Citation
The Adventures of Robinson Crusoe

Material Information

Title:
The Adventures of Robinson Crusoe
Added title page title:
Robinson Crusoe for children
Creator:
McGovern, Mary Harriet, 1881-
Rosenkrans, Elizabeth ( Illustrator )
Defoe, Daniel, 1661?-1731
Whitman Publishing Company ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Racine, Wisconsin
Publisher:
Whitman Pub. Co.
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1917
Language:
English
Physical Description:
80 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Castaways -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Shipwrecks -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Survival after airplane accidents, shipwrecks, etc -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Imaginary voyages -- 1864 ( rbgenr )
Genre:
Imaginary voyages ( rbgenr )
fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Wisconsin -- Racine
United States of America -- Illinois -- Chicago
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
Lovett, R.W. Robinson Crusoe,
General Note:
Cover col. ill. with title: Robinson Crusoe for children.
General Note:
Part I of Robinson Crusoe.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Daniel Defoe ; illustrated by Elizabeth Rosenkrans ; edited by Rosemary Kingston.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
13769389 ( OCLC )

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ROBINSON CRUSOE






Robinson Crusoe

I WAS BORN in York, England, in the year 1682.

My father was not rich, but he had become
well to do by trading. My elder brother had been
killed in the war with the Spaniards, and the
other had gone away from home and had never
been heard from. Consequently my father and
mother wanted me to stay at home with them.
But, sad to say, I would be satisfied with nothing
but going to sea.

My desire for a sailor’s life led me so strongly
against the will of my father, that there seemed -
to be something fatal in my obstinacy, tending
directly to the life of misery which was to be-
fall me.

One day, being at Hull, I met one of my
companions who was going by sea to London.
He urged me so strongly to go with him that I
consulted neither father nor mother, and in an
ill hour on the 1st of September, 1651, I went on
board a ship bound for London.

d



8 ROBINSON CRUSOE

The ship was no sooner out of the Humber
than the wind began to blow, and the sea to rise
in a most frightful manner. As I had never been
at sea before, I was desperately sick in body,
and terrified in mind.

I thought that every wave would swallow us
up, and that every time the ship fell into the hol-
low or trough of the sea, it would never rise
again. In this agony of mind I made many vows
and resolutions that if I ever set my foot on dry
land again, I would go directly home to my
father, and never venture forth to sea again as
long as I lived.

But next day the wind went down, the sea
grew calmer, and a fine evening followed. My
sea-sickness and my fears disappeared, and with
them, all my thoughts of home and duty. As
the great ship sailed on, I became more and more
fascinated with sea life.

The sixth day we came into Yarmouth Roads.
The wind had been contrary and the weather so
. calm ever since the storm that we had made lit-
tle headway. Here we were obliged to come to
anchor. The wind continued variable and on the
eighth day another storm came up. To make
matters worse, the ship sprung a leak. -



ROBINSON CRUSOE 9

“All hands to the pumps,” the captain cried.
Our efforts, however, were useless; the vessel
was doomed to sink. Guns were now fired as
signals of distress, and a boat was put off to us
from a nearby ship that had not been damaged
because she was light. We had great difficulty
in getting into the boat when it reached us, but -
we all managed to do so safely, and after several
hours of drifting, in constant fear of being
swamped, we reached the shore, drenched and
destitute.

At Yarmouth, we were given some money,
and I might easily have gone back to Hull, but
my ill fate pushed me on. With what money I
had, I made my way to London. There I fell in
with the master of a ship bound for the coast of
Guinea on a trading voyage. He took a fancy
to me and at once became my friend. I raised
some forty pounds by corresponding with my re-
lations. This money I invested in trinkets, such
as the captain carried to trade with the natives.
We then set sail and made a most successful
voyage.

The captain taught me the use of the ship’s
instruments, and I became a navigator as well
as a Guinea trader.





10 ROBINSON CRUSOE

My friend died soon after we returned to
England, but I resolved to make the same voyage
again on the same ship. This was a most un-
happy trip, for though I left a good portion of
_ my money with my friend’s widow, yet I fell into
terrible misfortunes.

As our ship was making her course towards
the Canary Islands, we were attacked by Moorish
pirates. After a desperate fight, we were
obliged to yield, and were all carried prisoners
into Sallee, a port belonging to the Moors.

I was sold as a slave and had to grind grain
and dig in the garden. For two years I plot-
ted and planned to escape, but was never
successful.

I was about to give up hope of ever being a
free man again, when one day my master decided
to take me on a fishing voyage with him. At last
my chance had come. As we were sailing past
a deserted coast, I crept up behind the Moor and
tossed him overboard into the sea. He rose im-
mediately, for he swam like a cork, and begged
to be taken in.

As he continued to swim after us I fetched
a gun from the cabin, and pointing it at him, said:
“You can swim well enough to reach the shore.



ROBINSON CRUSOE 11

If you try to get into the boat, I will shoot you.”
He turned about when he saw I was determined,
and swam toward the shore, which I have no doubt
he reached in safety.

I then steered the boat straight out to sea.
Luckily for me I was picked up by a Portuguese
ship. The captain listened to my story with sym-
pathy, and offered to take me to Brazil, whither
he was bound.

I shall never forget the generous treatment
I received from the captain on that trip. He even
paid me a good sum for the Moor’s fishing boat
so that I might have some money on hand when I
landed.

I soon learned that the planters of that
country lived well and became rich, so I decided
to stay there. When the Portuguese captain
sailed, I sent by him an order for the money I
had left with the English captain’s widow. Later
on I bought a piece of land and raised sugar and
tobacco.

In a few years I was prosperous and happy.
I often talked to the neighboring planters about
my voyage to the coast of Guinea, and told them
how easy it was to trade with the natives for
slaves, which were very dear in Brazil.



12 ROBINSON CRUSOE

One day several of the planters came to me
and said that they would fit out a ship to go to
the coast of Guinea if I would take charge of
the affair. “There is nothing we need so much
as slaves,” said they, “to work our plantations.”

Obeying the dictates of my fancy rather
than my reason, I accepted and set sail the 1st
of September, 1659—just eight years from the
day I first left home.

We carried a cargo of toys and trinkets
suitable for our trade with the negroes, such as
beads, bits of glass, shells, looking-glasses,
knives, scissors and hatchets.

For twelve days we had very good weather,
then a violent tornado overtook us. It blew in
such a terrible manner that for ten days we had
no control of the ship, but went wherever fate -
and the fury of the waves directed.

At last we perceived land ahead, but before
we could make out whether it was an island -
or the mainland, the ship struck on the sand a
long distance from the shore.

We were now in a dreadful condition and
there was nothing to do but to think of saving
our lives as best we could. One of our life-boats
had dashed against the ship’s rudder and broken



ROBINSON CRUSOE 13

away. The other we managed to fling over the
ship’s side. All eleven of us crowded in, commit-
ting ourselves to God’s mercy and the wild sea.
The storm had abated considerably, yet the sea
went dreadfully high upon the shore.

We were working desperately at the oars
and making nearer and nearer to land, when
suddenly a great wave came rolling after us and
upset the boat. We were all swallowed up in a
moment.

Nothing can describe what I felt when I sank
into the water; for though I swam very well, yet
I could not deliver myself from the waves so as

to draw breath. I had been carried a vast way .

towards the shore when the wave, having spent
itself, went back, and left me upon the land al-
most dry. Seeing myself nearer the mainland
than I expected, I got upon my feet and ran.
Another wave soon overtook me and then an-
other, until I was dashed against a rock with such
force that I was nearly senseless.

I held on, however, until the wave receded,
and the next run I took brought me to the main-
land, exhausted and bruised.

But I was now safe on shore, and began to
thank God that my life was saved. I walked



14 ROBINSON CRUSOE

about, making a thousand gestures and motions,
which I cannot describe. To think that all my
comrades were drowned; not one soul saved but
“myself. For I never saw any of them afterwards,
or any sign of them, except three of their hats
and two shoes that were not mates.

After looking at the barrenness about me I
began to realize that I had had a dreadful deliv-
erance. There seemed to be no prospect before
me, but that of perishing with hunger, or being
devoured by wild beasts. I had nothing with me
but a knife, a tobacco-pipe, and a little tobacco
in a box. The thought of having no other pro-
visions threw me into terrible agonies of mind.
I ran about like a madman.

When I came to some fresh water, about a
furlong from the shore, I calmed down and drank
to my great joy. Then I put a little tobacco in
my mouth to prevent hunger, and began to look
about for a safe place to sleep, for night was com-
ing on. :

I decided to get up in a tree, as I did not relish
the idea of falling a prey to ravenous beasts that
might come abroad in the dark. I expected to
stay awake all night, but nevertheless I placed
myself in a forking of the tree so that I would
not fall if I did happen to go to sleep.



ROBINSON CRUSOE 15

I was so fatigued that I fell asleep imme-
diately and did not wake up till it was broad day-
light. The weather was clear and the sea calm.

Imagine my surprise when I saw that the -
ship had been tossed up on the land about two
miles from me. The swelling of the tide had
lifted her off the sand bar and the wind and sea
had driven her to shore in the night.

I walked along the beach but could not reach
the vessel as there was an inlet of water between
the boat and myself, about half a mile broad.

After waiting till the tide had ebbed so far
out that I could come within a quarter of a mile
of the ship, I swam out to her.

When I reached the vessel I did not know
how to get on board, as she lay high out of the
water; her stern was lifted up on the bank, and
her head low, almost to the water. I swam
around her several times and at last spied a rope
hanging down the fore-chains. With great dif-
ficulty I got hold of it and climbed up into the
forecastle of the ship.

T found that the vessel was bulged, and had
a great deal of water in her hold. My joy was
keen when I discovered that all the ship’s pro-
visions were dry and untouched by the water.



16 ROBINSON CRUSOE

I filled my pockets with biscuits and ate them
as I went about other things, for I had no time
to lose.

There were some spare top-masts on board
and these I cut into three lengths and threw into
the water: Then I went down the ship’s side
and tied them together at both ends with heavy
rope. My raft was now completed, and ready
to load. First I laid all the planks or boards
upon it that I could get, then empty chests in
which I had packed all kinds of provisions, such
as bread, rice, three Dutch cheeses, five pieces
of dried goat’s flesh, some European corn, and
several cases of bottled liquors. The most im-
portant thing was a carpenter’s chest, which I
did not take the time to look into for I knew in
general what it contained.

My next care was for some ammunition and
arms. I found two fowling-pieces and two pis-
tols, some powder horns and two old, rusty
swords. I knew there were three barrels of pow-
der in the ship and, with much search, I found
them. Two of them were dry and good, and these
I got to my raft, with the arms. I also took
ashore the ship’s cat and dog, both of them half
dead from hunger and thirst.



ROBINSON CRUSOE 17

The raft was now pretty well freighted, but
how to get it back to shore was my next prob-
lem as I had neither sail, nor rudder. But for-
tunately the sea was no longer rough and the
tide was setting toward the shore. I found two
or three broken oars and with these I put to
sea and landed at high tide, when the water cov-
ered the bank. When it receded the raft was
high and dry.

I now began to view the country so as to seek
the proper place for my habitation. About a
mile from me there was a tall hill. Armed with
a gun, one of the pistols and a horn of powder I
traveled up to the top of the hill and discovered
with dismay that I was on an island, surrounded
on every side by the sea. There was no other
land to be seen except what appeared to be two
small islands about three leagues to the west.

Coming back to my raft I fell to work bring-
ing my cargo on shore, which took me all the rest
of the day. The fear of wild beasts’ devouring
me in the night still haunted me so I barricaded
myself round with the chests and boards that I
had brought on shore and made a kind of hut
for that night’s lodging.

Next morning I made another trip to the
ship. I realized that the first storm that blew



18 ROBINSON CRUSOE

would break her all in pieces, and I had best lose
no time in getting other things that I needed.

I got on board the ship as before, and made
a second raft. Then I loaded it with three bags
full of nails and spikes, a great screw-jack, a
dozen or two of hatchets and a grindstone.

Besides these things I took all the men’s
clothes that I could find, a spare fore-top sail, a
hammock, some bedding, two or three iron crows,
two barrels of musket bullets and seven muskets.

During my absence from shore I had half
expected that my provisions would be devoured
by wild beasts; but on my return I found no sign
of any such visitors. On one of the chests, how-
ever, sat a creature that resembled a wild cat.
At my approach, she ran away a little distance,
then sat very still and stared at me in rather a
friendly way. I tossed her a bit of biscuit, which
she smelled, then ate. She looked so pleased that
I would have given her more had I not suddenly
realized that my food supply was limited. Finally
she marched off.

As soon as I had carried my second cargo
up on land, I went to work to make a little tent
out of the sail and some poles which I cut for
that purpose. I then carried into the tent every-



ROBINSON CRUSOE 19

thing that I knew would be spoiled either by rain or
sun. The empty chests and casks I piled in a
circle around the outside of the tent to fortify
it from any sudden attempt from man or beast.

I blocked up the door with some boards
within, and spreading some of the bedding upon
the ground, lay down to sleep with my guns be-
side me. I slept very quietly all night and next
morning was ready for another trip to the aban-
doned ship. As long as the vessel stood upright
in that posture, I thought I ought to get every-
thing out of her I could. So every day at low
water, I went on board, and brought away such
things as rigging, rope, twine, and all of the sails,
which, of course, I had to cut in pieces.

There was a pleasant surprise in store for
me when I found a great hogshead of bread, a
box of fine sugar and a barrel of flour.

The last time I went on board I brought
away some pieces of cable and all the iron work
that I could move. If it had remained calm I
believe I would have eventually cut up the whole
ship and taken it ashore. But one night it blew
very hard and next morning the ship was no
longer to be seen.

T now set about building a dwelling on a lit-



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INTO THIS FORTRESS I CARRIED ALL MY RICHES



ROBINSON CRUSOE 21

tle plain on the side of a rising hill. There was
a hollow place in the rock, like the entrance to
a cave, but there was not really any cave, or way
into the rock, at all.

On the flat of the green, just below this hol-
low place, I resolved to pitch my tent. Before I
set it up, however, I drew a half-circle before the
hollow place, and in this half-circle I pitched two
rows of strong stakes, driving them into the
ground till they stood very firm, the biggest end
being out of the ground about five feet and a
half, and sharpened on the top.

Then I took the pieces of cable which I had
cut in the ship, and laid them in rows, one upon
another, between these two rows of stakes, up
to the top. This made a fence so strong that
neither man nor beast could get into it or over it.

The entrance into this place was not by a
door but by a short ladder to go over the top.
The ladder could be lifted in after me so that
I was completely fenced in and fortified from
all the world.

Into this fence or fortress I carried all my
riches—my provisions, ammunition and _ stores.
I made my tent double—that is one smaller tent
inside a bigger one, and even covered the upper-



22 RCBINSON CRUSOE

most part of it with a large tarpaulin, which I
had saved along with the sails. I knew the rains
during some part of the year would be more or
less violent and I thought it best to be prepared
in advance.

As time went on I dug a cave in the hillside,
back of the tent. I used the iron crows—brought
from the ship—for a pickaxe, and made a thing
like a hod with which to carry away the dirt that
I dug out of the cave. I had made a shovel out
of a piece of exceedingly hard wood which I had
cut from a tree.

Week after week I worked on the cave, hol-
lowing out a spacious room which was to serve
me as a warehouse, kitchen, dining room and
cellar.

No matter how hard I worked, each day I
always managed to find time to go out with my
gun to see if I could find anything fit for food.

It was a great satisfaction to me to learn
that there were wild goats on the island. I often
killed one and carried it home with me.

I did not wish to lose my reckoning of time
nor did I wish to forget the Sabbath day. So I
made a great cross out of two posts and set it up
on the shore. Upon the sides of this square post



ROBINSON CRUSOE 23

I cut a notch with my knife every day, and every
seventh notch was as long again as the rest; every
first day of the month was as long again as that
long one. In this manner I kept my calendar.

It was now the rainy season but neverthe-
less I made rounds in the woods for game and
always discovered something to my advantage
in these trips. One day I found a kind of wild .
pigeon and its young ones made excellent meat.

In the managing of my household affairs, I -
found myself wanting, of course, in many things.
I was at a great loss for candles and was obliged
to go to bed as soon as it was dark—about seven
o’clock. I remedied this to a certain extent for
whenever I killed a goat I saved the tallow. This
I placed in a little dish made of baked clay, and
added a wick of some oakum. It made me a
fairly good lamp.

In the middle of my labors, it happened that
rummaging my things, I found a little bag, that
had evidently been filled at one time with corn
for the feeding of poultry; but seeing nothing
in the bag but husks and dust I shook it out on
one side of my fortification, under the rock, and
proceeded to use the bag for other purposes.

What was my surprise about a month later,



24 ROBINSON CRUSOE

to see a few stalks of something green shoot-
ing out of the ground. After a little longer time
I saw about ten or twelve ears of perfect green
barley. I carefully saved every grain and laid it
away ready to sow again, hoping in time to have
enough to supply me with bread.

It was now the month of April and I had
about finished my wall and ladder when sud-
denly the earth came tumbling down from the
roof of my cave, and from the edge of the hill
over my head. Two of the posts I had set up in
the cave cracked in a frightful manner. I ran
forward to my ladder and climbed over the wall.
I had no sooner stepped down upon the firm
ground, than I plainly saw it was a terrible earth-
quake; for the ground I stood on shook three
times. A great piece of the top of the rock about
half a mile from me, fell down with such a noise
that I was terrified. “What if the hill should fall
upon my tent and bury all my household goods
at once?” thought I.

To make my situation worse, the rain began
to come down in torrents, and there was a great
hurricane of wind. The sea was lashed to foam
and trees were torn up by the roots.

The wind abated in about three hours, but
the rain continued all night and all the next day.



ROBINSON CRUSOE 25

I climbed over the wall and went into my
cave to escape the rain, but I was still in great
fear that the rock would fall upon me.

My one desire now was to find a new place
for my home where an earthquake could not
harm me. But my hatchets and axes were dull
and full of notches from cutting and chopping
knotty hard wood. Of course I had a grindstone
but I could not turn it and grind my tools too.
I finally contrived a wheel with a string to turn
with my foot so that I might have both my hands
at liberty. This took me over a week but it was
worth the effort for in a few days more I had my
tools in good shape again.

My thoughts were wholly diverted from
moving my habitation when one morning I looked
out to sea and saw that the earthquake and hurri-
cane had cast the wreck of the old ship so close
to the shore that I could walk quite close to it at
low water.

I worked every day the next month bring-
ing pieces of timber, planks and a great deal of
iron on shore. I had enough to build a good boat
had I but known how.

One day, going down to the sea-side, I found
a large tortoise, or turtle. I cooked it and the



26 ROBINSON CRUSOE

flesh was delicious. It was a pleasant change as I
had had nothing but goat meat and an occasional
fowl since landing in this horrible place.

I must have overworked in my effort to get
everything off the old ship, for one morning I
woke up with chills and fever. I was frightened
almost to death at the thought of being sick with
no one around to help me. I lay abed all day and
neither ate nor drank. I was ready to perish
with thirst; but I was so weak I had no strength
to stand up or to get myself any water to drink.

In the night I slept, but had a dreadful dream.
I thought I saw a man descend from a great
black cloud, in a bright flame of fire. His counte-
nance was most dreadful. When he stepped upon
the ground I thought the earth trembled, just as
it had done in the earthquake. Then I heard a
voice say:

“Seeing all these things have not brought
thee to repentance, now thou shalt die ;’—at which
words I thought the figure lifted up the spear that
was in his hand to kill me,

I can never describe the horrors of my soul
at this terrible vision, nor the impression that re-
mained upon my mind when I awakened and
found it was only a dream,



ROBINSON CRUSOE 27

During all my eight years of seafaring wick-
edness I had never thought seriously of God, nor
had I been thankful to Him for His great mercies.
But now I began to pray for the first time in many
years, after which I fell into a refreshing sleep.

When I woke again I felt much better and
arose and cooked three turtle eggs in the ashes,
and ate them. I remembered that the people in
Brazil took tobacco for the ague. I had some in
one of the chests I had saved, and I went to get
it. Iwas directed by heaven, no doubt, for I found
in the chest a cure both for soul and body. Packed
in with the tobacco was a Bible, which I had for-
gotten all about, but which I was now over-
joyed to find. I read from it a long while, and
having taken a dose of tobacco steeped in rum,
I went to bed.

The next day I had the fever again, but not so
bad. In a few days it left me, but I was so weak
that I could do but little. I sat in the mouth of
my cave and tried to weave baskets.

As soon as I was able I began to apply my-
self to making such necessary things as I found I
most wanted, particularly a chair and a table;
for without these I was not able to enjoy the few
comforts I had in the world, I could not write, or



28 ROBINSON CRUSOE

eat, or do several other things comfortably with-
outa table. I then made shelves about a foot and
a half wide all along one side of the cave, and on
these I arranged all my tools, nails and iron-work.

I also drove pieces into the wall of the
rock, on which to hang guns and all things that
would hang up.

My daily reading of the Bible gave me a
great deal of comfort—the first I had had since
coming to the island ten months before. I began
to give up the idea of ever being rescued and de-
cided to be as happy as I could.

It was about the 15th of July that I began to
take a more particular survey of the island it-
self. I took some provisions with me and started
out. After walking about two miles I cafe to a
creek whose banks were covered with grass, and
on the higher parts I found tobacco growing.
There were many other plants that I had never
seen before.

On the next day I went farther the same way,
and to my joy, I found melons and grapes. I
stayed there all that night, sleeping in a tree as
when I first landed.

In the morning I traveled on, some four miles
farther. Here I found a beautiful valley, where



ROBINSON CRUSOE 29

everything appeared so fresh and green that it
looked like a planted garden. There were orange,
lemon, lime and cocoa trees, but few of them bore
fruit. I gathered some green limes and found
their juice very refreshing. I resolved to lay up
a store of them for the wet season.

I picked a large quantity of the grapes, and
hung them upon the out branches of the trees, so
that they might cure and dry in the sun; as for
the limes and lemons, I carried a great many back
home with me.

I was so enamored with this beautiful valley
that I began to consider moving my habitation
there. After giving the matter much serious
thought, I came to the conclusion, however, that
Thad better stay by the sea-side, where something
might happen to my advantage. The same ill
fate that had brought me to the island, might
bring some other tnhappy wretches to the same
place. 'Fo hide myself among the hills and woods
in the centre of the island meant giving up all
hope and ehance of rescue. So I contented myself
with building a little bower over in the fruitful
valley, where I stayed three or four days at a
time, calling it my country home.

The 38rd of August I found the grapes I had







ROBINSON CRUSOE 31

hung up were perfectly dried and were now ex-
cellent raisins. I had about two hundred large
bunches of them. No sooner had I taken them
down and carried most of them to my cave, than
it began to rain so violently that I could not stir
out of my cave for several days at a time.

I was very careful now about getting wet, as
I was afraid of another attack of fever and ague.
In this confinement, I began to be straightened
for food. Fortunately the rain ceased for a few
hours and I went out and killed a goat and found a
very large tortoise. My meals consisted of raisins
for breakfast, goat’s flesh or turtle for dinner and
turtle eggs for supper. I always had to broil my
meat, as I had no vessel in which to boil or stew
anything, and this was a misfortune.

I counted up my notches on my post and
found I had been on shore three hundred and six-
ty-five days, for it was now the 30th day of Sep-
tember—the unhappy anniversary of my landing.
I kept this day as a solemn fast and determined
to keep every seventh day from now on as the
Sabbath day.

After a time I learned how to divide the rainy
season from the dry. The lack of this knowledge
at first had cost me dear, for I had sowed my



32 ROBINSON CGRUSOR
grain before the dry season but none had come
up. Fortunately I had not sown it all, and I plant-
ed the few grains left before the next rainy season
and it grew very well, though it was several years
before I had enough to make a crop.

I now took care to have plenty of provisions
on hand for the next season and stayed within
doors as much as possible during these months.
I occupied myself by weaving baskets which
proved of great service later on when I wished
to carry things from the fruitful valley to my
cave.

As soon as the rains were over I started on a
trip clear across the island. Taking a hatchet,
gun, and a larger quantity of powder than usual,
and followed by my faithful dog, I started on my
journey.

As soon as I came to the opposite sea-shore
I was surprised to see the sand covered with
turtles. On my side of the island they were very
rare. I don’t believe Ihad caught more than three
during an entire year. There were also a great
number of fowls of many kinds. Some of them
were very. good meat.

This side of the country was much pleasanter
than mine; but I no longer had any inclination to











e ia \ rr
ype ied + vA vel \
: Syd! WY AY Je
ae ae Jute
a ate ue Tile A ine if a th

I WAS AMAZED TO SEE THE SHORE SPREAD WITH SKULLS





ROBINSON CRUSOE 33

move. I was getting accustomed to my habita-
tion. All the time I was on this side of the island
it seemed as if I were upon a journey and from
home.

It was a very clear day, and I could see land
in the distance. Whether it was an island or a
continent, I could not tell. Neither did I know
what part of the world this might be, except that
I figured it must be part of America, down near
the Spanish dominions.

On this journey my dog surprised a kid, which
I caught and led by a string. I also saw an abund-
ance of parrots, one of which I knocked down with
a stick and brought back with me to tame. I was
more than delighted when I came to what I called
my home and threw myself in my hammock. I
had been gone a month. Everything seemed so
comfortable here that I resolved never to leave it
for so long a time again, while I remained on the
island.

I now read the Word of God every day and
began to derive great comfort. I no longer re-
belled at Fate for casting me on this uninhabited
island, even though I still was a prisoner, locked
up with the eternal bars and bolts of the ocean.

One morning I opened my Bible at these



34 ROBINSON CRUSOE

words: “I will never leave thee, never forsake
thee.”

From this moment I began to conclude in my
mind that it was possible for me to be happy in
this solitary condition. “If God does not forsake
me,” said I, “what matters it if all the world
should forsake me?”

Thus I began my third year. I was seldom
idle, dividing my time according to my daily em-
ployments. First I read the Scriptures, next I
spent three hours hunting for food, and the rest
of the day was passed in curing, preserving and
cooking what I had killed or caught for my sup-
ply. While working about, I talked much to my
parrot. I had taught her to call me Robinson
Crusoe and it pleased me greatly to hear her re-
peat it, as well as a few other things she had
learned after much drilling on my part.

I came near losing my crop of barley and
rice, which at best was not large, for some goats
and wild creatures, which I called hares, started
to eat it up one night. SoI had to fence in my
field. This took me over three weeks. In the mean-
time I tied my dog to the gate where he would
stand and bark all night long.

No sooner had I driven these enemies away



ROBINSON CRUSOE 35

than the birds began to eat up the ripe grain. I
finally shot three of them, and hung them up as
scarecrows. This had the desired effect, and in
the latter end of December, I harvested my corn.

I was sadly in need of a scythe or sickle.
However, I was fortunate in having brought on
shore from the ship, one of the broad-swords or
cutlasses. With the aid of this would-be-reaper,
I cut off the ears and carried them way in a great
basket. After rubbing the seed out with my
hands, I found that out of the half-peck of seed
that I had planted, I had nearly two bushels of
rice, and two and a half bushels of barley; that is to
say, by my guess, for I had no measure at that
time.

The household utensil that I was most in need
of was an earthen vessel that would hold liquid
and stand the heat of the fire at the same time.
I spent much time in hunting for the right kind of
clay. After experimenting about two months I
finally managed to burn two earthen jars without
cracking them. This success led me to make all
kinds of earthenware. I must confess that the
shapes were decidedly ugly as I had no way of
making them, save as children make mud pies.

I next started to make a mortar. As the



36 ROBINSON CRUSOE

rocks on the island were all too soft and crumbling
to use, I took a great block of hard wood, and
with much labor I rounded the outside. With the
help of a fire, I made a hollow place in it, as the
Indians in Brazil make their canoes. Then I
made a heavy pestle of iron-wood. With some
muslin taken from the ship, I fitted up some very
good sieves, and in a short time my corn was
ground or pounded into flour.

The next thing to be considered was the bak-
ing. I made some hollow earthen vessels, which
served as hearths. In these I built hot fires. Then,
raking the ashes and embers off clean, I put in my
loaves and covered them with earthen jars.

As I worked away on these things you may be
sure my thoughts ran many times upon the land
which I had seen from the other side of the island.
I could not help feeling that if I were on the oppo-
site shore, I might find some way or other to con-
vey myself farther, and perhaps at last find some
means of escape.

If only I had a boat, thought I, I could ven-
ture out to sea in search of the mainland. I had
been so successful in everything I had made that
I now considered myself skillful enough even to
make a boat. I didn’t stop to figure out how



I at Helis

| he eden mi
ae oh ),

ea Nee

Ca



ly

I MADE SOME HOLLOW EARTHEN.VESSELS __





38 ROBINSON CRUSOE

I would launch it after it was built, I just started
right out to make it. For twenty days I hacked
and hewed away at a great cedar-tree that was
five feet ten inches in diameter at the lower part,
and four feet eleven inches in diameter at the end
of twenty-two feet. It took me fourteen more
days getting the branches and limbs and its vast
spreading head cut off. I then worked about four
months trying to shape the bottom and hollow out
the inside.

If anyone ever worked hard with mallet and
chisel, I’m sure it was I. At last I was rewarded
for all my labor, for there stood a ‘handsome boat
big enough to carry about twenty-six men. I
was more than delighted, and now began to think
about getting it into the water. But all my de-
vices failed me. The boat lay about one hundred
yards from the water, but the trouble was it was
up hill towards the creek. But I dug into the
earth and made a declivity. When this was done
I was no better off than before for I could not
move the boat. Then I began to cut a dock or
canal.

“Tf I can’t bring the boat down to the water,”
said I, “I will have to bring the water up to the
boat.” When I found what a little digging I could



ROBINSON CRUSOE 39

do in a day, I began to calculate, and came to the
conclusion that it would take me about twelve
years to finish the work. There was nothing: left
to do but abandon the undertaking. For days I
was very sad and disappointed. But what was the
use of vain regrets? I should have had more
sense in the beginning and not attempted to build
such an enormous boat.

I now had finished my fourth year on the
island. I kept my anniversary by fasting and
reading the Bible as usual.

My clothes were beginning to wear out, even
though I had brought quite a supply from the sea-
men’s chests. Luckily for me I had saved all the
skins of the animals I had killed. These I had
cured by stretching them out in the sun with
sticks. Some of them were so hard they were of
no use, but many were soft. The first thing I
made was a cap and a suit. These were just the
thing for the rainy season, as I turned the hair
on the ouside to keep off the rain. I must con-
fess that I was not as good a tailor as I was a
carpenter.

After this I spent a great deal of time and
pains to make an umbrella. I was obliged to be
outdoors so much it was a most useful thing to me,



40 ROBINSON CRUSOE

as well for the rains as for the heat. I spoiled two
or three before I could get one that suited. My
greatest difficulty was in making one that would
close. At last I succeeded. I could now walk out
in the hottest weather and keep cool. Besides, as
I put the hair upwards on the umbrella it cast off
the rain like a pent-house.

Thus time passed on and I lived very com-
fortably. My chief labor was planting my barley
and rice and curing my raisins.

I no longer thought of trying to get to main-
land, but I did dream of making a tour around
the island. So I set about making a canoe. I was
much wiser this time, and made one that I could
get down to the sea. I worked nearly two years
building the boat and a canal to it, six feet in
width and four in depth. I fitted up a mast and
made a sail out of some of the little pieces of the
ship’s sails which lay in store. I tried the boat and
found she would sail very well. Then I made little
lockers or boxes at each end for provisions, am-
munition, ete. I also made a long hollow place
for my gun, with a flap over it to keep it dry. My
umbrella I fixed at the stern, so that it would
shield me like an awning.

All now being ready I loaded my ship for the



ROBINSON CRUSOE 41

voyage, putting in two dozen loaves of barley
bread, an earthen pot full of parched rice, a little
bottle of rum, and half a goat. I also had plenty
of powder and shot and two large coats, one to lie
upon and one to cover me in the night. Thus I
set sail.

When I came to the east side of the island, I
found a great ledge of rocks lying out about two
leagues into the sea, and beyond that a shoal of
sand. I was afraid to go so far out to sea, for
fear I could not get back again, so I anchored my
boat, and taking my gun, went on shore and
climbed a big hill, to get a view of the other side of
the ledge.

From the hill I perceived a strong and intri-
-eate current, which would be very likely to pre-
vent me from being able to get back to the island
again. There was a strong eddy under the shore.
I lay here for two days, not daring to venture
forth. But the third day the sea was calm, so I
set sail. I was just a short distance from the
rocks, when I found myself in a great depth of
water, and a current like the sluice of a mill. It
carried my boat along with it with great violence.
There was no wind stirring to help me, and work
though I did with my paddles, it was of no use.



42 ROBINSON CRUSOE

There was a current on both sides of me and I
knew that in a few leagues’ distance they would
join, and I would be carried out to sea where I
would die of hunger. I had found a tortoise on the
shore, which I had tossed in the boat and I still
had a jar of fresh water, but how long would this
food keep me alive if I were driven out into the
ocean?

When I was shipwrecked on the island I
thought Fate had dealt me her cruellest blow, but
I suddenly realized that there were still worse
conditions in store for me. I now looked back
upon my desolate, solitary island as the most
pleasant place in the world, and all the happiness
my heart could wish for was to be there again.
I stretched out my hands to it with eager wishes.

“O happy desert!” said I, “I shall never see
thee again. O miserable creature, whither am
I going?”

I still worked hard to get my boat out of the
current. About noon, a breeze sprang up from
the south east which cheered my heart a little.
In about a half hour more it blew a gentle gale.
By this time I had been driven a great distance
from my island; if the weather had been the least
cloudy or hazy so that I could not have seen the



ROBINSON CRUSOE 43

island, I do not know how I would ever have got-
ten back to it.

I put up my mast again, and spread my sail,
standing away to the north as much as possible,
to get out of the current.

The wind continued fair and I made such
good headway that I was soon back on land again.
As soon as I touched shore I fell on my knees and
gave thanks to God for my deliverance. I then
drew my boat into a little cove under some trees,
and lay down to sleep.

On awakening the problem was how to get
the boat back to my side of the island. I would
never attempt to go back the way I came, and
not knowing what new dangers I would run into
if I continued around the island, I decided to find a
creek where I could leave it in safety.

After coasting the shore for about three miles
I came to a very good inlet or bay, which nar-
rowed till it came to a very little rivulet which
made a good harbor for the boat. Taking my
gun and umbrella I started back across the island.
How deighted I was when I finally reached my
summer home, as I called it. I found everything
just as I had left it. I climbed over my fence and
threw myself down to rest, for I was very



44 ROBINSON CRUSOE

weary, and soon fell asleep. Imagine my sur-
prise when I was awakened by a voice calling
“Robin, Robin, Robin Crusoe! poor Robin Crusoe!
Where are you, Robin Crusoe? Where are you?
Where have you been?”

I was so dead asleep at first that I did not
waken thoroughly; dozing between sleeping and
waking I thought I had been dreaming till I
heard the same voice repeating: “Robin Crusoe!
Robin Crusoe!” At last I became wide awake
and started up in great fright. No sooner were
my eyes open than I saw my poll parrot sitting on
the top of the hedge.

Even after I knew it was the parrot that
had spoken to me, it took me some time to get
over my fright. I called to Polly and she came
and sat upon my thumb as she used to do, and
continued talking to me just as if she were over-
joyed to see me again; and so I carried her home
to my cave with me.

I had had enough rambling to sea for some
time and did nothing for several days but sit and
reflect upon the danger I had escaped. I would
have been very glad to have my boat again
on my side of the island; but my heart would
shrink and my blood run cold at the very thought



ROBINSON CRUSOE 45

of venturing to sea again, and battling with un-
known currents.

I began to think now of another way to kill
goats so as to be more sparing of powder. My
supply could not last forever, so I set traps and
caught some young kids, which I tamed, keeping
them in a large enclosure, securely fenced about.

Had anybody met me now he would either have
been greatly frightened or else would have had a
good laugh at my “get-up.” I wore a great, high
shapeless cap made of goat’s skin with a fiap hang-
ing down behind my neck. My jacket was short and
made of the same kind of skin. The breeches were
made of the skin of an old he-goat whose hair
hung down such a length on either side, that it
reached to the middle of my legs. I had no shoes
or stockings, but had contrived a kind of bus-
kins, to flap over my legs and lace on either side.
Thad a stiff belt of dried skin and from this hung
a little saw and hatchet. I wore another belt
which hung over my shoulder. At the end of its
under my left arm, were two pouches, both made
of goat’s skin too—one for my powder and the
other for my shot. I had a basket fastened to my
back, carried my gun on my shoulder and over
my head was the great clumsy, ugly goat-skin



46 ROBINSON CRUSOE

umbrella. From this description you can easily
imagine what a funny looking object I was.

As the months rolled by, I finally got up cour-
age enough to go to the other side of the island
to see if my boat was still safe. It was safe and
sound so I decided to leave it there again and go
back and build me another to use on my home side
of the island.

It happened that one day, about noon, while
going towards my boat, I was exceedingly sur-
prised to see the print of a man’s naked foot
in the sand. I stood like one thunderstruck. I
-listened, I looked around me, but I could hear
nothing, nor see anyone. I quickly climbed to a
near-by hill and looked in every direction, Then
I ran along the shore but could detect no other
foot-print. I came back to the foot mark and
examined it carefully. Yes, it was the foot of a
human being—toes, heel, every part of a naked
foot. Ihurried back to my fortification, looking
back at every two or three steps, mistaking every
bush and tree for a man. When I came to my
cave-home, I fled into it like one pursued. Whether
I went over by the ladder, or went in at the hole
in the rock, which I called a door, I cannot re-
member, I was so consumed with fear.



ROBINSON CRUSOE 47

I did not sleep a wink that night but lay
trembling, trying to figure out who it could be that
had visited the island. I fancied all sorts of
things, but finally concluded that some of the
savages of the main land had been there.

I now lived in constant dread of meeting this
enemy. When milking my goats or gathering my
fruit, if I heard the least noise, I would drop
everything and flee to my house.

I regretted having cut a door into the rock,
beyond where my fortification joined it. There-
fore I resolved to make a second fortifi-
cation, in the same manner of a semicircle, at a
distance from my wall where I had planted a
double row of trees about twelve years before.
Between these trees I drove great stakes. I
now had a double wall; my outer wall was thick-
ened with pieces of timber, old cables, and every-
thing I could think of to make it strong. I left
seven little holes, about as big as the thick of my
arm, and in these holes I placed my muskets like
cannon.

Then I planted the ground without as full of
trees as could well stand and grow, so that in two
years’ time, I had a grove so thick that no one
would ever imagine there was any human habita-
tion beyond it.



48 ROBINSON CRUSOE

One day as I wandered toward the west of
the island, I thought I saw a boat far out at sea.
On coming down from the hill, I was amazed to
see the shore spread with skulls and other bones
of human beings. There was a place where a fire
had been made, and a circle dug in the earth,
where I supposed the wretches had sat down to
their inhuman feast.

It did not seem to me that these wretches had
come to this island to search for anything, but
simply to have their feast and gO away again.
I had been on the island eighteen years now,
without being harmed and might easily be there
another eighteen years without being discovered
by them. However, the thought of those wretches
and their inhuman customs of eating one another
made me pensive and sad, and kept me close
within my own circle for almost two years after
this. By my own circle I mean my castle or forti-
fied cave, my country seat in the fruitful valley
and an enclosure in the woods where I now kept
my goats.

During this time I never once went to see my
boat on the other side of the island.

I made daily trips to a hill about three miles
from my castle where I could observe any boats













evi — ea : 2

AFTER TWO MONTHS OF HARD WORK, I SHAPED A CANOE






ROBINSON CRUSOE 49

that were on the sea, coming near the island.
After two or three months of this hard duty I
gave up watching for them. I managed to get
up courage enough to go to the other side of the
island and move my boat to the east end where I
hid it securely.

The constant fear in which I now lived put an
end to all inventions on my part. I was afraid to
drive a nail or chop a stick of wood lest some one
would hear the noise. I was uneasy about build-
ing a fire even, for fear that the smoke, which is
visible at a great distance in the day, should be-
tray me.

To my great consolation I had found a natural
cave in the woods. The entrance was a small hole
at the base of a large rock; inside it was roomy
and quite dry, but pitch black. Into this grotto I
carried my magazine of powder, several muskets
and other things. - E
: It was now December of my twenty-third

- year on the island. It being the month of harvest-
ing, I had to be abroad in the fields most of the
time.
Going out early one morning, I was surprised
to see a light on the shore, about two miles away
and to my horror, on my side of the island.



50 ROBINSON CRUSOE

I was so surprised that I rushed back to my
castle and pulled the ladder up after me. If the
savages should happen to ramble over this side
of the island and discover my corn field—partly
cut, or see any of my works, they would im-
mediately conclude that there were people in the
place, and would then never rest till they had
found me out. '

I loaded my muskets, which were mounted
upon my fortifications, and all my pistols and re-
solved to defend myself to the last gasp. At the
end of two hours I became impatient for news.
I climbed over my high wall and went to the top
of the hill which was my observation tower.
Pulling out my perspective glass, I lay flat down
on the ground and began to look for the place
from which the smoke was rising.

Yes, there was the fire, with nine naked say-
ages sitting around it. I could also see two canoes
which they had hauled up upon the shore. For
about an hour or more they danced around the
fire. Finally, as soon as the tide made to the west-
ward, I saw them take the boat and paddle away.

As soon as they were out of view, I took my
guns and pistols and went over to the place. My
indignation knew no bounds when I saw the



ROBINSON CRUSOE 51

marks of their dreadful feast, for there were
human bones scattered about on the sand.

I began to ponder how I could destroy them
when they should come again. After that I went
often to the hill to look for them, and if they had
come, I should certainly have attacked them.
But more than a year elapsed and I saw no signs
of them. In the meantime an event happened
which intensely excited me,

There had been a storm of wind all day and
evening, and a great deal of thunder and light-
ning. I was quietly reading my Bible, when sud-
denly I heard the noise of a gun, as I thought,
fired at sea.

I started up in the greatest haste, clapped my
ladder to the middle place of the rock, and pulled
it after me; mounting it the second time I reached
the top of the hill just as another shot was fired.
I concluded that there must be a ship in distress.
I knew that I could not help them, but I thought
they.might be able to rescue me. SoT gathered to-
gether all the dry wood I could find and made a
great fire on the hill-top. I felt that if there
was a ship nearby they would surely see this
roaring blaze. No doubt they did, for as soon as
the fire shot up I heard another gun, and then
several more.



52 ROBINSON CRUSOE

I watched all night but heard nothing more,
and in the morning, to my great sorrow, I saw
the wreck of a ship upon the concealed rocks, far
out from shore. But there was no sign of any
living thing on the wreck. Several days after,
the corpse of a drowned boy was washed ashore.
He had nothing in his pockets but a few pieces of
money and a tobacco pipe. Needless to say, I
was very glad to find the pipe.

The longing to go out to this wreck was so
strong that, at last, I loaded my boat with every-
thing necessary and ventured to sea. It was not
until I had made a careful study of the danger-
ous currents, however.

I reached the vessel safely and went aboard.
I found a dog almost dead with hunger and thirst.
I gave him a piece of my bread, and some fresh
water. He devoured the bread like a ravenous
wolf that had been starving for a week in the
snow. Besides the dog there was nothing left in
the ship that had life. There were two dead bodies
in the forecastle which was full of water.

Most of the cargo had been spoiled by waiter,
However, I managed to find a few dry things. I
saw several chests, and believing that they had
belonged to the seamen I loaded them in my lit-



ROBINSON CRUSOE 53

tle boat without even examining them. I also
found a little cask full of liquor, a powder-horn, a
fire shovel and tongs, two little brass kettles, a
copper pot in which to make chocolate, and a
gridiron. With this cargo and the dog I came
away, and by evening had reached my island
again.

I was so weary and fatigued that I slept that
night in the boat, and next morning got my
treasures up on shore. When I came to open the
sailor’s chests, I found several things of great
use tome. For example, there were several good
shirts, which were very welcome, and a dozen and
a half of white linen handkerchiefs. When I
came to the till of the chest, I found three great
bags of money; in one of them there were six
doubloons of gold, and some bars of gold. Upon
the whole this was not a very profitable voyage,
as the money was of no value to me. I would have
given it all for three or four pairs of English
shoes and stockings. In another of the chests I
also found some more money, but no gold. I
lugged this coin home to my cave and hid it away
with the other that I had brought from our own
shipwrecked vessel, many years before.

From now on my one idea seemed to be to



54 ROBINSON CRUSOE

get away from the island. One night I dreamed
that one of the victims of the cannibals ran away
from them and escaped to me. After this dream
I watched every day for the savages. The dream
had made such an impression on my mind that
I half believed I might capture one of these vic-
tims who might be able to pilot me to the main-
land.

I watched constantly for a year and a half
and was about to give up in disgust when one
morning I saw no less than five canoes on shore
and about thirty savages dancing around a fire.
In a little while two miserable wretches were
dragged up from the boats. One was knocked
down immediately and cut up to cook for the feast,
while the other was left standing by himself till
they would be ready for him.

This unfortunate being, seeing himself a lit-
tle at liberty, and unbound, started away from
them and ran with great speed along the sands,
directly toward me. I was dreadfully frightened,
when I saw him run away. However, my spirits
began to recover when I found there were only
three men following him, and he was by far the
best runner.

Between them and my castle was the creek,



ROBINSON CRUSOE 55

but the escaped victim thought nothing of that.
He plunged in and swam across in about thirty
strokes, landed and ran with exceeding strength
and swiftness. Of the three pursuers, only two
could swim, so the third returned. I ran down
the ladder, fetched my two guns, and getting up
again with the same haste to the top of the hill,
I crossed towards the sea. I rushed in between
the pursuer and the pursued, and knocked down
the first cannibal with the stock of my gun. I
was afraid to fire for fear the noise would attract
the rest of the savages. Upon seeing his com-
panion ‘fall, the other stopped, as if frightened
and I advanced towards him. But as I came nearer
I could see he had a bow and arrow and was
getting ready to take aim, so I was compelled to
shoot at him first, and killed him the first shot.
The poor fellow who was running away was so
startled by the fire and noise of my gun that he
stood stock still. I halloed to him and made signs
for him to come back to me.

He hesitated a while, then came toward me
a little way, and stood trembling like a leaf. I
smiled at him, and beckoned for him to come
closer. At length he came over to me, laid his
head on the ground and put my foot upon it.



56 ROBINSON CRUSOE

This was his way of telling me that he would be
my slave forever.

In the meantime the savage that I had
knocked down began to come to life again. See-
ing this, my new slave motioned for me to give
him my sword, which I did. He thereupon ran
quickly to the savage, and cut off his head at a
single stroke. He then returned the sword to
me, laughing in triumph. What puzzled him
most was to know how I had killed the other In-
dian so far off. He went over to him and turned
him from side to side. He then took up his bow
and arrows and came back to me, making signs
that we should bury the bodies in the sand. This
was a good idea as it would keep the other Indians
from finding the bodies, should they follow us.
After scraping holes in the sand, and covering
over the wretches, I led my slave, not to my castle,
but to my grotto on the farther side of the island.
Here I gave him bread and a bunch of raisins to
eat, and a draught of water, for I found he was
almost parched for drink. He was more than
grateful. When I had thus refreshed him, I made
signs for him to go and lie down and rest. So the
poor creature lay down and was soon fast asleep.

He was a comely, handsome fellow, with



ROBINSON CRUSOE 57

straight, strong limbs, tall and well shaped. He
had a very good countenance, noé a fierce and
surly aspect, but seemed to have somé@thing very
manly in his face. His hair was long and black,
not curled like wool; his forehead very high and
large, and there was a vivacious twinkle in his
eyes.

The color of his skin was not quite black, but
very tawny. His face was round and plump; his
nose was not flat like the Negroes’; he had a
shapely mouth, and teeth as white as wory. Aft-
er he had slept about a half hour he awoke and
came out of the cave to find me. I was milking
my goats. As soon as he saw me he ran toward
me, threw himself on his knees and made many
gestures, trying to show me how grateful he was.
He then put his head flat upon the ground and
placed my foot upon it, as he had done before.

I let him know that I understood him and was
very well pleased. It was a great comfort to have
a human being around, even if we could not un-
derstand each other. I immediately began to teach
him. First I let him know his name was Friday,
which was the day I saved his life. Next I taught
him to say Master, and then let him know that
was to be my name. He soon learned to say “Yes”
and “No” and to know their meaning,



58 ROBINSON CRUSOE

When we had our first meal together I gave
him some milk in an earthen pot, and let him see
me drink mine before him, and sop my bread in
it. Ithen gave him a cake of bread with which
to do the same. He quickly followed my example,
and made signs that the food was very good.

We stayed at the cave all night. Early next
morning I beckoned him to come with me, and let
let him know that I would give him some clothes.
This seemed to please him, as he was stark naked.

As we went by the place where we had
buried the two savages, he pointed to the place,
making signs that we should dig them up again
and eat them. At this I appeared very angry and
pretended to vomit at the very thought of such a
thing. I beckoned for him to come away, which
he did, in a most submissive manner. I then led
him up to the top of the hill to see if his enemies
were gone. By the aid of my glass I could see
the place where they had been, but there was no
trace of them or their canoes.

We went down to the shore and carefully
buried the remains of the horrible feast. After
many gestures and antics, Friday made me un-
derstand that there had been a great battle and
that four prisoners of which he was one, had been
brought to this island to be eaten,



ROBINSON CRUSOE 59

Now that there was no longer any signs of
savages about, I took my man to my castle and
fitted him out with a pair of linen drawers, a
jacket made of goat’s skin and a very good cap
of hare’s skin. He was delighted to see himself
dressed as his master.

I then made him a little tent between my two
fortifications. I fixed my doors so that I could
fasten them on the inside, and took all my guns
and weapons into my habitation every night. But
none of these precautions were necessary, I soon
found out, for never did man have a more faith-
ful, loving, sincere servant than Friday was to
me.

One morning I went out in the woods to kill
a goat and took Friday with me. I intended to
go over to my own enclosure and get one of my
own flock, but on the way, I saw a she-goat and
her two kids lying under the shade of a'tree. I
caught hold of Friday and made signs to him not
to stir. Then I aimed and killed one of the kids.
My companion was terrified at the sound of the
shot. He had not noticed that I had killed one
of the kids. He ripped open his jacket to feel
whether he was not wounded, as he thought I was
resolved to kill him. When he found that he was



60 ROBINSON CRUSOE

unharmed he came and knelt down before me,
embraced my knees, and said a great many things
I did not understand. I could easily see that he
was begging me not to kill him.

I took him by the hand, laughed at him, and
pointing to the kid which I had killed, beckoned
to him to run and fetch it, which he did. By and
by I saw a parrot sitting upon a tree within shot;
so, to let Friday understand a little what I would
do, I pointed first to the parrot, and then to my
gun, and last to the ground under the tree and
bade him watch the bird fall.

Notwithstanding all I had said to him, he
was again terribly frightened. I believe if I
had let him, he would have worshipped me and
the gun. As for the gun itself he would not so
much as touch it for several days.

When Friday tasted the stewed kid he showed
that he liked it very much. The next day I roasted
a piece, and he showed even more pleasure. He
made me understand he would never eat human
flesh any more. .

As the days went by, I taught him to beat
and sift corn and to make bread. His devotion
to me was most touching. I dare say he would
have sacrificed his life to save mine upon any



ROBINSON CRUSOE 61

oceasion whatsoever. I became more and more
delighted with him, and spared no efforts in.
teaching him everything I could that would make
him useful, handy and helpful. Especially did I
endeavor to make him speak and understand me
when I spoke.

After I had taught him English so that he
could understand me fairly well, I asked him how
it was that he had come to be taken prisoner. He
replied:

“They more many than my nation, in the
place where me was; they take one, two, three,
and me. My nation over-beat them, where me no
was B there my nation take one, two, great thou-
sand.”

“But why did not your side recover you from
your enemies?” I asked.

Friday answered: “Because they make me go
in canoe; my nation have no canoe that time.”

“What does your natien do with the prison-
ers they capture?” I questioned. “Do they carry
them away and eat them?”

“Yes, my nation eat mans too,” said Friday,
looking ashamed. “Sometimes they come here,
often come other else place.”

This interested me and I asked him if he had
ever been on my island with them, at other times.



62 ROBINSON CRUSOE

“Yes,” he replied, “I been here,” pointing to
the northwest side of the island.

Friday then went on to tell me how he had
been on the island once when they had eaten up
twenty men, two women and one child. He could
not tell twenty in English, but laid out stones to
that number.

I asked him a thousand questions about his
country and he told me all he knew. He said his
sort of people were called Caribs; but farther
west there were white bearded men like me, and
that they had killed “much mans.” I understood
from that, that he meant the Spaniards whose
cruelties in America had spread over the whole
country, and were remembered from father to
son.

As time passed away, I talked much to Friday
about God and he became a very good Christian.

When he could understand me well, I told
him of the countries of Europe, and how I came
to be on the island. He said that a boat had come
ashore in his country with seventeen white men in
it. I was delighted when he told me that the sev-
enteen white men were living with his people.

One day we were up on the hill at the east
side of the island. Friday, who was looking earn-



ROBINSON CRUSOE / 63

estly toward the main land, suddenly cried out:
“Oh, joy! oh! glad! there see my country.” That
set me to thinking whether I could not make the
voyage with Friday, or send him alone to see if
the white men were still there.

When I proposed to Friday that he go alone
to see his people, he said he would like to go but
that he would not leave me. I therefore resolved
to make a canoe large enough for both of us, and
venture forth. :

We felled a tree near the water, and after
two months of hard labor we had shaped a boat
and gotten her into the sea. I was surprised to see
how quickly my man Friday learned to manage,
turn, and paddle her along. I made a mast and a
sail, and fitted her out with an anchor and cable.

Friday knew very well how to paddle the ca-
noe, but he knew nothing of what belonged to a
sail and rudder and was quite amazed when he
saw me working them. However, I soon made
these things familiar to him and he became an
expert sailor. There was one thing I could not
make him understand and that was the compass.

Before we got started the rainy season was
upon us and we had to postpone our voyage and
stay indoors. When we began to go out again, I

- ge





64 ROBINSON CRUSOE

sent Friday down to the shore one day to find a
turtle. In a short time he came flying over my
outer wall in a great fright, crying out to me: “O,
master! O, bad!”

“What’s the matter, Friday?” said I.

“Oh! yonder, there,” cried he, “one, two, three
canoes, one, two, three!”

The poor creature was so frightened that I
hardly knew what to do with him. He trembled
in every limb, so sure was he that the savages
had come back to look for him.

“Friday,” said I, “we must fight them, and
you must help me all you can.” He assured me he
would, even saying: “me die when you bid die,
master.”

[hurriedly loaded the two fowling-pieces, four
muskets and two pistols. I hung my great sword
by my side, and gave Friday my hatchet. When I
had thus prepared, I went up to the hill and.
looking through my perspective-glass saw twen-
ty-one savages, three prisoners, and three canoes.
It was easy to be seen that they had come ashore
to have another of those dreadful feasts of human
bodies.

I was so indignant that I rushed back to Fri-
day, who by this time had gotten over his fright,



ROBINSON CRUSOE 65



THEY HAD COME ASHORE TO HAVE ANOTHER
OF THOSE DREADFUL FEASTS

and told him that we must go down to the shore
and kill these barbarians.

In this fit of fury I gave Friday one pistol to
stick in his girdle, and three guns to carry on his
shoulders. I took a pistol and the three remain-
ing muskets. Friday carried a large bag with
more powder and bullets, and I placed a bottle of
rum in one of my pockets.

I charged him to keep close behind me, and
not to stir, or shoot, or do anything till I bade him.



66 ROBINSON CRUSOE

We crept stealthily forward, hiding behind trees
and shrubbery. Finally we came within firing
distance, and I was filled with horror to see a
white man—evidently one of the bearded men
that Friday had told me about—lying on the sand,
bound hand and foot.

We had now not a moment to lose, for nine-
teen of the dreadful wretches sat upon the
ground, all closely huddled together. They had
just sent the other two to butcher the poor
Christian, for we could see them stoop down to
untie his hands and feet.

“Now, Friday,” said I, “do exactly as you see
me do.” SoIset down one of the muskets and the
fowling-piece upon the ground, and with the oth-
er musket took aim at the circle around the fire.
Friday aimed so much better than I, that on the
side that he shot he killed two and wounded three
more. On my side, I killed one, and wounded
two. A regular panic ensued. Those of the say-
ages who were not hurt, jumped to their feet, but.
did not know which way to run or which way to.
look.

As soon as the first shot was made, I threw
down my gun and took up another. Friday did
the same, and waited for the order to fire. We



ROBINSON CRUSOE 67

only killed two savages this time as our guns were
loaded with small pistol-bullets, but we wounded
so many that they ran about yelling and scream-
ing like mad creatures.

“Now, Friday,” said I, laying down the dis-
charged pieces, and taking up the musket which
was yet loaded, “follow me.”

We went directly toward the poor victim
who was still lying on the beach. The two butchers .
who were beside him when we first fired, had fled
in fright to the sea-side and had jumped into a
canoe, and three more of the rest made away in
the same manner. I told Friday to run down and
fire at them, which he did, killing two and badly
wounding a third.

In the meantime, I cut the flags that bound
the poor victim and gave him a drink from my
bottle, and a piece of bread which he quickly ate.
Seeing that he was somewhat recovered, I gave
him my sword and a pistol and told him that if he
had any strength left, at all, to get up and help
us fight. He was a Spaniard, but understood En-
glish.

He took the weapons thankfully, and as if
they gave him new vigor, he flew upon his mur-
derers like a fury. Shortly after I saw him in



68 ROBINSON CRUSOE

deadly combat with a powerful savage who was
wringing my sword out of his hands. I hastened
to his side, but he wisely dropped the sword and
shot his enemy through the body.

We fought desperately and succeeded in kill-
ing them all except the three who escaped in a
canoe of whom one was wounded, if not dead.

But it would never do to let these three carry
the news home to their people, for they would
surely return with two or three hundred canoes
and devour us. So we determined to pursue them
by sea.

We were about to enter one of their aban-
doned canoes when we discovered a prisoner,
lying in the bottom of the boat, tied hand and
foot. Imagine Friday’s surprise and joy when
he found that it was no other than his own long
lost father. It would have moved anyone to tears
to see how Friday kissed and hugged his father.
He jumped about, dancing and singing; then
wept and beat his own face and head.

This put an end to our pursuit of the other
savages, who had now almost disappeared from
sight. It was lucky for us that we did not attempt
to follow them for about two hours later a dread-
ful storm arose.



ROBINSON CRUSOE 69

When we reached home neither the Spaniard
nor Friday’s father was able to climb the ladder,
their limbs were in such a stiffened condition
from having been bound so long. We made them
a tent outside, and in a few days they were well
and strong again.

I set Friday to inquire of his father if he
thought the savages who had escaped would
come back with reinforcements. He was of the
opinion that even if they had outlived the storm
that night, they would never return, for he had
heard them talking and they thought Friday and
Robinson Crusoe were two heavenly spirits or
furies. It was impossible for them to conceive
that a man could dart fire, speak thunder and
kill at a distance.

In my discourse with the Spaniard he told
me how he and thirteen others had ‘been ship-
wrecked on the savage coast, and that his com-
panions were all alive, but in a state of great
want. I resolved to increase our stock of goats
and grain, sufficient to feed them all and then to
send for them. At the proper season we fell to
work digging, and planted as much grain as we
could.

At last we sent Friday’s father and the Span-





THEY LOOKED LIKE MEN IN DESPAIR



ROBINSON CRUSOE 71

iard over to the mainland. After they had been
gone about eight days a strange thing happened. I
was looking out to sea one morning when I be-
held a small boat with shoulder-of-mutton sail
heading for our shore. I ran for my perspective
glass and soon discovered a ship lying at anchor
about a league and a half out.

When the small boat, which appeared to be
an English long-boat, reached the shore, eleven
men landed. Three of them were unarmed and
appeared to be prisoners. These three sat down
upon the ground, very pensive, and looked like
men in despair. The others rambled about the
land as if they wanted to see what kind of a
place they were in.

As soon as the other men were out of sight,
Friday and I went up to the three distressed
creatures and asked them who they were. They |
were very much startled at our sudden approach,
and frightened at my uncouth appearance.

I calmed their fears and told them I was
ready to help them if they were in trouble.

Then one of them spoke up and said:

“IT was commander of that ship out there ; my
men mutinied against me and were going to mur-
der me, but were finally persuaded not to do so.



72 ROBINSON CRUSOE

Instead they have set me’on shore in this desolate
place, with these two men—one my mate and the
other a passenger, where they intend to leave us
to perish.

I then told him that I would venture to de-
liver him and his companions upon two condi-
tions; first, that while he stayed on the island he
was to have no authority, but was to be governed
by my orders; second, that if the ship should be
recovered, he was to carry my man Friday and
myself back to England, passage free.

The captain willingly agreed to these rea-
sonable demands, and I thereupon gave each of
them a musket and powder. We then went in
search of the villains and came upon them asleep
in a grove. The captain was loth to kill the men,
yet he said that there were two villains amongst
them who had been the authors of the mutiny in
the ship. If they escaped he feared they would
go on board and return with all the ship’s com-
pany and destroy us all.

In the middle of our discourse, two of the
men awoke, and cried out to the rest. But they
were too late, for our party fired, and one of the
two leaders was killed on the spot and the other
badly wounded. The captain then told the others



ROBINSON CRUSOE 73

that he would spare their lives if they would give
up their mutiny and obey his orders. This they
promised to do. We took no. chances, however,
but bound all our prisoners. We then went down
to the small boat, took everything out of it and
dragged it up beyond the reach of high tide.

After awhile another boat put off from the
ship with ten men in her, all armed. Eight of
them landed and started inland to find their com-
panions.

I immediately sent Friday and the captain’s
mate over beyond the little creek to a piece of
rising ground and told them to halloo as loud as
_ they could. As soon as the seamen answered
they were to call out again and in the meantime
by taking a round-about way and keeping al-
ways out of sight, they were to lead them into the
island as far as possible.

The strategy worked well, and it was dark
before they all got back. In the meantime we
had overcome the two men left in the boat. They
begged for mercy and agreed to help put down
the mutiny if the captain would but spare-their
lives.

When the eight men came back to the boat
in the dark, I made one of the two, whom we had
just taken prisoner, call out:



74 ROBINSON CRUSOE

“Tom Smith, for God’s sake, throw down your
arms and yield, or you are all dead men this
moment.”

“Whom must we yield to? Where are they?”
said Smith quickly.

“Here they are,” he replied; “here’s our cap-
tain and fifty men with him. They’ve been hunt-

ing you these two hours; if you do not yield at
once you are all lost.”

Then the captain called out that if they would
lay down their arms, the governor of the island,
by whom he meant me, would spare all their lives,
except that of Will Atkins. He had been the first
to mutiny and lay hold of the captain.

It was very dark and they could not tell how
many men were really pursuing them, so they
decided to lay down their arms. We then bound
them and took some to the cave, and the others
to my bower.

The captain talked matters over with the
prisoners and after picking out those that he
could trust, he set out for the ship, reaching her
about midnight.

After a short fight, the rebel captain was
killed, and order restored.



ROBINSON CRUSOE 75



The captain and some of his men then came
back to the island and brought me a lot of pro-
visions, and several outfits of clothing. The
clothing was a very kind and agreeable present,
but I must confess that I felt most awkward,
when I first put it on.

After dressing in my new clothes, so as to
look more like a real governor than when in my
goat skins, I had the rebels brought before me. I
told them that their rebel captain had been



76 ROBINSON CRUSOE

killed, and that I was now considering executing
them as pirates. I told them that I had resolved
to quit the island with all my men and take
passage for England.

Upon this they begged that I would let them
stay on the island, to which I gave my consent.

Friday and I did not wait for the return of
his father and the white men but I told the men
the story of the Spaniards that were to be ex-
pected and left a letter for them. They promised
to treat the new-comers well and share things
with them.

When I quit the island I took my great goat-
skin cap and umbrella, one of my parrots and all
the money I had taken off the two shipwrecked
vessels and which up to this time had been per-
fectly useless to me.

We set sail the 19th of December, 1686. I had
lived on the island twenty-eight years, two months
and nineteen days.

After a six months’ voyage we reached Eng-
land. Ihad been gone so long, that I was as much
a stranger as if I had never been known there.

I went down to Yorkshire but found my par-
ents were dead and all the family extinct except



ROBINSON CRUSOE 17

two sisters and two of the children of one of my
brothers.

In the meantime the captain told the owners
of the vessel how I had saved the ship and they
made up a purse of a thousand dollars for me.

With this money I resolved to go to Lisbon and
see if I could get any news from my plantations
in Brazil. Friday accompanied me and proved to
be a most faithful servant.

At Lisbon I found my old friend, the captain
of the Portuguese vessel that had picked me up
when I was escaping from the Moors. He was a
very old man now and had not been to Brazil
in nine years. However, he assured me, that the
last time he was there, my plantation was in a
flourishing condition.

I prepared the necessary papers and sent
them by a ship sailing to Brazil, and in about
seven months I received a large packet from my
surviving trustees giving a full account of my
plantation. It had kept improving all these years
and I was now the master of a fine estate and
50,000 pounds sterling in money. The trustees
sent me, beside the gold, 1,200 chests of sugar
and 800 rolls of tobacco.

I was so overcome by this news, and the re-



78 ROBINSON CRUSOE

ception of such great riches that I fell sick but
soon recovered and decided to return with Fri-
day to England. I had had so much of the sea
that I resolved to return by land—that is, except
from Calais to Dover.

After several thrilling adventures in the
Pyrennes mountains with wolves and bears, we
finally reached England.

I was glad to get back and made up my
mind to stop roving. I married and lived happi-
ly for many years. We had three children, two
sons and a daughter. I sold my plantation
in Brazil and was now very wealthy, and able to
help the remaining members of my family.

One of my nephews I brought up as a gen-
tleman, and the other I placed with a ship cap-
tain.. He was a bold and sensible young man and
in five years I gave him a good ship and sent
him to sea.

After seven years of peace and happiness
my wife died and to relieve my grief I decided to
go to sea with my nephew, who promised to make
atrip to my island. Itooka cargo of useful things
such as wearing apparel, beds, bedding, kitchen
utensils, guns and powder. I persuaded two car-
penters, a smith, a tailor and a very handy, in-



ROBINSON CRUSOE 79

genious fellow to go along with us and make the
island their future home. I offered them a sum
of money which made it worth their while.

When we landed there was great excitement.
Friday spied his father the first thing, and their
meeting was most touching. The Spaniard whose
life I had saved when the savages were preparing
to kill him was now governor of the island.

At first the Spaniards who had come over
from the mainland and the members of the ship’s
crew whom I had left there, when I returned to
England, did not get along very well, but now
everything was running along smoothly. The
island was in a most prosperous condition and no
one was at all anxious to leave it.

They were more than grateful to me for the
presents I brought them, and gave a warm wel-
come to the skilled workers who accompanied us.

I then left the island, promising to send
them some cattle, sheep, hogs and cows, as soon
as we touched at Brazil.

About three days after we had sailed, while
we were becalmed, a great fleet of canoes was
seen approaching us. When they came close
enough Friday went out on deck and called to
them in his language. Whether they understood



80 ROBINSON CRUSOE

him or not I never knew for they let fly about
three hundred arrows, and to my inexpressible
grief, killed poor Friday. I was so enraged at the
loss of my old trusty servant and companion that
I ordered the guns to be loaded and gave them
such a broadside that thirteen or fourteen of their
canoes were split and upset, and the men all set
a-swimming. The rest, frightened out of their
wits, rowed away as fast as they could.

Poor honest Friday! We buried him at sea.
I had eleven guns fired in his honor. Thus ended
the life of the most grateful, faithful, honest and
affectionate servant that ever man had.

When we arrived at Brazil, I fitted out a ship
and loaded it with a cargo that I had promised to
send my tenants on the island.

From Brazil we sailed around the Cape of
Good Hope, visited India and China and after
many thrilling adventures I returned at last to
England.

And here, resolving to fatigue myself no
more, I am preparing for a longer journey than
any of these, having lived a life of infinite varie-
ty seventy-two years, and learned sufficiently
to know the value of retirement and the blessing
of ending one’s days in peace.



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Arter Two Monrus or Harp Worx I
Swapep a Canoe (color)

THEY Hap ComE eae TO ae





20

ROBINSON CRUSOE
Robinson Crusoe

I WAS BORN in York, England, in the year 1682.

My father was not rich, but he had become
well to do by trading. My elder brother had been
killed in the war with the Spaniards, and the
other had gone away from home and had never
been heard from. Consequently my father and
mother wanted me to stay at home with them.
But, sad to say, I would be satisfied with nothing
but going to sea.

My desire for a sailor’s life led me so strongly
against the will of my father, that there seemed -
to be something fatal in my obstinacy, tending
directly to the life of misery which was to be-
fall me.

One day, being at Hull, I met one of my
companions who was going by sea to London.
He urged me so strongly to go with him that I
consulted neither father nor mother, and in an
ill hour on the 1st of September, 1651, I went on
board a ship bound for London.

d
8 ROBINSON CRUSOE

The ship was no sooner out of the Humber
than the wind began to blow, and the sea to rise
in a most frightful manner. As I had never been
at sea before, I was desperately sick in body,
and terrified in mind.

I thought that every wave would swallow us
up, and that every time the ship fell into the hol-
low or trough of the sea, it would never rise
again. In this agony of mind I made many vows
and resolutions that if I ever set my foot on dry
land again, I would go directly home to my
father, and never venture forth to sea again as
long as I lived.

But next day the wind went down, the sea
grew calmer, and a fine evening followed. My
sea-sickness and my fears disappeared, and with
them, all my thoughts of home and duty. As
the great ship sailed on, I became more and more
fascinated with sea life.

The sixth day we came into Yarmouth Roads.
The wind had been contrary and the weather so
. calm ever since the storm that we had made lit-
tle headway. Here we were obliged to come to
anchor. The wind continued variable and on the
eighth day another storm came up. To make
matters worse, the ship sprung a leak. -
ROBINSON CRUSOE 9

“All hands to the pumps,” the captain cried.
Our efforts, however, were useless; the vessel
was doomed to sink. Guns were now fired as
signals of distress, and a boat was put off to us
from a nearby ship that had not been damaged
because she was light. We had great difficulty
in getting into the boat when it reached us, but -
we all managed to do so safely, and after several
hours of drifting, in constant fear of being
swamped, we reached the shore, drenched and
destitute.

At Yarmouth, we were given some money,
and I might easily have gone back to Hull, but
my ill fate pushed me on. With what money I
had, I made my way to London. There I fell in
with the master of a ship bound for the coast of
Guinea on a trading voyage. He took a fancy
to me and at once became my friend. I raised
some forty pounds by corresponding with my re-
lations. This money I invested in trinkets, such
as the captain carried to trade with the natives.
We then set sail and made a most successful
voyage.

The captain taught me the use of the ship’s
instruments, and I became a navigator as well
as a Guinea trader.


10 ROBINSON CRUSOE

My friend died soon after we returned to
England, but I resolved to make the same voyage
again on the same ship. This was a most un-
happy trip, for though I left a good portion of
_ my money with my friend’s widow, yet I fell into
terrible misfortunes.

As our ship was making her course towards
the Canary Islands, we were attacked by Moorish
pirates. After a desperate fight, we were
obliged to yield, and were all carried prisoners
into Sallee, a port belonging to the Moors.

I was sold as a slave and had to grind grain
and dig in the garden. For two years I plot-
ted and planned to escape, but was never
successful.

I was about to give up hope of ever being a
free man again, when one day my master decided
to take me on a fishing voyage with him. At last
my chance had come. As we were sailing past
a deserted coast, I crept up behind the Moor and
tossed him overboard into the sea. He rose im-
mediately, for he swam like a cork, and begged
to be taken in.

As he continued to swim after us I fetched
a gun from the cabin, and pointing it at him, said:
“You can swim well enough to reach the shore.
ROBINSON CRUSOE 11

If you try to get into the boat, I will shoot you.”
He turned about when he saw I was determined,
and swam toward the shore, which I have no doubt
he reached in safety.

I then steered the boat straight out to sea.
Luckily for me I was picked up by a Portuguese
ship. The captain listened to my story with sym-
pathy, and offered to take me to Brazil, whither
he was bound.

I shall never forget the generous treatment
I received from the captain on that trip. He even
paid me a good sum for the Moor’s fishing boat
so that I might have some money on hand when I
landed.

I soon learned that the planters of that
country lived well and became rich, so I decided
to stay there. When the Portuguese captain
sailed, I sent by him an order for the money I
had left with the English captain’s widow. Later
on I bought a piece of land and raised sugar and
tobacco.

In a few years I was prosperous and happy.
I often talked to the neighboring planters about
my voyage to the coast of Guinea, and told them
how easy it was to trade with the natives for
slaves, which were very dear in Brazil.
12 ROBINSON CRUSOE

One day several of the planters came to me
and said that they would fit out a ship to go to
the coast of Guinea if I would take charge of
the affair. “There is nothing we need so much
as slaves,” said they, “to work our plantations.”

Obeying the dictates of my fancy rather
than my reason, I accepted and set sail the 1st
of September, 1659—just eight years from the
day I first left home.

We carried a cargo of toys and trinkets
suitable for our trade with the negroes, such as
beads, bits of glass, shells, looking-glasses,
knives, scissors and hatchets.

For twelve days we had very good weather,
then a violent tornado overtook us. It blew in
such a terrible manner that for ten days we had
no control of the ship, but went wherever fate -
and the fury of the waves directed.

At last we perceived land ahead, but before
we could make out whether it was an island -
or the mainland, the ship struck on the sand a
long distance from the shore.

We were now in a dreadful condition and
there was nothing to do but to think of saving
our lives as best we could. One of our life-boats
had dashed against the ship’s rudder and broken
ROBINSON CRUSOE 13

away. The other we managed to fling over the
ship’s side. All eleven of us crowded in, commit-
ting ourselves to God’s mercy and the wild sea.
The storm had abated considerably, yet the sea
went dreadfully high upon the shore.

We were working desperately at the oars
and making nearer and nearer to land, when
suddenly a great wave came rolling after us and
upset the boat. We were all swallowed up in a
moment.

Nothing can describe what I felt when I sank
into the water; for though I swam very well, yet
I could not deliver myself from the waves so as

to draw breath. I had been carried a vast way .

towards the shore when the wave, having spent
itself, went back, and left me upon the land al-
most dry. Seeing myself nearer the mainland
than I expected, I got upon my feet and ran.
Another wave soon overtook me and then an-
other, until I was dashed against a rock with such
force that I was nearly senseless.

I held on, however, until the wave receded,
and the next run I took brought me to the main-
land, exhausted and bruised.

But I was now safe on shore, and began to
thank God that my life was saved. I walked
14 ROBINSON CRUSOE

about, making a thousand gestures and motions,
which I cannot describe. To think that all my
comrades were drowned; not one soul saved but
“myself. For I never saw any of them afterwards,
or any sign of them, except three of their hats
and two shoes that were not mates.

After looking at the barrenness about me I
began to realize that I had had a dreadful deliv-
erance. There seemed to be no prospect before
me, but that of perishing with hunger, or being
devoured by wild beasts. I had nothing with me
but a knife, a tobacco-pipe, and a little tobacco
in a box. The thought of having no other pro-
visions threw me into terrible agonies of mind.
I ran about like a madman.

When I came to some fresh water, about a
furlong from the shore, I calmed down and drank
to my great joy. Then I put a little tobacco in
my mouth to prevent hunger, and began to look
about for a safe place to sleep, for night was com-
ing on. :

I decided to get up in a tree, as I did not relish
the idea of falling a prey to ravenous beasts that
might come abroad in the dark. I expected to
stay awake all night, but nevertheless I placed
myself in a forking of the tree so that I would
not fall if I did happen to go to sleep.
ROBINSON CRUSOE 15

I was so fatigued that I fell asleep imme-
diately and did not wake up till it was broad day-
light. The weather was clear and the sea calm.

Imagine my surprise when I saw that the -
ship had been tossed up on the land about two
miles from me. The swelling of the tide had
lifted her off the sand bar and the wind and sea
had driven her to shore in the night.

I walked along the beach but could not reach
the vessel as there was an inlet of water between
the boat and myself, about half a mile broad.

After waiting till the tide had ebbed so far
out that I could come within a quarter of a mile
of the ship, I swam out to her.

When I reached the vessel I did not know
how to get on board, as she lay high out of the
water; her stern was lifted up on the bank, and
her head low, almost to the water. I swam
around her several times and at last spied a rope
hanging down the fore-chains. With great dif-
ficulty I got hold of it and climbed up into the
forecastle of the ship.

T found that the vessel was bulged, and had
a great deal of water in her hold. My joy was
keen when I discovered that all the ship’s pro-
visions were dry and untouched by the water.
16 ROBINSON CRUSOE

I filled my pockets with biscuits and ate them
as I went about other things, for I had no time
to lose.

There were some spare top-masts on board
and these I cut into three lengths and threw into
the water: Then I went down the ship’s side
and tied them together at both ends with heavy
rope. My raft was now completed, and ready
to load. First I laid all the planks or boards
upon it that I could get, then empty chests in
which I had packed all kinds of provisions, such
as bread, rice, three Dutch cheeses, five pieces
of dried goat’s flesh, some European corn, and
several cases of bottled liquors. The most im-
portant thing was a carpenter’s chest, which I
did not take the time to look into for I knew in
general what it contained.

My next care was for some ammunition and
arms. I found two fowling-pieces and two pis-
tols, some powder horns and two old, rusty
swords. I knew there were three barrels of pow-
der in the ship and, with much search, I found
them. Two of them were dry and good, and these
I got to my raft, with the arms. I also took
ashore the ship’s cat and dog, both of them half
dead from hunger and thirst.
ROBINSON CRUSOE 17

The raft was now pretty well freighted, but
how to get it back to shore was my next prob-
lem as I had neither sail, nor rudder. But for-
tunately the sea was no longer rough and the
tide was setting toward the shore. I found two
or three broken oars and with these I put to
sea and landed at high tide, when the water cov-
ered the bank. When it receded the raft was
high and dry.

I now began to view the country so as to seek
the proper place for my habitation. About a
mile from me there was a tall hill. Armed with
a gun, one of the pistols and a horn of powder I
traveled up to the top of the hill and discovered
with dismay that I was on an island, surrounded
on every side by the sea. There was no other
land to be seen except what appeared to be two
small islands about three leagues to the west.

Coming back to my raft I fell to work bring-
ing my cargo on shore, which took me all the rest
of the day. The fear of wild beasts’ devouring
me in the night still haunted me so I barricaded
myself round with the chests and boards that I
had brought on shore and made a kind of hut
for that night’s lodging.

Next morning I made another trip to the
ship. I realized that the first storm that blew
18 ROBINSON CRUSOE

would break her all in pieces, and I had best lose
no time in getting other things that I needed.

I got on board the ship as before, and made
a second raft. Then I loaded it with three bags
full of nails and spikes, a great screw-jack, a
dozen or two of hatchets and a grindstone.

Besides these things I took all the men’s
clothes that I could find, a spare fore-top sail, a
hammock, some bedding, two or three iron crows,
two barrels of musket bullets and seven muskets.

During my absence from shore I had half
expected that my provisions would be devoured
by wild beasts; but on my return I found no sign
of any such visitors. On one of the chests, how-
ever, sat a creature that resembled a wild cat.
At my approach, she ran away a little distance,
then sat very still and stared at me in rather a
friendly way. I tossed her a bit of biscuit, which
she smelled, then ate. She looked so pleased that
I would have given her more had I not suddenly
realized that my food supply was limited. Finally
she marched off.

As soon as I had carried my second cargo
up on land, I went to work to make a little tent
out of the sail and some poles which I cut for
that purpose. I then carried into the tent every-
ROBINSON CRUSOE 19

thing that I knew would be spoiled either by rain or
sun. The empty chests and casks I piled in a
circle around the outside of the tent to fortify
it from any sudden attempt from man or beast.

I blocked up the door with some boards
within, and spreading some of the bedding upon
the ground, lay down to sleep with my guns be-
side me. I slept very quietly all night and next
morning was ready for another trip to the aban-
doned ship. As long as the vessel stood upright
in that posture, I thought I ought to get every-
thing out of her I could. So every day at low
water, I went on board, and brought away such
things as rigging, rope, twine, and all of the sails,
which, of course, I had to cut in pieces.

There was a pleasant surprise in store for
me when I found a great hogshead of bread, a
box of fine sugar and a barrel of flour.

The last time I went on board I brought
away some pieces of cable and all the iron work
that I could move. If it had remained calm I
believe I would have eventually cut up the whole
ship and taken it ashore. But one night it blew
very hard and next morning the ship was no
longer to be seen.

T now set about building a dwelling on a lit-
IS fof = | =
zn (We
Wee 5; eae







INTO THIS FORTRESS I CARRIED ALL MY RICHES
ROBINSON CRUSOE 21

tle plain on the side of a rising hill. There was
a hollow place in the rock, like the entrance to
a cave, but there was not really any cave, or way
into the rock, at all.

On the flat of the green, just below this hol-
low place, I resolved to pitch my tent. Before I
set it up, however, I drew a half-circle before the
hollow place, and in this half-circle I pitched two
rows of strong stakes, driving them into the
ground till they stood very firm, the biggest end
being out of the ground about five feet and a
half, and sharpened on the top.

Then I took the pieces of cable which I had
cut in the ship, and laid them in rows, one upon
another, between these two rows of stakes, up
to the top. This made a fence so strong that
neither man nor beast could get into it or over it.

The entrance into this place was not by a
door but by a short ladder to go over the top.
The ladder could be lifted in after me so that
I was completely fenced in and fortified from
all the world.

Into this fence or fortress I carried all my
riches—my provisions, ammunition and _ stores.
I made my tent double—that is one smaller tent
inside a bigger one, and even covered the upper-
22 RCBINSON CRUSOE

most part of it with a large tarpaulin, which I
had saved along with the sails. I knew the rains
during some part of the year would be more or
less violent and I thought it best to be prepared
in advance.

As time went on I dug a cave in the hillside,
back of the tent. I used the iron crows—brought
from the ship—for a pickaxe, and made a thing
like a hod with which to carry away the dirt that
I dug out of the cave. I had made a shovel out
of a piece of exceedingly hard wood which I had
cut from a tree.

Week after week I worked on the cave, hol-
lowing out a spacious room which was to serve
me as a warehouse, kitchen, dining room and
cellar.

No matter how hard I worked, each day I
always managed to find time to go out with my
gun to see if I could find anything fit for food.

It was a great satisfaction to me to learn
that there were wild goats on the island. I often
killed one and carried it home with me.

I did not wish to lose my reckoning of time
nor did I wish to forget the Sabbath day. So I
made a great cross out of two posts and set it up
on the shore. Upon the sides of this square post
ROBINSON CRUSOE 23

I cut a notch with my knife every day, and every
seventh notch was as long again as the rest; every
first day of the month was as long again as that
long one. In this manner I kept my calendar.

It was now the rainy season but neverthe-
less I made rounds in the woods for game and
always discovered something to my advantage
in these trips. One day I found a kind of wild .
pigeon and its young ones made excellent meat.

In the managing of my household affairs, I -
found myself wanting, of course, in many things.
I was at a great loss for candles and was obliged
to go to bed as soon as it was dark—about seven
o’clock. I remedied this to a certain extent for
whenever I killed a goat I saved the tallow. This
I placed in a little dish made of baked clay, and
added a wick of some oakum. It made me a
fairly good lamp.

In the middle of my labors, it happened that
rummaging my things, I found a little bag, that
had evidently been filled at one time with corn
for the feeding of poultry; but seeing nothing
in the bag but husks and dust I shook it out on
one side of my fortification, under the rock, and
proceeded to use the bag for other purposes.

What was my surprise about a month later,
24 ROBINSON CRUSOE

to see a few stalks of something green shoot-
ing out of the ground. After a little longer time
I saw about ten or twelve ears of perfect green
barley. I carefully saved every grain and laid it
away ready to sow again, hoping in time to have
enough to supply me with bread.

It was now the month of April and I had
about finished my wall and ladder when sud-
denly the earth came tumbling down from the
roof of my cave, and from the edge of the hill
over my head. Two of the posts I had set up in
the cave cracked in a frightful manner. I ran
forward to my ladder and climbed over the wall.
I had no sooner stepped down upon the firm
ground, than I plainly saw it was a terrible earth-
quake; for the ground I stood on shook three
times. A great piece of the top of the rock about
half a mile from me, fell down with such a noise
that I was terrified. “What if the hill should fall
upon my tent and bury all my household goods
at once?” thought I.

To make my situation worse, the rain began
to come down in torrents, and there was a great
hurricane of wind. The sea was lashed to foam
and trees were torn up by the roots.

The wind abated in about three hours, but
the rain continued all night and all the next day.
ROBINSON CRUSOE 25

I climbed over the wall and went into my
cave to escape the rain, but I was still in great
fear that the rock would fall upon me.

My one desire now was to find a new place
for my home where an earthquake could not
harm me. But my hatchets and axes were dull
and full of notches from cutting and chopping
knotty hard wood. Of course I had a grindstone
but I could not turn it and grind my tools too.
I finally contrived a wheel with a string to turn
with my foot so that I might have both my hands
at liberty. This took me over a week but it was
worth the effort for in a few days more I had my
tools in good shape again.

My thoughts were wholly diverted from
moving my habitation when one morning I looked
out to sea and saw that the earthquake and hurri-
cane had cast the wreck of the old ship so close
to the shore that I could walk quite close to it at
low water.

I worked every day the next month bring-
ing pieces of timber, planks and a great deal of
iron on shore. I had enough to build a good boat
had I but known how.

One day, going down to the sea-side, I found
a large tortoise, or turtle. I cooked it and the
26 ROBINSON CRUSOE

flesh was delicious. It was a pleasant change as I
had had nothing but goat meat and an occasional
fowl since landing in this horrible place.

I must have overworked in my effort to get
everything off the old ship, for one morning I
woke up with chills and fever. I was frightened
almost to death at the thought of being sick with
no one around to help me. I lay abed all day and
neither ate nor drank. I was ready to perish
with thirst; but I was so weak I had no strength
to stand up or to get myself any water to drink.

In the night I slept, but had a dreadful dream.
I thought I saw a man descend from a great
black cloud, in a bright flame of fire. His counte-
nance was most dreadful. When he stepped upon
the ground I thought the earth trembled, just as
it had done in the earthquake. Then I heard a
voice say:

“Seeing all these things have not brought
thee to repentance, now thou shalt die ;’—at which
words I thought the figure lifted up the spear that
was in his hand to kill me,

I can never describe the horrors of my soul
at this terrible vision, nor the impression that re-
mained upon my mind when I awakened and
found it was only a dream,
ROBINSON CRUSOE 27

During all my eight years of seafaring wick-
edness I had never thought seriously of God, nor
had I been thankful to Him for His great mercies.
But now I began to pray for the first time in many
years, after which I fell into a refreshing sleep.

When I woke again I felt much better and
arose and cooked three turtle eggs in the ashes,
and ate them. I remembered that the people in
Brazil took tobacco for the ague. I had some in
one of the chests I had saved, and I went to get
it. Iwas directed by heaven, no doubt, for I found
in the chest a cure both for soul and body. Packed
in with the tobacco was a Bible, which I had for-
gotten all about, but which I was now over-
joyed to find. I read from it a long while, and
having taken a dose of tobacco steeped in rum,
I went to bed.

The next day I had the fever again, but not so
bad. In a few days it left me, but I was so weak
that I could do but little. I sat in the mouth of
my cave and tried to weave baskets.

As soon as I was able I began to apply my-
self to making such necessary things as I found I
most wanted, particularly a chair and a table;
for without these I was not able to enjoy the few
comforts I had in the world, I could not write, or
28 ROBINSON CRUSOE

eat, or do several other things comfortably with-
outa table. I then made shelves about a foot and
a half wide all along one side of the cave, and on
these I arranged all my tools, nails and iron-work.

I also drove pieces into the wall of the
rock, on which to hang guns and all things that
would hang up.

My daily reading of the Bible gave me a
great deal of comfort—the first I had had since
coming to the island ten months before. I began
to give up the idea of ever being rescued and de-
cided to be as happy as I could.

It was about the 15th of July that I began to
take a more particular survey of the island it-
self. I took some provisions with me and started
out. After walking about two miles I cafe to a
creek whose banks were covered with grass, and
on the higher parts I found tobacco growing.
There were many other plants that I had never
seen before.

On the next day I went farther the same way,
and to my joy, I found melons and grapes. I
stayed there all that night, sleeping in a tree as
when I first landed.

In the morning I traveled on, some four miles
farther. Here I found a beautiful valley, where
ROBINSON CRUSOE 29

everything appeared so fresh and green that it
looked like a planted garden. There were orange,
lemon, lime and cocoa trees, but few of them bore
fruit. I gathered some green limes and found
their juice very refreshing. I resolved to lay up
a store of them for the wet season.

I picked a large quantity of the grapes, and
hung them upon the out branches of the trees, so
that they might cure and dry in the sun; as for
the limes and lemons, I carried a great many back
home with me.

I was so enamored with this beautiful valley
that I began to consider moving my habitation
there. After giving the matter much serious
thought, I came to the conclusion, however, that
Thad better stay by the sea-side, where something
might happen to my advantage. The same ill
fate that had brought me to the island, might
bring some other tnhappy wretches to the same
place. 'Fo hide myself among the hills and woods
in the centre of the island meant giving up all
hope and ehance of rescue. So I contented myself
with building a little bower over in the fruitful
valley, where I stayed three or four days at a
time, calling it my country home.

The 38rd of August I found the grapes I had

ROBINSON CRUSOE 31

hung up were perfectly dried and were now ex-
cellent raisins. I had about two hundred large
bunches of them. No sooner had I taken them
down and carried most of them to my cave, than
it began to rain so violently that I could not stir
out of my cave for several days at a time.

I was very careful now about getting wet, as
I was afraid of another attack of fever and ague.
In this confinement, I began to be straightened
for food. Fortunately the rain ceased for a few
hours and I went out and killed a goat and found a
very large tortoise. My meals consisted of raisins
for breakfast, goat’s flesh or turtle for dinner and
turtle eggs for supper. I always had to broil my
meat, as I had no vessel in which to boil or stew
anything, and this was a misfortune.

I counted up my notches on my post and
found I had been on shore three hundred and six-
ty-five days, for it was now the 30th day of Sep-
tember—the unhappy anniversary of my landing.
I kept this day as a solemn fast and determined
to keep every seventh day from now on as the
Sabbath day.

After a time I learned how to divide the rainy
season from the dry. The lack of this knowledge
at first had cost me dear, for I had sowed my
32 ROBINSON CGRUSOR
grain before the dry season but none had come
up. Fortunately I had not sown it all, and I plant-
ed the few grains left before the next rainy season
and it grew very well, though it was several years
before I had enough to make a crop.

I now took care to have plenty of provisions
on hand for the next season and stayed within
doors as much as possible during these months.
I occupied myself by weaving baskets which
proved of great service later on when I wished
to carry things from the fruitful valley to my
cave.

As soon as the rains were over I started on a
trip clear across the island. Taking a hatchet,
gun, and a larger quantity of powder than usual,
and followed by my faithful dog, I started on my
journey.

As soon as I came to the opposite sea-shore
I was surprised to see the sand covered with
turtles. On my side of the island they were very
rare. I don’t believe Ihad caught more than three
during an entire year. There were also a great
number of fowls of many kinds. Some of them
were very. good meat.

This side of the country was much pleasanter
than mine; but I no longer had any inclination to





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I WAS AMAZED TO SEE THE SHORE SPREAD WITH SKULLS


ROBINSON CRUSOE 33

move. I was getting accustomed to my habita-
tion. All the time I was on this side of the island
it seemed as if I were upon a journey and from
home.

It was a very clear day, and I could see land
in the distance. Whether it was an island or a
continent, I could not tell. Neither did I know
what part of the world this might be, except that
I figured it must be part of America, down near
the Spanish dominions.

On this journey my dog surprised a kid, which
I caught and led by a string. I also saw an abund-
ance of parrots, one of which I knocked down with
a stick and brought back with me to tame. I was
more than delighted when I came to what I called
my home and threw myself in my hammock. I
had been gone a month. Everything seemed so
comfortable here that I resolved never to leave it
for so long a time again, while I remained on the
island.

I now read the Word of God every day and
began to derive great comfort. I no longer re-
belled at Fate for casting me on this uninhabited
island, even though I still was a prisoner, locked
up with the eternal bars and bolts of the ocean.

One morning I opened my Bible at these
34 ROBINSON CRUSOE

words: “I will never leave thee, never forsake
thee.”

From this moment I began to conclude in my
mind that it was possible for me to be happy in
this solitary condition. “If God does not forsake
me,” said I, “what matters it if all the world
should forsake me?”

Thus I began my third year. I was seldom
idle, dividing my time according to my daily em-
ployments. First I read the Scriptures, next I
spent three hours hunting for food, and the rest
of the day was passed in curing, preserving and
cooking what I had killed or caught for my sup-
ply. While working about, I talked much to my
parrot. I had taught her to call me Robinson
Crusoe and it pleased me greatly to hear her re-
peat it, as well as a few other things she had
learned after much drilling on my part.

I came near losing my crop of barley and
rice, which at best was not large, for some goats
and wild creatures, which I called hares, started
to eat it up one night. SoI had to fence in my
field. This took me over three weeks. In the mean-
time I tied my dog to the gate where he would
stand and bark all night long.

No sooner had I driven these enemies away
ROBINSON CRUSOE 35

than the birds began to eat up the ripe grain. I
finally shot three of them, and hung them up as
scarecrows. This had the desired effect, and in
the latter end of December, I harvested my corn.

I was sadly in need of a scythe or sickle.
However, I was fortunate in having brought on
shore from the ship, one of the broad-swords or
cutlasses. With the aid of this would-be-reaper,
I cut off the ears and carried them way in a great
basket. After rubbing the seed out with my
hands, I found that out of the half-peck of seed
that I had planted, I had nearly two bushels of
rice, and two and a half bushels of barley; that is to
say, by my guess, for I had no measure at that
time.

The household utensil that I was most in need
of was an earthen vessel that would hold liquid
and stand the heat of the fire at the same time.
I spent much time in hunting for the right kind of
clay. After experimenting about two months I
finally managed to burn two earthen jars without
cracking them. This success led me to make all
kinds of earthenware. I must confess that the
shapes were decidedly ugly as I had no way of
making them, save as children make mud pies.

I next started to make a mortar. As the
36 ROBINSON CRUSOE

rocks on the island were all too soft and crumbling
to use, I took a great block of hard wood, and
with much labor I rounded the outside. With the
help of a fire, I made a hollow place in it, as the
Indians in Brazil make their canoes. Then I
made a heavy pestle of iron-wood. With some
muslin taken from the ship, I fitted up some very
good sieves, and in a short time my corn was
ground or pounded into flour.

The next thing to be considered was the bak-
ing. I made some hollow earthen vessels, which
served as hearths. In these I built hot fires. Then,
raking the ashes and embers off clean, I put in my
loaves and covered them with earthen jars.

As I worked away on these things you may be
sure my thoughts ran many times upon the land
which I had seen from the other side of the island.
I could not help feeling that if I were on the oppo-
site shore, I might find some way or other to con-
vey myself farther, and perhaps at last find some
means of escape.

If only I had a boat, thought I, I could ven-
ture out to sea in search of the mainland. I had
been so successful in everything I had made that
I now considered myself skillful enough even to
make a boat. I didn’t stop to figure out how
I at Helis

| he eden mi
ae oh ),

ea Nee

Ca



ly

I MADE SOME HOLLOW EARTHEN.VESSELS __


38 ROBINSON CRUSOE

I would launch it after it was built, I just started
right out to make it. For twenty days I hacked
and hewed away at a great cedar-tree that was
five feet ten inches in diameter at the lower part,
and four feet eleven inches in diameter at the end
of twenty-two feet. It took me fourteen more
days getting the branches and limbs and its vast
spreading head cut off. I then worked about four
months trying to shape the bottom and hollow out
the inside.

If anyone ever worked hard with mallet and
chisel, I’m sure it was I. At last I was rewarded
for all my labor, for there stood a ‘handsome boat
big enough to carry about twenty-six men. I
was more than delighted, and now began to think
about getting it into the water. But all my de-
vices failed me. The boat lay about one hundred
yards from the water, but the trouble was it was
up hill towards the creek. But I dug into the
earth and made a declivity. When this was done
I was no better off than before for I could not
move the boat. Then I began to cut a dock or
canal.

“Tf I can’t bring the boat down to the water,”
said I, “I will have to bring the water up to the
boat.” When I found what a little digging I could
ROBINSON CRUSOE 39

do in a day, I began to calculate, and came to the
conclusion that it would take me about twelve
years to finish the work. There was nothing: left
to do but abandon the undertaking. For days I
was very sad and disappointed. But what was the
use of vain regrets? I should have had more
sense in the beginning and not attempted to build
such an enormous boat.

I now had finished my fourth year on the
island. I kept my anniversary by fasting and
reading the Bible as usual.

My clothes were beginning to wear out, even
though I had brought quite a supply from the sea-
men’s chests. Luckily for me I had saved all the
skins of the animals I had killed. These I had
cured by stretching them out in the sun with
sticks. Some of them were so hard they were of
no use, but many were soft. The first thing I
made was a cap and a suit. These were just the
thing for the rainy season, as I turned the hair
on the ouside to keep off the rain. I must con-
fess that I was not as good a tailor as I was a
carpenter.

After this I spent a great deal of time and
pains to make an umbrella. I was obliged to be
outdoors so much it was a most useful thing to me,
40 ROBINSON CRUSOE

as well for the rains as for the heat. I spoiled two
or three before I could get one that suited. My
greatest difficulty was in making one that would
close. At last I succeeded. I could now walk out
in the hottest weather and keep cool. Besides, as
I put the hair upwards on the umbrella it cast off
the rain like a pent-house.

Thus time passed on and I lived very com-
fortably. My chief labor was planting my barley
and rice and curing my raisins.

I no longer thought of trying to get to main-
land, but I did dream of making a tour around
the island. So I set about making a canoe. I was
much wiser this time, and made one that I could
get down to the sea. I worked nearly two years
building the boat and a canal to it, six feet in
width and four in depth. I fitted up a mast and
made a sail out of some of the little pieces of the
ship’s sails which lay in store. I tried the boat and
found she would sail very well. Then I made little
lockers or boxes at each end for provisions, am-
munition, ete. I also made a long hollow place
for my gun, with a flap over it to keep it dry. My
umbrella I fixed at the stern, so that it would
shield me like an awning.

All now being ready I loaded my ship for the
ROBINSON CRUSOE 41

voyage, putting in two dozen loaves of barley
bread, an earthen pot full of parched rice, a little
bottle of rum, and half a goat. I also had plenty
of powder and shot and two large coats, one to lie
upon and one to cover me in the night. Thus I
set sail.

When I came to the east side of the island, I
found a great ledge of rocks lying out about two
leagues into the sea, and beyond that a shoal of
sand. I was afraid to go so far out to sea, for
fear I could not get back again, so I anchored my
boat, and taking my gun, went on shore and
climbed a big hill, to get a view of the other side of
the ledge.

From the hill I perceived a strong and intri-
-eate current, which would be very likely to pre-
vent me from being able to get back to the island
again. There was a strong eddy under the shore.
I lay here for two days, not daring to venture
forth. But the third day the sea was calm, so I
set sail. I was just a short distance from the
rocks, when I found myself in a great depth of
water, and a current like the sluice of a mill. It
carried my boat along with it with great violence.
There was no wind stirring to help me, and work
though I did with my paddles, it was of no use.
42 ROBINSON CRUSOE

There was a current on both sides of me and I
knew that in a few leagues’ distance they would
join, and I would be carried out to sea where I
would die of hunger. I had found a tortoise on the
shore, which I had tossed in the boat and I still
had a jar of fresh water, but how long would this
food keep me alive if I were driven out into the
ocean?

When I was shipwrecked on the island I
thought Fate had dealt me her cruellest blow, but
I suddenly realized that there were still worse
conditions in store for me. I now looked back
upon my desolate, solitary island as the most
pleasant place in the world, and all the happiness
my heart could wish for was to be there again.
I stretched out my hands to it with eager wishes.

“O happy desert!” said I, “I shall never see
thee again. O miserable creature, whither am
I going?”

I still worked hard to get my boat out of the
current. About noon, a breeze sprang up from
the south east which cheered my heart a little.
In about a half hour more it blew a gentle gale.
By this time I had been driven a great distance
from my island; if the weather had been the least
cloudy or hazy so that I could not have seen the
ROBINSON CRUSOE 43

island, I do not know how I would ever have got-
ten back to it.

I put up my mast again, and spread my sail,
standing away to the north as much as possible,
to get out of the current.

The wind continued fair and I made such
good headway that I was soon back on land again.
As soon as I touched shore I fell on my knees and
gave thanks to God for my deliverance. I then
drew my boat into a little cove under some trees,
and lay down to sleep.

On awakening the problem was how to get
the boat back to my side of the island. I would
never attempt to go back the way I came, and
not knowing what new dangers I would run into
if I continued around the island, I decided to find a
creek where I could leave it in safety.

After coasting the shore for about three miles
I came to a very good inlet or bay, which nar-
rowed till it came to a very little rivulet which
made a good harbor for the boat. Taking my
gun and umbrella I started back across the island.
How deighted I was when I finally reached my
summer home, as I called it. I found everything
just as I had left it. I climbed over my fence and
threw myself down to rest, for I was very
44 ROBINSON CRUSOE

weary, and soon fell asleep. Imagine my sur-
prise when I was awakened by a voice calling
“Robin, Robin, Robin Crusoe! poor Robin Crusoe!
Where are you, Robin Crusoe? Where are you?
Where have you been?”

I was so dead asleep at first that I did not
waken thoroughly; dozing between sleeping and
waking I thought I had been dreaming till I
heard the same voice repeating: “Robin Crusoe!
Robin Crusoe!” At last I became wide awake
and started up in great fright. No sooner were
my eyes open than I saw my poll parrot sitting on
the top of the hedge.

Even after I knew it was the parrot that
had spoken to me, it took me some time to get
over my fright. I called to Polly and she came
and sat upon my thumb as she used to do, and
continued talking to me just as if she were over-
joyed to see me again; and so I carried her home
to my cave with me.

I had had enough rambling to sea for some
time and did nothing for several days but sit and
reflect upon the danger I had escaped. I would
have been very glad to have my boat again
on my side of the island; but my heart would
shrink and my blood run cold at the very thought
ROBINSON CRUSOE 45

of venturing to sea again, and battling with un-
known currents.

I began to think now of another way to kill
goats so as to be more sparing of powder. My
supply could not last forever, so I set traps and
caught some young kids, which I tamed, keeping
them in a large enclosure, securely fenced about.

Had anybody met me now he would either have
been greatly frightened or else would have had a
good laugh at my “get-up.” I wore a great, high
shapeless cap made of goat’s skin with a fiap hang-
ing down behind my neck. My jacket was short and
made of the same kind of skin. The breeches were
made of the skin of an old he-goat whose hair
hung down such a length on either side, that it
reached to the middle of my legs. I had no shoes
or stockings, but had contrived a kind of bus-
kins, to flap over my legs and lace on either side.
Thad a stiff belt of dried skin and from this hung
a little saw and hatchet. I wore another belt
which hung over my shoulder. At the end of its
under my left arm, were two pouches, both made
of goat’s skin too—one for my powder and the
other for my shot. I had a basket fastened to my
back, carried my gun on my shoulder and over
my head was the great clumsy, ugly goat-skin
46 ROBINSON CRUSOE

umbrella. From this description you can easily
imagine what a funny looking object I was.

As the months rolled by, I finally got up cour-
age enough to go to the other side of the island
to see if my boat was still safe. It was safe and
sound so I decided to leave it there again and go
back and build me another to use on my home side
of the island.

It happened that one day, about noon, while
going towards my boat, I was exceedingly sur-
prised to see the print of a man’s naked foot
in the sand. I stood like one thunderstruck. I
-listened, I looked around me, but I could hear
nothing, nor see anyone. I quickly climbed to a
near-by hill and looked in every direction, Then
I ran along the shore but could detect no other
foot-print. I came back to the foot mark and
examined it carefully. Yes, it was the foot of a
human being—toes, heel, every part of a naked
foot. Ihurried back to my fortification, looking
back at every two or three steps, mistaking every
bush and tree for a man. When I came to my
cave-home, I fled into it like one pursued. Whether
I went over by the ladder, or went in at the hole
in the rock, which I called a door, I cannot re-
member, I was so consumed with fear.
ROBINSON CRUSOE 47

I did not sleep a wink that night but lay
trembling, trying to figure out who it could be that
had visited the island. I fancied all sorts of
things, but finally concluded that some of the
savages of the main land had been there.

I now lived in constant dread of meeting this
enemy. When milking my goats or gathering my
fruit, if I heard the least noise, I would drop
everything and flee to my house.

I regretted having cut a door into the rock,
beyond where my fortification joined it. There-
fore I resolved to make a second fortifi-
cation, in the same manner of a semicircle, at a
distance from my wall where I had planted a
double row of trees about twelve years before.
Between these trees I drove great stakes. I
now had a double wall; my outer wall was thick-
ened with pieces of timber, old cables, and every-
thing I could think of to make it strong. I left
seven little holes, about as big as the thick of my
arm, and in these holes I placed my muskets like
cannon.

Then I planted the ground without as full of
trees as could well stand and grow, so that in two
years’ time, I had a grove so thick that no one
would ever imagine there was any human habita-
tion beyond it.
48 ROBINSON CRUSOE

One day as I wandered toward the west of
the island, I thought I saw a boat far out at sea.
On coming down from the hill, I was amazed to
see the shore spread with skulls and other bones
of human beings. There was a place where a fire
had been made, and a circle dug in the earth,
where I supposed the wretches had sat down to
their inhuman feast.

It did not seem to me that these wretches had
come to this island to search for anything, but
simply to have their feast and gO away again.
I had been on the island eighteen years now,
without being harmed and might easily be there
another eighteen years without being discovered
by them. However, the thought of those wretches
and their inhuman customs of eating one another
made me pensive and sad, and kept me close
within my own circle for almost two years after
this. By my own circle I mean my castle or forti-
fied cave, my country seat in the fruitful valley
and an enclosure in the woods where I now kept
my goats.

During this time I never once went to see my
boat on the other side of the island.

I made daily trips to a hill about three miles
from my castle where I could observe any boats










evi — ea : 2

AFTER TWO MONTHS OF HARD WORK, I SHAPED A CANOE
ROBINSON CRUSOE 49

that were on the sea, coming near the island.
After two or three months of this hard duty I
gave up watching for them. I managed to get
up courage enough to go to the other side of the
island and move my boat to the east end where I
hid it securely.

The constant fear in which I now lived put an
end to all inventions on my part. I was afraid to
drive a nail or chop a stick of wood lest some one
would hear the noise. I was uneasy about build-
ing a fire even, for fear that the smoke, which is
visible at a great distance in the day, should be-
tray me.

To my great consolation I had found a natural
cave in the woods. The entrance was a small hole
at the base of a large rock; inside it was roomy
and quite dry, but pitch black. Into this grotto I
carried my magazine of powder, several muskets
and other things. - E
: It was now December of my twenty-third

- year on the island. It being the month of harvest-
ing, I had to be abroad in the fields most of the
time.
Going out early one morning, I was surprised
to see a light on the shore, about two miles away
and to my horror, on my side of the island.
50 ROBINSON CRUSOE

I was so surprised that I rushed back to my
castle and pulled the ladder up after me. If the
savages should happen to ramble over this side
of the island and discover my corn field—partly
cut, or see any of my works, they would im-
mediately conclude that there were people in the
place, and would then never rest till they had
found me out. '

I loaded my muskets, which were mounted
upon my fortifications, and all my pistols and re-
solved to defend myself to the last gasp. At the
end of two hours I became impatient for news.
I climbed over my high wall and went to the top
of the hill which was my observation tower.
Pulling out my perspective glass, I lay flat down
on the ground and began to look for the place
from which the smoke was rising.

Yes, there was the fire, with nine naked say-
ages sitting around it. I could also see two canoes
which they had hauled up upon the shore. For
about an hour or more they danced around the
fire. Finally, as soon as the tide made to the west-
ward, I saw them take the boat and paddle away.

As soon as they were out of view, I took my
guns and pistols and went over to the place. My
indignation knew no bounds when I saw the
ROBINSON CRUSOE 51

marks of their dreadful feast, for there were
human bones scattered about on the sand.

I began to ponder how I could destroy them
when they should come again. After that I went
often to the hill to look for them, and if they had
come, I should certainly have attacked them.
But more than a year elapsed and I saw no signs
of them. In the meantime an event happened
which intensely excited me,

There had been a storm of wind all day and
evening, and a great deal of thunder and light-
ning. I was quietly reading my Bible, when sud-
denly I heard the noise of a gun, as I thought,
fired at sea.

I started up in the greatest haste, clapped my
ladder to the middle place of the rock, and pulled
it after me; mounting it the second time I reached
the top of the hill just as another shot was fired.
I concluded that there must be a ship in distress.
I knew that I could not help them, but I thought
they.might be able to rescue me. SoT gathered to-
gether all the dry wood I could find and made a
great fire on the hill-top. I felt that if there
was a ship nearby they would surely see this
roaring blaze. No doubt they did, for as soon as
the fire shot up I heard another gun, and then
several more.
52 ROBINSON CRUSOE

I watched all night but heard nothing more,
and in the morning, to my great sorrow, I saw
the wreck of a ship upon the concealed rocks, far
out from shore. But there was no sign of any
living thing on the wreck. Several days after,
the corpse of a drowned boy was washed ashore.
He had nothing in his pockets but a few pieces of
money and a tobacco pipe. Needless to say, I
was very glad to find the pipe.

The longing to go out to this wreck was so
strong that, at last, I loaded my boat with every-
thing necessary and ventured to sea. It was not
until I had made a careful study of the danger-
ous currents, however.

I reached the vessel safely and went aboard.
I found a dog almost dead with hunger and thirst.
I gave him a piece of my bread, and some fresh
water. He devoured the bread like a ravenous
wolf that had been starving for a week in the
snow. Besides the dog there was nothing left in
the ship that had life. There were two dead bodies
in the forecastle which was full of water.

Most of the cargo had been spoiled by waiter,
However, I managed to find a few dry things. I
saw several chests, and believing that they had
belonged to the seamen I loaded them in my lit-
ROBINSON CRUSOE 53

tle boat without even examining them. I also
found a little cask full of liquor, a powder-horn, a
fire shovel and tongs, two little brass kettles, a
copper pot in which to make chocolate, and a
gridiron. With this cargo and the dog I came
away, and by evening had reached my island
again.

I was so weary and fatigued that I slept that
night in the boat, and next morning got my
treasures up on shore. When I came to open the
sailor’s chests, I found several things of great
use tome. For example, there were several good
shirts, which were very welcome, and a dozen and
a half of white linen handkerchiefs. When I
came to the till of the chest, I found three great
bags of money; in one of them there were six
doubloons of gold, and some bars of gold. Upon
the whole this was not a very profitable voyage,
as the money was of no value to me. I would have
given it all for three or four pairs of English
shoes and stockings. In another of the chests I
also found some more money, but no gold. I
lugged this coin home to my cave and hid it away
with the other that I had brought from our own
shipwrecked vessel, many years before.

From now on my one idea seemed to be to
54 ROBINSON CRUSOE

get away from the island. One night I dreamed
that one of the victims of the cannibals ran away
from them and escaped to me. After this dream
I watched every day for the savages. The dream
had made such an impression on my mind that
I half believed I might capture one of these vic-
tims who might be able to pilot me to the main-
land.

I watched constantly for a year and a half
and was about to give up in disgust when one
morning I saw no less than five canoes on shore
and about thirty savages dancing around a fire.
In a little while two miserable wretches were
dragged up from the boats. One was knocked
down immediately and cut up to cook for the feast,
while the other was left standing by himself till
they would be ready for him.

This unfortunate being, seeing himself a lit-
tle at liberty, and unbound, started away from
them and ran with great speed along the sands,
directly toward me. I was dreadfully frightened,
when I saw him run away. However, my spirits
began to recover when I found there were only
three men following him, and he was by far the
best runner.

Between them and my castle was the creek,
ROBINSON CRUSOE 55

but the escaped victim thought nothing of that.
He plunged in and swam across in about thirty
strokes, landed and ran with exceeding strength
and swiftness. Of the three pursuers, only two
could swim, so the third returned. I ran down
the ladder, fetched my two guns, and getting up
again with the same haste to the top of the hill,
I crossed towards the sea. I rushed in between
the pursuer and the pursued, and knocked down
the first cannibal with the stock of my gun. I
was afraid to fire for fear the noise would attract
the rest of the savages. Upon seeing his com-
panion ‘fall, the other stopped, as if frightened
and I advanced towards him. But as I came nearer
I could see he had a bow and arrow and was
getting ready to take aim, so I was compelled to
shoot at him first, and killed him the first shot.
The poor fellow who was running away was so
startled by the fire and noise of my gun that he
stood stock still. I halloed to him and made signs
for him to come back to me.

He hesitated a while, then came toward me
a little way, and stood trembling like a leaf. I
smiled at him, and beckoned for him to come
closer. At length he came over to me, laid his
head on the ground and put my foot upon it.
56 ROBINSON CRUSOE

This was his way of telling me that he would be
my slave forever.

In the meantime the savage that I had
knocked down began to come to life again. See-
ing this, my new slave motioned for me to give
him my sword, which I did. He thereupon ran
quickly to the savage, and cut off his head at a
single stroke. He then returned the sword to
me, laughing in triumph. What puzzled him
most was to know how I had killed the other In-
dian so far off. He went over to him and turned
him from side to side. He then took up his bow
and arrows and came back to me, making signs
that we should bury the bodies in the sand. This
was a good idea as it would keep the other Indians
from finding the bodies, should they follow us.
After scraping holes in the sand, and covering
over the wretches, I led my slave, not to my castle,
but to my grotto on the farther side of the island.
Here I gave him bread and a bunch of raisins to
eat, and a draught of water, for I found he was
almost parched for drink. He was more than
grateful. When I had thus refreshed him, I made
signs for him to go and lie down and rest. So the
poor creature lay down and was soon fast asleep.

He was a comely, handsome fellow, with
ROBINSON CRUSOE 57

straight, strong limbs, tall and well shaped. He
had a very good countenance, noé a fierce and
surly aspect, but seemed to have somé@thing very
manly in his face. His hair was long and black,
not curled like wool; his forehead very high and
large, and there was a vivacious twinkle in his
eyes.

The color of his skin was not quite black, but
very tawny. His face was round and plump; his
nose was not flat like the Negroes’; he had a
shapely mouth, and teeth as white as wory. Aft-
er he had slept about a half hour he awoke and
came out of the cave to find me. I was milking
my goats. As soon as he saw me he ran toward
me, threw himself on his knees and made many
gestures, trying to show me how grateful he was.
He then put his head flat upon the ground and
placed my foot upon it, as he had done before.

I let him know that I understood him and was
very well pleased. It was a great comfort to have
a human being around, even if we could not un-
derstand each other. I immediately began to teach
him. First I let him know his name was Friday,
which was the day I saved his life. Next I taught
him to say Master, and then let him know that
was to be my name. He soon learned to say “Yes”
and “No” and to know their meaning,
58 ROBINSON CRUSOE

When we had our first meal together I gave
him some milk in an earthen pot, and let him see
me drink mine before him, and sop my bread in
it. Ithen gave him a cake of bread with which
to do the same. He quickly followed my example,
and made signs that the food was very good.

We stayed at the cave all night. Early next
morning I beckoned him to come with me, and let
let him know that I would give him some clothes.
This seemed to please him, as he was stark naked.

As we went by the place where we had
buried the two savages, he pointed to the place,
making signs that we should dig them up again
and eat them. At this I appeared very angry and
pretended to vomit at the very thought of such a
thing. I beckoned for him to come away, which
he did, in a most submissive manner. I then led
him up to the top of the hill to see if his enemies
were gone. By the aid of my glass I could see
the place where they had been, but there was no
trace of them or their canoes.

We went down to the shore and carefully
buried the remains of the horrible feast. After
many gestures and antics, Friday made me un-
derstand that there had been a great battle and
that four prisoners of which he was one, had been
brought to this island to be eaten,
ROBINSON CRUSOE 59

Now that there was no longer any signs of
savages about, I took my man to my castle and
fitted him out with a pair of linen drawers, a
jacket made of goat’s skin and a very good cap
of hare’s skin. He was delighted to see himself
dressed as his master.

I then made him a little tent between my two
fortifications. I fixed my doors so that I could
fasten them on the inside, and took all my guns
and weapons into my habitation every night. But
none of these precautions were necessary, I soon
found out, for never did man have a more faith-
ful, loving, sincere servant than Friday was to
me.

One morning I went out in the woods to kill
a goat and took Friday with me. I intended to
go over to my own enclosure and get one of my
own flock, but on the way, I saw a she-goat and
her two kids lying under the shade of a'tree. I
caught hold of Friday and made signs to him not
to stir. Then I aimed and killed one of the kids.
My companion was terrified at the sound of the
shot. He had not noticed that I had killed one
of the kids. He ripped open his jacket to feel
whether he was not wounded, as he thought I was
resolved to kill him. When he found that he was
60 ROBINSON CRUSOE

unharmed he came and knelt down before me,
embraced my knees, and said a great many things
I did not understand. I could easily see that he
was begging me not to kill him.

I took him by the hand, laughed at him, and
pointing to the kid which I had killed, beckoned
to him to run and fetch it, which he did. By and
by I saw a parrot sitting upon a tree within shot;
so, to let Friday understand a little what I would
do, I pointed first to the parrot, and then to my
gun, and last to the ground under the tree and
bade him watch the bird fall.

Notwithstanding all I had said to him, he
was again terribly frightened. I believe if I
had let him, he would have worshipped me and
the gun. As for the gun itself he would not so
much as touch it for several days.

When Friday tasted the stewed kid he showed
that he liked it very much. The next day I roasted
a piece, and he showed even more pleasure. He
made me understand he would never eat human
flesh any more. .

As the days went by, I taught him to beat
and sift corn and to make bread. His devotion
to me was most touching. I dare say he would
have sacrificed his life to save mine upon any
ROBINSON CRUSOE 61

oceasion whatsoever. I became more and more
delighted with him, and spared no efforts in.
teaching him everything I could that would make
him useful, handy and helpful. Especially did I
endeavor to make him speak and understand me
when I spoke.

After I had taught him English so that he
could understand me fairly well, I asked him how
it was that he had come to be taken prisoner. He
replied:

“They more many than my nation, in the
place where me was; they take one, two, three,
and me. My nation over-beat them, where me no
was B there my nation take one, two, great thou-
sand.”

“But why did not your side recover you from
your enemies?” I asked.

Friday answered: “Because they make me go
in canoe; my nation have no canoe that time.”

“What does your natien do with the prison-
ers they capture?” I questioned. “Do they carry
them away and eat them?”

“Yes, my nation eat mans too,” said Friday,
looking ashamed. “Sometimes they come here,
often come other else place.”

This interested me and I asked him if he had
ever been on my island with them, at other times.
62 ROBINSON CRUSOE

“Yes,” he replied, “I been here,” pointing to
the northwest side of the island.

Friday then went on to tell me how he had
been on the island once when they had eaten up
twenty men, two women and one child. He could
not tell twenty in English, but laid out stones to
that number.

I asked him a thousand questions about his
country and he told me all he knew. He said his
sort of people were called Caribs; but farther
west there were white bearded men like me, and
that they had killed “much mans.” I understood
from that, that he meant the Spaniards whose
cruelties in America had spread over the whole
country, and were remembered from father to
son.

As time passed away, I talked much to Friday
about God and he became a very good Christian.

When he could understand me well, I told
him of the countries of Europe, and how I came
to be on the island. He said that a boat had come
ashore in his country with seventeen white men in
it. I was delighted when he told me that the sev-
enteen white men were living with his people.

One day we were up on the hill at the east
side of the island. Friday, who was looking earn-
ROBINSON CRUSOE / 63

estly toward the main land, suddenly cried out:
“Oh, joy! oh! glad! there see my country.” That
set me to thinking whether I could not make the
voyage with Friday, or send him alone to see if
the white men were still there.

When I proposed to Friday that he go alone
to see his people, he said he would like to go but
that he would not leave me. I therefore resolved
to make a canoe large enough for both of us, and
venture forth. :

We felled a tree near the water, and after
two months of hard labor we had shaped a boat
and gotten her into the sea. I was surprised to see
how quickly my man Friday learned to manage,
turn, and paddle her along. I made a mast and a
sail, and fitted her out with an anchor and cable.

Friday knew very well how to paddle the ca-
noe, but he knew nothing of what belonged to a
sail and rudder and was quite amazed when he
saw me working them. However, I soon made
these things familiar to him and he became an
expert sailor. There was one thing I could not
make him understand and that was the compass.

Before we got started the rainy season was
upon us and we had to postpone our voyage and
stay indoors. When we began to go out again, I

- ge


64 ROBINSON CRUSOE

sent Friday down to the shore one day to find a
turtle. In a short time he came flying over my
outer wall in a great fright, crying out to me: “O,
master! O, bad!”

“What’s the matter, Friday?” said I.

“Oh! yonder, there,” cried he, “one, two, three
canoes, one, two, three!”

The poor creature was so frightened that I
hardly knew what to do with him. He trembled
in every limb, so sure was he that the savages
had come back to look for him.

“Friday,” said I, “we must fight them, and
you must help me all you can.” He assured me he
would, even saying: “me die when you bid die,
master.”

[hurriedly loaded the two fowling-pieces, four
muskets and two pistols. I hung my great sword
by my side, and gave Friday my hatchet. When I
had thus prepared, I went up to the hill and.
looking through my perspective-glass saw twen-
ty-one savages, three prisoners, and three canoes.
It was easy to be seen that they had come ashore
to have another of those dreadful feasts of human
bodies.

I was so indignant that I rushed back to Fri-
day, who by this time had gotten over his fright,
ROBINSON CRUSOE 65



THEY HAD COME ASHORE TO HAVE ANOTHER
OF THOSE DREADFUL FEASTS

and told him that we must go down to the shore
and kill these barbarians.

In this fit of fury I gave Friday one pistol to
stick in his girdle, and three guns to carry on his
shoulders. I took a pistol and the three remain-
ing muskets. Friday carried a large bag with
more powder and bullets, and I placed a bottle of
rum in one of my pockets.

I charged him to keep close behind me, and
not to stir, or shoot, or do anything till I bade him.
66 ROBINSON CRUSOE

We crept stealthily forward, hiding behind trees
and shrubbery. Finally we came within firing
distance, and I was filled with horror to see a
white man—evidently one of the bearded men
that Friday had told me about—lying on the sand,
bound hand and foot.

We had now not a moment to lose, for nine-
teen of the dreadful wretches sat upon the
ground, all closely huddled together. They had
just sent the other two to butcher the poor
Christian, for we could see them stoop down to
untie his hands and feet.

“Now, Friday,” said I, “do exactly as you see
me do.” SoIset down one of the muskets and the
fowling-piece upon the ground, and with the oth-
er musket took aim at the circle around the fire.
Friday aimed so much better than I, that on the
side that he shot he killed two and wounded three
more. On my side, I killed one, and wounded
two. A regular panic ensued. Those of the say-
ages who were not hurt, jumped to their feet, but.
did not know which way to run or which way to.
look.

As soon as the first shot was made, I threw
down my gun and took up another. Friday did
the same, and waited for the order to fire. We
ROBINSON CRUSOE 67

only killed two savages this time as our guns were
loaded with small pistol-bullets, but we wounded
so many that they ran about yelling and scream-
ing like mad creatures.

“Now, Friday,” said I, laying down the dis-
charged pieces, and taking up the musket which
was yet loaded, “follow me.”

We went directly toward the poor victim
who was still lying on the beach. The two butchers .
who were beside him when we first fired, had fled
in fright to the sea-side and had jumped into a
canoe, and three more of the rest made away in
the same manner. I told Friday to run down and
fire at them, which he did, killing two and badly
wounding a third.

In the meantime, I cut the flags that bound
the poor victim and gave him a drink from my
bottle, and a piece of bread which he quickly ate.
Seeing that he was somewhat recovered, I gave
him my sword and a pistol and told him that if he
had any strength left, at all, to get up and help
us fight. He was a Spaniard, but understood En-
glish.

He took the weapons thankfully, and as if
they gave him new vigor, he flew upon his mur-
derers like a fury. Shortly after I saw him in
68 ROBINSON CRUSOE

deadly combat with a powerful savage who was
wringing my sword out of his hands. I hastened
to his side, but he wisely dropped the sword and
shot his enemy through the body.

We fought desperately and succeeded in kill-
ing them all except the three who escaped in a
canoe of whom one was wounded, if not dead.

But it would never do to let these three carry
the news home to their people, for they would
surely return with two or three hundred canoes
and devour us. So we determined to pursue them
by sea.

We were about to enter one of their aban-
doned canoes when we discovered a prisoner,
lying in the bottom of the boat, tied hand and
foot. Imagine Friday’s surprise and joy when
he found that it was no other than his own long
lost father. It would have moved anyone to tears
to see how Friday kissed and hugged his father.
He jumped about, dancing and singing; then
wept and beat his own face and head.

This put an end to our pursuit of the other
savages, who had now almost disappeared from
sight. It was lucky for us that we did not attempt
to follow them for about two hours later a dread-
ful storm arose.
ROBINSON CRUSOE 69

When we reached home neither the Spaniard
nor Friday’s father was able to climb the ladder,
their limbs were in such a stiffened condition
from having been bound so long. We made them
a tent outside, and in a few days they were well
and strong again.

I set Friday to inquire of his father if he
thought the savages who had escaped would
come back with reinforcements. He was of the
opinion that even if they had outlived the storm
that night, they would never return, for he had
heard them talking and they thought Friday and
Robinson Crusoe were two heavenly spirits or
furies. It was impossible for them to conceive
that a man could dart fire, speak thunder and
kill at a distance.

In my discourse with the Spaniard he told
me how he and thirteen others had ‘been ship-
wrecked on the savage coast, and that his com-
panions were all alive, but in a state of great
want. I resolved to increase our stock of goats
and grain, sufficient to feed them all and then to
send for them. At the proper season we fell to
work digging, and planted as much grain as we
could.

At last we sent Friday’s father and the Span-


THEY LOOKED LIKE MEN IN DESPAIR
ROBINSON CRUSOE 71

iard over to the mainland. After they had been
gone about eight days a strange thing happened. I
was looking out to sea one morning when I be-
held a small boat with shoulder-of-mutton sail
heading for our shore. I ran for my perspective
glass and soon discovered a ship lying at anchor
about a league and a half out.

When the small boat, which appeared to be
an English long-boat, reached the shore, eleven
men landed. Three of them were unarmed and
appeared to be prisoners. These three sat down
upon the ground, very pensive, and looked like
men in despair. The others rambled about the
land as if they wanted to see what kind of a
place they were in.

As soon as the other men were out of sight,
Friday and I went up to the three distressed
creatures and asked them who they were. They |
were very much startled at our sudden approach,
and frightened at my uncouth appearance.

I calmed their fears and told them I was
ready to help them if they were in trouble.

Then one of them spoke up and said:

“IT was commander of that ship out there ; my
men mutinied against me and were going to mur-
der me, but were finally persuaded not to do so.
72 ROBINSON CRUSOE

Instead they have set me’on shore in this desolate
place, with these two men—one my mate and the
other a passenger, where they intend to leave us
to perish.

I then told him that I would venture to de-
liver him and his companions upon two condi-
tions; first, that while he stayed on the island he
was to have no authority, but was to be governed
by my orders; second, that if the ship should be
recovered, he was to carry my man Friday and
myself back to England, passage free.

The captain willingly agreed to these rea-
sonable demands, and I thereupon gave each of
them a musket and powder. We then went in
search of the villains and came upon them asleep
in a grove. The captain was loth to kill the men,
yet he said that there were two villains amongst
them who had been the authors of the mutiny in
the ship. If they escaped he feared they would
go on board and return with all the ship’s com-
pany and destroy us all.

In the middle of our discourse, two of the
men awoke, and cried out to the rest. But they
were too late, for our party fired, and one of the
two leaders was killed on the spot and the other
badly wounded. The captain then told the others
ROBINSON CRUSOE 73

that he would spare their lives if they would give
up their mutiny and obey his orders. This they
promised to do. We took no. chances, however,
but bound all our prisoners. We then went down
to the small boat, took everything out of it and
dragged it up beyond the reach of high tide.

After awhile another boat put off from the
ship with ten men in her, all armed. Eight of
them landed and started inland to find their com-
panions.

I immediately sent Friday and the captain’s
mate over beyond the little creek to a piece of
rising ground and told them to halloo as loud as
_ they could. As soon as the seamen answered
they were to call out again and in the meantime
by taking a round-about way and keeping al-
ways out of sight, they were to lead them into the
island as far as possible.

The strategy worked well, and it was dark
before they all got back. In the meantime we
had overcome the two men left in the boat. They
begged for mercy and agreed to help put down
the mutiny if the captain would but spare-their
lives.

When the eight men came back to the boat
in the dark, I made one of the two, whom we had
just taken prisoner, call out:
74 ROBINSON CRUSOE

“Tom Smith, for God’s sake, throw down your
arms and yield, or you are all dead men this
moment.”

“Whom must we yield to? Where are they?”
said Smith quickly.

“Here they are,” he replied; “here’s our cap-
tain and fifty men with him. They’ve been hunt-

ing you these two hours; if you do not yield at
once you are all lost.”

Then the captain called out that if they would
lay down their arms, the governor of the island,
by whom he meant me, would spare all their lives,
except that of Will Atkins. He had been the first
to mutiny and lay hold of the captain.

It was very dark and they could not tell how
many men were really pursuing them, so they
decided to lay down their arms. We then bound
them and took some to the cave, and the others
to my bower.

The captain talked matters over with the
prisoners and after picking out those that he
could trust, he set out for the ship, reaching her
about midnight.

After a short fight, the rebel captain was
killed, and order restored.
ROBINSON CRUSOE 75



The captain and some of his men then came
back to the island and brought me a lot of pro-
visions, and several outfits of clothing. The
clothing was a very kind and agreeable present,
but I must confess that I felt most awkward,
when I first put it on.

After dressing in my new clothes, so as to
look more like a real governor than when in my
goat skins, I had the rebels brought before me. I
told them that their rebel captain had been
76 ROBINSON CRUSOE

killed, and that I was now considering executing
them as pirates. I told them that I had resolved
to quit the island with all my men and take
passage for England.

Upon this they begged that I would let them
stay on the island, to which I gave my consent.

Friday and I did not wait for the return of
his father and the white men but I told the men
the story of the Spaniards that were to be ex-
pected and left a letter for them. They promised
to treat the new-comers well and share things
with them.

When I quit the island I took my great goat-
skin cap and umbrella, one of my parrots and all
the money I had taken off the two shipwrecked
vessels and which up to this time had been per-
fectly useless to me.

We set sail the 19th of December, 1686. I had
lived on the island twenty-eight years, two months
and nineteen days.

After a six months’ voyage we reached Eng-
land. Ihad been gone so long, that I was as much
a stranger as if I had never been known there.

I went down to Yorkshire but found my par-
ents were dead and all the family extinct except
ROBINSON CRUSOE 17

two sisters and two of the children of one of my
brothers.

In the meantime the captain told the owners
of the vessel how I had saved the ship and they
made up a purse of a thousand dollars for me.

With this money I resolved to go to Lisbon and
see if I could get any news from my plantations
in Brazil. Friday accompanied me and proved to
be a most faithful servant.

At Lisbon I found my old friend, the captain
of the Portuguese vessel that had picked me up
when I was escaping from the Moors. He was a
very old man now and had not been to Brazil
in nine years. However, he assured me, that the
last time he was there, my plantation was in a
flourishing condition.

I prepared the necessary papers and sent
them by a ship sailing to Brazil, and in about
seven months I received a large packet from my
surviving trustees giving a full account of my
plantation. It had kept improving all these years
and I was now the master of a fine estate and
50,000 pounds sterling in money. The trustees
sent me, beside the gold, 1,200 chests of sugar
and 800 rolls of tobacco.

I was so overcome by this news, and the re-
78 ROBINSON CRUSOE

ception of such great riches that I fell sick but
soon recovered and decided to return with Fri-
day to England. I had had so much of the sea
that I resolved to return by land—that is, except
from Calais to Dover.

After several thrilling adventures in the
Pyrennes mountains with wolves and bears, we
finally reached England.

I was glad to get back and made up my
mind to stop roving. I married and lived happi-
ly for many years. We had three children, two
sons and a daughter. I sold my plantation
in Brazil and was now very wealthy, and able to
help the remaining members of my family.

One of my nephews I brought up as a gen-
tleman, and the other I placed with a ship cap-
tain.. He was a bold and sensible young man and
in five years I gave him a good ship and sent
him to sea.

After seven years of peace and happiness
my wife died and to relieve my grief I decided to
go to sea with my nephew, who promised to make
atrip to my island. Itooka cargo of useful things
such as wearing apparel, beds, bedding, kitchen
utensils, guns and powder. I persuaded two car-
penters, a smith, a tailor and a very handy, in-
ROBINSON CRUSOE 79

genious fellow to go along with us and make the
island their future home. I offered them a sum
of money which made it worth their while.

When we landed there was great excitement.
Friday spied his father the first thing, and their
meeting was most touching. The Spaniard whose
life I had saved when the savages were preparing
to kill him was now governor of the island.

At first the Spaniards who had come over
from the mainland and the members of the ship’s
crew whom I had left there, when I returned to
England, did not get along very well, but now
everything was running along smoothly. The
island was in a most prosperous condition and no
one was at all anxious to leave it.

They were more than grateful to me for the
presents I brought them, and gave a warm wel-
come to the skilled workers who accompanied us.

I then left the island, promising to send
them some cattle, sheep, hogs and cows, as soon
as we touched at Brazil.

About three days after we had sailed, while
we were becalmed, a great fleet of canoes was
seen approaching us. When they came close
enough Friday went out on deck and called to
them in his language. Whether they understood
80 ROBINSON CRUSOE

him or not I never knew for they let fly about
three hundred arrows, and to my inexpressible
grief, killed poor Friday. I was so enraged at the
loss of my old trusty servant and companion that
I ordered the guns to be loaded and gave them
such a broadside that thirteen or fourteen of their
canoes were split and upset, and the men all set
a-swimming. The rest, frightened out of their
wits, rowed away as fast as they could.

Poor honest Friday! We buried him at sea.
I had eleven guns fired in his honor. Thus ended
the life of the most grateful, faithful, honest and
affectionate servant that ever man had.

When we arrived at Brazil, I fitted out a ship
and loaded it with a cargo that I had promised to
send my tenants on the island.

From Brazil we sailed around the Cape of
Good Hope, visited India and China and after
many thrilling adventures I returned at last to
England.

And here, resolving to fatigue myself no
more, I am preparing for a longer journey than
any of these, having lived a life of infinite varie-
ty seventy-two years, and learned sufficiently
to know the value of retirement and the blessing
of ending one’s days in peace.





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28413a791003d87792451b2410ff014f
82039c3c25f4da2504c78f920acfb454e6f6e5ab
'2012-05-14T04:10:50-04:00'
describe
'168509' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIVZ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0224ab.jpg'
23639be30837a2ce495d4305819b53b5
ea5acd44978ddf87651858124ad82bbec29912ba
'2012-05-14T04:09:57-04:00'
describe
'3910' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIWA' 'sip-filesSN01273-0224ab.pro'
051e6c58a0d1de2724dcbd9d300c6a60
c07d4afd743a748e1368bd7548ebdc088120abb9
'2012-05-14T04:13:16-04:00'
describe
'67450' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIWB' 'sip-filesSN01273-0224ab.QC.jpg'
aaeb373ff4bcebf88b009bfb3c8167f7
f687e236f7bade2cfea936978c4f9bef6143791f
'2012-05-14T04:11:35-04:00'
describe
'2181236' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIWC' 'sip-filesSN01273-0224ab.tif'
2e1dedbe60e4a5eb3d303b7e95d043e7
d81e2de93f9afc7ccca0ff435c4947093ff5c2c2
'2012-05-14T04:10:07-04:00'
describe
'202' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIWD' 'sip-filesSN01273-0224ab.txt'
1cb4baae4e80de26c80d1eb3c35f4a74
5e6754a6e0ebe3de5f2b664823b133c8392dde44
'2012-05-14T04:12:19-04:00'
describe
'35902' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIWE' 'sip-filesSN01273-0224abthm.jpg'
3cf6424fbe19f03d909569242a67f81e
9dbb596bc177443c4d8ab04d7d72461f20e3957b
'2012-05-14T04:11:45-04:00'
describe
'26778' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIWF' 'sip-filesSN01273-0224athm.jpg'
c7fc2fb5aa47c06652efa9b4c299618a
57cd5fed1013d121e155d0eca187fe28d6633d79
'2012-05-14T04:12:36-04:00'
describe
'286256' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIWG' 'sip-filesSN01273-0225a.jp2'
fef43e5dd5222dcff9451312ca2f196c
41b588102c479d3d91c5f4372fb733e11372ee0d
'2012-05-14T04:11:50-04:00'
describe
'48502' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIWH' 'sip-filesSN01273-0225a.jpg'
39a5561249aa5ce229c1a4bfa8bd0ecd
3170799180fe97d8f2220bc902ecaeb5f4dae651
'2012-05-14T04:12:51-04:00'
describe
'3903' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIWI' 'sip-filesSN01273-0225a.pro'
0ad7dc71b13e774bb2ae7b92e062a319
fe39a37414b2672287533fc5039c8bc27ee5327f
'2012-05-14T04:10:04-04:00'
describe
'26424' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIWJ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0225a.QC.jpg'
2b35eac12a743bf92064f6691f354818
a563bf9a831fe975cd2612467e5f960c18c91fd6
describe
'2309144' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIWK' 'sip-filesSN01273-0225a.tif'
baba14c17f074e7e011fe360278878c6
798a79651854b5d8483e5a1210e24ecf8ec7c672
'2012-05-14T04:13:14-04:00'
describe
'193' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIWL' 'sip-filesSN01273-0225a.txt'
49646b95e50fa910729c052f31261410
cbc801bd0974388ec3139cc8ae0768f1db7c6217
'2012-05-14T04:09:11-04:00'
describe
'269709' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIWM' 'sip-filesSN01273-0225ab.jp2'
49df7e52d277ef1bf0831696da972d42
01b48a647e85b686a17b2844ac2385204068d7a6
'2012-05-14T04:11:47-04:00'
describe
'157011' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIWN' 'sip-filesSN01273-0225ab.jpg'
768fb8e8b7cc46e470da6815b239d60c
75da122fad309fef9778224402a510cf1f9e8764
'2012-05-14T04:13:15-04:00'
describe
'13564' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIWO' 'sip-filesSN01273-0225ab.pro'
5cc9c389c52f6c0cb3505895794fd2df
03635aee640435af600e31c329bfc4f5ccd9939e
'2012-05-14T04:11:23-04:00'
describe
'59598' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIWP' 'sip-filesSN01273-0225ab.QC.jpg'
5c99056f2a53f97f503c208cb8cdf03f
b0d03cde40c6dd04b05ff676c1fe594d07456be7
'2012-05-14T04:12:40-04:00'
describe
'2174404' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIWQ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0225ab.tif'
2df48a6509727e0491b4dadabf0a337b
8cbdb6d2fd0a5306dc64d353b3919fe3438a474f
'2012-05-14T04:13:28-04:00'
describe
'595' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIWR' 'sip-filesSN01273-0225ab.txt'
279c098952340ae0d3abdcba3a0819b3
0b3aee5644da4fbc538dc8593c2a2e66bda8d091
'2012-05-14T04:10:15-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'27709' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIWS' 'sip-filesSN01273-0225abthm.jpg'
d76e2a40561b77f7fe6e225b140f7f82
66941229577849626a1f1fc4d5ab28427e149f8b
'2012-05-14T04:11:03-04:00'
describe
'20824' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIWT' 'sip-filesSN01273-0225athm.jpg'
ee02003effacf3aeede0ddc0abb89c65
8643f74f22891b0077a0d4dc333501648a888acc
'2012-05-14T04:09:55-04:00'
describe
'269584' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIWU' 'sip-filesSN01273-0226a.jp2'
faed6ceb00583147ce3e4f7c8ec95abf
9092e86e20c8687456aa7716999b367be9ebf5c9
'2012-05-14T04:10:08-04:00'
describe
'35470' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIWV' 'sip-filesSN01273-0226a.jpg'
18da35eb6722bd54d57a36d7d98ea746
730b512fc718da0419678b3f896f514721bf8336
describe
'20757' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIWW' 'sip-filesSN01273-0226a.QC.jpg'
e39f304c1e9341ec8928d4e8b2af0130
d88cc2cc9e1d99f431d20911eb2f1fa9dc1451ee
'2012-05-14T04:11:49-04:00'
describe
'2174936' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIWX' 'sip-filesSN01273-0226a.tif'
ddc744c81c0d0279c66729b28fc76ce3
df21ee292c9d4a96513f21ff7837434c4eaf2c28
'2012-05-14T04:13:02-04:00'
describe
'269554' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIWY' 'sip-filesSN01273-0226ab.jp2'
f65017818e39922d7788f442fcce847f
97ecd744527a094d75d634435adee77d801961a1
'2012-05-14T04:09:38-04:00'
describe
'38823' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIWZ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0226ab.jpg'
3ba1798ee6f475605eb6337f9c5cf6f8
d19441831703cbb598d0785900c12eb7c5f98787
'2012-05-14T04:11:20-04:00'
describe
'672' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIXA' 'sip-filesSN01273-0226ab.pro'
823e45a31ba4bfc9718707481735f66d
ae12fd57f46b876db2279f9beb7d525b95eb49b2
'2012-05-14T04:11:33-04:00'
describe
'22842' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIXB' 'sip-filesSN01273-0226ab.QC.jpg'
c5c5a1590a28e39684c3899c67d66bdb
18119463b56fb26899f79803e484bf8dd6302504
'2012-05-14T04:11:00-04:00'
describe
'2175224' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIXC' 'sip-filesSN01273-0226ab.tif'
d0b68a40bc8831ad8d49d6c661e1ec38
953b3109c2f5003322cecc2a212d98596805796c
'2012-05-14T04:11:40-04:00'
describe
'44' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIXD' 'sip-filesSN01273-0226ab.txt'
78a960498ae2f73899adb158247bdba6
8c7e184f2f2b0f9480915025c84de891ba2ae515
describe
'19575' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIXE' 'sip-filesSN01273-0226abthm.jpg'
eb4f41e5cffa2e9481e0449bb0b27a17
dcb8125c99e959dfc676c266310cf8cdee709abb
describe
'18536' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIXF' 'sip-filesSN01273-0226athm.jpg'
0550520467cd9500b901779c0698cb8e
f5e20f25b10ad17af00e34717f983c4a7674a1a9
'2012-05-14T04:11:58-04:00'
describe
'269593' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIXG' 'sip-filesSN01273-0227a.jp2'
a800cc9991a4b43bd1eda026f3a1cb19
7906131eb336604fcb9de8e3516ea67cbb3709b3
'2012-05-14T04:12:04-04:00'
describe
'63796' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIXH' 'sip-filesSN01273-0227a.jpg'
f8b74b9bfb50779cd1e02880195ef7c6
5c9312dc28ef127e0acb902a9b040816c74238d8
'2012-05-14T04:11:15-04:00'
describe
'1153' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIXI' 'sip-filesSN01273-0227a.pro'
ef1cc382f608ce2608552b0f070a7ad8
e6f3455e7fabec7fc59e7415f0c76c088f6eb605
'2012-05-14T04:12:34-04:00'
describe
'27098' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIXJ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0227a.QC.jpg'
92f71f3611665457cd4bd2db229aa7b2
719932279505ed5c609d7529108710d9874290aa
'2012-05-14T04:10:18-04:00'
describe
'2174400' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIXK' 'sip-filesSN01273-0227a.tif'
ba8b3e4be76763a8e522eb937234fe24
378abba54107c06191d4d9cb0cdb86535461e56d
describe
'63' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIXL' 'sip-filesSN01273-0227a.txt'
7d99ae5e5fa16a760ddae584cad291ac
9dbf6998f4b036e2aed6445d37e4eccebd42a0fd
'2012-05-14T04:12:29-04:00'
describe
'269631' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIXM' 'sip-filesSN01273-0227ab.jp2'
e2829898e30182f6dc2f82cb980aa233
fdfe4b729bddd7919aa91d436a269685cef8a3b8
'2012-05-14T04:12:17-04:00'
describe
'145665' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIXN' 'sip-filesSN01273-0227ab.jpg'
45823a7f342093034ad5eaa1fd331860
89d05d311ad949a19213c3930b4f1275354898d9
'2012-05-14T04:10:32-04:00'
describe
'22834' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIXO' 'sip-filesSN01273-0227ab.pro'
a835558404068882cf5da149f65f0881
5b7b0da5c230cab967a1122179ab2fbf19477ea8
'2012-05-14T04:10:16-04:00'
describe
'61344' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIXP' 'sip-filesSN01273-0227ab.QC.jpg'
532a61dbd1964b1222bdf6f03b1e2437
98aa263a962c3f92aec964ef9a409b74ec249e5a
'2012-05-14T04:12:57-04:00'
describe
'2180284' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIXQ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0227ab.tif'
a512d33d54468ae11bf3e7db18f80698
0889c633a8f87866b52b75a6d55b3a9d47bf86e9
'2012-05-14T04:10:39-04:00'
describe
'939' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIXR' 'sip-filesSN01273-0227ab.txt'
ed3a34daa9a4416bf3bea7e160a0dd11
89124ce340da59a1197f9e490f42ff86835d00c1
describe
'31947' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIXS' 'sip-filesSN01273-0227abthm.jpg'
4671e2794d67cff0517c780a782ebdc9
e606e64e48c8a32a30dff179791ec789c2efdf5f
'2012-05-14T04:09:16-04:00'
describe
'19580' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIXT' 'sip-filesSN01273-0227athm.jpg'
b903fe3eaf4c84220b25e218fb4638b9
05843a4fae92c28eb563af14d60187de03ca04f2
'2012-05-14T04:11:56-04:00'
describe
'269683' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIXU' 'sip-filesSN01273-0228a.jp2'
b9fdc3876fe04e6b746b638156e32290
9ecdc59c4a3577076f1a923ebbc441a1c9edcfae
'2012-05-14T04:12:01-04:00'
describe
'206294' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIXV' 'sip-filesSN01273-0228a.jpg'
5dcd96c520eddaa43ff2cc8a9b80f404
65df93dc2c1c4b1668a4f86ecec0308a8f366bd9
'2012-05-14T04:13:13-04:00'
describe
'29856' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIXW' 'sip-filesSN01273-0228a.pro'
9efd0b4d431306123e295fcf4290b664
4552b1eeb3b7693be609993992221e3c2845849f
'2012-05-14T04:12:47-04:00'
describe
'75693' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIXX' 'sip-filesSN01273-0228a.QC.jpg'
ae2f088167f693c6a1402c48c6d750bd
d604848d9c894e9ca17b7b55a0486b916b91c963
'2012-05-14T04:12:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIXY' 'sip-filesSN01273-0228a.tif'
2497f8ddce529748a70e642cf0028f9d
b018214dfa81c8d13aef6b72c2767fb645e30845
describe
'1194' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIXZ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0228a.txt'
38b42ff979b42ed5e6cd73318b001cfa
2f85d9deb4373200e042aa3232b4b60a7d39cf8b
'2012-05-14T04:12:30-04:00'
describe
'269691' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIYA' 'sip-filesSN01273-0228ab.jp2'
b102a5f7902f90f7362f7ef360afa303
7be59a574fee1e9d157c1fb35f4fd7832bddda1a
'2012-05-14T04:12:07-04:00'
describe
'211491' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIYB' 'sip-filesSN01273-0228ab.jpg'
78eb46974bb5b062d436639cd37e2042
9ed78ba7b58017ff47cf71c448b54cb08bd0d603
'2012-05-14T04:13:12-04:00'
describe
'29638' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIYC' 'sip-filesSN01273-0228ab.pro'
eb91a22641aa83533d77f229677d97dc
56c7c534dd1f5c1850b101838720feda8e45e90c
'2012-05-14T04:12:05-04:00'
describe
'78426' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIYD' 'sip-filesSN01273-0228ab.QC.jpg'
16615fc3c014566758bbec492cc9081c
2027d19557801af72f87c583dcec8f96d4468fbd
'2012-05-14T04:12:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIYE' 'sip-filesSN01273-0228ab.tif'
8f60c05b18c49b175e0a82792a7cc739
a03c705405b42f81d6416be0b2bb91894c1017e5
'2012-05-14T04:12:28-04:00'
describe
'1192' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIYF' 'sip-filesSN01273-0228ab.txt'
8fe5948c754da61a518616fbf7e2589c
872721eb0fc7372fc2be850c2187dd9ab08c7598
'2012-05-14T04:10:58-04:00'
describe
'30911' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIYG' 'sip-filesSN01273-0228abthm.jpg'
eb3b4bc26849d5b87f8b77b014810e53
854124d677d36d4251406b2803b360dbca1a3932
'2012-05-14T04:11:41-04:00'
describe
'29993' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIYH' 'sip-filesSN01273-0228athm.jpg'
93eb7e13b8fac94629ca501ff75bf022
947352c4b78f0c779a31dbbfc803ac0c33adcf85
'2012-05-14T04:11:32-04:00'
describe
'269651' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIYI' 'sip-filesSN01273-0229a.jp2'
e341b845386402d30f9854ffa0b49952
b0dd366851c69c3e16f7c3d0373662bc7d319d11
'2012-05-14T04:13:21-04:00'
describe
'202428' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIYJ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0229a.jpg'
336464f362821825149d1ab553b531da
3f33157b099c00c45c78b63327b186aa48aa8e25
'2012-05-14T04:10:48-04:00'
describe
'29523' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIYK' 'sip-filesSN01273-0229a.pro'
eb56f8bb24809d30f4672fa38a12ec46
ddf86d5053b2c3ad6a5da5cb83dc614675a181db
'2012-05-14T04:11:22-04:00'
describe
'73827' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIYL' 'sip-filesSN01273-0229a.QC.jpg'
af01ea23690f016c57f47f6612238f3b
088768c65798f4b3b2f01e721ac17b31388dfd2d
'2012-05-14T04:12:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIYM' 'sip-filesSN01273-0229a.tif'
6be741801136ffc45f41c656456ce116
7003ca17670f3114588ae5c0ab97949880fdf74d
'2012-05-14T04:12:55-04:00'
describe
'1187' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIYN' 'sip-filesSN01273-0229a.txt'
15d38423bd59c3f8ea262a48e4223595
4abdbefbd389e953d66460df44458d8c90ce2b39
'2012-05-14T04:09:49-04:00'
describe
'269655' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIYO' 'sip-filesSN01273-0229ab.jp2'
97b117a181de7377964c5ed9655f424f
b279934daf3ff9ec1768d455d46f715d2950135f
describe
'166579' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIYP' 'sip-filesSN01273-0229ab.jpg'
c0d6243e054441b86f4780faddef1bc9
6e7331af21b72fc172be8a0cfa8847c6354c071d
'2012-05-14T04:13:05-04:00'
describe
'29177' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIYQ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0229ab.pro'
420475ccdc7b7a47bbcd50312832b971
31bae547ddbb22107aca03561670d59d73c8621e
'2012-05-14T04:11:52-04:00'
describe
'69961' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIYR' 'sip-filesSN01273-0229ab.QC.jpg'
bc00816380d89e44a5217ed1fa58d6e1
6c50b11708dd186b8157a7374b2f58ab9014e608
'2012-05-14T04:12:02-04:00'
describe
'2181276' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIYS' 'sip-filesSN01273-0229ab.tif'
6a15064b3f0009e92365c9e3309256b5
777cbf91d4eb725821ec55ba556664eb5706978b
describe
'1182' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIYT' 'sip-filesSN01273-0229ab.txt'
ccc3ce7f105eea8978a2fe5aecbec9f5
b9602d1822f858431152edd787eaf9c4835c4f07
'2012-05-14T04:13:25-04:00'
describe
'34770' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIYU' 'sip-filesSN01273-0229abthm.jpg'
39c0b9780ef0232cbba5d7272a206efc
fa237c914cb0fb2d0be434d4c126654b583d1c9b
'2012-05-14T04:12:25-04:00'
describe
'29880' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIYV' 'sip-filesSN01273-0229athm.jpg'
3e8b6f1ff589cf543c0cf812a6eebb78
e9ce93aa17e5bc04098bcea99d52213e604a4ef7
describe
'273130' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIYW' 'sip-filesSN01273-0230a.jp2'
81dd15e0571ad12218f8ab9ac301aa43
2ca6bd8a9261fe919b3b3b452c76ef5aafcea24f
'2012-05-14T04:11:17-04:00'
describe
'201522' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIYX' 'sip-filesSN01273-0230a.jpg'
95e1a1bc87100e3d6885fbaf28097459
ec2af7b7b98ca3977a01f79cc5dca99b6ef84f2c
'2012-05-14T04:09:17-04:00'
describe
'30247' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIYY' 'sip-filesSN01273-0230a.pro'
a7f4ef80b1b422857e62c3e9e76b2065
6584afa4c0e36318630c43277394952dcd96b2af
describe
'74031' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIYZ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0230a.QC.jpg'
366704c23c08d57e34fd751a6e351a7b
95a0025f21fc15c450d7953f3cb31f691a76c326
describe
'2202096' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIZA' 'sip-filesSN01273-0230a.tif'
e85939fd2dc345fa47416216cb87ff13
711ec53b44d31f4eece3ae9c0a0111bbefa21d83
describe
'1223' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIZB' 'sip-filesSN01273-0230a.txt'
f3bda51d768f1956d3c8852f998a6e6a
8882b5b256e5f15688c266687cacfeb2b1240645
'2012-05-14T04:13:04-04:00'
describe
'250539' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIZC' 'sip-filesSN01273-0230ab.jp2'
dda1b65884484f55a604ba37f0e64a7c
49c4b18180b5661d4fb16b0f84c292105a52e8c1
'2012-05-14T04:11:39-04:00'
describe
'232108' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIZD' 'sip-filesSN01273-0230ab.jpg'
535960952cdb46e2dfae05a3e93a2a3c
f6d5b2acdcac4115c0d7b647fb301a5c9c2ec92c
'2012-05-14T04:09:54-04:00'
describe
'29970' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIZE' 'sip-filesSN01273-0230ab.pro'
4df00240f77bbb53578963365cc09cfb
25ca85c56569972838950847a050cc5b6c10064d
'2012-05-14T04:10:59-04:00'
describe
'91142' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIZF' 'sip-filesSN01273-0230ab.QC.jpg'
2abf7b3a542570658b4b51ae8ab384ab
6427228b95728b77db88e956917b9cef20915cc5
'2012-05-14T04:13:31-04:00'
describe
'2029124' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIZG' 'sip-filesSN01273-0230ab.tif'
b5d3bb7096c6d61c1e629c99bc034bd1
aca1e274e950f47d8f3e0f1238936648fddea70e
describe
'1220' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIZH' 'sip-filesSN01273-0230ab.txt'
2a265f43d839a75435feacf0627d1154
ba0ad265575f326c74ce8f3845b255aaac26eb3f
'2012-05-14T04:12:46-04:00'
describe
'40159' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIZI' 'sip-filesSN01273-0230abthm.jpg'
d81848c42194292da59ce7f20ffd5110
a3e9a6e7fb4e391dc67f7ccb8cb8b186fd7869a2
'2012-05-14T04:12:42-04:00'
describe
'29969' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIZJ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0230athm.jpg'
870a2b1aee0acf42e169700b112cdfaa
fd38ad75ff8c285577007325d0b672eba9225d99
describe
'273127' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIZK' 'sip-filesSN01273-0231a.jp2'
48a924dccb89b9b50cf7bdd8cec688d9
6a8ae31ab285a2fad1c1c6e2e3e1a01d367b43c9
'2012-05-14T04:12:16-04:00'
describe
'206191' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIZL' 'sip-filesSN01273-0231a.jpg'
8c3ae2a573f90c9ca72ed0f26f799f8c
f81e7862b93395c19bc6e604612b4b1c3b28b19a
'2012-05-14T04:12:10-04:00'
describe
'32043' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIZM' 'sip-filesSN01273-0231a.pro'
d72dd857f7f13b41bfb3cbd16542ec3d
16ffcb9550c0498f2969287fea82677d383a3d9f
'2012-05-14T04:13:24-04:00'
describe
'75831' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIZN' 'sip-filesSN01273-0231a.QC.jpg'
a2978d428f64c7a462a60af4573ba389
80f5c32ebaee4af0183a119a3419b0e64b78e64b
'2012-05-14T04:12:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIZO' 'sip-filesSN01273-0231a.tif'
6c0f66e033b4a21679d69b23e3744cdc
e1fc8939d45bf45f973ea67e839156029ccd3705
describe
'1273' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIZP' 'sip-filesSN01273-0231a.txt'
901cc05bdbedf673f3f7786553f0d5f0
9247edcf72293a9d7445fa9d1790ba2180a3ba23
'2012-05-14T04:10:19-04:00'
describe
'273116' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIZQ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0231ab.jp2'
9b07352e937909cb323c2a58b4a20b29
52bb4ac10f7db5adcc383b6597634a27fb4b8f7f
'2012-05-14T04:12:59-04:00'
describe
'175108' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIZR' 'sip-filesSN01273-0231ab.jpg'
04a9bdba6495379d2e8f1ae3f41b44ff
3fa50b35e3f39c8e770d68db34ed98989f6c66d7
describe
'30824' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIZS' 'sip-filesSN01273-0231ab.pro'
526b65f20f97e8a37178eac3081a30b9
84d82ae991bff8367dc160416aa903a918ec3a18
'2012-05-14T04:11:53-04:00'
describe
'72423' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIZT' 'sip-filesSN01273-0231ab.QC.jpg'
a58094f1cad48bf22a199b103aa1e653
d409d4910f7278446813c535b7d87204e07c466e
'2012-05-14T04:12:26-04:00'
describe
'2209336' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIZU' 'sip-filesSN01273-0231ab.tif'
05181b08c455d098cf3dc3d8b0895a05
f21b37d1131d153e1f854b4a1a72b897da8420df
'2012-05-14T04:11:37-04:00'
describe
'1237' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIZV' 'sip-filesSN01273-0231ab.txt'
62fff7e3b74d2d55ec14f2feeb50c2d6
2a0628441ff15846a3b14945895ed72c03613214
'2012-05-14T04:10:26-04:00'
describe
'35642' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIZW' 'sip-filesSN01273-0231abthm.jpg'
904d358963d13b315e9085f731571f4b
59da56b1c31d9dc711f21641940c8f47afac4d04
describe
'30105' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIZX' 'sip-filesSN01273-0231athm.jpg'
b7d29fa6c668e1bc5e63bd44ff59888d
e0c66dcb02a06da390d8a26c97f36aa3f54119ef
'2012-05-14T04:09:59-04:00'
describe
'273149' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIZY' 'sip-filesSN01273-0232a.jp2'
8293ae3355565e1946ffb4173c5fcf04
ac817e2cb4286e93e233746bc18f8d7e83cb0cc3
describe
'195875' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAIZZ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0232a.jpg'
368e37a45b61f09717cb716ed65373db
73976c27d728fa4584799d88afe11c1a77e7d9de
describe
'30142' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJAA' 'sip-filesSN01273-0232a.pro'
71740cb64c8915d26a603c242e382df8
7ad33eb5886d4cc4da3eaa3f00fab2df92059558
'2012-05-14T04:12:27-04:00'
describe
'72334' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJAB' 'sip-filesSN01273-0232a.QC.jpg'
d890062e322c528718fbfdb9dbf23c96
bb9e56652da087cba016d63395d7f3decbaa4c3b
'2012-05-14T04:10:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJAC' 'sip-filesSN01273-0232a.tif'
aaf29becb9c12c4f93daaa8f2ced9301
e0851c541585b64db7a9270f883a862a60c7d834
'2012-05-14T04:13:27-04:00'
describe
'1211' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJAD' 'sip-filesSN01273-0232a.txt'
6ea6d4708d78216c27e3115d1929b92f
38bbfb26de618acd1e5f52db2f71017cc06fdc84
'2012-05-14T04:11:31-04:00'
describe
'269653' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJAE' 'sip-filesSN01273-0232ab.jp2'
5053173e2a5eb0349e59f116a4ac9575
3f085d72ed34d9fcd653c62f483b794c978e590a
describe
'219762' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJAF' 'sip-filesSN01273-0232ab.jpg'
727ad9ad9883da80d252d116f68b6a59
15471c68df3b50449f932add41d953ae1ae15329
'2012-05-14T04:10:54-04:00'
describe
'32196' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJAG' 'sip-filesSN01273-0232ab.pro'
690a49403718e296042db1f350166e2c
4749ce65786090d021993edb2ca67f06c4015423
'2012-05-14T04:13:20-04:00'
describe
'78028' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJAH' 'sip-filesSN01273-0232ab.QC.jpg'
4e692ef8c950c0dba28355b424dab778
7c232e319493aa487efa56e925cf1b51ffc336c8
'2012-05-14T04:13:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJAI' 'sip-filesSN01273-0232ab.tif'
6918a35f69cd355a41dead500e5b5856
ca6e3794bfa298fcea72d772a439dc75492f66fc
'2012-05-14T04:09:35-04:00'
describe
'1300' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJAJ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0232ab.txt'
b6dc586c5b7dc2f331c19ae981159db9
fc3ac2df691d5973c38a19e7384dfab541ed451a
describe
'30887' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJAK' 'sip-filesSN01273-0232abthm.jpg'
913f255cf9bf5b846542b7b8267679b5
5147f708eaed04a24b3163c6a387c3f62188cdd3
'2012-05-14T04:12:35-04:00'
describe
'29591' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJAL' 'sip-filesSN01273-0232athm.jpg'
b98d087145505c5e7d53a5aa21cdc02f
a1b5263a11791ce5387890138d57aabe468a2fb9
'2012-05-14T04:11:05-04:00'
describe
'273122' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJAM' 'sip-filesSN01273-0233a.jp2'
57a6089bcbd926405b6790a0a7a064a9
6f70234fed0a4b91486309f63136157498ab9e26
'2012-05-14T04:10:10-04:00'
describe
'203649' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJAN' 'sip-filesSN01273-0233a.jpg'
dd7b7d02af845560c4c82652576b2c49
5caf117457676f061192abd11804c7ddde31b87f
'2012-05-14T04:12:53-04:00'
describe
'32044' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJAO' 'sip-filesSN01273-0233a.pro'
9f17ea56eedde99d6a7dbde222a66df7
60994f00deb818d2c632cc4f0989167b440651e2
describe
'74682' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJAP' 'sip-filesSN01273-0233a.QC.jpg'
75473acf546f2bf7fdf94cb770a08184
e43156b48560ccf044adf9ef7b1ec933596228e4
'2012-05-14T04:09:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJAQ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0233a.tif'
ae0203903065541dfaceff1c93181967
9b0725b5bc755a8fd9a35dc29403e44e7efbf60b
'2012-05-14T04:12:43-04:00'
describe
'1275' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJAR' 'sip-filesSN01273-0233a.txt'
4125aaeecb1f768bd93cbb3331293c6c
2358b15f91187b4e5d454fc4f85df8263ba83869
'2012-05-14T04:11:34-04:00'
describe
'273096' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJAS' 'sip-filesSN01273-0233ab.jp2'
3687f27b8ede0ababa5870185a08dd0e
36e63d3092d77559b92ff8cb476af5d140b351a1
'2012-05-14T04:09:30-04:00'
describe
'208286' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJAT' 'sip-filesSN01273-0233ab.jpg'
76e9e376aa0f39b5072f2e77c360f000
39aab2e343b7a9ea729316a6ad3e39bbc6e30cb8
'2012-05-14T04:13:23-04:00'
describe
'31594' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJAU' 'sip-filesSN01273-0233ab.pro'
6ed707ad63110c6df80420665ee77d3e
953cb4291647405b206b539d896436dedd2d0834
describe
'74989' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJAV' 'sip-filesSN01273-0233ab.QC.jpg'
8e4a95a3177e5f424422fb019452ce4d
05e643fc78b0622b872cdf0f96cab251790d9c97
describe
'2202100' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJAW' 'sip-filesSN01273-0233ab.tif'
142a3dbad1a933d1af42d87c4ae1972d
901f948fcebd6eb60d2f5e96f876b16d31115070
'2012-05-14T04:09:36-04:00'
describe
'1274' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJAX' 'sip-filesSN01273-0233ab.txt'
24d12db6a4c421bbb11e41db65fce2cb
7b750cab69a7b5ad86b2f64e6df5b7995301b5b9
'2012-05-14T04:12:31-04:00'
describe
'30124' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJAY' 'sip-filesSN01273-0233abthm.jpg'
e713bd7bd5bc5e899dfb4829e01cb6a3
7623cd6b2bacdada03a2bb49888791679a4fd9ae
describe
'29818' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJAZ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0233athm.jpg'
166e39e540c33f21ac153b36414862c0
ac698b938461cfa1533a1a863febdb1b49344edd
'2012-05-14T04:12:58-04:00'
describe
'273154' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJBA' 'sip-filesSN01273-0234a.jp2'
66d797b8043ad13d0f9fd5c878b1a460
3f0e3d946c06149c656a06679393459244a59ae5
'2012-05-14T04:13:19-04:00'
describe
'181164' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJBB' 'sip-filesSN01273-0234a.jpg'
4d3dac3c8211b17f7e35848dc893a7ef
98654f939370c50616cb13ca7bd9da790c0c87ce
'2012-05-14T04:10:42-04:00'
describe
'1329' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJBC' 'sip-filesSN01273-0234a.pro'
03bb314daa81e85850adf3bf26d8c056
a4b2cf7e5f80fed2d989193384d8a85ae6f8590f
'2012-05-14T04:09:56-04:00'
describe
'62661' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJBD' 'sip-filesSN01273-0234a.QC.jpg'
a26840af8e385cb60e1af88a292ed3c1
ccf68ccddc5edb030b984cf3ea2fa8733c9c9372
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJBE' 'sip-filesSN01273-0234a.tif'
7f58dffde15f54563bba01247f828636
d30ffb9ff13d1d9790845fd39f15002511216d9a
describe
'151' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJBF' 'sip-filesSN01273-0234a.txt'
abf2d8c10aef0610efa897dd9e47ecd6
1224d0631dd89ca1cdf9d7592f6661c4762ce8bc
'2012-05-14T04:12:03-04:00'
describe
'273072' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJBG' 'sip-filesSN01273-0234ab.jp2'
f8eb6535a77fb660c65c6135812490b2
f0135242028a4f0df23f1e33faca5193fb694528
'2012-05-14T04:12:45-04:00'
describe
'206744' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJBH' 'sip-filesSN01273-0234ab.jpg'
2663b4e2f83ebfe8bcd5bf79f47233ba
cf045adfa4e3d06e4366fc59ffb4d823b1e253ae
'2012-05-14T04:09:46-04:00'
describe
'31358' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJBI' 'sip-filesSN01273-0234ab.pro'
2d65b8da4e5be8f392d2670ddaa07352
439c98be70bd988805abf2e95f4d9aac4b0f31fc
'2012-05-14T04:10:31-04:00'
describe
'76201' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJBJ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0234ab.QC.jpg'
08c8714a851ce3b1c8f903b315dd5dcb
2add37e88b7ea4dfb7f0610861c26c27295c3662
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJBK' 'sip-filesSN01273-0234ab.tif'
61e6067ddf96ec7c21b1ae187c14de22
3e0b5bbccd669ea0437222f6d2255e2be51735c9
describe
'1264' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJBL' 'sip-filesSN01273-0234ab.txt'
12211569983cf83270e6df3e40e07854
b38a07ab5502095c56bbbcd72c46215c44d50b19
'2012-05-14T04:11:46-04:00'
describe
'30894' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJBM' 'sip-filesSN01273-0234abthm.jpg'
a4f592fc25270117a6a0566ca8040f6d
5e883c4f7dc4dda69413e65b9053c000fc251d23
'2012-05-14T04:10:34-04:00'
describe
'29264' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJBN' 'sip-filesSN01273-0234athm.jpg'
c76396d7fa6c5da25d5275030fe71dea
ec6d59561baebb49050a06ea2e0d3d935ad2c518
'2012-05-14T04:12:50-04:00'
describe
'269678' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJBO' 'sip-filesSN01273-0235a.jp2'
470a3e1d573ce018fedabd93d074b16e
abaa7c81ff0a6935ee6dbf82283213d0dda20850
describe
'191669' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJBP' 'sip-filesSN01273-0235a.jpg'
a15061fb01a4bbb2ee02f781a8a1bb62
1107d71371173c9f41a0c25d2e50b0808dae333b
'2012-05-14T04:10:30-04:00'
describe
'29643' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJBQ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0235a.pro'
84afa35a41ff7d592afaf4ac52628b4f
05a148a61af5997ef385fe662fba2d8df85c4fb4
'2012-05-14T04:11:36-04:00'
describe
'71301' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJBR' 'sip-filesSN01273-0235a.QC.jpg'
519a8243558dfd17cdf73b6223d8fb3a
b24c0469d7f8b2e4c0e402e91d259562f49caa05
'2012-05-14T04:13:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJBS' 'sip-filesSN01273-0235a.tif'
0d392facd54bf9458608ff07f7b16b10
68905b70f7476104bff355815adc00bc6d2eea8f
'2012-05-14T04:10:24-04:00'
describe
'1195' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJBT' 'sip-filesSN01273-0235a.txt'
4bb244f17216d883a5ea0677532dafe4
d9097c0f454d0f41bc624d85c3d3fc3620d7dc62
describe
'269620' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJBU' 'sip-filesSN01273-0235ab.jp2'
31bd55d8700867144bb387e618b879e3
82dd540d7f63970f1c42d12a783a4e997129060e
'2012-05-14T04:12:00-04:00'
describe
'216342' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJBV' 'sip-filesSN01273-0235ab.jpg'
4c88a0e0da1a6a0427aa7bc5088f0b2a
59c78987c8ea8ae59691a13c5b58897b2c606ec3
describe
'31927' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJBW' 'sip-filesSN01273-0235ab.pro'
be737eb4d6d2f7bbe1ac3e5439aec10d
fd787a735689e802940a4dd384289fc7fcda0c7c
'2012-05-14T04:11:54-04:00'
describe
'78176' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJBX' 'sip-filesSN01273-0235ab.QC.jpg'
8c95ed00409704c2ea8c82ca56e04e30
46029207662b4c89b935fc0fc605c6975335d66e
'2012-05-14T04:11:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJBY' 'sip-filesSN01273-0235ab.tif'
ee2c7024a2e5c2cd4eef93db72b5e6ef
fd1c23d334b4a1c66e6c58df0c433723314f2b67
'2012-05-14T04:11:09-04:00'
describe
'1288' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJBZ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0235ab.txt'
ae83b65618437a0e50b177e90bcd89c7
49748b436d329b9af58e9070469a632711ec537f
'2012-05-14T04:13:00-04:00'
describe
'30234' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJCA' 'sip-filesSN01273-0235abthm.jpg'
ce6c7d9d757d48abdd6ab24824324971
6f2ad982c2cca2fcfee2613eb1c144c072435045
'2012-05-14T04:12:22-04:00'
describe
'29714' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJCB' 'sip-filesSN01273-0235athm.jpg'
d82faf13954aaf21b252bbd7900233a5
320dcc2f04230e4c8667897ec50aed01568412fb
describe
'269697' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJCC' 'sip-filesSN01273-0236a.jp2'
b03559e3ef1893b8b3e78801359a78d1
bc6ffc1ab4a3ad4743f3c62a5c213df2058ba1bd
describe
'212035' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJCD' 'sip-filesSN01273-0236a.jpg'
7125e8606388d1fdb5568825a5c3b366
9aedd872350cd21b7d19477f13a29a17c0b7c64a
'2012-05-14T04:10:13-04:00'
describe
'32538' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJCE' 'sip-filesSN01273-0236a.pro'
6b83d047de992c19832f239444c80aaa
bce1596f883cab58be3fc37d6f009dbc8f74c1b7
'2012-05-14T04:09:40-04:00'
describe
'76838' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJCF' 'sip-filesSN01273-0236a.QC.jpg'
427990f5c2da050bfddcf74c28cf90cf
f9ccc72fbd4056c3f8190a45d48896adae9dc654
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJCG' 'sip-filesSN01273-0236a.tif'
b3e1831c38ee71001452aa055e5e49d4
832ef2af04e9521d5f1cac7988779b84b46e950e
'2012-05-14T04:10:49-04:00'
describe
'1310' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJCH' 'sip-filesSN01273-0236a.txt'
c088201a1e240bae931c4191b9dac86e
99dbe0cdd966ab0937a1e62b52769eec05253c27
'2012-05-14T04:10:57-04:00'
describe
'269707' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJCI' 'sip-filesSN01273-0236ab.jp2'
9c8dbb6b8df2497fea5408ea613497a1
94df9ea47d144d2b28c3e06bfdb3b4e0cbaa9beb
describe
'171761' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJCJ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0236ab.jpg'
9a937c77a466ee33f9d4710b1df95e3c
a692d9817057f0b351defffa093c60ad684c210a
describe
'30196' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJCK' 'sip-filesSN01273-0236ab.pro'
9a7f16da97f9fb2ee22615d81023853e
b5bbd370359d54537947508e513d4128703c9ba5
describe
'71848' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJCL' 'sip-filesSN01273-0236ab.QC.jpg'
11b7ebc6938687928499813397bd2306
4529870130d62ec75e0314e303fcbe00b21d2ac2
'2012-05-14T04:12:11-04:00'
describe
'2181264' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJCM' 'sip-filesSN01273-0236ab.tif'
464d8bdd6e36b5b0fa28d892eacf116b
0c6e72a39a044d0d10dffee1758662183926cdaa
'2012-05-14T04:13:03-04:00'
describe
'1224' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJCN' 'sip-filesSN01273-0236ab.txt'
794ea59fe27415200ff331105fbf895a
786f59dcce99615f4cd72adcff84a656b7426d60
'2012-05-14T04:13:29-04:00'
describe
'34585' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJCO' 'sip-filesSN01273-0236abthm.jpg'
e0514133c2e6ea7d0395d09f4ede06da
4c810fe4495d96104a6ea675e034bfc685cf6935
'2012-05-14T04:13:01-04:00'
describe
'29983' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJCP' 'sip-filesSN01273-0236athm.jpg'
06568258c6784f331d95e73e0d34f175
20b31fa5a81e4db7bdb4568221fed19f1395ba94
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJCQ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0237a.jp2'
8f0a38e4cebd988ad3d6e4876c2fb4d9
72a1b61abf48ba78061cb9114fc06f83355f94a6
describe
'201163' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJCR' 'sip-filesSN01273-0237a.jpg'
45b88840edd76e9a4d379fc8a8ffe8ed
2a8783c2abbd5cedf0e33cf73850f4eef755aa7e
'2012-05-14T04:10:28-04:00'
describe
'30872' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJCS' 'sip-filesSN01273-0237a.pro'
fa728a41994f74f9f196b985cec77b7b
8ef4950fa0102971a15bd200a0bb9c695d823cc7
'2012-05-14T04:12:38-04:00'
describe
'72919' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJCT' 'sip-filesSN01273-0237a.QC.jpg'
77e56a8d23e41d734190d0432d889f0f
f07a19a736cf62e06d6d60bf4a7a07802889a4c6
describe
'2174396' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJCU' 'sip-filesSN01273-0237a.tif'
b0f63da856d630ec5c2751bf1b354ecb
78291cf5efe06718b893df72a240f3262ab955d0
'2012-05-14T04:11:08-04:00'
describe
'1244' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJCV' 'sip-filesSN01273-0237a.txt'
4a804faa0718798c2daccec8e1997906
c22aee8f65374284f9b8aa74429a0b88ad5243f9
describe
'269708' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJCW' 'sip-filesSN01273-0237ab.jp2'
51735fb204748906cfe6a06f58e56da6
a2869c0a97e794d11f7214a5abcb4d78d812c90b
describe
'212418' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJCX' 'sip-filesSN01273-0237ab.jpg'
4ebae7985e583086d693c77830431859
51e2eb95db7a554df31e90f2369b18885a4dfa55
'2012-05-14T04:13:10-04:00'
describe
'32353' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJCY' 'sip-filesSN01273-0237ab.pro'
0c339a052bf0b412cd3d2115bb510a01
1b8df49df8f795c4413f984d877c4651c5af558b
'2012-05-14T04:10:37-04:00'
describe
'76604' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJCZ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0237ab.QC.jpg'
64fcb50b682cfc2474c088c514cda8a7
f24947b9669824c2eda1e284077dd649470e7c60
'2012-05-14T04:12:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJDA' 'sip-filesSN01273-0237ab.tif'
a7490ab8a7c2491b398b14a20601e82d
0024bd84a02daf1071c3993cd678f331230ab5fb
'2012-05-14T04:10:01-04:00'
describe
'1308' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJDB' 'sip-filesSN01273-0237ab.txt'
8275a10e0c5e86c960b9acea17510e25
0d047e953d7df591717f725e450eea671ebf43d3
'2012-05-14T04:10:06-04:00'
describe
'30480' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJDC' 'sip-filesSN01273-0237abthm.jpg'
6a50e3cfb4c1ac64e997f427e723c455
e804d6d22c368066ac73a2149df5d9468963637e
'2012-05-14T04:13:18-04:00'
describe
'29198' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJDD' 'sip-filesSN01273-0237athm.jpg'
841a744e846372aa517682cb29454427
f408753db4a380fed5f2fd8a2317ad2d5809f60f
'2012-05-14T04:10:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJDE' 'sip-filesSN01273-0238a.jp2'
ec45f4a3e487bca5b1170269c716dfb9
c55aa93e6bd8b284d001945ed9ee203767076a67
'2012-05-14T04:09:29-04:00'
describe
'193206' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJDF' 'sip-filesSN01273-0238a.jpg'
bf7da69e3153a77cb79279815d42a90a
38eafc581d966cbaef2c51c076dd1e6e461db9b8
describe
'30029' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJDG' 'sip-filesSN01273-0238a.pro'
bb8031ebf593112fc30c08b0b5e1b457
a7cc550b4d3966c7e9975c7b1c60e1eea56466ea
'2012-05-14T04:10:45-04:00'
describe
'72115' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJDH' 'sip-filesSN01273-0238a.QC.jpg'
776f1ca6e9efa420bf5a374c8b9747f3
00b99997415f4d6b60b46a470d11cb3dc3dae31e
'2012-05-14T04:12:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJDI' 'sip-filesSN01273-0238a.tif'
bb1be6e1fc24ea5f96982d47e4ecd5d9
d1a9ebc031f6ec24fbf1b2b8e6e2862d4165f3b5
'2012-05-14T04:12:14-04:00'
describe
'1201' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJDJ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0238a.txt'
84b55c28e029253e13c6d930af72e106
685d2cf22907d1255045e4bc81dc7c81ee8524ee
describe
'269712' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJDK' 'sip-filesSN01273-0238ab.jp2'
af3f8a98346f01051ff7fce456b5b4be
1e3010f5f072f35d137a89f4671c8567a0b5cef8
'2012-05-14T04:10:47-04:00'
describe
'214138' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJDL' 'sip-filesSN01273-0238ab.jpg'
bc99d2f3c1251b70b32002d4e8bbfd79
c150fc675a55c0e1eaab19a0cf186c4863e14899
'2012-05-14T04:11:06-04:00'
describe
'31388' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJDM' 'sip-filesSN01273-0238ab.pro'
3fe2467315e61a9d9ecc7539348a7df6
944bd927577e1aeb09eb54c55bc44acc407589c0
describe
'76683' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJDN' 'sip-filesSN01273-0238ab.QC.jpg'
0eecd300f2d4b224dd960dc9d63ea879
35d9d9b0bb9cbc2fc2b15d314f546304fc9840ad
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJDO' 'sip-filesSN01273-0238ab.tif'
cb8e3c5057adf93a7511d810402cd27b
4b0d8b52c2d5ba93587c860e0da0e2f8c2d07572
'2012-05-14T04:10:17-04:00'
describe
'1266' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJDP' 'sip-filesSN01273-0238ab.txt'
478843258a1978b0219b46d652e8b7af
c658b66d84793b7bccd909c97afdb4ba21a3a936
describe
'30753' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJDQ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0238abthm.jpg'
7c6a11e1091bd236d3768bc4939ad4b2
e2013fda9038659f21921a7782a54edc42eff224
describe
'29839' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJDR' 'sip-filesSN01273-0238athm.jpg'
59d4514b7e7ca668e31a00172cf6893c
ca893f7069a00873da30591646c0fa81aa8bdb67
describe
'246069' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJDS' 'sip-filesSN01273-0239a.jp2'
97da73ab0b7172b50b0963fbd0978772
162acdb09d1254f6be48644ed142cb6e417fb075
'2012-05-14T04:11:18-04:00'
describe
'205875' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJDT' 'sip-filesSN01273-0239a.jpg'
b4128a65120d1a4acc0a1d582ffc61ce
b7cc7b7a151cb25c18867a16b09335a189ed2589
describe
'2029' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJDU' 'sip-filesSN01273-0239a.pro'
a4c101fee300bf4fbd44a1775192d8e5
a49f1dc0c24b4cebee2bd985265734a57d459404
'2012-05-14T04:09:53-04:00'
describe
'71001' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJDV' 'sip-filesSN01273-0239a.QC.jpg'
221fa0e080ee53f24389f298b8b1b0f4
2d2f364278ca03d570e1992daa8fbddedc35347e
describe
'1985472' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJDW' 'sip-filesSN01273-0239a.tif'
a71d1af584c1e2d5e4146a4d5229cf8f
e82326526a7b584a3eef5448cbcd814d3c9d7098
'2012-05-14T04:10:12-04:00'
describe
'280' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJDX' 'sip-filesSN01273-0239a.txt'
feda5a14c52a2842ab63c6e5fd2f1245
bb2d785d40c62f2f25d5066b5331b426af716e73
'2012-05-14T04:09:25-04:00'
describe
'269714' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJDY' 'sip-filesSN01273-0239ab.jp2'
ddede9094accf9968bbd3fbc43a87302
6a56a6542a740d61d8fc7e4790cf3c2fc8418aa8
describe
'216450' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJDZ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0239ab.jpg'
e516765847d10c30b068c0be94384032
3cd55d27e5e71194f81757c5ecf983240d5a5e6d
'2012-05-14T04:12:39-04:00'
describe
'31724' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJEA' 'sip-filesSN01273-0239ab.pro'
79459e5677ade384e3555130b702bbf4
7bf542780488d156fae504ae4051ded81479c201
describe
'77423' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJEB' 'sip-filesSN01273-0239ab.QC.jpg'
e2744a0ddf4c701fa8f01a4d9a14f383
4db53620a2a799151f919f2301fcb051e75c5e01
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJEC' 'sip-filesSN01273-0239ab.tif'
487dde0c149fc2216673893a0addb21e
dd257e7ec3bf119b10647d07d97b104c906fe85a
describe
'1260' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJED' 'sip-filesSN01273-0239ab.txt'
0cedd1025b5613a7e57e4d17f6436b31
b82b3928567ed7199dc70f0e3cacefbf7153c13e
'2012-05-14T04:09:51-04:00'
describe
'30681' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJEE' 'sip-filesSN01273-0239abthm.jpg'
a618594774e3fd86d38f0fbb1a739459
70bf40851e22bb7e911c994a41ca728be1a2f12e
describe
'31177' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJEF' 'sip-filesSN01273-0239athm.jpg'
2a21f1c74827400f3687f6c94e962431
6b339db8c1f83ca6d0de25098eb6b1c867e7235a
describe
'269649' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJEG' 'sip-filesSN01273-0240a.jp2'
a99037bece3930bdbdf2416f2bd9d5cc
dab6c22f5ff7b4f7ad6a2550b21c8838c06e4de5
describe
'209990' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJEH' 'sip-filesSN01273-0240a.jpg'
ab196511f154e86e973e728163403f33
c904c25c6a0b7f37427996d0e030cff2509666a5
'2012-05-14T04:11:57-04:00'
describe
'29791' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJEI' 'sip-filesSN01273-0240a.pro'
ac768c76d9b7e6acd57d923bc61ddbd8
c248f0371fbba93e25288cccea600e7d3c77690e
describe
'76725' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJEJ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0240a.QC.jpg'
2cfa5df4ebe50a8c8f50bc2b8992826c
a86d986f53eca68270d8f5b9531a2541066bd30e
'2012-05-14T04:09:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJEK' 'sip-filesSN01273-0240a.tif'
beb2b7443db24a7e1224785c7b5da7f4
2e262c60c7042574953e958b55cfdb420eaa79d7
describe
'1197' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJEL' 'sip-filesSN01273-0240a.txt'
32fe05547e71eb5ec8aba08bdbc8c0f9
36a272f1176502cdfe7d630ab9bec5bed2ff3513
'2012-05-14T04:13:26-04:00'
describe
'269576' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJEM' 'sip-filesSN01273-0240ab.jp2'
3a30c65ecb8bd8e250ba63f60c9c60f4
e55b26335b0a4624faa70383d9f964743ed03bc7
'2012-05-14T04:10:52-04:00'
describe
'42160' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJEN' 'sip-filesSN01273-0240ab.jpg'
c5a28d703f5bf03b45c71238bfabfc42
4f18d7e3f83afdd103d323dba7afd37385a68281
describe
'21750' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJEO' 'sip-filesSN01273-0240ab.QC.jpg'
d5286d53b6a43e6f2670aee60c23715d
77551dc13146719021ca29264252f21ea9f3b516
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJEP' 'sip-filesSN01273-0240ab.tif'
86443452904c7dd27193c21940c1e341
17385f50053d6242172752360f906586fcda1e37
describe
'18496' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJEQ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0240abthm.jpg'
5b45227e430f1376b0e6ee1fc34aca18
5c728262d420cc6fdfefc0880b200bdbf9fde329
describe
'30992' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJER' 'sip-filesSN01273-0240athm.jpg'
028cf8da2b107a64dbd1daf5de6807fe
af0f2475285d10c6209c36e137df1c21eda57aa3
describe
'269711' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJES' 'sip-filesSN01273-0241a.jp2'
19741f5dacc2a0b6976a00c3c91c20e0
c20f0ca3718f10c320e5b2f1edca54af0181cd53
describe
'199690' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJET' 'sip-filesSN01273-0241a.jpg'
21a43f49d20c56c93693e8746f2b9654
d1d540cdb411cc97c480b6374d8fd1f511246220
describe
'3107' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJEU' 'sip-filesSN01273-0241a.pro'
273aad04de3f910ce067c38e26bccb21
42e96b2ce5d62e7bba288a064d5e2249bcaac971
describe
'63119' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJEV' 'sip-filesSN01273-0241a.QC.jpg'
a06282f3267f63f103d00a045bc6b02b
c68b74633a2b27a618198e8650c661a8b15d3e33
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJEW' 'sip-filesSN01273-0241a.tif'
ed55cf145ee3e512cffe0ba1ba95c7f0
eb346fad33cdff1beb39d2455e2a5d1bce2903f4
describe
'148' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJEX' 'sip-filesSN01273-0241a.txt'
a73a3d94a2fc5d4d735e5498721257a3
ea240ad3692483b1152e78b873089e4eb8b781d3
describe
'269591' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJEY' 'sip-filesSN01273-0241ab.jp2'
20facb92a03a6e973830a84cc9358463
5039e6ea0e48ba2ba8c5b7a4d55bae59553715b7
'2012-05-14T04:11:48-04:00'
describe
'172173' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJEZ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0241ab.jpg'
14fb0bab4da2a6fa8785ae01306358cd
0a454fcb77adc08f2daa09ef71868f9ba305221e
'2012-05-14T04:13:22-04:00'
describe
'30068' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJFA' 'sip-filesSN01273-0241ab.pro'
51b39f12001f3102f38043e7e80c48b8
98aadfd61f7d49053f2e8a104576ff9ab50387ce
'2012-05-14T04:09:32-04:00'
describe
'71987' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJFB' 'sip-filesSN01273-0241ab.QC.jpg'
0bc393c7c540017084e3f3034e5021f3
3544fb4c41f4f2c4b7d37f12562592008e308dd6
'2012-05-14T04:12:44-04:00'
describe
'2181376' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJFC' 'sip-filesSN01273-0241ab.tif'
efbf05bdefa2f4ac292175a4b6f0ff71
9764c2116b5ee50853b656ce77327de6c451731d
describe
'1200' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJFD' 'sip-filesSN01273-0241ab.txt'
1e68ec99e4b31d48789f4c281c7bada3
cda0ff59d754d07ee7d79e7d6034387bb85fd80f
'2012-05-14T04:11:14-04:00'
describe
'35299' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJFE' 'sip-filesSN01273-0241abthm.jpg'
3bd518c7b71d18f415ee1f4b951f325b
68b1cd68f3c783f372803a28ae2c5f3b550bd9b1
describe
'28734' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJFF' 'sip-filesSN01273-0241athm.jpg'
799e892715bcbd2e617867be15551418
a05012801753c06f47958e1b113e98b941bc8f84
describe
'269658' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJFG' 'sip-filesSN01273-0242a.jp2'
e07b6d6fb9daad0828d082751054ecc1
349f013e52078a998f60a6da8ba19b715a7d0af1
describe
'185825' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJFH' 'sip-filesSN01273-0242a.jpg'
07dddd3d11e3e2cbc92e4cf36b40e379
1130836e0c972e3e30e4b5730765204e552dd7fe
describe
'30126' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJFI' 'sip-filesSN01273-0242a.pro'
64cb5427498c934654afb8c4d6ffd3bf
4b27b7773898d545df96bf238865cc4e32a9d16d
'2012-05-14T04:11:43-04:00'
describe
'71118' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJFJ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0242a.QC.jpg'
24f406c6f316191ad9b6bca5a149bed6
f3417d306ce75e5ab4f9beea7dfa552ec0351ef8
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJFK' 'sip-filesSN01273-0242a.tif'
b9feabdf0eb5033fdd98446737079f17
469bd773111cf2a069ea747a6f006dd0344fc3c1
describe
'1202' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJFL' 'sip-filesSN01273-0242a.txt'
89ace90d5d65ad0d859beaa3ece21e16
c3f64323d02d48ce44853572ed5a5e182367ab22
'2012-05-14T04:09:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJFM' 'sip-filesSN01273-0242ab.jp2'
5b1d66fce764e5afaa14d9a87b0bf1c2
1107c420f65fd11e11e27b96d1cf43ac71b1620d
describe
'215357' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJFN' 'sip-filesSN01273-0242ab.jpg'
4250eac91634c6f5b6c2f933f8d5f13a
2484ebf31130008d7350da09f237459697aec749
describe
'31997' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJFO' 'sip-filesSN01273-0242ab.pro'
87192a7db5533da1278e91db2b68c83a
4020951976b38b968b44de3bf0501a27881f64eb
'2012-05-14T04:11:26-04:00'
describe
'78435' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJFP' 'sip-filesSN01273-0242ab.QC.jpg'
47cc0166e2179d989de882b2bda60d5c
631a37d1dbefe8552fe0c5f7f36e8f79d3b7bcc0
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJFQ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0242ab.tif'
ce16bbbb1a2a3a419c334c205b8f8d0a
30cd0c49984cdb6cd84ae33fbdd199ea3296b4ae
describe
'1287' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJFR' 'sip-filesSN01273-0242ab.txt'
3adbd089d7d17a32418fc6d83b099abb
2b6615df88fcf4c355447de2db08d495d5c0f134
describe
'30058' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJFS' 'sip-filesSN01273-0242abthm.jpg'
2044d9d146c3a8e00c86cf186a72b2fe
c9e09ef3d107d5cb1123c7c5316a1e24eaa727f4
'2012-05-14T04:11:44-04:00'
describe
'28718' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJFT' 'sip-filesSN01273-0242athm.jpg'
9d75a134423998aef52326e6dea2b679
db3a0f3cee32b195ef06a2fd76816c70d0f6256a
'2012-05-14T04:12:37-04:00'
describe
'269648' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJFU' 'sip-filesSN01273-0243a.jp2'
d31c73106eff51af8d2d45277db6eaed
e8b1a3b37c295aa32ef9a0600ba8851db4b44bea
describe
'213977' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJFV' 'sip-filesSN01273-0243a.jpg'
07da21ea98e2801bc352b492918e7916
be819e0400888273dc3c51e201346b6d53445a31
'2012-05-14T04:10:02-04:00'
describe
'31967' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJFW' 'sip-filesSN01273-0243a.pro'
a5a6f5b8b7b2c6c71a1cbd9164630b07
c62e5635a1f913b295ad061a10fd17f59770d5df
'2012-05-14T04:11:16-04:00'
describe
'77717' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJFX' 'sip-filesSN01273-0243a.QC.jpg'
f57c4f9a01daa7ebc38dc6807e5211df
cdd85ee9ab56ce600ffa8215a87a2ef71758078a
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJFY' 'sip-filesSN01273-0243a.tif'
a2f8f88a762cb170b779bbb906544195
09a85c0f4df76019e366ab5f9d7379537075f3c4
describe
'1269' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJFZ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0243a.txt'
6fa9c9233c281be93be7eff53453fa3e
84a25b41e2d89df4a75d0722fe1f1135e9661d30
describe
'256544' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJGA' 'sip-filesSN01273-0243ab.jp2'
531fbc35570155d611b324b0a99e1f77
7155ba356118b6b86036238af758adde3615e61f
describe
'190869' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJGB' 'sip-filesSN01273-0243ab.jpg'
0fc5cf655261050811985108c0ab317c
d57edf580b6738bf8f1725439ff128686e607e89
describe
'1311' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJGC' 'sip-filesSN01273-0243ab.pro'
5415e869a73625da3e571e46150888d2
70ee0daa344e4641d49aa8be4682929cef3f5cab
describe
'71231' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJGD' 'sip-filesSN01273-0243ab.QC.jpg'
96cdae22fd2dd38cc0830aa00fd19289
4c67e9907d13ea8f48ecf70a4d573938f1b3b1fa
describe
'2070460' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJGE' 'sip-filesSN01273-0243ab.tif'
ce1fe1118397a9d04a012a4decf5c9b2
680829bfaafc91887136eb9f78455b9c7376beac
'2012-05-14T04:10:22-04:00'
describe
'173' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJGF' 'sip-filesSN01273-0243ab.txt'
322088f94338ebd551a8acb29cabfd64
2223fbf307c1b2f47cb15d0c4d81a65f1182413e
describe
'31351' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJGG' 'sip-filesSN01273-0243abthm.jpg'
9c15a95b8b68e71814efaf2de7046a86
11c7737e932ff082d57596aaeed5d435c5b1df58
describe
'30364' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJGH' 'sip-filesSN01273-0243athm.jpg'
41ff8f8637c34bff02c5ef51081eec51
4574955be739344661b107b85e4f206c8fee9cb5
describe
'269671' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJGI' 'sip-filesSN01273-0244a.jp2'
773c173f145fe67cd84ac34b3daec403
aa3e3bbeb6177ead6cf29c6f657b875f0afd51cf
'2012-05-14T04:09:37-04:00'
describe
'207359' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJGJ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0244a.jpg'
c20f82c0771fb7b3d85f37290cdd7465
6f7769da588483e973d734501468d95915489aca
describe
'31231' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJGK' 'sip-filesSN01273-0244a.pro'
f78c01e79bc20d29694736d7bf535136
1bad365920d18f77b5a7abe9ec1609a576bc6798
describe
'75932' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJGL' 'sip-filesSN01273-0244a.QC.jpg'
4d0767f348db6addce64241ec90bc54b
cb19ced5afdb1b7327a636bfb2761951eee24745
'2012-05-14T04:12:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJGM' 'sip-filesSN01273-0244a.tif'
da83b8cd440d7ac13e4ae89c584b7ad9
8720fed6fbaae61e0f4fe503ab1c58206e208142
describe
'1249' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJGN' 'sip-filesSN01273-0244a.txt'
3e772d4b1143886f527532f3852e3ef4
b986addd636668cc50b7f8f1410f2863b4b98c22
'2012-05-14T04:13:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJGO' 'sip-filesSN01273-0244ab.jp2'
cae956acc8351fd4ea9666c062d5158c
d1c1e1481163f2fcd1bcbbcd4ed23d90f95d563d
describe
'208906' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJGP' 'sip-filesSN01273-0244ab.jpg'
ba955e94785212e3fa25eafc536fc163
4af79af1c6dc2c0d1f5f70a9b34440e8408dc88a
describe
'30841' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJGQ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0244ab.pro'
e73ae688deac35088d2f3cf7088ec209
ac083fc344681f4bb525c4b20701f1adab9efe98
describe
'76839' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJGR' 'sip-filesSN01273-0244ab.QC.jpg'
588b8734c94be8da940bc280ec1abefc
4d60628c07d1566df7bd3a949f174fa32f2ee004
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJGS' 'sip-filesSN01273-0244ab.tif'
13add8e6b332d463b1086c6e118df397
e66dc595f53884f6bef56ea1362a92d134b9927e
describe
'1239' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJGT' 'sip-filesSN01273-0244ab.txt'
a1391f069fd5303cc0b7fd6254f815d1
f1193ebaa050eea1a603567b0f57c377265aeb9f
'2012-05-14T04:09:27-04:00'
describe
'31072' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJGU' 'sip-filesSN01273-0244abthm.jpg'
22edce5ec3d870a68a1d5b2795a90e12
15bcbdf870f3a0f7a323df74a359f9f697191a15
describe
'30139' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJGV' 'sip-filesSN01273-0244athm.jpg'
67ff80edf79ba69bf00529b53d487415
65a4d11b93ffc20b9db234d73d7a8db1c8395e6a
'2012-05-14T04:13:08-04:00'
describe
'269696' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJGW' 'sip-filesSN01273-0245a.jp2'
55a3e1bb1b55783ba506a4b0540ffa53
913317f5c4bb6f403ceb795ac8d423283d3136b4
describe
'168508' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJGX' 'sip-filesSN01273-0245a.jpg'
c44f727f5e9e0d67e4f8c0c49a6d7d80
0ba637a89488d24bd6d9dff47d94db6ec013b0fd
describe
'32168' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJGY' 'sip-filesSN01273-0245a.pro'
7703f466af59888a9f66afe3850c076f
f2653be4a14cbf4f1e831295881620ffff0b31f0
'2012-05-14T04:10:20-04:00'
describe
'69602' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJGZ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0245a.QC.jpg'
42eb4c9390c6274d8e53f724c08c3cc8
437b17526f7a9f5c5631d308c04307a6749a8743
'2012-05-14T04:11:38-04:00'
describe
'2180604' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJHA' 'sip-filesSN01273-0245a.tif'
9ea2e51444eb60038ff0e7081a5efe12
d5a4340c1fa0548433345d941ab95994f388e117
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJHB' 'sip-filesSN01273-0245a.txt'
f4a1895f688c0ea8e479fbb57081c17e
0550bb0bc37f6a47616951bdbc9b6ba4b48cbe00
describe
'269637' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJHC' 'sip-filesSN01273-0245ab.jp2'
5b954456cd6e6486195a6d66b9b75e9e
f94c1d810143d218da0c010e8f698550f2a15aad
describe
'175913' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJHD' 'sip-filesSN01273-0245ab.jpg'
6959b1b365b662e3d1e28dcf657a3cbe
86befb93987421ab0ecfe5f0c23823fe71f95e1b
describe
'31769' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJHE' 'sip-filesSN01273-0245ab.pro'
b9e35c2d5c24e994590f724a337e401e
9a504fbb806100147da9227debef996dee145101
'2012-05-14T04:10:23-04:00'
describe
'73676' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJHF' 'sip-filesSN01273-0245ab.QC.jpg'
1e8c57d67b5bea6f3c2564dd0897be2c
08707731246876684176beea48a2adb48f45a146
describe
'2181560' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJHG' 'sip-filesSN01273-0245ab.tif'
9c0e3cb16d601f1d78daa87c88953d36
c39f3d56e511b7dc746c30ba572d56f3ffbd0c3d
'2012-05-14T04:10:03-04:00'
describe
'1259' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJHH' 'sip-filesSN01273-0245ab.txt'
cdf8320e626d9fb93c250cf5581f4769
6100aa26fe588ac27128fec9b169b2455bad952b
'2012-05-14T04:12:56-04:00'
describe
'34894' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJHI' 'sip-filesSN01273-0245abthm.jpg'
eb477d85010880d96d7fcdfd704fe936
04e26cd7fc9a6632d44c9eaa16ada483e6f93e71
describe
'33537' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJHJ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0245athm.jpg'
b3f1c3708bb00ed285d22d5c966fadff
ba74cd792e26b19858a01126d4225728b3f80792
describe
'269688' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJHK' 'sip-filesSN01273-0246a.jp2'
cbf44fca4e6b51bf617856a385816fef
c4da3252c6caea355be6e8db480697cdfa91fdd9
describe
'207622' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJHL' 'sip-filesSN01273-0246a.jpg'
5d652ae6a7745cade2ddaa347f537ac4
f778330a369953502645e35bd8d6cd84e48e48ba
describe
'31087' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJHM' 'sip-filesSN01273-0246a.pro'
56c06af040eb0847afdcad5b82fbb231
b964a7e772f78961d8d6ba5679632f9a69297c73
describe
'75057' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJHN' 'sip-filesSN01273-0246a.QC.jpg'
f4ff007a4779d352e913d05fffd5c622
df09735973cc273064f6736e5a251f42c696f4e0
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJHO' 'sip-filesSN01273-0246a.tif'
600f35c664cdb7f3568b01b0077c8af8
c41124aa228985e1432e36f8782183f67c8b2d5b
describe
'1229' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJHP' 'sip-filesSN01273-0246a.txt'
52a585414ddae7a60cd92d655378657e
ac36cbe3210cf159c03aaece9505159547b960cc
describe
'269676' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJHQ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0246ab.jp2'
70cda9a44a9e2d56f136c6e21ec6eab3
fcfd7ac9a42b3a6837d6409317415cef0519842d
describe
'169642' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJHR' 'sip-filesSN01273-0246ab.jpg'
c5098f900144fbc1972297be2f996fb5
dcdba7e45ca84f4c667d315de097296b7e5167ad
describe
'30580' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJHS' 'sip-filesSN01273-0246ab.pro'
50ae0c25fa87bee003d90bcf8e62bdce
51acc3fa0caebdc831f8f88121af52a840579d0d
describe
'71928' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJHT' 'sip-filesSN01273-0246ab.QC.jpg'
c575e90f4063ecec544431c8852e8016
69ed398139bb71eb0d94142af45412cf374208f2
describe
'2181280' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJHU' 'sip-filesSN01273-0246ab.tif'
0376ddfa68af1591b80562964828bab4
2da0f942264d2019ee87a4b25d22ae135ebdae09
'2012-05-14T04:09:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJHV' 'sip-filesSN01273-0246ab.txt'
4c84c594ba60662f67d3c5e616d8bc2c
0bf271d12ffd1548084d5258e7de5d1832f69d2a
describe
'34668' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJHW' 'sip-filesSN01273-0246abthm.jpg'
679ae9becbcb2820141b754064983203
e3d3c821bc7780fd632a4bdd6b3db2eb193d8439
describe
'30161' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJHX' 'sip-filesSN01273-0246athm.jpg'
3f5c86128c0e9c0e6fa04e2bc779ecc6
76c055bea2c0f1baf913b855726f2eb6572cffcd
'2012-05-14T04:11:59-04:00'
describe
'269640' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJHY' 'sip-filesSN01273-0247a.jp2'
04f0f46d5af326984f7fa9e2df7e307b
c841dc5302cfc9facf13279479c278630b45fec3
describe
'196896' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJHZ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0247a.jpg'
0f222b6d8ca2015f46327ea65d39b9ce
b2072bd8b7b48e33a81af5e3e9b945208e8d2100
'2012-05-14T04:10:35-04:00'
describe
'29986' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJIA' 'sip-filesSN01273-0247a.pro'
9bbc47534a30269285d0cab3ad8b6432
8e74e11274a9e80cc9b77c7d7c4d4ca078d4cf5f
describe
'73032' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJIB' 'sip-filesSN01273-0247a.QC.jpg'
4e24c1f87c4e4049db16521c9162d95f
84007a615a416a30512d2c0c4a06d81f90f7353e
'2012-05-14T04:09:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJIC' 'sip-filesSN01273-0247a.tif'
f1f03a71608724497d8f727ff6858762
1413cef5e5122660e5a217e5b2daeca17b950591
describe
'1196' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJID' 'sip-filesSN01273-0247a.txt'
a8309588fdcd9ddd2cf4f9fb9da88910
83c6c91854123566939dc25109938e5579394be1
describe
'269675' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJIE' 'sip-filesSN01273-0247ab.jp2'
959739e927f6f686bd7b794db3f8e9f4
8511982441241e704ff6bb4915c009204c92d091
'2012-05-14T04:11:24-04:00'
describe
'218181' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJIF' 'sip-filesSN01273-0247ab.jpg'
4ce170baef0c5d44a6647c2f93079e76
d711f8e46c4421932c47f8aa6a4cc167a0d46596
describe
'32436' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJIG' 'sip-filesSN01273-0247ab.pro'
cfb2e25a0fa694521caca1bba6fdfc17
e7b87228c4a7a91e53ef3dac6ed5f17779a1d2c4
'2012-05-14T04:11:13-04:00'
describe
'78318' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJIH' 'sip-filesSN01273-0247ab.QC.jpg'
15fcc5900010664c4fc2ae8ba594db8b
56481c0ab6a8598de8bf5c566e28ac12f144b1f9
'2012-05-14T04:09:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJII' 'sip-filesSN01273-0247ab.tif'
d2fa295b62d21dc9b34b2ba947e8b2d4
eb55470928c785ba375011b669c9dc3080a3210e
'2012-05-14T04:11:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJIJ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0247ab.txt'
1b4622c7e3e0a946a9054e6aeb9ddd85
6cda67a797b5b3cd461b41f33d1ae8d3bd8031f7
'2012-05-14T04:12:24-04:00'
describe
'30503' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJIK' 'sip-filesSN01273-0247abthm.jpg'
9b733624a1f6b4ccc8ff26a5dd08867e
b5a5326b1a63c67b836ed839fbd762ddaa4708e7
describe
'29869' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJIL' 'sip-filesSN01273-0247athm.jpg'
06398dee2e34189bde14720a2b1706d2
328043502d8d0eec9114060fa4196a54ab3a1372
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJIM' 'sip-filesSN01273-0248a.jp2'
1640552e1535407683dfa6aa36868537
225e015b30e6a58f49e52b36fc7e7f8d116f3d5d
describe
'207066' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJIN' 'sip-filesSN01273-0248a.jpg'
3d865e1c8eca89456a8fcc5e73cd8553
e5915294f152ddc2ee7636552eee7abc9c245293
'2012-05-14T04:09:44-04:00'
describe
'31949' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJIO' 'sip-filesSN01273-0248a.pro'
067ae79a8f65b6a0e71200cbc5b6b300
98e14ed6b27360e31dd56835682fce4999a34997
'2012-05-14T04:11:30-04:00'
describe
'75653' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJIP' 'sip-filesSN01273-0248a.QC.jpg'
0723dc0c599daf7ab1562f0c8c821362
8b2971e3806b330e914da4ddba25812ebedf0a0b
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJIQ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0248a.tif'
1020a9d5e420cc2d77a222b82e7a9a2d
b2922eb5af32d41eed174adf78297ccc31978738
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJIR' 'sip-filesSN01273-0248a.txt'
8db51f9e8eebfa0be608e8a55214873c
23597da985cac3ef9a39baee477bd166fb849c9d
describe
'269706' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJIS' 'sip-filesSN01273-0248ab.jp2'
4778ba0791068b8ce5019966bf479ac5
434d78610ad44321ad2a9afd2c8138ce5d3eb30a
'2012-05-14T04:11:28-04:00'
describe
'173526' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJIT' 'sip-filesSN01273-0248ab.jpg'
77d3162c7a2b44a02c39e8de895e19a1
777a5950857b793afbaf81cb72341a40a4556f07
'2012-05-14T04:10:11-04:00'
describe
'31570' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJIU' 'sip-filesSN01273-0248ab.pro'
ff8827d616b02a40fca19866d9d29f5f
bc0d316d825fbf28c15d4a21f339b4543ce0dd8c
describe
'71769' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJIV' 'sip-filesSN01273-0248ab.QC.jpg'
21562469fa665bd15b1443433b3aea16
6e53ab183ca6c0e51ee8c852d800e5cabf9ea20e
'2012-05-14T04:11:01-04:00'
describe
'2181268' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJIW' 'sip-filesSN01273-0248ab.tif'
66b0f5a2779b34dfeab45e5ded73966a
f1bc1e2a42bdc381d321319cdc3d3abb1e23a4da
'2012-05-14T04:09:50-04:00'
describe
'1258' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJIX' 'sip-filesSN01273-0248ab.txt'
6c69f1985ecbbadbcb1221ccf85a8b72
bffa7a74ce02e98ca81251de665a1f228a0d89c5
describe
'34589' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJIY' 'sip-filesSN01273-0248abthm.jpg'
07caf4a0025485dc5e864ec21e64e9f1
ec904b14f79c07a6c1b78f6154576f2ca90da3c8
'2012-05-14T04:12:20-04:00'
describe
'29914' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJIZ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0248athm.jpg'
a84fb0aa3ade465cce5ed5dd7322e44b
565fda7b6415119e6a02b5675edbe575ab67a84e
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJJA' 'sip-filesSN01273-0249a.jp2'
1367d1097ed77c51999ba0f85bc714e8
b9acaf32d64af419e48ed69ef9420b74b77e7eb7
'2012-05-14T04:11:10-04:00'
describe
'209671' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJJB' 'sip-filesSN01273-0249a.jpg'
2bd8def314442848b86a72b826877ee1
30441817804ca0be6ab3ce0a9ceec7255c55570e
describe
'30831' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJJC' 'sip-filesSN01273-0249a.pro'
28c8a2b80e647adc916ad13753f28ead
c1f9569005b63129b31d2476f3f01aa552a030c9
describe
'77327' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJJD' 'sip-filesSN01273-0249a.QC.jpg'
ef6f2888d378e3ea447cdab497ca0e35
992d86c738a0f5224bee7980fd0bc5ba35b036be
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJJE' 'sip-filesSN01273-0249a.tif'
367315b51cb51c8e00f2f9602d23f5bc
67da6653d6ef0470da36fa830bc86537d5b78b41
'2012-05-14T04:09:12-04:00'
describe
'1256' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJJF' 'sip-filesSN01273-0249a.txt'
7075bf6cc0b35041d1dd11849df33c97
a11b615209b6215575629fc9968c8a5c15a0df49
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJJG' 'sip-filesSN01273-0249ab.jp2'
219780b2a5564e0dacf16fe93f50f4bf
2433536ac8a4bf18d42bb32b4196c1c894b64b90
describe
'197583' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJJH' 'sip-filesSN01273-0249ab.jpg'
bf63f42a90124e4a1c2a144e187fa0ff
5c042d08b104d67edb464e12fc3c11002243e128
'2012-05-14T04:09:31-04:00'
describe
'4096' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJJI' 'sip-filesSN01273-0249ab.pro'
39c9763c3b57bd36d2f0d09468e47570
139f334e7b41c967fccd8f1f50acfa4151c78d1a
describe
'61676' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJJJ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0249ab.QC.jpg'
ebef194ff79d1d5bfd6d2179e1fd5d86
5207395b33753a32f592a509f79212cb2153fc6e
'2012-05-14T04:11:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJJK' 'sip-filesSN01273-0249ab.tif'
cb20fe6d17730a74e4970f1a7c0acb46
09fa1d1dab99e991dd1783a51ca4ce456b3e4bed
describe
'319' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJJL' 'sip-filesSN01273-0249ab.txt'
209593517ea5afe92865dae945dce82d
748f478df5d103c873d7d5e3c29a2379cbffa278
describe
'27830' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJJM' 'sip-filesSN01273-0249abthm.jpg'
6689f616e67e57538ef297129ca43b0a
525deb755d033880a9bd18bca87bce228f35d888
describe
'30725' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJJN' 'sip-filesSN01273-0249athm.jpg'
471c7774471320dbe5d7bfd3dd60b8f6
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describe
'269704' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJJO' 'sip-filesSN01273-0250a.jp2'
53c89daee0d43c9bac0b3d6470e41043
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describe
'31480' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJJP' 'sip-filesSN01273-0250a.jpg'
10d41b1dfc45403cd76ceec0a433f00b
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describe
'228' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJJQ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0250a.pro'
331e9fe89359cdda158bd6d66bba3822
3cb77bc64dd5638ad54b8e82c0729ad110c22a6a
'2012-05-14T04:11:55-04:00'
describe
'20386' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJJR' 'sip-filesSN01273-0250a.QC.jpg'
98983a8efd846a0a78ce69b7e45c0b23
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describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJJS' 'sip-filesSN01273-0250a.tif'
1e839e4f6ca6d6fb3e2c7132f812e61a
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describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJJT' 'sip-filesSN01273-0250a.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJJU' 'sip-filesSN01273-0250ab.jp2'
28ee2dc79e67fcd6e814208dc84f490e
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describe
'168244' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJJV' 'sip-filesSN01273-0250ab.jpg'
267ffcca061c76dcc07ea96aeff21c33
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describe
'29537' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJJW' 'sip-filesSN01273-0250ab.pro'
f6b300c41dbfcd124482f4bf079a96d8
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describe
'71689' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJJX' 'sip-filesSN01273-0250ab.QC.jpg'
16e5339653f38914a66313d8cdec7a58
aa2b5bcccf55494f1d892a746c17b273bfce8a2f
describe
'2181608' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJJY' 'sip-filesSN01273-0250ab.tif'
019d58841522daeb8c10a092a849714c
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describe
'1199' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJJZ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0250ab.txt'
42259c8da81e99dc4de66b101cd903e7
cb78d763b66c127854ebb1354da80dbc2a324a53
'2012-05-14T04:10:46-04:00'
describe
'35496' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJKA' 'sip-filesSN01273-0250abthm.jpg'
d750e0515dccd18f18c0cd18903c4693
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describe
'18246' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJKB' 'sip-filesSN01273-0250athm.jpg'
3efbf8b8b78113bbd581af8c1b152d7c
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describe
'269486' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJKC' 'sip-filesSN01273-0251a.jp2'
5cc83f1b7e3c7dff5a1175f3424bf2c4
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describe
'211759' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJKD' 'sip-filesSN01273-0251a.jpg'
c05c94ade2f689e39203c5cad9d97983
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describe
'31205' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJKE' 'sip-filesSN01273-0251a.pro'
52652092619befbb2b85295797fbeed7
3671544df26dbde5d971077cbe29176773ff7457
describe
'76526' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJKF' 'sip-filesSN01273-0251a.QC.jpg'
df2c0001ac74aabfba0ad9b3ae2535c7
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describe
'2172672' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJKG' 'sip-filesSN01273-0251a.tif'
7c91f0b0f08de29e4a93933d9bcad380
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describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJKH' 'sip-filesSN01273-0251a.txt'
d584d3b01f411725f5314c27caec7979
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describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJKI' 'sip-filesSN01273-0251ab.jp2'
5223064ec06b5ac03068a0770468dddf
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describe
'213744' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJKJ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0251ab.jpg'
fdb59a491e49a0813bdee04719d67fab
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describe
'32187' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJKK' 'sip-filesSN01273-0251ab.pro'
b30ca960fed576ab0dcbc7901a371982
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describe
'77122' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJKL' 'sip-filesSN01273-0251ab.QC.jpg'
a1d70bef7ea7ccafb602d73bf3cd4711
988980d0ebc16b89b010bb2904f0027f0617b4cf
'2012-05-14T04:12:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJKM' 'sip-filesSN01273-0251ab.tif'
90b5042789e13eb477aacde44ce25689
69cf6ca889661bbdb69dbf90945b757b27a7c46f
'2012-05-14T04:09:14-04:00'
describe
'1309' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJKN' 'sip-filesSN01273-0251ab.txt'
a8f15ade8b1e47ba94d0a03398190a71
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describe
'30401' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJKO' 'sip-filesSN01273-0251abthm.jpg'
c281706c3a547e73aa36432286d44621
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'2012-05-14T04:12:12-04:00'
describe
'30086' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJKP' 'sip-filesSN01273-0251athm.jpg'
27ddd0ddc053bee81b4a555fcb93062e
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describe
'269670' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJKQ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0252a.jp2'
683b5df74a1c77a2e4026c51e16053ec
805e89e0d28ea93a413596b7e1d41afe29cb2e10
'2012-05-14T04:13:07-04:00'
describe
'215679' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJKR' 'sip-filesSN01273-0252a.jpg'
a3b029a423393d0c7b1d66f58640532e
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describe
'31455' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJKS' 'sip-filesSN01273-0252a.pro'
44b4b562c3174045060698a5ffb9f89c
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describe
'76912' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJKT' 'sip-filesSN01273-0252a.QC.jpg'
c2248017f5a4ef49ae75fcb446b4c016
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describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJKU' 'sip-filesSN01273-0252a.tif'
14c80a1032cf53bf939f1d66dd5badd7
66bdffe9537ed4dfbb497ec4bdee78be0662f434
'2012-05-14T04:11:51-04:00'
describe
'1254' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJKV' 'sip-filesSN01273-0252a.txt'
4014413428fe883ff8384d9098f9fdac
42e9ae884099b6a1368418e313d4c36119c11c70
describe
'269700' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJKW' 'sip-filesSN01273-0252ab.jp2'
859b50f52ee960090ede41c9d5e39c1a
03334ae2c77488a21ceba7c04aa3df3e83700f2b
'2012-05-14T04:10:56-04:00'
describe
'175631' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJKX' 'sip-filesSN01273-0252ab.jpg'
9718c87316cb03c2de83afa2331cf4ed
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describe
'31383' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJKY' 'sip-filesSN01273-0252ab.pro'
6cee62825cf5ba58285df7866141539c
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describe
'73500' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJKZ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0252ab.QC.jpg'
2b16cca6c50ca2662d51c64d23b5749b
2562ca64b6d6a3358656e5ce205c5178ec08e6e1
describe
'2181460' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJLA' 'sip-filesSN01273-0252ab.tif'
e50a37f0d50f3bb75f704dc2342162ad
1ec5544d99d26309e3d0bedfad68c75a9374f856
'2012-05-14T04:12:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJLB' 'sip-filesSN01273-0252ab.txt'
4520310a8b2b65be05ca49363c9eaa1d
ca39881944fa5f1a9fa4decf6cdf424bee6fbe08
describe
'35053' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJLC' 'sip-filesSN01273-0252abthm.jpg'
9e54e6e83405dae1a054fb3f03a9c406
222d2ccd176b32d5d169ce74fd8b3235f8ec993c
'2012-05-14T04:09:23-04:00'
describe
'30472' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJLD' 'sip-filesSN01273-0252athm.jpg'
de342ed14711033b2665eefcd5dd0d29
53a2dd317bc00a3fa95a637198eceedcfa6419af
describe
'269482' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJLE' 'sip-filesSN01273-0253a.jp2'
e2f69487ad130cbf20633172237bb822
8640e7daa172ee2eb1217cf37059a8ee059ebb5d
describe
'202925' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJLF' 'sip-filesSN01273-0253a.jpg'
f7157984aadcd7c1abd79998ab92e37f
d56f111ec6a436a4f378ff38f6c2fcb77ab234d4
'2012-05-14T04:12:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJLG' 'sip-filesSN01273-0253a.pro'
67dde31604ce14f8bb3055fe558ea075
a816b848b465b1d4357ad3a679d8b82368fb56a6
'2012-05-14T04:10:27-04:00'
describe
'74399' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJLH' 'sip-filesSN01273-0253a.QC.jpg'
81fafca613bd887e5ad342e587f052ab
1ec9782cadd4c4b14c381b8cf87cd8207ea6c554
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJLI' 'sip-filesSN01273-0253a.tif'
aef0a6a36e85073baa90e08f0efb3acd
ab412bc9110b349546dac97ee4df9ada3f12d319
describe
'1212' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJLJ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0253a.txt'
6ae3600dcefcd39bb4ee351540747b2f
81b5a49e291cc6d181ded8e0f0f57129fb21773f
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJLK' 'sip-filesSN01273-0253ab.jp2'
65f7731b940ba3c6c5c3558c31068f59
9a0a176cb615f5270f726e1995e6486f847cf6a2
describe
'178153' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJLL' 'sip-filesSN01273-0253ab.jpg'
69b1a8d66ff00e0d0caf57823382869e
53b503cdd9fa56f35ae958a2ef9a1da124015631
describe
'32451' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJLM' 'sip-filesSN01273-0253ab.pro'
01681f60874b02d76d3d180b7b4d2af5
80fadd02c5413807e4c034aeb009a600057c1f13
describe
'75166' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJLN' 'sip-filesSN01273-0253ab.QC.jpg'
2b7ad86b8f0568c4959650e52b182cd9
b3f0236303ccc07a36570132fc43017ebfbd5fea
'2012-05-14T04:12:48-04:00'
describe
'2181452' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJLO' 'sip-filesSN01273-0253ab.tif'
029a637fa3468de83639adb0352822a3
9a1e2bcc331fcb3eabda074ac4985153b7bb44af
describe
'1297' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJLP' 'sip-filesSN01273-0253ab.txt'
6bd07956dbab6850ab1f323cd92fafe4
34662d863ccbd7a86b2a90d4d88818484a301477
describe
'35091' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJLQ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0253abthm.jpg'
8a6efe252445ab3e7487ec07e80a8dce
5012d9fb96608474c2a87e68287696f7918637c6
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJLR' 'sip-filesSN01273-0253athm.jpg'
2bb5f3ca695075335148b6dcc563d4d7
36f18436925a569bec15ab9caffa6883f6832e4b
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJLS' 'sip-filesSN01273-0254a.jp2'
f19b87de0124abc645d572514bfef042
5a6c4d83e393f669237c3e4349d503b9885e8f48
describe
'215385' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJLT' 'sip-filesSN01273-0254a.jpg'
5061f88c0695fc19da74560bbf158e84
4d7b19ea9d904bd08b81952bcfa95fdf490a43a7
describe
'31809' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJLU' 'sip-filesSN01273-0254a.pro'
82a5220736213acaebdd4ac72ed2ca25
6b6c8141d702da8b058821f66490f9a52efca7da
describe
'78721' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJLV' 'sip-filesSN01273-0254a.QC.jpg'
827cf6374f6955ac3885123c13ce2d56
45d0ce0090fb67aa8296b537bafe33b4f302623c
'2012-05-14T04:09:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJLW' 'sip-filesSN01273-0254a.tif'
d83f9d11f1275db683bffea6df2573e2
78ff3bc5a3f8f470c8e014a449c47c19a8308693
'2012-05-14T04:11:02-04:00'
describe
'1268' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJLX' 'sip-filesSN01273-0254a.txt'
0314216681fcab4ace068c6635e15dad
cfa88b07a763104f92948f00615a467ea76dd5cc
describe
'269587' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJLY' 'sip-filesSN01273-0254ab.jp2'
c4df47474cac6043e9a179acf0809498
b496cbf769adef68b0e896cbb0a4792c6dea9fc9
describe
'181692' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJLZ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0254ab.jpg'
6bc437c413f73c8a37e1ccd87b1019ab
fc8c3d3c513b3d43a4489f31ab8e42f72a60b5bd
describe
'32882' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJMA' 'sip-filesSN01273-0254ab.pro'
12757db588f61dc7eb632c2a34dfea90
52051788fbf344731da654639b9a389f003522d3
describe
'75424' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJMB' 'sip-filesSN01273-0254ab.QC.jpg'
ffe835d17dfa855b7bd53268181e1357
76247434c0479bbc9086f94a27f7f194c27eb9f2
describe
'2181512' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJMC' 'sip-filesSN01273-0254ab.tif'
ca10f3e94f76ae2893ef3a68362edade
780346927e47bb3af179acf464b87b7f56484775
describe
'1318' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJMD' 'sip-filesSN01273-0254ab.txt'
82f4a3adf9f61def72bf8da7fac51dbf
36f8f344f0fd4bbec8340a77d75c86217caf8403
describe
'35318' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJME' 'sip-filesSN01273-0254abthm.jpg'
d3b5517bc314a14ea9addc95542dd7f4
11fd1c7fd90a72494553eae56169ac28a21ebfca
describe
'30691' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJMF' 'sip-filesSN01273-0254athm.jpg'
d3182e3bf3990094fdede747a06da3b3
1495dc9cd0aea7f83c95d70dafb2f300860b7564
describe
'269423' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJMG' 'sip-filesSN01273-0255a.jp2'
f8d5b4e3596331a0b011c080848991a6
6e23d0a7f41a21fecc78727d742822ccea206415
describe
'215002' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJMH' 'sip-filesSN01273-0255a.jpg'
360a2876edd8a03c69c0b1e74603a957
b65ca11bfc5ff82ee75ff4191003a72fa843fcb5
describe
'32937' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJMI' 'sip-filesSN01273-0255a.pro'
d130c667ab92a5115b9e4db361c0615c
cd0e29808eaebedcd5187cb23024631232f5b100
describe
'77289' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJMJ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0255a.QC.jpg'
5fb98d916af8e2bb569a6ef6a1882846
5cadf18aba5b5f88a7d274b92b3decff7418354a
describe
'2172664' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJMK' 'sip-filesSN01273-0255a.tif'
4ee3782fcc241b5190d684e7cdc812cf
8b6d3be5a13f127ca999a207d4b2bd67b96e44c3
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJML' 'sip-filesSN01273-0255a.txt'
612507192d25c9972f98878f9c6b2214
ea85f2ac199fe5839273a51ec79d37868b40321e
describe
'269613' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJMM' 'sip-filesSN01273-0255ab.jp2'
4001e15fb01f5e9790ebb9691f19c049
5c3c8c00b1a3394d50d643256047c0986c1d52cf
'2012-05-14T04:09:26-04:00'
describe
'215618' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJMN' 'sip-filesSN01273-0255ab.jpg'
9b18753d49a4d3da0e0c3c6a56314498
f937e573460979085c64c2c0392aabceec810780
describe
'30939' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJMO' 'sip-filesSN01273-0255ab.pro'
76942512a2b9e3176787ef13fc177e11
5373348d815fa7bdf4feed7aacef48c8f7d2104d
describe
'78199' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJMP' 'sip-filesSN01273-0255ab.QC.jpg'
53d886422c386ed9a9ca8d9e93cc84e2
af9aa5d2313fca91396d60c194257b6de0a14668
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJMQ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0255ab.tif'
cb789d9fecd8a83c67d0018952c03d96
69e69ec1f92411a1d203d0400ab547221f00f43a
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJMR' 'sip-filesSN01273-0255ab.txt'
7e82954e9a990d3a6760e6f1a3ec5c37
a2d468265209d48dd9db32419054a6aefa3de8a0
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJMS' 'sip-filesSN01273-0255abthm.jpg'
738fb033ebbe663f5774a09e7f503819
c085c80f17e309900623f41f63432167d30c57da
describe
'30004' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJMT' 'sip-filesSN01273-0255athm.jpg'
f743089bfd37d33d8a4c7ba2b4a3cb44
ea6f77b462df77830fa5291728778d450633c068
describe
'269643' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJMU' 'sip-filesSN01273-0256a.jp2'
ce1f77478b76da3deecf88d72dbc03b4
6e13cee5697948a1b6863a37db9e3f16e0329419
describe
'204987' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJMV' 'sip-filesSN01273-0256a.jpg'
60e6bf039de20a9fb88be322d8ed52e9
982d9d564a423d1d4cdd04bb4b0e1cea7fd9ce02
'2012-05-14T04:09:18-04:00'
describe
'30473' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJMW' 'sip-filesSN01273-0256a.pro'
bfe0243c2f390b3a1ca91ba5680230e8
84ec4e07ac6c9b4fbaba322c619e5d175ca35c8a
describe
'75894' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJMX' 'sip-filesSN01273-0256a.QC.jpg'
144ef236800c8203bb2714cea173dd10
e50813033193c50f3e8f3a01fc41ecfc81eb767a
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJMY' 'sip-filesSN01273-0256a.tif'
627ed43d3edf3f0d81065ede3e630043
45a9fec1969b6c27655ba8019822959c46292163
describe
'1227' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJMZ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0256a.txt'
6f01c0bdfcaf70b8302b9f3169d306cb
8e8c2c52ef104693e43f65c115b0c78f4c42721a
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJNA' 'sip-filesSN01273-0256ab.jp2'
4fdd58965f1b09e1300e3beebcdfdee9
4ab12c2c672e91f003bf9fdfd4ffc1e8aace633c
describe
'201625' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJNB' 'sip-filesSN01273-0256ab.jpg'
76c1428a19ec6c15b6f37ace56da398c
fe53051001e14bfff539e272d42a94192556cc49
'2012-05-14T04:09:47-04:00'
describe
'28739' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJNC' 'sip-filesSN01273-0256ab.pro'
3ee6579dd3905e3046c005f0238eecd6
70f5f27fbe0d0a4e9cab6a4f64a30197de84437d
describe
'74471' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJND' 'sip-filesSN01273-0256ab.QC.jpg'
c1ad4313444b7d5f232b88ade552cf70
db62306b571fe6c0e992168ec7e21ce259b1df25
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJNE' 'sip-filesSN01273-0256ab.tif'
cdc93d78b7332b0abeabc491193cf9d4
b52c7b8fd634c71e36968569439f48ad245e0d4a
describe
'1175' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJNF' 'sip-filesSN01273-0256ab.txt'
c2b6e7458bb8135aed5a2ed296697699
d95cf667709bfc903339ab145de1c9d5e9be83ee
describe
'30451' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJNG' 'sip-filesSN01273-0256abthm.jpg'
bfd049fbcbaa2c53aef8d5eb2d36cf91
540dfee74c93d488cee8099917d6a2f07b211306
describe
'30313' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJNH' 'sip-filesSN01273-0256athm.jpg'
b97f4070d256afd4e68871485067ae46
8d52ff885f30af0f6652d1cf0aaf7a0694180284
describe
'269481' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJNI' 'sip-filesSN01273-0257a.jp2'
92e19e25c4ad82df39c16422c6b52c17
b95b52e30b6d8746e8df50dfae3ff61df57c420d
'2012-05-14T04:09:28-04:00'
describe
'205292' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJNJ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0257a.jpg'
044ac63a69aa5d00e3bff1c1d07e05a1
959c0a93fd31497c51b16e21704fb7befc3496bf
describe
'29874' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJNK' 'sip-filesSN01273-0257a.pro'
b5e58b00bb424b03084e1ad520d9a1f2
50ad857690c03e1e91b742e0772cd3ee6189c3bd
describe
'74081' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJNL' 'sip-filesSN01273-0257a.QC.jpg'
ca13a76c9ef33a1b319b65642f00959f
faf45dd9c7f94aefd851ef83e377dba76d54cd53
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJNM' 'sip-filesSN01273-0257a.tif'
78ea5964dd8481b3e94f29f62181069e
503210587b7e39cbe2ff12b3565ee0622aa2e344
describe
'1209' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJNN' 'sip-filesSN01273-0257a.txt'
34ea4d83a83e4b0b9da91ac32a210890
dcbb20279628a5a17c9d327eca88a3d287f66d3a
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJNO' 'sip-filesSN01273-0257ab.jp2'
968315e2ead24e9e4487ae18a293765c
ce5c3b922589ed85176280fe3cf12c6fe3139d9b
describe
'215024' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJNP' 'sip-filesSN01273-0257ab.jpg'
1e09d8a455f15065c2d8008bfbf889af
ebc1d4191df175a74c81d5981473b42cfbeb8943
describe
'31174' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJNQ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0257ab.pro'
22f210c37de9867cd64e70e73277beb7
6e6c6aa3f1df75df75b2e2ed7ec5f1e78f53fed9
describe
'78944' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJNR' 'sip-filesSN01273-0257ab.QC.jpg'
d9bb3df9c1587cd2bd827eba830a9f20
b085f73239a0d03111e0d17789d0469bce055268
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJNS' 'sip-filesSN01273-0257ab.tif'
d71f29baefc0c0bb622dfaa26aea3e35
bbd792f1036282c3cf4bfbed3c21f1663f8f88ca
describe
'1241' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJNT' 'sip-filesSN01273-0257ab.txt'
c8640f4c06182fc09fabd0c7474bde1f
fa60446fa789be496dcc3a23c62aceff2f1ba6b0
describe
'30594' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJNU' 'sip-filesSN01273-0257abthm.jpg'
ff4b61486c10412b578f4b8ac730489d
1e4af5a7a6850f30906b333c9d0f07c229860561
describe
'30202' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJNV' 'sip-filesSN01273-0257athm.jpg'
f9f0568534e8d0f5d6be2acfe25f924b
14a8d3b3aca6169720fb24001492c2b75e2e8c2c
describe
'269452' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJNW' 'sip-filesSN01273-0258a.jp2'
0f7e167b535661f5babf0168f0a7e376
960f9c688b55dcfebd8c1c7c04dd8356188adfd0
describe
'196662' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJNX' 'sip-filesSN01273-0258a.jpg'
885b21bc23c76bf6c70c6c6a75eecefd
bc78f546711e4a645b66d80ef92442e8a91c78f8
describe
'28726' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJNY' 'sip-filesSN01273-0258a.pro'
291f860bde28a0a0b75a232fb48fba92
161ec223849bdb6016fb425855b2e68616475816
describe
'72068' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJNZ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0258a.QC.jpg'
9242eae6c5bb65d78124afe124948edb
b2d72372cc4c312627dd41c0edf7c7eebdf80b42
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJOA' 'sip-filesSN01273-0258a.tif'
6c4a19db1f0864a470ab5956fc2958d2
5d525200582b7d60c27b0fd21b6bb5e885c8b93e
describe
'1155' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJOB' 'sip-filesSN01273-0258a.txt'
dd33044b06822c755c4d65c2666ac38b
df85a6b0abb3e986b73379d498206eba43baa851
describe
'257606' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJOC' 'sip-filesSN01273-0258ab.jp2'
f58e27b2a04d32ee67a6e419375fc430
27ef83a75d8f5f1ca76abdd07519b78d9d8fbcb8
describe
'191416' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJOD' 'sip-filesSN01273-0258ab.jpg'
e110911f832c5972393fa418d7bb2788
692524b2b72c62c9954a4fe715278b0e1fb403a8
describe
'13849' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJOE' 'sip-filesSN01273-0258ab.pro'
14ab6b966ae1b2bc48b12df862debf90
6f5cbc5885674c8e5e3346358cd03506a9c582cb
describe
'71856' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJOF' 'sip-filesSN01273-0258ab.QC.jpg'
1b4fe59f58496d4579b6a33be0179403
7328f7bffa35651866da532a86eca8b9d67d6530
describe
'2077712' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJOG' 'sip-filesSN01273-0258ab.tif'
fb06e567247b24666f4dfb3a8fecdb87
21ba63e4006cbf11582fb17db69be7228b3e1990
describe
'563' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJOH' 'sip-filesSN01273-0258ab.txt'
76c435a4bc792e18fb7ba6c21c10a76a
4b05d88abaec88c60c780d6c4a278c8c1e4bd888
describe
'30845' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJOI' 'sip-filesSN01273-0258abthm.jpg'
75e0428522c6b23fce0aeb893caa4974
e785436879e3b792330c97b14c715e0c3283ed11
'2012-05-14T04:10:40-04:00'
describe
'29870' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJOJ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0258athm.jpg'
a52c79edbb3e30b925e8f6ed6b2a9e39
435164f1b18c1e4f7da48aeed3fb87fb707aa076
'2012-05-14T04:09:20-04:00'
describe
'269616' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJOK' 'sip-filesSN01273-0259a.jp2'
23982b2548fdb8d4e2a92dd731b93d13
e1f2c5da3e1754d1900a7756bff20b3089b27a35
describe
'203002' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJOL' 'sip-filesSN01273-0259a.jpg'
70d990e8f502d896d04623182f81cb2c
52036f9d304e8bf1eb09ad10a629fc832516b75f
describe
'30205' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJOM' 'sip-filesSN01273-0259a.pro'
d1ce4e02a3cc76c622fadefc22a69135
355a9310416e1917a951b1648238219e6b726f5e
describe
'74632' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJON' 'sip-filesSN01273-0259a.QC.jpg'
838dd0edf4d3c79279375f5f5bed96fd
1c7f5056560c6c5fabf02458853495ec0a60449d
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJOO' 'sip-filesSN01273-0259a.tif'
a24cdd815d1928fcf7eb90f95d43f41e
d838e62385f208d9205adda716a1fd28cdc0eac8
describe
'1210' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJOP' 'sip-filesSN01273-0259a.txt'
71b3dd01b16c020edc331bfff2eeb5bc
4cdf2afc12bd8f0f173bc85ea5d0eeb4982095f9
describe
'269674' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJOQ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0259ab.jp2'
3a37814e91a306923e407badb3c97ced
cac78ae8343238f753255195360bf080f9bb3276
describe
'167259' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJOR' 'sip-filesSN01273-0259ab.jpg'
f64d6420ae84fe4bfd97dc0835f340d6
bcad7d67b6053bd7dd652bb020441634c8bc6a2d
'2012-05-14T04:09:39-04:00'
describe
'29963' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJOS' 'sip-filesSN01273-0259ab.pro'
754d0419f759a93812e9a3151fdefd91
486520c8572e457c0666705d2ace54dd4d25f4e7
describe
'70065' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJOT' 'sip-filesSN01273-0259ab.QC.jpg'
6e42e7341216d9ddf0e2170db9477670
71fe435415f7a3832f2fcf05c4100b66ebcc11e9
describe
'2181016' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJOU' 'sip-filesSN01273-0259ab.tif'
e7d874576b3b8fb8bdc2669a5dbdf519
069c30c72f85616afc374253de16b04f5efe06aa
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJOV' 'sip-filesSN01273-0259ab.txt'
7a7be4e4f4e5c50192e6793d7b693b89
fe806e3c821724d93492188841302b9c241c059c
describe
'34375' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJOW' 'sip-filesSN01273-0259abthm.jpg'
03b8824e82aef23d0ecac4fa10c06121
27a6e9f1cc3ad27a099f7e5992d1a245837e205e
describe
'29619' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJOX' 'sip-filesSN01273-0259athm.jpg'
45f06463a5dacc0d84c3e371ab8d069f
8660fa7b1398f61cfb6c477ea67ce021f895ac63
describe
'269701' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJOY' 'sip-filesSN01273-0260a.jp2'
2882ab28a115e450edbe380a82bbffc6
549cfff031f7b4668aacf0e29421a85c428ef20d
describe
'201820' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJOZ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0260a.jpg'
fa1bc462b1c1330c1a69673aa74490bc
e08ed6e1bfc4f47896bd733c81ce45fb67915858
describe
'29872' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJPA' 'sip-filesSN01273-0260a.pro'
5e47ec407191bab67a3b218e2dc5d405
d79fd1ea989af39d82617d0436b1821fc1251745
describe
'73697' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJPB' 'sip-filesSN01273-0260a.QC.jpg'
9656a4be78bec8c752dc8ecbce275517
bc03701888170e71427053ca92e0744ade7cb9ff
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJPC' 'sip-filesSN01273-0260a.tif'
fd7df5ef3b49345c7234adc35c04cfff
438b9d66cabc0e62e595db2db062c6a31111b5a1
describe
'1208' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJPD' 'sip-filesSN01273-0260a.txt'
a48634742dc53f2303ec7b07846c370b
590ef05cd8f04f1c2772c31e6e0e4015e8eea10f
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJPE' 'sip-filesSN01273-0260ab.jp2'
7c538db26c0994641a36dac6c7907cc2
250ad2b0176f561de46affcf2097301b1e36dc20
describe
'169358' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJPF' 'sip-filesSN01273-0260ab.jpg'
20ce766c06272d1bc45a071b02ba35a2
34513c40284ed601eab0553f6800ec6e78e501d8
describe
'29956' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJPG' 'sip-filesSN01273-0260ab.pro'
d29f40dbb27232f23990febf2803fbdb
ca5db284a7613645e33f13877506662f4c208e29
describe
'71006' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJPH' 'sip-filesSN01273-0260ab.QC.jpg'
ce3d8835cc29a9c9ea16642419746c36
1a645a5f86bafc0aacaa791af732cc9740ec8af2
describe
'2180960' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJPI' 'sip-filesSN01273-0260ab.tif'
6870245faa8662de5342a9252c6a195c
3368a507ea792faac9a6272c0c0405fe1fadacf1
'2012-05-14T04:12:18-04:00'
describe
'1217' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJPJ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0260ab.txt'
6bb3b1fb08a0a621cb42bbb6cd305ed5
26fc6cebad8ff2ce608bd8415dd849348832b5ee
describe
'34106' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJPK' 'sip-filesSN01273-0260abthm.jpg'
def10427ac5253c5d70e728d28d6d4c0
a6b92914ce4a2d46b76a98ffe1103bccf9e8cd12
describe
'29578' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJPL' 'sip-filesSN01273-0260athm.jpg'
c99dede05c625eeb7986ba32b1399a93
c9263a5c2ae32c963cc36b69d0e909429dc08715
'2012-05-14T04:09:45-04:00'
describe
'269667' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJPM' 'sip-filesSN01273-0261a.jp2'
495ed0410a3953a45b9c90168c9917df
2f7aa8ec71f820686d6b54a7c2b9d7eebc74b62d
describe
'162166' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJPN' 'sip-filesSN01273-0261a.jpg'
81652989a59b30cd4c50c3e3d4c6d42a
96e954b3087d658eddd34f0e6a228f7ad5c144d5
describe
'2268' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJPO' 'sip-filesSN01273-0261a.pro'
dccc18672514b19e6b90ff8bdbe6db68
b26c61a84ad34ddb57ec9feeb578c5a004c7a261
describe
'59090' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJPP' 'sip-filesSN01273-0261a.QC.jpg'
b122443ec2872cad3c00bf4f8bfd9987
21e0d574a10b8c6e508b314f6b23be5400b08764
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJPQ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0261a.tif'
e9d1000318151ec61a68970d93ad5255
a7b8bf0ccbd2e3d14f9256fa455d00c961d491de
describe
'136' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJPR' 'sip-filesSN01273-0261a.txt'
e9455413aabc50160d17bb691f5d8076
3837bc4c52437e24012d3d97c7d106385abb7264
describe
Invalid character
'269681' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJPS' 'sip-filesSN01273-0261ab.jp2'
d21618aaf0368fd5e114bb4a2eca5925
522bdc4bfa9a0c69fdfcf0f8ef6766dea5154f77
describe
'206209' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJPT' 'sip-filesSN01273-0261ab.jpg'
ce6f67ca0d6d209c975678791d03a578
749e2529c9da7ce7d19ba9c0b9ba01f806ec1442
'2012-05-14T04:09:33-04:00'
describe
'30675' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJPU' 'sip-filesSN01273-0261ab.pro'
390e7152ae8f04e72291c54d9fc5b6b5
3c25156a589c6e2af9960fb8c271bcc67c7182e3
describe
'74147' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJPV' 'sip-filesSN01273-0261ab.QC.jpg'
68eb23b82c7fb6512cc3f17d2e860794
cad5b752e00296afe353cb74287e96e154534c2e
'2012-05-14T04:13:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJPW' 'sip-filesSN01273-0261ab.tif'
f0038b208179f89e4ba3a10ee6f7dab8
ff16d84fe55667a7151ec83359aaeb94289bb65a
describe
'1257' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJPX' 'sip-filesSN01273-0261ab.txt'
54428960b589e3215f9ff77a1d2530c8
36441290814d16c8830ae2c54c6578aec4b5991a
describe
'29582' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJPY' 'sip-filesSN01273-0261abthm.jpg'
26f2cbac8ddf8e7703209c3cdd24e7e3
e73d2787084a4539a1d2ee2c5cf00b1863410777
describe
'27823' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJPZ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0261athm.jpg'
d93f2a8985785ccc06606e83ff6bdea0
b184afb81979e94857e45957039cfb0483b2c275
describe
'269660' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJQA' 'sip-filesSN01273-0262a.jp2'
d0b65fa2918d289b2a5f1076b341fdeb
ead2f104a1d2e52f41ba495575008938fad273d4
'2012-05-14T04:10:43-04:00'
describe
'204734' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJQB' 'sip-filesSN01273-0262a.jpg'
36cfe1307e39bcc1e0f615655d0aa177
a7c60b4f65d760503cf2d5be9a8e607e46c52cb2
describe
'31010' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJQC' 'sip-filesSN01273-0262a.pro'
20e5b01d828c464a8f9034d29218ebf6
86de671143b90f9960c7b205abd12334aeee8ee8
'2012-05-14T04:11:25-04:00'
describe
'75739' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJQD' 'sip-filesSN01273-0262a.QC.jpg'
2e4b3b95e9b0b45ce80a942461611362
8b640a7e3cc22e868569281aabc55be5e7b9de06
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJQE' 'sip-filesSN01273-0262a.tif'
ea50a8656a3ab67e19b5a4221f988420
fdbba3d6178001c18d617ec97d7eb6c71238213a
'2012-05-14T04:09:43-04:00'
describe
'1231' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJQF' 'sip-filesSN01273-0262a.txt'
9762196c5e989cae75322863ae2fa58b
c5f3c10b6bfa6821820f3a457fc2ef5e8b3c2463
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJQG' 'sip-filesSN01273-0262ab.jp2'
ff7d1ab623777bca9d589820b3a96a34
d0bc0f5a4df48ba76e14c4e55daee9d1731b7b9b
describe
'174685' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJQH' 'sip-filesSN01273-0262ab.jpg'
633cfea764917cb40b777a3dabb95a3e
ddd1ce8c2a218d1ba8a32a1cc4459a66610eb2c6
'2012-05-14T04:10:21-04:00'
describe
'30634' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJQI' 'sip-filesSN01273-0262ab.pro'
825e83b3db9048e52228ad869bf2e9e3
c673c1b10fd3d35d5b905dc9bb03e693cef79c37
describe
'71738' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJQJ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0262ab.QC.jpg'
65a8c5cd62d9f328a9db34d0021a51e3
70f71b517650fc3295162f41b48636d1a59ab5dc
describe
'2181272' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJQK' 'sip-filesSN01273-0262ab.tif'
71f71b4f4ff7865a250c05a4bb679f1d
3d3eee1c166477b1f2d6f54d1cb7f8af3b7a7792
'2012-05-14T04:12:49-04:00'
describe
'1240' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJQL' 'sip-filesSN01273-0262ab.txt'
0aa6ba4ea5fcd0e2f46daba2322ec99e
95e5ed12a7c6a0bf3a5c7601e3bafea08a1d9917
describe
'35074' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJQM' 'sip-filesSN01273-0262abthm.jpg'
377a924e029f524f9d51c42e688f86fc
d98ed06dd2aa48b02d103759378dcd0afbc01f21
describe
'30006' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJQN' 'sip-filesSN01273-0262athm.jpg'
446c0b9c39677c3ea89fc6b257a22f99
98120d3557ca94955b51f3b428496370ea9b6a9f
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJQO' 'sip-filesSN01273-0263a.jp2'
8436d6895d99b1742f8f7ef23b6db080
de49dc1ec132485dc2d1f351c709ae303a261519
describe
'178901' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJQP' 'sip-filesSN01273-0263a.jpg'
115aad12163325759940b9eda6e765a3
0cf21e989276a354fafdb6c893084748972bb983
describe
'26157' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJQQ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0263a.pro'
5370f3e9d9005d268df4a2946cc740b3
ae042708122332a0b5f0a87a1abc76ccde8ba4ce
describe
'67142' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJQR' 'sip-filesSN01273-0263a.QC.jpg'
766fbfc123953ba5bf87f0e0dd7d472d
4af347d079e4912ed74b507ada4ba8b011864eac
'2012-05-14T04:09:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJQS' 'sip-filesSN01273-0263a.tif'
6bd59c2c46cc1f72bd0f9a58bf7ca5fb
42ff98404fe12d1e96f14b6e17d6dce27165de1e
describe
'1076' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJQT' 'sip-filesSN01273-0263a.txt'
fa600bbcb3597862547d6daba9b7dc63
12c512aa82d3a7981562397eb4d4fe13afbd6183
describe
'264729' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJQU' 'sip-filesSN01273-0263ab.jp2'
ba8d1886b30c6808ba47a3c70c66c5f3
844fa6244137982cdf1498b38b2c28926eaec665
'2012-05-14T04:09:13-04:00'
describe
'164624' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJQV' 'sip-filesSN01273-0263ab.jpg'
71b212b075cea7669814183f45ba94dd
fab17810fe772400829f560e2febbfbd5df073dc
describe
'13264' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJQW' 'sip-filesSN01273-0263ab.pro'
55f7d9abf0a03dbafcb1254eeb303920
1382c20c141ec681529e5f064d47401acde062a1
describe
'67138' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJQX' 'sip-filesSN01273-0263ab.QC.jpg'
cc58743cd066fdfd830be6cf8c0694da
aab5099b9eadec344739b3a81a97971ee4f969e0
describe
'2141184' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJQY' 'sip-filesSN01273-0263ab.tif'
344e6add983bea619aba9585296b7d67
b658e55493e2e24d4050511fa9943ce333c757fc
describe
'535' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJQZ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0263ab.txt'
7d220a92b41ed35f85e60fb5edc4d704
9bdff1dc9ad335b792b4983b692de8d23b09c31a
describe
'33996' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJRA' 'sip-filesSN01273-0263abthm.jpg'
ac3400c73eb4d83c374f8620ead4e025
0775a35853e1d9f33e478391228b92dc43d901be
describe
'28621' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJRB' 'sip-filesSN01273-0263athm.jpg'
6a23d0904ccaccd07da6626aa9ab9395
288972c669529a4cb3f29892bfd6f35fe0297bf6
describe
'269672' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJRC' 'sip-filesSN01273-0264a.jp2'
d3ca4ff2d5b4ba3eb99fff036b29c63f
4796d1cc2b712b76d7cb173e348cb49e3904c49f
'2012-05-14T04:13:09-04:00'
describe
'192703' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJRD' 'sip-filesSN01273-0264a.jpg'
da612e36cd21cab8ccb23884c7f42910
51c5e86c934330f0defecf62fd68e5de6924108b
describe
'28300' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJRE' 'sip-filesSN01273-0264a.pro'
1d908c337e0a38b83ad30345090b3192
6b98cfcfa3b320dee3120ccbfac645eed2b1f8e8
describe
'71171' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJRF' 'sip-filesSN01273-0264a.QC.jpg'
b37149829d8f3ce8e24bd34bb81a4308
abca78ac146a8ab57ee4024d17e250a1650c0ac8
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJRG' 'sip-filesSN01273-0264a.tif'
f14f6008ab2759c9e5e4227ce5bfaab8
563b0d686b478c5741df82b17254d0943f629ef6
describe
'1144' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJRH' 'sip-filesSN01273-0264a.txt'
f470a652bc69c2a8ee0b2397929da90e
755b1b33971d89a7acbbf846cf675411a1121f13
describe
'269698' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJRI' 'sip-filesSN01273-0264ab.jp2'
b403584b61f3823aaf2b01bbaf62a0e9
e260bf3ad8a86ba961c11b7d866f5427548f9411
describe
'170980' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJRJ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0264ab.jpg'
8b186304d901721eb53872f4f0faea0a
6ef74cb64ac8c942f1f5911b082afa642e411379
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJRK' 'sip-filesSN01273-0264ab.pro'
916b635851eb371f25cd68e71e0bb92a
b9693f080fbffe8a4467642729745c6eacbbccc6
describe
'70872' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJRL' 'sip-filesSN01273-0264ab.QC.jpg'
29f8613fe412c7b1470fb6eb19a86632
fea7f0bf66cad7c4b916d031c6b4e7f81aad473c
describe
'2181136' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJRM' 'sip-filesSN01273-0264ab.tif'
6cbfc55b54786de5806b7175979d5c65
a61cf9b2b68549c1d82e9b74d0b19e85a395c361
'2012-05-14T04:10:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJRN' 'sip-filesSN01273-0264ab.txt'
ad31d0e7def5093271f1ce0639534b72
669f4287a209b18f8d458557a7dc045d358da552
describe
'34404' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJRO' 'sip-filesSN01273-0264abthm.jpg'
4fcd93fed6bfce2f00369f216c4fe5ab
933171feda20ff250329692e9c38dfed10447ba1
describe
'29463' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJRP' 'sip-filesSN01273-0264athm.jpg'
b08cfbaca9fde1329ab446b963e5fb1c
75a069461290098de5c97b97a95f7c7c38fc1c39
'2012-05-14T04:10:53-04:00'
describe
'269646' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJRQ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0265a.jp2'
0366e6534d4d78c26a130deb2d71f09b
5861d777e87fadda9739bf31b685abd209c548e5
describe
'194403' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJRR' 'sip-filesSN01273-0265a.jpg'
bbbe4a062afeee6f0804700e87f0b6ce
7744e06f2b996c6e681126917f0a897b3beb59b1
describe
'30062' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJRS' 'sip-filesSN01273-0265a.pro'
15e21b1a852b5a98fce253f13d5419ac
86af80e8b36a172777d8fa32862bcb30a0d6d594
describe
'73543' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJRT' 'sip-filesSN01273-0265a.QC.jpg'
e505047f24783aa0bd4dff8e47e0c052
e591c551db56f2b841cb5e0fb9f211816d41a792
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJRU' 'sip-filesSN01273-0265a.tif'
090039b7241bfe6cb64c3385d8bcc34e
8bba750ac877fe47ebe5541f691f99642176a396
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJRV' 'sip-filesSN01273-0265a.txt'
e921aad6a69730ca516e419a0fbd1f3c
933d68ce41528a78053a847c411e1168676eccaa
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJRW' 'sip-filesSN01273-0265ab.jp2'
c4e982f7fd0c4b31161683337a091c87
5fd94779f83e541190ec4e97bf5f66b1d69db771
'2012-05-14T04:09:15-04:00'
describe
'172076' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJRX' 'sip-filesSN01273-0265ab.jpg'
08673c3a4e8faa7c007d8d2f51aca0c9
6c6c45790a3e2300bb1491bf18800618b7346d8a
describe
'31046' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJRY' 'sip-filesSN01273-0265ab.pro'
0842b075428c0ec30c97b9bae9436dae
453842e91c78a45a3b89c5eaa76a31d0bce94da0
describe
'73022' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJRZ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0265ab.QC.jpg'
68eb287c2d5ccd9042b9436e5ea8a373
d8e494be9f68a7fd09a7ba5578d5224fb0f61b56
describe
'2181164' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJSA' 'sip-filesSN01273-0265ab.tif'
ebacdf06244e4e18b134ac6c8bb8256b
97de5a2da3af396056f5ee75c6104bbd169bb661
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJSB' 'sip-filesSN01273-0265ab.txt'
209c40afb900bae8f96c53a0dd6f473a
7b0fac81cbede54a0c23a8317ef317927313231c
describe
'34489' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJSC' 'sip-filesSN01273-0265abthm.jpg'
4cb4eea925e80df7e775b731a7603bb4
1a7ae6aaa211db666da5711d377264b4016594d1
describe
'30027' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJSD' 'sip-filesSN01273-0265athm.jpg'
8b392e8b9d5220f1796710bd405866cd
4f0e8f1248101a55b3b16eb725ee92a37c490a99
describe
'269565' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJSE' 'sip-filesSN01273-0266a.jp2'
9bbd8cd99f5764275218cf7e2c00f309
7b6ae37e8cfb3d441ea1161da03475fb7dfbe74d
describe
'210215' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJSF' 'sip-filesSN01273-0266a.jpg'
b6226d808a24ca5d06a8595164f32e59
9d6de34ff28b7e48ed66ee85794b1e189d404aaf
describe
'30772' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJSG' 'sip-filesSN01273-0266a.pro'
166fe6bfacab4a028d2764436d94885a
ab6174c10f4b0ab0691ac96d42fc5f947d89726e
describe
'76670' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJSH' 'sip-filesSN01273-0266a.QC.jpg'
71a45720cdb9cb1746ee15674edb8ff8
b44e425a7f8b1b2268a3b559456a8ab6a2b88599
describe
'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJSI' 'sip-filesSN01273-0266a.tif'
71972369fd4eeb0d3bfad23858d749d8
fb13b444a706ab5d10d7adda6a254d138702005c
describe
'1233' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJSJ' 'sip-filesSN01273-0266a.txt'
3a1a08245b80eb6c6eccf0b0bd90fb9a
c9e9a1fb51b629866118e9f4484edb7aa53cb7ac
describe
'29995' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJSK' 'sip-filesSN01273-0266athm.jpg'
fddd2ebf862604910fef13e92485f622
e8783ef7cf8ae8328ea353a5315cee743901039d
describe
'108001' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJSL' 'sip-filesUF00074465_00001.mets'
2a78537b56773b788bb83c788925e350
13abe1cd2193e22d85499a1584d91f0a901cd93a
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-10T20:40:53-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'138021' 'info:fdaE20091230_AAAABLfileF20091230_AAAJSO' 'sip-filesUF00074465_00001.xml'
5c5b17ef647b7a4fe70e9e6b3ff9dcc6
87b767372366c38e20fdec41de6e2c4cb8abe758
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-10T20:40:52-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.