Citation
Old Mother Goose's rhymes & tales

Material Information

Title:
Old Mother Goose's rhymes & tales
Uniform Title:
Mother Goose
Portion of title:
Old Mother Goose's rhymes and tales
Creator:
Haslewood, Constance ( Illustrator )
Frederick Warne and Co ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
Frederick Warne & Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
47, [1] p. : col. ill. ; 24 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry ( lcsh )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes -- 1889 ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry -- 1889 ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1889
Genre:
Nursery rhymes ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
poetry ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
Holland
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Baldwin Library copy lacks p. 11-12.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
illustrated by Constance Haslewood.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026644911 ( ALEPH )
ALG4652 ( NOTIS )
70870151 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


kk Warne & C°

ed in Holland.





‘ae
3
aig?
oe

Frese











The Baldwin Library

University
mB vs
Florida










OLD MOTHER GOOSE AND HER SON JACK.







CoNnsTANCE HASLEWOO

N Ev York

Faxes DERICK WARNE
1889.

Printed. in Holland.







OLD MOTHER GOOSE.



Old Mother Goose, when
She wanted to -wander,
Would ride through the air
On avery fine gander.

Mother Goose had a house,
| "Twas built in a wood,
a : Where an owl at the door
For sentinel stood.

Tihis*is herxson, Jack
~ A plain-looking Lad;
ess not Mery goog,

Nor yet very bad.





OLD MOTHER GOOSE.

She sent him to market,

A live goose he bought,
-“Here, mother,” says he,
“lt will not go for nought.”

Jack’s goose and her gander
Grew very fond;

They’d both eat together,
Or swim in one pond.

Jack found one fine morning,
As | have been told,
His goose had laid him
An ess of pure gold.

Jack ran to his mother,
The news for to tell;
She called him a good boy,
And said it was well.

Jack sold his gold eg¢,
To a rogue of a 538
Who cheated him out of
The half of his due.





| jae





os

OLD MOTHER GOOS E :

Then Jack went a courting
A lady so gay,
As fair as the lily,

And sweet as the May.

The Jew and the Squire

Came behind his back,
And began to belabour
The sides of poor Jack.

And then the gold egs
Was thrown into the sea,
When Jack jumped in,

And got it back presently.

The Jew got the goose,
Which he vowed he would kill,
Resolving at once
His pockets to fill.

Jack's mother came in,
And caught the Boose soon,

And mounting its back,

Flew up to the moon.





MISTER FOX,O!

A fox went out in a hungny plight,
And o begsedof th



and their res
of Mister Fs

a
7

€





MISTER FOX,0O!

He tookthe grey goose by. the sleeve
. Says he“Madam Goose

LL take you

And car
He seized ti
“ And swung her a
The black duck cried out

Quack! q:
With her lege ue congas doy











MiS TER Ox, ©

d fat duck,
mn, O11”





PLE Pee BOY BLUE.

Little boy-blue come blow up your horn,’
The sheep's in the meadow, the cows in the corn,
is Where's the little boy that looks after the sheep ?
He 1s under the hay-cock fast asleep. }}







Soret ees





See ip seiouuney etn Na aa 3 . Fe fi i





Pages

11-12
Missing

From
Original



ONE, TWO, BUCKLE MY SHOE,





One, two, buckle my shoe ; A
.Three, four, kneck at the door; (av
Five, six, pick up sticks;
Seven, eight, lay them straight;
Nine, ten,a good fat hen;
Eleven, twelve, who will delve:

Fifteen, sixteen, maids a-kissing ;
Seventeen, eighteen, maids“a waiting;
Nineteen, twenty, Sive me plenty.



13



MULTIPLICATION IS VEXATION.



Multiplication is vexation,
Diviston its as bad;

The Rule of three doth puzzle me,
And Practice drivés me mad,

14



A TEN O’ CLOCK SCHOLAR.

A diller, a dollar, 6 ten o’clock scholar,
What makes you come so soon

You used to come at ten o'clock.
But now you come at noon.



2



THE FROG WHO WOULD A-WOOING GO.
ee



A Frog he would a-wooing go
Whether his mother would let him or no,

So off he set with his opera hat,

And on the road he met with a rat.





THE FROG WHO WOULD A-WOOING GO.



“Pray .M° Rat, will you come with me
Kind M* Mousey For to see?”

When they came to the door of Mouseys hall,
Th gave a loud knock,and they gave a loud call.





THE FROG WHO WOULD A-WOOING GO.



“Pray, M"° Mouse, are you within 2?”
Oh,-yes, kind sips,|m sitting to spin.”

“Pray, M! Frog, will you ive us a song ms
“Buf let it be something thats not very long.’



1s



THE FROG WHO WOULD A-WOOING GO.



CO: : 3? ea

“Since you have caught cold, MS Frog Mousey said,

e ei a 5 | B Bee 2
mee SiNg you a song that | nave just made.

Butwhile they were alla mepry-making,
A cat and her kittens came tumbling tn

——





THE FROG WHO WOULD A-WOOING GO.



The cat she seized the rat by the crown;
The kittens they pulled the Little mouse down.

This put MP Frog in a terrible Fright;
He took up his hat and wished them good night





THE FROG WHO WOULD A-WOOING GO.



But as Froggy was crossing over a broo

A lily -white duck came and gobbled him up.

?

So there was an end of one, two, three,

The Rat, the Mouse,and the little Frog-gee.





if
I HAD A LITTLE HUSBAND. z!

| had a little husband,no bigger than my thumb;
| put him-in a pint pot,and there | bid him drum,
| bousht a little horse,that galloped up and down;

i bridled him,and saddled him, and sent him out of town.

| save him eee ae to garter up his hose;
Anda Little hanc kerch to wipe his l tle nose.









eee



LAD. Ajtai Ey bp Olek

[had alittle doll, the prettiest ever seen,
She washed the dishes, she kept the house clean:
She went to the mill to fetch me some Flour,

She brought ithome in less than an hour;

She baked me my bread, she brewed me my ale,
She sat by the Fire and told many a Fine tale.





THE LITTLE BOY AND GIRL.

There was a little boy and a little girl
Lived in an alley;
Says the little boy to the little girl,
“Shall l, oh!shall 1?”

z,



Says the little girl to the little boy,
“What shall we do?”

Says the little boy to the little girl.
“IT will kiss you.”



THE SQUIRREL.

The winds they did blow,
The leaves oe did was,

Along came a beggar boy, ae
nd put me t
He took me up to London,

A did®





Put meina silver cage,
And hung me up on high.
With apples by the Fire,

And nuts For to crack,
Besides a little Peather bed

To rest my little back.

to
or



THE FAT MAN OF BOMBAY.







There was fat mon OF Bortibaly

= : Who was. ve acne
ed a snipe

Flew away with his pipe

Which vexed the Fat man of Bombay.

e sunshiny day




26



_THE OLD MAN OF THE NILE.

There was anold man of the Nile,

——

i Who had a benevolent smile.

When they said

“Smue again”
He replied
“lm not vain”

Bukl think f know

how to smile.”











LITTLE JESSIE.



Jessie is both young and fair,

Dewy eyes and sunny hair;
Say hair and dewy eyes,

Are not where her beauty lies,

Jessie is both Pond and true

Heart of gold,and will of yew,
Will of yew, and heart oF gold,

Still her charms are scarcely told.
IF she yet remain unsun

Pretty, caestane docile, young,
What remains not here compiled

Jessie is alittle child.

28.



LITTLE JOHNNY.



Johnny shall have a new bonnet,

And Johnny shall do tothe Fair,
And Johnny shall havea blue ribbon

To tie up his bonny brown hair.

And why may | not love Johnny?

And why may not Johnny love me ?
And why may | not love Johnny,

As well as any body ?

And here’s a leg for a stocking
And here is a leg for a shoe

And he has a kiss For his daddy

And two For his mammy, | trow.

2S



MY LITTLE OLD MAN.



My Little old man
and | fell out,
UL tell you what

twas all about.

| had money,and
he had none,
And thats the way
the noise begun.

50



THE OLD WOMAN OF LEEDS.



There was an old woman
of Leeds,

Who spent all her time in
_good deeds;

She worked for the poor
Till her Fingers were sore
This pious old woman of Leeds.

31.

VS



LITTLE FRED.



When little Fred went to bed,
He always said his prayers;

He kissed Papa,and then Mamma,

And straightway went up stairs.

32



GREGORY GRIGGS

Gregory Griggs, Gregory Griges,

Had twenty-seven diPFerent widss,

He wore them up,and he wore them down,
To please|the people of Boston town,

hem east, and he wore them west,

r could tell which he liked best. .



|
lg
\
:

353



BESSY BELL AND MARY GRAY.

Bessy Bell and Mary Gray.
They were two bonny lassies;
They builta house upon the lea,
And covered itwith rashes.

kept the garden gate.

And Mary kept the pantry;

Bessy vays had to wait,
nile Mary lived in plenty.

Bessy




34.



MY LITTLE-HIGHLANDER.









This merry fittle Highland
Running down the hill

Fleetly as -a deer runs

Never can keep still






happy littl
The whole summer day.
He loves in bright sunshine.

To dance, Jump, and play.

35



HEY DIDDLE, DIDDLE



56



LIP tLe JULIA AP- JONES;

Little Julia Ap-Jones stood on the cold stones,
ibbling a morsel of cheese,
sh ra








37.



DHE BUS eso E

Abus proee
Rid” 0) fdear me,
ere shall | Find good ho
over sweet
Rte a treat
en dopteat

per say
e to



38



SISSY, SISSY, COME AND DRINK.

“a

Sissy, Sissy,come and drink
~ OP this water Fresh and clear. fi
am standing on the brink. Y
a lake that! ve Pound here. :
Init! can see the Sky ee fh
Blue as it looks up om high | y
We can bathe,drink or play —
As In this water every day:














| can see birds in it,toa.
Yellow birds like me and you#
How did they get there | wang

For the water they are undef
b 5 i

39.






Ten Little NiggerBoys went out to dine
One, choked his little selP, and then there were Nine.
z “Ae ps,



Nine Little Nigger Boys sat up very late
One overslept himself, and then there were Eight.

40





TEN LITTLE ONIGGERS .




Eight Little Nigger Boys trave in Devon;

One said hed stay there, and then there were Seven

Seven Little Nigger Boys chopping up Sticks
One chopped himself in halves, and then there were Six.

ele





TEN LITTLE NIGGERS.




Six Little Nigger Boys playing with aHtve;
A Bumble-Bee stung one, and then there were
Five.

Five Little Nigger Boys going in Por Law;
One got in Chancery, and then there were Four.

Aa.



TEN LITTLE NIGGERS.







YY Roing © tto sea;
A Red Herring swallowed one, and then there
were Three.

Three Little Nigger Boys walkiag inthe Zoo
The big Bear hugged one, and then there were Two.

43



TEN LITTLE NIGGERS.




Two Little Nigger Boys sitting in the Sun;
One got Frizzled,up, and then there was One.




One Little Nigger oy ivind all alone
‘He got marpied,and then there were None.

44.

)





THERE WAS A LITTLE MAN.

There was alittle man,

And he had a littie_gun,
And his bullets were made of lead lead lead:
He went to the brook

And saw a little’ duck,

And he shot tt right through the head,
head, head.

He carried it home
To his old wife Joan,
And bid her a Fire for to make, make, make,
To roast the little duck
He had shot in the brook
And hed go and fetch here,
the drake = ez
See drake, drak

: eg






Be te




45.

ti,



LITTLE FOUR YEARS OLD.

At dawnind of the mornin
Sweet eee ees,
And From his drowsy eyelids
The downy slumber shakes.
His soft hair all a-tumbl
About his pretty head,
Trying to put his shoes o
He sits up in his |















: ek
i aero Bike
ike ressed he has his breakfast:
y And then runs of f to play.
le means to be a gardner
d the says) to-day.
oon he tires of digging.
ows down his little spade,
d.says"lm not a dardner
mean to have a trade



LITTLE FOUR YEARS OLD.







And now lam a carpenter
| harmmepr in big nats;
Out of this box I’m making
A row of garden pales,

But soon his Fancy changes:
a}
The hay-makers are near;
And as a little driver
Will Four years-old appear









And proudly now hle marches
_ Holding his whip.you see!
A sweeter little plough boy
Than this, there cannot be.

Thus till the ev ‘ning shadow
Close oer the busy day
He mimies many lab

In ever cha NB ng

47





LITTLE FOUR YEARS OLD.

Then weary,finds a cushion |
And resting on his knees,
Cries coaxingly, “Dear Mother

Tell me a story, please









The tale is told: his eyelids c

Will scarcely open keep, —
And mother lays her darling
In his small bed to sleep. ©



He Lifts his arms up to her
And murmurs,
“Good night, dear,
les only Little Freddie
Your own boy,

now thats here”’

THE END.











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-! 4 oe on j

4 : \ te \
A S |

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‘ Dg | | .
Ri \ alt . i :

‘ ‘ \ oe ee a

" ' . a a y
ia ;
Ye 5
i *
:
‘ ,
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, a
at >
os
‘ \
POL, : af

‘ ‘i “t 4 m oF “ : Mother vase had : ‘id a,

“Twas: lbuilt %







a









‘
\ s ‘
ee AS i = t ; r eh
Se Ree Pe doors) \ 5 Oa
» = For Sentinel’ stood. ‘ ne
I .
#

~*
x





Full Text




kk Warne & C°

ed in Holland.





‘ae
3
aig?
oe

Frese








The Baldwin Library

University
mB vs
Florida




OLD MOTHER GOOSE AND HER SON JACK.




CoNnsTANCE HASLEWOO

N Ev York

Faxes DERICK WARNE
1889.

Printed. in Holland.




OLD MOTHER GOOSE.



Old Mother Goose, when
She wanted to -wander,
Would ride through the air
On avery fine gander.

Mother Goose had a house,
| "Twas built in a wood,
a : Where an owl at the door
For sentinel stood.

Tihis*is herxson, Jack
~ A plain-looking Lad;
ess not Mery goog,

Nor yet very bad.


OLD MOTHER GOOSE.

She sent him to market,

A live goose he bought,
-“Here, mother,” says he,
“lt will not go for nought.”

Jack’s goose and her gander
Grew very fond;

They’d both eat together,
Or swim in one pond.

Jack found one fine morning,
As | have been told,
His goose had laid him
An ess of pure gold.

Jack ran to his mother,
The news for to tell;
She called him a good boy,
And said it was well.

Jack sold his gold eg¢,
To a rogue of a 538
Who cheated him out of
The half of his due.


| jae





os

OLD MOTHER GOOS E :

Then Jack went a courting
A lady so gay,
As fair as the lily,

And sweet as the May.

The Jew and the Squire

Came behind his back,
And began to belabour
The sides of poor Jack.

And then the gold egs
Was thrown into the sea,
When Jack jumped in,

And got it back presently.

The Jew got the goose,
Which he vowed he would kill,
Resolving at once
His pockets to fill.

Jack's mother came in,
And caught the Boose soon,

And mounting its back,

Flew up to the moon.


MISTER FOX,O!

A fox went out in a hungny plight,
And o begsedof th



and their res
of Mister Fs

a
7

€


MISTER FOX,0O!

He tookthe grey goose by. the sleeve
. Says he“Madam Goose

LL take you

And car
He seized ti
“ And swung her a
The black duck cried out

Quack! q:
With her lege ue congas doy








MiS TER Ox, ©

d fat duck,
mn, O11”


PLE Pee BOY BLUE.

Little boy-blue come blow up your horn,’
The sheep's in the meadow, the cows in the corn,
is Where's the little boy that looks after the sheep ?
He 1s under the hay-cock fast asleep. }}







Soret ees





See ip seiouuney etn Na aa 3 . Fe fi i


Pages

11-12
Missing

From
Original
ONE, TWO, BUCKLE MY SHOE,





One, two, buckle my shoe ; A
.Three, four, kneck at the door; (av
Five, six, pick up sticks;
Seven, eight, lay them straight;
Nine, ten,a good fat hen;
Eleven, twelve, who will delve:

Fifteen, sixteen, maids a-kissing ;
Seventeen, eighteen, maids“a waiting;
Nineteen, twenty, Sive me plenty.



13
MULTIPLICATION IS VEXATION.



Multiplication is vexation,
Diviston its as bad;

The Rule of three doth puzzle me,
And Practice drivés me mad,

14
A TEN O’ CLOCK SCHOLAR.

A diller, a dollar, 6 ten o’clock scholar,
What makes you come so soon

You used to come at ten o'clock.
But now you come at noon.



2
THE FROG WHO WOULD A-WOOING GO.
ee



A Frog he would a-wooing go
Whether his mother would let him or no,

So off he set with his opera hat,

And on the road he met with a rat.


THE FROG WHO WOULD A-WOOING GO.



“Pray .M° Rat, will you come with me
Kind M* Mousey For to see?”

When they came to the door of Mouseys hall,
Th gave a loud knock,and they gave a loud call.


THE FROG WHO WOULD A-WOOING GO.



“Pray, M"° Mouse, are you within 2?”
Oh,-yes, kind sips,|m sitting to spin.”

“Pray, M! Frog, will you ive us a song ms
“Buf let it be something thats not very long.’



1s
THE FROG WHO WOULD A-WOOING GO.



CO: : 3? ea

“Since you have caught cold, MS Frog Mousey said,

e ei a 5 | B Bee 2
mee SiNg you a song that | nave just made.

Butwhile they were alla mepry-making,
A cat and her kittens came tumbling tn

——


THE FROG WHO WOULD A-WOOING GO.



The cat she seized the rat by the crown;
The kittens they pulled the Little mouse down.

This put MP Frog in a terrible Fright;
He took up his hat and wished them good night


THE FROG WHO WOULD A-WOOING GO.



But as Froggy was crossing over a broo

A lily -white duck came and gobbled him up.

?

So there was an end of one, two, three,

The Rat, the Mouse,and the little Frog-gee.


if
I HAD A LITTLE HUSBAND. z!

| had a little husband,no bigger than my thumb;
| put him-in a pint pot,and there | bid him drum,
| bousht a little horse,that galloped up and down;

i bridled him,and saddled him, and sent him out of town.

| save him eee ae to garter up his hose;
Anda Little hanc kerch to wipe his l tle nose.









eee
LAD. Ajtai Ey bp Olek

[had alittle doll, the prettiest ever seen,
She washed the dishes, she kept the house clean:
She went to the mill to fetch me some Flour,

She brought ithome in less than an hour;

She baked me my bread, she brewed me my ale,
She sat by the Fire and told many a Fine tale.


THE LITTLE BOY AND GIRL.

There was a little boy and a little girl
Lived in an alley;
Says the little boy to the little girl,
“Shall l, oh!shall 1?”

z,



Says the little girl to the little boy,
“What shall we do?”

Says the little boy to the little girl.
“IT will kiss you.”
THE SQUIRREL.

The winds they did blow,
The leaves oe did was,

Along came a beggar boy, ae
nd put me t
He took me up to London,

A did®





Put meina silver cage,
And hung me up on high.
With apples by the Fire,

And nuts For to crack,
Besides a little Peather bed

To rest my little back.

to
or
THE FAT MAN OF BOMBAY.







There was fat mon OF Bortibaly

= : Who was. ve acne
ed a snipe

Flew away with his pipe

Which vexed the Fat man of Bombay.

e sunshiny day




26
_THE OLD MAN OF THE NILE.

There was anold man of the Nile,

——

i Who had a benevolent smile.

When they said

“Smue again”
He replied
“lm not vain”

Bukl think f know

how to smile.”








LITTLE JESSIE.



Jessie is both young and fair,

Dewy eyes and sunny hair;
Say hair and dewy eyes,

Are not where her beauty lies,

Jessie is both Pond and true

Heart of gold,and will of yew,
Will of yew, and heart oF gold,

Still her charms are scarcely told.
IF she yet remain unsun

Pretty, caestane docile, young,
What remains not here compiled

Jessie is alittle child.

28.
LITTLE JOHNNY.



Johnny shall have a new bonnet,

And Johnny shall do tothe Fair,
And Johnny shall havea blue ribbon

To tie up his bonny brown hair.

And why may | not love Johnny?

And why may not Johnny love me ?
And why may | not love Johnny,

As well as any body ?

And here’s a leg for a stocking
And here is a leg for a shoe

And he has a kiss For his daddy

And two For his mammy, | trow.

2S
MY LITTLE OLD MAN.



My Little old man
and | fell out,
UL tell you what

twas all about.

| had money,and
he had none,
And thats the way
the noise begun.

50
THE OLD WOMAN OF LEEDS.



There was an old woman
of Leeds,

Who spent all her time in
_good deeds;

She worked for the poor
Till her Fingers were sore
This pious old woman of Leeds.

31.

VS
LITTLE FRED.



When little Fred went to bed,
He always said his prayers;

He kissed Papa,and then Mamma,

And straightway went up stairs.

32
GREGORY GRIGGS

Gregory Griggs, Gregory Griges,

Had twenty-seven diPFerent widss,

He wore them up,and he wore them down,
To please|the people of Boston town,

hem east, and he wore them west,

r could tell which he liked best. .



|
lg
\
:

353
BESSY BELL AND MARY GRAY.

Bessy Bell and Mary Gray.
They were two bonny lassies;
They builta house upon the lea,
And covered itwith rashes.

kept the garden gate.

And Mary kept the pantry;

Bessy vays had to wait,
nile Mary lived in plenty.

Bessy




34.
MY LITTLE-HIGHLANDER.









This merry fittle Highland
Running down the hill

Fleetly as -a deer runs

Never can keep still






happy littl
The whole summer day.
He loves in bright sunshine.

To dance, Jump, and play.

35
HEY DIDDLE, DIDDLE



56
LIP tLe JULIA AP- JONES;

Little Julia Ap-Jones stood on the cold stones,
ibbling a morsel of cheese,
sh ra








37.
DHE BUS eso E

Abus proee
Rid” 0) fdear me,
ere shall | Find good ho
over sweet
Rte a treat
en dopteat

per say
e to



38
SISSY, SISSY, COME AND DRINK.

“a

Sissy, Sissy,come and drink
~ OP this water Fresh and clear. fi
am standing on the brink. Y
a lake that! ve Pound here. :
Init! can see the Sky ee fh
Blue as it looks up om high | y
We can bathe,drink or play —
As In this water every day:














| can see birds in it,toa.
Yellow birds like me and you#
How did they get there | wang

For the water they are undef
b 5 i

39.



Ten Little NiggerBoys went out to dine
One, choked his little selP, and then there were Nine.
z “Ae ps,



Nine Little Nigger Boys sat up very late
One overslept himself, and then there were Eight.

40


TEN LITTLE ONIGGERS .




Eight Little Nigger Boys trave in Devon;

One said hed stay there, and then there were Seven

Seven Little Nigger Boys chopping up Sticks
One chopped himself in halves, and then there were Six.

ele


TEN LITTLE NIGGERS.




Six Little Nigger Boys playing with aHtve;
A Bumble-Bee stung one, and then there were
Five.

Five Little Nigger Boys going in Por Law;
One got in Chancery, and then there were Four.

Aa.
TEN LITTLE NIGGERS.







YY Roing © tto sea;
A Red Herring swallowed one, and then there
were Three.

Three Little Nigger Boys walkiag inthe Zoo
The big Bear hugged one, and then there were Two.

43
TEN LITTLE NIGGERS.




Two Little Nigger Boys sitting in the Sun;
One got Frizzled,up, and then there was One.




One Little Nigger oy ivind all alone
‘He got marpied,and then there were None.

44.

)


THERE WAS A LITTLE MAN.

There was alittle man,

And he had a littie_gun,
And his bullets were made of lead lead lead:
He went to the brook

And saw a little’ duck,

And he shot tt right through the head,
head, head.

He carried it home
To his old wife Joan,
And bid her a Fire for to make, make, make,
To roast the little duck
He had shot in the brook
And hed go and fetch here,
the drake = ez
See drake, drak

: eg






Be te




45.

ti,
LITTLE FOUR YEARS OLD.

At dawnind of the mornin
Sweet eee ees,
And From his drowsy eyelids
The downy slumber shakes.
His soft hair all a-tumbl
About his pretty head,
Trying to put his shoes o
He sits up in his |















: ek
i aero Bike
ike ressed he has his breakfast:
y And then runs of f to play.
le means to be a gardner
d the says) to-day.
oon he tires of digging.
ows down his little spade,
d.says"lm not a dardner
mean to have a trade
LITTLE FOUR YEARS OLD.







And now lam a carpenter
| harmmepr in big nats;
Out of this box I’m making
A row of garden pales,

But soon his Fancy changes:
a}
The hay-makers are near;
And as a little driver
Will Four years-old appear









And proudly now hle marches
_ Holding his whip.you see!
A sweeter little plough boy
Than this, there cannot be.

Thus till the ev ‘ning shadow
Close oer the busy day
He mimies many lab

In ever cha NB ng

47


LITTLE FOUR YEARS OLD.

Then weary,finds a cushion |
And resting on his knees,
Cries coaxingly, “Dear Mother

Tell me a story, please









The tale is told: his eyelids c

Will scarcely open keep, —
And mother lays her darling
In his small bed to sleep. ©



He Lifts his arms up to her
And murmurs,
“Good night, dear,
les only Little Freddie
Your own boy,

now thats here”’

THE END.





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