Citation
Happy family

Material Information

Title:
Happy family illustrated stories and poems for little people
Series Title:
Firelight series
Creator:
W. L. S ( Illustrator )
Harper ( Illustrator )
Foster, E. F ( Illustrator )
Hayden, Parker ( Illustrator )
Tucker, E. S ( Illustrator )
Hirschberg, Alice ( Illustrator )
Barnes, C ( Illustrator )
Reid, J. B ( Illustrator )
Shelton, William Henry, 1840-1932 ( Illustrator )
Cox, A. S ( Illustrator )
Taylor, William Ladd, 1854-1926 ( Illustrator )
C. F. S ( Illustrator )
C. A. N ( Illustrator )
Merrill, Frank T ( Frank Thayer ), b. 1848
Humphrey, Maude, 1868-1940 ( Illustrator )
H.M. Caldwell Co ( Publisher )
Russell Publishing Company ( Copyright holder )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
H.M. Caldwell Co.,
H.M. Caldwell Co.
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1888
Language:
English
Physical Description:
[97] p. : ill. ; 27 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1888
Bldn -- 1888
Genre:
Children's poetry
fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Copyright by Russell Publishing Company.
General Note:
Illustrations signed by W.L.S., Harper, E.F. Foster, Parker Hayden, E.S. Tucker, Alice Hirschberg, C. Barnes, J.B. Reid, W.H. Shelton, A.S. Cox, W.L. Taylor, C.F.S., C.A.N., F.T. Merrill, M. Humphrey, and others.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
AHN3349 ( NOTIS )
024137006 ( AlephBibNum )
23529005 ( OCLC )

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HAPPY FAMILY:

ILLUSTRATED STORIES AND Poems

FOR

LITTLE PEOPLE.

WITH ORIGINAL ILLUSTRATIONS.



NEW VORRK:
THE H. M. CALDWELL CoO.

PUBLISHERS



Copyright, 1888,
By RUSSELL PUBLISHING COMPANY.



ee ee ee

tt Satie



CHINQUAPIN NECKLACES.

Dip you ever see a chinquapin necklace? George and _ his
sister Emma went out one day to find some nuts to make
one. :

First they gathered the prickly burrs and threw them on the
ground. Then they took long sticks and threshed out the little
brown nuts until they had a bag full.

When they took them home their mother boiled the chinqua-
pins, and gave them big needles, with long threads to string

them on while the nuts were quite soft. They made necklaces



CHINQUAPIN NECKLACES.

“Ree

‘t

by her teeth. They had become
dingy and ugly, too, after being kept
a week or two. :

“Never mind,” said George;

“chestnuts will soon be ripe now,
and they are much nicer than chin-
- quapins.”

“Yes; but we cannot make neck-
laces of chestnuts,’ replied Emma,
who liked to feel the smooth, cool
nuts on her neck, and to slip the
long string of them through her
fingers.

M. T. HUNTER.



so long that wheu
they put them on
the glossy beads
hung down to the
floor.

“The best part
of my necklace is
that I can eat it
up, said George.

Emma kept hers
a long: time, until
the mice began to
nibble it. Then
the nuts were too
hard to be cracked





THE PEACK-MAKER.

Sammiz had two roosters, a white one and a gray;

They fell into a quarrel, and began to fight one day,

And Sammie—oh! it grieves me to say—he thought it fun!
And stopped his play to watch till the rooster-fight was done.

Oh, fiercely fought the roosters, and flapped their heavy wings!

(Had they learned to quarrel, think you, from boys who do such things ?)
But Sammy only laughed, and clapped his hands to see

How the gray attacked the white, and the white fought savagely.

§) But along came Gobbler, with proud, majestic mien,

i And, ruffling up his feathers, gazed disgusted at the scene,

i Lifted high his stately head, and looked at Sam
a minute ;

But Sam was only thinking, “I guess old White’lI

i \ win it.”













No longer paused the gobbler, but onward swiftly flew,
And thrust his portly body at once between. the two;
Gave a peck to Mr. White, and a nip at Mr. Gray,
sx Till they hung their tails at last, and withdrew
Pir. in sore dismay.

Then the gobbler strutted after and gobbled in

\ the ear
f\ Of each most silly fighter. What he said I did
mu not hear;

a Ge
A c Pe. 2 /
A ene " 4 es —
er 4 het >
Seat cS
a ; aa, aN
Y as ,

ssp But no doubt he gave advice that was sensible
iz] We and true,

4 wl And he taught young Sam a lesson that was.
Sf sadly needed, too.



I 5 Sg ORES -. Sar $B eS
Ss -
\he ie 2 MARY D. BRINE.





TABLEAUX IN THE NURSERY.

Ir was a cold, rainy day. Polly, Puss, Jess, and Will stood by the
aursery window, watching the rain. Baby Ned was asleep on nurse's
Jap.

“TI wish we could go out for a walk,” said Jess.

“So do I,” said Polly ; “I just love to go out in the rain.”

“ But nurse will never let us go,” complained Will.

_ “No, indeed; you would every one take cold and be sick,” said
nurse. “ You ought to be glad you have such a nice, warm place to
stayin. Think how many nice things you have to play with. A good
many little children have no good home or nice playthings.”

“But we have played everything we know, and we are awful tired
staying in,” said Puss.

“IT wish mamma did not have company; then she could come and
play with us,” said Polly.

“You might get up some tableaux,” suggested nurse. “You have
not done that for a long time.”

“Oh, yes!—that will be splendid,” cried Jess. Even Will. who
thought he was too large a boy to take part in girl’s plays, agreed
that it would be fun.

Baby Ned woke up, and then nurse could help them. She set him
on the sofa to play with a mug and spoon. She arranged the screen in
front of one corner, and brought out some shawls and other things for



TABLEAUX IN THE NURSERY.

them to dress with. They arranged the tableaux behind the screen, then
nurse pulled it away. She and baby Ned were the audience.

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The Sleeping Beauty
was the first tableau.

Jess was asleep
on a couch
made of
a bright
shawl.
She was all covered up with a
curtain, and had a wreath of arti

on her head. Will was the prince.
looked very gay with Polly’s blue circular for a cloak, thrown over his



white lace
ficial flowers
He was standing beside her. He

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TABLEAUX IN THE NURSERY.

shoulders. A hat, with a long white feather, was on his head. He
had his toy sword hung at his side.

Then they had Little Red Riding Hood
her grandmother.

Polly was the grand- ‘ | a "
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mother; she had : vn on
acapwith a wide {| peg) : : NY frill,
and was propped } fees \ : me eee : =) sup on
pillows. Puss was = Red Rid-
ing Hood;. she Xe had on a
bright red cloak, 5 and carried
a little basket. H

It took them a
long time to dress, ©
and arrange each
tableau.
They were
just say-
ing,








we- have
when nurse




time to get ready for supper.”
They could not believe that the
time had gone so quickly. “TI guess we'll boy



play tableaux every rainy day,” said Jess.
MARGARET RYDER.

or d>P-3U> EH—E Wor »



I

Ey wasypsa,



How many babies have you, little mother?
Tell me how many, and what are their names?

“One, two, five, four, seven, and another, —
Little Bess, big Bess, Belle and her brother,

Pussy and Kittykin, Annie and James.

“Annie 1s me; and the two pretty Bessies
Are dollies that wink, and both very nice;
And Jamie is mamma’s true baby she dresses,
And lets me rock him and feed him with kisses;
And Pussy and Kittykin run and catch mice!”

And Belle? “Why, she was picked from a corn-hill:
Her hair is the silk, and the husks her dress ;
My papa guesses she must have been born ill,
Toes in the air, and skirts that are worn ill!
But Pve set her right, and she hugs little Bess.”

And the brother of Belle? “Dear me! I suppose
You'd call him a squash! but he’s real bright ,—



LITTLE ANNIE COUNTS HER BABIES.

A little hump-backed, and I guess his nose
Is a kind of wart; and he wears long clothes,
For, you see, his figure is not just right!



“ But I love him as well as I love the Bessies, —
I love them all, and they all love me;
And the very best of all, I guess, is
The true, live baby that mamma dresses;
And here we are, all now, just as you see!”
GEO. S. BURLEIGH.





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KITTY’S THANKSGIVING DINNER.

THANKSGIVING—DAY had arrived, and Aunt Abby had come from
Boston to join the family party at the old farm-house. She came op
the last train before dinner, as she had been detained on the way by
a slight accident. She brought her little orphan niece Sadie with her.
All the little country nieces rushed to the door to meet them when
they arrived.

“Oh, what a lovely bird that is on your bonnet, Aunt Abby!” said
one of the little girls as she laid it on the piano.

“Yes,” replied Aunt Abby; “my canary died, and I had it stuffed
and wear it on my bonnet.”

Then they all went out to dinner, which was waiting. The kitten,
who was shy of so many strangers, crept softly into the room they
had just vacated. She was allowed to curl up on the piano fora
nap sometimes; so up she jumped to her favorite place.

Kitty was all settled for sleep when her eye caught sight of a
lovely bird, with eyes wide open, looking straight at her. Then
her face assumed a crafty look, and she crept softly along and
suddenly pounced upon the bonnet. She began tearing the bird with
her claws and teeth.

It made no difference to her that the bird didn’t attempt to fly
‘way She kept on tearing it to pieces, but it couldn’t have tasted
rery good to her.



KITTY’S THANKSGIVING DINNER.

When the party came in from dinner there seemed enough feathers:
and stuffing scattered around to make three or four canary-birds
Aunt Abby, of course, felt very badly; but Kitty had scampered out
as the party came in; so she escaped punishment at that time. Per
haps she thought they
intended the bird for her
Thanksgiving dinner





VIRGINIA C. HOLLIS.









































































































































HOW BUNNY WAS LOST AND FOUND.

FRANK GOLDTHWAITE is a little
boy, and so, of course, he does not
care for dolls; but, instead of a doll,
he has a white rabbit, which one of
his friends made of Canton flannel,
and sent him at Christmas.

For a long time Bunny slept with
Frank every night, came to the table
with him when he had his meals, and
was his constant companion.



Frank lives in a village where the
winters are very long and cold. The snow is often so deep there that
the fences are entirely covered.

One day in March, when it was snowing quite hard, Frank’s papa
was going out on an errand. He asked the little boy if he would not
hike to go, too.

Oh, yes! Frank was always glad to go; and soon, in warm coat,
cap, mittens, and leggins, he was ready to start.

“ Bun must go too,” said Frank, “ for I don’t think he was ever out
when it snowed ; were you, Bun?”

Bunny, of course, said nothing. Indeed it would be hard for any one
to speak who was squeezed so tightly as he was in Frank’s chubby
little hand.

It was cold out-doors, and Frank grew tired of holding Bunny ; so
he tucked him into his coat-pocket. He trudged alone, watching the
feathery flakes, kicking the light snow, and now and then falling
down and rolling about in it.

When he came home mamma said, as she unbuttoned his coat,
« Well, did you and Bunny have a good walk?”



HOW BUNNY WAS LOST AND FOUND.

“Oh, yes, mamma! Didn’t we, Bun?” and Frank put his hand in
his pocket to get his little pet. Alas! the pocket was empty.

Frank burst into tears, and sobbed, “O mamma, I’ve lost my
Bunny! I’ve lost my Bunny ! ”

He wanted to start right out to find him; but mamma said there

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would be no use. The snow had probably covered him by this time.
She tried to comfort Frank by saying that perhaps the same friend
would make him another. But for many days the little boy mourned
for his pet.

Some weeks after, Frank’s papa was making a call, when something
was said about the many things that are lost in the snow.

“hen Mr. Goldthwaite told the story of Frank’s rabbit. When he



HOW BUNNY WAS LOST AND FOUND.

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had finished the lady excused herself and left the room; returning,

_ she brought Bunny.
“There,” she said, “I’m so glad to know whose it is! I found it,
- and knew it was some child’s pet; but I couldn’t find out whose.”

It was evening when papa came in with the rabbit, and Frank was
sound asleep. When he woke next morning he could hardly believe
his eyes, for there was his own Bunny once more. Then what a hug-
ying and kissing there was! And ever since Bunny has had such

good care that I don’t believe he will ever be lost again.
MRS. M. C. RANKIN.







THE CHICKADEE—DEE.

LirtrLe darling of the snow,
Careless how the winds may blow,
Happy as a bird can be,

Singing, oh, so cheerily,
Chickadee-dee! Chickadee-dee!

When the skies are cold and gray,
When he trills his happiest lay,
Through the clouds he seems to see
Hidden things to you and me.
Chickadee-dee ! chickadee-dee!

Very likely little birds

Have their thoughts too deep for words.
But we know, and all agree,

That the world would dreary be
Without birds, dear chickadee!

ELIZABETH A. DAVIS.











THE CHICKADEE-DEE.

















































































MINNA’S THANKSGIVING.

Eva Rogers was a little girl who lived in the upper part of New
York city. Every pleasant day her grandpapa took her in his pretty:
buggy to drive through Central Park. They often went beyond the
park, where there were few trees and houses; very little, in fact, to look
at besides vegetable gardens. But it was on these quiet drives that
grandpapa handed the reins to Eva, and under his good guidance she
had become quite a skilful driver.

One spring day, a particularly fine garden, although a very smal’
one, made them rein in Fleetfoot, and, as they were looking rathe”
wistfully at some tender young heads of lettuce, a little girl, in queer, short-waisted German dress, came from a small house near by,
and, dropping a funny little courtesy, asked : —

“Is der someting de little lady vants ?”

Well, they bought lettuce that day, and a few days later they bought
some chiccory, then lettuce again; and every time the same little gir!
would come out and make the same little courtesy, and say : —-

“Is der someting de little lady vants ?”

Her name was Minna. Eva learned that the third time they stopped
at the garden. Later she learned that Minna’s mother had been sick
for many weeks; so the little daughter, although only ten years old.
did her best to fill the mother’s place. Truly her busy hands had
made the small house bright and cosey.

November came at last, and there were no more vegetables to sel’
for a few months. “The little lady” had not called for a week o7



MINNAS THANKSGIVING.

more. Minna was wishing that she could see the buggy, with the fine
old gentleman and the bright little girl, driving up to the door. Could
it: be ? — yes, surely there were the very ones she was thinking of driv-













































































































‘ing towards Minna’s house. Before they reached it Minna was stand-
ing on the curb-stone, smiling and courtesying.

, “Ts der someting de little lady vants?” she asked, ba quickly
‘added, “Ihaf nodding for her to-day.”

' “We want nothing to-day, Minna,” said Eva’s grandpapa. “ How
| is your mother ?”

:
4

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MINNA’S THANKSGIVING.

“De guod mutter is mooch better, sir.”

“That is good,” said Eva.
“ Now, Minna, day after to-
morrow will be Thanks-
giving, and people
in this country
always eat
turkey and
all sorts










=f e

on that day,”— here grandpape
reached under the seat of the buggy
for somethmg, — “so you must
cook this in your very best man-
ner,’ — here she handed Minna a
huge brown paper parcel, — “ and
be sure to stuff it nicely. These
you stew, these you crack and.
eat, and these you eat just as
they are.”

Well! wall! a small avalanche of »
parcels came tumbling out, one after
the other, while Minna looked on,
too surprised to say a word.







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I UN 4 to Florida with my mamma, but
A Mey “Certainly we will!” answered.
grandpapa.

\ eee 1 arin “ a ‘i ; ; :
3 j ane i It l My Now, good-by ! Minna, ; na, bat
ee ne

And before Minna could say a word, or even drop @ courtesy, Fleet-
foot had started offand they were gone |

M. V. W.



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at
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FOUR YEARS OLD.

How many times to-day, I wonder,
Have I been told

IT must be a lady now, because
I am four years old?

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Mamma keeps saying, “ Little ladies
Are always quiet.”
So just one minute, more or less,

Ill sit and try it.
CLARA DOTY



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BERTIE was a very good boy. He was kind, obedient, truthful,;
and unselfish. He had, however, one great fault. He always forgot.

No matter how important the errand, his answer always was “I
forgot.” When he was sent with a note to the dress-maker his
mother would find the note in his pocket at night. If he was sent to
the store in a great hurry, to get something for tea, he would return
late, without the article, but with his usual answer.
' His father and mother talked the matter over, and decided that
something must be done to make the little boy remember.

Christmas was near, and Bertie was busy making out a list of
things which San‘a Claus was to bring him.

“Santa Claus may forget some of those things,” said his mother.

“‘ He cannot,” replied Bertie ; “for I shall write sled, and skates,



SANTA CLAUS DOES NOT’ FORGET.

and drum, and violin, and all the things on this paper. Then when
Santa Claus goes to my stocking he will find the list. He can see it
and put the things in as fast as he reads.”

Christmas morning came, and Bertie was up at dawn to see what
was in his stocking. His mother kept away from him as long as she
could, for she ae what
Santa Claus had done.

Finally she heard him

coming with slow steps
tio her room. Slowly he
ojpened the door and came
towards her. He held in
Eis hand a list very much
longer than the one he
had made out. He put it
in his mother’s hand,
while tears of disappoint-
tent fell from his eyes.
_ “See what Santa Claus
left for me; but I think
-he might have given me
‘one thing besides.”

His mother opened the
roll. It was a list of all
“the errands Bertie had
_ been asked to do for six
_-months. At the end of
i all was written, in staring capitals, “I FORGOT.”

Bertie wept for an hour. Then his mother told him they were all
going to grandpa’s. For the first time he would see a Christmas
tree. Perhaps something might be growing there for him.

It was very strange to Bertie, but on grandpa’s tree he found
everything he had written on his list. Was he cured of his bad
habit? Not all at once; but when his mother saw that he was
particularly heedless she would say, “Remember, Santa Claus does
not forget.”













































































M. A. HALEY.





SCAMP’S THANKSGIVING.

To-pay was Thanksgiving day. At least my master said so. AY
I know is, that Thanksgiving means a big dinner, — every Thanksgiv-
ing I have been to, and I am right old now for a pug-dog. My master
always invites lots of people to dinner, and such a good time they
have !

Yesterday I heard my master say there was going to be a number
of people here to dinner, so I thought I would invite some dog friends
to dinner, too. Pug-dogs have friends as well as their masters. So I
went out early this morning, and I saw a poor, hungry-looking dog

pve amet



SCAMP’S THANKSGIVING. | 83

‘walking up the street, and I invited him. Then I met a cat, and I
Invited her. Then I saw a bull-dog, and I invited him ; and, last of
all, I thought I would ask my master’s brother Alexis’ ew They
all said they would come.

Then I began to wonder how I was going to get dinner for them.
So I began to hunt around. I went into the kitchen and saw a big

| fat turkey on the table. Just then Annie, the cook, went out of the

: _Yroom;so I jumped up on the table and caught the turkey in my

\ | mouth. I was just about to jump down with it when Annie came
back. “You Scamp!” she cried, “what are you doing?”

I dropped the turkey and started to run, but she caught me. “ You
bad dog,” said she ; “now I am going to lock you up.” She took me
tio the cellar and vat me in the coal-bin and locked the door. Here
I have been all day. How ashamed I shall be when I get out and see
all the guests I invited! I wonder if they came. I don’t think I like

‘Thanksgiving.
} JOHN S. SHRIVER.







TWO LITTLE CATS.

We are two little cats,
Two good little cats,
Two small white cats are we;
We take sweet milk for our early morning meal,
But we must have cream for tea.

We have nice little claws,
Nice, sharp little claws,
That shine as they come and go;
But we never, never scratch till our tails are pulled,
When we want our tails to grow.

We have dear little teeth,
White, sound little teeth ;
But we are so polite,
If people just behave as they ought to behave,
We never attempt to bite.



TWO LITTLE CATS.

We have round little eyes,
Such mild blue eyes ;
But, though they close im sleep,

They can see the whisk of the shadow of a tail, ©

If a mouse should dare to creep.







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We have fine snowy coats,
_ And bows at our throats!
Oh, how lovely it must be
For other folks to live in the very same house

With two such cats as we!
7 CLARA G. DOLLIVER









THE DOLLS AND THE

OTHER DOLLS.

“Mamma,” little Nellie asked, “is it right to give away things

that have been given to you?”



























































































































































































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wore white frocks and blue kid boots.
und their eyes would open ani] e'int.

Her mamma replied that
it might be quite right some-
times; and she said, “But I
should feel sorry if I had
made a little friend a present
she did not value, and so was
glad to part with it.”

“Q mamma!” said Nellie,
“vou know how I value my
dollies, every one, that my
dear aunts and cousins sent
me because I was sick. Now
Iam well again. To-morrow
is New-Year’s. Some sick
little girls in the hospital
want dollies. Could I, if I
knew which one to choose,
keep only one for myself, and
send the whole five of them
for. those poor children who
haven't any ?”

Her mamma liked the plan.
She gave Nellie a box, and
ellie began kissing her ba-
bies, and laying them, one
after another, in the box.

There were two of nearly
the same size, that were very
dear to this little mother.
She called them twins. They

They had real blonde hair,



Sassi
Neen inan
Penny in

THE DOLLS AND THE OTHER DOLLS.

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_ These lovely twins Nellie
held in her arms a long time
before she could decide which
to part with. When she did
place one in the box, to be her
‘own no more, a tear was on the doll’s cheek. I do not think the
drop came from dolly’s eye.

A few days after the dolls were given Nellie’s mamma let her invite |



_ three little girls to play with her. Each girl brought her Christmas
' or her New-Year’s doll; and the three ‘dolls, with Nellie’s, looked
_ sweetly sitting together in a row.

By and by Nellie’s mamma came to her room, which she had given

; to the party for its use that afternoon. She told the children she
would give them a little supper of cakes and pears and grapes, and it

would be ready as soon as Biddy could bring the ice-cream from down.
street.



THE DOLLS AND THE OTHER DOLLS.

The smiling child-visitors gathered around the kind lady, saying,
«We thank you, and we love you ever so much.”

Nellie said softly, “Mamma dear, I wouldn’t take my dollies back
if I could. I love to think they amuse the sick children. But I do
wish that for just a minute we had as many at this party.”

Her mamma turned to her dressing-case. It stood low enough for
the smallest child to look into the mirror at the back easily. Moving
off the toilet cushions and cologne-bottles, the lady put the four dolls
in front of the looking-glass. Their reflection in the glass showed
four more. | ° |

“Six, seven, eight,” cried the girls, delighted. “And all are twins
— four pairs of twins!” |

After supper they made the twins sit, and stand, and dance, bow
and shake hands, before the looking-glass. So they played till dusk,
when the other little girls’ mammas sent to take them home, after
kissing Nellie good-night.

LAVINIA S. GOODWIN.





















































































































OS Rept et ng

m.

own oe
eee taney

SOMETHING WHICH MAY LOST.

A WEE little maid, with a bright little face,
Climbed up on the railing, one day,

Which guarded the pansies; a slip and a fall,
And down ’mid the blossoms she lay.

No very bad bruises were found on her knees,
And very few tears in her eyes.

“The child lost her balance,’ her Grandma declared;

May listened in wondering surprise.



\They missed her, and down in the pansies she knelt,

| Now peering first this way and that ;
‘ : .
“'Tis gone, some one stealed it!” she calmly announced,

Looking up from the depths of her hat.
“And what did you drop?” asked her mamma, surprised,

i And kissing the cheeks all aglow;
‘Then laughed at her answer, and kissed her again:

“My balance; I lost it, you know.”

MAY M. ANDERSON.





BLUE WATERMELONS.

THERE is no child, I do believe,
But likes a watermelon.

That luscious fruit might tempt the best
Of men to be a felon!

Its dark-green rind, all lined with white ;
Seeds black as night in winter;

And the sweet pinkness of the core! —
No pink was ever pinker!

Our Max, a funny boy of six,
Wears never aught but azure.
He leaves the red for little Bob,
Our darling younger treasure.
Bob’s suits and hose are cardinal,
Or shading into scarlet,
While Max wears never aught but blue—
The funny little varlet!

And watermelons Max won’t eat!
What do you think the reason?

I fear *twill sound to every boy
Like veritable treason.

But Max looks very serious, —
No eyes were ever truer,—

He says it is because they’re pink;

He “wishes they were bluer!”
KATE UPSON Ci.akk.



A NOVEL UMBRELLA.

Myo wanted to drive to market alone, but mamma was afraid to let
him, for he had never been used to horses before they moved to the
farm two months before. But papa said any baby could drive Liz,
she was such a steady horse; and surely a big boy, eleven years old,
who wore long pantaloons and top-boots, could drive her. Myo had
driven when papa or mamma was with him, and knew how to man-
age the horse very well, so papa said, “We will let him try it once
alone.”

In the market-wagon were six barrels of spmach. The barrels had
slits i the sides to let the air in, so the spmach would not wilt. Myo









































felt very large as he drove away to market with his load. Mamma
could stand in the door, and, looking across the meadows, see the road
nearly the whole two miles to town. When it grew time for Myo to
come back mamma grew anxious, for it was beginning to rain. At



A NOVEL UMBRELLA,













































last she saw the old gray horse and green market wagon coming along
the road. The railroad ran very near the house, and mamma watched
to see that they got safely over the track. Yes, the track was safely
passed, and Liz came trotting steadily towards home; but where was
Myo? He was nowhere to be seen. ‘The lines were not dragging on
the ground. Indeed they seemed to be firmly held by some one who
was guiding the horse, but no driver was visible.

Mamma’s heart almost stopped beating and she grew faint ; but she
broke into a laugh as Liz turned in at the gate and trotted by the
house to the barn, for she saw that the lines went through the slits in
a barrel that was bottom up, and she knew that under that barrel a
black-eyed boy was sheltered from the rain that was now falling fast.

“T wasn’t going to get wet,” said Myo, “ when I could put the lines
through two holes and look out of another one, and keep perfectly dry.
There was no use getting wet when I could make an umbrella of a

barrel, was there ?”
MARY A. ALLEN.









































ea

















THE RIDING HORSES.

“Ou, do look, Uncle Ben! See those two horses riding in a cart!”

“How funny!” echoed Dolly.

“Where is the man who pulls the cart?” asked John. His blue
eyes were wide open with wonder.

Uncle Ben laughed. “The horses are not riding ;” said he, « they
are hard at work. Just watch them.”

Well, it did look as if the horses were in a wagon. One of them
was white, and the other black. They were walking fast. That you
could see, from the motion of their heads and shoulders.

Yet they did not move forward. The cart, as John called it, had a
canvas cover, and wooden sides.

“You see those horses are going up-hill,” said Uncle Ben.



THE RIDING HORSES.

So it was. They were walking on a platform, made of a great
many strips of wood. These were laid upon chains. The chains
went over a round stick of wood, like a wheel, at each end. When
the horses tried to walk up, the platform rolled back. That was
why they did not get ahead.

At the rear end of the cart was a drum, or solid wheel. from this to the barn ; there it was fastened to a threshing-machine.

The farmer and his son were threshing oats. The straw was fed in
at one end of the machine. It moved along till it reached some little
hammers. These pounded out the oats, which went one way into a
box. The straw came out by itself and fell upon the floor.

The children watched all this with great glee. So the two horses
were not riding, as Uncle Ben said. They were doing very useful
work.

Some children, so Uncle Ben told his pets, are like these horses.
They never get ahead, though they are always busy. They are care-
less in study, so that, when they grow older, and leave their books
behind, they have made no progress. . .

Such children are not useful to others, like the horses. They do
not learn, and they do not help thresh oats; but sometimes their

parents thresh these idlers with a switch.
C. BELL.























AN AWFUL ANIMAL.

“WHERE is Waltie?” said Captain Drew, as he came in one May
morning. “I found a ground-bird’s nest in the furrow I was plough-
ing, and brought it in to let him see the eggs. He hasn’t run off te
the woods again, has he?”

Mr. Drew took a drink of home-made beer, while his wife cleaned



AN AWFUL ANIMAL.

the cooky dough off her hands, and called Sadie. She came in with
ber doll Rosie, and mamma said : —
“Where is Wal-
tie, dear?”
“QO manm-
ma! he went
toward the
woods with
his hatchet,
and I forgot to
Z soe ~ tell I did, truly.”
Pimento ge A now, maybe
your little brother is lost, because
you have so short a memory. You
think too much of your own pleasure to
care for others ; as a punishment put Rosie
away for the rest of the day.”

Captain Drew called a couple of men and

went to the forest.

\\ Waltie troubled them much by steak
at \ ing off to the forest to “chop down
a) trees,’ as he called tie bushes.
Captain Drew saw in this the help
which was to come to him in the
future, and smiled upon the
little woodchopper. The
woods were extensive, and
there were dangerous animals
inthem. A bell had been tied around the
child’s neck, so that they could trace him ; but the cunning boy held
the tongue. Then he was tied to the bedpost. But, as they did not
cure him, Sadie had been told to watch him ; but she failed to report.







a

th mt uA


















FREDDIE?S PATTY KILLER.

All was confusion at the Drew home. Mrs. Drew let her cookies
burn, and Sadie cried, partly about Waltie, and partly about Rosie.

At last a tired little boy came running into the house; between
showers of tears le said, “I’ve seen an awful big wiggle-tail! I’m
never going to run away any more, never.”

All they could learn of Waltie was, « [t was awful big, and a wiggle-
tail.’ |

Captain Drew thought perhaps it was a bear. Sadie became more
careful as she hugged Rosie, and shivered at the thought of the awful
animal.

Afterward, as Captain Drew was passing through the forest with
his little boy, he was surprised when Waltie pointed out a « wigyle
It was only a common black squirrel. We had many a hearty

93

tail.

laugh over “ the awful animal.”
S. ROSALIE SILL.



FREDDIE'S PATTY KILLER.

UittLe Freddie is not yet three years old. He tries to talk like
grown people, and, like most little boys, makes many mistakes. He
calls animal “amaline;”” and when he tried to say indigestible he
called it “dingy vegetable.” One day he came in from his play
exclaiming, “OQ mamma! I found a patty killer.”

“A what?” asked mamma.

“A patty killer. He was just as woolly, and had lots of legs.”

With all her questioning mamma could not guess what Freddie
had seen.



FREDDIE'S PATTY KILLER.

This was the first one he had ever seen; but he said he knew
it was a “patty killer,” because /
in a book, and his sis

A few days
jittle chair
picture-

he had seen the picture of one



had told him its name.
after this Freddie sat in his
turning the leaves of a

book. Suddenly his
eyes brightened, and

ter




















he ran to his mamma,
crying, “O mamma,
this is what I saw!
Here is a_ patty
killer. Just see!”

And what do you
suppose. it was?
Mamma could not
help laughing.
It was a
picture
of a big
, cater:

_ pillar,
its




with
bright
spots and stripes





nicely colored, sa
that it looked very
much like a real,
living one.

Mamma will al-
ways think of Freddie’s name for it whenever she

sees a caterpillar, or a picture of one.
H. L. CHARLES.











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STE Sh NEE TE







FISHING BY FIRE-LIGHT.

“ Now, boys,” said papa, “if you can get some good bait we
will try fishing by fire-light.” |

Hartley and Herbert looked at each other and laughed. One
of them made reply, “ Why, papa, are you going to turn Simple
Simon, and fish in your mother’s pail, here by her open fire?”

There was « twinkle now in papa’s eye, too, but he only said, “ Get
the worms before dark. As soon as the stars come out we will go
down on Grand Point.”

Now, Herbert’s idea of fishing was to sit in grandpa’s row-boat in
the warm sunshine, and throw bits of his gingerbread and cracker
into the water. Then he watched the fishes gather by the hundreds,
all eager for a crumb. It was delightful to see the bits dart through
the water. He almost thought the crumbs were alive, too.

That was fun, but fishmg in the dark, damp evening was quite
another thing. It had no attractions for Herbert. However, when
the time came he went, and certainly was not sorry afterwards.
Papa built a bright, warm fire, and the boys, wrapped in their thick
overcoats, sat upon an old log, patiently waiting what might
follow.

The light from the fire made so many weird shadows that Herbert
was half inclined to be frightened. He sat close to his father, and



FISHING BY FIRE-LIGHT.
papa need not have said, “Keep very still, Herbert.”

Pretty soon
papa gave a twitch, as if to pull up his hook, but could not raise 1t,
“Tt must be something heavy, boys,” he said, running up the
beach, dragging his line after him.
The boys were on their feet now, peering into the darkness.

Such

N

SS 2

SS

BY



























a





splashing and dashing, as a huge fish made its appearance on dry
land !
nine pounds.

It was a bass, nearly two feet long, and weighed more than

They went to the same place the next night, and the next, and the
next, but caught nothing. Perhaps the fishes told all their neighbors
of the sad fate of their big brother Bass. At least that is what Her-
bert thought.

LIZZIE

MAY SHERWOOD.



THE LITTLE HARVEST MOUSE.

Wuat a strange little
éreature this is, with its
pretty, pensile nest hung
on the stout grass stems,
or wheat straws, and
sometimes to the head
of a thistle ! These nests
are woven, very careful-
ly, of narrow grasses,
just in the shape of a
hollow globe, not a bit
larger than a cricket-
ball.

The harvest mouse is
so tiny that when it is
full grown it will not
weigh the sixth part of
an ounce. Isn't it a
wonder that it can build
so beautiful a house to
live in? Why, the walls
are so thin that the baby
ly seen from the outside,
breeze ; and yet the mice
never fall out, — just

————

i
1

WSSn

————————————
oo
Hie





































































































































































mice inside the nest can be easi- |
as they swing to and fro in the
are packed so tightly that they
like sardines in a box! |

You cannot find an opening anywhere! The mother mouse must

push her way between the meshes of these loosely woven walls whe:

she feeds the young mice, though nobody knows just. ow ske does i!



THE LITTLE HARVEST MOUSE.

Often, in this light and airy cradle, there are seven or eight mice te
feed!

All mice and rats are very good climbers, but the harvest
mouse, with its long, slender tail and
flexible toes, is better fitted than any
other for climbing.

They must be very nimble, as their
food consists of insects, especially
flies, which they are very fond
of, and when they go in pur-
suit of them their aim
is as sure as that of
the swallow.










Lown,

MRS. G. HALL.



iter,

<











































THE MAIL-CARRIER AND THE SQUIRREL.

In the State of Maine there lives a man who is very fond of dumo
animals. His business was to take the mail from the station to the
post-office, in the centre of the town. To reach the station he had to
cross a river in a smail boat, and then walk along on the shore a long

istance.

One day, as he was walking along, he saw a little squirrel running
beside the way. On returning home he thought of the squirrel and
put a handful of corn into his pocket. The next day, on coming te
the place, he saw the squirrel again. Without appearing to notice
it he scattered the corn along.

The squirrel was shy at first, and kept some distance away, but as
the mail-carrier passed on he had the pleasure of seeing her pick up
the corn. :

The kind man repeated this each day. The squirrel would venture
a little nearer each time, until she became so tame that she would run



THE MAIL-CARRIER AND THE SQUIRREL.

up on his clothes and perch on his shoulder. Then he would stop
and hold open his pocket, and she would jump into it and eat the corn
there.

She had a nest in a hollow tree, where rested three pretty baby



squirrels. After a while she took them to meet the kind man with
her. He fed them all, with much pleasure, for several weeks :
then he was called away, and another man took his place. He was
very sorry to leave the squirrels, they had been such good friends for
many months.

MRS. F. 8S. LOVEJOY.



s ype
yh Ss



TWO ENGLISH FRIENDS.

HERE are two little English friends, —
I do not know their names, —

Who live in famous London town,
Beside the river Thames.

And seated in right royal state,
Upon a soft fur rug,

Behold the little English prince,
Beside the English pug.



TWO ENGLISH FRIENDS.

The little prince, from top to toe,
Is beautifully dressed,

And seems determined to appear
His very, very best;

While doggie, with his nose in air,
Is very much put out,

And says he’d really like to know
What that strange man’s about.

The little prince says, “ Doggie dear,
You mustn’t fidget so,

For we're to have our pictures sent
To grandmamma, you know;

So look as pleasant as you can,
And do not make me laugh,

Or have a naughty frown, because
"Twill spoil the photograph.”

The little prince, upon his throne,
Is very much at ease,
And this sweet photograph of him
Can hardly fail to please ;
While the English pug, beside him there,
Who stays because he must,
Expresses in a funny way
His very great disgust. 3
| JOSEPHINE POJ.LARD.

































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































CAT-TAILS.

"Twas a group of merry children,
And, the marshes going by,

One boy shouted: “See the cat-tails!
See the cat-tails, nice and high!”

Then a wee tot, from the city,
Said, with brimming eyes of blue:
*“ Wiiat a shame it was to drown them!

Did they drown the kittens too?”
: GEORGE E. COOPER.





JOHNNIE’S BONFIRE.

GRANDMA was very sick, and mamma could not leave her for a
moment. Papa had gone a few miles away for a nurse, so there
was no one to get Johnnie and Eddie ready for Sunday school.

“Qh, dear,” sighed Johnnie, “I’m so tired keeping still! Let us
go down on the big rock, and read.” |

“What do you want of matches if you are only going to read?”
inquired Eddie, seeing Johnnie reach up to the match-safe.

“Oh, there might be a total eclipse of the sun, you know; then
we should have to strike a light.”

This seemed satisfactory to Eddie, and he put on his hat.

They went across the pasture, over an old bridge, to a grove,
and were at the big rock. That rock had long been o thmi’y fa
vorite.



JOHNNIE’S BONFIRE.

There was an opening in the rock, which was filled with dried
grass, dead leaves, and moss. It was just the place for a bonfire,
Johnnie thought, as he looked over his book. A small fire could.
surely do no harm, and he and Eddie could warm their hands,
for the September air was chilly indeed. He sent Eddie to fetch
some dry sticks and bark from the woods near by, and soon‘a
bright blaze was leaping and dancing above the rocks. Johnnie
watched it rather anxiously, and was glad enough to see it die
down at last, and soon go out, as he supposed.

He returned to the house, but he felt all the while as if some
dreadful thing was about to happen.

Pretty soon he saw the minister, who lived next door, running
across the lots with a pail in each hand. His father was just re-
turning home with the nurse for grandma. He dashed up to the
gate, and left both the nurse and old Kate in the road. Seizing
a pail he darted down the pasture. Johnnie thought of his bon-
fire in an instant. Sure enough it had started up again, and was
running as fast as it could towards the large wood-lot his father
prized so much.

That evening when the fire had been really put out, and noth-
ing serious had come of it, Johnnie told his papa how sorry he
was, and promised never to play with fire again.

LIZZIE MAY SHERWOOD.







THE TWO PIGS.

A TRUE STORY.

Wuen Madge was seven years old and Edith five they weut to the
country to spend the summer on their Grandpa Mason’s farm. Hav-
ing lived in the city all their lives they were very happy to be able to
run in the fields, pick wild-flowers, and ride in the hay-cart. They
had such big appetites that grandma declared they would eat her out
of house and home.

But they were very good little girls, and tried so hard not to give
their grandma any trouble that one day Grandpa Mason made each
of them a present of a little white pig.

The little girls had never before had any pets, and they pecame



THE TWO PIGS.

very fond of the pigs. One was named Snowball and the other
Frisky, and they soon learned to come when the children called them.
They were good little pigs, and very tame, and did not make a fuss
when they were washed. They had to be washed very often, for they
were fond of lymg in mud-puddles, and playing in the farm-yard
with their dirty little brothers, and they didn’t mind being scolded.

But the little girls loved them, dirty or clean, and were sorry to
leave them in September, when they went back to the city. They
did not forget them, and when summer came again, and they went to
the farm in June, they asked for Frisky and Snowball before they
had even taken off their hats.

“They’re alive, and will be glad to see you, I haven’t a doubt,”
aald grandpa. “Come out to the
born.”

“The darling little things!”
said Madge. “I wonder if they
will know us.”





my if |
if |)
\ Hi

But it was the little girls who didn’t know the pigs, for Snowball
and Frisky had grown into big hogs, and grandpa had them in a pen,
fattening them to kill in the fall.

How he did laugh when he saw how surprised and sorry Madge



THE LITTLE ORIOLE THIEF.

and Edith were! But after a while he took them into the loft of the
barn, and showed them two flying-squirrels i In a tin cage.

“ Here are some new pets,” he said; “you will like these as wel)
as the pigs.”

But it was a long time before the little girls ceased to mourn ove!

the loss of Frisky and Snowball.
‘MRS. F. B. GETCHELL.



MapamE SHEPLEY sat at
her window, knitting a very
pretty blue-silk sock for her
little grand-daughter Mar-
garet. Somebody called
her away for a moment,
when a saucy little oriole,
called “Baltimore,” flew up
to her basket upon the win:
dow-sill. The bird had just
nested, and helped herself
to a skein of the silk which
she was about to join on
to her work. She quickly
made off with it to her un-
finished nest in the apple-
tree near by.

But the. silk would noi.
do as the oriole wanted at
all. It would get caught in





LITTLE BETTIN#; A SWINGING SONG.

the branches, and in spite of
all the bird’s efforts got ter-
ribly tangled. She tugged
and tugged, but to no pur-
pose. At last she had to
content herself with a few
loose threads, leaving a
good many strings, here.
and there, fluttering in the
wind.

These strings made her
very angry ; for weeks after,
as she passed to and fro,
she always stopped, and
gave the threads a spiteful
jerk, as much as to say, “O, you hateful
yarn! you've given me heaps of trouble.
I wish I'd never stolen you. Id be better
off, I know.”



MRS. G. HALL.



LITTLE BETTINE: A SWINGING SONG.

SWINGING, swinging, little Bettine,

Prettiest- lassie that ever was seen;
Swinging, swinging,

Up where the long, lithe branches blow,

Down where the white, swaying lilies grow;

Swinging, swinging, little Bettine,

Under the larches cool and green.

Swinging, swinging, little Bettine,
Blossom-crowned, like a summer queen ;
‘Swinging, swinging,



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swinging, little Bettine,

Under the larches cool and green.

Down where the brown bee keeps her quest;
winging,

Up where the robin hides his nest,

S

EMMA C. DOWD



THE

BIRTHDAY BOOTS.

Ir was almost Jo-Jo’s birthday.

He was neither very old nor very big, but more than anything
in the world he wanted a pair of boots.

His brother Hal was grown up and in college, and he said it

was a shame for Jo-Jo
to wear knee-pants and
shoes when he so much
wished to be a young
man. |
So it was planned in
secret that on his birth-
day Jo-Jo should have
his first pair of boots.
They were bought.
It seemed as if you
could fairly see the
noise in them _ they
were so stout in the
sole, and so heavy and
sturdy in the uppers.
“JT think you will
have to put a weather-
strip round the edges,”
said Hal to his mother
the night before, when
they were looking them
over, and saying what
a big boy Jo-Jo had
grown to be; “there'll
be no living in the
house with him for the
racket.”

=





THE BIRTHDAY BOOTS.

His mother smiled.

“] think we'll set them outside his door and
let him find them first thing in the morning,”
said she.

“Just let me put a motto on the bottom of
one,’ cried Hal; “it will be a good way to
convey a moral.”

It was a fine surface to write on, the smooth,
polished leather, and Hal printed with ink, in
good, plain letters upon one, —












ie S Trane
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‘THE MORE HASTE THE LESS SPEED;”





and upon the other,
“SEVEN LEAGUES TO THE STEP.” -

He looked his work over
with pride, and laughed to
think of Jo-Jo’s running

Periph

atin.

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THE BIRTHDAY BOOTS.

about with letters always under his feet, when he did so hate tc
read.

First thing upon coming out of his room in the morning, Jo-—Jc
found the boots. He was too delighted to think of stopping up
stairs to put them on, but ran down into the general sitting-room,
where the family were waiting for breakfast.

His face was covered with smiles, and he swung the boots round
his head at the risk of breaking every trinket in the room.

‘“ Hi-oh!” he eried; “ boots! boots!”

“Try them on,” said his mother, “and see if they are as nice
as you think.”

Jo-Jo burst halfa-dozen buttons off his shoes in his haste to make
the change. He put his foot eagerly in at the top, and pressed it
down to the ankle, but it would go no further.

He tugged and pulled, got red in the face, and finally lost his tem:
per.

Hal came forward to see. The boots were, indeed, altogether too
small. The shoe man had evidently given the wrong number.

“T can change them for a larger size,” said Jo-Jo, unwilling to give
them up. :

Just then he caught sight of Hal’s writing.

“Who did it?” he cried.

Hal owned he did it as a sort of joke.

Then Jo-Jo, who had been on the verge of erying, laughed aloud

“T think the joke is on you this time, Mister Hal,’ he shouted.

And it was. The ink had soaked into the leather, so that the
boots were too soiled to return.

“T'll have them to pay for, sure enough,” said Hal, willing to turn
Jo-Jo’s attention in any way from his disappointment.

This pair having failed, they persuaded Jo-Jo to wait one more
year, when he should choose his own boots, and have them fitted

before they were taken home.
C. D. B.























































AT. MILKING—TIME.

Wuiteroot, Lightfoot,

Set back your right foot,
Chewing, and waiting the maid with the pail;
Horns in the sunshine,

Hoofs in the clover,
Gentle cow, stand and be milked by the rail.

_ Fairy Carrie
_ And little boy Harry
| Have come to the meadow along with me.
“ Whip-poor-Will! Poor Will!”
Hear a complaining
Out of the dusk gathered under the tree.

Closing, dozing,
Field flowers reposing
Fade as the sun goes to far-away iands ;
Strawberries scarlet
Mix with green grasses,
Hide more and more from the search of
small hands.















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Le

AT MILKING-TIME.



AT MILKING-TIME.

Glancing, dancing,
Fire-flies romancing,
Light, tiny lamps in the dewy-damp vines ;
Frogs are a-crooning ;
Forth hops a rabbit ;
High flies the night-hawk that peeps while he dines,

Whitefoot, Lightfoot,
Have now your right foot,
Full to the brim is my pail with white foam;
Looks the round moon so,
Over the hill yonder, —
Guess there, too, a milkmaid’s on her way home.

Fairy Carrie
And little man Harry
Skip from the field, but look back through the bars;
Sings lone whippoorwill;
Folds her limbs Whitefoot ;
Shine in the pasture-brook two early stars.

LAVINIA 8S. GOODWIN.









































































































































Athi i
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THE NEST OF GOLD.



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Percy DALE was a dear, pink and white little boy, with a tangle
of golden ringlets, so long and silky that strangers often stopped
him on the street to admire them. He wouldn’t have cared, only
they sometimes stroked his head, and called him a “sweet little

oh 99

girs
Now, Percy loved littie girls; but to be called a little girl himself

was not at all to his liking. It always sent him running to his



THE NEST OF GOLD.

mamma to beg her to cut off the dreadful curls that made people say
he was “a little girl-boy.”

“Oh, no, no, darling ; mamma can’t shear her pet lamb,” she
would answer with a kiss ; “but by and by we'll ask Miss Olive to do
it.”

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_ “By and by” was slow in coming, and Percy’s fourth birthday
found him with curls longer and lovelier than ever. That morning, |
as he swung on the gate, an old lady, passing, said to him,
smilingly : —

“Won't you sell me your beautiful, bright curls, little Miss? My
little grand-daughter hasn’t any.”

“Little Miss” indeed! The words nearly broke Percy’s heart. He



THE NEST OF GOLD.

dragged his apron up over the hated ringlets, and held it close till
the lady had gone.

Then he hopped down from the gate, his eyes shining with a
happy thought. He would stop people from calling him names!
He would run across the street all by himself, and ask Miss Olive te
cut his hair off so short that everybody’d know he wasn’t a girl!

As it happened, his mamma had lately said to Miss Olive that one
of these days his curls must be clipped ; so, when the little fellow told
his errand, Miss Olive at once pinned a towel about his neck, and
snip, snip, went ‘ier big shears through his wavy mane. °

She put the longest curls in a paper box for Percy to carry home;
and, not being a very tidy woman, she threw the rest of them out of
‘the back window into the yard. These were spied by two yellow
birds about to set up house-keeping, and carried off, tress by tress, to
the lilac-tree in the garden. There the birds wove them into the
daintiest golden nest that ever was seen. In this they reared -a
thriving little family ; and when the cold winds came, and they all
flitted away to the sunny south, Miss Olive brought the empty nest
to Percy’s mamma, who has kept it to this day.

PENN SHIRLEY.







MORNING—GLORIES.

Wake, baby, Ill sing you a ballad;
Come, open your eyes and hear

Of the gay, painted ladies, so fresh and so fair,
Who lean at the lattice near.



MORNING-GLORIES.



Their gowns have the hues of the rainbow, —
Violet, crimson, and pink;

And their faces are fair as the morning
When the sun first rises, I think.

See, on their hearts glisten dew-drops, —
Jewels more precious and rare

Than any queen-lady can boast of
At her bridal or crowning to wear.

Gay-painted ladies and bonnie,
Out at the lattice there,
Lean from their bower and beckon to you:
“Good-morning, my baby fair!”
J. K. LUDLUM

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SAMMY’S “FLYING—HORSKES.”

Sammy Swett was ten yearsold, and the son ofa poor widow. She

also had four children younger than Sammy to support. Sammy
used to do-errands for the neighbors, and thus earned a few pennies
sometimes.
_ Once a neighbor took him to a fair which was held in a large
field. Sammy had ten cents to spend, and used it to pay for a
ride on the “flying-horses.” He thought the ride was delightful,
and when he went home told his brother and three little sisters
about it. All but Baby Bess, who couldn’t quite understand. wished
they could have a ride on the wonderful flying-horses.

One day, late in the fall, Sammy stood at the kitchen window,
watching his mother’s clothes-reel, which the wind was whirling
rapidly. The idea came to him, suddenly, that this reel would
be just as good as the flying-horses if he only had some seats



SAMMY’S ‘ FLYING-HORSES.”

hanging from it. The reel was a tall pole, with four long bars
like a cross upon it. Sammy ran te the wood-shed and got four
stout ropes. He tied one of these to the end of each cross-bar.
Then he looked about for seats. Sue’s little chair answered for
one, the seat of an old baby-carriage for another, an old box for ;



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another, and a market-basket, which he thought would do for
Baby Bess, made the fourth.

After a deal of tying and fixing, he had all these fastened to
the ends of the ropes. Then he had quite a time getting his
“passengers aboard.” But finally they were all in their seats,
and then there was a jolly time indeed. The wind was quite
strong, the reel kept whirling, the children shouting and laughing
in high glee. Baby Bessie’s head was all that could be seen of



THE FARM BREAKFAST.

ner, the market-basket was so large; but she enjoyed: it, and
tried to make as much noise as the rest. Mamma came to see
what it was all about, and laughed heartily after she had exam-
ined the ropes to see that they were strong enough to hold their

precious burdens.
VIRGINIA C. HOLLIS.

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THE FARM BREAKFAST.

Orr went the hired maid; .
Off went the hired man;
The busy farmer and his wife

Must do the best they can.

@ne;. two;. three, four !
. - Loud strikes the kitchen clock ;

“T| must,” the farmer says, “get up
At once: and feed my stock.”

He gives: the cow some: timothy,
The steers, some meadow-hay,

The pair of working oxen. grain,
And so: begins. the: day.



THE FARM BREAKFAST.





























































































































































































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He brings some turnips for the sheep,
The dappled colt some barley,
And gets a measure full of oats
For good old Dan and Charley.

He throws the flock of hens some corn;
He gives the calves. some meal ;

The pigs: he had forgotten quite
Until he heard them squeal.

Within the house, “Bow wow! Bow wow!”
Old Towser begs for meat ;

“Mew! mew!” The yellow kitten asks
For something she can eat;

And down. the stairs come hungry Tom,
And hungry Rose and Neddy,;

And ask, with one united voice,

“Oh, isn’t breakfast ready ?”’
MARION DOURTAS.



HOW COAL JS MADE.



Dip you know that coal is
made from plants? Not one
child in a hundred knows that!
The very heat it gives out is
what the plant first took in.

What is there more valuable
than coal, that’ warms our
houses so nicely and gives us
such beautiful gas-light to sit
by on cold winter nights ?

All kinds of machinery ar:
worked by it, from the factory
to the engine. Even the oil
that we use in our lamps comes
from coal and the remains of
plants. If you were to take a
piece in your hands you can
see the ‘impression of leaves
like those you gather in the
country lanes.

Many have stems too. They are very, very hard, and even
have the marks where the roots grew!

Many kinds of ferns and huge trees of the forest often make
coal, for every coal mine has more or less of these ; even the cones
of the pine have been found in the coal. |



LITTLE HUM.

Peat is the beginning of a bed of coal before it grows hard.
You know what a nice fire it makes. Coke, which you have
often seen burning so brightly in the grate, is made by driving
out all the oil and gases from coal,—the very gas that we burn.

Tar often oozes out of the lumps of coal on a fire, making
little black bubbles, which burst and burn. Paraffine oil is made
from this very tar, and benzoline too. Aniline comes from ben-
zoline, which makes some of our most beautiful dyes. Essences that
are put in the candies you buy, and taste so good, come from
tar. So you see that from coal we get nearly all our heat and
light, colors and pleasant flavors. Isn’t it useful, though !

MRS. G. HALL.



LITTLE HUM.

Tue children were out in the walnut-orchard, playing dinner.
They had a cunning little table. The tea-set had gilt edges and little
pink flowers. They had real coffee, little bits of biscuit, and Jap
anese plum jelly ; frosted cake, too, and oranges, and big, red bananas.

Mamma sat in the house alone, sewing.

“Hum-m! hum-m! hum-m!” sounded something in the hall.

Mamma dropped her work and ran out there. A humming-bird
was up against the ceiling. The ceiling frightened it and made it
feel homesick, for it was not used to having anything in the way
when it wanted to fly up towards the sky.

Little Hum felt lost because he had flown away from the blue sky
and the sun.

You, dear little children, would feel as poor Hum did if you should



LITTLE HUM.































































i











run: away. from home and get lost on some lonesome road. Yuu
would. keep trotting about,.on your. little, tired feet, trying to find
your way back to papa and mamma. You would. feel sorry that. you
had run away. Perhaps Hum was sorry that. he had. flown away.
He kept dashing about and bumping his head so hard that, rcamma
was afraid it ached.



LITTLE HUM.

He soon became so tired that he slid down the wall and mamma
picked him up. She took her smallest scissors and cut off a cobwek
that was tangled around his little bits of feet.

Poor, tired, little Hum lay quite still in mamma’s hand. Per
haps it seemed like a warm nest. Mamma called the children to see
him. They came crowding around her on the veranda.









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They thought Hum was very small and pretty, and Hum thought
they were giants.

““ Now see him fly,” said mamma, and she opened her hand.

“Hum-m!” He was off in the top of a tall tree as quick as a
flash.

A few days later the children found a dead humming-bird. It may
have been the same one. They wrapped him in a fig-leaf and buried

him under a rose-tree.
ANNA C. FIELD.



AUGUST AND ITS WORK.













































































a in ae

Wuo has made dry all the cool,
shady places
Where my little brook used to
ripple and play ?
“T coaxed the brook off,’ said
fiery-breathed August ;
“In soft, little mist-clouds it
floated away.”



Who has turned yellow and brown
my green pastures ?
Who has been bleaching my
green sea of wheat?
“JT ripened the verdure,” said
fierce, scorching August,
“And I threw those brilliant-
hued flowers at your feet.

“TI finished the ripening of all
the wild berries,
And I put the bloom on the
fair, downy peach;
For me in the orchard the sweet-
Ings grow mellow,
And I have some beautiful
tintings for each.”

SARAH E. HOWARD.













X 7, Ke

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S 7 .
PW



SODA WATER.

“Gone to visit Aunt Jane — hurrah!” shouted Ted.

“Won’t it be jolly,” said Ned.

Ted and Ned lived in the country, and thought it a very good
place to live. But Aunt Jane lived in a town, and they thought
that still nicer.

When they arrived there Aunt Jane took them all about, showing
them a great many interesting things; into some stores, too, where
they thought they would like to buy everything they saw.

Last of all, when they were tired and hot, she took them toa
place where they had some soda water.

The boys thought it the nicest thing that they had ever tasted.

The next day, among the great sprinkling-wagons which went by
Aunt Jane’s house, they saw one with great letters painted on it,
and they spelled : —

RAND’S SODA WATER.

“Q Aunt Jane!” exclaimed Ted, “was it Rand’s soda water
that we had yesterday ?”

“Yes,” said Aunt Jane. Then she went out of the room.

“It's a great shame to water streets with such good stuff,” said
Ned.

“T should think so,” said Ted.

“Don’t you s’pose we could get a little?” asked Ned. “A glass
or two wouldn't make a bit of difference when they’re throwing so
much away.”



SODA WATER.

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« And then we shouldn’t have to pay five cents for it,” said Ted.

“TLet’s try,” said Ned. “There comes another one.”

“Yes, see!” said Ted. “*Rand’s Soda Water.’ ”

Both got a glass and ran out.

“ Now we must drink it up quick,” said Ted.

“Yes, before it stops foaming.”

They ran into the stream of the sprinkling-cart as it passed, and
by getting their clothes pretty wet managed to get a foaming glass
full.

“ Drink — quick!” cried Ted.

‘And they drank quick, until it was:almost all gone.

“Ts’nt it sp—” said Ned.

“—lendid!” said Ted.

But they said it because they were all ready to say it.

«7 — don’t know as it’s so dreadful good, aiter all,” said Ned, mak

ang a face.
“Nor I either,” said Ted, making another.



FAREWELL TO SUMMER.

“°Tisn’t half so sweet as that in the store,” said Ned.

“ Nor so pink,” said Ted.

Ned looked at what was left in his glass. It had rather a yellow,
muddy look. He tasted it and made a worse face.

“Aunt Jane,’ said Ted, as they went into the house, “that soda
water in the carts isn’t half so nice as that in the store.”

“ How do you know ?” she asked.

“’Cause we tasted.”

“ That isn’t soda water,’ she said. “It is an advertisement to tell
people where they can get it.”

Then she went to the pantry and stayed there a little while. When
she came back she gave them some ginger-snaps to take away the
taste. And Ned wondered why it took her so long to get them.

But neither Ned nor Ted ever knew that she had stayed to have

a good laugh all by herself.
SYDNEY DAYRE.



FAREWELL TO SUMMER.

Au day I hear a singing,
My little love.

The cricket’s faint knell ringing,
My little love.

The yellow leaves are flying,

And Lady Wind is sighing,

Ah, me! The summer’s dying,
My httle love.



FAREWELL TO SUMMER.

Her sweet soul has departed,
My little love.

The birds are broken-hearted,
My little love.

She was so fair and smiling,

Our inmost hearts beguiling,

The long hours sweetly whiling,
My little love.

Our arms she filled with flowers,
My little love.
And sent us healing showers,
My little love,
Even in fullest measure.
Nay, shared your childish pleasure,
And lavished all her treasure
On my little love.

Farewell is sad, sad saying,

My little love.
When winter flees, I’m praying,

My little love,
We may together meet her.
Ah! nothing could be sweeter
Than, hand in hand, to greet her,

My little love.

GRACE WINTHROP OLIVER.







AB - SY ay :
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THE LITTLE PRISONER. 5 ;

Tue day little Harry was two years old he gave himself and his’
mamma a real fright. He was very active, and could run all over
the house, and go up and down stairs without help from eA.

It happened on the morning of his birthday
that there was no one at home with zim but
mamma ; she was putting a chamber in
order for visitors. He trotted around
after her, drawing a pair of tin
horses. No thought of mischief
had entered his mind.

By and by, when mamma
went into the hall for
something, he stayed be-
hind in one of the cham-
bers. He shut the door
and locked it. Mamma
hurried back and told
him to turn the key
quick and open the door.
He tried and tried, but
could not doit. At last
he pulled the key out of
the door, and could not
put it m again. There he was, shut up alone, like a squirrel In a
cage.

“When he found that he could not get out he was frightened and
began to cry.




























THE LITTLE PRISONER.

Mamma could not open the door, but she called to him, “Don’t
ery, Harry, and papa will come very soon and take you out.”

Then she told him to push the big arm-chair up close to the door,
and climb into it, then she would tell
him sonie stories.

He did as she said, and mamma put
her mouth down to the key-hole and
told him about “Little Boy Blue,’ and
“Mother Hubbard,” and “ Bo-peep,” and
other things that he liked. She kept
telling them over and over, because she
wanted him to be quiet and not. feel.
frightened.
~s After a time his papa came home.
When he heard what was the matter
he went straight to the barn and brought
‘y the long ladder and put it up to the

_ chamber window. Then he had to break
= {como i a pane of glass so
that he could open
the window and
get into the room
where Harry was.

The little pris-
oner was very
glad to be at lib-
erty once more.
He ran out with
smiles and tears
on his face, say-
ing, ‘“‘Won’t do
so again, mam-
ma! won't do so

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M. BR. N. HATHEWAY.

















LITTLE SAILORS.

Now, Harry, pull the chairs up,
And, Fanny, get the shawl,
And we will play we’re sailors,
And that we’re in a squall.

Don’t be in such a hurry,
Pll fix it if you wait ;
I want to get the hassocks
To make the “Golden Gate.” |

Now this chair is the ship’s stern
And that one is the bow ; |

But there, you must be careful
And not’lean hard, you know.

Now, sailors, pull that sail up
And tuck the corners in.

Well —if you want it tighter
Ask mamma for a pin!



LITTLE SAILORS. 89

Now couldn’t you sing something
About the ocean blue?
Well, never mind, “ By-baby,”
Or anything will do!
See here, you careless sailors,
You mind what you're about ;
You know that water’ll drown you
If you should tumble out!















There, now you've gone and done it;
I knew just how ’twould be.
I told you to be careful,
And now you're hurt, you see.
Well, never mind; we won't play
Werre sailors any more,
But get the blocks, and build up
A playhouse on the floor.
MRS. GENEVIEVE LYNCH



THE HERMIT CRAB.

WHEN you go to the sea-shore in the summer you hear a great
deal said about “crabbing,” and no doubt you have helped to catch
the little creatures, and to eat them too. And you know that most of











them are covered on the outside by a thick coat, or shell. The one
called the “hermit crab” has no covering over his tail, only over
the other part of his body. Of course it is very liable to get in-



170 THE HERMIT CRAB.

jured if it is not guarded, and how do you think the crab
does it?

Well, he just puts it into some empty shell that he finds, and goes
about dragging it after him. As he grows the tail gets to be too





































































large for the shell, and as soon as it begins to tell him so, by its
pinching, he quietly pulls it out, and hunts up another, trying them

one by one to see if they will fit. Sometimes several crabs claim the
same shell, and after fighting about it find, after all, that it will not

fit any of their tails! How cheap they must feel!
S MRS. G. HALL.





THE GREAT DRAGON-FLY.

Here is a little creature that comes whirring along with
flashy green and glittering wings, and so swift of flight that
nothing can escape him. Most insects heed the
birds; but the dragon-fly does not, for







even the swallow cannot catch
him. His wings sound like the un-
furling of a small silken flag, he goes
so fast !

Look at y ae him when you see him! He
cannot sting you! Don’t aif be afraid. He may
breathe as if he were fright ened, but that is not
so. If you should give him a spider, or a beetle,
he would munch it down before your very eyes;
but not before he has removed the hard wing:
cases. He will eat as long as you supply him
too. Thirty or forty flies are nothing for a single



meal ! |
When tired off he goes to some branch, or swig, sits



there a moment, shakes and plumes his pretty wings, as
if to see if they are in order; then he is 4 away to
find other victims, just as if he had been fasting
for a week !

The first years of the dragon-fly’s | life were

passed under water, where he was
in chasing the insects to be found
he got his wings!

just as busy
there as since



MRS G. HALL.







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KATRINA IN THE PLAY.

KatTRINA is not a little girl, as you may think from her name.

Instead she is a beautiful speckled hen.

She has a great many gifts and graces, besides the very usefu!
accomplishment of laying eggs.

She is quite particular about her surroundings, and insists upon
having a nest of her very own, that no other hen in the flock is
allowed to use. She likes best to come into the house, and the chil-
dren have placed a nice little box behind the stove for a nesi.
‘When Katrina wishes to be let in she pecks at the kitchen door, and
it is opened for her.



LITTLE. BOY BLUE.

She looks around at first to see if all is right, and then hops on
the nest, where she sings to herself in a satisfied way.

One holiday the children arranged to play “Jack and the Bean-
stalk.”

But they must have the giant’s hen that laid the golden egg.

So, when all was ready, little Isabelle carried Katrina in her arms,
and stood her down on the stage.

She looked around at the audience in a dignified manner, and then
walked to the nest, and settled herself serenely.

In a few minutes she flew off with a triumphant cackle, and, lo, a
beautiful golden egg was left in the nest! |

The play was so great a success that they had it repeated, and
Katrina acted her part just as well the second time, and seemed to
enjoy it as much as the children. Don’t you think Katrina is quite

a wonderful little hen ? |
ANNIE DOUGLAS BELL.



LITTLE BOY BLUE.

Down in the meadow the cows are calling,

The robin’s sweet song comes home from afar,
And the apple blooms softly are falling;

Little Boy Blue, how sleepy you are!

Over the hills gray shadows are creeping,
Swift to her nest the mother-bird flies;
Little Boy Blue, in my fond arms sleeping,

Cradled and soothed with tender lullabies,



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LITTLE BOY BLUE. 3 99

Little Boy Blue, when ‘the months
you number
Shall grow into years in your
life’s young day,
You will scorn your sweet baby-
hood’s slumber,
And boyhood’s wild sports will
lure you away.


















On your sweet lips I will press
softest kisses ;
For still you are mine, though
years swiftly glide.
Little. Boy Blue, the world never
misses
One from its ranks,—oh, then,
stay at my side!

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HOW WYNAN WENT DEER_HUNTING.

Tue Adirondack region about the lodge where Wynan was staying
abounded in deer. His papa was anxious to shoot one, and arrange-
ments were made for camping 2ut a few miles away, near a Jake
where the deer were known to feed.

Wynan’s brother Harry and uncle Jack were to be of the party,
and Wynan begged so hard to be allowed to go, too, that consent was
finally given. They arrived at the camping-place late in the after-
noon. After pitching their tent and eating supper they sat around
the bright pine fire, while the guide told stories. Wynan himself
took a little nap on his papa’s knee, in anticipation of his promised
: evening on the lake.

At nine o’clock they started,—papa, Wy sins and the guide, —after
first smearing their faces and hands with a preparation of tar to pro-
tect them from the black flies, which were very troublesome. Wynan
thought it fine fun as he set off in the boat; but the guide did not
fancy taking out a little boy on a deer-hunt, for he was afraid that he
would talk or make some noise, and thus spoil the sport. Wynan,
however, made all sorts of fair promises, and truly nobody could have
been stiller than he.

The guide paddled slowly along near the shore, and a lantern, with
a birch-bark reflector, high up in the bow of the boat, sent its light



HOW WYNAN WENT DEER-HUNTING.

tur ahead over the water. In this way the persons in the boat could
not be seen by the deer, who came down at night to feed upon the
grass that grew in the water at the margin of the lake. The animals
could see only the bright light, and it seemed to dazzle them.

Papa’s gun was in position, underneath the light, when, suddenly,
Wynan saw distinctly a deer, a short distance away, standing quite



still. Wynan was so excited that before he knew it he jerked papa’s
arm, causing the gun to go off before papa had intended it should.

There was a sharp report, and then a great object leaped into the
boat, or tried to, nearly upsetting it. The deer had been wounded by
the shot, and had jumped, he knew not where; but, as it chanced,
into the very arms of his enemies. The guide put an end to the
animal’s life, and they started back to the camp.

The next day Wynan ate venison steak for breakfast; and wasn’t
mamma astonished when told that Wynan had helped to shoot a deer:
The antlers, which were fine ones, ‘Vynan carried home with him.

EMMA C. DOWD





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HAPPY FAMILY:

ILLUSTRATED STORIES AND Poems

FOR

LITTLE PEOPLE.

WITH ORIGINAL ILLUSTRATIONS.



NEW VORRK:
THE H. M. CALDWELL CoO.

PUBLISHERS
Copyright, 1888,
By RUSSELL PUBLISHING COMPANY.
ee ee ee

tt Satie



CHINQUAPIN NECKLACES.

Dip you ever see a chinquapin necklace? George and _ his
sister Emma went out one day to find some nuts to make
one. :

First they gathered the prickly burrs and threw them on the
ground. Then they took long sticks and threshed out the little
brown nuts until they had a bag full.

When they took them home their mother boiled the chinqua-
pins, and gave them big needles, with long threads to string

them on while the nuts were quite soft. They made necklaces
CHINQUAPIN NECKLACES.

“Ree

‘t

by her teeth. They had become
dingy and ugly, too, after being kept
a week or two. :

“Never mind,” said George;

“chestnuts will soon be ripe now,
and they are much nicer than chin-
- quapins.”

“Yes; but we cannot make neck-
laces of chestnuts,’ replied Emma,
who liked to feel the smooth, cool
nuts on her neck, and to slip the
long string of them through her
fingers.

M. T. HUNTER.



so long that wheu
they put them on
the glossy beads
hung down to the
floor.

“The best part
of my necklace is
that I can eat it
up, said George.

Emma kept hers
a long: time, until
the mice began to
nibble it. Then
the nuts were too
hard to be cracked


THE PEACK-MAKER.

Sammiz had two roosters, a white one and a gray;

They fell into a quarrel, and began to fight one day,

And Sammie—oh! it grieves me to say—he thought it fun!
And stopped his play to watch till the rooster-fight was done.

Oh, fiercely fought the roosters, and flapped their heavy wings!

(Had they learned to quarrel, think you, from boys who do such things ?)
But Sammy only laughed, and clapped his hands to see

How the gray attacked the white, and the white fought savagely.

§) But along came Gobbler, with proud, majestic mien,

i And, ruffling up his feathers, gazed disgusted at the scene,

i Lifted high his stately head, and looked at Sam
a minute ;

But Sam was only thinking, “I guess old White’lI

i \ win it.”













No longer paused the gobbler, but onward swiftly flew,
And thrust his portly body at once between. the two;
Gave a peck to Mr. White, and a nip at Mr. Gray,
sx Till they hung their tails at last, and withdrew
Pir. in sore dismay.

Then the gobbler strutted after and gobbled in

\ the ear
f\ Of each most silly fighter. What he said I did
mu not hear;

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ssp But no doubt he gave advice that was sensible
iz] We and true,

4 wl And he taught young Sam a lesson that was.
Sf sadly needed, too.



I 5 Sg ORES -. Sar $B eS
Ss -
\he ie 2 MARY D. BRINE.


TABLEAUX IN THE NURSERY.

Ir was a cold, rainy day. Polly, Puss, Jess, and Will stood by the
aursery window, watching the rain. Baby Ned was asleep on nurse's
Jap.

“TI wish we could go out for a walk,” said Jess.

“So do I,” said Polly ; “I just love to go out in the rain.”

“ But nurse will never let us go,” complained Will.

_ “No, indeed; you would every one take cold and be sick,” said
nurse. “ You ought to be glad you have such a nice, warm place to
stayin. Think how many nice things you have to play with. A good
many little children have no good home or nice playthings.”

“But we have played everything we know, and we are awful tired
staying in,” said Puss.

“IT wish mamma did not have company; then she could come and
play with us,” said Polly.

“You might get up some tableaux,” suggested nurse. “You have
not done that for a long time.”

“Oh, yes!—that will be splendid,” cried Jess. Even Will. who
thought he was too large a boy to take part in girl’s plays, agreed
that it would be fun.

Baby Ned woke up, and then nurse could help them. She set him
on the sofa to play with a mug and spoon. She arranged the screen in
front of one corner, and brought out some shawls and other things for
TABLEAUX IN THE NURSERY.

them to dress with. They arranged the tableaux behind the screen, then
nurse pulled it away. She and baby Ned were the audience.

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The Sleeping Beauty
was the first tableau.

Jess was asleep
on a couch
made of
a bright
shawl.
She was all covered up with a
curtain, and had a wreath of arti

on her head. Will was the prince.
looked very gay with Polly’s blue circular for a cloak, thrown over his



white lace
ficial flowers
He was standing beside her. He

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TABLEAUX IN THE NURSERY.

shoulders. A hat, with a long white feather, was on his head. He
had his toy sword hung at his side.

Then they had Little Red Riding Hood
her grandmother.

Polly was the grand- ‘ | a "
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mother; she had : vn on
acapwith a wide {| peg) : : NY frill,
and was propped } fees \ : me eee : =) sup on
pillows. Puss was = Red Rid-
ing Hood;. she Xe had on a
bright red cloak, 5 and carried
a little basket. H

It took them a
long time to dress, ©
and arrange each
tableau.
They were
just say-
ing,








we- have
when nurse




time to get ready for supper.”
They could not believe that the
time had gone so quickly. “TI guess we'll boy



play tableaux every rainy day,” said Jess.
MARGARET RYDER.

or d>P-3U> EH—E Wor »
I

Ey wasypsa,



How many babies have you, little mother?
Tell me how many, and what are their names?

“One, two, five, four, seven, and another, —
Little Bess, big Bess, Belle and her brother,

Pussy and Kittykin, Annie and James.

“Annie 1s me; and the two pretty Bessies
Are dollies that wink, and both very nice;
And Jamie is mamma’s true baby she dresses,
And lets me rock him and feed him with kisses;
And Pussy and Kittykin run and catch mice!”

And Belle? “Why, she was picked from a corn-hill:
Her hair is the silk, and the husks her dress ;
My papa guesses she must have been born ill,
Toes in the air, and skirts that are worn ill!
But Pve set her right, and she hugs little Bess.”

And the brother of Belle? “Dear me! I suppose
You'd call him a squash! but he’s real bright ,—
LITTLE ANNIE COUNTS HER BABIES.

A little hump-backed, and I guess his nose
Is a kind of wart; and he wears long clothes,
For, you see, his figure is not just right!



“ But I love him as well as I love the Bessies, —
I love them all, and they all love me;
And the very best of all, I guess, is
The true, live baby that mamma dresses;
And here we are, all now, just as you see!”
GEO. S. BURLEIGH.


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KITTY’S THANKSGIVING DINNER.

THANKSGIVING—DAY had arrived, and Aunt Abby had come from
Boston to join the family party at the old farm-house. She came op
the last train before dinner, as she had been detained on the way by
a slight accident. She brought her little orphan niece Sadie with her.
All the little country nieces rushed to the door to meet them when
they arrived.

“Oh, what a lovely bird that is on your bonnet, Aunt Abby!” said
one of the little girls as she laid it on the piano.

“Yes,” replied Aunt Abby; “my canary died, and I had it stuffed
and wear it on my bonnet.”

Then they all went out to dinner, which was waiting. The kitten,
who was shy of so many strangers, crept softly into the room they
had just vacated. She was allowed to curl up on the piano fora
nap sometimes; so up she jumped to her favorite place.

Kitty was all settled for sleep when her eye caught sight of a
lovely bird, with eyes wide open, looking straight at her. Then
her face assumed a crafty look, and she crept softly along and
suddenly pounced upon the bonnet. She began tearing the bird with
her claws and teeth.

It made no difference to her that the bird didn’t attempt to fly
‘way She kept on tearing it to pieces, but it couldn’t have tasted
rery good to her.
KITTY’S THANKSGIVING DINNER.

When the party came in from dinner there seemed enough feathers:
and stuffing scattered around to make three or four canary-birds
Aunt Abby, of course, felt very badly; but Kitty had scampered out
as the party came in; so she escaped punishment at that time. Per
haps she thought they
intended the bird for her
Thanksgiving dinner





VIRGINIA C. HOLLIS.






































































































































HOW BUNNY WAS LOST AND FOUND.

FRANK GOLDTHWAITE is a little
boy, and so, of course, he does not
care for dolls; but, instead of a doll,
he has a white rabbit, which one of
his friends made of Canton flannel,
and sent him at Christmas.

For a long time Bunny slept with
Frank every night, came to the table
with him when he had his meals, and
was his constant companion.



Frank lives in a village where the
winters are very long and cold. The snow is often so deep there that
the fences are entirely covered.

One day in March, when it was snowing quite hard, Frank’s papa
was going out on an errand. He asked the little boy if he would not
hike to go, too.

Oh, yes! Frank was always glad to go; and soon, in warm coat,
cap, mittens, and leggins, he was ready to start.

“ Bun must go too,” said Frank, “ for I don’t think he was ever out
when it snowed ; were you, Bun?”

Bunny, of course, said nothing. Indeed it would be hard for any one
to speak who was squeezed so tightly as he was in Frank’s chubby
little hand.

It was cold out-doors, and Frank grew tired of holding Bunny ; so
he tucked him into his coat-pocket. He trudged alone, watching the
feathery flakes, kicking the light snow, and now and then falling
down and rolling about in it.

When he came home mamma said, as she unbuttoned his coat,
« Well, did you and Bunny have a good walk?”
HOW BUNNY WAS LOST AND FOUND.

“Oh, yes, mamma! Didn’t we, Bun?” and Frank put his hand in
his pocket to get his little pet. Alas! the pocket was empty.

Frank burst into tears, and sobbed, “O mamma, I’ve lost my
Bunny! I’ve lost my Bunny ! ”

He wanted to start right out to find him; but mamma said there

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would be no use. The snow had probably covered him by this time.
She tried to comfort Frank by saying that perhaps the same friend
would make him another. But for many days the little boy mourned
for his pet.

Some weeks after, Frank’s papa was making a call, when something
was said about the many things that are lost in the snow.

“hen Mr. Goldthwaite told the story of Frank’s rabbit. When he
HOW BUNNY WAS LOST AND FOUND.

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had finished the lady excused herself and left the room; returning,

_ she brought Bunny.
“There,” she said, “I’m so glad to know whose it is! I found it,
- and knew it was some child’s pet; but I couldn’t find out whose.”

It was evening when papa came in with the rabbit, and Frank was
sound asleep. When he woke next morning he could hardly believe
his eyes, for there was his own Bunny once more. Then what a hug-
ying and kissing there was! And ever since Bunny has had such

good care that I don’t believe he will ever be lost again.
MRS. M. C. RANKIN.




THE CHICKADEE—DEE.

LirtrLe darling of the snow,
Careless how the winds may blow,
Happy as a bird can be,

Singing, oh, so cheerily,
Chickadee-dee! Chickadee-dee!

When the skies are cold and gray,
When he trills his happiest lay,
Through the clouds he seems to see
Hidden things to you and me.
Chickadee-dee ! chickadee-dee!

Very likely little birds

Have their thoughts too deep for words.
But we know, and all agree,

That the world would dreary be
Without birds, dear chickadee!

ELIZABETH A. DAVIS.








THE CHICKADEE-DEE.














































































MINNA’S THANKSGIVING.

Eva Rogers was a little girl who lived in the upper part of New
York city. Every pleasant day her grandpapa took her in his pretty:
buggy to drive through Central Park. They often went beyond the
park, where there were few trees and houses; very little, in fact, to look
at besides vegetable gardens. But it was on these quiet drives that
grandpapa handed the reins to Eva, and under his good guidance she
had become quite a skilful driver.

One spring day, a particularly fine garden, although a very smal’
one, made them rein in Fleetfoot, and, as they were looking rathe”
wistfully at some tender young heads of lettuce, a little girl, in queer, short-waisted German dress, came from a small house near by,
and, dropping a funny little courtesy, asked : —

“Is der someting de little lady vants ?”

Well, they bought lettuce that day, and a few days later they bought
some chiccory, then lettuce again; and every time the same little gir!
would come out and make the same little courtesy, and say : —-

“Is der someting de little lady vants ?”

Her name was Minna. Eva learned that the third time they stopped
at the garden. Later she learned that Minna’s mother had been sick
for many weeks; so the little daughter, although only ten years old.
did her best to fill the mother’s place. Truly her busy hands had
made the small house bright and cosey.

November came at last, and there were no more vegetables to sel’
for a few months. “The little lady” had not called for a week o7
MINNAS THANKSGIVING.

more. Minna was wishing that she could see the buggy, with the fine
old gentleman and the bright little girl, driving up to the door. Could
it: be ? — yes, surely there were the very ones she was thinking of driv-













































































































‘ing towards Minna’s house. Before they reached it Minna was stand-
ing on the curb-stone, smiling and courtesying.

, “Ts der someting de little lady vants?” she asked, ba quickly
‘added, “Ihaf nodding for her to-day.”

' “We want nothing to-day, Minna,” said Eva’s grandpapa. “ How
| is your mother ?”

:
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MINNA’S THANKSGIVING.

“De guod mutter is mooch better, sir.”

“That is good,” said Eva.
“ Now, Minna, day after to-
morrow will be Thanks-
giving, and people
in this country
always eat
turkey and
all sorts










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on that day,”— here grandpape
reached under the seat of the buggy
for somethmg, — “so you must
cook this in your very best man-
ner,’ — here she handed Minna a
huge brown paper parcel, — “ and
be sure to stuff it nicely. These
you stew, these you crack and.
eat, and these you eat just as
they are.”

Well! wall! a small avalanche of »
parcels came tumbling out, one after
the other, while Minna looked on,
too surprised to say a word.







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I UN 4 to Florida with my mamma, but
A Mey “Certainly we will!” answered.
grandpapa.

\ eee 1 arin “ a ‘i ; ; :
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ee ne

And before Minna could say a word, or even drop @ courtesy, Fleet-
foot had started offand they were gone |

M. V. W.
“cme,

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FOUR YEARS OLD.

How many times to-day, I wonder,
Have I been told

IT must be a lady now, because
I am four years old?

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Mamma keeps saying, “ Little ladies
Are always quiet.”
So just one minute, more or less,

Ill sit and try it.
CLARA DOTY



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BERTIE was a very good boy. He was kind, obedient, truthful,;
and unselfish. He had, however, one great fault. He always forgot.

No matter how important the errand, his answer always was “I
forgot.” When he was sent with a note to the dress-maker his
mother would find the note in his pocket at night. If he was sent to
the store in a great hurry, to get something for tea, he would return
late, without the article, but with his usual answer.
' His father and mother talked the matter over, and decided that
something must be done to make the little boy remember.

Christmas was near, and Bertie was busy making out a list of
things which San‘a Claus was to bring him.

“Santa Claus may forget some of those things,” said his mother.

“‘ He cannot,” replied Bertie ; “for I shall write sled, and skates,
SANTA CLAUS DOES NOT’ FORGET.

and drum, and violin, and all the things on this paper. Then when
Santa Claus goes to my stocking he will find the list. He can see it
and put the things in as fast as he reads.”

Christmas morning came, and Bertie was up at dawn to see what
was in his stocking. His mother kept away from him as long as she
could, for she ae what
Santa Claus had done.

Finally she heard him

coming with slow steps
tio her room. Slowly he
ojpened the door and came
towards her. He held in
Eis hand a list very much
longer than the one he
had made out. He put it
in his mother’s hand,
while tears of disappoint-
tent fell from his eyes.
_ “See what Santa Claus
left for me; but I think
-he might have given me
‘one thing besides.”

His mother opened the
roll. It was a list of all
“the errands Bertie had
_ been asked to do for six
_-months. At the end of
i all was written, in staring capitals, “I FORGOT.”

Bertie wept for an hour. Then his mother told him they were all
going to grandpa’s. For the first time he would see a Christmas
tree. Perhaps something might be growing there for him.

It was very strange to Bertie, but on grandpa’s tree he found
everything he had written on his list. Was he cured of his bad
habit? Not all at once; but when his mother saw that he was
particularly heedless she would say, “Remember, Santa Claus does
not forget.”













































































M. A. HALEY.


SCAMP’S THANKSGIVING.

To-pay was Thanksgiving day. At least my master said so. AY
I know is, that Thanksgiving means a big dinner, — every Thanksgiv-
ing I have been to, and I am right old now for a pug-dog. My master
always invites lots of people to dinner, and such a good time they
have !

Yesterday I heard my master say there was going to be a number
of people here to dinner, so I thought I would invite some dog friends
to dinner, too. Pug-dogs have friends as well as their masters. So I
went out early this morning, and I saw a poor, hungry-looking dog

pve amet
SCAMP’S THANKSGIVING. | 83

‘walking up the street, and I invited him. Then I met a cat, and I
Invited her. Then I saw a bull-dog, and I invited him ; and, last of
all, I thought I would ask my master’s brother Alexis’ ew They
all said they would come.

Then I began to wonder how I was going to get dinner for them.
So I began to hunt around. I went into the kitchen and saw a big

| fat turkey on the table. Just then Annie, the cook, went out of the

: _Yroom;so I jumped up on the table and caught the turkey in my

\ | mouth. I was just about to jump down with it when Annie came
back. “You Scamp!” she cried, “what are you doing?”

I dropped the turkey and started to run, but she caught me. “ You
bad dog,” said she ; “now I am going to lock you up.” She took me
tio the cellar and vat me in the coal-bin and locked the door. Here
I have been all day. How ashamed I shall be when I get out and see
all the guests I invited! I wonder if they came. I don’t think I like

‘Thanksgiving.
} JOHN S. SHRIVER.




TWO LITTLE CATS.

We are two little cats,
Two good little cats,
Two small white cats are we;
We take sweet milk for our early morning meal,
But we must have cream for tea.

We have nice little claws,
Nice, sharp little claws,
That shine as they come and go;
But we never, never scratch till our tails are pulled,
When we want our tails to grow.

We have dear little teeth,
White, sound little teeth ;
But we are so polite,
If people just behave as they ought to behave,
We never attempt to bite.
TWO LITTLE CATS.

We have round little eyes,
Such mild blue eyes ;
But, though they close im sleep,

They can see the whisk of the shadow of a tail, ©

If a mouse should dare to creep.







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We have fine snowy coats,
_ And bows at our throats!
Oh, how lovely it must be
For other folks to live in the very same house

With two such cats as we!
7 CLARA G. DOLLIVER






THE DOLLS AND THE

OTHER DOLLS.

“Mamma,” little Nellie asked, “is it right to give away things

that have been given to you?”



























































































































































































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wore white frocks and blue kid boots.
und their eyes would open ani] e'int.

Her mamma replied that
it might be quite right some-
times; and she said, “But I
should feel sorry if I had
made a little friend a present
she did not value, and so was
glad to part with it.”

“Q mamma!” said Nellie,
“vou know how I value my
dollies, every one, that my
dear aunts and cousins sent
me because I was sick. Now
Iam well again. To-morrow
is New-Year’s. Some sick
little girls in the hospital
want dollies. Could I, if I
knew which one to choose,
keep only one for myself, and
send the whole five of them
for. those poor children who
haven't any ?”

Her mamma liked the plan.
She gave Nellie a box, and
ellie began kissing her ba-
bies, and laying them, one
after another, in the box.

There were two of nearly
the same size, that were very
dear to this little mother.
She called them twins. They

They had real blonde hair,
Sassi
Neen inan
Penny in

THE DOLLS AND THE OTHER DOLLS.

TERROR,
\ WY Nt \

Pep een



























































































































































































NN)



_ These lovely twins Nellie
held in her arms a long time
before she could decide which
to part with. When she did
place one in the box, to be her
‘own no more, a tear was on the doll’s cheek. I do not think the
drop came from dolly’s eye.

A few days after the dolls were given Nellie’s mamma let her invite |



_ three little girls to play with her. Each girl brought her Christmas
' or her New-Year’s doll; and the three ‘dolls, with Nellie’s, looked
_ sweetly sitting together in a row.

By and by Nellie’s mamma came to her room, which she had given

; to the party for its use that afternoon. She told the children she
would give them a little supper of cakes and pears and grapes, and it

would be ready as soon as Biddy could bring the ice-cream from down.
street.
THE DOLLS AND THE OTHER DOLLS.

The smiling child-visitors gathered around the kind lady, saying,
«We thank you, and we love you ever so much.”

Nellie said softly, “Mamma dear, I wouldn’t take my dollies back
if I could. I love to think they amuse the sick children. But I do
wish that for just a minute we had as many at this party.”

Her mamma turned to her dressing-case. It stood low enough for
the smallest child to look into the mirror at the back easily. Moving
off the toilet cushions and cologne-bottles, the lady put the four dolls
in front of the looking-glass. Their reflection in the glass showed
four more. | ° |

“Six, seven, eight,” cried the girls, delighted. “And all are twins
— four pairs of twins!” |

After supper they made the twins sit, and stand, and dance, bow
and shake hands, before the looking-glass. So they played till dusk,
when the other little girls’ mammas sent to take them home, after
kissing Nellie good-night.

LAVINIA S. GOODWIN.


















































































































OS Rept et ng

m.

own oe
eee taney

SOMETHING WHICH MAY LOST.

A WEE little maid, with a bright little face,
Climbed up on the railing, one day,

Which guarded the pansies; a slip and a fall,
And down ’mid the blossoms she lay.

No very bad bruises were found on her knees,
And very few tears in her eyes.

“The child lost her balance,’ her Grandma declared;

May listened in wondering surprise.



\They missed her, and down in the pansies she knelt,

| Now peering first this way and that ;
‘ : .
“'Tis gone, some one stealed it!” she calmly announced,

Looking up from the depths of her hat.
“And what did you drop?” asked her mamma, surprised,

i And kissing the cheeks all aglow;
‘Then laughed at her answer, and kissed her again:

“My balance; I lost it, you know.”

MAY M. ANDERSON.


BLUE WATERMELONS.

THERE is no child, I do believe,
But likes a watermelon.

That luscious fruit might tempt the best
Of men to be a felon!

Its dark-green rind, all lined with white ;
Seeds black as night in winter;

And the sweet pinkness of the core! —
No pink was ever pinker!

Our Max, a funny boy of six,
Wears never aught but azure.
He leaves the red for little Bob,
Our darling younger treasure.
Bob’s suits and hose are cardinal,
Or shading into scarlet,
While Max wears never aught but blue—
The funny little varlet!

And watermelons Max won’t eat!
What do you think the reason?

I fear *twill sound to every boy
Like veritable treason.

But Max looks very serious, —
No eyes were ever truer,—

He says it is because they’re pink;

He “wishes they were bluer!”
KATE UPSON Ci.akk.
A NOVEL UMBRELLA.

Myo wanted to drive to market alone, but mamma was afraid to let
him, for he had never been used to horses before they moved to the
farm two months before. But papa said any baby could drive Liz,
she was such a steady horse; and surely a big boy, eleven years old,
who wore long pantaloons and top-boots, could drive her. Myo had
driven when papa or mamma was with him, and knew how to man-
age the horse very well, so papa said, “We will let him try it once
alone.”

In the market-wagon were six barrels of spmach. The barrels had
slits i the sides to let the air in, so the spmach would not wilt. Myo









































felt very large as he drove away to market with his load. Mamma
could stand in the door, and, looking across the meadows, see the road
nearly the whole two miles to town. When it grew time for Myo to
come back mamma grew anxious, for it was beginning to rain. At
A NOVEL UMBRELLA,













































last she saw the old gray horse and green market wagon coming along
the road. The railroad ran very near the house, and mamma watched
to see that they got safely over the track. Yes, the track was safely
passed, and Liz came trotting steadily towards home; but where was
Myo? He was nowhere to be seen. ‘The lines were not dragging on
the ground. Indeed they seemed to be firmly held by some one who
was guiding the horse, but no driver was visible.

Mamma’s heart almost stopped beating and she grew faint ; but she
broke into a laugh as Liz turned in at the gate and trotted by the
house to the barn, for she saw that the lines went through the slits in
a barrel that was bottom up, and she knew that under that barrel a
black-eyed boy was sheltered from the rain that was now falling fast.

“T wasn’t going to get wet,” said Myo, “ when I could put the lines
through two holes and look out of another one, and keep perfectly dry.
There was no use getting wet when I could make an umbrella of a

barrel, was there ?”
MARY A. ALLEN.






































ea

















THE RIDING HORSES.

“Ou, do look, Uncle Ben! See those two horses riding in a cart!”

“How funny!” echoed Dolly.

“Where is the man who pulls the cart?” asked John. His blue
eyes were wide open with wonder.

Uncle Ben laughed. “The horses are not riding ;” said he, « they
are hard at work. Just watch them.”

Well, it did look as if the horses were in a wagon. One of them
was white, and the other black. They were walking fast. That you
could see, from the motion of their heads and shoulders.

Yet they did not move forward. The cart, as John called it, had a
canvas cover, and wooden sides.

“You see those horses are going up-hill,” said Uncle Ben.
THE RIDING HORSES.

So it was. They were walking on a platform, made of a great
many strips of wood. These were laid upon chains. The chains
went over a round stick of wood, like a wheel, at each end. When
the horses tried to walk up, the platform rolled back. That was
why they did not get ahead.

At the rear end of the cart was a drum, or solid wheel. from this to the barn ; there it was fastened to a threshing-machine.

The farmer and his son were threshing oats. The straw was fed in
at one end of the machine. It moved along till it reached some little
hammers. These pounded out the oats, which went one way into a
box. The straw came out by itself and fell upon the floor.

The children watched all this with great glee. So the two horses
were not riding, as Uncle Ben said. They were doing very useful
work.

Some children, so Uncle Ben told his pets, are like these horses.
They never get ahead, though they are always busy. They are care-
less in study, so that, when they grow older, and leave their books
behind, they have made no progress. . .

Such children are not useful to others, like the horses. They do
not learn, and they do not help thresh oats; but sometimes their

parents thresh these idlers with a switch.
C. BELL.




















AN AWFUL ANIMAL.

“WHERE is Waltie?” said Captain Drew, as he came in one May
morning. “I found a ground-bird’s nest in the furrow I was plough-
ing, and brought it in to let him see the eggs. He hasn’t run off te
the woods again, has he?”

Mr. Drew took a drink of home-made beer, while his wife cleaned
AN AWFUL ANIMAL.

the cooky dough off her hands, and called Sadie. She came in with
ber doll Rosie, and mamma said : —
“Where is Wal-
tie, dear?”
“QO manm-
ma! he went
toward the
woods with
his hatchet,
and I forgot to
Z soe ~ tell I did, truly.”
Pimento ge A now, maybe
your little brother is lost, because
you have so short a memory. You
think too much of your own pleasure to
care for others ; as a punishment put Rosie
away for the rest of the day.”

Captain Drew called a couple of men and

went to the forest.

\\ Waltie troubled them much by steak
at \ ing off to the forest to “chop down
a) trees,’ as he called tie bushes.
Captain Drew saw in this the help
which was to come to him in the
future, and smiled upon the
little woodchopper. The
woods were extensive, and
there were dangerous animals
inthem. A bell had been tied around the
child’s neck, so that they could trace him ; but the cunning boy held
the tongue. Then he was tied to the bedpost. But, as they did not
cure him, Sadie had been told to watch him ; but she failed to report.







a

th mt uA















FREDDIE?S PATTY KILLER.

All was confusion at the Drew home. Mrs. Drew let her cookies
burn, and Sadie cried, partly about Waltie, and partly about Rosie.

At last a tired little boy came running into the house; between
showers of tears le said, “I’ve seen an awful big wiggle-tail! I’m
never going to run away any more, never.”

All they could learn of Waltie was, « [t was awful big, and a wiggle-
tail.’ |

Captain Drew thought perhaps it was a bear. Sadie became more
careful as she hugged Rosie, and shivered at the thought of the awful
animal.

Afterward, as Captain Drew was passing through the forest with
his little boy, he was surprised when Waltie pointed out a « wigyle
It was only a common black squirrel. We had many a hearty

93

tail.

laugh over “ the awful animal.”
S. ROSALIE SILL.



FREDDIE'S PATTY KILLER.

UittLe Freddie is not yet three years old. He tries to talk like
grown people, and, like most little boys, makes many mistakes. He
calls animal “amaline;”” and when he tried to say indigestible he
called it “dingy vegetable.” One day he came in from his play
exclaiming, “OQ mamma! I found a patty killer.”

“A what?” asked mamma.

“A patty killer. He was just as woolly, and had lots of legs.”

With all her questioning mamma could not guess what Freddie
had seen.
FREDDIE'S PATTY KILLER.

This was the first one he had ever seen; but he said he knew
it was a “patty killer,” because /
in a book, and his sis

A few days
jittle chair
picture-

he had seen the picture of one



had told him its name.
after this Freddie sat in his
turning the leaves of a

book. Suddenly his
eyes brightened, and

ter




















he ran to his mamma,
crying, “O mamma,
this is what I saw!
Here is a_ patty
killer. Just see!”

And what do you
suppose. it was?
Mamma could not
help laughing.
It was a
picture
of a big
, cater:

_ pillar,
its




with
bright
spots and stripes





nicely colored, sa
that it looked very
much like a real,
living one.

Mamma will al-
ways think of Freddie’s name for it whenever she

sees a caterpillar, or a picture of one.
H. L. CHARLES.








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STE Sh NEE TE




FISHING BY FIRE-LIGHT.

“ Now, boys,” said papa, “if you can get some good bait we
will try fishing by fire-light.” |

Hartley and Herbert looked at each other and laughed. One
of them made reply, “ Why, papa, are you going to turn Simple
Simon, and fish in your mother’s pail, here by her open fire?”

There was « twinkle now in papa’s eye, too, but he only said, “ Get
the worms before dark. As soon as the stars come out we will go
down on Grand Point.”

Now, Herbert’s idea of fishing was to sit in grandpa’s row-boat in
the warm sunshine, and throw bits of his gingerbread and cracker
into the water. Then he watched the fishes gather by the hundreds,
all eager for a crumb. It was delightful to see the bits dart through
the water. He almost thought the crumbs were alive, too.

That was fun, but fishmg in the dark, damp evening was quite
another thing. It had no attractions for Herbert. However, when
the time came he went, and certainly was not sorry afterwards.
Papa built a bright, warm fire, and the boys, wrapped in their thick
overcoats, sat upon an old log, patiently waiting what might
follow.

The light from the fire made so many weird shadows that Herbert
was half inclined to be frightened. He sat close to his father, and
FISHING BY FIRE-LIGHT.
papa need not have said, “Keep very still, Herbert.”

Pretty soon
papa gave a twitch, as if to pull up his hook, but could not raise 1t,
“Tt must be something heavy, boys,” he said, running up the
beach, dragging his line after him.
The boys were on their feet now, peering into the darkness.

Such

N

SS 2

SS

BY



























a





splashing and dashing, as a huge fish made its appearance on dry
land !
nine pounds.

It was a bass, nearly two feet long, and weighed more than

They went to the same place the next night, and the next, and the
next, but caught nothing. Perhaps the fishes told all their neighbors
of the sad fate of their big brother Bass. At least that is what Her-
bert thought.

LIZZIE

MAY SHERWOOD.
THE LITTLE HARVEST MOUSE.

Wuat a strange little
éreature this is, with its
pretty, pensile nest hung
on the stout grass stems,
or wheat straws, and
sometimes to the head
of a thistle ! These nests
are woven, very careful-
ly, of narrow grasses,
just in the shape of a
hollow globe, not a bit
larger than a cricket-
ball.

The harvest mouse is
so tiny that when it is
full grown it will not
weigh the sixth part of
an ounce. Isn't it a
wonder that it can build
so beautiful a house to
live in? Why, the walls
are so thin that the baby
ly seen from the outside,
breeze ; and yet the mice
never fall out, — just

————

i
1

WSSn

————————————
oo
Hie





































































































































































mice inside the nest can be easi- |
as they swing to and fro in the
are packed so tightly that they
like sardines in a box! |

You cannot find an opening anywhere! The mother mouse must

push her way between the meshes of these loosely woven walls whe:

she feeds the young mice, though nobody knows just. ow ske does i!
THE LITTLE HARVEST MOUSE.

Often, in this light and airy cradle, there are seven or eight mice te
feed!

All mice and rats are very good climbers, but the harvest
mouse, with its long, slender tail and
flexible toes, is better fitted than any
other for climbing.

They must be very nimble, as their
food consists of insects, especially
flies, which they are very fond
of, and when they go in pur-
suit of them their aim
is as sure as that of
the swallow.










Lown,

MRS. G. HALL.



iter,

<








































THE MAIL-CARRIER AND THE SQUIRREL.

In the State of Maine there lives a man who is very fond of dumo
animals. His business was to take the mail from the station to the
post-office, in the centre of the town. To reach the station he had to
cross a river in a smail boat, and then walk along on the shore a long

istance.

One day, as he was walking along, he saw a little squirrel running
beside the way. On returning home he thought of the squirrel and
put a handful of corn into his pocket. The next day, on coming te
the place, he saw the squirrel again. Without appearing to notice
it he scattered the corn along.

The squirrel was shy at first, and kept some distance away, but as
the mail-carrier passed on he had the pleasure of seeing her pick up
the corn. :

The kind man repeated this each day. The squirrel would venture
a little nearer each time, until she became so tame that she would run
THE MAIL-CARRIER AND THE SQUIRREL.

up on his clothes and perch on his shoulder. Then he would stop
and hold open his pocket, and she would jump into it and eat the corn
there.

She had a nest in a hollow tree, where rested three pretty baby



squirrels. After a while she took them to meet the kind man with
her. He fed them all, with much pleasure, for several weeks :
then he was called away, and another man took his place. He was
very sorry to leave the squirrels, they had been such good friends for
many months.

MRS. F. 8S. LOVEJOY.
s ype
yh Ss



TWO ENGLISH FRIENDS.

HERE are two little English friends, —
I do not know their names, —

Who live in famous London town,
Beside the river Thames.

And seated in right royal state,
Upon a soft fur rug,

Behold the little English prince,
Beside the English pug.
TWO ENGLISH FRIENDS.

The little prince, from top to toe,
Is beautifully dressed,

And seems determined to appear
His very, very best;

While doggie, with his nose in air,
Is very much put out,

And says he’d really like to know
What that strange man’s about.

The little prince says, “ Doggie dear,
You mustn’t fidget so,

For we're to have our pictures sent
To grandmamma, you know;

So look as pleasant as you can,
And do not make me laugh,

Or have a naughty frown, because
"Twill spoil the photograph.”

The little prince, upon his throne,
Is very much at ease,
And this sweet photograph of him
Can hardly fail to please ;
While the English pug, beside him there,
Who stays because he must,
Expresses in a funny way
His very great disgust. 3
| JOSEPHINE POJ.LARD.






























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































CAT-TAILS.

"Twas a group of merry children,
And, the marshes going by,

One boy shouted: “See the cat-tails!
See the cat-tails, nice and high!”

Then a wee tot, from the city,
Said, with brimming eyes of blue:
*“ Wiiat a shame it was to drown them!

Did they drown the kittens too?”
: GEORGE E. COOPER.


JOHNNIE’S BONFIRE.

GRANDMA was very sick, and mamma could not leave her for a
moment. Papa had gone a few miles away for a nurse, so there
was no one to get Johnnie and Eddie ready for Sunday school.

“Qh, dear,” sighed Johnnie, “I’m so tired keeping still! Let us
go down on the big rock, and read.” |

“What do you want of matches if you are only going to read?”
inquired Eddie, seeing Johnnie reach up to the match-safe.

“Oh, there might be a total eclipse of the sun, you know; then
we should have to strike a light.”

This seemed satisfactory to Eddie, and he put on his hat.

They went across the pasture, over an old bridge, to a grove,
and were at the big rock. That rock had long been o thmi’y fa
vorite.
JOHNNIE’S BONFIRE.

There was an opening in the rock, which was filled with dried
grass, dead leaves, and moss. It was just the place for a bonfire,
Johnnie thought, as he looked over his book. A small fire could.
surely do no harm, and he and Eddie could warm their hands,
for the September air was chilly indeed. He sent Eddie to fetch
some dry sticks and bark from the woods near by, and soon‘a
bright blaze was leaping and dancing above the rocks. Johnnie
watched it rather anxiously, and was glad enough to see it die
down at last, and soon go out, as he supposed.

He returned to the house, but he felt all the while as if some
dreadful thing was about to happen.

Pretty soon he saw the minister, who lived next door, running
across the lots with a pail in each hand. His father was just re-
turning home with the nurse for grandma. He dashed up to the
gate, and left both the nurse and old Kate in the road. Seizing
a pail he darted down the pasture. Johnnie thought of his bon-
fire in an instant. Sure enough it had started up again, and was
running as fast as it could towards the large wood-lot his father
prized so much.

That evening when the fire had been really put out, and noth-
ing serious had come of it, Johnnie told his papa how sorry he
was, and promised never to play with fire again.

LIZZIE MAY SHERWOOD.




THE TWO PIGS.

A TRUE STORY.

Wuen Madge was seven years old and Edith five they weut to the
country to spend the summer on their Grandpa Mason’s farm. Hav-
ing lived in the city all their lives they were very happy to be able to
run in the fields, pick wild-flowers, and ride in the hay-cart. They
had such big appetites that grandma declared they would eat her out
of house and home.

But they were very good little girls, and tried so hard not to give
their grandma any trouble that one day Grandpa Mason made each
of them a present of a little white pig.

The little girls had never before had any pets, and they pecame
THE TWO PIGS.

very fond of the pigs. One was named Snowball and the other
Frisky, and they soon learned to come when the children called them.
They were good little pigs, and very tame, and did not make a fuss
when they were washed. They had to be washed very often, for they
were fond of lymg in mud-puddles, and playing in the farm-yard
with their dirty little brothers, and they didn’t mind being scolded.

But the little girls loved them, dirty or clean, and were sorry to
leave them in September, when they went back to the city. They
did not forget them, and when summer came again, and they went to
the farm in June, they asked for Frisky and Snowball before they
had even taken off their hats.

“They’re alive, and will be glad to see you, I haven’t a doubt,”
aald grandpa. “Come out to the
born.”

“The darling little things!”
said Madge. “I wonder if they
will know us.”





my if |
if |)
\ Hi

But it was the little girls who didn’t know the pigs, for Snowball
and Frisky had grown into big hogs, and grandpa had them in a pen,
fattening them to kill in the fall.

How he did laugh when he saw how surprised and sorry Madge
THE LITTLE ORIOLE THIEF.

and Edith were! But after a while he took them into the loft of the
barn, and showed them two flying-squirrels i In a tin cage.

“ Here are some new pets,” he said; “you will like these as wel)
as the pigs.”

But it was a long time before the little girls ceased to mourn ove!

the loss of Frisky and Snowball.
‘MRS. F. B. GETCHELL.



MapamE SHEPLEY sat at
her window, knitting a very
pretty blue-silk sock for her
little grand-daughter Mar-
garet. Somebody called
her away for a moment,
when a saucy little oriole,
called “Baltimore,” flew up
to her basket upon the win:
dow-sill. The bird had just
nested, and helped herself
to a skein of the silk which
she was about to join on
to her work. She quickly
made off with it to her un-
finished nest in the apple-
tree near by.

But the. silk would noi.
do as the oriole wanted at
all. It would get caught in


LITTLE BETTIN#; A SWINGING SONG.

the branches, and in spite of
all the bird’s efforts got ter-
ribly tangled. She tugged
and tugged, but to no pur-
pose. At last she had to
content herself with a few
loose threads, leaving a
good many strings, here.
and there, fluttering in the
wind.

These strings made her
very angry ; for weeks after,
as she passed to and fro,
she always stopped, and
gave the threads a spiteful
jerk, as much as to say, “O, you hateful
yarn! you've given me heaps of trouble.
I wish I'd never stolen you. Id be better
off, I know.”



MRS. G. HALL.



LITTLE BETTINE: A SWINGING SONG.

SWINGING, swinging, little Bettine,

Prettiest- lassie that ever was seen;
Swinging, swinging,

Up where the long, lithe branches blow,

Down where the white, swaying lilies grow;

Swinging, swinging, little Bettine,

Under the larches cool and green.

Swinging, swinging, little Bettine,
Blossom-crowned, like a summer queen ;
‘Swinging, swinging,
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swinging, little Bettine,

Under the larches cool and green.

Down where the brown bee keeps her quest;
winging,

Up where the robin hides his nest,

S

EMMA C. DOWD
THE

BIRTHDAY BOOTS.

Ir was almost Jo-Jo’s birthday.

He was neither very old nor very big, but more than anything
in the world he wanted a pair of boots.

His brother Hal was grown up and in college, and he said it

was a shame for Jo-Jo
to wear knee-pants and
shoes when he so much
wished to be a young
man. |
So it was planned in
secret that on his birth-
day Jo-Jo should have
his first pair of boots.
They were bought.
It seemed as if you
could fairly see the
noise in them _ they
were so stout in the
sole, and so heavy and
sturdy in the uppers.
“JT think you will
have to put a weather-
strip round the edges,”
said Hal to his mother
the night before, when
they were looking them
over, and saying what
a big boy Jo-Jo had
grown to be; “there'll
be no living in the
house with him for the
racket.”

=


THE BIRTHDAY BOOTS.

His mother smiled.

“] think we'll set them outside his door and
let him find them first thing in the morning,”
said she.

“Just let me put a motto on the bottom of
one,’ cried Hal; “it will be a good way to
convey a moral.”

It was a fine surface to write on, the smooth,
polished leather, and Hal printed with ink, in
good, plain letters upon one, —












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‘THE MORE HASTE THE LESS SPEED;”





and upon the other,
“SEVEN LEAGUES TO THE STEP.” -

He looked his work over
with pride, and laughed to
think of Jo-Jo’s running

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THE BIRTHDAY BOOTS.

about with letters always under his feet, when he did so hate tc
read.

First thing upon coming out of his room in the morning, Jo-—Jc
found the boots. He was too delighted to think of stopping up
stairs to put them on, but ran down into the general sitting-room,
where the family were waiting for breakfast.

His face was covered with smiles, and he swung the boots round
his head at the risk of breaking every trinket in the room.

‘“ Hi-oh!” he eried; “ boots! boots!”

“Try them on,” said his mother, “and see if they are as nice
as you think.”

Jo-Jo burst halfa-dozen buttons off his shoes in his haste to make
the change. He put his foot eagerly in at the top, and pressed it
down to the ankle, but it would go no further.

He tugged and pulled, got red in the face, and finally lost his tem:
per.

Hal came forward to see. The boots were, indeed, altogether too
small. The shoe man had evidently given the wrong number.

“T can change them for a larger size,” said Jo-Jo, unwilling to give
them up. :

Just then he caught sight of Hal’s writing.

“Who did it?” he cried.

Hal owned he did it as a sort of joke.

Then Jo-Jo, who had been on the verge of erying, laughed aloud

“T think the joke is on you this time, Mister Hal,’ he shouted.

And it was. The ink had soaked into the leather, so that the
boots were too soiled to return.

“T'll have them to pay for, sure enough,” said Hal, willing to turn
Jo-Jo’s attention in any way from his disappointment.

This pair having failed, they persuaded Jo-Jo to wait one more
year, when he should choose his own boots, and have them fitted

before they were taken home.
C. D. B.




















































AT. MILKING—TIME.

Wuiteroot, Lightfoot,

Set back your right foot,
Chewing, and waiting the maid with the pail;
Horns in the sunshine,

Hoofs in the clover,
Gentle cow, stand and be milked by the rail.

_ Fairy Carrie
_ And little boy Harry
| Have come to the meadow along with me.
“ Whip-poor-Will! Poor Will!”
Hear a complaining
Out of the dusk gathered under the tree.

Closing, dozing,
Field flowers reposing
Fade as the sun goes to far-away iands ;
Strawberries scarlet
Mix with green grasses,
Hide more and more from the search of
small hands.












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Le

AT MILKING-TIME.
AT MILKING-TIME.

Glancing, dancing,
Fire-flies romancing,
Light, tiny lamps in the dewy-damp vines ;
Frogs are a-crooning ;
Forth hops a rabbit ;
High flies the night-hawk that peeps while he dines,

Whitefoot, Lightfoot,
Have now your right foot,
Full to the brim is my pail with white foam;
Looks the round moon so,
Over the hill yonder, —
Guess there, too, a milkmaid’s on her way home.

Fairy Carrie
And little man Harry
Skip from the field, but look back through the bars;
Sings lone whippoorwill;
Folds her limbs Whitefoot ;
Shine in the pasture-brook two early stars.

LAVINIA 8S. GOODWIN.






































































































































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THE NEST OF GOLD.



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Percy DALE was a dear, pink and white little boy, with a tangle
of golden ringlets, so long and silky that strangers often stopped
him on the street to admire them. He wouldn’t have cared, only
they sometimes stroked his head, and called him a “sweet little

oh 99

girs
Now, Percy loved littie girls; but to be called a little girl himself

was not at all to his liking. It always sent him running to his
THE NEST OF GOLD.

mamma to beg her to cut off the dreadful curls that made people say
he was “a little girl-boy.”

“Oh, no, no, darling ; mamma can’t shear her pet lamb,” she
would answer with a kiss ; “but by and by we'll ask Miss Olive to do
it.”

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_ “By and by” was slow in coming, and Percy’s fourth birthday
found him with curls longer and lovelier than ever. That morning, |
as he swung on the gate, an old lady, passing, said to him,
smilingly : —

“Won't you sell me your beautiful, bright curls, little Miss? My
little grand-daughter hasn’t any.”

“Little Miss” indeed! The words nearly broke Percy’s heart. He
THE NEST OF GOLD.

dragged his apron up over the hated ringlets, and held it close till
the lady had gone.

Then he hopped down from the gate, his eyes shining with a
happy thought. He would stop people from calling him names!
He would run across the street all by himself, and ask Miss Olive te
cut his hair off so short that everybody’d know he wasn’t a girl!

As it happened, his mamma had lately said to Miss Olive that one
of these days his curls must be clipped ; so, when the little fellow told
his errand, Miss Olive at once pinned a towel about his neck, and
snip, snip, went ‘ier big shears through his wavy mane. °

She put the longest curls in a paper box for Percy to carry home;
and, not being a very tidy woman, she threw the rest of them out of
‘the back window into the yard. These were spied by two yellow
birds about to set up house-keeping, and carried off, tress by tress, to
the lilac-tree in the garden. There the birds wove them into the
daintiest golden nest that ever was seen. In this they reared -a
thriving little family ; and when the cold winds came, and they all
flitted away to the sunny south, Miss Olive brought the empty nest
to Percy’s mamma, who has kept it to this day.

PENN SHIRLEY.




MORNING—GLORIES.

Wake, baby, Ill sing you a ballad;
Come, open your eyes and hear

Of the gay, painted ladies, so fresh and so fair,
Who lean at the lattice near.
MORNING-GLORIES.



Their gowns have the hues of the rainbow, —
Violet, crimson, and pink;

And their faces are fair as the morning
When the sun first rises, I think.

See, on their hearts glisten dew-drops, —
Jewels more precious and rare

Than any queen-lady can boast of
At her bridal or crowning to wear.

Gay-painted ladies and bonnie,
Out at the lattice there,
Lean from their bower and beckon to you:
“Good-morning, my baby fair!”
J. K. LUDLUM

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SAMMY’S “FLYING—HORSKES.”

Sammy Swett was ten yearsold, and the son ofa poor widow. She

also had four children younger than Sammy to support. Sammy
used to do-errands for the neighbors, and thus earned a few pennies
sometimes.
_ Once a neighbor took him to a fair which was held in a large
field. Sammy had ten cents to spend, and used it to pay for a
ride on the “flying-horses.” He thought the ride was delightful,
and when he went home told his brother and three little sisters
about it. All but Baby Bess, who couldn’t quite understand. wished
they could have a ride on the wonderful flying-horses.

One day, late in the fall, Sammy stood at the kitchen window,
watching his mother’s clothes-reel, which the wind was whirling
rapidly. The idea came to him, suddenly, that this reel would
be just as good as the flying-horses if he only had some seats
SAMMY’S ‘ FLYING-HORSES.”

hanging from it. The reel was a tall pole, with four long bars
like a cross upon it. Sammy ran te the wood-shed and got four
stout ropes. He tied one of these to the end of each cross-bar.
Then he looked about for seats. Sue’s little chair answered for
one, the seat of an old baby-carriage for another, an old box for ;



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another, and a market-basket, which he thought would do for
Baby Bess, made the fourth.

After a deal of tying and fixing, he had all these fastened to
the ends of the ropes. Then he had quite a time getting his
“passengers aboard.” But finally they were all in their seats,
and then there was a jolly time indeed. The wind was quite
strong, the reel kept whirling, the children shouting and laughing
in high glee. Baby Bessie’s head was all that could be seen of
THE FARM BREAKFAST.

ner, the market-basket was so large; but she enjoyed: it, and
tried to make as much noise as the rest. Mamma came to see
what it was all about, and laughed heartily after she had exam-
ined the ropes to see that they were strong enough to hold their

precious burdens.
VIRGINIA C. HOLLIS.

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THE FARM BREAKFAST.

Orr went the hired maid; .
Off went the hired man;
The busy farmer and his wife

Must do the best they can.

@ne;. two;. three, four !
. - Loud strikes the kitchen clock ;

“T| must,” the farmer says, “get up
At once: and feed my stock.”

He gives: the cow some: timothy,
The steers, some meadow-hay,

The pair of working oxen. grain,
And so: begins. the: day.
THE FARM BREAKFAST.





























































































































































































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He brings some turnips for the sheep,
The dappled colt some barley,
And gets a measure full of oats
For good old Dan and Charley.

He throws the flock of hens some corn;
He gives the calves. some meal ;

The pigs: he had forgotten quite
Until he heard them squeal.

Within the house, “Bow wow! Bow wow!”
Old Towser begs for meat ;

“Mew! mew!” The yellow kitten asks
For something she can eat;

And down. the stairs come hungry Tom,
And hungry Rose and Neddy,;

And ask, with one united voice,

“Oh, isn’t breakfast ready ?”’
MARION DOURTAS.
HOW COAL JS MADE.



Dip you know that coal is
made from plants? Not one
child in a hundred knows that!
The very heat it gives out is
what the plant first took in.

What is there more valuable
than coal, that’ warms our
houses so nicely and gives us
such beautiful gas-light to sit
by on cold winter nights ?

All kinds of machinery ar:
worked by it, from the factory
to the engine. Even the oil
that we use in our lamps comes
from coal and the remains of
plants. If you were to take a
piece in your hands you can
see the ‘impression of leaves
like those you gather in the
country lanes.

Many have stems too. They are very, very hard, and even
have the marks where the roots grew!

Many kinds of ferns and huge trees of the forest often make
coal, for every coal mine has more or less of these ; even the cones
of the pine have been found in the coal. |
LITTLE HUM.

Peat is the beginning of a bed of coal before it grows hard.
You know what a nice fire it makes. Coke, which you have
often seen burning so brightly in the grate, is made by driving
out all the oil and gases from coal,—the very gas that we burn.

Tar often oozes out of the lumps of coal on a fire, making
little black bubbles, which burst and burn. Paraffine oil is made
from this very tar, and benzoline too. Aniline comes from ben-
zoline, which makes some of our most beautiful dyes. Essences that
are put in the candies you buy, and taste so good, come from
tar. So you see that from coal we get nearly all our heat and
light, colors and pleasant flavors. Isn’t it useful, though !

MRS. G. HALL.



LITTLE HUM.

Tue children were out in the walnut-orchard, playing dinner.
They had a cunning little table. The tea-set had gilt edges and little
pink flowers. They had real coffee, little bits of biscuit, and Jap
anese plum jelly ; frosted cake, too, and oranges, and big, red bananas.

Mamma sat in the house alone, sewing.

“Hum-m! hum-m! hum-m!” sounded something in the hall.

Mamma dropped her work and ran out there. A humming-bird
was up against the ceiling. The ceiling frightened it and made it
feel homesick, for it was not used to having anything in the way
when it wanted to fly up towards the sky.

Little Hum felt lost because he had flown away from the blue sky
and the sun.

You, dear little children, would feel as poor Hum did if you should
LITTLE HUM.































































i











run: away. from home and get lost on some lonesome road. Yuu
would. keep trotting about,.on your. little, tired feet, trying to find
your way back to papa and mamma. You would. feel sorry that. you
had run away. Perhaps Hum was sorry that. he had. flown away.
He kept dashing about and bumping his head so hard that, rcamma
was afraid it ached.
LITTLE HUM.

He soon became so tired that he slid down the wall and mamma
picked him up. She took her smallest scissors and cut off a cobwek
that was tangled around his little bits of feet.

Poor, tired, little Hum lay quite still in mamma’s hand. Per
haps it seemed like a warm nest. Mamma called the children to see
him. They came crowding around her on the veranda.









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They thought Hum was very small and pretty, and Hum thought
they were giants.

““ Now see him fly,” said mamma, and she opened her hand.

“Hum-m!” He was off in the top of a tall tree as quick as a
flash.

A few days later the children found a dead humming-bird. It may
have been the same one. They wrapped him in a fig-leaf and buried

him under a rose-tree.
ANNA C. FIELD.
AUGUST AND ITS WORK.













































































a in ae

Wuo has made dry all the cool,
shady places
Where my little brook used to
ripple and play ?
“T coaxed the brook off,’ said
fiery-breathed August ;
“In soft, little mist-clouds it
floated away.”



Who has turned yellow and brown
my green pastures ?
Who has been bleaching my
green sea of wheat?
“JT ripened the verdure,” said
fierce, scorching August,
“And I threw those brilliant-
hued flowers at your feet.

“TI finished the ripening of all
the wild berries,
And I put the bloom on the
fair, downy peach;
For me in the orchard the sweet-
Ings grow mellow,
And I have some beautiful
tintings for each.”

SARAH E. HOWARD.










X 7, Ke

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S 7 .
PW



SODA WATER.

“Gone to visit Aunt Jane — hurrah!” shouted Ted.

“Won’t it be jolly,” said Ned.

Ted and Ned lived in the country, and thought it a very good
place to live. But Aunt Jane lived in a town, and they thought
that still nicer.

When they arrived there Aunt Jane took them all about, showing
them a great many interesting things; into some stores, too, where
they thought they would like to buy everything they saw.

Last of all, when they were tired and hot, she took them toa
place where they had some soda water.

The boys thought it the nicest thing that they had ever tasted.

The next day, among the great sprinkling-wagons which went by
Aunt Jane’s house, they saw one with great letters painted on it,
and they spelled : —

RAND’S SODA WATER.

“Q Aunt Jane!” exclaimed Ted, “was it Rand’s soda water
that we had yesterday ?”

“Yes,” said Aunt Jane. Then she went out of the room.

“It's a great shame to water streets with such good stuff,” said
Ned.

“T should think so,” said Ted.

“Don’t you s’pose we could get a little?” asked Ned. “A glass
or two wouldn't make a bit of difference when they’re throwing so
much away.”
SODA WATER.

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« And then we shouldn’t have to pay five cents for it,” said Ted.

“TLet’s try,” said Ned. “There comes another one.”

“Yes, see!” said Ted. “*Rand’s Soda Water.’ ”

Both got a glass and ran out.

“ Now we must drink it up quick,” said Ted.

“Yes, before it stops foaming.”

They ran into the stream of the sprinkling-cart as it passed, and
by getting their clothes pretty wet managed to get a foaming glass
full.

“ Drink — quick!” cried Ted.

‘And they drank quick, until it was:almost all gone.

“Ts’nt it sp—” said Ned.

“—lendid!” said Ted.

But they said it because they were all ready to say it.

«7 — don’t know as it’s so dreadful good, aiter all,” said Ned, mak

ang a face.
“Nor I either,” said Ted, making another.
FAREWELL TO SUMMER.

“°Tisn’t half so sweet as that in the store,” said Ned.

“ Nor so pink,” said Ted.

Ned looked at what was left in his glass. It had rather a yellow,
muddy look. He tasted it and made a worse face.

“Aunt Jane,’ said Ted, as they went into the house, “that soda
water in the carts isn’t half so nice as that in the store.”

“ How do you know ?” she asked.

“’Cause we tasted.”

“ That isn’t soda water,’ she said. “It is an advertisement to tell
people where they can get it.”

Then she went to the pantry and stayed there a little while. When
she came back she gave them some ginger-snaps to take away the
taste. And Ned wondered why it took her so long to get them.

But neither Ned nor Ted ever knew that she had stayed to have

a good laugh all by herself.
SYDNEY DAYRE.



FAREWELL TO SUMMER.

Au day I hear a singing,
My little love.

The cricket’s faint knell ringing,
My little love.

The yellow leaves are flying,

And Lady Wind is sighing,

Ah, me! The summer’s dying,
My httle love.
FAREWELL TO SUMMER.

Her sweet soul has departed,
My little love.

The birds are broken-hearted,
My little love.

She was so fair and smiling,

Our inmost hearts beguiling,

The long hours sweetly whiling,
My little love.

Our arms she filled with flowers,
My little love.
And sent us healing showers,
My little love,
Even in fullest measure.
Nay, shared your childish pleasure,
And lavished all her treasure
On my little love.

Farewell is sad, sad saying,

My little love.
When winter flees, I’m praying,

My little love,
We may together meet her.
Ah! nothing could be sweeter
Than, hand in hand, to greet her,

My little love.

GRACE WINTHROP OLIVER.




AB - SY ay :
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THE LITTLE PRISONER. 5 ;

Tue day little Harry was two years old he gave himself and his’
mamma a real fright. He was very active, and could run all over
the house, and go up and down stairs without help from eA.

It happened on the morning of his birthday
that there was no one at home with zim but
mamma ; she was putting a chamber in
order for visitors. He trotted around
after her, drawing a pair of tin
horses. No thought of mischief
had entered his mind.

By and by, when mamma
went into the hall for
something, he stayed be-
hind in one of the cham-
bers. He shut the door
and locked it. Mamma
hurried back and told
him to turn the key
quick and open the door.
He tried and tried, but
could not doit. At last
he pulled the key out of
the door, and could not
put it m again. There he was, shut up alone, like a squirrel In a
cage.

“When he found that he could not get out he was frightened and
began to cry.

























THE LITTLE PRISONER.

Mamma could not open the door, but she called to him, “Don’t
ery, Harry, and papa will come very soon and take you out.”

Then she told him to push the big arm-chair up close to the door,
and climb into it, then she would tell
him sonie stories.

He did as she said, and mamma put
her mouth down to the key-hole and
told him about “Little Boy Blue,’ and
“Mother Hubbard,” and “ Bo-peep,” and
other things that he liked. She kept
telling them over and over, because she
wanted him to be quiet and not. feel.
frightened.
~s After a time his papa came home.
When he heard what was the matter
he went straight to the barn and brought
‘y the long ladder and put it up to the

_ chamber window. Then he had to break
= {como i a pane of glass so
that he could open
the window and
get into the room
where Harry was.

The little pris-
oner was very
glad to be at lib-
erty once more.
He ran out with
smiles and tears
on his face, say-
ing, ‘“‘Won’t do
so again, mam-
ma! won't do so

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M. BR. N. HATHEWAY.














LITTLE SAILORS.

Now, Harry, pull the chairs up,
And, Fanny, get the shawl,
And we will play we’re sailors,
And that we’re in a squall.

Don’t be in such a hurry,
Pll fix it if you wait ;
I want to get the hassocks
To make the “Golden Gate.” |

Now this chair is the ship’s stern
And that one is the bow ; |

But there, you must be careful
And not’lean hard, you know.

Now, sailors, pull that sail up
And tuck the corners in.

Well —if you want it tighter
Ask mamma for a pin!
LITTLE SAILORS. 89

Now couldn’t you sing something
About the ocean blue?
Well, never mind, “ By-baby,”
Or anything will do!
See here, you careless sailors,
You mind what you're about ;
You know that water’ll drown you
If you should tumble out!















There, now you've gone and done it;
I knew just how ’twould be.
I told you to be careful,
And now you're hurt, you see.
Well, never mind; we won't play
Werre sailors any more,
But get the blocks, and build up
A playhouse on the floor.
MRS. GENEVIEVE LYNCH
THE HERMIT CRAB.

WHEN you go to the sea-shore in the summer you hear a great
deal said about “crabbing,” and no doubt you have helped to catch
the little creatures, and to eat them too. And you know that most of











them are covered on the outside by a thick coat, or shell. The one
called the “hermit crab” has no covering over his tail, only over
the other part of his body. Of course it is very liable to get in-
170 THE HERMIT CRAB.

jured if it is not guarded, and how do you think the crab
does it?

Well, he just puts it into some empty shell that he finds, and goes
about dragging it after him. As he grows the tail gets to be too





































































large for the shell, and as soon as it begins to tell him so, by its
pinching, he quietly pulls it out, and hunts up another, trying them

one by one to see if they will fit. Sometimes several crabs claim the
same shell, and after fighting about it find, after all, that it will not

fit any of their tails! How cheap they must feel!
S MRS. G. HALL.


THE GREAT DRAGON-FLY.

Here is a little creature that comes whirring along with
flashy green and glittering wings, and so swift of flight that
nothing can escape him. Most insects heed the
birds; but the dragon-fly does not, for







even the swallow cannot catch
him. His wings sound like the un-
furling of a small silken flag, he goes
so fast !

Look at y ae him when you see him! He
cannot sting you! Don’t aif be afraid. He may
breathe as if he were fright ened, but that is not
so. If you should give him a spider, or a beetle,
he would munch it down before your very eyes;
but not before he has removed the hard wing:
cases. He will eat as long as you supply him
too. Thirty or forty flies are nothing for a single



meal ! |
When tired off he goes to some branch, or swig, sits



there a moment, shakes and plumes his pretty wings, as
if to see if they are in order; then he is 4 away to
find other victims, just as if he had been fasting
for a week !

The first years of the dragon-fly’s | life were

passed under water, where he was
in chasing the insects to be found
he got his wings!

just as busy
there as since



MRS G. HALL.




— SS
—— —S remem ee Sy



———

NA rr n



i / ig
flab

£6



KATRINA IN THE PLAY.

KatTRINA is not a little girl, as you may think from her name.

Instead she is a beautiful speckled hen.

She has a great many gifts and graces, besides the very usefu!
accomplishment of laying eggs.

She is quite particular about her surroundings, and insists upon
having a nest of her very own, that no other hen in the flock is
allowed to use. She likes best to come into the house, and the chil-
dren have placed a nice little box behind the stove for a nesi.
‘When Katrina wishes to be let in she pecks at the kitchen door, and
it is opened for her.
LITTLE. BOY BLUE.

She looks around at first to see if all is right, and then hops on
the nest, where she sings to herself in a satisfied way.

One holiday the children arranged to play “Jack and the Bean-
stalk.”

But they must have the giant’s hen that laid the golden egg.

So, when all was ready, little Isabelle carried Katrina in her arms,
and stood her down on the stage.

She looked around at the audience in a dignified manner, and then
walked to the nest, and settled herself serenely.

In a few minutes she flew off with a triumphant cackle, and, lo, a
beautiful golden egg was left in the nest! |

The play was so great a success that they had it repeated, and
Katrina acted her part just as well the second time, and seemed to
enjoy it as much as the children. Don’t you think Katrina is quite

a wonderful little hen ? |
ANNIE DOUGLAS BELL.



LITTLE BOY BLUE.

Down in the meadow the cows are calling,

The robin’s sweet song comes home from afar,
And the apple blooms softly are falling;

Little Boy Blue, how sleepy you are!

Over the hills gray shadows are creeping,
Swift to her nest the mother-bird flies;
Little Boy Blue, in my fond arms sleeping,

Cradled and soothed with tender lullabies,
eg
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LITTLE BOY BLUE.


LITTLE BOY BLUE. 3 99

Little Boy Blue, when ‘the months
you number
Shall grow into years in your
life’s young day,
You will scorn your sweet baby-
hood’s slumber,
And boyhood’s wild sports will
lure you away.


















On your sweet lips I will press
softest kisses ;
For still you are mine, though
years swiftly glide.
Little. Boy Blue, the world never
misses
One from its ranks,—oh, then,
stay at my side!

ba
ROL) ee”
: Ieee
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oa

{
See




HOW WYNAN WENT DEER_HUNTING.

Tue Adirondack region about the lodge where Wynan was staying
abounded in deer. His papa was anxious to shoot one, and arrange-
ments were made for camping 2ut a few miles away, near a Jake
where the deer were known to feed.

Wynan’s brother Harry and uncle Jack were to be of the party,
and Wynan begged so hard to be allowed to go, too, that consent was
finally given. They arrived at the camping-place late in the after-
noon. After pitching their tent and eating supper they sat around
the bright pine fire, while the guide told stories. Wynan himself
took a little nap on his papa’s knee, in anticipation of his promised
: evening on the lake.

At nine o’clock they started,—papa, Wy sins and the guide, —after
first smearing their faces and hands with a preparation of tar to pro-
tect them from the black flies, which were very troublesome. Wynan
thought it fine fun as he set off in the boat; but the guide did not
fancy taking out a little boy on a deer-hunt, for he was afraid that he
would talk or make some noise, and thus spoil the sport. Wynan,
however, made all sorts of fair promises, and truly nobody could have
been stiller than he.

The guide paddled slowly along near the shore, and a lantern, with
a birch-bark reflector, high up in the bow of the boat, sent its light
HOW WYNAN WENT DEER-HUNTING.

tur ahead over the water. In this way the persons in the boat could
not be seen by the deer, who came down at night to feed upon the
grass that grew in the water at the margin of the lake. The animals
could see only the bright light, and it seemed to dazzle them.

Papa’s gun was in position, underneath the light, when, suddenly,
Wynan saw distinctly a deer, a short distance away, standing quite



still. Wynan was so excited that before he knew it he jerked papa’s
arm, causing the gun to go off before papa had intended it should.

There was a sharp report, and then a great object leaped into the
boat, or tried to, nearly upsetting it. The deer had been wounded by
the shot, and had jumped, he knew not where; but, as it chanced,
into the very arms of his enemies. The guide put an end to the
animal’s life, and they started back to the camp.

The next day Wynan ate venison steak for breakfast; and wasn’t
mamma astonished when told that Wynan had helped to shoot a deer:
The antlers, which were fine ones, ‘Vynan carried home with him.

EMMA C. DOWD


ven LARUE and

t to see aLad
sie a Formal Call,




NNSA



A VERY LARGE DOLL.









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'2013-12-10T05:49:23-05:00' 'mixed'
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http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
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describe
'336580' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWKM' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
417bdb94d21a62dcddb0b930283f4855
0c85f74b47a1754322fb4189b109a6585b4e4fa9
'2012-06-20T09:50:35-04:00'
describe
'503711' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWKN' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
87f976a0f269638326e322c5c5a5fd41
a62e26f962412eb1bcd9c3f4d33d9e0a38944c98
'2012-06-20T09:51:53-04:00'
describe
'432675' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWKO' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
4dd2a6a870dcce0745888fcbef765b14
f2086178fb3c4880904701b6b2087838bbdc3cb3
'2012-06-20T09:51:18-04:00'
describe
'334171' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWKP' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
dac4dc78eb3a4cf54b3fffd80a02aa6a
af380a01f315129f041a8dc6b081db374a2521c2
'2012-06-20T09:53:07-04:00'
describe
'521112' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWKQ' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
64cb8ae5ede6794443e4198e026a530b
daeaf9ab03634b7368df88deb975f50182c0ad61
'2012-06-20T09:53:39-04:00'
describe
'549121' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWKR' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
cfbc82d68280c82b6ad4f445d5b31551
470a7262a467eb4eb833065a85c15e0afaa0afb5
'2012-06-20T09:51:55-04:00'
describe
'578846' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWKS' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
a61432dc1f728356930cceaf34420b56
15c9821007dba558ecda1c40314fed6c2e883f1a
'2012-06-20T09:54:44-04:00'
describe
'321365' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWKT' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
ceacc77f511f5fe201a315b1e19b4238
32c90077060dbc460d1dd7613ee554a434b57d59
describe
'483288' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWKU' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
ed55d7f99aa80b9d0e9b9e8de6a21a5a
d270e40a6f5dc58c0adf94667dcf5fb73eea46af
'2012-06-20T09:50:44-04:00'
describe
'515438' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWKV' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
35eb35cf774719bf66da7196a82d19ae
7cfd76d6d62adcd82d5e857afcb3bdedb3e0694b
describe
'492733' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWKW' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
4df88f134a3222d48145e8a6cde323cf
fd429a2ef10ea83ec58d09d16a4ef582db8c4c2c
'2012-06-20T09:53:50-04:00'
describe
'536971' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWKX' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
0eee0a397307b16df8925ff06a21a902
a1efd3f828a6f40c347f46cfc5eefe21b86f34b8
'2012-06-20T09:54:11-04:00'
describe
'434386' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWKY' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
34390020d902d70c510631b0bec69989
81583e4c8e20939c6794ad601c2acf98b6b7a886
'2012-06-20T09:53:02-04:00'
describe
'504907' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWKZ' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
c4d5ae521e7b20b9e76fcb5365c590f3
aaf08357c3700e92d081e4960797b36330f67d4c
describe
'454373' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWLA' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
d96977aec71341305506778eebe4f35b
83198445f85639e82f0fa88a7a9aff56ffe92ce3
'2012-06-20T09:54:32-04:00'
describe
'539071' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWLB' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
6ba4260ef376adbc5fb8a4446dee96a9
7e18026cf751c99e7b2e3a774e1e9811709c9072
'2012-06-20T09:54:54-04:00'
describe
'524957' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWLC' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
fae8a530c530eb6c29716584bd9d7706
89bf8662f77b4f2ce7ca3b84f46d7ca0fa5f028a
'2012-06-20T09:54:17-04:00'
describe
'502185' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWLD' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
690c4e46a8129ef45c294c59d1bfc580
bfe2a5c85e81f594007a2afcef96264ee7c1f06b
'2012-06-20T09:51:35-04:00'
describe
'519857' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWLE' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
0d7f4ae24ccf95144d6cba3e5229eb79
9321803703e51a8a5368a52742ae771169abfa5a
'2012-06-20T09:50:56-04:00'
describe
'533707' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWLF' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
b797128ec09050b600ceb2a9c97c01a7
8582fc610195fdac2f0a30ec62392428975b49e3
'2012-06-20T09:52:55-04:00'
describe
'499489' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWLG' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
a0d472a6cc1628b007ee06990067b050
2b4c1b6ee49d99085c8e423edc567db009988ae0
'2012-06-20T09:51:40-04:00'
describe
'500918' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWLH' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
133afc66e6778a4577435690d799804a
b66af32d9896efdeb8170939f75421710aa163a8
'2012-06-20T09:52:08-04:00'
describe
'514619' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWLI' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
23308d3aff6873bc17e6658b1ebceaeb
0327e5c8faf134e4c482ab37cabcbc7c628343c4
'2012-06-20T09:50:13-04:00'
describe
'527791' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWLJ' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
ba2211d79ead72802df7fef23a365ebc
2f0bb788d1d3976a8a0fb1fe533cd676a999631b
'2012-06-20T09:49:44-04:00'
describe
'559340' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWLK' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
1e8c1cb22f82502b579b2ba4ea017b67
768b979794dfeadf6be6e8174bd258c108fb92dd
'2012-06-20T09:54:12-04:00'
describe
'318997' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWLL' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
872ff27e7fac8f9801ef408d6a334cfc
70df879fff9f45ca828b1aacc906d6183b8ae7c6
'2012-06-20T09:52:58-04:00'
describe
'449338' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWLM' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
6edc065a46681b510e0d8f54e8122a45
9c91af5116641b841a6dec89df0e0a53eab62fc7
'2012-06-20T09:54:34-04:00'
describe
'572454' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWLN' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
1ac8055c6eae8f1df54b85430b52c448
563640ba01f8024de56fb60b2658bcf99f84d276
describe
'426712' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWLO' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
3c7fca9bd07c6c89147f643f9b08c900
ebfb8f6560ed8791a2f6c487d7cf5274906836fe
'2012-06-20T09:51:49-04:00'
describe
'491610' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWLP' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
75ba05bb1e0cdb6a3eef84c7147277e4
5780884837ece53f58226ccd07741361e9aad306
'2012-06-20T09:53:09-04:00'
describe
'462335' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWLQ' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
c11b8e9daecd5230e52a64c7bc005ce3
2a2b658b27ad3eb7aeb46e824a0b993a9c546f42
'2012-06-20T09:52:42-04:00'
describe
'499444' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWLR' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
8f0f69ddf4f940d34243898c66dc4705
25091c43307dc677544b11f4dd9d242b460cfa3a
describe
'523211' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWLS' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
e504dba9bba4597231dfbf3086864ff4
ccd840f76c7f0e9a1d4462abe6619d8fe77de60c
'2012-06-20T09:52:54-04:00'
describe
'453417' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWLT' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
088f11f47cac1abfb0f0b0c41d0d6a94
42ec6ca76b0fc5ec8cb3f58884a5bb19ae861764
describe
'513613' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWLU' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
3e21763bd82229f7a01b24a322574999
63631e0a9b230cbe8c2fcfcdee7f4af2af9b1e7c
'2012-06-20T09:52:20-04:00'
describe
'512531' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWLV' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
650fbb62ef055a24d4ff5bcc9964da26
1c8e7d372f47b6224d10858235c07324e899d074
'2012-06-20T09:51:24-04:00'
describe
'476087' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWLW' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
1532f59d5a091bc12de40b467b1001c9
fd20c46e0523c1102f9ec3235f3d7253db3c4f50
'2012-06-20T09:53:10-04:00'
describe
'504534' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWLX' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
7a0ce8263a0b1f37aeffb0f02bee0cbd
e487f5e89d25d295cf696d6748b2d37814e528d5
describe
'534993' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWLY' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
71dc509b6dce00c1f83ec08dd2f462cc
aa5749b4b2c05b038ee41d4241fd1f57b0fda398
'2012-06-20T09:52:47-04:00'
describe
'359134' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWLZ' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
1633696b3bafbe4aef464001779f81b8
c8b26a61ee264a662f5c6b2707258d5506d5c081
'2012-06-20T09:54:48-04:00'
describe
'471560' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWMA' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
b7c30c5a0d9b9f7cc75db5b933869d7c
4fe11668461b2618d5a5dda10ae818b18b880d2e
describe
'288268' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWMB' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
5a7ec27dd1005392625abe69ae971c0c
2898d60b29fa190c81b508cf9d133cba2795d8f3
'2012-06-20T09:52:45-04:00'
describe
'543791' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWMC' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
d54dcff1b71fa5e62541ef40d0a3585e
10e31f7fc4a57cf5d91bc53277ab08f18d624fef
'2012-06-20T09:52:40-04:00'
describe
'342021' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWMD' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
c4ad55b2f60006feb795d0481cbe527c
0a62a2c7deaa4e1eb03618a1c9028a12418f90b8
'2012-06-20T09:51:33-04:00'
describe
'492793' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWME' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
24df038df2fa6d88db4b9048873f0eac
5569c0600715f2e5a2a45491fcc6c0000efcf1fd
'2012-06-20T09:53:59-04:00'
describe
'236195' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWMF' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
36009ee519f2b546feaf7d761dca7609
a1aa60345cfe1b062fe235c9b4ec037de0d69619
'2012-06-20T09:50:27-04:00'
describe
'205066' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWMG' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
23ff128dd28584dfd2ed02d982622e5e
16e458d88d5a4e50484b6c5591de5d8f8dfeaac7
'2012-06-20T09:53:35-04:00'
describe
'521322' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWMH' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
3d012e92bfa3a1010178e9fa2126d084
2c9f55f5055c898e7319d1e4431f521f97a8531a
'2012-06-20T09:54:37-04:00'
describe
'443757' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWMI' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
b7a0a63efb8cb5d1557cdc2ff87f47a0
c832b8203388c0d8059cb8d9364d092800ce7843
describe
'485951' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWMJ' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
0620fe0e5f111f34811dd8d573f1e6c1
01ed3ceda0aeef1a9b86db3b483c314d024edff1
'2012-06-20T09:55:00-04:00'
describe
'457910' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWMK' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
a503d03446a7dadf8d702f3c3ff5635a
56031d30b6e93af1cc9be658995ded7beb9a7b25
'2012-06-20T09:52:21-04:00'
describe
'508011' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWML' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
470ed82e34487e642200d338e89d506e
c363b5a238b986271b9c3656760b6014c0718123
'2012-06-20T09:51:23-04:00'
describe
'313630' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWMM' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
ab9e48801064986d6c25452362d20c76
c72ba4189e7d2e029063d0e2bb7b1a716c0a7f5e
'2012-06-20T09:53:34-04:00'
describe
'545499' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWMN' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
04a394500f20e95da5204a9944955986
666802ad316d6a5e17f5907ecb1a83ea31be4c54
'2012-06-20T09:54:00-04:00'
describe
'294294' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWMO' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
d326de29b4fefa5e7f847957bdfa494f
1947cf877953c7af503d61b776cf99233e1e8a9e
'2012-06-20T09:54:59-04:00'
describe
'578687' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWMP' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
4a4d8fe707675522132744a01276abb8
b725f1e083c99e151576ea8520476d2206940588
'2012-06-20T09:54:22-04:00'
describe
'455454' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWMQ' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
deb11083cb03189bdd23dc16ab11916f
57b1dec680cd80d46ab26d0bea95ae9736a6111a
describe
'518789' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWMR' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
3bd951ba469934d71c3506e0fe714f8d
6f62911b128d0dbc3a8ff37d6e7edd4849ba9f4b
'2012-06-20T09:51:38-04:00'
describe
'514120' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWMS' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
fb1b6ce8679ddd4b51691d83a94c99a7
bb00bc290597457fddea4f395ff7d4ffec3cfef8
'2012-06-20T09:49:34-04:00'
describe
'541278' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWMT' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
2e91deff43e30fb4a9e8ecfef7ce0ec7
922307279612a0c2d975c2ac767bc43966e7b23a
describe
'301887' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWMU' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
219ae422a1ab8347cb94e4bd62e094cd
b52e425f3dad30eddaeed56e52b93d22343a34b9
'2012-06-20T09:52:50-04:00'
describe
'282413' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWMV' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
6784d9e5eae7ecd4f4375acd9f4fde73
c860c3aceb00fe7c8e588da71c36019e30396a81
describe
'1328137' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWMW' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
4f2feac2d9c52864e2a61e28831c8124
ca5eb3b14dd7a214d91379ae7ee4298d952aaeca
'2012-06-20T09:54:21-04:00'
describe
'1536078' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWMX' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
a3808ae604666f81b2c9641b8a86e27d
541ef2e33167699bbf5538fbded6b7bc76ec8633
'2012-06-20T09:54:18-04:00'
describe
'48765' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWMY' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
1525409ff18fdecda2b2c55d95aaba9b
3c6748c5c723943afecc158868002b994c54494b
'2012-06-20T09:52:33-04:00'
describe
'9633' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWMZ' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
6f250e9885d550d9f41fdf5c212cd3e1
eecb2ecd227f037a7fc31890dafd0c0716d4e4bd
'2012-06-20T09:49:59-04:00'
describe
'1541852' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWNA' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
77efc1c4a99a4cdf989b93459e28fe89
5d8f9fb71f945caca0b9ec682e9b88842194b01b
'2012-06-20T09:54:52-04:00'
describe
'1553789' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWNB' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
4ec7805595c021615f25d71fbf2b6677
187bedc6a4d2e52675bdeb050ee66cf062a2fb53
'2012-06-20T09:53:49-04:00'
describe
'223472' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWNC' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
6180dd0ebff36c4feb740a2809910bdc
e4dd07446889cc04380c0f36f2e5f44cf96cb5ad
describe
'171224' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWND' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
46ba72851472824af65915aaa9467a00
9fa6ee3ff424ec1a0ab9cb54853483e69554e5df
'2012-06-20T09:52:35-04:00'
describe
'1547267' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWNE' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
8cb2eab03f9e1f56833f5fdb26555368
07df66f73029224d24812b18cb3b47762c5ce545
'2012-06-20T09:53:40-04:00'
describe
'1502999' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWNF' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
d442867fbf609272b817fb4a4f75ca55
ec723025946c693f8e004f64808d77d6274a83c1
'2012-06-20T09:52:13-04:00'
describe
'149907' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWNG' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
c893f95f1ac136c83a63fe551dc900a7
af47e8a4e1b31a5d0f33cee6202a3c9175513c2b
describe
'1387522' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWNH' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
4130eba8137406e6b9f5c6987b876cf3
affd18ef377a489d15bd4c34d63fa0572e1570e8
'2012-06-20T09:50:18-04:00'
describe
'216201' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWNI' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
809e0bc6ebef3342cbf63d95bab4fff8
c68470ecb492fd517ae5ccc5ee664271c8689a46
'2012-06-20T09:51:15-04:00'
describe
'1606611' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWNJ' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
40674aaf00e17b8bbdb9d05731a46b6d
43d8cf4f12067f1b8a1370800858976831748847
'2012-06-20T09:55:04-04:00'
describe
'185712' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWNK' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
679d001681d7486b2000b65e66526147
3d52a68433af8f5c1d9f46bc3f40e5c559a4c497
'2012-06-20T09:53:28-04:00'
describe
'1687581' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWNL' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
a3e2de54175bc9f4fccedec569fffc51
89f79af65bb0c80fa03e02fcc63fabd9a9b9a688
'2012-06-20T09:54:25-04:00'
describe
'1687610' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWNM' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
987b5b22a70711a54af100889a780a8a
8f9e892ac126d0fa4bae097a623c43b4b9a23b68
'2012-06-20T09:51:27-04:00'
describe
'132060' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWNN' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
156b093698f0fba2a55ea2981ce3a148
d545576439a80884636ddbbb55bb38e29281d0c6
describe
'1376729' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWNO' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
80c753ee253630ba80dd938839f3e1c3
23fb178412c981b9bbd0e87133b4fa98325f7a4d
'2012-06-20T09:52:34-04:00'
describe
'298475' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWNP' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
39b748609a8a59f73bd010651c6f63fc
ef8ab47cbfeb8c854102e7d5216b459488f02f46
'2012-06-20T09:49:26-04:00'
describe
'1687564' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWNQ' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
3b121a3d9895a1ade5051735428c4e91
70ea1fb8d1fe0217b0778726215d347db83fe3b9
'2012-06-20T09:54:53-04:00'
describe
'1687608' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWNR' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
bfe019ffc397327da8601a1ca0c53668
27ce48b55b4bd68f2ce30ebae844b20e56a0217e
describe
'1524818' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWNS' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
64c57efe7b879933f40df30a9091b5c7
f691b1cf693fde790c2c03560171aeb417abc2b9
'2012-06-20T09:52:44-04:00'
describe
'1687597' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWNT' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
145d06dde33450285567c87f8411c329
2aefe8cde28c34e20ba49e3045641aba82ac04fe
'2012-06-20T09:51:51-04:00'
describe
'1687574' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWNU' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
b6d4536dd95e5fc3e8ca7bcfd661f94b
0b6b8382d5873ffab7c00f1af7d11cbb55a5fd9e
'2012-06-20T09:50:00-04:00'
describe
'1604110' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWNV' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
71a45768edc563c0c31cb208ee3114c4
eaf1accaa5657520716ffaea8f8fa517e699850b
'2012-06-20T09:50:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWNW' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
c0f334363decdc6c12a3dcf3ce3159fc
80ce4ce356e5b42fa9b04240d85b2eb5c6c74700
describe
'168958' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWNX' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
ee2e6416fce1b7c260c305625efe630d
ef6807badf9dc9e0df592b6e94ff925b8b1d8aad
'2012-06-20T09:54:35-04:00'
describe
'1540648' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWNY' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
0e77b15b805d7f34072ca7cb46c11214
0b6032e0411ea6e252faa37a3001ee26d0f534f7
'2012-06-20T09:50:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWNZ' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
5e02f3a13b00adc0d82c1360ee6119be
6cfb0c5545244db1b6c96d09399ff90184c98506
'2012-06-20T09:49:38-04:00'
describe
'1720363' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWOA' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
9dcd522ab3fcf3ed288706ff0a9faf1b
b558abb8b07028df30987ea16882c53cfeaf7851
'2012-06-20T09:51:02-04:00'
describe
'1687596' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWOB' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
2d11fb60108aabca944923f004740bc6
1aa19367f7d283b2adf303adc18309f93a894b1c
'2012-06-20T09:53:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWOC' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
e47db1bdc041b3591ee88ce5c13161cd
b585b96142c5e1911242dd7f061900a66fcb603b
describe
'170100' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWOD' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
3acee261291fd09de3ab235c3cc1fa8a
fe83301a90462e00afbf74502fbe40a8e7b6b910
'2012-06-20T09:51:04-04:00'
describe
'1687513' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWOE' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
e27022935e18963ed36957da1b80cf3e
0ca7d3b67fc96f2391d08ed6b20d8e8d0da19834
'2012-06-20T09:51:00-04:00'
describe
'1720358' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWOF' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
ef552e7286595301a25303b40c865344
500416ac85a26eb54f1f3b8568f4d361ef05ccb7
'2012-06-20T09:50:23-04:00'
describe
'1687586' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWOG' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
cf80a4357600f1b44f786c5b163068a2
a59822cb7f62e2e01f669fd4000dfe9ed8cfc517
'2012-06-20T09:52:17-04:00'
describe
'208635' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWOH' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
3e8358746e9e851cd0916442fc677dff
34f608fdd24655194aeee3c10fa575eee27b70a9
'2012-06-20T09:51:28-04:00'
describe
'1720364' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWOI' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
1c637edfbd87e0398c40d603e3035e0b
8891f12c3bb2a5729f65f684291ee246297e6452
'2012-06-20T09:52:48-04:00'
describe
'306126' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWOJ' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
e5ee76a418560c3705c5a4deeaddf752
f739ccd92b976c66edce12de5a490030296b8549
'2012-06-20T09:54:24-04:00'
describe
'214037' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWOK' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
a497df7b21ad0e534c12fa76bd43728f
0938b183615847b0068828b4bdcd391320ae5448
describe
'1687600' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWOL' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
8963541bc976670415e88f5abddf29ae
fdc1e2bc8bdb9a3c0cebb03421fd7b032a73ac5b
'2012-06-20T09:53:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWOM' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
62c138d9c966c8cece2fc4217b7e94a3
0d62a7375dfac199a08b29c71f56bba557ccfac6
'2012-06-20T09:53:11-04:00'
describe
'1687584' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWON' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
c5b254724c0913fb5d9934cedea286bc
e24af37f1ffc0c7b2b48585872b10e123effcd4d
describe
'196803' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWOO' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
6dbc7001671cf2fd3b4fab504ccc34ea
382d24f75dc27b81d69d6079be19fa90bafcf002
'2012-06-20T09:52:56-04:00'
describe
'1720207' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWOP' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
6cea2910ab286ae9c6b92ddd19fe5882
7821e4dcd1c0364d06791b552ee736ab98ec5bb3
'2012-06-20T09:54:05-04:00'
describe
'1687611' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWOQ' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
c22aa24ead033015fc211ae23484ec0c
7cc40c53519e1d7a2e9429f505a99f9715e83aba
describe
'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWOR' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
efd81dbf12426536a5dd58c5a4814c34
4477d010da20fc5e3e90a00b9d462f97ea9a4696
'2012-06-20T09:50:20-04:00'
describe
'1687603' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWOS' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
28cc6ee02a75de9dc5ffe3e041c44e72
5399ea8baae9173d2672076865bbb1ad7d5d6d1f
'2012-06-20T09:53:20-04:00'
describe
'1687601' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWOT' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
020882781303b800db26e847c8243200
ac7317f1ecca7be983b9bc6c86544e4bd5ff8b66
'2012-06-20T09:54:42-04:00'
describe
'1687573' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWOU' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
39a6be7c29e6ac339dd3e43ff5411606
0055a40555c4ca74dd1794425ec793a376bb55ff
describe
'1590629' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWOV' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
b4a0f391105903e2e54e5bc57d559a94
248cd673f0009e91a969b34506d1e8dbecad252a
'2012-06-20T09:53:37-04:00'
describe
'1578265' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWOW' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
c700ca8d215997a051c20ec11776be09
74b0c678eba248f652e13d78568cbeaba6c1d42a
describe
'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWOX' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
bda9f2ea1c15a3f9f6df06176d2258e8
56530c10681237c0858bdad3cedd0e6bb646ec43
'2012-06-20T09:52:04-04:00'
describe
'1687517' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWOY' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
80012c1b9dcdd226277ecab223c0ea13
e636a596b136461eec73bf00e004dc4f761942b1
describe
'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWOZ' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
169bd40e73c4fc74d39e1d4ebef9caa3
00395339440d77b673c1636648e999149c202396
describe
'1687599' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWPA' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
a7c930cf2e2682061e23073f94fbf9f8
9ee49deaff7a65659def64256de97f51ba5663da
'2012-06-20T09:53:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWPB' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
34a17ba05f14e05c86b3fd1bb681ad2b
696896a068e0f7d317f0593ef34ff6166894de7b
'2012-06-20T09:52:06-04:00'
describe
'1687555' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWPC' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
3a16869d12d37f5c9ed0700b5d1fa0c4
7ca23594fbc38d5152d7830a232e34cee8a58f30
'2012-06-20T09:50:19-04:00'
describe
'1605010' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWPD' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
e2305e264e149c0a099ad5a04823d241
24cf953b3f091ef19eeb257d6461ac87428cf5ee
describe
'1687537' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWPE' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
e0787a162ef50439b17b198854155957
5bf11ca206c1a159c417867e8f10fc75accde6a5
'2012-06-20T09:54:10-04:00'
describe
'185840' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWPF' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
9b16f8782bc5320e953564b0cb354940
f8d26522e9849e70d97b5aba594a650d2960e931
'2012-06-20T09:54:40-04:00'
describe
'1687579' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWPG' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
06ab5f6fba194c6b14a01c5d7d07c1cc
c188b677cd2acde20aaad0cf6644e4dd9b28c23a
'2012-06-20T09:52:22-04:00'
describe
'1720339' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWPH' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
abe32801b49ea989b25c3e6e6e5836b9
236fd6721e5a20bc584798ac8075a2ee63ea89b2
'2012-06-20T09:50:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWPI' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
7d381ffd04016595b7d95ff512e0acd9
3d65cddbfbda0133597c2c2cdf792b933404afef
describe
'1720349' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWPJ' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
55d95784aab1248a77d42f32c0bbd40d
1f82e278ad7b015eed0f2305048842062abada56
'2012-06-20T09:49:56-04:00'
describe
'1720362' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWPK' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
881a251328ec0ec03660847585c43b51
8deab0343f521f72f04df835b1c7d6a80d884760
'2012-06-20T09:51:56-04:00'
describe
'1687559' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWPL' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
089a7a50a2830c810dd35d170f379bef
c8c19007651a65f3e77471ce0bc769b69a6ae414
describe
'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWPM' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
f729e51e210110c8479d9b424e562d87
2ad720cb5894e5b558f7ec4eeb85f9291a0acdd3
describe
'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWPN' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
6d1a32ace5c20ccd2864b7371b4c6737
cc01281c5fcde7b22b26d2b0ad7057aaae9d55d7
'2012-06-20T09:52:02-04:00'
describe
'1687499' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWPO' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
7a215eeb7bc47281876e967055464bfb
67436e020e6b1348bfc7659215d0a9f303f7e571
'2012-06-20T09:52:39-04:00'
describe
'1687595' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWPP' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
15e462d2c119021869be9acf330a466c
05cab86b14fda9fe80dd7d0d63c7cb452c8d8f69
'2012-06-20T09:51:08-04:00'
describe
'1687606' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWPQ' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
6c9f4107e91769a4d7c724f0fbc46513
39be4d272feb489880c117969001e60dfbcc1115
'2012-06-20T09:51:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWPR' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
650e38cc4de09a053bd082b606db21fd
5cae95fd3ea2e482ff37689af6bfaf242f6b3d99
describe
'1687604' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWPS' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
d6626f7e9941261150c742afaa13ef9b
1ec3e548e0691a1c4a36d0e8da36846e70ebbde8
'2012-06-20T09:53:54-04:00'
describe
'206167' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWPT' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
ddf9c9a7b0ab36dcf5938916fe839405
716a309b28315ca801c24ab029dabac7e07ed997
'2012-06-20T09:50:59-04:00'
describe
'1687343' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWPU' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
b83bf89871fb2aa3ecd619b101fefb15
031347ffec44f91cc823b50d7f135cdde9df9a7e
'2012-06-20T09:52:30-04:00'
describe
'196621' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWPV' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
6427383df390b1eccce44679a0a91ab5
5944033a36490a8a8d04edea440d3e5d01850464
'2012-06-20T09:50:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWPW' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
7cab0028ce4cd79759c74da70e6a67eb
0c85aa1273a95b3b5112703afdb049daeda3f460
describe
'238815' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWPX' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
d699d8c1376da7282bfc6c646f4ce4bb
df3327dffc74cec6b6f59900046999f2776a6885
describe
'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWPY' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
6d8ae18851fc0b8c66fec4e16d1f1f29
6fa496a8a1b32824affa74f2677a20b5b9ed3ffe
'2012-06-20T09:52:18-04:00'
describe
'151148' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWPZ' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
a8ed7cc196690558f61ae3cbec74c4ea
4109ccecc7adad07cc9784fbbca84feeb1cc1027
'2012-06-20T09:49:49-04:00'
describe
'131222' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWQA' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
88d0feb4ea2278322d0ac2637e743f2d
6c55aeb03f9a34bda6be8e3d9865d4660bb873d8
'2012-06-20T09:51:20-04:00'
describe
'1687489' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWQB' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
b7c9f0fc78c6f05054c1bd5eab5f3e07
3df0bdb4a0bf15a4c8d8af988b6affbdae13e868
describe
'1687323' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWQC' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
5f438321b6e7967249bff2401814a923
370580443e0c03489317ceb3cdcdae0f9a702209
'2012-06-20T09:49:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWQD' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
1c5f32bf6e25ecda4b1fdc59844b200a
3607b9029dbf8e1b49b33a7e1ba915beaaf87bdb
'2012-06-20T09:50:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWQE' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
0f6b8e71cfce6133806e0b9b4aebab06
1f66a6476bf9a296455e18426349fe01751e57cc
'2012-06-20T09:52:29-04:00'
describe
'1687609' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWQF' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
bfd75b73c295a6b6df1730ce4016fa04
8a560d5f7d23bf1c1f7661cf1788d6773595dfe6
'2012-06-20T09:53:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWQG' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
36434b1834663428bdc0e194d94d98ce
770e6d45c389c318cf543573757c728a3c6cae07
'2012-06-20T09:50:11-04:00'
describe
'197898' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWQH' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
fd58183fbbf3cb5e321bb6b0e23f97a5
aa3a368e13c8a5f0ed8354b935736105571254ff
'2012-06-20T09:54:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWQI' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
5ff24eb659957a0e7991a78e08dc8bd4
302eae3ac197254a1ac272847bc1eaa7bdf4ba95
describe
'168423' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWQJ' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
a231f4f5b6ee2a8e74278b0cca2f6371
d139faba7c984bea49756e13f6a389e60e6bef06
describe
'1416732' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWQK' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
854f3368bceb18baff87f81449116fb4
b16c037a4f3b81699636eb39ce974b6ed43a1553
'2012-06-20T09:51:54-04:00'
describe
'1687545' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWQL' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
eed41ffd9b71fa011f79085f325eae09
0b239c356172dc1545fb86ce6189b68614545a49
describe
'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWQM' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
88a0edf43a382341279fe4ec6543922c
e71a2529df7313dda28682cbad30d5805fc9caf0
'2012-06-20T09:50:25-04:00'
describe
'1687605' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWQN' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
362fc517f20a8cd47cb52e44ad2e15f7
e179b01d881026dffdf4cc0747a982ce51d86e19
describe
'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWQO' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
2ee0a371e647e668ee1465408e2a9c43
4c6475079c2c6144a3d802b9c69d379db68d4762
'2012-06-20T09:50:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWQP' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
9341dc6ddcef4af4bc8cba9c3cbdd99d
3ede848a3a80c999f075e6bd0592a6bbbb3f34aa
'2012-06-20T09:50:12-04:00'
describe
'654969' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWQQ' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
43cfa8cb04625f836e15496e9dcc7cce
05a4472130b5e43f528bce832002dbec31f1cbde
'2012-06-20T09:50:42-04:00'
describe
'28379588' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWQR' 'sip-files00001.tif'
da5a8c7129a149f2b4eb3603446665b4
e9d01e019e17053328fe400625ec7001b826ce12
'2012-06-20T09:49:22-04:00'
describe
'31894828' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWQS' 'sip-files00002.tif'
124f566635f6faec39ed38feaec365e2
79db374302d977893169060e3520d62fb5b33b2c
describe
'36881848' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWQT' 'sip-files00006.tif'
6ada2054b975b1c10e32f49a4b7d1ce6
778a0c179e64e6254a9cbb0dac6438c570a5fbed
'2012-06-20T09:53:06-04:00'
describe
'1698264' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWQU' 'sip-files00007.tif'
c41399ea7c448668c6c9bc543c08c933
69d27b06f923ba44b067608b935831e0785993d8
'2012-06-20T09:50:38-04:00'
describe
'1695892' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWQV' 'sip-files00008.tif'
d119a7653654e2fd6feed1a6f28c1086
af0f46c033b435efb265c0c63976529e599cd748
'2012-06-20T09:53:18-04:00'
describe
'12348236' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWQW' 'sip-files00009.tif'
9370fdfde8a79319db73e74ad1cf9c70
8bafafc68d4908b499346da24c5652cbeea9e839
describe
'12443840' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWQX' 'sip-files00010.tif'
b56c6638ef78c2d2eba5608aa8e17963
b9d8077509b119d8a4905100105a7d27e9df126a
'2012-06-20T09:50:49-04:00'
describe
'1703464' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWQY' 'sip-files00011.tif'
4d566a6095ba249ac743957987644987
37faed3bcc87cdaeaa83451affb8c1a62520349a
describe
'1702396' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWQZ' 'sip-files00012.tif'
35bcd8efa7f555d2cf9d7265194252ee
4125ea6a390522cccde4cc610470d5f3d8c07f99
describe
'12393472' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWRA' 'sip-files00013.tif'
d5afc12f335e7392ea9334fab376b48b
f6ec63486924573a55aa122135410bb9034b6fd0
'2012-06-20T09:53:44-04:00'
describe
'12039036' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWRB' 'sip-files00014.tif'
c2c694e94055015f4bb7692b3737eec3
002e1074d425c5db4b2f33af34c110ea06d5e744
'2012-06-20T09:51:52-04:00'
describe
'1701500' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWRC' 'sip-files00015.tif'
b24315be23fa62a149bf61fa36b4846c
422b94922172f1a1c280d30d2ec5ab5772729094
describe
'11111740' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWRD' 'sip-files00016.tif'
d9bbed24808a615961260108f37e778d
7ca001c37b032f7ea1319cbaa0c452700f8cd867
'2012-06-20T09:51:37-04:00'
describe
'1703236' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWRE' 'sip-files00017.tif'
60eeb99786b06e5c5eb7f96f1840992f
c647c5a6f6370119813c77b994ca4ed40f7cf2d3
'2012-06-20T09:49:41-04:00'
describe
'12865200' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWRF' 'sip-files00018.tif'
9b6da86536881e50aa09100dde77d3e1
3fe85cb3489f8b6d9712649b53a8a4c35d325576
'2012-06-20T09:52:46-04:00'
describe
'1702256' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWRG' 'sip-files00019.tif'
307688a9903b2adb5fd301fd018296cb
7b786fe04eebf0cea5ddc7877a3f9385fbb34159
'2012-06-20T09:54:38-04:00'
describe
'13513020' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWRH' 'sip-files00020.tif'
1e650c1f9cd54a547116b456cc99f74b
242b216f70a4e7c56ec8eb3abf6af2662f345053
'2012-06-20T09:51:06-04:00'
describe
'13513520' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWRI' 'sip-files00021.tif'
4c8b2ed979640022e903c9c4f4ad39dc
0c23acd9d2f31a96f44d47c717c59c8e8785444c
'2012-06-20T09:54:04-04:00'
describe
'1699764' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWRJ' 'sip-files00022.tif'
4c3558674054c7ee71be93503d0f748d
849fca1328e42fd86ccd40538744149cbf59d830
describe
'11025396' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWRK' 'sip-files00023.tif'
063849f5c48a179e9c5afb4800cb0c01
cf33032cb6548f861d302d4f646afe5775ad70c8
'2012-06-20T09:54:19-04:00'
describe
'1702652' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWRL' 'sip-files00024.tif'
6e9cb29b54607a6f1a7f69384c25f3fa
143eb5cdf2ff867bade68f1c68515af77e4b28e0
describe
'13513268' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWRM' 'sip-files00025.tif'
bb84764f4b5a19c7569c643edf619880
137b43dd38a7ced40aeb96c45c0214df1530f380
'2012-06-20T09:51:46-04:00'
describe
'13514360' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWRN' 'sip-files00026.tif'
eb4911fd930e8a2be565f5e2c7e0482a
bb3a2d4278db9f1c83de7a10b055f56bb7da1866
'2012-06-20T09:50:01-04:00'
describe
'12210716' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWRO' 'sip-files00027.tif'
20d98a18c140b062e5ce9583461507b9
52b6d1dabb9aa84232bbd683ac884cc1ea052cbc
'2012-06-20T09:49:46-04:00'
describe
'13513616' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWRP' 'sip-files00028.tif'
8362118da01ec9efb93d341ddd527329
2d31d4bc10c715795090064cc51146be537540d0
describe
'13514408' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWRQ' 'sip-files00029.tif'
d571bbd9a7e70e49611c937777a3f35c
fb4cea426d5fd785915691804e50743a5ea0161c
'2012-06-20T09:51:47-04:00'
describe
'12845088' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWRR' 'sip-files00030.tif'
56623f5471a8449015954b74eabfe90b
be05a5a3e0d2bcf40aa9e1465fd61190b23e5869
'2012-06-20T09:52:36-04:00'
describe
'13513644' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWRS' 'sip-files00031.tif'
4ec1ffabe8aded0ad2085bc3d7a270e2
3e0d5ca7386b8b4ac246f0a1403d1cc68ea6e389
'2012-06-20T09:51:26-04:00'
describe
'1700440' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWRT' 'sip-files00032.tif'
752a88cabeee7a5125de5d686b1a0bbb
2746f69ebab4dccdb9c1b8154afbd5eb74529f1a
'2012-06-20T09:49:50-04:00'
describe
'12337256' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWRU' 'sip-files00033.tif'
991a4077d3af177a8a1226168cee4468
54ab07373146a9fa20232a77e1df6daabfe23705
'2012-06-20T09:54:08-04:00'
describe
'13513360' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWRV' 'sip-files00034.tif'
7757a63940c19e9b237e9e07ba8efe01
5494b399734c73859c11a609858bbad278fab066
describe
'13775828' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWRW' 'sip-files00035.tif'
31fd1b389b968a0f365df133feaf1ecb
0311c4d7cf3443a1a7ca7d6ee0f6c640065c01a6
'2012-06-20T09:53:38-04:00'
describe
'13513164' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWRX' 'sip-files00036.tif'
302355eaf290376afe3382edf2e59647
2a389ae10fbb9b0f2abb037bce459cb258dfdb67
'2012-06-20T09:51:09-04:00'
describe
'13512952' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWRY' 'sip-files00037.tif'
320e78c332fa66d8100f1528d832bfdc
bf4bbeed05d0aa3cb1a8e89f32e2d8aea1872560
'2012-06-20T09:49:27-04:00'
describe
'1700988' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWRZ' 'sip-files00038.tif'
d5e47021cd85268fcae77a82f65106f9
1b117337af056f7c5ba75faf7a09874703dce93d
'2012-06-20T09:54:29-04:00'
describe
'13775916' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWSA' 'sip-files00040.tif'
fd66a1870baa67de48099cafff82862d
3775247d3dd3eee2a9381465021db5c552767ec0
'2012-06-20T09:50:48-04:00'
describe
'13513496' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWSB' 'sip-files00041.tif'
0913091fc424b518f9dfd662ea1f6d44
172e0f503ce537dd48059e092ca882863aaf604d
describe
'13775536' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWSC' 'sip-files00043.tif'
e8bb8aa00bfdea1234867fa3580778f9
9974074784b4a58c1c7b597c26432510ec6cc23e
'2012-06-20T09:50:08-04:00'
describe
'1704224' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWSD' 'sip-files00044.tif'
d414e082c2c273c7b33ce02340f808a7
6b1ca600e1e126f7216dba2946d6c1c73e20ca6a
describe
'1703264' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWSE' 'sip-files00045.tif'
df83c6eb8028515fed01f357851b051e
0906504b4c248739aaa597eaad20d645915a9e10
'2012-06-20T09:52:12-04:00'
describe
'13513892' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWSF' 'sip-files00046.tif'
9d34bc9b4e23c62a05179d9c29b657ee
c4215eb545c8dec32f0a69fa64fd632707182a80
describe
'13515076' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWSG' 'sip-files00047.tif'
db7f78819339e253310593b67e564211
1d33636410739307986a1dda90b07cddee78484a
'2012-06-20T09:51:03-04:00'
describe
'13514816' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWSH' 'sip-files00048.tif'
a6df30e9744c79ce9fb7a23664c3a62f
34bbe9ba960ba26253db8e443dfadbbf91d12aad
describe
'1703156' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWSI' 'sip-files00049.tif'
52ecd8258ae8a47fccf098daedca592a
7d863c5089e3a94cf3523bfc848b4ab745aba90e
describe
'13775080' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWSJ' 'sip-files00050.tif'
e6b702878eca5a3fc684c296fbdf3bb5
b34d582b429f8e0ff12d15c19e183e94650c5248
'2012-06-20T09:53:36-04:00'
describe
'13513432' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWSK' 'sip-files00051.tif'
1583bec04d6d984e7b4c07844f54c70e
46e7813c95c282989ee3698d74868c87140afc96
'2012-06-20T09:50:33-04:00'
describe
'13513512' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWSL' 'sip-files00052.tif'
5cdf00015e91687c76ed22d1c9531500
211d7646ebead1e6f027df09f62c09d7878e29bd
'2012-06-20T09:50:30-04:00'
describe
'13513704' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWSM' 'sip-files00053.tif'
be1e353d70fc97f2a93371929e79d54f
2659a8f6ea12fdcc2952c9ea52eafc3c68bce32e
describe
'13512624' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWSN' 'sip-files00054.tif'
25f0ecfe0f75ee02e1979a4044ac9c63
fb0da0bd76dcd8dd1fe5c92c8102c4ddb75dee07
describe
'13512044' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWSO' 'sip-files00055.tif'
df18a3732a62bb328bb913a151dd8a4a
e63c9dcaceb5f39e4ab4ce0555028c7c5eec85ea
'2012-06-20T09:49:55-04:00'
describe
'12735804' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWSP' 'sip-files00056.tif'
f0f6a1c8df17a596949c4f71b2dbb363
6407ac3d74bb1ed50d25ad87a84f119470e5dc89
'2012-06-20T09:50:47-04:00'
describe
'12639480' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWSQ' 'sip-files00057.tif'
ad34b648e1ff7b4330d4cb0bbabd0ac5
eb9c788254661d47d7bd183a4126467f87724c26
'2012-06-20T09:53:17-04:00'
describe
'13513144' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWSR' 'sip-files00058.tif'
da5308bcd68d3a871ea839f1a9d91378
a4ff4f18778f2cb480767d9ce0d90cde211e5125
'2012-06-20T09:51:41-04:00'
describe
'13513300' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWSS' 'sip-files00059.tif'
4c23ce7a38c650f3551ddbe254765359
6db3741074ab4f1c487fc80a33e0ea953e611617
'2012-06-20T09:49:52-04:00'
describe
'13513396' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWST' 'sip-files00060.tif'
525ce161a9200b44a454786b4ae45001
8bfa065fb3526bfc06ad55b186b9eb650948f8b4
describe
'13513696' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWSU' 'sip-files00061.tif'
c002ccb09284562e70913eb7e7322bd4
056aacb768d11ee25404206b0e34ac0f274b2fff
'2012-06-20T09:54:28-04:00'
describe
'13513040' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWSV' 'sip-files00062.tif'
bd266186316b73d8a81e573c9d11ac67
b61416803e43db8a7994437198f0ecd3a3f4545b
'2012-06-20T09:52:49-04:00'
describe
'13513508' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWSW' 'sip-files00063.tif'
b2073b0fe8e826947574a6fce11e226a
72144a586758c56872196f84d7d1159778e5ab75
'2012-06-20T09:55:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWSX' 'sip-files00064.tif'
f034654d4bba877ba9ebcc2f5e2adcca
ac797f853e61664d962fbd2bf0a5c04d097e495a
describe
'12852728' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWSY' 'sip-files00065.tif'
f2de4500a9cd117b18e9dee5095380c7
51f0e7c776e66202b770b8f62f3fbaed1a4de008
'2012-06-20T09:52:32-04:00'
describe
'13514152' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWSZ' 'sip-files00066.tif'
cc22f75910ce80c5b6a18c3731b7687f
1727246ff91ed9693e003057d8c64a1e7e38d146
'2012-06-20T09:52:52-04:00'
describe
'1702636' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWTA' 'sip-files00067.tif'
5843c7afd11304da69b8a0f7ae138c75
89b928fdae099ab7de7564f4043927e0ae727592
describe
'13512788' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWTB' 'sip-files00068.tif'
f4294962641a2c721a3165c92e67ddfa
a5cbf0b9262638389d441c505cc732c402468448
'2012-06-20T09:49:33-04:00'
describe
'13775632' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWTC' 'sip-files00069.tif'
e909096d1201256064502e33a3bb5cd3
1763df08f84f59ae3983c0d8c8e8b8a08a21de9c
'2012-06-20T09:49:39-04:00'
describe
'13511556' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWTD' 'sip-files00070.tif'
12e54d3d43b23e1f0160bdf7e00a7172
f347af01581ca5374db646abfdd3442b6a99f6d2
'2012-06-20T09:50:54-04:00'
describe
'13774716' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWTE' 'sip-files00071.tif'
100e65c1e2ffa8ae0a687dd69e35d9d5
d20c301df02bd2c07c76c43f721177e0971cc1cd
describe
'13775324' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWTF' 'sip-files00072.tif'
99c397fe4275d53c90950387c3f977e7
89298e7d612bd101540d4f7dbb7b469fcb9b7ac5
'2012-06-20T09:52:11-04:00'
describe
'13513488' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWTG' 'sip-files00073.tif'
cd2d1954e66596b88d19ba6adb247a22
6f7124ad4d930ac001fa10b2b3ba450ca0a3f5b1
'2012-06-20T09:55:02-04:00'
describe
'13513400' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWTH' 'sip-files00074.tif'
d8c6ab07871d5190dfee01e0dca3ca36
fb035c2b3f709ff1646841bb3718521c55356e3c
describe
'13512828' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWTI' 'sip-files00075.tif'
b08c2ff631267a3c77d3d1edbcb91aa7
fd9e864b85cf4e4b0b7bc1cfeaa45c75ddc1d2d2
describe
'13513776' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWTJ' 'sip-files00076.tif'
ad2be775b9b93cafe29424cdcd3e1d3e
5c9fada897e651ae6e41abce26bc6489be8fbeba
describe
'13513844' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWTK' 'sip-files00077.tif'
02a29e69ac5497572c804d2939e11f25
e9ef8695ec079daa8b01c2e9daccbd2fdfbc2db9
'2012-06-20T09:50:10-04:00'
describe
'13512956' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWTL' 'sip-files00078.tif'
bff340bb393ddf74b6e85f3bdac6019c
9b0ee04658ed744a6f94ee278f7ebf195534f374
'2012-06-20T09:52:15-04:00'
describe
'13512700' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWTM' 'sip-files00079.tif'
a98fa47f3ede3760276803c2bd8a5216
dd2ed799f289c8c57d4ff78bbc30e25b0b87d287
'2012-06-20T09:50:07-04:00'
describe
'13513684' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWTN' 'sip-files00080.tif'
cdf59bcab805e74ce93db46b58469b3b
b1176ca783caff3cbb2a326d7846549e16ed867d
'2012-06-20T09:51:16-04:00'
describe
'1703084' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWTO' 'sip-files00081.tif'
047e7e08ac8914128ebf1371cb9ebdf1
18dd19db78fc84d1f4ba76a6faeb25ed3f383289
'2012-06-20T09:52:23-04:00'
describe
'13512644' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWTP' 'sip-files00082.tif'
e0ae09503ab52a17baf600361128d685
b51eb8a2226690b5b347157609885317ebf87950
describe
'1701760' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWTQ' 'sip-files00083.tif'
65bc6ebb2242b33c7f149e46246d7d67
367b3009e0a1f1117b13d9055aa50e2d083c1f5e
'2012-06-20T09:53:01-04:00'
describe
'13514172' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWTR' 'sip-files00084.tif'
07fec5c4f7afca676625c05491a4c2a2
37ab58fee85a92964400f701e4cbff8bcd3c1b0f
describe
'1702884' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWTS' 'sip-files00085.tif'
123e085366e548a31769467a743e3a05
4c546d2d91b562b0d983d63cb37894ecead7b18c
'2012-06-20T09:52:09-04:00'
describe
'13775228' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWTT' 'sip-files00086.tif'
1550a3f23ec00678e128fae7eaccf093
7dd59a763257bb46d4556d3bedd47f2c4777c377
'2012-06-20T09:49:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWTU' 'sip-files00087.tif'
b4d2688cdeab41b42b96f204aebc349c
9251cd4b35f72ee5d51573018bd5502a75a6ba57
'2012-06-20T09:51:44-04:00'
describe
'1699936' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWTV' 'sip-files00088.tif'
1e42e227e42e42cd065d13a42da8de63
ad7253cf4f5fc98927ac28ea4386713d4b9ba8ad
'2012-06-20T09:49:40-04:00'
describe
'13513620' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWTW' 'sip-files00089.tif'
0e3acdca04d9c1d262a8f926a34b2fe7
be7a3b1d501b3a133bb441df7c1df2dc1a1cb8b9
'2012-06-20T09:51:22-04:00'
describe
'13514416' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWTX' 'sip-files00090.tif'
f5ea4cb30c67f8403501279aab77dc26
256679af8877db9fcfd3ec43713819731333db40
'2012-06-20T09:54:49-04:00'
describe
'13512596' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWTY' 'sip-files00092.tif'
2433cc6f72dd31cc7b06fd2a290f158a
a83be79b5d2a8edefbfa0c2410cd2a7ab526cd7b
'2012-06-20T09:49:36-04:00'
describe
'13512768' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWTZ' 'sip-files00094.tif'
e75009cad60f4356ddd3c28f019d1afe
2cf2ed0edf01fa218afe7c730b601bbf7a5866f5
describe
'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWUA' 'sip-files00095.tif'
57980f57e10358567c6d2568c46bab7d
c27fdf5e19b52e27f72856b48eafe9c8f0e3d5ed
describe
'13513464' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWUB' 'sip-files00096.tif'
c49494aee78df2f2219b745adc191ac4
8085b4dfb2fa77fc61a17a3058ea7cb60f9ae4fb
'2012-06-20T09:50:43-04:00'
describe
'1702052' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWUC' 'sip-files00097.tif'
e6fa726530542ade038532b21500c544
bcf744e0850341a8dabdb3bf3a725bd18f27e78e
describe
'11345996' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWUD' 'sip-files00098.tif'
f73f36b7b646c1baa7b440d1e463673c
6eaa03fc6742760ec79715f6847cf8cd3a92b86c
describe
'13512924' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWUE' 'sip-files00099.tif'
b3efb8803e69439a9f5b557e0fa2b859
e4b5c28403ca0a5f3a6a8ae1e15a916f12a23bb3
'2012-06-20T09:51:10-04:00'
describe
'13513188' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWUF' 'sip-files00100.tif'
bfd2f6f9fb6757c8b43585b0f360a8ad
ef864c17726c9b9699fc6e7da5d664984202faab
describe
'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWUG' 'sip-files00101.tif'
90a3682585f32e054b3df4ad63d1f925
73ac40e68dd8b67e9f19f2d2c9371a7c89f4ed7d
'2012-06-20T09:52:01-04:00'
describe
'13513500' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWUH' 'sip-files00102.tif'
05c77642bdf1738e3ffe607bf164f8f3
151f05e2a47943b1103cb7297537835d7afd6990
'2012-06-20T09:54:06-04:00'
describe
'40511580' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWUI' 'sip-files00105.tif'
2cafba991911434198739550c993c2f8
f959691b10c25bd347e92ed0b699afac0e11e9da
'2012-06-20T09:53:53-04:00'
describe
'15730740' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWUJ' 'sip-files00106.tif'
44559176f35cd3c35f051de5a9755136
c3f2ffcfec3a186682725e4fc93d8f55e9343ff2
'2012-06-20T09:49:37-04:00'
describe
'4009' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWUK' 'sip-files00002.pro'
abab29fbc9a47074a2028bd858f4389d
c63f93e571bbb54b5fc2ac1013cc68a43797ad47
'2012-06-20T09:51:50-04:00'
describe
'12144' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWUL' 'sip-files00006.pro'
2fec0937589790e61828c4ed28029307
8efb5b0edc726dd93fd98989552931579aef7237
describe
'3972' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWUM' 'sip-files00007.pro'
f94bc5b20237e5820d7de04de7fa3f08
d4d875b80759b2ca3132de8e5058f5c5517cd156
describe
'1498' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWUN' 'sip-files00008.pro'
8fac4adce970c004fe575a6f6ccbbfd4
67cc1cce6a2101f3b3b73b005da9a3f3e5f63f85
'2012-06-20T09:51:25-04:00'
describe
'13996' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWUO' 'sip-files00009.pro'
f22672bdccf93276abf735914d46722a
c5c153e527d715368fe73b6dabbd851c6ba2dcb6
describe
'19260' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWUP' 'sip-files00010.pro'
4f4ace6c96087267e2f95f0ea71e179b
d4e61439f66edaf951c8e6a9229bd517ec152ea8
'2012-06-20T09:54:33-04:00'
describe
'33932' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWUQ' 'sip-files00011.pro'
bab2b3da5ebe23404a08c15bc1edb385
6abf0ededb6a22df9d06410f00e89a516f0da46c
describe
'33379' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWUR' 'sip-files00012.pro'
3dd42838a37d58b54784bcf4434f3bc0
80ce7a86ae23d669273b9e219703b9125105bb96
describe
'15350' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWUS' 'sip-files00013.pro'
667c82b8ea8872100a7e99712508d373
22cb6e7b33525db41ca353cc21eb76fdb6249c0e
'2012-06-20T09:51:05-04:00'
describe
'23236' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWUT' 'sip-files00014.pro'
c9e3f620d6a92adbbdb895146b8a3d09
864eafebee140aabda0b7d397cf6c13a6cd778f6
describe
'21491' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWUU' 'sip-files00015.pro'
66c894b221fe8c3bca14b35c490fb1c8
c793ada5426562fc56cf1fd88ff6d5202329ed61
'2012-06-20T09:52:51-04:00'
describe
'12889' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWUV' 'sip-files00016.pro'
617c1a722d8689a757816594734d1206
57207efe75941310c8077161b4eeac5ecfafa242
'2012-06-20T09:49:24-04:00'
describe
'35119' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWUW' 'sip-files00017.pro'
639865ab5ab31b300e575dd95dc9fbe6
a28643ed63fa22e172f0a7c39e050f8a0509dd91
describe
'17202' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWUX' 'sip-files00018.pro'
2ef19e30585595268c47452583a4681d
ab994f3c43baf495315350ff9b4a85a845d133cf
'2012-06-20T09:49:43-04:00'
describe
'37482' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWUY' 'sip-files00019.pro'
54db0b660dc92f03c91eebbfb3b6404b
31feb37194ff7bacaa5874b6a5b20cba2b03d1d9
'2012-06-20T09:50:40-04:00'
describe
'19643' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWUZ' 'sip-files00020.pro'
7d8002751756aedef59e19e8c680ce44
2b3fdedb5013d7662ae4eeb2cd9b8fcb5f657094
'2012-06-20T09:52:24-04:00'
describe
'16597' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWVA' 'sip-files00021.pro'
bc184ab72e306ce32897893681e9976e
99b4122ad13e631fca2549d1b31cceb319bf6c7b
describe
'14514' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWVB' 'sip-files00022.pro'
bc7f0db980e70416e09fe2a6d62e13a7
8d157356ab3c4841fda523c4e094cc5cb8316438
'2012-06-20T09:52:27-04:00'
describe
'1012' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWVC' 'sip-files00023.pro'
1da5fcd9759eff7b14d13c04debec13a
a3d4c235771ddbf5a39740203c6e856ea7b3bea4
'2012-06-20T09:52:25-04:00'
describe
'42168' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWVD' 'sip-files00024.pro'
769b765508dbfe72774af493c27618e1
a7489faab73622fba2f961bb697b0fadbde5f54a
describe
'15097' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWVE' 'sip-files00025.pro'
f44934548d30562cccfb41aaf32898dc
84ff03ad8a2ae1f82f3036a18009f6bf9733fbe6
'2012-06-20T09:50:28-04:00'
describe
'30253' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWVF' 'sip-files00026.pro'
c28d6570d0bc6cbb45638904c33314d4
b30867935daf196a810a400624ecb417b56992db
'2012-06-20T09:51:36-04:00'
describe
'7067' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWVG' 'sip-files00027.pro'
d049640f76bf6561b60a4fe17dfab426
bcf5f6e988eb43894a65b79f85ee5b99b0983189
describe
'22917' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWVH' 'sip-files00028.pro'
0458e947178cda5c2b1ea056771cdcf9
e6ae5474ebe669242983a17f87563b9589b7ccb8
describe
'39428' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWVI' 'sip-files00029.pro'
94bbc0ffa57c60cca9cba6ac75acc2db
86c2ea514eb3ad5dcdadee912d5b0a7e8916d438
'2012-06-20T09:54:07-04:00'
describe
'16240' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWVJ' 'sip-files00030.pro'
60e97d9bd1be1e6c677e75851b0c5276
82a8bffddafc1f2ebf4efb66dcefd5f09998131d
describe
'26854' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWVK' 'sip-files00031.pro'
bfd3a573092324a8730fe3162ef0cd32
b2ce6f38b3c8fe2c3d149102d4a3a2d334817234
describe
'14335' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWVL' 'sip-files00032.pro'
05a466da9ce230c4c4fc8894e92bd77b
025fec19dafc27f941d7040cff8385f96ffa8d7c
describe
'11398' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWVM' 'sip-files00033.pro'
8d4ce69fb708ba908ee76cc131bbd773
624f818513d5e267b93d49136a57cae56478f133
'2012-06-20T09:51:01-04:00'
describe
'23458' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWVN' 'sip-files00035.pro'
48cee359436591e3571cbece035f6319
b14292357c5467f8366dd062efa443981cd63236
describe
'26478' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWVO' 'sip-files00036.pro'
cf385e0a7b14f88f5e59f89d46b36848
dd392d3ead1f615ae39d7ec60d5672f2f3940655
'2012-06-20T09:53:29-04:00'
describe
'21037' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWVP' 'sip-files00037.pro'
fe7e932db6652ff832cb754146289088
86ca77d6b222904bd439e4ea50c9afbba0dc0ec3
describe
'21733' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWVQ' 'sip-files00038.pro'
9dd77545713866a0483240226c0bc528
2110a726f17bb7e2339e3afc608d559298aa63a0
'2012-06-20T09:53:19-04:00'
describe
'24213' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWVR' 'sip-files00039.pro'
51d3df9aefa26a781020308baf7a7f11
fb765a8bf24384cf53dba08945a8759be52991bf
describe
'29892' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWVS' 'sip-files00040.pro'
fecacf53e076f2c051d9e6266cfdb6e0
6328447298a4fbcbe1df4fc5ec8e1d0dd4b85864
describe
'18692' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWVT' 'sip-files00041.pro'
11a6f2132284f41bf4c14804f7720a74
33de36d6ccd949653aa8b17cbd2e19405a6dfe27
describe
'33706' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWVU' 'sip-files00042.pro'
52166f3a2d55fb779225c58d90f3c7df
ff42ef3ffcb8096e79b324ec02dc562ee6386376
'2012-06-20T09:50:15-04:00'
describe
'8877' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWVV' 'sip-files00043.pro'
8194c9bececb142e36148be13e9f47ec
9e0603382d86b2b5b024d116dc859834d9aaa8ed
'2012-06-20T09:54:50-04:00'
describe
'32126' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWVW' 'sip-files00044.pro'
fc7e998e1032e83653cfd47f912ad952
43b9cc73179ac7ae29c44df70212eecc74366668
describe
'35235' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWVX' 'sip-files00045.pro'
96a92a93c991e9e10516d2e5017d03bf
71ff28e0f4b412d8cc2b023d27d1b60d7bb4c77d
describe
'22581' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWVY' 'sip-files00046.pro'
322786997ee15de816223245bf458990
22063c113c6e7b22dca4e705e7ea499718409e11
describe
'17015' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWVZ' 'sip-files00047.pro'
f29172c0ec605ce3a043c03f1ebfa35e
6eafbcee994af940e6f61483bbca40f75547807c
'2012-06-20T09:52:19-04:00'
describe
'15220' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWWA' 'sip-files00048.pro'
bfb5ec22c1d3b73231db53de682697e2
b49e43f9e3edcd354df7e9806383b0b767da7518
describe
'35727' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWWB' 'sip-files00049.pro'
76b509ca8ad879ea080f5544ca9b5d29
fb3d1eff908a2936fe8eb9b648641c776d7805de
describe
'19725' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWWC' 'sip-files00050.pro'
5884ce09e43b221699ad4be24889a490
bf6ca7e2111af16954ca6a74261fc168522892fe
describe
'26596' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWWD' 'sip-files00051.pro'
f3df2709534f8a69178302174d47221f
5caf6fb1b2bbe1f3c742117b0d517b64a28aa188
'2012-06-20T09:52:10-04:00'
describe
'14868' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWWE' 'sip-files00052.pro'
5aeca05009e1215e68d2e5ba9d0ee9af
842a29f4a66571e5db60f55ad99ddd136ecbc930
describe
'26466' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWWF' 'sip-files00053.pro'
142fcf9c2d8f4ed56f815006c53564cf
f09b030143b15eb23342bc9110b36b5f56b5f72e
describe
'15300' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWWG' 'sip-files00054.pro'
439d90e50a602376bdc648a565d0db68
763761cc014145de7cfed3e7e537e960f83ee091
'2012-06-20T09:52:26-04:00'
describe
'7621' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWWH' 'sip-files00055.pro'
c0f51875b67e2da4211856e843be5d85
99bd54b3f51d4ae33b739c938a20ffe8f1a42893
'2012-06-20T09:49:29-04:00'
describe
'21210' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWWI' 'sip-files00056.pro'
c7da81f4de9de3e26dfb770ca7f84cef
34650f24b08dca1e06fd3ab1b8890600e3b6a28f
describe
'9933' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWWJ' 'sip-files00057.pro'
8e19b5309f1f64dd6ba8a4ebd6c1925a
cec959000ec22f1da4a793c418cccacb7a25c966
describe
'20338' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWWK' 'sip-files00058.pro'
485783281a4682a835da7b8706bb3666
c859e8d44a29976d13c409dee5ab6477bdb816db
describe
'35689' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWWL' 'sip-files00059.pro'
c16d17f65678d426d469ddb2e21dfc18
64d90efe37eab0387a06b999932450ed8be47392
'2012-06-20T09:53:30-04:00'
describe
'18348' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWWM' 'sip-files00060.pro'
40b602d513326ac8cd6781b5587d180b
3fcb65b68282f9ce008e56fba2a0811869245f9d
describe
'29989' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWWN' 'sip-files00061.pro'
ffdd23126ae833bc9d57ce8987987ac0
260e1fc076807bcc533719c6f963ef20fe92da39
'2012-06-20T09:51:58-04:00'
describe
'25187' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWWO' 'sip-files00062.pro'
b3bea6ecd913f0e9f8c63540472f5278
b6395d106fe3c5960ef1c70078bd4ae1af336820
describe
'26231' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWWP' 'sip-files00063.pro'
8e17a2ae249e27e3bc1a6d9d542bd59e
3f16a7aa6aafb5bfc07c46cf235c227476cdc0a8
describe
'3041' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWWQ' 'sip-files00064.pro'
72388d84db054c6b8da124c4b652cb12
9bc603a7565ef097c3e8a3fa27df808409c766f7
describe
'25166' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWWR' 'sip-files00065.pro'
95f569ef92c2e01d333d75967753c827
a43f7f582f88c65503b05977fec98e6160a98fc9
describe
'15627' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWWS' 'sip-files00066.pro'
08d4f4e84661af25fa262e6beb5a6913
35443badbe5ec5c48076e7cd8c227fa54f621fe5
'2012-06-20T09:53:58-04:00'
describe
'44799' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWWT' 'sip-files00067.pro'
64560011d233e0a27d3141d90adc6751
55cfb492e4736457c6edcf6b281dde364cd3b603
describe
'15188' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWWU' 'sip-files00068.pro'
83d1fc6bddedc9babdb24222d83ef289
4ae8f93aaa6a8b65e01cbcc92df0341596db9c7e
describe
'2211' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWWV' 'sip-files00069.pro'
51f70aea48e132ef11ce13ad73f20512
589afd6dc89ee244f4a22769d79b8839a35f3db5
describe
'16013' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWWW' 'sip-files00070.pro'
e552f52322279adb899dfc8bd0268cde
16992a56d524769b69b8dac5df2aa2024eef9bb2
describe
'12183' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWWX' 'sip-files00071.pro'
32841e111e6a40170993daa7a247f0c2
021ea255d4c1b6a9778001038c5e05a701a0f7ea
describe
'17180' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWWY' 'sip-files00072.pro'
540f10ee1481c0a3b38d25d71b70efa7
2c160cb6b4041815ea9ac29af4c469a98c608780
describe
'33585' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWWZ' 'sip-files00073.pro'
cfc7d3cdf044b04b7b6ca89f9d1e87a7
419d4ddde8cae0ff62ad05182a6e60bae08db1ac
'2012-06-20T09:49:20-04:00'
describe
'5447' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWXA' 'sip-files00074.pro'
fac50b2df311ea8fe333d3dbf0b238a9
25d0ee9a384fb43cc2b0c7a413ea9e9fd6976c71
describe
'12596' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWXB' 'sip-files00075.pro'
fa02024776e88d41842de087bf768d35
045c721c01227cb93626be14b3870bfaf2d3d71e
describe
'24627' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWXC' 'sip-files00076.pro'
bdc868562d18d07772a8d12c44f80306
a292ba779182d5f9988d90f7b98f5c5fff84adcb
describe
'22870' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWXD' 'sip-files00077.pro'
d087ef733eacdb8309e900ddfb69d020
724df912dbbbe44d20d5e3723c7787c14954f2f8
describe
'19245' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWXE' 'sip-files00078.pro'
f93b3247827eabb076d8610dfc01116c
832f35be229068bcc367fb6cb679b7b44b0fc134
'2012-06-20T09:53:48-04:00'
describe
'16196' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWXF' 'sip-files00079.pro'
b30d25c6438a9c4999690b942c67778c
188581f6bc5072fecd720dc24455595eedf7c744
describe
'25840' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWXG' 'sip-files00080.pro'
f16305014e8294e9a5c60e7b3968170b
8a08ed9d77e20020bfa01b9a1025ca7fe83e6b3a
describe
'40719' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWXH' 'sip-files00081.pro'
a83400fec45a1d558a96e83c16ffbf2f
6c6a57abd35a18e21ad774b3b1046481e056ff16
describe
'10283' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWXI' 'sip-files00082.pro'
fd51ef6019a9dfbe94a5b25f943a46e2
07dbc7b5267e2de5d178734d28d4fa7411c95cc3
describe
'20565' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWXJ' 'sip-files00083.pro'
2d7013d3f724ee10dddf73ae5b926a9c
d721c7c664398f5e2396a0d0eb6d762a1b0db1bc
describe
'19652' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWXK' 'sip-files00084.pro'
6af260048563b2b8dbd99706a6c5cae2
002be68ba1401e8d5015a34fc6d8fab2dcc64aec
describe
'31423' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWXL' 'sip-files00085.pro'
df7c3fc730d16c9a001bc0a91893cb40
d6ef07f332e483ba0e15ba90d85b0f95c74376b2
describe
'20830' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWXM' 'sip-files00086.pro'
3df9287b840e362c888aa930bd1daa1d
7887d1cbf0d40191a44082b238b670ff1cbd92b8
describe
'27315' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWXN' 'sip-files00087.pro'
f9e5ab26b6d7e0c64534a9178ba55dc9
57c6bb6125fc1e8b07955b0b522fda3c430f4688
describe
'28493' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWXO' 'sip-files00090.pro'
6b5acee436ecfe2e3016607dcb77c373
ec829255a5271af9b1bb1b881349e8c02d962916
describe
'13297' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWXP' 'sip-files00091.pro'
8f53cef98f37f610d697f979852d364c
2984d87a832ed5e56d4cd64e390ac4aa965080af
'2012-06-20T09:50:17-04:00'
describe
'14263' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWXQ' 'sip-files00092.pro'
c49dd321c57d693ed13d4b656b8e24d5
41de7d672643170009a636519214b7e8223bb6c3
describe
'14572' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWXR' 'sip-files00093.pro'
56c1b8b25977137a8d8ce4c4c3b56af4
13d0328c7ee1fd0dc81808fc583d5388642c293e
describe
'20643' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWXS' 'sip-files00094.pro'
7d7fd27376e677b855c1f6c8a463364a
e8c64babbb0ff18bb35f67b9724c18559fd1abc8
describe
'36980' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWXT' 'sip-files00095.pro'
2a222c9962d95723f868a73455455c6b
80874f98ef9c8d85efb826419be667f259dc29cb
describe
'17133' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWXU' 'sip-files00096.pro'
d99516b99ba84bb3426f0e976e9a0a18
195d976bdb317b4297588b5dfa54a286ac8dabad
describe
'33024' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWXV' 'sip-files00097.pro'
d42b3d0effa757cfdca965af18d21a56
8491d9fc32bdb794370ae22bc680a16d3c9057ab
describe
'710' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWXW' 'sip-files00098.pro'
d20c6dc4b297599ca4712c275ca4188d
8ec818d56dfc8792660de3aa9648845eb2bda602
describe
'11793' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWXX' 'sip-files00099.pro'
b274639bb59f71623c1c6a72870c580e
e14392c7a4251184ea6df30b3b059857ae301cae
describe
'36593' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWXY' 'sip-files00100.pro'
1819849dbe1b61910ac7831460e6de3b
094e5781cd453f3615d7c062e3a08b2074581786
describe
'30084' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWXZ' 'sip-files00101.pro'
d336e644a0192c7c8946ba46d0f2b8f9
fe72db0d7658e9691eba542e24567cd24f4ab44c
describe
'711' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWYA' 'sip-files00102.pro'
ad66bc9d76f750d665953e237c9b986e
f6d767fc56c5ecb2c578d7c990a5523d89077a6a
describe
'315' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWYB' 'sip-files00105.pro'
dd2ed3a74beba86806be4b777a2e6283
fb9a6f7017ede56efa430c0a0925124c07249422
describe
'13415' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWYC' 'sip-files00106.pro'
e8c69a316a1f6406bda797abd407ae7c
cebd02d07529e2be3b833d22c8aaa007ee57528e
describe
'318' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWYD' 'sip-files00001.txt'
21ff902f5c4f814e073d1fc36c7140af
f5809385f0470a454b152c1f975895d712bcc01d
describe
'372' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWYE' 'sip-files00002.txt'
d6d5e588c961558d5f5040d4770af864
afbaacc4893aa97fd187ef32ca06e5d87b342048
describe
'435' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWYF' 'sip-files00006.txt'
7de49b5fb5538a1a357176cf48e60f0d
2760cd317de395af1e51126199600fc19f8b20a1
'2012-06-20T09:52:00-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'249' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWYG' 'sip-files00007.txt'
78a90cbc451aa9f6e1ae338209cdd93f
64d703e00ae865c4ebfef0945d66ad7c19471947
describe
'135' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWYH' 'sip-files00008.txt'
b0bbfe24cd01b57615eb320123cd2912
02169de37d4733a2a6009000c9d14935b26c49c9
'2012-06-20T09:52:03-04:00'
describe
'613' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWYI' 'sip-files00009.txt'
238e2c06a3ad148a438a05a3f474c2db
18187e0ff4f166ebd092f82393c98e4d085f714b
describe
'1443' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWYJ' 'sip-files00010.txt'
3367f87f495c54a293946e3a647179e5
7d31a6870a705c98505d99f22d917925e1239e51
describe
'1660' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWYK' 'sip-files00011.txt'
7551093be8b07abb6da2602810328947
ce1427046cb7e3cfbb3335da901a519a185694a2
'2012-06-20T09:50:04-04:00'
describe
'1301' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWYL' 'sip-files00012.txt'
65f85d241a249866e20df7af6225d43e
897b7b7eb7048ee69ee02ee55e56a17091a97a7c
'2012-06-20T09:54:47-04:00'
describe
'830' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWYM' 'sip-files00013.txt'
03e0f7f1f7dca381520f591efbd20239
70415acbaeae48413cf4e1fc01edc61cfb7955d2
'2012-06-20T09:53:57-04:00'
describe
'1415' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWYN' 'sip-files00014.txt'
21627eda6826d30b68724d060db41d56
52209955aa13bb12790fa27165586b9365839fed
'2012-06-20T09:51:11-04:00'
describe
'850' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWYO' 'sip-files00015.txt'
772a27808928169ccbec739b1343c11f
5816803b6790203c6e7b16ab3a8d1d91c09516f0
describe
'676' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWYP' 'sip-files00016.txt'
4043a715f629b8ecc285bb4842975f3c
d0a6ada12f94498407b6baee71a5abda57cfabb2
describe
'1358' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWYQ' 'sip-files00017.txt'
3112d6d6b999cb4ffc4efe4c36253042
f1e9d45c7006fb2b138024bb52021c358a3b748c
describe
'883' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWYR' 'sip-files00018.txt'
ede42211e291dfc467cbcc7093c5f2dc
eb9e1d27a923ec166106345d34a00a4b9c6ee08a
'2012-06-20T09:49:42-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1444' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWYS' 'sip-files00019.txt'
9dfe82225099d9111b8de98877542652
1993787e16bc2989c3c9d52628845cd94bef02c5
describe
'852' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWYT' 'sip-files00020.txt'
c741c032d025c26de59fa15857f709db
fca5d7ce4b0b19509a98c675360494769330f5c0
describe
'734' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWYU' 'sip-files00021.txt'
89cc22db4e93e31d6cfecbbf041c6e20
d801a615f70a39d9dbe34ed9deb70cced0651a15
'2012-06-20T09:54:55-04:00'
describe
'811' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWYV' 'sip-files00022.txt'
666a4b35c392def51eb1b2203514cea9
035aee38a0ccf2f83999f63f8975aa59fdd66ba5
describe
'156' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWYW' 'sip-files00023.txt'
f5b806bddc7660726f83ce18642402e9
cc1de28839ee058ad4ece475ef23f3a6dc9fe6c5
'2012-06-20T09:53:45-04:00'
describe
'1652' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWYX' 'sip-files00024.txt'
6c978202f0a9bb35e8d2e983ded4459d
e37e8eb179fd72a8730008086aead815aa75ab7e
describe
'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWYY' 'sip-files00025.txt'
cde7da645d84db8dbb42a677d8e5870e
5e923c73f08199a35241f0f0632333e37b28122a
describe
'1701' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWYZ' 'sip-files00026.txt'
435c56bbc2e5f527854f46e8458f7fbe
ec50930db23420becb756302237807044d147cea
'2012-06-20T09:51:43-04:00'
describe
'572' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWZA' 'sip-files00027.txt'
04443c3cded51216a1b106982d155df6
1e6074f0b1a7b5020c8c306d12f296b278e56baf
describe
'889' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWZB' 'sip-files00028.txt'
4c4c2f72622fdadce4bd3dc94bd3a1a1
b8f3073a5c325c0328745fa4f80d5e61f33e6210
describe
'1742' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWZC' 'sip-files00029.txt'
c448be6637b5554d339033eaac0d292f
069c6a6ac69211451e182a226f72e6a7a04c000a
describe
Invalid character
'664' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWZD' 'sip-files00030.txt'
83897e2ec4390a6d34276b9a65c32958
da778c3f2cf015cd18fb3f12207e13e624bcc89a
describe
'1135' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWZE' 'sip-files00031.txt'
ceb9a4f833996fe1b3f14d40adb1c594
76858265942df46141fef458c639124319b2d019
describe
'713' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWZF' 'sip-files00032.txt'
5654c11d352e9faa4837be952267acff
2bb8783957fbfb6c9bd9885170b10201275d0c50
describe
'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWZG' 'sip-files00033.txt'
3cbaf69f552fe0994ba01bc968219e87
01ee44ad5a882b0a5fab1c28487ada6892dfcf30
describe
'2224' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWZH' 'sip-files00034.txt'
2b9ecf02310106a6a8f0ac257bae0d96
6c1e821422b2cca07c35e86b4cb0c0d0b04cfae5
describe
'1000' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWZI' 'sip-files00035.txt'
b13a45a38d3aa7d9cb098a24714cec78
a7a02a559fabb96123ccc088ef7c85afc810d536
describe
Invalid character
'1299' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWZJ' 'sip-files00036.txt'
c5fda606fc0d3102e3ea17197c4b8b8c
bc1bc060b931622fb462c820b6fdc3a39f47a2ad
describe
Invalid character
'974' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWZK' 'sip-files00037.txt'
c2f9e11c439a4e89ed18c2452122063f
32c6d2b3777ee167c4a993855f140e6e214d6e84
'2012-06-20T09:52:28-04:00'
describe
'912' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWZL' 'sip-files00038.txt'
5a639f77995af02eed17e78b168c2a70
82621654d64442edc2c25601c091c0da8a1aabf6
describe
'991' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWZM' 'sip-files00039.txt'
116b2c954fa613546fad8b0f5832d36e
b51e6eabfe265fc84c909ba5f7313fb070760daf
describe
'1203' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWZN' 'sip-files00040.txt'
73cc5189dfcd8b41ff8724f17506a4a8
30f24fecd21efd8f4dba36fc71dc7837de831951
'2012-06-20T09:50:50-04:00'
describe
'758' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWZO' 'sip-files00041.txt'
4c6822e43f8b76380aead0e45e783818
8d3e07930ac58c96c2e4a533f4a0adc293bd59fd
describe
'1435' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWZP' 'sip-files00042.txt'
98ac51fc0b0baa16d7536b92d14ca30b
c25e01c867b95cdaa8f1031e4ab6f5c30f39cd85
describe
'408' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWZQ' 'sip-files00043.txt'
f914823fdc14ea012fde2734c0f2d41a
861e8cac29237065e543114ffc2bd1ac0797736b
'2012-06-20T09:50:41-04:00'
describe
'2079' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWZR' 'sip-files00044.txt'
8f6da880d12528e4f997619447a011b5
485dcbc04952dc0b3ab975806306131eaaaa41bd
describe
'1456' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWZS' 'sip-files00045.txt'
3482de7860a3acf242b1b9d4824a9beb
96793fc740a86bcd5f8da7707f1f33e2318fbfa7
'2012-06-20T09:55:01-04:00'
describe
'2026' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWZT' 'sip-files00046.txt'
6c7687a2859fc71691f6a5c8927cb8be
3e4bf28888cdaf327c2baa52ed0fa6372d36c7d0
'2012-06-20T09:54:15-04:00'
describe
'728' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWZU' 'sip-files00047.txt'
35aedd7b72545ed2904b373b5d7083f4
978ea60008ab24b82c6f2cf502ec77add462d4a9
describe
Invalid character
'659' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWZV' 'sip-files00048.txt'
e9a5a2f12df501e5bc6d9fa489747f01
39403d56292d40349e056440cd8f3cf4baba49d1
'2012-06-20T09:53:13-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1434' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWZW' 'sip-files00049.txt'
1474764133d5e418ddebb0bed3ecb9bc
7c33c051c48cc63390bad1fd8f4452c407786c66
describe
'853' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWZX' 'sip-files00050.txt'
bfa4e3f1d5fa5a14733d43643880cd38
f4cf26f0b3af4b75917eb21c16fe78371b327df3
describe
'1058' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWZY' 'sip-files00051.txt'
10d3f9d593c9d0421f826f5d898c6afc
004dfeb94d76603b90651a5d7054f5c877e51511
'2012-06-20T09:54:23-04:00'
describe
'741' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABWZZ' 'sip-files00052.txt'
726b250eb5150e235ac4059c4991a372
75de3731e5e43974e14516e8bd28135d7ec3d5b8
describe
Invalid character
'1143' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXAA' 'sip-files00053.txt'
d85a43e2058097d75a170ecef6eeb7fa
6350623de122e175f0d3752100d709570769a920
'2012-06-20T09:54:14-04:00'
describe
'751' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXAB' 'sip-files00054.txt'
e765c650c3738ec4fda4e10a81462953
53d228f47ab70de732564e504554a59af8fa6c9f
describe
'354' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXAC' 'sip-files00055.txt'
c66d7858062c83c4186a7ad520903b47
5be0aca010d668141bc6ae923fb6e74105de39b3
describe
'898' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXAD' 'sip-files00056.txt'
45f24c0622e2794583e332686808a645
2e91cac788f97ec283cfa2321f8693fb240d5e33
describe
'520' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXAE' 'sip-files00057.txt'
91aeadf812ba4266873551be14f35168
66e1f1acd118d8227649d09f5fca7d7a3fba24fe
'2012-06-20T09:49:19-04:00'
describe
'814' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXAF' 'sip-files00058.txt'
665425b2df4bf11d7856ea73d5f048c1
9bc6abf03beba40cd4df80530f518e3ccc505a9c
describe
'1439' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXAG' 'sip-files00059.txt'
05b42017c22266ef30b7b91bbce275de
08a85a2717d30c65621e265fd959cfc80bf42b28
describe
'815' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXAH' 'sip-files00060.txt'
923b37c768bf1f710b1641de79acca41
36bc9e1940d396926608eccb9f4d97d3ef2eeac7
describe
'1258' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXAI' 'sip-files00061.txt'
af4611bf49fe8978da4e8cbc9d735d4a
64ce3ca35033a6c619470fdda18707e6d7467c2d
describe
'1837' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXAJ' 'sip-files00062.txt'
0defd22d4db8fc85049f021012b692b2
1cf84db0b2952d9a79288a16e14377c7d40ac288
describe
'1215' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXAK' 'sip-files00063.txt'
371c04d28d8a4ad475a9717c62bf19d4
57d90da6e94a1941276cb912efdbf7812211004c
describe
Invalid character
'227' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXAL' 'sip-files00064.txt'
d581b7f2c96fd1606b108ec254753453
3bbc596decdff401cc763d8a2fd9ffae0960f75e
describe
'1080' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXAM' 'sip-files00065.txt'
1db2836caf82f785f70bf46a7a389e73
552edb946a04c5398484d7d1697d6ad258d5de12
'2012-06-20T09:50:14-04:00'
describe
'996' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXAN' 'sip-files00066.txt'
3b5e1ec049475874b6f7d0e73fe4bb51
113deef706e73970cc0bab008e7a5522026b80fd
describe
'1814' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXAO' 'sip-files00067.txt'
3efe5c97694186b889d4f7580039ed89
131b2d7e0252749cf45ef6a10172cfad2a13c5b2
describe
Invalid character
'772' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXAP' 'sip-files00068.txt'
13217e7216f57456d1086bc6bc3a0d08
6ea6d18a4131208cb101450445f58f46bbb22020
describe
'455' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXAQ' 'sip-files00069.txt'
b203da9bf8ed16788e3a1c47de09d0f4
f7c8fd868e08d183505b93e480c98fef84a5f5fe
describe
Invalid character
'915' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXAR' 'sip-files00070.txt'
af75abec79b1920917f1d5927544002e
3e3f0af64d6d0a35b49ebbec78ed87696b60100c
describe
'527' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXAS' 'sip-files00071.txt'
e95640877433a83980cbb8d0439f1250
d2d5e1c45c42719270056675b0f728ed9633b419
describe
'740' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXAT' 'sip-files00072.txt'
eb48b8da84f07bde2a105cb8465fb245
07f6de49128494f631040ab1d2892ecd88f462ad
describe
Invalid character
'1395' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXAU' 'sip-files00073.txt'
0c25586b479b95a28c57959a07c6b72a
d5a0577765040db2c1b6a0e88b630949120ce0ca
describe
'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXAV' 'sip-files00074.txt'
1c036f67bf62daa873997f84c7839c08
2e0a5b101bad2e8aec1e2435cf0008d805412b1c
describe
'577' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXAW' 'sip-files00075.txt'
20f03fc5534fd3bf9096db72a404dbe3
850dc6e7f4e354e2a110ee96adfc6e2e90b3c63e
'2012-06-20T09:54:01-04:00'
describe
'983' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXAX' 'sip-files00076.txt'
276e72dda7724d4c6e4a253d96efe4e1
aed4630a6b05c7e2017110f6fe0969ce1fd511a3
describe
'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXAY' 'sip-files00078.txt'
c91e78d0c4b53ff09d26ab63d065a584
aefaba72e04a4d4a8aa8333bdd2152f583a50c61
describe
'708' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXAZ' 'sip-files00079.txt'
d73dd94fa5f2f551f489b93a3d1fe162
b091d9fb4f224d751e049fb7a350a4b3cab74490
describe
'1671' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXBA' 'sip-files00080.txt'
028be393978fcc1741aa03d1ab30d697
5c05c067a36c8609a5f19e614b4161bbcc335f35
describe
Invalid character
'1677' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXBB' 'sip-files00081.txt'
f3067eb0feaf5b3349098b5c7e3e03f2
757c47e3a6cb730bce78c3dcc6cffa9e17a75bd5
describe
'469' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXBC' 'sip-files00082.txt'
8bc443db09f4257da430afc00fc57193
9bec7cafd1baf978cff40355eae635bd3e03e292
'2012-06-20T09:49:32-04:00'
describe
'911' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXBD' 'sip-files00083.txt'
a433060dd27c388145899850458c31ba
404dc63a231736eb2468be8fcacfb506d5f5661c
describe
'1260' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXBE' 'sip-files00084.txt'
f700267768e57cd8ddef005984ed0529
b4f2da39b51cbb5d9395c4dba9e1871282d2d9bf
describe
'1283' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXBF' 'sip-files00085.txt'
59c25aae07ca799030899ad8ecd20fe8
a4c74f51ab5a76a3547b020ddd87d909f9d6f389
describe
'876' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXBG' 'sip-files00086.txt'
9334461f499b55f1a28da16ce343faee
2755ef32980323089797dcee2e7c69709b172505
describe
'1298' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXBH' 'sip-files00087.txt'
cd4c8d014fc4379f57f446c6d48dd6be
2ad8dc484fbe99ec6c410914675bfdf4df466241
'2012-06-20T09:54:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXBI' 'sip-files00088.txt'
310e4af1520cb26d42e81075a5deffd9
39eee89378ed326842a08d0479ad7491ee8598da
describe
'2226' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXBJ' 'sip-files00090.txt'
bad680018c221ffbfcb10bf69de7306c
2bafdf32f0edfe6fb1dcd9e3a2754649bc888fb8
describe
Invalid character
'560' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXBK' 'sip-files00091.txt'
11c567f3a0d713857e2c95e625883370
d02fd61a038d515bdc0f787fb73b705e34ec423a
describe
'647' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXBL' 'sip-files00092.txt'
d99a91932156f87d92b2d627d43843ca
5a81ed059fe35f0be7284e4e89cf0829c7e8f3f9
'2012-06-20T09:54:45-04:00'
describe
'719' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXBM' 'sip-files00093.txt'
6b73e16518972a71e5748c919b093e73
2d239988a064e032b792b595b5e652b9764a0b7a
describe
'895' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXBN' 'sip-files00094.txt'
c5ca846865468e858613dbf6a71e0961
59649d09bc3c771407d81d113257b317ba0807a6
describe
'1632' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXBO' 'sip-files00095.txt'
f5f0ad4416edf0ad8bd0b0768087774b
926ffce641b9fffb604b469b2c83e09ebc68879c
describe
'831' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXBP' 'sip-files00096.txt'
52819a96e5a933849169278dd52496c0
c735db8de39f858000842d2ada190084e2bd87a2
describe
'1496' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXBQ' 'sip-files00097.txt'
cf037a916f793155f0650d3af1d55b65
54c7f2326a4a8437472a1496c07020f05b84a2d7
'2012-06-20T09:50:34-04:00'
describe
'136' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXBR' 'sip-files00098.txt'
440989d3b2ce51fad52b223cbe95c94d
d30a7dc8f7104d0e6fad707a5778d3708552b2fe
describe
'720' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXBS' 'sip-files00099.txt'
a5d97aa23a918cdf56b9383307a4eddd
8d35a5880d9114a3a6afcdeb05796b86cf51c1e1
describe
'1397' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXBT' 'sip-files00100.txt'
82997b6dd6cc5674eb8a39c1b8909e8c
8feee7e569cdf5fb6716afea1adc5c51321435a6
'2012-06-20T09:54:36-04:00'
describe
'1231' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXBU' 'sip-files00101.txt'
b445b11002ce1c34a83f022f1e847ade
7139fc2f1285ec6f9622114c6ff8913ca0e177ac
describe
'100' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXBV' 'sip-files00102.txt'
264633621f1bc972867543c09b164f13
d7ef8983549b0649ce5892c640f9fb46a1a96cb4
describe
'148' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXBW' 'sip-files00105.txt'
95243fc038c1fb82ec34f1eadf7ee00d
2560d2937d58fa4aa2713e15814a00335fa4f0e1
describe
'903' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXBX' 'sip-files00106.txt'
ef55b6957477d84a9433ad84c71a8190
1fac7f41a7fb4ff4d107640bc9dfcc88aaf58033
'2012-06-20T09:52:37-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'45421' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXBY' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
6e33ca111e4dfec407e8e5465ff9c0a2
7c5024a2af24bb9c9d18dd4d137312638f190bd2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'119679' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXBZ' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
162f7131bd756202c5af6eff0af7f4fe
3afe59b431cbf4538e9efd9b4013c16104b063bc
'2012-06-20T09:50:26-04:00'
describe
'48047' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXCA' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
741fadfcfbd886501d4678f59ca98af2
29578ce397e3d5ceda667edb18d5ca31a27723af
describe
'47358' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXCB' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
c9813f42a225baea78cae6bcc6adbabb
d92ec1429a4dbb47c356db41a9ed514321e5d580
'2012-06-20T09:52:59-04:00'
describe
'10495' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXCC' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
0ce0430943b681a3fccd9c19a0b3f0af
168a963cf6e3e3e7ed4644f61e41114fb1720d1a
describe
'51808' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXCD' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
1cc38bb66319e3af076e2400f81cc110
8c4591caa31fc5e7f89121b038436a8c6830997a
'2012-06-20T09:51:34-04:00'
describe
'49548' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXCE' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
386bbbf26fcff7fac7b83a65b7f65a83
8d31b8b7487ae8fc2386d6e5bfd293960a133b29
describe
'49743' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXCF' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
bf8de4cfaa7192cd5b5c43cfa89cb1db
f77cec879bc03f6a9b73e89edefa4d9f9f3ae3d0
'2012-06-20T09:54:58-04:00'
describe
'128618' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXCG' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
ba68f630336a095975bb235d614cb00c
89600f8e07660aaf865ebff517f40a13788692d9
describe
'156704' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXCH' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
9726647a6f9bef04376bdd3965db3c0b
cc3c3f800ac4e7dfccf917784ebf20c2db58c62e
describe
'35615' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXCI' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
78c8798cbc9a95c5f271610b4549bd4a
f178caf148a71728c18a3426a744642d3ac790d5
describe
'159153' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXCJ' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
f934831de69df137356508e80b3a2fdb
5faf7f1b7360ef45074dd82e0022ab5f90248b2c
describe
'47191' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXCK' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
877860cbf74f685d9e2be4f4ad860945
878a43014ff3e0a33668a3a4c7028035e1647f6d
describe
'44744' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXCL' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
fcbb476a3e400d837e117547f8b3d510
b76085e70dd218af6d2cb28c1537912715c51221
describe
'137151' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXCM' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
d14f771e9131b7b936e03b0ab2e4d72c
9134f2b9caa634b17c9bed3606e55d93dc3e1044
describe
'48155' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXCN' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
0cc2dc6e5a0199ac3387ba6760426ce1
68423140a1f5658fa0ad7a762e0872dcdfbdfb86
describe
'117627' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXCO' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
2a237324e503ba8f754f6c2412661125
2523470d871aff3dd7509a2976952076d8019e30
describe
'50067' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXCP' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
3abad6794acf60cc9e322b600cf52aea
1f3aa93a9a78042ba7060010b416eb512f604bf1
describe
'46802' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXCQ' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
c1ac34dbe84039108d6bee219563db9d
ab595208c4eb1849e8111d3d022fb4c3ae7dcf1c
describe
'46746' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXCR' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
1aae1d3906645466417f3f9be6686e7a
2475babff38259b01ff58330803e91ba6cc0817b
describe
'144659' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXCS' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
5dcd392dacd419c89316cbd9d2ab3e11
225ce28571a634e80fb81910fb679fffbe10a2d1
describe
'151972' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXCT' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
2ef82da5edbc1f5d708e7f7e614d9ecc
093311d1df3eccc0cf7fba765972dc4bf92535ea
describe
'149763' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXCU' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
0451dcbe10812dd24b190a5cb3026810
9f634fdde9262f4c783263feb3780e7f31fe74ef
describe
'44890' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXCV' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
cb5cae6c2a0ba02a1931b3a4ded929f9
c4b72eed65ade3716734d4ea9823d30114d39c0b
describe
'29716' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXCW' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
710e680c4845d30afd6c7d918e1e6bab
e73f7a74c80b0ddedef006ce8436cbd3520dab12
describe
'130119' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXCX' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
15593566766edfb6c9e83786830d91a6
88b555a18cfbaef9b3dc05f94f348a3a476a9222
describe
'44797' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXCY' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
c4642eca310e873ea68554f2f2d32a14
76c8c7b45adbe5b6abb797a6d62877ff881837e8
describe
'47503' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXCZ' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
67965232afd7be6893ce40ec88ae7dda
fc45d94c2561701afb07ded11ed969989fa57344
describe
'46398' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXDA' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
6a07b368378de8d74aebd29b6fce5501
21cc42386932d9b93d4d29aa51eda8ff8c17407b
'2012-06-20T09:51:59-04:00'
describe
'136523' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXDB' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
83985b2d054cc1320d4bda274d83f3ae
b33bb4c38c07e013fd98ce9e4fd021e9383a4645
'2012-06-20T09:54:39-04:00'
describe
'55469' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXDC' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
384581ed05c7169c79dc1780faf20494
bb4eab119fa54f4c4e0e45e642dbfe299354d7ee
describe
'74476' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXDD' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
bf988f49c8c4b08d00fd9357cc0339f7
eb1243e55d0fa66f98ad90f682cfe0e7f572bf6c
describe
'46052' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXDE' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
39a443e982f24700d6db8f87dc48c805
8035a5e94d07bebc2f06d94d9170177a2fabad51
describe
'154246' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXDF' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
982424bc1c4ee76fd96df8ff98d73934
b1ed4cec28d433dce466840401843423a8a99a15
'2012-06-20T09:54:09-04:00'
describe
'142129' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXDG' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
9392547df2a5416116dd82a0be504bf6
a12a5391d2f12ab8504d30f3486889593692f030
describe
'160955' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXDH' 'sip-filesUF00054392_00001.xml'
3300a5ef9dec89676be2cc181c65666d
eaa9fa8bed8148a171de61cddbd13f816eee56a5
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/sobekcm/'.
'2013-12-10T05:49:24-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/sobekcm.xsd
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/sobekcm.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/sobekcm/'.
'114595' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXDI' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
3556593870c1e7274bd69c190e6fd9c3
c2ff17eb3dd69fc231c13a33fc254d213bf87060
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80354' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXDJ' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
b6905133c801a07e9cd5fb0aa59afd34
0f5785991bcaf80df0008c73f980cdbd3b1fb1fb
describe
'29501' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXDK' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
56d09d74cb8e9a1b8741515e4bddeba7
6059c42aef3eac8eb40b72f0decb8c2b6db5f4e9
'2012-06-20T09:49:31-04:00'
describe
'204577' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXDL' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
b09dd60083f5bb3aaf63abafccd6c293
128439d22378ca54ffd5e22556eccb5a6c9160b3
describe
'65188' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXDM' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
005b04556f8b81a1c44d1c39a261522a
768d9bdabc51b1843042502cc7c4acf97b37d5f2
describe
'43056' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXDN' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
b5b2ac80256d0b8e69c857b8d5f08e2c
0964d1184b48d980fe7b84a683b5bd4d98f11c78
'2012-06-20T09:51:57-04:00'
describe
'20650' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXDO' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
ee984df95872205057ee1b1027cb4b92
66aa76b35acd369ea69cfdef30fa2917f8bd5e1b
describe
'13448' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXDP' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
f9f75234878a9a4ec8eaf4437659efc6
9e8de90d2da59f1c6d3f401948e1eb9c498b50df
describe
'171896' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXDQ' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
8ba2f3d0f61dffcb5f04e40684f28f33
5d583dcbee0d4aacca60be59bc1fd00bd4ed52aa
'2012-06-20T09:54:57-04:00'
describe
'53666' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXDR' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
7ac5b7210ff1e159655d8605c2ff8d50
ddee46953ed3751360a9c19cd968a625383f3e92
describe
'163780' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXDS' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
47cad3a622f87ce0c152df1d05641291
63c69460d35f563a958bd2aa9c293cd1b2e2c0f2
describe
'51915' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXDT' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
50160f584aa408fdd40fe576ef6d3450
42f10b7c7f935ba68fb7c0a9b8b4aeba4c12d3dc
describe
'47212' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXDU' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
22f8d78cf25bc3b395f5925d97085584
fe43564e72fd4c9c2079c2c5e29e2a29dfd9eed4
describe
'110402' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXDV' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
fd96317c692161ba6c7281fa3d39a8db
865aade3117736db65f8f21f6ec8d9f45c8787a3
describe
'41210' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXDW' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
0a6271c6e09cea07f030ad59bcceba55
004df8fa7d130a71c184ebc43132026eb3220705
'2012-06-20T09:51:13-04:00'
describe
'173277' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXDX' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
ff70ccc648a14a83ea8674fa1eba31e4
11ded11fd7d35900a61d1d2225cc4bdfbde44aa2
'2012-06-20T09:50:55-04:00'
describe
'166112' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXDY' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
c3286db4da9715fc6e66fc672aa381fc
c09baa77b45166d02ed2d9c2db4179072d92dd9b
'2012-06-20T09:50:36-04:00'
describe
'53965' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXDZ' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
ab62d8205462d0aa6d124d00d6d1d1c6
498f1795db2b321a3d761c12cc764d6b6752a5dc
describe
'97989' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXEA' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
f5505b21b2391e87e790e744f46c37d9
eb9dc7a30c037f26cf2b1299358c5899deab8fcb
'2012-06-20T09:51:21-04:00'
describe
'37195' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXEB' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
41a7a9b2b7f2a6e98e14e0f2ccb8c595
039a5002ad769937fe54da6f9581fe8f2d3c6465
describe
'47473' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXEC' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
17d6f485d02d383ba3a3fb48a41dfb2b
f834078c2266a080f4ed9fc795c2cd0fea8bfb43
describe
'128157' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXED' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
4029247351621ba1bf70b234ae4b7a43
28985cf19dc8223cfe10f183b82ebbb2f1970622
describe
'47366' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXEE' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
1fbfbb2d569114c6aaadc87458b233b8
2ff5e1d776e6c426609835a6518557c709038280
describe
'44102' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXEF' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
9b4d057cad50343409a02bb30d7f7c77
2e717c850944f5bda4b2633979381be87a809f13
describe
'143379' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXEG' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
b8d9409a78b55358a0598416788636b4
de01040091b419457dc35211f75703c4d0934a78
describe
'154041' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXEH' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
8f750fa8cfca93416a6343c84b852ed2
5988206e0b3c7152e20004122ca2ffab011a1dc8
describe
'48695' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXEI' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
d4208e9dbf201accfcf1774bb80c2b00
8cfc50f66e0d4cb679239163b4a0a01c042a6eea
describe
'72284' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXEJ' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
c0742860983e0ede817bd069e5c1ffaa
aad0ec3a8addefae0f53e2feadabc01fd86f7307
describe
'141752' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXEK' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
f0552129f74341731a5d198ea040bc81
8335752ff335d1b1d898abf93c3e70af01ead084
describe
'47141' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXEL' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
d79f3ab1ea031bad3b64ef8cadfa811e
7483f48ec64fab5d28d5b936c755c52d6778b0e8
describe
'130303' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXEM' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
c097693ba3846cc527ca00465532d2a5
b8e8a5399f63e88cfb59e071204560a0f5348273
describe
'45614' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXEN' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
5512e72074ba52605082de75f3fdc2bb
0ca12f0e0d70a771b79ffb03386319f2a01da4cd
'2012-06-20T09:49:45-04:00'
describe
'153426' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXEO' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
a79fdc67d26b5f6599917c1ed49a5a16
9a016f52d6da1f8639b1f39f54fc12ff6f7cb720
describe
'48261' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXEP' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
2d068800830203d11bd9a8f55253df7e
ccaa02c834ee0ae92de90db5f617885cb79f60aa
'2012-06-20T09:53:04-04:00'
describe
'167597' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXEQ' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
fcfc2a01f5d30818a653c9424664a362
854ace78a0795da3f1fb2ed382ebccc9c235ad0e
describe
'52684' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXER' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
068640b2a4cd36bda678b5dc58a3c99d
479910957534e6fea4f4c86aa21758ae8b38a607
describe
'156070' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXES' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
26e38cc9fa42915b4316f2d35adcad85
3080c30662dcfbdacf5c8e94fe203ecf2d2eeb17
describe
'48677' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXET' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
83fd1315fd559afb4400c77caa12b5a0
23631110612e471f6313cb0bfcf19be324f9dc69
describe
'161434' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXEU' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
8f5d278415cd069070ab123775461edd
afc179494ea4cf03e95fb319df3733e75706b0db
describe
'49546' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXEV' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
937656620a2db027f1e443b8414fdfcf
588c18e64e76f93d619d7f28abb64430c457512a
describe
'168766' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXEW' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
224edc59a0a9208ab7d0a36c005024ee
d5d85ed467edb247c12fb02ea12d85ae8f1cdad3
'2012-06-20T09:51:29-04:00'
describe
'52179' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXEX' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
8593895cf13272d1318adfb9c3a9c4b3
23e8c6346575445f3d82e3c7be03c99d1aced6bc
describe
'149393' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXEY' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
53bf90ed966fb5fdb17cfb5a76768618
a5dd8f185d0d89087fd179f64beace78b3ab7cbd
describe
'47270' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXEZ' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
5f1325e797f9eb252da3cbc221f43fdc
9b066ce936a94bc84935cad88d0ab7dc0dbe3320
describe
'154187' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXFA' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
6f078cf4777e26f02cad41d4b3300e3d
c5afc4a3ff692ffc1493033405195e728271bf84
describe
'48381' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXFB' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
8cc444ad082ffe18a3b063d966b753ac
93f1cc95a06cd3d2b8a58eb68203de301a7e0ad8
describe
'81733' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXFC' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
6a46f13f7e99dee292a09ea886dbf23d
5485cc7f201cba849d66fd741972e632483def32
describe
'33101' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXFD' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
1ca8181bb9bfb89bd1897e6e6e36df20
d3501177a6ac27705038f9ce868382805ef9b783
describe
'145361' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXFE' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
e6e94a6905a224cc818b814494cc9b5a
1cc8ebe48acafa1d1f4e5e0ae9b25358cf4fa84a
describe
'46744' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXFF' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
65a6f9f6fe25cf46919c64f0bc865113
9bbeaca6311c3d4fb2fcc31541a982f18316160e
describe
'49346' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXFG' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
1060ba797f2f86521901f5410304bcaa
68f05644e1595eec5a66314dd1460db546d6cf4c
'2012-06-20T09:53:26-04:00'
describe
'159655' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXFH' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
eaaea29d1334a2c0c9364d0fcbaa91a7
e5067bc061a6f818607c905aa82dcd142d639b12
describe
'50407' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXFI' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
b8029cfdd0f76b8e5bd9630e3729c05e
bc6e678b7a8c3fdd9570d121ae0b0ac1d5eaf4f4
describe
'147483' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXFJ' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
cb2ed4504a256b4df0b0e6a2a2d9c775
2d40c6d98877868ecdad20808b6efb957a04440b
'2012-06-20T09:52:43-04:00'
describe
'148148' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXFK' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
6400d52507a930bdbb59b129d72bace3
784a8d158f4dac927e54116397ecb1f23e985399
describe
'94980' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXFL' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
2bdda77dee74b078060798e20414e9fe
7edecefee73ef0b9f750884ac9804da1a82a523b
describe
'156730' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXFM' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
afffd379ca4d41193228d8b55cc67e47
a987082b653183243e0430485579091d3638edb6
describe
'48392' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXFN' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
4af4a894f2ecabf2c245e6c133b73f75
660a18d0ec898d6544b6f566673c18cd1c5f5a20
describe
'159884' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXFO' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
2104f9533a2ed9951bcaf92808764ce4
ef5bcfa51afb2d0ea51bedeb1e9bf6e8048144d6
describe
'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXFP' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
3f188d1de684d3b9905157f0e4de65fa
642161c164a2f5a2e831c5f5bfd66329d953db82
'2012-06-20T09:49:53-04:00'
describe
'155824' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXFQ' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
230d1447d418ef0e6200b63cd56be961
d9a4a89b4f818a05c4699b8ab50d8383c5577161
describe
'49257' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXFR' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
1c24c1a1e953e47159f8a983fc8bff9d
832f2fda57cabc998c0cb8cdbaf8a5813c34347b
describe
'126815' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXFS' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
0457d69017975600d3320ee3a8b3df45
ebbf08526a06dee455bc8db767c7453bda9954de
describe
'150017' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXFT' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
7b60e02f221d3a4e3ad0071560c62c20
9909b9b824c0ecab8f057ac5e4ece8365d723bb3
describe
'47209' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXFU' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
5e9b40829493f556a6707749a574412b
4665216c27429354a3c88d49b57f5c113804cf6e
describe
'151110' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXFV' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
0cd942f09841b1ac7e92871e73f1e866
975ed1ebabba81fbad2c3c2746d4480d466b0cd9
'2012-06-20T09:50:46-04:00'
describe
'50918' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXFW' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
dbb87b7016ed7e004bac70cf1886c45b
ef5bc7e4152bfa5c742c2935efa3e2d87099028f
describe
'127720' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXFX' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
4aec635ed6fb238a45a4950786dcb1c5
64c8b741f136aeb91ee9412fa09022405ad7aa55
describe
'46807' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXFY' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
46e8e77e81b9307fc92884344ae77de9
e120402fbc6335aaf44de16b02095c5bb237e870
describe
'158829' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXFZ' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
b3c5d0005e9d828f435582890993a883
e9423961c759852d4a19297f3f04c08a8e97bcf4
describe
'50257' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXGA' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
f1d7d61975c8000f8cfa7955fdcb3145
a8800dec26c915b2dce0c626bbd6c5a3944c46ed
describe
'170036' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXGB' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
04ea15cabf049714cc433b0d2cd7df0e
d682740bff1c9efcab0de5343c14ab6c531f6ba6
describe
'54011' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXGC' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
9765f474e93437f33098b2edca0e4e9a
b519f856dc5798549056a94adf797697f47429ed
'2012-06-20T09:51:42-04:00'
describe
'175405' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXGD' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
a7b061cfdd1f951d3e45dd041c998734
f5692376e620fbf3da54bdd764657a9d5c552d01
describe
'54492' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXGE' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
a2559801c5b5c102343591876b4524d6
aba9c1f19093f715689bbf602c3e478877afa77a
describe
'123434' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXGF' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
9429cf15403fb30a36075af128c62911
0c7ccea475b54392614cd232e332599ec1f0d95e
describe
'44304' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXGG' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
23b54099c3481f76fdc183d0a8c29a87
5c81c8d261427b1fa92355971344d1dc9dc6ef12
describe
'148300' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXGH' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
fc985cc4a7970478de4965c872f926a5
5e1f4b80dc4c37b810ceca306e6e42b1b5091bdd
describe
'155937' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXGI' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
9075e988097fa9db2f810386a1049206
f6d73070a0a367b41db6ec60d7fc928067d981ed
describe
'48428' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXGJ' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
5a8abe025631b3e48a34499e057d0042
29e27e117b680688500c6a0e168cbb2cd9fa6de7
'2012-06-20T09:49:23-04:00'
describe
'148407' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXGK' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
4bcb4540146c28fa58e2e2a4f79ae164
2f5d95e74b220047bffc4818a366d68504b8ff4b
describe
'47672' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXGL' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
f57eaa1b06fd52acae866bf8bb03e299
81849ff8e99525eb57ef9e71756b87ab823485e4
describe
'161652' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXGM' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
b57fc8e6600ed493e4535d3d9bd185a4
e5a890f4caa466c3a53b53fc04a99d0d56990261
describe
'49729' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXGN' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
1b732e7f9bb4dc0f7228a34e6b80c44f
62752442e64c3fe634843b004a8f46f36a24804c
describe
'131166' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXGO' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
a45ef393e753c49de3db9fecc90b7337
7df2dbaa221cad0288ebbebd6756dc57618912ee
'2012-06-20T09:52:38-04:00'
describe
'42903' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXGP' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
272138280a7bd164668c0f1edaa280b7
63ab31769f74cc8e8e55c5666c44f9e07aa50f33
describe
'44402' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXGQ' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
52026ab41b6aa132c0392692feff2afc
175203d0b13eea3d3809fe85b3630b66607fe68f
describe
'42661' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXGR' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
fa70ee99abc0f53587754a9ab7ecbd11
6e860c872afff5edf282e7f719a8edaa5ff5b1ab
describe
'158780' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXGS' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
e37173b11b31498a08c19ded905ed25e
18df0e46433b69b2eaca8c7817c4e6a4a4367f81
describe
'49343' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXGT' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
a6239688b15f5a3310c3c6d16717f2cf
14cb5b5e2727f69f167ded53f4cd99f38857de5a
describe
'47998' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXGU' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
04f6dacb668b4460833db7901fe5e9e0
ccb3f9205fa493ea0d50a377b68492893533c1fa
describe
'153362' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXGV' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
cff85fabb2abc69db1ee7b882c7c1d38
0f652bbf320e1e09ad5999af18a42c73e715f7f4
describe
'46888' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXGW' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
a46d323020de72d73abc8f4f22bc8a3e
122cfcd37741d740f280812ab07a5de47187af56
describe
'154953' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXGX' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
48b07e8357696bbb90d0d4d9f97e704d
7b75228b299b09dd9ff8458a0d00cca9a9659c80
describe
'162248' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXGY' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
c6906b8e03739e3c0fc1a0e688d2f1db
6ac6c9fbe97ef440569faf4cbd6ed522d5bff8f4
describe
'152897' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXGZ' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
f0b01f2370235424cc98a4f7f7390fd1
59eaa4b040c87581c33d9905fe93c61f9b38d80f
describe
'48626' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXHA' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
76572d5aa738b23e230e03b88b430183
bf9e929865cc0d78e28f7d0d234fef7a346b149b
describe
'151389' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXHB' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
3aa413e73e0082e93acca4ad4ae45339
5ce2e3e5d1653f3597e3d5c0e236e7914435b5a0
describe
'159585' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXHC' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
ef54aa6be03aa441c47de7dc07b7ad49
6ca734f3acafd411fd2ebe57327252fa54c8d8e8
describe
'48859' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXHD' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
ae6c718d6a63e54598b7f8bf778ecc0e
e439c28b44f448c797b4df80873240e69729aa93
describe
'167277' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXHE' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
cb26a981d83e0560a3051b75f28fa383
b021393b3a12f6c1388eb3827d496e462925a81e
describe
'52300' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXHF' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
022079f1774cfcda159ab2ce7b038bd9
a4d0f19a81491ccf0c30b4362647e3e5a8d8ab0a
describe
'118770' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXHG' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
9e3fad3be6080883118342590871c426
012f60b1b3181dc375dac74426c8cb206d7e0221
describe
'43622' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXHH' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
0e505a965a0f216548bc5ec95ea6bc47
24abb219a36d5804915b41d2ad7f656b032b0d5a
describe
'136242' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXHI' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
70adf010f9db1bb677cda5d2d5f9b816
5921faf71b9cfca5bd3b9ecb3d94960b68fcf478
describe
'163872' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXHJ' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
22681dce53075eb6b3f8a4ef66299e14
2c3a4de5fb3d2c9494cc476d6f74d9d22e8d8b00
describe
'49706' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXHK' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
bdbe9c585af183d15beece155ef40d23
8d163fe6826e29e283eca87ca747cfc98acac037
describe
'126762' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXHL' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
b313090e4f6bde292cb1c7d74870797f
d61d6af25dd9ab7a9c622f5adccdcf6bef163bac
describe
'40139' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXHM' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
17d1e0c1019b74981c886b83007ec698
209627b76ca9c3a961c03a0358e3917672ae6cd5
describe
'144815' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXHN' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
989b6fb2b284e57429e2fc4b50a18236
d740b342f0862722b0bb826240066497ee69e4a9
'2012-06-20T09:50:29-04:00'
describe
'45802' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXHO' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
d27405f8f47002bf3760ee6673f3ed89
ceccd6ee4269444833ae968d34bca22895a6831c
'2012-06-20T09:50:05-04:00'
describe
'141766' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXHP' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
afbf2c365e90e079a67ca5bfb92dbdb5
7b66e5f02e7163208db1eb4c907c726bd9a9c410
describe
'46185' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXHQ' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
96bdd4599f85c7fd50c817b05d601117
96f8cbd7f96c4753c5044a03954df38852d55bbf
describe
'155514' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXHR' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
41df101b09c44a07696f1ea7f7b0686d
083980d1c4bc63923cf935fe5802f45ddf8249d8
describe
'48937' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXHS' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
7250be70954265b1a78910041575c770
98962d3af876967a108a690b747362f9c2e37f24
describe
'152609' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXHT' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
ad8eccbaef915938af636686e614ddae
ca79090e4b38e880484684ea48c4c9dcb3e0193e
describe
'136749' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXHU' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
12e7a63b28dcd3069fad598f42a36742
a53d844f29c431a28a4b851a8163fd2887fa1bf1
describe
'44424' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXHV' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
6dfd0fdb206de1b3eea8ee727002a012
4962dceb49c7bc811d1352182f5f281ddf3adf74
describe
'156461' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXHW' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
1449bc281779d05a47b1a1257baf6cf5
a4b33cccb5cef0a28716282bc93dd4ece72edda4
describe
'156830' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXHX' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
fbd7bfd8f9fd4fc563bfd27f2de83b1f
b6c875c2d3306bf5e08ff07472e6f22f25267d53
describe
'49265' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXHY' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
db403e012cba371555af53a9c14c09be
20fd361d767ad8a46570ec2915790682e2685dda
describe
'149741' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXHZ' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
1afa22f70b01574fec9739a45f407e13
90540e5398dc6d75926a398c6aa7826108ad7359
'2012-06-20T09:53:16-04:00'
describe
'46431' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXIA' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
ccf561480b594071fc6eb8b31cca5619
eaa67fdbab8bb16170fa49d23fcb2796f940c54b
'2012-06-20T09:52:41-04:00'
describe
'160348' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXIB' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
c18fc765e53c2d820ce7e54380518fab
9fb346e29276415f3345562d1279594d9503b696
describe
'50256' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXIC' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
97bf5a546aa45337cbdd9398541eacf7
f55c56f2399f7243e86dd91f6f28c2140e7ac796
describe
'47005' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXID' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
b5676ae5a0b7b474eac405429c140807
36c31ab9d0bd97bf2c04faf1d5558cfec8fdf28d
describe
'140558' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXIE' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
da1b65b575114bc34f7ba3c844877b10
f6996b9245f42a3bdad4648e6d7c838280d067f3
describe
'43948' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXIF' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
11984433b4727e623f6f0d8f5df2715d
13a97862b4d1c65ef3d9475bbaf2bede1b45c0a4
describe
'102653' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXIG' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
a67ba2ef8c3069f600aa301f6869f067
f92abd6d2ee6991a7a7a882d20fb536ba7abfefd
describe
'39964' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXIH' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
727c940d665ed5407be3aed6e3831037
be2a0ee85f91d3b0d40a380c2a47dbc12bc92f7c
describe
'162724' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXII' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
fb106bfead3ca2d23036f735a3f39640
df4e252676041af085b9d53e7eec4180ba484ee7
describe
'51901' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXIJ' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
b75f6c0fc3d1d7793321f6e032b15786
3f96f8fc43de79710ca7a48002b03459f2499577
describe
'124728' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXIK' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
da4c96eefe0645359258a237df9afcb9
7906cb0b66e02e92bf8b239361bf0edeca2f5981
describe
'44638' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXIL' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
20cd004e1be8f5d599e2a175e2144c19
56923cf5ec289b9932da179ac582ca5b424e93ec
describe
'148548' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXIM' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
d5c2daca50e0d3818177f2959026b530
3c4586323dbff727ae2088412bcc0649b4e35ca4
describe
'88402' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXIN' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
5d12f4dd8ce488c5d497ea70631ebbe7
6170c79b0c21acba32ee924f54d7b63207edbb10
'2012-06-20T09:54:51-04:00'
describe
'34931' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXIO' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
2bd7ddd574fae26d3bb8e9a01c457be5
a3655c50147ad46334c561e63064b7a96525d8c7
describe
'31231' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXIP' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
01b049217d2bd2b7b4925bb7defbf335
d945e8f900db06a010432a0fd98903e298050e30
describe
'157093' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXIQ' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
09853522900f4d374ab7445b6187837f
a4adfdf22d396506375f3512b6252a40414610c7
'2012-06-20T09:54:31-04:00'
describe
'49866' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXIR' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
86c3e0d2f941bf609996976449a5ce28
44912df91b54fbf895fecdd961e1bd29221e608d
describe
'168633' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXIS' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
08ae11917ff46ad243f51a49b25ec421
556fa6df78224a8924a0c7a0d3ae91dceb37d156
describe
'52697' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXIT' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
f935193386c8e938cca6b67f6d1a3d78
5af23d280e22d75fd7fcb1dcdbb287398e6415b2
describe
'131182' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXIU' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
eeb2fe563a2801713cda469e1d2722a3
a9023ffd5165ff1808dc4fd4648aa414529c945b
'2012-06-20T09:52:14-04:00'
describe
'40945' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXIV' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
1944fb332935bebedafa2c7c53d0fde4
113f0115285ff6f23a8b0b979bb0ecadfd20dd1c
describe
'143993' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXIW' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
2b7f7a64b28f3381001050792b5c946f
307428fe6bfef0bfe4764c1f295ad49288cbf7b8
describe
'45310' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXIX' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
14b6b98313aca828d92068cef3a57dab
15afc77a6479db73195c532fc53cb8f845589147
describe
'43943' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXIY' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
c628eb477962464d80596781e57cfe6a
4b2fe3cba45d9b096ece0a1b88971d604f7472c2
describe
'150828' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXIZ' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
aa6654fb0a4507149312d78af15c6c57
05964ddf0160700a8190862e3557bd71500627fa
describe
'47178' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXJA' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
09cd654772b291a0b072d6f23883922c
4efb4585a1a868628c03a7336453bcf1fafbdd74
describe
'161077' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXJB' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
12b1fc623d54b3c076748fe2243ce24f
4f6270363edf8cb79d980b5f74c7583e3eb98b98
describe
'50225' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXJC' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
fb408ffcd3b6bc451450b789b662542d
5d0a53f74ec6f69a64658e16f37caa068c318042
describe
'41019' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXJD' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
b158d4b3b29cea5c9c7dee0c67447345
bc7980aafb2b94d181ca36597df86357a5be5a99
describe
'166006' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXJE' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
c7b9a8e9d818b8f352635e65de40ad59
e2e43d8e6b85dbdcfbfda303140fb9088e737b0b
describe
'137043' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXJF' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
e7d561141f6e617443ca710d26707677
a227e324bd3953448c589f47fe00a59710b5a285
describe
'156663' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXJG' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
20ee2151e40b974117aac38065d7f521
d3efa41cc944e225ec8acb5f2fa7e4ea23680efe
describe
'48705' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXJH' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
316c219537f391ff41127b105cda5938
0256b0856881f29f7e594e3eb4f3ef38caec9b7a
describe
'154869' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXJI' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
abb972560c78c375a4d71315acd4da2e
9c7814f92d6b2c0a118160b3ebccd52359cf2f0a
describe
'47497' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXJJ' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
5e314e0f1ef6ced6617aaab7fa66790e
5b636f22f41e05e7255769b46daf232e66a55f98
describe
'49674' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXJK' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
e82ebacd6c4038bbd85278ee7c12d258
756df7541524718e2cc695decca06d25de1b2118
describe
'85520' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXJL' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
9cb1383d151b07ef8cc656948a2ba0aa
775aaa9467df72ab2a543e0c1f8365b8adba8efd
describe
'29530' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXJM' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
26dd9010972ef2357d98372b88cef5f8
8ae1e0db0f89cd32f2132b7872f59ceee9aa4bd4
describe
'82918' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXJN' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
e2f34d25ca5f09edfd14435d61fdefb2
3b8106cd78e5e9a0be9cec3f71e456af394ca716
describe
'28469' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAAODfileF20100515_AABXJO' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
931ceee3251e0c60297258d9e1ebfd28
1747ebc05dd144b1af649d085844a3673e9a15cc
describe