Citation
Cinderella and the little glass slipper

Material Information

Title:
Cinderella and the little glass slipper
Uniform Title:
Cinderella
Cinderella
Creator:
White & Allen ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New York ;
London
Publisher:
White and Allen
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : ill. (some col.) ; 27 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Love -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Kindness -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Stepmothers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Cruelty -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Pride and vanity -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Fairies -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Fairy tales -- 1889 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1889
Genre:
Fairy tales ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026615089 ( ALEPH )
ALG3382 ( NOTIS )
04554903 ( OCLC )

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text








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New York and London.
WHITE and ALLEN.



3
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© yric AL, 8
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mberi

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AT home poor Cinderella was
made very miserable by her
envious step-sisters, who at last
persuaded their mother to send

her down to the kitchen.
“The stupid thing ought
not to sit in the parlour
with us,” they said. ‘ Those
who eat ought to work. Send
her down into the kitchen to

the kitchen-maids.”

They even took away from
her the clothes that had been
given her by her mother, and,
in their place, she was made

to wear an ugly old frock and



a pair of big, clumsy shoes.
‘“‘ Look at our fine princess now,” cried her
step-sisters, as they drove her down into the kitchen. “ See how she is dressed!”

The more agreeable Cinderella was the more ill-natured her step-mother became, and the

’
worse the little girl’s step-sisters treated her, so that it seemed as if nothing she could do
would ever please them. While she was down in the kitchen her step-sisters went into society,
and used to spend most of their time in buying dresses and pretty toys. Cinderella was hardly
allowed to look at their fine things, and, if she put out her hand to touch them, the sisters
would at once cry out—

“Take your hands away. You will soil the things with your dirty fingers.”

Poor little girl! She was often made very sad by her step-mother’s harsh treatment ; and as
she used to eat her meals sorrowfully by herself, she would think of her dear mother who had

died, and remember how kind and good she had been to her.











[N the morning she had to rise early to draw water,
to light the fires, to cook, and to wash, and
during the day she had to remain in the
dark, dingy kitchen, with the maids for
her only companions. Her cruel step-
mother treated the servants with
greater kindness than she _ did
Cinderella, who was set to do the
worst of the work, such as washing
the dishes, scrubbing stairs, and
polishing the floors in the different
rooms of the house. At night,
when her step-sisters retired to
their fine bedrooms, which were
beautifully furnished, and had large
mirrors on the walls, so that the sisters could

had to sleep in a wretched garret with bare walls, on a





feather beds of her step-sisters. There she wouid often lie awake



noises made by the rats and mice as they ran about the
another in their play, and sometimes, when the ni

+ snot ie) }
hte was stormy, the wind would howl so

dismally in the chimney and around the window that Cinderella had to put her hands to her



ie
Cae
or
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<<
o
oO
c
uu
ot
°

ears to stop out the dreadful din. During the day her step-sisters did al

her miserable, pushing her away when they met her, and speaking rudely to her. However,

Cinderella bore everything with patience, for she did not like to complain to her father, who

oved 7 nif * V0} Ale, eet eee vHICt ; + ac mt toh
loved his wife so much that he hardly thought she could do anything that was not right.









TELE ASRROI







“My
Ni ceiirsanean



eames

eee, eT

ce





PR res i














Now the King of the
country decided to

give a grand ball, which was to
last for three nights, and to which
all the beautiful young ladies in the land
should be invited, so that the young
prince might choose a wife. When the
step-sisters heard the news they were
delighted, and they at once ran off for
Cinderella.

“Cinderella,” they cried, ‘‘come here
at once, and dress our hair, and trim our ~
shoes with gold buckles. We are going

to a ball at the King’s palace.”

treatment of her; but she was too good-natured to do such a thing, and so she took
the greatest care, and did their hair so well that they looked prettier than they had ever done
before. After she had performed this task, she went to her step-mother and begged her to let
her go with her sisters to the ball; for she was fond of dancing, and had never been to a
party before.

“ How could you go toa ball?” cried the step-mother. “See how dirty you are, covered all
over with ashes! Besides, you have no dress nor drawing-room shoes.”

4
Cinderella, however, still begged to be allowed to go, and at length her step-mother said —

back to the kitchen. I have just thrown a dish of peas among the ashes.



Chere, you may 2

’ oO

if you can pick them all out and bring them to me in two hours, I will let you go.”



~—*
+r we
ve
<4 tee

we

CCINDE “RELLA ran off into

garden, and when she



You birds of the sky :
ned

For I know I can’t do it

In time, though I try.

In a minute or so two



doves flew into the kitchen through the

igh
window, and they were soon followed by i
\ -
several other birds, who, ittering and nodding

their heads at ec set to work to pick peas out of the ashes



q

However, to be allowed to go





angry, and at last, oan two pans
Cinderella go if she picked up all the peas in two hours.

‘She can never do that i id the cruel woman to her



to call the birds



Away ran Cinderella into the

}

ickly, and as they worked hard, every pea was picked up



2

Cc)

*

Cinderella carried the peas to her step-mother.



“ Be off to your place in the kitchen,” she said, when she saw the peas, “<



You have no dress, you don’t know how to dance, and if you went to th









































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CINDERELLA went into the garden,
and looked about to find the
largest pumpkin that there was, and
at length she discovered one so large
that it was too big for her to carry,
so she rolled it along like a barrel
until she got it into the kitchen.
When the fairy saw it she scooped
out the inside of the pumpkin so as
to leave nothing but the rind. Then
she touched the shell with her wand,
and it at once became a beautiful golden

carriage. The next thing she did was to tell



Cinderella to go into the pantry for the



mouse-trap, in which she would find six

- oe little live mice. Cinderella went as she was



. bid, and found the trap there with six bright-eyed
little mice in it, as the fairy had said she would. Bringing
the trap to the fairy, she opened the door of it very gently,
so that only one mouse could come out at a time, and as each
| a mouse came forth the old woman touched it with her wand, and it became
at once a fine dapple-grey carriage horse, with a magnificent tail and mane tied up with light
blue ribbons.
“Now, my dear god-child,” said the fairy, ‘‘ you have here a coach and horses much finer
than those of your sisters, and handsomer than any that will be seen at the King’s palace.

Now we want a postillion and a coachman fit to drive such a beautiful carriage, so run to

the stable and bring me the rat-trap that is there.”







ELLA was full of





rats. The fairy took them out of

ap, and, touching them with her wand, one was




changed into a smart postillion and the other into a

y-looking, red-faced coachman, both in full livery.





go into the garden again
equipage. When you go out keep to

and by the wall you will fi







ed QO soon came back again

: _ - ieee her rAXtIc a Ba LS

in her apron. Another wave of the s

} 4 Be ae a aA

Wa ae © >, VINGerelia Saw in





fairy, “is not this as fine a carriage as you could wish

























CINDERELLA'S catriage excited great notice at the palace gate,
and the King’s servants, who had never seen anything to equal
it before, gathered round it wondering to whom it belonged.
The news of its arrival was at once borne to the King, and

the young prince came to hand Cinderella out of it and to

conduct her into the ball-room. As soon as_ she entered,
ali the people stopped their conversation, the musicians
forgot their music, and the dancers stood still, so astonished

were they by the beauty of the strange lady, and a

murmur went round the room—

“ How beautiful she is!”
Even the King, old as he was, whispered to the
Queen that the stranger was the most beautiful
woman he had ever seen, only excepting the
Queen herself, and the ladies noted the
stranger’s magnificent dress, and wondered
whether they could get others like it for the
next night’s ball. The prince, having con-
ducted Cinderella to a seat, requested the pleasure
of her hand for the next dance. When the time came, he
was delighted to discover that Cinderella was the best dancer in the room, and so pleased was
he, that, at the supper wich followed, he could not eat a morsel, not being able to turn his
eyes away from her. Meanwhile, Cinderella’s step-sisters sat beside her at the table, not
knowing her in her fine dress, and they were delighted to receive some of the sweets and

oranges that she had received from the prince.





JR EMEMBERING what the fairy

had told her, Cinderella, when
the clock struck a quarter to
twelve, made a low courtesy to
the company and left the palace.
When she reached home she found
her god-mother still there, and,
having thanked her for the pleasure
she had had, asked her if she might
return to the ball the next night, as the prince had begged her to do. The
fairy said she might. Soon afterwards the step-sisters came home, and Cinderella
went ta the door, yawning and rubbing her eyes as though tired with sitting up
for them, and said—

“Dear me, how late you are!”

“If you had been to the ball you would not think it late,” replied the sisters. ‘“ There
was such a beautiful princess there, and she was so kind to us, and even gave us oranges
and sweets.”

Cinderella asked who the princess was, but the sisters replied that no one knew her name,
and that the prince had been asking every one about her. The next evening the sisters went
to the ball again, and Cinderella followed in her carriage, in a new dress that the fairy
provided, more beautiful even than the former one. The prince, who had been watching
for her arrival, was soon at her side, and he whispered so many nice things that she quite
forgot all about what her god-mother had said would happen at twelve o'clock. So they sat
together chatting until the clock began to strike twelve, when Cinderella started to her feet
and fled like a startled fawn from the room. In such a hurry was she that she left one of
the glass slippers behind her, which the prince, who picked it up, put away very carefully

amongst his treasures.















+2














!
|
|









=
if

1€a















WwW















oO





















Full Text










A

Py









> aR nate aR itor” mene TAL A RI ere iP

oe a ‘ Rt





be
. :
A
4 ;
: { Ke 2







” 4

A
New York and London.
WHITE and ALLEN.
3
g 1889
© yric AL, 8
; i PPe
&. oN
Bite
Ow





mberi

e

Rem

Ciills



&







AT home poor Cinderella was
made very miserable by her
envious step-sisters, who at last
persuaded their mother to send

her down to the kitchen.
“The stupid thing ought
not to sit in the parlour
with us,” they said. ‘ Those
who eat ought to work. Send
her down into the kitchen to

the kitchen-maids.”

They even took away from
her the clothes that had been
given her by her mother, and,
in their place, she was made

to wear an ugly old frock and



a pair of big, clumsy shoes.
‘“‘ Look at our fine princess now,” cried her
step-sisters, as they drove her down into the kitchen. “ See how she is dressed!”

The more agreeable Cinderella was the more ill-natured her step-mother became, and the

’
worse the little girl’s step-sisters treated her, so that it seemed as if nothing she could do
would ever please them. While she was down in the kitchen her step-sisters went into society,
and used to spend most of their time in buying dresses and pretty toys. Cinderella was hardly
allowed to look at their fine things, and, if she put out her hand to touch them, the sisters
would at once cry out—

“Take your hands away. You will soil the things with your dirty fingers.”

Poor little girl! She was often made very sad by her step-mother’s harsh treatment ; and as
she used to eat her meals sorrowfully by herself, she would think of her dear mother who had

died, and remember how kind and good she had been to her.








[N the morning she had to rise early to draw water,
to light the fires, to cook, and to wash, and
during the day she had to remain in the
dark, dingy kitchen, with the maids for
her only companions. Her cruel step-
mother treated the servants with
greater kindness than she _ did
Cinderella, who was set to do the
worst of the work, such as washing
the dishes, scrubbing stairs, and
polishing the floors in the different
rooms of the house. At night,
when her step-sisters retired to
their fine bedrooms, which were
beautifully furnished, and had large
mirrors on the walls, so that the sisters could

had to sleep in a wretched garret with bare walls, on a





feather beds of her step-sisters. There she wouid often lie awake



noises made by the rats and mice as they ran about the
another in their play, and sometimes, when the ni

+ snot ie) }
hte was stormy, the wind would howl so

dismally in the chimney and around the window that Cinderella had to put her hands to her



ie
Cae
or
oO

<<
o
oO
c
uu
ot
°

ears to stop out the dreadful din. During the day her step-sisters did al

her miserable, pushing her away when they met her, and speaking rudely to her. However,

Cinderella bore everything with patience, for she did not like to complain to her father, who

oved 7 nif * V0} Ale, eet eee vHICt ; + ac mt toh
loved his wife so much that he hardly thought she could do anything that was not right.



TELE ASRROI







“My
Ni ceiirsanean



eames

eee, eT

ce





PR res i











Now the King of the
country decided to

give a grand ball, which was to
last for three nights, and to which
all the beautiful young ladies in the land
should be invited, so that the young
prince might choose a wife. When the
step-sisters heard the news they were
delighted, and they at once ran off for
Cinderella.

“Cinderella,” they cried, ‘‘come here
at once, and dress our hair, and trim our ~
shoes with gold buckles. We are going

to a ball at the King’s palace.”

treatment of her; but she was too good-natured to do such a thing, and so she took
the greatest care, and did their hair so well that they looked prettier than they had ever done
before. After she had performed this task, she went to her step-mother and begged her to let
her go with her sisters to the ball; for she was fond of dancing, and had never been to a
party before.

“ How could you go toa ball?” cried the step-mother. “See how dirty you are, covered all
over with ashes! Besides, you have no dress nor drawing-room shoes.”

4
Cinderella, however, still begged to be allowed to go, and at length her step-mother said —

back to the kitchen. I have just thrown a dish of peas among the ashes.



Chere, you may 2

’ oO

if you can pick them all out and bring them to me in two hours, I will let you go.”
~—*
+r we
ve
<4 tee

we

CCINDE “RELLA ran off into

garden, and when she



You birds of the sky :
ned

For I know I can’t do it

In time, though I try.

In a minute or so two



doves flew into the kitchen through the

igh
window, and they were soon followed by i
\ -
several other birds, who, ittering and nodding

their heads at ec set to work to pick peas out of the ashes



q

However, to be allowed to go





angry, and at last, oan two pans
Cinderella go if she picked up all the peas in two hours.

‘She can never do that i id the cruel woman to her



to call the birds



Away ran Cinderella into the

}

ickly, and as they worked hard, every pea was picked up



2

Cc)

*

Cinderella carried the peas to her step-mother.



“ Be off to your place in the kitchen,” she said, when she saw the peas, “<



You have no dress, you don’t know how to dance, and if you went to th
































n = :
+2) Q a
= 3 2 . =
” a
S oe On a =
D 3
2 F sted










































































CINDERELLA went into the garden,
and looked about to find the
largest pumpkin that there was, and
at length she discovered one so large
that it was too big for her to carry,
so she rolled it along like a barrel
until she got it into the kitchen.
When the fairy saw it she scooped
out the inside of the pumpkin so as
to leave nothing but the rind. Then
she touched the shell with her wand,
and it at once became a beautiful golden

carriage. The next thing she did was to tell



Cinderella to go into the pantry for the



mouse-trap, in which she would find six

- oe little live mice. Cinderella went as she was



. bid, and found the trap there with six bright-eyed
little mice in it, as the fairy had said she would. Bringing
the trap to the fairy, she opened the door of it very gently,
so that only one mouse could come out at a time, and as each
| a mouse came forth the old woman touched it with her wand, and it became
at once a fine dapple-grey carriage horse, with a magnificent tail and mane tied up with light
blue ribbons.
“Now, my dear god-child,” said the fairy, ‘‘ you have here a coach and horses much finer
than those of your sisters, and handsomer than any that will be seen at the King’s palace.

Now we want a postillion and a coachman fit to drive such a beautiful carriage, so run to

the stable and bring me the rat-trap that is there.”

ELLA was full of





rats. The fairy took them out of

ap, and, touching them with her wand, one was




changed into a smart postillion and the other into a

y-looking, red-faced coachman, both in full livery.





go into the garden again
equipage. When you go out keep to

and by the wall you will fi







ed QO soon came back again

: _ - ieee her rAXtIc a Ba LS

in her apron. Another wave of the s

} 4 Be ae a aA

Wa ae © >, VINGerelia Saw in





fairy, “is not this as fine a carriage as you could wish
















CINDERELLA'S catriage excited great notice at the palace gate,
and the King’s servants, who had never seen anything to equal
it before, gathered round it wondering to whom it belonged.
The news of its arrival was at once borne to the King, and

the young prince came to hand Cinderella out of it and to

conduct her into the ball-room. As soon as_ she entered,
ali the people stopped their conversation, the musicians
forgot their music, and the dancers stood still, so astonished

were they by the beauty of the strange lady, and a

murmur went round the room—

“ How beautiful she is!”
Even the King, old as he was, whispered to the
Queen that the stranger was the most beautiful
woman he had ever seen, only excepting the
Queen herself, and the ladies noted the
stranger’s magnificent dress, and wondered
whether they could get others like it for the
next night’s ball. The prince, having con-
ducted Cinderella to a seat, requested the pleasure
of her hand for the next dance. When the time came, he
was delighted to discover that Cinderella was the best dancer in the room, and so pleased was
he, that, at the supper wich followed, he could not eat a morsel, not being able to turn his
eyes away from her. Meanwhile, Cinderella’s step-sisters sat beside her at the table, not
knowing her in her fine dress, and they were delighted to receive some of the sweets and

oranges that she had received from the prince.


JR EMEMBERING what the fairy

had told her, Cinderella, when
the clock struck a quarter to
twelve, made a low courtesy to
the company and left the palace.
When she reached home she found
her god-mother still there, and,
having thanked her for the pleasure
she had had, asked her if she might
return to the ball the next night, as the prince had begged her to do. The
fairy said she might. Soon afterwards the step-sisters came home, and Cinderella
went ta the door, yawning and rubbing her eyes as though tired with sitting up
for them, and said—

“Dear me, how late you are!”

“If you had been to the ball you would not think it late,” replied the sisters. ‘“ There
was such a beautiful princess there, and she was so kind to us, and even gave us oranges
and sweets.”

Cinderella asked who the princess was, but the sisters replied that no one knew her name,
and that the prince had been asking every one about her. The next evening the sisters went
to the ball again, and Cinderella followed in her carriage, in a new dress that the fairy
provided, more beautiful even than the former one. The prince, who had been watching
for her arrival, was soon at her side, and he whispered so many nice things that she quite
forgot all about what her god-mother had said would happen at twelve o'clock. So they sat
together chatting until the clock began to strike twelve, when Cinderella started to her feet
and fled like a startled fawn from the room. In such a hurry was she that she left one of
the glass slippers behind her, which the prince, who picked it up, put away very carefully

amongst his treasures.









+2











!
|
|









=
if

1€a















WwW















oO