Citation
My Robinson Crusoe story book

Material Information

Title:
My Robinson Crusoe story book
Series Title:
My Robinson Crusoe story book
Creator:
Weedon, L. L ( Lucy L )
Webb, Archibald
Nister, Ernest ( Publisher )
Defoe, Daniel, 1661?-1731
E.P. Dutton (Firm) ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
New York
Publisher:
Ernest Nister ;
Ernest Nister
E.P. Dutton & Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
128 p., 3 leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 20 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Castaways -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Shipwrecks -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Survival after airplane accidents, shipwrecks, etc -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Imaginary voyages -- 1890 ( rbgenr )
Genre:
fiction ( marcgt )
Children's literature ( fast )
Imaginary voyages ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
Lovett, R.W. Robinson Crusoe,
Citation/Reference:
NUC pre-1956,
General Note:
Ill. signed AW or Arch Webb.
General Note:
"Printed in Bavaria"--P. 128.
General Note:
Front. included in paging.
General Note:
Each leaf of plate has two or three scenes.
General Note:
Part I of Robinson Crusoe, retold.
General Note:
"No. 3533."
General Note:
University of Florida's copy imperfect: spine and one plate lacking.
Statement of Responsibility:
re-told for the little ones by L.L. Weedon.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
28121072 ( oclc )

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Full Text
fy Robinson Crusoe Sfory Book





LIST OF THE SERIES

Uniform in Price and Style

MY STORY BOOK OF DOGS
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK
MY BIBLE STORY BOOK
MY SHORT STORY BOOK
MY WILD ANIMAL BOOK
MY FARMYARD STORY BOOK
MY NURSERY RHYME BOOK
MY NURSERY TALE BOOK



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Ry Robinson Crusoe
Story Book

Re-told for the Liffle Gnes
by
Ik. Ik. Weedon.



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© P DUTTON & Co Neos YORK:

IM, No. 3533:











CHAPTER
CHAPTER
CHAPTER
CHAPTER
CHAPTER
CHAPTER
CHAPTER
CHAPTER
CHAPTER
CHAPTER
CHAPTER

CHAPTER

Ee
III

VI
VII

VIII .

IX

XI.
XII

PAGE ~

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27
37
47
57
67
77
87
97

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. 117





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Jl2y Robinson Crusoe Story Book’
CHAPTER I

OBINSON CRUSOE was born in the
Te 1632 in the city of York. His
parents were well-to-do folks and intended
their son to become a lawyer, but young
Robinson was of a roving disposition, and
longed to be a sailor and visit foreign lands.
His father and mother talked to him very
seriously, warning him of the terrible fate
that would surely overtake him if he left
his comfortable home and the friends who
loved him, and they reminded him that his
elder brother who had gone away to fight
in Flanders had never returned, for he had
met his death in a battle against the
Spaniards. What became of Robinson’s:
second brother no one ever knew.

However, the sad fate of his two brothers
had little effect upon him, and he never
ceased to urge both his father and mother



8 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

to allow him to seek his fortune abroad.
His mother reproached him bitterly for his
ingratitude towards them, and his father
sighed and shook his head sadly, saying:
“That boy might be happy if he would
stay at home; but if he goes abroad, he
will be the most miserable wretch that ever
was born: I can give no consent to it.”
Well, Robinson Crusoe appeared to take
his father’s words to heart for a time, but
at the end of a year he had forgotten all
that had been said to him, and as soon as
an opportunity occurred he ran away to sea.
A companion of Crusoe’s was sailing
from Hull to London, and it seemed to the
youth too good an opportunity to be missed,
and so he set sail with him, without sending
any message whatever to his parents.
Scarcely had the ship left the Humber
than the wind began to blow and the sea
to rise, and Crusoe began to wish he had
never gone to sea, and to remember all his
father had said would happen to him. He
made up his mind if ever he reached the
shore in safety he would go straight home



MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 9

and never leave his parents again. But no
sooner did the weather clear up than he
forgot all his good resolutions. His companion,
who had been to sea before, and was used
to rough weather, clapped him on the shoulder

SB -



and bade him take heart, and Crusoe joined
with him in making merry, and laughing
at his late fears.

Six days after he had set sail the ship
came into Yarmouth Roads, and there they



10 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

were for a time becalmed, for in those days
all the ships were sailing vessels and depended
on wind and weather. When the wind came
at length, it blew a hurricane. Poor Crusoe
was terrified, and even the captain and sailors
acknowledged they had never seen worse
weather.

Still the storm increased, and, although
Crusoe and everyone else on board laboured
hard to save their ship, it soon became
apparent that the vessel was doomed.

The captain ordered guns to be fired
as signals of distress, and presently a boat
from another ship was lowered and came
to their aid, and Crusoe and his companions
managed, with great difficulty, to get on-
board, and were rowed ashore. Long before
they came to land the vessel they had left
sank before their eyes.

You would have thought this would
have been a lesson to the young man; but
instead of repenting he made up his mind
to go to London and seek there for further
adventures. As he had some money in his
pockets he travelled thither by land, and



MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK II

very soon met with a ship's captain, who
invited him to accompany him to the coast
of Guinea, promising to take him there
free of charge, and giving him every
Opportunity of trading with the natives,
when they arrived there.

Crusoe accepted _ this generous offer
gratefully and, writing to some relations
for assistance, he received from them the
sum of about £40, which he invested in
toys and trifles of jewellery, with which he
intended to trade.

On the voyage out, the captain, who
was a kindly, honest man, instructed him
in. the art: ‘of seamanship, and when they
landed in Africa he helped him to dispose
of his wares, so that he returned home
with £300 in his pockets instead of £40.

Robinson Crusoe was now set up as
a Guinea trader; but unfortunately for him,
his good friend, the captain, died soon
after their return to London. However, he
left £200 of his money with the captain’s
widow, who took care of it for him, and,
having invested the other £100 in goods



12 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

with which to trade, he resolved to make
the same voyage again, and embarked in
the same vessel, with the former mate of
the ship as captain.

This was a very unfortunate voyage
for all concerned, for when they were mid-
way between the Canary Islands and the
coast of Africa they were surprised one
morning by a Moorish pirate ship from
Sallee, which gave chase to them with all
sail set.

The captain of Crusoe’s ship ordered
as many sails as the masts would carry
to be spread; but it was all in vain, and
when it became certain that the pirate ship
Was gaining on them they determined to fight.

Crusoe’s ship carried twelve guns and
the pirate ship eighteen, and the pirate
captain had two hundred men on_ board,
so that, although Crusoe and his companions
fought very bravely, their ship was at length
disabled, and after killing and wounding
numbers of the crew the pirates took the
remainder prisoners and carried them into
the port of Sallee.



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14 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

The Moorish captain took Robinson
Crusoe for his own slave and, much to
the youth’s disappointment, left him on
shore, when he went to sea, to look after
the garden.

Iwo years passed swiftly away, with
very little change for the young man, who
had never ceased to hope for a chance to
escape, but as yet had never found one.
However, his master happened to be short
of money and was therefore unable to fit
out his ship to sail again. To while away
the time he took to fishing, and, as Crusoe
proved very clever at this Sport, his master
always took him with him.

At length the Opportunity for which
Robinson Crusoe had waited so long arose.
His master had arranged a fishing-party
for himself and some of his friends, and
had ordered his English slave to provision
a big boat, which he had taken from an
English ship, and also to put on board
this boat several muskets and some shot
and powder in case they saw some wild fowl,

At the last moment the Moor and his





MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 15

friends were unable to go, owing to some
business which arose, but as the guests
were to sup at the captain’s house he ordered
Crusoe to go on board, taking with him a
man, and a boy named Xury, and to catch
a dish of fish for their supper.

So Crusoe set out with high hopes
and beating heart. They went a little way
out from the shore and set to work to fish,
but when a fish came to Crusoe’s hook he
would not pull it up, and so it appeared
as though they were catching nothing, and
Crusoe said: “This will not do; our master
will not be thus served; we must stand
farther off.’ The man agreeing they ran
farther out, and Crusoe waited until his two
companions were intent upon their fishing
when he stepped suddenly behind the man
and tossed him clear overboard. He was
a splendid swimmer and so Crusoe bade
him swim ashore, threatening to shoot him
if he came near the boat.

When he was sure that the man had
obeyed his commands he turned to the boy
Xury and made him swear to be faithful



16 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

to him, and after that they sailed away to
the south-east, never resting until the
country they had left was far behind them.

For five days Robinson Crusoe and the
boy Xury sailed along without once landing,
but by that time they felt sufficiently safe
to steer the boat to the mouth of a little
river and anchor there, meaning to swim
ashore as soon as it was dark and try and
discover what sort of a country they had
come to.

But when night fell they could hear
the wild animals on shore roaring so terribly
that they were afraid to venture. However,
as they were short of water they were bound
to go ashore to find some.

They went therefore by day, and met
with no mishap, but found plenty of good
water and shot a hare, which furnished
them with a good meal.







CHAPTER II

S Robinson Crusoe had previously been
for a voyage to this coast he knew
that the Canary Islands and the Cape de
Verd Islands lay somewhere in this direction,
but he had no compass nor any other
nautical instruments to help him to steer
by and so he was obliged to trust more
or less to luck. He and Xury cruised about
in Southern regions for some weeks, landing
frequently for water and to shoot game.
They were afraid to venture on shore by
night for fear of wild animals, but one day
they saw a lion lying asleep upon a rock
and Crusoe fired at him, wounding him in
the leg. The great beast began to move
off slowly, but Crusoe fired again and shot
him in the head and saw him drop. He made
little noise, but just lay struggling for life.
Xury, who had previously been very
much frightened, now took heart and begged.
to be allowed to go ashore.







18 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

So Crusoe gave him leave and the boy
jumped into the water, carrying the gun
in one hand and paddling himself ashore
with the other, and going close up to the
creature he put the muzzle of his gun into
his ear and soon despatched him. They
skinned the great beast and dried the skin
in the sun, and it served Crusoe for a bed
folie on.

After this Crusoe and Xury sailed on
southwards, hoping they were nearing the
Cape de Verd, where they thought they
might meet with some European = ship
which would take them on board, for by
this time their provisions were beginning
to run short..

At length they came to land which
they knew to be inhabited, for they could
see negroes standing on the shore watching
them. They made signs to them that they
wished for food, and the negroes, who were
kindly and hospitable people, brought food,
and water in jars, and placed them on
the sea shore, then they retreated to a safe
distance and allowed Crusoe and Xury to



MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 19

land and take the provisions into the boat,
for they were as frightened of the men in
the boat as they were of them.

Before leaving that country Crusoe was
able to do the kind-hearted N€gQroes a service,
for two fierce leopards dashed down into
’ qur.|the midst of them,
an pes Jand Crusoe, raising
ol his musket to his
ie A Wj shoulder, fired and
: “"|succeeded in killing
one, when the other
promptly dashed away
in terror.

Crusoe having taken
a good store of food
and water on board
; Once more set sail,
and after a voyage of eleven days met
with a fresh adventure, for Xury, who was
at the helm, suddenly cried out: ‘Master,
a sail!”

Crusoe fired his musket to attract the
attention of the ship’s master,’ and presently
he was taken on board.



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20 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

The vessel proved to be a Portuguese
one, and fortunately for Crusoe, who spoke
no language but his own, there was a Scotch
sailor on board, to whom he told his story
and who translated it to the Portuguese
captain.

Crusoe was very kindly treated on this
ship, for although he offered all he had to
the captain as a return for his deliverance
the good fellow would accept nothing from
him, but insisted upon giving him a fair
price for his boat, his guns, and even for
poor black Xury, who was a slave and
could therefore be sold the same as the
rest of his master’s goods.

Crusoe was loth to part with him, but
Xury himself was quite content to go with
so kind a master as the Portuguese captain,
especially as he promised to set him at
liberty after ten years’ service.

They made a good voyage to the Brazils,
and when they came to port Crusoe bade
farewell to his kind deliverers and the boy
Xury and purchased a plantation with the
money he had received from the captain.



MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK ar

On this plantation he grew sugar canes
and tobacco, and prospered exceedingly, but
finding the work very trying he never ceased
to regret that he had parted with poor Xury.
. He wrote home to the widow woman .
with whom he had left his money and
asked her to invest £100 of it in suitable
wares, and to send them out to him. This
she did, and Robinson Crusoe traded with
them to such advantage that he became a
rich man and was able to have both black
and white servants to serve him.

He remained four years in the Brazils,
and whilst there learned to speak the language
fluently, so that he was able to converse
with his neighbours and recount to them
the experiences through which he had passed.

He told them of how he had visited
the Guinea coast and traded there with the
negroes, and how he had even bought and
sold the negroes themselves.

They listened attentively to his words
and at length persuaded him to fit out a
ship and take it to the Guinea coast to
get slaves for them.





22 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

Crusoe agreed to this on condition that
on his return he should receive a share of
the slaves for work on his plantation.

Alas! poor Crusoe, he little dreamt of
the misfortunes that were about to over-
take him.

He set sail on September 1, 1650,
on board a fine vessel, carrying a goodly
cargo of beads, glass, knives, scissors, hatchets
and such like goods, likely to attract the
negroes.

For the first twelve days the weather ©
was fine and warm; but after that it changed,
and they were overtaken by a fierce hurricane.
Whilst. this raged a man and a boy were
washed overboard and drowned, and every-
one on board thought their last hour had come.

The ship was so much damaged that
the captain changed his course, and steered
to the N.W. by W., hoping to reach some
of the English islands, where they might
obtain relief; but a second and a worse
storm overtook them and when they were
in sight of land the ship was driven upon
a sand bank. The wind raged and stormed



MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 23










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every moment the ship
would, go to pieces. With great difficulty
a boat was flung over the ship’s side, and
Crusoe and the rest of the ship’s crew got
into it and laboured hard to reach the shore.
After they had rowed about a league and
a half a raging wave, mountain-high, came
rolling over them, the boat was upset, and
everyone was soon struggling in the water.

Robinson Crusoe was a fine swimmer,
but it was impossible to swim in such a
sea. The waves carried him along towards
the shore, threatening to drag him back to
destruction as they retreated, but at length



24 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

he felt ground beneath his feet. Breathless
and half drowned he yet managed to struggle
to his feet and ran gasping towards the
main land. How thankful he was when
at length he sank down exhausted upon
green grass]

As soon as he had sufficiently recovered
he looked around him to see if any of
his companions had been as fortunate as
himself; but there was no sign of any one
of them.

Crusoe walked about a little to try and
discover what sort of an island he had
chanced upon, and to his joy discovered a
spring of fresh water. He took a good
draught, and having a box with a little
tobacco in it in his pocket he placed a
little of it in his mouth to allay the pangs
of hunger, climbed a tall tree, and, after
having cut himself a stout staff asa weapon
in case of need, he fell fast asleep and
slept as comfortably as though he had been
in a bed of down.

When he woke in the morning the
storm had abated and the sea had retreated



MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 25

so far that he found the ship was but a
short distance from the land.

He took off his clothes and swam out
to her, but it was no os
easy matter to get on CF
board, for she
aground and high
out of the water.
At length he saw
a rope hanging
over the side, and
by means of this
he was able to
haul himself on
board. To his
great joy he found
that little of the
ship’s goods were
damaged, and irs
having first par- |! ie EMS o Fe
taken of a hearty meal he decided to build
a raft upon which to convey all he required
ashore. .

He searched eagerly until he found the
carpenter's chest, which was a very valuable



















































































26 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

prize and worth more to him than a ship-
load of gold.

He built his raft of the broken masts
and spars, making them fast with ropes.

He filled some of the seamen’s chests
with food, clothing and ammunition, and
with great difficulty got them aboard the
raft. His next care was to convey the
carpenter's chest aboard it, and, having
taken care to provide himself with some
fowling-pieces and pistols, he decided that
his raft was sufficiently heavily freighted
and decided to make for the shore.



CHAPTER III

Ce had some trouble in getting his

craft safely ashore, for the only oars
upon the ship were broken, and so he could
not use them to row with. However, he
managed to guide his craft into the tidal
current of a river and so steer inland.
Several times the raft was all but- upset
and its cargo lost; but with great patience
and skill he succeeded in steering it into
a little cove and anchoring it there, until
at last the tide ebbed and left it high and
dry upon the mainland.

His next work was to view the country
round and choose the best place upon which
to build himself a hut, and so, taking a.
fowling-piece in his hand he climbed a
high hill. Alas! to his sorrow he found
himself to be upon a barren island, ap-
parently uninhabited except by wild animals.
He saw a great number of fowls, but as
he had never before seen any birds at all



28 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

like them he could not tell whether they
were fit for food or not. However, he shot
at a great bird, which he saw perched upon
a tree at the entrance to a wood, and brought
it down.

It soon became evident that no gun
had ever previously been fired in this desolate -
region, for an innumerable number of fowls
at once rose into the air screaming and
crying and seeming half dazed with fear.

The bird Crusoe had killed appeared
to be a kind of hawk—at least, its beak
and colour resembled one, but its talons
were short. It proved, however, to be unfit
for food and so he flung it away.

He then returned to his raft and fell
to work to bring his cargo on shore. This
took up the rest of the day. What to do
with himself at night he did not know,
for he was afraid. to lie down upon the
ground to rest lest some wild beast should
devour him. He found afterwards there
was no need for these fears. However, it
was necessary to prepare some place in
which to pass the night, and presently he



MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 39

arranged the seamen’s chests and the planks
he had brought from the ship in such a
way that he had a comfortable lodging for
the night.






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The next day he
decided to pay another
visit to the ship to
: bring away a number
of other things which he knew might be
useful to him. As the raft was heavy and
cumbersome he did not make use of it, but
stripped himself and swam out to the ship.



30 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

He built another raft, much lighter and
easier to manage, and this he loaded with
all sorts of Carpenter’s stores, nails, screws,
spikes, and so on. He brought away a
good store of shot and powder also, besides
sails, hammocks and bedding, and a vast
quantity of clothing.

Crusoe was a little anxious upon reaching
the shore as to whether his little hut might
have been molested during his absence; but
he found no sign of any visitors, only upon
one of the chests there sat a creature like
a wild cat. Crusoe threw it a morsel of:
biscuit which the cat ate, and then looked
at Crusoe as though asking for more; but
he was obliged to be Sparing of his food
and could give her none, so off she marched.

Day after day Robinson Crusoe boarded
the vessel, bringing away everything that
he could carry in the way of stores, ropes,
canvas, tools and knives, powder, Spirits,
and so on, and even a bag of money, for
which he knew he had no use whatever
in his present plight.

With the canvas and ropes he made



MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 31

himself a very comfortable tent and was
able to place all his powder and other
perishable goods under cover.

He had scarcely completed this work
when another storm arose and the ship
broke up in pieces.

Now that Crusoe had more leisure he
decided to look about him to see if he
could find a better place in which to build
himself a home, for his present abode was
too near the sea, and he had to fetch his
fresh water from some distance.

He wished to choose a spot which
would be healthy, sheltered, which could
be made secure against. the visits of either
man or beast, and which might also have
a good view of the sea, so that if any
ship chanced to come that way it might
not pass unnoticed. He found at length
just the place he wanted. It was a little
plain on the side of a rising hill, which
had such a steep front that nothing could
come down upon him from the top. At
‘the end of the plain was a rock partly
hollowed out, and before this rock he pitched



32 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

his tent. In front of it he drove in two
rows of strong stakes about five-and-a-half
feet high, and sharpened on the top. The
two rows were about six inches apart and
formed such a strong fence that he felt
sure neither man nor beast could get into
it or over it. There was no door in the
fence, but Crusoe entered his domain by
means of a short ladder, which he could
draw in after him. Into this fence, or for-
tress, he carried all the goods he had brought
from the wreck, and then he built a large tent
with tarpaulin, with another smaller tent
beneath it, so that he was quite snug and
comfortable and secure against all intrusion,

He then began to hollow out the rock
at the back of his tent, and in this way
he formed a sort of cellar in which he
might store the goods which might be spoilt
if a storm arose. His powder, which was
very precious to him, he divided into various
packets and hid in different places, which
he marked carefully, so that should one
portion be destroyed he would still have
some left, for he needed it for his guns,



MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY: BOOK 33

Every day he went out shooting. There -
were a quantity of goats upon the island,
and he sometimes shot one of them for

R ; food; there were also
a number of animals
resembling hares,
which were very good
to eat.

Crusoe was afraid
that alone upon this
desert island he might
lose count of time,
and so he made a
great cross and set
it up in front of his tent. Upon the cross
he carved the date of his landing upon the
island, — September 30th, 1659 — and he
cut a notch for every day; every seventh
day the notch was twice as long as. the
others, and this stood for Sunday.

There had been a dog and two cats
on board the ship. The two cats Crusoe
carried ashore, whilst the dog plunged into
the sea and swam after him, so that when
he had these animals with him in the tent

3





34 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

he was not quite so lonely. He had also
some Bibles, some books on navigation,
and a number of other books. Ink, too,
he had, and pens and paper, so that as
long as these lasted he was able to keep
a record of all that happened.

Crusoe next set to work to make himself
a table and a chair, so that he could sit at
his ease to take his meals and rest himself.

As time passed on Crusoe became more
or less used to his solitude. He knew the
best way to keep himself from brooding
too much over his forlorn state was to
keep himself busily employed. He there-
fore made up his mind to improve his
dwelling-place. He roofed in the tent and
made it into a more substantial house, put
up shelves and hooks, and made himself
various utensils.

He hollowed out the cave both to left
and right, and made a door at one end,
which led out into the open beyond his
palisade, so that there was no longer any
need for him to use a ladder whenever he
wished to leave home.



MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 35

He was able to carry all his stores
into the cave, and thus leave more room
in his own house, which he fitted up with



eo
every convenience he could manage to make
himself.
One thing he forgot, and that was
that when he hollowed out the cave he ought
Sie



36 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

to have put props to prevent the roof
falling in, and so one day a great quantity
of earth and rock fell down from the roof,
and Crusoe very narrowly escaped losing
his life.

It took him a very long time to clear
away the rubbish and to repair the damage,
but in the end he accomplished this safe-
ly and made everything neat and snug
about him.



CHAPTER IV

OBINSON CRUSOE had now been a

long time upon the island and so

was able to adapt himself more or less to
his sad circumstances.

One discovery he made was about the
climate. He found out that either the
weather was exceedingly dry or else ex-
ceedingly wet: there were not four seasons,
as with us, only two, the rainy season
and the dry season. |

During the rainy season poor Crusoe
suffered terribly from ague. He shivered
and shook, and was burning hot and then
icy cold, and felt so very ill that he was
sure he was about to die. However, he
did not die, and in due time the sun
shone again and he began to recover.

One day, when he was feeling quite
well again, he thought he would tidy
up his abode, and in so doing he came
across some empty bags which had con-



38 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

tained barley and rice for the chickens on
the ship. Thinking the bags would be useful,
Crusoe turned them inside out and shook
them to free them of the grains clinging
to the sacking.

Some time afterwards he was surprised
to find these grains had taken root and
sprung up. When the grain was ripe he
gathered the ears, dried them, and sowed
them again at the proper season, so that
in time he came to have quite large crops
of both rice and barley.

During one of the rainy seasons Crusoe
had a terrible fright. There was a great
rumbling and grumbling noise, and the
earth began to shake. The props he had
placed beneath the roof of his cave cracked
and gave way, and he was afraid the roof
was going to fall.

However, by degrees the earthquake,
for such it was, began to subside, and after
that a drenching rain fell which soaked
Crusoe to the skin, for he was afraid to
venture into his tent for some time lest
it should fall and he be buried beneath it.



MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 39

























A furious wind blew all the time and
huge rocks were hurled from the cliffs into
the sea. The fury of the waves broke up
the remaining portions of the wrecked ship
and a number of very useful things began
to be washed ashore, amongst them was
a barrel full of powder. He was very glad
of this, because he had tried to make
himself some barrels, and for want of fit-
ting tools and materials had not been able
to do so. The powder in the barrel had
been soaked with water and was caked and
hard, but Crusoe rolled the cask high up



4o MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

on the sand until he had time to remove
the powder.

One day he found a turtle on the
shore. This was the first he had found,
and until that day he had not known
these creatures inhabited that country. He
killed it, and then had a fine feast. for
the flesh of the animal was a great treat
to Crusoe, who had been living principally
upon goat's flesh and fish, which he broiled
upon the ashes of his fire.

There were a number of eggs with
the turtle, which Crusoe was also very
glad of, especially as he was just recovering
from a bad attack of ague. He roasted
some of the eggs in the ashes and found
them very good and nourishing.

But alas! during the whole of the
rainy season he was subject more or less
to fits of ague until he suddenly found
remedy to cure himself.

He remembered that the Portuguese
were wont to dose themselves with tobacco
for various ailments, and he went to one
of the chests in which he remembered to



MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 41

have placed some tobacco, to take it out.
He found it, and with it he found a Bible,
Which he took out and placed upon his.
table. He made a sort of infusion of the
tobacco by steeping it in rum, and after
several days dosing he cured himself of
the ague.

Then he began to study the Bible he
had found, and very soon in reading the
familiar words he began to think how wil-
ful and disobedient he had been both to-
wards God and his parents.

He reflected, too, from out of how
many perils God had delivered him and.
yet how ungrateful he had been for His
goodness. The words “All these things
have not brought thee to repentance,” seemed
to remain fixed in his mind, and when he
came to this text: “He is exalted a Prince.
and a Saviour, to give repentance and to
give remission,” he put down the Bible.
and for the first time in his life prayed
to God to give him true repentance, and
to make him a better man than he had,
been before.



42 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

From this time he found he was much
better able to bear his sad position, and
although he was so lonely and desolate he
was still able to thank God for all the
mercies left to him.

Robinson Crusoe had now been some
ten months upon the island, and all this
time he had found no signs of any human
being ever having visited it; he began, too,
to be certain that he would have to spend
the remainder of his life there.

His house being finished and made as
comfortable as he was able to make it,
he decided to explore the island more
thoroughly than he had been able as yet
to do.

IIe went up the little creek, where he
had first brought his rafts ashore, and
found that some two miles up the tide
ceased to flow and the water was fresh
and good. On the banks of the stream
were pleasant grass meadows in which
grew tobacco and other plants, the names
and uses of which Crusoe did not know.
He searched in vain for the cassava root,















































































































Mie

“a, Wy ee
, “a

Ling,



e 2
>>
=

T= =
a Bye

























































turism me be





44 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

of which the Indians make their bread.
He saw some sugar canes growing quite
wild and only needing cultivation to make
them perfect.

The next day he went the same way
again, but pushed farther on, and after he
had passed the meadows he came to a
more densely wooded country. Here he
found quantities of delicious fruits, grapes,
melons, etc., which made an_ acceptable
change of diet for him.

He decided that he would pluck a
number whilst they were still in perfection
and dry them in the sun so that he might
use them as we do raisins.

He spent his first night away from
his hut in this delightful place, passing
the night in the fork of a tree, as he
had done when first he was cast upon the
island. In the morning he again went for-
ward, and came at length to a most beauti-
ful valley, where he found fruit of all
kinds growing in great profusion.

There were cocoa-nut trees and limes,
oranges and citrons.



MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK - 45

Taking as large a load as he could
carry he turned his steps towards home,
but though the limes and lemons were all
right when he arrived there, most of the



grapes were spoilt, owing to the richness
of the fruit and the weight of the juice.
The following day Robinson Crusoe
made another expedition to the fruitful side
of the island. This time he plucked a



46 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

large quantity of grapes and hung them
from the branches of the trees so that they
might dry in the sun, and he filled as
many sacks as he could carry with limes
and lemons and took them home with
him, for he knew the juice of these fruits
was very wholesome.

He thought a good deal about this
beautiful spot and wished he had made
his home there, in the midst of so much
vegetation, but as his first home was very
neat and compact he decided that he would
leave it as it was, and build: thimseli 2
second little house, where he could stay
when he felt so inclined.



CHAPTER V

‘RRUSOE worked hard to build his bower
or seaside house, and when he had
finished it he made a double fence around
it. The fence was made of strong stakes,
which he cut from trees growing in the
neighbourhood, and the spaces between the
stakes he filled with brushwood. He made
no gate, but entered and left his new
domain by means of a ladder.

By the time he had finished this new
habitation the rainy season had set in, and
so he retreated to his first abode, which
was much more sheltered than the little
bower in the fruitful valley.

The grapes he had hung upon the
trees were perfectly dry and very excellent
in taste, so these he took with him into
his hut.

Crusoe had been much concerned at
the loss of one of his cats, when one day
to his surprise and joy she walked into



48 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

the hut followed by three pretty little
kittens.

During the rainy season Crusoe could

Z73 not venture much
abroad, and only went
out when forced by
hunger to supply some
food, he would then
shoot a goat or kill
a turtle and bring
them home. His meals
at that time were as
= ~ follows:—a bunch of
raisins for breakfast,
some goat’s flesh, or
turtle, for dinner,
s, for he had no pot
in which to boil food, and two or three
turtle eggs for supper.

Whilst Robinson Crusoe was kept shut
up in his hut, on account of the rain, he
thought he might as well pass the long
hours away by making alterations and
improvements to his dwelling-place and the
cave behind it. He worked with a will





MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 49

for many hours daily, and by the time
the rainy season came to an end, every-
thing was in a fairly good habitable
condition. Only the door which he had
made at the end of jthe cave, so that
he should have another way out, caused .
him a little anxiety. He was nervous
lest some wild animal should come and
claw it down; but he told himself his fears
must be vain, for so far the biggest crea-
ture he had seen upon the island was
a goat.

When the dry season at length set in
and Crusoe was able to visit his summer
residence, as he called the little bower in the
fruitful valley, he found the stakes of which
he had built his fence had budded and
thrown out long shoots, which he cut off
and determined to make into baskets.

He had long needed something of the
kind in which to carry fruit, grain, and
so on, and with a very little practice he
succeeded in making some neat and service-
able wicker-work utensils.

The fence around his summer house

4



50 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

proved such an effective screen that he
determined to set up a similar one around
the hut and cave.

This he did, and very safely entrenched
he felt when this was completed.

Robinson Crusoe had long wished to
make a thorough examination of his island,
and as he had no very urgent work on
hand just then, he resolved to travel in-
land across it to the seashore on the other
side, as previously he had only travelled
along the coast.

He armed himself with his gun and
hatchet, took his dog with him, also a
larger supply of powder and shot than he
usually carried, provisioned himself with
biscuits and dried raisins, and set out upon
his journey. As he reached higher land,
the day being very clear, he could see,
far across the sea, the faint but distinct
outline of another coast. Whether it was
the coast of America, or merely another
island, he could not tell; also he felt afraid
that it might perchance be inhabited by
Savages, or even cannibals.



MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK "51

But although he was uncertain as to
what the land might be, the very sight of
it set him longing to get away. ,

He turned away from the sea and
began to walk forward in leisurely fashion.
He found that side of the island much
pleasanter than the one upon which he had
fixed his permanent abode. The fields were
very sweet to see, with quantities of flowers
and tall waving grass. There were a great
many parrots flying about, and Crusoe
thought to himself how nice it would be
if he could catch one, so that he could
train it to talk to him. But the birds
were very shy, and it was a long time before
he could get near one.

However, he crept stealthily along beneath
the branches of the trees until he saw a
young bird, and this he succeeded in
knocking over with his stick.

It was only stunned, and Crusoe picked
it up and afterwards carried it~ home with
him, and, by dint of very great patience, he
succeeded in teaching it to talk.

It learned first to say “Poll,” and

4°



52 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

afterwards to call Crusoe by name. These
were the first spoken words the poor cast-
away had heard since his shipmates had
all been drowned.

From the time Crusoe had caught sight
of the country across the water he never
ceased thinking of how he could reach it.
He remembered that one.of the ship’s boats
had been cast upon shore and went to
examine it; but although he worked hard
repairing the boat, when his work was
finished he could not move it, it was too
heavy for his unaided efforts.

But he would not despair, and next
set to work to build a boat for himself.

With the greatest difficulty he at length
succeeded in chopping down a tree, and
this he proceeded to hollow out in the
same manner as the Indians hollow out
their canoes—namely, by burning the inside
and leaving the outer shell.

All this took him a very long time,
for, of course, he had other work to see
to as well.

One day, when he was out, his dog







54 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

surprised and seized a young kid. Crusoe
took it away from the dog before he had
harmed it, and fastened it up, and in a
very short time he succeeded in taming it,
when he added it to the number of his
household pets.

Crusoe, as I have previously told you,
had planted some barley and rice seeds.
He very soon found that if he wished to
preserve his crops he must do something
to prevent the wild goats and birds from
devouring it all.

To keep out four-footed robbers he
built a stout fence around the patches of
land where he had planted his seeds, and
having shot a number of the birds he
hung their bodies about the fields, and the
rest of the birds flew away in terror.

When Robinson Crusoe succeeded in
gathering sufficient grain from his barley
and rice crops, he did not know how to
grind it so that he might have flour to
make bread. At length he made a sort of
mill by hollowing out a hard piece of
wood, placing the barley corns in the hollow,



MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 55

and then pounding them with a_ heavy
club of wood. |

He had flour then it is true, but how
was he to bake his bread? For a very —
long time he had wished for pots and pans
in which he could boil food for himself
instead of always roasting it on the ashes
of his fire.

He now looked about for some clay,
and, having found some suitable to his
purpose, he fashioned a number of pots
and pipkins, baked them in the sun, and
tried to use them for cooking, but they
were not waterproof and soon crumbled
up. However, he found that a portion of
one of the pots which had fallen into the
fire had burnt as hard and as red as a
tile, so he then set to work to fashion
some more jars and to build his fire up
in such a way that he could SHES the clay
until it became fireproof.

He succeeded so well that he soon
had as many pots and jars as he required.
He fashioned also a kind of oven of clay,
by making a shallow sort of basin.



56 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

Having tiled his hearth he lighted a
fire upon it, and when the tiles were hot
he made his bread, placed it upon the hot
tiles, put the shallow basin over it, and
heaped fire around it. In this way the
bread was baked as well as though it had
been in the best oven in the world” time Crusoe came to be quite 2 S00
pastrycook, and made cakes and puddings
with his rice.









: ST
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abut”
. Ss WN NE
Bee < ee aww ig

..o es)
SS ee ‘gee
Cares
\ 1a]

CHAPTER VI

OBINSOXN, CRUSOE had worked hard
for four months hollowing out the tree
trunk to make his new boat. He finished
it with great care and skill, and when at
length it was all complete it was quite
large enough to have carried six-and-twenty
men, and consequently would have taken
Crusoe and all his cargo easily.
There was nothing left then but to
get it launched; but, try as he would, he
could not move it. He dug all around it,



58 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

and made a sort of canal down to the sea,
but it was not deep enough, and when he
reckoned up the time it would take him
to make a sufficiently deep channel to float
the boat he found it would be at least
ten or twelve years, and so he gave up
in despair.

It was a great grief to poor Crusoe
to be obliged to abandon all hope of sail-
ing away from his desert island, but he
tried to comfort himself by thinking how
much worse off he might have been had he
not been able to save so many useful
things from the wreck.

By this time Robinson Crusoe had
been four years upon his island and, as
you may think, his clothes were getting a
good deal the worse for wear. He had
had a fairly good supply, because the sea-
men’s chests which he had brought ashore
had been partly filled with shirts and socks
and other clothing.

Sometimes he had been afraid that
clothing would fail him altogether. He
knew quite well that he could not go naked,



MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 59

as the savages do, for the sun was so hot
that it blistered his skin, even through his
clothing.

When he was reduced almost to rags
he determined to make some clothes for
himself. He had saved the skins of all
the goats and hares he had killed, and
had cured them in the sun, and with these
skins he set to work to make himself a.
suit of clothes.

First he made a great cap for his
head. It was pointed and had the shaggy
goat hair on the outside. Next he made
himself a waistcoat and a pair of breeches,
all of them with shaggy hair outside. They
were very loose, because he wanted them
more to keep off the heat of the sun than
for warmth, and they were rather strange-
looking garments it is true, but they were
very serviceable, and it was with no little
pride that Crusoe put on the first suit of
clothes he had ever made.

After he had finished the clothing he
made for himself a great umbrella, which
would open and shut. It was a very diffi-



60 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

cult thing to do, for, though he could have
made an open one quite easily, he knew
it would be very inconvenient if he could
not close it too.

It was indeed a strange-looking umbrella,
but the thick goat skin of which it was
made served him in the wet weather to
keep off the rain, and in the hot weather
to keep off the sun: nothing could pene-
trate the thick goats’ hair.

For the next five years nothing very
extraordinary happened to Robinson Crusoe.
He passed his time chiefly in planting and
reaping barley and rice and curing his
raisins and attending to his animals.

You would have thought he had had
enough of boat building when his eyes
rested, as they often did, upon the great
boat he had made and which lay rotting
in the sun, but he determined at length
to make a small one, which, though it
would not serve him to escape to the main
land, would yet be of use in taking him
round the coast, from one part of the
island to another.



MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 61

When the boat was finished he fixed
a mast on her and made a sail of some
of the canvas from the wrecked ship's sails.
He had a paddle to steer with, and he fixed
his big umbrella at the stern of the boat to
serve instead of an awning to keep off the



sun rays. Then he began his voyage round
the island. He took with him a goodly
store of provisions, his gun and some
powder, and two coats to serve him for

a bed.
At first all went well, but at length



62 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

he came to a ledge of rock with a sand
bank beyond it, and he was obliged to go
a great way out to sea in order to get
round it. He had landed on first per-
ceiving this hindrance, for the wind was
blowing hard and he did not care to be
so far out at sea in a gale of wind.

However, when the wind abated he set
off again, but he was very soon caught in
a current, and, paddle as he might, he found
himself being carried farther and farther
out to sea. The wind had dropped, and it
was useless therefore to hoist his sail, and
as he felt himself drifting farther and
farther from the shore Robinson Crusoe
gave himself up for lost.

Often and often he had felt he hated
the very sight of the desert island upon
which he had been cast, but now that he
felt he might never see it again, but perish
miserably of starvation, drifting and drifting
day after day upon the pitiless sea, he
stretched his hands towards the spot that
had been his home for so long and asked
God to help him.



MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 63

Just then a puff of wind blew upon
his cheek, and in about half an hour’s time
it blew a gentle gale. Crusoe hoisted his



sail and was carried along rapidly out of
the current which had been bearing him
out to sea, and into a strong eddy which



64 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

ran back towards the coast. He felt as
though he had been a man reprieved from
death.

After sailing many and many a mile
he came ashore at length on the far side
of the point which he had tried to round
in the morning.

No sooner had he beached his boat
than he fell upon his knees and thanked
God for his safe deliverance. Then he
refreshed himself with the food he had
with him, and then lay down and_ fell
fast asleep.

When he awoke in the morning he
was greatly perplexed as to how he should
take his boat home again, for he was
afraid lest he might be again caught in
the current which had well nigh swept him
out to sea. He got into his boat and
coasted along the shore in a westwardly
direction, until he came to a little bay,
where he landed, fastened up the boat and
set out on foot, carrying nothing but his
gun in his hand.

He soon recognised the place as one







MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK — 65

he had visited on foot, and before very
long he reached the little hut which he
called his country house. He climbed over
the fence by the ladder and, being very
weary, he soon fell fast asleep. What was
his surprise when he was awakened by
hearing his name called over and over
again—“ Robinson Crusoe, Robinson Crusoe.”

He started up in alarm, and looked
around him, and very soon he saw, perched
on the tree above him, the parrot which
he had tamed and taught to call him by |
name. It had followed him all the way
from his home on the other side of the
island.

When he set out for his other home
he carried Poll with him, and very glad
he was to reach home again safely, even
though he had to leave behind him the
boat which had cost him so much time
and trouble to make.

He did not leave his own side of the
island again for some time; but amused
himself with his daily occupations. He had
been afraid to use his powder and shot

5



66 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

too often, in case he might run short, and
so, instead of shooting a wild goat when he
wanted food, he had set traps and taken
a number alive. These he kept in fenced
meadows, in the same way that our farmers
keep sheep, and he never had any lack of
meat, or milk, for goats yield very good
milk, which Crusoe was glad to have both
to drink and to make into butter and
cheese.



CHAPTER VII

F you could have seen Robinson Crusoe
at this time you would have thought
him a strange figure. Clad all in goat
skins, and with his queer peaked hat upon
his head, and soft leather buskins on his
feet, a goatskin umbrella over his head,
and a basket upon his back, he was al-
together unlike any other person. He had
both scissors and knives and so he kept
his beard neatly trimmed, but grew his
moustache to a great length, and this gave
him a somewhat fierce expression.

For a very long time Crusoe did not
attempt to go near the little canoe he had
built, for he was afraid to sail it round
past the current, which had so _ nearly
wrecked him. When at length he did visit
it he found that the current only existed
at certain times and was dependent on the
ebb and flow of the tide.

However, he was afraid to venture very

5



68 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

far in the canoe after the terrible experience
he had had before, and decided to keep it
for his use when at his summer residence,
and to build another for his use at the
winter hut.

As I told you, the fences around both
his huts had budded and grown into
sheltering trees, the fences too around his
grain fields and goat enclosures had like-
wise grown very thick and dense, and no
one landing upon the island would have
guessed at first sight that they were other
than ordinary clumps of trees. One day
Crusoe was on his way down to the little
creek where he kept his boat, meaning to
take a voyage, when what was his surprise
to see upon the sand the print of a man’s
naked foot.

He stood a moment as though thunder-
struck. It was not the print of his own
foot, for he wore his leather buskins, and
this print showed the impression of the
toes and heel perfectly.

He listened eagerly; but heard nothing,
and then turned and fled for safety to his



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TN
Ug

fj
(PM
Mn

fs / Wy}
g ey Lt ns
yyy» a oi

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t ’ maT

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70 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

castle, as he ever afterwards called his
larger and better protected home.

For three whole days and _ nights
Robinson Crusoe did not venture to stir
from his castle, and not a wink did
he sleep at night, so terrified was he
that some savages might break through
his fortifications and murder him as he
slept.

But at length the pangs of hunger
caused him to venture abroad, for he chanced
to have very little food in the hut with
him.

Then he remembered the goats which
he had penned up and which depended
upon him for food and attention, and so
he came out, and to his surprise found
everything just as usual.

So he went about his work and when
nothing happened he began to imagine he
must have made a mistake. However, he
strengthened his fence and added to it
another outer one which took root and in
a few years’ time hid all trace of his
dwelling-place.



MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 71

He made the fence very thick and
strong from within and made little loopholes
with platforms behind them, upon which
he rested his seven muskets, as though
they had been cannons.

He planted numbers of young trees,
too, which in time grew up and formed
a thick wood, and he made a different
entrance to the cave behind his hut. By
means of a couple of ladders he could
scale the rock, draw the ladders up after
him and drop down within his fence.
Whenever he walked abroad now he went
armed with musket, cutlass, and a couple
of pistols, and as time passed on he began
to feel quite safe again and to feel more
and more certain that he had made a
mistake.

One day when Crusoe was wandering
about the island he chanced to look out
to sea and saw, as he thought, a _ boat
upon the water, a great distance off.

In one of the seamen’s chests he had
found ‘a telescope, and he fetched this and
took a long, long look out to sea; but he



73 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

could not be sure whether it was a boat
or no. However, he decided that from this
time he would add the telescope to the
other things without which he never stirred
abroad.

When he came down from the high
point upon which he was standing he
strolled down to the beach and was per-
fectly horrified to see the shore spread with
skulls, hands, feet and other remains of
human bodies.

He saw, too, the place where a great
fire had been lighted, and a circle dug in
the earth, where some horrible creatures
had feasted: on human bodies.

It was all too plain what had happened.
A number of cannibals had evidently landed
there and then had killed and eaten their
prisoners.

Crusoe turned sick with horror, and
left the spot, determining that he would
never go near it again.

For nearly two years he never did,
and for the best part of that time he was
trying to decide how he could possibly



MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 73

destroy the dreadful cannibals if ever they
should have occasion to visit the island
again.

He devised many plans, amongst others
he thought of digging a hole, putting five
or six pounds of powder in it, in the hope
that if they kindled a fire above the spot



the powder would explode and they would
all be blown to pieces.

But, as Crusoe could ill afford to
waste so much powder, and there was but
a very slight chance they would light a
fire at the spot he chose, he decided to
abandon this idea.



74 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

He next looked out for a convenient
spot in which he might hide himself, and
found a huge hollow tree, which was suff-
ciently large to take him and his weapons,
and from which spot he would have a
good view of the cannibals at their feast.
He thought that with the aid of two mus-
kets and his pistols he would be able to
kill a great number of them, they being
unprepared for his attack.

After- he had laid his plans he used
to patrol the coast every day, and every
day he mounted to the top of a hill, about
three miles from his castle, as he called
it, and seating himself there he would take
a survey with his telescope to see if he
could distinguish any boats or canoes upon
the sea.

But as time passed on and nothing
happened he began to grow a little tired
of these elaborate preparations, for never
by any chance did he see a boat sailing
upon the water, and never was there
any sign of any savages again visiting the

island.



MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 75

Moreover, he persuaded himself that
the whole affair was no business of his.
It was the custom of these savages to
devour their prisoners, and as they knew
no better he thought it would perhaps
be wrong to punish too severely those
who erred through no fault of their own.
Then, too, supposing he did not succeed
in killing them all, if one escaped might
he not go back to the mainland and
return with large numbers of others to
murder him in revenge?

He decided that it would be wiser
to keep away from that part of the island
altogether. He took his boat away to the
east end of the island, where he thought the
savages would not be likely to land, on
account of the strong current, and moored
her safely under the shelter of some tall
rocks.

He kept to the shelter of his two
huts and seldom went any distance from
them.

He refrained from firing his gun more
than absolutely necessary, and he was



76 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

chary about even lighting a fire by day,
as smoke can be seen from a great
distance. He used to Heht ‘his tre at
night, or else go to a deep “valley 20
light one.

After a time he made some charcoal
and used that to cook his food by, be-
cause charcoal fires make no smoke.



CHAPTER VIII

N€ day when Robinson Crusoe was hard
at work cutting down the branches of
some trees in order to burn them and
make charcoal of them, he chanced to
move aside some brushwood and found it
hid the opening to a cave or passage of
some sort.

He stooped down and crawled in
through the opening, but was soon out
again, for he saw what looked like two
livid coals glaring at him from the dark-
ness; also he could hear low groans and
mutterings in some unknown guttural
language.

But out in the open he was ashamed
of his cowardly fears, so he took a lighted
torch in his hand and once more ventured
to explore the passage.

He had not gone three steps before
he was almost as frightened as before, for
he heard a loud sigh, like that of a man





78 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

in pain, and it was followed by a broken
noise, as of words half expressed, and then
came another deep sigh. He stepped back
so terrified that his hair rose from his
head; but once more he plucked up heart,
telling himself that he ought to be ashamed
of such cowardly fears, and that at any
rate it was better to know the worst and
have done with it, so stepping forward he
raised the torch above his head and by
the light of it he could dimly see a large
white form stretched full length upon the
ground.

He stooped over it and saw—why,
just this: a big he-goat stretched at his
length and apparently dying of old age.

Crusoe stirred him with his foot to
‘see if he could get him out of the cave,
but the old creature was unable to move,
and so he left him lying there to end his
days in peace.

Having examined the cave, he found
that it was but a small one, but had a
narrow opening at the far end through
which he did not venture to pass, as



MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 79

it was very low and he had no candle
with him.

I must tell you that Robinson Crusoe
had some very good candles, which he
made himself of goats’ tallow. He was
often hard put to it to find wicks for the
candles, but he used rags, rope-yarn, and
sometimes a dried weed, something like a
nettle.

The following day Crusoe again went
to the cave with a plentiful supply of
candles and a tinder box. He crawled
through the inner opening and came at
length into another cave, which was about
twenty feet high and which was most
beautiful to behold, for when he had lighted
his candles he saw that the walls and roof
sparkled and shone like gold and diamonds.
The floor was dry and level and covered
with a sort of loose gravel, and Crusoe
was delighted for he knew that he had at
length found a really safe hiding-place in
case of danger threatening him.

The only drawback was the narrow
opening, and that was scarcely to be called



80 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

a drawback, for should any number of
savages discover his whereabouts they could
only enter one at a time, and the entrance
could therefore easily be defended by one
man.

Into this cave Crusoe carried most of
his powder and bullets, and left it there
with his spare muskets.

The poor old goat, which had so
frightened Crusoe, died very soon of old
age, and so he dug a deep hole close by
where the animal lay and buried him in
it, covering him well over with earth.

In the month of December, twenty-
three years after Robinson Crusoe had been
cast upon the island, he chanced to have
risen very early in the morning, as it was
harvest time with him, and no sooner had
he left his castle than he noticed the light
of a large fire burning some two miles
off, towards the end of the island.

Crusoe knew very well that it meant
‘the cannibals had come to visit his island
once more, and he was very much afraid.
He went back to his castle at once, pulling



MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 81

the ladder up after him, and prepared to
defend himself to the last gasp and sell
his life dearly.

But after he had waited a long time



without anything happening, he ventured

out, and, climbing to the top of a rock, he

saw about nine savages dancing round a

big fire and evidently making a great feast.
6



8a MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

Their canoes had been hauled ashore,
and presently, when the tide rose, they
pushed out their boats, jumped into them
and paddled away.

As soon as he saw they were really
gone he ventured down to the shore where
they had been and there he saw a most
horrible sight, for the sand was strewn
with human remains and was all stained
with blood.

This horrible sight so roused Robinson
Crusoe’s anger that he determined, if ever
the savages again came to the island, he
would attack them, no matter how many
there might be.

Months passed by and still no savages
came, but one morning in the month of
May a great storm arose, and as Robinson
sat in his castle reading his Bible, and
listening to the wind and rain howling
and raging around him, he suddenly heard
the sound of a gun fired out at sea, and
guessed that at length a ship had come
to visit the island, either by design or
driven there by stress of weather.



MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 83

He hastened out, and, climbing to the
top of a hill, soon succeeded in getting a
blazing fire burning. His heart beat high
with joy to think that soon he might meet
with some white men who would deliver
him from his desolate island. No sooner
did the fire blaze up than the guns from
the ship began to boom out once more,
but Crusoe could do nothing to help the
poor souls on board, and when at length
the morning dawned and the thick mist
cleared away, he saw the vessel plainly,
but she was a wreck and was stuck fast
upon a reef.

For some time he was afraid to ven-
ture out to the wreck, for she lay just
where the current had been that had once
nearly whirled him out to sea, but he
longed very much to know whether any of
the crew had been saved.

This he never knew for certain, but
certainly no living soul from the wreck
ever came ashore at the island.

A few days after the storm a boy’s

body was washed ashore. It was impos-
6*



84 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

sible to tell to what nation he belonged,
for he had few clothes on him, and in
his pockets were but two gold pieces and
a tobacco pipe. The latter Robinson Crusoe
valued far beyond the gold.

As soon as the weather was quite calm
Crusoe determined to venture out to the
wreck, for he still hoped that there might
be some living soul on board of it.

He provisioned his boat, and taking
a compass with him set out. At first he
was afraid that he would get into the cur-
rent and be swept out to sea, and his
heart failed him, so that he came ashore
after paddling a short distance along the
coast, but the following day he started
again, and presently came safely to the
wreck.

It was a dismal sight to see, for the
ship, which was evidently a Spanish one,
was jammed between two rocks, and the
stern and quarter were beaten to pieces by
the sea. |

On coming close to the wreck he saw
a dog which yelped pitifully when it saw



MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 85




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Crusoe. He called to it, and it jumped
overboard and scrambled into the boat.

Crusoe gave the poor starved creature
some food and water, which it eat and
drank ravenously.

After this Crusoe boarded the ship
and saw two men lying in the cook’s
galley and quite dead. He saw no sign
of any other person, and he soon found
that the dog was the only living creature
left.



86 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

He carried on board his boat a couple
of sea-chests, a quantity of various kinds
of liquor, some copper and brass kettles
and pans, a fire shovel and tongs and a
grid-iron, and then, taking the dog with
him, he sailed towards land, and succeeded
in carrying these things safely ashore.



CHAPTER Ix

RUSOE was very glad to have another

dog, for the one he had first brought

ashore with him had long since been
dead.

There were many things in the sea-
men’s chests which were of great use to
him, linen shirts and handkerchiefs, coloured
neckcloths, and some shoes and _ stockings.
Besides these things he had found a quan-
tity of spirits and sweetmeats, also money,
this latter being of very little use to him
in his present abode.

He stored it away, however, in his
cave, together with all the other things he
saved from the wreck.

Having brought all these things ashore
and stowed them safely away, he went back
to his boat and paddled it along the shore
until he came to the little cove he called
his harbour, where he left it and returned
to his home. | :



83 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

He found everything quite safe, and,
as usual, his family very glad to welcome
him back.

Could you have taken a peep at
Crusoe at meal times, or when he was
taking his ease, you would have seen him
surrounded by his family, as he called his
pet animals. The dog he had rescued from
the wreck sat close beside him at his right
hand, a couple of cats sat upon the table,
purring aloud with pleasure and content,
and Poll, the parrot, upon her perch called
him by name or screamed the names of
his other pets, or told him conceitedly
what a pretty bird she was. Poor lonely
Crusoe was only too glad to make com-
panions of his pets.

It had been a terrible disappointment
to Crusoe that he had not been able to
rescue a single living man from the Spanish
ship, and the sight of the poor dead white
men had set him longing more than ever
to meet with fellow creatures once again,
and he made up his mind that if ever
the cannibals came to his island again



MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 89

he would try and rescue one of their
prisoners, in the hope that he might then
have someone to help him to escape from
the island.

He thought so much about this that
one night he had a dream about it. He
thought he saw two canoes glide up to
the shore with eleven savages in them,
and that they had with them another
savage whom they were going to kill and
eat, when the prisoner suddenly jumped
up and ran for his life towards Crusoe,
who showed him where to hide himself.
He dreamt that the savages could not
find their prisoner and that he became
Crusoe’s servant and helped him to get
away to the mainland.

Robinson Crusoe felt quite happy when
he awoke, for he had a feeling that his
dream would come true, but a year and
a half passed away before there was any
sign of savages upon the island.

Then one morning he found they had
come at last, and in numbers too, for he
saw five canoes, all on the shore together.



go MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

He felt afraid to attack such a large party,
as he knew there must be, and retreated
to his castle; but after a time he felt he
must know what was going on, and, placing
his guns at the foot of his ladder, clam-
bered up it and took a peep.

He saw about thirty savages dancing
round a fire and guessed they were about
to partake of one of their horrible feasts.
Even as he watched he saw two miserable
wretches dragged from the boats: one was
immediately knocked down by a_ wooden
club, and whilst the dreadful creatures were
busy about this victim the other was left
standing by himself until they should be
ready for him.

He was unbound, and must suddenly
have made up his mind to make an effort
to escape. He started away from his cap-
tors and ran with incredible swiftness along
the sands, straight im the ‘dinectron: o7
Robinson Crusoe.

To Crusoe’s surprise and relief only
three savages started in pursuit, and these
their prisoner began quickly to outstrip.



MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK gI

Between Crusoe’s castle and the savages
there stretched a little creek, but the escap-
ing savage made nothing of it, as, plung-
ing in, he was soon safely landed on the
other side. It then became evident that
only two of his pursuers could swim, for



though two followed, one remained behind
standing on the brink of the water.
Seeing how the prisoner was gaining
ground Crusoe thought to himself that
now was the time to secure a servant for
himself. He hurried down his ladder and



92 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

ran .as fast as hé* could) and “by 2 snom
cut, so as to place himself between pur-
suers and pursued, at the same time
calling out to the man to stop. At first
the poor creature was almost as frightened
of Crusoe as he was of the savages, but
when he saw him knock down one of his
enemies with the butt-end of his rifle, he
decided that he must be a friend.

Crusoe was loth to fire, lest the other
savages should hear the report, but as the
second black man had a bow and arrows
and was about to let fly a shaft, he was
forced to shoot him.

The poor fellow whom Crusoe had
saved now came crawling on hands and
knees towards him, and when he reached
his feet he first kissed the ground and
then placed one of Crusoe’s feet upon his
neck, in token that Crusoe was his master
and he his slave.

The savage whom Crusoe had knocked
down was beginning to come to his senses,
and Crusoe pointed to him, and his new
slave made a motion towards the sword



MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 93

which Crusoe wore in the belt at his side.
He gave the man the sword and he ran
towards his fallen enemy and cut off his
head at one blow. After that he made a
sign that he would bury the two dead
foes in the sand, so that the others should
not see them, and this he did very rapidly
and neatly.

Although he could not understand what
he said Crusoe was very thankful to hear
him speak, for his was the first man’s
voice he had heard for twenty-five years.

Crusoe did not take him to his castle;
he thought it would be safer to go and
hide in the cave. As soon as they arrived
there he gave the man some bread and a
bunch of raisins and a draught of fresh
water, which he needed badly after his.
long, exhausting race.

Then Crusoe showed him some rice
straw and made a sign to him that he
should lie down and sleep. This he did,
but in about half an hour’s time he awoke
and came out of the cave to Crusoe, who
was milking his goats.



94 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

He was a pleasant-looking fellow, with
long, straight black hair, and seemed to
be about twenty-six years of age. He
made every sign he could to express his
gratitude to his master, and again knelt
down and placed Crusoe’s foot upon his
neck,

Crusoe then gave him some of the
goats) milk and a cake of bread, which
he eat with great relish.

The two men stayed that night at the
cave and in the morning Crusoe led him
towards his castle, meaning to get some
clothes for him, as he was quite naked.

There was no sign anywhere of the
savages or their canoes, and so Crusoe
came to the conclusion that they must
have left the island, not even caring to
find out what had become of their two
companions.

However, he was very cautious, and
before going to the place where the canni-
bals had feasted, he armed his servant
with his own sword, the bow and the
arrows and a musket, and, carrying a



MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 95

couple of muskets himself, he approached
the spot. The cannibals had _ evidently
departed, but the ghastly human remains
which they had left behind turned Crusoe
sick. He made his man light a large fire



and burned the skulls and bones that
he saw.

The previous day had been a Friday,
and so he decided to name his servant
after the day on which he had _ been
rescued.



96 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

Friday soon learnt his own name and
also to call Robinson Crusoe “Master.”
He was very quick to learn, and in a few
days knew the difference between ‘‘yes” and
“no” and other simple words. One thing
he did not learn so quickly, and that was
to wear clothes. He was very proud of
them it is true, but he was so unused to
wearing any clothing whatever that at
first they galled him terribly. But in the
end he became used to them and would
not have gone without them.



CHAPTER X > =

T first Robinson Crusoe was _ half

afraid to trust Friday, and therefore
built a little sleeping-place for him, which
he strongly barricaded at night so that
the young man could not steal upon him
unawares.

He need have had no fear, for Friday
proved to be absolutely trustworthy, and
a loving and devoted servant. He was a
clever fellow, too, and learned to speak
English very quickly, and also learned the
use of the English tools, which he had
never previously seen, and assisted his
master greatly in all that he did.

The thing that he most disliked was
Crusoe’s gun, for he could not but believe
that there was some evil spirit in it which
spat fire and killed people. But in time
he even became used to this, and learned
to shoot with it.



Full Text


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Re-told for the Liffle Gnes
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Jl2y Robinson Crusoe Story Book’
CHAPTER I

OBINSON CRUSOE was born in the
Te 1632 in the city of York. His
parents were well-to-do folks and intended
their son to become a lawyer, but young
Robinson was of a roving disposition, and
longed to be a sailor and visit foreign lands.
His father and mother talked to him very
seriously, warning him of the terrible fate
that would surely overtake him if he left
his comfortable home and the friends who
loved him, and they reminded him that his
elder brother who had gone away to fight
in Flanders had never returned, for he had
met his death in a battle against the
Spaniards. What became of Robinson’s:
second brother no one ever knew.

However, the sad fate of his two brothers
had little effect upon him, and he never
ceased to urge both his father and mother
8 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

to allow him to seek his fortune abroad.
His mother reproached him bitterly for his
ingratitude towards them, and his father
sighed and shook his head sadly, saying:
“That boy might be happy if he would
stay at home; but if he goes abroad, he
will be the most miserable wretch that ever
was born: I can give no consent to it.”
Well, Robinson Crusoe appeared to take
his father’s words to heart for a time, but
at the end of a year he had forgotten all
that had been said to him, and as soon as
an opportunity occurred he ran away to sea.
A companion of Crusoe’s was sailing
from Hull to London, and it seemed to the
youth too good an opportunity to be missed,
and so he set sail with him, without sending
any message whatever to his parents.
Scarcely had the ship left the Humber
than the wind began to blow and the sea
to rise, and Crusoe began to wish he had
never gone to sea, and to remember all his
father had said would happen to him. He
made up his mind if ever he reached the
shore in safety he would go straight home
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 9

and never leave his parents again. But no
sooner did the weather clear up than he
forgot all his good resolutions. His companion,
who had been to sea before, and was used
to rough weather, clapped him on the shoulder

SB -



and bade him take heart, and Crusoe joined
with him in making merry, and laughing
at his late fears.

Six days after he had set sail the ship
came into Yarmouth Roads, and there they
10 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

were for a time becalmed, for in those days
all the ships were sailing vessels and depended
on wind and weather. When the wind came
at length, it blew a hurricane. Poor Crusoe
was terrified, and even the captain and sailors
acknowledged they had never seen worse
weather.

Still the storm increased, and, although
Crusoe and everyone else on board laboured
hard to save their ship, it soon became
apparent that the vessel was doomed.

The captain ordered guns to be fired
as signals of distress, and presently a boat
from another ship was lowered and came
to their aid, and Crusoe and his companions
managed, with great difficulty, to get on-
board, and were rowed ashore. Long before
they came to land the vessel they had left
sank before their eyes.

You would have thought this would
have been a lesson to the young man; but
instead of repenting he made up his mind
to go to London and seek there for further
adventures. As he had some money in his
pockets he travelled thither by land, and
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK II

very soon met with a ship's captain, who
invited him to accompany him to the coast
of Guinea, promising to take him there
free of charge, and giving him every
Opportunity of trading with the natives,
when they arrived there.

Crusoe accepted _ this generous offer
gratefully and, writing to some relations
for assistance, he received from them the
sum of about £40, which he invested in
toys and trifles of jewellery, with which he
intended to trade.

On the voyage out, the captain, who
was a kindly, honest man, instructed him
in. the art: ‘of seamanship, and when they
landed in Africa he helped him to dispose
of his wares, so that he returned home
with £300 in his pockets instead of £40.

Robinson Crusoe was now set up as
a Guinea trader; but unfortunately for him,
his good friend, the captain, died soon
after their return to London. However, he
left £200 of his money with the captain’s
widow, who took care of it for him, and,
having invested the other £100 in goods
12 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

with which to trade, he resolved to make
the same voyage again, and embarked in
the same vessel, with the former mate of
the ship as captain.

This was a very unfortunate voyage
for all concerned, for when they were mid-
way between the Canary Islands and the
coast of Africa they were surprised one
morning by a Moorish pirate ship from
Sallee, which gave chase to them with all
sail set.

The captain of Crusoe’s ship ordered
as many sails as the masts would carry
to be spread; but it was all in vain, and
when it became certain that the pirate ship
Was gaining on them they determined to fight.

Crusoe’s ship carried twelve guns and
the pirate ship eighteen, and the pirate
captain had two hundred men on_ board,
so that, although Crusoe and his companions
fought very bravely, their ship was at length
disabled, and after killing and wounding
numbers of the crew the pirates took the
remainder prisoners and carried them into
the port of Sallee.
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14 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

The Moorish captain took Robinson
Crusoe for his own slave and, much to
the youth’s disappointment, left him on
shore, when he went to sea, to look after
the garden.

Iwo years passed swiftly away, with
very little change for the young man, who
had never ceased to hope for a chance to
escape, but as yet had never found one.
However, his master happened to be short
of money and was therefore unable to fit
out his ship to sail again. To while away
the time he took to fishing, and, as Crusoe
proved very clever at this Sport, his master
always took him with him.

At length the Opportunity for which
Robinson Crusoe had waited so long arose.
His master had arranged a fishing-party
for himself and some of his friends, and
had ordered his English slave to provision
a big boat, which he had taken from an
English ship, and also to put on board
this boat several muskets and some shot
and powder in case they saw some wild fowl,

At the last moment the Moor and his


MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 15

friends were unable to go, owing to some
business which arose, but as the guests
were to sup at the captain’s house he ordered
Crusoe to go on board, taking with him a
man, and a boy named Xury, and to catch
a dish of fish for their supper.

So Crusoe set out with high hopes
and beating heart. They went a little way
out from the shore and set to work to fish,
but when a fish came to Crusoe’s hook he
would not pull it up, and so it appeared
as though they were catching nothing, and
Crusoe said: “This will not do; our master
will not be thus served; we must stand
farther off.’ The man agreeing they ran
farther out, and Crusoe waited until his two
companions were intent upon their fishing
when he stepped suddenly behind the man
and tossed him clear overboard. He was
a splendid swimmer and so Crusoe bade
him swim ashore, threatening to shoot him
if he came near the boat.

When he was sure that the man had
obeyed his commands he turned to the boy
Xury and made him swear to be faithful
16 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

to him, and after that they sailed away to
the south-east, never resting until the
country they had left was far behind them.

For five days Robinson Crusoe and the
boy Xury sailed along without once landing,
but by that time they felt sufficiently safe
to steer the boat to the mouth of a little
river and anchor there, meaning to swim
ashore as soon as it was dark and try and
discover what sort of a country they had
come to.

But when night fell they could hear
the wild animals on shore roaring so terribly
that they were afraid to venture. However,
as they were short of water they were bound
to go ashore to find some.

They went therefore by day, and met
with no mishap, but found plenty of good
water and shot a hare, which furnished
them with a good meal.

CHAPTER II

S Robinson Crusoe had previously been
for a voyage to this coast he knew
that the Canary Islands and the Cape de
Verd Islands lay somewhere in this direction,
but he had no compass nor any other
nautical instruments to help him to steer
by and so he was obliged to trust more
or less to luck. He and Xury cruised about
in Southern regions for some weeks, landing
frequently for water and to shoot game.
They were afraid to venture on shore by
night for fear of wild animals, but one day
they saw a lion lying asleep upon a rock
and Crusoe fired at him, wounding him in
the leg. The great beast began to move
off slowly, but Crusoe fired again and shot
him in the head and saw him drop. He made
little noise, but just lay struggling for life.
Xury, who had previously been very
much frightened, now took heart and begged.
to be allowed to go ashore.




18 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

So Crusoe gave him leave and the boy
jumped into the water, carrying the gun
in one hand and paddling himself ashore
with the other, and going close up to the
creature he put the muzzle of his gun into
his ear and soon despatched him. They
skinned the great beast and dried the skin
in the sun, and it served Crusoe for a bed
folie on.

After this Crusoe and Xury sailed on
southwards, hoping they were nearing the
Cape de Verd, where they thought they
might meet with some European = ship
which would take them on board, for by
this time their provisions were beginning
to run short..

At length they came to land which
they knew to be inhabited, for they could
see negroes standing on the shore watching
them. They made signs to them that they
wished for food, and the negroes, who were
kindly and hospitable people, brought food,
and water in jars, and placed them on
the sea shore, then they retreated to a safe
distance and allowed Crusoe and Xury to
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 19

land and take the provisions into the boat,
for they were as frightened of the men in
the boat as they were of them.

Before leaving that country Crusoe was
able to do the kind-hearted N€gQroes a service,
for two fierce leopards dashed down into
’ qur.|the midst of them,
an pes Jand Crusoe, raising
ol his musket to his
ie A Wj shoulder, fired and
: “"|succeeded in killing
one, when the other
promptly dashed away
in terror.

Crusoe having taken
a good store of food
and water on board
; Once more set sail,
and after a voyage of eleven days met
with a fresh adventure, for Xury, who was
at the helm, suddenly cried out: ‘Master,
a sail!”

Crusoe fired his musket to attract the
attention of the ship’s master,’ and presently
he was taken on board.



(A
pala


20 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

The vessel proved to be a Portuguese
one, and fortunately for Crusoe, who spoke
no language but his own, there was a Scotch
sailor on board, to whom he told his story
and who translated it to the Portuguese
captain.

Crusoe was very kindly treated on this
ship, for although he offered all he had to
the captain as a return for his deliverance
the good fellow would accept nothing from
him, but insisted upon giving him a fair
price for his boat, his guns, and even for
poor black Xury, who was a slave and
could therefore be sold the same as the
rest of his master’s goods.

Crusoe was loth to part with him, but
Xury himself was quite content to go with
so kind a master as the Portuguese captain,
especially as he promised to set him at
liberty after ten years’ service.

They made a good voyage to the Brazils,
and when they came to port Crusoe bade
farewell to his kind deliverers and the boy
Xury and purchased a plantation with the
money he had received from the captain.
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK ar

On this plantation he grew sugar canes
and tobacco, and prospered exceedingly, but
finding the work very trying he never ceased
to regret that he had parted with poor Xury.
. He wrote home to the widow woman .
with whom he had left his money and
asked her to invest £100 of it in suitable
wares, and to send them out to him. This
she did, and Robinson Crusoe traded with
them to such advantage that he became a
rich man and was able to have both black
and white servants to serve him.

He remained four years in the Brazils,
and whilst there learned to speak the language
fluently, so that he was able to converse
with his neighbours and recount to them
the experiences through which he had passed.

He told them of how he had visited
the Guinea coast and traded there with the
negroes, and how he had even bought and
sold the negroes themselves.

They listened attentively to his words
and at length persuaded him to fit out a
ship and take it to the Guinea coast to
get slaves for them.


22 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

Crusoe agreed to this on condition that
on his return he should receive a share of
the slaves for work on his plantation.

Alas! poor Crusoe, he little dreamt of
the misfortunes that were about to over-
take him.

He set sail on September 1, 1650,
on board a fine vessel, carrying a goodly
cargo of beads, glass, knives, scissors, hatchets
and such like goods, likely to attract the
negroes.

For the first twelve days the weather ©
was fine and warm; but after that it changed,
and they were overtaken by a fierce hurricane.
Whilst. this raged a man and a boy were
washed overboard and drowned, and every-
one on board thought their last hour had come.

The ship was so much damaged that
the captain changed his course, and steered
to the N.W. by W., hoping to reach some
of the English islands, where they might
obtain relief; but a second and a worse
storm overtook them and when they were
in sight of land the ship was driven upon
a sand bank. The wind raged and stormed
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 23










ants ai 7 a Zz ail
Ly ZL, Wy Pa >
“YOM ea
Tia Aa
fs i i io Aas
[i Hi

=

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aN








ig i WA.
i
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es

Ze



oe ~ furiously, and theyexpected
every moment the ship
would, go to pieces. With great difficulty
a boat was flung over the ship’s side, and
Crusoe and the rest of the ship’s crew got
into it and laboured hard to reach the shore.
After they had rowed about a league and
a half a raging wave, mountain-high, came
rolling over them, the boat was upset, and
everyone was soon struggling in the water.

Robinson Crusoe was a fine swimmer,
but it was impossible to swim in such a
sea. The waves carried him along towards
the shore, threatening to drag him back to
destruction as they retreated, but at length
24 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

he felt ground beneath his feet. Breathless
and half drowned he yet managed to struggle
to his feet and ran gasping towards the
main land. How thankful he was when
at length he sank down exhausted upon
green grass]

As soon as he had sufficiently recovered
he looked around him to see if any of
his companions had been as fortunate as
himself; but there was no sign of any one
of them.

Crusoe walked about a little to try and
discover what sort of an island he had
chanced upon, and to his joy discovered a
spring of fresh water. He took a good
draught, and having a box with a little
tobacco in it in his pocket he placed a
little of it in his mouth to allay the pangs
of hunger, climbed a tall tree, and, after
having cut himself a stout staff asa weapon
in case of need, he fell fast asleep and
slept as comfortably as though he had been
in a bed of down.

When he woke in the morning the
storm had abated and the sea had retreated
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 25

so far that he found the ship was but a
short distance from the land.

He took off his clothes and swam out
to her, but it was no os
easy matter to get on CF
board, for she
aground and high
out of the water.
At length he saw
a rope hanging
over the side, and
by means of this
he was able to
haul himself on
board. To his
great joy he found
that little of the
ship’s goods were
damaged, and irs
having first par- |! ie EMS o Fe
taken of a hearty meal he decided to build
a raft upon which to convey all he required
ashore. .

He searched eagerly until he found the
carpenter's chest, which was a very valuable
















































































26 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

prize and worth more to him than a ship-
load of gold.

He built his raft of the broken masts
and spars, making them fast with ropes.

He filled some of the seamen’s chests
with food, clothing and ammunition, and
with great difficulty got them aboard the
raft. His next care was to convey the
carpenter's chest aboard it, and, having
taken care to provide himself with some
fowling-pieces and pistols, he decided that
his raft was sufficiently heavily freighted
and decided to make for the shore.
CHAPTER III

Ce had some trouble in getting his

craft safely ashore, for the only oars
upon the ship were broken, and so he could
not use them to row with. However, he
managed to guide his craft into the tidal
current of a river and so steer inland.
Several times the raft was all but- upset
and its cargo lost; but with great patience
and skill he succeeded in steering it into
a little cove and anchoring it there, until
at last the tide ebbed and left it high and
dry upon the mainland.

His next work was to view the country
round and choose the best place upon which
to build himself a hut, and so, taking a.
fowling-piece in his hand he climbed a
high hill. Alas! to his sorrow he found
himself to be upon a barren island, ap-
parently uninhabited except by wild animals.
He saw a great number of fowls, but as
he had never before seen any birds at all
28 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

like them he could not tell whether they
were fit for food or not. However, he shot
at a great bird, which he saw perched upon
a tree at the entrance to a wood, and brought
it down.

It soon became evident that no gun
had ever previously been fired in this desolate -
region, for an innumerable number of fowls
at once rose into the air screaming and
crying and seeming half dazed with fear.

The bird Crusoe had killed appeared
to be a kind of hawk—at least, its beak
and colour resembled one, but its talons
were short. It proved, however, to be unfit
for food and so he flung it away.

He then returned to his raft and fell
to work to bring his cargo on shore. This
took up the rest of the day. What to do
with himself at night he did not know,
for he was afraid. to lie down upon the
ground to rest lest some wild beast should
devour him. He found afterwards there
was no need for these fears. However, it
was necessary to prepare some place in
which to pass the night, and presently he
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 39

arranged the seamen’s chests and the planks
he had brought from the ship in such a
way that he had a comfortable lodging for
the night.






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hia MO yea) 8
Ww . Mf SH
pi ) USS

MMe






“ Sth binb asc?

rm
| th hi

ve











The next day he
decided to pay another
visit to the ship to
: bring away a number
of other things which he knew might be
useful to him. As the raft was heavy and
cumbersome he did not make use of it, but
stripped himself and swam out to the ship.
30 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

He built another raft, much lighter and
easier to manage, and this he loaded with
all sorts of Carpenter’s stores, nails, screws,
spikes, and so on. He brought away a
good store of shot and powder also, besides
sails, hammocks and bedding, and a vast
quantity of clothing.

Crusoe was a little anxious upon reaching
the shore as to whether his little hut might
have been molested during his absence; but
he found no sign of any visitors, only upon
one of the chests there sat a creature like
a wild cat. Crusoe threw it a morsel of:
biscuit which the cat ate, and then looked
at Crusoe as though asking for more; but
he was obliged to be Sparing of his food
and could give her none, so off she marched.

Day after day Robinson Crusoe boarded
the vessel, bringing away everything that
he could carry in the way of stores, ropes,
canvas, tools and knives, powder, Spirits,
and so on, and even a bag of money, for
which he knew he had no use whatever
in his present plight.

With the canvas and ropes he made
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 31

himself a very comfortable tent and was
able to place all his powder and other
perishable goods under cover.

He had scarcely completed this work
when another storm arose and the ship
broke up in pieces.

Now that Crusoe had more leisure he
decided to look about him to see if he
could find a better place in which to build
himself a home, for his present abode was
too near the sea, and he had to fetch his
fresh water from some distance.

He wished to choose a spot which
would be healthy, sheltered, which could
be made secure against. the visits of either
man or beast, and which might also have
a good view of the sea, so that if any
ship chanced to come that way it might
not pass unnoticed. He found at length
just the place he wanted. It was a little
plain on the side of a rising hill, which
had such a steep front that nothing could
come down upon him from the top. At
‘the end of the plain was a rock partly
hollowed out, and before this rock he pitched
32 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

his tent. In front of it he drove in two
rows of strong stakes about five-and-a-half
feet high, and sharpened on the top. The
two rows were about six inches apart and
formed such a strong fence that he felt
sure neither man nor beast could get into
it or over it. There was no door in the
fence, but Crusoe entered his domain by
means of a short ladder, which he could
draw in after him. Into this fence, or for-
tress, he carried all the goods he had brought
from the wreck, and then he built a large tent
with tarpaulin, with another smaller tent
beneath it, so that he was quite snug and
comfortable and secure against all intrusion,

He then began to hollow out the rock
at the back of his tent, and in this way
he formed a sort of cellar in which he
might store the goods which might be spoilt
if a storm arose. His powder, which was
very precious to him, he divided into various
packets and hid in different places, which
he marked carefully, so that should one
portion be destroyed he would still have
some left, for he needed it for his guns,
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY: BOOK 33

Every day he went out shooting. There -
were a quantity of goats upon the island,
and he sometimes shot one of them for

R ; food; there were also
a number of animals
resembling hares,
which were very good
to eat.

Crusoe was afraid
that alone upon this
desert island he might
lose count of time,
and so he made a
great cross and set
it up in front of his tent. Upon the cross
he carved the date of his landing upon the
island, — September 30th, 1659 — and he
cut a notch for every day; every seventh
day the notch was twice as long as. the
others, and this stood for Sunday.

There had been a dog and two cats
on board the ship. The two cats Crusoe
carried ashore, whilst the dog plunged into
the sea and swam after him, so that when
he had these animals with him in the tent

3


34 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

he was not quite so lonely. He had also
some Bibles, some books on navigation,
and a number of other books. Ink, too,
he had, and pens and paper, so that as
long as these lasted he was able to keep
a record of all that happened.

Crusoe next set to work to make himself
a table and a chair, so that he could sit at
his ease to take his meals and rest himself.

As time passed on Crusoe became more
or less used to his solitude. He knew the
best way to keep himself from brooding
too much over his forlorn state was to
keep himself busily employed. He there-
fore made up his mind to improve his
dwelling-place. He roofed in the tent and
made it into a more substantial house, put
up shelves and hooks, and made himself
various utensils.

He hollowed out the cave both to left
and right, and made a door at one end,
which led out into the open beyond his
palisade, so that there was no longer any
need for him to use a ladder whenever he
wished to leave home.
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 35

He was able to carry all his stores
into the cave, and thus leave more room
in his own house, which he fitted up with



eo
every convenience he could manage to make
himself.
One thing he forgot, and that was
that when he hollowed out the cave he ought
Sie
36 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

to have put props to prevent the roof
falling in, and so one day a great quantity
of earth and rock fell down from the roof,
and Crusoe very narrowly escaped losing
his life.

It took him a very long time to clear
away the rubbish and to repair the damage,
but in the end he accomplished this safe-
ly and made everything neat and snug
about him.
CHAPTER IV

OBINSON CRUSOE had now been a

long time upon the island and so

was able to adapt himself more or less to
his sad circumstances.

One discovery he made was about the
climate. He found out that either the
weather was exceedingly dry or else ex-
ceedingly wet: there were not four seasons,
as with us, only two, the rainy season
and the dry season. |

During the rainy season poor Crusoe
suffered terribly from ague. He shivered
and shook, and was burning hot and then
icy cold, and felt so very ill that he was
sure he was about to die. However, he
did not die, and in due time the sun
shone again and he began to recover.

One day, when he was feeling quite
well again, he thought he would tidy
up his abode, and in so doing he came
across some empty bags which had con-
38 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

tained barley and rice for the chickens on
the ship. Thinking the bags would be useful,
Crusoe turned them inside out and shook
them to free them of the grains clinging
to the sacking.

Some time afterwards he was surprised
to find these grains had taken root and
sprung up. When the grain was ripe he
gathered the ears, dried them, and sowed
them again at the proper season, so that
in time he came to have quite large crops
of both rice and barley.

During one of the rainy seasons Crusoe
had a terrible fright. There was a great
rumbling and grumbling noise, and the
earth began to shake. The props he had
placed beneath the roof of his cave cracked
and gave way, and he was afraid the roof
was going to fall.

However, by degrees the earthquake,
for such it was, began to subside, and after
that a drenching rain fell which soaked
Crusoe to the skin, for he was afraid to
venture into his tent for some time lest
it should fall and he be buried beneath it.
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 39

























A furious wind blew all the time and
huge rocks were hurled from the cliffs into
the sea. The fury of the waves broke up
the remaining portions of the wrecked ship
and a number of very useful things began
to be washed ashore, amongst them was
a barrel full of powder. He was very glad
of this, because he had tried to make
himself some barrels, and for want of fit-
ting tools and materials had not been able
to do so. The powder in the barrel had
been soaked with water and was caked and
hard, but Crusoe rolled the cask high up
4o MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

on the sand until he had time to remove
the powder.

One day he found a turtle on the
shore. This was the first he had found,
and until that day he had not known
these creatures inhabited that country. He
killed it, and then had a fine feast. for
the flesh of the animal was a great treat
to Crusoe, who had been living principally
upon goat's flesh and fish, which he broiled
upon the ashes of his fire.

There were a number of eggs with
the turtle, which Crusoe was also very
glad of, especially as he was just recovering
from a bad attack of ague. He roasted
some of the eggs in the ashes and found
them very good and nourishing.

But alas! during the whole of the
rainy season he was subject more or less
to fits of ague until he suddenly found
remedy to cure himself.

He remembered that the Portuguese
were wont to dose themselves with tobacco
for various ailments, and he went to one
of the chests in which he remembered to
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 41

have placed some tobacco, to take it out.
He found it, and with it he found a Bible,
Which he took out and placed upon his.
table. He made a sort of infusion of the
tobacco by steeping it in rum, and after
several days dosing he cured himself of
the ague.

Then he began to study the Bible he
had found, and very soon in reading the
familiar words he began to think how wil-
ful and disobedient he had been both to-
wards God and his parents.

He reflected, too, from out of how
many perils God had delivered him and.
yet how ungrateful he had been for His
goodness. The words “All these things
have not brought thee to repentance,” seemed
to remain fixed in his mind, and when he
came to this text: “He is exalted a Prince.
and a Saviour, to give repentance and to
give remission,” he put down the Bible.
and for the first time in his life prayed
to God to give him true repentance, and
to make him a better man than he had,
been before.
42 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

From this time he found he was much
better able to bear his sad position, and
although he was so lonely and desolate he
was still able to thank God for all the
mercies left to him.

Robinson Crusoe had now been some
ten months upon the island, and all this
time he had found no signs of any human
being ever having visited it; he began, too,
to be certain that he would have to spend
the remainder of his life there.

His house being finished and made as
comfortable as he was able to make it,
he decided to explore the island more
thoroughly than he had been able as yet
to do.

IIe went up the little creek, where he
had first brought his rafts ashore, and
found that some two miles up the tide
ceased to flow and the water was fresh
and good. On the banks of the stream
were pleasant grass meadows in which
grew tobacco and other plants, the names
and uses of which Crusoe did not know.
He searched in vain for the cassava root,












































































































Mie

“a, Wy ee
, “a

Ling,



e 2
>>
=

T= =
a Bye

























































turism me be


44 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

of which the Indians make their bread.
He saw some sugar canes growing quite
wild and only needing cultivation to make
them perfect.

The next day he went the same way
again, but pushed farther on, and after he
had passed the meadows he came to a
more densely wooded country. Here he
found quantities of delicious fruits, grapes,
melons, etc., which made an_ acceptable
change of diet for him.

He decided that he would pluck a
number whilst they were still in perfection
and dry them in the sun so that he might
use them as we do raisins.

He spent his first night away from
his hut in this delightful place, passing
the night in the fork of a tree, as he
had done when first he was cast upon the
island. In the morning he again went for-
ward, and came at length to a most beauti-
ful valley, where he found fruit of all
kinds growing in great profusion.

There were cocoa-nut trees and limes,
oranges and citrons.
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK - 45

Taking as large a load as he could
carry he turned his steps towards home,
but though the limes and lemons were all
right when he arrived there, most of the



grapes were spoilt, owing to the richness
of the fruit and the weight of the juice.
The following day Robinson Crusoe
made another expedition to the fruitful side
of the island. This time he plucked a
46 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

large quantity of grapes and hung them
from the branches of the trees so that they
might dry in the sun, and he filled as
many sacks as he could carry with limes
and lemons and took them home with
him, for he knew the juice of these fruits
was very wholesome.

He thought a good deal about this
beautiful spot and wished he had made
his home there, in the midst of so much
vegetation, but as his first home was very
neat and compact he decided that he would
leave it as it was, and build: thimseli 2
second little house, where he could stay
when he felt so inclined.
CHAPTER V

‘RRUSOE worked hard to build his bower
or seaside house, and when he had
finished it he made a double fence around
it. The fence was made of strong stakes,
which he cut from trees growing in the
neighbourhood, and the spaces between the
stakes he filled with brushwood. He made
no gate, but entered and left his new
domain by means of a ladder.

By the time he had finished this new
habitation the rainy season had set in, and
so he retreated to his first abode, which
was much more sheltered than the little
bower in the fruitful valley.

The grapes he had hung upon the
trees were perfectly dry and very excellent
in taste, so these he took with him into
his hut.

Crusoe had been much concerned at
the loss of one of his cats, when one day
to his surprise and joy she walked into
48 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

the hut followed by three pretty little
kittens.

During the rainy season Crusoe could

Z73 not venture much
abroad, and only went
out when forced by
hunger to supply some
food, he would then
shoot a goat or kill
a turtle and bring
them home. His meals
at that time were as
= ~ follows:—a bunch of
raisins for breakfast,
some goat’s flesh, or
turtle, for dinner,
s, for he had no pot
in which to boil food, and two or three
turtle eggs for supper.

Whilst Robinson Crusoe was kept shut
up in his hut, on account of the rain, he
thought he might as well pass the long
hours away by making alterations and
improvements to his dwelling-place and the
cave behind it. He worked with a will


MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 49

for many hours daily, and by the time
the rainy season came to an end, every-
thing was in a fairly good habitable
condition. Only the door which he had
made at the end of jthe cave, so that
he should have another way out, caused .
him a little anxiety. He was nervous
lest some wild animal should come and
claw it down; but he told himself his fears
must be vain, for so far the biggest crea-
ture he had seen upon the island was
a goat.

When the dry season at length set in
and Crusoe was able to visit his summer
residence, as he called the little bower in the
fruitful valley, he found the stakes of which
he had built his fence had budded and
thrown out long shoots, which he cut off
and determined to make into baskets.

He had long needed something of the
kind in which to carry fruit, grain, and
so on, and with a very little practice he
succeeded in making some neat and service-
able wicker-work utensils.

The fence around his summer house

4
50 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

proved such an effective screen that he
determined to set up a similar one around
the hut and cave.

This he did, and very safely entrenched
he felt when this was completed.

Robinson Crusoe had long wished to
make a thorough examination of his island,
and as he had no very urgent work on
hand just then, he resolved to travel in-
land across it to the seashore on the other
side, as previously he had only travelled
along the coast.

He armed himself with his gun and
hatchet, took his dog with him, also a
larger supply of powder and shot than he
usually carried, provisioned himself with
biscuits and dried raisins, and set out upon
his journey. As he reached higher land,
the day being very clear, he could see,
far across the sea, the faint but distinct
outline of another coast. Whether it was
the coast of America, or merely another
island, he could not tell; also he felt afraid
that it might perchance be inhabited by
Savages, or even cannibals.
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK "51

But although he was uncertain as to
what the land might be, the very sight of
it set him longing to get away. ,

He turned away from the sea and
began to walk forward in leisurely fashion.
He found that side of the island much
pleasanter than the one upon which he had
fixed his permanent abode. The fields were
very sweet to see, with quantities of flowers
and tall waving grass. There were a great
many parrots flying about, and Crusoe
thought to himself how nice it would be
if he could catch one, so that he could
train it to talk to him. But the birds
were very shy, and it was a long time before
he could get near one.

However, he crept stealthily along beneath
the branches of the trees until he saw a
young bird, and this he succeeded in
knocking over with his stick.

It was only stunned, and Crusoe picked
it up and afterwards carried it~ home with
him, and, by dint of very great patience, he
succeeded in teaching it to talk.

It learned first to say “Poll,” and

4°
52 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

afterwards to call Crusoe by name. These
were the first spoken words the poor cast-
away had heard since his shipmates had
all been drowned.

From the time Crusoe had caught sight
of the country across the water he never
ceased thinking of how he could reach it.
He remembered that one.of the ship’s boats
had been cast upon shore and went to
examine it; but although he worked hard
repairing the boat, when his work was
finished he could not move it, it was too
heavy for his unaided efforts.

But he would not despair, and next
set to work to build a boat for himself.

With the greatest difficulty he at length
succeeded in chopping down a tree, and
this he proceeded to hollow out in the
same manner as the Indians hollow out
their canoes—namely, by burning the inside
and leaving the outer shell.

All this took him a very long time,
for, of course, he had other work to see
to as well.

One day, when he was out, his dog

54 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

surprised and seized a young kid. Crusoe
took it away from the dog before he had
harmed it, and fastened it up, and in a
very short time he succeeded in taming it,
when he added it to the number of his
household pets.

Crusoe, as I have previously told you,
had planted some barley and rice seeds.
He very soon found that if he wished to
preserve his crops he must do something
to prevent the wild goats and birds from
devouring it all.

To keep out four-footed robbers he
built a stout fence around the patches of
land where he had planted his seeds, and
having shot a number of the birds he
hung their bodies about the fields, and the
rest of the birds flew away in terror.

When Robinson Crusoe succeeded in
gathering sufficient grain from his barley
and rice crops, he did not know how to
grind it so that he might have flour to
make bread. At length he made a sort of
mill by hollowing out a hard piece of
wood, placing the barley corns in the hollow,
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 55

and then pounding them with a_ heavy
club of wood. |

He had flour then it is true, but how
was he to bake his bread? For a very —
long time he had wished for pots and pans
in which he could boil food for himself
instead of always roasting it on the ashes
of his fire.

He now looked about for some clay,
and, having found some suitable to his
purpose, he fashioned a number of pots
and pipkins, baked them in the sun, and
tried to use them for cooking, but they
were not waterproof and soon crumbled
up. However, he found that a portion of
one of the pots which had fallen into the
fire had burnt as hard and as red as a
tile, so he then set to work to fashion
some more jars and to build his fire up
in such a way that he could SHES the clay
until it became fireproof.

He succeeded so well that he soon
had as many pots and jars as he required.
He fashioned also a kind of oven of clay,
by making a shallow sort of basin.
56 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

Having tiled his hearth he lighted a
fire upon it, and when the tiles were hot
he made his bread, placed it upon the hot
tiles, put the shallow basin over it, and
heaped fire around it. In this way the
bread was baked as well as though it had
been in the best oven in the world” time Crusoe came to be quite 2 S00
pastrycook, and made cakes and puddings
with his rice.






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CHAPTER VI

OBINSOXN, CRUSOE had worked hard
for four months hollowing out the tree
trunk to make his new boat. He finished
it with great care and skill, and when at
length it was all complete it was quite
large enough to have carried six-and-twenty
men, and consequently would have taken
Crusoe and all his cargo easily.
There was nothing left then but to
get it launched; but, try as he would, he
could not move it. He dug all around it,
58 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

and made a sort of canal down to the sea,
but it was not deep enough, and when he
reckoned up the time it would take him
to make a sufficiently deep channel to float
the boat he found it would be at least
ten or twelve years, and so he gave up
in despair.

It was a great grief to poor Crusoe
to be obliged to abandon all hope of sail-
ing away from his desert island, but he
tried to comfort himself by thinking how
much worse off he might have been had he
not been able to save so many useful
things from the wreck.

By this time Robinson Crusoe had
been four years upon his island and, as
you may think, his clothes were getting a
good deal the worse for wear. He had
had a fairly good supply, because the sea-
men’s chests which he had brought ashore
had been partly filled with shirts and socks
and other clothing.

Sometimes he had been afraid that
clothing would fail him altogether. He
knew quite well that he could not go naked,
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 59

as the savages do, for the sun was so hot
that it blistered his skin, even through his
clothing.

When he was reduced almost to rags
he determined to make some clothes for
himself. He had saved the skins of all
the goats and hares he had killed, and
had cured them in the sun, and with these
skins he set to work to make himself a.
suit of clothes.

First he made a great cap for his
head. It was pointed and had the shaggy
goat hair on the outside. Next he made
himself a waistcoat and a pair of breeches,
all of them with shaggy hair outside. They
were very loose, because he wanted them
more to keep off the heat of the sun than
for warmth, and they were rather strange-
looking garments it is true, but they were
very serviceable, and it was with no little
pride that Crusoe put on the first suit of
clothes he had ever made.

After he had finished the clothing he
made for himself a great umbrella, which
would open and shut. It was a very diffi-
60 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

cult thing to do, for, though he could have
made an open one quite easily, he knew
it would be very inconvenient if he could
not close it too.

It was indeed a strange-looking umbrella,
but the thick goat skin of which it was
made served him in the wet weather to
keep off the rain, and in the hot weather
to keep off the sun: nothing could pene-
trate the thick goats’ hair.

For the next five years nothing very
extraordinary happened to Robinson Crusoe.
He passed his time chiefly in planting and
reaping barley and rice and curing his
raisins and attending to his animals.

You would have thought he had had
enough of boat building when his eyes
rested, as they often did, upon the great
boat he had made and which lay rotting
in the sun, but he determined at length
to make a small one, which, though it
would not serve him to escape to the main
land, would yet be of use in taking him
round the coast, from one part of the
island to another.
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 61

When the boat was finished he fixed
a mast on her and made a sail of some
of the canvas from the wrecked ship's sails.
He had a paddle to steer with, and he fixed
his big umbrella at the stern of the boat to
serve instead of an awning to keep off the



sun rays. Then he began his voyage round
the island. He took with him a goodly
store of provisions, his gun and some
powder, and two coats to serve him for

a bed.
At first all went well, but at length
62 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

he came to a ledge of rock with a sand
bank beyond it, and he was obliged to go
a great way out to sea in order to get
round it. He had landed on first per-
ceiving this hindrance, for the wind was
blowing hard and he did not care to be
so far out at sea in a gale of wind.

However, when the wind abated he set
off again, but he was very soon caught in
a current, and, paddle as he might, he found
himself being carried farther and farther
out to sea. The wind had dropped, and it
was useless therefore to hoist his sail, and
as he felt himself drifting farther and
farther from the shore Robinson Crusoe
gave himself up for lost.

Often and often he had felt he hated
the very sight of the desert island upon
which he had been cast, but now that he
felt he might never see it again, but perish
miserably of starvation, drifting and drifting
day after day upon the pitiless sea, he
stretched his hands towards the spot that
had been his home for so long and asked
God to help him.
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 63

Just then a puff of wind blew upon
his cheek, and in about half an hour’s time
it blew a gentle gale. Crusoe hoisted his



sail and was carried along rapidly out of
the current which had been bearing him
out to sea, and into a strong eddy which
64 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

ran back towards the coast. He felt as
though he had been a man reprieved from
death.

After sailing many and many a mile
he came ashore at length on the far side
of the point which he had tried to round
in the morning.

No sooner had he beached his boat
than he fell upon his knees and thanked
God for his safe deliverance. Then he
refreshed himself with the food he had
with him, and then lay down and_ fell
fast asleep.

When he awoke in the morning he
was greatly perplexed as to how he should
take his boat home again, for he was
afraid lest he might be again caught in
the current which had well nigh swept him
out to sea. He got into his boat and
coasted along the shore in a westwardly
direction, until he came to a little bay,
where he landed, fastened up the boat and
set out on foot, carrying nothing but his
gun in his hand.

He soon recognised the place as one

MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK — 65

he had visited on foot, and before very
long he reached the little hut which he
called his country house. He climbed over
the fence by the ladder and, being very
weary, he soon fell fast asleep. What was
his surprise when he was awakened by
hearing his name called over and over
again—“ Robinson Crusoe, Robinson Crusoe.”

He started up in alarm, and looked
around him, and very soon he saw, perched
on the tree above him, the parrot which
he had tamed and taught to call him by |
name. It had followed him all the way
from his home on the other side of the
island.

When he set out for his other home
he carried Poll with him, and very glad
he was to reach home again safely, even
though he had to leave behind him the
boat which had cost him so much time
and trouble to make.

He did not leave his own side of the
island again for some time; but amused
himself with his daily occupations. He had
been afraid to use his powder and shot

5
66 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

too often, in case he might run short, and
so, instead of shooting a wild goat when he
wanted food, he had set traps and taken
a number alive. These he kept in fenced
meadows, in the same way that our farmers
keep sheep, and he never had any lack of
meat, or milk, for goats yield very good
milk, which Crusoe was glad to have both
to drink and to make into butter and
cheese.
CHAPTER VII

F you could have seen Robinson Crusoe
at this time you would have thought
him a strange figure. Clad all in goat
skins, and with his queer peaked hat upon
his head, and soft leather buskins on his
feet, a goatskin umbrella over his head,
and a basket upon his back, he was al-
together unlike any other person. He had
both scissors and knives and so he kept
his beard neatly trimmed, but grew his
moustache to a great length, and this gave
him a somewhat fierce expression.

For a very long time Crusoe did not
attempt to go near the little canoe he had
built, for he was afraid to sail it round
past the current, which had so _ nearly
wrecked him. When at length he did visit
it he found that the current only existed
at certain times and was dependent on the
ebb and flow of the tide.

However, he was afraid to venture very

5
68 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

far in the canoe after the terrible experience
he had had before, and decided to keep it
for his use when at his summer residence,
and to build another for his use at the
winter hut.

As I told you, the fences around both
his huts had budded and grown into
sheltering trees, the fences too around his
grain fields and goat enclosures had like-
wise grown very thick and dense, and no
one landing upon the island would have
guessed at first sight that they were other
than ordinary clumps of trees. One day
Crusoe was on his way down to the little
creek where he kept his boat, meaning to
take a voyage, when what was his surprise
to see upon the sand the print of a man’s
naked foot.

He stood a moment as though thunder-
struck. It was not the print of his own
foot, for he wore his leather buskins, and
this print showed the impression of the
toes and heel perfectly.

He listened eagerly; but heard nothing,
and then turned and fled for safety to his
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70 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

castle, as he ever afterwards called his
larger and better protected home.

For three whole days and _ nights
Robinson Crusoe did not venture to stir
from his castle, and not a wink did
he sleep at night, so terrified was he
that some savages might break through
his fortifications and murder him as he
slept.

But at length the pangs of hunger
caused him to venture abroad, for he chanced
to have very little food in the hut with
him.

Then he remembered the goats which
he had penned up and which depended
upon him for food and attention, and so
he came out, and to his surprise found
everything just as usual.

So he went about his work and when
nothing happened he began to imagine he
must have made a mistake. However, he
strengthened his fence and added to it
another outer one which took root and in
a few years’ time hid all trace of his
dwelling-place.
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 71

He made the fence very thick and
strong from within and made little loopholes
with platforms behind them, upon which
he rested his seven muskets, as though
they had been cannons.

He planted numbers of young trees,
too, which in time grew up and formed
a thick wood, and he made a different
entrance to the cave behind his hut. By
means of a couple of ladders he could
scale the rock, draw the ladders up after
him and drop down within his fence.
Whenever he walked abroad now he went
armed with musket, cutlass, and a couple
of pistols, and as time passed on he began
to feel quite safe again and to feel more
and more certain that he had made a
mistake.

One day when Crusoe was wandering
about the island he chanced to look out
to sea and saw, as he thought, a _ boat
upon the water, a great distance off.

In one of the seamen’s chests he had
found ‘a telescope, and he fetched this and
took a long, long look out to sea; but he
73 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

could not be sure whether it was a boat
or no. However, he decided that from this
time he would add the telescope to the
other things without which he never stirred
abroad.

When he came down from the high
point upon which he was standing he
strolled down to the beach and was per-
fectly horrified to see the shore spread with
skulls, hands, feet and other remains of
human bodies.

He saw, too, the place where a great
fire had been lighted, and a circle dug in
the earth, where some horrible creatures
had feasted: on human bodies.

It was all too plain what had happened.
A number of cannibals had evidently landed
there and then had killed and eaten their
prisoners.

Crusoe turned sick with horror, and
left the spot, determining that he would
never go near it again.

For nearly two years he never did,
and for the best part of that time he was
trying to decide how he could possibly
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 73

destroy the dreadful cannibals if ever they
should have occasion to visit the island
again.

He devised many plans, amongst others
he thought of digging a hole, putting five
or six pounds of powder in it, in the hope
that if they kindled a fire above the spot



the powder would explode and they would
all be blown to pieces.

But, as Crusoe could ill afford to
waste so much powder, and there was but
a very slight chance they would light a
fire at the spot he chose, he decided to
abandon this idea.
74 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

He next looked out for a convenient
spot in which he might hide himself, and
found a huge hollow tree, which was suff-
ciently large to take him and his weapons,
and from which spot he would have a
good view of the cannibals at their feast.
He thought that with the aid of two mus-
kets and his pistols he would be able to
kill a great number of them, they being
unprepared for his attack.

After- he had laid his plans he used
to patrol the coast every day, and every
day he mounted to the top of a hill, about
three miles from his castle, as he called
it, and seating himself there he would take
a survey with his telescope to see if he
could distinguish any boats or canoes upon
the sea.

But as time passed on and nothing
happened he began to grow a little tired
of these elaborate preparations, for never
by any chance did he see a boat sailing
upon the water, and never was there
any sign of any savages again visiting the

island.
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 75

Moreover, he persuaded himself that
the whole affair was no business of his.
It was the custom of these savages to
devour their prisoners, and as they knew
no better he thought it would perhaps
be wrong to punish too severely those
who erred through no fault of their own.
Then, too, supposing he did not succeed
in killing them all, if one escaped might
he not go back to the mainland and
return with large numbers of others to
murder him in revenge?

He decided that it would be wiser
to keep away from that part of the island
altogether. He took his boat away to the
east end of the island, where he thought the
savages would not be likely to land, on
account of the strong current, and moored
her safely under the shelter of some tall
rocks.

He kept to the shelter of his two
huts and seldom went any distance from
them.

He refrained from firing his gun more
than absolutely necessary, and he was
76 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

chary about even lighting a fire by day,
as smoke can be seen from a great
distance. He used to Heht ‘his tre at
night, or else go to a deep “valley 20
light one.

After a time he made some charcoal
and used that to cook his food by, be-
cause charcoal fires make no smoke.
CHAPTER VIII

N€ day when Robinson Crusoe was hard
at work cutting down the branches of
some trees in order to burn them and
make charcoal of them, he chanced to
move aside some brushwood and found it
hid the opening to a cave or passage of
some sort.

He stooped down and crawled in
through the opening, but was soon out
again, for he saw what looked like two
livid coals glaring at him from the dark-
ness; also he could hear low groans and
mutterings in some unknown guttural
language.

But out in the open he was ashamed
of his cowardly fears, so he took a lighted
torch in his hand and once more ventured
to explore the passage.

He had not gone three steps before
he was almost as frightened as before, for
he heard a loud sigh, like that of a man


78 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

in pain, and it was followed by a broken
noise, as of words half expressed, and then
came another deep sigh. He stepped back
so terrified that his hair rose from his
head; but once more he plucked up heart,
telling himself that he ought to be ashamed
of such cowardly fears, and that at any
rate it was better to know the worst and
have done with it, so stepping forward he
raised the torch above his head and by
the light of it he could dimly see a large
white form stretched full length upon the
ground.

He stooped over it and saw—why,
just this: a big he-goat stretched at his
length and apparently dying of old age.

Crusoe stirred him with his foot to
‘see if he could get him out of the cave,
but the old creature was unable to move,
and so he left him lying there to end his
days in peace.

Having examined the cave, he found
that it was but a small one, but had a
narrow opening at the far end through
which he did not venture to pass, as
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 79

it was very low and he had no candle
with him.

I must tell you that Robinson Crusoe
had some very good candles, which he
made himself of goats’ tallow. He was
often hard put to it to find wicks for the
candles, but he used rags, rope-yarn, and
sometimes a dried weed, something like a
nettle.

The following day Crusoe again went
to the cave with a plentiful supply of
candles and a tinder box. He crawled
through the inner opening and came at
length into another cave, which was about
twenty feet high and which was most
beautiful to behold, for when he had lighted
his candles he saw that the walls and roof
sparkled and shone like gold and diamonds.
The floor was dry and level and covered
with a sort of loose gravel, and Crusoe
was delighted for he knew that he had at
length found a really safe hiding-place in
case of danger threatening him.

The only drawback was the narrow
opening, and that was scarcely to be called
80 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

a drawback, for should any number of
savages discover his whereabouts they could
only enter one at a time, and the entrance
could therefore easily be defended by one
man.

Into this cave Crusoe carried most of
his powder and bullets, and left it there
with his spare muskets.

The poor old goat, which had so
frightened Crusoe, died very soon of old
age, and so he dug a deep hole close by
where the animal lay and buried him in
it, covering him well over with earth.

In the month of December, twenty-
three years after Robinson Crusoe had been
cast upon the island, he chanced to have
risen very early in the morning, as it was
harvest time with him, and no sooner had
he left his castle than he noticed the light
of a large fire burning some two miles
off, towards the end of the island.

Crusoe knew very well that it meant
‘the cannibals had come to visit his island
once more, and he was very much afraid.
He went back to his castle at once, pulling
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 81

the ladder up after him, and prepared to
defend himself to the last gasp and sell
his life dearly.

But after he had waited a long time



without anything happening, he ventured

out, and, climbing to the top of a rock, he

saw about nine savages dancing round a

big fire and evidently making a great feast.
6
8a MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

Their canoes had been hauled ashore,
and presently, when the tide rose, they
pushed out their boats, jumped into them
and paddled away.

As soon as he saw they were really
gone he ventured down to the shore where
they had been and there he saw a most
horrible sight, for the sand was strewn
with human remains and was all stained
with blood.

This horrible sight so roused Robinson
Crusoe’s anger that he determined, if ever
the savages again came to the island, he
would attack them, no matter how many
there might be.

Months passed by and still no savages
came, but one morning in the month of
May a great storm arose, and as Robinson
sat in his castle reading his Bible, and
listening to the wind and rain howling
and raging around him, he suddenly heard
the sound of a gun fired out at sea, and
guessed that at length a ship had come
to visit the island, either by design or
driven there by stress of weather.
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 83

He hastened out, and, climbing to the
top of a hill, soon succeeded in getting a
blazing fire burning. His heart beat high
with joy to think that soon he might meet
with some white men who would deliver
him from his desolate island. No sooner
did the fire blaze up than the guns from
the ship began to boom out once more,
but Crusoe could do nothing to help the
poor souls on board, and when at length
the morning dawned and the thick mist
cleared away, he saw the vessel plainly,
but she was a wreck and was stuck fast
upon a reef.

For some time he was afraid to ven-
ture out to the wreck, for she lay just
where the current had been that had once
nearly whirled him out to sea, but he
longed very much to know whether any of
the crew had been saved.

This he never knew for certain, but
certainly no living soul from the wreck
ever came ashore at the island.

A few days after the storm a boy’s

body was washed ashore. It was impos-
6*
84 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

sible to tell to what nation he belonged,
for he had few clothes on him, and in
his pockets were but two gold pieces and
a tobacco pipe. The latter Robinson Crusoe
valued far beyond the gold.

As soon as the weather was quite calm
Crusoe determined to venture out to the
wreck, for he still hoped that there might
be some living soul on board of it.

He provisioned his boat, and taking
a compass with him set out. At first he
was afraid that he would get into the cur-
rent and be swept out to sea, and his
heart failed him, so that he came ashore
after paddling a short distance along the
coast, but the following day he started
again, and presently came safely to the
wreck.

It was a dismal sight to see, for the
ship, which was evidently a Spanish one,
was jammed between two rocks, and the
stern and quarter were beaten to pieces by
the sea. |

On coming close to the wreck he saw
a dog which yelped pitifully when it saw
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 85




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i

Crusoe. He called to it, and it jumped
overboard and scrambled into the boat.

Crusoe gave the poor starved creature
some food and water, which it eat and
drank ravenously.

After this Crusoe boarded the ship
and saw two men lying in the cook’s
galley and quite dead. He saw no sign
of any other person, and he soon found
that the dog was the only living creature
left.
86 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

He carried on board his boat a couple
of sea-chests, a quantity of various kinds
of liquor, some copper and brass kettles
and pans, a fire shovel and tongs and a
grid-iron, and then, taking the dog with
him, he sailed towards land, and succeeded
in carrying these things safely ashore.
CHAPTER Ix

RUSOE was very glad to have another

dog, for the one he had first brought

ashore with him had long since been
dead.

There were many things in the sea-
men’s chests which were of great use to
him, linen shirts and handkerchiefs, coloured
neckcloths, and some shoes and _ stockings.
Besides these things he had found a quan-
tity of spirits and sweetmeats, also money,
this latter being of very little use to him
in his present abode.

He stored it away, however, in his
cave, together with all the other things he
saved from the wreck.

Having brought all these things ashore
and stowed them safely away, he went back
to his boat and paddled it along the shore
until he came to the little cove he called
his harbour, where he left it and returned
to his home. | :
83 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

He found everything quite safe, and,
as usual, his family very glad to welcome
him back.

Could you have taken a peep at
Crusoe at meal times, or when he was
taking his ease, you would have seen him
surrounded by his family, as he called his
pet animals. The dog he had rescued from
the wreck sat close beside him at his right
hand, a couple of cats sat upon the table,
purring aloud with pleasure and content,
and Poll, the parrot, upon her perch called
him by name or screamed the names of
his other pets, or told him conceitedly
what a pretty bird she was. Poor lonely
Crusoe was only too glad to make com-
panions of his pets.

It had been a terrible disappointment
to Crusoe that he had not been able to
rescue a single living man from the Spanish
ship, and the sight of the poor dead white
men had set him longing more than ever
to meet with fellow creatures once again,
and he made up his mind that if ever
the cannibals came to his island again
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 89

he would try and rescue one of their
prisoners, in the hope that he might then
have someone to help him to escape from
the island.

He thought so much about this that
one night he had a dream about it. He
thought he saw two canoes glide up to
the shore with eleven savages in them,
and that they had with them another
savage whom they were going to kill and
eat, when the prisoner suddenly jumped
up and ran for his life towards Crusoe,
who showed him where to hide himself.
He dreamt that the savages could not
find their prisoner and that he became
Crusoe’s servant and helped him to get
away to the mainland.

Robinson Crusoe felt quite happy when
he awoke, for he had a feeling that his
dream would come true, but a year and
a half passed away before there was any
sign of savages upon the island.

Then one morning he found they had
come at last, and in numbers too, for he
saw five canoes, all on the shore together.
go MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

He felt afraid to attack such a large party,
as he knew there must be, and retreated
to his castle; but after a time he felt he
must know what was going on, and, placing
his guns at the foot of his ladder, clam-
bered up it and took a peep.

He saw about thirty savages dancing
round a fire and guessed they were about
to partake of one of their horrible feasts.
Even as he watched he saw two miserable
wretches dragged from the boats: one was
immediately knocked down by a_ wooden
club, and whilst the dreadful creatures were
busy about this victim the other was left
standing by himself until they should be
ready for him.

He was unbound, and must suddenly
have made up his mind to make an effort
to escape. He started away from his cap-
tors and ran with incredible swiftness along
the sands, straight im the ‘dinectron: o7
Robinson Crusoe.

To Crusoe’s surprise and relief only
three savages started in pursuit, and these
their prisoner began quickly to outstrip.
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK gI

Between Crusoe’s castle and the savages
there stretched a little creek, but the escap-
ing savage made nothing of it, as, plung-
ing in, he was soon safely landed on the
other side. It then became evident that
only two of his pursuers could swim, for



though two followed, one remained behind
standing on the brink of the water.
Seeing how the prisoner was gaining
ground Crusoe thought to himself that
now was the time to secure a servant for
himself. He hurried down his ladder and
92 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

ran .as fast as hé* could) and “by 2 snom
cut, so as to place himself between pur-
suers and pursued, at the same time
calling out to the man to stop. At first
the poor creature was almost as frightened
of Crusoe as he was of the savages, but
when he saw him knock down one of his
enemies with the butt-end of his rifle, he
decided that he must be a friend.

Crusoe was loth to fire, lest the other
savages should hear the report, but as the
second black man had a bow and arrows
and was about to let fly a shaft, he was
forced to shoot him.

The poor fellow whom Crusoe had
saved now came crawling on hands and
knees towards him, and when he reached
his feet he first kissed the ground and
then placed one of Crusoe’s feet upon his
neck, in token that Crusoe was his master
and he his slave.

The savage whom Crusoe had knocked
down was beginning to come to his senses,
and Crusoe pointed to him, and his new
slave made a motion towards the sword
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 93

which Crusoe wore in the belt at his side.
He gave the man the sword and he ran
towards his fallen enemy and cut off his
head at one blow. After that he made a
sign that he would bury the two dead
foes in the sand, so that the others should
not see them, and this he did very rapidly
and neatly.

Although he could not understand what
he said Crusoe was very thankful to hear
him speak, for his was the first man’s
voice he had heard for twenty-five years.

Crusoe did not take him to his castle;
he thought it would be safer to go and
hide in the cave. As soon as they arrived
there he gave the man some bread and a
bunch of raisins and a draught of fresh
water, which he needed badly after his.
long, exhausting race.

Then Crusoe showed him some rice
straw and made a sign to him that he
should lie down and sleep. This he did,
but in about half an hour’s time he awoke
and came out of the cave to Crusoe, who
was milking his goats.
94 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

He was a pleasant-looking fellow, with
long, straight black hair, and seemed to
be about twenty-six years of age. He
made every sign he could to express his
gratitude to his master, and again knelt
down and placed Crusoe’s foot upon his
neck,

Crusoe then gave him some of the
goats) milk and a cake of bread, which
he eat with great relish.

The two men stayed that night at the
cave and in the morning Crusoe led him
towards his castle, meaning to get some
clothes for him, as he was quite naked.

There was no sign anywhere of the
savages or their canoes, and so Crusoe
came to the conclusion that they must
have left the island, not even caring to
find out what had become of their two
companions.

However, he was very cautious, and
before going to the place where the canni-
bals had feasted, he armed his servant
with his own sword, the bow and the
arrows and a musket, and, carrying a
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 95

couple of muskets himself, he approached
the spot. The cannibals had _ evidently
departed, but the ghastly human remains
which they had left behind turned Crusoe
sick. He made his man light a large fire



and burned the skulls and bones that
he saw.

The previous day had been a Friday,
and so he decided to name his servant
after the day on which he had _ been
rescued.
96 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

Friday soon learnt his own name and
also to call Robinson Crusoe “Master.”
He was very quick to learn, and in a few
days knew the difference between ‘‘yes” and
“no” and other simple words. One thing
he did not learn so quickly, and that was
to wear clothes. He was very proud of
them it is true, but he was so unused to
wearing any clothing whatever that at
first they galled him terribly. But in the
end he became used to them and would
not have gone without them.
CHAPTER X > =

T first Robinson Crusoe was _ half

afraid to trust Friday, and therefore
built a little sleeping-place for him, which
he strongly barricaded at night so that
the young man could not steal upon him
unawares.

He need have had no fear, for Friday
proved to be absolutely trustworthy, and
a loving and devoted servant. He was a
clever fellow, too, and learned to speak
English very quickly, and also learned the
use of the English tools, which he had
never previously seen, and assisted his
master greatly in all that he did.

The thing that he most disliked was
Crusoe’s gun, for he could not but believe
that there was some evil spirit in it which
spat fire and killed people. But in time
he even became used to this, and learned
to shoot with it.
98 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

Crusoe's first endeavour was to make
Friday understand what a horrible thing
it was to be a cannibal. He taught him
how to cook the flesh of goats and other
animals, and tried to make him take salt
with his meals.

This he could never learn to do; but
he liked Crusoe’s food so much that he
made signs to his master that he would
never eat man’s flesh again.

As there were now two mouths to
feed instead of one Crusoe resolved to sow
more rice and barley, and Friday soon
learnt to grind the meal and bake bread
from it, as well as his master had ever
done it himself.

Crusoe was happier now than he had
ever been since he first came to the island,
for he had a clever and affectionate com-
panion.

As soon as he could make Friday
understand, he questioned him about his
own home and people, and asked him how
far it was from the island to his own
country. Friday told him they could sail


MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 99

there quite easily if they had a sufficiently
large boat and if they took heed of the
ebb and flow of the tide.

He told Crusoe also about a number
of white men who had been wrecked upon
the coast of his country and who were
even then living with his people.

You may be sure this made Crusoe
more anxious than ever to get over to the
mainland and meet these people, and so
he told Friday that he meant to build a
boat and he should help him.

At first he told Friday he would give
him a boat and let him go back by him-
self to his own people, but Friday would
not agree to this; he brought a hatchet to
his master and told him he might kill
him if he would, but that he, Friday,
would never leave him. |

Crusoe was much touched by this de-
votion, and he promised the poor fellow |
they should never be parted again, if he -
could help it, and that they would build
a boat and sail in it together away to
the mainland.
100 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

So they cut down the largest tree they
could find and set to work to hollow it
out. Friday would have burnt it out, but
Crusoe taught him how to cut it out with
tools, which he soon did very handily.

After they had finished the inside they
used their axes to cut and hew the out-
side into the true shape of a boat.

It took them a month to make this
boat, but when it was in the water it
floated beautifully and would have carried
twenty men with ease.

Crusoe was astonished to find how
skilfully Friday managed this boat, for he
could make it fly through the water in
spite of its great weight.

One day Crusoe sent Friday down to
the seashore to find a turtle for their dinner,
and very soon he was back again, full of
terror and excitement, for he had seen
three canoes drawn up on the shore and
about three-and-twenty cannibals about to
hold a feast upon the prisoners they had
brought with them.

Crusoe armed himself and Friday with
orl

Yj
Y
{|

y

TN gh
jee a
dy


102 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

as many weapons as they could carry, and
both of them hastened to a little wood
which overlooked the place where the canni-
bals were.

They were all busily engaged eating
the flesh of one of their victims, whilst a
little way off, upon the sand, a poor white
man lay fast bound. Friday told him this
was one of the men who had been living
with his people.

Crusoe’s heart burned with anger and
he determined to rescue the poor man or
die in the attempt.

He loaded all the muskets and pistols
that he had and instructed Friday exactly
how to act.

Just as the savages were about to lay
hands on their white prisoner the two men
in ambush let fly.

As fast as they could shoot and re-
load they shot down the savages, who were
terrified at this, to them, unknown manner
of assault. Several were killed and many
wounded, and the others began to run~
towards the canoes.
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 103

Crusoe rushed forward and_ hastened
to cut the white man’s bonds and place a
sword and pistols in his hands.

He was very weak, but upon one of
the savages attacking him he defended
himself bravely with the sword, until the
savage threw him down and was about to
despatch him, when the Spaniard drew the
pistol from his girdle and shot him through
the body.

The rest of the savages then fled
in two of the canoes, leaving the third
behind, and when Crusoe would have jumped
into this in order to pursue them, he
found another poor wretch, tightly bound,
lying in the bottom of the boat.

Crusoe called to Friday to come and
help him lift him out, and what was his
surprise to see his servant clasp the poor
creature in his arms and embrace and weep
over him.

As soon as he could speak he told
Crusoe that this was his father, who had
been taken prisoner, together with some
others by another tribe, and who would


104 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

most assuredly have been killed and eaten
had they not come to the rescue.

They gave the two men food and
drink, and when they had somewhat re-
covered they helped them into the little
canoe and paddled them round to the castle
side of the island.

They were both very much exhausted,
so much so that they could not climb
over the fence into the castle stronghold,
and Crusoe had to rig up a tent outside it.
He then set to work to cook a good meal,
and when it was ready he sat down to
table, and, with Friday as interpreter, had
some conversation with them.

After they had supped Crusoe ordered
Friday to go and bring back the muskets
and other weapons they had left behind
on the sands, and also he told his man
to bury the dead bodies of the savages
and to wipe out all appearance of their
having visited the island.

Crusoe was somewhat afraid lest the
savages should return to the island with
large numbers of companions to revenge
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 105



themselves, but Friday said he was sure
they had been too much frightened by
the guns ever to come back again.

In this surmise he proved to be
correct for they never did come again.

Crusoe found out from the Spaniard
that there were sixteen of his compatriots
who had been wrecked and were now
living with Friday's tribe.

He himself had been captured by
another tribe in some small war.

Crusoe suggested that he should go
back to his companions and ask them
if they were willing to come over to
the island to assist in building a_ ship
large enough to carry them all home to
England.
106 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

The Spaniard promised to do this,
but in the meantime ‘they ql’. vo
work to plant an extra supply of barley
and rice, to cure an enormous quantity
of raisins, and in other ways to provide
sufficient food for the coming of all these
people.
CHar Trek a

S soon as the harvest had been gathered

in, and Crusoe felt he had sufficient
store of food for all the men whom he
expected the Spaniard to bring back, he
gave him leave to go over the sea and
find out if his companions would be willing
to come to the island with him.

He charged him on no account to
bring any man with him who would not
first swear to him and to the old savage,
Friday’s father, who was to go with him
in the boat, that he would in no way in- |
jure Robinson Crusoe, but would promise
to be loyal and serve him as though he
were their captain.

Crusoe then gave them a good store
of provisions to take with them, and the
Spaniard and Friday’s father went away
in one of the canoes which the cannibals
had brought them over in, meaning to
devour them.
108 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

Crusoe gave each of them a musket
and eight charges of powder and _ ball,
warning them to be very careful of them
and only use them in an emergency.

When they had been gone about eight
days Friday came running to him and
shouting that they were come back.

Crusoe jumped up and joined his man
and saw a boat, with a shoulder-of-mutton
sail, standing in from the shore.

He speedily found out that this was
not the boat they were expecting, and so
he fetched his telescope and, climbing the
hill, took a survey, and at once saw a
ship lying at anchor about a league and
a. half -outâ„¢ at. sea;

It appeared to be an English ship,
and very soon Crusoe began to wonder
what it could be doing in that region,
when not driven thither by stress of weather.
He feared it might perhaps be a pirate
ship, and so he determined to watch care-
fully what happened before showing him-
self to the sailors.

They rowed ashore, landing about half
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 109

a mile from Crusoe’s castle, and he then
saw there were in all eleven men, but
three of them were evidently prisoners.
As soon as they were ashore the three



men began to make gestures of entreaty
and Friday made sure that they were to
be killed and eaten.

Two men were left in the boat to
take charge of her, and these two presently
110 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

fell asleep, having taken too much brandy
to drink. The prisoners sat down upon
the ground, looking utterly disconsolate,
and the rest of the men went roaming
about the island.

They were so long gone that the tide
went out, and when at length one of those
left in the boat woke up, he found the
boat high and dry upon the sand. He
shouted for his comrades -to come and
help push it off; but when they came
their united strength was not sufficient to
get it afloat, and so, with true seaman-like
haphazard indifference, one said to another,
“Tet her alone, Jack, -shell float. next
tide,” and off they all went to see what
amusement they could discover to keep
them employed until the turn of the tide.

Crusoe knew it would be at least ten
hours before the boat would float again,
and so he set himself to see very care-
fully to his fortifications, for he knew it
would be more difficult to defend himself
against a band of English desperadoes than
it had been against a set of savages. As
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 111

soon as the sailors were out of sight
Crusoe went down to speak to the three
prisoners, who had wandered off to the
shelter of a great tree and had there
seated themselves.

Bidding Friday also arm himself and
follow him at a distance Crusoe approached
the three men. They started up in alarm
as they saw this strange apparition, and
when he spoke to them, first in Spanish
and then in English, telling them that
he was a friend sent to succour them, one
of them replied that he must then be sent
directly from Heaven.

By questioning them Crusoe soon found
out that the three men were the captain,
mate, and one passenger of a ship, the
crew of which had mutinied and _ had
brought them ashore meaning to leave them
on a desert island to perish miserably.

Crusoe enquired whether the seamen
had any muskets with them, and hearing
they had but two, one of which had been
left in the boat, he said that they ought to
have little difficulty in overcoming them all.


112 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

The captain said he was certain that
if two of the worst of them were put out
of the way they might be able to reason
with the others.

He promised Crusoe that if they were
successful in regaining possession of his
ship that he would give him and his man
free passage home to England, and pro-
mised, moreover, to obey him in every-
thing so long as they remained upon the
island.

Having armed the three men Crusoe
set out with them and Friday, and pre-
sently made an unexpected onslaught upon
the sailors, who were fast asleep in a little
wood near by.

The fight was a short and sharp one.
The two worst characters were shot and
three others wounded, and, seeing that it
was in vain to resist five fully-armed men,
they submitted to be bound, promising that
when the captain succeeded in regaining
possession of the ship they would obey
him and help him sail the ship back
to Jamaica.
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 113

After the captain had been introduced
to Crusoe’s castle and had admired his
fortifications and the many ingenious con-











Pa ae




trivances he had made during his long
residence upon the island, they set to work

to discuss the best means by which they
rs)
114 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

could recover the ship. There were still
twenty-six men aboard of her, all more
or less desperate, for having been guilty
of mutiny they knew they were liable to
be hanged when they reached England.

They had been firing guns as signals to
the men on shore to return to the ship,
and when they did not do so another
boat, manned by ten men, was lowered.
Crusoe had ordered Friday to knock a
hole in the first boat, and they now made
ready to receive the second boatload of
men. They sent those already captured
under the charge of Friday, and one of
the men whom the captain said might be
trusted, to the cave, so that they might
be out of sight and unable to communicate
with their companions.

When the boat reached the shore the
men in her were evidently much disturbed
to find the first boat staved in and no
sign of their comrades. They returned to
the ship forthwith to confer with their
friends, but presently returned, and, leaving
two men in charge of the boat, the rest
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 115

went ashore and proceeded to explore the
island in search of their fellows.

Robinson Crusoe sent Friday and the
mate a long way off, telling them to keep
calling out so that the seamen might think
they were their lost comrades and follow
them farther and farther away. This plan
succeeded admirably, and when they were
safely out of the way the captain rushed
out, knocked one man down, and succeeded
in persuading the other man to return to
his allegiance.

When night fell and the other men
returned from their fruitless search they
were surrounded, the ringleader shot dead,
some of the prisoners were bound and left
in the cave, and those whom the captain
felt he could trust were allowed to assist
him in re-taking his ship. They patched ;
up the boat which they had previously
knocked a hole in, and then, dividing their
numbers between the boats, they rowed
off to the ship and succeeded in board-
ing her.

It was quite dark and the mutineers

ge
116 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

were taken unawares, and before they
knew what was happening the captain and
the mate had knocked down and killed two
of them, when the rest were easily taken
prisoners.

Only one of the attacking party was
injured, the mate’s arm was broken by a
musket ball. As soon as the ship was
secured the captain fired seven guns, which
was the signal agreed upon with Crusoe
to show that they had succeeded.
CHAPTER ile

7 was two o'clock in the morning when

Crusoe heard the guns fired and knew
the ship had been re-taken.

He was very glad then to lie down
and rest, for he was very tired after all
the fatigues he had gone through. He was
awakened by hearing the noise of a gun
and someone calling. He recognised the
captain’s voice, and the next moment he
appeared in sight.

He flung his arms around Crusoe and,
calling him ‘Dear Friend,” and ‘ Deliverer,”
he told him that his ship, and all it con-
tained, was his and at his disposal.

Poor Crusoe was, at first, much over-
come to think that, after his long, long
sojourn upon the island, he was once more
to see his native land.

The first thing he did was to dress
himself in the fine suit of clothes the
captain brought ashore for him, then he


118 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

interviewed the sailors whom he had kept
bound, and made a great show of par-
doning them on condition that they would
promise to amend their ways.

He then, with the captain’s help, chose
the men they thought they could best trust
to help them sail the ship home to Eng-
land, and the rest were told they would
be left upon the island.

Crusoe told them of the sixteen Spaniards
who would shortly return, and left a letter
which was to be given them on their
arrival.

He told the men all about his own
stay upon the island, and instructed them
how to tend the flocks of goats, raise bar-
ley and rice, and so on, and after pro-
mising them to send a ship to visit the
Colony whenever it lay in his power to do
so, he and Friday went on board the ship
and soon set sail for England.

He took with him the queer suit of
goat skin and the goat-skin umbrella, and
one or two other relics, also he did not
forget to take with him the gold and silver
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 119

which he had saved from the wreck of the
Spanish ship.

When at length he arrived in England,
from which he had been absent thirty-five
years, he found his father and mother were






wer
Mi] I ,

;

ee
i / i ih
we ih



nee

The owners of the ship which he had
rescued made him a present of two hundred
pounds, and, after having visited and re-
warded the poor widow, who had all this
long time taken care of the money which
he had once left in her charge, he deter-
mined once more to set sail and to visit
120 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

the Brazils, to find out what had chanced
to his plantation there.

Friday went with him and proved a
most faithful servant upon all occasions.
When he came to Lisbon he met with the
captain who had once rescued Crusoe off
the coast of Africa.

He enquired from him as to what had
happened, for he had left him trustee of
his estate. The honest old man brought
him a pouch containing a hundred and
sixty Portuguese moidores in gold, which was
only part of the interest he had received,
but part he owned he had been so un-
fortunate as to lose.

Crusoe would not take more than a
hundred moidores from him, and promised
to return these if he succeeded in regaining
possession of his plantation, which had
lapsed to the Government, it being sup-
posed he was long since dead.

However, upon Crusoe making known
that he was still alive, he received a most
affectionate letter from his partner in the
plantation, and, as everyone concerned in
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 121

the business had behaved with great justice
and honesty, as soon as he had proved his
identity he found himself master of no
less a fortune than fifty thousand pounds
sterling in money, and a fine estate in the
Brazils worth over a thousand pounds a
year.

The first thing Crusoe did was to
recompense the old sea captain, who had
fallen upon somewhat evil days, and to
settle upon him sufficient money to render
him comfortably off for the rest of his
life.

Then he remembered the poor widow
woman who had taken charge of his money
for him, and sent her also a sum of money
sufficient to ease her mind of all worry
for the future. |

Next he determined to return to Eng-
land, but having a great aversion to risking
his life at sea again he determined to
travel overland.

His old captain introduced him to an
English gentleman, the son of a merchant
in Lisbon, who was willing to travel with


122 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK ,

him, and they were afterwards joined by
two other English merchants and two
young Portuguese gentlemen.

Besides these there were five servants
in the party, Crusoe engaging an English
sailor to travel with him in addition to
his man Friday.

They set out from Lisbon and _travel-
led across Spain until they approached the
Pyrenean Mountains.

Here they encountered terrible weather.
It was freezingly cold and the snow fell
fast and thick, and they were afraid that
they might lose their way.

But they met with some French gentle-
men, who had a guide with them who
said he would undertake to see them safely
across the mountains, provided they were
sufficiently well armed to withstand the
onslaughts of the wild animals they might
encounter. |

And so, upon the 15th November, they
set out from Pampeluna, and travelled quite
easily for some distance, until at length
they could see the pleasant and fruitful
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 123



provinces of Languedoc and Gascony in
the distance.

However, although they had begun to
descend from the heights they were not
yet out of danger, for it began to snow
heavily, and one night the guide, who had
been riding in advance of the rest, was
suddenly attacked by two ravenous wolves.

The rest of the party were out of
sight, but on hearing the man cry out
Friday rode forward at great speed and
was just in time to save his life. He shot
124 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

one creature through the head and the
other fled howling back to the wood.

The poor guide was very badly hurt,
and whilst they were helping him off his
horse, Friday saw a _ bear, which had
followed the wolves out of the wood.
“Master,” said he, “me shakee hand with
him; me makee you good laugh.”

Thereupon Friday ran towards the bear,
and, picking up a stone, threw it at him.
This had the effect of causing the bear to
turn in his direction, whereupon Friday
laid his musket at the foot of a tree and
began to clamber “up it. By. the time
Friday had reached a branch of the tree
the bear was close behind him.

Friday worked his way along to the
very end of the branch and the bear
followed him as far as he dared.

Friday began to jump about, crying ,
out to them to see how well he could
make the bear dance.

The huge animal was growling very
fiercely by this time, when suddenly Friday
jumped lightly to the ground and, running
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 125

to the foot of the tree, picked up his
musket and stood waiting until the great
bear, which had begun working its way
backwards down the tree, was within reach,
when he shot it through the head and it
rolled over quite dead.

“So we kill bears in my country,” said
Friday, “we no gun, but shoot much long
arrow!”

They were obliged to leave the bear
lying where it was, though the skin was
well worth saving, but night was fast falling
and they could hear the dismal howling of
the wolves in the surrounding woods.

Suddenly a riderless horse, pursued by
a number of these dreadful creatures, came
rushing out of the wood, and very soon
they came upon the remains of two men
and a second horse, all of them well nigh
devoured. There was little time to dwell
upon the horror of it, for they were pre-
sently attacked by some three hundred
wolves, and hard work they had to defend
themselves.

It would have gone badly with the


126 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

party indeed had not Crusoe thought of
an expedient which rid them of them once
for all.

He caused Friday to lay a train of
powder along a fallen tree trunk, this
they set light to, and the next moment
the whole pack of wolves seemed to be a
blaze of fire, for the powder exploded,
scorching and injuring many of them,
whereupon the rest of them turned tail
and rushed off in terror.

The next day they reached a little
town where they were obliged to leave
their guide, for his limbs had swelled so
from the wounds he had received that he
could go no farther.

After that they travelled on through
France, meeting with little mishap, and
reached Dover upon the 14th of January.

Robinson Crusoe was determined to
settle down comfortably at home. He
relieved the necessities of the few friends
and relations left to him, and finding one
of his nephews a hardy adventurous fellow,
such as he had been himself, he made a
MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK 127

sailor of him and fitted out a fine ship
for him.

He sold his estates in Brazil and,
being now a very rich man, he married
and might have lived happily for the
remainder of his days.

In course of time he had three chil-
dren, two sons and a daughter, and then
his wife died.

Soon after this sad event his nephew
came home and persuaded him to set
sail with him in search of further adven-
tures.

The first place he wished to visit was
the Colony he had founded in the island.
He found it in a thriving condition, peopled’
by the seamen he had left there and the
Spaniards who had returned to it after
Crusoe’s departure for England.

Before leaving Crusoe left with them
a number of necessities which he had
brought out for them, knowing as he did
the things which they would be likely to
require.

He promised to send out from
128 MY ROBINSON CRUSOE STORY BOOK

England other supplies of a useful nature
together with a number of cows, sheep
and pigs, which the Colonies asked for.

Then ‘he took leave of them ana
sailed home for England, where for a
while he rested. Ten years later he set
out upon further adventures, but these I
must tell you of in another book.



Printed in Bavaria.