Citation
Blue & red, or, The discontented lobster

Material Information

Title:
Blue & red, or, The discontented lobster his history related in verse
Alternate title:
Blue and red, or, The discontented lobster
Portion of title:
Discontented lobster
Creator:
Ewing, Juliana Horatia Gatty, 1841-1885
André, R ( Richard ), 1834-1907 ( Illustrator )
Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge (Great Britain) ( Publisher )
E. & J.B. Young & Co ( Publisher )
Emrik & Binger ( Lithographer )
Place of Publication:
London
New York
Publisher:
Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge
E. & J.B. Young & Co.
Manufacturer:
Chromolithographed by Emrik & Binger
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
32 p. : col. ill. ; 24 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Lobsters -- Juvenile poetry ( lcsh )
Contentment -- Juvenile poetry ( lcsh )
Blue -- Juvenile poetry ( lcsh )
Red -- Juvenile poetry ( lcsh )
Wit and humor, Juvenile -- Juvenile poetry ( lcsh )
War -- Juvenile poetry ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1883
Genre:
poetry ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Illustrated half-title.
General Note:
Chromolithographs: half-title, frontispiece, t.p. ill., text illustrations.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
by Juliana Horatia Ewing ; and painted in colours by R. Andre.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026685122 ( ALEPH )
ALG6270 ( NOTIS )
21308991 ( OCLC )

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Â¥

Lp SOR 'o::
» Society: Fir
Christian K
lor losis A













SS
RESAS |
DNS

L

»
y
y
165

2 i)
SON oe

‘ S @ 1 4 Ve

A WO

& San 17 ve
I

Xabi
NW 847

fe :

Disconterted.
Llolsster’:



i MY aL
Py Vy i
4m Z ise

fyi



Ss Illustrated by

R: André :
















UTTER ITT ae eae RE

RTS

.
8
%
8

MATL UE

REASSURES ATA TMB A ET CREA ORR TIF PSPS BS EIEN TES ESE BO LAT LN SCARE BESTE







bas

Topster,: ,
bs Qistory eee i Verse , f

. i eee: Swing:
\ Autor of | Jackanopes’” S é

“We and the World:
€T:€T:E€T:€T.ET: YA

igtees
and gave in colours





Chromolithographed by
EmrkS Binger’
15 Holborn Viaduct: London: €:C:









or the”

isconfenled” |
[eoBSTE






















mt

ERMIT me, Reader, to make my bow,
And allow
Me to humbly commend to your tender
mercies
The hero of these simple verses.
By domicile, of the British Nation ;
By birth and family, a Crustacean.

One’s hero should have a name that rare is ;



_And his was Homarus, but Vulgaris /

A Lobster who dwelt

with several others,—

His sisters and brothers,—

In a secluded but happy
home,

Under the salt sea’s foam.







~ At the outermost point of a rocky bay.













A sandy, tide-pooly, cliff-bound cove,
With a red-roofed fishing village above,
Of irregular cottages, perched up high
Amid pale yellow poppies next to the sky.
Shells and pebbles and wrack below,

And shrimpers shrimping all in a row;
Tawny sails and tarry boats,

Dark brown nets and old cork floats ;
Nasty smells at the nicest spots, |

And blue-jerseyed sailors and lobster-pots.





sicrPeN TRA



IS sweet to be
At home in the deep, deep sea.












It is very pleasant to have the power
- To take the air on dry land for an hour;
And when the mid-day mid-summer sun

Is toasting the fields as brown as a bun,




And the sands are baking, it’s very nice




To feel as cool as a strawberry ice



In one’s own particular damp sea-cave,









8



And the ‘ better to see with’ down below,




To wash one’s eyes in the ebb and flow






Of the tides that come and the tides that go.”

_ So sang the Lobsters, thankful for their mercies,

All but the hero of these simple verses.













pe : ‘ a hero—

If he’s worth the grand
old name.
_ Though temperature

may change from

“Should keep his temper,
all the same :
Courageous and content
\ in his estate,
And proof against the
spiteful blows of Fate.
It, therefore; troubles
me to have to say,

That with this Lobster

oo it was never so ;
aa gee .

; See Whate’er the weather or the sort of day,



TR Ao No matter if the tide were high or low,
ae

eae

pee) >

Whatever happened he was never pleased,

: et is Pe And not himself alone, but all his kindred teased.





















“Oh! oh!

What a world of woe

We flounder about in, here below ! |
Oh dear ! oh dear!

It is too, too dull, down here !



I haven’t the slightest patience —
With any of my relations ;
I take no interest whatever
In things they call curious and clever.
And, for love of dear truth, I state it,
As for my Home—I hate it !
I’m conyinced 1 was formed for a larger sphere,
And am utterly out of my element here.”

Then his brothers and sisters said,

Each solemnly shaking his and her head,





And yet we are sure,
















That, in spite of all you have to endure,

You might go much farther and fare much worse.
We wish you could live in a higher sphere,
But we think you might live happily here.”

“‘T dont live, I only exist,” he said,

“Be pleased to look upon me as dead.”

And he swam to his cave, and took to his bed.
He sulked so long that the sisters cried,

‘“« Perhaps he has really and truly died.”

But the brothers went to the cave to peep,
For they said, ‘‘ Perhaps he is only asleep.”

They found him, far too busy to talk,





With a very large piece of bad salt pork.








‘Dear Brother, what luck you have had to-day !




Can you tell us, pray,



Is there any more pork afloat in the bay?”




But not a word would my hero say,




Except to repeat, witn sad persistence,




“ This is not life, it’s only existence.”







fishing village

An individual bent on pillage ;



But a robber whom true scientific




feeling




May find guilty of picking, but




not of stealing.




He picked the yellow poppies on the cliffs ;




He picked the feathery seaweeds in the pools ;







iffs

k

and s

2
oO
a
g
o
Ge
mn
~
a
o
J
S
3.
oe,
o
o
o
o
ce
~
oS
vo
aw
oe
a
o
ri

s of all the country fools

ked the brain

e pic

ium,

is own herbar

ies for h

d the popp

ie

r

Hed

1m,

de town aquari

i

And caught the Lobsters for a seas





A

‘“ TANK No. 20°” is deep,
“TANK NO. 20”? is cool,

For clever contrivances always keep

The water fresh in the pool ;

Anda very fine plate-glass window is free to the public

view,







y























For the primal cause of incidents,
One often hunts about,
When its only a coincidence
That matters so turned out.
And I do not know the reason
Or the reason I would tell ;
But it may have been the season—
| Why my hero chose this moment
for casting off his shell.
He had hitherto been dressed

(And so had all the rest)

In purplish navy blue from top to toe ;
But now his coat was new,

It was of every shade of blue

Between azure and the deepest indigo ;



And his sisters kept telling him, till they were tired,




“Vhere never was anyone so much. admired.”



BREE LES,







My hero was happy at last, you will say ?














So he was, dear Reader—two nights and a day ;

Then, as he and his relatives lay,

Each at the mouth of his mock

Cave in the face of a miniature rock,

They saw, descending the opposite cliff,

By jerks spasmodic of elbows stiff ;

Now hurriedly slipping, now seeming calmer,
With the ease and the grace of a hog in armour,
And as solemn as any ancient palmer,
|

No less than nine,

Exceedingly fine,



. And full-grown lobsters, all in a line.

Sbput the worst of the matter remains to be said. j

f them RE ;

i] These nine big lobsters were all of










Palinurus vulgaris, oc Spiny Lobster.














And when they got safe to the floor of the tank,—

For which they had chiefly good luck to thank, —

They settled their cumbersome coats of mail, ;
And every beter tucked his tail

| Neatly under him as he sat |

In a circle of nine for a cosy chat.

They seemed to be sitting hand in hand,

As shoulder to shoulder they sat in the sand,

And waved their antenna in calm rotation,

c Apparently holding a consultation.

But what were the feelings of Master Blue Shell.



18,

-From the moment that those Nine he saw.

He never could bear his blue coat more.

“Oh, Brothers in misfortune !” he said,

“Did you ever see any lobsters so grand,

As those who sit down there in the sand?

Why were we born at all, since not one of us al] wasborn red 2”
_“ Dear Brother, indeed, this is quite a whim.”

“(So his brothers and sisters reasoned with him ;
And being exceedingly cultivated,

The case with remarkable fairness stated.)





1.













CP is a primary colour,

it’s true,




® But so is BLUE}

And we all of us think, dear Brother,
That one is quite as good as the other,
A swaggering soldier’s a saucy varlet,

- Though he looks uncommonly well in

scarlet.

No doubt there’s much to be said

For a field of poppies of glowing red ;



20











eee rifts in sunset skies,
Roses and blushes and red sunrise ;
For a glow on the Alps, and the
glow of a forge,
A Foxglove bank in a woodland
Borge ;
Sparks that are struck from red-
hot bars,
The sun in a mist, and the red>

star Mars ;








Flowers of countless shades and shapes,
Matadors’, judges’, and gypsies’ capes ;

The red-haired King who was killed in the wood,
Robin Redbreasts and little Red Riding Hood ;



TET EARLE EN IE CIEL RINE CST ITT





The scarlet Ibis,

rose cockatoos,
ardinal’s gloves, and Karen’s shoes ;
' Coral and rubies, and huntsmen’s
oe pink ;

Red, in short, is splendid, we think.



93














aa i PRT MI FENG raseicer atten oe
: i

Then think of the blue of a mid-day sky, i

Of the sea, and the hills, and a Scotchman’s eye, i



Of the tender blue of all things afar,

A, ‘And the navy blue of the British tar,



Of peacock’s feathers, forget-me-nots,
Worcester china, and “‘jap ” tea-pots.
The blue that the western sky wears casually,

Sapphire, turquoise, and lapis-lazuli.



Knights of the Garter ?

And, if the subject is not too

shocking,

<3. An intellectual lady’s stocking ?°





26




























And who that loves hues
Could fail to mention
The wonderful blues

Of the mountain gentian? ”



But to all that his brothers and sisters said,

He made no reply but—‘‘I wish I were dead !





I’m ail over blue, and I want to be red.”

_And he moped and pined, and took to his bed.











“That little one looks uncommonly sickly,
Put him back in the sea, and put him back quickly.”
The voice that spoke was the voice of Fate,

And the lobster was soon in his former state ;
Where, as of old, he muttered and mumbled,

And growled and grumbled ;

- «Oh dear ! what shall I do!

‘ T want to be red, and I’m all over blue.”





















te TH Te BE DRL AAT RENAE. Sie










>
I don’t think I ever met with a book
The evil genius of which was a
cook ;
But it Be befel,

In the tale I have the honour to
tell ;
For as he was fretting and fuming a

about ;

A fisherman fished my hero out ;

And; in process of time, he heard a
voice, ;

Which made him rejoice.

The voice was the cook’s, and what it said

Was, “ He’ll soon come out a beautiful red.”





The less we say about this the better,

It was all fulfilled to the very letter.

He did become a beautiful red,





380.











Some gentle readers cannot well endure
To see the ill end of a bad beginning ,
And hope against hope for a nicer cure
For naughty heroes than to leave off sinning.
And yet persisting in behaving badly,

Do what one will, does commonly end sadly,




“But things in general are so much mixed,
That every case must stand upon its merits ;

And folk’s opinions are so little fixed,




And no one knows the least what he inherits— =
I should be glad to shed. some parting glory
Upon the hero of this simple story.



seems



to me a mean end
to a ballad,
But the truth is, he was made into salad ;

It’s not how one’s hero should end his days,











In a mayonnaise, :

But I’m told that he looked

SAIS

RD EES

exceedingly nice,
With cream - coloured

sauce, and pale green

MPT,

lettuce and ice.

EL

I confess that if
he'd been my

relation,



ATE ART ARS

This would not





|

afford me any

consolation ;







TASTED

LEELA LE SI LOE IIE






0 AT RP VER ATOR SPATE GD EI IIE PSE SSL LEG EAL OE LESLIE ESE OIL LEER LEO



For I feel (though one likes to speak well of the dead)
That it must be said,
He need not have died so early lamented,

If he’d been content to live contented.



P.S.—His claws were raised to very high stations ;

They keep the earwigs from our carnations.



Se SSRERER NPN INANE GYR EEE SN 0 EL ERR RW LER ESATA NSS IN EELS IT ENE RE IONS LR TL EN |

'



Sh 20 |





\

Christian ‘

i Torthumberla| a Ave
, 1 5

< 4 rt
DOcrety far





Full Text
Â¥

Lp SOR 'o::
» Society: Fir
Christian K
lor losis A




SS
RESAS |
DNS

L

»
y
y
165

2 i)
SON oe

‘ S @ 1 4 Ve

A WO

& San 17 ve
I

Xabi
NW 847

fe :

Disconterted.
Llolsster’:



i MY aL
Py Vy i
4m Z ise

fyi



Ss Illustrated by

R: André :
















UTTER ITT ae eae RE

RTS

.
8
%
8

MATL UE

REASSURES ATA TMB A ET CREA ORR TIF PSPS BS EIEN TES ESE BO LAT LN SCARE BESTE

bas

Topster,: ,
bs Qistory eee i Verse , f

. i eee: Swing:
\ Autor of | Jackanopes’” S é

“We and the World:
€T:€T:E€T:€T.ET: YA

igtees
and gave in colours


Chromolithographed by
EmrkS Binger’
15 Holborn Viaduct: London: €:C:






or the”

isconfenled” |
[eoBSTE






















mt

ERMIT me, Reader, to make my bow,
And allow
Me to humbly commend to your tender
mercies
The hero of these simple verses.
By domicile, of the British Nation ;
By birth and family, a Crustacean.

One’s hero should have a name that rare is ;



_And his was Homarus, but Vulgaris /

A Lobster who dwelt

with several others,—

His sisters and brothers,—

In a secluded but happy
home,

Under the salt sea’s foam.




~ At the outermost point of a rocky bay.













A sandy, tide-pooly, cliff-bound cove,
With a red-roofed fishing village above,
Of irregular cottages, perched up high
Amid pale yellow poppies next to the sky.
Shells and pebbles and wrack below,

And shrimpers shrimping all in a row;
Tawny sails and tarry boats,

Dark brown nets and old cork floats ;
Nasty smells at the nicest spots, |

And blue-jerseyed sailors and lobster-pots.


sicrPeN TRA



IS sweet to be
At home in the deep, deep sea.












It is very pleasant to have the power
- To take the air on dry land for an hour;
And when the mid-day mid-summer sun

Is toasting the fields as brown as a bun,




And the sands are baking, it’s very nice




To feel as cool as a strawberry ice



In one’s own particular damp sea-cave,






8



And the ‘ better to see with’ down below,




To wash one’s eyes in the ebb and flow






Of the tides that come and the tides that go.”

_ So sang the Lobsters, thankful for their mercies,

All but the hero of these simple verses.










pe : ‘ a hero—

If he’s worth the grand
old name.
_ Though temperature

may change from

“Should keep his temper,
all the same :
Courageous and content
\ in his estate,
And proof against the
spiteful blows of Fate.
It, therefore; troubles
me to have to say,

That with this Lobster

oo it was never so ;
aa gee .

; See Whate’er the weather or the sort of day,



TR Ao No matter if the tide were high or low,
ae

eae

pee) >

Whatever happened he was never pleased,

: et is Pe And not himself alone, but all his kindred teased.


















“Oh! oh!

What a world of woe

We flounder about in, here below ! |
Oh dear ! oh dear!

It is too, too dull, down here !



I haven’t the slightest patience —
With any of my relations ;
I take no interest whatever
In things they call curious and clever.
And, for love of dear truth, I state it,
As for my Home—I hate it !
I’m conyinced 1 was formed for a larger sphere,
And am utterly out of my element here.”

Then his brothers and sisters said,

Each solemnly shaking his and her head,


And yet we are sure,
















That, in spite of all you have to endure,

You might go much farther and fare much worse.
We wish you could live in a higher sphere,
But we think you might live happily here.”

“‘T dont live, I only exist,” he said,

“Be pleased to look upon me as dead.”

And he swam to his cave, and took to his bed.
He sulked so long that the sisters cried,

‘“« Perhaps he has really and truly died.”

But the brothers went to the cave to peep,
For they said, ‘‘ Perhaps he is only asleep.”

They found him, far too busy to talk,





With a very large piece of bad salt pork.





‘Dear Brother, what luck you have had to-day !




Can you tell us, pray,



Is there any more pork afloat in the bay?”




But not a word would my hero say,




Except to repeat, witn sad persistence,




“ This is not life, it’s only existence.”







fishing village

An individual bent on pillage ;



But a robber whom true scientific




feeling




May find guilty of picking, but




not of stealing.




He picked the yellow poppies on the cliffs ;




He picked the feathery seaweeds in the pools ;




iffs

k

and s

2
oO
a
g
o
Ge
mn
~
a
o
J
S
3.
oe,
o
o
o
o
ce
~
oS
vo
aw
oe
a
o
ri

s of all the country fools

ked the brain

e pic

ium,

is own herbar

ies for h

d the popp

ie

r

Hed

1m,

de town aquari

i

And caught the Lobsters for a seas


A

‘“ TANK No. 20°” is deep,
“TANK NO. 20”? is cool,

For clever contrivances always keep

The water fresh in the pool ;

Anda very fine plate-glass window is free to the public

view,







y




















For the primal cause of incidents,
One often hunts about,
When its only a coincidence
That matters so turned out.
And I do not know the reason
Or the reason I would tell ;
But it may have been the season—
| Why my hero chose this moment
for casting off his shell.
He had hitherto been dressed

(And so had all the rest)

In purplish navy blue from top to toe ;
But now his coat was new,

It was of every shade of blue

Between azure and the deepest indigo ;



And his sisters kept telling him, till they were tired,




“Vhere never was anyone so much. admired.”



BREE LES,




My hero was happy at last, you will say ?














So he was, dear Reader—two nights and a day ;

Then, as he and his relatives lay,

Each at the mouth of his mock

Cave in the face of a miniature rock,

They saw, descending the opposite cliff,

By jerks spasmodic of elbows stiff ;

Now hurriedly slipping, now seeming calmer,
With the ease and the grace of a hog in armour,
And as solemn as any ancient palmer,
|

No less than nine,

Exceedingly fine,



. And full-grown lobsters, all in a line.

Sbput the worst of the matter remains to be said. j

f them RE ;

i] These nine big lobsters were all of










Palinurus vulgaris, oc Spiny Lobster.











And when they got safe to the floor of the tank,—

For which they had chiefly good luck to thank, —

They settled their cumbersome coats of mail, ;
And every beter tucked his tail

| Neatly under him as he sat |

In a circle of nine for a cosy chat.

They seemed to be sitting hand in hand,

As shoulder to shoulder they sat in the sand,

And waved their antenna in calm rotation,

c Apparently holding a consultation.

But what were the feelings of Master Blue Shell.
18,

-From the moment that those Nine he saw.

He never could bear his blue coat more.

“Oh, Brothers in misfortune !” he said,

“Did you ever see any lobsters so grand,

As those who sit down there in the sand?

Why were we born at all, since not one of us al] wasborn red 2”
_“ Dear Brother, indeed, this is quite a whim.”

“(So his brothers and sisters reasoned with him ;
And being exceedingly cultivated,

The case with remarkable fairness stated.)


1.













CP is a primary colour,

it’s true,




® But so is BLUE}

And we all of us think, dear Brother,
That one is quite as good as the other,
A swaggering soldier’s a saucy varlet,

- Though he looks uncommonly well in

scarlet.

No doubt there’s much to be said

For a field of poppies of glowing red ;
20











eee rifts in sunset skies,
Roses and blushes and red sunrise ;
For a glow on the Alps, and the
glow of a forge,
A Foxglove bank in a woodland
Borge ;
Sparks that are struck from red-
hot bars,
The sun in a mist, and the red>

star Mars ;





Flowers of countless shades and shapes,
Matadors’, judges’, and gypsies’ capes ;

The red-haired King who was killed in the wood,
Robin Redbreasts and little Red Riding Hood ;
TET EARLE EN IE CIEL RINE CST ITT





The scarlet Ibis,

rose cockatoos,
ardinal’s gloves, and Karen’s shoes ;
' Coral and rubies, and huntsmen’s
oe pink ;

Red, in short, is splendid, we think.
93











aa i PRT MI FENG raseicer atten oe
: i

Then think of the blue of a mid-day sky, i

Of the sea, and the hills, and a Scotchman’s eye, i



Of the tender blue of all things afar,

A, ‘And the navy blue of the British tar,



Of peacock’s feathers, forget-me-nots,
Worcester china, and “‘jap ” tea-pots.
The blue that the western sky wears casually,

Sapphire, turquoise, and lapis-lazuli.
Knights of the Garter ?

And, if the subject is not too

shocking,

<3. An intellectual lady’s stocking ?°


26




























And who that loves hues
Could fail to mention
The wonderful blues

Of the mountain gentian? ”



But to all that his brothers and sisters said,

He made no reply but—‘‘I wish I were dead !





I’m ail over blue, and I want to be red.”

_And he moped and pined, and took to his bed.








“That little one looks uncommonly sickly,
Put him back in the sea, and put him back quickly.”
The voice that spoke was the voice of Fate,

And the lobster was soon in his former state ;
Where, as of old, he muttered and mumbled,

And growled and grumbled ;

- «Oh dear ! what shall I do!

‘ T want to be red, and I’m all over blue.”


















te TH Te BE DRL AAT RENAE. Sie










>
I don’t think I ever met with a book
The evil genius of which was a
cook ;
But it Be befel,

In the tale I have the honour to
tell ;
For as he was fretting and fuming a

about ;

A fisherman fished my hero out ;

And; in process of time, he heard a
voice, ;

Which made him rejoice.

The voice was the cook’s, and what it said

Was, “ He’ll soon come out a beautiful red.”


The less we say about this the better,

It was all fulfilled to the very letter.

He did become a beautiful red,


380.











Some gentle readers cannot well endure
To see the ill end of a bad beginning ,
And hope against hope for a nicer cure
For naughty heroes than to leave off sinning.
And yet persisting in behaving badly,

Do what one will, does commonly end sadly,




“But things in general are so much mixed,
That every case must stand upon its merits ;

And folk’s opinions are so little fixed,




And no one knows the least what he inherits— =
I should be glad to shed. some parting glory
Upon the hero of this simple story.
seems



to me a mean end
to a ballad,
But the truth is, he was made into salad ;

It’s not how one’s hero should end his days,











In a mayonnaise, :

But I’m told that he looked

SAIS

RD EES

exceedingly nice,
With cream - coloured

sauce, and pale green

MPT,

lettuce and ice.

EL

I confess that if
he'd been my

relation,



ATE ART ARS

This would not





|

afford me any

consolation ;




TASTED

LEELA LE SI LOE IIE






0 AT RP VER ATOR SPATE GD EI IIE PSE SSL LEG EAL OE LESLIE ESE OIL LEER LEO



For I feel (though one likes to speak well of the dead)
That it must be said,
He need not have died so early lamented,

If he’d been content to live contented.



P.S.—His claws were raised to very high stations ;

They keep the earwigs from our carnations.



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