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Star (Roseau, Dominica)

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Star (Roseau, Dominica)
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Star (Roseau, Dominica)
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RESE.. :TIUTE T : S T A R
FOR T:-E .;J ., .
162 EP.. 73 ST;i6 1I I
NEW YORK 21, DO M INICA
S- Vir!tte Duce Comnite Fortuna
Editor PHYLLIS SHAND ALLFREY

Vol. I No. 20 December 11th, 1965 Five Cents

THE MAIN BEHIND TI-IE TELEPHONE
*. 'with his back to the wall!
The Rt. Hon. Harold Wilson, Prime Minister
of Britain, looks as if he is reflecting
on his Commonwealth Secretary's words:
"You can't trust Ian Smith. He has lied
to me'and he has lied to others."In the
House, Mr. Wilson said that this comment
was true. *** Wilson is now in a deep dilemma.
-- He is being attacked by the Conservatives
for being too ruthless to the Rhodesian
whites, by the African Nationalists, who
want Britain to go to war over Rhodesia,
and by his own back-benchers and some
Liberals, who think he is not tough enough,
Zambia needs troops on the Rhodesian side'
of the Kariba Dam; the Rhodesian Africans,
Suite rightly, want majority rule. But
Wilson says this majority rule in not immed-
iately attainable. He will not recognize
S the Smith regime, but is prepared to talk
Switch the illegal Smith Cabinet 'as private
citizens, through Governor Sir Humphrey
a! .Gibbs'. "** Meanwhile, as he prepares to
Sfly to the U.S.A. for talks, he is being
pressed by African members of the Common-
', wealth, some of whom are ready to break
away over Rhodesia. *** TWsilson sticks
*: ::-t~: ~ *.::;:::stubbornly to the power of sanctions'rather
than a blood-bath to break the Smith regime,
F I R E A R M S A E S :YQ and to the rule of law: but nobody knows what
the outcome will be.

THE GENERAL PUBLIC IS HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT IN VIEW OF THE SUCCESS OF THE FIREARMS
-AMNESTY LAID DOWAIN TO 30th NOVEvMBER, 1965, THE COVEmFiTEV'T OF DOMINICA HAS EXTENDED
THE Ai.', T OFFER PERIOD TO 31st DECEMBER, 1965.
ALL PERSONS IN POSSESSION OF ANY FIREARMS OR AMMUNITION WHICH ARE NOT LICENCED
ARE THES_ FORE ;,._ IT.l'D TO HAND THEM IN TO POLICE HEADQUARTERS, ROSEAU OR TO THE
POLICE OFFICER IN CHARGE OF ANY POLICE STATION IN THE TERRITORY ON OR BEFORE THE
31st DAY OF DECEMBER 1965.
31st DAY OF DECEMER, 1965. -- J.V.MulliGan, Chief of Police
FRONT FPAE RERITTE'N: We had designed our front page to quote extensively from the
Human Rights Day (Dec.0l) Message of U Thant, U.N, General Secretary. The firearms
notice above reminded us that we should pay tribute to two brave Dominican Police-
men, one of whom, Corporal Eli Maguire Thomas, was murdered last Saturday while
trying to disarm a criminal. His companion, Constable J. Delsol, was seriously
injured at Portsmouth by assailants who supported the miscreant, allegedly one
FogartyAnatole, now on bail for an offence (attacking a Policeman during national
carnival.) :*** We know our readers will respect our decision to do honour to those
brave ncn, and will study U Thant's words with all the more gravity afterwards,
seeing that a man laid down his life that they should live within the law, We appeal
to these who have any clues to expose the hiding-place of the attacker, and offer
our heartfelt sympathy to the relatives of brave Corporal- Thomas and to injured
Constable Delsol. As U Thant said: we must stand against "brutality which injures
innocent people caught in the clash of violent disputes"'.
HE BL:SSIGT & OPE IITNG OF THE INEW SPCK BOOKSHOP TAKES PLACE IN FIELDS LANE ON
EC.E..2 13th AT 4,30 p.m. (Society for Promoti.g Christian Knowledge).








Page Tw-~E SA audy eebrl~ .6


LOCAL NEWS
U.N. Regional Representative of the
Technical Assistance Board and Director
of Fund Programmes in the Caribbean,
assed through Dominica in the Federal
almon Wednesday and met H.H. the Admin-
istrator, the C.M. and other Ministers;
he also talked to Financial Sec. G.H.
Clarke & other Principal Secretaries. Mr,
Campbell will return next year.
Conratulations are still being received
by Mr. R. BE Tunty) Royer, Belgian
Vice-Consul, on the Chevalier of the "
Crow_ honour bestowed on him by King
Baudoin: we add our congratulations
tool
Primary Schools have been made avail-
able during pre-election time to all
Gen. Election candidates.
SurVeyor Clement E. Fingal returned to-
Dominica fully qualified afrgq passing
his final examination (of t ef institute
of Surveyors) and subsequent research
in the Colonial Office on D/ca maps.
He now works in the Lands & Surveys
Department here,
Carib Chief's Investiture took place at
Salybiawh< ischoolchildrennhoke saw
the presentation of the sash and staff
by HH. Mr. Guy. Songs and addresses
were given, and the changes which
the new road would bring were stressed.
The Hon. C.M. expressed disappointment
at the few villagers present, urging
the Carib Council to work hard fok
continued progress. The Carib Chief,
Mr. Jernandois Francis, presented a
petition to Government expressing
his Council's dissatisfaction at
certain financial and managerial
matters, His Honour said that he hoped
the Chief's 3rd term would be peaee-
ful, placid and prosperous, and that
in future Caribs would become politi-
ciana, l-cwycrs and so on, Mrs. Guy
war~ tho: presonted with a bouquet.
D.:TP,_ Ge e..Election Candidates are:-
Rccan ..: -;1 .C aillcyne; Roseau S.-:
.,A, E<.r-;n; Scuth-Eastern:-David Cuffy;
o-tr: o::.tl:..-Cola Fadelle; Southern: -
t ;:.-. ::'adollc; Westorn:-E.B. Henry;
Ior :'~l tr:n-V Jno. Charles;
: Ft. i- :.Frcbfsl Laville; North--Eastern:-
-.lc; Ecv.th WI estern:-Anthony
S" "or.t.:hrn,:-Clifford Royer.
'',. l'e.d-1 Society Fresidnnt is
i 'ic- C ". C-roll. Congratulations!
S -ic'--:, ondo-n LaSwyr on legal
bu.ine.as for 'he- M-;hodist Church,
iiiod -te iulan.d last Tuesday.


LOCAL NEWS
Five delegates (all men) of the Dominica
Pensioners Association were received
by the Hon. C.M, last Wednesday. He
promised to forward their memorandum'
to the Colonial Secretary. It asked
for increased pensions.
Dominica Gardens i What a pity.:that
tV-l well-arranged. displayof .blossoms
and'plants."took ~laco at C.H,S. 6n the
same.Sunday-as Goodwill. Festival and
other social events. Many were unable -.
to visit-it, and missed seeing Mr.C.J.L.
Dupiigny's wonderful roses (he won the
van Geest cup); also Mrs. Leo Roberts'
collection, Mrs,Keith Robinson's orchids
and Mrs. Stafford Shillingford's gladioli;
Mrs. Philip Nassief's feelift for form
and colour came out clearly in her
arrangements, with Miss Elsie Ritchie
a keen contestant; Mrs. Cadman Smith
(another artist in paint and flowers)
had some striking exhibits. The cup,
of course, was for a show garden; and
perhaps next year the Dominica.Flower
Garden Assoc. will arrange a conducted
tour Mrs. D.O.N. McIntyre was runner-up
with 93 marks for her lovely garden.
Mrs. Brisbane & Mins Elsie Ritchie
followed Mrs. Leo Roberts as garden
prizewinners, and for verandah displays
Mrs. Cecil Bellot came first, with Miss
Ruth Nicholas second. Even window-
boxes won pride of place. Flower Judges
were Mrs. John Osborn, Sister Bertine
& Mrs. Mulligan; Garden Judges were
Messrs. Allan Guye, Allandale Winston
and Mrs. L.A. Pinard, Mrs. J.J.Copland
tied with Mr. C.J.L, Dupigny for the
potted cactus prize, and Mr. Copland's
small garden was second of its class.

Mayor Visits School: His WJorihip Mr. P.
John addressed staff and pupils of Roseau
Girls' Junior Mixed School last Weds,,
as part of the new Council's 'keep the
city clean' campaign. It is understood
he has already visited other schools in
Roseau,

READERS' VIEWS
Dear Madam, Laydat Enjoyed the Band

The Music-Lovers Govt. Band makes
everybody happy, young and old. The
old feel as if they were only 16 years
old again! It was a joy to see that
Band arrive in the Church Yard and to
hear its sweet music. All thanks and
good wishes to the musicians,
NEIL STEDMAN,Ladt
*Laudat,


READERS' VIEWS contd. p. 10.


Saturday, Dedemb~er 11, l965


Page TwoO


THE STAR








Stri:dny, DecerTher 11, 1965 THE STAR Page Three


CARIBBEAN MNEWS
Greenwood's Now Plan: We learn, not
.from our local Government,but through
a journalist in Britain (Thomas
Hughes, writing in the Daily Tclegraph)
sonmthing of the terms Sir Stephen
Luke came out to discuss with the Six
or the Seven, whose status has been
"in suspense". Under the heading
"Revival not feasible", Hughes writes:
"Both the British Government and the
leaders of the seven islands are recon-
ciled to the belief that a revival of
the Federation idea is not politically
or economically feasible in the immed-
iate future. ***Mr. Greenwood's plan, it
is understood, would be similar to the
Cook Islands' relationship with New
Zealand, *** The individual govern-
ments would be free to run their own
affairs subsidized and aided by Britain
while Whitehall would retain powers of
finance, defence and foreign relations
administered through a local commiss-
ioner appointed by London.
***The islands concerned are Grenada,
St. Lucia, St. Kitts, St. Vincent,
Antigua and Dominica, together comprising
just over 500,000 inhabitants. Except
for St. Vincent, the island Govts.
have pressed Britain strongly in recent
months for internal autonomy. ***They
are not expected-to quarrel with the
outline-proposal, which is now being
discussed with each Government in turn
by Sir Stephen Luke, Senior Crown
Agent for the W.I., on Mr. Greenwood's
behalf. Sir Stephen flow to the West
Indies with the plan recently. ****
Any plan that Mr. Greenwood may have
to reform the old Federation has been
undorminad by the determination of
Barbados to go it alone. *** (to which
we would add our own political comment:
a. Some of the islands are 'making-
noise' about complete financial control
by Britain; and b. It was not only
Barbados which caused the break-down
of tho Eastern Caribbean federal plan)

St. Vinc:et: Four members of Mr.Milton
Cato's Labour Party secured seats in
the Kingstown Town Council election.
"* Mr. Ebenezer Joshua said on Tuesday
that St. Vincent had not yet decided
in favour of joining the trade pact
with F.G., Barbados & Antigua. ***
Dormiu.ic: Loroy Mitchel, Y.C.W. del:
(di'ocosYinto the YCW Conference in Bang-
kok (see p.4), had the privilege of
meeting Cardinal Cardijn in a train .


CARIBBEAN NEWS
Grenada: Sir Garnet Gordon and Mr.
Dorek Knight negotiated and signed a
new salaries agreement for Geest
workers last Tuesday. *** Grenada has
banned the importation of all Rhodesian
goods except 'under licence from the
Controller of Supplies'.
U.W.I. Six UWI graduates are to teach
in French Lycees- during the current
academic year. *** Feasibility studies
on the establishment of a plant in
Grenada to produce nutmeg jelly &'cheese'
as well as a study to determine whether
the sugar industry in St, Lucia should
be re-established are now proceeding.
*** All Bahamas Scholarships are now
to be tenable at the U.W.I, unless the
required facilities are not available
there, **' French Govt. scholarship has
been awarded to Leroy Cooke of Jamaica
(for 1965/66). He will study at Aix-
en-Provence. *** The J. Macy Jr. Faund-
ation of New York has granted U.W.I.
$114,000 U.S. for six years to strength-
en education and research in Paediatrics
(child health care) at U.W.I. Medical
School.
Trinidad: The dispute between the Oil
Workers' Union and Texaco Trinidad is
now before the Industrial Arbitration
Court. The Union is requesting that the
Company should publish a statement of
its production costs and profits. The
Union also asks for 15% wage increase*
B.G. Premier Forbes Burnham, in Britain
-o discuss border dispute with Venezuela,
in which 50,000 sq. miles are claimed,
will on his way home have free trade
area talks with Antiguan & Barbadian
leaders. He stopped off in New York
on his way to London to discuss the
$300 million U.S. 7-yr. programme for
which he hopes (for development),
$50 million U.S. of investments will be
available to the Guianese, it was stated,
Florida's Caribbean Conf: the 16th
annual conference of the Univ. of Florida
was concluded last week. Various leading
U.S. spokesmen and women addressed the
gathering, of which the theme was "U.S.
relations with the Caribbean."'
Firstdirect Air Service from Nova Scotia
to Bermuda and the West Indies was
inaugurated last week first direct
service in fact since the Lady Boats
were terminated nearly ten years ago.
The two and a half hour flight from
Canada costs $108 (Ca.) return.
SPECIAL GREETINGS RATES for XMAS Messages
in the STAR Dominica readership 11501


S.latu-rd-'y, December 11, 1965


THE STAR:


Page Three






Saturday, December 11,1


This week, instead of the usual short story, we are glad to grant a request from
Youth and print the following details of ---
Y.C.W. THIRD INTERNATIONAL COUNCIL IN BANGKOK
A Pilgrimage of Solidarity

Bangkok is the capital of Thailand in South East Asia, and is the crossroad
of Indian and Chinese culture -- the two main civilisations of Asia. This race
has adopted the culture and religion of India, and is characterized by a spirit
of hospitality, friendliness and deep religious convictions. In Bangkok is found
all the contrast of a country in the process of development -- the luxury of the
very rich and the poverty of the very poor; the social injustice and the lack of
understanding towards those who have to change their way of life; the most modern
technical development and the most ancient way of life of many of her people.
The Third Y.C.W. International Council now being held in Bangkok, Thailand,
is a gesture of friendship to the working youth of Asia and will proclaim the
Young Christian Workers' fraternal love and openness of heart. It will be a
pilgrimage of solidarity. This Diocese's Leroy Mitchel of Portsmouth has recently
arrived in Bangkok to take part in the Conference.(He represents Antigua & Mont
serrat as well).
How Y. CW. Began It is amazing to see how the idea of a young priest, Joseph
Leon Cardijn, now-His Eminence Cardinal Cardijn, could have spread so rapidly
over a period of 53 years. Cardinal Cardijn, returning home for a vacation,
found that his old friends who had gone to work in Belgian factories had unidr-
gone vast changes morally and spiritually. He searched for the reason, and the
answer brought about the origin of the Y.C.W. movement in 1912. It began with a
snall group of girls, followed poon after by a group of boys, in Laeken, Brussels.
The war and invasion of 1914 had their ill effects on the movement, and it was
not until 1924 that the movoiont was officially launched and named "Jeunesse
Ouvriere Chrctionne" -- Young Christian Workers. Today the movement has spread
through 77 countries and has a total of 163 national movements. However, the
Y.C.W, exists in various stages of development in more than 98 countries, and
claims a total of 35 Y.C.W. missionaries.
The question of international councils dates back to 1957, when 32,000 Young
Workers.from all corners of the world gathered in Rome before the Holy Father
for the 1st International Council. At that Council, this diocesan Y.C.W, was
represented by Charles Maynard and the then Yvette Montoute. The Second Council
was held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in 1961. The diocese was again represented
by Francis Andre and the then Ivinia Stevenson of Mahaut.
The Purposo: The fundamental purpose of this International Council is to review
the activities of the past four years and to plan future work and activities.
These will include reports of the International movement, planning and orientat-
ion of future work, examination and approval of the general budget, and the
election of the executive committee to serve for the next four years.
The executive committee of the International Y.C.W,, after consultation
with the 98 countries where Y.Q.W. is established, will propose an enquiry on
"Free Time for the Young Workers". By proposing this world enquiry to the Coun-
cil, the Y.C.W. intends to ask all young workers to concentrate their efforts on
this topic so that they make use of their free time to further their knowledge,
to tak- initiative, to develop their talents, and consequently to build a world
where everyone shall live .a full and abundant life.
When the Council officially opened on Nov. 30, the local sections marked
the opening with rallies in the various villages (on Sunday Nov.28), and in
Roseau the next day at St. Gerard's Hall. There was also a radio talk by the
DiQcesan President on the Monday, which was in keeping with the Y.C.W. Motto --
1"To conquer the working world for Christ".
The release ends: "May all Y.C.W.s of the diocese reflect onI their responsibility!
United in the love of all our brothers and sisters of work, we can change the
face of the earth."

SISTER ALICIA TO RETURN We are delighted-to report that Sister Mary Alicia, who
want back to Belgium to recover her health, is expected in Dominica by year's end.


Page Four


THE STAR







Saturday, December 11, 1965 THE STAR Page Five


CHRISTMAS IS COMING... By A.W,

"Christmas is coming, the geese are getting fat...", to quote an old
nursery Rhyme. About this time of the year in England, the turkeys -- and
more traditionally the geese -- have reached the end of their days in the
farmyard and are now hanging line upon line in the butcher's window. It is
hard to find a piece of beef, lamb or pork at your favourite store but nothing
reminds one so much that-Christmas is really coming than seeing this wonderful
and mouth-watering sight. I know full well that in the tropics this is not
possible, due to the heat; but it is one of the first things that comes to my
mind when I compare a town in Britain.or Ireland to here in Dominica.
Another impression of a Christmas in England is when on a cold, dark and
dismal Christmas day round five o'clock,.while everyone is going home to their
warm fireside, you look up at the lights in streets which are garlanded across
the roads and at the shop windows. Towns become a fairyland, not just for the
children, but they are changed beyond recognition, and unless a thick fog
blots out the lights, you can forget that you are cold and tired, then stand
and stare for just a few minutes at man-made beauty. Lights, Christmas trees
and fabulous window displays all make this wonderful sight, and although a
lot of it is just plain advertising to make you buy a "present for him or her,
or one for the woman who has just everything", the commercial side is forgotten
at this instant.
Of course, the children are the people who make Christmas and for whom
Ghristmas is made. Thore, too, the shops do their very best to make a toy
world for them. You can take your children out for an afternoon round town,
take them to all the big stores, let them feast their eyes on all the marvellous
toys, and then if you have any money left, take them to see Santa Claus
either by space ship orisubmarine or airplane (whichever may take their fancy).
When they reach the venerable white-haired gentleman, they are given an
attractively packed parcel -- blue for a boy and pink for a girl. You can
nearly always see a little child perched up on Santa's knee whispering in his
ear what is longed-for at Christmas. This I don't see here, and it is a pityI*
Of course there are no chimneys for Santa to come down, but everyone's door
is always open, so he doesn't have the trouble he has in some countries. I've
always wondered how he manages to keep clean in England!
The Christmas 'pop' songs that are blared continuously across the radio
seem to lose their meaning here. Very few people in the Wost Indies have
seen snow, ice, frost and sleighs. I wonder what they really think they are?**
Why has nobody written some special Christmas songs for the tropics? ***
Still, the carols are heard here, as they are everywhere in the world, and
their meaning is universal, no matter what the weather. They bring out the
true symbolism of Christmas, and though December 25th is the biggest fete of
all the year, the religious feeling is still with everybody, and that is the
main thing. So, this year I must try and forget about the snow, and enjoy a
traditional Christmas dinner rounded up by a swim in the Caribbean.

Footnotes for AW.: This pleasant seene is also visible in at least one
largo store in Dominica nowadays* Our David sat on Santa's knee last year.
** One of our contributors has written some special Christmas verses on
tropicalising or nationalising Santa Claus look out for them
S'*A.W. will find a reprint of a Dominican Christmas poem on page 7.
And for those who may miss the absent short story,'Jasper and the Editor are
both producing tales for Christmas, which will appear in the next two issues.

POPE AND PATRIARCH IN ACCORD
A joint declaration was made at the end of the Ecumdnical Council's last
meeting,on Tuesday Dec, 6, by Pope Paul and the Patriarch of the Eastern
Orthodox Church, regretting the events which caused a breach between the two
Churches 900 years ago.







THE STAI


QUEEN AND COMMONWEALTH
*-.Bejr Maest 's Februarvisit : In
addition to the official release which
weenclosed in last Saturday's issue,
we are now informed that "It is not
yet possible to say whether a visit to
the Cabrits can be included in the
programme".
Wire-photo picture facilities will be
available during the Queen's tour; the
portable apparatus, which will be
shipped from island to island, will
enable photographs of the Royal visitors
etc. to be transmitted via Barbados
throughout the world, within a few
moments. ******
The British journal Spectator (editor
ex-Minister Ian McLeod) has apologised
to a South African Judge who sentenced
a Ioi'arnalist and a warder recently.The
Judge was criticised by the Spectator
for 'condoning torture' but the
remark has been withdrawn.
Rhodesia is feeling the big squeeze,
fiscal and trade: since the Bank Direc-
tors were changed and funds and exports
stopped Mr 8maith has said that half
a million foreign workers may be repat-
riated when there is unemployment.
Rhodesia, 150,333 sq. miles, has a
3,200,000 population, of which three
millions are Africans and 200,000 whites.
(See Front page for'further news).i
Malawi (once Nyasaland) 36,829 sq.
miles Prime Minister Dr, Hastings
Banda population 2,920,00o0 has
cut off trade and fiscal relations
with Rhodesia, "for the time being".
Zambia: (once Northern Rhodesia), under
President Kenneth Kaunda, saw RAF
transport planes and Jets land last
Friday, but Kaunda said he was not
satisfied with Britain's military assis-
tance. "We want Britain to take over
the entire Kariba Dam area including
the Rhodesian part," he told a Press
onforence. *** Sofar the British
hve not accedbd to Kaunda's demand to
seize the Dam. Kaunda said later that
he reserves Zambia's position about
the severing of diplomatic relations
urged by the O.A.U. against Britain,
adding that "it might cause Zambia
more harm than good", *
France joined the British embargo on
the purchase of Rhodesian tobacco.
* Note: Zambia is,290,320 sq.miles
in area, with a population of 2,510,000.
"THE HAT I GOT FOR CHRISTMAS IS TOO BIG"
is the title of a brand new popular
song: listen for it!


Notice
WEST INDIES SHIPPING SERVICE
FREE BAGGAGE ALLOWANCE AND EkCESS
BAGGAGE

THE PUBLIC IS ASKED TO NOTE THAT THE
TERM BAGGAGE REFERS TO THE PERSONAL
EFFECTS OF THE PASSENGER, i.e. CLOTHES
etc.
ALL OTHER ITEMS SUCH AS FURNITURE,
FRUIT, PROVISIONS etc. ARE CONSIDERED
AS CARGO AND MUST BE MANIFESTED AS
SUCH. BOOKING FOR CARGO CLOSE AT NOON
ON THE DAY BEFORE THE SHIP'S ARRIVAL
AND NO BOOKINGS WILL BE ACCEPTED AFTER
THAT TIME. -CARGO MUST BE DELIVERED
ALONGSIDE THE SHIP AT THE TIME STATED
ON THE BOAT NOTE RECEIVED AT THE TIME
OF BOOKING.
ANY UNMANIFESTED CARGO WILL BE
REFUSED BY THE VESSEL. FURNITURE, FRUIT,
PROVISIONS etc. WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED AS
EXCESS BAGGAGE. -
INTENDING PASSENGERS ARE ASKED TO
NOTE THIS CAREFULLY TO AVOID POSSIBLE
EMBARRASSMENT AT A LATER DATE.
La ROSE & CO. LTD*,
SHIPPING DEPARTMENT.
UNITED NATIONS: A-full trade embargo
against South Africa was moved and
passed at a U.N. session. Only Portugal
voted against. Britain, France & U.S.A.
abstained on the grounds that the U.N,
was not in a position to impose sanctions
fully43
DBOA Press Release,
Banana growers are informed that the 3
drops in the Green Boat Price sinoe
22nd November were due to unusually
severe winter weather which interrupted
markets and slowed down sales. It is
important to note with respect to the
latest drop in the Green Boat Price
effective 6th December that while Elders
and Fyffes lowered their Green Boat
Price by two units; Geests once again
were able to lower their Green Boat
Price by one unit only.
The Company have expressed the hope
that they can maintain their present
Green Boat Price although more cold
weather is forecast.

WAR AND PEACE: Senator Wm. Fulbright,
Chairman of the U.S. Foreign Relations
Committee, told CPA delegates in N.Z,
that the U.S. should find "honourable
means of compromise" to end the war in
Viet Nam."It is better to have a popular
Govt. in Viet Nam independent of China
than a weak Democratic regime," he said.


Page Six


Saturday, December 11,1965








Saturday, December 11, 1965 THE STAR Page Seven

The poem below was printed on the front page of Eprouvons Nos Droits (cont.)
the Christmas number of the Dominica Herald,1964. functioning society. And if, for
The author, however, retains copyright of all her most of us, the practicable way
works, of doing this is by voicing our
THE CHRISTMAS STROLLERS opinions, either in the press
or otherwise, then why don't we
'Tis Christmas eve, and cool. With quiet feetotherwise, then why don't we
The strolling singers cross to where the street do i more often? Why do we
allow timidity, jeers, criti-
Splinters with silver, like a jagged street. iy
cism and possibly complexes to
Inaginei In a land devoid of snow inhibit us from executing our
The starlight makes a frosted festoor show, DUTIES to the State, when we
Mock fir-trees lifting up their fruits aglow, enjoy other privileges the State
has to offer? By holding back
What does it signify? That everywhere,
we become deceptors, frauds, un-
From polar wastes to palmy hemisphere grateful I wouldnrt say cit-
The world keeps tryst with a remembrance clear. izens -- b ut beggars.
izens -- but beggars.
And the remembrance --- Just some common hay The only thing which should
Smoothed in a box against a Byy's birthday, inhibit us is incrimination, and
Yet see! The oxen curl their hoofs to pray.' we are guiltless of this unless
a law has been disobeyed. There
0, what a childish fancy! That is why is no law in any democracy to
All children love it so, and glorify stop a citizen from expressing
the tender legend which will never die. his opinions; We shouldn't
suppose that there is any such
And that is why, like children, strollers gaze legislation here either. Our
At neighbours' Christmas trees through starry haze Government is not one of those
And to the Child their simple carols raise. that pretends to be democratic.
Phyllis Shand Allfrey So let us use our rights by feel-

By Vans LeBlanc: EPROUVONS NOS DROITS (Let us Exercise our Rights)
Political rights exist for the common good purposefully; but they belong to
the individual. In fact, they are privileges rather than merely rights. And they
constitute the capacity of citizens to participate in government., both as
vigilant, public-spirited private citizens or as public officials in the admin-
istration. In either case the citizen has this specific political favour given
him by the State over his ordinary civil rights.
We should be very fortunate to be under the auspices of a government of which
one of the main characteristics is public opinion, thus summoning the citizen to
take part in government. There are governments which claim to be democratic and
still do not allow their citizens to avail themselves of such political rights --
which are (so to speak) inalienable. Let us all get ourselves informed on our
on affairs, and take part in public affairs by expressing the truth and seeking
truth. But what do such rights comprise? They comprise the right to speak publicly,
to make use of the local press, to vote for whomsoever one desires, to worship
in whichever church one pleases (whether it be in a building or not), and other
Civil liberties which are not really necessary of mention here. In fact, there
are so many more of them that space wouldn't permit me to do so now. But those
I have listed Democracy owes to its Citizens, and MUST give them. However,
while most of us realise that these rights are there, we do not use them as we
might truly want to. There is some deterrent (or probably more than one), which-
forces us to suppress our feelings, forces us to let corruption and irrationality
prevail unchallenged, and we either sit by and grumble among ourselves or we help
the laissez-faire cycle. It is time that those of us who know our rights use
them without being held back by purely psychological deterrents. They are other-
wise innefective and they will soon disappear once we brave the obstacles. And
those of us who do not know what those rights are, let us make it our responsib-
ility -- as indeed it is -- to find out what those rights are.
It is for us to realise that by using such rights, we do not only indulge
in enjoying privileges: we are also living up to certain responsibilities,
the frequent companions of privileges. It is incumbent upon us to concern our-
selves with public affairs, to take an active part in the moulding of a properly
(continued top of page, right-hand)


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Page Eight THE STAR Saturday, December 11, 1965

BOOK REVIEW: "DAWNLIT" Magazine published by
The Dawbiney Literary Club (Price $1.00)
There are 84 pages in this collection, it is well patronised by advertisers
and contains a medley of articles, short stories and verses. I have always
thought of Dawbiney Lit. Club as a debating society rather than a true literary
association, and in the role as I conceive it, it appears very successful. This
number is a challenging and eager one. It is eager, as Lamming would put it,
"to prove something". Public affairs, mysticism and religion are among its major
topics, with a good overlay of local scenery and, of course, patriotic nationalism.
The debating type of articles are among the most capably written; the poems are
the worst. In my view W.R.F. Watty's poems are the best. The article on poetry
falls-bhort because it lacks true criteria: the quotations are mostly chosen for
their extolling or exhortatory qualities.. But as the writer, Miss Jean Lawrence,
says "we should not discourage those who are trying to express themselves".
Among the short stories, Aliclk Lazare, Patricia Garraway and Franklin Watty
(whose piece is really a satirical vignette) stand out. But oh, if only the
verse-makers would not put in so many capital letters, and the prose-writers so
much overstatement! Take the last sentence of one of Lazare's stories: "And her
shame, her degradation evaporated before the sublimity of her noble sacrifice."
He could have removed three abstract definitive words from that sentence and
made it much stronger. And how do you think the words 'when.health's swift auto
rolls away' (A. Richards) or 'Is this story palatable?' (A..Leevy) fit into a
poetic concept? K.G. Butler's piece on "The Ostracised" is touching. I must
confess that I skipped some of this publication; I skipped it, but I may go back
and read it again, one idle day. --- P.S.A.

DOMINICA BANANA GROWERS' ASSOCIATION
NOTICE TO BANANA GROWERS
Banana Prices
Growers are notified that consequent upon the reduction of the present Green
Boat Price of 56.15.0 by one unit of 3.10.0 to 53.5s. per ton effective 6th
December, 1965, the price payable for bananas from that date will be as follows:-
At Reception Stations *. .,* 3.40 per lb.
At Southern & Eastern Buying Points ... ... 2.720 per lb.
At Northern Buying Points ... ... ... 2.600 per lb.
Growers who qualify for Incentive Bonus will receive an additional .250
per lb.
A.D. BOYDI
General Manager.

CHAUCER: The Nun's Priest's Tale (continued: for G.C.E. Students).
With a wry deference to the virtue of poverty, Chaucer relates how a poor
widow, somewhat stooping with the weight of years, lived in a small sooty cottage
in a tree-lined dale; she earned her bread in patience and simplicity, supporting
herself and two daughters and caring for her small stock three hogs, three cows
and a ewe called Molly. She needed no hot sauce because she had little meat or
dainty food; her diet and clothes were humble. On the other hand she never got
sick from overeating or drinking neither red nor white wine passed her lips but
her diet was of brown bread, singed bacon and sometimes an egg or two. Her little
yard, enclosed with sticks, had a dry ditch around it. In that yard she kept her
cock, Chanticleer -- a merrier crow than his was never heard in all the land!
He was as true to the matin hour as the abbey clock. Instinct told him all
about the ascension of the equinox, and when it had risen fiftcen.degrees, he
crew so that it was a joy to listen. (Chaucer then gives a categoric description
of Chanticlecr's colouring and beauty, ending: "his neck and baok were golden).
This gentle cock had seven spouses: fairest of all was Dame Portelote or Partlet.
She was very polite, discreet and debonair, and her behaviour was such that
since she was a week old she had held fast Chanticleer's affections. How fine
to hear them singing a duet: "My love has journeyed afar!" (Chaucer adds, as
if in an undertone: 'For in those days, I have heard that birds and beasts could
both speak and sing, as we do.0) NEXT WEEK: The Bad Dream.







I, e I


THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL (ELECTIONS) ORDINANCE, CAP. 183

NOTICE OF TSSUE OF WRITS OF ELECTION


His Honour the administrator having issued his writ for the election
nf ~ seliier of the- Le;--.-_'i.clAve Council in respect of each of the elector-
al ".stri 1sts mentioneJ ':c.7, the returning officer of each of the elect-
orIC districts ment.io;e below, the returning officer of each district
will on the 18th day of December 1965 now next ensuing between the hours
of 9 a.m. and 2 pm. in his respective district proceed to the nomination
and if there is no opposition, to the election of a member.

Forms of nomination papers may be obtained from the Returning
Officers.

Every nomination paper must be signed by any six or more electors
qualified to vote in respect of each particular district, and should be
handed to the returning officer between the said hours of 9 a.m. and 4 pm*

Yo nomination paper shall be valid or acted upon by the returning
officer unless it is accompanied by:-
(a) the consent in writing of the person therein nominated and,
(b) a deposit of one hundred and twenty dollars in cash.

Every candidate shall at the time of his nomination deliver to the
returning officer a statutory declaration of his qualifications made and
subscribed by such candidate or, if the candidate is absent from the
Colony on nomination day, by his duly adthorised agent. If such statut-
ory declaration is not delivered as aforesaid the nomination shall be
*deemed to be'void.


In the event election is being contested the Poll will be taken
between the hours of 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. on the 7th day of January 1966
in each electoral district-
'No. DI Returning Officer Address
.-----l j.G
T. Roseau-Northern Arlington J. Riviere Goodwil
2, Roseau-Southern TU. Vinci Bruney Roseau
3. Western B. Jno. Rose Iahaut
4. North-Western R.J. Sebastien Coulibistri
5. South-e'stern C.,.E. Guiste Soufriere
6. Eastern J. Johnson Thomas Castle Bruc
7. North-Eastern A.A. Benjamin Marigot
8. South-Eastern Kinnard Leatham 'orne Jaune
9. Northern B.A. Carbon Bense
10. Portsmouth Peter J. Israel Portsmouth
11. Sou then C S. GreRoire r' n rahv


1


e

e


V.I. oIf NSTON
Supervisor of Elections.


Avvt. 2/12/65


Saturday. December 11, 19665


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Saturday, December 11,1965


S T A R S P OR TS
Cricket. The first Test between England
and Australia started at Brisbane on
Friday. Play was restricted to just
under two hours, due to heavy rain, and
in that time Australia, who won the
tcx;, scored 79 for the loss of Red-
J'.h's wicket. Bill Lawry, who opened
i v .,h Redpath, is. 40 not out, while Bob
SCouper is 20 not out. Play was as dull
ao the weather, and a small crowd saw
: Redpath & Lawry begin confidently for
Australia. Redpath was unfortunate
when he played on to a yorker from
Brown for 17 the day's sole interest.
Earlier, the England selectors surpri-
sed everyone by naming an out-of-form
Boycott among the Eleven for the match.
Boycott has been ill and has not had
much cricket on the tour,
Football: England has at last had a
match and can look forward more surely
to the World Cup championship next July,
On Wednesday they beat Spain in Madrid
by two goals to nil. Manager Alf Ram-
say decided beforehand that drastic
changes were needed after his team's
recent poor performances. Billy Charl-
ton was put back at left-wing and Allan
Ball of Blackpool, an inside-forward,
was shifted to right-wing. The Arsenal
pair (Eastham & Baker) were brought in
at inside-right ana centre-forward
respectively. Spain are Champions of
Europe, and beating them at home took
some doing, I think the combination
Eastham-Baker (clubmates)did the trick,
England were a superb team and took
command from the start.The Spaniards
were never allowed to settle in mid-
field, thus their goal-hungry forwards
were starved, England went ahead after
26 minutes, when a fine move between
Chalton, Eall and Eastham ended with
Baker scoring from close range. This
2nd 'ocal came late in the 2nd half,
when -.t;her brilliant move was conver-
tud by the inside-left. On Tuesday,
-Sco". and %c.-re knocked out of the
World ('up Champ, by Italy. In the 1st
.le. (.yed in ITov.) Scotland won
l-. 1-t this timo they lost 3-0. This
dciC'~ lee'ves only England of the
'ione countrio-s' among 16 competing
for the World Cup Championship 1966,
SHIPS AHOY
SUNDAY 5th: MV/ Ammon, 96 tons gen.
cargo;INI/V Atlantic Comet,30 tons gen.
& frozen car-go; /V Tsefat -large lot
frozen foods; Yacht Tamba from Mat/que.
S/S Irpinia from UK, 71 passengers.
Sailing to UK, 30 passengers, mostly
children. MONDAY Sch. Island Pride
from Irontserrat; M/T Pt0 Fortin, Fone
Coleo (Contd. next column,. ... ...


READERS' VIEWS- (contd.)
Dear Mrs. Editor, Your Star Ascends
I have been aske-yT
my follow readers to-inform you that
the STAR is the best of the three papers
in this island, and they want to know
you personally. You must by all means
enlargen the size of the STAR to meet
that of the Chronicle and Herald.
We are glad indeed to know that you
shall be standing for Roseau North.
Please use your good influence with the
women. It is time that our Leg. Co. be
composed of at least two or three women.
Otherwise the men (especially the Labour
men in power) just feel that the Leg.Co.
is their society, and nobody else's.
Fight hard to get in by all means.
ONE OF FIFTY,
Northern District.
Dear Madam, That Rhodesian Tobacco!
Would somebody kindly tell
me how LeBlanc & Govt. intend to pay or
cause to be paid the $70,000 for Rhod-
esian tobacco (which is a shame), seeing
that sterling is blocked to that land and
I heard on the radio Rhodesian 'imperial
preference' is over, making goods dearer.
VEXED CRITIC, Roseau.
IMPORTANT NEWSBRIEFS: Gen. de Gaulle
wins or loses the Presidency of France in
the 2nd ballot tomorrow: .first figures
44% for him and 32% for Socialist runner-
up. *** BIG SOVIET CHANGES the Dep P.M,
of Russia was 'relieved' of his post,
given a Communist Party job; and President
Mikoyan (70) resigned on grounds of
health, replaced by Podgorny (62). The
Soviets have announced a bigger arms
budget, while-U.S.A, is cutting Bomber:
costs. U.S.A. TO HELP-INDIA! Change of
attitude(this week) states U.S. will
lend famine-struck India $50 million US
and ship tons of wheat & free food there.
GHANA is-taking preparatory steps to
leave the Comonwealth, but Nigeria has
refused to contemplace this move,- ***
The P.M.s of India and Pakistan,Shastri
and Ayoub Khan, go to Moscow for concil-
iation talks with the Soviet leaders
soon. Ayrub Khan is in Lond6n enroute w
SHIPS AHOY,..Monday: Sloop Pacific from
Antigua via Portsmouth -.gas cylinders;
Emilia M. fr. Antigua ditto with salt.
Wednesday: MVs Federal Palm, 136 tons
gan. cargo, mailsv,17 pass; Federal Maple
14 pas,. mails, 129 tons cargo; VenImos
from US.A. 35 tons cargo, 109 bags mails.
M/V Adviser (UK) 145 tons cargo; 2 fuel
Tankers and S/S Meteor-with Tourists.
Thursday: M/V Goestbay & Geestland -
bananas, Fond Cole; Sloop Camela B.from
Montscrrat 829 stems bananas to transhi p
fnt~Eoh ley al tRos au oml S oli.ca,
at. ^ Bath Rea, Roseau, Bominica ,Wr*I


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