Citation
Little boy blue

Material Information

Title:
Little boy blue : a collection of nursery rhymes with pictures
Creator:
Greenaway, Kate, 1846-1901 ( Illustrator )
Marcus Ward & Co ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Belfast
New York
Publisher:
Marcus Ward & Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
32 p. : col. ill. ; 22 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes -- 1875 ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry -- 1875 ( lcsh )
Baldwin -- 1875
Genre:
Nursery rhymes ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
poetry ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Northern Ireland -- Belfast
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Unsigned illustrations by Kate Greenaway appear on title page and pages 11, 17, and 24. Cf. Detroit Public Library. Kate Greenaway, p. 204.
General Note:
Decorated endpapers.
General Note:
Bound in dark blue glazed pictorial boards.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026847948 ( ALEPH )
ALH3478 ( NOTIS )
08149406 ( OCLC )

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text




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jes Boy Blue,
Come blow your horn,
The sheep’s in the meadow,

The cow’s in the corn.

How can a little boy

Mind his sheep,

Under the haycock,

Fast asleep ?











h CLI ECT/ION OCF

Nursery RHYMES
WITH Pictures

MaARcUS WaRD x Co LIMITED

LONDON BELFAST kK NEW yORK



PRINTED
AND PUBLISHED BY

S
MARCUS WARD
& CO LIMITED
LONDON
BELFAST: NEW YORK





Concencts



PAGE
Rub-a-dub-dub, - - 6,7
Hickory, dickory, dock, aS
Simple Simon, - - - 9
PAGE
Mr. Watts, - - - - 10 Oranges and lemons, - 20, 21
Little Miss Muffet, - - II London Town, - - 22
When I was a boy, =) 12,03 Hey, diddle, diddle, - 22
Jack and Jill, - - - 14, 15 My son John, - - - 23
Goosey, Goosey Gander, - 16 Valentine, O Valentine, - 24
Pat a cake, - - - 16 Rain, rain, - - - - 24
Little Bo-Peep, - - - 17 There was a little woman, 25
Three wise men of Gotham, 18 Bandy legs, - - . 26
T had a little pony, - - 19 Tossed up in a blanket, - 27
The Crooked Man, - - oT
The Raven, - Se OnE2O)
Wee Willie Winkie, - 30, 31

Little Boy Blue, - - = 32





DUB

Ree ere !
Three men in a tub,

The Butcher,

The Baker,

The Candlestick-maker.

They all came out of



A roasted potato.







\

acy

——








|e@KORY

P)ieKory
P)oeK

H ICKORY, dickory, dock!
The mouse ran up the clock!

The clock struck one,

Down the mouse ran,

Hickory, dickory, dock !

The clock struck two,
And three and four,
And the mouse had to run

Up and down every hour.





IMPLE imo

So SIMON met a pieman



Going to the fair;
Says Simple Simon to the pieman,
‘‘Let me taste your ware!”
Says the pieman to Simple Simon,
“First show me your penny ;”
Says Simple Simon to the pieman,

”

‘Indeed I have not any.





OME, good Mr. Watts, we are troubled with rats,
Will you drive them out of a house ?

We have mice, too, in plenty,
That feed in the pantry ;
But let the mice stay,

And nibble away—

What harm’s in

A little brown mouse ?





Poca Miss TiGereG
Gere
[_{TTLE Miss Muster 7
Sat on a tuffet,
Mm Eating of curds and whey ;
Along came a spider,
And sat down beside her,

And frightened Miss Muffet away.

(en)
> â„¢)
co)

Ever after, that spider
Could never abide her,
Because she had nothing to say;
So now, when he sees her,
Not wishing to tease her,

He goes t’other side of the way!



It





| HEN I was a boy
I lived by myself,




And all the bread and cheese I got
: Y I put upon the shelf.
The rats and the mice
They led me such a life,
I was forced to go to London-town

To get me a wife.

The streets were so broad,
And the lanes were so narrow,

I was forced to bring my wife home
In a wheelbarrow.

The wheelbarrow broke,
And my wife had a fall,

Down came wheelbarrow,

Wife, and all.

12







Kee

ACK and Jill went up the hill




To fetch a pail of water :
Jack fell down and broke his crown,

And Jill came tumbling after.

Up Jack got and home did trot
As fast as he could caper,
He went to bed to mend his head

With vinegar and brown paper.

Jill came in, and she did grin
To see his paper plaster :
His mother vexed did scold her next

For causing Jack’s disaster.





5



®

OOSEY, Goosey Gander,
Where shall I wander?
.Upstairs, downstairs,
And in my lady’s chamber !
There | meta little man
Who wouldn't say his prayers;
I took him by the left leg,

And threw him down-stairs !



AT a cake, pat a cake,
Baker’s man!
Bake me a cake
As fast as you can.
Make it and bake it,
And mark it with B,
And serve it up hot

For Baby and me.

16






a



®

OOSEY, Goosey Gander,
Where shall I wander?
.Upstairs, downstairs,
And in my lady’s chamber !
There | meta little man
Who wouldn't say his prayers;
I took him by the left leg,

And threw him down-stairs !



AT a cake, pat a cake,
Baker’s man!
Bake me a cake
As fast as you can.
Make it and bake it,
And mark it with B,
And serve it up hot

For Baby and me.

16






a



IT#LE O-PEEr

She lost her sheep,
And didn’t know where to find them;

Let them alone, and they'll come home,
And bring their tails behind them.





Little Bo-Peep fell fast asleep,

And dreamt she heard them bleating ;
But when she awoke, she found it a joke,
For they were still a-fleeting.

Then up she took her little crook,
Determined for to find them;

She found them indeed, but it made her heart bleed,
For they'd left their tails behind them,







It happened one day, as Bo-Peep did stray
Into a meadow hard by,

There she espied their tails side by side,
All hung on a tree to dry.

villi

ner? Ee
WT
aes

17





18







HREE wise men of Gotham
%

le Went to sea in a bowl;
If the bowl. had been stronger,

My tale had been longer.



HAD a little pony,
I called it Dapple Grey ;
I lent it to a lady
To ride a mile away.
She whipped it, she slashed it,
She drove it through the mire;
I will not lend my pony more

For all the lady’s hire!



ss





RANGES and lemons,”
Say the bells of St. Clement’s ;

“Poker and tongs,”
Say the bells of St. Johns;

“You owe me five farthings,”
Say the bells of St. Martin’s;

“When will you pay me?”

Say the bells of Old Bailey ;

“When I grow rich,”
Say the bells of Shoreditch ;

“When will that be?”

Say the bells of Stepney ;



“T do not know,”

Says the great bell of Bow,

20







hee] ~
ee 8 HICH is the way
. £3 To London Town—

To London Town, to London Town ?

One foot up and one foot down: °




That is the way to London Town!

EY ®PIDDLE YIDDLE

The cat and the fiddle,

The cow jumped over the moon:

The little dog laughed
To see such sport,
And the dish ran away
With the spoon.



22



hee] ~
ee 8 HICH is the way
. £3 To London Town—

To London Town, to London Town ?

One foot up and one foot down: °




That is the way to London Town!

EY ®PIDDLE YIDDLE

The cat and the fiddle,

The cow jumped over the moon:

The little dog laughed
To see such sport,
And the dish ran away
With the spoon.



22



IDDLE, diddle, dumpling !
*~ My son John
Went to bed
With his stockings on:
One shoe off,
And one shoe on,
_ Diddle, diddle, dumpling!
My son John!



n
G2



Zz

oY

ALENTINE, O Valentine !



Curl your locks as I do mine!

ES #

















Dress yourself in clothes so fine,

ME

Af

ee oS
I’ll choose you for my Valentine!

cee

ve

go to Spain,




AIN, rain,

And never more come back again!



24



Zz

oY

ALENTINE, O Valentine !



Curl your locks as I do mine!

ES #

















Dress yourself in clothes so fine,

ME

Af

ee oS
I’ll choose you for my Valentine!

cee

ve

go to Spain,




AIN, rain,

And never more come back again!



24



HERE was a little woman, as I’ve heard tell;
She went to market, her eggs for to sell—

Her eggs for to sell, and her beef for to buy,
And she fell asleep on the king’s highway.

Up came a little pedlar, whose name was Stout,
And he clipped her petticoats all round about,—
All round about, close by her knees :

Then this little woman began for to sneeze.



She began to shiver, and she began to shake,

Till this little woman began to awake. E

She began to wake, and she began to cry,
“ Deat, ha. mere¢yon me!. This is none of 1;
But if this be I, as I suppose it be,

I have a little dog at home, and he knows me.” &




Home went this little woman, all in the dark,
And when she came near, her dog began to bark—
Her dog began to bark, and she began to cry,

“Oh dear! ha’ mercy on me! This is none of I.”

25



S I was going to sell my eggs,

I met a man with bandy legs:
Bandy legs and crooked toes,
I tripped him up,
And he fell on his nose.



26



HERE was an old woman



Tossed up in a blanket,






ei
ZS. =
—S LEN Ninety times as high as the moon.

i Where she was going, I couldn’t but ask it,

For under her arm she carried a broom.





“Old woman, old woman, old woman,” cried I

iy
yy




“Whither! oh whither! oh whither so high?”
“To sweep the cobwebs off the sky,
And I'll be with you by-and-by.”

ZY

=, HERE was a crooked man,

And he walked a crooked mile, , WW)
And he found a crooked sixpence SS
.
Beside a crooked stile; \

$e And he had a crooked cat,
And it caught a crooked mouse,

And they all lived together

In a little crooked house.



HERE was an old woman



Tossed up in a blanket,






ei
ZS. =
—S LEN Ninety times as high as the moon.

i Where she was going, I couldn’t but ask it,

For under her arm she carried a broom.





“Old woman, old woman, old woman,” cried I

iy
yy




“Whither! oh whither! oh whither so high?”
“To sweep the cobwebs off the sky,
And I'll be with you by-and-by.”

ZY

=, HERE was a crooked man,

And he walked a crooked mile, , WW)
And he found a crooked sixpence SS
.
Beside a crooked stile; \

$e And he had a crooked cat,
And it caught a crooked mouse,

And they all lived together

In a little crooked house.










FARMER went trotting
e Upon his grey mare—
Bumpety, bumpety, bump!
With his daughter behind him,
So rosy and fair,

Lumpety, lumpety, lump!

A raven cried “ Croak,” and they all tumbled down;

The mare broke her knees, and the farmer his crown;
The mischievous raven flew laughing away,

And vowed he would serve them the same the next day—

Bumpety, bumpety, bump!

28



4 ZL










Be WILLIE WINKITE
Runs through the town,
Upstairs and downstairs
In his night-gown:
Rapping at the window, #
Crying through the lock—

“Are the children in their beds ?

3°







ponents





eo



2



1 BOY BLUE,

Your horn is blown!



Here you are at the end,

Left all alone!

32



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Full Text

4
ie a {
i,

J



i
(3




ay a a a
== art >



The Baldwin Library

University
mB 53
Florida


Cr a

%

[ae De
ia





jes Boy Blue,
Come blow your horn,
The sheep’s in the meadow,

The cow’s in the corn.

How can a little boy

Mind his sheep,

Under the haycock,

Fast asleep ?








h CLI ECT/ION OCF

Nursery RHYMES
WITH Pictures

MaARcUS WaRD x Co LIMITED

LONDON BELFAST kK NEW yORK
PRINTED
AND PUBLISHED BY

S
MARCUS WARD
& CO LIMITED
LONDON
BELFAST: NEW YORK


Concencts



PAGE
Rub-a-dub-dub, - - 6,7
Hickory, dickory, dock, aS
Simple Simon, - - - 9
PAGE
Mr. Watts, - - - - 10 Oranges and lemons, - 20, 21
Little Miss Muffet, - - II London Town, - - 22
When I was a boy, =) 12,03 Hey, diddle, diddle, - 22
Jack and Jill, - - - 14, 15 My son John, - - - 23
Goosey, Goosey Gander, - 16 Valentine, O Valentine, - 24
Pat a cake, - - - 16 Rain, rain, - - - - 24
Little Bo-Peep, - - - 17 There was a little woman, 25
Three wise men of Gotham, 18 Bandy legs, - - . 26
T had a little pony, - - 19 Tossed up in a blanket, - 27
The Crooked Man, - - oT
The Raven, - Se OnE2O)
Wee Willie Winkie, - 30, 31

Little Boy Blue, - - = 32


DUB

Ree ere !
Three men in a tub,

The Butcher,

The Baker,

The Candlestick-maker.

They all came out of



A roasted potato.




\

acy

——





|e@KORY

P)ieKory
P)oeK

H ICKORY, dickory, dock!
The mouse ran up the clock!

The clock struck one,

Down the mouse ran,

Hickory, dickory, dock !

The clock struck two,
And three and four,
And the mouse had to run

Up and down every hour.


IMPLE imo

So SIMON met a pieman



Going to the fair;
Says Simple Simon to the pieman,
‘‘Let me taste your ware!”
Says the pieman to Simple Simon,
“First show me your penny ;”
Says Simple Simon to the pieman,

”

‘Indeed I have not any.


OME, good Mr. Watts, we are troubled with rats,
Will you drive them out of a house ?

We have mice, too, in plenty,
That feed in the pantry ;
But let the mice stay,

And nibble away—

What harm’s in

A little brown mouse ?


Poca Miss TiGereG
Gere
[_{TTLE Miss Muster 7
Sat on a tuffet,
Mm Eating of curds and whey ;
Along came a spider,
And sat down beside her,

And frightened Miss Muffet away.

(en)
> â„¢)
co)

Ever after, that spider
Could never abide her,
Because she had nothing to say;
So now, when he sees her,
Not wishing to tease her,

He goes t’other side of the way!



It


| HEN I was a boy
I lived by myself,




And all the bread and cheese I got
: Y I put upon the shelf.
The rats and the mice
They led me such a life,
I was forced to go to London-town

To get me a wife.

The streets were so broad,
And the lanes were so narrow,

I was forced to bring my wife home
In a wheelbarrow.

The wheelbarrow broke,
And my wife had a fall,

Down came wheelbarrow,

Wife, and all.

12

Kee

ACK and Jill went up the hill




To fetch a pail of water :
Jack fell down and broke his crown,

And Jill came tumbling after.

Up Jack got and home did trot
As fast as he could caper,
He went to bed to mend his head

With vinegar and brown paper.

Jill came in, and she did grin
To see his paper plaster :
His mother vexed did scold her next

For causing Jack’s disaster.


5
®

OOSEY, Goosey Gander,
Where shall I wander?
.Upstairs, downstairs,
And in my lady’s chamber !
There | meta little man
Who wouldn't say his prayers;
I took him by the left leg,

And threw him down-stairs !



AT a cake, pat a cake,
Baker’s man!
Bake me a cake
As fast as you can.
Make it and bake it,
And mark it with B,
And serve it up hot

For Baby and me.

16






a
IT#LE O-PEEr

She lost her sheep,
And didn’t know where to find them;

Let them alone, and they'll come home,
And bring their tails behind them.





Little Bo-Peep fell fast asleep,

And dreamt she heard them bleating ;
But when she awoke, she found it a joke,
For they were still a-fleeting.

Then up she took her little crook,
Determined for to find them;

She found them indeed, but it made her heart bleed,
For they'd left their tails behind them,







It happened one day, as Bo-Peep did stray
Into a meadow hard by,

There she espied their tails side by side,
All hung on a tree to dry.

villi

ner? Ee
WT
aes

17


18




HREE wise men of Gotham
%

le Went to sea in a bowl;
If the bowl. had been stronger,

My tale had been longer.



HAD a little pony,
I called it Dapple Grey ;
I lent it to a lady
To ride a mile away.
She whipped it, she slashed it,
She drove it through the mire;
I will not lend my pony more

For all the lady’s hire!



ss


RANGES and lemons,”
Say the bells of St. Clement’s ;

“Poker and tongs,”
Say the bells of St. Johns;

“You owe me five farthings,”
Say the bells of St. Martin’s;

“When will you pay me?”

Say the bells of Old Bailey ;

“When I grow rich,”
Say the bells of Shoreditch ;

“When will that be?”

Say the bells of Stepney ;



“T do not know,”

Says the great bell of Bow,

20

hee] ~
ee 8 HICH is the way
. £3 To London Town—

To London Town, to London Town ?

One foot up and one foot down: °




That is the way to London Town!

EY ®PIDDLE YIDDLE

The cat and the fiddle,

The cow jumped over the moon:

The little dog laughed
To see such sport,
And the dish ran away
With the spoon.



22
IDDLE, diddle, dumpling !
*~ My son John
Went to bed
With his stockings on:
One shoe off,
And one shoe on,
_ Diddle, diddle, dumpling!
My son John!



n
G2
Zz

oY

ALENTINE, O Valentine !



Curl your locks as I do mine!

ES #

















Dress yourself in clothes so fine,

ME

Af

ee oS
I’ll choose you for my Valentine!

cee

ve

go to Spain,




AIN, rain,

And never more come back again!



24
HERE was a little woman, as I’ve heard tell;
She went to market, her eggs for to sell—

Her eggs for to sell, and her beef for to buy,
And she fell asleep on the king’s highway.

Up came a little pedlar, whose name was Stout,
And he clipped her petticoats all round about,—
All round about, close by her knees :

Then this little woman began for to sneeze.



She began to shiver, and she began to shake,

Till this little woman began to awake. E

She began to wake, and she began to cry,
“ Deat, ha. mere¢yon me!. This is none of 1;
But if this be I, as I suppose it be,

I have a little dog at home, and he knows me.” &




Home went this little woman, all in the dark,
And when she came near, her dog began to bark—
Her dog began to bark, and she began to cry,

“Oh dear! ha’ mercy on me! This is none of I.”

25
S I was going to sell my eggs,

I met a man with bandy legs:
Bandy legs and crooked toes,
I tripped him up,
And he fell on his nose.



26
HERE was an old woman



Tossed up in a blanket,






ei
ZS. =
—S LEN Ninety times as high as the moon.

i Where she was going, I couldn’t but ask it,

For under her arm she carried a broom.





“Old woman, old woman, old woman,” cried I

iy
yy




“Whither! oh whither! oh whither so high?”
“To sweep the cobwebs off the sky,
And I'll be with you by-and-by.”

ZY

=, HERE was a crooked man,

And he walked a crooked mile, , WW)
And he found a crooked sixpence SS
.
Beside a crooked stile; \

$e And he had a crooked cat,
And it caught a crooked mouse,

And they all lived together

In a little crooked house.







FARMER went trotting
e Upon his grey mare—
Bumpety, bumpety, bump!
With his daughter behind him,
So rosy and fair,

Lumpety, lumpety, lump!

A raven cried “ Croak,” and they all tumbled down;

The mare broke her knees, and the farmer his crown;
The mischievous raven flew laughing away,

And vowed he would serve them the same the next day—

Bumpety, bumpety, bump!

28
4 ZL







Be WILLIE WINKITE
Runs through the town,
Upstairs and downstairs
In his night-gown:
Rapping at the window, #
Crying through the lock—

“Are the children in their beds ?

3°




ponents





eo



2
1 BOY BLUE,

Your horn is blown!



Here you are at the end,

Left all alone!

32
EH CW eat OS cea CG GIG cece
eRe ets oS | Sh a ls
ea | oS Sh ene PSS CSIC)
sees a a) 3% ee
Hinedeae Hemene neue
io) Si) 5% (lS sew et oot | Sal
alae taee tyes fel vale
ee eee ee sa

eae ea sens Gi
pi lelWa(ol sf olzale 56 «1s 8/54 ts 9 34

eile tee at's te © ls ve iets @)
Reece ee ees ea ae alo el ola




B

nro









—~——- fs



ofa ae FS i SS] |
<8 te (0/34 sta lelati
pe Amen om en
sWetetsAetes wet

*|vsle| 5% [9] lel s%(e]

ae
6
xe
Co SS
Me)
+ F +
ij
fe A Of |

ae
| EI
el SIca)
oh

ie? | r ==
y ° | WW 7
Ww “
AOS |
& Aof|
Ei; Sie | Ne
o \ | | A
= &}* 9 | m
rn +
————s | 6 [oP
‘A tue A
NA AS
ik e AX
| L—_ | 6
\e ao
rm t Ae |
« ey WW
ae
2 Wy a é
|| As oe
>
NI
S Re
i
&}5|
2 mm Ae
fo | | Ar
> 6a
oc & wy
DS .
9B) GS
For of
a 5 s
5 ey RS

[ae] Sl S|
ORO



Ts Sei =
oie
ce
Lone

SL