Citation
Robinson Crusoe

Material Information

Title:
Robinson Crusoe
Series Title:
Kriss Kringle series
Creator:
Defoe, Daniel, 1661?-1731 ( Author, Primary )
McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
McLoughlin Bros.
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1897
Language:
English
Physical Description:
[10] p. : ill. (4 col.) ; 23 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Castaways -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Shipwrecks -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Survival after airplane accidents, shipwrecks, etc -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Imaginary voyages -- 1897 ( rbgenr )
Baldwin -- 1897
Genre:
Imaginary voyages ( rbgenr )
fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Text begins and ends on p. [2]-[3] of cover. Six pages of text and 4 full page full color ill.; smaller ill. in text are three color.
General Note:
Cover shows a young Crusoe on a raft with supplies and a kitten, with a wrecked ship in the background; back cover has Crusoe and Friday meeting the Spaniards.
General Note:
Lovett, R.W. Robinson Crusoe, 773, is a variant in the same series, with 8 p. of text, 2 of ill. and a different cover.
General Note:
Part I of Robinson Crusoe retold by a third person.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
029060281 ( ALEPH )
30345740 ( OCLC )
AJQ2149 ( NOTIS )

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text










OBINSON CRUSOE, while still a small boy,

ran away from home. He went to a seaport,

and then on board a big ship to learn to be a sailor.

The captain liked him, and he made several voyages,
without any serious ill luck, until he became a man.

He then sailed on’a ship that was going to Africa.
Before they were out many days a great storm came up,
and the ship was driven on the rocks and wrecked.
Everybody was drowned except Robinson Crusoe, and
he was thrown upon the beach almost dead. When he
was able to walk, he went up on a hill, and found he
was on an island, with no sign of other inhabitants.

His condition was lonely enough,

f / and he was very sad.
j Vy, Night soon came on;
if he climbed a tree, to
sleep, fearing there
might be wild ani-
mals on the island.
Jn the morning,
when he awoke, the
sky was clear, and —
the sea calm.. The
_ ship lay on the rocks,
- and, when the tide
was low, he was able
to swim out to it.























S20 BD. He found the food

MORINGON CRUSOE CEs TOPE TAKEN, Ona VOYAGE. quite dry, and he set’



The Baldwin Library

[Rm Bue University



y dy) 00

ROBINSON CRUSOE.

about getting some ashore. He
made a raft of some planks, and
saved all he could from the ship
before she went to pieces. His
next task was to make a place
to live in. He found a cave,
and around the entrance
he drove a row of piles, to
get over which he had
to use a ladder. This
he called his Castle.
After this he made
Rit a table sand! ehain,
mn | ie "i and some other use-
ful things. Often, he
went about the island
with his gun, and shot birds and wild goats, whose flesh
he used for food. He also caught a parrot alive; this,
and a ‘dog. and two cats that had been on board the
ship, were his only companions. At last he thought
he would capture some goats, and they would supply
him with milk.as well as meat, and clothing besides,
for he could make garments out of their skins. He
also wished to make a canoe, and, after a great deal of
labor, he cut down a large tree, and shaped a boat out
-of it. With this he could sail around the island. After
many years had passed, Robinson Crusoe, one day, saw
the prints of naked feet in the sand on the shore; these
tracks were made by savages. Not long after, he saw
smoke at a distance, and very soon a “lot of savages
gathered about a fire. They killed one of two men.









THE ORPHAN KID.







ROBINSON CRUSOE AT HOME IN THE CASTLE.

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ROBINSON CRUSOE. |

who lay bound on the ground, and placed the body on
the fire to cook. While they were busy, the other man
managed to free himself, and ran straight to Robinson
Crusoe. He decided to try to save him, and fired his
gun at the men when they came near enough.

One was killed; ‘the others ran to their canoes,
and paddled away. The captive fell on his knees
before Crusoe, who took him with him to his Castle.
He taught him a little English, and named him Friday
—as it was on that day he saved his life. He soon be-
came a pleasant companion, as well as a useful servant.

Nearly two years passed before they saw any more
savages. One morning, Friday came running in, to
tell Crusoe that a large number had landed with some
captives, whom they had begun to kill and eat.

Robinson Crusoe armed.‘himself and Friday,
and both went to attack the savages. They killed
several, and the rest-were so frightened that they fled
to their canoes, leaving on the ground a prisoner
whom they had not. killed: Crusoe saw that he was
a white man, and set him free. . Friday found another
captive in a canoe af. which the savages had
left behind. This at / ie
Was. an old man. Tad
and, when Friday
looked in his face,
he saw that it was.
iis own lather, = : n-
and embraced and Sy on, =
kissed him, in a . i ee
transport of joy. A VOYAGE IN THE einen




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ROBINSON CRUSOE.

The white captive was a Spaniard
who, with sixteen others,

fe had been shipwrecked
ss on the mainland.
Robinson
Crusoe and
the Spaniard
“= thought they
wouldall like
to come and
live together

wig —) .. onthe island.
A SS —-—Ss They _ then










———













=== built a large
——. Doat, ena:
os >= when allawas
THE FOOT-PRINTS IN THE SAND. :
ready,..the

Spaniard and Friday’s father set sail for thesmainland.
One morning, soon after, Friday came, running in, say-
ing that a ship was*in sight. Crusoe knew that it’was
an English ship, and saw that a boat had put off for the’
shore. He did not think it best to be seen, till he knew
why they were landing, and it was wise that he did not.

Eleven-men landed, and Crusoe saw that three of
them were very sad, and:kept by themselves, while the
rest scattered about the island. - As soon as they were
out of hearing, Robinson Crusoe approached the men,
and spoke to them. They were astonished to see him,
and told him that one was the captain, and the others
the mates; that there had been a mutiny on the ship,
and that the sailors were going to leave them on the







CRUSOE SAVING FRIDAY’S LIFE.

ROBINSON







ROBINSON CRUSOE RELEASES THE CAPTIVE.



ROBINSON CRUSOE. |

island, and sail
away in. the
ship. Robin-
son Crusoe
offered 10
help the cap-
tain to recov-
er his ship,
if he would
agree tocarry
himself and
Priday, to
Eneland
in case they

SHOOTING THE RINGLEADER succeed ed,

OF THE MUTINY. .

Gee and the cap-
tain gladly promised. They retired among the trees,
and, when the men returned, shot two, who, the cap-
tain said, were leaders in the mischief. The others,
taken by surprise, cried out for pardon. This the
captain granted, on condition that they swear to assist
him in recovering the ship, and they all did so. It
was decided to wait until it-was. dark before trying to
take the ship. Those on board, not knowing the turn
affairs had taken, were not prepared to resist, and, when
the captain had shot the ringleader of the mutiny, the
rest of the men submitted, <- 2:7 -—

The ship:.set..sail the next day, and Robinson
Crusoe left his island, after having spent over twenty-
eight years upon it. He had saved some gold from
the wrecked ship, and this he took with him, but















ROBINSON CRUSOE.

everything else he left for the Spaniards when they~~
came from the mainland. |

Poor Friday never reached England. One day,
some savages came paddling toward the ship in canoes,
and Friday was sent on the upper deck to speak to
them, and find out what they wanted. At almost the
first word, the wretches let fly their arrows at him, and
he was killed. The ship’s guns were fired at the
canoes, and the savages were all killed, but Robinson
Crusoe was not consoled by that for the loss of Friday,
~ of whom he ‘had become very fond.

When he arrived in England, he found his father
and mother were dead, and few of his friends were
living, and for a time he felt almost as lonely as
when he was on his island. But he married a good
wife before long, and settled down to a quiet,. indus-
‘trious country life. He was blest with children, who
grew up to be his
delight and comfort,
and he spent
his old age
in peace and
happiness.

—As soon =
as youl can
read yourself,
you should
read the com-
plete: life) of
Robinson -
Crusoe. DEATH OF FRIDAY.













Full Text









OBINSON CRUSOE, while still a small boy,

ran away from home. He went to a seaport,

and then on board a big ship to learn to be a sailor.

The captain liked him, and he made several voyages,
without any serious ill luck, until he became a man.

He then sailed on’a ship that was going to Africa.
Before they were out many days a great storm came up,
and the ship was driven on the rocks and wrecked.
Everybody was drowned except Robinson Crusoe, and
he was thrown upon the beach almost dead. When he
was able to walk, he went up on a hill, and found he
was on an island, with no sign of other inhabitants.

His condition was lonely enough,

f / and he was very sad.
j Vy, Night soon came on;
if he climbed a tree, to
sleep, fearing there
might be wild ani-
mals on the island.
Jn the morning,
when he awoke, the
sky was clear, and —
the sea calm.. The
_ ship lay on the rocks,
- and, when the tide
was low, he was able
to swim out to it.























S20 BD. He found the food

MORINGON CRUSOE CEs TOPE TAKEN, Ona VOYAGE. quite dry, and he set’



The Baldwin Library

[Rm Bue University
y dy) 00

ROBINSON CRUSOE.

about getting some ashore. He
made a raft of some planks, and
saved all he could from the ship
before she went to pieces. His
next task was to make a place
to live in. He found a cave,
and around the entrance
he drove a row of piles, to
get over which he had
to use a ladder. This
he called his Castle.
After this he made
Rit a table sand! ehain,
mn | ie "i and some other use-
ful things. Often, he
went about the island
with his gun, and shot birds and wild goats, whose flesh
he used for food. He also caught a parrot alive; this,
and a ‘dog. and two cats that had been on board the
ship, were his only companions. At last he thought
he would capture some goats, and they would supply
him with milk.as well as meat, and clothing besides,
for he could make garments out of their skins. He
also wished to make a canoe, and, after a great deal of
labor, he cut down a large tree, and shaped a boat out
-of it. With this he could sail around the island. After
many years had passed, Robinson Crusoe, one day, saw
the prints of naked feet in the sand on the shore; these
tracks were made by savages. Not long after, he saw
smoke at a distance, and very soon a “lot of savages
gathered about a fire. They killed one of two men.









THE ORPHAN KID.




ROBINSON CRUSOE AT HOME IN THE CASTLE.

3
OS
ze
kK
Zz
2
=
K
=
°
w
O°
2)
~
oc
oO
Zz
O
a)
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cO
O
oc


ROBINSON CRUSOE. |

who lay bound on the ground, and placed the body on
the fire to cook. While they were busy, the other man
managed to free himself, and ran straight to Robinson
Crusoe. He decided to try to save him, and fired his
gun at the men when they came near enough.

One was killed; ‘the others ran to their canoes,
and paddled away. The captive fell on his knees
before Crusoe, who took him with him to his Castle.
He taught him a little English, and named him Friday
—as it was on that day he saved his life. He soon be-
came a pleasant companion, as well as a useful servant.

Nearly two years passed before they saw any more
savages. One morning, Friday came running in, to
tell Crusoe that a large number had landed with some
captives, whom they had begun to kill and eat.

Robinson Crusoe armed.‘himself and Friday,
and both went to attack the savages. They killed
several, and the rest-were so frightened that they fled
to their canoes, leaving on the ground a prisoner
whom they had not. killed: Crusoe saw that he was
a white man, and set him free. . Friday found another
captive in a canoe af. which the savages had
left behind. This at / ie
Was. an old man. Tad
and, when Friday
looked in his face,
he saw that it was.
iis own lather, = : n-
and embraced and Sy on, =
kissed him, in a . i ee
transport of joy. A VOYAGE IN THE einen




MB,

Te ee S



si sittin Way
i 4 As Any OnE.
phe . yall 4 «
iin wee uty ph ap
“ " Wh wen ag cee oh eae
. aye cin

vee, OR SC



¢
eee


ROBINSON CRUSOE.

The white captive was a Spaniard
who, with sixteen others,

fe had been shipwrecked
ss on the mainland.
Robinson
Crusoe and
the Spaniard
“= thought they
wouldall like
to come and
live together

wig —) .. onthe island.
A SS —-—Ss They _ then










———













=== built a large
——. Doat, ena:
os >= when allawas
THE FOOT-PRINTS IN THE SAND. :
ready,..the

Spaniard and Friday’s father set sail for thesmainland.
One morning, soon after, Friday came, running in, say-
ing that a ship was*in sight. Crusoe knew that it’was
an English ship, and saw that a boat had put off for the’
shore. He did not think it best to be seen, till he knew
why they were landing, and it was wise that he did not.

Eleven-men landed, and Crusoe saw that three of
them were very sad, and:kept by themselves, while the
rest scattered about the island. - As soon as they were
out of hearing, Robinson Crusoe approached the men,
and spoke to them. They were astonished to see him,
and told him that one was the captain, and the others
the mates; that there had been a mutiny on the ship,
and that the sailors were going to leave them on the




CRUSOE SAVING FRIDAY’S LIFE.

ROBINSON




ROBINSON CRUSOE RELEASES THE CAPTIVE.
ROBINSON CRUSOE. |

island, and sail
away in. the
ship. Robin-
son Crusoe
offered 10
help the cap-
tain to recov-
er his ship,
if he would
agree tocarry
himself and
Priday, to
Eneland
in case they

SHOOTING THE RINGLEADER succeed ed,

OF THE MUTINY. .

Gee and the cap-
tain gladly promised. They retired among the trees,
and, when the men returned, shot two, who, the cap-
tain said, were leaders in the mischief. The others,
taken by surprise, cried out for pardon. This the
captain granted, on condition that they swear to assist
him in recovering the ship, and they all did so. It
was decided to wait until it-was. dark before trying to
take the ship. Those on board, not knowing the turn
affairs had taken, were not prepared to resist, and, when
the captain had shot the ringleader of the mutiny, the
rest of the men submitted, <- 2:7 -—

The ship:.set..sail the next day, and Robinson
Crusoe left his island, after having spent over twenty-
eight years upon it. He had saved some gold from
the wrecked ship, and this he took with him, but












ROBINSON CRUSOE.

everything else he left for the Spaniards when they~~
came from the mainland. |

Poor Friday never reached England. One day,
some savages came paddling toward the ship in canoes,
and Friday was sent on the upper deck to speak to
them, and find out what they wanted. At almost the
first word, the wretches let fly their arrows at him, and
he was killed. The ship’s guns were fired at the
canoes, and the savages were all killed, but Robinson
Crusoe was not consoled by that for the loss of Friday,
~ of whom he ‘had become very fond.

When he arrived in England, he found his father
and mother were dead, and few of his friends were
living, and for a time he felt almost as lonely as
when he was on his island. But he married a good
wife before long, and settled down to a quiet,. indus-
‘trious country life. He was blest with children, who
grew up to be his
delight and comfort,
and he spent
his old age
in peace and
happiness.

—As soon =
as youl can
read yourself,
you should
read the com-
plete: life) of
Robinson -
Crusoe. DEATH OF FRIDAY.