Citation
The history of Cinderella, or, The little glass slipper

Material Information

Title:
The history of Cinderella, or, The little glass slipper embellished with 14 engravings
Uniform Title:
Cinderella
Cover title:
Cinderella, or, The little glass slipper
Portion of title:
Little glass slipper
Creator:
Catnach, James, 1792-1841 ( Printer, Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Printed & published by J. Catnach
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
12 p. : ill. ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Publishers' paper bindings (Binding) -- 1840 ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1840 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1840
Genre:
fairy tales ( aat )
Publishers' paper bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Fairy tales ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date from printed wrapper.
General Note:
Publisher's advertisement on p. [4] of wrapper.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
027262011 ( ALEPH )
50916274 ( OCLC )
ALK2325 ( NOTIS )

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Full Text




- CINDERELI

‘SLIP




Embellished with





Nee 41.—~1840,

en Engravings.



PER.









The Baldwin Library







THE

?

OR
LITTLE GLASS

vw



LONDON
Printed and Published by

J. CATNACH,

Dials.

Monmouth-Court, Seven

& 8,

o
~~)







CINDERELLA.

_ Ata short distance from a great city, there lived, many
ages since, a gentleman of fortune, and his wife, an
amiable and beautiful young lady, whom he had married.
As they were fondly attached to each other, they enjoyed
the greatest happiness, and the birth of a daughter increased,
if possible, their felicity; but, unfortunately for the child,
the mother died before she had reared up her offspring, and

left her husband a prey to sorrow.

When the gentlemen’s grief was a little abated, he so felt
the want of a wife, that he resolved to look for some prudent
lady, who might be a mother to his child, and a companion
to himself. Unfortunately, his second choice fell on a widow
lady, of a, proud and tyrannical disposition, who had two
daughters by a former marriage, hoth equally haughty and
_ bad tempered as their mother. a

This woman had the cunning to conceal her bad qualities |
so well, that the gentleman thought she was very amiable ;
but the marriage was scarcely over, when she appeared in
her real character. She paid no attention to her husband,

quarrelled with the servants. and treated his sweet little oirl
with great harshness. The gentleman, who loved his daughter |
dearly, remonstrated against the cruelty of her behaviour ; m
but it only made her worse: and unable to resist her violence,
he fell into low spirits, which brought bim to a Dice hay
grave.

After the death of her father, the young orphan found the —
hardships of her situation soon greatly increased. If she .
chanced to.come into any of the rooms where her step-mother i,
or her daughters were, she was sure of being scolded, be :
they were vexed that she looked prettier than them.

_ even went so far as to make her assist the servants im putting .
-saucepans on the fire, washing the pots, and in cleaning ent
the rooms, which were all newly furnished in the first style. of



elegance. At night, she was forced to sleep in @ farret Of g



4

CINDERELLA, OR THE GLASS SLIPPER. 3

straw bed without curtains, and she had not clothes enough
even to protect her from the cold. _ | |

_ Although so barbarously used, the sweet girl went through
all this drudgery without repining ; and when her work was
done, she would sit down in the corner of the chimney among
the cinders, which made some of the family eall her Cinder-
wench. However, the younger of the sisters, thinking this
appellation was vulgar, gave her the more genteel name of
Cinderella, and all the rest followed her example. Notwith-
standing all that she endured, Cinderella, as she grew up,
became every day more beautiful, and far surpassed the two
sisters with all their fine clothes.

_ About.this time, a splendid ball was to be given at court
by the king’s son, to which all the nobility and gentry of the
kingdom were invited, and, among others, the two sisters re-
ceived an invitation ; but poor Cinderella, whom no one knew
any thing of, was not invited.

The two haughty creatures, quite delighted with the king’s
son, immediately proceeded to arrange their dresses for the
grand occasion. ‘Their preparations were very oppressive to
Cinderella, who being extremely neat-handed, had to wash,
plait, and iron all their fineries, while they would do nothing
but talle of the fine »all, and how they were to be dressed on
that evening. “J,” said the eldest, “‘ will put on my scarlet
velvet, with the French trimming.” “And 1,” said the
youngest, “ will wear the green velvet dress T had for the last
ball, and also my gold muslin train, which, with diamonds in
my hair, will certainly look quite enchanting.”

On the morning of the ball, a first-rate hair dresser was
sent for, and the most becoming and fanciful ornaments pro-
cured from almost every fashionable shop in the city.
Although these vain, silly girls could chatter enough about
fine clothes, yet, in dressing tastefully, they were infinitely
surpassed by Cinderella, and as they knew she had a natural
genius in these matters, they condescended to employ her on:
this oceasion |

Any other person who had met with the same cruel treat-—
ment as Cinderella, would have endeavoured to make them
look as ugly as possible; but thisgood natured girl assisted
to deck them ont to the best advantage. Nothing pleased
them unless Cinderella did it ; and even their hair, which
had been already dressed by one of the most fashionable
ha‘t-dressers, she was obliged to adjust to her. own taste.



4 CINDERELLA, OR THE GLASS SLIPPER.

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Yet, notwithstanding the attention paid to them by
Cinderella, the ungrateful creatures could not refrain from
their accustomed derision, and repeatedly asked if she would
like to go tothe ball, “Ah!” said Cinderella, “you are
making game of me; it is not a place for such poor girlsas.
Tam to go to.” ‘You are right,” said they; ‘‘ how the
folks would laugh, were they to see a cinder-wench in the
ball-room! ”

I almost forgot to mention, that they were so taken up
with their looking-glasses and the ball, that they hardly ate
anything for two days, and they had broked mere than a
dozen stay-laces, in trying to give themselves a slender
shape. |

At length the wished-for moment arrived, and these proud
misses stept into a beantiful carriage, attended by servants
in handsome liveries, and drove away to the palace.

Cinderella followed the coach with her eyes as far as she
could see, and then returned tothe kitchen in tears; where,
for the first time, she bewailed her hard and cruel degrada-
tion. She continued sobbing in the corner of the chimney,
‘until @ noise in the kitchen roused her, and she looked un



CINDERELLA, OR THE. GLASS SLIPPER. 5

to see what had occasioned it. Her surprise was great indeed
to seea little curious looking woman, very antiquely dressed;
in her right hand she carried a wand, and in the other held a
crutch to support herself.

Cinderella could not account for this strange apparition,
and thought that her eyes had deceiyed her, as she had not
seen this curious personage before ; but the old woman, with
a good-natured smile on her countemauce. approached, and
thus accosted her :—

“¢ My dear Cinderella, | am your godmother, and know-
ing the desire you have to go to this fine ball, [have come
for the purpose of gratifying your wish: therefore, dry up
your tears; and, as you are a good girl, I will furnish you
with an equipage suitable to your merit.”

Cinderella then remembered, that she had heard hep father
and mother often talk of her godmother, and that she was
one of these good fairies who interest themselves in the
welfare of all the children to whom they stand sponsors ;
and this recollection revived her spirits sc much, that she
wiped away her tears, and spoke to the fairy, her Roam athe:
in her usual pleasant manner.

The fairy took Cinderella by the hand, and having led her
to a retired spot, said, “‘ Now my. dear, you must go into
the garden and fetch me a pumpkin.” Cinderella almost flew
to execute her commands, and returned. with one of the
finest. she could meet with. Her godmother took the
pumpkin, and scooped out the inside of it, leaving nothing
but rind ; she then struck it with her wand, and it ‘instantly
became one of the most elegant gilt carmingen: hag ever was
seen.

She next ears Cinderella to go. te the pantry for the
mouse-trap. She didso, and found six little mice alive in
the trap, w which she brought to the fairy, who requested her
to lift up the door very gently, so that anly one of them
might go out at the time.

Ciaderella raised the trap-door, . andas the mice came out
one by one, a touch of the fairy’s wand transioxmed® them
into carriage-horses. °

“Now, my dear girl,” said, the fairy, ff ‘Shere you have °
a coach nd horses, much handsomer than. your sisters, to.
say the least of them, but, as we nave neither a. papiliog? nor
a coachman to take care of them, run . to! the staule, where ,
the Far HAP ig placed, and bring it to me.” |



6 CINDERELLA, OR THE GLASS SLIPPER.
|, — 7




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Cinderella, who did not lose a moment in the execution
of ker commands, soon returned with the trap, in which
there’ were two large rats. The fairy touched them both
with her wand, and immediately the one was changed into
a handsome postilion, and the other into as tine a jolly-look-
ing coachman as ever she beheld.

Her godmother then said, *‘ My dear Cinderella, youmust
go to the yarden again before I can complete your equipage ;
when you yet there, keep to the right side,and close to the
wall you will see the watering-pot standing’; look behind it
and there you will find six lizards, which you must bring to
me immediately. :

Cinderella flewto the garden as she was desired, and-
found the six lizards, which she put into her apron, and
brought tothe fairy. Another touch of the wonderful wand
soon converted these animals into six spruce footmen, in
dashing liveries who immediatly jumped up behind the
carriage, and. with as much agility as if they had been
accustomed to do nothing else all their lives. :

The coachman and postilion having likewise taken their
places, the fairy said to Cinderella, ‘* Well, my dear girl, is
not this as fine anequipage as you could desire tu go to the
bell with? ‘Tell me, now, are you pleased with it?”









r,

CINDFREI LA, OR THE GLASS SLIPPER. 7

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|

a





**O yes, dear godmother,” replied Cinderella ; and then,
with a good deal of hesitation, added, “ but how can I make
my appearance among so many finely—dressed people inthese
mean-looking clothes ?”’ 2 gota

‘*Give vourself no uneasiness about that my dear,” said the
fairy, with a good-humoured smile; ‘the most laborious
part of our task is already accomplished, and it will be hard
if | cannot make your dress correspond with your equipage.”

On say ing this, she teuched Cinderella with the magic
wand, and her clothes were instantly changed into most
magnificent apparel, ornamented with the most costly jewels
that ever were beheld. The fairy took from her pockets a
most beautiful pair of elastic glass slippers, which she
caused Cinderella to put on, and then desired her to get into
the carriage with all expeditien, as the ball had already
commenced,

Cinderella instantly stepped into the chariot, and her god-
mother, before she took leave, strictly charged her, on no ,
account whatever, to stay at the ball after the clock had
struck twelve; and then added, that if sbe stopped a single
moment beyond that time, her fine coach, horses, coachman,
postilion, footmen, and fine apparel, would all return to their
Original shapes of pumpkin, mice, rats, lizaads, and mean
looking clothes,





# CINDERELLA, OR, THE: GLASS » SLIPPER.

Cinderella promised most. ‘faithfully. to attend to cevetly
thing that tke fairy had mentioned ; and then, quite over-
joyed, drove to the palace, which she reached in a short time.

The arrival of so splendid an equipage as Cinderella’s
could not fail to attract general notice at the palace; and
information having reached the king’s son, that a beautifal
young lady, evidently a princess, was in waiting, he hastened
to the door, handed her out of the carriage, and led her
gracefully into the ball-room.

When Cinderella made her appearance, both music and
dancing were suspended for a few minuets—not even a whis-
per was heard ; and the company seemed to be struck dumb
with admiration, for every one was employed in gazing at
the beauty and magnificence of this elegant stranger.

‘Then they began in whispers to express their admiration

“How beautifnl she is! what a handsome figure !—khow
elegantly sheis dressed!” Even the prince’s father, old as he
was, could not behold her with indifference, but repeatedly
said to the queen, thathe had never seen so lovely a creature.
The ladies were all engaged in observing how her elothes
were made, that they might be able to describe them to
their dress-makers, and, if possible, materials and patterns to be got ready for the next evening’s
ball. :
- So angelic and faultless was the form of the lovely stranger,
that even envy seemed to be asleep ; for not one of the ladies
present had the most distant expectations of being able to
rival her in any one of the qualities which she possessed ; and
only looked upon as a superior being, whom they might try
to copy from.

The king’s son conducted Cinderella. to one of the most
distinguished seats, and placing himself by her side, begged:
she would allow him to hand her some fruits or jellies.
These she received with great politeness, and he then re-
quested to have the honour of dancing with her.. Cinderella -
gave a smiling consent, and the delighted prince immediately |
led her out to the centre of the ball- “room, followed by the :
eyes of the whole company. —

The music struck up, and the dance commenced; but if:
the beauty, elegant figure, and the splendour of Cinderella's -
dress had before drawn the attention and admiration of every”
person in the room, the astonishment which was excited by
her dancing, it is impossible to describe. The gracefulnesg:,
of all her motions, and the airy lig atness with which she





CINDERELLA, OR THE GLASS SLIPPER

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moved, for she seemed scarcely totouch the ground, drew

forth a general murmur ofadmiration, which, as the prince

led her off, changed into the loudest acclamations of applause

and the company, all in one voice, pronounced her to be the
most elegant and accomplished female that had ever been

seen

A magnificent collation was served up, consisting of most
delicious fruits, confectionary, and wines ; but so much was
the young prince engaged in attending to Cinderella, that he
did not eat one morsel during the whole of the evening.

Cinderella was seated near her sisters, to whom she fre-
quently spoke ; and such was her goodness of heart, that she
even gave them a part of the fine delecacies which she had
received from the prince : but they entertained not the slight-
est suspicion whom she was, and were astonished and
delighted at the civilities they received from her.

During her conversation with them, Cinderella heard the
clock strike eleven and three quarters, and she immediately
rose, took a hurried leave of the company, and returned
safely home in her carriage. |

On entering the house, she found hergodmother waiting, to
whotn she related all that had taken place at the ball, and





10 CINDERELLA, OR THE GLASS SLIPPER,

thanked her a thousand times for the pleaure ehe had enjoyed.
She then told the fairy, that there was to be another ball on
the following evening, to which the prince had given hera
very pressing invitation; and modestly signified the
happiness it would afford her to be present on that occasion
also.

Her godmother had just promised to gratify her wishes,
when a loud knocking announced the arrival of her sisters.

On their entrance, Cinderella, who pretended to be just
awakened out of a sound sleep, fell to rubbing her eyes, and
yawned out, “Oh dear, how late you have stepped! I
thought you would never have come home.”’

<«¢ Had you been at the ball,” said one of the sisters, “you

would not have been so sleepy ; for the most beautiful princess
ever beheld, came there; she paid ussuch great attention,
and gave us a part of the delicacies the prince presented to
her.” | : .
It was with difficulty that Cinderella could refrain from
laughiug ; but she concealed her mirth, and enquiredthe name .-
of the young princess. ‘They replied, that nobody knew her,
and that the prince being very anxious to learn whom she
was, had offered a large reward to any person who would
satisfy his curiosty. |

Cinderella said, with asmile, ‘‘ How very beautiful she -
must be! and how fortunate you were in seeing her! O, if 1
could only get one peep at her! Dear Miss Charlotte, will.
you lend me one of your gowns, that L may go to the next
ball, and get a sight of this beantiful lady ?”

‘¢ Do you really think I am so mad as to lend my gowns
to a cinder-wench ? No, [ am not sucha fool; so, mind your
own business, and leave balls to your betters.”

This answer was just what Cinderella expected ( for, if the
request had been granted. she would have been puzzled how
to act in the business. | BH

Next evening, the two ladies went again to the ball; and
Cinderella soon followed them, but dressed in a far more
magnificent style than formerly. The prince, who was quite
delighted to see her again ; did rot leave her side the whole»
evening, and continually paying her the most flattering com
pliments and attention. | Distt .

Cinderella was se much taken up with the dancing and the
civilities of the young prince, that the Jevening passed away
before she was aware: and the clock struck twelve, when
she supposed that it could scarcely beeleven. Alarmed, she



CINDERELLA, OR THE GLASS SLIPPER. 11,

sprung from her seat, and almost flew out of the ball-room.—
The prince pursued her, which made Cinderella run the
faster, and in the hurry she dropped one of her glass slippers ,
which he picked up. :

Fatigued and breathless, it was with difficulty that Cinder-
ella reached home in her old clothing. without coach, atten-
dants, or any of her grandeur, except the remaining glass
slipper. |

The prince, who lost sight of Cinderella when he stopped
to pick up the slipper, enquired of all the gaurds if they had
seen amagnificent princess pass through the palace gates;
but they said that no person whatever had gone ont, except
a poor beggar girl.

When the sisters of Cinderella came home, she enquired,
if they had been as well amused as at the former ball, and
if the beautiful princess hod been there. They said she had;
but, as the clock struck twelve, she flew out of the ball
room, and in her haste, had cropped one of her finely-shaped
glass slippers ; that the kings son having found the slipper,
did nothing bat view it during the remainder of the ball, and
every person said that he was violently in love with the
beautiful princess. 3 ,

A few days after the ball, the prince caused it to be pro-
claimed, that he would marry the lady whom the slipper
fitted : and he sent one of the principal officers of the house-
hold to all the ladies of hls court. The slipper was first
- ¢arried to the princesses and duchesses, and then to the ladies
of inferior rank ; but finding no oneit would fit, he returned
with an account ofhis bad success. And the prince having
ordered him to go round to the other ladies of his dominions,
it was atlast brought to the two sisters, who used avery exer~
tion to squeeze the slipper on, but all tono purpose.

Cinderella, who was present during the trial, knowing her
slipper, said, with a sinile, ‘ Pray, sir, may I be allowed to
try iton?’”? The two sisters burst out in laughter, and said
rudely, “Very likely indeed that it will fit your clumsy foot!’
The officer, seeing thut Cinderella was very beautiful, de-
sired her to try it on, as the prince had commanded him
to allow every one who wished to havea trial. Cinderella,
sitting down on a chair, put it'on her foot with the great-
‘est éage, ‘The two sisters were astonished at seeing it fit so
very exactly ; but they were much more astonished, wher
she pulled its fellow from her pocket, and put it onlikewise-
At trat moment the fairy entered unperceived by any on¢,



12 CINDERELLA, OR THE GLASS SLIPPER,

IN ‘) \
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‘6





and touching Ciuderella with her wand, changed her poor
clothes into a more magnificent dress than she had yet
appeared in. oe ,

When the sisters found that poor Cinderell was he
beautifnl princess, they fell on their knees, and entreated par-
don for their former cruel behaviour. Cinderella freely for-
gave them; after which the officer conducted her to the
prince whe was so struck with her beauty, that he solicited
her hand in marriage. ,

Cinderella gave her consent, and the ceremony took place
a few days afterwards, with great pomp and rejoicing. The
amiable qualities of Cinderella were as conspicuous after,
as they had been before marriage, by which means she re-
tained the love of her husband, and gained the esteem of the
court, and the good will of all who knew her.

Although Cinderella had been so cruelly used by her two
step-sisters, yetshe was sofar from resenting their ill-tretment,
that she sent for them to court, and by her influence they
were shortly after married to two noblemen ; and Cinderella
spent a long life in a state of felicity which seldom falls to
the lot of mortals; nor did she fail te remember, with
gratitude and affection, her friend the fairy, who had contri-
buted so much to her cemfort and happiness.







23.0 rie

THE FOLLOWING LARGE.
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| ale |



Vysu's New London Spell- .
ing Book.

f The Golden A. B. C.

| ©Mavor’s Improved Spelling

7. Book. )

Chie | in the Wood.

; Mary the Maid of the lan.
, Crazy Jane.

_ John Gilpin.

~ Child’s Dream.















The Disaces Oracle. Early Blossoms. 4 ‘ |

- The Circle of Fate. | } Irish Bulls by Teddy \

4 Napoleon’s Book of Fate. O'Flannigan. — “| |
4 Life of Robin Hood. Plants of Paradise. i
«of Dick Turpin. | History of England. 4

Jack Sheppard. History of London. 4
-Ambrose.Gwinett: } A Visit to the. Zoologieal i]

Three Fingered J Jack. }* Gardens.— “Beast. 4
Tom Thumb. . Second Part._——Birds, 4

4 Simple Simon. - % Captain Ross's” Voyages. a
4 Punch and Jndy. _ $ Dame Trot, i
"| Mother Goose. = = —‘}_ Old Mother Habbaed. 4
ou 3 Little Tom Tucker. | 3 Fish and the Ring. :
~ Jack and Jill. OG > History of the Kings and
Jack Spratt aay his Cat. Queens of England. ;
Nursery Rhymes. |

Rory O* More, Se. ce



A Variety of New Penny, Twopenny, ad
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tt





Full Text




- CINDERELI

‘SLIP




Embellished with





Nee 41.—~1840,

en Engravings.



PER.






The Baldwin Library




THE

?

OR
LITTLE GLASS

vw



LONDON
Printed and Published by

J. CATNACH,

Dials.

Monmouth-Court, Seven

& 8,

o
~~)




CINDERELLA.

_ Ata short distance from a great city, there lived, many
ages since, a gentleman of fortune, and his wife, an
amiable and beautiful young lady, whom he had married.
As they were fondly attached to each other, they enjoyed
the greatest happiness, and the birth of a daughter increased,
if possible, their felicity; but, unfortunately for the child,
the mother died before she had reared up her offspring, and

left her husband a prey to sorrow.

When the gentlemen’s grief was a little abated, he so felt
the want of a wife, that he resolved to look for some prudent
lady, who might be a mother to his child, and a companion
to himself. Unfortunately, his second choice fell on a widow
lady, of a, proud and tyrannical disposition, who had two
daughters by a former marriage, hoth equally haughty and
_ bad tempered as their mother. a

This woman had the cunning to conceal her bad qualities |
so well, that the gentleman thought she was very amiable ;
but the marriage was scarcely over, when she appeared in
her real character. She paid no attention to her husband,

quarrelled with the servants. and treated his sweet little oirl
with great harshness. The gentleman, who loved his daughter |
dearly, remonstrated against the cruelty of her behaviour ; m
but it only made her worse: and unable to resist her violence,
he fell into low spirits, which brought bim to a Dice hay
grave.

After the death of her father, the young orphan found the —
hardships of her situation soon greatly increased. If she .
chanced to.come into any of the rooms where her step-mother i,
or her daughters were, she was sure of being scolded, be :
they were vexed that she looked prettier than them.

_ even went so far as to make her assist the servants im putting .
-saucepans on the fire, washing the pots, and in cleaning ent
the rooms, which were all newly furnished in the first style. of



elegance. At night, she was forced to sleep in @ farret Of g
4

CINDERELLA, OR THE GLASS SLIPPER. 3

straw bed without curtains, and she had not clothes enough
even to protect her from the cold. _ | |

_ Although so barbarously used, the sweet girl went through
all this drudgery without repining ; and when her work was
done, she would sit down in the corner of the chimney among
the cinders, which made some of the family eall her Cinder-
wench. However, the younger of the sisters, thinking this
appellation was vulgar, gave her the more genteel name of
Cinderella, and all the rest followed her example. Notwith-
standing all that she endured, Cinderella, as she grew up,
became every day more beautiful, and far surpassed the two
sisters with all their fine clothes.

_ About.this time, a splendid ball was to be given at court
by the king’s son, to which all the nobility and gentry of the
kingdom were invited, and, among others, the two sisters re-
ceived an invitation ; but poor Cinderella, whom no one knew
any thing of, was not invited.

The two haughty creatures, quite delighted with the king’s
son, immediately proceeded to arrange their dresses for the
grand occasion. ‘Their preparations were very oppressive to
Cinderella, who being extremely neat-handed, had to wash,
plait, and iron all their fineries, while they would do nothing
but talle of the fine »all, and how they were to be dressed on
that evening. “J,” said the eldest, “‘ will put on my scarlet
velvet, with the French trimming.” “And 1,” said the
youngest, “ will wear the green velvet dress T had for the last
ball, and also my gold muslin train, which, with diamonds in
my hair, will certainly look quite enchanting.”

On the morning of the ball, a first-rate hair dresser was
sent for, and the most becoming and fanciful ornaments pro-
cured from almost every fashionable shop in the city.
Although these vain, silly girls could chatter enough about
fine clothes, yet, in dressing tastefully, they were infinitely
surpassed by Cinderella, and as they knew she had a natural
genius in these matters, they condescended to employ her on:
this oceasion |

Any other person who had met with the same cruel treat-—
ment as Cinderella, would have endeavoured to make them
look as ugly as possible; but thisgood natured girl assisted
to deck them ont to the best advantage. Nothing pleased
them unless Cinderella did it ; and even their hair, which
had been already dressed by one of the most fashionable
ha‘t-dressers, she was obliged to adjust to her. own taste.
4 CINDERELLA, OR THE GLASS SLIPPER.

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Yet, notwithstanding the attention paid to them by
Cinderella, the ungrateful creatures could not refrain from
their accustomed derision, and repeatedly asked if she would
like to go tothe ball, “Ah!” said Cinderella, “you are
making game of me; it is not a place for such poor girlsas.
Tam to go to.” ‘You are right,” said they; ‘‘ how the
folks would laugh, were they to see a cinder-wench in the
ball-room! ”

I almost forgot to mention, that they were so taken up
with their looking-glasses and the ball, that they hardly ate
anything for two days, and they had broked mere than a
dozen stay-laces, in trying to give themselves a slender
shape. |

At length the wished-for moment arrived, and these proud
misses stept into a beantiful carriage, attended by servants
in handsome liveries, and drove away to the palace.

Cinderella followed the coach with her eyes as far as she
could see, and then returned tothe kitchen in tears; where,
for the first time, she bewailed her hard and cruel degrada-
tion. She continued sobbing in the corner of the chimney,
‘until @ noise in the kitchen roused her, and she looked un
CINDERELLA, OR THE. GLASS SLIPPER. 5

to see what had occasioned it. Her surprise was great indeed
to seea little curious looking woman, very antiquely dressed;
in her right hand she carried a wand, and in the other held a
crutch to support herself.

Cinderella could not account for this strange apparition,
and thought that her eyes had deceiyed her, as she had not
seen this curious personage before ; but the old woman, with
a good-natured smile on her countemauce. approached, and
thus accosted her :—

“¢ My dear Cinderella, | am your godmother, and know-
ing the desire you have to go to this fine ball, [have come
for the purpose of gratifying your wish: therefore, dry up
your tears; and, as you are a good girl, I will furnish you
with an equipage suitable to your merit.”

Cinderella then remembered, that she had heard hep father
and mother often talk of her godmother, and that she was
one of these good fairies who interest themselves in the
welfare of all the children to whom they stand sponsors ;
and this recollection revived her spirits sc much, that she
wiped away her tears, and spoke to the fairy, her Roam athe:
in her usual pleasant manner.

The fairy took Cinderella by the hand, and having led her
to a retired spot, said, “‘ Now my. dear, you must go into
the garden and fetch me a pumpkin.” Cinderella almost flew
to execute her commands, and returned. with one of the
finest. she could meet with. Her godmother took the
pumpkin, and scooped out the inside of it, leaving nothing
but rind ; she then struck it with her wand, and it ‘instantly
became one of the most elegant gilt carmingen: hag ever was
seen.

She next ears Cinderella to go. te the pantry for the
mouse-trap. She didso, and found six little mice alive in
the trap, w which she brought to the fairy, who requested her
to lift up the door very gently, so that anly one of them
might go out at the time.

Ciaderella raised the trap-door, . andas the mice came out
one by one, a touch of the fairy’s wand transioxmed® them
into carriage-horses. °

“Now, my dear girl,” said, the fairy, ff ‘Shere you have °
a coach nd horses, much handsomer than. your sisters, to.
say the least of them, but, as we nave neither a. papiliog? nor
a coachman to take care of them, run . to! the staule, where ,
the Far HAP ig placed, and bring it to me.” |
6 CINDERELLA, OR THE GLASS SLIPPER.
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Cinderella, who did not lose a moment in the execution
of ker commands, soon returned with the trap, in which
there’ were two large rats. The fairy touched them both
with her wand, and immediately the one was changed into
a handsome postilion, and the other into as tine a jolly-look-
ing coachman as ever she beheld.

Her godmother then said, *‘ My dear Cinderella, youmust
go to the yarden again before I can complete your equipage ;
when you yet there, keep to the right side,and close to the
wall you will see the watering-pot standing’; look behind it
and there you will find six lizards, which you must bring to
me immediately. :

Cinderella flewto the garden as she was desired, and-
found the six lizards, which she put into her apron, and
brought tothe fairy. Another touch of the wonderful wand
soon converted these animals into six spruce footmen, in
dashing liveries who immediatly jumped up behind the
carriage, and. with as much agility as if they had been
accustomed to do nothing else all their lives. :

The coachman and postilion having likewise taken their
places, the fairy said to Cinderella, ‘* Well, my dear girl, is
not this as fine anequipage as you could desire tu go to the
bell with? ‘Tell me, now, are you pleased with it?”






r,

CINDFREI LA, OR THE GLASS SLIPPER. 7

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**O yes, dear godmother,” replied Cinderella ; and then,
with a good deal of hesitation, added, “ but how can I make
my appearance among so many finely—dressed people inthese
mean-looking clothes ?”’ 2 gota

‘*Give vourself no uneasiness about that my dear,” said the
fairy, with a good-humoured smile; ‘the most laborious
part of our task is already accomplished, and it will be hard
if | cannot make your dress correspond with your equipage.”

On say ing this, she teuched Cinderella with the magic
wand, and her clothes were instantly changed into most
magnificent apparel, ornamented with the most costly jewels
that ever were beheld. The fairy took from her pockets a
most beautiful pair of elastic glass slippers, which she
caused Cinderella to put on, and then desired her to get into
the carriage with all expeditien, as the ball had already
commenced,

Cinderella instantly stepped into the chariot, and her god-
mother, before she took leave, strictly charged her, on no ,
account whatever, to stay at the ball after the clock had
struck twelve; and then added, that if sbe stopped a single
moment beyond that time, her fine coach, horses, coachman,
postilion, footmen, and fine apparel, would all return to their
Original shapes of pumpkin, mice, rats, lizaads, and mean
looking clothes,


# CINDERELLA, OR, THE: GLASS » SLIPPER.

Cinderella promised most. ‘faithfully. to attend to cevetly
thing that tke fairy had mentioned ; and then, quite over-
joyed, drove to the palace, which she reached in a short time.

The arrival of so splendid an equipage as Cinderella’s
could not fail to attract general notice at the palace; and
information having reached the king’s son, that a beautifal
young lady, evidently a princess, was in waiting, he hastened
to the door, handed her out of the carriage, and led her
gracefully into the ball-room.

When Cinderella made her appearance, both music and
dancing were suspended for a few minuets—not even a whis-
per was heard ; and the company seemed to be struck dumb
with admiration, for every one was employed in gazing at
the beauty and magnificence of this elegant stranger.

‘Then they began in whispers to express their admiration

“How beautifnl she is! what a handsome figure !—khow
elegantly sheis dressed!” Even the prince’s father, old as he
was, could not behold her with indifference, but repeatedly
said to the queen, thathe had never seen so lovely a creature.
The ladies were all engaged in observing how her elothes
were made, that they might be able to describe them to
their dress-makers, and, if possible, materials and patterns to be got ready for the next evening’s
ball. :
- So angelic and faultless was the form of the lovely stranger,
that even envy seemed to be asleep ; for not one of the ladies
present had the most distant expectations of being able to
rival her in any one of the qualities which she possessed ; and
only looked upon as a superior being, whom they might try
to copy from.

The king’s son conducted Cinderella. to one of the most
distinguished seats, and placing himself by her side, begged:
she would allow him to hand her some fruits or jellies.
These she received with great politeness, and he then re-
quested to have the honour of dancing with her.. Cinderella -
gave a smiling consent, and the delighted prince immediately |
led her out to the centre of the ball- “room, followed by the :
eyes of the whole company. —

The music struck up, and the dance commenced; but if:
the beauty, elegant figure, and the splendour of Cinderella's -
dress had before drawn the attention and admiration of every”
person in the room, the astonishment which was excited by
her dancing, it is impossible to describe. The gracefulnesg:,
of all her motions, and the airy lig atness with which she


CINDERELLA, OR THE GLASS SLIPPER

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moved, for she seemed scarcely totouch the ground, drew

forth a general murmur ofadmiration, which, as the prince

led her off, changed into the loudest acclamations of applause

and the company, all in one voice, pronounced her to be the
most elegant and accomplished female that had ever been

seen

A magnificent collation was served up, consisting of most
delicious fruits, confectionary, and wines ; but so much was
the young prince engaged in attending to Cinderella, that he
did not eat one morsel during the whole of the evening.

Cinderella was seated near her sisters, to whom she fre-
quently spoke ; and such was her goodness of heart, that she
even gave them a part of the fine delecacies which she had
received from the prince : but they entertained not the slight-
est suspicion whom she was, and were astonished and
delighted at the civilities they received from her.

During her conversation with them, Cinderella heard the
clock strike eleven and three quarters, and she immediately
rose, took a hurried leave of the company, and returned
safely home in her carriage. |

On entering the house, she found hergodmother waiting, to
whotn she related all that had taken place at the ball, and


10 CINDERELLA, OR THE GLASS SLIPPER,

thanked her a thousand times for the pleaure ehe had enjoyed.
She then told the fairy, that there was to be another ball on
the following evening, to which the prince had given hera
very pressing invitation; and modestly signified the
happiness it would afford her to be present on that occasion
also.

Her godmother had just promised to gratify her wishes,
when a loud knocking announced the arrival of her sisters.

On their entrance, Cinderella, who pretended to be just
awakened out of a sound sleep, fell to rubbing her eyes, and
yawned out, “Oh dear, how late you have stepped! I
thought you would never have come home.”’

<«¢ Had you been at the ball,” said one of the sisters, “you

would not have been so sleepy ; for the most beautiful princess
ever beheld, came there; she paid ussuch great attention,
and gave us a part of the delicacies the prince presented to
her.” | : .
It was with difficulty that Cinderella could refrain from
laughiug ; but she concealed her mirth, and enquiredthe name .-
of the young princess. ‘They replied, that nobody knew her,
and that the prince being very anxious to learn whom she
was, had offered a large reward to any person who would
satisfy his curiosty. |

Cinderella said, with asmile, ‘‘ How very beautiful she -
must be! and how fortunate you were in seeing her! O, if 1
could only get one peep at her! Dear Miss Charlotte, will.
you lend me one of your gowns, that L may go to the next
ball, and get a sight of this beantiful lady ?”

‘¢ Do you really think I am so mad as to lend my gowns
to a cinder-wench ? No, [ am not sucha fool; so, mind your
own business, and leave balls to your betters.”

This answer was just what Cinderella expected ( for, if the
request had been granted. she would have been puzzled how
to act in the business. | BH

Next evening, the two ladies went again to the ball; and
Cinderella soon followed them, but dressed in a far more
magnificent style than formerly. The prince, who was quite
delighted to see her again ; did rot leave her side the whole»
evening, and continually paying her the most flattering com
pliments and attention. | Distt .

Cinderella was se much taken up with the dancing and the
civilities of the young prince, that the Jevening passed away
before she was aware: and the clock struck twelve, when
she supposed that it could scarcely beeleven. Alarmed, she
CINDERELLA, OR THE GLASS SLIPPER. 11,

sprung from her seat, and almost flew out of the ball-room.—
The prince pursued her, which made Cinderella run the
faster, and in the hurry she dropped one of her glass slippers ,
which he picked up. :

Fatigued and breathless, it was with difficulty that Cinder-
ella reached home in her old clothing. without coach, atten-
dants, or any of her grandeur, except the remaining glass
slipper. |

The prince, who lost sight of Cinderella when he stopped
to pick up the slipper, enquired of all the gaurds if they had
seen amagnificent princess pass through the palace gates;
but they said that no person whatever had gone ont, except
a poor beggar girl.

When the sisters of Cinderella came home, she enquired,
if they had been as well amused as at the former ball, and
if the beautiful princess hod been there. They said she had;
but, as the clock struck twelve, she flew out of the ball
room, and in her haste, had cropped one of her finely-shaped
glass slippers ; that the kings son having found the slipper,
did nothing bat view it during the remainder of the ball, and
every person said that he was violently in love with the
beautiful princess. 3 ,

A few days after the ball, the prince caused it to be pro-
claimed, that he would marry the lady whom the slipper
fitted : and he sent one of the principal officers of the house-
hold to all the ladies of hls court. The slipper was first
- ¢arried to the princesses and duchesses, and then to the ladies
of inferior rank ; but finding no oneit would fit, he returned
with an account ofhis bad success. And the prince having
ordered him to go round to the other ladies of his dominions,
it was atlast brought to the two sisters, who used avery exer~
tion to squeeze the slipper on, but all tono purpose.

Cinderella, who was present during the trial, knowing her
slipper, said, with a sinile, ‘ Pray, sir, may I be allowed to
try iton?’”? The two sisters burst out in laughter, and said
rudely, “Very likely indeed that it will fit your clumsy foot!’
The officer, seeing thut Cinderella was very beautiful, de-
sired her to try it on, as the prince had commanded him
to allow every one who wished to havea trial. Cinderella,
sitting down on a chair, put it'on her foot with the great-
‘est éage, ‘The two sisters were astonished at seeing it fit so
very exactly ; but they were much more astonished, wher
she pulled its fellow from her pocket, and put it onlikewise-
At trat moment the fairy entered unperceived by any on¢,
12 CINDERELLA, OR THE GLASS SLIPPER,

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and touching Ciuderella with her wand, changed her poor
clothes into a more magnificent dress than she had yet
appeared in. oe ,

When the sisters found that poor Cinderell was he
beautifnl princess, they fell on their knees, and entreated par-
don for their former cruel behaviour. Cinderella freely for-
gave them; after which the officer conducted her to the
prince whe was so struck with her beauty, that he solicited
her hand in marriage. ,

Cinderella gave her consent, and the ceremony took place
a few days afterwards, with great pomp and rejoicing. The
amiable qualities of Cinderella were as conspicuous after,
as they had been before marriage, by which means she re-
tained the love of her husband, and gained the esteem of the
court, and the good will of all who knew her.

Although Cinderella had been so cruelly used by her two
step-sisters, yetshe was sofar from resenting their ill-tretment,
that she sent for them to court, and by her influence they
were shortly after married to two noblemen ; and Cinderella
spent a long life in a state of felicity which seldom falls to
the lot of mortals; nor did she fail te remember, with
gratitude and affection, her friend the fairy, who had contri-
buted so much to her cemfort and happiness.

23.0 rie

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Jack Sheppard. History of London. 4
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Tom Thumb. . Second Part._——Birds, 4

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