Citation
Tiny Tab and her cousins

Material Information

Title:
Tiny Tab and her cousins
Creator:
Beard, James Carter, 1837-1913 ( Illustrator )
Francis, J. G ( Joseph Greene ), 1849-1930 ( Illustrator )
D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publisher:
D. Lothrop Co.,
D. Lothrop Co.
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1886
Language:
English
Physical Description:
I v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 26 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1886 ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1886 ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1886
Genre:
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Illustrations by J. Carter Beard and J. G. Francis.
General Note:
Includes prose and verse.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
ALG5313 ( NOTIS )
026661183 ( AlephBibNum )
67293132 ( OCLC )

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The waysof amusing baby are numberless; but the
best of them all is the old one—mother-talk.

What shall she talk about? The pictures and stories
of BaontGn a Look at these pictures, for instance.
They have got to be explained, of course; but that is
what they are for, to give the mother something 70
talk about. .

But, remember, baby hasn’t got used to the pace of
this quick world. Give him time. He couldn’t find
out for himself what a story there is in one of these
simple pictures. There is the mother cat in her rock-
ing-chair with her steaming cup of tea and the kittens
playing blind-fold. How happy they are!

Send five cents to D. Lothrop Company, Boston,

for a copy of Babyland.





An Oyster: Catcher.

These seg ONe of the pictures in My Land und and there is nothing in it that isn’t borne out by
Water Friends, a book of which the author says: it the learning of learned men.
is py eny with the hope of interesting boys and LD. Lothrop Company, Boston, publish it; book-
girls in the wonderful little neighbors around them; sellers have it, of course.



Goliath Bectle.













Snapping Turtle.

Ly (
ip Hi /
\ co a







HINY FAB AND eI ees



BOSTON _
D. LOTHROP AND COMPANY
FRANKLIN AND HAWLEY STREETS



CopyRIGHT, 1586,
BY
D. LoTHrRop & COMPANY.





THEY CIR-CUM-NAV--GATE THE GLOBE.



WHERE TI-NY TAB WAS FOUND.

Jan-et was go-ing home from
grand-pa’s. It was cold, and
she went with a hop-skip and a
trip. It was just a mile from
the red house on grand-pa’s
hill to the white house on pa-
pas hill, and half-way there
was a piece of woods, where
Jan-et knew ev-er-y leaf-y hol-
and where there were
It
was grow-ing dark fast, but she
stopped and called: ‘Gone to
bed in there, squir-ries ?”

No squirrel called back.
In-stead, some-bod-y or some-

thing an-swer-ed:

low,
al-ways man-y squir-rels.

“Mew! mew-mew!”

“Why!” said Jan-et, ‘that’s
a kit-ty!”

So it was; a soft, white lit-
tle crea-ture came press-ing
through the fence and out to

the road. ‘* Why, you lit-tle

dar-ling,” said Jan-et, stoop-ing,
“Such a lit-tle tiny Tab!”

Two soft, pink eyes looked
up, a lit-tle white back arched
to meet her hand, and then,
what do you think? Why,
that kit-ty jumped right up-on
Jan-et’s muff and stood there;
and when Jan-et rose up te
go on she stayed right on the
muff, ) |

“Oh, you dear lit-tle Tab,”
said Jan-et to her; “some boy
has brought
thrown you a-way! But you
shall go home with me.”

Kit-ty seemed toknow. She
sat down on the muff and rode

you here and

a-long, pur-ring sweet thanks,
‘“And yes,” purred she, “it
was a boy! No girl ev-er car-
ried a kit-ty off and threw her
away—now, did she?”
“No,” said Jan-et, “nev-er!”





TI-NY TAB RIDES HOME ON THE MUFF,



THE SPOT-TED KIT-TENS.

I went to grand-pa’s barn to hunt for eggs the oth-er day
And what do you guess I found ly-ing cud-dled in the hay’
Oh! the kit-ty kit-ty kit-tens—such tiny, dar-ling kit-tens!
The dear-est little kit-tens that you ev-er saw at play.

They scampered and they capered, rolled and rolled a-rount:
They pulled each other’s tails and they tumbled on the ground
Oh! the jolly, jolly kit-tens— the mer-ry mites of kit-tens-
Such rol-lick-ing and frolicking! the like was nev-er foun(

I laughed, and I laughed a-gain, and still I laughed with gle
For grand-pa said: “I don't know what to do, with three
So you shall have a kit-ten, which-ev-er lit-tle kit-ten

You choose, when they are big enough to take a-way, you see

Which would you choose? There’s one as shi-ny black as je
With his rogu-ish lit-tle eyes, and spots of buff —a pret-ty pe
He’s a fris-ky little kit-ten—a sau-cy, cun-ning kit-ten,

I like the black-buff kit-ten—but I haven't cho-sen yet. —

For there’s a lit-tle gray thing with soft and silk-y fur,
I hugged her in my arms and she nev-er tried to stir,
And she is spot-ty too—a beauty of. a kit-ten,

Such a co-sey lit-tle kit-ten — and you ought to hear her purr!

































AT THE BARN.— THEY SCAM-PER-ED AND THEY CA-PER-ED,



HOW JET BE-CAME A WHITE CAT.

But when you see the third one you can-not help but know
How hard it is to choose when I love the oth-ers so,
She’s the sweet-est lit-tle kitten—the down-rest of kit-tens
And her dain-ty tor-toise fur is flaked with soft-est snow,
What shalf 1 do about it? I can-not choose, you see!
Which-ev-er one I take I can-not let the oth-ers be!
Oh! the kitty kitty kittens, the bon-ny, bonny kit-tens!
Oh! grand-pa dear, now couldn't you give them all to me?



HOW JET BE-CAME A WHITE CAT.

Jet has had a good duin-
ner, chick-en and tur-key both,
But Jet is a bad

He wish-es

and gra-vy.
lit-tle
he could know what is

that dish.

peep-cat.
in

He hopes it ts

squash pie. Up he jumps.
and—ah! slip! splash! I:
this scared, wet, white lit-tl

for th
this Jet

ob-ject, spring-ing
cel-lar-door — is

Yes, this is Jet.



JET'S AD-VEN-TURE IN THE PAN-TRY.



NEL-LIE’S CATS.

Nel-lie loves cats. She has
eight. She is a-wak-ened each
morn-ing by a gen-tle scratch-
ing at the win-dow, that grows
to be a big scratch and a
loud me-ow if she doesn’t an-
swer.

It is fun-ny to see four of
them sit-ting on the win-dow-
sill, the rail-
ing of the porch a-wait-ing a

and four on

re-ply to that scratch.
When

win-dow they all bounce in

Nel-le o-pens the

pell-mell, and race o-ver the
bed and play hide-and-seek be-
hind the pil-lows.

These cats are named Eliz-
a-beth, Liz-zie, Bet-sey and
Bess, James, Jim-mie, Jam-sie
and Jim, aft-er Nel-lie’s pa-pa
and mam-ma.

Eliz-a-beth is the lead-er in
mis-chief. She taught the oth-

ers how to. scratch at the
win-dow.
James is the high-mind-ed cat.

He sits on the diction-a-ry on



AT NEL-LIE’S WIN-DOW.

top of the book-rack and some- »
times on the man-tel. But he is
care-ful not to whisk his tail
and break the or-na-ments.



PAINT-ER PE-TER-KIN’S CATS.

Great beau-ties, great rogues door a-jar and the five rogues
too, are Paint-er Pe-ter-kin’s stepped in, and the mam-ma-
five cats. Paint-er Pe-ter-kin cat rogue sat down and saw
tries to keep them out of his four kit-ten rogues climb and



GREAT BEAU-TIES AND GREAT ROGUES,

stu-dio, where he has a great whisk, and claw, and do things

ma-ny things that tip o-ver —six-teen naughty paws —

ea-sy and run out and spoil. do-ing things, with brush-es
But one day he left the and bot+tles and paints.



PINK-IE SUP-POS-ES.

When I run out in the snow,
S’po-sin’ I should have to go
"Out no shoes,
‘Out no hat,
Like my lit-tle pus-sy-cat!



THIS IS PINK-IE’S CAT.

S’pos-in’ I should say meow,
‘Stead of talk-ing ‘s I do now,
‘Out no play-things

'Cept a ball,
‘Cept .a spool, or—that’s all.

S’pose my dress was on-ly fur,

And I al-ways had to purr,
And had claws
To catch mice—

I don’t think ‘twould be real
nice!



THIS IS PINK-IE,

S’pose I was a tru-ly cat
Ly-ing on the kitch-en mat,
‘Out no crib
White and _pret-ty, |
Who d’ you s’pose would feed that kit-ty?



THREE DREAMS.

Oft-en when Cat Silk-y-soft like mam-ma’s dreams, they
and her daugh-ter-cats woke are al-ways fun-ny.”

So mam-ma told
first, and it was
fun-ny, as us-u-al,
“T dreamed,” said_
she, “that I was
a great com-mon
black cat, and that.









[ lived up in an

























CAT SILK-Y-SOrT AND HER DAUGH-TER-CATS.



in the morn-ing they would
tell each oth-er their dreams;
for cats are great dream-
ers. So the oth-er morn-
ing, “Let's tell dreams,” said ie oS
Pet. ,

“Let's,” said Prink, “and er-y day at noon I put jon a
mam-ma shall tell first, for I blue cra-vat and gave ai ice-

|

|

]





















































THE KIT-TEN THAT SAT UP TO SUP-PER.



cream lunch to
eight rats!”

“ That nev-
er come to pass,
mam-ma,” said
Prink. “ And
I,” Prink went
on, ‘I dream-
ed I was grown
up, and was a
great beau-ty,
and a paint-er
paint-ed me,

THREE DREAMS.



“You vain.
puss! thatl/
nev-er come to.
pass, said
mam-ma. |

‘And I,’ said
Pet, gig-gling
right out, “J
dream-ed I was
an old danc-ing-
mas-ter, and the |
chil-dren here
had to take les-

and I was hung in the pict-ure sons of me— and did-nt I

store in a most el-e-gant frame,

bey

them out for mak-ing

with the most el-e-gant rib- me stand on my hind paws

bons and gold-en tassels.”

yes-ter-day — yes, I did!”



PET’S DREAM.





OUT PEEPED PUS-SY AT HER,



GRAND-PA’S VAL-EN-TINE.

Grand-pa’s ver-y least lit-tle
grand-daugh-ter was a ver-y
pret-ty child, but she was a
ver-y self-ish one, too. Her
nurs-es did not like her, and
her mam-ma did not know
what to do with her. Grand-
pa said it was be-cause she
was the on-ly pet-ted creat-ure
in the house; be-cause ev-er-y-
thing dain-ty and _pret-ty was
She had all
the can-dy, all the bon-bons, all
Grand-
pa said she ought to have some
pets, something smaller than
her-self to care for, and to be
kind to.

On St. Val-en-tine’s Day,
grand-pa sent Nel-ly a fun-ny
val-en-tine, and she was to have
it for hers just as long as she
took good care of it. So mam-
ma came up in-to Nel-ly’s

giv-en to her.

the love and kiss-es.

room on St. Val-en-tine’s morn-
ing, and she said: “ There is
a love-ly val-en-tine for you
down-stairs, dear. If you are
good, and dress quick-ly, you
may see it be-fore break-fast;
but not 1f you are naugh-ty.”

Nel-ly did not wrig-gle or
kick e-ven once while Ma-ry
but-toned her boots, did not run
off e-ven once when the lit-tle
skirts went o-ver her head, held
her face up sweet and quret
to be washed, stood still to be
brushed, and have her col-lar
pinned, and then a-way she.
tripped down-stairs.

Mam-ma o-pened the par-lot
door.

“Run in,” she said, “and
see your val-en-tine.” |

Nel-ly looked all a-round,
but she saw noth-ing new.

“Why,” said mam-ma, “1



GRAND-PAS VAL-EN-TINE.

left her here—where zs she?”

« She?” said Nel-ly. And
then she laughed and ran to
the big chair in the cor-ner, and
mam-ma ran af-ter her, laugh-
ing too. There was grand-
pa’s val-en-tine — a trick-sy lit-
tle pus-sy-cat ; and she had crept
in-to mam-ma’s muff, and there
she sat, her soft lit-tle head
peep-ing
sweet-ly.

And did this kitty make
Nelly a good little girl?
Well, I think her in-flu-ence
was what grand-pa ex-pect-ed,
for Nel-ly was ver-y kind and
po-lite to her cat, brushed her,
and fed her, and let her in
and out, and spoke soft-ly
and kind-ly, and kitty went
ev-el y-where with her, e-ven
to church one day, and in-to
the coun-try when the fam-i-ly
went; and Nelly has been
hear 1 to give her much good

out, and pur-ring

ad-vice—not to catch birds,
and not to growl and spit at
oth-er cats, but to share her
sau-cer of cream and her chick-



NEL-LY AD-VIS-ES HER CAT.

en bones with those oth-er cats,
and nev-er, nev-er to mew to be
served first at ta-ble—and this
ad-vice could have come on-ly
from a good, thought-ful lit-
tle girl.



THE CHRIST-MAS KIT-TY.

One time Fan and Fay
almost did-n’t have a-ny
Christ-mas. They did be-fore
night, though ; but they would-
nt if it had-n’t been for a
little stray kit-ty. You see
San-ta Claus
pres-ents by pa-pa, and pa-pa’s
train was snowed in, and there

was to send

would-n't have been any-thing
but just
rai-sins if
it had-n’t
been for
that kit-
ty-cat.

It was
a-bout



noon,and

TIP-O-VER-THINGS PLAY,

they were
look-ing out at the storm,
big, cold tears run-ning down
their they

heard a scratch on the door,

nos-es, when

a-bout

loud amelie
They harked a_ min-ute.

as as



WORK-BASK-ET PLAY.

Then they heard it a-gain,
as wee and fine as if a fairy
They looked at
each oth-er — there was some
thing so Zzve in the sound they
did-n’t dare go to the door.
“Mew!” said a small voice:
and this time there was a
great deal of scratch-ing, at

were there.

least two little feet. They
ran to the door, and in
pranced a jet-black kit-ten.

She shook the snow off with

looked all
a-round with two great, bright,

Ae |cukeesticezed,



THAT JOL-LY KIT MADE CHRIST-MAS E-NOUGH FOR TWO HOUS-ES,

aN
.























THE CHRIST-MAS KIT-TY.

gold-green eyes for a sau-cer
of milk, purred, and then rub-
bed her head a-gainst Fay.

No
that jol-ly kit made Christ-

more big cold tears!

for two houses.

alll
bask-et play,
thread

things play, and chase-her-tail

mas e-nough
She knew a-bout work-
and spool-of-

play, and tip-o-ver-

play, and roll-a-ball play —

there could be no doubt that

she was no com-mon kit, h
a true Christ-mas-pres-ey
cat, left there a-pur-pose whe
San-ta Claus drove by wif
but, (

she was too sweet to descril

the rein-deer sleigh;

at all when by-and-by in t
soft, snowy, fire-lit twrlight







crept up in-to their laps, at



purred and went to sle¢.
while Fan and Fay sang li
kit-ty-bye-lows.







































































SLATE PICT-URE.—TAK-ING KIT-TY’S PICT-URE.



THE WHITE HEN AND HER PETS.

It was Peg-gy’s
work to hunt the
eggs. But the
White Hen would
al-ways have her
nest the
porch, and_ that
made it hard for
her, for she had
to lie down flat and crawl in.

One night af-ter school, she
found the White Hen on the
nest, and ver-y cross in-deed.
She tried to “shoo” her off, but
she would not move. So she
pushed her a lit-tle and then she
saw—not a plump white egg,
but the soft, fur-ry heads of two
little black kit-tens; and they
both said Mew/ to Peg-gy.
But the White Hen was cross
and pecked, and Peg-gy had to
come out and leave her.

That same night Tab-by

un-der



PEG-GY.

came in with a kitten in her
mouth; soon she came a-gain
with an-oth-er; then with an-
oth-er; but she seemed un-eas-y
and Peg-gy saw her go un-der
the porch, and heard her mew.





HOW FUN-NY SHE LOOKED!

The next morn-ing, Peg-gy
took a stick and crept un-dert

the porch. She made the White



THE WHITE HEN AND HER PETS.

Hen step off her nest, and there
were two more kit-tens.
Peg-gy gave Tab-by a nice
box on the porch, but in a few
min-utes the White Hen came
up, cluck-ing as loud as she
could, and sat down by the
kit-tens
mewed she would cluck.

box, and when the
Peg-gy put some crumbs on
the floor to see what she

would do; and she broke the



CHILD-LIFE ON THE FARM.— THE FIRST LES-SON.

crumbs with her bill and
called the kittens to eat, as
if they were chick-ens, and if,
Tab-by tried
she made her-self as big as!
two hens and drove her a-way;)
and when she nes-tled the kit
tens up in her feath-ers, how,
funny she did look! Then,
Peg-gy had to car-ry them,
where the White Hen could

not come.

to come near;









A THANKS-GIV-ING GIFT.

giv-ing gift
from Grand-
ma? You ney-



er could guess.
It wasa bas-ket:

of French kit-
tens. i ie ye

reached the lit-
tle Greys’ home
just in time for
the great din-
ner. :

“French
eats! said:
Dick, “we can
nev-er un-der-
stand them or
they us!”

Bue “ehey:
found their

What think you came to pret-ty pet kit-ties mewed in
the little Greys all the way A-mer-i-can, and knew ev-er-y
over the o-cean as a thanks- trick A-mer-ican cats play-





HOW DAI-SY GOT HER WISH.

Dai-sy had three kit-tens —
Puff, who was cream-col-ored,
drab, and Midge

gold-col-ored —three new, lit-

Beau-ty,

tle, sleep-y, hap-py kit-tens.

“T wish my kit-ties had
some stock-ings!” Dai-sy said
to her aunt-ie the day be-fore
Christ-mas.

“Their feet are not cold,”
peel eincyaeciicc mnt
cov-ered with soft fur.”

“But to hang up, you
know,” said Dai-sy. ‘‘San-ta
Claus might bring them some

said aunt-ie.

neck-rib-bons.”

Dai-sy’s own stock-ing was
brim-ful of pres-ents the next
morn-ing, and they were so
very pret-ty, that she nev-er
thought of her kit-tens till
near noon.

She found them all a-sleep

in grand-ma’s easy-chair with



its striped
dam-ask cov-er, and the dia
mond-shaped ti-dy on the back,}
made in |
checks.
And what do you think?)
There were the kit-tens, all
three, in new sat-in neck-rib
bons tied in beau-ti-ful bows!
on the back! |
Lit-tle cream-col-ored Puff’s
scar-let;, drab Beau-ty's!
was pink; and gold-col-ored|
Midge’s was blue— O, so

ver-y be-com-ing!

black-and-green

crim-son-and-white;

Was

“San-ta Claus must have}
been ver-y near when I wished)
that. wish to aunt-ie,” thought
Daisy. ‘And O, what good)
taste he has!” she ad-ded)
as she looked a-gain at the!



gay lit-tle pus-sies. “I should|
like to have him pick out mj
next new dress, I think.”














































ion
asfee

A

P

Cand

Kas

iw

chain”?




eas Nes

DAI-SY’S KIT-TENS AND THEIR CHRIST-MAS GIFTS,



SNOW-BALL’S EX-PE-RI-ENCE.

Snow-ball is a ver-y young
kit-ten in-deed. She has lived
She is fond

She curls

just one sum-mer.
of the sun-shine.
her-self up on the pi-az-za
where the sun shines warm
and sleeps for hours. She
likes rain-y days, too, for then
she climbs up to the top of
the wood-pile un-der the shed,
where it is warm and dry,
and sleeps for hours more.

But the oth-er day some-
thing hap-pened to Snow-ball.
She was
found it ver-y cold. She was
think-ing that she had bet-ter
run home, when she felt some-

out walk-ing and

thing cold hit her on the nose.
She lift-ed her head quick-ly,
to see what it was, and some-
thing else, ver-y cold, flew
right in-to her eye. When she
winked that off she found one











more on her lit-tle soft paw.
Be-fore she could find out what!
it was, ex-cept that it was whitel
and cold, it was gone, and her}
fur was wet where it had been!
Then she looked up and saw!
that the air was full of thesel
queer lit-tle things which were}
so cold and wet and white, and|
that they were fall-ing ev-er-y
where. So she grew very
much fright-ened and ran home}
as fast as she could.

“Mew! mew! dear moth!
er, she cried, “‘ what zs it that}
is com-ing down from the sky}
and that makes me so cold?’}

“Why, you fool-ish kit-ten,|
said the wise old moth-er-cat,|
tak-ing off her spec-ta-cles}
“don't youknowthatitis snow?’ |

Snow-ball looked out of the}
“T don’t think I}

like snow,” she said.

win-dow.





























































































































“ WHAT'S THIS SO COLD ON MY PAW?” SAID SNOW-BALL.



OUT-WIT-TED.

Three little tab-by-coats all in a row,

Moth-er Puss loves them, this I know;

Pet nam-ed them Pearl-y, Fred and Dick —

Nice lit-tle tab-by-coats, so smooth and slick!
“Vou can't keep them,” broth-er Ned said,
Fold-ing his arms, and shak-ing his head;

“Our fish they'd catch, our birds they'd kill,

Ill find them a place by the old red mill!”

In-to his lap, lit-tle Pet climbed,

Round his neck her chub-by arms twined,

But coax-ing was vain, though a close em-brace
Drew the ro-sy mouth to her broth-er’s face.

Ned was gone, on-ly Pet and Puss,

To guard the dar-lings, but now, for-sooth!
Where should they go, to be safe from harm —
Up-stairs, down-stairs, or in the big barn?

No trace of tab-by-coats, in-doors or out;
Moth-er Puss stares at this bust-ling a-bout;

Pet smiles de-mure-ly when none can see,
Whis-pers ‘‘ No-bod-y knows, Tab, but you and me!”
Mam-ma found in her hat-box three fun-ny things,
All curled up in soft, wool-ly rings ;

Called, “ Pet, Pet! Oh look! oh do!”
Laugh-ing, she said: “Tab lugged one, and I lugged two!”





“TAB LUGGED ONE, AND . LUGGED TWO.”









JUMPER’S STRANGE FISH.

Jumper is Willie Watson’s little
white cat.

The house where Willie and Jum-
per live is near a large stream of
water.

Cats do not like to wet their
feet.

They will never step in the water
if they can help it.

_ For this reason, you might doubt
what I am going to tell you about
Jumper.

But every word of this story is
true.

Little white Jumper does not hunt

for rats and mice, as cats usually
do.

When she is hungry Jumper goes
to the stream to catch a fish.

Jumper takes her seat among some
stones near a Still place in the stream,
where a great many little fish swim
by. .

When one comes near, Jumper
snatches it out of the water with her

paw.

Then she takes it in her teeth and
runs into the house with it.

But one day Jumper made a mis
take in her fishing,



JUMPER’S STRANGE FISH.

Aman had left a basket on the Oh! how mad Jumper was then!
stones and gone away. She jumped, and she mewed.

She tried hard to shake off the
ugly creature.

But she could not get away from
it until Willie came and _ helped
her.

He opened the close-shut claws
of the crab. |

Then how fast little white Jumper
ran off!

Her paw was hurt so badly that
she was quite lame for many days.

Still Jumper often goes fishing.



JUMPER,

There were crabs in the basket.
Jumper looked at the crabs.
She thought they were very
strange fish.
But they looked good.
They smelled good.
At last she pulled one out of the
basket.
Jumper felt very proud of such
| alarge fish.
_ She dragged the crab to the house
to show to Willie. But she never looks for fish ia
_ But, as she was playing with it, baskets now.
| the crab caught hold of her paw.



JUMPER AND THE STRANGE FISH.





A LES-SON IN MAN-NERS.

4

'

Ws

wa
Bra-ve , my beau-ti-ful dears! —Go play!”
Three whisks and a whirl! off and a-way!
No more Be-+hav-ing — hur-rah! — to-day !



Tue moth-er-cat rose up out of her
sleep;

She called to her kit-tens, so shrill and
deep

That in they pranced, all three in a heap,

“ Kit-tens!” said she, ina tone so grave
That each lit-tle tail for-got to wave,
“It's time! taught you how to be-have.,

“All el-e-gant cats mind cer-tain laws—
Know va-ri-ous styles of hold-ing paws,
And dain-ty ways to man-age claws.

“Nice well-bred kit-tens walk side by
side

Behind their moth-er, with gen-tle
glide —

Not scam-per and roll and hop and
hide.

“J wish you to learn to give a paw
With a soft and el-e-gant me-aw !
And the sweet-est smile one ev-er saw.

“And a bow—a really graceful bow

Is what few cats ev-er learn how

To make—I'll train you my-self. See
now —

“Not a nod — but slow and deep — “us































































































AL-MOST A SAD STO-RY.

BY E.

Bees

Granp-pA and Grand-ma
Hall lived all a-lone.

They had chick nor child,
not ev-ena cat; and they didn’t
know there was e-ven so much
as a mouse in the house.

But there was one, a lit+tle
fel-low with the lov-li-est brown
tur, that lived all by him-self
be-hind the win-dow cur-tain in
the par-lor. He al-ways had had
agood time and al-ways ex-pect-
ed to; for you must know that

this lit-tle brown mouse had
nev-er ev-en heard of a cat!
But one day the lit-tle yrand-
daugh-ter, Beth, came to live
with Grand-pa anc Grand-
ma Hall.
her birds and her do'ls, and,

a-las, all her cats ; and the ver-y

She brought all |

first night the cats — there were

four of them —came trvop-ing

in-to the par-lor, and be-‘ore he |
could wink or think of ev-en |
hold up his lit-tle pink paws in |





AL-MOST A SAD STO-RY.

aston-ish-ment, they had Mr.
Mouse stand-ing up before
them. All he could do was to
hold uphis paws and say,
“Please, A/ease not to!”

Old Mis-tress Cat looked on

i





































































































quietly. Not so her three
bois-ter-ous sons.

“QO please not to!” said the
lit-tle brown mouse a-gain.

“ Shall!” said Mid-night.

“Will!” said Spot-ty.













































“0, PLEASE NOT TO!”

“Must!” said Snow-flake.
“That’s what mice are for!”

And then — well —bless her
heart! — grand-ma ap-peared,
ind the cats looked a-round —

ind per-haps they thought that

as it was er mouse it wouldn’t
be po-lite. Be that as may,
Mous-ie ran out the o-pen door
and was nev-er seen or heard
of a-gain—not by little Beth's
cats at least.



i
»
5
®
S,
t
q

Tar aera

TAK-ING THE





THE RAT SKETCH-ING THE CATS.



FAM-I-LY OUT TO RIDE.







THE CATS CATCH-ING THE RAT.



THE HIS-TO-RY OF NAN-CY LEE.

BY A. W. A.

One time there was a lit-tle
black kit-ten named Nan-cy
Lee. Nan-cy was-n’t want-ed
where she lived.

The cook was a big cross
wom-an, who said she “did-n't
want that good-for-noth-ing kit-
ten a-round un-der her feet.”

So she picked up a broom
and scat-ted Nan-cy Lee out
doors.

The poor kit-ten cried a-loud
“Me-a-ow!” But that did-n't
dry her soft fur. She was so
fright-ened that she hid a-mong
the bush-es for a long time.

Af-ter a while she raised her
head and looked a-round for a
inend. But she saw on-ly a big
black bee-tle.

Then she jumped into the
toad, and sat down on the grass
to smooth out her wet fur.
~ She had nev-er washed her

own lit-tle coat be-fore, for her
moth-er had al-ways done it for
her; but she was do-ing the
best she could, when along
came a bigdog. And what do
you think he did?

Just as Nan-cy was go-ing up
to him to ask him to let her
warm her-self by him, he
o-pened his big mouth and said,
“ Berrr-r! dow! wow!”

Oh! how Nan-cy Lee did
run! |

Next she saw a large red
cow. This cow was walk-ing
a-long the road eat-ing grass.
The cow looked so nice and
kind that Nan-cy ran and sat
down right un-der her.

The cow did-n't drive her
a-way, nor say “scat! ” nor
“bow! wow!” but still she was
walk-ing a-long a lit-tle bit at a
time, and the kit-ten sat so close



THE HIS-TO-RY OF NANCY LEE.

to her feet that she was in
dan-ger.

Just then a lit-tle girl with
long yel-low hair looked out of
the house near by.

“Oh, mam-ma!” said she,
“out there's a lit-tle black kit-
ten, sit-ting un-der a big cow.
She looks so cold, poor thing!
I’m ‘fraid the cow will step on
her! Look, mam-ma.”

So the la-dy looked too, and
saw them. She liked kit-tens
as well as her lit-tle girl, but
she did-n’t want a-ny more, as
they had three al-read-y.

Still the little girl begged
hard to have the kit-ten brought
in, and at last the la-dy went
out and got her. The little
girl took her little broom and
brushed her, and then she sat
by the warm stove and washed
her rough dir-ty coat, whilethe
lady went out and warmed
some milk. She gave it to
Nan-cy Lee in a teen-ty, ween-ly

lit-tle pan, just big enough for
her. Nancy drank just as fast
as she could, and then had a4
lit-tle bit of Char-lotte Russe
that the lit-tle girl was eat-ing, |
Wasn't that a fun-ny din-ner
for Nan-cy?

Then Miss Lee be-gan to
sing for the girl-ie. Did you
know kit-tens could sing?

She sang ‘ P-r-r-r-r” so soft-
ly! The little girl laughed,
and Nan-cy stopped.

Then the little girl said,
““Mam-ma, she looks just as if
her name was Nan-cy Lee.,
Now, kittie, if that’s your
name, sing more, but if ‘tisn't,.
keep still.”

Then thekit-ten began a-gain,
and purred and purred like
ev-er-y-thing, and so they called
her Nan-cy Lee.

Nan-cy Lee still lives in her
new home, and has all the new
milk she can drink out of the
teen-ty, ween-ty lit-tle pan.





NAN-CY LEE SEES THE BIG BLACK BEE-TLE,













A Moth-er’s Lul-la-by.

= a eg UL
~ oe NU Sie

HICK-O-RY, DICK-O-RY, DOCK!

Lit-tre Mar-ger-y Daw, “ Hick-o-ry, dick-o-ry, dock!
who us-u-al-lly sang “see-saw” The mice ran up the clock!”
when she sat in her rock-ing-

chair, one day took it into She sang it o-ver and o-ver,
her cur-ly head to sing a new un-til, all at once, Puss, who
song. ‘ Hick-o-ry, Dick-o-ry, Jay doz-ing on the win-dow-
Dock,” she sang as she rocked sill, found her-self purr-ing it
to and fro: | too:





HICK-O-RY, DICK-O-RY, DOCK?!

| Hick-o-ry, dick-o-ry, dock!
|The mice ran up the clock!”

| Well, the next thing Puss
{knew she was rub-bing her
ivel-vet paws in her eyes, and
wak-ing up from a nap, and
|Mar-ger-y gone, and noth-ing
jstir-ring in the room but the
irest-less sun-beams and_ the
ltick-ing clock. She jumped
idown and walked a-round the
table, and mewed, and felt
lver-y hun-gry. But there was
jnoth-ing on the ta-ble but the
|vin-e-gar cru-et and a knife,
land so she sat down and
jwait-ed. She was still rath-er



WHAT HAP-PENED,

sleep-y, and Mar-ger-y’s song
began to hum it-self in her
ears.

“The mice—the mice—
mice — the clock —the clock
— clock!”

All at once she. sat up
straight and rubbed her eyes.
“Yes, they did!” she said,
“they ran up the clock! I'll —
have ’em! J'll have ‘em for
my dinner! Ill run up the

clock my-self !”

She sprang light-ly on one
of the long weights, and—
well, look at the pict-ure, my
dears, and you can see just
what hap-pened:





PUT-TING KIT-TY TO BED.

BY

M.

E. S.

Kirt-ty, Kit-ty, go to sleep,

Shut your eyes, and dont you
peep,

Sing with me your little song,

We will not make it ver-y long.



Hur-ry Kit-ty, for you see

Mam-ma soon will come for
me,

And J must see you safe in bed

All cov-ered up ex-cept your

head.

And while I rock you in my
chair,

You must purr your lit-tle
prayer.

Al-tho’ you say it soft and low,

‘Twill all be just the same you
know.

Mam-ma makes me bend my
knee,

But Kit-ty dear, you can’t, you
see, |

For youre too little yet to try—

See! I’m so big, and tall, and
high.

And then you can’t say any

words,

No more than chicks, or lit-tle
birds,

But I have heard the Bible tell

That e-ven birds are cared for
well.

Bae toe toaay aay ae eta Se ee Gt ee









NOLL.

Nott owns a dear pussy. _ first time Noll saw her, and
Noll is sure she is one of has nev-er worn a-ny since.
the fa-mous “ Three lit-tle kit- And af-ter los-ing her mit-
tens she must have lost her-self

— for Noll found her one
spring twi-light down by the
hedge, all alone, cry-ing for
her sup-per — that’s what Noll
said the “‘ mze-ows” meant.
And Noll, hap-py, ten-der-
heart-ed Noll, has the gift of
know-ing what the “‘e-ows,”
the ‘‘da-ba-as,’ the ‘‘ 00-005,”
the “ dow-wows ” and the bird:
chirps mean; and _ pus-sies,
lamb-kins, cows, dogs, bird-ies,
and e-ven wee down-y chick-ies,
seem ver-y hap-py when she
pats them with a ten-der coo.
Noll says she has taught
pus-sy to tell her A B Cs—
not as you do, but by pat-ting
them soft-ly with her vel-vet
2,paw, one at a time, as Noll
Se 2 names them o-ver.
z But I think Noll’s chub-by
tens who lost fhe mit-tens”— hand must help the vel-vet
at least she had none on the paw—don't you?







PUSSY’S

Pussy slept in the barn with her
three kittens.

They had a nice hay nest.
hay nest was warm and soft.

This



MARY’S PET.

The kittens were comfortable.

But mother Pussy was not satis-
fied.

She knew about a place which she

CHOICE.

thought the kittens would like better.

This place was a little girl's trun-
dle-bed.

Do you know what a trundle-bed
is?

Perhaps you never have seen one.

Trundle-beds are not much used
now. Long ago they were common.

Then the bedsteads for grown peo-
ple were higher than they are now.

A trundle-bedstead was like a low
square box, with four feet.

It had casters fitted into its four
feet, so that it could be rolled, or trun-
dled, under the large bed.

It staid under the large bed in the

daytime.

It was pulled out at night.
The little children slept in this
trundle-bed.



PUSSY'S

Mary’s trundle-bed was soft. It
had a white pillow. |

It had a silk bed-quilt, made from
one of mamma's dresses.

This silk bed-quilt was quilted in
little squares, like a checker-board.
In every square there was a blue
flower.

Little Mary liked this silk bed-
quilt very much.

It was so soft and so pretty.

Pussy liked it too. She was al-
lowed to lie on it sometimes.

One day Pussy ran into the house.

She came from the barn. She had
something in her mouth.

She went through the kitchen so
fast that the cook did not see what
she had in her mouth.

The cook thought pussy had caught
a mouse.

Pussy ran right through the kitch-
en, into the hall, and up-stairs.

She crept under the big bed.

She jumped up into the trundle-
bed.

She put something down on the
soft, silk quilt.

Then she jumped out and ran
down-stairs.

CHOICE,

After she had gone, something said,
“ Mi-ew, mi-ew !” .
That was what Mary heard. O,
such a little mi-ew!
Mice don’t mew.
So it was not a mouse.
The mi-ew came from under the
big bed.
Mary pulled out the trundle-bed.
She saw a tiny kitty on her pretty
silk quilt.
It was a lovely white kitty, with
black spots.
Mary ran back to the window.
She saw pussy going straight back
to the barn to get her other little
kitties.
But mamma said that this couldn’t
be allowed.
This is what mamma sang to her
little girl:
“ Puss and her kittens
Must sleep in the hay ;
And the bed be kept tidy
For my little May!”

But the first little kitty staid in
the house. Mary tied a blue ribbon
around its neck, and it always was

Mary’s pet.





















































One little black cat, one little gray —

Two little funny cats having such a play!
Over goes the gray cat sticking out her toes;
Down tumbles Blackie, right upon her nose!

Here comes the mamma-cat, straight across the floor;
There go. the kitten-cats scrambling for the door;

Up pops a brown mouse, coming through a crack!
Jump goes the mamma-cat before it can get back!

Funny little black cat, funny little gray —
How they let the brown mouse try to run away!
Off goes the brown mouse, in among the pails!
Then how the mamma-cat pulls their little tails!





KITTY IN THE CRADLE.

« | want a live baby,” said Jenny one
day;

«A baby that knows how to frolic
and play;











“ ROCK-A-BY, BABY, OH! ROCK-A-BY-BY.”

My doll can do nothing but just
wink her eyes,
And all the day long in the drawer
She lies.
Come here, little kitty,

with milk;

I'll feed you

I'll wrap you in dolly’s best blanket

of silk;
















I'll fasten a pretty lace cap on your
head ;

I'll rock you to sleep in my dolly’s
soft bed.”

Then kitty purred gently, as if she
would say,

“T think twould be nice to be treated
that way ;”

And she tried very hard to be patient
and good, |

And let Jenny do with her justas she {

would.

She lay in the cradle dressed up in
a cap;

She soon went to sleep and hada
long nap;

While Jenny like any small mother
sat nigh,

And sung, “ Rock-a-by, baby, ol.
rock-a-by-by.”









Full Text


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The waysof amusing baby are numberless; but the
best of them all is the old one—mother-talk.

What shall she talk about? The pictures and stories
of BaontGn a Look at these pictures, for instance.
They have got to be explained, of course; but that is
what they are for, to give the mother something 70
talk about. .

But, remember, baby hasn’t got used to the pace of
this quick world. Give him time. He couldn’t find
out for himself what a story there is in one of these
simple pictures. There is the mother cat in her rock-
ing-chair with her steaming cup of tea and the kittens
playing blind-fold. How happy they are!

Send five cents to D. Lothrop Company, Boston,

for a copy of Babyland.


An Oyster: Catcher.

These seg ONe of the pictures in My Land und and there is nothing in it that isn’t borne out by
Water Friends, a book of which the author says: it the learning of learned men.
is py eny with the hope of interesting boys and LD. Lothrop Company, Boston, publish it; book-
girls in the wonderful little neighbors around them; sellers have it, of course.



Goliath Bectle.













Snapping Turtle.

Ly (
ip Hi /
\ co a




HINY FAB AND eI ees



BOSTON _
D. LOTHROP AND COMPANY
FRANKLIN AND HAWLEY STREETS
CopyRIGHT, 1586,
BY
D. LoTHrRop & COMPANY.


THEY CIR-CUM-NAV--GATE THE GLOBE.
WHERE TI-NY TAB WAS FOUND.

Jan-et was go-ing home from
grand-pa’s. It was cold, and
she went with a hop-skip and a
trip. It was just a mile from
the red house on grand-pa’s
hill to the white house on pa-
pas hill, and half-way there
was a piece of woods, where
Jan-et knew ev-er-y leaf-y hol-
and where there were
It
was grow-ing dark fast, but she
stopped and called: ‘Gone to
bed in there, squir-ries ?”

No squirrel called back.
In-stead, some-bod-y or some-

thing an-swer-ed:

low,
al-ways man-y squir-rels.

“Mew! mew-mew!”

“Why!” said Jan-et, ‘that’s
a kit-ty!”

So it was; a soft, white lit-
tle crea-ture came press-ing
through the fence and out to

the road. ‘* Why, you lit-tle

dar-ling,” said Jan-et, stoop-ing,
“Such a lit-tle tiny Tab!”

Two soft, pink eyes looked
up, a lit-tle white back arched
to meet her hand, and then,
what do you think? Why,
that kit-ty jumped right up-on
Jan-et’s muff and stood there;
and when Jan-et rose up te
go on she stayed right on the
muff, ) |

“Oh, you dear lit-tle Tab,”
said Jan-et to her; “some boy
has brought
thrown you a-way! But you
shall go home with me.”

Kit-ty seemed toknow. She
sat down on the muff and rode

you here and

a-long, pur-ring sweet thanks,
‘“And yes,” purred she, “it
was a boy! No girl ev-er car-
ried a kit-ty off and threw her
away—now, did she?”
“No,” said Jan-et, “nev-er!”


TI-NY TAB RIDES HOME ON THE MUFF,
THE SPOT-TED KIT-TENS.

I went to grand-pa’s barn to hunt for eggs the oth-er day
And what do you guess I found ly-ing cud-dled in the hay’
Oh! the kit-ty kit-ty kit-tens—such tiny, dar-ling kit-tens!
The dear-est little kit-tens that you ev-er saw at play.

They scampered and they capered, rolled and rolled a-rount:
They pulled each other’s tails and they tumbled on the ground
Oh! the jolly, jolly kit-tens— the mer-ry mites of kit-tens-
Such rol-lick-ing and frolicking! the like was nev-er foun(

I laughed, and I laughed a-gain, and still I laughed with gle
For grand-pa said: “I don't know what to do, with three
So you shall have a kit-ten, which-ev-er lit-tle kit-ten

You choose, when they are big enough to take a-way, you see

Which would you choose? There’s one as shi-ny black as je
With his rogu-ish lit-tle eyes, and spots of buff —a pret-ty pe
He’s a fris-ky little kit-ten—a sau-cy, cun-ning kit-ten,

I like the black-buff kit-ten—but I haven't cho-sen yet. —

For there’s a lit-tle gray thing with soft and silk-y fur,
I hugged her in my arms and she nev-er tried to stir,
And she is spot-ty too—a beauty of. a kit-ten,

Such a co-sey lit-tle kit-ten — and you ought to hear her purr!






























AT THE BARN.— THEY SCAM-PER-ED AND THEY CA-PER-ED,
HOW JET BE-CAME A WHITE CAT.

But when you see the third one you can-not help but know
How hard it is to choose when I love the oth-ers so,
She’s the sweet-est lit-tle kitten—the down-rest of kit-tens
And her dain-ty tor-toise fur is flaked with soft-est snow,
What shalf 1 do about it? I can-not choose, you see!
Which-ev-er one I take I can-not let the oth-ers be!
Oh! the kitty kitty kittens, the bon-ny, bonny kit-tens!
Oh! grand-pa dear, now couldn't you give them all to me?



HOW JET BE-CAME A WHITE CAT.

Jet has had a good duin-
ner, chick-en and tur-key both,
But Jet is a bad

He wish-es

and gra-vy.
lit-tle
he could know what is

that dish.

peep-cat.
in

He hopes it ts

squash pie. Up he jumps.
and—ah! slip! splash! I:
this scared, wet, white lit-tl

for th
this Jet

ob-ject, spring-ing
cel-lar-door — is

Yes, this is Jet.



JET'S AD-VEN-TURE IN THE PAN-TRY.
NEL-LIE’S CATS.

Nel-lie loves cats. She has
eight. She is a-wak-ened each
morn-ing by a gen-tle scratch-
ing at the win-dow, that grows
to be a big scratch and a
loud me-ow if she doesn’t an-
swer.

It is fun-ny to see four of
them sit-ting on the win-dow-
sill, the rail-
ing of the porch a-wait-ing a

and four on

re-ply to that scratch.
When

win-dow they all bounce in

Nel-le o-pens the

pell-mell, and race o-ver the
bed and play hide-and-seek be-
hind the pil-lows.

These cats are named Eliz-
a-beth, Liz-zie, Bet-sey and
Bess, James, Jim-mie, Jam-sie
and Jim, aft-er Nel-lie’s pa-pa
and mam-ma.

Eliz-a-beth is the lead-er in
mis-chief. She taught the oth-

ers how to. scratch at the
win-dow.
James is the high-mind-ed cat.

He sits on the diction-a-ry on



AT NEL-LIE’S WIN-DOW.

top of the book-rack and some- »
times on the man-tel. But he is
care-ful not to whisk his tail
and break the or-na-ments.
PAINT-ER PE-TER-KIN’S CATS.

Great beau-ties, great rogues door a-jar and the five rogues
too, are Paint-er Pe-ter-kin’s stepped in, and the mam-ma-
five cats. Paint-er Pe-ter-kin cat rogue sat down and saw
tries to keep them out of his four kit-ten rogues climb and



GREAT BEAU-TIES AND GREAT ROGUES,

stu-dio, where he has a great whisk, and claw, and do things

ma-ny things that tip o-ver —six-teen naughty paws —

ea-sy and run out and spoil. do-ing things, with brush-es
But one day he left the and bot+tles and paints.
PINK-IE SUP-POS-ES.

When I run out in the snow,
S’po-sin’ I should have to go
"Out no shoes,
‘Out no hat,
Like my lit-tle pus-sy-cat!



THIS IS PINK-IE’S CAT.

S’pos-in’ I should say meow,
‘Stead of talk-ing ‘s I do now,
‘Out no play-things

'Cept a ball,
‘Cept .a spool, or—that’s all.

S’pose my dress was on-ly fur,

And I al-ways had to purr,
And had claws
To catch mice—

I don’t think ‘twould be real
nice!



THIS IS PINK-IE,

S’pose I was a tru-ly cat
Ly-ing on the kitch-en mat,
‘Out no crib
White and _pret-ty, |
Who d’ you s’pose would feed that kit-ty?
THREE DREAMS.

Oft-en when Cat Silk-y-soft like mam-ma’s dreams, they
and her daugh-ter-cats woke are al-ways fun-ny.”

So mam-ma told
first, and it was
fun-ny, as us-u-al,
“T dreamed,” said_
she, “that I was
a great com-mon
black cat, and that.









[ lived up in an

























CAT SILK-Y-SOrT AND HER DAUGH-TER-CATS.



in the morn-ing they would
tell each oth-er their dreams;
for cats are great dream-
ers. So the oth-er morn-
ing, “Let's tell dreams,” said ie oS
Pet. ,

“Let's,” said Prink, “and er-y day at noon I put jon a
mam-ma shall tell first, for I blue cra-vat and gave ai ice-

|

|

]


















































THE KIT-TEN THAT SAT UP TO SUP-PER.
cream lunch to
eight rats!”

“ That nev-
er come to pass,
mam-ma,” said
Prink. “ And
I,” Prink went
on, ‘I dream-
ed I was grown
up, and was a
great beau-ty,
and a paint-er
paint-ed me,

THREE DREAMS.



“You vain.
puss! thatl/
nev-er come to.
pass, said
mam-ma. |

‘And I,’ said
Pet, gig-gling
right out, “J
dream-ed I was
an old danc-ing-
mas-ter, and the |
chil-dren here
had to take les-

and I was hung in the pict-ure sons of me— and did-nt I

store in a most el-e-gant frame,

bey

them out for mak-ing

with the most el-e-gant rib- me stand on my hind paws

bons and gold-en tassels.”

yes-ter-day — yes, I did!”



PET’S DREAM.


OUT PEEPED PUS-SY AT HER,
GRAND-PA’S VAL-EN-TINE.

Grand-pa’s ver-y least lit-tle
grand-daugh-ter was a ver-y
pret-ty child, but she was a
ver-y self-ish one, too. Her
nurs-es did not like her, and
her mam-ma did not know
what to do with her. Grand-
pa said it was be-cause she
was the on-ly pet-ted creat-ure
in the house; be-cause ev-er-y-
thing dain-ty and _pret-ty was
She had all
the can-dy, all the bon-bons, all
Grand-
pa said she ought to have some
pets, something smaller than
her-self to care for, and to be
kind to.

On St. Val-en-tine’s Day,
grand-pa sent Nel-ly a fun-ny
val-en-tine, and she was to have
it for hers just as long as she
took good care of it. So mam-
ma came up in-to Nel-ly’s

giv-en to her.

the love and kiss-es.

room on St. Val-en-tine’s morn-
ing, and she said: “ There is
a love-ly val-en-tine for you
down-stairs, dear. If you are
good, and dress quick-ly, you
may see it be-fore break-fast;
but not 1f you are naugh-ty.”

Nel-ly did not wrig-gle or
kick e-ven once while Ma-ry
but-toned her boots, did not run
off e-ven once when the lit-tle
skirts went o-ver her head, held
her face up sweet and quret
to be washed, stood still to be
brushed, and have her col-lar
pinned, and then a-way she.
tripped down-stairs.

Mam-ma o-pened the par-lot
door.

“Run in,” she said, “and
see your val-en-tine.” |

Nel-ly looked all a-round,
but she saw noth-ing new.

“Why,” said mam-ma, “1
GRAND-PAS VAL-EN-TINE.

left her here—where zs she?”

« She?” said Nel-ly. And
then she laughed and ran to
the big chair in the cor-ner, and
mam-ma ran af-ter her, laugh-
ing too. There was grand-
pa’s val-en-tine — a trick-sy lit-
tle pus-sy-cat ; and she had crept
in-to mam-ma’s muff, and there
she sat, her soft lit-tle head
peep-ing
sweet-ly.

And did this kitty make
Nelly a good little girl?
Well, I think her in-flu-ence
was what grand-pa ex-pect-ed,
for Nel-ly was ver-y kind and
po-lite to her cat, brushed her,
and fed her, and let her in
and out, and spoke soft-ly
and kind-ly, and kitty went
ev-el y-where with her, e-ven
to church one day, and in-to
the coun-try when the fam-i-ly
went; and Nelly has been
hear 1 to give her much good

out, and pur-ring

ad-vice—not to catch birds,
and not to growl and spit at
oth-er cats, but to share her
sau-cer of cream and her chick-



NEL-LY AD-VIS-ES HER CAT.

en bones with those oth-er cats,
and nev-er, nev-er to mew to be
served first at ta-ble—and this
ad-vice could have come on-ly
from a good, thought-ful lit-
tle girl.
THE CHRIST-MAS KIT-TY.

One time Fan and Fay
almost did-n’t have a-ny
Christ-mas. They did be-fore
night, though ; but they would-
nt if it had-n’t been for a
little stray kit-ty. You see
San-ta Claus
pres-ents by pa-pa, and pa-pa’s
train was snowed in, and there

was to send

would-n't have been any-thing
but just
rai-sins if
it had-n’t
been for
that kit-
ty-cat.

It was
a-bout



noon,and

TIP-O-VER-THINGS PLAY,

they were
look-ing out at the storm,
big, cold tears run-ning down
their they

heard a scratch on the door,

nos-es, when

a-bout

loud amelie
They harked a_ min-ute.

as as



WORK-BASK-ET PLAY.

Then they heard it a-gain,
as wee and fine as if a fairy
They looked at
each oth-er — there was some
thing so Zzve in the sound they
did-n’t dare go to the door.
“Mew!” said a small voice:
and this time there was a
great deal of scratch-ing, at

were there.

least two little feet. They
ran to the door, and in
pranced a jet-black kit-ten.

She shook the snow off with

looked all
a-round with two great, bright,

Ae |cukeesticezed,
THAT JOL-LY KIT MADE CHRIST-MAS E-NOUGH FOR TWO HOUS-ES,

aN
.




















THE CHRIST-MAS KIT-TY.

gold-green eyes for a sau-cer
of milk, purred, and then rub-
bed her head a-gainst Fay.

No
that jol-ly kit made Christ-

more big cold tears!

for two houses.

alll
bask-et play,
thread

things play, and chase-her-tail

mas e-nough
She knew a-bout work-
and spool-of-

play, and tip-o-ver-

play, and roll-a-ball play —

there could be no doubt that

she was no com-mon kit, h
a true Christ-mas-pres-ey
cat, left there a-pur-pose whe
San-ta Claus drove by wif
but, (

she was too sweet to descril

the rein-deer sleigh;

at all when by-and-by in t
soft, snowy, fire-lit twrlight







crept up in-to their laps, at



purred and went to sle¢.
while Fan and Fay sang li
kit-ty-bye-lows.







































































SLATE PICT-URE.—TAK-ING KIT-TY’S PICT-URE.
THE WHITE HEN AND HER PETS.

It was Peg-gy’s
work to hunt the
eggs. But the
White Hen would
al-ways have her
nest the
porch, and_ that
made it hard for
her, for she had
to lie down flat and crawl in.

One night af-ter school, she
found the White Hen on the
nest, and ver-y cross in-deed.
She tried to “shoo” her off, but
she would not move. So she
pushed her a lit-tle and then she
saw—not a plump white egg,
but the soft, fur-ry heads of two
little black kit-tens; and they
both said Mew/ to Peg-gy.
But the White Hen was cross
and pecked, and Peg-gy had to
come out and leave her.

That same night Tab-by

un-der



PEG-GY.

came in with a kitten in her
mouth; soon she came a-gain
with an-oth-er; then with an-
oth-er; but she seemed un-eas-y
and Peg-gy saw her go un-der
the porch, and heard her mew.





HOW FUN-NY SHE LOOKED!

The next morn-ing, Peg-gy
took a stick and crept un-dert

the porch. She made the White
THE WHITE HEN AND HER PETS.

Hen step off her nest, and there
were two more kit-tens.
Peg-gy gave Tab-by a nice
box on the porch, but in a few
min-utes the White Hen came
up, cluck-ing as loud as she
could, and sat down by the
kit-tens
mewed she would cluck.

box, and when the
Peg-gy put some crumbs on
the floor to see what she

would do; and she broke the



CHILD-LIFE ON THE FARM.— THE FIRST LES-SON.

crumbs with her bill and
called the kittens to eat, as
if they were chick-ens, and if,
Tab-by tried
she made her-self as big as!
two hens and drove her a-way;)
and when she nes-tled the kit
tens up in her feath-ers, how,
funny she did look! Then,
Peg-gy had to car-ry them,
where the White Hen could

not come.

to come near;






A THANKS-GIV-ING GIFT.

giv-ing gift
from Grand-
ma? You ney-



er could guess.
It wasa bas-ket:

of French kit-
tens. i ie ye

reached the lit-
tle Greys’ home
just in time for
the great din-
ner. :

“French
eats! said:
Dick, “we can
nev-er un-der-
stand them or
they us!”

Bue “ehey:
found their

What think you came to pret-ty pet kit-ties mewed in
the little Greys all the way A-mer-i-can, and knew ev-er-y
over the o-cean as a thanks- trick A-mer-ican cats play-


HOW DAI-SY GOT HER WISH.

Dai-sy had three kit-tens —
Puff, who was cream-col-ored,
drab, and Midge

gold-col-ored —three new, lit-

Beau-ty,

tle, sleep-y, hap-py kit-tens.

“T wish my kit-ties had
some stock-ings!” Dai-sy said
to her aunt-ie the day be-fore
Christ-mas.

“Their feet are not cold,”
peel eincyaeciicc mnt
cov-ered with soft fur.”

“But to hang up, you
know,” said Dai-sy. ‘‘San-ta
Claus might bring them some

said aunt-ie.

neck-rib-bons.”

Dai-sy’s own stock-ing was
brim-ful of pres-ents the next
morn-ing, and they were so
very pret-ty, that she nev-er
thought of her kit-tens till
near noon.

She found them all a-sleep

in grand-ma’s easy-chair with



its striped
dam-ask cov-er, and the dia
mond-shaped ti-dy on the back,}
made in |
checks.
And what do you think?)
There were the kit-tens, all
three, in new sat-in neck-rib
bons tied in beau-ti-ful bows!
on the back! |
Lit-tle cream-col-ored Puff’s
scar-let;, drab Beau-ty's!
was pink; and gold-col-ored|
Midge’s was blue— O, so

ver-y be-com-ing!

black-and-green

crim-son-and-white;

Was

“San-ta Claus must have}
been ver-y near when I wished)
that. wish to aunt-ie,” thought
Daisy. ‘And O, what good)
taste he has!” she ad-ded)
as she looked a-gain at the!



gay lit-tle pus-sies. “I should|
like to have him pick out mj
next new dress, I think.”











































ion
asfee

A

P

Cand

Kas

iw

chain”?




eas Nes

DAI-SY’S KIT-TENS AND THEIR CHRIST-MAS GIFTS,
SNOW-BALL’S EX-PE-RI-ENCE.

Snow-ball is a ver-y young
kit-ten in-deed. She has lived
She is fond

She curls

just one sum-mer.
of the sun-shine.
her-self up on the pi-az-za
where the sun shines warm
and sleeps for hours. She
likes rain-y days, too, for then
she climbs up to the top of
the wood-pile un-der the shed,
where it is warm and dry,
and sleeps for hours more.

But the oth-er day some-
thing hap-pened to Snow-ball.
She was
found it ver-y cold. She was
think-ing that she had bet-ter
run home, when she felt some-

out walk-ing and

thing cold hit her on the nose.
She lift-ed her head quick-ly,
to see what it was, and some-
thing else, ver-y cold, flew
right in-to her eye. When she
winked that off she found one











more on her lit-tle soft paw.
Be-fore she could find out what!
it was, ex-cept that it was whitel
and cold, it was gone, and her}
fur was wet where it had been!
Then she looked up and saw!
that the air was full of thesel
queer lit-tle things which were}
so cold and wet and white, and|
that they were fall-ing ev-er-y
where. So she grew very
much fright-ened and ran home}
as fast as she could.

“Mew! mew! dear moth!
er, she cried, “‘ what zs it that}
is com-ing down from the sky}
and that makes me so cold?’}

“Why, you fool-ish kit-ten,|
said the wise old moth-er-cat,|
tak-ing off her spec-ta-cles}
“don't youknowthatitis snow?’ |

Snow-ball looked out of the}
“T don’t think I}

like snow,” she said.

win-dow.


























































































































“ WHAT'S THIS SO COLD ON MY PAW?” SAID SNOW-BALL.
OUT-WIT-TED.

Three little tab-by-coats all in a row,

Moth-er Puss loves them, this I know;

Pet nam-ed them Pearl-y, Fred and Dick —

Nice lit-tle tab-by-coats, so smooth and slick!
“Vou can't keep them,” broth-er Ned said,
Fold-ing his arms, and shak-ing his head;

“Our fish they'd catch, our birds they'd kill,

Ill find them a place by the old red mill!”

In-to his lap, lit-tle Pet climbed,

Round his neck her chub-by arms twined,

But coax-ing was vain, though a close em-brace
Drew the ro-sy mouth to her broth-er’s face.

Ned was gone, on-ly Pet and Puss,

To guard the dar-lings, but now, for-sooth!
Where should they go, to be safe from harm —
Up-stairs, down-stairs, or in the big barn?

No trace of tab-by-coats, in-doors or out;
Moth-er Puss stares at this bust-ling a-bout;

Pet smiles de-mure-ly when none can see,
Whis-pers ‘‘ No-bod-y knows, Tab, but you and me!”
Mam-ma found in her hat-box three fun-ny things,
All curled up in soft, wool-ly rings ;

Called, “ Pet, Pet! Oh look! oh do!”
Laugh-ing, she said: “Tab lugged one, and I lugged two!”


“TAB LUGGED ONE, AND . LUGGED TWO.”






JUMPER’S STRANGE FISH.

Jumper is Willie Watson’s little
white cat.

The house where Willie and Jum-
per live is near a large stream of
water.

Cats do not like to wet their
feet.

They will never step in the water
if they can help it.

_ For this reason, you might doubt
what I am going to tell you about
Jumper.

But every word of this story is
true.

Little white Jumper does not hunt

for rats and mice, as cats usually
do.

When she is hungry Jumper goes
to the stream to catch a fish.

Jumper takes her seat among some
stones near a Still place in the stream,
where a great many little fish swim
by. .

When one comes near, Jumper
snatches it out of the water with her

paw.

Then she takes it in her teeth and
runs into the house with it.

But one day Jumper made a mis
take in her fishing,
JUMPER’S STRANGE FISH.

Aman had left a basket on the Oh! how mad Jumper was then!
stones and gone away. She jumped, and she mewed.

She tried hard to shake off the
ugly creature.

But she could not get away from
it until Willie came and _ helped
her.

He opened the close-shut claws
of the crab. |

Then how fast little white Jumper
ran off!

Her paw was hurt so badly that
she was quite lame for many days.

Still Jumper often goes fishing.



JUMPER,

There were crabs in the basket.
Jumper looked at the crabs.
She thought they were very
strange fish.
But they looked good.
They smelled good.
At last she pulled one out of the
basket.
Jumper felt very proud of such
| alarge fish.
_ She dragged the crab to the house
to show to Willie. But she never looks for fish ia
_ But, as she was playing with it, baskets now.
| the crab caught hold of her paw.



JUMPER AND THE STRANGE FISH.


A LES-SON IN MAN-NERS.

4

'

Ws

wa
Bra-ve , my beau-ti-ful dears! —Go play!”
Three whisks and a whirl! off and a-way!
No more Be-+hav-ing — hur-rah! — to-day !



Tue moth-er-cat rose up out of her
sleep;

She called to her kit-tens, so shrill and
deep

That in they pranced, all three in a heap,

“ Kit-tens!” said she, ina tone so grave
That each lit-tle tail for-got to wave,
“It's time! taught you how to be-have.,

“All el-e-gant cats mind cer-tain laws—
Know va-ri-ous styles of hold-ing paws,
And dain-ty ways to man-age claws.

“Nice well-bred kit-tens walk side by
side

Behind their moth-er, with gen-tle
glide —

Not scam-per and roll and hop and
hide.

“J wish you to learn to give a paw
With a soft and el-e-gant me-aw !
And the sweet-est smile one ev-er saw.

“And a bow—a really graceful bow

Is what few cats ev-er learn how

To make—I'll train you my-self. See
now —

“Not a nod — but slow and deep — “us

























































































AL-MOST A SAD STO-RY.

BY E.

Bees

Granp-pA and Grand-ma
Hall lived all a-lone.

They had chick nor child,
not ev-ena cat; and they didn’t
know there was e-ven so much
as a mouse in the house.

But there was one, a lit+tle
fel-low with the lov-li-est brown
tur, that lived all by him-self
be-hind the win-dow cur-tain in
the par-lor. He al-ways had had
agood time and al-ways ex-pect-
ed to; for you must know that

this lit-tle brown mouse had
nev-er ev-en heard of a cat!
But one day the lit-tle yrand-
daugh-ter, Beth, came to live
with Grand-pa anc Grand-
ma Hall.
her birds and her do'ls, and,

a-las, all her cats ; and the ver-y

She brought all |

first night the cats — there were

four of them —came trvop-ing

in-to the par-lor, and be-‘ore he |
could wink or think of ev-en |
hold up his lit-tle pink paws in |


AL-MOST A SAD STO-RY.

aston-ish-ment, they had Mr.
Mouse stand-ing up before
them. All he could do was to
hold uphis paws and say,
“Please, A/ease not to!”

Old Mis-tress Cat looked on

i





































































































quietly. Not so her three
bois-ter-ous sons.

“QO please not to!” said the
lit-tle brown mouse a-gain.

“ Shall!” said Mid-night.

“Will!” said Spot-ty.













































“0, PLEASE NOT TO!”

“Must!” said Snow-flake.
“That’s what mice are for!”

And then — well —bless her
heart! — grand-ma ap-peared,
ind the cats looked a-round —

ind per-haps they thought that

as it was er mouse it wouldn’t
be po-lite. Be that as may,
Mous-ie ran out the o-pen door
and was nev-er seen or heard
of a-gain—not by little Beth's
cats at least.
i
»
5
®
S,
t
q

Tar aera

TAK-ING THE





THE RAT SKETCH-ING THE CATS.



FAM-I-LY OUT TO RIDE.







THE CATS CATCH-ING THE RAT.
THE HIS-TO-RY OF NAN-CY LEE.

BY A. W. A.

One time there was a lit-tle
black kit-ten named Nan-cy
Lee. Nan-cy was-n’t want-ed
where she lived.

The cook was a big cross
wom-an, who said she “did-n't
want that good-for-noth-ing kit-
ten a-round un-der her feet.”

So she picked up a broom
and scat-ted Nan-cy Lee out
doors.

The poor kit-ten cried a-loud
“Me-a-ow!” But that did-n't
dry her soft fur. She was so
fright-ened that she hid a-mong
the bush-es for a long time.

Af-ter a while she raised her
head and looked a-round for a
inend. But she saw on-ly a big
black bee-tle.

Then she jumped into the
toad, and sat down on the grass
to smooth out her wet fur.
~ She had nev-er washed her

own lit-tle coat be-fore, for her
moth-er had al-ways done it for
her; but she was do-ing the
best she could, when along
came a bigdog. And what do
you think he did?

Just as Nan-cy was go-ing up
to him to ask him to let her
warm her-self by him, he
o-pened his big mouth and said,
“ Berrr-r! dow! wow!”

Oh! how Nan-cy Lee did
run! |

Next she saw a large red
cow. This cow was walk-ing
a-long the road eat-ing grass.
The cow looked so nice and
kind that Nan-cy ran and sat
down right un-der her.

The cow did-n't drive her
a-way, nor say “scat! ” nor
“bow! wow!” but still she was
walk-ing a-long a lit-tle bit at a
time, and the kit-ten sat so close
THE HIS-TO-RY OF NANCY LEE.

to her feet that she was in
dan-ger.

Just then a lit-tle girl with
long yel-low hair looked out of
the house near by.

“Oh, mam-ma!” said she,
“out there's a lit-tle black kit-
ten, sit-ting un-der a big cow.
She looks so cold, poor thing!
I’m ‘fraid the cow will step on
her! Look, mam-ma.”

So the la-dy looked too, and
saw them. She liked kit-tens
as well as her lit-tle girl, but
she did-n’t want a-ny more, as
they had three al-read-y.

Still the little girl begged
hard to have the kit-ten brought
in, and at last the la-dy went
out and got her. The little
girl took her little broom and
brushed her, and then she sat
by the warm stove and washed
her rough dir-ty coat, whilethe
lady went out and warmed
some milk. She gave it to
Nan-cy Lee in a teen-ty, ween-ly

lit-tle pan, just big enough for
her. Nancy drank just as fast
as she could, and then had a4
lit-tle bit of Char-lotte Russe
that the lit-tle girl was eat-ing, |
Wasn't that a fun-ny din-ner
for Nan-cy?

Then Miss Lee be-gan to
sing for the girl-ie. Did you
know kit-tens could sing?

She sang ‘ P-r-r-r-r” so soft-
ly! The little girl laughed,
and Nan-cy stopped.

Then the little girl said,
““Mam-ma, she looks just as if
her name was Nan-cy Lee.,
Now, kittie, if that’s your
name, sing more, but if ‘tisn't,.
keep still.”

Then thekit-ten began a-gain,
and purred and purred like
ev-er-y-thing, and so they called
her Nan-cy Lee.

Nan-cy Lee still lives in her
new home, and has all the new
milk she can drink out of the
teen-ty, ween-ty lit-tle pan.


NAN-CY LEE SEES THE BIG BLACK BEE-TLE,










A Moth-er’s Lul-la-by.

= a eg UL
~ oe NU Sie

HICK-O-RY, DICK-O-RY, DOCK!

Lit-tre Mar-ger-y Daw, “ Hick-o-ry, dick-o-ry, dock!
who us-u-al-lly sang “see-saw” The mice ran up the clock!”
when she sat in her rock-ing-

chair, one day took it into She sang it o-ver and o-ver,
her cur-ly head to sing a new un-til, all at once, Puss, who
song. ‘ Hick-o-ry, Dick-o-ry, Jay doz-ing on the win-dow-
Dock,” she sang as she rocked sill, found her-self purr-ing it
to and fro: | too:


HICK-O-RY, DICK-O-RY, DOCK?!

| Hick-o-ry, dick-o-ry, dock!
|The mice ran up the clock!”

| Well, the next thing Puss
{knew she was rub-bing her
ivel-vet paws in her eyes, and
wak-ing up from a nap, and
|Mar-ger-y gone, and noth-ing
jstir-ring in the room but the
irest-less sun-beams and_ the
ltick-ing clock. She jumped
idown and walked a-round the
table, and mewed, and felt
lver-y hun-gry. But there was
jnoth-ing on the ta-ble but the
|vin-e-gar cru-et and a knife,
land so she sat down and
jwait-ed. She was still rath-er



WHAT HAP-PENED,

sleep-y, and Mar-ger-y’s song
began to hum it-self in her
ears.

“The mice—the mice—
mice — the clock —the clock
— clock!”

All at once she. sat up
straight and rubbed her eyes.
“Yes, they did!” she said,
“they ran up the clock! I'll —
have ’em! J'll have ‘em for
my dinner! Ill run up the

clock my-self !”

She sprang light-ly on one
of the long weights, and—
well, look at the pict-ure, my
dears, and you can see just
what hap-pened:


PUT-TING KIT-TY TO BED.

BY

M.

E. S.

Kirt-ty, Kit-ty, go to sleep,

Shut your eyes, and dont you
peep,

Sing with me your little song,

We will not make it ver-y long.



Hur-ry Kit-ty, for you see

Mam-ma soon will come for
me,

And J must see you safe in bed

All cov-ered up ex-cept your

head.

And while I rock you in my
chair,

You must purr your lit-tle
prayer.

Al-tho’ you say it soft and low,

‘Twill all be just the same you
know.

Mam-ma makes me bend my
knee,

But Kit-ty dear, you can’t, you
see, |

For youre too little yet to try—

See! I’m so big, and tall, and
high.

And then you can’t say any

words,

No more than chicks, or lit-tle
birds,

But I have heard the Bible tell

That e-ven birds are cared for
well.

Bae toe toaay aay ae eta Se ee Gt ee



NOLL.

Nott owns a dear pussy. _ first time Noll saw her, and
Noll is sure she is one of has nev-er worn a-ny since.
the fa-mous “ Three lit-tle kit- And af-ter los-ing her mit-
tens she must have lost her-self

— for Noll found her one
spring twi-light down by the
hedge, all alone, cry-ing for
her sup-per — that’s what Noll
said the “‘ mze-ows” meant.
And Noll, hap-py, ten-der-
heart-ed Noll, has the gift of
know-ing what the “‘e-ows,”
the ‘‘da-ba-as,’ the ‘‘ 00-005,”
the “ dow-wows ” and the bird:
chirps mean; and _ pus-sies,
lamb-kins, cows, dogs, bird-ies,
and e-ven wee down-y chick-ies,
seem ver-y hap-py when she
pats them with a ten-der coo.
Noll says she has taught
pus-sy to tell her A B Cs—
not as you do, but by pat-ting
them soft-ly with her vel-vet
2,paw, one at a time, as Noll
Se 2 names them o-ver.
z But I think Noll’s chub-by
tens who lost fhe mit-tens”— hand must help the vel-vet
at least she had none on the paw—don't you?




PUSSY’S

Pussy slept in the barn with her
three kittens.

They had a nice hay nest.
hay nest was warm and soft.

This



MARY’S PET.

The kittens were comfortable.

But mother Pussy was not satis-
fied.

She knew about a place which she

CHOICE.

thought the kittens would like better.

This place was a little girl's trun-
dle-bed.

Do you know what a trundle-bed
is?

Perhaps you never have seen one.

Trundle-beds are not much used
now. Long ago they were common.

Then the bedsteads for grown peo-
ple were higher than they are now.

A trundle-bedstead was like a low
square box, with four feet.

It had casters fitted into its four
feet, so that it could be rolled, or trun-
dled, under the large bed.

It staid under the large bed in the

daytime.

It was pulled out at night.
The little children slept in this
trundle-bed.
PUSSY'S

Mary’s trundle-bed was soft. It
had a white pillow. |

It had a silk bed-quilt, made from
one of mamma's dresses.

This silk bed-quilt was quilted in
little squares, like a checker-board.
In every square there was a blue
flower.

Little Mary liked this silk bed-
quilt very much.

It was so soft and so pretty.

Pussy liked it too. She was al-
lowed to lie on it sometimes.

One day Pussy ran into the house.

She came from the barn. She had
something in her mouth.

She went through the kitchen so
fast that the cook did not see what
she had in her mouth.

The cook thought pussy had caught
a mouse.

Pussy ran right through the kitch-
en, into the hall, and up-stairs.

She crept under the big bed.

She jumped up into the trundle-
bed.

She put something down on the
soft, silk quilt.

Then she jumped out and ran
down-stairs.

CHOICE,

After she had gone, something said,
“ Mi-ew, mi-ew !” .
That was what Mary heard. O,
such a little mi-ew!
Mice don’t mew.
So it was not a mouse.
The mi-ew came from under the
big bed.
Mary pulled out the trundle-bed.
She saw a tiny kitty on her pretty
silk quilt.
It was a lovely white kitty, with
black spots.
Mary ran back to the window.
She saw pussy going straight back
to the barn to get her other little
kitties.
But mamma said that this couldn’t
be allowed.
This is what mamma sang to her
little girl:
“ Puss and her kittens
Must sleep in the hay ;
And the bed be kept tidy
For my little May!”

But the first little kitty staid in
the house. Mary tied a blue ribbon
around its neck, and it always was

Mary’s pet.















































One little black cat, one little gray —

Two little funny cats having such a play!
Over goes the gray cat sticking out her toes;
Down tumbles Blackie, right upon her nose!

Here comes the mamma-cat, straight across the floor;
There go. the kitten-cats scrambling for the door;

Up pops a brown mouse, coming through a crack!
Jump goes the mamma-cat before it can get back!

Funny little black cat, funny little gray —
How they let the brown mouse try to run away!
Off goes the brown mouse, in among the pails!
Then how the mamma-cat pulls their little tails!


KITTY IN THE CRADLE.

« | want a live baby,” said Jenny one
day;

«A baby that knows how to frolic
and play;











“ ROCK-A-BY, BABY, OH! ROCK-A-BY-BY.”

My doll can do nothing but just
wink her eyes,
And all the day long in the drawer
She lies.
Come here, little kitty,

with milk;

I'll feed you

I'll wrap you in dolly’s best blanket

of silk;
















I'll fasten a pretty lace cap on your
head ;

I'll rock you to sleep in my dolly’s
soft bed.”

Then kitty purred gently, as if she
would say,

“T think twould be nice to be treated
that way ;”

And she tried very hard to be patient
and good, |

And let Jenny do with her justas she {

would.

She lay in the cradle dressed up in
a cap;

She soon went to sleep and hada
long nap;

While Jenny like any small mother
sat nigh,

And sung, “ Rock-a-by, baby, ol.
rock-a-by-by.”