
'2012-09-14T09:38:26-04:00'
describe
'197161' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQRG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00079.jpg'
987cb3055a9b99cf0ff90f3b35da0608
e4bea3be5b05214af6107461853d1ddb8a389c58
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQRH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00156.tif'
8e635b76e806405ac5b5c13a135b08fe
919536ce32eb9c62bed2d26864249b6a3ef807ba
'2012-09-14T09:41:51-04:00'
describe
'187249' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQRI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00008.jpg'
76968c0f6e114164d6082569f9ff4030
253415ea5d0658641256969d17267d6ac2e976a9
'2012-09-14T09:41:21-04:00'
describe
'2109' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQRJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00171.txt'
59401e6bb6cac5d348df6b870944895b
b6db7ceaf01b87dae2bc57fc467fa48e2abd7964
describe
'57737' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQRK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00156.pro'
f532f7c9b536103995999ee48a785a69
1a3b657c284731bac4f9f36572edd36f924e13de
describe
'57435' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQRL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00014.pro'
6554ec3ee536bc2613bbc6c891080cb3
3a434dd99fd9116982e9946384f16fee15c4c974
describe
'61044' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQRM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00111.QC.jpg'
b9cef9ebea9fa35a3d258128d9244731
b42a50db73cff4eb03863e0394d6f9a5beeb0a1a
'2012-09-14T09:40:20-04:00'
describe
'60393' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQRN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00132.pro'
94b6cbb74b60fed14cceb2d1170ba1b8
4611010f4ad344c51926a96766d0bf6bc86c82dc
describe
'58943' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQRO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00024.QC.jpg'
33076a1d24b1b959e3ee497583584658
144fbf05117f543c9183f3a2beb41326c8abcbe1
'2012-09-14T09:40:56-04:00'
describe
'724700' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQRP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00163.jp2'
16e24058ae69b389278cbc96855899cb
6441e51b5ef46ea91d393c83f994a719bcde5ef8
describe
'51' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQRQ' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
dc79a2d58b163b1a0162ddef51a28b2b
1508a10b8c39280e37ab037394ef8d1688488616
describe
'2219' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQRR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00112.txt'
da3509ea41fe589f2f8020ddc45e3694
95bcb1fc289e0386f3c38e878d11632ca4004c6e
'2012-09-14T09:40:14-04:00'
describe
'724783' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQRS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00134.jp2'
bb1e1acb89f72088088b47ada375e7bd
3e5e558afe50d0480c8146501e153400a4cb05ed
describe
'20727' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQRT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00179thm.jpg'
a5ad76706f384cb323ce371542255f1f
5ce2e45e8215f19ddf014b92afae297e81ae1c11
'2012-09-14T09:39:48-04:00'
describe
'155155' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQRU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00189.jpg'
99f160a1afa49c1566abec82654d7b03
40d41ab3ff62410579dcac707ec029109df90777
describe
'5810864' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQRV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00173.tif'
8b35719dbc4f5547ac4101f1344b7d70
584b5194b5ac3253fcee2a9e1e599303a1a28e1c
'2012-09-14T09:40:25-04:00'
describe
'10598' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQRW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00189.pro'
50e6b0cdf513a5aeae20bed287bd7821
d1f9e3a98893410b32c5c4923f5387b41a3974fe
'2012-09-14T09:36:18-04:00'
describe
'57421' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQRX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00072.pro'
d9de36fe539055f0d53f9576967dc35b
b192aa589ba965cea93898ed3f22344508849695
'2012-09-14T09:39:37-04:00'
describe
'724676' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQRY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00022.jp2'
7e40a98b7c30afcecbd61f4ac3856142
3dd302d5ee60a90f8a918f103641f7c86ea299f4
'2012-09-14T09:39:56-04:00'
describe
'724807' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQRZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00052.jp2'
aa404c3bca026451a42f3de4842acf83
ed7583c963fa74cbd92a928b5c2e3e41fb9a8b07
'2012-09-14T09:36:27-04:00'
describe
'59297' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQSA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00122.pro'
6d013b1f24b4f509140dd82d6f502017
708cb1d8a6abaa81588b80f44da486e4627059e9
describe
'46872' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQSB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00183.QC.jpg'
77fae15d7d713c9e18fc8d74200a06be
b34ab31e17496b8c676725c5ff9f8b5fe0e5fc83
'2012-09-14T09:38:55-04:00'
describe
'63200' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQSC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00019.QC.jpg'
152fc01c8c58cb0c644f3517c2087b13
4fc0217c814e996db79f8b7c406ef7eb34199117
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQSD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00011.pro'
92748e4eff84d733c464111a6bffd41c
8cd0e96fe6039491cc0b0c59ddf61c260f900a57
describe
'175572' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQSE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00088.jpg'
8aeb0f48f98962a1fff22e847fef55b9
82dba210f043e7052bebd703d2bfbc7c5d4d53f9
'2012-09-14T09:39:17-04:00'
describe
'1702' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQSF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00037.pro'
3e4c5110dae0fd7927dba28f1b26c8d9
92f91a5fcc11bf77e948a777ae4240342076e9d5
describe
'5810852' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQSG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00041.tif'
3173ffdedbdb0fcf3d763661be8e7938
ee7c0d464d2ff09a0a55bb73089ba1480a68eda0
'2012-09-14T09:40:10-04:00'
describe
'26270' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQSH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00013.pro'
5f411b43033503733927cef00bf6c8fd
1f1406c9291e7ae745742790e29ee2ccc3b18e9e
describe
'724798' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQSI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00156.jp2'
1079183605d368f5346acb23616730f1
c83cb194e60eef3c601f8cd080be8e191c20b057
'2012-09-14T09:41:38-04:00'
describe
'57539' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQSJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00163.pro'
c1a24b70e62d8ac45c152b3d2dbead65
e2862c842c416dca042513cbbb648a287a002d6c
'2012-09-14T09:38:19-04:00'
describe
'60039' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQSK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00028.QC.jpg'
fdf32e56b2842ee6ae8caed52cf0ebc3
437945f6bd1699dfed2ecdd5595c3cb04e877812
'2012-09-14T09:40:32-04:00'
describe
'349' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQSL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00167.txt'
7f7ea482e35b99aec60542faa7c30ea9
611523d8bf7d7fbf3b62c59dfa61894d6605c7ec
'2012-09-14T09:37:45-04:00'
describe
'25882' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQSM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00047.pro'
7e403bb3e008d237a9ec583e5ff6719f
9e38e0eecfc2847e3b76b8b8f984b60b124f295f
'2012-09-14T09:37:06-04:00'
describe
'724689' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQSN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00149.jp2'
3d5e1ec6191c04b9d40c179acfa1fd2b
1b84f74c97db3888228fd50f2f7aa9e1b796a86c
'2012-09-14T09:41:19-04:00'
describe
'165789' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQSO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00119.jpg'
ad9306901c261fa08e4f8c43d8848e7f
9d2e23c02474c1501f0c29d1999ecf18e9bdeb84
'2012-09-14T09:42:38-04:00'
describe
'23702' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQSP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00171thm.jpg'
c98de5380ee6bbce4c21161cf2578760
ec5e890a2c248f7be007ee5f98e489056a27e64e
describe
'931' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQSQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00164.txt'
4dad42c53b94b44b86e17651290dc716
09b5f94a981d5d20e8f90f51a5cee22570e0e7d5
'2012-09-14T09:41:59-04:00'
describe
'22085' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQSR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00040thm.jpg'
c7f254d7fd081807cc1f5d8861cf6d3d
0600d254e047501c290ee52d4a99644e7fa9eb81
describe
'20302' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQSS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00181thm.jpg'
9bbb33a85cf3f8e045fc2374838eb7dd
0c93ee190073e93080b8dbf385f30b007f464982
describe
'724804' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQST' 'sip-filesvid00001_00039.jp2'
ad1bebde4de61b8793337841fc0c08de
c358162d6261c3296e5c02b3d37546e8627692b6
'2012-09-14T09:36:02-04:00'
describe
'51424' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQSU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00093.QC.jpg'
e1693599a9f86e783b5f11e37bf33280
e763a57c09fa108fb9c3113b3e3b30a3e1a3d86e
'2012-09-14T09:37:26-04:00'
describe
'724744' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQSV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00126.jp2'
01d80fc6207e39f61ca1b034377844ac
5e15934a73312ac0d7a15c69414ada6327581554
describe
'724768' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQSW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00114.jp2'
1aff8bd9d0e514fe6de8157d508300ff
4b4af1a72ddc6a3bab0352f8c22634dc3e962476
'2012-09-14T09:38:14-04:00'
describe
'171082' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQSX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00136.jpg'
dfb20dbd967968896f7eccfe912cf780
30a18c7b687bee448cd3af6d8061e2d95392a46a
'2012-09-14T09:35:50-04:00'
describe
'48758' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQSY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00055.QC.jpg'
f5dc815e41b36bb80bf7250b98874941
bd84191364c69f14299eb10fd10194b9951b4c1d
'2012-09-14T09:42:50-04:00'
describe
'3922' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQSZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00005.pro'
49b57946d5f1091a7fb2aa26bb521751
287562a2a8364f6acaa0c3fe9ff646cbb7cd977c
'2012-09-14T09:41:50-04:00'
describe
'114077' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQTA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00125.jpg'
02cdfca517bab131758ee26b66658bdb
1361865461fc5189aa943e104f817bc6195ed348
'2012-09-14T09:37:34-04:00'
describe
'64499' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQTB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00091.QC.jpg'
436f06a6e7c0d2378009344b3d3ca79d
56576a1483a86f597de1752fdf68a2f7e465f370
'2012-09-14T09:39:35-04:00'
describe
'2326' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQTC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00128.txt'
0077b78103b0314b681f00f0a4517dd8
a12eec7acb02d46f0be4062f2d21e65f731c3764
'2012-09-14T09:39:53-04:00'
describe
'21979' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQTD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00117thm.jpg'
9c7faf2e42599d625225d784cc0e971f
75e3c76f131755b86749935fe24b1464cf6db19c
'2012-09-14T09:37:24-04:00'
describe
'60161' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQTE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00174.QC.jpg'
6927f59970242260386bc022bccfb1ae
8ede512659ed3b07a6590e3c96f63e987f1d7602
'2012-09-14T09:35:56-04:00'
describe
'189149' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQTF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00060.jpg'
e2eb516c0515fea35d9a3efc11b6e9cd
1e5a4c9b4e7443c0f70cf84d2f4381a974456ddd
describe
'58909' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQTG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00012.pro'
1fde462fd239eb4e4300f4ce84fb64f4
eed48cc7920d42e5688226108bba78a4b5339989
'2012-09-14T09:41:57-04:00'
describe
'724780' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQTH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00028.jp2'
6ebd20dd4a429c640ab73a973b7904b5
77cc27ee2920a99b77e271f48ec6e905bf2eab1e
'2012-09-14T09:36:04-04:00'
describe
'173414' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQTI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00147.jpg'
f9c3e0bc5e1554f70ee43d0151fe4ccf
df20b9afda38c5380236f556bf462ce4cc2574d2
'2012-09-14T09:37:00-04:00'
describe
'49911' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQTJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00179.QC.jpg'
80803fada42c416437d3d882afd807e3
e35d7a6a87edeecfcd35375fe80669f129e84443
describe
'24496' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQTK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00099thm.jpg'
6222f08647e8483b3594c26cd865cfa8
e63bacc9639088960e0c363f9a4535a2abaa95d9
describe
'2401' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQTL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00040.txt'
5bfaea0b148eba9f0736d2fff487a472
c27f06e65f277db9d038738f57bb4a122b9bc770
'2012-09-14T09:37:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQTM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00137.jp2'
965cbb14b42ff50e06bd61e5411fef20
68ffb630d8cf41991c8d4d030077a29d152aba45
'2012-09-14T09:37:17-04:00'
describe
'147' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQTN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00093.txt'
fc807381320f40853aea51dc8778d9ac
bd0f8d18deefe524ef0966748814560cb5d14537
'2012-09-14T09:38:58-04:00'
describe
'173626' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQTO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00178.jpg'
adae68731956f9af4f391f0bf0bef063
a1098c60ed1a60e260bd3c7e6e921acc99b12797
'2012-09-14T09:39:59-04:00'
describe
'2399' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQTP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00090.txt'
7b7fbe9d35709a45e04a78927e6d8b17
650fd046737491e77835a93254c24e3942025737
describe
'585' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQTQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00183.txt'
7bde97aaad67a3b53145ae186c24860c
2de18640420a9356ef6114f9146ecd0118d80929
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQTR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00094.pro'
0e4c2e5e694c0a560d46c8ac2eae906a
91216f464e1ddcced8ec04348bc9fc2ec193b657
describe
'56585' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQTS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00186.pro'
37829bfcef1b818c19e51bde06137fb9
9a5d22f205cdef24524f52363f338c57447b00ac
'2012-09-14T09:42:17-04:00'
describe
'185988' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQTT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00107.jpg'
6120edbdf8d9c11561e3f19a839af4a0
a9fa520461ef554f46fcf18530631b5c45ca4551
describe
'169069' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQTU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00024.jpg'
9fe8a614ebe770e4d37874615c372653
9d1b50a75a9078795519f679f3360861c52fc101
describe
'724530' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQTV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00091.jp2'
7e32e5a7b48c7f6d01a31e6135b76ed7
bbad34e3327114d233fdf5e7d0ce38d123c5ed45
'2012-09-14T09:39:36-04:00'
describe
'5810916' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQTW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00131.tif'
96eb9ad1861c048dbcd6550b97ab2e7f
38789b0f357befbb24d347197f504ea6cea6daf3
'2012-09-14T09:38:08-04:00'
describe
'5812024' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQTX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00128.tif'
e6ffb69977a4b1511aafafd97f3efa6d
5b3106e3d46184def0de46f2a9bbc46c084f27ee
'2012-09-14T09:41:22-04:00'
describe
'5812068' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQTY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00052.tif'
fcd558717b62159025c0c511d747eca5
a7c659b285b8dbbc61a55a30ed444609b0c67a91
'2012-09-14T09:38:17-04:00'
describe
'884' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQTZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00125.pro'
078761ac03c55d1eb95f40a64fd85609
42d73352d361574b0dfd586b2457ef14863a80c9
describe
'24474' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQUA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00053thm.jpg'
79692917785fb0c29603dcb7dcfc04da
add73f4fc347204da82e4e1c96f3f87fbb504332
'2012-09-14T09:37:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQUB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00036.jp2'
91f451a0cd8e08580496310bad9ce6c5
3954f199a8a5f11159e95b7f7c5dc54a00d5eda4
'2012-09-14T09:37:37-04:00'
describe
'724755' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQUC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00027.jp2'
59cbcc726038392bdc065d6add65a03f
fbd9ebbcf8a41c5ac19a6e8a75298ba1060a388c
'2012-09-14T09:42:08-04:00'
describe
'24145' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQUD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00086thm.jpg'
8e8f0259afde572bfb2d5cb8d878b0fd
0418cfc43a72f0eca8fbc38de73a40835d6c8d79
describe
'57678' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQUE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00066.pro'
ca73711043df3d6ad1adf44f99a11add
3870cde34212f624544486b2c6a3ac3238e7c208
'2012-09-14T09:36:12-04:00'
describe
'61546' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQUF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00091.pro'
bafc5ab1894223bcbabdcb88d15f6d69
887684200c5dd9c813cf9b6f7ddc6c6e83c898ab
'2012-09-14T09:40:36-04:00'
describe
'24060' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQUG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00094thm.jpg'
d926e5e989eb5004dd4ecd0c5027a503
aaebd0901c8debf9bdc5182bd72b488471d2adf8
'2012-09-14T09:39:50-04:00'
describe
'5812064' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQUH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00124.tif'
9ed365209356cb6b7483527eb87b7752
5f348a0f5081bb4309ca4e95b7efc3c2d035f4fd
'2012-09-14T09:37:35-04:00'
describe
'181815' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQUI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00166.jpg'
89897104bd19f2232dce1622fb730277
548eeab186e21eb12a520e0daf268bbdf5e8cf31
'2012-09-14T09:38:36-04:00'
describe
'23592' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQUJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00046thm.jpg'
3113e79e0879c3068db50198e89bc2be
1aef4a8f35653b8b2e3a515fe5abf5167ddcc607
describe
'185917' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQUK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00094.jpg'
0663dc9dd6f2ff0c2126a97cb3c2043a
d0bfbebf7d03ac4c32f516b6b11cb0751bcb5530
'2012-09-14T09:42:14-04:00'
describe
'62081' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQUL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00086.QC.jpg'
c97837ebbf4702dad667bb4fabdf8b0f
3f32f56cbd3776a91211f06f7bb6c1ca1db5c9da
describe
'23363' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQUM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00048thm.jpg'
3f8653a00519130b87d4ce32c2b37aea
a565dea51061be9c4fd946856ca368b14a1f1b5b
'2012-09-14T09:41:04-04:00'
describe
'174024' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQUN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00159.jpg'
2df83dcc733f8d41819131291a8066e8
4033b877f2c0a462477a333519ad1d059e6955e1
'2012-09-14T09:39:28-04:00'
describe
'5812304' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQUO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00184.tif'
1e1373724dd355b8e33dd119f234c85a
228da3a1ca43d34b7fba2d5302841a18bd390cee
'2012-09-14T09:40:24-04:00'
describe
'21927' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQUP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00143thm.jpg'
7f841ce5ae7b3ac03ec330a9846a75dc
5297bd3cdf069b725e8b2e4c26e6b5216b2c0fde
'2012-09-14T09:37:13-04:00'
describe
'724423' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQUQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00100.jp2'
fb7cf32a160c0d8771b7ac3626aeaec8
d90d756ed535cc0840c5b8b7e75446eba7374c7f
'2012-09-14T09:38:35-04:00'
describe
'60560' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQUR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00085.QC.jpg'
1f087fe9d72b677d0bc90e4028542fb2
3473acd51b197694c500a99ac1c8785e248bd347
'2012-09-14T09:40:40-04:00'
describe
'724670' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQUS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00162.jp2'
9722fe9fd594b806a1efe1120bd1aaf7
392bf9937ef7d05b92269a695eaa2a03281b6fff
'2012-09-14T09:37:58-04:00'
describe
'20260' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQUT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00158thm.jpg'
aaef7687306e453a8b1bdc5828933408
79ab0dd3b5d781528bebe5102f24b894a959597c
describe
'5810768' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQUU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00093.tif'
c1e8c4d977b5d3c2e7b137ff8dd537cf
d62f52cc23db34c6403a124fb1fb9e5c1997667a
describe
'5811312' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQUV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00015.tif'
15546fcc43b04bf2de75edb24061f2f6
7217f09d62c75d0dd00961008d46f963b45f7e10
'2012-09-14T09:39:51-04:00'
describe
'990' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQUW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00017.txt'
d278ce130fcc09d45c6b64ece07ccdd8
248fc215c8466d69eac25aa3ee9966d0c6f41fe2
describe
'23303' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQUX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00161thm.jpg'
8afcd146f25146a71b044cb35a27ae75
7bf8653459f53a50fffb28c92f807f277543b7c7
'2012-09-14T09:38:22-04:00'
describe
'49274' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQUY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00170.QC.jpg'
82649338c30a8fd4114114e733786f79
bb9044aa94fd243d2bdd080d7ccd27ec0fa8635c
'2012-09-14T09:42:33-04:00'
describe
'2255' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQUZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00076.txt'
7c4712f402ea22e1d53c26a3491506ca
6a0fa56eaf2010c8fd5237db6203bd605e0cd368
describe
'23892' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQVA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00018thm.jpg'
5680ceb2292cae6b79338f6a1b3eadf3
4ba982e54ed11cb072a5111b51f328dbc82f7ee9
'2012-09-14T09:36:06-04:00'
describe
'23151' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQVB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00067thm.jpg'
649a951d4053814ca93cedda76f01574
d0f9441c9b59637c6d787d2cad4dacdbbd0ec445
'2012-09-14T09:39:31-04:00'
describe
'60220' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQVC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00082.pro'
c8188cc0938762f9c95d88d31d3783ee
e27cac4e6a1b55f1bc71dfa02d21519ead033095
'2012-09-14T09:42:57-04:00'
describe
'57269' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQVD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00036.pro'
2d60b6bebb542afc311aeed6baf90da2
12e896bbb6c364406b608891b9406e492ef51f5d
'2012-09-14T09:40:26-04:00'
describe
'5811952' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQVE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00178.tif'
9f8ec1e0a160d6e267824f85ea22c84a
51e8adf4d82332b6338faf074ad622b069f1b0df
'2012-09-14T09:41:32-04:00'
describe
'178031' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQVF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00171.jpg'
db6f2bcf0940a91a09da4b4675e2664d
290b4319c03363a712be1351ce8e20ef3309c18b
'2012-09-14T09:41:03-04:00'
describe
'24234' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQVG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00070thm.jpg'
03723ee9309e0f14073f44b09b850200
2fffee3cdb896561790540097f2af8bfdb57ab80
'2012-09-14T09:39:47-04:00'
describe
'5810744' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQVH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00189.tif'
eb0806a1ae4fb84263f65766d36da75b
23243d361f6faa529dd365c71eeb6e26c6f8f517
'2012-09-14T09:37:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQVI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00084.txt'
869c153bf8b9b998e8921df561789407
501a318ed04d93cc1727aed2add0237cb45ecc72
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQVJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00074.jp2'
d1f8a4bd0077d8096f6ee26779b34b08
36eeea41981b351593352c334f9aea79cfc3b4eb
'2012-09-14T09:39:16-04:00'
describe
'21022' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQVK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00187thm.jpg'
4ee0ee30ac0702aa3e82a8008a1d850a
4ac7e885ee9caf34b460bc2be53debfc99be6b04
'2012-09-14T09:40:27-04:00'
describe
'23975' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQVL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00020thm.jpg'
782476e08c4efe415e2bd0ac5cb84347
e004b27b615cbf8739db1ad5f2571cddb7dce834
describe
'724793' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQVM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00015.jp2'
45ca9a6fe14b92339a4edec3bd77228b
66e99664dd0a8dc13f75d265c8d9bd088011ee2d
'2012-09-14T09:41:15-04:00'
describe
'61295' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQVN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00154.QC.jpg'
0525e14165ed4feab4f3658758fa8baa
18213f2c412620e4e4541311639915b0cd46ff13
'2012-09-14T09:42:23-04:00'
describe
'724348' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQVO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00035.jp2'
f4e48f34a2a5edeeb59d7f4cb5466f29
447713f4ada4a52cc6b205d8e976c57011467c97
'2012-09-14T09:38:31-04:00'
describe
'133871' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQVP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00005.jpg'
a57b496e3f12e788dd56292df010662b
c957931e6a43993ec61fc6f1ad36f941a792d1f4
describe
'20447' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQVQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00133thm.jpg'
78fa871b0307a9835b3a7f7b5ea76989
9cd73ac55f3410eba47ef40b41ccc05ebf4becdf
'2012-09-14T09:42:35-04:00'
describe
'5811576' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQVR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00084.tif'
229b058ff3f494f3beb8496e381f278b
805b446379faab2bc2956b9fda2350e543e11512
'2012-09-14T09:35:47-04:00'
describe
'658' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQVS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00181.txt'
2889fe4df860b7cae36acad1768b61cf
2e8538e38447bae5a9f7dcf57699c160f1ba83ef
'2012-09-14T09:39:33-04:00'
describe
'5811872' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQVT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00148.tif'
f159924a4d8f23aec8caf2b145798355
fdc19ffa48a2f20fc0ef69468bb68ccf83b8b092
'2012-09-14T09:37:22-04:00'
describe
'724787' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQVU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00160.jp2'
020a6e8e21625b11c80e02bc5256e62e
f3350530a2d7ec051f5210f1ce2a07cb97bbdc57
describe
'8704' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQVV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00004thm.jpg'
b1f24b5efd3e68d989cb972840507dfa
38eb447e3a8ae92e83a71672d75e090fab6d87fa
describe
'23624' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQVW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00169thm.jpg'
516f873e41ca83891efbcca1d93611a3
fb922faabf533d329f3f5ba976d5987992681489
'2012-09-14T09:40:22-04:00'
describe
'724713' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQVX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00128.jp2'
da53ff9ab27ea50cdbc38a3ec965161d
280cf00930496a2f4b74bd047113109b735370e5
describe
'23728' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQVY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00089thm.jpg'
827f48d8701b622c4b0ecf34ad92acb0
94e9a328da6a54db8bd10a1a88785e8b1b31e5ea
describe
'2215' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQVZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00108.txt'
0b695d29d0f5318ed753a0cfaa2e154e
cef5e0f9d346827c52a522400fb1062da0418183
describe
'2325' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQWA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00008.txt'
cdcd14fdfba7f7fa72e3985b641dcc71
db4242f5f59e9c4897871851e4e56a307a5aa9df
'2012-09-14T09:38:01-04:00'
describe
'2192' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQWB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00165.txt'
1fe84ea608e09efdd67c2c0463fe071b
291b380da5cfc38e6669622fc8cd22dd87a4d5be
'2012-09-14T09:37:10-04:00'
describe
'53293' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQWC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00013.QC.jpg'
943df0f432a1d33dffc12c251c31b364
3c0e0424571e50321ccf61d44d5174adc3492fc7
'2012-09-14T09:42:04-04:00'
describe
'163631' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQWD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00146.jpg'
ec8e56f931fe76ffe44aba4d989dcf4b
bbc35928a07147253c2450d00e02a344c5092318
'2012-09-14T09:43:03-04:00'
describe
'724786' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQWE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00098.jp2'
9471c00143510c84d0459364fc632c4a
62af804d735beb26a8937f5222c1086039487c6a
describe
'175947' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQWF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00174.jpg'
c72ac2f2087fa37b18e090b4e5283dc7
60cfb9b1dcd1d9dffb1c477b24aad9d6136fa63f
describe
'56332' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQWG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00190.QC.jpg'
d396a9b0272b01055ad72aea8632c4b9
1c2a178bc9580ea277330aa7f7e28cb88f58e921
'2012-09-14T09:36:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQWH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00176.jp2'
1261d2404082235ea308319b7fcd52b9
c45f47ab8ee0253102fee309d2c0abe701a1eb44
'2012-09-14T09:37:07-04:00'
describe
'60458' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQWI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00089.pro'
10e8d3db91be0bb5e4691681251632e3
4a027479d73c0bf720700077f254f486813ea71a
'2012-09-14T09:41:44-04:00'
describe
'2301' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQWJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00016.txt'
3f23a1edbde82b23c18939dc95a8b01c
bc88562a6637192a9fa747cbacbe77560bc16203
describe
'166244' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQWK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00104.jpg'
8e289731e9da606484ea39f1c731f2bc
6afc5b1454ae2369910e52d96d6f1817d00c9f57
'2012-09-14T09:42:40-04:00'
describe
'724723' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQWL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00144.jp2'
6852ae1b3f60e98d64e93a54932a7fbe
b95be9074ebc79a0f4f7f916a9d212975dcb13d1
describe
'5810984' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQWM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00040.tif'
e0c3273883b6c54641bcf246d0983c42
4612701456ac5d030899fae3c2d8ffdab0ead49b
describe
'57011' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQWN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00084.pro'
51b2ed67d7fe9d265db292acb35522e2
cd2582294e22cd66b1ea0ba26865fe412c2f5fad
describe
'56362' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQWO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00064.pro'
19ef5d8c82b6f1cef5cd0f4f10c373ad
2d70909ff7e491eb21d3243c937568b3123c1dd7
describe
'23467' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQWP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00042thm.jpg'
1c15801e687acd5222a7464a71d91a06
e87321701370e6b22c98b70c61d85f6728734159
describe
'56528' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQWQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00046.pro'
86bff441709711615d04118de07951d1
0b64e89a18064030db757725e99b571347ba7c07
describe
'170659' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQWR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00167.jpg'
7e72e47059f2ef12d20fd35e33acfe12
b9b05d1d0d9840f507301e1d1ce9633470b59a30
describe
'23280' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQWS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00090thm.jpg'
6d974fe2f5c595ecc5fee99bfd2a56c0
139c0ea9e1769da9ddf204a08c01779e0597dd99
'2012-09-14T09:38:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQWT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00112.tif'
435b1255de06022af3f8893238a2f65e
465254398993645ba30790cd6bac98e7e507af52
'2012-09-14T09:35:52-04:00'
describe
'59088' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQWU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00059.pro'
65f2b1e1f68260fb3f2ebd2c98aef32b
86384f93bb5f6114f844098557990cba2d05a084
describe
'2332' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQWV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00168.txt'
3bd25bafe1b996cf5e32788382323fcf
c9ad475fa880cffee85572230ff70df306b2f46c
describe
'724704' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQWW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00138.jp2'
413dfe16a45a934bfe5273314db276ff
adba8e661600a0b0055b68772910204eb09139c8
'2012-09-14T09:41:00-04:00'
describe
'50378' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQWX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00017.QC.jpg'
2e66a824269c20697dc81b0c858db10b
6a6c9e8dfe8d27d6fe4ac21f97e24ab16aff918e
describe
'174258' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQWY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00109.jpg'
9b9f6ffd2fac6abce46afecf7adaccef
83bd68d98474db2b94fc58eeb7e700ebcfeb246f
describe
'127' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQWZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00125.txt'
6ed8a6b7ab42e57c897900e588346fbf
faaea4c5b54f6fdf746d663536796931619a5b35
'2012-09-14T09:37:46-04:00'
describe
'57979' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQXA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00028.pro'
494d68d0f3e78fbfb29603412c500596
b09b4edcf2c531215bec89e9497ae61ad5d80186
describe
'56840' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQXB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00119.pro'
0c11e919b70a8b72a8f6f147c9ce9322
dfb94a0f5c7d9ba33dfbfd23e83a5cf66171c36c
'2012-09-14T09:39:43-04:00'
describe
'724447' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQXC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00161.jp2'
ead10ce68a6ab36f6c2bf55ba6f8de44
4f1d788d3c7f4dd20e9bb662e432ee8d9435648b
describe
'184537' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQXD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00073.jpg'
a49fc5126d9fe0e61332cea35199dbd2
e2d94ee96c9b7a69fa35a6b28d888a657958ad1b
describe
'2105' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQXE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00010.txt'
50625d10a9460b70f9ba5a1f58c0333f
b02f6aca76808ffb6e528ed8384f0cab8f78d846
describe
'167380' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQXF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00026.jpg'
fe2fc8c855e1602dde492f3f1862e148
bb90578e30cabd223359af5821158e8a4b3d9c14
'2012-09-14T09:39:29-04:00'
describe
'2216' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQXG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00119.txt'
aae1bbf2608426cc4940cf752d6bb942
76c3e27d0cc80849bd7ea2f2f299c41f09803de8
'2012-09-14T09:42:37-04:00'
describe
'21057' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQXH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00041thm.jpg'
447713d53bc396a54c01a9842c70dbfe
07dbb4be1a35a8c63609f23ff5989826cccb17de
describe
'561' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQXI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00160.txt'
bb84675d1b6871e483ffd051984ab4e2
df278427f37b4216d884224ce92447569b6ec4e0
describe
'2270' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQXJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00174.txt'
f58fc5c7db9cfa3e07bcf0603269f8e2
ac51d034669614b668aebe0e6de12427b7f4b693
'2012-09-14T09:42:11-04:00'
describe
'58738' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQXK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00074.pro'
7a3b58141f9f2c0c1fe67f86ef2e7c72
a02083f89d30f914d0d5c9153c7d98d26a9a35fc
'2012-09-14T09:37:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQXL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00188.jp2'
5980dcc5d9268de06a0c041ddb15cc4e
407aa129019980320d91d6910815ac727450edd1
describe
'5810400' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQXM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00005.tif'
49053b678bec24e9e00f5b13fa4eed12
c77be8605eb537a5d604fd6f5b7746d796e69c63
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQXN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00164.jp2'
d08158dccab0ec245af4d7c5e51847f8
a6c20c4e248a6c10504758a0dc2e3499d64b3146
'2012-09-14T09:41:30-04:00'
describe
'58326' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQXO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00072.QC.jpg'
74f748bb3b673d2773291fafd2c29be3
6625187cff47f5241d5eabc382d35c903caf82de
describe
'58791' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQXP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00080.QC.jpg'
9ae2d50606c898971aaba9eaed409167
83d447da7319aa6c311bf88a214dda3458ccddca
'2012-09-14T09:40:49-04:00'
describe
'5811880' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQXQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00110.tif'
ac79da9f9484e55bfdf52009e61516f9
fc8a8919a1d9c14023e7db95b280809998b92062
'2012-09-14T09:43:06-04:00'
describe
'5811204' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQXR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00034.tif'
322674516320afa63d15ef4f2ccc88f6
c18dfbeb83835767a83e9b8bb249696362b81103
describe
'59648' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQXS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00176.QC.jpg'
bc18809a8b9dec4b8294cec12ec09c17
0540a6e8f7bbb96b2ca515a0ea24d2f88c224950
'2012-09-14T09:41:43-04:00'
describe
'21384' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQXT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00004.jpg'
dba2b24e3cdff867aeeef75e1416811d
311a2a90ca25e2c568f676adb1ad3706d4f027d9
describe
'60183' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQXU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00089.QC.jpg'
67ee8b0ade8b0487f5ed4868560e50d3
21d2a9efb4cffacbaf09de561150e9811518e4b7
'2012-09-14T09:42:45-04:00'
describe
'61313' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQXV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00166.pro'
c2425aba60882d4d29d40fd0db69c2d1
17904174bf17709091d898caa9c6c8c38bbd1748
'2012-09-14T09:37:41-04:00'
describe
'24231' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQXW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00052thm.jpg'
f2a43eba974ba422f1cf976c31c9d8d6
1e81e43b09bb7f3dc5ca9c50f235b1b43ace22e5
describe
'59495' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQXX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00044.pro'
56e43515bf7043ca7ae19b0cf77115da
e1eddc947ac89373dbf7a73ac16f0cd89a822a23
'2012-09-14T09:42:56-04:00'
describe
'5811912' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQXY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00092.tif'
2058976b66a61fbcab12432a176c59e7
7ff655f91e3684ffe47f59c0dc759875029dfd60
'2012-09-14T09:41:40-04:00'
describe
'5807552' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQXZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00035.tif'
27955abf8190e51abb1626d9222013ca
2a09796b875fd238219ebffe891359e881cd57a8
describe
'168104' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQYA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00112.jpg'
53c6ad1c618382e13e9b5ed13b78a740
7fd16f3529cfe5df9de340322eff82c5193027f3
describe
'58353' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQYB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00024.pro'
9a4c30dae1cdc109ec2b69e1f47454f7
1fcd95082de1ec6997fac735c40b32031f1ae058
'2012-09-14T09:35:43-04:00'
describe
'5806940' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQYC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00006.tif'
acbe72076ba05ff1b771341f2a692635
e5b25834e16208dbd27c39833d63280232e653f1
'2012-09-14T09:38:18-04:00'
describe
'61088' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQYD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00156.QC.jpg'
3684d7a70075c46e2d2852d3074f105f
011368b9d8ee7f8e55957d0fa786a44774c90043
describe
'5811920' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQYE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00180.tif'
81490a0fe160bbd60f82096395481474
7eebe4b024ca766f67b174de7582ecf6fee8b618
describe
'59362' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQYF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00012.QC.jpg'
c024943ac41e014b0c652c7d168ad9f1
030bbc89a0e1f4b2bcb48d57f654a41c6c83cd1d
'2012-09-14T09:36:31-04:00'
describe
'58476' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQYG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00180.pro'
856b44a11cfec1a50c39fc9ca85e51ca
87512cb8093dec39e81600765daf31d9640810d5
'2012-09-14T09:39:39-04:00'
describe
'23842' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQYH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00180thm.jpg'
8964a2191f342bab021b646dfa462dd5
5c791f36004f0953aabdb97b6faf83b4cfc1318e
describe
'25082' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQYI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00123thm.jpg'
357e553b81ead2beabee2a0d0d5d7dd9
be4b8dff73e4e75f9ade1ed8afd3bd3a2801afca
'2012-09-14T09:41:31-04:00'
describe
'1992' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQYJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00190.txt'
d94a0ccc9bce02ae2224a04a8094f5ac
9c052423a2904d3d2ead12de85eeac41f466ad60
describe
'23434' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQYK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00100thm.jpg'
95c6072abe68f987fc36210aa98f025e
db8fe4d194e06d16364c03d774efeac4c179ba37
'2012-09-14T09:40:16-04:00'
describe
'57782' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQYL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00116.pro'
3a42d5dceb2a05c0779ad239f838d10b
bbdbcfd5427e8a00433d5fc4bba2eac68dbe474b
describe
'724632' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQYM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00013.jp2'
12c3e6e22b4c287892ddddb843130aaa
ff4db43ed3a22a41cc7353a0ac6994a4a3a8d070
describe
'59398' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQYN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00008.pro'
1c4e255bca33a69bafcb6e8f157127ac
feceb59e6948888149443a9bf48e419cff449119
'2012-09-14T09:43:16-04:00'
describe
'174282' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQYO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00191.jpg'
d7ee92f654ac7d3eb481c8a428d2902a
8f646bc0b823cbc2fda4116497246f1b45d2b1ea
describe
'5811944' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQYP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00154.tif'
864fe4c5c89ad62bc66c5dd5b85e1ea2
bbc0b360112b7cad3548e0542770f47243c49c75
'2012-09-14T09:43:18-04:00'
describe
'21799' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQYQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00139thm.jpg'
7c2941d5f1738bbe31c9e3684945a10e
a84f89de7c280b4e358d045c7d3cdc588a9a4b6a
'2012-09-14T09:38:53-04:00'
describe
'1240' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQYR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00051.pro'
c527326fa7faa3ca7a3eed29df8d3f3c
1764d48b495426a8c9c49feb6edb659033d4a6b4
'2012-09-14T09:39:19-04:00'
describe
'5811688' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQYS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00039.tif'
8703eabaf2ddfc700931b38b508604a9
54fd7100725746fd76a2a1cbd7d63bacd34506e3
'2012-09-14T09:38:51-04:00'
describe
'60366' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQYT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00098.pro'
0988c62b80c3c86d6f49f62d9cade3c2
898a8658d87a3b162213cb364070636f701660fb
describe
'57574' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQYU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00023.pro'
2e1844161d96f109f100605771250ec9
46cdb4e05c4532d324ce393020b52506eb18dfbf
'2012-09-14T09:37:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQYV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00074.tif'
6901ca206b574957cd170f15c355ff27
26686b05802bf59382b6b10dd059aed3f0f379d3
'2012-09-14T09:35:42-04:00'
describe
'5811092' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQYW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00117.tif'
bf56550a93df1465ab4e44b41dbb6bcc
012306298057f9831f6fd63d9f5c9020cd65651b
describe
'2202' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQYX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00064.txt'
50be58cf6f9433c65be192181a966231
3eed0aad6df1d4994871abc317a1a795b008b248
'2012-09-14T09:40:51-04:00'
describe
'5811340' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQYY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00031.tif'
d721fb7bd7c5b7163a4df3e5b3060566
cf6a08de15cf4360dde35460676b0029798cebe5
'2012-09-14T09:40:11-04:00'
describe
'11228' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQYZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00006thm.jpg'
fc896446f5724904f09713cb7ada07fb
0d2a239e5dd52a3d1fdf8343318bae6aac74702c
describe
'724730' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQZA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00190.jp2'
4512b96983eb71f86d933f9a035e6f03
2d551845c6023c74138e8063d53d1cf60b4b3dfc
'2012-09-14T09:42:44-04:00'
describe
'14567' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQZB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00149.pro'
afe971ba747f4da46de7f27726d72510
0779f422b59f842ec4647b2ccc433fe13caff8ef
describe
'60404' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQZC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00180.QC.jpg'
624711dcd8fc9bb575838242d156f9b7
90eb8f68935d8455aecff79e8e6efb68c09dfba7
'2012-09-14T09:35:57-04:00'
describe
'168176' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQZD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00095.jpg'
a507c9ab4f02a532867fe1979d6039c2
9c33016f0aa292d4b4606166bf8856f3c19251bc
'2012-09-14T09:36:25-04:00'
describe
'2277' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQZE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00054.txt'
6a430aa743bbdf3bc51ca46c66466ece
4664b88455635e55dd30b59978684328afb8f346
'2012-09-14T09:38:15-04:00'
describe
'37500' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQZF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00158.QC.jpg'
522bc4faea576951059cdd7838eac778
bc78eb1eb1bce59682f45a613ff3899a2797fda7
describe
'180910' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQZG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00029.jpg'
6827297b2a37c3c244c5b27af715b2ba
46cf0c67f1b9f9873a7b1f1994c52cb41a1051b1
describe
'54410' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQZH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00031.QC.jpg'
8cc7afa2aa14003e637048405c17dcd4
af1f8b33a0d952af0e8c4d45d7bb0d1a6ec20df9
describe
'60704' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQZI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00008.QC.jpg'
8bf48147d71f0bc32b11f20599503e9e
81807b96f5f943034b14a87c301b0ecb6ad503ba
describe
'724790' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQZJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00032.jp2'
68990c933dcbe704b0aed88ec5d8398c
1c1b3241fbd21ef651c14902b5b6ea8390e47de7
'2012-09-14T09:38:54-04:00'
describe
'5811624' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQZK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00036.tif'
24cafa89b690f0215673452f74197f32
861ef555c38f0fa3ae3c3c0e52813bfed5e53f8a
'2012-09-14T09:39:57-04:00'
describe
'175' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQZL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00071.txt'
796956f6c7ffed6443b3853653de0bf4
d1683cda2d7eac159d23e48a5ada78cbdee6f3ee
'2012-09-14T09:39:08-04:00'
describe
'16667' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQZM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00035thm.jpg'
700fb8cccd54d8ec40b31cba75a0e079
b22cbb2223d5edca92104e2f83b5219f1a9fd1f1
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQZN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00106.tif'
98309f35f9f846524297d4cba17eb302
3b2496e122f4ce020a37bd65c84836b1d3d39349
describe
'24123' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQZO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00129thm.jpg'
447254a853fbb1bc56da152cead73508
cdeb86dab5a2837355589f6b171fc736f1c24ff6
describe
'52749' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQZP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00164.QC.jpg'
616d46df60f498542ab708b5f13763f2
492ecb2343f4f6871e106a7069ed24d42d9c806e
describe
'62622' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQZQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00056.pro'
005d852a67b0a286ca850d64f1c69f6c
72c89a073ae4db4a2cedd7e26b243ccca73a34e6
describe
'59822' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQZR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00068.pro'
fba0e1f213b59f04a3c95535251539dc
710f352507b4d976e9aa2c315e979cc9279ba9c0
describe
'521' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQZS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00035.pro'
46e682d7122cfd1e75a91ec221ddfa5e
f505d5ca73fc9ce0937eeeb39219102681300410
describe
'5811248' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQZT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00060.tif'
0e14858d864523dc7f3c9072c67a4d7b
53efddd1cb4a7a585c2611bcb5cb18b17fc55434
'2012-09-14T09:36:40-04:00'
describe
'937' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQZU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00157.txt'
086a8871c548c6c39a599896e22a92ac
829c1956bfed2c54b3b6b185d7b86aa9456bd7c3
describe
'2281' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQZV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00034.txt'
11f579c9a015f0f248b05544c92849b9
8edb41103f8378efd2d577b39a9c6235861cdcaa
'2012-09-14T09:39:10-04:00'
describe
'62774' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQZW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00056.QC.jpg'
2cda5bf30f4dbfdd4e27183d6b8e05a7
186d115862abf01afbf75749e742c11864fc6ee5
'2012-09-14T09:43:02-04:00'
describe
'2370' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQZX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00136.txt'
9e52de4234f7997075eea5e0b3bd0021
e7620e35e8bc65fc23cf0df3043514e2da5d5241
describe
'2279' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQZY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00018.txt'
8b4b7b0ea2596b96066ba3c6a43a0c63
56a76b4defc92e3ddcd66635f4c7390193e4340c
'2012-09-14T09:36:42-04:00'
describe
'166270' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACQZZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00038.jpg'
a0b5954b0c2144ee114db00ba3af1999
19732e3759978886af760aa35ec5384ef24e5cca
describe
'24225' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRAA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00134thm.jpg'
a911c91f5ee19aca41ccf0148285c9a2
199460df2f9b7bd7e89e811557ed06d5792eced1
'2012-09-14T09:42:21-04:00'
describe
'27736' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRAB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00121.pro'
4d89bb852ab667565f1a89b4398fc7a9
df82fffaebc704d823131d5c28b254873ff519b0
describe
'58023' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRAC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00144.pro'
da0c44708586bb6a20f1b800f5659b0e
197648cc1d36935323cf6b6153fbe6ad5e91298b
describe
'2384' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRAD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00166.txt'
a68531e0a00528450352ea375b451290
341591678f83b8c307a8d75141e6d46dac7e65ed
describe
'807341' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRAE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00002.jp2'
be9b5a9ad32d438610f7fc4fea4786d6
f1c01464e95218d8f3d7fcaadbf81ab7d5480668
describe
'5810516' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRAF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00177.tif'
213c2ae81997af91052163a951a3ca63
f81e92d2fcd28d2897c676cdb46dd3af6acf1b32
'2012-09-14T09:36:46-04:00'
describe
'61458' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRAG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00074.QC.jpg'
01db8bd5cdaa0b56b6d0c08258e87a7a
75dc25f921c2120e664ac5306043a43706d9fa13
describe
'252' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRAH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00051.txt'
93614949c854edc21c46566aad2009a0
ce6978716c7f920afa36d72c7dcaced8debed53a
describe
'57736' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRAI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00157.QC.jpg'
83599400b734d8c916183734887f4916
41cad1f8cbf8ae5885898197e2c7002c282a3c07
describe
'57436' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRAJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00159.pro'
15bf057b5353bb2d4de5d28a472c5a1b
25fb93d35cf640f6aeb836c52b60fe0adb310192
'2012-09-14T09:38:52-04:00'
describe
'724774' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRAK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00110.jp2'
b97afe89a713bc9ed1f76641c7c74f55
61d20fdea10b0642559187cc61d85d0e1e5b803f
describe
'5809104' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRAL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00020.tif'
7f2bf4da48fbefb9eacd0cd07388fae8
d7b0fc216685e03cb9311d93b2707c57fb9ae45d
describe
'187520' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRAM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00037.jpg'
273af8b1ece826f7e2d3f39533ffb147
eebd83cc88bf802696bef9f528660b1fdbcebf23
'2012-09-14T09:36:26-04:00'
describe
'459' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRAN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00162.txt'
2746d0b6dc23bae09cb1346e3b5293d4
b12c108b11c9ebd479eaaeebf0a73f4b797badf1
describe
'14419' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRAO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00160.pro'
b57ed2532efefc8d438d1d29f65334ab
270744d413cc8ed6c4f75fa0f313ef9be84372b9
describe
'5812264' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRAP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00105.tif'
6c59948a973fd7c1a5341102846fd433
35749cb6fcd48d0fe63d78aa68b39005de7dc645
'2012-09-14T09:36:48-04:00'
describe
'2348' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRAQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00126.txt'
e5f8e1b758aebd1dfe34cdf0a872220a
2d8f798d6fd6e0d183376afb709ca6e10febfdb5
'2012-09-14T09:39:27-04:00'
describe
'60775' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRAR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00137.QC.jpg'
3faac5e416ffe2d46191b9b23728546e
c04f5f2632c0754ddf89ecebc18ba4c32a532512
describe
'59279' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRAS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00054.QC.jpg'
37ae3752427e36d38b2322bd37ab661c
0d4d7547f74e905e2b0c6d5f8156a18b04c9c2c8
'2012-09-14T09:41:12-04:00'
describe
'31893' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRAT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00131.QC.jpg'
155dd46007da80dafc0e37de01389516
24aef6e4921297015ac0857bc51f3cd62663dbba
describe
'168253' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRAU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00163.jpg'
8171135e115e992723af373208bb67c1
03a6a68720fe43dd2f9119f369177c92775511d4
'2012-09-14T09:38:07-04:00'
describe
'60253' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRAV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00114.QC.jpg'
e83e1e7a5880870f0574fa0084933ac8
60c243b678d288764c27abf245b82c8a514a0fe2
'2012-09-14T09:39:32-04:00'
describe
'23479' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRAW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00142thm.jpg'
26552c1315721bd59de7674c82cddafb
4c43ff95db7a959bfb03e9f368332f2a0ebf8bbc
describe
'724695' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRAX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00059.jp2'
b00278685c8e11744c4ee9ff5b45cabd
10f134a293ff65446ba5d587bccb2f474a1746d9
'2012-09-14T09:37:49-04:00'
describe
'724800' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRAY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00058.jp2'
15c55e93b1cb5bab7db8affc0180e001
495e45a41e724d41ded487ef6463681c67a4ef2c
'2012-09-14T09:42:20-04:00'
describe
'101683' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRAZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00192.jpg'
1786c790fb7fe784b74b958723019015
b4f4379e1a557fe64d80b187c17db07759e494fe
describe
'2364' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRBA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00182.txt'
c63e119a85f811b01a742dc7de82687c
da671f4e67d4854c7bd383dbd544a587580b2d2b
'2012-09-14T09:37:21-04:00'
describe
'60707' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRBB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00182.pro'
49e9c35c2eac8ccea9e2e31528e6c158
69768c0c6ce487f0e71a3dad0bf1162785def441
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRBC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00154.jp2'
ce7327be30a02a7847b209f1b50e3922
86fa34809eacd6f3f201ab0077662bbac4e111a7
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRBD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00121.jp2'
643bea80bf0907b40c171a5d87acba14
94f010164ac1c7190f4b1ecd29b1aa14dcaf7c86
describe
'23366' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRBE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00176thm.jpg'
10c5e28024c615275ae6b146ba6cfd48
9427ff46fa2e59cd9f1ffed244dad15764176316
'2012-09-14T09:35:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRBF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00005.txt'
0def89926979e74a6ebf0faa6702ef9b
c66a57e1731bfc64d8bafb411f106531e0f65943
describe
'5811964' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRBG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00135.tif'
cc8486619fab2f2b266c0fc4112c619c
13ad8419fd44e6a0a0dbee96a83e8d03fe58e56a
describe
'724806' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRBH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00151.jp2'
135beee129549f57bb803270ebd44981
a2509bc5f52286e7e82599c1354c700a51db0e2b
describe
'57034' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRBI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00104.pro'
490150e976384d282135e5478b940222
bc746d523f0f3870e3440fd80e58359890b2a474
describe
'1712' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRBJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00073.pro'
7d383861a8ba96b3ab814a0addff96ed
2bb8854c1ac87c55e2188c50b5efde7770890624
'2012-09-14T09:38:02-04:00'
describe
'96235' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRBK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00131.jpg'
bd37a463942903dea006a31543e75208
d7beeccfe5c8ea4ecf3d61866031c0a0e9eeea67
'2012-09-14T09:39:26-04:00'
describe
'2248' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRBL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00114.txt'
a974f95f922696e4ba02a4ec7f0d8971
c322f83a8cd78b129e6b9789d5bd621ae0dcba1b
'2012-09-14T09:42:05-04:00'
describe
'176841' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRBM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00087.jpg'
ce05114124b451166b5457b1a571adc4
04a47722a55181cb81a2d7bc37091ea198a66e77
'2012-09-14T09:38:56-04:00'
describe
'5811564' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRBN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00025.tif'
d7652aadadb34061a43e15c7c945bef9
58c11faafc9754fc4df734d606cc41aefa9e5052
'2012-09-14T09:36:09-04:00'
describe
'61483' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRBO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00083.pro'
0b13626d1118f6f44c833b416c2b7d5f
f68db81e33cc54e7621f452cb31d71f5116b77a2
describe
'23875' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRBP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00150thm.jpg'
53ac042c2ed8e7a1bcc47d89512ec5cb
1fa2f9cb8e93f7ee7029ba304c7f330b1801e251
'2012-09-14T09:40:04-04:00'
describe
'2395' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRBQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00091.txt'
3cf802310d3f651b90ecd0d9c7d715f5
dee31679a861d52757e7408f54eec06c2a96857a
describe
'724420' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRBR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00127.jp2'
81272201179383f581ac04c65e080d13
21b4fb900ebcad8cc1f90026cc75dc5a17cf6d38
describe
'769' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRBS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00133.txt'
56da555dc7c1f5e0ec70548b6484a30a
fc8ee6df54e648de972e38146e667f699a133eae
describe
'5812072' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRBT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00059.tif'
162e345e0d6825013d5f039f5043f889
b06157c91b798b2a9a0e6b91f8e5caeeed23ac2c
'2012-09-14T09:37:33-04:00'
describe
'5812084' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRBU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00120.tif'
e44bb9795894bbb3c6f78b260f6b99fe
69ace41ea3212a177e65e0313754440bd4d9c88c
'2012-09-14T09:42:16-04:00'
describe
'60894' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRBV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00112.QC.jpg'
1b0195715bef10379165249244737210
7afb4d33728a1293e9e8e02b6d5a236aab9f93f0
'2012-09-14T09:42:27-04:00'
describe
'5811532' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRBW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00137.tif'
c8ce78ad5f0eb8e5ee865516cc82b4b1
8d5716467b408e137b0e2d372e506d00e0795862
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRBX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00142.jp2'
ca409deaf7ed5b43b48c28b964efd3e9
d7d63911a395911ebf7906d6523a9a25c67577dc
describe
'5810592' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRBY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00063.tif'
e5542b664dd5d167a7a2ab09e3111331
4eed45f05eb5a3c7011787bc21fbad8c82d5270c
'2012-09-14T09:38:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRBZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00169.jp2'
7967899862b93ed79957d2d40d13f438
5073a023a8b6d4741e94764ff0a14943df59711c
describe
'5811040' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRCA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00037.tif'
30cc2476b92246b408525c07e4f422ca
d9ef4f05e9bac3e5d7f4c019d859cee0257c31de
describe
'5811988' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRCB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00144.tif'
689adb529e802f8da312b42d8347c57c
ad1ad2c4627976128dcbbcf78c3b2a8535f9992a
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRCC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00018.jp2'
ac92e9a9bdc1cfdadd0432ff8e97ebe7
8bc5ee5b7478c70bff345c0b693613474dd2cb8f
'2012-09-14T09:43:00-04:00'
describe
'24504' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRCD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00132thm.jpg'
4e0cdfa56fc177385a7af49d628d0851
e66ec5018c06e84902aca4bb309673588eaf2097
'2012-09-14T09:40:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRCE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00176.tif'
f5c4c5c844d0eb582f073103888c5298
ea2c432f034dda71b487bb63ef99f75e469a987e
describe
'59430' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRCF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00138.QC.jpg'
7d2a20498bc682788dd1ae36ac7fd0ab
32262e73b132910c345f0333d9b23d1c300d3047
'2012-09-14T09:38:43-04:00'
describe
'176316' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRCG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00086.jpg'
5e5464de25cfc1c9559dac9a2bf61b75
e1b320f11cda857e71fc8c7d78dc89ccb6152754
'2012-09-14T09:37:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRCH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00178.jp2'
b9e7293c42e0342f015c5a62478317fe
834174adbc73d212b12708f9b3379714455634ae
describe
'558' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRCI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00117.txt'
6efd4393c962dc10f660019b105729f4
4a8b863f627c9baeaeb8f549988d3174656f8a44
describe
'5812032' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRCJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00165.tif'
a4eeb7b8cec1bc01eca9643ad1d6e5d8
35b9a9c9b59abca287be063fd75e446a6cb4d87a
'2012-09-14T09:38:03-04:00'
describe
'55701' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRCK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00097.QC.jpg'
a348d4d0db6296e5b2886593048a99f1
ea5b0f2c9ed7a6ec366a66c4f8ade94bb9fa670e
describe
'182602' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRCL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00123.jpg'
0cfe7b568013bd1326db4ea242fb521b
b04c56628d2990608e815e492009c90e37e1ea40
describe
'724118' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRCM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00088.jp2'
282382b71d5f37101bac52756fadffc8
26c29c2993d4cc412fd6bba5f9c1ee37da5886b3
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRCN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00098.tif'
88a3324690eb5294df57eda6189aa68d
9fa2f31dccb62562ed8fb851d000ec2295ecb370
describe
'5811768' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRCO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00011.tif'
95bcf5772bea976a330ebf34ee613d9a
a56e8d1c9c4db7d2c7cf91642041c108fc7cc496
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRCP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00011.jp2'
d87416cafe73d591e365753474a54c74
f8b5dbb16b665c381da0908204668bc19fa44fc7
describe
'11013' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRCQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00162.pro'
88b1dfdfe38980adf4597753b25a044a
4dfcef0492167394f3918fccb3b67415ea0074be
'2012-09-14T09:37:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRCR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00048.tif'
acda7177cad1c14570b7cd42886f0085
b91eac4c6b079f5b545471b912ee3d8b3b8576b9
'2012-09-14T09:38:34-04:00'
describe
'5811744' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRCS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00026.tif'
255768729130465ccf143354ada09da1
dad15f30402c2c274eab5e350871ca1a1abb285b
describe
'724775' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRCT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00167.jp2'
abcd0eef6f8ab31dfb7a0d8c7dcdac5b
e3f4d4627a30b685840a7495cdeb8283c7577eb0
'2012-09-14T09:43:19-04:00'
describe
'5809852' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRCU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00168.tif'
58cf83fe7642240442b672dc30ff8db2
4ee42f3691f43983fdf71e2520881e8f0343ae85
'2012-09-14T09:39:52-04:00'
describe
'59272' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRCV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00104.QC.jpg'
a2233c520a1b6a8e53a01d79e0e71121
d70efdfc2815bf40e19736733b5441897115c5d0
'2012-09-14T09:35:38-04:00'
describe
'724547' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRCW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00081.jp2'
0189ee2205dd97e9fbc7b850828ceda6
e58a0d760729c9c68cd1be7b2cdf269a05b61987
'2012-09-14T09:40:37-04:00'
describe
'57275' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRCX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00034.QC.jpg'
a11f745a74c5bce2059418baba18c3c9
4791654192b961108048ea86ae726d3bf68a826b
describe
'24407' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRCY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00032thm.jpg'
11033bbf60c756dbbed19552dd751e81
8a5fe1f91c46e40e19be6f79ff58bd314786d7b1
'2012-09-14T09:40:05-04:00'
describe
'169960' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRCZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00130.jpg'
2b20c3834b055b05321e99098dbd8397
cdeb767e57919a25471b4f3fe353ee928dda47f0
describe
'191288' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRDA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00031.jpg'
e1b262ff4b1401d17feb628e960634f8
197b7322f459b83d7293023ed96ed199046171a4
'2012-09-14T09:36:08-04:00'
describe
'5812312' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRDB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00115.tif'
c8be7e6b767675b13ca34eb25d273d5e
cf09ed90a3b2b0ac75158ab93dcb0b8e8ae87f7f
describe
'172788' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRDC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00113.jpg'
685bd234e4e8d2258edd8271279bf0e5
8136bdc70ba060ac6594e300d726f4ff4f5e4b2e
describe
'61268' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRDD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00106.QC.jpg'
1a2b2fdbaeb257c8f7fd87fe001e41bf
3629d93bc54bb40b1ccb061c7b7116deb39d0852
describe
'724743' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRDE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00038.jp2'
d20c86deb061be326561f5cf2a72de8c
4c401bc74b47d53c33ab61108df7e8060970f8bb
describe
'175902' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRDF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00050.jpg'
d473d8bb0aa4a6eb982734ae8ea0c188
3f087cd7fdbe33740855f0a5d1bc7f07675ba96a
'2012-09-14T09:38:38-04:00'
describe
'2375' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRDG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00052.txt'
05b7ae084d4cb3377d0ce9fc47666755
4ed0f585b9b136925f504e11d37ec81ef0d31476
describe
'23282' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRDH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00162thm.jpg'
46fdc996fa9e4c644bdd9be279f54d3f
1fbf18d0e001487269941983d547212912b330ae
'2012-09-14T09:35:49-04:00'
describe
'724498' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRDI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00056.jp2'
386f70ff68de4eaec98d60a0b91351e9
ac00075c013f92e6119d023aa26596a10c87ff84
describe
'2243' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRDJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00159.txt'
18fa6c232c6e205cd34074af2254fc99
d12b308f8e188f721de717b5dddca91bb8e4f5c1
describe
'57485' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRDK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00021.pro'
6ef3dab07efc68b7bf3d9aeb0db23165
a4e320743bd8b7923ba30ef5c6e009d6cb0de542
'2012-09-14T09:37:47-04:00'
describe
'24096' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRDL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00028thm.jpg'
58a9377be42e77a3e983432500e4bca2
e0bdcf45a659e4346010ebcb7f4300f842cb5f27
describe
'2306' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRDM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00032.txt'
e8c61a3fee28f379facb2ec7a60c0eab
64abcbf677c4d446d6794f66caf5976c3db1a7f0
describe
'14386' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRDN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00117.pro'
7649bee15858c5219e19bc6002ec0478
e8900e9153b38313c841a0848fe916fad0fee59d
'2012-09-14T09:36:39-04:00'
describe
'2257' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRDO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00096.txt'
33dc188b78ba0a1b6e92f57a7cc842b8
d63592746654ff0689e813ee4137e2112246af1e
describe
'49077' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRDP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00181.QC.jpg'
c9f28e085d7565795f76e6d98714132a
728ab027bfa9e833a525ed4505579942aa358813
'2012-09-14T09:42:53-04:00'
describe
'171091' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRDQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00053.jpg'
e39d2fdaeaaf633672f6a788f74a6bbb
1626c2e70c7ffc8f5aeca60eb417f97d95b314bd
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRDR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00153.tif'
54e4caae8e390c44280dc75987afed0b
2739248ed62db849a21572283223d47b7dbb793e
describe
'2308' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRDS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00053.txt'
84775e38de07c6f8b4f793baf1d2e487
6c9ce12b6d09eed44882edfffce69c15f161606e
'2012-09-14T09:42:01-04:00'
describe
'724792' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRDT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00158.jp2'
5f9c8dc18f082fe499526dceaade8adf
a8aeb87273ab275fe8f4670de89889f3d01cc4de
'2012-09-14T09:39:40-04:00'
describe
'24006' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRDU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00101thm.jpg'
7a95011927717947ea5a38f6f48eca6a
a5f0f3f04158eaf61f16b40b4b322804feba4a8e
'2012-09-14T09:42:06-04:00'
describe
'24256' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRDV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00106thm.jpg'
5869921ec72e81081f80076fef915904
f6487122f59a464f967891abd5d74976d7a28745
describe
'50184' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRDW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00191.QC.jpg'
affae59d944a8aa34862792e5e4fd778
24e5f1860a6104d85e61f369c5502f0354b1bcf0
'2012-09-14T09:42:28-04:00'
describe
'24801' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRDX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00127thm.jpg'
347fa8b63e8b15c676f862142744833a
26ec2097a7f659efd027211529232a217758b5f6
'2012-09-14T09:40:50-04:00'
describe
'61549' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRDY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00110.QC.jpg'
d4c37d13112294f2138b46eb827ff303
509f5ff470fee1d3c4e645cf9b11558029ec6684
describe
'191074' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRDZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00093.jpg'
9f47c934e08a172cb11205ad207df427
d7d23eb6d44d9f3e8a11eae71ce4a939add2d3f8
'2012-09-14T09:36:29-04:00'
describe
'56559' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACREA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00033.pro'
c9c42f0f948fd7add7a6c046ff14ee1c
9991ce2fa15417ee464cbe6925ae4bf567f293ed
describe
'5808216' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACREB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00141.tif'
77cd61cc4aafdc3edfd6b69a4151ebf0
5eaf1920e6ae76a10393074c96f5541939a36df5
'2012-09-14T09:42:25-04:00'
describe
'54834' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACREC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00043.QC.jpg'
1a755dbe729ae12aa733297ef2358e19
adf8a65dacdf2c80e2bb4ac4e7756250590d071d
'2012-09-14T09:37:27-04:00'
describe
'724765' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRED' 'sip-filesvid00001_00183.jp2'
1076e920b3c876603fab5724d53c2192
c43ecb7adfb09dbc1c83187c634e1b5cea59cdc6
describe
'176603' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACREE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00115.jpg'
efc3237e6b80467712abb7d4a8d861f8
1eb52f1fd879e0a8eccb343edb87f2ac175c51a3
describe
'5811488' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACREF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00047.tif'
1e74d55750c52ce9ae55cf0b4f93cae3
07b7befb79633104aa0a80adbeaaee31e67be6f0
'2012-09-14T09:41:42-04:00'
describe
'2336' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACREG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00039.txt'
73ccc418ee10954f39a40f17982bffe4
c8d1484ebfb31f6dae4ba75c90b41e8a534f23f4
describe
'49981' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACREH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00167.QC.jpg'
3a718b39e3e5ec7c9f6eca121ee07a5f
627361a439102ff3f3f2d85d03bbc3e3a7da5bc1
describe
'724714' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACREI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00072.jp2'
4ef00aba91c4c942d30537071e330f3e
c0c347d55bb9dee7e3a099ad3c2ddc6eb005d7e7
'2012-09-14T09:37:12-04:00'
describe
'62352' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACREJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00049.QC.jpg'
c3c36ddc585ed2f050368abc767d1c9f
48d3a602ce5e39ef6bf2bad05d071c3734698439
'2012-09-14T09:42:41-04:00'
describe
'175909' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACREK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00168.jpg'
44d0be2dfda35b5fbadb6002209a596c
a430f95ae6fa970d3b23a765031238e0e3dbc365
'2012-09-14T09:40:21-04:00'
describe
'23423' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACREL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00140thm.jpg'
22b3128ff314ae4ebc7e5d4bcee15b7f
b61bf38f27a10ccc2368bff3ffe0cac5ea6922a0
describe
'59891' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACREM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00171.QC.jpg'
5f882a7635395b14f8ede42fa24c7375
0f44cf557d48db23b1ec9dbcc47fa19a2befd22b
describe
'59361' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACREN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00044.QC.jpg'
30f1bae43910f5f13044515ea8247753
4d6966e92535eae66f34cd1dc52157adcb9179d8
describe
'5810564' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACREO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00055.tif'
4a24b86f69db033cb56202e463b87d91
37946f12988ae24f47eb5645ae537e674b633b0f
describe
'170789' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACREP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00085.jpg'
624e9502fb11d659a8d70a600a8bb5ee
38f78a63bfc3dbf236e21456b6db5556181d1998
'2012-09-14T09:42:15-04:00'
describe
'5811280' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACREQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00013.tif'
228736fbaf36be5c7c71f2bf81ac1fa4
cb796a1c535c9be3d65406f65f116c25c2163a10
'2012-09-14T09:39:55-04:00'
describe
'62577' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRER' 'sip-filesvid00001_00099.QC.jpg'
cf532a2c80f7feb2eb8c89da916ebd22
26682c7abf9621c32b7a7249f4b851b008f9c1e9
describe
'175981' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRES' 'sip-filesvid00001_00141.jpg'
7db5984a60bcd4514578736f2f98cb52
a588cc747c5047118c50e9f8840238ac3b78d0b4
'2012-09-14T09:35:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRET' 'sip-filesvid00001_00033.tif'
801f3a5cf9a3a22806032a9204c19ddc
c3f2fbc23a04ccfca3c236f37828faaecaa13e1d
'2012-09-14T09:42:42-04:00'
describe
'724651' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACREU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00093.jp2'
ac12264f142b8357dd903370d196f3ec
c97cf22079dd537681700afda7417e780d50a837
'2012-09-14T09:42:18-04:00'
describe
'176985' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACREV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00083.jpg'
32fee7929ba3579951d459a812f66cec
29d4ea2945f5efbdbcec6d65627783df8b9297ba
describe
'5811968' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACREW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00171.tif'
8b63bf4a9707a935db9e6b8d6c5ef1a9
32e8d594fe1ec26483dc463dcf1694d42294414f
describe
'24081' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACREX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00110thm.jpg'
dccf6f2767392b1814ff45c18501c3d3
cadf582a0a5700f8a1ef3875bf1bdd8557ac9d35
describe
'23841' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACREY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00157.pro'
a5d43bd51e8be1e954fbd28df68041d1
674033c0eff3efad87dccf7cd40f92e284e0796e
describe
'724739' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACREZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00016.jp2'
e8527982c018ef3810baf1b82f82ccf6
699b548daec6982be0cfc963642f7983a3b5fc2e
describe
'2209' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRFA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00186.txt'
be942e6e3e21b770db0cfa364fc6b094
7ae1354a6986539f93c21c061a7595745de64b0e
describe
'180116' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRFB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00025.jpg'
e413e48d545761aa75bc3a94bd907551
e5a4550f27a86ca202e0363ed3bde77435cf9e2b
describe
'164108' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRFC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00084.jpg'
7c9fd47793b651f53a5880cfc1ac3b60
5bdf72d5595cc8ae72adc0b70efe130f9b850ee6
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRFD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00185.jp2'
4d20aa6dfa951bc751d6e13f29f498e3
0c1c12bc780e129576c91d9ff5799b321887dc46
describe
'60200' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRFE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00129.pro'
13535605ec0746a5070ddba4153a1672
d2e47765b5ef1c95d8bfebabdf929f10e4f1e549
describe
'60658' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRFF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00178.QC.jpg'
b64120d5bbc46a09c5b5df54e3f9157d
e0b1931062853a5cb167437448fbe7386fc4cd21
'2012-09-14T09:41:33-04:00'
describe
'2276' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRFG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00062.txt'
3ac6324bb5df52faf9a1ad33a455d796
fec1ad93a1749007f429857eae19837e7f97f13f
describe
'53086' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRFH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00057.QC.jpg'
b5ce593f20258517dc328555d88e8496
fd5fba708effc3114f11c156e4b3ad8daf47b29f
describe
'22783' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRFI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00164thm.jpg'
c09b7f292e0965fb9b6e7b8fabb8694c
6cbbdc026d57fb6476479c96c6409dd5c81f4fec
'2012-09-14T09:36:23-04:00'
describe
'64058' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRFJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00126.QC.jpg'
f229fe89cd220039a3293633d313967a
34fd06a2501c3f87a3c958848f2dcb65351af532
describe
'167116' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRFK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00170.jpg'
affd428c1aab6c6767489b335eee7077
8797d5960a7f1e89e288f10722aa914a041867e4
describe
'22684' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRFL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00190thm.jpg'
5e631a345b9b229516cad48ff34ae9d8
851845fd8ad1c3d74ac8901cd079df10beb8fc1f
describe
'59326' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRFM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00172.pro'
8700c8b9cf92c8c3c08eef370ed1feb1
84ff7bcc15a960f22a1b4d1cc463426846f57db6
describe
'5810052' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRFN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00183.tif'
0d3158f64ca098aa2862ee7defb38721
f5efe277b9ca42420ed15e530901b4c4782e4b4a
describe
'724418' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRFO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00095.jp2'
f57da0621a97d04795ef3851863f4ae4
955c99725d0fa5ac49ea6368c19ec0021eae5365
'2012-09-14T09:42:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRFP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00143.tif'
34724c3eb6451b88aa0487a66840d357
1b774562637ea398b04198ce6a643be4fdb2962a
'2012-09-14T09:41:45-04:00'
describe
'60584' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRFQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00108.QC.jpg'
a3f9b325d44794664e4043e732c3db5a
4ca014f31a441fea9373e50be2992e97081e0310
describe
'5808008' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRFR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00187.tif'
f9fb97b848944d020d1f2b5a00288be2
daa4783b8ec98bbc1dc638776e98827c9c042750
describe
'23740' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRFS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00102thm.jpg'
6481bd85822efa0ec4989a7b91ae56b9
56e57fbaccb633e39825adac2fb0285a772f6b02
describe
'59194' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRFT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00176.pro'
ccc77edf8005cb7c049765892323778e
0d357633e8ec751cce95d656e131e08e49609b3a
'2012-09-14T09:43:14-04:00'
describe
'724518' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRFU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00170.jp2'
78733365c0c3712bab16a2d3bb5f77f4
c8e7e7ea2d7df533800304d42a90bc49c3e4993f
'2012-09-14T09:37:48-04:00'
describe
'164012' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRFV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00176.jpg'
6d91bf8416cfd965ab2977d25775e480
b501698ed71386f9448929ed0c144a8b0a900d2c
describe
'56981' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRFW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00100.pro'
2f566b880fec7897ed4c1090e08bd9c6
b1c7ee50d73ec2bc8129b5010df3d20db2a82722
'2012-09-14T09:36:16-04:00'
describe
'183600' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRFX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00040.jpg'
10b39f30dc27941aa2fe82396841190c
922eec6243b781e8a720e6c87fb00e2d12b34353
describe
'21934' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRFY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00145thm.jpg'
0e7b30ca228418feb54c8b9128d7602a
ea9d83ad8a0003ba9019144355a01bebd38e5ee5
describe
'180370' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRFZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00155.jpg'
33a09d823079e3c82e74f1bd4e77cccf
19150cc8c842596e7cd1eb3da0e3a629d74ecbd5
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRGA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00111.txt'
dea9a7dc3887698cb32f59034fa68499
8ff803c236f9f70bab7e3583c5be2bd52da47ae7
describe
'225589' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRGB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00099.jpg'
8067f4dc25ab2e0115be4a42bd0d9143
3160335545632510ff4961cd30645959e7b0cc0c
describe
'25097' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRGC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00019thm.jpg'
8c0efa467212e829917d174b8a79fa12
d4fdef632319712ba27714556f5cefd8dfd20c29
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRGD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00089.txt'
6814fc6744973d117b040a0f1c1cf843
e949a062f86de7a8c958107ffe603aa19a8bcf26
describe
'862' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRGE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00065.pro'
a72da4c118d40cd4420a2c9046a28698
0ac299dec3e79e1375cbf5ac4ed22223e533270b
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRGF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00054.jp2'
78ab0a4f18220c3dee0eb0eb98c91173
fca2fbb081f1abfbb4277b8777ea90c76caff201
'2012-09-14T09:38:30-04:00'
describe
'20047' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRGG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00081thm.jpg'
9677a1a578dd77ac558654c9822da97a
d3ea224dad4e36d36d3f667a0a4af6a9dcd7dc36
describe
'5811940' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRGH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00129.tif'
41c6a52c15f1ec1342d07e6451cccfbb
4a3fd2ce8f675d739cfdda5154b3af1c8d0ba677
'2012-09-14T09:42:07-04:00'
describe
'2252' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRGI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00023.txt'
0fd41b89365dacf679d4d3c9b8ba8cff
fc681e06ce748b6aa397e590b29f2653c6b068ad
'2012-09-14T09:38:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRGJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00099.jp2'
f809f160baaa7e15b74680106a55c8cc
e1aacf540a6cb122f6866b85b326c700ab3d43f7
describe
'2236' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRGK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00072.txt'
917a998033dad422abf328c6c1ec6e76
3a7a3618469a43dea7910661fafb99adc4d0c450
'2012-09-14T09:39:42-04:00'
describe
'2344' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRGL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00127.txt'
499c614a8eb8a2578b99859e4937c280
d95ca2bbe8d4c93e00e21301ee94f3c3a442ba05
'2012-09-14T09:39:24-04:00'
describe
'60466' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRGM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00120.pro'
8a5f92558d263eb303df9fb94ef001c8
f1982410cadb66eec2c02b49aa9b497a4a60efea
describe
'95' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRGN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00003.txt'
011f16aa6281e3f074519382bce9df0e
5bd4a40d0868a1d1d73a7b787d9d77128ac6c2fe
describe
Invalid character
'21144' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRGO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00007thm.jpg'
69d47b85523af952bd4c826f750d6725
4802f856517ef63dbccfb328930ff1d1cd897c85
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRGP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00119.tif'
4a7af1b2222735219dc388f07cbe02b4
b12bd300f267f1cb256f4ca1fa4fadbb17633df3
describe
'170038' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRGQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00023.jpg'
ce0a24eb3321a6b4e534cd9a96850951
b3769f1858e5813cabf1f00d003a33bbbca963a6
describe
'18070' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRGR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00155.pro'
5a381f062ec38fbe949340c9d57ce38e
ac2efd6aa0bac517ecfd02d6a12710be5edd954b
describe
'23648' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRGS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00039thm.jpg'
1c5a50cb64759d881b48d447dc8e1dbb
414d9ab868dbf4cc9dcccceec586d6ef6647bbb2
'2012-09-14T09:35:58-04:00'
describe
'51128' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRGT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00152.QC.jpg'
f2e8e6c0fc7f2db3a21dfeaa94500ab4
031a112e3997c2b1ca4d1bce0557b1fd5428f31e
describe
'23704' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRGU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00159thm.jpg'
ac07271fe5bf8660b9c3590ab83f6686
563af756fd8b0719d4a0fe82e475232116c2f1d1
describe
'25021' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRGV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00185thm.jpg'
b485ca05fb58f168a1ac7b83b66d2d29
85d3e5f3cc09fffae89f95873d95cdaa0f694184
'2012-09-14T09:37:29-04:00'
describe
'58734' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRGW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00019.pro'
c21d27078e43cf0aa85d9b0cd72babd0
c99c76ccb4434691341af57261272e511dab8c12
describe
'724805' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRGX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00153.jp2'
ad230adfd008117eb8945864b2362247
b8c24dad351d47a3c39104e9e4497ab1d5e74e93
describe
'59530' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRGY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00110.pro'
72ab60fc6f0b88f9ab77155ef4325145
5074036ebda6f2f3817df58f7af795d0e46cf718
describe
'24090' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRGZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00087thm.jpg'
9152364bc52002439e5c9136a47cf6cb
bdf3c8c557e2ef1de68a1a6d1482fccb3f83992a
describe
'5811272' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRHA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00139.tif'
8950bc2dc3e17e0f28a05341d82398dd
0469fa8771bb98349aab75ee06adf87c9f4921c2
describe
'724666' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRHB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00060.jp2'
02ecc5e3868c7540a020beb77f79b223
62a069104f725ddd761ccf41ae97de2052045d34
describe
'7772' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRHC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00088.pro'
9ab0707b498fcca780a4a389e7a1f86d
35c2bca2e5dc18185719195a1b1a3c9cc4f187a6
'2012-09-14T09:37:59-04:00'
describe
'793' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRHD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00093.pro'
34dd9f78c62baf217c19ea3ba0b753ff
781eb737d95c5770ea1bf076057f5845f1167381
describe
'1084' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRHE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00067.txt'
b8077785c945e437f2edeb266f82f469
c00450f16493c5d6f31309c4d19801f8db9c8eea
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRHF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00066.jp2'
0cbb7372e5f13836626ee8eb172f7f9b
64f6b4a3340ff537492357cfcbe55b8e5224c553
describe
'53997' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRHG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00171.pro'
d1d02ffde56bf5f88a3e58aad2a7f142
02586c36babd9108366f47af60da6b10053ed05b
'2012-09-14T09:37:15-04:00'
describe
'724762' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRHH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00117.jp2'
3069bc1e10c6235faf2646098c28c3d9
98123bc0d30d5dffa979a905223a1111675a1a32
'2012-09-14T09:42:48-04:00'
describe
'24519' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRHI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00114thm.jpg'
98aa72f23e5a9052d76595acd5a201e1
c73b1f9a5f994caed140bf7d7837b3d98f470075
'2012-09-14T09:36:33-04:00'
describe
'23268' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRHJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00010thm.jpg'
54ac3874f2e8475dc5ccac1b9c8799c9
e477ee6800dc3a0c9a71e28c873557f940829d07
'2012-09-14T09:40:30-04:00'
describe
'2237' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRHK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00104.txt'
76d536fdacf97af4ec8799510f5bb9d8
63291a7f760c0a5f7d6571fb8e86ec0018106de7
describe
'60030' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRHL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00109.pro'
b6b9d7c862e5fa719e26f9ba4ef42ef3
05aa67f69e45ae6e2adf252b03c54f7b55e55cb3
describe
'685' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRHM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00060.txt'
3bb279bde3709a98348478caa6040829
a5b35cc5fe2a0aa7075514461cf784734f43fab1
describe
'161094' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRHN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00081.jpg'
a0e5f0d0cb6133f7b4e09e87057d9282
e153ec810b18f18a84a46005f4613c875f442071
describe
'61033' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRHO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00132.QC.jpg'
f36f46c8303d8ac5191bb444d68a9af9
5e930dd5575bcf06ed90834b2b975eef9b4ba38b
describe
'724550' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRHP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00075.jp2'
c09c4cdfc22efdf8f40b170e62b4adfc
a5aa53044388f32f282ce1fa0646c81d0022b84b
describe
'143548' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRHQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00007.jpg'
99c8b5bc8066f74e0eb56c12ff646213
a069c48c2c596d01ec0ab35a95706c79fc860f69
describe
'23481' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRHR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00085thm.jpg'
a70fb6267fd7c45f7bd42aa3073b726d
287948a69f898c7773e209d7e274cc5f80c1d497
describe
'171379' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRHS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00114.jpg'
d4eb5d560f247b0d7f458acdc6c9de89
e1a132d49980b27e1bc9492d455e841d6ea147e7
'2012-09-14T09:41:16-04:00'
describe
'18661' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRHT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00152.pro'
75af9baea016f2abd6e3a1248a1eccf2
3b14cb19bbd4af398c2e5083e908696beaca2d9a
'2012-09-14T09:40:58-04:00'
describe
'60158' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRHU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00140.pro'
19868c14fdab6120854b12a1ff96154a
edd69ffeb833d2567086b5120e836d1d56934a7b
'2012-09-14T09:39:41-04:00'
describe
'178613' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRHV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00175.jpg'
1d77494c85152537fdd14a4cb0568363
e7959919d5d29dd3c609c177353d7df1be802fbd
'2012-09-14T09:42:32-04:00'
describe
'60100' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRHW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00066.QC.jpg'
6b8bf2725b60621fb7a3f47106273cc7
a91ee3d408f6b16533e171c0404898156d244bd2
describe
'724634' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRHX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00073.jp2'
dc1adfccdc8e8a1fd6152d6b3af1234e
54b249347eee96d6c4aec32e08daa98244fdb5fa
describe
'2351' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRHY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00082.txt'
5699bfbd1ff9fc5e79b5aea7ac5b5844
cc35b1e8c275090a8ac422532d75a5edf0e8b0a9
'2012-09-14T09:40:46-04:00'
describe
'5809472' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRHZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00097.tif'
97978fa46de40f57d8d089d8781900c5
ada59d5529b27a4b249ccb240a1579ff1539debc
describe
'14044' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRIA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00069.pro'
fb210e0b8c9983c1c66fd2d9ce678194
8c0bfdbd3c460babde646b57741b750016a7471d
'2012-09-14T09:36:30-04:00'
describe
'167059' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRIB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00033.jpg'
b3f4a8d2718b8fbd813fd79fd4a2a7a9
8dbfef0eebcf03443237ab3a66e13f4eedbc0f85
'2012-09-14T09:38:44-04:00'
describe
'5811844' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRIC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00104.tif'
b0de2d9eb9b46f6e2a3fd2caebd23a37
c382b79ae0bed8d01903e94ade10e527f287756d
describe
'14363' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRID' 'sip-filesvid00001_00183.pro'
5287f315c15c3afabcbb8a2602b8dda3
7fd18fca95d735ec97088b2fba801f10059104e7
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRIE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00136.pro'
d4cf9b2510cd34dc96b275690329331e
1fda1c96e6752668626ffcf2ab8610a80026d271
describe
'2224' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRIF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00026.txt'
f9e567dce47f394c7e31b2dd3c068ef7
4b561bed67a6eab1b679beb18f5bb00624542c38
describe
'22143' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRIG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00175thm.jpg'
810514628ed4a7aa930c675b12b522e7
7697159398d96aedfeb71fb733395a2628611100
describe
'61325' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRIH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00052.QC.jpg'
b4f53a88914f4e5545d5fb412eacb90b
dc2289384e2f24fa5c4f821b7f6d0b4a2ac94ab9
describe
'10138' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRII' 'sip-filesvid00001_00001.pro'
acb936aac63860d4a0276164b33f692e
8b93baeb771cc95133b40d526806b771fa050db0
describe
'316' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRIJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00107.txt'
4a38ab00354431e387f04432a68ef8b5
5fd8dcc4820f4bc9eb44dae6adf6583ba385d09b
describe
'170577' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRIK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00096.jpg'
1240d2bf95364ee8652fc6d53547f4c4
b252dfe0b11f467c89ee12d8301aefbf4f625732
'2012-09-14T09:43:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRIL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00136.tif'
a8373c0ba1ebe9cea2d8031dd95fd2c1
c789b8e8b6c23b16c05f3d80428ec9867ed54b66
'2012-09-14T09:36:21-04:00'
describe
'2263' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRIM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00036.txt'
9f7a20f2afc534b8c2829fd815011ab8
73c2419c8dc9b93a1abf6b09e3fd162c68087840
'2012-09-14T09:40:18-04:00'
describe
'169659' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRIN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00063.jpg'
f74e77f0ab14c4b9a0f0509efccad6eb
bffc34c34b4977102b3f3f40da64cf25cc652bfd
describe
'23072' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRIO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00072thm.jpg'
0bb1cfd0ceb0213c9ea4294864fdbe93
22fe71ad332682d270afd20392e71bf9a531f731
'2012-09-14T09:42:46-04:00'
describe
'724718' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRIP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00047.jp2'
6dcaa449b35c6dbdb0c80ff5c5aff3d0
71ee2904cfea4527c4bc9f03c4c644880f0ea640
'2012-09-14T09:36:36-04:00'
describe
'166004' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRIQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00072.jpg'
5e6c290c546cfef2cb4999bc3698fd07
5071c44e56ba0f1ff6906a13b62bbc256e3919a2
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRIR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00135.jp2'
dcb053b09b5e046935058bbe3097274d
dcf14d5e69221d4d59dadf723acffa8e2d3f5476
describe
'5811896' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRIS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00121.tif'
fd9ecdeb70c25194242a0df0670d9196
c53f1e5a6f8bfc0e7f22d93075c9b03debc24094
describe
'47391' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRIT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00081.QC.jpg'
1e79dcc4c2bdfde34891bf79f254aa72
e1f0b54c096d8fc8e7b58332396ff6589358c759
describe
'183210' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRIU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00067.jpg'
7c47d82fa8386e96a67b22e4be7710a8
ed139004a2541a3a0f7052fb6f3386c268acd2d0
describe
'25781' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRIV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00175.pro'
04f9685b8f5dd042d0a9cca23ae6cd9b
6aa7f25054fb187169ab2a4a3fbe46dd11c83fca
'2012-09-14T09:42:00-04:00'
describe
'21652' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRIW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00149thm.jpg'
f49eef286c7132f0ab9ebf345d6c7dda
4d018cbb8fb3bf557b080ee347381d2069840e4c
describe
'58536' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRIX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00034.pro'
24c8effed8aaa6b0cade43bec0380f69
03cbad9ce366c2e605eaf5bf074153cd51747ca2
describe
'5810424' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRIY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00017.tif'
0a744217c2e9e71d8820bda4b80fb245
60cd8485dce005ffac87f5336b47d6ac120b47fe
describe
'5811848' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRIZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00094.tif'
079f47d415076c56a597fb7f7120e88b
df020b17684dbea5d640a61d5dab98d717c8ae0a
describe
'5812004' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRJA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00016.tif'
64f51b2f8d39269e71301c00c5df2c10
6ff263630612aed069baa16352e55c50009cc336
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRJB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00153.txt'
8d7cdb34d219dec3bc5c75b4fb22ec8c
bd8363d5c87cc791bd67f7463564d8508871a6b6
describe
'23852' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRJC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00111thm.jpg'
ee50fea230a3217ca8316144b927828f
cebb942615a6bcb19fb8276ce454e080be278e48
describe
'23995' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRJD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00113thm.jpg'
80592182bb3f25f5ae95506860d45207
ca452bd01aebb31cba69f5708e7d6438ce7322ef
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRJE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00148thm.jpg'
aaab453b0dc097ea0e81ad86df90036f
f33e62f1522cbc1c39fbad6dbcd48ca03a57c4fa
'2012-09-14T09:37:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRJF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00118.jp2'
9f6efe8b4c4eb7f09c3d4f65879ce647
0735d799c508fba29dcc0cebed055a9a1b61dd9d
describe
'61963' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRJG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00153.QC.jpg'
0ce53ec493d2f05c9e010271da963ce7
0ac1f09c9e58a65aaffb42d05b77f60fafb260d8
describe
'60486' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRJH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00186.QC.jpg'
1dcf989877e7fcf3aecd00a9b298663b
29d6b958e1c8b0eb166ac3d00bf0043e1c3ad518
describe
'24258' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRJI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00112thm.jpg'
04f2aa8ca47e6e5f2567f93e257060f5
3ca6d2a8e02fe4c436d7ea4811706b52a1ec7699
describe
'177481' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRJJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00070.jpg'
f0373ffa7ed8546ef7845f3a799a61c5
302e6dab9f6fc375c8e90bbd9185d271509c5a81
describe
'58973' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRJK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00040.QC.jpg'
70d5ae560a6125c5b47f18c2dfa154ea
2b57d7d578d3ac07aa1cc13006bc94323e71dafc
'2012-09-14T09:42:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRJL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00103.txt'
19c4a9a5d5ca4124102d3cbe911bd4c5
a00f99c1e1aa1c8e21fc0d593331ff14d174aff0
describe
'58013' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRJM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00174.pro'
565a2e1212fe7d3fdf7139154dc7244f
448d97a6f2c60b7debeb11ddef5455eb08cc5d80
describe
'94059' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRJN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00035.jpg'
ed5731ffc207759cd7bb31e575111d09
f467937079f9c342ef57683cc2151201e31f52f6
'2012-09-14T09:42:03-04:00'
describe
'60263' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRJO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00090.QC.jpg'
c8cc10e0500c124dfe76df7285e1cb0f
d1cb677adaaa145cd795147ace3cf52945b69b57
'2012-09-14T09:36:05-04:00'
describe
'57259' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRJP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00010.QC.jpg'
fb9f63db6062a0862f2baf884dd04ffe
4b2d52b41bb3949e6c09fa3c29818e905685b66f
describe
'176401' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRJQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00150.jpg'
c59eae254db2913c1a356c33904bf231
068f370b0888cc3089b290a736e90638482c6785
describe
'58530' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRJR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00064.QC.jpg'
bf820d3e6943925a71f32c01079f457a
ac9f0d1bd26552342c7a28c9bbe15b1302be4615
describe
'160564' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRJS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00145.jpg'
66b28eee5ebb4485968220b693443a76
b20664ced6707ac78308d140ddd8c63b01c65ce8
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRJT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00130.txt'
b0be755c8153c1ac916950d9253da52e
03ee0a6e420f74848e928fc4ac546320bbcea62d
describe
'162' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRJU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00158.txt'
d4529001928a953b82d52aca290d595f
1008eb1b33b2737c9813bf7779199921e4183b9c
describe
'162689' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRJV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00142.jpg'
2571162aeefddec0bd7cf359b32a0c2c
fe873a67ce7cd3c52470744d94318013c3d9a35b
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRJW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00010.tif'
2914b1135e19640667f138cb108c107f
8631fc056bdcf605f95b1f9dbfddb0f0c62d4dc8
'2012-09-14T09:42:12-04:00'
describe
'2310' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRJX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00113.txt'
6dc3e157547781f889eb2fb8f7c77f39
3acde5fa63f8db5c643c61009b6d6593b7c0f0f6
describe
'179001' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRJY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00092.jpg'
7e002ad21c59a1b54f9bb3b1b8415186
2a4194c08c048ac610368b9356fbfc8a6c20b2ac
describe
'24223' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRJZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00186thm.jpg'
c2c4691a151fa66f1b1cecec1faaa169
c398a0b9e1bfad607814c5e3ff9c88d8d46d7879
'2012-09-14T09:38:48-04:00'
describe
'724769' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRKA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00165.jp2'
dc2ed57c38abc15995a86fa3cf350b8c
89a9fda870e7c95345ca0132802eb369b6957a43
describe
'134341' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRKB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00003.jpg'
f4fd92c2e15a6ff82e2fcb6fbab8f3b4
d3a7583ba0a34b2313baa5f85fa3a6e9e774b201
describe
'23388' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRKC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00155thm.jpg'
b1634e4ce3ede9e5ad8400d84f2ad356
aeee40d5ecec5f2415342393dd7fb66517876fd9
describe
'24427' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRKD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00059thm.jpg'
ab0fda2949c3e7b0158e1440fda9d5a2
fb7cf5706336c3dbb9832b7fe8d1cc799f146bcc
describe
'23548' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRKE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00014thm.jpg'
7f9937dc083d4c0b4481efb781bafc40
21c59799471bf6d583f725a2f3566569cc2b96f1
describe
'17571' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRKF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00139.pro'
f422096afad9ae87731801fe41f6a8a8
be1df09b431486f69be3e25849efe99d12c41287
'2012-09-14T09:35:48-04:00'
describe
'20045' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRKG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00005thm.jpg'
3e4f280d9fa2bea17978e0cc798a2ee0
b4134804962cf8c030a95ed0f79bb32f0cf1753b
describe
'24383' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRKH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00058thm.jpg'
af4e4223e5f3d04df298e808285af689
d28d06c1b22665b9d6b5e20013c4886062c28f4e
describe
'22845' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRKI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00015.pro'
55918cd4218ce5f9f24185b9a89cb66b
c1f197dd92ad2042e02215e4904a10d90860319a
'2012-09-14T09:40:47-04:00'
describe
'11106' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRKJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00081.pro'
ddca97eb2fb3a3f97db9ad9c039fa781
47a387923898aa7a7ad13d7c7667346d0d260080
'2012-09-14T09:38:42-04:00'
describe
'724745' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRKK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00130.jp2'
9b8e57597fb9fac4598235ec86abac89
ab999f1c27bff305973459e43b9a19e250d48efe
describe
'724684' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRKL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00148.jp2'
1f586b6e887b92e10fa33cde49099b02
016540c1f6571e150265d2de92059650652c124d
describe
'2299' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRKM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00059.txt'
4fb5423fb39f77ced7c5713bad26a26c
b8741f044279322d484defe4d3063d4a68d93cdb
describe
'26448' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRKN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00001thm.jpg'
03d9c5093751652fd7d27f1a4d234f27
a8a9f5171519f0d9e727002fbeec542d57f55b6a
'2012-09-14T09:43:20-04:00'
describe
'180674' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRKO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00151.jpg'
3860f43f734a47ca5e747224f3753c9c
0a244ea314fc88981e0e1c322560c09bb0addbff
describe
'172096' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRKP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00089.jpg'
b5f095551f9e295848557d6cc07d9377
ba3ca7e4a4ed91665d10504303189a6af00cb51c
'2012-09-14T09:41:56-04:00'
describe
'7984' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRKQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00145.pro'
c0f733e782a3c8d62d98f186d301b2d9
b641dd6c059ca7e9757482d6a23115ce2ba2ae53
describe
'165604' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRKR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00144.jpg'
f535268329b88d23a8cfc33e70597d7b
01b5fc5311a9f155451095b0cf0c859420aaab81
describe
'2274' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRKS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00106.txt'
b62dc6d8f4465a80084d3b53f71ba1ab
3b254e9c7ecfdc5db362cf252b7aa2b22faf5083
'2012-09-14T09:43:11-04:00'
describe
'541' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRKT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00187.txt'
e9c58abe7582e0efafe44ed74ac0159c
79c9c3f0b578f3a6173f5406928b4149a4e50a06
'2012-09-14T09:36:22-04:00'
describe
'23313' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRKU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00021thm.jpg'
879aff1a0d4780837c4f71a14874e5ec
b08d0d4444070f2cf240dd27c6c3636ba90267b8
describe
'5811780' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRKV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00116.tif'
ad172f5faa99822c6de70388fdac6bf1
d230dc78d95a90b07fb7dfb20b53b89fd17f1101
describe
'62240' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRKW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00022.QC.jpg'
824ffe0d0eb1598b7c428a6079d892f8
d951e7635baac91099dcd2ed7fdb93159ebdb566
describe
'5811552' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRKX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00021.tif'
81483e34e7cdaa11e7d7faeaa1341619
fe53e2f46e505f9a6eb85f3eac4a441f0fe01422
describe
'144160' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRKY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00133.jpg'
80e31e3df903bd7f02c0e6547b150331
a4a4abd6dd676b4862bce0b7a5a4e0eb4bdcdbe0
describe
'23661' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRKZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00104thm.jpg'
f017f24f6b9decc41e85f0d55b36cc26
f883e8a5209c95d9f48fd2f6e26d3c143298a7ca
describe
'178576' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRLA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00077.jpg'
183f4140a0b74e4c5e4f797ef0e1d37a
8abdf9e10fa478154552548da59f7739257745ac
describe
'189248' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRLB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00042.jpg'
a44936a47b800a10dc4cc2ceddc1ac9c
168cad6426ddf28ff894e5c4b6cf8a809c8b35fe
'2012-09-14T09:36:41-04:00'
describe
'59889' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRLC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00042.pro'
c3ef4edc877b805237b61c2dc9ca0a9d
6a47af31b55afcc32df93064d4c0fece7366d154
describe
'25178' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRLD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00126thm.jpg'
9857d98a9f1d1202ab36a5c5f2610a42
dff70051d0fee175a50082a2a343e5f9c9c71f84
'2012-09-14T09:36:47-04:00'
describe
'166543' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRLE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00012.jpg'
c3cd40fa9b2addd891240165a1706c05
1d201a4570313fb685a824e3909037a865393d81
describe
'23378' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRLF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00076thm.jpg'
ac551800f4cacc2492f4353b8b837b88
8d79f2965671625f41aedf8f6e416d650e2e42a6
describe
'59345' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRLG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00030.pro'
36a94f6b8d9f6f98c5ab9e65eb878052
83a57d6e162fefea2149c5dee4e026b910a19091
describe
'62735' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRLH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00115.QC.jpg'
53c8411f1c1b5bfb51062e551c70be0a
1d2e6d91cef9e583a6860bdb291e1fa97263699e
'2012-09-14T09:36:43-04:00'
describe
'59906' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRLI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00185.pro'
36ce1f9cea42c533e7d4dc16a01a246f
04089a1eb2aff5e97c63ff350027fd0cef316a89
'2012-09-14T09:43:04-04:00'
describe
'339' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRLJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00145.txt'
6c370b61939831510012998e1dbc055b
e29cce41a0830af5a6cbaa9a395d3dbec9de65fd
describe
'58515' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRLK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00030.QC.jpg'
e383b18fb5a1d93b608c5c965ff89484
353756337b0b7d2c1f50b901fd6559fe019f0ece
describe
'55793' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRLL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00048.pro'
1cdfb8c4e2c59af895f9ff5cfcf28489
a9be154a0ced462dd0ecc55d7595684b026d9cf6
describe
'170717' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRLM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00011.jpg'
7c9e57b6989b8e88ae6724f4054aba86
a95139adbcdb39298bd08f3f2f3aca4d49bd7ddf
'2012-09-14T09:38:57-04:00'
describe
'5808528' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRLN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00170.tif'
ed9f3f990be56f5d7ddf34a8e3330530
a022971927e28a5a6ed7f9be3f122e1441c71c1b
'2012-09-14T09:39:23-04:00'
describe
'20466' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRLO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00170thm.jpg'
9dd223ed093ddec1122f410dd73d4d20
99ed7b3f9eedf2d0117095ae2eb4736915d3c787
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRLP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00138.txt'
f52f2940270e9b1b2218ae90cb7c33f4
bdade4c4157df63af6a10f9bb1c6e43df0f7d91d
describe
'60416' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRLQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00001.QC.jpg'
15e4312be01fbab82c09583946948bb7
f514f0ef296317bde5458134720617e96fa47fde
'2012-09-14T09:41:23-04:00'
describe
'631' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRLR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00177.txt'
706b4096ec1546498c4d6f4b1b54b5cb
8078221864aa2caffa43c934d9b37c8746a667de
'2012-09-14T09:38:05-04:00'
describe
'59805' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRLS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00076.QC.jpg'
b2d7c4ed4ee0d3c3c2af5e4ba8009ae3
978494373ce92043b49515d6b9daec94cef21712
describe
'154474' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRLT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00048.jpg'
a9478e722680b390804d7ec693593c2e
b6d7ba500c0eb8b1ff6a975ca8f12383df99d179
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRLU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00043.jp2'
55b7a00735ec2d7f8edcc66a4002b8ea
a1e3df602a068b15887205a2e340c0c5775ad440
describe
'176219' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRLV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00169.jpg'
0e89a94b6d43b669174db3d0ec2d5db3
bb8b857c47d191c247c2311fdba20070f6d07589
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRLW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00092.txt'
c467c95cd2f3b19dadcee34872179ea1
e1813af47e386de42c6bb1986e0a19dda0fd2c25
describe
Invalid character
'5810000' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRLX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00051.tif'
d777df2f9cddacc09c2bb6f378e1fd97
e6e39a30dc904178d12d37a455b686c791a6f18f
describe
'22114' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRLY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00071thm.jpg'
c6e5c7cef7ad5d5aacdaaefa5f72af84
08c8fcdfffa95077e77166ffc2129098400f84f2
describe
'766' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRLZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00025.txt'
c70e3fd2fcd7b37d4f562f5b275050ff
bb782e502099acbca64639fb502088798122612a
describe
'5808596' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRMA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00145.tif'
b301a8bee568337050fc6ceae3e28aab
d79421c947a7d23340fec04a2040e7e436c5433d
'2012-09-14T09:36:51-04:00'
describe
'5811828' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRMB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00082.tif'
6660233ad6d695dfb86621434a43505d
e5d8cd59354420e0103d148aff9c74d7af8b4fd1
describe
'465' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRMC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00141.txt'
1b5e321e286bc40a1e82e4327fb9125a
785dfc582bb4771eafe18bd2c2047e180196f02f
describe
'724717' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRMD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00067.jp2'
07fed1862f111199b68cb59e9c85ff16
3b1b6354889046dbbc395cd4acabff352dcd4d10
describe
'2330' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRME' 'sip-filesvid00001_00115.txt'
c11f68f5858e014329da4d7900d9e0cd
9f1eee39b65859258d8f5ac07ea6721b78036122
describe
'159' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRMF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00065.txt'
75e55d3686271a293fa7a0c4732ea270
c024f134bfcf22101da936854dff8851948be5d5
'2012-09-14T09:38:25-04:00'
describe
'9891' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRMG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00179.pro'
c627c8dd14297aa76f0b8a3df89617c1
94e169ed300daec232c04fbb9e5f72049c3dcb86
describe
'169429' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRMH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00052.jpg'
192f82a89d23f569ea64d2791c91358b
1c2b02b6fec38cc720afae18a0742857101f3b82
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRMI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00034.jp2'
78d4c2a1420845f34b9ba6cab31ba22d
9b7dbb0c453e18b8062b8e84ce2651a7149e565e
describe
'185457' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRMJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00091.jpg'
7d07e0f442dc483d94458380f44ed8ae
74633c60794dae54131935a2941ee4a4c37b37de
'2012-09-14T09:36:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRMK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00042.jp2'
cef9ad93a80a9f35680464909558fc2c
545679217302e131c65b93bf48399261a87ff18f
describe
'2221' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRML' 'sip-filesvid00001_00135.txt'
f2e98255ef54a9f164b401bd01b8c5ef
3c38471ae5666157d05cd2b5ecf7432ba57fcc70
describe
Invalid character
'63381' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRMM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00105.QC.jpg'
a8546fb8cb3b53d0244c61c5497cf6bf
653d8ccfbe1f88e6ad7ae8d2b43c4721e479cc75
describe
'5809440' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRMN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00090.tif'
9c0ff5b434b3071a25ab7014ece9b6a0
a5a4cac98794ad67c5fe458962317b9fec3015a8
describe
'59842' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRMO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00045.pro'
b4268f1e702c14a886a06ba2277c4198
3f6f4aa6a4b205153021090875c8f17c159a405c
describe
'169653' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRMP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00117.jpg'
d4f408cb68b7559e49e1e0aa468fe127
b0af29b7680ff6a7d3bcc3d9f064ef705416e946
describe
'5809612' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRMQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00085.tif'
05cee616211fc53570298cbd2011071d
2aac84ecf7447efb6d61181432a9e4d059ecfded
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRMR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00165.jpg'
a39255b788355ab5eb1e246ebf8213b4
6e6e7a07e2bc826b92d4c27276d8381515eb7396
describe
'2286' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRMS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00118.txt'
6edc040efdc18556f180a364acc90af7
2a125ee93d2d99a6ab7b54c304580c64f2a16bfd
describe
'8099' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRMT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00031.pro'
bcc397582b73c194693ed5f58bee4349
66dfb2fe4afb0481f59afcbe9bd8beb383c6cea9
describe
'2327' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRMU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00020.txt'
f139214de438e8291124d9a4072375cb
6629e66ef2c844b4a83695956bd439e1be202cef
'2012-09-14T09:40:41-04:00'
describe
'20950' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRMV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00167thm.jpg'
ee1fa08bbf38fbaab8734e5bcba557ca
304a398751cdff23130b7a57ebca53a12a27601f
describe
'301' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRMW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00088.txt'
9c3dd18f43e03cb30c50d775b873c838
5a19f8731d09fc273e6da23e7a06e6dd5620fdce
describe
'2343' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRMX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00129.txt'
295d0cf52bdea59456342da3485f3860
60a82266b41130931e29183f682f79fd0c0518d0
'2012-09-14T09:41:48-04:00'
describe
'62101' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRMY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00188.QC.jpg'
4acfadc2b6e5d1efcd6e22bbb66680b3
59cef24e33cfc9519c2d7a084600dde38f1fca56
'2012-09-14T09:39:09-04:00'
describe
'358' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRMZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00079.txt'
7d5d9d7a914a1364dd076a5f02ea23e5
3577d585e2d7cfd17b29e783fec431c520a5c49b
describe
'23306' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRNA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00044thm.jpg'
67e9e2e76ab492859f1f3dc47580684b
07891f6c7ce912e3e3df2f602bd67e49e6d36b5b
describe
'724740' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRNB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00076.jp2'
6e332b0b29fd974ad075537b47cb49b3
29cb95cc40c2ba5e4d98994adc1b2f66d75db414
'2012-09-14T09:36:55-04:00'
describe
'2347' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRNC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00123.txt'
90294fd5c3f4c63ae741ef072c9cbc07
3863cac471719472a6c2ca0b457b55248d78a224
'2012-09-14T09:43:15-04:00'
describe
'141' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRND' 'sip-filesvid00001_00131.txt'
db8ccf6db91b58770d688e29b29825b8
5128e96ce9c1f5995fbd9f4aeed8430c65650b2c
describe
'24279' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRNE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00056thm.jpg'
433f9a105b38c927d699ed0ff8198745
9f3da30d11aece55bb9961ec13fa61e45ff2e386
describe
'5809864' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRNF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00174.tif'
3ca7ea349eb70c8813cf3b67e06fff50
e76c41199c3c1ad4712933b35e0798bbed672c2f
describe
'724799' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRNG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00008.jp2'
4d22ff3ef3b3151ab5b670078acd0e30
056e333c6c09c4fd3dc1faaa3e8b1e123bab9dd7
'2012-09-14T09:39:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRNH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00068.jp2'
64545f82583e342476aa4b63c46963a6
810e577acbe628b5858ad3d5d16023db393ef2d1
'2012-09-14T09:43:08-04:00'
describe
'24015' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRNI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00108thm.jpg'
2ad9e82d71bfdaf28a7a919c75fb840a
0cfc28fd63be796c7199eafa89387abf8142f3e7
describe
'22898' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRNJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00064thm.jpg'
f18053efeeeb8957148f9cb1044ea9a9
48655e833feb32ddc6883c58809f1ea5ac6cb280
describe
'167627' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRNK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00185.jpg'
d6f69534a5b09009886cd04cdf02fbc5
58b6649eb00bdaa37f967a6d114fae88a5d79bcb
describe
'16566' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRNL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00181.pro'
9505ef0e09eef0eda78a93caaad52e3a
c0e1abd34234df66c04115c7b421ddb3f37cd172
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRNM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00021.txt'
a3d589c27cbcd046721ac71d56b17b10
7d02a7ffcbdc79a17d69e9d0b19b0847a0aeacfb
describe
'169779' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRNN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00132.jpg'
663fd813ba1128bd0aa741605b96302f
e405e50fb0e23eb96b6d5d980a4ec5430038b74d
describe
'2191' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRNO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00134.txt'
3fc00b341828dbe6d663eb8000cf12f3
e45819cd7f26821362048dcd500fde6d52d6f53e
describe
'724681' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRNP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00044.jp2'
c611074525bc8c7737081d580bea7863
40a93ff9652813c2ad917dfad8a3c1c89daffdae
describe
'572' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRNQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00069.txt'
cdbcf0967fc0026009e5b2c7cba092ab
865bb721b03b0f56c83137d28abd77244d8a5d16
describe
'20986' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRNR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00147.pro'
258e2c3446c249c4958ed0f42eb9e0ea
776f6e2c48357dff4a8fbea909005fa352e156c1
describe
'5810136' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRNS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00075.tif'
47eca9122475c1ee9245578b25c7db6d
b3fa10b5ed02eccb6aae2247c3348751232132e3
describe
'44699' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRNT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00051.QC.jpg'
4a75d7dadd3e02c6a7bdd31034cbb537
5c2e1cd5326050057c405c1afe736d6f7e08849e
describe
'24294' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRNU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00135thm.jpg'
40c2411d120109c47f389e55df87a041
3fc3664c545bb758c3dfcff9b0069316effd659b
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRNV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00075.txt'
10ffcdf9a05a244f013e282f2c9374e0
99c610ce1cd7ca3c4651a661c93910e8c5d5f910
describe
'60190' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRNW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00130.QC.jpg'
1c60b202e61998445f666f7a4a2f489f
2309d6ccbd1a5fabc04ee1f4e8c99dec7a40ccdd
'2012-09-14T09:43:17-04:00'
describe
'61292' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRNX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00148.QC.jpg'
a7f53685fcb44751166046020a89b1f6
a9e087054eb05d1eec0d3fa29eb088037d3fe4fd
describe
'167780' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRNY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00058.jpg'
fba77cc2605ac3990d1d0ff68502aa32
edcd13472f03bfd778f66d60f146bef6f458c782
describe
'24415' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRNZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00049thm.jpg'
82e023e2354fbc5ad055d1239c3f3cc5
c4b45ff869ab44fccc6181eaff4060c593915386
describe
'2328' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACROA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00150.txt'
3e2b2b9189e4e8ddb5506f3d5506cfb1
5761ed6493b67370b20f3c05bf1c2f957ca8e3b1
describe
'175779' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACROB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00111.jpg'
80081367dc6e9c7f08c7c13d78891967
d2ddb5529a9396635b2b2c32fd01375274613f34
describe
'58726' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACROC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00033.QC.jpg'
7903d4bfbb0251ea0e72c9f8b952f28b
9820986343025bd446fa118e095f31dd3891824d
'2012-09-14T09:42:49-04:00'
describe
'60175' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACROD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00124.QC.jpg'
790d01a78ee3d8b7be673052ed7199f5
4f5552ea71046d9e7c421cb1528246d6bbfe4ff5
describe
'61602' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACROE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00118.QC.jpg'
87e58da10bc48d29e8f9c4e277a083d5
d94e128fa08803b6221cddc255784d78f67e8d19
describe
'5811440' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACROF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00030.tif'
42a224d66a9eef6b82e82df9135d10dc
73ad3ad27e66cb719c89700f1864e9c6227a0850
describe
'180909' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACROG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00027.jpg'
317ad353f058a999d2fbab2ec05add42
9bc16711ec6907a4c304c475ab6b4bd4b83a2211
describe
'18938060' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACROH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00192.tif'
f3bac964090a5e4f9d74b1800435d082
1c52a1bc7d2c8851efe92edf7fe0033a0ea0dace
describe
'61307' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACROI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00050.QC.jpg'
d582dc752d19ea02f1bace450e8f15b7
06d5d69978d01719fd916646a3b16cc839ba62f5
describe
'170863' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACROJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00041.jpg'
b6343bbe74ae6651de191a2199260c11
b626b03ed389e64eec08809491a7ad9b9904f668
describe
'61356' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACROK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00150.QC.jpg'
90a47d55721ea42dd7d96c1b655a0954
6bf8e9cec17855fd94a9341bb97acd3fdc9ae514
'2012-09-14T09:38:59-04:00'
describe
'49856' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACROL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00063.QC.jpg'
a040ebd91483a1eb163f7683bd8e8ee5
a6366cae4777eb49ab26c289a3e4e5774601bc78
describe
'22694' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACROM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00043thm.jpg'
207cf8a702e7266f578309501e2ce49a
241379b5e28496312f8b46466be9d9ff90453ba7
describe
'58508' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRON' 'sip-filesvid00001_00084.QC.jpg'
a66d44f9b3649aeb79eeb921d15c85d7
70ed300055b4a19b98c73237b8755bdc5292406f
describe
'22262' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACROO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00015thm.jpg'
e01a788b8d6e59600ff40ae388407fed
8a737a36ae9334a608148d7093aa3c37a6e17fd6
describe
'57998' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACROP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00138.pro'
bc58f0d4215fa4f01ac24eeb22134034
d7bdce33243e11136caac1166de3c859e9f054e8
describe
'2439' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACROQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00056.txt'
79333c3866a99e468aaf9a7ec7706c72
20be8b30082c0769affa996566de44941ad3ec44
describe
'27400' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACROR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00192.QC.jpg'
7082cf611fac6e85bc0f4863f10715cd
aaf15c878e4f3a5286c09217fd45b0e1af61d44b
describe
'54719' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACROS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00175.QC.jpg'
89017b1875d526a9ba7084c7b80f525a
7151705ab10d0346104e58f4f4477cc70eeef3ff
describe
'186480' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACROT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00039.jpg'
79143c16c35f0f8d7395c0ff1d26a144
f860652df51d4a19ae81d9ae92d7eef0ed6bdb05
describe
'5811432' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACROU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00064.tif'
8f61a87e9742c7682df2bb064b2e2cd7
e5446e024e2457ad4d7456a556a74ad357d3a519
describe
'5811852' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACROV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00146.tif'
4422919f0497c60aeb6fc9537f298b22
efe6c74206ef5827470633dc3db76efb3b29414e
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACROW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00021.jp2'
77c707c5f6d347b4b94e51c51219bb1f
102c12a3f189e1bf81c2001a1ed3e1c2cc541992
describe
'63896' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACROX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00166.QC.jpg'
778bb83f5e8a6859794696878c37d674
a3c5a1ce77d79a63071244de2a2ba07faa7f0278
'2012-09-14T09:35:41-04:00'
describe
'56811' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACROY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00048.QC.jpg'
3e24391629d7339901a1f62adb4f3572
4f2d630b9a08bc6977f7c3f1693aef838aba59e5
describe
'1154' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACROZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00097.txt'
704b112292ff1011a3485fffd84afa20
f320399381d0e6437f66c1889e53ffcb2d843dc7
'2012-09-14T09:36:01-04:00'
describe
'5812164' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRPA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00114.tif'
e9cc73c3a42a63e576784a7d70175872
0a7185bea288e3821490959705ebed4918928fac
describe
'724725' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRPB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00070.jp2'
5eeca36346ba3d5ac1d727f8271687b0
dee20057fef9e4d09b33e2c5cedcfec4df35bd3b
describe
'172315' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRPC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00090.jpg'
9ae771f1c1a4c3d1b87d1bd122dc7a39
109bffdaf9ab4968bc48eb4790340fdade88d5f7
'2012-09-14T09:36:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRPD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00150.tif'
8e220c707d5421d41d0d519f85262845
36cf781644b69ac0a5b7bcbe6a59c3d348138296
'2012-09-14T09:38:16-04:00'
describe
'25039' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRPE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00115thm.jpg'
479596cbd521c7a4cff2d1108645de5e
ccc17c5feb7a95b8b5ffc0bd6ec821df315544d4
describe
'170857' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRPF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00080.jpg'
13a0cdb6451e83048090ebab430ac007
62c9ed11b61b0f33b7bb5524cb31c32af8b0b298
describe
'53821' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRPG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00010.pro'
4bcffe1373588454be28b724fc32b6d5
cb5f95469ade7f1bf532ced8e2b809c8030f514c
describe
'23967' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRPH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00050thm.jpg'
f36ab87d69fd70a08c2435e4a5bf0f10
78e2521c3fcb72a2446a5b854b0d3e27be379537
describe
'25344' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRPI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00017.pro'
3780053ee6b94197baec788373e98320
0f32f4bb50084292919fc8f2d876188dcac8c3ba
describe
'61843' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRPJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00042.QC.jpg'
3810c132d150a3d7b3c32224b77757b3
56f3870e81d89f282ac65f9d0d0468eecd385b6d
describe
'23854' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRPK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00078thm.jpg'
9e4e922d33dd044eedab85f38f811766
6e9883ace07d17d4696b335016afca1cfa22be4e
describe
'5811592' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRPL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00042.tif'
966ace5c293697f76c89a47462c55a24
3dbe74924e790daf2331a6e2f2a7a0b7b696cc86
describe
'2266' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRPM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00124.txt'
65ba742d3afc9c8ca18f90ea62cdfd60
707f6bc60b7db2b7ba1c05338757646a43d50e12
describe
'171112' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRPN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00017.jpg'
bbcf85af8a0fdcaa23cb3fd2cb0e39b5
a941b2b7e015260c2db81af755015b69b8ef5d44
'2012-09-14T09:36:28-04:00'
describe
'19584' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRPO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00125thm.jpg'
f081969cb7e7090d94df7dd1ef202986
48c363f2d12e23e56db9706bb7ffb7a2e66aae50
'2012-09-14T09:42:34-04:00'
describe
'23395' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRPP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00084thm.jpg'
9ccdc43d88d8f714919a267a63bba335
5907b5699fa9a7729ee25910a8a53c4002a180e6
describe
'23958' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRPQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00068thm.jpg'
806d82b63518657bc9e2c02257fa4b71
fe86e3c66e141b7907a86ee5cf80e7a66f29bfaf
describe
'5810420' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRPR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00181.tif'
6b920cd917f2e496e2eed78185b056e7
f6cd98362d6053f252fa436b951985a1983ed36e
describe
'23905' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRPS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00082thm.jpg'
4ad3e9b25d62cdb443726bca0f815503
7798061dc20797de2e0835f9342901ad8c569a0b
describe
'171995' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRPT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00184.jpg'
373b7d260baeb2a7d21cc20f84854f01
dd10f91a31361b8b7d9b6c6a9b88becbb0e127b9
describe
'25147' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRPU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00083thm.jpg'
bc94d7c71e6400fe69727dd303491851
6d02ede481d913f98c18f2ac821317664ca95738
describe
'2242' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRPV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00014.txt'
2e6705a3faa1192c7b0886f68745097e
69dfdad4b055b70c5c22e1c776f648d0b8fab675
describe
'20754' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRPW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00063thm.jpg'
c1bfdce838f5c1e471c5557069b48462
05546d380b0a42447febc1a3c048e7832dc36edf
describe
'724575' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRPX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00037.jp2'
7cc61355b4ab4412e0df9429ad86cb77
9acc9ed6d09c1bfa24b6ff7a09834d72328360d3
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRPY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00142.txt'
ef1d4d37d140af3e835ac765cab430da
7d53a585172952b40848a2e5c89a34ca9023e461
describe
'63215' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRPZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00092.QC.jpg'
423a20fba9bae8860e1c511e4d5022bf
9c4b0c0d86b46b2bef9f0580ff2aec394418d4f8
describe
'59314' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRQA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00014.QC.jpg'
83c39b67bbbd9ee8bd3dcf6b36e043f6
1d87bdb69dd1c168b5c9d5942ba96958bbd90003
'2012-09-14T09:40:06-04:00'
describe
'17183' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRQB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00077.pro'
7c6c22615406c199ddd4aff1503fc113
25e45064c5d62e4c9dbb652f9bb2b2831eff7690
'2012-09-14T09:40:48-04:00'
describe
'51199' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRQC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00139.QC.jpg'
0649f0207ae725f0c4716e582b660dcd
c6398c50d3ea94d65df7eb58fa0aa8fdb05a15f1
describe
'411' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRQD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00001.txt'
23b68e4cb46f578fe2d7c8bb6bcbfaad
8c927a243edf2355a152cb27c7d500d71777c47c
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRQE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00108.jp2'
2aa0b03f519f173f3868139a033f8cfe
db39bd8426ff736ff7f814782f0de9f32e9a21ee
describe
'58742' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRQF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00188.pro'
33a794739116e48cd0f3c23c0c8c8e47
59b2242b0b44ca1c7982932fba7f6840df54cbc0
describe
'5811568' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRQG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00080.tif'
5b94052371889522e8bcc62159600d0c
5f50b2c6c0cd675fc5a94d8e0e4a06f7e2aa6b6c
'2012-09-14T09:42:36-04:00'
describe
'2285' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRQH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00011.txt'
b13b3f7917471d1e067d1610769affed
27762c68accbb978b7ef3c9c166853fb963cb63e
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRQI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00139.jp2'
90b08a5189d606b5ce8508dec97e4d92
ec0671facea8f7b1e0ad7ee800b084880e39c8cd
describe
'61324' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRQJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00058.QC.jpg'
479699e0a440a959bdd8e1c8b31d0fda
5561fe4b9db6e4a90b3cec62015e1028ee1e3583
describe
'5812112' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRQK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00022.tif'
927b1516c3fb10fc0e7803d09605f8d7
1c5f5603b084fc7e8f3a1b7cac155cad98633b2c
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRQL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00017.jp2'
77eab66dfe1b37dc38d4290bee03916b
9618048ae3057490abb78abc78c3533358a4bc15
describe
'5808732' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRQM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00009.tif'
f468309ef9c349cfadba76aef46d4b34
587653a7d7625c0f1aaa0b2bed6f36387952c821
'2012-09-14T09:42:43-04:00'
describe
'23712' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRQN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00054thm.jpg'
3047880c5633554c2b221e9dcfa26c76
87a68d0ae9853e3d175c8756a7615ea73a20b786
describe
'2264' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRQO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00066.txt'
9b6584b25ec7696979a6712275ad6f35
4c63a1a36642a2040230139abc1a1c98ccbb7aca
describe
'63386' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRQP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00094.QC.jpg'
e78400bfa97686833a1001e027271947
a94c3f7486207b0d6dad6e165b20559b772f84b6
describe
'2357' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRQQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00095.txt'
fb6e611dbe41bd7949afc7634662dac6
93d9245641c4245e7cbc588d12939e92698a1dcd
describe
'2290' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRQR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00019.txt'
5bfdae8a95348e8b4260fd47a900e05f
33d65cc3a8ddf7cab95ffabe4fef9a48ad07cf60
describe
'24126' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRQS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00062thm.jpg'
137bd6667e9a2bdbfff583e438d8fa0e
e0ae5839262495ef5d265ba7ed2c40c6f18fdf8f
describe
'163775' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRQT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00190.jpg'
f6d064e705aad345f9c943ac6b3cdb37
1c5d297973f03a17f9086a88fc765e2f78be7ba1
describe
'181052' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRQU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00098.jpg'
5fe002c010fad208c7d5b706f3439700
04f0a60b36809021241d99e70f723424111d8b4c
describe
'60498' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRQV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00105.pro'
d6fe26b7e7d0deab33b1d59fabdeb72b
674dd62b4346bc46d16589389675a328987d72ac
describe
'59803' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRQW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00011.QC.jpg'
62a6dcc6b00e5ae86844ac9de783e521
28981226041dea1da39de90dfebd64e0c5254716
describe
'2313' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRQX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00122.txt'
e350aecbaa91144ca258ffd144ecaebf
eebdd1992e59805a0439c127dc22909eb42281ac
describe
'17896' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRQY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00063.pro'
b9f35c77d530eb0c98b64a50e2c8fde9
9f47b4ff4bab182265b4c5e73089bfafbafcc17e
describe
'166693' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRQZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00044.jpg'
2907d5d5898b347ddcff40626909dfb3
1e5f486aafc210256dcb6f46d9980a4211a8fc33
describe
'724767' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRRA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00182.jp2'
0386a9335016e0660d62b17a0937b15d
485f5765772c563d67d5d24116a0f5d7ec9d23f1
describe
'2214' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRRB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00161.txt'
7f4edc4d1715ddac8849191b21580b7a
bbf32e975b47dd3faf94452a3486ea28cad56bb8
describe
'56966' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRRC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00108.pro'
9dc2c611a08ebe6ef5e586b3ed7dac28
41e509c91d87077d7b4c4f7dc042f1fd257e4858
describe
'669' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRRD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00077.txt'
321d5f339113f6457fcb8a71afbb43a6
e962e66b2b3330bbb0b5aa8d1ec0a32fe6df6ec5
'2012-09-14T09:40:34-04:00'
describe
'55461' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRRE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00160.QC.jpg'
c4c510b9ac8f7c3a421a9700acb1af27
c5fe8402aaa6836d716f0c19b6489b5f0bdffea9
describe
'35759' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRRF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00136a.QC.jpg'
9e32446e0f15abdde128000632cfc49e
4be821a89cf46759f7651ec17c634a3bd16dfcc9
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRRG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00155.jp2'
938a6f3284ec760eadf4a35f7afe1a79
e72f8ed0ba2474290f6f85aa246941ee6ceabeb5
describe
'23450' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRRH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00066thm.jpg'
f4624b8c0e5b9c23bbbb46b40251a91a
091f83d7f8df51ae51824e1df205dcbeb5aa136a
describe
'62223' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRRI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00087.QC.jpg'
9e1f13a48764e3f8cb46358fb7d146f0
3a2b057e6781c76d20d0c9785d8b6774aad95e1e
'2012-09-14T09:41:17-04:00'
describe
'5810540' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRRJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00083.tif'
7889e2a83fbcc035b19ecda169ad139f
c7c431cc862b5c9fbc9219182b7857cb6d1ceabb
describe
'5812496' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRRK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00126.tif'
8a2c6bf0e6d18176d74c610ea30937d9
0c7b18dfbd398ca993ef1ecc3813d121c8a6a9e3
describe
'5810008' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRRL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00056.tif'
f6a3a1551f8573780b2359c608b0c838
a572bd4d4ddb1918c13fd7e63b2140286cf01a15
describe
'60695' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRRM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00135.QC.jpg'
29994d82535f022d23bc3552bde04183
f40afe533539feaa403777363eb6122ae777f234
describe
'8337' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRRN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00167.pro'
a9d38c5e3c2fdfa7599920add4614784
5d2d0171b26494ec5ad5dd8bb91eb23f709091c5
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRRO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00046.txt'
0e8aedac2849c293fb88514d4f3cfbc7
d8c41f4ff4d36366ae3401fd12dde8eec1945591
describe
'57225' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRRP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00130.pro'
fb4d3bbe7b874449fa22ec68a80d1af9
9495a34edc859bb091f9189c9ca5eb8b9a4ab8ec
describe
'66811' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRRQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00006.jpg'
d619af4e0ded5511fc9bf93885501649
43f74aebeeabc640ca2174a84e5556385e8900e3
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRRR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00159.tif'
9c972c1050a06966e06a5031416726b3
fc07ff7bef811475cae805092e670ac4df5fa2a0
describe
'81' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRRS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00073.txt'
c812837aeb51feb51aa48254a11ed4b9
fe59bece47ca061daa30bb4ab03f2959b3c9930e
describe
'189865' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRRT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00103.jpg'
132afc91a11efe2daa7e51f9c25680cb
25d58a3fb664720382c6e854fbefa29764080c4d
'2012-09-14T09:41:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRRU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00084.jp2'
fe00bf56e6be20176442995359ba5270
9b407744a378f8727962776e04de09a86668a328
describe
'2337' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRRV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00030.txt'
ae00c4ede8a93d4d6616483ec4c654b8
c24ccc10b691803c3d490c993d99509af59379e8
describe
'724777' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRRW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00180.jp2'
902da0386ab4ccd0205421e880a8c697
6f7638f407c52a704c39230dd6622620bf99c750
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRRX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00010.jp2'
e00d9535b9730ea53df36d09b52d6ae9
c44fa01a86424c665da1de68328cb9911d56594f
describe
'818' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRRY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00147.txt'
e7ebd5ab4d626c7c858eeb3dc469fde6
d3e5703c9d427d689cc086264df6e5ba10966616
describe
'13834' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRRZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00187.pro'
112f0020054014f48b6b41da3f4de8b5
0cade1759c4270421145f6d84ad38ce4f23253e1
describe
'5812428' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRSA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00182.tif'
bb4a32539b9322739f941bb8d82d86e7
aa760e6aff7e93484819a0a0f3b462da1eadc349
'2012-09-14T09:43:12-04:00'
describe
'169664' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRSB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00118.jpg'
fd6847023537a20f9e1cea46e194053d
c81a55b9369cc3c6dd1ff7d624b9f2c9323ff8f6
describe
'59735' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRSC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00020.pro'
451b2a4e194e9bce6ec016cefb6ba707
18f3c40b1cbd1e7c51722bfe161bf8389ec88cd9
describe
'724761' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRSD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00024.jp2'
b40ad89ac580b2f1d53957de2b19d666
d5f4dbeef21f4c1cc27e29db844761c8e5bb014b
describe
'10109' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRSE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00004.QC.jpg'
2bf30d7da2a01c5dd31829c3f3200327
8a0cf66e03df7fddeeb2df0119c286957d5d4fc2
describe
'42443' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRSF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00005.QC.jpg'
ef38a9252a9f0ff216ebec1efb24bffe
0fd98acc3c382d0801d0a38e02aa44081b1a23e6
describe
'56308' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRSG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00162.QC.jpg'
d1115b03a252ecdeb7f85ddf28cf6bbe
6b9983106f2c66869f9f007d72f6c89d6f5970e0
describe
'5809732' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRSH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00079.tif'
1079e5e0e3a25529de186e9b92bb17b1
74c734c52820db6912783f1326f638258bbe2d64
describe
'5811820' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRSI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00018.tif'
f5ec333dd5dfd4d864575eff27aaec45
d43d9d29f6cc852690ab53d10596924dda0ec667
'2012-09-14T09:41:52-04:00'
describe
'58760' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRSJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00101.pro'
f9e30df3d27ef5abdd96099dbc563a54
da1f38bda677849a1ca2972507dc8ae755f41cd1
describe
'45776' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRSK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00133.QC.jpg'
589f33fbb1cd3f109409b58001457597
d55276a5ced0f6fd51f8572d4bab7e25e21711c9
describe
'56720' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRSL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00047.QC.jpg'
01dc98a61d44e92b427d53356f20f57a
b62e3bc1c43c5fe4eeacd9d6356f21b33a3e435c
describe
'171931' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRSM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00120.jpg'
afc87c98f663f63ec6f574a445b4c3c0
07f7a6c97d0bafcab145d88116c9b087d6015f81
'2012-09-14T09:37:23-04:00'
describe
'21526' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRSN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00141thm.jpg'
ea07cbd8b70b600bd7e1e08db04bb5e9
96e079c410b3725826d029cd56cd84c09ef1bab4
describe
'5810004' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRSO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00091.tif'
90ba2ae317b738864369f4241014619a
4bffad6fc643549ee94db519ade8590acc585a32
describe
'23556' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRSP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00011thm.jpg'
6634062f70ea040aa0c00d9eb9208018
5099aca525fe688666d77db847e0fff3d14e1e34
describe
'724742' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRSQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00082.jp2'
a266fc49889770bf087527cf3fc49f00
f15218e6affcdf59d9785b0a56a6af5ce1c21a00
describe
'19199' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRSR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00051thm.jpg'
a37a3b391da42a35083edbcce6c174d5
27d3f9817f1f074ae6970939e1303decc3c22c73
describe
'724747' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRSS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00006.jp2'
345a3fcaace157e67bb5f7c78abdc42b
1889b856cba0520472b0509363ecc82a4e98073a
describe
'46763' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRST' 'sip-filesvid00001_00189.QC.jpg'
2d8109333362117889d16fe6e184342c
706374c413dc1275841680d8d1560f5811dd027a
describe
'724778' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRSU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00104.jp2'
e720feb63265f239c5dd6348b4a6612e
f447a33d96475a73e895c452a1844182c851fa10
describe
'724607' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRSV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00189.jp2'
84456904ed92706743621b9787af861e
70a4ae087df47834867cee47e472fbd3647c89e1
describe
'56963' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRSW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00038.pro'
aa161129dec0c696fb7512e2b544c22d
5734d61ac9dabc772794669e83d3b4c4e1c8cbef
describe
'1928' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRSX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00158.pro'
934341a001a9572776ea3ada572a23ad
a0c3a37c78249dca53d70606607ccb7cb0fe2b8a
describe
'5811932' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRSY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00086.tif'
284842d87642003df08429b4eec40f22
ce9641247da0c8c98a93b0497723ca66d3096842
'2012-09-14T09:41:08-04:00'
describe
'50626' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRSZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00007.QC.jpg'
400e0e26815aa02f55253b7b5850fa66
2dc673d122c6c3a1067b9568f1e760d617dea14e
describe
'23539' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRTA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00163thm.jpg'
b6611f1238982cfc2c559821e315790e
a2188311bd1c2e235936aca0e6f673be158be552
describe
'22413' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRTB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00031thm.jpg'
6af245a20c47b6b609a502534ec35b97
353270ca763fb6b91262e91fa04c3b6da0f4354d
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRTC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00109.jp2'
5b8406ac90c3ca4473bcc81dca2146ca
9b3cf1ec7692a3b7ea06b9a68fb2867a5f423f07
describe
'2358' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRTD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00120.txt'
3bdc9b8257c3be2651c621ee1e79b0f9
cc722e8d869ead91c57cb5169c282f54b459990f
describe
'2346' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRTE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00140.txt'
2ccaa98a34b5c8cd93ecd57f6bb98e63
aeb80a47e7e0fb30cf5e7dd41d24a9504f06f450
describe
'173692' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRTF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00056.jpg'
10cc350fd3b4256fb8b4d44f160db3a0
5e6a14a308fe11dfbb365c9edbc3efcefe18564d
describe
'23199' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRTG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00024thm.jpg'
506005bdb545a671504d0f4a394e4b17
d1e3dbe84f8ab6187f10ec415c53fe57494656c3
describe
'2352' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRTH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00169.txt'
b21d658b73577abd68401bf804130191
2a53a14787521c9daf531158feff77afba06f60e
describe
'8163' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRTI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00143.pro'
ff6089ee6c8dee30c2070ba448ad4244
7a0783f4d634eb15a384666819716dcd6cb936c5
describe
'48258' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRTJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00002.QC.jpg'
3824a0415d4a83be19abed626909506b
efa706f581b4cc0f173453a95662978e88ed6533
describe
'51076' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRTK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00117.QC.jpg'
afead54e42beac9ea746863600d23a6b
3ffe95087b6037f3c5a8aa55649a5b6c840c3c82
'2012-09-14T09:37:57-04:00'
describe
'724524' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRTL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00174.jp2'
41c59aa549cc8f0b9522f98a8fb8c14b
53a8fd9dae942a77eb9103ae3984d39174dff8e7
describe
'5811332' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRTM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00152.tif'
792e451468bb9ff1aff66d3eb7009a7c
a0efadbbcae30750d47c6c0c7920d00e26d73b06
describe
'166264' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRTN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00009.jpg'
705dd2b449d2dc287b1a784808e80981
3f7032bbf8355ce4e7df357d31f0f757c4a0bbef
describe
'5811516' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRTO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00012.tif'
20b896707b4d641ca5231536c6b5b588
22d6716b4f1ac7ecf0b2b1b415bb6b7dcdf51878
describe
'60345' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRTP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00123.pro'
e33a5f4f60834f5078e61c6cca6c9d05
58a9e40a5be97921c6deec16fad0b956880191e5
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRTQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00005.jp2'
b09b96ff6df13e649e34ee9cfc832319
4f8ef224d4f55a0abb8d797b737ae8fcade87b59
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRTR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00103.jp2'
c6e153264625cdb9cc4a90b65bac8ae7
8dfaeca2ea476e1650afc1f990f4e1ff5c0dfad2
describe
'2241' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRTS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00033.txt'
7b498f6889325fcf37b62de7a4a0f972
f00519f90c7707f4a03c91d0591f151235c88679
'2012-09-14T09:41:24-04:00'
describe
'834004' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRTT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00191.jp2'
ee4dec0dd7db6f64c0378e844f3173a0
7ad2103cd8163e7d35566373688f2a6bb5f5fff7
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRTU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00105.jp2'
6ea02a2bc52828c5130df6d7b6160723
b7d1a77e8283088dcbc8e9e77a4b8e7e08ae398d
describe
'60009' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRTV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00154.pro'
c93283bbe415b5639b2a2c9550ed3e69
77e3bc1a2634134d59ffc2c74f4032ed4a817937
describe
'60064' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRTW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00144.QC.jpg'
18a491502d4abe3de69ac16835db356d
1d614f9de5197bb908f58c3974810b8e5cfb1c33
describe
'23495' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRTX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00138thm.jpg'
3e705ad88479c805eeb9f5f64d53e56e
dc0d400a9f31b3e606c8c1503458c4f8d0403678
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRTY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00148.txt'
5e77a5f36fb4dc2b73447137162e85aa
80f215b0950ed435a0fd020fc55e5dffac30b328
describe
'58090' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRTZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00111.pro'
11f6aff7063ad78c2422a05430e7a5bd
641b4e424dfdad197679c00139649d07cfce06b0
describe
'5810804' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRUA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00167.tif'
bef239c53af975cf29048a414e2f7465
bcb871ca6ea8d23f55f94732f7f306388a382685
'2012-09-14T09:41:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRUB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00062.QC.jpg'
c63802dfd7ab2584e1f84444c660163c
f95c7eb24db0884c54b0e4e088367dbf89d8f018
describe
'724760' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRUC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00062.jp2'
cd8fcc6756280c6efa2d85a4af1b1219
a7fa7359fa681dcfdbc331ecb1ece5c0491db6bf
describe
'167012' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRUD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00064.jpg'
f6c9083a213ae33ddd01a2a68682f6d7
3be4e58bbbf637136bae8fffa4fbfb2c7187e371
describe
'24115' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRUE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00098thm.jpg'
58fea818c2e8c8570d9ef0786cc47cb1
c574170c60d7bc2040a61c5c902a881b7d5cf437
describe
'181952' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRUF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00047.jpg'
3b0bb9cbcb402bebdf3bfe55a5d883cf
d774d8c1c74aec9570dc7e10ded23f00035e3606
describe
'5805908' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRUG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00088.tif'
2401d424708135e5afe4412c54033fd5
2ac1c4c631cce1436596316ebc06fd166152bb2b
describe
'62048' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRUH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00151.QC.jpg'
7665164a9d4ee883aed92545e2c9e7cb
f648dcce08853b3966c6e436310f779389680eb4
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRUI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00074.txt'
f4d11a43c19b49547a20ecb2b24ef248
ca71fceb4e9bdbb9f9a68a3550d001a2b1ab027e
describe
'5811816' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRUJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00038.tif'
4687a768845c027decf348be366eee7c
881d92d72105c904ff6aa7e9e42777af8aba8565
'2012-09-14T09:41:54-04:00'
describe
'724587' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRUK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00181.jp2'
f2f5154203efc4fa4f57ecd305e2490c
a27f197d04e5dff06616cc27c7c7b448002f6909
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRUL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00164.tif'
e2c1a721664b8f7b96ed217a3b59e5b4
9660e069e7eb2da81885325289d0cb78398d42be
describe
'2292' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRUM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00178.txt'
17b3dfabee2e9fa31537f09c98140879
4e9030752ed0780524e924d993bc008996e26965
describe
'6480' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRUN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00002.pro'
9b038c687095989f5151f48c953761cf
073c909c27569121dbcebf45bf9aae20c89cb696
describe
'62512' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRUO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00023.QC.jpg'
fb621c493fe7b6a4836479332e65ef5b
e3744f45f8e133e454a1bff3c22300a0e8e45ba7
'2012-09-14T09:40:35-04:00'
describe
'2251' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRUP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00058.txt'
dde3bffa58f163290a38e39e555bc504
41bff198a81c659705191b0b0f0e594fdff62f15
'2012-09-14T09:36:49-04:00'
describe
'2278' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRUQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00151.txt'
845d82cbc8bba68eae4eefb6b006152d
fad6b98923f2eed670b486794736df42a15675f9
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRUR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00050.tif'
e68af61d537c1c2d82516f15c423192e
990d2b169bcbc55c282b72b59f92c42ac024adef
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRUS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00085.pro'
9c13ecb536e425426932824a21ddfbf8
6056c02b50023b004a95494e56e9851ed9e2e033
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRUT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00040.jp2'
922c98e473547ef09dca49203b15ba70
eb14565f24f150629c48adfe4c0cf067f10c846b
describe
'24357' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRUU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00124thm.jpg'
825a66e92c76b3db6c09561a264d1d0a
5cf3a17d581fe0495b05365ca5a564e4e076e3d8
describe
'5811788' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRUV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00054.tif'
9463969e1d2011603bb8e9c8eca98dd4
94e407affa33096c84f1982e229f9ff00f26a49d
describe
'7927' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRUW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00107.pro'
313ad238f27f841d5d470ec368a3e410
8abf4b2d8dec0e298c0e7ed292e88f416750e51c
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRUX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00045.txt'
0658f753d73eafc24af1d54531e38289
f69720f76b5a2daf6fa91dec9780bf536c8b71e7
describe
'724500' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRUY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00087.jp2'
2177a353831e87a672aee93614cf6b53
9094a3b41c19153d70211f4d3b9bcd45b8ecfa70
describe
'5811632' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRUZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00076.tif'
70363b5e7c67194181bb7afe9a5a78cb
772cfb1877ddbcadfb156aa2df5d76c8f06d5118
describe
'150' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRVA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00035.txt'
3b1ad48e824163244184f8b83762434f
2e9e54bd1e589b5d7de0a0bcc7bb4b12c569df3f
describe
'172052' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRVB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00110.jpg'
57188dd66f858f91bdb3a98df9bc3de9
c821a4531767cd40ed656ffc100586ef8c601b7f
describe
'62603' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRVC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00098.QC.jpg'
353260dc3ee5205f5590d796258050cc
15dfd4b77820e036bcd2b433a22b1fd49a9a2eed
describe
'5811216' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRVD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00065.tif'
3a9cf0f84f075e103e6a66be42b7a3b3
d8e19cf15491f7c89d94fea1f3378e24c2d9bada
'2012-09-14T09:41:58-04:00'
describe
'58018' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRVE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00029.pro'
e786733ee52b5a0f849fcc35fc810275
570b91c985169a1a9718a583c8d069efbf791861
describe
'61376' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRVF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00078.QC.jpg'
357aed85408308990e1857416815bb60
a033af677e63f7a99206f58bb4092c484d8e25cd
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRVG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00159.jp2'
e3914d077f0da5cc0bd2574cd4da83af
0b05f63ea2bab7895631445bbb6d446e4aef7907
describe
'21596' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRVH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00191thm.jpg'
315945ca6f01d8017cf42d14fdb07e57
0b496fa2ff88e7c7816be762fe17f1c71df17461
describe
'24724' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRVI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00184thm.jpg'
c5433a59f16bf18be0ce6855d85d39c5
bf1bc633ceb0a079859d69504bef3c5bd0159412
describe
'60957' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRVJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00092.pro'
7d7726e3055bc1d932570e53c1069295
56f80c23aba49270291d5a2eb7a3e302911d4b68
describe
'21805' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRVK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00037thm.jpg'
437fa36b45be9bebc00b943082fe8fbf
358ec34fb4e70dd2e789455d8ce477fe60af0e6b
describe
'724724' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRVL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00113.jp2'
5ba000e9e7e57d480efe4e3646b9c013
2f8e0b4e11753a8ccc26b28ea3d7e058927b5071
describe
'2194' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRVM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00070.txt'
02a2801fc1a690416c4889a072970b1d
bbc2563440ba4400399ce5be56047aa51ca28d10
describe
'24354' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRVN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00109thm.jpg'
d0cac4af164b8025c1a1b18d54cd9f14
8a7a78dbd88f2be5bce2e4f6b3cb3ee325c004dc
describe
'5809548' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRVO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00127.tif'
487e95884158af976a09c6352f82f127
b68b1ecd64e11f25fad0d9cfd0809f38c9e08165
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRVP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00101.txt'
cbcb4202e0356df1f5f10b3ae1b41abb
105654af4cae12f9e55eab5c554d157abe6b420f
describe
'724523' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRVQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00079.jp2'
ffcd2071720b976a51988292eba3c713
cdeac214e716b47f94e655be2a39fa5fff8bdeaa
describe
'63010' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRVR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00184.QC.jpg'
c191fef3c5d8c6a30d2010e34e3e7da3
387b3040313105269aba4818b90ced623ec52912
'2012-09-14T09:40:45-04:00'
describe
'23308' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRVS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00147thm.jpg'
ba30c7a64af8eb74b2ec06e906b8de60
7f4d14a02588840749a024c7b1cacb1a4295492c
describe
'61723' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRVT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00082.QC.jpg'
f5095a131446328b056f4cb8cf8e3c13
aa313932791220c22ec71c4855a32977b957eb7b
describe
'22292' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRVU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00152thm.jpg'
00c2bdee2b1c1696e5efea4bfd1f53fc
0bd11098bbee42daca3d6ac0cb43ea384a94a829
describe
'20860' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRVV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00003thm.jpg'
50941fc2c33d3925e16e28579bdc71aa
e434dc99deec879934699a8bad12e0c70c130baa
describe
'51686' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRVW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00141.QC.jpg'
f184091f251023c025fa8fe1565e5565
06ae4dede322e8fddaf4c8dd695935e62fabd900
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRVX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00008.tif'
2b844bbf9cb4fd3a7fbc7c01b5130dc6
067f7d559f9201c690630e75410ebee6138ab77e
describe
'55844' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRVY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00155.QC.jpg'
a22a0c6bef2599ddf6f4869e75a4d430
c3d5235fb8692d156a89263a5009a0114e782489
describe
'2315' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRVZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00172.txt'
3aa2689db1ee78df36782cd69eb1a319
9734a578986976c67758e96e437f78796194e03d
describe
'724737' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRWA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00133.jp2'
082f2ed5ac96417cc16b5f426e2f6a54
354ae528c6f419fc58e6c94ca53871b8d0f75b89
describe
'724801' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRWB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00003.jp2'
c433d3119fb4616cec1645fff011ab92
9fe0a85984777c2cbdaaab98999c049a60ef16e3
describe
'59585' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRWC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00169.pro'
feed1ff0ff565e505785d966feffd451
712044f6034af1369273ed6454a3a16b549b5fa7
describe
'171253' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRWD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00156.jpg'
a3eadb6cc49d0ca91556f003230d1bce
92b2b35117c96b1062b178d6caa4e82d1277a1bc
describe
'946' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRWE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00057.txt'
5f84c3215d3f1619efb908c251702de5
70eb0f0b1e5b7bf6d9b3d9cb6f2141e525b73fa6
describe
'53115' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRWF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00077.QC.jpg'
7c4b5bebcac88497363af6f036bc17d9
b171a03da80281327db89e9e3eddd6a032f7be5a
describe
'63401' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRWG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00027.QC.jpg'
6ffecc7b3cb7cb89648ec0997f452458
85e85282cd075dace3775994004fe2658c42e28c
describe
'58070' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRWH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00113.pro'
0a8eef947d2f75792393cb48d8204b89
9af4895979a6745b027af060385daae1a447e4eb
describe
'5810992' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRWI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00003.tif'
14ee55ea2728e17019713a36e1df436b
21428a8c177eee6aea481a5813aab09c627fd31c
describe
'22303' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRWJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00013thm.jpg'
20043d5a090a5fcdca98230a7e96c30d
997e9fd7a7aa9f3e4621d5271b684c9ca7ccec50
describe
'20309' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRWK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00055thm.jpg'
83f8e8a535d44c5fefbc74fe0ec16a20
c87c603673ca3c1c25b0b924d48ea52dcbc3df88
describe
'5812100' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRWL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00053.tif'
ff83523ca9ffdad9742be107fcf0e50b
13cca150d7680f0a6e14bd826a9b02a23aeef857
'2012-09-14T09:38:27-04:00'
describe
'60033' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRWM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00036.QC.jpg'
fd735c096ee4e20f7913eceb8605d3a2
d9cfdc9e2269e71ad28a85dcc26d9d966dc125d1
'2012-09-14T09:42:51-04:00'
describe
'180769' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRWN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00122.jpg'
65d7501f15f8f9654080dce6ca7cfd1d
767dff818a0af08eacdeb296fac729271be88896
describe
'172805' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRWO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00137.jpg'
4d143ad63dcb361e942995572063ae32
c42cd8229c55da2813ec3ca34d18029081155985
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRWP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00071.jp2'
21fee3fb703131d248f596f455772301
f3dfd0d329cbe42fb5d3f3e13e0ee7d6c773f11b
describe
'23298' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRWQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00121thm.jpg'
f3044390ad9b92f5ad6ec3fcb7de6acb
540e12849539c9e1320f9e6c48ff84884e7b184a
describe
'63' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRWR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00136a.txt'
bb3117b5d3d8560c084b569abde4de68
2dfcb76573d1e3c586c4b626b66d3537f5c07680
describe
'24141' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRWS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00092thm.jpg'
3ac3c3e096d4d7a078121b22222680de
1a127732398ca6194fa0a148c072a20ea77ab681
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRWT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00110.txt'
9cf64dae7f2862ffd6ee39f647380313
8ca035c700e9fca775608eb061aa54c4bfa73797
describe
'171977' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRWU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00076.jpg'
b30b8ef2e75293f327520516237871af
14da9b7bb3d9433bd9560048d6b3ae3b236c8b06
describe
'52919' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRWV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00149.QC.jpg'
0f5f95883e9f4ce13e173cb40bf55881
03f57edf75742978a21db7ba311ae22148921565
describe
'724751' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRWW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00055.jp2'
67e3b4ef629d3d9c1277afdaf875d616
a622f0718447aba6aee6581220f3ba9cc86a5b18
describe
'5810156' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRWX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00099.tif'
62147211d3be63874c31c5546833beb6
633a6aded90592b75cf84c867e1cd031f34f212d
describe
'19388308' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRWY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00002.tif'
6b0218517b4c115714e129c9402f2f77
b80a9b255b003e172c6a203097b7c0ce2026af74
'2012-09-14T09:37:16-04:00'
describe
'724422' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRWZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00009.jp2'
82b686f67105e79083408047e669c680
e5c08896ed1760f00c7a34cf7eff32c53e3145eb
describe
'23258' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRXA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00137thm.jpg'
fd6b364ca95206f2e1bb6d72db7ac4dc
39949a0e23c5683d05862420d4ca62ecdbfad4f6
describe
'124' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRXB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00037.txt'
a06c3916bd73636cfff54fc862f54a30
350dd7b4f48cb735b4151fc402a3c5be123bfde6
describe
'2383' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRXC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00009.txt'
c4fbfa157c16a3942a206d38c51537ad
9b7a027f4d508e082df6b91213dedd3f53e28506
describe
'54613' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRXD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00107.QC.jpg'
1e2eb624c62047333036c5007995326a
04c76de6b9d9de0daa251f8437bb0927d37f394d
'2012-09-14T09:40:55-04:00'
describe
'58232' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRXE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00178.pro'
39ab74170033c9d9b40b15e919ebfc77
a28c194fbc1a895a0f09a74bc1d77f0e68cbcdc5
describe
'107809' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRXF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00158.jpg'
25ee1e8b65bddb3a0c1d861040add85f
e11d55dcdb863d6703bb7391f409ef6c21b38e3e
'2012-09-14T09:41:47-04:00'
describe
'58500' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRXG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00018.pro'
32efd06659674e29e492930ab6cc4dfb
b21a8ad10eaab462b7d81bb64fe23e7f23cc7375
describe
'5812320' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRXH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00019.tif'
1aa0b8999664b5b77da884c64399dca7
f1fd5288283058555d4603633b18c0a32d8c2eb4
describe
'59535' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRXI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00184.pro'
9954717137dfece4f56893a0b64bef5a
cb13c171ab98c3e4a8058e6a24a277121cfdba0b
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRXJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00061.jp2'
6d30041d2940fc5522273ac48e96879c
04a982c5c5976297eb31b32efd065d6e60b6b9fd
describe
'18932036' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRXK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00001.tif'
926b3a0d5f7f3e55ed550a9e6db6d822
30a0943360a235661cd4b4dc4d8410126a91562a
'2012-09-14T09:36:35-04:00'
describe
'724719' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRXL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00045.jp2'
ece7204fc048a8d81396115a30f7ad2a
eadd7a0d39ae97a412f177d3dd6dde561a29e280
describe
'168300' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRXM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00161.jpg'
3080950341a1ae5a311ed2770021900d
739a28e155b0aa12a73e1302d3c952d5ed98bbbf
describe
'176181' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRXN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00106.jpg'
68bc29833c9458bc4231228fee02e006
a37411bed50f10e8b321ab44f2b31f729d3f0054
describe
'176349' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRXO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00057.jpg'
b799ad49bed12d5f9b2cc54c0cdcfb08
abacbd39d7bbaee024bf147ef1be0f419eb6b23d
describe
'24388' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRXP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00166thm.jpg'
8ee6241218b404e9d9dc55a5ee1e8445
8db48cd9c018c95f9008b0a96fa18bc0c9ba9130
describe
'60452' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRXQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00126.pro'
a00c2539d3a549332c11dc718a0ed7d6
74474ddf914525e56399f0dd82fab58a28820209
describe
'176866' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRXR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00105.jpg'
7b915f9a74aa45795fe345f47a6b351b
9954177a273a2fef82716df8dd09e788d2e0de4d
describe
'59798' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRXS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00061.pro'
4ff4dd7d1abc39544322240fd1bbfc0d
659b8e2f870127f0bc0381081f8994f72628888f
'2012-09-14T09:41:41-04:00'
describe
'164859' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRXT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00138.jpg'
02b8d8ee4a081b00e74c132eb4a0dd65
f81992c171ce2b109a14f4fd6be936bfb7ebf719
describe
'164131' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRXU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00173.jpg'
458582c14ced3102e2e3e43751a66c4d
e494b61b6ccf5b315a4f758b6e57136fe8729c5e
describe
'724736' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRXV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00019.jp2'
df6f37be7d88e8e1990ff90cdea0d9db
27072cc44ac01451f2983f382ca432292f579c21
describe
'5812052' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRXW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00058.tif'
0f72eaa1f7a7a2e139deeda23e109a34
3521ae453e68cf1c9863dc45729a5dc6d42df769
'2012-09-14T09:41:29-04:00'
describe
'170392' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRXX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00059.jpg'
8a0beba37e13cc98f9466f79e1c8869c
cb359170e1f0a5f68f70261b7607087060c05089
describe
'59482' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRXY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00128.pro'
e740b915231aac181d00678f24add5fa
3ef1582b63f863395a730ce9cba28239eb7328d4
'2012-09-14T09:41:07-04:00'
describe
'724308' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRXZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00187.jp2'
4c7f79c28560337c2e7260311130e1c5
8548de6ddbb3f70b11f602d861868036e8e470d5
'2012-09-14T09:36:52-04:00'
describe
'5811904' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRYA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00014.tif'
8b6e772f5dc06b97547c961c35873014
b2bf213ea7e3247f91c49c3dc7c64c2f873eef04
describe
'24419' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRYB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00156thm.jpg'
6d2d3da3ef2e3a18a43fa4f6c9761fa2
12411ce371e753e5778695ea96dd6e380990f83d
describe
'173510' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRYC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00018.jpg'
4aee4a8ea9ba1d7e0019fabb219fac33
b075272c7eb4f0e00130649183c24109c182179b
describe
'62179' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRYD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00168.QC.jpg'
995c30783d3264311423d9db944d24d6
5e03ce9cdd258a1db4802923399cea2535002efc
describe
'187362' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRYE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00162.jpg'
57c9c3234cf9f322d38f069c3d013d3a
4a1cf97384d354bef381003f7587d4dc3b664350
describe
'2302' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRYF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00180.txt'
d5d951a8710befd38c1c5b299c6e5bd8
1fd960e44f43e09e13949f8eda3abf897134fdfe
describe
'58813' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRYG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00009.QC.jpg'
5c551d5570c8ce47094263cfb4e6defd
b73dbed49328577bd685e47ce946f79e050addc6
describe
'5811804' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRYH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00078.tif'
a734ac7a61be446b029c14eff983731c
a3de73f2c518881a275a72d7112239ec7f2e8818
describe
'56581' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRYI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00026.pro'
321487212e36bf5531bce2d7ad7f19e7
65eabcaf329293c89af0726931a1dda48251f699
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRYJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00031.txt'
67b81e5cb80f0a3a8c177331f142c880
fa373cbfd48955bf5b9df7c53072a213a166898b
describe
'59587' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRYK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00127.pro'
ddd4bd688dec316f811ddb607c9618fb
bcb9f48f0f00e1e1ab53fea07b923d92d0ae5cd4
describe
'58888' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRYL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00078.pro'
43b25d607190398be7f3728e43f76d5a
9bea7c8bbcfcb7e1fd9d4b2a9a35636412ddcf94
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRYM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00048.jp2'
4fde1b4d8678e18ef90669efeac511b1
19bbf6670452c723ab839f5db24b8177bf41b0f4
'2012-09-14T09:39:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRYN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00111.jp2'
bc20da9ed2b1b8e388d1472b1e4a873c
6412ca01086bd2758e8626079c694be3fbed56b5
describe
'788707' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRYO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00192.jp2'
b46209f4fa55e4636685d55a6643d500
04fe6d9871630467a651182d7b18ef002349212b
describe
'17458' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRYP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00131thm.jpg'
d3a2bb6c26775631afb69b59ad13fe83
2ff8438251fd4d1661cfbe88603cf3db64f2d62c
describe
'2353' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRYQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00098.txt'
0df015c4c191e51124215e2d9c4e612e
222719ff4bfdd557b32737ecfc9100ba142217b5
describe
'724486' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRYR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00089.jp2'
b79f53646e218f738fbe97885cdb3534
73c371cdc53b8141a90aca882adc24cfafdc8729
describe
'57289' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRYS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00079.QC.jpg'
f6a733227f0bfc81a468cf738c2b8257
3fcc1249e8158506d6b843d606e6db0ae455e087
describe
'23862' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRYT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00174thm.jpg'
84fc43e51f0dbb86b461ad14f002e360
0df506f1dc646e97d96d4278f4c1a53c48e5886a
describe
'25731' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRYU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00043.pro'
aecbf92cfa33da604609825f60ad45b9
a5af95a81f7f9eff55016fa62edfd7d6e776459a
describe
'749' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRYV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00152.txt'
c5fe347f824bb83df89a59291bec330a
af7f0c45b4b6aa6d9db48d7136610ecc5b16cafb
describe
'57370' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRYW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00076.pro'
18443b63a4754932e0ad81d02693f47c
603f9252da54e2c4c920c0c500dbb788eb65a25e
describe
'2374' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRYX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00137.txt'
96b8a0c5cb756ee244cb5105c79f18cf
c08f3afa8626cf1bd0cce194bf6a6b11ad04d688
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRYY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00146.jp2'
2d853acd55ecf4475d66f4669a218d5f
2443bab83cc45259b5cb4fbe3ff155a913ec0efb
describe
'2227' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRYZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00100.txt'
45334c05655c6acf987177bb8c15d3fc
ec5c63ae25049cd1f727e88b59a9e0503786f671
describe
'5811716' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRZA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00142.tif'
82097c7528dcccf08d203b17f04c61a1
6f0a63f2516bcc835389cf6006b4c9e705637305
'2012-09-14T09:37:08-04:00'
describe
'5812044' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRZB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00118.tif'
b32f70542ff7605b214797cd509dfa04
c60551efebfb6a43ac11b728fc04ba0bc1a132f1
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRZC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00156.txt'
3b03a1aa033dc3dc7d4dad50a842f863
1eff324eb82c81594d555e17b2ef82e7f9d4819e
describe
'24683' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRZD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00182thm.jpg'
b0af78746cee36c8386e5aba2b2de1d2
8cac40907635917c05358c8da7380ded39d17aa4
describe
'163334' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRZE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00054.jpg'
3f98b663ee2aa993f4c14f80e6fce22e
12bab012343899b547a864e3b264ce6549c7f00b
describe
'60590' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRZF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00165.QC.jpg'
97f47a112fa6543fd5a5fa16aeb54dce
8b73be17e4a860a3368362e51b6409c1a6ce36dc
'2012-09-14T09:36:44-04:00'
describe
'705' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRZG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00155.txt'
6f2052606c412e7671ab3d99cd6048ce
e4086a5c11dfbef54e15a889e56334b0cd420ab3
describe
Invalid character
'701' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRZH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00063.txt'
46bfdde3b28fdacd06883a55db736419
822a1d80a6a75f5e076b844f02683ad15e77f930
describe
'724741' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRZI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00096.jp2'
11b20dc573c058e6cb27e0f374b30de1
94c0f1b2d6abc30fb2abd825fda2d9b50c6dc0f0
describe
'55071' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRZJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00147.QC.jpg'
b864b71bb92fb48b5cbbfa27bfd846a9
3e4ec8050638072898b7a20671c575e14f273033
describe
'2280' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRZK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00087.txt'
0161f1693b26fc28f268a8f6120a41b5
af1eaa32a947fad4fd532b9bcfdf48d0a0d3777c
describe
'168520' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRZL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00100.jpg'
1fef92dbf41ea55aea41a186a75cf52a
a29724dfd55f7b9a7e061dcb7f9f1161a4cf0f12
describe
'177674' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRZM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00082.jpg'
8aa27009a9e4087168334656bca680ad
f683713215d7fc8b26de12a7194a3872cc5bb134
describe
'156' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRZN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00055.txt'
6a8007c8cd0be3bb73904036c5f22875
5160f703627a4964d8c6e723adc6ce3b188ee2e0
describe
'59292' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRZO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00102.pro'
27f6853d285632b2d93712251ff64fb0
581faf5016bcc15e5370dbc18ac0f4f91391751f
describe
'17582' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRZP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00060.pro'
6380e32c71790cc9c8eecc9fd17fc7e6
94f8abf7a3c703c0f15f83f22769dd76ec1abed1
describe
'175794' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRZQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00179.jpg'
dd65b6fe1bc95ce736a2aa182f773296
04a1af488dc654165e96c1c927452eb3a76404d2
describe
'193566' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRZR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00071.jpg'
e01cd8780bac3f6137e84e2ff2d641ce
7b7a302a33a518a2f610c3b8f942fb3896af5fce
describe
'22664' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRZS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00107thm.jpg'
ced9023ac329efd6256c19361961e57a
30476fed7813c41277c78c856cf44bfae514e6b2
describe
'590' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRZT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00149.txt'
c8149bb4dc87e02631859576dfaac709
f4b67a61c68434b9326712a3db09d5ba00aebeda
describe
'1068' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRZU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00099.pro'
f84bd69ba100c1b7893f00920f7d8f2d
a3db694abfb5c5640dedcd2041529aef0d8344a6
describe
'19874' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRZV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00041.pro'
1c348dcda8ec85bec18642e61c296330
805300f7dd7f324ccc2f7b3964a1e179c2068817
describe
'171860' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRZW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00135.jpg'
e54dc67dd4785b4386f954c1ac6373e3
37d3fd7d1b281be876592047dcde253e3e34e92c
describe
'5812236' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRZX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00109.tif'
93780bc4b347dbcd7bd5fdf014d4118a
447a88b504eb7929c13dcfa28e4da09ce6ed26d7
describe
'58933' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRZY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00049.pro'
53293de467ccadaa6dbe63ddf3cd2875
0a041d22b80089e71e8cc204cc4a7383c0c97f43
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACRZZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00086.txt'
b8a065948333cdbc51936e1cda85717f
80b397c0d682d9ae2af3e08570a75e94bec4edcc
describe
'23788' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSAA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00168thm.jpg'
90813dd20924a9798f1b8cedd03b9a3f
ce8cbf2fbaa5119016005c6f3d1f6a1cde527f32
describe
'172584' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSAB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00016.jpg'
d62c75790e338ac85cd6520845f92523
9bea39cfe53d64a511d38862b4d5ee267e725cd6
describe
'60977' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSAC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00052.pro'
2089dfc2f82bd323eff0c0fe5fc976af
ba6e59a77cf6be3ea49efcff5fafb1bbcefba6f6
describe
'22429' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSAD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00034thm.jpg'
b6dc4fb60fae28fb8e2601e6e8d13a66
451e51fe08dc35e705dd339cb9de3ed61927ef86
describe
'2271' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSAE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00024.txt'
0ce46ee4a1212b2b2e4f684350c7eace
e6b8306fec61de7f8d8a221b1e6f1bc8d7e9b71a
describe
'49948' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSAF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00145.QC.jpg'
8eb71ad20d7ce535e927c481229d58d3
a03e3575fb8db78b2b181f74d9303e8a924f2af3
describe
'724426' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSAG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00077.jp2'
1b0ed211ed8abe69d38c37587caf68a4
ea519a3b1628adcb669b4df14a03e4f223658109
describe
'59920' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSAH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00039.pro'
cf042f602c65d965ddba787eb742eb19
8a33c67141be3a5fb49bedf2e7ae203f37c60ba6
describe
'189163' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSAI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00143.jpg'
f60768002cf851b949242397aa189ffe
b3df490074aaeec5bd33efa66fe64665fadca1c6
describe
'173941' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSAJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00153.jpg'
655ef76a9f2264348290a7ab207eecc4
650b23f7c8d7d753e4cf8e8c80b72a21830d2ada
describe
'21473' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSAK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00057thm.jpg'
5ab7bf5d19d1c3c4fca54261140ef451
20155be39ad1e8175607e0a9a428bdceacf4a5e6
describe
'59963' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSAL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00038.QC.jpg'
cb470c572b3a9c293da3b8b93dcb6dc6
38afca7843e5b914cf19fc95f8c8e1af3fcdabb8
describe
'19088' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSAM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00133.pro'
88537f12de6bb485a7f21d9475b8cb65
44a4671ac15d1c7b10893f654a639065b8046933
describe
'24659' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSAN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00119thm.jpg'
43b934ad0008f1cc1a303000feaced80
3786c61e7bf167e515cd056cb81ad1363e22aed9
describe
'20026988' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSAO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00191.tif'
4242626aae2a10d46a6090306bc873e8
625c91b0b1101d6ed07b7849a264ff92b86369bf
'2012-09-14T09:41:53-04:00'
describe
'724542' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSAP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00172.jp2'
34de838fd3d284ab0a158b47d03f8cf5
8e4d28a2103d63cfc087e39b1e15133a7f4e8c06
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSAQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00068.tif'
fb854f27279eafd349be0d3d9bdd84dd
11a6bb40b6a092468a67495a496bc3327193fa88
describe
'20636' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSAR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00017thm.jpg'
1e9fc5547ec8268da05490df43e99343
d21d4cdee4a85cf2317353a4e4f4858be8d75228
describe
'5808764' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSAS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00161.tif'
c98cbb03004322a9c46fb5c670b75e29
8ed74d806ce9423ee3779712b5c77e7bd450e2ed
describe
'58526' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSAT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00161.QC.jpg'
52155cff8c65b6572bace70f1f51499d
f0f06c80622e709ad61c7c54c9109a398548c8fb
describe
'167257' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSAU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00186.jpg'
42feee020b0ff4e3b08bc3a1377cc4e3
77d96f320cf99b405b194ddf57b342bb138bc1b7
describe
'58978' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSAV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00168.pro'
6d41835908a69d47976cfa59463f7e7f
ae1ae50ea3beb9afe7a987080a0ce43e7afa206e
describe
'165650' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSAW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00051.jpg'
0a70c9fc774e3f7f4a344741016a23f3
f4625cbe82908c3047736167b1703ede833162e7
describe
'58190' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSAX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00124.pro'
0193639c40d1130125a4adf896fa03c7
61cbcd1aa876c6c09f19e500ae71f48c394fd299
describe
'54224' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSAY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00071.QC.jpg'
3a07d11f2927d6d41f5572cbe6e93860
ae50d87842ec003164337a8772fc073ce31a1281
describe
'178337' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSAZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00127.jpg'
91bc64986131deb19e2c9ce40e3a7e0e
6864dc7deb910c8323da4222413db8fd3b8967f3
describe
'59954' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSBA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00115.pro'
74d9452ec0e9037742f1ea5ff3c494ac
a93758510697a06b3df1aebe1f94f2d12cfe5547
describe
'24477' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSBB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00075thm.jpg'
7436e509ac9ee6a4803935119303fa41
b62e358c9c6f94639a543c708357aa8ebb2480b7
describe
'2305' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSBC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00085.txt'
95abfea6885fa467cebe5b33f292b6c5
4a43a6aefe973631caabd95409408f937b0b29a4
describe
'63588' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSBD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00127.QC.jpg'
28470460dc3283a59571c747f9bd591c
fd175819fcbece261ba3641aae1c0f5e4ad6884d
describe
'24628' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSBE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00188thm.jpg'
9940af466c327285ae21a213d334ba75
761750a472bec62b3a271499fcaae58e10269101
describe
'5811772' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSBF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00069.tif'
fbb02f1403fc6ec00e6241187a11715b
48174d1816fb19564794b4d5ce494808ece99e38
describe
'174970' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSBG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00015.jpg'
d9d4f8dab26c153b3da34e13cb692b7f
ae3ed2ace0b18e9962fc0ab05e06af5c323ee60b
describe
'22819' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSBH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00095thm.jpg'
dac915a1cc95287b99130c2add0bfee5
a197d020b7191f7639fe41b15dbb46e4d6f73e7e
describe
'1408' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSBI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00136a.pro'
60cf4de8a497e9ccf8102c5fc2e8fb15
7b6c60abeb33af9004d0d71d1f9d0a662ac908a4
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSBJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00140.tif'
d113f8c7651cfdecfb40dabef53f0bf9
235cf9482943ffdd170e5e314659cb26f94444a8
'2012-09-14T09:39:05-04:00'
describe
'56341' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSBK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00075.pro'
c0aeddd3935f3d19f7724a65e1f7ad08
8e4cd2f4eef741620ae3686a5f8f148d1bd9b906
describe
'61742' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSBL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00090.pro'
7f342ef6b638f3b1fe752f9f2c4c09f7
03e1450c40f7a15256147455bed65c334f8fda37
describe
'59517' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSBM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00146.QC.jpg'
501fe1ef67a0482fbfaeb09518f2312d
e2b9de67d46741af49762ca0fa7278586873bef9
describe
'24260' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSBN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00165thm.jpg'
a43b54371ebe46092cffd804ba8ff87c
df48ecdfdf7a88ee0938921c1c7013e6f0d22695
describe
'5811424' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSBO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00190.tif'
81e736d99a4dd8875e33cf93e022f845
2b49040d98c8d9223c224ecf6a8a53c5708ea8c2
describe
'724510' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSBP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00168.jp2'
0df051d7b365cbffc314853800ef09ad
fdf523910e5e891971fce585e7d458514ce05d13
describe
'5811560' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSBQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00045.tif'
44aebfe801edbc5caf5bcb44400519c5
4afe1610d089a03776628815e2c4343c735dcd95
describe
'58748' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSBR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00087.pro'
6b28cec8ac6f54fa48c63ff0de87e469
14168ab665cfaa7725489a1e07a771912881a2f0
describe
'5808424' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSBS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00175.tif'
ff5b3ab39756dda299c16d9cb36ee580
5c0da7d91229927afd37769687abd8862716b1e0
'2012-09-14T09:40:44-04:00'
describe
'23216' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSBT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00069thm.jpg'
fc7863af342fcc15ed14fb4e8993b5cd
f8bbbdaf9c9d7b0ee26ff711719dcec764bea99c
'2012-09-14T09:37:05-04:00'
describe
'58437' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSBU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00054.pro'
222868a2d20ccd951060a15db57896c6
66cdab7ebbee8f71df62a3a625d998ad5e846f2c
describe
'23803' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSBV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00172thm.jpg'
377b21139c26d72da9f0e0e8de267861
89f61c768548b825349f8b7fcc003842c17f6dc1
describe
'23480' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSBW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00103thm.jpg'
c2c612d662a41feccebfef8b8ac1c799
f41596726a065646365093350c9ea74e9dc4a848
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSBX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00102.txt'
406a85470ebefd54002550d2a931e152
470d229110c143ace3226d43411a57bb55cf9626
describe
'173858' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSBY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00182.jpg'
18b1701c4a9f2e7f4b47ab4bcab3059b
d4dfe69a524d7532729e20c3a9147917c5b0b0b8
describe
'724522' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSBZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00143.jp2'
21f9cb05dc2a15169515eabb14401346
ffc7b0436af43b55d0543232e8502c99b674c7ad
describe
'61712' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSCA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00053.QC.jpg'
af00f0e3a022d651b78a9c0c7894426e
cc17066841034d1d087ca3a8e353c33a6fdd0d76
describe
'22817' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSCB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00045thm.jpg'
fbd55996a7eea46a66d4f25016b7b813
2adeb08f021c1b167992d617ca5adb1461e3ffa4
describe
'724480' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSCC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00097.jp2'
c7d1ffa715a8880e5f74d61d1f1e916c
8b6f96901889d3f750f21e7013f350fe202349ed
describe
'164457' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSCD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00183.jpg'
bcb71cbd9f4b3eb7cd6197cdc7a86b46
a9af93cbd86141dbdd383e6d9ada30c0a723f67e
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSCE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00061.tif'
4c506d9c211ce624e93188725ca27334
7ca74e63df21bb449758cf08953fca1accf0bf5f
describe
'60388' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSCF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00137.pro'
1bd6f0b8f58bec26ac2d16e4a4d7f98f
b73dc346b67bdcb193a943a604228c8f1f6d2e45
describe
'59881' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSCG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00172.QC.jpg'
0aa515b6ee7ff2307e209fcf239e18e3
9033d8307b83c0d93994b79e8e37ba18d02dc01a
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSCH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00061.txt'
c677778ab009bd438980399dd1f89ac5
02bd616ecdfa7dffec64f8866f236cabed499a7f
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSCI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00045.QC.jpg'
a680c3f4de493288f342dc31c5392796
d47fbc0ba857ecd2875dcd05692061925b9871c2
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSCJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00129.jp2'
16ed60a4752c1fe79c4f75de3254a328
7c8ea36005439f497476b02655ef53fccc09a8cc
describe
'55135' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSCK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00121.QC.jpg'
0c85d1de6e93bb7b7bf47d4d1b3ea634
c74e0f8a3dd8bf8161477111cc8cc4ee6978448e
describe
'2275' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSCL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00146.txt'
229487ccd1f1163ff38f161703ec8d9d
0a99899402639407911847d03b7700311564a4df
describe
'5809920' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSCM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00087.tif'
888bfdf61b997abf1cbd61ef03409a6c
1191b90e988d32cd0eb7293cb6a076526d3a3182
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSCN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00096.QC.jpg'
75371b82b2025a466a4b30f3a4a7b1f2
c272800c07c2c8126b39f873a92b62cf3446475d
describe
'61375' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSCO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00136.QC.jpg'
25c17dcc49e50475ffdcd2737a68270b
63c2f42415cfc937574b25a347fe2e6940151843
describe
'57806' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSCP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00142.QC.jpg'
ec507e5e778decfef6dff8be9deaf644
9d65b23c906ed223ba707c58ff72209b2c508f58
describe
'172110' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSCQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00188.jpg'
050c3619fc3588f73bb9b699a0a811f4
54c50d81b8b54a3ae4742c24a4955142502205ee
describe
'176572' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSCR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00049.jpg'
b35ec170d1ff900ab95bc4f7edd52c4c
359c3000dbbc4d6b6761cc7d66b82a8934d7d4d9
describe
'176650' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSCS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00066.jpg'
b10a06fe41ee15d5e7c1888c1b234ebd
33cba3ca3ecd2add0cdd7dc6244ca80cdaf3a9a7
describe
'56961' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSCT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00142.pro'
b070ffa69a8432ee0cbb7ee2b0dfb59e
35a52b11d3ac5ac703ff0d6c7402eaa288158eaa
describe
'170745' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSCU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00022.jpg'
bb7100091920d53635705f6689fcadee
a0c8c0b7cf78a951832fb4dc7312071d92887603
describe
'2434' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSCV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00042.txt'
2b95d1f410cd7344dc670e0103e4dc7b
a85249bae0f4f7a7f64623d1ec6f66b0776b8452
describe
'21819' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSCW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00077thm.jpg'
4cb5829d0e1a933ce1dda412218491cd
7d38cdf529c6b3d74d23560832cdf3ee844210d8
describe
'5808944' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSCX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00007.tif'
422f37259e51a44def8d1c2a2789092a
375fb1903d4200e614e746a85fdda2d4c665578a
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSCY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00057.jp2'
1d8b6133220fad108438551252c5daeb
56a008d6bb89b51a29a5f781f9c08cd71ed507ed
describe
'385' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSCZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00179.txt'
0b9fdd67fb47cf57c9fe8421cc8e3062
d8c8f7b12b03d232757efd79f86ab00a5cbe49d2
describe
'724752' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSDA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00031.jp2'
5f534113da441ac8c82885b311f26332
91045d4b66e4386229647650af0cfff297643ec0
describe
'24108' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSDB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00157thm.jpg'
4652252230e9cd9767031de4d8bee88b
98937fa213ac924e99e9a11e131e227268e91c3b
describe
'162309' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSDC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00028.jpg'
6329fb8601989a1aaafbc385192369cb
99e0d6ace87aa46179dc2cb210a392bfb29c0475
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSDD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00175.jp2'
0f9b596df97027b00ce456e407b7bd8d
6ce0d0b804fab20b6a534276c1af12fb3b78b0bd
describe
'5811644' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSDE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00160.tif'
cab1541c2f5722d487d054c4fbf739e7
8b4ab7a2b7794a5ef30961b275b5e2060a10e6a2
describe
'169380' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSDF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00140.jpg'
a3b5b0cdd393ab2453811799888afdb3
3893da7ad18133a147c5ea4eab2ad078054c1df2
describe
'724345' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSDG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00141.jp2'
7a808027a60d0d15c2f4d5f2ddb050ea
628cd83464964497a5c25b28385fcd312d8a8abb
describe
'174855' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSDH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00101.jpg'
ad69e6f381cdeb048d9a9bd3b1b7e216
58fa5f1d7d92a5da903a6debfee9f62ac347b70a
describe
'22407' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSDI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00060thm.jpg'
85aa06fb0431c8deb4ee92924f623781
a41592235a186ce79e731319f18d48d6d1c88bc0
describe
'57189' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSDJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00136a.jpg'
9ed5b815231b4871e6256507fe75d045
2b7ff60ea12576f78f8dd18d37aa9d31f2beac7d
describe
'24298' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSDK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00128thm.jpg'
1cf986abeee328e781809edc452e4c6b
0ae045529f03faa20dc2f60a0f28822bc6698134
describe
'5809076' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSDL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00100.tif'
fca097928414d6c9e69fa308e6e65cd2
06621ba6c7366225eb62fc4229d823b287bd78e6
describe
'168215' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSDM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00181.jpg'
fb6140703d095329f5304a9c98af65d6
4f9f3d368e3219982446586c7beb17df8b6833b7
describe
'52990' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSDN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00143.QC.jpg'
11fdfe1aad838d3f33db8ca9166a230c
60ee199fbb1513b126bf8be7521c9ef6d5d4cc85
describe
'42721' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSDO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00007.pro'
b38322ef637de7f5368251dd50d911e5
46e7837b2147a3f4217b732c3a00474e91b74e13
describe
'5810212' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSDP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00166.tif'
23275bcb8076f4d92d32ab976f92234a
48e64ec58a6d487b0d204d48a10c24c77a7ee6d9
describe
'164747' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSDQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00180.jpg'
1e53a5901a3f8f67039cfecddeef802c
4e74d151982217762fa114e8b19b69bf13352872
describe
'223331' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSDR' 'sip-filesUF00074467_00001.mets'
18bc715860509052a50df6bc3c4ee9bb
94b3bebdac74791ffaa3210c4fa9a291a40b9cff
describe
'2013-12-09T21:07:55-05:00'
xml resolution
'132918' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSDU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00002.jpg'
7fd85e23ea9dd54198935243b2171a6d
8c204df61f1da54136aac414ce2efbd55f6cb3a0
describe
'172249' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSDV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00014.jpg'
e74f923c5abea98be5a034fde0330a07
d3f05c3f0bff3f7a744994a1c190c20144b3ac79
describe
'171558' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSDW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00020.jpg'
d756e6d4eedb6b341358970a5a0084d0
bd32feb7f011051d473d94653dc006aea220d759
describe
'167998' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSDX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00021.jpg'
91c338bd18c13374eead5dd3f1e0fe4d
5bdd05e595d474c1b0e1fcc8ebab7eaa737c92c9
describe
'174189' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSDY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00032.jpg'
ded0b7e1a8832162eb46f203e96d1b42
a4833e16c1289768ccc91ba7cf0f04551d68794d
describe
'183592' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSDZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00036.jpg'
094d34fdc3289f92cfc82c7332c2423a
5033c4662f04f2e62cc4e65b079f9df0bf0e7015
describe
'170707' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSEA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00043.jpg'
603d7d9d8c144db103f90eeb9b922abf
01570450c20b3e50873c10a9c31134a9f3a8d985
describe
'174308' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSEB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00045.jpg'
ff3d22f5c70a7a091394ad0bf0837edd
a6d3f947ae6b3f51e2bfef97ff40acb9aad98fb5
describe
'171854' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSEC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00062.jpg'
7a159aea04d82e12bc38f66c26878aaa
d590a584d5f206f0c21d8c4a1cea8fc0745b9b87
describe
'211247' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSED' 'sip-filesvid00001_00065.jpg'
4b4c8e9c8918450ce59352606b40e7c7
faadbfc205faecba79bf18554504027274fb9f1f
describe
'172221' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSEE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00068.jpg'
a0d4f88a327d9619692d6374212920a4
53a5651f00e2754f009904b03d0f50798d1e636e
describe
'177872' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSEF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00069.jpg'
ee7a8755f9330b008a5c3cc003fb84e1
93318ae9977636168a7ecc943fe1ec2a9e4ff870
describe
'175390' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSEG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00074.jpg'
0025275f5a58a5bc8366baaaf6d32926
30e09ce90dd416faa2c9b8873debd3dfbf6d6142
describe
'168582' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSEH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00097.jpg'
bb4675866b70780c67da04b567c87bf8
1de2b4989c19c967a5c76192bdfddc6e18f9a677
describe
'182219' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSEI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00102.jpg'
30f10f04540e71e34c84dbb2a5a4be98
8a8028809a4b155378e8a43d12e70be754105f5b
describe
'164757' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSEJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00108.jpg'
0702ec708270f76aae9f6c20c06bb0a4
6407f07a0aa34c258bf5897c50f80c68d88d21c0
describe
'167166' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSEK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00124.jpg'
40f8d3cfb410d282f3cd50422b2177fd
8b8903362ec2499387d366622227c2cc5c5d6b8d
describe
'171090' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSEL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00128.jpg'
d00972ef412f8a79c7e6856211dd6d60
f8372abb2f9e7bfb44b790dcda3f89234343362e
describe
'170526' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSEM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00139.jpg'
f2a7caffc2aa5d6563cc402e0b5663be
071642f86f2026d97475236e666b21ec55a77a7e
describe
'168839' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSEN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00152.jpg'
ee35f55bd67aabf387914399340bd451
e0b0cbf6b74d1790b495771937cd4568e79c83eb
describe
'172012' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSEO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00154.jpg'
494ffa7f4c8c805396a8f15ba1405cb3
0eff932b527c7147762cbd5ffad5d57599615a78
describe
'182098' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSEP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00157.jpg'
a68b3abafccf3b6a874681dc448df81d
49a21a881da542e0fb522e28b1fc7c5204a087d1
describe
'186073' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSEQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00160.jpg'
6d632452b8daba26806999b9801a3b1e
06f9f86f54ff0fafaaac702ca47ee17b4b9c0d9b
describe
'724487' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSER' 'sip-filesvid00001_00007.jp2'
e4243ddc91d1b721f511361212bfcd2d
17f33a9a414ef571f38845281febf843608f160d
describe
'724733' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSES' 'sip-filesvid00001_00014.jp2'
4dc5cb1f4d2ea58d06751b9f3ef91086
8a2c9f1f4bfa53eb374a8211549ee1dec046476a
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSET' 'sip-filesvid00001_00029.jp2'
1b8c1ae2571b56993e1134f240728c4f
d8f0d41653f7038a8a45ed05fc2137cad5704a75
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSEU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00030.jp2'
a3ffb24da753463579f162f2d4fffe0f
61289b43280144f9295b3c8a9e06aebcc402729a
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSEV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00033.jp2'
0051857f24b949b0423fb9873b44639f
97d200e85822eac0c79ae25553c87ab0b8306c84
describe
'724729' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSEW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00041.jp2'
2745e88b017e9ff52e3be315b84141d8
268d1566c3b5d38c9376ec626f0f75b2cc89b993
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSEX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00049.jp2'
a6acfeeffa3adb43227cf5d9d58e837a
0cfac26184d2d48c2f771d0cc5f094ca376eece2
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSEY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00053.jp2'
6a3acc5101b7d565da61af65e313213e
282608b964bd5b8ace9f75a8dad3bb8fbfe4af39
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSEZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00063.jp2'
9cfc62cb699ceea7680926098181d7cd
22a59bf9338affba157920d12c4270d26bdcc66d
describe
'724749' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSFA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00064.jp2'
ab3aa779b70782c4960486e19b42d668
ebd21386c5f70932916f1133f13506d6bc4c2a14
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSFB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00065.jp2'
e655f68c015f948ac7b3690089a27d7d
d05ae8bebdb07f2fa13cf38633489407b5f883ee
describe
'724588' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSFC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00069.jp2'
c45133f40c0cf17b1876f2aa0d9b895f
0c570554467b4b464be2a99c3258b1e73e3ec7b8
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSFD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00078.jp2'
826448047ee695df2d431f6907d4e8de
ca10f35782697a9c20bb378eb99fa11e747acc7c
describe
'724488' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSFE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00090.jp2'
2ecb1f63389621ac001cc1cefa015676
9a7c69e8c15679e9600c54cb622713e6cf40ae76
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSFF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00092.jp2'
f0325ebda1acaaf4164f6a2d6dae017c
a346367b21e968484fb10bde122855284c1cebd2
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSFG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00101.jp2'
dfe3f6f2529cd90c945c7f14974453f8
d65b4de5ecd9334498fd67943745b2d92ed8db01
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSFH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00106.jp2'
5917fea55c4f22c7ba059c05246bec39
4f4382d29fc21ef804f6b7c451d0f29bdaa0c655
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSFI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00107.jp2'
ab0fd30622afc3f9f0aaa383135d34a0
8688049fd362600742a2a4fe3c3ea8cd744ae20a
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSFJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00112.jp2'
a42c86e1b544813817abe7c60e6abb57
8f6fb7e6ab793c1ba2b20c85ca20fb5c5e4ede5c
describe
'724750' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSFK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00115.jp2'
b2b9f81ec17ec9a6970128d21543d0a8
ded9d3ba627404e6f0267c1f5c72206efddd97d6
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSFL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00116.jp2'
8e5f5c063a17773c27f7cbbe202b9b44
678146c54960e880de1d61790c6fcecf5fc9aa5a
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSFM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00119.jp2'
0f41f1c9f4baae6e1485a79dbff9fb6f
59a31278c9b75d6150c4ebdec1a038c2fa909ac6
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSFN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00123.jp2'
32dfcf64b4097b482cb9d7752b5285ab
5abca9feafa0a35cb4e57ab760e3067a650f6660
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSFO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00124.jp2'
1c3447991f21467b12bdf4844495f675
0fce4299395818643bb969adae1735ae2558086f
describe
'724371' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSFP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00145.jp2'
b3b5540e8a7b647b3911c96ed7d809e4
ff958e822c9972b2c62d1aee1da72db44759df3e
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSFQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00152.jp2'
a71a968e9372968019d9916b90466861
2356a18cf96790404624fd92023ce22d308b6111
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSFR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00171.jp2'
c41b6b3df3126a9ef21fe98671c122ae
bc4328c551391fa30f0fdabc617b1b4a4bb748d2
describe
'724776' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSFS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00173.jp2'
3fbdbd91cabc0508c1dbed890250f421
9dab939520988173932b8e078ac130f7f07a6686
describe
'724561' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSFT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00179.jp2'
d7860ddbf7f30dd6ddce93353b0f8231
8b128d26315a61a1f3d0dc43c2d95f696dacedf6
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSFU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00186.jp2'
d2745a8d20f2c7cb5f931f62f85b7dcb
5cedb47bd4848904755ded0fe8deb66c118ff8f5
describe
'5812012' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSFV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00028.tif'
2d68aa07eb74c02f6e3fd26255eb73b7
f4b49f459868a85f9f6b842646b40ac41cc2faa1
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSFW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00032.tif'
1fd356fedcc4d4751b64165d0578dca9
20d112ebf358ad925019fd7556d688c94109bb1d
describe
'5811536' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSFX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00043.tif'
1fd9f251fc650ec39095242dbff6dd9f
1cf36cd45d05526fba10cf49a976ee93871dc4f4
describe
'5811664' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSFY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00044.tif'
cd2e9e8bfac297d92b2ef485fffb9f93
384dd2127ca7b0086146d587c6b0599b3b63abb5
describe
'5811672' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSFZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00072.tif'
da691d8f2a7e9259cd1e1caf8adb0188
7f09e968ffac5f6948af6fc9f982f32f7fcee39e
describe
'5810956' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSGA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00073.tif'
94e900745f22ca00ef05d1511b807c7c
ea8a418c1a97252ed6ff540b69c9486a9f9bff7c
describe
'5809112' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSGB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00077.tif'
a4d6ef51703c98300952492394b0e05c
469269b6ffba2ab98b8fb6fd3ac156efbfc2d04b
describe
'5808352' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSGC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00081.tif'
1e3012cf2e9a3b08a5147316b119beb1
9643e260763ea3bce21c1c359ec750738d15c08c
'2012-09-14T09:38:12-04:00'
describe
'5811908' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSGD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00096.tif'
f489f6082a8aa964f9f3dadfb8300544
5ba8724aca25d82106174888e4bfa670a9c05b03
'2012-09-14T09:40:01-04:00'
describe
'5812108' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSGE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00101.tif'
a20cba04bcd8e6edd6898538c86e1fe5
eb8c920bb0d73d1ca7f4791c03680dd53eaffb42
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSGF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00102.tif'
224b14a9e3bee72e703fe42a769af826
9d7f20c4ab0f89cdcf73a60642ee1f56cef83fcf
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSGG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00103.tif'
4f099df26f71c5c0845e4a05e9a618b4
5f64af713d893b32946e89dfd6795e3f2b473cd5
describe
'5811888' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSGH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00113.tif'
565d39090d566491229f9e2e6445823f
a2540d7f78bd2610a750ee63bb2fbe259d374275
describe
'5809484' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSGI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00123.tif'
4424969303707126acb028d5c18b7b9e
7e917d1b2fbb8beaad1cfb375301edc8abe661b2
describe
'5809324' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSGJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00125.tif'
091074ce1d0e538a6e71674817d025f8
ff0b5dccfe708215641e663411fda6bd2bfd1a86
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSGK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00130.tif'
4ac9e523c9f7cba444360311d3809e06
e0b18bc87107a0662988169a77e76b45a171d473
describe
'5811704' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSGL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00138.tif'
fa2a7889c491cdb300a6ed469baf3409
8cc3ef834df69914042b6c072d27a7eacab49dd5
describe
'5808904' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSGM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00147.tif'
8b9dfd8f4c9a19f41cd7dd5b0140364b
16bcbdfe1a08a2069f40cffabf6869c52650c14e
describe
'5812008' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSGN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00151.tif'
5d64badb96dcd98c625c5e378336e9a4
aa1d2b384b7e6be8cbc37279daf3e37a90bb8cd7
'2012-09-14T09:40:07-04:00'
describe
'5811916' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSGO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00162.tif'
278dd47bf51b526bf973e0c50277a95f
001e922962f03f1b8a4b45352aacc9e70c6f58b8
describe
'5811756' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSGP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00163.tif'
15dfa4353844fd68fbffcb5c5807aa55
b53ee9c39dc613bee99b3dd664c620ef623a25e8
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSGQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00169.tif'
ca8c511742e64d601600cded4f49cb5c
cf539a55d2b5f3e940001cca2e79fe8a408e13ef
describe
'1970' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSGR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00006.pro'
52b886244d495b5f15191aa693362402
d327ea0aa9daf47e638a86f09c2d74d4c72e64a1
describe
'59372' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSGS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00032.pro'
c6b9e06d704c3efaa5b8b95e386369df
5c202df04b82a6607b74b470eb83432fd486d14c
describe
'59526' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSGT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00040.pro'
c40e6ea79873de94204638f2d8adb8a0
5e1318f964d81c4987457eb6f24056801504a1bf
describe
'58671' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSGU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00053.pro'
8eaea0b102cf8f5539dd852d3d76ec19
4aa22165cd073eb408fca18ac23c75818a4f460e
describe
'825' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSGV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00055.pro'
9b28cd20e0568abea24511d65567b837
25b4d59347c36647e18279c2264a803518fdf1ba
describe
'23699' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSGW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00057.pro'
793f9cb1abfbeee132fb2672af7c1b1f
e19e9bf4cbd8bb598a388f6329a19302681fa08c
'2012-09-14T09:39:22-04:00'
describe
'58390' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSGX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00062.pro'
5d96e6c30311d69a3b128306ef63ef03
0f5e282e5d3d1ce2d7093fca0971c01ad849ea67
describe
'56382' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSGY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00070.pro'
7059af2924f84c8dc44943788a437bae
90936c5829e67f247773bc518e1c897e6f52e0d0
describe
'976' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSGZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00071.pro'
6effcdfbc0ae948e159061637772932f
fb2d641cec9ad5b9eb5f215ece5f471cd29db29b
describe
'8387' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSHA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00079.pro'
847c0d74a75bf773e36c63222fdcf73d
2833d8c1fc4e4b38d40260c69afcb40a41b5b28d
describe
'58741' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSHB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00086.pro'
4e22c7c553ee6b6d18f9edf932ad423a
68810bc8c3da456502f7ec85db19f866f9f6f22f
describe
'57991' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSHC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00096.pro'
a12f826847580ce4fa278217e3e8fc7f
c3a5a54fd6b8030e7982a9a53ed2b32e62412b07
describe
'29671' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSHD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00097.pro'
24fbf2e75141b6ac3834505bc93b129a
1d994225059c0def130810912296951adddbf115
describe
'58125' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSHE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00106.pro'
5bade766b8ebd4ced986f4e9d8032e75
31aa9244f0065fe73f5cba232e37f5a4f0f6cf66
describe
'56433' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSHF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00112.pro'
42e0ce8f9ee0a9ccc155bb371a6ab851
5379f42412161a8be1a801b78b6bf0e0320675ad
describe
'57046' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSHG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00114.pro'
bd0091747a54780a17e8c0f20c0ec444
c03a8c41a1b853f4c2815c9d7f718f31f7f44017
describe
'58576' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSHH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00118.pro'
63f05595c527d0f355a7414753781318
5dc8a5bfc1db7d0b158fd6266c835436cee9429c
describe
'933' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSHI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00131.pro'
5e7d06489a0772b0050f918962d2c6c7
43937fe99405a41956d15b9d7b3955e980a69b95
describe
'55782' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSHJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00135.pro'
b9d0c24f430f2bceb0cc9d60cca92373
87148d34ecb3424d46b511131edae82af5fdd566
describe
'58400' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSHK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00146.pro'
dc8972dfe15fb1998158f8be05b47434
e28b3debff5af0be8c67038d1647b627b2fb4aa6
describe
'60895' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSHL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00148.pro'
5230e77c284c1b29f97d39c2f7b1e87f
37cbebe9815e52a5d2c9c972b4f21e59c2a220ab
describe
'58528' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSHM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00151.pro'
844abcd1300b4c5fa3f129a0237553be
9c1bcf794c88f0ebed98fc3ce5094355e5e17531
describe
'23861' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSHN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00164.pro'
f8013c389e83f8e7aec3a3263458ae1f
bd566f0fc30c5eae018e3c63336c1a1101f00fdd
describe
'55862' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSHO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00165.pro'
07787b95ba6bfa4f4d210b096059266b
e86b67ae0603ef3fede106660655e87b3ce800fe
describe
'16242' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSHP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00170.pro'
26b63d9f88b23cd839ca4023f1e9a3fe
4e054e114d4ddc62e3744010a36b8e7b9e46888b
describe
'16168' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSHQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00177.pro'
07beb44af410914d2530408b38a24643
f0bec88ffbe1ac46ffd6ece834bca4a1c2822329
describe
'99' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSHR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00006.txt'
75233d646a3554c03e75e0f352b2cb3f
dfa6d0aa7d2dd0a3854bff82e2706f15f0a834e6
describe
'1692' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSHS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00007.txt'
97645a0c5c330619a9db817a7c7acec1
2be3d3b0a075df690a9f28ed3eed6d47025f58f2
describe
'1026' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSHT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00013.txt'
63637dcc50cf9c623f302756cfad1b04
37e4b2d10d6c8a27f12cb438b3174b1a16366d13
describe
'891' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSHU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00015.txt'
86fd02a3e8f988624113d457cbed3246
0eaf0da3f34d2a118bde90e60eb90fa03a9c7684
describe
'2256' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSHV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00028.txt'
a7acd811daad869f25460e4d40e878c9
0f8ec6beadf0c970a832524acd54fb44ebd50dea
describe
'776' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSHW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00041.txt'
3dd6074cfd7656a9605b661c31457255
4c21305e9df21c542c9ec16884cfecf7c5b59144
describe
'2341' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSHX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00049.txt'
58342a6038b1239c68f912c4227b9114
cb21278c7714dacf033ad2b191f9ac54a717ff10
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSHY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00068.txt'
487bf5149a9ba73cd0233c3dede72232
02f9f6ab8e20dcf1f97a43a523d1a60208f92c3d
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSHZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00078.txt'
8299d5480e661104f4a18debd57702cf
986e81190a900fe1cc1977aa5ebdcc916bb55157
describe
'500' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSIA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00081.txt'
c4d62267d967891ddbc988f650fe9d13
28638f46bd62b040ed10eba3ca578f710a8672c2
describe
Invalid character
'2388' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSIB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00083.txt'
91f57b5eb716264fd974cd76242bd633
03c6cfaeebcb7996e1ea0c4dd95678ff23eac667
describe
'2382' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSIC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00094.txt'
232cd6f57a2d66ac91e424146e015573
89d9bb6cc625aa81a6fc7e468fd34687f3575fb3
describe
'194' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSID' 'sip-filesvid00001_00099.txt'
dc4f3785c16a8a4a5f4d47ba609d5b67
a1474294b117b224877de913a55c84ca0302a17e
describe
'2338' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSIE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00109.txt'
cbef08995b9ea79cf901b14cb9a25371
cf7b59217d4b602fd0d3abd907770b8d259a94fe
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSIF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00116.txt'
ef72d4e2bfcf06490c3fcd70b803c945
33e0046e83f8f9579528a5d7ab4873fd14aad787
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSIG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00132.txt'
15c453b3bf1248c17cd73278e646067c
783932a184f64062e2705b3925ec68de37cbe98b
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSIH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00139.txt'
f1ed14af9d541ea80efec96fae0296f9
9f46b9ee9e3fc9470bd020ed6fbb9ee358cbc259
describe
'2262' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSII' 'sip-filesvid00001_00144.txt'
c86ec8157bd08d981d9a0fd062b28af4
d84a0f015c39079a5e90eb050e28e18e57feaac3
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSIJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00163.txt'
3cd41ab6852e61060b6e843e704905ec
7ba26b2c114cba8a5ab18ccc79099bec2843a60c
describe
'1010' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSIK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00175.txt'
7d5e9d02d1bc87786e1cb957a97c6a76
4b1642c95ace287fa1d364595bd6829853a87e48
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSIL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00184.txt'
c44f6ca79b7799a7e614d2334a2fadaf
4659fa3d34ef098a39dee7eeca6972e9a36fa99d
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSIM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00185.txt'
e6474ffdcee7fcd867de4c28eed98d34
f475beb61b2a59f7253ad0351c2ad27bf7421920
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSIN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00188.txt'
313b3286d6c2c716a438daae67e6aa83
faf5224d00066fdc3ce35327881abd70fba462ef
describe
'59738' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSIO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00100.QC.jpg'
445e8004c19a26f1ddeaaf50c1c63236
2781c5090bacf0b2b4d05e758d960537483c30e7
describe
'50671' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSIP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00041.QC.jpg'
1226bec2f513f91fb4ade9462f8345fd
966409b812272b4ec0437532e8d9398bdefc7c5a
describe
'30248' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSIQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00035.QC.jpg'
8c75f4b3cb21ca47b9eaaf9d5ab4dfb7
07a43b279a49b1da6a1c06c3c70b35a8307cccc6
describe
'23381' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSIR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00079thm.jpg'
098423d76d4e158cb41cbaf4358db0b0
027d1a4e2b76c288662df0e79039a1e09efd83b4
describe
'23762' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSIS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00116thm.jpg'
979bbf8aedfee08375e82b93efd1d0c7
c69df405b1bedc8e5ecec12eab55678f03c057d0
describe
'23332' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSIT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00080thm.jpg'
5a0559bc935df94293916a886bdb15ad
32a03282e80bae98efa0c38aa367a968f02d8291
describe
'55647' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSIU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00025.QC.jpg'
84365d0d77166cfdbc3612a92479808d
a701e723301b589c738966845adec1e5ffd20312
describe
'62327' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSIV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00182.QC.jpg'
23c08b8dc4ca451d382cca726aff333a
b5e72fcca338c1453cd3ced009d0fbcf173a3437
describe
'24399' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSIW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00091thm.jpg'
0760f95e27bc826eafe471330fd29af9
ce0425eeb8fceec2d94a4f9560286a17df8080e6
describe
'23172' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSIX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00012thm.jpg'
d29b4f1e3781248ba86215b3670b1e22
030cbd82d8403df1b831909605f1baab5be6c300
describe
'22688' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSIY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00047thm.jpg'
dbb120d2c9972a38d1b1055dc59b2f74
d65e006912183087770974a28dcc798ba75df6e8
describe
'23656' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSIZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00038thm.jpg'
7eb81c32fce85d3039775d760443622b
dee9e29d93c4d223943cf8779fc11c0cbfe8f621
describe
'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSJA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00029.QC.jpg'
5adf39a8d9ecb6889bd36890a062d6b1
e13f361048cf5d088fb1fa1eb3f99fe45b7398b4
describe
'61612' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSJB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00070.QC.jpg'
7c302cc340d1ee47771263c797a37c49
7ac718776d9c5a31272356de17f5b73f897f7c28
describe
'54057' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSJC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00015.QC.jpg'
741266f6cd2d7a0db880b24567a5f0f4
bf63596077d24ece7af7d9487c7082af4c28c3ee
describe
'61139' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSJD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00101.QC.jpg'
45fb98eaf4fd4c2546450e5f23a03774
b4c301b0e42d5929913c052572ac2db58f797f0b
describe
'20638' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSJE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00189thm.jpg'
ae91478252610a21ececf972f09a2be5
6280d91bddd8729e16b702084f7c3f292f142f92
describe
'51632' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSJF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00073.QC.jpg'
564747a806ab69afc1658f965e9befb1
27844d299cedfdc9d7cb0d523eb9279a7cfc9c99
describe
'44499' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSJG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00003.QC.jpg'
e867982db7f2b511c1f9f41d85c066c8
3594d12bdfd3fe29bbe6b84510f79a33f7fe2664
describe
'24314' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSJH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00120thm.jpg'
55856b1556fafc02390c5a40972fe3cd
b5eb68eff3a7de3c37138c47f90973108406b63c
describe
'288241' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSJI' 'sip-filesUF00074467_00001.xml'
dd31ebd5afdc8c849f61d05e7171008c
c1adadd0ef345da125edc90d5131bc5425931303
describe
'2013-12-09T21:07:58-05:00'
xml resolution
'22991' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSJJ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00008thm.jpg'
ba8e69a223f7f570a304ea86e81a1f73
031e4c3031f6153329205e3575f81a028a0d4a27
describe
'60537' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSJK' 'sip-filesvid00001_00016.QC.jpg'
2161aa1764176638cb83ee2f6a5bde0b
5d45a8184bd547a627fbcee83088656110100fa5
describe
'60435' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSJL' 'sip-filesvid00001_00020.QC.jpg'
f6c9d9a5d94b5132f10a6444569a1c02
546af1f275e89cd7f764ff0d4f3e41622c8a8096
describe
'58712' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSJM' 'sip-filesvid00001_00021.QC.jpg'
1760bfc74a872d95db31218dd0b23c4a
200041b50086062fb4ff35b71dec2e34802b3670
describe
'59741' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSJN' 'sip-filesvid00001_00026.QC.jpg'
655a059d3c64e2efbfa05303223aa71f
a1af53d3251274c61023067c9d60d3d04f895528
describe
'23849' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSJO' 'sip-filesvid00001_00026thm.jpg'
8fda4245539569ae997c1a7aed082268
25519dcaaef674bdaeac091d7a02b6f4de479113
describe
'23010' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSJP' 'sip-filesvid00001_00030thm.jpg'
23275026a22d8e707fd17c722f8bf433
f4ac4da0d9ad2b3f02d18f8ed0be3ce05d57fbeb
describe
'23360' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSJQ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00036thm.jpg'
87d47deec09455ebbb9132f51e5df410
b5ddbb4f214cc0cf58bbcb535dedda32d2522af5
describe
'62095' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSJR' 'sip-filesvid00001_00039.QC.jpg'
32ee5d6e63edc0f2446a7b1723efd656
1be68b84459b6166fd255c5916ac048689db7f44
describe
'59631' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSJS' 'sip-filesvid00001_00046.QC.jpg'
a878e2e573eb6291e7ba48e02df4035d
d3e675dc993cf33a449ac19af05dab9a08a07b0e
describe
'61395' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSJT' 'sip-filesvid00001_00059.QC.jpg'
1e2e17117f7f838aa303e46e9183fa93
164b2b60f3418fc561f8dba8d86802f81df424de
describe
'55112' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSJU' 'sip-filesvid00001_00069.QC.jpg'
bfeea20b5fccf217ef01abde3a6f226f
e7744b769c60de2cf36d096195baf1a90dee6ea9
describe
'21132' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSJV' 'sip-filesvid00001_00088thm.jpg'
ab3060530ea1bedaf0cc5a7b7b0e7524
567225ee4ffd88e7f1ae6d6b2b4f08e8ae4ccf83
describe
'21041' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSJW' 'sip-filesvid00001_00093thm.jpg'
04c879be49b1ac01c915df570b4aba54
3fe7936146869fe2d0c26ae0a6a1ad7f97bc96e7
describe
'22855' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSJX' 'sip-filesvid00001_00097thm.jpg'
06586a5d1fe341a6174f7aa40c89aa91
4db2f96b2657f26dbd8b0b21a66a2b56ac761e6d
describe
'62160' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSJY' 'sip-filesvid00001_00102.QC.jpg'
c73f44a4848a5c51af0d23d4775e3547
444cd1d5dd7de1c61936cdf18f6e619936beafa6
describe
'61433' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSJZ' 'sip-filesvid00001_00119.QC.jpg'
3d4dbc656438b91c585b9a5ca9d204d1
270ba7898fc225b7bf1256b10600bad085c41902
describe
'61901' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSKA' 'sip-filesvid00001_00120.QC.jpg'
2361c4c865207c92de2392cdb17a7e35
35ef69132b96e05e06cd5729ec286e8d6ded0225
describe
'63251' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSKB' 'sip-filesvid00001_00122.QC.jpg'
2120d1f98871470d57e273056a8ca18e
f0b06bc7bd50769960d40ce8adb1d518193ac554
describe
'23350' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSKC' 'sip-filesvid00001_00130thm.jpg'
e75dfe9fbab75b94499286acdd88a03c
994f70db68c79aba8086279b48ba1406b5392395
describe
'23688' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSKD' 'sip-filesvid00001_00144thm.jpg'
2ac0e671e0e5a8362c9892b9715d6ca2
73cd08fdf91145e91f7699f90c0ab8bce291f999
describe
'60721' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSKE' 'sip-filesvid00001_00169.QC.jpg'
30e6a7662e81ee09827ef1764bbe1a53
ead13755a95c2dc33e7d1a1dd24dd5563cb8acdf
describe
'48212' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSKF' 'sip-filesvid00001_00173.QC.jpg'
8344a69d6054ee3c624f62c9312acd4c
7e34b97568284bcdcef04023abd6cc210cd1741f
describe
'48276' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSKG' 'sip-filesvid00001_00177.QC.jpg'
a144a60df94d506c6f426d51852e8fe8
c15c16417b4a12ca774c7e86efc627d7a5ef9a28
describe
'23991' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSKH' 'sip-filesvid00001_00178thm.jpg'
8e359986ea67300522f8d559321e502e
6fb043e18abcdb009ca1cf4c633d48decdee4131
describe
'63654' 'info:fdaE20101201_AAAALQfileF20101201_AACSKI' 'sip-filesvid00001_00185.QC.jpg'
b6f750357f57c0f5f5ffc355ae88c311
c8e6c13393d6a6b4f4e1e6901379987a27b36952
describe


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EUADTC9Z2_EN8VZG INGEST_TIME 2014-05-05T20:04:19Z PACKAGE UF00074467_00001
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES