Citation
Memoirs of my dog

Material Information

Title:
Memoirs of my dog interspersed with original anecdotes of animals : designed to cherish, in the youthful mind, kindly feelings towards the brute creation
Creator:
Cobbin, Ingram, 1777-1851 ( Author, Primary )
Berger, G ( George ) ( Publisher )
Ball, Arnold & Co ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
G. Berger
Ball, Arnold & Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
94. 2 p., [4] leaves of plates : col. ill. ; 14 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Dogs -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Animal welfare -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Human-animal relationships -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1840 ( rbgenr )
Baldwin -- 1840
Genre:
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Inferred date based on publishers' name and date established from Brown P. London publishers and printers c. 1800-1870.
General Note:
Publisher's advertisement follows text.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
by Ingram Cobbin.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026648461 ( ALEPH )
51961212 ( OCLC )
ALG4794 ( NOTIS )

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Full Text




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MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.


























































































































































































































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MY DOG'S PROFILE.



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG:

INTERSPERSED WITH
Original Anecdotes of Animals,

DESIGNED

TO CHERISH, IN THE YOUTHFUL MIND, KINDLY FEELINGS
TOWARDS THE BRUTE CREATION.

By INGRAM COBBIN, M.A.

“‘Dr. Brown considered the Duties which we owe to the Brute Creation,
as a very important branch of ethics, and, had he lived, he would have
published an essay upon the subject.’’—Lirz or Dr. Tomas Brown, BY
THE Rey. Dr. WELSH.

LONDON:
G. BERGER, HOLYWELL STREET, STRAND;

AND BALL, ARNOLD & CO., PATERNOSTER ROW.



LONDON:
G. Berger, Printer, Holywell Street, Strand.



TO PARENTS AND TEACHERS.

SomE young persons frequently discover a great
propensity to tease the brute creation; while others
evince as strong a predilection in their favour.
One great object of these pages is, to correct the
disposition of the former, and cherish that of the
latter.

Of all animals, none have often been worse used
than the dog; and hence the proverb, to express
the ill usage practised by any individual towards
another, “He treated him like a dog.” It has
always been the fate of a few to be too much
petted, but of a large number to be very unkindly
used.



vi TO PARENTS AND TEACHERS.

I am one of those who think it probable, at least,
that the animal creation may be restored in an-
other state. If I err, my error is innocent; and
I have on my side some of the greatest names. I
think that nothing that is intellectual can die, and
I perceive in many animals more than instinct.*
In what condition they may exist I know not, any
more than I know that they may exist at all.
Scripture is silent upon the subject; and where
that is silent about future things, all must be con-
jecture. Yet, from the nature of spirit which the
beast. possesses, it must be presumed that, if he

* Toplady says, that ‘instinct is a name for we know not what ;
and he that would distinguish between instinct and reason, must first
find a medium between matter and spirit.” Igo notso far: I agree
with Lord Monboddo, that instinct is different from reason; and
sucking has, for instance, been properly mentioned as an example
of instinct which is, indeed, common to human beings before they can
reason, and is equally common to all the tribes of mammalia. But
a dog does something which requires reason, and is more than in-
stinct, when, like my animal, he brings me a letter or newspaper,
and delivers it to me, instead of dropping it by the way ; and delivers
it to me, and not to any other person, and searches for me at the
same time till he jinds me, in whatever part of the premises I
may be.



TO PARENTS AND. TEACHERS. Vil

finally ceases to exist when he leaves this world,
it is not from the constitution of his nature, but
from the will of his Creator. “I will honestly
confess,” says Toplady, “that I never yet heard
one single argument urged against the immor-
tality of brutes, which, if admitted, would not,
mutatis mutandis, be equally conclusive against
the immortality of man.” Wesley, holding similar
sentiments, replies thus to the objector who may
ask, ‘‘ But of what use will those creatures be in
that future state?” “I answer this by another
question: what use are they of now? If there
be, as has commonly been supposed, eight thousand
species of insects, who is able to inform us of what
use seven thousand of them are? If there are four
thousand species of fishes, who can tell us of what
use are more than three thousand of them? If
there are six hundred sorts of birds, who can tell
of what use five hundred of those species are? If
there be four hundred sorts of beasts, to what
use do three hundred of them serve? Consider
this; consider how little we know of even the



vill TO PARENTS AND TEACHERS.

present designs of God; and then you will not
wonder that we know still less of what he deigns
to do in the new heaven, and the new earth.”*

The Holy Book unravels not this knotty ques-
tion, for it is furnished only to inform us about
the destiny of men, and not of inferior creatures.
The advocates for one side of the question quote
the language of the preacher, Eccles. iii. 21, ‘“ Who
knoweth the spirit of a man that goeth upward,
and the spirit of a beast that goeth downward in
the earth 2”; The advocates for the other quote
Rom. vill. 22: “For we know that the whole
creation groaneth and travaileth in pain together

* Mr. Wesley's arguments are founded on the discoveries of
science at that time; but in a very few years afterwards, Drury’s
cabinet of Insects was sold, containing 11,000 species of insects ;
and large additions have been made continually, since that period,
in every branch of natural history.

+ Psalm xlix. 12, is another passage which may be quoted against
the restoration of animals; but all commentators agree in the
opinion that this merely signifies, that as the brute creation die,
so also do men die.



TO PARENTS AND TEACHERS. 1S

until now.” Both passages are involved in dif-
ficulty, and throw no clear light upon the subject.
It is one in which reason, enlightened by revela~
tion,* must chiefly be our guide; but to which
religion is certainly not opposed, as it respects the
view of a future state of existence. Such an
opinion adopted, also appears to me to be highly
favourable to the cultivation of humanity towards
the brute creation, and gives us more exalted views
than the other, of the benevolence of that divine
Being whose “tender mercies are over alk his
works.” But it is not my intention here to enter
elaborately into the argument, and it is not one
into which the young mind can enter: it is there-
fore, of course, not enforced, but only hinted at,
in the narrative.

* T have here added a qualifying clause ; for it may be doubted

if man would ever have thought of immortality, even for himself,
without some traditionary knowledge, at least, of revelation.

+ The author has read, with much pleasure, The Prize Essay |
written by Dr. Sryzus, entitled, ‘* The Animal Creation :. its
Claims on our Humanity stated and enforced.” But he cannot
avoid expressing his regret that he has spoken so lightly of the



x TO PARENTS AND TEACHERS.

My sympathy with the suffering brute creation
has made me strongly attached to them, and I think
that the grateful creatures generally know that I
am their friend. I have especially observed the
sagacity of dogs, and those of the poodle breed

opinion entertained by many great men, in favour of the future
existence of animals. The following observations might as well
have been omitted: ‘‘ The questions, whether animals possess
souls? whether they are immortal, and will exist in another state
of being? we leave to the speculative and dreamy enthusiast. We
quarrel not with the poor untutored Indian, who thinks,

* Admitted to that equal sky,
His faithful dog will bear him company.’

Nor would we break the charm which binds more enlightened
philosophers, and some of the gentler race of Christians, to the
sweet illusion, that compensation will follow animal suffering in an
after-life.” Dr. Styles must know that men of high intelligence
and sound sense have argued for the future existence of the brute
creation; and while the author of this work does not presume
positively to assert it, he would remember that it has been favoured
by men of science and philosophy, as well as by men of distinguished
piety and good sense. Toplady and Wesley have already been
quoted : a few others are here added, for the extracts from which
the author is indebted to Sheppard’s interesting volume, The Autumn
Dream: “If,” says Bonnet, ‘ the lower animals have souls, their
soul is as indivisible, as indestructible by second causes, as the soul



TO PARENTS AND TEACHERS. x1

have attracted my particular attention. I believe
the reason why some persons so little admire
animals is, because they are not aware how much
of intelligence can be drawn out from them, and
they know nothing of. one pleasure of life, of no

of man: a simple substance can neither be divided nor decom-
pounded. The soul of the animal, therefore, can perish only by
annihilation ; and I do not see that religion announces, in express
terms, that annihilation ; but I do see that it celebrates the im-
mense treasures of divine goodness.” ‘‘If,” says Dr. BARCLAY,
‘‘animals are reserved for a future state, and destined, like man,
in a new heaven or a new earth, to animate new bodies, and of
different materials, who will presume to say to the Omniscient and
the Almighty, that, after fulfilling his purposes here, they can
answer no other purpose hereafter? May they not be reserved,
as forming many of the customary links in the chain of being, and,
by preserving the chain entire, contribute there, as they do here,
to the general beauty and variety of the universe? Besides—
though some individuals of the human species, in that blessed state,
may no longer feel an interest in them, yet, to others of more con-
templative minds, may they not be a source not only of sublime,
but of perpetual delight?” &e. ‘It is,” says Bisnop Burner,
“thought an insuperable difficulty that brutes should be immortal,
and, by consequence, capable of everlasting happiness. Now this
manner of expression is both invidious and weak: but the thing
intended by it is really no difficulty at all, either in the way of
natural or moral consideration. For, frst suppose the invidious



xi TO PARENTS AND TEACHERS.

inferior kind, derived from the affectionate regard
which is often displayed by brute creatures towards
tender masters.

My objects in writing this memoir are not merely
to furnish an amusing volume for the young, but

thing designed in such a manner of expression, were really implied,
as it is not in the least, in the natural immortality of brutes—
namely, that they must arrive at great attainments, and become
rational and moral agents—even this would be uo difficulty, since
we know not what latent powers and capacities they may be endued
with. There was once, prior to experience, as great presumption
against human creatures, as there is against the brute creatures,
arriving at that degree of understanding which we have in mature
age. For, we can trace up our existence to the original with
theirs. And we find it to be ageneral law of nature, that creatures
endued with capacities of virtue and religion, should be placed in a
condition of being in which they are altogether without the use of
them, for a considerable length of their duration——as in infancy and
childhood, And great part of the human species go out of the
present world before they come to the exercise of these capacities
in any degree at all. But then, secondly, the natural immortality
of brutes does not in the least imply that they are indued with any
latent capacities of a rational or moral nature. And the economy
of the universe might require that there should be living creatures
without any capacities of this kind. And all difficulties, as to the
manner how they are to be disposed of, are so apparently and



TO PARENTS AND TEACHERS. Xl

‘to add a few pages to the anecdotes of animal
sagacity, of which so many instances are recorded
in our natural historics and animal biography ; to
excite a taste for reading books of a superior class,
on the subject; and especially to promote dispo-

wholly founded in our ignorance, that it is wonderful they should
be insisted upon by any, but such as are weak enough to think they
are acquainted with the whole system of things.” To these remarks,
especially from the pen of a BurueER, the author may now venture,
without fear of the appellation of a “‘ speculative and dreamy en-
thusiast,” to add some thoughts on the subject, which he himself
wrote about ten years since in a periodical miscellany, when he
was not at all aware that he was in such good company: ‘* The
works of nature are as yet but little known, even by the most
intellectual students of the various departments of science. The
beauties that lie concealed in the bud—the mysterious chemistry
perpetually in operation—the secrets of the earth’s bosom, and of
the sea’s depths—what a source of delight may these open to the
mind of the glorified being, while he shall perpetually exclaim, as
page after page of the immense and beautiful volume is unfolded,
©O Lord, how excellent are thy works, in wisdom hast thou made
themall!’ It is true, ‘the earth and all the works that are therein
shall be burnt up ;’ but we know not what resuscitation of nature
may take place in the new heaven and the new earth, which shall
be perfectly defecated from all that is impure; or otherwise, how
much of God’s creation must, as far as relates to this interesting
object, have been made in vain. Nor let it be scornfully said,



xiv TO PARENTS AND TEACHERS.

sitions of kindness towards the brute creation, and
in particular,
“ Towards the poor dog, in life the firmest friend,
The first to welcome, foremost to defend ;

Whose honest heart is still his master’s own,
Who labours, fights, breathes, lives for him alone.”

I have adopted the form of a memoir in record-
ing some anecdotes which have come under my
own knowledge, this being more interesting to the

‘Shall the odious reptile, and the insignificant and filthy insect, be
restored, and be objects of contemplation in the world of bliss?’
Be it remembered, that nothing shall be injurious or hurtful there ;
and that a celestial philosopher must have a scope for enjoyment,
which all the giant minds that ever existed on this side the grave
must fail, even when combined, to shadow forth, Let it also be
recollected, that no work of God, when properly viewed, is insig-
nificant; that the most trifling blade of grass, or animated piece of
dust that we tread under our feet, baffles all our powers to create ;
and supposing any of us could call forth either into existence,
mankind would justly look upon us as phenomena not less than
divine, and we should leave Sir Isaac Newton and his fellow-minds
at an immeasurable distance. If, then, the most minute of God’s
works are so great, and if they are ‘sought out’ here by all that
“take pleasure in them,’ how much more may we believe that, as
they are most worthy the notice of an exalted intellect, so they
will form a portion of those objects of delight and inquiry, which
shall employ the bright hosts of immortality. The conjecture is



TO PARENTS AND TEACHERS. XV

young than a mere essay. The memoir is that of
an animal who was one of singular sagacity and
good temper, and therefore an excellent subject to
effect my design. He was my friend and compa-
nion for fourteen years, and we found no difficulty
to understand each other on almost any subject on
which it was possible for man and beast to con-
verse. A word, ora motion of the hand, in general,

pleasant, it is harmless, and it is not derogatory to the greatness
and goodness of the Creator, and may possibly be involved in the
declaration, that, owing to sin, ‘ the whole creation groaneth, being
burdened, longing-to be delivered.’” The author of the above
remarks would further add, that in his opinion men of sense and
piety would do well to speak with greater modesty when they
oppose the doctrine of the future existence of animals: they assert
it as a thing for certain that they will not exist ; but how do they
know that they will not? Their prejudices are no ground of argu-
ment. It is a fine benevolent idea that they will; and we are sure
that our utmost thoughts cannot exceed the divine benevolence.

It may be here necessary to explain, that, owing to considerable
delay in the publication of this little volume, it now appears some
time after the author of “ Animal Creation” has recommended it to
the notice of his juvenile readers, in a note in his Prize Essay—the
body of the work having been forwarded, as soon as it came from
the press, for the perusal of the gentleman who has so obligingly
noticed it.



_ xvi TO PARENTS AND TEACHERS.

“easily conveyed to him my: meaning, and he readily
obeyed. I envy not ‘the insensibility of any one,
who can smile at the writer when he adds, that
he deeply regrets his loss.

In writing a memoir, I have found many oppor-.
tunities for throwing in useful hints for the young,
which they would not perhaps so readily nor so
well retain, if communicated through other me-
diums; and I have endeavoured to make the whole
suitable for the volatile individuals who may give
them a perusal.

Camberwell. Ic.



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

CHAPTER I.

Description of my Dog—How he became Mine—His engaging
behaviour—Original Anecdotes of a Horse—Of a Goose—
Anecdote of a Goose and Dog—Original Anecdotes of a Squirrel
—Ofa Poodle Dog belonging to a French Officer—Of another
Poodle—Singular instance of Retaliation in another Dog of the
same Breed—Anecdote of a former Poodle of my own—Original
and extraordinary Anecdotes of a Dog in the North of England.

\

It was on a fine day in the month of October,
1824, when I first saw my dog. He was a beau-
tiful young animal, all vivacity, and the sun shone
splendidly on his snow-white coat of silken curls,
and his mild dark hazel eye sparkled with delight
as he bounded along, attracted by a ball in the
hand of his leader, which every now and then he
caught with the greatest dexterity. He was

B



1 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

dressed in the highest style of dog fashion, for he
was a poodle, whose privileges far exceed those of
other dogs; being allowed to have the hair cut, and
the beard shaved, and to wear mustachios and
trowsers, or pantaloons, shaped something like
those of many biped fops who strut about in the
highest mode of fashion. He'was also decorated
with the blue riband, but wore no star, and the
former adorned his neck, and not his breast. It
formed a beautiful contrast with his snowy white
frill, and his curly silk jacket, which was cut short
like that of an hussar, while his lower garments
were thin, and sat round his loins and his limbs as
close as wax, and fitted far better than any that
could have been made by the first tailor in Cork or
Bond Street.

Four months before, I had lost.a dog of the
same breed, the poor animal having been killed by
another dog at a hospital whither he had been sent
for the cure of an eruption on his skin. Till then
I had not thought of replacing him, but the idea
now suddenly came into my mind. Seeing that I



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 3

noticed the animal, the dealer asked me if I wanted
to buy a dog. My former one was a present, and
having been valued at ‘ten guineas, I expected a
demand would have been made upon me of a larger
sum than I should have thought proper to have
paid for the purchase. To my surprise, on asking
the price, the reply was, “ fifteen shillings.” [
inquired. about his temper; the vender answered
that it was one of the very best. ‘ Temper is
every thing.” Who likes a person with a sullen or
a crabbed temper; or a child that is always irritable
and fretful, or a dog that can never salute any body
without a growl ora snap? “ Here, sir,” said the
dealer, “is a proof of his good temper,” leading
him at the same time by the ear; ‘no dog but

one of the very best temper would permit that.”
_“ Will he fetch and carry?” ‘“ You may see that,
sir, In a moment,” said he; and throwing the ball,
it was quickly pursued, seized, and returned to the
hand of the dealer. ‘ Well,” said I, “ if you will
take him to my house at some distance, the dog is
mine.”

B 2



4 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

The loss of my former animal; which I had had
about two years, had caused great regret in my
family, and a successor was never thought of. He
was, therefore, received very coolly, and paid for
with some reluctance. In the evening I returned
home, after some hours absence, and found that
from his having something of the urbanity, as well
as the appearance of a gentleman, he was already
in a fair way of being domesticated at my fire-
side. As he had not the talent of conversation, he
amused the company by other means, and most
readily agreed to perform some interesting tricks,
at which he was quite an adept. He was in the
act of exhibiting some of these when I returned,
and he soon made himself so much at home, that
in a few days he became a general favourite.

I was always an admirer of animals, though for
a number of years I never had a dog except for a
few months, and, before I could be much attached
to him, he was lost. But I had been accustomed
to ride a pretty little mare for four or five years, of
which I was fond—a creature that always took care



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 5

to let me know if the groom had given her no food
at her proper time, by saluting me with a neigh,
being silent if she had been fed. I had also been
partial to fowls, which, when I had them, would
fly upon my head and shoulders, and eat out.of my
hands.. And I had been honoured with the attach-
ment of a goose.

I scarcely know whether or not to mention this
fact, especially after reading of a Newfoundland
dog, who enjoyed the like honour. “ In one of
those amusing and instructive works upon natural
history, in which we find recorded the traits of
character peculiar to different animals, there is an
account of a goose, which had formed so strong an
attachment to a Newfoundland dog belonging to
the same master, that she was never easy out of
his society. Neptune was conscious of this kindly
feeling, and returned it to a certain extent; and
whenever they were together in the yard, he feed-
ing, and goosey looking affectionately on, or the
contrary, it was all very well; but when Neptune.
took the air in the street of the village, or by the



6 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

road side, or went to refresh himself in a neigh-
bouring pond, goosey would accompany him. Then
it was too, that after enduring the waddle and quack
of his admiring companion for a certain period of
time, Neptune invariably, as soon as he saw any
dogs of condition, or puppies of quality coming,
put himself into a long trot, and darted round a
corner, or over a gate, in order to exhibit his dis-
like of the connexion.” However, I only relate a
fact, and I could not help it any more than Nep-
tune, if my goose thought there was any thing
attractive about me to engage her affections. This
creature followed me about on my premises, was
fond of peeping at me in my parlour, and, when
invited, would lay her head on my knee to be
stroked, or sit on my lap; but as good breeding is
desirable for a parlour guest, and goose was not
always well-behaved, she was at length expelled
from the parlour; and having made great havoc in
the garden—where she had no business to enter—
and stolen all my lettuces and other things, the un-
fortunate culprit was sentenced to die, and execu-



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 7
tion-was passed upon her accordingly; she, however,
died a noble death, having, like many illustrious
lords and ladies, had her head cut off. I was vexed
after her end, that, in a thoughtless moment, I had
consented to her being put to death. Poor crea-
ture! many a greater delinquent has escaped all
punishment. She had shown great confidence in
me, and confidence should never be abused, and
she had afforded me some amusement. Before I
leave her, I must relate one curious anecdote. My
premises consisted of two parts entirely divided
from each other, the back buildings being of the
same height as the front, and used for all common
purposes. The space between them formed an
alley of some length, enclosed at each end by a wall.
This was the domain of my poultry, and of goose
among the rest. But I had then a spaniel puppy
who loved a frolic, and, like some children, never
passed an hour without getting into mischief. One
day he took it into his head to chace the goose, and
as the latter expanded her wings, he took a fancy
to indulge himself with a ride, so seating himself



8 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

upon his feathered saddle, the goose—as if to ac-
commodate him as agreeably as she could, though
she did not mean it—spread her wings still more,
and ran backwards and forwards crying under her
load. Hearing the noise, I went to see what was
the matter, and there was my puppy sitting as
gravely as a judge on the back of the bird, enjoying
a pleasant morning’s ride, till I thought he had
had sufficient exercise, and released the goose
from her rider.

I must add that I had likewise a beautiful
squirrel, which was a very intelligent and amusing
creature, and often afforded an innocent laugh at
the fire-side. He had been the pet of a friend,
who gave it to me, and was perfectly tame. He
would allow of being laid on his back between the
knees, and stroked on the breast. One of his
luxuries was to lie on his mistress’s lap, and
another to nestle in the servant’s pocket, whence
he would pop out his head if he heard a voice; or
when she came in to wait at table, I would some-
times put nuts into my pockets, and roll on the



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 9

carpet that he might come and rifle them, and his
keen nose soon set him in a bustle to procure his
plunder. He was very fond of sugar, and would
jump upon the tea-table and take it dexterously
from the basin, and then curling his fine bushy tail
around him, he would sit up in a corner, like a
monkey, nibbling it. His movements were always
nimble; and once in his haste, he popped his head
into the hot water of the slop-basin, instead of the
sugar-basin—when he scalded. the tip of his nose,
and then scampered off, sneezing and scolding in
the most laughable manner. The little creature
had a proper cage, with a cylinder to run round
and keep his agile feet in motion, and a chamber
_ for retirement and rest; but he had also the free
scope of the house, and if called, he would run
about, pricking up his ears, and peeping into every
room till he found the person that called him, when
he would greet him with a cry of pleasure, and
mount his shoulders with the agility of a lamp-
lighter. This engaging little creature was killed
by a wanton boy, who mischievously turned round



10 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

his cage while he was retreating from him into his
sleeping apartment, and broke his back. The poor
animal did not instantly die, but lived many hours
afterwards, and in great agony expired on his mis-
tress’s lap, whither he had crawled that he might
receive her caresses with his last breath. Poor
squirrel was not suffered to die without some tears
being shed for his loss. I sketched his portrait
after death, which I have since sometimes looked
upon with a melancholy pleasure.

But, to return to the subject of these memoirs:
I have already said that he was a poodle. Dogs
of every species have for ages been reckoned
among the friends and companions of the human
race; but, with the exception of the Newfoundland
dog, the poodle is considered as the most intel-
ligent, and no one of the dog tribe is equal to him
in affording amusement. He is sometimes called
“the French dog ;” for his breed is much esteemed
in France, and the natives teach him a thousand
diverting tricks, which he learns with the greatest
facility. I know a gentleman, who was a military



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 11

officer of that country, who had one which he
highly valued, for he had been his companion for
years, and had attended him, and slept with him
many a time on the field of battle; among other
amusing tricks he would undergo the process of
trial as a deserter—be imprisoned in the corner—
drop his tail and ears when tried—stand upright to
be shot at—and then, suddenly falling down, lay
extended on the floor without moving a foot, as if
he was killed.

I must here further digress from my story of
my dog, to mention one anecdote of this creature
which showed his extraordinary sagacity. His
master had taught him to fetch his provisions as he
wanted them, from any of the neighbouring places
where he might be quartered. His fame had
reached the ears of many officers, and one day they
watched him, when he was the bearer of a note
and basket to bring back some fowls from a farm-
house above a mile distant. The fowls were put
into the basket alive, and the basket was one with
two lids. As long as he carried it, the fowls rode



12 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

securely; but, when he had completed about half
his journey, he sat down the basket to rest, when
one of the fowls feeling disposed to return home,
found his way out by lifting up one of the lids.
Moustache—for that was the dog’s name—was
keeping a watchful eye over his charge, and in-
stantly pursuing the deserter, brought it back, and
pushing up the basket-lid with his nose, replaced
the captive in prison. But while he was so doing,
a fowl on the opposite side took the alarm, and
escaped by lifting up the other lid. Moustache
also caught and replaced that in the same manner.
But after he had done so several times with the
same ill success, a fowl always escaping on one
side, as fast as he put one in on the other side—he
stood for a moment, as if to pause and consider
what he should do—when, again catching his fowl,
he gave it a gripe in the neck, and placed it in
dead; and, as the others escaped in succession, he
served them all in the same way, till, having no
more to escape, he took up his basket and hurried
home to his master, much to the amusement and |



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 18

astonishment of all who saw his sagacious exploits.
One of the superior officers of high rank in the
army, wished much to possess this dog, and offered
his master a large sum for his purchase, but he
would not part with his old comrade. Within a
month after, poor Moustache was poisoned! This
was a cruel and malicious deed. Moustache’s
master severely felt his loss, and even now, after
many years have passed away, in speaking of him,
he can scarcely refrain from tears.

Another instance of the sagacity of the poodle
occurs to my recollection. It was one of a very
large kind, which had been purchased by a friend
of mine, who taught him to play many pranks;
among other things he would hide any thing in any
part of the house, and then send his dog to fetch
it, which, by the keenness of his scent, he never
failed to accomplish.

But a singular-instance of retaliation for an
affront, occurred, not long since, in the case of an
animal of the poodle kind, which was bred in the
family of a relative of mine. He was accustomed



14 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

to go out a walking frequently with his master and
mistress; but one day they were going where they
did not take him, and he wished much to be one of
the party. He importuned, and they denied. At
length they left him; he dropped his ears and tail,
and retired. On their return they could not obtain
an entrance, for the key of the garden-gate was
nowhere to be found. While they were waiting
and considering what was to be done, a younger
branch of the family returned, to whom the dog
was much attached, and he guessed what had hap-
pened. The dog was sent to him, and he coaxed
him, and asked him what he had done with the
key. After a little time poodle was prevailed
upon to relent, and cantering into the field adjoin-
ing, he scratched up the earth, and hastened back,
bearing in his mouth the lost article! The fact
was, that when the door-bell rung, he was often
the bearer of the key to let any of the family in,
and often brought it back when they were let out.
He, therefore, knew that they could not get in
without it, and as they would not let him out, he



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 15

was resolved that they should not be let in, and so
he went and hid the key in the field, till he was
induced to relent!

My former poodle displayed a similar sagacity.
On my returning home from a jourmey on one
occasion, my slippers were not to be found. It
was recollected that a few days before he had been
seen with one of them in the garden, and it was
no doubt concealed with the other by him in some
secret corner. I said, ‘*Send him to me, and leave
all the doors open,” and then proceeded to ask,
while he pricked up his ears and turned his head
cunningly on one side, “‘ Where are my slippers,
sir?” This I repeated several times, and then de-
sired him to fetch them. The animal instantly
started off down the garden, and brought one and
laid it at my feet. ‘ Now, sir,” said I, “ fetch
the other.” The command was instantly obeyed.
This certainly was like reason.

It is not, however, usual to find any thing like
this except in the poodle; yet, I myself know of
one striking exception. The dog, if I rightly



16 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

remember, was a large mongrel, something of the
mastift kind, and perhaps a mixt breed of the bull
dog. I was one day standing in the street of a
large town in the north of England, conversing
with a friend, when this animal came up to us,
and remained looking up in my face with a most
prying and sagacious look. ‘ What,” said I, to
my friend, “does that dog want? he evidently
wants something.” “Give him a halfpenny,” said
he, “ and you will see.” I gave him the money,
and he immediately took it wp and marched off to
a baker’s shop close at hand, where he laid it out
for a cake. ‘ I will tell you a curious anecdote
of that dog,” said my friend. ‘‘ He was accus-
tomed to deal regularly with that baker; but some
time since I happened to be in the shop when he
came in to purchase a cake, and the stock was all
gone, save half'acake. This he gave to the dog
for his money. The dog looked at the cake—then
at him, and was not satisfied, expressing his discon-
tent as we do, by grumbling: I patted him, and
urged him to take the cake, which, at length, he



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 17

did reluctantly, and walked away. I then charged
the baker not to cheat the poor animal, but give
him the half cake when he had one. Some time
after, happening to be in his shop, the dog passing
by, I asked him if he had ever given him the cake
which he owed him.” ‘No, sir,” said the ‘baker,
“T have not, for he has never been in my shop
since.” Then calling him to me, I begged the
baker to give him a cake, and from that day he
returned and renewed his custom!” Tt is not long
since I inquired of my friend about this singular
animal, when he informed me that he was knocked
on the head by a butcher for stealing a leg .of
mutton, a cruel act, since the owner guaranteed
to pay any damage that he might.do, he often
taking it into his head to choose a joint of meat, and
take it home carefully to his master at the hour of
preparation for dinner.



t8 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

CHAPTER II.

My Dog named.—His amiable Disposition.—His Propensity to
rove,—His Honesty, together with an amusing Anecdote.—His
Fidelity as a Watchman.—Saves his Master’s House from being
robbed.—Droll original Anecdote of a Newfoundland Dog, in a
Note appended.—Remarkable Instance of my Dog’s Kindness to
a Cat.—The Affection of Puss for her Friend.—My Dog’s
Country Excursion.—Amusing Instance of his Sagacity at Cricket.
—His probable narrow Escape from being Killed.—Several
Anecdotes of Remarkable Dogs mentioned in History.—Of the
Tricks of some Others.—Original Anecdote of Dogs used in
France for Smuggling.

Or the ancestry of my favourite poodle I know
nothing. It might perhaps have been French, and
traced back, like some of our ancient nobility, to
the Norman line from the days of William the
Conqueror. But I have no genealogy to guide
my conjectures. He certainly, for sagacity and
beauty, would not have disgraced any race of
dogs. When I bought him, his name was Tip, an



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 19

abridgment of Tippoo Saib, a celebrated eastern
tyrant and warrior, it being usual to call dogs after
the names of renowned fighting men, perhaps from
the resemblance of disposition between them. I
am, however, not accustomed to value men by the
number they injure, but rather by the number they
benefit; and so seeing that my dog had a lively
look of benevolence, united with a cheerful and
gay disposition, I gave him another name, and
henceforth he was known only as Frisx.

“ The dog,” says a writer on ‘ Animal Bio-
graphy,’ “is more tractable than any other animal,
and conforms himself to the movements and habits
of life of his master. His diligence, his ardour, and
his obedience, are inexhaustible; and his disposi-
tion is so friendly, that, unlike every other animal,
he seems to remember only the benefits he receives.
He soon forgets our blows, and instead of dis-
covering resentment while we chastise him, he
exposes himself to tortuxe, and even licks the hand
whence it proceeds.” This character is more espe-
cially applicable to dogs of the spaniel kind; but

c 2

a



20 MEMOIRS OF MY. DOG.

my dog had nothing of the spaniel in him except
his gentleness. He was bold and undaunted when
he met any other dog, how large soever he might
be, and he never licked his master’s hand, or face,
a qualification readily to be dispensed with. Nor |
was he ardent in his love, but always steady.
Dogs differ in disposition like human beings, and
his was strictly what it was often called by those
who knew him—amiable. My former poodle was
ardent in his affection; and, on my return home,
after any long absence, would leap on a chair,
throw his paws around my neck, nibble my ears,
and absolutely scream for joy. Frisk, on the
contrary, received me in sober silence, took his
place by my side on a sofa, or, after receiving a
few caresses, reposed calmly as near as possible to
my feet. On all occasions he patiently waited
my return home, which he would know by my
knock at the door, when he would run and sniff
loudly at the bottom of it, and then, indeed, if it
were not opened speedily, he discovered some de-
gree of impatience, and would either whine for the



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 21

servant, or scold her by barking, that she had not
moved fast enough for his wishes. The friendship
which subsisted between me and my dog was not
one that would allow us to forget each other. To
us the adage would not apply, “out of sight, out
of mind.” When at any time I was absent in the
country, I often inquired after him, and desired
that he should receive a pat from his mistress as a
token of “my remembrance, and, though he was
unconscious of this favour, it afforded me some
gratification; while, on the other hand, he gave
sufficient signs that he did not forget me, by
anxiously awaiting the arrival of every coach, and
listening whenever one stopped near the door, or
starting up, with expectant looks, when he per-
ceived that one of the gates of entrance had been
opened, and showing marks of disappointment ~
when I did not return as he seemed to have
hoped.

As for chastismg my dog, he seldom required it.
He was so obedient—so tractable—and so cleanly
im his habits, that he scarcely had a fault. The



29g MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

only thing that excited my displeasure was his
inclination to rove. He was like the monkey in
the fable, remarkably fond of seeing the world,
and I was often afraid he would be lost init. The
strictest watch was therefore kept over him, that
he should not go out alone; but, notwithstanding
our vigilance, he would frequently give us the slip,
and sometimes wholly escape our pursuit for many
hours. I was not afraid but that he would return;
if left alone; but I feared that some worthless _
persons might steal him, as is often the case, either
to sell him, or obtain any reward that might be
offered for his recovery. Once I think he must
have been tied up for a whole day; and on another
occasion I watched his return till twelve o’clock at
night, when I at last saw him wandering about on
the opposite side of the way, evidently wishing,
yet afraid to return home; I ran out and took
him in my arms, and while I remonstrated with
him, most readily forgave him, in the pleasure of
receiving him safely again. On several occasions
I tried to cure him of his rambling propensity by



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 23

flogging him, but it was impossible to chastise so
amiable a creature. His predecessor would have
snapped at me, and in his anger have bitten me;
but he, except in one instance, bore it all with the
most perfect patience. Then he sought a hiding-
place, where he in general remained till I called
him to beg my pardon, which he would do by
throwing himself on his back at my feet, and a few
kind words on my part healed all his wounds and
soon made us friends. Even dumb animals may
teach us useful lessons of forgiveness, and reproach
us by their conduct, when we are unforgiving
towards each other.

I have said that he scarcely had a fault, and in
truth it was so, and among his virtues was that of
honesty. On one occasion, however, he forgot his
reputation, and it happened, that when we were
talking to a friend of his virtues, and especially
of that particular virtue, he vexatiously rushed into
the room, pursued by the servant, with a beefsteak
in his mouth, of which he had just contrived to get
possession. What shall I say in apology for him?



24. MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

All I can say is, that he was not the thief, but only
the receiver of the stolen goods; but as the receiver
is always reckoned as bad as the thief, I am afraid
that in this instance I must plead for him in vain.
The fact was, indeed, that on several occasions
puss, whose honesty was never very great, carried
off some articles of food, and being seen by Frisk,
he thought that he had a lawful right to the spoil,
especially as it was no longer on any forbidden
spot. It must, at all events, be confessed that he
was more honest than, I am sorry to say, some
young persons are, who, though they ought to know -
better, slily avail themselves of any opportunity to
taste that which they know is forbidden.

Never was there a more trusty dog in watching
his master’s house. He never gave any unneces-
sary alarm by barking at other dogs, or passing
noises in the road; nor would he ever behave
rudely to friends that visited me, but he knew
when he had duties as a guardian to perform. In
the day, his strong hoarse voice, with his seeming
fierceness, warned the vagabond whom he saw on



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. © QB

the premises to make a speedy retreat;* and at
night, if he was silent, he did not want vigilance.
It was just after the establishment of the police in
the. metropolis, when I was suddenly aroused in
the middle of the night by an unusual bark, as
well as an unusual barking of my dog. His anger

* The inhabitants of the vicinity of the city of London are sadly
pestered with trampers and other itinerant venders of wares, who,
as well as vagabonds, are great nuisances, treading over the garden
beds, dirtying the walks, and calling the servants by knocks and
rings to attend to their business, and then being always unwilling to
take a denial. A droll circumstance occurred a few years since at
_ the house of a gentleman not*far from me, who kept a Newfound-
land dog in his back garden. A. man, with a basket of fowls on his
head, not gaining entrance at the front, boldly ventured to enter
the back premises by a side door. The dog instantly sprung upon
the strange intruder, and laid hold of his garments behind, but only
held fast, without biting him. The master saw the man’s predica-
ment from a back window, but could not at the moment interpose
for him, being seized with a fit of laughing at his droll situation.
The man, however, in his fright, let fall the basket of fowls, and
the dog, preferring a fowl to a pair of breeches, loosed his hold,
and carried one off as his prize, while the itinerant poulterer took
to his heels, and ran to some distance from the premises. Having,
however, recovered his recollection, he returned to beg for his
fowls and basket, which were safely delivered to him, the dog not
having injured the one he had taken, and the man received an useful
lesson, to mind in future how he ventured upon private premises.



26 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

was great, and his noise incessant. I was sure
something was exceedingly wrong, and instantly
sprung out of bed and got a light, when I saw a
policeman at my gate. He informed me that the
dog had called his attention, having heard his loud
and angry bark and strong voice, at some distance ;
and that, on his arriving at the gate, a man had
escaped over the side wall, and another behind the
house. Providentially no great injury was done,
for the window, at which an entrance was at-
tempted, was well lined with iron, and resisted. the
tool of the robber, whom the dog had detected at -
the very commencement of his evil work. The
policeman was let into the house, and Frisk re-
ceived him without the least notice, as if aware
that he was called in to see that all was right.
** With such a guardian,” said the policeman, “you
need, sir, never to fear the attacks of any thieves.
He has saved you from being robbed.” Many of
my near neighbours had at that time been great
losers, or much alarmed by several lawless gangs.
It is worthy of remark, that my dog never before



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. QT

nor afterwards gave any alarm, nor was it ne-
cessary.

A remarkable instance of his sympathy and bene-
volence occurred in the case of the cat. Poor puss
had by some means received a severe wound in the
eye. It was directly noticed by Frisk, who at
once became her surgeon, and his skill in curing
his fellow-servant was successful; for after fre-
quently licking her eye with ‘his tongue, in a few
days it became decidedly better, and was. soon
healed. Such sympathy and benevolence might
be a lesson to some, who, from their higher nature,
ought to possess both, but have neither. Puss
always showed the highest esteem for one who so
well merited it from her; she usually saluted him,
on their meeting in the morning, by putting nose
to nose; rubbed her sleek jacket against his legs,
and walked along purring by his side in some of
his walks in the garden, and sometimes brought
one or more of her kittens, when they came into
the world, and laid them at his feet, that he might
share in her pleasure in beholding her new progeny.



28 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

The instances of his extraordinary sagacity are
many. As my dog enjoyed good health, I had
never taken him into the country for change of air ;
and as I had never ascertained that he had a taste
for scenery, I did not imagine that I deprived him
of much enjoyment in not making him my com-
panion when I left home on any country excursion:
His chief deprivation was in losing his master,
whom he evidently missed, and for whose return he
looked as long as there remained any hope; and I,
on my part, did not forget that I had left him
behind me. However, on one occasion, while the
carriage was at my door, which was to.convey me
and his mistress about twenty miles out of town, he
looked so wishfully at us, and we so wishfully at
him, just on the eve of parting, that I jumped out,
opened the garden gate through which he was
taking a farewell peep, and, in a moment, we all
drove away snugly together. He seemed to enjoy
the ride, and made many observations on the pas-
sengers which we passed along the road, standing ,
up on his hind legs, and placing his front paws



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 29

against the windows, that he might enjoy the novel
sight. On arriving at our temporary habitation,
he looked all over the premises, as if to see that
every thing was pleasant and convenient, and soon
formed a friendship with a young dog that resided
there. He was shown the spot for his bed, my
cloak being placed for the purpose in one corner
of our bed-room; and he usually, when tired,
went thither to repose of his own accord, long
before we went to rest. He was also delighted
with his daily excursions; and, as a rabbit-warren
lay near, on a neighbouring steep hill, he was
sometimes indulged with a walk there, when he
rambled far off among the shrubs, sniffing at the
rabbit burrows, and pursuing the little animals
for amusement, but catching none. But what I
would particularly mention, is this curious fact:
My lodgings were at a boarding-school; and as
there was a large play-ground for the scholars, they
had ample space for playing at cricket, which is an
exceedingly favourite game among all classes, in
that part of the country. I sometimes joined with



30 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

the boys and their master, and Frisk thought he
might also as well unite in enjoying the healthy
pastime. I was, however, fearful that he might be
injured by running in for the ball, as his quick eye
perceived it coming; and as he sometimes inter-
fered with the bowling, and obstructed the players
by catching it, I gave him directions to stand with-
out the circle, where he would be of real service,
to prevent it from going down a declivity into the
public road, when it was beyond the bounds. My
dog was at all times an apt learner, and it was ad-
mirable to see how readily the creature understood
the hint given him; and every time that we went
to play, he regularly took his station beyond the
bounds, watching as eagerly for the ball as any
player, and catching it as dexterously as the best,
when it happened to pass them all. He would,
however, deliver it to no one but his master.

I believe my poor favourite would one day have
been killed, during this visit, by a savage New-
foundland dog, who met him with me in a narrow
walk, and looked at him with so much mischief



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 3l

lurking in his eye, that, suspecting his inclination,
I took up my animal, and securing him under my
arm, looked very observingly at the gentleman,
which caused him to walk away. Ona subsequent
visit I saw a poodle dog in the road, as I was going
to take a walk; and on my return learned that he
had been met by the same Newfoundland dog, who
instantly seized him and killed him. I believe
this was not the only instance in which he had
indulged in this savage propensity, though it ap-
pears that the poodle had often insulted him in
passing, when secured within the railing of his own
premises. The Newfoundland dog has, however,
sometimes been known to display the more noble
spirit of generosity, and scorned to exert his power
over a feeble enemy, as some cowardly big boys do
over little ones. I have lately read of one, who
being insulted by a smaller dog, took him up —
gently in his mouth, and dropped him over a bridge
into a river, leaving him to scramble out in the best
way that he could. Impertinent puppies ought
always to be punished with contempt.



32 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

Dogs have been taught numerous tricks, and to
do many useful things. Bingley informs us, in his
“Animal Biography,” that, “some years since, a
person who lived at the turnpike-house, about a
mile from Stratford-on-Avon, had trained a dog to
go to the town for small articles of grocery that he
wanted. A note, mentioning the things, was tied
round the dog’s neck, and in the same manner the
articles were fastened; and the commodities were
always brought safe to his master. He also men-
tions a dog belonging to a nobleman of the Medici
family, and says that it always attended at its
master’s table, changed the plates for him, and
carried him his wine in a glass placed on a salver,
without spilling the smallest drop. It would also
hold the stirrup in its teeth, while its master was
mounting his horse.” Plutarch relates, that, in the
theatre of Marcellus, a dog was exhibited before
the emperor Vespasian, so’ well instructed as to
excel in every kind of dance. He afterwards
feigned illness in so natural a manner, as to strike
the spectators with astonishment: first shewing



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 33

symptoms of pain; then falling down as if dead,
and suffering himself to be carried about in that
state; afterwards, at the proper time, seeming to
revive, as if waking from a profound sleep; and
then sporting about, and shewing every demon-
stration of joy.

I have also seen a dog select any card called for
out of many spread on the floor, and walk on his
fore legs, holding up the hind ones. But these
and other tricks are often taught by severity, and
even cruelty, which ought at all times to be avoided.
We should never gratify our curiosity, and enjoy
pleasure, at the expense of the feelings of the
meanest animal. God made us to rule, but not to
tyrannize, over his inferior creatures.

At a dinner in France, at which I was one of the
party, I recollect hearing a French gentleman tell
a laughable story about a dog; but it reflected no
credit on the persons who were so cruel as to ill-
treat him to make him serve their own ends. The
French have, like us, dowaniers, or custom-house
officers, to watch and see that no foreigners intro-

D



34 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

duce articles of manufacture that are prohibited, lest
they should injure their own people who make the
same article. The smugglers, however, will secretly
bring in forbidden goods; and among the means
used to accomplish their purposes, they trained up
dogs. One article chiefly smuggled was lace; and
these dogs were covered all over with the coat of
some other dogs, and the lace was put between
their covering and their skin. The custom-house
officers discovered, this scheme; so that it was ne-
cessary to contrive some method by which the dogs
should escape them altcgether. The smugglers
therefore used to dress up a person like a douanier,
or custom-house officer, and he was employed to
give the dogs severe beatings. The effect of this
was, that whenever the poor animals again caught
sight of an officer, they took to their heels with all
possible expedition; and he must have been a
Mercury indeed who could have managed to catch
them. These dogs knew their way home, or where
to meet their masters: and thus the forbidden
goods escaped in safety.



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 35

CHAPTER III.

My Dog’s delight in a Ball.—His singular way of Begging.—
Diverting Tricks played by him.-—His recognition of Old Friends.
—-His usefulness to his Master.—Several interesting Anecdotes
of his Sagacity and Docility—His Knowledge of Words, and
rvemarkable Anecdotes in proof of it. —Singular Anecdote in
reference to a Picture.—Anecdote of a curious Fall while fast
asleep.—His Knowledge of the Sabbath.—Further Instances of
his Docility and Gentleness.—His Knowledge of Time.—His
Cordiality with Puss.—His Faults.—Process of Shaving and
Dressing.—His Food.—Decline of his Faculties.—His Master’s
watchful care over Him.—Becomes Deaf and nearly Blmd.—His

sudden Illness and Death.—His Master’s Grief.—Remarkable
Sign of Distress manifested by the Cat.—His Grave.—His Skin
preserved and stuffed—Expressions of Regret on Account of
his Loss. —His Epitaph.

My dog could play a number of amusing tricks ;
but unless he had been treated with severity by
those who first trained him, he received none from
my hand. When he came to me, he delighted in
fetching and carrying a ball, which would probably
not have been the case had he been beaten into it:

pdaZ



36 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

and one of his last efforts, a few days before his
death, was to play with one; but he dropped it
down as soon as he had taken it into his mouth—
like a sort of prophetic omen that his days of
playing were over.

He begged with the most perfect ease, and it was
generally his own voluntary act. His mode of
doing it was singular, and not like other dogs, by
dropping the fore paws; but he put them together
as any one would put his hands, flat against each
other, so that the toe nails of each foot touched
their fellows. A lady one day gave him some
biscuit out of her reticule—biscuit being an article
of food of which he was passionately fond—and
ever after, when he saw a lady sit down with a
reticule in her hand or on her lap, he never failed
to present himself as a suitor for her bounty.
Many friends knew his propensity, and often sup-
plied themselves to gratify the importunate and
general favourite. A lady one day gave him a
captain’s biscuit, whole. This was so unusual a
thing, that the creature was not sure whether it



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 37

was given him to eat or to carry to some one in thd
room. He therefore turned round to his mistress,
and holding it up in his mouth, looked her hard in
the face, and waited her word to know whether he
was to partake of the bountiful repast or not. On
receiving a token of approbation, he was not long
in cracking it so as to suit his convenience, and in
a few minutes the subject of perplexity wholly
disappeared.
He often held a piece of biscuit on his nose, and
if at one word of command I said, “ Take it,” or
“Fire,” he caught it in his mouth; or if I said,
“* Make ready—present—frre !” he caught it on my
pronouncing the last word.
I also taught him to wait patiently while I held
a bit of biscuit on my knee or my toe; during
which time [ would ask him if he liked it—if he
wished to have it—and many other questions;
when he would leer at me, and cast a longing eye
at the food, but never venture to take it, till, in the
same tone of voice, I said, “ You may have it,” or
“Take it.” I taught him this amusing trick, not



38 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

by severity—for, from some circumstances, I am
certain he would never have done it—he would then
have become both timid and obstinate; but I
treated him kindly, merely gently checking him
with my voice, and holding up my finger, when he
at first presumed to take the biscuit before the
proper time. Biscuit was, indeed, always a lure
to him. Ihave sometimes called to him to come
in from the garden when I particularly wanted
him, but I should have called in vain unless I had
spoken with authority, for no dog could have been
more deaf when he pleased; but on my promising
to give him a bit of biscuit if he would come in,
he instantly sprung up the garden steps and was in
the room. This article was often promised to him
for doing any thing I wished; and as I made it a
point never to fail in performing my promise, he
always believed my word, and I always succeeded
in accomplishing my purpose. There is nothing
more desirable than keeping our word; and my
dog would soon have known when it was violated.
He never told a lie himself; and I am persuaded



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 39

he would not have been pleased, if those who pvo-
mised him a piece of biscuit had broken their faith
_ with him.

In his best days he was highly diverting. I
taught him to play at hide and seek. He used
to know my movements when I opened the door
for the purpose, and was all alive to the game.
Then, pricking wp his ears and his tail, he would
retreat down stairs, either of his own accord or
by good-humoured command, and wait till a
stamp of the foot gave him the signal to begin
seeking. I would hide in any room of the house,
and in any part of the room, and he began by
quickly traversing the whole, if necessary, bark-
ing joyously all the time. If he could not find
me the first time, he then made a second search,
when he went more quietly and deliberately to
work, sniffing at every step, and prying carefully
into every place, especially into those places in
which I had never before hid myself. In this
way he never failed to find the object of his
search, though he was several times long about



40 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

“it, when I was carefully wrapped up in the cur-
tains, or concealed under the carpet, and when a
young lady hid herself in a closet. When he had —
got me, he led me generally into the parlour to
shew his success, always seizing me by the cuff of
the coat. He would then retreat below, as before,
and wait for the stamp of the feet, as often as I
chose to renew the game.

His scent was remarkably keen, and appeared to
remain good when his other faculties were nearly

_ gone. Faithful to old friends, if any that he
formerly knew well came to see me, though he
were in another part of the house, he instantly dis-
covered them, and hastened to give them a hearty
welcome. In this way, an old servant, who had
left me seven years before, was recognized by him
in the garden with the greatest delight, before he
could well see her face. I availed myself of this
faculty to enjoy his skill in searching after a ball,
which, being hid in any part of the garden within
reach of his scent, he would diligently seek and
discover.



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 4)

But his tricks were often useful, as well as
amusing. When at one time I was in the habit of
going every day into the city, he knew my usual
hour for returning home; and whether I returned
then, or at any other time, he stood at my feet
waiting for me to take off my boots, that he might
carry them into the kitchen, and bring. back my
slippers. Nothing could equal the despatch with
which he performed the duty of boots.

As he had no regular breakfast or tea, I indulged
him on, those occasions with milk and water, and he
and puss very sociably took it out of the same dish,
till I thought proper to separate them, as his huge
tongue, like a table-spoon, lapped up the greater
part, before puss’s, like a tea-spoon, could furnish
her with any supply. As we should always love
justice, I never failed to act the part of magistrate
between them, and endeavoured to adjust all mat-
ters as equitably as I possibly could. In addition
to the milk and water, I allowed him a small piece
of bread, which I taught him to fetch. On the
order being given him to go for his bread, he went:



42 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

down. to the servant, held up his neck to receive the
article, which was tied in a napkin kept for the
purpose, and hung round his neck; and then he
scampered up stairs with it as fast as possible, hold-
ing up his neck in like manner to his master or
mistress, to have the napkin untied, when he re-
ceived the bread in smail pieces, during the hour
. of breakfast. In this way he was also sometimes
the bearer of money in change, and other things.
I generally made him take back his napkin in his
mouth, before he ate his bread, and deliver it to the
servant; but he would now and then slily drop it
on the stairs, and as I knew he could not have been
down with it, I made him go back and take it down.
This was hard duty, while the bread remained
uneaten; but as he knewit must be performed, it was
genuine fun to see how he cleared his ground, some-
times tumbling down stairs, and then tumbling up,
in his haste to receive the reward of all his trouble.

As he was, at all times, like the shadow of his
master, when I was in my study he was at my feet
or near my side, and frequently was serviceable in



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 43

picking up any paper or letter that might drop,
and putting it into my hand.

He was often the bearer of letters or newspapers,
and. knew where to find me, whether in the parlour,
study, or garden. It was amusing to see him can-
tering along a gravel walk of considerable length,
bearing the article in his dips, which he usually de-
livered to me without the least soil. The last time
that he did me this sort of service, was only a few
weeks before his death, when he brought a news-
paper to my study door. Owing to his age and
infirmities, I had dispensed with the performance
of these duties for many months; but on this
occasion the servant found it convenient to try his
skill and activity, and he still faithfully and willingly
triéd to do his part. I heard his feet gently scratch
at the door, but, being very closely occupied, I
would not move to let him in. He then repeated
his scratches, but still I was deaf to his signs. At
length he drew a much longer and louder scratch,
and I supposed he wanted something particular.
On opening the door, he stood a moment and looked



4A: MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

at me, and I was just about to shut him out, as he
did not enter, when he took up the newspaper,
which he had laid down behind the door-post while
he was waiting, and holding it up to me in his
mouth, I received it in my hand; he then turned
away, having discharged his message, and marched
down stairs, not wishing at that time to enjoy my
company.

I had had him more than seven years, when I
one day regretted that I had never taught him to
shut the door. As amere experiment, I tried what
I could accomplish, little expecting that I should
succeed so well. J never gave him more than three
or four lessons, when the willing creature, as if
desirous of pleasing his master, ever after shut the
door at my bidding. The way-in which I did it,
was this: I placed his fore paws against the parlour
door, and pushed it hard enough to shut. The
animal perceived at once that this was the way to
do it, and then readily reared up to perform his
task. I brought him into the habit of it by first
rewarding him with biscuit, and afterwards making

































































































































































































































MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 45

him do it before I gratified any particular wish,
-when, at the word of command, he would shut the
door in great haste. It was most amusing to see
him sometimes, when'the lock was -perverse and
would spring back, for he would then shut it again
and again; and if I said, “Do it properly, sir!”
he would run back and give it a thorough bang.
Never was there a more willing creature in serving
those whom he loved, and in aiming to please. In
this case, and in his general aptness to learn, I have
known some who might have taken from him an
useful lesson.

It is obvious that dogs understand language.
Leibnitz, a celebrated German, informed the French
academicians—a set of learned men in Franee—
that he knew of a dog that had been taught by a
peasant’s son to utter as many as thirty words, and
that he himself had heard him speak. I cannot
boast that my dog could speak, but he certainly
knew most things that I said about him; so that
on many occasions I have been obliged to urge
caution in speaking, lest he should be put on solici-



46 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

tations when I did not want them. It was quite
enough to tell him he should go a-walking, and he
prepared for it by stretching his limbs and dancing
for joy. The word of command to go to his
dinner or his supper, needed not often: to be twice
repeated. In the same way, he knew when he was
told to go to bed. And when he saw me going out,
and it was not convenient to take him, he would
instantly drop his ears and tail, and return behind,
when I said, “ No, Frisk, you cannot go.”

But two striking proofs of his keen intelligence
here occur to my recollection. It was his custom
every morning to tap at our bed-room doors when
it was our usual hour of rising, and he would pay
us a visit for a few moments to receive a pat, and
then depart. One of the family, in an adjoining
room, used occasionally to give him a morsel of
biscuit that had remained in his pocket from the
preceding day; and one morning, when he had
given him all, and he still continued begging, he
said to him, in a low tone, “‘ No, Frisk, I have got
no more; if you want it, you must go down and ask



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 4Z

the servant,” mentioning her name. Instantly the
dog retreated, and did as he suggested: the servant
asking him, when he went to breakfast, what it was
he had sent the dog down for, for he had: solicited
her for something very earnestly, and she, sus-
pecting what it was, had met his wishes.

At another time, I was lounging on the sofa, on
a cold day, when the door was left open. The
animal was in his usual place on the sofa, slum-
bering at my feet, when I observed to his mistress,
without at all designing or expecting that he would
notice my words, “I wish that Frisk would get
down and shut that door; I would readily give him
a bit of biscuit.” The words had no sooner escaped
my lips, than he dropped lazily from the sofa, and
as lazily shut the door, and then came looking up
at me expecting his reward, when I was forced to
rise, because I would not disappoint him, and
thought that such intelligence ought to be re-
warded. I could not help exclaiming, “ Did you
ever see such extraordinary intelligence in an
animal! How that dog understands words !”



48 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

Bingley speaks of the favourite dog of an elderly
lady, which discovered, some time after her death,
the strongest emotions on the sight of her picture,
when it was taken down to be cleaned. Before
this, he had never been observed to notice the
painting. This reminds me of a singular fact that
occurred with regard to my dog. I had pinned
against the wall of a dressing-room a coloured
print of a poodle, which bears this inscription,
“ Sancuo, the property of the Marchioness of
Worcester; taken at the battle of Salamanca, by
the Marquis, from the grave of its master, a French
officer, where it was found exhausted, and nearly
starved to death, and was with much difficulty
forced away from becoming a sacrifice to its fidelity.”
The dog in this print is scarcely so large as a rat,
and yet my animal one day caught sight of it, and
evidently perceived in it a likeness to one of his
own stock. I observed his remarkable attention to
the picture, and begged his mistress to notice it.
She was reclining on a sofa under it, when he reared
up on his hind legs, and resting his fore feet upon



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 49

the edge of the sofa, he looked at Sancho with a
still more scrutinizing eye. Then he mounted on
his mistress, whom I requested to be still, that we
might see the result; and the observing creature,
by rearing once more on his hind legs, was able to
reach the object of his inquiry. He now surveyed
it, smelt it, and being satisfied that it was an illu-
sion, he gave wp further inquiry, nor did he ever
notice it again.

My dog had evidently, at times, much the ap-'
pearance of a philosopher, or student of wisdom.
He generally indulged in his musings before the
fire. One afternoon he seated himself, with great
importance and gravity, upon a chair which had
been left vacant near the hearth, and here for a
while he was seemingly

; “ Sinking from thought to thought, in vast profound ;”

when he yielded to drowsiness, as many a student

had done before him, and pitched head foremost

from his elevation. He got up and shook himself,

with half opened eyes, apparently wondering where
E



50 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

he was, how he came there, and what had happened
to him, the little fireside party heartily laughing at
the poor fellow’s mishap. Frisk, however, clearly
formed a resolution, on this occasion, that he never
more would nod on a chair, and he strictly adhered
to it, from that day till the hour of his death: for
the moment he found himself getting drowsy, he
jumped down and doubled himself up on the floor.
It is well if we grow wise from experience; and,
knowing what is injurious to us, avoid being ex-
posed to ita second time, when it is in our power
to guard against it.

Dogs have been remarked to know the regular
return of the Sabbath—and so did he; and on that
day he used to mount a chest of drawers or a
dressing-table at the bed-room window, and there
his beautifully white picture appeared to all be-
holders in the public road, glazed and framed,
during the hours of Divine service. The instant he
saw his master and mistress return, he quitted his
post of observation, and was speedily at the door,
to welcome them home.



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 51

I am one of those who think, that, as rational
creatures, who receive daily bounties from the
hand of Providence, and daily family comforts and
mercies, I ought, with my family, to thank God
for his goodness, and ask new favours from his
hand. God gives his bounties even to the most
forgetful and ungrateful; but they are much
sweetened to those who thus own his kind hand in
bestowing them all. The habits of this creature
were remarkable in being conformed to mine ; and
he was a pattern for some young people, in his
quiet and orderly behaviour, when we were en-
gaged in that which he was aware was something
that appeared to require much gravity.

As I am writing a memoir, every little trait of
character may fairly be admitted into my narrative.
I taught my dog to ask me to open the door, by
laying down his head on the floor while he con-
tinued standing: this pretty and interesting atti-
tude he also assumed whenever he coaxed me; and
when in the morning he visited my bed-room, this
was one mode of soliciting my attention and asking

E2



52 ' MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

for a pat. I alsotaught him to tap me on the arm
or shoulder, at command, before he received any
thing to eat from my hand. He took the least
morsel of food gently from my fingers, and always
knew when and where to carry a bone out of the
room, which was too large to eat, without dropping
it on the carpet. Such was his gentle temper, that
he might always be passed when gnawing his bone ;
and. on some occasions he has allowed it to be taken
from him. Little infants have held out food to
him in the hand, whose fingers were. too small for
the purpose; and as the hand was half closed, it
was delightful to see the tenderness of the creature
in dealing with the child, patiently working his
way with his nose into the palm of his hand, and
then taking hold of the piece of food so as not to
occasion the child or the spectator the least alarm.
He had, indeed, a peculiar partiality for children ;
always preferring the youngest in the room, and
treating the helpless infant with the greatest kind-
ness. To ill-use any animal, shows a bad dispo-
sition; but to have teased or ill-treated one with



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 538

such benevolence of character, would have displayed
the worst of inclinations. Half the animals that are
vicious, are made so by being teased.

My garden obviously afforded him much delight.
He loved to ramble round it, and scented the fresh
morning breeze, and basked in the sun on the
grass-plot, and, as he had something of a taste for
hunting, his pleasure was greatly heightened if he
could chase any interlopers, such as a neighbouring
cat or fowl; in failure of which, he would content
himself with pursuing a hopping frog. The gar-
deners, too, have often laughed to see with what
gravity he would watch them sowing the patches
of seed on the flower-beds—for he would go and sit
down by them, or by his master, as they were so
engaged, watching and turning his head and eye
acutely, as if to see that they performed their work
properly, and then removing his seat, as they re-
moved from place to place. Sometimes he fetched
a stone or a ball, and laying it at his master’s feet,
looked him full in the face, and then looked at the
ball, pushing it towards him, to. express his desire



54 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

that it might be thrown; when he often flew as fast
down the gravel walk as the ball itself, and would
catch it ascending at its first bound. Sometimes
he might be seen sauntering down the walks at his
master’s heels, puss being in company; and fre-
quently they were seen kindly saluting each other.
It was a pretty sight; and this friendly token was
usually repeated between them in the morning, and
after any long absence. I think some young per-
sons who are given to quarrelling, might profitably
have taken a leaf out of their book, and learned a
lesson of kindness towards each other.

I had one day an extremely strong proof of the
attachment of puss to her old friend, which occurred
while I was walking in the garden. A dog had
found an entrance through some adjoining pre-
mises; but on his seeing Frisk, he expected a
drubbing, for presuming to encroach upon his
territories, and being conscious that he was wrong
—as doing wrong makes cowards even of dogs—he
took to his heels and rushed through a quickset
hedge. Frisk pursued him at a slower pace, not



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 55

with a view to chastise him—for his heart was too
kind—but just, in all probability, to say, after his
manner, that he was welcome, if he pleased, to
take a walk in his garden—for he usually received
such a visitor with much cordiality. Puss, how-
ever, evidently put another construction on the
business—and though she is usually a great coward
when she sees a dog, and very jealous of such an
interloper, she seemed to think that Frisk, now
almost blind, needed a defender; and after placing
herself by his side, she dashed forward through the
hedge whence the stranger had escaped, brandishing
a noble tail, and spitting at him with every mark of
indignation and contempt. Her conduct virtually
said, “I dare you to come near my old and faithful
friend, whom no one shall insult but. myself.”

My dog was almost as good as a clock, to guide
the movements of every day. He knew my hour
of rising, and paid me a visit at the precise time:
he knew his hour of dinner, and followed the
servant continually about till he received it,
though latterly he sometimes anticipated it half an



56 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

hour before the time: and he equally knew his hour

for supper, and regularly withdrew to rest, after
the supper of the family. In each of these instances

he always, however, showed his lovely spirit of
patience, asking, by his expressive and gentle looks,

but not claiming: my former poodle was not to be

put off so quietly; but if his meals were delayed,
he followed the servant about, nibbling at her toes

or heels till he wearied her into compliance.

Puss and he usually fed together; but, notwith-
standing their love, sometimes they had a little
quarrel: he was in general very good in not claim-
ing her portion, though he often cast a longing
eye at it; but if a bit fell in his way, he was not
ceremonious in refusing -it. She, too, rather took
advantage of his feeble sight as: he grew old, and
ventured sometimes to crawl under his very nose,
to have a share of his food. This was presuming
too far, and he would then remonstrate with her,
and now and then the quarrel for an instant rather
run high; but he always claimed and maintained
a dignified superiority. No two animals, on the



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 57

whole, could better have agreed together: they
often fed out of the same dish, and they often slept
back to back, to keep each other more comfortable
_by the fire-side—puss, however, usually watched
her opportunity to get the snuggest place, and
instead of turning her out—which he could have
done in amoment, had he pleased—my dog showed
how much he loved peace, by always quietly yield-
ing to her usurpation. If this temper of mind
were indulged among young persons, and even .
those more old; in matters of indifference, how
much more happy would many be, who are always
fretting and fuming about the little ills of life.
Had this animal acted otherwise, it would have
been only acting as an irrational brute; but he
was in many things an exception to Dr. Watts’s
description of the canine race :—
*¢ Let dogs delight to bark and bite,
For God hath made them so.”

T have acknowledged that my dog had faults,
but that they were few. Though cleanly in his
habits, he would sometimes indulge himself with



58 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

poking his nose under the copper-hole or the fire-
place; when he needed again to have his face
washed before he could appear in respectable com-
pany—for the least soil was soon visible on his
delicate dress. JI do not know, however, that he
was so bad in this as some children, who from their
griming habits are more fit for a pig-stye than for
a parlour. He would also forget all sense of con-
sequences, when in pursuit of a strange cat in the
garden; and, plunging sometimes into a ditch half
full of mud and water, would exchange his beau-
tiful white trousers for a pair of black boots. He
also amused himself, rather mischievously, with
scratching up the grass of the plot, and then tearing
it with his teeth: as this was a habit in which he
often indulged, I was obliged to reprove him more
angrily than usual—as all ill habits ought to be
severely checked, whether in human beings or in |
brutes. He also was not always particular about
keeping the path-way, but trod upon the flower-
beds when fresh dug, and left the marks of his feet ;
yet, in general, it must be confessed, he excited the



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 59

admiration of those who observed how carefully he
would wend round the walks, and avoid treading
on the beds. He had a relish for some sorts of
fruit, and enjoyed a dessert very much, if taken in
the garden: a ripe gooseberry, a sweet raspberry,
or a strawberry, was extremely gratifying to his
appetite; but it was necessary to abstain for awhile
from giving him the latter, since the rogue watched
his master’s movements, and discovered that he
could gather them quite as well as he could. It
is not quite certain that he purposely picked them
when he could not be seen, though too many in-
stances have been known in which young folks
have done so with forbidden fruit, and it was not
much to their credit; but it is believed that he
wholly abstained from taking them at his pleasure
in future, when he was lectured for so doing.

His greatest fault, as I have before intimated,
was his inclination to go out without leave. In
vain did I remonstrate with him, and he, in the
best way in which he could, begged my pardon for
each offence—for on the first favourable oppor-



60 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

tunity he would renew his ramblings, sometimes
extending them as far as neighbouring villages,
and inducing me to give him up for lost. I much
feared that he would degrade himself as a gentle-
man, by getting into low company; and I suspect
he was not very particular on that point when he
was out. Bad company among dogs, like bad
company among children, sometimes leads to very
disastrous consequences. Now and then these
animals seem to imitate an Irish row, ten or a
dozen of them congregating together to have a
general quarrel, and every body is looking at them
‘to see what is the matter. Sometimes they have
to settle some affair of honour, which takes place
between them by a duel only: this they do without
seconds; but they too frequently find some for
them in some mischievous men or boys, who in this
instance condescend to lower themselves to the
rank of the brutes. One of my great fears was,
that Frisk might get into some of these scrapes.
He was, however, not of a quarrelsome disposi-
tion, as I have before hinted; and this among



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 61

dogs, as well as among people, preserves from
much evil.

These were his chief faults, and for the most
part they were pardonable offences, and arose prin-
cipally from not knowing better. Where I could
make him sensible that he did wrong, it was a fine
trait in his character that he always strove to mend.

I must not forget to mention, that Frisk was
usually shaved and washed about once a fortnight.
This office I was accustomed to perform, for the
charge of the dog barber is five shillings; and
though it may be well for the rich to scatter their
money in every direction for the support of the
industrious, I thought myself not justified in
spending so much upon my dog. People should
always contrive so to manage their expences, as
to have something to bestow upon the poor and
needy, and for the support of benevolent institu-
tions. As the poodle’s hair naturally grows wild,
as our own would do were it not cut, it is cus-
tomary to employ persons to keep his coat in order.
The French support many of these persons, called



62 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

tondeurs de chiens, or dog-shearers, who cut the
coats of the animals as shepherds do those of sheep,
their silky wool somewhat resembling that of the
latter animal, but is much finer. They usually
shave the hind quarters close to the skin, as these
are the most liable to mop up the dirt; and from
the head to the middle of the body is left a good
coat, which covers the animal in beautiful silken
ringlets. The face is cut so as to leave him a fine
pair of whiskers, which give him an unusually
knowing and sharp appearance; the ears and tail
are combed out, the former almost resembling
skeins of silk hanging together, cut, and having
the fine threads separated. On the hips are often
left tufts of hair; and the fore and hind legs are
dressed in various ways, according to the pleasure
of the master, the fore ones sometimes having
trousers, and the latter above the loins a kind of
breeches. In performing the operation of shaving
dogs, they are, for the most part, very restive, and
indeed, all of them manifest a dislike to it: my
former poodle used to show his teeth very angrily



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 63

at it, and he continued snarling the whole time,
though he would never bite me, which he would
have done had another person shaved him. Thus,
whenever I was his tonsor, we kept up an animated
conversation; indeed, there was a sort of debate
between us about which should be master. Frisk
never gnashed his teeth, or in any way expressed
anger, but only dropped his tail, and endeavoured
to hide himself when he saw the preparation forth-
coming; and it was necessary to use the utmost
precaution to take him unawares, for he seemed
almost to guess when it was determined that he
should undergo the operation. Most other animals
are muzzled and tied by the legs while they are
shaved ; but when he was placed on a table he was
entirely passive, and his joy was great when he was
freed from the scissars. He, however, always ex-
pected the supplement, and looked very cautiously
about him for the preparation of soap and water
towash him clean. And patiently did the creature
stand in the tub till the servant had performed this
operation; nor would he stir, though left alone



64 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

during the washing. His joy was very great when
he had been rubbed with dry cloths; and now he
was further dricd in the air or the sun, or by the
fire, when his ears were combed, and his beauty
was complete. Many children are not half so
good, in passing through the ordeal of washing
only their hands and their face. Then was his
master gratified in both admiring and exhibiting
his beauty, and his dog was fit to be a visitor to
the queen.

The process I have mentioned, though un-
pleasant to the dog, is really beneficial to him,
adding to his strength, which is decreased by the
nourishment required for so much coating ; tending
to his comfort, by the removal of so. much warm
hair, in hot weather; and materially adding to his
cleanliness.

The dog usually lives about twelve years, but
sometimes he attains double that age. I therefore
fondly flattered myself, that, from the general
health of my animal, he would have had a still
longer span added to his life. My dog was con-



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 65

sidered a finely-formed creature, and enjoyed an
excellent constitution. I, unfortunately, through
ignorance, exposed it to injury for two years, from
about the age of five to seven. His cook had
died; and not being supplied with meat, I fed him
with raspings and pot liquor, of which he became
very fond, and grew fat upon them. But he also
became very weak, and at length subject to a kind
of spasm. I was apprehensive that he had re-
ceived some hurt from a blow or kick inflicted by
some cruel person whom he might have met in his
occasional rambles, and procured the advice of a
farrier, who administered external and internal
medicines, and put the poor brute to great pain,
but he derived no benefit. At length I discovered
that dogs, being carnivorous animals—or fitted to
live upon flesh—could not long continue in health
without meat; and the life my animal did enjoy,
was chiefly derived from the few bits and bones
which fell to his lot from a small family. Bread
will make’ a dog fat, but it affords little or no
strength. I therefore, on making the discovery
F



66 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

from information, provided liberally for his dinner
and supper table; and from that time he had a
regular allowance of about half a pound of bul-
lock’s liver a-day. His health and his strength
were now rapidly recruited, and I had the satisfac-
tion of «seeing my poor animal become once more
full of. life and vigour.

As he had no hard work, but lived a life of
ease, and was treated kindly, enjoying moderate
exercise, it was not before he had attained his
fifteenth year, that he showed any particular symp-
toms of decline. His spirits, his eyesight, and all
his mental faculties, were good, and his activity
was apparently the same as ever. The first warn-
ing of his advanced age was an attack of the rheu-
matism. We should always be. kind to the sick ;
and I know not why we should not be so to sick
animals, especially after they have for years afforded
us pleasure, and rendered us many useful services.
I applied proper remedies myself to my dog’s aged
limbs—kept him as much as possible out of the
cold and wet—would not tempt him to employ



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 67

any unnecessary exertion in play—carried him
sometimes up the stairs, to prevent his feeling the
pain from his stiffened joints, which occasionally
made him cry out—and wrapped him warmly in
his bed every night. By this attention to his
comfort, which cost me little money, and less
labour, and afforded me the highest gratification,
my dog soon recovered: but I was cautious,
after this, that he should never put his old
joints too much to the test by running after any
object.

About this time I also noticed, with much
concern, a speck on his left eye, which was an
indication that his sight was failing. He however
continued in his usual health, with the exception
of a trifling humour on the skin of one of his fore-
legs, which was removed by ointment, and now
and then a bilious attack, for which I found nature
to be avery good doctor, and he sometimes assisted
her by eating a long and broad-leaved grass which
is-found springing up wild in many gardens. In
his search for this medicinal herb of the canine

FQ

a



68 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

race, I sometimes assisted him, and he ate as much
as he wanted from my hand.

In the winter in which he had attained his
fifteenth year, he was attacked with a violent
cough and asthma. I now kept him within doors
as much as possible, and let him sleep in the
kitchen instead of the passage, that he might enjoy
the benefit of a warmed room. I also frequently
gave him water-gruel at night; and one of my last
visits before going to bed was to my dog, to bestow
upon him my usual caress, which he generally
expected, and raised his head up to receive it: on
these occasions I now held between my fingers a
lump of Spanish liquorice, of which he was fond,
and he nibbled at it for some time, by which his
throat must have been moistened, and his cough
was much relieved.

As spring returned, I had the pleasure of seeing
my dog regain much of his vigour, and at times he
played with his favourite ball as lively as ever.
But I was concerned to observe that his sight
continued rapidly to decay, and both eyes were



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 69

alike affected. In addition to this mark of old
age, he was also troubled with deafness, and, by
the autumn of 1838, he was nearly totally deaf
and blind; so that he could not hear without
being called in a very loud voice, nor see any
objects except a little with one eye, and then only
in an oblique direction.

I was out of town at this season, and my poor
old friend was observed to miss me very much. I
returned for a short time, and then left home for
some days again. On my return I found my poor
animal declining very fast, but he ate his meals as
usual, and the chief difference in him was a want
of spirits, and a tendency to sleep more than ordi-
nary. On the evening before he was taken ill, he
stretched himself by my side till supper-time, as I
sat writing In my study, as if to pay me a last
visit of affection. On the next day he was very
heavy—yet still he paid his accustomed visit to
our bed-room, and threw himself on his back at
my feet, that I might caress him. At dinner he
seemed particularly dull, but he took bits, in his



70 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

gentle manner, from my hand and from that of his
mistress. About supper-time he was very sick;
after which he was taken to his bed. His mistress
gave him a morsel of biscuit, the last thing that he
ate. In the morning it was discovered that he had
been sick all night, but he had made no disturb-
ance. He was moved on his bed to the lower part
of the house; here he soon became exceedingly
ill, and lay stretched on his side, unable to rise.
Ge would take nothing solid, and all he took was
a little milk and water which I handed to him,
and of which he lapped only three times. Some-
thing like a convulsion fit now followed, and as he
attempted several times to rise, he fell with his
head violently upon a stone floor. I placed mats
and other soft things under and around him, and
kept shifting them as he restlessly turned from
side to side. After this he revived a little, and
was able to crawl into the kitchen near the fire;
but again appearing to grow worse, he was carried
out for air, and laid on the grass-plot in the garden.
The gardener thought it possible, that by adminis-



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 71

tering some medicine he might yet recover, and I
instantly procured a pill from the druggist’s shop ;
but, on opening his mouth, there did not appear to
be any passage down his throat. I therefore
desisted from giving him the pill, but procured
some castor-oil, and administered that, in hopes of
rendering him some speedy relief. I found, how-
ever, that this remained in his mouth, and would
not pass into his stomach. My hopes were now
all over. He lay upon his old. bed, stretched on
his side, and appearing nearly dead; he lifted up
his head twice, and laid it instantly down again,
and a plaintive and heart-rending moan proceeded
from him. After this he became quite quiet. I
and the gardener lifted him by a board that was
placed under his bed, and once more carried him
from the grass-plot into the house, when in about
an hour my poor animal breathed his last as in a
gentle sleep. :

J-am not ashamed to say that I shed tears over
his body; I should have been ashamed to say that
I did not. I must, indeed, have been insensible to



72 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

every feeling of humanity, to witness with indif-
ference the death of such a kind and interesting
creature, that had invariably displayed towards me
the most sincere attachment, and been the compa-
nion of my walks and my studies during fourteen
years.

Puss, who had lived on terms of friendship with
him for five or six years, saw him dying, and was
evidently aware of her irrecoverable loss, when he
disappeared. On the day after his death she
refused her food; and on the following day I gave
it to her at the usual hour, when she laid it down,
paused over it, gazed about with a wild and ex-
pressive look, as if in hopeless search for her com-
panion, and then uttered a most melancholy howl,
such as I never heard from any animal before.

Thus died Frisk, in the afternoon of September
15th, 1838, and in the sixteenth year of his age.
His body was deposited beneath a willow-tree in
my garden, where I had long determined that, if I
should survive him, he should have his grave.

His beautiful skin was preserved and stuffed,































!



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 73

and remains as a faithful remembrancer of his
name and virtues. His attitude is couchant, with
his head erect, and turned a little on one side, and
between his fore feet is his favourite toy, a ball.
I retain it in a glass case, as a substitute for his
portrait. But, alas! that mild, beautiful, and
intelligent eye, so often and so justly admired,
sparkles no more. ‘There is the very same pretty
clothing which his Creator gave him, but it no
longer conceals beneath it the heart that beat so
fondly towards his friends, and especially his
master. There is the form, but it has lost the
sportive bounding limb, and that which gave it all
its Interest, its intelligence, and life. I miss that
form every where, by day and by night. J want
to receive its morning visits—to see it stretched
at my feet, or walking by my side, or feeding out
of my hand. ‘There would now be music to my
ear in that bark. would be esteemed a treasure. The house wants
an interesting inhabitant. The garden looks more
desolate than it can be made by the winds of



74: MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

‘autumn, and its flowers are less sweet, and bright

and beautiful, than when my dog watched me
sowing or gathering them. Poor Frisk, I feel that
I loved thee, and long, very long, shall I cherish
thy memory!

EPITAPH ON MY DOG.

Weep, willow, o’er this narrow spot of earth,
For here lies one of more than common worth—
A faithful friend ; and such we rarely find
Among the passing crowds of human kind.

Bland were his manners, and his temper mild—
Alike the favourite of the man and child ;

And in his eyes the thinking mind could trace,
A keen intelligence beyond his race.

Kind creature! thou art gone, thy days are o’er,
Thy master meets thy fond caress no more ;
No more thy harmless tricks and pranks displays,
‘Which made with wonder every eye to gaze.

But he forgets thee not; the honest tear
He shed, and not alone, upon thy bier :
And on his memory fixed shalt thou remain,
Though he shall never see “ thy like again.”



~t

Or

MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

CHAPTER IV.

Concluding Remarks.—Brief Anecdotes of singular Attachments
of Dogs.—Dogs are grateful Creatures.—Anecdotes of their
remarkable Attachment to their Masters.—Of their Protecting
and Preserving Human Beings.—Their Attachment to Children
confirmed by Anecdote.—Their great Usefulness.—God’s Kind-
ness to his Creatures.—Animals may possibly Live in another
state.—Our final Destiny and Responsibility.

In closing this brief narrative, which I trust
has not been uninteresting to the young reader,
let me indulge the hope that it may teach him to
show kindness to the brute creation. Some have,
indeed, carried their attachment to an extreme.
An Emperor of Japan was so fond of dogs, that
he caused huts to be built and food to be provided
for them in.every street, and where they roved
about freely without a home, such provisions for
their comfort did credit to his feelings; so did the
kind attentions which he caused to be paid to them



76 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

when sick: this was the way to make them attached
to man as afriend. He however carried his atten-
tions too far, when he provided burying places for
them at the tops of the mountains, and obliged
human beings to bear them thither, labouring
under their burden. The late Duchess of York
showed a similar partiality for these creatures, of
which she had a very considerable number. She
provided for her dogs every comfort during life ;
and when. they died they were buried in a cemetery
which she provided for them, near the celebrated
grotto at Oatlands. There may now be seen a
large number of neat little hillocks, beneath which
are deposited the remains of her favourites; and
to some of them are appended grave-stones, with
their names and epitaphs. Some would perhaps
say, that her expenditure on these animals had
better have been bestowed on the poor: I believe
that she by no means overlooked them; and if she
was lavish of kindness towards the brute creation,
it was at least, if I may so speak, an amiable
failing.



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. V7

We should remember, that we are almost certain
of returns of gratitude for acts of kindness which
we bestow upon these creatures; and I am sorry
to add, that this is not always the case when we
bestow our favours on those who ought to know
better how to repay us. It costs us very little to
acquire the attachment of a faithful animal, and
there is at all times something cheering in his dis-
interested caresses. Eiven when his master is no
more, no friend can more deeply deplore his death.
Many instances are recorded of the dog pining
away, from the long absence of his master—of his
attachment to the spot where his beloved reniains
were interred—and of his dying with grief for his
loss.

“At a tavern called the Throstle Nest, in the
Scotland Road, Liverpool, might have been seen,
a few years since—and he may still survive—a dog
that belonged to a poor Italian, who wandered
about with an organ and monkey. The Italian
died, and was buried in the cemetery of the Catholic
chapel, adjoming the tavern. For some time,



78 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

hunger alone induced the dog to leave his master’s
grave, but when the tavern was opened he became
an inmate. He did not, however, then forget his
master; for every morning, directly the doors were
opened, he was seen going to the burial-ground,

‘Where all forgetting, by the world forgot,”

the poor Italian sleeps, till the morning of the
resurrection.”

“In March, 1834, a gentleman was discovered
dead in the neighbourhood of Paris, with his
faithful dog watching his body. The corpse was
taken to a place called the morgue, where dead
bodies which are found, are placed, to be owned by
the relatives or friends of the deceased. Here the
faithful dog still attended, night and day, till, on
the third day, the gentleman’s son discovered his
lost father, when the dog, on receiving his master’s
pocket-handkerchief, and being told to go home
with it, was with some difficulty persuaded to leave
the spot.” What friend could have shown more
attachment ?



MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 79

Dogs have also frequently shown a singular care
in preserving and protecting human beings. I
will here mention one anecdote, out of a large
number that might be collected, of the singular
sagacity of a Newfoundland dog in preserving a
gentleman who was nearly drowned. I have
found it in Bingley’s “ Animal Biography,” before
quoted: “In the summer of 1792, a gentleman
went to Portsmouth for the benefit of sea-bathing.
He was conducted in one of the machines into the
water; but being unacquainted with the steepness
of the shore, and no swimmer, he found himself,
the instant he quitted the machine, nearly out of
his depth. The state of alarm into which he was
thrown, increased his danger; and, unnoticed by
the person who attended the machine, he would
unavoidably have been drowned, had not a large
Newfoundland dog, which by accident was standing
on the shore, and observed his distress, plunged in
to his assistance. The dog seized him by the hair,
and conducted him safe to land. The gentleman
afterwards purchased the dog, at a high price ;



Full Text

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MY DOG'S PROFILE.
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG:

INTERSPERSED WITH
Original Anecdotes of Animals,

DESIGNED

TO CHERISH, IN THE YOUTHFUL MIND, KINDLY FEELINGS
TOWARDS THE BRUTE CREATION.

By INGRAM COBBIN, M.A.

“‘Dr. Brown considered the Duties which we owe to the Brute Creation,
as a very important branch of ethics, and, had he lived, he would have
published an essay upon the subject.’’—Lirz or Dr. Tomas Brown, BY
THE Rey. Dr. WELSH.

LONDON:
G. BERGER, HOLYWELL STREET, STRAND;

AND BALL, ARNOLD & CO., PATERNOSTER ROW.
LONDON:
G. Berger, Printer, Holywell Street, Strand.
TO PARENTS AND TEACHERS.

SomE young persons frequently discover a great
propensity to tease the brute creation; while others
evince as strong a predilection in their favour.
One great object of these pages is, to correct the
disposition of the former, and cherish that of the
latter.

Of all animals, none have often been worse used
than the dog; and hence the proverb, to express
the ill usage practised by any individual towards
another, “He treated him like a dog.” It has
always been the fate of a few to be too much
petted, but of a large number to be very unkindly
used.
vi TO PARENTS AND TEACHERS.

I am one of those who think it probable, at least,
that the animal creation may be restored in an-
other state. If I err, my error is innocent; and
I have on my side some of the greatest names. I
think that nothing that is intellectual can die, and
I perceive in many animals more than instinct.*
In what condition they may exist I know not, any
more than I know that they may exist at all.
Scripture is silent upon the subject; and where
that is silent about future things, all must be con-
jecture. Yet, from the nature of spirit which the
beast. possesses, it must be presumed that, if he

* Toplady says, that ‘instinct is a name for we know not what ;
and he that would distinguish between instinct and reason, must first
find a medium between matter and spirit.” Igo notso far: I agree
with Lord Monboddo, that instinct is different from reason; and
sucking has, for instance, been properly mentioned as an example
of instinct which is, indeed, common to human beings before they can
reason, and is equally common to all the tribes of mammalia. But
a dog does something which requires reason, and is more than in-
stinct, when, like my animal, he brings me a letter or newspaper,
and delivers it to me, instead of dropping it by the way ; and delivers
it to me, and not to any other person, and searches for me at the
same time till he jinds me, in whatever part of the premises I
may be.
TO PARENTS AND. TEACHERS. Vil

finally ceases to exist when he leaves this world,
it is not from the constitution of his nature, but
from the will of his Creator. “I will honestly
confess,” says Toplady, “that I never yet heard
one single argument urged against the immor-
tality of brutes, which, if admitted, would not,
mutatis mutandis, be equally conclusive against
the immortality of man.” Wesley, holding similar
sentiments, replies thus to the objector who may
ask, ‘‘ But of what use will those creatures be in
that future state?” “I answer this by another
question: what use are they of now? If there
be, as has commonly been supposed, eight thousand
species of insects, who is able to inform us of what
use seven thousand of them are? If there are four
thousand species of fishes, who can tell us of what
use are more than three thousand of them? If
there are six hundred sorts of birds, who can tell
of what use five hundred of those species are? If
there be four hundred sorts of beasts, to what
use do three hundred of them serve? Consider
this; consider how little we know of even the
vill TO PARENTS AND TEACHERS.

present designs of God; and then you will not
wonder that we know still less of what he deigns
to do in the new heaven, and the new earth.”*

The Holy Book unravels not this knotty ques-
tion, for it is furnished only to inform us about
the destiny of men, and not of inferior creatures.
The advocates for one side of the question quote
the language of the preacher, Eccles. iii. 21, ‘“ Who
knoweth the spirit of a man that goeth upward,
and the spirit of a beast that goeth downward in
the earth 2”; The advocates for the other quote
Rom. vill. 22: “For we know that the whole
creation groaneth and travaileth in pain together

* Mr. Wesley's arguments are founded on the discoveries of
science at that time; but in a very few years afterwards, Drury’s
cabinet of Insects was sold, containing 11,000 species of insects ;
and large additions have been made continually, since that period,
in every branch of natural history.

+ Psalm xlix. 12, is another passage which may be quoted against
the restoration of animals; but all commentators agree in the
opinion that this merely signifies, that as the brute creation die,
so also do men die.
TO PARENTS AND TEACHERS. 1S

until now.” Both passages are involved in dif-
ficulty, and throw no clear light upon the subject.
It is one in which reason, enlightened by revela~
tion,* must chiefly be our guide; but to which
religion is certainly not opposed, as it respects the
view of a future state of existence. Such an
opinion adopted, also appears to me to be highly
favourable to the cultivation of humanity towards
the brute creation, and gives us more exalted views
than the other, of the benevolence of that divine
Being whose “tender mercies are over alk his
works.” But it is not my intention here to enter
elaborately into the argument, and it is not one
into which the young mind can enter: it is there-
fore, of course, not enforced, but only hinted at,
in the narrative.

* T have here added a qualifying clause ; for it may be doubted

if man would ever have thought of immortality, even for himself,
without some traditionary knowledge, at least, of revelation.

+ The author has read, with much pleasure, The Prize Essay |
written by Dr. Sryzus, entitled, ‘* The Animal Creation :. its
Claims on our Humanity stated and enforced.” But he cannot
avoid expressing his regret that he has spoken so lightly of the
x TO PARENTS AND TEACHERS.

My sympathy with the suffering brute creation
has made me strongly attached to them, and I think
that the grateful creatures generally know that I
am their friend. I have especially observed the
sagacity of dogs, and those of the poodle breed

opinion entertained by many great men, in favour of the future
existence of animals. The following observations might as well
have been omitted: ‘‘ The questions, whether animals possess
souls? whether they are immortal, and will exist in another state
of being? we leave to the speculative and dreamy enthusiast. We
quarrel not with the poor untutored Indian, who thinks,

* Admitted to that equal sky,
His faithful dog will bear him company.’

Nor would we break the charm which binds more enlightened
philosophers, and some of the gentler race of Christians, to the
sweet illusion, that compensation will follow animal suffering in an
after-life.” Dr. Styles must know that men of high intelligence
and sound sense have argued for the future existence of the brute
creation; and while the author of this work does not presume
positively to assert it, he would remember that it has been favoured
by men of science and philosophy, as well as by men of distinguished
piety and good sense. Toplady and Wesley have already been
quoted : a few others are here added, for the extracts from which
the author is indebted to Sheppard’s interesting volume, The Autumn
Dream: “If,” says Bonnet, ‘ the lower animals have souls, their
soul is as indivisible, as indestructible by second causes, as the soul
TO PARENTS AND TEACHERS. x1

have attracted my particular attention. I believe
the reason why some persons so little admire
animals is, because they are not aware how much
of intelligence can be drawn out from them, and
they know nothing of. one pleasure of life, of no

of man: a simple substance can neither be divided nor decom-
pounded. The soul of the animal, therefore, can perish only by
annihilation ; and I do not see that religion announces, in express
terms, that annihilation ; but I do see that it celebrates the im-
mense treasures of divine goodness.” ‘‘If,” says Dr. BARCLAY,
‘‘animals are reserved for a future state, and destined, like man,
in a new heaven or a new earth, to animate new bodies, and of
different materials, who will presume to say to the Omniscient and
the Almighty, that, after fulfilling his purposes here, they can
answer no other purpose hereafter? May they not be reserved,
as forming many of the customary links in the chain of being, and,
by preserving the chain entire, contribute there, as they do here,
to the general beauty and variety of the universe? Besides—
though some individuals of the human species, in that blessed state,
may no longer feel an interest in them, yet, to others of more con-
templative minds, may they not be a source not only of sublime,
but of perpetual delight?” &e. ‘It is,” says Bisnop Burner,
“thought an insuperable difficulty that brutes should be immortal,
and, by consequence, capable of everlasting happiness. Now this
manner of expression is both invidious and weak: but the thing
intended by it is really no difficulty at all, either in the way of
natural or moral consideration. For, frst suppose the invidious
xi TO PARENTS AND TEACHERS.

inferior kind, derived from the affectionate regard
which is often displayed by brute creatures towards
tender masters.

My objects in writing this memoir are not merely
to furnish an amusing volume for the young, but

thing designed in such a manner of expression, were really implied,
as it is not in the least, in the natural immortality of brutes—
namely, that they must arrive at great attainments, and become
rational and moral agents—even this would be uo difficulty, since
we know not what latent powers and capacities they may be endued
with. There was once, prior to experience, as great presumption
against human creatures, as there is against the brute creatures,
arriving at that degree of understanding which we have in mature
age. For, we can trace up our existence to the original with
theirs. And we find it to be ageneral law of nature, that creatures
endued with capacities of virtue and religion, should be placed in a
condition of being in which they are altogether without the use of
them, for a considerable length of their duration——as in infancy and
childhood, And great part of the human species go out of the
present world before they come to the exercise of these capacities
in any degree at all. But then, secondly, the natural immortality
of brutes does not in the least imply that they are indued with any
latent capacities of a rational or moral nature. And the economy
of the universe might require that there should be living creatures
without any capacities of this kind. And all difficulties, as to the
manner how they are to be disposed of, are so apparently and
TO PARENTS AND TEACHERS. Xl

‘to add a few pages to the anecdotes of animal
sagacity, of which so many instances are recorded
in our natural historics and animal biography ; to
excite a taste for reading books of a superior class,
on the subject; and especially to promote dispo-

wholly founded in our ignorance, that it is wonderful they should
be insisted upon by any, but such as are weak enough to think they
are acquainted with the whole system of things.” To these remarks,
especially from the pen of a BurueER, the author may now venture,
without fear of the appellation of a “‘ speculative and dreamy en-
thusiast,” to add some thoughts on the subject, which he himself
wrote about ten years since in a periodical miscellany, when he
was not at all aware that he was in such good company: ‘* The
works of nature are as yet but little known, even by the most
intellectual students of the various departments of science. The
beauties that lie concealed in the bud—the mysterious chemistry
perpetually in operation—the secrets of the earth’s bosom, and of
the sea’s depths—what a source of delight may these open to the
mind of the glorified being, while he shall perpetually exclaim, as
page after page of the immense and beautiful volume is unfolded,
©O Lord, how excellent are thy works, in wisdom hast thou made
themall!’ It is true, ‘the earth and all the works that are therein
shall be burnt up ;’ but we know not what resuscitation of nature
may take place in the new heaven and the new earth, which shall
be perfectly defecated from all that is impure; or otherwise, how
much of God’s creation must, as far as relates to this interesting
object, have been made in vain. Nor let it be scornfully said,
xiv TO PARENTS AND TEACHERS.

sitions of kindness towards the brute creation, and
in particular,
“ Towards the poor dog, in life the firmest friend,
The first to welcome, foremost to defend ;

Whose honest heart is still his master’s own,
Who labours, fights, breathes, lives for him alone.”

I have adopted the form of a memoir in record-
ing some anecdotes which have come under my
own knowledge, this being more interesting to the

‘Shall the odious reptile, and the insignificant and filthy insect, be
restored, and be objects of contemplation in the world of bliss?’
Be it remembered, that nothing shall be injurious or hurtful there ;
and that a celestial philosopher must have a scope for enjoyment,
which all the giant minds that ever existed on this side the grave
must fail, even when combined, to shadow forth, Let it also be
recollected, that no work of God, when properly viewed, is insig-
nificant; that the most trifling blade of grass, or animated piece of
dust that we tread under our feet, baffles all our powers to create ;
and supposing any of us could call forth either into existence,
mankind would justly look upon us as phenomena not less than
divine, and we should leave Sir Isaac Newton and his fellow-minds
at an immeasurable distance. If, then, the most minute of God’s
works are so great, and if they are ‘sought out’ here by all that
“take pleasure in them,’ how much more may we believe that, as
they are most worthy the notice of an exalted intellect, so they
will form a portion of those objects of delight and inquiry, which
shall employ the bright hosts of immortality. The conjecture is
TO PARENTS AND TEACHERS. XV

young than a mere essay. The memoir is that of
an animal who was one of singular sagacity and
good temper, and therefore an excellent subject to
effect my design. He was my friend and compa-
nion for fourteen years, and we found no difficulty
to understand each other on almost any subject on
which it was possible for man and beast to con-
verse. A word, ora motion of the hand, in general,

pleasant, it is harmless, and it is not derogatory to the greatness
and goodness of the Creator, and may possibly be involved in the
declaration, that, owing to sin, ‘ the whole creation groaneth, being
burdened, longing-to be delivered.’” The author of the above
remarks would further add, that in his opinion men of sense and
piety would do well to speak with greater modesty when they
oppose the doctrine of the future existence of animals: they assert
it as a thing for certain that they will not exist ; but how do they
know that they will not? Their prejudices are no ground of argu-
ment. It is a fine benevolent idea that they will; and we are sure
that our utmost thoughts cannot exceed the divine benevolence.

It may be here necessary to explain, that, owing to considerable
delay in the publication of this little volume, it now appears some
time after the author of “ Animal Creation” has recommended it to
the notice of his juvenile readers, in a note in his Prize Essay—the
body of the work having been forwarded, as soon as it came from
the press, for the perusal of the gentleman who has so obligingly
noticed it.
_ xvi TO PARENTS AND TEACHERS.

“easily conveyed to him my: meaning, and he readily
obeyed. I envy not ‘the insensibility of any one,
who can smile at the writer when he adds, that
he deeply regrets his loss.

In writing a memoir, I have found many oppor-.
tunities for throwing in useful hints for the young,
which they would not perhaps so readily nor so
well retain, if communicated through other me-
diums; and I have endeavoured to make the whole
suitable for the volatile individuals who may give
them a perusal.

Camberwell. Ic.
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

CHAPTER I.

Description of my Dog—How he became Mine—His engaging
behaviour—Original Anecdotes of a Horse—Of a Goose—
Anecdote of a Goose and Dog—Original Anecdotes of a Squirrel
—Ofa Poodle Dog belonging to a French Officer—Of another
Poodle—Singular instance of Retaliation in another Dog of the
same Breed—Anecdote of a former Poodle of my own—Original
and extraordinary Anecdotes of a Dog in the North of England.

\

It was on a fine day in the month of October,
1824, when I first saw my dog. He was a beau-
tiful young animal, all vivacity, and the sun shone
splendidly on his snow-white coat of silken curls,
and his mild dark hazel eye sparkled with delight
as he bounded along, attracted by a ball in the
hand of his leader, which every now and then he
caught with the greatest dexterity. He was

B
1 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

dressed in the highest style of dog fashion, for he
was a poodle, whose privileges far exceed those of
other dogs; being allowed to have the hair cut, and
the beard shaved, and to wear mustachios and
trowsers, or pantaloons, shaped something like
those of many biped fops who strut about in the
highest mode of fashion. He'was also decorated
with the blue riband, but wore no star, and the
former adorned his neck, and not his breast. It
formed a beautiful contrast with his snowy white
frill, and his curly silk jacket, which was cut short
like that of an hussar, while his lower garments
were thin, and sat round his loins and his limbs as
close as wax, and fitted far better than any that
could have been made by the first tailor in Cork or
Bond Street.

Four months before, I had lost.a dog of the
same breed, the poor animal having been killed by
another dog at a hospital whither he had been sent
for the cure of an eruption on his skin. Till then
I had not thought of replacing him, but the idea
now suddenly came into my mind. Seeing that I
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 3

noticed the animal, the dealer asked me if I wanted
to buy a dog. My former one was a present, and
having been valued at ‘ten guineas, I expected a
demand would have been made upon me of a larger
sum than I should have thought proper to have
paid for the purchase. To my surprise, on asking
the price, the reply was, “ fifteen shillings.” [
inquired. about his temper; the vender answered
that it was one of the very best. ‘ Temper is
every thing.” Who likes a person with a sullen or
a crabbed temper; or a child that is always irritable
and fretful, or a dog that can never salute any body
without a growl ora snap? “ Here, sir,” said the
dealer, “is a proof of his good temper,” leading
him at the same time by the ear; ‘no dog but

one of the very best temper would permit that.”
_“ Will he fetch and carry?” ‘“ You may see that,
sir, In a moment,” said he; and throwing the ball,
it was quickly pursued, seized, and returned to the
hand of the dealer. ‘ Well,” said I, “ if you will
take him to my house at some distance, the dog is
mine.”

B 2
4 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

The loss of my former animal; which I had had
about two years, had caused great regret in my
family, and a successor was never thought of. He
was, therefore, received very coolly, and paid for
with some reluctance. In the evening I returned
home, after some hours absence, and found that
from his having something of the urbanity, as well
as the appearance of a gentleman, he was already
in a fair way of being domesticated at my fire-
side. As he had not the talent of conversation, he
amused the company by other means, and most
readily agreed to perform some interesting tricks,
at which he was quite an adept. He was in the
act of exhibiting some of these when I returned,
and he soon made himself so much at home, that
in a few days he became a general favourite.

I was always an admirer of animals, though for
a number of years I never had a dog except for a
few months, and, before I could be much attached
to him, he was lost. But I had been accustomed
to ride a pretty little mare for four or five years, of
which I was fond—a creature that always took care
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 5

to let me know if the groom had given her no food
at her proper time, by saluting me with a neigh,
being silent if she had been fed. I had also been
partial to fowls, which, when I had them, would
fly upon my head and shoulders, and eat out.of my
hands.. And I had been honoured with the attach-
ment of a goose.

I scarcely know whether or not to mention this
fact, especially after reading of a Newfoundland
dog, who enjoyed the like honour. “ In one of
those amusing and instructive works upon natural
history, in which we find recorded the traits of
character peculiar to different animals, there is an
account of a goose, which had formed so strong an
attachment to a Newfoundland dog belonging to
the same master, that she was never easy out of
his society. Neptune was conscious of this kindly
feeling, and returned it to a certain extent; and
whenever they were together in the yard, he feed-
ing, and goosey looking affectionately on, or the
contrary, it was all very well; but when Neptune.
took the air in the street of the village, or by the
6 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

road side, or went to refresh himself in a neigh-
bouring pond, goosey would accompany him. Then
it was too, that after enduring the waddle and quack
of his admiring companion for a certain period of
time, Neptune invariably, as soon as he saw any
dogs of condition, or puppies of quality coming,
put himself into a long trot, and darted round a
corner, or over a gate, in order to exhibit his dis-
like of the connexion.” However, I only relate a
fact, and I could not help it any more than Nep-
tune, if my goose thought there was any thing
attractive about me to engage her affections. This
creature followed me about on my premises, was
fond of peeping at me in my parlour, and, when
invited, would lay her head on my knee to be
stroked, or sit on my lap; but as good breeding is
desirable for a parlour guest, and goose was not
always well-behaved, she was at length expelled
from the parlour; and having made great havoc in
the garden—where she had no business to enter—
and stolen all my lettuces and other things, the un-
fortunate culprit was sentenced to die, and execu-
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 7
tion-was passed upon her accordingly; she, however,
died a noble death, having, like many illustrious
lords and ladies, had her head cut off. I was vexed
after her end, that, in a thoughtless moment, I had
consented to her being put to death. Poor crea-
ture! many a greater delinquent has escaped all
punishment. She had shown great confidence in
me, and confidence should never be abused, and
she had afforded me some amusement. Before I
leave her, I must relate one curious anecdote. My
premises consisted of two parts entirely divided
from each other, the back buildings being of the
same height as the front, and used for all common
purposes. The space between them formed an
alley of some length, enclosed at each end by a wall.
This was the domain of my poultry, and of goose
among the rest. But I had then a spaniel puppy
who loved a frolic, and, like some children, never
passed an hour without getting into mischief. One
day he took it into his head to chace the goose, and
as the latter expanded her wings, he took a fancy
to indulge himself with a ride, so seating himself
8 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

upon his feathered saddle, the goose—as if to ac-
commodate him as agreeably as she could, though
she did not mean it—spread her wings still more,
and ran backwards and forwards crying under her
load. Hearing the noise, I went to see what was
the matter, and there was my puppy sitting as
gravely as a judge on the back of the bird, enjoying
a pleasant morning’s ride, till I thought he had
had sufficient exercise, and released the goose
from her rider.

I must add that I had likewise a beautiful
squirrel, which was a very intelligent and amusing
creature, and often afforded an innocent laugh at
the fire-side. He had been the pet of a friend,
who gave it to me, and was perfectly tame. He
would allow of being laid on his back between the
knees, and stroked on the breast. One of his
luxuries was to lie on his mistress’s lap, and
another to nestle in the servant’s pocket, whence
he would pop out his head if he heard a voice; or
when she came in to wait at table, I would some-
times put nuts into my pockets, and roll on the
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 9

carpet that he might come and rifle them, and his
keen nose soon set him in a bustle to procure his
plunder. He was very fond of sugar, and would
jump upon the tea-table and take it dexterously
from the basin, and then curling his fine bushy tail
around him, he would sit up in a corner, like a
monkey, nibbling it. His movements were always
nimble; and once in his haste, he popped his head
into the hot water of the slop-basin, instead of the
sugar-basin—when he scalded. the tip of his nose,
and then scampered off, sneezing and scolding in
the most laughable manner. The little creature
had a proper cage, with a cylinder to run round
and keep his agile feet in motion, and a chamber
_ for retirement and rest; but he had also the free
scope of the house, and if called, he would run
about, pricking up his ears, and peeping into every
room till he found the person that called him, when
he would greet him with a cry of pleasure, and
mount his shoulders with the agility of a lamp-
lighter. This engaging little creature was killed
by a wanton boy, who mischievously turned round
10 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

his cage while he was retreating from him into his
sleeping apartment, and broke his back. The poor
animal did not instantly die, but lived many hours
afterwards, and in great agony expired on his mis-
tress’s lap, whither he had crawled that he might
receive her caresses with his last breath. Poor
squirrel was not suffered to die without some tears
being shed for his loss. I sketched his portrait
after death, which I have since sometimes looked
upon with a melancholy pleasure.

But, to return to the subject of these memoirs:
I have already said that he was a poodle. Dogs
of every species have for ages been reckoned
among the friends and companions of the human
race; but, with the exception of the Newfoundland
dog, the poodle is considered as the most intel-
ligent, and no one of the dog tribe is equal to him
in affording amusement. He is sometimes called
“the French dog ;” for his breed is much esteemed
in France, and the natives teach him a thousand
diverting tricks, which he learns with the greatest
facility. I know a gentleman, who was a military
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 11

officer of that country, who had one which he
highly valued, for he had been his companion for
years, and had attended him, and slept with him
many a time on the field of battle; among other
amusing tricks he would undergo the process of
trial as a deserter—be imprisoned in the corner—
drop his tail and ears when tried—stand upright to
be shot at—and then, suddenly falling down, lay
extended on the floor without moving a foot, as if
he was killed.

I must here further digress from my story of
my dog, to mention one anecdote of this creature
which showed his extraordinary sagacity. His
master had taught him to fetch his provisions as he
wanted them, from any of the neighbouring places
where he might be quartered. His fame had
reached the ears of many officers, and one day they
watched him, when he was the bearer of a note
and basket to bring back some fowls from a farm-
house above a mile distant. The fowls were put
into the basket alive, and the basket was one with
two lids. As long as he carried it, the fowls rode
12 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

securely; but, when he had completed about half
his journey, he sat down the basket to rest, when
one of the fowls feeling disposed to return home,
found his way out by lifting up one of the lids.
Moustache—for that was the dog’s name—was
keeping a watchful eye over his charge, and in-
stantly pursuing the deserter, brought it back, and
pushing up the basket-lid with his nose, replaced
the captive in prison. But while he was so doing,
a fowl on the opposite side took the alarm, and
escaped by lifting up the other lid. Moustache
also caught and replaced that in the same manner.
But after he had done so several times with the
same ill success, a fowl always escaping on one
side, as fast as he put one in on the other side—he
stood for a moment, as if to pause and consider
what he should do—when, again catching his fowl,
he gave it a gripe in the neck, and placed it in
dead; and, as the others escaped in succession, he
served them all in the same way, till, having no
more to escape, he took up his basket and hurried
home to his master, much to the amusement and |
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 18

astonishment of all who saw his sagacious exploits.
One of the superior officers of high rank in the
army, wished much to possess this dog, and offered
his master a large sum for his purchase, but he
would not part with his old comrade. Within a
month after, poor Moustache was poisoned! This
was a cruel and malicious deed. Moustache’s
master severely felt his loss, and even now, after
many years have passed away, in speaking of him,
he can scarcely refrain from tears.

Another instance of the sagacity of the poodle
occurs to my recollection. It was one of a very
large kind, which had been purchased by a friend
of mine, who taught him to play many pranks;
among other things he would hide any thing in any
part of the house, and then send his dog to fetch
it, which, by the keenness of his scent, he never
failed to accomplish.

But a singular-instance of retaliation for an
affront, occurred, not long since, in the case of an
animal of the poodle kind, which was bred in the
family of a relative of mine. He was accustomed
14 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

to go out a walking frequently with his master and
mistress; but one day they were going where they
did not take him, and he wished much to be one of
the party. He importuned, and they denied. At
length they left him; he dropped his ears and tail,
and retired. On their return they could not obtain
an entrance, for the key of the garden-gate was
nowhere to be found. While they were waiting
and considering what was to be done, a younger
branch of the family returned, to whom the dog
was much attached, and he guessed what had hap-
pened. The dog was sent to him, and he coaxed
him, and asked him what he had done with the
key. After a little time poodle was prevailed
upon to relent, and cantering into the field adjoin-
ing, he scratched up the earth, and hastened back,
bearing in his mouth the lost article! The fact
was, that when the door-bell rung, he was often
the bearer of the key to let any of the family in,
and often brought it back when they were let out.
He, therefore, knew that they could not get in
without it, and as they would not let him out, he
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 15

was resolved that they should not be let in, and so
he went and hid the key in the field, till he was
induced to relent!

My former poodle displayed a similar sagacity.
On my returning home from a jourmey on one
occasion, my slippers were not to be found. It
was recollected that a few days before he had been
seen with one of them in the garden, and it was
no doubt concealed with the other by him in some
secret corner. I said, ‘*Send him to me, and leave
all the doors open,” and then proceeded to ask,
while he pricked up his ears and turned his head
cunningly on one side, “‘ Where are my slippers,
sir?” This I repeated several times, and then de-
sired him to fetch them. The animal instantly
started off down the garden, and brought one and
laid it at my feet. ‘ Now, sir,” said I, “ fetch
the other.” The command was instantly obeyed.
This certainly was like reason.

It is not, however, usual to find any thing like
this except in the poodle; yet, I myself know of
one striking exception. The dog, if I rightly
16 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

remember, was a large mongrel, something of the
mastift kind, and perhaps a mixt breed of the bull
dog. I was one day standing in the street of a
large town in the north of England, conversing
with a friend, when this animal came up to us,
and remained looking up in my face with a most
prying and sagacious look. ‘ What,” said I, to
my friend, “does that dog want? he evidently
wants something.” “Give him a halfpenny,” said
he, “ and you will see.” I gave him the money,
and he immediately took it wp and marched off to
a baker’s shop close at hand, where he laid it out
for a cake. ‘ I will tell you a curious anecdote
of that dog,” said my friend. ‘‘ He was accus-
tomed to deal regularly with that baker; but some
time since I happened to be in the shop when he
came in to purchase a cake, and the stock was all
gone, save half'acake. This he gave to the dog
for his money. The dog looked at the cake—then
at him, and was not satisfied, expressing his discon-
tent as we do, by grumbling: I patted him, and
urged him to take the cake, which, at length, he
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 17

did reluctantly, and walked away. I then charged
the baker not to cheat the poor animal, but give
him the half cake when he had one. Some time
after, happening to be in his shop, the dog passing
by, I asked him if he had ever given him the cake
which he owed him.” ‘No, sir,” said the ‘baker,
“T have not, for he has never been in my shop
since.” Then calling him to me, I begged the
baker to give him a cake, and from that day he
returned and renewed his custom!” Tt is not long
since I inquired of my friend about this singular
animal, when he informed me that he was knocked
on the head by a butcher for stealing a leg .of
mutton, a cruel act, since the owner guaranteed
to pay any damage that he might.do, he often
taking it into his head to choose a joint of meat, and
take it home carefully to his master at the hour of
preparation for dinner.
t8 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

CHAPTER II.

My Dog named.—His amiable Disposition.—His Propensity to
rove,—His Honesty, together with an amusing Anecdote.—His
Fidelity as a Watchman.—Saves his Master’s House from being
robbed.—Droll original Anecdote of a Newfoundland Dog, in a
Note appended.—Remarkable Instance of my Dog’s Kindness to
a Cat.—The Affection of Puss for her Friend.—My Dog’s
Country Excursion.—Amusing Instance of his Sagacity at Cricket.
—His probable narrow Escape from being Killed.—Several
Anecdotes of Remarkable Dogs mentioned in History.—Of the
Tricks of some Others.—Original Anecdote of Dogs used in
France for Smuggling.

Or the ancestry of my favourite poodle I know
nothing. It might perhaps have been French, and
traced back, like some of our ancient nobility, to
the Norman line from the days of William the
Conqueror. But I have no genealogy to guide
my conjectures. He certainly, for sagacity and
beauty, would not have disgraced any race of
dogs. When I bought him, his name was Tip, an
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 19

abridgment of Tippoo Saib, a celebrated eastern
tyrant and warrior, it being usual to call dogs after
the names of renowned fighting men, perhaps from
the resemblance of disposition between them. I
am, however, not accustomed to value men by the
number they injure, but rather by the number they
benefit; and so seeing that my dog had a lively
look of benevolence, united with a cheerful and
gay disposition, I gave him another name, and
henceforth he was known only as Frisx.

“ The dog,” says a writer on ‘ Animal Bio-
graphy,’ “is more tractable than any other animal,
and conforms himself to the movements and habits
of life of his master. His diligence, his ardour, and
his obedience, are inexhaustible; and his disposi-
tion is so friendly, that, unlike every other animal,
he seems to remember only the benefits he receives.
He soon forgets our blows, and instead of dis-
covering resentment while we chastise him, he
exposes himself to tortuxe, and even licks the hand
whence it proceeds.” This character is more espe-
cially applicable to dogs of the spaniel kind; but

c 2

a
20 MEMOIRS OF MY. DOG.

my dog had nothing of the spaniel in him except
his gentleness. He was bold and undaunted when
he met any other dog, how large soever he might
be, and he never licked his master’s hand, or face,
a qualification readily to be dispensed with. Nor |
was he ardent in his love, but always steady.
Dogs differ in disposition like human beings, and
his was strictly what it was often called by those
who knew him—amiable. My former poodle was
ardent in his affection; and, on my return home,
after any long absence, would leap on a chair,
throw his paws around my neck, nibble my ears,
and absolutely scream for joy. Frisk, on the
contrary, received me in sober silence, took his
place by my side on a sofa, or, after receiving a
few caresses, reposed calmly as near as possible to
my feet. On all occasions he patiently waited
my return home, which he would know by my
knock at the door, when he would run and sniff
loudly at the bottom of it, and then, indeed, if it
were not opened speedily, he discovered some de-
gree of impatience, and would either whine for the
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 21

servant, or scold her by barking, that she had not
moved fast enough for his wishes. The friendship
which subsisted between me and my dog was not
one that would allow us to forget each other. To
us the adage would not apply, “out of sight, out
of mind.” When at any time I was absent in the
country, I often inquired after him, and desired
that he should receive a pat from his mistress as a
token of “my remembrance, and, though he was
unconscious of this favour, it afforded me some
gratification; while, on the other hand, he gave
sufficient signs that he did not forget me, by
anxiously awaiting the arrival of every coach, and
listening whenever one stopped near the door, or
starting up, with expectant looks, when he per-
ceived that one of the gates of entrance had been
opened, and showing marks of disappointment ~
when I did not return as he seemed to have
hoped.

As for chastismg my dog, he seldom required it.
He was so obedient—so tractable—and so cleanly
im his habits, that he scarcely had a fault. The
29g MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

only thing that excited my displeasure was his
inclination to rove. He was like the monkey in
the fable, remarkably fond of seeing the world,
and I was often afraid he would be lost init. The
strictest watch was therefore kept over him, that
he should not go out alone; but, notwithstanding
our vigilance, he would frequently give us the slip,
and sometimes wholly escape our pursuit for many
hours. I was not afraid but that he would return;
if left alone; but I feared that some worthless _
persons might steal him, as is often the case, either
to sell him, or obtain any reward that might be
offered for his recovery. Once I think he must
have been tied up for a whole day; and on another
occasion I watched his return till twelve o’clock at
night, when I at last saw him wandering about on
the opposite side of the way, evidently wishing,
yet afraid to return home; I ran out and took
him in my arms, and while I remonstrated with
him, most readily forgave him, in the pleasure of
receiving him safely again. On several occasions
I tried to cure him of his rambling propensity by
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 23

flogging him, but it was impossible to chastise so
amiable a creature. His predecessor would have
snapped at me, and in his anger have bitten me;
but he, except in one instance, bore it all with the
most perfect patience. Then he sought a hiding-
place, where he in general remained till I called
him to beg my pardon, which he would do by
throwing himself on his back at my feet, and a few
kind words on my part healed all his wounds and
soon made us friends. Even dumb animals may
teach us useful lessons of forgiveness, and reproach
us by their conduct, when we are unforgiving
towards each other.

I have said that he scarcely had a fault, and in
truth it was so, and among his virtues was that of
honesty. On one occasion, however, he forgot his
reputation, and it happened, that when we were
talking to a friend of his virtues, and especially
of that particular virtue, he vexatiously rushed into
the room, pursued by the servant, with a beefsteak
in his mouth, of which he had just contrived to get
possession. What shall I say in apology for him?
24. MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

All I can say is, that he was not the thief, but only
the receiver of the stolen goods; but as the receiver
is always reckoned as bad as the thief, I am afraid
that in this instance I must plead for him in vain.
The fact was, indeed, that on several occasions
puss, whose honesty was never very great, carried
off some articles of food, and being seen by Frisk,
he thought that he had a lawful right to the spoil,
especially as it was no longer on any forbidden
spot. It must, at all events, be confessed that he
was more honest than, I am sorry to say, some
young persons are, who, though they ought to know -
better, slily avail themselves of any opportunity to
taste that which they know is forbidden.

Never was there a more trusty dog in watching
his master’s house. He never gave any unneces-
sary alarm by barking at other dogs, or passing
noises in the road; nor would he ever behave
rudely to friends that visited me, but he knew
when he had duties as a guardian to perform. In
the day, his strong hoarse voice, with his seeming
fierceness, warned the vagabond whom he saw on
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. © QB

the premises to make a speedy retreat;* and at
night, if he was silent, he did not want vigilance.
It was just after the establishment of the police in
the. metropolis, when I was suddenly aroused in
the middle of the night by an unusual bark, as
well as an unusual barking of my dog. His anger

* The inhabitants of the vicinity of the city of London are sadly
pestered with trampers and other itinerant venders of wares, who,
as well as vagabonds, are great nuisances, treading over the garden
beds, dirtying the walks, and calling the servants by knocks and
rings to attend to their business, and then being always unwilling to
take a denial. A droll circumstance occurred a few years since at
_ the house of a gentleman not*far from me, who kept a Newfound-
land dog in his back garden. A. man, with a basket of fowls on his
head, not gaining entrance at the front, boldly ventured to enter
the back premises by a side door. The dog instantly sprung upon
the strange intruder, and laid hold of his garments behind, but only
held fast, without biting him. The master saw the man’s predica-
ment from a back window, but could not at the moment interpose
for him, being seized with a fit of laughing at his droll situation.
The man, however, in his fright, let fall the basket of fowls, and
the dog, preferring a fowl to a pair of breeches, loosed his hold,
and carried one off as his prize, while the itinerant poulterer took
to his heels, and ran to some distance from the premises. Having,
however, recovered his recollection, he returned to beg for his
fowls and basket, which were safely delivered to him, the dog not
having injured the one he had taken, and the man received an useful
lesson, to mind in future how he ventured upon private premises.
26 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

was great, and his noise incessant. I was sure
something was exceedingly wrong, and instantly
sprung out of bed and got a light, when I saw a
policeman at my gate. He informed me that the
dog had called his attention, having heard his loud
and angry bark and strong voice, at some distance ;
and that, on his arriving at the gate, a man had
escaped over the side wall, and another behind the
house. Providentially no great injury was done,
for the window, at which an entrance was at-
tempted, was well lined with iron, and resisted. the
tool of the robber, whom the dog had detected at -
the very commencement of his evil work. The
policeman was let into the house, and Frisk re-
ceived him without the least notice, as if aware
that he was called in to see that all was right.
** With such a guardian,” said the policeman, “you
need, sir, never to fear the attacks of any thieves.
He has saved you from being robbed.” Many of
my near neighbours had at that time been great
losers, or much alarmed by several lawless gangs.
It is worthy of remark, that my dog never before
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. QT

nor afterwards gave any alarm, nor was it ne-
cessary.

A remarkable instance of his sympathy and bene-
volence occurred in the case of the cat. Poor puss
had by some means received a severe wound in the
eye. It was directly noticed by Frisk, who at
once became her surgeon, and his skill in curing
his fellow-servant was successful; for after fre-
quently licking her eye with ‘his tongue, in a few
days it became decidedly better, and was. soon
healed. Such sympathy and benevolence might
be a lesson to some, who, from their higher nature,
ought to possess both, but have neither. Puss
always showed the highest esteem for one who so
well merited it from her; she usually saluted him,
on their meeting in the morning, by putting nose
to nose; rubbed her sleek jacket against his legs,
and walked along purring by his side in some of
his walks in the garden, and sometimes brought
one or more of her kittens, when they came into
the world, and laid them at his feet, that he might
share in her pleasure in beholding her new progeny.
28 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

The instances of his extraordinary sagacity are
many. As my dog enjoyed good health, I had
never taken him into the country for change of air ;
and as I had never ascertained that he had a taste
for scenery, I did not imagine that I deprived him
of much enjoyment in not making him my com-
panion when I left home on any country excursion:
His chief deprivation was in losing his master,
whom he evidently missed, and for whose return he
looked as long as there remained any hope; and I,
on my part, did not forget that I had left him
behind me. However, on one occasion, while the
carriage was at my door, which was to.convey me
and his mistress about twenty miles out of town, he
looked so wishfully at us, and we so wishfully at
him, just on the eve of parting, that I jumped out,
opened the garden gate through which he was
taking a farewell peep, and, in a moment, we all
drove away snugly together. He seemed to enjoy
the ride, and made many observations on the pas-
sengers which we passed along the road, standing ,
up on his hind legs, and placing his front paws
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 29

against the windows, that he might enjoy the novel
sight. On arriving at our temporary habitation,
he looked all over the premises, as if to see that
every thing was pleasant and convenient, and soon
formed a friendship with a young dog that resided
there. He was shown the spot for his bed, my
cloak being placed for the purpose in one corner
of our bed-room; and he usually, when tired,
went thither to repose of his own accord, long
before we went to rest. He was also delighted
with his daily excursions; and, as a rabbit-warren
lay near, on a neighbouring steep hill, he was
sometimes indulged with a walk there, when he
rambled far off among the shrubs, sniffing at the
rabbit burrows, and pursuing the little animals
for amusement, but catching none. But what I
would particularly mention, is this curious fact:
My lodgings were at a boarding-school; and as
there was a large play-ground for the scholars, they
had ample space for playing at cricket, which is an
exceedingly favourite game among all classes, in
that part of the country. I sometimes joined with
30 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

the boys and their master, and Frisk thought he
might also as well unite in enjoying the healthy
pastime. I was, however, fearful that he might be
injured by running in for the ball, as his quick eye
perceived it coming; and as he sometimes inter-
fered with the bowling, and obstructed the players
by catching it, I gave him directions to stand with-
out the circle, where he would be of real service,
to prevent it from going down a declivity into the
public road, when it was beyond the bounds. My
dog was at all times an apt learner, and it was ad-
mirable to see how readily the creature understood
the hint given him; and every time that we went
to play, he regularly took his station beyond the
bounds, watching as eagerly for the ball as any
player, and catching it as dexterously as the best,
when it happened to pass them all. He would,
however, deliver it to no one but his master.

I believe my poor favourite would one day have
been killed, during this visit, by a savage New-
foundland dog, who met him with me in a narrow
walk, and looked at him with so much mischief
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 3l

lurking in his eye, that, suspecting his inclination,
I took up my animal, and securing him under my
arm, looked very observingly at the gentleman,
which caused him to walk away. Ona subsequent
visit I saw a poodle dog in the road, as I was going
to take a walk; and on my return learned that he
had been met by the same Newfoundland dog, who
instantly seized him and killed him. I believe
this was not the only instance in which he had
indulged in this savage propensity, though it ap-
pears that the poodle had often insulted him in
passing, when secured within the railing of his own
premises. The Newfoundland dog has, however,
sometimes been known to display the more noble
spirit of generosity, and scorned to exert his power
over a feeble enemy, as some cowardly big boys do
over little ones. I have lately read of one, who
being insulted by a smaller dog, took him up —
gently in his mouth, and dropped him over a bridge
into a river, leaving him to scramble out in the best
way that he could. Impertinent puppies ought
always to be punished with contempt.
32 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

Dogs have been taught numerous tricks, and to
do many useful things. Bingley informs us, in his
“Animal Biography,” that, “some years since, a
person who lived at the turnpike-house, about a
mile from Stratford-on-Avon, had trained a dog to
go to the town for small articles of grocery that he
wanted. A note, mentioning the things, was tied
round the dog’s neck, and in the same manner the
articles were fastened; and the commodities were
always brought safe to his master. He also men-
tions a dog belonging to a nobleman of the Medici
family, and says that it always attended at its
master’s table, changed the plates for him, and
carried him his wine in a glass placed on a salver,
without spilling the smallest drop. It would also
hold the stirrup in its teeth, while its master was
mounting his horse.” Plutarch relates, that, in the
theatre of Marcellus, a dog was exhibited before
the emperor Vespasian, so’ well instructed as to
excel in every kind of dance. He afterwards
feigned illness in so natural a manner, as to strike
the spectators with astonishment: first shewing
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 33

symptoms of pain; then falling down as if dead,
and suffering himself to be carried about in that
state; afterwards, at the proper time, seeming to
revive, as if waking from a profound sleep; and
then sporting about, and shewing every demon-
stration of joy.

I have also seen a dog select any card called for
out of many spread on the floor, and walk on his
fore legs, holding up the hind ones. But these
and other tricks are often taught by severity, and
even cruelty, which ought at all times to be avoided.
We should never gratify our curiosity, and enjoy
pleasure, at the expense of the feelings of the
meanest animal. God made us to rule, but not to
tyrannize, over his inferior creatures.

At a dinner in France, at which I was one of the
party, I recollect hearing a French gentleman tell
a laughable story about a dog; but it reflected no
credit on the persons who were so cruel as to ill-
treat him to make him serve their own ends. The
French have, like us, dowaniers, or custom-house
officers, to watch and see that no foreigners intro-

D
34 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

duce articles of manufacture that are prohibited, lest
they should injure their own people who make the
same article. The smugglers, however, will secretly
bring in forbidden goods; and among the means
used to accomplish their purposes, they trained up
dogs. One article chiefly smuggled was lace; and
these dogs were covered all over with the coat of
some other dogs, and the lace was put between
their covering and their skin. The custom-house
officers discovered, this scheme; so that it was ne-
cessary to contrive some method by which the dogs
should escape them altcgether. The smugglers
therefore used to dress up a person like a douanier,
or custom-house officer, and he was employed to
give the dogs severe beatings. The effect of this
was, that whenever the poor animals again caught
sight of an officer, they took to their heels with all
possible expedition; and he must have been a
Mercury indeed who could have managed to catch
them. These dogs knew their way home, or where
to meet their masters: and thus the forbidden
goods escaped in safety.
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 35

CHAPTER III.

My Dog’s delight in a Ball.—His singular way of Begging.—
Diverting Tricks played by him.-—His recognition of Old Friends.
—-His usefulness to his Master.—Several interesting Anecdotes
of his Sagacity and Docility—His Knowledge of Words, and
rvemarkable Anecdotes in proof of it. —Singular Anecdote in
reference to a Picture.—Anecdote of a curious Fall while fast
asleep.—His Knowledge of the Sabbath.—Further Instances of
his Docility and Gentleness.—His Knowledge of Time.—His
Cordiality with Puss.—His Faults.—Process of Shaving and
Dressing.—His Food.—Decline of his Faculties.—His Master’s
watchful care over Him.—Becomes Deaf and nearly Blmd.—His

sudden Illness and Death.—His Master’s Grief.—Remarkable
Sign of Distress manifested by the Cat.—His Grave.—His Skin
preserved and stuffed—Expressions of Regret on Account of
his Loss. —His Epitaph.

My dog could play a number of amusing tricks ;
but unless he had been treated with severity by
those who first trained him, he received none from
my hand. When he came to me, he delighted in
fetching and carrying a ball, which would probably
not have been the case had he been beaten into it:

pdaZ
36 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

and one of his last efforts, a few days before his
death, was to play with one; but he dropped it
down as soon as he had taken it into his mouth—
like a sort of prophetic omen that his days of
playing were over.

He begged with the most perfect ease, and it was
generally his own voluntary act. His mode of
doing it was singular, and not like other dogs, by
dropping the fore paws; but he put them together
as any one would put his hands, flat against each
other, so that the toe nails of each foot touched
their fellows. A lady one day gave him some
biscuit out of her reticule—biscuit being an article
of food of which he was passionately fond—and
ever after, when he saw a lady sit down with a
reticule in her hand or on her lap, he never failed
to present himself as a suitor for her bounty.
Many friends knew his propensity, and often sup-
plied themselves to gratify the importunate and
general favourite. A lady one day gave him a
captain’s biscuit, whole. This was so unusual a
thing, that the creature was not sure whether it
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 37

was given him to eat or to carry to some one in thd
room. He therefore turned round to his mistress,
and holding it up in his mouth, looked her hard in
the face, and waited her word to know whether he
was to partake of the bountiful repast or not. On
receiving a token of approbation, he was not long
in cracking it so as to suit his convenience, and in
a few minutes the subject of perplexity wholly
disappeared.
He often held a piece of biscuit on his nose, and
if at one word of command I said, “ Take it,” or
“Fire,” he caught it in his mouth; or if I said,
“* Make ready—present—frre !” he caught it on my
pronouncing the last word.
I also taught him to wait patiently while I held
a bit of biscuit on my knee or my toe; during
which time [ would ask him if he liked it—if he
wished to have it—and many other questions;
when he would leer at me, and cast a longing eye
at the food, but never venture to take it, till, in the
same tone of voice, I said, “ You may have it,” or
“Take it.” I taught him this amusing trick, not
38 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

by severity—for, from some circumstances, I am
certain he would never have done it—he would then
have become both timid and obstinate; but I
treated him kindly, merely gently checking him
with my voice, and holding up my finger, when he
at first presumed to take the biscuit before the
proper time. Biscuit was, indeed, always a lure
to him. Ihave sometimes called to him to come
in from the garden when I particularly wanted
him, but I should have called in vain unless I had
spoken with authority, for no dog could have been
more deaf when he pleased; but on my promising
to give him a bit of biscuit if he would come in,
he instantly sprung up the garden steps and was in
the room. This article was often promised to him
for doing any thing I wished; and as I made it a
point never to fail in performing my promise, he
always believed my word, and I always succeeded
in accomplishing my purpose. There is nothing
more desirable than keeping our word; and my
dog would soon have known when it was violated.
He never told a lie himself; and I am persuaded
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 39

he would not have been pleased, if those who pvo-
mised him a piece of biscuit had broken their faith
_ with him.

In his best days he was highly diverting. I
taught him to play at hide and seek. He used
to know my movements when I opened the door
for the purpose, and was all alive to the game.
Then, pricking wp his ears and his tail, he would
retreat down stairs, either of his own accord or
by good-humoured command, and wait till a
stamp of the foot gave him the signal to begin
seeking. I would hide in any room of the house,
and in any part of the room, and he began by
quickly traversing the whole, if necessary, bark-
ing joyously all the time. If he could not find
me the first time, he then made a second search,
when he went more quietly and deliberately to
work, sniffing at every step, and prying carefully
into every place, especially into those places in
which I had never before hid myself. In this
way he never failed to find the object of his
search, though he was several times long about
40 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

“it, when I was carefully wrapped up in the cur-
tains, or concealed under the carpet, and when a
young lady hid herself in a closet. When he had —
got me, he led me generally into the parlour to
shew his success, always seizing me by the cuff of
the coat. He would then retreat below, as before,
and wait for the stamp of the feet, as often as I
chose to renew the game.

His scent was remarkably keen, and appeared to
remain good when his other faculties were nearly

_ gone. Faithful to old friends, if any that he
formerly knew well came to see me, though he
were in another part of the house, he instantly dis-
covered them, and hastened to give them a hearty
welcome. In this way, an old servant, who had
left me seven years before, was recognized by him
in the garden with the greatest delight, before he
could well see her face. I availed myself of this
faculty to enjoy his skill in searching after a ball,
which, being hid in any part of the garden within
reach of his scent, he would diligently seek and
discover.
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 4)

But his tricks were often useful, as well as
amusing. When at one time I was in the habit of
going every day into the city, he knew my usual
hour for returning home; and whether I returned
then, or at any other time, he stood at my feet
waiting for me to take off my boots, that he might
carry them into the kitchen, and bring. back my
slippers. Nothing could equal the despatch with
which he performed the duty of boots.

As he had no regular breakfast or tea, I indulged
him on, those occasions with milk and water, and he
and puss very sociably took it out of the same dish,
till I thought proper to separate them, as his huge
tongue, like a table-spoon, lapped up the greater
part, before puss’s, like a tea-spoon, could furnish
her with any supply. As we should always love
justice, I never failed to act the part of magistrate
between them, and endeavoured to adjust all mat-
ters as equitably as I possibly could. In addition
to the milk and water, I allowed him a small piece
of bread, which I taught him to fetch. On the
order being given him to go for his bread, he went:
42 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

down. to the servant, held up his neck to receive the
article, which was tied in a napkin kept for the
purpose, and hung round his neck; and then he
scampered up stairs with it as fast as possible, hold-
ing up his neck in like manner to his master or
mistress, to have the napkin untied, when he re-
ceived the bread in smail pieces, during the hour
. of breakfast. In this way he was also sometimes
the bearer of money in change, and other things.
I generally made him take back his napkin in his
mouth, before he ate his bread, and deliver it to the
servant; but he would now and then slily drop it
on the stairs, and as I knew he could not have been
down with it, I made him go back and take it down.
This was hard duty, while the bread remained
uneaten; but as he knewit must be performed, it was
genuine fun to see how he cleared his ground, some-
times tumbling down stairs, and then tumbling up,
in his haste to receive the reward of all his trouble.

As he was, at all times, like the shadow of his
master, when I was in my study he was at my feet
or near my side, and frequently was serviceable in
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 43

picking up any paper or letter that might drop,
and putting it into my hand.

He was often the bearer of letters or newspapers,
and. knew where to find me, whether in the parlour,
study, or garden. It was amusing to see him can-
tering along a gravel walk of considerable length,
bearing the article in his dips, which he usually de-
livered to me without the least soil. The last time
that he did me this sort of service, was only a few
weeks before his death, when he brought a news-
paper to my study door. Owing to his age and
infirmities, I had dispensed with the performance
of these duties for many months; but on this
occasion the servant found it convenient to try his
skill and activity, and he still faithfully and willingly
triéd to do his part. I heard his feet gently scratch
at the door, but, being very closely occupied, I
would not move to let him in. He then repeated
his scratches, but still I was deaf to his signs. At
length he drew a much longer and louder scratch,
and I supposed he wanted something particular.
On opening the door, he stood a moment and looked
4A: MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

at me, and I was just about to shut him out, as he
did not enter, when he took up the newspaper,
which he had laid down behind the door-post while
he was waiting, and holding it up to me in his
mouth, I received it in my hand; he then turned
away, having discharged his message, and marched
down stairs, not wishing at that time to enjoy my
company.

I had had him more than seven years, when I
one day regretted that I had never taught him to
shut the door. As amere experiment, I tried what
I could accomplish, little expecting that I should
succeed so well. J never gave him more than three
or four lessons, when the willing creature, as if
desirous of pleasing his master, ever after shut the
door at my bidding. The way-in which I did it,
was this: I placed his fore paws against the parlour
door, and pushed it hard enough to shut. The
animal perceived at once that this was the way to
do it, and then readily reared up to perform his
task. I brought him into the habit of it by first
rewarding him with biscuit, and afterwards making



























































































































































































































MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 45

him do it before I gratified any particular wish,
-when, at the word of command, he would shut the
door in great haste. It was most amusing to see
him sometimes, when'the lock was -perverse and
would spring back, for he would then shut it again
and again; and if I said, “Do it properly, sir!”
he would run back and give it a thorough bang.
Never was there a more willing creature in serving
those whom he loved, and in aiming to please. In
this case, and in his general aptness to learn, I have
known some who might have taken from him an
useful lesson.

It is obvious that dogs understand language.
Leibnitz, a celebrated German, informed the French
academicians—a set of learned men in Franee—
that he knew of a dog that had been taught by a
peasant’s son to utter as many as thirty words, and
that he himself had heard him speak. I cannot
boast that my dog could speak, but he certainly
knew most things that I said about him; so that
on many occasions I have been obliged to urge
caution in speaking, lest he should be put on solici-
46 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

tations when I did not want them. It was quite
enough to tell him he should go a-walking, and he
prepared for it by stretching his limbs and dancing
for joy. The word of command to go to his
dinner or his supper, needed not often: to be twice
repeated. In the same way, he knew when he was
told to go to bed. And when he saw me going out,
and it was not convenient to take him, he would
instantly drop his ears and tail, and return behind,
when I said, “ No, Frisk, you cannot go.”

But two striking proofs of his keen intelligence
here occur to my recollection. It was his custom
every morning to tap at our bed-room doors when
it was our usual hour of rising, and he would pay
us a visit for a few moments to receive a pat, and
then depart. One of the family, in an adjoining
room, used occasionally to give him a morsel of
biscuit that had remained in his pocket from the
preceding day; and one morning, when he had
given him all, and he still continued begging, he
said to him, in a low tone, “‘ No, Frisk, I have got
no more; if you want it, you must go down and ask
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 4Z

the servant,” mentioning her name. Instantly the
dog retreated, and did as he suggested: the servant
asking him, when he went to breakfast, what it was
he had sent the dog down for, for he had: solicited
her for something very earnestly, and she, sus-
pecting what it was, had met his wishes.

At another time, I was lounging on the sofa, on
a cold day, when the door was left open. The
animal was in his usual place on the sofa, slum-
bering at my feet, when I observed to his mistress,
without at all designing or expecting that he would
notice my words, “I wish that Frisk would get
down and shut that door; I would readily give him
a bit of biscuit.” The words had no sooner escaped
my lips, than he dropped lazily from the sofa, and
as lazily shut the door, and then came looking up
at me expecting his reward, when I was forced to
rise, because I would not disappoint him, and
thought that such intelligence ought to be re-
warded. I could not help exclaiming, “ Did you
ever see such extraordinary intelligence in an
animal! How that dog understands words !”
48 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

Bingley speaks of the favourite dog of an elderly
lady, which discovered, some time after her death,
the strongest emotions on the sight of her picture,
when it was taken down to be cleaned. Before
this, he had never been observed to notice the
painting. This reminds me of a singular fact that
occurred with regard to my dog. I had pinned
against the wall of a dressing-room a coloured
print of a poodle, which bears this inscription,
“ Sancuo, the property of the Marchioness of
Worcester; taken at the battle of Salamanca, by
the Marquis, from the grave of its master, a French
officer, where it was found exhausted, and nearly
starved to death, and was with much difficulty
forced away from becoming a sacrifice to its fidelity.”
The dog in this print is scarcely so large as a rat,
and yet my animal one day caught sight of it, and
evidently perceived in it a likeness to one of his
own stock. I observed his remarkable attention to
the picture, and begged his mistress to notice it.
She was reclining on a sofa under it, when he reared
up on his hind legs, and resting his fore feet upon
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 49

the edge of the sofa, he looked at Sancho with a
still more scrutinizing eye. Then he mounted on
his mistress, whom I requested to be still, that we
might see the result; and the observing creature,
by rearing once more on his hind legs, was able to
reach the object of his inquiry. He now surveyed
it, smelt it, and being satisfied that it was an illu-
sion, he gave wp further inquiry, nor did he ever
notice it again.

My dog had evidently, at times, much the ap-'
pearance of a philosopher, or student of wisdom.
He generally indulged in his musings before the
fire. One afternoon he seated himself, with great
importance and gravity, upon a chair which had
been left vacant near the hearth, and here for a
while he was seemingly

; “ Sinking from thought to thought, in vast profound ;”

when he yielded to drowsiness, as many a student

had done before him, and pitched head foremost

from his elevation. He got up and shook himself,

with half opened eyes, apparently wondering where
E
50 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

he was, how he came there, and what had happened
to him, the little fireside party heartily laughing at
the poor fellow’s mishap. Frisk, however, clearly
formed a resolution, on this occasion, that he never
more would nod on a chair, and he strictly adhered
to it, from that day till the hour of his death: for
the moment he found himself getting drowsy, he
jumped down and doubled himself up on the floor.
It is well if we grow wise from experience; and,
knowing what is injurious to us, avoid being ex-
posed to ita second time, when it is in our power
to guard against it.

Dogs have been remarked to know the regular
return of the Sabbath—and so did he; and on that
day he used to mount a chest of drawers or a
dressing-table at the bed-room window, and there
his beautifully white picture appeared to all be-
holders in the public road, glazed and framed,
during the hours of Divine service. The instant he
saw his master and mistress return, he quitted his
post of observation, and was speedily at the door,
to welcome them home.
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 51

I am one of those who think, that, as rational
creatures, who receive daily bounties from the
hand of Providence, and daily family comforts and
mercies, I ought, with my family, to thank God
for his goodness, and ask new favours from his
hand. God gives his bounties even to the most
forgetful and ungrateful; but they are much
sweetened to those who thus own his kind hand in
bestowing them all. The habits of this creature
were remarkable in being conformed to mine ; and
he was a pattern for some young people, in his
quiet and orderly behaviour, when we were en-
gaged in that which he was aware was something
that appeared to require much gravity.

As I am writing a memoir, every little trait of
character may fairly be admitted into my narrative.
I taught my dog to ask me to open the door, by
laying down his head on the floor while he con-
tinued standing: this pretty and interesting atti-
tude he also assumed whenever he coaxed me; and
when in the morning he visited my bed-room, this
was one mode of soliciting my attention and asking

E2
52 ' MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

for a pat. I alsotaught him to tap me on the arm
or shoulder, at command, before he received any
thing to eat from my hand. He took the least
morsel of food gently from my fingers, and always
knew when and where to carry a bone out of the
room, which was too large to eat, without dropping
it on the carpet. Such was his gentle temper, that
he might always be passed when gnawing his bone ;
and. on some occasions he has allowed it to be taken
from him. Little infants have held out food to
him in the hand, whose fingers were. too small for
the purpose; and as the hand was half closed, it
was delightful to see the tenderness of the creature
in dealing with the child, patiently working his
way with his nose into the palm of his hand, and
then taking hold of the piece of food so as not to
occasion the child or the spectator the least alarm.
He had, indeed, a peculiar partiality for children ;
always preferring the youngest in the room, and
treating the helpless infant with the greatest kind-
ness. To ill-use any animal, shows a bad dispo-
sition; but to have teased or ill-treated one with
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 538

such benevolence of character, would have displayed
the worst of inclinations. Half the animals that are
vicious, are made so by being teased.

My garden obviously afforded him much delight.
He loved to ramble round it, and scented the fresh
morning breeze, and basked in the sun on the
grass-plot, and, as he had something of a taste for
hunting, his pleasure was greatly heightened if he
could chase any interlopers, such as a neighbouring
cat or fowl; in failure of which, he would content
himself with pursuing a hopping frog. The gar-
deners, too, have often laughed to see with what
gravity he would watch them sowing the patches
of seed on the flower-beds—for he would go and sit
down by them, or by his master, as they were so
engaged, watching and turning his head and eye
acutely, as if to see that they performed their work
properly, and then removing his seat, as they re-
moved from place to place. Sometimes he fetched
a stone or a ball, and laying it at his master’s feet,
looked him full in the face, and then looked at the
ball, pushing it towards him, to. express his desire
54 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

that it might be thrown; when he often flew as fast
down the gravel walk as the ball itself, and would
catch it ascending at its first bound. Sometimes
he might be seen sauntering down the walks at his
master’s heels, puss being in company; and fre-
quently they were seen kindly saluting each other.
It was a pretty sight; and this friendly token was
usually repeated between them in the morning, and
after any long absence. I think some young per-
sons who are given to quarrelling, might profitably
have taken a leaf out of their book, and learned a
lesson of kindness towards each other.

I had one day an extremely strong proof of the
attachment of puss to her old friend, which occurred
while I was walking in the garden. A dog had
found an entrance through some adjoining pre-
mises; but on his seeing Frisk, he expected a
drubbing, for presuming to encroach upon his
territories, and being conscious that he was wrong
—as doing wrong makes cowards even of dogs—he
took to his heels and rushed through a quickset
hedge. Frisk pursued him at a slower pace, not
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 55

with a view to chastise him—for his heart was too
kind—but just, in all probability, to say, after his
manner, that he was welcome, if he pleased, to
take a walk in his garden—for he usually received
such a visitor with much cordiality. Puss, how-
ever, evidently put another construction on the
business—and though she is usually a great coward
when she sees a dog, and very jealous of such an
interloper, she seemed to think that Frisk, now
almost blind, needed a defender; and after placing
herself by his side, she dashed forward through the
hedge whence the stranger had escaped, brandishing
a noble tail, and spitting at him with every mark of
indignation and contempt. Her conduct virtually
said, “I dare you to come near my old and faithful
friend, whom no one shall insult but. myself.”

My dog was almost as good as a clock, to guide
the movements of every day. He knew my hour
of rising, and paid me a visit at the precise time:
he knew his hour of dinner, and followed the
servant continually about till he received it,
though latterly he sometimes anticipated it half an
56 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

hour before the time: and he equally knew his hour

for supper, and regularly withdrew to rest, after
the supper of the family. In each of these instances

he always, however, showed his lovely spirit of
patience, asking, by his expressive and gentle looks,

but not claiming: my former poodle was not to be

put off so quietly; but if his meals were delayed,
he followed the servant about, nibbling at her toes

or heels till he wearied her into compliance.

Puss and he usually fed together; but, notwith-
standing their love, sometimes they had a little
quarrel: he was in general very good in not claim-
ing her portion, though he often cast a longing
eye at it; but if a bit fell in his way, he was not
ceremonious in refusing -it. She, too, rather took
advantage of his feeble sight as: he grew old, and
ventured sometimes to crawl under his very nose,
to have a share of his food. This was presuming
too far, and he would then remonstrate with her,
and now and then the quarrel for an instant rather
run high; but he always claimed and maintained
a dignified superiority. No two animals, on the
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 57

whole, could better have agreed together: they
often fed out of the same dish, and they often slept
back to back, to keep each other more comfortable
_by the fire-side—puss, however, usually watched
her opportunity to get the snuggest place, and
instead of turning her out—which he could have
done in amoment, had he pleased—my dog showed
how much he loved peace, by always quietly yield-
ing to her usurpation. If this temper of mind
were indulged among young persons, and even .
those more old; in matters of indifference, how
much more happy would many be, who are always
fretting and fuming about the little ills of life.
Had this animal acted otherwise, it would have
been only acting as an irrational brute; but he
was in many things an exception to Dr. Watts’s
description of the canine race :—
*¢ Let dogs delight to bark and bite,
For God hath made them so.”

T have acknowledged that my dog had faults,
but that they were few. Though cleanly in his
habits, he would sometimes indulge himself with
58 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

poking his nose under the copper-hole or the fire-
place; when he needed again to have his face
washed before he could appear in respectable com-
pany—for the least soil was soon visible on his
delicate dress. JI do not know, however, that he
was so bad in this as some children, who from their
griming habits are more fit for a pig-stye than for
a parlour. He would also forget all sense of con-
sequences, when in pursuit of a strange cat in the
garden; and, plunging sometimes into a ditch half
full of mud and water, would exchange his beau-
tiful white trousers for a pair of black boots. He
also amused himself, rather mischievously, with
scratching up the grass of the plot, and then tearing
it with his teeth: as this was a habit in which he
often indulged, I was obliged to reprove him more
angrily than usual—as all ill habits ought to be
severely checked, whether in human beings or in |
brutes. He also was not always particular about
keeping the path-way, but trod upon the flower-
beds when fresh dug, and left the marks of his feet ;
yet, in general, it must be confessed, he excited the
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 59

admiration of those who observed how carefully he
would wend round the walks, and avoid treading
on the beds. He had a relish for some sorts of
fruit, and enjoyed a dessert very much, if taken in
the garden: a ripe gooseberry, a sweet raspberry,
or a strawberry, was extremely gratifying to his
appetite; but it was necessary to abstain for awhile
from giving him the latter, since the rogue watched
his master’s movements, and discovered that he
could gather them quite as well as he could. It
is not quite certain that he purposely picked them
when he could not be seen, though too many in-
stances have been known in which young folks
have done so with forbidden fruit, and it was not
much to their credit; but it is believed that he
wholly abstained from taking them at his pleasure
in future, when he was lectured for so doing.

His greatest fault, as I have before intimated,
was his inclination to go out without leave. In
vain did I remonstrate with him, and he, in the
best way in which he could, begged my pardon for
each offence—for on the first favourable oppor-
60 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

tunity he would renew his ramblings, sometimes
extending them as far as neighbouring villages,
and inducing me to give him up for lost. I much
feared that he would degrade himself as a gentle-
man, by getting into low company; and I suspect
he was not very particular on that point when he
was out. Bad company among dogs, like bad
company among children, sometimes leads to very
disastrous consequences. Now and then these
animals seem to imitate an Irish row, ten or a
dozen of them congregating together to have a
general quarrel, and every body is looking at them
‘to see what is the matter. Sometimes they have
to settle some affair of honour, which takes place
between them by a duel only: this they do without
seconds; but they too frequently find some for
them in some mischievous men or boys, who in this
instance condescend to lower themselves to the
rank of the brutes. One of my great fears was,
that Frisk might get into some of these scrapes.
He was, however, not of a quarrelsome disposi-
tion, as I have before hinted; and this among
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 61

dogs, as well as among people, preserves from
much evil.

These were his chief faults, and for the most
part they were pardonable offences, and arose prin-
cipally from not knowing better. Where I could
make him sensible that he did wrong, it was a fine
trait in his character that he always strove to mend.

I must not forget to mention, that Frisk was
usually shaved and washed about once a fortnight.
This office I was accustomed to perform, for the
charge of the dog barber is five shillings; and
though it may be well for the rich to scatter their
money in every direction for the support of the
industrious, I thought myself not justified in
spending so much upon my dog. People should
always contrive so to manage their expences, as
to have something to bestow upon the poor and
needy, and for the support of benevolent institu-
tions. As the poodle’s hair naturally grows wild,
as our own would do were it not cut, it is cus-
tomary to employ persons to keep his coat in order.
The French support many of these persons, called
62 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

tondeurs de chiens, or dog-shearers, who cut the
coats of the animals as shepherds do those of sheep,
their silky wool somewhat resembling that of the
latter animal, but is much finer. They usually
shave the hind quarters close to the skin, as these
are the most liable to mop up the dirt; and from
the head to the middle of the body is left a good
coat, which covers the animal in beautiful silken
ringlets. The face is cut so as to leave him a fine
pair of whiskers, which give him an unusually
knowing and sharp appearance; the ears and tail
are combed out, the former almost resembling
skeins of silk hanging together, cut, and having
the fine threads separated. On the hips are often
left tufts of hair; and the fore and hind legs are
dressed in various ways, according to the pleasure
of the master, the fore ones sometimes having
trousers, and the latter above the loins a kind of
breeches. In performing the operation of shaving
dogs, they are, for the most part, very restive, and
indeed, all of them manifest a dislike to it: my
former poodle used to show his teeth very angrily
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 63

at it, and he continued snarling the whole time,
though he would never bite me, which he would
have done had another person shaved him. Thus,
whenever I was his tonsor, we kept up an animated
conversation; indeed, there was a sort of debate
between us about which should be master. Frisk
never gnashed his teeth, or in any way expressed
anger, but only dropped his tail, and endeavoured
to hide himself when he saw the preparation forth-
coming; and it was necessary to use the utmost
precaution to take him unawares, for he seemed
almost to guess when it was determined that he
should undergo the operation. Most other animals
are muzzled and tied by the legs while they are
shaved ; but when he was placed on a table he was
entirely passive, and his joy was great when he was
freed from the scissars. He, however, always ex-
pected the supplement, and looked very cautiously
about him for the preparation of soap and water
towash him clean. And patiently did the creature
stand in the tub till the servant had performed this
operation; nor would he stir, though left alone
64 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

during the washing. His joy was very great when
he had been rubbed with dry cloths; and now he
was further dricd in the air or the sun, or by the
fire, when his ears were combed, and his beauty
was complete. Many children are not half so
good, in passing through the ordeal of washing
only their hands and their face. Then was his
master gratified in both admiring and exhibiting
his beauty, and his dog was fit to be a visitor to
the queen.

The process I have mentioned, though un-
pleasant to the dog, is really beneficial to him,
adding to his strength, which is decreased by the
nourishment required for so much coating ; tending
to his comfort, by the removal of so. much warm
hair, in hot weather; and materially adding to his
cleanliness.

The dog usually lives about twelve years, but
sometimes he attains double that age. I therefore
fondly flattered myself, that, from the general
health of my animal, he would have had a still
longer span added to his life. My dog was con-
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 65

sidered a finely-formed creature, and enjoyed an
excellent constitution. I, unfortunately, through
ignorance, exposed it to injury for two years, from
about the age of five to seven. His cook had
died; and not being supplied with meat, I fed him
with raspings and pot liquor, of which he became
very fond, and grew fat upon them. But he also
became very weak, and at length subject to a kind
of spasm. I was apprehensive that he had re-
ceived some hurt from a blow or kick inflicted by
some cruel person whom he might have met in his
occasional rambles, and procured the advice of a
farrier, who administered external and internal
medicines, and put the poor brute to great pain,
but he derived no benefit. At length I discovered
that dogs, being carnivorous animals—or fitted to
live upon flesh—could not long continue in health
without meat; and the life my animal did enjoy,
was chiefly derived from the few bits and bones
which fell to his lot from a small family. Bread
will make’ a dog fat, but it affords little or no
strength. I therefore, on making the discovery
F
66 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

from information, provided liberally for his dinner
and supper table; and from that time he had a
regular allowance of about half a pound of bul-
lock’s liver a-day. His health and his strength
were now rapidly recruited, and I had the satisfac-
tion of «seeing my poor animal become once more
full of. life and vigour.

As he had no hard work, but lived a life of
ease, and was treated kindly, enjoying moderate
exercise, it was not before he had attained his
fifteenth year, that he showed any particular symp-
toms of decline. His spirits, his eyesight, and all
his mental faculties, were good, and his activity
was apparently the same as ever. The first warn-
ing of his advanced age was an attack of the rheu-
matism. We should always be. kind to the sick ;
and I know not why we should not be so to sick
animals, especially after they have for years afforded
us pleasure, and rendered us many useful services.
I applied proper remedies myself to my dog’s aged
limbs—kept him as much as possible out of the
cold and wet—would not tempt him to employ
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 67

any unnecessary exertion in play—carried him
sometimes up the stairs, to prevent his feeling the
pain from his stiffened joints, which occasionally
made him cry out—and wrapped him warmly in
his bed every night. By this attention to his
comfort, which cost me little money, and less
labour, and afforded me the highest gratification,
my dog soon recovered: but I was cautious,
after this, that he should never put his old
joints too much to the test by running after any
object.

About this time I also noticed, with much
concern, a speck on his left eye, which was an
indication that his sight was failing. He however
continued in his usual health, with the exception
of a trifling humour on the skin of one of his fore-
legs, which was removed by ointment, and now
and then a bilious attack, for which I found nature
to be avery good doctor, and he sometimes assisted
her by eating a long and broad-leaved grass which
is-found springing up wild in many gardens. In
his search for this medicinal herb of the canine

FQ

a
68 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

race, I sometimes assisted him, and he ate as much
as he wanted from my hand.

In the winter in which he had attained his
fifteenth year, he was attacked with a violent
cough and asthma. I now kept him within doors
as much as possible, and let him sleep in the
kitchen instead of the passage, that he might enjoy
the benefit of a warmed room. I also frequently
gave him water-gruel at night; and one of my last
visits before going to bed was to my dog, to bestow
upon him my usual caress, which he generally
expected, and raised his head up to receive it: on
these occasions I now held between my fingers a
lump of Spanish liquorice, of which he was fond,
and he nibbled at it for some time, by which his
throat must have been moistened, and his cough
was much relieved.

As spring returned, I had the pleasure of seeing
my dog regain much of his vigour, and at times he
played with his favourite ball as lively as ever.
But I was concerned to observe that his sight
continued rapidly to decay, and both eyes were
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 69

alike affected. In addition to this mark of old
age, he was also troubled with deafness, and, by
the autumn of 1838, he was nearly totally deaf
and blind; so that he could not hear without
being called in a very loud voice, nor see any
objects except a little with one eye, and then only
in an oblique direction.

I was out of town at this season, and my poor
old friend was observed to miss me very much. I
returned for a short time, and then left home for
some days again. On my return I found my poor
animal declining very fast, but he ate his meals as
usual, and the chief difference in him was a want
of spirits, and a tendency to sleep more than ordi-
nary. On the evening before he was taken ill, he
stretched himself by my side till supper-time, as I
sat writing In my study, as if to pay me a last
visit of affection. On the next day he was very
heavy—yet still he paid his accustomed visit to
our bed-room, and threw himself on his back at
my feet, that I might caress him. At dinner he
seemed particularly dull, but he took bits, in his
70 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

gentle manner, from my hand and from that of his
mistress. About supper-time he was very sick;
after which he was taken to his bed. His mistress
gave him a morsel of biscuit, the last thing that he
ate. In the morning it was discovered that he had
been sick all night, but he had made no disturb-
ance. He was moved on his bed to the lower part
of the house; here he soon became exceedingly
ill, and lay stretched on his side, unable to rise.
Ge would take nothing solid, and all he took was
a little milk and water which I handed to him,
and of which he lapped only three times. Some-
thing like a convulsion fit now followed, and as he
attempted several times to rise, he fell with his
head violently upon a stone floor. I placed mats
and other soft things under and around him, and
kept shifting them as he restlessly turned from
side to side. After this he revived a little, and
was able to crawl into the kitchen near the fire;
but again appearing to grow worse, he was carried
out for air, and laid on the grass-plot in the garden.
The gardener thought it possible, that by adminis-
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 71

tering some medicine he might yet recover, and I
instantly procured a pill from the druggist’s shop ;
but, on opening his mouth, there did not appear to
be any passage down his throat. I therefore
desisted from giving him the pill, but procured
some castor-oil, and administered that, in hopes of
rendering him some speedy relief. I found, how-
ever, that this remained in his mouth, and would
not pass into his stomach. My hopes were now
all over. He lay upon his old. bed, stretched on
his side, and appearing nearly dead; he lifted up
his head twice, and laid it instantly down again,
and a plaintive and heart-rending moan proceeded
from him. After this he became quite quiet. I
and the gardener lifted him by a board that was
placed under his bed, and once more carried him
from the grass-plot into the house, when in about
an hour my poor animal breathed his last as in a
gentle sleep. :

J-am not ashamed to say that I shed tears over
his body; I should have been ashamed to say that
I did not. I must, indeed, have been insensible to
72 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

every feeling of humanity, to witness with indif-
ference the death of such a kind and interesting
creature, that had invariably displayed towards me
the most sincere attachment, and been the compa-
nion of my walks and my studies during fourteen
years.

Puss, who had lived on terms of friendship with
him for five or six years, saw him dying, and was
evidently aware of her irrecoverable loss, when he
disappeared. On the day after his death she
refused her food; and on the following day I gave
it to her at the usual hour, when she laid it down,
paused over it, gazed about with a wild and ex-
pressive look, as if in hopeless search for her com-
panion, and then uttered a most melancholy howl,
such as I never heard from any animal before.

Thus died Frisk, in the afternoon of September
15th, 1838, and in the sixteenth year of his age.
His body was deposited beneath a willow-tree in
my garden, where I had long determined that, if I
should survive him, he should have his grave.

His beautiful skin was preserved and stuffed,




























!
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 73

and remains as a faithful remembrancer of his
name and virtues. His attitude is couchant, with
his head erect, and turned a little on one side, and
between his fore feet is his favourite toy, a ball.
I retain it in a glass case, as a substitute for his
portrait. But, alas! that mild, beautiful, and
intelligent eye, so often and so justly admired,
sparkles no more. ‘There is the very same pretty
clothing which his Creator gave him, but it no
longer conceals beneath it the heart that beat so
fondly towards his friends, and especially his
master. There is the form, but it has lost the
sportive bounding limb, and that which gave it all
its Interest, its intelligence, and life. I miss that
form every where, by day and by night. J want
to receive its morning visits—to see it stretched
at my feet, or walking by my side, or feeding out
of my hand. ‘There would now be music to my
ear in that bark. would be esteemed a treasure. The house wants
an interesting inhabitant. The garden looks more
desolate than it can be made by the winds of
74: MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

‘autumn, and its flowers are less sweet, and bright

and beautiful, than when my dog watched me
sowing or gathering them. Poor Frisk, I feel that
I loved thee, and long, very long, shall I cherish
thy memory!

EPITAPH ON MY DOG.

Weep, willow, o’er this narrow spot of earth,
For here lies one of more than common worth—
A faithful friend ; and such we rarely find
Among the passing crowds of human kind.

Bland were his manners, and his temper mild—
Alike the favourite of the man and child ;

And in his eyes the thinking mind could trace,
A keen intelligence beyond his race.

Kind creature! thou art gone, thy days are o’er,
Thy master meets thy fond caress no more ;
No more thy harmless tricks and pranks displays,
‘Which made with wonder every eye to gaze.

But he forgets thee not; the honest tear
He shed, and not alone, upon thy bier :
And on his memory fixed shalt thou remain,
Though he shall never see “ thy like again.”
~t

Or

MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

CHAPTER IV.

Concluding Remarks.—Brief Anecdotes of singular Attachments
of Dogs.—Dogs are grateful Creatures.—Anecdotes of their
remarkable Attachment to their Masters.—Of their Protecting
and Preserving Human Beings.—Their Attachment to Children
confirmed by Anecdote.—Their great Usefulness.—God’s Kind-
ness to his Creatures.—Animals may possibly Live in another
state.—Our final Destiny and Responsibility.

In closing this brief narrative, which I trust
has not been uninteresting to the young reader,
let me indulge the hope that it may teach him to
show kindness to the brute creation. Some have,
indeed, carried their attachment to an extreme.
An Emperor of Japan was so fond of dogs, that
he caused huts to be built and food to be provided
for them in.every street, and where they roved
about freely without a home, such provisions for
their comfort did credit to his feelings; so did the
kind attentions which he caused to be paid to them
76 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

when sick: this was the way to make them attached
to man as afriend. He however carried his atten-
tions too far, when he provided burying places for
them at the tops of the mountains, and obliged
human beings to bear them thither, labouring
under their burden. The late Duchess of York
showed a similar partiality for these creatures, of
which she had a very considerable number. She
provided for her dogs every comfort during life ;
and when. they died they were buried in a cemetery
which she provided for them, near the celebrated
grotto at Oatlands. There may now be seen a
large number of neat little hillocks, beneath which
are deposited the remains of her favourites; and
to some of them are appended grave-stones, with
their names and epitaphs. Some would perhaps
say, that her expenditure on these animals had
better have been bestowed on the poor: I believe
that she by no means overlooked them; and if she
was lavish of kindness towards the brute creation,
it was at least, if I may so speak, an amiable
failing.
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. V7

We should remember, that we are almost certain
of returns of gratitude for acts of kindness which
we bestow upon these creatures; and I am sorry
to add, that this is not always the case when we
bestow our favours on those who ought to know
better how to repay us. It costs us very little to
acquire the attachment of a faithful animal, and
there is at all times something cheering in his dis-
interested caresses. Eiven when his master is no
more, no friend can more deeply deplore his death.
Many instances are recorded of the dog pining
away, from the long absence of his master—of his
attachment to the spot where his beloved reniains
were interred—and of his dying with grief for his
loss.

“At a tavern called the Throstle Nest, in the
Scotland Road, Liverpool, might have been seen,
a few years since—and he may still survive—a dog
that belonged to a poor Italian, who wandered
about with an organ and monkey. The Italian
died, and was buried in the cemetery of the Catholic
chapel, adjoming the tavern. For some time,
78 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

hunger alone induced the dog to leave his master’s
grave, but when the tavern was opened he became
an inmate. He did not, however, then forget his
master; for every morning, directly the doors were
opened, he was seen going to the burial-ground,

‘Where all forgetting, by the world forgot,”

the poor Italian sleeps, till the morning of the
resurrection.”

“In March, 1834, a gentleman was discovered
dead in the neighbourhood of Paris, with his
faithful dog watching his body. The corpse was
taken to a place called the morgue, where dead
bodies which are found, are placed, to be owned by
the relatives or friends of the deceased. Here the
faithful dog still attended, night and day, till, on
the third day, the gentleman’s son discovered his
lost father, when the dog, on receiving his master’s
pocket-handkerchief, and being told to go home
with it, was with some difficulty persuaded to leave
the spot.” What friend could have shown more
attachment ?
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 79

Dogs have also frequently shown a singular care
in preserving and protecting human beings. I
will here mention one anecdote, out of a large
number that might be collected, of the singular
sagacity of a Newfoundland dog in preserving a
gentleman who was nearly drowned. I have
found it in Bingley’s “ Animal Biography,” before
quoted: “In the summer of 1792, a gentleman
went to Portsmouth for the benefit of sea-bathing.
He was conducted in one of the machines into the
water; but being unacquainted with the steepness
of the shore, and no swimmer, he found himself,
the instant he quitted the machine, nearly out of
his depth. The state of alarm into which he was
thrown, increased his danger; and, unnoticed by
the person who attended the machine, he would
unavoidably have been drowned, had not a large
Newfoundland dog, which by accident was standing
on the shore, and observed his distress, plunged in
to his assistance. The dog seized him by the hair,
and conducted him safe to land. The gentleman
afterwards purchased the dog, at a high price ;
80 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

and preserved him as a treasure of equal value
with his whole fortune.” He also mentions another
instance of a dog that saved human life: “ A gen-
tleman walking by the side of the river Tyne,
observed, on the opposite side, that a child had
fallen into the water. He pointed out the object
to his dog, which immediately jumped in, swam
over, and catching hold of the child with his
mouth, landed it safely on the shore.” There was
in the Exhibition of Paintings this year (1838), at
‘the Royal Academy, one of a noble Newfoundland
dog, executed by a distinguished animal painter,
Landseer: this dog, it was said, had saved many
lives; and he was justly described in the catalogue
which pointed out his picture, as “A Member of
the Humane Society.” Dogs have also sometimes
protected persons, and, by an extraordinary saga-
city, preserved human life when threatened by
wicked men. I have read of a marvellous instance
of a gentleman’s dog, who, contrary to all his
former habits and to his privileges, would one
night resolutely persist in sleeping under his
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 81.

master’s bed, notwithstanding every effort to turn
him out. In the middle of the night the secret of
his conduct was made plain: Providence, by an
extraordinary interposition in his master’s behalf,
or by employing some remarkable instinct of the
animal, had sent him there to preserve his master’s
life. The room was entered by a ferocious villain,
resolved to kill and plunder: the dog instantly
seized him by the throat, and protected his master,
though the robber was one with whom he must
have been well acquainted, for he proved to be his
master’s valet. The following article is extracted
from a newspaper called The Sheffield Iris, but I
have not preserved the date :

-“ Daring Attack and wonderful Sagacity of
Dog.—One evening last week, as Mr. S. Cocker, of
Hathersage, was returning home in his gig from
this town, in crossing the moors, a large dog at-
tempted to stop the horse, but which he whipped
off, and proceeded onwards. He had not gone far
when a man jumped from amongst the heather and
endeavoured to stop the horse, and drag him out of

G
82 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

the gig. The dog, which it appears had con-
tinued to follow Mr. C., again came up, and sprung
at the man, who hastily retreated, which cnabled
Mr. C. to drive on. When a few hundred yards
further, a second robber leaped from the heather,
but before he had time to turn himself, he was
nearly throttled by the faithful animal. Mr. C.
shortly afterwards arrived safely at home, the dog
accompanying him, where he now remains, and no
doubt will be highly estimated. It is very remark-
able that Mr. C. never saw the dog before.”

I could mention several instances in which the
sagacity of the courageous dog has protected his
master from the highway robber; but here was
one in which the dog protected a stranger. Is
not the dog, then, properly called the friend of
man? There have been many instances of the dog
bringing animals to justice. One may be here
mentioned. The dead body of a Roman soldier,
who had been killed in a domestic tumult, was
carefully watched and guarded by his dog, who
would not permit any person to touch the remains
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 83

of his departed master. Pyrrhus, King of Epirus,
happening to pass that way, took notice of so
striking a spectacle, and inquired into the cireum-
stances of the case. On being informed that the
man had been slain three days before, and that the
dog in all that time had neither stirred from the
body nor taken any food, the king ordered the
corpse to be interred, and the dog to be taken
care of and brought to him. The creature soon
grew fond of Pyrrhus, who, shortly after, ordering
his forces to be mustered, the soldiers passed before
him in review. During this ceremony, the dog for
some time lay quietly at his feet, until, seeing
those soldiers march by who had murdered his late
master, he sprung at them with such rage and
fierceness, and turned himself to Pyrrhus with
such meaning in his looks and gestures, that the
men were sent to prison on suspicion of having
committed the crime with which the dog seemed
to charge them. Being strictly examined, they
confessed themselves guilty, and were accordingly
executed !

G 2
84 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

An account has just been put into my hands, of
a French ensign’s dog, which affords another proof
of the warm attachment of the dog to his master.
This creature was a poodle. He was by his
master’s side in the battle of Austerlitz, a small
town in Moravia. " This terrible battle occurred
on the 2nd of December, 1805. Three emperors
were on the field of action; the Emperors of
Austria and Russia, on the one side, and the Em:
peror of the French on the other. Two hundred
pieces of cannon vomited destruction at the same
time, upon two hundred thousand men, of which
the two armies consisted; and forty thousand men
lay stretched upon the field. In the heat of this
dreadful action, a French ensign was struck down
by a shot. His faithful poodle was not alarmed
for himself, but barked in the most furious manner
on seeing the state of his master, and did every
thing he could to encourage and comfort him in
his dying moments. The hardy officer wrapped
himself in the folds of his standard, and, just as
the cry of victory reached his ear, expired. The


THE ENSIGN’S DOG.
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 85

affectionate dog threw himself on the dead body.
This, we should have thought, would have guarded
it from further insult; but no: war—the most
barbarous practice in the world—makes men thirst
after blood. Five or six Russians—probably for
the purpose of seizing the colours, which the
ensign had carried—were just on the point of
running the poor animal through with their bayo-
nets, that they might obtain. this trophy, when a
discharge of a large shot, called grape-shot, killed
the soldiers, and the brave poodle remained on his
post in triumph, until he was removed by some of
his master’s comrades. ‘

In a work by T. B. Johnson, we have some
particulars of the great kindness of a dog towards
the children of his family. The writer says, “when
twelve months old, he had attained a larger size,
and greater strength than ordinary, and prior to.
this period had shown many indications ‘of asto-
nishing sagacity. He had become exceedingly
attached to the female part of my family, and par-
ticularly to the children. A little daughter, a
86 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

child about six years of age, attended a school at
the distance of a quarter of a mile, to which the
dog uniformly accompanied her every morning, as
well as at noon; and, as soon as he had conducted
his charge safely into the house, returned home.
However, pursuing this system for a short time, he
was not content with guarding the child to school,
but began to escort her home. ‘Twelve o’clock
was the hour at which the children left the school
for the purpose of coming home to dinner, a few
minutes before which, Frank (for that was the
name by which the animal was distinguished), with
elevated tail, trotted away, and placing himself in
front of the school, patiently waited till the little
throng came out, when he eagerly selected his
charge, and guarded her home with all the pride
imaginable. At five o'clock in the afternoon a
similar proceeding took place. It was amusing—
indeed, it was highly interesting—to witness the
' performance of these operations by this affectionate
and sagacious creature. [have many times watched
it with unspeakable pleasure. About ten minutes
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 87

before twelve and five o’clock (how he contrived
to calculate the time so exactly I am unable to
describe), Frank left my premises, and in a minute
or two appeared before the door of the school,
where, squat on his haunches, he attentively waited
the opening of the door: on such occasions the
children are crowded together, and Frank might
be observed amongst them busily employed in
selecting his charge. Dogs: never appear fully
satisfied of the identity (or sameness of the person)
till they have exercised their olfactory (or smelling)
organ, as well as their orbs of vision (their eyes) on ,
the subject of their solicitude; and, therefore,
Frank always enjoyed a few grateful sniffs before
he took his order of march, which was a few yards
in advance, with elevated tail, and evidently in all
the pride of self-satisfactory duty; but on the
appearance of any person, or any animal from
which danger was to be apprehended, the dog
came close to the child, and forbade nearer ap-
proach; he was particularly suspicious of the
proximity (or nearness) of a beggar, or any mean
‘$8 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

or ruffianly person.” I have remarked that dogs,
‘in general, are fond of children, and return their
caresses with great gratitude. There are, how-
ever, different dispositions among these animals,
as there are among human beings, and some dogs
are not to be trusted; it is, therefore, necessary
to know what is the temper of a dog before they
venture to become familiar with him. Even my
erabbed poodle would let a chlid fetter him, or
do any thing it pleased with him; but he would
not, like Frisk, allow of any freedom from mere
infants.

The great usefulness of the tribes of dogs is
another reason why we should hold them in high
estimation. Besides their humane attentions which
I have noticed, where it is necessary to live upon
game, the dog assists the wild hunter by his scent
and his speed, in search of his food. Where there
are wild beasts, he guards his dwelling at night,
and boldly chases and attacks the foe by day. In

' Holland, and in Brussels, he is of great service in
drawing little carts to the herb markets; and, in
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 89

the more northern regions, he draws a sledge,
laden with provisions, or with his master: this _
practice is universal in Kamschatka, where four,
yoked to a sledge, will draw an hundred and ninety
English pounds weight, besides the driver, and
travel above twenty miles a day; and if unloaden,
and upon a hardened snow, will travel a hundred
English miles a day. But these animals are not
treated by their savage northern masters with the
tenderness shown to those in the more southem
climates of the world; the brute seems sensible of
this neglect, and possessing the same sagacity with
the rest of the genus, is destitute of that submis-
sion and affection towards its master, inseparable
from the animal in these climates; for, if the
master lose his seat, or is flung out of the sledge,
the dogs leave him behind and continue their
journey, till the sledge be overturned, or stopped
by some impediment.” I have seen a drunken
man thrown out of his dog-cart, and his dog
stopped instantly, and would not go on without
him. Most-probably this man showed more kind-
90 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

ness to his animal than these northern savages
show to theirs.

In Newfoundland, the dogs of that country are
employed to fetch water from the rivers, a: boy
' driving them in harnessed to empty barrels, which,
when filled, they draw out and take home. They
are also employed in bringing down wood from the
interior of the country to the sea-coast. “ Four
of them, yoked to a sledge, are able to draw three
hundred weight of wood, with apparent ease, for
several miles. Their docility is as material to their
owners as their strength, for they frequently per-
form these services without a driver. As soon as
they are relieved of their load at the proper place,
they return in the same order to the woods from
whence they were dispatched, where their labours
are commonly rewarded with a meal of dried
fish.”

The little sharp terrier is also an useful animal to
those who are annoyed with rats and other vermin,
which destroy corn and other things of value. The
shepherd’s dog is to him of the greatest value, and
MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 91

he would be unable to collect and lead his flocks
without him; the sagacious animal saves him
many a weary task in seeking and restoring the
wandering sheep. Creatures, so useful, should on
that account be duly valued and kindly treated;
but when, to their usefulness, we add the qualities
of fidelity and humanity, already noticed, the dog
has a particularly high claim to our regard. Re-
member, then, that dogs are useful creatures, and
gentle and kind crea-
tures; that they have intelligence, and feeling,

that, if well used, they are

and gratitude, and faithfulness, and love, all which
are fine qualities, and not unworthy a human erea-
ture. I want, by the perusal of these pages, to
lead you to the study of natural history, or those
books that treat of the sagacity and habits of
animals in general. They are full of many very
interesting facts; and I want to lead you to admire
the handi-works of God in every creature which
he has formed, and formed to show forth his
praise.

Then again, think of the kindness of God to his
92 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

creatures. ‘‘ His tender mercies are over all his
works.” How greatly he stoops to notice us who
are but “ dust and ashes in his sight.” We can
display no such condescension in noticing the
animals beneath us. Yet ‘“ the Lord preserveth
man and beast.” Indeed, as Dr. Young observes,
“ there is not a fly but infinite wisdom is concerned
in its structure and destination.” And God has
not thought it beneath him to commend animals
to our kind attentions in his holy word; for Solo-
mon, whom he inspired to write for our instruc-
tion, says, ‘‘ The merciful man is merciful to his
beast.” Another worthy divine, therefore, properly
asks, ‘How dare we then be the destroyers of
their ease, which we ought always to promote, or
wantonly deprive them of that life which we cannot
restore.”

I must add.one more reason why we should be
kind toanimals: I am not quite sure that they may
not live to become objects of our admiration and
pleasure in another world. At most we know but
little of them in this, and in some way or other
‘ MEMOIRS OF MY DOG. 93

they may exist there, that we may learn by them
more of the wisdom, power, and goodness of the
Divine Being shown in them than we can learn
here. But this is only what I, and some others,
suppose. A child asked me on the death of my
dog, where he was gone. It was a question I could
not answer. The Bible tells us nothing about
brutes, whether they will live or not in another
world, but it tells us that we shall, and we must
leave the destiny of the lower-animals to the plea-
sure of their Creator, assured that he will do with
them what is right. Let us bless God that we
are placed among his more noble creatures, that he
‘* teacheth us more than the beasts of the earth,
and maketh us wiser than the fowls of heaven.”
But with our higher rank we are accountable ‘to
God. We know the difference between right and
wrong, and if we do evil, we must expect to reap
the fruits of our doings. We have, indeed, sinned
against God and debased ourselves; but for this
he, in his great mercy, has provided a remedy, and
though we have merited eternal death, yet through
94 MEMOIRS OF MY DOG.

the Saviour we have life eternal. Let’ us then
not live like brutes, but like beings to whom it is
revealed by their Creator that we are made for
IMMORTALITY, and so “seek for glory, and honour,
and immortality, eternal life.”



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