Citation
The new American first reader

Material Information

Title:
The new American first reader
Series Title:
E.H. Butler & co.'s new American series
Creator:
Sargent, Epes, 1813-1880
May, Amasa ( Author )
E.H. Butler & Co ( Publisher )
Van Ingen & Snyder ( Engraver )
Westcott & Thomson ( Stereotyper )
R. Sherman & Co ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
Philadelphia
Publisher:
E.H. Butler & Co.
Manufacturer:
Sherman & Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
48 p. : ill. ; 19 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
English language -- Orthography and spelling -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Readers -- 1871 ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1871 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1871
Genre:
Readers ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Publisher's advertisements on endpapers
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
by Epes Sargent and Amasa May.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026946291 ( ALEPH )
ALH7548 ( NOTIS )
09009972 ( OCLC )

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PHILADELPHIA.
of BBW











PUBLICATIONS OF FE. H. BUTLER & co.



MITCHELL’S NEW SERIES OF GEOGRAPHIES,

THE STANDARD GEOGRAPHICAL SERIES OF AMERICA,
COMPRISING:

Mitchell’s New First Lessons in Geography.
Mitchell’s New Primary Geography.
Mitchell’s New Intermediate Geography.
Mitchell’s New School Geography and Atlas.
Mitchell’s New Physical Geography.
Mitchell’s New Outlime Maps and Key. Small Series,
Mitchelil’s New Outlime Maps and Key. Large Series,
Mitchelic New Ancient. Geocranhv.

Philedelahia Courly Prisom==Courie Bloc,

> <<» + __ —___

The Books of this Library must not be marked nor written
upon, nor injured in any way nor in any part.

The Blank leaves must not be defaced nor torn out.

The Books not to be loaned out of the cell.

. Any violation of these Rules will be punished by withdraw-
ing all Books from every person in the cell in which the offence
is committed, until the individual offender is discovered.

Only three Books allowed at one time, and no Books to be
detained more than two weeks.

HOWARD PERKINS,

Superintendent.

Goodrich’s Pictorial Natural History.

CHARACTERISTICS:

1, This series presents graded historical text-books.

2. The different books are printed in a clear and beautiful type, and the
illustrations are unequaled in number and artistic execution.

3. The matter is divided into easy and comprehensive periods.

4, The pages are free from religious preferences and political prejudices,

6, The topical arrangement of the contents, and the alphabetical indexes
of the larger books, enhance their usefulness,

6. The great historical facts, eventful epochs, and important dates,
are presented in a lively and pleasing style.

7. The Child’s History has the merit of brevity without baldness; the
Pictorial U. S., completeness without redundancy.

8, All the books of the Series are elegantly and substantially bound.
9, They are all NEW EDITIONS, brought down to the present time,

The Baldwin ner







|
|









PUBLICATIONS OF KE. H. BUTLER & CO.

BINGHAM'S SERIES OF APPROVED TEXT-BOOKS,

This Series Comprises:

BINGHAM’S ENGLISH GRAMMAR. BINGHAM’S LATIN GRAMMAR.
BINGHAM’S LATIN EXERCISES. BINGHAM’S LATIN READER.
BINGHAM’S CAESAR.
BINGHAM’S LATIN PROSE COMPOSITION. (In press.)

The points of excellemce, rendered specially prominent by the actual test of the
school-room, and embodied in the recommendations of many of the first educators cf the
country, may be briefly noted.

BINGHAW’S ENGLISH GRAMMAR.

“The subject is discussed in the most philosophical manner.”—“ The conformity of the
rules to the Latin Grammar is a step in the right direction.”

BINGHAW’S LATIN GRAMMAR.

“Comprehensiveness of details.”—“ Copious exercises in immediate connection with
every theoretical principle.”—“ Correctness, clearness and conciseness of its rules of
gender.”—“‘ The careful marking of the quantity of the vowels.”—* Perfectly simple,
progressive and rigorously exact.”—“Its admirable method of treating the gender
of the third declension.”—“ Methodical, clear. and direct.’—“It is a most admirably
arranged Drill-book.”—“ Sufficiently advanced for the college student.”—* Suffi-
ciently elementary for the beginner.”

BINGHAW’S LATIN READER.

“The only Latin reader in which the quantity of the vowels is marked.”—* It is just
what the young Latin pupil needs previous to commencing Cassar.”

BINGHAWM’S. CHiSAR.

“One of the neatest, cleanest and most attractive classical works published.’—
“Worthy of the Grammar.”—“ Handsomely printed, substantially and neatly bound.”
y yp y






THENNEHY’S GHOLOGY.
By SANBORN TENNEY, A.M.
A Now Edition of this Work, with over 250 Engravings.
What ts said of tt by experienced teachers :—“¥ regard Tenney’s Geology as a Mopen
school-book ;”—“ Presents the leadimg facts of the scienco in a clear and natural

manner, and contains all that is required in an ordinary course of instruction.”
oo

PROF, COPPER'S SERIES OF APPROVED TEXT-BOOKS.

By HENRY COPPEE, LL.D, President Lehigh University.



COPPEE’S ELEMENTS OF LOGIC,
COPPEE’S ELEMENTS OF RHETORIC.
COPPEE’S ACADEMIC SPEAKER.

Prof. Coppée’s status in educational matters is ample guaranteo of the worth of his
beoks; they are being rapidly adepted by the various Normal Schools and
higher Seminaries throughout the country,





























































































PHILADELPHIA

SESUILEREC,













TO THE TEACHER.

In teaching the child to speak we give him whole words, and in
teaching him to read we should first do the same. Analysis inte
sounds and into letters should be subsequent steps.

In this First Reader let the child first pronounce the words sing/;
and then read the sentences in which they are used.

Object-teaching, however, may be employed, at the discretion of the
teacher, as auxiliary to the word-method, and here the blackboard
will be needed. Select some object-word from the Lesson. We will
suppose it is cat, from Lesson XVII. Puta picture of a cat before the
children, and then put a variety of questions in regard to the object
and its pictorial representation. Then present the word cat. This
will be the First Step.

Let the words in the Lesson having the sound of d@ as in cat (man,
ran, rat) be arranged in a column. Call attention to the sound of @
as heard in these words; then let the pupil make the sound—4, 4d, a,
d, d—distinctly. Then teach him to make each sound in the word cat,
thus, &, d, 4. Proceed in this way with other words of the Lesson.
Pointing to a word, say, Pronownce it, and the pupil speaks it. Then
say, Sound it, and he gives its separate elementary sounds. This is
the Second Step.

In the Third Step the alphabetic names of the letters composing
the words are taught, and you say, Spell it, Print the word cat on
the blackboard; then print each letter of the word separately. Then
require the pupils to name each letter as it is pointed out, and thus
gradually teach them to spell.

All these processes of analysis should be deferred as premature if it
is found that the attention of children can be better held by allowing
them to read the short sentences of the Lessons, even to the end of
the book, before proceeding to the more abstract task of teaching the
sounds and letters.

The advantage of one new feature in our present First Reader will
be readily seen. In the reading lessous very few words are used which
have not been previously made familiar to the eye by being given
in large type separately from the sentences. Frequent reviews of
each new collection of words as they are learnt add to the thorough.
aess of the plan; in which the advantages of the word-method, the
phonic, the old A, B, C method and of object-teaching are all com-
bined



Butered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1871, by
FE. ll. BUTLER & CO.,

In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.



Westcert & THOMSON, SHermMan & OD,
Stereotypers, Philada. Printers, Philada





































































dE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 5



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6 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.

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Two, - @0 IL.
Three, - @©@8@ Il.
Four, - @6800 , lV.
Five, - ©8808 VY.
Six, - ©8@808868 VI.
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cat dog box

fay pan jar

raw __ hive SIze
milk quail

aei1o0u Ww y










* ,
THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 7 ]



LESSON I.



LESSON II.







THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER



LESSON III.

no
-Ho

SO
ho

(x0
lo

on of
On ox
or. Ox

Ho ox go on. So go ox.
O go or I go ox. Go on.

ail ——

ae





THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER,

LESSON VI.

am an at AS
as at an-

an aS am

at ame as

ITamon. Go on.
As I am on, go.
On anox am I? No.
Go on, go so.

if in:
in
it

I am in. Go on.
Is it on? It is.
Go if it is on.

On it is: so I go







10 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.





LESSON VIII.

me he we be ye
ye me He We be
Bee ee



Is he by it? He is.
; If he is by it, go on.
I go on, so go in.

up us” by my
by my up us
us up my by

I am up on it.
Up on it am IL.
On it up am I.

















THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 11



LESSON &.




Ho, ho! Go up, gO On, go so.
So go, ho, ho! go up, go on.








the thy our Ah

Ah! the ox is in.
Is it the ox? No.
Is it our ox? No. ake
Ah! it is no ox. ==



LESSON XII.

He she She
If she is by it, so
is he. If he is by

it, so is she. He is,
by it; she is by it.















12 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.

LESSON XIII.







Do to it so, as I do to it.
As I do to it, to it do so.
To it do so, as I to it do.
To it as I do, so do to it.

LESSON XIV.

do go lo ho



no so 0 to.
so no do go
to
Go do.
Go to.



Do go.

















THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 18



LESSON XV.

Recapitulation of Words.—No. 1.

[The thirty-six words of the preceding lessons are repeated
in this. Let the pupils, singly or all together, pronounce the
words first across the page and then down, till they are readily
known by their forms at sight. Then the words may be
spelled, or their elements sounded, at the teacher’s option. |

an on he gO A
am or me ho a
at OX we lo I
if up ye no i
in us by so O
it be my on 0
as of to the Ah
is do she thy our

LESSON XVI.
his hers hers his

Is it hers or his?
It is his or hers.

It is hers or his.
2









14 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.



LESSON XVII.

cat





Phe cat ran at the rat.
The dog ran at the hog.
The man ran at the dog.

Man, cat, rat, dog, hog ran.

LESSON XVIII.

boy
oO}







Girl, see me in the ear.
Are you in the car, boy? I am.

seed









THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 15

LESSON XIX.

has and bag
hat land nag





































See! the dog has a bag.

On the nag is a boy.

The boy has a hat.

Boy, nag, dog are on our land.



LESSON XX.

had bad book got
have lad look

Look at her book.
1 had a book; a bad
lad got it. She has
a book, as you see.












16 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER,



BESSON XXI.

hen men fed did
hens met yes give








Has the girl fed the hens? Yes.
Did she do so? Yes. The men
I met are to give me a hen. Are
the men to do so? Yes.

LESSON XXII.

him what — little
who mine — good
| Who is on the
nag? tle boy; what of
it? The nag is
mine; look at the
nag and the lad.

i









THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 17

day lay vet lig
say way set

Did es pig get ae Yes, the
pig got in. In “what way did he
getin? Ican not say. Did you
set the dog on him? Oh no.

LESSON XXIV.

log off but eat
hop fox hut ill
Hop off the log, % :

fox! Go, but do

not go to the hut

to eat the hens:

it is ill of you to
do so. Hop off!
2*





18 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.



sea ship cry big
tree whip try fig
saw with was may

You may see a ship
on the sea.
Do not ery, but try
to be good.
I saw a boy with
a big whip.
We saw a big fig:
it was on a tree.
& A cat met a rat, and
ae the rat ran.

LESSON XXVI.

father mother © sister
uncle brother aunt

An uncle is a brother of a
mother or father. An aunt is a |
sister of a mother or father.





THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 19

LESSON XXVIII.
Recapitulation of Words.—No. 2.
if my our
in no she
is of
it on
lo or

me OX











20 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.

LESSON XXVIII.

far now sky that
for how goes they




4
TER eS = .
LSD iM, ———= a

What is it that they see up in
the sky? What is it for? I can
not say. Look now how it goes
up, far, far, up.

LESSON XXIX.
toe he bit arm
hoe pie lit pan

A boy hit his toe with a hoe.
Let the pie lie on the pan. A dog
bit a girl on the arm.







THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.

LESSON XXX.

air all gay — then
ice =6out play come

































































Let us go out in the air. Come,
let us go on the ice. We can see
all the boys at play. Is it not gay?

LESSON X2XI.

yet rod jug dew
wet sod mug new

I see a new mug
by the new jug.

The sod is yet
wet with dew. A





rod is for the bad.
re









22 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.



LESSON XXXII.

one boat when
love pond will





















































































They are on the pond in a boat.
The dog goes in for the hat of one
of the boys.

He has gotit. What a good dog!
I love a dog when he is good.

LESSON XXXIII.

tin cup tell cake

been rub well take

Take a bit of cake.
Rub the tin cup.

. Tell me if you
~ have been well.












THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 23



LESSON XXXIV.
Recapitulation of Words.—No. 3.

dew lie play
far lies pond
for love — rob
gay mug rod
goes new rub
hit now sky
hoe one sod
how out take
ice pan tell
jug pie tells

LESSON XXXV.



See him fix the ege on its end.
That man will go to sea in a ship.

He is a good man, and a man
to love. He will go far, far out on
the wide, wide sea.











24 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST TEAD EL



Bee oT ARAMA:



The man with the gun does not
see the fox by the tree.

Does the bee buzz? It does.

Is the sun in the sky? It is.



LESSON XXXVII.

drum doll cap nest






= é
boy a drum? Qh yes.
girl a doll? She has.
man a cap? Oh no.
bird a nest? Sce it.














THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 25



LESSON XXXVITI.

teach school tries
read soon learn





















See the boy at his book. She
will teach him to read, for he is a
good boy and tries to learn. He
will learn to read the good book.







pen oil old foot
ink rake ask put

Give the boy pen and ink. Put
the oil ina can. Ask the girl how
old she is.







————————————————xx
THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. |





SON XL.



owl was in a tree. A fox is sly
and shy. Put the fish on a dish.

LESSON XLI.



A. girl fell from a swing and _ hit
her head. it made her cry. swing is not a safe thine for a

little girl.

ees an







' THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 27









LESSON ALII.

bed went swim too
said time beach two









































































A boy went to a beach by the
sea. He saw two dogs who went
in to swim. They had a good
time. He had a good time too.






LESSON XLII.

them here words sing






Come
hear these birds. 1 ¥
hear them; they sing
long and well. but §
sing no words.









28 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.
LESSON XLIV.

Recapitulation of Words.—No. 4.
act eye leg soon
ask fell long sun
beach fill made swim
bed fish nest. swing
bee fix oil tea
birds fly old teach
buzz foot owl them
cap four pen thing
cow from put these
cows gun rake time
dish guns read too
does head said tree
doll hear school tries
drum here shy two
ear ink sing went
egg its sir words
end learn sly your



LESSON XLV.

barn bark vex hay

Hear the dog bark
at the ox. They are
~in the barn. An ox





eats hay. The dog ;
“will vex the ox. 1













THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 2g

LESSON XLVI.

Shall there floor
blind where ehildren



























Look ra See the children

at play! Where is the blind man ?
The girl plays that she is the blind
man. One boy is down on the floor.

LESSON XLVII.

white black hot drink

I can see two &
cows. They go to
drink. One is white,

\} one black. It is a
hot day.

' 3 *







30 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.

LESSON XLVIII.

down talk blue child
shoe mild

fall walk





























By the blue sea we can walk
and talk. The air is mild now.
See the boats. Do not wet your
new shoes, child.

LESSON XLIX.
swan neck lake fine.

See the white
swan on the lake.
See it swim. Is it
not a fine bird?
What a long neck
it has!





















| THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 31

LESSON L.

hight
night
quite
house
shore
gaze

] love to gaze on | the lieht- house
by night. Tis light is for the ships
that come near the shore. We
will walk there on the shore.






LESSON LI.

smell sweet

Let us go and ~*<
watch the men as =
they make hay. I
love the sweet smell
of new hay.

watch









32 TUE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. |

LESSON LI.

horse

rode

hurt

< sinall
thrown

A pig ran near ilies legs of a gay
horse. A boy who rode the horse
was thrown off and hurt. It is not
safe for a boy to ride a gay horse.

LESSON LIil.

Star’
step
sits
pure ©

A girl sits on the door-step and
looks at the moon and the stars so
clear and pure.























THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 33

LESSON LIV.
Recapitulation of Words—No. 5.

bark fine near smell
barn ’ floor neck star
black gaze night step
blind hay pure swan
blue horse quite sweet
child hot ride talk
chil’dren house rode there
clear hurt safe thrown
door lake shall vex
down light shoe walk
drink mild shore where
fall moon small white

LESSON LV.
Ann sleep — once

crib) = says ~—s mind

Ann puts her | |
doll in its crib. we
“Go to sleep,” she jj
says; “mind your. i)
little mother, child, |}
and go to sleep at.
once.”













\ |
i







34 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.

LESSON LVI.

steam name flag
wide waved — took



























































‘Two fine steam-ships once met
on the wide sea. On one of the
ships there was a little girl. She
took a flag and waved it.

LHSSON LVII.

could would should

A dog ran to get our cat; but
the dog could not run as fast as
the cat, so the cat got off.









THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 35



LESSON LVIITI.
care earth cloud
their heard gone
bend wind — blows

The wind
I see a black cloud
The trees bend tc
the earth. The birds
you heard sing are

gone.
LESSON LIX.
cane mouth Max
paws guard — keep
Here is Max. Sec a
him keep guard. He
has a hat on his
head and a cane in
his paws. But ah

what has he in hiss
mouth? Take it out, Max.







36 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.



LESSON LX.

flew
free

- dear
shoot

I saw a man with a gun try to
shoot a bird, but the bird flew off.
It flew off and sang a glad song. I
was glad to see the bird get free,

as the man had no use for it.

gave
lost

LESSON LXI.

poor found

mean street

This boy found
a bag and a book in
the street. He ran
and gave back the
bag and the book to

the man who had lost them.









NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.

LESSON ee

Jane has learnt to row a boat.
She has an oar in each hand.
How fast the boat must move! Sce
that duck on the pond.

LESSON LXIII.

Noise water





















See the boys They can row,
On the lake! They can play.

What a noise See them go
They will make’ On their way.
4









38 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.

Sate

LESSON LXIV.
Recapitulation of Words.—No. 6.



Ann found mean shoot
blows free mind should
cane gave more sleep
care elad mouth song
cloud gone must steani
could guard name still
crib hand noise street
dear hands oar their
duck heard oars took
each home once use
earth Jane paws wa'ter
fast keep poor waved
flag learnt row would
flags lost sang wind
tlew Max songs wide

cask



LESS

ON LXV.
het












reach

The boy tries to reach down
into a cask to get an apple. Will
he not fall? Yes; see, he falls!
He should not act in that way.

ae cn ee ee Fe ee



Mi
i











THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 39





LESSON LXVI.
great green first
break leaves llowers








On the first of May we all went
to get flowers and green leaves.
We had a fine time. “Mt day-break
the air was mild, and not a cloud
was to be seen.

LESSON LXVII.

fire call hurry
Fire! fire! AY a
house is on fire! /4
Get water to put
out the fire. Call =
the fire-men. ‘Tell
them to hurry.











40 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.



LESSON LXVIII.

lamb five cart
climb = ugh frog



What do you see? I can see
five birds on a high tree; a lamb
on the sod; a boy, a horse, a cart,
a flag, a frog, and a log.

LESSON LXIX.

fair some bright
You must not lie late in bed. The sun
has been up some time. Your father and
brother are up and at work. How fai
and bright the day! Come out and see.













THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 41

LESSON LX.

kite hold

like large
trot bark
slip pulls
John hand:







John has a large new kite

it go up, high up in the air! John
runs with it to make it go up. .

Hold on to the string, John. It
pulls, but you must not let it slip
from your hand.

The wind blows well. John’s
dog Trot runs with him. Trot
barks, for he likes to see the kite
goup. So do I.

es











42 ae NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.



We saw an old blind man by the
side of the road. A dog held the
man’s hat, as if to beg for him.
My brother put. five cents into the
man’s hat.

LESSON LX&XITI.




Rose little
clothes,
soft

hair





Pronounce clotoes kloze or klothz.

1 take care of her clothes; And a very small nose
She has soft flaxen hair,

And her name is Rose.

And a sweet little mouth,

I have a little doll, | She has pretty blue eyes
|
|
| And her name is Rose





THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 43



LESSON LXXIIL

neat > brush





week hope
spell comb
next write

I see a brush, a comb and a book.
The girl has the brush and the
comb in her hands; her brother
has the book.

Make him neat, sister! Brush
his hair every day. Next week he
must go to school.

LESSON LXXIV.

We saw a fox try to get a hen,
but the hen did not let him get
her. She flew up to the top of
her pen; and then a man ran to
get the fox, but the fox ran off.

The man had a gun, and fired it
at the fox; but the man did not
take good aim; the fox was not hit.



























=





44 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER



LESSON LXXV.

Ruth J une garden



On a fine day in June, Ruth
went to walk. She found a pink,
and held it up for her mother to
smell of. Ruth loves the garden.
I hope you will love it too.

LESSON LXXVI.

back kind Bluff

AF John can sit on
his dog’s back; for
this dog is large and
kind. His name is
Bluff. He takes care
of John.







THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 46

LESSON LXXVII.

Recapitulation of Words.—No. 7.
ap ple fair John’s purse
back fall June reach
beg fine kind road
blind fire kite Rose
Bluff first lamb Ruth
break flax’en large side
bright flowers leaves slip
brush frog like slips
call garden lit’tle soft
cart great lost some
cask ereen neat spell
cents hair next string
climb high pink trot
clothes hold pret ty very
comb hope pull week
each hurry pulls write



pump J
beast. (saan

Pump away, boy! Cold water is the thing for
young and old; for bird and beast; for man,
woman and child. We want water to drink and
water to wash with.













46 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.



LESSON LXXIX.
pipe fist Snow
strike yours dare
club drop comes







The boys have made a snow-
man. He has a pipe in his mouth
and a club in his fist. Strike us,
if you dare, snow-man! When the .
sun comes out you will drop that
club of yours.










LESSON LXXxX.
The little bird sat on the top of a tree,
“And who is so glad as 1?” sang he.
The little boy sat on the top of a gate;
Run to school, little boy, or you will be late





THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.

LESSON L&XXI.
Recapitulation of Words.—No. 8.
beast drop pump wash
club fist snow woman
comes late strike young
dare pipe want yours

LESSON LXXXII.
les’sons moth’er chil’dren

Here they are! All back from
school! Their mother comes out
to say, “Iam glad to see you all















48 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.
back. Have you been good chil:
dren at school? Have you said
your lessons well ?”

Yes, they have been good, and
have said their lessons well. Now
they shall play. By and by they
shall look at a new book.









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SESUILEREC,










TO THE TEACHER.

In teaching the child to speak we give him whole words, and in
teaching him to read we should first do the same. Analysis inte
sounds and into letters should be subsequent steps.

In this First Reader let the child first pronounce the words sing/;
and then read the sentences in which they are used.

Object-teaching, however, may be employed, at the discretion of the
teacher, as auxiliary to the word-method, and here the blackboard
will be needed. Select some object-word from the Lesson. We will
suppose it is cat, from Lesson XVII. Puta picture of a cat before the
children, and then put a variety of questions in regard to the object
and its pictorial representation. Then present the word cat. This
will be the First Step.

Let the words in the Lesson having the sound of d@ as in cat (man,
ran, rat) be arranged in a column. Call attention to the sound of @
as heard in these words; then let the pupil make the sound—4, 4d, a,
d, d—distinctly. Then teach him to make each sound in the word cat,
thus, &, d, 4. Proceed in this way with other words of the Lesson.
Pointing to a word, say, Pronownce it, and the pupil speaks it. Then
say, Sound it, and he gives its separate elementary sounds. This is
the Second Step.

In the Third Step the alphabetic names of the letters composing
the words are taught, and you say, Spell it, Print the word cat on
the blackboard; then print each letter of the word separately. Then
require the pupils to name each letter as it is pointed out, and thus
gradually teach them to spell.

All these processes of analysis should be deferred as premature if it
is found that the attention of children can be better held by allowing
them to read the short sentences of the Lessons, even to the end of
the book, before proceeding to the more abstract task of teaching the
sounds and letters.

The advantage of one new feature in our present First Reader will
be readily seen. In the reading lessous very few words are used which
have not been previously made familiar to the eye by being given
in large type separately from the sentences. Frequent reviews of
each new collection of words as they are learnt add to the thorough.
aess of the plan; in which the advantages of the word-method, the
phonic, the old A, B, C method and of object-teaching are all com-
bined



Butered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1871, by
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In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.



Westcert & THOMSON, SHermMan & OD,
Stereotypers, Philada. Printers, Philada




























































dE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 5



SCRIPT.
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ae ee te a

yout Ueughts to yout lish Weth while
ee oe fe
You must Ceatn to bead and tele I
yu auld, tewtn yu mus adlend


6 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.

One, 8 i.
Two, - @0 IL.
Three, - @©@8@ Il.
Four, - @6800 , lV.
Five, - ©8808 VY.
Six, - ©8@808868 VI.
Seven, - ©8080 880 Vil.
Hight, - @©8282800808280 VITl.
Nine, - ©000006800 IX.

- eoccccccce X.

cat dog box

fay pan jar

raw __ hive SIze
milk quail

aei1o0u Ww y







* ,
THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 7 ]



LESSON I.



LESSON II.




THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER



LESSON III.

no
-Ho

SO
ho

(x0
lo

on of
On ox
or. Ox

Ho ox go on. So go ox.
O go or I go ox. Go on.

ail ——

ae


THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER,

LESSON VI.

am an at AS
as at an-

an aS am

at ame as

ITamon. Go on.
As I am on, go.
On anox am I? No.
Go on, go so.

if in:
in
it

I am in. Go on.
Is it on? It is.
Go if it is on.

On it is: so I go




10 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.





LESSON VIII.

me he we be ye
ye me He We be
Bee ee



Is he by it? He is.
; If he is by it, go on.
I go on, so go in.

up us” by my
by my up us
us up my by

I am up on it.
Up on it am IL.
On it up am I.














THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 11



LESSON &.




Ho, ho! Go up, gO On, go so.
So go, ho, ho! go up, go on.








the thy our Ah

Ah! the ox is in.
Is it the ox? No.
Is it our ox? No. ake
Ah! it is no ox. ==



LESSON XII.

He she She
If she is by it, so
is he. If he is by

it, so is she. He is,
by it; she is by it.












12 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.

LESSON XIII.







Do to it so, as I do to it.
As I do to it, to it do so.
To it do so, as I to it do.
To it as I do, so do to it.

LESSON XIV.

do go lo ho



no so 0 to.
so no do go
to
Go do.
Go to.



Do go.














THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 18



LESSON XV.

Recapitulation of Words.—No. 1.

[The thirty-six words of the preceding lessons are repeated
in this. Let the pupils, singly or all together, pronounce the
words first across the page and then down, till they are readily
known by their forms at sight. Then the words may be
spelled, or their elements sounded, at the teacher’s option. |

an on he gO A
am or me ho a
at OX we lo I
if up ye no i
in us by so O
it be my on 0
as of to the Ah
is do she thy our

LESSON XVI.
his hers hers his

Is it hers or his?
It is his or hers.

It is hers or his.
2






14 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.



LESSON XVII.

cat





Phe cat ran at the rat.
The dog ran at the hog.
The man ran at the dog.

Man, cat, rat, dog, hog ran.

LESSON XVIII.

boy
oO}







Girl, see me in the ear.
Are you in the car, boy? I am.

seed






THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 15

LESSON XIX.

has and bag
hat land nag





































See! the dog has a bag.

On the nag is a boy.

The boy has a hat.

Boy, nag, dog are on our land.



LESSON XX.

had bad book got
have lad look

Look at her book.
1 had a book; a bad
lad got it. She has
a book, as you see.









16 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER,



BESSON XXI.

hen men fed did
hens met yes give








Has the girl fed the hens? Yes.
Did she do so? Yes. The men
I met are to give me a hen. Are
the men to do so? Yes.

LESSON XXII.

him what — little
who mine — good
| Who is on the
nag? tle boy; what of
it? The nag is
mine; look at the
nag and the lad.

i






THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 17

day lay vet lig
say way set

Did es pig get ae Yes, the
pig got in. In “what way did he
getin? Ican not say. Did you
set the dog on him? Oh no.

LESSON XXIV.

log off but eat
hop fox hut ill
Hop off the log, % :

fox! Go, but do

not go to the hut

to eat the hens:

it is ill of you to
do so. Hop off!
2*


18 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.



sea ship cry big
tree whip try fig
saw with was may

You may see a ship
on the sea.
Do not ery, but try
to be good.
I saw a boy with
a big whip.
We saw a big fig:
it was on a tree.
& A cat met a rat, and
ae the rat ran.

LESSON XXVI.

father mother © sister
uncle brother aunt

An uncle is a brother of a
mother or father. An aunt is a |
sister of a mother or father.


THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 19

LESSON XXVIII.
Recapitulation of Words.—No. 2.
if my our
in no she
is of
it on
lo or

me OX








20 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.

LESSON XXVIII.

far now sky that
for how goes they




4
TER eS = .
LSD iM, ———= a

What is it that they see up in
the sky? What is it for? I can
not say. Look now how it goes
up, far, far, up.

LESSON XXIX.
toe he bit arm
hoe pie lit pan

A boy hit his toe with a hoe.
Let the pie lie on the pan. A dog
bit a girl on the arm.




THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.

LESSON XXX.

air all gay — then
ice =6out play come

































































Let us go out in the air. Come,
let us go on the ice. We can see
all the boys at play. Is it not gay?

LESSON X2XI.

yet rod jug dew
wet sod mug new

I see a new mug
by the new jug.

The sod is yet
wet with dew. A





rod is for the bad.
re






22 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.



LESSON XXXII.

one boat when
love pond will





















































































They are on the pond in a boat.
The dog goes in for the hat of one
of the boys.

He has gotit. What a good dog!
I love a dog when he is good.

LESSON XXXIII.

tin cup tell cake

been rub well take

Take a bit of cake.
Rub the tin cup.

. Tell me if you
~ have been well.









THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 23



LESSON XXXIV.
Recapitulation of Words.—No. 3.

dew lie play
far lies pond
for love — rob
gay mug rod
goes new rub
hit now sky
hoe one sod
how out take
ice pan tell
jug pie tells

LESSON XXXV.



See him fix the ege on its end.
That man will go to sea in a ship.

He is a good man, and a man
to love. He will go far, far out on
the wide, wide sea.








24 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST TEAD EL



Bee oT ARAMA:



The man with the gun does not
see the fox by the tree.

Does the bee buzz? It does.

Is the sun in the sky? It is.



LESSON XXXVII.

drum doll cap nest






= é
boy a drum? Qh yes.
girl a doll? She has.
man a cap? Oh no.
bird a nest? Sce it.











THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 25



LESSON XXXVITI.

teach school tries
read soon learn





















See the boy at his book. She
will teach him to read, for he is a
good boy and tries to learn. He
will learn to read the good book.







pen oil old foot
ink rake ask put

Give the boy pen and ink. Put
the oil ina can. Ask the girl how
old she is.




————————————————xx
THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. |





SON XL.



owl was in a tree. A fox is sly
and shy. Put the fish on a dish.

LESSON XLI.



A. girl fell from a swing and _ hit
her head. it made her cry. swing is not a safe thine for a

little girl.

ees an




' THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 27









LESSON ALII.

bed went swim too
said time beach two









































































A boy went to a beach by the
sea. He saw two dogs who went
in to swim. They had a good
time. He had a good time too.






LESSON XLII.

them here words sing






Come
hear these birds. 1 ¥
hear them; they sing
long and well. but §
sing no words.






28 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.
LESSON XLIV.

Recapitulation of Words.—No. 4.
act eye leg soon
ask fell long sun
beach fill made swim
bed fish nest. swing
bee fix oil tea
birds fly old teach
buzz foot owl them
cap four pen thing
cow from put these
cows gun rake time
dish guns read too
does head said tree
doll hear school tries
drum here shy two
ear ink sing went
egg its sir words
end learn sly your



LESSON XLV.

barn bark vex hay

Hear the dog bark
at the ox. They are
~in the barn. An ox





eats hay. The dog ;
“will vex the ox. 1










THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 2g

LESSON XLVI.

Shall there floor
blind where ehildren



























Look ra See the children

at play! Where is the blind man ?
The girl plays that she is the blind
man. One boy is down on the floor.

LESSON XLVII.

white black hot drink

I can see two &
cows. They go to
drink. One is white,

\} one black. It is a
hot day.

' 3 *




30 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.

LESSON XLVIII.

down talk blue child
shoe mild

fall walk





























By the blue sea we can walk
and talk. The air is mild now.
See the boats. Do not wet your
new shoes, child.

LESSON XLIX.
swan neck lake fine.

See the white
swan on the lake.
See it swim. Is it
not a fine bird?
What a long neck
it has!


















| THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 31

LESSON L.

hight
night
quite
house
shore
gaze

] love to gaze on | the lieht- house
by night. Tis light is for the ships
that come near the shore. We
will walk there on the shore.






LESSON LI.

smell sweet

Let us go and ~*<
watch the men as =
they make hay. I
love the sweet smell
of new hay.

watch






32 TUE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. |

LESSON LI.

horse

rode

hurt

< sinall
thrown

A pig ran near ilies legs of a gay
horse. A boy who rode the horse
was thrown off and hurt. It is not
safe for a boy to ride a gay horse.

LESSON LIil.

Star’
step
sits
pure ©

A girl sits on the door-step and
looks at the moon and the stars so
clear and pure.




















THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 33

LESSON LIV.
Recapitulation of Words—No. 5.

bark fine near smell
barn ’ floor neck star
black gaze night step
blind hay pure swan
blue horse quite sweet
child hot ride talk
chil’dren house rode there
clear hurt safe thrown
door lake shall vex
down light shoe walk
drink mild shore where
fall moon small white

LESSON LV.
Ann sleep — once

crib) = says ~—s mind

Ann puts her | |
doll in its crib. we
“Go to sleep,” she jj
says; “mind your. i)
little mother, child, |}
and go to sleep at.
once.”










\ |
i







34 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.

LESSON LVI.

steam name flag
wide waved — took



























































‘Two fine steam-ships once met
on the wide sea. On one of the
ships there was a little girl. She
took a flag and waved it.

LHSSON LVII.

could would should

A dog ran to get our cat; but
the dog could not run as fast as
the cat, so the cat got off.






THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 35



LESSON LVIITI.
care earth cloud
their heard gone
bend wind — blows

The wind
I see a black cloud
The trees bend tc
the earth. The birds
you heard sing are

gone.
LESSON LIX.
cane mouth Max
paws guard — keep
Here is Max. Sec a
him keep guard. He
has a hat on his
head and a cane in
his paws. But ah

what has he in hiss
mouth? Take it out, Max.




36 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.



LESSON LX.

flew
free

- dear
shoot

I saw a man with a gun try to
shoot a bird, but the bird flew off.
It flew off and sang a glad song. I
was glad to see the bird get free,

as the man had no use for it.

gave
lost

LESSON LXI.

poor found

mean street

This boy found
a bag and a book in
the street. He ran
and gave back the
bag and the book to

the man who had lost them.






NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.

LESSON ee

Jane has learnt to row a boat.
She has an oar in each hand.
How fast the boat must move! Sce
that duck on the pond.

LESSON LXIII.

Noise water





















See the boys They can row,
On the lake! They can play.

What a noise See them go
They will make’ On their way.
4






38 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.

Sate

LESSON LXIV.
Recapitulation of Words.—No. 6.



Ann found mean shoot
blows free mind should
cane gave more sleep
care elad mouth song
cloud gone must steani
could guard name still
crib hand noise street
dear hands oar their
duck heard oars took
each home once use
earth Jane paws wa'ter
fast keep poor waved
flag learnt row would
flags lost sang wind
tlew Max songs wide

cask



LESS

ON LXV.
het












reach

The boy tries to reach down
into a cask to get an apple. Will
he not fall? Yes; see, he falls!
He should not act in that way.

ae cn ee ee Fe ee



Mi
i








THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 39





LESSON LXVI.
great green first
break leaves llowers








On the first of May we all went
to get flowers and green leaves.
We had a fine time. “Mt day-break
the air was mild, and not a cloud
was to be seen.

LESSON LXVII.

fire call hurry
Fire! fire! AY a
house is on fire! /4
Get water to put
out the fire. Call =
the fire-men. ‘Tell
them to hurry.








40 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.



LESSON LXVIII.

lamb five cart
climb = ugh frog



What do you see? I can see
five birds on a high tree; a lamb
on the sod; a boy, a horse, a cart,
a flag, a frog, and a log.

LESSON LXIX.

fair some bright
You must not lie late in bed. The sun
has been up some time. Your father and
brother are up and at work. How fai
and bright the day! Come out and see.










THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 41

LESSON LX.

kite hold

like large
trot bark
slip pulls
John hand:







John has a large new kite

it go up, high up in the air! John
runs with it to make it go up. .

Hold on to the string, John. It
pulls, but you must not let it slip
from your hand.

The wind blows well. John’s
dog Trot runs with him. Trot
barks, for he likes to see the kite
goup. So do I.

es








42 ae NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.



We saw an old blind man by the
side of the road. A dog held the
man’s hat, as if to beg for him.
My brother put. five cents into the
man’s hat.

LESSON LX&XITI.




Rose little
clothes,
soft

hair





Pronounce clotoes kloze or klothz.

1 take care of her clothes; And a very small nose
She has soft flaxen hair,

And her name is Rose.

And a sweet little mouth,

I have a little doll, | She has pretty blue eyes
|
|
| And her name is Rose


THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 43



LESSON LXXIIL

neat > brush





week hope
spell comb
next write

I see a brush, a comb and a book.
The girl has the brush and the
comb in her hands; her brother
has the book.

Make him neat, sister! Brush
his hair every day. Next week he
must go to school.

LESSON LXXIV.

We saw a fox try to get a hen,
but the hen did not let him get
her. She flew up to the top of
her pen; and then a man ran to
get the fox, but the fox ran off.

The man had a gun, and fired it
at the fox; but the man did not
take good aim; the fox was not hit.
























=





44 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER



LESSON LXXV.

Ruth J une garden



On a fine day in June, Ruth
went to walk. She found a pink,
and held it up for her mother to
smell of. Ruth loves the garden.
I hope you will love it too.

LESSON LXXVI.

back kind Bluff

AF John can sit on
his dog’s back; for
this dog is large and
kind. His name is
Bluff. He takes care
of John.




THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER. 46

LESSON LXXVII.

Recapitulation of Words.—No. 7.
ap ple fair John’s purse
back fall June reach
beg fine kind road
blind fire kite Rose
Bluff first lamb Ruth
break flax’en large side
bright flowers leaves slip
brush frog like slips
call garden lit’tle soft
cart great lost some
cask ereen neat spell
cents hair next string
climb high pink trot
clothes hold pret ty very
comb hope pull week
each hurry pulls write



pump J
beast. (saan

Pump away, boy! Cold water is the thing for
young and old; for bird and beast; for man,
woman and child. We want water to drink and
water to wash with.










46 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.



LESSON LXXIX.
pipe fist Snow
strike yours dare
club drop comes







The boys have made a snow-
man. He has a pipe in his mouth
and a club in his fist. Strike us,
if you dare, snow-man! When the .
sun comes out you will drop that
club of yours.










LESSON LXXxX.
The little bird sat on the top of a tree,
“And who is so glad as 1?” sang he.
The little boy sat on the top of a gate;
Run to school, little boy, or you will be late


THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.

LESSON L&XXI.
Recapitulation of Words.—No. 8.
beast drop pump wash
club fist snow woman
comes late strike young
dare pipe want yours

LESSON LXXXII.
les’sons moth’er chil’dren

Here they are! All back from
school! Their mother comes out
to say, “Iam glad to see you all












48 THE NEW AMERICAN FIRST READER.
back. Have you been good chil:
dren at school? Have you said
your lessons well ?”

Yes, they have been good, and
have said their lessons well. Now
they shall play. By and by they
shall look at a new book.






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THE NEW AMERICAN | mes

By EPES SARGENT and AM
COMPRISING:
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