Citation
Boys and girls

Material Information

Title:
Boys and girls
Creator:
Bramston, M
Dickes, William, 1815-1892 ( Printer of plates )
Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge (Great Britain) -- Committee of General Literature and Education
Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge (Great Britain) ( Publisher )
Pott, Young, and Company ( Publisher )
Oxford University Press ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London
New York
Publisher:
Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge
Pott, Young, & Co.
Manufacturer:
Clarendon Press
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
128, [2] p., [1] leaf of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 17 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children of clergy -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Fever -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Country life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Family stories -- 1875 ( local )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1875 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1875
Genre:
Family stories ( local )
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
England -- Oxford
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication based on binding indicating publication in the 1870's.
General Note:
Frontispiece printed in colors by W. Dickes.
General Note:
Publisher's advertisements follow text.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
by M. Bramston ; published under the direction of the Committee of General Literature and Education; appointed by the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
002219000 ( ALEPH )
ALF9180 ( NOTIS )
71279290 ( OCLC )

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The Baldwin Library

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BOYS

AND GIRLS.



Page 106,











BOYS AND GIRLS.

By M. BRAMSTON,
Author of
“ The Panelled House,” ‘A Steadfast Woman,” &c.

‘e

PUBLISHED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF
THE COMMITTEE OF GENERAL LITERATURE AND EDUCATION,
APPOINTED BY THE SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING
CHHISTIAN KNOWLEDGE.



LONDON:
Society for Promoting Christian Browledge.

Sold at the Depositories :
77 Great Queen Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields:
4 Royal Exchange; 48 Piccadilly ;
And by all Booksellers,

New York: Pott, Young, & Co.





PRINTED ve
Yor the Society for Promoting Christian, Knowledge
AT THE CLARENDON PRESS,
OXFORD.





INTRODUCTION.

N case any boys and girls should take up this
| book without having read a tale called
‘Elly’s Choice? I will tell them the names and
ages of the children mentioned at the time when
this story begins.

Mr. Langford was the clergyman of a village
called Ringland, and he had eight children:
Tom, who was fifteen; Dick, fourteen; Charlie,
twelve; Elly, eleven; Frank and Johnny, twins
of nine; Maggie, seven; and Gerty, between
three and four. The five eldest boys were all at
school, and Elly went every day to Ringland
Hall, where her great aunt, Mrs. Farwood, lived,
to be taught by the same governess who in-
structed her little cousin, Cordelia Temple, a
child a few months younger than Elly. Cordelia
and her little brother Alfred were Mrs. Farwood’s
grandchildren, whom she had always taken care



4 : L[utroduction.

of, because their father and mother were in
India; but Cordelia’s mother had of late been
home for a visit on account of her health, and
had only just gone back to rejoin her husband,
Alick Graham was an orphan boy of fourteen,
who spent his holidays at Mrs. Farwood’s, who
was very kind to him: he was rather a delicate
boy, never having quite recovered the effects of
an accident he had had two years before, when
Charlie Langford had gone out with him carrying
a gun, and the gun had burst and a splinter had
entered Alick’s knee. Having mentioned these
particulars, the story itself will explain every-
thing else needful. It was written in accordance
with the request of certain little people who in-
sisted on hearing some more about Elly and her
brothers and sisters and cousins when they grew
older: and as possibly some of the other young
readers of “Ellys Choice” may have had the
same wish, a chapter of the further history of the
little Langfords is here offered for their perusal,





BOYS AND) GLE IES,

CHAPTER I.

WO years had passed since we took leave of
the little Langfords, all settled comfortably
in their new home at Ringland. They had all

grown taller and bigger since then, as was to
be expected: the five boys were all at school, and
Elly still went to the Hall every day to do lessons
with Cordelia under kind Miss Morison. Elly
was getting on well with her lessons, and was
very anxious to begin to learn Greek: but mamma
and Miss Morison both said that Greek must wait
until needlework was better. For Elly’s fingers,
when they held a needle, seemed, as old nurse
said, to be all thumbs.

It was July, and Miss Morison had gone away
for her holidays. Alick Graham had come to
the Hall for his, and all the Vicarage boys had
come back for theirs: and great fun they had



6 Boys and Girls.

during the first week. The only person who
did not thoroughly enjoy it was poor little
Cordelia Temple, who looked moped and melan-
choly, poor child! as well she might, Her mother
had gone back to India a month before, just
when Corda had fully learnt what it was to have
a real mother; and nobody except Miss Morison
quite knew how great this first trouble was to the
little girl. Her cousins were sorry for her when
they remembered to be so, but they were not old
enough to understand that when people are in
trouble they need extra forbearance: and they
often said that Corda was cross because she did
not care to play cricket and hockey: with the
rest, when in reality the poor little girl only felt
motherless and unhappy.

Of course the children did not always play to-
gether. Very often they divided into two sets:
the three bigger boys, the twins, and Alick going
off together; Elly, Corda, and Maggie follow-
ing their own devices. Maggie was now seven
years old: she was a plump-faced, merry, happy
little girl, always good-tempered, and only in
trouble when she had lessons to do. She was
very fond of her cousin Alfred, who was a year
younger than herself, and was always taking his
part when the bigger ones snubbed him, as they
did sometimes: for he was a timid, fretful, little
fellow, not over-strong in health.

One day, however, it happened that all the
seven children had been playing cricket in the
field, and little Gertrude, the baby of the family,
had been sitting on the grass watching them.



Boys and Girls. 7

When the “warning bell” rang five minutes be-
fore dinner, to bid them all come in to wash their
_hands and faces, Maria, the parlour-maid, told them
that their father and mother were engaged with
Dr. Cole, and that master 'Tom was to carve the
leg of mutton for dinner. Tom said, “Oh, bother!”
and Dick, the next brother, who was by far the
neatest-handed of the family, volunteered to fill
his place. Gertrude said grace in her baby voice,
and they all set to work with good appetites, ex-
cept Corda, who was rather dainty, and hated
roast mutton.

This was the sort of talk that went on.

“T say!” (from Charlie) “I wish we had an
eleven all boys instead of having to make it up
with girls.”

“Elly bowled you out oftener than you did her,
Master Charlie,” said Alick.

“Elly isn’t so bad. But look at-Corda’s play !”

“ Corda made a catch this morning,” said Elly.

“JT don’t like cricket; I think it’s stupid!” said
Corda, very demurely.

“Oh, oh, oh!” said all the others in indigna-
tion. .

“T wonder what is the use of girls!” said Frank
very slowly.

* Just as much usé as boys,” said Elly.

“No they ar’n’t,” said Charlie. “Men can do
everything women can do, but women can’t do
half what. men can. I wouldn’t be a woman for
anything.”

* People must have wives,” suggested Johnny.

Elly felt her usual desire to be a boy too much



8 Boys and Girls.

to contradict Charlie’s statement, and it was left
to Corda to take up the cudgels for her sex.

“IT wouldn’t be a man,” she said; “I like girls
a preat deal better than boys, and I am sure boys
are no good at all.”

“ Sour grapes,” said Tom: and as the conver-
sation proceeded for some time we may leave
it for a little while, and go to hear what Dr.
Cole is saying to Mr. and Mrs. Langford, for it
is more important to the hungry children next
door than they think.

“If you take my advice,” said Dr. Cole, “you
will send the young ones away directly. It isa
most violent form of the fever, and if the wind
changes, you will have the air from Hopkins’
cottage blowing directly on to you. Six fresh
cases since last night!”

«And Thompson’s little girl not expected to
live!?? said Mrs. Langford with a little shiver, as
she thought of her own eight rosy healthy children.

“Nor Tom Dale either. It is a most serious
illness for any one to have, and I can’t too strongly
urge you and Miss Farwood to send the children
out of the way.”

* But where can they go?” said the mother.

“You must take them to the sea somewhere,”
said Mr. Langford to his wife.

“Tam not going to be away from you, Richard,”
she said. “If they go away, I must leave them
under the charge of nurse. I have no belief in
your power of taking care of yourself when there
is any press of work,”

«That is true,” said Dr, Cole. “ Now, look here,





Boys and Girls. 9

Mrs. Langford, I have got a big farmhouse on my
hands near Bellsand—that is, half a dozen rooms
in it—for the next two months. I got it furnished
for a cousin of mine, and when she had been there
a month, her husband sent for her to come to him
to Australia, so I took the furniture, such as it was,
off her hands, and nobody has taken it of me yet.
I believe it’s a good bit the worse for wear, but
that won’t matter so much. ‘There’s a splendid
common, a quarter of a mile to the sea, and a mile
of sands as flat asa pancake. ‘The nearest town
is five miles off, and they can’t get into mischief
if they try ; splendid air, honest people,—know ’em
well. Do you pack’em off this afternoon, and Pll
go and talk to Miss Farwood, and persuade her
to do the same. There, my dear lady, what better
can you wish? Only two hours of train and five
miles’ drive,—you might go over there twice a
week and look after them if you liked.”

So, after ‘much doubt and hesitation, Mr. and
Mrs. ‘Langford closed with Dr. Cole’s kind offer ;
and it only remained to go and tell the dinner-
eating children in the next room of their
fate.

«“There’s mother!” said Dick, as she.came in,
by no means sorry to give over his task of helping
ten hungry people who had already arrived at ask-
ing for more.

“My dear children,” she began, as she took her
place, looking as much flurried as gentle Mrs,
Langford ever could look, “stop talking all of you,
and listen to me.’

‘There was a dead silence, broken only by the



10 Boys and Girls.

clatter of Maggie’s fork, which took the opportu-
nity of tumbling down.

“T don’t know if you have heard that there is
a bad fever just broken out in the village. I told
you three days ago, if you remember, not to go
down the Blackberry Lane, where the Hopkinses
live; I hope none of you have been there.”

“No, mother, none of us,” said Tom and Elly
together.

“Now it seems to be spreading upwards to-
wards us, and Dr. Cole says you must all go away
this very afternoon.”

All the eyes grew large and round, and most of
the mouths opened also.

“Weare going to send you to a farmhouse on
what they call Endlow Common, five miles from
Bellsand, Possibly Alick and Corda and Alfred
may follow you there. Dr. Cole is going to sug-
gest the place to Aunt Lucy. Nurse and Eliza
will go with you, and I hope you will all try to
prove yourselves good and trustworthy.”

' “What are we to do all day?” said Tom ina
dolorous voice.

“Why itll be awfully jolly,” said Dick, who
had naturalistic tastes. “Is it near the sea, mo-
ther?” ,

«A mile off only. You'll be able to do some
collecting, and that sort of thing,” said the mother,
kindly: “and if you take your new microscope—”

“Hurrah!” said Dick.

“You six bigger ones may take three books
apiece, but try to choose them wisely. Johnny,
mind you look out your pencils and drawing-



Boys and Girls. II

paper, you will want them. Elly, don’t forget
your workbox: Charlie, I recommend you to take
your basket of tools. Tom, I don’t know what
occupation you will like best, but I recommend
you to think of something for indoors; and Frank
the same. Maggie’s dolls will be enough for her.”

“Mother, how can you think of us all at once
like that?” said Tom. “It must make your head
go round.”

Mrs. Langford laughed a little. “It does, Tom,”
she said; “my head is going round at this mo-
ment; but none the less 1 must get you children
all off by the five o’clock train. By the way,”
she said suddenly, “I wish, Dick, that you and
Charlie would go off at once by this train, take
a fly to Endlow Common from Bellsand, and a
note from me to Mrs, Burton, the farmer’s wife,
as to getting beds and tea ready. You have got
half an hour.”

They all gasped. Dick and Charlie shouted
out “Hurrah!” and rushed off for their hats,
What could be more delightful than to be sent
off on such an errand at a moment’s notice?
Tom looked a little hurt that he had not been
the one selected; but his mother said, “I shall
have no end of instructions for you, Tom, I can’t
spare you. Now I must write this letter. Finish
your dinner quickly, children, you will have to be
busy all this afternoon.”

Imagine what a bustle and scurry there was
over all the house during that afternoon! Nurse
and mamma were the only two persons in the
household who kept their heads, and well for them



12 Boys and Girls.

it was that they did so. Maggie was found to
have filled one corner of the trunk which nurse
was packing with the furniture out of her doll’s
house, because, she said, the dolls ast have a bed
to lie on, and chairs and tables to use, or they
would not be comfortable all the time they were
at Endlow; and little Gerty improved the occa-.
sion by filling her two fat hands with Frank’s col-
lection of stones, and tumbling them headlong
into the other end of the trunk. Elly was so
much taken aback by the suddenness of the move,
that she could only stand leaning her long lank
length against the wall, and ejaculate, “How very
funny!” at intervals, until nurse set her to fetch
her brothers’ clothes to be packed, which gave her
useful employment.

But in the midst of all this bustle and hurry,
Mrs. Langford found time for a private talk with
Tom, and another with Elly, before the time
came to go off to the station. ‘There was a sta-
tion at Ringland now, which made it much easier
for the Langfords to get to Endlow that after-
noon. :

Tom’s talk came first, when his mother was
arranging the box of books, paint-boxes, &c.,
which were to serve the eight children for indoor
employment during the whole time they were
at Endlow. i ;

«Tom, old fellow,” she said, “you will be the
eldest, and I shall look to you to keep the others
in order. Only don’t scold and hector them too
much, as you are sometimes given to do.”

« All right, mother,” said Tom.





Boys and Girls, 13

“J know I can trust you, and Dick, and Elly,
not to do anything out of my sight that you
wouldn’t do if I were with you,” said his mother,
“otherwise I should not like this plan at all.
My only doubt is whether you will be wise and
reasonable enough to keep each other in order.
Bear and forbear, and don’t say sharp things for
the pleasure of teasing, that’s all. And don’t fly
in nurse’s face more than you can ele, even
when you don’t think she is overwise.’

Tom promised to do his best: he was very
fond of his mother, and could scarcely help pro-
mising anything she asked when her hand was on
his shoulder, and her kind face looking into his.
Then it was Elly’s turn.

“Elly, my little woman,” said Mrs. Langford,
“T hope you will do your best to keep the peace
and make things go smoothly while you are away
. from us. In such an experiment as this, girls
have a great deal in their hands.”

“The boys are always saying that girls are of
no use,” said Elly.

“Prove to them that they are of great use,
then.. Try and be gentle, and not rough, Elly,
and I think that the boys won’t say that you are
of no use.”

- «That's what Miss Morison says,” said Elly.
«Gentle and not rough: But it is so much easier
to be rough, mother.”

“No doubt it is to some people,” said Mrs.
Langford; “and I think you are one of them.
But “when rough people have tamed themselves
into gentleness, their gentleness is worth more



}

14 Boys and Girls.

than other people’s, I think. But I don’t want
to lecture now, my dear. Now, you understand
that nurse is to have the control over you: of
course I can’t expect your elder brothers to mind
her as much as I hope you will; that would be
expecting rather too much from them. But I
hope you will set the example to Frank, and
Johnny, and Maggie, of being good and obedient
to her.”

«Yes, mother,” said Elly, who, to give her her
due,- was a very obedient little girl.

“And now run and get your books, for you
have not given me them yet.”

_ Elly went out of the room, and came back with
a rather red face, and her hands held behind her
back.

“ Mother, would you mind packing them with-
out looking at them? There’s one I don’t want
you to see.”

«Why not?” said her mother, laughing, “I
don’t suppose you would wish to take a book
I should not like you to read, Elly!”

“Oh, no, mamma. You wouldn’t mind my
reading it in the holidays. It’s only a lesson-
book. There! Do you want to see it, or may
I put it in myself without your looking ?”

Mrs. Langford knew of the delights of chil-
dren’s secrets by experience, and she made no
further objections to Elly’s putting in a very un-
interesting-looking book in a school-cover of
dirty brown calico. The other two books were
a volume of fairy tales, and a natural history book
of Dick’s,



Boys and Girls, 15

“Three books will never be enough for him
to look in for all the new animals he finds,” said
Elly; “so he can have one of mine.”

And strange as it may appear to those who do
not know how much work can be got through by
a busy household, the children, with nurse and the
housemaid, were all packed off together by the
five o’clock train.













CHAPTER II.

T was nearly eight o’clock, and it seemed to
the children that they had been hours and
hours in the omnibus which was taking them

from Bellsand Station to Endlow Common. It
was a hot evening, and nurse would not let them
sit in a draught, and kept all the windows shut
on one side; and that side, unfortunately, was
the one that they wanted the most to look out
of, because the sea was to be seen in blue peeps
behind green hedges, and there were little white
sailing boats scattered about it, turning golden
with the setting sun.. Gertrude was tired and
sleepy, but too hungry to sleep, and not old
enough to know she must not fret: Maggie’s
round face was graver than usual. Frank and
Johnny were cross because they had to sit inside,
there being so much luggage on the small omni-
bus that there was only room for Tom on the
seat with the driver. Elly herself felt too tired
and hungry to be able to do more than to control
her own crossness, and could not manage to make
things more comfortable for the boys.

But at last all things come to an end, even a

journey in a close omnibus. The omnibus went
slowly up a steep hill, then the hedges ceased and





Boys and Girls. 17

the green edge at the roadside widened into an
immense common, purple and yellow with hea~-
ther and furze, sloping down gradually to a wide
expanse of blue sea. Five minutes further brought
them in sight of an old grey stone farmhouse,
with red tiles, with a farmyard at the back, and
stacks of wheat and hay showing behind. At the
door, which opened full upon the common, stood
Dick and Charlie, waving their caps.

They went-in through a rough flagged passage
into a good-sized room with two windows, light
but rather low, and with a drab paper hanging
in a most dilapidated way on the wall in dirty
flakes. There was a round table spread with a
tablecloth, covered with blue plates, and cups,
and a metal teapot; there was a horsehair sofa,
and several horsehair chairs, high and slippery;
and there was a varnished picture of “King
Alfred and the Cakes” hanging above the mantel-
piece.

“T hope, Mrs. Brown,” said Mrs, Burton to
nurse, “you will find everything comfortable,
ma’am, as much as can be on such short notice.
Jemima Ann and your young gentlemen have
been busy enough this afternoon: and I assure
you I was properly vexed when I came back to
find I had been out so late.”

Elly, who was listening, began to wonder how
much vexation was “proper.” Nurse made some
civil reply, and, leaving Eliza‘to pour out the tea,
she went up to see the bedrooms. There were
three: one for nurse and Eliza, with a crib for
Gerty; one for Elly and Maggie; and one with

c



18 Boys and Girls.

a long row of beds, like a school dormitory, for
the five boys.

Then they came down again, and set to work
at the farmhouse tea, which they all liked ex-
tremely; and then they were one and all glad
to go to bed, and leave unpacking and all other
arrangements for the next day. Before long, all
the eight were asleep.

"The eastern sun shone into Elly’s eyes and
awoke her early the next morning. At first she
could hardly remember where she was,—in such
a funny bare little room, with an old-fashioned
tent bedstead with washed-out blue curtains:
but soon she came to her senses, and recollected
that this was Endlow. “What fun!” said Elly
to herself; “Ill get up and look about me before
the others are awake.” And up she got and
dressed quietly, without awaking Maggie; and
then, having tried very hard not to hurry her
prayers through the longing she had to be out,
she slipped noiselessly down the stairs, through
the flagged passage, and out into the early radiant
sunshine of the summer morning.

For a minute or two Elly stood in absolute
wonder at the splendid dazzling sunshine, and the
dewy heath and furze which smelt so strange and
delicious: and then she looked to the south, and
saw the strange misty blue of something that was
neither land nor sky, and she almost sprang for
joy at thinking that it was the sea. She wished
now that one of the others was there to share the
pleasure of it with her: she almost thought of
waking Maggie, or one of the boys: but then



Boys and Girés. 19

again, Maggie was tired with yesterday’s journey,
and had better have her sleep out, and experience
had taught Elly that it was just as well not to
suggest to her brothers to get up at five when
breakfast was not to be till half-past eight. So
she set out to explore the place by herself.
Soon she found that the common was ex-
tremely dewy, and that dew, though very lovely,
is disadvantageous to the hems of cotton-frocks.
So Elly opened the gate and went into the farm-
yard, where the farming men were moving about,
and where six calves in a row all stood and
looked at her, as if they had never seen a little
girl in a white linen flapping hat before: and
very likely they had not. She liked walking on
the soft golden straw, and she had not gone far
before she heard a sound which made her mouth
water, as of a soft frothy liquid trickling into a
wooden pail, and a sweet smell of cow’s breath
in the air. Elly could not help looking in over
the top of the wooden door. The man who was
milking the cows saw her, and said, “Have a
drop of warm milk, little missy ?”
_ May I?” said Elly, with a delighted face,
coming in. She stood by while the man filled
a little tin mug with the frothy milk and gave
it to her: how delicious it was! Three times,
altogether, Elly emptied that mug; and she could
have gone on yet longer, except that she was
afraid that the man would think her greedy. So
she thanked him, and went out of the cowhouse,
feeling all the better for her treat.
Having explored the farmyard, Elly went up
: C2



20 Boys and Girls.

the little path towards the house, where she saw
Mrs. Burton and “ Jemima Ann,” as they called
her, bustling about at work.

“ You're early this morning, little miss?” said
Mrs. Burton, as she saw her ; and Elly came up
to her, and ‘told her about the treat she had had
in the cowhouse. “Bless you, dear,” said Mrs.
Burton, “you may have some every morning if
you like. Milk’s plenty with us this time of
year; we give it to the pigs, we do.”

“ And may I go into the garden?” said Elly.

“To be sure you may, and pick yourself a nice
little posy, if you like. Only don’t pick the
roses; Burton’s choice over them.”

Elly went into the garden, which was chiefly
kitchen garden, with a border of gay homely
flowers: stocks and southernwood and orange
escolzia. But the garden was rather dull when
there was the common and the sea to look at;
and Elly suddenly took it into her head that she
would go down to the beach and look at the sea
closely. Before any of the others! What fun!
In another moment she was out over the stone
wall, and springing over the furze and the hea-
ther, down the hill towards the sea. It was fur-
ther than she had expected, but Elly did not mind
that. There came a steep slope of grass with
sand at the bottom, which came over her ankles
and into her boots; she went on until it grew
firmer under her feet, and lo and behold, there
was a white line of surf in front of her, where the
little blue waves were breaking at their leisure,
while the whole sea was alive with what an old















































BOYS AND GIRLS. Page 21



Boys and Girls. 21

Greek once called “countless laughter” from
every little ripple on its surface.

\ Elly had not seen the’sea since she was six
years old, when all the little Langfords had gone
there for change after the measles. But how
delicious this was! She had not been old enough -
to enter into its beauty as she could now. Some-
how, she did not know why, she felt so glad that
she could almost have cried, and the verse of the
“Venite,” which she had heard over and over
again without thinking about it, seemed to come
into her head with a new meaning, “The sea is
His, and He made it, and His hands prepared the
dry land.” But little girls of eleven do not very
often think for long at a time, and soon Elly had
found something that took up all her thoughts,
a lovely little pink pair of bivalve shells, half
epen. And there was another, and there a big
whelk, and there what the children called a
“silver bucket,? with its purple outside rubbed
off here and there to display the silver pearly
lining. Elly had her handkerchief full of treasure
before long, and began to wonder whether it was
nearly breakfast-time.

She walked back rather more slowly than she
had come, for she was getting tired, and the sun
was hot now; but when she got to the house, and
looked at the clock, it was still only seven. An
hour and a half to wait! Elly was tired, and yet
she did not like to go in and wait in the dull
sitting-room on the slippery horsehair chairs:
so she went out again, and passed by a haystack
with a ladder leaning by the side. ‘The haystack



22 Boys and Girls.

had been partly used, and the top of it looked
inviting and shady, for a taller one close against
it sheltered it from the sun. Elly climbed up,
sat down in a deliciously soft pleasant seat, and
found it so luxurious that she did not wish to
_ Move away. “How jolly this is!” she thought,
as she laid back her head on the hay; “if only
I had that Greek grammar here, I might begin
to learn the letters,’—perhaps you can now guess
what Elly’s secret was—* but it’s too comfortable
to move—much nicer than a bed. I wonder if
nurse would let me sleep here one Pe if—
or if——

But Elly did not wonder much more, for she
was fast aleep; and the next thing she knew was
that she woke up with a start, seeing Dick’s face
peering into hers, and hearing him say, “Here
she is! You little goose, Elly; we've been
looking for you for half an hour! Make haste
and come to breakfast.”

So ended Elly’s morning adventures.





CHAPTER III.

parlour where the breakfast was laid out
at the big table and all the children were
sitting round it. She did not lock very tidy,
with her cotton frock stained with dew and mud
above her knees, and her hair full of bits of hay,
as might have naturally been expected after her
nap. There was a general shout as she appeared.
“ Well, Miss Eleanor,” said nurse, severely,
“if it had been Miss Margaret, I should not
have wondered; but a great girl of eleven years
old like you -
_ “You have kept us all waiting ever so long,”

Ee felt rather small as she came into the



' said Tom.

*“ Goodness, Miss Eleanor!’’ said Eliza.

“Doodness, Elly!” repeated Gerty, so that
they all began to laugh.

“ Shall I go and make myself tidy?” said poor
Elly.

a No? said nurse, “we can’t wait any longer;
sit down and eat your breakfast, and don’t be so
tiresome again.”

Elly was quite ready for her breakfast, and her
sleep had refreshed her, so that she was not tired
any longer. I should be sorry to mention the



24 Boys and Girls.

quantity of bread and butter which she ate that
morning, the sea air had given her such an
appetite.

While they were at breakfast, Mrs. Burton
brought in a letter which had just come by the
post. Endlow Common was so far out of his
way that the postman always slipped the letters
into a wooden box on the road half a mile off
between: two stones, and the Burtons fetched
them in the course of the day. They had fetched
them early this morning in consideration of their
visitors.

The letter was from Mrs. Langford to Tom,
and informed them that Blessington was coming
that day to the farm with Corda and Alfred, and
that Alick would follow in a week’s time. He
was going for a visit to a friend until then.

“JT wonder what Mrs. Blessington will think
of these rooms!” said Eliza; for the Vicarage
servants were not very fond of Cordelia’s nurse.

« She.must think what she pleases,” said nurse,
shortly; “but I hope Miss Eleanor will think
better than to come to breakfast such a figure
with her hair full of hay another time.”

«Well, nurse, I wanted to go and brush it,”
said Elly, who was getting tired of the subject.

«Brush a fiddle-stick!” said nurse, as con-
temptuously as if Elly had wished to do such a
thing; “why your hair is more like a doormat
than Christian hair. You come up with me
after: breakfast, and I shall have a fine job, I
suppose.”

“Oh, please, nurse,” said Elly, “do you think



Boys and Girls. 25

we could get bathing-gowns for Maggie and me?
The water did look so beautiful.”

~“QOh yes,” said nurse, who was out of temper ;
“you may go on to the common and buy them
off them furze bushes, I dare say. Bathing-gowns,
indeed!”

Elly’s countenance fell, for she wished to bathe
more than anything; but she had sense enough
not to pursue the subject then when nurse was
cross, and she underwent the pulling out and
combing of her hair with as much patience as
was to be expected under the circumstances.
Presently it was done, and then she found that
all the others except Gerty were gone out. She
ran out after them, and found that they were
not gone far; the sun was too hot for any except
. Tom and Dick to go down to the beach to bathe,
and Charlie, Johnny, Frank, and Maggie, were all
sitting doing nothing in the shade of the house.
Maggie had her doll certainly, which was an
unfailing resource to her; but the three boys
were kicking their heels in the air in a state
of perfect laziness, just ripening into mischief.
Elly had brothers enough to know what would
be the outcome of this: so she stood there and
said, “Boys, do you want books, or paints, or
anything? I'll go and get them if you do.”

Charlie graciously allowed her to fetch him
“Holiday House,” and Johnny, who wasa
gentlemanly little boy, got up at once to fetch
his paints and drawing-book. Frank said he
wanted nothing; and indeed he was one of
those children who have a positive love of



26 Boys and Girls,

idleness for its own sake. Elly herself acceded
to a request from Maggie that she would come
and play with her and her dolls; and the children
passed the morning in tolerable peace and enjoy-
ment, notwithstanding the heat.

Then came dinner, for which Tom and Dick
were as late as Elly had been for breakfast.
None of the children were very hungry now,
it was so hot; but they had the novelty. of
drinking milk for dinner, which they thought
much better than meat. And then nurse said
they had better stay in the parlour for a little
while, because it was so hot; and when the
heat of the day went off they would walk down
to the beach, The three biggest boys scouted
the idea of staying in, and all went out and
sat under a haystack, where they went to sleep.
Nurse gave Elly and Maggie a task of sewing,
for which I cannot say that either of them were
very grateful; and Frank hung about the room
doing nothing, only disturbing Johnny at his
painting. Johnny had drawn the house with
the hedge at the side, and the haystack where
Elly had slept; and though his lines were not
all as straight as they might have been, his
drawing amused him and charmed Gerty, who
thought her brothers the cleverest people in the
world.

When they had been working for some time,
they heard the sound of wheels; and they threw
down their work and rushed out to the door
to meet the carriage which had brought their
cousins.



Boys and Girls, 27

The first thing they heard was Blessinzton’s
voice. “Well, ’m sure! I’d just as soon live
at the Land’s End as such a place as this!”

“ Mamma has been to the Land’s End, Blessing-
ton, and she says it is the nicest place she knows,”
said Elly.

“Well, Miss Eleanor, this is the most out-of-
the-way outlandish place I ever did see. If
they’d sent us to that lovely place Bellsand, where
there is a parade, and bathing machines, and rows
of beautiful straight houses, and none of these
nasty hills, I’d have said it was a good idea—but
here—ugh!”

And Blessington, who had by this time got out
her parcels and packages, paid the flyman and
went into the house with Corda and Alfred, who
were both tired and cross, and wanted their
dinner.

“Oh, Corda, this is so nice!” said Elly,
forgetting that she had thought it rather dull
just now.

“This ugly dark room!” said Corda.

“But there’s the sea only a little way off, and
~ shells!”

“T hate the sea,” said Corda, “it always makes
me think of mamma’s going away. I don’t want
to see it, ’m sure!”

However, after Corda had had some dinner she
began to see things in a more cheerful sight.
The heat of the day began to go off, and Elly
persuaded nurse to let her take the others down
to the beach. Nurse demurred at first, saying
that they would fall into the sea and get drowned;



28 Boys and Girls.

but at last she agreed to come too, as Elly said it
was only such a little way.

Oh, how nice it was there on the flat shining
sand with the tide coming in gently in little
ripples! The children made a great sand castle
with a moat and a tunnel, and it was quite a
long time after the moat was filled before the
castle was washed away. Even Corda forgot her
troubles and her fatigue, and played as merrily
as any of them in the cool evening air; and when
they came home to tea, they were all too tired to
do more than have tea and go to bed,

But when Elly was asleep, Dick came in softly
and awoke her.

“The sea will get in and spoil it!” she said,
for she was still dreaming about the sand castle.

“Nonsense, Elly!” said Dick, shaking her
gently to get her to wake. “I say, ] want you
to come up to our room; you can see the moon
shining on the sea, and it looks so awfully
pretty!”

Elly was awaké by this time, and after putting
on her dressing-gown and slippers, she followed
Dick up the narrow little stairs that led to the
attic where the boys slept. Charlie and the
twins were asleep, and Tom was down stairs
writing a letter; for Tom was of that age when
it appeared to him a waiving of his privileges of
years, if he did not stay up till past ten.

Dick led Elly to the window, which was wide
open, as was only right under the circumstances ;
for the night was warm and the heather sweet,
and the dewy evening air was quite delicious to



Boys and Girls. 29

breathe after the heat of the day. And looking
out thence into the moonlight, Elly saw a blue
space of sea with a silver rippling track upon it,
where it caught the light from the almost full
moon. ;

“Oh, Dick, how pretty!” she said.

“Isn't it?” said Dick, much gratified by her
admiration. JI wanted to show it to somebody,
and the boys are all snoring like pigs, and ‘Tom
wouldn’t come.”

“1 wish mamma could see it,” said Elly. “I
say, Dick, I think it would be very nice here if
nurse wouldn’t give me so much needlework to
do. And do you know, I want to bathe so
awfully, only I haven’t got a bathing-gown.
There’s a place among the rocks where Corda
and I might undress quite nicely: and Corda
has got such a lovely new bathing-gown.”

“What does a bathing-gown cost?” said Dick,
who was very soft-hearted, and enjoyed bathing
above everything himself.

“I don’t know. I have got a shilling and
a sixpence and a silver twopence, but I’m sure
that is not enough; and I don’t like to ask
mamma because she said the other day she
could not spend any more on our clothes till
Michaelmas.”

“Well, you ask nurse how much stuff it will
take, and we'll see if it can’t be managed,” said
Dick, whose godfather had presented him with a
whole sovereign only a week before, and who
therefore felt equal to any emergency.

Elly went back to her bed extremely happy,



30 Boys and Girls.
between gratitude to Dick and pleasure at his
calling her up to see the moon; and the next
thing she was aware of was nurse calling her
and Maggie the next morning, and telling them
that breakfast would be ready in half an hour.







CHAPTER IV.

“ Charlie and I want to walk into the town

this morning. Do you want any pepper or
needles or anything of that sort that we can bring
back to you?”

“ Pepper, bless your heart ?” said nurse, laughing,
“no, thank you, Master Richard; but you’re a good
boy to ask me. But I think there are one or two
little things I want, now I come to think of it.”

“TI want some cold cream for Miss Cordelia’s
face,’ said Blessington: “the sun has burnt her
that brown already, 1 don’t know what her grand-
mamma will say.”

Whereat Charles began to tease Corda about
her complexion being so precious; and Corda
turned sulky, and looked inclined to cry. But
Elly made them laugh with the quotation—“He
only does it to annoy, because he knows it teases;”
and the little breeze passed over. Dick went off
with Charlie, armed with the right number of
yards and the right description of stuff for Elly’s
bathing-gown; and the two boys trudged merrily
along the road with its border of common, where
tne bees were buzzing and the butterflies fluttering
over the sunny heath and furze.

fg | SAY, nurse,” quoth Dick the next morning,



32 Boys and Girls.

Nothing very remarkable happened on their
way to Bellsand, except that Dick, who was
butterfly-mad, caught two brown butterflies and
missed a Painted Lady. He discoursed to Charlie
about the possibility that Oleander Hawk-moths
might come to Endlow Common across the
Channel; for the book said that such things had
been known to happen, and why should they not
here? “Mind, Charlie!” said Dick, “that if you
ever see anything that looks the least like a Hawk-
moth you get at it at once; only fancy how dis-
gusted you would be to think that you had had
a chance of an Oleander, and had missed it!”

Charlie listened respectfully to this lecture from
Dick; because Dick knew more about butterflies
than any other boy at their school, and because
he thought it would be the most delightful thing
in the world to catch something that no one else
had got. Dick had once achieved this glory,
when in the. preceding September he had himself
caught a Camberwell Beauty, sitting on a fallen
apple in the Rectory garden, and the county
paper had actually had a paragraph to the effect,
that “One of the rarest of British butterflies, the
Camberwell Beauty, has lately been caught by
Master Richard Langford, son of the Rector of
Ringland. We congratulate the young gentleman
on his conquest.” Charlie would have liked above
everything to be congratulated upon his conquest
in the newspaper.

“T say,” said Charlie, presently, “it’s awfully
hot, and we’ve only gone two miles. Let us sit
down and rest, Dick.”



Boys and Girls. 33

“Tt’ll only be hotter if we wait,” said sturdy
Dick. “Let us get on now, Charlie, and when
we get to Bellsand we'll have a jolly good bathe.
Come now, do get on!”

Charlie was rather apt to be lazy, and Dick had
to.exhort him thus many times during their five-
mile walk to Bellsand. But at last the lonely
road began to be edged with houses; smart ladies
in blue serge with gold anchor buttons began to
appear on the beach; and five minutes’ walk
brought them into the midst of the little town,
in front of a confectioner’s shop, where both of
them stood still with one accord, for they were
hungry by this time.

«Tl have one of those jolly Bath buns!” quoth
Charlie. “I’m so awfully hungry, and Pve got
a shilling in my pocket. What will you have
Dick?”

“Bread and cheese,” said Dick, who was out-
growing the small boy’s love for sweet things, and
was rather doubtful whether Elly’s bathing-gown
would leave him money enough to buy a shrimp-
ing-net on which he had set his heart.

Accordingly, he had finished his luncheon before
Charlie had got half through his. Charlie had
spent his shilling in six Bath buns, and began to
feel that it was rather doubtful how long it would
take to get through them. You may have too
much of anything, even Bath buns, as Charlie
began to feel.

“Now, do stop,” said Dick. “You'll never get
home again if you eat all that. Besides, we’ve got
to bathe, after I have done my shopping. You

D



34 Boys and Girls.

can put the rest in your pocket; you'll be glad of
it after bathing,”

It does not require much self-denial to leave
off eating when you have had more than enough;
and Charlie pocketed the rest of his buns, paid
for them, and followed Dick out. of the shop.
The next thing they did was to buy Elly’s bathing-
gown, which by following nurse’s directions and
the advice of the good-natured shop girl, who was
much amused at the errand of her young customers,
Dick managed very creditably. ‘The shop girl told
him that she would send the parcel to Endlow
Farm by the carrier, and she also instructed him
as to the best place for his shrimping-net, which
under her directions he purchased. Then. they
went down to the bathing-machines, and had a
delightful bathe in. the warm water. Dick, at
least, thought it delightful; but Charlie had eaten
too much to enjoy his bathe as much as his
brother; and when they got out after staying in
the water quite as long as was prudent, Charlie
insisted on lying down on the beach to go to
sleep, while Dick tried the merits of his new
shrimping-net.

He did not catch many shrimps, certainly; but
he filled the tin case which he always carried slung
on his. shoulder with bits of seaweed, pebbles,
shells, and one unfortunate sea anemone, and this
did just as well for nature-loving Dick, When
he came back to Charlie, thinking that it was
time to set off to go home, he found Charlie, to
his astonishment, talking eagerly to a stumpy
red-haired boy about his own size.



Boys and Girls, 35

“Don’t you remember Halford, at Parkins’?”
said Charlie. Mr. Parkins was the master of their
first school.

“Qh yes, I remember,” said Dick, not very
warmly, for Halford had not been a shining
character at school, and Dick would rot -have
minded never renewing their acquaintance.

« Awful brute of a place, wasn’t it?” said Hal-
ford, jauntily, with his hands in his pockets.

“That’s as fellows think,” said Dick. “I say,
Charlie, we must be getting home again; we've
got a long way to go.”

“Where are you?” said Halford.

“ Endlow Farm.”

“ At the low end of the world, I should think,”
said Halford, laughing boisterously at his own
bad pun. Dick did not seem to see it, and began
to walk on, leaving Charlie and his friend to
follow, which they did at their leisure. At last
Dick heard his brother calling to him to wait,
and saw that he had parted company with his
companion. ;

«What do you want to take up again with that
vulgar brute for?” said Dick, who did not soften
his words more than most schoolboys of his age.

“He isn’t half a bad fellow,” said Charlie.

“Well, you ought to know best. J never let
Halford egg me on to bore holes in all the wash-
hand basins, or to let off crackers in school,” said
Dick, referring to sundry early episodes of Charlie’s
school life.

“No,” said Charlie, coolly; “you always were
@ prig, and not up to fun.” he,

Z a3



36 Boys and Girls.

There was just enough truth in this accusation
to make Dick angry; for there was in him a
tendency to priggishness which might have been
strongly developed had he not undergone the
discipline of school. So the brothers walked on
apart and not on the best of terms for about a
quarter of an hour. After that time they began
to forget their differences and began to be sociable
again.

“'There’s an awful jolly thing coming on next
week at Bellsand,” said Charlie. “It’s a boat-
race done by men in outriggers, between the
Champion of the Bellsand and the Champion of
Whitebar, and there’s going to be a spread after-
wards, and Halford’s going to dine. He says he
knows both of them and has seen them play
billiards together; they do it awfully well.”

“I dare say,” said Dick, drily.

“Do you think papa will say we may go and
see it?”

«See a couple of cads play billiards?”

“No, the boat-race.”

‘We can ask.” |

“JT do wish you wouldn’t walk so fast, Dick,”
pleaded Charlie. “I am so hot and tired and
thirsty, and my head aches.” ~

Dick was not an unkindly boy, and he slack-
ened his pace to suit his brother’s needs; but
even with this concession, he found it very diffi-
cult to get Charlie on; and when they reached
Endlow Farm poor Charlie was fit for nothing
but bed,

«Gracious me!” said Blessington to nurse, “you



Boys and Girls. 37

may depend upon it, Mrs. Brown, that poor child
has taken the fever.”

“Taken the fever!” said Elly, opening her eyes
wide; “oh nurse, has he?”

“No, no, my dear, he’s only a bit overdone,”
said nurse, smiling. “He'll be all right to-
morrow;” and she hastened away to see after
him.

“Tt’s all very well for Mrs. Brown to put it off
in that way,” said Blessington, mysteriously to
her subordinate Sarah; “but you see if my words
don’t come true.”

“Oh, Blessington,” said Elly, looking ready to
cry, “do you really think so? Somebody ought
to write to mamma.”

“They ought, no doubt,” said Blessington, “and
if you did, Miss Eleanor, there’s Mrs. Burton’s
brother not gone back to Bellsand yet, and he’d
be in time to post the note for you. I'll go and
stop him if you make haste and write.”

Accordingly Elly took a post-card and wrote—
“Dear mamma, we think Charlie has taken the
fever. He has got a bad headache and feels very
sick. Please tell us what to do about him. We
are all quite well and this is a very nice place.
Your loving daughter, Elly.

«“P.S.—Nurse does not think it is the fever,
but Blessington and I do.”

For some reason best known to herself, Elly did ~
not tell nurse that she had written. ‘Nurse was
a little jealous of Blessington, and Elly was sure
that she would scold her for taking Blessington’s
opinion rather than her own. Therefore you may



38 _ Boys and Girls.

imagine nurse’s commotion when the next day as
they were sitting at dinner, a fly drove up to the
door, and Mrs. Langford came in looking anxious
and harassed.

“ Charlie, how is he?” she said, before another
word had time to be spoken,

“All right, thank you,” said Charlie, with his
mouth full of roast mutton.

For you may not be astonished to hear that
Charlie’s illness had not been the fever, but merely
he effect of bathing after too many Bath buns ;
and nurse had quite cured him the night before

with a tumbler of mustard and water.

“OQ mamma, I am so sorry I wrote and fright-
ened you!” said Elly, penitently, when all ‘had
been exp'ained.,

“You meant the best, 1] daresay, dear, but you
certainly gave papa and me a terrible fright !
However, it is a good thing in one way that I
have come, for I wanted to see how you were all
getting on, and I should not have liked to leave

’Ringland otherwise.”

“ Flow are ae all there, ma’am?” said nurse.

“Well, we hope the fever is no worse; there
were fewer fresh cases yesterday than the aay
before. But it is a terrible time for us all, and
we can’t be too thankful that the children are all
pate out of the way of it.”

“Mamma,” said Maggie, « do. please come and
let me show you the cowhouse? Elly and I always
go and get some new milk when they are milking;
and it is so nice!”

“Mamma,” said Dick, “there are such lots of



Boys and Girls, 39

Painted Ladies about here, and I really do think
this would be the very place for an Oleander,
don’t you?’

Frank had gone out and picked a “ nosegay of
heather and thyme, and the sweet-scented flowers
that grew on the common, and brought it back to
his mother as a present; and Elly brought the
breadths of her-new bathing-gown, to display at
once the munificence of Dick’s present and her
own industry.

“Very kind of Dick,” said Mrs. Langford,
patting his shoulder; « but I think mammas ought
to pay for their little girls bathing-gowns, so I
will pay Dick the money back, and he can spend
it on something else.”

“ But I meant it for a present to Elly,” said Dick.

«Very well; then suppose you keep it so, and
instead. of paying you, Dick, I will spend my
money on wine, for some of the poor people in —
the fever.”

“Mamma,” said Elly, “will you take my
eighteenpence to buy wine too?”

Maggie also had a fourpence which she was
very anxious to contribute; and Frank had two-
pence halfpenny, and Johnny a shilling; Charlie
had only two stale Bath buns, the remains of his
yesterday’s feast. Corda brought five shillings to
her aunt, rather shyly, and begged her to take it.

“ Are you sure you won’t wish to have it back?”
said Mrs. Langford.

- * No,” said Corda, and then she whispered,
“Because [ promised mamma to try not to be
selfish.”



40 Boys and Girls.

Mrs. Langford kissed her little niece—for
though Corda was really her cousin, she always
called her aunt—and said, “Then I am sure
mamma will be very much pleased, dear little
woman. But now I am afraid I must be going
back, or I shall miss the train.”

“OQ mamma, I do wish you were going to stay!”
rose up in a dolorous cry.

“TI wish I was, but I must not leave poor papa
when he has so much to do, and the parish is in
such trouble, Good-bye, children, and don’t send
for me another time without nurse’s authority,
Elly, dear,”

Elly felt rather small, and so perhaps did
Blessington, although Mrs. Langford said nothing
to her. For they” had given Mrs. Langford a

_ great fright, and put her to the trouble and ex-
pense of a long tiring journey on a hot day, when
there was not the slightest need for so doing.

Tom went back with his mother in the fly to
Bellsand, to see her into the train, and then to
walk back. Tom told her what he had heard
from Dick about Charlie and his friend Halford.

“J am glad there are five good miles between
them,” said Mrs. Langford, smiling. “I look to
you, Tom, to keep Charlie out of mischief; don’t
let him get with this Halford, or indeed go to

«Bellsand at all if you can help it, for I don’t
think he is strong enough for the walk in the
heat. He is growing too fast to be very strong,”

Tom promised to do his best, and their arrival
at the station put everything else out of his head.





CHAPTER V.

HE bathing-gown was finished, and at ten
T o’clock on a lovely sunny morning Blessing-
ton took down Elly, Corda, and Maggie to
the beach so that they might bathe among the
rocks. Alfred was afraid of the water, and he
refused to accept Elly’s invitation to come in
with her, so that she would take care of him.
He preferred playing with Gertrude on the sand
in the shade of a rock, where there were plenty
of limpets and brown sea-weed; and accordingly
the three little girls undressed in a convenient
place among the rocks, and put on their bathing-
gowns, For nurse had managed to coritrive
something which did duty for one for Magels,
much to the little girl’s delight.

“What a nice dressing- room this is!” said Elly,
as she waited for Corda, who was not quite so
soon ready. “We have got a white carpet of
sand, and some lovely red sea-weed to make the
walls pretty, and a blue roof.

“T don’t see any roof,” said Maggie.

“The sky, Madge!” laughed Elly.

“But we ought to have some hooks to hang
ap our clothes upon to make it. as nice as a
machine,” said matter-of-fact little Corda.



42 Boys and Girls.

“ The rocks are our hooks,” said Elly. “Wouldn’t
it be funny if we really had hooks among the
rocks! But are you ready, Corda? Maggie and
Tam. Now then, come!”

“Pip your heads, there’s good children,’ said
Blessington: and the three little girls, hand in
hand, treading very gingerly with their bare feet,
went into the clear calm warm water. “Oh!”
cried Maggie, “it’s so funny!” and she stood still
with the water up to her ankles.

“Oh, come on,” said Elly: “it’s not half deep
enough yet. Here we are; now we'll dip our
heads.” But truth compels me to say that though
Maggie and Corda thought they had dipped their
heads, they had really only dipped their faces, and
their hair remained as dry as before. Elly, who was
less timid, performed the feat more thoroughly.

Then they jumped about in the water and
splashed each other, like so many mermaids,
and thought it was only too soon when Bles-
sington called to them that it was time to
come out.

They would have liked to stay in for an hour
instead of five minutes, but that would hardly
have been a good thing for them: and they came
back to have a good rub with Blessington’s towels,
and then put on their clothes again and went
back to the farm, when they were all so hungry
that Mrs, Burton gave them each a great hunch
of seed-cake,

They were all a little tired with their first
bathe, and were not at all unwilling to sit.in the
shade of the house with quiet occupations. Maggie



Boys and Girls. 43

had her doll; Corda, who delighted in needlework,
was making a red silk pincushion; and Elly, much
as if ske was doing something wrong, fetched the
Greek grammar, with which she meant to surprise:
every one when she reached home.

“T wish you would read to us, Elly,” said Corda.
«What story is that?”

“It isn’t a story; it’s a secret,” said Elly.

Maggie sprang up at once to see.

“Madge, it’s dishonourable to try to find out
things that are secrets,” said Elly severely: and
poor Maggie retreated crushed.

«Why do you read things which are not
stories,” said Corda, rather discontentedly ; “if it
was a story you might have read to us.”

“JT can’t talk now: [I’m busy,” said Elly: and
in an audible whisper she began conning the
names of the letters, “Alpha, Beta,—that must
be C next, what can be the name of it? No, it’s
Gamma, what a very odd place for G to come in
the alphabet!” And Elly was so much surprised
that she said aloud, “Corda, do you know the
. little Greek children did not learn their A, B, C,
‘but their A, B, G?”

“Ts that Greek you’re doing then?” said Corda,

indifferently.

“Well, if I tell you, you must promise faith-
fully never to tell anybody. Will you promise,
Corda?”

“Yes,” said Corda.

* And you, Maggie?’

“Pll never tell nobody! never!” said Maggie,
highly honcured.





44. Boys and Girls.

“Well then, I'll tell you. I’m going to try to
teach myself Greek these holidays, and surprise
everybody. I’m learning the letters now. Oh, do
you know it is so funny! Z comes in the middle
of the alphabet instead of the end!”

«I know what that letter is,” said Corda, point-
ing to one. “It’s V.”

“There you’re just wrong; it’s N,” said Elly,
proud of her superior knowledge. “Now I mean
to learn all these letters before I leave off to-day.
Alpha, Beta, Gamma .

“What do you want to do it for?” said
Corda.

«Because I do,” said Elly. “Now don’t talk to
me any more, either of you.”

“YT wouldn’t do lessons in the holidays!” said
Corda.



“JTt’s not a lesson,” said Elly, rather grandly.

“But I told you, you were not to talk.”

Presently Frank, who was tired of playing, came
and sat down beside the little girls. “Oh, Frank,
began Maggie, “we have had such a lovely bathe ;
and we went to such a beautiful place!”

“Not near so beautiful as the place I have
been to,” said Frank, who, like some other little
boys, thought it very clever to cram his little
sister with nonsense, and make her believe what
was not true.

“What was yours like?” said Maggie. “Ours
was among the rocks, and had beautiful soft white
sand for a carpet, and green and red sea-weed
about the walls.”

“ Mine,” said Frank, “was ever so much better



Boys and Girls, 45

than that. JI went along the rocks till I saw
something that looked like a cave; and I went
in. Well, do you know, the floor was all in
stripes of red and blue sand, and there was
beautiful gold and silver sea-weed hanging down
from the roof: and there was a little pool in
one corner, full of gold fish.”

Corda laughed, knowing that it was all Frank’s
nonsense; but Maggie took it all in.

“Gold and silver sea-weed! Oh, may I go and
see it? Will nurse take me?”

' No, there are too many rocks before you get
there for nurse to take you,” said Frank, willing
to go on with his romance.

“ How far off is it? Could I walk there?”

«QO yes, you could walk there,” said Frank, “but
youd have to look very sharp for it. But you
don’t know what a beautiful place it is. If you
once saw the golden and silver sea-weed, you
wouldn’t think much of the red and green you
talk about.”

“ And what is the roof made of?” said Corda;
for though she knew that Frank was talking non-
sense, she liked to pretend he was not.

“ Shining diamonds,” said Frank, “with a few
rubies here and there!”

“Why don’t they take them away and put
them in brooches?” said Maggie, gravely.

“Because nobody knows about the place except
me,” said Frank. “Some day I shall go there
with a pick-axe and get some of them, and sell
them, and buy a pony and a Newfoundland dog
with the money. So mind you don’t say a word



46 Boys and Girls.

to any one, Madge, Lecause if you do, perhaps
somebody else will go and get my diamonds.”

“Oh, 1 won’t tell anybody!” said Maggie, who
was such a simple little girl that she could not
understand why Frank; and Corda, and Elly, all
laughed at this speech.

The others, as children do, thought it very
great fun to tell Maggie nonsensical things of
this sort, which she always believed. They
little thought that their greatest trouble at End-
low Farm was to arise from this silly nonsense
of Frank’s.

However, the subject was put a stop to for the
present, for the letter-box had just been emptied
by Mr. Burton, who brought a letter for Corda
from Alick. In it he said that he was not coming
quite so soon as he had said, for the people with
~ whom he was staying had asked him to stay over
a cricket-match which was to be on Friday, and
he would therefore not be able to come to Endlow
till the Saturday, which was just a week from the
day on which Corda got the letter,

“How odd it is!” said Elly, who had by
this time had enough of her Greek: “the sun is
gone in, and yet it is hotter than when it was
out.”

The children looked up at the sky. .The sea
had turned grey instead of blue, and there was a
long line of reddish grey cloud over tke horizon,
coming up against the wind. Presently a low
rumble came up out of it. .

“Oh,” said Corda, “there is going to be a storm”
I do believe!” And she gathered up her work



Boys and Girls. 47

and went in, while Elly said, “What a coward
Corda is about thunder!”

However, it was not all cowardice on Corda’s
part. Some people cannot help being more afraid
of thunder than others: Elly and her brothers and
sisters were not nervous as Corda was, so that
there was no credit due to them on that score.
People who are not nervous should not laugh at
those who are, for they do not know what pain
and misery they are spared.

The storm came on quickly, and a very violent
one it was. Mr. Burton was glad that he had had
a new lightning conductor put up on his highest
chimney, for as there were no trees about, the
farm-house might very likely have been struck
in such a storm. The lightning flashed, and the
thunder roared, and the rain poured down in
torrents. The boys and girls all came in, and
called out “Oh!” at each fresh flash, and “That
was a buster!” at every fresh peal of thunder: and
they were so much occupied with watching the
storm that they never noticed that Corda was not
there. Nurse found it out first, and Elly went
to look for the little girl, “Corda!” she cried,
but no Corda came; and they were beginning
to get into a fright about her, when the storm
lessened, and Corda appeared, looking rather
ashamed of herself, but perfectly unaware how
very odd she looked, for she had been hiding in
the coal-hole, as the darkest place where she could
find, so that she might not see the lightning: and
her face, hands, and frock were all streaked with
black coal-dust,



48 Boys and Girls.

“The thunder has burnt her!” said Maggie,
and began to cry. |

And though nothing so terrible as this had
happened, poor Corda did not find it pleasant
to be twitted for many a day with “who hid in
the coal-hole?”







CHAPTER VI.

HE storm had one bad effect: for it spoilt
the weather entirely for two days: and this
was the more tiresome to the children be-

cause the first of these two days was Sunday, and
they did not know what to do with themselves
shut up in the house with very few Sunday books,
and none of their usual Sunday pleasures. Maggie,
who was the most contented of little mortals,
took Alfred and Gertrude to play at a very fa-
vourite game at Langford Rectory, called “Corner
Church.” All the three children preached at once
in Corner Church, and the sermon consisted
merely of the one sentence “Brethren be good,”
repeated again and again in different tones, So,
as it was not a difficult game, little Gerty stood
up and said “Bevren be dood” as heartily as
anybody.

But the other children were not so fortunate,
since they were too old to play at Corner Church,
Elly and Corda had both brought texts to illu-
minate, and could have amused. themselves very
peaceably—though truth compels me to say that
Elly’s illuminating was generally too untidy to be
worth looking at when it was done—if it had not
been for their brothers, who having nothing to do,

E



Le) Boys and Girls.

except Dick, amused themselves by pommelling
one another to the loss of all peace in the
room.

At last nurse said, “Master Tom, it seems to
me it would be more Sunday-like if you read us
the Psalms and Lessons this morning.”

“Not I,” said Tom, who was shy like most lads
of his age.

“Qh, Tom!” said Elly; “do let us chant the
Psalms, half taking one verse and half the other as
we do at home on Easter Sunday!”

This proposal found favour with everybody but
Dick, who did not care for singing, and was busy
with his sea-weed specimens in one corner, But
he withdrew his opposition when Maggie came
and said in her coaxing way “Do help us sing,
Dick!”

So Charlie, who was the best singer of the
family, started them off with Lord Mornington’s
chant, so much beloved by children: and the
singing was so successful that they were not con-
tent with going through the Psalms for the
morning, but went on with those for the evening
and the next morning as well. After this was
over, Tom declared that it was hardly raining at
all, and nurse told the boys they had better put on
their great coats and go out for a walk before
dinner. Elly wanted to go too, but nurse said
“No” very peremptorily to this: and the little
girl had to swallow down her vexation as best she
could. However, in the afternoon the rain held
up, and they all went to church, armed with
waterproofs and umbrellas.



Boys and Girls. Br

In the evening they asked Bible questions and
tried to puzzle one another; which was not
difficult; as they were accustomed to do at home:
but they all found the day heavy and were not
sorry when bed-time came. When Elly and
Corda were in bed, Elly said, “It zs horrid on
Sunday without papa and mamma. We can get
along quite nicely on other days, but Sundays are
dreadful without them!”

“Well,” said poor Corda, “I don’t think you
need talk, Elly. You’ll see them again in a few
weeks, and you saw Aunt Eleanor only on Thurs-
day: and I haven’t seen mamma for a month and
1 shan’t see her again for years and years and
years!”

And poor little Corda began to cry.

Elly was a kind-hearted little girl, She got
out of her own bed and crept into Corda’s, and
put her arms round her and tried to comfort her as
well as she could. Somehow, she began to think
that she had not been quite so kind to Cordaas
she might have been: and she thought so still
more when Corda sobbed out “and mamma told
me I was to try and not be selfish, and not be
cross when I am laughed at, and I can’t help it;
and she’d be so sorry if she knew, and if I write it
all down on a piece of paper it looks as if I had
been’ so very bad. I can’t send it to her. I
always used to tell her when she came to see me
at night how naughty I had been, and then she
forgave me, and it was all right.”

“Yes,” said Elly: “when [came to-Ringland
first by myself, I used to feel like that too. But

Rh



52 Boys and Girls,

mamma told me that she couldn’t always be with
me, and that I must think when I said my prayers
that I was telling God about what I had done
wrong instead of her, and that He would forgive
me if I was sorry just as she would,”

“Yes,” said Corda, “but it is so different.”

_ © But,” said Elly, “I suppose people have to
learn to be good like that. Only think what we
should do if we were like Alick, with no father
and mother at all!”

“Alick is very good,” said Corda, as if she
thought that his case hardly applied to her,

“ Perhaps,” said Elly, “some people are ‘ gooder’
for not having nice things like other people. In
stories it is generally the unhappy people who get

ood,”

“Oh, don’t talk like that, Elly!” said Corda;
“it makes me feel as if I didn’t want to be
good!”

“Well, it needn’t,” said Elly: “because mamma
says it is of no use to make ourselves unhappy

by thinking about what may possibly happen in
' the future. She says that all we have got to
think about is being good now, and that is quite
enough for us. Besides, you know, I don’t think
' Alick is at all unhappy, though he has got nobody

belonging to him, Perhaps when things really
happen to people they are not so bad as we
suppose.”
“If I were you,” said Corda, “I should always
be thinking that Aunt Eleanor Or Uncle Richard
- would catch the fever at Ringland.”
Elly gave a little shiver: for she had never



Boys and Girls, 53

thought of the possibility before, and it was not a
p'easant suggestion. “I don’t think anything so
horrid,” she said, almost crossly. “I wish you
wouldn’t say such things, Corda.”

“J didn’t mean to make you angry,” said
Corda.

“[’m not angry,” said Elly: and Corda took
hold of her and kissed her so that she could not
help forgiving her. And then after this con-
versation Elly went back into her own bed, and
soon they were both of them fast asleep, forgetting
all their troubles both real and imaginary in
dreams-of sea-weeds and bathing adventures,

So ended their first Sunday at Endlow.







CHAPTER VII.

ATTER, patter, patter, came the rain
P against the window on Monday morning,

putting an end to all hopes of bathing for
the little girls: for who cares to bathe in the
rain? It was a row of very melancholy faces that
assembled in the parlour at breakfast that morning,
and nurse seemed to share the prevailing gloom,
for she said, “Goodness knows whatever I am
to do with all you children through another wet
day!”

Rain or no rain, the boys must go out for a
walk: and as they had been brought up not to
mind weather, nurse made no very great objec-
tion to their going out. But Elly and Corda
stood disconsolately by the window, looking out
at the grey clouds, which were so dark and heavy
that all the light there was seemed to come from
the yellow furze on the common.

“Rain, rain, go away, and come again another
day,” sings Maggie in her cheery contented little
voice, nursing her doll.

“Just as if it would!” says Corda, rather
crossly.

“It won’t go away for your staring at it, Miss
Cordelia,” says nurse.



Boys and Girls, 55

“It likes to be looked at, perhaps,” Elly said,
more cheerfully, trying to make a little joke.

“Like Miss Cordelia,” said Sarah, Blessington’s
nurserymaid. There was some truth in the re-
mark, for Corda was:a little bit vain; but the
truth in it only made it more irritating to
poor cross Corda, especially when Elly joined in
the giggle that followed the joke. Corda gave
an impatient wriggle with her shoulders, and _
stalked out of the room, banging the door after ©
her. The servants laughed as she went out,
which did not tend to improve her temper; and
when Elly came flying up stairs after her to ask’
her to come down again, Corda had locked the
door and would say nothing but “I shan’t: go
away!” Perhaps it was a little annoying to have
Elly shouting at her through the door so that
every one in the house could hear what she said;
but Elly had not yet learnt all the tact she had
to learn in her life.

So- Elly came down, got her Greek book, and
set to work again upon the letters: and she in-
sisted on having the book open before her when
nurse gave her the daily task of needlework to .
do. _But as usually happens when little girls try
to do two things at once, it ended by her doing
neither well. Instead of getting the letters into
her head, her eyes fell upon a page a little further
on, where the English sentences looked more
interesting. “The baker has not injured the
citizens. The citizens have injured the wolf,”
put a whole story into her head about the baker,
the wolf, and the citizens, which the wise man



56 Boys and Girls.

who wrote the exercise probably never dreamed
of. She was discoursing upon the subject to
Maggie, who was placidly hemming a handker-
chief by her side, and was telling her how the
injured and harmless baker had had a wolf put
into his shop by the spiteful citizens, and how
the baker finding that it had eaten all his best
loaves, had nearly killed it, and consequently
“the citizens had injured the wolf,’ when nurse
came up to look at her work.

“Oh, Miss Elly!” said nurse, “I should be
ashamed if I were you to go on chattering about
wolves and bakers, and not work better than
that! Why, the wolf itself would be ashamed of
such work!’

Maggie burst out into one of her merry peals
of laughter; but Elly did not laugh when she
saw nurse take hold of the thread which she
had just put in, take hold of the end, and ruth-
lessly tear it all out. Once Elly might have
got into a passion at such a thing; but now
she had learnt to control her temper, and beyond
getting very red she said nothing, though she
could not help looking very doleful as nurse gave
her back the long hem to do again.

Maggie had done hers very nicely, and nurse
said she mignt go. She hopped out of the room
like a little bird. Maggie liked hopping on one
leg much better than walking on two, and had
to be reproved for it in the schoolroom, and

. then she ran up stairs and called at Corda’s doer.

“Corda, do let me in. I want to come in so

much |”



Boys and Girls, 57

Whetker it was that Corda was getting over
her fit of temper, or whether Maggie’s soft plead--
ing went to her heart more than Elly’s shouts,
certain it is that she opened the door and let
Maggie in.

“What do you want?” she said, as Maggie
climbed up upon the bed.

“Oh, I want you to come down,” said Maggie.
“Elly’s done her work badly and got to do it
all over again, and Alfred and I and Gerty want
you to come and play with us.”

«That’s nonsense. Nobody ever wants me
to play with them,” said Corda, who certainly
was not so amusing a playfellow as Elly, and
did not generally care to play with the little
ones.

“Yes, we do. We like to play with you
because you are gentle and not rough,” said
Maggie racking her little brains for something
“nice” to say and yet true. Certainly Maggie
at seven had more tact than Elly at eleven. i

Corda looked as if she were going to be soft-
ened; but her “monkey,” as Elly called her
temper, was on her shoulder again.

“You don’t. You tell stories, Magzie. You
know you like Elly ever so much better than
me, and so does Alfred, and Alick, and every-
body. Nobody cares a bit for me, and I den't
deserve they should!”

The last little piece of candour scemed to
come out in spite of poor Corda herself. Perhaps
she would have been tco proud to say so to any
one except Maggie, who hardly took it ia,

“50



58 Boys and Girls.

“We all care about you very much, Corda,”
she said, simply. “We were all so glad when
we heard you were coming here. And we don’t
like you to be unhappy and cry up here all by
yourself. Do come down!”

Corda was not hard-hearted enough to resist
her little cousin’s pleading. She washed. her face
and came down looking rather ashamed of herself.
Sarah began, when she saw her: “Well, Miss
Cordelia, we shall know who miustn’t be laughed
at another time!”

“Sarah,” said Elly, turning round upon her
sharply from her work, “leave Corda alone, if
you please |”

“Hoity toity!” said Sarah; but Elly’s rebuke
had its effect, both on her and on Corda. Corda
went up to Elly, took hold of her work, and
said, “Tl finish it for you if you like, Elly.”

“Oh thank you, Corda!” said Elly, joyfully, for
Corda was very quick and neat in her work; “but
I don’t know if nurse will let me!”

“Yes, if; Miss Cordelia likes,” said nurse, who
had been rather sorry to vex Elly, especially when
she saw how good-temperedly she had borne her
double task. ,

So Corda, without any more words sat down
quietly by Elly’s side, and took her work out of
her hands. Elly laid her head on Corda’s shoulder
and kissed her, and Corda began to feel that one
little act of kindness had cleared away the yellow
mist from her eyes which made her think that
everybody hated her.

The work was quickly finished, and then Elly



Boys and Girls. 59

and Corda had a game with the little ones until
it was time for Gertrude to have her midday sleep.
Then Mrs. Burton came in and said, “Ive been
thinking, Mrs, Brown, if the children like to go
and play in the big barn, it’s quite empty of
everything except a little straw, and as dry as
dry.”

Xe Oh, how jolly!” said Elly, springing up.

They put on their goloshes and waterproofs
and ran across through the rain to the barn, which
was the most delightful place you can imagine.
There was a long rope lying. there, and Mrs.
Burton got one of the men to come and fasten
it up to a beam, so that they could swing on
it: and when they had done swinging they buried
themselves in the heap of clean sweet straw which
filled up one corner, and enjoyed themselves
thoroughly until it was dinner-time.

After dinner the boys all came to play in the
barn too, and they had a famous siege of the straw
fortress, which was defended by Elly, Tom, and
Charlie. They began to think that a wet day
was not so very dreadful after all, if it allowed
them such fun as this; and they were thoroughly
tired out with play and laughing, and were sitting
panting on the straw, when Elly gave a shriek of
delight.

“What is it? A rat?” said Charlie.

«The sun!” said Elly.

And then they saw that the clouds had parted,
and that the sun had sent down a bright yellow
ray through an opening in the timbers of the barn
upon the straw. ‘They ran to the door and looked



60 Loys and Girls.

out; and lo and behold, it was so fine that they
all felt obliged to go down to the beach at once!
The servants went with them, for they were glad
to get out too; and they had a very pleasant hour
upon the beach before tea. All the west was in
a golden glow, and the sky and sea were both so
' bright, that the children could hardly bear to look
at them.

“Which way did you go to get the golden sca-
weed, Frank?” said Maggie.

7 Oh, that way,” said Frank, still thinking it
clever to puzzle his little sister, and pointing to
the left. “But mind you don’t say anything!”

“Ts it a very long way?”

“ Not further than you could walk in the after-
noon.”

« And be back at night?”

“T came back at night, you know.”

And with that Frank ran off to look at a star-
fish, and never thought that the time would come
when the thought of the golden sea-weed would
make him more unhappy than he had ever been
in his life.

3
»)

ge

SOE

ep
& ig’ ves
°

eu

*
=





CHAPTER VIII.

‘HE next was a lovely morning, and the
children’s spirits were as high as they had
before been low; and if anything was

needed to raise them higher, it was Mrs. Burton’s
announcement the next morning as she brought
in the refilled milk-jug. “Bless me, what a head
Ihave got, to be sure! Why, I wholly forgot to
say that Mr. Maurice our clergyman, came in
yesterday and said there was a school-treat up at
the Vicarage to-day, and if any of the young folks
he’d seen at church yesterday would like to go up
and see it, and help the boys play cricket and
such like, he’d be very glad. He said he’d known
your Pa at college, I think, Master.‘Tom.”

Nurse and Blessington and Mrs, Burton all
agreed that under the circumstances they might
venture to take the children up without further
orders from Ringland. Perhaps they were not
sorry themselves to have a chance of seeing the
world, for Endlow Farm was rather dull for middle-
aged people who cared neither for common nor sea.

"So they settled to go up to the Vicarage, which
was close to the church, about two o ’clock : which
Mrs, Burton said was the time at which the festi-
vities began; and as it was a very hot day, Mrs,



62 Boys and Girls.

Burton persuaded her husband to let them all
“ride up” as she called it, in the great covered
waggon. She liked to go in her smartest clothes,
and it was not nice, poor woman! to get to the
Vicarage white with dust, and so hot that she had
to fan herself with her pocket-handkerchief for a
quarter of an hour. So the whole party, ten boys
and girls, four servants, and Mrs. Burton, all
packed themselves into the waggon, and jolted
along the sunny road as far as the Vicarage
garden. The waggon had no springs, and its
motion was rather rough, so that poor nurse
called out “Oh, my poor bones!” several times,
and Blessington remarked to Sarah that she should
not wish her friends to see her in such a rustic
conveyance; but the children thought it capital
fun, though they were not so very sorry when the
slow weary drive was over, and they were sitting
under the trees on the Vicarage lawn in the
shade, each with a large plate of gooseberries
to eat.

Mr. and Mrs. Maurice were considerably amused
when they saw what an immense party Mrs.
Burton had brought; and they were also puzzled
to know why Elly, Maggie, and Gertrude, should
be dressed only in plain buff-cottons, while Corda,
who seemed to be their sister, wore a delicate
white cambric all over braid and embroidery.
But Corda, who was never shy in company, ex-
plained that she and Alfred were cousins to the
rest, and. that their papa and mamma were in
India.

“ And so’you-are all together at Endlow Farm >”



Boys and Girls. 63

said Mrs. Maurice, kindly. ‘Do you like it?”
and she turned to Elly.

“Oh yes,” said Elly, “awfully!”

And then she suddenly remembered that mamma
had often told her that “awfully” was not exactly
a young lady’s word, and got red with confusion ;
but Mrs. Maurice was too goodnatured to do
more than smile. She called one of her own
girls, a pretty, pleasant-looking creature about
fifteen, and told her to take the visitors into the
field; she thought they could make up a nice
game of “Hunt the slipper” in the shade, under
the elmtrees. She told the boys that they could
go into the field with Mr. Maurice, and he would
set them all to play a good game of cricket; and
the servants found a shady seat where they could
see everything, and make acquaintance with Mrs.
Burton’s friends.

Dora Maurice soon saw that Elly and Maggie
were well used to school-feasts, and to playing
at the village children’s games; even that very
foolish one of “Sally Sally water, sprinkle in the
pan,” where the little girls choose out each other
to be kissed. Poor Maggie was at once pounced
upon by all the school-girls in turn to be kissed,
because she was so plump and rosy and merry-
looking; and though she was not over fond of
kissing, she endured it contentedly, only whisper-
ing aside to Elly, “They do make my mouth so
sticky!” Corda was too shy, or too refined to
join in the game at all; but she did vouchsafe to
take part in the game of “I have a little dog and
it shan’t bite you.” But here she was not a good



64 Boys and Girls.

runner, and Elly was supremely happy. No one
could catch her as she dodged about screaming
with laughter, her hair flying in the air, so sure
of her swiftness of foot, that she dared to wait till
her pursuer was almost on her before she ran off
again. But at last they tired her out, and she
was glad enough to sit down panting, with a
crimson face, and to let other people set off their
“little dogs” to bite.

; But perhaps you will think that I am telling

-you too much about the girls, and so now we
will go to the boys.

In the midst of their cricket, who should turn
up but Charlie’s dear friend, Tommy Halford!
Mr. Maurice had asked some cousins of his to
the school-feast, and they had brought Tommy
with them. ‘There he stood with his hands in
his pockets, looking on at the game, and making
jeering remarks on the village boys’ play, until
one of them said, “I say young’un, you may be
a swell, but if you don’t drop that sauce of yours,
Tl. make you.” . And considering that the boy
who said this looked fully able and willing to
carry out his words, Tommy thought it best to
subside,

Tom Langford was bowling, and as he bowled
well they made him take plenty of work. Thus
it was that he never perceived that Charlie was
gone off from the game, until it was tea-time,
and the school-boys had to leave their game to
take their places on the grass. Then it was dis-
covered that Halford and Charlie were sauntering
round the field in close conversation,



Boys and Girls, — 65

“TI say, Tom,” said Dick, “you won’t let
him go to see the boat-race with that little
brute? I can’t think how Charlie can stand him;
I can’t.”

“He shan’t go,” said Tom, “if I can help
it. Vd sooner write to mother. He'll get
into no end of mischief if we don’t look out,
Dick.”

«“ When is the boat-race?” said Dick.

“On Thursday. I haven’t the least doubt ‘but
that they are settling their plans there.- But
‘Pll be even with him!”

But the two boys’ talk was stopped, for they
were called upon to help in handing cake, and
filling cups with coffee out of large tin-cans.
Elly and Maggie were in their glory here; Corda
was rather too conscious of the necessity of
keeping her pretty white frock free from coffee-
stains and pressed currants out of the cake. But
-she enjoyed herself too; and when they went
-up to take leave of Mrs. Maurice, she made
her little speech of thanks much more prettily
than Elly, who got shy, and could only mutter
inaudibly, “Thank you for having us.” Miss
‘Morison used to say that Elly and Corda were
exactly suitable for a pair of friends, because one
could always supply what the other lacked; and
-as they were very fond of each other, they had
no silly little jealousies now when one got more
-praise than the other.





CHAPTER IX.

e l TELL you you shan’t, Charlie!”
*T tell you I shall!”
“You know papa would be angry!”

[don’t know any such thing!”

“Well, mother told me to keep you out of
mischief, and I shall, so here goes!” Tom
slipped out of the bedroom in which he and
Charlie were disputing, and in a trice had turned
the key upon his brother. “There!” he shouted,
through the door, “when you choose to give me
your word of honour not to go off to Bellsand
to-day, I'll let you out!”

Charlie flung himself against the door as if he
wished to break it open, but though he made a
great noise, it was no nearer opening than before.

“Master ‘Tom, what are you doing to him?”
- said nurse, from the bottom of the stairs.

“Keeping him in order,” answered Tom, in a
provokingly cool voice. “When he promises to
be a good little boy he shall come down.”

“Well, you needn’t cheek him after you’ve
locked him up, Tom,” said Dick, from below.

“Oh!” said Maggie, with a very long face,
“Tom, do please let Charlie come out and have
some breakfast,”



Boys and Girls. 67

“ Not till he chooses to promise to do what he
ought,” said:Tom, incurably. “He is a naughty
boy, Madge, and I have got to keep him in order.”

And it certainly appeared as if Tom rather
enjoyed the task. He was inflexible to the
entreaties of his. sisters, and consented with
some reluctance to let Maggie take up a slice
of bread and butter and push it under the door,
where there was a crack quite wide enough to
admit it if it was not cut too thick,

Maggie came back crying, having accomplished
her task, but not having been able to get a word
out of Charlie. “Suppose he had tumbled down
and hurt himself!” said Corda, so earnestly, that
Elly’s eyes grew round with terror.

“ Nonsence, he’s only sulky,” said Tom, who
was a little proud of his promptness and the
vigorous measures he had taken, and did not like
them to be criticised.

“J do believe,” said Corda, who sat where she
could see out of the window, “that the cow boy
has taken one of your scarlet caps. I see his
head moving along there just along the top of
the furze—you can just see the scarlet thing
moving; how quick he is going!”

Tom, Dick, Frank, and Johnny, who all rejoiced
in scarlet caps, rushed out frantically into the
passage to see if their caps were safe; for “Only
imagine what an awful thing it would be,” said
Johnny, “if he had really put one of our caps on
his head!” There were three; but after a search,
Frank produced his out of his pocket, with a
tangle of string and a lump of toffy in it.

FQ



68 ‘Boys and Girls.

“Where’s Charlies?” said Elly. “The cow-
“boy must have got his.”

But at that very moment the suspected cow-boy
‘passed the door carrying a bucket of pigs’ wash,
and innocent of any covering to his head except
his sun-bleached thatch of hair. Suddenly it flashed
upon Dick—“I say, Tom! he’s got out of the
window, and that was 422 with his own cap!” '

Tom rushed up with his key, opened the door,
and found the room empty. The attic window,
over a sloping roof which reached within six feet
of the ground, presented a most obvious: way,
which T’om had overlooked, out of the difficulty.
“Pll never lock up anybody again,” said ‘Tom,
very much crestfallen, “unless the window is a
‘good twenty feet from the ground.”

“Fle’s a very naughty boy!” said nurse, in-
dignantly. “What’s to be done now?”

Tom stood pondering.

“ Finish breakfast, I hope,” said Frank, who had
an excellent appetite at all times.

Altogether this seemed to. be good advice; for
Charlie had a quarter of an hour's start of them,
and his brothers did not know to what part of
Bellsand he was going: nor, if they found him
could they bring him back by main force.
Suddenly Elly said, “ Alick is coming to-day!”

“What of that?” said Tom, rather crossly.

“Why, Charlie always minds what Alick says,
you know, because of his making him lame. If
Alick could find him, I am sure he could get him
to come back.”

«Not if he said he wouldn’t,” growled Tom.



Boys and Girls: 69:

“Charlie could knock him down if he chose,
though he is two years younger.”

Charlie wouldn’t be such a brute,” said Elly,
indignantly. “You know he wouldn’t, Tom!”

‘Tom, you see, was of opinion that when people.
were wrong, the thing was to put them right by
main forcé. Elly saw that Charlie might easily
be led when he would not be driven. a

“It’s like the fable,” said Dick, in his. old-
fashioned considering way. “Tom is to be the
wind, and Alick is the sun, and Charlie is the
traveller and his cloak—I suppose his cloak is the
boat-race !”

. They laughed at this; and then it was settled
that Tom should go down to Bellsand to meet
Alick at the train, and that the two together
should proceed to search for the runaway and
bring him safely back. For, as nurse said, though
it was very naughty of Master Charlie to do what’
he knew his papa and mamma would not like,
yet still she could not say that there was any call
to put them out, poor things! by telegraphing to
them about a trifle.

Tom was to start at eleven o’clock, but just’
before that time he came up to Dick and said,.
“T say, old fellow, perhaps you’d better go instead
of me.”

“Why?” said Dick.

“Well, perhaps I put his monkey up a little
this morning, and he might forget his dignity
more with you and Alick.”

This was as near an approach to confessing ;
himself to have made a mistake as would be’



70 Boys and Girls,

expected from dignified Tom, and Dick took it as
it was meant. He at once consented to take
Tom’s place, and to go to mect Alick at Bellsand.

Alick arrived safely, looking very bright, and
was greeted by Dick with “I say, old fellow,
we're ina pretty go. I want you to come with
me and find that young donkey.”

«What young donkey?” said Alick.

“Charlie. That little sneak Halford has turned
up here and has got him under his thumb, and
to-day Tom locked him up because he would go
to the boat-race there is to-day, and he cut out of
the window. So you and I are to go and look
after him, old fellow; for Charlie always minds
you, you know!”

“Til come,” said Alick; “but I am not so sure
about his minding me. I’m sure if he tried he
could knock me down.”

Alick was very small for his age and there was
a good deal of truth in what he said: for he was
not at all a strong boy, never having quite re-
covered the weakness which his accident had
caused him,

“He would not be such a brute,” said Dick,
“after what he did to you.”

“'That’s nonsense,” said Alick. “It was the
purest accident, and it was quite as much my
fault as his for being such a fool as to go out
with him. However, let us think what we are to
do. Where does this Halford live?’

“We don’t know,” said Dick, “but we thought
they would tell us up at the post-office. J know
where that is, Comeon.” —



Boys and Girls, 71

“Stop a bit, you harum-scarum fellow,” said
Alick. “I have got to book my luggage first, if
we are to tramp the town all day.”

Accordingly Alick fulfilled his duties, and they
set forth. ‘The post-office authorities informed
them of Mr. Halford’s lodgings, and they found
that they were a good mile off. However they
proceeded to trudge thither, and then found that
Master Tommy and another young gentleman
had gone into the town at least two hours
before.

«Where were they likely to be?” asked Alick.

“Ob, most likely at the Swan. The room
there was the best for seeing, and most of the
gentry went there to look out of the best parlour
window,” said the maid, and shut the door.

Accordingly Alick and Dick retraced their
steps to the middle of the town, and inquired at
the “ Swan” whether Tommy Halford had been
seen there; but he had not. The boys hardly
knew what to do, and. looked at each other in
dismay.

“Well,” said Dick, philosophically, “whether
we find Charlie or not, we can’t live on air. I
am so awfully hungry!” -

This misfortune was happily easily curable,
and the boys went into the pastry-cook’s and ate
sandwiches from under a glass case in the window
with a happy disregard of the time that had
elapsed since they had been cut. After this they
felt able to carry on their search, and began it by
sitting for a quarter of an hour on a bench on
the parade, watching the crowd pass by. It was



72. Boys and Girls.

getting pretty thick now, for the boat-race was to
begin at three.

They were just beginning to think that they:
must take more active measures, when not far off
they perceived a crowd gathering. It was natural
that they should at once go up to see what was to
be seen. A policeman was dragging a boy by the
arm: in the middle of it. “Alick,”?:said Dick,
turning quite white, “it’s Charlie!”

They forced their way in, and presently Charlie
caught sight of them. “ Alick, Dick,” he cried,
despairingly, «do come here and help me! Tell
him I didn’t!”

“What is it?” said Alick, making his way up:
to the policeman; and though he was only a boy
of fourteen, there was such an air of gentleman-
liness about his look and voice, that the policeman
answered him respectfully.

“ An old gentleman, sir, has just given him in
charge for picking his pocket.”

“Jt is a mistake, I assure you!” said Alick.
“This is Charlie Langford, and his father is a
clergyman at Ringland. Where is the old gentle-
man ?”.

“T suppose yow re another of the swell mob,”.
said the old gentleman, who was close by. “ That’s
what they always do—come forward to screen:
each other.”

“No, sit,” said the policeman, “this here
young sees isn’t one of the swell mob: I
knows ’em too well. But you say, sir, you found
this boy’s hand in your pocket, and your watch
gone F* >”?















BOYS AND GIRLS.



Boys and Girls. 73

“J felt a hand in my pocket, I tell you,” said
the old gentleman testily; “and I felt for my
watch and it was gone, and saw this boy making
off. If that isn’t evidence, I don’t know what is.”

“T understood, sir,” said the policeman, “that
you found this boy’s hand in your pocket. I
should have had nothing to do with taking him
up if I-had known what you meant. ‘There,
young gentleman, you may go, and [’m sorry |
laid hands on you; but when people first tell one
story and then another, how is a man to know
what they mean ?”

Poor Charlie, sobbing bitterly, was led away by
his brother and Alick. He certainly looked
rather disreputable; he was apt to be very untidy
at the best of times, unless his brothers routed
hirn, and he had got a three-cornered hole in one
trouser showing ‘his knee through it, and his
jacket was all “over dust, and his hands grimed
with tar. He and Tommy Halford had beeii
prowling about among the boats, and Charlie, at
least, had got himself into a terrible mess, as he
generall y did when he had an opportunity.

“Don’t tell the girls!” was the first thing he
could say that was audible; and the next was,
“That sneak Halford, Pi never speak to him
again |”

“Why? what did he do?” said Dick,

“ Slipped out of the way, instead of coming up to
help me—and there was I not knowing a creature ;
and that nasty horrid old man telling such lies!
They might have seen I was a gentleman ! Pe

« Well,” said Dick with brotherly frankness, “if



7A. Boys and Girls,

you come to that, 1 don’t think you look much
like one just now.”

“Tm sure I don’t look like a thief!” sobbed
poor Charlie, his manliness quite broken down,
and even his rage not sufficing to keep him from
his tears.

“No, but you do look something of a cad,”
said Dick. “However it is all right now, and
we had better go home as soon as we can.
Come along. Now you have found out the
merits of your beloved Halford, I don’t care.”

“Til never speak to him again,’ said Charlie.
“IT never should have thought he would have been
such a coward, and a sneak, and a brute!”

“Well,” said Alick, rather drily, “we had
better not discuss him any more just now, I
think.”

“No, because it was Charlie’s own doing,
getting into such a fix,” said Dick.

“Well, you needn’t tell me that now,” growled
Charlie, ‘éT know it just as well as you, and
better too. It was all ‘Tom’s fault for locking me
in this morning. I shouldn’t have gone if he had
left me alone.”

In fact, according to Charlie, it was all other
people’s fault and not his own. He was too
angry to be sorry; and he was by no means in
the sweetest temper as they drove home, though
Alick and Dick both spared him as much as they
could.

They were met by Elly and Maggie, who had
come upon the edge of the common to meet ic,
“Ob, there he is!” cried Maggie in great delight



Boys and Girls, 75

for all day she had been haunted by an undefined
idea that Charlie would have been carried away
by gipsies, or fallen into the sea, or met with
some other adventure suitable to a naughty boy.

Charlie did not respond very warmly; but that
was perhaps not remarkable, for he could hardly
help feeling very small.

Tom was quite as much relieved as Maggie,
though he was by no means pleased when the
police adventure was confided to him. “All his
own fault! he said, “just like him! and to think
that people would be able to say that one of the
Lanegfords had been taken up for a pickpocket !”

« Well,” said Alick, “as far as that goes it was
an uncomfortable adventure enough, but hardly
poor Charlie’s fault: it might have happened to
anybody.”

«“ Not to you or me or Dick,” said Tom ; “ we
don’t look such grubs, I hope.”

«Well, I daresay it will be a lesson to him to
mind what he is about in future.”

“But, Alick,” said Tom, “I wish you would
make him write and tell mamma. I don’t like
to tell tales of him, and yet if he won’t write I
must. I know mamma will say I ought not to
have locked him up for one thing.”

« At least without looking to see if the window
was safe,” said Alick, laughing.

« And altogether it’s a horrid bore to have to
keep order! I wish you would be Prefect over
them all instead of me, Alick !”

“Certainly not,” said Alick! “I wouldn’t for
anything, Really you fellows talk as if 1 were the



76 Boys and Girls,

model prig of one of Corda’s little books who
always talks in five-syllable words and keeps all
the rest in order. Let us leave poor Charlie
alone a bit, he'll come all right, and you may be
sure he’ll be none so fond of that precious little
sneak Halford in future.”







CHAPTER X.

. CAUNDAY came again, but it was not like the
8 Sunday that I described before. It was a

lovely, hot, bright day; so hot that nurse
said that the little ones were not to go to church
at all, as the three-mile walk would be too much
for them: and only the five boys, Elly and Alick
went to church in the morning. They came back
hot and tired, more inclined to drink immense
draughts of milk than to eat the hot roast beef
which Mrs. Burton had provided for the Sunday’s
dinner; and nurse, pitying them, said that she
would ask for a plate of cold meat for their tea.
After dinner they all went and lay down in the
shade of the house outside on the common: each
_of them had a book, but when nurse went out an
hour afterwards she found all the seven asleep!
At the sound of her footstep, which was none of
.the lightest, Elly, Alick, and Dick all started up
and tried to look as if they had been awake all the
time; but it was so evident that they had not, that
they all began to laugh, and ‘this awoke the other
boys. They were all the better for their rest; but
as it was still too hot to go for a walk, Alick
proposed that they should ask whether they might
. go into the barn, and there if they liked he would
read a story to them.



78 Boys and Girls.

Elly was off like a shot, and she came back with
the requisite permission, and with Corda and
Maggie also, all anxiety to hear the story. They
went into the barn, and made themselves comfort-
able upon the straw—all except Corda—who said
that the straw smelt mousey, and went to fetch
a three-legged stool from the house, upon which
she sat perched during Alick’s story, making up in
dignity for what she wanted in comfort. You may
be sure her cousins did not lose the opportunity
of laughing at her; but Corda was very good-
humoured about it, for she was not now the spoilt
little girl she had been when Elly first came to
Ringland, and teasing did not always make her
cross.

“What's the story, Alick?’ said Elly. “Why,
it’s written! Did you write it?”

« Wish I could,” said Alick. “No, it was Mrs,
Penrose where I was staying last Sunday; she
wrote it and read it to us; and when IJ asked if I
might have it to read again, she said ‘Yes,’ I might
have it and keep it, because she had another
copy. It’s jolly, I think. It’s an allegory, you
know.”

“T like allegories,” said Elly.

“T hate ’em,” said Tom. “They’re always
about good little boys with bare feet walking on
stony paths, and naughty little boys walking on
grass where they’re told not. Is there anything
like that in your allegory, Alick? Because if so,
I won’t listen.”

“No, there’s nothing about bare feet all
through,” said Alick, compozedly; but it may be



Boys and Girls. 79

safest for you to keep your book at hand in case
the story bores you.”

«Well, if it does I shall go to sleep,” said Tom,
making himself comfortable on his bed.

Alick began.

“Qne day I had been thinking about the
strangeness of different people’s characters and
dispositions, and when I went to sleep 1 had a
curious dream, which seemed to explain to me
many things which had before been strange to
me.

“JT dreamt that I was standing in a village street
—just like any village street that you might see
in England—where people were all going about
their business as upon an ordinary day. But there
was one thing which surprised me very much in
this village, and that was the number of animals
which were to be seen in the street. No one
passed up or down, or even came out of a cottage
door, without some animal by his side: here there
was a man with a big eagle, which fluttered by his
side as if it would have liked to have flown away:
there was a woman with a donkey’: then came a
girl with a calf: then a boy with a panther: and
then another woman with a sheep. While I was
thinking that the people of this village must be
extraordinarily devoted to animals, an old man
came up to my side, and said, ‘You seem to be a
stranger here: can I explain to you anything which
you desire to know ??

«T answered, ‘Sir, if it would not trouble you,
I should be glad to know what is the occupation
of the people of this village, It seems so curious



80 Boys and Girls.

that every one who passes through the street
should have a pet animal by his side.’”

“ Awfully jolly! 1 should think,” interrupted
Johnny. “I should like that village.”

Tom gave him a back- handed cuff to cause
‘silence, and Alick proceeded:

“< Stranger,’ said the old man, whose name I
afterwards found was Sapiens, ‘I will explain to
you all that you desire: and if you would like to
remain during the day among our people here, and
watch their ways, I will stay by your side and
tell ie anything you may wish to know’

“[ gladly accepted his offer, and this is what he

told me.

«The name of the island where this village stood
was Vita Humana: and the King of it had given
the people certain laws which were not in force

“anywhere else. There was a narrow strait of
sea, about half a mile wide which divided Vita
‘Humana from another island beyond it, where
there dwelt some rebels to the King who were
always trying to do harm to the people who were -
faithful to him. They dared not land on the
island; but if the boys and girls left the safe
shore in some fishing-boat, such as was used by
men who did not care for the risk of being caught,
it was only too likely that the rebels might sweep
down upon them in their swift ships and carry
them off to their own country, where, too often,

they taught them to be as rebellious as them-
selves.

“J do not know for what reason, but it was one
of the laws made by the King that every one as



Boys and Girls, 81

long as they lived in Vita Humana should be
accompanied by an animal of some sort. The
King settled what animal should be allotted to
every one: and there was no child, however small,
but had an animal always at his side: young
when he was young, growing in size as he grew.”

“ That’s impossible!” said Dick: “ a horse would
be full grown by the time the child was three.”

“How uncomfortable it must have been to
have an elephant in your bed!” said Maggie, ina
tone of deep sympathy with the sufferer.

“T say now, really!” said Alick, “you know
it’s only an allegory. You can’t make everything
come properly without making the whole thing
nonsense.”

“Do go on, never mind them,” said Elly, who
was always ready for anything in the shape of a
story.

Accordingly Alick went on.

“These animals were each chained to the
person who owned it, in such a way that no one
could undo the chains: and they never were
undone all the time their owner lived in Vita
Humana. The chain was arranged so that the
animal could not hurt the person it belonged to,
however fierce its temper might be; but it might
easily hurt other people if it were not kept in
good order. The aim of its owner was, or cught
to have been, for some were very careless, to
tame the animal, to make it serviceable and
obedient, so that it should be a good servant
instead of a bad master. If it were thus ruled
and kept in order, it always happened that on the

G



82; Boys and Girls.

day when the King sent his special messenger to
Vita Humana with a key to unlock any one’s
chain and free him from his animal, the animal
lay down at once and died, and its owner was
free to go to the glorious land where the King
lived; but if he had let it go wild, and not
checked it, there was a terrible danger lest it
should spring on him and devour him, or else tear.
and maim him so that he could not go to the
King’s country.

“But, I said, ‘surely some animals are too
wild to be tamed by the hand of a little child’—
one passed me just then chained to a lion cub—
‘if they rise into fury, how can the child resist
them ?’ :

“¢Men say,’ said Sapiens, ‘that the King has
means of knowing all, and helping those who
need help. Besides, you see that the animals are.
easily tamed while they are young,’

«Surely, I said, ‘those who have tamed their
animals and made them. obedient and serviceable,
do not like to lose them entirely when their chain.
is taken off?’ ;

“ animals are drags to them, and hamper them so.
that they cannot do what they would like as well
as they would if the animals were not there. The
animals are not pets to them: in fact, any in-.
dulgence at once makes. them fierce and head-
strong. But perhaps you would like to see the
school, where Pastor, whom the King has set to:
teach us, and his wife Dulcis, are instructing the
children at. this very hour.’ ae



Boys and Girls. 83

“Oh!” said Corda, “did they really take their
animals with them to school?”

“TY should like to go to that school,” said
Maggie.

Alick continued reading.

“ Accordingly I went into the school with
Sapiens. It was a large building, and full of
children, each of whom had his own animal close
to his side. Pastor, who was teaching them, had
a horse, and his wife Dulcis a panther; but I
noticed that both these animals seemed so well
broken in that they obeyed every motion of their
owner, and one glance was sufficient to quiet
them. But it was far otherwise with the children,
Their animals were struggling, and fidgeting, and
snarling and scuffling, and some of them took no
pains to keep them in order at all, so that they dis-
turbed the others. I could not think how any one
could learn in a school like this; but Sapiens told
me that they were so used to each other’s animals
that it disturbed them less than I imagined.

“TI noticed especially a group of children who
were sitting on the same bench learning together.
There was a boy with a lion, whom they called
Victor: a girl with a large mastiff, whose name
was Fidelis: a boy with a sloth, called Torpidus:
another little boy with a monkey, called Ludens ;
and.a girl named Acerba with a tiger. Now I
observed that Fidelis was really trying. to learn
her lesson; but the other children’s animals would
not let her mastiff alone. First Ludens’ monkey
pulled the dog’s ear, and he growled a little
pettishly and moved out of the way; but in so

G2



84 Boys and Girls.

doing he touched Acerba’s tiger which was
asleep, and it gave him a pat with one of its
heavy claws, which made him spring up and
bristle and snarl ready for a fight, ‘Fidelis!’
said Pastor’s voice gently: and Fidelis coloured
and gave a tug with all her might at the mastiff’s
chain, which had such an effect upon him that he
lay down again.

“« Children,’ said Pastor, presently, “as it is so
fine to day, I shall give you a half-holiday. But,
first of all, I want to say a few wordsto you. Iam
afraid that some of you are not nearly so careful
as you ought to be about keeping your animals in

order, especially when you are at play. It was
only last Saturday that I heard a story about a
mastiff springing upon a bear, and biting it se-
verely? Fidelis blushed and hung her head.
‘Now you know how very important it is that
you should learn to tame your animals when you
are young, if you ever hope to be free from them
when you get older? @

«¢ But, sir,’ said Victor, ‘it does seem so unfair
that some of us should have beasts that are so hard
to tame, and some that are so easy. And he
looked with some envy at Torpidus’ sloth, which
certainly never tried to bite any one, and was quite
satisfied so long as it could sleep.

“«Once upon a time, Victor,’ said Pastor, with
a smile, ‘I knew a little girl who had a panther
to tame, and she said just what you do. She said
that a panther was so sly, and cunning, and cruel,
that she would never be able to tame it, and she
was quite unhappy. But do you know that after



Boys and Girls. 85

all she did tame it, and I don’t know that there is
any better behaved animal in the village’ And
ke looked across at his wife, who smiled and
shook her head. Certainly her panther seemed to
give her as little trouble as an animal could.

«“¢ Besides,’ added Pastor, ‘it is the animals that
are hardest to tame that often turn out most
useful when they have been tamed. Your lion,
Victor, if you tame it young, will be a strong and
useful servant to you, till the King’s messenger
comes with the key to unlock your chain.’

“<«T hope that won’t be for a long time,’ whis-
pered Ludens: ‘don’t you, Fidelis?’ He hugged
his monkey as he spoke,

“ Fidelis was looking grave, and did not answer.
I believe she was thinking that her mastiff was
not yet as tame as she would like it to be when
the King’s messenger came with the key.

“ Then the children sang a hymn, and school was
over. They were soon playing merrily in the
common outside, and the animals frisked about
and seemed to enjoy the play as much as the
children, Only Torpidus threw himself down on
the grass, because his sloth wanted to go to sleep:
and in a short time he was asleep too. ‘That is
a bad sign,’ said Sapiens: ‘I never like to see a
boy make a point of indulging his animal as that
Torpidus does.’

* Before long I observed that some of the children
were making up a party to go out on the beach to
pick up shells. There was Fidelis, and Victor,
and Ludens, and Acerba: and Ludens ran and
awoke Torpidus and the sloth, and tried to



36 Boys and Girls.

persuade him to come with them. ‘Torpidus at
last consented, because it was too much trouble to
refuse: and the children, who had brought their
dinners to school with them, set off in high spirits
along the lane which led to ‘the shore, I followed
behind them at a little distance, it was a hot day,
and before long the animals began to get quarrel-
some—especially Acerba’s tiger, which she did not
keep in good order. Victors lion and Fidelis’s
mastiff more than once needed all their owners’
strength to prevent them from attacking the
quarrelsome beast, but they were careful and |
succeeded in mastering them. But before they
had got more than half way to the beach, they
were met by a big boy named Improbus, who had
a wolf by his side. I saw, to my horror, that his
face was growing like the wolf’s face: and I re-
marked upon it to Sapiens. ‘That is the case,’
he said sadly, ‘when the people of this island let
‘their animals master them instead of obeying them?
“Presently I saw Improbus stroking and coaxing
‘and praising Acerba’s tiger, at which she looked
‘very much pleased. These two went on in front,
and the others, not sorry to be relieved of their
company, followed a litéle in the rear: Torpidus
lingering behind, saying that it was so hot he
could not hurry. I saw that Sapiens looked
sad, and he said, ‘I wish Pastor was in the way.
I know he would be grieved to see Acerba
making acquaintance with Improbus: he is no
fitting company for any of Pastor’s school chil-
dren. But see, what are they doing now. For
T heard a mutter and a growl from the animals,



Boys and Girls. 87

‘some of which were pulling fiercely at their
chains. The children were all standing on the
‘beach near an empty boat which was moored
on the shore, and Improbus and Acerba were
‘urging the others to get into it. They wanted
a row. on this hot day, they said: and the boat
was too heavy for two to manage alone.

“Fidelis and Victor refused. Jt was distinctly
forbidden them, they said, and they would not do
it. Thenthere came a fight between the animals:
for Improbus and Acerba set their wolf and tiger
to fight the dog and the lion, and as they were
bigger and stronger, it almost seemed as if they
would get the best of it. But the dog and the
lion, though not so strong, were better trained to
‘obey their master and mistress, and skill and
discipline told in the end against brute force.

« When Improbus saw that he could not frighten
the children into submission, he began’ to laugh
at them. Victor and Fidelia did not ‘care very
much about this; but Ludens did, and when
Improbus said that he did not dare to get into the
boat, Ludens sprang in at once. Fidelis begged
him to come out, and as he refused, she -got
in to pull him out by force: and then Improbus,
‘taking advantage of the two children being ia
the boat, cut the cord with a sharp knife, so
that it swung round at once, and the current
carried it out of their wading depth.

“ Acerba looked rather frightened: Ludens set
up a wailing cry: Victor plunged into the water
‘and swam up to the boat to try to guide it
back to land; but he soon found that this was



88 Boys and Girls.

impossible, and the only thing for him was to
climb over the side into it, for the current was
too strong for him to swim back. Then Fidelis
cried out: ‘Torpidus, Torpidus, run and find
Pastor and ask him to help us! We have no
oars, and we are drifting out to sea! Make haste,
make haste!”

“Torpidus did run a few steps faster than he
had ever done before in his life; but after a little
while he began to feel very hot and tired, and
saying to himself ‘I shall get on faster if I.
rest for a few moments, he sat down on a shady
bank, for the sloth was pulling back at its chain:
and presently he was fast asleep, while Fidelis,
Victor, and Ludens were being drifted out by the
ebb-tide nearer and nearer to the perilous shore
of their enemies.

«Suddenly Sapienstouched me, asI was watching
the poor children in their helpless misery. [
longed to help them; but it seemed to me that
Sapiens and myself were invisible, and that we
could not make our presence perceived al the
inhabitants of Vita Humana: we could only look
on. ‘Look, look!’ said Sapiens, pointing to
Improbus. I looked, and I saw him turning pale
and looking terribly frightened, as from the air
behind him came something which looked like
a grey cloud, but gradually shaped itself into a
Figure bearing a key. ‘The King’s messenger,’
said Sapiens. ‘Which of them can he be come
for! Poor Acerba? no,-it is Improbus.’

“¢Tmprobus,’.said the messenger, ‘I have come
to unlock your chain,’

Sent



Boys and Girls. 89

«On not yet, not yet ? pleaded Improbus, while
Acerba sank back fainting on the ground. But
though he prayed and implored, the messenger paid
no heed to his prayers. ‘The wolf rose up, grim
and gaunt, as if it knew that now was its time of
mastery, and stood over the trembling lad. I saw
the messenger unlock the chain, and I heard the
yell of the fierce beast; but I saw no more, For
the form of the messenger changed back again
into the grey cloud, infolding the two, and when
it passed away, Improbus and the wolf had gone:
and only Acerba lay on the ground sobbing with
grief and terror. The tiger seemed quite sub-
dued, and did not impede her when, struck by
a sudden thought, she cried, ‘I will go and find
Pastor!’ and sprang up and rushed away at her
fullest speed.

“Meanwhile, how fared it with the children in
the boat ?

“'They began to comfort each other as best they
could. . ‘We did not come here of our own free
will,” said Fidelis; ‘and the King will not let
us be hurt. Pastor always tells us so, you know.’

«« But perhaps we shall have to fight hard first,’
said Victor. ‘For see, the boat is drifting nearer
and nearer to the enemy’s coast.’

«« Tet us ask the King to help us fight and take
care of us,’ said Fidelis. ‘Oh, if only our animals
were as obedient as Pastor’s horse and Dulcis’s
panther! For they knew that if it came to
fighting, much would depend upon the docility of
their animals.

««We will always try more and more to keep



90 Boys and Girls.

‘them in order if once we get out of this,’ said
Victor.

“It is a good sign that they are not boastful
and self confident, said Sapiens to me. ‘You
may be sure they will be kept safe, even if the
King has to send his messenger with the oe
to-unchain them from their beasts.

“I turned round to see if any help were forth-
coming, but I could see none. When I looked
again, the current had carried them almost over
to the opposite shore, where a group of men were
waiting to draw in the boat and seize the children.
But this was not so easy. Victor’s lion and
Fidelis’s dog were in the boat, ready to fight, and
alert to seize any unwary hands which might be
‘laid upon the boat. Ludens sat behind with his
monkey: he was too young and weak to take
part in the fighting. Victor and Fidelis stood up
bravely, encouraging their animals, and pointing
‘out to them when to resist the most dangerous
‘attempts of their enemies. I saw that the rebels
tried to bribe the animals with tempting food:
but Victor and Fidelis had trained them too well
to allow them to seize upon it, and the beasts
‘only growled and snarled at the offered morsels. ©

“But it was hard work for the children, and
‘I began to fear that their strength would soon be
overcome, when Ludens gave a cry of joy. ‘There
is Pastor on his horse swimming out to us!’ he
said.

“Keep up a little longer, Fidelis!’ said Victor.
‘ The King will help us, and we must not give in!”

“Bravely the good horse struggled through the



Boys aud. Girls. QI

waves: nearer and nearer it came: and Pastor
came panting up to them. ‘I can but take one
at a time,’ he said, as he grasped Ludens and sat
him and his monkey in front of him: ‘hold out a
little longer, dear children, and all will be safe.
The King will not fail you’

“Encouraged by his words, Victor and Fidelis
held out until he could come back again: this
time he took away Fidelis and swam with her to

safety. Then he returned for Victor, and carried
him also away out of reach of his enemies. But
‘I noticed that as he neared the shore with Victor,
the horse swam more and more slowly: and
finally, when they reached the landing-place,
where a crowd was now assembled to welcome
him back, both he and the horse sank down
‘exhausted on the beach.

“Flis wife went up to him to give him a draught
of wine, but he waved it back with a strange and
solemn look-upon his face. ‘The King’s messen-
ger, Dulcis,” he said, in an awestruck voice.
’What. was that shadowy cloud which seemed to
be shaping itselffrom out of the air?’ A sudden
hush fell upon all, as they beheld the shadow with

‘the key in his hand. ‘Pastor, said the voice
“which I had heard before, only that this time its
tones were gentle, ‘I have come to unlock your
‘chain. Before I do so, speak to those about you
what words you have need to say,

“ Pastor bowed his head ; ‘call Acerba to me, > he

“said. \ She came, sobbing bitterly.

«« Child? he said, gent! y, ‘you sinned and you

have repented, The King is merciful to you.



92 Boys and Girls.

Do your best to tame that tiger of yours that the
unlocking of your chain may be no dread to you,
but a hope. Little Ludens, do you the same:
keep guard over your animal that it may not drag
you and others again into danger. Victor and
Fidelis, be brave all your lives as you have been to-
day; do not cease to keep guard over your beasts,
for your warfare is not over. ‘Torpidus !’—Torpidus
was not there. He was still asleep on the shady
bank with his sloth.

“<«It is nearly time,’ said the messenger.

“Then Pastor and Dulcis spoke together in low
tones which none else could hear: and I never
saw so happy a look on a man’s face as on his,
just before the messenger came up and unlocked
his chain. At that moment the cloud infolded
him as it had done Improbus; but then it was
grey and heavy, whereas now it shone like silver.
-When it lifted away, there was nothing to be
seen but the dead horse and broken chain. Pastor
had gone to his King, and was free.

“ I said, thinking of the gentle messenger who _
had carried Pastor to the King.

“«Perhaps you have,’ said Sapiens, ‘but you
also have a beast to tame before he comes.’ But
as he spoke, the crowd, and the shining sea, and
the dead horse, and the broken chain faded into
mist, and I awoke.”

There was a silence, only broken by Dick,
saying, “awfully jolly that story is, isn’t it, Tom?”

ying ¥ JOUY vi )

“Yes,” said Tom (who had not gone to sleep),



Bus and Girls, 93
“but its just like all allegories. If people only
had to break in an animal to get to heaven, it
would be easy enough. It’s nearly as bad as the
little brutes with bare feet after all.”

“I wonder,” said Maggie, meditatively, “whether
if before I went to sleep I thought about people’s
characters and dispositions I should be able to
dream such a nice dream as that!”

“TI wonder what our beasts are!” said Elly,
“TY think Corda’s is a Persian cat.”

“ And yours a Shetland pony,” said Alick.

* But it was a snaame to make the animals die!”
said Johnny, who could not get over this at all.

“Why,” said Alick, “the animals only mean
the worse part of us, and I am sure they bother
people enough all their lives.”

Charlie said nothing, and Tom rather thought
he had been asleep; but he had really been listen-
ing, and the effect of the story and of his own
better self together, was to make him sit. down
and write a long letter to his mother, confessing
his Bellsand adventures. It was wonderful how
much the better he felt as soon as this was done:
the confession lifted a load off his mind, and Elly
said to Corda that night—*“ Charlie is quite jolly
again now. I am so glad, for he is my. own
ownest brother, and I can’t bear him to be dull
and cross, and for the others to laugh at him.”

“Yes,” said Corda, “he was as kind to-night
as if he had been Dick.”

This was saying a great deal, for Dick was
quite Corda’s favourite among the boys,





CHAPTER XI.

one day to Elly, as he came up to her

and found her knitting her brows over
a book. It was a pleasant morning with a fresh
breeze, not so hot as it had been, and the children
were all on the beach together. “Greek!” he
said, as he caught sight of the letters. ‘What
a fellow you are, Elly, to be sure! Who would
have thought of your wanting to do Greek in the
holidays! You needn’t shut up the book now,
the murder’s out!”

“Only please don’t tell the others,” said Elly,
imploringly. “You know, Alick, I want awfully
to know Greek, and mamma and Miss Morison
won’t let me begin till I can work better: and
I hate work, and the cotton always gets dirty and
snarls up, and I never shall be able to work as
well as Corda if I live to be a hundred. So
I thought I might just as well try if I couldn't
teach it to myself, and I meant to have done
lots these holidays: I learnt the letters the first
week I was here, and somehow I have never done
any more, so I thought I must try again.”

“ Shall I give you a lesson?” said Alick,

* Oh do!” said Elly.

Vi 7HAT are you so busy over?” said Alick



Boys and Girls. _ 95

~ So the two sat down together: and Alick gave
Elly her first Greek lesson. He found it rather
agreeable to be schoolmaster to such a quick and
eager pupil; and when he had finished, he said
“TJ tell you what, Elly, it’s an awful pity that you
den’t take pains with your needlework so as to get
on to Greek, “You'd beat Charlie in a very little
‘while if you did, you are three times as sharp.”

Elly looked pleased at the praise, and disap-
pointed at the advice.

*“ But I can’t!” she said.-

“Why not? what's the matter with your
bands? said Alick, taking one up and studying
it. “It’s nothing but that you don’t take pains.
‘If you can give your mind one quarter as much to
needlework as you do to the lessons you like,
you'd work just as well as Corda.”

“Tt’s all very weil for you to talk, Alick,” said
Elly, despondingly; “but boys don’t know how
lucky they are, that’s all. How would you like to be
stuck down for an hour every day with a needle in
your hand, and a horrid long hem, or seam which is
worse, to do while you are being read history to? I
think about the history and forget the work, and
then Miss Morison says, ‘Elly, you’re not working,’
and then I gobble my stitches to make up for lost
time, and then I have to pick it out—nasty stuff!” -

“ Of course if you think it beneath you to attend
to it, it’s impossible that you should ever do it,”
said Alick.

“J don’t think it beneath me,” began Elly; but
truth was too strong for her, and she ended her
sentence with “Do I?”



Full Text
CX

AS
~~



WW \
The Baldwin Library

Univers
i ; RmB Florida






BOYS

AND GIRLS.



Page 106,








BOYS AND GIRLS.

By M. BRAMSTON,
Author of
“ The Panelled House,” ‘A Steadfast Woman,” &c.

‘e

PUBLISHED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF
THE COMMITTEE OF GENERAL LITERATURE AND EDUCATION,
APPOINTED BY THE SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING
CHHISTIAN KNOWLEDGE.



LONDON:
Society for Promoting Christian Browledge.

Sold at the Depositories :
77 Great Queen Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields:
4 Royal Exchange; 48 Piccadilly ;
And by all Booksellers,

New York: Pott, Young, & Co.


PRINTED ve
Yor the Society for Promoting Christian, Knowledge
AT THE CLARENDON PRESS,
OXFORD.


INTRODUCTION.

N case any boys and girls should take up this
| book without having read a tale called
‘Elly’s Choice? I will tell them the names and
ages of the children mentioned at the time when
this story begins.

Mr. Langford was the clergyman of a village
called Ringland, and he had eight children:
Tom, who was fifteen; Dick, fourteen; Charlie,
twelve; Elly, eleven; Frank and Johnny, twins
of nine; Maggie, seven; and Gerty, between
three and four. The five eldest boys were all at
school, and Elly went every day to Ringland
Hall, where her great aunt, Mrs. Farwood, lived,
to be taught by the same governess who in-
structed her little cousin, Cordelia Temple, a
child a few months younger than Elly. Cordelia
and her little brother Alfred were Mrs. Farwood’s
grandchildren, whom she had always taken care
4 : L[utroduction.

of, because their father and mother were in
India; but Cordelia’s mother had of late been
home for a visit on account of her health, and
had only just gone back to rejoin her husband,
Alick Graham was an orphan boy of fourteen,
who spent his holidays at Mrs. Farwood’s, who
was very kind to him: he was rather a delicate
boy, never having quite recovered the effects of
an accident he had had two years before, when
Charlie Langford had gone out with him carrying
a gun, and the gun had burst and a splinter had
entered Alick’s knee. Having mentioned these
particulars, the story itself will explain every-
thing else needful. It was written in accordance
with the request of certain little people who in-
sisted on hearing some more about Elly and her
brothers and sisters and cousins when they grew
older: and as possibly some of the other young
readers of “Ellys Choice” may have had the
same wish, a chapter of the further history of the
little Langfords is here offered for their perusal,


BOYS AND) GLE IES,

CHAPTER I.

WO years had passed since we took leave of
the little Langfords, all settled comfortably
in their new home at Ringland. They had all

grown taller and bigger since then, as was to
be expected: the five boys were all at school, and
Elly still went to the Hall every day to do lessons
with Cordelia under kind Miss Morison. Elly
was getting on well with her lessons, and was
very anxious to begin to learn Greek: but mamma
and Miss Morison both said that Greek must wait
until needlework was better. For Elly’s fingers,
when they held a needle, seemed, as old nurse
said, to be all thumbs.

It was July, and Miss Morison had gone away
for her holidays. Alick Graham had come to
the Hall for his, and all the Vicarage boys had
come back for theirs: and great fun they had
6 Boys and Girls.

during the first week. The only person who
did not thoroughly enjoy it was poor little
Cordelia Temple, who looked moped and melan-
choly, poor child! as well she might, Her mother
had gone back to India a month before, just
when Corda had fully learnt what it was to have
a real mother; and nobody except Miss Morison
quite knew how great this first trouble was to the
little girl. Her cousins were sorry for her when
they remembered to be so, but they were not old
enough to understand that when people are in
trouble they need extra forbearance: and they
often said that Corda was cross because she did
not care to play cricket and hockey: with the
rest, when in reality the poor little girl only felt
motherless and unhappy.

Of course the children did not always play to-
gether. Very often they divided into two sets:
the three bigger boys, the twins, and Alick going
off together; Elly, Corda, and Maggie follow-
ing their own devices. Maggie was now seven
years old: she was a plump-faced, merry, happy
little girl, always good-tempered, and only in
trouble when she had lessons to do. She was
very fond of her cousin Alfred, who was a year
younger than herself, and was always taking his
part when the bigger ones snubbed him, as they
did sometimes: for he was a timid, fretful, little
fellow, not over-strong in health.

One day, however, it happened that all the
seven children had been playing cricket in the
field, and little Gertrude, the baby of the family,
had been sitting on the grass watching them.
Boys and Girls. 7

When the “warning bell” rang five minutes be-
fore dinner, to bid them all come in to wash their
_hands and faces, Maria, the parlour-maid, told them
that their father and mother were engaged with
Dr. Cole, and that master 'Tom was to carve the
leg of mutton for dinner. Tom said, “Oh, bother!”
and Dick, the next brother, who was by far the
neatest-handed of the family, volunteered to fill
his place. Gertrude said grace in her baby voice,
and they all set to work with good appetites, ex-
cept Corda, who was rather dainty, and hated
roast mutton.

This was the sort of talk that went on.

“T say!” (from Charlie) “I wish we had an
eleven all boys instead of having to make it up
with girls.”

“Elly bowled you out oftener than you did her,
Master Charlie,” said Alick.

“Elly isn’t so bad. But look at-Corda’s play !”

“ Corda made a catch this morning,” said Elly.

“JT don’t like cricket; I think it’s stupid!” said
Corda, very demurely.

“Oh, oh, oh!” said all the others in indigna-
tion. .

“T wonder what is the use of girls!” said Frank
very slowly.

* Just as much usé as boys,” said Elly.

“No they ar’n’t,” said Charlie. “Men can do
everything women can do, but women can’t do
half what. men can. I wouldn’t be a woman for
anything.”

* People must have wives,” suggested Johnny.

Elly felt her usual desire to be a boy too much
8 Boys and Girls.

to contradict Charlie’s statement, and it was left
to Corda to take up the cudgels for her sex.

“IT wouldn’t be a man,” she said; “I like girls
a preat deal better than boys, and I am sure boys
are no good at all.”

“ Sour grapes,” said Tom: and as the conver-
sation proceeded for some time we may leave
it for a little while, and go to hear what Dr.
Cole is saying to Mr. and Mrs. Langford, for it
is more important to the hungry children next
door than they think.

“If you take my advice,” said Dr. Cole, “you
will send the young ones away directly. It isa
most violent form of the fever, and if the wind
changes, you will have the air from Hopkins’
cottage blowing directly on to you. Six fresh
cases since last night!”

«And Thompson’s little girl not expected to
live!?? said Mrs. Langford with a little shiver, as
she thought of her own eight rosy healthy children.

“Nor Tom Dale either. It is a most serious
illness for any one to have, and I can’t too strongly
urge you and Miss Farwood to send the children
out of the way.”

* But where can they go?” said the mother.

“You must take them to the sea somewhere,”
said Mr. Langford to his wife.

“Tam not going to be away from you, Richard,”
she said. “If they go away, I must leave them
under the charge of nurse. I have no belief in
your power of taking care of yourself when there
is any press of work,”

«That is true,” said Dr, Cole. “ Now, look here,


Boys and Girls. 9

Mrs. Langford, I have got a big farmhouse on my
hands near Bellsand—that is, half a dozen rooms
in it—for the next two months. I got it furnished
for a cousin of mine, and when she had been there
a month, her husband sent for her to come to him
to Australia, so I took the furniture, such as it was,
off her hands, and nobody has taken it of me yet.
I believe it’s a good bit the worse for wear, but
that won’t matter so much. ‘There’s a splendid
common, a quarter of a mile to the sea, and a mile
of sands as flat asa pancake. ‘The nearest town
is five miles off, and they can’t get into mischief
if they try ; splendid air, honest people,—know ’em
well. Do you pack’em off this afternoon, and Pll
go and talk to Miss Farwood, and persuade her
to do the same. There, my dear lady, what better
can you wish? Only two hours of train and five
miles’ drive,—you might go over there twice a
week and look after them if you liked.”

So, after ‘much doubt and hesitation, Mr. and
Mrs. ‘Langford closed with Dr. Cole’s kind offer ;
and it only remained to go and tell the dinner-
eating children in the next room of their
fate.

«“There’s mother!” said Dick, as she.came in,
by no means sorry to give over his task of helping
ten hungry people who had already arrived at ask-
ing for more.

“My dear children,” she began, as she took her
place, looking as much flurried as gentle Mrs,
Langford ever could look, “stop talking all of you,
and listen to me.’

‘There was a dead silence, broken only by the
10 Boys and Girls.

clatter of Maggie’s fork, which took the opportu-
nity of tumbling down.

“T don’t know if you have heard that there is
a bad fever just broken out in the village. I told
you three days ago, if you remember, not to go
down the Blackberry Lane, where the Hopkinses
live; I hope none of you have been there.”

“No, mother, none of us,” said Tom and Elly
together.

“Now it seems to be spreading upwards to-
wards us, and Dr. Cole says you must all go away
this very afternoon.”

All the eyes grew large and round, and most of
the mouths opened also.

“Weare going to send you to a farmhouse on
what they call Endlow Common, five miles from
Bellsand, Possibly Alick and Corda and Alfred
may follow you there. Dr. Cole is going to sug-
gest the place to Aunt Lucy. Nurse and Eliza
will go with you, and I hope you will all try to
prove yourselves good and trustworthy.”

' “What are we to do all day?” said Tom ina
dolorous voice.

“Why itll be awfully jolly,” said Dick, who
had naturalistic tastes. “Is it near the sea, mo-
ther?” ,

«A mile off only. You'll be able to do some
collecting, and that sort of thing,” said the mother,
kindly: “and if you take your new microscope—”

“Hurrah!” said Dick.

“You six bigger ones may take three books
apiece, but try to choose them wisely. Johnny,
mind you look out your pencils and drawing-
Boys and Girls. II

paper, you will want them. Elly, don’t forget
your workbox: Charlie, I recommend you to take
your basket of tools. Tom, I don’t know what
occupation you will like best, but I recommend
you to think of something for indoors; and Frank
the same. Maggie’s dolls will be enough for her.”

“Mother, how can you think of us all at once
like that?” said Tom. “It must make your head
go round.”

Mrs. Langford laughed a little. “It does, Tom,”
she said; “my head is going round at this mo-
ment; but none the less 1 must get you children
all off by the five o’clock train. By the way,”
she said suddenly, “I wish, Dick, that you and
Charlie would go off at once by this train, take
a fly to Endlow Common from Bellsand, and a
note from me to Mrs, Burton, the farmer’s wife,
as to getting beds and tea ready. You have got
half an hour.”

They all gasped. Dick and Charlie shouted
out “Hurrah!” and rushed off for their hats,
What could be more delightful than to be sent
off on such an errand at a moment’s notice?
Tom looked a little hurt that he had not been
the one selected; but his mother said, “I shall
have no end of instructions for you, Tom, I can’t
spare you. Now I must write this letter. Finish
your dinner quickly, children, you will have to be
busy all this afternoon.”

Imagine what a bustle and scurry there was
over all the house during that afternoon! Nurse
and mamma were the only two persons in the
household who kept their heads, and well for them
12 Boys and Girls.

it was that they did so. Maggie was found to
have filled one corner of the trunk which nurse
was packing with the furniture out of her doll’s
house, because, she said, the dolls ast have a bed
to lie on, and chairs and tables to use, or they
would not be comfortable all the time they were
at Endlow; and little Gerty improved the occa-.
sion by filling her two fat hands with Frank’s col-
lection of stones, and tumbling them headlong
into the other end of the trunk. Elly was so
much taken aback by the suddenness of the move,
that she could only stand leaning her long lank
length against the wall, and ejaculate, “How very
funny!” at intervals, until nurse set her to fetch
her brothers’ clothes to be packed, which gave her
useful employment.

But in the midst of all this bustle and hurry,
Mrs. Langford found time for a private talk with
Tom, and another with Elly, before the time
came to go off to the station. ‘There was a sta-
tion at Ringland now, which made it much easier
for the Langfords to get to Endlow that after-
noon. :

Tom’s talk came first, when his mother was
arranging the box of books, paint-boxes, &c.,
which were to serve the eight children for indoor
employment during the whole time they were
at Endlow. i ;

«Tom, old fellow,” she said, “you will be the
eldest, and I shall look to you to keep the others
in order. Only don’t scold and hector them too
much, as you are sometimes given to do.”

« All right, mother,” said Tom.


Boys and Girls, 13

“J know I can trust you, and Dick, and Elly,
not to do anything out of my sight that you
wouldn’t do if I were with you,” said his mother,
“otherwise I should not like this plan at all.
My only doubt is whether you will be wise and
reasonable enough to keep each other in order.
Bear and forbear, and don’t say sharp things for
the pleasure of teasing, that’s all. And don’t fly
in nurse’s face more than you can ele, even
when you don’t think she is overwise.’

Tom promised to do his best: he was very
fond of his mother, and could scarcely help pro-
mising anything she asked when her hand was on
his shoulder, and her kind face looking into his.
Then it was Elly’s turn.

“Elly, my little woman,” said Mrs. Langford,
“T hope you will do your best to keep the peace
and make things go smoothly while you are away
. from us. In such an experiment as this, girls
have a great deal in their hands.”

“The boys are always saying that girls are of
no use,” said Elly.

“Prove to them that they are of great use,
then.. Try and be gentle, and not rough, Elly,
and I think that the boys won’t say that you are
of no use.”

- «That's what Miss Morison says,” said Elly.
«Gentle and not rough: But it is so much easier
to be rough, mother.”

“No doubt it is to some people,” said Mrs.
Langford; “and I think you are one of them.
But “when rough people have tamed themselves
into gentleness, their gentleness is worth more
}

14 Boys and Girls.

than other people’s, I think. But I don’t want
to lecture now, my dear. Now, you understand
that nurse is to have the control over you: of
course I can’t expect your elder brothers to mind
her as much as I hope you will; that would be
expecting rather too much from them. But I
hope you will set the example to Frank, and
Johnny, and Maggie, of being good and obedient
to her.”

«Yes, mother,” said Elly, who, to give her her
due,- was a very obedient little girl.

“And now run and get your books, for you
have not given me them yet.”

_ Elly went out of the room, and came back with
a rather red face, and her hands held behind her
back.

“ Mother, would you mind packing them with-
out looking at them? There’s one I don’t want
you to see.”

«Why not?” said her mother, laughing, “I
don’t suppose you would wish to take a book
I should not like you to read, Elly!”

“Oh, no, mamma. You wouldn’t mind my
reading it in the holidays. It’s only a lesson-
book. There! Do you want to see it, or may
I put it in myself without your looking ?”

Mrs. Langford knew of the delights of chil-
dren’s secrets by experience, and she made no
further objections to Elly’s putting in a very un-
interesting-looking book in a school-cover of
dirty brown calico. The other two books were
a volume of fairy tales, and a natural history book
of Dick’s,
Boys and Girls, 15

“Three books will never be enough for him
to look in for all the new animals he finds,” said
Elly; “so he can have one of mine.”

And strange as it may appear to those who do
not know how much work can be got through by
a busy household, the children, with nurse and the
housemaid, were all packed off together by the
five o’clock train.










CHAPTER II.

T was nearly eight o’clock, and it seemed to
the children that they had been hours and
hours in the omnibus which was taking them

from Bellsand Station to Endlow Common. It
was a hot evening, and nurse would not let them
sit in a draught, and kept all the windows shut
on one side; and that side, unfortunately, was
the one that they wanted the most to look out
of, because the sea was to be seen in blue peeps
behind green hedges, and there were little white
sailing boats scattered about it, turning golden
with the setting sun.. Gertrude was tired and
sleepy, but too hungry to sleep, and not old
enough to know she must not fret: Maggie’s
round face was graver than usual. Frank and
Johnny were cross because they had to sit inside,
there being so much luggage on the small omni-
bus that there was only room for Tom on the
seat with the driver. Elly herself felt too tired
and hungry to be able to do more than to control
her own crossness, and could not manage to make
things more comfortable for the boys.

But at last all things come to an end, even a

journey in a close omnibus. The omnibus went
slowly up a steep hill, then the hedges ceased and


Boys and Girls. 17

the green edge at the roadside widened into an
immense common, purple and yellow with hea~-
ther and furze, sloping down gradually to a wide
expanse of blue sea. Five minutes further brought
them in sight of an old grey stone farmhouse,
with red tiles, with a farmyard at the back, and
stacks of wheat and hay showing behind. At the
door, which opened full upon the common, stood
Dick and Charlie, waving their caps.

They went-in through a rough flagged passage
into a good-sized room with two windows, light
but rather low, and with a drab paper hanging
in a most dilapidated way on the wall in dirty
flakes. There was a round table spread with a
tablecloth, covered with blue plates, and cups,
and a metal teapot; there was a horsehair sofa,
and several horsehair chairs, high and slippery;
and there was a varnished picture of “King
Alfred and the Cakes” hanging above the mantel-
piece.

“T hope, Mrs. Brown,” said Mrs, Burton to
nurse, “you will find everything comfortable,
ma’am, as much as can be on such short notice.
Jemima Ann and your young gentlemen have
been busy enough this afternoon: and I assure
you I was properly vexed when I came back to
find I had been out so late.”

Elly, who was listening, began to wonder how
much vexation was “proper.” Nurse made some
civil reply, and, leaving Eliza‘to pour out the tea,
she went up to see the bedrooms. There were
three: one for nurse and Eliza, with a crib for
Gerty; one for Elly and Maggie; and one with

c
18 Boys and Girls.

a long row of beds, like a school dormitory, for
the five boys.

Then they came down again, and set to work
at the farmhouse tea, which they all liked ex-
tremely; and then they were one and all glad
to go to bed, and leave unpacking and all other
arrangements for the next day. Before long, all
the eight were asleep.

"The eastern sun shone into Elly’s eyes and
awoke her early the next morning. At first she
could hardly remember where she was,—in such
a funny bare little room, with an old-fashioned
tent bedstead with washed-out blue curtains:
but soon she came to her senses, and recollected
that this was Endlow. “What fun!” said Elly
to herself; “Ill get up and look about me before
the others are awake.” And up she got and
dressed quietly, without awaking Maggie; and
then, having tried very hard not to hurry her
prayers through the longing she had to be out,
she slipped noiselessly down the stairs, through
the flagged passage, and out into the early radiant
sunshine of the summer morning.

For a minute or two Elly stood in absolute
wonder at the splendid dazzling sunshine, and the
dewy heath and furze which smelt so strange and
delicious: and then she looked to the south, and
saw the strange misty blue of something that was
neither land nor sky, and she almost sprang for
joy at thinking that it was the sea. She wished
now that one of the others was there to share the
pleasure of it with her: she almost thought of
waking Maggie, or one of the boys: but then
Boys and Girés. 19

again, Maggie was tired with yesterday’s journey,
and had better have her sleep out, and experience
had taught Elly that it was just as well not to
suggest to her brothers to get up at five when
breakfast was not to be till half-past eight. So
she set out to explore the place by herself.
Soon she found that the common was ex-
tremely dewy, and that dew, though very lovely,
is disadvantageous to the hems of cotton-frocks.
So Elly opened the gate and went into the farm-
yard, where the farming men were moving about,
and where six calves in a row all stood and
looked at her, as if they had never seen a little
girl in a white linen flapping hat before: and
very likely they had not. She liked walking on
the soft golden straw, and she had not gone far
before she heard a sound which made her mouth
water, as of a soft frothy liquid trickling into a
wooden pail, and a sweet smell of cow’s breath
in the air. Elly could not help looking in over
the top of the wooden door. The man who was
milking the cows saw her, and said, “Have a
drop of warm milk, little missy ?”
_ May I?” said Elly, with a delighted face,
coming in. She stood by while the man filled
a little tin mug with the frothy milk and gave
it to her: how delicious it was! Three times,
altogether, Elly emptied that mug; and she could
have gone on yet longer, except that she was
afraid that the man would think her greedy. So
she thanked him, and went out of the cowhouse,
feeling all the better for her treat.
Having explored the farmyard, Elly went up
: C2
20 Boys and Girls.

the little path towards the house, where she saw
Mrs. Burton and “ Jemima Ann,” as they called
her, bustling about at work.

“ You're early this morning, little miss?” said
Mrs. Burton, as she saw her ; and Elly came up
to her, and ‘told her about the treat she had had
in the cowhouse. “Bless you, dear,” said Mrs.
Burton, “you may have some every morning if
you like. Milk’s plenty with us this time of
year; we give it to the pigs, we do.”

“ And may I go into the garden?” said Elly.

“To be sure you may, and pick yourself a nice
little posy, if you like. Only don’t pick the
roses; Burton’s choice over them.”

Elly went into the garden, which was chiefly
kitchen garden, with a border of gay homely
flowers: stocks and southernwood and orange
escolzia. But the garden was rather dull when
there was the common and the sea to look at;
and Elly suddenly took it into her head that she
would go down to the beach and look at the sea
closely. Before any of the others! What fun!
In another moment she was out over the stone
wall, and springing over the furze and the hea-
ther, down the hill towards the sea. It was fur-
ther than she had expected, but Elly did not mind
that. There came a steep slope of grass with
sand at the bottom, which came over her ankles
and into her boots; she went on until it grew
firmer under her feet, and lo and behold, there
was a white line of surf in front of her, where the
little blue waves were breaking at their leisure,
while the whole sea was alive with what an old












































BOYS AND GIRLS. Page 21
Boys and Girls. 21

Greek once called “countless laughter” from
every little ripple on its surface.

\ Elly had not seen the’sea since she was six
years old, when all the little Langfords had gone
there for change after the measles. But how
delicious this was! She had not been old enough -
to enter into its beauty as she could now. Some-
how, she did not know why, she felt so glad that
she could almost have cried, and the verse of the
“Venite,” which she had heard over and over
again without thinking about it, seemed to come
into her head with a new meaning, “The sea is
His, and He made it, and His hands prepared the
dry land.” But little girls of eleven do not very
often think for long at a time, and soon Elly had
found something that took up all her thoughts,
a lovely little pink pair of bivalve shells, half
epen. And there was another, and there a big
whelk, and there what the children called a
“silver bucket,? with its purple outside rubbed
off here and there to display the silver pearly
lining. Elly had her handkerchief full of treasure
before long, and began to wonder whether it was
nearly breakfast-time.

She walked back rather more slowly than she
had come, for she was getting tired, and the sun
was hot now; but when she got to the house, and
looked at the clock, it was still only seven. An
hour and a half to wait! Elly was tired, and yet
she did not like to go in and wait in the dull
sitting-room on the slippery horsehair chairs:
so she went out again, and passed by a haystack
with a ladder leaning by the side. ‘The haystack
22 Boys and Girls.

had been partly used, and the top of it looked
inviting and shady, for a taller one close against
it sheltered it from the sun. Elly climbed up,
sat down in a deliciously soft pleasant seat, and
found it so luxurious that she did not wish to
_ Move away. “How jolly this is!” she thought,
as she laid back her head on the hay; “if only
I had that Greek grammar here, I might begin
to learn the letters,’—perhaps you can now guess
what Elly’s secret was—* but it’s too comfortable
to move—much nicer than a bed. I wonder if
nurse would let me sleep here one Pe if—
or if——

But Elly did not wonder much more, for she
was fast aleep; and the next thing she knew was
that she woke up with a start, seeing Dick’s face
peering into hers, and hearing him say, “Here
she is! You little goose, Elly; we've been
looking for you for half an hour! Make haste
and come to breakfast.”

So ended Elly’s morning adventures.


CHAPTER III.

parlour where the breakfast was laid out
at the big table and all the children were
sitting round it. She did not lock very tidy,
with her cotton frock stained with dew and mud
above her knees, and her hair full of bits of hay,
as might have naturally been expected after her
nap. There was a general shout as she appeared.
“ Well, Miss Eleanor,” said nurse, severely,
“if it had been Miss Margaret, I should not
have wondered; but a great girl of eleven years
old like you -
_ “You have kept us all waiting ever so long,”

Ee felt rather small as she came into the



' said Tom.

*“ Goodness, Miss Eleanor!’’ said Eliza.

“Doodness, Elly!” repeated Gerty, so that
they all began to laugh.

“ Shall I go and make myself tidy?” said poor
Elly.

a No? said nurse, “we can’t wait any longer;
sit down and eat your breakfast, and don’t be so
tiresome again.”

Elly was quite ready for her breakfast, and her
sleep had refreshed her, so that she was not tired
any longer. I should be sorry to mention the
24 Boys and Girls.

quantity of bread and butter which she ate that
morning, the sea air had given her such an
appetite.

While they were at breakfast, Mrs. Burton
brought in a letter which had just come by the
post. Endlow Common was so far out of his
way that the postman always slipped the letters
into a wooden box on the road half a mile off
between: two stones, and the Burtons fetched
them in the course of the day. They had fetched
them early this morning in consideration of their
visitors.

The letter was from Mrs. Langford to Tom,
and informed them that Blessington was coming
that day to the farm with Corda and Alfred, and
that Alick would follow in a week’s time. He
was going for a visit to a friend until then.

“JT wonder what Mrs. Blessington will think
of these rooms!” said Eliza; for the Vicarage
servants were not very fond of Cordelia’s nurse.

« She.must think what she pleases,” said nurse,
shortly; “but I hope Miss Eleanor will think
better than to come to breakfast such a figure
with her hair full of hay another time.”

«Well, nurse, I wanted to go and brush it,”
said Elly, who was getting tired of the subject.

«Brush a fiddle-stick!” said nurse, as con-
temptuously as if Elly had wished to do such a
thing; “why your hair is more like a doormat
than Christian hair. You come up with me
after: breakfast, and I shall have a fine job, I
suppose.”

“Oh, please, nurse,” said Elly, “do you think
Boys and Girls. 25

we could get bathing-gowns for Maggie and me?
The water did look so beautiful.”

~“QOh yes,” said nurse, who was out of temper ;
“you may go on to the common and buy them
off them furze bushes, I dare say. Bathing-gowns,
indeed!”

Elly’s countenance fell, for she wished to bathe
more than anything; but she had sense enough
not to pursue the subject then when nurse was
cross, and she underwent the pulling out and
combing of her hair with as much patience as
was to be expected under the circumstances.
Presently it was done, and then she found that
all the others except Gerty were gone out. She
ran out after them, and found that they were
not gone far; the sun was too hot for any except
. Tom and Dick to go down to the beach to bathe,
and Charlie, Johnny, Frank, and Maggie, were all
sitting doing nothing in the shade of the house.
Maggie had her doll certainly, which was an
unfailing resource to her; but the three boys
were kicking their heels in the air in a state
of perfect laziness, just ripening into mischief.
Elly had brothers enough to know what would
be the outcome of this: so she stood there and
said, “Boys, do you want books, or paints, or
anything? I'll go and get them if you do.”

Charlie graciously allowed her to fetch him
“Holiday House,” and Johnny, who wasa
gentlemanly little boy, got up at once to fetch
his paints and drawing-book. Frank said he
wanted nothing; and indeed he was one of
those children who have a positive love of
26 Boys and Girls,

idleness for its own sake. Elly herself acceded
to a request from Maggie that she would come
and play with her and her dolls; and the children
passed the morning in tolerable peace and enjoy-
ment, notwithstanding the heat.

Then came dinner, for which Tom and Dick
were as late as Elly had been for breakfast.
None of the children were very hungry now,
it was so hot; but they had the novelty. of
drinking milk for dinner, which they thought
much better than meat. And then nurse said
they had better stay in the parlour for a little
while, because it was so hot; and when the
heat of the day went off they would walk down
to the beach, The three biggest boys scouted
the idea of staying in, and all went out and
sat under a haystack, where they went to sleep.
Nurse gave Elly and Maggie a task of sewing,
for which I cannot say that either of them were
very grateful; and Frank hung about the room
doing nothing, only disturbing Johnny at his
painting. Johnny had drawn the house with
the hedge at the side, and the haystack where
Elly had slept; and though his lines were not
all as straight as they might have been, his
drawing amused him and charmed Gerty, who
thought her brothers the cleverest people in the
world.

When they had been working for some time,
they heard the sound of wheels; and they threw
down their work and rushed out to the door
to meet the carriage which had brought their
cousins.
Boys and Girls, 27

The first thing they heard was Blessinzton’s
voice. “Well, ’m sure! I’d just as soon live
at the Land’s End as such a place as this!”

“ Mamma has been to the Land’s End, Blessing-
ton, and she says it is the nicest place she knows,”
said Elly.

“Well, Miss Eleanor, this is the most out-of-
the-way outlandish place I ever did see. If
they’d sent us to that lovely place Bellsand, where
there is a parade, and bathing machines, and rows
of beautiful straight houses, and none of these
nasty hills, I’d have said it was a good idea—but
here—ugh!”

And Blessington, who had by this time got out
her parcels and packages, paid the flyman and
went into the house with Corda and Alfred, who
were both tired and cross, and wanted their
dinner.

“Oh, Corda, this is so nice!” said Elly,
forgetting that she had thought it rather dull
just now.

“This ugly dark room!” said Corda.

“But there’s the sea only a little way off, and
~ shells!”

“T hate the sea,” said Corda, “it always makes
me think of mamma’s going away. I don’t want
to see it, ’m sure!”

However, after Corda had had some dinner she
began to see things in a more cheerful sight.
The heat of the day began to go off, and Elly
persuaded nurse to let her take the others down
to the beach. Nurse demurred at first, saying
that they would fall into the sea and get drowned;
28 Boys and Girls.

but at last she agreed to come too, as Elly said it
was only such a little way.

Oh, how nice it was there on the flat shining
sand with the tide coming in gently in little
ripples! The children made a great sand castle
with a moat and a tunnel, and it was quite a
long time after the moat was filled before the
castle was washed away. Even Corda forgot her
troubles and her fatigue, and played as merrily
as any of them in the cool evening air; and when
they came home to tea, they were all too tired to
do more than have tea and go to bed,

But when Elly was asleep, Dick came in softly
and awoke her.

“The sea will get in and spoil it!” she said,
for she was still dreaming about the sand castle.

“Nonsense, Elly!” said Dick, shaking her
gently to get her to wake. “I say, ] want you
to come up to our room; you can see the moon
shining on the sea, and it looks so awfully
pretty!”

Elly was awaké by this time, and after putting
on her dressing-gown and slippers, she followed
Dick up the narrow little stairs that led to the
attic where the boys slept. Charlie and the
twins were asleep, and Tom was down stairs
writing a letter; for Tom was of that age when
it appeared to him a waiving of his privileges of
years, if he did not stay up till past ten.

Dick led Elly to the window, which was wide
open, as was only right under the circumstances ;
for the night was warm and the heather sweet,
and the dewy evening air was quite delicious to
Boys and Girls. 29

breathe after the heat of the day. And looking
out thence into the moonlight, Elly saw a blue
space of sea with a silver rippling track upon it,
where it caught the light from the almost full
moon. ;

“Oh, Dick, how pretty!” she said.

“Isn't it?” said Dick, much gratified by her
admiration. JI wanted to show it to somebody,
and the boys are all snoring like pigs, and ‘Tom
wouldn’t come.”

“1 wish mamma could see it,” said Elly. “I
say, Dick, I think it would be very nice here if
nurse wouldn’t give me so much needlework to
do. And do you know, I want to bathe so
awfully, only I haven’t got a bathing-gown.
There’s a place among the rocks where Corda
and I might undress quite nicely: and Corda
has got such a lovely new bathing-gown.”

“What does a bathing-gown cost?” said Dick,
who was very soft-hearted, and enjoyed bathing
above everything himself.

“I don’t know. I have got a shilling and
a sixpence and a silver twopence, but I’m sure
that is not enough; and I don’t like to ask
mamma because she said the other day she
could not spend any more on our clothes till
Michaelmas.”

“Well, you ask nurse how much stuff it will
take, and we'll see if it can’t be managed,” said
Dick, whose godfather had presented him with a
whole sovereign only a week before, and who
therefore felt equal to any emergency.

Elly went back to her bed extremely happy,
30 Boys and Girls.
between gratitude to Dick and pleasure at his
calling her up to see the moon; and the next
thing she was aware of was nurse calling her
and Maggie the next morning, and telling them
that breakfast would be ready in half an hour.




CHAPTER IV.

“ Charlie and I want to walk into the town

this morning. Do you want any pepper or
needles or anything of that sort that we can bring
back to you?”

“ Pepper, bless your heart ?” said nurse, laughing,
“no, thank you, Master Richard; but you’re a good
boy to ask me. But I think there are one or two
little things I want, now I come to think of it.”

“TI want some cold cream for Miss Cordelia’s
face,’ said Blessington: “the sun has burnt her
that brown already, 1 don’t know what her grand-
mamma will say.”

Whereat Charles began to tease Corda about
her complexion being so precious; and Corda
turned sulky, and looked inclined to cry. But
Elly made them laugh with the quotation—“He
only does it to annoy, because he knows it teases;”
and the little breeze passed over. Dick went off
with Charlie, armed with the right number of
yards and the right description of stuff for Elly’s
bathing-gown; and the two boys trudged merrily
along the road with its border of common, where
tne bees were buzzing and the butterflies fluttering
over the sunny heath and furze.

fg | SAY, nurse,” quoth Dick the next morning,
32 Boys and Girls.

Nothing very remarkable happened on their
way to Bellsand, except that Dick, who was
butterfly-mad, caught two brown butterflies and
missed a Painted Lady. He discoursed to Charlie
about the possibility that Oleander Hawk-moths
might come to Endlow Common across the
Channel; for the book said that such things had
been known to happen, and why should they not
here? “Mind, Charlie!” said Dick, “that if you
ever see anything that looks the least like a Hawk-
moth you get at it at once; only fancy how dis-
gusted you would be to think that you had had
a chance of an Oleander, and had missed it!”

Charlie listened respectfully to this lecture from
Dick; because Dick knew more about butterflies
than any other boy at their school, and because
he thought it would be the most delightful thing
in the world to catch something that no one else
had got. Dick had once achieved this glory,
when in the. preceding September he had himself
caught a Camberwell Beauty, sitting on a fallen
apple in the Rectory garden, and the county
paper had actually had a paragraph to the effect,
that “One of the rarest of British butterflies, the
Camberwell Beauty, has lately been caught by
Master Richard Langford, son of the Rector of
Ringland. We congratulate the young gentleman
on his conquest.” Charlie would have liked above
everything to be congratulated upon his conquest
in the newspaper.

“T say,” said Charlie, presently, “it’s awfully
hot, and we’ve only gone two miles. Let us sit
down and rest, Dick.”
Boys and Girls. 33

“Tt’ll only be hotter if we wait,” said sturdy
Dick. “Let us get on now, Charlie, and when
we get to Bellsand we'll have a jolly good bathe.
Come now, do get on!”

Charlie was rather apt to be lazy, and Dick had
to.exhort him thus many times during their five-
mile walk to Bellsand. But at last the lonely
road began to be edged with houses; smart ladies
in blue serge with gold anchor buttons began to
appear on the beach; and five minutes’ walk
brought them into the midst of the little town,
in front of a confectioner’s shop, where both of
them stood still with one accord, for they were
hungry by this time.

«Tl have one of those jolly Bath buns!” quoth
Charlie. “I’m so awfully hungry, and Pve got
a shilling in my pocket. What will you have
Dick?”

“Bread and cheese,” said Dick, who was out-
growing the small boy’s love for sweet things, and
was rather doubtful whether Elly’s bathing-gown
would leave him money enough to buy a shrimp-
ing-net on which he had set his heart.

Accordingly, he had finished his luncheon before
Charlie had got half through his. Charlie had
spent his shilling in six Bath buns, and began to
feel that it was rather doubtful how long it would
take to get through them. You may have too
much of anything, even Bath buns, as Charlie
began to feel.

“Now, do stop,” said Dick. “You'll never get
home again if you eat all that. Besides, we’ve got
to bathe, after I have done my shopping. You

D
34 Boys and Girls.

can put the rest in your pocket; you'll be glad of
it after bathing,”

It does not require much self-denial to leave
off eating when you have had more than enough;
and Charlie pocketed the rest of his buns, paid
for them, and followed Dick out. of the shop.
The next thing they did was to buy Elly’s bathing-
gown, which by following nurse’s directions and
the advice of the good-natured shop girl, who was
much amused at the errand of her young customers,
Dick managed very creditably. ‘The shop girl told
him that she would send the parcel to Endlow
Farm by the carrier, and she also instructed him
as to the best place for his shrimping-net, which
under her directions he purchased. Then. they
went down to the bathing-machines, and had a
delightful bathe in. the warm water. Dick, at
least, thought it delightful; but Charlie had eaten
too much to enjoy his bathe as much as his
brother; and when they got out after staying in
the water quite as long as was prudent, Charlie
insisted on lying down on the beach to go to
sleep, while Dick tried the merits of his new
shrimping-net.

He did not catch many shrimps, certainly; but
he filled the tin case which he always carried slung
on his. shoulder with bits of seaweed, pebbles,
shells, and one unfortunate sea anemone, and this
did just as well for nature-loving Dick, When
he came back to Charlie, thinking that it was
time to set off to go home, he found Charlie, to
his astonishment, talking eagerly to a stumpy
red-haired boy about his own size.
Boys and Girls, 35

“Don’t you remember Halford, at Parkins’?”
said Charlie. Mr. Parkins was the master of their
first school.

“Qh yes, I remember,” said Dick, not very
warmly, for Halford had not been a shining
character at school, and Dick would rot -have
minded never renewing their acquaintance.

« Awful brute of a place, wasn’t it?” said Hal-
ford, jauntily, with his hands in his pockets.

“That’s as fellows think,” said Dick. “I say,
Charlie, we must be getting home again; we've
got a long way to go.”

“Where are you?” said Halford.

“ Endlow Farm.”

“ At the low end of the world, I should think,”
said Halford, laughing boisterously at his own
bad pun. Dick did not seem to see it, and began
to walk on, leaving Charlie and his friend to
follow, which they did at their leisure. At last
Dick heard his brother calling to him to wait,
and saw that he had parted company with his
companion. ;

«What do you want to take up again with that
vulgar brute for?” said Dick, who did not soften
his words more than most schoolboys of his age.

“He isn’t half a bad fellow,” said Charlie.

“Well, you ought to know best. J never let
Halford egg me on to bore holes in all the wash-
hand basins, or to let off crackers in school,” said
Dick, referring to sundry early episodes of Charlie’s
school life.

“No,” said Charlie, coolly; “you always were
@ prig, and not up to fun.” he,

Z a3
36 Boys and Girls.

There was just enough truth in this accusation
to make Dick angry; for there was in him a
tendency to priggishness which might have been
strongly developed had he not undergone the
discipline of school. So the brothers walked on
apart and not on the best of terms for about a
quarter of an hour. After that time they began
to forget their differences and began to be sociable
again.

“'There’s an awful jolly thing coming on next
week at Bellsand,” said Charlie. “It’s a boat-
race done by men in outriggers, between the
Champion of the Bellsand and the Champion of
Whitebar, and there’s going to be a spread after-
wards, and Halford’s going to dine. He says he
knows both of them and has seen them play
billiards together; they do it awfully well.”

“I dare say,” said Dick, drily.

“Do you think papa will say we may go and
see it?”

«See a couple of cads play billiards?”

“No, the boat-race.”

‘We can ask.” |

“JT do wish you wouldn’t walk so fast, Dick,”
pleaded Charlie. “I am so hot and tired and
thirsty, and my head aches.” ~

Dick was not an unkindly boy, and he slack-
ened his pace to suit his brother’s needs; but
even with this concession, he found it very diffi-
cult to get Charlie on; and when they reached
Endlow Farm poor Charlie was fit for nothing
but bed,

«Gracious me!” said Blessington to nurse, “you
Boys and Girls. 37

may depend upon it, Mrs. Brown, that poor child
has taken the fever.”

“Taken the fever!” said Elly, opening her eyes
wide; “oh nurse, has he?”

“No, no, my dear, he’s only a bit overdone,”
said nurse, smiling. “He'll be all right to-
morrow;” and she hastened away to see after
him.

“Tt’s all very well for Mrs. Brown to put it off
in that way,” said Blessington, mysteriously to
her subordinate Sarah; “but you see if my words
don’t come true.”

“Oh, Blessington,” said Elly, looking ready to
cry, “do you really think so? Somebody ought
to write to mamma.”

“They ought, no doubt,” said Blessington, “and
if you did, Miss Eleanor, there’s Mrs. Burton’s
brother not gone back to Bellsand yet, and he’d
be in time to post the note for you. I'll go and
stop him if you make haste and write.”

Accordingly Elly took a post-card and wrote—
“Dear mamma, we think Charlie has taken the
fever. He has got a bad headache and feels very
sick. Please tell us what to do about him. We
are all quite well and this is a very nice place.
Your loving daughter, Elly.

«“P.S.—Nurse does not think it is the fever,
but Blessington and I do.”

For some reason best known to herself, Elly did ~
not tell nurse that she had written. ‘Nurse was
a little jealous of Blessington, and Elly was sure
that she would scold her for taking Blessington’s
opinion rather than her own. Therefore you may
38 _ Boys and Girls.

imagine nurse’s commotion when the next day as
they were sitting at dinner, a fly drove up to the
door, and Mrs. Langford came in looking anxious
and harassed.

“ Charlie, how is he?” she said, before another
word had time to be spoken,

“All right, thank you,” said Charlie, with his
mouth full of roast mutton.

For you may not be astonished to hear that
Charlie’s illness had not been the fever, but merely
he effect of bathing after too many Bath buns ;
and nurse had quite cured him the night before

with a tumbler of mustard and water.

“OQ mamma, I am so sorry I wrote and fright-
ened you!” said Elly, penitently, when all ‘had
been exp'ained.,

“You meant the best, 1] daresay, dear, but you
certainly gave papa and me a terrible fright !
However, it is a good thing in one way that I
have come, for I wanted to see how you were all
getting on, and I should not have liked to leave

’Ringland otherwise.”

“ Flow are ae all there, ma’am?” said nurse.

“Well, we hope the fever is no worse; there
were fewer fresh cases yesterday than the aay
before. But it is a terrible time for us all, and
we can’t be too thankful that the children are all
pate out of the way of it.”

“Mamma,” said Maggie, « do. please come and
let me show you the cowhouse? Elly and I always
go and get some new milk when they are milking;
and it is so nice!”

“Mamma,” said Dick, “there are such lots of
Boys and Girls, 39

Painted Ladies about here, and I really do think
this would be the very place for an Oleander,
don’t you?’

Frank had gone out and picked a “ nosegay of
heather and thyme, and the sweet-scented flowers
that grew on the common, and brought it back to
his mother as a present; and Elly brought the
breadths of her-new bathing-gown, to display at
once the munificence of Dick’s present and her
own industry.

“Very kind of Dick,” said Mrs. Langford,
patting his shoulder; « but I think mammas ought
to pay for their little girls bathing-gowns, so I
will pay Dick the money back, and he can spend
it on something else.”

“ But I meant it for a present to Elly,” said Dick.

«Very well; then suppose you keep it so, and
instead. of paying you, Dick, I will spend my
money on wine, for some of the poor people in —
the fever.”

“Mamma,” said Elly, “will you take my
eighteenpence to buy wine too?”

Maggie also had a fourpence which she was
very anxious to contribute; and Frank had two-
pence halfpenny, and Johnny a shilling; Charlie
had only two stale Bath buns, the remains of his
yesterday’s feast. Corda brought five shillings to
her aunt, rather shyly, and begged her to take it.

“ Are you sure you won’t wish to have it back?”
said Mrs. Langford.

- * No,” said Corda, and then she whispered,
“Because [ promised mamma to try not to be
selfish.”
40 Boys and Girls.

Mrs. Langford kissed her little niece—for
though Corda was really her cousin, she always
called her aunt—and said, “Then I am sure
mamma will be very much pleased, dear little
woman. But now I am afraid I must be going
back, or I shall miss the train.”

“OQ mamma, I do wish you were going to stay!”
rose up in a dolorous cry.

“TI wish I was, but I must not leave poor papa
when he has so much to do, and the parish is in
such trouble, Good-bye, children, and don’t send
for me another time without nurse’s authority,
Elly, dear,”

Elly felt rather small, and so perhaps did
Blessington, although Mrs. Langford said nothing
to her. For they” had given Mrs. Langford a

_ great fright, and put her to the trouble and ex-
pense of a long tiring journey on a hot day, when
there was not the slightest need for so doing.

Tom went back with his mother in the fly to
Bellsand, to see her into the train, and then to
walk back. Tom told her what he had heard
from Dick about Charlie and his friend Halford.

“J am glad there are five good miles between
them,” said Mrs. Langford, smiling. “I look to
you, Tom, to keep Charlie out of mischief; don’t
let him get with this Halford, or indeed go to

«Bellsand at all if you can help it, for I don’t
think he is strong enough for the walk in the
heat. He is growing too fast to be very strong,”

Tom promised to do his best, and their arrival
at the station put everything else out of his head.


CHAPTER V.

HE bathing-gown was finished, and at ten
T o’clock on a lovely sunny morning Blessing-
ton took down Elly, Corda, and Maggie to
the beach so that they might bathe among the
rocks. Alfred was afraid of the water, and he
refused to accept Elly’s invitation to come in
with her, so that she would take care of him.
He preferred playing with Gertrude on the sand
in the shade of a rock, where there were plenty
of limpets and brown sea-weed; and accordingly
the three little girls undressed in a convenient
place among the rocks, and put on their bathing-
gowns, For nurse had managed to coritrive
something which did duty for one for Magels,
much to the little girl’s delight.

“What a nice dressing- room this is!” said Elly,
as she waited for Corda, who was not quite so
soon ready. “We have got a white carpet of
sand, and some lovely red sea-weed to make the
walls pretty, and a blue roof.

“T don’t see any roof,” said Maggie.

“The sky, Madge!” laughed Elly.

“But we ought to have some hooks to hang
ap our clothes upon to make it. as nice as a
machine,” said matter-of-fact little Corda.
42 Boys and Girls.

“ The rocks are our hooks,” said Elly. “Wouldn’t
it be funny if we really had hooks among the
rocks! But are you ready, Corda? Maggie and
Tam. Now then, come!”

“Pip your heads, there’s good children,’ said
Blessington: and the three little girls, hand in
hand, treading very gingerly with their bare feet,
went into the clear calm warm water. “Oh!”
cried Maggie, “it’s so funny!” and she stood still
with the water up to her ankles.

“Oh, come on,” said Elly: “it’s not half deep
enough yet. Here we are; now we'll dip our
heads.” But truth compels me to say that though
Maggie and Corda thought they had dipped their
heads, they had really only dipped their faces, and
their hair remained as dry as before. Elly, who was
less timid, performed the feat more thoroughly.

Then they jumped about in the water and
splashed each other, like so many mermaids,
and thought it was only too soon when Bles-
sington called to them that it was time to
come out.

They would have liked to stay in for an hour
instead of five minutes, but that would hardly
have been a good thing for them: and they came
back to have a good rub with Blessington’s towels,
and then put on their clothes again and went
back to the farm, when they were all so hungry
that Mrs, Burton gave them each a great hunch
of seed-cake,

They were all a little tired with their first
bathe, and were not at all unwilling to sit.in the
shade of the house with quiet occupations. Maggie
Boys and Girls. 43

had her doll; Corda, who delighted in needlework,
was making a red silk pincushion; and Elly, much
as if ske was doing something wrong, fetched the
Greek grammar, with which she meant to surprise:
every one when she reached home.

“T wish you would read to us, Elly,” said Corda.
«What story is that?”

“It isn’t a story; it’s a secret,” said Elly.

Maggie sprang up at once to see.

“Madge, it’s dishonourable to try to find out
things that are secrets,” said Elly severely: and
poor Maggie retreated crushed.

«Why do you read things which are not
stories,” said Corda, rather discontentedly ; “if it
was a story you might have read to us.”

“JT can’t talk now: [I’m busy,” said Elly: and
in an audible whisper she began conning the
names of the letters, “Alpha, Beta,—that must
be C next, what can be the name of it? No, it’s
Gamma, what a very odd place for G to come in
the alphabet!” And Elly was so much surprised
that she said aloud, “Corda, do you know the
. little Greek children did not learn their A, B, C,
‘but their A, B, G?”

“Ts that Greek you’re doing then?” said Corda,

indifferently.

“Well, if I tell you, you must promise faith-
fully never to tell anybody. Will you promise,
Corda?”

“Yes,” said Corda.

* And you, Maggie?’

“Pll never tell nobody! never!” said Maggie,
highly honcured.


44. Boys and Girls.

“Well then, I'll tell you. I’m going to try to
teach myself Greek these holidays, and surprise
everybody. I’m learning the letters now. Oh, do
you know it is so funny! Z comes in the middle
of the alphabet instead of the end!”

«I know what that letter is,” said Corda, point-
ing to one. “It’s V.”

“There you’re just wrong; it’s N,” said Elly,
proud of her superior knowledge. “Now I mean
to learn all these letters before I leave off to-day.
Alpha, Beta, Gamma .

“What do you want to do it for?” said
Corda.

«Because I do,” said Elly. “Now don’t talk to
me any more, either of you.”

“YT wouldn’t do lessons in the holidays!” said
Corda.



“JTt’s not a lesson,” said Elly, rather grandly.

“But I told you, you were not to talk.”

Presently Frank, who was tired of playing, came
and sat down beside the little girls. “Oh, Frank,
began Maggie, “we have had such a lovely bathe ;
and we went to such a beautiful place!”

“Not near so beautiful as the place I have
been to,” said Frank, who, like some other little
boys, thought it very clever to cram his little
sister with nonsense, and make her believe what
was not true.

“What was yours like?” said Maggie. “Ours
was among the rocks, and had beautiful soft white
sand for a carpet, and green and red sea-weed
about the walls.”

“ Mine,” said Frank, “was ever so much better
Boys and Girls, 45

than that. JI went along the rocks till I saw
something that looked like a cave; and I went
in. Well, do you know, the floor was all in
stripes of red and blue sand, and there was
beautiful gold and silver sea-weed hanging down
from the roof: and there was a little pool in
one corner, full of gold fish.”

Corda laughed, knowing that it was all Frank’s
nonsense; but Maggie took it all in.

“Gold and silver sea-weed! Oh, may I go and
see it? Will nurse take me?”

' No, there are too many rocks before you get
there for nurse to take you,” said Frank, willing
to go on with his romance.

“ How far off is it? Could I walk there?”

«QO yes, you could walk there,” said Frank, “but
youd have to look very sharp for it. But you
don’t know what a beautiful place it is. If you
once saw the golden and silver sea-weed, you
wouldn’t think much of the red and green you
talk about.”

“ And what is the roof made of?” said Corda;
for though she knew that Frank was talking non-
sense, she liked to pretend he was not.

“ Shining diamonds,” said Frank, “with a few
rubies here and there!”

“Why don’t they take them away and put
them in brooches?” said Maggie, gravely.

“Because nobody knows about the place except
me,” said Frank. “Some day I shall go there
with a pick-axe and get some of them, and sell
them, and buy a pony and a Newfoundland dog
with the money. So mind you don’t say a word
46 Boys and Girls.

to any one, Madge, Lecause if you do, perhaps
somebody else will go and get my diamonds.”

“Oh, 1 won’t tell anybody!” said Maggie, who
was such a simple little girl that she could not
understand why Frank; and Corda, and Elly, all
laughed at this speech.

The others, as children do, thought it very
great fun to tell Maggie nonsensical things of
this sort, which she always believed. They
little thought that their greatest trouble at End-
low Farm was to arise from this silly nonsense
of Frank’s.

However, the subject was put a stop to for the
present, for the letter-box had just been emptied
by Mr. Burton, who brought a letter for Corda
from Alick. In it he said that he was not coming
quite so soon as he had said, for the people with
~ whom he was staying had asked him to stay over
a cricket-match which was to be on Friday, and
he would therefore not be able to come to Endlow
till the Saturday, which was just a week from the
day on which Corda got the letter,

“How odd it is!” said Elly, who had by
this time had enough of her Greek: “the sun is
gone in, and yet it is hotter than when it was
out.”

The children looked up at the sky. .The sea
had turned grey instead of blue, and there was a
long line of reddish grey cloud over tke horizon,
coming up against the wind. Presently a low
rumble came up out of it. .

“Oh,” said Corda, “there is going to be a storm”
I do believe!” And she gathered up her work
Boys and Girls. 47

and went in, while Elly said, “What a coward
Corda is about thunder!”

However, it was not all cowardice on Corda’s
part. Some people cannot help being more afraid
of thunder than others: Elly and her brothers and
sisters were not nervous as Corda was, so that
there was no credit due to them on that score.
People who are not nervous should not laugh at
those who are, for they do not know what pain
and misery they are spared.

The storm came on quickly, and a very violent
one it was. Mr. Burton was glad that he had had
a new lightning conductor put up on his highest
chimney, for as there were no trees about, the
farm-house might very likely have been struck
in such a storm. The lightning flashed, and the
thunder roared, and the rain poured down in
torrents. The boys and girls all came in, and
called out “Oh!” at each fresh flash, and “That
was a buster!” at every fresh peal of thunder: and
they were so much occupied with watching the
storm that they never noticed that Corda was not
there. Nurse found it out first, and Elly went
to look for the little girl, “Corda!” she cried,
but no Corda came; and they were beginning
to get into a fright about her, when the storm
lessened, and Corda appeared, looking rather
ashamed of herself, but perfectly unaware how
very odd she looked, for she had been hiding in
the coal-hole, as the darkest place where she could
find, so that she might not see the lightning: and
her face, hands, and frock were all streaked with
black coal-dust,
48 Boys and Girls.

“The thunder has burnt her!” said Maggie,
and began to cry. |

And though nothing so terrible as this had
happened, poor Corda did not find it pleasant
to be twitted for many a day with “who hid in
the coal-hole?”




CHAPTER VI.

HE storm had one bad effect: for it spoilt
the weather entirely for two days: and this
was the more tiresome to the children be-

cause the first of these two days was Sunday, and
they did not know what to do with themselves
shut up in the house with very few Sunday books,
and none of their usual Sunday pleasures. Maggie,
who was the most contented of little mortals,
took Alfred and Gertrude to play at a very fa-
vourite game at Langford Rectory, called “Corner
Church.” All the three children preached at once
in Corner Church, and the sermon consisted
merely of the one sentence “Brethren be good,”
repeated again and again in different tones, So,
as it was not a difficult game, little Gerty stood
up and said “Bevren be dood” as heartily as
anybody.

But the other children were not so fortunate,
since they were too old to play at Corner Church,
Elly and Corda had both brought texts to illu-
minate, and could have amused. themselves very
peaceably—though truth compels me to say that
Elly’s illuminating was generally too untidy to be
worth looking at when it was done—if it had not
been for their brothers, who having nothing to do,

E
Le) Boys and Girls.

except Dick, amused themselves by pommelling
one another to the loss of all peace in the
room.

At last nurse said, “Master Tom, it seems to
me it would be more Sunday-like if you read us
the Psalms and Lessons this morning.”

“Not I,” said Tom, who was shy like most lads
of his age.

“Qh, Tom!” said Elly; “do let us chant the
Psalms, half taking one verse and half the other as
we do at home on Easter Sunday!”

This proposal found favour with everybody but
Dick, who did not care for singing, and was busy
with his sea-weed specimens in one corner, But
he withdrew his opposition when Maggie came
and said in her coaxing way “Do help us sing,
Dick!”

So Charlie, who was the best singer of the
family, started them off with Lord Mornington’s
chant, so much beloved by children: and the
singing was so successful that they were not con-
tent with going through the Psalms for the
morning, but went on with those for the evening
and the next morning as well. After this was
over, Tom declared that it was hardly raining at
all, and nurse told the boys they had better put on
their great coats and go out for a walk before
dinner. Elly wanted to go too, but nurse said
“No” very peremptorily to this: and the little
girl had to swallow down her vexation as best she
could. However, in the afternoon the rain held
up, and they all went to church, armed with
waterproofs and umbrellas.
Boys and Girls. Br

In the evening they asked Bible questions and
tried to puzzle one another; which was not
difficult; as they were accustomed to do at home:
but they all found the day heavy and were not
sorry when bed-time came. When Elly and
Corda were in bed, Elly said, “It zs horrid on
Sunday without papa and mamma. We can get
along quite nicely on other days, but Sundays are
dreadful without them!”

“Well,” said poor Corda, “I don’t think you
need talk, Elly. You’ll see them again in a few
weeks, and you saw Aunt Eleanor only on Thurs-
day: and I haven’t seen mamma for a month and
1 shan’t see her again for years and years and
years!”

And poor little Corda began to cry.

Elly was a kind-hearted little girl, She got
out of her own bed and crept into Corda’s, and
put her arms round her and tried to comfort her as
well as she could. Somehow, she began to think
that she had not been quite so kind to Cordaas
she might have been: and she thought so still
more when Corda sobbed out “and mamma told
me I was to try and not be selfish, and not be
cross when I am laughed at, and I can’t help it;
and she’d be so sorry if she knew, and if I write it
all down on a piece of paper it looks as if I had
been’ so very bad. I can’t send it to her. I
always used to tell her when she came to see me
at night how naughty I had been, and then she
forgave me, and it was all right.”

“Yes,” said Elly: “when [came to-Ringland
first by myself, I used to feel like that too. But

Rh
52 Boys and Girls,

mamma told me that she couldn’t always be with
me, and that I must think when I said my prayers
that I was telling God about what I had done
wrong instead of her, and that He would forgive
me if I was sorry just as she would,”

“Yes,” said Corda, “but it is so different.”

_ © But,” said Elly, “I suppose people have to
learn to be good like that. Only think what we
should do if we were like Alick, with no father
and mother at all!”

“Alick is very good,” said Corda, as if she
thought that his case hardly applied to her,

“ Perhaps,” said Elly, “some people are ‘ gooder’
for not having nice things like other people. In
stories it is generally the unhappy people who get

ood,”

“Oh, don’t talk like that, Elly!” said Corda;
“it makes me feel as if I didn’t want to be
good!”

“Well, it needn’t,” said Elly: “because mamma
says it is of no use to make ourselves unhappy

by thinking about what may possibly happen in
' the future. She says that all we have got to
think about is being good now, and that is quite
enough for us. Besides, you know, I don’t think
' Alick is at all unhappy, though he has got nobody

belonging to him, Perhaps when things really
happen to people they are not so bad as we
suppose.”
“If I were you,” said Corda, “I should always
be thinking that Aunt Eleanor Or Uncle Richard
- would catch the fever at Ringland.”
Elly gave a little shiver: for she had never
Boys and Girls, 53

thought of the possibility before, and it was not a
p'easant suggestion. “I don’t think anything so
horrid,” she said, almost crossly. “I wish you
wouldn’t say such things, Corda.”

“J didn’t mean to make you angry,” said
Corda.

“[’m not angry,” said Elly: and Corda took
hold of her and kissed her so that she could not
help forgiving her. And then after this con-
versation Elly went back into her own bed, and
soon they were both of them fast asleep, forgetting
all their troubles both real and imaginary in
dreams-of sea-weeds and bathing adventures,

So ended their first Sunday at Endlow.




CHAPTER VII.

ATTER, patter, patter, came the rain
P against the window on Monday morning,

putting an end to all hopes of bathing for
the little girls: for who cares to bathe in the
rain? It was a row of very melancholy faces that
assembled in the parlour at breakfast that morning,
and nurse seemed to share the prevailing gloom,
for she said, “Goodness knows whatever I am
to do with all you children through another wet
day!”

Rain or no rain, the boys must go out for a
walk: and as they had been brought up not to
mind weather, nurse made no very great objec-
tion to their going out. But Elly and Corda
stood disconsolately by the window, looking out
at the grey clouds, which were so dark and heavy
that all the light there was seemed to come from
the yellow furze on the common.

“Rain, rain, go away, and come again another
day,” sings Maggie in her cheery contented little
voice, nursing her doll.

“Just as if it would!” says Corda, rather
crossly.

“It won’t go away for your staring at it, Miss
Cordelia,” says nurse.
Boys and Girls, 55

“It likes to be looked at, perhaps,” Elly said,
more cheerfully, trying to make a little joke.

“Like Miss Cordelia,” said Sarah, Blessington’s
nurserymaid. There was some truth in the re-
mark, for Corda was:a little bit vain; but the
truth in it only made it more irritating to
poor cross Corda, especially when Elly joined in
the giggle that followed the joke. Corda gave
an impatient wriggle with her shoulders, and _
stalked out of the room, banging the door after ©
her. The servants laughed as she went out,
which did not tend to improve her temper; and
when Elly came flying up stairs after her to ask’
her to come down again, Corda had locked the
door and would say nothing but “I shan’t: go
away!” Perhaps it was a little annoying to have
Elly shouting at her through the door so that
every one in the house could hear what she said;
but Elly had not yet learnt all the tact she had
to learn in her life.

So- Elly came down, got her Greek book, and
set to work again upon the letters: and she in-
sisted on having the book open before her when
nurse gave her the daily task of needlework to .
do. _But as usually happens when little girls try
to do two things at once, it ended by her doing
neither well. Instead of getting the letters into
her head, her eyes fell upon a page a little further
on, where the English sentences looked more
interesting. “The baker has not injured the
citizens. The citizens have injured the wolf,”
put a whole story into her head about the baker,
the wolf, and the citizens, which the wise man
56 Boys and Girls.

who wrote the exercise probably never dreamed
of. She was discoursing upon the subject to
Maggie, who was placidly hemming a handker-
chief by her side, and was telling her how the
injured and harmless baker had had a wolf put
into his shop by the spiteful citizens, and how
the baker finding that it had eaten all his best
loaves, had nearly killed it, and consequently
“the citizens had injured the wolf,’ when nurse
came up to look at her work.

“Oh, Miss Elly!” said nurse, “I should be
ashamed if I were you to go on chattering about
wolves and bakers, and not work better than
that! Why, the wolf itself would be ashamed of
such work!’

Maggie burst out into one of her merry peals
of laughter; but Elly did not laugh when she
saw nurse take hold of the thread which she
had just put in, take hold of the end, and ruth-
lessly tear it all out. Once Elly might have
got into a passion at such a thing; but now
she had learnt to control her temper, and beyond
getting very red she said nothing, though she
could not help looking very doleful as nurse gave
her back the long hem to do again.

Maggie had done hers very nicely, and nurse
said she mignt go. She hopped out of the room
like a little bird. Maggie liked hopping on one
leg much better than walking on two, and had
to be reproved for it in the schoolroom, and

. then she ran up stairs and called at Corda’s doer.

“Corda, do let me in. I want to come in so

much |”
Boys and Girls, 57

Whetker it was that Corda was getting over
her fit of temper, or whether Maggie’s soft plead--
ing went to her heart more than Elly’s shouts,
certain it is that she opened the door and let
Maggie in.

“What do you want?” she said, as Maggie
climbed up upon the bed.

“Oh, I want you to come down,” said Maggie.
“Elly’s done her work badly and got to do it
all over again, and Alfred and I and Gerty want
you to come and play with us.”

«That’s nonsense. Nobody ever wants me
to play with them,” said Corda, who certainly
was not so amusing a playfellow as Elly, and
did not generally care to play with the little
ones.

“Yes, we do. We like to play with you
because you are gentle and not rough,” said
Maggie racking her little brains for something
“nice” to say and yet true. Certainly Maggie
at seven had more tact than Elly at eleven. i

Corda looked as if she were going to be soft-
ened; but her “monkey,” as Elly called her
temper, was on her shoulder again.

“You don’t. You tell stories, Magzie. You
know you like Elly ever so much better than
me, and so does Alfred, and Alick, and every-
body. Nobody cares a bit for me, and I den't
deserve they should!”

The last little piece of candour scemed to
come out in spite of poor Corda herself. Perhaps
she would have been tco proud to say so to any
one except Maggie, who hardly took it ia,

“50
58 Boys and Girls.

“We all care about you very much, Corda,”
she said, simply. “We were all so glad when
we heard you were coming here. And we don’t
like you to be unhappy and cry up here all by
yourself. Do come down!”

Corda was not hard-hearted enough to resist
her little cousin’s pleading. She washed. her face
and came down looking rather ashamed of herself.
Sarah began, when she saw her: “Well, Miss
Cordelia, we shall know who miustn’t be laughed
at another time!”

“Sarah,” said Elly, turning round upon her
sharply from her work, “leave Corda alone, if
you please |”

“Hoity toity!” said Sarah; but Elly’s rebuke
had its effect, both on her and on Corda. Corda
went up to Elly, took hold of her work, and
said, “Tl finish it for you if you like, Elly.”

“Oh thank you, Corda!” said Elly, joyfully, for
Corda was very quick and neat in her work; “but
I don’t know if nurse will let me!”

“Yes, if; Miss Cordelia likes,” said nurse, who
had been rather sorry to vex Elly, especially when
she saw how good-temperedly she had borne her
double task. ,

So Corda, without any more words sat down
quietly by Elly’s side, and took her work out of
her hands. Elly laid her head on Corda’s shoulder
and kissed her, and Corda began to feel that one
little act of kindness had cleared away the yellow
mist from her eyes which made her think that
everybody hated her.

The work was quickly finished, and then Elly
Boys and Girls. 59

and Corda had a game with the little ones until
it was time for Gertrude to have her midday sleep.
Then Mrs. Burton came in and said, “Ive been
thinking, Mrs, Brown, if the children like to go
and play in the big barn, it’s quite empty of
everything except a little straw, and as dry as
dry.”

Xe Oh, how jolly!” said Elly, springing up.

They put on their goloshes and waterproofs
and ran across through the rain to the barn, which
was the most delightful place you can imagine.
There was a long rope lying. there, and Mrs.
Burton got one of the men to come and fasten
it up to a beam, so that they could swing on
it: and when they had done swinging they buried
themselves in the heap of clean sweet straw which
filled up one corner, and enjoyed themselves
thoroughly until it was dinner-time.

After dinner the boys all came to play in the
barn too, and they had a famous siege of the straw
fortress, which was defended by Elly, Tom, and
Charlie. They began to think that a wet day
was not so very dreadful after all, if it allowed
them such fun as this; and they were thoroughly
tired out with play and laughing, and were sitting
panting on the straw, when Elly gave a shriek of
delight.

“What is it? A rat?” said Charlie.

«The sun!” said Elly.

And then they saw that the clouds had parted,
and that the sun had sent down a bright yellow
ray through an opening in the timbers of the barn
upon the straw. ‘They ran to the door and looked
60 Loys and Girls.

out; and lo and behold, it was so fine that they
all felt obliged to go down to the beach at once!
The servants went with them, for they were glad
to get out too; and they had a very pleasant hour
upon the beach before tea. All the west was in
a golden glow, and the sky and sea were both so
' bright, that the children could hardly bear to look
at them.

“Which way did you go to get the golden sca-
weed, Frank?” said Maggie.

7 Oh, that way,” said Frank, still thinking it
clever to puzzle his little sister, and pointing to
the left. “But mind you don’t say anything!”

“Ts it a very long way?”

“ Not further than you could walk in the after-
noon.”

« And be back at night?”

“T came back at night, you know.”

And with that Frank ran off to look at a star-
fish, and never thought that the time would come
when the thought of the golden sea-weed would
make him more unhappy than he had ever been
in his life.

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CHAPTER VIII.

‘HE next was a lovely morning, and the
children’s spirits were as high as they had
before been low; and if anything was

needed to raise them higher, it was Mrs. Burton’s
announcement the next morning as she brought
in the refilled milk-jug. “Bless me, what a head
Ihave got, to be sure! Why, I wholly forgot to
say that Mr. Maurice our clergyman, came in
yesterday and said there was a school-treat up at
the Vicarage to-day, and if any of the young folks
he’d seen at church yesterday would like to go up
and see it, and help the boys play cricket and
such like, he’d be very glad. He said he’d known
your Pa at college, I think, Master.‘Tom.”

Nurse and Blessington and Mrs, Burton all
agreed that under the circumstances they might
venture to take the children up without further
orders from Ringland. Perhaps they were not
sorry themselves to have a chance of seeing the
world, for Endlow Farm was rather dull for middle-
aged people who cared neither for common nor sea.

"So they settled to go up to the Vicarage, which
was close to the church, about two o ’clock : which
Mrs, Burton said was the time at which the festi-
vities began; and as it was a very hot day, Mrs,
62 Boys and Girls.

Burton persuaded her husband to let them all
“ride up” as she called it, in the great covered
waggon. She liked to go in her smartest clothes,
and it was not nice, poor woman! to get to the
Vicarage white with dust, and so hot that she had
to fan herself with her pocket-handkerchief for a
quarter of an hour. So the whole party, ten boys
and girls, four servants, and Mrs. Burton, all
packed themselves into the waggon, and jolted
along the sunny road as far as the Vicarage
garden. The waggon had no springs, and its
motion was rather rough, so that poor nurse
called out “Oh, my poor bones!” several times,
and Blessington remarked to Sarah that she should
not wish her friends to see her in such a rustic
conveyance; but the children thought it capital
fun, though they were not so very sorry when the
slow weary drive was over, and they were sitting
under the trees on the Vicarage lawn in the
shade, each with a large plate of gooseberries
to eat.

Mr. and Mrs. Maurice were considerably amused
when they saw what an immense party Mrs.
Burton had brought; and they were also puzzled
to know why Elly, Maggie, and Gertrude, should
be dressed only in plain buff-cottons, while Corda,
who seemed to be their sister, wore a delicate
white cambric all over braid and embroidery.
But Corda, who was never shy in company, ex-
plained that she and Alfred were cousins to the
rest, and. that their papa and mamma were in
India.

“ And so’you-are all together at Endlow Farm >”
Boys and Girls. 63

said Mrs. Maurice, kindly. ‘Do you like it?”
and she turned to Elly.

“Oh yes,” said Elly, “awfully!”

And then she suddenly remembered that mamma
had often told her that “awfully” was not exactly
a young lady’s word, and got red with confusion ;
but Mrs. Maurice was too goodnatured to do
more than smile. She called one of her own
girls, a pretty, pleasant-looking creature about
fifteen, and told her to take the visitors into the
field; she thought they could make up a nice
game of “Hunt the slipper” in the shade, under
the elmtrees. She told the boys that they could
go into the field with Mr. Maurice, and he would
set them all to play a good game of cricket; and
the servants found a shady seat where they could
see everything, and make acquaintance with Mrs.
Burton’s friends.

Dora Maurice soon saw that Elly and Maggie
were well used to school-feasts, and to playing
at the village children’s games; even that very
foolish one of “Sally Sally water, sprinkle in the
pan,” where the little girls choose out each other
to be kissed. Poor Maggie was at once pounced
upon by all the school-girls in turn to be kissed,
because she was so plump and rosy and merry-
looking; and though she was not over fond of
kissing, she endured it contentedly, only whisper-
ing aside to Elly, “They do make my mouth so
sticky!” Corda was too shy, or too refined to
join in the game at all; but she did vouchsafe to
take part in the game of “I have a little dog and
it shan’t bite you.” But here she was not a good
64 Boys and Girls.

runner, and Elly was supremely happy. No one
could catch her as she dodged about screaming
with laughter, her hair flying in the air, so sure
of her swiftness of foot, that she dared to wait till
her pursuer was almost on her before she ran off
again. But at last they tired her out, and she
was glad enough to sit down panting, with a
crimson face, and to let other people set off their
“little dogs” to bite.

; But perhaps you will think that I am telling

-you too much about the girls, and so now we
will go to the boys.

In the midst of their cricket, who should turn
up but Charlie’s dear friend, Tommy Halford!
Mr. Maurice had asked some cousins of his to
the school-feast, and they had brought Tommy
with them. ‘There he stood with his hands in
his pockets, looking on at the game, and making
jeering remarks on the village boys’ play, until
one of them said, “I say young’un, you may be
a swell, but if you don’t drop that sauce of yours,
Tl. make you.” . And considering that the boy
who said this looked fully able and willing to
carry out his words, Tommy thought it best to
subside,

Tom Langford was bowling, and as he bowled
well they made him take plenty of work. Thus
it was that he never perceived that Charlie was
gone off from the game, until it was tea-time,
and the school-boys had to leave their game to
take their places on the grass. Then it was dis-
covered that Halford and Charlie were sauntering
round the field in close conversation,
Boys and Girls, — 65

“TI say, Tom,” said Dick, “you won’t let
him go to see the boat-race with that little
brute? I can’t think how Charlie can stand him;
I can’t.”

“He shan’t go,” said Tom, “if I can help
it. Vd sooner write to mother. He'll get
into no end of mischief if we don’t look out,
Dick.”

«“ When is the boat-race?” said Dick.

“On Thursday. I haven’t the least doubt ‘but
that they are settling their plans there.- But
‘Pll be even with him!”

But the two boys’ talk was stopped, for they
were called upon to help in handing cake, and
filling cups with coffee out of large tin-cans.
Elly and Maggie were in their glory here; Corda
was rather too conscious of the necessity of
keeping her pretty white frock free from coffee-
stains and pressed currants out of the cake. But
-she enjoyed herself too; and when they went
-up to take leave of Mrs. Maurice, she made
her little speech of thanks much more prettily
than Elly, who got shy, and could only mutter
inaudibly, “Thank you for having us.” Miss
‘Morison used to say that Elly and Corda were
exactly suitable for a pair of friends, because one
could always supply what the other lacked; and
-as they were very fond of each other, they had
no silly little jealousies now when one got more
-praise than the other.


CHAPTER IX.

e l TELL you you shan’t, Charlie!”
*T tell you I shall!”
“You know papa would be angry!”

[don’t know any such thing!”

“Well, mother told me to keep you out of
mischief, and I shall, so here goes!” Tom
slipped out of the bedroom in which he and
Charlie were disputing, and in a trice had turned
the key upon his brother. “There!” he shouted,
through the door, “when you choose to give me
your word of honour not to go off to Bellsand
to-day, I'll let you out!”

Charlie flung himself against the door as if he
wished to break it open, but though he made a
great noise, it was no nearer opening than before.

“Master ‘Tom, what are you doing to him?”
- said nurse, from the bottom of the stairs.

“Keeping him in order,” answered Tom, in a
provokingly cool voice. “When he promises to
be a good little boy he shall come down.”

“Well, you needn’t cheek him after you’ve
locked him up, Tom,” said Dick, from below.

“Oh!” said Maggie, with a very long face,
“Tom, do please let Charlie come out and have
some breakfast,”
Boys and Girls. 67

“ Not till he chooses to promise to do what he
ought,” said:Tom, incurably. “He is a naughty
boy, Madge, and I have got to keep him in order.”

And it certainly appeared as if Tom rather
enjoyed the task. He was inflexible to the
entreaties of his. sisters, and consented with
some reluctance to let Maggie take up a slice
of bread and butter and push it under the door,
where there was a crack quite wide enough to
admit it if it was not cut too thick,

Maggie came back crying, having accomplished
her task, but not having been able to get a word
out of Charlie. “Suppose he had tumbled down
and hurt himself!” said Corda, so earnestly, that
Elly’s eyes grew round with terror.

“ Nonsence, he’s only sulky,” said Tom, who
was a little proud of his promptness and the
vigorous measures he had taken, and did not like
them to be criticised.

“J do believe,” said Corda, who sat where she
could see out of the window, “that the cow boy
has taken one of your scarlet caps. I see his
head moving along there just along the top of
the furze—you can just see the scarlet thing
moving; how quick he is going!”

Tom, Dick, Frank, and Johnny, who all rejoiced
in scarlet caps, rushed out frantically into the
passage to see if their caps were safe; for “Only
imagine what an awful thing it would be,” said
Johnny, “if he had really put one of our caps on
his head!” There were three; but after a search,
Frank produced his out of his pocket, with a
tangle of string and a lump of toffy in it.

FQ
68 ‘Boys and Girls.

“Where’s Charlies?” said Elly. “The cow-
“boy must have got his.”

But at that very moment the suspected cow-boy
‘passed the door carrying a bucket of pigs’ wash,
and innocent of any covering to his head except
his sun-bleached thatch of hair. Suddenly it flashed
upon Dick—“I say, Tom! he’s got out of the
window, and that was 422 with his own cap!” '

Tom rushed up with his key, opened the door,
and found the room empty. The attic window,
over a sloping roof which reached within six feet
of the ground, presented a most obvious: way,
which T’om had overlooked, out of the difficulty.
“Pll never lock up anybody again,” said ‘Tom,
very much crestfallen, “unless the window is a
‘good twenty feet from the ground.”

“Fle’s a very naughty boy!” said nurse, in-
dignantly. “What’s to be done now?”

Tom stood pondering.

“ Finish breakfast, I hope,” said Frank, who had
an excellent appetite at all times.

Altogether this seemed to. be good advice; for
Charlie had a quarter of an hour's start of them,
and his brothers did not know to what part of
Bellsand he was going: nor, if they found him
could they bring him back by main force.
Suddenly Elly said, “ Alick is coming to-day!”

“What of that?” said Tom, rather crossly.

“Why, Charlie always minds what Alick says,
you know, because of his making him lame. If
Alick could find him, I am sure he could get him
to come back.”

«Not if he said he wouldn’t,” growled Tom.
Boys and Girls: 69:

“Charlie could knock him down if he chose,
though he is two years younger.”

Charlie wouldn’t be such a brute,” said Elly,
indignantly. “You know he wouldn’t, Tom!”

‘Tom, you see, was of opinion that when people.
were wrong, the thing was to put them right by
main forcé. Elly saw that Charlie might easily
be led when he would not be driven. a

“It’s like the fable,” said Dick, in his. old-
fashioned considering way. “Tom is to be the
wind, and Alick is the sun, and Charlie is the
traveller and his cloak—I suppose his cloak is the
boat-race !”

. They laughed at this; and then it was settled
that Tom should go down to Bellsand to meet
Alick at the train, and that the two together
should proceed to search for the runaway and
bring him safely back. For, as nurse said, though
it was very naughty of Master Charlie to do what’
he knew his papa and mamma would not like,
yet still she could not say that there was any call
to put them out, poor things! by telegraphing to
them about a trifle.

Tom was to start at eleven o’clock, but just’
before that time he came up to Dick and said,.
“T say, old fellow, perhaps you’d better go instead
of me.”

“Why?” said Dick.

“Well, perhaps I put his monkey up a little
this morning, and he might forget his dignity
more with you and Alick.”

This was as near an approach to confessing ;
himself to have made a mistake as would be’
70 Boys and Girls,

expected from dignified Tom, and Dick took it as
it was meant. He at once consented to take
Tom’s place, and to go to mect Alick at Bellsand.

Alick arrived safely, looking very bright, and
was greeted by Dick with “I say, old fellow,
we're ina pretty go. I want you to come with
me and find that young donkey.”

«What young donkey?” said Alick.

“Charlie. That little sneak Halford has turned
up here and has got him under his thumb, and
to-day Tom locked him up because he would go
to the boat-race there is to-day, and he cut out of
the window. So you and I are to go and look
after him, old fellow; for Charlie always minds
you, you know!”

“Til come,” said Alick; “but I am not so sure
about his minding me. I’m sure if he tried he
could knock me down.”

Alick was very small for his age and there was
a good deal of truth in what he said: for he was
not at all a strong boy, never having quite re-
covered the weakness which his accident had
caused him,

“He would not be such a brute,” said Dick,
“after what he did to you.”

“'That’s nonsense,” said Alick. “It was the
purest accident, and it was quite as much my
fault as his for being such a fool as to go out
with him. However, let us think what we are to
do. Where does this Halford live?’

“We don’t know,” said Dick, “but we thought
they would tell us up at the post-office. J know
where that is, Comeon.” —
Boys and Girls, 71

“Stop a bit, you harum-scarum fellow,” said
Alick. “I have got to book my luggage first, if
we are to tramp the town all day.”

Accordingly Alick fulfilled his duties, and they
set forth. ‘The post-office authorities informed
them of Mr. Halford’s lodgings, and they found
that they were a good mile off. However they
proceeded to trudge thither, and then found that
Master Tommy and another young gentleman
had gone into the town at least two hours
before.

«Where were they likely to be?” asked Alick.

“Ob, most likely at the Swan. The room
there was the best for seeing, and most of the
gentry went there to look out of the best parlour
window,” said the maid, and shut the door.

Accordingly Alick and Dick retraced their
steps to the middle of the town, and inquired at
the “ Swan” whether Tommy Halford had been
seen there; but he had not. The boys hardly
knew what to do, and. looked at each other in
dismay.

“Well,” said Dick, philosophically, “whether
we find Charlie or not, we can’t live on air. I
am so awfully hungry!” -

This misfortune was happily easily curable,
and the boys went into the pastry-cook’s and ate
sandwiches from under a glass case in the window
with a happy disregard of the time that had
elapsed since they had been cut. After this they
felt able to carry on their search, and began it by
sitting for a quarter of an hour on a bench on
the parade, watching the crowd pass by. It was
72. Boys and Girls.

getting pretty thick now, for the boat-race was to
begin at three.

They were just beginning to think that they:
must take more active measures, when not far off
they perceived a crowd gathering. It was natural
that they should at once go up to see what was to
be seen. A policeman was dragging a boy by the
arm: in the middle of it. “Alick,”?:said Dick,
turning quite white, “it’s Charlie!”

They forced their way in, and presently Charlie
caught sight of them. “ Alick, Dick,” he cried,
despairingly, «do come here and help me! Tell
him I didn’t!”

“What is it?” said Alick, making his way up:
to the policeman; and though he was only a boy
of fourteen, there was such an air of gentleman-
liness about his look and voice, that the policeman
answered him respectfully.

“ An old gentleman, sir, has just given him in
charge for picking his pocket.”

“Jt is a mistake, I assure you!” said Alick.
“This is Charlie Langford, and his father is a
clergyman at Ringland. Where is the old gentle-
man ?”.

“T suppose yow re another of the swell mob,”.
said the old gentleman, who was close by. “ That’s
what they always do—come forward to screen:
each other.”

“No, sit,” said the policeman, “this here
young sees isn’t one of the swell mob: I
knows ’em too well. But you say, sir, you found
this boy’s hand in your pocket, and your watch
gone F* >”?












BOYS AND GIRLS.
Boys and Girls. 73

“J felt a hand in my pocket, I tell you,” said
the old gentleman testily; “and I felt for my
watch and it was gone, and saw this boy making
off. If that isn’t evidence, I don’t know what is.”

“T understood, sir,” said the policeman, “that
you found this boy’s hand in your pocket. I
should have had nothing to do with taking him
up if I-had known what you meant. ‘There,
young gentleman, you may go, and [’m sorry |
laid hands on you; but when people first tell one
story and then another, how is a man to know
what they mean ?”

Poor Charlie, sobbing bitterly, was led away by
his brother and Alick. He certainly looked
rather disreputable; he was apt to be very untidy
at the best of times, unless his brothers routed
hirn, and he had got a three-cornered hole in one
trouser showing ‘his knee through it, and his
jacket was all “over dust, and his hands grimed
with tar. He and Tommy Halford had beeii
prowling about among the boats, and Charlie, at
least, had got himself into a terrible mess, as he
generall y did when he had an opportunity.

“Don’t tell the girls!” was the first thing he
could say that was audible; and the next was,
“That sneak Halford, Pi never speak to him
again |”

“Why? what did he do?” said Dick,

“ Slipped out of the way, instead of coming up to
help me—and there was I not knowing a creature ;
and that nasty horrid old man telling such lies!
They might have seen I was a gentleman ! Pe

« Well,” said Dick with brotherly frankness, “if
7A. Boys and Girls,

you come to that, 1 don’t think you look much
like one just now.”

“Tm sure I don’t look like a thief!” sobbed
poor Charlie, his manliness quite broken down,
and even his rage not sufficing to keep him from
his tears.

“No, but you do look something of a cad,”
said Dick. “However it is all right now, and
we had better go home as soon as we can.
Come along. Now you have found out the
merits of your beloved Halford, I don’t care.”

“Til never speak to him again,’ said Charlie.
“IT never should have thought he would have been
such a coward, and a sneak, and a brute!”

“Well,” said Alick, rather drily, “we had
better not discuss him any more just now, I
think.”

“No, because it was Charlie’s own doing,
getting into such a fix,” said Dick.

“Well, you needn’t tell me that now,” growled
Charlie, ‘éT know it just as well as you, and
better too. It was all ‘Tom’s fault for locking me
in this morning. I shouldn’t have gone if he had
left me alone.”

In fact, according to Charlie, it was all other
people’s fault and not his own. He was too
angry to be sorry; and he was by no means in
the sweetest temper as they drove home, though
Alick and Dick both spared him as much as they
could.

They were met by Elly and Maggie, who had
come upon the edge of the common to meet ic,
“Ob, there he is!” cried Maggie in great delight
Boys and Girls, 75

for all day she had been haunted by an undefined
idea that Charlie would have been carried away
by gipsies, or fallen into the sea, or met with
some other adventure suitable to a naughty boy.

Charlie did not respond very warmly; but that
was perhaps not remarkable, for he could hardly
help feeling very small.

Tom was quite as much relieved as Maggie,
though he was by no means pleased when the
police adventure was confided to him. “All his
own fault! he said, “just like him! and to think
that people would be able to say that one of the
Lanegfords had been taken up for a pickpocket !”

« Well,” said Alick, “as far as that goes it was
an uncomfortable adventure enough, but hardly
poor Charlie’s fault: it might have happened to
anybody.”

«“ Not to you or me or Dick,” said Tom ; “ we
don’t look such grubs, I hope.”

«Well, I daresay it will be a lesson to him to
mind what he is about in future.”

“But, Alick,” said Tom, “I wish you would
make him write and tell mamma. I don’t like
to tell tales of him, and yet if he won’t write I
must. I know mamma will say I ought not to
have locked him up for one thing.”

« At least without looking to see if the window
was safe,” said Alick, laughing.

« And altogether it’s a horrid bore to have to
keep order! I wish you would be Prefect over
them all instead of me, Alick !”

“Certainly not,” said Alick! “I wouldn’t for
anything, Really you fellows talk as if 1 were the
76 Boys and Girls,

model prig of one of Corda’s little books who
always talks in five-syllable words and keeps all
the rest in order. Let us leave poor Charlie
alone a bit, he'll come all right, and you may be
sure he’ll be none so fond of that precious little
sneak Halford in future.”




CHAPTER X.

. CAUNDAY came again, but it was not like the
8 Sunday that I described before. It was a

lovely, hot, bright day; so hot that nurse
said that the little ones were not to go to church
at all, as the three-mile walk would be too much
for them: and only the five boys, Elly and Alick
went to church in the morning. They came back
hot and tired, more inclined to drink immense
draughts of milk than to eat the hot roast beef
which Mrs. Burton had provided for the Sunday’s
dinner; and nurse, pitying them, said that she
would ask for a plate of cold meat for their tea.
After dinner they all went and lay down in the
shade of the house outside on the common: each
_of them had a book, but when nurse went out an
hour afterwards she found all the seven asleep!
At the sound of her footstep, which was none of
.the lightest, Elly, Alick, and Dick all started up
and tried to look as if they had been awake all the
time; but it was so evident that they had not, that
they all began to laugh, and ‘this awoke the other
boys. They were all the better for their rest; but
as it was still too hot to go for a walk, Alick
proposed that they should ask whether they might
. go into the barn, and there if they liked he would
read a story to them.
78 Boys and Girls.

Elly was off like a shot, and she came back with
the requisite permission, and with Corda and
Maggie also, all anxiety to hear the story. They
went into the barn, and made themselves comfort-
able upon the straw—all except Corda—who said
that the straw smelt mousey, and went to fetch
a three-legged stool from the house, upon which
she sat perched during Alick’s story, making up in
dignity for what she wanted in comfort. You may
be sure her cousins did not lose the opportunity
of laughing at her; but Corda was very good-
humoured about it, for she was not now the spoilt
little girl she had been when Elly first came to
Ringland, and teasing did not always make her
cross.

“What's the story, Alick?’ said Elly. “Why,
it’s written! Did you write it?”

« Wish I could,” said Alick. “No, it was Mrs,
Penrose where I was staying last Sunday; she
wrote it and read it to us; and when IJ asked if I
might have it to read again, she said ‘Yes,’ I might
have it and keep it, because she had another
copy. It’s jolly, I think. It’s an allegory, you
know.”

“T like allegories,” said Elly.

“T hate ’em,” said Tom. “They’re always
about good little boys with bare feet walking on
stony paths, and naughty little boys walking on
grass where they’re told not. Is there anything
like that in your allegory, Alick? Because if so,
I won’t listen.”

“No, there’s nothing about bare feet all
through,” said Alick, compozedly; but it may be
Boys and Girls. 79

safest for you to keep your book at hand in case
the story bores you.”

«Well, if it does I shall go to sleep,” said Tom,
making himself comfortable on his bed.

Alick began.

“Qne day I had been thinking about the
strangeness of different people’s characters and
dispositions, and when I went to sleep 1 had a
curious dream, which seemed to explain to me
many things which had before been strange to
me.

“JT dreamt that I was standing in a village street
—just like any village street that you might see
in England—where people were all going about
their business as upon an ordinary day. But there
was one thing which surprised me very much in
this village, and that was the number of animals
which were to be seen in the street. No one
passed up or down, or even came out of a cottage
door, without some animal by his side: here there
was a man with a big eagle, which fluttered by his
side as if it would have liked to have flown away:
there was a woman with a donkey’: then came a
girl with a calf: then a boy with a panther: and
then another woman with a sheep. While I was
thinking that the people of this village must be
extraordinarily devoted to animals, an old man
came up to my side, and said, ‘You seem to be a
stranger here: can I explain to you anything which
you desire to know ??

«T answered, ‘Sir, if it would not trouble you,
I should be glad to know what is the occupation
of the people of this village, It seems so curious
80 Boys and Girls.

that every one who passes through the street
should have a pet animal by his side.’”

“ Awfully jolly! 1 should think,” interrupted
Johnny. “I should like that village.”

Tom gave him a back- handed cuff to cause
‘silence, and Alick proceeded:

“< Stranger,’ said the old man, whose name I
afterwards found was Sapiens, ‘I will explain to
you all that you desire: and if you would like to
remain during the day among our people here, and
watch their ways, I will stay by your side and
tell ie anything you may wish to know’

“[ gladly accepted his offer, and this is what he

told me.

«The name of the island where this village stood
was Vita Humana: and the King of it had given
the people certain laws which were not in force

“anywhere else. There was a narrow strait of
sea, about half a mile wide which divided Vita
‘Humana from another island beyond it, where
there dwelt some rebels to the King who were
always trying to do harm to the people who were -
faithful to him. They dared not land on the
island; but if the boys and girls left the safe
shore in some fishing-boat, such as was used by
men who did not care for the risk of being caught,
it was only too likely that the rebels might sweep
down upon them in their swift ships and carry
them off to their own country, where, too often,

they taught them to be as rebellious as them-
selves.

“J do not know for what reason, but it was one
of the laws made by the King that every one as
Boys and Girls, 81

long as they lived in Vita Humana should be
accompanied by an animal of some sort. The
King settled what animal should be allotted to
every one: and there was no child, however small,
but had an animal always at his side: young
when he was young, growing in size as he grew.”

“ That’s impossible!” said Dick: “ a horse would
be full grown by the time the child was three.”

“How uncomfortable it must have been to
have an elephant in your bed!” said Maggie, ina
tone of deep sympathy with the sufferer.

“T say now, really!” said Alick, “you know
it’s only an allegory. You can’t make everything
come properly without making the whole thing
nonsense.”

“Do go on, never mind them,” said Elly, who
was always ready for anything in the shape of a
story.

Accordingly Alick went on.

“These animals were each chained to the
person who owned it, in such a way that no one
could undo the chains: and they never were
undone all the time their owner lived in Vita
Humana. The chain was arranged so that the
animal could not hurt the person it belonged to,
however fierce its temper might be; but it might
easily hurt other people if it were not kept in
good order. The aim of its owner was, or cught
to have been, for some were very careless, to
tame the animal, to make it serviceable and
obedient, so that it should be a good servant
instead of a bad master. If it were thus ruled
and kept in order, it always happened that on the

G
82; Boys and Girls.

day when the King sent his special messenger to
Vita Humana with a key to unlock any one’s
chain and free him from his animal, the animal
lay down at once and died, and its owner was
free to go to the glorious land where the King
lived; but if he had let it go wild, and not
checked it, there was a terrible danger lest it
should spring on him and devour him, or else tear.
and maim him so that he could not go to the
King’s country.

“But, I said, ‘surely some animals are too
wild to be tamed by the hand of a little child’—
one passed me just then chained to a lion cub—
‘if they rise into fury, how can the child resist
them ?’ :

“¢Men say,’ said Sapiens, ‘that the King has
means of knowing all, and helping those who
need help. Besides, you see that the animals are.
easily tamed while they are young,’

«Surely, I said, ‘those who have tamed their
animals and made them. obedient and serviceable,
do not like to lose them entirely when their chain.
is taken off?’ ;

“ animals are drags to them, and hamper them so.
that they cannot do what they would like as well
as they would if the animals were not there. The
animals are not pets to them: in fact, any in-.
dulgence at once makes. them fierce and head-
strong. But perhaps you would like to see the
school, where Pastor, whom the King has set to:
teach us, and his wife Dulcis, are instructing the
children at. this very hour.’ ae
Boys and Girls. 83

“Oh!” said Corda, “did they really take their
animals with them to school?”

“TY should like to go to that school,” said
Maggie.

Alick continued reading.

“ Accordingly I went into the school with
Sapiens. It was a large building, and full of
children, each of whom had his own animal close
to his side. Pastor, who was teaching them, had
a horse, and his wife Dulcis a panther; but I
noticed that both these animals seemed so well
broken in that they obeyed every motion of their
owner, and one glance was sufficient to quiet
them. But it was far otherwise with the children,
Their animals were struggling, and fidgeting, and
snarling and scuffling, and some of them took no
pains to keep them in order at all, so that they dis-
turbed the others. I could not think how any one
could learn in a school like this; but Sapiens told
me that they were so used to each other’s animals
that it disturbed them less than I imagined.

“TI noticed especially a group of children who
were sitting on the same bench learning together.
There was a boy with a lion, whom they called
Victor: a girl with a large mastiff, whose name
was Fidelis: a boy with a sloth, called Torpidus:
another little boy with a monkey, called Ludens ;
and.a girl named Acerba with a tiger. Now I
observed that Fidelis was really trying. to learn
her lesson; but the other children’s animals would
not let her mastiff alone. First Ludens’ monkey
pulled the dog’s ear, and he growled a little
pettishly and moved out of the way; but in so

G2
84 Boys and Girls.

doing he touched Acerba’s tiger which was
asleep, and it gave him a pat with one of its
heavy claws, which made him spring up and
bristle and snarl ready for a fight, ‘Fidelis!’
said Pastor’s voice gently: and Fidelis coloured
and gave a tug with all her might at the mastiff’s
chain, which had such an effect upon him that he
lay down again.

“« Children,’ said Pastor, presently, “as it is so
fine to day, I shall give you a half-holiday. But,
first of all, I want to say a few wordsto you. Iam
afraid that some of you are not nearly so careful
as you ought to be about keeping your animals in

order, especially when you are at play. It was
only last Saturday that I heard a story about a
mastiff springing upon a bear, and biting it se-
verely? Fidelis blushed and hung her head.
‘Now you know how very important it is that
you should learn to tame your animals when you
are young, if you ever hope to be free from them
when you get older? @

«¢ But, sir,’ said Victor, ‘it does seem so unfair
that some of us should have beasts that are so hard
to tame, and some that are so easy. And he
looked with some envy at Torpidus’ sloth, which
certainly never tried to bite any one, and was quite
satisfied so long as it could sleep.

“«Once upon a time, Victor,’ said Pastor, with
a smile, ‘I knew a little girl who had a panther
to tame, and she said just what you do. She said
that a panther was so sly, and cunning, and cruel,
that she would never be able to tame it, and she
was quite unhappy. But do you know that after
Boys and Girls. 85

all she did tame it, and I don’t know that there is
any better behaved animal in the village’ And
ke looked across at his wife, who smiled and
shook her head. Certainly her panther seemed to
give her as little trouble as an animal could.

«“¢ Besides,’ added Pastor, ‘it is the animals that
are hardest to tame that often turn out most
useful when they have been tamed. Your lion,
Victor, if you tame it young, will be a strong and
useful servant to you, till the King’s messenger
comes with the key to unlock your chain.’

“<«T hope that won’t be for a long time,’ whis-
pered Ludens: ‘don’t you, Fidelis?’ He hugged
his monkey as he spoke,

“ Fidelis was looking grave, and did not answer.
I believe she was thinking that her mastiff was
not yet as tame as she would like it to be when
the King’s messenger came with the key.

“ Then the children sang a hymn, and school was
over. They were soon playing merrily in the
common outside, and the animals frisked about
and seemed to enjoy the play as much as the
children, Only Torpidus threw himself down on
the grass, because his sloth wanted to go to sleep:
and in a short time he was asleep too. ‘That is
a bad sign,’ said Sapiens: ‘I never like to see a
boy make a point of indulging his animal as that
Torpidus does.’

* Before long I observed that some of the children
were making up a party to go out on the beach to
pick up shells. There was Fidelis, and Victor,
and Ludens, and Acerba: and Ludens ran and
awoke Torpidus and the sloth, and tried to
36 Boys and Girls.

persuade him to come with them. ‘Torpidus at
last consented, because it was too much trouble to
refuse: and the children, who had brought their
dinners to school with them, set off in high spirits
along the lane which led to ‘the shore, I followed
behind them at a little distance, it was a hot day,
and before long the animals began to get quarrel-
some—especially Acerba’s tiger, which she did not
keep in good order. Victors lion and Fidelis’s
mastiff more than once needed all their owners’
strength to prevent them from attacking the
quarrelsome beast, but they were careful and |
succeeded in mastering them. But before they
had got more than half way to the beach, they
were met by a big boy named Improbus, who had
a wolf by his side. I saw, to my horror, that his
face was growing like the wolf’s face: and I re-
marked upon it to Sapiens. ‘That is the case,’
he said sadly, ‘when the people of this island let
‘their animals master them instead of obeying them?
“Presently I saw Improbus stroking and coaxing
‘and praising Acerba’s tiger, at which she looked
‘very much pleased. These two went on in front,
and the others, not sorry to be relieved of their
company, followed a litéle in the rear: Torpidus
lingering behind, saying that it was so hot he
could not hurry. I saw that Sapiens looked
sad, and he said, ‘I wish Pastor was in the way.
I know he would be grieved to see Acerba
making acquaintance with Improbus: he is no
fitting company for any of Pastor’s school chil-
dren. But see, what are they doing now. For
T heard a mutter and a growl from the animals,
Boys and Girls. 87

‘some of which were pulling fiercely at their
chains. The children were all standing on the
‘beach near an empty boat which was moored
on the shore, and Improbus and Acerba were
‘urging the others to get into it. They wanted
a row. on this hot day, they said: and the boat
was too heavy for two to manage alone.

“Fidelis and Victor refused. Jt was distinctly
forbidden them, they said, and they would not do
it. Thenthere came a fight between the animals:
for Improbus and Acerba set their wolf and tiger
to fight the dog and the lion, and as they were
bigger and stronger, it almost seemed as if they
would get the best of it. But the dog and the
lion, though not so strong, were better trained to
‘obey their master and mistress, and skill and
discipline told in the end against brute force.

« When Improbus saw that he could not frighten
the children into submission, he began’ to laugh
at them. Victor and Fidelia did not ‘care very
much about this; but Ludens did, and when
Improbus said that he did not dare to get into the
boat, Ludens sprang in at once. Fidelis begged
him to come out, and as he refused, she -got
in to pull him out by force: and then Improbus,
‘taking advantage of the two children being ia
the boat, cut the cord with a sharp knife, so
that it swung round at once, and the current
carried it out of their wading depth.

“ Acerba looked rather frightened: Ludens set
up a wailing cry: Victor plunged into the water
‘and swam up to the boat to try to guide it
back to land; but he soon found that this was
88 Boys and Girls.

impossible, and the only thing for him was to
climb over the side into it, for the current was
too strong for him to swim back. Then Fidelis
cried out: ‘Torpidus, Torpidus, run and find
Pastor and ask him to help us! We have no
oars, and we are drifting out to sea! Make haste,
make haste!”

“Torpidus did run a few steps faster than he
had ever done before in his life; but after a little
while he began to feel very hot and tired, and
saying to himself ‘I shall get on faster if I.
rest for a few moments, he sat down on a shady
bank, for the sloth was pulling back at its chain:
and presently he was fast asleep, while Fidelis,
Victor, and Ludens were being drifted out by the
ebb-tide nearer and nearer to the perilous shore
of their enemies.

«Suddenly Sapienstouched me, asI was watching
the poor children in their helpless misery. [
longed to help them; but it seemed to me that
Sapiens and myself were invisible, and that we
could not make our presence perceived al the
inhabitants of Vita Humana: we could only look
on. ‘Look, look!’ said Sapiens, pointing to
Improbus. I looked, and I saw him turning pale
and looking terribly frightened, as from the air
behind him came something which looked like
a grey cloud, but gradually shaped itself into a
Figure bearing a key. ‘The King’s messenger,’
said Sapiens. ‘Which of them can he be come
for! Poor Acerba? no,-it is Improbus.’

“¢Tmprobus,’.said the messenger, ‘I have come
to unlock your chain,’

Sent
Boys and Girls. 89

«On not yet, not yet ? pleaded Improbus, while
Acerba sank back fainting on the ground. But
though he prayed and implored, the messenger paid
no heed to his prayers. ‘The wolf rose up, grim
and gaunt, as if it knew that now was its time of
mastery, and stood over the trembling lad. I saw
the messenger unlock the chain, and I heard the
yell of the fierce beast; but I saw no more, For
the form of the messenger changed back again
into the grey cloud, infolding the two, and when
it passed away, Improbus and the wolf had gone:
and only Acerba lay on the ground sobbing with
grief and terror. The tiger seemed quite sub-
dued, and did not impede her when, struck by
a sudden thought, she cried, ‘I will go and find
Pastor!’ and sprang up and rushed away at her
fullest speed.

“Meanwhile, how fared it with the children in
the boat ?

“'They began to comfort each other as best they
could. . ‘We did not come here of our own free
will,” said Fidelis; ‘and the King will not let
us be hurt. Pastor always tells us so, you know.’

«« But perhaps we shall have to fight hard first,’
said Victor. ‘For see, the boat is drifting nearer
and nearer to the enemy’s coast.’

«« Tet us ask the King to help us fight and take
care of us,’ said Fidelis. ‘Oh, if only our animals
were as obedient as Pastor’s horse and Dulcis’s
panther! For they knew that if it came to
fighting, much would depend upon the docility of
their animals.

««We will always try more and more to keep
90 Boys and Girls.

‘them in order if once we get out of this,’ said
Victor.

“It is a good sign that they are not boastful
and self confident, said Sapiens to me. ‘You
may be sure they will be kept safe, even if the
King has to send his messenger with the oe
to-unchain them from their beasts.

“I turned round to see if any help were forth-
coming, but I could see none. When I looked
again, the current had carried them almost over
to the opposite shore, where a group of men were
waiting to draw in the boat and seize the children.
But this was not so easy. Victor’s lion and
Fidelis’s dog were in the boat, ready to fight, and
alert to seize any unwary hands which might be
‘laid upon the boat. Ludens sat behind with his
monkey: he was too young and weak to take
part in the fighting. Victor and Fidelis stood up
bravely, encouraging their animals, and pointing
‘out to them when to resist the most dangerous
‘attempts of their enemies. I saw that the rebels
tried to bribe the animals with tempting food:
but Victor and Fidelis had trained them too well
to allow them to seize upon it, and the beasts
‘only growled and snarled at the offered morsels. ©

“But it was hard work for the children, and
‘I began to fear that their strength would soon be
overcome, when Ludens gave a cry of joy. ‘There
is Pastor on his horse swimming out to us!’ he
said.

“Keep up a little longer, Fidelis!’ said Victor.
‘ The King will help us, and we must not give in!”

“Bravely the good horse struggled through the
Boys aud. Girls. QI

waves: nearer and nearer it came: and Pastor
came panting up to them. ‘I can but take one
at a time,’ he said, as he grasped Ludens and sat
him and his monkey in front of him: ‘hold out a
little longer, dear children, and all will be safe.
The King will not fail you’

“Encouraged by his words, Victor and Fidelis
held out until he could come back again: this
time he took away Fidelis and swam with her to

safety. Then he returned for Victor, and carried
him also away out of reach of his enemies. But
‘I noticed that as he neared the shore with Victor,
the horse swam more and more slowly: and
finally, when they reached the landing-place,
where a crowd was now assembled to welcome
him back, both he and the horse sank down
‘exhausted on the beach.

“Flis wife went up to him to give him a draught
of wine, but he waved it back with a strange and
solemn look-upon his face. ‘The King’s messen-
ger, Dulcis,” he said, in an awestruck voice.
’What. was that shadowy cloud which seemed to
be shaping itselffrom out of the air?’ A sudden
hush fell upon all, as they beheld the shadow with

‘the key in his hand. ‘Pastor, said the voice
“which I had heard before, only that this time its
tones were gentle, ‘I have come to unlock your
‘chain. Before I do so, speak to those about you
what words you have need to say,

“ Pastor bowed his head ; ‘call Acerba to me, > he

“said. \ She came, sobbing bitterly.

«« Child? he said, gent! y, ‘you sinned and you

have repented, The King is merciful to you.
92 Boys and Girls.

Do your best to tame that tiger of yours that the
unlocking of your chain may be no dread to you,
but a hope. Little Ludens, do you the same:
keep guard over your animal that it may not drag
you and others again into danger. Victor and
Fidelis, be brave all your lives as you have been to-
day; do not cease to keep guard over your beasts,
for your warfare is not over. ‘Torpidus !’—Torpidus
was not there. He was still asleep on the shady
bank with his sloth.

“<«It is nearly time,’ said the messenger.

“Then Pastor and Dulcis spoke together in low
tones which none else could hear: and I never
saw so happy a look on a man’s face as on his,
just before the messenger came up and unlocked
his chain. At that moment the cloud infolded
him as it had done Improbus; but then it was
grey and heavy, whereas now it shone like silver.
-When it lifted away, there was nothing to be
seen but the dead horse and broken chain. Pastor
had gone to his King, and was free.

“ I said, thinking of the gentle messenger who _
had carried Pastor to the King.

“«Perhaps you have,’ said Sapiens, ‘but you
also have a beast to tame before he comes.’ But
as he spoke, the crowd, and the shining sea, and
the dead horse, and the broken chain faded into
mist, and I awoke.”

There was a silence, only broken by Dick,
saying, “awfully jolly that story is, isn’t it, Tom?”

ying ¥ JOUY vi )

“Yes,” said Tom (who had not gone to sleep),
Bus and Girls, 93
“but its just like all allegories. If people only
had to break in an animal to get to heaven, it
would be easy enough. It’s nearly as bad as the
little brutes with bare feet after all.”

“I wonder,” said Maggie, meditatively, “whether
if before I went to sleep I thought about people’s
characters and dispositions I should be able to
dream such a nice dream as that!”

“TI wonder what our beasts are!” said Elly,
“TY think Corda’s is a Persian cat.”

“ And yours a Shetland pony,” said Alick.

* But it was a snaame to make the animals die!”
said Johnny, who could not get over this at all.

“Why,” said Alick, “the animals only mean
the worse part of us, and I am sure they bother
people enough all their lives.”

Charlie said nothing, and Tom rather thought
he had been asleep; but he had really been listen-
ing, and the effect of the story and of his own
better self together, was to make him sit. down
and write a long letter to his mother, confessing
his Bellsand adventures. It was wonderful how
much the better he felt as soon as this was done:
the confession lifted a load off his mind, and Elly
said to Corda that night—*“ Charlie is quite jolly
again now. I am so glad, for he is my. own
ownest brother, and I can’t bear him to be dull
and cross, and for the others to laugh at him.”

“Yes,” said Corda, “he was as kind to-night
as if he had been Dick.”

This was saying a great deal, for Dick was
quite Corda’s favourite among the boys,


CHAPTER XI.

one day to Elly, as he came up to her

and found her knitting her brows over
a book. It was a pleasant morning with a fresh
breeze, not so hot as it had been, and the children
were all on the beach together. “Greek!” he
said, as he caught sight of the letters. ‘What
a fellow you are, Elly, to be sure! Who would
have thought of your wanting to do Greek in the
holidays! You needn’t shut up the book now,
the murder’s out!”

“Only please don’t tell the others,” said Elly,
imploringly. “You know, Alick, I want awfully
to know Greek, and mamma and Miss Morison
won’t let me begin till I can work better: and
I hate work, and the cotton always gets dirty and
snarls up, and I never shall be able to work as
well as Corda if I live to be a hundred. So
I thought I might just as well try if I couldn't
teach it to myself, and I meant to have done
lots these holidays: I learnt the letters the first
week I was here, and somehow I have never done
any more, so I thought I must try again.”

“ Shall I give you a lesson?” said Alick,

* Oh do!” said Elly.

Vi 7HAT are you so busy over?” said Alick
Boys and Girls. _ 95

~ So the two sat down together: and Alick gave
Elly her first Greek lesson. He found it rather
agreeable to be schoolmaster to such a quick and
eager pupil; and when he had finished, he said
“TJ tell you what, Elly, it’s an awful pity that you
den’t take pains with your needlework so as to get
on to Greek, “You'd beat Charlie in a very little
‘while if you did, you are three times as sharp.”

Elly looked pleased at the praise, and disap-
pointed at the advice.

*“ But I can’t!” she said.-

“Why not? what's the matter with your
bands? said Alick, taking one up and studying
it. “It’s nothing but that you don’t take pains.
‘If you can give your mind one quarter as much to
needlework as you do to the lessons you like,
you'd work just as well as Corda.”

“Tt’s all very weil for you to talk, Alick,” said
Elly, despondingly; “but boys don’t know how
lucky they are, that’s all. How would you like to be
stuck down for an hour every day with a needle in
your hand, and a horrid long hem, or seam which is
worse, to do while you are being read history to? I
think about the history and forget the work, and
then Miss Morison says, ‘Elly, you’re not working,’
and then I gobble my stitches to make up for lost
time, and then I have to pick it out—nasty stuff!” -

“ Of course if you think it beneath you to attend
to it, it’s impossible that you should ever do it,”
said Alick.

“J don’t think it beneath me,” began Elly; but
truth was too strong for her, and she ended her
sentence with “Do I?”
96 Boys and Girls.

“You know best,” said Alick.
Elly laughed; but none the less what Alick
said had some effect upon her. She could not

like work while she did it so badly; but her face »

was not nearly so long that afternoon when nurse
gave her her daily task to do, and she certainly
did it better. It is wonderful how much boys and
girls can help each other when they enter kindly
into each other’s difficulties instead of sneering at
them as-some do. If Miss Morison or Corda had
said to Elly just what Alick had said, she would
not have remembered it half so well as she did
when it came from a boy.

And here I may as well mention that though
Elly did find it tiresome to be careful over her
work, and to make neat little stitches, and to
stick her needle in her work carefully when she
put it away, yet when once she had got into the
habit of doing so she did not find her work nearly
so disagreeable as it had been. There is always
a pleasure in doing anything well; and when
anybody’s will goes wit their tasks instead of
against them, it is wonderful how much pleasanter
they become.

Meanwhile the news from Ringland began to
improve. Mr. and Mrs. Langford were still ver y
busy with the sick people, but there had been no
fresh cases of fever for a fortnight, and though
there had been some deaths, most of the sick
people were beginning to get better. Mrs. Lang-
ford said that she longed for a breath of sea-air,
for the whole of Ringland smelt so nasty with the
carbolic acid that they had put about to purify the
“Boys and Girls. 07

air that she felt as if she were ina tar bath. In
about a fortnight more, Mrs Langford said that
she hoped that she and papa would both be able
to come down to Endlow for a little change
before the children came back, so that they would
be able to see the boys a little before their return
to school. In another three or four weeks the
doctor said he thought that Ringland would be
safe for the children to return to, and then Miss
Morison would come back to the Hall and lessons
would begin again.

“Oh, won't it be jolly to have papa and
mamma here?” said Elly, prancing, as Tom
called it when she had heard the letter read.
«We shall have such lots of things to show
them, There are Dick’s sea-weeds, and my
aquarium i

“My aquarium,” I must here explain, meant a
‘wash-handbasin full of sea-water, which held afew
stones with some sea-weed, two sea-anemones,
three periwinkles, and a little green and purple
crab which employed itself in teasing the ane- .
mones and pushing them off their stones. ‘Elly
called this aquarium her’s, because she had resigned
her wash-handbasin for it; but ingreality Dick,
the family naturalist, presided over it, and pre-
vented Elly from filling it with all manner of
sea-creatures which would have preyed upon each
other, and would have died because they had not
water enough to breathe in.

— « Dick,” said Maggie’s little voice, “ you
haven’t got any gold and silver sea-weeds in
your collection,”



H
98 Boys and Girls.

“Gold and silver sea-weeds? What do you
mean, Madge?” said Dick, eagerly; for he knew
that there were gold and silver ferns, and thought
that there might be yellow and white sea-weed
called by this name,

«There are some near here,” said Maggie—
Frank was not in the way just then—“but I
mustn’t say who told me, because it’s a secret.”

“T wish I could get some,” said Dick, “if there
are any. Perhaps it’s a new sort that nobody has
ever discovered before. Perhaps it might be called
something-or-cther—a Langfordica.”

“Equus Marinus Communis, or the common
horse-marine,” muttered Tom; but Dick’s natu-
ralistic enthusiasm was not to be so easily
checked.

“T say, Madge, try if you can get whoever told
you to get you a bit,” said he. “It might be
very important indeed, you know,” he added to
Tom; “it might be a link between the Zosteras
and the— I forget what comes next to them; but
Pll look. Did you hear how it grew, Madge?”

“Hanging from a roof of a cave,” said Madge,
highly delighted that her communication should
cause so much excitement in her big brother.

Dick rushed at once to his sea-weed book, and
nurse came up to the group of children, saying,
“Miss Corda and Miss Elly, you had better get
your bathe early this morning, before the tide
goes down too far. Mr. Burton says this is a
spring tide, and the tide will go out as far as
the ugly black rocks they call the Four Fin.
gers.”
Boys and Girls, 99

«Why ds they call it a spring tide when it’s
nearly autumn?” said Elly.

“That must be a mistake,” said Charlie. cc
know all about it. Spring tides come in the
spring, and neap tides in the autumn.”

“ Nonsense, Charlie,” said Dick; “spring tides
come every month at the full moon, and neap
tides mean any tides that are not spring tides.
You always get hold of the wrong end of the
story somehow, if it is anything to do with
physical science.”

' (Dick was very much delighted when he found
that “physical science” was the right word to
apply to his favourite studies. It. sounded so
“much grander than “natural history. )

“Physical fiddlestick!” said Tom, who felt it
‘to be part of his duty to keep his scientific
younger brother in his proper place.

' But before the day was over, Tom found: by
experience that spring tides were not fiddlestick,
and in fact none of the young Langfords were
likely to forget the name of them again.



HQ


CHAPTER XII.

were sitting on the beach; Elly with her

Greek book, and Corda with a cardboard
marker which she was making to send to her
mamma in India. Both the little girls were very
busy, and therefore. it was not the best time
in the world for poor little Maggie to rush up
eagerly to them, and set her foot, covered with
wet sand, upon Corda’s coloured silks which were
lying by her side. Corda was very eager about
this marker, which was the first she had ever
made by herself; it was to have “No cross no
crown” upon it: the first “no” was to be in red,
the second in blue, the cross in brown with black
perspective sides, and the crown in gold thread to
be put in last. ‘There was also to be a zigzag
edge of green, and a green ribbon, which Corda
told Elly that she chose because green was the
colour of hope. Elly sympathised very much in
the sentiment, and almost wished to work a
marker too; but the needle, as we know, was
not Elly’s favourite implement. And just now
Elly had her own little ambition, fostered by the
help Alick gave her: namely, to surprise her
father and mother some day soon by casually

Fre and Corda had had their bathe, and
Boys and Girls. IOl .

taking up her father’s Greek Testament and
reading a chapter to them out of it. So-she was
really working at her Greek adjectives in a manner
which showed considerable energy, and which,
being voluntary, she liked, though she would have
thought it very hard if Miss Morison had set it as
a task for her to do in the holidays.

So when Maggie came up and trod on,Corda’s
silks, saying, “1 have got a plan in my head,” all
the answer she got from Corda was a pettish cry
of, “Maggie, how tiresome you are!” and from
Elly, these words, which did not enlighten her
much: “Ho kai he alethés, to alethés,” which she
was “hearing herself,” as she called it, out of the
book.

“Oh, Pm so sorry!” said Maggie, as Corda
rescued her sanded silks.

“T daresay you are,” said Corda, who was a
good deal vexed, “but you’ve spoilt them now.
You should look where you are going; and I
wish you wouldn’t come bothering when Elly and
I are busy.”

«But Elly, do you think I may.

“Oh, bother, Madge!” said Elly, in her turn,
disturbed from her lesson. ‘Do leave me alone,
till Pve-done this.”

“Yes,” said Corda, “do go away, Maggie.
You do more mischief in a minute than you do
good ina week. There, you are nearly treading
on that silk again: and now you are on my frock.
How clumsy you are! I shan’t be able to get
this done now to go by the next mail.”

Corda was nearly crying with vexation, and

oP


102 Boys and Girls.

Maggie said penitently, “ Couldn’t Mr. Burton get
you some more silk when he goes into Bellsand?”

“No, of course not! How would he know
how to choose silks! Do get away, and don’t
bother.”

Poor Maggie, considerably snubbed, retired to

_her inseparable companion, Alfred. She was
very anxious to go and find the gold and silver
sea-weed for Dick, and she could not ask nurse
for permission, for nurse was at the farm, having
gone home with Gertrude as soon as the little
girls had had their bathe, Blessington and; Sarah
were sitting together under a rock, but Blessington
refused to be responsible for any of the little
Langfords, and, in fact, made herself rather
disagreeable to them, so that they were not
inclined to have more to do with her than they
could help, Elly was really responsible for her
little sister; but Maggie was growing up every
year to be more upon an equality with her, and it
never entered Elly’s head to look. after her as she
would have done after little Gertrude,

“T really do think we might go,” said Maggie,
as she returned to Alfred. “Frank said it wasn’t
far off, and I daresay we shall be back by dinner-
time. You know if-nurse was here she’d come
bothering after us, and Frank particularly doesn’t
want anybody to know about it. If we find it,
Alfred, you must promise faithfully never to show
it to anybody.”

“TI do promise faithfully,” said Alfred; though
as he said it, it sounded like “I do pomith faith.
fully.”
Boys and Girls. 103

“Then let’s go!” said Maggie, “If we’re not
back by dinner it won’t signify. Look here!”
and she turned her pocket out into her lap, and
displayed triumphantly several half-bitten stale
crusts, a large slice of plain cake, and a medicine
phial filled with milk. “Nurse gave it me,” said
Maggie, “and I washed it out at the pump, so the
milk won’t taste nasty. I thought we might be
thirsty if we had to go far.”

“It won’t be a very nice dinner, will it?” said
Alfred, rather doubtfully.

“Well, if it isn’t, we must pretend itis, The
crusts will be the meat, and the cake the pudding.
Come along now, Alf. Let’s creep along close to
that big rock, and then they won’t see which side
we go. Oh, I forgot: we must take our spades
and our baskets, because we may want to dig up
the blue and red sand.”

And the two little figures edged away unper-
ceived until they were out of sight.

It happened that Gertrude was not very well
that day; and thus when Blessington, Sarah, and
the other children went back to the farm at dinnet-
time, they found nurse up stairs with her. The
boys had taken their dinner with them, and were
going out shrimping to make the most of the low.
tide; and Elly was rather disgusted because, as
she thought, they had taken Maggie and Alfred
to share in the fun, and had left her behind; Bles-
sington was cross with nurse for having, as she
thought, trespassed upon-her authority by giving
Alfred leave to go with his cousins; and nurse
was keeping guard over Gertrude, who had gone
104 Boys and Girls.

quietly to sleep, and had left word that no one
was to disturb her, so that she had no opportunity
of correcting this wrong impression. She was so
anxious to keep the little girl quiet, that she did
not even come down to set Elly her task of needle-
work; for little Gertrude was rather a delicate
child, and now and then had feverish colds which
ended- in croup if they were not most carefully
watched. So it happened that in the afternoon,
Elly and Corda went for a ramble on the common,
and Blessington and Sarah sat down in state in
the sitting-room to their work.

Meanwhile, Maggie and Alfred had gone on
and ona long way, keeping up near the cliffs so
as to be able to watch for the entrance of the
cave with the blue and red sand, and the gold and
silver sea-weed hanging down from the roof. Once
or twice they saw what looked as if it might be
the place:, there was one lovely little real cave,
which had a floor of white sand, and green sea
ferns hanging down from the roof; but the chil-
dren looked -in and turned away disappointed.
What was white sand, when you wanted it striped
with blue and red? Soon after this, Alfred tumbled
down and cut his knee so that it bled; he cried
a great deal, and Maggie, to comfort him and di-
vert his thoughts, proposed that they should have
their dinner. . By this time they were both fairly
hungry; the crusts and the cake both disappeared,
though both had acquired a strong taste of sea-
weed through being in Maggie’s pocket; and the
milk in the medicine phial was carefully divided,
and swallowed, though Alfred did make a face at
Boys and Girls, 105

the flavour it possessed. The day was hot, and
they were rather tired; and after walking on a
little further, and climbing about a long ridge of
rocks which they had come to, and which were
tilted up out of the ground so that the ledges
were like steps, delightful to clamber, Alfred be-
gan to say that he wanted to sit down.

Maggie did not object at all; she thought it
was avery nice place, and she had a very com-
fortable ledge to sit on with another behind it
for a back. The sun was going in, but it was
hot and sultry, and the rest was delightful; and
Maggie sat looking at the sea, which was now
turning shining and milky-looking as the white
clouds came over the sky. It was a long way
out, she thought, and something looked odd, she
did not know what it was. Perhaps it was only
the unaccustomed loneliness which felt so strange
to the little girl; she half thought of telling Alfred
that they must get up and go home, and then she
saw that he had gone to sleep with his head on
her Jap, and that it was a pity to disturb him
just yet. And Maggie, who was a very con-
siderate little girl, trying to sit still so as not
to wake him, very soon followed his example,
and fell asleep herself.

When Maggie awoke, some two hours later,
she looked about her in surprise. Everything
seemed to have changed since she went to sleep.
The water, which had been a long way out, had
come up nearly all round her ledge of rock, so
that she was on a peninsula jutting out into the
sea, It was all white and shining now except in
106 Boys and Girls.

one part of the sky, where there was a great lilac
thundercloud, yellow underneath. “Alf, Alf!”
said Maggie, shaking him awake, “get up, get up.
‘The water is coming, and we must try to get out
of the way, or perhaps we shall be drowned.”

Little Alfred was frightened, and began to cry.
He was only half awake even now.

“Come, darling, don’t cry,” said Maggie in her’
most motherly way. “We shan’t be drowned if
you are a good boy, only we must make haste.”
And she began to iead him down off the rock on
to the uncovered strip of sand between it and the
cliff. He tumbled once or twice, and began to
cry, and she had to coax him to get on. She was
a sensible little woman, and she was quite aware
that they must get out of the way of the sea as
soon as they could.. After some time they got
upon ‘the sand, and then Maggie stood still and
looked about her.

«Why don’t you come on, Maggie?” said Al-
fred. “Come on quick; don’t let the sea catch
us)”

“We can’t get back the way we went, Alf,”
said Maggie, looking puzzled. “Look there. We
got over those rocks, and now the sea has got
over them, and covered them, Come on this
way. We must see whether we can find a place
to climb up into.”

* Oh, but the sea will drown us!” sobbed poor
little Alfred. “I want Elly, and Corda, and Bles-
sington! Oh, I don’t like it, I don’t like it!”

Maggie did not like it either, and her lip |
quivered; but she was a year and a half older
Boys and Girls. 107

than Alfred, and felt that it would not do to show
him that she was frightened. They went on along
the sand together, under the cliff, and the water
kept coming nearer and nearer, till at last there

was hardly any space between the sea and the
cliffs. ‘Then, to make it worse, there came a flash
of lightning and a clap of thunder; it was not
very close, but close enough to frighten the chil-
dren still more.

“ Alfred,” said Maggie, unable to keep from
crying now, “we must stop a minute and say our
prayers, for really I don’t know what to do.”

“ But the sand is getting all wet!” said Alfred;
“we can’t kneel down.”

“Well then, we must say it standing,” said
Maggie. “IT iL say it, Alfred, and you must say
Amen, because that means that you want it too;
don’t you know when papa says in church ‘ Lighten
our darkness,’ we say Amen at the end?” ~

Maggie spoke very gravely, and then she began,
“ Please, God, don’t let the thunder burn us, or the
sea drown us. And I’m sorry we came without
telling anybody, only I thought we should have
been back sooner, and 1 won’t do it again—and
it wasn’t Alfred’s fault because I made him, and
I’m very sorry. And we'll both be very good
always, and not do anything naughty any more.
Now, Alfred, you say ‘Amen.’”

Alfred said it obediently, and the two poor
little children, hand in hand, went on toiling
along the narrow path left them by the waves,
which soon would be no path at all, but onl
dashing and surging waste of water.


CHAPTER XIII.

HE lilac thundercloud that Maggie and

T Alfred saw from their perilous perch on
the rock made the shrimping-party hurry

back when’ the tide had covered up their
hunting-ground, without waiting for any further
spoils: and Elly and Corda, who were sitting
on a furze hillock on the common near the house
saw the line of little dark figures scrambling up
the ridge of the common against the yellow sky.
Corda had resolved to endure the thunder this
time rather than hide in the coal-hole again, but
she did not like it at all, and had only yielded to
very strong persuasions on Elly’s part to watch
and see the cloud come up. They could run into
the house in half a minute as it was so near.

“There are those naughty boys!” said Elly,
who was still indignant at having Leen left be-
hind, And she ran over the common to meet
them, and began to upbraid them. “Boys, I do
think you might have just come round by the
bathing-place for me, when you took Maggie
and Alfred who don’t care about it half as much
as I do——”

«Maggie and Alfred?” said Tom, What
is the child talking about ?”


Boys and Girls, | 109

‘E\ly rathér resented being called a child by ‘Tom.
“Why, I am talking about what you did to-day,
Tom,” she said, a little sharply; “and I think
you might have taken me as well as Maggie.”

“But we never took Maggie,” said Dick. “We
six fellows went off just as we are after we had
been bathing, and that boy Willis offered to show
us the best shrimping place. We've seen nothing
of Maggie or Alfred.”

“But where are they then?” said Elly, looking
bewildered.

“ We don’t know,” said Charlie as he trudged
on with his basket.

Elly stood quite still with her eyes and mouth
open. She could not understand this.

“Come, Elly,” said Alick, putting his hand on
her shoulder and walking alongside of her, “let’s
hear about this mystery. Tell us when you saw
them last. Do you mean that they haven’t been
home to dinner?”

“No,” said Elly, her lip trembling, and looking
ready to cry: “we thought they’d gone with you.”

«When did you see them last, then?”

«This morning, when Corda was working and
Iwas doing my Greek. Maggie came and trod
on Corda’s silks, and Corda scolded.her. Oh, do
you think she could have started off with Alfred
to walk to Bellsand to buy some more?”

«“ Maggie couldn’t walk to Bellsand if she tried,
and Alfred would never get half way,” said Frank.

“But they’re such little fools they wouldn’t
know that,” said Tom. “They'll get caught in
a precious storm presently !”
110 Boys and Girls.

“Pll run to the turnpike and ask if they’ve
passed there,” said Dick, who always thought of
the most sensible thing to do in an emergency.
The turnpike was about three-quarters of a mile
‘off, at the end of the common. “Here, Elly,
take my basket ;” and he was off like a shot.

“How could you have thought that we wanted
two little shavers like that?” said Tom to Elly.
«And if we had, we shouldn’t have taken them
without saying something. about it to somebody.
Nurse might have known that.”

“We thought she had given them leave to go,”
said Elly, mournfully ; “but she’s been up with
Gerty in the bedroom, because she was afraid
Gerty was: going to have the croup, and she
‘wouldn’t let any of us come up to disturb her
when she was asleep.” -

«Well, we must tell her now,” said Alick,
“whether Gerty is asleep or not. You had
better run and tell her, as quietly as you can,”
he added, as Elly was tearing off at the top of
her speed. “It’s no good making more noise
_and fuss than you need.”

« What has happened »” said Corda, coming up
to them, perceiving that something was amiss.

“Why you’ve let Madge and Alfred be lost
between you,” said Tom, who was a good deal
discomposed; “and Elly thinks they’ve gone off
to Bellsand about some girl’s flummery of yours.
T should have thought you two might have looked
after them better than that; but girls are never
any good about anything!”

* Come, come, ‘Tom, don’t scold her,” said the
Boys and Girls. TII

more tender-hearted Alick, perceiving the look
of consternation on Corda’s face, not unmixed
with self-reproach, as she remembered how cross
she had been to Maggie about the silk.

“Do you—do you think gipsies will steal
them?” she faltered.

“Gipsies!” said Tom in a tone of great con-
tempt, “who ever heard of gipsies stealing
children out of a one-syllable story book?
They'll lose their way, and be caught in a storm.
and there’ll be a pretty go altogether!”

Meanwhile Elly, with more consideration than
she often showed, had gone up shoeless to nurse
and had said.in a frightened panting whisper,
“Nurse, we are afraid Maggie and Alfred are
lost. We think perhaps they have gone to Bell-
sand to get Corda’s silks, and please what do you
think can be done?”

“You stay here with Gerty, and I’ll see,” said
nurse, making a clucking noise of consternation
which finished poor Elly. She sat down by
Gerty’s bed—the little girl had gone to sleep
again, and was getting better of her feverish
attack—and then she laid her face on her arms
against the side of the crib and cried bitterly.
She did not know what she feared—anything and
everything; . Elly had hardly ever known what
anxiety was before.

It was a great relief to her when Eliza came
in, knowing nothing of what had happened; and
Elly who felt as if she could not bear to be alone
there, out of hearing of what went on, asked her
to look after Gerty till nurse came back, and ran
112 Boys and Girls.

down stairs to the rest. But she heard no good
news, Dick had come back panting with his run
to say that’no children answering the description
of Maggie and Alfred had ‘passed the turnpike
that day; and then, as they all stood round in a
silent and anxious group, Dick said suddenly,
“ By-the-by, Madge said something about some
golden sea-weed she was going to find and bring
me home. Do you know anything about it, any
of you? It seemed to be a precious secret.”

“Frank!” said Elly, “could she have gone to ’
find that place you told her nonsense about, with
blue and red stripes of sand?”

“What place?” said nurse.

“Only some nonsense of Frank’s,” said Corda,
“about a cave with gold and silver sea-weed and
coloured sand, and Maggie said she wanted to
go there and find it.”

“Master Frank, you naughty boy,” said nurse,
“what have you been telling your little sister?
You naughty boy to go and tell the poor child
stories like that!”

Frank began to cry. “I was only in fun,” he
said; “I never thought she’d try to go there.”

“Let’s hear what you did tell her then, young
master,” said Mr. Burton, beginning to look
grave.

“T said,” sobbed out poor Frank, “I’d been to
a cave among. the rocks where there was blue
and red sand and gold and silver sea-weed, and
a little pond with goldfish in the corner; and
I said it was up that way—and Madge asked if
she could find it, and come back by dinner-time—
Boys and Girls. 113

and I didn’t mean any harm, I’m sure. I was
only in fun.”

“Tf there’s any chance of their being on the
beach,” said Mr, Burton, “the only thing is to
go and get a boat at once, and row round that
way to see if we can get ’em off. ‘These here
spring-tides are nasty things to them as don’t
know their ways, and I wouldn’t have ’em catch
me up there for a hundred pounds. Bill!” he
shouted, to one of his men, “run down to the
. boat-house as fast as you can, and get the boat
out; Pll be down in a minute!”

Poor Frank! he was sorry enough now for his
thoughtless nonsense. When some time after this,
his mother showed him that verse in the Proverbs,
which says, “ As a madman who casteth firebrands,
arrows, and death, so is a man who deceiveth
his neighbour, and saith, ‘Am I not in sport?”
poor Frank burst into fresh tears, and said, «I'l!
never cram up anybody again, mother! never!”

Just then to increase their perplexity, came a
flash of lightning followed by a clap of thunder,
which sent Corda into the house like a shot,
followed less hurriedly by the rest.

All tried to persuade themselves that it was
perfectly impossible that the children should be
on the beach; but the fact remained that they -
had been seen there last, and that they had their
spades’ and baskets with them. Now there was
only one direction in which the beach was
dangerous at high-tide, and that was the left-
hand direction as you stood at the bathing-place
facing the sea; to the right, where the boys had

I
Ii4 Boys and Girls.

been shrimping, the beach was chiefly smooth
sand and low rocks, and there were no cliffs, only
the steep slope of the common towards the sea.
The bathing-place was the beginning of the rocky
part of the coast, and it was thence that the
cliffs began to rise up like a steep wall, till in
some places they rose as high as two hundred
feet of rock. This, as we know, was the direction
which poor Maggie and Alfred had taken.

The boys started off. Tom, Charlie, Alick,
Frank, and Johnny, along the top of the cliff,
with a long rope, in case they found the children
in danger below; Mr. Burton and one of his men,
with Dick, in a boat along the shore. Mr. Burton
did not tell the nurses or the children what he
really feared; namely, that Maggie and Alfred
would be beyond help by this time, if they had
been caught in one of the dangerous little bays
on the coast. The thunderstorm had come on,
but it was not a violent one, though there was
heavy rain falling, which made nurse peremptorily
forbid poor Elly to go with the boys. She sat
and cried in the parlour until the storm cleared
off, when she obtained nurse’s reluctant permission
to go along the path the boys had taken, and to
see if she could see anything of them. Corda
wished to go too, but Blessington, who was very
unhappy about Alfred, and consequently very
cross, refused to trust her out of her sight.

The five boys had gone but slowly, shouting
as they went, and pausing every few moments
to look as far over the edge of the cliff as they
dared, lying fiat along it and looking over the
Boys and Girls, 115

edge. Tom kept them in order, and would not
let any one but himself and Alick do this; and
after a little while Alick began to walk very
lame, and said he would sit down for a little
while, and then follow them; -he had had more
walking that day than he could quite manage.
Thus it was that Elly came upon him after a
mile’s walk, sitting by the path, rather spent, but
with too much spirit not to struggle on by her side.

“Oh, Alick!” said Elly, “do you think we shall
ever see them again ?”

“T hope so,” said Alick; but his voice shook
as he spoke. For he knew how the water was
lapping and foaming in the little bays below.

“And nurse says it is my fault!” proceeded
poor Elly in tears. “And I’m sure I would do
anything if I could only know Maggie was safe.
Oh, do you think I shall never see her dear little
fat face again?”

“I hope we shall see her again,” said Alick, in
a low voice, “whether she is safe now or not,
Elly. You know God is taking care of her.”

“Yes,” said Elly, sobbing, “and Maggie is such
a good little girl, She was hardly ever cross or
naughty or tiresome like me.” And a vision of
the sweet little rosy contented face came over
poor Elly, and made her absolutely writbe with
misery, at the thought of losing her. Alick could
only put his arm round her, and say, “Don’t
cry so, Elly, dear!” and though she could not
help crying, Alick’s sympathy comforted her, and
she leaned her head against him, and her sobs
grew less violent,

12
116 Boys and Girls.

“Now let us come on again,” she said; and
on they trudged not saying much, growing more
and more heart-sick, especially. when Johnny
came running back to them, saying, “We can’t
see anything, nor Mr. Burton either. There is
his boat; do you see? Dick is to hold up a
flag whenever they see anything of them. But
you can’t come on, can you, Alick? you’re as
lame as a tree.”

__ “Elly and I will follow you, slowly,” said Alick,
trying to look as if there was nothing amiss with
him.

_ But before long he had to stop again, and sit
down; and Elly, who did not like to leave him,
and who began to feel a terrible dread of the
news which might meet the rest, stayed with
him. The sky had cleared up after the storm,
and there was a lovely sunset beginning. The
west was a hazy mixture of gold and blue, with
gold clouds floating in it. “Oh, Alick!” said
Elly, “do you think—if they are—if they are
drowned—their souls are somewhere in that
part of the sky where it is so beautiful? I think
-perhaps they. wouldn’t mind if they were!”

“T am sure they won’t mind anyhow,” said
-Alick; “because you know Who said, ‘ Suffer
little children—— ” .

Elly sat looking at the sky from the cliff-top ;-
and the beauty of the sunset, and.the thoughts
it brought to her began to soothe her pain. But
still-it kept coming back to her with stabs—
.“Oh Maggie, Maggie, my darling little sister!”
and, “ What will mamma say when she hears it?”


CHAPTER XIV.

FTER Alick and Elly had sat still for half
an hour or so on the cliff top, Alick
perceived that Elly was growing impatient

to be off again, and he begged her to leave him
there if she liked, and he would stay until she
came back. Elly accordingly went on along the
path by the hill top. Everything was so bright
now with the sunset that it looked as if it had
been bathed in gold: as Elly walked along, the
sea was shining on her right hand below the
cliff, and a furzy slope rose up on her left, glowing
with yellow blossoms, A lane with low grassy
banks ran up this slope at the point which Elly
had now come to; it was not steep, but straight,
so that Elly could see along it for perhaps a
quarter of a mile: and as she looked, she started,
and her heart beat so that she could hardly stand.
For the sun shone on two little brown-hollanded
figures walking hand in hand from the further end,
and for a moment Elly thought they looked as if
they might be Maggie and Alfred. But then she
saw that each of them had a shawl on, crossed
and pinned behind: and her heart sank again,
for she knew that Maggie and Alfréd had had
no shawls. But still an undefined hope made
118 Boys and Girls.

her wait at the entrance of the lane until they
came up.

They came nearer and nearer, and Elly saw that
the tallest had a bush of long light hair at her
back like Maggie, and that the other smaller one
was certainly a boy—she saw his short holland
open trousers. But somehow Elly felt as if she
had no strength left in her limbs to run and see:
she could only wait till they came up, when
Maggie caught sight of her, and set off towards
her at a run, and the two little sisters were locked
in. each other’s arms: Elly crying and laughing
and kissing her at once, and Maggie looking very
much puzzled at this reception.

“Oh, Maggie, Maggie, I thought you were
drowned,” pouted Elly.

“T wasn’t,” said Maggie. “But the sea nearly
caught us, Elly, and we got quite wet, and then it
thundered, and Alfred and I said our prayers and
asked God not to let us be drowned, and then we
went on, and the sea came into our boots, and
then we came to a place where the cliff wasn’t
quite so steep and there was some water that ran
down into the sand, and made it muddy. And
we climbed up there somehow by when the water
came, and came to a house where there was such
a nice old woman: and we asked her to let us
stay till the thunder was gone, and so she did,
and she gave us some bulls’ eyes out of a bottle in
her window, and some ginger beer. And when
the thunder left off we said we must go home to
Endlow, and she said if we went in the rain she
must wrap us up, and Mrs, Burton would send
Boys and Girls. rIQ

back the shawls by her boy. And so here we are—
but why are you crying, Elly?” said Maggie,
ending her story at last.

«We thought you were drowned,’ sobbed Elly,
trying to stop herself but feeling an odd lump in
her throat which nearly choked her. “And now,
how are we to let the boys and Mr. Burton
know?”

* Hollo!” shouted Alick, who had dragged him-
self up the hill slowly after Elly. You little
wretches, what a fright you have given us all!
Elly, you had better run on and catch up the rest
and tell them that everything is right while I take
these creatures hame.”

Elly stopped to give one rapturous kiss to
Maggie and another to Alfred, and then sped off
on her way. Oh, how happy she felt now! It
did not seem to her like the same world that it
had been: for now the sunshine had got back
into her heart. On and on she ran forgetting
_ weariness, and breathlessness, and all other sub-
lunary evils: and after half-an-hour’s run she
found her brothers, beginning to be terribly tired
and hopeless over their search, ‘“ ‘They’re found,
they’re found!” was all that she could pant out as
she came up to them, and dropped down on the
grass, hot and panting. ‘The boys raised a shout
of Hurrah! and waved a pocket handkerchief as a
signal to Mr. Burton in the boat: and then they
heard a faint “ Hurrah!” coming to them over the
golden water, and saw the -oat turning round to
go homewards, But they themselves waited a
little while for Elly to rest after her run, only
120 Boys and Girls,

Frank and Charlie setting off to get home as soon
as they could,

They were just where the cliff path made a
“steep descent into a little valley, which sloped
down nearly to the sea on the one hand, and up
to a little cottage on the other, some quarter of a
mile off. “Why!” cried Elly, “this is where they
must have got up from the beach, and that must
be the cottage where they went to for shelter.
But only look, Tom, what a place it is for them
to have climbed up by themselves!”

The place did look bad from above, as rough
descents: are wont to do: and it would at any
time have been more dangerous to go down than
- to climb up. But however this might have been
it certainly was something of a feat for two little
children like Maggie and Alfred to have accom-
plished all by themselves with no one to help
them, - “And Vl tell you what, Elly,” said Tom:
“TI believe that’s the only place they could have
got up from the bathing-place to Whitebar. And
just look at.the sea now!”

The coast curved on the other side of the
valley, and Elly saw the water shining and
rippling up to the very edge of the cliffs. Nota
speck of sand showed anywhere, and most of the
rocks were covered. Elly grasped Tom’s hand
tight, and nearly began to cry again from pure
gladness and than Kfuiness,

“Come, old girl,” said Tom, kindly; “we must
think of getting back now. Are you getting
rested?”

“Tm all ready, thank you,” said Elly, getting
Boys and Girls, oa

_up, and finding herself rather uncomfortably stiff
and tired. However, when she once began to
walk, she found that she could get on better, and
she trudged on bravely over the cliff between
Tom and Johnny. The sun had set now, but the
west was bright, and it was very cool and pleasant.
The three children were all too tired, too satisfied,
and perhaps also too thankful, to have much to
say to each other.

They got in at last, had some tea and went to
bed; but before they did so, Mr. Burton came
into the parlour and told Tom and Elly what a
very narrow escape the two children had had.
For if Maggie had slept for a quarter of an
hour longer, or if she had turned to the left in-
stead of the right when she got off the rock—or
if she had dawadled along the beach, or tried to
escape the water by waiting on some rock
higher than the rest—humanly speaking, nothing
could have saved either of them. Mr. Burton
and his boat would have been too late; and, as
Tom said, there was no place where the chil-
dren could have climbed up, except the one they
had been led to in time to get out of the way of
the tide.

“But that little missy is an uncommon sharp
little maid,” said Mr. Burton to nurse, smiling.
“ She’s got all her wits about her and no mistake.
Most would have been frightened out of their
senses, and stood and. screamed, and let the tide
catch ’em; but, says she; ‘I-knew if we could get
up there the tide wouldn’t catch us, and so we
did.’ I’d like a little lass like that, and so would
122 Boys and Girls.

my wife: that’s what my little Bess would have
been like if she’d lived.”

“She’d no business to go off like that, though,
naughty little monkey!’ said nurse, who even
now could not forgive the fright that Maggie had
caused her.

«Shell never do it again, nurse,” said Elly,
pleadingly.

* And [hope you'll look after her better next
time, Miss Eleanor,’ said nurse. “A great girl
of eleven not, able to look after her little sister
for one morning !”

“Come, come, Mrs. Brown,” said the farmer,
“you mustn’t be too hard upon them. They’ve
had a lesson too.” Poor Elly drooped her head,
and Frank looked very much ashamed.

Corda and Maggie were both asleep when Elly
went up to bed, but Elly was not too tired to
kneel down by Maggie’s bed and say the few
simple words of thanksgiving for her little sister’s
safety that came into her head.. “And I will try
to be very careful, and good and all that I ought
to be, always now,” said Elly to herself as she
laid her tired little self down by Maggie’s side,
thinking what it would have been if she had had
no little sister to cuddle in bed that night.

And this was the end of Maggie’s search for
the golden sea-weed, as you may well imagine.




CHAPTER XV.

« Y dear children,—
“Tam glad to tell you that papa and I

have settled at last to come down to
Endlow for ten days before you come back, and
we hope to be with you to-morrow. It will bea
great pleasure to us to see you all agairf, and we
shall be all the better for a little rest and change
after our hard work. You will have to show us
so many things, and especially the place where
dear little Maggie and Alfred were in such ter-
rible danger. Good-bye dear children, and believe

me your loving mother, « Ft anor LANGFORD.”

This letter delighted the little Langfords very
much, and all that day they were engaged ia
making the bedroom which their father and
mother were to have, look as nice as possible.
It was really a bare room with white-washed
walls and no carpet, like all the other rooms. in
the house, and when chairs and a table had been
brought in, and a selection of the children’s
books laid in order upon it, it still looked so bare
that they all hailed it as a good suggestion when
Corda said, Let us make some heather-wreaths
to put up about the room to make it look nicer.”

Accordingly Corda and Elly worked hard all
day at their heather-wreaths, and Johnny, who
124 Boys and Girls.

was very neat-handed, tacked some letters. of
green leaves upon a piece of white calico which
nurse gave him, and put up the word “ Welcome”
over the fire-place, which all the children thought
looked quite beautiful. And the next day when
Mrs. Langford appeared, and was led up in
triumph by all her sons and daughters, and Corda
and Alfred, to see her room, she told them that
she thought it very beautiful indeed, and had
never expected to sleep in a room decorated with
wreaths and inscriptions, like a national school-
room at a children’s feast.

How nice it was to have mamma there among.
them! Even the uncomfortable parlour with its
horse-hair furniture, began to look quite cheerful
when Mrs. Langford was sitting there, with her
work in her hand and all-the children clustered
round her, and Mr. Langford standing by the fire
reading the newspaper he had bought in the train
as he came along, For nurse had lighted a fire
to-day, because it was chilly and windy, with a
gale blowing, and Mrs. Burton had found some
stores of wall-paper, with which Dick and Alick
had covered the walls of the parlour where the
old paper was torn.

“Upon my word, young people,’ said papa,
“you have been making yourselves quite comfort-
able all this time!”

There was a great deal to be told on both sides,
as you may imagine. Mr. and Mrs. Langford had
to tell the children all about the fever: how ter-
rible it had been at first, when in some place

whole families were lying ill all together, father,
Boys and Girls, 125
mother, and children unable to help each other:
and then how Mrs. Langford and her husband had
had to go round the village, carrying great cans of
soup, and ladling them out themselves into the
‘sick people’s plates and mugs because they had no
one to send for them. And for three nights, when
the fever was at its worst, neither Mr. nor Mrs.
Langford had gone to bed at all, but had been
sitting up with sick people who could not get any
one to nurse them.

“Oh, Aunt Eleanor, did you really ?” said Corda.
“ Flow tired you must have been! And I wonder
you were not afraid of catching the fever!”

' €Tt is no use to be afraid of things, Corda
dear,” said Mrs. Langford, smiling, “when we
have to do them.”

“But you might have died, mamma,” said
Frank, “if you had.”
~ Sol might, Frank, But don’t you think it would
have been rather cowardly of me not to help the
‘poor people who had nobody else to help them,
because I might have caught the fever myself?”

“Mamma,” said Elly, “I think you are a real
heroine!”

_ Mrs. Langford laughed heartily at the chorus
of agreement in this sentiment which rose from
her other children.

“Well,” she said, “now that I have told you all
‘my experience since you have been away, children,
I want you to tell me yours.”

“OQ mamma! but we haven’t had any,” said Frank.

“Yes you have, every one of you. Nobody can
live for five weeks in this world without learning
126 Boys and Girls.

something by it. Madge, my pet, what have you
learnt since you have been here that you did not
know before? Not to go off for rambles among
the rocks without asking leave?”

“Yes, mamma,” said Maggie: “I won’t again.”

“No, I don’t think you will. Then you have
learnt that oid people’s heads are sometimes wiser
than young ones: that is something worth know-
ing. Why, Elly, what is this? Have you written
a book on your experience?” as Elly, with a very
red face, stuffed a volume into her mother’s hand.

“No, mamma,” said Elly, “but I have learnt
to the end of the adjectives since I have been
here, so I have learnt something!”

“Fave you really? Then you have been an
industrious little girl,” said her mother, smiling;
“but I hope you have learnt something else too,
Elly dear. Book-learning is very useful and very
necessary, but things that we learn from experi-
ence are still better. Can’t you think of anything
you have learnt from experience?”

“Yes, mamma,” said Elly. “I know how horrid
it would feel if Maggie had really been drowned.”

« Aunt Eleanor,’ said Corda, “I know the sort
of things you mean we ought to learn by experi-
ence—not Elly’s sort of thing at all. I think
I have learnt that it is a great deal better not
to, make a fuss when people do what I don’t like,
Is that the right sort of experience?”

“Quite,” said Mrs. Langford, patting Corda’s
shoulder: “very useful experience indeed. Now
boys, let me have yours.”

“Mine,” said Frank, “is that it is awfully jolly
to have papa and mamma here again.”
Boys and Girls. 127

“Oh, but that’s everybody’s experience; that
isn’t fair,” said Johnny.

“Nevermind: let itstand Johnny. What is yours?”

“Oh,” said Johnny, and paused: during which
pause his brothers cheered him on with “ Out with
it, old fellow!” “Don’t shout too loud!” “Don’t
speak without thinking ;” and other remarks not
calculated to stimulate his thinking powers. At
last he came out with “Well, my experience is
that Endlow is an awfully jolly place altogether!”

“You needn’t have thought so long about saying
that,” said Charlie. Mine is ‘s

«The folly of friendship as shown in Thomas
Halford, Esquire!” said Tom.

Charlie shook his shoulders, not approving of
this allusion; but he came out with a senti-
ment much more original than Johnny’s. “My
experience is, that I hate Bath buns, and I believe
they put cochineal and all sorts of poisons into
mine, because they made me ill.”

“ Cochineal!” said Dick; “ cochineal isn’t poi-
sonous, and the buns weren’t red, were they?”

“Well, then, I mean calomel,” said Charlie:
whereat his mother laughed uncontrollably.

“Mine,” said Dick, “is that you must never put
crabs and sea-anemones into the same aquarium.
And also that I don’t believe that Oleander Hawk-
moths ever are blown across the Channel, or they
would have been blown here with the south winds
that we have had for so many days!”

“Highly valuable experience,” said his father,
who was laughing heartily at this recital. “Now
then, Tom, give us yours.”


128 Boys and Girls,

“ Mine is that I hate responsibility,” said Tom,
“and [ll never undertake any again if I can help
it: and [’m heartily glad to be rid of mine, for
it’s more plague than profit.”

“ And Alick?” said Elly.

But Alick only laughed and held his tongue,
‘with a sly glance at Tom: so that his experiences
were never revealed to the world, whatever they
may have been.

The children enjoyed their parents’ visit very
much. They had delightful rock expeditions with
their father, and once they went in a rowing boat
to Whitebar, which every one enjoyed except
Corda, who was ill, and resolved never to get
-into a boat again; but at last the days were all
gone, and the omnibus came to the door to carry
them all back to Bellsand station. The baskets,
and stones, and sea-weeds, and shells that every
one of the ‘party had to carry would have stocked a
museum, and it wasewell that there would be no
changing of trains between Bellsand and Ringland.

Mrs. Burton stood at the door to see them off,
having bestowed a bead mat on Elly, and another
on Corda, as a proof of her affection: and as they

all settled themselves in the omnibus, and drove
off, leaning out of all possible windows to catch
a last sight of the farmhouse, Mrs. Langford said:
“Well, children, considering how happy you have
been here, and. how terribly unhappy we might
have all been—except,” she added reverently, “ for
the goodness of God, I think we ought all to be
very thankful whenever we ae of our stay at
Endlow Farm!”
NEW SERIES OF ONE SHILLING BOOKS,

With COLOURED FRONTISPIECE and Two full-page
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BOYS AND GIRLS.

By Miss Bramston, Author of “ The Panelled House,” &c.

THE SLAVE DEALER OF THE COANZA,
A Naval Story. By S. W. SapLeg, Esq., Author of “ Marshal
Vavasour,”’ &¢. ‘

THE STORY OF THE GREAT CZAR.

A Sketch of the Life of Peter of Russia. By James F. Coss, Esq.,
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THE TWO SHIPMATES,
By W. H. G. Kineston, Esq., Author of “ The Gilpins,” “ Michael
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RIVERSDALE,
By Mrs. C. BE. Bowen, Author of “ New Stories on Old Subjects,”
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THE PERSONAL EXPERIENCE OF ROBIN THE BOLD,

With Observations on Divers Characters. By Miss A. C. CHam-
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PICTURES FROM THE EARLY HISTORY OF VENICE,
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A FAITHFUL SERVANT.

Journal of what took place in the Tower of the Temple during the
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SARDINIA.

By Mrs. Davey.

A MONTH AT BRIGHTON, AND WHAT CAME OF IT.
By Mary E. Surpiey, Author of “ Janetta,” &c.
AN INHERITED TASK; OR, EARLY MISSION LIFE
IN SOUTHERN AFRICA,

By Cuaries H. EDEN, Esq., Author of “The Fortunes of the
Fletchers,” &c,


RECENT PUBLICATIONS.

ALICH NEVILLE.
By Mrs. C. E. Bowen. 18mo, cloth boards .... «
ADVENTURES OF MARSHAL VAVASOUR,
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ALICH IN THE COUNTRY.

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A Child’s Story. 18mo, cloth boards . . « « « » e « +
PARABLES OF LIFE.
By the Author of “Earth’s Many Voices.” Royal 16mo, on
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PIECES OF SILVER.
By the Author of “ Whiter than Snow.” 18mo, cloth boards
SCHOOL AND HOLIDAYS.
A description of German Upper Class Life for Girls. Trans-
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STORIES OF SUCCHSS, as Illustrated by the
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xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20080506_AAABIY' PACKAGE 'UF00066168_00001' INGEST_TIME '2008-05-07T12:48:24-04:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T17:11:01-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 298278; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-18T14:41:00-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '257672' DFID 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHIZ' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-filesUF00066168_00001.xml'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' e572374e9d84b31e8a4f42a66274bf05
'SHA-1' a6d6c1d2a65ff3ceafe71d320be58d2facb35a73
EVENT '2011-12-09T02:02:43-05:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'2013-12-18T14:34:41-05:00'
xml resolution
'47' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHJB' 'sip-files00001.txt'
0c1956b79738231ff439dd36a263fa82
00e8f5f9ffa341277ccecfa33b9e14ca5d947f45
'2011-12-09T02:03:58-05:00'
describe
'277' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHJC' 'sip-files00004.txt'
c2772dc859155e5a8eecf99291bc033c
f4fcc6bf5b3ab3b208be8d38dd66aa9f5db4229e
'2011-12-09T02:04:22-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'652' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHJD' 'sip-files00005.txt'
9bedc62cad4c4611be3c93ed82059d50
2b5fd3d1540ce0b081598cf75aa408fa1bcd688e
'2011-12-09T02:02:31-05:00'
describe
'180' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHJE' 'sip-files00006.txt'
ca41180601c290a090edbb41b7e108d9
30a4029b0f5b0be1610abc9d06a6b9c4a7330f6f
'2011-12-09T02:04:05-05:00'
describe
'875' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHJF' 'sip-files00007.txt'
d5dc33956a2326c79147a8097e756cbf
093aaa281feed211cbb752b1acf9191d8cd5284a
'2011-12-09T02:03:29-05:00'
describe
'1052' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHJG' 'sip-files00008.txt'
842408f4adbd77432389e24c32375bca
4e1f73046a3d8b93aca5d8f24c186704a43394e4
'2011-12-09T02:03:51-05:00'
describe
'883' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHJH' 'sip-files00009.txt'
29e0607d907ae1a9d4a09b5922cc7fbd
b2b2eca8af44f2b516037e0d61b174f3bd270328
'2011-12-09T02:01:49-05:00'
describe
'1597' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHJI' 'sip-files00010.txt'
a081c4f30526e453d79a7d392ed8aa48
c86866d77fea123aa44622c942ced47125b66644
'2011-12-09T02:03:05-05:00'
describe
'1439' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHJJ' 'sip-files00011.txt'
c943db127c1bc5a88522857cc0053298
4b0bfc0b684b1e29e8b7262f6dc4a86acfda9818
'2011-12-09T02:01:58-05:00'
describe
'1504' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHJK' 'sip-files00012.txt'
3d0020f57891c64f1b7a265e4875bfe3
b4fb2d043f5fb094db51cfe5b7f89dc71aa13623
'2011-12-09T02:03:19-05:00'
describe
'1572' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHJL' 'sip-files00013.txt'
3c705a6d80fddee24a4185dfb064056a
421bd847743e1ce1d8ad556d5692ac3236bc807f
'2011-12-09T02:02:57-05:00'
describe
'1432' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHJM' 'sip-files00014.txt'
8500debf485f6ca5a4f3495033aa6eee
fcfae9f1501f9074d84f72399387fca265910bef
'2011-12-09T02:04:10-05:00'
describe
'1539' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHJN' 'sip-files00015.txt'
d67e5c28e13725045351684c11ce75bb
9f1fe65e78f35db6ccc8849797a76296590eb86d
'2011-12-09T02:02:38-05:00'
describe
'1542' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHJO' 'sip-files00016.txt'
344e2da1e6a0ace9fbbffebfd298a6a1
6de392009a510ec1bb8b335361c1905078b1b890
'2011-12-09T02:02:17-05:00'
describe
'1506' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHJP' 'sip-files00017.txt'
943a5eb116537dc9dce2b282f575ed49
35318bcfc4ac8ef64349baff2bd98e5815717c77
'2011-12-09T02:02:04-05:00'
describe
'1415' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHJQ' 'sip-files00018.txt'
02d633e565490249c8b46de7c50a7cae
fafd7b55cc87fec8612c1efc1c57bcd1a981fcf4
'2011-12-09T02:03:09-05:00'
describe
'385' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHJR' 'sip-files00019.txt'
2ac9e3c04f3d143e2da7863d600e9b33
f0f689b7a6a8cb789ca7220585473ba571975065
'2011-12-09T02:04:26-05:00'
describe
'1241' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHJS' 'sip-files00020.txt'
58068ff861e37fbf3544c2342110bfca
dff43d00da14e7dcaef4d4ba9655ba6cb381bdb9
'2011-12-09T02:02:52-05:00'
describe
'1569' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHJT' 'sip-files00021.txt'
d700fc2b9dd6aec14d38a6717b7d22d8
643c4c3b54f18b7dd637d4962029203d494bcbf8
describe
'1554' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHJU' 'sip-files00022.txt'
fd38cc1c06f885e5cbdd5406ecb6faf8
7481122b0b7085e712a025a43772f5d7ce7bec62
'2011-12-09T02:03:52-05:00'
describe
'1626' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHJV' 'sip-files00023.txt'
829541be17c65aa402f1a79352fd7679
d2fda6e881b865960de41f7b7951aa2f34514310
'2011-12-09T02:04:25-05:00'
describe
'1583' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHJW' 'sip-files00024.txt'
f6a15d77664335848ee63089b2958a93
7a33c294344fa0f6596bf6b8ba58c8f944814a28
'2011-12-09T02:03:37-05:00'
describe
'160' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHJX' 'sip-files00026.txt'
1dfc9ea1a197a7276ba0c7cd7e1cee43
91141d44ff34d0764d77d7ff569000058737726b
'2011-12-09T02:02:10-05:00'
describe
'1632' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHJY' 'sip-files00027.txt'
2ad8f5539e5eb39e57ff0c06d3f3d88a
78c27cc0e6b8dac33c9550757f7f8538fb5e8e81
describe
'1018' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHJZ' 'sip-files00028.txt'
3f28a5dda11f22524ff07fe703bd7c8b
d15e06dfde913ece41f3fca0a39e86f76f0345c2
'2011-12-09T02:02:07-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'1106' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHKA' 'sip-files00029.txt'
d3ec3aa70f9f1ee4e8c65ccdb3b495e2
c1251872c9a4d0975f3fc08abf28c1fcf79bafae
'2011-12-09T02:02:59-05:00'
describe
'1493' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHKB' 'sip-files00030.txt'
a3cf0cf6d9cd76ab59eabeb98909cbd7
0f311718278005ea50af0dccff9b482f2145d2c8
describe
'1543' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHKC' 'sip-files00031.txt'
9d2f4a930e249d7cfcc40c59451e7b8e
c5f2fde5e57e462943b602877f0a96778949ba66
'2011-12-09T02:04:20-05:00'
describe
'1489' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHKD' 'sip-files00032.txt'
5ab9221a991509001c45e2cb68df5afe
ea5a72bc9b24bf1d0b3f751b9e5928ae5ab78ee5
'2011-12-09T02:04:32-05:00'
describe
'1435' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHKE' 'sip-files00033.txt'
8f1280e60a40ac3425d5ff0d33167e19
b0bbb78ecf42d0c0f4fd1141d109f0650b10e0b9
describe
'1534' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHKF' 'sip-files00034.txt'
80aaba0dc52fda9a77a90cc521b518d2
4c7c221759f359880f4f0408179f73df6394720c
describe
'1438' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHKG' 'sip-files00035.txt'
eeffe0ffb74c28a1f2cb7c99431a95af
4e404a2408cbdfab7209180540ae7bb3f6be544f
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHKH' 'sip-files00036.txt'
fd72268ff963f1a53bd8d8fb71d72f17
db4462b94c85fd60995c225e74b8ca1d9bf8d190
'2011-12-09T02:02:00-05:00'
describe
'1255' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHKI' 'sip-files00037.txt'
f82c81fb42502769c46493d25ff5f01b
0ec1d364218d2ed4824a8b432b89e86040f74b3f
'2011-12-09T02:02:35-05:00'
describe
'1575' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHKJ' 'sip-files00038.txt'
ab3e05f7c56d133be1209529e0692334
61133be1f31e7216b5fef874f86ff0310018fe9e
'2011-12-09T02:02:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHKK' 'sip-files00039.txt'
44856503dcdb7baed0e757a958f0a109
d6610e77a4770cd2a2ce152aeadb874a56131bcb
'2011-12-09T02:02:27-05:00'
describe
'1574' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHKL' 'sip-files00040.txt'
d35db4e34eade09610e71a5ab2f9e2b2
8a0e83985cd61f057880753e12e4998d550e093d
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHKM' 'sip-files00041.txt'
2d727f2d7ed63eb6c13476a7ee006960
19af6203abf6ed85f3aff6585afa521ddc6b9674
describe
'1416' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHKN' 'sip-files00042.txt'
30d7e27fbade3d24c4e3a57556445dd7
4bfd48bcd4f587a340df5e5017b7318b33cb38f6
'2011-12-09T02:02:47-05:00'
describe
'1452' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHKO' 'sip-files00043.txt'
7dd0c6e8872c12602ebe9b868b0d4284
322ca8fe1006e84fb4a2e37de9f5e63fe911e860
describe
'1463' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHKP' 'sip-files00044.txt'
05f8d1028038eaa59a52fb4e5215ee93
9aaebdff0270e095ef158daf92484d21a22fb015
'2011-12-09T02:04:43-05:00'
describe
'1421' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHKQ' 'sip-files00045.txt'
c6da09612a98ce87a58e9aa98d745418
e06aa88b20c5d35423b2edf3abf8de4e4e4b2762
'2011-12-09T02:02:40-05:00'
describe
'1544' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHKR' 'sip-files00046.txt'
f03c9ff1a80e56a30cd580a064f5ff44
22abd94f7605cda81753538d6983598826b1de9b
'2011-12-09T02:01:54-05:00'
describe
'1183' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHKS' 'sip-files00047.txt'
59124e1cdd9671601f4a0969204ae5ec
daf421692f9f553557266ce87214c6d02469a1f9
'2011-12-09T02:02:28-05:00'
describe
'1523' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHKT' 'sip-files00048.txt'
6972d404c223289bba0bdd3408b47aba
bf1e17b63adba8718106031f9c4ac9cf5430849d
'2011-12-09T02:02:16-05:00'
describe
'1410' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHKU' 'sip-files00049.txt'
087bc98a7dde4867a16a0f842e123043
285a4207bb40efd5b1247e5ee068a2a5c65054c0
'2011-12-09T02:02:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHKV' 'sip-files00050.txt'
cee08297d56efc9bfdb57ec1b18fe443
0da04cc6739da4027136db8747618f9eb7aed59b
'2011-12-09T02:04:41-05:00'
describe
'1475' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHKW' 'sip-files00051.txt'
9ef89011ef1c2073a8c5c82ac3f95909
ff4d03036dd4a6c924b2a66abf4e0c7f6ef80956
'2011-12-09T02:03:50-05:00'
describe
'1502' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHKX' 'sip-files00052.txt'
ee382f01b6c5bacb22aa95b31f33031c
81edaca9d7df73ca2a06ea5e817c2c18bd2734d0
'2011-12-09T02:04:14-05:00'
describe
'1565' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHKY' 'sip-files00053.txt'
809043917fb9c346fa2917fa2e76ef79
f537a530b3e913d0a61fe061ae80914f30d22226
'2011-12-09T02:02:22-05:00'
describe
'259' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHKZ' 'sip-files00054.txt'
5bed10eaaab94c4c8489d30b03620e13
ec13f5dce5cecaa09bf2343c0741688d4f1fd944
'2011-12-09T02:01:40-05:00'
describe
'1287' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHLA' 'sip-files00055.txt'
5c128fe4df9a033c404ec22a3f4303ba
50eeea2a69be854f2c46f807c6f08ce0defb6b35
'2011-12-09T02:03:30-05:00'
describe
'1478' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHLB' 'sip-files00056.txt'
7bdb34ede8ecafae3375ff91bbcd8395
321db28c91f5dc14bfb48d28575a06772883c270
'2011-12-09T02:03:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHLC' 'sip-files00057.txt'
3c198ab3640fc4d32d3d20f77cccf3dd
a5c24065dc0718fca48d28ae0daec4999b8f4f61
'2011-12-09T02:01:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHLD' 'sip-files00058.txt'
d8cc8534f5f0ae226c30ea674023b549
443ae4a5875207f28291ae1709407168bba15e29
'2011-12-09T02:04:48-05:00'
describe
'723' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHLE' 'sip-files00059.txt'
4c61d33fb5831dcb67b3b0fa68358d88
3250eef22a9f7aed9f9cd05550a055110a650fdd
'2011-12-09T02:01:46-05:00'
describe
'1141' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHLF' 'sip-files00060.txt'
28933267077b5ae33489972639ec5a6b
548a6d59d74f245163479dd3f994411ee2fafcd6
'2011-12-09T02:03:32-05:00'
describe
'1606' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHLG' 'sip-files00061.txt'
3a59702c6921482161ba385119b3d244
855883c9f0e7bac86ee8ff696b4366b3b8bab5d0
'2011-12-09T02:02:02-05:00'
describe
'1510' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHLH' 'sip-files00062.txt'
6f36fe44eb95f931ddc7d49896a81356
af190a9063502f8c6287f61f662fabc95971786c
'2011-12-09T02:03:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHLI' 'sip-files00063.txt'
d03ba99369f40ca82f40960be96fb114
90c243893821a8b79bfc9e39de29a9d148236919
'2011-12-09T02:04:01-05:00'
describe
'1476' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHLJ' 'sip-files00064.txt'
7227ffd9af84289cfa7e50e063d64264
a7c1e9af55e0e71e5afb6166752fe36a9a32aac7
'2011-12-09T02:02:41-05:00'
describe
'1545' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHLK' 'sip-files00065.txt'
52714f2d15ee1d8ea5e8f0aac1a1a394
c3a697fcb29468aefb513c0ef1734ffd09da15e9
'2011-12-09T02:04:19-05:00'
describe
'1054' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHLL' 'sip-files00066.txt'
f7f78c42d61850ae5e23e04976718c13
1c3a22a43ada68ae7b16ff0197191ed062fa5faa
describe
'1310' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHLM' 'sip-files00067.txt'
1ea3999f64e5259e083d8b817b1cdbcc
4eab5bf096d31e2cbab6ea83fd8a099a91807490
'2011-12-09T02:02:50-05:00'
describe
'1551' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHLN' 'sip-files00068.txt'
fc83e941ca68fd54148691aa773a75a3
fe43e5ae807760ef5516669ad6f4f8cfa3b021e3
'2011-12-09T02:01:56-05:00'
describe
'1584' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHLO' 'sip-files00069.txt'
594e91d39061429b80598256d1d46d7a
452d5143b2d575b0b04af02f32b1c947091faf40
'2011-12-09T02:02:20-05:00'
describe
'1535' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHLP' 'sip-files00070.txt'
7254c0a8669632a79f4ffa5316908954
6f493c4175e9356b2076ba9cdb115e2078828280
'2011-12-09T02:03:39-05:00'
describe
'1375' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHLQ' 'sip-files00071.txt'
18f2d487fdf5815fb371bc9f37d93ba3
ef7c17ad9a01c5805b4bed513c33c5880941b278
'2011-12-09T02:03:48-05:00'
describe
'1149' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHLR' 'sip-files00072.txt'
e7c4890439ff78a8db32b5061ec8eea8
2a2f3beda27ef68edf896b26734e80bf07a88ae1
'2011-12-09T02:04:39-05:00'
describe
'1613' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHLS' 'sip-files00073.txt'
84647124fb44ff9f98d5132c5d3f7a76
0ba9b8e9dead7acde9e7a8c0c7f15c6444afd3f1
'2011-12-09T02:02:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHLT' 'sip-files00074.txt'
411da1b1fbc163aee012da3a4559553f
e8e8ab2bb2777d4f21a1a2c42a0a706eb6d0d463
'2011-12-09T02:03:42-05:00'
describe
'1454' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHLU' 'sip-files00075.txt'
790bd09c3bb65ea5b2f8de116c144dba
b12bf210c515af896ecc3099da4361b4cd1dbaa8
describe
'1456' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHLV' 'sip-files00076.txt'
a698066a902fae0563d6f9a032a9924e
2505d5801c21014c8eb01cbe46639dc3da57a5eb
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHLW' 'sip-files00077.txt'
8dda5826a8f36c66c33ea1d6373a44c4
40016ce274fb4be692806b60e228d3da7b563e57
'2011-12-09T02:03:44-05:00'
describe
'1443' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHLX' 'sip-files00078.txt'
f78128bc07d2f9e30c3f4aa9b4d035b0
8ef8e19196fb3592732d26d34ac12cb08def76ce
describe
'132' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHLY' 'sip-files00079.txt'
cee9b3b398d71b4b08fcde3e4eff9dcc
00b1589e9d875b80204e52ad648d2c6e80b7d975
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'1547' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHLZ' 'sip-files00081.txt'
caccb4f06f2aa5b305076b51a394074c
c719fe8e3bb7c9884d5b79e6d371f9d22fecd36c
'2011-12-09T02:01:55-05:00'
describe
'1440' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHMA' 'sip-files00082.txt'
6b1327d8427fb438b03bdbb0377ef9a8
3d3ab21260e423b9acf8aa80d621e7c9d9c2c573
'2011-12-09T02:03:28-05:00'
describe
'1525' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHMB' 'sip-files00083.txt'
8d70221dd4cc6978f79706dfd15172ae
8a00c05c65ea48bf67a17caaac8d535f7f3a5a26
'2011-12-09T02:01:50-05:00'
describe
'370' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHMC' 'sip-files00084.txt'
f222c9d8e958f2f9709ee98dc90b597c
6e86acfa085d9c7d17f6ba68f259e7ac276b9b9c
'2011-12-09T02:03:07-05:00'
describe
'1446' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHMD' 'sip-files00085.txt'
f5547f6468afeb47ccdbb8f611fb4041
1ac06df5c91e065c456b93152e21f2be8c58d13d
'2011-12-09T02:01:35-05:00'
describe
'1515' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHME' 'sip-files00086.txt'
3a734ed08dcbb490ad9f80911056d214
b52327d4a068b2ed24f78226e9c680c6cee9c13c
describe
'1526' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHMF' 'sip-files00087.txt'
d7aa920347a04c2cc5539ea6897c50c1
4d6d00616981dcaed2bcb876515b3b26e11f3e68
'2011-12-09T02:04:46-05:00'
describe
'1528' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHMG' 'sip-files00088.txt'
4671f8b54927711d7c68551689b8138e
d44b70f75a58b0c38e3ac69a9567a8550762a6d6
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHMH' 'sip-files00089.txt'
40f6296ca0bac449dc221313941f07dd
26a2636ebd2f0960a768079c7918d8247c075a38
'2011-12-09T02:02:39-05:00'
describe
'1522' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHMI' 'sip-files00090.txt'
d221127209faa5575c9edd256ed72f1a
974f520909a361b494f4c603a2e2262c534b5388
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'1630' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHMJ' 'sip-files00091.txt'
c69a0b5ce16e09e40af1e06b0d24b470
9b751462cc4c346c4902225e9089fc435524fcf4
'2011-12-09T02:02:12-05:00'
describe
'1608' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHMK' 'sip-files00092.txt'
4a0ef5d28b1caf5720151e51bd8ae0ba
954b7c245789a4fca489f7d5262224b7c28c8594
describe
'1603' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHML' 'sip-files00093.txt'
9122f1b5260197a28b8aaa95d89545c9
0a8f0ed8abca98547e7edf70fb5782edab6a4d6e
'2011-12-09T02:01:41-05:00'
describe
'1654' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHMM' 'sip-files00094.txt'
8e14b293216a378c456046a37bfd8256
49456923129c2ffcf0590a9cf05d97257d5cd026
'2011-12-09T02:02:48-05:00'
describe
'1618' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHMN' 'sip-files00095.txt'
f4d722d28a291dd8a7a7b6148b4db0c1
8a86cf6864a7dcfa2c2a676424daadc50014f9d9
'2011-12-09T02:04:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHMO' 'sip-files00096.txt'
8cb0f0ef21cc6786e9492c262ad20eb9
b801488fcec5d5a6b25b45c2490738161f65787c
'2011-12-09T02:03:46-05:00'
describe
'1546' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHMP' 'sip-files00097.txt'
9d8c3e0138d30e806cac1d91c832cf46
a3dc403766d2063c2e9623c2c5159dd18cb2d1b8
'2011-12-09T02:02:19-05:00'
describe
'1566' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHMQ' 'sip-files00098.txt'
46e8b073ad6d71b19773a1870abfca25
14ba82609a72c5480f3d470bf16880163513a8bf
describe
'1591' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHMR' 'sip-files00099.txt'
6d26a9ed66e98c9b20424910e82e71c6
c7df1439d7a9dcea6a53fdeae21796e4803451e5
'2011-12-09T02:04:50-05:00'
describe
'1524' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHMS' 'sip-files00100.txt'
48c9381b1c826b58f37aeb8e9cd5a9b7
964deb093ed59efcbb037d7a07a2a3259f664183
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHMT' 'sip-files00101.txt'
9af6d0a8de65234cca3a7426060d50c2
e4077cbff8b27aa4dc41ff0d345db1627b206dac
describe
'1206' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHMU' 'sip-files00102.txt'
e188612d36918f6567bf2eca774774a2
c7fa27ac5b5555dc0b682eaf9af2cf22d187697f
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHMV' 'sip-files00103.txt'
76c596e3813cfb83f26b7571bc7d543a
19fd5d1c911c1b8d7906ceeecc9610a6849ce75a
'2011-12-09T02:03:27-05:00'
describe
'1585' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHMW' 'sip-files00104.txt'
b3230ed38b2c863c4f412a84e0d3f153
10bda92e791214e67b525108986a6d710af5da7e
'2011-12-09T02:04:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHMX' 'sip-files00105.txt'
41ca115247827cf6902c09c75e3814a4
d88773e40c530f7fc10840cd72fd22d669d0752b
'2011-12-09T02:02:09-05:00'
describe
'1500' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHMY' 'sip-files00106.txt'
68602f76c778717cc195e5c8044d62ea
899470b86f789bb1fff4342df8180f0c13c9ddab
'2011-12-09T02:02:36-05:00'
describe
'1079' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHMZ' 'sip-files00107.txt'
3e45a16226ea73f9215a38267e8af93f
2216a4d91eb20731f64ae3a23242ad82e15cf931
'2011-12-09T02:04:06-05:00'
describe
'1238' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHNA' 'sip-files00108.txt'
610777faaf60dae5033c1741e8414efa
21b8419517b214612f13b4b4d84980b34f773368
describe
'1472' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHNB' 'sip-files00109.txt'
ecf9e0d3a3009e5d47b18f07573667e6
ada25d851fb01bdd88c79fb6c3da93cad10a2571
'2011-12-09T02:03:47-05:00'
describe
'1530' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHNC' 'sip-files00110.txt'
f00693014ee1a46f1040170eee5ab7e4
cca5a422be8937b030da522caad2b6bb4887ccd9
describe
'1589' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHND' 'sip-files00111.txt'
6fce17337484aee145af5c60c496facc
23c5826f7afd28d9f1b89c9f3943392407b89a8f
'2011-12-09T02:03:06-05:00'
describe
'1659' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHNE' 'sip-files00112.txt'
9fb59990f35a44543cc91a575d3930d7
5d270af0ffe5defb7c92fb5d7aaf5558fee753cc
describe
'1602' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHNF' 'sip-files00113.txt'
4b71f01194951530dc664549adc001a3
de6297f96d44095194a730f5ad7e844733ecee67
'2011-12-09T02:02:55-05:00'
describe
'1509' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHNG' 'sip-files00114.txt'
d8c60675c923601f064235e27198d373
827a9c52c30286abf46d421a7cb30309ed1c2aa1
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHNH' 'sip-files00115.txt'
65646f047287775f9c6556a3cef1cfd1
79b5c12acaa93f5e7895becbf2a1f7aa32e04ef0
describe
'1189' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHNI' 'sip-files00116.txt'
4d39ebf4b3b4e771e6ca2814439097ed
079840bde7b241bbf108beec84ad74a4288c1d1d
describe
'1483' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHNJ' 'sip-files00117.txt'
c955e2c8caa8f9ca9aa89062b0ee2bec
d0b67578d37ec723779e07eb5515db432fec4582
'2011-12-09T02:01:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHNK' 'sip-files00118.txt'
e7654805ebf6fc6e7436311d9b6a68e8
438adb545315753bd246ea3eec1b44297f044509
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHNL' 'sip-files00119.txt'
22c8b53b56e48d3628ed5bfa1bbb721d
c4ed2b0c1a6cde1827abe5bc49403616af937c81
'2011-12-09T02:04:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHNM' 'sip-files00120.txt'
5204a6712a33af200a58eb05f272940a
49189ece2c74060674099eb7a83b79fef60df8bb
'2011-12-09T02:04:42-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'1598' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHNN' 'sip-files00121.txt'
ffd4357590444f24e0bd4df8e453e133
e750b130faa731a2dfeb822e8def83935531af8c
'2011-12-09T02:03:20-05:00'
describe
'1635' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHNO' 'sip-files00122.txt'
4056749b414a0aeab79283c0649eda6c
792922c13ad5c6e895a88b5e99add321430625fa
'2011-12-09T02:02:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHNP' 'sip-files00123.txt'
7d0757b0d0069d6fc7b473eea61ead76
d1ffbe81f2f43e1ad08fd42273b1db90c93f6f00
'2011-12-09T02:04:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHNQ' 'sip-files00124.txt'
d585b200d53d967c7000801b52df6bcf
23f38a7aa5249d61f0e255cddac195c2fb443f9d
describe
'1257' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHNR' 'sip-files00125.txt'
a90db28c941d072b8d08a2e7bf5b825a
86fc90e6d5b1e24a6253d2729189635700e09124
'2011-12-09T02:03:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHNS' 'sip-files00126.txt'
d3beb3094bca358c78cdc0e2dfd2928e
14e1ebbdb579ecceb6d05be388f7bf54e065c810
'2011-12-09T02:04:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHNT' 'sip-files00127.txt'
76159c35ef2703ada7b23b8a00752f73
e148e7f78bee165646aa0ea31ffdd8cf94c43d8e
'2011-12-09T02:02:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHNU' 'sip-files00128.txt'
c67a0ea74f708c42eaaa1ff83ab6a613
77ce4c7fe4f6f16a5c76d087d24e092dc7d94bd4
describe
'1596' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHNV' 'sip-files00129.txt'
887fea47f1c1812e64fbbc58e55f1d78
845356a76ff0d6cb8c186f0372fc741eae53bcc4
describe
'1288' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHNW' 'sip-files00130.txt'
318414259b5d3c3e3957d2288bd490f5
32500607e42b049f94d1dc22fa9346ad31916b7b
describe
'1281' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHNX' 'sip-files00131.txt'
f18aea97989540c86840689df3587ddf
0898ff60ca90640ed28ea3c8d9928c9fdcdfab4d
describe
'1581' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHNY' 'sip-files00132.txt'
449a61892a4277766755e4dfca1bef64
6eb5415b99fdce23531a4aa464ada4490a01da77
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHNZ' 'sip-files00133.txt'
8f5200b1e8e195bbad7926bbdd2c529c
214a02051c34dded95dfc3a52a52ed23ef71792f
describe
'1636' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHOA' 'sip-files00134.txt'
772e024e087abec50fe57ba2b2f1f33e
85fff13914cfbd28d7b20aa4384627fc44c1254e
'2011-12-09T02:04:24-05:00'
describe
'1567' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHOB' 'sip-files00135.txt'
b8ebe2188f505c1a2a295748009cb1ad
7e11187546be909db48272147de63a7dc37497e9
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHOC' 'sip-files00136.txt'
dbce36f57f9f9f0d4e5c383532a0bd0c
fe638359c7c53d2a67034c78409d8a50f48aa7f0
'2011-12-09T02:03:16-05:00'
describe
'1637' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHOD' 'sip-files00137.txt'
1ba33087d8a681aca2ee4e7ccaf43cb3
ff8273d7c5cb769fb1ac0dbbcc4fb476ada90ba0
describe
'2082' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHOE' 'sip-files00138.txt'
d7b944e0195b02d8bcdb37f23ffed4e9
a34288fdba19b670e3d5e6b391ecdfa733652fe3
describe
'167' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHOF' 'sip-files00141.txt'
270ccc5d75985714ffda97ad9dd809d7
19dace03e9e5e920d7b44d751066e8e015c28bd4
'2011-12-09T02:04:28-05:00'
describe
'284451' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHOG' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
69a1d991e7e56e95d3823f2edf10dc9e
18cd44efa959e3a4faa2b62bf9c89859bb3fe415
describe
'284209' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHOH' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
d7afbf6bba451ee96d3bc5f6ca6da518
61eb07db06e57564406259f90354bb1166668b8f
'2011-12-09T02:03:45-05:00'
describe
'261335' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHOI' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
18a45dc2e201ceba3e9d0a5934484402
980976977cea3769af00473a4bc0cc86423afc7d
describe
'247759' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHOJ' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
04e8d1fa90f39376ab035f4e8c71ecc6
3ae4946a9f6ce36cfe71b0c8a6d3ab59a2d56c2c
describe
'213989' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHOK' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
3f14ea8fd6e4fcd83f0e9c11e006e12e
9fc2ecd8d3c6a89ebfeeb80cf980672cd94eedb4
'2011-12-09T02:01:53-05:00'
describe
'255952' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHOL' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
5cfb59afb885287f7ca3d52675fcbd89
975c78cfa7a3e2c24df379ca66e73f98c832222b
describe
'266872' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHOM' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
0bf35f6b237df76a16a9ae100714dbd6
afc7722ef6bf6fca398277264fb97cbe34ebae14
'2011-12-09T02:02:01-05:00'
describe
'258912' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHON' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
9cafa088e7f0ab577abb7a24aaa5daaf
2556b297739a234c3e118832363a2327d77760ba
describe
'260994' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHOO' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
b3089deb520977b836a78f9803bbad3c
1759afc468347756dd548cfecc21692e209a95cc
describe
'260670' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHOP' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
5d6247480f152de0d8e6c1a7eb7ee70c
2582940885b237971b2feb12b1e62b79701a82cd
'2011-12-09T02:02:33-05:00'
describe
'262020' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHOQ' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
d38dec3966c81a580f162c062cd51243
9d1dcb47a2360d7abd6d30e991a66a007cffe9ee
describe
'260672' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHOR' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
62f87d714f449f6e818622662e8b3452
16dcb27b6a56e60a95cb33b02bcab081f53fc18f
describe
'270575' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHOS' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
d32bf0beb680c31289e708a177d81c99
47d32e44d6d8bd8769f3bf4fdaaccbc967925131
'2011-12-09T02:04:04-05:00'
describe
'251324' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHOT' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
406e5277b5941952e7011ed3ccb5093c
b2f1dafcea915cae50b927738eafb73ffde8a128
describe
'265221' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHOU' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
20da39024464b746a3ce50241028d736
f5fc254e5609ed8e3c9274a07c9e143b89292beb
describe
'256747' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHOV' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
3e10011855f3699a344d5fa2ae5b73f9
3b83b231cafe9076c308b45e83f800a9e80a5007
'2011-12-09T02:03:00-05:00'
describe
'264833' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHOW' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
8bcfe1524a55b9f1a2707c0dc81636e3
0753797dfd73a6625780d71f641e7ff54748f33c
'2011-12-09T02:03:25-05:00'
describe
'260605' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHOX' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
7ac53040c59d568938cb6c8219f2eabb
63df3eaccbfb2295538764e90cafb63b287b18a4
describe
'259743' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHOY' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
aa5fbc700f2b927b8742a2b707e6b508
349fd4d3df58ce4b60af9ce027857eab483b141b
describe
'258100' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHOZ' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
4d49167c393a6e5a6393b0e41adf39d4
b3a5ec93d8b628c680924294e44f9540e77e009f
'2011-12-09T02:04:51-05:00'
describe
'263736' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHPA' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
283bd21e2f4c12f79f88738a78af08f0
cb093c13ae366c4af7f76f75482fa8e757d127a3
'2011-12-09T02:03:55-05:00'
describe
'259511' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHPB' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
ea0dc5008a28a107cc91b5dd294bf3ca
9e33936ee36edb5e36a5bfedea0523852c20eb03
describe
'259971' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHPC' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
09eaff3031493847d85585ac517e6f39
8019b2d04158bdc0757b13bbbfb06f5f25168860
describe
'266680' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHPD' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
2e22ae000cf6dede4edd6087da4f163d
2a4af8123f03b76834602bb4e4e502cc67efba6c
describe
'262023' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHPE' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
0c3cbaa9be9e7a51016907f8a3ae69f8
c26c17a3f77eec3ab86256b6c39c128a487a7d59
describe
'268693' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHPF' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
218200fdf0c6a70e829f962c9b59db7f
7b24a2ac94d3b999eac1958a16d9406bbf6139a0
describe
'263958' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHPG' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
79f0e85397133e7895f5372d60856d7a
5957f46644e55f883eb7348328033d588b4ddb79
'2011-12-09T02:03:34-05:00'
describe
'267463' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHPH' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
01280596d022a6f21ebe8d99be337c24
7db838cecdb76d284506565d7ebb1fde2a142ab6
describe
'262884' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHPI' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
b69cc1595a6ac03223db00b9d5c1e4d6
41f3fe84b98d012738515aaa3de046310ee66397
describe
'267564' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHPJ' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
c6f56b64e753d18d7cd04612a0df66c8
62ef260e754b0144dc6e15421f0abfa73dc0ed67
describe
'259465' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHPK' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
b79fb945a22538d39b51468ef7c24020
7b827065e929b010c9876b15cdd059a3a0e42394
describe
'268384' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHPL' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
e637746dcae6382a26e7b9058a02e15f
229f73b71d1ec6848bd63b88147d65387e308a10
describe
'265044' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHPM' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
8cd15750cf0e5a117a7e2758f3804d78
3fe7222845f9976e683e854084f6294fb975366b
describe
'265264' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHPN' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
3689701849459983f55234de579a121e
9aa77a970730627889e5424365614eeea4c4590d
describe
'265071' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHPO' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
d045e78cdfea9bb673ad6e7b71c42b67
1c5e68692715b4807ba73986c1ed0b9259f289ee
'2011-12-09T02:01:44-05:00'
describe
'264983' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHPP' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
5afd48e12bd3806d3139c377290fac45
728ef11685f19b9b1596377dc9b96a3cfd553d14
describe
'262500' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHPQ' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
e5ae52a57e4e7f0e54b8ea22587f9573
3bd94fd55a63f086983d16c1ed3071c2dfb1db71
'2011-12-09T02:03:23-05:00'
describe
'264370' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHPR' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
253d9b826a9d9a6ec34e2790e9b6915b
a71b05e57a4ab51e68a76b65852c5eaeeeac6067
'2011-12-09T02:01:52-05:00'
describe
'262826' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHPS' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
b8ad4f40d8ae73fe7580722e4231b85f
0b9875444f357bbcae29c5595bed6869db231d22
describe
'268071' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHPT' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
bad8728cfd6c651ec4f1a743d06ed8c6
eb3698b2ede956dda44a71fb193630fb5b960e16
'2011-12-09T02:03:22-05:00'
describe
'261712' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHPU' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
ad4391f8a40067565e1a3a3f08196aed
a3a7774b4127fefd706de829808e2f452ac8a27c
'2011-12-09T02:01:37-05:00'
describe
'266153' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHPV' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
2a31eb6affd3f96b162da50ef40872e1
5f8349bfb50e93a5cde3385d6638dbb157f7f16a
'2011-12-09T02:02:26-05:00'
describe
'255717' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHPW' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
fb9e72ca870fd7af10399413be8bb78a
be18cfb212cda3754729cf710e51b8c430104ee0
describe
'260689' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHPX' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
6973e0762e2fe02114a10501f49905c2
843517d530e53c4e632da42444f2319882c01f82
describe
'265077' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHPY' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
fd3bcf51a2cd5eca292e9c3969d9867d
e8083a0826b33dfed98c2cb411710e9cf3a904e5
describe
'267399' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHPZ' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
dac2ab724fda56b0d474e58405033319
6ca6d01f33b2b656a627d117672e1f0b85b4cbb4
describe
'262785' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHQA' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
b0127ff4b6056bd30f460fb61a5fc79a
3df3201b6288c75af8cc0c5a7665ae3b765ddb25
describe
'267461' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHQB' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
53267c147c627a54ddd1e6cb0bdd5163
a52c26d88d1379efd53a3fbada1454f2ba3f753c
describe
'262604' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHQC' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
cde82868489988c2217a934bc385a4d3
ed68231412449c98f3f6440e6cc81ea9daa8fcd3
'2011-12-09T02:04:02-05:00'
describe
'261861' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHQD' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
f33b16ab893e95efc1c2454c79353052
75e9f82d33a1adf0221beac7b83d6a4ffd0e39f3
'2011-12-09T02:01:39-05:00'
describe
'261068' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHQE' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
f031c6608ff63cff37d6efaa5282f6f8
85ebb3d6dfd91bd76c53885299571615e1e5393e
'2011-12-09T02:03:13-05:00'
describe
'264153' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHQF' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
56adc6b38cf46a41dd2bef68d35585ac
201eb0091d72e21cac4c7abd52e8bbc5a5fa2f87
describe
'265544' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHQG' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
e882ad5491066d24cb118c70a94a2867
45fd0f2ca4884a724d67dd23c99031f1d6c37bf0
describe
'264753' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHQH' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
3ecf5fcb7a3f0949d3d0bb8d3c343fda
1c91c053ba527587e79af8880f7f8572662aa680
'2011-12-09T02:04:40-05:00'
describe
'258810' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHQI' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
6e9b44fbaa8813b6f020eafbde3bf8e5
a9d3cbc4d9dd9d3078fb6045935bf94c04f7c482
describe
'263803' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHQJ' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
fa247f5910c158e197726bdc042bf8e3
dfb25d2cc8900921aad18ef578a3fa85154cb83e
'2011-12-09T02:02:46-05:00'
describe
'269219' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHQK' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
26cc634a76eae57cca873d91f19003fd
f5ad763ed300c9c1fcbd5ebeb97a4b645c1a0dd2
'2011-12-09T02:02:37-05:00'
describe
'269135' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHQL' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
9636760109123556d0a7f6e9ed0f8c19
42282844084636c0a7da9753e60004a526f72e3e
describe
'269047' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHQM' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
2f0b51dc250e0907514ed342d4edbfca
4e355f32fb653558231898e3f5cfa3df96f6940c
describe
'271393' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHQN' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
060296d8dccb7016c6d084d9dcc6ffa2
5122086a87ce391170ea2a8fdfa40fc925bf338c
'2011-12-09T02:02:14-05:00'
describe
'269476' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHQO' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
382fef62df97bd3f6bf0c84866a3d0d3
69616dbe7412cd07b4a9f83e3d110f707d456e38
'2011-12-09T02:01:48-05:00'
describe
'272070' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHQP' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
4f35761f6a5d98ab6771c1308124aa5b
4815b9f3218088592c64824c7521235721d14dde
describe
'269136' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHQQ' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
d690b1cfc75da608d1a0e7f2ba99701a
7c4558e2de6762026d67b50c7d33550687005c34
describe
'270124' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHQR' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
18af04a5aca9925e8b09bbc689eb9348
b78ffd1fd5f0351eecc907be93c73bc7ac131d4b
'2011-12-09T02:03:31-05:00'
describe
'261889' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHQS' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
2161957fb1345093decabefca8bed2cc
774483c6e5671ef25e1179d167df2e3ca153e1c6
'2011-12-09T02:03:21-05:00'
describe
'271013' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHQT' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
fbec4f85f52e510b4178af0a157b7f28
95e625f08b3ca0943b474dfcac9712cca5b88069
describe
'267548' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHQU' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
a9600be48b9cc2d7b4bd768864baa7b5
40fb322074440b86f08cb45e20a6a44ec19f4f5f
describe
'267332' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHQV' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
5ec1ae0ea348d61ff3025ba9199ae245
72d2331495f830fa2faa055dfdfa0c80257c4968
'2011-12-09T02:02:06-05:00'
describe
'269603' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHQW' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
7a4b53d44833badd7760ccd459b6daba
f09ed5dedb23d977e4e042bbdce973b276278784
describe
'269236' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHQX' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
9a126cfff2e2f77d4d457c8c6909146e
35e9ddd35dfccd6cdd7cb26c0ac4e836c5603b1d
'2011-12-09T02:04:38-05:00'
describe
'269385' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHQY' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
d53fb31030666cc47a9bde26d3547b24
7ceaa2d697a3617c710c3a549c05301f9e709805
'2011-12-09T02:03:15-05:00'
describe
'267495' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHQZ' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
eabe16ee1992c710aab71f56768972f9
afd4eac07603ff9c3504a9bd96f54f436038114b
describe
'270864' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHRA' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
ab0f383870406d33b3f7e978cc81e658
9106bf998d29325d079540e3db64597e5203b2e2
describe
'268245' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHRB' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
1760ff9d97a1c64d6939a14d197c1eda
45c6063a6e5ba599a8b329745ef47286ce652f18
describe
'270986' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHRC' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
69961974b6178b7eefe8a077db941133
28fe9e940db5dc11ede67e167a0c1c0f32eec3f9
'2011-12-09T02:03:18-05:00'
describe
'262498' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHRD' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
045f8aed88f94f2e8b24ddd391264e69
0234c7d9005fd1ab60ae344189aec09a70eec03a
describe
'258295' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHRE' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
720f477e8f717b9a7f9ecae9f307ae9e
b9e3e1008e78b88d8c642fe513e4b5219b6051f3
'2011-12-09T02:04:16-05:00'
describe
'265691' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHRF' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
ccfaf863672f19681a451360ac1ed8a9
1ba58d3c7ba1a7da4dd4217b822e70421fbdaf37
describe
'264791' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHRG' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
ac1ae25fcfb1d2e097a81ff004f41ab7
f849f9722419640a7fcbdc7739650a0ba4f76466
describe
'265298' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHRH' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
5975b5fc15cae6f2fa68ad7f44de63d5
9e5c76195e1702e258ecceeb378f8cbfe58dd758
'2011-12-09T02:03:11-05:00'
describe
'266012' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHRI' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
303c815b779c2e751656d303629ca3b2
4033125ced2d128f1f15429b11471ccfae95ae33
describe
'265158' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHRJ' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
1a8cbf313137db580463d51067c1bdf7
220a3dea12252a3feef0d257a9f10a1d7b2b3f2c
'2011-12-09T02:03:43-05:00'
describe
'269810' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHRK' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
caf70ca0e6fbc0f1a4f04259d03e6029
c8ac1ee360b5ffe35c7b1a753ff32848e26e238a
describe
'265663' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHRL' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
6a2141b1a5e2f2d4ef416931472b3090
295cee078956b5bac237030b513f6ec067342fb2
describe
'265914' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHRM' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
b4434fc0ca3a5a970b41608a00b052ec
8dce4483920873fae8fb2e0e9c513db39f4e12a6
describe
'267010' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHRN' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
9c6322ad595039c335b1cfdd2717f05c
922662de9690dd2ce3e11fe5ce75f6885d75b782
describe
'265093' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHRO' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
0d1daf8213c48863d9a71a02c8a36291
dc371aaab87fd85986465fd9eb6968c02f1b7d08
'2011-12-09T02:04:17-05:00'
describe
'267530' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHRP' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
400e283b4ce2a4f69c1c55b7c4cc7cdc
e7b5204dd955f68914c36ae7858527de5d0f52eb
describe
'267257' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHRQ' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
0aaa089f9fa46b97710d50caae84e590
e31a7449c13823a3fdd31dfe15ab2fb9c183cb5c
describe
'268988' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHRR' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
6cd7e7340c1fcac1d7efc162cce7a08d
b4d61226312b9bd806e6a3e6592eaf7568a1da9c
describe
'267927' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHRS' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
8a91b863e48c632342e1427c3c260442
8ed5d865732aa8bc51535c6bff12959800643a28
describe
'258879' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHRT' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
db17ef30acc432cc072581b8c28b224e
1a71dade138bbc4c46457a6e9b35602dcf4af683
describe
'258212' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHRU' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
4f279aa7d06a3865b569801a646b5109
ab96a337dcdd33429bce936d0c69befd3bd52419
describe
'267136' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHRV' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
955a881e200bd163777fd4ae52c18fa2
6e0ee9aa8ea9e122622d5c2fbc5258346a15c241
'2011-12-09T02:03:17-05:00'
describe
'264600' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHRW' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
1e1b48d73eb3180ae17f6485abd9d672
fdd97d92588425f9635573a185113a177f25ff0d
describe
'262209' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHRX' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
072fe9754b338f357dfd89791a524974
29221e25022377989c706504c17a0b1203e8b397
describe
'263781' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHRY' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
f538b25dcd2deae6e5f1ac4b87738fb5
775e4ff6d4ce96f4a1dc8c33c57317545a3746ae
describe
'261018' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHRZ' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
34f470160ec811cef8a408fe54e5d276
838c4945eea9c8e39abfe45aa2050c7c906de89b
'2011-12-09T02:03:35-05:00'
describe
'260524' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHSA' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
62d4d8a89ed2980bce40eb24371dcdd7
f216196bbbd6380c8713c1398d7c39ec5562dc12
describe
'260544' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHSB' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
33be7b6352452443b78372f53bad75f8
033ecf5c16241f5fd8fdf727962ff716deb026d0
describe
'261481' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHSC' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
8db4956a97fbd24d4a5b66e2f1a00d9f
37794e7d8b80e36ab03d4020ff64cdf4e8649017
describe
'263551' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHSD' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
f9ec478c86beeaa6e533a2b544ab14a3
0b023e258aabbf61fe0d66b082c1dc42f85275c2
describe
'264650' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHSE' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
688dda903fe7ab52001c86ee4654c300
dc029321ed38b7f78cacfa268731e1eac0594bc9
'2011-12-09T02:04:21-05:00'
describe
'264223' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHSF' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
fef1b41d21e9a1917333ac23d5019d6d
33379b87ea973f11c208a9575a9d9cb836a8a3ce
'2011-12-09T02:04:00-05:00'
describe
'269237' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHSG' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
47207e9b3e73c9adfc83445456a50f8f
211fa8de25c1e5528cd792a0adf47558e6677e41
describe
'269474' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHSH' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
2486014c6ec64e6c15bb249e88793318
eb7752f3b5213bdedc4367c5b36e59f9cb74022d
'2011-12-09T02:03:54-05:00'
describe
'267838' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHSI' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
03b10f06b9849082f2fa9afbad3e6387
c3aab28decf2d8f2f6fcf20ef7f435c6dd8e147f
describe
'260320' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHSJ' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
9cfc402c13f6aef133247669b258c2ec
5075e59908f62eaf20e57d4fc0fb55d6cc08c077
describe
'251068' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHSK' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
a00197d54e9ba2ae0b1406b02523ccb1
b5d53f9f2760d2680f816efab7f04878a371731b
describe
'265085' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHSL' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
3e0d70ac9c33287997d45516c85aa4fb
19fa4b19d112becff9f00b98a31c6deb7a5aa294
describe
'263825' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHSM' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
dac57aa668bb694051ba9b8236264fbc
463707d139fe55724f582ec2175091feff851817
describe
'259679' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHSN' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
fad41099127a323b98ebd42849cc487e
c09e919de555406a73666924f2af1241b00ee6de
'2011-12-09T02:04:13-05:00'
describe
'251566' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHSO' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
ffbb699f8d4dabe9d0a589ee2b93a593
94d3d3c9df679b21bbcce25de4e19c00b6018a92
'2011-12-09T02:02:24-05:00'
describe
'267147' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHSP' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
4acc0280dd89d44280fff5d734dfaf63
39fa45fad86a34886bba0af4163b751047dcd3f3
'2011-12-09T02:03:36-05:00'
describe
'264919' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHSQ' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
c03988567c9d1361664d06b4c917c345
0944c76cf2f12ff7943ee5b0558d5861ea826223
describe
'265188' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHSR' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
0ef447f4693332e3ac69a49e24732ca2
da98c2aa1bfc300058297ec5ca93c6ed3b55f579
describe
'265262' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHSS' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
712c9c1647f3bf3ea6860859939e53e2
d7b21227d49df2056187db905d13aeab2bd33952
'2011-12-09T02:03:38-05:00'
describe
'257703' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHST' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
c3daa3b5ee4b06e3345e082e0da6f3db
21f4978fe8fbe76d49b8d387573860e599cd749c
'2011-12-09T02:03:02-05:00'
describe
'262544' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHSU' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
133214778549ca2c8ae7981232332524
dcbc149b3d83dd5df6eb92afce1800c8fc4d49c1
describe
'265547' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHSV' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
e55e72ebd3030817c90fd1834a299a6c
511f65ef9c56e1c0db897fb70dcfb02596701500
describe
'264397' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHSW' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
f13fac88237df17fd88580ad90a90761
c6112d179f42d776cbddf8b8afeb9bc18042b1e3
describe
'269033' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHSX' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
78af3025d4f0dfdb464ebc750a40f043
de0b296db0ff293fbea62201926c05c28b41bb9c
describe
'265118' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHSY' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
3bcbe40471c1b48444b5ab6041d028c8
6c76259543b46a4ce534065d766b7edcf233918d
'2011-12-09T02:01:43-05:00'
describe
'268970' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHSZ' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
fc6e7e9fceee4483bbbd96154e4125cc
2b2cb992d6b1e63e7c7854cfcbd050e18841c563
'2011-12-09T02:03:33-05:00'
describe
'255954' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHTA' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
a90faed54aacf101dbd765ed3d58574f
d7b762ea9fc9f21e2af463b412c252ba250a785d
'2011-12-09T02:01:38-05:00'
describe
'263991' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHTB' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
25a3d100b11f6a03c9f1ba20c1485617
b31d3e451f93f824ba6ffbbfaf4d4c0be0a6a294
describe
'262770' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHTC' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
bca36caea404b2efad5c5d0f4bb9f31a
6e896c2263ec1bc3561e0dc06dfa6b77110f2e52
describe
'261620' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHTD' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
b241aa2074f173995ae1545301d5819c
7e71d7bffa5bc4164220c1206471198087137026
'2011-12-09T02:03:59-05:00'
describe
'264888' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHTE' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
7da5f37ad25ebf3298d9ddf17fc7dc04
10dbc35cb0905cf90ab8a89e60f5dbb1666fc40f
describe
'267088' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHTF' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
88ff4b7eee18f5d63bd6eab4c1fe0ed8
df241bf2c38aa9a2594e64d5016a47f0cd6edeae
describe
'260517' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHTG' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
082175676310fdb6907a01d5fdc73a6c
df92d955d308eec0a4ad0f69a3dacc8e0b81ec17
describe
'264530' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHTH' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
30bdfa4a5c274c20e87ba0f3045555cf
e71e93fcf00bedb6c06088027e6e7f4795d5d2bf
'2011-12-09T02:04:09-05:00'
describe
'267981' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHTI' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
d61a58a2f6c840ddee760de8721f5646
65714ed0fbdd83f80c1376b62a7e12ef12c6daef
describe
'267108' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHTJ' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
35aff2263bd0245bde29409195eb18ab
2de2f336456706cc804b7edf77750bde7a13c86f
describe
'261479' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHTK' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
cfabdec7a5382a6c64e1aabb068a23eb
9b8c8d3dee8144d2b071747ff350df55cbbd1926
describe
'290103' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHTL' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
d3353f5399fc5eedd0937eacf20ebf61
31498aa08337815479d517c3c92648796ec5bf74
'2011-12-09T02:04:11-05:00'
describe
'295287' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHTM' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
142d3eec19a9bf4c452750a3abadacc9
42de6479fca0076cd231975d8f76b85eeae94d66
describe
'58097' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHTN' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
42a65a198495f64561d18d953e85231d
aec1166c87f96d995717f83d28642d0777222acc
'2011-12-09T02:03:10-05:00'
describe
'6846636' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHTO' 'sip-files00001.tif'
86eff1da2de41bdc0221301ee214c79e
24f74665c3c63848c809bcba61e6b956ff594a9f
describe
'6827020' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHTP' 'sip-files00002.tif'
8cdbb259a7a92a5fcec8acf0011481cd
1ae62fe5ad08540f6f4a4363a54b4a5b205f4ffe
describe
'6295476' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHTQ' 'sip-files00004.tif'
f8d7864342828aae559918413116b2dc
51a0f09c9c94273621d4b4647f9a0a98946bbe22
describe
'2001972' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHTR' 'sip-files00005.tif'
d8b49392bb4e158ee6b7862763701c6d
b42dff6a3861bc5b210e64454269cf758b82e6c0
describe
'2105792' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHTS' 'sip-files00006.tif'
f7c798b54b371cbe8ae88c8558ef393c
9f8cabdd6863b68cfe27eb95b735fe306bc73172
'2011-12-09T02:01:51-05:00'
describe
'2069492' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHTT' 'sip-files00007.tif'
6eed4005b9a6b9d7f9b68ce27b00e1cc
40c7cf4ad2d613599afd537371da431dca6d275a
describe
'2156700' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHTU' 'sip-files00008.tif'
5b4a38be6c20c3097c53ab56a4ec5018
d3f7bb9291549f29058f6203d30ee392db0c307b
describe
'2092320' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHTV' 'sip-files00009.tif'
e0f917dd30c00723cb46d38780d22a65
2081a76be574b267af99ff0666f8c84454ca1608
describe
'2110368' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHTW' 'sip-files00010.tif'
66213845b193496052d6cc84438e4cbf
e405b848f446cd2bc09fe329d66ab8ad86945cc1
'2011-12-09T02:04:49-05:00'
describe
'2107852' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHTX' 'sip-files00011.tif'
3f0f3d5190d6d1ef7769f6cfe31f0453
217d9ff90d49d7c5836260b6ed090bc91750d0ff
describe
'2118440' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHTY' 'sip-files00012.tif'
de5b97930bcc6858264d54a05a2805a3
8d0e22a9d5f7e5bcceb27fdd60920596ee19e162
describe
'2107848' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHTZ' 'sip-files00013.tif'
3294b2dc37929f817edef0b0840d020a
1b5ae8158c2b6b8d2aa44394e7fcb36a5b3971cc
describe
'2187220' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHUA' 'sip-files00014.tif'
755c5eab15785262c51eacb9f7d7bd9e
5110cf318047d78bca9ca735b72bccdc9cdf45fd
describe
'2033140' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHUB' 'sip-files00015.tif'
00a025c2905399588536fbc474ea5a97
51f7a5e98cc2138bc41015bb4e1ce419f3381812
describe
'2143796' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHUC' 'sip-files00016.tif'
f80d8dfa76b00d2f46ab47f2397daba2
abcb23b5a6b9dbbc2c61c1daf334db168ee96a51
'2011-12-09T02:02:54-05:00'
describe
'2076052' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHUD' 'sip-files00017.tif'
75901e20e736d2b190e50578745469e1
b28ad134297d26f11ca92cf75e45125fe6f22ced
describe
'2140768' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHUE' 'sip-files00018.tif'
739a16835023fa083edff68ac03d413f
a95e6f2ee11faf81c2b0702ea9b8a5f37c363f77
'2011-12-09T02:02:44-05:00'
describe
'2103736' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHUF' 'sip-files00019.tif'
204c094aa525b633e0e9c8093aaf5c33
58649b36026acf6bd5e9474f5395abdc709d19bb
'2011-12-09T02:02:15-05:00'
describe
'2099624' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHUG' 'sip-files00020.tif'
773d693677ed5d09082551e85acc24d6
85d9a7515afba4fd1443bd22456722f71e6c1377
describe
'2087600' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHUH' 'sip-files00021.tif'
b0b0c4d5ea00cde62c9da8a8079b82ed
51038104b95f5ad3f847da81fce393b4ce4d4fd5
describe
'2132444' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHUI' 'sip-files00022.tif'
ed099b75a15a656ffc1a1e0de0ec506e
0ee9d5f15877652f0e997ef7bcf971ce8c9f8c41
'2011-12-09T02:04:23-05:00'
describe
'2098252' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHUJ' 'sip-files00023.tif'
2adb9077654f22a3887fc15701f61daa
110e9702aa5c2848fa0365ead5e1eea3c7deba30
describe
'2102400' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHUK' 'sip-files00024.tif'
e706ffc0c49f30e39c8175c29769b824
a256ae81fb44bb591bf0876671cb58a147f6b99e
describe
'2154460' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHUL' 'sip-files00026.tif'
f5289754d50b090b7a465e71a5b99a19
63a77033c49e5b0544bdaf2a2ae443bad0c4872b
'2011-12-09T02:03:14-05:00'
describe
'2118452' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHUM' 'sip-files00027.tif'
31a955eca56efb2d8f72c6bef97c553d
c27cb8a1e87eacf35a8d83ea6a5d46b07f75b516
describe
'2170396' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHUN' 'sip-files00028.tif'
c8dc74fcb56b84d479c606f07abf3d2b
72ac10d00b83c41e217bdca4ed415143793e31ed
'2011-12-09T02:03:40-05:00'
describe
'2133604' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHUO' 'sip-files00029.tif'
fa82517c46b06042c61b9db3db42305d
7adbff0c04c58a3b4c138a3bdefddadc7ff69ed5
describe
'2162272' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHUP' 'sip-files00030.tif'
7789bf649af74f6846e13b28b20a3172
d0d430a3a4fa08aac0f1b3fcd31d9bc552672752
describe
'2125132' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHUQ' 'sip-files00031.tif'
3b1902f5151b8a1fc0c86e0d603c2cca
20c2fc98f169f0a04fc640068f431f6cee6313e2
'2011-12-09T02:02:21-05:00'
describe
'2162656' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHUR' 'sip-files00032.tif'
0041c898c4c7bd78b4b22b9041336685
010a1c457d84110630d900a62f7a0b70512a17be
describe
'2097996' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHUS' 'sip-files00033.tif'
2097ed7c31fb21aa1aa557871f8d7ac3
cbcb2506446ac55f0ffe5d26ba508549352eef3c
describe
'2169736' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHUT' 'sip-files00034.tif'
fce4c14fefdbc9873b4717fbae8023af
0889dbd3d9adbe9f69866ae3f68b6d7eef43abd7
'2011-12-09T02:04:37-05:00'
describe
'2142480' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHUU' 'sip-files00035.tif'
d16a6fecce5d78afe20cda6f9c8a3918
372ff61c9f2f65f905abb335fb619376e2436d86
'2011-12-09T02:04:31-05:00'
describe
'2140584' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHUV' 'sip-files00036.tif'
91a9bd20c6ae228540796e6fef328cd9
7f5964b0fc8fdd2da237ba9e917a900ca935f654
describe
'2142624' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHUW' 'sip-files00037.tif'
01a01e4c81d6430e40ac807197184045
96911abe3e0f4c1801402a27f22551b2df923c43
'2011-12-09T02:04:34-05:00'
describe
'2141944' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHUX' 'sip-files00038.tif'
3a8db44a063a392605e86167ff624145
dca00236f5881bf30fd01e254f285fb32cf9a483
'2011-12-09T02:03:08-05:00'
describe
'2122372' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHUY' 'sip-files00039.tif'
fe00eb0f69ba054e78412e5bbb50f804
4a874c868253f375f5d9b0f5c7904201d6e02892
'2011-12-09T02:03:01-05:00'
describe
'2137164' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHUZ' 'sip-files00040.tif'
2910138228b7702c355805748a30fdd6
db230320eccd770b0bd701c9133c41e5c736bf70
describe
'2124512' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHVA' 'sip-files00041.tif'
71a4edb5cc94d8bbb8f86dcc34c6c563
4753f24b1b33d80d76095ba7721508ec9b8374e5
'2011-12-09T02:02:25-05:00'
describe
'2166768' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHVB' 'sip-files00042.tif'
5753d10670969c80dfb7b058c4ad5e99
2c3768dd490d84edf14c100bb02710e81151638c
'2011-12-09T02:04:18-05:00'
describe
'2115820' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHVC' 'sip-files00043.tif'
f561215129bf10493cbe43247a2cd029
4890f0c2519c8bb98524e490cb1aabeafbc178e1
'2011-12-09T02:04:12-05:00'
describe
'2151044' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHVD' 'sip-files00044.tif'
6dda606af3ee283f099f383ba4002cdd
c474a3f3caeabfbb7f1dd2572ffc8d3842cc1a48
describe
'2067628' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHVE' 'sip-files00045.tif'
90749cf4b440364667f6f920b7fe6e86
1550e0bcbdc54775d3af246bfa14b1ddc1b805f5
'2011-12-09T02:02:11-05:00'
describe
'2107444' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHVF' 'sip-files00046.tif'
615eb440d40b3ea5887f3dc9c748cf1a
82247f712cdc102d9af4318ea35dce5bda099418
describe
'2142160' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHVG' 'sip-files00047.tif'
0a7c71c2f5b4ac8acbcc300e2e0e4d86
cf4a53db3becabae8b54fc8964a344e38fd1f9cd
describe
'2161436' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHVH' 'sip-files00048.tif'
8ae033e5826250115ce32e162c956a06
8c8162713a6ec5c09088db48f192ee1d8e6aa323
describe
'2124784' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHVI' 'sip-files00049.tif'
1463fee48c876673637089dbd2120a31
cedfce0268499666dcb72de99ee87ce50f802f13
describe
'2162008' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHVJ' 'sip-files00050.tif'
87136e923643cb73b41cc8037b8f836d
4e1d14b9d449f16b7d62670abee84523230f9cdb
describe
'2123164' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHVK' 'sip-files00051.tif'
b78f1ddb772b2620cac6e6b93841cc8d
770d7566122de8d30e12563db9369a6d460fdc4c
describe
'2117136' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHVL' 'sip-files00052.tif'
35212cf90dfc96b18d6b9be5f8ce9443
412431aae48846d1018b63e9234041772e60c3d7
'2011-12-09T02:03:56-05:00'
describe
'2110728' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHVM' 'sip-files00053.tif'
ccf98f03a97158d3c325be88eb23b50f
afa6edae0a1460f0e3e73a574e6d1b2b69cc3e96
describe
'2131768' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHVN' 'sip-files00054.tif'
8820e5f5d9f6af1594b2ba8d17e5cad2
3cd296d0fd77424f4a7b6b3a9e79b064fab4da0c
describe
'2145944' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHVO' 'sip-files00055.tif'
62a878eef2dde07a37afa788deaf2afd
40cad766ee0af3e8f46cd1cc97569b31f441acf7
describe
'2140208' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHVP' 'sip-files00056.tif'
ee34ccad5089bbfa9395ae191cf2f78b
186b29e182f700b510f562f364cb770a78d64969
describe
'2093328' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHVQ' 'sip-files00057.tif'
b9917d14fb293bfc7822e07c1f4a88f3
50e48dc9f302c4b3fdaaaeaf554838f553c9b814
describe
'2132724' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHVR' 'sip-files00058.tif'
9521d40e29cc7646c65ff1b8d23b9ab0
555e4406db420839e7cd792ad7963d90cd8310f0
describe
'2173576' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHVS' 'sip-files00059.tif'
ef1d8196f627f326d59298396a994683
d97008003b853fe4f550ef0b231f3fcf42bcdcf9
describe
'2174628' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHVT' 'sip-files00060.tif'
88fc25d7e4ece136ea0471c2d0f7cc7c
e03bd7470f9c6a4cdb061bafbb01cda1d4bd7995
describe
'2174112' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHVU' 'sip-files00061.tif'
1ff5e0507c8ebb5f37477a3721709db3
f99cb5ed4be714ffb5ced80795f60d96b0baf121
describe
'2193364' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHVV' 'sip-files00062.tif'
658d8e215740fe97a2c444c6b54cd85b
86c1bbfc189874e1edeba067df7c3b84c86463ad
describe
'2178164' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHVW' 'sip-files00063.tif'
041bc8003eef5011167644ded9679ee2
e31bc95cf2ae94cfaddaeb12670f449eda8e206c
describe
'2198728' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHVX' 'sip-files00064.tif'
1b267a4cdbe14da2c7ca221f96bd2f20
6a1b085a5023543b0818053576d0e6dd62a940fa
describe
'2175024' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHVY' 'sip-files00065.tif'
a01121d112e63dfc33398e0116d304b1
c42e97b5d9f4a610a789929e3ff5350a43226dc0
'2011-12-09T02:03:26-05:00'
describe
'2182384' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHVZ' 'sip-files00066.tif'
6d9944b9336ea416045df3c85c9abfea
8f4a19e50f4193baabf5e2037dedc5898938c20b
'2011-12-09T02:03:04-05:00'
describe
'2117300' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHWA' 'sip-files00067.tif'
3ebcdc3664f717d888f11e7bc38dd733
6b9bca9652ebc5115f7c80794e97b8edaec6baf3
describe
'2190212' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHWB' 'sip-files00068.tif'
f8ce311256a06b0f2de99428430b219b
3aee31f740915597c8e077db0107519adf997560
'2011-12-09T02:01:45-05:00'
describe
'2162608' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHWC' 'sip-files00069.tif'
73d49f257c0266183eab339eb2daefdb
9190592a10e3a4b6b84ee5ba2789dd2071f518a4
describe
'2160508' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHWD' 'sip-files00070.tif'
5957daa13bda3b8ccaaa1a98262c93c6
60f44c649211af840fa6da4eeb583ad1663c4034
describe
'2179280' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHWE' 'sip-files00071.tif'
d7e3eb0ca06f0935ffff92c2580c163a
c362b7dce0d4154664f01550b832c36dc8a2754b
describe
'2175816' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHWF' 'sip-files00072.tif'
e7d042d60ce9a0651b5e85365589fa4e
339f9b9cc29d152efad16f4a1afa8a5f6e3da5f0
describe
'2177024' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHWG' 'sip-files00073.tif'
191ca57c31975a792da4775d23c28759
6b094e97e52252dcabffd5cba5b43085f92d266d
describe
'2162012' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHWH' 'sip-files00074.tif'
0a663b339b8dec92db01f2ef74f147cf
745f71aa1cb295a1fb23651864dadf9b9186701f
describe
'2189484' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHWI' 'sip-files00075.tif'
101dfe247aaf1aa01611bfab79659f31
0ae0f141cf2d8907deb2affb7cbf0f460b495bbe
describe
'2167964' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHWJ' 'sip-files00076.tif'
5354dd974ce8847dac42d4d8a612b1a7
3bc7b32cc75105be81d619cc7707099543913cf0
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHWK' 'sip-files00077.tif'
d7144ef32e6b085ae9f54c45c8af1be3
ea06e28418e1d11ed4cba8bb3673f74c32830831
'2011-12-09T02:02:51-05:00'
describe
'2123264' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHWL' 'sip-files00078.tif'
ccb0865a1fc8188e603ef680d0a55c6c
5efe36fbb4ee7b27a45abaf7b873e6ddab1c5293
describe
'2086840' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHWM' 'sip-files00079.tif'
766abedf6437c120996570d35aabc7f9
9a9e547fe2b9c4c53cd2274ec282c431e8b7c465
describe
'2147128' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHWN' 'sip-files00081.tif'
28f2561574eabc826f15eb3690e5cb22
7b6ebf181e43fd4a469450cb56bf89a0855f0eeb
'2011-12-09T02:04:47-05:00'
describe
'2140388' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHWO' 'sip-files00082.tif'
de8f24a301cf95658f848cfbab8c55b6
e0e28c9a56818363676b115bcaa4d8fda2bb78e5
'2011-12-09T02:01:59-05:00'
describe
'2144064' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHWP' 'sip-files00083.tif'
e8c74589f3ca488441cef0a3a48cfed8
e5df750fa7c15a42113570f233c5977167c8dd06
'2011-12-09T02:03:57-05:00'
describe
'2146812' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHWQ' 'sip-files00084.tif'
98d12127b777bd4e3bb0856f5ba43366
f821c6d63df31e903f9a7aec5b3155d63bde02aa
describe
'2143092' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHWR' 'sip-files00085.tif'
139d818c70958e9aa12e79b00209c7c6
f7ed05ec109bb2f686ac1b0b773c8c24bb701809
describe
'2180856' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHWS' 'sip-files00086.tif'
814f39d907ce45458bda30831ba09c0b
a06849411a253003955c3d548b83da46c56cb14b
describe
'2147428' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHWT' 'sip-files00087.tif'
25fdb3f5990d5018ff68602d1b06d7ac
f6fa46aabdcc27ae499e2dc259867e7884650bc7
describe
'2149164' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHWU' 'sip-files00088.tif'
94e7dce4afc1e1d3e2315d329f2309b1
9dfb3460ade42fe8e8d251aceb0f206272ec8fba
describe
'2157984' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHWV' 'sip-files00089.tif'
2b1e6370f0abdfda61dfba7d329ec3cd
3543ccd31677949551c8328b1a0d7cccc4fc68c1
describe
'2142892' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHWW' 'sip-files00090.tif'
bffd3b08605f434851c41b8da710b06b
013bb4429f83e1c90e2be25abd9231e80abd2f7c
describe
'2162208' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHWX' 'sip-files00091.tif'
207774ef275f05d4e7bb9adc4d74ac49
6bbd74b584bf0a09d29ff7347993f5b9b0125b6e
describe
'2160104' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHWY' 'sip-files00092.tif'
f142ad0de59c4c082e23743ae26d93a1
21f1d12c2dd48ce5af11dcab735663eda1606bb6
'2011-12-09T02:02:05-05:00'
describe
'2173560' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHWZ' 'sip-files00093.tif'
f3903b2d1a92617bcf211ead274644a9
bde3502328a1ab3664ea2c4f7ec215f554896a51
describe
'2165896' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHXA' 'sip-files00094.tif'
edd261dabfb9b7b27b37da61983e9d0c
d9d5a292f13f10000446d192efa3b1f9d48a50f1
describe
'2093272' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHXB' 'sip-files00095.tif'
f65bedf18d3daba937169748e7592205
8dba2ca0826de19dc14b1008685cff3fce0116ae
'2011-12-09T02:02:58-05:00'
describe
'2087512' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHXC' 'sip-files00096.tif'
9e48c8422cda7c356bf911244236cf79
138c963bb248139103f6b355befbb45e5c468cf3
'2011-12-09T02:04:30-05:00'
describe
'2159004' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHXD' 'sip-files00097.tif'
79756cef74468e37dbe9920b98684543
6e8043021fab694b84454c90f424edd3eb9a980d
describe
'2139020' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHXE' 'sip-files00098.tif'
b1a66f3036abf1d7ca1e220a8bc8cf36
a7f92101edcab4130b23bf123ab59cd9dbf4a9c6
describe
'2119468' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHXF' 'sip-files00099.tif'
e9b9a56fcc8e47ec34a370b18453ef35
d3d007839b47bdc6782b117057a8986cca82db1f
describe
'2132180' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHXG' 'sip-files00100.tif'
214555251914b9c97410e59b66802bb0
40f4b737e2c646bb0bd0a2e30d691d1e2130d73e
'2011-12-09T02:02:34-05:00'
describe
'2109652' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHXH' 'sip-files00101.tif'
4a3be3278a62f29c862c87b07379fce0
3ee5c1e37bc3de3c4abd72ba23aaccf9b294ebf0
describe
'2105836' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHXI' 'sip-files00102.tif'
2888330e58ee2a3829b986dd040c4b62
e6b13c2004de08318f0b706191286a9fb7687fea
describe
'2105896' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHXJ' 'sip-files00103.tif'
19d6f8f6a3f80f44bb5d1fadb7a91035
906ce9a3e525e38a06d3fda2451d6f630f141b47
describe
'2113920' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHXK' 'sip-files00104.tif'
607741c4e2997db726a64af1dfcb3ebc
2f911a18032ecbc9604a471052fe2a49457d22ca
describe
'2130472' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHXL' 'sip-files00105.tif'
c863c101c8e4e55d0f77cd8e2ef64b90
fa1544754d43b8265f2eb21d5f728252de9db535
describe
'2139340' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHXM' 'sip-files00106.tif'
535460eac21d8040aa99d749b2189896
4f945735eb355fec4e867cecdaf0c3f9d699c329
describe
'2134448' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHXN' 'sip-files00107.tif'
6cb834b0bfdf1be692dfe816e132798d
288e463bd89aa4f0c2008fc6c8e6e7b2d190b401
describe
'2175912' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHXO' 'sip-files00108.tif'
cf3a5ace6bd612e50e7979b237265c31
705ba7e8ee170fb55f65ca53f756ae6c564e1571
describe
'2177900' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHXP' 'sip-files00109.tif'
cae60bb2bc4e6ac9cdef448200353251
5d8e61f5686d63b8c9728457f2c4f108a7f99898
'2011-12-09T02:03:53-05:00'
describe
'2164676' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHXQ' 'sip-files00110.tif'
ffba89e39718bf36cf75f131631ed557
5b14773b3e7316bb18c8c32c4d6762baf542cd68
describe
'2104404' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHXR' 'sip-files00111.tif'
897f2a1c0c1bb99c0ad36cb003c608eb
aad1eec6dfbeede51e4b93e02e0ac15cea5e1a49
describe
'2031588' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHXS' 'sip-files00112.tif'
cc88d8aa9b7bb86bae38a11b1a769f6a
bdfdbd95db29b50ff10ea9dfabc6c62663c9a334
'2011-12-09T02:02:45-05:00'
describe
'2142860' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHXT' 'sip-files00113.tif'
6a5e54ba466e9bb38e5c3d0209fcce1d
21a966f2e29647b3e646d5a504369cc4d927d6fe
describe
'2132204' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHXU' 'sip-files00114.tif'
0cd6071b5eec7e824a1ee937ae51c54b
a0e66a2a1197138175c4e7b0da507034d9354e31
'2011-12-09T02:03:41-05:00'
describe
'2099644' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHXV' 'sip-files00115.tif'
a52f4cd0a79a788d4a261f96aab5bdd4
fe77b8811516769f0a88fbe262861ce6dd146271
describe
'2034292' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHXW' 'sip-files00116.tif'
02d2abce146a55e0a4d390c3924e0bc9
2061d33545bb2521034b29b66c78930063b1c811
'2011-12-09T02:02:18-05:00'
describe
'2159392' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHXX' 'sip-files00117.tif'
1466c0aa93ee4cd5869e8a8855895609
0212933c28853e9f9996297be1520b757b335c1e
describe
'2141280' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHXY' 'sip-files00118.tif'
d782fdad17a5aca4208e47e5e393b828
afbbef6c456e0f37689a79f1f3505b35b80677c8
describe
'2143380' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHXZ' 'sip-files00119.tif'
945de6b0ad82a5557f2529d553f2ee4c
fb58abf20aaa3927e93a7fe147e78427770761ee
describe
'2144272' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHYA' 'sip-files00120.tif'
ef6a6b119e959155acd1589cd30d1fd6
b68d74ad20f2cdab104de214177e10b551984b9a
'2011-12-09T02:04:08-05:00'
describe
'2083556' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHYB' 'sip-files00121.tif'
f394ad10fb7dc2a60230b7d4e4330389
250a4542358f2abe0414bc8e6db6a892ff47c3ad
describe
'2122676' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHYC' 'sip-files00122.tif'
4e1927a220cd659e740ae26964e710ca
d1028bb7e14fd3c9d6b60afaecf2649e62da147b
'2011-12-09T02:04:27-05:00'
describe
'2146644' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHYD' 'sip-files00123.tif'
5b608b30f1b80ed790b7d7c6620cf877
9aaeeaf07e06705c3cfa8505b498ee2c346bd147
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHYE' 'sip-files00124.tif'
56e3840862b10cc573a999e3f4890ebe
76551204d647167a7d99262e38a7fd086e6382c4
describe
'2174840' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHYF' 'sip-files00125.tif'
2b4171cb1134f855e7cb6d5747314c9e
eb8249f8264778d785fc67a2a05736e9df0e1661
describe
'2142988' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHYG' 'sip-files00126.tif'
e4798827c355d12a9685ce67c467c4f4
a6fee870b48ec2514d9f950ab760a06d4e74d83e
describe
'2173828' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHYH' 'sip-files00127.tif'
3c15064c80ff381735d18df16d9f2495
f5b184c7380ded0019ba6a5ab634a0e1ce2bf74b
describe
'2069312' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHYI' 'sip-files00128.tif'
597f06b78ac900e711a90ef8f630f57a
4cac020fac8b23b0658265e0d1519cfae1a192e3
describe
'2133896' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHYJ' 'sip-files00129.tif'
3a0406647eacf78e73c4f1fc76649e48
56bdaca3af7c25830915ce17d3ae23f75c757267
describe
'2124208' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHYK' 'sip-files00130.tif'
16628cb3612c7970b2a3862075a3c7ca
68d4bc4569af33307acbffef546def70c977fe63
'2011-12-09T02:02:49-05:00'
describe
'2114864' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHYL' 'sip-files00131.tif'
8b1cc2a171e546f1e989e59e82627903
cb6cc102ed1e9f79c440492cb8f6a61830586e75
'2011-12-09T02:01:57-05:00'
describe
'2140936' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHYM' 'sip-files00132.tif'
54945d4c000e50b799159aa289f5f381
d9a567b7840f963b709e212be10292b1d664e87f
'2011-12-09T02:04:07-05:00'
describe
'2158796' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHYN' 'sip-files00133.tif'
0b7589f0e37bd16ced9816eee821e421
27a95111da39f2f1c64fdcea1b4a4dde7c54f80c
'2011-12-09T02:02:53-05:00'
describe
'2106600' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHYO' 'sip-files00134.tif'
08c7c5bf8fd74e8510c802815ccb48d2
b7fdc1a80cba70646cdcafe073bf0ece1c96eb89
describe
'2138552' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHYP' 'sip-files00135.tif'
350351dff646d7a6fbb1c17bef5abdce
110d175913afc215a0caa49aec6be5464f86d9a7
describe
'2165688' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHYQ' 'sip-files00136.tif'
684040af8342052a5013dcdf17da5ab2
027a0746de912564d49a9d38c2447e317af932fb
describe
'2160152' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHYR' 'sip-files00137.tif'
2692ef9115614b81bdb14fba52f1cd2c
e9238faf69186f3e7c83f5ff43699bf935d1adba
describe
'2114108' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHYS' 'sip-files00138.tif'
3a8a9a798aac76f793f1e5c1ee8fd596
ec82c57de3a3e84c3e46e283529c120e84f3cf4d
describe
'6980936' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHYT' 'sip-files00139.tif'
874b62369176cea287e6afb7c6c6cc92
7599275beae55d9580a1741b2111a7537d95a6fe
describe
'7093532' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHYU' 'sip-files00140.tif'
449db1d65aa6b428aee1d02a360d3bde
b4168c06320f5b41b4afd574ec4a334ed41581fa
describe
'1411924' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHYV' 'sip-files00141.tif'
4c2d39c1bb7e0652f6df432bfe39403b
d7a3ff89d347a4794287bc2f1018035714833fc5
describe
'657557' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHYW' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
02d8483777b65d77346168489e8eea7a
61c3ba8fc3e764f1c20749f6bbea0da9e4e2ba58
'2011-12-09T02:02:23-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'375637' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHYX' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
b42c7be1f3267b2399f425d55eb691d2
0944590e7ff2ac2d5d88f1e81ec6a3e4d048dfce
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'534697' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHYY' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
0aeec5cc3f41c2c33f7b7896e9b54ff2
887e0e423a90a1f8aa8b0035d15a0ecc4a8f708a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'144270' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHYZ' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
ac3147350264f359bf997021d73ba22f
e6668208abdb979667dde7a0615f0c1f024b28ca
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'52884' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHZA' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
f481796dd8ba73a2a5d2cdcadefd0352
f85dab4728b409066b75bf7dbdd8b91bb14e284c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'215194' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHZB' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
d9b8496af03e7a559452529def70daa3
73583679a9fe6eaf3596b2ca9da943ade1792e24
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'208928' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHZC' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
c21fd9c19ce8e31f3d2646e1786826bd
4ad2306515135d45a1e5d21aea0f9949d798beb9
'2011-12-09T02:02:30-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'204055' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHZD' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
4d44143a2f1d3437965df2c7c54722bd
1bfe02d38b363b8f6149003d2b9fb901f7a73767
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'298266' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHZE' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
b72baaafc299f0368539df909d487c01
2cd77975866bce43307a724e8e109de80879920f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'276797' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHZF' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
4c202a7b3f86ae107374c8436cfa5521
a63599c426f09c3f576561faaf19b7369591929a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'274243' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHZG' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
a0e1581880af52778864350e32f5a22e
b8b1e41a450b905f6ff981a2ee889fde75569f16
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'279664' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHZH' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
e8e1da07a6111bfdaf28d03c628138d1
f62f0bf45424778b119cf0f797a0684c28b316bc
'2011-12-09T02:02:13-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'270937' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHZI' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
e62716cefa6f7c43296fe9a75664f293
c055e951cc5bcd6409921d5d12d86011b80021f8
'2011-12-09T02:04:35-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'288034' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHZJ' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
ccba684737020e031a79d8c9181fccfc
25d4af53b1ec65242667c2d38f7ae04bbadf9759
'2011-12-09T02:03:24-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'276976' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHZK' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
c3fcdcd48538e4ff276e95b080faf508
cd0bc898a83140cf325f17bb22a4bd50095a38e4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'274011' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHZL' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
712573b101d0bdf1c5a7f50bd0f4b06d
ec852bca3648151e991bf831cf9e2d6d206719ec
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'265894' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHZM' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
2b9fddea8b2cff0ef6cec42bf731046e
b2d376276283236c7ddd6147c5e1aa4054a5cad7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'115234' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHZN' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
a3f085c6f1ffadbbaebb7975ca84cb0b
16ec5e0b5210d5fcc69a755d7f080b518e1dec15
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'250284' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHZO' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
d8868d517e5ea1b669b756ea5aaeb5b9
0038f92d59f0536a86ef94b755c5ca603ec45648
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'298265' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHZP' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
a9990e8616405d50b050884dd1661b67
bef596ee38553171acb2d7517ff26b21d5a0ab00
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'281582' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHZQ' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
a012539abae1331c25dd283fc768a7ba
5d131d8e579e82802968beabed824efcc7c19c4f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'287882' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHZR' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
d9c48eeb1d122aa1388112163e7e24f1
c445f4937f7cc271e143fcc0e9262fe70292b506
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'298855' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHZS' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
6b08ca958302dd28fa73aac4c6e51ea7
b336be5653bb9ff74d7f47d594bf018df57537bc
'2011-12-09T02:04:45-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'248119' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHZT' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
999ce5a87a70243ea5264efeb8442f08
8b0fd482fdee5c2cb6746a47b7f0dad7d4b5102f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'308396' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHZU' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
ab2d68885249763e238dac6c2f7b9627
d8a5ff923ad6f32d755362b358fc335a301296f6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'194905' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHZV' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
0e2d0e414fba882310fe349e4b3722bf
37291d7f7d24afe254d5cff63f622675d268a598
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'233386' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHZW' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
2659f403f16566ad77b376d8075ace11
880b20c11de764e305106923e0442fa78632150a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'283423' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHZX' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
bcf784e7556c541eea7f22d2fec1a740
e7de0065f928bd48a75fb3dd24fa2caff0c209e6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'283900' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHZY' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
6b0b3fc162f504a84a5c71f64e758182
36bec3fc2316751470287b40d461daf2b6a802ab
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'277141' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACHZZ' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
2c66e55f33ad0ebfd5b1095051f75101
bb412df4b3e47fe5b3876e8e0d25c828e799c8d5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'254595' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIAA' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
2b6e17654937561f6012070dca1f4129
039d15e9af9d534ac568d97abc05c037486b6d57
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'291396' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIAB' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
f408469cb4523446e1ff28575810c577
41513d244aba5dc2102ad4e882712b9281e051e5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'267050' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIAC' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
ac07857de7c4b9e6bc03e5aa83dcf734
adc95399b74af393c3e6e602cc9a8ae9d0193942
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'91561' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIAD' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
fc96d612042b5434c195743d943ee822
ce9499923b94f298793defbabc51c8b857d09b56
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'251002' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIAE' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
30518cbfb0b1881886758ee7470ae340
6aff4ed6a0e084639bb58fa39d6cdad64d84a4ad
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'295481' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIAF' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
26b82cf049dde3ca3f558ca077dcb176
792bb8fb2a51d38f0ae57b4f8d43fc5b21659f96
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'282332' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIAG' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
0f69528ce8fa5d06f7368ea3420842d7
d63f1448033343876c94b6fa65d405c5b2f25a95
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'290798' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIAH' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
5c1f0ece362e18b7a9fd53ede8164152
4885bb8e4004a8ec3bc18f2ced8262d5cb433b66
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'265394' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIAI' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
33fb81cde38a90e2c9d76df46a5525f8
3e80ff0902f12163aa382ee05e66b399b33fbfc2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'266340' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIAJ' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
87b6c90f42620b21fa0da75d737a8918
1fbaf372fff7cabaa762dfad87034d0bce515b21
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'266105' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIAK' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
0edea0b730b7d440f9109f4744cf65f1
eba1fbb416544641473832f83913966a65d7b6aa
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'262904' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIAL' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
513e607b37b08a4d40878d9e0a4eb70f
af38326c2d170d0170caa5f47ca5a25f278ca894
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'263148' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIAM' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
6af6529ba35480f7c6a97e520be1ac0d
7de33ad27711251ed7484d4e5fa41623fd6ca383
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'270632' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIAN' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
e3deb9a7ad18b155232afd386fcfcadb
e901c042751a0f01bf19acb5dad4d2fafcdf0174
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'249518' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIAO' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
13648048242fa929b848cc3659010f03
4adaf364f1fdb81e4c8584bc2570fd0cbbce6862
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'287873' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIAP' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
560ddcf841f9f0584835fa6656f4c025
09333e925dca44bbafcc110ef372862d5cb39a38
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'255871' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIAQ' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
aad0f3be3f8ecce948ebef22bb6e259b
c9be1eeda79f30468f804260c197b5beb60ed708
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'258655' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIAR' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
ea4e7ff37b2f3a19eed47f24d6ae0961
9235b257f14f7fd4d50252d5f13cbbef25943dc0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'271623' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIAS' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
52d540b3affc175e3664eca719106881
0afa684d04a0ed219c80a3bfe6fecc28d7709466
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'281940' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIAT' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
86a277492f88672c84a0d8eeae09308f
09019703e510ab8115b567068f1aacc986e265bc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'283983' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIAU' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
5e6195cb105780fc1f92f2fd11594d6a
9fc315ba63d5aa32a60d79143ccb695f8503506e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'100819' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIAV' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
2d47ff212ad608cfdcffbfe37bb2ef9e
94c9c9bd708e4a8dce9308a5f22e8b1b8d2e5dc0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'265956' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIAW' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
d2dc8588208957b19e54a295d0ba297d
f0906bfaa6ffe7dfa58eeb43cc75ffe5b1c72b3b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'265610' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIAX' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
ac85b132ee53754c64fd01642f93e8a9
2373cf393fce722b84ebb6613fa30e64a884de42
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'279107' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIAY' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
311ac518df5013015bf903426cc1c0dd
e33589afe2f16a35609813398dc08efb85106e8f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'272623' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIAZ' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
b957b75fdfd889f00f24f309cd170864
473380f7516d9d4a7808434ca9db2fd8aee7d914
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'153560' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIBA' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
1804402ebf7714364e31d351cd9448d2
6eb9950725992eae8f3348c5b19ac70c6a7fa17d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'231108' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIBB' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
b87d6307a63c7746079db70a8b26c836
7b339c025fc8b9a74ba3a61ec8d5fd9d53ee9230
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'279231' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIBC' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
4c70cb046c27fd58d9d2bdf0386ab32e
ac3cfe2ff9d3dcfb552a143a83caf84f2c8401aa
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'275577' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIBD' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
f7edb2f6fd901d079f6ef0069c6b769b
43d89ff1dda000a53304a3b538dd549d05404c52
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'256956' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIBE' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
bf5326a2d7d175b90e1c5fb4a1c06aa6
ea0a750336cb7219be17f99ea1821d9473400837
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'260461' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIBF' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
c44d732dc16368d92dd701939963d5fa
7ef36b0de200fdf62add6dff623ee679c29bf419
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'260450' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIBG' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
6989dbd4cd969e9eef2d24c8d7b66254
7b339fa9b221f1765f585fd13a5ac92d6a89efc5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'194036' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIBH' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
9a0510e4ccf94ad8806e2c9e9b0489ea
4511a990bb9f11578e8f780dace1b3cf593baece
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'253269' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIBI' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
a377dfdc31cd3109ed71e58781dd267a
129b6e99aaa483038c457cb6fa36f5f687aacffc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'284462' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIBJ' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
7f24d955b6bb6e8d63484de86c242158
97a415ec214dda5515c56a91950cab3a80bae590
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'281464' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIBK' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
e70b0e38bc1ec20e8f9069b9afb5e698
217a8dc370cfea8b1bfd6c34a8549df588c73111
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'278101' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIBL' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
870a1c18c356ebd0110ee2f0e7e4ce94
01013bf4431a5a10f9df9a42085eeed7ea06796c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'248952' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIBM' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
11401f56820de94256df63a6df548bcd
4bd231c883621e9800f39bd3c7c40d354f29e8df
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'246481' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIBN' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
7dd97cc455df5c9f84c005e6ec4939ed
2ee8a8425259ccdfdc67d32572aa8e3faeb76fdd
'2011-12-09T02:01:36-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'280270' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIBO' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
49ca2d4f6d6e492db58ba2b350b38f78
55d4b8579b6a8b4b9782bfa7bdc7f17dd9e5031c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'289374' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIBP' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
ba0b387602ffec49800a59ff06cb0e9a
a37c3c56ae4d81782dd0f876a41633f761d7d38f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'268786' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIBQ' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
8b6d4ebd9b444e62bda21fa09930c379
1ab11e73ab9a0add713853d126c8c179ce92c93a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'262961' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIBR' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
19a2f7eafc77d1d35f14fa34769376ba
25253c4830806a3528aa1269f1ee97f8f6d3a1f1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'270874' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIBS' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
fd88f4529198151a3209a90260f865b5
e6ab38a66eac3755ef779ee366c97b7ce1c774a4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'262453' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIBT' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
3f6bdf600efc078f6cd180d9cb95b61b
9d05083042977b868da5a5548470c2d14617d4b9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'218777' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIBU' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
0464a05d382ced0df6f5a4d4a3a70ca9
cfab11adfb7738dad52a7ee89c3c266d59ed1a29
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'275772' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIBV' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
63eae0b401f9a1f40b506981115ddcbb
5f8ea06b0db9600c4fd3ebd5ab00de4bbb868aec
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'245354' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIBW' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
42accb13e5c6594526f70278ea13a551
c65ec6293cbef2a0a442b5bd1ec0784c210884ed
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'258305' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIBX' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
37c3c72f24975524ab6abcd7cf56fd34
89d7f19f36cbf9ad4eabca77a50af3e3cd4a9e80
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'100254' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIBY' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
77b098c32ecc8d9d1f76e543cd333312
fc04b4c16a9fd5e2a03be72c599b21b7312ae36d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'262181' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIBZ' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
999da2702d86a2244acfb682458763af
d5e091af7d20fb9f0e8ae3ef544220a105353158
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'271234' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACICA' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
928d14bc3dbc87352e4f338f6d1c6f34
edd71e2a336e92f6b8ef990c3520af9abad8fec8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'268340' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACICB' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
7761d955175a4345e1bf72b4c31b17b7
92335a8ff9bb8a6fbc5639505c27296ffe855909
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'273854' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACICC' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
9c415c81b94d73a1c9d3d299675e4e7d
53fd2cb0f3622234a6a700c67f1426e8e23b85df
'2011-12-09T02:02:29-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'267261' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACICD' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
e561dbca8b3652de67e0585de2116b94
0e92912521e0c11becff54023be710f8d81f53c2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'278017' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACICE' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
e1825200c74a257492ecb828ee60b54e
534fc1ccdd9d9cef74731b6eda28b440eafce6f2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'290770' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACICF' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
c21662f681f1a2d5e9364847224a17fc
7fbb0c4cf3bce25d56141c331c2eb0a45d6481a5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'289324' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACICG' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
92f309c5d644c32112422ac5b367116d
be346740e117b1d11ac27efcac5fa821ba0db766
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'275764' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACICH' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
06faf60877a415600b7cb2bb20f9abdf
45e80e7198b794c974283207a2bd2ff1df3cc751
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'297692' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACICI' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
b3f5ac487b8872531672656abace73c5
c3fb34f2d2cae57b57fd2d4f7fae026c40177176
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'292269' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACICJ' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
9fa7ab3c7c1551a1577efecacee8d5ba
64f49cc6b8bf3b9716c9abba79a64ac1f5bd69f0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'275165' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACICK' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
7a872e4eb20118e85cbdbaceb8c56097
88df015dfffa8a5c407e8716520d15c6b27a6cd7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'270685' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACICL' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
fcacd3da3f6aea57994e0715ed98536d
f45da83b7df77372d4806cb671dfafa44db68976
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'282936' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACICM' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
c487a8d9228de07e9f90ddda0f0d666a
68ba0b13fcf064b843d78167ed489627ea60c73c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'280820' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACICN' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
44b601a848ded1666db9b2eb88430396
39386493653c78622d66c0650e5b1d80729f63dc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'270396' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACICO' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
aeb1d82096d47054cff2efddba2d57e2
784404542ad32b7a15cfcefac70bd06491b644f1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'267814' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACICP' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
54f5a7f5003ee185ccf6bb9936ed5d58
c3e27a0b924227d0efa367844e5e25589e23d6b2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'265948' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACICQ' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
7139ec78af257aab6867bcb7f12f85a2
1fc41604dbc59f498d0825f7574608227103a33a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'275341' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACICR' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
bc48e7ef492682aaa243ae55faf03f2a
2050f518a238aa67531cd04f84013b5e52056578
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'282487' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACICS' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
429a23663bbd3487720172e60bc74bad
c3ed05aee200b02584a76c56fd589329a248f68c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'267938' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACICT' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
d741e3dcd95473fce960b3556a615211
7ce8bb574e97f7aab7ce827b97f3b06f26437669
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'277940' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACICU' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
8c040d3ccb2861fdc8ee029efad6c7a3
04d42796ae40289c58c085f5b1dc923d815120e0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'202601' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACICV' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
7003ec31bd466a1a76391fe650927dbb
f53fe7fdf56a52da2d4c9d57f2cd23ba9baa6e27
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'264454' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACICW' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
3256d2458f4ac433899db332dc9e955d
47fc4633924bc4c74ed0e13cc3dade105c223d77
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'264351' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACICX' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
80ab876124c2d160cd799274d2cb5fcf
f3bff95ae490c9282c21d749750ad0fb4a4a8bf8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'281923' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACICY' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
02353cc13f300b1485d5d60ff9160b19
9c2e4f05590d74ba1e91420307e7cc4db1ee0381
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'285584' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACICZ' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
f9e71279aa8cff3f5471d681f73c724d
ae6d6d9a2a15231e7ce3ca886f78e4b041f62dbe
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'291613' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIDA' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
36d966b2ebf93d9906e2a409d7270cf6
65927a45f42ac13ca542b3e96a1aa7be79cdba0a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'278676' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIDB' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
8a11f84216aa6fab56aa41313bd57256
eb2e93efbc9b85b74ec3dec74bd820e9d7e585cf
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'267793' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIDC' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
4be68e0e165e45adde8983772fe9b922
d1977c8e49498d6d1693bffa46e9d26f5f3cf53e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'274643' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIDD' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
ef374a8b2da41632ad989f28f985eb89
e322591cf7ef2a829c64d5c173a842801c583eac
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'251996' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIDE' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
c0a5618657fd746b5f182280771d7583
72d6eeec7b0438ad929075d7357640823a61d2e2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'265617' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIDF' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
6c3a5770b43445ae16665f1fedfd1098
b9623ca5f8cd4e532559b39d56c66e39d99ef04e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'270491' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIDG' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
f1111c65c8251a9af452ae1f24b06ee6
a891832631204cf6d1f6c0ddefb89748bce6bd99
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'269053' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIDH' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
6008047f4985ef7986ed3a480205e7f4
535152539faf827d1f481d77b8044f4a9b225a4a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'265194' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIDI' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
3c4de881f5f3ce744004ef96ba2fc989
80ed88837a86726f08ae6a13aa24ba38f209ad02
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'279944' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIDJ' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
997574b784bb142a1f8f53eb19be723d
926e938ad512ae040290d551be64c1d9b87303f5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'288564' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIDK' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
39c0069d7c4f04bce665d8f01036aa03
f3f3afc57203852b92ae2b5e6337621c95ac6b3b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'275136' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIDL' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
1e25c59106a91ade139a0fddde4c9c8f
b005b1adb5ba6a4a27d2ce8d33a032112a7d045b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'274872' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIDM' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
6090991a95fb28a48cb9964fcebd1885
dc80cdc4f97c758e4f7ba3a0cb785d885314613f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'258661' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIDN' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
40c03ad4affd3fda76b8f429b53f2ddf
71ac27f470b06ed16253a1bc08a35e3a28be23df
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'271895' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIDO' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
3cbdb8cd7f34e0a11fb7385195f9062b
e97eb9df3756955934b7c8a5eebe04e5cfd6adba
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'265358' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIDP' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
6b185b67ddf46df49bd52357e38112dd
e1d1a799533324ad02974fc5c730fd2b44f465ee
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'269131' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIDQ' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
b2aaeb9e08b0ca3ddccc6e6cf71082f5
f4ba18e91d4d575dac4827dfb33fb6a9a62e4808
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'270915' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIDR' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
1b8416dfd1edefa77ab466e5ea1f6776
a9dee69cae30e784cf939185a9755a36456d6688
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'236062' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIDS' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
1dffe7092a19619fb74de72c9ea24e48
9f51e6437badab33370348a5b6a2856176a954b7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'258354' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIDT' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
d59e79afeec732db39bbb3e525447877
917d6e6ce888585de3666d9a3334b3292a6bc7a7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'283946' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIDU' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
3a9a0910fbc6452697d451f36f1d7ec0
a171de23e331793aca251c30359435f9816b73cc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'269336' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIDV' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
d39f77cb30480d86f9e7c15791aecf9f
431dea120c92d3d2620b3197cc2b52c5265dadf8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'283315' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIDW' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
a634da69a4a07d5833825aa2c4fdbfc6
8e398cd4950147ca89f8a73aca48cccd3f756806
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'273389' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIDX' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
2b983458da1d30f908a1b7660bfa9167
6e4272bc60f1f64c0f3940a294a5e68c6f576569
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'293536' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIDY' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
bf857a6e5b7ce7caf7e1a65e5a506a17
52b207d16ae728e69195f6c5a42d7864389b4056
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'239299' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIDZ' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
c6b413adaa19d22cc1fe961abbd4d432
c32bf4cd6308b7efb57093b14faeae8f9beea1d6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'244522' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIEA' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
cdd80aea70c0e46be3ab2ede83ac4713
83870e39af5df320c6dec9675869cafe73ca33c9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'319631' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIEB' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
e231ae8aabd88e3230086a2b5c0a47de
5f9be2b6affeced01055918b492cdbed3aa6850d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'418657' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIEC' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
cbf2ec7563b3dd0699f057497f6da1a0
df6696b44043681d8fb9f7f1440b7f4d55d07730
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'153378' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIED' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
9509de36f61f836e43f0ed8fcfdc4fc1
3ff71fa1734ae074e47c0709658d6dc133a8f047
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'394' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIEE' 'sip-files00001.pro'
2c9edbaebbf92c537b70f627392fdd90
1f990a7885b42c8cce3fa8b2088730bb62410320
describe
'123759' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIEF' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
caf34544f4ba87fae0413973686aad25
9e81765f391048abba5e67bd1037dcbd5c091353
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'67148' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIEG' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
2a8a6ca8b8dedf50e1a234f19691a491
4864c8b1c88fd94b8e465544d0e1e99bd93c6aa7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2017' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIEH' 'sip-files00004.pro'
21f65acaafc2d025550f1440bf248623
4ef07feaaf7f9f159770612e25488895e94d21e5
describe
'116301' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIEI' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
fcfde4bb5847f0b491117f47694715c9
f027c06596cc69f5767e5514da6e0a34a757d131
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'11664' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIEJ' 'sip-files00005.pro'
f0fe986a0549a59331e066d65a36e75c
8762b7340a5801f3cfb361232c7f82fe0a4fbb05
describe
'53319' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIEK' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
eb361948782ab4a94d6fbba86bf4cae9
c3645380593087da118bad652bb0abd5b9b52701
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2503' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIEL' 'sip-files00006.pro'
fffa3542477229ddd02fb950a85e2193
f1bcc0b153aa4f39dc1a1f7a10933c8690053c85
describe
'23144' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIEM' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
c00047158003c213cf0d2c9ee584007e
e54e33ab846a87e0bfde92df9cafab7f42f5165c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'21334' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIEN' 'sip-files00007.pro'
0728f514dde4262a20a8d83b78c0cb25
e5775a5eda6380e680f49f2ab021d72f6a507e87
describe
'82343' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIEO' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
812edfaab17d7e097501c9b15303acb0
c9a4b17821b0bef060f2c4845dd2bf0e2b48da3e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'26514' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIEP' 'sip-files00008.pro'
33ff2bd1ff510e5e8881be9524af391b
ea1d1b3293589cfb49e77a47937794ece3553160
describe
'80149' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIEQ' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
c6489af91b8c5b01af367b89b2ebd47f
ddb7dbe92910396933e3f735831d1d6dd5aec2b0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'20919' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIER' 'sip-files00009.pro'
1030f01b04d016843eaabc45cfcf8b03
c301c81b97035399bb37c3afa0e0be67f7ab8664
describe
'72950' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIES' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
060b442bab1fd61fcc578631e24ceb44
0abdbea68afe39152ab2f37af769192e66c9c42c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'40198' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIET' 'sip-files00010.pro'
6902ad8ee8d2ecf4585ff6bed88bbb6a
d0e1906696b988a9dab0ac2ff95c410077aa5bca
describe
'102324' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIEU' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
5c038f288d24275fd373bc141184031a
e7c352abad52ab5988de5ef596f55299b7eff101
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35294' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIEV' 'sip-files00011.pro'
1bbf36bca69a7733812f16a452d497c6
3f78319db77736c12b1f8738ebeb92b7a5bef607
describe
'95924' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIEW' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
8eafcf61e922f8c4d159b04b1b52bf12
600bbb069358820b221ec3243dfef6fefcf0a7cb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37398' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIEX' 'sip-files00012.pro'
6f9e7402c4a342e706b8c794050b2473
50f3711e8baaa29c214bbcc5ddef84cf26c1dba5
describe
'97211' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIEY' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
80e1d95bdba6468f90e3f6585106cb98
acf1c6a2593571c4fad5558ca64b8e156f5e4892
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39484' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIEZ' 'sip-files00013.pro'
3ecbfcca9f436d737e062ef04af12107
e9e8912e9475d12bad3d6280d17a824ae8d4580f
describe
'98345' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIFA' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
1a0215819109a719b70fc9af82617cfd
41abda9aa98636eb53207e3d7c61cea598139d24
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35344' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIFB' 'sip-files00014.pro'
7ad55e07a031756bbe17b190edb1daeb
ed40eed58c339da152a67e3ffaa72c5a3b5fdeb2
describe
'96392' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIFC' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
0aa44552f80625cb143a14066a2d0e2b
6186b0d341622a00d9cebafdca336ea1a16f4e58
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38650' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIFD' 'sip-files00015.pro'
83a66ea68bea9d402fdee70af6c0d450
89ca479ea19a5738455b88abd12ae6be52bbdd3a
describe
'101715' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIFE' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
624a8e1d7ce0f1db27c1e508cea79610
9e779d49bb2d915a816c09410f9fefda5f95c9ee
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38418' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIFF' 'sip-files00016.pro'
9ef175652b75d74cb682a1abf568fe6f
f033b7fa4dee00d5a6cf52fd62f3f2def3d8d1dd
describe
'97631' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIFG' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
5451d2d743fc5cee294861b04b756727
058ebfb027dedcbaa888f4a46a143743e547d435
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37300' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIFH' 'sip-files00017.pro'
98f082da5409cc8680e5ceb94c339c7c
b991c96b13918580ab90b1b6fc9b290df9ffbde6
describe
'97924' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIFI' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
44beca97d3683f1277d37d0fd418c437
6aa04b11c68efab8644a1e3d9b0675418e7ce13a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35222' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIFJ' 'sip-files00018.pro'
d91cdd8e84dbf11e4c26fac3ede67f27
31c9fe0a21c4a6759e72217b02b5296ba6028b62
describe
'95501' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIFK' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
9d7dccfb5f9ab83d2f96ebdd3b968be3
4175f60964426a3f62e0d58018b1c9e5cf89c312
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'9471' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIFL' 'sip-files00019.pro'
67fd73864208980fc04dd3fd6f246851
e31b895882299772d8d076a0de1cea5b665da270
describe
'42942' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIFM' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
f6ced069a32188091cd34c7d69767530
7259c1d575cc9b6004d9990690a0418cd5372aea
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'30575' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIFN' 'sip-files00020.pro'
e629b04bf279c43c409d06989c5e4138
900e55af30c214a501bd383d0220909671e3bbb3
describe
'89694' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIFO' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
1eadeadaaa997dc79bd4cf0907f9b186
8e99ac8838e31e3d9f36b4cc5dc964bac7b68a0e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38856' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIFP' 'sip-files00021.pro'
7ad6b89b7612ffa92f337471a9f851f1
2585297e548b57307d3e1b0c10762224dc80df32
describe
'102270' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIFQ' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
cbf4dbde5ac1b549caadfb1870efa498
fcfae17c8f907c66ffb78244ff7e9dc12a600f8a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39264' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIFR' 'sip-files00022.pro'
4ca29601143d99d79fb79ad277f790bf
5246d264686c8c3001bb99fde2e1504dad2256a9
describe
'100223' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIFS' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
1c0e34067e4f97b54f779da041fdbddc
a7d987655fbb6fc06ed4e89f3c3e6c3dadfce036
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'40247' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIFT' 'sip-files00023.pro'
3b6637b18b7220a0338046a91ce460b4
07a0bbed9be80de6228590199fe073b497c897a9
describe
'100445' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIFU' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
442ca83adc1505e365d473c6899a7a98
28d407227cf51a999010ff09793da4d05ca53c51
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39889' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIFV' 'sip-files00024.pro'
032bf643222873da1524ab1d466e6e0d
66a72ff8759af56a2dc5e1d144438adae6f86503
describe
'103140' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIFW' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
5ff3c8abdc73e8e69b15e77abd4fb163
43cdf5d2da30fbfcf7c5caeb30a69176305874b7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'914' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIFX' 'sip-files00026.pro'
e20194f3208603fe446e653705b31276
438069740e9247fb636cf921870593c2bc775ad7
describe
'68293' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIFY' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
264921b11f57129fc36dc3fcaa61c53a
a3aae7b1c5bffb91a1f465f8a1f6b25312aeae6a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'40723' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIFZ' 'sip-files00027.pro'
092fec950d347ae1d9ced7f619ea797e
4767f7cbf1f3b15dfab3f00b6d2e5742ebdc78f9
describe
'103381' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIGA' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
7149f2cc40c3fd45bc5070a5d0ab7f27
03e654df93971fa071bbef505966fbe4cb9c5430
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'24848' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIGB' 'sip-files00028.pro'
fccd025f197a24de70968deb69267eeb
7332e26fb0fd008e6579eec9285bb7a6d2cbd7ca
describe
'72116' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIGC' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
dcffaa0ce8ff4435eda1f0feec67bd41
ab9baea092e2ce0b8bd06e03bda745bd076be0f4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'26471' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIGD' 'sip-files00029.pro'
3e8f52288e351ae948f96c6a3dfd8719
259b28b34bf24426eb56a049357ebf09b3879134
describe
'86197' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIGE' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
9d38d8b4e38fe1ecf5e54206710a0887
a4e9d6bf20bcb59ec5a78a3e88d17fa10555fe2d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37100' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIGF' 'sip-files00030.pro'
2bdafea0ebb3d290fbab62fbac3f05f5
e15cbcb650c06f6330e98e77e9485e62eea624a2
describe
'98903' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIGG' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
4acc263c988bea978f7a5916b94eada6
baeea3c6ffda75241e975d5bb3d88bcfea6ee5aa
'2011-12-09T02:04:33-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38845' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIGH' 'sip-files00031.pro'
ea283f167d587d0eb232beec51b1e3c8
1f33c4594d3ff6b44aa87438609b19ecf60890bb
describe
'98752' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIGI' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
0216f997187fd34cd85e31b346dcec2a
c65b1fd5d620c476567a9efbd632fdbbcfdef903
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37370' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIGJ' 'sip-files00032.pro'
859dae1682ab0c91e2e3fb445e557efa
b498e273c2f3f1afb3eecd4d25a7cf72fb22a848
describe
'98553' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIGK' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
1b2ce2d7a521432bab3462e851b92fe1
8dc1292617ba90e828118dd05d4cac8e69949207
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35358' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIGL' 'sip-files00033.pro'
e085814170656a697fc809f71fe6dd3b
6edba0e13d0264cd147af305c9b1e8f8369fec07
describe
'92127' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIGM' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
4ceb7e5709d42a173040bf92c1e47983
e5f4740e6e68a3c0881e905b5702b0ac184064be
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38312' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIGN' 'sip-files00034.pro'
f631153958b09efb24f2752c1fe620d3
2d34d0be27d20be612ae047fbc9c4ab4f953db52
describe
'101281' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIGO' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
17c0e0e957211f162ab231f7cc5672bc
4ac667cfcb06bce4fc1f15d98fd45213999f3690
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36004' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIGP' 'sip-files00035.pro'
8ac127fee07bc1fb586a6d21508e4ccc
8f948015fe12b1411a10b69c4cd9b2eb86f1991c
describe
'95787' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIGQ' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
fc3feaba11bc34704a21b29154b84996
3da5317a7e80fb731ccacf75c262f664294432a1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7996' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIGR' 'sip-files00036.pro'
b2a913a629b9c7bcc6f609538655142d
2e3c2d36269754f7d9d359d1c36fc2d9a1699ae7
describe
'37060' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIGS' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
6ba3ed81e46f887068300e514854a989
082f1709dce9b11c49330e0fc44b89638aeb999f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'30782' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIGT' 'sip-files00037.pro'
f290d4d618095979ad32c282bf4b0f27
5bda133ca12e15dd7e01f196a34043baa84ae431
describe
'88523' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIGU' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
0c1e99f738b1fe77caccafd5456f8b5a
c789f1bf1042325c3cc81a37099106fe41c7e652
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39703' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIGV' 'sip-files00038.pro'
210321fdbe4ff96bde9f644416acb717
b9a376796c71bde6fbd1a4a96fcbaf36d52ebb60
describe
'99675' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIGW' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
6a62d1dda8b4cc1cc4f4e21e7545f9bc
717fced22c507622e9b91e12e1edc1798a4583d1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37922' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIGX' 'sip-files00039.pro'
8af1cbff7a38c1813126bfe5b7a5c87a
6a2750493e75c0ac5268935821812569383dff0c
describe
'100155' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIGY' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
5488127377a68041b510c7b3c75572a1
405bcfca65d1b04ce728bacd56e5fd71d8e193a7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39833' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIGZ' 'sip-files00040.pro'
2ac00e7c33daff18d425a6ad083ad5b2
2d2cdafaac511421c5b7df64eb5848f18c3cf68f
describe
'100398' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIHA' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
055cbd1b6fc3908c1800cdbaba36f9a1
6a9893fa66050eb3b26ec73daf651b2238bd3119
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35926' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIHB' 'sip-files00041.pro'
5dcb555d52a99a896b527747d41a4ba1
43ce24c0adfdd5e12fb43ee0a69253ecaf00913e
describe
'93040' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIHC' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
051ad6986c54c0d4e0adc3c4bfb8d0ed
8faaace43b264646f52d8e9c07b38f9b116b4590
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35161' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIHD' 'sip-files00042.pro'
03df400109864ffd2d7b57f2bc6413d8
313b04b0014410cd70c25d788ef394175f06e760
describe
'94664' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIHE' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
fe2e1a889fbe2668fd07b19fb4edf239
224fb47603f3c13bb481d7168adbc4f93c8f483b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36155' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIHF' 'sip-files00043.pro'
88e6b89f99df756fcab5a6deffd901af
91dec7c1b7ce57718c9d6b0ac1c43d76c1c5af14
describe
'95003' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIHG' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
852fc51ac22837e3261cc092b8f36c48
4101f615f70905c76bbacd86c7f69d5ed3c834ee
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36541' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIHH' 'sip-files00044.pro'
642abf9f1481aeb72981e2adcdec5a8c
2e1d1a9c1662b5b5c4fada6440053bb631b1cb9f
describe
'92448' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIHI' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
d076f927e6bfc350f24c1a7c18672797
38fb4d886c41b568ec1600d20e7d240494d0a152
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35345' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIHJ' 'sip-files00045.pro'
191123d677b870ce151c5e4f17807707
12fa1a391999286e6e010cb8d2dc031909f49944
describe
'93776' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIHK' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
7099f2fc7ee222b146f7dc12029aa747
e4c36b1de8d23dd6c96f503ae0d7be0b98c93aca
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37923' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIHL' 'sip-files00046.pro'
63ed2af33cfe92810a05af6958949f14
f3be601ad4e4c10158dd1d8d3fbef33a2a9ad702
describe
'95687' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIHM' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
fad07649d35eb6434fded061415c368e
297d629b0fe3a676836b3266d89297c060cd4b1b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28807' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIHN' 'sip-files00047.pro'
5997d3a08a3c1a21b5977246e23923b7
82f45bc9d1fda78915fc6b128f5fa24fc19aa2e1
describe
'87583' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIHO' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
ddb2e463e65b30036c49b58d875f5f7c
ae279aa54b6423544747e2fb7f63315948925e50
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38168' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIHP' 'sip-files00048.pro'
20d416aec6909e1486594c918452d6a0
a50f30c36d377681fe52fed1f53bea0860de2075
describe
'99416' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIHQ' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
f8440458e4dcaf1b3aad72c1179f0ffb
1edcd5cf23abdc6982e7b524f587298aa1270eb1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'34576' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIHR' 'sip-files00049.pro'
3172096171eaacaf2a2d3c5525fdf5b9
cfab83af34988468575f683ddb294d060eca0a69
describe
'90074' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIHS' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
9f0e315851910951a050ff5062bda2c9
7a1937395b60a1f3c283d3c91c54320e37d61fb7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35205' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIHT' 'sip-files00050.pro'
9834ce1f29c89677c7ec143c0d20be9c
84e015e70e56ec1e8e84a26c50dfba20c02fc9a1
describe
'94418' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIHU' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
4368bc3a044dd5b6a019f37cd1579753
7d927bbe7a53a2e9bde5fc1b00546e6029787653
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36801' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIHV' 'sip-files00051.pro'
764847fa0df9b67ac4e684c0e55136bc
ffc22198e8573fc0a4b5bb0008de4d095444d446
describe
'97473' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIHW' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
8a8d48c21c464f02c13c1405ca38b448
d2ad21365b943fa55972f46f88ea54fe2cc562e1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37615' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIHX' 'sip-files00052.pro'
151a079037ef653bf266799212b8300c
4ee71c0ed09b2950f64b106ee3fef9ba0361bbf2
describe
'98296' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIHY' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
1ac9688d6ccf00a200b4b7b79cc29041
9ddc252ab981e78605adf6f52f62aa23d54503da
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39566' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIHZ' 'sip-files00053.pro'
9ce44fe723569afc963ca16f207a5360
8d354011b6daa3bf27e0383bf8853f1f34105eec
describe
'100222' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIIA' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
8bcb65dc922a5ba1aed7c30055f43bf3
1b046f1e8e51a050710ef11a23fbd627a547aac1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'6267' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIIB' 'sip-files00054.pro'
f878d09fe15ad7e58ea32c9f82d80277
5c8a34188408936b2ee38a4026469bd5224efc7f
describe
'37472' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIIC' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
ae71ec7c7d3a8b1c35816cca5843e78a
40ca37a1f24b97d0f58acb87c2a3f72a3d097e5f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'30778' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIID' 'sip-files00055.pro'
c35f021ac9f737e8384ec4405782a3fb
4cc7e9dae0422d9799b98ca97a7dc13d76b2a4ad
describe
'91071' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIIE' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
9076bac7e17f4a5b7c6f77726947eb3d
11d11eef551ff85c6b8bf6d0c60b2e8f0ab7e98c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36837' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIIF' 'sip-files00056.pro'
05eaef3c9551cecb71ae961a1a7881fb
54bca5d987ae56b8b1f8733070df9131e04959ad
describe
'94473' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIIG' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
5a025906ae0803e644f005a12a4bf1a1
22f4fc9b7b6ae7c47405f929b0db15929059f946
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38563' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIIH' 'sip-files00057.pro'
fbe375447c19523167831945b4cdc73c
d0ad48ca61df4d4930ed866e99984bb86c78ba1e
describe
'100555' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIII' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
fab01583bdfd9359874a673fc2928287
edba4c159fe403dd2525e3850903eed3d38805c6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36819' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIIJ' 'sip-files00058.pro'
777d2dc97c45c41771c16e91de574b9b
75d6bae34cc0f6ebe636812e11248446516fdf14
describe
'97599' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIIK' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
266eb4facea103f483cca84ea19a1cc9
eb66c68485949950f5146d92fe5d8aa15f97421d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'16641' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIIL' 'sip-files00059.pro'
cb1db25402c7d94435e0cf3c5e349aa8
3cee89c20505976cbf3ffff620b0cba017183876
describe
'57145' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIIM' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
ef3e991730d7b86883d3a17345f9f5ee
0ea1e624f940edb5e8397f10cefc7a9f8ba2ca3b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27638' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIIN' 'sip-files00060.pro'
b3e2cdb01d9ce8296ebe4a21c3bed41e
f2694a38aa9987f4ce8d7e048b8e2d14fc268e2b
describe
'83197' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIIO' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
daf6c6bc8298f47f0eab0da7e1609a1b
8db6c2827c213a9eb64f87579fc9316382840e27
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'40536' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIIP' 'sip-files00061.pro'
49f6a9fd5fe8f068f21df1af16cbe839
cacc12fa165d9f20cd3aa31d12c4726b4655db27
describe
'98675' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIIQ' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
0e932ddc5a7cfcedfc8129689a2673db
ce5b141ec7c53919ddd2bc9556d27c68d548c8b2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38016' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIIR' 'sip-files00062.pro'
74f788ac769d1901c02dcd35fec1a4db
bc2404574976657ea478070d4faa4797a11c577a
describe
'96842' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIIS' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
753c0d2266adf014b37fd2e0747bfb08
d410fed5116662d5b5a85cb16a4d861298821c5e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35816' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIIT' 'sip-files00063.pro'
62762d63bcf6c6f5dbea7cfbf478215c
74d75184038505984d3010a086d692caf9bac165
describe
'92242' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIIU' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
65ab164cadf4de77469eef65822e080a
a56b614faad354345b3356e5c21e5e5bcfae187c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36842' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIIV' 'sip-files00064.pro'
2f7047fe32085c54c5c75d4910cb2c9f
7fe35b3d0f18631fd84c2803dbeb06445f10331f
describe
'92894' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIIW' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
dab135c30935dbcc612edd3413fc0f21
7d6782015873eb1a0e1164bffc28ffd37389a067
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38430' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIIX' 'sip-files00065.pro'
ecf6e1d57727aaf89a4b3919d7793ea2
74b9b96839ed4e9af4f54bff9a1761111afdc2d5
describe
'94713' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIIY' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
bf48fec32e9bbf6e9605691a35ea7336
6a74bd33a84eca644e4968429b1f3f4c86ab895b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'25150' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIIZ' 'sip-files00066.pro'
56dbca6e3cefd6c38e7ec444323260dc
33a3c08d313055ac70b8807364d20529cff15e2a
describe
'71083' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIJA' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
80823f9fe54597da10ad2fc58a424e6f
5c5390e9b3b6705bbc8caa662054308d5169c4c8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'31968' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIJB' 'sip-files00067.pro'
eebf0257fbc68cdea6eda83fb8e10374
aa9b66ac591bda38b7d017d3c7bbcba5c3190b2c
describe
'89710' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIJC' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
5033ac96bc857ac3a8f8e19b3512c8ed
8f3632777113218a2148fd73e78717434a513a91
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38978' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIJD' 'sip-files00068.pro'
ab18dbe95e64d8228e86989116830017
e80ded6a61475d5b2b8674ab83b352e4a8f462f7
describe
'98357' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIJE' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
8254024bc966ec1e1c8db5b32f4e31c6
8680ca540bf829ac29d87693a0992d07cb1e9bcf
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39969' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIJF' 'sip-files00069.pro'
4f0d94cd3e66477250ce105b5ff61a99
f67d1b743eb11b9630b17b5f603c6dc1333b4b7e
describe
'97654' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIJG' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
f4b1307a4bb97f2a4da8afd041c12e45
e6000862f81312d0333dbeb6769b966d336f4054
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38707' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIJH' 'sip-files00070.pro'
80fa42e39f47f80536c76f9307aec382
1a95e1e56568faa342469004e9cbd4d1159cbe69
describe
'97273' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIJI' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
1808efc610c31a5be2f2ea6b220c2a86
e6b4ed5b921e6f5936e23e4e60e3092be7a53764
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'33601' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIJJ' 'sip-files00071.pro'
643bc30e8d906f989a1701bdbabf598a
e17bbe864cff6c56d718bedf7fddbc038ca606c1
describe
'87543' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIJK' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
4d0ed49d3e825ed980c7b7aefa891dca
9fe9dd900e3d25d50965a2f4b303206b4dfae2a2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27369' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIJL' 'sip-files00072.pro'
74705844ee9fc870e042e3e2c9e5349b
22c4d46251aa1a4e578eea7c74df825781d41230
describe
'85018' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIJM' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
18965346e027f71a7158fa2dd087a897
74f2c9821fee63e221a461dca552d5282977f2b0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39406' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIJN' 'sip-files00073.pro'
95480aae3c1a0d5a57244159cb3464e6
0ea3d8ebe17884a4d3a685f0b3a967eab66f592b
describe
'98418' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIJO' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
f66282b92fc4a1688163400727e0e7f0
f99386d16db270df8e40ab662e904aa544d0491e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37717' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIJP' 'sip-files00074.pro'
26e72b944e0150a220534e2a7ef777d9
f57075238f8a958c46fb13ecee95ab8b5f93b7b9
describe
'97598' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIJQ' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
2a879851e5ed359dc1eded945a62c3b3
7226fb5086c1d385048ce6600f11090c05ca53c9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36194' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIJR' 'sip-files00075.pro'
8e69cf022af87ef2acd5cb69c992e168
82ddbef76f1a2d14af684d154681f1266ad245f4
describe
'93604' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIJS' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
b500535ac68228f036ffa4af4ec9652e
798cf68d7e4f32e50f21f684fe9f69bee8e6e65e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36466' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIJT' 'sip-files00076.pro'
8f16480b2fa2afc9d7b4872d30812867
60595897291a654b49e355c09f28811b43717d7b
describe
'92484' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIJU' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
bd51ab61e820459a69d413e2a3d4fc66
a8a8de59083ec61a37ee4d68e850ef23b5f59d64
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37537' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIJV' 'sip-files00077.pro'
ce61357d6366f8758d7f5e985b8dc7aa
d874ceaf3d7f1abd8653b3d82b86cb24a2cd0fe6
describe
'93837' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIJW' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
97a11e446bffbba79518b43d35bc2f2a
106acfdbc93c5117e10c6323501cc9ff6780b9bc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35565' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIJX' 'sip-files00078.pro'
04abcf2018f2c591cd8fe49e5a7ad80d
72544429a7f1e57772b3887110b4b7491ace6c8b
describe
'92068' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIJY' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
8e70b4fb6659b574c3828cd1cec0561a
3d8e778b1ba55ab27b5d0dd6bb05770b926b0a33
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1328' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIJZ' 'sip-files00079.pro'
297e72382d65070a99ee8c0e374122b3
dff9b2a252afbc2e0129d178194805930d92ebb2
describe
'65055' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIKA' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
948e6d77ef11dd497de599f63c29ed15
7be93d651e00de404fba2027364e8205e6129678
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38784' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIKB' 'sip-files00081.pro'
ca2efee2ab59dfdd656d7a97fd54bc5c
db3f339302a5fe734b939842c4df9dadf0d06c17
describe
'94181' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIKC' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
e305d9ac6bd200f6c466e90c5aef465a
650fdee7a2596386ea95f349def0f3dfcbcb76a1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'34310' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIKD' 'sip-files00082.pro'
05957f50792506c6bf0d4fa6584faa77
404e971637d2cbebdd016d37b4919718eb34587c
describe
'90886' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIKE' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
33f51328bce949b232e741be138ffb80
d751c981c7defad505b82ed83a888a7c784f432b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37736' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIKF' 'sip-files00083.pro'
dabdf62f0669c84649a4f4226cda5925
aa45bd30ead42976e8699ca6e9252d307fb64619
describe
'91785' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIKG' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
343dc20e367e6cab7f4757c6b9c9cc06
6c3a96df7e8be52a5d98450ab859faf86abb2e19
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7984' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIKH' 'sip-files00084.pro'
1442bf54947c619ee9c117599da889bb
1448cf82a3bb5f72e5e5a97c02b29824a0b50523
describe
'40056' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIKI' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
0ab759fd871abb43f3974d3c2ce70d5f
6d8fcead62a5d50c36435cb53f6edbe8e650794f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'34835' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIKJ' 'sip-files00085.pro'
d5d03aed762f099b372fdd687b7b0eed
cf64b797043272cb5c2084c814f034f02d00b5f4
describe
'89978' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIKK' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
56e65f53623d515efe8a1f3c8ce6b101
3d197c597055ed68cd8b80af935010fc1c2807c0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37880' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIKL' 'sip-files00086.pro'
ca3eafdcdd2f79d09ed325663f08a334
345606faa27ea68fb8304e92feb9add5ce2a49b3
describe
'95172' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIKM' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
6e93da2bdde081bb04968edda8bfd2c9
977ba00478ed36906326cbbb09cd99b1b5e00887
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38301' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIKN' 'sip-files00087.pro'
36499a6303101cff43cb88cba700ddbf
80ffc8179c2e6b425382ea6c23d90d6cd06a7a03
describe
'93730' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIKO' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
99c24998173ebb2991bbedb225ba58bd
baa24815fad21d1f9c339cf1605b22a9b39018da
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38255' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIKP' 'sip-files00088.pro'
d98298b25b07af89a79cea4150b4478d
bb98e525580fd02c76c38640d65ec63bd8fa8c89
describe
'94574' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIKQ' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
82aed5feab2447898fdbf66a3ae4cd61
c7794135301e72a4909b33fa340e50320b1dfcd3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37967' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIKR' 'sip-files00089.pro'
8029b9de8a19164e598ea54994259e5c
52ee85f2e16817af037a3a222348e64a2e9452c4
describe
'95499' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIKS' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
45c8ac59368aaa2a8f12e75f5576b844
eb28a847ed11906fed493f32ab818100062fd72c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37963' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIKT' 'sip-files00090.pro'
630fc2169717c2b19768549f8853339c
018f52b3bd3fc32eac0c1a491b2e5f9e60e7385b
describe
'96124' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIKU' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
0553f26ddee00dcf9f7f98720b3f882e
8b62bc89a7296b4312802ffa49ff19c865ca477f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39888' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIKV' 'sip-files00091.pro'
99a35d461fde013a0ff14f28dd3236f9
c8aa7052db43886975e76c807955d50405367313
describe
'97866' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIKW' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
dd30768dfac37039b28c221ee52792e6
b080454532ce343796dab89d6704b3948148763b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'40487' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIKX' 'sip-files00092.pro'
7b620c71005dc8509e098101bc2eb12a
8c05a13b3dc095976431ee70c982e168ae8a9fa0
describe
'97768' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIKY' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
8f7478deba13957b6d9a7fc9060817ed
4cf41308fcbe22fec615c93c112d50e852a1376f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39950' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIKZ' 'sip-files00093.pro'
be1fa7c743a24dbb6eddaa53e16bc99f
6f7db3cd033df1ee836eecaca510b7b29e7d3477
describe
'95825' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACILA' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
49e68494ffb01195f5277c2a9af36125
fc283d38f6a016d07e149a71d8ccd1be2a78ab94
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'41891' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACILB' 'sip-files00094.pro'
87f83f24e9395f246c5ab9ad354de9b4
8ba975b0239a3cb69854dee8c3955f42ef64c145
describe
'99751' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACILC' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
22e167ba8055b8a1ea88925fa3dc053a
8a8ecef820c93cb2236a56ef40561fefd0d1a102
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'40498' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACILD' 'sip-files00095.pro'
1a08d5b0903afb6062f004da493b8fb4
1edd910c52ee8a1c27131b3532fec4dc71740c37
describe
'100014' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACILE' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
51078f54b375aeaef1314864f1012fb1
278547dbc295501321d85de60b7be267e2d2c010
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38706' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACILF' 'sip-files00096.pro'
78465a2987a693f0e5db9e2e57f3ab53
8a88ef777e86fbd38d43a7887efe9a0f371918be
describe
'96142' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACILG' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
a93ea34ce5806c7ceb7d8c2687e6ea43
f948d963f9660cb72347932ba02686429cdf7e2d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38844' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACILH' 'sip-files00097.pro'
f1cd2297515fe12ce16013b53365d752
0c623684ff89f23e7a0a7eb08d77423af484c887
describe
'95511' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACILI' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
0e23f61ce7d58cbb2a7419c08628b219
8fb3a96a04fa031bbe60ffd836672af4ba1fb539
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39359' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACILJ' 'sip-files00098.pro'
fcb5bff6262c9882c25940f340fc20dc
b1bab997124efd28972364a387c56d3a37ee5f5a
describe
'96376' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACILK' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
d353f47f8ad9e5e702e26dbf7fe5c4b1
2b37a0659d191a3e54176f5ca7ca1acedeec7e4b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39685' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACILL' 'sip-files00099.pro'
4d6b55fcbd345350f26517ccd0e40a09
11fdf4bde8d46dd41d4a3bc296a568ad2d4c9757
describe
'96032' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACILM' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
c2e3ef584b69b4ed0f59311e9cf4bb6d
8f1a635ce5f9b39ee7fb21712b1d835faeebaa09
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38095' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACILN' 'sip-files00100.pro'
a6eab4d84c0666a59d8ad404936de1e8
6e7d25a8e05a262ecdd7dfc738c618d05d4de637
describe
'94439' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACILO' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
5f1eed56eb13066f87f69ee355507b52
44132f0484468bf14e3e2a5f9c34cdd7ba4ef52d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38062' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACILP' 'sip-files00101.pro'
6eb1118ffd31c516641884bf44fe4168
a922dbe328536168ef7f004d58c15dcdac32c7cd
describe
'93014' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACILQ' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
6ea3a5a895c259345eff22c8fd6ca07d
6695b9f9876026a04ac1394503e4ab10dc0fe848
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29206' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACILR' 'sip-files00102.pro'
4b193915ea6a138dd20362fc49455101
1c36d47b3d38ed42c900860cf7e90d53d07bd91a
describe
'89127' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACILS' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
5e1f551ca6c1fad00b7cd57311ab697f
6015a46c98afe1ce7bbdd358c08b7d9cd48c00ed
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39395' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACILT' 'sip-files00103.pro'
3ce1a4f117de3b702bde63225e051775
66e5e1400b7c9e593610511d14a377e9a0f07902
describe
'93300' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACILU' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
7e27a2bd588f2d4b34d0a8e10fb068c3
b11fc82278771ebb23b15080d7195560f4b15461
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39955' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACILV' 'sip-files00104.pro'
597e66afbbf319aac58736c316f94f12
228beb01b9db1f4e3e89664519a02a5508d38e57
describe
'99448' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACILW' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
f19ccd7dcb875d20b151b54b0d6db616
3aeb864b5bd6de580f69a3487e1ed322dea15389
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38096' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACILX' 'sip-files00105.pro'
ecbcd93f36489bb1effa6ca08864c884
2ca9b2c9cdc5068eb703b848d10480555174086f
describe
'96702' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACILY' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
0c7ae3d51fa524eadeaa1169b53647e7
71217891d7dc1a895956d795a2eed57855320125
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37532' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACILZ' 'sip-files00106.pro'
d1e8ab21e2ce0fc214f3b33bd2f6657b
afe8d00794cebbd737017adcb179cc1aa4cf6052
describe
'96737' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIMA' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
2a50ec7a4dc83607b33987d657a3e3f7
e6a36d7e391e46de435d48546b9f3d9a38a74450
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'25648' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIMB' 'sip-files00107.pro'
2cdbae1cce687a60f8f8602bf8539b8e
5581960887f1b10e97e05c83f4dc8c4db6db34b5
describe
'73144' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIMC' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
82fe59c9f4d301d7d61925e328f35baa
a9c06d4a3267da1ff347e1d7a50f75fcded773d3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'30494' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIMD' 'sip-files00108.pro'
357301dc63bd5fa3f464af8e746dafeb
b7f17d56482283b4a514081101fb6874637fb5f9
describe
'93687' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIME' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
ae2de81cf8facbdaaf2ccffbd86828fe
7a052685cea3241653a76ff2f3ad29cbcaa72f31
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36808' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIMF' 'sip-files00109.pro'
7813c9ff23a81fcfad55683e5bf9bde5
c24c512ab443cfa662844047cd25702f75791012
describe
'94081' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIMG' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
c05f2b074b2c5c92ada9790acabaf493
b1a9fe11b2f899d0809b07e9477b530ccb7bce99
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38584' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIMH' 'sip-files00110.pro'
0fb4ccb44f40dc4cb94ed3750d694f21
bfee3b13568dcdaa1f68f5158a7f003668565fa7
describe
'96630' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIMI' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
45423dee300513e68550e36a8a0c9e37
c8690a10127ff7505078c1722d096fd5135c77b9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39932' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIMJ' 'sip-files00111.pro'
27a839362ffadbf333ab4baaba83ed03
719a082d7b524d9a6c5f5526287fa494738389db
describe
'97875' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIMK' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
997d142175b5682bdc54ec86f3de2210
fd00225ba0fa4412af22d2ce4b740edbb190b6a3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'41712' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIML' 'sip-files00112.pro'
bece0b8456b08005f826e7e7aa39b5e0
0e1b631087209c6267a43f772823d6f26200d3be
describe
'101160' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIMM' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
f64719411dbf770a0a3b4e1cbcc8952d
44f8bf828a3035a97f8d4b0253cb1b5a3af0f90e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'40523' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIMN' 'sip-files00113.pro'
cdbf07668520fb80b0d4741a8c540150
4d1c73db33f01a14fcf7d9389e51b05fb000febe
describe
'99512' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIMO' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
98431a7a97f078cd759361b3f41b601d
4b13ee7a4f6e5c80942a0215fe1ea1756ae8081a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37697' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIMP' 'sip-files00114.pro'
ba9d02d85a06c0159dc43049acb5f411
c135327eebc75b42eb57a7823ef3055d7960e306
describe
'92949' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIMQ' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
b9ba8b9b7208bf6b343e091de3db4d39
0e7fa34bb01abdd36195e1e083f4518233b2f401
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39170' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIMR' 'sip-files00115.pro'
a02f11f03c8053094b9c7d5582c44feb
2b4b988e2f60e41b971b1890cdf9e1a39406c52f
describe
'96108' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIMS' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
2eed68872de131f2b35478a58fcf4d97
ddd9d852b022daf600557587df7e171c23caa71d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28636' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIMT' 'sip-files00116.pro'
174815acde9580549bd5a19dea3241cd
094a611fee944bea107b3ac820c88a7cebaa4cff
describe
'89380' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIMU' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
c90043e8aee161c7d1e06b7741a79fed
d71f0ba2fe48299d99473b19720770aa178f7489
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37030' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIMV' 'sip-files00117.pro'
6832826637d854036a121fa6f3c0e9b8
aea20e1485ca0a565e1be436a09606082c403074
describe
'95444' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIMW' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
e49c77bada9b78b64acf7950365858b5
f8b339c1ddbaa3a6c1bccccbe22493f72f468308
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIMX' 'sip-files00118.pro'
ba4b27ad5fc23d527cc215986fc0de1b
5528bd98e1a03b7e78a167a234bfde4e43e0f9eb
describe
'95792' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIMY' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
1aa80f3cc63ff5a570400d3c399d44c7
1ded453ed67f55bac4bf8b11b9f4e956e82323bd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38472' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIMZ' 'sip-files00119.pro'
2464f43fdc592ec719b86961a8d9658f
f8a1af0174da6704ea300f54af1891079db8012b
describe
'95866' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACINA' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
bf8dc8f9cd8841be9cae75c85893c22c
32c40242fc459edbffcc9a8b6f2072d77160ecd1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37525' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACINB' 'sip-files00120.pro'
8241c56e58370227209c3e8660ea5918
2354f56459c9c12a28d7a4f4f7db274f08609f93
describe
'95914' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACINC' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
0a5921514c3f69789309676ce5a3832a
4915d6c808615a7fa8273656a2eeebc810fb82d1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39591' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIND' 'sip-files00121.pro'
6511a618eb96584d7393c3caab448d79
26e24e1ebd62dc3938455c688dba2be86d62039a
describe
'98056' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACINE' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
414eef81b3384e238d8b2335b7188638
8a27c8b44a08207ef4c2d5b8a5c5738818939ffd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'41290' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACINF' 'sip-files00122.pro'
af5c4f446b6892101f494c7fead7827d
e7af23f57b061d4f39d085db10315ed8da4caf93
describe
'101748' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACING' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
a34016c1b24db5ef146f46d9b6e9a2ab
c61ca91a476bbefe00cc9115009db7f0e44c8d5a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39016' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACINH' 'sip-files00123.pro'
88805a70777f3b32385d69c1634d7270
25c67031f9bd7248d4c9594bba62ccfc350da810
describe
'98176' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACINI' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
e4bb02aef46f8327ead361a33c93a79c
80a423ff3cf1729e9bfb0dc0b67490660ccdad73
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37686' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACINJ' 'sip-files00124.pro'
91d930083f5409b997b24e27ebc87a85
227d5175ba0231d62952564f729905b2b7117abf
describe
'95713' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACINK' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
6a3bbfeee69aca2cbc2c32ac8ab9235f
97f0abd22b180cb28b8a27e3a5576fd99e29b76a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'31144' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACINL' 'sip-files00125.pro'
9b9997c79037dd9241d095aef3048f63
1c1cc637908e62b8ebd9e1b083f0f0189f21ef36
describe
'88340' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACINM' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
6798a6fecc7443db645d46434c38ceb0
85c579e950c27da710f062b47187ca137210188b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39285' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACINN' 'sip-files00126.pro'
98a8801e6347f928f9cddb9d838868a3
cae1bc941dd522c50ed4d8faff1c894d440e8983
describe
'97968' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACINO' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
30e3297724446d92090cf88298e13960
9767fd742730787bced8c73235ede714d7259198
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39168' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACINP' 'sip-files00127.pro'
b3241cbb186b5647b5c71c92d42a656c
dbf88d92691e93c4299da87c5b30d31b2c1cf0d2
describe
'96593' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACINQ' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
261df4b29b5cecac9662a06d2bb02327
cbf057de7a837a2b3e59ac72f111c96dc8698fff
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37618' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACINR' 'sip-files00128.pro'
45f48a117596c1131eff3bb00a6f4157
2d43bc491d12122e01bc90f5c3405291319b9d6a
describe
'95894' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACINS' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
52c98c831469fb07e21a185428dbf0b9
5de7608a5120f0877e7aa043269ba658b82b2dd4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39855' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACINT' 'sip-files00129.pro'
933baf90ab4b45cd8816cc706c2a6561
5f914c6931860c00fbab12f6a3826c76aa92c784
describe
'96138' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACINU' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
74cfa57facd2660e5bd1a8f13862fe7a
76de63852b052e825c85bafde6a2e8fbeb0420fd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'31652' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACINV' 'sip-files00130.pro'
8ff7ba938f6e3566264087d937b4e2a0
630180359884cc56dacccd46a87f339c87bca082
describe
'85155' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACINW' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
c52b5b036894cc9861283e35bf1a8f9d
f6f0a2ff600efb185713b441ab3f683093c603fd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'31408' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACINX' 'sip-files00131.pro'
5535091426a9a6eff85d32d298ec5149
71924aa5306cdf01fc22a31542a2e995add942ef
describe
'91976' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACINY' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
a9cdb1841960af399b444191982d9532
357e7d6018481273c181986e44908d81944a86e9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39702' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACINZ' 'sip-files00132.pro'
dfa8078d50179f99d9e517e02855a7ed
134730ee9015ef3848cb0187c862fea16e624124
describe
'98073' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIOA' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
2a6874b4cb194fda1d961cf2fd1c885e
0f7c798d70f8915fad8eff90eb22e939ab8ea054
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37088' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIOB' 'sip-files00133.pro'
2a6628fb2752373f382dd1d51f14c913
8d5a12fc8fa31a5f43c750e14ec323d239df6801
describe
'93859' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIOC' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
d5201f4c509fdbf88cfdfd7f5685a306
5cd2647a1df70386dce5a5b67d515a194a770b1c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'40642' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIOD' 'sip-files00134.pro'
decddf2a055b8aa7352e36f68993915a
bae90753b6894fbcece2528b1ab112276a794556
describe
'100615' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIOE' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
df61c221d30d3185bf85d110f06f4605
bca50d6f61bd5987dbccc3c7595671e1bd344d2a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38859' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIOF' 'sip-files00135.pro'
51d3a31c4f93d3b183240f4f987ebf0c
883bedc900672b3aff01b1413cf0caf6aa443dcc
describe
'97579' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIOG' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
643d6255d582c5ce8dc6fc07aeab9263
458a580f95decc9330ed5c85f140f28f071e223a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39427' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIOH' 'sip-files00136.pro'
22614b35fad6fcab98298d804fa8d8b4
046f4ad7c93c87a50a4fe9d798238a035144e89c
describe
'99339' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIOI' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
79fbad59360e6d02e09fee7ca8f6b714
e6922c6f510b18e0a3d2f23ba6b8ba1ca589e12f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37906' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIOJ' 'sip-files00137.pro'
cd2c27ae7c9ffee181e3e888de0682aa
bdc72c1bc2c8286b8a301a44a92c837bc523ac95
describe
'83603' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIOK' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
dfc84ae26b6d302e47b2e70b202a7dfb
74b124f54555b10c06ebeceee1f763f82602572d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'45956' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIOL' 'sip-files00138.pro'
f756140744591564bfd20e47f48e64a4
a086c6b43715fc20be4738ec9e245fbc2aea4864
describe
'87763' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIOM' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
96171a6d0df5891a8e0e7059036f13ca
8741f9386fc0f60611062c538f913aa98e7939d7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'74021' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACION' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
21958b979ea1039d843b6fffc4f7412a
6a4e06821ee2e14125cfbec3561cd4aa1f1b53b3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'76676' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIOO' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
6af0c375550495de91260eb8ee316a17
0e1be8a7f1d045a1e6de912a5a064300ab3b138c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'910' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIOP' 'sip-files00141.pro'
31d70a15aabd3cf0ae647de0be22b3cc
0cb37e21ce612ae3f7302446794a341fadef293b
describe
'39599' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIOQ' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
28bb60499d07f87195bd86229f3bcbde
3756c577184a7a4a5c76c5c0d493b97852660838
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'24' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIOR' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
0ea27fad9d36e14fca7eb62cbf8ed066
a70c01a201533922909a471c0075b72565a2c3b0
describe
'191805' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIOS' 'sip-filesUF00066168_00001.mets'
f4c7c352cd9df5a67f91374d75ac5caa
33db27d66384617521fd8d7b572f87b9e31e3485
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-18T14:34:43-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'40248' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABIYfileF20080507_AACIOU' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
346b0cc53a74cdb1d26ea4a2c9fee571
959e0de3b8259bbd28c10df8015e95bd8cb36e7a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 195Value offset not word-aligned: 143
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned