Citation
Robinson Crusoe in words of one syllable

Material Information

Title:
Robinson Crusoe in words of one syllable
Creator:
Aikin, Lucy, 1781-1864 ( Author, Primary )
Watson, John Dawson, 1832-1892 ( Illustrator )
McKay, David ( Publisher )
Defoe, Daniel, 1661?-1731 ( Author, Secondary )
Dalziel Brothers ( Engraver )
Place of Publication:
Philadelphia (610 South Washington Square)
Publisher:
David McKay Publisher
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
92 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Castaways -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Shipwrecks -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Survival after airplane accidents, shipwrecks, etc -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Imaginary voyages -- 1908 ( rbgenr )
Genre:
fiction ( marcgt )
Children's literature ( fast )
Imaginary voyages ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date from inscription.
General Note:
Illustrations signed by J.D.W.; engraved by Dalziel.
General Note:
Parts I and II of Robinson Crusoe.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Mary Godolphin ; author of "The Pilgrim's progress," and "The Swiss family Robinson," in words of one syllable.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
SN01272 ( lccn )
26812745 ( oclc )
001762038 ( aleph )

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Full Text


IN WORDS
ONE SYLLABLE

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ROBINSON CRUSOE

IN WORDS OF

ONE SYLLABLE

BY

MARY GODOLPHIN

AUTHOR OF ‘‘ THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS,” AND ‘‘ THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON,”
IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE





PHILADELPHIA:
DAVID McKAY, PUBLISHER,
610 SOUTH WASHINGTON SQUARE,



IN UNIFORM STYLE.
In Words of One Syllable.

ILLUSTRATED.

ROBINSON CRUSOE.

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.
#ESOP’S FABLES.

PRICE, FIFTY CENTS EACH.

Sold by all Booksellers and sent, post-paid,
on receipt of price by the Publishers.

_ PHILADELPHIA:
DAVID MCKAY, PUBLISHER,
610 S. WASHINGTON SQUARE,





PREFACE.

—_— —_.

Ac Py HE production of a book which is adapted to the use
4 of the youngest readers needs but few words of



excuse or apology. The nature of the work seems to be suffi-
ciently explained by the title itself, and the author’s task has
been chiefly to reduce the ordinary language into words of one
syllable. But although. as far as the subject matter is con-
cerned, the book can lay no claims to originality, it is believed
that the idea and scope of its construction are entirely novel,
for the One Syllable literature of the present day furnishes
little more than a few short, unconnected sentences, and those
chiefly in spelling books. -

The deep interest which De Foe’s story has never failed to
arouse in the minds of the young, induces the author to hope
that it may be acceptable in its present form.

It should be stated that exceptions to the rule of using
words of one syllable exclusively have been made in the case of
the proper names of the boy Xury and of the man Friday.











HIS FIRST WRECK.

ROBINSON CRUSOE

IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.



ea WAS born at York on the First of March in the sixth

@| year-of the reign of King Charles the First. From
the time when I was quite a young child I had felt a
great wish to spend my life at sea, and as I grew, so did this
taste grow more and more strong; till at last I broke loose
i





2 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

from my school and home, and found my way on foot to Hull,
where I soon got a place on board a ship.

When we had set sail but a few days, a squall of wind came
on, and on the fifth night we sprang a leak. All hands were
sent to the pumps, but we felt the ship groan in all her planks,
and her beams quake from stem to stern; so that it was soon
quite clear there was no hope for her, and that all we could do
was to save our lives.

The first thing was to fire off guns, to show that we were in
need of help, and at length a ship, which lay not far from us,
sent a boat to our aid. But the sea was too rough for it to
lie near our ship’s side, so we threw out a rope, which the men
in the boat caught, and made fast, and by this means we all
got in.

Still, in so wild a sea it was vain to try to get on board the
ship which had sent out the men, or to use our oars in the boat,
and all we could do was to let it drive to shore.

In the space of half an hour our own ship struck on a rock
and went down, and we saw her no more. We made but slow
way to the land, which we caught sight of now and then when
the boat rose to the top of some high wave, and there we saw
men who ran in crowds, to and fro, all bent on one thing, and
that was to save us.

At last to our great joy we got on shore, where we had the
luck to meet with friends who gave us the means to get back
to Hull; and if I had now had the good sense to go home, it
would have been well for me.

The man whose ship had gone down said with a grave look,
“Young lad, you ought to go to sea no more, it is not the kind



THE TURKS GIVE CHASE. 3

of life for you.” ‘ Why, sir, will you go to sea no more then ?”
“That is not the same kind of thing. I was bred to the sea,
but you were not, and came on board my ship just to find out
what a life at sea was like, and you may guess what you will
come to if you do not go back to your home. God will not
bless you, and it may be that you have brought all this wo

on us.”

I spoke not a word more to him; which way he went I knew
not, nor did I care to know, for I was hurt at this rude speech.
Shall I go home, thought I, or shall I go to sea? Shame kept
me from home, and I could not make up my mind what course
of life to take.

As it has been my fate through life to choose for the worst,
so I did now. I had gold in my purse, and good clothes on
my back, and to sea I went once more.

But I had worse luck this time than the last, for when we
were far out at sea, some Turks in a small ship came on our
track in full chase. We set as much sail as our yards would
bear, so as to get clear from them. But in spite of this, we saw
our foes gain on us, and we felt sure that they would come up
to our ship in a few hours’ time.

At last they caught us; but we brought our guns to bear on
them, which made them sheer off for a time, yet they kept up
a fire at us as long as they were in range. The next time the
Turks came up, some of their men got on board our ship, and
set to work to cut the sails, and do us all kinds of harm. So,
as ten of our men lay dead, and most of the rest had wounds,
we gave in.

The chief of the Turks took me as his prize to a port which
I—2



4 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

was held by the Moors. He did not use me so ill as at first I
thought he would have done, but he set me to work with the
rest of his slaves. This was a change in my life which I did
not think had been in store for me. How my heart sank with
grief at the thought of those whom I had left at home, nay, to













HE IS MADE A SLAVE.

whom I had not had the grace so much as to say ‘‘ Good bye”
when I went to sea, nor to give a hint of what I meant to do!

Yet all that I went through at this time was but a taste of
the toils and cares which it has since been my lot to bear.

I thought at first that the Turk might take me with him
when next he went to sea, and so I should find some way to
get free; but the hope did not last long, for at such times he
left me on shore to see to his crops. This kind of life I led
for two years, and as the Turk knew and saw more of me, he
made me more and more free. He went out in his boat once
or twice a week to catch a kind of flat fish, and now and then



A SLAVE TO THE TURK. 5

he took me and a boy with him, for we were quick at this kind
of sport, and he grew quite fond of me.

One day the Turk sent me in the boat to catch some fish,
with no one else but a man and a boy. While we were out,
so thick a fog came on, that though we were not half.a mile
from the shore, we quite lost sight of it for twelve hours; and
when the sun rose the next day, our boat was at least ten miles
out at sea. The wind blew fresh, and we were all much in
want of food; but at last, with the help of our oars and sail,
we got back safe to land.

When the Turk heard how we had lost our way, he said that
the next time he went out, he would take a boat that would
hold all we could want if we were kept out at sea. So he had
quite a state room built in the long boat of his ship, as well as
a room for us slaves. One day he sent me to trim the boat,
as he had two friends who would go in it to fish with him.
But when the time came they did not go, so he sent me with
the man and the boy—whose name was Xury—to catch some
fish for the guests that were to sup with him.

Now the thought struck me all at once that this would be a
good chance to set off with the boat, and get free. So in the
first place I took all the food that I could lay my hands on,
and I told the man that it would be too bold of us to eat of the
bread that had been put in the boat for the Turk. He said he
thought so too, and he brought down a small sack of rice and
some rusks.

While the man was on shore I put up some wine, a large
lump of wax, a saw, an axe, a spade, some rope, and all sorts
of things that might be of use tous. I knew where the Turk’s



6 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

case of wine was, and I put that in the boat while the man was
on shore. By one more trick I got all that I had need of. I
said to the boy, ‘‘ The Turk’s guns are in the boat, but there is
no shot. Do you think you could get some? You know
where it is kept, and we may want to shoot a fowl or two.” . So
he brought a case and a pouch which held all that we could
want for the guns. These I put in the boat, and then set sail
out of the port to fish.

The wind blew from the north, or north west, which was a
bad wind for me; for had it been south, I could have made for
the coast of Spain. But, blow which way it might, my mind
was made up to get off, and to leave the rest to fate. I then
let down my lines to fish, but I took care to have bad sport;
and when the fish bit I would not pull them up, for the Moor
was not to see them. I said to him, ‘ This will not do: we
shall catch no fish here; we ought to sail on a bit.” Well, the
Moor thought there was no harm in this. He set the sails,
and, as the helm was in my hands, I ran the boat out a mile or
more, and then brought her to, as if I meant to fish.

Now, thought I, the time has come for me to get free; so I
gave the helm to the boy, and then took the Moor round the
waist, and threw him out of the boat.

Down he went! but soon rose up, for he swam like a duck.
He said he would go all round the world with me, if I would
but take him in.

I had some fear lest he should climb up the boat's side, and
force his way back; so I brought my gun to point at him, and
said, ‘““ You can swim to land with ease if you choose, make
haste then to get there; but if you come near the boat you



XURY SWEARS TO BE TRUE. v4

shall have a shot through the head, for I mean to bea free
man from this hour.”

He then swam for the shore, and no doubt got safe there,
as the sea was so calm.



HE TAKES XURY WITH HIM.

At first I thought I would take the Moor with me, and let
Xury swim to land; but the Moor was not a man that I could
trust.

When he was gone I said to Xury, “If you will swear to pe
true to me, you shall be a great man in time; if not, I must
throw you out of the boat too.”

The poor boy gave:me such a sweet smile as he swore to be
true to me, that I could not find it in my heart to doubt him.



8 ROBINSON CRUSOE

While the man was still in view (for he was on his way to
the land), we stood out to sea with the boat, so that he and
those that saw us from the shore, might think we had gone to
the straits’ mouth, for no one went to the south coast, as a tribe
of men dwelt there who were known to kill and eat their foes.

We then bent our course to the east, so as to keep in with
the shore; and as we had a fair wind and a smooth sea, by
the next day at noon, we were a long way off, and quite out of
the reach of the Turk.

I had still some fear lest I should be caught by the Moors,
so I would not goon shore in the day time. But when it grew
dusk we made our way to the coast, and came to the mouth of
a stream, from which we thought we would swim to land, and
then look round us. But as soon as it was quite dark we
heard strange sounds—barks, roars, grunts, and howls. The
poor lad said he could not go on shore till dawn. “ Well,”
said I, “then we must give it up, but it may be that in the
day time we shall be seen by men, who for all we know would
do us more harm than wild beasts.” ‘“ Then we give them the
shoot gun,” said Xury with a laugh, “and make them run
way.”

I was glad to see so much mirth in the boy, and gave him
some bread and rice.

We lay still at night, but did not sleep long, for in a few
hours’ time some huge beasts came down to the sea to bathe.
The poor boy shook from head to foot at the sight. One of
these beasts came near our boat, and though it was too dark
to see him well, we heard him puff and blow, and knew that
he must bea large one by the noise he made. At last the brute



XURY FINDS A FRESH SPRING. 9

came as near to the boat as two oars’ length, so I shot at him,
and he swam to the shore.

The roar and cries set up by beasts and birds at the noise
of my gun would seem to show that we had made a bad choice
of a place to land on; but be that as it would, to shore we had
to go to find some fresh spring, so that we might fill our casks.
Xury said if I would let him go with one of the jars, he would
find out if the springs were fit to drink; and, if they were
sweet, he would bring the jar back full. ‘‘ Why should you
go?” said I; ‘“‘why should not I go, and you stay in the boat?”
At this Xury said, ‘If wild mans come they eat me, you go
way.” I could not but love the lad for this kind speech.
“Well,” said I, “ we will both go, and if the wild men come
we must kill them, they shall not eat you or me.”

I gave Xury some rum from the Turk’s case to cheer him
up, and we went on shore. The boy went off with his gun,
full a mile from the spot where we stood, and came back with
a hare that he had shot, which we were glad to cook and eat;
but the good news which he brought was that he had found a
spring, and had seen no wild men.

I made a guess that the Cape de Verd Isles were not far off,
for I saw the top of the Great Peak, which I knew was near
them. My one hope was that if I kept near the coast, I should
find some ship that would take us on board ; and then, and not
till then, should I feel a free man. In aword,I put the whole
of my fate on this chance, that I must meet with some ship, or
die.

On the coast we saw some men who stood to look at us.
They were black, and wore no clothes. I would have gone on



10 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

shore to them, but Xury—who knew best—said, ‘“‘ Not you
go! Not you go!” Sol brought the boat as near the land
as I could, that I might talk to them, and they kept up with
me a long way. I saw that one of them had a lance in his
hand.

I made signs that they should bring me some food, and they
on their part made signs for me to stop my boat. So I let
down the top of my sail, and lay by, while two of them ran off;
and in less than half an hour they came back with some dry
meat and a sort of corn which is grown in this part of the
world. This we should have been glad to get, but knew not
how to do so; for we durst not go on shore to them, nor did
they dare to come to us.

At last they took a safe way for us all, for they brought the
food to the shore, where they set it down, and then went a
long way off while we took it in. We made signs to show our
thanks, for we had not a thing that we could spare to give
them.

But as good luck would have it, we were at hand to takea
great prize for them; for two wild beasts, of the same kind as
the first I spoke of, came in full chase from the hills down to
the sea.

They swam as if they had come for sport. The men flew
from them in fear, all but the one who held the lance. One of
these beasts came near our boat; so I lay in wait for him with
my gun; and as soon as the brute was in range, I shot him
through the head. Twice he sank down in the sea, and twice
he came up; and then just swam to the land, where he fell
down dead. The men were in as much fear at the sound of



A SHIP IN SIGHT. 11

my gun as they had been at the sight of the beasts. But when
I made signs for them to come to the shore, they took heart,
and came.

They at once made for their prize ; and by the help of a rope,
which they slung round him, they brought him safe on the
beach.

We now left our wild men, and went on and on, for twelve
days more. The land in front of us ran out four or five miles,
like a bill; and we had to keep some way from the coast to
make this point, so that we lost sight of the shore.

I gave the helm to Xury, and sat down to think what would
be my best course to take; when all at once I heard the lad cry
out, ‘A ship with a sail! A ship with a sail!” He did not
show much joy at the sight, for he thought that this ship had
been sent out to take him back; but I knew well, from the
look of her, that she was not one of the Turk’s.

I made all the sail I could to come in the ship’s way, and
told Xury to fire a gun, in the hope that if those on deck could
not hear the sound, they might see the smoke. This they did
see, and then let down their sails so that we might come up to
them, and in three hours’ time we were at the ship’s side. The
men spoke to us in French, but I could not make out what they
meant. At last a Scot on board said in my own tongue, ““Who
are you? Whence do you come?” I told him ina few words
how I had got free from the Moors.

Then the man who had charge of the ship bade me come on
board, and took me in, with Xury and all my goods. I told
him that he might take all I had; but he said, ‘‘You shall have
your goods back when we come ‘to land, for I have but done



12 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

for you what you would have done for me, had I been in the
same plight.”

He gave mea good round sum for my boat, and said that I
should have the same sum for Xury, if I would part'with him.
But I told him that as it was by the boy’s help that I had got
free, I was loth to sell him. He said it was just and right in me
to feel thus, but at the same time, if I could make up my mind
to part with him, he should be set free in two years’ time. So,
as the poor slave had a wish to go with him, I did not say no.
I got to All Saints’ Bay in three weeks, and was now a free
man.

I had madea good sum by all my store, and with this I went
onland. But I did not at all know what todo next. At length
I met with a man whose case was much the same as my own,
and we both took some land to farm. My stock, like his, was
low, but we made our farms serve to keep us in food, though
not more than that. We both stood in need of help, and I
saw now that I had done wrong to part with my boy.

I did not at all like this kind of life. What! thought I,
have I come all this way to do that which I could have done
as well at home with my friends round me? And to add to
my grief, the kind friend who had brought, me here in his ship,
now meant to leave these shores.

On my first start to sea when a boy, I had put a small sum
in the hands-of an aunt, and this my friend said I should do
well to spend on my farm. So when he got home he sent some
of it in cash, and laid out the rest in cloth, stuffs, baize, and
such like goods. My aunt had puta few pounds in my friend's
hands as a gift to him, to show her thanks for all that he had



GOES TO SEA ONCE MORE. 13

done for me, and with this sum he was so kind as to buy mea
slave. In the mean time I had bought a slave, so now I had
two, and all went on well for the next year.

But soon my plans grew too large for my means. One day
some men came to ask me to take charge of a slave ship to be
sent out by them. They said they would give me a share in
the slaves, and pay the cost of the stock. This would have
been a good thing for me if I had not had farms and land;
but it was wild and rash to think of it now, for I had madea
1arge sum, and ought to have gone on in the same way for three
or four years more. Well, I told these men that I would go
with all my heart, if they would look to my farm in the mean
time, which they said they would do.

So I made my will, and went on board this ship on the same
day on which, eight years since, I had left Hull. She had six
guns, twelve men, and a boy. We took with us saws, chains,
toys, beads, bits of glass, and such like ware, to suit the taste
of those with whom we had to trade

We were not more than twelve days from the Line, when a
high wind took us off we knew not where. All at once there
was acry of “ Land!” and the ship struck on a bank of sand,
in which she sank so deep that we could not get her off. At
last we found that we must make up our minds to leave her,
and get to shore as well as we could. There had been a boat
at her stern, but we found it had been torn off by the force of
the waves. One small boat was still left on the ship’s side, so
we got in it. |

There we were all of us on the wild sea. The heart of each
now grew’ faint, our cheeks were pale, and our eyes were dim,



14 XURY FINDS A FRESH SPRING.

for there was but one hope, and that was to find some bay, and
so get in the lee of the land. We now gave up our whole
souls to God.

The sea grew more and more rough, and its white foam
would curl and boil. At last the waves, in their wild sport,
burst on the boat’s side, and we were all thrown out.

I could swim well, but the force of the waves made me lose
my breath too much to do so. At length one large wave took
me to the shore, and left me high and dry, though half dead
with fear. I got on my feet and made the best of my way for
the land; but just then the curve of a huge wave rose up as
high as a hill, and this I had no strength to keep from, so it
took me back to the sea. I did my best to float on the top,
and held my breath to do so. The next wave was quite as
high, and shut me up in its bulk. I held my hands down
tight to my side, and then my head shot out at the top of the
waves. This gave me heart and breath too, and soon my
feet felt the ground.

I stood quite still for a short time, to let the sea run back
from me, and then I set off with all my might to the shore,
but yet the waves caught me, and twice more did they take
me back, and twice more land me on the shore. I thought the
last wave would have been the death of me, for it drove me on
a piece of rock, and with such force, as to leave me in a kind
of swoon, which, thank God, did not last long. At length, to
my great joy, I got up to the cliffs close to the shore, where I
found some grass, out of the reach of the sea. There I sat
down, safe on land at last.

I could but cry out in the words of the Psalm, “ They that



THE WRECK. 15

go down to the sea in ships, these men see the works of the
Lord in the deep. For at His word the storms rise, the winds
blow, and lift up the waves; then do they mount to the sky,
and from thence go down to the deep. My soul faints, I reel
to and fro, and am at my wit’s end: then the Lord brings me
out of all my fears.”



CAST ON THE SHORE.

I felt so wrapt in joy, that all I could do was to walk up
and down the coast, now lift up my hands, now fold them on
my breast and thank God for all that He had done for me,
when the rest of the men were lost. All lost but I, and I was
safe! I now cast my eyes round me, to find out what kind of
a place it was that I had been thus thrown in, like a bird in a
storm. Then all the glee I felt at first left me; for I was wet
and cold, and had no dry clothes to put on, no food to eat, and
not a friend to help me.

There were wild beasts here, but I had no gun to shoot



16 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

them with, or to keep me from their jaws. I had but a knife
and a pipe.

It now grew dark; and where was I to go for the night ?
I thought the top of some high tree would be a good place to
keep me out of harm’s way; and that there I might sit and
think of death, for, as yet, I had no hopes of life. Well, I
went to my tree, and made a kind of nest to sleep in. Then I
cut a stick to keep off the beasts of prey, in case they should
come, and fell to sleep just as if the branch I lay on had been
a bed of down.

When I woke up it was broad day; the sky too was clear
and the seacalm. But I saw from the top of the tree that in
the night the ship had left the bank of sand, and lay but a
mile from me; while the boat was on the beach, two miles on
my right. I went some way down by the shore, to get to the
boat; but an arm of the sea, half a mile broad, kept me from
it. At noon, the tide went a long way out, so that I could get
near the ship; and here I found that if we had but made up
our minds to stay on board, we should all have been safe.

I shed tears at the thought, for I could not help it; yet, as
there was no use in that, it struck me that the best thing for
me to do was to swim to the ship. I soon threw off my clothes,
took to the sea, and swam up to the wreck. But how was I
to get on deck? I had swum twice round the ship, when a
piece of rope caught my eye, which hung down from her side
so low, that at first the waves hid it. By the help of this rope
I got on board.

I found that there was a bulge in the ship, and that she had
sprung a leak. You may be sure that my first thought was to



SAFE AT LAST. Wy

look round for some food, and I soon made my way to the bin
where the bread was kept, and ate some of it as I went to and
fro, for there was no time to lose. There was, too, some rum,
of which I took a good draught, and this gave me heart. What



HE LOOKS ROUND THE SHIP FOR FOOD.

I stood most in need of, was a boat to take the goods to shore.
But it was vain to wish for that which could not be had; and
as there were some spare yards in the ship, two or three large
planks of wood, and a spare mast or two, I fell to work with
these to make a raft.



me ROBINSON CRUSOE.

I put four spars side by side, and laid short bits of plank on
them, cross ways, to make my raft strong. Though these
planks would bear my own weight, they were too slight to
bear much of my freight. So I took a saw which was on
board, and cut a mast in three lengths, and these gave great
strength to the raft. I found some bread and rice, a Dutch
cheese, and some dry goat’s flesh. There had been some
wheat, but the rats had got at it, and it was all gone.

My next task was to screen my goods from the spray of the
sea; and it did not take me long to do this, for there were
three large chests on board which held all, and these I put on
the raft. When the high tide came up it took off my coat and
shirt, which I had left on the shore; but there were some
fresh clothes in the ship.

‘See, here is a prize!” said I, out loud (though there were
none to hear me), “ now I shall not starve.” For I found four
large guns. But how was my raft to be got to land? I had
no sail, no oars; and a gust of wind would make all my store
slide off. Yet there were three things which I was glad of—
a calm sea, a tide which set in to the shore, and a slight breeze
to blow me there.

I had the good luck to find some oars in a part of the ship
in which I had made no search till now. With these I put to
sea, and. for half a mile my raft went well; but soon I found
it drove to one side. At length I saw a creek, up which, with
somé toil, I took my raft; and now the beach was so near,
that I felt my oar touch the ground.

Here I had well nigh lost my freight, for the shore lay on a
slope, so that there was no place to land on, save where one



BRINGS HIS RAFT SAFE TO LAND. _ 19

end of the raft would lie so high, and one end so low, that.all
my goods would fall off. To wait till the tide came up was
all that could be done. So, when the sea was a foot deep, I
thrust the raft on a flat piece of ground, to moor her there, and
stuck my two oars in the sand, one on each side of the raft.
Thus I let her lie till the ebb of the tide, and when it went
down, she was left safe on land with all her freight.

I saw that there were birds on the isle, and I shot one of
them. Mine must have been the first gun that had been heard
there since the world was made; for, at the sound of it, whole
flocks of birds flew up, with loud cries, from all parts of the
wood. The shape of the beak of the one I shot was like that
of a hawk, but the claws were not so large.

I now went back to my raft to land my stores, and this took
up the rest of the day. What to do at night I knew not, nor
where to find a safe place to land my stores on. I did not like
to lie down on the ground, for fear of beasts of prey, as well as
snakes, but there was-no cause for these fears, as I have since
found. I put the chests and boards round me as well as I
could, and made a kind of hut for the night.

As there was still a great store of things left in the ship,
which would be of use to me, I thought that I ought to bring
them to land at once; for I knew that the first storm would
break up the ship. So I went on board, and took ee care
this time not to load my raft too much.

The first thing 1 sought for was the tool chest; anu .n it
were some bags of nails, spikes, saws, knives, and such things;
but best of all, I found a stone to grind my tools on. There
were two or three flasks, some large bags of shot, and a roll of

3—2



20 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

lead ; but this last I had not the strength to hoist up to the
ship’s side, so as to get it on my raft. There were some spare
sails too, which I brought to shore.

I had some fear lest my stores might be run orf with by
beasts of prey, if not by men; but I found all safe and sound
when I went back, and no one had come there but a wild cat,
which sat on one of the chests. When I came up I held my



HE MAKES A HUT FOR THE NIGHT.

gun at her, but as she did not know what a gun was, this did
not rouse her. She ate a piece of dry goat’s flesh, and then
took her leave.

Now that I had two freights of goods at hand, I madea tent
with the ship’s sails, to stow them in, and cut the poles for it
from the wood. I now took all the things out of the casks
and chests, and put the casks in piles round the tent, to give it
strength ; and when this was done, I shut up the door with
the boards, spread one of the beds (which I had brought from



THE LAST OF THE SHIP. 21

the ship) on the ground, laid two guns close to my head, and
went to bed for the first time. I slept all night, for I was
much in need of rest.

The next day I was sad and sick at heart, for I felt how dull
it was to be thus cut off from all the rest of the world! I had
no great wish for work: but there was too much to be done
for me to dwell long on my sad lot. Each day, as it came, I
went off to the wreck to fetch more things; and I brought
back as much as the raft would hold. One day I had put too
great a load on the raft, which made it sink down on one side,
so that the goods were lost in the sea; but at this I did not
fret, as the chief part of the freight was some rope, which would
not have been of much use to me.

The twelve days that I had been in the isle were spent in
this way, and I had brought to land all that one pair of hands
could lift; though if the sea had been still calm, I might have
brought the whole ship, piece by piece.

The last time I swam to the wreck, the wind blew so hard,
that I made up my mind to go on board next time at low tide.
I found some tea and some gold coin; but as to the gold, it
made me laugh to look at it. ‘“‘O drug!” said I, “thou art
of nouse tome! I care not to save thee. Stay where thou
art, till the ship go down, then go thou with it!”

Still, I thought I might as well just take it; sol put it ina
piece of the sail, and threw it on deck that I might place it on
the raft. By-and-bye, the wind blew from the shore, so I had
to swim back with all speed; for I knew that at the turn of
the tide I should find it hard work to get to land at all. But
in spite of the high wind, I came to my home all safe. At



22 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

dawn of day I put my head out, and cast my eyes on the sea,
when lo! no ship was there !

This change in the face of things, and the loss of sucha
friend, quite struck me down. Yet I was glad to think that I
had brought to shore all that could be of use to me. I had
now to look out for some spot where I could make my home.
Half way up a hill there was a small plain, four or five score
feet long, and twice as broad ; and as it had a full view of the
sea, I thought that it would be a good place for my house.

I first dug a trench round a space which took in twelve
yards; and in this I drove two rows of stakes, till they stood
firm like piles, five and a half feet from the ground. I made
the stakes close and tight with bits of rope, and put small
sticks on the top of them in the shape of spikes. This made
so strong a fence that no man or beast could get in.

The door of my house was on the top, and I had to climb
up to it by steps, which I took in with me, so that no one else
might come up by the same way. Close to the back of the
house stood a high rock, in which I made a cave, and laid all
the earth that I had dug out of it round my house, to the
height of a foot and a half. I had to go out once a day in
search of food. The first time, I saw some goats, but they
were too shy and swift of foot to let me get near them.

At last I lay in wait for them close to their own haunts. If
they saw me in the vale, though they might be on high ground,
they. would run off, wild with fear; but if they were in the
vale, and I on high ground, they took no heed of me. The
first goat I shot had a kid by her side, and when the old one
feli, the kid stood near her, till I took her off on my back, and



lS HOOK PETS; 23

then the young one ran by my side. I put down the goat, and
brought the kid home to tame it; but as it was too young to
feed, I had to kill it.

At first I thought that, for the lack of pen and ink, I should
lose all note of time; so I made a large post, in the shape of



















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































HE SETS UP A CROSS TO TELL THE DATE,

across, on which I cut these words: “I came on these shores
on the 8th day of June, in the year 1659.” On the side of this
post I made a notch each day as it came, and this I kept up till
the last.

I have not yet said a word of my four pets, which were two
cats, a dog, anda bird. You may guess how fond I was of
them, for they were all the friends left to me. I brought the
dog and two cats from the ship. The dog would fetch things
for me at all times, and by his bark, his whine, his growl, and
his tricks, he would all but talk to me; yet he could not give
me thought for thought.



24 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

If I could but have had some one near me to find fault with,
or to find fault with me, what a treat it would have been!
Now that I had brought ink from the ship, I wrote downa
sketch of each day as it came; not so much to leave to those
who might read it, when I was dead and gone, as to get rid of
my own thoughts, and draw me from the fears which all day
long dwelt on my mind, till my head would ache with the
weight of them.

I was a long way out of the course of ships; and oh! how
dull it was to be cast on this lone spot with no one to love, no
one to make me laugh, no one to make me weep, no one to
make me think. It was dull to roam, day by day, from the
wood to the shore, and from the shore back to the wood, and
feed on my own thoughts all the while.

So much for the sad view of my case; but like most things,
it had a bright side as well asa dark one. For here was I safe
on land, while all the rest of the ship’s crew were lost. Well,
thought I, God who shapes our ways, and led me by the hand
then, can save me from this state now, or send some one to be
with me. True, Iam cast on a rough and rude part of the
globe, but there are no beasts of prey on it to kill or hurt me.
God has sent the ship so near to me, that I have got from it
all things to meet my wants for the rest of my days. Let life
be what it may, there is sure to be much to thank God for.
And I soon gave up all dull thoughts, and did not so much as
look out for a sail.

My goods from the wreck had been in the cave for more
than ten months; and it was time now to put them right, as
they took up all the space, and left me no room to turn in: so



HE ADDS TO HIS CAVE. 25

I made my small cave a large one, and dug it out a long way
back in the sand rock. Then I brought the mouth of it up to
the fence, and so made a back way to my house. This done



—o

SAD THOUGHTS AS HE ROAMS,

I put shelves on each side, to hold my goods, which made my
cave look like a shop full of stores. To make these shelves I
cut down a tree, and with the help of a saw, an axe, a plane,
and some more tools, I made boards.

A chair, and a desk to write on, came next. I rose in good
time, and set to work till noon, then I ate my meal, then I



26 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

went out with my gun, and to work once more till the sun had
set; and then to bed. It took me more than a week to change
the shape and size of my cave, but I had made it far too large,
for in course of time the earth fell in from the roof; and had I
been in it when this took place, I should have lost my life I
had now to set up posts in my cave, with planks on the top of
them, so as to make a roof of wood.

One day, when out with my gun, I shot a wild cat, the skin
of which made me a cap; and I found some birds of the dove
tribe, which built their nests in the holes of rocks.

I had to go to bed at dusk, till I made a lamp of goat’s fat,
which I put in a clay dish; and this, with a piece of hemp for
a wick, made a good light As I had found a use for the bag
which had held the fowl’s food on board ship, I shook out from
it the husks of corn. This was just at the time when the
great rains fell, and in the course of a month, blades of rice,
corn, and rye sprang up. As time went by, and the grain
was ripe, I kept it, and took care to sow it each year; but I
could not boast of a crop of wheat, as will be shown by-and-
bye, for three years.

A thing now took place on the isle, which no one could have
dreamt of, and which struck me down with fear. It was this
—the ground shook with great force, which threw down earth
from the rock with a loud crash—once more there was a shock
—and now the earth fell from the roof of my cave. The sea
did not look the same as it had done, for the shocks were just
as strong there as on land. The sway of the earth made me
feel sick ; and there was a noise and a roar all round me.

The same kind of shock came a third time; and when it



HE FALLS ILL, 27

had gone off, I sat quite still on the ground, for I knew not
what todo. Then the clouds grew dark, the wind rose, trees
were torn up by the roots, the sea was a mass of foam and
froth, and a great part of the isle was laid waste with the
storm. I thought that the world had come to an end. In
three hours’ time all was calm; but rain fell all that night and
a great part of the next day. Now, though quite worn out, I
had to move my goods which were in the cave, to some safe
place.

I knew that tools would be my first want, and that I should
have to grind mine on the stone, as they were blunt and worn
with use. But as it took both hands to hold the tool, I could
not turn the stone; so I made a wheel by which I could move
it with my foot. This was no small task, but I took great
pains with it, and at length it was done.

The rain fell for some days and.a cold chill came on me; in
short, I was ill. I had pains in my head, and could get no
sleep at night, and my thoughts were wild and strange. At
one time I shook with cold, and then a hot fit came on, with
faint sweats, which would last six hours at a time. Ill as I
was, I had to go out with my gun to get food. I shot a goat,
but it was a great toil to bring it home, and still more to cook
it.

I spent the next day in bed, and felt half dead from thirst,
yet too weak to stand up to get some drink. I lay and wept
like a child. ‘“ Lord, look on me! Lord, look on me!” would
I cry for hours.

At last the fit left me, and I slept, and did not wake till
dawn. I dreamt that I lay on the ground, and saw a man



28 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

come down from a great black cloud in a flame of light.
When he stood on the earth, it shook as it had done a few
days since; and all the world to me was full of fire. He came
up and said, ‘As I see that all these things have not brought
thee to pray, now thou shalt die.” Then I woke,.and found
it was a dream. Weak and faint, I was in dread all day lest
my fit should come on. .

Too ill to get out with my gun, I sat on the shore to think,
and thus ran my thoughts: ‘ What is this sea which is all
round me? and whence is it? There can be no doubt that
the hand that made it, made the air, the earth, the sky. And
who is that? It is God who hath made all things. Well,
then, if God hath made all things, it must be He who guides
them; and if so, no one thing in the whole range of His
works can take place and He not know it. Then God must
know how sick and sad I am, and He wills me to be here.
Oh, why hath God done this to me?”

Then some voice would seem to say, ‘‘ Dost thou ask why
God hath done this to thee? Ask why thou wert not shot by
the Moors, who came on board the ship, and took the lives of
thy mates. Ask why thou wert not torn by the beasts of prey
on the coasts. Ask why thou didst not go down in the deep
sea with the rest of the crew, but didst come to this isle, and

art safe.”
"A sound sleep then fell on me, and when I woke it must
have been three o’clock the next day, by the rays of the sun;
nay, it may have been more than that; for I think that this
must have been the day that I did not mark on my post, as I
have since found that theré was one notch too few.



HE GOES ROUND THE JSLE. 29

I now took from my store the Book of God’s Word, which I
had brought from the wreck, not one page of which I had yet
read. My eyes fell on five words, that would seem to have
been put there for my good at this time; so well did they
cheer my faint hopes, and touch the true source of my fears.
They were these: “TI will not leave thee.” And they have
dwelt in my heart to this day. I laid down the book, to pray.
My cry was “O Lord, help me to love and learn Thy ways.”
This was the first time in all my life that I had felt a sense
that God was near, and heard me. As for my dull life here,
it was not worth a thought; for now a new strength had come
to me; and there was a change in my griefs, as well as in my
joys.

I had now been in the isle twelve months, and I thought it
was time to go all round it, in search of its woods, springs,
and creeks. Sol set off, and brought back with me limes and
grapes in their prime, large and ripe. I had hung the grapes
in the sun to dry, and in a few days’ time went to fetch them,
that I might lay up a store. The vale, on the banks of which
they grew, was fresh and green, and a clear bright stream ran
through it, which gave so great a charm to the spot, as to make
me wish to live there.

But there was no view of the sea from this vale, while from
tay house, no ships could come on my side of the isle, and not
be seen by me; yet the cool, soft banks were so sweet and new
to me, that much of my time was spent there.

In the first of the three years in which I had grown corn, I
had sown it too late; in the next, it was spoilt by the drought ;
but the third year’s crop had sprung up well.



30 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

I found that the hares would lie in it night and day, for
which there was no cure but to plant a thick hedge all round
it; and this took me more than three weeks to do. I shot the



ON THE LOOK: OUT FOR A SAIL,

hares in the day time; and when it grew dark, I made fast the
dog’s chain to the gate, and there he stood to bark all night.
In a short time the corn grew strong, and at last ripe; but,
just as the hares had hurt it in the blade, so now the birds ate
it in the ear. At the noise of my gun, whole flocks of them
would fly up; and at this rate I saw that there would be no
corn left; so I made up my mind to keep a look out night and



THE BIRDS IN THE CORN. 31

day. I hid by the side of a hedge, and could see the birds sit
on the trees and watch, and then come down, one by one, as at
first.

Now each grain of wheat was, as it were, a small loaf of
bread to me. So the great thing was to get rid of these birds.
My plan was this: I shot three, and hung them up like thieves,
to scare all that came to the corn; and from this time, as long
as the dead ones hung here, not a bird came near. When the
corn was ripe, I made a scythe out of the swords from the
ship, and got in my crop.

Few of us think of the cost at which a loaf of bread is made.
Of course, there was no plough here to turn up the earth, and
no spade to dig it with, so I made one with wood; but this
was soon worn out, and for want of a rake, I made use of the
bough of a tree. When I had got the corn home, I had to
thresh it, part the grain from the chaff, and store it up. Then
came the want of a mill to grind it, of sieves to clean it, and
of yeast to make bread of it.

Still, my bread was made, though I had no tools; and no
one could say that I did not earn it by the sweat of my brow.
When the rain kept me in doors, it was good fun to teach my
pet bird Poll to talk; but so mute were all things round me,
that the sound of my own voice made me start.

My chief wants now were jars, pots, cups, and plates, but I
knew not how I could make them. At last I went in search
of some clay, and found some a mile from my house; but it
was quite a joke to see the queer shapes and forms that I made
out of it. For some of my pots and jars were too weak to
bear their own weight; and they would fall out here, and in



32 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

there, in all sorts of ways; while some, when they were put
in the sun to bake, would crack with the heat of its rays. You
may guess what my joy was when at last a pot was made



HE FAILS FOR A TIME TO MAKE POTS,

which would stand the heat of the fire, so that I could boil the
meat for broth.

The next thing to be made was a sieve, to part the grain
from the husks. Goat's hair was of no use to me, as I could
not weave or spin; so I made a shift for two years, witha thin
kind of stuff, which I brought from the ship. But to grind the



GIVES UP HIS FIRST BOAT. 33

corn with the stones was the worst of all, such hard work did
I find it. To bake the bread I burnt some wood down to an
ash, which I threw on the hearth to heat it, and then set my
loaves on the hearth, and in this way my bread was made.

The next thing to turn my thoughts to was the ship’s boat,
which lay on the high ridge of sand, where it had been thrust
by the storm which had cast me on these shores. But it lay
with the keel to the sky, so I had to dig the sand from it, and
turn it up with the help of a pole. When I had done this, I
found it was all in vain, for I had not the strength to launch
it. So all I could do now, was to make a boat of less size
out of a tree; and I found one that was just fit for it, which
grew not far from the shore, but I could no more stir this
than I could the ship’s boat.

What was to be done? I first dug the ground flat and
smooth all the way from the boat to the sea, so as to let it slide
down; but this plan did not turn out well, so I thought I
would try a new way, which was to make a trench, so as to
bring the sea up to the boat, as the boat could not be brought
to the sea. But to do this, I must have dug down to a great
depth, which would take one man some years to do. And
when too late, I found it was not wise to work out a scheme
till I had first thought of the cost and toil.

“Well,” thought I, “I must give up the boat, and with it
all my hopes to leave the isle. But I have this to think of: I
am lord of the whole isle; in fact, a king. I have wood with
which I might build a fleet, and grapes, if not corn, to freight
it with, though all my wealth is but a few gold coins.” For
these I had no sort of use, and could have found it in my heart

3



34 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

to give them all for a peck of peas and some ink, which last I
stood much in need of. But it was best to dwell more on
what I had than on what I had not.

I now must needs try once more to build a boat, but this
time it was to have a mast, for which the ship’s sails would
be of great use. I made a deck at each end to keep out the
spray of the sea, a bin for my food, and a rest for my gun,
with a flap to screen it from the wet. More than all, the boat
was one of such a size that I could launch it.

My first cruise was up and down the creek, but soon I got
bold, and made the whole round of my isle. I took with me
bread, cakes, and a pot full of rice, some rum, half a goat, two
great coats, one of which was to lie on, and one to put on at
night. I set sail in the sixth year of my reign. On the east
side of the isle there was a large ridge of rocks which lay two
miles from the shore, and a shoal of sand lay for half a mile
from the rocks to the beach. To get round to this point, I
had to sail a great way out to sea; and here I all but lost my
life.

But I got back to my home at last. On my way there,
quite worn out with the toils of the boat, I lay down in the
shade to rest my limbs, and slept. But judge, if you can, what
a start I gave, when a voice woke me out of my sleep, and
spoke my name three times! A voice in this wild place! To
call me by name, too! Then the voice said, ‘‘ Where are you?
Where have you been? How came you here?” But now I
saw it all; for at the top of the hedge sat Poll, who did but
say the words she had been taught by me.

I now went in search of some goats, and laid snares for them,



AT HOME ONCE MORE. 35

with rice for a bait. I had set the traps in the night, and
found they had all stood, though the bait was gone. So I
thought of a new way to take them, which was to make a pit
and lay sticks and grass on it, so as to hide it; and in this
way I caught an old goat and some kids. But the old goat
was much too fierce for me, so I let him go.



THE NEW BOAT.

I brought all the young ones home, and let them fast a long
time, till at last they fed from my hand, and were quite tame.
I kept them ina kind of park, in which there were trees to
screen them from the sun. At first my park was three miles
round ; but it struck me that, in so great a space, the kids
would soon get as wild as if they had the range of the whole
vale, and that it would be as well to give them less room;
so I had to make a hedge, which took me three months to
plant. My park held a flock of twelve goats, and in two years
more there were more than two score.

5—2



36 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

My dog sat at meals with me, and one cat on each side of
me, on stools, and we had Poll to talk to us. Now fora word
or two as to the dress in which I made a tour round the isle.
I could but think how droll it would look in the streets of the
town in which I was born. I wore a high cap of goat’s skin,
with a flap that hung down, to keep the sun and rain from my
neck, a coat made from the skin of a goat too, the skirts of
which came down to my hips, and the same on my legs, with
no shoes, but flaps of the fur round my shins. I had a broad
belt of the same round my waist, which drew on with two
thongs ; and from it, on my right side, hung a saw and an axe;
and on my left side a pouch for the shot. My beard had not
been cut since I came here. But no more need be said of my
looks, for there were few to see me.

A strange sight was now in store for me, which was to
change the whole course of my life in the isle.

One day at noon, while on a stroll down toa part of the
shore that was new to me, what should I see on the sand but
the print of a man’s foot! I felt as if I was bound by a spell,
and could not stir from the spot.

By-and-bye, I stole a look round me, but no one was in
sight. What could this mean? I went three or four times to
look at it. There it was—the print of a man’s foot; toes, heel,
and all the parts of a foot. How could it have come there?

My head swam with fear; and as I left the spot, I made
two or three steps, and then took a look round me; then two
steps more, and did the same thing. I took fright at the
stump of an old tree, and ran to my house, as if for my life.
How could aught in the shape of a man come to that shore,



THE PRINT OF A FOOT. 37

and I not to know it? Where was the ship that brought him?
Then a vague dread took hold of my mind, that some man, or
set of men, had found me out; and it might be, that they
meant to kill me, or rob me of all I had.



HIS FRIGHT AT SIGHT OF THE FOOT PRINT.

How strange a thing is the life of man! One day we love
that which the next day we hate. One day we seek what the
next day we shun. One day we long for the thing which the
next day we fear; and so we go on. Now, from the time that
I was cast on this isle, my great source of grief was that I
should be thus cut off from the rest of my race. Why, then,
should the thought that a man might be near give me all this
pain? Nay, why should the mere sight of the print of a man’s
foot make me quake with fear? It seems most strange, yet
not more strange than true.

Once it struck me that it might be the print of my own foot,
when first the storm cast me on these shores. Could I have



38 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

come this way from the boat? Should it in truth turn out to
be the print of my own foot, I should be like a boy who tells
uf a ghost, and feels more fright at his own tale, than those do
whom he meant to scare.

Fear kept me in doors for three days, till the want of food
drove me out. At last I was so bold as to go down to the
coast to look once more at the print of the foot, to see if it was
the same shape as my own. I found it was not so large bya
great deal; so it was clear there were men in the isle. Just at
this time my good watch dog fell down dead at my feet. He
was old and worn out, and in him I lost my best guard and
friend.

One day as I went from the hill to the coast, a scene lay in
front of me which made me sick at heart. The spot was spread
with the bones of men. There was a round place dug in the
earth, where a fire had been made, and here some men had
come to feast. Now that I had seen this sight, I knew not
how to act; I kept close to my home, and would scarce stir
from it, save to milk my flock of goats.

To feel safe was now more to me than to be well fed; and I
did not care to drive a nail, or chop a stick of wood, lest the
sound of it should be heard, much less would I fireagun. As
to my bread and meat, I had to bake it at night when the
smoke could not be seen. But I soon found the way to burn
wood with turf at the top of it, which made it like chark, or
dry coal; and this I could use by day, as it had no smoke.

I found in the wood where I went to get the sticks for my
fire, a cave so large that I could stand in it; but I made more
haste to get out than in; for two large eyes, as bright as stars,



THE PRINT OF A FOOT. 39

shone out from it with a fierce glare. I took a torch, and
went to see what they could be, and found that there was no
cause for fear; for the eyes were those of an old grey goat,
which had gone there to die of old age. I gave him a push,
to try to get him out of the cave, but he could not rise from
the ground where he lay; so I left him there to die, as I could
not save his life.

I found the width of the cave was twelve feet; but part of it,
near the end, was so low that I had to creep on my hands and
feet to goin. What the length of it was I could not tell, for
my light went out, and I had to give up my search. The next
day I went to the cave with large lights made of goat’s fat;
and when I got to the end, I found that the roof rose to two
score feet or more.

As my lights shone on the walls and roof of the cave, a sight
burst on my view, the charms of which no tongue could tell;
for the walls shone like stars. What was in the rock to cause
this it was hard to say; they might be gems, or bright stones,
or gold. But let them be what they may, this cave was a
mine of wealth to me; for at such time as I felt dull or sad,
the bright scene would flash on my mind’s eye, and fill it with
Joy.

All these years had gone by, with no new sight to rest my
eyes on, till this scene burst on them. I felt as if I should
like to spend the rest of my life here, and at its close, lie
down to die in this cave, like the old goat.

As I went home I was struck by the sight of some smoke,
which came froma fire no more than two miles off. From this
time I lost all my peace of mind. Day and night a dread



40 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

would haunt me, that the men who had made this fire would
find me out. I went home and drew up my steps, but first I
made all things round me look wild and rude. To load my
gun was the next thing to do, and I peer: it would be best
to stay at home and hide



HE SEES SOME SMOKE,

But this was not to be borne long. I had no spy to send
out, and all I could do was to get to the top of the hill, and
keep a good look out. At last, through my glass, I could see
a group of wild men join ina dance round their fire. As soon
as they had left, I took two guns, and slung a sword on my
side; then with all speed, I set off to the top of the hill, once
more to have a good view.

This time I made up my mind to go up to the men, but not
with a view to kill them, for I felt that it would be wrong to
do so. With such a load of arms, it took me two hours to
reach the spot where the fire was; and by the time I got there,
the men had all gone; but I saw them in four boats out at sea,



THE WILD MEN’S FEAST. AI

Down on the shore, there was a proof of what the work of
these men had been. The signs of their feast made me sick at
heart, and I shut my eyes. I durst not fire my gun when I
went out for food on that side the isle, lest there should be



HE SEES THE WILD MEN,

some of the men left, who might hear it, and so find me out.
This state of things went on for a year and three months, and
for all that time I saw no more men.

On the twelfth of May, a great storm of wind blew all day
and night. As it was dark, I sat in my house; and in the midst



42 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

of the gale, I heard a gun fire! My guess was that it must
have been from some ship cast on shore by the storm. So I
set a light to some wood on top of the hill, that those in the
ship, if ship it should be, might know that some one was there
to aid them. I then heard two more guns fire. When it was
light, I went to the south side of the isle, and there lay the
wreck of a ship, cast on the rocks in the night by the storm.
She was too far off for me to see if there were men on board.

Words could not tell how much I did long to bring but one
of the ship’s crew to the shore! So strong was my wish to
save the life of those on board, that I could have laid down my
own life to do so. There are some springs in the heart which,
when hope stirs them, drive the soul on with such a force, that
to lose all chance of the thing one hopes for, would seem to
make one mad; and thus was it with me.

Now, I thought, was the time to use my boat; so I set to
work at once to fit it out. I took on board some rum (of which
I still had a good deal left), some dry grapes, a bag of rice,
some goat’s milk, and cheese, and then put out to sea. A
dread came on me at the thought of the risk I had run on the
same rocks; but my heart did not quite fail me, though I knew
that, as my boat was small, if a gale of wind should spring up,
all would be lost. Then I found that I must go back to the
shore till the tide should turn, and the ebb come on.

I made up my mind to go out the next day with the high
tide, so I slept that night in my boat. At dawn I set out to
sea, and in less than two hours I came up to the wreck. What
a scene was there! The ship had struck on two rocks. The
stern was torn by the force of the waves, the masts were swept



A SHIP CAST ON THE ROCKS. 43

off, ropes and chains lay strewn on the deck, and all was wrapt
in gloom. As I came up to the wreck, a dog swam to me with
a yelp and a whine. I took him on board my boat, and when
I gave him some bread, he ate it like a wolf, and as to drink,
he would have burst if I had let him take his fill of it.

I went to the cook’s room, where I found two men, but they
were both dead. The tongue was mute, the ear was deaf, the
eye was shut, and the lip was stiff; still the sad tale was told,
for each had his arm round his friend’s neck, and so they must
have sat to wait for death. What a change had come on the
scene, once so wild with the lash of the waves and the roar of
the wind! All was calm now—death had done its work, and
all had felt its stroke, save the dog, and he was the one thing
that still had life.

I thought the ship must have come from Spain, and there
was much gold on board. I took some of the chests and put
them in my boat, but did not wait to see what they held, and
with this spoil, and three casks of rum, I came back.

I found all things at home just as I had left them, my goats,
my cats, and my bird. The scene in the cook’s room was in my
mind day and night, and to cheer me up I drank some of the
rum. I then set to work to bring my freight from the shore,
where I had left it. In the chests there were two great bags
of gold, and some bars of the same, and near these lay three
small flasks and three bags of shot, which were a great prize.

From this time, all went well with me for two years; but it
was not to last. One day, as I stood on the hill, I saw six
boats on the shore! What could this mean? Where were
the men who had brought them? And what had they come



44 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

for? I saw through my glass that there were a score anda
half, at least, on the east side of the isle. They had meat on
the fire, round which I could see them dance. They then took
aman from one of the boats, who was bound hand and foot;
but when they came to loose his bonds, he set off as fast as his
feet would take him, and in a straight line to my house.

To tell the truth, when I saw all the rest of the men run to
catch him, my hair stood on énd with fright. In the creek, he
swam like a fish, and the plunge which he took brought him
through it ina few strokes. All the men now gave up the
chase but two, and they swam through the creek, but by no
means so fast as the slave had done. Now, I thought, was the
time for me to help the poor man, and my heart told me it
would be right to do so. iran down my steps with my two
guns, and went with all speed up the hill, and then down by a
short cut to meet them.

I gave a sign to the poor slave to come to me, and at the
same time went up to meet the two men who were in chase of
him. I madearush at the first of these, to knock him down
with the stock of my gun, and he fell. I saw the one who was
left aim at me with his bow, so, to save my life, I shot him
dead.

The smoke and noise from my gun, gave the poor slave
who had been bound, such a shock, that he stood still on the
spot, as if he had been ina trance. I gave a loud shout for
him to come to me, and I took care to show him that I was a
friend, and made all the signs I could think of to coax him up
to me. At length he came, knelt down to kiss the ground,
end then took hold of my foot, and set it on his head. All



THE SLAVE. 45

this meant that he was my slave; and I bade him rise, and
made much of him.

But there was more work to be done yet, for the man who
had had the blow from my gun was not dead. I made a sign
for my slave (as I shall now call him) to look at him. At this
he spoke to me, and though I could not make out what he
said, yet it gave me a shock of joy; for it was the first sound
of a man’s voice that I had heard, for all the years I had been
on the isle.

The man whom I had struck with the stock of my gun, sat
up; and my slave, who was in great fear of him, made signs
for me to lend him my sword, which hung in a belt at my side.
With this he ran up to the man, and with one stroke cut off
his head. When he had done this, he brought me back my
sword with a laugh, and put it down in front of me. I did not
like to see the glee with which he did it, and I did not feel
that my own life was quite safe with such a man.

He, in his turn, could but lift up his large brown hands with
awe, to think that I had put his foe to death, while I stood so
far from him. But as to the sword, he and the rest of his
tribe made use of swords of wood, and this was why he knew
so well how to wield mine. He made signs to me to let him
go and see the man who had been shot; and he gave him a
turn round, first on this side, then on that ; and when he saw
the wound made in his breast by the shot, he stood quite still
once more, as if he had lost his wits. I made signs for him to
come back, for my fears told me that the rest of the men migh?
come in search of their friends.

I did not like to take my slave to my house, nor to my cave ;



46 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

so I threw down some straw from the rice plant for him to sleep
on, and gave him some bread and a bunch of dry grapes to eat.
He was a fine man, with straight strong limbs, tall, and young.
His hair was thick, like wool, and black. His head was large
and high, and he had bright black eyes. He was of a dark
brown hue; his face was round, and his nose small, but not
flat; he had a good mouth with thin lips, with which he could
give a sofi smile ; and his teeth were as white as snow.

I had been to milk my goats in the field close by, and when
he saw me, he ran to me, and lay down on the ground to show
me his thanks. He then put his head on the ground, and set
my foot on his head, as he had done at first. He took all the
means he could think of, to let me know that he would serve
me all his life; and I gavea sign to show that I thought well
of him.

The next thing was to think of some name to call him by.
I chose that of the sixth day of the week (Friday), as he came
to me on that day. I took care not to lose sight of him all
that night, and when the sun rose, I made signs for him to come
to me, that I might give him some clothes, for he wore none.
We then went up to the top of the hill, to look out for the men ;
but as we could not see them, or their boats, it was clear that
they had left the isle.

My slave has since told me that they had had a great fight
with the tribe that dwelt next to them, and that all those men
whom each side took in war were their own by right. My
slave’s foes had four who fell to their share, of whom he was
one.

I now set to work to make my man acap of hare’s skin, and



HIS MAN FRIDAY. 47

gave him a goat’s skin to wear round his waist. It was a great

source of pride to him, to find that his clothes were as good as
my own.



GIVES CLOTHES TO HIS SLAVE.

At night, I kept my guns, sword, and bow close to my side;
but there was no need for this, as my slave was, in sooth, most
true tome. He did all that he was set to do, with all his whole



48 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

heart in the work; and I knew that he would lay down his life
to save mine. What could a mando more than that? And oh,
the joy to have him here to cheer me in this lone isle!

I did my best to teach him, so like a child as he was, to do
and feel all that was right. I found him apt, and. full of fun;
and he took great pains to learn all that I could tell him. Our
lives ran on inacalm, smooth way; and, but for the vile feasts
which were held on the shores, I felt no wish to leave the isle.

As Friday had by no means lost his zest for these meals, it
struck me that the best way to cure him was to let him taste
the flesh of beasts; so I took him with me one day to the wood
for some sport. I sawa she goat, in the shade, with her two
kids. I caught Friday by the arm, and made signs to him not
to stir, and then shot one of the kids; but the noise of the gun
save the poor man a great shock. He did not see the kid, nor
did he know that it was dead. He tore his dress off his breast
to feel if there was a wound there; then he knelt down to me,
and took hold of my knees to pray of me not to kill him.

To show poor Friday that his life was quite safe, I led him
by the hand, and told him to fetch the kid. By-and-bye, I saw
a hawk in a tree, so I bade him look at the gun, the hawk, and
the ground; and then I shot the bird. But my poor slave gave
still more signs of fear this time than he did at first, for he
shook from head to foot. He must have thought that some
fiend of death dwelt in the gun, and I think that he would have
knelt down to it, as well as to me; but he would not so much
as touch the gun for some time, though he would speak to it
when he thought I was not near. Once he told me that what
he said to it was to ask it not to kill him.



FRIDAY LEARNS TO MAKE BREAD. 49

I brought home the bird, and made broth of it. Friday was
much struck to see me eat salt with it, and made a wry face;
but I, in my turn, took some that had no salt with it, and I
made a wry face at that. The next day I gave him a piece of
kid’s flesh, which I had hung by a string in front of the fire to
roast. My plan was to put two poles, one on each side of the
fire, and a stick on the top of them to hold the string. When
my slave came to taste the flesh, he took the best means to let
me know how good he thought it.

The next day I set him to beat out and sift somecorn. I let
him see me make the bread, and he soon did all the work. I
felt quite a love for his true, warm heart, and he soon learnt to
talk to me. One day I said, “Do the men of your tribe win
in fight?” He told me, with a smile, that they did. ‘“ Well,
then,” said I, ‘how came they to let their foes take you?”

“They run one, two, three, and make go in the boat that
time.”

“Well, and what do the men do with those they take?”

“ Eat them all up.”

This was not good news for me, but I went on, and said,
“Where do they take them?”

‘““Go to next place where they think.”

“ Do they come here?”

“Yes, yes, they come here, come else place too.”

“Have you been here with them twice?”

“Yes, come there.”

He meant the north-west side of the isle, so to this spot I
took him the next day. He knew the place, and told me he
was there once, and with him twelve men. To let me know

+



50 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

this, he placed twelve stones all of a row, and made me count
them.

“ Are not the boats lost on your shore now and then?” He
said that there was no fear, and that no boats were lost. He
told me that up a great way by the moon—that is, where the
moon then came up—there dwelt a tribe of white men like me,
with beards. I felt sure that they must have come from Spain,
to work the gold mines. I put this to him: “ Could I go from
this isle and join those men ?”

‘Yes, yes, you may go in two boats.”

It was hard to see how one man could go in two boats, but
what he meant was, a boat twice as large as my own.

One day I said to my slave, ‘“‘ Do you know who made you?”

But he could not tell at all what these words meant. Sol
said, ‘‘Do you know who made the sea, the ground we tread
on, the hills, and woods?” He said it was Beek, whose home
was a great way off, and that he was so old, that the sea and
the land were not so old as he.

“If this old man has made all things, why do not all things
bow down to him?”

My slave gave a grave look, and said, “All things say ‘O’
to him.”

‘Where do the men in your land go when they die?”

“ All go to Beek.”

I then held my hand up to the sky to point to it, and said,
“God dwells there. He made the world, and all things in it.
The moon and the stars are the work of His hand. God sends
the wind and the rain on the earth, and the streams that flow: He
hides the face of the sky with clouds, makes the grass to grow



FRIDAY TELLS OF GOD. 51

for the beasts of the field, and herbs for the use of man. God’s
love knows no end. When we pray, He draws near to us and
hears us.”

It was a real joy to my poor slave to hear me talk of these
things. He sat still fora long time, then gave a sigh, and
told me that he would say “O” to Beek no more, for he was
but a short way off, and yet could not hear till men went up
the hill to speak to him

‘Did you go up the hill to speak to him?” said I.

“No, Okes go up to Beek, not young mans.”

“What do Okes say to him?”

“They say ‘O.’”

Now that I brought my man Friday to know that Beek was
not the true God, such was the sense he had of my worth, that
I had fears lest I should stand in the place of Beek. I did my
best to call forth his faith in Christ, and make it strong and
clear, till at last—thanks be to the Lord—I brought him to the
love of Him, with the whole grasp of his soul.

To please my poor slave, I gave him a sketch of my whole life;
I told him where I was born, and where I spent my days when
a child. He was glad to hear tales of the land of my birth,
and of the trade which we keep up, in ships, with all parts of
the known world. I gave him a knife and a belt, which made
him dance with joy.

One day as we stood on the top of the hill at the east side of
the isle, I saw him fix his eyes on the main land, and stand for
a long time to gaze at it; then jump and sing, and call out to
me.

“What do you see?” said I.
4—2



52 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

“O joy!” said he, with a fierce glee in his eyes, “O glad}
There see my land!”

Why did he strain his eyes to stare at this land, as if he had
a wish to be there? It put fears in my mind which made me
feel far less at my ease with him. Thought I, if he should go
back to his home, he will think no more of what I have taught
him and done for him. He will be sure to tell the rest of his
tribe all my ways, and come back with, it may be, scores of them,
and kill me, and then dance round me, as they did round the
men, the last time they came on my isle. |

But these were all false fears, though they found a place in
my mind a long while; and I was not so kind to him now as
I had been. From this time I made it a rule, day by day, to
find out if there were grounds for my fears or not. JI said,
“Do you not wish to be once more in your own land ?”

“Yes! I be much O glad to be at my own land.”

“What would you do there? Would you turn wild, and be
as you were?”

“No, no, I would tell them to be good, tell them eat bread,
corn, milk, no eat man more!”

‘Why, they would kill you!”

“No, no, they no kill; they love learn.”

He then told me that some white men, who had come on
their shores in a boat, had taught them a great deal.

“Then will you go back to your land with me?”

He said he could not swim so far, so I told him he should
help me to build a boat to goin. Then he said, “If you go, I

0.”

: ““T go? why, they would eat me!”



A NEW BOAT. 53

“No, me make them much love you.”

Then he told me as well as he could, how kind they had been
to some white men. I brought out the large boat to hear what
he thought of it, but he said it was too small. We then went to
look at the old ship’s boat, which, as it had been in the sun for
years, was not at all ina sound state. The poor man made sure
that it would do. But how were we to know this? I told him
we should build a boat as large as that, and that he should go
home in it. He spoke not a word, but was grave and sad.

“What ails you?” said I.

“Why you grieve mad with your man?”

“What do you mean? I am not cross with you.”

‘No cross? no cross with me? Why send your man home
to his own land, then?”

“Did you not tell me you would like to go back?”

“Yes, yes, we both there; no wish self there, if you not
there!”

‘And what should I do there?”

“You do great deal much good! you teach wild men be good
men ; you tell them know God, pray God, and lead new life.”

We soon set to work to make a boat that would take us
both. The first thing was to look out for some large trees that
grew near the shore, so that we could launch our boat when it
was made. My slave’s plan was to burn the wood to make it
the right shape; but as mine was to hew it, I set him to work
with my tools, and in two months’ time we had made a good
strong boat; but it took a long while to get her down to the
shore.

Friday had the whole charge of her: and, large as she was



54 "ROBINSON CRUSOE.

he made her move with ease, and said, “he thought she go
there well, though great blow wind!” He did not know that
I meant to make a mast and sail. I cut down a young fir-tree
for the mast, and then I set to work at the sail. It made me
laugh to see my man stand and stare, when he came to watch
me sail the boat. . But he soon gave a jump,a laugh, and a
clap of the hands when he saw the sail jib and fall, first on this
side, then on that.

The next thing to do was to stow our boat up in the creek,
where we dug a small dock; and when the tide was low, we
made a dam, to keep out the sea. The time of year had now
come for us to set sail, so we got out all our stores, to put them
in the boat. .

One day I sent Friday to the shore, to get a sort of herb that
grew there. I-soon heard him cry out to me, “O grief! O
bad! O bad! O out there boats, one, two, three!” ‘Keep a
stout heart,” said I, to cheer him. The poor man shook with
fear; for he thought that the men who brought him here, had
now come back to kill him.

“Can you fight?” said I.

“Me shoot; but me saw three boats; one, two, three!”

“Have no fear; those that we do not kill, will be sure to
take fright at the sound of our guns. Now will you stand by
me, and do just as you are bid?”

“Me die when you bid die.”

I gave hima good draught of rum; and when he had drunk
this, he took up an axe and two guns, each of which hada
charge of swan shot. I took two guns as well, and put large
shot in them, and then hung my great sword by myside. From



THREE STRANGE BOATS. 55

the top of the hill, I saw with the help of my glass, that the
boats had each brought eight men, and one slave. They had
come on shore’ near the creek, where a grove of young trees
grew close down to the sea. .



THEY GO TO AID THE WHITE MEN.

They had with them three slaves, bound hand and foot, and
you who read this, may guess what they were brought here
for. I felt that I must try and save them from so hard a fate,
and that todo this, I should have to put some of their foes to
death. So we set forth on our way. I gave Friday strict
charge to keep close to me, and not to fire till I told him to
do so.

We went full a mile out of our way, that we might get round
to the wood to hide there. But we had not gone far, when my



56 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

old qualms came back to me, and I thought, “Is it for me to
dip my hands in man’s blood? Why should I kill those who
have done me no harm, and mean not to hurt me? Nay, who
do not so much as know that they are in the wrong, when they
hold these feasts. Are not their ways a sign that God has left
them (with the rest of their tribe) to their own dull hearts?
God did not call me to be a judge for Him. He who said
‘Thou shalt not kill,’ said it for me, as well as the rest of the
world.”

A throng of thoughts like these would rush on my mind, as
if to warn me to pause, till I felt sure that there was more to
call me to the work than I then knew of. I took my stand in
the wood, to watch the men at their feast, and then crept on,
with Friday close at my heels. Thus we went till we came to
the skirts of the wood. Then I said to Friday, “Go up to the
top of that tree, and bring me word if you can see the men.”

He went, and, quick as thought, came back to say that they
were all round the fire, and that the man who was bound on
the sand would be the next they would kill. But when he told
me that it was a white man, one of my own race, I felt the
blood boil in my veins. Two of the gang had gone to loose
the white man from his bonds; so now was the time to fire.

At the sound of our guns, we saw all the men jump up from
the ground where they sat. It must have been the first gun
they had heard in their lives. They knew not which way to look.
I now threw down my piece, and took up a small gun; Friday
did the same; and I gave him the word to fire. The men ran
right and left, with yells and screams. .

I now made arush out of the wood, that they might see me,



THEY SAVE THE WHITE MAN. 57

with my man Friday at my heels, of course. We gave a loud
shout, and ran up to the white man as fast as we could. There
he lay on the hot sand. I cut the flag, or rush, by which he
was bound, but he was too weak to stand or speak, so I gave
himsomerum. He let me know by all the signs that he could



THE WHITE MAN NEAR DEATH.

think of, how much he stood in my debt for all that I had
done for him. ;
I said, ‘“‘ We will talk of that by-and-bye; but now we must
.do what we can to save our lives.” Friday, who was free to go
_ where he chose, flew here and there, and put all the men to the
rout. They fled in full haste to their boats, and were soon out
at sea; and so we got rid of our foes at last.
The man whom we had found on the sand told us that his
name was Carl, and that he came from Spain. But there was



58 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

One more man to claim our care; for the black men had left a
small boat on the sands, and in this I saw a poor wretch who
lay half dead. He could not so much as look up, so tight was
he bound, neck and heels. When I cut the bonds from him
he gave a deep groan, for he thought that al] this was but to
lead him out to die.

Friday then came up, and I bade him speak to the old man
in his own tongue, and tell him that he was free. This good
news gave him strength, and he sat upin the boat. But when
Friday came to hear him talk, and to look him in the face, it
brought the tears to my eyes to see him kiss and hug the
poor old man, and dance round him with joy, then. weep,
wring his hands, and beat his own face and head, and then
laugh once more, sing and leap. For a long time he could
not speak to me, so as to let me know what all this meant.
But at length he told me that he was the son of this poor old
man, and that his name was Jaf.

It would be a hard task for me to tell of all the quaint signs
Friday made to show his joy. He went in and out of the
boat five or six times, sat down by old Jaf, and held the
poor old man’s head close to his breast to warm it; then he
set to work to rub his arms and feet, which were cold and
stiff from the bonds. I told Friday to give him some rum
and bread; but he said, “None! Bad dog eat all up self.”
He then ran off straight to the house, and took no heed of
my calls, but went as swift as a deer.

In an hour's time, he came back with a jug in his hand.
The good soul had gone all the way to the house, that Jaf
might have a fresh draught from my well; and with it he



CARL AND ¥AF. 59

brought two cakes, one of which I bade him take to Carl, who
lay in the shade of a tree. His limbs were stiff and cold, and
he was too weak to say a word.

I set my man to rub his feet with rum, and while he did so,
I saw Friday turn his head round from time to time, to steal
a look at the old man. Then we brought Carl and Jaf home
from the boat on our backs, as they could not walk. The door
of my house was at the top, and the poor sick men could not
climb the steps by which I got in, sa we made for them a tent
of ald sails.

I was now a king of these three men, as well as lord of
the isle; and I felt proud to say “‘ They all owe their lives to
their king, and would lay them down for him if he bade them
do so.” But I did not think that my reign was so soon to
come to an end. The next thing for us to do was to give
Carl and Jaf some food, and to kill and roast a kid, to which
we all four sat down, and I did my best to cheer them.

Carl in a few days grew quite strong, and I set him to work
to dig some land for seed; for it was clear we should want
more corn now that we had two more mouths to fill. So we
put in the ground all the stock of grain I had, and thus we
all four had as much work as we could do for some time.
When the crop grew, and was ripe, we found we had a good
store of grain.

We made a plan that Carl and Jaf should go back to the
main land, to try if they could get some of the white men, who
had been cast on shore there, to come and live with us; so
they got out the boat, and took with them two guns, and
food for eight days. They were to come back in a week’s



60 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

time, and I bade them hang out a sign when they came in
sight, so that we might know who they were.

One day, Friday ran up to me in great glee, and said, “‘ They
are back! They are back!” A mile from shore, there was a
boat with a sail, which stood in for the land; but I knew it
could not be the one which our two friends had gone out in, for
it was on the wrong side of the isle for that. I saw too, through
my glass, a ship out at sea. There were twelve men in the boat,
three of whom were bound in chains, and four had fire arms.

By-and-bye, I saw one of the men raise his sword to those
who were in chains, and I felt sure that all was not right. Then
I saw that three men who had been bound were set free; and
when they had come on shore they lay on the ground, in the
shade of a tree. I was soon at their side, for their looks, so
sad and worn, brought to my mind the first few hours I had
spent in this wild spot, where all to me was wrapt in gloom.

I went up to these men and said:

“Who are you, Sirs?”

They gave a start at my voice and at my strange dress, and
made a move as if they would fly from me. I said, ‘‘ Do not
fear me, for it may be that you have a friend at hand, though
you do not think it.” “ He must be sent from the sky then,”
said one of them with a grave look; and he took off his hat
, to meat thesame time. ‘ All help is from thence, Sir,” I said.
‘“ But what can I doto aid you? You look as if you had some
load of grief on your breast. I saw one of the men lift his
sword as if to kill you.” |

The tears ran down the poor man’s face, as he said, “Is this
a god, or is it buta man?” ‘Have no doubt on that score,



PAUL AND HIS CREW. 6z

Sir,” said I, “fora god would not have come with a dress like
this. No, do not fear—nor raise your hopes too high; for you
see but a man, yet one who will do all he can to help you.
Your speech shows me that you come from the same land as I
do. [ will do all I can to serve you. Tell me your case.



PAUL STATES HIS CASE,

“ Our case, Sir, is too long to tell you while they who would
kill us were so near. My name is Paul. To be short, Sir, my
crew have thrust me out of my ship, which you see out there,
and have left me here to die. It was as much as I could do to
make them sheathe their swords, which you saw were drawn
to slay me. They have set me down in this isle with these
two men, my friend here, and the ship’s mate.”

“Where have they gone?” said I.



62 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

“There, in the wood close by. I fear they may have seen
and heard us. If they have, they will be sure to kill us all.”

“Have they fire arms ?”

“ They have four guns, one of which is in the boat.”

“Well then, leave all to me!”

“There are two of the men,” said he, ‘ who are worse than
the rest. All but these I feel sure would go back to work the
ship.”

I thought it was best to speak out to Paul at once, and I
said, ‘“‘ Now if I save your life, there are two things which you
must do.”

But he read my thoughts, and said, “If you save my life,
you shall do as you like with me and my ship, and take her
where you please.”

’ I saw that the two men, in whose charge the boat had been

left, had come on shore; so the first thing I did was to send
Friday to fetch from it the oars, the sail, and the gun. And
now the ship might be said to be in our hands. When the
time came for the men to go back to the ship, they were ina
great rage; for, as the boat had now no sail nor oars, they
knew not how to get out to their ship.

We heard them say that it was a strange sort of isle, for that
sprites had come to the boat, to take off the sails and oars. We
could see them run to and fro, with great rage; then go and
sit in the boat to rest, and then come on shore once more.
When they drew near to us, Paul and Friday would fain have
had me fall on them at once. But my wish was to spare them,
and kill as few as I could. I told two of my men to creep on
their hands and feet close to the ground, so that they might



MAKES TERMS WITH THE CREW 63

not be seen, and when they got up to the men, not to fire till
I gave the word.

They had not stood thus long, when three of the crew came
up to us. Till now, we had but heard their voice, but when
they came so near as to be seen, Paul and Friday stood up and
shot at them. Two of the men fell dead, and they were the
worst of the crew, and the third ran off. At the sound of the
guns I came up, but it was so dark that the men could not tell
if there were three of us or three score.

It fell out just as I could wish, for I heard the men ask, ‘‘ To
whom must we yield, and where are they?” Friday told them
that Paul was there with the king of the isle, who had brought
with him a crowd of men! At this one of the crew said, “ If
Paul will spare our lives, we will yield.” ‘‘ Then,” said Friday,
“you shall know the king’s will.” Then Paul said to them,
“You know my voice; if you lay down your arms the king
will spare your lives.”

They fell on their knees to beg the same of me. I took good
care that they did not see me, but I gave them my word that
they should all live, that I should take four of them to work
the ship, and that the rest would be bound hand and foot, for
the good faith of the four. This was to show them what a stern
king I was.

Of course I soon set them free, and I put them in a way to
take my place on the isle. I told them of all my ways, taught
them how to mind the goats, how to work the farm, and make
the bread. I gave them a house to live in, fire arms, tools, and
my two tame cats,—in fact, all but Poll and my gold.

As I sat on the top of the hill, Paul came up to me. He



64 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

held out his hand to point to the ship, and with much warmth
took me to his arms, and said, ‘“ My dear friend, there is your
ship! for she is all yours, and so are we, and all that is in her.”



HIS JOY AT SIGHT OF THE SHIP.

f cast my eyes to the ship, which rode half a mile off the
shore, at the mouth of the creek, and near the place where I
had brought my rafts to the land. Yes, there she stood, the
ship that was to set me free, and to take me where I might
choose to go. She set her sails to the wind, and her flags



BACK TO THE LAND OF HIS BIRTH. 65

threw out their gay stripes in the breeze. Such a sight was too
much for me, and I fell down faint with joy. Paul then took
out a flask which he had brought for me, and gave me a dram,
which I drank, but for a good while I could not speak to him.

Friday and Paul then went on board the ship, and Paul took
charge of her once more. We did not start that night, but at
noon the next day I left the isle !—that lone isle, where I had
spent so great a part of my life—not much less than thrice ten
long years.

When I came back to the dear land of my birth, all was
strange and new to me. I went to my old home at York, but
none of my friends were there, and to my great grief I saw,
on the stone at their grave, the sad tale of their death.

As they had thought, of course, that I was dead, they had
not left me their wealth and lands, so that I stood much in
want of means, for it was but asmall sum that I had brought
with me from the isle. But in this time of need, I had the
luck to find my good friend who once took me up at sea. He
was now grown too old for work, and had put his son in the
ship in his place. He did not know me at first, but I was
soon brought to his mind when I told him whoI was. I found
from him that the land which I had bought on my way to the
isle was now worth much.

As it was a long way off, I felt no wish to go and live there,
so I made up my mind to sell it, and in the course of a few
months, I got for it a sum so large as to make me a rich man
all at once.

Weeks, months, and years went by; I had a farm, a wife,

and two sons, and was by no means young; but still I could
5



66 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

not get rid of a strong wish which dwelt in my thoughts by
day and my dreams by night, and that was to set foot once
more in my old isle.

I had now no need to work for food, or for means of life;
all I had to do was to teach my boys to be wise and good, to
live at my ease, and see my wealth grow day by day. Yet the
wish to go back to my wild haunts clung round me likea cloud,
and I could in no way drive it from me, so true is it that ‘ what
is bred in the bone will not come out of the flesh.”

At length, I lost my wife, which was a great blow to me, and
my home was now so sad, that I made up my mind to launch
out once more on the broad sea, and go with my man Friday
to that lone isle where dwelt all my hopes.

I took with me as large a store of tools, clothes, and such
like goods as I had room for, and men of skill in all kinds of
trades, to live in the isle. When we set sail, we had a fair
wind for some time, but one night the mate, who was at the
watch, told me he saw a flash of fire, and heard a gun go off.
At this we all ran on deck, from whence we saw a great light,
and as there was no land that way, we knew that it must be
some ship on fire at sea, which could not be far off, for we heard
the sound of the gun.

The wind was still fair, so we made our way for the point
where we saw the light, and in half an hour it was but too
plain that a large ship was on fire in the midst of the broad sea.
I gave the word to fire off five guns, and we then lay by, to wait
till break of day. But in the dead of the night the ship blew
up in the air, the flames shot forth, and what there was left of
the ship sank. We hung out lights, and our guns kept up a



ON THE WAY BACK. 67

fire all night long, to let the crew know that there was -help at
hand.

At eight o'clock the next day we found, by the aid of the
glass, that two of the ship’s boats were out at sea, quite full of

SSS
eeeeeeeeEeeooEEE
=



DEATH OF HIS WIFE.

men. They had seen us, and had done their best to make us
see them, and in half an hour we came up with them.

It would be a hard task for me to set forth in words the scene
which took place in my ship, when the poor French folk (for
such they were) came on board. As to grief and fear, these are

5—2



68 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

soon told—sighs, tears, and groans make up the sum of them
—but such a cause of joy as this was, in sooth, too much for
them to bear, weak and all but dead as they were.

Some would send up shouts of joy that rent the sky; some
would cry and wring their hands as if in the depths of grief;
some would dance, laugh, and sing ; not a few were dymb, sick,
faint, in a swoon, or half mad; and two or three were seen to
give thanks to God.

In this strange group, there was a young French priest who
did his best to soothe those around him, and I saw him go up
to some of the crew, and say to them, ‘“ Why do you scream,
and tear your hair, and wring your hands, my men? Let your
joy be free and full, give it full range and scope, but leave off
this trick of the hands, and lift them up in praise; let your
voice swell out, not in screams, but in hymns of thanks to God,
who has brought you out of so great a strait, for this will add
peace to your joy.”

The next day they were all in a right frame of mind, so I
gave them what stores I could spare, and put them on board a
ship that we met with on her way to France, all save five, who,
with the priest, had a wish to join me.

But we had not set sail long when we fell in with a ship that
had been blown out to sea by a storm, and had lost her masts;
and, worse than all, her crew had not had an ounce of meat or
bread for ten days. I gave them all some food, which they ate
like wolves in the snow, but I thought it best to check them,
as I had fears that so much all at once would cause the death
of some of them.

There were a youth and a young girl in the ship who the



THE ISLE IN SIGHT. 69

uate said he thought must be dead, but he had not had the heart
to go near them, for the food was all gone. I found that they
were faint for the want of it, and as it were in the jaws of death;
but in a short time they both got well, and as they had no wish
to go back to their ship, I took them with me. So now I had
eight more on board my ship, than I had when I first set out.

In three months from the time when I left home, I came in
sight of my isle, and I brought the ship safe up by the side of
the creek, which was near my old house.

I went up to Friday, to ask if he knew where he was. He
took a look round him, and soon, with a clap of the hands, said
“O yes! O there! O yes! O there!” By-and-bye he set upa
dance with such wild glee, that it was as much as I could do to
keep him on deck. ‘ Well, what think you, Friday?” said I,
“shall we find those whom we left still here?”

He stood quite mute for a while, but when I spoke of old Jaf
(whose son Friday was), the tears ran down his face, and his
heart was full of grief.

“No, no,” said he, “‘no more; no, no more.”

“ How do you know that?” said I; but he shook his head
and said, ‘“O no, O no; he long dead, he much old man.”

Just then his quick eye caught sight of some men at the top
of the hill, and he said, ‘“‘ I see men there, there, there! ”

I could not see the least sign of them, but I gave the word
to fire three guns, to show that we were friends, and soon we
saw smoke rise from the side of the creek. I then got out the
boat, put up a flag of peace, and went on shore with Friday,
the French priest, and some of the crew. We all had arms
with us, in case there should be foes on the isle that we knew



70 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

not of, but we found that there was no need to be on-our guard.
The first man I cast my eyes on at the creek was my old friend
Carl from Spain, whom I took from the hands of the red men
when I was last on the isle. °

I gave strict charge to all in the boat not to go on shore, but
Friday could not be kept back, for he had caught sight of old Jaf.
We stood by to watch him fly to the old man like a shaft from
a bow, and catch him in his arms, and stroke him, and set him
down in the shade; he then stood a short way off to look at
him, with all his soul in his eyes, as one might view some choice
work of art. He next led the old man by the hand up and
down the shore, and now and then came to the boat to fetch
him 4 cake, or a sip of rum; then he would set him down once
more on the ground, dance round and round him, and all the
while tell him strange tales of what he had seen since he and
old Jaf had last met. ©

Carl and his friends bore a flag of truce like mine, and at first
Carl could not make out who I was; but when I spoke to him
in his own tongue, he threw up his arms and said that he felt
shame not to have known the face of the man who had once
come to save him. He shook my hands with much warmth, and
then took me to my old house, which he now gave up to me.

I could no more have found the spot than if I had not been
there at all, for the trees were so thick and close, that the house
could not be got at save by such blind ways as none but those
who made them could find out. ‘ Why should you raise so
strong a fence round you?” said I; but Carl told me he felt
sure I should think there was much need of it when I had heard
all that had come to pass since I was last on the isle.



ON THE ISLE ONCE MORE. zr

He then sent for the old crew of Paul’s ship, but I could not
guess who they were, till Carl said, “ These, Sir, are some of
the men who owe their lives to you.”






a
o

_ =e
WIT» ess

CARL’S JOY AT SIGHT OF HIS OLD FRIEND.



as
\G

ZENS

Then one by one they came up to me, not as if they had been
the rough crew of a ship, but like men of rank who had come
to kiss the hand of their king.

The first thing was for me to hear all that had been done
in the isle since I had left it.

I must make a short pause in this part of my tale, and state
that when I was last on the isle I sent off Carl and Jaf to the



72 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

main land to fetch some of Carl's friends who had been cast
on shore there on their way from Spain. Of course I had no
hope then that a ship was so near to take me to the land of my
birth. So when Carl and Jaf came back to the isle they found
that I had gone, and that five strange men were there in my
place.

These five men were part of the crew who had thrust Paul
out of his ship. Two of them, whose names were Sam and
Joe, were not so bad as their three mates, who were a set of
great rogues, and were led by one of the name of Will. When
I left the isle in Paul’s ship, I took Sam and Joe on board
with me, but just as I was on the point to sail, they got out
one of the ship’s boats and went back to the isle, to join their
three friends.

I will now go on to tell, just as I heard it from Carl. all
that had come to pass since I had left the isle) When Will
and his men saw that their two mates had come to join them,
they would have no more to do with them, nor would they let
them have a share in the house, nor food to eat. So Sam and
Joe had to live as well as they could by hard work, and they
set up their home on the north shore of the isle, where they
built huts and sheds, and made a farm.

To be just to Will, I must here state that, bad as he was,
he did two kind things, when Carl and his friends came back
to the isle, for he gave them food to eat, and he put my note
in Carl’s hands, as well as a long scroll on which I had set
down how they were to bake the bread, bring up the tame
goats, plant the corn, dry the grapes, and make pots and pans,
just as I had done.



CARL AND ¥AF AT WORK. 73

For some time all went on well with Carl and his men in
my old home. They had the use of the house and the cave,
and went in and out just as they chose. Carl and Jaf did the
work, and as for Will and his friends, all they did was to shoot
birds, and roam on the shore. When they came home at night,
they sat down to eat of all the good things in the house, for
which they gave no thanks, and like the dog in the ox’s stall,
when they did not care to eat, they would not let the rest do
so. Of such small things as these it would not be worth my
while to tell, but that at last they broke out in a fierce strife
with the rest, and their spite grew to such a pitch that flesh
and blood could not stand it.

When Carl—whom I shall now call the “Chief,” as he took
the lead of all the rest—first came back from the main land,
he would have let all the five men of Paul’s crew live in the
house, and be good friends if they could; but the three rogues
would not hear of it, so the Chief gave poor Sam and Joe corn
for seed, as well as some peas which I had left on the isle,
and they soon learnt to dig and plant, and hedge in their land,
in the mode which I had set for them, and in short to lead
good lives.

When the three bad men saw this, they were fuli of spite,
and set to work to tease and vex them. They told them that
the isle was their own, and that no one else had a right to
build on it if they did not pay them rent. Sam and Joe
thought at first that this was a joke, and said, ‘Come and sit
down, and see what fine homes we have built; then tell us
what rent you wish us to pay, and in what coin you would
like to have it.”



74 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

But Will soon made it plain that they were not in jest; for
he set fire toa torch and put it to the roof of the hut, and
would have burnt it down, had not Joe set his foot on the
torch, and put out the flame. This made Will so full of rage,
that he ran at him with a pole which he had in his hand, and
a fierce fight then took place, the end of which was that the
three rogues had to run off. But in a short time they came
back, trod down the corn, and shot the young kids, which the
poor men had got to bring up tame.

At last the spite of Will and his friends grew to such a
pitch, that one night they set off with fire arms to kill poor
Sam and Joe while they slept. But when they came to their
huts no one was to be found; so quoth Will, ‘‘Ha! here’s the
nest, but the birds are flown!” Then they fell to work to
pull down all that they could lay their hands on, and left not
a stick, nor so much as a sign to show where the huts had
stood; and they tore up all the young trees by the roots, and
flung them far and wide.

When Carl and his friends heard of these foul deeds, it
made their blood boil, but all that Will had to say was, “You,
Sir Jacks of Spain, shall have the same sauce if you do not
mend your ways.” So Carl took from them their guns and
knives, and had them set in chains. As soon as they had
time to feel the pain of this kind of life, the three rogues grew
more cool, and sought to make peace, and to get back their
arms, and live at large. The Chief told them that in time
he would set them free, but that he could not let them live
in the house, nor give them their arms for three or four months.

At last they came to beg that Carl and his men would take



THE THREE ROGUES. 75

them in once more, and give them bread to eat, as they had
no food but eggs all that time. But the Chief said that he
would not yield till they had sworn to build up the huts which
they had torn down. So they did.’

One day a whim took Will and his two friends that they
would go to the main land to try if they could seize some of



BROUGHT TO BAY.

the red men, and bring them home as slaves, to do the hard
part of their work for them.

Carl would have been glad to get rid of men whom he could
not well trust from day to day, but told them in good faith how
rash he thought his plan was. Yet as their minds were made
up, he gave them from the stores all that they could want, and
a large boat to go in; and when the rest of the men bade them
‘‘good speed,” none thought they would find their way back to
the isle. But lo! in the course of three weeks they did in truth
come home. They said they had found the land in two days,



76 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

and that the red men gave them roots and fish to eat, and they
brought with them eight slaves, three of whom were men, and
five were girls. So they gave their good hosts an axe, a spade,
a screw, and an old key, and brought off the slaves in the boat.

As to the young girls, Carl and the rest of the men from
Spain did not care to wed them, so the five men from Paul’s
crew drew lots for the choice, and each had one of them for a
wife, while the male slaves were set to work for the good of all,
though there was not much for them to do. But one of them,
ran off to the woods, and was not to be found, and as some of
the wild tribes had been on the isle to feast and dance, Carl
had good cause to fear that he might have gone back with them,
and that if he got safe home, he would be sure to tell his tribe
of the white men’s haunts so near at hand.

One night Carl felt a great weight on his mind, and could
get no sleep. He lay still for some time, yet as he did not feel
at ease, he got up and took a look out, but as the night was too
dark for him to see, he went back to his bed once more. Still
it was of no use, for though he knew not why, his thoughts
would let him have no rest; he then woke up one of his
friends, and told him how it had been with him. ‘Say you
so?” said he. ‘‘ What if some of the wild tribes have come on
shore, and it is the sound of their boats that woke you up?”

Then they set off to the top of the hill where I was wont to
go, and from thence they saw through a glass a fleet of more
than a score of boats, full of men who had bows, darts, clubs,
swords of wood, and such like arms of war; and it was clear
that a horde of some fierce tribe had come to trap and slay the
white men.



THE RED MEN COME ON SHORE. a7

Their boats were still far out at sea, so that Carl and his men
had some hours to think what they should do. Their force was
so small, that they thought it wise to hide and lie in wait.

They first made safe their wives and stores in a thick part of
the wood. In the next place, as soon as they saw that the red
men had come on shore, and that they bent their course that
way, they drove all the goats out to stray in the wood, just
where they chose, that the red men might think they were
wild.

Carl and his men then drew up ina small band, calm and
brave. Two of the wives could not be kept back, but would
go out and fight with bows and darts.. Then Carl, as Chief of
the isle, took the lead, but he put Will at the head of one band
of men, for at this time he had shown such good faith, and
such shrewd, keen sense, that all thought well of his skill and
zeal.

As the Chief had not arms for all, he did not give guns to the
slaves, but each of them had a long staff with a spike at the
end, and an axe to hang at his side. They took up their post
in the wood near the site of the huts that were burnt down,
and there they lay in wait for the red men.

The foe now came on with a bold and fierce mien, not ina
line, but in crowds here and there, to the point where Carl lay
in wait for them. When the first band were so near as to be
in range of the guns, Carl gave the word for his men to shoot
at them all at once, so that those who came up first fell dead
on the spot, and great fear and dread came on the rest.

The Chief and his men then went forth from the skirts of the
wood where they had lain in wait, and fell on the foe from three



78 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

points with the butt end of their guns, and swords, and staves,
and they fought so well that the red men set up a loud shriek,
and fled for their lives with all the speed that fear and swift
feet could lend them. As the Chief did not care to give chase,
they got safe back to the shore where their boats lay.

But their rout was not yet at an end, for it blew a great storm
that day, so that the boats could not put off; and in the night
the tide drove most of them so high on the shore that they
could not be got to sea save with great toil, and the waves broke
some of them to bits.

At dawn of day, when the Chief saw how things stood, he
said, ‘“‘ If we let these men get their boats out and go back, they
will make it known to the rest of the tribes on the main land
that we are here, and there will be no end to our wars as long
as we live; but if we keep them here and treat them well, they
will not harm us.” Soto make sure that they should not leave
the isle, the Chief told his men to get some dry wood from dead
trees and set the boats on fire.

When the red men saw this they ran all round the isle with
loud cries, as if they were mad, so that Carl did not know at
first what to do with them, for they trod all the corn down with
their feet, and tore up the vines just as the grapes were ripe,
and did a great deal of harm.

At last the Chief sent old Jaf to tell the red men in their
own tongue how kind he would be to them ; how he would. save
their lives and give them part of the isle to live in, if they
would keep in their own bounds; and that they should have
corn and rice to plant, and bread to eat, till such time as the
crops should be ripe.



TERMS OF PEACE. 79

The poor men were but too glad to get such good terms of
peace, and they soon learnt to make all kinds of things with
canes and wood, such as chairs, stools, and beds; and this they
did with great skill when they were once taught. From this
time, till I came back to the isle, my friends saw no more of the
wild tribes.

When I heard this tale from Carl, my heart beat fast at the
thought of the great straits that he and the rest had been
brought through; and I was glad to find that in so small a
space as my isle (which at first held none but me) all these
tribes of the Great Race should now live in peace!

I was much struck with the change in the isle, for the trees
had grown, huts had sprung up, and a great part of the land
was sown for crops. As to Will’s hut, it was quite a work of
art; it had strong posts at each point, and the walls and roof
were made of cane work; it had a thatch of straw from the rice
plant, and a huge leaf on the top to screen it from the sun.

I now told Carl that I had not come to take off his men, but
to bring more, and to give them all such things as they might
want to guard their homes and cheer their hearts.

The next day I made a grand feast for them, and the ship's
cook came on shore to dress it. We brought out some of our
rounds of salt beef and pork, a bowl of punch, and some beer
and French wines, while Carl gave the cook five whole kids to
roast, three of which were sent to the crew on board ship, that
they on their part might feast on fresh meat from the shore.

I gave the men coats, shirts, hats, shoes, and all kinds of
clothes, both for warm and cold days, with gowns and shawls
for their wives, and I need not say how glad they were of such



80 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

gifts. Then I brought out a good stock of tools, from which
each man had a spade, a rake, an axe, a crow, a saw, anda knife,
as well as arms and all that they could want for the use of them.

As I now saw that there was good will on all sides, I brought
on shore the youth and the girl whom I took from the wreck
when they were half dead for want of food. The girl had been
brought up with care, and all the crew had a good word for
her. Both she and the youth felt a wish to be left on the isle,
as well as the French priest; so I gave them each a plot of
ground, on which they built tents and barns.

I had brought out with me men of skill to work on the isle,
one of whom could turn his hand to all sorts of things, so I
gave him the name of “ Jack of all trades.”

One day the French priest came to me to ask if I would
leave my man Friday on the isle; ‘‘ For through him,” said he,
“T could talk to the red men in their own tongue, and teach
them the things of God; and need I add it was for this cause
that I came here?” I felt that I could not part with my man
Friday for the whole world, so I told the priest that if I could
have made up my mind to leave him, I was quite sure that
Friday would not leave me.

When I had seen that all things were in a good state on the
isle, I set to work to put my ship in trim, that I might once
more quit these shores.

As I was on my way to the ship, the youth whom I spoke of
just now, came up to me, and said, “ Sir, you have brought a
priest with you, and while you are still here we wish him to
wed two of us.” I made sure that one of these must be the
maid that I had breught in my ship, and that it was the wish



THE BEST GIFT. 81

of the young man to make her his wife. So I spoke to him
with some warmth in my tone, and bade him turn it well in his
mind first, as the girl had not been brought up in the same



THE GIFT OF GOD’S WORD.

rank of life as he had. But he said with a smile that I had
made a wrong guess, for it was “ Jack of all trades” that he had
come to plead for.

It gave me great joy to hear this, as I knew the girl was as
good as she could be, and I thought well, too, of Jack; so on
that day I gave her to him to be his wife. They were - have



82 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

a large piece of ground where they might grow their crops, with
a house to live in, and sheds for their goats and stores.

The isle was now set out in this way: all the west end was
left waste, so that if the wild tribes should land on it, they
might come and go, and hurt no one. The old house was to
be the Chief’s, with all its woods, which now spread out as far
as the creek, while the south end was for the white men and
their wives; and as for the poor red men whose boats we had
burnt, they had the range of the wild part of the isle.

It struck me that there was one gift which I had not thought
of, and that was the book of God’s Word, which I knew would
give them fresh strength for their work, and help them to bear
the ills of life. So I bade them all come round me, and as I
took up this book of books I said, “ Prize it and lay it to your
hearts! for there are words in it which come from the lips of
Christ our Lord, words which He speaks to us in love, to win
us to Him. Till now you have had no such book on the isle.
No doubt these rich plains, these crops, these bright waves
that wash the shores which close you in, all prove to you that
there is a Great God, a God of Love; yet these stop short when
they tell us of God’s skill and God’s love, they leave us in the
dark as to how we can save our souls. But this book tells us
of a world to come, a bright world of love and peace—and the
way to gain it.”

Now that I had been on the isle a month, on the fifth of May
I once more set sail with my good Friday, and they all told me
that they should stay there till I came to fetch them.

I gave one long look at them from the deck, and then hid
my face in my hands.



A FIGHT WITH WILD MEN. 33

When we had been out three days, though the sea was
smooth and calm, I saw it look quite black at one point, and
heard one of the crew give a cry of ‘“‘ Land!” As I knew there
was no coast near, I could not tell what to make of this, so I
sent the mate to the mast head, to find out with his glass what
it was. He came down with the bad news that it was a fleet
of scores and scores of small boats, full of wild men who came
on fast with fierce looks at us.

As soon as they drew near, I gave the word to furl all sail
and stop the ship, and as I knew that the worst thing these
men could do was to set us on fire, I had the boats out, and
made fast one of them at the head, and one at the stern.

In this way, we lay by for the foe, and in a short time they
came up with us, and, as I thought, meant to close us in. At
first they were struck with awe at the size of the ship, but they
soon came so near to us, that our crew told them by signs with
their hands to keep back, and this, though we did not mean it,
brought on a fight with them. They shot a cloud of darts at
our boats, which our men kept off with boards for shields.
We did not fire at them, yet in half an hour they went back
out to sea, and then came straight at us once more.

I bade my men get out the guns, and keep close, so as to be
safe from their darts if they should shoot, and I then sent
Friday on deck to call out to the wild men in their own tongue,
and ask what they meant todo. It may be that they did not
know what he said, but as soon as he spoke to them, I heard
him cry out that they would shoot. This was too true, for they
let fly a thick cloud of shafts, and to my great grief, Friday fell
dead. There was no one else in sight, and he was shot with

II—-2



84 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

three darts, three more of which fell quite near him. I was so
mad with rage, that I should have been quite glad to sink all
their boats, so I let the men load five guns with small shot,
and five with large, and we gave them such a fierce fire as they
had not seen in all their lives.

Then a strange scene met our eyes, and no words can tell
the dread and fear that came on them al!; for most of their
boats, which were small, were split and sunk—three or four by
one shot. The rest fled as fast as their oars would take them.

Our boat took up one poor man who swam for his life, but
his speech was so strange to us, that we could have learnt as
much from the sound of a horn. At first he would not eat or
speak, and we had fears least he would pine to death, so to cure
him we took him out in the boat and threw him in the sea,
and told him by signs that if he would not speak or eat, we
would not save his life. He swam round and round the boat,
and at last made signs that he would do as we told him, so we
took him in.

When we had taught him to say a few words, he told us
that his tribe and four more had come out with their kings to
have a great fight.

‘““But what,” said I, “made them come up to us?” At which
he said, ‘“‘To make you see great fight!”

So it was for this that poor Friday fell, he who for long years
had been so good and true to me! My heart sank with grief.
We wound him in a shroud and let him down to his grave in
the sea. And now, with deep grief, I must take my leave of
him.

We went on with a fair wind to All Saints Bay, and here I



THE ISLE LEFT FOR THE LAST TIME. 85

found the sloop I had brought with me from home, which I
meant to send to my isle with men and stores, when I had
learnt how things stood there.

As one of my crew felt a strong wish to go back to the isle

























































































DEATH OF FRIDAY.

m it, I said he should by all means, and I gave him the red
man whom we had on board, for his slave. I found too that a
man who was in fear of the Church of Spain would be glad to
be safe there with his wife and two girls; sol put them on
board the sloop, and I sent with them three milch cows, five
calves, a horse, four colts, and a score of pigs, all of which, as
{ heard, went safe and sound. I have now no more to say of



86 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

my isle, as I had left it for the last time.. But the rest of my
lite was spent for the most part in lands quite as far from home.
From the Bay of All Saints we went strait to the Cape of Good
Hope. Here I made up my mind to part with the ship in
which I had come from the isle, and to stay on land.

I soon made friends with some men from France, and two
Jews who had come out to the Cape to trade. I found that
some goods which I had brought with me from home, were
worth a great deal, and I made a large sum by the sale of them,
which I laid out in gems, as they took up so small a space.

When we had been at the Cape of Good Hope nine months,
we thought that the best thing we could do was to hire a ship,
and sail to the Spice Isles to buy cloves; so we got a ship and
men to work her, and set out. We went from port to port, to
and fro, bought and sold our goods, and spent from first to
last, six years in this part of the world.

At length we thought we would go and seek new scenes, and
by-and-bye we fell in with a strange set of men, as you who
read this tale will say when you look at the print in front of
this page.

When we had gone on shore we bought a large house built
with canes, which had a high fence of the same round it, to
keep off thieves, of whom it seems there are not a few in that
land. The name of the town was Ching, and we found that
the fair or mart, which was held there once a year, would not
take place for three or four months, so we sent our ship back to
the Cape, as we meant to stay in this part of the world for
some time, and go from place to place to look round us,and then
come back to the fair at Ching.



THE GREAT FAIR AT CHING. | 87

We first went to a town which it was well worth our while
to see; it was quite in the heart of the land, and was built with
straight streets which ran in cross lines.

But I must say, when I came home to the place of my birth,
I was much struck to hear my friends say such fine things of
the wealth and trade of this part of the world; for I found



XG
ES=

Bo Wuugy

A GREAT MAN AT CHING.



that the men were a mere herd of mean slaves, who could boast
of but few arts or works of skill, and that their ways were
well nigh as rough as those of the red men whom I had left on
my isle.

What is their trade to ours, or that of France and Spain?
What are their ports, with a few junks and barks, to our grand
fleets? One of our large ships of war would sink all their
craft, one line of French troops would beat all their horse, and
the same may be said of their ports, which would not stand for
one month sucha siege as we could bring to bear on them. In
three weeks’ time we came to their chief town, where we laid in



88 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

a large stock of tea, fans, shawls, trays, and raw silk, which we
put on the backs of our mules, and set out for the North.
We had with us some Scots who had come out to trade here,
and had great wealth.

As we knew that we should run all kinds of risks on our way,
we took a strong force with us, to keep off the wild hordes who
rove from place to place all through the land. We had five
guides, and all our coin was put in one purse to buy food on the
way, and to pay the men who took charge of us.

One of us we chose for our chief, to take the lead in case we
should have to fight for our lives; and when that time came
we found that we had no small need of his skill.

On each side of the road we saw men who were at work on
cups, bowls, and jars, of all shapes that could be thought of,
which they made out of a fine clay; and this is the ware that
has so wide a fame, and is the chief trade in this part of the
world.

One thing the guide said he would show me, which could be
seen no where else (and this, in good sooth, I could not sneer
at,as I had done at most of the things I had seen here), for it
was to be a house all built with the same kind of ware as the
plates and cups that we use are made of, but much more choice.
“ How big is this house?” said I; ‘can we take it on the mule’s
back?” “On the mule’s back!” said the guide; ‘why, two
score men live init.” He then took me to see this strange sight,
and it was in truth a large house, built with laths, on which
were nung tiles of the best ware that can be made out of clay.
It had a bright glaze on it, which shone in the sun like glass.
Down the sides of the house were leaves and scrolls, drawn



A HOUSE BUILT OF WARE. 89

with blue paint; the walls of the rooms were made of small
tiles in all shades of red, blue, and green, with here and there
some gold on them, in rude forms it is true, but done in good
taste ; and as the same kind of earth was made use of to join
the tiles, you could not see where they met. The floors of all
the rooms were of the same kind of ware, and so was the roof;
but that was quite black to keep off the heat of the sun’s rays.
If I had had more time to spare, I should have been glad to
see more of this strange place, for there were ponds for the fish,
as well as walks, courts, and yards, all of which were made in
the same way.

This odd sight kept me from my friends for two hours, and
when I came up to them, I paid a fine to our Chief, as he and
all the rest had had to wait for me so long; for we ran a great
risk if we did not keep close to the rest.

In two days’ time we came to the Great Wall, which was
built as a fort to guard the land from the wild tribes that
roam at large through the vast plains to the west. It runs the
whole length of the land, and turns, and winds, and is so high
that it was thought no foe could climb it, or, if they did, no wall
could stop them.

Our Chief gave some of us leave to go out and hunt, as they
call it; but what was it but to hunt sheep! These sheep, as
it fell out, were not such bad sport, for they are wild and swift
of foot; they go in large flocks, and, like true sheep, keep close
when they fly.

In this hunt, we met with some of the wild hordes I spoke
of, who rove from place to place in gangs, to rob and kill all
they fall in with. They know no true mode of war or skill in



90 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

fight, their arms are not good, and, as to their steeds, they are
but poor lean beasts, and by no means fit for hard work.

As soon as these men saw us, they blew some notes ona
kind of horn, the sound of which was quite new tome. We
thought it must be to call their friends round them, and so it
was, for in a short time a fresh troop of the same size came to



A WILD CHARGE,

join them, and they were all, as far as we could judge, a mile
off. As soon as one of the Scots who was with us heard the
horn, he said we must lose no time, but draw up in line, and
charge them at once. We told him we would all fight the
rogues, if he would take the lead.

They stood like a mere crowd, drawn up in no line, and
cast a wild gaze at us. But when they saw us come at them
they let fly their darts, which, though their aim was true, fell
short of us. We made a halt to fire, then rode at full speed
and fell on them sword in hand, led by the bold Scot.



ON THE WAY HOME. QI

_ As soon as we came up they fled right and left; but three of
them, each of whom had a short sword, made a stand, and did
all they could to call the rest back. Our Scot rode close up
to them, and with the stock of his gun threw one from his



HOW THEY DRIVE IN THE NORTH.

horse, shot the next, and the third ran off; and this put an end
to the fight. All that we lost were the sheep we had in chase,
for not a man was hurt.

Thus we went on from place to place, and at length made our
way to the chief town of the North Seas, just a year and a half
from the time when we left Ching.

At last I took ship, and set sail for the land of my birth,



92 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

which I had left this time for ten years, nine months, and
three days.

And now I must bring this tale of my life to a close; while
at the age of three score years and twelve, I feel that the day
is at hand when I must pray to go forth on that sea of peace
and love, which has no waves or shores but those of bliss
which knows no end.



THE END.



Full Text


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describe
'4993600' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIXQ' 'sip-files00042.tif'
f110e2d76071c9dee5116799da3624c6
0ee02880e98e4293ecac58900ee1f7bf209ed7c7
'2012-10-03T19:15:12-04:00'
describe
'4993152' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIXR' 'sip-files00091.tif'
c4f604b96cc318d46cfa353bd6ac6ed2
1744562aa29d36d573ce8516f50afc32f7365cd8
'2012-10-03T19:14:55-04:00'
describe
'70607' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIXS' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
c935a6e9d24a63fde8ae7ec44777de83
04502c761c21d76a4692065f43db64cbc4cf98af
'2012-10-03T19:14:43-04:00'
describe
'4992576' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIXT' 'sip-files00039.tif'
d422c671a3b9438ac9eb620dd1d80977
a08ed8c10c467ca7c6ec5fcb36944823a4be3db5
'2012-10-03T19:16:41-04:00'
describe
'1064' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIXU' 'sip-files00008.txt'
f4ef191c9c27d160916e1ed28ee7b55c
c98d18cae2f64d34f057ba5b9eda59218aaea655
'2012-10-03T19:18:37-04:00'
describe
'158743' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIXV' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
8513b005a67e4c89a95f86ad1dc85749
d8363910b7345b63c65b216e82b574f1a73e2d59
'2012-10-03T19:23:45-04:00'
describe
'1681' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIXW' 'sip-files00025.txt'
edbffdfaf70709da5e6e75e790d218a0
30e9d447143474cca3cd5db011d6a42f6e45bbda
'2012-10-03T19:18:15-04:00'
describe
'69164' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIXX' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
e1f3871571d429ecfba4378cb9e8527b
b9bd2ef6acc00ab658b4ae89d8da31932784ffec
'2012-10-03T19:16:23-04:00'
describe
'164393' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIXY' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
86b1bb12c62b732e8e4435cf6042ff10
bd1209cff3c417de5635af8748e19f736a86e1b7
'2012-10-03T19:17:05-04:00'
describe
'172681' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIXZ' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
088abd31e63262799872987b984b96a4
73d954dc7264333e36569b22e65cc192c87d1adf
'2012-10-03T19:17:50-04:00'
describe
'3919184' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIYA' 'sip-files00103.tif'
832cd07b961212771f2a8feca35f40ae
004f4280dc1278166f1ca897417ed8c3bef7236f
'2012-10-03T19:18:50-04:00'
describe
'4992840' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIYB' 'sip-files00088.tif'
3dbdcc68a1ae4c7936c1403ad943d82d
80acbd058c8cdd307a92589d646c9c7f3513f488
'2012-10-03T19:18:13-04:00'
describe
'180196' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIYC' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
867bcc4deb1e88b4e8fabceb02e3b27e
564e57a5af1f580d33a8d58c00f195bfa8fccc1a
'2012-10-03T19:16:43-04:00'
describe
'21879' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIYD' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
ee736e9919ef366ba04f23d5fa108cdb
de448b30b899680277faf37ae1385619023d82a5
'2012-10-03T19:17:16-04:00'
describe
'42135' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIYE' 'sip-files00012.pro'
d247888db50229de33160c5a128f522a
4d99ab3cd900e12a78458b69ae7a83498d6492e7
'2012-10-03T19:23:56-04:00'
describe
'21626' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIYF' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
553adc9cba0e4ed0abd692c564840ac3
f79e23be68110dc0c8a0bc027a6f945d914f8cd1
'2012-10-03T19:17:18-04:00'
describe
'43307' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIYG' 'sip-files00040.pro'
aaa94fc64b99b75fade4080e7b765de4
2d2df7d32480f260ae88e8f8bb58740128bbc2ab
'2012-10-03T19:15:53-04:00'
describe
'621300' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIYH' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
a21726a391ce82bdb24bf629356a1d74
26f7a582462ea268fa4659e63b2b589ad4721e94
'2012-10-03T19:16:20-04:00'
describe
'34849' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIYI' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
56195daaf5edcb3b92ee48184653f7c4
dcb989d06a7fd79c308bf224b55b4ae708d1ce3b
'2012-10-03T19:16:34-04:00'
describe
'621304' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIYJ' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
1a8cf7592bb509933ae8ff8c9e456656
692774254e45313865595a7018ed581bd78217a9
'2012-10-03T19:23:58-04:00'
describe
'161394' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIYK' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
b4a9c855ef7a4bd6da33c464602004dd
d2deebea2e10faa0a9a324d4428e69e89cc5acc6
'2012-10-03T19:19:29-04:00'
describe
'121281' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIYL' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
28185a9bffb37050fadd2d0bf10a8522
72b185c5c9a183286d4b8c730c7cda3d6d378229
'2012-10-03T19:21:20-04:00'
describe
'147090' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIYM' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
af4ff325009eef62e9e2aa3ac6974d04
fe3bbed15d6c0a9f4d4168751867c70a835d0e9d
'2012-10-03T19:23:35-04:00'
describe
'34322' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIYN' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
99bfd342c1de0195bb7ce5a4e9409f89
c68512fa45632276b0780e82d4df52df8a0fd287
'2012-10-03T19:23:53-04:00'
describe
'621281' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIYO' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
aeff672ae0b09500309428a4833a9cf7
10d885e7c81a22453534dc5d7e8b66a0c52c1171
'2012-10-03T19:15:09-04:00'
describe
'621302' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIYP' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
15b3d263d70dc59aad00b4eb35ad0b1a
f9beffda5a18698d2ff24e2932c94143b9b075fe
'2012-10-03T19:14:37-04:00'
describe
'30455' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIYQ' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
cbdddfe8ac2ed1c5f8d22f6680b01328
e13e2b779f334fa8889cc079dd67f05e451df1b3
'2012-10-03T19:18:16-04:00'
describe
'33473' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIYR' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
bbb1fdaf0430581c74be22de3b5deb13
45c2ffc978423c76d2c30c7ad444fede6a0ff0fc
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIYS' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
c34a007ed9f69cf01870cf009db3c36d
9d29662ab9187f2ff43d540350fc6304126ee83b
'2012-10-03T19:18:10-04:00'
describe
'39430' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIYT' 'sip-files00058.pro'
fd10cf0740fdd4817bf1b07c782d288a
8dad504e876147f2040e017df069751ec11241d2
'2012-10-03T19:14:34-04:00'
describe
'621298' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIYU' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
5157d7f89daea5f267b7039ce8d6e1d6
df78bbb9b3ded5451c65540d1dc6ac38687fc773
'2012-10-03T19:14:49-04:00'
describe
'173698' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIYV' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
7d990b9d80c3c0681f2e11dce9b2326a
e696236afc158de61080f7ce816222d80cff5c83
'2012-10-03T19:21:39-04:00'
describe
'129634' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIYW' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
f3b2875068287aa00e767a523c6a5f22
e825003548ed3dbfc4250e2b7f364bab0b63bdec
describe
'29893' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIYX' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
8a29133900c0a6887e338177d2e92234
9c7f94bad291e3b1985f3bc7e68d7912392b2e77
'2012-10-03T19:19:46-04:00'
describe
'621272' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIYY' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
962dbc6cdd7c4b3fe423479b22ce6013
89d041e24f799df776a6e00daf4453a9828b9401
'2012-10-03T19:15:32-04:00'
describe
'1750' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIYZ' 'sip-files00097.txt'
2011002de8ec9f1494e49fc2d9324240
f99843dacbafea6d7e63d63ab3a58981bfc5edf8
'2012-10-03T19:18:14-04:00'
describe
'621270' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIZA' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
88a6145c90065dbae55a6ab21b2244bd
8794fd3bc85920319dfa157c5a7b685450190c32
'2012-10-03T19:17:08-04:00'
describe
'171093' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIZB' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
9f6913e3fa5af1bbf2f4835204a31915
6969e953e8ec97da72bfbb5a8d500d2a21eaf9ac
'2012-10-03T19:22:49-04:00'
describe
'4993240' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIZC' 'sip-files00064.tif'
3f0c5306b7ae25e8aafa77e45cf9a928
11e1b04b0c855d52ab94e935f5b6f5f03de8f604
'2012-10-03T19:22:17-04:00'
describe
'33960' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIZD' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
94a6dee71c45813aa31071db40bafc1b
c62d5ceaf22f2b8a2981504426fbd10bea4a9d21
'2012-10-03T19:17:31-04:00'
describe
'69958' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIZE' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
1a4f376f3e38ceaf0979dd2244e9cb9c
785b0961a95dbbc5a4394ebcdcefdd057bbfab59
'2012-10-03T19:19:26-04:00'
describe
'53174' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIZF' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
a931ce1f47a78c248899e32aa3ff152c
671ae7ed721e0fa623ca9ebe25a02fa20b286e02
describe
'46370' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIZG' 'sip-files00028.pro'
899fba9b9e8e399ef6233ec39451b1b0
685424be9f82a4eac1fea55099540d5e38a2d2e9
'2012-10-03T19:19:07-04:00'
describe
'4992172' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIZH' 'sip-files00026.tif'
d250d360b664710870fcff5344cf86ce
4e08e233a91eae7e369953732c7560586af0c971
'2012-10-03T19:22:27-04:00'
describe
'1709' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIZI' 'sip-files00018.txt'
3a3ac67735f071420402c07a5e6de9f4
307fd17d296fd5d778a2059ba2e5690f8fdf2f3e
'2012-10-03T19:21:11-04:00'
describe
'44493' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIZJ' 'sip-files00075.pro'
28d77e50ff0737ecef4190fcb47f1275
1ae090c12efcd56d6be80f9ca76a3464b9185b64
'2012-10-03T19:17:58-04:00'
describe
'4988044' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIZK' 'sip-files00005.tif'
e3f1cb593f552da82af1c1d3cbc06e95
01e1d775905d6e2348911c218040ddb7267866ab
'2012-10-03T19:16:47-04:00'
describe
'160308' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIZL' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
e96e1711f2f2e0c5ad79215105b9965c
845f4ed8b3b607f04f4efd083f799cc2da24b58a
'2012-10-03T19:17:38-04:00'
describe
'139223' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIZM' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
1782dbe85d1e6356f1bba74c2d1f92d0
13d592d204a12b293238de2c789a0c793b9e1b51
'2012-10-03T19:14:25-04:00'
describe
'4993032' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIZN' 'sip-files00020.tif'
30a48ef7b4dc8000da826e7041cf8066
4caeac23749b9e3fda5d9a97076613c96fde4baa
'2012-10-03T19:16:09-04:00'
describe
'621273' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIZO' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
a85394a7540202fd4d794b4930e12a32
ab06aa9077ef5983483ec152d7aaf80ae8328cf4
'2012-10-03T19:16:29-04:00'
describe
'621290' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIZP' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
a6c87f365ef60ddafb2549e1ca6847db
1e17f983cfa790e6d7e8db15e2e0c46d17da176a
describe
'621283' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIZQ' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
d25a23fab843031ac746a7224abde0dd
b2bb1d0ce4f48e1f8724e57c75ff53f4b497a927
'2012-10-03T19:15:30-04:00'
describe
'33218' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIZR' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
9edd379705006500aa656d28b5ef3710
98b07f270105007ea0c0783fe10cff0d5e62a54a
'2012-10-03T19:14:32-04:00'
describe
'1821' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIZS' 'sip-files00051.txt'
ce131aa2980a818f4071038e6b4b177b
c199d45d1e951b7fe20c14e65c11cf4e1ab89f2e
describe
'4993476' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIZT' 'sip-files00028.tif'
11a94a855ccf21e14a417614eb867249
4780f833637dd1c21b8c004f1817135841806246
'2012-10-03T19:14:39-04:00'
describe
'621265' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIZU' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
eda947eaba7e384776f0910f7b546de4
c1e1cca8b76920f5467e90929b4542d9a2bd9542
'2012-10-03T19:16:55-04:00'
describe
'173874' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIZV' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
12e887a0da4e31058f49a6da1728cf89
216282dfdc68e9208f67dbdbe36080113e496011
'2012-10-03T19:15:21-04:00'
describe
'1699' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIZW' 'sip-files00040.txt'
26df68ad24cc3efa66eae8b4864b4fff
a9ae53209df7ef3ef0679afc5ca07abe9c3f608d
describe
'19198' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIZX' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
b48a5f60a45ac0e2b4d6edda78022788
0eebfc6a5a5f41755bd16aa1b0c17d091d244572
'2012-10-03T19:15:45-04:00'
describe
'4991788' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIZY' 'sip-files00056.tif'
41bbc68df961e790591d685d997ad4c7
6955f54b9eaabf97e4ff1e8810e22637da2d3baa
'2012-10-03T19:23:03-04:00'
describe
'33806' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABIZZ' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
fcdb77396becec20edeef7313fe6f92c
c62bb98795743b4309c5fa23e1477c3ac4cc9cb7
describe
'173616' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJAA' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
685255d48b89e0b06b554e9404ba1b64
c128ad4ea7e70d8dffe57dc8fd838964d6ad15e8
'2012-10-03T19:20:39-04:00'
describe
'4992112' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJAB' 'sip-files00008.tif'
cb1c4210b519b3735399874a85ee4ea4
ed8b716fd8625ceabd92d99d5efd2c0db9e9a7d2
'2012-10-03T19:21:50-04:00'
describe
'171024' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJAC' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
24c18c7f9b58047f4622e65dc727da5c
0a201e89d2fe3b6516fbea537f2c0b03f147c047
'2012-10-03T19:18:48-04:00'
describe
'178744' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJAD' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
35d279258fca7ccff224284829a83cb6
9da490256f23d54af85b7199fb44af22810d5072
'2012-10-03T19:21:37-04:00'
describe
'33139' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJAE' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
c1d8e758acf07e97a210fa64f6e6ddc5
551ec94f1fdee4a7c53f21ddde7f2248868a559a
'2012-10-03T19:23:43-04:00'
describe
'4993124' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJAF' 'sip-files00046.tif'
c3a505243460723a59ae4e7ca6c8189f
dfedd21489f5a70a18719d39073c7c466894a2fc
describe
'142209' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJAG' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
2e5eff7c1ccb58fcaaecf8f807778a79
1921ae4ea0d22e71e0d31d53cb39336859bf3a68
'2012-10-03T19:16:40-04:00'
describe
'32282' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJAH' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
5d67508c6b031871d02c3f5d77d053a9
23013285824e49f2195e90fbdc6c5938fd763b57
describe
'171026' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJAI' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
ddd75885726447a3b7c52ae90e0e74e1
139c277dffb353206ff424916fa1bd6899f8e3dd
'2012-10-03T19:16:07-04:00'
describe
'621224' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJAJ' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
555093809ed18231868e6d6a41819da2
6db6f70718e832e38668d2948a4e1fb7f4bd07f9
'2012-10-03T19:18:47-04:00'
describe
'25489' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJAK' 'sip-files00099.pro'
7c60569b93169829a062b83143ca9d6a
b1af8b089c15aecfaeadb6b273a8a8d38e0aa65f
'2012-10-03T19:16:25-04:00'
describe
'4993092' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJAL' 'sip-files00018.tif'
82bcac7cc06c9e5f98d0bfef06e9958c
49e89eea26ada66de5bb9db9ba149924dcff44e3
'2012-10-03T19:20:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJAM' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
bae9048fef79af310ffd28255e51a10a
bb5305adb4d346e58b67f10191dae62ebd3d4498
describe
'26113' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJAN' 'sip-files00008.pro'
148a5c507351e2fa0cc90b5d1cea9d29
a3e017971ddc6b04c2ed858b234094cc82e14e3b
'2012-10-03T19:18:52-04:00'
describe
'51164' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJAO' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
75cbb839f5f763ee5cccedaa60dad70b
f901962235867ff7bd5ed479dd43f95a9f64f307
describe
'33307' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJAP' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
34781140c32cb31506893b4e4242547f
2dc7a9bf685aae56f43a53a67e06c67ffce1db6e
'2012-10-03T19:14:58-04:00'
describe
'70942' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJAQ' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
63776dc3e4a651f9689e41c4eb744db9
26fe574f0f263fb3b8f588a2fa4e243b464ce905
'2012-10-03T19:18:55-04:00'
describe
'33453' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJAR' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
0876e9617d3b006d0bdd54e9f8f52684
bfa350ec9bd84ed144b6b9dc6d16d74c94c430a6
'2012-10-03T19:23:47-04:00'
describe
'48' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJAS' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
d036db271ea97f8f16b5852036611f07
5a476372f9297a07e3cc25d90826aee109fdfa26
'2012-10-03T19:21:25-04:00'
describe
'621099' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJAT' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
4e6bc9410c9c79030d68647adcc2d46e
f178ba2a594e3bda7c4e5483ddfcd3e323927422
'2012-10-03T19:16:35-04:00'
describe
'1693' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJAU' 'sip-files00055.txt'
b22f464a33c387a6a720604149f5472e
90e70d023aaf6fd46fc4fa78551159dfed2a7b4f
'2012-10-03T19:15:01-04:00'
describe
'180147' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJAV' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
9a91f371070314652f4749e49600327c
f3988d09019254a31557644bd61253c4f37b34a7
'2012-10-03T19:18:29-04:00'
describe
'1645' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJAW' 'sip-files00093.txt'
8b3a942e2b2821904516921741bd8274
eef059b2839b7461f26d792082584bb290d91971
'2012-10-03T19:18:12-04:00'
describe
'167556' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJAX' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
e2c1947840adfb483784baa75b64385d
ff6a5402c9470687dce5cd76c8a085f68baf56f7
'2012-10-03T19:19:28-04:00'
describe
'163780' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJAY' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
4de1457f7f53dcec4f5a3a6edd90fe6f
2b260483209f41797bb1bb7a558eb437a3109d73
'2012-10-03T19:16:18-04:00'
describe
'30240' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJAZ' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
a4059a69c521d218039d442ed814e9b0
f36495e8e22d1e8b2d74ebba878e452792a9ecdb
'2012-10-03T19:18:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJBA' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
b37f30d646d86f83d336dc9975860619
931d29a864ea335f901d75253f2010d66b1e8e4f
'2012-10-03T19:18:06-04:00'
describe
'43653' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJBB' 'sip-files00027.pro'
c60cbf88565c40cb032cda3a896b012a
7b16ff76b297ee533d18af979aea905e87a49b6a
'2012-10-03T19:18:09-04:00'
describe
'4992364' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJBC' 'sip-files00080.tif'
6c3fd08a49627a61b1da0f6b931c32a5
ca7f72146d6990a49874523807fee18e591b595b
'2012-10-03T19:14:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJBD' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
7ec85eed8b6e641dd1cdc58686b3aea0
6fe3c008c882141a0b20a88cb8f58009eb39c59b
'2012-10-03T19:16:51-04:00'
describe
'621289' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJBE' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
e8a74914ae0ec56d54a4a49d3ac30f95
6519784e8bc3f9b7b76de4ea93ef8d85cc569304
'2012-10-03T19:22:08-04:00'
describe
'4992888' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJBF' 'sip-files00038.tif'
1f74d277b56c12af20e152a72d690a65
4179c57b65b7b4a1bcddd9d20123dfcb570c6966
'2012-10-03T19:17:56-04:00'
describe
'167696' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJBG' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
0c28f57245c357117548b5aaca16ceec
54c690c706425229c1eabbae735d5d00204301d6
'2012-10-03T19:23:04-04:00'
describe
'171705' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJBH' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
fb9f85b79d2ce0e162edf4615d0c650e
8fc4f84e2f4b450aaf5dd48f47a28b80e3e6dc05
describe
'154231' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJBI' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
e957c05346852ff6458eef4005453d7b
cfee87c95492eaa749998cfdf41c0f70710d3405
'2012-10-03T19:14:26-04:00'
describe
'621233' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJBJ' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
91dc4f33b95e8911b70c8720854015e8
b8b3bf8575f1a05f0eed5f53b0940d5c5edcbbb3
'2012-10-03T19:14:36-04:00'
describe
'43738' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJBK' 'sip-files00015.pro'
4935deee8dbb95ac8423f5487ea1ce06
01602c5362551a40b4fb44ef9adbeb1d3bdd28ef
'2012-10-03T19:19:37-04:00'
describe
'33446' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJBL' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
27629bf22376eabdfb63f219441eb967
715e348542d540aafe394350d4163db0a4bf6b20
'2012-10-03T19:14:30-04:00'
describe
'72322' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJBM' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
cc0eb7bd60de97b189f4e676735f15e9
5b7e8ab0b9674522053c561366a63559dfc29c3c
describe
'621301' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJBN' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
d603e70506bfa92d20477fca7bedf3f7
8b26a52804053708b9b0163e605d46efaccbd358
'2012-10-03T19:22:01-04:00'
describe
'48143' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJBO' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
c68ec8cfc116c58b0864b0e448aeb4b1
a47fd5ed54414ba4822b209338fb46a8b3b784f4
describe
'55629' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJBP' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
532a3905a4b03620bdb376e963a31ba8
0180d8ecc5248790d89eb690be696bbd19ad5a09
'2012-10-03T19:14:54-04:00'
describe
'67790' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJBQ' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
b0bb0a078a5b705d2ced921beab0b285
fcc161a624bace1aa4b9d1e23ec6643808b25cf0
'2012-10-03T19:17:03-04:00'
describe
'34850' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJBR' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
b27255fb87d678e715d626e01adbbb72
ae529ff29472dec9c7105ee18c364784eb558cf0
'2012-10-03T19:18:54-04:00'
describe
'44789' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJBS' 'sip-files00083.pro'
a128f2680c451084786527e36f0d0730
3d3b3bf7f546a6357ba2a2dfbc479943254d3e9a
describe
'33836' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJBT' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
c776e682999ff6d51650f0d081bbb91a
4c31b0e72421765e87ca48170a6a4bcd9db7557f
'2012-10-03T19:15:13-04:00'
describe
'1559' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJBU' 'sip-files00062.txt'
9ee99c25c92333177a84f69fe94a68e8
3645a8c92c489a2cb33c73f98222ad0d55b80960
'2012-10-03T19:22:56-04:00'
describe
'4993040' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJBV' 'sip-files00031.tif'
452b411b39145d8ca2d1f90966e2ebab
20d745e9139711916921e8d98bfa40bc842ff738
'2012-10-03T19:16:00-04:00'
describe
'621213' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJBW' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
b7f0c5026e9c02904dc451c7b5a2ab51
92751ac5e3fc096e30e251b4688132fc9e66d3ed
describe
'1652' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJBX' 'sip-files00011.txt'
5c331a6b6ae85ac64b58cd7cd8d979a4
2561e49f0bc5978d720c1ba05ed5cdb880b817ed
'2012-10-03T19:23:16-04:00'
describe
'621288' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJBY' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
072d6ed263d7b43a9778fb2973e135d4
8e83a91b34062d2da5c8e3ac32a6a1e67c86eb86
describe
'70558' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJBZ' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
e3d0d7dbac626efbfed000b46afdd6f9
46cdbaddc667d4923f1bec5abc1546bcd0edaf27
'2012-10-03T19:16:36-04:00'
describe
'43804' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJCA' 'sip-files00053.pro'
96f9ffff4d3b085f53c3e28959e1d5ff
6b1feccd9ffc5bedd6e40567df07a694008abec8
'2012-10-03T19:17:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJCB' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
1b5c716646a2c28b69223c69d264a246
cb955d3ea0629a91bdbec7370d0b43803f0145df
'2012-10-03T19:18:04-04:00'
describe
'4993448' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJCC' 'sip-files00067.tif'
fd4bc444d4f2537b9e843866cf1144ce
9384562e951866e2276e8fc5b0d9453e499dff90
'2012-10-03T19:14:46-04:00'
describe
'161709' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJCD' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
53cbea9c6894932b58fcf6d4842bd5ff
772ba10ae89c3b8573c3714c67935ad4ba319b2a
'2012-10-03T19:18:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJCE' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
19aa112a8a9b213e1f7c300f06117783
46beafca95ccf24e259485e249b32fb9f11bc21e
'2012-10-03T19:15:20-04:00'
describe
'34642' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJCF' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
0aca3d3b35d7b6302fd9d620fc40a7c7
08df7fdf95a45705188ecb50015715abe0362349
'2012-10-03T19:15:29-04:00'
describe
'4993256' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJCG' 'sip-files00023.tif'
40f0f094b61b923a8f597eda938428a1
a5b5f3482e35416e1eba3be8b74bbb3b8044fddc
'2012-10-03T19:16:32-04:00'
describe
'33309' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJCH' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
3738d5b4030be966620e65a764a82789
72d2a88deb570c26013069605d0e0462e8986299
'2012-10-03T19:21:47-04:00'
describe
'167808' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJCI' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
ccf40cfb8d118834e4a1406f98005e91
3456c6de12eed77c6ebe46e58239ef401726f0da
'2012-10-03T19:17:21-04:00'
describe
'1723' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJCJ' 'sip-files00098.txt'
4f92371a07489b6463204c826249862c
3ec242ddee7fe9cb95012720bf475026645464a4
describe
'1014' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJCK' 'sip-files00024.txt'
e5ba02d6bbd50aca9bce02b2c3a6a727
92ed6dd9e27c03afaff475c57c9a66349a0939fc
'2012-10-03T19:15:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJCL' 'sip-files00061.tif'
549616dfdc0c2b8a383e604b2347da1c
84e031e99f5ae264292902354a981e4b1d103889
'2012-10-03T19:15:11-04:00'
describe
'4993332' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJCM' 'sip-files00063.tif'
f22a13bd93b653d42ea5fc0d5762389e
81be21fdad71fe8b8229a96595a0c7670b70036b
'2012-10-03T19:18:49-04:00'
describe
'4993204' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJCN' 'sip-files00014.tif'
74a1eecdf487cf8c2aaea42f39b4272c
66666e6a750029e9195b138d554e5cc80c61ba96
'2012-10-03T19:15:51-04:00'
describe
'33756' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJCO' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
72e516122baff71b9834cf4909048991
d9753cd564763d0bf13893f83cc4f7431bfbf225
describe
'620936' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJCP' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
118c388217335b6e78af2cb917c541a6
af14a412ee9a92a476e719d4db630312ff016cb8
describe
'621259' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJCQ' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
f41aba0c23ab301cdee0cf35cf41de44
42d080186932fe419d24ded615597478362c36d7
'2012-10-03T19:16:22-04:00'
describe
'67827' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJCR' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
baa78a40c142814045426ea025696889
b0fd2abb16d2e26b05bc9635cab54e507d02ad45
'2012-10-03T19:16:52-04:00'
describe
'4992816' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJCS' 'sip-files00099.tif'
7a35b707f4f42421e68591f7ac449547
89cb9f8953fab0dee5075e6626b7f4d4afa4aab4
describe
'147120' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJCT' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
5ad9a9962e9755741d7edcbabeeac72d
b75231b5f7c0cd64b62097eddcccac9b245fc1bf
'2012-10-03T19:16:54-04:00'
describe
'1800' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJCU' 'sip-files00085.txt'
1ab8c0de2c0416ec580f5a31528213fb
f6c513ffd70654bd436da50c197d478aee0c9f07
'2012-10-03T19:18:59-04:00'
describe
'40417' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJCV' 'sip-files00071.pro'
cec497276959b56629e6cdcefceda9b1
6f1bb5dc8f3268160c2dd4596e0e3a61eaf27b1a
'2012-10-03T19:16:46-04:00'
describe
'39282' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJCW' 'sip-files00062.pro'
f618bb4c6ff1948ce004430a1fff200a
23d41ef0b2e5bbf72645f61787dbf95377b79fc7
describe
'44821' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJCX' 'sip-files00030.pro'
8e0927a4bbee349a99527c75261a6592
1e0049e6dcf72ed9ff3b4f1b33e87bc805c7bf67
'2012-10-03T19:14:56-04:00'
describe
'4993036' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJCY' 'sip-files00095.tif'
55fe7297ced6ed09ec952bdb38b82e8b
092ef576194ba1f4a975e7edb65d37a735961de5
'2012-10-03T19:16:27-04:00'
describe
'91666' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJCZ' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
70fb803c3c2b9f6dd67d232659ca671d
14ffb6ef917486f76be64b330a3acc2415fd983c
'2012-10-03T19:17:57-04:00'
describe
'33388' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJDA' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
a9ded0a577fea64a8945f7494b81cf1e
9d2533e66050267f6062d28633e701f915412155
'2012-10-03T19:16:49-04:00'
describe
'70521' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJDB' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
2a7647cd27311a3a98bb3a2f4d11e185
53189cb20c0b9207f34fa04fe8fdb5ff586a98ba
'2012-10-03T19:17:20-04:00'
describe
'4993296' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJDC' 'sip-files00040.tif'
3c80cc9993e7c905dcfded6718d5d8cb
7147e26cb91a722a5dc635eb4ef93573f9fe76e7
'2012-10-03T19:19:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJDD' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
6bf4dbc42b9227950fbcadaf4d88a2e5
65c4939439b1c7f5f252f30be6a755e85abe998e
'2012-10-03T19:17:45-04:00'
describe
'45305' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJDE' 'sip-files00031.pro'
c3675a2d1204c0b573e6532b72f8df88
4972b44ed752bc7ec4490c153eef2d9ccd85d6e7
'2012-10-03T19:15:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJDF' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
527d5e4a7c401426742655f24edcb41b
0b77cf6d4a83bf84472409e4d7c865c547367687
'2012-10-03T19:14:51-04:00'
describe
'1783' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJDG' 'sip-files00088.txt'
b694a568f5d2d5076b360d63b886a1ef
1021b72ac4e5fe926926953dcd30fadc821c56f4
describe
'726' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJDH' 'sip-files00094.txt'
9f92172a78aa09251fdac929b5d8dda4
298c35020953ff46501d2ef226bfe70a06b4bd91
'2012-10-03T19:19:27-04:00'
describe
'621296' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJDI' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
4a7566ae81ef9b7ab2b48d7c597153a6
f47d61fabb0fa617d538c314f8218974137d6e62
'2012-10-03T19:18:27-04:00'
describe
'33449' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJDJ' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
bfeecd4e32c80ebcc725b1f965de6b33
3e31d49a6183dc71918f3fec990a670f3645a9e6
'2012-10-03T19:14:53-04:00'
describe
'45673' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJDK' 'sip-files00079.pro'
c28694e5623ae21aaaab121176bd95ca
0c4a593e664387043698fc107e18289c30bd8aaf
describe
'18512' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJDL' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
d1aef68949a476428bd83ea733c7a192
7a67aa4a1bbfc7711880d54919967e58e8c9f9b9
'2012-10-03T19:22:24-04:00'
describe
'68337' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJDM' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
2f1eb8367932c29e0301ca8c1c8feb8f
d3b8fa53ab83b5bbf845d141458cd0d43388f4e9
'2012-10-03T19:16:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJDN' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
a9a8b3b628a6b1d2df2fde12ba14e504
59b682c0a626d9a325576b85704255f18820b11a
describe
'43284' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJDO' 'sip-files00021.pro'
6a0db5dcadf6c8a2f34428f121dc1574
a6770b4a708b4911bf251f6241aebb1290589cec
describe
'22289' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJDP' 'sip-files00066.pro'
d98c1132a0d9eee494a951823ef4b578
51ac271f1d24eaa4c8e52405ddaa9025c4d60b54
'2012-10-03T19:14:24-04:00'
describe
'73615' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJDQ' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
3db064fc639a5c8d33a9c540607689d6
49b766766be159a4e689adb464849062dd1dce43
'2012-10-03T19:14:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJDR' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
f9d849bafb58424f401904b88ef0d54d
4033ac81afad6c49d014598ae833038ef46f62af
describe
'621249' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJDS' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
2d2262af7eb0b233d30f800f8681fd0e
20722892f95d9750d6fdb54fe2ac5202669873f6
'2012-10-03T19:16:30-04:00'
describe
'163423' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJDT' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
77cfd3a4e2a61d9bc14545db0f06d61d
9a95f755718b17d9b1bd05c0f0efdf2a397feb22
'2012-10-03T19:15:42-04:00'
describe
'20470' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJDU' 'sip-files00064.pro'
75324da546ee94f997b2f98320ee4ad9
06f627e39dfffcdf66c7b9e59aa0faa40f13db45
'2012-10-03T19:20:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJDV' 'sip-files00017.txt'
41e48fdccb6ebd90fbaf713abfacad6c
6555a74f87c5b2afe5a7faf3f813eb1d68016635
'2012-10-03T19:18:51-04:00'
describe
'71327' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJDW' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
edf6d2422e62455b5c5fbb8455edbd1b
b9c1173276bc64eb5748a21d183061bc66ceed20
'2012-10-03T19:16:44-04:00'
describe
'33751' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJDX' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
313f549f9f2f57b633fda90e36f9a92a
96f9ddcb819ec98bf15cf15f955035215733a71e
'2012-10-03T19:16:56-04:00'
describe
'4992948' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJDY' 'sip-files00030.tif'
e3f281516bd67553a522d5e5b036cbdc
36aa21ad6404bca0ecd6248770f7b03ddbb41747
describe
'4991452' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJDZ' 'sip-files00010.tif'
890699cb01958d46a37652669041a848
306106bd8430f6e5ca01edfe236ea7a931f572b8
'2012-10-03T19:23:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJEA' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
248a9121c7e336227406c48976ffc172
1f5d7c85a60b6ac94a4fb77f556b171245e4150d
'2012-10-03T19:15:57-04:00'
describe
'171096' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJEB' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
ec8e6c6b642a28800f55daffa3fac97b
ace263f5d937c98ab57c703cf549723f3886727b
'2012-10-03T19:15:52-04:00'
describe
'604' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJEC' 'sip-files00050.txt'
bf3232906d7b25db852c3cd210d20a80
eb10fac1a9f7f29aa21fc7409424a7c146262a31
'2012-10-03T19:17:40-04:00'
describe
'42842' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJED' 'sip-files00025.pro'
7eb787e32f3ed4bca81b4082a378e4ee
55192ee70bde4d11543f566e24175a4a98759757
'2012-10-03T19:15:39-04:00'
describe
'33225' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJEE' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
c9758e8d0b8270e5686c5bfcbca830c9
332a08168d1c343e063ede611ca128ea53f5ff92
describe
'172813' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJEF' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
f47eb1a83ab475b9ffc1504c8457c20e
c9b06296d34afc1a59c99f6d53a669860eab3971
'2012-10-03T19:17:51-04:00'
describe
'71105' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJEG' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
ee9095fbc7ea30e7cbb75e139452c43c
3a3669b262ad807d0a46a1bee72d19188cbf62b6
'2012-10-03T19:15:28-04:00'
describe
'621256' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJEH' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
f7a9e82993a11751766380b8803212fd
24a1c194824127fd4796af86e6cf0f8f9c063b62
'2012-10-03T19:19:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJEI' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
acc7b6c649bba55b525ac5a1bda4059f
4109097335786ce401846e09f99b62c60cf86cc6
'2012-10-03T19:18:34-04:00'
describe
'51199' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJEJ' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
84d24b2bb200d4a4e060ba57940758dd
416fd073c2fa2a62c17d8fde95dd8633a0bfee74
describe
'4992648' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJEK' 'sip-files00053.tif'
13f797fc172bc3930701a24d01d79f1e
db0a3443df78631c563878d149661819dcc0d00f
describe
'72921' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJEL' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
d95d781ec74752399a96d599a6c40f99
47716ae36206132c3931209dc405c4de24d4b189
'2012-10-03T19:22:15-04:00'
describe
'24183' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJEM' 'sip-files00032.pro'
8b09c8cdc577fb29f139491900d74562
fc680b3ee34e42bc5f4ef5ea1f0b0d3e21dd11d8
describe
'4993292' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJEN' 'sip-files00059.tif'
602fc726416cabb7c2e6cd165cd2e433
067e234a20a3edeaf6f46c7e08a3b0991a193f3c
'2012-10-03T19:20:00-04:00'
describe
'1001' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJEO' 'sip-files00070.txt'
4f905864b453c61b85b2e7652298f592
7b2cd0290d068cf7c36f14e94fac0d88d97fd3b2
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJEP' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
ecb8648ed309e102b9bb9b0394dcbc19
e92f32bebe440a0993b20e1ad5976fec4c9db696
describe
'1772' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJEQ' 'sip-files00078.txt'
1b705c18949d03e102fadbe671686c20
fcf1fc4b7e04de983a93ddfac2ddf95c99c60dd2
'2012-10-03T19:14:31-04:00'
describe
'33443' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJER' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
18d95bab24c16252638ebfab709b7ed1
2c2ad16c1c8150d384976e84899556f0ae581c18
'2012-10-03T19:22:30-04:00'
describe
'621264' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJES' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
9e69ed0194c590e33406db57a5b4e888
e02e5b4f204ac1e714db0fddd0770f427f0aa9ed
'2012-10-03T19:22:05-04:00'
describe
'182180' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJET' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
37810695b6730f3de9820f1da1513c22
b554cae10a558560b70c85ac1315938778590ca4
'2012-10-03T19:17:32-04:00'
describe
'22023' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJEU' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
4fc548063b91b2e4368c15f089fc21c7
783818a138477b13f95efa983adf0407be41f8d5
describe
'4992108' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJEV' 'sip-files00090.tif'
eb34c9797da2c4f06e70b3ab84211fa8
f92cc7070ddbe420701abd77acc758e778c2adee
'2012-10-03T19:14:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJEW' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
586c4318ab7f86a4b3394b2a0594ad4f
db756102b307e99d947819859f84fd24d6cad827
'2012-10-03T19:15:33-04:00'
describe
'621274' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJEX' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
76617349bc3fdb300fd39eae6bba6903
3473f20a5b20288140a29b0b569c3c1edd6596eb
describe
'74016' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJEY' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
9ae89f13e37ebda45d4c04e3d3b28f40
e1b7f03e9e602ff4e6e1d6dae9c2da69deaff32d
'2012-10-03T19:15:23-04:00'
describe
'621275' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJEZ' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
c03207cd5fe6bcc7e461615cb25e0696
b8533996f9337ab9e912e6fa0fcdf74d1af4068b
describe
'42430' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJFA' 'sip-files00037.pro'
43944ac2c39c879bd9875086b8311516
3ff5b9867ef7ea35eec1661dbaec5f85587dfe86
describe
'4992808' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJFB' 'sip-files00094.tif'
fd611ae4d571b7f94bcdca432910ae67
b43c85402ccb3c8084f136a4787e23f04d4dbc1d
'2012-10-03T19:17:13-04:00'
describe
'34173' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJFC' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
9c192f052355394767e82c3d1c2ad1d6
192b7757f08c8037f232b1172be1943a7e3494c7
describe
'170478' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJFD' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
e7f8f2cf318353379153e983209fb703
8836e84eb249f41486c2d13479ed48e7bb28874f
'2012-10-03T19:18:03-04:00'
describe
'34039' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJFE' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
7ecc7ae16378b53e919cc8a6ef345efe
98a8edf784a1b3cbab26f04288a4473368409c3b
'2012-10-03T19:16:03-04:00'
describe
'71147' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJFF' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
16cd110b6816beb8da26891bfd9d223c
0e549a4456f2e544ab72c41151e3a52a1d15dade
'2012-10-03T19:19:15-04:00'
describe
'29288' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJFG' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
c74888a70ee7249ab3c4b0bef92cb0ec
959cbe848cc182d3de6164615d6b9f90f6a84867
'2012-10-03T19:15:05-04:00'
describe
'161643' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJFH' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
d823263f575975269c1d5d5484bb19b9
04d415437c161eacf2471be7558193f73d2f6c7d
'2012-10-03T19:17:49-04:00'
describe
'72173' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJFI' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
4395c33d85cd9f03c43bec3cfba433a6
fac3fb44a241e7f345fe27fb9d707d0f73d70fd5
describe
'1754' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJFJ' 'sip-files00069.txt'
6e46429b2bdafc74d9a304708cc2aed7
197977325b04d5782f5d8e2df8cc2dcbe1d29557
'2012-10-03T19:16:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJFK' 'sip-files00100.tif'
d6b12b94093c3cfee63a5fc6d565144d
6e4e92c6a76e075e93c6952ad74d577672cf21c5
'2012-10-03T19:20:12-04:00'
describe
'45692' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJFL' 'sip-files00085.pro'
817e2e19082fd27ba75dfd773c255444
4c8dbb33c7419cf9cdd91650c4723d2c067665ad
'2012-10-03T19:16:12-04:00'
describe
'160195' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJFM' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
a00d65db8d1dec1362037fc956c34cd3
aa8a8efc1f47f7ae5e0189014c8c317af2a46711
describe
'171044' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJFN' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
e70733ab57e4d0c456aaa2f127208cc4
9f40fdb6f41b7ce896188f2cb2fea306b2b42390
describe
'72812' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJFO' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
4556815caaa68b377a92b631d6004525
71307d2defb8f7ae3d0906333375eb1bceeb2221
describe
'1708' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJFP' 'sip-files00043.txt'
e3aa4439532918c9d88b3f93a21ba531
7075bdd9e8375f2d1d5b63561dbfd26d6ce7c010
'2012-10-03T19:15:37-04:00'
describe
'168735' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJFQ' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
0cc42a04f6d6a89e676372b1c39c3c49
ad1f4dbc71cef2fd21f1b062bdc6e19cdcad6d34
describe
'56145' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJFR' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
af12b89081577c28d031c6092d4fcfa2
bd7f092230fa9bae370812ebb9e6247fab8bee5c
'2012-10-03T19:18:53-04:00'
describe
'24071' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJFS' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
8cd444212cb0006f517e8e843d72d4a6
95e4ae40e2bcca658ec26641589adb88c44244d3
describe
'42750' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJFT' 'sip-files00020.pro'
d4f1135fade5ce3bb646151718a784a6
0c3e21de32988ad063b959024328e9f0fdae41b6
describe
'346' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJFU' 'sip-files00006.txt'
5e71dd0af9dd4935339431bd8f90b34a
32752e917c4455c4785365563b8eef8c19ef7739
'2012-10-03T19:16:59-04:00'
describe
'72749' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJFV' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
7c4204c0c8338d9ef20746bd8681a152
0b05d41549ab1a2f26cd1f1506097c3304305244
describe
'25189' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJFW' 'sip-files00029.pro'
e6d9a7e4894623c57b338f80064277f8
a21a116dfb80b4972c0de20f04408e5c4b18ee7d
'2012-10-03T19:22:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJFX' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
738812188c8924fd5ac6de8df3fdae24
b87d54b0f17d5aa00c6e7150d975f552d5fc537b
'2012-10-03T19:16:11-04:00'
describe
'661171' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJFY' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
299e58e65994e8d28e1c8b171161148d
c974e8b66d9e7eb9e191ba2867ca08235bacd6fe
describe
'171049' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJFZ' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
ea61f1696c8c236ab423ae6baaf1996e
e104dec5e1a1e2882b4a43aaa17ed2bdc0a9785b
'2012-10-03T19:23:59-04:00'
describe
'36963' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJGA' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
9c00c1b29b18cdb14bb27fea6dc3aef8
29c2a092e4fb758407c0e05f91fe213759d86aea
'2012-10-03T19:19:08-04:00'
describe
'651956' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJGB' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
2c64cea79d71b4acf76f54fa77e2c385
911bdf60459ee34d4ebdeac027f3c0d94ff07cfa
'2012-10-03T19:17:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJGC' 'sip-files00037.tif'
689f87e7e976a74957f07f396254e243
47d23eab82a03e89fc3f4f5494b9a01e401bb834
'2012-10-03T19:17:11-04:00'
describe
'621221' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJGD' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
1eaa1fc045e90efef084ae89d96b0d19
239411ecdea7575a829e97abd3bb111f141ebed8
'2012-10-03T19:14:45-04:00'
describe
'998' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJGE' 'sip-files00032.txt'
79373011a1adfe8f21ae5d64d67bc672
fe58cbce4a3a198140699a67f012377bd214012e
'2012-10-03T19:16:16-04:00'
describe
'4993436' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJGF' 'sip-files00068.tif'
4032802e00c0d666692c3920d56b33df
b0702386cb69ad9d3317858f6489f202d413d9fd
describe
'126851' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJGG' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
9dc2e055a799957a8beb582678bc7403
bdd2adc118b7201a77260c86b58a6af42a35a471
describe
'23385' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJGH' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
b2cc2309715e8042f3623f8db0c86bfc
632b2e97f11c40a857398a1012bf9f48c33ff21a
describe
'71989' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJGI' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
8ba5ffea4d7cb06ea2657d4d818c6bf2
4c60a4e678be0ba511735a585881071639b50766
'2012-10-03T19:17:47-04:00'
describe
'33414' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJGJ' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
65e67c2b37acf371f3e5d03605bb6299
912c470251b1cdae405e6fc997dbea5d9b0b7536
describe
'1682' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJGK' 'sip-files00020.txt'
0b575addceb98c66add337e534e734af
e0b15407734f8ee44bd4cad7c61e4ddc8f15c5fe
describe
Invalid character
'621286' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJGL' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
844589803f85e03bb5b27a0c4e9f4406
c6c2e53bc1fc397948d7afe3a186e2a5a3c630b6
describe
'621292' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJGM' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
12c16afe9b6b3f20b60ed73c50b7604b
be1d554280d4033d398aeb36fc378a25895607bf
'2012-10-03T19:14:57-04:00'
describe
'1554' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJGN' 'sip-files00059.txt'
06c02ae071f6be2324f7ea00ffea82b1
c50e9ca15a5cd41058755693bcb014ce615fa2f3
'2012-10-03T19:21:41-04:00'
describe
'161564' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJGO' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
1d8e17a6f8677423b1a3a4510b5688ec
d23a953c0be8db8d8c25ea22b9b3ed6003059fcf
describe
'4993016' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJGP' 'sip-files00054.tif'
a7403f847b5e2273af36d6e79c58c3ea
fe68b03950632c122b26e353a05cde773d6cef60
'2012-10-03T19:15:04-04:00'
describe
'44769' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJGQ' 'sip-files00035.pro'
e762007bf48ceb3d3e74025990912789
474a75fcafe8aa90a18ff06b1635dc6634923d99
'2012-10-03T19:15:31-04:00'
describe
'14723' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJGR' 'sip-files00090.pro'
0aa19adf2430609dffca07dfd13b48ba
b8ab4b7dc14816b79d029265b12a4313d8511ee3
'2012-10-03T19:22:00-04:00'
describe
'33566' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJGS' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
5eef02e8bc8d670d5ba2b4196c6343fd
3e0559192ed878d6f0637efe82a287c53f1b2078
describe
'19281' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJGT' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
9222de92468887e96f28bfdc6c27096e
a728d339383557238aa12d6d7b9c4fa644ca485c
describe
'34151' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJGU' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
d65d0528c7e7b767c53ea5a673e41234
00161b9da13ed2565efba14a1eb95549ce6b7ac9
describe
'567' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJGV' 'sip-files00076.txt'
63fd82843fc44c677f0709437a1c5fb5
51157da719a0139cda54855b11ff36246f700e09
describe
'66160' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJGW' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
3102b49effdca3942acd9dc6af6f5a2e
9ca3ac976867e454fb9627e359d742996bb23f86
describe
'621260' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJGX' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
7086acbec35d5e5c17460c6b479fc796
ef074ffec5119885f382b23452d15a7a5d67518c
describe
'4992920' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJGY' 'sip-files00097.tif'
8a77b5fa4b60f92538f7413d79976e6b
bcfe360b314fa0df445d67d58fa67be3b81df0ef
'2012-10-03T19:16:37-04:00'
describe
'44108' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJGZ' 'sip-files00069.pro'
6ca9c395419e04a264fbd144ee49fd10
1ec76866830c9a22c321cd8821e156f8b61e0aca
'2012-10-03T19:20:58-04:00'
describe
'4993252' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJHA' 'sip-files00072.tif'
6d1905108ad04c53898b9deca71e41e1
c3fc306f6fe12b2a7a7fdb28b2ee2c5a33841456
'2012-10-03T19:23:36-04:00'
describe
'1789' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJHB' 'sip-files00079.txt'
401cb9ee04d29cb64eeaeaea026761d1
b180df93205ffcff6492b3581d22660981715b3d
describe
Invalid character
'70941' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJHC' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
290e4cf6f23e08af21be0976747a7196
ace32de47f2dbedaff741b1d45814dac8e0e4907
'2012-10-03T19:15:41-04:00'
describe
'171704' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJHD' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
4ce442e4973616c3f7b45aee972bce48
9ce13ebf33631e6130a908301e35c6b025178384
'2012-10-03T19:18:58-04:00'
describe
'134339' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJHE' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
f37a6305a667357fff64911eab25a013
c2168f2f7101ec7df22d23040c168eb82cc67466
'2012-10-03T19:17:59-04:00'
describe
'33111' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJHF' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
c6def9a00c596259e2c6ad5a9200afcd
d846681a4acc189b7eb15a5a8ed8acbccd0e5cce
'2012-10-03T19:17:09-04:00'
describe
'44485' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJHG' 'sip-files00065.pro'
5f7e29731615236acda6c85f3fd90cab
4c85038046b00053f5d0743f9500f7af197a6f59
describe
'4992936' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJHH' 'sip-files00011.tif'
73fb5e3b37ddc9bca3844acc35602dab
50734be8a2faa5bf02596464f11942eb6e1294e8
'2012-10-03T19:18:00-04:00'
describe
'25017' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJHI' 'sip-files00084.pro'
b7676b89269e47b1ea64bad966f98480
6131275cae6c7dc0942dcf36b22b1f594d185c64
'2012-10-03T19:16:31-04:00'
describe
'1758' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJHJ' 'sip-files00030.txt'
d137a85950a9805917eeacc34b845dfb
ec42c2caac155d36f3a6e957f9e75df623bc020c
'2012-10-03T19:17:53-04:00'
describe
'621284' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJHK' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
38d4b26c481f5c99dad9b8b9050a7367
49ae4b757ece32496f508a15187a4816185d9079
'2012-10-03T19:17:48-04:00'
describe
'136389' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJHL' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
d36dc89489c151b4b3bbb05fa0246431
bd60fdc6c871be880f667f749633c3f633a4eb23
describe
'67287' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJHM' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
9f51b90c8b184f28dea9263aa2c7ca51
776755624e4e963b2b455e85f58e4d040dbf7e86
'2012-10-03T19:15:59-04:00'
describe
'167754' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJHN' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
e6bbdc2ac3944afc89b4a7cd12d9be1b
4006007344f498e91482618da90d94745a580903
'2012-10-03T19:23:09-04:00'
describe
'128095' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJHO' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
0f53c5effa093f91cb0b4ad16c197b74
e58b421f3a855a6fcabdbfe9327031db618790dc
'2012-10-03T19:17:42-04:00'
describe
'33970' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJHP' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
c98e4bf2b7d16d56c0cb9b97dfb7ca2a
759a4e60c440e8f26d18e64be88d21bbb3362e1a
'2012-10-03T19:19:49-04:00'
describe
'4993236' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJHQ' 'sip-files00027.tif'
79f3b27485b7094c449ca4cb57f49fa7
6e9282c9686377c33eb7c87ee91f2664bd48a85c
'2012-10-03T19:14:50-04:00'
describe
'24512' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJHR' 'sip-files00024.pro'
26d0c31a91cb6336a87df09bd8e62e2f
627672a119d3747d682f8db47faa4d0d9a8505bb
describe
'17891' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJHS' 'sip-files00016.pro'
b38943d4c351752c33916272c596c219
4b64f71de1301aa2829a2619f628f72cb6114138
describe
'1780' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJHT' 'sip-files00052.txt'
3c4ebff10a06ba5cb98106da6c599fd6
69ec81874124e7d6aa6b80945675ef7d67408246
'2012-10-03T19:14:40-04:00'
describe
'33922' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJHU' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
484f25672b6af3d5315f157061710add
5b0de25b901481fa1fec5cddebbd50fa4bd33dee
'2012-10-03T19:16:42-04:00'
describe
'165267' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJHV' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
070eb1d60d93cecd830ace812af50a78
5014ff8f79ae9d5051a0673be9292a5cea416538
'2012-10-03T19:20:47-04:00'
describe
'40995' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJHW' 'sip-files00063.pro'
a762d303e93293e9311fa057a0d856f6
e22756396b805aac04e71cb6ed1ecd59d8ef715a
describe
'15185' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJHX' 'sip-files00041.pro'
9eb191787790c935ff0303cfb7191fc0
485f65bb681e6f4628ed270586c295eb203e942d
describe
'34210' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJHY' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
c5478767ec97e7b0a405b25bfc586f9e
a9dee1ce989ff0419c0cdacade3a3f11f8b8e4a0
'2012-10-03T19:16:14-04:00'
describe
'44046' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJHZ' 'sip-files00086.pro'
882b0009a21ae3b519cc98a1b2fbc24d
8bd58024d920dd923da08f3f9f6e6d84abd613a5
'2012-10-03T19:19:39-04:00'
describe
'4993180' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJIA' 'sip-files00065.tif'
6168c9394f58c0f300463d0230e72afd
26395e11643a80374a05b10e95309a2c099b543e
'2012-10-03T19:14:59-04:00'
describe
'33271' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJIB' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
5ada66f2af21e4f605a8716e3cb531c8
c9c425bd916d595c1cfdf19d734792b1fc0139e7
'2012-10-03T19:18:33-04:00'
describe
'1543' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJIC' 'sip-files00061.txt'
0e11db3d0f6460418c8d5b9431b4ffb3
d3a977c1edabee701a42c5d54784342ee363b0dd
'2012-10-03T19:19:25-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'57326' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJID' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
07a516e974c7259780e3f73d011096a3
6338e7c239f63f753a631a5b5c0491dce02956b6
'2012-10-03T19:17:43-04:00'
describe
'175702' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJIE' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
42b90005319e316eab7ba6b42f57584e
2e0cd87df54a294fe0190b31c369d091a00583b0
'2012-10-03T19:19:21-04:00'
describe
'33859' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJIF' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
e8e15be242f91bdffded7e447bcbdda6
fd35abd60856e90880b43cf6fcb6dc742425998e
describe
'1702' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJIG' 'sip-files00012.txt'
8079fe6140103e158aa6c1ddf3f2c8a8
c25123280fa9d78ac39ef320a4a5dced7b871460
'2012-10-03T19:17:30-04:00'
describe
'1619' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJIH' 'sip-files00063.txt'
3110188c4664f4d1b890035be41033ef
c4b7e86e6eb23d63634e8c58f883d817de11ac89
'2012-10-03T19:15:00-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1746' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJII' 'sip-files00065.txt'
6acee8c3a55b12277bbe03e57f1ee285
23796f052fc5ddc813d438948b06cc4edc06c78b
describe
'703' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJIJ' 'sip-files00100.txt'
cb74ae7606ec71709497b0d9591083fc
834643361b4b9ba0f1353556a3200feecbc45d03
'2012-10-03T19:18:11-04:00'
describe
'32777' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJIK' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
55f944cbe09cf2623a47932c6e19a323
57ff7fe474fc174212feb52c18866c4c81d7d1be
'2012-10-03T19:23:34-04:00'
describe
'134449' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJIL' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
db256b12992cde98794cbe009577a4f6
cdd11efc4d8da351e4cc8527423ba8e22b7d616e
'2012-10-03T19:15:38-04:00'
describe
'162247' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJIM' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
1a9453868d0387aefc7a7a06a08a8e8f
40d3025ba06819a445342e47ea75b12ed6a125db
'2012-10-03T19:23:18-04:00'
describe
'25419' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJIN' 'sip-files00046.pro'
d50ba23924e3961c6b512c8c19891fdd
dc8918c13c9d00075464c203a2658de38abe50e4
'2012-10-03T19:17:39-04:00'
describe
'621303' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJIO' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
33b5c2fd5f6e152734cca8e4bae02687
988a5d3c2ac8627211cd1cfe2fdeaed3be46d155
describe
'1868' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJIP' 'sip-files00028.txt'
071f49297a4e739e866d0d644b90883b
ae9f8ad6eb8a555d306633cbbb501e25f94e1cac
'2012-10-03T19:22:58-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1696' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJIQ' 'sip-files00074.txt'
04e673005e57ad2ef1f22711c3766c59
d9edbe2f6fa398246f6014bbab5f5961765c4071
'2012-10-03T19:17:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJIR' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
2e066c7aee2e0f4ef6bdfe52febd9081
9bb5f2bbd5573bd2fb1bd1e4abceb10ce56ab644
'2012-10-03T19:15:35-04:00'
describe
'621267' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJIS' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
8c7367dfc284c8e5e7f4302f5526a4ef
b75a37636f5793c4a71f0ac6cd33e868c9de4b4f
'2012-10-03T19:15:48-04:00'
describe
'57455' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJIT' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
c4f11b86f3a5d5127cf37046c9ca888f
f34b8042490f909fa0b0fff4470a4e46eeafca76
describe
'621250' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJIU' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
2c0d7605e74a97032fc667d2dd46972f
08c326186fafccc33d1d604252e6b7c3577af280
'2012-10-03T19:22:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJIV' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
eafc859b677f5cb2154c549148071ae1
031259008ecad1e60d55b9e58daccc9a52470e66
'2012-10-03T19:18:05-04:00'
describe
'638739' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJIW' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
ae527ea7d59666c240ebaff5072d674e
74879c705e6cbde17b1ef8787619d497febf05ab
'2012-10-03T19:18:57-04:00'
describe
'64261' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJIX' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
93d8e936801cdf926662bf4715e0fbd8
77edbce7098dc64b8d323e5b630c9e4b80056740
'2012-10-03T19:19:45-04:00'
describe
'43141' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJIY' 'sip-files00067.pro'
75216975b5e7625222bea1ec0c399eeb
338aa7b6e7a60016ca01db1ae07075575057f928
'2012-10-03T19:17:54-04:00'
describe
'4993228' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJIZ' 'sip-files00024.tif'
7678ed15c7befa96674e1ef494f6e930
24e1509fe9f0bc748dc8403305b134181848e681
describe
'33851' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJJA' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
214f97fabff3ff2541af44a341b94845
32066a97a8731ed42cd03b08cfbc36b63b256bab
describe
'621282' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJJB' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
649bd454af48759e5786f9744ef8a624
90b07beb1a423417a198282c19c1d22b2429b4f9
describe
'86806' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJJC' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
cb96e770e3640d2df63f7d7330d14012
c315d1fae330319a735ad83e129ef626865d8435
'2012-10-03T19:16:26-04:00'
describe
'160529' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJJD' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
160fde62bd5d092ee7f080173f7807e7
d488d7e1927323b061fa4f221b2e827b48aeb46b
'2012-10-03T19:23:25-04:00'
describe
'70773' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJJE' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
f71f16db0067eaa0353833006680eb25
449c624dddb9372d165712f8fae70a5ed9151908
'2012-10-03T19:16:53-04:00'
describe
'15892320' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJJF' 'sip-files00001.tif'
b6461bada798e6bd1bc1371dad0f9c6e
deb0e5924ddcc4df9444bb8301cc72f56221a44f
'2012-10-03T19:15:02-04:00'
describe
'173532' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJJG' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
a31cea9e9d911c47e47a7b6ff7ce145e
583ddce0e5b8c1e1ed35e9ade4c04207a62f5ab9
'2012-10-03T19:17:19-04:00'
describe
'33771' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJJH' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
311f887edd1964797d154fb95526d085
05c74f08cefdfc9900e0bc697df94713635e037c
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJJI' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
bf9d73c30807ed8e16d8e9b8207f0e91
833191a9f926a8cfb2a4314c026be4c9f66cddd3
describe
'1766' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJJJ' 'sip-files00091.txt'
7d566e4fac550c4235ffdff7514cbeb5
478d9c1690553dc248e270a3ef54f2209aeee7d2
'2012-10-03T19:17:55-04:00'
describe
'4993224' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJJK' 'sip-files00013.tif'
1d133e8ebc8edceb88d8ff86448865c1
753e824d6809d3d38dc046b72d5a65b2c8527e93
describe
'6415' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJJL' 'sip-files00006.pro'
6b67b0c83de160b30b254bf2cadf47d9
1c533df21975604c65da8d7a58dbfe394ae44ebe
'2012-10-03T19:21:52-04:00'
describe
'35073' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJJM' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
8eaa04c242539642ec0879df2de0aac5
07370b68d3bd7701f116e235b7d52a079d2b3af9
'2012-10-03T19:21:31-04:00'
describe
'173903' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJJN' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
22a6dad0dfd556b6dc222297b22d7d5d
7fc226996ce1d666e8e0705e67341d29d03e2066
describe
'621293' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJJO' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
70d3c7074307c29e810e9454480ca8a2
7b093218250824a3386024ca612d3b05e5c7c2a5
describe
'72300' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJJP' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
5586642015aae76d3556a3add36e5667
11869280d1fff0e427932c7af25268d05ba0ae74
describe
'621169' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJJQ' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
02cfd326363d9ca645a12aeb5f3c68df
d4e3d0c5996ff7f2d93aa33e4842cd96ac99c707
describe
'32958' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJJR' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
7801087b40a3dfb0ecf2e9ca2b61c568
fdde97ea45f48232abe8eaf5fa20d5a47a6bff4f
describe
'4991208' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJJS' 'sip-files00006.tif'
38b5bdf823aea061f353fd60ec2147a1
958dcb70d6fd1e00a7b614386cd7bb78b5185ca7
'2012-10-03T19:22:59-04:00'
describe
'60116' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJJT' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
1a3b57ca71d1cf75460835a8a261438b
ea9ca8bef8e9a72ea3974aaca36bd1b721173123
'2012-10-03T19:17:41-04:00'
describe
'15145' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJJU' 'sip-files00026.pro'
c63d8901de959823df1c98d8b79e1369
9a0888f53519184875e0841a2ecd54d3a639805b
'2012-10-03T19:19:05-04:00'
describe
'25176' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJJV' 'sip-files00044.pro'
6c88b8c6d790b87f138e90299b27e5ca
3cd40e6e2863df70396564572632758a6960fbef
'2012-10-03T19:17:44-04:00'
describe
'71057' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJJW' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
3cbfe2db5e4f8edb935a1c52843c1456
dda2a9085d6b7298e31f668fffb8a9f1a2786a6f
'2012-10-03T19:17:28-04:00'
describe
'159570' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJJX' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
a04a6a269d9673ddc30ecab12d026704
38f3463e593de2a9bc642a539f3f918b10a72a78
'2012-10-03T19:22:53-04:00'
describe
'167984' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJJY' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
b72a1d60c9aefbd7c405c34f9250d7ac
3921c203a4cb2c73756fb3ea28f676bf9b2046b3
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJJZ' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
0aac7f22641589bb30adb8d58bce5471
228844a1641a9ceec208b7b786ef1e06e1673eba
describe
'9219' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJKA' 'sip-files00010.pro'
2b96c906a7b4d646ba2c0180780180ea
d7635f67aa34ab34b9bd57d7a07df400ce898b5f
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJKB' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
29d4c20c4dacfefe0bc9b6c758371ec8
a8d0a0712bb59ebed7e1b2213719625ef012613e
describe
'71038' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJKC' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
07cc77b922eb36785c293914079e19f7
c68cfbafaeb1497bd93a5c2f48fbb838eb8fc895
'2012-10-03T19:16:04-04:00'
describe
'63941' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJKD' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
cc852fdeaea73d90ae6dadbe6b921d42
8bee011b3f0bed59247331d48961328b3473bf7b
'2012-10-03T19:17:22-04:00'
describe
'4993248' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJKE' 'sip-files00092.tif'
1294e77d609c25c9777678a0081adeca
414ff4fec4046e2951ee85fbc190bdc6255a8c2c
'2012-10-03T19:14:27-04:00'
describe
'19145' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJKF' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
1695916beed6af91d7dc12b99221ac90
7937c9bcb7a8992c8ce0c05c1152990fb1ddf89a
'2012-10-03T19:19:20-04:00'
describe
'731' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJKG' 'sip-files00016.txt'
d654259041b3abdc6cfaf11fca908f6f
bf1610baf80bfa9b647114372c70a9a90229d233
describe
'4988056' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJKH' 'sip-files00009.tif'
216d34bef399e48a3e2192c902fef9ba
e340e260f67d24b91482812334cfcfa266a6b348
'2012-10-03T19:15:10-04:00'
describe
'621145' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJKI' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
b475746c46b795b21c5543aa370583e1
309618af713e6fb3d9d454b04196592ee87ae8db
describe
'33476' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJKJ' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
146a4d98cb74b664e23c14e4a91424ba
f271d6952a559162668a4f4cb1b6d60e5a843d43
describe
'43590' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJKK' 'sip-files00033.pro'
9b5a98b8b5693bab19ce7bf3b569337a
f4d018291c6830721ed7e7df2ba3f66022d113a2
'2012-10-03T19:15:56-04:00'
describe
'64938' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJKL' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
4e28ea11615bd29f3e6ff9aa1fc5b839
31dec0171bb09e72acab4c42e1247415174306eb
'2012-10-03T19:15:36-04:00'
describe
'4993068' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJKM' 'sip-files00096.tif'
3665c09d4a173941846bc4fd45c4dcc3
0dd99296e4359e3ef418a4171fb895e75136d30e
'2012-10-03T19:19:54-04:00'
describe
'172150' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJKN' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
9c76adc2d74a5162ea95659026215e8a
ab842cd523b30b38a8be26ca91f255c9de7f2edb
'2012-10-03T19:16:48-04:00'
describe
'71465' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJKO' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
d259b7e92153cad41f5d3224c19aab64
2ee365c485a7616843db57a63c2c78f2d96fc290
'2012-10-03T19:16:38-04:00'
describe
'173232' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJKP' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
4755b0983c9262fd55f052fae8331f8b
a1a21df56ddeb31962306b038a529c35d2694c22
'2012-10-03T19:15:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJKQ' 'sip-files00035.tif'
aa0e325856dd612e4857bb4b36972952
e8baadf0c3410f442e6f75bf1595c02183b758db
describe
'600' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJKR' 'sip-files00026.txt'
5f74dfc7c0260ebebb6f6396ff478417
f0d9e64bc85ff9855eb1f1e3a3e60558ffedf9cf
describe
'74325' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJKS' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
f3a1fc9302a4af55c19f18153d2065c7
ae56443ff835810a87243a5d3b1d746d0852fbd0
describe
'29319' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJKT' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
b88670ee80e33f2c1f680fc7b4c8ef36
ed5b4037a7dca90d9b619450066a943981a11cf9
'2012-10-03T19:17:06-04:00'
describe
'55948' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJKU' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
40faab009692fe5b6a8d0cea32a17b1c
da16528018f56f9d53d021fc237174496add8be6
'2012-10-03T19:15:26-04:00'
describe
'63233' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJKV' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
ed8669d4e679ca6f5fe98f750fc8e36d
59965cbe7d00797aa09af1df8c200c0c7f272adf
'2012-10-03T19:16:17-04:00'
describe
'492799' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJKW' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
e395badc6ed3aacc7bc29de67f5d4578
f78b7b239c23ee73c533b993547dbfec0f0a993b
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJKX' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
47e3aafd2b7f5a37c169d1774b43e416
8d33cbad5ebf5dbb7a93ec5003498ef04cb55dd5
describe
'74910' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJKY' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
64e841b330ee218683f126afb982cea9
efb52e7ee95a8bbaa570df59b174d22690367a9f
describe
'34388' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJKZ' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
3be34133978afed44a5a03a0cb5c16fb
44c23693230b8180ee8d08b82c96277660a10af5
'2012-10-03T19:19:57-04:00'
describe
'15348492' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJLA' 'sip-files00003.tif'
26f8cc92c8f397e3b46c078a630cdd0d
aa169f2557b9d33135136b355e5fd667a5a2d842
'2012-10-03T19:21:54-04:00'
describe
'62043' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJLB' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
e9bd1b1e7221076af2cb60f0f57f8a6f
4e80ec5961007eb90e0be16906c7b038a98bce30
'2012-10-03T19:15:06-04:00'
describe
'175780' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJLC' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
f001c2e119e9140b374f6dcb80c82361
6b9d6ef755eb6a4cbb33ccf0a3c5974f7126b7f3
'2012-10-03T19:16:08-04:00'
describe
'4993084' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJLD' 'sip-files00015.tif'
68248aead0f6245eb82541e2fc8ff281
8be0736fcdc92e0a8bb988ea0a87ecaa4d5d296e
'2012-10-03T19:14:47-04:00'
describe
'30687' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJLE' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
4dfcfabc6d16fa5ec48a8c5f1fbdde20
2bf155cf3774fec2a9ed0930c8762e3ad71b4d69
describe
'32697' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJLF' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
be2c6fbc502c9137b05f70b6fcdee1f4
fe4e8a8c54eb45379f3a38a20f0887ae4a99ac4f
describe
'15171' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJLG' 'sip-files00050.pro'
be19d3f79ca25c399031c6413b123e47
d66e25538b325867f9d02cba08f7d5ec5e9e089a
describe
'32712' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJLH' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
be1b3c1483dd4e6d14857f40dbe06225
04c9acac33f5189ea7f52b21f97a604db3ebb4c7
'2012-10-03T19:14:38-04:00'
describe
'606' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJLI' 'sip-files00041.txt'
54d927a58b99ec0d536947209dabe557
824a872256255edd4a16a3a53b6b049969b34c0c
describe
Invalid character
'44221' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJLJ' 'sip-files00087.pro'
07578ac0903e913c1e9db5536b4d8f9b
51763c67003b100abe17b0a66c245b73b484201f
'2012-10-03T19:22:26-04:00'
describe
'63566' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJLK' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
ce28d70e66edb54cd6dfaf3f68e6c2f8
04536f1e0d03255e65a750b08cccbb8606592860
describe
'163127' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJLL' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
22c9f2eed16aa093136da31707c19bce
7364e7e07b2d5ea4861299b8eb836cbfd33ba94a
'2012-10-03T19:15:17-04:00'
describe
'1726' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJLM' 'sip-files00022.txt'
82a6ab89dca8601409610fc4c04bfde6
9b4180c440688a599838f1d2497d0d0d3c3e73b1
'2012-10-03T19:20:36-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1637' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJLN' 'sip-files00036.txt'
69a80ca6401317ccb4f812890fcab5ff
66c0e067b4a28e55dffd60518d1927550ea3b051
'2012-10-03T19:16:24-04:00'
describe
'33052' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJLO' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
0d6c6a71b1116c0d8afddf5d550bfe9f
1d2c04c889b61b44058bc7746f33a8675d6d4676
describe
'69893' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJLP' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
6ce3d83d8f54480155fb3bace820b92c
9a6bc12a76be27dfc4d159967ab168db1be412a7
'2012-10-03T19:14:42-04:00'
describe
'29641' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJLQ' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
e9436b98f8e0fa26097f4e9308e0076f
db45ded9e549e29a51c5cb5b523bbc65569550a1
'2012-10-03T19:21:36-04:00'
describe
'146118' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJLR' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
fcb99a7a407f874eb2209fd63e27df83
3e728a2dc6f8596499cd002bf5273624a56e12d6
describe
'43227' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJLS' 'sip-files00023.pro'
593efa7396e1316b811d3b847e8b91a7
a3f86f0e57a69b72fcc47f791084325edc982aa6
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJLT' 'sip-files00083.tif'
c3cc4dfe778d9e77c7aed02e9b07637e
04dc693297ec2f76e2a0621bb8856f4c4b92eec5
describe
'66134' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJLU' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
c7ed23e47d0cc81c17a7b8741c233fc6
2ab902f336b993b9b8997ff32d09c6944b6f0157
describe
'66253' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJLV' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
e5db57fb6fe516f639e249be7438291d
90a0fcc22e86db4aceaf92c29cea40abe07633f1
'2012-10-03T19:19:30-04:00'
describe
'1037' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJLW' 'sip-files00044.txt'
38752baa2f4dd6f7c481d4404bdf046d
b2f0dbf63d0f012f134590099a3a3a27e5904c8a
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJLX' 'sip-files00083.txt'
17b66002b63ccbeb50774203d33daa35
ea1a7b9f68a0e1c58487ff09b29c73fe3b6753eb
describe
'33036' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJLY' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
e5206c15d740253978e2d9c1616ff89d
e093884c7dde5b0bfc9ed48027f93a17b95130a7
'2012-10-03T19:18:02-04:00'
describe
'1764' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJLZ' 'sip-files00045.txt'
cce39fc11aabdb9544ada609e6a6469a
48b6c5c219864ad418d582bc02848bd6454b95ec
describe
'621241' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJMA' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
b2a0089e14b318b8d81765b5a1282b31
34d132161ce10973ee25460c6c2f338a57cb30da
describe
'15664884' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJMB' 'sip-files00105.tif'
3a5cd468a215fe202be352626d98f1b0
2c1a3fcb03cef73dd66762f4905c319a7dc8cbc5
'2012-10-03T19:20:50-04:00'
describe
'1725' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJMC' 'sip-files00027.txt'
b29a165b5614fe5475a3f87dbb013c08
c454bd26a35b73e779c70382444055c7e329152a
'2012-10-03T19:21:44-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1728' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJMD' 'sip-files00038.txt'
b2d7c01e24aac6a19abace2b191b7c93
1794d5e203f9f5fec7e8a46dc51a4a0154cc9991
describe
'72059' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJME' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
a8ecebd88572f439b67101d38bb4cc4d
53a035d4d2fa181e9b7a90e1d0e2a2bc21ecf360
'2012-10-03T19:14:44-04:00'
describe
'453' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJMF' 'sip-files00004.pro'
a41b1c7e581eb90d26ac89c5adf9a4aa
d75200b65cf8fd71717ce4322e9be3224c3d0093
'2012-10-03T19:14:22-04:00'
describe
'449' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJMG' 'sip-files00010.txt'
f48ef1b8861a5034f1121109704f8d21
332f2ec4540468c742486c291300331998b2d49b
'2012-10-03T19:17:02-04:00'
describe
'28239' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJMH' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
a9b934584cbcae4598cdc468996f7b81
61d9daacd96720d0083bf009b9464ce22617a800
'2012-10-03T19:22:45-04:00'
describe
'62817' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJMI' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
3f76b6589755724831fafaabcaed0bbe
367b035d7fdbd941ab08e1b79e80a0ba90df214b
describe
'17644' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJMJ' 'sip-files00100.pro'
012c5b2cad504ce69c386b7b0870ac2f
64897e3ef79d80ea9ab660c92278bf97be668827
describe
'42921' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJMK' 'sip-files00048.pro'
4fe168261b28da3fc318ec5b9c4bd7b0
6f43b2dd1cd46cfc8a11a46a46efbd5762cdab96
describe
'170774' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJML' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
e8e20e9db53052ec3db22bec241151b5
31ef4b0fe1dc42b152d3453059628f21e88adef3
describe
'74085' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJMM' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
c9131d75f1e687a94d99e724c1c1b3a7
d4f80678dd6b1780002ac38c16bbd99d35bcc38a
describe
'72446' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJMN' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
0cf609d7a2e6d735f24c325b08a0b1dc
7b381efc639db9b6f05970fd87528588c1645dd1
describe
'4991948' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJMO' 'sip-files00034.tif'
ee746aedfb0490580804db2738ee30d7
6799917cb03eb591446fa26bac1389dc027f7521
'2012-10-03T19:21:06-04:00'
describe
'64287' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJMP' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
7e02678d885cc68caeb5fd0e52555b08
137da88153dd9a7018d6736b2089e961ca652b42
'2012-10-03T19:22:19-04:00'
describe
'43836' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJMQ' 'sip-files00095.pro'
f900c46e73419b3f3e2f805fe055c34e
38ec8688b882b41750fb8e6756a0baa50a707298
describe
'169977' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJMR' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
c7644f477cacbf9af114dfe529a69fce
cafd7af59de3e8f1fb185c516700f80b8d64730f
describe
'32955' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJMS' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
825176aea379909a3c5c4903b6209bcd
18476b4e089f000821d241b6d28f365addd4e11c
describe
'43114' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJMT' 'sip-files00072.pro'
480cd1d125ee16d3d2330c53bc8b8b58
80ef155c7a85c10b49ca6a7ffb75fa156912cbee
describe
'4993756' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJMU' 'sip-files00074.tif'
141093795a1a6cacbc8fabe401059b2f
1c72aaee070eeb45c7bac40e2f33a231b6a6b0f9
'2012-10-03T19:16:01-04:00'
describe
'4992396' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJMV' 'sip-files00029.tif'
44845a786ada921b8b05434514d827d7
a7b265bd01dd56e71d0d6562b68b0d297c1c0335
'2012-10-03T19:16:02-04:00'
describe
'4993004' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJMW' 'sip-files00087.tif'
baf8c232ed2cb86b2759b524eb45451a
960a5bdfc9f374c849a1061caa02c2f4015969fd
describe
'621291' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJMX' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
e1e1658861f4529e7bdc724d26999d1a
3d8b34e3259b42a3b543301f59bf3aacda7208ee
'2012-10-03T19:19:36-04:00'
describe
'45057' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJMY' 'sip-files00078.pro'
dc16a77289b877608c7f89a954e8208b
470bed5675b0a6c05b02ad4e338f0085650f4182
'2012-10-03T19:17:14-04:00'
describe
'72973' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJMZ' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
73699f5bdc3a5798f63397d33ca94509
5ea6982b76b676e5cd4d2535269f1259d677b663
describe
'42791' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJNA' 'sip-files00017.pro'
f115c0c442c1000d5abba46444b8b7d5
f4621a5bffa4d5d49f307414c3825fd6b76069ad
'2012-10-03T19:14:29-04:00'
describe
'4993120' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJNB' 'sip-files00043.tif'
dcbf72325889fd32dcf36498a0fe7326
28fe8eb2e44514acdf9e900c28df214f4f608ea5
'2012-10-03T19:18:18-04:00'
describe
'168499' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJNC' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
7e0a59df1f0568e057898240c9a47185
a0f2f6cbd95e4b93a6024446450cc9fe9f972821
describe
'881' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJND' 'sip-files00066.txt'
d8039ba95fc8235e36b933a9985ff0f5
444cdf1f2a68daed897a2d2267880321a00b0b87
'2012-10-03T19:22:32-04:00'
describe
'14861184' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJNE' 'sip-files00104.tif'
4cddcf525b96d9f0863d39d554044703
a998f59600858e624a5f88c5f6f4e601dd09e29e
describe
'10088' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJNF' 'sip-files00056.pro'
d705b22e179cece795dd37877263c526
3d26fa4796f6cda68479ef74af95a5b51cccb337
'2012-10-03T19:21:43-04:00'
describe
'45748' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJNG' 'sip-files00042.pro'
09b72b7fd11aaea3240f8aaac1f62e87
f070644bd3c8160d360069c9a4d0f6c15da13866
'2012-10-03T19:17:15-04:00'
describe
'8453' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJNH' 'sip-files00007.pro'
b2a63c19fe0a505c946e8a3d2f8aeb80
08a0e11371c8fc1f7dfc994ecc7c8d19eac22693
'2012-10-03T19:18:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJNI' 'sip-files00012.tif'
9596d201efa6a2867209547902c42c03
433f1e7a5998450fb2c09078bb2bdb9e4d868c22
describe
'55503' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJNJ' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
14628089ecb6ba3187811364b405944e
c65e3140812f915308a023140478abb7cfda7678
describe
'16020' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJNK' 'sip-files00080.pro'
ac21f8cfca8442a5d58afa5fb8120ae4
f95d1a53e257552e73882f8a401305cd5503ef4a
describe
'29554' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJNL' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
8c8e42081b16869471ffd8baf02427e0
49b2897d3f086984522399898fd71cc73681245a
'2012-10-03T19:20:07-04:00'
describe
'4992028' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJNM' 'sip-files00050.tif'
829e04430412cee45172cfcbdd7ada3a
90f83ee8d8c4d9dbfda18f3cd0856d5f1b7aa4d5
describe
'21344' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJNN' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
618a9950186997a91d0b4f23ff48d62d
a366d03effea55e0b834c3be61b6f1361d36c3f3
describe
'33683' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJNO' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
5289818017315ebda880df5248b7f72f
4cb17e0d256d5a86b5e17829ef1e4e693cd6b5c6
'2012-10-03T19:14:48-04:00'
describe
'65644' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJNP' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
527005d510dbb73bf0b3b38f44b01430
8588d599e30d162da068e626bb5614720b9e4ef6
describe
'67448' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJNQ' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
937ebf8ce6ab37caa1176b199034ed6e
f9b1c42cf789b47d21c5a4cd385bd9b443ac125e
describe
'1565' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJNR' 'sip-files00058.txt'
215a1e2da6e967005b47c7c96b040866
266ac4d04ac0e78c332302d20b095d5ad47f14f3
describe
'621239' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJNS' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
e39f1ee68c284dbb13d8251b494e409a
2edbaa2ffaedfdf7bc2ad974fa6e9820bc4d8bcd
'2012-10-03T19:21:24-04:00'
describe
'2911' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJNT' 'sip-files00003.pro'
e790c5cd0993419af2fce56e47ead022
b698aa2a928b6a59dee5898341529788817f850e
describe
'1719' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJNU' 'sip-files00095.txt'
75487d3074ec0b95007cc1b37a549142
9bc319430e1e83104b128dd67e9e595b86af5a2b
'2012-10-03T19:19:14-04:00'
describe
'621003' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJNV' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
614ef2a2bb61450b628ce8666b4ae985
344c8b0f02e83f5677cf70a1e78071e4bad6d626
'2012-10-03T19:16:45-04:00'
describe
'621295' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJNW' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
b686a55fe1ba98f7919e072dab843c83
9bebc1dd7d90e1a0b63c6457dcc09f2ed716f17e
describe
'4993064' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJNX' 'sip-files00089.tif'
a37dc686b08c70af9fee2dbe0794048a
0aed5df3f23090b3404baf7de840f0ef12331a7b
'2012-10-03T19:15:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJNY' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
3279fae75e069527f93db1b669d6dcd7
94308a041a1544e0bbe1ff93ee8c8291d13cd4ab
describe
'164159' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJNZ' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
9a92103f2e3a48d2f638088d0f00d514
140ee348939d4bd36bb4815413b6b1cabdb2fe1d
describe
'172422' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJOA' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
08a26f95968bdfbe87923f915b40c508
38aa0c55875ca84b5634148b748a27272a3fbc36
'2012-10-03T19:17:24-04:00'
describe
'175034' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJOB' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
849297b3928f15f2d51d479210f50ed7
15b1221c9868d8ad8476c1c0395d60fb60b41a7e
describe
'621285' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJOC' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
7665723e7652487a309d64c707f938b5
ad99ac4fb0ce9113138da0e29b1bbcb219ae9eb4
'2012-10-03T19:20:19-04:00'
describe
'618294' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJOD' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
d2f598ae28796b1cd6dbce2b95b2ba19
067e371d0f1aad1c0ef70d58706cc06e226d8d70
'2012-10-03T19:16:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJOE' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
233123c5b6408c9b7e3da85264ec21b1
329d16442363e4efa996851fcffc870e2f0af51e
describe
'33840' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJOF' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
75da379d89513fbc96526759feb03254
b6e57e8e81f924031bd17b1fbd8aed2e6421ce1a
describe
'66711' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJOG' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
663ac4c306c0313e06de630857f1411d
dddf1d0f8b51dde519ba1eeffa2d32a055a2379d
describe
'43958' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJOH' 'sip-files00022.pro'
cdf3dfff7c22a51037fc9fcd5c919529
8d962f552956f10c56bcbbedcb46b3cbd0e7bb57
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJOI' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
de89e0db04bca5f91a81b8f8a7f0f12f
22249d5cd6d427bcd1f90e60e6c2787da331d05e
'2012-10-03T19:16:13-04:00'
describe
'71787' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJOJ' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
234dea7f03c9d429d8350f46cee13011
7fa0aa5abd7dcb96d022b6bc42907b2e98563d28
describe
'4992992' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJOK' 'sip-files00033.tif'
06c27668ec4b9a50d01c248112621920
926277e541e7873050347350018697968a8b5d47
'2012-10-03T19:17:46-04:00'
describe
'165690' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJOL' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
fcad929dd111af28542e79bf73a77432
e43aa01a8338c4b02d501ae09fa18f99853e7671
describe
'33890' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJOM' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
e181fe7e747973a7b3d743c1896d2471
c2b6ea5256c9af379ca30977f5df448b36222569
describe
'4992984' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJON' 'sip-files00075.tif'
b5eef333bd4422b2f9c187491e54e27c
03e83da63cbb650a27e1a3b3649ebe6ed381bc69
describe
'4992032' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJOO' 'sip-files00041.tif'
544dc5f5aa032db441c081ad08b7e0d9
3b3a14912c94005f8934e68e373806f85980f68a
'2012-10-03T19:14:41-04:00'
describe
'69835' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJOP' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
9c934e1f5cabcdb7159a3f2ccf84de57
e98cbf829487ac5f67d2f755c2297a063dc4c3e7
describe
'21678' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJOQ' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
322f22dcd2840a986f751ea64afd9a46
0ddeebdcfc945e7ecef0be00663da37ca883fc4f
'2012-10-03T19:17:23-04:00'
describe
'26899' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJOR' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
e743dbb24ab06b340328c084259c9431
ec46ac31ac0a10b04cca69c034bb06cab366e564
describe
'4993276' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJOS' 'sip-files00055.tif'
8674a1964824893048c9ceda19cf570e
589cdbcde64a8fbedc875b5e7917cfcfcd8d9fbc
'2012-10-03T19:15:44-04:00'
describe
'487353' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJOT' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
c0b119736294a901137b196ffa07468b
91508852bab77df02f9d6fac9eb49b9b0630faab
'2012-10-03T19:19:03-04:00'
describe
'43657' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJOU' 'sip-files00082.pro'
8caabb3f02ade9823dca9f29b9a4ad77
a91f075a7427c87790c8ea4ee1a1cfeaeac57c08
describe
'34146' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJOV' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
b6e106ff9f8f23365ec23ad2497d9101
429f1e6682b7acd58ac4fbcb70667ad944226e01
'2012-10-03T19:22:03-04:00'
describe
'642' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJOW' 'sip-files00080.txt'
f57903c213faf2e05670559668f5f7a2
941b0fc91c09d6824effdaaf02fdd08a359d7eb7
describe
'55527' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJOX' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
841d342b725935c055878a37c0a436d3
50ffc368a11d300ced818cffca44950ebc3fb13e
describe
'69926' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJOY' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
32b66c3517eaa1e8b3add3d9371ebff2
b0374f528d0f4b98588cb5d0eeb9071c014b0ed9
'2012-10-03T19:22:36-04:00'
describe
'31425' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJOZ' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
3c2f03ffa9033d8e1998452cf39d6b55
e25bb9d442717969b0d99589d963ee0a4d4b6f68
describe
'14498' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJPA' 'sip-files00073.pro'
4c528b9a5c4af0b05f62623e7445b4cf
6c30811baaeee88c12b067c5acad4c458e8c752b
describe
'44837' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJPB' 'sip-files00091.pro'
d11561a62afa7bf7471890cb42263a38
f65750ecd110854e845005f30e5b8b561bd34497
'2012-10-03T19:18:23-04:00'
describe
'38861' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJPC' 'sip-files00060.pro'
652cd409d253bcbf3766b0c37b57c152
b6e10d64e49e239e65e1364710e58b8302b28389
describe
'18564' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJPD' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
53d3117dc52ca4a09fd1617d9f488963
d16b24b5debf3fb9b610ccd44a67c9fb6a22a2df
describe
'33800' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJPE' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
7289ecb32ac64a0d68a3e60c865d69ac
991186f11ae7e2c0208e8ab8d614304d1a4d8452
describe
'621277' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJPF' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
e2eee7b4cdb8414b2ce8d5160b866315
777db61b315c55475065a106db8d745971a8c80d
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJPG' 'sip-files00068.pro'
2e197fe5f293ef21f4a704dffbf1c0db
e6608eac4b57a7339a16af92a9de1e350b168378
describe
'4993396' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJPH' 'sip-files00044.tif'
21acdd3b97c5ec2bc4b023824730f0b9
3eca5e1121c2577aa18080198a3752b4d938d698
describe
'4993044' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJPI' 'sip-files00084.tif'
25518ce6a11b0770d221d9afe889f775
2ad0d1a0da65b7814389c5db87ae255c1edc9b29
describe
'178495' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJPJ' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
c11d19ed3b220099aa9dda5a3d970989
aa0a129322d17c6fa97c1ed1d9c6942981bb5a9b
describe
'166562' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJPK' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
d60d04d327a675fc44903347e997dd20
2f293979e16bd987d0bb777177307828f7984974
'2012-10-03T19:19:38-04:00'
describe
'72111' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJPL' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
eb26d5bd33c6148b3c74f834037bf7fd
6116f50698b98116c4fe4960cc6a4d74d428b62a
describe
'4993156' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJPM' 'sip-files00017.tif'
972f7ccfb0a6af050535e8c3c83f25ca
7e4d3a01218c7c504a4429eb02ca9d30ddb1518a
describe
'1042' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJPN' 'sip-files00046.txt'
0b714a08877506f9890fb9aedd1942d2
08f4feb3cb423464a52e4186b223b9e344b3e13c
describe
'4992368' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJPO' 'sip-files00016.tif'
58d45699fc1bee87ac9bf9d25179b9b1
5f85f3476b4a00920e736744af5d96d9e14a27a3
describe
'142' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJPP' 'sip-files00001.txt'
fe9b45d8e36af3cc0c1c6108e63ccaa0
0e9918700fbfc2e018114a4bc070d8d567eeb0c2
describe
Invalid character
'72232' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJPQ' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
57cf61c8e6fdafbf27ca24ae663ed435
b85e6b21f59208ffb19874f8bca3b1edfbfb4fb3
describe
'164164' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJPR' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
38c5e042a93bc218748c757284b91cd4
5052dcfd90cbf47517810c821450c3daf3d11b18
'2012-10-03T19:22:21-04:00'
describe
'46150' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJPS' 'sip-files00051.pro'
8b727cf595427e077733e0d8af99166d
6631ef76597000eac377b22352d2d07b46aecd6c
'2012-10-03T19:15:54-04:00'
describe
'166620' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJPT' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
b62b8eaa1e110bc60cf24621aee9d2bc
2833c9855f251fd84caa5df88df3a84d4eaa7cf3
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJPU' 'sip-files00047.txt'
faaf98b6a7d1d5cdfd62ad7fcb95d97c
104f6a46c79f48937b29c9cc60e765bd9a2e7d7b
describe
'621269' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJPV' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
69889d3316f428337d2aded393caf8fa
80d13b6e1d9f4db2ca66047c7626aa3e6a89d09b
describe
'1755' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJPW' 'sip-files00035.txt'
f2f3f3917cfe2e28c66935b6c3134b98
08a4a4a2bfbc7c1a8e232225f83d05d93f91aab2
describe
'1117' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJPX' 'sip-files00096.txt'
e5ddb805c2363d1f2331bdf9dc257dea
0bc65286f5ad47bcb09dc72fc8102ddb2da397b5
'2012-10-03T19:22:40-04:00'
describe
'33879' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJPY' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
1c91aae60759aabf9a3e71620b3634b6
b07c7c21cce3ed0fa10955866bc8affbf4f45a3b
describe
'177904' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJPZ' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
77c9d2b3d4a69a8cbcd5137f0146a5c8
838c6be04f2e80ceb2113066eaa12eeacf9b0f7f
describe
'1684' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJQA' 'sip-files00048.txt'
ea906cb90ad969893864e18ef4337ae7
5f0a8b5191b4a5df86e8b68211a1fb431fbc53b8
describe
'4993048' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJQB' 'sip-files00062.tif'
919e0884d04fee1c86b64812482456c0
198e9584216cd530755a8f361d5df59ead4228ca
'2012-10-03T19:16:28-04:00'
describe
'4993200' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJQC' 'sip-files00019.tif'
c8ef62e5638a46d3f357e15e24e77386
4a5bd2a8d33a1e4b4f06cb21a8665d24bb379781
describe
'513' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJQD' 'sip-files00106.pro'
b0c245bdfa229049f661a19264fbe439
edf4df6259a29bbb366e4490ff00b1b4013b3d30
describe
'46933' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJQE' 'sip-files00057.pro'
bde3390419e6f4d969ed561c982a1d12
6482877504a281283864209a965cce2d46b72385
describe
'1662' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJQF' 'sip-files00037.txt'
efb05f3d45a93771ca31690cc2169ccf
484b2b253f68532cf248b199cd2c1fcb428af93b
describe
'41666' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJQG' 'sip-files00036.pro'
96302af36ac3e93531e70657d4c8f19a
d65c97e5130f1b8631a3c96d1007340e2e11f1f0
'2012-10-03T19:15:47-04:00'
describe
'32904' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJQH' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
c43835e672331a40b6f1ec9dfb69bbd0
eb14ca256764db7f65f670fe853a8dea9f811a69
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJQI' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
8e20cae4bf31bdf2f64bede6ee3bf2f8
f0d1a57fc45c5c5a3fcebe90259bbfb3a623e221
'2012-10-03T19:18:32-04:00'
describe
'1691' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJQJ' 'sip-files00067.txt'
dffb947cd954887cc0718430e7c14f94
047aa3fff3c794083b806ac7bbef1302869772a5
'2012-10-03T19:21:00-04:00'
describe
'70844' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJQK' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
167579b8e178b05f76d3165d1663d0ea
31c01b0871e040baf312c5aaf318386ddcd001ca
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJQL' 'sip-files00098.tif'
e74455e4187931da55cf6c39bc0b9ec3
62145557e5a67c5271496b54893f1dba65874e59
describe
'72707' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJQM' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
a7970e846d8194d8b21c0fa9c429766e
b0ab15d0313e04a3ce56f6d253225626cfdbba86
'2012-10-03T19:22:02-04:00'
describe
'173597' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJQN' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
1687deb06d895c743d8b4740d7732480
c3bfbc69d799897b018cdb41b9672611b1168474
describe
'170092' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJQO' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
7c20511dc7a81eff8909f745257a97d2
1475b38d7b85edfbd27f11920dcbf791f01dd5a7
'2012-10-03T19:20:42-04:00'
describe
'9909' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJQP' 'sip-files00101.pro'
65636e51c05a91e09ce7d4f58ea09177
fea0a1d306800655a9b8912ee331793043f40e1b
describe
'42049' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJQQ' 'sip-files00011.pro'
82ae55e6297500397c9dce3ba9a0b13f
5cb6789b7c52a8a77e006d3515bfae6a56a9ccf3
describe
'4993080' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJQR' 'sip-files00051.tif'
610cc26ef9ac8705959c8eab257c199f
63bf7fc3609eba99e2817de34739ac63c02ac8da
'2012-10-03T19:19:48-04:00'
describe
'64821' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJQS' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
665250f8bd85fe792145731e0c224e75
0a8526a14705d689f0297ac63c1129a4fdf03ce4
describe
'621246' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJQT' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
c1229a22e73ac17b0218656483f327ab
fc641712929921d412c6034e940cfbb8886595dd
describe
'71762' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJQU' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
ff3c0458d5c8dfb99463b120eafe5849
5c2091438f3a653f07f43b8a9f2a3844707d405f
describe
'72823' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJQV' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
2e30c47a24dc60aecc724a6bea952d26
debc1f58df518f4ddffbb3c51a2429804663a2e5
'2012-10-03T19:19:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJQW' 'sip-files00070.tif'
f0fd3e235c1fa5bc8b0c4b48359e2164
936bafc00c4bae7ed984d2631f955f63c1c7fe3f
'2012-10-03T19:19:43-04:00'
describe
'72127' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJQX' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
a30ed32129b076e41abf2e2ac825fb7a
507f6a0c11e0ed8a9ebcb6b74e3df259ab624771
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJQY' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
6ae70ada10389c089eda1b1cd81d45f0
718b56d58d456c3c02fcd638b3217b0a0953f8e5
describe
'621197' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJQZ' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
4f548530588ef893d22b8996b890384b
8fcbac597c12d1c23d2d06c7211d461170097ceb
'2012-10-03T19:20:24-04:00'
describe
'44567' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJRA' 'sip-files00097.pro'
5461b9a135bb6f2c20c54422e970826b
76d4ca00db76702d6be51d3a007d6018dabf9020
describe
'33966' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJRB' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
778a4049756344baa018552706f34fad
4abc4e2919c7edc95f879b3aa4cfd2079467631b
describe
'70883' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJRC' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
675c4f78bea5a4de64bda4fe49880325
7fbac78b0f827271f6c5169764b3bb5933638325
describe
'22597' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJRD' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
c4b75657e7dcbb35519114d757aefb5a
3a9c294b347bb903f5d3a54867de0a3f3bf05076
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJRE' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
d1b72cbd11a3c48642ee4f6b520467e5
98da3932b2abb93123b3c85dfb49c5378999874f
'2012-10-03T19:20:14-04:00'
describe
'1714' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJRF' 'sip-files00023.txt'
5401a94c0f6c4cf6339a5568a909966f
0cb8b3f53d731ef4ff06a4fbad33269554e6ed5b
'2012-10-03T19:15:40-04:00'
describe
'28274' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJRG' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
51a3128438e614d2584698a42c9a0081
a9b213fb5ef36f418f1d9a6fa4b38b54efd4037c
describe
'1058' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJRH' 'sip-files00099.txt'
21e8720d2e7d0db29cbb86b644b1f6d3
7365743e3458cdc057e6c74b3fb6b27f3210717d
describe
'4993384' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJRI' 'sip-files00071.tif'
7e83b5e4fc998df8f05d545bb7b254fc
5000491c2227c1184331a16a0d5a98f4a1c7953b
describe
'67645' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJRJ' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
0d80718f5ce86d8c4af84a2e439989cc
9df4a26679f38b520d29f038dafbba8224d6db0a
'2012-10-03T19:18:36-04:00'
describe
'4993128' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJRK' 'sip-files00021.tif'
de12a15869af63dcf3afec7f8befccd9
df1ab2441d26bc57da5ed50062315e3c7cabc817
describe
'30394' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJRL' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
e6f82d97a168c95ead65b9753dec694e
ffaf84626a6476c368ab9199c1c3e3576bc41751
describe
'21754' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJRM' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
1e8af2c2b7cfc528920f0280a1bf0e0d
6b9b6a4db889e601a29ca2caa7648654c242e0ea
'2012-10-03T19:22:10-04:00'
describe
'1583' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJRN' 'sip-files00060.txt'
9a2001622f64e65c085645f9ccfa29d2
8629ba60a00aca91eb0897ac8fefd1c9f4f33109
describe
'818' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJRO' 'sip-files00064.txt'
518839e46ec9b8cdc8af8d23f84f3082
fed4de747101e06e2a7c5e1006b675ad47399a47
'2012-10-03T19:23:02-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'71921' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJRP' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
fffb4e288dd9f1d610963874ae4ddaac
904feac0ba6545f7556918dc442715adb090f273
'2012-10-03T19:16:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJRQ' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
ae88d61363fbee342c9cde62b609c382
d50c34a2f3550ad362c6741c7d87a16d08279979
describe
'212125' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJRR' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
650c178fcf4680fa7b169502ecf8a917
5a30d271444b2d0482e938b438b4558e6338698e
describe
'265' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJRS' 'sip-files00003.txt'
c2ff90eb0925fdaacfabee1b6e3f305e
9d81065bc38ffa854061d65edf62fe9fc8d97292
'2012-10-03T19:15:34-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'29106' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJRT' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
e7a94fc7facd1e98a71827cf78f42312
656f317e6624a178e9a677929d84e01db96fa72f
'2012-10-03T19:15:15-04:00'
describe
'42352' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJRU' 'sip-files00081.pro'
01aa1ae840d721e2a4cc5ab5794299d2
0daa9f7ea51cb00482905366c361b7a28e3cef0d
describe
'28776' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJRV' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
1416b26951b8b229b27bb92322e48ad6
b12a4eb985c4b7aa81989fa9b036b019c9d156e3
describe
'1867' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJRW' 'sip-files00092.txt'
b899b37b55d64ae2dbf9534ec72df531
6efa6cf93712598a45d72e81393736ff2423b178
'2012-10-03T19:20:01-04:00'
describe
'33927' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJRX' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
2f11e735da00bf56caf1fe2aa65ad9f1
fb2729eb7a2f639cfed6f29fe70caf01300502ce
'2012-10-03T19:20:30-04:00'
describe
'621276' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJRY' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
c42cc3cc8846813d347053d2498439df
923183b324d9b28d5875636db37671cc0f833fb2
describe
'33011' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJRZ' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
be8df10ea4277385b4df8a4050c5afc9
f84e6c8b3533ba52ab16b56008fc2188924121bb
describe
'1711' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJSA' 'sip-files00082.txt'
ea3c45d03dc7ed0daad861479d6a4b10
28acc80bb3d1f90c675835f38aff79e12d0a306b
describe
'33045' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJSB' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
d920fffb718fe53c6ea64167ee5a751b
753cbda1a72a32523313acccf7c55b03a1aae55f
describe
'1038' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJSC' 'sip-files00029.txt'
327160d2705e7350169dfe309834402a
7a18fdb2b1fae48ec96201d6bb84411370281573
describe
'621245' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJSD' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
b80076a05b0346160ef722e48159da66
6c1be13901e84a195f13b2c1c78e2eba1c1833af
describe
'1597' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJSE' 'sip-files00071.txt'
825651bb8b5e841ad3417a0195f7cab7
c223f6804157b414c2650039f98622a2bf4d31c4
'2012-10-03T19:21:21-04:00'
describe
'34129' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJSF' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
f01a83beec88e0fc9b0b6cadfdc44e9e
cac0a26467d87d0c3f45521bfa9dcaac7d41eaee
describe
'398' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJSG' 'sip-files00101.txt'
fd6757f6309c2af6c53e3e18503b2137
75a7f10ac72d8b968bd61430194d10ca69e75759
'2012-10-03T19:21:01-04:00'
describe
'31476' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJSH' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
df53f8b56a3cf6649a477fbd018e70ae
6acf5fd104ac10ba0f6c4cdf4017061040f1ba5e
describe
'1736' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJSI' 'sip-files00087.txt'
f79cb21fb8e6583aff10d39011837cbb
bf7725bc58240dbcaa38344403873b6282caceec
'2012-10-03T19:22:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJSJ' 'sip-files00066.tif'
b0162c2b47eeeec79de54a830880c3d9
02bb0a5867e090df54e946b652914434820d4b9b
'2012-10-03T19:18:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJSK' 'sip-files00102.tif'
944b0f109782ab4532b4b0310c0e16b5
fbd9a49ee28dbac5762c43a2ee8899ededd2f082
'2012-10-03T19:20:53-04:00'
describe
'22783' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJSL' 'sip-files00070.pro'
3550c9a59653525e6ef6644950000e03
70146be2c19dd9ce872b1eef5879fcd28005438b
describe
'33362' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJSM' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
1044c87673e4319383645f25f318381b
c7133f5daea8b8fb622b096445c6c68d78e88ec8
describe
'2100552' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJSN' 'sip-files00106.tif'
84689c36032fd73e684aee8298c3d64a
32f995462c6be45d74bbd7019703ff77092a83cf
describe
'1603' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJSO' 'sip-files00019.txt'
38461ac1e1a4ecdef33e3f9b2e0242e8
d640e9a7e9e77f9e2ac30b13b592d3289b28d944
describe
'30960' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJSP' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
702ed1f356ee43618128eecfb9b7ea9b
393963cd25d334e21aa4bfbabac90b18004a357f
describe
'621279' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJSQ' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
17b537626149b34111e3fb6457e888f8
7eb9fe8e648229060a50b1ddfa9d3f43f49fe927
describe
'43837' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJSR' 'sip-files00047.pro'
d98c6aac56f2364af0a87d9d5e5eadcf
06a2c63f6827d555d2dc2c441a7e86a2bf90c611
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJSS' 'sip-files00048.tif'
08317ba00e3b28f8dc6a044718c55a77
cfde89435cd0dee0aba9e9bc702420638d6be465
'2012-10-03T19:22:18-04:00'
describe
'4992960' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJST' 'sip-files00085.tif'
222b41278a5d725ec89028c41f58bbce
9fb0e0558b605e623e9f83882e6fd706a3e17805
'2012-10-03T19:21:57-04:00'
describe
'1733' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJSU' 'sip-files00086.txt'
02be2502cd33eea566df8a84df0b1649
b268cf0ef25b58cfea289a7b5a13e2d3befb40e4
describe
Invalid character
'31022' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJSV' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
51736daaf1409e313551343eaca6afb8
c4621dd6fbd7c2f4cc02c4a603eb74cf42223825
'2012-10-03T19:19:56-04:00'
describe
'39249' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJSW' 'sip-files00059.pro'
01412acbcd394ad2a8849ad7be0f8169
78081348a2e66440a1254d5d05ed737d80c5f236
describe
'4991524' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJSX' 'sip-files00101.tif'
c1f75f710755f6115b72d72da92be48b
39682b358b791d6229932124042c47216e575a4c
'2012-10-03T19:19:50-04:00'
describe
'1661' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJSY' 'sip-files00081.txt'
0055c5fb05a0cc733102b38fb33fb531
5dcc48a24f058859ac79fec1ddbebe8c92866e62
'2012-10-03T19:20:56-04:00'
describe
'4993272' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJSZ' 'sip-files00086.tif'
f068779a50387b790ae32a597edf68b8
470c8bba0c9256488ab48d8d990171e726ae503b
'2012-10-03T19:23:44-04:00'
describe
'70916' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJTA' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
b2678aa0b521c3b227e2be3bb457d38a
24a79e2abc0559ec59ad7327f300600b7242573e
'2012-10-03T19:20:18-04:00'
describe
'1698' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJTB' 'sip-files00021.txt'
0940b53dd7a917186ea2d193c8feb499
569c63f8d633d006e43ed60639d80b9c0cfb5c27
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJTC' 'sip-files00033.txt'
182a48c8a519fc9d00c12d1bad53d226
71445d70765ab91b438bd086861a305c4561aba4
'2012-10-03T19:20:17-04:00'
describe
'69115' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJTD' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
ea0028be26e99bedb26c44b634867845
1b7e268aa8d2294e37928f8e1608a1e011e58ba0
describe
'48519' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJTE' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
69e9070ce1f800aba7829b53565ba98b
38fb203f4a4fee9b3c87a07efd8b288ac13f6b4e
describe
'4993212' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJTF' 'sip-files00025.tif'
48391aac0d09e16e01af812b3372605b
7fa706afb21977e628840ecba811f23c3ea82e89
'2012-10-03T19:17:00-04:00'
describe
'4993532' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJTG' 'sip-files00078.tif'
271e5b75f3d964baf4433fbe9ef12cd0
31fe845bcc1c81411b705593a4f14557610288c3
'2012-10-03T19:21:09-04:00'
describe
'33666' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJTH' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
b18529351dbf06d956a55da69aecb8b5
f58d25686d6d3267608f29834e8d15f28c16affb
describe
'27022' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJTI' 'sip-files00096.pro'
a8c72eee1e311906f80525f0858cc744
9e744d25cc1a9e7b54ea590857a60fab940fe1ac
'2012-10-03T19:23:41-04:00'
describe
'43988' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJTJ' 'sip-files00038.pro'
b38b436f2a91d9b4fbfe31e7c5e173d9
bface90eaea0684d2cea6c033313e2f07984ce6e
describe
'4993360' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJTK' 'sip-files00069.tif'
64fdc44cd366d193629466181940863d
3261a8e586a214fb73c8080f42e03edd426927d4
describe
'71794' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJTL' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
0ce759e2aa827e1253fb136200a2fa92
3f8e9710080fc39abdde6427b0a866ea685b5b90
'2012-10-03T19:16:21-04:00'
describe
'1665' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJTM' 'sip-files00068.txt'
a385d394018ee44dc97a6ba315569e5a
2ccbbe1193cccbcdbf57aa3a39a9a9325ef1c561
describe
'1802' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJTN' 'sip-files00042.txt'
fe6f80be490d0fe15abfb180910fc588
2cfae538e2c7d28b85b43efda07162d7df138ba5
'2012-10-03T19:19:22-04:00'
describe
'177178' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJTO' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
cefcb9b062539d6693b9e0da7bb95ee1
b15837ae5805842688bf7a2937442e0013e7b70a
'2012-10-03T19:23:57-04:00'
describe
'33697' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJTP' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
92ee27d46eabec0843beec605d0b0094
1641c29b9cc28e096db497945dbb20ef0fa284bd
describe
'175919' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJTQ' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
a4985849fceaf77ca2865da4456994ec
5f496c848cd2cd0e9f32805b886f30789a0b02eb
describe
'621278' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJTR' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
1a11eff5b4531d328c4b573a6fff6b36
d7b7b83fd2646ab137cf73becdfcf2b57e6fb01c
describe
'21655' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJTS' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
e9f168937409aad4277f0a46c7f3fea1
3d8c3622d073446854f47004d3a7b70203fc63e7
describe
'33285' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJTT' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
da3de4be9e5a7faf2571d358c6736a6c
1f815cb1af93bd7a219a48e6c8e0ce692912493b
'2012-10-03T19:22:55-04:00'
describe
'170929' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJTU' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
d56caa50a6d9bd9d7ce43efebf290e34
abb321dacbffe000ed43331e34bc938de4c5b6f9
describe
'171241' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJTV' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
d9b2b9b6b942854f0600432bd0303566
70452b8ef65adf7bec9646c764de4f3cd71aa75c
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJTW' 'sip-files00072.txt'
ddd06cd5cc4dd8d4653cf40507f379bf
9a289c987977b55d3ef7d5ae44cac29f6e0c6939
describe
'175183' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJTX' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
41cde46d17c9438c3df9195dfd2be458
9a3eaefe6c3b8b928985e903dfce52938a70119c
describe
'70801' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJTY' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
8b47a764a871d1aec5f5210055a55b11
ff67a58b83f9e81177f7afeeded923fbf5fe25ac
'2012-10-03T19:17:04-04:00'
describe
'46489' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJTZ' 'sip-files00092.pro'
ccd6f265703f1028378cf1dd9b386c2d
b1d9c71c4e039d5eac977ac48803e5ab24789b50
describe
'168756' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJUA' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
4395f8452b88e3dea1c54f1e764b4f34
7f1046638993daa4395f2d8dbc81030ec2729c8b
describe
'1727' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJUB' 'sip-files00053.txt'
d27c7ffd5498d0e6860150f997f4395c
9dd58d1d42e3b4b65f8ea62ffff0e08795dc8522
'2012-10-03T19:22:04-04:00'
describe
'701' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJUC' 'sip-files00034.txt'
ad93cfc7dfa8d94429096e4dd4c7a69e
58e306ed2e1b2a085a1ea69afef2cf4feacfab78
'2012-10-03T19:18:08-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'4993072' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJUD' 'sip-files00057.tif'
862558a4013e4842b5658e29192c3f2e
5f26e3628b6ac5a25123e7d3bbe1a84b561af35f
'2012-10-03T19:20:57-04:00'
describe
'621200' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJUE' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
69ffec2ef63bca73643b1c0cde10512f
85ceaabe36259735502878c70c3ba56defd08571
describe
'43950' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJUF' 'sip-files00098.pro'
3cfc3eb6968bbecc8cf530bc93dd4b15
945e9012cf00688d68a592776e92a7ef902034e8
describe
'50335' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJUG' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
b902abf1f7e5ea583c064ad8b328591a
7116f99093d5be62e4565306cf59d5f0893f30d3
describe
'65227' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJUH' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
32787a9e74cf7f198cca0aaecb10f10a
e3dc8c50a9e0d47b73dac07be97871cbd13d954a
'2012-10-03T19:23:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJUI' 'sip-files00077.tif'
7c0c5dd7be8125e97d93feb70113e980
14491ba7004168207545e9e1c734400add56974f
describe
'4992980' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJUJ' 'sip-files00049.tif'
9a3a33bb94aa96bd1ac256f01d7cbc06
b037b24f1fc19e6d064b9e641211fa5073f548bd
'2012-10-03T19:17:07-04:00'
describe
'174129' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJUK' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
08165c6f985c710b2b825324806eb2ae
1e30087481192216559602cbdbb0c3846f65c2df
describe
'38826' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJUL' 'sip-files00061.pro'
8584b216a213bdafafbad7d2a2c760d7
629cd83bb2e070cd7ce4a746a3d4c91cefe69d44
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJUM' 'sip-files00045.tif'
88ba0541405126ef3dd594a36059b7a1
fad5fe57079052165792a6ecab264cfeec1df3d5
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJUN' 'sip-files00081.tif'
67eea58b3f069ab0aa0e321614b69289
f46ac807f9e41df89cdecc94a9ce81e689228861
'2012-10-03T19:20:11-04:00'
describe
'405' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJUO' 'sip-files00056.txt'
e63f2b6510b881b0f9e448b3eb72e0cf
9075f5025fa8d9273dc455875f48704aadba495d
describe
'170470' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJUP' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
4e67698ecfb3713ff1268e4c3da44ce1
496529e1656197c7c6c57f34ecaa67aa418bece1
describe
'32' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJUQ' 'sip-files00106.txt'
705e9dabffa8572650e5c5f9af0e2895
f133dfbf5b033fb5ed7603c6da7f2dcbfbc158c6
'2012-10-03T19:21:28-04:00'
describe
'14246' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJUR' 'sip-files00076.pro'
e5d4354dffd6cebfa77c1d885f299966
476566383b1272b528ed97d48b2858c08f22f3b2
describe
'34345' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJUS' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
4f6147261f165a1a0934a850eb0c89b6
448412f311befe605236cd2adedbc2c0acdce245
describe
'72495' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJUT' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
8d053a9eed3c1d2f5228b7bcd14f91f0
495687c6af1c7bc97a74b91fc91518a8014acab9
'2012-10-03T19:20:59-04:00'
describe
'33227' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJUU' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
f5e6c7bae24b92371ca0bbb0412f8cb5
9067dc48e9d8e077c1ba68a913aef5183d470576
describe
'34336' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJUV' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
0a5c14db96fae1cdb215b85357c75897
93fa6434f2c755cb2bd659108b1eb599a2208bc2
'2012-10-03T19:22:47-04:00'
describe
'161447' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJUW' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
20900178d6d2543aafd30982e1a29bc4
9a52dfb8082bfb65e28efdcfe9b6e7ae4846218f
describe
'1745' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJUX' 'sip-files00075.txt'
c7bc5f5b29124484486037436e7e1abd
ddd413d3dcb969381c40422a39852bbf11b0db62
describe
'1784' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJUY' 'sip-files00031.txt'
728d9fc71252d31a480630885756f479
783a5f85ff44ee97550ce585fc3ef43308a1319b
describe
'172600' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJUZ' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
ae6899a03ec1fae5e563e155fd6f3425
789c0a0b2cf237f7db5d8465615cace8dff90ffd
describe
'621222' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJVA' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
ccf1cce14b3f51083559f9b91df70db4
711c232eb1f53a6dd029ebee3627c44607d2f7c2
'2012-10-03T19:21:45-04:00'
describe
'4993220' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJVB' 'sip-files00060.tif'
92f18d62a708d1e5d72181fad7f92627
dd7df94662e899b03ada3d0e0a71efbebb7fb22c
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJVC' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
9a11df7c26d17dcb0279db709d3d1115
46189463abbb55d35b5e8822c532e334b8432294
describe
'70658' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJVD' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
db8b17bd5f0b42567fa773c6c07a0443
55f807a3ba99bfad064471c0ba09a2aee3a22f5e
'2012-10-03T19:20:41-04:00'
describe
'17874' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJVE' 'sip-files00039.pro'
1b2e6ee989ae6a470b96c2aea35ea252
f7c5b42e509dcd7942b9c6664b8e4a03a5bb48b3
describe
'26525' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJVF' 'sip-files00013.pro'
29d7b332649d504b68f26aaedc73813a
663938181e3592080da59fee5e8d4b9c57b9b5f5
describe
'4992352' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJVG' 'sip-files00073.tif'
1ed7ac525479cbfb4e366fd60958f99d
2e2f52287527eaeec270631bb358476aab0c9955
'2012-10-03T19:21:29-04:00'
describe
'171125' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJVH' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
3b5251e7dbbd89054fe0cecaabe7dda5
df668889683a55aca9c04199758d9482e7004e57
describe
'23451' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJVI' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
37bf50989f3689dfae4d69ae0f645f30
46fc17b7a8629eceb93e6ebb779f4cbd3e436a4b
describe
'33984' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJVJ' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
695b56d5d65fb25a9ba7af2a9ffb5678
ac33020fc0013aa837e7a84354917b79074cc622
'2012-10-03T19:19:35-04:00'
describe
'30129' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJVK' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
a158a09814187b719d0e5541978c492a
7a3cbd9f3ffaac243002fb616eee3c443978a487
describe
'43053' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJVL' 'sip-files00077.pro'
a438f1e32a3544cbba030641e51b4bcb
d7d8d5cc228b5a02173130287db8111dfc868de9
describe
'34155' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJVM' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
1151d5f1b704408bc5dffe7ff4230972
f10e16d99512a7b01bfe413e812ebaa3daf37657
describe
'712' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJVN' 'sip-files00039.txt'
b0e2a2143781b5edbd898af9040fc3e5
2201cfdd3cc808334d2a60e32c6604eba83c5a73
describe
'175085' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJVO' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
869500064412949b4ff41e1bdb1ccb31
72aab2b7d278fc880550e254795a38af7641b15d
describe
'70975' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJVP' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
9490f057400b34498cd4e18e1c2c16ed
5cefb0916c283da0e52ac17974d5ec0cb2c64132
describe
'39' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJVQ' 'sip-files00004.txt'
e6e07a1b0cb64b26657067dea05bc730
b799d0107cc096264f004ff4a145c3e83d4bc060
'2012-10-03T19:21:53-04:00'
describe
'1837' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJVR' 'sip-files00057.txt'
522043c357895ab6a7bd601ab2341222
1604a10d3f8a171bd8fe3111e4375ad75f2e8ec7
describe
'4993344' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJVS' 'sip-files00058.tif'
b52dd5bf5b438bf672d212d293fa6d55
ec42fd1ba1b00c9c07bc4d93aadb99261b1d08fc
describe
'66532' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJVT' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
60770fea4c10754c6e7d80bdc81d3ca6
cb9e791f82e86b3e16b2998740c159c76ad7fa21
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJVU' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
42bc8b228ec0df54606d81c96a0fcda7
4997f787ed800e69c5e343d3dfb1f13b0ce564d5
'2012-10-03T19:15:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJVV' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
b661ab21ddc47444ba424972b754541e
8d26baf3fdaf25874e1e850d6a2623632a9bce9f
'2012-10-03T19:23:28-04:00'
describe
'621194' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJVW' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
7ff9f9c07e6d95deb38067dc4badecfb
2a1ce2d89430783a2b93fa7aa777be9935860016
describe
'69784' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJVX' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
c27f09b99e7bbdcff96006893fad2733
e7972748def87bf9db705e4584b2741369ce1b07
describe
'4989068' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJVY' 'sip-files00007.tif'
3170296b61772bb9164b45251a0a0667
aafd70b1c7d908139ba577f473cf250f926b5b33
describe
'31102' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJVZ' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
6b4edb3bf3bec70e93b77dcafc960322
699dbeb9e13b8f15e1b50d91d5c14d68c262b9da
describe
'31611' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJWA' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
6538862060a66a4fac78cf0103bfbed5
72383ea1c2b70f7b0762b0fbcf3398120bd969ee
'2012-10-03T19:22:06-04:00'
describe
'1716' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJWB' 'sip-files00015.txt'
bc16fbbfcb333a6c76b8850da8d081fc
8469a4874823e82761b4c3fcdb353dd1a08fe64b
describe
'72392' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJWC' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
17bd0ec060016c436b5f3244fbecb763
efdb4d76864e7b658085f9d3577f136719a05fd6
describe
'71223' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJWD' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
3e3d8fcdb0778fae9f7eecac0ebb0694
dc8b39fc4e69ee3e6c3e0dc911b461696958f418
describe
'43557' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJWE' 'sip-files00018.pro'
552d7a5f946e41693b887010ef091052
d68b342591ab9a7f29f6726a9e574da9651c9880
describe
'18358' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJWF' 'sip-files00094.pro'
5fc508093c80cf27d2d774de4f2d25c5
8020f39519e8f8385a568dc8d10ab5bbdf66de2a
describe
'45413' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJWG' 'sip-files00052.pro'
a06dc79691209570482b1ce7299e4fce
ef52f9e8f296faef96beae41005be56ff491897b
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJWH' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
866d7323be94d34e7623e69ad785b447
f61d55219c55479f6ba5e6567d76208c4fe1d4b2
describe
'58283' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJWI' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
a005c07206332c1c99298d5f9ea23acf
a18d9e216058c1d8adb508cea1c744cc85480c0d
'2012-10-03T19:22:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJWJ' 'sip-files00036.tif'
8ac920d9e314e7c803edba6e30608f7f
fce234d08b82151af1e4e326e447788bbb668a4c
describe
'68327' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJWK' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
9cafe95dec6e633bcdfb87d06eb493f0
f3bfd0e64ae57ead449b12f1c0b95de9af0260ce
describe
'621299' 'info:fdaE20110222_AAAAEVfileF20110222_AABJWL' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
bd88e18028e1f0431f7bb8c26bab4e06
14eee78df2ac0c70cea276f46b69d40932c80595
describe
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IN WORDS
ONE SYLLABLE

OF

i RRs

(an)
ES
<
ad
fone
5
=










wa
ROBINSON CRUSOE

IN WORDS OF

ONE SYLLABLE

BY

MARY GODOLPHIN

AUTHOR OF ‘‘ THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS,” AND ‘‘ THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON,”
IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE





PHILADELPHIA:
DAVID McKAY, PUBLISHER,
610 SOUTH WASHINGTON SQUARE,
IN UNIFORM STYLE.
In Words of One Syllable.

ILLUSTRATED.

ROBINSON CRUSOE.

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.
#ESOP’S FABLES.

PRICE, FIFTY CENTS EACH.

Sold by all Booksellers and sent, post-paid,
on receipt of price by the Publishers.

_ PHILADELPHIA:
DAVID MCKAY, PUBLISHER,
610 S. WASHINGTON SQUARE,


PREFACE.

—_— —_.

Ac Py HE production of a book which is adapted to the use
4 of the youngest readers needs but few words of



excuse or apology. The nature of the work seems to be suffi-
ciently explained by the title itself, and the author’s task has
been chiefly to reduce the ordinary language into words of one
syllable. But although. as far as the subject matter is con-
cerned, the book can lay no claims to originality, it is believed
that the idea and scope of its construction are entirely novel,
for the One Syllable literature of the present day furnishes
little more than a few short, unconnected sentences, and those
chiefly in spelling books. -

The deep interest which De Foe’s story has never failed to
arouse in the minds of the young, induces the author to hope
that it may be acceptable in its present form.

It should be stated that exceptions to the rule of using
words of one syllable exclusively have been made in the case of
the proper names of the boy Xury and of the man Friday.





HIS FIRST WRECK.

ROBINSON CRUSOE

IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.



ea WAS born at York on the First of March in the sixth

@| year-of the reign of King Charles the First. From
the time when I was quite a young child I had felt a
great wish to spend my life at sea, and as I grew, so did this
taste grow more and more strong; till at last I broke loose
i


2 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

from my school and home, and found my way on foot to Hull,
where I soon got a place on board a ship.

When we had set sail but a few days, a squall of wind came
on, and on the fifth night we sprang a leak. All hands were
sent to the pumps, but we felt the ship groan in all her planks,
and her beams quake from stem to stern; so that it was soon
quite clear there was no hope for her, and that all we could do
was to save our lives.

The first thing was to fire off guns, to show that we were in
need of help, and at length a ship, which lay not far from us,
sent a boat to our aid. But the sea was too rough for it to
lie near our ship’s side, so we threw out a rope, which the men
in the boat caught, and made fast, and by this means we all
got in.

Still, in so wild a sea it was vain to try to get on board the
ship which had sent out the men, or to use our oars in the boat,
and all we could do was to let it drive to shore.

In the space of half an hour our own ship struck on a rock
and went down, and we saw her no more. We made but slow
way to the land, which we caught sight of now and then when
the boat rose to the top of some high wave, and there we saw
men who ran in crowds, to and fro, all bent on one thing, and
that was to save us.

At last to our great joy we got on shore, where we had the
luck to meet with friends who gave us the means to get back
to Hull; and if I had now had the good sense to go home, it
would have been well for me.

The man whose ship had gone down said with a grave look,
“Young lad, you ought to go to sea no more, it is not the kind
THE TURKS GIVE CHASE. 3

of life for you.” ‘ Why, sir, will you go to sea no more then ?”
“That is not the same kind of thing. I was bred to the sea,
but you were not, and came on board my ship just to find out
what a life at sea was like, and you may guess what you will
come to if you do not go back to your home. God will not
bless you, and it may be that you have brought all this wo

on us.”

I spoke not a word more to him; which way he went I knew
not, nor did I care to know, for I was hurt at this rude speech.
Shall I go home, thought I, or shall I go to sea? Shame kept
me from home, and I could not make up my mind what course
of life to take.

As it has been my fate through life to choose for the worst,
so I did now. I had gold in my purse, and good clothes on
my back, and to sea I went once more.

But I had worse luck this time than the last, for when we
were far out at sea, some Turks in a small ship came on our
track in full chase. We set as much sail as our yards would
bear, so as to get clear from them. But in spite of this, we saw
our foes gain on us, and we felt sure that they would come up
to our ship in a few hours’ time.

At last they caught us; but we brought our guns to bear on
them, which made them sheer off for a time, yet they kept up
a fire at us as long as they were in range. The next time the
Turks came up, some of their men got on board our ship, and
set to work to cut the sails, and do us all kinds of harm. So,
as ten of our men lay dead, and most of the rest had wounds,
we gave in.

The chief of the Turks took me as his prize to a port which
I—2
4 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

was held by the Moors. He did not use me so ill as at first I
thought he would have done, but he set me to work with the
rest of his slaves. This was a change in my life which I did
not think had been in store for me. How my heart sank with
grief at the thought of those whom I had left at home, nay, to













HE IS MADE A SLAVE.

whom I had not had the grace so much as to say ‘‘ Good bye”
when I went to sea, nor to give a hint of what I meant to do!

Yet all that I went through at this time was but a taste of
the toils and cares which it has since been my lot to bear.

I thought at first that the Turk might take me with him
when next he went to sea, and so I should find some way to
get free; but the hope did not last long, for at such times he
left me on shore to see to his crops. This kind of life I led
for two years, and as the Turk knew and saw more of me, he
made me more and more free. He went out in his boat once
or twice a week to catch a kind of flat fish, and now and then
A SLAVE TO THE TURK. 5

he took me and a boy with him, for we were quick at this kind
of sport, and he grew quite fond of me.

One day the Turk sent me in the boat to catch some fish,
with no one else but a man and a boy. While we were out,
so thick a fog came on, that though we were not half.a mile
from the shore, we quite lost sight of it for twelve hours; and
when the sun rose the next day, our boat was at least ten miles
out at sea. The wind blew fresh, and we were all much in
want of food; but at last, with the help of our oars and sail,
we got back safe to land.

When the Turk heard how we had lost our way, he said that
the next time he went out, he would take a boat that would
hold all we could want if we were kept out at sea. So he had
quite a state room built in the long boat of his ship, as well as
a room for us slaves. One day he sent me to trim the boat,
as he had two friends who would go in it to fish with him.
But when the time came they did not go, so he sent me with
the man and the boy—whose name was Xury—to catch some
fish for the guests that were to sup with him.

Now the thought struck me all at once that this would be a
good chance to set off with the boat, and get free. So in the
first place I took all the food that I could lay my hands on,
and I told the man that it would be too bold of us to eat of the
bread that had been put in the boat for the Turk. He said he
thought so too, and he brought down a small sack of rice and
some rusks.

While the man was on shore I put up some wine, a large
lump of wax, a saw, an axe, a spade, some rope, and all sorts
of things that might be of use tous. I knew where the Turk’s
6 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

case of wine was, and I put that in the boat while the man was
on shore. By one more trick I got all that I had need of. I
said to the boy, ‘‘ The Turk’s guns are in the boat, but there is
no shot. Do you think you could get some? You know
where it is kept, and we may want to shoot a fowl or two.” . So
he brought a case and a pouch which held all that we could
want for the guns. These I put in the boat, and then set sail
out of the port to fish.

The wind blew from the north, or north west, which was a
bad wind for me; for had it been south, I could have made for
the coast of Spain. But, blow which way it might, my mind
was made up to get off, and to leave the rest to fate. I then
let down my lines to fish, but I took care to have bad sport;
and when the fish bit I would not pull them up, for the Moor
was not to see them. I said to him, ‘ This will not do: we
shall catch no fish here; we ought to sail on a bit.” Well, the
Moor thought there was no harm in this. He set the sails,
and, as the helm was in my hands, I ran the boat out a mile or
more, and then brought her to, as if I meant to fish.

Now, thought I, the time has come for me to get free; so I
gave the helm to the boy, and then took the Moor round the
waist, and threw him out of the boat.

Down he went! but soon rose up, for he swam like a duck.
He said he would go all round the world with me, if I would
but take him in.

I had some fear lest he should climb up the boat's side, and
force his way back; so I brought my gun to point at him, and
said, ‘““ You can swim to land with ease if you choose, make
haste then to get there; but if you come near the boat you
XURY SWEARS TO BE TRUE. v4

shall have a shot through the head, for I mean to bea free
man from this hour.”

He then swam for the shore, and no doubt got safe there,
as the sea was so calm.



HE TAKES XURY WITH HIM.

At first I thought I would take the Moor with me, and let
Xury swim to land; but the Moor was not a man that I could
trust.

When he was gone I said to Xury, “If you will swear to pe
true to me, you shall be a great man in time; if not, I must
throw you out of the boat too.”

The poor boy gave:me such a sweet smile as he swore to be
true to me, that I could not find it in my heart to doubt him.
8 ROBINSON CRUSOE

While the man was still in view (for he was on his way to
the land), we stood out to sea with the boat, so that he and
those that saw us from the shore, might think we had gone to
the straits’ mouth, for no one went to the south coast, as a tribe
of men dwelt there who were known to kill and eat their foes.

We then bent our course to the east, so as to keep in with
the shore; and as we had a fair wind and a smooth sea, by
the next day at noon, we were a long way off, and quite out of
the reach of the Turk.

I had still some fear lest I should be caught by the Moors,
so I would not goon shore in the day time. But when it grew
dusk we made our way to the coast, and came to the mouth of
a stream, from which we thought we would swim to land, and
then look round us. But as soon as it was quite dark we
heard strange sounds—barks, roars, grunts, and howls. The
poor lad said he could not go on shore till dawn. “ Well,”
said I, “then we must give it up, but it may be that in the
day time we shall be seen by men, who for all we know would
do us more harm than wild beasts.” ‘“ Then we give them the
shoot gun,” said Xury with a laugh, “and make them run
way.”

I was glad to see so much mirth in the boy, and gave him
some bread and rice.

We lay still at night, but did not sleep long, for in a few
hours’ time some huge beasts came down to the sea to bathe.
The poor boy shook from head to foot at the sight. One of
these beasts came near our boat, and though it was too dark
to see him well, we heard him puff and blow, and knew that
he must bea large one by the noise he made. At last the brute
XURY FINDS A FRESH SPRING. 9

came as near to the boat as two oars’ length, so I shot at him,
and he swam to the shore.

The roar and cries set up by beasts and birds at the noise
of my gun would seem to show that we had made a bad choice
of a place to land on; but be that as it would, to shore we had
to go to find some fresh spring, so that we might fill our casks.
Xury said if I would let him go with one of the jars, he would
find out if the springs were fit to drink; and, if they were
sweet, he would bring the jar back full. ‘‘ Why should you
go?” said I; ‘“‘why should not I go, and you stay in the boat?”
At this Xury said, ‘If wild mans come they eat me, you go
way.” I could not but love the lad for this kind speech.
“Well,” said I, “ we will both go, and if the wild men come
we must kill them, they shall not eat you or me.”

I gave Xury some rum from the Turk’s case to cheer him
up, and we went on shore. The boy went off with his gun,
full a mile from the spot where we stood, and came back with
a hare that he had shot, which we were glad to cook and eat;
but the good news which he brought was that he had found a
spring, and had seen no wild men.

I made a guess that the Cape de Verd Isles were not far off,
for I saw the top of the Great Peak, which I knew was near
them. My one hope was that if I kept near the coast, I should
find some ship that would take us on board ; and then, and not
till then, should I feel a free man. In aword,I put the whole
of my fate on this chance, that I must meet with some ship, or
die.

On the coast we saw some men who stood to look at us.
They were black, and wore no clothes. I would have gone on
10 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

shore to them, but Xury—who knew best—said, ‘“‘ Not you
go! Not you go!” Sol brought the boat as near the land
as I could, that I might talk to them, and they kept up with
me a long way. I saw that one of them had a lance in his
hand.

I made signs that they should bring me some food, and they
on their part made signs for me to stop my boat. So I let
down the top of my sail, and lay by, while two of them ran off;
and in less than half an hour they came back with some dry
meat and a sort of corn which is grown in this part of the
world. This we should have been glad to get, but knew not
how to do so; for we durst not go on shore to them, nor did
they dare to come to us.

At last they took a safe way for us all, for they brought the
food to the shore, where they set it down, and then went a
long way off while we took it in. We made signs to show our
thanks, for we had not a thing that we could spare to give
them.

But as good luck would have it, we were at hand to takea
great prize for them; for two wild beasts, of the same kind as
the first I spoke of, came in full chase from the hills down to
the sea.

They swam as if they had come for sport. The men flew
from them in fear, all but the one who held the lance. One of
these beasts came near our boat; so I lay in wait for him with
my gun; and as soon as the brute was in range, I shot him
through the head. Twice he sank down in the sea, and twice
he came up; and then just swam to the land, where he fell
down dead. The men were in as much fear at the sound of
A SHIP IN SIGHT. 11

my gun as they had been at the sight of the beasts. But when
I made signs for them to come to the shore, they took heart,
and came.

They at once made for their prize ; and by the help of a rope,
which they slung round him, they brought him safe on the
beach.

We now left our wild men, and went on and on, for twelve
days more. The land in front of us ran out four or five miles,
like a bill; and we had to keep some way from the coast to
make this point, so that we lost sight of the shore.

I gave the helm to Xury, and sat down to think what would
be my best course to take; when all at once I heard the lad cry
out, ‘A ship with a sail! A ship with a sail!” He did not
show much joy at the sight, for he thought that this ship had
been sent out to take him back; but I knew well, from the
look of her, that she was not one of the Turk’s.

I made all the sail I could to come in the ship’s way, and
told Xury to fire a gun, in the hope that if those on deck could
not hear the sound, they might see the smoke. This they did
see, and then let down their sails so that we might come up to
them, and in three hours’ time we were at the ship’s side. The
men spoke to us in French, but I could not make out what they
meant. At last a Scot on board said in my own tongue, ““Who
are you? Whence do you come?” I told him ina few words
how I had got free from the Moors.

Then the man who had charge of the ship bade me come on
board, and took me in, with Xury and all my goods. I told
him that he might take all I had; but he said, ‘‘You shall have
your goods back when we come ‘to land, for I have but done
12 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

for you what you would have done for me, had I been in the
same plight.”

He gave mea good round sum for my boat, and said that I
should have the same sum for Xury, if I would part'with him.
But I told him that as it was by the boy’s help that I had got
free, I was loth to sell him. He said it was just and right in me
to feel thus, but at the same time, if I could make up my mind
to part with him, he should be set free in two years’ time. So,
as the poor slave had a wish to go with him, I did not say no.
I got to All Saints’ Bay in three weeks, and was now a free
man.

I had madea good sum by all my store, and with this I went
onland. But I did not at all know what todo next. At length
I met with a man whose case was much the same as my own,
and we both took some land to farm. My stock, like his, was
low, but we made our farms serve to keep us in food, though
not more than that. We both stood in need of help, and I
saw now that I had done wrong to part with my boy.

I did not at all like this kind of life. What! thought I,
have I come all this way to do that which I could have done
as well at home with my friends round me? And to add to
my grief, the kind friend who had brought, me here in his ship,
now meant to leave these shores.

On my first start to sea when a boy, I had put a small sum
in the hands-of an aunt, and this my friend said I should do
well to spend on my farm. So when he got home he sent some
of it in cash, and laid out the rest in cloth, stuffs, baize, and
such like goods. My aunt had puta few pounds in my friend's
hands as a gift to him, to show her thanks for all that he had
GOES TO SEA ONCE MORE. 13

done for me, and with this sum he was so kind as to buy mea
slave. In the mean time I had bought a slave, so now I had
two, and all went on well for the next year.

But soon my plans grew too large for my means. One day
some men came to ask me to take charge of a slave ship to be
sent out by them. They said they would give me a share in
the slaves, and pay the cost of the stock. This would have
been a good thing for me if I had not had farms and land;
but it was wild and rash to think of it now, for I had madea
1arge sum, and ought to have gone on in the same way for three
or four years more. Well, I told these men that I would go
with all my heart, if they would look to my farm in the mean
time, which they said they would do.

So I made my will, and went on board this ship on the same
day on which, eight years since, I had left Hull. She had six
guns, twelve men, and a boy. We took with us saws, chains,
toys, beads, bits of glass, and such like ware, to suit the taste
of those with whom we had to trade

We were not more than twelve days from the Line, when a
high wind took us off we knew not where. All at once there
was acry of “ Land!” and the ship struck on a bank of sand,
in which she sank so deep that we could not get her off. At
last we found that we must make up our minds to leave her,
and get to shore as well as we could. There had been a boat
at her stern, but we found it had been torn off by the force of
the waves. One small boat was still left on the ship’s side, so
we got in it. |

There we were all of us on the wild sea. The heart of each
now grew’ faint, our cheeks were pale, and our eyes were dim,
14 XURY FINDS A FRESH SPRING.

for there was but one hope, and that was to find some bay, and
so get in the lee of the land. We now gave up our whole
souls to God.

The sea grew more and more rough, and its white foam
would curl and boil. At last the waves, in their wild sport,
burst on the boat’s side, and we were all thrown out.

I could swim well, but the force of the waves made me lose
my breath too much to do so. At length one large wave took
me to the shore, and left me high and dry, though half dead
with fear. I got on my feet and made the best of my way for
the land; but just then the curve of a huge wave rose up as
high as a hill, and this I had no strength to keep from, so it
took me back to the sea. I did my best to float on the top,
and held my breath to do so. The next wave was quite as
high, and shut me up in its bulk. I held my hands down
tight to my side, and then my head shot out at the top of the
waves. This gave me heart and breath too, and soon my
feet felt the ground.

I stood quite still for a short time, to let the sea run back
from me, and then I set off with all my might to the shore,
but yet the waves caught me, and twice more did they take
me back, and twice more land me on the shore. I thought the
last wave would have been the death of me, for it drove me on
a piece of rock, and with such force, as to leave me in a kind
of swoon, which, thank God, did not last long. At length, to
my great joy, I got up to the cliffs close to the shore, where I
found some grass, out of the reach of the sea. There I sat
down, safe on land at last.

I could but cry out in the words of the Psalm, “ They that
THE WRECK. 15

go down to the sea in ships, these men see the works of the
Lord in the deep. For at His word the storms rise, the winds
blow, and lift up the waves; then do they mount to the sky,
and from thence go down to the deep. My soul faints, I reel
to and fro, and am at my wit’s end: then the Lord brings me
out of all my fears.”



CAST ON THE SHORE.

I felt so wrapt in joy, that all I could do was to walk up
and down the coast, now lift up my hands, now fold them on
my breast and thank God for all that He had done for me,
when the rest of the men were lost. All lost but I, and I was
safe! I now cast my eyes round me, to find out what kind of
a place it was that I had been thus thrown in, like a bird in a
storm. Then all the glee I felt at first left me; for I was wet
and cold, and had no dry clothes to put on, no food to eat, and
not a friend to help me.

There were wild beasts here, but I had no gun to shoot
16 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

them with, or to keep me from their jaws. I had but a knife
and a pipe.

It now grew dark; and where was I to go for the night ?
I thought the top of some high tree would be a good place to
keep me out of harm’s way; and that there I might sit and
think of death, for, as yet, I had no hopes of life. Well, I
went to my tree, and made a kind of nest to sleep in. Then I
cut a stick to keep off the beasts of prey, in case they should
come, and fell to sleep just as if the branch I lay on had been
a bed of down.

When I woke up it was broad day; the sky too was clear
and the seacalm. But I saw from the top of the tree that in
the night the ship had left the bank of sand, and lay but a
mile from me; while the boat was on the beach, two miles on
my right. I went some way down by the shore, to get to the
boat; but an arm of the sea, half a mile broad, kept me from
it. At noon, the tide went a long way out, so that I could get
near the ship; and here I found that if we had but made up
our minds to stay on board, we should all have been safe.

I shed tears at the thought, for I could not help it; yet, as
there was no use in that, it struck me that the best thing for
me to do was to swim to the ship. I soon threw off my clothes,
took to the sea, and swam up to the wreck. But how was I
to get on deck? I had swum twice round the ship, when a
piece of rope caught my eye, which hung down from her side
so low, that at first the waves hid it. By the help of this rope
I got on board.

I found that there was a bulge in the ship, and that she had
sprung a leak. You may be sure that my first thought was to
SAFE AT LAST. Wy

look round for some food, and I soon made my way to the bin
where the bread was kept, and ate some of it as I went to and
fro, for there was no time to lose. There was, too, some rum,
of which I took a good draught, and this gave me heart. What



HE LOOKS ROUND THE SHIP FOR FOOD.

I stood most in need of, was a boat to take the goods to shore.
But it was vain to wish for that which could not be had; and
as there were some spare yards in the ship, two or three large
planks of wood, and a spare mast or two, I fell to work with
these to make a raft.
me ROBINSON CRUSOE.

I put four spars side by side, and laid short bits of plank on
them, cross ways, to make my raft strong. Though these
planks would bear my own weight, they were too slight to
bear much of my freight. So I took a saw which was on
board, and cut a mast in three lengths, and these gave great
strength to the raft. I found some bread and rice, a Dutch
cheese, and some dry goat’s flesh. There had been some
wheat, but the rats had got at it, and it was all gone.

My next task was to screen my goods from the spray of the
sea; and it did not take me long to do this, for there were
three large chests on board which held all, and these I put on
the raft. When the high tide came up it took off my coat and
shirt, which I had left on the shore; but there were some
fresh clothes in the ship.

‘See, here is a prize!” said I, out loud (though there were
none to hear me), “ now I shall not starve.” For I found four
large guns. But how was my raft to be got to land? I had
no sail, no oars; and a gust of wind would make all my store
slide off. Yet there were three things which I was glad of—
a calm sea, a tide which set in to the shore, and a slight breeze
to blow me there.

I had the good luck to find some oars in a part of the ship
in which I had made no search till now. With these I put to
sea, and. for half a mile my raft went well; but soon I found
it drove to one side. At length I saw a creek, up which, with
somé toil, I took my raft; and now the beach was so near,
that I felt my oar touch the ground.

Here I had well nigh lost my freight, for the shore lay on a
slope, so that there was no place to land on, save where one
BRINGS HIS RAFT SAFE TO LAND. _ 19

end of the raft would lie so high, and one end so low, that.all
my goods would fall off. To wait till the tide came up was
all that could be done. So, when the sea was a foot deep, I
thrust the raft on a flat piece of ground, to moor her there, and
stuck my two oars in the sand, one on each side of the raft.
Thus I let her lie till the ebb of the tide, and when it went
down, she was left safe on land with all her freight.

I saw that there were birds on the isle, and I shot one of
them. Mine must have been the first gun that had been heard
there since the world was made; for, at the sound of it, whole
flocks of birds flew up, with loud cries, from all parts of the
wood. The shape of the beak of the one I shot was like that
of a hawk, but the claws were not so large.

I now went back to my raft to land my stores, and this took
up the rest of the day. What to do at night I knew not, nor
where to find a safe place to land my stores on. I did not like
to lie down on the ground, for fear of beasts of prey, as well as
snakes, but there was-no cause for these fears, as I have since
found. I put the chests and boards round me as well as I
could, and made a kind of hut for the night.

As there was still a great store of things left in the ship,
which would be of use to me, I thought that I ought to bring
them to land at once; for I knew that the first storm would
break up the ship. So I went on board, and took ee care
this time not to load my raft too much.

The first thing 1 sought for was the tool chest; anu .n it
were some bags of nails, spikes, saws, knives, and such things;
but best of all, I found a stone to grind my tools on. There
were two or three flasks, some large bags of shot, and a roll of

3—2
20 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

lead ; but this last I had not the strength to hoist up to the
ship’s side, so as to get it on my raft. There were some spare
sails too, which I brought to shore.

I had some fear lest my stores might be run orf with by
beasts of prey, if not by men; but I found all safe and sound
when I went back, and no one had come there but a wild cat,
which sat on one of the chests. When I came up I held my



HE MAKES A HUT FOR THE NIGHT.

gun at her, but as she did not know what a gun was, this did
not rouse her. She ate a piece of dry goat’s flesh, and then
took her leave.

Now that I had two freights of goods at hand, I madea tent
with the ship’s sails, to stow them in, and cut the poles for it
from the wood. I now took all the things out of the casks
and chests, and put the casks in piles round the tent, to give it
strength ; and when this was done, I shut up the door with
the boards, spread one of the beds (which I had brought from
THE LAST OF THE SHIP. 21

the ship) on the ground, laid two guns close to my head, and
went to bed for the first time. I slept all night, for I was
much in need of rest.

The next day I was sad and sick at heart, for I felt how dull
it was to be thus cut off from all the rest of the world! I had
no great wish for work: but there was too much to be done
for me to dwell long on my sad lot. Each day, as it came, I
went off to the wreck to fetch more things; and I brought
back as much as the raft would hold. One day I had put too
great a load on the raft, which made it sink down on one side,
so that the goods were lost in the sea; but at this I did not
fret, as the chief part of the freight was some rope, which would
not have been of much use to me.

The twelve days that I had been in the isle were spent in
this way, and I had brought to land all that one pair of hands
could lift; though if the sea had been still calm, I might have
brought the whole ship, piece by piece.

The last time I swam to the wreck, the wind blew so hard,
that I made up my mind to go on board next time at low tide.
I found some tea and some gold coin; but as to the gold, it
made me laugh to look at it. ‘“‘O drug!” said I, “thou art
of nouse tome! I care not to save thee. Stay where thou
art, till the ship go down, then go thou with it!”

Still, I thought I might as well just take it; sol put it ina
piece of the sail, and threw it on deck that I might place it on
the raft. By-and-bye, the wind blew from the shore, so I had
to swim back with all speed; for I knew that at the turn of
the tide I should find it hard work to get to land at all. But
in spite of the high wind, I came to my home all safe. At
22 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

dawn of day I put my head out, and cast my eyes on the sea,
when lo! no ship was there !

This change in the face of things, and the loss of sucha
friend, quite struck me down. Yet I was glad to think that I
had brought to shore all that could be of use to me. I had
now to look out for some spot where I could make my home.
Half way up a hill there was a small plain, four or five score
feet long, and twice as broad ; and as it had a full view of the
sea, I thought that it would be a good place for my house.

I first dug a trench round a space which took in twelve
yards; and in this I drove two rows of stakes, till they stood
firm like piles, five and a half feet from the ground. I made
the stakes close and tight with bits of rope, and put small
sticks on the top of them in the shape of spikes. This made
so strong a fence that no man or beast could get in.

The door of my house was on the top, and I had to climb
up to it by steps, which I took in with me, so that no one else
might come up by the same way. Close to the back of the
house stood a high rock, in which I made a cave, and laid all
the earth that I had dug out of it round my house, to the
height of a foot and a half. I had to go out once a day in
search of food. The first time, I saw some goats, but they
were too shy and swift of foot to let me get near them.

At last I lay in wait for them close to their own haunts. If
they saw me in the vale, though they might be on high ground,
they. would run off, wild with fear; but if they were in the
vale, and I on high ground, they took no heed of me. The
first goat I shot had a kid by her side, and when the old one
feli, the kid stood near her, till I took her off on my back, and
lS HOOK PETS; 23

then the young one ran by my side. I put down the goat, and
brought the kid home to tame it; but as it was too young to
feed, I had to kill it.

At first I thought that, for the lack of pen and ink, I should
lose all note of time; so I made a large post, in the shape of



















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































HE SETS UP A CROSS TO TELL THE DATE,

across, on which I cut these words: “I came on these shores
on the 8th day of June, in the year 1659.” On the side of this
post I made a notch each day as it came, and this I kept up till
the last.

I have not yet said a word of my four pets, which were two
cats, a dog, anda bird. You may guess how fond I was of
them, for they were all the friends left to me. I brought the
dog and two cats from the ship. The dog would fetch things
for me at all times, and by his bark, his whine, his growl, and
his tricks, he would all but talk to me; yet he could not give
me thought for thought.
24 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

If I could but have had some one near me to find fault with,
or to find fault with me, what a treat it would have been!
Now that I had brought ink from the ship, I wrote downa
sketch of each day as it came; not so much to leave to those
who might read it, when I was dead and gone, as to get rid of
my own thoughts, and draw me from the fears which all day
long dwelt on my mind, till my head would ache with the
weight of them.

I was a long way out of the course of ships; and oh! how
dull it was to be cast on this lone spot with no one to love, no
one to make me laugh, no one to make me weep, no one to
make me think. It was dull to roam, day by day, from the
wood to the shore, and from the shore back to the wood, and
feed on my own thoughts all the while.

So much for the sad view of my case; but like most things,
it had a bright side as well asa dark one. For here was I safe
on land, while all the rest of the ship’s crew were lost. Well,
thought I, God who shapes our ways, and led me by the hand
then, can save me from this state now, or send some one to be
with me. True, Iam cast on a rough and rude part of the
globe, but there are no beasts of prey on it to kill or hurt me.
God has sent the ship so near to me, that I have got from it
all things to meet my wants for the rest of my days. Let life
be what it may, there is sure to be much to thank God for.
And I soon gave up all dull thoughts, and did not so much as
look out for a sail.

My goods from the wreck had been in the cave for more
than ten months; and it was time now to put them right, as
they took up all the space, and left me no room to turn in: so
HE ADDS TO HIS CAVE. 25

I made my small cave a large one, and dug it out a long way
back in the sand rock. Then I brought the mouth of it up to
the fence, and so made a back way to my house. This done



—o

SAD THOUGHTS AS HE ROAMS,

I put shelves on each side, to hold my goods, which made my
cave look like a shop full of stores. To make these shelves I
cut down a tree, and with the help of a saw, an axe, a plane,
and some more tools, I made boards.

A chair, and a desk to write on, came next. I rose in good
time, and set to work till noon, then I ate my meal, then I
26 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

went out with my gun, and to work once more till the sun had
set; and then to bed. It took me more than a week to change
the shape and size of my cave, but I had made it far too large,
for in course of time the earth fell in from the roof; and had I
been in it when this took place, I should have lost my life I
had now to set up posts in my cave, with planks on the top of
them, so as to make a roof of wood.

One day, when out with my gun, I shot a wild cat, the skin
of which made me a cap; and I found some birds of the dove
tribe, which built their nests in the holes of rocks.

I had to go to bed at dusk, till I made a lamp of goat’s fat,
which I put in a clay dish; and this, with a piece of hemp for
a wick, made a good light As I had found a use for the bag
which had held the fowl’s food on board ship, I shook out from
it the husks of corn. This was just at the time when the
great rains fell, and in the course of a month, blades of rice,
corn, and rye sprang up. As time went by, and the grain
was ripe, I kept it, and took care to sow it each year; but I
could not boast of a crop of wheat, as will be shown by-and-
bye, for three years.

A thing now took place on the isle, which no one could have
dreamt of, and which struck me down with fear. It was this
—the ground shook with great force, which threw down earth
from the rock with a loud crash—once more there was a shock
—and now the earth fell from the roof of my cave. The sea
did not look the same as it had done, for the shocks were just
as strong there as on land. The sway of the earth made me
feel sick ; and there was a noise and a roar all round me.

The same kind of shock came a third time; and when it
HE FALLS ILL, 27

had gone off, I sat quite still on the ground, for I knew not
what todo. Then the clouds grew dark, the wind rose, trees
were torn up by the roots, the sea was a mass of foam and
froth, and a great part of the isle was laid waste with the
storm. I thought that the world had come to an end. In
three hours’ time all was calm; but rain fell all that night and
a great part of the next day. Now, though quite worn out, I
had to move my goods which were in the cave, to some safe
place.

I knew that tools would be my first want, and that I should
have to grind mine on the stone, as they were blunt and worn
with use. But as it took both hands to hold the tool, I could
not turn the stone; so I made a wheel by which I could move
it with my foot. This was no small task, but I took great
pains with it, and at length it was done.

The rain fell for some days and.a cold chill came on me; in
short, I was ill. I had pains in my head, and could get no
sleep at night, and my thoughts were wild and strange. At
one time I shook with cold, and then a hot fit came on, with
faint sweats, which would last six hours at a time. Ill as I
was, I had to go out with my gun to get food. I shot a goat,
but it was a great toil to bring it home, and still more to cook
it.

I spent the next day in bed, and felt half dead from thirst,
yet too weak to stand up to get some drink. I lay and wept
like a child. ‘“ Lord, look on me! Lord, look on me!” would
I cry for hours.

At last the fit left me, and I slept, and did not wake till
dawn. I dreamt that I lay on the ground, and saw a man
28 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

come down from a great black cloud in a flame of light.
When he stood on the earth, it shook as it had done a few
days since; and all the world to me was full of fire. He came
up and said, ‘As I see that all these things have not brought
thee to pray, now thou shalt die.” Then I woke,.and found
it was a dream. Weak and faint, I was in dread all day lest
my fit should come on. .

Too ill to get out with my gun, I sat on the shore to think,
and thus ran my thoughts: ‘ What is this sea which is all
round me? and whence is it? There can be no doubt that
the hand that made it, made the air, the earth, the sky. And
who is that? It is God who hath made all things. Well,
then, if God hath made all things, it must be He who guides
them; and if so, no one thing in the whole range of His
works can take place and He not know it. Then God must
know how sick and sad I am, and He wills me to be here.
Oh, why hath God done this to me?”

Then some voice would seem to say, ‘‘ Dost thou ask why
God hath done this to thee? Ask why thou wert not shot by
the Moors, who came on board the ship, and took the lives of
thy mates. Ask why thou wert not torn by the beasts of prey
on the coasts. Ask why thou didst not go down in the deep
sea with the rest of the crew, but didst come to this isle, and

art safe.”
"A sound sleep then fell on me, and when I woke it must
have been three o’clock the next day, by the rays of the sun;
nay, it may have been more than that; for I think that this
must have been the day that I did not mark on my post, as I
have since found that theré was one notch too few.
HE GOES ROUND THE JSLE. 29

I now took from my store the Book of God’s Word, which I
had brought from the wreck, not one page of which I had yet
read. My eyes fell on five words, that would seem to have
been put there for my good at this time; so well did they
cheer my faint hopes, and touch the true source of my fears.
They were these: “TI will not leave thee.” And they have
dwelt in my heart to this day. I laid down the book, to pray.
My cry was “O Lord, help me to love and learn Thy ways.”
This was the first time in all my life that I had felt a sense
that God was near, and heard me. As for my dull life here,
it was not worth a thought; for now a new strength had come
to me; and there was a change in my griefs, as well as in my
joys.

I had now been in the isle twelve months, and I thought it
was time to go all round it, in search of its woods, springs,
and creeks. Sol set off, and brought back with me limes and
grapes in their prime, large and ripe. I had hung the grapes
in the sun to dry, and in a few days’ time went to fetch them,
that I might lay up a store. The vale, on the banks of which
they grew, was fresh and green, and a clear bright stream ran
through it, which gave so great a charm to the spot, as to make
me wish to live there.

But there was no view of the sea from this vale, while from
tay house, no ships could come on my side of the isle, and not
be seen by me; yet the cool, soft banks were so sweet and new
to me, that much of my time was spent there.

In the first of the three years in which I had grown corn, I
had sown it too late; in the next, it was spoilt by the drought ;
but the third year’s crop had sprung up well.
30 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

I found that the hares would lie in it night and day, for
which there was no cure but to plant a thick hedge all round
it; and this took me more than three weeks to do. I shot the



ON THE LOOK: OUT FOR A SAIL,

hares in the day time; and when it grew dark, I made fast the
dog’s chain to the gate, and there he stood to bark all night.
In a short time the corn grew strong, and at last ripe; but,
just as the hares had hurt it in the blade, so now the birds ate
it in the ear. At the noise of my gun, whole flocks of them
would fly up; and at this rate I saw that there would be no
corn left; so I made up my mind to keep a look out night and
THE BIRDS IN THE CORN. 31

day. I hid by the side of a hedge, and could see the birds sit
on the trees and watch, and then come down, one by one, as at
first.

Now each grain of wheat was, as it were, a small loaf of
bread to me. So the great thing was to get rid of these birds.
My plan was this: I shot three, and hung them up like thieves,
to scare all that came to the corn; and from this time, as long
as the dead ones hung here, not a bird came near. When the
corn was ripe, I made a scythe out of the swords from the
ship, and got in my crop.

Few of us think of the cost at which a loaf of bread is made.
Of course, there was no plough here to turn up the earth, and
no spade to dig it with, so I made one with wood; but this
was soon worn out, and for want of a rake, I made use of the
bough of a tree. When I had got the corn home, I had to
thresh it, part the grain from the chaff, and store it up. Then
came the want of a mill to grind it, of sieves to clean it, and
of yeast to make bread of it.

Still, my bread was made, though I had no tools; and no
one could say that I did not earn it by the sweat of my brow.
When the rain kept me in doors, it was good fun to teach my
pet bird Poll to talk; but so mute were all things round me,
that the sound of my own voice made me start.

My chief wants now were jars, pots, cups, and plates, but I
knew not how I could make them. At last I went in search
of some clay, and found some a mile from my house; but it
was quite a joke to see the queer shapes and forms that I made
out of it. For some of my pots and jars were too weak to
bear their own weight; and they would fall out here, and in
32 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

there, in all sorts of ways; while some, when they were put
in the sun to bake, would crack with the heat of its rays. You
may guess what my joy was when at last a pot was made



HE FAILS FOR A TIME TO MAKE POTS,

which would stand the heat of the fire, so that I could boil the
meat for broth.

The next thing to be made was a sieve, to part the grain
from the husks. Goat's hair was of no use to me, as I could
not weave or spin; so I made a shift for two years, witha thin
kind of stuff, which I brought from the ship. But to grind the
GIVES UP HIS FIRST BOAT. 33

corn with the stones was the worst of all, such hard work did
I find it. To bake the bread I burnt some wood down to an
ash, which I threw on the hearth to heat it, and then set my
loaves on the hearth, and in this way my bread was made.

The next thing to turn my thoughts to was the ship’s boat,
which lay on the high ridge of sand, where it had been thrust
by the storm which had cast me on these shores. But it lay
with the keel to the sky, so I had to dig the sand from it, and
turn it up with the help of a pole. When I had done this, I
found it was all in vain, for I had not the strength to launch
it. So all I could do now, was to make a boat of less size
out of a tree; and I found one that was just fit for it, which
grew not far from the shore, but I could no more stir this
than I could the ship’s boat.

What was to be done? I first dug the ground flat and
smooth all the way from the boat to the sea, so as to let it slide
down; but this plan did not turn out well, so I thought I
would try a new way, which was to make a trench, so as to
bring the sea up to the boat, as the boat could not be brought
to the sea. But to do this, I must have dug down to a great
depth, which would take one man some years to do. And
when too late, I found it was not wise to work out a scheme
till I had first thought of the cost and toil.

“Well,” thought I, “I must give up the boat, and with it
all my hopes to leave the isle. But I have this to think of: I
am lord of the whole isle; in fact, a king. I have wood with
which I might build a fleet, and grapes, if not corn, to freight
it with, though all my wealth is but a few gold coins.” For
these I had no sort of use, and could have found it in my heart

3
34 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

to give them all for a peck of peas and some ink, which last I
stood much in need of. But it was best to dwell more on
what I had than on what I had not.

I now must needs try once more to build a boat, but this
time it was to have a mast, for which the ship’s sails would
be of great use. I made a deck at each end to keep out the
spray of the sea, a bin for my food, and a rest for my gun,
with a flap to screen it from the wet. More than all, the boat
was one of such a size that I could launch it.

My first cruise was up and down the creek, but soon I got
bold, and made the whole round of my isle. I took with me
bread, cakes, and a pot full of rice, some rum, half a goat, two
great coats, one of which was to lie on, and one to put on at
night. I set sail in the sixth year of my reign. On the east
side of the isle there was a large ridge of rocks which lay two
miles from the shore, and a shoal of sand lay for half a mile
from the rocks to the beach. To get round to this point, I
had to sail a great way out to sea; and here I all but lost my
life.

But I got back to my home at last. On my way there,
quite worn out with the toils of the boat, I lay down in the
shade to rest my limbs, and slept. But judge, if you can, what
a start I gave, when a voice woke me out of my sleep, and
spoke my name three times! A voice in this wild place! To
call me by name, too! Then the voice said, ‘‘ Where are you?
Where have you been? How came you here?” But now I
saw it all; for at the top of the hedge sat Poll, who did but
say the words she had been taught by me.

I now went in search of some goats, and laid snares for them,
AT HOME ONCE MORE. 35

with rice for a bait. I had set the traps in the night, and
found they had all stood, though the bait was gone. So I
thought of a new way to take them, which was to make a pit
and lay sticks and grass on it, so as to hide it; and in this
way I caught an old goat and some kids. But the old goat
was much too fierce for me, so I let him go.



THE NEW BOAT.

I brought all the young ones home, and let them fast a long
time, till at last they fed from my hand, and were quite tame.
I kept them ina kind of park, in which there were trees to
screen them from the sun. At first my park was three miles
round ; but it struck me that, in so great a space, the kids
would soon get as wild as if they had the range of the whole
vale, and that it would be as well to give them less room;
so I had to make a hedge, which took me three months to
plant. My park held a flock of twelve goats, and in two years
more there were more than two score.

5—2
36 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

My dog sat at meals with me, and one cat on each side of
me, on stools, and we had Poll to talk to us. Now fora word
or two as to the dress in which I made a tour round the isle.
I could but think how droll it would look in the streets of the
town in which I was born. I wore a high cap of goat’s skin,
with a flap that hung down, to keep the sun and rain from my
neck, a coat made from the skin of a goat too, the skirts of
which came down to my hips, and the same on my legs, with
no shoes, but flaps of the fur round my shins. I had a broad
belt of the same round my waist, which drew on with two
thongs ; and from it, on my right side, hung a saw and an axe;
and on my left side a pouch for the shot. My beard had not
been cut since I came here. But no more need be said of my
looks, for there were few to see me.

A strange sight was now in store for me, which was to
change the whole course of my life in the isle.

One day at noon, while on a stroll down toa part of the
shore that was new to me, what should I see on the sand but
the print of a man’s foot! I felt as if I was bound by a spell,
and could not stir from the spot.

By-and-bye, I stole a look round me, but no one was in
sight. What could this mean? I went three or four times to
look at it. There it was—the print of a man’s foot; toes, heel,
and all the parts of a foot. How could it have come there?

My head swam with fear; and as I left the spot, I made
two or three steps, and then took a look round me; then two
steps more, and did the same thing. I took fright at the
stump of an old tree, and ran to my house, as if for my life.
How could aught in the shape of a man come to that shore,
THE PRINT OF A FOOT. 37

and I not to know it? Where was the ship that brought him?
Then a vague dread took hold of my mind, that some man, or
set of men, had found me out; and it might be, that they
meant to kill me, or rob me of all I had.



HIS FRIGHT AT SIGHT OF THE FOOT PRINT.

How strange a thing is the life of man! One day we love
that which the next day we hate. One day we seek what the
next day we shun. One day we long for the thing which the
next day we fear; and so we go on. Now, from the time that
I was cast on this isle, my great source of grief was that I
should be thus cut off from the rest of my race. Why, then,
should the thought that a man might be near give me all this
pain? Nay, why should the mere sight of the print of a man’s
foot make me quake with fear? It seems most strange, yet
not more strange than true.

Once it struck me that it might be the print of my own foot,
when first the storm cast me on these shores. Could I have
38 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

come this way from the boat? Should it in truth turn out to
be the print of my own foot, I should be like a boy who tells
uf a ghost, and feels more fright at his own tale, than those do
whom he meant to scare.

Fear kept me in doors for three days, till the want of food
drove me out. At last I was so bold as to go down to the
coast to look once more at the print of the foot, to see if it was
the same shape as my own. I found it was not so large bya
great deal; so it was clear there were men in the isle. Just at
this time my good watch dog fell down dead at my feet. He
was old and worn out, and in him I lost my best guard and
friend.

One day as I went from the hill to the coast, a scene lay in
front of me which made me sick at heart. The spot was spread
with the bones of men. There was a round place dug in the
earth, where a fire had been made, and here some men had
come to feast. Now that I had seen this sight, I knew not
how to act; I kept close to my home, and would scarce stir
from it, save to milk my flock of goats.

To feel safe was now more to me than to be well fed; and I
did not care to drive a nail, or chop a stick of wood, lest the
sound of it should be heard, much less would I fireagun. As
to my bread and meat, I had to bake it at night when the
smoke could not be seen. But I soon found the way to burn
wood with turf at the top of it, which made it like chark, or
dry coal; and this I could use by day, as it had no smoke.

I found in the wood where I went to get the sticks for my
fire, a cave so large that I could stand in it; but I made more
haste to get out than in; for two large eyes, as bright as stars,
THE PRINT OF A FOOT. 39

shone out from it with a fierce glare. I took a torch, and
went to see what they could be, and found that there was no
cause for fear; for the eyes were those of an old grey goat,
which had gone there to die of old age. I gave him a push,
to try to get him out of the cave, but he could not rise from
the ground where he lay; so I left him there to die, as I could
not save his life.

I found the width of the cave was twelve feet; but part of it,
near the end, was so low that I had to creep on my hands and
feet to goin. What the length of it was I could not tell, for
my light went out, and I had to give up my search. The next
day I went to the cave with large lights made of goat’s fat;
and when I got to the end, I found that the roof rose to two
score feet or more.

As my lights shone on the walls and roof of the cave, a sight
burst on my view, the charms of which no tongue could tell;
for the walls shone like stars. What was in the rock to cause
this it was hard to say; they might be gems, or bright stones,
or gold. But let them be what they may, this cave was a
mine of wealth to me; for at such time as I felt dull or sad,
the bright scene would flash on my mind’s eye, and fill it with
Joy.

All these years had gone by, with no new sight to rest my
eyes on, till this scene burst on them. I felt as if I should
like to spend the rest of my life here, and at its close, lie
down to die in this cave, like the old goat.

As I went home I was struck by the sight of some smoke,
which came froma fire no more than two miles off. From this
time I lost all my peace of mind. Day and night a dread
40 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

would haunt me, that the men who had made this fire would
find me out. I went home and drew up my steps, but first I
made all things round me look wild and rude. To load my
gun was the next thing to do, and I peer: it would be best
to stay at home and hide



HE SEES SOME SMOKE,

But this was not to be borne long. I had no spy to send
out, and all I could do was to get to the top of the hill, and
keep a good look out. At last, through my glass, I could see
a group of wild men join ina dance round their fire. As soon
as they had left, I took two guns, and slung a sword on my
side; then with all speed, I set off to the top of the hill, once
more to have a good view.

This time I made up my mind to go up to the men, but not
with a view to kill them, for I felt that it would be wrong to
do so. With such a load of arms, it took me two hours to
reach the spot where the fire was; and by the time I got there,
the men had all gone; but I saw them in four boats out at sea,
THE WILD MEN’S FEAST. AI

Down on the shore, there was a proof of what the work of
these men had been. The signs of their feast made me sick at
heart, and I shut my eyes. I durst not fire my gun when I
went out for food on that side the isle, lest there should be



HE SEES THE WILD MEN,

some of the men left, who might hear it, and so find me out.
This state of things went on for a year and three months, and
for all that time I saw no more men.

On the twelfth of May, a great storm of wind blew all day
and night. As it was dark, I sat in my house; and in the midst
42 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

of the gale, I heard a gun fire! My guess was that it must
have been from some ship cast on shore by the storm. So I
set a light to some wood on top of the hill, that those in the
ship, if ship it should be, might know that some one was there
to aid them. I then heard two more guns fire. When it was
light, I went to the south side of the isle, and there lay the
wreck of a ship, cast on the rocks in the night by the storm.
She was too far off for me to see if there were men on board.

Words could not tell how much I did long to bring but one
of the ship’s crew to the shore! So strong was my wish to
save the life of those on board, that I could have laid down my
own life to do so. There are some springs in the heart which,
when hope stirs them, drive the soul on with such a force, that
to lose all chance of the thing one hopes for, would seem to
make one mad; and thus was it with me.

Now, I thought, was the time to use my boat; so I set to
work at once to fit it out. I took on board some rum (of which
I still had a good deal left), some dry grapes, a bag of rice,
some goat’s milk, and cheese, and then put out to sea. A
dread came on me at the thought of the risk I had run on the
same rocks; but my heart did not quite fail me, though I knew
that, as my boat was small, if a gale of wind should spring up,
all would be lost. Then I found that I must go back to the
shore till the tide should turn, and the ebb come on.

I made up my mind to go out the next day with the high
tide, so I slept that night in my boat. At dawn I set out to
sea, and in less than two hours I came up to the wreck. What
a scene was there! The ship had struck on two rocks. The
stern was torn by the force of the waves, the masts were swept
A SHIP CAST ON THE ROCKS. 43

off, ropes and chains lay strewn on the deck, and all was wrapt
in gloom. As I came up to the wreck, a dog swam to me with
a yelp and a whine. I took him on board my boat, and when
I gave him some bread, he ate it like a wolf, and as to drink,
he would have burst if I had let him take his fill of it.

I went to the cook’s room, where I found two men, but they
were both dead. The tongue was mute, the ear was deaf, the
eye was shut, and the lip was stiff; still the sad tale was told,
for each had his arm round his friend’s neck, and so they must
have sat to wait for death. What a change had come on the
scene, once so wild with the lash of the waves and the roar of
the wind! All was calm now—death had done its work, and
all had felt its stroke, save the dog, and he was the one thing
that still had life.

I thought the ship must have come from Spain, and there
was much gold on board. I took some of the chests and put
them in my boat, but did not wait to see what they held, and
with this spoil, and three casks of rum, I came back.

I found all things at home just as I had left them, my goats,
my cats, and my bird. The scene in the cook’s room was in my
mind day and night, and to cheer me up I drank some of the
rum. I then set to work to bring my freight from the shore,
where I had left it. In the chests there were two great bags
of gold, and some bars of the same, and near these lay three
small flasks and three bags of shot, which were a great prize.

From this time, all went well with me for two years; but it
was not to last. One day, as I stood on the hill, I saw six
boats on the shore! What could this mean? Where were
the men who had brought them? And what had they come
44 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

for? I saw through my glass that there were a score anda
half, at least, on the east side of the isle. They had meat on
the fire, round which I could see them dance. They then took
aman from one of the boats, who was bound hand and foot;
but when they came to loose his bonds, he set off as fast as his
feet would take him, and in a straight line to my house.

To tell the truth, when I saw all the rest of the men run to
catch him, my hair stood on énd with fright. In the creek, he
swam like a fish, and the plunge which he took brought him
through it ina few strokes. All the men now gave up the
chase but two, and they swam through the creek, but by no
means so fast as the slave had done. Now, I thought, was the
time for me to help the poor man, and my heart told me it
would be right to do so. iran down my steps with my two
guns, and went with all speed up the hill, and then down by a
short cut to meet them.

I gave a sign to the poor slave to come to me, and at the
same time went up to meet the two men who were in chase of
him. I madearush at the first of these, to knock him down
with the stock of my gun, and he fell. I saw the one who was
left aim at me with his bow, so, to save my life, I shot him
dead.

The smoke and noise from my gun, gave the poor slave
who had been bound, such a shock, that he stood still on the
spot, as if he had been ina trance. I gave a loud shout for
him to come to me, and I took care to show him that I was a
friend, and made all the signs I could think of to coax him up
to me. At length he came, knelt down to kiss the ground,
end then took hold of my foot, and set it on his head. All
THE SLAVE. 45

this meant that he was my slave; and I bade him rise, and
made much of him.

But there was more work to be done yet, for the man who
had had the blow from my gun was not dead. I made a sign
for my slave (as I shall now call him) to look at him. At this
he spoke to me, and though I could not make out what he
said, yet it gave me a shock of joy; for it was the first sound
of a man’s voice that I had heard, for all the years I had been
on the isle.

The man whom I had struck with the stock of my gun, sat
up; and my slave, who was in great fear of him, made signs
for me to lend him my sword, which hung in a belt at my side.
With this he ran up to the man, and with one stroke cut off
his head. When he had done this, he brought me back my
sword with a laugh, and put it down in front of me. I did not
like to see the glee with which he did it, and I did not feel
that my own life was quite safe with such a man.

He, in his turn, could but lift up his large brown hands with
awe, to think that I had put his foe to death, while I stood so
far from him. But as to the sword, he and the rest of his
tribe made use of swords of wood, and this was why he knew
so well how to wield mine. He made signs to me to let him
go and see the man who had been shot; and he gave him a
turn round, first on this side, then on that ; and when he saw
the wound made in his breast by the shot, he stood quite still
once more, as if he had lost his wits. I made signs for him to
come back, for my fears told me that the rest of the men migh?
come in search of their friends.

I did not like to take my slave to my house, nor to my cave ;
46 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

so I threw down some straw from the rice plant for him to sleep
on, and gave him some bread and a bunch of dry grapes to eat.
He was a fine man, with straight strong limbs, tall, and young.
His hair was thick, like wool, and black. His head was large
and high, and he had bright black eyes. He was of a dark
brown hue; his face was round, and his nose small, but not
flat; he had a good mouth with thin lips, with which he could
give a sofi smile ; and his teeth were as white as snow.

I had been to milk my goats in the field close by, and when
he saw me, he ran to me, and lay down on the ground to show
me his thanks. He then put his head on the ground, and set
my foot on his head, as he had done at first. He took all the
means he could think of, to let me know that he would serve
me all his life; and I gavea sign to show that I thought well
of him.

The next thing was to think of some name to call him by.
I chose that of the sixth day of the week (Friday), as he came
to me on that day. I took care not to lose sight of him all
that night, and when the sun rose, I made signs for him to come
to me, that I might give him some clothes, for he wore none.
We then went up to the top of the hill, to look out for the men ;
but as we could not see them, or their boats, it was clear that
they had left the isle.

My slave has since told me that they had had a great fight
with the tribe that dwelt next to them, and that all those men
whom each side took in war were their own by right. My
slave’s foes had four who fell to their share, of whom he was
one.

I now set to work to make my man acap of hare’s skin, and
HIS MAN FRIDAY. 47

gave him a goat’s skin to wear round his waist. It was a great

source of pride to him, to find that his clothes were as good as
my own.



GIVES CLOTHES TO HIS SLAVE.

At night, I kept my guns, sword, and bow close to my side;
but there was no need for this, as my slave was, in sooth, most
true tome. He did all that he was set to do, with all his whole
48 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

heart in the work; and I knew that he would lay down his life
to save mine. What could a mando more than that? And oh,
the joy to have him here to cheer me in this lone isle!

I did my best to teach him, so like a child as he was, to do
and feel all that was right. I found him apt, and. full of fun;
and he took great pains to learn all that I could tell him. Our
lives ran on inacalm, smooth way; and, but for the vile feasts
which were held on the shores, I felt no wish to leave the isle.

As Friday had by no means lost his zest for these meals, it
struck me that the best way to cure him was to let him taste
the flesh of beasts; so I took him with me one day to the wood
for some sport. I sawa she goat, in the shade, with her two
kids. I caught Friday by the arm, and made signs to him not
to stir, and then shot one of the kids; but the noise of the gun
save the poor man a great shock. He did not see the kid, nor
did he know that it was dead. He tore his dress off his breast
to feel if there was a wound there; then he knelt down to me,
and took hold of my knees to pray of me not to kill him.

To show poor Friday that his life was quite safe, I led him
by the hand, and told him to fetch the kid. By-and-bye, I saw
a hawk in a tree, so I bade him look at the gun, the hawk, and
the ground; and then I shot the bird. But my poor slave gave
still more signs of fear this time than he did at first, for he
shook from head to foot. He must have thought that some
fiend of death dwelt in the gun, and I think that he would have
knelt down to it, as well as to me; but he would not so much
as touch the gun for some time, though he would speak to it
when he thought I was not near. Once he told me that what
he said to it was to ask it not to kill him.
FRIDAY LEARNS TO MAKE BREAD. 49

I brought home the bird, and made broth of it. Friday was
much struck to see me eat salt with it, and made a wry face;
but I, in my turn, took some that had no salt with it, and I
made a wry face at that. The next day I gave him a piece of
kid’s flesh, which I had hung by a string in front of the fire to
roast. My plan was to put two poles, one on each side of the
fire, and a stick on the top of them to hold the string. When
my slave came to taste the flesh, he took the best means to let
me know how good he thought it.

The next day I set him to beat out and sift somecorn. I let
him see me make the bread, and he soon did all the work. I
felt quite a love for his true, warm heart, and he soon learnt to
talk to me. One day I said, “Do the men of your tribe win
in fight?” He told me, with a smile, that they did. ‘“ Well,
then,” said I, ‘how came they to let their foes take you?”

“They run one, two, three, and make go in the boat that
time.”

“Well, and what do the men do with those they take?”

“ Eat them all up.”

This was not good news for me, but I went on, and said,
“Where do they take them?”

‘““Go to next place where they think.”

“ Do they come here?”

“Yes, yes, they come here, come else place too.”

“Have you been here with them twice?”

“Yes, come there.”

He meant the north-west side of the isle, so to this spot I
took him the next day. He knew the place, and told me he
was there once, and with him twelve men. To let me know

+
50 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

this, he placed twelve stones all of a row, and made me count
them.

“ Are not the boats lost on your shore now and then?” He
said that there was no fear, and that no boats were lost. He
told me that up a great way by the moon—that is, where the
moon then came up—there dwelt a tribe of white men like me,
with beards. I felt sure that they must have come from Spain,
to work the gold mines. I put this to him: “ Could I go from
this isle and join those men ?”

‘Yes, yes, you may go in two boats.”

It was hard to see how one man could go in two boats, but
what he meant was, a boat twice as large as my own.

One day I said to my slave, ‘“‘ Do you know who made you?”

But he could not tell at all what these words meant. Sol
said, ‘‘Do you know who made the sea, the ground we tread
on, the hills, and woods?” He said it was Beek, whose home
was a great way off, and that he was so old, that the sea and
the land were not so old as he.

“If this old man has made all things, why do not all things
bow down to him?”

My slave gave a grave look, and said, “All things say ‘O’
to him.”

‘Where do the men in your land go when they die?”

“ All go to Beek.”

I then held my hand up to the sky to point to it, and said,
“God dwells there. He made the world, and all things in it.
The moon and the stars are the work of His hand. God sends
the wind and the rain on the earth, and the streams that flow: He
hides the face of the sky with clouds, makes the grass to grow
FRIDAY TELLS OF GOD. 51

for the beasts of the field, and herbs for the use of man. God’s
love knows no end. When we pray, He draws near to us and
hears us.”

It was a real joy to my poor slave to hear me talk of these
things. He sat still fora long time, then gave a sigh, and
told me that he would say “O” to Beek no more, for he was
but a short way off, and yet could not hear till men went up
the hill to speak to him

‘Did you go up the hill to speak to him?” said I.

“No, Okes go up to Beek, not young mans.”

“What do Okes say to him?”

“They say ‘O.’”

Now that I brought my man Friday to know that Beek was
not the true God, such was the sense he had of my worth, that
I had fears lest I should stand in the place of Beek. I did my
best to call forth his faith in Christ, and make it strong and
clear, till at last—thanks be to the Lord—I brought him to the
love of Him, with the whole grasp of his soul.

To please my poor slave, I gave him a sketch of my whole life;
I told him where I was born, and where I spent my days when
a child. He was glad to hear tales of the land of my birth,
and of the trade which we keep up, in ships, with all parts of
the known world. I gave him a knife and a belt, which made
him dance with joy.

One day as we stood on the top of the hill at the east side of
the isle, I saw him fix his eyes on the main land, and stand for
a long time to gaze at it; then jump and sing, and call out to
me.

“What do you see?” said I.
4—2
52 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

“O joy!” said he, with a fierce glee in his eyes, “O glad}
There see my land!”

Why did he strain his eyes to stare at this land, as if he had
a wish to be there? It put fears in my mind which made me
feel far less at my ease with him. Thought I, if he should go
back to his home, he will think no more of what I have taught
him and done for him. He will be sure to tell the rest of his
tribe all my ways, and come back with, it may be, scores of them,
and kill me, and then dance round me, as they did round the
men, the last time they came on my isle. |

But these were all false fears, though they found a place in
my mind a long while; and I was not so kind to him now as
I had been. From this time I made it a rule, day by day, to
find out if there were grounds for my fears or not. JI said,
“Do you not wish to be once more in your own land ?”

“Yes! I be much O glad to be at my own land.”

“What would you do there? Would you turn wild, and be
as you were?”

“No, no, I would tell them to be good, tell them eat bread,
corn, milk, no eat man more!”

‘Why, they would kill you!”

“No, no, they no kill; they love learn.”

He then told me that some white men, who had come on
their shores in a boat, had taught them a great deal.

“Then will you go back to your land with me?”

He said he could not swim so far, so I told him he should
help me to build a boat to goin. Then he said, “If you go, I

0.”

: ““T go? why, they would eat me!”
A NEW BOAT. 53

“No, me make them much love you.”

Then he told me as well as he could, how kind they had been
to some white men. I brought out the large boat to hear what
he thought of it, but he said it was too small. We then went to
look at the old ship’s boat, which, as it had been in the sun for
years, was not at all ina sound state. The poor man made sure
that it would do. But how were we to know this? I told him
we should build a boat as large as that, and that he should go
home in it. He spoke not a word, but was grave and sad.

“What ails you?” said I.

“Why you grieve mad with your man?”

“What do you mean? I am not cross with you.”

‘No cross? no cross with me? Why send your man home
to his own land, then?”

“Did you not tell me you would like to go back?”

“Yes, yes, we both there; no wish self there, if you not
there!”

‘And what should I do there?”

“You do great deal much good! you teach wild men be good
men ; you tell them know God, pray God, and lead new life.”

We soon set to work to make a boat that would take us
both. The first thing was to look out for some large trees that
grew near the shore, so that we could launch our boat when it
was made. My slave’s plan was to burn the wood to make it
the right shape; but as mine was to hew it, I set him to work
with my tools, and in two months’ time we had made a good
strong boat; but it took a long while to get her down to the
shore.

Friday had the whole charge of her: and, large as she was
54 "ROBINSON CRUSOE.

he made her move with ease, and said, “he thought she go
there well, though great blow wind!” He did not know that
I meant to make a mast and sail. I cut down a young fir-tree
for the mast, and then I set to work at the sail. It made me
laugh to see my man stand and stare, when he came to watch
me sail the boat. . But he soon gave a jump,a laugh, and a
clap of the hands when he saw the sail jib and fall, first on this
side, then on that.

The next thing to do was to stow our boat up in the creek,
where we dug a small dock; and when the tide was low, we
made a dam, to keep out the sea. The time of year had now
come for us to set sail, so we got out all our stores, to put them
in the boat. .

One day I sent Friday to the shore, to get a sort of herb that
grew there. I-soon heard him cry out to me, “O grief! O
bad! O bad! O out there boats, one, two, three!” ‘Keep a
stout heart,” said I, to cheer him. The poor man shook with
fear; for he thought that the men who brought him here, had
now come back to kill him.

“Can you fight?” said I.

“Me shoot; but me saw three boats; one, two, three!”

“Have no fear; those that we do not kill, will be sure to
take fright at the sound of our guns. Now will you stand by
me, and do just as you are bid?”

“Me die when you bid die.”

I gave hima good draught of rum; and when he had drunk
this, he took up an axe and two guns, each of which hada
charge of swan shot. I took two guns as well, and put large
shot in them, and then hung my great sword by myside. From
THREE STRANGE BOATS. 55

the top of the hill, I saw with the help of my glass, that the
boats had each brought eight men, and one slave. They had
come on shore’ near the creek, where a grove of young trees
grew close down to the sea. .



THEY GO TO AID THE WHITE MEN.

They had with them three slaves, bound hand and foot, and
you who read this, may guess what they were brought here
for. I felt that I must try and save them from so hard a fate,
and that todo this, I should have to put some of their foes to
death. So we set forth on our way. I gave Friday strict
charge to keep close to me, and not to fire till I told him to
do so.

We went full a mile out of our way, that we might get round
to the wood to hide there. But we had not gone far, when my
56 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

old qualms came back to me, and I thought, “Is it for me to
dip my hands in man’s blood? Why should I kill those who
have done me no harm, and mean not to hurt me? Nay, who
do not so much as know that they are in the wrong, when they
hold these feasts. Are not their ways a sign that God has left
them (with the rest of their tribe) to their own dull hearts?
God did not call me to be a judge for Him. He who said
‘Thou shalt not kill,’ said it for me, as well as the rest of the
world.”

A throng of thoughts like these would rush on my mind, as
if to warn me to pause, till I felt sure that there was more to
call me to the work than I then knew of. I took my stand in
the wood, to watch the men at their feast, and then crept on,
with Friday close at my heels. Thus we went till we came to
the skirts of the wood. Then I said to Friday, “Go up to the
top of that tree, and bring me word if you can see the men.”

He went, and, quick as thought, came back to say that they
were all round the fire, and that the man who was bound on
the sand would be the next they would kill. But when he told
me that it was a white man, one of my own race, I felt the
blood boil in my veins. Two of the gang had gone to loose
the white man from his bonds; so now was the time to fire.

At the sound of our guns, we saw all the men jump up from
the ground where they sat. It must have been the first gun
they had heard in their lives. They knew not which way to look.
I now threw down my piece, and took up a small gun; Friday
did the same; and I gave him the word to fire. The men ran
right and left, with yells and screams. .

I now made arush out of the wood, that they might see me,
THEY SAVE THE WHITE MAN. 57

with my man Friday at my heels, of course. We gave a loud
shout, and ran up to the white man as fast as we could. There
he lay on the hot sand. I cut the flag, or rush, by which he
was bound, but he was too weak to stand or speak, so I gave
himsomerum. He let me know by all the signs that he could



THE WHITE MAN NEAR DEATH.

think of, how much he stood in my debt for all that I had
done for him. ;
I said, ‘“‘ We will talk of that by-and-bye; but now we must
.do what we can to save our lives.” Friday, who was free to go
_ where he chose, flew here and there, and put all the men to the
rout. They fled in full haste to their boats, and were soon out
at sea; and so we got rid of our foes at last.
The man whom we had found on the sand told us that his
name was Carl, and that he came from Spain. But there was
58 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

One more man to claim our care; for the black men had left a
small boat on the sands, and in this I saw a poor wretch who
lay half dead. He could not so much as look up, so tight was
he bound, neck and heels. When I cut the bonds from him
he gave a deep groan, for he thought that al] this was but to
lead him out to die.

Friday then came up, and I bade him speak to the old man
in his own tongue, and tell him that he was free. This good
news gave him strength, and he sat upin the boat. But when
Friday came to hear him talk, and to look him in the face, it
brought the tears to my eyes to see him kiss and hug the
poor old man, and dance round him with joy, then. weep,
wring his hands, and beat his own face and head, and then
laugh once more, sing and leap. For a long time he could
not speak to me, so as to let me know what all this meant.
But at length he told me that he was the son of this poor old
man, and that his name was Jaf.

It would be a hard task for me to tell of all the quaint signs
Friday made to show his joy. He went in and out of the
boat five or six times, sat down by old Jaf, and held the
poor old man’s head close to his breast to warm it; then he
set to work to rub his arms and feet, which were cold and
stiff from the bonds. I told Friday to give him some rum
and bread; but he said, “None! Bad dog eat all up self.”
He then ran off straight to the house, and took no heed of
my calls, but went as swift as a deer.

In an hour's time, he came back with a jug in his hand.
The good soul had gone all the way to the house, that Jaf
might have a fresh draught from my well; and with it he
CARL AND ¥AF. 59

brought two cakes, one of which I bade him take to Carl, who
lay in the shade of a tree. His limbs were stiff and cold, and
he was too weak to say a word.

I set my man to rub his feet with rum, and while he did so,
I saw Friday turn his head round from time to time, to steal
a look at the old man. Then we brought Carl and Jaf home
from the boat on our backs, as they could not walk. The door
of my house was at the top, and the poor sick men could not
climb the steps by which I got in, sa we made for them a tent
of ald sails.

I was now a king of these three men, as well as lord of
the isle; and I felt proud to say “‘ They all owe their lives to
their king, and would lay them down for him if he bade them
do so.” But I did not think that my reign was so soon to
come to an end. The next thing for us to do was to give
Carl and Jaf some food, and to kill and roast a kid, to which
we all four sat down, and I did my best to cheer them.

Carl in a few days grew quite strong, and I set him to work
to dig some land for seed; for it was clear we should want
more corn now that we had two more mouths to fill. So we
put in the ground all the stock of grain I had, and thus we
all four had as much work as we could do for some time.
When the crop grew, and was ripe, we found we had a good
store of grain.

We made a plan that Carl and Jaf should go back to the
main land, to try if they could get some of the white men, who
had been cast on shore there, to come and live with us; so
they got out the boat, and took with them two guns, and
food for eight days. They were to come back in a week’s
60 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

time, and I bade them hang out a sign when they came in
sight, so that we might know who they were.

One day, Friday ran up to me in great glee, and said, “‘ They
are back! They are back!” A mile from shore, there was a
boat with a sail, which stood in for the land; but I knew it
could not be the one which our two friends had gone out in, for
it was on the wrong side of the isle for that. I saw too, through
my glass, a ship out at sea. There were twelve men in the boat,
three of whom were bound in chains, and four had fire arms.

By-and-bye, I saw one of the men raise his sword to those
who were in chains, and I felt sure that all was not right. Then
I saw that three men who had been bound were set free; and
when they had come on shore they lay on the ground, in the
shade of a tree. I was soon at their side, for their looks, so
sad and worn, brought to my mind the first few hours I had
spent in this wild spot, where all to me was wrapt in gloom.

I went up to these men and said:

“Who are you, Sirs?”

They gave a start at my voice and at my strange dress, and
made a move as if they would fly from me. I said, ‘‘ Do not
fear me, for it may be that you have a friend at hand, though
you do not think it.” “ He must be sent from the sky then,”
said one of them with a grave look; and he took off his hat
, to meat thesame time. ‘ All help is from thence, Sir,” I said.
‘“ But what can I doto aid you? You look as if you had some
load of grief on your breast. I saw one of the men lift his
sword as if to kill you.” |

The tears ran down the poor man’s face, as he said, “Is this
a god, or is it buta man?” ‘Have no doubt on that score,
PAUL AND HIS CREW. 6z

Sir,” said I, “fora god would not have come with a dress like
this. No, do not fear—nor raise your hopes too high; for you
see but a man, yet one who will do all he can to help you.
Your speech shows me that you come from the same land as I
do. [ will do all I can to serve you. Tell me your case.



PAUL STATES HIS CASE,

“ Our case, Sir, is too long to tell you while they who would
kill us were so near. My name is Paul. To be short, Sir, my
crew have thrust me out of my ship, which you see out there,
and have left me here to die. It was as much as I could do to
make them sheathe their swords, which you saw were drawn
to slay me. They have set me down in this isle with these
two men, my friend here, and the ship’s mate.”

“Where have they gone?” said I.
62 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

“There, in the wood close by. I fear they may have seen
and heard us. If they have, they will be sure to kill us all.”

“Have they fire arms ?”

“ They have four guns, one of which is in the boat.”

“Well then, leave all to me!”

“There are two of the men,” said he, ‘ who are worse than
the rest. All but these I feel sure would go back to work the
ship.”

I thought it was best to speak out to Paul at once, and I
said, ‘“‘ Now if I save your life, there are two things which you
must do.”

But he read my thoughts, and said, “If you save my life,
you shall do as you like with me and my ship, and take her
where you please.”

’ I saw that the two men, in whose charge the boat had been

left, had come on shore; so the first thing I did was to send
Friday to fetch from it the oars, the sail, and the gun. And
now the ship might be said to be in our hands. When the
time came for the men to go back to the ship, they were ina
great rage; for, as the boat had now no sail nor oars, they
knew not how to get out to their ship.

We heard them say that it was a strange sort of isle, for that
sprites had come to the boat, to take off the sails and oars. We
could see them run to and fro, with great rage; then go and
sit in the boat to rest, and then come on shore once more.
When they drew near to us, Paul and Friday would fain have
had me fall on them at once. But my wish was to spare them,
and kill as few as I could. I told two of my men to creep on
their hands and feet close to the ground, so that they might
MAKES TERMS WITH THE CREW 63

not be seen, and when they got up to the men, not to fire till
I gave the word.

They had not stood thus long, when three of the crew came
up to us. Till now, we had but heard their voice, but when
they came so near as to be seen, Paul and Friday stood up and
shot at them. Two of the men fell dead, and they were the
worst of the crew, and the third ran off. At the sound of the
guns I came up, but it was so dark that the men could not tell
if there were three of us or three score.

It fell out just as I could wish, for I heard the men ask, ‘‘ To
whom must we yield, and where are they?” Friday told them
that Paul was there with the king of the isle, who had brought
with him a crowd of men! At this one of the crew said, “ If
Paul will spare our lives, we will yield.” ‘‘ Then,” said Friday,
“you shall know the king’s will.” Then Paul said to them,
“You know my voice; if you lay down your arms the king
will spare your lives.”

They fell on their knees to beg the same of me. I took good
care that they did not see me, but I gave them my word that
they should all live, that I should take four of them to work
the ship, and that the rest would be bound hand and foot, for
the good faith of the four. This was to show them what a stern
king I was.

Of course I soon set them free, and I put them in a way to
take my place on the isle. I told them of all my ways, taught
them how to mind the goats, how to work the farm, and make
the bread. I gave them a house to live in, fire arms, tools, and
my two tame cats,—in fact, all but Poll and my gold.

As I sat on the top of the hill, Paul came up to me. He
64 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

held out his hand to point to the ship, and with much warmth
took me to his arms, and said, ‘“ My dear friend, there is your
ship! for she is all yours, and so are we, and all that is in her.”



HIS JOY AT SIGHT OF THE SHIP.

f cast my eyes to the ship, which rode half a mile off the
shore, at the mouth of the creek, and near the place where I
had brought my rafts to the land. Yes, there she stood, the
ship that was to set me free, and to take me where I might
choose to go. She set her sails to the wind, and her flags
BACK TO THE LAND OF HIS BIRTH. 65

threw out their gay stripes in the breeze. Such a sight was too
much for me, and I fell down faint with joy. Paul then took
out a flask which he had brought for me, and gave me a dram,
which I drank, but for a good while I could not speak to him.

Friday and Paul then went on board the ship, and Paul took
charge of her once more. We did not start that night, but at
noon the next day I left the isle !—that lone isle, where I had
spent so great a part of my life—not much less than thrice ten
long years.

When I came back to the dear land of my birth, all was
strange and new to me. I went to my old home at York, but
none of my friends were there, and to my great grief I saw,
on the stone at their grave, the sad tale of their death.

As they had thought, of course, that I was dead, they had
not left me their wealth and lands, so that I stood much in
want of means, for it was but asmall sum that I had brought
with me from the isle. But in this time of need, I had the
luck to find my good friend who once took me up at sea. He
was now grown too old for work, and had put his son in the
ship in his place. He did not know me at first, but I was
soon brought to his mind when I told him whoI was. I found
from him that the land which I had bought on my way to the
isle was now worth much.

As it was a long way off, I felt no wish to go and live there,
so I made up my mind to sell it, and in the course of a few
months, I got for it a sum so large as to make me a rich man
all at once.

Weeks, months, and years went by; I had a farm, a wife,

and two sons, and was by no means young; but still I could
5
66 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

not get rid of a strong wish which dwelt in my thoughts by
day and my dreams by night, and that was to set foot once
more in my old isle.

I had now no need to work for food, or for means of life;
all I had to do was to teach my boys to be wise and good, to
live at my ease, and see my wealth grow day by day. Yet the
wish to go back to my wild haunts clung round me likea cloud,
and I could in no way drive it from me, so true is it that ‘ what
is bred in the bone will not come out of the flesh.”

At length, I lost my wife, which was a great blow to me, and
my home was now so sad, that I made up my mind to launch
out once more on the broad sea, and go with my man Friday
to that lone isle where dwelt all my hopes.

I took with me as large a store of tools, clothes, and such
like goods as I had room for, and men of skill in all kinds of
trades, to live in the isle. When we set sail, we had a fair
wind for some time, but one night the mate, who was at the
watch, told me he saw a flash of fire, and heard a gun go off.
At this we all ran on deck, from whence we saw a great light,
and as there was no land that way, we knew that it must be
some ship on fire at sea, which could not be far off, for we heard
the sound of the gun.

The wind was still fair, so we made our way for the point
where we saw the light, and in half an hour it was but too
plain that a large ship was on fire in the midst of the broad sea.
I gave the word to fire off five guns, and we then lay by, to wait
till break of day. But in the dead of the night the ship blew
up in the air, the flames shot forth, and what there was left of
the ship sank. We hung out lights, and our guns kept up a
ON THE WAY BACK. 67

fire all night long, to let the crew know that there was -help at
hand.

At eight o'clock the next day we found, by the aid of the
glass, that two of the ship’s boats were out at sea, quite full of

SSS
eeeeeeeeEeeooEEE
=



DEATH OF HIS WIFE.

men. They had seen us, and had done their best to make us
see them, and in half an hour we came up with them.

It would be a hard task for me to set forth in words the scene
which took place in my ship, when the poor French folk (for
such they were) came on board. As to grief and fear, these are

5—2
68 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

soon told—sighs, tears, and groans make up the sum of them
—but such a cause of joy as this was, in sooth, too much for
them to bear, weak and all but dead as they were.

Some would send up shouts of joy that rent the sky; some
would cry and wring their hands as if in the depths of grief;
some would dance, laugh, and sing ; not a few were dymb, sick,
faint, in a swoon, or half mad; and two or three were seen to
give thanks to God.

In this strange group, there was a young French priest who
did his best to soothe those around him, and I saw him go up
to some of the crew, and say to them, ‘“ Why do you scream,
and tear your hair, and wring your hands, my men? Let your
joy be free and full, give it full range and scope, but leave off
this trick of the hands, and lift them up in praise; let your
voice swell out, not in screams, but in hymns of thanks to God,
who has brought you out of so great a strait, for this will add
peace to your joy.”

The next day they were all in a right frame of mind, so I
gave them what stores I could spare, and put them on board a
ship that we met with on her way to France, all save five, who,
with the priest, had a wish to join me.

But we had not set sail long when we fell in with a ship that
had been blown out to sea by a storm, and had lost her masts;
and, worse than all, her crew had not had an ounce of meat or
bread for ten days. I gave them all some food, which they ate
like wolves in the snow, but I thought it best to check them,
as I had fears that so much all at once would cause the death
of some of them.

There were a youth and a young girl in the ship who the
THE ISLE IN SIGHT. 69

uate said he thought must be dead, but he had not had the heart
to go near them, for the food was all gone. I found that they
were faint for the want of it, and as it were in the jaws of death;
but in a short time they both got well, and as they had no wish
to go back to their ship, I took them with me. So now I had
eight more on board my ship, than I had when I first set out.

In three months from the time when I left home, I came in
sight of my isle, and I brought the ship safe up by the side of
the creek, which was near my old house.

I went up to Friday, to ask if he knew where he was. He
took a look round him, and soon, with a clap of the hands, said
“O yes! O there! O yes! O there!” By-and-bye he set upa
dance with such wild glee, that it was as much as I could do to
keep him on deck. ‘ Well, what think you, Friday?” said I,
“shall we find those whom we left still here?”

He stood quite mute for a while, but when I spoke of old Jaf
(whose son Friday was), the tears ran down his face, and his
heart was full of grief.

“No, no,” said he, “‘no more; no, no more.”

“ How do you know that?” said I; but he shook his head
and said, ‘“O no, O no; he long dead, he much old man.”

Just then his quick eye caught sight of some men at the top
of the hill, and he said, ‘“‘ I see men there, there, there! ”

I could not see the least sign of them, but I gave the word
to fire three guns, to show that we were friends, and soon we
saw smoke rise from the side of the creek. I then got out the
boat, put up a flag of peace, and went on shore with Friday,
the French priest, and some of the crew. We all had arms
with us, in case there should be foes on the isle that we knew
70 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

not of, but we found that there was no need to be on-our guard.
The first man I cast my eyes on at the creek was my old friend
Carl from Spain, whom I took from the hands of the red men
when I was last on the isle. °

I gave strict charge to all in the boat not to go on shore, but
Friday could not be kept back, for he had caught sight of old Jaf.
We stood by to watch him fly to the old man like a shaft from
a bow, and catch him in his arms, and stroke him, and set him
down in the shade; he then stood a short way off to look at
him, with all his soul in his eyes, as one might view some choice
work of art. He next led the old man by the hand up and
down the shore, and now and then came to the boat to fetch
him 4 cake, or a sip of rum; then he would set him down once
more on the ground, dance round and round him, and all the
while tell him strange tales of what he had seen since he and
old Jaf had last met. ©

Carl and his friends bore a flag of truce like mine, and at first
Carl could not make out who I was; but when I spoke to him
in his own tongue, he threw up his arms and said that he felt
shame not to have known the face of the man who had once
come to save him. He shook my hands with much warmth, and
then took me to my old house, which he now gave up to me.

I could no more have found the spot than if I had not been
there at all, for the trees were so thick and close, that the house
could not be got at save by such blind ways as none but those
who made them could find out. ‘ Why should you raise so
strong a fence round you?” said I; but Carl told me he felt
sure I should think there was much need of it when I had heard
all that had come to pass since I was last on the isle.
ON THE ISLE ONCE MORE. zr

He then sent for the old crew of Paul’s ship, but I could not
guess who they were, till Carl said, “ These, Sir, are some of
the men who owe their lives to you.”






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WIT» ess

CARL’S JOY AT SIGHT OF HIS OLD FRIEND.



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ZENS

Then one by one they came up to me, not as if they had been
the rough crew of a ship, but like men of rank who had come
to kiss the hand of their king.

The first thing was for me to hear all that had been done
in the isle since I had left it.

I must make a short pause in this part of my tale, and state
that when I was last on the isle I sent off Carl and Jaf to the
72 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

main land to fetch some of Carl's friends who had been cast
on shore there on their way from Spain. Of course I had no
hope then that a ship was so near to take me to the land of my
birth. So when Carl and Jaf came back to the isle they found
that I had gone, and that five strange men were there in my
place.

These five men were part of the crew who had thrust Paul
out of his ship. Two of them, whose names were Sam and
Joe, were not so bad as their three mates, who were a set of
great rogues, and were led by one of the name of Will. When
I left the isle in Paul’s ship, I took Sam and Joe on board
with me, but just as I was on the point to sail, they got out
one of the ship’s boats and went back to the isle, to join their
three friends.

I will now go on to tell, just as I heard it from Carl. all
that had come to pass since I had left the isle) When Will
and his men saw that their two mates had come to join them,
they would have no more to do with them, nor would they let
them have a share in the house, nor food to eat. So Sam and
Joe had to live as well as they could by hard work, and they
set up their home on the north shore of the isle, where they
built huts and sheds, and made a farm.

To be just to Will, I must here state that, bad as he was,
he did two kind things, when Carl and his friends came back
to the isle, for he gave them food to eat, and he put my note
in Carl’s hands, as well as a long scroll on which I had set
down how they were to bake the bread, bring up the tame
goats, plant the corn, dry the grapes, and make pots and pans,
just as I had done.
CARL AND ¥AF AT WORK. 73

For some time all went on well with Carl and his men in
my old home. They had the use of the house and the cave,
and went in and out just as they chose. Carl and Jaf did the
work, and as for Will and his friends, all they did was to shoot
birds, and roam on the shore. When they came home at night,
they sat down to eat of all the good things in the house, for
which they gave no thanks, and like the dog in the ox’s stall,
when they did not care to eat, they would not let the rest do
so. Of such small things as these it would not be worth my
while to tell, but that at last they broke out in a fierce strife
with the rest, and their spite grew to such a pitch that flesh
and blood could not stand it.

When Carl—whom I shall now call the “Chief,” as he took
the lead of all the rest—first came back from the main land,
he would have let all the five men of Paul’s crew live in the
house, and be good friends if they could; but the three rogues
would not hear of it, so the Chief gave poor Sam and Joe corn
for seed, as well as some peas which I had left on the isle,
and they soon learnt to dig and plant, and hedge in their land,
in the mode which I had set for them, and in short to lead
good lives.

When the three bad men saw this, they were fuli of spite,
and set to work to tease and vex them. They told them that
the isle was their own, and that no one else had a right to
build on it if they did not pay them rent. Sam and Joe
thought at first that this was a joke, and said, ‘Come and sit
down, and see what fine homes we have built; then tell us
what rent you wish us to pay, and in what coin you would
like to have it.”
74 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

But Will soon made it plain that they were not in jest; for
he set fire toa torch and put it to the roof of the hut, and
would have burnt it down, had not Joe set his foot on the
torch, and put out the flame. This made Will so full of rage,
that he ran at him with a pole which he had in his hand, and
a fierce fight then took place, the end of which was that the
three rogues had to run off. But in a short time they came
back, trod down the corn, and shot the young kids, which the
poor men had got to bring up tame.

At last the spite of Will and his friends grew to such a
pitch, that one night they set off with fire arms to kill poor
Sam and Joe while they slept. But when they came to their
huts no one was to be found; so quoth Will, ‘‘Ha! here’s the
nest, but the birds are flown!” Then they fell to work to
pull down all that they could lay their hands on, and left not
a stick, nor so much as a sign to show where the huts had
stood; and they tore up all the young trees by the roots, and
flung them far and wide.

When Carl and his friends heard of these foul deeds, it
made their blood boil, but all that Will had to say was, “You,
Sir Jacks of Spain, shall have the same sauce if you do not
mend your ways.” So Carl took from them their guns and
knives, and had them set in chains. As soon as they had
time to feel the pain of this kind of life, the three rogues grew
more cool, and sought to make peace, and to get back their
arms, and live at large. The Chief told them that in time
he would set them free, but that he could not let them live
in the house, nor give them their arms for three or four months.

At last they came to beg that Carl and his men would take
THE THREE ROGUES. 75

them in once more, and give them bread to eat, as they had
no food but eggs all that time. But the Chief said that he
would not yield till they had sworn to build up the huts which
they had torn down. So they did.’

One day a whim took Will and his two friends that they
would go to the main land to try if they could seize some of



BROUGHT TO BAY.

the red men, and bring them home as slaves, to do the hard
part of their work for them.

Carl would have been glad to get rid of men whom he could
not well trust from day to day, but told them in good faith how
rash he thought his plan was. Yet as their minds were made
up, he gave them from the stores all that they could want, and
a large boat to go in; and when the rest of the men bade them
‘‘good speed,” none thought they would find their way back to
the isle. But lo! in the course of three weeks they did in truth
come home. They said they had found the land in two days,
76 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

and that the red men gave them roots and fish to eat, and they
brought with them eight slaves, three of whom were men, and
five were girls. So they gave their good hosts an axe, a spade,
a screw, and an old key, and brought off the slaves in the boat.

As to the young girls, Carl and the rest of the men from
Spain did not care to wed them, so the five men from Paul’s
crew drew lots for the choice, and each had one of them for a
wife, while the male slaves were set to work for the good of all,
though there was not much for them to do. But one of them,
ran off to the woods, and was not to be found, and as some of
the wild tribes had been on the isle to feast and dance, Carl
had good cause to fear that he might have gone back with them,
and that if he got safe home, he would be sure to tell his tribe
of the white men’s haunts so near at hand.

One night Carl felt a great weight on his mind, and could
get no sleep. He lay still for some time, yet as he did not feel
at ease, he got up and took a look out, but as the night was too
dark for him to see, he went back to his bed once more. Still
it was of no use, for though he knew not why, his thoughts
would let him have no rest; he then woke up one of his
friends, and told him how it had been with him. ‘Say you
so?” said he. ‘‘ What if some of the wild tribes have come on
shore, and it is the sound of their boats that woke you up?”

Then they set off to the top of the hill where I was wont to
go, and from thence they saw through a glass a fleet of more
than a score of boats, full of men who had bows, darts, clubs,
swords of wood, and such like arms of war; and it was clear
that a horde of some fierce tribe had come to trap and slay the
white men.
THE RED MEN COME ON SHORE. a7

Their boats were still far out at sea, so that Carl and his men
had some hours to think what they should do. Their force was
so small, that they thought it wise to hide and lie in wait.

They first made safe their wives and stores in a thick part of
the wood. In the next place, as soon as they saw that the red
men had come on shore, and that they bent their course that
way, they drove all the goats out to stray in the wood, just
where they chose, that the red men might think they were
wild.

Carl and his men then drew up ina small band, calm and
brave. Two of the wives could not be kept back, but would
go out and fight with bows and darts.. Then Carl, as Chief of
the isle, took the lead, but he put Will at the head of one band
of men, for at this time he had shown such good faith, and
such shrewd, keen sense, that all thought well of his skill and
zeal.

As the Chief had not arms for all, he did not give guns to the
slaves, but each of them had a long staff with a spike at the
end, and an axe to hang at his side. They took up their post
in the wood near the site of the huts that were burnt down,
and there they lay in wait for the red men.

The foe now came on with a bold and fierce mien, not ina
line, but in crowds here and there, to the point where Carl lay
in wait for them. When the first band were so near as to be
in range of the guns, Carl gave the word for his men to shoot
at them all at once, so that those who came up first fell dead
on the spot, and great fear and dread came on the rest.

The Chief and his men then went forth from the skirts of the
wood where they had lain in wait, and fell on the foe from three
78 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

points with the butt end of their guns, and swords, and staves,
and they fought so well that the red men set up a loud shriek,
and fled for their lives with all the speed that fear and swift
feet could lend them. As the Chief did not care to give chase,
they got safe back to the shore where their boats lay.

But their rout was not yet at an end, for it blew a great storm
that day, so that the boats could not put off; and in the night
the tide drove most of them so high on the shore that they
could not be got to sea save with great toil, and the waves broke
some of them to bits.

At dawn of day, when the Chief saw how things stood, he
said, ‘“‘ If we let these men get their boats out and go back, they
will make it known to the rest of the tribes on the main land
that we are here, and there will be no end to our wars as long
as we live; but if we keep them here and treat them well, they
will not harm us.” Soto make sure that they should not leave
the isle, the Chief told his men to get some dry wood from dead
trees and set the boats on fire.

When the red men saw this they ran all round the isle with
loud cries, as if they were mad, so that Carl did not know at
first what to do with them, for they trod all the corn down with
their feet, and tore up the vines just as the grapes were ripe,
and did a great deal of harm.

At last the Chief sent old Jaf to tell the red men in their
own tongue how kind he would be to them ; how he would. save
their lives and give them part of the isle to live in, if they
would keep in their own bounds; and that they should have
corn and rice to plant, and bread to eat, till such time as the
crops should be ripe.
TERMS OF PEACE. 79

The poor men were but too glad to get such good terms of
peace, and they soon learnt to make all kinds of things with
canes and wood, such as chairs, stools, and beds; and this they
did with great skill when they were once taught. From this
time, till I came back to the isle, my friends saw no more of the
wild tribes.

When I heard this tale from Carl, my heart beat fast at the
thought of the great straits that he and the rest had been
brought through; and I was glad to find that in so small a
space as my isle (which at first held none but me) all these
tribes of the Great Race should now live in peace!

I was much struck with the change in the isle, for the trees
had grown, huts had sprung up, and a great part of the land
was sown for crops. As to Will’s hut, it was quite a work of
art; it had strong posts at each point, and the walls and roof
were made of cane work; it had a thatch of straw from the rice
plant, and a huge leaf on the top to screen it from the sun.

I now told Carl that I had not come to take off his men, but
to bring more, and to give them all such things as they might
want to guard their homes and cheer their hearts.

The next day I made a grand feast for them, and the ship's
cook came on shore to dress it. We brought out some of our
rounds of salt beef and pork, a bowl of punch, and some beer
and French wines, while Carl gave the cook five whole kids to
roast, three of which were sent to the crew on board ship, that
they on their part might feast on fresh meat from the shore.

I gave the men coats, shirts, hats, shoes, and all kinds of
clothes, both for warm and cold days, with gowns and shawls
for their wives, and I need not say how glad they were of such
80 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

gifts. Then I brought out a good stock of tools, from which
each man had a spade, a rake, an axe, a crow, a saw, anda knife,
as well as arms and all that they could want for the use of them.

As I now saw that there was good will on all sides, I brought
on shore the youth and the girl whom I took from the wreck
when they were half dead for want of food. The girl had been
brought up with care, and all the crew had a good word for
her. Both she and the youth felt a wish to be left on the isle,
as well as the French priest; so I gave them each a plot of
ground, on which they built tents and barns.

I had brought out with me men of skill to work on the isle,
one of whom could turn his hand to all sorts of things, so I
gave him the name of “ Jack of all trades.”

One day the French priest came to me to ask if I would
leave my man Friday on the isle; ‘‘ For through him,” said he,
“T could talk to the red men in their own tongue, and teach
them the things of God; and need I add it was for this cause
that I came here?” I felt that I could not part with my man
Friday for the whole world, so I told the priest that if I could
have made up my mind to leave him, I was quite sure that
Friday would not leave me.

When I had seen that all things were in a good state on the
isle, I set to work to put my ship in trim, that I might once
more quit these shores.

As I was on my way to the ship, the youth whom I spoke of
just now, came up to me, and said, “ Sir, you have brought a
priest with you, and while you are still here we wish him to
wed two of us.” I made sure that one of these must be the
maid that I had breught in my ship, and that it was the wish
THE BEST GIFT. 81

of the young man to make her his wife. So I spoke to him
with some warmth in my tone, and bade him turn it well in his
mind first, as the girl had not been brought up in the same



THE GIFT OF GOD’S WORD.

rank of life as he had. But he said with a smile that I had
made a wrong guess, for it was “ Jack of all trades” that he had
come to plead for.

It gave me great joy to hear this, as I knew the girl was as
good as she could be, and I thought well, too, of Jack; so on
that day I gave her to him to be his wife. They were - have
82 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

a large piece of ground where they might grow their crops, with
a house to live in, and sheds for their goats and stores.

The isle was now set out in this way: all the west end was
left waste, so that if the wild tribes should land on it, they
might come and go, and hurt no one. The old house was to
be the Chief’s, with all its woods, which now spread out as far
as the creek, while the south end was for the white men and
their wives; and as for the poor red men whose boats we had
burnt, they had the range of the wild part of the isle.

It struck me that there was one gift which I had not thought
of, and that was the book of God’s Word, which I knew would
give them fresh strength for their work, and help them to bear
the ills of life. So I bade them all come round me, and as I
took up this book of books I said, “ Prize it and lay it to your
hearts! for there are words in it which come from the lips of
Christ our Lord, words which He speaks to us in love, to win
us to Him. Till now you have had no such book on the isle.
No doubt these rich plains, these crops, these bright waves
that wash the shores which close you in, all prove to you that
there is a Great God, a God of Love; yet these stop short when
they tell us of God’s skill and God’s love, they leave us in the
dark as to how we can save our souls. But this book tells us
of a world to come, a bright world of love and peace—and the
way to gain it.”

Now that I had been on the isle a month, on the fifth of May
I once more set sail with my good Friday, and they all told me
that they should stay there till I came to fetch them.

I gave one long look at them from the deck, and then hid
my face in my hands.
A FIGHT WITH WILD MEN. 33

When we had been out three days, though the sea was
smooth and calm, I saw it look quite black at one point, and
heard one of the crew give a cry of ‘“‘ Land!” As I knew there
was no coast near, I could not tell what to make of this, so I
sent the mate to the mast head, to find out with his glass what
it was. He came down with the bad news that it was a fleet
of scores and scores of small boats, full of wild men who came
on fast with fierce looks at us.

As soon as they drew near, I gave the word to furl all sail
and stop the ship, and as I knew that the worst thing these
men could do was to set us on fire, I had the boats out, and
made fast one of them at the head, and one at the stern.

In this way, we lay by for the foe, and in a short time they
came up with us, and, as I thought, meant to close us in. At
first they were struck with awe at the size of the ship, but they
soon came so near to us, that our crew told them by signs with
their hands to keep back, and this, though we did not mean it,
brought on a fight with them. They shot a cloud of darts at
our boats, which our men kept off with boards for shields.
We did not fire at them, yet in half an hour they went back
out to sea, and then came straight at us once more.

I bade my men get out the guns, and keep close, so as to be
safe from their darts if they should shoot, and I then sent
Friday on deck to call out to the wild men in their own tongue,
and ask what they meant todo. It may be that they did not
know what he said, but as soon as he spoke to them, I heard
him cry out that they would shoot. This was too true, for they
let fly a thick cloud of shafts, and to my great grief, Friday fell
dead. There was no one else in sight, and he was shot with

II—-2
84 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

three darts, three more of which fell quite near him. I was so
mad with rage, that I should have been quite glad to sink all
their boats, so I let the men load five guns with small shot,
and five with large, and we gave them such a fierce fire as they
had not seen in all their lives.

Then a strange scene met our eyes, and no words can tell
the dread and fear that came on them al!; for most of their
boats, which were small, were split and sunk—three or four by
one shot. The rest fled as fast as their oars would take them.

Our boat took up one poor man who swam for his life, but
his speech was so strange to us, that we could have learnt as
much from the sound of a horn. At first he would not eat or
speak, and we had fears least he would pine to death, so to cure
him we took him out in the boat and threw him in the sea,
and told him by signs that if he would not speak or eat, we
would not save his life. He swam round and round the boat,
and at last made signs that he would do as we told him, so we
took him in.

When we had taught him to say a few words, he told us
that his tribe and four more had come out with their kings to
have a great fight.

‘““But what,” said I, “made them come up to us?” At which
he said, ‘“‘To make you see great fight!”

So it was for this that poor Friday fell, he who for long years
had been so good and true to me! My heart sank with grief.
We wound him in a shroud and let him down to his grave in
the sea. And now, with deep grief, I must take my leave of
him.

We went on with a fair wind to All Saints Bay, and here I
THE ISLE LEFT FOR THE LAST TIME. 85

found the sloop I had brought with me from home, which I
meant to send to my isle with men and stores, when I had
learnt how things stood there.

As one of my crew felt a strong wish to go back to the isle

























































































DEATH OF FRIDAY.

m it, I said he should by all means, and I gave him the red
man whom we had on board, for his slave. I found too that a
man who was in fear of the Church of Spain would be glad to
be safe there with his wife and two girls; sol put them on
board the sloop, and I sent with them three milch cows, five
calves, a horse, four colts, and a score of pigs, all of which, as
{ heard, went safe and sound. I have now no more to say of
86 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

my isle, as I had left it for the last time.. But the rest of my
lite was spent for the most part in lands quite as far from home.
From the Bay of All Saints we went strait to the Cape of Good
Hope. Here I made up my mind to part with the ship in
which I had come from the isle, and to stay on land.

I soon made friends with some men from France, and two
Jews who had come out to the Cape to trade. I found that
some goods which I had brought with me from home, were
worth a great deal, and I made a large sum by the sale of them,
which I laid out in gems, as they took up so small a space.

When we had been at the Cape of Good Hope nine months,
we thought that the best thing we could do was to hire a ship,
and sail to the Spice Isles to buy cloves; so we got a ship and
men to work her, and set out. We went from port to port, to
and fro, bought and sold our goods, and spent from first to
last, six years in this part of the world.

At length we thought we would go and seek new scenes, and
by-and-bye we fell in with a strange set of men, as you who
read this tale will say when you look at the print in front of
this page.

When we had gone on shore we bought a large house built
with canes, which had a high fence of the same round it, to
keep off thieves, of whom it seems there are not a few in that
land. The name of the town was Ching, and we found that
the fair or mart, which was held there once a year, would not
take place for three or four months, so we sent our ship back to
the Cape, as we meant to stay in this part of the world for
some time, and go from place to place to look round us,and then
come back to the fair at Ching.
THE GREAT FAIR AT CHING. | 87

We first went to a town which it was well worth our while
to see; it was quite in the heart of the land, and was built with
straight streets which ran in cross lines.

But I must say, when I came home to the place of my birth,
I was much struck to hear my friends say such fine things of
the wealth and trade of this part of the world; for I found



XG
ES=

Bo Wuugy

A GREAT MAN AT CHING.



that the men were a mere herd of mean slaves, who could boast
of but few arts or works of skill, and that their ways were
well nigh as rough as those of the red men whom I had left on
my isle.

What is their trade to ours, or that of France and Spain?
What are their ports, with a few junks and barks, to our grand
fleets? One of our large ships of war would sink all their
craft, one line of French troops would beat all their horse, and
the same may be said of their ports, which would not stand for
one month sucha siege as we could bring to bear on them. In
three weeks’ time we came to their chief town, where we laid in
88 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

a large stock of tea, fans, shawls, trays, and raw silk, which we
put on the backs of our mules, and set out for the North.
We had with us some Scots who had come out to trade here,
and had great wealth.

As we knew that we should run all kinds of risks on our way,
we took a strong force with us, to keep off the wild hordes who
rove from place to place all through the land. We had five
guides, and all our coin was put in one purse to buy food on the
way, and to pay the men who took charge of us.

One of us we chose for our chief, to take the lead in case we
should have to fight for our lives; and when that time came
we found that we had no small need of his skill.

On each side of the road we saw men who were at work on
cups, bowls, and jars, of all shapes that could be thought of,
which they made out of a fine clay; and this is the ware that
has so wide a fame, and is the chief trade in this part of the
world.

One thing the guide said he would show me, which could be
seen no where else (and this, in good sooth, I could not sneer
at,as I had done at most of the things I had seen here), for it
was to be a house all built with the same kind of ware as the
plates and cups that we use are made of, but much more choice.
“ How big is this house?” said I; ‘can we take it on the mule’s
back?” “On the mule’s back!” said the guide; ‘why, two
score men live init.” He then took me to see this strange sight,
and it was in truth a large house, built with laths, on which
were nung tiles of the best ware that can be made out of clay.
It had a bright glaze on it, which shone in the sun like glass.
Down the sides of the house were leaves and scrolls, drawn
A HOUSE BUILT OF WARE. 89

with blue paint; the walls of the rooms were made of small
tiles in all shades of red, blue, and green, with here and there
some gold on them, in rude forms it is true, but done in good
taste ; and as the same kind of earth was made use of to join
the tiles, you could not see where they met. The floors of all
the rooms were of the same kind of ware, and so was the roof;
but that was quite black to keep off the heat of the sun’s rays.
If I had had more time to spare, I should have been glad to
see more of this strange place, for there were ponds for the fish,
as well as walks, courts, and yards, all of which were made in
the same way.

This odd sight kept me from my friends for two hours, and
when I came up to them, I paid a fine to our Chief, as he and
all the rest had had to wait for me so long; for we ran a great
risk if we did not keep close to the rest.

In two days’ time we came to the Great Wall, which was
built as a fort to guard the land from the wild tribes that
roam at large through the vast plains to the west. It runs the
whole length of the land, and turns, and winds, and is so high
that it was thought no foe could climb it, or, if they did, no wall
could stop them.

Our Chief gave some of us leave to go out and hunt, as they
call it; but what was it but to hunt sheep! These sheep, as
it fell out, were not such bad sport, for they are wild and swift
of foot; they go in large flocks, and, like true sheep, keep close
when they fly.

In this hunt, we met with some of the wild hordes I spoke
of, who rove from place to place in gangs, to rob and kill all
they fall in with. They know no true mode of war or skill in
90 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

fight, their arms are not good, and, as to their steeds, they are
but poor lean beasts, and by no means fit for hard work.

As soon as these men saw us, they blew some notes ona
kind of horn, the sound of which was quite new tome. We
thought it must be to call their friends round them, and so it
was, for in a short time a fresh troop of the same size came to



A WILD CHARGE,

join them, and they were all, as far as we could judge, a mile
off. As soon as one of the Scots who was with us heard the
horn, he said we must lose no time, but draw up in line, and
charge them at once. We told him we would all fight the
rogues, if he would take the lead.

They stood like a mere crowd, drawn up in no line, and
cast a wild gaze at us. But when they saw us come at them
they let fly their darts, which, though their aim was true, fell
short of us. We made a halt to fire, then rode at full speed
and fell on them sword in hand, led by the bold Scot.
ON THE WAY HOME. QI

_ As soon as we came up they fled right and left; but three of
them, each of whom had a short sword, made a stand, and did
all they could to call the rest back. Our Scot rode close up
to them, and with the stock of his gun threw one from his



HOW THEY DRIVE IN THE NORTH.

horse, shot the next, and the third ran off; and this put an end
to the fight. All that we lost were the sheep we had in chase,
for not a man was hurt.

Thus we went on from place to place, and at length made our
way to the chief town of the North Seas, just a year and a half
from the time when we left Ching.

At last I took ship, and set sail for the land of my birth,
92 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

which I had left this time for ten years, nine months, and
three days.

And now I must bring this tale of my life to a close; while
at the age of three score years and twelve, I feel that the day
is at hand when I must pray to go forth on that sea of peace
and love, which has no waves or shores but those of bliss
which knows no end.



THE END.

















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