Citation
The Life and adventures of Robinson Crusoe

Material Information

Title:
The Life and adventures of Robinson Crusoe
Uniform Title:
Robinson Crusoe
Creator:
Defoe, Daniel, 1661?-1731
Defoe, Daniel,
Chapman, Edwin O
Griset, Ernest Henry, 1844-1907
Watson, John Dawson, 1832-1892
Linton, W. J ( William James ), 1812-1897
Macquoid, Thomas Robert, 1820-1912
Marriott, R. S
Thomas, William Luson, 1830-1900
Wentworth, Frederick
Dalziel Brothers
M.A. Donohue & Co
Place of Publication:
Chicago ( 407-429 Dearborn Street )
Publisher:
M.A. Donohue & Co.
Manufacturer:
Printed and bound by M.A. Donohue & Co.
Language:
English
Edition:
New ed. -- edited for young readers by E.O Chapman.
Physical Description:
176 p. : ill., port. ; 26 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Castaways -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Shipwrecks -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Survival after airplane accidents, shipwrecks, etc -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Imaginary voyages -- 1864 ( rbgenr )
Genre:
Children's literature ( fast )
Imaginary voyages ( rbgenr )
fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Illinois -- Chicago
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Cover col. ill. with title: Robinson Crusoe.
General Note:
On t.p.: "With<?> upwards of two hundred illustrations by Dalziel, Griset, J.D. Watson and others." <first word not legible>
General Note:
Engravers include: G. LaFosse, Linton, T. Macquoid, R.S. Marriott, and Wentworth.
General Note:
Donohue began using the above form of name in 1903. Cf. Amer. literary pub. houses, 1638-1899.
General Note:
Printed in double columns.
General Note:
Parts I and II of Robinson Crusoe.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Daniel Defoe.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
SN01271 ( lccn )
20619112 ( oclc )

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Full Text


CHICAGO.

M-A:DononueE & Go.



ity

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Grendpa—Now for one more try.







THE LIFE AND ADVENTURES

a

oF

PINSON CRISCOr:

BY DANIEL DEFOE













@ NEW EDITION, EDITED FOR YOUNG READERS BY E. O. CHAPMAN.

«gS UPWARDS OF TWO HUNDRED ILLUSTRATIONS BY DALZIEL, @RISET, J. D. WATSON AWD OTHERS,

CHICAGO

M. A. DONOHUE & COMPANY

407-429 DEARBORN STREET



7 PRINTED AND BOUND
BY

M. A. DONOHUE & CO.
CHICAGO



INTRODUCTION.






Tux story of Rosrm-
son Crusor was writ-
&.. ten by Daniel De Foe,
and first published in
3719, nearly one hundred and seventy years
ago. The author called it “The Life and
Strange Surprising Adventures of Robinson
_ Crusoe, of York, Mariner: who lived eight-
and-twenty years all alone in an uninhabited.
: asland on the coast of America, near the
_ south of the great river Oroonoque; hav-
- tag been cast on shove by shipwreck, where-
in all the men perished but himself. With
_ an account how he was at last strangely
_ delivered by Pirates, Written by himself.”
They gave their books very long titles
in those days. But the people soon found
that this was a very interesting bock, de-
spite its long title. No publisher wanted
to print it at first, but as soon as it was
published, a large number of copies were
sold, and publishers have been printing it
xad. selling it ever since.
It was at first thought by some to be an

entirely true story, but it is not. It ia, ne
doubt, however, founded in part on the real
adventures of Alexander Selkirk, the son
of a shoemaker in Scotland. The following
brief account of him is given by Wilson,
the biographer of De Foe:

“His real name was Selcraig, which be
changed to that of Selkirk, when he went
to sea, He was born at Largo, in the
county of Fife, in 1676, and, after a cor
mon school education, was put to hie
father’s business, which was that of a shee.
maker. Being a spoiled child, he soon dis-
covered a waywardness of temper that gave
much uneasiness to his parents; whilst an
early propensity to the sea rendered his
employment irksome, At length an inci-
dent occured that put him upon indulging
his humor; for, being brought under ehurch-
censure for irregular conduct when he was
eighteen years of age, rather than submit,
he suddenly left home, and was never heard
of for six years. It is supposed that he was
with the buccaneers in the South Seas. Ir.
1701 we find him again at Largo, but the
same intractable person as ever, being en.
gaged in constant broils with his family.
As the sea was his favorite element, he did
not continue long in Scotland, but, going
to London, engaged with Captain Dampier



6 | INTRODUCTION.



apon a cruising expedition to the South
Seas. This was the voyage that rendered
his subsequent history so mteresting to the
lovers of romance.

“Being appointed sailing-master of the
Cinque Ports galley, a companion to the
St. George, commanded by Dampier, he left
England in the spring of 1703, and, after
various adventures, both vessels reached
the island of Juan Fernandez in the follow-
weg February. After staying some time to
re-fit, they sailed again in quest of booty ;
oat a violent quarrel arising between Sel-
kirk and his commander, Stradling, which
settled into a rooted arimosity, the former
resolved to take the first opportunity of
leaving the vessel. This occurred at the
beginning of September, 1704, when her
srazy state obliged Stradling to return to
‘aan Fernandez for fresh repairs; which



being completed, Selkirk bade a final adien
to his comrades at the end of the sams
month. Upon this island he lived by him
self four years and four months, until he
was released by Captain Woodes Rogers,
in the month of February, 1709.”

It has been said that this wild fellow
wrote a story of his adventures and gave it
to De Foe, and that De Foe made the story
of Rozsryson Crusor from it, but this is not
believed to be true,

Whether the story is founded upon that
of Selkirk or not, it 18 one that every body
finds full of interest. The picture of Crusoe,
with his coat and umbrella of goat skins,
watching day after day for a ship, until the
days pass into months and the months inte
years, is one which readers will never tira
of, and is especially attractive to boys am
girls,







ROBINSON

a

\ of York, in the year 1632.
My father’s right name
was Kreutznaer, and he
| had come to England from
¥, Bremen. My mother’s re-
lations were named Robin.
son, SO Pe was named Robinson Kreutznaer.
The English people called it Crusoe, and
after a while we came to write it so.

My father was not rich, but he had
become well to do by trading, and he
wished me to stay at home and be happy 3
and all the more because both he and my
mother were getting old, and further, be-
€ause one of my elder brothers had been



CRUSOE.

killed in the war with the Spaniards, aud

the other had gone away from home and

had not been heard from; but I would be
satisfied with nothing but going to sea.
and my inclination to this led me s¢
strongly against the will of my father, anc
against all the entreaties of my mother
that there seemed to be something fatal in
my perversity, tending directly to the his
of misery which was to befali me. a3

One morning, my father called me into
his chamber, where he was sick with the
gout, and talked to me very seriously
about it. He told me that if I staid at
home, I had a prospect of raising my
fortunes and living a life of happiness



riches,









ROBINSON CRUSOE.

He said that it was only the very wealthy
on the one hand, or the very desperate on
the other, who went abroad in search of
adventure. Mine was the middle state,
which he had found by experience was the
best state in the world. This was the
state of life that was envied both by kings
and beggars. This condition of life was
what the wise man meant when he prayed
that he might have neither poverty nor



ever, as no opportunity presented itself, J
still remained at home, though i refused
to engage in any business or tu learn ary
trade,

One day, being at Hull, I met one of my
companions who was going by sea to Lon. _
don, and he invited me so strongly to gu
with him that I consulted neither father
nor mother any more, nor so much as sent
them word of it; but leaving them to hear
of it as they might, without asking God’s
blessing, or my father’s, without any con-
sideration of circumstances or consequences,
and in an ill hour, God knows, on the Ist
of September, 1651, I went on board a ship
bound for London.

Never any young adventurer’s misfor

===. | tunes, I believe, began sooner or continued —



Much more he told me to dissuade me
from going to sea, and he ended by saying
that though he should not cease to pray
for me, if I did take this foolish step,
God would not bless me.

I was deeply affected by what my father
said, and I resolved not to think any more
of going abroad. But in a few days my
good resolutions were all given up and I
began to think of running away from
home in spite of the entreaties of my

father and the tears of my mother. How-



longer than mine. The ship was no sooner |
got out of the Humber than the winé
began to blow, and the sea to rise in a
most frightful manner ; and, as I had never
been at sea before, I was most inexpresstbly
sick in body, and terrified in mind, I!
began now seriously to reflect upon what I
had done, and how justly I was overtaken
by the judgment of Heaven for my wicked
leaving my father’s house, and abandoning
my duty. All the good counsels of my
parents came now fresh into my mind; and
my conscience, which was not yet come to
the pitch of hardness to which it has come
since, reproached me with the contempt of
advice, and the breach of my duty to God
and my father.

I thought that every wave would swallow
us up, and that every time the ship fe’!
into the hollow or trough of the sea, it
would never rise again. In this agony of
mind I made many vows and resolutions,



ROBINSON CRUSOE. 6

that if it would please God to spare my
life in this one voyage, if ever I got once
my foot upon dry land again, I would go
directly home to my father, and never set





made a sight that I thought is must ve
lightful I ever saw.

I had slept well in the night and was
now no more sea-sick, but very cheertn|,



it into a ship again while I lived; that I
would take his advice, and never run my:
self into such miseries as these any more,
I had these wise and good thoughta as
long as the storm lasted, and, indeed, for
some time after. But the next day, the
wind abated and the sea grew calmer, and
a fine evening followed. My sea-sickness
and my fears disappeared, and with them
all my thoughts of home and duty. The
sun rose clear the next morning, and his
beams shining upon the sea, which was
‘quite smooth. there being little or no wind,

looking with wonder upon the sea that war
so rough and terrible the day before, an
could be so calm and so pleasant in so little
a time after. And now, lest my good re
solutions should continue, my companion
who had enticed me away comes to ine.

“Well, Bob,” says he, clapping me upea
the shoulder, “how do you do afier it? |
warrant you were frightened, wer’n’t yu,
last night, when it blew but a capful of
wind ?”

“A capful d’you call it ?” said I; “tw
a terrible storm.”





“A storm, you foot !” replies he; “do you
call that a storm? why, it was nothing at
all; give us but a good ship and sea-room,
and we think nothing of such a squall of
wind as that; but you’re but a fresh-water
sailor, Bob. Come, let us make a bowl of
punch, and we'll forget all that.”

To make short this sad part of my story,
we went the way of all sailors; the punch
was made, and I was made half-drunk with
it; and in that one night’s wickedness I

drowned all my repentance, all my reflec.

tions upon my past conduct, all my resolu-
tions for the future. In a word, as the sea
_was returned to its smoothness, so the
‘hurry of my thoughts being over, my fears
of being swallowed up by the sea being
forgotten, and the current of my former
desires returned, I entirely forgot the vows
end promises that I made in my distress.

ROBINSON CRUSOE.

I found, indeed, some intervals of retiee:
tion; and the serious thoughts did, as it
were, endeavor to return agam sometimes;
but I shook them off, and roused myself
from them, and applying myself to drink-
ing and company, soon mastered the return
of those fits. But I was to have another
trial for it still ; and Providence, as in such
cases generally it does, resolved to leave me
entirely without excuse; for if I would
not take this for a deliverance, the next
was to be such a one as the worst and most
hardened wretch among us would confesa
both the danger and the mercy.

The sixth day of our being at sea, we
came into Yarmouth Roads; the wind
having been contrary, and the weather
calm, we had made but little way since the
storm, Here we were obliged to, come te
an anchor, and here we lay, the wind co.
tinuing contrary, for seven or eight days.
during which time a great many ships from
Newcastle came into the same Roads.

We had not, however, rid here so long —
but we should have tided it up the river,
but that the wind blew too fresh, and,
after we had lain four or five days, blew
very hard. However, the Roads being
reckoned as good as an harbor, the anchor.
age good, and our ground-tackle very
strong, our men were unconcerned, and not
in the least apprehensive of danger, but
spent the time in rest and mirth, after the
manner of the sea, But the eighth day, ii
the morning, the wind increasea, an* we
had all hands at work to strike our top.
masts, and make everything snug and close,
that the ship might ride as easy as possible,
By noon the sea went very high indeed,
and our ship rode forecastle in, shipped



ROBINSON CRUSOE.

several seas, and we thought once or twice
our anchor had come home; upon which
our master o rdred out the sheet-anchor.
The storm grew fiercer and fiercer until
I began to see terror in the faces of the
seamen themselves. At first, I was quite
stupid with sickness and fear, and I lay in
the cabin; but now I clambered on deck,
and looked about. Two of the ships near us
had cut their masts, and I heard the sailors











say that two more had been blown out to
sea, Finally a great ship foundered before
our eyes, and the master ordered our masts
to be cut away. Then came a cry that we
‘had sprung a leak, and we ali went to
work at the pumps.
_ All our efforts were useless; the water

‘gained rapidly in the hold, and it became.

‘gertain that we could not ride out the

nye

“storm, Guns were now fired as signals of



ih



distress, and, the storm somewhat abating,
a boa, as put off to us from a ship that
had not been damaged, because she was
light. We had great difficulty in getting
into the boat when it reached us; but we
did it safely and after several hours of
drifting, in danger of being swamped every
minute, we reached the hoe drenched

and destitute. The ship sank seon after
we left her.



At Yarmouth, we were given some inoney,
and I might easily have gone back to Hull,
but my ill fate pushed me on. With what
money I had, I made my way to London.
hore I fell in with the master of a ship
bound for the coast of Guinea on a trading
voyage. He took quite a fancy to me at
once and became my friend. I raised some
forty pounds by corresponding with some
relations, and investing it in trinkets, such



ROBINSON CRUSOE.



as ihe captain carried to trade with the

Our ship making her course towards the

natives, we set sail, and made a most suc- | Canary Islands, was surprised, in the gray
cessful voyage.



of the morning, by a Moorish rover of Sal-
lee, who gave chase to us. We crowded as
much canvas as our yards would spread, or
our masts carry, to get clear; but finding
the pirate gained upon us, we prepared to
fight, our ship having twelve guns and the
rogue eighteen. About three in the after.
noon he came up with us, and bringing to,
by mistake, just athwart our quarter, we
brought eight of our guns to bear on that
side, and poured in a broadside upon him,
which made him sheer off again, after
returning our fire, and pouring in also his
small shot from near two hundred men
which he had on board. However, we had
not a man touched, all our men keeping
close.

He prepared to attack us again, and we
to defend ourselves; but laying us on board
the next time upon our other quarter, he
entered sixty men upon our decks, who’
immediately fell to cutting and hacking
the sails and rigging. We plied them with

My success I owed entirely to my | small shot, half-pikes, powder-chests, and

friend the captain, who first showed me
what things to buy in London, and then
how to trade them with the natives of
Guinea for gold-dust. On the voyage, he
taught me the use of the ship’s instruments,
by which an account of our course was
taken every day, and I became a navigator
as well as a Guinea trader,

My friend died soon after his arrival at
home, but I resolved to go the same voy-
age again on the same ship. This was a
most unhappy voyage, for though I left a
good portion of my money with my friend’s
widow, yet I fell into terrible misfortunes.





ROBINSON CRUSOE.



pen like, an cleared our deck of them
«wice. However, to cut short this melan-
choly part of our story, our ship being dis-
abled, and three of our men killed, and
‘eight wounded, we were obliged to yield,
‘and were all carried prisoners into Sallee,
» port belonging to the Moors.
- The usage I had there was not so
areacful as I at first feared ; nor was I car-
-aed up the country to the Emperor’s court,
as the rest of our men were, but was kept
‘py the captain as his proper prize, and
made his slave, being young and nimble,
and fit for his business. At this surpris-
“ng change of my circumstances, from a
merchant to a slave, I was perfectly over-
whelmed; and now I looked back upon
ony father’s prophetic discourse to me, that
1 should be miserable; which I thought
‘was now s0 effectually brought to pass,
‘that I could not be worse; for now the
‘nand of heaven had Gearen me, and I
was undone. But alas! this was but a
taste of the misery I was to go through.
i As my new patron, or master, had taken
‘me homes to his house, so I was in hopes
‘bh: at he would take me with him when he
went to sea again, believing that it would
ee time or other be his fate to be taken
yy a man-of-war, and that then I should
te set at liberty. But this hope of mine
was soon taken away; for when he went
to sea, he left me on shore to look after his
Titile g garden, and do the con aon drudgery
‘of slaves about his house,
‘had no one to tak to, for, though
ere were other slaves, not one of them
could understand my language, nor could
a understand theirs, But while at work




















thought of nothing but my escape. RBut
for a long time no means of escaping pre-
sented itself.

After about two years, my master stayer
at home longer than usual, and two or
three times a week he used to go out
a-fishing in his boat. He always took me
and a young Moresco, besides a Moor, with



r Bo AN aa tees =
oie + . Y Sa ee
af Swe & ite AA

him, for we made him very merry, and I
was very dexterous In catching fish,

It happened one time, that, going ,fish-
ing with him in a calm morning, a fog rose
so thick, that though we were not half a
league from the shore, we lost sight of it;
and rowing we knew not whither, we
labored all day and all the next night; and

when the morning came, we found we had

“igging in the garden or grinding grain, I | pulled out to sea instead of pulling in for



14 . ROBINSON CRUSOE.



the shore. However, we got well in again,
though with a great deal of labor and some
danger, and we were all very hungry. But
our master, warned by this disaster, resolv-
ed to take more care of himself in the
future; and having lying by him the long
boat of our English ship which he had
taken, he resolved he would not go a-fish-
ing any more without a compass and some
provision. So he ordered the carpenter of



Moor to take me and the young Moreseo,
whose name was Xury, and go and cates
some fish, as he expected some distinguished
company to sup with him. Now, thought
I, is my chance to get my liberty.

My first contrivance was to speak to the
Moor and ask him if we ought not to take
along some food for our dinner; for I told
him we must not presume to eat of our
master’s bread. He said that was true; se









his snip to build a little cabin in the
middle of the long-boat and fit a place for
provisions and water, also for a compass,
end put ina mast and sails. After that,
. we used to go afishing in the long-boat.
fime day my master commanded the



y U1

REY WY

AN i
N

‘

he brought a basket full of their kind, anc:
three jars with fresh water into the boat.
I knew where my master’s case of bottles
stood, and I conveyed them into the boat
whils the Moor was on shore, as if they
had been there before for our master



ROBINSON CRUSOE.



conveyed also a great lump of beeswax
into the boat, which weighed about half
an hundred weight, with a parcel of twine
or thread, a hatchet, a saw, and a hammer,
all of which were of great use to us after-
wards,

Another trick I
tried upon him, which
he innocently came
into also: “Moely,”
said I, “our patron’s
guns are all on board
the boat; can you not
get a little powder
and shot? It may be
we may loll some
alcamies (a fowl like

15



southerly, I had been sure to make the
eoast of Spain; but my resolutions were,
blow which way it would, I would be gone
from that horrid place where I was, and
leave the rest “to fate.

After we had fished some time and







our curlews) for our-
~ selves.” “Yes,” says
he, “T'll bring some;”
and ‘accordingly, he
brought a great leath-
er pouch, which held
about a pound and a
half of powder, and
another with shot,
that had five or six
pounds, with some
bullets, and put all into the boat. At the
same time, I had found some powder of my
master’s in the great cabin, and thus fur-
nished with everything needful, we sailed
out of the port to fish.
_ » The castle, which is at the entranee of the
‘port, knew who we were, and took no
‘notice of us; and we were not above a mile
‘out of the pore before we hauled in our
‘sail, and sat us down to fish. The wind
blew from the N. N. E., which was con-
‘trary to my desire; ier had it blown







caught nothing (for when I had fish on my
hook I would not pull them up, that he
might not see them) I said to the Moor,
“This will not do; our master wi not be
thus served; we must stand further off.”
He, thinking no harm, agreed, and, being
in the head of the boat, set the sails; and,
as I had the helm, I ran the boat out near
a league farther, and then brought her to,
as if I would fish; when, giving the boy
the helm, I stepped forward to where the
Moor was, and making as if I stooped for



16




something behind him, I took him by sur.

prise with my arm under his waist, and
tossed him clear overboard into the sea.

He rose immediately, for he swam like a

cork, and begged to be taken in.
As he continued to swim after us I
&:tched a fowling-piece from the cabin,

and pointing it at him, said: “You can
swim well enough to reach the shore, If
you try to get in the boat, I will shoot
you.” He turned about when he saw I
was determined, and swam toward the
shore, which I have no doubt he reached
in safety.

When he was gone, I turned to the boy,
and said to him, “Xury, if you will be
faithful to me, ll make you a great man;
hut if you will net stroke your face to be
true to me,” that is, swear by Mahomet
and his father’s beard, “I must throw you
into the sea, too.” The boy smiled in my
face, and spoke so innocently, that I could

ROBINSON CRUSOE.

not mistrust him, and swore to be faithful
to me, and go all ever the world with me.
As long as the swimming Moor could
see me, I steered the boat straight out to
sea, for I knew he would tell his master
which way I had gone. But as soon as
I thought the boat was out of his sight,
IT turned her head to the south-east.
With a good breeze and a smooth sea, at
three o’clock on the afternoon of the next
day, I had no doubt that we were one
hundred and fifty miles from Sallee. At
this time we were within sight of the
coast, and I knew that we were were out

-of the kingdom of the Moors.

But so afraid was J of being followed
by my late master, that we sailed on
toward the south for five days, without
stopping. At the close of the fifth day,
we anchored at the mouth of a little river;
but I was afraid to go on shore for fear of
the wild beasts, which inhabit that coast
in great numbers. They made hideous
noises in the night, and sometimes we could
see great creatures bathing on the beach.
One of them swam off toward the boat,
but ashot from a fowling-piece sent him
quickly back to the shore.

However, we had to go on shore for
water, for we had not a pint left, so, the
next day, we drew the boat in as close as
we could, and waded ashore, taking our
fowling-pieces and two jars. I staid by
the boat, while Xury secon found some
water and filled the jars. He also shot a
hare, which we roasted on the shore, and
had quite a feast.

Several times I was obliged to land for
fresh water, after we had left this place;
and once in particular, being early in the



EOBINSON CRUSOE.





morning, we came to an anchor under a
» Uttle pomt of land. Xury, whose eyes
were more about him than it seems mine
_ were, calls softly to me, and tells me that we
“had best go farther off the shore; “ for,”
“says he, “look, yonder lies a dreadful
“monster on the side of that hillock, fast
asleep.” I looked where he pointed, and
saw a terrible great lion that lay on the



‘side of the shore, under the shade of a
piece of the hill. I took our biggest gun,
and loaded it with a good charge of pow-
der, and with two slugs, and laid it down;
then I loaded another gun with two bul-
lets; and the third (for we had three
pieces) I loaded with five smaller bullets.
[ took the best aim I could with the first
piece to have shoe him in the head, but he



7





lay so, with his leg raisea a little above
his nose, that the slugs hit his leg about
the knee, and broke the bone. He started.
up, growling at first, but finding his leg
broke, fell down again; and then got up
upon three legs, and gave the most hideous
roar that ever I heard. I took up the

second piece immediately, and though he
began to move off, fired again, and shot



him in the head, and had the pleasure to
see him drop.

This was game indeed to us, but this
was no food; and I was very sorry to lose
three charges of powder and shot upon a
creature that was good for nothing to us.
I bethought myself, however, that perhaps
the skin of him might, one way or other,
be of some value to us. Se Xury and |



ROBINSON CRUSOE.



went to work with him; but Xury was
much the better workman at it, for I knew
very ill how to do it. Indeed, it took us
both the whole day, but at last we got off
the hide of him, and spreading it on the

devour the flesh, making signs to offer me
some. I shook my head, but signified that

I would take the skin, if they would put it
on the shore and go away. ‘This they did,
and I sent Xury for it.

They also left on



































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































top of our cabin, the sun effectually dried | the shore a great jar of water and some

it in two days’ time, and it at
served me to lie upon.

After sailing on for twelve dover more I
found that the land was inhabited by
negroes, who ran along the shore and made
signs tous. As I thought them savages, I
did not venture to go on shore, One day
a great leopard ran down among them to
the water, at which they were greatly
frightened. When I shot him, they were
greatly surprised and very grateful. They
quickly took off the skin and began to

dried roots and corn for which I was
thankful.

I sailed on for eleven days more without
going near the shore till I saw the land run
out a great way into the sea, This I took
to be Cape de Verde. On sailing out to
the point of the Cape, I saw land far out
to sea which I thought was the Cape de
Verde Islands, I stepped into the cabin
and was thinking whether I ought not te
sail for the Islands when I heard Xury ery
out: “Master, master, a ship with a sail.”



ROBINSON CRUSOE.

ts
i rushed from the cabin and found Xury
‘in a great fright, he thinking that it must
needs be a ship of his old master, the
‘pirate. I saw, however, that it was a
Portuguese ship, and I crowded all sail to
come up to her, and was soon on board.
- Upon hearing my story, the captain
offered to take me to the Brazils, whither
the was going, without any pay whatever, and
tto take all my goods also, He offered to
give me a good sum for my boat, which I
‘accepted. He wanted also to ie Xury,
‘but I was loth to sell the boy’s liberty as
soon as he had gained it. But as he offered
to set him free in ten years and to treat
him well, and, moreover, Xury being will-
ing, I Jet the Captain have him,

We made a good voyage to the Brazils,
landing in All Saints’ Bay in twenty-two
days. The generous treatment the captain
gave me, I can never enough remember, He
would take nothing of me for my passage,
gave me twenty ducats for the leopard’s
skin, and forty for the lion’s skin, which I
had in my boat, and caused everything I
had in the ship to be punctually delivered
to me; such as the case of bottles, two of
‘my guns, and a piece of the lump of bees’.
‘wax, for I had made candles of the rest ; in
‘a word, I made about two hundred aa
‘twenty pieces of eight of all my cargo; and
‘with this stock I went on shore,
_ I soon learned that the planters of that
country lived well and became rich, so I
ought Jand and became a planter, raising
ugar and tobacco, When the Portuguese
captain sailed, I sent by him an order for
the money mich I had left with the
‘Snglish captain’s widow, and gave him in-
fractions to invest it in Lisbon, in such




1g

utensils and things as [ wanted; which ke
did, and brought them to me on his next
voyage.

I was now very prosperous and happy,
but I was not to remain so. I often talked.
to the planters about me of my voyage to
the coast of Guinea, and how easy it was to
trade with the natives for gold-dust, or
even for slaves, which were very dear in
the Brazils.

One day some of the planters came to
me and proposed, that, as there was noth:
ing we needed so much as slaves to work
our plantations, they would fit out a ship
to go to the coast of Guinea for slaves, and
that I would take charge of the affair, Al
though I was very well situated where r
was, I accepted their proposal, providing





they would take care of my property while
I was gone. In short, I obeyed blindly the
dictates of my fancy rather than my reason;
and, accordingly, the ship being fitted out,
and the cargo finished, and all things done



20 :

BOBINSON CRUSOH. .



as by agreement, by my partners in the| At last we perceived land ahead, bat he
voyage, £ went on board in an evil hour | fore we could make out whether it was om
again, the 1st of September, 1659, being the
game day eight years that I went from my



father and mother at Hull, acting the rebel
to their authority, and the fool te my own
interest.

» Our ship was about one hundred and
twenty tons burden, carried six guns, and
fourteen men, besides the master, his boy,
and myself, We had on board no large
cargo of goods, except of such toys as were
fit for our trade with the negroes, such as
beads, bits of glass, shells, and odd trifles,
especially little Jooking-glasses, knives,
scissors, hatchets, and the like,

We had very good weather, and we
sailed north, at first, along our own coast.
We passed the line in about twelve days’
ime, and were, by our last observation, in
seven degrees twenty-two minutes north
latitude, when a violent tornado took us
quite out of our knowledge. It blew in
uch a terrible manner, that for twelve
days together we could do nothing but
drive, and, seudding away before it, let it
earry us wherever fate and the fury of the
waves directed; and during these twelve
days, I need not say that I expected every
day to be swallowed up; nor did any in
the ship expect to save their lives,

island or the mainland, the ship struck on
the sand a long distance from the shore.
Now, we were in a dreadful condition m

deed, and had nothing to do but to think
of saving our lives as best we could. We
had a boat at our stern just before the
storm, but she was first staved by dashing
against the ship’s rudder, and in the next,
place she broke away, and either sunk or
was driven off to sea; so there was no hope
from her. We had another boat on board,
but how to get her off into the sea was a
doubtful thing; however, there was no
room to debate, for we fancied the ship
would break in pieces every minute, and

some told us she was actually broken

already.

In this distress, the mate of our vesse!
lay hold of the boat, and with the help cf
the rest of the men, they got her flung over
the ship’s side; and getting all into her, let
go, and committed ourselves, being eleven



in number, to God’s mercy and the wild
sea; for though the storm was abated con-
siderably, yet the sea went dreadfully hich
upon the shore,



ROBINSON CRUSOE.

at

Ce LE LO AL

And now we all saw piainly that the
boat vould not escape, and that we should
be drowned. As to making sail, we had
none, nor, if we had, could we have done
anything with it; so we worked at the oar
towards land, on with heavy hearts,
like men going to execution; for we all
‘knew that when the boat came near the
shore she would be dashed in a thousand

perhaps make smooth water. But there
was nothing of this appeared; but as we
made nearer and nearer the shore, the lan:
looked more frightful than the sea.

At last, a great wave came rolling after
us, overset the boat, and we were all swal.
lowed up in a moment. Nothing can de
scribe what I felt when I sank into the
water; for though I swam very well, yet F































pieces by the breach of the sea. However,
‘we committed our souls to God in the most
earnest manner,

_ What the shore was, whether rock or
sand, whether steep or shoal, we knew not:
the only hope was that we might happen
into some bay or gulf, or the mouth of some
river, where by great chance we might run
our boat in under the lee of the land, and





could not deliver myself from the waves se
as to draw breath, till that wave having
driven me, or rather carried me, a vast way
on towards the shore, and having spent
itself, went back, and left me upon the land
almost dry, but half dead with the water I
took in, I had so much presence of maind,
as well as breath left, that seeing myself
nearer the main land than I expected, i got





upon my feet’ and ran.

Another wave soon over-

took me and then another, until I was

dashed against a rock with such force as to
make me nearly senseless.

I held on to the rock, however, until the
wave receded, and the next run I took I
got to the mainland, exhausted ind bruised,
and, indeed, more dead than sive.

But I was now landed, and safe on
shore, and began to look up and to thank
God that my life was saved. I walked
about the shore, lifting up my hands, and
my whole being, I may say, wrapt up in
a contemplation of my deliverance; mak-
ing a thousand gestures and motions, which
I cannot describe; reflecting upon all my
comrades that were drowned, and that
there should not be one soul saved but
myself; for, as for them, I never saw them
afterwards, or any sign of them, except
three of their hats, one cap, and two shoes
that were not fellows.

I cast my eyes to the stranded vessel,
when, the breach and froth of the sea
being so big, I could hardly see it, it lay

, 80 far off, and considered, Lord! how was
ae possible I could get on shore?

After I had solaced my mind with the
comfortable part of my condition, I began
to look around me, to see what kind of
place I was in, and what was next to be

pe es



ROBINSON CRUSOE.



done; and I soon found my comforts abate,
and that, in a word, I had a dreadful de.
liverance; for I was wet, had no clothes to
shift me, nor anything either to eat or
drink, to comfort me. Neither did I see-
any prospect before me, but that of per.
ishing with hunger, op being devoured by
wild beasts; and that which was particu!
larly affecting to me was, that I had ne
weapon, either to hunt and kill any crea
ture for my sustenance, or to defend my.
self against any other creature that migh‘
ae to kill me for theirs. In a sonal \
had nothing about me but a knife, a to
bacco-pipe, and a little tobacco in a box.
This was all my provision; and this threv:
me into terrible agonies of mind, that for),
while I ran sina like a madman. Nigh’
coming upon me, I began, with a heavy
heart, to consider what would be my lot
there were any ravenous beasts in that:
country, seeing at night they always come
abroad for prey.

All the remedy that offered to my
thoughts, at that time, was to get up into
a thick bushy tree, like a fir, but thorny,
which grew near me, and where I resolvel
to sit all night, and consider the nex
day what death I should die, for as yet
saw no prospect of life. I walked Bho,
a furlong from the shore, to see if I coul:
find any fresh water to drink, which I aid
to my great joy; and having drunk, anv
put a little tobacco in my mouth to pr
vent hunger, I went to the tree, and ge!
ting up into it, endeavoured to place my,
self so that if I should sleep I might no
fall. And having cut me a short stick
like a truncheon, for my defence, I took »
my lodging; and being excessively fatigues



ROBINSON CRUSOE.



{ fell fast asleep, and slept as comfortably
as, I believe, few could have done in my
condition, and found myself more refreshed
with it than I think I ever was on such an
occasion.

28

that at least I might save some necessary
things for my use.

When I came down from my apartment
in the tree, I looked about me again, and
the first thing I found was the boat, which



When I waked up it was broad day-
light, the weather clear, and the storm
abated, so that the sea did not rage and
swell as before; but that which surprised
â„¢e more was, that the ship was lifted off
in the night from the sand where she lay,
by the swelling of the tide, and was driven
up almost as far asthe rock which I at first
mentioned, where I had been so bruised
_ by the wave dashing me againstit. This
_ being within about a mile from the shore
where I was, and the ship seeming to stand
_ aapright still, I wished myself on board,

lay, as the wind and sea had tossed her up, .
upon the land, about two miles on my right —
hand. I walked as far as I could upon -

shore to have got to her; but found aneck, -

or inlet of water between me and the boat

Foe ace

which was about half a mile broad; so I

came back for the present, being more
intent upon getting at the ship, where I

hoped to find something for my present *

subsistence,

A little after noon I found the sea very
calm, and the tide ebbed so far out, that J
could come within a quarter of a mile of

,

Ae



24



‘se ship. And here I found a fresh renew-
mg of my grief ; for I saw evidently, that if
we had kept on board, we had been all
safe; that is to say, we had all got safe on
shore, and I had not been so miserable as
to be left entirely destitute of all comfort
and company as I now was.

This foreed the tears to my eyes again.
As there was little relief in that, I resolved
if possible, to get to the ship; so I pulled
off my clothes, for the weather was hot, and



tovk to the water. But when I eame to the
ship my difficulty was still greater to know
tww to get on board, for as she lay high out
of tha water, there was nothing within my

ROBINSON CRUSOE.



reach to lay hold of. I swam around he
twice, and the second time I espied a small
piece of rope hanging down the fore-chains
so low, that with great difficulty I got hold
of it, and by the help of that rope got up
into the forecastle of the ship.

I found that the ship was bulged, and
had a great deal of water in her hold; but
that she lay soon the side of a bank of
hard sand, or rather earth, that her stern lay
lifted up upon the bank, and her head low,
almost to the water. By this means all her
quarter was free, and all that was in that
part was dry; for you may be sure my firs!
work was to search, and to see what wa:
spoiled and what was free. And, first, |
found that all the ship’s provisions were
dry and untouched by the water, and being
very well disposed to eat, I went to the
bread-room and filled my pockets with bis
cuit, and ate itas I went about other things,
for I had no time to lose. I also found
some rum in the great cabin, of which |
took a large dram, and which I had, indeed,
need enough of, to spirit me for what wa:
before me.

Now I wanted nothing but a boat, to
furnish myself with many things which |
foresaw would be very necessary to me. Ii
was in vain to sit still and wish for what
was not to be had; and this extremity’
roused my application. We had severali
spare yards, and two or three large spars o!
wood, and a spare top-mast or two in the
ship. I resolved to fall to work with these’
and I flung as many of them overboard as /
could manage for their weight, tying every,
one with a rope, that they might not driv:
away. When this was done [ went dow:
the ship’s side, and pulling them to me, .





tied four of them together at both ends, as
well as I could, in the form of a raft, and
laying two or three short pieces of plank
npon them, crossways, I found I could
walk upon it very well, but that it was not

able to bear any great weight, the pieces

being too light.
So I went to work, and with the carpen-
ter’s saw I cut a spare top-mast into three

lengths, and added them to my raft, with a

ROBINSON CRUSOE.

2a

of arrack. These I stowed by thea.selv as,
there being no need to put them into the
chest, nor any room for them.

‘While I was doing this, I found the tide
began to flow, though very calm; and I had

great deal of labor and pains. But the) aN

hope of furnishing myself with necessaries

encouraged me to go beyond what I should |

have been able to have done upon another
occasion,

My raft was now strong enough to bear

any reasonable weight. My next care was
what to load it with, and how to preserve
what I had Jaid upon it from the surf of
the sea: but I was not long considering
this. z

I first laid all the planks or boards upon |

it that I could get, and having considered
well what I most wanted, I first got three

of the seamen’s chests, which I had broken |
open and emptied, and lowered them down

upon my raft; the first of these I filled
with provisions—viz., bread, rice, three
Dutch cheeses, five pieces of dried goat’s



the mortification to see my coat, shirt and
waistcoat, which I had left on the shore

\flesh (which we lived much upon), and a} upon the sand, swim away, As for my

little remainder of Kuropean corn, which
had been laid by for some fowls which we
brought to sea with us, but the fowls were
killed. There had been some barley and
wheat together; but, to my great disap.
pointment, I found afterwards that the rats
had eaten or spoiled it all, As for liquors,
I found several cases of bottles belonging
to our skipper, in which were some cordial
Wines ; and, in all, about five or six gallons

breeches, which were only sinen, and open-
kneed, I swam on board in them and my
stockings,

However, this put me upon rummaging
for clothes, of which I found enough, but
took no more than what I wanted for pre-
sent use, for I had other things which my
eye was more upon 3 as, first, tools to work
with on shore; and it was after long
searching that I found out the carpenter's



a

ehest, which was indeed a very useful prize
to me, and much more valuable than a ship-
lading of gold would have been at that
time. I got it down to my raft, whole as
it was, without losing time to look into it,
for I knew in general what it contained.



My next care was for,some ammunition
and arms. ‘There were two fowling-pieces
in the cabin, and two pistols, These I
secured first, with some powder-horns, and
two old, rusty swords. I knew there were
three barrels of powder in the ship and,
with much search, I found them; two of
them were dry and good, and these I got
to my raft, with the arms.

And now I thought myself pretty well
Sreighted, and I began to think how I
should get to shore with all my things,
having neither sail, oar, nor rudder, and
the least puff of wind would have overset
my raft. But the sea was calm, the tide
was setting toward the shore, and what

, little wind there was, blew in that direc.
‘ Gon, I found, however, two or three
broken oars, and with these I put to sea.

The raft went very well; but I found
that the tide took me some distance from

ROBINSON CRUSOE,

the point where I had landed before, by
which I perceived that there was an in
draft of the water. This led me to think
that there might be a creek or river there;
and so I found there was.

I steered my raft toward it as well as I
could. At the mouth of the little creek I
came very near suffering a second ship-
wreck, which, I verily believe, would have
broken my heart, Thd raft ran on a shoal,
and nearly upset. I held all the things in
their places, and when the tide rose a little
higher, it floated safely off. I landed at
high tide, when the water covered the
bank, and when it receded, the raft was
high and dry.

My next work was to view the country,
and seek a proper place for my habitation,
and where to stow my goods, to secure
them from whatever might happen. Where
I was, I yet knew not; whether on the
continent or an island; whether inhabited
or not inhabited; whether m danger of
wild beasts or not,

There was a hill not above a mile from
me, which rose up very steep and high,
and which seemed to overtop some other
hills, which lay as in a ridge from it, north
ward, I took out one of the fowliny
pieces, and one of the pistols, and a hori
of powder; and thus armed, I traveled foi
discovery up to the top of that hill, whers
after I had with great labor and difficulty .
got to the top, I saw my fate, to my grea!
affliction—viz., that I was in an islanc
environed every way with the sea ni
land to be seen except some rocks, whic
lay a great way off, and two small island |
less than this, which lay about thre
leagues to the west,



ROBINSON CRUSOE. 2%



I found also that the island I wasinwas| At my coming back, I shot at a great
barren, and, as I saw good reason to| bird, which I saw sitting upon a tree, on
believe, uninhabited, except by wild beasts, | the side of a great wood. I believe it was
of which, however, I saw none. Yet I saw | the first gun that had been fired there
abundance of fowls, but knew not their | since the creation of the world. I had na
kinds; neither, when I killed them, could | sooner fired, but from all parts of the wood
I tell what was fit for food and what not. | there arose an innumerable number of



























28

fowls of many. -sorts, making a confused
screaming and crying, every one according
to his usual note, but not one of them of
any kind that I knew. As for the creature
I killed, I took it to be a kind of hawk, its
color and beak resembling it, but it had no
talons or claws more than common. Its
fiesh was carrion, and fit for nothing.
Contented with this discovery, I came
back to my raft, and fell to work to bring
my cargo on shore, which took me all the
rest of the day. What to do with myself
at night I knew not, nor indeed where to
rest, for I was afraid to lie down on the
ground, not knowing but some wild beast
might devour me, though, as I afterwards





ROBINSON CRUSOE.

found, there was really no need for those
fears,

However, as well as I could, I barricaded
myself round with the chests and. boards
that I had brought on shore, and made a
kind of hut for that night’s lodging. As
for food, I yet saw not which way to sup-
ply myself, except that I had seen two ox
three creatures, like hares, run out of the
wood where I shot the fowl.

I now began to consider that I might
yet get a great many things out of the
ship, which would be useful to me, and
particularly some of the rigging and sails,
and such other things as might come to
land; and I resolved tc make another voy-
age on board the vessel, if possible. And
as I knew that the first storm that blew
must necessarily break her all in pieces, :
resolved to set all other things apart, till :
got everything out of the ship that I could
get. Then I called a council—that is to
say, in my thoughts—whether I should
take back the raft; but this appeared im-
practicable; so I resolved to go as before,
when the tide was down; and I did s0,
only that I stripped before I went from my
hut, having nothing on but a chequered|
shirt, a pair of linen drawers, and a pair of/
pumps on my feet,

I got on board the ship as before, and)
prepared a second raft; and, having had:
experience of the first, I neither made this;
so unwieldy, nor loaded it so hard, but yet,
I brought away several things very usefu)
to me; as, first, in the carpenter’s stores l
found two or three bags full of nails an
spikes, a great screw-jack, a dozen or tw
of hatchets, and, above all, that most useftl’
thing called a grindstone.

|
i
j



ROBINSON CRUSOE.

“i these I secured, together with seve-
ral things belonging to the gunner, particu-
iarly two or three iron crows, and two
parrels of musket bullets, seven muskets,
and another fowling piece, with some small



quantity of powder more; a large bag-full
of small shot, and a great roll of sheet lead ;
but this last was so heavy I could not
hoist it up to get it over the ship’s side.
Besides these things, I took all the men’s
elothes that I could find, and a spare fore-
top sail, a hammock, and some bedding;
and with this [ loaded my second raft, and
brought them all safe on shore, to my very
great comfort.
_ I was under some apprehension during
my absence from the land, that at least my
provisions might be devoured on shore;
but when I came back, I found no sign of
any visitor; only there sat a creature like a
‘wild cat, upon one of the chests, which,



29



when I came towards it, ran away @. little
distance, and then stood still. She sat very
composed and unconcerned, and looked fuli
in my face, as if she had a mind to be
acquainted with me. I presented my gun
to her, but, as she did not understand it,
she was perfectly unconcerned at it, nor
did she offer to stir away; upon which I
tossed her a bit of biscuit, though, by the
way, I was not very free of it, for my store
was not great; however, I spared her a bit,
T say, and she went to it, smelled at it, and
ate it, and looked (as pleased) for more;
bat I thanked her, and could spare no
more, so she marched off.

Having got my second cargo on shore—
though I was obliged to open the barrels of
powder, and bring them by parcels, for they
were too heavy, being large casks—I went
to work to make me a little tent, with the
sail, and some poles which I cut for that
purpose; and into this tent I brought
everything that I knew would spoil either
with rain or sun; and I piled all the empty
chests and casks up in a circle round the
tent, to fortify it from any sudden attempt,
either from man or beast.

When I had done this, I blocked up the
door of the tent with some boards within,
and an empty chest set up on end without;





ae ROBINSON CRUSOE.

ang spreading one of the beds upon the
ground, laying my two pistols just at my
head, and my gun at length by me, I went
to bed for the first time, and slept very
quietly all night. I was very weary and
heavy; for the night before I had slept
little, and had labored hard all day, as
well to fetch those things from the ship, as
to get them on shore.

I had the biggest magazine of all kinds
now that ever was laid up, I believe, for one
man; but still I was not satisfied, for while

ZA



the ship stood upright in that posture, I
thought I ought to get everything out of
her Icould. So every day, at low water, I
went on board, and brought away some.
thing or other; but particularly the third
time I went, I brought away as much of
the rigging as I could, as also all the small
rope and rope twine I could get, with a
piece of spare canvas, which was to mend
the sails upon occasion, and the barrel of
wet gunpowder. In a word, I brought
away all the sails, first and last; only that
E was fain to cut them in pieces, and bring





as much at a time as I could, for they were
no more useful to me for sails, but as mere
canvas only.

But that which comforted me more still,
was, that at last of all, after I had made
five or six such voyages as these, and
thought I had nothing more to expect from
the ship that was worth my meddling with
—I say, after all this, I found a great hogs-
head of bread, three large runlets of rum
or spirits, a box of fine sugar, and a barrel
of fine flour; this was surprising to me, be-
cause I had given over expecting any more
provisions except what was spoiled by the
water. I soon emptied the hogshead of the
bread, and wrapped it up, parcel by parcel,
in pieces of the sails, which I cut out; and,
in a word, I got all this on shore also,
though at several times.

The next day I made another voyage, and
now, having plundered the ship of what
was portable, I cut up the cable in pieces
that I could lift, and gathered all the iron
work that I could move. I cut up the
yards and made a raft to take it all ashore,
but when I got into the little cove, the ratt
upset and my load all went to the bottom.
However, when it was low water, I got the
most of it out.

If it had remained calm, I verily believe
that I would have cut up the whole ship
and got it ashore. The twelfth time that
I went on board, I found some money and
some knives. The former was of no worth
to me, but I took it, and as the wind began
to rise I hurried on shore. It blew very
hard that night, and in the morning there
was no more ship to be seen.

I now began to think of securing mysell

against wild beasts and savages, by build

















ROBINSON CRUSOE.





ing a dwelling, and I resolved to make me
both a tent and a cave, and I set about
finding a more healthy and suitable spot
than where I then was.

T consulted several things in my situa-
tion, which I found would be proper for
me: first, health and fresh water ; secondly,
shelter from the heat of the sun; thirdly,
security from ravenous creatures, whether
man or beast; fourthly, a view to the sea,
that if God sent any ship in sight, I might
not Jose any advantage for my deliverance,
of which I was not willing to banish my
expectation yet,

In search of a place proper for this, I
found a little plain on the side of a rising
nill, whose front towards this little plain
was steep as a house side, so that nothing
could come down upon me from the top.
On the side of the rock there was a hollow
place, worn a little way in, like the en-
trance or door of a cave; but there was
not really any cave, or way into the rock,
at all.

On the flat of the green, just below this
hollow place, I resolved to pitch my tent,
This plain was not above a hundred



end of it, descended irregularly every way,
down into the low ground by the sea-side.

Before I set up my tent, I drew a half:
circle before the hollow place, and in this
half-circle I pitched two rows of strong
stakes, driving them into the ground till
they stood very firm, the biggest end being
out of the ground above five feet and a
half, and sharpened on the top. The two
rows did not stand above six inches from
one another.

Then I took the pieces of cable which I
had cut in the ship, and Jaid them in rows,
upon one another, within the circle, be
tween these two rows of stakes, up to the



yards | top, placing other stakes in the insit

broad, and about twice as long, and lay | leaning against them, about two feet andi

green before my door; and, at the

half high, like a spur to a post; and tli



ROBINSON CRUSOE.

L——— eeeeeeee
kj

east could get into it or over It.



feree was so strong, that neither man nor| year are very violent there.



IT made :t
double—viz., one smaller tent within, anc

The entrance into this place I made to] one larger ent above it; and covered the

be, not hy a dcor, but by a short ladder to| uppermost part of it with a large tar

po over the top; which ladder, when I was
fh, I lifted over after me Saad so I was
completely fenced im a ad
thought, from all the world, and conse- ;
quently slept secure in the mgh$, which



other ‘wise I could not have done; though,
as it appeared afterwards, ieie was no
need of all this caution from the enemies
that I apprehended danger from.

Into this fence, or fortreas) with infinite
labor, I carried all my riches, all my pro-
visicrs, ammunition, and stores; and I
made me a large tent also, to preserve me
from the rains, that in one part of the





fortified, as 1]

paulin, which I had saved among he sails,
When I had done all this, I dug a cave

in the hill-side, piling the earth and stones,
within my fence so as to raise the ground

nearly to the top. Before I had done ail

this, a thunder-storm, accompanied by sharp
flashes of lightning, frightened me very
much for fear that my powder would take
fire. As soon as the storm was over, I
went to work and separated the powder
into small parcels and hid it away im
different places in the rocks.

In the interval of time while this wae
doing, I weni out at least once every day



Ge ROBINSON CRUSOE.

Se ey

with my gun, as well to divert myself, as | and I was upon the rocks, they took no
to see if I could kill anything fit for food ;| notice of me; from whence I concluded,
and, as near as I could, to acquaint myself} that by the position of their optics, theix
with what the island produced. The first | sight was so directed downward, that thep



time L weut out, I discovered that tuere | did not readily see objects that were abov
were goats ‘n the island, which was a great | them; so afterwards I always climbed thi
satislaction to me; but they were so shy, | rocks first, to get above them, and the
£0 subtle, a.d so swift of foot, that i was | had frequently a fair mark,

the most dificult thing in the world to| The first shot I made among these cred
come at them; but I was not discouraged | tures I killed a she-goat, which had a litt!
at this. 1 observed if they saw me in the | kid by her, which grieved me heartily; fo
valleys. though they were upon the rocks, | when the old one fell, the kid stood sto«
they would run away, as in a terrible fright; | still by her, till I came and took her u!
hut if they were feeding in the valleys, | and not only so, but when I carried ti







36 ROBINSON CRUSOE.




kept a strict account of everything, but
they were soon gone. We had on the
ship two cats and a dog, and I had brought
both of the cats on aoe As for the dog
he swam ashore, and became my trusty
servant for many years.

old one with me upon my shoulders, the
kid followed me quite to my enclosure ;
upon which I laid down the dam, and took
the kid in my arms, and carried it over my
pale, in hopes to have bred it up tame;
but it would not eat, so I was forse to
kill it and eat 1t myself. The want of tools made every work £

After 1 had been there abouv ten or | did go on heavily; and it was near a whole
twelve TONS; it came inte my thoughts that | year beiore I had entirely finished my

i should lose my reckoning of time, and | | littie pale, or surrounded habitation. The
should even forget the Sabbath-day from’ piles or stakes, which were as heavy as I
the working-days: but to prevent this, E: could well lift, were a long time in cutting
and preparing in the Sas and more, by
fee in bringing home; so that i spent

sometimes two days i in eutting and bring-
ing home one of those posts, and a third
day in driving it into the ground Bui
what need I have been concerned at the
tediousness of anything I had to o, seeing
I had time enough to do it in? nor had I
any other pag if that had beer
over, at least that f could foresee, except —
the ranging the island to seek for food,
and climbing the high recks to see if any
vessel was within sight.

Uaving now brought my mind a little
ito relish my condition, and given over
cut it with my knife upon a large yost, in | looking out to sea, to see if IF could spy a
capital letters, and making it inte a great | ship; I say, giving over these things, J
eross, I set it up on the shore where ! first began to apply myself to ascommodate my
landed, viz., “I came on shore here on the | way of living, and to make things as easy
30th of September, 1659.” | to me as I could.

Upon the sides of this square post Leut| I have already described my habitation,
every day a notch with my knife, and | which was a tent under the side of a rock,
every seventh notch was as long again as {surrounded with a strong pale of posts
the rest, and every first day of the month | and cables; but I might now rather cail it
as fong again as that long one; and thus I! wall, for I raised a kind of wall up

Rept mv
I had brought from the ship some pens, | the outeide; and after some time (I think
iais and paper, and while they lasted I it was a year and a half) I raised raftes









ROBINSON CRUSOE. x



af LR MONT TIT TCE ORIENT I







from it, leaning to the rock, and thatched |
or covered it with boughs of trees, and

such things as I could get to keep out the ;
rain, which I found at some times of the

year very violent.

I have already observed how I broaght |
all my goods into this pale, and inte ‘his |
cave ch I had made ‘behind me Batlj
must observe, too, that at first this was 3
confused heap of goods, which, as they lay
in no order, so they took up ail my place.
I had no room to turn myself; so 1 set my
self to enlarge my cave, and worked far-
ther into the earth, for it was a loose,
sandy rock, which yielded easily to the
labor I bestowed on it; and so when £j
found I was pretty safe as to beasts of |
prey, I worked sideways, to the right |
hand, into the rock; and then turning to! wanted a board, ee ad ue other way but te
the right again, wor ked quite ont, and cut down a tree, set tt on an edge belors
made ine a door to come out on the out: , me, and hew it flat en either side with my
side of my pale or fortification. axe, till I had brought it to be as thin as 4

And now J began to apply myself to | | plank, and then dub it smooth with my
Make such necessary things as I found £ i adze. It is true, by this methed I coule
:



roost wanted, partic valarly a chair and # | make but one board out of a whole tree,
table; for without these I was not able to | but this i had ne remedy for but patience,
enjoy the few comforts I had in the world.; However, | made me a table and a chair,
I could not write, or eat, or do several | in the firsé ee and this I did out of the
things with so much pleasure without a| short pieces of boards that 1 brought on
table. | say raft oe the ship. But when I had

Thad never handiad a tool in my life; | wrought out some boards as above, 1 made
and yet, in time, by labor, application, and | large shelves, of the breadth of a foot »nd.
contrivance, I found, at last, that I wanted | ali “half, one over another, al} alony one
Rothing but I could have made it, espe-| side of my eave, to lay all my tools, naiix
cially if Thad had the tools. However, I | and iron-work on; and, in a word, to sepx:
made abundance of things, even without | rate every thing at large into their piaces,
toois ; and some with no more tools than | that I might come easily at them; also 4
an adze and a hatchet, which, perhaps, | knocked pieces into the wall of the ruck,
were never made that way before, and that | to hang my guns and all things that would
With infinite labor. For example, if I| hang up; so that had my cave been to be»



38



reen, it looked like a general magazine of
sil necessary things; and I had everything
xo ready at my hand, that it was a great
pleasure to me to see all my goods in such
order,



As Jong as my ink
lasted IT kept a jour:
nal of all that vapb to me, of wuaich I
will now give a part, for much that T wrote
at that time I have already told, and need
not repeat

September 39,
Robinson Crusve, being shipwrecked, dur-
ing a dreadful storm, in the offing, came on
shore on this dismal, unfortunate island,

which I called “The Island of Despair ;”

1659.—I, poor, miserable

all the rest of the ship’s company being

drowned, aud myself almost dead.

All the rest of the day I spent in affliet-
ing myself at the dismal circumstances |
was brought to; viz, 1 had neither food,
house, clothes, weapon, nor place to fly to;
and, in despair of any relief, saw nothing
but death before me: either that I should
be devoured by wild beasts, or perish by
starvation.

Oct. 25.—It rained all night and all
day, with some gusts of wind; during
which time the ship broke in pieces, the
wind biowing a little harder than before,



%





ROBINSON CRUSOE.

and was no more to be seen, except the
wreck of her, and that only at low water.
T spent this day in govering and securing
the goods which I saved, that the rain
might not spoil them.

Oct. 26.—I walked about the shore
almost all day, to find out a place to fix
my habitation, greatly concerned to secure
myself from any attack in the night, either
from wild beasts or men. ieht
I fixed upon a proper place, under a rock,
and marked out a semicircle for my el

Towards

campment, which I resolved to strengthen
with a work, wall, or fortification, made of
double piles, lined within with cables, and
without with turf.

Krom the 26th to the 3

rarrying all 4

ae Tt worked

very hard in y goods to iny
new habitation, though some part of the
time it rained exceeding hard,

Nov. 1—On this day T made a stric
division of my time, fixing the hours which
I would devote to my several duties, “viz:
every morning, to walk out with my
it did) not rain:

oul
for two or three hours, if
then to employ myself to work: til abou
eleven o’clock; then to eat what EF had t
live on; then to lie down and sleep, th
weather being very hot: ; then to
The werking Paik this day w:
wholly employed in making my fable,

This day L went abroad wit!
iad ext

ia UC

VW or

again, of



Nov. 5.
my gun and my dog, and killed a wi
her skin pretty soft, but her flesh good fy
nothing.
C took

Coming

Of every creature that DT kille:
off the skin and preserved |
back by the seashore, E saw i

or three seals, but not well knowing w!
they were at first, while I stood oagine:

them, they got into the sea and eseape? 1!



ROBINSON CRUSOE. KO





ne

— : : ares
Nov. 17.—This day I began to dig behind | worked it by little and little into the form
my tent into the rock, to make room for| of a shovel or spade; the handle exactly

my further conveniency.
' Note—Three things I wanted exceed-
ingly for this work, viz, a pickaxe, a
shovel, and a wheelbarrow, or basket ; so I
desisted from my work, and began to con-
sider how to supply that want, and make
me some tools. As for the pickaxe, I
made use of the iron crows, which were
proper enough, though heavy; and the
next thing was a shovel, or spade, This was
so absolutely necessary, that, indeed, I
could do nothing effectually without it; but
what kind of one to make I knew not.
Nov. 18.—The next day, in searching
the woods, I found a tree of that wood,
er like it, which, in the Brazils, they call
the iron-tree, for its exceeding hardness ; of
this, with great labor, and almost spoiling
my axe, I cut a piece, and brought it home,
with difficulty enough, for it was exceed-
mgly heavy, The excessive hardness of
the wood, and having no other way, made
mea long while upon this machine, for I



| make wicker-ware

shaped like ours in England, only that the

board part having no iron shod upon it at

. a La.
Sag =
oN aot Es P



SP



bottom, it would not last me so long ; how
ever, it served well enough for the uses
which I had occasion to put it to; but
never was a shovel, I believe, made after
that fashion or so long making,

I was still deficient, for I wanted
basket, or a wheelbarrow. A basket {
could not make by any means, having no
such things as twigs that would bend to
at least, none yet found
out; and as to the wheelbarrow, I fancied
I could make all but the wheel; but that
I had no notion of; neither did I know
how to go about it; besides, f had no
possible way to make iron gudgeons for the
spindle or axis of the wheel to run in: so
I gave it over, and so, for sarrying away





‘a0



ROBINSON CRUSOE.

the earth which I dag out of the cave, I |in widening and deepening my cave, thn
made a thing like a hod, which the laborers | it might hold my goods commodiously

carry mortar in, when they serve the brick-

layers.

Note.—During all this time 1 worked te
make this room, or cave, spacious enough



This was not so difficult to me as the
making the shovel; and yet this and the
shovel, and the attempt which I made in
vain to make a wheelbarrow, took me no
Jess than four days, I mean always except-
| ng my morning’s walk with my gun, which
I seldom failed, and very seldom failed
also of bringing home something fit to eat.
_ WVov. 23.—My other work having stood
still, because of my making these tools,
when they were finished I went on, and
working every day, as my strength and
time allowed, spent eighteen days entirely

to accommodate me as a warehouse, 0!
magazine, a kitchen, a dining-room, and i
cellar. As for a lodging, I kept to the
tent; except that sometimes, in the we
season of the year, it rained so hard, that !
could not keep myself dry, which cause
me afterwards to cover all my place within
my pale with long poles, in the form 0!
rafters, leaning against the rock, and loai
them with flags and J-~ge leaves of trees
like a thatch.

Dec. 10.—I began now to think my cavé
or vault finished, when on a sudden “

{



: ROBINSON CRUSOE.

oo

seems I had made it too large), a great

quantity of earth fell down from the top.

i now had a great deal of work to do over
again, for I had the loose earth to carry:

out, and then I had to pre) un the ceiling.



him’ upon some goats, Lut thev all faced
about upon him, and he knew ‘his danger
and would not come near them.

All this time it rained hard nearly every
day. J made rounds in the woods for game





Dec, 11.—This day I went to work and
got posts pitched upright to the top, with
boards across over each top, and in a week
I had the roof secured.

Dec. 27,—Killed a young goat, od lamed
another, so that I catched it and led it home

by a string. When IJ had it home, I bound
and splintered up its leg, which was broke,

Note—I took such care of it that it
lived, and the leg grew as strong as ever.
By nursing it so long, it grew tame and
would not go away. This led me to think
of taming more goats,

Jan. 2.—Went out with my dog, and set

when the rain permitted me, and made fre
quent discoveries in these walks of somes
thing or other to my advantage ; particularly
I found a kind of wild pigeons, which
build, not as wood pigeons in a tree, but
rather as house pigeons, in the holes of the
rocks; and takmg some young ones, I en
deavored to breed them up tame, aud cid
so; but when they grew older they flew ut
away, which perhaps was at first for want
of feeding them, for I had nothing to give
them; however, I frequently found their
nests, and got their young ones, which were
very good meat.



42 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

And now, in the managing my household | which was generally by seven o'clock, |
affairs, I found myself wanting in many | was obliged to go to bed. I remember:
things, which I thought at first it was im- | the lump of bees’-wax with which I mac
possible for me to make; as, indeed, as to | candles inmy African adventure; but I ha!
some of them it was: for instance, I could | none of that now. The only remedy I hai
never make a cask to be hooped. I had a; was, that when I had killed a goat, I saved
small runlet or two, as I observed before; | the tallow, and with a little dish made
but I could never arrive to the capacity of | clay, which I baked in the sun, to which |
making one by them, though I spent many | added a wick of some oakum, I made 1
weeks about it; IL could never put in the |a lamp; and this gave me light, though wi
a clear, steady light like a candle.

In the middle of all my labors, it hap.
pened that, remmaging my things, T found
a little bag, which had been filled with com
for the feeding of poultry. What little 1.
mainder of corn had been in the bag was
all devoured by the rats, and I saw not hing
in the bag but husks and dust; and bei
willing to have the bag for some other us,
I shook the husks of corn out of it on one’
side of my fortification, under the rock. _

It was a little before the great rains juy
now mentioned, that I threw this stuff away:
taking no notice of anything, and not +’
much asremembering that [had thrown any
thing there, when, about a month after!
saw some few stalks of something give
shooting upon the ground, which I fanci
might be some plant Thad not seen. But)
was surprised when, after a little lonw
time, I saw about ten or twelve ears con
out, which were perfect green barley,
the same kind as our English barley.

It is impossible to express the astonis
ment and confusion of my thoughts on tl
oceasion. I had hitherto acted upon no h
ligious foundation at all; indeed, I |i
very few notions of religion in my |
nor had entertained any sense of anyt:
that had befallen me, otherwise than

——=





heads, nor join the staves so true to one an-
other as to make them hold water; so I gave
that also over.

In the next place, I was at a great loss
for candles; so that as soon as it was dark,

oo i e308



ROBINSON CRUSOE.

43



chance, or, as we lightly say, what pleases
God, without so much as inquiring into the
end of Providence in these things. But
after I saw barley grow there in a climate
which I knew was not proper for corn, and
especially that I knew not how it came
there, it startled me strangely, and I began
to suggest that God had miraculously caused
this grain to grow without any help of seed
sown.

This touched my heart a little, and
brought tears out of my eyes, and I began
to bless myself that such a prodigy of
Nature should happen upon my account ;
and this was the more strange to me, be-
eause I saw near it still, all along by the
side of the rock, straggling stalks of rice,
and which I knew, because I had seen it
grow in Africa, when I was ashore there.

I carefully saved the ears of this corn,!

you may be sure, in their season, which
was about the end of June; and laying up
every corn, I resolved to sow them all
again, hoping in time to have sufficient to
supply me with bread. But it was not
till the fourth year that I would allow
myself the least grain of this corn to eat,
and even then but sparingly; for I lost all
that I sowed the first season, by not
observing the proper time; for I sowed it
just before the dry season, so that it never
came up at all.

Besides this barley, there were twenty
or thirty stalks of rice, which I preserved
with the same care, and whose use was of
the same kind, or to the same purpose,
viz., to make me bread, or rather food;
Vfer I found ways to cook it up without

aking, though I did that also after some



But to return to my Journal :—

April 16.—I finished the ladder; so 2
went up the ladder to the top, and then
pulled it up after me, and let it down on
the inside. This was a complete enclosure
to me; for within I had room enough, and
nothing. could come at me from without,
unless it could first mount my wall.



The very next day after this wall was
finished, I had almost had all my labor
overthrown at once, and myself killed.
The case was thus:— inside of it, behind my tent, just in the
entrance into my cave, I was terribly
frightened with a most dreadful surpris-
ing thing indeed; for, all on a sudden, IT
found the earth came tumbling down from
the roof of my cave, and from the edge of
the hill over my head, and two of the posts
I had set up in the cave cracked in a fright-
ful manner. I was heartily scared; and for!
fear I should be buried in it, I ran forward:
to my ladder, and not thinking myself safe |
there neither, I got over my wall for fear
of the pieces of the hill, which I expected
might roll down upon me. I was no sooner
stepped down upon the firm ground, than
I plainly saw it was a terrible earthquake ;



ae

ROBINSON CRUSOE.



for the ground I stood on shook three
times, with such shocks as would have
overturned the strongest building that
‘could be supposed to have stood upon the
earth; and a great piece of the top of the
rock, which stood about half a mile from
me, next the sea, fell down with such a
terrible noise as I never heard in all my
hfe, I perceived also the very sea was put
into a violent motion by it.

I was so amazed with the thing itself,
having never felt the like, or discoursed
with any one that had, that I was like one
dead or stupefied; and the motion of the



easch made my stomach sick like one that
was tossed at sea, But the noise of the
falling of the rock awaked me as it were,
_ and rousing me from the stupefied condi-
tion I was in, filled me with horror, and I
thought of nothing then, but the hill fall-
ing upon my tent and all my household
goods, and burying all at once.

_ When I found there were no more shocks,
1 began to take courage, but I was for a
long time afraid to get over the wall for
fear the hill would fall on me, To make
my situation worse, the rain began to fall
down in torrents, and there came a terrible

%

hurricane of wind. The sea was lashed to
foam; and trees were torn up by the roots,
and, in short, it was a dreadful storm.

In about three hours the wind abated,
but the rain continued all night and all the
next day. As there were no more shocks,
I climbed over the wall and went into my
cave to escape the rain, but still in great
fear that it would fall upon me.

This led me to a resolve that I would
find a new place for my home, where an
earthquake could not harm me, and I find
this in my journal:

April 22.—I began to consider of means
to put this resolve in execution; but |
was at a great loss about my tools, |
had three large axes, and abundance of
hatchets (for we earried the hatchets for
traffic with the Indians); but with much
chopping and cutting knotty hard wool,
they were all full of notches and dull;
and though I had a grindstone, I coull
not turn it and grind my tools too. Al
length, I contrived a wheel with a string,
to turn it with my foot, that I might han
both my hands at liberty.

Note.—I had not seen any such thing i
England, or at least not to take notice hot
it was done, though since I have observe
it was very common there; besides the
my grindstone was very lange and heavy
This machine cost me a full week's w a
tc bring it to perfection.

April 28, 29.—These two whole a
took up in grinding my tools, my machit
for turning my grindstone performing v i
well.

Aprit 30.—Having perceived my De
had been low a great while, I now took!
survey of it, and reduced myself to 0



ROBINSON CRUSOE.

ves eee PRs eae tae:

Eons a day, which made oO heart |



we pmething lie on the shore like a cask;
when I came to it, I found a small eer
anil two or three pieces of the wreck of the
ghip, which were driven on shore by the
je hurricane; and fooking towards the:
rec ky I thought it seemed to lie higher |

ht of the water than it used to do. Ij
“mined the barrel which was driven
shore, and soon found that it was a bar-
of ae ; but it had taken water, ;
the ee was caked as hard as a|











Or more.

a vhen I came to the ship, I found that
the earthquake or the hurricane had cast it
mo close to the shore that I could walk









‘his aie diverted my thoughts from
ig ny eee and I busied myself

2 L fourd was filled with sand. This
paid uot do, but [resolved to pull her
inora and to that end I worked every |

Macy 4.—I went afishing, but cauzht
one ish that 1 durst eat of, till I was
ary of my sport; when, just going to
ve off, | crmybt a young dolphin, I had
fe nie a long Hine of some rope-yarn, but
ad xo hooks; yet I frequently caught
/euouch, as iach asl cared to eat; all
Which t dred in the sun, and ate them







a3

May 5.—-Worked on reas Ane :

euk

.another beam asunder. and - brought ae
__Jn the morning, looking tewara ; great fir planks from otf the decks, whicn [
side, the tide being low, I saw | tied together, and made swim on shore
when the tide of flood came in.











May 6.—Worked on the wreck; got
several iron bolts, and other pieces of iron
work; worked very hard, and came home
very much tired.

May 7.—Went to the wreck again, witk
an intent not to work, but found the weight
of the wreck had broken itself down; that
several pieces of the ship seemed io lie
loose, and the inside of the hold la 9
open that I could see into #





May 8.—Went to the wreck, and cur-
ried an iron crow to wrench up the deck
which lay now quite clear of the water or
sand. Iwrenched open two planks, and
brought them on shore also with the tide.

May 9.—Went to the wreck, and with
the crow made way into the body of the
wreck, and felt several casks, and loosened
them with the crow, but could not break
them up. I felt also a roll of English
lead, and could stir it, but it was too heavy
to move.

May 10, 11, 12, 13, 14.—Went every
- day to the wreck ; and got a good deal of
pieces of timber, and boards, or planks, and
two or three hundredweight of iron.

May 15.—I carried two hatchets, to try
if I could not cut a piece off the roll of
lead, but as it lay about a foot and a half
in the water, I could not make any blow to
drive the hatchet.

May 16.—It had blown hard in the
night, and the wreck appeared more broken
by the force of the water; but I stayed so
long in the woods, to get pigeons for food,
that the tide prevented me going to the
wreck,

I continued this work every day to the
15th of June, except the time necessary to
get food, which I always appointed, during
this part of my employment, to be when
the tide was up, that I might be ready
when it was ebbed out; and by this time
I had gotten timber, and plank, and iron.
work enough to have built a good boat, if
I had known how; and also I got, at seve-
ral times, and in several pieces, near one
hundredweight of the sheet-lead,

June 16.—Going down to the sea-side, I
found a large tortoise, or turtle. This was



ROBINSON CRUSOE.



the first I had seen, which, it seems, was
only my misfortune; for had i happened
to be on the other side of the island, [
might have had hundreds of them every '
day.

“une 17 U spent in cooking the turtle. 1
found in her threescore eggs; and her flesh.
was to me, at that time, the most savore'
and pleasant that ever I tasted in my life
having had no flesh, but of goats and |
fowls, since I landed in this horrzble place,

June 18,—Rained all theday, and stayed
within. I thought, at this time, the rain
felt coid, and I was something chilly,
which } knew was not usual in that latitude.

June 19.—Very ill, and shivering, as if
the weather had been cold.

June 20.—No rest all night: violent
pains in my head, and feverish.

June 21.—Very ill; frightened almost ta
death with the apprehension of my sad con-
dition—to be sick, and no help; prayed
to God, for the first time since the storia
off of Hull, but scarce knew what I said
or why; my thoughts being all confused.

June 22.—A little better; but under
dreadful apprehensions of sickness,

June 23.—Very bad again; cold ané
shivering, and then a violent headache.

June 24.—Much better.

June 25.—An ague very violent: the fit
held me seven hours; cold fit, and hot with
faint sweats after it,

June 26. — Better; and having
victuals to eat, took my gun, but found my
self very weak; however, I killed a she
goat, and with much difficulty got it home
and broiled some of it, and ate. I woula
fain have stewed it, and made some brei?.
but had no pot,







48



June 2’ —The ague again so violent that
I lay a-bed all day, and neither ate nor
drank. I was ready to perish with thirst ;
but so weak I had no strength to stand up,
or to get myself any: water to drink.
Prayed to God again, but was light-headed ;
and when I was not, I was so ignorant I
knew not what to say; only I lay and
cried, “Lord, look upon me! Lord, pity
me! Lord, have mercy upon me!” I sup-
pose I did nothing else for two or three
hours; till, the fit wearing off, I fell asleep,
and did not awake till far in the night.
When I awoke, I found myself much re-
freshed, but weak, and exceeding thirsty ;
however, as I had no water in my whcle
habitation, I was forced to He till morning,
and went to sleep again. In this second
sleep, I had this terrible dream: I thought

.



that I was sitting on the ground, and that
i saw a man descend from a great black
moud in a bright flame of fire. His
sountenanee was most dreadful, When he

.OBINSON CRUSOE.



stepped cpon the ground, I thought th:
earth trembled, just as it had done in the
earthquake. Then I heard a voice so
terrible that it is impossible to express
the terror of it. All that I. understood
was this :-—* Seeing all these things have
not brought thee to repen‘.uce, now thou
shalt die ;’—at which words, I thought he
lifted up the spear that was in his hand to
Jal] me,

No one that shall ever read this account
will expect that I sheuld be able to de
scribe the horrors of my soul at this terrible
vision. Nor is it any more possible to de:
scribe the impression that remained upon
my mind when I awaked, and found it
was but a dream.

I had, alas! no divine knowledge. What
Y had received from my father had been
worn out by eight. years of seafaring
wickedness. During all that time I had
never thought seriously of God, nor had |
been thankful to Him for His great mer
cies. But now I began to pray for the
first time in many years, after which I fell,
into a refreshing sleep. |

June 28.—Feeling much better, I arose
and cooked three of the turtle’s eggs in
the ashes, and ate them. I tned to walk
about with my gun, but was too weak to;
go far, and I sat down to think. I knew
that the ague would return the next day,
and then I remembered that the Brazilians
took tobacco for such distempers. I had

~ gome tobaceo in one of the chests that |)

had saved, and I went to get it. I was
directed by heaven, no doubt, for I found
in the chest a cure both for soul and body.
Packed in with the tobacco was a Bibl,
which I had forgotten all about, but whid!



ROBINSON CRUSOZ#.
(rege EN a A Le

Â¥ was now overjoyed to find. I took it to
my table and read from it a long time, and |
having taken a dose of tobacco steeped in'|
vum, I went to bed.

‘be next day I had the fever, but not so
Gas, and July 3d I missed it for good and
ali. I was, however, so weak for many |
uays that I could do but ttle more than |
sit at the mouth of my cave and try to
make baskets.

It was the 15th of July that I began to
take a more particular survey of the island
tiself, I went up the creek first, where, as
I ininted, I brought my rafts on shore, I
found, after T came about two miles up,
that the tide did not float any higher; and '
that it was no more than a little brook. }
On iis banks were many meadows covered
with grass, and on the higher parts I found |
tobacco growing. There were many other !
ants that D had never seen before,

On the next day I went farther the same
way, and, much to my joy, found melons
on the ground in great abundance, and |
grapes hanging in great clusters from the ;
branches of the trees, IY staid there all
at night, sleeping in a tree as when Tj
rst landed. In the morning, I traveled on |
nie four miles farther. Here I found a!
licious valley, where everything appeared |
30 fresh and green that it looked like aj
planted garden. Here were orange, lemon,
lime and cocoa trees, but few of them bore
uit, I gathered some green limes, and,
xed with water, I fo ind their juice very
freshing. I resolved to lay up a store of
‘all for the wet season.

wth order to do this, I gathered a great
heap of grapes in one place, a lesser heap

* snother place, and a great pareel of

wt

Xb :
i


























i
i
|
i

se





i
'
i
{



eter Sains

42



imes and lemons in another place: and
aking a few of each with me, I traveled
home, but before I got thither, the grapes
were spoiled; the richness of the fruit, and
the weight of the juice, having broken
them and bruised them, they were good for
little ornothing. .As to the limes, they were
good, but I could bring but a few.

]
4
u
7



nel Pea

The next day I went back, having made
1ne two small bags to brig home my har.
vest; but I was surprised, when, coming to
sty heap of grapes, I found them all spread
abroad, trodden to pieces, and dragged
about, some here, some there, and abund-
ance eaten and devoured, By .this I con-
cluded there were some wild creatures
thereabouts, which had done this; but
what they were I knew not. However, I
took another course; for I gathered » large



BO

quantity of the grapes, and hung them
upon the out branches of the trees, that
they might cure and dry in the sun; and
as for the limes and lemons, I carried as
many back as I could well stand under.

| When I came home from this journey, I
contemplated with great pleasure the fruit-
fulness of that valley, and the pleasantness
of the situation; the security from storm
on that side of the water, and the wood;
and concluded that I had pitched upon a
place to fix my abode, which was by far
the worst part of the country. Upon the
whole, I began to consider of removing my
habitation, and to look out for a place



ROBINSON CRUSOE. |
reece eer cern nee re A CE ‘

equally safe as where now I was situate, if
possible, in that pleasant, fruitful part of
the isiand.

This thought ran long in my head, and
I was exceedingly fond of it for some time,
the pleasantness of the place tempting me ;
but when I came to a nearer view of it, J
considered that I was now by the sea-side,
where it was at least possible that some-
thing might happen to my advantage ;
and that the same ill fate that brought
me hither, might bring some other un.
happy wretches to the same place ; and to
enclose myself among the hills and woods
in the centre of the island, was to antici-
pate my bondage, and to render such an
affair not only improbable, but impossible;
and that therefore I ought not by any
means to remove. .

However, I was so enamored with
this place, that I spent much of my time
there for the whole remaining part of the
month of July; and though, upon second
thoughts, T resolved as above not to remove,
yet I built me a little kind of a bower, and
surrounded it at a distance with a strong
fence, being a double hedge, as high as |
could reach, well staked, and filled between
with brushwood; and here I lay very
secure, sometimes two or three nights to-
gether, always going over it with a ladder
as before; so that I fancied now I had my
country house and my sea-coast house.

The 8rd of August, I found the grapes I
had hung up were perfectly dried, and
indeed were excellent good raisins cf the
sun; so I began to take them down from the
trees, and it was very happy that I did so.
for the rains which followed would have
spoiled them, and I had lost the better part







52 ROBINSON CRUSOE.



wf my winter’s food; for I had above two
hundred large bunches of them. No sooner
ad I taken them al! down, and carried
most of them home to my cave, but it began

to rain; and it rained, more or less, every

day, till the middle of October, and some-
times so violently, that I could not stir out
of my cave for several days.



In this season I was much surprised with
the increase of my family. I had been con-
cerned for the loss of one of my cats, who
yan away from me, and I heard no more
tidings of her, till, to my astonishment, she
eame home about the end of August, with

three kittens. I afterward came to be so
pestered with cats, that I was forced to
kill them like vermin, or wild beasts, and
to drive them from my house as much as
possible.

From the 14th of August to the 26th,
incessant rain, so that I could not stir, and
was now very careful not to be much wet,
dn tlris confinement, I began to be strait
ened for food; but venturing out twice, I
one day killed a goat; and the last day,
which was the 26th, found a very large
sortoise, which was a treat to me, and my



oer,



A oo

food was regulated thus :—I ate < bunch of

raisins for my breakfast; a piece of the

goat’s flesh, or of the turtle, for my dinner,
broiled (for, to my great misfortune, I had
no vessel to boil or stew anything), and
two or three of the turtle’s eggs for supper.

Sept. 30.—I was now come to the un:
happy anniversary of my landing. I cast
up the notches on my post, and found
I had been on shore three hundred and
sixty-five days. I kept this day as asolema
fast, setting it apart for religious exercises,
prostrating myself on the ground with tle

=| most serious humiliation, confessing my

sins to God, acknowledging his righteous
judgment upon me, and praying to him to
have mercy upon me through Jesus Christ;
and having not tasted the least refreshment;
for twelve hours, even till the going dowal
of the sun, I then ate a biscuit-cake and «
bunch of grapes, and went to bed, finishing
the day as I began it. I now set off every!
seventh day as the Sabbath day.

My ink gave out about this time, and I
gave up my journal, After a time I am
how to divide the rainy season from the
dry season, but at first the lack of thi
knowledge came near costing me dear, fo
I sowed my grain before the dry season
and not a stalk came up. Fortunately]
had not sown it all, and I sowed the fev
grains left before the rainy season and i
grew very well, though it was several yean
before I had enough to make a crop. |

After I had found, by experience, the ib
consequences of being abroad in the raitl
I took care to furnish myself with prov);
sions before hand, siat I might not by,
obliged to go oz, and I sat within door,
as much as possible during the wet mouth

r









In this time I found much employment,
and very suitable also to the time, for I
found great oecasion of many things which
I had no way to furnish myself with but
by hard labor and ‘constant application ;

particularly, I had tried many ways to.

make myself a basket, but all the twigs I
could get for the purpose proved so brittle
that they would do nothing.
| It came into my mind that the twigs of
| that tree from whence I cut my stakes that
'grew might possibly be as tough as the
isallows, willows, and osiers in England,
fand I resolved to try. Accordingly, the
next day I went to my country-house, as I
called it, and cutting some of the smaller
twigs, I found them to my purpose as much
as I could desire. During the next season,
I employed myself in making, as well as
I could, a great many baskets, both to

ROBINSON CRUSOE,

83



carry earth or lay up anything, as I had
occasion ; and though I did not finish them
very handsomely, yet I made them sufii-
ciently servicable for my purpose; and
thus, afterwards, I took care never to be
without them; and as my wicker-ware
decayed, I made more, especially strong,
deep baskets to place my corn in, instead of
sacks, when I should come to have any
quantity of it.

I now resolved to travel quite across to
the other side of the island, so, taking a
hatchet with my gun and dog, and a larger
quantity of powder and shot than usual,
and putting a great bunch of raisins and

_two biscuit cakes in my pouch, I began

my journey.

I saw abundance of parrots, and fain
would I have caught one, if possible, te
have kept it to be tame, and taught i te





5a



speak to me. I did, after some painstak-
ing, catch a young parrot, for I knocked it
down with a stick, and having recovered
- it, I brought it heme; but it was some
‘years before I could make him speak;
however, at last, I taught him to call me
‘by my name very familiarly.
ih iii
ne














As soon as I came to the seashore, I was
surprised to see that I had taken up my
jot on the worst side of the island, for
here, indeed, the shore was covered with
innumerable turtles, whereas, on the other
side, I had found but three in a year and
a half. Here was also an infinite number
of fowls of many kinds, some of which I
had not seen before, and many of them
very good meat, but such as I knew not
the names of, except those called penguins.

T could have shot as many as I pleased,
~ but was very sparing of my powder and
shot, and therefore had more mind to kill
a she-goat, if I could, which I could better
feed on; and though there were many
goats here, more than on the other side of
the island, yet it was with much more
difficulty that I could come near them,

I confess this side of the country was




ROBINSON CRUSOE.

much pleasanter than mine; but yet I had
not the least inclination to remove, for, as
I was fixed in my habitation, it became
natural to me, and I seemed all the while
I was here to be as it were upon a jour.
ney, and from home. However, I trav.
eled along the shore of the sea towards
the east, I suppose about twelve miles, and
then setting up a great pole upon the shore
for a mark, I concluded I would go home
again.

I took another way going home, and
became bewildered and lost, so that I had
to go back to my post and start again. In

[||| this journey, my dog surprised a kid, which

I caught and led by a string till I came te
my bower, where I left him, securely tied.
I cannot express my satisfaction when |
came to what I called my home and threw
myself in my hammock. I had been gone
a month, and it all appeared so comfortable
that I resolved never to leave it for so long
a time again, while I remained on the
island,

It was now that I began sensibly to feel
how much more happy the life I now led
was, with all its miserable circumstances
than the wicked, abominable life I led all
the past part of my days; and now having
changed both my sorrows and my joys:
my very desires altered, and my delights
were perfectly new f--m what they we
at first coming.

Before, as I walked about, either on 1
hunting, or for viewing the country, tl
anguish of my soul at my condition woull
break out upon me on a sudden, and J
very heart would die within me, to think
of the woods, the mountains, the deserts!
was in, and how I was a prisoner, locked



ROBINSON CRUSOE. 53



up with the eternal bars and bolts of the | would go off, and the grief having ex-
ocean, in an uninhabited wilderness, with: } hausted itself would abate. |
out redemption, In the midst of the! But now I began to exercise myself;
greatest composures of my mind, this} with new thoughts. I daily read the Word
would break out upon me like a storm, | of God, and applied all the comforts of it
and make me wring my hands, and weep | to my present state. One morning, being



like a child. Sometimes it would take me| very sad, I opened the Bible upon these
in the middle of my work, and I would sit | words, “I will never leave thee, never for-
down and sigh, and look upon the ground | sake thee.” Immediately it occurred that
for an hour or two together; and this| these words were to me; why otherwise
was still worse to me, for if I could burst | should they be directed in such a manner,
out into tears, or vent myself by words, it | just at the moment when I was mournivg



88



over my condition, as one forsaken of God
and man? “ Well, then,” said I, “if God



ROBINSON CRUSOE.





“

mind at that thought, and I durst not
speak the words. “ Tow canst thou become

does not forsake me, of what ill conse- | such a hypocrite,” said I, even audibly, “to
quence cen it be, or what matters it, though | pretend to be thankful for a condition,



which, however
thou mayst en.
deavor to be eo.
tented with, thou
wouldst rather
pray heartily to.
delivered from?”
So I stopped
there; but though
I could not say |
thanked God for
being there, yet
I sincerely gave
thanks to God foi
opening my eyes
by whatever afflict
Ing providences
to see the forme:
condition of my
life, and to mourn
for my wickednes:
and repent.

Thus I began
my third year. |
was seldom idle,
dividing my tim:

the world should all forsake me seeing, on | according to my daily employments, such 2s

the other hand, if I had all the \vorld, and
should lose the favor and blessing of God,
shere would be no comparison in the loss?”

from this moment I began to conclude
on my mind that it was possible for me to
“e bappy in this forsaken, solitary condi.
on; and I was going to give thanks to
itod for bringing me to this place. [know
sat what it was, but something shocked my

first, my duty to God, and the reading th
Scriptures, which I always set apart som
time for, thrice every day; secondly, the
going abroad with my gun for food, whic
generally took up three hours in every
morning, when it did not rain; thirdly,
the ordering, curing, preserving and coo
ing what I had killed or caught for wy
supply. These took up great part of tle







58

day. Also, it
the middle of the day, when the sun was
in the zenith, the violence of the heat was
too great to stir out; so that about four
hours in the evening was all the time I
could: be supposed to work in, with this
exception, that sometimes I changed my
hours of hunting and working, and went



to work in the morning, and abroad with !

my gun in the afternoon.

While in-doors, during the rains, I talked
much to my parrot, which now learned her
own name and seemed to repeat it for my
diversion, as it pleased me greatly.

I was now in the months of November
and December, expecting my crop of barley
and rice. The eae I had dug up for



them was not great; for my seed of each
“was not above half a peck, for I had lost
ne whole crop by sowing in the dry sea-
son; but now my crop promi very well,
when on a sudden I found I was in danger

ROBINSON CRUSOE.

‘ \ Ag .

is to be considered, that in | of losing it all again by enemies of sever)



sorts, which it was scarcely possible to keey
from it; as, first the goats, and wild crea,
tures which I calted hares, which, tasting
the sweetness of the blade, eat it so clos: .
that it could get no time to shoot up inte
stalk, |
This I saw no remedy for, but making
an inclosure about it with a hedge, which! |
did with a great deal of toil, and the mony
because it required a great deal of speed :
the creatures daily spoiling my corn. Hoy
ever, as my arable land was but small
suited to my crop, I got .it totally wel
fenced in about three weeks’ times ani
shooting some of the creatures in the dy
time, I set my dog to guaru it in the nigh:
tying him up to a stake at the gate, wher
he would stand and bark all night lone; s
in a little time the enemies forsook th —
place, and the corn grew very strong ail
well. ee
But now I had even greater trouble { —
keep the birds from eating all of th —
ripening grain. I finally shot three (¢
them, and hung them up as scarecrow
This el the effact I desired, and kept th
birds away. In the }atter pra of Decet :
ber I reaped my corn. Fee
I was sadly put to it for a scytheg, a
sickle to cut it down, and all I could i
was to make one, as well as I could, outi ‘
one of the broad-swords, or cutlass!
| which I saved among the arms out of tl
ship. However, as my crop was bi :
small I had no great difficulty to cut! te
down; in short, I reaped it in my way, fi fi C a
I cut nothing off but the ears, and carrit
it away in a great basket which I
made, and so rubbed it out with my ban























ROBINSON CRUSOE. by



and at the end of all my harvesting, I
found that out of my half-peck of seed I
had near two bushels of rice, and above
two bushels and a-half of barley; that is
sto say, by my guess, for I had no measure
‘at that time.

I had long studied, by some means or
other, to make myself some earthen vessels,
which, indeed, I wanted sorely. I did not
doubt but if I could find out any clay, I
might botch up some such pot as might,
being dried by the sun, be hard enough
and strong enough to bear handling, and
to hold anything that was dry, and re-
quired to be so; and as this was necessary
in preparing corn, meal, &c., which was
the thing that I was upon, I resolved to
make some as large as I could, and fit only
to stand like jars, to hold what should be
put into them.

It would make the reader pity me, or
rather laugh at me, to tell how many awk-
ward ways I took to raise this paste ; what
odd, misshapen, ugly things I made; how
many of them fell in, and how many fell
out—the clay not being stiff enough to
bear its own weight; how many cracked

by the over-violent heat of the sun, being |:

set out too hastily; and how many fell to
pieces with only removing, as well before
as after they were dried; and, in a word,
how, after having labored hard to find the
clay—to dig it, to temper it, to bring it
home, and work it—I could not make
above two large earthen ugly things (I can-
not call them jars) in about two months
labor,
However, as the sun baked these two
- very dry and hard, I lifted them very
gently up, and set them down again in two

great wicker baskets, which I had made on
purpose for them, that they might not
break.

Though miscarried so much in my design
for large pots, yet I made several smaller
things with better success; such as little
round pots, flat dishes, pitchers and pipkins,
and anything my hand turned to; and the
heat of the sup baked them strangely hard.



But all this would not answer my end,
which was to get an earthen pot to hold
what was liquid, and bear the fire; which
none of these could do, It happened after
some time, making a pretty large fire for

-cooking my meat, when I went to put it

out after I had done with it, I] found a
broken piece of one of my earthenware ves-
sels in the fire, burnt as hard as a stone,



M

and red as a tile. I was agreeably surprised
to see it, and said to myself that certainly
they might be made to burn whole, if they
weuld burn broken. ;

This set me to study how to order my
fre so as to make it burn me some pots, I
had no notion of a kiln, such as the potters
burn in, or of glazing them with lead,
though I had some lead to do it with; but
I placed three large pipkins, two or three







pots, in a pile, one upon another, and placed
my firewood all round it, with a heap of
embers under them. I plied the fire with

fresh fuel round the outside and upon the.

top, till I saw the pots in the inside red-hot
quite through, and observed thet they did
not crack at all; when I saw them clear
red, I let them stand in that heat about
five or six hours, till I found one of them,
though it did nos crack, did melt or run;
for the sand which was mixed with the
clay melted with the violence of the heat,
and would have run into glass if I had
gone on, SoIslacked my fire gradually till
the pots began to abate of the red color,
wnd watching them all night, that I might

ROBINSON CRUSOE.



not let the fire abate too fast, in the mort.
ing I had three very good (I will not say
handsome) pipkins, and. two other earthen
pots, as hard burnt as could be desired, and
one them perfectly glazed with the running
of the sand.

After this experiment, I wanted neo sort
of earthenware for my use; but I must
needs say as to the shapes of them they
were very indifferent, as any one may sup
pose, when I had no way of making them,
but as the children make dirt pies, or as 4
woman would make pies tha never learned
to raise paste,

I now thought to dig out a stone, and
make myself a mortar; but, after searching
a long while I could find no stone hard
enough, as all the rocks on the island were
soft and crumbling. I got instead a great
block of hard wood, and with much labor
T rounded the outside, and then, with the
help of fire, made a hollow place in it, as
the Indians in Brazil make their canoes
Then I made a heavy pestle of iron-weod,
and laid them both by till I had my next
crop of corn to grind or pound into flour
With some muslin taken from the ship, |
made some very good sieves.

The baking part was the next thing te
be considered, but I managed this fe
I made some hollow earthen vessels, which
served as hearths, In there I built
fires, Then, raking the ashes and ember
off clean, I put in my loaves and covers
them with earthen jars.

All the while these things were doing
you may be sure my thoughts ran many
times upon the land which I had. seen
from the other side of the island; and |
was net without secret wishes that [ wat

‘ot





on shor there, fancying that I might find
some way or other to convey myself far-
ther, and perhaps at last find some means
of escape.
- But all this while I made no allowance
for the dangers of such a condition, and
how I might fall into the hands of say-
‘ages, and perhaps such as I might have
season to think far worse than the lions
and tigers of Africa; that if I once came
into their power I should run a hazard of
being killed, and perhaps of being eaten;
for I had heard that the people of the
Caribbean coasts were cannibals, or men-
eaters, and I knew by the latitude, that I
eould not be far off from that shore. All
these things, I say, which I ought to have
eonsidered well of, and I did cast up in
my thoughts afterwards, yet took up none
oi my apprehensions at first, nd my head
tan mightily upon the thought of getting
over to that shore.
Now, I wished for my boy Xury and
the long-boat, with the shoulder-of-mutton
“sail, with which I sailed above a thousand
miles on the coast of Africas but this was
invain. Then I thought I would go and
took at our ship’s boat, which was blown
up upon the shore a great way, in the
Storm, when we were first cast away. She
day almost where she did at first, but not
quite, and was turned, by the force of the
Waves and the winds, almost bottom up-
Ward, against the high ridge of rough
sand, but no water about her as before.
{f Thad had hands to have refitted her,
and to have launched her into the water,









bruis with her. easily enough; bat I!

ROBINSON

CRUSOE,



might have easily foreseen that I could no
more turn her and set her upright upon
her bottom, than I could remove the
island ; however, I went to the wood, and
cut levers and rollers, md brought them to
the boat, resolved to try what I could do.

I spared no pains, indeed, in this piece
of fruitless toil, and spent, I think, three
or four weeks about it; at last, finding it
impossible to heave it up with my little
strength, I fell to digging away the sand,
to undermine it, and so to make it fall
down, setting pieces of wood to thrus:
and guide it right in the fall. —

But I was unable to stir it, or to vs *



#23 ROBINSON CRUSOE.



under it, much less to move it forward to-
wards the water; so I was forced to give
it over; and yet, though I gave over the
hopes a the boat, my desire to venture
over for the mainland increased.



“* “upon thinking whether
it was not possible to make myself a
canoe, or periagua, such as the natives of
those climates make, even without tools,
or, as I might say, without hands—viz.,
of the trunk of a great tree. This I not
only thought possible, but easy, and pleased
myself extremely with my thoughts of
making it, and with my having much more
convenience for it than any of the Negroes
or Indians; but not at all considering the
particular inconveniences which I lay
under more than the Indians did, viz.,
want of hands to move it into the water
when it was made.

I went to work upon this boat the most
like a foo] that ever man did, who had any
of his senses awake. I pleased myself
with the design, without determining
whether I was ever able to undertake it;
not but that the difficulty of launching my
boat came often into my head; but I put
a stop to my inquiries into it, by this
foolish answer which I gave myself; “Let
me first make it; I warrant I shall find
some way to get it along when it is done.”



This at length set me-

This was a most preposterous method ;
but the eagerness of my fancy prevailed,
and to work I went, and felled a cedar:
tree, I question much whether Solomoz
ever had such a one for the building the |
Temple of Jerusalem. It was five feet ten
inches diameter at the lower part, and four
feet eleven inches diameter at the end of
twenty-two feet; after which it lessened
for a while, and then parted into branches,
It was not without infinite labor that I
felled this tree. J was twenty days hack.
ing and hewing at it at the bottom; I was
fourteen more getting the branches and
limbs and the vast spreading head of it cut
off, which I hacked and hewed through
with my axe and hatchet. After this, it
cost me a month to shape it to something
like the bottom of a boat. It cost me
near three months more to clear the inside,
and work it out so as to make an exact
boat of it. This I did, indeed, without fire,
by mere mallet and chisel, and by the dint
of hard labor, till I had brought it to be a
very handsome periagua, and big enough
to have carried six-and-twenty men.

When I had gone through this work, I
was extremely delighted with it. The
boat was really much bigger than ever I
saw a canoe or periagua, that was made of
one tree, in my life. Many a weary stroke
it had cost, you may be sure—for there
remained nothing but to get it into the
water; and had I gotten it into the water,
I make no question, but I should have
begun the maddest voyage, and the most
unlikely to be performed that ever was
undertaken,

But all my devices to get it into the
water failed me. It lay about one hur

t



Se tae 4
Pie ee = a

ae =
SE

4

ie
ay
i : A

y
A VZ

Uy
14
y

Mii





64



dred yards from the water, and not more;
but the first inconvenience was, it was up
hill towards the creek, Well, to take
away this discouragement, I resolved to
dig into the surface of the earth, and so
make a declivity. This I began, and it
cost me a prodigious deal of pains (but
who grudge pains that have their deliver-
anee in view ?); but when this was worked
through, and this difficulty managed, it was
still much at one, for I could no more stir
the canoe than J could the other boat.
Then I measured the distance of ground,
and resolved to cut a dock or canal, to
bring the water up to the canoe, seeing I
could not bring the canoe down to the
water. IT began this work, but upon cal.
culating the amount of digging and what
I could do in a day, I found it would take
twelve years to finish it, so I was obliged
to abandon it,

In the middle of this work I finished my
fourth year in this place, and kept my anni-
versary with the same devotion, and with
as much comfort as ever before; for, by
a constant study and serious application of
the Word of God, and by the assistance of
His grace, I gained a different knowledge
from what 1 had before. I looked now
upon the world as a thing remote, which I
had nothing to do with, no expectation
from, and, indeed, no desire about; in a
word, I had nothing indeed to do with it,
nor was ever likely to have.

The next thing to my ink being wasted,
was that of my bread, I mean the biscuit
which I brought out of the ship. This I
had husbanded to the last degree, allowing
myself but one cake of bread a day for
above a year; and yet I was quite without

ee

ROBINSON CRUSOE.
OCD EEE OCC CCI COL EL AL LC LL A TTC,

bread for a year before [ got any corn of
my own.

My clothes, too, began to decay mightily ;:
as to lmen, I had had zone for a good
while, except some shirts which I had found
in the chests of the other seamen, and
which I carefully preserved ; because many
times I could bear no other clothes on but
a shirt; and it was a very great help
to me that I had, among all the men’s
clothes of the ship, almost three dozen
of shirts. There were also several thick
watch-coats of the seamen’s, which were
left behind, but they were too hot to wear:
so I set to work, tailoring, or rather, indeed,
botching, for I made most piteous work of
it. However, I made shift to make two or
three waiscoats, which I hoped would serve
me a great while; as for breeches or
drawers, I made but a very sorry shift till
afterwards.

I have mentioned that I saved the skins
of all the creatures that I killed, I mean
four-footed ones, and I had hung them up
stretched out with sticks in the sun, br
which means some of them were so dry and
hard that they were fit for little, but other
it seems, were very useful. The first thing
made of these was a great cap for my heal,
with the hair on the outside, to shoot af
the rain; and this performed so well, thi
after, I made me a suit of clothes wholly ¢
those skins. I must not omit to acknov
ledge they were wretchedly made; for if!
was a bad carpenter, I was a worse tailoi
However, they were such as J made a ver!
good shift with, and when I was abroad, !
it happened to rain, the hair ef the wails
coat.and cap bemg outermost, E was ker

very dry.



ROBINSON CRUSOL.
—— OO. oO -

After this, I'ispent a great deal of time
and pains to make an umbrella, I was, in-
deed, in great need of one, and had a great
mind to make one. I had seen them made
in the Brazils, where they are very useful
in the great heats which are there, and I
felt the heats every jot as great here, and
greater too, being nearer the equinox; be-
sides, as I was obliged to be much abroad,

65



it spread, but if it did not let down too,
and draw in, it would not be portable for
me any way but just over my head, which
would not do, However, at last, as I said,
I made one to answer. I covered it with

skins, the hair upwards, so that it east off
the rain like a pent-house, and kept off
the sun so effectually, that I could walk
outiin the hottest of the

weather with,

4



it was a most useful thing to me, as well
for the rams as the heats. I took a world
of pains at it, and was a great while before
I could mak» anything likely to hold: nay,
after I thougat I had hit the way, I spoiled
two or three before I made one to my mind.
But at last I made one that answered indit-
ferently well; the main difficulty I found
was to make it to let down. I could make

greater advantage than I could before in
the coolest.

Thus I lived mighty comfortably, my
mind being entirely composed by resigning
to the will of God, and throwing myself
wholly upon the disposal of His providence.
This made my life better than sociable, for
when I began to regret the want of conver:
sation, I would ask myself whether thus



66



gonversing mutually with my own thoughts,
and (as I hope I may say) with even my
Maker, by ejaculations and petitions, was
not better than the utmost enjoyment of
human society in the world ?

I cannot say that, after this, for five |

years, any extraordinary thing happened to
me, but I lived on in the same course, in
the same posture and place, just as before.
The chief thing [ was employed in, besides
my yearly labor of planting my barley and
rice, and curing my raisins—of both which
I always kept up just enough to have
sufficient stock of the year’s provision
beforehand—I had one labor, to make me
a canoe, which at last I finished ; so that,
by digging a canal to it of six feet wide
and four feet deep, I brought it into the
creek, almost half a mile.

In building this boat I was wiser than
in building my larger one, and I built it
small enough to get to the sea. I was near
two years in building it, but I never
grudged my labor, in Hone of nae a
boat to go off to sea at last.

However, though my little periagua was
finished, yet the size of it was not at all
answerable to the design which I had in
view when I made the first; I mean of
venturing over to the mainland, so that
design was given over for the present. As
{ had a boat, my next design was to make
a tour round the island.

For this purpose, I fitted up a little mast
in my boat, and made a sail to it out of
some of the little pieces of the ship’s sails
which lay in store. I tried the boat, and
found she would sail very well. Then I
made little lockers or boxes at éach end to
put provisions, ammunition, etc, to be

ROBINSON CRUSOE.

kept dry, either from rain or the spray of
the sea. I made also, a little, long, hollow
place where I could lay my gun, making a
flap to hang down over it to keep it dry.
I fixed my umbrella at the stern, to stand
over my head like an awning. All now
being ready, I loaded my ship for the voy-
age, putting in two dozen loaves of barley
bread, an earthen pot full of parched
rice, a little bottle of rum, and half a goat,
powder and shot for my gun, and two
large coats, one to lie upon and one to
cover me in the night, and thus I set sail.

When I came to the east side of the
island, I found a great ledge of rocks lie
out about two leagues into the sea, and be-
yond that a shoal of sand lying half a
league more. J was afraid to go so far out
to sea, for fear Ef could not get back again,
so I anchored my boat, and, taking my
gun, went on shore and climbed a big hill,
to get a view of the other side of the
ledge.

From the hill I perceived a strong and
intricate current, which would be very
likely to prevent me from being able to
make the island again. And, indeed, had
I not got first upon this hill, I believe it
would have been so; for there was the
same current on the other side of the
island, only that it set off at a farther dis-
tance, and I saw there was a strong eddy
under the shore; so I had nothing to do
but to get out of the first current, and }
should presently be in an eddy.

I lay here, however, two days, because,
the wind blowing pretty fresh at E.S.L.,,
and that being just contrary to the current,
made a great breach of the sea upon the
point; so that it was not safe for me to



ROBINSON CRUSOE.

keep too close to the shore for the breach,
nor to go too far off, because of the stream.

‘The third day, in the morning, the wind
having abated overnight, the sea was calm,
and I ventured. But I ama warning-piece
to all rash and ignorant pilots; for no
Sooner was I come to the point, when I
was not even my boat’s length from the
shore, but I found myself in a great depth
of water, and a current like the sluice of
amill, It carried my boat along with it

ce



with such violence that all I could de
could not keep her so much as on the edge ©
of it; but I found it hurried me farther
and farther out from the eddy, which was
on my left hand. There was no wind
stirring-to help me, and all that I could do
with my paddles signified nothing. And
now I began to give myself over for lost; '
for as the current was on both sides of the
island, I, knew in a few leagues’ distance
they must join again, and then I was inve-







coverably gone; so that
~ > T had no prospect be-
fore me but of perishing, not by the sea,
for that was calm enough, but of starving
from hunger. I had, indeed, found a tor-
tois3 on the shore, as big almost as I could
lift, and had tossed it into the boat; and I
had a great jar of fresh water, that is to
say, one of my earthen pots; but what
was all this to being driven into the vast
ocean, where, to be sure, there was no
shore, no mainland or island, for a thous:
and miles at least 2

And now I saw how easy it was for the
providence of God to make the most mis.
erable condition that mankind could be in
worse. Now I looked back upon my deso-
late, solitary island as the most pleasant
_ place in the world, and all the happiness
_my heart could wish for was to be there
again. I stretched out my hands to it,
with eager wishes. “O happy desert!”
said I,“I shall never see thee more. O
miserable creature! whither am I goings?

I still worked hard to get my boat out
vf the current. About noon, a breeze
sprang up from the 8. 8. E., which cheered
my heart a little, and especially when, in
about half an hour more, it blew a pretty
small, gentle gale. By this time, I had
got at a frightful distance from the island;
and had the least cloudy or hazy weather
intervened, I had beer undone another |

ROBINSON CRUSOE.

way, too; for I had no compass on board,
and should never have known how to have
steered towards the island, if I had but
once lost sight of it. But the weather
continuing clear, I applied myself to get
up my mast again, and spread my sail,
standing away to the north as much as
possible, to get out of the current.

I made such good headway that I soon
found an eddy which carried me about a
league on my way back. The wind con-
tinuing fair, I continued to near the island
and soon got to land. When I was on
shore, I fell on my knees and gave God
thanks for my deliverance. After which, I
drew my boat into a little cove under some
trees, and laid me down to sleep, being
quite spent with the fatigue of the voyage,
which I resolved not to repeat.

IT was now at a great loss which way to
get home with my boat. I had runso much
hazard, and knew too mueh of the case, to °
think of attempting it by the way I went
out; and what might be at the other side I
knew not, norhad I any mind to run any
more ventures. So I resolved, on the next
morning, to make my way westward along
the shore, and to see if there was no creek |
where I might lay up my frigate in safety,
so as to have her again, if I wanted her.
Tn about three miles, coasting the shore, I
came to a very good inlet or bay, about
mile over, which narrowed till it came to,a
very little rivulet or brook, where I found
a very convement harbor for my bont
Here I put in, and, having stored my baat
very safe, I went on shore to look abut
me, and see where I was.

I soon found I had but a little passed | by
the place where I had been before, =

i

‘< \
; i



4

ROBINSUN CRUSOE. 49.

- 5 eae sey ee

¢ravelled on foot to that shore; so, taking
nothing out of my boat but my gun and
umbrella, for it was exceedingly hot, I
began my march. The way was comfort.
able enough after such a voyage as I had
been upon, and I reached my old bower in
the, evening, where I found everything
standing as I left *t.

I got over the feuce, and laid me down
to rest my limbs, for I was
very weary, and fell asleep.
But judge you, if you can,
what a surprise I must have
been in when I was awaked
out of my sleep by a voice,
calling me by my name sev-
eral times: “Robin, Robin,
Robin Crusoe! poor Robin
Crusoe! Where are you,
Robin Crusoe? Where are
you? Where have you’
been ?”

I was so dead asleep at
first, being fatigued with
rowing the first part of the
day and walking the latter
part, that I did not awake
thoroughly; and dozing be-
tween sleeping and waking,
thought I dreamed that
somepody spoke to me; but
as the voice continued to
repeat, “Robin Crusoe!
Robin Crusoe!” at last I
began to awake more per-
fectly, and was at first
dreadfully frightened, and
starte. up in the utmost
consternation, No sooner
were my eyes open, but I

f
8
&

ETL [] oe ssawernennrenas HR ATT



saw my poll sitting on the top of the
hedge, and immediately knew that it wa-,
he that spoke to me; for just in such
bemoaning language I had used to tals
to him and teach him.

However, even though I knew it was the
parrot, and that indeed it could be nobody
else, it was a good while before I could
compose myself. Holding out my hand,



ES



and calling him by his name, “ Poll,” the
sociable creature came to me, and sat upon

my thumb, as he used to do, and continued |

talking to me, “Poor Robin Crusoe! and
how did I come here! and where had I
been ?” just as if he had been overjoyed to
see me again; and so | carried him home
along with me.

T had now enough of rambling to sea for
some time, and enough to do for many days
to sit still and reflect upon the danger I



had been in. I would have been very glad
te have had my boat again on my side of
the island; but I knew not how it was
practicable to get it about. As to the east
side of the island, which I had gone round,
J knew well enough there was no ventur-
ing that way ; my very heart would shrink
and my very blood run chill, but to
think of it; and as to the other side of the
island, I knew there was a current there
quite as dangerous.

2 began to think now what I should do
for goat’s fesh when my powder should be
jall gone. To make provision for this, I set
traps, and caught some young kids, which
I tamed, keeping them in a large enclosure,
securely fenced about. It would have
made a stoic smile to see me and my little
family sit down to dinner. There was my

ROBINSON CRUSOE.



island. I had the lives of all my subjects
at absolute command; I could hang, draw.
give life and liberty and take it away, and
no rebels among all my subjects. Then to
see how like a king I dined too, all alone,
attended by my servants! Poll, as if he
had been my favourite, was the only per:
son permitted to talk to me; my dog, who
was now grown very old and crazy, sat
always at my right hand; and two cats,
one on one side the table, and one on the
other, expecting now and then a bit from
my hand, as a mark of special favor.

I wanted the use of my boat very much,
but I was very loth to run any more risk
at sea. One day I resolved to go by land
to the little hill on the other side where ]
had observed how the shore lay and the
current set, and so I started, following the
edge of the shore. Had any of the people
of England met me at that time, I should
either have frightened them or raised a
great deal of laughter. °

I had a great, high shapeless cap, made
of goat’s skin, with a flap hanging down
behind, as well to keep the sun from me as
to shoot the rain off from running into my
neck; nothing being so hurtful in these
climates as the rain upon the flesh under
the clothes,

I had a short jacket of goat’s skin, the
skirts coming down to about the middle
of the thighs, and a pair of open-kneed
breeches of the same. The breeches were
made of the skin of an old he-goat, y7hose
hair hung down such a length on either
side, that, tike pantaloons, it reached to the
middle of my legs. Stockings and shoes |
had none, but had made me a pair of some

majesty, the prince and Jord of the whole | things, I scarce know what to call them,

















































































#2 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

like buskins, to flap over my legs, and lace | my head a great, clumsy, ugly goat-ski
on either side like spatterdashes, but of a| umbrella, but which, after all, was the





most barbarous shape, as indee* were.all
the rest of my clothes.

I had on a broad belt of goat’s skin
dried, which I drew together with two
thongs of the same, instead of buckles;
and in a kind of a frog on either side of
this, instead of a sword and dagger, hung
a little saw and a hatchet, one on one side,
one on the other. I had another belt not
so broad, and fastened in the same manner,
which hung over my shoulder; and at the
end of it, under my left arm, hung two
pouches, both made of goat’s skin too, in
one of which hung my powder, in the
other my shot. At my back I carried my

most necessary thing I had about me next
to ny gun.

When I reached the hill, I found the sea
quite still, which convinced me that the
current was formed by the ebb and flow
of the tide. Still I resolved to leave the
boat for use on that side of the island, and
to make me another boat to use on my
home side,

It happened one day, about noon, going
towards my boat, I was exceedingly sur-
prised with the print of a man’s naked foot
on the shore, which was very plain to be
seen on the sand, I stood like one thun.
derstruck, or as if I had seen an appar.

basket, on my shoulder my gun, and over jition. I listened, I Jooked around me, but





ROBINSON CRUSOE. | 7

car



J could hear nothing, nor see anything; I
went up to a rising ground, to look far.
ther; I went up the shore, and down the
shore, but it was all one; I could see no
other impression but that one. I went to
it again to see if there were any more, and
to observe if it might not be my fancy;
but there was no room for that, for there
was exactly the print of a foot—toes, heel,
and every part of a foot. How it came
thither I knew not, nor could in the least
imagine. But after innumerable fluttering
thoughts, like a man perfectly confused
and out of myself, I came home to my for-
tification, not feeling,
as we say, the ground
I went on, but terti-
fed to the last de.
gree, looking behind
me at every two or
three steps, mistaking
every bush and tree,
and fancying every
stump at a distance
‘to bea man, Norisit
possible to describe
how many various
shapes my affrighted
imagination represent-
ed things to me in;
how many wild ideas
were formed every
moment in my faney,
and what strange un-
accountable whimseys
came into my thoughts
by the way.

When I came to
my castle (for so I
think I called it ever

after this), I fled into it like one pur
sued. Whether I went over by tre
ladder, as first contrived, or went in at
the hole in the roc’, which I called a
door, I cannot remember ; for never frighted
hare fled to cover, or fox to earth, with
more terror >of mind than I did to this
retreat.

IT had no sleep that night, but Jay
trembling with fright and thinking who or
what it could be that had visited the
island. I fancied all sorts of things, but
finally concluded that some of the savages
of the main land had been there, and this





74



did not in the least allay my fear, for after-
wards I was in constant dread that I
should meet them, When milking my
goats or gathering my fruit, if I heard the
least noise, I was ready to drop every:
‘thing and flee to my house.

| Now I began sorely to repent that I had
dug my cave so large as to bring a door
through again beyond where my fortifica-
tion joined to the rock. Therefore I re-
solved to draw me a second fortification, in
the same manner of a semicircle, at a dis-
tance from my wall, just where I had
planted a double row of trees about twelve
years before, These trees having been planted
so thick before, there wanted but few piles
to be driven between them, and my wall
would be soon finished. So that I had
now a double wall; and my outer wall
was thickened with pieces of timber, old



ROBINSON CRUSOE.

cables, and everything I could 4

of to make it strong, having in it sex
little holes, about as big as I might 1)
my arm out at. In the inside of this
thickened my wall to about ten feet thii
continually bringing earth out of my ca
and laying it at the foot of the wall, @
walking upon it; and through the sey
holes I contrived to plant the muskets |
cannon, so I could fire all the seven guns
two minutes’ time. This wall I was ma
a weary month in finishing, and yet ner
thought myself safe till it was done.
Then I planted the ground without

full of trees as could well stand and gw
so that, in two years’ time, I had a grove
thick that no one would ever imagine thet
was any human habitation beyond {
While I was doing this I thought much}
the safety of my goats; so I made a strw







































































ROBINSON CEISOR.



rere,
enciosure in a retired part of vhe island,
and removed to it ten she-goats and two
he-goats and left them there.

One day as I wandered more to the west
part of the island, being ona hill, I thought
T saw a boat far out at sea, but I was not
sure. On coming down from the hill, I
‘was confounded and amazed to see the
shore spread with skulls and other bones of
human bodies. There was a place where
a fire had been made, and a cirele dug in
the earth, where I supposed the savage
wretches had sat down to their inhuman
feast. When I recovered from my horror
at such a sight, I began to thank God that
I was cast ashore upon a part of the island
that was not visited by the cannibals.

In this frame of thankfulness, I went
home to my eastle, and began to be much
easier now, as to the safety of my cireum-
stances, than ever I was before: for I
observed that these wretches never came to
this island in search of what they could
get; perhaps not seeking, not wanting, or
not expecting, anything here; and having
often, no doubt, been up in the covered,
Woody part of it, without finding anything
to their purpose. I knew I had been here
now almost eighteen years, and never saw
the least footsteps of human creature there
before; and J might be eighteen years
tore as entirely concealed as I was now, if
I did not discover myself to them, which I
had no manner of occasion to do; it being
my only business to keep myself entirely
concealed where I was, unless I found a
better sort of creatures than cannibals to
make myself known to. Yet I entertained
such an abhorrence of the Savage wretches
that I have been speaking of, and of the





—





wretened inhuman custom of their devour.
ing and eating one another up, that I con-
tinued pensive and sad, and kept close
within my own circle for almost two years
after this, When I say my own circle, I
mean by it my three plantations, viz, my
castle, my country-seat (which I called my
bower), and my enelosure in the woods:
nor did I look after this for any other use
than as an enclosure for my goats; for the
aversion Which nature gave me to these
wretches was such, that I did not so much
as go to look after my boat in all this time,
but began rather to think of making me








another; for I could not think of ever
making any more attempts to bring the
other boat round the island to me, lest I
should meet with some of those creatures
at sea; in which case, if I had happened to
have fallen into their hands, I knew what
would have been my lot.

Night and day, I could think of nothing
now but how I might destroy some of
these monsters, and, if possible, save the
victim they should bring hither to destroy.
It would take up a larger volume than this
whole work is intended to be, to set down
all the contrivances I hatched, or rather
brooded upon, in my thoughts, for the

ROBINSON CRUSOE.

destroying of th
creatures, or at le
frightening them 80
to prevent their co
hither any more. j
all was abortive; n
ing could be possi
to take effect, unles
was to be there to
it myself; and wh
could one man
among them, wk
perhaps there mi
be twenty or thirty
them, together wi
their darts, or thi
bows and arrows, wi
which they probab
could shoot as true{
a mark as I could wi














my gun?
Sometimes a a
of digging a hd

under the place whe
they made their
and putting in five or six pounds of
powder, which, when they kindled th
fire, would consequently take fire, and bla.
up all that was near it: but as, in the
place, I should be unwilling to -waste
much powder upon them, my being nf
within the quantity of one barrel, so nae
could I be sure of its going off at any
tain time, when it might surprise the
and, at best, that it would do little mo
‘tian just blow the fire about their ears alt
fright them, but not sufficient to mu
them forsake the place; so I laid it asi
I continually made my tour every mot
ing to the top of the hill, which was ft
















#8 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

of my business which required fire, such
as burning of pots and pipes. ete, inti
my new apartment in the woods; where
after I had been some time, I found, to
my unspeakable consolation, a mere nat
ural cave in the earth, which went in 4
vast way, and where, I dare say, no savy
age, had he been at ihe mouth of it, would
be so hardy as to venture in; nor, indeed,
would any man else, but one who, like me

observe any boats upon the sea, coming near | Wanted nothing so much as a sate retreat
the island, or standing over towards it; but | On entering with a lighted torch, I stum
I began to tire of this hard duty, after I | bled over Lay old he-goat that had crept i
had for two or three months constantly | there to die, and who did die the next day

kept my watch, but came always back| The entrance to this cave was a smal
without any discovery. hole at the base of a large rock, but within



my castle, as I called it,
about three miles or
more, to see if I could

I began to think, too, that it was not | it was large and roomy and quite dry. |
was greatly rejoiced at the discovery, and

I brought here my magazine of powder.
several muskets and other things.

for me to judge these wretches, and for a
year, I gave up watching for them. This
I did, however: I removed my boat and
hid it securely on the east end of the
island, and I kept myself more retired
than ever.

“I believe the reader of this will not
think it strange if I confess these anxie-
ties, these constant fears I lived in, and
the concern that was now upon me, put
an end to all invention, and to all the
contrivances that I had laid for my future
accommodations and conveniences. I had
the care of my safety more now upon
hands than that of my food. I cared not
‘to drive a nail, or chop a stick of wood
now, for fear the noise I should make
should be heard; much less would I fire
a gun for the same reason; and, above all,
I was intolerably uneasy at making any
fire, lest the smoke, which is visible at
a great distance in the day, should betray
me. For this reason, I removed that part



»



ROBINSON CRUSOE.



Jé was now the month of December in
my twenty-third year; and this, being the
southern solstice (for winter I cannot call
it), was the particular time of my harvest,
d required me to be pretty much abroad
the fields, when, going out early in the
giorning, I was surprised with seeing a
‘Aight of some fire upon the shore, at a dis-








72



tance from me of about two miies towards
the end of the island where { had observed
some savages had been, as before, and not
on the other side, but, to my great afflic-
tion, it was on my side of the island.

I was, indeed, terribly surprised at the
sight, and stopped short within my grove,
not daring to'go out, lest I might be sur-





£0 ROBINSON CRUSUE.

—— ek Linas

pria«; and yet I had no more peace|say, my muskets, which were mountol
witha, from the apprehensions I had| upon my new fortifications, and all my
that if these savages, in rambling over | pistols, and resolved to defend myself to
the island, should find my corn standing | the last gasp—not forgetting seriously ty
or cut, or any of my works, they would | commend myself to the Divine protection,
and earnestly to pray to God to delive
me out of the hands of the barbarians
And in this posture I continued about
two hours, and began to be impatient for
intelligence abroad, for I had no spies to
send out. I was not able to bear sitting
in ignorance any longer; so setting up my
ladder to the side of the hill, and the
pulling the ladder after me,I set it up
again, and mounted to the top of the hil]
and pulling out my perspective-glass, I lai
me down flat on the ground, and began to
look for the place. I presently found
there were no Jess than nine naked sar
ages sitting round a small fire they had
made, not to warm them, for they had no
need of that, the weather being extremely
hot, but, as I supposed, to dress some of
their barbarous diet of human flesh which
they had brought with them, whether alive
or dead I could not know.

They had two canoes with them, which
they had hauled up upon the shore ; ant
as it was then ebb of tide, they seemed to
‘me to wait the return of the fload to go
immediately conclude that there were per away again, As I expected, so it prove;
ple in the place, and would ther: never resi. ‘or, as soon as the tide made to the west
til’ chey had found me out. is this ex-; «ard, I saw them all take boat and rov

tremity I went back directly to my eastle, | ( r paddle, as we call it) away. I should
aad pulled up the ladder after me, having | ke ve observed, that for an hour or mot
made all things without look as wild i before they went off they were dancing
gataral as I could. auc U could easily discern their postures

Then I prepared myseit within, putting | anc 2estures by my glass.
inyself in a posture of defence; I loadeC a8 soon ag 1 saw them gone, I took my
ail my cannon, as I called them—that is to | guns and pistols and went away to tht

‘ é











ROBINSON CRUSOE.



they were out at sea, making over for the
‘main.
with horror, the marks. of their dreadful

feast, in the blood and bones. of buman

bodies.

I was so filled with indignation at this |)

sight, that I began to ponder how I could
destroy them when they should come
again, I went often to the hill to look for
them, and if they had come, I should cer-
tainly heve attacked them. But more than
a year elapsed and I saw no signs of them,





listen for a second gun,
Going down to the shore I saw }: ee



which, accordingly,





in about half a minute, I heard; and by
the sound, knew that it was from that part:
of the sea where I was dr’ven out with the
and I lived on very comfortably. In the | current, in my boat. I immediately cons.

sidered that this must be some ship in dis.
tress. I had the presence of mind, at that
minute, to think, that though I could not
help them, it might be they might help
me; so I brought together all the dry
wood f could get at hand, and, making a
good, handsome pile, I set it on fire upon,
the hill. The wood was dry, and blazed
freely; and though the wind blew very;

meantime, an event happened which | hard, yet it burned fairly out, so that I

intensely excited me.

There had been a storm of wind au day,
with a great deal of lightning and thunder,
and a very foul night it was after it. As
Iwas reading in the Bible, and taken up
with very serious thoughts about my pres-
ent condition, I was surprised with the
noise of a gun, as I thought, fired at sea.
This was, to be sure, a surprise of a differ-

ent nature from any I had met before; for

the notions this. put into. my thoughts were
of another kind. I started up in the
greatest haste, and) in a trice, clapped my
ladder to the middle place of the rock, and
pulled it after me; and; mounting it the

was certain, if there was any such thing as
a ship, they must need see it, and no doubt
they. did; for as soon as my fire blazed up,

I heard another gun aud then several
more. s



In the morning I saw to. my great sor-
row the wreck of a.ship upon the concealed,
rocks, far out from shore. I cannot ex:



82



plain, by any possible energy of words,
what a strange longing I felt in my soul
upon this sight, breaking out sometimes
thus :—“ Oh, that there had been but one
or two, nay, or but one soul, saved out of
this ship, to have escaped to me that I
might but have had one companion, one
fellow-creature, to have spoken to me and
to have conversed with!” In all the time
of my solitary life, I never felt so earnest,

ROBINSON CRUSOE.





And now the thought so pressed upon
me night and day that I must go off to this
ea that, at last, I loaded my boat with
everything necessary and ventured to sea,
after making a careful study of the dan-
gerous currents.

When I came close to the ship, a dog
appeared upon her, who, seeing me coming,
yelped and cried ; and, as soon as I called
him, jumped into the sea to come tome. I





















































































































































































































































































































































































so strong a desire after the society of my
fellow-creatures, or so deep a regre* at the
want of it. ;
But there was no sign of any living
thing on the wreck, and I had only the
affliction, some days after, to see the corpse
cf 2 drowned boy come on shore. He had
nothing in his pockets but two pieces of
eight and a tobacco pipe—the last was to
me of ten times more value than the first,



took him into the boat, but found lim
almost dead with a. and thirst. I gave
him a cake of my ier and he ev ound
it like a ravenous wolf that had been starv:
ing a fortnight in the snow; I then gave
the poor creature some fresh water, with
which, if I would have let him, he would
have burst himself. After this I went on
board ; but the first sight I met with was
with two men drowned in the forecastile.



ROBINSON CRUSOE.



Besides the dog, there was nothing left in

the ship that had life; nor any goods, that
a vould see Sut what were spoiled by the

‘Water. I saw several chests, which I

‘Deieve beionged to some of the seamen;

tad Leos two of them into the boat, with-
mer exanriay what was in ther~







I found, besides these chests, a little cuss
full of liquor, of about twenty gallons,
which I got into my boat with much dift-
culty. ‘There were several muskets in tae
cabin, and a great powder-horn, with about
four pounds of powder init. As for the
muskets, I had no oceasion for them. so 4

7



84 ROBINSON CRUSO#:

left them, and took the powder-horn.. I to: mes and. about. a. dozen and a half of
took a fire shovel and: tongs, which I} white linen. handkerchiefs.. Besides this,
wanted extremely ;. as- also: two:little: brass-| when: I came: to the till in the chest, I







kettles, a copper pot to. make chocolate, | found there three great bags of. pieces of
.J eight; and in one of them, six doubloons

and a gridiron;. and with. this: cargo, and}



the dog, T came away, and. the same even-
ing I reached the island: again,.weary and

fatigued to the last:degree.. [reposed: that)

tight in the boat, and: in. the morning I got

all may cargo om shore: The cask of liquor:

Â¥ found to be a: kind of rum;.not at all
evod; but when I came to open the chests,
Yound several things: of. great use to me.
Fo. example, I found.in one a fine case of
oorttles, filed with cordial waters.. I found
two pots of very good succades, or sweat-
ments, so fastened on the top that the salt
had not hurt them. I found some

good shirts, which were very welcome



of gold, and some smail bars of gold; I

suppose they mightall weigh near a pound.

Upon the whole; I got: very little by this
voyage: that.was of any use-to me; for as
to the-money, I had no manner-of occasion
for it;.for it. was to- meas: the-dirt under
my feet, and I would have given it all for
three or four pair of English shoes and
stockings, which: were things I greatly
wanted, I had, indeed, got two pairs of
shoes now, which I took off the feet of the
two drowned men whom [f saw in the
wreck, and I found two pairs more in one
of the chests, which were very welcome to



1



me. iI found iin
this seaman’s chest
about fifty pieces
of eight, in zials,
but no gold. Well,
however, I lugged -
‘this money home
to my cave, and ;
laid it 'up,-as I had
done that .before
which .I chad got
in our own --ship.
But it was .a great
pity that the other

part of this ship .had not come to my
share; for I .am -satisfied I might have
loaded niy canoe several times -over
with money; which, if I:had ever escaped
to eee would have Jain here ‘safe






enouBH till I might have come again and
fetched it.

After this event, T lived easy cheat for
near two years, but I thought constantly
of how I should get away from the island.
One night I dreamed that one of the vic-
tims of the cannibals ran away from them

and came to me. “Now,” thouzht I, in
my dream, “I may venture to ‘the ‘main
land, for this savage will be my pilot.”
‘After this dream, I watched every day for

| the cannibals, determined to capture one of

their victims,

IT had watched thus for about.a year and.
a half, when I saw one morning no less
than five canoes on shore, and there were
about thirty of the savages dancing around
a fire. While I looked, I saw two miser
able wretches ae! from the boats.
One was knocked down immediately andj
cut up for their cookery, while the other;
was left standing by himself ‘till they?

§ | would be ready for him.

This poor wretch, seeing himself a little
at-liberty, and unbound, started away from

them, and ran with incredible swiftness



—

&

en

Satcne,
(a LR Re
i ;
Ye ~ sa
iY, 2
4

i





Whore er
am








SS Se so aE
= = eS Zl
= aS SE See ee
Se ER CS SSSSESESE SE =
4

aloag the sands, directly towards me. I
was dreadfully frightened, when I perceived
him ran my way; and especially when, as
{ thought, I saw him pursued by the whole
body. However, my spirits began to re-
cover when I found that there was not
above three men that followed him; and
still more was I encouraged, when I found
that he outstripped them exceedingly in
running,

There was between them and my castle,
the creek; but he made nothing of it, but,
plunging in, swam through in about thirty
strokes, landed, and ran with exceeding
strength and swiftness. When the three
persons came to the creek, I found that two
of them could swim, but the third went no
farther, and soon after went softly back
again. It came very warmly upon my
thoughts that now was the time to get me
a servant, and perhaps a companion. I
immediately ran down the ladder, fetched
my two guns, and getting up again with
the same haste to the top of the hill, I
erossed towards the sea; and having a
very short cut, and all down hill, clap’d

ROBINSON CRUSOE.

myself in the way between the pursuers
and the pursued, hallooing aloud te
him that fled, who, looking back, was ai
first perhaps as much frightened at me es
at them. But I beckoned with my hand to
him to come back; and, in the mean time,
rushing at once upon the foremost, |
knocked him down with the stock of my
piece. I was loth to fire, because I would
not have the rest hear. Having knocked
this fellow down, the other stopped, as if
he had been frightened, and I advanced
towards him, But as I came nearer, I per.
ceived he had a bow and arrow, and was
fitting it to shoot at me: so I was then
obliged to shoot at him first, which [ did,
and killed him at the first shot. . The poor
savage who fled, but had stopped, was so
frightened with the fire and noise of my
piece that he stood stock still, I hallooed
again to him, and made signs to come for
ward, which he easily understood, and





SIE

WSs
SS

SS










ae ROBINSON CRUSOE.

came a little way, and stood, trembling. I
smiled at him pleasantly, and beckoned,
and at length he came close to me, laid his
head upon the ground, and put ‘my foot
upon it. This, it seems, meant that he
would be my slave forever, ‘
_ But there was more work to do. The:
‘ savage that I had knocked down began‘to.
come to himself, and sat up-on the ground.:
My savage motioned for me to give him my.
sword, and when I gave it to him he ran:
quickly and cut off his head at a-single
stroke. “When he had done ‘this, ‘he comes:
laughing to ‘me in sign ‘of triumph, and:
brought me the sword again. But :that
‘which astonished ‘him most, was to know!
how I killed the ‘other « Tadian ‘so far off.
When ‘he came +o him, ‘he stood like ‘one’
amazed, looking at ‘him, ‘turning him first:
on one eae, then-on the other. “He stook,
up his bow and :arrows ‘and came ‘back; ‘80;
IT turned to go aa and ‘beckoned ikim to .
follow’ me.










should Hes ‘them with sisi Eat hay |
might not be seen by the :rest, if ‘they ‘fol-
lowed; and so I made-signs ‘to ‘him ‘again



ecient hho chad coats a hole 4 in the oad

with ‘his hands, big enough to bury the

first in, and then dragged him into it, and
| covered him; ‘and did so by the other also.
| Then calling him:away, I carried him, not
_ | tomy-eastle, but quite away to my cave,

| on the farther part of the island. Here I
}-gave him bread and a bunch of raisins to
| eat, and a draught of water, which I found
‘| he ‘was indeed in great distress for, and
| having refreshed him, I made signs for
|-him to go and lie down to sleep, so the
| poor creature lay down, and went to sleep.

He'was a comely, handsome fellow, with

: straight, strong limbs, tall and well shaped;
1 _and, as 1 reckon, about twenty-six years of



ROBINSON CuUSOR. sy



ae



age. He hada very good.countenance, not night; ‘but, as soon ‘as it-was day, I occ
a fierce and -surly -aspect, ‘but seemed to] koned ‘to Ahim +o come with me, and ‘Jet
have something very manly in his face.| him know I would give him some clothes;
His hair was Jong and black, not curled at which he seemed verv glad, for he was
like wool; ‘his forehead very high and! |
large; and .a great vivacity and sparkling
sharpness in ‘his eyes. ‘The -color :of his,
skin was not. quite black, but very tawny..
His face was round :and plump ; his nose.
small, not flat like the Negroes; a very
good. mouth, thin Tips, :and ‘his ‘fine teeth.
well set, and:as white-as ivory. After he
had slept-about ‘half an ‘hour, he awoke and
came out-of the:eave'tome: for had been
milking my goats. “When he espied me he’
came Tunning ‘to:me, laying himself down:
again upon ‘the ground, with all the:pos-
sible signs tion, making «a great many-antic gestures
to-show it. At last ‘he lays ‘his ‘head flat,
mpon the ground, -close ‘to my foot, -and’
sets my other foot upon ‘his head, ‘as hethad_
done ‘before.
I let him know ‘that I understood ‘him:
and was wery ‘well pleased. ‘In a Tittle
time I ‘began ‘to «speak sto thim,:and ‘teach.
him ‘to speak ‘to ame; :and, first, I let ‘him
know ‘his mame should the Frmay, which:
_ was ‘the day Tssavedl ‘his life. I-called ‘him :
so for the memory of the time. I likewise | stark naked. As we went by the place
taught him'tosay Master,and then Jet.him | where he had buried the two men, he
know ‘that was.to.be my name; I likewise | pointed exactly to the ‘place, and -showed
_ waght him ‘tossay Yes .and No, -and to.| me the marks that he had :made to ‘find
know the meaning of them. J gave him | them again, making signs te :me that we
‘some milk .in an‘earthen >ot,.and Jet him |-should dig them up again and -eat them.
see me drink it before him, and -sop my | -At this Iappeared very -angry, made .as if
bread init; and:gave-him-a:cake-of ‘bread | I would vomit at thé thoughts of it, and
itodo the ‘like, which -hequickly complied | beckoned with my :hand to him to come
‘with,and made signs that.it was ‘very good | away, which the did immediately, with
for him," kept therewith -him all thet! 2reet submission. J then Jed hiv) up te







the top of the hill, to see if his enemies
were gone, and pulling out my glass, I saw
plainly the place where they“had been, but
no appearance of them or their canoe.

We visited the place, and carefully
buried the remains of their horrible feast.
Friday let me know that there had been
a great battle, and that four prisoners, of
which he was one, were brought here to

be eaten. When we came back to our
eastle, J fell to work to dress my man,
Friday. I gave him a pair of linen
drawers, and made him a jerkin of goat’s
skin, and a very good cap of hare’s skin,
and he was mightily pleased to see himself
clothed like his master.

I then made him a little tent between
my two fortifications, and I fixed all my
@oors so that I could tien eas ae

ROBINSON CRUSOE.










inside, As to the weapons, I took thy
all into my habitation every night. Bu
needed none of all this precaution; }
never man had a more faithful, lovh
sincere servant than Friday was to m
without passions, sullenness, or desig
perfectly obliged and engaged. His vq
affections were tied to me, like those off
child to a father ; and I dare say he wa







have sacrificed his life to save
upon any occasion whatsoever, The m
testimonies he gave me of this put it
of doubt, and soon convinced me that
needed no precautions for my safety on!
account.

I was greatly delighted with him,
made it my business to teach him evely
thing that was proper to make him useli
handy, and helpful; but especially











make him speak, and understand me when.

I spoke. And he was the aptest scholar
that ever was; and particularly was so
merry, so constantly diligent, and so pleased
when he could but understand me, or make
me understand him, that it was very pleas-
ant to me to talk to him.

After I had heen two or three days

returned to my castle, I thought that, in
order to bring Friday off from his horrid
way of feeding, and from the relish of a

cannibal’s stomach, I ought to let him taste

other flesh ; so I took him out with me one



ROBINSON CRUSOE.

intending to kill a kid out of my om
flock, and bring it home and dress it; but
as I was going, I saw ashe-goatlying dow)
in the shade, and two young kids sitting
by her. I catched hold of Friday an¢
made signs to him not to stir; immediate
I presented my piece, shot, and killed ong
of the kids, The-poor creature, who had,
at a distance, indeed, seen me kill hi
enemy, but did not know nor could
imagine how it was done, was sensibl:
surprised; trembled, and shook, and looked
so amazed ‘that I thought he would have
‘sunk down. He did not see the kid I sho
at, or perceive I had killed it, but ripped
up his waistcoat, to feel eehether ie Was
not wounded; and, as I found presentiy,
thought I was “resdlved to kill him; for he
came and kneeled down to me, and enbe
ing my knees, said a great many things!
ae not understand ; but I could easily se:
the meaning was, to pray me not to kill him
I soon found a way +o convince hin
that I-wouid do him no harm; and taking
him up by the hand, laughed at him, and
pointing to the kid which J had killed,

‘beckoned ‘to him to run-and fetch it, which

he did; and while he was wondering, and
looking to see how the creature was killed,
Tloaded my gun again, By-and-by I saw
a great fowl sitting upon a tree withia
ate ‘so, to let Friday understand a little
what I would do, i called him to me again,

pointed at the fowl, which was indeed 4

parrot, and tomy gun, and to the ground
under the parrot, to Jet him see I would
make it fall. I fired,.and bade him look,
and ‘immediately he saw ‘the ‘parrot fall,
He stood tike one frightened again, nob

morning to the woods. I went, indeed, | withstanding all I had said to him; and!





supe 3 ROBINSON CRUSOE... . 98



ne



uetieve, if I would have let him, he would | to make bread, and in a short time he wat
hava worshipped me and the gun, As for able to Wo all my work as well as £ coulé
‘he gun itself, he would not so much as | do it myself, and we lived very happily
‘ouch it for several days. ~ Thad a mind once to try if he haa avy.

When Friday tasted the. stewed kid he | hankering inclination to his own country
‘et me know that he liked it very much, | again;. and having taught him Englisi se
Tie next day I roasted a piece, and when | well that he could answer me almost any
‘nday came to eat it he expressed great question, I asked him whether the nation
-“avistaction, and’ made me: understand that | he belonged to never conquered in battle,
be would néver eat human flesh any more..| At which. he smiled, and said, “ Yes, yes
‘ taught him to beat and sift the corn and’! we always fight the better.”



































Master—How came
=< you to be taken pris-
oner, then ?

fviday—They more many than my na-
tion, in the place where me was; they take
one, two, three, and me; my nation over-
beat them in the yonder place, where me
no was; there my nation take one, two,
great thousand.

Master—But why did not your side re-
zover you from your enemies ?

“riday—They run, one, two three, and
me, and make me go in the canoe; my
nation have no canoe that time.

Master—Well, Friday, what does your
nation do with the men they take? Do
they carry them away and eat them ?

Hriday—Y es, nvy nation eat mans too.

Master—Where do they carry them ?

Friday—Go to other place, where they
think.

Master—Do they come hither ?

Friday—Yes, yes, they come hither;
come other else place.

oe you been here with
them ?
a I been here (points to
the N. W. side of the island, which, it
seems, was their side),

By this I understood that my man,
Friday, had formerly been among the
savages who used to come on shore on



“ROBINSON CRUSOE.



the farther part of the island, on the said
man-eating occasions that he was now
brought for; and, some time after, when
I took the courage to carry him to that
side, being the same I formerly mentioned,
he presently knew the place, and told me
he was there once, when they eat up
twenty men, two women and one child.
He could not tell twenty in English, | ‘but
he numbered them, by laying so many
stones in a row, and pointing to me to tell
them over.

I asked Friday a thousand questions
about his country, and he told me all he
knew. He said his ‘sort of people were
called Caribs; but further west there were
white-bearded men like me, and that they
had killed “much mans;” by all of which,
I knew, he meant the Spaniards whose
cruelties in America had spread over the
whole country, and were remembered from
father to son, As the time passed away,
I talked much to Friday about God and
the Saviour, and I verily believe that he
became a better Christian than I was.
When he could understand me well I told
him of the countries of Europe, and how
I came to be on the island. When |
showed him the ship’s boat which was
now falling to pieces on the shore, he told
me that such a boat had come Ene in
his country with seventeen white men in it,
and that these white men were then living
with his people.

It was after this some time, that being
upon the top of the hill, at the east side of
the island, Friday, the weather being very
serene, looked very earnestly towards the
main land, then fell to dancing and cried,
“Oh, joy! oh, glad! there see my country.’





That set me to thinking whether I could
bot make the voyage with Friday, or send
Priday alone to see if the white men were
still there,

When I proposed to Friday that he
thould go over alone to see his people, he
et very badly, and said he would like to

*ROBINSON CRUSOE.



go, but would not leave me; so I resolved
to make a large canoe and make the ven-
ture, We felled a large tree near the
water, and, with a month’s hard labor, we
shaped a very handsome boat, and in an-
other fortnight we got her into the water.
Though she was large enough te carry



ee

ey

twenty men,

I was. surprised: to-see: with

paddle her along; So I asked: himif we

would, and if we: might venture over in|
‘not be: fiightened.”

her very well, though great. blow wind.”| up: as: well as: I could. However, I saw

her.

“Yes,” he said; “we venture over in

However, I had a farther design that he
knew nothing-of, and that was to make a

mast and a sail, and to fit her with an.

auehor and cable.



Atter all this was done, I had my man
Friday to teach as to what belonged to the
navigation of my boat; for, though he
knew very weli how to paddle the canoe,
ha knew nothing of what belonged to a
sail and a rudder; and was the most
anazed when he saw me work the boat to

aad again in the sea by the rudder,.and

how the sail gibbed, and filled this. way or
that way, as the course we sailed changed.
However, with a little use-I made all these
things familiar to him, and he became an
expert sailor, except that as to the com-
pass 1 could make him understand very
hittie of that.
By the time I had the boat finished the
“rainy season was upon us, and we had to
keep within doors. When we began to go
out again, I sent Friday down to the shore
ene day to find turtle. In a short time
he came flying over my outer wall in a



‘ROBINSON CRUSOE.

great. fright, crying out to me, “O, master}

what Gexterity and low swift my man ©} master f O} bad!” “What's the-matter,

Friday could manage her, turn: her, and |.
‘says: he;: “one, two, three canoes, one,



Friday?” said’ E. “Oh! yonder, there,

two, three!” “Well, Friday,” says I, “do
So: I heartened him

the-poor fellow: was most: terribly scared,
for nothing ran in: his head’ but. that they
were come back to.look for im, and weuld

-cut him in: pieces and eat: him;. and the

poor fellow trembled so that I scarcely
knew what to-do»with: him. I comforted
him as well as:I could, and' told him I was
in as much danger as he, and that they

jz. | would eat me as well as him. “But,” said

I, “Friday, we must resolve to: fight them,
Can you fight, Friday?” “Me shoot,”
says he; “but there-come many great num
ber.” “No-matter for that,” said I, again;
“our guns will fright them that: we do no

‘Kill” So I asked him. whether, if I re
‘solved to: defend him, he wowld defend

me,.and stand by me; and’ do just as I bid
him. He said, “Me die when you bid dig,
master.”

I loaded the two: fowling-pieces with
swan shot as large: as small pistol-bullets
Then I took four muskets, and loaded
them with two:slugs, and five small bullets
each ; and my two pistols I loaded witha
brace of bullets each. I hung my great
sword by my side, and gave Friday his
hatchet. When I had thus prepared my
self, I took my perspective-glass, and went
up to the side of the hill; and I found

quickly by my glass that there were on¢

and-twenty savages, three prisoners, all

three canoes; and that their whole bus
‘ness seemed to be the. triumphant banqué



112



men, and had taken passage to go to
As for them, they could not go
so Engla*.l in the ship, except as prisoners
in arms, «nd upon reaching ee LSS

Knglane. |

would sutely be hanged.



Upon thia they begged that I would let
tnem stay oa the island, to which I gave
my consent. Then I told them my whole
history, and how i kad managed every-
thing, I left them all my firearms and
about a barrel and a half of gunpowder,
and { prevailed uvon the captain to give
thei two barrels more and also some gar-
den seeds. IT gave them also the bag of
ews, and the captain sent them their chests
anu ciothes, for which they seemed very
thankful And then I left the island, after
being upon it eight-and-twenty years, two
®ontns and nineteen days,

“ROBINSON CR USOE.







When I came 2 to Big ,
fect stranger to all the: wi

3

except two sisters and i children of one
of my brothers. The captain gave to the

SSeS SE

owners a handsome account of my saving
the ship, and they made up a purse of
nearly £200. With this money I resolved
to go to Lisbon and see if I could get any
news from my plantations in Brazil. J
accordingly took shipping and arrived in
Lisbon safely, Friday accompanying me,
and proving a most valuable servant. Here
I found my old friend, the captain, whe
took me on the coast of Africa. He was
an old man now, and he told me he had
not been to the Brazils for nine years, but
he assured me that when he was there last,
ty martner was alive, and he believed ¥



ROBINSON CRUSOE.

reece, pe gts

as he fired upon them and would not sub-
mit, the mate shot him dead. The next
day his body was hung up at the yard-
arm as a warning to the rest.

When the captain came back, he told
me he had brought me some little refresh-
ments, such as the ship afforded. Upon

this, he called aloud to the boat, and bade {

his men bring the things ashore that were
for the governor; and, indeed, it was a
present as if I had been one that was not
to be carried away along with them, but
as if I had been to dwell upon the island
still, and they were to go without me.
First, he had brought me a case of bottles
full of excellent cordial waters, six large
bottles of Madeira wine, two pounds of
excelient good tobacco, twelve good pieces
of the ship’s beef, and six pieces of pork,
with a bag of peas, and about a hundred-
weight of biscuit. He also brought me a
box of sugar, 1 box of flour, a bag full of
lemons, and two bottles of lime-juice, and
abundance of other things. But besides
these, he brought me six new clean
shirts, six very good neckcloths, two pair
of gloves, one pair of shoes, a hat, and one
pair of stockings, and a very good suit of
clothes of his own, which had been worn
but very little: in a word, he clothed me
from head to foot. It was a very kind and
agreeable present, as any one may imagine,
to one in my circumstances; but never was
anything in the world of that kind so
unpleasant, awkward, and uneasy as it was
to me to wear such clothes at their first
putting on.



1b.

before me, and I tod them 1 had got a full
account how they had run away with the
ship, and were preparing to commit further
robberies. I let them know that by my



direction the ship had. been seized ; that
she lay now in the road; and they might
see that their new captain had received the

j reward of his villany ; that, as to them, f

wanted to know what they had to say why
I should not execute them as pirates, as
they could not doubt but I had authority
to do.

One of them answered that they had
nothing to say but this, that when they
were taken, the captain promised them
their lives, and they humbly implored my

After dressing in my new clothes, soas| mercy But 1 told them I knew not what
to look more like a real governor than in | mercy to show them; for as for myself I
my goat skins, I had all the rebels brought | had resolved to quit the island with all mv



Full Text




CHICAGO.

M-A:DononueE & Go.
ity

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Grendpa—Now for one more try.

THE LIFE AND ADVENTURES

a

oF

PINSON CRISCOr:

BY DANIEL DEFOE













@ NEW EDITION, EDITED FOR YOUNG READERS BY E. O. CHAPMAN.

«gS UPWARDS OF TWO HUNDRED ILLUSTRATIONS BY DALZIEL, @RISET, J. D. WATSON AWD OTHERS,

CHICAGO

M. A. DONOHUE & COMPANY

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BY

M. A. DONOHUE & CO.
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INTRODUCTION.






Tux story of Rosrm-
son Crusor was writ-
&.. ten by Daniel De Foe,
and first published in
3719, nearly one hundred and seventy years
ago. The author called it “The Life and
Strange Surprising Adventures of Robinson
_ Crusoe, of York, Mariner: who lived eight-
and-twenty years all alone in an uninhabited.
: asland on the coast of America, near the
_ south of the great river Oroonoque; hav-
- tag been cast on shove by shipwreck, where-
in all the men perished but himself. With
_ an account how he was at last strangely
_ delivered by Pirates, Written by himself.”
They gave their books very long titles
in those days. But the people soon found
that this was a very interesting bock, de-
spite its long title. No publisher wanted
to print it at first, but as soon as it was
published, a large number of copies were
sold, and publishers have been printing it
xad. selling it ever since.
It was at first thought by some to be an

entirely true story, but it is not. It ia, ne
doubt, however, founded in part on the real
adventures of Alexander Selkirk, the son
of a shoemaker in Scotland. The following
brief account of him is given by Wilson,
the biographer of De Foe:

“His real name was Selcraig, which be
changed to that of Selkirk, when he went
to sea, He was born at Largo, in the
county of Fife, in 1676, and, after a cor
mon school education, was put to hie
father’s business, which was that of a shee.
maker. Being a spoiled child, he soon dis-
covered a waywardness of temper that gave
much uneasiness to his parents; whilst an
early propensity to the sea rendered his
employment irksome, At length an inci-
dent occured that put him upon indulging
his humor; for, being brought under ehurch-
censure for irregular conduct when he was
eighteen years of age, rather than submit,
he suddenly left home, and was never heard
of for six years. It is supposed that he was
with the buccaneers in the South Seas. Ir.
1701 we find him again at Largo, but the
same intractable person as ever, being en.
gaged in constant broils with his family.
As the sea was his favorite element, he did
not continue long in Scotland, but, going
to London, engaged with Captain Dampier
6 | INTRODUCTION.



apon a cruising expedition to the South
Seas. This was the voyage that rendered
his subsequent history so mteresting to the
lovers of romance.

“Being appointed sailing-master of the
Cinque Ports galley, a companion to the
St. George, commanded by Dampier, he left
England in the spring of 1703, and, after
various adventures, both vessels reached
the island of Juan Fernandez in the follow-
weg February. After staying some time to
re-fit, they sailed again in quest of booty ;
oat a violent quarrel arising between Sel-
kirk and his commander, Stradling, which
settled into a rooted arimosity, the former
resolved to take the first opportunity of
leaving the vessel. This occurred at the
beginning of September, 1704, when her
srazy state obliged Stradling to return to
‘aan Fernandez for fresh repairs; which



being completed, Selkirk bade a final adien
to his comrades at the end of the sams
month. Upon this island he lived by him
self four years and four months, until he
was released by Captain Woodes Rogers,
in the month of February, 1709.”

It has been said that this wild fellow
wrote a story of his adventures and gave it
to De Foe, and that De Foe made the story
of Rozsryson Crusor from it, but this is not
believed to be true,

Whether the story is founded upon that
of Selkirk or not, it 18 one that every body
finds full of interest. The picture of Crusoe,
with his coat and umbrella of goat skins,
watching day after day for a ship, until the
days pass into months and the months inte
years, is one which readers will never tira
of, and is especially attractive to boys am
girls,




ROBINSON

a

\ of York, in the year 1632.
My father’s right name
was Kreutznaer, and he
| had come to England from
¥, Bremen. My mother’s re-
lations were named Robin.
son, SO Pe was named Robinson Kreutznaer.
The English people called it Crusoe, and
after a while we came to write it so.

My father was not rich, but he had
become well to do by trading, and he
wished me to stay at home and be happy 3
and all the more because both he and my
mother were getting old, and further, be-
€ause one of my elder brothers had been



CRUSOE.

killed in the war with the Spaniards, aud

the other had gone away from home and

had not been heard from; but I would be
satisfied with nothing but going to sea.
and my inclination to this led me s¢
strongly against the will of my father, anc
against all the entreaties of my mother
that there seemed to be something fatal in
my perversity, tending directly to the his
of misery which was to befali me. a3

One morning, my father called me into
his chamber, where he was sick with the
gout, and talked to me very seriously
about it. He told me that if I staid at
home, I had a prospect of raising my
fortunes and living a life of happiness
riches,









ROBINSON CRUSOE.

He said that it was only the very wealthy
on the one hand, or the very desperate on
the other, who went abroad in search of
adventure. Mine was the middle state,
which he had found by experience was the
best state in the world. This was the
state of life that was envied both by kings
and beggars. This condition of life was
what the wise man meant when he prayed
that he might have neither poverty nor



ever, as no opportunity presented itself, J
still remained at home, though i refused
to engage in any business or tu learn ary
trade,

One day, being at Hull, I met one of my
companions who was going by sea to Lon. _
don, and he invited me so strongly to gu
with him that I consulted neither father
nor mother any more, nor so much as sent
them word of it; but leaving them to hear
of it as they might, without asking God’s
blessing, or my father’s, without any con-
sideration of circumstances or consequences,
and in an ill hour, God knows, on the Ist
of September, 1651, I went on board a ship
bound for London.

Never any young adventurer’s misfor

===. | tunes, I believe, began sooner or continued —



Much more he told me to dissuade me
from going to sea, and he ended by saying
that though he should not cease to pray
for me, if I did take this foolish step,
God would not bless me.

I was deeply affected by what my father
said, and I resolved not to think any more
of going abroad. But in a few days my
good resolutions were all given up and I
began to think of running away from
home in spite of the entreaties of my

father and the tears of my mother. How-



longer than mine. The ship was no sooner |
got out of the Humber than the winé
began to blow, and the sea to rise in a
most frightful manner ; and, as I had never
been at sea before, I was most inexpresstbly
sick in body, and terrified in mind, I!
began now seriously to reflect upon what I
had done, and how justly I was overtaken
by the judgment of Heaven for my wicked
leaving my father’s house, and abandoning
my duty. All the good counsels of my
parents came now fresh into my mind; and
my conscience, which was not yet come to
the pitch of hardness to which it has come
since, reproached me with the contempt of
advice, and the breach of my duty to God
and my father.

I thought that every wave would swallow
us up, and that every time the ship fe’!
into the hollow or trough of the sea, it
would never rise again. In this agony of
mind I made many vows and resolutions,
ROBINSON CRUSOE. 6

that if it would please God to spare my
life in this one voyage, if ever I got once
my foot upon dry land again, I would go
directly home to my father, and never set





made a sight that I thought is must ve
lightful I ever saw.

I had slept well in the night and was
now no more sea-sick, but very cheertn|,



it into a ship again while I lived; that I
would take his advice, and never run my:
self into such miseries as these any more,
I had these wise and good thoughta as
long as the storm lasted, and, indeed, for
some time after. But the next day, the
wind abated and the sea grew calmer, and
a fine evening followed. My sea-sickness
and my fears disappeared, and with them
all my thoughts of home and duty. The
sun rose clear the next morning, and his
beams shining upon the sea, which was
‘quite smooth. there being little or no wind,

looking with wonder upon the sea that war
so rough and terrible the day before, an
could be so calm and so pleasant in so little
a time after. And now, lest my good re
solutions should continue, my companion
who had enticed me away comes to ine.

“Well, Bob,” says he, clapping me upea
the shoulder, “how do you do afier it? |
warrant you were frightened, wer’n’t yu,
last night, when it blew but a capful of
wind ?”

“A capful d’you call it ?” said I; “tw
a terrible storm.”


“A storm, you foot !” replies he; “do you
call that a storm? why, it was nothing at
all; give us but a good ship and sea-room,
and we think nothing of such a squall of
wind as that; but you’re but a fresh-water
sailor, Bob. Come, let us make a bowl of
punch, and we'll forget all that.”

To make short this sad part of my story,
we went the way of all sailors; the punch
was made, and I was made half-drunk with
it; and in that one night’s wickedness I

drowned all my repentance, all my reflec.

tions upon my past conduct, all my resolu-
tions for the future. In a word, as the sea
_was returned to its smoothness, so the
‘hurry of my thoughts being over, my fears
of being swallowed up by the sea being
forgotten, and the current of my former
desires returned, I entirely forgot the vows
end promises that I made in my distress.

ROBINSON CRUSOE.

I found, indeed, some intervals of retiee:
tion; and the serious thoughts did, as it
were, endeavor to return agam sometimes;
but I shook them off, and roused myself
from them, and applying myself to drink-
ing and company, soon mastered the return
of those fits. But I was to have another
trial for it still ; and Providence, as in such
cases generally it does, resolved to leave me
entirely without excuse; for if I would
not take this for a deliverance, the next
was to be such a one as the worst and most
hardened wretch among us would confesa
both the danger and the mercy.

The sixth day of our being at sea, we
came into Yarmouth Roads; the wind
having been contrary, and the weather
calm, we had made but little way since the
storm, Here we were obliged to, come te
an anchor, and here we lay, the wind co.
tinuing contrary, for seven or eight days.
during which time a great many ships from
Newcastle came into the same Roads.

We had not, however, rid here so long —
but we should have tided it up the river,
but that the wind blew too fresh, and,
after we had lain four or five days, blew
very hard. However, the Roads being
reckoned as good as an harbor, the anchor.
age good, and our ground-tackle very
strong, our men were unconcerned, and not
in the least apprehensive of danger, but
spent the time in rest and mirth, after the
manner of the sea, But the eighth day, ii
the morning, the wind increasea, an* we
had all hands at work to strike our top.
masts, and make everything snug and close,
that the ship might ride as easy as possible,
By noon the sea went very high indeed,
and our ship rode forecastle in, shipped
ROBINSON CRUSOE.

several seas, and we thought once or twice
our anchor had come home; upon which
our master o rdred out the sheet-anchor.
The storm grew fiercer and fiercer until
I began to see terror in the faces of the
seamen themselves. At first, I was quite
stupid with sickness and fear, and I lay in
the cabin; but now I clambered on deck,
and looked about. Two of the ships near us
had cut their masts, and I heard the sailors











say that two more had been blown out to
sea, Finally a great ship foundered before
our eyes, and the master ordered our masts
to be cut away. Then came a cry that we
‘had sprung a leak, and we ali went to
work at the pumps.
_ All our efforts were useless; the water

‘gained rapidly in the hold, and it became.

‘gertain that we could not ride out the

nye

“storm, Guns were now fired as signals of



ih



distress, and, the storm somewhat abating,
a boa, as put off to us from a ship that
had not been damaged, because she was
light. We had great difficulty in getting
into the boat when it reached us; but we
did it safely and after several hours of
drifting, in danger of being swamped every
minute, we reached the hoe drenched

and destitute. The ship sank seon after
we left her.



At Yarmouth, we were given some inoney,
and I might easily have gone back to Hull,
but my ill fate pushed me on. With what
money I had, I made my way to London.
hore I fell in with the master of a ship
bound for the coast of Guinea on a trading
voyage. He took quite a fancy to me at
once and became my friend. I raised some
forty pounds by corresponding with some
relations, and investing it in trinkets, such
ROBINSON CRUSOE.



as ihe captain carried to trade with the

Our ship making her course towards the

natives, we set sail, and made a most suc- | Canary Islands, was surprised, in the gray
cessful voyage.



of the morning, by a Moorish rover of Sal-
lee, who gave chase to us. We crowded as
much canvas as our yards would spread, or
our masts carry, to get clear; but finding
the pirate gained upon us, we prepared to
fight, our ship having twelve guns and the
rogue eighteen. About three in the after.
noon he came up with us, and bringing to,
by mistake, just athwart our quarter, we
brought eight of our guns to bear on that
side, and poured in a broadside upon him,
which made him sheer off again, after
returning our fire, and pouring in also his
small shot from near two hundred men
which he had on board. However, we had
not a man touched, all our men keeping
close.

He prepared to attack us again, and we
to defend ourselves; but laying us on board
the next time upon our other quarter, he
entered sixty men upon our decks, who’
immediately fell to cutting and hacking
the sails and rigging. We plied them with

My success I owed entirely to my | small shot, half-pikes, powder-chests, and

friend the captain, who first showed me
what things to buy in London, and then
how to trade them with the natives of
Guinea for gold-dust. On the voyage, he
taught me the use of the ship’s instruments,
by which an account of our course was
taken every day, and I became a navigator
as well as a Guinea trader,

My friend died soon after his arrival at
home, but I resolved to go the same voy-
age again on the same ship. This was a
most unhappy voyage, for though I left a
good portion of my money with my friend’s
widow, yet I fell into terrible misfortunes.


ROBINSON CRUSOE.



pen like, an cleared our deck of them
«wice. However, to cut short this melan-
choly part of our story, our ship being dis-
abled, and three of our men killed, and
‘eight wounded, we were obliged to yield,
‘and were all carried prisoners into Sallee,
» port belonging to the Moors.
- The usage I had there was not so
areacful as I at first feared ; nor was I car-
-aed up the country to the Emperor’s court,
as the rest of our men were, but was kept
‘py the captain as his proper prize, and
made his slave, being young and nimble,
and fit for his business. At this surpris-
“ng change of my circumstances, from a
merchant to a slave, I was perfectly over-
whelmed; and now I looked back upon
ony father’s prophetic discourse to me, that
1 should be miserable; which I thought
‘was now s0 effectually brought to pass,
‘that I could not be worse; for now the
‘nand of heaven had Gearen me, and I
was undone. But alas! this was but a
taste of the misery I was to go through.
i As my new patron, or master, had taken
‘me homes to his house, so I was in hopes
‘bh: at he would take me with him when he
went to sea again, believing that it would
ee time or other be his fate to be taken
yy a man-of-war, and that then I should
te set at liberty. But this hope of mine
was soon taken away; for when he went
to sea, he left me on shore to look after his
Titile g garden, and do the con aon drudgery
‘of slaves about his house,
‘had no one to tak to, for, though
ere were other slaves, not one of them
could understand my language, nor could
a understand theirs, But while at work




















thought of nothing but my escape. RBut
for a long time no means of escaping pre-
sented itself.

After about two years, my master stayer
at home longer than usual, and two or
three times a week he used to go out
a-fishing in his boat. He always took me
and a young Moresco, besides a Moor, with



r Bo AN aa tees =
oie + . Y Sa ee
af Swe & ite AA

him, for we made him very merry, and I
was very dexterous In catching fish,

It happened one time, that, going ,fish-
ing with him in a calm morning, a fog rose
so thick, that though we were not half a
league from the shore, we lost sight of it;
and rowing we knew not whither, we
labored all day and all the next night; and

when the morning came, we found we had

“igging in the garden or grinding grain, I | pulled out to sea instead of pulling in for
14 . ROBINSON CRUSOE.



the shore. However, we got well in again,
though with a great deal of labor and some
danger, and we were all very hungry. But
our master, warned by this disaster, resolv-
ed to take more care of himself in the
future; and having lying by him the long
boat of our English ship which he had
taken, he resolved he would not go a-fish-
ing any more without a compass and some
provision. So he ordered the carpenter of



Moor to take me and the young Moreseo,
whose name was Xury, and go and cates
some fish, as he expected some distinguished
company to sup with him. Now, thought
I, is my chance to get my liberty.

My first contrivance was to speak to the
Moor and ask him if we ought not to take
along some food for our dinner; for I told
him we must not presume to eat of our
master’s bread. He said that was true; se









his snip to build a little cabin in the
middle of the long-boat and fit a place for
provisions and water, also for a compass,
end put ina mast and sails. After that,
. we used to go afishing in the long-boat.
fime day my master commanded the



y U1

REY WY

AN i
N

‘

he brought a basket full of their kind, anc:
three jars with fresh water into the boat.
I knew where my master’s case of bottles
stood, and I conveyed them into the boat
whils the Moor was on shore, as if they
had been there before for our master
ROBINSON CRUSOE.



conveyed also a great lump of beeswax
into the boat, which weighed about half
an hundred weight, with a parcel of twine
or thread, a hatchet, a saw, and a hammer,
all of which were of great use to us after-
wards,

Another trick I
tried upon him, which
he innocently came
into also: “Moely,”
said I, “our patron’s
guns are all on board
the boat; can you not
get a little powder
and shot? It may be
we may loll some
alcamies (a fowl like

15



southerly, I had been sure to make the
eoast of Spain; but my resolutions were,
blow which way it would, I would be gone
from that horrid place where I was, and
leave the rest “to fate.

After we had fished some time and







our curlews) for our-
~ selves.” “Yes,” says
he, “T'll bring some;”
and ‘accordingly, he
brought a great leath-
er pouch, which held
about a pound and a
half of powder, and
another with shot,
that had five or six
pounds, with some
bullets, and put all into the boat. At the
same time, I had found some powder of my
master’s in the great cabin, and thus fur-
nished with everything needful, we sailed
out of the port to fish.
_ » The castle, which is at the entranee of the
‘port, knew who we were, and took no
‘notice of us; and we were not above a mile
‘out of the pore before we hauled in our
‘sail, and sat us down to fish. The wind
blew from the N. N. E., which was con-
‘trary to my desire; ier had it blown







caught nothing (for when I had fish on my
hook I would not pull them up, that he
might not see them) I said to the Moor,
“This will not do; our master wi not be
thus served; we must stand further off.”
He, thinking no harm, agreed, and, being
in the head of the boat, set the sails; and,
as I had the helm, I ran the boat out near
a league farther, and then brought her to,
as if I would fish; when, giving the boy
the helm, I stepped forward to where the
Moor was, and making as if I stooped for
16




something behind him, I took him by sur.

prise with my arm under his waist, and
tossed him clear overboard into the sea.

He rose immediately, for he swam like a

cork, and begged to be taken in.
As he continued to swim after us I
&:tched a fowling-piece from the cabin,

and pointing it at him, said: “You can
swim well enough to reach the shore, If
you try to get in the boat, I will shoot
you.” He turned about when he saw I
was determined, and swam toward the
shore, which I have no doubt he reached
in safety.

When he was gone, I turned to the boy,
and said to him, “Xury, if you will be
faithful to me, ll make you a great man;
hut if you will net stroke your face to be
true to me,” that is, swear by Mahomet
and his father’s beard, “I must throw you
into the sea, too.” The boy smiled in my
face, and spoke so innocently, that I could

ROBINSON CRUSOE.

not mistrust him, and swore to be faithful
to me, and go all ever the world with me.
As long as the swimming Moor could
see me, I steered the boat straight out to
sea, for I knew he would tell his master
which way I had gone. But as soon as
I thought the boat was out of his sight,
IT turned her head to the south-east.
With a good breeze and a smooth sea, at
three o’clock on the afternoon of the next
day, I had no doubt that we were one
hundred and fifty miles from Sallee. At
this time we were within sight of the
coast, and I knew that we were were out

-of the kingdom of the Moors.

But so afraid was J of being followed
by my late master, that we sailed on
toward the south for five days, without
stopping. At the close of the fifth day,
we anchored at the mouth of a little river;
but I was afraid to go on shore for fear of
the wild beasts, which inhabit that coast
in great numbers. They made hideous
noises in the night, and sometimes we could
see great creatures bathing on the beach.
One of them swam off toward the boat,
but ashot from a fowling-piece sent him
quickly back to the shore.

However, we had to go on shore for
water, for we had not a pint left, so, the
next day, we drew the boat in as close as
we could, and waded ashore, taking our
fowling-pieces and two jars. I staid by
the boat, while Xury secon found some
water and filled the jars. He also shot a
hare, which we roasted on the shore, and
had quite a feast.

Several times I was obliged to land for
fresh water, after we had left this place;
and once in particular, being early in the
EOBINSON CRUSOE.





morning, we came to an anchor under a
» Uttle pomt of land. Xury, whose eyes
were more about him than it seems mine
_ were, calls softly to me, and tells me that we
“had best go farther off the shore; “ for,”
“says he, “look, yonder lies a dreadful
“monster on the side of that hillock, fast
asleep.” I looked where he pointed, and
saw a terrible great lion that lay on the



‘side of the shore, under the shade of a
piece of the hill. I took our biggest gun,
and loaded it with a good charge of pow-
der, and with two slugs, and laid it down;
then I loaded another gun with two bul-
lets; and the third (for we had three
pieces) I loaded with five smaller bullets.
[ took the best aim I could with the first
piece to have shoe him in the head, but he



7





lay so, with his leg raisea a little above
his nose, that the slugs hit his leg about
the knee, and broke the bone. He started.
up, growling at first, but finding his leg
broke, fell down again; and then got up
upon three legs, and gave the most hideous
roar that ever I heard. I took up the

second piece immediately, and though he
began to move off, fired again, and shot



him in the head, and had the pleasure to
see him drop.

This was game indeed to us, but this
was no food; and I was very sorry to lose
three charges of powder and shot upon a
creature that was good for nothing to us.
I bethought myself, however, that perhaps
the skin of him might, one way or other,
be of some value to us. Se Xury and |
ROBINSON CRUSOE.



went to work with him; but Xury was
much the better workman at it, for I knew
very ill how to do it. Indeed, it took us
both the whole day, but at last we got off
the hide of him, and spreading it on the

devour the flesh, making signs to offer me
some. I shook my head, but signified that

I would take the skin, if they would put it
on the shore and go away. ‘This they did,
and I sent Xury for it.

They also left on



































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































top of our cabin, the sun effectually dried | the shore a great jar of water and some

it in two days’ time, and it at
served me to lie upon.

After sailing on for twelve dover more I
found that the land was inhabited by
negroes, who ran along the shore and made
signs tous. As I thought them savages, I
did not venture to go on shore, One day
a great leopard ran down among them to
the water, at which they were greatly
frightened. When I shot him, they were
greatly surprised and very grateful. They
quickly took off the skin and began to

dried roots and corn for which I was
thankful.

I sailed on for eleven days more without
going near the shore till I saw the land run
out a great way into the sea, This I took
to be Cape de Verde. On sailing out to
the point of the Cape, I saw land far out
to sea which I thought was the Cape de
Verde Islands, I stepped into the cabin
and was thinking whether I ought not te
sail for the Islands when I heard Xury ery
out: “Master, master, a ship with a sail.”
ROBINSON CRUSOE.

ts
i rushed from the cabin and found Xury
‘in a great fright, he thinking that it must
needs be a ship of his old master, the
‘pirate. I saw, however, that it was a
Portuguese ship, and I crowded all sail to
come up to her, and was soon on board.
- Upon hearing my story, the captain
offered to take me to the Brazils, whither
the was going, without any pay whatever, and
tto take all my goods also, He offered to
give me a good sum for my boat, which I
‘accepted. He wanted also to ie Xury,
‘but I was loth to sell the boy’s liberty as
soon as he had gained it. But as he offered
to set him free in ten years and to treat
him well, and, moreover, Xury being will-
ing, I Jet the Captain have him,

We made a good voyage to the Brazils,
landing in All Saints’ Bay in twenty-two
days. The generous treatment the captain
gave me, I can never enough remember, He
would take nothing of me for my passage,
gave me twenty ducats for the leopard’s
skin, and forty for the lion’s skin, which I
had in my boat, and caused everything I
had in the ship to be punctually delivered
to me; such as the case of bottles, two of
‘my guns, and a piece of the lump of bees’.
‘wax, for I had made candles of the rest ; in
‘a word, I made about two hundred aa
‘twenty pieces of eight of all my cargo; and
‘with this stock I went on shore,
_ I soon learned that the planters of that
country lived well and became rich, so I
ought Jand and became a planter, raising
ugar and tobacco, When the Portuguese
captain sailed, I sent by him an order for
the money mich I had left with the
‘Snglish captain’s widow, and gave him in-
fractions to invest it in Lisbon, in such




1g

utensils and things as [ wanted; which ke
did, and brought them to me on his next
voyage.

I was now very prosperous and happy,
but I was not to remain so. I often talked.
to the planters about me of my voyage to
the coast of Guinea, and how easy it was to
trade with the natives for gold-dust, or
even for slaves, which were very dear in
the Brazils.

One day some of the planters came to
me and proposed, that, as there was noth:
ing we needed so much as slaves to work
our plantations, they would fit out a ship
to go to the coast of Guinea for slaves, and
that I would take charge of the affair, Al
though I was very well situated where r
was, I accepted their proposal, providing





they would take care of my property while
I was gone. In short, I obeyed blindly the
dictates of my fancy rather than my reason;
and, accordingly, the ship being fitted out,
and the cargo finished, and all things done
20 :

BOBINSON CRUSOH. .



as by agreement, by my partners in the| At last we perceived land ahead, bat he
voyage, £ went on board in an evil hour | fore we could make out whether it was om
again, the 1st of September, 1659, being the
game day eight years that I went from my



father and mother at Hull, acting the rebel
to their authority, and the fool te my own
interest.

» Our ship was about one hundred and
twenty tons burden, carried six guns, and
fourteen men, besides the master, his boy,
and myself, We had on board no large
cargo of goods, except of such toys as were
fit for our trade with the negroes, such as
beads, bits of glass, shells, and odd trifles,
especially little Jooking-glasses, knives,
scissors, hatchets, and the like,

We had very good weather, and we
sailed north, at first, along our own coast.
We passed the line in about twelve days’
ime, and were, by our last observation, in
seven degrees twenty-two minutes north
latitude, when a violent tornado took us
quite out of our knowledge. It blew in
uch a terrible manner, that for twelve
days together we could do nothing but
drive, and, seudding away before it, let it
earry us wherever fate and the fury of the
waves directed; and during these twelve
days, I need not say that I expected every
day to be swallowed up; nor did any in
the ship expect to save their lives,

island or the mainland, the ship struck on
the sand a long distance from the shore.
Now, we were in a dreadful condition m

deed, and had nothing to do but to think
of saving our lives as best we could. We
had a boat at our stern just before the
storm, but she was first staved by dashing
against the ship’s rudder, and in the next,
place she broke away, and either sunk or
was driven off to sea; so there was no hope
from her. We had another boat on board,
but how to get her off into the sea was a
doubtful thing; however, there was no
room to debate, for we fancied the ship
would break in pieces every minute, and

some told us she was actually broken

already.

In this distress, the mate of our vesse!
lay hold of the boat, and with the help cf
the rest of the men, they got her flung over
the ship’s side; and getting all into her, let
go, and committed ourselves, being eleven



in number, to God’s mercy and the wild
sea; for though the storm was abated con-
siderably, yet the sea went dreadfully hich
upon the shore,
ROBINSON CRUSOE.

at

Ce LE LO AL

And now we all saw piainly that the
boat vould not escape, and that we should
be drowned. As to making sail, we had
none, nor, if we had, could we have done
anything with it; so we worked at the oar
towards land, on with heavy hearts,
like men going to execution; for we all
‘knew that when the boat came near the
shore she would be dashed in a thousand

perhaps make smooth water. But there
was nothing of this appeared; but as we
made nearer and nearer the shore, the lan:
looked more frightful than the sea.

At last, a great wave came rolling after
us, overset the boat, and we were all swal.
lowed up in a moment. Nothing can de
scribe what I felt when I sank into the
water; for though I swam very well, yet F































pieces by the breach of the sea. However,
‘we committed our souls to God in the most
earnest manner,

_ What the shore was, whether rock or
sand, whether steep or shoal, we knew not:
the only hope was that we might happen
into some bay or gulf, or the mouth of some
river, where by great chance we might run
our boat in under the lee of the land, and





could not deliver myself from the waves se
as to draw breath, till that wave having
driven me, or rather carried me, a vast way
on towards the shore, and having spent
itself, went back, and left me upon the land
almost dry, but half dead with the water I
took in, I had so much presence of maind,
as well as breath left, that seeing myself
nearer the main land than I expected, i got


upon my feet’ and ran.

Another wave soon over-

took me and then another, until I was

dashed against a rock with such force as to
make me nearly senseless.

I held on to the rock, however, until the
wave receded, and the next run I took I
got to the mainland, exhausted ind bruised,
and, indeed, more dead than sive.

But I was now landed, and safe on
shore, and began to look up and to thank
God that my life was saved. I walked
about the shore, lifting up my hands, and
my whole being, I may say, wrapt up in
a contemplation of my deliverance; mak-
ing a thousand gestures and motions, which
I cannot describe; reflecting upon all my
comrades that were drowned, and that
there should not be one soul saved but
myself; for, as for them, I never saw them
afterwards, or any sign of them, except
three of their hats, one cap, and two shoes
that were not fellows.

I cast my eyes to the stranded vessel,
when, the breach and froth of the sea
being so big, I could hardly see it, it lay

, 80 far off, and considered, Lord! how was
ae possible I could get on shore?

After I had solaced my mind with the
comfortable part of my condition, I began
to look around me, to see what kind of
place I was in, and what was next to be

pe es



ROBINSON CRUSOE.



done; and I soon found my comforts abate,
and that, in a word, I had a dreadful de.
liverance; for I was wet, had no clothes to
shift me, nor anything either to eat or
drink, to comfort me. Neither did I see-
any prospect before me, but that of per.
ishing with hunger, op being devoured by
wild beasts; and that which was particu!
larly affecting to me was, that I had ne
weapon, either to hunt and kill any crea
ture for my sustenance, or to defend my.
self against any other creature that migh‘
ae to kill me for theirs. In a sonal \
had nothing about me but a knife, a to
bacco-pipe, and a little tobacco in a box.
This was all my provision; and this threv:
me into terrible agonies of mind, that for),
while I ran sina like a madman. Nigh’
coming upon me, I began, with a heavy
heart, to consider what would be my lot
there were any ravenous beasts in that:
country, seeing at night they always come
abroad for prey.

All the remedy that offered to my
thoughts, at that time, was to get up into
a thick bushy tree, like a fir, but thorny,
which grew near me, and where I resolvel
to sit all night, and consider the nex
day what death I should die, for as yet
saw no prospect of life. I walked Bho,
a furlong from the shore, to see if I coul:
find any fresh water to drink, which I aid
to my great joy; and having drunk, anv
put a little tobacco in my mouth to pr
vent hunger, I went to the tree, and ge!
ting up into it, endeavoured to place my,
self so that if I should sleep I might no
fall. And having cut me a short stick
like a truncheon, for my defence, I took »
my lodging; and being excessively fatigues
ROBINSON CRUSOE.



{ fell fast asleep, and slept as comfortably
as, I believe, few could have done in my
condition, and found myself more refreshed
with it than I think I ever was on such an
occasion.

28

that at least I might save some necessary
things for my use.

When I came down from my apartment
in the tree, I looked about me again, and
the first thing I found was the boat, which



When I waked up it was broad day-
light, the weather clear, and the storm
abated, so that the sea did not rage and
swell as before; but that which surprised
â„¢e more was, that the ship was lifted off
in the night from the sand where she lay,
by the swelling of the tide, and was driven
up almost as far asthe rock which I at first
mentioned, where I had been so bruised
_ by the wave dashing me againstit. This
_ being within about a mile from the shore
where I was, and the ship seeming to stand
_ aapright still, I wished myself on board,

lay, as the wind and sea had tossed her up, .
upon the land, about two miles on my right —
hand. I walked as far as I could upon -

shore to have got to her; but found aneck, -

or inlet of water between me and the boat

Foe ace

which was about half a mile broad; so I

came back for the present, being more
intent upon getting at the ship, where I

hoped to find something for my present *

subsistence,

A little after noon I found the sea very
calm, and the tide ebbed so far out, that J
could come within a quarter of a mile of

,

Ae
24



‘se ship. And here I found a fresh renew-
mg of my grief ; for I saw evidently, that if
we had kept on board, we had been all
safe; that is to say, we had all got safe on
shore, and I had not been so miserable as
to be left entirely destitute of all comfort
and company as I now was.

This foreed the tears to my eyes again.
As there was little relief in that, I resolved
if possible, to get to the ship; so I pulled
off my clothes, for the weather was hot, and



tovk to the water. But when I eame to the
ship my difficulty was still greater to know
tww to get on board, for as she lay high out
of tha water, there was nothing within my

ROBINSON CRUSOE.



reach to lay hold of. I swam around he
twice, and the second time I espied a small
piece of rope hanging down the fore-chains
so low, that with great difficulty I got hold
of it, and by the help of that rope got up
into the forecastle of the ship.

I found that the ship was bulged, and
had a great deal of water in her hold; but
that she lay soon the side of a bank of
hard sand, or rather earth, that her stern lay
lifted up upon the bank, and her head low,
almost to the water. By this means all her
quarter was free, and all that was in that
part was dry; for you may be sure my firs!
work was to search, and to see what wa:
spoiled and what was free. And, first, |
found that all the ship’s provisions were
dry and untouched by the water, and being
very well disposed to eat, I went to the
bread-room and filled my pockets with bis
cuit, and ate itas I went about other things,
for I had no time to lose. I also found
some rum in the great cabin, of which |
took a large dram, and which I had, indeed,
need enough of, to spirit me for what wa:
before me.

Now I wanted nothing but a boat, to
furnish myself with many things which |
foresaw would be very necessary to me. Ii
was in vain to sit still and wish for what
was not to be had; and this extremity’
roused my application. We had severali
spare yards, and two or three large spars o!
wood, and a spare top-mast or two in the
ship. I resolved to fall to work with these’
and I flung as many of them overboard as /
could manage for their weight, tying every,
one with a rope, that they might not driv:
away. When this was done [ went dow:
the ship’s side, and pulling them to me, .


tied four of them together at both ends, as
well as I could, in the form of a raft, and
laying two or three short pieces of plank
npon them, crossways, I found I could
walk upon it very well, but that it was not

able to bear any great weight, the pieces

being too light.
So I went to work, and with the carpen-
ter’s saw I cut a spare top-mast into three

lengths, and added them to my raft, with a

ROBINSON CRUSOE.

2a

of arrack. These I stowed by thea.selv as,
there being no need to put them into the
chest, nor any room for them.

‘While I was doing this, I found the tide
began to flow, though very calm; and I had

great deal of labor and pains. But the) aN

hope of furnishing myself with necessaries

encouraged me to go beyond what I should |

have been able to have done upon another
occasion,

My raft was now strong enough to bear

any reasonable weight. My next care was
what to load it with, and how to preserve
what I had Jaid upon it from the surf of
the sea: but I was not long considering
this. z

I first laid all the planks or boards upon |

it that I could get, and having considered
well what I most wanted, I first got three

of the seamen’s chests, which I had broken |
open and emptied, and lowered them down

upon my raft; the first of these I filled
with provisions—viz., bread, rice, three
Dutch cheeses, five pieces of dried goat’s



the mortification to see my coat, shirt and
waistcoat, which I had left on the shore

\flesh (which we lived much upon), and a} upon the sand, swim away, As for my

little remainder of Kuropean corn, which
had been laid by for some fowls which we
brought to sea with us, but the fowls were
killed. There had been some barley and
wheat together; but, to my great disap.
pointment, I found afterwards that the rats
had eaten or spoiled it all, As for liquors,
I found several cases of bottles belonging
to our skipper, in which were some cordial
Wines ; and, in all, about five or six gallons

breeches, which were only sinen, and open-
kneed, I swam on board in them and my
stockings,

However, this put me upon rummaging
for clothes, of which I found enough, but
took no more than what I wanted for pre-
sent use, for I had other things which my
eye was more upon 3 as, first, tools to work
with on shore; and it was after long
searching that I found out the carpenter's
a

ehest, which was indeed a very useful prize
to me, and much more valuable than a ship-
lading of gold would have been at that
time. I got it down to my raft, whole as
it was, without losing time to look into it,
for I knew in general what it contained.



My next care was for,some ammunition
and arms. ‘There were two fowling-pieces
in the cabin, and two pistols, These I
secured first, with some powder-horns, and
two old, rusty swords. I knew there were
three barrels of powder in the ship and,
with much search, I found them; two of
them were dry and good, and these I got
to my raft, with the arms.

And now I thought myself pretty well
Sreighted, and I began to think how I
should get to shore with all my things,
having neither sail, oar, nor rudder, and
the least puff of wind would have overset
my raft. But the sea was calm, the tide
was setting toward the shore, and what

, little wind there was, blew in that direc.
‘ Gon, I found, however, two or three
broken oars, and with these I put to sea.

The raft went very well; but I found
that the tide took me some distance from

ROBINSON CRUSOE,

the point where I had landed before, by
which I perceived that there was an in
draft of the water. This led me to think
that there might be a creek or river there;
and so I found there was.

I steered my raft toward it as well as I
could. At the mouth of the little creek I
came very near suffering a second ship-
wreck, which, I verily believe, would have
broken my heart, Thd raft ran on a shoal,
and nearly upset. I held all the things in
their places, and when the tide rose a little
higher, it floated safely off. I landed at
high tide, when the water covered the
bank, and when it receded, the raft was
high and dry.

My next work was to view the country,
and seek a proper place for my habitation,
and where to stow my goods, to secure
them from whatever might happen. Where
I was, I yet knew not; whether on the
continent or an island; whether inhabited
or not inhabited; whether m danger of
wild beasts or not,

There was a hill not above a mile from
me, which rose up very steep and high,
and which seemed to overtop some other
hills, which lay as in a ridge from it, north
ward, I took out one of the fowliny
pieces, and one of the pistols, and a hori
of powder; and thus armed, I traveled foi
discovery up to the top of that hill, whers
after I had with great labor and difficulty .
got to the top, I saw my fate, to my grea!
affliction—viz., that I was in an islanc
environed every way with the sea ni
land to be seen except some rocks, whic
lay a great way off, and two small island |
less than this, which lay about thre
leagues to the west,
ROBINSON CRUSOE. 2%



I found also that the island I wasinwas| At my coming back, I shot at a great
barren, and, as I saw good reason to| bird, which I saw sitting upon a tree, on
believe, uninhabited, except by wild beasts, | the side of a great wood. I believe it was
of which, however, I saw none. Yet I saw | the first gun that had been fired there
abundance of fowls, but knew not their | since the creation of the world. I had na
kinds; neither, when I killed them, could | sooner fired, but from all parts of the wood
I tell what was fit for food and what not. | there arose an innumerable number of
























28

fowls of many. -sorts, making a confused
screaming and crying, every one according
to his usual note, but not one of them of
any kind that I knew. As for the creature
I killed, I took it to be a kind of hawk, its
color and beak resembling it, but it had no
talons or claws more than common. Its
fiesh was carrion, and fit for nothing.
Contented with this discovery, I came
back to my raft, and fell to work to bring
my cargo on shore, which took me all the
rest of the day. What to do with myself
at night I knew not, nor indeed where to
rest, for I was afraid to lie down on the
ground, not knowing but some wild beast
might devour me, though, as I afterwards





ROBINSON CRUSOE.

found, there was really no need for those
fears,

However, as well as I could, I barricaded
myself round with the chests and. boards
that I had brought on shore, and made a
kind of hut for that night’s lodging. As
for food, I yet saw not which way to sup-
ply myself, except that I had seen two ox
three creatures, like hares, run out of the
wood where I shot the fowl.

I now began to consider that I might
yet get a great many things out of the
ship, which would be useful to me, and
particularly some of the rigging and sails,
and such other things as might come to
land; and I resolved tc make another voy-
age on board the vessel, if possible. And
as I knew that the first storm that blew
must necessarily break her all in pieces, :
resolved to set all other things apart, till :
got everything out of the ship that I could
get. Then I called a council—that is to
say, in my thoughts—whether I should
take back the raft; but this appeared im-
practicable; so I resolved to go as before,
when the tide was down; and I did s0,
only that I stripped before I went from my
hut, having nothing on but a chequered|
shirt, a pair of linen drawers, and a pair of/
pumps on my feet,

I got on board the ship as before, and)
prepared a second raft; and, having had:
experience of the first, I neither made this;
so unwieldy, nor loaded it so hard, but yet,
I brought away several things very usefu)
to me; as, first, in the carpenter’s stores l
found two or three bags full of nails an
spikes, a great screw-jack, a dozen or tw
of hatchets, and, above all, that most useftl’
thing called a grindstone.

|
i
j
ROBINSON CRUSOE.

“i these I secured, together with seve-
ral things belonging to the gunner, particu-
iarly two or three iron crows, and two
parrels of musket bullets, seven muskets,
and another fowling piece, with some small



quantity of powder more; a large bag-full
of small shot, and a great roll of sheet lead ;
but this last was so heavy I could not
hoist it up to get it over the ship’s side.
Besides these things, I took all the men’s
elothes that I could find, and a spare fore-
top sail, a hammock, and some bedding;
and with this [ loaded my second raft, and
brought them all safe on shore, to my very
great comfort.
_ I was under some apprehension during
my absence from the land, that at least my
provisions might be devoured on shore;
but when I came back, I found no sign of
any visitor; only there sat a creature like a
‘wild cat, upon one of the chests, which,



29



when I came towards it, ran away @. little
distance, and then stood still. She sat very
composed and unconcerned, and looked fuli
in my face, as if she had a mind to be
acquainted with me. I presented my gun
to her, but, as she did not understand it,
she was perfectly unconcerned at it, nor
did she offer to stir away; upon which I
tossed her a bit of biscuit, though, by the
way, I was not very free of it, for my store
was not great; however, I spared her a bit,
T say, and she went to it, smelled at it, and
ate it, and looked (as pleased) for more;
bat I thanked her, and could spare no
more, so she marched off.

Having got my second cargo on shore—
though I was obliged to open the barrels of
powder, and bring them by parcels, for they
were too heavy, being large casks—I went
to work to make me a little tent, with the
sail, and some poles which I cut for that
purpose; and into this tent I brought
everything that I knew would spoil either
with rain or sun; and I piled all the empty
chests and casks up in a circle round the
tent, to fortify it from any sudden attempt,
either from man or beast.

When I had done this, I blocked up the
door of the tent with some boards within,
and an empty chest set up on end without;


ae ROBINSON CRUSOE.

ang spreading one of the beds upon the
ground, laying my two pistols just at my
head, and my gun at length by me, I went
to bed for the first time, and slept very
quietly all night. I was very weary and
heavy; for the night before I had slept
little, and had labored hard all day, as
well to fetch those things from the ship, as
to get them on shore.

I had the biggest magazine of all kinds
now that ever was laid up, I believe, for one
man; but still I was not satisfied, for while

ZA



the ship stood upright in that posture, I
thought I ought to get everything out of
her Icould. So every day, at low water, I
went on board, and brought away some.
thing or other; but particularly the third
time I went, I brought away as much of
the rigging as I could, as also all the small
rope and rope twine I could get, with a
piece of spare canvas, which was to mend
the sails upon occasion, and the barrel of
wet gunpowder. In a word, I brought
away all the sails, first and last; only that
E was fain to cut them in pieces, and bring





as much at a time as I could, for they were
no more useful to me for sails, but as mere
canvas only.

But that which comforted me more still,
was, that at last of all, after I had made
five or six such voyages as these, and
thought I had nothing more to expect from
the ship that was worth my meddling with
—I say, after all this, I found a great hogs-
head of bread, three large runlets of rum
or spirits, a box of fine sugar, and a barrel
of fine flour; this was surprising to me, be-
cause I had given over expecting any more
provisions except what was spoiled by the
water. I soon emptied the hogshead of the
bread, and wrapped it up, parcel by parcel,
in pieces of the sails, which I cut out; and,
in a word, I got all this on shore also,
though at several times.

The next day I made another voyage, and
now, having plundered the ship of what
was portable, I cut up the cable in pieces
that I could lift, and gathered all the iron
work that I could move. I cut up the
yards and made a raft to take it all ashore,
but when I got into the little cove, the ratt
upset and my load all went to the bottom.
However, when it was low water, I got the
most of it out.

If it had remained calm, I verily believe
that I would have cut up the whole ship
and got it ashore. The twelfth time that
I went on board, I found some money and
some knives. The former was of no worth
to me, but I took it, and as the wind began
to rise I hurried on shore. It blew very
hard that night, and in the morning there
was no more ship to be seen.

I now began to think of securing mysell

against wild beasts and savages, by build











ROBINSON CRUSOE.





ing a dwelling, and I resolved to make me
both a tent and a cave, and I set about
finding a more healthy and suitable spot
than where I then was.

T consulted several things in my situa-
tion, which I found would be proper for
me: first, health and fresh water ; secondly,
shelter from the heat of the sun; thirdly,
security from ravenous creatures, whether
man or beast; fourthly, a view to the sea,
that if God sent any ship in sight, I might
not Jose any advantage for my deliverance,
of which I was not willing to banish my
expectation yet,

In search of a place proper for this, I
found a little plain on the side of a rising
nill, whose front towards this little plain
was steep as a house side, so that nothing
could come down upon me from the top.
On the side of the rock there was a hollow
place, worn a little way in, like the en-
trance or door of a cave; but there was
not really any cave, or way into the rock,
at all.

On the flat of the green, just below this
hollow place, I resolved to pitch my tent,
This plain was not above a hundred



end of it, descended irregularly every way,
down into the low ground by the sea-side.

Before I set up my tent, I drew a half:
circle before the hollow place, and in this
half-circle I pitched two rows of strong
stakes, driving them into the ground till
they stood very firm, the biggest end being
out of the ground above five feet and a
half, and sharpened on the top. The two
rows did not stand above six inches from
one another.

Then I took the pieces of cable which I
had cut in the ship, and Jaid them in rows,
upon one another, within the circle, be
tween these two rows of stakes, up to the



yards | top, placing other stakes in the insit

broad, and about twice as long, and lay | leaning against them, about two feet andi

green before my door; and, at the

half high, like a spur to a post; and tli
ROBINSON CRUSOE.

L——— eeeeeeee
kj

east could get into it or over It.



feree was so strong, that neither man nor| year are very violent there.



IT made :t
double—viz., one smaller tent within, anc

The entrance into this place I made to] one larger ent above it; and covered the

be, not hy a dcor, but by a short ladder to| uppermost part of it with a large tar

po over the top; which ladder, when I was
fh, I lifted over after me Saad so I was
completely fenced im a ad
thought, from all the world, and conse- ;
quently slept secure in the mgh$, which



other ‘wise I could not have done; though,
as it appeared afterwards, ieie was no
need of all this caution from the enemies
that I apprehended danger from.

Into this fence, or fortreas) with infinite
labor, I carried all my riches, all my pro-
visicrs, ammunition, and stores; and I
made me a large tent also, to preserve me
from the rains, that in one part of the





fortified, as 1]

paulin, which I had saved among he sails,
When I had done all this, I dug a cave

in the hill-side, piling the earth and stones,
within my fence so as to raise the ground

nearly to the top. Before I had done ail

this, a thunder-storm, accompanied by sharp
flashes of lightning, frightened me very
much for fear that my powder would take
fire. As soon as the storm was over, I
went to work and separated the powder
into small parcels and hid it away im
different places in the rocks.

In the interval of time while this wae
doing, I weni out at least once every day
Ge ROBINSON CRUSOE.

Se ey

with my gun, as well to divert myself, as | and I was upon the rocks, they took no
to see if I could kill anything fit for food ;| notice of me; from whence I concluded,
and, as near as I could, to acquaint myself} that by the position of their optics, theix
with what the island produced. The first | sight was so directed downward, that thep



time L weut out, I discovered that tuere | did not readily see objects that were abov
were goats ‘n the island, which was a great | them; so afterwards I always climbed thi
satislaction to me; but they were so shy, | rocks first, to get above them, and the
£0 subtle, a.d so swift of foot, that i was | had frequently a fair mark,

the most dificult thing in the world to| The first shot I made among these cred
come at them; but I was not discouraged | tures I killed a she-goat, which had a litt!
at this. 1 observed if they saw me in the | kid by her, which grieved me heartily; fo
valleys. though they were upon the rocks, | when the old one fell, the kid stood sto«
they would run away, as in a terrible fright; | still by her, till I came and took her u!
hut if they were feeding in the valleys, | and not only so, but when I carried ti

36 ROBINSON CRUSOE.




kept a strict account of everything, but
they were soon gone. We had on the
ship two cats and a dog, and I had brought
both of the cats on aoe As for the dog
he swam ashore, and became my trusty
servant for many years.

old one with me upon my shoulders, the
kid followed me quite to my enclosure ;
upon which I laid down the dam, and took
the kid in my arms, and carried it over my
pale, in hopes to have bred it up tame;
but it would not eat, so I was forse to
kill it and eat 1t myself. The want of tools made every work £

After 1 had been there abouv ten or | did go on heavily; and it was near a whole
twelve TONS; it came inte my thoughts that | year beiore I had entirely finished my

i should lose my reckoning of time, and | | littie pale, or surrounded habitation. The
should even forget the Sabbath-day from’ piles or stakes, which were as heavy as I
the working-days: but to prevent this, E: could well lift, were a long time in cutting
and preparing in the Sas and more, by
fee in bringing home; so that i spent

sometimes two days i in eutting and bring-
ing home one of those posts, and a third
day in driving it into the ground Bui
what need I have been concerned at the
tediousness of anything I had to o, seeing
I had time enough to do it in? nor had I
any other pag if that had beer
over, at least that f could foresee, except —
the ranging the island to seek for food,
and climbing the high recks to see if any
vessel was within sight.

Uaving now brought my mind a little
ito relish my condition, and given over
cut it with my knife upon a large yost, in | looking out to sea, to see if IF could spy a
capital letters, and making it inte a great | ship; I say, giving over these things, J
eross, I set it up on the shore where ! first began to apply myself to ascommodate my
landed, viz., “I came on shore here on the | way of living, and to make things as easy
30th of September, 1659.” | to me as I could.

Upon the sides of this square post Leut| I have already described my habitation,
every day a notch with my knife, and | which was a tent under the side of a rock,
every seventh notch was as long again as {surrounded with a strong pale of posts
the rest, and every first day of the month | and cables; but I might now rather cail it
as fong again as that long one; and thus I! wall, for I raised a kind of wall up

Rept mv
I had brought from the ship some pens, | the outeide; and after some time (I think
iais and paper, and while they lasted I it was a year and a half) I raised raftes






ROBINSON CRUSOE. x



af LR MONT TIT TCE ORIENT I







from it, leaning to the rock, and thatched |
or covered it with boughs of trees, and

such things as I could get to keep out the ;
rain, which I found at some times of the

year very violent.

I have already observed how I broaght |
all my goods into this pale, and inte ‘his |
cave ch I had made ‘behind me Batlj
must observe, too, that at first this was 3
confused heap of goods, which, as they lay
in no order, so they took up ail my place.
I had no room to turn myself; so 1 set my
self to enlarge my cave, and worked far-
ther into the earth, for it was a loose,
sandy rock, which yielded easily to the
labor I bestowed on it; and so when £j
found I was pretty safe as to beasts of |
prey, I worked sideways, to the right |
hand, into the rock; and then turning to! wanted a board, ee ad ue other way but te
the right again, wor ked quite ont, and cut down a tree, set tt on an edge belors
made ine a door to come out on the out: , me, and hew it flat en either side with my
side of my pale or fortification. axe, till I had brought it to be as thin as 4

And now J began to apply myself to | | plank, and then dub it smooth with my
Make such necessary things as I found £ i adze. It is true, by this methed I coule
:



roost wanted, partic valarly a chair and # | make but one board out of a whole tree,
table; for without these I was not able to | but this i had ne remedy for but patience,
enjoy the few comforts I had in the world.; However, | made me a table and a chair,
I could not write, or eat, or do several | in the firsé ee and this I did out of the
things with so much pleasure without a| short pieces of boards that 1 brought on
table. | say raft oe the ship. But when I had

Thad never handiad a tool in my life; | wrought out some boards as above, 1 made
and yet, in time, by labor, application, and | large shelves, of the breadth of a foot »nd.
contrivance, I found, at last, that I wanted | ali “half, one over another, al} alony one
Rothing but I could have made it, espe-| side of my eave, to lay all my tools, naiix
cially if Thad had the tools. However, I | and iron-work on; and, in a word, to sepx:
made abundance of things, even without | rate every thing at large into their piaces,
toois ; and some with no more tools than | that I might come easily at them; also 4
an adze and a hatchet, which, perhaps, | knocked pieces into the wall of the ruck,
were never made that way before, and that | to hang my guns and all things that would
With infinite labor. For example, if I| hang up; so that had my cave been to be»
38



reen, it looked like a general magazine of
sil necessary things; and I had everything
xo ready at my hand, that it was a great
pleasure to me to see all my goods in such
order,



As Jong as my ink
lasted IT kept a jour:
nal of all that vapb to me, of wuaich I
will now give a part, for much that T wrote
at that time I have already told, and need
not repeat

September 39,
Robinson Crusve, being shipwrecked, dur-
ing a dreadful storm, in the offing, came on
shore on this dismal, unfortunate island,

which I called “The Island of Despair ;”

1659.—I, poor, miserable

all the rest of the ship’s company being

drowned, aud myself almost dead.

All the rest of the day I spent in affliet-
ing myself at the dismal circumstances |
was brought to; viz, 1 had neither food,
house, clothes, weapon, nor place to fly to;
and, in despair of any relief, saw nothing
but death before me: either that I should
be devoured by wild beasts, or perish by
starvation.

Oct. 25.—It rained all night and all
day, with some gusts of wind; during
which time the ship broke in pieces, the
wind biowing a little harder than before,



%





ROBINSON CRUSOE.

and was no more to be seen, except the
wreck of her, and that only at low water.
T spent this day in govering and securing
the goods which I saved, that the rain
might not spoil them.

Oct. 26.—I walked about the shore
almost all day, to find out a place to fix
my habitation, greatly concerned to secure
myself from any attack in the night, either
from wild beasts or men. ieht
I fixed upon a proper place, under a rock,
and marked out a semicircle for my el

Towards

campment, which I resolved to strengthen
with a work, wall, or fortification, made of
double piles, lined within with cables, and
without with turf.

Krom the 26th to the 3

rarrying all 4

ae Tt worked

very hard in y goods to iny
new habitation, though some part of the
time it rained exceeding hard,

Nov. 1—On this day T made a stric
division of my time, fixing the hours which
I would devote to my several duties, “viz:
every morning, to walk out with my
it did) not rain:

oul
for two or three hours, if
then to employ myself to work: til abou
eleven o’clock; then to eat what EF had t
live on; then to lie down and sleep, th
weather being very hot: ; then to
The werking Paik this day w:
wholly employed in making my fable,

This day L went abroad wit!
iad ext

ia UC

VW or

again, of



Nov. 5.
my gun and my dog, and killed a wi
her skin pretty soft, but her flesh good fy
nothing.
C took

Coming

Of every creature that DT kille:
off the skin and preserved |
back by the seashore, E saw i

or three seals, but not well knowing w!
they were at first, while I stood oagine:

them, they got into the sea and eseape? 1!
ROBINSON CRUSOE. KO





ne

— : : ares
Nov. 17.—This day I began to dig behind | worked it by little and little into the form
my tent into the rock, to make room for| of a shovel or spade; the handle exactly

my further conveniency.
' Note—Three things I wanted exceed-
ingly for this work, viz, a pickaxe, a
shovel, and a wheelbarrow, or basket ; so I
desisted from my work, and began to con-
sider how to supply that want, and make
me some tools. As for the pickaxe, I
made use of the iron crows, which were
proper enough, though heavy; and the
next thing was a shovel, or spade, This was
so absolutely necessary, that, indeed, I
could do nothing effectually without it; but
what kind of one to make I knew not.
Nov. 18.—The next day, in searching
the woods, I found a tree of that wood,
er like it, which, in the Brazils, they call
the iron-tree, for its exceeding hardness ; of
this, with great labor, and almost spoiling
my axe, I cut a piece, and brought it home,
with difficulty enough, for it was exceed-
mgly heavy, The excessive hardness of
the wood, and having no other way, made
mea long while upon this machine, for I



| make wicker-ware

shaped like ours in England, only that the

board part having no iron shod upon it at

. a La.
Sag =
oN aot Es P



SP



bottom, it would not last me so long ; how
ever, it served well enough for the uses
which I had occasion to put it to; but
never was a shovel, I believe, made after
that fashion or so long making,

I was still deficient, for I wanted
basket, or a wheelbarrow. A basket {
could not make by any means, having no
such things as twigs that would bend to
at least, none yet found
out; and as to the wheelbarrow, I fancied
I could make all but the wheel; but that
I had no notion of; neither did I know
how to go about it; besides, f had no
possible way to make iron gudgeons for the
spindle or axis of the wheel to run in: so
I gave it over, and so, for sarrying away


‘a0



ROBINSON CRUSOE.

the earth which I dag out of the cave, I |in widening and deepening my cave, thn
made a thing like a hod, which the laborers | it might hold my goods commodiously

carry mortar in, when they serve the brick-

layers.

Note.—During all this time 1 worked te
make this room, or cave, spacious enough



This was not so difficult to me as the
making the shovel; and yet this and the
shovel, and the attempt which I made in
vain to make a wheelbarrow, took me no
Jess than four days, I mean always except-
| ng my morning’s walk with my gun, which
I seldom failed, and very seldom failed
also of bringing home something fit to eat.
_ WVov. 23.—My other work having stood
still, because of my making these tools,
when they were finished I went on, and
working every day, as my strength and
time allowed, spent eighteen days entirely

to accommodate me as a warehouse, 0!
magazine, a kitchen, a dining-room, and i
cellar. As for a lodging, I kept to the
tent; except that sometimes, in the we
season of the year, it rained so hard, that !
could not keep myself dry, which cause
me afterwards to cover all my place within
my pale with long poles, in the form 0!
rafters, leaning against the rock, and loai
them with flags and J-~ge leaves of trees
like a thatch.

Dec. 10.—I began now to think my cavé
or vault finished, when on a sudden “

{
: ROBINSON CRUSOE.

oo

seems I had made it too large), a great

quantity of earth fell down from the top.

i now had a great deal of work to do over
again, for I had the loose earth to carry:

out, and then I had to pre) un the ceiling.



him’ upon some goats, Lut thev all faced
about upon him, and he knew ‘his danger
and would not come near them.

All this time it rained hard nearly every
day. J made rounds in the woods for game





Dec, 11.—This day I went to work and
got posts pitched upright to the top, with
boards across over each top, and in a week
I had the roof secured.

Dec. 27,—Killed a young goat, od lamed
another, so that I catched it and led it home

by a string. When IJ had it home, I bound
and splintered up its leg, which was broke,

Note—I took such care of it that it
lived, and the leg grew as strong as ever.
By nursing it so long, it grew tame and
would not go away. This led me to think
of taming more goats,

Jan. 2.—Went out with my dog, and set

when the rain permitted me, and made fre
quent discoveries in these walks of somes
thing or other to my advantage ; particularly
I found a kind of wild pigeons, which
build, not as wood pigeons in a tree, but
rather as house pigeons, in the holes of the
rocks; and takmg some young ones, I en
deavored to breed them up tame, aud cid
so; but when they grew older they flew ut
away, which perhaps was at first for want
of feeding them, for I had nothing to give
them; however, I frequently found their
nests, and got their young ones, which were
very good meat.
42 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

And now, in the managing my household | which was generally by seven o'clock, |
affairs, I found myself wanting in many | was obliged to go to bed. I remember:
things, which I thought at first it was im- | the lump of bees’-wax with which I mac
possible for me to make; as, indeed, as to | candles inmy African adventure; but I ha!
some of them it was: for instance, I could | none of that now. The only remedy I hai
never make a cask to be hooped. I had a; was, that when I had killed a goat, I saved
small runlet or two, as I observed before; | the tallow, and with a little dish made
but I could never arrive to the capacity of | clay, which I baked in the sun, to which |
making one by them, though I spent many | added a wick of some oakum, I made 1
weeks about it; IL could never put in the |a lamp; and this gave me light, though wi
a clear, steady light like a candle.

In the middle of all my labors, it hap.
pened that, remmaging my things, T found
a little bag, which had been filled with com
for the feeding of poultry. What little 1.
mainder of corn had been in the bag was
all devoured by the rats, and I saw not hing
in the bag but husks and dust; and bei
willing to have the bag for some other us,
I shook the husks of corn out of it on one’
side of my fortification, under the rock. _

It was a little before the great rains juy
now mentioned, that I threw this stuff away:
taking no notice of anything, and not +’
much asremembering that [had thrown any
thing there, when, about a month after!
saw some few stalks of something give
shooting upon the ground, which I fanci
might be some plant Thad not seen. But)
was surprised when, after a little lonw
time, I saw about ten or twelve ears con
out, which were perfect green barley,
the same kind as our English barley.

It is impossible to express the astonis
ment and confusion of my thoughts on tl
oceasion. I had hitherto acted upon no h
ligious foundation at all; indeed, I |i
very few notions of religion in my |
nor had entertained any sense of anyt:
that had befallen me, otherwise than

——=





heads, nor join the staves so true to one an-
other as to make them hold water; so I gave
that also over.

In the next place, I was at a great loss
for candles; so that as soon as it was dark,

oo i e308
ROBINSON CRUSOE.

43



chance, or, as we lightly say, what pleases
God, without so much as inquiring into the
end of Providence in these things. But
after I saw barley grow there in a climate
which I knew was not proper for corn, and
especially that I knew not how it came
there, it startled me strangely, and I began
to suggest that God had miraculously caused
this grain to grow without any help of seed
sown.

This touched my heart a little, and
brought tears out of my eyes, and I began
to bless myself that such a prodigy of
Nature should happen upon my account ;
and this was the more strange to me, be-
eause I saw near it still, all along by the
side of the rock, straggling stalks of rice,
and which I knew, because I had seen it
grow in Africa, when I was ashore there.

I carefully saved the ears of this corn,!

you may be sure, in their season, which
was about the end of June; and laying up
every corn, I resolved to sow them all
again, hoping in time to have sufficient to
supply me with bread. But it was not
till the fourth year that I would allow
myself the least grain of this corn to eat,
and even then but sparingly; for I lost all
that I sowed the first season, by not
observing the proper time; for I sowed it
just before the dry season, so that it never
came up at all.

Besides this barley, there were twenty
or thirty stalks of rice, which I preserved
with the same care, and whose use was of
the same kind, or to the same purpose,
viz., to make me bread, or rather food;
Vfer I found ways to cook it up without

aking, though I did that also after some



But to return to my Journal :—

April 16.—I finished the ladder; so 2
went up the ladder to the top, and then
pulled it up after me, and let it down on
the inside. This was a complete enclosure
to me; for within I had room enough, and
nothing. could come at me from without,
unless it could first mount my wall.



The very next day after this wall was
finished, I had almost had all my labor
overthrown at once, and myself killed.
The case was thus:— inside of it, behind my tent, just in the
entrance into my cave, I was terribly
frightened with a most dreadful surpris-
ing thing indeed; for, all on a sudden, IT
found the earth came tumbling down from
the roof of my cave, and from the edge of
the hill over my head, and two of the posts
I had set up in the cave cracked in a fright-
ful manner. I was heartily scared; and for!
fear I should be buried in it, I ran forward:
to my ladder, and not thinking myself safe |
there neither, I got over my wall for fear
of the pieces of the hill, which I expected
might roll down upon me. I was no sooner
stepped down upon the firm ground, than
I plainly saw it was a terrible earthquake ;
ae

ROBINSON CRUSOE.



for the ground I stood on shook three
times, with such shocks as would have
overturned the strongest building that
‘could be supposed to have stood upon the
earth; and a great piece of the top of the
rock, which stood about half a mile from
me, next the sea, fell down with such a
terrible noise as I never heard in all my
hfe, I perceived also the very sea was put
into a violent motion by it.

I was so amazed with the thing itself,
having never felt the like, or discoursed
with any one that had, that I was like one
dead or stupefied; and the motion of the



easch made my stomach sick like one that
was tossed at sea, But the noise of the
falling of the rock awaked me as it were,
_ and rousing me from the stupefied condi-
tion I was in, filled me with horror, and I
thought of nothing then, but the hill fall-
ing upon my tent and all my household
goods, and burying all at once.

_ When I found there were no more shocks,
1 began to take courage, but I was for a
long time afraid to get over the wall for
fear the hill would fall on me, To make
my situation worse, the rain began to fall
down in torrents, and there came a terrible

%

hurricane of wind. The sea was lashed to
foam; and trees were torn up by the roots,
and, in short, it was a dreadful storm.

In about three hours the wind abated,
but the rain continued all night and all the
next day. As there were no more shocks,
I climbed over the wall and went into my
cave to escape the rain, but still in great
fear that it would fall upon me.

This led me to a resolve that I would
find a new place for my home, where an
earthquake could not harm me, and I find
this in my journal:

April 22.—I began to consider of means
to put this resolve in execution; but |
was at a great loss about my tools, |
had three large axes, and abundance of
hatchets (for we earried the hatchets for
traffic with the Indians); but with much
chopping and cutting knotty hard wool,
they were all full of notches and dull;
and though I had a grindstone, I coull
not turn it and grind my tools too. Al
length, I contrived a wheel with a string,
to turn it with my foot, that I might han
both my hands at liberty.

Note.—I had not seen any such thing i
England, or at least not to take notice hot
it was done, though since I have observe
it was very common there; besides the
my grindstone was very lange and heavy
This machine cost me a full week's w a
tc bring it to perfection.

April 28, 29.—These two whole a
took up in grinding my tools, my machit
for turning my grindstone performing v i
well.

Aprit 30.—Having perceived my De
had been low a great while, I now took!
survey of it, and reduced myself to 0
ROBINSON CRUSOE.

ves eee PRs eae tae:

Eons a day, which made oO heart |



we pmething lie on the shore like a cask;
when I came to it, I found a small eer
anil two or three pieces of the wreck of the
ghip, which were driven on shore by the
je hurricane; and fooking towards the:
rec ky I thought it seemed to lie higher |

ht of the water than it used to do. Ij
“mined the barrel which was driven
shore, and soon found that it was a bar-
of ae ; but it had taken water, ;
the ee was caked as hard as a|











Or more.

a vhen I came to the ship, I found that
the earthquake or the hurricane had cast it
mo close to the shore that I could walk









‘his aie diverted my thoughts from
ig ny eee and I busied myself

2 L fourd was filled with sand. This
paid uot do, but [resolved to pull her
inora and to that end I worked every |

Macy 4.—I went afishing, but cauzht
one ish that 1 durst eat of, till I was
ary of my sport; when, just going to
ve off, | crmybt a young dolphin, I had
fe nie a long Hine of some rope-yarn, but
ad xo hooks; yet I frequently caught
/euouch, as iach asl cared to eat; all
Which t dred in the sun, and ate them







a3

May 5.—-Worked on reas Ane :

euk

.another beam asunder. and - brought ae
__Jn the morning, looking tewara ; great fir planks from otf the decks, whicn [
side, the tide being low, I saw | tied together, and made swim on shore
when the tide of flood came in.











May 6.—Worked on the wreck; got
several iron bolts, and other pieces of iron
work; worked very hard, and came home
very much tired.

May 7.—Went to the wreck again, witk
an intent not to work, but found the weight
of the wreck had broken itself down; that
several pieces of the ship seemed io lie
loose, and the inside of the hold la 9
open that I could see into #


May 8.—Went to the wreck, and cur-
ried an iron crow to wrench up the deck
which lay now quite clear of the water or
sand. Iwrenched open two planks, and
brought them on shore also with the tide.

May 9.—Went to the wreck, and with
the crow made way into the body of the
wreck, and felt several casks, and loosened
them with the crow, but could not break
them up. I felt also a roll of English
lead, and could stir it, but it was too heavy
to move.

May 10, 11, 12, 13, 14.—Went every
- day to the wreck ; and got a good deal of
pieces of timber, and boards, or planks, and
two or three hundredweight of iron.

May 15.—I carried two hatchets, to try
if I could not cut a piece off the roll of
lead, but as it lay about a foot and a half
in the water, I could not make any blow to
drive the hatchet.

May 16.—It had blown hard in the
night, and the wreck appeared more broken
by the force of the water; but I stayed so
long in the woods, to get pigeons for food,
that the tide prevented me going to the
wreck,

I continued this work every day to the
15th of June, except the time necessary to
get food, which I always appointed, during
this part of my employment, to be when
the tide was up, that I might be ready
when it was ebbed out; and by this time
I had gotten timber, and plank, and iron.
work enough to have built a good boat, if
I had known how; and also I got, at seve-
ral times, and in several pieces, near one
hundredweight of the sheet-lead,

June 16.—Going down to the sea-side, I
found a large tortoise, or turtle. This was



ROBINSON CRUSOE.



the first I had seen, which, it seems, was
only my misfortune; for had i happened
to be on the other side of the island, [
might have had hundreds of them every '
day.

“une 17 U spent in cooking the turtle. 1
found in her threescore eggs; and her flesh.
was to me, at that time, the most savore'
and pleasant that ever I tasted in my life
having had no flesh, but of goats and |
fowls, since I landed in this horrzble place,

June 18,—Rained all theday, and stayed
within. I thought, at this time, the rain
felt coid, and I was something chilly,
which } knew was not usual in that latitude.

June 19.—Very ill, and shivering, as if
the weather had been cold.

June 20.—No rest all night: violent
pains in my head, and feverish.

June 21.—Very ill; frightened almost ta
death with the apprehension of my sad con-
dition—to be sick, and no help; prayed
to God, for the first time since the storia
off of Hull, but scarce knew what I said
or why; my thoughts being all confused.

June 22.—A little better; but under
dreadful apprehensions of sickness,

June 23.—Very bad again; cold ané
shivering, and then a violent headache.

June 24.—Much better.

June 25.—An ague very violent: the fit
held me seven hours; cold fit, and hot with
faint sweats after it,

June 26. — Better; and having
victuals to eat, took my gun, but found my
self very weak; however, I killed a she
goat, and with much difficulty got it home
and broiled some of it, and ate. I woula
fain have stewed it, and made some brei?.
but had no pot,

48



June 2’ —The ague again so violent that
I lay a-bed all day, and neither ate nor
drank. I was ready to perish with thirst ;
but so weak I had no strength to stand up,
or to get myself any: water to drink.
Prayed to God again, but was light-headed ;
and when I was not, I was so ignorant I
knew not what to say; only I lay and
cried, “Lord, look upon me! Lord, pity
me! Lord, have mercy upon me!” I sup-
pose I did nothing else for two or three
hours; till, the fit wearing off, I fell asleep,
and did not awake till far in the night.
When I awoke, I found myself much re-
freshed, but weak, and exceeding thirsty ;
however, as I had no water in my whcle
habitation, I was forced to He till morning,
and went to sleep again. In this second
sleep, I had this terrible dream: I thought

.



that I was sitting on the ground, and that
i saw a man descend from a great black
moud in a bright flame of fire. His
sountenanee was most dreadful, When he

.OBINSON CRUSOE.



stepped cpon the ground, I thought th:
earth trembled, just as it had done in the
earthquake. Then I heard a voice so
terrible that it is impossible to express
the terror of it. All that I. understood
was this :-—* Seeing all these things have
not brought thee to repen‘.uce, now thou
shalt die ;’—at which words, I thought he
lifted up the spear that was in his hand to
Jal] me,

No one that shall ever read this account
will expect that I sheuld be able to de
scribe the horrors of my soul at this terrible
vision. Nor is it any more possible to de:
scribe the impression that remained upon
my mind when I awaked, and found it
was but a dream.

I had, alas! no divine knowledge. What
Y had received from my father had been
worn out by eight. years of seafaring
wickedness. During all that time I had
never thought seriously of God, nor had |
been thankful to Him for His great mer
cies. But now I began to pray for the
first time in many years, after which I fell,
into a refreshing sleep. |

June 28.—Feeling much better, I arose
and cooked three of the turtle’s eggs in
the ashes, and ate them. I tned to walk
about with my gun, but was too weak to;
go far, and I sat down to think. I knew
that the ague would return the next day,
and then I remembered that the Brazilians
took tobacco for such distempers. I had

~ gome tobaceo in one of the chests that |)

had saved, and I went to get it. I was
directed by heaven, no doubt, for I found
in the chest a cure both for soul and body.
Packed in with the tobacco was a Bibl,
which I had forgotten all about, but whid!
ROBINSON CRUSOZ#.
(rege EN a A Le

Â¥ was now overjoyed to find. I took it to
my table and read from it a long time, and |
having taken a dose of tobacco steeped in'|
vum, I went to bed.

‘be next day I had the fever, but not so
Gas, and July 3d I missed it for good and
ali. I was, however, so weak for many |
uays that I could do but ttle more than |
sit at the mouth of my cave and try to
make baskets.

It was the 15th of July that I began to
take a more particular survey of the island
tiself, I went up the creek first, where, as
I ininted, I brought my rafts on shore, I
found, after T came about two miles up,
that the tide did not float any higher; and '
that it was no more than a little brook. }
On iis banks were many meadows covered
with grass, and on the higher parts I found |
tobacco growing. There were many other !
ants that D had never seen before,

On the next day I went farther the same
way, and, much to my joy, found melons
on the ground in great abundance, and |
grapes hanging in great clusters from the ;
branches of the trees, IY staid there all
at night, sleeping in a tree as when Tj
rst landed. In the morning, I traveled on |
nie four miles farther. Here I found a!
licious valley, where everything appeared |
30 fresh and green that it looked like aj
planted garden. Here were orange, lemon,
lime and cocoa trees, but few of them bore
uit, I gathered some green limes, and,
xed with water, I fo ind their juice very
freshing. I resolved to lay up a store of
‘all for the wet season.

wth order to do this, I gathered a great
heap of grapes in one place, a lesser heap

* snother place, and a great pareel of

wt

Xb :
i


























i
i
|
i

se





i
'
i
{



eter Sains

42



imes and lemons in another place: and
aking a few of each with me, I traveled
home, but before I got thither, the grapes
were spoiled; the richness of the fruit, and
the weight of the juice, having broken
them and bruised them, they were good for
little ornothing. .As to the limes, they were
good, but I could bring but a few.

]
4
u
7



nel Pea

The next day I went back, having made
1ne two small bags to brig home my har.
vest; but I was surprised, when, coming to
sty heap of grapes, I found them all spread
abroad, trodden to pieces, and dragged
about, some here, some there, and abund-
ance eaten and devoured, By .this I con-
cluded there were some wild creatures
thereabouts, which had done this; but
what they were I knew not. However, I
took another course; for I gathered » large
BO

quantity of the grapes, and hung them
upon the out branches of the trees, that
they might cure and dry in the sun; and
as for the limes and lemons, I carried as
many back as I could well stand under.

| When I came home from this journey, I
contemplated with great pleasure the fruit-
fulness of that valley, and the pleasantness
of the situation; the security from storm
on that side of the water, and the wood;
and concluded that I had pitched upon a
place to fix my abode, which was by far
the worst part of the country. Upon the
whole, I began to consider of removing my
habitation, and to look out for a place



ROBINSON CRUSOE. |
reece eer cern nee re A CE ‘

equally safe as where now I was situate, if
possible, in that pleasant, fruitful part of
the isiand.

This thought ran long in my head, and
I was exceedingly fond of it for some time,
the pleasantness of the place tempting me ;
but when I came to a nearer view of it, J
considered that I was now by the sea-side,
where it was at least possible that some-
thing might happen to my advantage ;
and that the same ill fate that brought
me hither, might bring some other un.
happy wretches to the same place ; and to
enclose myself among the hills and woods
in the centre of the island, was to antici-
pate my bondage, and to render such an
affair not only improbable, but impossible;
and that therefore I ought not by any
means to remove. .

However, I was so enamored with
this place, that I spent much of my time
there for the whole remaining part of the
month of July; and though, upon second
thoughts, T resolved as above not to remove,
yet I built me a little kind of a bower, and
surrounded it at a distance with a strong
fence, being a double hedge, as high as |
could reach, well staked, and filled between
with brushwood; and here I lay very
secure, sometimes two or three nights to-
gether, always going over it with a ladder
as before; so that I fancied now I had my
country house and my sea-coast house.

The 8rd of August, I found the grapes I
had hung up were perfectly dried, and
indeed were excellent good raisins cf the
sun; so I began to take them down from the
trees, and it was very happy that I did so.
for the rains which followed would have
spoiled them, and I had lost the better part

52 ROBINSON CRUSOE.



wf my winter’s food; for I had above two
hundred large bunches of them. No sooner
ad I taken them al! down, and carried
most of them home to my cave, but it began

to rain; and it rained, more or less, every

day, till the middle of October, and some-
times so violently, that I could not stir out
of my cave for several days.



In this season I was much surprised with
the increase of my family. I had been con-
cerned for the loss of one of my cats, who
yan away from me, and I heard no more
tidings of her, till, to my astonishment, she
eame home about the end of August, with

three kittens. I afterward came to be so
pestered with cats, that I was forced to
kill them like vermin, or wild beasts, and
to drive them from my house as much as
possible.

From the 14th of August to the 26th,
incessant rain, so that I could not stir, and
was now very careful not to be much wet,
dn tlris confinement, I began to be strait
ened for food; but venturing out twice, I
one day killed a goat; and the last day,
which was the 26th, found a very large
sortoise, which was a treat to me, and my



oer,



A oo

food was regulated thus :—I ate < bunch of

raisins for my breakfast; a piece of the

goat’s flesh, or of the turtle, for my dinner,
broiled (for, to my great misfortune, I had
no vessel to boil or stew anything), and
two or three of the turtle’s eggs for supper.

Sept. 30.—I was now come to the un:
happy anniversary of my landing. I cast
up the notches on my post, and found
I had been on shore three hundred and
sixty-five days. I kept this day as asolema
fast, setting it apart for religious exercises,
prostrating myself on the ground with tle

=| most serious humiliation, confessing my

sins to God, acknowledging his righteous
judgment upon me, and praying to him to
have mercy upon me through Jesus Christ;
and having not tasted the least refreshment;
for twelve hours, even till the going dowal
of the sun, I then ate a biscuit-cake and «
bunch of grapes, and went to bed, finishing
the day as I began it. I now set off every!
seventh day as the Sabbath day.

My ink gave out about this time, and I
gave up my journal, After a time I am
how to divide the rainy season from the
dry season, but at first the lack of thi
knowledge came near costing me dear, fo
I sowed my grain before the dry season
and not a stalk came up. Fortunately]
had not sown it all, and I sowed the fev
grains left before the rainy season and i
grew very well, though it was several yean
before I had enough to make a crop. |

After I had found, by experience, the ib
consequences of being abroad in the raitl
I took care to furnish myself with prov);
sions before hand, siat I might not by,
obliged to go oz, and I sat within door,
as much as possible during the wet mouth

r






In this time I found much employment,
and very suitable also to the time, for I
found great oecasion of many things which
I had no way to furnish myself with but
by hard labor and ‘constant application ;

particularly, I had tried many ways to.

make myself a basket, but all the twigs I
could get for the purpose proved so brittle
that they would do nothing.
| It came into my mind that the twigs of
| that tree from whence I cut my stakes that
'grew might possibly be as tough as the
isallows, willows, and osiers in England,
fand I resolved to try. Accordingly, the
next day I went to my country-house, as I
called it, and cutting some of the smaller
twigs, I found them to my purpose as much
as I could desire. During the next season,
I employed myself in making, as well as
I could, a great many baskets, both to

ROBINSON CRUSOE,

83



carry earth or lay up anything, as I had
occasion ; and though I did not finish them
very handsomely, yet I made them sufii-
ciently servicable for my purpose; and
thus, afterwards, I took care never to be
without them; and as my wicker-ware
decayed, I made more, especially strong,
deep baskets to place my corn in, instead of
sacks, when I should come to have any
quantity of it.

I now resolved to travel quite across to
the other side of the island, so, taking a
hatchet with my gun and dog, and a larger
quantity of powder and shot than usual,
and putting a great bunch of raisins and

_two biscuit cakes in my pouch, I began

my journey.

I saw abundance of parrots, and fain
would I have caught one, if possible, te
have kept it to be tame, and taught i te


5a



speak to me. I did, after some painstak-
ing, catch a young parrot, for I knocked it
down with a stick, and having recovered
- it, I brought it heme; but it was some
‘years before I could make him speak;
however, at last, I taught him to call me
‘by my name very familiarly.
ih iii
ne














As soon as I came to the seashore, I was
surprised to see that I had taken up my
jot on the worst side of the island, for
here, indeed, the shore was covered with
innumerable turtles, whereas, on the other
side, I had found but three in a year and
a half. Here was also an infinite number
of fowls of many kinds, some of which I
had not seen before, and many of them
very good meat, but such as I knew not
the names of, except those called penguins.

T could have shot as many as I pleased,
~ but was very sparing of my powder and
shot, and therefore had more mind to kill
a she-goat, if I could, which I could better
feed on; and though there were many
goats here, more than on the other side of
the island, yet it was with much more
difficulty that I could come near them,

I confess this side of the country was




ROBINSON CRUSOE.

much pleasanter than mine; but yet I had
not the least inclination to remove, for, as
I was fixed in my habitation, it became
natural to me, and I seemed all the while
I was here to be as it were upon a jour.
ney, and from home. However, I trav.
eled along the shore of the sea towards
the east, I suppose about twelve miles, and
then setting up a great pole upon the shore
for a mark, I concluded I would go home
again.

I took another way going home, and
became bewildered and lost, so that I had
to go back to my post and start again. In

[||| this journey, my dog surprised a kid, which

I caught and led by a string till I came te
my bower, where I left him, securely tied.
I cannot express my satisfaction when |
came to what I called my home and threw
myself in my hammock. I had been gone
a month, and it all appeared so comfortable
that I resolved never to leave it for so long
a time again, while I remained on the
island,

It was now that I began sensibly to feel
how much more happy the life I now led
was, with all its miserable circumstances
than the wicked, abominable life I led all
the past part of my days; and now having
changed both my sorrows and my joys:
my very desires altered, and my delights
were perfectly new f--m what they we
at first coming.

Before, as I walked about, either on 1
hunting, or for viewing the country, tl
anguish of my soul at my condition woull
break out upon me on a sudden, and J
very heart would die within me, to think
of the woods, the mountains, the deserts!
was in, and how I was a prisoner, locked
ROBINSON CRUSOE. 53



up with the eternal bars and bolts of the | would go off, and the grief having ex-
ocean, in an uninhabited wilderness, with: } hausted itself would abate. |
out redemption, In the midst of the! But now I began to exercise myself;
greatest composures of my mind, this} with new thoughts. I daily read the Word
would break out upon me like a storm, | of God, and applied all the comforts of it
and make me wring my hands, and weep | to my present state. One morning, being



like a child. Sometimes it would take me| very sad, I opened the Bible upon these
in the middle of my work, and I would sit | words, “I will never leave thee, never for-
down and sigh, and look upon the ground | sake thee.” Immediately it occurred that
for an hour or two together; and this| these words were to me; why otherwise
was still worse to me, for if I could burst | should they be directed in such a manner,
out into tears, or vent myself by words, it | just at the moment when I was mournivg
88



over my condition, as one forsaken of God
and man? “ Well, then,” said I, “if God



ROBINSON CRUSOE.





“

mind at that thought, and I durst not
speak the words. “ Tow canst thou become

does not forsake me, of what ill conse- | such a hypocrite,” said I, even audibly, “to
quence cen it be, or what matters it, though | pretend to be thankful for a condition,



which, however
thou mayst en.
deavor to be eo.
tented with, thou
wouldst rather
pray heartily to.
delivered from?”
So I stopped
there; but though
I could not say |
thanked God for
being there, yet
I sincerely gave
thanks to God foi
opening my eyes
by whatever afflict
Ing providences
to see the forme:
condition of my
life, and to mourn
for my wickednes:
and repent.

Thus I began
my third year. |
was seldom idle,
dividing my tim:

the world should all forsake me seeing, on | according to my daily employments, such 2s

the other hand, if I had all the \vorld, and
should lose the favor and blessing of God,
shere would be no comparison in the loss?”

from this moment I began to conclude
on my mind that it was possible for me to
“e bappy in this forsaken, solitary condi.
on; and I was going to give thanks to
itod for bringing me to this place. [know
sat what it was, but something shocked my

first, my duty to God, and the reading th
Scriptures, which I always set apart som
time for, thrice every day; secondly, the
going abroad with my gun for food, whic
generally took up three hours in every
morning, when it did not rain; thirdly,
the ordering, curing, preserving and coo
ing what I had killed or caught for wy
supply. These took up great part of tle

58

day. Also, it
the middle of the day, when the sun was
in the zenith, the violence of the heat was
too great to stir out; so that about four
hours in the evening was all the time I
could: be supposed to work in, with this
exception, that sometimes I changed my
hours of hunting and working, and went



to work in the morning, and abroad with !

my gun in the afternoon.

While in-doors, during the rains, I talked
much to my parrot, which now learned her
own name and seemed to repeat it for my
diversion, as it pleased me greatly.

I was now in the months of November
and December, expecting my crop of barley
and rice. The eae I had dug up for



them was not great; for my seed of each
“was not above half a peck, for I had lost
ne whole crop by sowing in the dry sea-
son; but now my crop promi very well,
when on a sudden I found I was in danger

ROBINSON CRUSOE.

‘ \ Ag .

is to be considered, that in | of losing it all again by enemies of sever)



sorts, which it was scarcely possible to keey
from it; as, first the goats, and wild crea,
tures which I calted hares, which, tasting
the sweetness of the blade, eat it so clos: .
that it could get no time to shoot up inte
stalk, |
This I saw no remedy for, but making
an inclosure about it with a hedge, which! |
did with a great deal of toil, and the mony
because it required a great deal of speed :
the creatures daily spoiling my corn. Hoy
ever, as my arable land was but small
suited to my crop, I got .it totally wel
fenced in about three weeks’ times ani
shooting some of the creatures in the dy
time, I set my dog to guaru it in the nigh:
tying him up to a stake at the gate, wher
he would stand and bark all night lone; s
in a little time the enemies forsook th —
place, and the corn grew very strong ail
well. ee
But now I had even greater trouble { —
keep the birds from eating all of th —
ripening grain. I finally shot three (¢
them, and hung them up as scarecrow
This el the effact I desired, and kept th
birds away. In the }atter pra of Decet :
ber I reaped my corn. Fee
I was sadly put to it for a scytheg, a
sickle to cut it down, and all I could i
was to make one, as well as I could, outi ‘
one of the broad-swords, or cutlass!
| which I saved among the arms out of tl
ship. However, as my crop was bi :
small I had no great difficulty to cut! te
down; in short, I reaped it in my way, fi fi C a
I cut nothing off but the ears, and carrit
it away in a great basket which I
made, and so rubbed it out with my ban




















ROBINSON CRUSOE. by



and at the end of all my harvesting, I
found that out of my half-peck of seed I
had near two bushels of rice, and above
two bushels and a-half of barley; that is
sto say, by my guess, for I had no measure
‘at that time.

I had long studied, by some means or
other, to make myself some earthen vessels,
which, indeed, I wanted sorely. I did not
doubt but if I could find out any clay, I
might botch up some such pot as might,
being dried by the sun, be hard enough
and strong enough to bear handling, and
to hold anything that was dry, and re-
quired to be so; and as this was necessary
in preparing corn, meal, &c., which was
the thing that I was upon, I resolved to
make some as large as I could, and fit only
to stand like jars, to hold what should be
put into them.

It would make the reader pity me, or
rather laugh at me, to tell how many awk-
ward ways I took to raise this paste ; what
odd, misshapen, ugly things I made; how
many of them fell in, and how many fell
out—the clay not being stiff enough to
bear its own weight; how many cracked

by the over-violent heat of the sun, being |:

set out too hastily; and how many fell to
pieces with only removing, as well before
as after they were dried; and, in a word,
how, after having labored hard to find the
clay—to dig it, to temper it, to bring it
home, and work it—I could not make
above two large earthen ugly things (I can-
not call them jars) in about two months
labor,
However, as the sun baked these two
- very dry and hard, I lifted them very
gently up, and set them down again in two

great wicker baskets, which I had made on
purpose for them, that they might not
break.

Though miscarried so much in my design
for large pots, yet I made several smaller
things with better success; such as little
round pots, flat dishes, pitchers and pipkins,
and anything my hand turned to; and the
heat of the sup baked them strangely hard.



But all this would not answer my end,
which was to get an earthen pot to hold
what was liquid, and bear the fire; which
none of these could do, It happened after
some time, making a pretty large fire for

-cooking my meat, when I went to put it

out after I had done with it, I] found a
broken piece of one of my earthenware ves-
sels in the fire, burnt as hard as a stone,
M

and red as a tile. I was agreeably surprised
to see it, and said to myself that certainly
they might be made to burn whole, if they
weuld burn broken. ;

This set me to study how to order my
fre so as to make it burn me some pots, I
had no notion of a kiln, such as the potters
burn in, or of glazing them with lead,
though I had some lead to do it with; but
I placed three large pipkins, two or three







pots, in a pile, one upon another, and placed
my firewood all round it, with a heap of
embers under them. I plied the fire with

fresh fuel round the outside and upon the.

top, till I saw the pots in the inside red-hot
quite through, and observed thet they did
not crack at all; when I saw them clear
red, I let them stand in that heat about
five or six hours, till I found one of them,
though it did nos crack, did melt or run;
for the sand which was mixed with the
clay melted with the violence of the heat,
and would have run into glass if I had
gone on, SoIslacked my fire gradually till
the pots began to abate of the red color,
wnd watching them all night, that I might

ROBINSON CRUSOE.



not let the fire abate too fast, in the mort.
ing I had three very good (I will not say
handsome) pipkins, and. two other earthen
pots, as hard burnt as could be desired, and
one them perfectly glazed with the running
of the sand.

After this experiment, I wanted neo sort
of earthenware for my use; but I must
needs say as to the shapes of them they
were very indifferent, as any one may sup
pose, when I had no way of making them,
but as the children make dirt pies, or as 4
woman would make pies tha never learned
to raise paste,

I now thought to dig out a stone, and
make myself a mortar; but, after searching
a long while I could find no stone hard
enough, as all the rocks on the island were
soft and crumbling. I got instead a great
block of hard wood, and with much labor
T rounded the outside, and then, with the
help of fire, made a hollow place in it, as
the Indians in Brazil make their canoes
Then I made a heavy pestle of iron-weod,
and laid them both by till I had my next
crop of corn to grind or pound into flour
With some muslin taken from the ship, |
made some very good sieves.

The baking part was the next thing te
be considered, but I managed this fe
I made some hollow earthen vessels, which
served as hearths, In there I built
fires, Then, raking the ashes and ember
off clean, I put in my loaves and covers
them with earthen jars.

All the while these things were doing
you may be sure my thoughts ran many
times upon the land which I had. seen
from the other side of the island; and |
was net without secret wishes that [ wat

‘ot


on shor there, fancying that I might find
some way or other to convey myself far-
ther, and perhaps at last find some means
of escape.
- But all this while I made no allowance
for the dangers of such a condition, and
how I might fall into the hands of say-
‘ages, and perhaps such as I might have
season to think far worse than the lions
and tigers of Africa; that if I once came
into their power I should run a hazard of
being killed, and perhaps of being eaten;
for I had heard that the people of the
Caribbean coasts were cannibals, or men-
eaters, and I knew by the latitude, that I
eould not be far off from that shore. All
these things, I say, which I ought to have
eonsidered well of, and I did cast up in
my thoughts afterwards, yet took up none
oi my apprehensions at first, nd my head
tan mightily upon the thought of getting
over to that shore.
Now, I wished for my boy Xury and
the long-boat, with the shoulder-of-mutton
“sail, with which I sailed above a thousand
miles on the coast of Africas but this was
invain. Then I thought I would go and
took at our ship’s boat, which was blown
up upon the shore a great way, in the
Storm, when we were first cast away. She
day almost where she did at first, but not
quite, and was turned, by the force of the
Waves and the winds, almost bottom up-
Ward, against the high ridge of rough
sand, but no water about her as before.
{f Thad had hands to have refitted her,
and to have launched her into the water,









bruis with her. easily enough; bat I!

ROBINSON

CRUSOE,



might have easily foreseen that I could no
more turn her and set her upright upon
her bottom, than I could remove the
island ; however, I went to the wood, and
cut levers and rollers, md brought them to
the boat, resolved to try what I could do.

I spared no pains, indeed, in this piece
of fruitless toil, and spent, I think, three
or four weeks about it; at last, finding it
impossible to heave it up with my little
strength, I fell to digging away the sand,
to undermine it, and so to make it fall
down, setting pieces of wood to thrus:
and guide it right in the fall. —

But I was unable to stir it, or to vs *
#23 ROBINSON CRUSOE.



under it, much less to move it forward to-
wards the water; so I was forced to give
it over; and yet, though I gave over the
hopes a the boat, my desire to venture
over for the mainland increased.



“* “upon thinking whether
it was not possible to make myself a
canoe, or periagua, such as the natives of
those climates make, even without tools,
or, as I might say, without hands—viz.,
of the trunk of a great tree. This I not
only thought possible, but easy, and pleased
myself extremely with my thoughts of
making it, and with my having much more
convenience for it than any of the Negroes
or Indians; but not at all considering the
particular inconveniences which I lay
under more than the Indians did, viz.,
want of hands to move it into the water
when it was made.

I went to work upon this boat the most
like a foo] that ever man did, who had any
of his senses awake. I pleased myself
with the design, without determining
whether I was ever able to undertake it;
not but that the difficulty of launching my
boat came often into my head; but I put
a stop to my inquiries into it, by this
foolish answer which I gave myself; “Let
me first make it; I warrant I shall find
some way to get it along when it is done.”



This at length set me-

This was a most preposterous method ;
but the eagerness of my fancy prevailed,
and to work I went, and felled a cedar:
tree, I question much whether Solomoz
ever had such a one for the building the |
Temple of Jerusalem. It was five feet ten
inches diameter at the lower part, and four
feet eleven inches diameter at the end of
twenty-two feet; after which it lessened
for a while, and then parted into branches,
It was not without infinite labor that I
felled this tree. J was twenty days hack.
ing and hewing at it at the bottom; I was
fourteen more getting the branches and
limbs and the vast spreading head of it cut
off, which I hacked and hewed through
with my axe and hatchet. After this, it
cost me a month to shape it to something
like the bottom of a boat. It cost me
near three months more to clear the inside,
and work it out so as to make an exact
boat of it. This I did, indeed, without fire,
by mere mallet and chisel, and by the dint
of hard labor, till I had brought it to be a
very handsome periagua, and big enough
to have carried six-and-twenty men.

When I had gone through this work, I
was extremely delighted with it. The
boat was really much bigger than ever I
saw a canoe or periagua, that was made of
one tree, in my life. Many a weary stroke
it had cost, you may be sure—for there
remained nothing but to get it into the
water; and had I gotten it into the water,
I make no question, but I should have
begun the maddest voyage, and the most
unlikely to be performed that ever was
undertaken,

But all my devices to get it into the
water failed me. It lay about one hur

t
Se tae 4
Pie ee = a

ae =
SE

4

ie
ay
i : A

y
A VZ

Uy
14
y

Mii


64



dred yards from the water, and not more;
but the first inconvenience was, it was up
hill towards the creek, Well, to take
away this discouragement, I resolved to
dig into the surface of the earth, and so
make a declivity. This I began, and it
cost me a prodigious deal of pains (but
who grudge pains that have their deliver-
anee in view ?); but when this was worked
through, and this difficulty managed, it was
still much at one, for I could no more stir
the canoe than J could the other boat.
Then I measured the distance of ground,
and resolved to cut a dock or canal, to
bring the water up to the canoe, seeing I
could not bring the canoe down to the
water. IT began this work, but upon cal.
culating the amount of digging and what
I could do in a day, I found it would take
twelve years to finish it, so I was obliged
to abandon it,

In the middle of this work I finished my
fourth year in this place, and kept my anni-
versary with the same devotion, and with
as much comfort as ever before; for, by
a constant study and serious application of
the Word of God, and by the assistance of
His grace, I gained a different knowledge
from what 1 had before. I looked now
upon the world as a thing remote, which I
had nothing to do with, no expectation
from, and, indeed, no desire about; in a
word, I had nothing indeed to do with it,
nor was ever likely to have.

The next thing to my ink being wasted,
was that of my bread, I mean the biscuit
which I brought out of the ship. This I
had husbanded to the last degree, allowing
myself but one cake of bread a day for
above a year; and yet I was quite without

ee

ROBINSON CRUSOE.
OCD EEE OCC CCI COL EL AL LC LL A TTC,

bread for a year before [ got any corn of
my own.

My clothes, too, began to decay mightily ;:
as to lmen, I had had zone for a good
while, except some shirts which I had found
in the chests of the other seamen, and
which I carefully preserved ; because many
times I could bear no other clothes on but
a shirt; and it was a very great help
to me that I had, among all the men’s
clothes of the ship, almost three dozen
of shirts. There were also several thick
watch-coats of the seamen’s, which were
left behind, but they were too hot to wear:
so I set to work, tailoring, or rather, indeed,
botching, for I made most piteous work of
it. However, I made shift to make two or
three waiscoats, which I hoped would serve
me a great while; as for breeches or
drawers, I made but a very sorry shift till
afterwards.

I have mentioned that I saved the skins
of all the creatures that I killed, I mean
four-footed ones, and I had hung them up
stretched out with sticks in the sun, br
which means some of them were so dry and
hard that they were fit for little, but other
it seems, were very useful. The first thing
made of these was a great cap for my heal,
with the hair on the outside, to shoot af
the rain; and this performed so well, thi
after, I made me a suit of clothes wholly ¢
those skins. I must not omit to acknov
ledge they were wretchedly made; for if!
was a bad carpenter, I was a worse tailoi
However, they were such as J made a ver!
good shift with, and when I was abroad, !
it happened to rain, the hair ef the wails
coat.and cap bemg outermost, E was ker

very dry.
ROBINSON CRUSOL.
—— OO. oO -

After this, I'ispent a great deal of time
and pains to make an umbrella, I was, in-
deed, in great need of one, and had a great
mind to make one. I had seen them made
in the Brazils, where they are very useful
in the great heats which are there, and I
felt the heats every jot as great here, and
greater too, being nearer the equinox; be-
sides, as I was obliged to be much abroad,

65



it spread, but if it did not let down too,
and draw in, it would not be portable for
me any way but just over my head, which
would not do, However, at last, as I said,
I made one to answer. I covered it with

skins, the hair upwards, so that it east off
the rain like a pent-house, and kept off
the sun so effectually, that I could walk
outiin the hottest of the

weather with,

4



it was a most useful thing to me, as well
for the rams as the heats. I took a world
of pains at it, and was a great while before
I could mak» anything likely to hold: nay,
after I thougat I had hit the way, I spoiled
two or three before I made one to my mind.
But at last I made one that answered indit-
ferently well; the main difficulty I found
was to make it to let down. I could make

greater advantage than I could before in
the coolest.

Thus I lived mighty comfortably, my
mind being entirely composed by resigning
to the will of God, and throwing myself
wholly upon the disposal of His providence.
This made my life better than sociable, for
when I began to regret the want of conver:
sation, I would ask myself whether thus
66



gonversing mutually with my own thoughts,
and (as I hope I may say) with even my
Maker, by ejaculations and petitions, was
not better than the utmost enjoyment of
human society in the world ?

I cannot say that, after this, for five |

years, any extraordinary thing happened to
me, but I lived on in the same course, in
the same posture and place, just as before.
The chief thing [ was employed in, besides
my yearly labor of planting my barley and
rice, and curing my raisins—of both which
I always kept up just enough to have
sufficient stock of the year’s provision
beforehand—I had one labor, to make me
a canoe, which at last I finished ; so that,
by digging a canal to it of six feet wide
and four feet deep, I brought it into the
creek, almost half a mile.

In building this boat I was wiser than
in building my larger one, and I built it
small enough to get to the sea. I was near
two years in building it, but I never
grudged my labor, in Hone of nae a
boat to go off to sea at last.

However, though my little periagua was
finished, yet the size of it was not at all
answerable to the design which I had in
view when I made the first; I mean of
venturing over to the mainland, so that
design was given over for the present. As
{ had a boat, my next design was to make
a tour round the island.

For this purpose, I fitted up a little mast
in my boat, and made a sail to it out of
some of the little pieces of the ship’s sails
which lay in store. I tried the boat, and
found she would sail very well. Then I
made little lockers or boxes at éach end to
put provisions, ammunition, etc, to be

ROBINSON CRUSOE.

kept dry, either from rain or the spray of
the sea. I made also, a little, long, hollow
place where I could lay my gun, making a
flap to hang down over it to keep it dry.
I fixed my umbrella at the stern, to stand
over my head like an awning. All now
being ready, I loaded my ship for the voy-
age, putting in two dozen loaves of barley
bread, an earthen pot full of parched
rice, a little bottle of rum, and half a goat,
powder and shot for my gun, and two
large coats, one to lie upon and one to
cover me in the night, and thus I set sail.

When I came to the east side of the
island, I found a great ledge of rocks lie
out about two leagues into the sea, and be-
yond that a shoal of sand lying half a
league more. J was afraid to go so far out
to sea, for fear Ef could not get back again,
so I anchored my boat, and, taking my
gun, went on shore and climbed a big hill,
to get a view of the other side of the
ledge.

From the hill I perceived a strong and
intricate current, which would be very
likely to prevent me from being able to
make the island again. And, indeed, had
I not got first upon this hill, I believe it
would have been so; for there was the
same current on the other side of the
island, only that it set off at a farther dis-
tance, and I saw there was a strong eddy
under the shore; so I had nothing to do
but to get out of the first current, and }
should presently be in an eddy.

I lay here, however, two days, because,
the wind blowing pretty fresh at E.S.L.,,
and that being just contrary to the current,
made a great breach of the sea upon the
point; so that it was not safe for me to
ROBINSON CRUSOE.

keep too close to the shore for the breach,
nor to go too far off, because of the stream.

‘The third day, in the morning, the wind
having abated overnight, the sea was calm,
and I ventured. But I ama warning-piece
to all rash and ignorant pilots; for no
Sooner was I come to the point, when I
was not even my boat’s length from the
shore, but I found myself in a great depth
of water, and a current like the sluice of
amill, It carried my boat along with it

ce



with such violence that all I could de
could not keep her so much as on the edge ©
of it; but I found it hurried me farther
and farther out from the eddy, which was
on my left hand. There was no wind
stirring-to help me, and all that I could do
with my paddles signified nothing. And
now I began to give myself over for lost; '
for as the current was on both sides of the
island, I, knew in a few leagues’ distance
they must join again, and then I was inve-




coverably gone; so that
~ > T had no prospect be-
fore me but of perishing, not by the sea,
for that was calm enough, but of starving
from hunger. I had, indeed, found a tor-
tois3 on the shore, as big almost as I could
lift, and had tossed it into the boat; and I
had a great jar of fresh water, that is to
say, one of my earthen pots; but what
was all this to being driven into the vast
ocean, where, to be sure, there was no
shore, no mainland or island, for a thous:
and miles at least 2

And now I saw how easy it was for the
providence of God to make the most mis.
erable condition that mankind could be in
worse. Now I looked back upon my deso-
late, solitary island as the most pleasant
_ place in the world, and all the happiness
_my heart could wish for was to be there
again. I stretched out my hands to it,
with eager wishes. “O happy desert!”
said I,“I shall never see thee more. O
miserable creature! whither am I goings?

I still worked hard to get my boat out
vf the current. About noon, a breeze
sprang up from the 8. 8. E., which cheered
my heart a little, and especially when, in
about half an hour more, it blew a pretty
small, gentle gale. By this time, I had
got at a frightful distance from the island;
and had the least cloudy or hazy weather
intervened, I had beer undone another |

ROBINSON CRUSOE.

way, too; for I had no compass on board,
and should never have known how to have
steered towards the island, if I had but
once lost sight of it. But the weather
continuing clear, I applied myself to get
up my mast again, and spread my sail,
standing away to the north as much as
possible, to get out of the current.

I made such good headway that I soon
found an eddy which carried me about a
league on my way back. The wind con-
tinuing fair, I continued to near the island
and soon got to land. When I was on
shore, I fell on my knees and gave God
thanks for my deliverance. After which, I
drew my boat into a little cove under some
trees, and laid me down to sleep, being
quite spent with the fatigue of the voyage,
which I resolved not to repeat.

IT was now at a great loss which way to
get home with my boat. I had runso much
hazard, and knew too mueh of the case, to °
think of attempting it by the way I went
out; and what might be at the other side I
knew not, norhad I any mind to run any
more ventures. So I resolved, on the next
morning, to make my way westward along
the shore, and to see if there was no creek |
where I might lay up my frigate in safety,
so as to have her again, if I wanted her.
Tn about three miles, coasting the shore, I
came to a very good inlet or bay, about
mile over, which narrowed till it came to,a
very little rivulet or brook, where I found
a very convement harbor for my bont
Here I put in, and, having stored my baat
very safe, I went on shore to look abut
me, and see where I was.

I soon found I had but a little passed | by
the place where I had been before, =

i

‘< \
; i
4

ROBINSUN CRUSOE. 49.

- 5 eae sey ee

¢ravelled on foot to that shore; so, taking
nothing out of my boat but my gun and
umbrella, for it was exceedingly hot, I
began my march. The way was comfort.
able enough after such a voyage as I had
been upon, and I reached my old bower in
the, evening, where I found everything
standing as I left *t.

I got over the feuce, and laid me down
to rest my limbs, for I was
very weary, and fell asleep.
But judge you, if you can,
what a surprise I must have
been in when I was awaked
out of my sleep by a voice,
calling me by my name sev-
eral times: “Robin, Robin,
Robin Crusoe! poor Robin
Crusoe! Where are you,
Robin Crusoe? Where are
you? Where have you’
been ?”

I was so dead asleep at
first, being fatigued with
rowing the first part of the
day and walking the latter
part, that I did not awake
thoroughly; and dozing be-
tween sleeping and waking,
thought I dreamed that
somepody spoke to me; but
as the voice continued to
repeat, “Robin Crusoe!
Robin Crusoe!” at last I
began to awake more per-
fectly, and was at first
dreadfully frightened, and
starte. up in the utmost
consternation, No sooner
were my eyes open, but I

f
8
&

ETL [] oe ssawernennrenas HR ATT



saw my poll sitting on the top of the
hedge, and immediately knew that it wa-,
he that spoke to me; for just in such
bemoaning language I had used to tals
to him and teach him.

However, even though I knew it was the
parrot, and that indeed it could be nobody
else, it was a good while before I could
compose myself. Holding out my hand,
ES



and calling him by his name, “ Poll,” the
sociable creature came to me, and sat upon

my thumb, as he used to do, and continued |

talking to me, “Poor Robin Crusoe! and
how did I come here! and where had I
been ?” just as if he had been overjoyed to
see me again; and so | carried him home
along with me.

T had now enough of rambling to sea for
some time, and enough to do for many days
to sit still and reflect upon the danger I



had been in. I would have been very glad
te have had my boat again on my side of
the island; but I knew not how it was
practicable to get it about. As to the east
side of the island, which I had gone round,
J knew well enough there was no ventur-
ing that way ; my very heart would shrink
and my very blood run chill, but to
think of it; and as to the other side of the
island, I knew there was a current there
quite as dangerous.

2 began to think now what I should do
for goat’s fesh when my powder should be
jall gone. To make provision for this, I set
traps, and caught some young kids, which
I tamed, keeping them in a large enclosure,
securely fenced about. It would have
made a stoic smile to see me and my little
family sit down to dinner. There was my

ROBINSON CRUSOE.



island. I had the lives of all my subjects
at absolute command; I could hang, draw.
give life and liberty and take it away, and
no rebels among all my subjects. Then to
see how like a king I dined too, all alone,
attended by my servants! Poll, as if he
had been my favourite, was the only per:
son permitted to talk to me; my dog, who
was now grown very old and crazy, sat
always at my right hand; and two cats,
one on one side the table, and one on the
other, expecting now and then a bit from
my hand, as a mark of special favor.

I wanted the use of my boat very much,
but I was very loth to run any more risk
at sea. One day I resolved to go by land
to the little hill on the other side where ]
had observed how the shore lay and the
current set, and so I started, following the
edge of the shore. Had any of the people
of England met me at that time, I should
either have frightened them or raised a
great deal of laughter. °

I had a great, high shapeless cap, made
of goat’s skin, with a flap hanging down
behind, as well to keep the sun from me as
to shoot the rain off from running into my
neck; nothing being so hurtful in these
climates as the rain upon the flesh under
the clothes,

I had a short jacket of goat’s skin, the
skirts coming down to about the middle
of the thighs, and a pair of open-kneed
breeches of the same. The breeches were
made of the skin of an old he-goat, y7hose
hair hung down such a length on either
side, that, tike pantaloons, it reached to the
middle of my legs. Stockings and shoes |
had none, but had made me a pair of some

majesty, the prince and Jord of the whole | things, I scarce know what to call them,











































































#2 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

like buskins, to flap over my legs, and lace | my head a great, clumsy, ugly goat-ski
on either side like spatterdashes, but of a| umbrella, but which, after all, was the





most barbarous shape, as indee* were.all
the rest of my clothes.

I had on a broad belt of goat’s skin
dried, which I drew together with two
thongs of the same, instead of buckles;
and in a kind of a frog on either side of
this, instead of a sword and dagger, hung
a little saw and a hatchet, one on one side,
one on the other. I had another belt not
so broad, and fastened in the same manner,
which hung over my shoulder; and at the
end of it, under my left arm, hung two
pouches, both made of goat’s skin too, in
one of which hung my powder, in the
other my shot. At my back I carried my

most necessary thing I had about me next
to ny gun.

When I reached the hill, I found the sea
quite still, which convinced me that the
current was formed by the ebb and flow
of the tide. Still I resolved to leave the
boat for use on that side of the island, and
to make me another boat to use on my
home side,

It happened one day, about noon, going
towards my boat, I was exceedingly sur-
prised with the print of a man’s naked foot
on the shore, which was very plain to be
seen on the sand, I stood like one thun.
derstruck, or as if I had seen an appar.

basket, on my shoulder my gun, and over jition. I listened, I Jooked around me, but


ROBINSON CRUSOE. | 7

car



J could hear nothing, nor see anything; I
went up to a rising ground, to look far.
ther; I went up the shore, and down the
shore, but it was all one; I could see no
other impression but that one. I went to
it again to see if there were any more, and
to observe if it might not be my fancy;
but there was no room for that, for there
was exactly the print of a foot—toes, heel,
and every part of a foot. How it came
thither I knew not, nor could in the least
imagine. But after innumerable fluttering
thoughts, like a man perfectly confused
and out of myself, I came home to my for-
tification, not feeling,
as we say, the ground
I went on, but terti-
fed to the last de.
gree, looking behind
me at every two or
three steps, mistaking
every bush and tree,
and fancying every
stump at a distance
‘to bea man, Norisit
possible to describe
how many various
shapes my affrighted
imagination represent-
ed things to me in;
how many wild ideas
were formed every
moment in my faney,
and what strange un-
accountable whimseys
came into my thoughts
by the way.

When I came to
my castle (for so I
think I called it ever

after this), I fled into it like one pur
sued. Whether I went over by tre
ladder, as first contrived, or went in at
the hole in the roc’, which I called a
door, I cannot remember ; for never frighted
hare fled to cover, or fox to earth, with
more terror >of mind than I did to this
retreat.

IT had no sleep that night, but Jay
trembling with fright and thinking who or
what it could be that had visited the
island. I fancied all sorts of things, but
finally concluded that some of the savages
of the main land had been there, and this


74



did not in the least allay my fear, for after-
wards I was in constant dread that I
should meet them, When milking my
goats or gathering my fruit, if I heard the
least noise, I was ready to drop every:
‘thing and flee to my house.

| Now I began sorely to repent that I had
dug my cave so large as to bring a door
through again beyond where my fortifica-
tion joined to the rock. Therefore I re-
solved to draw me a second fortification, in
the same manner of a semicircle, at a dis-
tance from my wall, just where I had
planted a double row of trees about twelve
years before, These trees having been planted
so thick before, there wanted but few piles
to be driven between them, and my wall
would be soon finished. So that I had
now a double wall; and my outer wall
was thickened with pieces of timber, old



ROBINSON CRUSOE.

cables, and everything I could 4

of to make it strong, having in it sex
little holes, about as big as I might 1)
my arm out at. In the inside of this
thickened my wall to about ten feet thii
continually bringing earth out of my ca
and laying it at the foot of the wall, @
walking upon it; and through the sey
holes I contrived to plant the muskets |
cannon, so I could fire all the seven guns
two minutes’ time. This wall I was ma
a weary month in finishing, and yet ner
thought myself safe till it was done.
Then I planted the ground without

full of trees as could well stand and gw
so that, in two years’ time, I had a grove
thick that no one would ever imagine thet
was any human habitation beyond {
While I was doing this I thought much}
the safety of my goats; so I made a strw




































































ROBINSON CEISOR.



rere,
enciosure in a retired part of vhe island,
and removed to it ten she-goats and two
he-goats and left them there.

One day as I wandered more to the west
part of the island, being ona hill, I thought
T saw a boat far out at sea, but I was not
sure. On coming down from the hill, I
‘was confounded and amazed to see the
shore spread with skulls and other bones of
human bodies. There was a place where
a fire had been made, and a cirele dug in
the earth, where I supposed the savage
wretches had sat down to their inhuman
feast. When I recovered from my horror
at such a sight, I began to thank God that
I was cast ashore upon a part of the island
that was not visited by the cannibals.

In this frame of thankfulness, I went
home to my eastle, and began to be much
easier now, as to the safety of my cireum-
stances, than ever I was before: for I
observed that these wretches never came to
this island in search of what they could
get; perhaps not seeking, not wanting, or
not expecting, anything here; and having
often, no doubt, been up in the covered,
Woody part of it, without finding anything
to their purpose. I knew I had been here
now almost eighteen years, and never saw
the least footsteps of human creature there
before; and J might be eighteen years
tore as entirely concealed as I was now, if
I did not discover myself to them, which I
had no manner of occasion to do; it being
my only business to keep myself entirely
concealed where I was, unless I found a
better sort of creatures than cannibals to
make myself known to. Yet I entertained
such an abhorrence of the Savage wretches
that I have been speaking of, and of the





—





wretened inhuman custom of their devour.
ing and eating one another up, that I con-
tinued pensive and sad, and kept close
within my own circle for almost two years
after this, When I say my own circle, I
mean by it my three plantations, viz, my
castle, my country-seat (which I called my
bower), and my enelosure in the woods:
nor did I look after this for any other use
than as an enclosure for my goats; for the
aversion Which nature gave me to these
wretches was such, that I did not so much
as go to look after my boat in all this time,
but began rather to think of making me





another; for I could not think of ever
making any more attempts to bring the
other boat round the island to me, lest I
should meet with some of those creatures
at sea; in which case, if I had happened to
have fallen into their hands, I knew what
would have been my lot.

Night and day, I could think of nothing
now but how I might destroy some of
these monsters, and, if possible, save the
victim they should bring hither to destroy.
It would take up a larger volume than this
whole work is intended to be, to set down
all the contrivances I hatched, or rather
brooded upon, in my thoughts, for the

ROBINSON CRUSOE.

destroying of th
creatures, or at le
frightening them 80
to prevent their co
hither any more. j
all was abortive; n
ing could be possi
to take effect, unles
was to be there to
it myself; and wh
could one man
among them, wk
perhaps there mi
be twenty or thirty
them, together wi
their darts, or thi
bows and arrows, wi
which they probab
could shoot as true{
a mark as I could wi














my gun?
Sometimes a a
of digging a hd

under the place whe
they made their
and putting in five or six pounds of
powder, which, when they kindled th
fire, would consequently take fire, and bla.
up all that was near it: but as, in the
place, I should be unwilling to -waste
much powder upon them, my being nf
within the quantity of one barrel, so nae
could I be sure of its going off at any
tain time, when it might surprise the
and, at best, that it would do little mo
‘tian just blow the fire about their ears alt
fright them, but not sufficient to mu
them forsake the place; so I laid it asi
I continually made my tour every mot
ing to the top of the hill, which was ft










#8 ROBINSON CRUSOE.

of my business which required fire, such
as burning of pots and pipes. ete, inti
my new apartment in the woods; where
after I had been some time, I found, to
my unspeakable consolation, a mere nat
ural cave in the earth, which went in 4
vast way, and where, I dare say, no savy
age, had he been at ihe mouth of it, would
be so hardy as to venture in; nor, indeed,
would any man else, but one who, like me

observe any boats upon the sea, coming near | Wanted nothing so much as a sate retreat
the island, or standing over towards it; but | On entering with a lighted torch, I stum
I began to tire of this hard duty, after I | bled over Lay old he-goat that had crept i
had for two or three months constantly | there to die, and who did die the next day

kept my watch, but came always back| The entrance to this cave was a smal
without any discovery. hole at the base of a large rock, but within



my castle, as I called it,
about three miles or
more, to see if I could

I began to think, too, that it was not | it was large and roomy and quite dry. |
was greatly rejoiced at the discovery, and

I brought here my magazine of powder.
several muskets and other things.

for me to judge these wretches, and for a
year, I gave up watching for them. This
I did, however: I removed my boat and
hid it securely on the east end of the
island, and I kept myself more retired
than ever.

“I believe the reader of this will not
think it strange if I confess these anxie-
ties, these constant fears I lived in, and
the concern that was now upon me, put
an end to all invention, and to all the
contrivances that I had laid for my future
accommodations and conveniences. I had
the care of my safety more now upon
hands than that of my food. I cared not
‘to drive a nail, or chop a stick of wood
now, for fear the noise I should make
should be heard; much less would I fire
a gun for the same reason; and, above all,
I was intolerably uneasy at making any
fire, lest the smoke, which is visible at
a great distance in the day, should betray
me. For this reason, I removed that part



»
ROBINSON CRUSOE.



Jé was now the month of December in
my twenty-third year; and this, being the
southern solstice (for winter I cannot call
it), was the particular time of my harvest,
d required me to be pretty much abroad
the fields, when, going out early in the
giorning, I was surprised with seeing a
‘Aight of some fire upon the shore, at a dis-








72



tance from me of about two miies towards
the end of the island where { had observed
some savages had been, as before, and not
on the other side, but, to my great afflic-
tion, it was on my side of the island.

I was, indeed, terribly surprised at the
sight, and stopped short within my grove,
not daring to'go out, lest I might be sur-


£0 ROBINSON CRUSUE.

—— ek Linas

pria«; and yet I had no more peace|say, my muskets, which were mountol
witha, from the apprehensions I had| upon my new fortifications, and all my
that if these savages, in rambling over | pistols, and resolved to defend myself to
the island, should find my corn standing | the last gasp—not forgetting seriously ty
or cut, or any of my works, they would | commend myself to the Divine protection,
and earnestly to pray to God to delive
me out of the hands of the barbarians
And in this posture I continued about
two hours, and began to be impatient for
intelligence abroad, for I had no spies to
send out. I was not able to bear sitting
in ignorance any longer; so setting up my
ladder to the side of the hill, and the
pulling the ladder after me,I set it up
again, and mounted to the top of the hil]
and pulling out my perspective-glass, I lai
me down flat on the ground, and began to
look for the place. I presently found
there were no Jess than nine naked sar
ages sitting round a small fire they had
made, not to warm them, for they had no
need of that, the weather being extremely
hot, but, as I supposed, to dress some of
their barbarous diet of human flesh which
they had brought with them, whether alive
or dead I could not know.

They had two canoes with them, which
they had hauled up upon the shore ; ant
as it was then ebb of tide, they seemed to
‘me to wait the return of the fload to go
immediately conclude that there were per away again, As I expected, so it prove;
ple in the place, and would ther: never resi. ‘or, as soon as the tide made to the west
til’ chey had found me out. is this ex-; «ard, I saw them all take boat and rov

tremity I went back directly to my eastle, | ( r paddle, as we call it) away. I should
aad pulled up the ladder after me, having | ke ve observed, that for an hour or mot
made all things without look as wild i before they went off they were dancing
gataral as I could. auc U could easily discern their postures

Then I prepared myseit within, putting | anc 2estures by my glass.
inyself in a posture of defence; I loadeC a8 soon ag 1 saw them gone, I took my
ail my cannon, as I called them—that is to | guns and pistols and went away to tht

‘ é








ROBINSON CRUSOE.



they were out at sea, making over for the
‘main.
with horror, the marks. of their dreadful

feast, in the blood and bones. of buman

bodies.

I was so filled with indignation at this |)

sight, that I began to ponder how I could
destroy them when they should come
again, I went often to the hill to look for
them, and if they had come, I should cer-
tainly heve attacked them. But more than
a year elapsed and I saw no signs of them,





listen for a second gun,
Going down to the shore I saw }: ee



which, accordingly,





in about half a minute, I heard; and by
the sound, knew that it was from that part:
of the sea where I was dr’ven out with the
and I lived on very comfortably. In the | current, in my boat. I immediately cons.

sidered that this must be some ship in dis.
tress. I had the presence of mind, at that
minute, to think, that though I could not
help them, it might be they might help
me; so I brought together all the dry
wood f could get at hand, and, making a
good, handsome pile, I set it on fire upon,
the hill. The wood was dry, and blazed
freely; and though the wind blew very;

meantime, an event happened which | hard, yet it burned fairly out, so that I

intensely excited me.

There had been a storm of wind au day,
with a great deal of lightning and thunder,
and a very foul night it was after it. As
Iwas reading in the Bible, and taken up
with very serious thoughts about my pres-
ent condition, I was surprised with the
noise of a gun, as I thought, fired at sea.
This was, to be sure, a surprise of a differ-

ent nature from any I had met before; for

the notions this. put into. my thoughts were
of another kind. I started up in the
greatest haste, and) in a trice, clapped my
ladder to the middle place of the rock, and
pulled it after me; and; mounting it the

was certain, if there was any such thing as
a ship, they must need see it, and no doubt
they. did; for as soon as my fire blazed up,

I heard another gun aud then several
more. s



In the morning I saw to. my great sor-
row the wreck of a.ship upon the concealed,
rocks, far out from shore. I cannot ex:
82



plain, by any possible energy of words,
what a strange longing I felt in my soul
upon this sight, breaking out sometimes
thus :—“ Oh, that there had been but one
or two, nay, or but one soul, saved out of
this ship, to have escaped to me that I
might but have had one companion, one
fellow-creature, to have spoken to me and
to have conversed with!” In all the time
of my solitary life, I never felt so earnest,

ROBINSON CRUSOE.





And now the thought so pressed upon
me night and day that I must go off to this
ea that, at last, I loaded my boat with
everything necessary and ventured to sea,
after making a careful study of the dan-
gerous currents.

When I came close to the ship, a dog
appeared upon her, who, seeing me coming,
yelped and cried ; and, as soon as I called
him, jumped into the sea to come tome. I





















































































































































































































































































































































































so strong a desire after the society of my
fellow-creatures, or so deep a regre* at the
want of it. ;
But there was no sign of any living
thing on the wreck, and I had only the
affliction, some days after, to see the corpse
cf 2 drowned boy come on shore. He had
nothing in his pockets but two pieces of
eight and a tobacco pipe—the last was to
me of ten times more value than the first,



took him into the boat, but found lim
almost dead with a. and thirst. I gave
him a cake of my ier and he ev ound
it like a ravenous wolf that had been starv:
ing a fortnight in the snow; I then gave
the poor creature some fresh water, with
which, if I would have let him, he would
have burst himself. After this I went on
board ; but the first sight I met with was
with two men drowned in the forecastile.
ROBINSON CRUSOE.



Besides the dog, there was nothing left in

the ship that had life; nor any goods, that
a vould see Sut what were spoiled by the

‘Water. I saw several chests, which I

‘Deieve beionged to some of the seamen;

tad Leos two of them into the boat, with-
mer exanriay what was in ther~







I found, besides these chests, a little cuss
full of liquor, of about twenty gallons,
which I got into my boat with much dift-
culty. ‘There were several muskets in tae
cabin, and a great powder-horn, with about
four pounds of powder init. As for the
muskets, I had no oceasion for them. so 4

7
84 ROBINSON CRUSO#:

left them, and took the powder-horn.. I to: mes and. about. a. dozen and a half of
took a fire shovel and: tongs, which I} white linen. handkerchiefs.. Besides this,
wanted extremely ;. as- also: two:little: brass-| when: I came: to the till in the chest, I







kettles, a copper pot to. make chocolate, | found there three great bags of. pieces of
.J eight; and in one of them, six doubloons

and a gridiron;. and with. this: cargo, and}



the dog, T came away, and. the same even-
ing I reached the island: again,.weary and

fatigued to the last:degree.. [reposed: that)

tight in the boat, and: in. the morning I got

all may cargo om shore: The cask of liquor:

Â¥ found to be a: kind of rum;.not at all
evod; but when I came to open the chests,
Yound several things: of. great use to me.
Fo. example, I found.in one a fine case of
oorttles, filed with cordial waters.. I found
two pots of very good succades, or sweat-
ments, so fastened on the top that the salt
had not hurt them. I found some

good shirts, which were very welcome



of gold, and some smail bars of gold; I

suppose they mightall weigh near a pound.

Upon the whole; I got: very little by this
voyage: that.was of any use-to me; for as
to the-money, I had no manner-of occasion
for it;.for it. was to- meas: the-dirt under
my feet, and I would have given it all for
three or four pair of English shoes and
stockings, which: were things I greatly
wanted, I had, indeed, got two pairs of
shoes now, which I took off the feet of the
two drowned men whom [f saw in the
wreck, and I found two pairs more in one
of the chests, which were very welcome to
1



me. iI found iin
this seaman’s chest
about fifty pieces
of eight, in zials,
but no gold. Well,
however, I lugged -
‘this money home
to my cave, and ;
laid it 'up,-as I had
done that .before
which .I chad got
in our own --ship.
But it was .a great
pity that the other

part of this ship .had not come to my
share; for I .am -satisfied I might have
loaded niy canoe several times -over
with money; which, if I:had ever escaped
to eee would have Jain here ‘safe






enouBH till I might have come again and
fetched it.

After this event, T lived easy cheat for
near two years, but I thought constantly
of how I should get away from the island.
One night I dreamed that one of the vic-
tims of the cannibals ran away from them

and came to me. “Now,” thouzht I, in
my dream, “I may venture to ‘the ‘main
land, for this savage will be my pilot.”
‘After this dream, I watched every day for

| the cannibals, determined to capture one of

their victims,

IT had watched thus for about.a year and.
a half, when I saw one morning no less
than five canoes on shore, and there were
about thirty of the savages dancing around
a fire. While I looked, I saw two miser
able wretches ae! from the boats.
One was knocked down immediately andj
cut up for their cookery, while the other;
was left standing by himself ‘till they?

§ | would be ready for him.

This poor wretch, seeing himself a little
at-liberty, and unbound, started away from

them, and ran with incredible swiftness
—

&

en

Satcne,
(a LR Re
i ;
Ye ~ sa
iY, 2
4

i





Whore er
am








SS Se so aE
= = eS Zl
= aS SE See ee
Se ER CS SSSSESESE SE =
4

aloag the sands, directly towards me. I
was dreadfully frightened, when I perceived
him ran my way; and especially when, as
{ thought, I saw him pursued by the whole
body. However, my spirits began to re-
cover when I found that there was not
above three men that followed him; and
still more was I encouraged, when I found
that he outstripped them exceedingly in
running,

There was between them and my castle,
the creek; but he made nothing of it, but,
plunging in, swam through in about thirty
strokes, landed, and ran with exceeding
strength and swiftness. When the three
persons came to the creek, I found that two
of them could swim, but the third went no
farther, and soon after went softly back
again. It came very warmly upon my
thoughts that now was the time to get me
a servant, and perhaps a companion. I
immediately ran down the ladder, fetched
my two guns, and getting up again with
the same haste to the top of the hill, I
erossed towards the sea; and having a
very short cut, and all down hill, clap’d

ROBINSON CRUSOE.

myself in the way between the pursuers
and the pursued, hallooing aloud te
him that fled, who, looking back, was ai
first perhaps as much frightened at me es
at them. But I beckoned with my hand to
him to come back; and, in the mean time,
rushing at once upon the foremost, |
knocked him down with the stock of my
piece. I was loth to fire, because I would
not have the rest hear. Having knocked
this fellow down, the other stopped, as if
he had been frightened, and I advanced
towards him, But as I came nearer, I per.
ceived he had a bow and arrow, and was
fitting it to shoot at me: so I was then
obliged to shoot at him first, which [ did,
and killed him at the first shot. . The poor
savage who fled, but had stopped, was so
frightened with the fire and noise of my
piece that he stood stock still, I hallooed
again to him, and made signs to come for
ward, which he easily understood, and


SIE

WSs
SS

SS







ae ROBINSON CRUSOE.

came a little way, and stood, trembling. I
smiled at him pleasantly, and beckoned,
and at length he came close to me, laid his
head upon the ground, and put ‘my foot
upon it. This, it seems, meant that he
would be my slave forever, ‘
_ But there was more work to do. The:
‘ savage that I had knocked down began‘to.
come to himself, and sat up-on the ground.:
My savage motioned for me to give him my.
sword, and when I gave it to him he ran:
quickly and cut off his head at a-single
stroke. “When he had done ‘this, ‘he comes:
laughing to ‘me in sign ‘of triumph, and:
brought me the sword again. But :that
‘which astonished ‘him most, was to know!
how I killed the ‘other « Tadian ‘so far off.
When ‘he came +o him, ‘he stood like ‘one’
amazed, looking at ‘him, ‘turning him first:
on one eae, then-on the other. “He stook,
up his bow and :arrows ‘and came ‘back; ‘80;
IT turned to go aa and ‘beckoned ikim to .
follow’ me.










should Hes ‘them with sisi Eat hay |
might not be seen by the :rest, if ‘they ‘fol-
lowed; and so I made-signs ‘to ‘him ‘again



ecient hho chad coats a hole 4 in the oad

with ‘his hands, big enough to bury the

first in, and then dragged him into it, and
| covered him; ‘and did so by the other also.
| Then calling him:away, I carried him, not
_ | tomy-eastle, but quite away to my cave,

| on the farther part of the island. Here I
}-gave him bread and a bunch of raisins to
| eat, and a draught of water, which I found
‘| he ‘was indeed in great distress for, and
| having refreshed him, I made signs for
|-him to go and lie down to sleep, so the
| poor creature lay down, and went to sleep.

He'was a comely, handsome fellow, with

: straight, strong limbs, tall and well shaped;
1 _and, as 1 reckon, about twenty-six years of
ROBINSON CuUSOR. sy



ae



age. He hada very good.countenance, not night; ‘but, as soon ‘as it-was day, I occ
a fierce and -surly -aspect, ‘but seemed to] koned ‘to Ahim +o come with me, and ‘Jet
have something very manly in his face.| him know I would give him some clothes;
His hair was Jong and black, not curled at which he seemed verv glad, for he was
like wool; ‘his forehead very high and! |
large; and .a great vivacity and sparkling
sharpness in ‘his eyes. ‘The -color :of his,
skin was not. quite black, but very tawny..
His face was round :and plump ; his nose.
small, not flat like the Negroes; a very
good. mouth, thin Tips, :and ‘his ‘fine teeth.
well set, and:as white-as ivory. After he
had slept-about ‘half an ‘hour, he awoke and
came out-of the:eave'tome: for had been
milking my goats. “When he espied me he’
came Tunning ‘to:me, laying himself down:
again upon ‘the ground, with all the:pos-
sible signs tion, making «a great many-antic gestures
to-show it. At last ‘he lays ‘his ‘head flat,
mpon the ground, -close ‘to my foot, -and’
sets my other foot upon ‘his head, ‘as hethad_
done ‘before.
I let him know ‘that I understood ‘him:
and was wery ‘well pleased. ‘In a Tittle
time I ‘began ‘to «speak sto thim,:and ‘teach.
him ‘to speak ‘to ame; :and, first, I let ‘him
know ‘his mame should the Frmay, which:
_ was ‘the day Tssavedl ‘his life. I-called ‘him :
so for the memory of the time. I likewise | stark naked. As we went by the place
taught him'tosay Master,and then Jet.him | where he had buried the two men, he
know ‘that was.to.be my name; I likewise | pointed exactly to the ‘place, and -showed
_ waght him ‘tossay Yes .and No, -and to.| me the marks that he had :made to ‘find
know the meaning of them. J gave him | them again, making signs te :me that we
‘some milk .in an‘earthen >ot,.and Jet him |-should dig them up again and -eat them.
see me drink it before him, and -sop my | -At this Iappeared very -angry, made .as if
bread init; and:gave-him-a:cake-of ‘bread | I would vomit at thé thoughts of it, and
itodo the ‘like, which -hequickly complied | beckoned with my :hand to him to come
‘with,and made signs that.it was ‘very good | away, which the did immediately, with
for him," kept therewith -him all thet! 2reet submission. J then Jed hiv) up te




the top of the hill, to see if his enemies
were gone, and pulling out my glass, I saw
plainly the place where they“had been, but
no appearance of them or their canoe.

We visited the place, and carefully
buried the remains of their horrible feast.
Friday let me know that there had been
a great battle, and that four prisoners, of
which he was one, were brought here to

be eaten. When we came back to our
eastle, J fell to work to dress my man,
Friday. I gave him a pair of linen
drawers, and made him a jerkin of goat’s
skin, and a very good cap of hare’s skin,
and he was mightily pleased to see himself
clothed like his master.

I then made him a little tent between
my two fortifications, and I fixed all my
@oors so that I could tien eas ae

ROBINSON CRUSOE.










inside, As to the weapons, I took thy
all into my habitation every night. Bu
needed none of all this precaution; }
never man had a more faithful, lovh
sincere servant than Friday was to m
without passions, sullenness, or desig
perfectly obliged and engaged. His vq
affections were tied to me, like those off
child to a father ; and I dare say he wa







have sacrificed his life to save
upon any occasion whatsoever, The m
testimonies he gave me of this put it
of doubt, and soon convinced me that
needed no precautions for my safety on!
account.

I was greatly delighted with him,
made it my business to teach him evely
thing that was proper to make him useli
handy, and helpful; but especially





make him speak, and understand me when.

I spoke. And he was the aptest scholar
that ever was; and particularly was so
merry, so constantly diligent, and so pleased
when he could but understand me, or make
me understand him, that it was very pleas-
ant to me to talk to him.

After I had heen two or three days

returned to my castle, I thought that, in
order to bring Friday off from his horrid
way of feeding, and from the relish of a

cannibal’s stomach, I ought to let him taste

other flesh ; so I took him out with me one



ROBINSON CRUSOE.

intending to kill a kid out of my om
flock, and bring it home and dress it; but
as I was going, I saw ashe-goatlying dow)
in the shade, and two young kids sitting
by her. I catched hold of Friday an¢
made signs to him not to stir; immediate
I presented my piece, shot, and killed ong
of the kids, The-poor creature, who had,
at a distance, indeed, seen me kill hi
enemy, but did not know nor could
imagine how it was done, was sensibl:
surprised; trembled, and shook, and looked
so amazed ‘that I thought he would have
‘sunk down. He did not see the kid I sho
at, or perceive I had killed it, but ripped
up his waistcoat, to feel eehether ie Was
not wounded; and, as I found presentiy,
thought I was “resdlved to kill him; for he
came and kneeled down to me, and enbe
ing my knees, said a great many things!
ae not understand ; but I could easily se:
the meaning was, to pray me not to kill him
I soon found a way +o convince hin
that I-wouid do him no harm; and taking
him up by the hand, laughed at him, and
pointing to the kid which J had killed,

‘beckoned ‘to him to run-and fetch it, which

he did; and while he was wondering, and
looking to see how the creature was killed,
Tloaded my gun again, By-and-by I saw
a great fowl sitting upon a tree withia
ate ‘so, to let Friday understand a little
what I would do, i called him to me again,

pointed at the fowl, which was indeed 4

parrot, and tomy gun, and to the ground
under the parrot, to Jet him see I would
make it fall. I fired,.and bade him look,
and ‘immediately he saw ‘the ‘parrot fall,
He stood tike one frightened again, nob

morning to the woods. I went, indeed, | withstanding all I had said to him; and!


supe 3 ROBINSON CRUSOE... . 98



ne



uetieve, if I would have let him, he would | to make bread, and in a short time he wat
hava worshipped me and the gun, As for able to Wo all my work as well as £ coulé
‘he gun itself, he would not so much as | do it myself, and we lived very happily
‘ouch it for several days. ~ Thad a mind once to try if he haa avy.

When Friday tasted the. stewed kid he | hankering inclination to his own country
‘et me know that he liked it very much, | again;. and having taught him Englisi se
Tie next day I roasted a piece, and when | well that he could answer me almost any
‘nday came to eat it he expressed great question, I asked him whether the nation
-“avistaction, and’ made me: understand that | he belonged to never conquered in battle,
be would néver eat human flesh any more..| At which. he smiled, and said, “ Yes, yes
‘ taught him to beat and sift the corn and’! we always fight the better.”
































Master—How came
=< you to be taken pris-
oner, then ?

fviday—They more many than my na-
tion, in the place where me was; they take
one, two, three, and me; my nation over-
beat them in the yonder place, where me
no was; there my nation take one, two,
great thousand.

Master—But why did not your side re-
zover you from your enemies ?

“riday—They run, one, two three, and
me, and make me go in the canoe; my
nation have no canoe that time.

Master—Well, Friday, what does your
nation do with the men they take? Do
they carry them away and eat them ?

Hriday—Y es, nvy nation eat mans too.

Master—Where do they carry them ?

Friday—Go to other place, where they
think.

Master—Do they come hither ?

Friday—Yes, yes, they come hither;
come other else place.

oe you been here with
them ?
a I been here (points to
the N. W. side of the island, which, it
seems, was their side),

By this I understood that my man,
Friday, had formerly been among the
savages who used to come on shore on



“ROBINSON CRUSOE.



the farther part of the island, on the said
man-eating occasions that he was now
brought for; and, some time after, when
I took the courage to carry him to that
side, being the same I formerly mentioned,
he presently knew the place, and told me
he was there once, when they eat up
twenty men, two women and one child.
He could not tell twenty in English, | ‘but
he numbered them, by laying so many
stones in a row, and pointing to me to tell
them over.

I asked Friday a thousand questions
about his country, and he told me all he
knew. He said his ‘sort of people were
called Caribs; but further west there were
white-bearded men like me, and that they
had killed “much mans;” by all of which,
I knew, he meant the Spaniards whose
cruelties in America had spread over the
whole country, and were remembered from
father to son, As the time passed away,
I talked much to Friday about God and
the Saviour, and I verily believe that he
became a better Christian than I was.
When he could understand me well I told
him of the countries of Europe, and how
I came to be on the island. When |
showed him the ship’s boat which was
now falling to pieces on the shore, he told
me that such a boat had come Ene in
his country with seventeen white men in it,
and that these white men were then living
with his people.

It was after this some time, that being
upon the top of the hill, at the east side of
the island, Friday, the weather being very
serene, looked very earnestly towards the
main land, then fell to dancing and cried,
“Oh, joy! oh, glad! there see my country.’


That set me to thinking whether I could
bot make the voyage with Friday, or send
Priday alone to see if the white men were
still there,

When I proposed to Friday that he
thould go over alone to see his people, he
et very badly, and said he would like to

*ROBINSON CRUSOE.



go, but would not leave me; so I resolved
to make a large canoe and make the ven-
ture, We felled a large tree near the
water, and, with a month’s hard labor, we
shaped a very handsome boat, and in an-
other fortnight we got her into the water.
Though she was large enough te carry
ee

ey

twenty men,

I was. surprised: to-see: with

paddle her along; So I asked: himif we

would, and if we: might venture over in|
‘not be: fiightened.”

her very well, though great. blow wind.”| up: as: well as: I could. However, I saw

her.

“Yes,” he said; “we venture over in

However, I had a farther design that he
knew nothing-of, and that was to make a

mast and a sail, and to fit her with an.

auehor and cable.



Atter all this was done, I had my man
Friday to teach as to what belonged to the
navigation of my boat; for, though he
knew very weli how to paddle the canoe,
ha knew nothing of what belonged to a
sail and a rudder; and was the most
anazed when he saw me work the boat to

aad again in the sea by the rudder,.and

how the sail gibbed, and filled this. way or
that way, as the course we sailed changed.
However, with a little use-I made all these
things familiar to him, and he became an
expert sailor, except that as to the com-
pass 1 could make him understand very
hittie of that.
By the time I had the boat finished the
“rainy season was upon us, and we had to
keep within doors. When we began to go
out again, I sent Friday down to the shore
ene day to find turtle. In a short time
he came flying over my outer wall in a



‘ROBINSON CRUSOE.

great. fright, crying out to me, “O, master}

what Gexterity and low swift my man ©} master f O} bad!” “What's the-matter,

Friday could manage her, turn: her, and |.
‘says: he;: “one, two, three canoes, one,



Friday?” said’ E. “Oh! yonder, there,

two, three!” “Well, Friday,” says I, “do
So: I heartened him

the-poor fellow: was most: terribly scared,
for nothing ran in: his head’ but. that they
were come back to.look for im, and weuld

-cut him in: pieces and eat: him;. and the

poor fellow trembled so that I scarcely
knew what to-do»with: him. I comforted
him as well as:I could, and' told him I was
in as much danger as he, and that they

jz. | would eat me as well as him. “But,” said

I, “Friday, we must resolve to: fight them,
Can you fight, Friday?” “Me shoot,”
says he; “but there-come many great num
ber.” “No-matter for that,” said I, again;
“our guns will fright them that: we do no

‘Kill” So I asked him. whether, if I re
‘solved to: defend him, he wowld defend

me,.and stand by me; and’ do just as I bid
him. He said, “Me die when you bid dig,
master.”

I loaded the two: fowling-pieces with
swan shot as large: as small pistol-bullets
Then I took four muskets, and loaded
them with two:slugs, and five small bullets
each ; and my two pistols I loaded witha
brace of bullets each. I hung my great
sword by my side, and gave Friday his
hatchet. When I had thus prepared my
self, I took my perspective-glass, and went
up to the side of the hill; and I found

quickly by my glass that there were on¢

and-twenty savages, three prisoners, all

three canoes; and that their whole bus
‘ness seemed to be the. triumphant banqué
112



men, and had taken passage to go to
As for them, they could not go
so Engla*.l in the ship, except as prisoners
in arms, «nd upon reaching ee LSS

Knglane. |

would sutely be hanged.



Upon thia they begged that I would let
tnem stay oa the island, to which I gave
my consent. Then I told them my whole
history, and how i kad managed every-
thing, I left them all my firearms and
about a barrel and a half of gunpowder,
and { prevailed uvon the captain to give
thei two barrels more and also some gar-
den seeds. IT gave them also the bag of
ews, and the captain sent them their chests
anu ciothes, for which they seemed very
thankful And then I left the island, after
being upon it eight-and-twenty years, two
®ontns and nineteen days,

“ROBINSON CR USOE.







When I came 2 to Big ,
fect stranger to all the: wi

3

except two sisters and i children of one
of my brothers. The captain gave to the

SSeS SE

owners a handsome account of my saving
the ship, and they made up a purse of
nearly £200. With this money I resolved
to go to Lisbon and see if I could get any
news from my plantations in Brazil. J
accordingly took shipping and arrived in
Lisbon safely, Friday accompanying me,
and proving a most valuable servant. Here
I found my old friend, the captain, whe
took me on the coast of Africa. He was
an old man now, and he told me he had
not been to the Brazils for nine years, but
he assured me that when he was there last,
ty martner was alive, and he believed ¥
ROBINSON CRUSOE.

reece, pe gts

as he fired upon them and would not sub-
mit, the mate shot him dead. The next
day his body was hung up at the yard-
arm as a warning to the rest.

When the captain came back, he told
me he had brought me some little refresh-
ments, such as the ship afforded. Upon

this, he called aloud to the boat, and bade {

his men bring the things ashore that were
for the governor; and, indeed, it was a
present as if I had been one that was not
to be carried away along with them, but
as if I had been to dwell upon the island
still, and they were to go without me.
First, he had brought me a case of bottles
full of excellent cordial waters, six large
bottles of Madeira wine, two pounds of
excelient good tobacco, twelve good pieces
of the ship’s beef, and six pieces of pork,
with a bag of peas, and about a hundred-
weight of biscuit. He also brought me a
box of sugar, 1 box of flour, a bag full of
lemons, and two bottles of lime-juice, and
abundance of other things. But besides
these, he brought me six new clean
shirts, six very good neckcloths, two pair
of gloves, one pair of shoes, a hat, and one
pair of stockings, and a very good suit of
clothes of his own, which had been worn
but very little: in a word, he clothed me
from head to foot. It was a very kind and
agreeable present, as any one may imagine,
to one in my circumstances; but never was
anything in the world of that kind so
unpleasant, awkward, and uneasy as it was
to me to wear such clothes at their first
putting on.



1b.

before me, and I tod them 1 had got a full
account how they had run away with the
ship, and were preparing to commit further
robberies. I let them know that by my



direction the ship had. been seized ; that
she lay now in the road; and they might
see that their new captain had received the

j reward of his villany ; that, as to them, f

wanted to know what they had to say why
I should not execute them as pirates, as
they could not doubt but I had authority
to do.

One of them answered that they had
nothing to say but this, that when they
were taken, the captain promised them
their lives, and they humbly implored my

After dressing in my new clothes, soas| mercy But 1 told them I knew not what
to look more like a real governor than in | mercy to show them; for as for myself I
my goat skins, I had all the rebels brought | had resolved to quit the island with all mv


































ROBINSON CRUSOE.

(oar) wees de, een: mee

Where are they ?”
says Smith quickly
“Here they are,”
says he; “ here’s om
captain and fifty men











































with him, have been











hunting you these

































































































the boat before it was dark; and, indeed,
they were heartily tired themselves also,
by the time they came back to us.

When they came back to the boat in

the dark, and found it high on the shore of
the creek, and their two men gone, they
_ began to complain that they were on an
enchanted island.

I made the man they had left in the
boat, who was now one of ‘us, call them
by name, to try if I could bring them to
a parley. So he calls out as loud as he
could to one of them, “Tom Smith! Tom
Smith! For God’s sake, throw down your
arms and yield, or you are all dead men
this moment.” “Whe must we yield to?



two hours; the boat-
swain is killed, Will °
Frye 1s wounded, and
{ am a prisoner; and
if you do not yieid
at once, you are al!
lost.”

Then the captair
called out that if they
would lay down their
arms, the ‘governor,
by whom he meant
me, would spare al!
their lives, except
that of Will Atkins,
who, it seems, was the
first man to mutiny
and lay nold of the captain. They all lay
down their arms at once, and we doune.
them and took some to the cave, and the
others to my bower. 1 mended the hole
that we had made im the first boat, and
after talking with the prisoners, the cap-
tain picked out those that he could trust
and started to retake the ship, reaching her
about midnight. |

Those that were on the deck were not
alarmed at seeing their own boats coming
back, and so the captain, after a sbort
fight, captured them all and put down the
hatches to keep the others below ‘They
then broke open the door of the roan.
house where the new rebel captain iy acai
ROBINSON CRUSOE.

They were just going into the boat,
when Kriday and the mate hallooed; and
they answering, ran along the shore west-
ward, towards the voice they heard, when
they were presently stopped by the creek,
where, the water being up, they could not
get over, and called for the boat to come



XD





their sight, we surprised the two men before
they were aware; one of them lying on
the shore, and the other being in the boat.

| The fellow on shore was between sleeping

up and set them over, as I expected. When

they had set themselves over, I observed
that the boat being gone up a good way
mto the creek, they took one of the three
men out of her, to go along with them, and
jett only two in the boat, having fastened
her to the stump of a little tree on the
shore. This was what I wished for; and
mumediately leaving Friday and the cap-
tam's mate to their business, I took the
rest with me, and crossing the creek out of



and waking, and going to start up. The cap.
tain, who was foremost, ran in upon him,
and knocked him down; and then called
out to him in the boat to yield, or he was
adead man. There needed very few argu-
ments to persuade a single man to yield,
when he saw five men upon him, and
his comrade knocked down. In _ the
meantime, Hriday and the captain’s mate
so well managed their business with the
rest, that they drew them, by hallooing and
answering, from one hill to another, till
they not only heartily tired them, but left
them where they could not reach back te
108 +

ROBINSON CRUSOE.

es

to their other boat; and it was easy to see | times, Finding that they were not answered

they were under a great surprise to find her
stripped of all that was in her, and a great
After they had mused

hole in her bottom.

awhile upon this, they set up two or three
great shouts, to try if they could make

























their companions hear; but all was to no
purpose. Then they fired a volley of their
small arms; but it was all one; those in
the cave, we were sure, could not hear ;
and those in our keeping, though they
heard it well enough, yet durst give no
answer to them. Then three men got intu

the boat and put her off a little way from
the shore, while the other seven started to
find their companions,

It seems they were too much frightened
to go far from the shore, but they went to
the top of a hill and hallooed several

they came to the conclusion that their com-
panions were all murdered, and they started
for the shore resolved to go back to the
ship and sail away without them.

As soon as I perceive1 them go towards



the shore, I imagined it to be as it really
was; but I presently thought of a strata.
gem to fetch them back again, and. which
answered my end to a tittle. I ordered
Friday and the captain’s mate to go over
the little creek to a rising ground, at about

| half a mile distance, and halloo out as loud

as they could; and that as soon as ever
they heard the seamen answer them, they
should return it again; and then keeping
out of sight, take a round, always answer
ing when the others hallooed, to draw them
as far into the island as possible.
BOBINSON CRUBOL ww

the other badly wounded. But he jumped
up and called for help, and then, as I came
up, he, with all the rest, cried out for
mercy. The captain told them he would









three muskets for you, with powder and
pall; tell me next what you think is
proper to be done.” He showed all the
testimony of bis gratitude that he was.
able, but offered to be wholly guided by
me. 1 told him the best method I could
thmk of was to fire on them at once as
they lay. He said, very modestly, that he
was loth to kill them, if he could help it;
but that those two were incorrigible vil-;
lains, and bad been the authors of all the })
mutiny in the ship, and if they escaped,
we should be undone still, for they would
go on board and bring the whole ship’s
company, and destroy us all
In the middle of this discourse we heard
some of them awake, and soon after we |
‘saw two of them on their feet. I asked spare their lives if they would give up
inn if either of them were the men who! their mutiny and obey his orders, which
he had said were the heads of the mutiny ? | they promised todo. I was willing they
He said, “No.” “Well, then,” said J,| should be spared; but“l told the captain
“you may let them escape; if the rest |he should keep them bound while they
escape you, it is your fault.” Animated | were upon the island. .
’ with this, he took the musket I had given! We now laid our plans to get possession
bim in his hand, and a pistol in his belt, | of the ship. As we thought they would be
and his two comrades with him,-with each sending a boat ashore tot look for their
man a piece in bis hand, The two men | comrades, we took everything from the boat
who were with him, going first, made some | on shore, and dragged her up beyond the
reach of high tide and stove a hole in her
bottom, so that they could not use her.
After a while another boat put off from
the ship with ten men in her, all armed.
We put some of our prisoners in the cave,
2S (sad some we kept with us, securely tied.
2 == | So now we kept clese and watched the
sailors rowing ashore,
noise, at which one of the seamen started | As soon as they got to the place where
ap apd cried out to the rest. But he was/| their other boat lay, they ran their boat |
_ 0 late, for our party fired, aad one of | into the beach and came all on shore, hau!
Uke two leaders was killed on the spot and | ing the boat up after them They all ran’


































































boat would float again, and by that time it
would be dark. So [kept close. I fitted
myself up for battle as before, and waited
in my ¢astle. About two o'clock, how-
ever, when they had all straggled into the
‘woods and out of sight, I resolved to
disclose myself to the three distressed
men, who were seated under a tree but 2
short distance off.
Friday and I went out, and when we
came near them [ called out, “What are

ye, gentlemen?” They all started up, and |
were very much fnghtened at my uncoutr |

appearance. But I calmed their fears with
a few words, and told them I was ready to
assist them. “ What is your case?” said I.
“ Our case is too long,” said one, “to tell
you now, but, in short, I was coramander
of that ship; my men have mutinied
against me; they have been hardly pre-
vailed on not to murder me, and, at last,
have set me on shore in this desolate place,
with these two men with me—one my
mate, the other a passenger, where we ex-
pected to perish, believing the place to be
uninhabited, and know not yet whet to
think of it.” “Where are these brutes,
your enemies?” said I. “There they lie,
sir,” said he, pointing to a thicket of trees.
“Have they any firearms?” ssid L He
auswered, “They had only two pieces, one
of which they left in the boat.” “Well

ROBINSON CHUSOU.





then,” said 1, “leave the rest to me I! see _
they are all asleep ; it is an easy thing to
kill them all; but shall we rather take
them prisoners?” He told me there were
two desperate villains among them, that i
was scarce safe to show any mercy to; out
if they were secured, he believed all tne
rest would return to ther duty. “ Well,”
says I, “let us retreat out of their view or
hearing, lest they awake, and we will
solve further.” So they willingly wen
back with me.
“Look you, sir,” said I; “if I vento
upon your deliverance, my conditions are
but two; first, that while you stay on
this island with me, you will not pretend
to any authority here, and if Y put arme
in your hands, you will, rpon aii occasions,
give them up to me, and do no prejudice
to me er mine upon tis island, and im the



























































































































































































































































































































































{meantime be governed by my orders :
secondly, that if the ship is or may be
recovered, you will carry me and my mac
to England, passage free.”

He gave me assurance that he would
comply with these most reasonabie de

mands, “Well, then,” said I, “here are
ay ROBINSON CRUSOE.





peas

the villaina Lift up His Sewn aigress
cutlass, as the seamen call it, or sword, to
strike one of the poor men; and I expected
to see him fall every moment; at which
all the blood in my body seemed to run
chill in my veins. I wished heartily now
for my Spaniard, and the savage that was
gone with him, or that I had any way to
ndiscovered within shot of






eres renee ener a teen

they pleased; but they sat down a.) three
upon the ground, very pensive, anc. Locked
like men in despair,

it was just at the top of high water
when these people came on shore; snd
while they rambled about to see what krud
of a place they were in, they had eareless!y
stayed till the tide was spent, Jeaving their
boat aground. They had left two men sr



them, that I might have secured the three
men, for I saw no firearms they had among
them; but it fell ont to my mind another
way. After I had observed the outrageous
‘ asage of the three men by the insolent sea-
men, I observed the fellows run scattering
about the land, as if they wanted to see
the country. I observed also that the
three other men had liberty to go where

tke boat, who, having drunk a little tou
much brandy, fell asleep. When they
awoke and found that the boat was too
fast aground for them to stir it, they hal:
looed out for the rest; upon which they
all came to the boat. Then J heard one of
them say, “Let her alone, Jack, sh+'l!
float next tide,”

I knew it would be ten hours before ti
ROBINSON CRUBGE.



Fee 34, ga ETL

master, they are come, they are come !” abo t me—I cannot: tell an when they



I jumped up, and went out as soon as 1

could get my clothes on, through my little |

grove, which, by the way, was by this time

grown to be a very thick wood. But I was

_ surprised, when, presently, I saw a boat

standing in for the shore, with a shoulder
of-mutton sail, as they call it, and the wind
- blowing pretty fair to bring them in; also
I observed, presently, that they did not
come from that side which the shore lay
on, but from the southernmost end of the
island. Upon this I called Friday in, and
bade him lie close, for these were not the
people we looked for, and that we might
aot know yet whether they were friends or
enemies. In the next place, I went in to
fetch my perspective glass, to see what [
could make out of them. I had scarce set
foot upon the hill, when my eye plainly
_ discovered a ship lying at anchor, not above

a league and a half from the shore, By my
observation, it appeared plainly to be an
English ship, and the boat appeared to be
en English long- boat.

T cannot express the confusion I was in,

though the joy of seeing a ship, and one

that I had reason to believe was manned
by my own countrymen, and consequently
friends, was such as I cannot describe;
bat yet I had vome secret doubts hanging





bidding me keep 1 ‘upon my yhard

thought were Dutch, but it did not prove

so. There were in all eleven men, wher sf
three of them I found were unarmed, aad.
as I thought, bound; and when the firs
four or five of them were jumped on shore.
they took those three out of the boat, as
prisoners. One of the three I could per
ceive using the most passionate gestures of
entreaty, affliction, and despair; the other |
two, I could perceive, lifted up thex
hands sometimes, and appeared concerned,
indeed, but not to such a degree ss the
first. I was perfectly confounded at the
sight, and knew not what the meaning of
itshould be. Friday called out to me in.
English, as well as he could, “O master!
you see English mans eat prisoner as wel!
as savage mans.” “Why, Friday,” says I,
“do you think they are going to eat them,
then ?”—“ Yes,” says Friday, “they will
eat them.”—* No, no,” says I, “ Friday; I
am afraid they will murder them, indeed ;
but you may be sure they will not eat
them.”

All this while I had no thought of what
the matter really was, but stood trembling
with the horror of the sight, expecung
every moment when the three pnsoners
should be killed; nay, once I saw me &




PP cnentenenantentatnl

This he said he knew, because he heard
them all cry out so, in their language, one
to another; for it was impossible for them
to conceive that a man could dart fire, and
speak thunder, and kill at a distance, And
this old savage was in the right; for, as
} understood since, by other hands, the
savages never attempted to go over to
the island afterwards; they were so ter-





ROBINSON CRUSOR. ~

108
state of great want. I resolved to increase
our stock of goats and grain, sufficient te
feed them all, and then to send fer them.
At the proper season we fell to work dig
ging, and planted as much grain as we
could. We also gathered more grapes, aud
caught a large number of kids) At last, |
victualed the boat and sent the Spaniard

and Friday’s father over to the main. agree







































































































rified with the

with fire from the gods.

in my discourse with the Spaniard, he



accounts given by those
four men (for it seems they did escape the
sea), that they believed whoever went to
that enchanted island would be destroyed





Ing upon a signal which they should show.
upon approaching the island again.

It was no less than eight days I hat
waited for them, when astrange and unfore
seen accident intervened, of which the like
has not, perhaps, been heard of in his

~ told me how he and thirteen others had | tory. I was fast‘asleep in my hutch one
been shipwrecked on the savage coast. and | morning when my man Friday came ru»
that his companions were all alive but ina | ning to me, and called aloud, “Master
ROBINSON CRUSOE.

The Spaniard’s limbs were as bad as
those of the savage, but Friday picked
him up and carried him to the boat, and
paddled it along to the creek, and so we
got home. Neither the savage nor the
Spaniard could climb over the wall, so
we made them a good tent outside. But
they soon got well and as strong as Friday
and myself.

I had Friday ask his father what he
thought of the escape of the savages in



the canoe, and their bringing the whole
nation to destroy us. His opinion was
that they could never live out the storm,
but, if they did, that they were so dread-
fully frightened with the manner of their
being attacked, the noise, and the fire, that
he believed they would tell the people
they were all killed by thunder and ligit-
ning, not by the hand of man; and that
Friday and I were two heavenly spirits,
or furies, come down to destroy them.
ROBINSON CRUSCE.



still, that he was only unbound in order
to be killed. When Friday came to him,
I bade him speak to him, and tell him of
his deliverance; and pulling out my bottle,
made him give the poor wretch a dram;
which, with the news of his being de
tivered, revived him, and he sat up in the
boat. But when Friday came to hear him
speak, and look in his face, it would have
noved anyone to tears to have seen how

friday xissed Lim, embraced him, hugged






into the boat, and out of the boat, a grest
many times ; when he went in to him, ba
would sit down, open his breast, and hol!
his father’s head close to his bosom hait ai.
hour together; then he took his arms noc
ankles, which were numbed and. stiff with
binding, and chafed and rubbed them with
his hands; and I gave him some rum out
of my bottle to rub them with, which did

them a great deal of good.

This action put an end to our pursuit of

mma, eried, laughed, hallooed, jumped | the canoe with the other savages whe
spout, danced, sung; then eried again, were now gotten almost out of sight , and
wrong his hands, beat his own face and ‘it wag happy for aa, for it biew so hard
wad; and then sung and jumped about | withis two hours after, and before they
again like a distracted creature, It waa 4! could be got» quarter of their way, and
xood while before I could make him speak | continued blowing so hard a!) uight, and
. “© me, or tell me what was the matter; | that from the north-west, which was against
put when he came a little to himself, he | them, that I could not suppose their host
tolé me that it was his father. He went | could live.
300

when we first fired had fled in fright to the
sea-side and had jumped into a cance, and
three more of the rest made the same way.
1 told Friday to run down and fire at



them, which he did, killing two and badly
wounding a third.

I cut the flags that bound the poor vic
tim, and asked him, in the Portuguese
jongue, what he was. He answered, in
Latin, Christianus ; but was so faint and
weak that he could scarce stand or speak.
I gave him a drink from my bottle, and a
piece of bread which he quickly ate. Then
T asked him what countryman he was, and
he said Espagnole; and being a little
recovered, let me know how thankful he
was, “Seignior,” said I, in as good
Spanish as I could make up, we must
_ fight now. Take this sword and pistol, if
you have any strength left.” He took

them thankfully and, as if they gave him |* iy

new vigor, he flew upon his murderers like
a fury. A powerful savage once threw
him on his back and was wringing my
sword out of his hands, when he wisely
quitted the sword and shot him through
the body, before I, who was running up to
help him, could come near him, We
killed them ali except four who escaped in

ROBINSON CRUSOE.

the boat, whereof onze was wounded, if nes
dead.

Those that were in the canoe worked —
hard to get out of gunshot, and though
Friday made two or three shots at them, I
did not find that he hit any of them
Friday would fain have had me to take one
of their canoes, and pursue them; and,
indeed, I was very anxious about their
escape, lest, carrying the news home ts
their people, they should come back per-
haps with two or three hundred of the
canoes, and devour us; se [I conssnied te
pursue them by sea, and running te one of
their canoes, I jumped in, and bade iriday
follow me. But when I was in the canoe
I was surprised to find another poor crea
ture lie there, bound hand and foot, as the
Spaniard was, and almost dead with fear ;
for he had not been able to look over the
side of the boat, he was tied so hard neck
and heels, and had been tied so long, that
he had really little life in him.



I Lee cut the twisted flags or
rushes, and would have helped him up;
but he could not stand or speak, bat
groaned most piteously, believing, it seam,
BUBLNSON URUSOE. . OE









two of them, and wounded three more; | lets, we found only two drop; but se mua
end on my side 7 killed one, and wounded | were wounded, that they ran about yeliing
two. They were, you may be sure, in a] and. screaming like mad croatares, all
dreadful consternation; and all of them | bloody, and most of them miserabix
‘nat were not hurt jumped upon their feet, | wounded.

ont did not know which way to run, or| “Now, Friday,” said I, laying loves the
“gich way to look, Friday kept his eyes | discharged pieces, and taking up the mus

































































close upon me, that, as I had bid him, he| ket which was yet loaded, “follow me,”
might observe what I did; so, as soon as | which he did witha great deal of courage :
the first shot was inade, I threw down the | upon which I rushed out of the wood and
piece, and took up the fowling-piece, and | showed myself, and Friday close at my
Hriday did the like. He saw me cock and | foot. As soon as I perceived they saw me.
present; he did the same again. “ Are you! | shouted as loud as I could, and bade
ready, Hriday?” said L “Yes,” says he. ; Friday do so tou, and running as fast az 4
“Let fly, then,” said I, “in the name of | could, which by the way wasnot very fast,
pods anc with that! fired again among | being loaded with arms as I was, I made.
the amazed wretches, and so did Friday ; | directly towards the poor victim, who was
wid as our pieces were now loaded with } as I said, iying apon the beach. The twe
vtint . walk swear snot, or smal} pistol mai. | tudehers who were going toward him
gee ROBINSON CRUSOE.











In this posture I fetched a compass to my
right hand of near a mile, as well'to get
over the creek as to get into the wood, so
that I might come within shot of them
before I should be discovered, Friday fol-
lowing close at my heels. I marched till
i came to the skirt of the wood on the side
‘which was next to them, only that one cor-
ser of the wood lay between me and them.
Here I called softly to Friday, and show-
ing him a great tree which was just at the
eorner of the wood, bade him go to the tree,
and bring me word what. they were doing.

He did so, and came immediately back to -

me, and told me thatthey were all about
their fire eating the flesh of one of their pris-
oners, and that another lay bound upon the
sand a little from them, whom he said they
would kill next; and this fired the very
soul within me. He told me it was not
one of their nation, but one of the bearded
men whom he had told me of, that came to
their countryin the boat. Iwas filled with
horror at the very naming of the white
bearded man; and going to the tree, I saw
plainly a white man, who lay upon the
beach of the sea with his hands and feet
tied with flags, or things like rushes,

i had now not a moment to lose, for
ameteen of the dreadful wretches sat upon
the ground, all close huddled together, and

-

“do exactly as you see me do.”



had just sent the other two to butcher the
poor Christian, and bring him perhaps limk
by limb to their tre, and they were stoop
ing down to untie the bandsat his feet. |
turned to Friday: “Now, Friday,” said i.
So I set
down one of the muskets and the fowling-
piece upon the ground, and Friday did the
like by his, and with the other musket I
took my aim at the savages, bidding him
to do the like; then asking him if. he was
ready, he said, “Yes.” “Then fire at
them,” said I; and at the same moment I
fired. also,

Friday took his aim so much better than
I, that on the side that he shot he killed




































ROBINSON CRUSOE. rs 9%



upon pthese three human bodies, I ob-| very cheerful, and told me, as before, he
served also that they landed, not where | would die when I bid die, |

they had done when Friday made his| In this fit of ‘fury I gave Friday one pis.
escape, but nearer to my creek, where the | tol to stick in his girdle, and three guns
shore was low, and where a thick wood | upon his shoulder, and I took one pistol
sanae close almost down to the sea, This, | and the other three myself; and in this

|



with the abhorrence of the inhuman errand posture we marched out. I took a smaih
these wretches came about, filled me with | bottle of rum in my pocket, and gave
such indignation that I came down again | Friday a large bag with more powder and
to Friday, and told him I was resolved to bullets ; and as to orders, I charged ‘him.
20 down to them, and kill them all; and | to keep close behind me, and not to stir;
asked him if he would stand by me He| or shoot, or do anything till I bid him,
had now got over his fright, and he was | and in the meantime not to speak a word


==
ee
——————
SSS Se
———————




aA _BOBINBON CRUSOE.

would have a very good account of my | tain, as well because I was the oldest maa,
plantation. I prepared the necessary papers | as because I had two servants
_and sent them by a ship sailing to the} When we came to the Pyrenean Mon»,
‘Brazils, and in about seven - months [| tains, I suffered much with the cold, and

o a there was so much snow that we were
stopped ten days for want of a guide. We
found one, however, and set out again.
We were descending on the northern side
of the mountains, when, our guide being
something before us, out rushed three
monstrous wolves, and after them a bear
Two of the wolves flewupon the guide
and, had he been far beicre us, he would
have been devoured before we could have
helped him. One of them fastened upon
his horse, and the other attacked the man
with such violence that he had not time or
presence of mind enough to draw his pis
tol, but hallooed and cried out to us most
lustily. My man Friday, like a bold
fellow, rode directly up, and with his
| pistol shot the wolf in the head. ‘The
other, when he heard the pistol shot, tied
immediately.

But never was a fight managed so hardily,
and in such a surprising manner, as that
between Friday and the be. Ar tho































received a large packet from my surviving
trustees giving a full account of my plan-
tation, which had been so improved that I
was now master of about 50,000 pounds
sterling in money, with a fine estate. The
trustees sent me, besides the gold, 1,200
chests of sugar and 800 rolls of tobacco.

I was so overcome by this news, and the
reception of such great riches, that I fell
sick, but soon recovered. I rewarded my
old benefactor, and appointed him receiver
of the profits of my plantation, Having
settled all my affairs in Lisbon, I resolved
to return to. England by land—that is,
except from Calais to Dover. I engaged an-
ether servant, and joined a party of mer.
chants, who were going the same way.

Jn this manner J set out from Lisbon ; | bear is a heavy, clumsy creature, and does
and our company being very well mounted | not gallop as the’ wolf does, whicn ¥
and armed, we made a little troop, where-| swift and light, so he has two particulat
of they did me the honor to call me cap- | qualities, First, as to men, who are not his




proper prey ; if you do not meddle with
him he will not meddle with you; but
then you must take care to be very civil to
him, and give him the road, for he is a
very nice gentleman ; he will not goastep
out of his way for a prince; nay, if you
are really afraid, your best way is to look

another way and keep going on; for if you §
stop, and stand still, and look at him, he

takes it for an affront; but if you throw
or toss anything at him, and it hits him,
though it were but a bit of stick as big as
your finger, he sets all other business aside
to pursue his revenge—that is his first
quality.
atironted, he will never leave you, night or
day, but follow at a good round rate till
he overtakes you.

When, on a sudden, we espied the bear,
we were a little surprised. ‘‘Oh-oh, oh
says Friday ; ‘“‘oh, master! you give me te
leave, me shakee te hand with him; me
makee you good laugh.”

“You fool,” said I, “he will eat you
up.” “Tatee me up! Eatee me up!” says
Vridxy, twice over again ; ‘me eatee him
up; me makee you good laugh; you all
stay here,me show you good laugh.” So
down he sits, and gets his boots off in a
moment, and puts on a pair of pumps (as

ROBINSON CRUSOE

The next is, that if he be once |



had, as we say, the heels of the bear, came
up with him quickly, and took up a great
stone, and threw it at him, and hit him
just on the head, but did him no more

7

we call the flat shoes they wear, and which | harm than if he had thrown it against a
he had in his pocket), gives my other ser- wall. Butit answered Friday’send, forthe
vant his horse, and with his gun away he rogue was so void of fear that he did it

flew, swift like the wind. purely to make the bear follow him, and

y . , s

The bear was walking softly on, and | show us some laugh, as he called it. As
offered to meddle with nobody, till Friday | soon as the bear felt the stone, and saw
coming pretty near, calls to him, as if the | him, he turns about, and comes after him

bear could understand him: “Hark ye, hark
72-5 be ees .

ye, saysTriday, “mespeakee with you.”

We followed at a distance.

taking very long strides, and shuffling on
at a strange rate, so as would have put a
Friday, who | horse to.a middling gallop. Away runs
ila

Wriday, and seeing a great oak-tree fit for
his purpose, he beckoned us to follow ; and
doubling his pace, he got nimbly up the
tree, laying his gun down upon the ground,
at about five or six yards from the bottom
of the tree. The bear soon came to the tree,
and we followed at a distance. The first
thing he did, he stopped at the gun,



smelled at it, but let it lie, and up he
scrambles into the tree, climbing like a
‘eat, though so monstrous heavy.
Friday went out on a long branch, and
the bear followed him. “Now,” said Fri-
day, “see me make bear dance,” and he
began to shake the limb up and down, so
that the bear had all it could do to hold
on. When the bear would move back,
Friday would sit still and tell him to come
farther, and the bear would start toward
him, and get, another shaking as before



ROBINSON CRUSOE.

pemmtaen —

Hinally, Friday crept to the end of th
limb and dropped to the ground, and the
bear began te come down backward, !"y.
day picked up his gun, and when the bea
was nearly on the ground he shot hi
through the head.

The guide now pressed us forward. We
had one dangerous place to pass, and ow



guide told us, if there wire more wolvet
in the country, we should find them there;

land this was a small plain surrounded

with woods on every side, and a long uar
row defile, or lane, which we were to pas?
to get through the wood, and then we
should come to the village where we wet
to lodge, It was within half an hour o
sunset when we entered the wood, and 5
little after sunset when we canie into the
plain. We met with nothing in the fin
wood, except that in a little plain we “2
ROBINSON CaUBOR



five great wolves cross the road, full speed,
one after another. Upon this, our guide,
who was but a faint-hearted fellow, bid us
keep in a ready posture, for he believed



there were more wolves acoming. We
sept our arms ready and our eyes about us;
oat we saw no more wolves till we came
through that wood, and entered the plain.

As soon as we came into the plain, the first:

object we met with was a poor horse which
_ the wolves had killed, and at least a dozen
of them .at work picking his bones. We
had not gone half over the plain, when we
began to hear the wolves howl in the wood
on our left in a frightful manner, and pres-
ently we saw about a hundred coming on

directly toward us, all in a body. I scarce ,

knew in what manner to receive them, but
found to draw ourselves in a close line was
the only way; so we formed in a moment,
but I ordered that only every other man
should fire, and that, the others should
stand ready to give them a second volley
ammediately. However, at present, we had
no necessity ; for upon firing the frst vol-
ley, the enemy made 1 full stop. Four of
them. being shot in the bead, dropped ;

several others were wounded, and went |

bleeding off. I found they ‘stopped, but
did not immediately retreat; whereupon I
caused all the company to halloo as loud

as wa could; and they began to retire and |



117

tum aboat, I then ordered a second volley
to be fired in their rear, which put them to —
the gallop, and away they went to the
woods. We had but little more than loaded
our fusees, when we heard a terrible noise
in the same wood on our left, only that: it
was farther onward. .

The night was coming on, and the light
began to be dusky, which made it the
worse on our side; and, on a sudden, we
perceived two or three troops of wolves, one
ov. our left, one behind us, and one in our
front, so that we seemed to be surrounded
with them. However, as they did not fal}
upon us, we kept our way forward. At





another opening of the wood, we heard
the noise of a gun, and looking that way,
out roshed a horse, with a saddle, and
a bridle on him, flying like the wind, and
sixteen or seventeen wolves after him full
speed,
Lid

But here we had a most horrible sight;
for, riding up to where the horse came out,
we found the carcases of another horseand
of two men, devoured by the ravenous
ereatures. This filled us with horror, and
we knew not what cdurse to take; but the
creatures resolved us soon, for they



gathered about us presently, in hopes of

















prey. It happened, very much to our
advantage, that at the entrance into the
wood, there lay some large timber-trees. I
drew my little troop in among those trees,
and placing ourselves in a line behind one
long tree, I advised them all to alight, and
keeping that tree before us for a breast-
work, to stand in a triangle, or three fronts,
inclosing our horses in the centre. We did



ROBINSON CRUSOE.
———<$<—

so, and it was well we did; for never wa;
a more furious charge than the creature;
made upon us. They came on us with ;
growling kind of a noise, and mounted th
piece of timber. I ordered our men to fix
as before, every other man; and they toci
their aim so sure that they killed several «
the wolves at the first volley; but thex
was a necessity to keep a continual firing
for they came on like devils, those behinc
pushing on those before. I finally ordered
a train of powder to be poured along the
log, and I set fire to it. This frightenec
them so that when we had fired anothe
volley and gave a great shout, they al
turned tail and left us, and © 2 resume
our journey.

I reached England and made up my minc
to stop roving. I married a wife not to mj
dissatisfaction, and had three children, twe
sons and a daughter, and for seven year:
was contented I sold r, gplantation 1
the Brazils and was wea.,3 and happy
One of my nephews I bred up as a gentle
man, the other I placed with a shit
captain, and being a. bold and sensibit
fellow, in five years I gave him a goo
ship and sent him to sea.

But, my wife dying and my nepkev
coming home with good success from °:
voyage to Spain, the old desire to ¢
abroad returned, and in my after voyage
I had more adventures of which I sha.
give an aceount in a Second Part a! ©)
history.
ROBINSON CRUSOE.





Pe by bale

HAT homely proverb, that
what is bred in the bone

oa



ested than in thestory of my life.
Any one would think that after

rire thirty-five years’ affliction, and a
tie variety of unhappy circumstances,
which few men, if any, ever went
chrough before, and after near seven years
_ of peace and enjoyment in the fulness of
all things, and grown old, that the native
propensity to rambling should be worn
out, and I might, at sixty-one years of age,
have been a little inclined to stay at home.

Yet all these things had no effect upon
me, or at least not enough to resist the
strong inclination I had to go abroad again.
In particular, the desire of seeing my new
plantation on the island, and the colony [
left there, ran in my head continually. I
dreamed of it all night, and my imagina.
tion ran upon it all day; and my fancy
worked so steadily and strongly upor i’
that I talked of it in my sleep.

_In this kind of temper I lived some years
My wife, finally, told me very seriously,
one night, that she believed there was seme
powerful impulse of Providence upow me
to visit my island again, and that J owgdt
420



to go. This affectionate behavior in my wife
'prought me a little out of the vapors, and
1 began to think seriously of my folly,
and to give up my thoughts of going
away. I resolved to divert myself with
other things, and to engage in some busi-
ness that might effectually tie me up from



any more excursions of this kind; for I
fouud that thing return upon me chiefly
when I was idle, and had nothing to do.
To this purpose, I bought a little farm in
the county of Bedford. I had a little
house upon it, and the land about it, I
found, was capable of great improvement.
In a word, I went down to my farm, settled
my family, bought ploughs, harrows, a

setting seriously to work, became in one
half-year a mere country gentleman. My
thoughts were entirely taken up in manag-
ing my servants, cultivating the ground,
enclosing, planting, ete.; and I lived, as I
“hought, the most agreeable life that na-
ware was capable of directing,

Sut in the middle of all this felicity,

one blow from unseen Providence un-
minged me at once, and drove me into.a



ROBINSON CRUSOE.

deep relapse of the wandering disposition.
which, as I may say, being born in nv
very blood, soon recovered its hold of ime.
This blow was the loss of my wife. My
thoughts ran all away again into the old
affair; my head was quite turned with the
whimseys of foreign adventures; and all
the pleasant, innocent amusements of my
farm, which before entirely possessed me,
were nothing to me, had no relish,. and
were like music to one that has no ear, or
food to one that has no taste; in a word, |
resolved to let my farm, and return to Lon.
don. When I came to London, I was still
as uneasy as I was before; I had no relish
for the place, no employment in it. ~~“hing
to do but to saunter about.

It was now the beginning of the year
1698, when my nephew, whom [I had
brought up to the sea, was come home
from a short voyage to Bilboa. He came
to me, and told me that some merchants of
his acquaintance had been proposing to
him to go a voyage for them to the East
Indies, and to China, as private traders.
“And now, uncle,” says he, “if you will
go to sea with me, I will engage to land
you upon your old habitation in the island;

| for we are to touch at the Brazils,”
cart, wagon, horses, cows and sheep, and, |:

This so exactly hit with my temper that
I consented, but told him I would go no

further than my own island. He argued

against this, but to little purpose. How

ever, I and my man Friday went on board,

in the Downs, on the 8th of January, 1693.
I took with me the frame of a sloop that
could be easily put together. I also took
with me some servants whom I purposed
to leave on the island, among them twe
carpenters, a smith, a very handy in












genious fellow, who could do many things,

and a tailor, In my cargo was an abun-
dance of cloths and wearing apparel, beds,
bedding, and household stuff, particularly
kitchen utensils, with pots, kettles, pewter,
brass, ete. and near a hundred pounds more
m iron-work, nails, tools of every kind,
staples, hooks, hinges, and every necessary
thing I could think of,

I carried also a hundred spare arms,
muskets, and fusees; besides some pistols,
a considerable quantity of shot of all
sizes, three or four tons of lead, and two
vieces of brass cannon; and, because I
knew not what time and what extremities
I was providing for, I carried a hundred



barrels of powder, besides swords, cut
lasses, and the iron part of some pikes and
halberts. So that, in short, we had a large
magazine of all sorts of stores; and J
made my nephew carry two small quarter-
deck guns more than he wanted for his
ship, to leave behind if there was occasion ;
that when we came there, we might build
a fort, and man it against all sorts of
enemies.

Contrary winds first put os to the north.
ward, and we were obliged to put in at
Galway, in Ireland. Here [ took in sev-
eral live hogs, and two cows with their
calves, which I resolved, if I had a good

passage, to put on shore in my island ; but:
Azz

a

we found occasion to dispose otherwise of
them. :

_ We set out on the 5th of February from
Ireland, and had a very fair gale of wind
lor some days. As I remember, it might
be about the 20th of February, in the even-
ing late, when the mate, having the watch,
came into the round-house, and told us he
saw a flash of fire, and heard a gun fired.

ROBINSON CRUSOE.



I immediately ordeved that five guns
should be fired, one soon after another,
that, if possible, we might give notice to
them that there was help for them at hand,
and ‘that they might endeavor to save
themselves in their boat; for though we
could see the flames of the ship, yet they,
it being dark, could see nothing of us.

We lay by some time upon this, only



This made.us all run out upon the quarter-
deck, where we saw a very great light,
which we concluded must be some ship
on fire at sea; and as, by our hearing the
noise of guns just before, we concluded
that it could not be far off, we stood
directly towards it. In about half an hour’s
sailing, the wind being fair and the weather
clearing up a little; we conid y.ainly dis.
cern that it was a great ship on fire,

driving as the burning ship drove, waiting
for daylight; when, on a sudden, to our
great terror, though we had reason to
expect it, the ship blew up in the air; and
in a few minutes the rest of the ship sunk

About eight o’clock in the morning, wé
discovered the ship’s boats, and foul
there were two of them, both thronged
with people. We immediately spread out
ancient, to let them know we saw thet
RGBINSON CRUSOE. a

APT IRC

and hung a waft out, as asignal forthem| It is impossible for me to express tie
to come on board; and then made more | several gestures, the strange ecstasies
‘sail, standing directly to them. In little | which these poor delivered people ran irto.
more than half an hour, we came up with | There were some in tears; some raging and
them; and, in a word, took them all in, | tearing themselves, as if they had been in
being no Jess than sixty-four men, women | the greatest agonies of sorrow; some stark
and children, raving and downright lunatic; some rr.



aid don





PETTITT ee




about the ship stamping with their feet,
others wringing their hands; some were

dancing, some singing, some laughing,
Inore crying, many quite dumb, not able to
speak a word; several swooning and ready
to faint; and a few were crossing them-
selves, and giving God thanks,

There were two priests among then, one
much older than the other. This old priest
went stark mad, but the young one was
very calm, and after he had fallen on his
knees and given thanks, he did much to
quiet the others. In a little more than a
week, we met a barque, which the French
people hired to put them on shore; all
except the young priest, who desired to go
with us.

We steered on toward the West Indies

ROBINSON CRUSOE.



ship with one mast gone, and quite heip.
less. The crew were in great distress,
being out of provisions, and nearly starved,
There was a youth, and his mother, and
a maid-servant on board, who were passen-
gers, and having no provisions of their
own, they were ina more deplorable con-
dition than the rest; for the seamen, being
reduced to such an extreme necessity them-
selves, had no compassion for the poor
passengers. We lay by the ship long
enough to supply them with provisions,
and help them put up a new mast, and they’
thought they could continue their voyage.
While we lay there, the woman passenger |
died, and the son begged that we would

take him and the servant on our’ s™».
which we did.

I shall trouble nobody with the little in-

cidents of wind, weather, currents, etc., on

the rest of our voyage; but, to shorten my
story, shall observe that I came to my old
habitation, the island, on the 10th of April,
1695. It was with no small difficulty that
I found the place ; for, as I came to it, and
went from it, before, on the south and east
side of the island, coming from the Brazils,
so now, coming in between the main and
the island, I did not know it when I saw it.

We went on shore on several islands,
but none for my purpose; only tits I
learned by my coasting the shore, that I
was under one great mistake before, viz,
that the continent which I thought I saw
from the island I lved im, was really no
continent, but a long island, or rather a
ridge of islands.

Thus, coasting from one island vw at:
other, at length I came fair on the south |

for twenty days, when we came up with a| side of my island, and presently knew the
a

the ship safe to an anchor, broadside with

the little creek where my old habitation

was. .

As soon as I saw the place, I called for

Friday, and asked him if he knew where

be was? He looked about a little, and,
presently clapping his hands, cried, “ Oh,

ROBINSON CRUSOE.

128

c



ery countenance of the place ; so I brought | “ Well, well,” says I, “Friday, you don’t

know; but shall we see anyone else,
then?” The fellow, it seems, had better
eyes than I, and he points to the hill just
above my old house; and, though we lay
half a league off, he cries out, “ Me see,
me see, yes, yes, me see much man there,
and there, and there!”



yes; oh, there—oh, yes; oh, there !” point-
ing to our old habitation, and fell dancing
and capering like a mad fellow; and I had
much ado to keep him from jumping into
the sea, te swim ashore to the place.
“Well, Friday,” says I, “do you think
we shall find anybody here? and do you
think we shall find your father?” “No,
no,” says he, shaking his head, “no see
him more; no, never more see him again.
he long ago die; he much old man.”

As soon as Friday told me he saw
people, I caused the English ancient to be
spread, and fired three guns, to give them
notice we were friends; and immediately
ordered a boat out, taking Friday with me;
and went directly on shore, taking with
me the young friar, We had, besides,
about sixteen men well armed, if we had
found any new guests there which we did
not know of; but we had no need >t
weapons.
126



—

As we went on shore, the first man I
fixed my eye upon was the Spaniard
whose life I had saved. I ordered nobody
to go on shore at first but myself; but
there was no keeping Friday in the boat,
for the affectionate creature had spied his
father at a distance, and if they had not
let him go ashore, he would have jumped
into the sea. He was no sooner on shore,
but he flew away to his father, like an
arrow out of a bow. It would have made
any man shed tears, in spite of the firmest
resolution, to have seen the first transports
of this poor fellow’s joy when he came to
his father: how he embraced him, kissed



ROBINSON CRUSOE.





arms, set him down upon a tree, and lay
down by.him; then stood and looked a.
him, stroked his face, took him up in his| him for a quarter of an hour together;
then lay down on the ground, and stroked
his legs, and kissed them, and then got up
again, and stared at him; one would have

thought the fellow bewitched. But it
would have made a dog laugh the next
day to see how his passion ran out another
way. In the morning, he walked along the
shore again with his old father, several
hours, always leading him by the hand, as
if he had been a lady; and every now and
“then he would come to the boat to fetch
something or other for him, either a lump
of sugar, a dram, a biscuit cake, or some-
thing or other that was good. In the
afternoon, his frolics ran another way ; for
then he would set the old m n down upon
the ground, and dance about him, and
make a thousand antic postures and ges
‘tures; and all the while he did this he
would be talking to him, and telling hin
one story or another of his travels, and of
what happened to him abroad, to divert
him. In short, if the same filial affection
was to be found in Christians te theif
ROBINSON CRUSOH

—_—

parents, in our part of the world, one
would be tempted to say there would
hardly have been Se need of the fifth
commandment,

The first Spaniard, whom I said, I ‘knew
very well, was he whose life I had saved.
He came towards the boat, and he not only
did not ae me at first, but he had no



thoughts, no notion of its being me that
was come, till I spoke to him. “ Seignior,”
said I, in Portuguese, “do you not know
me?” At which he spoke not aword, but
threw his arms abroad, and saying some-
thing in Spanish that I did not perfectly
hear, came forward and embraced me, tell-
ing me he was inexcusable not to know that
face again that he had once seen as if an
angel from Heaven, sent to save his life ;



“127



then, beckoning to the person that attended
him, bade him go and call out his com-

rades.

He then asked me if I would walk to

my old ha bitation, where he would give me

possession of my own house again. So I
walked along with him; but, alas! I could
no more find the place again than if I had















never been there; for they had planted so
many trees, and’ in ten years’ time they
were grown so big, that, in short, the place
was inaccessible, except by such windings
and blind ways as they themseives only,
who made them, could find.

I asked him what put them upon ail
these fortifications. He told me I would say
there was need enough of it, when they
had given me an account how they had
428



passed their time. Nothing that ever befell
him in his life, he said, was so afflicting to
him at first, as the disappointment when he
came back to the island and found I was
not there.

As to the three barbarians (so he called
them) that were left behind, and of whom,
he said, he had a long story to tell me, the
Spaniards all thought themselves muck
better among the savages, only that their
number was so small; “and,” says he, “had
they been strong enough, we had been all
jong ago in purgatory;” and with that he
crossed himself on the breast. “ But, sir,”
says he, “I hope you will not be displeased
when I shall tell you how, forced by neces-
sity, we were obliged to disarm them, and
make them our subjects, as they would not
be coptent with being moderately our



ROBINSON CRUSOR.

~s

masters, but would be our murderers.” [|
answered, I was afraid of it when I left
them there, and nothing troubled me at
my parting from the islazd, but that they
were not come back, that § migkt have pui
them in possession of everything first, and
left the others in a state of subjection, as
they deserved.

While I was saying *"%s, the man
came whom he had sent back, and with
him eleven more, In the dress they ~vere
in, it was impossible to guess whaé nation
they were of; but he made all cle...» both
ts them and to me. First he turned to
né, and pointing to them, said, “These,
sir, are some of the gentlemen who owe
their lives to you;” and then turning to
them, and pointing to me, he let them
know who I was; upon which they all
came up, one by one, not as if they had
been sailors, and ordinary fellows, but
really as if they had been noblemex. and {
a monarch.


ROBINSON CRUSOE.
a i a Re

As soow as [ had retired with the Span-
ard, 1 naa him relate to me all that had
sappened, and first I asked hira about ais
yoyage to the main, as I then thought it,
ath Ienday’s father. He told me they had
, safe voyage and his friends were over-
foyed to see him, and they had thought
lim surely. dead. They borrowed some
lage canoes from the savages under the







428

2s



way I baked my bread, bred up tame
goats, and planted my corn; and, in a
word, everything I did. They began te
live very sociably ; and the head Spaniard,
who had seen pretty much of my methods,
and Friday’s father together, managed all
their affairs; but as for the Englishmen,
they did nothing but ramble about the
island, shoot parrots, and catch tortoises;













































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































3,
% wih
yh



RS Eh «
Rein vt i os
AMIN

WN Z77,



pretense of gor.g o-fishing, and reached the
island in safety.

The only just thing the vgues did was
that, when the Spaniards came ashore, they
gave my letter to them, and gave them
“wovisions, as I ordered them; also they
give them the long paper of directions
which ‘I had left with them, containing
iM particular methods which I took for
anaging every part of my life there; the



























































































and when they came home at night, the
Spaniards had their suppers for them.

The Spaniards would have heep satisfiea
with this, had the others but let then
alone, which, however, they could not find
in their hearts to do long; but, like the deg
in the manger, thy would not eat them-
selves, neither would they let the others
eat, The difference, nevertheless, wes
first but trivial, and such as is not wore:
peiating, but at last it broke out into open
qar ; and though, it is true, the first rela-
Hon of it came fon the Spaniards them-
~ felves, whom I may call the accusers, yet
«vhen I came to examine the fellows, they
could not deny © word of it,
3ut before I come to the particuiars of
this part, T must supply a defect in my
dormer relation ; and this was, I forgot to
set down, among the rest, that just as we
were weighing the anchor to set sail, there
~ happened a little quarrel on board of our
shxp, and the captain, in separating them,
threatened again to hang them when he
came to England. .'This so frightened two
of them that they stole the ship’s pinnace,
ana taking two muskets and some other
weapons, they ran away to/ their com-
ganions on shore. But the other rogues
would not have them to live with them,
but made them go and build huts for
themselves. This they had done when the
Spaniards came |
gome corn to plant, and they began to live
pretty well. - But the three rogues would
not let them alone, but tore up their crops
and set their hut on fire.
_ Sut not to crowd this part with al av-
rount of the lesser part of their rogueries,

such as treading down their corn, shooting |.

ROBINSON CR USOE.



The latter gave them |

e



three young kids ‘and a sho-gost, which the

| poor men had got to breed up tame for

their store; and, in a word, ‘placzing then
night and day i in this manner, it forced the
two men to such a desperation, that they

| resolved to fight them all three, the first

time they had a fair opportunity. i"

It happened that the day be“ore, two of
the Spaniards, having been in the woods,
had seen one of the two Englishinen, whom,
for distinction, I called the. honest men,
and he had made a sad complaint to the

Spaniards of the. barbarous uszge they had

met with from their three countrymen.
When the Spaniards came here at night
and they were all at supper, cue of them
took. the freedom to repreve the three
Englishmen, though in very gentle and
mannerly terms, and asked then how they
could be so cruel, _

One of the Englishmen returned ‘ery

briskly, “What had they to do there? tha:

they came on shore without leave; ané
that they should not plant or build upon
the island; it was none of their ground.’
“Why,” said the Spaniard, very calmly,
“ Seionior Inglese, they must not starve.”
The Englishman replied, “They might
starve; they should not plant nor build ix
that place, . They should be servants


ROBINSON CRUSOH. _ TSR
° y P a hcee eae
the Spaniards had given notice ef their:
coming, and Atkins proposed that they
should take revenge on the Spaniards.

iAs soon as they had made this bloody «



and work for them.” “But,” says the.
spaniard, “they are not bought with your
money; you have no right to make thein
servants.” The Englishman answered,
“The island was theirs ; the governor had

given it to them, and no man had anything

bargain, they fell to work with the poo
men’s habitation. They did not set fir









to do theré but themselves;” and with
‘that, swore that they would go and burn
all their new huts, “Why,” said the
Spaniard, “ by the same rule we would be
your slaves too.” “And so you shall,”
says the bold dog, “before we are done
with you.” With that, they strode off mee
their guns,

They intended to wait till midnight, and
then go murder the two men and burn
their huts ; but they fell asleep and did not
awake until their victims were gone abroad
inthe morning, Then they eoneluded that



indeed, to anything, but they pulled down
both their houses, and pulled them so limb
from limb that they left not the least stick
standing, or scarce any sign on the ground
where they stood. They tore all their little
collected household ‘stuff in pieces, and
threw everything about.im such a manner,
that the poor men afterwards found some
of their things a mile off their habitation.
When they had done this, they pulled up
ali the young trees which the poor men
had planted; pulled up an inclosure they
had made to secuie their cattle and thes
232

es

corn; and, in a word, sacked and phindered
everything as completely as a horde of
Tartars would have done.













them wherever they had been, though they |
were but two to three; so that, had they |
met, there certainly would have been.

bloodshed among them, for they were all k

very stout, resolute fellows, to give them
their due.

But Providence took more care to keep
them asunder than they themselves could

eed

SS
SSS





| of — eno —— and one of them

The two men were,at this juncture, gone | I
to find them out, and had resolved to fight |

1 ties
hse

"1 hie fst, knocked hia down -

R OBINS on CR USOE.





na ee _~

. ag

‘do to meet; for, as if they had dogged ona
another, when the three were gone thither,

, the two were here; and afterwards, when

the two went back to find them, the three
were come to the old habitation again. We
shall see their different conduct presently,

When the three came back like furioug
creatures, flushed with the rage, which the

| work they had been about had put them

into, they came up to the Spaniards, and
told them what they had done, by way




Ry

SENS
A esti

stepping up to one of the Spaniards, as if
they had been a couple of boys at play,
takes hold of his hat as it was upon hia
head, and giving it a twirl about, fleering

gin his face, says to him, “And you, Seé
| gnior Jack Spaniard, shall have the same
| sauce, if. you do not mend your manners,”

The Spaniard, who, though a quiet, civil
mn, was as brave a man as could be,
h ving no weapon in his hand, stepped
gravely up to him, and, with one blow af
“ which one




ROBINSON CRUSOE. 158







of the rogues, as insolent as the first, fired starved, and en to be taken in. So
his pistol at the Spaniard immediately. He | the eared took them in again, and gave
missed his body, indeed, for the bullets} them their arms, first making eo go and

went through his hair, but one of them
touched the tip of his ear, and he bled
pretty much. The blood made the Spaniard
. believe he was more hurt than he really

was, and that put him into some heat, for |

before he acted all in a perfect calm. But
now, resolving to go through with his work,
he stooped, and took the fellow’s musket
whom he had knocked down, and was just
going to shoot the man who had fired at
him, when the rest of the Spaniards, being

in the cave, came out and calling to him

not to shoot, they stepped im, secured the
other two, and took their arms from them.

“The rogues went away swearing ven-
geance, but when they had wandered about
for three days, they came back nearly



build up the huts and fences they had
destroyed. They had just begun to be in-
solent again when an accident happened.
which mgde them lay by all private resent
ments, and look to the ~reservation of their
lives.

The Spaniard whom I had saved and


aB4 .
who was then the leader or the governor,
feeling restless one night, got up and

wandered abroad to see if anything was}

the matter. He had not gone far when he
was surprised to see several fires and a
great number of savages walking about
them. He went back and told the rest,
and they all kept very close till morning,
It seems that the savages had had a great
battle in their own country, and both sides
had come here to eat their prisoners, But
neither party knew that the other was on
the island. In the morning, when they
found it out, they fell to fighting again,
and a great number were killed. Three of
them ran away, right into our habitation
and were captured by the Spaniards.
When the battle was over, the victors
raised a great shout, and took to their
canoes, and shortly after the others fol-
lowed, none of them who went away
having found out that there were inhabi-
tants on the island. The great danger they
had been in tamed even the three English
brutes I have been speaking of; and for a





ROBINSON CRUSOE.



great. while after, they were tractable, and
went about the common business of the
whole society well enough. But some time
after this they fell into such simple meas.

‘ures again, as brought them into a great

deal of trouble.

They had taken three prisoners, as {
observed ; and these three being lusty, stout
young fellows, they made them servants,
and taught them to work for them; and
as slaves they did well enough. But they
did not take their measures with them as!
did by my man Friday, and so they never
had them to assist them and fight for them
as I had Friday, who was as true to me as
the very flesh upon my bones.

And now they had another broil win
the three Englishmen; one of whom

being in a rage at one of the three slaves
|
ROBINSON CRUSU«.



tecause the fellow had not done some-
thing right which he bid him do, drew a
hatchet out of a frog-belt, in which he
wore it, and fell upon the poor savage to
kill him. One of the Spaniards, who was
by, seeing him give the fellow a barbarous
eut in his shoulder, placed himself between
him and the savage. The fellow, being
enraged the more at this, struck at the
Spaniard with his hatchet, when the
Spaniard knocked him down with a shovel.
The two other Englishmen rushed on the |
Spaniard, and the other Spaniards coming
-to the rescue, a sharp fight ensued, and
then the three Englishmen -vere taken
prisoners. ; a a
Some of ‘the Spaniards were then for
putting them to death; but the merciful
governor decided that they should be‘
turned away to live by themselves, and
forbidden to come ear them under pain





of being shot. He gave them grain and
provisions and all else that they needed,
except arms and ammunit.on, and they
went and builded huts on a remote part oi

the island. Here they lived for neariy a

year, when they came in one day and
asked for a canoe and arms, and said they
would go over to the mainland and seek
their fortunes. The Spaniards gave them:
arms and ammunition ard some tools, ane












































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































186



having baked bread enough to serve them
a month, and given them as much goats’
desh as they could eat while it was sweet,
and a great basket of dried grapes, a pot
of fresh water, and a young kid alive, they
boldly set out in the canoe for a voyage
over the sea, where it was at least forty
miles broad, The Spaniards called after
them, “ Bon veyajo!” and no man ever
thought of seeing them any more.



ROBINSON CRUSOE.

on ? ri

battle were eaten. ‘There had been a grees
fight, and the king then had a large num bey
waiting to be killed and eaten. ‘Wil

Atkins in fun asked if they might have
some, and the savages brought down to th
boat five women and: eleven men.

As brutish as these fellows were at homs,
their stomachs turned at this sighi, ang
they did not know what to do. To refuse
, the prisoners would have .

seen the highest







































































































































































































































But after two-and-twenty days’ absence | affront to the savage gentry that could be

they all came back, and upon being ques-
Boned told of their adventures, They had
reached what they thought the main land
and found it only anisland, The savages
‘ashed down to the shore to fight them, so
they did not land. They landed, however,
tt another island where they were well
treaved. On that island, they were told
inet only the men and women taken in

offered them. After some debate tliey
resolved to accept of them; and, in return,
they. gave the savages one of their hatchets, .
an old key, a knife, and six or seven of
their bullets; which, though they,tid not
understand their use, they seemed particu:
larly pleased with; and then tying the poo!
creatures’ hands behind them, they dragge*
the prisoners into the boat for orr men


On the way back, they stopped at the
frst iSland and set eight of them at lib-
erty, and the others they had brought to
sur island and then had them bound in

reir huts, so they could not run away.
Upon hearing such a remarkable story, all
went over to the huts to look at them.
Here they sat, all of them stark naked,
First,.there were three men, lusty, comely
fellows, well-shaped, straight and fair limbs,
about thirty and thirty-five years of age;
and five women, whereof two might be
from thirty to forty; two more not above
_ four or five-and-twenty; and the fifth, a
tall, comely maiden, about sixteen or seven-
teen. The women were well-favored, agree-
able persons, both in shape and features,
only tawny; and two of them, had they
been perfectly white, would have passed
for very handsome women, even in London
itself,

Only one of them, a woman, could
.understand Friday’s father, but through
her we soon made them understand that
they were not to be eaten, nor even killed,
_ At this, when we untied them, they all

fell to dancing, and then they all began to !

take up things to signify that they woul*
work, As there were five women and
five Englishmen, the Spaniards let these
last each choose one for a wife, which they
did. And now each one built a hut for
himself, the two honest ones in one place,
and the three rogues in another,

Some time after this, five or six canoes
of savages came on shore. Our men kept
within doors till the canoes were gone,
and then it was discovered that they had
‘eft three of their number behind, and
they lay under a tree fast asleep. After



ROBINSON CRUSOE. se



consultation it was resolved to take them
prisoners; and they did so. The poor
fellows were strangely frightened wher
they were seized upon and bound; and
afraid, like the women, that they should be
murdered and eaten for it ~eems those
people think all the world do us they do:
but they were soon made easy as to that.
One of them ran awa&y to the wooile:
and was never seen again, He probabt

jae oe
BEN . zg
pa fh Wissen,

Sy
SH SE KG pa
Â¥ Aa ey to ia

oe Sn Beery tess


escaped with some canoes that came ashore
soon after.
The first testimony they had that this
fellow had given intelligence of them was,
that, about two months after, six canoes of
savages came rowing along the north side
of the island, where they never used to

“Wives.

ROBINSON CRUSOE.

When our men came out from the tree,
the savage who was not killed began to
make piteous moans for his life, so they
tied him to a tree and ran on to their
Soon after, the other savages went
away as they came. It was five or six
months before they saw any more of the



zome before, and landed about a mile from
the habitation of the two Englishmen,
where this escaped man had been kept.
As they were coming directly towards
their huts, the two men sent their wives
cand some of their goods into the woods,
and went a little way themselves and hid
in a hollow tree. The savages burned
their huts and then scattered about the
island. A number of them coming: up to
the hollow tree, the two Englishmen fired
and killed all but one, Among the killed
was the savage who had escaped.

savages, when, on a sudden, they wer
invaded by a@ fleet of no less than eight
and-twenty canoes. The savages came on
shore in the evening, so our men had time
to make preparation. In the morning
they came ranging along the shore. Our
army was small, indeed. "here were seven:
teen Spaniards, five Englishmen, old Fr:
day (or Friday’s father), the three slaves
taken with the women, who proved vely
faithful, and three other siaves who 1c
with the Spaniards. To arm these, they
had eleven muskets, five pistols, three
ROBINSON CRUSOE:

138



fowling-pieces, five muskets or fowling-
pieces, two swords and three old halberts.

Tc their slaves they did not give
either musket or fusee ; but they had each
a long staff, with a great spike of iron fas-
tened into each end of it, and by his side
a hatchet; also every one of our men hat
a hatchet. Two of the women could not
be prevailed upon, but they would come
into the fight, and they had bows and

their situation; only that Will Atkins,
who now proved a most useful fellow, with
six men, was planted just behind a small
thicket of bushes, as an advanced guard,
with orders to let the first of them pass by,
and then fire into the middle of them, and
as soon as he had fired, to make his retreat
es nimbly as he could round a part of the
wood, and so come behind the Spaniards.
When the savages came on, they ran



























































arrows, which the Spaniards had taken
from the savages when the first action hap-
pened, and the women had hatchets too.
The Spaniard governor commanded. the
whole; and Will Atkins, who, though a
lreadful fellow for wickedness, was a
most daring, bold fellow, commanded

under him. The savages came forward |

like Yions; and our men, which was the
werst ot their fate, had no advantage in



strageling about every way in heaps, ov
of all manner of ordey, and Will Atkins
let about fifty of them pass by him; then
seeing the rest come in avery thick throng,
he orders three of his men to fire, having
loaded their muskets with six or seven bul-
lets apiece. How many they killed or
wounded they knew not, but the conster-
nation and surprise was inexpressible
among the savages. They were frightened




fo the last degree to hear such a dreadful

noise, and see their men killed, and others
hurt, but see nobody that did it; when, in
the middle of their fright, Will Atkins and
his other three let fly again among the
thickest of them; and in less than a min-
ute, the first three being loaded again, gave
them a third volley.

Had Will Atkins and his men retired
immediately, as they were ordered to do,
or had the rest of the body been at hand,
to pour in their shot continually, the sav-
ages had been effectually routed; for they
thought they were killed by the gods with
thunder and lightning; but some of the
savages who were at a distance spying
them, came upon them behind, and wounded
Atkins himself, and killed one of his fellow
Englishmen with their arrows, as they did
afterwards one Spaniard, and one of the
‘odian slaves,





ROBINSON CRUSOL.







ee

Our men being thus hard laid af,
retreated to a rising ground in the wood;
and the Spaniards, after firing three volleys
upon them, retreated also; for their num-
ber was so great, and they were so desper-
ate, that though above fifty of them were
killed, and more than as many wounded,
yet they came on in the teeth of our men,
fearless of danger, and shot their arrows
like a cloud.

The Spaniz.u governor having drawn
his little body up together upon a rising
ground, Atkins, though he was wounded,
would have them march and charge again
altogether at once; but the Spaniard re-
plied: “Seignior Atkins, you see how their
wounded men fight; let them alone till
morning; all the wounded men will be
stiff and sore with their wounds, and faint
with the loss of blood; and so we shall
have the fewer to engage.” This advice
ROBINSON CR USOR.





was good; but Will Atkins replied mer-
tily, “That is true, seignior, and so shall I
too; and that is the reason I would goon

while cL am warm.” “Well, Seignior
Atkins,” says the Spaniard, “ you have be-
iaved gallantly, and done your part; we

it}

oe to see who hurt them, or which wat
to fly. *

They fought desperately, out so many
were killed and wounded, that tie zest
soon fled to their boats and put to sea.
But a dreadful storm coming on that even-
ing, many of the canoes were lost and the
others driven back to the island, seeing
which our men went over and fired guns

j to frighten them, and they allran into the
-woods, Our men then destroyed all their
‘boats, so that they could not get back to

their nation to bring another army. The
savages kept hid in the woods most of the
time, but they managed to destroy the
crops and do much damage. Having no
weapons, they were reduced to a deplor
able condition, some of them even starv-
ing to death. Friday’s father then caught
one, and through him arrangements were
made by which they were given seeds and
tools and a part of the island to live on,
upon condition that they would not leave

will fight for you if you cannot come ons their bounds, The kept their promise,

but I think it best to ste till morning.”
So they waited.

But as it was a clear moonlight night,
ani they found the savages in great dis-
order about their dead and wounded men,
and a great noise and hurry among them
where they lay, they afterwards resolved
bo fai upon them in the night. They
tame so near where the thickest of them
lay, that, before they were seen or heard,
eight of them fired in upon them, and did
dreadful execution upon them; in half a
minute more, eight others fired after them,
pourl ig

I nae et



in their small shot im such a \
quanaty, that abundance were killed and |

and became very good and peaceful fek
lows, -
This was the condition of things on my



wor ted ; and all this white they were not | =
42



return, My coming was a great relief to
them, because we furnished them with
knives, scissors, spades, shovels, pickaxes,
and all things of that kind which they
could want. With the help of those tools,
they came at last to build up their huts or
houses very handsomely, raddling or work-



ing it up like basket-work all the way
round. Our men were so taken with it,
that they got the wild savages to come and
do the like for them; so that when I came
to see the two Englishmen’s colonies, they
looked, at a distance, as if they all lived
like bees ina hive. As for Will Atkins,
who was now become a very industrious,
useful, and sober fellow, he had made him-
self such a tent of basket-work as, I be-
lieve, was never seen. It was one hundred
and twenty paces round on the outside, as

ROBINSON CRUSOE.

I measured it by my steps; the walls were
as close worked as a basket, and very strcng,

Round the top he laid strong pieces,
pinned together with wooden pins, from
which ,he raised a pyramid for roof, very
handsome, [I assure you, and joined to-

gether, very well, though he had no nails,

and. ousy a few iron spikes, which he made
himself too, out of the old iron that I had
left there; and, indeed, this fellow showed
abundance of ingenuity in several things
which he had no knowledge of. He made
him a forge, with a pair of wooden be!
lows to blow the fire. He made himse!'
charcoal for his work; and: he formed ©
of the iron crows a middling good anv! \"
hammer upon. In this manner he mice
many things, but especially hooks, staji«:.
and spikes, bolts and hinges.
ROBINSON CRUSOE.

oe



{ had many talks with the Spaniards
mba their adventures among the savages.
They told me they had given up all hope of
getting away. They were compelled to

go with them to their wars, and in one of . tas

them the Spaniard, whom { had rescued,
was taken prisoner. They were very
grateful to me for sending for them, and
were very polite and kind in every way.
So I called them all together one day, and
showed them the stores I had brought,
and was going to leave them, for I had
not come to take them away. First, I
asked them, one by one, if they. were
willing to stay, and would give up all
animosities, one to another. |
‘told me he would..

Will Atkins, with abundance of frank.
ness, said they had met with affliction
enough to make them all sober, and ene-
mies enough to make them all friends;
that, fur his part, he would live and die
with them; that they had done nothing to
him, bué what his own mad humor made
necessary; and that he would ask them
pardon, if I desired it, for the foolish and
brutish things he had done to them; and
as for going to England, he cared not if
he did ‘not go thither these twenty years.

| Teannot express what pleasure sat upon
the countenances of all these poor men,
when they saw the care I had taken of
them.@ They told me I was a father to
them; and that having such a correspond.
ent as I was in so remote a part of the
World, it would make them forget that
they were left in a desolate place; and
they all engaged to me not to leave the
-Qlace without my consent,

And each -



had brotght with me, particularly the
tailor, the smith, and the two carpenters,
all of them most necessary people; but,
above all, my general artificer, than whom
they could not name anything that was
more useful to them. And the tailor, to
show his concern for them, went to work
immediately, and, with my leave, made
them every one a shirt, the first thing he
did; and what was still more, he taught

the women not only how to stitch, but he

made. them assist to make the shirts for
their husbands, and for all the rest.

As to the carpenters, I sctrce need men-
tion how useful they were; for they took
to pieces all my clumsy, unhandy things,
and made clever, convenient tables, tools,
bedsteads, cupboards, lockers, shelves, and
everything they wanted of that kind. But
to let them see how nature made artificers
at first, I carried the carpenters to see Will

Then I presented to them the people I | Atkins’ basket-house, as I called in: and

¢

f
erry \ | ROBINSON CRUSOE.



“ney both owned they never saw an instance
“4 such natural ingenuity before, nor any-
wang so regular and handily built, at least
ef its kind. And one of them, when he saw

it, after musing a good while, turning
to me, “I am sure,” says he, “that
has no need of us; you need do
but give him tools.”
ROBINSON CRUSOE.

145



“he young man whose mother was
starved to death, and also the maid
requested leave to remain, so a plot of
ground was given them and a house was
built for them to live in. Before I left the

riest married the maid to my Jack-of-all-
trades, as I call him, and they built another

something of religion; that notwithstandé |
ing these English subjects of mine, as he
called them, had lived with these women.

almost seven years, had taught them to

speak English, and that they were, as he
perceived, women capable of instruction,
yet they had not, to this hour, taught them



house, This young Catholic priest had
x0 much true piety that he was beloved by
all. He came to me one morning and told
tue that the men I was leaving behind
would not have God’s blessing if they were
act married to their wives, and further.
‘More that they should teach their wives

anyt? ing of the Christian religion—no, not
so much as to know that there was a God.
“T am persuaded,” says he, “had those
men lived in the savage country whence
their wives came, the savages would have
taken more pains to have brought them to
be idolaters, and to worship the devil, taex
9 >

146 ROBINSON CRUSOE:

ae: (



any of these men, so far as I can see, have | and urging how unchristian and irre
tagen with them to teach them the knowl. | life it was, I first asked them if they
edge of the true God.” I walked along | married men or bachelors, They



itoward the Englishmen’s houses, and he | showed-that two of them were wid: wer:
walked with me, discoursing by the way. | and the other three were single mep,

When we came to the Englishmen, I be- | bachelors. I asked them with what cov
gan to talk to them of the scandalous life | science they could take these women, aw
they ied, and gave them a full account of | call them their wives and not be lawfully
the notice the clergyman had taken of it; | married to them.
ROBINSON CRUSOE. . 143

ane





oe ep eee.

They all gave me the answer I expected, | that the laws of man being otherwise, they
viz, that there was nobody to marry them; | might desert the poor women and children
that they agreed before the governor to | hereafter; and that their wives, being
xeep them as their wives, and to maintain | friendless and moneyless, would have te
them and own them as their wives; and | help themselves.



they thought, as things stood with them,| All this went on as 1 expected ; anc!
they were as legally married as if they had | they told me, especially Will Atkins, whe
been married by a parson. now seemed to speak for the rest, that they
i told them that no doubt they were | loved their wives as well as if they had
married in the sight of God, and were | been born in their own native country, and
pound to keep them as their wives: but! would not leave them on any account what

4

Pont
AS ‘ ROBINSON CRUSOE.
ever ; ce they did verily believe that their} But when the clergyman came to per
wives were as virtuous and as modest, and | form the duty which he had suggested, he
did, to the utmost of their skill, as much | would not do it till he had first awakened
for them and for their children as any wo-} in them some sense of their religious duty,
men could possibly do. And Will Atkins, } He talked to them with such effect that
for his own particular, added, that if any | two of them promised to live religious
usm would offer to carry him home to Eng. | lives and to teach their wives about God»







tad, and make him captain of the best | and the priest married these two; but
muan-of-war in the navy, he would not. go | Will Atkins said he would go and talk
with him if he might not carry his wife | with his wife about it. “This man.
and children with him. In a word, they | Atkins,” said the priest, “ however wicke*
all consented to be married by the priest. | he has been, will be a true convert.”
ee)
Were)
Bs

LTA.

< H

iy y

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i
H
A
A
yi

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ahs


























































After this, my clergyman, turning to me,
said, “I entreat you, sir, let us walk out
and look; I daresay we shall find this poor
man somewhere or other talking seriously |
to his wife, and teaching her already some
thing of religion.” We went out together,
and I carried him a way which none knew
but myself, and where the trees were very ;

thick, when, coming to the edge of the
wood, 1 saw Atkins and his tawny wife
sitting under the shade of a bush, very
eager in discourse, pointing up to the sun,
and to every quarter of the heavens, and

then’ down to the earth, then out to the |

sea, then to himseif, then to her, to the
woods, to the trees. “Now,” says the

EOBINSON



CRUSOE.



« ) clergyman, “you see my words are made

good. The man preaches to her; mark him
‘now, he is telling her that our God has
made him and her, and the heavens, the
earth, the sea, the woods, the trees, eta”
“T believe he is,” said I, Immediately, we
perceived Will Atkins start upon his feet,
fall down on his knees, and lift up both
his hands.

« We went back, and after a while Will
Atkins and his wife came in. Upon ques:
tioning him, he told. me that he had tried

{to talk to his wife about God. She would
| not believe him at first, because she could

Z|

not understand why he did not worship so
‘reat and good a being. This so shocked
him that he realized what a great sinner he
had been, and he had resolved to be a
Christian. Both he and his wife were
ready to be baptized, and the priest per-
formed that office, and then married them.

The last thing I did before I went away
was to take a Bible to Will Atkins, The

man was so confounded, that he was not
able to speak for some time; but recover.
ing himself, he takes it with both his
hands and turning to his wife, “Here.


ROBINSON CRUSOE.











































































































my dear,” says he, “did I not tell you
eur God, though he lives above, could
hear what we shave said?
book I’ prayed .for when you and I
kneeled down under the bush; now God
has heard us and sent it.” When he had
said so, the man fell into transports of
passionate joy.

Having now-done with the island, I left
them all in good circumstances, and in a
flourishing ous and went on board
my ship again on the 6th of May. I prom-
ised to a them farther relief from the
Brazils, and particularly I promised to
send them some cattle, such as sheep, hogs
and cows, As to the two cows and calves
which I brought from England, we had
been obliged to kill them at sea, for want
,of hay to feed them.

{Sout three days after we had sailed,
while we were becalmed, a great fleet of

Here’s the





‘canoes were seen approaching us. I had the

ship brought to an anchor ; the boats were
put overboard and manned, for I was afraid
only that they would set the ship on fire.
When they came nearer to us, they seemed
to be struck with wonder and astonishmelit,
as at a sight which doubtless they had
never seen before. They came up, how

ever, very near to us, and seemed to go

about to row round us; but we called to
our men in the boats het to let them come
too near them. Our men beckoned with
their hands to keep them back, which they
understood very well, and went back; but
at their retreat about fifty arrows came on
board us from those boats, and one of our
men in the long-boat was wounded, How:
ever, I called to them not to fire by any
means; but we handed down some deal
fants into the boat, with which they made
a kind of fence to cover them. They
LGR

Serta eres



rowed a little farther out to sea, till they
same directly broadside with us, and then
rowed down straight upon us. Upon this
T ordered all my men to keep close, lest
they should shoot any more arrows, and
made all our guns ready. I made Friday
go out upon the deck, and call out aloud
to them in his language, to know what
they meant; which accordingly he did,
Whether they understood him or not, that
I knew not; but immediately Friday cried
out they were going to shoot, and, unhap-
pily for him, poor fellow, they let fly
about three hundred of their arrows, and,
to my inexpressible grief, killed poor
Friday, no other man being in their sight. I
was so enraged at the loss of my old trusty
servant, and companion, that I immediately
ordered five guns to be loaded with small
shot, and four with great, and gave them
such a broadside as they had never heard
in their lives before. They were not above
walf a cable’s length off when we fired;

and our gunners took the aim so well that [ims

tmirteen or fourteen of their canoes were
split and overset, and the men all set





ROBINSON CRUSOE.

mer

aswimming; the rest, frightened out of

their wits, scoured away as fast as they
could, taking but little care to save those
whose boats were split or spoiled with our
shot; so I suppose that many of them
were lost.

We were now under sail again, but 1
was the most disconsolate creature alive
for want of my man Friday, and would
have been very glad to have gone back to
the island, to have taken one of the rest
from. thence for my occasion, but it could
not be; so we went on. Poor honest
Friday! We buried him with all the de-
cency and solemnity possible, by putting
him into a coffin, and throwing him into
the sea; and I caused them to fire eleven
guns for him; and so ended the life of the
most grateful, faithful, honest, and affec-
tionate servant that ever man had:

Wearrived at the Brazils in about twelve
days’ time. My old partner was glad to
see me, and sent me some very handsome




ROBINSON CRUSOE.



presents; and when I told him of the frame
‘of the sloop I had bought, and that it was
“my design to send some supplies to the
people on my island, he offered to attend
to it for me.

Accordingly, he got hands, and finished
‘he sloop in a very few days; and I gave
the master of her such instructions that he
could not miss the place; nor did he, as ‘I
had an account from my partner after-

who wished to go to the island with his
wife and daughters, and we let them go.
Among the rest of the supplies sent te
my tenants on the island, I sent them by
the sloop three milch cows and five calves,
about twenty-two hogs among them, three .
sows with pigs, two mares, and a stone
horse. For my Spaniards, according to
my promise, I engaged three Portugal wo-
men to go, and recommended it to them te



wards. I got him soon loaded with the
eargo I sent them; and one of our seamen,
unat had been on shore with me there,
offered to go with the sloop and settle
there, upon my letter to the governor
Spaniard, to allot him a sufficient quantity
of land for a plantation, and giving him
some clothes and tools for his planting
work. ‘There was also a man that had

marry them, All this cargo arrived safe,
and was very welcome to my old inhabi-
tants, who were now, with this addition,
between sixty and seventy people, besides
little children, of which there were a great
many. I found letters at London from
them all, by way of Lisbon, when I came
back to England.

T have now done with the island, ana ai’

fallen into the displeasure of the church, | manner of discourse about it; and wae

,
ever reads the rest of my memorandums
would do well to turn his thoughts entirely
from it, and expect to read of the follies of
an old man, not warned by his own harms,
much less by those of other men, to be-
ware.

T had no more business to go to the
East Indies than a man at full liberty has
to go to the turnkey at Newgate and de-
sire him to lock him up among the _prissa-

















































































2

ers there, and starve him. Had I taken a
small vessel from England, and gone
directly to the island; taken a patent from
the Government here to have secured my
property; had I carried over cannon and
ammunition, servants and people to plant,
and taken possession of the place, and in-
creased it with people, as I might easily
have done; had I then settled myself
snere, and sent the ship back Jaden with

w 1

ROBINSON CRUSOE.



good rice, as I might also have done in six
months’ time, and ordered my friends io
have fitted her out again for our supply, I
had at least aeted like a man of common
sense; but I was possessed of a wandering
spirit.

From the Brazils, we went directly to
the Cape of Good Hope, when we took in
fresh water, and then made the best of.
our way to the coast of Madagascar.



Though the people there. are fierce and
treacherous, we traded some trifles, such
as knives, scissors, etc, for some fat bv!-
locks,

It happened one evening, when we went
on shore, that a greater number of their
people came down than usual, but all very
friendly and civil; and they brought sev:
eral kinds of previsiens, for which we
satisfied them with such teys as we had,
ROBINSON CRUSOE. lan







the women brought us milk and roots,
and several things very acceptable to us,
and all was quiet, and we made us a little
tent or hut of some boughs, and lay on
shore all night. But I was not so well
satisfied to lie on shore as the rest; and
I spread the sail on the bottom of the boat,
avd lay all night in the boat.

About two o’clock in the morning, we
heard one of our men make a terrible noise
on the shore, calling out for God’s sake to
bring the boat in, and come and help
them. At the same time I heard the fire of
five muskets, whicb was the number of
guns they had, and then three-times over;
for, it seems, the natives here were not so
easily frightened with guns as the savages
were in America, where I had to do with
them. All this while I knew not what
was the matter, but rousing immediately
from sleep with the noise, I caused the| . We took up seven of our men, and with
boat to be thrust in, and resolved, «with | difficulty enough too, three of them being
three fusees we had on board, to land and’| very ill wounded; and that which was
assist our men. | still worse was that while we stood in the

We got the buat soon to , the shore, but | boat to take our men in, we were im as
our men were in too much haste; for being much danger as they were in on shore;



come td the shore, they plunged into the | for they poured their arrows in upon us
water, to get to the boat with all the|so thick that we were glad to barricade
expedition they could, being pursued by | the side of the boat up with two or three
between three or four hundred men, loose boards, which we had by mere acci-
; ; dent in the boat. We had, by the light,
| of the moon, a little sight of them, as they
stood pelting us from the shore with darts
and arrows; and having got ready our fire.
arms, we gave them a volley that we could
hear, by the cries of some of them, had
nae several; however, they stood
thus in battle array on the shore till break
of day.
In this condition we Jay, and could acu


86

tell how to weigh our anchor, or set up
our sail, because we must needs stand up
in the boat, and they were as sure to hit
us as we were to hit a bird in a tree with
small shot. We made signals of distress
to the ship, and the captain, hearing our
firing, pretty weli understood us; and
weighing anchor with all speed, he stood as
near the shcze as he durst with the ship,
and then sent out another boat, with ten
hands jn her, to assist us, and they towed
_ us back to the ship.

We soon learned the cause of the aa
It seems that a young woman had been
taken by one of our sailors and carried into
the woods. An-old woman, who was with
the young one, made a great outcry, and
that brought on the attack. We had one
man killed, and the rest came off free, ex-



ROBINSON CRUSOE.
Sa NN

cept the one who was the cause of the
trouble, for he had not come back from the

woods. The third night, in the dark, we

took twenty stout fellows and went quietly
ashore to see if we could find the missing
man. We saw nothing of him, and I re.
solved on going on board; but the boat»
swain and his party were resolved to make
a visit to the Indian town, where these
dogs, as they called them, dwelt, and asked
me to go along with fe and if they
could find them, as they still fancied they
should, they did not doubt of getting a
good booty; and it might be they might
find Tom Jeffry there; that was the man’s
name we had lost. . |

I positively refused it, and rose up, for I
was sitting on the ground, in order to go
to the boat. One or two of the men begam

s

N
aN
i
*
are



ROBINSON CRUSOE.

15?



‘w opportune me to go; and, when I re.
_ tused, began to grumble, and say they were
not under my command, and they would go.
“Come, Jac
you go ae me? Tllgo for one.” Jack
‘said he would—and then another—and, in

a word, they all left me but one, whom I
persuaded to stay, 4 and a EDO, lett im “he

boat.

When they came to the Tacit town,
three of them, who were a little before the
rest, called out and told them that they had

found Tom Jeffry; they all ran up to the |

place, where they found the poor fellow
hanging up naked by one arm, and his
throat cut. There was an Indian house
just by the tree, where they found sixteen
or seventeen of the principal Indians, and
two or three of them wounded by our shot;
-and our men found they were awake, and
talking one to another in that house, but
knew not their number.

The sight of their poor mangled comrade



,’ says one of the ae “wil &



so enraged them, as before, that they swore
to one another to be revenged, and that not
an Indian that came into their hands should
have any quarter; and to work they went
immediately, and in a quarter of an hour
they set the town on fire in four or five
places, and murdered so many of the peo:
ple that the rest rest ran off to the woods,
When our men came back, we set sail to
Bengal. On the way I blamed the men
very much for what they had done, and
this led to further trouble. I had gone on
shore at Bengal, and the men came and
told me they were resolved to leave me
there, for if I went back to the ship they
would all leave her. I sent for the capiain,
and told him it would be so hard for him
to get sailors, that I had better stay, so he
left me, with all my goods and with plenty
of money.

Here I met an English merchant, and to
gether we bought a ship and made trading
voyages to the Spice Islands:and to China
with great profit. We then sold our ship
\

ROBINSON CRUSOE.























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































resolveu to voyage no more. But one day
a Dutch ship came into port, and the man
who claimed to be the captain offered to
sell her to us cheap, and we bought. All
the crew left her, which we thought very
strange, but we afterwards learned that
they had mutinied and murdered the cap-
tain, and after sailing for a while as pirates
had sold the ship to us. We picked up
some English and some Dutch sailors, and
resolved to go to China again.

fn this voyage, being by contrary winds
obliged to beat up and down a great while
in. the Straits of Malacca, and among the
islands, we were no sooner got clear of
those difficult seas, than we found our ship
had sprung a leak, and we were not able,
by all our industry, to find out where it
was. This forced us to put into the river
of Cambodia, While we were here, and



going often on shore for refreshment, there
comes to me one day an Englishman, and
he was, it seems, a gunner’s mate on board
an English East India ship, which rode in
the sauio river, and speaking English,
“Su,” says he, “you are a stranger to me,
and I to you; but I have something to tel]
you that very nearly concerns you.”

IT looked steadfastly at him a good while,
and thought at first I had known hun, but
T did not. “If it very nearly concerns
me,” said I, “and not yourself, what nioves
you to tell it to me?” “I am moved,”
says he, “by the imminent danger you are
in, and, for aught I see, you have no know-
ledge of it.” “I know no danger J amin,”
says I, “but that my ship is leaky, and |
cannot find it out; but I intend to lay her
aground to-morrow, to see if I can find it.”
“Do you know, sit,” said he, “the town of
ROBINSON CRUSOR. 169

-Yampodia iies about fifteen leagues up this
river; and there are two large English ships
about five leagues on this side, and three
Dutch?” I turned short upon him, and

said: “Sir, I wish you would explain

yourself; I cannot imagine what reason [
have to be afraid of any of the Company’s
ships, or Dutch ships. What can they |
have to say to me?” “Well, sir,” says he,

“if you think yourself secure, you must

take your chance; I am sorry your fate

should blind you against good advice; but
assure yourself, if you do not put to sea
immediately, you will the very. next tide
be attacked by five long-boats full of men,
and perhaps, if you are taken, you will be
hanged for a pirate.”

This led me to question him further, and

acek
I found that he himself took us for pirates, The inhabitants, who had never been





knowing the story of the killing of the acquainted with such a sight, came won-
captain and the seizing of the ship by the | dering down the shore to look at us; and
raseal who: sold her to us. As soon as I} seeing the ship lie down on one side in
reached the side of the ship, my partner.) such a manner, and heeling in towards the
teld me he had stopped the leak, and we | shore, and not seeing our men, who were
weighed anchor and set sail at once. It] at work on her bottom with stages, and
was not long before we found ourselves | with their boats on the offside, they pre
clsed by five boats. As they came up| sently concluded that the ship was cast
and were making to board us, we poured away, and lay fast on the ground. On this -
ina broadside upon them which sank one supposition, they all came about us in two
beat, and running out our two long guns, | or three hours’ time, with ten or twelve
we kept firing till the rest gave up the | large boats, intending, no doubt, to have
chase. We picked up three of their men | come on board and plundered the ship, and
and went on our way, and reached the | if they found us there, to have carried us
coast of Cochin China. As we did not find | away for slaves to their king, or whatever
the ship so perfectly tight and sound as we | they call him.

desired, we resolved while we were at this | When they came up to the ship, and
plece to lay her on shore, and take out | began to row round her, they discovered
what heavy things we had on board, and | us all hard at work on the outside of the
elean her bottom, if possible, to find out | ship’s bottom and side, washing, and grav-
where the leaks were. ing and stopping, as every seafaring may



knows how. They stood for a while gaz-
ing at us, and we, who were a little sur-
prised, ead not imagine what their de-
sign was; but being willing to be sure, we
took fie opportunity to get some of us
into the ship, and others to hand down
arms and ammunition to those that were
at’ work, to defend themselves with, if
there should be occasion. And it was no
more than need—for they agreed, it seems,

that the ship was really a wreck, and that |

we were all at work endeavoring to save
her. Upon this, they took it for granted
we all belonged to them, and away they
came directly upon our men.

Our men, seeing so many of them, began
to be frightened, and cried out to us to
know what they should do. I immediately
_ ealled to the men to come on board; and
the few who were on board worked with
ai the strength and hands we had to bring
the ship to rights. But. however, neither

ROBINSON CRUSOE. coats ee

the men upon the stages nor those in the
boats could do as they were ordered, betore
the Cochin Chinese were upon them; and
two of their boats boarded our long-boat,
and began to lay hold of the men as es

| prisoners.

The first man they laid hold of was an

| English seaman, a stout, strong fellow. He

grappled the pagan, and dragged him out
of their boat into ours, where, taking him

| by the ears, he beat his head against. the

| boat’s gunnel ; and, in the meantime a
§ )

| Dutchman als up a musket, and with the
| bint end of it so laid about him, that he

knocked down five of them. But this wag
doing little towards resisting thirty or forty
men, who began to throw themselves inte
the long: -boat, where we had but five mer
in all to defend it; however, the following,
accident, which deserved our laughter;
gave our men a complete victory.

Our carpenter being prepared to grave
the outside of the ship, as well as to pay
the seams where he had caulked her to stor
the leak, had got two kettles just let down
into the boat, one filled with boiling pitch,
and the other with resin, tallow, and oil,
and such stuff as the shipwrights use for
that work; ad the man that attended tne
carpenter had a great iron ladle in nie


ROBINSON ORUSOE.

BB

hand, with which he supplied the men that



16]

While this was being done, my partner





ware at work with the hot stuff. Two of| got the ship to rights, and getting a gun
the enemy’s men entered the boat just |in position, sent a charge of .small shot

where this fellow stood, being in the fore-
sheets; he immediately saluted them with
a ladleful of the stuff, boiling hot, which
so burned and scalded them, being half.

among their boats, which sent them away
as fast as they could paddle. The next
day we finished our repairs and set sail,
keeping well off the coast of China, so as



naked, that they roared out like bulls, and,
enraged with the fire, leaped both into the
wea. The carpenter saw it, and cried out,
“Well done, Jack! give them some more
of it ;” and stepping forward himeelf, takes
eae of the mops, and dipping it in the pitch-
pot, he and his man threw it among them
so plentifully that, in short, of all the men
iu the three boats, there was not one that
escaped being scalded and burned with it,
in a most frightful, pitiful manner, and
maade such a howling and erving that I
mever heard a worse noise.

not to meet any English or Dutch ships,
In latitude of 80 degrees we stood in for
the shore, and a boat came off with an old
Portuguese pilot, whom we took on board,
I told him that we wanted to go to Naw:
quin, at which he smiled av¢ aid we would
find a better port of trade at Ningpo, ané
then go by the canal to see the great city
of Pekin.
“Well,” said I, “Seignior Portuguese,
but that is not our business now ; the great
question is, if you can can carry us up te

| the great city of Nanquin, from whence we






































































ean travel to Pekin afterwards?” He said
he could do so very well, and that there
was a great Dutch ship gone up that way
just before. This gave me a little shock,
for a Dutch ship was now our terror. ‘The
old man found me a littie confused and
under some concern when he named a
Dutch ship, and said to me, “Sir, you need
be under no apprehensions of the Dutch ;
I suppose they.are not now at war with
your nation? You are no pirates; what
need you fear?” “Why, seignior,” said J,
“1 hope there are no pirates in these seas,
We are but in an ill condition to meet
_ with them, for you see we have but a small

force, and are but very weakly manned.”
“Oh, sir,” says he, “don’t be concerned; I
do not. know that there have been any
pirates in these seas for fifteen years, except
one, which was seen, as I hear, in the Bay
of Siam, about a month since; but you may
be assured she is gone to the southward ;
nor was she a ship of any great force, or

ROBINSON CRUSOE. i
eee ie |

fit for the work. Ske was not built-for a

‘privateer, but was run away with by a rep-
|. robate crew that wason board, after the cap-

tain and some of his men had been mur-
dered.” “ Why, then,” said I, “they deserve
death.” “Nay,” said the old man, “they
do deserve it, and they will certainly have
it, if they light upon any English or Dutch
ship; for they have all agreed together,

that if they meet that rogue, theyll give

him no quarter.”

After more conversation, I told him the
whole story of how we got the very ship
that he was talking of. He was greatly
surprised, but he said we did well to go to
Nanquin, for if we fell into the hands of
the English or Dutch at that time they
would listen to no explanation. He ad-
vised that we sell the ship at Nanquin and.
buy a Chinese junk, and promised to assist.
us at both sale and purchase. He promised,
too, to see the Dutch and English masters
and explain all, so that the new owners of
the ship should not have the same trouble ©
that we had.

While these things were passing between
us, by way of discourse, we went forward
directly for Nanquin, and in about thirteen
days’ sail came to an anchor at the south-
west point of the great Gulf, where, by the

way, I came by accident to understand that

two Dutch ships were gone the length be
fore me and that I should certainly fall inte
their hands. I consulted my partner again
in this exigency, and he was'as much at @
loss as I was, and would very gladly have
been safe on shore almost anywhere; how-
ever, was not in such perplexity neither,
but I asked the old pilot if there was ne
creek or harbor which I might put inte
_ ROBINSON CRUSOE.
a

and pursue my business with the Chinese

srivately, and be in no danger of the

euemy. He told me if I would sail to the
southward about forty-two leagues, there
was a little port called Quinchang, where
the fathers of the mission usually landed
“vom Macao, on their progress to teach
the Christian religion to the Chinese, and
where no. European sb*»s ever put in. We
sesolved to go to this place, and weighed
Â¥ once,

16%

ot

had any experience of, nothing makes man:
kind so completely miserable as that of be.
ing in constant fear. Well does the Scripture
say, “The fear of mar bringeth a ‘snare ;”
it is a life of death, and the mind is so ep
tirely oppressed by it, that it is capable ox
no relief, Providence began here to clear
up our way a little; and the first thing that -
offered was, that our old Potiapcess pilot



brought a Japan. merchant to us, who im.

guired what goods we had; and, in the





























































































































We did not come to the other port (the
wind being contrary) for five days; but it
was very much to our satisfaction; and [
was joyful when I set my foot on shore,
‘resolving, and my partner too, that if it
were possible to dispose of pinenlves and
effects any other way we would never set
one foot on beard that unhappy vessel
more. And indeed, I must acknowledge, that
ef all the circumstances of life that ever I



























first place he bought all our opium, and
gave us a very good price for it, paying us
in gold ‘by weight, some small pieces of
their own coin, and some in small wedges,
of ten or twelve ounces each.

The Japan merchant would not buy the
ship, but he made-an offer to hire her to
take home his wares. I had a young man
with me who offered to go in the ship te
look after my interests, and to account for
164



everything to me, which he did. The
Japan merchant treated him very fairly,
sending him with goods to the Manillas,
where he treated with the Spaniards ona
brought back cloves and other spices.
Having got a good acquaintance at
Manilla, he got his ship made free ship,
and the governor of Manilla hired him to
go to Acapulco, on the coast of Mexico.



He made the voya » to Acapulco very
happily, and there he sold his ship; and
having there also obtained allowance to
travel by land to Porto Bello, he found
means, somehow or other, to get to Jamaica
with all his treasure; and ahout eight years
after came to England, exceeding rich.

We were now on shore in China: if f
thought myself banished, and remote from
my own country at Bengal, where I had
many ways to get home for my money,
what could I think of myself now, when
I was got about a thousand leagues farther
off. We went ten days’ journey to the
city of Nanquin, a city well worth seeing,
indeed. They say it has a million of people
in it; it is regularly built, the streets all
exactly straight, and cross one another in

ROBINSON CRUSOE.
ra

direct lines, which gives the figure of R
great advantage. But when I came te
compare the miserable people of these
countries with ours, their fabrics, their
manner of living, their government, their
religion, their wealth, and their glory, as
some call it, I must confess that I scarcely
think it worth my while to mention them
here.

We had made the acquaintance of a
Spanish priest, called Father Simon, who
was going to Pekin, and upon his invita
tion, we accompanied him. We were
fifteen days reaching the great city,
through a country infinitely populous.
Though very poor, the people were very
proud; and my friend Father Simon and
I used to be merry to see the beggarly
pride of these people. For example,
coming by the house of a country gentle.
man, as Father Simon called him, about
ten leagues off the city of Nanquin, we
had first of all the honor to ride with the
master of the house about two miles, The
state he rode in was a perfect Don Quixot-
ism, being a mixture of pomp and poverty.
Hie habit: was very proper for a merry-
andrew, being a dirty calico, with hanging
sleeves; tassels, and cuts,and slashes almost
on every side. It covered a taffety ves’, as
greasy as a butcher’s, and which testified
that his honor must be a most exquisite
sloven. His horse was but a poor, starved,
hobbling creature, and he had two slaves
following him on foot to drive the poor?
creature along. He had a whip in his han
and he belabored the beast as fast about,
the head as his slaves did about the tail
and thus he rode by us, with about ten or
twelve servants, going from +he city to
BOBiNSUN CRUBOE

nis country seat about half a league before
us. We traveled on gently, but this figure
‘of a gentleman rode away before us; and
‘as we stopped at a village about an hour
to refresh us, when we came by the coun-
try seat of this great man, we saw him in
'» little place before his door, eating a
yy Seat






repas.. It was a kind of garden, but ue
was easy to be seen; and we were given to
anderstand that the more we looked at
him the better he would be pleased. He
sat ander a tree, something like the pal-
ietto, which effectually shaded him over
the head; but under the tree was placed
‘s large umbrella, which made that part
(ook well enough. He sat lolling back in
‘a great elbow-chair, being a heavy, corpu-
jent man, and had his meat brought him
‘by tivo women-slaves. He had two more,
ne, of whom fed the squire with a spoon,

\
}
}
5

a

and the other held the dish with one hanu,
and scraped off what he let fall upon his
worship’s beard and taffety vest.

Thus leaving the poor wretch to pleasg
himself with our looking at him, as if we
admired his pomp, though we really pitied
and contemned him, we pursned our jou»





oe Revisma)
ney; only Father Simon had tl_ curiosity
to stay to inform himself what dainites the ©
country justice had to feed on in all his
state, which he had the honor to teste of,
and which was, I think, a mess of boiled
rice, with a great piece of garlic in it, and
a little bag filled with green pepper, and
another plant which they have there
‘something like our ginger, but smelling
like musk, and tasting like mustard, All
this was put together, and a small piece of
lean mutton boiled in it, and this was his
worship’s repast. Four or five servants


A I oe Porter sat





ROBINSON CRUSOR

Fie nee A ES ee, a cans

more attended at a distance, who we sup- \ land to Museovy. within tourar 37m weexa
posed were to eat of the same after their and he was sure we would take the upper

‘nastier

At lengta we arrived at “Pekin: I fad
gobody with me but the youth whom my
a vhew the captain had given me to attend



me a8 a servam, and who proved very
trusty and diligent; and my partner had
bobody with hue but one servant, who
was a kinsman. As for the Portuguese
puot, ve .eing desirous to see the court,
we bore his charges for his company, and to
use him as an interpreter, for he under
atood the language of the country, and
spoke good French and a little English.
And indeed this old man was a most useful
implement to us everywhere; for we had
not been above a week at Pekin, when he
came laughing: “Ah, Seignior Inglese,”
says he, “T have something to tell which
rill make your heart glad. ° In short, he
told us there was a great caravan of Mus-
vevite and Polish reerateiats in the city,

tunity to go with them.
I confess I was greatly surprised with

this good news, and had scarce power

speak to him for some time; but at last &
turned to him. “How do you know this ”

said I; “are you sure it is true?” “ Yes,”
says be; “T met this morning on the street
an old acquaintance of mine, an Armenian,
who is among them.” We then went te

consult together what was to bedone; an¢,

J asked my partner what he thought S the

: pilot’s news, and whether it would suit

with his affairs? He told me he would do

| just as I would; for he had settled all his

affairs so.well at Bengal, and left his effects
in such good hands, that as we had maéea

eae here, if he could invest it in

China silks, wrought and raw, such as
might be worth the carriage, he would be
content to go to England, and then make
his voyage back to Bengal by the Com:
pany’s ships. —

The old pilot was of so much service to
us that we agreed to pay him a good price

‘to accompany us, to which he consented,

and we soon made our eee 2

‘start with the caravan.

Mt was the beginning of February, our
style, when we set out from Pekin. My
partner avd the old pilot had gone express
back to the port where we had first put

In, to dispose of some goods which we had.

left there ; and 1, with a Chinese merchant.
went to Nanquin, where 1 bought ninety
pieces of fine damasks, with about two hun-
dred pieces of other very fine silks of sev:
eral sorts, some mixed with gold. Besides

“preparing to set out on their jour ney by this, we bought a very large quantity off

f
!

is
S
1


_ ROBINSON CRUSOE.



- 167















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































raw silk, and some other goods, our cargo
amounting, in these goods only, to about
three thousand five hundred pounds ster-
ling; which, together with tea and some
fine calicoes, and three camels’ loads of
nutmegs and cloves, loaded in all eighteen
camels for our share, besides those we rode
upon; which, with two or three spare
horses, and two horses loaded with pro-
visions, made us, in short, twenty-six
camels and horses in our retinue.

The company was very great, and, as far

.as I can remember, made between three
and four hundred horse, and upwards of
one hundred and twenty men, very well
armed, and provided for all events. The
company consisted of people of several!
nations; but there were about sixty of
them merchants of Moscow; and to our

particular satisfaction, five of them were '

































































Scots, who appeared also to be men of
great experience in business, and of very
good substance.

When we had travelled one day’s jour-
ney, the guides, who were five in number,
called all the gentlemen and merchants—
that is to say, all the passengers except the
servants—to a great council, as they called
it. At this council, eve.y one deposited
a certain quantity of money to a common
stock, for the necessary expense of buy ing
forage on the way, where it was not other-
wise to be had, and for satisfying the
guides, getting horses, and the like; and

here they constituted the j journey, as they

call it,viz., they named captains and officers
to draw us all up, and give the word of
command, in case of an attack, and give
every one their turn of Cea

In two days more we passed the great

¢
168



China wall, made for a fortification against
the Tartars; and a very great work it is,
going over hills and mountains in a need-
less track, where the rocks are impassable,
and the precipices such as no enemy could
| possivly enter, or indeed climb up. They
tell us its length is near a thousand English
‘niles, but that the country is five hundred
in a straight measured line, which the wall
bounds, without measuring the windings



and ‘urnings it takes. It is about four
fathoms high, and as many thick in some
places. :

I stood still an hour or thereabouts with-
put trespassing our orders (for so long the
earavan was in passing the gate), to look at
it on every side, near and far off—I mean
what was within my view; and the guide

} xf our caravan, who had been extolling it
, for the wonder of the world, was mighty



ROBINSON CRUSOE.



eager to hear my opinion of it. I told him
it was a most excellent thing to keep out
the Tartars; which he happened not to
understand as I meant it,and so took it for
a compliment; but the old pilot laughed,

Yi Oh, Seignior Inglese,” says he, “you

speak in colors.” “In colors!” said I;
“what do you mean by that?” “Why,
you speak what looks white this way, and —

another, You tell him it ?s a good wall
to keep out Tartars; you tell me by that
it is good for nothing but to keep out
Tartars. I understand you, Seignior
Inglese ; but Seignior Chinese understands
you his own way.” “ Well,” says I, “sei-
gnior, do you think it would stand out an
army of our country people, with a good
train of artillery? or our engineers, with
two companies of miners? Would they
; ROBINSON CRUSOE.

153

RR —————

not batter it down in ten days, that an
army might enter in battalia? or blow it
up in the air, foundation and all, that there
should be no sign of it left?” “ Ay, ay,”
says he, “I know that.”

Soon after this, as a party of us had
left the caravan to hunt wild sheep, we
met about forty Tartars, and as soon
as they saw us, one of them blew a
kind of horn very loud, but with a bar-
barous sound. We all supposed this was

MG
me ¢

Co
\Y
B SAY



to call their friends about them, and so it
was ; for, in less thaw ten minutes, a troop
of forty or fifty more appeared, at about
a mile distance; but our work was over
first, as it happened.

One of the Scots merchants of Moscow
happened to be with us, and as soon as he
heard the horn, he told us that we had no-
thing to do but to charge them imme-
diately, without loss of time ; and drawing



us up in a line, he asked if we were re-
solved. We told him we were ready to
follow him; so he rode direetly towards

them. As soon as they saw 8 advance,

they let fly their arrows, which, however,
missed us, very happily. It seems they mis:
took noi their aim, but their distance; for
their arrows all fell short of us, but with
so true an aim, that had we been about
twenty yards nearer, we must have had
several men wounded, if not killed.

Immediately we halted, and thougs i
was at a great distance, we fired, and sent
them leaden bullets for wooden arrows,
following our shot full gallop, to fall in
among them sword in hand, As soon as
we came up to them we fired our pistols in
their faces, and then drew; but they fied
in the greatest confusion imaginable.

We wanted two days’ journey of the
city of Naum, on the frontier of the


10 ne ROBINSON CRUSOE.

eee,

' dred soldiers sent us from a garrison of

the Chinese, on our left, and three hudred

more from the city of Naum, and with

these we advanced boldly. The three

hundred soidiers from Naum marched in

our front, the two hundred in our rear,

f and our men on each side of our camels,

| with our baggage, and the whole caravan

in the centre. In this order, and well

prepared for battle, we thought ourselves

a match for the whole ten thousand Mogul

Tartars, if they had appeared; but the
next day, whenthey did appear, it was

quite another thing.

Chinese Empire, when we met messengers | When we were entered upon a desert of
from the governor to tell all caravans to | about fifteen or sixteen miles over; behold
halt till they had a guard sent for them; | by a cloud of dust they raised, we saw an
for that a body of Tartars, making ten | enemy was at hand; ‘and they were at
thousand in all, had appeared in the way, | hand indeed, for they came on upon the
about thirty miles beyond the city. Ac-|spur.. The Chinese, our guard in the .
cordingly, two days after, we had two hun- j front, who had talked so big the dav









Sefore, began to stagger; and the soldiers
frequently looked behind them, which is a
certain sign in a soldier that he is just

ready to run away. My old pilot being},

near me, called out: “Seignior Inglese,
those fellows must be encouraged, or they
will ruin us all; for,if the Tartars come
on, they will never stand it.” “I am of
your mind,” says I; “but what must be
done?” “Done!” says he, “let fifty of
our men advance, and flank them on each
wing, and encourage them, and they will
fight like brave fellows in brave company ;
but without this, they will every man turn
his back.” Immediately I rode up to our
leader, ané told him, and accordingly fifty
of us marched to the right wing, and
fifty to the left.

The Tartars came on, and an imnumer-
able company they were; how many we

ROBINSON CRUSOE.

could: not tell, but ten thousand, we
thought, was the least. - A party of them
came on first, and viewed our posture;
and, as we found them within gunshot,
our leader ordered the two wings to
advance swiftly, and give them a salvo
on each wing with their shot, which was
done; and they went off, I suppose, back
to give an account of the reception they
were like to meet with. And, indeed, that
salute cloyed their stomachs, for they
immediately halted, stood awhile to con
sider it, and wheeling off to the left, they
gave over their design.

Two days after, we came to the city of
Naun, or Naum; we thanked the governor
for his care of us, and collected to thé
value of a hundred crowns, or thereabouts,
which we gave to the soldiers sent to guard
us; and here we rested one day-
ROBINSON CRUSOE.

193







As we were riding through the Musco.
vite dominions, being a little way off from
- $he coravan, I came upon some people wor-
vaiping an idol. It had a head not resem-
bling any creature that the world ever
saw; ears as big as goats’ horns, and as
high ; eyes as big as a crown piece ; a nose
Yke a crooked ram’s horn, and a mouth ex-
tended four-cornered, like that of a lion, |
with horrible teeth, hooked like a parrot’s |
ander bill. It was dressed up in the filth- |
jest manner that you cowd suppose; its ;
upper garment was of sheep-skins, with the

wool outward; a great Tartar bonnet on
the head, with two horns growing through
it. It was about eight feet high, yet had no
feet or legs, nor any other pre;z-crtion of
parts. I rode up to the image or monster
—call it what you will—and with my
sword made a stroke at the bonnet that
was on its head, and cut it in two; and
one of our men that was with me took hold
of the sheep-skin that covered it, and pulled
at it, when, behold, a most hideous outery
and howling ran through the village, and
two or three hundred people came about

















































my ears, so that I was glad to scour for it,
for we saw some had some bows and ar
rows, We went back in the night and
destroyed the idol with fire.

We had been ‘almost seven months on
our journey when we arrived at Tobolski,
and here I resolved to stop for the winter,
and let the caravan go on. Here 1 made
the acquaintance of an exiled prince, and
the winter, though very cold, passed very
pleasantly. In the month of May,I began
to pack up to continue my journey with a
caravan that was soon to start, and I won-
dered why the prince could not go with
me. But mv wonder was over when I
entered upon that subject with the person
I have mentioned, ‘Consider, first, sir,”
said he, “the place where we are; and,
secondly, the condition we are in. We are
surrounded with stronger things than bars
or bolts; on the north side, an unnavigable
ocean, where ship never sailed, and boat
hever swam; every other way we have a
_ ROBINSON CRUSOE.







thousand miles to pass through the Czar’s
own dominions, and through the towns
garrisoned by his troops; so that we could
neither pass undiscovered by the road, nor
subsist by any other way;
vain to attempt it.” However, I prevailed
apon him to make the attempt to escape
with me. We did not start till June, and,
after much hardship and fatigue, we Genie
entered Europe, having passed the river
Kama, which in these parts is the boundary
between Europe and Asia. The first city,
on the European side was called Soloy
Kamskoi, which is as much as to say, the
great city on the river Kama; and here we

thought to see some evident alteration im
the people But we were mistaken; for as
we had a vast desert to pass, which is near

i s . .
geven hundred miles long in some places,

so that it is.

>

but not above two hundred over where we
passed it, so till we came past that hor
rible place, we found very little difference
betiveen that country and the Mogul Tar
tary. The people are mostly pagans, and
little better than the savages of America;
their houses and towns .full of idols, and
their way _ living was wholly barbarous,
except in the cities, and the villages near
them, where they are Christians, as they
call themselves, of the Greek Church, but
have have their religion mingled with se
many relics of superstition that it is scarce
to be known in some plases from mere
sorcery and witchcraft.

In passing this forest, J thought, ‘deed,
we must (after all our dangers were, to our
imagination, escaped) have beex plundered!
and robbed, and perhaps murdered, by @:


ROBINSON CRUSOE.

* .

troop of ‘hieveu: of phat country they

were, J am yet at a Joss to know, but they
were ali on: horseback, and carried bows
and arrows. We were but. sixteen men in
ali, but we drew up before our camels, and
hey finally went off a little way. We
moved to a little wood, and put upa barri-

cade of branches, and so waited for them.’

About two hours before night they came
down directly upon us, when we found
they had been joined by some more.

sOur old pilot was our captain, and de-
sired us not to fire upon ‘them till they
came within pistol-shot, that we might be
sure to kill, and that when we did fire we
should be sure to take good aim. We bade
him give the word of command, which he
delayed so long, that there were some of
‘them within an pikes’ length of us when
we let fly. We aimed so true that we



16

killed fourteen of them, aad wounded i
several others, as also several of their



horses; for we had all of us loaded our |

pieces with two or three bullets at least.
’ They.were terribly surprised’ with our
fire, and retreated immediately. about one
hundred rods from us; in which time we
loaded our pieces again, and seeing them
keep that distance, we sallied out, and
caught four or five of their horses, whose
riflers we supposed were killed ; and com-
ing up to the dead, we judged they were
Tartars, but knew not how they came to
make an excursion such an unusual length.
We slept little, you may be sure, but
spent the most part of the night ix
strengthening our situation, and ‘barricad-
ing the entrances into the wood, and keep-
ing a strict watch. We waited for day-
light, and when it came, it gave us a very






























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































176
unwelcome discovery indeed; for
enemy, who we thought were dgeeel
with the reception they met with, were
now greatly increased, and had set up'
eleven or twelve huts or tents, as if they
were resolved to besiege us.

However, as they did not attack us that
day, at night we left our fires burning in
front, and slipped out the other side nh the
wood and so got aw y. At last we arrived
safely at Archangel, where we were obliged
to wait six weeks fora ship. Finally we
took passage on a Hamburger, and arrived
in the Eibe on the 18th of September, the
young Russian prince traveling safely as
my steward.

Here my partner and I found a very
good sale for our goods, as well those of
China as the sables etc., of Siberia; and,
dividing the produce, my share amounted |
to £3,475 1%, 3d, including about six |



ROBINSON CR UsO#.





the | tengs ed pounds’ worth of diamonds, eit

I purchased at Bengal.

Here the youny lord took his lezve of
us, and went up the Elbe, in order to go
to the court of Vienna, where he resolved
to seek protection, and could correspond
with those of his father’s friends who were
left alive. He did not part without testi-
monies of gratitude for my services.

To conclude: having stayed near four
months in Hamburg, I came from thence
by land to the Hague, where I embarked
in the packet, and arrived in London the
10th of January, 1705, having been absent
from England ten years and nine months.
And here I resolved to prepare for a longer
journey than all these, having lived a life
of infinite variety seventy-two years, and
learned sufficiently to know the value of.
retirement, and the blessing of ending our
| days in peace.








;
~~
& a