Citation
Ali Baba, or, The forty thieves

Material Information

Title:
Ali Baba, or, The forty thieves
Series Title:
Aladdin series
Uniform Title:
Ali Baba (Folk tale)
Added title page title:
The forty thieves
Creator:
McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
McLoughlin Bros.,
McLoughlin Bros.
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1889
Language:
English
Physical Description:
[14] p. : ill. (some col.) ; 27 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Bldn -- 1880
Genre:
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Title from col. illustrated wrappers; text on inside covers.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
AJD8459 ( NOTIS )
027281533 ( AlephBibNum )
13029698 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text



At~ADDIM 8EEj
-M "'- "--





p.., ..- p..
p..




i!
,d .p:
















4_. "- -\ . .. .. . ;f -I.. .

I:,~. . ... . ." :







'p p 'pp -




ALI BABA, OR THE FORTY THIEVES,

THERE once lived in a town of Persia two
brothers, one named Cassim, and the other Ali
Baba. Cassim had married a rich wife, but Ali
Baba was poor, and made his living by cutting
wood, which he brought upon three asses into
the town to sell.

One day when he was in the forest cutting
wood, he saw a troop of horsemen coming to-
ward him. Fearing they might be robbers, he
climbed a tree to hide. Near the tree there was
a steep bank formed of solid rock. When the
horsemen came up, Ali Baba counted them, and found they were forty in number.

They dismounted in front of the rock, and one, who seemed to be captain, said the
words, “ Open, Sesame,” when instantly a door opened in the rock. Then they )
all passed through, and the door closed after them.

Ali Baba stayed in the tree, and after awhile the door opened again, and the rob-
bers came out. Then the captain closed the door by saying, “Shut, Sesame,” and
all rode away. |

When they were out of sight Ali Baba came down, and, going up to the rock,
said, “Open, Sesame.” The door at once opened, and Ali Baba, entering, found
himself in a large cave, lighted from a hole in
the top, and full of all kinds of treasure—rich
silks and carpets, gold and silver ware, and
great bags of money. He loaded his three
asses with as many of the bags of gold as they
could carry; and, after closing the door by
saying, ‘ Shut, Sesame,” made his way home.

When he came there and told his wife of their
good luck, she was delighted, and wished to
count the gold to sce how rich they were.
“No,” said Ali Baba, “that will take too long; I
must dig a hole and bury it at once.” “ You
are right,” said she, ‘but at least let us form
some idea how much there is. Let me meas-
ure it while you dig the hole.”













The Baldwin Library

University

RmB ws



Mii BABA OR THE hORTY friky Es,



But as she had no measure of her own, she ran to Cassim’s wife to borrow one.
Now, Cassim’s wife was very inquisitive, and wished to find out what they were
going to use the measure for, so she covered the bottom of it with suet. When Ali
Baba’s wife had done with it, she carried it back, but did not notice that a piece of
gold had stuck to the suet, When Cassim’s wife saw the gold she wondered
greatly—knowing Ali Baba to be so poor—and told her husband about it. He
went to Ali Baba and persuaded him to explain how he had become so rich as to
have to measure his money, and when he heard the story, he made up his mind
that he, too, would get some of the treasure.

So he started for the forest with a lot of mules the
next morning. He opened the door by saying,
“Open, Sesame,” and when he went in, it closed
after him. He began to pile up bags of gold near
the door, but when he was ready to

go he found that he had forgotten the
_ magic words which opened it, and be-
fore he could recall them, the robbers |
returned. The moment they caught ( g&i%
sight of him, they rushed upon him a
with their swords and killed him, and
then cut his body in four quarters, and
hung them up in the cave.

When night fell, and Cassim had not
returned, his wife was greatly alarmed
and went to confer with Ali Baba.
He tried to comfort her, but when morning came,
and Cassim did not yet appear, he set out for the
cave with his three asses. When he reached there
and saw his brother’s body, he was struck with hor-
ror at the sight; but he quickly wrapped up the
pieces and carried them home on one of the asses, loading the other two again
with gold. .

He now wished to get Cassim buried without letting any one know that he had
not died a natural death. Cassim’s wife had a slave named Morgiana, who was
very quick-witted, and Ali Baba took her into his confidence, and got her to assist
him.

She went next morning to a druggist near by and asked for a medicine which is
used only in case of the most serious sickness. The druggist inquired who
was ill. ie







Bx
on

*




F i VS \ \ bf, wel
Nees | Gn Rae
Su oe Es au AIA
a NY aYY\"
oly z=
aS @









Beene

ALI BABA SHOWS THE GOLD TO HIS WIFE,





ALI BABA, OR THE FORTY THIEVES.

“Alas!” said Morgiana, sighing, ‘““‘my master, Cassim himself, and he is so sick
that we are in great anxiety about him.’

Late in the same day she went again to the druggist to obtain some more of the
medicine, and in answer to his inquiries about her master’s condition, said, with
tears in her eyes:

‘Oh, he is much worse. The medicine appears to do him no good, and I greatly
fear that I am going to lose my good master.”

In addition to this Ali Baba and his wife made a point of being often seen pass-
ing back and forth between Cassim’s house and their own during the day, and
took care to tell as many of the neighbors as possible that Cassim was dangerously
ill. So no one was surprised when cries and lamentations were heard issuing from
Cassim’s house in the evening, and Morgiana spread the news about that her mas-
ter was dead.

Very early the next morning she went to an old cobbler named Baba Mustapha,
whose custom she knew it was to open his stall at daybreak, and, looking around
carefully to see that she was not observed, approached him, and putting a piece of
gold in his hand, whispered:

‘Baba Mustapha, I have a task for you for which you will be well paid. But I
must make it a condition that you shall be blindfolded while Iam taking you to
the place and bringing you back.”

Baba Mustapha hesitated a little at
this, fearing he might be led into dan-
ger, but Morgiana named a price for his
services which caused him to set aside
his doubts, and when he had received a
portion of the money down, he allowed
her to bind a handkerchief about his
eyes, and lead him where she would.
She brought him to her master’s house,
and when he was in the room where the
body was, she removed the bandage
from his eyes, and told him to sew the
pieces of the body together.

When he had done the work she again
put the handkerchief over his eyes, after
giving him the rest of his money, and
then conducted him back to his stall. aE

Then the funeral was held, with the Lee emis
usual ceremonies, and Cassim was buried mee Bee ge




~~
-? ga AVG
Yj y ‘diy {| i




i
uy
ey



exe BABA OR THE FORTY THIEVES:

without any suspicion being excited. The customs of the country allowed a man
to have more than one wife, and it was also usual when a husband died that his
brother should marry his widow. So in order that he might enjoy his good for-
tune, and live as a man of wealth, without causing remarks to be made about his
sudden rise in life, Ali Baba married Cassim’s widow, who was known to be rich,
and went to live in her house.

Meanwhile, the robbers had again visited their cave, and finding that the body-
had been removed, saw that somebody knew their secret, and resolved not to rest
till they found out who it was. One of them proposed to go into the town to see
if he could find a clue, and the captain allowed him to do so. He fell in, by acci-
dent, with Baba Mustapha, who told him of
how he had been hired to sew up a dead
body. The robber at once felt that he was
on the track of the one he was looking for,
so he offered the old mana large piece of
gold to show him the house where he had
done the sewing. Baba Mustapha explained

‘that his eyes had been covered on the way,
but the robber thought that if he were again
blindfolded he might remember the turns |
he had made, and so find the place. They
tried this plan. Baba Mustapha walked on
and at last stopped before a house which
was indeed, Ali Baba’s. The robber marked
the door with chalk, and returned to his
comrades. A) P

Shortly after, Morgiana came out of the eye
house and saw the mark, and thinking it
might mean mischief, she marked two or three doors on each side in the same way.

The robber, in the meantime, had reported his success, and the captain ordered
all to go into the town, separately, and meet together at a certain place, where he
would join them. He took the robber who had found the house, and went with
him to look at it, and see what had best be done. The robber led him into the
street where Ali Baba lived, and when they came to one of the doors which Mor-
giana had marked, he pointed to it; but the captain noticed that the next house
was marked in the same way, and on looking further, found five or six more. He
saw that they were foiled, and ordered his men to return to the forest. When they
got there, they put to death the robber who, they thought, had deceived them—a
fate which he admitted he deserved for not taking more pains.







HIS MULES INTO ALI BABA’S YARD.

~

THE FALSE OIL MERCHANT DRIVING

ne atte



ALI BABA, OR THE FORTY THIEVES.

Another of the troop then said he would try the task. He went and engaged
Baba Mustapha to lead him as he had the first one, and when he stopped at the
house, put a mark with red chalk in a place where he thought it would not be
seen.

But it did not escape the eyes of Morgiana, and she marked the other houses in
the same place and manner.

The robbers went to the town as before, but when the captain and the robber
came to the street they found that they were baffled again. So all returned, and
the second robber was put to death for his failure as the first had been.

Then the captain went himself, and got Baba Mustapha to conduct him in the
same way that he had the others; but he did not put any mark on the house.
Instead, he looked at'it so carefully that he would know it when he saw it again.
He then sent his 1 men to buy nineteen mules and thirty-eight leather oil-jars, one

full of oil and the rest empty. When they had brought
them to the cave, he put a man in each of the empty
jars, and loaded all the jars on the mules, and set out
for the town so as to reach it about evening.

He led his mules through the streets till he came to-
the house of Ali Baba, to whom he applied for lodging, -
saying that he was an oil merchant who had just arrived
and could not find a place to stay. Ali Baba was hos-
pitable, and allowed him to drive his mules into the yard, ©

pering to his men that when they should hear him throw _
a stone out of the window, they must come out of the —
jars, and he would join them. He then went into the -
house and was shown to a room.

Now it happened that Morgiana needed some oil, and
as it was too late to buy any, she thought she would
take a little out of the jars in the yard. So she went out with her oil-pot, and
drew near one of the jars to help herself, when, to her great surprise, she heard a
man’s voice within it say, softly, ‘Is it time?” Startled as she was, she did not
lose her presence of mind, but answered, ‘‘ Not yet, but presently.” She went in
this way to all of the jars, answering the same, until she came, last of all, to the
jar of oil.

She saw at once the danger to which her master was exposed, and laid a plan
to avert it. She filled a great kettle from the jars of oil, and set it on the fire till
the oil was boiling. Then she took it and poured enough into each jar to kill
the robber inside. After that she went into the house, and, putting out her light,



MORGIANA. ;

where he unloaded them, and set the jars in rows, whis-



Als) BABA (OR THE FORTY DHIEVES.

watched through a window to see what would happen. She had not waited long
before the captain, hearing no one stirring, opened his window and began throwing
stones at the jars. But as no movement followed, he became alarmed, and stole
' down into the yard, where he found that all of his men were dead. Full of rage
and despair, he climbed over the wall of the yard and made his way off to the cave.

When Morgiana saw him go, she
went to bed well pleased to have suc-
ceeded in saving her master and his
family.

The next morning Ali Baba arose
early to go to the baths. Upon his
return, he was surprised to see the
jars still in the yard. He questioned
Morgiana, who opened the door, in
regard to it. or answer she led hina
to the nearest jar, and asked him to
look into it. He did so and started
back in alarm when he saw the dead
robber within.

‘“Morgiana,” said he, ‘what does
this mean? [Explain what has hap-
pencds

‘Sbewill said sie.“ *biut frst look
in the other jars.”

So Ali Baba passed from one jar, to another, finding a body in each, until he
came to the oil-jar which was very much sunk. He stood speechless with aston-
ishment for some moments, and then he again requested Morgiana to tell how
this had come to pass. She led him into the house, and related all that had
occurred from the time she had first noticed the mark upon the door to the flight
of the captain.

On hearing the story Ali Baba said to her: “We all owe our lives to your wit
and courage. Asa first token of my gratitude, I give you your freedom, and in
due time, I will add still further to your reward.”

Then, at the extreme end of the garden, under the shade of some large trees,
he and one of his slaves dug a trench in which they buried the bodies of the rob-
bers. The jars and weapons they hid, while the mules were sent to the market,
at different times, to be sold.

But the captain now hated Ali Baba worse than ever, and swore that he would
have revenge for the death of his comrades. He resolved that he would go to the



WC





RQ

‘MORGIANA KILLS THE ROBBER







MORGIANA DANCING,



Ae BABA ORS LHE POR DY Eoin VES,

town to live, so that he might watch for a chance to carry out his purpose. So he
rented a warehouse, to which he took a lot of silks and other stuffs, and set up as
a merchant under the name of Cogia Hassan.

Now, as it happened, the warehouse which the captain rented was near that of
Ali Baba’s son, who was also a merchant. Naturally, they soon became acquainted ;
and Cogia Hassan, although not yet aware of the young man’s relationship to Ali
Baba, cultivated his friendship as being likely to be of use to him in obtaining the
information necessary to carry out his designs. But it was not very long before
Ali Baba came one day to his son’s warehouse, and was seen and recognized by
Cogia Hassan, who soon found out that he was the father of his neighbor. After
this, of course, he became doubly attentive to the son, making him presents, and
often asking him to dine or sup with him. Ali Baba’s son felt obliged to return
these courtesies, and so it soon came to pass that Cogia Hassan was invited to
Ali Baba’s house to supper.

He went and carried, concealed, a dagger with which he intenaed to kill Ali
Baba as soon as he saw a chance of doing it with certainty. Ali Baba received
him very cordially, and thanked him for the kindness he had shown towards his
son, saying that to an inexperienced ue man such an acquaintance was, in
itself, a valuable advantage.

After further friendly conversation, they sat down to supper. At the meal
Cogia Hassan was careful to abstain from the use of salt, for amongst the Persians
even the wickedest think it wrong to kill a man whose salt they have eaten. Mor-
giana, who was serving, noticed this, and it caused her to suspect him. She
inspected Cogia Hassan closely, and soon became satisfied that he was none other
than the false oil merchant; and when
she saw that he had a dagger con-
cealed under his garment, she perceived
in what peril her master was placed.
With her usual quickness she conceived
a plan to thwart the robber’s purpose,
and she boldly determined to put it into
execution at once.

She was a very fine dancer, and often
entertained Ali Baba and his guests
with exhibitions of her skill. As soon
as the principal portion of the meal
was over, she retired and arrayed her-
self in a pretty dancing costume, and
then, accompanied by a fellow-servant,





Poo. BABA. cOln PE ORES aE VES,

who sung and played upon the tambou-
rine, she returned and proposed giving a
performance, while Ali Baba, and his son,
and their guest, were enjoying the dessert
and smoking. Cogia Hassan, of course,
politely expressed his pleasure; although,
secretly, he was annoyed at the intrusion
as likely to interfere with his evil intent.
Morgiana carried in her hand a jeweled
dagger, and as she danced she would point
it first to her own breast and then to those
of the others in succession, in a playful
way, and as though it were part of the
dance. Then, at last, she took the tambou-
rine and went from one to another, pre-
senting it for a reward after the custom of
street performers. Ali Baba and his son each put ina piece of gold, and Cogia
Hassan, when she came to him, pulled out his purse to do the same. But as he
reached his hand, Morgiana raised aloft her dagger, and plunged it with all her
strength into his heart, and he fell dead.

Ali Baba cried out with horror; but when
Morgiana told him who his guest was, and,
opening his garment, showed him the con-
cealed dagger; his feelings changed to joy at
his escape, and admiration for Morgiana’s
shrewdness, courage, and fidelity, and it seemed
to him that he could not say nor do enough to
. thank her.

They soon disposed of the captain’s body by
burying it in the garden with those of his com-
rades, and, as the robbers were now all dead,
they were free from further danger. After
awhile, Ali Baba’s son married Morgiana, and
they lived long in peace and happiness.











Full Text
xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20100515_AAAAND' PACKAGE 'UF00054514_00001' INGEST_TIME '2010-05-15T11:55:12-04:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T18:14:15-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 300501; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-10T05:48:52-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '6264' DFID 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUGT' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00001.pro'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' 11c87f6deae2254da4f95e37fd338e51
'SHA-1' 7494ff9025ecaa651f9e5c02bf3a1d765d9fe3fd
EVENT '2012-06-20T17:10:47-04:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'23398488' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUGU' 'sip-files00004.tif'
3a2ce30998998fc6f701e7fcb1045d5d
ebd984e6f2db53358e52f04bd07aea517c7c6cce
'2012-06-20T17:10:50-04:00'
describe
'346' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUGV' 'sip-files00008.txt'
5313802ac8cdb611724ddcbd663cf60f
e31cea2edf0c646db786d7e26a78167405e7030e
'2012-06-20T17:10:29-04:00'
describe
'67422' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUGW' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
ebd58e3e7e2751d6e494529e81e0b807
874fe93f8edd7cd59347233451b54caf54aed744
'2012-06-20T17:10:07-04:00'
describe
'3285' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUGX' 'sip-files00012.pro'
349a8752f27bd5977a7dc67f3f19ffb3
7d4477df77520895f1760e3b95b70e484bdcdd32
'2012-06-20T17:10:31-04:00'
describe
'628473' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUGY' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
a4b02a5180e3f49c5d706ae17f26eba5
121d6725efe76d33078a98816f27c187d8b350f1
'2012-06-20T17:10:39-04:00'
describe
'367468' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUGZ' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
77e07d6160498b7ce652552635c53809
d9bd3d2eaa7a4aeca29199072f22a257f53ee4e3
'2012-06-20T17:10:37-04:00'
describe
'945941' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUHA' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
f1a2813df1160c99246433f362f08868
790e2202b901aa1ebe5ae1d0d60d275ee163b17a
'2012-06-20T17:10:24-04:00'
describe
'52318' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUHB' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
417a67882b8a7d1b1ad22e405f6a32c3
2aa98553b4feaee7dcbb2c3a8fb161ae05a0b1f5
'2012-06-20T17:10:21-04:00'
describe
'386551' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUHC' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
0855855f1bec1d61aac14864358c8e05
6790c59b372f340c5c2385d6b9fdb3ec9f95161c
'2012-06-20T17:10:22-04:00'
describe
'965792' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUHD' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
0ed9e25799ea4e93d161a9daaf76d5e3
902374367268cb1b2b96d8aaf73506889e3bd258
'2012-06-20T17:10:43-04:00'
describe
'192043' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUHE' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
a488c9db7fca4e3901d77e4a5bd20108
5c77de28ec0c2780ba78d89b882fcd2bd92899f3
'2012-06-20T17:10:34-04:00'
describe
'23061260' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUHF' 'sip-files00005.tif'
14bf575eb68da89a4bf6e455d2ec7d7e
120fc9bf55cebd7f039c6d6ee450e615c1721086
'2012-06-20T17:10:20-04:00'
describe
'68590' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUHG' 'sip-files00009.pro'
fe0287cad6b1c97382b4ce056115939e
2089f2000c250305450d8d9731fbda8ee4542b8f
'2012-06-20T17:10:14-04:00'
describe
'7919900' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUHH' 'sip-files00002.tif'
895ef534058dbea578233abe8b086f1f
7b41c5f7a4db62745355d1d56c59cd201751ca9f
'2012-06-20T17:10:59-04:00'
describe
'47283032' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUHI' 'sip-files00008.tif'
c7fab4ebbf96a6410e696a6e9d28fdb4
463f20ecf5538ef8caa48e9ecc2d59bcc2b20667
'2012-06-20T17:10:57-04:00'
describe
'541915' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUHJ' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
2d09b592772390923d54ab5cb57ca781
68203129e9a357d22ec3d5f04acddb7c5a2c8838
'2012-06-20T17:10:23-04:00'
describe
'4796' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUHK' 'sip-files00008.pro'
6a2f8d4bf298cda21141dfdbd31d50f9
5d44882d3ae0bcdbfcadfef5dd194ae2b26901e1
'2012-06-20T17:10:55-04:00'
describe
'8' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUHL' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
cb446dd9f2176f402cebf299fc5cc7fd
98130c1f919555aed2d9f3b781b8aaa9cc75a65e
'2012-06-20T17:10:17-04:00'
describe
'976555' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUHM' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
5bb0ec6c4542b5c3244839a8455f49b0
b1813f6cfa720ef6952b8b393d05ae99c1418f74
'2012-06-20T17:11:00-04:00'
describe
'453' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUHN' 'sip-files00015.pro'
5e92c7c5b875647ba669d4e0677024ab
e7dae983f711c9b01c8199dac13cada47a8ae55d
'2012-06-20T17:10:51-04:00'
describe
'474033' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUHO' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
af6530867b87365240c5336c21872eab
806e14743cd5da15bd209c8e22bc75faed51dc2c
'2012-06-20T17:10:33-04:00'
describe
'397' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUHP' 'sip-files00011.txt'
a227557a256076c43625777a0338e963
8e69256e67e94808093069023bcb2e7e9c51920e
describe
'478202' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUHQ' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
8ed6f90181e566dcb9e0aed9fa428666
f1f41bb9ac350ac6f2438992b8d713f6cb0c939d
describe
'7588960' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUHR' 'sip-files00014.tif'
40fe256b2aa4c9d10f910132611ac29b
cf48347d12e35b645c19d41f958edeb02984f5b4
'2012-06-20T17:10:52-04:00'
describe
'466971' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUHS' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
30e493e3e0d67738b05a6081b744bfb9
75a3711ba7a195bb830aea3b733d9648283d9686
'2012-06-20T17:10:15-04:00'
describe
'56549' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUHT' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
fb23c5b95fb340eba7e4d12c1538675e
12875247d13e24accdd0bded82b8da134b0cbcc1
'2012-06-20T17:10:12-04:00'
describe
'2561' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUHU' 'sip-files00002.txt'
4430787824716a3505f1f0f065b44be4
1b383faa1da2a1aee8d1fd25ffe06f457e6b7bf8
'2012-06-20T17:10:44-04:00'
describe
'68535' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUHV' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
45f9460d932152a8745ee7014afaa1b0
a32d525d5bbb37c89c803e4f6ddb3a2cf3d19c98
describe
'641688' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUHW' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
86ed4b7a1b66dd6e342939440ae852b0
20102c3019d12549c4f82bd476688db2b0c09790
'2012-06-20T17:10:19-04:00'
describe
'7834796' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUHX' 'sip-files00010.tif'
c2d6c695a686fb8edd52dceada6cf1a1
bc1d15310078060fed802cabadd1cdebf34cc962
'2012-06-20T17:10:25-04:00'
describe
'145657' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUHY' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
741fd0d849c6b76c933391e1ae9b50bc
69e9d9e5b689d19ae2d2de7f28d5daf0e7d603e2
'2012-06-20T17:10:28-04:00'
describe
'959755' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUHZ' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
24c72708e3445ebd9e8332322d5dbeec
7ef20bc3b44b304e9b24c26749028f9026a70472
'2012-06-20T17:10:36-04:00'
describe
'2189' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUIA' 'sip-files00006.txt'
1ffccc8736ed58bb2542cbbe33cdf953
33d16e42427a6357b56559af469d0fba5b26238b
describe
'48355' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUIB' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
179ae27ecf92b614bf9c315b42b7ef7f
52ba6efd870e676603c8c01c946f3bbf415caa59
'2012-06-20T17:10:08-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1457' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUIC' 'sip-files00005.pro'
9ab91f1b6eb65048dd1f62ae3cb6e464
115d98e1b44baf8cbc650160b01ab16dcc27be0e
'2012-06-20T17:10:49-04:00'
describe
'159164' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUID' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
8bd5cb89a21998750cbea16496d4a82d
80f96570ad8abfdb2714036db646b01d4bcdf01d
'2012-06-20T17:10:42-04:00'
describe
'2954' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUIE' 'sip-files00009.txt'
0fbe0e2f8362a95d3c39ccd615f243f0
25850a13e70a9a8268ba20c2c5a73e3b71375539
describe
'23234388' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUIF' 'sip-files00011.tif'
1ade58dab3472bad1734d59ceb1cd01d
f033192ba4a0ecf4d028909609204210d05b8526
'2012-06-20T17:10:46-04:00'
describe
'48282' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUIG' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
30e53af78174c4158784936b3a2927df
c393c483f17e658a773c7a4ac6b9baaeeddeba81
describe
'267' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUIH' 'sip-files00012.txt'
41450745ee0666edb09b8f6c1ea27ef7
327e6fcddca49d0682e3cca5ac0a9395f1ae9ea8
describe
'121084' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUII' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
5ea39624f33af5546dd796cf8dc3ad95
03d9dc23a155b5ce97104e7d2932d8dea596b032
describe
'969216' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUIJ' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
ec440361f9c3b80fe6617fded757ebf2
2044c2a62809788e7ac4c37f4181e56551f6e915
'2012-06-20T17:10:48-04:00'
describe
'166285' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUIK' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
4f7efe2702c19a0a439a5b1002591cee
c434073be71de476682a3fb5e149530f2f9cc997
describe
'23975476' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUIL' 'sip-files00001.tif'
5905028348fa28e790c50a0b855eb813
949fb476ca37506e1439c47f3c7baa4a5324fcda
'2012-06-20T17:10:10-04:00'
describe
'357811' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUIM' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
1fe5d4bed5d82b8b2664721147ffc42a
b57d990518efe8659b90057a1226ba84cbcb1891
'2012-06-20T17:10:09-04:00'
describe
'70607' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUIN' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
5137431f0d9fe59705cb8b64201270ae
e03ed574c19c03cc558fe377dd56bf42870ade31
describe
'7748988' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUIO' 'sip-files00013.tif'
999ec6439bf8a843635f5caa430b3aab
97036e23297c387147fa4e1f9d4483dc9b5a26f0
'2012-06-20T17:10:11-04:00'
describe
'55162' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUIP' 'sip-files00006.pro'
561a3416b0143f78df94aee07390e6fc
b22226cca9b06e1f437bbdf6187e837ab5de2564
describe
'971654' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUIQ' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
aa0e02ad172486712f3afc05fd9011c1
8e3b1dd67b3d7bb07cead78029b2aec1ab5751f8
describe
'69069' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUIR' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
05811749a055e3ea3ca5e4778930f9cc
3d1abd2e22223f520b88e35889b1184ea03e717c
describe
'7795828' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUIS' 'sip-files00006.tif'
16439a783dca33920da71ab65ae8a5d5
3268805556a6941fadbfd7f68418421ef46c548b
'2012-06-20T17:10:41-04:00'
describe
'57081' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUIT' 'sip-files00010.pro'
a7795c6c4103b92cb011cb9bec66c410
6e82bcc68ca5c618d0965b675c011f3967bc4cef
describe
'188903' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUIU' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
d0cd8f478ad4c2abc9afeafa6dffd923
c37df76524f7a7d10f19045c82d09afe456400aa
'2012-06-20T17:10:54-04:00'
describe
'7855684' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUIV' 'sip-files00009.tif'
a0116e185348aec67aace61e1ec43b0d
e275bae755f396910e60e288992bd9659b808d8a
describe
'52616' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUIW' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
97436307454b825760e99c2ec0ead27f
9d672c6d162a55700e3e45dae763319809601ce9
describe
'629607' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUIX' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
92c26522da035a04ff96064ae50bbad9
4dbc5a1e923884f742310b8a6839ad9871438ac5
describe
'973728' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUIY' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
c2c9c579e7717425f6a8daa1dafe8f49
d9eb0295b50d39f908bbf65fd02c28fd9768dff7
'2012-06-20T17:10:58-04:00'
describe
'967071' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUIZ' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
9888602b80e566070ea7c48ec4b1a21a
1c060c795a4381345e9c42a3d2ad6553b73331b6
'2012-06-20T17:10:13-04:00'
describe
'7776372' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUJA' 'sip-files00003.tif'
7e0003ea4a1a5cb113c74cf9b0d7237d
b3515d107606ef3afcf312450ee30811e35e4d47
describe
'23431124' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUJB' 'sip-files00015.tif'
9a6add33763914426c07fe4c860c5c87
0749bfae5a455855ef9f3a4f45d41b89fd9ba8c8
'2012-06-20T17:10:38-04:00'
describe
'156257' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUJC' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
d5541474ff9deed76a9b1c00934597ca
3d3fc5c64f2dfffef33d3274dabe7bb3c666aada
'2012-06-20T17:10:32-04:00'
describe
'137238' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUJD' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
8eaeacdaea8dbfd5038be00f6f3e1efc
a321fd36c70716fbf02c798a1492907574bdf0ea
describe
'53310' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUJE' 'sip-files00002.pro'
0c3850890f9dbd99da9d7c5cc1735608
f0632500a1ca89532872e1015798790e21f1059d
describe
'598' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUJF' 'sip-files00004.pro'
f2ec78d43482a148378287696c6a5238
0b350f9147f5ff33bd64b67c1678bb97a3ab9581
describe
'2289' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUJG' 'sip-files00010.txt'
5ac00db03a9ec87ef489e6316202ecaa
bb0b4a80b24978b07044898aa1c9c1a02a906f8e
'2012-06-20T17:10:18-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'54101' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUJH' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
559fce99b73c936846696edf173c24e1
9bdec1207d7ff10da911c1dfe79f955e317dc9f5
describe
'987048' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUJI' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
88a6abcb790989a2ba70ede8a76a6286
d64fd637ea26a5d1d9076fe430b2c34d814d2032
describe
'64574' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUJJ' 'sip-files00007.pro'
7152deaa23d2204cb095181b68d57282
45162c67ba779f99e5731fd543912ddc819acf49
describe
'22719864' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUJK' 'sip-files00012.tif'
784dea61590366157d8245fa47e77ee3
e74806ab4f7e68577813a279c8c4e22f9ec17d61
describe
'979095' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUJL' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
f5e2dfcf01c6aae09a092e6cdfd8745a
01947895cf1e34abe594cc477129230262550c10
describe
'59554' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUJM' 'sip-files00003.pro'
f449cc95755de74941c864a7727f2476
df905d72d046fdc7b0e36460d2f9c969e191bb61
describe
'1969066' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUJN' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
7d46e8aad0343e2cf554619ff2a66e70
9fa7618384ab9decf2247a184d9335870ebe2bd3
describe
'24119' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUJO' 'sip-filesUF00054514_00001.mets'
aa9b28949c16a3b86c1df00625f986bf
fbeb9135bf3f73d988ce6b3429807bcdbafc54a3
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/sobekcm/'.
'2013-12-10T05:47:22-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/sobekcm.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/sobekcm.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/sobekcm/'.
'330544' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUJR' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
b61f452677e90326d967c85bcbcae89f
16a83655c27578efeeefafea9ba4e6c289fffe25
'2012-06-20T17:10:35-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'467775' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUJS' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
98d7b3b337f2d96b37b34313ceef94f3
53433b3d0489035baf6ca5c39d3f3fd6e040f123
describe
'474548' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUJT' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
2d7f9f98a2a2c09537a80a7484d31b35
6510e39438c54cb10a977e967984cf4d616b8372
describe
'455228' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUJU' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
caba5d80a4d39570f97286b9d27d4858
9f4cd2ee10b6d0d3b69dcc8a98d87b66cba6ac60
describe
'657908' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUJV' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
8ced1d3ae500a989d942a84663ebf21a
69db9d010b11d28aa4ca03379b57c0ec90499d1e
describe
'954795' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUJW' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
0675c5c3d87eb677835d74a080903038
ebd77ac9692dc873c5311309de668fd5f1efaecc
describe
'945611' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUJX' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
c0886340a922ef723b7e46c98790f321
cd2a500099ec92cf4fc0a88bf4006bc3a4ea1afa
'2012-06-20T17:10:30-04:00'
describe
'975277' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUJY' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
496fed9ec3bcda17fe456ba8ca5540c8
8fa11806dcb1021b6afb5a317ca8dc1fe45643ad
describe
'7661388' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUJZ' 'sip-files00007.tif'
a0882aaf8d3116562895e0b2fd91d27c
9a1a54fab2dd57f65d7c1d82df6f4e6abbb7236c
describe
'4779' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUKA' 'sip-files00011.pro'
7d9a052e6d0b83e8c7d00092acfd516d
9aec580a59087ccf778a01752d53947bde876312
describe
'66158' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUKB' 'sip-files00013.pro'
4feda29ac722d8ef4ec35414758da8c0
222cd6f02c2cdbf9d7f6607d2f50e0c5aa0dbe20
describe
'48212' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUKC' 'sip-files00014.pro'
44f4e5d4f88c3736b34c40f046478026
02dec51670136cf7118b4ba7a6ee34ba718e1e05
describe
'482' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUKD' 'sip-files00001.txt'
71ea0d48a8d2734298c336c51e7db014
8bce440d5373a4f1687609b7711e32298c530d63
describe
Invalid character
'2398' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUKE' 'sip-files00003.txt'
ba2a1c1b57cc85658165e413ab9339c8
69c291f5a9fffcc59bdde72e91e683755a631286
describe
Invalid character
'162' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUKF' 'sip-files00004.txt'
7d689a33b9dcdfbb8822d338b71935ea
bac34bfb1020273807766eaf535febfa5d29f6d6
describe
'177' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUKG' 'sip-files00005.txt'
d4b29ccdbc1adff4cef569fd975989af
f10c0e3af994a24a395db18ff4444b713fe27e05
describe
'2537' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUKH' 'sip-files00007.txt'
aadabbdc4403c68f3999d6ee8ee732bc
052bf687fc96dbf5b07c57830c6587680829064e
describe
'2966' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUKI' 'sip-files00013.txt'
ef7756c03abfc7225ef35159e9f3c74c
33f0637ecc98e393048d31b70efe84df4e087b8c
describe
'2350' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUKJ' 'sip-files00014.txt'
623aa298a19563b437c184017beb1636
6023537d3d3ed4dc21b99fe31c70c16b06344a07
describe
'93' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUKK' 'sip-files00015.txt'
ce6d52afe3009325605129840a2051bb
9ca0e5e93d656a9e786a24571e93efd1075c24b8
'2012-06-20T17:10:26-04:00'
describe
'109944' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUKL' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
353f85e20858bc86a5dac4d7adf0fe45
574153cc48689a5f52c36cba9d61e97f12bdb948
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'56558' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUKM' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
599d0fe0d26364d7a3ffb0808d8d24d4
3068fc11c016b2e28d90a06eb6ef1d779236e5f0
describe
'55459' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUKN' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
28a02cfd51e75ac72f74afff0410bd09
0fa6545b73fe1d99e1de56ec2cbee747a13bdb44
describe
'56511' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUKO' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
31cae3a9c720d8f48ecbf1290d0a1af4
566853a41c4a70fe2ca17b4125961c3eadae7525
'2012-06-20T17:10:16-04:00'
describe
'55042' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUKP' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
33cd7310fef53ff736c79ea0da14556c
7b237b67503e4b61adcec90f3571b0d82f6a3e0f
describe
'29987' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUKQ' 'sip-filesUF00054514_00001.xml'
1bf0fe76f92b455fc8d3a4ed08ca16bd
cf370cc66c0a9a982388d8949a689004510244bc
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/sobekcm/'.
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/sobekcm.xsd
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/sobekcm.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/sobekcm/'.
'149148' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUKR' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
2cdabc3b9ae534a63d251318481ea3aa
a77c38e89e26cfb34f953d3fe026e1c11061b496
describe
'187901' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUKS' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
2a84b21769ebcaea03f64d04c2e91c7e
499daca37290437e881d71f66b36f11b551de811
describe
'151904' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUKT' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
cc4af98ff61206656de92ef1ace65055
da28fdde9e12111488b665e93aaa5d2760a05ab6
describe
'154883' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUKU' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
ba03a0929eab7c297db8c3cafa202e53
0b14cc85b623ac815ba7ec92a6870271687e847b
describe
'198844' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUKV' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
fa59bb84d0b34a5ebc6a86021b6d3c4c
2da0966da17f7325f4bc5c2b5de2be9984072d49
describe
'123633' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUKW' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
e0ec25e70b536eab81397d1dc6c2c449
95a74413400a240cc74ca18f5699c5c84b1dc2df
describe
'62074' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANDfileF20100515_AABUKX' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
28557f00b1b3fc5e838e2c71eb804fff
1b19022ab90a0f352239028f4738dd8199a3a055
describe


ALI BABA, OR THE FORTY THIEVES,

THERE once lived in a town of Persia two
brothers, one named Cassim, and the other Ali
Baba. Cassim had married a rich wife, but Ali
Baba was poor, and made his living by cutting
wood, which he brought upon three asses into
the town to sell.

One day when he was in the forest cutting
wood, he saw a troop of horsemen coming to-
ward him. Fearing they might be robbers, he
climbed a tree to hide. Near the tree there was
a steep bank formed of solid rock. When the
horsemen came up, Ali Baba counted them, and found they were forty in number.

They dismounted in front of the rock, and one, who seemed to be captain, said the
words, “ Open, Sesame,” when instantly a door opened in the rock. Then they )
all passed through, and the door closed after them.

Ali Baba stayed in the tree, and after awhile the door opened again, and the rob-
bers came out. Then the captain closed the door by saying, “Shut, Sesame,” and
all rode away. |

When they were out of sight Ali Baba came down, and, going up to the rock,
said, “Open, Sesame.” The door at once opened, and Ali Baba, entering, found
himself in a large cave, lighted from a hole in
the top, and full of all kinds of treasure—rich
silks and carpets, gold and silver ware, and
great bags of money. He loaded his three
asses with as many of the bags of gold as they
could carry; and, after closing the door by
saying, ‘ Shut, Sesame,” made his way home.

When he came there and told his wife of their
good luck, she was delighted, and wished to
count the gold to sce how rich they were.
“No,” said Ali Baba, “that will take too long; I
must dig a hole and bury it at once.” “ You
are right,” said she, ‘but at least let us form
some idea how much there is. Let me meas-
ure it while you dig the hole.”













The Baldwin Library

University

RmB ws
Mii BABA OR THE hORTY friky Es,



But as she had no measure of her own, she ran to Cassim’s wife to borrow one.
Now, Cassim’s wife was very inquisitive, and wished to find out what they were
going to use the measure for, so she covered the bottom of it with suet. When Ali
Baba’s wife had done with it, she carried it back, but did not notice that a piece of
gold had stuck to the suet, When Cassim’s wife saw the gold she wondered
greatly—knowing Ali Baba to be so poor—and told her husband about it. He
went to Ali Baba and persuaded him to explain how he had become so rich as to
have to measure his money, and when he heard the story, he made up his mind
that he, too, would get some of the treasure.

So he started for the forest with a lot of mules the
next morning. He opened the door by saying,
“Open, Sesame,” and when he went in, it closed
after him. He began to pile up bags of gold near
the door, but when he was ready to

go he found that he had forgotten the
_ magic words which opened it, and be-
fore he could recall them, the robbers |
returned. The moment they caught ( g&i%
sight of him, they rushed upon him a
with their swords and killed him, and
then cut his body in four quarters, and
hung them up in the cave.

When night fell, and Cassim had not
returned, his wife was greatly alarmed
and went to confer with Ali Baba.
He tried to comfort her, but when morning came,
and Cassim did not yet appear, he set out for the
cave with his three asses. When he reached there
and saw his brother’s body, he was struck with hor-
ror at the sight; but he quickly wrapped up the
pieces and carried them home on one of the asses, loading the other two again
with gold. .

He now wished to get Cassim buried without letting any one know that he had
not died a natural death. Cassim’s wife had a slave named Morgiana, who was
very quick-witted, and Ali Baba took her into his confidence, and got her to assist
him.

She went next morning to a druggist near by and asked for a medicine which is
used only in case of the most serious sickness. The druggist inquired who
was ill. ie







Bx
on

*




F i VS \ \ bf, wel
Nees | Gn Rae
Su oe Es au AIA
a NY aYY\"
oly z=
aS @



Beene

ALI BABA SHOWS THE GOLD TO HIS WIFE,


ALI BABA, OR THE FORTY THIEVES.

“Alas!” said Morgiana, sighing, ‘““‘my master, Cassim himself, and he is so sick
that we are in great anxiety about him.’

Late in the same day she went again to the druggist to obtain some more of the
medicine, and in answer to his inquiries about her master’s condition, said, with
tears in her eyes:

‘Oh, he is much worse. The medicine appears to do him no good, and I greatly
fear that I am going to lose my good master.”

In addition to this Ali Baba and his wife made a point of being often seen pass-
ing back and forth between Cassim’s house and their own during the day, and
took care to tell as many of the neighbors as possible that Cassim was dangerously
ill. So no one was surprised when cries and lamentations were heard issuing from
Cassim’s house in the evening, and Morgiana spread the news about that her mas-
ter was dead.

Very early the next morning she went to an old cobbler named Baba Mustapha,
whose custom she knew it was to open his stall at daybreak, and, looking around
carefully to see that she was not observed, approached him, and putting a piece of
gold in his hand, whispered:

‘Baba Mustapha, I have a task for you for which you will be well paid. But I
must make it a condition that you shall be blindfolded while Iam taking you to
the place and bringing you back.”

Baba Mustapha hesitated a little at
this, fearing he might be led into dan-
ger, but Morgiana named a price for his
services which caused him to set aside
his doubts, and when he had received a
portion of the money down, he allowed
her to bind a handkerchief about his
eyes, and lead him where she would.
She brought him to her master’s house,
and when he was in the room where the
body was, she removed the bandage
from his eyes, and told him to sew the
pieces of the body together.

When he had done the work she again
put the handkerchief over his eyes, after
giving him the rest of his money, and
then conducted him back to his stall. aE

Then the funeral was held, with the Lee emis
usual ceremonies, and Cassim was buried mee Bee ge




~~
-? ga AVG
Yj y ‘diy {| i




i
uy
ey
exe BABA OR THE FORTY THIEVES:

without any suspicion being excited. The customs of the country allowed a man
to have more than one wife, and it was also usual when a husband died that his
brother should marry his widow. So in order that he might enjoy his good for-
tune, and live as a man of wealth, without causing remarks to be made about his
sudden rise in life, Ali Baba married Cassim’s widow, who was known to be rich,
and went to live in her house.

Meanwhile, the robbers had again visited their cave, and finding that the body-
had been removed, saw that somebody knew their secret, and resolved not to rest
till they found out who it was. One of them proposed to go into the town to see
if he could find a clue, and the captain allowed him to do so. He fell in, by acci-
dent, with Baba Mustapha, who told him of
how he had been hired to sew up a dead
body. The robber at once felt that he was
on the track of the one he was looking for,
so he offered the old mana large piece of
gold to show him the house where he had
done the sewing. Baba Mustapha explained

‘that his eyes had been covered on the way,
but the robber thought that if he were again
blindfolded he might remember the turns |
he had made, and so find the place. They
tried this plan. Baba Mustapha walked on
and at last stopped before a house which
was indeed, Ali Baba’s. The robber marked
the door with chalk, and returned to his
comrades. A) P

Shortly after, Morgiana came out of the eye
house and saw the mark, and thinking it
might mean mischief, she marked two or three doors on each side in the same way.

The robber, in the meantime, had reported his success, and the captain ordered
all to go into the town, separately, and meet together at a certain place, where he
would join them. He took the robber who had found the house, and went with
him to look at it, and see what had best be done. The robber led him into the
street where Ali Baba lived, and when they came to one of the doors which Mor-
giana had marked, he pointed to it; but the captain noticed that the next house
was marked in the same way, and on looking further, found five or six more. He
saw that they were foiled, and ordered his men to return to the forest. When they
got there, they put to death the robber who, they thought, had deceived them—a
fate which he admitted he deserved for not taking more pains.




HIS MULES INTO ALI BABA’S YARD.

~

THE FALSE OIL MERCHANT DRIVING

ne atte
ALI BABA, OR THE FORTY THIEVES.

Another of the troop then said he would try the task. He went and engaged
Baba Mustapha to lead him as he had the first one, and when he stopped at the
house, put a mark with red chalk in a place where he thought it would not be
seen.

But it did not escape the eyes of Morgiana, and she marked the other houses in
the same place and manner.

The robbers went to the town as before, but when the captain and the robber
came to the street they found that they were baffled again. So all returned, and
the second robber was put to death for his failure as the first had been.

Then the captain went himself, and got Baba Mustapha to conduct him in the
same way that he had the others; but he did not put any mark on the house.
Instead, he looked at'it so carefully that he would know it when he saw it again.
He then sent his 1 men to buy nineteen mules and thirty-eight leather oil-jars, one

full of oil and the rest empty. When they had brought
them to the cave, he put a man in each of the empty
jars, and loaded all the jars on the mules, and set out
for the town so as to reach it about evening.

He led his mules through the streets till he came to-
the house of Ali Baba, to whom he applied for lodging, -
saying that he was an oil merchant who had just arrived
and could not find a place to stay. Ali Baba was hos-
pitable, and allowed him to drive his mules into the yard, ©

pering to his men that when they should hear him throw _
a stone out of the window, they must come out of the —
jars, and he would join them. He then went into the -
house and was shown to a room.

Now it happened that Morgiana needed some oil, and
as it was too late to buy any, she thought she would
take a little out of the jars in the yard. So she went out with her oil-pot, and
drew near one of the jars to help herself, when, to her great surprise, she heard a
man’s voice within it say, softly, ‘Is it time?” Startled as she was, she did not
lose her presence of mind, but answered, ‘‘ Not yet, but presently.” She went in
this way to all of the jars, answering the same, until she came, last of all, to the
jar of oil.

She saw at once the danger to which her master was exposed, and laid a plan
to avert it. She filled a great kettle from the jars of oil, and set it on the fire till
the oil was boiling. Then she took it and poured enough into each jar to kill
the robber inside. After that she went into the house, and, putting out her light,



MORGIANA. ;

where he unloaded them, and set the jars in rows, whis-
Als) BABA (OR THE FORTY DHIEVES.

watched through a window to see what would happen. She had not waited long
before the captain, hearing no one stirring, opened his window and began throwing
stones at the jars. But as no movement followed, he became alarmed, and stole
' down into the yard, where he found that all of his men were dead. Full of rage
and despair, he climbed over the wall of the yard and made his way off to the cave.

When Morgiana saw him go, she
went to bed well pleased to have suc-
ceeded in saving her master and his
family.

The next morning Ali Baba arose
early to go to the baths. Upon his
return, he was surprised to see the
jars still in the yard. He questioned
Morgiana, who opened the door, in
regard to it. or answer she led hina
to the nearest jar, and asked him to
look into it. He did so and started
back in alarm when he saw the dead
robber within.

‘“Morgiana,” said he, ‘what does
this mean? [Explain what has hap-
pencds

‘Sbewill said sie.“ *biut frst look
in the other jars.”

So Ali Baba passed from one jar, to another, finding a body in each, until he
came to the oil-jar which was very much sunk. He stood speechless with aston-
ishment for some moments, and then he again requested Morgiana to tell how
this had come to pass. She led him into the house, and related all that had
occurred from the time she had first noticed the mark upon the door to the flight
of the captain.

On hearing the story Ali Baba said to her: “We all owe our lives to your wit
and courage. Asa first token of my gratitude, I give you your freedom, and in
due time, I will add still further to your reward.”

Then, at the extreme end of the garden, under the shade of some large trees,
he and one of his slaves dug a trench in which they buried the bodies of the rob-
bers. The jars and weapons they hid, while the mules were sent to the market,
at different times, to be sold.

But the captain now hated Ali Baba worse than ever, and swore that he would
have revenge for the death of his comrades. He resolved that he would go to the



WC


RQ

‘MORGIANA KILLS THE ROBBER




MORGIANA DANCING,
Ae BABA ORS LHE POR DY Eoin VES,

town to live, so that he might watch for a chance to carry out his purpose. So he
rented a warehouse, to which he took a lot of silks and other stuffs, and set up as
a merchant under the name of Cogia Hassan.

Now, as it happened, the warehouse which the captain rented was near that of
Ali Baba’s son, who was also a merchant. Naturally, they soon became acquainted ;
and Cogia Hassan, although not yet aware of the young man’s relationship to Ali
Baba, cultivated his friendship as being likely to be of use to him in obtaining the
information necessary to carry out his designs. But it was not very long before
Ali Baba came one day to his son’s warehouse, and was seen and recognized by
Cogia Hassan, who soon found out that he was the father of his neighbor. After
this, of course, he became doubly attentive to the son, making him presents, and
often asking him to dine or sup with him. Ali Baba’s son felt obliged to return
these courtesies, and so it soon came to pass that Cogia Hassan was invited to
Ali Baba’s house to supper.

He went and carried, concealed, a dagger with which he intenaed to kill Ali
Baba as soon as he saw a chance of doing it with certainty. Ali Baba received
him very cordially, and thanked him for the kindness he had shown towards his
son, saying that to an inexperienced ue man such an acquaintance was, in
itself, a valuable advantage.

After further friendly conversation, they sat down to supper. At the meal
Cogia Hassan was careful to abstain from the use of salt, for amongst the Persians
even the wickedest think it wrong to kill a man whose salt they have eaten. Mor-
giana, who was serving, noticed this, and it caused her to suspect him. She
inspected Cogia Hassan closely, and soon became satisfied that he was none other
than the false oil merchant; and when
she saw that he had a dagger con-
cealed under his garment, she perceived
in what peril her master was placed.
With her usual quickness she conceived
a plan to thwart the robber’s purpose,
and she boldly determined to put it into
execution at once.

She was a very fine dancer, and often
entertained Ali Baba and his guests
with exhibitions of her skill. As soon
as the principal portion of the meal
was over, she retired and arrayed her-
self in a pretty dancing costume, and
then, accompanied by a fellow-servant,


Poo. BABA. cOln PE ORES aE VES,

who sung and played upon the tambou-
rine, she returned and proposed giving a
performance, while Ali Baba, and his son,
and their guest, were enjoying the dessert
and smoking. Cogia Hassan, of course,
politely expressed his pleasure; although,
secretly, he was annoyed at the intrusion
as likely to interfere with his evil intent.
Morgiana carried in her hand a jeweled
dagger, and as she danced she would point
it first to her own breast and then to those
of the others in succession, in a playful
way, and as though it were part of the
dance. Then, at last, she took the tambou-
rine and went from one to another, pre-
senting it for a reward after the custom of
street performers. Ali Baba and his son each put ina piece of gold, and Cogia
Hassan, when she came to him, pulled out his purse to do the same. But as he
reached his hand, Morgiana raised aloft her dagger, and plunged it with all her
strength into his heart, and he fell dead.

Ali Baba cried out with horror; but when
Morgiana told him who his guest was, and,
opening his garment, showed him the con-
cealed dagger; his feelings changed to joy at
his escape, and admiration for Morgiana’s
shrewdness, courage, and fidelity, and it seemed
to him that he could not say nor do enough to
. thank her.

They soon disposed of the captain’s body by
burying it in the garden with those of his com-
rades, and, as the robbers were now all dead,
they were free from further danger. After
awhile, Ali Baba’s son married Morgiana, and
they lived long in peace and happiness.










xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E4VFGJO3I_8XHOSF INGEST_TIME 2014-05-05T19:12:34Z PACKAGE UF00054514_00001
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES