Citation
Robinson Crusoe

Material Information

Title:
Robinson Crusoe
Series Title:
Robin Hood series
Added title page title:
The story of Robinson Crusoe
Creator:
Defoe, Daniel, 1661?-1731
McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
McLoughlin Bros.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
[10] p. : ill. ; 20 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Castaways -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Shipwrecks -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Survival after airplane accidents, shipwrecks, etc -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Imaginary voyages -- 1889 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1889
Genre:
Imaginary voyages ( rbgenr )
fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Caption title: The story of Robinson Crusoe.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
027984429 ( ALEPH )
30061023 ( OCLC )
AJH5173 ( NOTIS )

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Full Text





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TIE STORY OF ROBINSON CRUSOE.

oe

I was born in the city of York, in England, in the year 1682,
My father was a man of some wealth, able to give me a good home,
and send me to school. It was his wish that I should be a lawyer ;
but my head began to be filled very early with thoughts of ram-
bling, and I would be satisfied with nothing but gceing to sea. My
father gave me strong and earnest counsel against it, but with little
effect. One day, being at Hull, I met a school-fellow who was
about to sail for London in his father’s ship,-and he prompted me
to go with him, and in an evil hour, without asking God’s blessing
or my father’s, I went on board.

On the way to London, a storm arose, the ship was wrecked, and
we barely escayead with our lives. I went on foot to London, where
I met with the master of a vessel which traded to the coast of
Africa. He took a fancy to me, and offered me a chance to go with
him on his voyages, which I gladly accepted.

A great storm came up, and the ship was tossed about for many
days, until we did not know where we were. Suddenly we struck a
bank of sand, and the sea broke over the ship in such a way that
we could not hope to have her hold many moments without break-
wg into pieces. In this distress we launched a boat. After we had.
been driven four or five miles, a raging wave struck us so furiously
that it overset the boat at once. Though I swam well the waves
were so strong that I was dashed against a rock with such force that
it left me senseless. But I recovered a little before the waves
returned, and, running forwaid, got to the mainland saiely.

The Baldwin Library

RmB

University
of
Florida



THE STORY OF ROBINSON CRUSOE.

Then I began to look about to see if any of my comrades had
escaped, but I could see no sign of any of them.

The night coming on, I climbed into a thick, bushy tree to sleep,
not knowing but that there might be ravenous beasts there. When
I awoke, next morning, the sea was calm, and I could see the ship
about a mile from the shore ; and when the tide ebbed, I swam out
to her. I found that all the provisions were dry, and being very _
hunery, I filled my pockets with biscuit, and eat as I went about
other things ; for I saw that I must lose no time in getting ashore
all that I could from the ship. I first threw overboard several
spare yards and spars. Then I went down the ship’s side and tied
them together, and laying a few short pieces of plank upon them,
I had a raft strong enough to bear a moderate weight.. Next I
lowered upon it three seamen’s chests, and filled them with pro-
visions. After a long search I found the carpenter’s chest, which
was a great prize to me. I lowered it upon the raft, and then
secured a supply of guns and gunpowder. With this cargo I
started for the shore, and, with a great deal of trouble, succeeded
in landing it safely.

My next work was to view the country and seek a proper place
to stow my goods. I knew not yet where I was, whether on the
continent or an island. There was a hill not over a mile away,
very steep and high; and I climbed to the top of it, and saw that
I was on an island, barren, and as I saw good reason to believe,
weinhabited.

Every day, for twelve days, I made a trip to the vessel, bringing
ashore a!l that I thought would be useful to me. The night of the
twelfth day there was a violent wind, and when I awoke in the
morning the ship was nowhere to be seen.

Then I gave my thoughts to providing myself with a safe habi-
tation. I found a little plain, on the side of a hill, whose front
towards the plain was very steep, and had in it a hollow place like





Ses

ROBINSON CRUSOE SAILING IN HIS BOAT.





HE SAND.

RINTS IN T

FINDING THE FOOTP



THE STORY OF ROBINSON CRUSOE.

the door of a cave. Here I resolved to pitch my tent, which I
made of sails that I had brought from the ship. Around it I drew
a half circle, and drove two rows of piles into the ground, making a
kind of fortress. I left no entrance, but used a short ladder to go
over the top, and when I was in, lifted it over after me. Then I
enlarged the hollow place I have spoken of until I had made quite
a cave, which served as a cellar for my house, which I called my
castle.

I had found aboard a dog and two cats. I carried the cats ashore
on the raft, but as for the dog he swam ashore himself, and was a
trusty servant to me for many years. Besides the company of these
- pets, I had that of a parrot which I caught, and which I taught to
speak ; and it often gave me much amusement.

I went out every day with my gun to hunt for food. I found that
there were goats running wild on the island, and often succeeded in
shooting one. But I saw that my ammunition would in time all be
gone, and that to have a steady supply of goat’s flesh, I must breed
them in flocks. So TI set a trap to take some alive, and succeeded
in catching several. I enclosed a piece of ground for them to ru.
in; and in course of time, had a large flock, which furnished me with
all the meat I needed.

I saved the skins of all the creatures I shot, and dried them;
and when my clothes were worn out, replaced them with gar-
ments made of these. Then, at the expense of a great deal of time
and trouble, I made an umbrella, also of skins, which I needed
much to keep off both sun and rain.

For a long time I brooded over the idea of making a canoe of the
trunk of a tree, as the Indians do, and at last set to work at the
task. I cut a large tree, and spent over three months shaping it
into the form of a boat. Then I found it too large to move to the
water. I afterwards made a smaller one, and succeeded in launch-



THE STORY UF ROBINSON CRUSOE.

ing it, and set out to make a tour around the island init. But when
I had been out three days, such a storm arose that I was near being
lost. At last I was.able to bring my boat to the shore, in a little
cove; and there I left it, and went across the island, on foot, to my
castle, not caring to go to sea again in such an unsafe vessel.

Thus ‘years and years passed away. Although I had, to some
extent, become contented with my solitary lot, yet at times a terrible
sense of loneliness and desolation would come over me. Many
times I would go to the top of a hill where I could look out to sea,
in hopes of catching sight of a ship. Then I would fancy that, at
a vast distance, I spied a sail. I would please myself with the
hopes of it, and after looking at it steadily, till I was almost blind,
would lose it quite, and sit down and weep like a child, and thus
icrease my misery by my folly.

But one day I saw a sight which turned my thoughts in a new
channel. It was the print of a naked foot upon the sand near the
shore. It filled me with fear, for it showed that the island must
sometimes be visited by savages.

One morning, going out quite early, I could see the light of a fire
about two miles away. I went to the top of the hill and looked in
the direction of the fire. I saw that five canoes were drawn up on
the shore, while a swarm of naked savages were dancing about the
fire. Presently they dragged two poor wretches from the boats. One
of them was knocked down at once, and several of the savages set to
work to cut him up. They were evidently cannibals, and were going
to hold one of their horrible feasts on their-captives. The other
captive was left standing for a moment, and seeing a chance to
escape, started to run. I was greatly alarmed when I saw that he
was coming directly toward me, but when I saw that only two pur:
sued him, and that he gained upon them, I made up my mind to
help him. When they were near enough, I took a short cut down



‘4,
As

Ke







SAVED.



THE STORY OF ROBINSON CRUSOE.

the hill, and placed myself between pursuers and pursued. Then Lt
advanced on the foremost, and knocked him down with the stock
of my gun. The other took his bow and was going to shoot me,
when I fired at him and killed him. Then I made signs to the poor
runaway to come to me, and he did so in fear and trembling, kneel-
ing at my feet and setting my foot upon his head, as a sign that he
was my slave.

I had now a companion, and in a short time I began to teach him
to speak to me. First I let him know that his name was to be
Friday, for that was the day I saved his life. Then I taught him
everything that I thought would make him useful, handy, and help-
ful. I clothed him in a suit made of goatskins, and he seemed to
be greatly pleased to be dressed like myself.

After some time had passed over, Friday came running to me one
morning to say that there was a ship in sight. Welcome as this
news was, I thought I would not show myself until I could learn
what had brought the ship there, and it was well that I did not. I
watched in concealment and saw a boat leave the ship and make
for the shore. Eleven men landed, and I saw that three of them
were bound as captives. They were laid upon the ground while the
rest. dispersed about the island. I approached tne captives and
questioned them, and found they were English, that one was the
captain, and the others were the mate and a passenger, and that
there had been a mutiny on the ship, and that the men, as a favor,
instead of killing them, were going to leave them on the island.

I offered to aid them to recover the ship, and going back: to the
eastle, I brought guns and gave them to them. When the men
returned to the boat we shot two, who the captain said were the
leaders, and the rest, taken by surprise, yielded to us| The cap-
tain made them swear that they would obey him faithfully, and
then returned to the ship. Those on board were equally surprised



THE STORY OF ROBINSON CRUSOE.

at the turn affairs had taken, and when one of the worst was killed,
were glad to return to their duty. Then the captain came back to
the island, and told me that the ship and all that he had was at my
service, in return for what I had done for him. I told him that all
I asked was a free passage for Friday and myself back to England.
--To this he gladly assented. He provided me with clothing from his
own wardrobe, and after I had arranged all my affairs, Friday and I
went aboard. Thus, I left the island, twenty-eight years, two
months, and nineteen days after I had landed upon it.
~ Three days after we set sail, we saw a great fleet of small boats,
full of savages, come paddling toward us as if to attack us. I told
Friday to go on deck and speak to them in his own language;
but he had no sooner spoken than they let fly a cloud of arrows
‘ at him, three of which hit him, and the poor fellow fell dead. Ina
rage, I ordered the ship’s guns to be fired into the fleet. Half of the
canoes were destroyed, while the rest scoured away so fast that in a
short time none of them could be seen. Poor honest Friday we
buried in the sea, with all the honor possible. So ended the life
of the most grateful, faithful, and affectionate servant that ever
man had. -
And now there is little more to teli. I arrived safely in England,
glad to be back in my old home once more, and desiring nothing
out to spend the rest of my days in peace and quietness.







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TIE STORY OF ROBINSON CRUSOE.

oe

I was born in the city of York, in England, in the year 1682,
My father was a man of some wealth, able to give me a good home,
and send me to school. It was his wish that I should be a lawyer ;
but my head began to be filled very early with thoughts of ram-
bling, and I would be satisfied with nothing but gceing to sea. My
father gave me strong and earnest counsel against it, but with little
effect. One day, being at Hull, I met a school-fellow who was
about to sail for London in his father’s ship,-and he prompted me
to go with him, and in an evil hour, without asking God’s blessing
or my father’s, I went on board.

On the way to London, a storm arose, the ship was wrecked, and
we barely escayead with our lives. I went on foot to London, where
I met with the master of a vessel which traded to the coast of
Africa. He took a fancy to me, and offered me a chance to go with
him on his voyages, which I gladly accepted.

A great storm came up, and the ship was tossed about for many
days, until we did not know where we were. Suddenly we struck a
bank of sand, and the sea broke over the ship in such a way that
we could not hope to have her hold many moments without break-
wg into pieces. In this distress we launched a boat. After we had.
been driven four or five miles, a raging wave struck us so furiously
that it overset the boat at once. Though I swam well the waves
were so strong that I was dashed against a rock with such force that
it left me senseless. But I recovered a little before the waves
returned, and, running forwaid, got to the mainland saiely.

The Baldwin Library

RmB

University
of
Florida
THE STORY OF ROBINSON CRUSOE.

Then I began to look about to see if any of my comrades had
escaped, but I could see no sign of any of them.

The night coming on, I climbed into a thick, bushy tree to sleep,
not knowing but that there might be ravenous beasts there. When
I awoke, next morning, the sea was calm, and I could see the ship
about a mile from the shore ; and when the tide ebbed, I swam out
to her. I found that all the provisions were dry, and being very _
hunery, I filled my pockets with biscuit, and eat as I went about
other things ; for I saw that I must lose no time in getting ashore
all that I could from the ship. I first threw overboard several
spare yards and spars. Then I went down the ship’s side and tied
them together, and laying a few short pieces of plank upon them,
I had a raft strong enough to bear a moderate weight.. Next I
lowered upon it three seamen’s chests, and filled them with pro-
visions. After a long search I found the carpenter’s chest, which
was a great prize to me. I lowered it upon the raft, and then
secured a supply of guns and gunpowder. With this cargo I
started for the shore, and, with a great deal of trouble, succeeded
in landing it safely.

My next work was to view the country and seek a proper place
to stow my goods. I knew not yet where I was, whether on the
continent or an island. There was a hill not over a mile away,
very steep and high; and I climbed to the top of it, and saw that
I was on an island, barren, and as I saw good reason to believe,
weinhabited.

Every day, for twelve days, I made a trip to the vessel, bringing
ashore a!l that I thought would be useful to me. The night of the
twelfth day there was a violent wind, and when I awoke in the
morning the ship was nowhere to be seen.

Then I gave my thoughts to providing myself with a safe habi-
tation. I found a little plain, on the side of a hill, whose front
towards the plain was very steep, and had in it a hollow place like


Ses

ROBINSON CRUSOE SAILING IN HIS BOAT.


HE SAND.

RINTS IN T

FINDING THE FOOTP
THE STORY OF ROBINSON CRUSOE.

the door of a cave. Here I resolved to pitch my tent, which I
made of sails that I had brought from the ship. Around it I drew
a half circle, and drove two rows of piles into the ground, making a
kind of fortress. I left no entrance, but used a short ladder to go
over the top, and when I was in, lifted it over after me. Then I
enlarged the hollow place I have spoken of until I had made quite
a cave, which served as a cellar for my house, which I called my
castle.

I had found aboard a dog and two cats. I carried the cats ashore
on the raft, but as for the dog he swam ashore himself, and was a
trusty servant to me for many years. Besides the company of these
- pets, I had that of a parrot which I caught, and which I taught to
speak ; and it often gave me much amusement.

I went out every day with my gun to hunt for food. I found that
there were goats running wild on the island, and often succeeded in
shooting one. But I saw that my ammunition would in time all be
gone, and that to have a steady supply of goat’s flesh, I must breed
them in flocks. So TI set a trap to take some alive, and succeeded
in catching several. I enclosed a piece of ground for them to ru.
in; and in course of time, had a large flock, which furnished me with
all the meat I needed.

I saved the skins of all the creatures I shot, and dried them;
and when my clothes were worn out, replaced them with gar-
ments made of these. Then, at the expense of a great deal of time
and trouble, I made an umbrella, also of skins, which I needed
much to keep off both sun and rain.

For a long time I brooded over the idea of making a canoe of the
trunk of a tree, as the Indians do, and at last set to work at the
task. I cut a large tree, and spent over three months shaping it
into the form of a boat. Then I found it too large to move to the
water. I afterwards made a smaller one, and succeeded in launch-
THE STORY UF ROBINSON CRUSOE.

ing it, and set out to make a tour around the island init. But when
I had been out three days, such a storm arose that I was near being
lost. At last I was.able to bring my boat to the shore, in a little
cove; and there I left it, and went across the island, on foot, to my
castle, not caring to go to sea again in such an unsafe vessel.

Thus ‘years and years passed away. Although I had, to some
extent, become contented with my solitary lot, yet at times a terrible
sense of loneliness and desolation would come over me. Many
times I would go to the top of a hill where I could look out to sea,
in hopes of catching sight of a ship. Then I would fancy that, at
a vast distance, I spied a sail. I would please myself with the
hopes of it, and after looking at it steadily, till I was almost blind,
would lose it quite, and sit down and weep like a child, and thus
icrease my misery by my folly.

But one day I saw a sight which turned my thoughts in a new
channel. It was the print of a naked foot upon the sand near the
shore. It filled me with fear, for it showed that the island must
sometimes be visited by savages.

One morning, going out quite early, I could see the light of a fire
about two miles away. I went to the top of the hill and looked in
the direction of the fire. I saw that five canoes were drawn up on
the shore, while a swarm of naked savages were dancing about the
fire. Presently they dragged two poor wretches from the boats. One
of them was knocked down at once, and several of the savages set to
work to cut him up. They were evidently cannibals, and were going
to hold one of their horrible feasts on their-captives. The other
captive was left standing for a moment, and seeing a chance to
escape, started to run. I was greatly alarmed when I saw that he
was coming directly toward me, but when I saw that only two pur:
sued him, and that he gained upon them, I made up my mind to
help him. When they were near enough, I took a short cut down
‘4,
As

Ke




SAVED.
THE STORY OF ROBINSON CRUSOE.

the hill, and placed myself between pursuers and pursued. Then Lt
advanced on the foremost, and knocked him down with the stock
of my gun. The other took his bow and was going to shoot me,
when I fired at him and killed him. Then I made signs to the poor
runaway to come to me, and he did so in fear and trembling, kneel-
ing at my feet and setting my foot upon his head, as a sign that he
was my slave.

I had now a companion, and in a short time I began to teach him
to speak to me. First I let him know that his name was to be
Friday, for that was the day I saved his life. Then I taught him
everything that I thought would make him useful, handy, and help-
ful. I clothed him in a suit made of goatskins, and he seemed to
be greatly pleased to be dressed like myself.

After some time had passed over, Friday came running to me one
morning to say that there was a ship in sight. Welcome as this
news was, I thought I would not show myself until I could learn
what had brought the ship there, and it was well that I did not. I
watched in concealment and saw a boat leave the ship and make
for the shore. Eleven men landed, and I saw that three of them
were bound as captives. They were laid upon the ground while the
rest. dispersed about the island. I approached tne captives and
questioned them, and found they were English, that one was the
captain, and the others were the mate and a passenger, and that
there had been a mutiny on the ship, and that the men, as a favor,
instead of killing them, were going to leave them on the island.

I offered to aid them to recover the ship, and going back: to the
eastle, I brought guns and gave them to them. When the men
returned to the boat we shot two, who the captain said were the
leaders, and the rest, taken by surprise, yielded to us| The cap-
tain made them swear that they would obey him faithfully, and
then returned to the ship. Those on board were equally surprised
THE STORY OF ROBINSON CRUSOE.

at the turn affairs had taken, and when one of the worst was killed,
were glad to return to their duty. Then the captain came back to
the island, and told me that the ship and all that he had was at my
service, in return for what I had done for him. I told him that all
I asked was a free passage for Friday and myself back to England.
--To this he gladly assented. He provided me with clothing from his
own wardrobe, and after I had arranged all my affairs, Friday and I
went aboard. Thus, I left the island, twenty-eight years, two
months, and nineteen days after I had landed upon it.
~ Three days after we set sail, we saw a great fleet of small boats,
full of savages, come paddling toward us as if to attack us. I told
Friday to go on deck and speak to them in his own language;
but he had no sooner spoken than they let fly a cloud of arrows
‘ at him, three of which hit him, and the poor fellow fell dead. Ina
rage, I ordered the ship’s guns to be fired into the fleet. Half of the
canoes were destroyed, while the rest scoured away so fast that in a
short time none of them could be seen. Poor honest Friday we
buried in the sea, with all the honor possible. So ended the life
of the most grateful, faithful, and affectionate servant that ever
man had. -
And now there is little more to teli. I arrived safely in England,
glad to be back in my old home once more, and desiring nothing
out to spend the rest of my days in peace and quietness.