Citation
Madge and her ten recruits

Material Information

Title:
Madge and her ten recruits : a temperance tale
Creator:
E. G. E. ( Author, Primary )
John S. Marr & Sons. ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Glasgow
Publisher:
John S. Marr and Sons
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
128 p., 3 leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 19 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Temperance -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Temperance and religion -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Hope -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Prayer -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Sisters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Sick -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Physicians -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Family -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Baldwin -- 1885.
Spatial Coverage:
Scotland -- Glasgow.

Notes

General Note:
Frontispiece printed in colors.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in Special Collections, George A. Smathers Libraries
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026674609 ( ALEPH )
ALG5860 ( NOTIS )
65191163 ( OCLC )

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The Baldwin Library














|) Madge and Ber Cor Recruits.

a
ws QQEMPERANCE SRALE.

BY

E 6. E,

Author of “ Ethel Clemence,’ “ Mattie’s Happy Home,” “ Aimée,? &¢t.

** Absence of occupation is not rest,
A mind quite vacant is a mind distress’d.”
—COWPER.

GLASGOW:
JOHN S MARR AND SONS,
51 DUNDAS STREET.
1885,





CONTENTS.

CHAP. 3 PAGER
I. Tue First River 1n THe BAND or Hore CHAIN, . 5
II. In tox Hosprran Warp, , 0 9 . 13
Ill Toe Dawn or Licut, ‘ ; , . . 21
IV. Unconscious INFLUENCE, . c . 0 30
V. “Ir av First you Don’r SuccrEp—Try Agatn,” 7 38
VI. A PracticaL View or ToTaL ABSTINENCE, 3 a 47
VII. Manpcer’s First Recruits, . . 7 . . 55
VIII. A Curtous ADVENTURE AND ITs CONSEQUENCES, : . 65
IX. ExampLe BerrerR THAN PRECEPT, . 3 7 . 77
X. Home once Mors, . : a 5 . . 88
XI, More Recruits anp A Great Opsect GAINED, . 0 97
XII. A Treat or FLowers, : - . . . lll

XIU. THe Excursion, . ; ' 0 e . 120



MADGE AND HER TEN RECRUITS.

CHAPTER I.
THE FIRST RIVET IN THE BAND OF HOPE CHAIN.

‘Do what you can for fellow-man

With honest heart and true,

Much may be done by every one,
There’s work for all to do.

Though you can do but little,
That little’s something still ;

Youll find a way for something,
If you but have the will.

Be kind to those around you,
To charity hold fast,

Let each think first of others
And leave himself till last.

Act as you would that others should
Act always unto you ;

Mvci MAY BE DONE BY EVERY ONE—
THERE’S WORK FOR ALL TO DO.”

Ir was a bleak cold evening in winter, and the misty rain
and sharp wind pierced the thin scanty clothing of two
children, who, though not begging, were aimlessly wandering
up and down a quiet street. “O Madge, come home!”
pleaded the smaller of the two. “Iam so cold, and tired,
and hungry; do let us come home.”



6 THE FIRST RIVET IN THE BAND OF HOPE CHAIN.

Poor Madge! was she not the same, and anxious into the
bargain? “Let us sit down here, Nellie,” she said coaxingly,
“and I will take you on my lap to keep you warm. We
can’t go home yet, because of father—there now, isn’t that
better?” and she wrapped her thin shawl round the shiver-
ing child and held her close.

But Nellie was not so easily pacified. “It’s not much
better,” she whined, then breaking into a cry, she sobbed, “O
Madge, come home, it’s so cold here, and I’m so tired.”
Madge knew it would be useless to go home yet. The church
clock had just chimed, and she well knew that a long time
must pass before there was even a chance of her father
coming out of that brilliantly-lighted public-house at the
corner, where he spent his evenings. She wanted to be near
to take him home, and besides, to-night he had locked the
door, or she could have put little Nellie to bed, and come
out again to wait for him; so nothing remained to be done
but be patient, and try to amuse the weary little child.
“See, Nellie,” she said cheerfully, “all these boys and girls.
I wonder where they are going! What a lot! seven, eight,
nine; how they run!” Nellie stopped crying, interested in
watching the children, who were hurrying along in all direc-
tions.

“Look, Madge!” she cried, emerging from the shawl, that
she might see better, “there are more coming down the other
way, all going to the same place; big people, too; there’s a
woman with a baby in her arms.”

“Shall we go too?” said Madge, whose own curiosity was



THE FIRST RIVET IN THE BAND OF HOPE CHAIN. 7

now aroused. “Here, take my hand, and we'll see what
it is.”

Following the stream of people round a corner, they came
to a brightly lighted house: the door stood open invitingly,
but Madge and Nellie held back, although all the others
hurried in as if quite at home.

“Come along,” said a man who stood inside, “aren’t you

_coming in? the meeting is just going to begin.”

“We didn’t know we might, sir,” said Madge.

“To be sure,” said the man good-naturedly, “every one is
welcome at the Band of Hope; the more the better; here
are more children, in with you all, or you'll be late,” and
almost before Madge knew what she was doing, she found
herself and Nellie seated in such a nice, warm, bright room,
filled with people of all ages, young and old. Nellie had
forgotten her troubles in the pleasure of this new scene. So
Madge was quite satisfied; this was a much nicer place to
wait for father in, and if Nellie was good and happy that was
the chief thing. So she gave herself up to enjoying herself
for once, and looked about with great interest. At the
farthest end of the room was a table, behind which sat some
gentlemen, and on which Madge’s sharp eyes spied rows of
shining silvery things like half-crowns ; what could they be
for? Presently one of the gentlemen gave out a hymn,
every one stood up, Nellie and Madge doing whatever they
saw the others do, and Madge found herself joining quite
loudly in the chorus, for she had a quick ear, and a sweet
little voice, and the words and tune of



8 THE FIRST RIVET IN THE BAND OF HOPE CHAIN,

‘*Rescue the perishing,
Care for the dying,
Jesus is merciful,
Jesus will save,”

were just as easy and far prettier than the songs she knew
well from hearing so constantly in the streets. Then every
one knelt down and aclergyman prayed. Madge did not
quite take in all his words, but she listened and liked what
he said. Then after a pause one of the gentlemen stood up,
and said he was now going to give away medals to all those
members who had kept their pledges faithfully for a year;
and while Madge was wondering what he meant, he began
to call out different names, when boys, girls, men, and women
from different parts of the room went up, each to receive
one of the shining things which Madge had seen on the
table, and which they now fastened on their coats, suspended _
_ by a blue ribbon. The two children gazed at this strange
scene with the deepest interest until every medal was gone,
and the noise of clapping (in which Nellie had assisted until
her little hands were quite hot) had subsided; then the
gentleman said he had still to give away the highest prize—
that for obtaining ten recruits, and he called on Janie Wilson
to come up for it. To Madge’s great surprise, the people on
the row with her began to make room, and a little girl who
sat next to her got up, smiling and blushing, and went up
to the table. As Janie passed, Madge saw that she already
had a medal and blue ribbon on, so she wondered what she
was to get, but as she returned to her seat, she held in her



THE FIRST RIVET IN THE BAND OF HOPE CHAIN. 9

hand a little silver bar, which she began to fasten on the
ribbon. Seeing Madge watch so earnestly, she said, “ Look,
isn’t it pretty ?”

“Very,” replied Madge, “but what is it? and why did you
get it?”

“The medal is because I have been a year a teetotaler—
never drink spirits or. anything like that, you know—and
the bar is because I got ten other people to sign, or promise
they wouldn't either.”

“ How nice,” said Madge admiringly. “I would like to
get one.”

“Well, will you sign?” said Janie eagerly. But just then
there was a cry of “ Hush-sh,” and a woman sitting behind
tapped them sharply on their shoulders, so Madge did not
answer. Another gentleman began to speak so simply and
plainly that she understood every word he said. He told
several stories which made the children laugh, but chiefly
he spoke in an earnest way of the sin and misery caused by
drink, which went to Madge’s very heart, and when alluding
to homes which had once been happy, but were rendered
wretched by drunken fathers, who spent all their earnings on
drink while their children starved, Madge started and looked
at the gentleman, quite sure he was speaking of them, but
he was looking another way, and she remembered with a
sigh that there were plenty of other poor children as sad
and wretched as they were. In conclusion he said, “ This is
a great war which we have to carry into the enemy’s camp,
and if we mean to win, we must be like true soldiers—brave.



10 THE FIRST RIVET IN THE BAND OF HOPE CHAIN.

and steady. I iment a great many in this room to-night
have already signed, but there may be some who have not,
and to them I address myself particularly. I beg of you not
to go home before joining our ranks, by signing our Band of
Hope pledge. Let no one say, ‘J am of no consequence; or,
‘What good could J do by joining?’ We want every one to
join. The grandest castle in the world is formed of multitudes
of stones, all different sizes and shapes, but cemented together
by mortar into one grand edifice; let us be like that; you can-
not all be the polished handsome stones, but you can be like
the useful mortar that binds them together, filling every chink.
If every one here who has not yet signed will do so to-night,
and will then try each to get one more before our next meeting,
what a fine addition to our ranks that would be! At the
close of this meeting any one who wishes can be given a
pledge-card; do let me once more urge on you not to lose
this opportunity ; who knows if you may have another?”
He sat down, and the closing hymn was sung. Madge pon-
dered over the words she had heard. Young as she was,
poor child, she had seen enough of the evils of drink to
make her feel she would do anything to put an end to it;
the gentleman had said he hoped nobody would go away
without signing, but she was a stranger, too shy to go for-
ward alone. While she was thinking what she should do,
her neighbour touched her arm, saying pleasantly,

“Well, will you join?”

“T don’t know how,” answered Madge. “I'd like to, but
Pm afraid.”



THE FIRST RIVET IN THE BAND OF HOPE CHAIN. 11

“Qh nonsense,” replied the other, “it’s so easy; and it’s
so nice to feel you belong to the Band of Hope. Yow don’t
want ever to drink, do you?”

“Oh no, no,” said Madge with a shudder, “indeed, I don’t.”

“Well then come with me, I’ll show you what to do.”

Madge got up, holding her little sister’s hand, and followed
her new friend shyly to the table. One of the gentlemen
looked up with a smile, saying, “Janie Wilson is an inde-
fatigable agent; here she is with a new recruit. Well, Janie,
are you going in for another bar ?”

“ Please, sir, this is a little girl who would like to sign,
but doesn’t know what to do,” said Janie, “so I brought her
up ; she may sign, mayn’t she ?”

“ Of course, indeed she may,” said the gentleman kindly ;
then turning to Madge he said, “ Well, my little girl, what is
your name ?”

“ Madge Stevenson, sir.”

“Where do you live?”

“Tn 3 Back Lane, sir.”

“How old are you?” Madge was not sure; she only
knew she was a great deal older than Nellie.

“No matter,” said the gentleman, “I daresay you are
old enough to understand what it is you are going to do;
listen now while I explain it.” He then clearly explained
the nature of the pledge, and made Madge repeat after him
that by God’s help she would “abstain from all intoxicating
drinks as beverages.” Then he filled up a little card, and
desired her to sign her name. Poor Madge thought it was



12 THE FIRST RIVET IN THE BAND OF HOPE CHAIN.

all up, for she could not write; but the gentleman wrote the
name for her, and showed her where to put her mark. How
proud and happy she felt when he gave her the pretty
little card, telling her to keep it safe, and that she was now
a regular member of the Band of Hope! Nellie was tired
out with the evening’s excitement, and was almost asleep ;
so Madge took her in her arms, waiting patiently near the
door of the public-house until her father should come out.
The words of the hymn “ Rescue the perishing, care for the
dying,” rang in her ears; while she went over in her mind
what she had heard about the war needing brave soldiers,
or the castle needing many stones, and wondered if she was
like the mortar now that she had taken the pledge, and
would she ever become one of the great stones, until she
nearly fell asleep sitting on the cold doorstep.



CHAPTER II.
IN THE HOSPITAL WARD.

On life’s ocean wide

Your fellow-creatures guide,

And point to a shore beyond the stormy tide!

What is marred make right,

What is severed unite,

And leave where’er you go love’s golden thread of light !

JOE STEVENSON when sober (now, alas! a rare occurrence)
was not unkind to his children ; indeed, at one time he had

deen an affectionate, loving father; but so long ago that

Nellie had quite, and Madge almost, forgotten it.

The recollection therefore of the weary, patient, cold little
children, waiting outside the public-house for him that bitter
evening, caused him severe self-reproach next morning. It
was only Tuesday, yet what had become of his Saturday’s
wages? True, some had gone for the rent, and some to
Madge to buy food and fire; but what of the rest? He well
knew it had gone for his own selfish gratification in three
evenings at the “public.” With mind and body both
uncomfortable, he turned from the scanty allowance of stir-
about prepared by Madge for breakfast, and went out to try
to seek work, having been told by his employer on Satur-
day that he need not come back again, as he was too
unsatisfactory. But what was in reality the prickings of.
conscience, the children very naturally mistook for an
increase of bad humour; so that they felt a sense of relief



14 IN THE HOSPITAL WARD.

when the door closed after him, and they were able to
speak to each other without fear of a harsh word or blow.

“Do you know what day this is, Nellie?” asked Madge,
as she washed up the breakfast things, giving them carefully
to her little sister to dry and put in their places.

“ Visiting day,” answered Nellie brightly.

“Yes,” replied Madge. “We'll see mammie to-day, and
tell her all the news. I wonder what she’ll say when she
hears I’m a Band of Hope!”

“Won't you show her your nice little book that the
gentleman wrote your name in?” asked Nellie.

“To be sure I will,” answered Madge. “I’ve got a bit of
clean paper to wrap it in, to keep it from getting soiled.
Won’t it be nice when I get a medal with a blue ribbon!
I mean to get a silver bar too, like the little girl that sat
next us.”

“ How will you get it?” asked Nellie with interest.

“ By getting ten people to sign their names,” said Madge.

“T’d like one too,” said little Nellie, “I want to be a
Band of Hope.”

“You’re too little yet,” said Madge. “The gentleman
said so; but maybe you'll be big enough to be the last of my
ten people!”

“Who will they be?” asked Nellie. “I wish you’d get
father.”

A shade crossed Madge’s face, indeed she wished so too;
but there was almost nothing she would dread more than to
speak to him on the subject. “Come along now,” she said



IN THE HOSPITAL WARD. 15

to her little sister, “it’s time we were going to see mother;
‘T'll dress you first, and you must stay quiet till I’m ready.”
Soon they were ready to start. Madge took Nellie’s hand
as they walked through the crowded strects to the hospital
where their mother was. Madge had been there so often,
that she was not shy now when they passed through the
big gates and went into the large hall, where the good-
natured porter nodded to them, telling them they might go
up. Nellie tightened her hold of her sister’s hand, as they
went up flight after flight of scrupulously clean stairs, along
corridors, into a large airy room, with long rows of white

‘beds down each side, and tables down the middle, on which
were scrap-books, flowers, &c.

Many a languid eye followed the children as they passed
down the room without even glancing around them, till
they reached almost the end; then with a cry of joy they
sprang forward, half. pacers their mother with kisses.
The sick woman raised herself on her elbow, holding out
both her hands. “O mammie! mammie!” said Madge,
kneeling down beside her, “I am so glad to see you!”
Little Nellie climbed up into the bed beside her mother, and
with her arms tight round her neck, hugged her with all
her might, smiling defiance at the nurse, who, passing by,
warned her it was against the rules to get into the beds.

“ And how are you, mammie?” asked Madge.

“ Better,” answered her mother cheerfully, “The doctor
says I’m doing nicely.”

“When may you come home?” asked Madge.



16 IN THE HOSPITAL WARD.

“T don’t know that,” said Mrs. Stevenson. “He hasn’t
said a word of that yet.” -

“© mother! we do want you so much,” said poor Madge.

“Do you think I don’t want you too?” said her mother
softly, stroking her hair. “How is father?”

Another cloud passed over Madge’s face as she replied,
“He’s very well.”

“TI thought maybe he would come to-day to see me,” said
his poor wife wistfully.

“He went out to seek work,” said Madge, then turning
the subject, she exclaimed, “O mammie, do you know
where we went last night? It was so nice, and now I ama
Band of Hope, a member, you know; and I’ve promised I'll
never again take anything to drink.”

“* Never take anything to drink!’ bless the child, what
does she mean?” exclaimed Mrs. Stevenson in surprise. -

Madge produced from her pocket a tiny parcel, and
unwrapping several papers, took out her little pledge-card,
saying, “Here it is; now, mammie, read what is on it, and
you’ll know all about it.”

Mrs. Stevenson took the card, but her eyes were weak,
and the print small, so she gave it back to Madge.

“Give it to me, child,” said a woman in the next bed, “I’m
a good scholard, I'll read it for her.”

Madge did so, and the woman slowly and carefully read:
“TI hereby promise, by God’s help, to abstain from all intoxi-
cating liquors (‘that means whisky, or beer, or porter,’
explained Madge, ‘the gentleman told me’) as beverages,



IN THE HOSPITAL WARD. 17

and I consider this promise binding until I return this card
of membership, or have my name removed from the roll of
members.” ;

Madge then gave a minute account of their adventures
the night before, detailing every word almost that she could
remember. While not only her mother, but the women at
each side of her, listened attentively. “You don’t mind my
signing, mother, do you?” she asked in conclusion.

“Mind! indeed I don’t,” answered her mother. “I’ve
seen enough of drink to make me hate it; but there was
nothing of this sort in my day, or I’d have joined it too

‘myself. I’d be only thankful to feel sure that no child of
mine would ever touch a drop of it.”

Madge was surprised at this outburst from her usually
quiet mother, but she only answered, “ Well, then, mammie,
when you come home, you can join and be the first of my
ten recruits.” Mrs. Stevenson smiled, and said she would.

“Drink is a bad thing,” remarked one of the women.
“Teetotalism is good, I’m sure, though I don’t know much
of it myself.”

“Maybe it would be better for you, ma’am, if you did,”
observed the nurse politely, as she, too, listened attentively
to the conversation. The woman winced a little. Nurse
Mooney knew more about her private affairs than she cared
to be made public, and could, if she chose, disclose the
fact that drink had been the cause of the accident which
brought her to the hospital.

I wish the Parliament would make a law that not a
2



18 IN THE HOSPITAL WARD.

drop of liquor could be sold; it’s a curse to the country,”
said Mrs. Stevenson’s other neighbour. “Only for it I
wouldn’t be here now.”

“You! Mrs. Tracy,” exclaimed the nurse. “Why, I
thought you were the soberest woman in the place; even
when you were ordered stimulants you wouldn’t take it.”

“J never touch it myself,” answered Mrs. Tracy quietly, “but
all the same, it’s what brought me here. I was coming home
one night from my work; I suppose I was tired and was walk-
ing slow; but suddenly a carriage dashed round a corner,
the coachman was lashing the horses, and was too drunk to
pull up when he saw me. I was knocked down, and the
wheel went over my leg; there was a crowd in a moment,
some of them carried me here, and the coachman was taken
to the station-house. They only knew that he had been
leaving his master and mistress at a party, and had stopped
at a public-house on his way home; so that is how I came
here.” i

“T don’t deny that it must be a good thing to be a
teetotaler,” said the first woman, “but it must be awfully
hard to give up what you're used to; I don’t think I could
do that.”

“What's that written on the rest of the card?” asked
the nurse,

The woman took it up again, and read slowly and dis-
tinctly, “O Almighty God and merciful Father, listen,
I beseech Thee, to my prayer: forgive me all my sins}
help me to keep my promise of abstinence; bless me in ny



IN THE HOSPITAL WARD. 19

efforts in Thy service, and may I ever trust only in Thy
heavenly grace; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.”
Then turning the card round and round, she read, “Without
me ye can do nothing ;” “ Watch and pray ;” “ Even Christ
pleased not Himself;” “Bear ye one another’s burdens;” “In
Me is thine help,” texts which were printed on the margins.
When she came to this last, there was a silence; each of
the women seemed to feel that it was a sort of answer to
her last remark, and nobody liked to speak.

“ Here is the lady with the flowers,” said nurse, presently
breaking the silence.

A lady with a basket of evergreens came up to the
bed, saying pleasantly, “I’m sorry we have no flowers yet,
but even these bunches of evergreens are pretty,” and
she handed each of the women a nice little bunch of a
shiny dark plant, box and cyclemen leaves; then seeing
Nellie’s dark eyes peeping over her mother’s shoulder
she smilingly handed her one too, and with a curious look
at Madge she wished them all good morning, and passed
down the other side of the room, distributing her bouquets,
for which an eager hand was held out from every bed.

“Tt’s very kind of you, Miss Arnold, to come here, even
in the winter time,” said the nurse. “The patients love
the flowers in summer, and these green things will be a
treat to us.” Miss Arnold said she hoped soon to have
flowers also ; then nodding pleasantly, she left the ward.

“Mammie!” whispered Madge, “I know that lady’s face;
she was at the meeting last night when I got my card;



20 IN THE HOSPITAL WARD.

I think she knew me too, for she looked very hard at
me.”

“Tsn’t she kind to bring us these?” said Mrs. Stevenson,
putting her little bunch into a glass which stood beside her
bed. “I had what she brought last week until to-day,
when they were so withered, nurse took them away. I’d
give these to you, only Nellie has some for herself; put
them in water, Madge, when you go home, they'll look nice
for father when he comes in: he used to be very fond of
flowers. I’m glad they came before you had to go away.
Nobody knows the pleasure these flowers give to us poor
sick people in the wards.”



CHAPTER III.

THE DAWN OF LIGHT,

** Yet some there are upon whose childish brows
Wan poverty hath done the work of care.

Look up, ye sad ones!—'tis your Father's house

Beneath whose consecrated dome you are ;

More gorgeous robes ye see, and trappings rare,

And watch the gaudier forms that gaily move,

And deem, perchance, mistaken as you are,

The ‘ coat of many colours’ proves His love,

Whose sign is in the heart, and whose reward above.”

—Mrs, Sigourney.
“THERE’S a knock at our door, Madge.”

Madge, who was singing at the top of her voice, almost
drowning the very discordant accompaniment of cleaning
with a knife the saucepan in which their breakfast of stir-
about had been cooked, stopped both occupations, and
shouted, “Come in:” thinking it was either one of their
fellow-lodgers come to borrow something, or the landlady,
although, indeed, she always dispensed with the ceremony
of knocking.

Great, therefore, was her surprise when the door opened,
and a nicely dressed lady entered, saying pleasantly, “Does
a little girl called Madge Stevenson live here?”

“Yes, ma’am, that’s me,” said Madge, awkwardly twirling
her apron, while Nellie looked up in surprise from the old
doll which she was nursing in the corner, and whispered,
“Tt’s the flower lady.”



22 THE DAWN OF LIGHT.

“To be sure,” said the lady, “I might have known your
face: I am sure I saw you lately,” then catching sight of
Nellie’s bright eyes glancing in the direction of the mug of
flowers, she added, “Oh yes, I remember now, that is the
little girl who was in her mother’s bed at the hospital
yesterday, and I saw you both before at”

“The meeting on Monday night,” said Madge promptly.

“Exactly,” answered the lady. “And now, are you not
wondering what brings me here to-day ?”

Madge was wondering very much, but did not like to say so.

Miss Arnold continued, “Well, I am what is called ‘a
district visitor,’ and when you joined the Band of Hope it
became my duty to come to see you, to become acquainted
with you, in fact! However, I daresay you don’t understand
much about that. Now, tell me, do you two children live
all alone here while your mother is in hospital ?”

“There’s father,” said Madge doubtfully.

Miss Arnold’s quick eye glanced round the cheerless,
uncomfortable room, taking in more of the family history
than Madge would have dreamed of telling; she was used
to visiting the poor, and understood the circumstances of
the case pretty well. Changing the subject she asked, “I
suppose you and your little sister go to school every day ?”

“No, ma’am.”

“No; nor to Sunday-school ?’

“No, ma’am.”

“That is a pity. But you go to church, I hope?”

“No, ma’am.” '





THE DAWN OF LIGHT. 23

“Ts it possible?” said Miss Arnold. “You would like it
so much if you went.”

“We didn’t always live here,’ said Madge looking down.
“ And we didn’t know we might go to the school.”

“Of course you may,” said the lady cheerfully. “Can
you read ?”

“ No, ma’am.”

“Would you like to learn? If you would, and if your
parents have no objection, I can easily arrange for you.”

Madge looked greatly pleased, and answered at once, “I'd
like to go school well; I often wished I could learn to read.”

“Well, so you shall then,” said Miss Arnold, “at least if
we can get leave; tell me, before your mother was ill did
you never go to church, or chapel, or any such place?”

Madge was not quite sure; mother had not been able to
walk much, and father never went.

“Well, about school, there is no time like the present, and
you might as well begin at once,” said the lady. “I will
take you to-morrow, if you can only ask leave from your
father first.” s

“T’d rather ask mother,” said Madge; “but we can’t see
her till next visiting day.”

“That’s too bad,” said Miss Arnold, who was quite up to
hospital rules, and knew that this was the case, “but wait!
I’ve thought of a plan. I will go to the hospital now, I
can always get in, and I will ask your mother if she will
allow you to go to school; if she says no, I shall call here
and tell you; but if she has no objection, you must come to



24 THE DAWN OF LIGHT.

my house to-morrow morning, and I shall take you myself.
Now, do you think you understand ?”

“Yes, ma’am,” said Madge; “if you don’t come back by-
and-bye, we're to know that mother says we may go to you
to-morrow morning.”

“ Quite right,” said the young lady smiling. “Now I must
explain where you are to go. Do you know Clarence
Street ?”

“Yes, ma’am ; it’s not far from this.”

“Very well, then, go to No. 15, and ask for Miss Arnold,
and don’t be later than ten o’clock. Now, do you think you
can remember all that?”

Madge smiled too, and repeated, “Go to 15 Clarence Street
at ten o'clock, and ask for Miss Arnold.”

“Very good,” said the lady. “I think you won’t forget.
Now, good-bye, I hope I shan’t see you again to-day, because
if I don’t it will mean that I shall see you to-morrow!
Good-bye, little one, what is your name?”

“Nellie,” replied the child shyly, while Madge opened
the door, and showed her guest down the rickety stairs.
Then bounding up again she cried, “O Nellie, Nellie, don’t
you hope mother will let us go? it would be so much nicer
to go to school than to sit here all-day, or play in the street.
I do hope she will say yes.”

Little Nellie always liked what Madge liked, and not
knowing anything about school did not much care; but
seeing her sister so excited, she was quite content to be so
too, and went down to the front door with her, where she



THE DAWN OF LIGHT, 25

sat curled up on Madge’s lap, with the old doll in her own
little arms, watching to see if Miss Arnold should come
again, until daylight faded, and the lamps in the street were
lighted; when with a sigh of relief Madge declared there
was no chance of her coming that night, and they went
indoors.

Miss Arnold’s visit to the hospital was most satisfactory.
Mrs. Stevenson was an ignorant, poor woman, but very fond
of her children, and so pleased and grateful for any interest
shown in them that she readily and willingly gave her con-
sent to all the plans for their good. Miss Arnold was sorry
she had made such a negative arrangement with Madge, and
would have gone round again by Back Lane to tell her the
result, but it was too late; however, she need not have been
afraid of her forgetting her promise, for next morning,
punctually as the church clock struck ten, a modest ring
sounded at the door of 15 Clarence Street, and the servant
came in to say that two little girls were waiting in the hall.
Madge had made herself and Nellie as tidy as possible, and
it was well she had, for, as she said afterwards, “ the lady was
that good, she actually walked with the likes of us herself.”
When they reached the school, Madge was much interested
to see the way in which all the girls stood up in answer to
Miss Arnold’s pleasant greeting—she seemed to know each
one of them separately, asking for mothers, sisters, or fathers,
as if she knew all quite well. After a few words with the
teacher, Miss Arnold stood up to leave, patting Madge’s
shoulder, and telling her to be a good girl, and do whatever



26 THE DAWN OF LIGHT.

Miss Anderson told her. A monitress was then called up to
take her in hand, and Madge felt inclined to either ery or
run away, when lo! who should it prove to be, but her old
acquaintance, Janie Wilson! so that she felt quite at home,
and soon found that school was not so formidable as she
feared. When three o’clock came, she and Nellie felt quite
proud of themselves as they walked home, swinging the bag
of books which Miss Anderson had given them, in imitation
of the other girls.

Since their mother’s illness, Sunday had always been an
unusually dreary day to the children. Their father had no
work to do, so slept half the day. If fine, they went out,
but if wet, they were afraid to make a noise or do anything
to make him angry; so that the idea of going to Sunday-
school was a joyful one.

According to Miss Arnold’s directions, they went to her
house, and with her to the school, which was ever connected
in Madge’s mind with the Band of Hope meeting. She was
put in a class with several other little girls of her own age,
and was so pleased to hear them repeat their verses correctly,
that she wished she could do go also; but firstly, she had no
Bible, and if she had she could not read it, so she contented
herself by listening attentively to what her teacher said.
The lesson was about Christ feeding the multitude, and it
went home at once to Madge’s heart. She was very hungry;
as usual their allowance of food had been very small, and
whatever it was, Nellie always got the largest share; so
that to her was particularly appropriate the story of the



THE DAWN OF LIGHT. 27

wonderful man, who cured the sick, taught the people who
followed Him in crowds, and when night came, and they
were too far from home to go back, would not listen to the
suggestions of those who said they might go and buy food
for themselves, saying the poor tired men and women might
faint by the way, but desired them to sit down on the grass
in rows, so that nobody should be forgotten or overlooked,
and divided the food amongst them, not only each person
getting as much as he could eat, but plenty being left over.
Madge was sorry when the lesson was over, she felt so
interested, and now she did not quite know what was to be
done next. While she was waiting in uncertainty at the
school-door, holding Nellie’s hand, somebody touched her,
and looking round she saw Janie Wilson.

“T thought,” said she, “that perhaps you would not know
where to sit in church, would you like to come with me?”

“Oh! very much,” replied Madge, “I was just wondering
what I was to do.”

“Well, come along then,” said Janie. “How did you like
Sunday-school ?”

“ Very much,” answered Madge decidedly, “I thought that
a lovely story ; I couldn’t help wishing that man lived now,
and would cure sick people and give food to hungry people.”

“That's like the hymn,” said Janie, “ where it says—

‘*T wish that His hands had been laid on my head,
And His arm had been thrown around me,
That I might have seen His kind look when He said,
‘ Let the little ones come unto me!’”



28 THE DAWN OF LIGHT.

“That's just what I would say,” said Madge. “Is there
any more?”

“Yes,” replied Janie, “there is another verse that goes on
like this—

** But now to His footstool in prayer I may go,
To ask for a share of His love,
And if I thus earnestly seek Him below,
I shall see Him and hear Him above.”

“That’s not so pretty,” said Madge, “ besides I don’t know
what His footstool means.”

“Oh! that means praying,” said Janie. “Though we can’t
sce Him, He sees us and hears us too; and we may ask Him
for anything we want.”

“But would we get it?” asked Madge with interest.

“T suppose we should if it was good for us,” answered
Janie. “Yes, I know we should, for there is a verse that
says, ‘ Ask, and it shall be given you.’”

“Well, I never!” said Madge slowly. “To think of any
one so great-and powerful as He is, listening to a poor child
like me. Are you in earnest, Janie?”

“T am indeed,” said Janie, “but hush! here we are at the
church, we mustn’t talk any more now.”

Madge and Nellie followed quietly into the seat Janie
entered. Everything was very new to them; the size of the
church, the grandeur of its coloured windows and tall pillars,
the swelling of the organ, which just then began to play, and
the crowds of ladies and gentlemen combined to overawe
them and kept Nellie quiet; as for Madge, she listened to



THE DAWN OF LIGHT. 29

every word and watched every movement of the clergyman
as if she could not be tired. Of course there was a great
deal she did not understand, but there also was a good deal
she did, and the chapters and some of the prayers she liked
greatly. When the service was over, Madge observed that
every one knelt down in silent prayer, so, following their
example, she did so too. Janie’s verse, “Ask, and it shall
be given you,” had been in her mind all the time, and the
thought now came that she would try if the good Lord
would really hear her if she did “ask.” So with bowed head
she whispered to herself, “Don’t be angry with me for ask-
ing, but I am very hungry, and I know there is no food at
home; will the kind Lord who gave bread to all the hungry
people in the far country, give us some too? and help me to
try to be a good girl and learn about Him, and will He soon
cure mammie, and send her home?”

Madge then took Nellie’s little hand and went home feel-
ing, she knew not why, as if she did not mind being hungry
as much as she had done.



CHAPTER IV.

UNCONSCIOUS INFLUENCE.

** In man’s most dark extremity
Oft succour dawns from Heaven.”
Lord of the Isles, Canto 20.

WHEN the children got home they found the door locked.

“Oh dear,” said Madge in dismay, “I never thought father
would go out so early ; what shall we do?”

“Ts that Madge Stevenson?” called a voice downstairs.

“Yes, ma’am,” cried Madge, running down quickly.

“Your father has gone out,” said the woman. “My
man’s out too, and I’ve just got a present from my sister in
the country, so I thought you two might as well come and
help us to eat it.”

“Oh! thank you, Mrs. Connor,” said Madge gratefully ;
“that’s real good of you.”

“ One good turn deserves another,” said Mrs. Connor, “and
you often give me a helping hand when I’m busy, and I |
daresay often will.”

“ Indeed I will, ma’am,” said Madge.

“Well, sit down now, and try if country bread isn’t better
than what you get to buy.”

The children needed no second bidding, and ‘igre ehty



UNCONSCIOUS INFLUENCE. $1

enjoyed the thick slices of bread and butter which kind-
hearted Mrs. Connor cut for them. When she had finished
Nellie went to play with a kitten on the hearth, where after
a good romp they both fell asleep together.

“Poor child! she’s tired out,” observed Mrs. Connor;
“what have you been doing with her all day ?”

“We've been to Sunday-school, and to church,” replied
Madge importantly, as she covered the sleeping child with
her own little jacket.

“Well! well!” remarked Mrs. Connor, “that is a new
thing. What put that into your head? See, there is the
’ rain, it’s well you are in here. I'll tell you what, you help
me to tidy up a bit, and you can stay comfortably here till
your father comes in.”

Madge joyfully agreed, it was pouring rain now, and if
they were out it would only be to sit outside the public-
house door, waiting to catch their father, to coax him for a
penny or two, which most likely he would not have to give;
besides, this room was a perfect paradise compared to their
own.

“ Well, so you’ve been to school,” said Mrs. Connor when
the “tidying” was done, and they sat down at the fire.
“T’m glad to hear it, there’s nothing like education when
you are young.”

“T am learning to read and write,” said Madge.

“Very good,” returned her friend. “I wish I'd learned
when I was your age. Why, once we were offered a fine
situation, to care for offices, and Connor to be hall-porter,



32 UNCONSCIOUS INFLUENCE.

but when they found neither of us could read well, they
wouldn’t take us.”

“Think of that,” said Madge. “I’m glad I’m learning.”

“And another time,” continued Mrs. Connor, “I could
have got a place as housekeeper, only I couldn’t read much,
and wasn’t a teetotaler.”

“T’m one,” said Madge. “I joined the Band of Hope on
Monday night.”

“You! child,” said Mrs. Connor in surprise; “if it was
your father now, there would be some sense in it; but you.”

“T’m very glad I did then,” said Madge, “only for that
I’d never have gone to school,” and she began the story of
their unexpected visit from Miss Arnold after the Band of
Hope meeting, and how she had got them to go to school.
Then came a description of the Sunday-school, and the
beautiful story she had heard there; to which Mrs. Connor
listened with deep attention. When she had finished telling
of the church, and all she had seen and heard there, Madge
suddenly exclaimed, “ Oh! I do believe He heard me.”

“ Who heard what, child?” asked Mrs. Connor.

Madge’s colour deepened. “If he did, it’s the most
wonderful thing I ever heard of,” she said slowly. “A
girl told me that the same Lord Jesus that gave the
crowds of people all the food is in heaven now, and that
He hears any one that asks Him for what they want. So
though I wasn’t sure if she was in earnest, I thought I’d
try, for I was very hungry, we'd had so little breakfast
before we went out, and I just asked Him to send us some-



UNCONSCIOUS INFLUENCE, 33

thing to eat. I never thought of it till now, but, sure
enough, though our door was locked that we couldn’t get in,
you brought us in here, and gave us twice as nice things as
we would get at home ; so it must have been that He heard
what I said, and made you ask us in.”

“That’s very queer,” said Mrs. Connor. “I don’t know
when I saw my sister before, and she brought us such a lot
of bread and things, that I couldn’t help thinking when I
saw you two going away into the rain, it would be a pity
not to give you a share when we had plenty; but, the
queerest part is, I don’t think I ever did it before, and I
don’t know what made me do it now.”

“Well! that is wonderful,” said Madge. ‘“ How good He
must be to hear me, and answer me so quickly.”

“T haven’t heard that sort of talk for years,” said Mrs.
Connor reflectively. “Long ago, my mother used to tell
me that very story, and I used to go to church, aye, and
pray too, but someway I got out of the way of it. Now
Connor and me, we’re very respectable, we don’t drink the
way others do, our room is very snug,” and she looked round
it complacently, “and we put by something every week,
but as to going to church, I don’t think we were there since
the day we were married.”

“Will you come with me to-night?” asked Madge. “I
know it will be again by-and-bye.”

“Tut, child, you'll be tired,” said Mrs. Connor.

“No, I won't,” said Madge. “Id like to go, besides
when I got what I asked for there, it would be only right

3



34 UNCONSCIOUS INFLUENCE.

for me to go, and thank Him for it; do come, will
you?”

“ Well, I don’t mind if I do,” said Mrs. Connor hesitat-
ingly, “someway that story you told me has set me thinking
of old times; I’d like to go, if it was only to hear ‘Our
Father’ again, but I’m ashamed, that’s the fact.”

“Never mind,” said Madge, who didn’t know what she
meant by “Our Father.” “I know the way now, and I'll
show you; Nellie will sleep safe enough till we come back.”

“Well, ll go,” said Mrs. Connor getting up; “when I
take a thing into my head, I have to doit. Connor will be
in presently, and will mind the child, but he’ll think I am
mad surely.”

If Madge thought the church imposing in the morning, it
seemed doubly so now, with the numerous brilliant gas-
lights. The organ was playing as they went in, so they
slipped quietly into a seat near the door, just as the clergy-
man began to read—‘“I will arise and go to my father,
and will say unto him, Father, I have sinned against Heaven,
and before thee, and am no more worthy to be called thy
son.” When Madge looked next round at her companion,
she was astonished to see tears running down her cheeks.
Mrs. Connor was generally so self-possessed and good-
humoured, that it was all the more strange, and Madge
eyed her with curiosity, but made no remark. As they
walked home, Mrs. Connor said, “I think now I’ve been to
church, I’ll go regular. I would be a better woman now if
Ihadn’t given it up. Oh! dear, but it reminded me of long



UNCONSCIOUS INFLUENCE, 35

ago—hearing the very same words. If I shut my eyes I
could have fancied I was a girl again sitting beside my poor
mother. Madge, you’re young; don’t be like me when
you’re old, regretting all the things you ought to have done.”

Before Madge could answer they reached the house, and
at the same moment her father came up in the opposite
direction, so she just ran into Mrs. Connor’s room for the
still sleeping Nellie, and followed her father upstairs, but
not before her kind friend put a large piece of the country
bread into her pocket, telling her to eat it for her supper.
Madge looked furtively at her father, and was relieved to
see he was not in a very bad humour. The “early Sunday
closing” of the public-house was a boon to her. “ Where
were you coming from when I met you?” he asked.

“From church, father,’ answered the child; but instead
of being surprised as she expected, he went on,

“T saw your mother to-day, and she told me of some fine
friend that had sent you to school—queer that you didn’t
tell me, though I was in the house with you.”

“Oh, Iam so glad you went to see mother,” cried Madge,
disregarding the latter part of his speech. “She is always
so glad to see you, and so disappointed when you don’t

”

go.

Joe Stevenson’s face softened ; he used to be very fond of
his wife, and his conscience pricked him when he thought
how‘seldom he had taken the trouble to go to see her, now
she was ill, although, as Madge said, it gave her such pleasure.

“Father,” said Madge timidly, taking the bread out of



36 UNCONSCIOUS INFLUENCE.

her pocket, “Mrs, Connor gave me this, will you have a
bit?”

The father looked ashamed. “No, child,” said he, “eat it
yourselves ; it’s well for you that strangers are kind, for I
think it’s precious little you have here.”

“But you’ve had no supper, father,” persisted Madge.

“Never mind,” he answered gruffly ; then added, “ Who is
this lady that has taken you up?”

“Miss Arnold, father, of Clarence Street,” answered
Madge.

“Miss Arnold, the clergyman’s daughter!” said her father
in surprise ; “how on earth did you come across her ?”

Madge told the whole story of their following the crowd
on Monday evening into the meeting, of Miss Arnold’s visit
a few days after, and of the trouble she took to get permission
for them to go to school.

“But whatever made her do all that for you?” asked
Stevenson; “she didn’t know you; what made her take
such a lot of trouble?”

“T don’t know,” replied Madge simply, “unless it is that
she is real good.”

“ And so you’ve signed the pledge,” said her father again.
“What good will that do you? You didn’t want it.”

“No,” said Madge, “but they say the good of getting chil-
dren to join is, that if they never taste drink when they are
little, they won’t want it when they grow up.”

Joe Stevenson nodded his head in a sort of sad assent; he
felt the truth of what his little daughter had said. Madge



UNCONSCIOUS INFLUENCE. 37

could hardly believe that she was really talking so familiarly
with her father, of whom she generally was so afraid; she
went on, “If I keep my pledge without once breaking it for
a whole year, I shall get a lovely medal on a blue ribbon, to
hang here,” touching her frock; “and if I can get ten other
people to join too, I shall get a silver bar to put on the
ribbon, wouldn’t that be nice, father?” No answer.

Madge, greatly interested in her subject, went on without
heeding, “I told mammie about it the day we saw her at
the hospital, and she promised to be one of my ten recruits
when she comes home; I wish you would be another, father,
will you?” But Joe Stevenson’s good humour had vanished.

“Hold your tongue,” said he angrily, “and be off to bed;
it’s where you ought to have been sent long ago. I won't
stand talk like that, so you needn't try it on; be off with
you at once.”

Poor little Madge! so this was the end of her nice chat
with her father, which, in her own little mind, she thought
was the beginning, perhaps, of better times! Bitterly dis-
appointed, and more than ever frightened at his manner, she
went away, and quietly creeping into bed beside little Nellie,
she silently cried herself to sleep.



CHAPTER V.

“Ip AT FIRST YOU DON’T SUCCEED—TRY AGAIN.”

“Tn this is our safety—doing the daily ‘/itéles’ as opportunity is given,
and leaving the issue with God.”—Agnes Jones.

Days and weeks passed by. The children went regularly to
school, and made fair progress. The weekly visits to the
hospital, anxiously looked for, were paid, when every scrap
of news was eagerly told, and as eagerly heard. Mrs,
Stevenson was much better, and the doctors held out pro-
mises that very soon she might go home. The Band of
Hope meetings were great objects of interest, and whatever
the weather might be, the two little figures were always to
be seen sitting in the front row. Madge’s taste for singing
was gratified, as she now attended the practice of hymns to
be sung, and delighted in learning the pretty tunes. In-
deed, there seemed no end to the privileges to which her
Band of Hope membership admitted her. They had been
to a magic-lantern display, and already the school children
were talking of the “excursion” in the summer. What this
was Madge and Nellie were not quite sure, but they took
it for granted it was something delightful, looking forward
accordingly.

This was the bright side of the picture, but there was a
dark one too, Their father spent as much time as ever at



“TF AT FIRST YOU DON’T SUCCEED—TRY AGAIN.” 39

the public-house. Monday and Tuesday he never worked,
and occasionally his employer dismissed him for idleness.
Then when he got his wages, some was always overdue for
rent, a little went to Madge to buy necessary food, and all
the rest Joe Stevenson spent on his own selfish gratification.
Child as Madge was, she couldn’t help thinking how well it
was her mother was provided for in the hospital, and what
they would do to get her good food when she came home.
Then, though the days were longer, the March winds were
bitterly cold, and whistled through the children’s clothes as
they sat almost every night waiting in the street for their
father. Thanks to kind Miss Arnold, they had warmer
clothes now; but even these were not proof against the cold
blast that blew round that corner shop which the children
had good reason to hate. Mrs. Connor was unfailingly kind
to them; many a comfortable meal they got in her warm
room, where she often allowed Madge to learn her school
lessons by the light of her fire and candle. Whether Connor
had thought his wife mad, as she predicted, for going to
church or not never transpired; but she went again and
again, until at last he began to go too, and also to the week
evening service, to which they could drop in in their work-
ing clothes without being remarked. Madge often tried to
induce them to go with her to the Band of Hope, but with-
out success. “They were too old,” they said, “to go to that
sort of place, it was more suited to children.”

“Tndeed,” said Madge earnestly one Monday evening,
when, after helping her kind friend to “clean up,” she was



40 “IF AT FIRST YOU DON’T SUCCEED—-TRY AGAIN.”

trying to persuade them to come with her and Nellie, “in-
deed, plenty of grown-up people go, real old men and women
too; do come, I know you’d like it ever so much; there’s
lovely music, and nice speaking, and funny reading too; do
come this once, and sce if you don’t like it ; I know you will.”

But Mr. Connor only shook his head.

“Nonsense, Connor,” said his wife, “you could go if you
liked, don’t disappoint the child.”

“Why don’t you go yourself then?” asked her husband
laughing.

Madge perceived her advantage, and hastened to urge it, —
saying coaxingly, “Do come, I know if you were once there
you would like it; for the same gentleman is to speak that
was there the first night we went, and he is a lovely speaker ;
if you don’t like it I’ll never ask you to go again.”

“Well, there is something in that,” said Connor good-
naturedly. “What do you say, missus?”

“T don’t care if I go this once, just to please the child,”
said Mrs. Connor; “she’s always asking, and we’re always
refusing.”

“Well, hurry up then,” said Connor, “and mind you're
never to ask us again.”

“That is, if you don’t like it,” said Madge archly, as she
ran in delight upstairs to dress herself and Nellie for the
meeting. As they went along the streets, Madge was
half afraid her friends would even then change their minds,
and it was not until they were all seated in good places
that she felt easy about them, .



“TF AT FIRST YOU DON’T SUCCEED—TRY AGAIN.” 41

She was glad that the hymn was one of her favourite
lively tunes, with a good full chorus, and she sang with
redoubled energy when she saw her friend nodding his
head, and keeping time with his foot. Then came a spirited
dialogue between two boys, which was followed by a couple
of songs, one a simple ballad, the other a rattling sea-song,
both equally pleasing to the taste of the audience. Then
came the speech of the evening. Madge almost wondered
did the gentleman know who was present, for he began by
saying he was going to address himself, not to drunkards,
but to the sober, respectable people who had not signed any
pledge, and who felt themselves secure, in no danger of temp-
tation, or of being ledaway. Madge stole a glance to see how
her companions took this, but they looked interested, which
was all she wanted. The speaker then went on to say, he
was “a soldier employed in the cause of warring against
one great enemy, the drink traffic, an enemy more dangerous,
because more insidious, than if an army of Zulus, under
Cetewayo himself, assailed our shores. In that case every
one would make common cause, and cowardly indeed would
be the man who would keep back from the fight from fear
of what people would think of him, or from fear of exposing
himself to privation or discomfort. Now here was an enemy
which had almost taken possession, not only of our own
country, but of every country in the world;” in proof of

which he read an extract from the writings of Robertson, the
celebrated American historian, who said, “it seems to have
been one of the first exertions of human ingenuity, to dis-



42 “IF AT FIRST YOU DON’T SUCCEED—TRY AGAIN,”

cover some composition of an intowicating quality, and
there is hardly a nation so rude, or so destitute of invention,
as not to have succeeded.”

“Now an enemy which had conquered nearly every nation
in the world, must indeed be a powerful one; and yet what
a mere handful, comparatively speaking, there was to battle
against it! Was it any wonder the captains wished to
recruit their ranks, when they saw this enemy in their own
towns, their own neighbourhoods, aye, many of them in
their own families? Was it a time for half-hearted people,
merely content with being decent and temperate themselves,
but who did not care to join in fighting the foe and driving
it out of the country? People of this kind might be com-
pared to Englishmen who would give food and shelter to
the supposed Zulus landing on their shores, but protested
that because they had not actually joined them, they were
not really encouraging them.” Here Connor gave the floor
an angry knock with his stick, and Madge looked up at
him in alarm; but she saw that it was only in sympathetic
indignation at the picture drawn by the speaker, and that
his interest had carried him away. “What brave man or
woman in this room could see a person walking heedlessly
on the brink of a precipice, and say, ‘Let him do it, it is no
business of mine to interfere;’ instead of, at least, giving a
word of warning; or, if the person tumble over, say ‘Serve
him right, he deserves it, he should have looked where he
was going.’ Should you not rather warn him of his danger,
and then, if necessary, stretch out the helping hand to pull



“IF AT FIRST YOU DON’T SUCCEED—TRY AGAIN.” 43

him back. Yet how many are there who act on this plan,
seeing friends, neighbours, relatives walk on, day by day,
to the brink of the precipice of drink (down which, if they
fall, it is so hard to get up again), without a word of warning
or advice; literally acting on the words, ‘Am I my brother's
keeper ?’ and if they fall mentally say, ‘Serve him right.’
Dear friends, remember who it was that said ‘he that is not
with Me is against Me; and he that gathereth not with Me
seattereth abroad!’ You must be either one thing or the
other; either on our side, which is the right one, or on that
of the enemy fighting against us. And now, to take a
more personal, practical view of what this enemy does for
us”—the speaker then entered into the statistics of how
much was annually spent on drink; how many millions
went into the pockets of distillers, brewers, and publicans,
while public appeals were being made on behalf of the
starving poor in the country, who, although unable to buy
ordinary food, could generally spare money for drink. How
much each person, even the most temperate, spent, if he
put together every glass of porter, ale, wine, or spirits, and
made out the sum-total at the end of a year. Madge thought
this part extremely stupid, but was satisfied when she saw
how earnestly her companions were listening; indeed Connor
got so excited and red in the face, that Madge was afraid
he would speak out. However, when the speaker sat down,
he contented himself by vigorously applauding with hands,
stick, and feet.

“That’s what I call a fine speech,” said he, as they went



44 “IF AT FIRST YOU DON’T SUCCEED—TRY AGAIN.”

home. “There’s no nonsense about that man; didn’t he
put it plain? I am sure I never thought before that a
simple glass of something every day was any harm, but,
according to him, it is encouraging the drink traffic, little
as itis. But sure enough if every one did it, what a lot of
money must go to the publicans; and if nobody did it!—
Mary, how much do we get a day ?”

“Not much indeed,” replied Mrs. Connor, “just a pint of
porter each with our dinner.”

“Well, that’s threepence a day, and threepence a day is
one and ninepence a week,” said Connor getting excited
with his subject. “One and ninepence a week comes to,
let me see—four pounds eleven a year. And that, counting
odd treats, festivals, and those sort of things, certainly
mounts up to five pounds at least. I say, wife,” and he
gave his stick an angry knock on the pavement, stopping
short as he did so, “what do you say to that? Did you think
that you and I spent five pounds a year on drink ?”

“Tndeed, I did not,” she answered ruefully. “Oh dear,
what a lot of things that would buy.”

“ Aye, or better still, think if we had saved it what a
nice little sum we’d have now in the bank. How long are
we married ?”

“Five and twenty years last Christmas,” answered his
wife promptly.

“Then, if we’d put by the five pounds a year all that
time, we’d have one hundred and twenty-five pounds now!”
eried Connor, waxing wrathful, “And all that time we’ve



“IF AT FIRST YOU DON’T SUCCEED—TRY AGAIN.” 45

dealt regular at Simpson’s. All our good money has gone
into his pocket. There he is, driving his carriage, with his
wife and children dressed so fine, too grand to look at the
like of us. That’s the fellow that wouldn’t even give me a.
letter of recommendation when I asked him, saying ‘he
didn’t know me!’ Not another penny of mine shall he ever
get, mind that, Mary.”

“Sure it will be as bad if you give it to some one else,”
said practical Mrs. Connor. “They are all the same. If we
don’t go to Simpson’s, there’s Fox’s, the next nearest to us,
and his wife is a real fine lady, with riding horses for herself
and her children, and a grand country house. They wouldn't
live over a public-house !”

“Then I'll go to none of them,” cried Connor. “It’s our
hard-earned wages that pays for their grandeur. Simpson
and I were boys together, though ‘he doesn’t know me’ now.
Maybe if I’d taken to selling whisky I’d be a rich man now
too. See, here is a handbill I got at the door just now, say-
ing that gentleman, Mr. Hamilton, is going to give a lecture
at the Town Hall to-morrow evening on the same subject.
I’ve a great mind to go and hear him again.”

Madge’s eyes twinkled, but she wisely said nothing, though
her heart leaped with joy at the success of her undertaking.

“ Hollo, what’s this?” exclaimed Connor, as they reached
their own door; and in the dark, ill-lighted lane he stumbled
over a prostrate figure.

“Oh, it’s father,” uttered Madge, springing forward. “He
is dead, his head has hit against the doorstep.”



46 “IF AT FIRST YOU DON’T SUCCEED—TRY AGAIN.”

“No, child, he’s only drunk,” said Connor, raising him up.
“ Hold on now, and I'll soon get him upstairs for you.”

“Only drunk!” When Connor came down again, heated
with the exertion of helping Joe Stevenson up to his room,
where he left him with his two helpless little girls, he said to
his wife thoughtfully, “Mary, I think that’s a case of leaving
aman to walk on the brink of the precipice without a word
of warning, and now he has fallen over, and no mistake. [
might be tempted to say, ‘Serve him right, if it was only
himself, but it’s a sore sight to see those innocent children
suffering for him. I believe the gentleman is right; drink
is an enemy that ought to be put down.”

“Don’t make your mind up too sudden,” said his wife
cautiously. “Sleep on it.”

“T will,” he answered; “for when I say a thing I do it.
But that man’s words are ringing in my ears. I’d like to
hold a helping hand to poor Joe Stevenson, for his children’s
sake; but how could I preach to him if 1 took my bottle
every day myself? Anyway, it has given us something to
think of.”

*



CHAPTER VI

A PRACTICAL VIEW OF TOTAL ABSTINENCE.

‘Live the life of faith; let God, and the glory of God, be the end and aim
of all your occupations ; love one another as Jesus Christ loves you ; yield
yourselves wholly to His guardian care; listen not to the suggestions of your
interests, but lend your ears to the calling whereunto ye are called; and
while ye behold with love and forbearance each other’s imperfections, strive,
each of you, with all energy and carefulness, to live as though you were the
least of all your companions.” —WSister Liduvine Barré.

Next day was hospital visiting day, and the children ran all
the way from school lest they should lose a moment of the
precious time allowed them. They found their mother, with
her two companions, sitting at the fire, all much improved in
health. Nellie nestled in her mother’s arms, eager to show her
a treasured doll lately given her by Miss Arnold. Madge sat
on a low stool at her feet, in perfect contentment at being
beside her. People say an hospital ward is a little world in
itself, with its petty jealousies, friendships, and cares; but, if
so, what a narrow little world it is! Madge’s visits were
quite events to the strange wonten, who listened to all her
news with deep interest. This day she hada great deal to
tell about the exciting meeting the night before. She had a
wonderful memory, and could generally give the substance
of anything she heard quite plainly enough to be interesting,
and Mr. Hamilton’s speech being rather off the common, she
remembered with remarkable accuracy all about the Zulu.



48 A PRACTICAL VIEW OF TOTAL ABSTINENCE.

army compared to the enemy drink; and the cowards who
were afraid to warn people from the dangerous precipice, or
to help them back if they fell over. To all of which her
audience listened with admiring interest. But she became
rather hazy about the statistical part, only remembering what
Mr. Connor had calculated about his spending five pounds a
year on porter.

“Dear, dear, think of that!” exclaimed one of the women.
“Who would imagine that threepence a day could mount to
that in a year? Why, I’m sure I spend more than that my-
self alone, and then there’s my husband and my two sons!
I’m sure they spend twice as much each of them.”

“Well, suppose, then, you all spend the same,” said Mrs.
Stevenson quietly, “there’s twenty pounds a year gone out
of your family. What do you think of that?”

Mrs, Sims stared blankly into the fire while she totted it
up in her mind to try if there could be any mistake, but
finding there was not, she ejaculated, “ Well I never!”

“You ought to give it up, Mrs. Sims,” observed the nurse,
who generally joined the conversation when not busy. “You
would soon be a rich woman.”

“ Kasier said than done,” returned Mrs. Sims sulkily.

“J don’t care a pin about it,” said the nurse. “I only
take my beer because it is part of my rations, served out to
me like any other allowance, but I’d just as soon not take it
as take it.”

“Well, will you give it up then, ma’am?” asked Madge
eagerly,



A PRACTICAL VIEW OF TOTAL ABSTINENCE. 49

Nurse Mooney looked sharply at the child to see if she
meant to insult her; but Madge’s clear, innocent eyes met
hers so fully that she saw the child never dreamed of giving
offence.

“T wish if you did you would be one of iy ten,” she said
simply. “Nobody has yet promised me to sign but mammie,
and I am so anxious to get some names.”

“Well, if I ever do sign, Il do it for you,” said nurse
laughing, “and I’d do it to-morrow if I had to buy beer, but
when I’m given it, it is different.”

“Ask them to give you the money instead,” suggested
Mrs. Stevenson.

“That’s not a bad idea,” said nurse; “I declare I willl.
(ll ask the matron this very day.”

“And then you'll come with me and join the Band of
Hope,” said Madge oily: “but mind if you sign, you
must keep your pledge.”

“Why, child, do you think I mean to break my word?”
said nurse half offended. “No, if I promise, I keep it, and
Ill say this much, if the matron grants what I ask her, I'll
let you know.” 4

“And mammie will sign when she comes home,” said
Madge, laying her head on her mother’s lap.

“Indeed, I will,” said Mrs. Stevenson. “I think if I can
get a cup of tea and a little food, it’s as much as I can
expect then. O Madge, dear, I keep wondering how we
are to get on; if I only could get some work to help to keep

the house: bit what can I do?”
, 4



50 A PRACTICAL VIEW OF TOTAL ABSTINENCE,

“You won’t be able for any hard work, mammie,” said
Madge sorrowfully, looking at her mother’s pale face.

“No, not for many a day,” replied Mrs. Stevenson, “ but if
I could get needlework—only now I am so out of practice ; I
mean to speak to Miss Arnold about it the next day she
comes here, I am sure she will help me if she can; O
Madgie, she is so kind to me: her very visits seem to cheer
me up.”

“T wish I could help too, mammie,” said Madge.

“So you do,” answered her mother cheerfully. “Don’t
you think it is a comfort to me here, that my little Madge
is at home taking care of Nellie, and making father com-
fortable ?”

“O mammie,’ said Madge sadly, “that is just it. It is
easy enough to mind Nellie, she’s no trouble, but I can’t do
_anything for father; he is just as bad as ever: whether I
make the room nice for him, or don’t touch it at all, it is
all the same. I vexed him once, and he never speaks to me
now.” And the recollection of the fright he gave her the
night before overcame the poor child, though she wisely
said nothing about it: she laid her face on her mother’s
knee, and sobbed.

“ Poor little one,” said Mrs. Stevenson softly stroking her
hair, “you have a hard time of it at home, but soon [Il
be back to help you, and it won’t be quite so bad when
we can share it together. Madge, there’s one thing I’ve
learned since I came to this place, thanks to Mr. and Miss
Arnold, and that is, that God will take care of us in all our



A PRACTICAL VIEW OF TOTAL ABSTINENCE. 51

troubles, and help us out of them. Mr. Arnold gave mea
beautiful verse one day I was fretting sorely, ‘Casting all
your care upon Him, for He careth for you’ Someway,
whenever I think of those words, I feel more easy. I am
quite sure we'll be taken care of somehow. So I don’t
mean to fret over it now.”

“But about father,” said Madge looking up. “If he stays
this way, we couldn’t be happy.”

“That is part of the ‘care’ I suppose,” said Mrs,
Stevenson thoughtfully. “So we must leave it, and maybe |
God will look after poor father for us. At all events He
knows best, so we had better leave it to Him; the verse
says ‘He cares for us,’ and if so, He will settle all about us.”

Madge had need that evening to try and think of her
mother’s words; for when they got home she found her
father had again been dismissed by his employer for drink
and idleness, and had consequently come home in a very
bad humour, It was supper-time, but there was nothing to
eat, and when she timidly told him so, he swore at her; and
when little Nellie, tired after the day, and frightened at her
father’s words, burst into a fit of nervous crying, he struck
and shook her violently, saying he would beat her if she did
not stop; and strode angrily out of the room, as Madge well
knew, to the public-house. Poor Madge, she soothed her
little sister as well as she could, although she needed cheer-
ing herself. Cold, hungry, lonely—they had no fire, food,
or friend; true they might go to bed, and forget their
sorrows in sleep, but when morning came, it would be as



52 A PRACTICAL VIEW OF TOTAL ABSTINENCE.

bad—no food, no fire. Madge knew she had only to go
downstairs to her kind friends, and they would give her all
she wanted, but she shrank from asking them. They were
so very kind, that she couldn’t bear to beg from them,
besides she suddenly recollected that this was the evening
Connor had said he would go again to hear Mr. Hamilton
at the Town Hall, so that even if she wished, there would
be no use in her going down, as they were out. Then her
mother’s words came again, “ ‘Casting all your care upon
Him, for He careth for you!’ someway when I think of
those words I feel more easy.” “Mammie has more to fret
about than I have,” thought Madge, “for she is sick and
away ; so if they make her feel happier, I ought to also. I
wonder does He care for us. I'll ask Him to, at all events.
And the poor little weary, sorrowful girl knelt down to
pray, before lying down in bed with her still sobbing little
sister.

“There’s that Joe Stevenson going out,” said Mrs. Connor
looking over the geraniums that nearly filled their little
window. “I wonder what brought him home so early.”

“J’m afraid he must have been shunted again,” said her
husband. “It’s a great pity: such a clever workman as he
is might earn what he liked, if he would only keep steady.”

“My heart aches for those poor children,” said Mrs.
Connor. “They look as if they were half starved; I wonder
now has he left them their supper! I’ve a mind to go up
and see.”

“Well, bad as he is, he would hardly be such a ruffian as



A PRACTICAL VIEW OF TOTAL ABSTINENCE, 53

not do that,” said Connor. “I say, missus, do you know
what time it is? if we don’t make haste we shall be late for
the lecture; I’m curious to hear that gentleman again.” So
Mrs. Connor had not time to go upstairs to see after her
little protégés, but all the way her thoughts ran on them,
and her heart misgave her. When they reached the Town
Hall, it was almost filled throughout ; and Connor whispered
to his wife with a chuckle, that it would put a start in the
enemy to see how many were against him ! *

Mr. Hamilton took up the same ground as the evening
before ; speaking still more strongly on each point, especially
dwelling on the duty of each person who considered himself
not in danger, to warn, help, or encourage those who were :
“Let him who thinketh he standeth, take heed lest he fall!”
Every strong point of the other side of the question was
assailed in turn, fairly discussed, and finally beaten. Mr.
Hamilton seemed to have arguments to prove everything:
yet he did it so quietly, fairly, and practically, that they
were conclusive.

Connor listened breathlessly : he was an intelligent man,
who understood and appreciated scientific explanations of
the subject; but it was so very new to him, that it was like
newly opening his eyes to a fresh view of an old familiar
subject. Amongst the numerous rows of faces his, honest,
beaming, and intelligent, was conspicuous, and attracted the
attention of the speaker, who, orator as he was, felt encou-
raged by the manifest attention and interest this man, in
particular, took in his subject. When he had finished, Mr.



54 A PRACTICAL VIEW OF TOTAL ABSTINENCE.

Hamilton slipped away from the platform, and singling
Connor out from the crowd who were slowly making their
way out, addressed him pleasantly. In a few minutes they
were deep in conversation, and several points to which
Connor could not quite agree, Mr. Hamilton patiently
went over, proving and explaining in the most persuasive
way. “I think, my friend,” said he at length, “you could
not do better than join us! Come; will you?”

“T am strongly thinking I will, sir,’ said Connor, “but
not to-night.”

“Why not?” asked Mr. Hamilton. “There is no time
like the present, and I have not much faith in putting off
to a more convenient season; I like to strike while the iron
is hot!”

“Well, sir, so do I,” said Connor slowly; “but if I join
at all, I’d like to do it for a little girl; it was she who first
spoke to me about total abstaining, and though I used to
laugh at her, she never left me alone, till at last I said I’d
go with her for once, just to stop her bothering. She thinks
a deal of her ‘recruits,’ as she calls them, so I wouldn’t for
anything disappoint her.”

“Certainly not,” said Mr. Hamilton warmly, “I quite
agree with you, and I am not afraid of your disappointing
either her or me. If I am not mistaken, you will be a good
friend to our cause some day. Good-night to you,” and he
shook hands heartily with Connor and his wife.



CHAPTER VII

MADGE'S FIRST RECRUITS.

‘* The Lord will fashion in His own good time
(Be this the labourer’s proudly humble creed)
Such ends as, to His wisdom, fittest chime
With His vast love’s eternal harmonies,
There is no failure for the good and wise ;
What tho’ thy seed fall by the way-side
And the birds snatch it ; yet the birds are fed ;
Or they may bear it far across the tide,
To give rich harvests after thou art dead.”
—Polities for the People.
Next morning Mrs. Connor sent up to the children, and
before they went to school gave them a good comfortable
breakfast, at the same time administering a friendly scolding
for not having come down to her the night before instead of
going to bed hungry, as she found out they had done; but,
after getting a promise from Madge that she would never do
so again, she forgave them, and they ran off to school happy
and contented. At twelve o’clock Connor, as usual, came
home for his dinner, and at the door met Joe Stevenson,
lounging with his hands in his pockets, smoking idly.
“Morrow, neighbour,” said Connor cheerily, “what brings
you here at this time of day?”
“Got nothing to do,” answered Stevenson erufily.
“Out of work, eh?” said Connor. “That’s bad these hard
times. It’s hard enough when you’re in work to keep the

pot boiling.”



56 MADGE’S FIRST RECRUITS.

“Tt’s my luck,” grumbled Stevenson.

Connor felt inclined to question this, but wisely refrained.
He was thinking of the two lectures he had heard, and in
his own rough, honest way was trying to put some of his
good resolutions into practice. Here was a man whom he
had seen for a long time stumbling along at the edge of the
pit without feeling himself called on to utter a word of warn-
ing from his own safe standpoint. Now the man had gone
over, should he not do his utmost to draw him back? But
he was not a diplomatist. Whatever was in his mind he gave
utterance to without trying to modify or soften its plainness.

“T say, neighbour,” said he bluntly, “do you want
work?”

“Of course I do,’ answered Stevenson. “It’s not from
choice I’d stay at home and starve.”

“Well, then,” continued the other, “I think I could get
you some if you chose to take it. We’re short a hand at our
place, and you are just the man that would do if you were
steady ; but, to tell you the truth, I wouldn’t like to recom-
mend you at present.”

Stevenson fired up at this, and said angrily—“I don’t know
what you mean; I am as good as you any day.”

“Oh, you know well enough,” said Connor.

“ Well,” said Stevenson, changing his ground, “I don’t see
much difference. I take my drink at the public, if that is
what you mean; and you get yours there and take it at home;
it comes to much the same.”

“Tam going to give it up,” said Connor quietly.



MADGE’S FIRST RECRUITS. 57

“You are,” returned Stevenson, with a sneering laugh;

“when will you begin?”

“This minute, if you like,” answered Connor good-humour-
edly. “I really am going to give it up (not that I ever took
much, but that’s nothing), and if you'll promise me to do the
same, Ill nearly promise you a good situation. I think I’ve
only to ask for it. You see, I know you are a first-rate
workman, so in that way I can recommend you.”

Stevenson stared at him, utterly unprepared for this, and
not knowing what to answer.

Connor went on :—“I know there’s no good in rowing a
fellow when he’s down. The best plan is to help him up
again; so if you will do what I advise, I’ll try and give you
a hand. Just make up your mind not to go near the public,
say fora week. Try how you get on, and I'll speak for you
when I go back to work after dinner. I know they’re ina
hobble for the want of a man, and you’d just suit the place.
But if there was a chance of your going off drinking in a day
or two, I wouldn’t ask for you.”

“T’d have every one laughing at me,” muttered Stevenson.

“Not a bit of it,’ said Connor; “but I must go in, or I'll
have no time for my dinner. See here, you come in too, I'll
engage my missus has enough for us both, and we'll talk it
over.”

“No, no,” said Stevenson, drawing back. “TI’ll think over
what you said, but Dl not go in.” ;

“Oh, come along, man,” urged Connor, but Joe still refused.
He felt really ashamed of himself, for he well knew the kind-



58 MADGE'S FIRST RECRUITS.

ness his neighbours invariably showed his children. He knew
that only that very morning they would have been breakfast-
less but for the kind message which he overheard when all
thought he was asleep. He knew he might, if he chose, often
have done a civil turn for them, but that instead he was
always markedly rude in his manner when they met, so that
now Connot’s kind offer to get him a situation, and his friendly
invitation, made him for once feel quite abashed. He was
pleased the children should accept this hospitality, but for
himself, he felt as if one mouthful, under all these circum-
stances, would choke him. Muttering something about having
dined, Stevenson said he would think over what they had
been discussing, and would meet Connor on his way to his
work to tell him bis decision. Whatever this was, Connor
spoke to his employer, and came home in the evening with
orders for Joe Stevenson to go with him to the works next
morning.

Madge knew nothing of all this, for her friends rightly
thought it was not fit for her to discuss her father’s conduct;
but she was thankful and delighted to find he had got work
again. “TI’ll tell mammie about this,” thought she, “when I
see her next. Surely it is wonderful how God knows what
we want. I never felt so lonely and miserable as last night,
but I asked Him to help us, and I tried to say over and over
till I fell asleep mother’s verse—‘Casting all your cares upon
Him,’ and before I wakened this morning He had made things
better for us. It must have been Him who put it into Mrs.
Connor's mind to think we had no breakfast, and to give us



MADGE’S FIRST RECRUITS. 59

some; and now He has sent father work. How good it is of
Him! I wonder if I never stop asking would He make
father give up drinking! That would be nice; but, oh dear,
I don’t think anything would make him do that. Anyway,
Dll try,” and Madge remembered one of the large texts on the
walls of the school which said, “ Whatsoever ye shall ask in
my name, I will do it.” So, with a feeling of relief, as if she
had got an answer to her question, she put on her hat to go
as usual with her friends to the working people’s service. She
knew nothing of her father’s resolve not to go to the public-
house that evening; so never thought of staying at home
with him, nor would he have liked it if she had. Madge often
wondered how her friends had liked the lecture at the Town
Hall, but they never mentioned it. She felt a little disap-
pointed, for she expected great things from it. Connor had
taken such a keen interest in the first, that she quite thought
he would like the next still better. She longed to ask, but
was afraid, for had he not told her on Monday that he would
go that once if she promised never to ask him again. Little
she guessed all that was passing through his mind. He was
an elderly man, and, on his own showing, had been accus-
tomed for twenty-five years, at least, to take some stimulant
every day, so that it was no small sacrifice of inclination and
habit to give it suddenly up. Mrs. Connor was satisfied with
an extra cup of tea, but when dinner-hour came, and he came
home hot after his work, he missed his long-accustomed
frothing glass of porter more than he could have imagined
possible—so much, indeed, that he wondered at himself, for



60 MADGE’S FIRST RECRUITS.

he always had prided himself on being so abstemious as to
care very little about it. Still, though he missed it, he felt
none the worse for that. He did as good a day’s work as
ever. He slept well, looked well, and, still better, felé well,
so that he could not object on that score. His wife acknow-
ledged she felt just as he did, and at the end of the week
produced one and ninepence, saved from their porter.

“ Simpson is that much the poorer,” said Connor triumph-
antly, as he looked at the money. “Mary, for curiosity
sake, keep it safe; that’s the firstfruits of our temperance,”
then added reverently, “and please God it won’t be our last.”
That was really Tom Connor’s pledge. Until he uttered
those words, he had not fully decided on which side to stay;
but from that moment his mind was made up. He always
said he was slow to take an idea, but that once convinced
that a thing was right he did it, and it was so now: from
that day Connor and his wife were total abstainers from
conviction. Tom Connor loved a joke, and he determined
that Madge should know nothing of his intentions until
Monday night. He wanted to see if she would ask him again
to go with her to the Band of Hope; but if he knew how
to keep a promise, so did she, and when the evening came,
although she was longing to know if he would go with her,
she refrained from asking. She had been helping Mrs.
Connor with her washing, and, as usual, stayed afterwards
for supper, but when the clock pointed to seven, she rose up.

“Youre not going yet, surely?” said he in pretended
surprise.



MADGE’S FIRST RECRUITS. 61

“Yes, this is Band of Hope night,” answered Madge
unsuspectingly.

“T suppose you don’t want us to go there any more,” said
Connor, his eyes twinkling.

“Oh, indeed, I do,” cried Madge; “only I promised I
would not ask you to go again—that is, if you didn’t like
it. O Mr. Connor, you are laughing at me! Are you only
joking?”

“ Indeed I am,” said Connor. “We meant to go all the
time; aye, and more than that, me and the missus are
going to sign for you to-night, too! What do you say to
that ?”

Madge hardly knew what to say. She clapped her hands,
and hugged her two friends with all her might, then,
stopping short, she asked—“ But what will you do without
your porter every day ?”

“Never mind that,” replied Connor gaily “We haven’t
touched it for some days, and we are alive still; so I suppose
we can do without it. Now be off and get ready.”

How happy Madge was ushering her friends again into
the hall! How she listened to everything for them, hoping
they would like it, and sang with redoubled energy when she
thought that next time they would be members too! She
was glad they should see how many were the privileges to
which members were entitled, for this very evening it was
announced that ata certain time prizes would be awarded to
children under a particular age for essay-writing, or examina-
tions on a given subject, and for window gardening, flower-



62 MADGE’S FIRST RECRUITS.

seeds for which would be sold to members after the meeting.
Of essays and examinations, of course, Madge knew nothing,
but she dearly loved flowers, and would gladly have gone
in for that, but where would she get the pennies to pay for
the seeds? So she put it out of her head.

When the meeting was over, the general public went
away, but a few went to the far end of the room to buy
their seeds, and a few more remained to sign—amongst
these were our friends. Proudly important was Madge, as
bidding Nellie sit quietly on the bench, she elbowed her
way, followed by her recruits, to the large table at which
Mr. Arnold himself was sitting ; but he looked so kind and
pleasant that she did not feel a bit afraid of him, and said
simply— Please, sir, here’s Mr. and Mrs. Connor come to
sign,”

“T am very glad to hear it,” said Mr. Arnold warmly,
turning to the old couple. He had noticed them lately at
the services, and especially had observed Connor's energetic
appreciation of the temperance lectures. He then desired
all to kneel down, while he offered up a prayer that none
might undertake this pledge in his own strength, but that
He who had begun this good work in them, might enable
them to keep it firmly and faithfully to the end. “Now who
will sign first?” asked Mr. Arnold, when the prayer was
over.

For a moment there was a silence, then Connor came
forward, saying—“ Here goes, I will.”

Mr. Arnold smiled, and took up a little pledge-book, in



MADGE'S FIRST RECRUITS. 63

which, after reading aloud the contents,he wrote the date,
then gave it to him to sign.

Connor took the pen, and with infinite pains, in his
biggest writing, with many flourishes, wrote his name—
« edie Connor.”

Mr. Arnold then called upon his wife, to whom writing
was a much greater labour; however with her spectacles on
her nose, and her pen oe balanced, she carefully wrote
—“ Mary Connor.”

“T suppose I may enter these to your account?” said Mr.
Arnold smilingly to Madge, who answered blushing—“ Yes,
please, sir.”

“Very good,” said he, referring to her name on the roll
of members. “That is a good beginning.”

Connor and his wife took their little books, and carefully
put them in their respective pockets; but before they
reached the door, Connor exclaimed—* Now I am a member
of the Band of Hope, and have a right to buy flower-seeds
as well as any one else; how do you sell them, ma’am ?”

“They are only meant for children,” answered a lady who
was selling them at the table.

“Well, it’s for a child I want them,” replied Connor.
“ Here, Madge, what kind will you have?”

“Me!” exclaimed Madge in surprise. “Oh, thank you,
Mr. Connor. I was just wishing I could get some;” and,
looking up at the lady, she saw that it was Miss Taylor,
her own teacher in the Sunday-school.



64 MADGE’S FIRST RECRUITS.

“So you are going in for the gardening prize, Madge,” said
she with a smile. “ Now choose, what will you have?”

Madge did not know one name from another, so Miss
Taylor chose for her some sweet-pea, mignonnette, and dwarf
nasturtium, saying as she did so—‘ Do you know how to
sow them ?”

“T think so, ma’am,” answered Madge; “but I haven’t
any pots.”

“Never mind, child,” said Mrs. Connor, “I’ve got some
old boxes at home that will do just as well, and Connor
will get you some good soil, I am sure. They wouldn’t
grow in the stuff about our place—a mixture of mortar and
dust.”

So Madge went home with her treasured packages of
seeds, as happy and light-hearted as if she was going
home to a palace, and brimming over with pleasure at
having succeeded in getting her two kind old friends to
join the Band of Hope.



CHAPTER VIII.

A CURIOUS ADVENTURE AND ITS CONSEQUENCES.

‘Tn the baron’s hall of pride,
By the poor man’s dull fireside ;
*Mid the mighty, ’mid the mean,
Little children may be seen,
Like the flowers that spring up fair,
Bright and countless everywhere !

‘* Blessings on them! they in me
Move a kindly sympathy,
With their wishes, hopes, and fears,
With their laughter and their tears,
With their wonder so intense,
And their small experience!

§* Little children, not alone
On the wide earth are ye known,
Mid its labours and its cares,
’Mid its sufferings and its snares ;
Free from sorrow, free from strife,
In the world of love and life,
Where no sinful thing hath trod,
In the presence of your God,
Spotless, blameless, glorified,
Little children, ye abide! ”— ary Howitt.

ManpcE was not long in perceiving that her father did not
go, as before, to the public. He came in more regularly,
and gave her’more money, so she tried her very utmost to
make him comfortable, and please him in any way; but in -
spite of all her efforts she was conscious of failing miserably,
and day after day she longed for her mother to come home.
She had always told her to keep the room clean, for that
father disliked a dirty floor; so one day after eon Madge



66 A CURLOUS ADVENTURE AND ITS CONSEQUENCHS.

set to work with much difficulty to wash it out; but the
day was damp, and she had so deluged it with water that it
would not dry, and when six o’clock came, and her father
came home, he swore at her for the state of discomfort the
place was in, and saying he would catch his death of rheu-
matism if he stayed in it, strode away in a rage, while poor
Madge, every bone aching with her exertions, sobbed with
disappointment. Then when Stevenson gave her more
money he quite expected he would get better food; but
Madge knew nothing of cooking beyond making tea or stir-
about, and unsavoury indeed were her attempts at frying
bacon or fish, or even boiling potatoes, from which her father
would turn in anger, saying she only wasted the food. Poor
child! she did her best, and she was only a child, but the
best was very bad indeed! Their clothes, too, were in a sad
state for want of mending; but though Madge learned to sew
at school, she had not become proficient enough yet to be of
much use, and her attempts at mending was mere cobbling.
Oh! how she did long for her mother to come home and set
things right. She was very anxious, too, to hear the result
of Nurse Mooney’s proposal of giving up her beer; but
several times that Madge went to the hospital, nurse herself
was ill, so she could not hear. At last one day she went
she was glad to see the nurse back as usual at her post. “O
mammie, mammie! when are you coming home?” she cried,
throwing herself into her mother’s arms.

“Very soon now, dearie,” said her mother. “The doctor
is to tell me to-morrow what day I may go out.”



A CURIOUS ADVENTURE AND ITS CONSEQUENCES. 67

“T am glad,” said Madge with a sigh of relief. “ But,
mammie, I’m afraid you won’t be as comfortable as here.”

“Home is home, dearie,” said Mrs. Stevenson smiling.

“Ves, but, mammie,” said Madge, “I’m afraid you will
miss the nice meals at regular hours, and these lovely soft
beds,” and she glanced admiringly at the beds with the com-
fortable wooden spring mattresses.

“But I shall have father, and you, and Nellie,” said Mrs.
Stevenson, “I’d rather have that than all the comforts of a
palace. O Madge! I have some good news for you! I spoke
to Miss Arnold about getting me some work; she asked
could I sew, but I said on account of my eyes I could not do
any fine work; so then she asked could I knit? Of course I
said yes, for I have been knitting all my life, so she got me
an order for a dozen pairs of stockings to begin with; she is
to supply the wool, and she says she thinks she can get me
as much as I can do. Isn’t that a comfort, Madge? Don’t
you think we may be sure now that God does care for us?”

“O mammie! that is good news,” said Madge, her eyes
filling with tears. “That will be nice easy work that won’t
tire you. I am so glad.”

“Here is a little pair of socks I made for Nellie,” said her
mother, trying them on her little foot. “A lady gave me
some wool to amuse myself with, and I have another pair
for you nearly done.” Madge’s eyes sparkled now.

“Well, Madge,” said nurse coming up, “you never asked
about the beer money.”

“T couldn't, for I didn’t see you, ma’am,” said Madge, “but



68
I thought of it very often, and I asked mother, only she
didn’t know.”

“Well, I went to the matron that very day, as I said I
would,” continued nurse, “and she at once said she would be
very glad to do it, and wished all the rest would do the same;
so I’ve got the money instead ever since.”

“That’s all right!” cried Madge joyfully. “You won’t
forget your promise to me, will you?”

“No fear,” said nurse laughing. “ When will be the next
day?”

“On Monday evening,” replied Madge.

“Not till then? I hoped it would be sooner; Id like to
do it at once. Never mind, you may be sure I won’t forget
it then, so look out for me at the hall, for you must show me
the way.”

Nurse was called away before Madge had time to express
her delight, but she saw how glad she was.

“OQ mammie,” said Madge, “I do think this is a day of
good news. Everything I’ve heard since I came here has
been good.”

“Will you think this good also, Madge?” said one of the
women whom she had got quite to look on asa friend. “I
am going out to-morrow.”

“Are you, Mrs. Tracy?” said Madge. “It is well mother
is going soon too, or she would miss you; yes, I think that
is good news too.”

“T shall be lonely enough,” said Mrs. Tracy, “for I’ve been
very comfortable here; but your mother says you don’t live



A CURIOUS ADVENTURE AND ITS CONSEQUENCES. 69

far from where I stop, so I want to know will you sometimes
come in to see me?”

“Indeed I will,” said Madge, “if mother lets me.”

“T expect at first Pll be rather lonesome,” said Mrs. Tracy;
“you see I live alone, and till my leg gets quite strong, I
can’t go about much; and here [I’ve got so used to seeing
people come in and out, that T’ll miss them, so I’d be very
glad if you will come to see me. I like to hear all your news
about the Band of Hope and the schools and church.”

Madge little guessed how all her weekly chat had en-
livened or interested this poor stranger in her monotonous
life in the hospital !

“Miss Arnold has promised to go see you, hasn’t she?”
said Mrs. Stevenson.

“Yes; God bless her,” replied Mrs. Tracy. “She is like
a ray of sunshine that brings light and warmth wherever it
goes.”

“Miss Arnold is our district visitor,’ said Madge, “she
came to see Mrs. Connor the other day, and she says she is _
the nicest young lady in the world.”

“OQ Madge! what about your seeds?” said her mother,
“have you planted them yet?”

“O mammie,” said Madge ruefully, “1 made such a stupid
mistake ; I was so vexed: Mr. Connor brought me a big bag
of good clay, and Mrs. Connor gave me some boxes to put
them in, but I never planted seeds before, and I put the dear
little mignonnette seeds in first, and then covered them up
with the clay, wasn’t it a pity?” All the women laughed
heartily at poor Madge’s mistake, while she went on, “I was



70 A CURIOUS ADVENTURE AND ITS CONSEQUENCES.

so sorry, but fortunately Miss Arnold happened to come in,
so she showed me the right way to do it, and I think the
rest will come up nicely; I have a bit of broken glass over
the top of each box, and I water them every day.”

“When will the show be?” asked Mrs. Stevenson.

“Some time in summer,” replied Madge; “you will be
home then, mammie, and will be quite strong long before it.
O mammie, there’s going to be an excursion in summer
too. Miss Taylor says Nellie and I may go, and any one that
is a Band of Hope; won't it be nice?”

“What is it?” asked Mrs. Stevenson.

“J don’t quite know,” said Madge. “The children say
it’s lovely ; they go in a train to the country, and see the
sea, and gather shells or flowers, Mammie, if you’re a
Band of Hope then, you can come too.” But Mrs. Stevenson
in her present state did not feel equal to any such great
exertion, so made no remark, not liking to damp the ardour
of her little daughter, who had so few pleasures.

As the children were going home, Nellie pulled her sister's
hand, saying, “ Look, Sissy, at those pretty little girls; what
a lovely dolly the littlest one has got.” There were two little
girls, almost their own sizes, walking before them, but the
elder, unlike Madge, left the little one to take care of herself
while she gazed with admiration into the shop windows.
They were pretty children, and beautifully dressed. Madge
and Nellie followed them, watching them until they had
reluctantly to go into a shop to do a message for one of the
hospital nurses. When they came out the pretty children
had disappeared,









A CURIOUS ADVENTURE AND ITS CONSEQUENCES, 71

“Sissy, did you see her doll’s lovely little red cloak?”
asked Nellie.

“No; I was looking at the little girl herself,” answered
Madge. “She had such beautiful long golden curls, and a
lovely little hat with a real bird in it.”

“T’m glad you don’t leave me to walk alone, Sissy,” said
little Nellie, skipping along on one foot, as she held her
sister’s hand. “I think I would get frightened in the
crowded streets.”

“Tf you weren’t, I would be to see you walk alone,” said
Madge laughing. She watched over this little one as if she
had been her mother.

“ Sissy, there is the biggest little girl again,” cried Nellie
suddenly ; “but she is alone, and she is crying! What is
the matter 4”

Yes, there was the “ biggest little girl,” as Nellie described
her, standing at the door of a fashionable shop crying bitterly,
while a couple of women questioned her, and a tall police-
man looked down majestically on them all. “I only ran
across to look in at a shop window for a moment,” sobbed
the child, “and when I came back she was gone. Oh dear!
papa will be so angry, and mamma will be so sorry! Oh,
what shall I do?”

“The idea of leaving a child alone in this crowd,” said one
of the women indignantly.

“Depend upon it she has gone somewhere,” observed the
policeman sententiously.

“That’s just it,” said the woman, “so she must; but the
thing is, where did she go?”



72 A CURIOUS ADVENTURE AND ITS CONSEQUENCES.

“T’d go and look for her, only I don’t know what she is
like.”

“T do,” exclaimed Madge eagerly. “I know her; do let
me go? I'll try to find her.”

“Oh thank you, thank you,” said the little girl, drying
her streaming eyes, never thinking of asking how she could
possibly know her.

“Then you must stay here, or the child won’t know where
to find you,” said the woman. “Would the little girl know
her way home, do you think %”

“No, we never were in town before,” said the child, sob-
bing afresh. “We only came yesterday from the country.
Our maid left us in the square this afternoon, but we thought
it stupid, like the country, and not half as much fun as look-
ing at the shops, so we thought we would go into the streets
for a while; we didn’t think it would be any harm.”

“Well, if you stay there, I’ll go and look for her,’ said
Madge compassionately, while the policeman and women
questioned her about her name and address; and, holding
Nellie’s hand very tight, she ran down the street. But here
was a great thoroughfare, one street led into another, while
each was filled with people, horses, carriages, and tram-cars.
Which way to take was a puzzle—each seemed equally un-
likely —so she turned down the most crowded, looking
keenly from side to side. Just as she almost was giving up
in despair, she caught sight, to her great joy, of the little
figure with the long golden curls,and the doll’s scarlet cloak.
Two tram-cars were coming in opposite directions, a carriage
and pair was close beside, and several cabs driving hither



A CURIOUS ADVENTURE AND ITS CONSEQUENCES. 73

and thither, while the little girl, bewildered with noise and
bustle, was preparing to run across.

“O Nellie, she’ll be killed,” screamed Madge. “Stop
where you are; don’t you stir for your life—I’ll be back in
a@ moment.”

“Child, are you mad? you'll be killed yourself!” cried
a man, catching her arm; but Madge, freeing herself from
his grasp, darted into the street and caught the child just as
a tram-car glided by, and a coachman pulled up his horses
so suddenly as to nearly throw them down. A policeman
came up and held Madge, who had got a severe blow and
hardly knew where she was. A crowd collected.

“Tt was no fault of mine,” began the coachman, when he
suddenly stopped, and looking at the unconscious cause of
the accident, exclaimed, “ Why if that isn’t our Miss Eva!
How on earth did you get here, Missie?”

“O Smithson, save me!” cried the little girl.

The coachman took her up in his arms, while the police-
man held the horses. “But, Miss Eva, whatever brought
you here alone?” he asked ; “and who is this girl that saved
you? for that’s what she did, and no mistake,”

“You’d better get on now,” said the policeman ; “there’s
no harm done.”

“T won't go without this girl, too,” said Smithson. “My
master shall hear of what she has done for him to-day; that
child is the very apple of his eye.”

“Well, let the child go too,” said A 44, beginning to tire of
the scene.

“No, no,” said Madge faintly, “I must go to Nellie.”



74

“Where?” asked the man.

“Tt’s her little sister,” said some one in the crowd. “I saw
her bid the child stay still when she rushed off under the
horses’ feet.”

The policeman marched over to the pathway where Nellie
was standing, and led her to Madge, who, for the first time
realising the horrors of what had been, burst into tears.

“Now, coachman, drive on,” ordered the policeman, “don’t
stop the way any longer.”

“There’s the other little girl; I promised I would look for
this one if she’d stay where I left her,” said Madge, vainly
struggling against being put in the carriage. “I must go
and tell her she is safe.”

“So you shall, then,” said Smithson, beginning to compre-
hend what she meant. “There, get in, like a good girl; I'll
drive slowly along, and you can show me where you left her.”

Madge told him the street, and they drove off. Little Eva,
now quite recovered from her fright, stared steadily at Nellie,
who, thinking it very good fun to be in a grand carriage like
this, stared equally fixedly at her. Not so Madge; she gazed
out of the window, in terror lest they should pass the little
lady, whom she at last spied still at the door of the shop
where she had left her. “There she is,” cried Madge, while
Smithson pulled up, saying severely, “I don’t know what
your papa will say to all this, Miss Alice, nor what brought
you young ladies out in the crowded streets alone; but this
I do know, only for this brave little girl, Miss Eva would
have been killed under a tram-car or by these very horses.
Now, jump in, like a good child.”



A CURIOUS ADVENTURE AND ITS CONSEQUENCES, 75

“ Please, sir, let us get out,” pleaded Madge. “I’d much
rather walk.”

“You're not able to walk,” said the man, turning the
handle safely. “Besides, you must come home, that my
master may hear of what you’ve done ;” and, without wait-
ing for an answer, he drove off.

Alice put her hand into Madge’s, saying timidly, “I am
very, very much obliged to you. Thank you for what you
did.”

Madge smiled. She felt rather sick, and couldn't talk
much, but managed to say, “ You should hold her hand all
the time; I never let Nellie’s go.”

“Ts this Nellie?” “Yes, miss.”

“And what is your name ?”

“Madge Stevenson,” replied Madge.

“Do you live near here?” again asked Alice.

“Pretty near,” replied Madge. “Mother is in hospital.
This is visiting day, so we’ve been to see her, and were
coming home when we met you,”

“Ts your mother sick?” asked Alice.

“She was; but she’s nearly well now. She is coming
home in a few days,” answered Madge.

But just then the carriage stopped at the door of a very
handsome house, and a number of people rushed down the
steps when they saw the children. A tall gentleman seized
little Eva in his arms, and covering her with kisses, bore her
into the house, where a fair, gentle lady met her at the door,
sobbing, “Ob, my child, my darling, you don’t know what a
fright you gave us! Thank God, you are safe,”



76 A CURIOUS ADVENTURE AND ITS CONSEQUENCES,

“You may well say that, ma'am,” muttered Smithson.
“Wait till you hear all.”

Meantime Madge and Nellie felt very uncomfortable. No-
body noticed them, and they wished they could go home.
But Smithson was determined his master should hear of
them, so bidding them stand in the hall, he followed his
master into the library, while a groom led the horses away.
Ina few minutes the gentleman came out, looking very pale,
with something very like tears glistening in his eyes. Hold-
ing out his hand to Madge, he said in a deep voice, “ Little
girl, I cannot thank you for what you have done for us
to-day. I never can express what her mother and I owe
you. My man has told me about it. You have saved us
from a sorrow too deep to think of.”

Madge was quite frightened, and not by any means proud
of le She felt much inclined to run away.

The gentleman then catching sight of the blood trickling
down her face, cried in alarm, “My child, were you hurt too?”

“Not much, sir,” said Madge in great confusion.

“Here, Smithson, I leave them in your charge,” said Mr.
Gilbert. “Take them both downstairs, and let the women
dress the child’s cut. See they have something nice to eat,
and then take them home in a cab; and you, my little girl,”
turning to Madge, and speaking in tones of deep feeling, “I
want you to-morrow. Smithson will arrange about your
coming. Mrs. Gilbert wishes to see you herself, but she is
too excited now to bear it at present. Smithson, I leave you
to see that these children get every attention,” which kind-
hearted Smithson gladly promised to do.



CHAPTER IX.
EXAMPLE BETTER THAN PRECEPT.

_**Bad custom, consolidated into habit, is such a tyrant that; men some-
times cling to vices even while they curse them. ‘They have become the
slaves of habits whose powers they are impotent to resist.—Samuel Smiles,

Hap Mrs. Stevenson been at home, she would have been
alarmed at the non-appearance of the children, but their
father troubled himself very little about them. Hour after
hour struck without his once thinking it strange they were
not in. Not so Mrs. Connor. Her motherly heart was
ereatly disturbed. Knowing that the hospital rules forbade
their staying beyond a certain hour, she could not imagine
what kept them out so late. Great therefore was her relief
when a cab drove down the narrow lane where they lived,
and stopped at their door. It was dark by this time, but
the light of a gas-lamp showed a livery servant lifting
Nellie out of the cab, while Madge followed.

“Gracious me!” exclaimed Mrs. Connor, catching sight
of a bandage across Madge’s forehead, “what has happened?
How did you get hurt, child? What 2s the matter?”

“Tt’s all right now, ma’am,” said Smithson, “but there
might have been matter enough; wait till I pay the cab,
and you shall hear all about it. I’ve brought you home a
wounded hero, or heroine, or whatever you like to call her,
anyway she’s the bravest little girl in the country.” He
then dismissed the cab, and following into Mrs. Connor’s ”
snug room, began the whole story which he had already



78 EXAMPLE BETTER THAN PRECEPT.

recounted to his master, and to all the servants assembled
in the servants’ hall, of how, only for Madge’s prompt action
and “pluck,” the darling of his master’s house, the precious
little Eva, would inevitably have been run over by either a
tram-car or his own horses. While he was speaking, Joe
Stevenson, attracted by the unusual bustle, entered the
room unperceived, and without knowing at first that it was
of his own daughter the man was talking in such glowing
terms. “My mistress is very delicate,” continued the man,
“and she got an awful shock; for some of the people who
heard Miss Alice’s story, and found out her address, rushed
off to the house with the news that Miss Eva was lost; so
that when we got home, the poor lady was nearly frightened
to death, and could not bear the excitement of hearing the
particulars, much less seeing the girl; but my master desired
me to be sure to say she is to come to-morrow, for they want
to see her very particular.”

“Oh, please no!” cried Madge, “indeed I’d rather not;
I’ve been thanked enough already, and I’m sure I never
did it for that.”

“T’m sure you didn’t,” said Smithson, “but you don’t know
my master! When he says a thing, he means it to be done;
so if you don’t come to him to-morrow, he’ll come to you!
Now, ma’am,” turning to Mrs. Connor, “will you see she
comes? She's not much hurt (strange to say), and my
mistress will be real vexed if she doesn’t see her herself.”

“That I will,” said Mrs. Connor heartily, “Ill take her
myself; stay, here’s her father.” Smithson looked at Steven-
son—was he the father of this brave little girl?



EXAMPLE BETTER THAN PRECEPT. 79

“She shall go,” said he, for the first time feeling a sort of
admiration for his little daughter, “and I am much obliged
to you for all your trouble.”

“Not at all,” said Smithson, “J owe her something too,
for only for her pulling the child away, at the risk of her
own life, I couldn’t have held those horses back; law, I
can’t bear to think of it! Good-night to you all,” and he went
out quickly.

Madge was glad when the fuss was over. It had been an
exciting day, and the praise and admiration she had received
were very new to her, so she kissed her kind old friends,
and went wearily up to bed. But nothing was so new, or
so unusual, as, when she was in bed, to find her father
bending over her with a kiss! Madge sprang up in amaze-
ment.

“T’ve been a bad father to you, Madge,” said he, “that’s
a fact, but I mean to be better.”

“© father, you have been better,” cried Madge, “a great,
great deal better lately. It’s I that haven't been able to
take proper care of you, or make you comfortable; but,
father, mammie is coming home in a few days now, and
then we'll be happy again: she’ll make us all right.”

“You're a good child,” said her father in a softened voice,
and to her surprise he stooped down to give her another
kiss. He had not realised, until he heard Smithson’s story,
how fond he really was of his little girl, nor how terribly
near losing her he was. A wave of recollections swept over
his mind—of when, as a young man, he had just brought his
blooming bride home to a snug little cottage, while it had



80 EXAMPLE BETTER THAN PRECEPT.

been his boast that she should want nothing, as long as he
had strength to work; then his pride and joy when his
little girl was born, and christened after her mother; how he
worked doubly hard: that both wife and child should live
comfortably ; then the beginning of his downward course,
when a fellow-workman first tempted him to “the Crown
and Anchor;” the removal from the suburban cottage toa
room in town; the birth and death of two little boys; the
parting with one, after another, all their nice furniture ; his
wife’s delicacy, brought on by fretting; and finally, their
removal to this narrow lane, where the scantily furnished
room told its own story—poverty, neglect, caused by DRINK.
A wild longing to cast it all away as a bad dream, and
begin again, came over him. Oh! if he could only undo
the past, and live a new life for the future! Then he
thought of Madge’s words: “ Mammie is coming home; then
we'll be happy again: she'll make all right,” and something
more like a prayer than he had said for many a long day
rose to his lips, that this indeed might be the case. He
knew how forgiving and loving she always was to him, so
that the fault was altogether his own, and a lurking con-
viction grew stronger in his heart that his love for drink
was at the bottom of all. Could he but overcome that, all
might yet be well. Yes, this was his enemy, which had
turned him into a selfish animal, robbing him of all love for
wife or children or self-respect. He used to pride himself on
his strength; he was strong still, surely he would not allow
himself to be vanquished, body and soul, without a struggle. |
An intense burning desire to be free once more caused his



EXAMPLE BETTER THAN PRECEPT. 81

heart to throb wildly. Madge’s conversation with him
weeks ago came into his mind. Could he ever humble
himself so as to do as she asked him that night, and sign
the pledge for her! He got up and walked rapidly up and
- down the room to clear his brain. How his companions
would laugh at him, how they would sneer and jeer at his
expense! Would he ever have strength of mind to bear it!
But an enemy which had taken complete possession for
several years was not to be evicted at a minute’s notice ;
its stronghold was shaken, but not destroyed; and when
Joe Stevenson at last lay down in bed, a hattle between
right and wrong, conscience and inclination, was raging
within him. Which would win? Oh for a good angel to
watch over him and guide him aright! Yes, there was One,
who, looking down from heaven, saw the conflict ; whose
loving heart yearned over this one sheep, apparently so
hopelessly lost in the wilderness, and determined that He
would seek for it and save it, that in its safety it might
secure the happiness of the two little tender lambs, whose
very lives till now had been in such jeopardy. Joe Steven-
son little thought that he was being led by One whose
never-failing Providence ordered all things both in heaven
and earth, and would not even suffer one sparrow to fall to
the ground without His permission. Quite unknown to
himself this poor wandering sheep was being watched and
led home by a way which he knew not.

Next day Mrs. Connor fulfilled her promise of taking
the children to see the lady. Madge implored to be let
off, and when her friend would not hear of it, she worked



82 EXAMPLE BETTER THAN PRECEPT.

herself into such a state of trepidation, that when they
reached the house she could hardly stand. Mrs, Connor
preferred staying outside, and as the children, hand in hand,
went up the flight of stone steps alone, Madge’s knees
trembled so under her, that she almost fell. With beating
heart she timidly rang the bell, and would greatly have
liked to run away before the door was opened; but when it
was, the servant received her as one who was both expected
and welcome, desiring her to go upstairs. Madge felt as if
all hope for escape was gone when the door shut behind
her, and they followed the servant up stairs carpeted soft
as velvet, past a conservatory, where flowers, more beautiful
than Madge had ever dreamed of, bloomed, perfuming the
whole house with their sweetness, into a drawing-room
beautifully furnished, and so covered with mirrors, that for
a time Madge thought there were endless rooms opening off
each other, and then did not believe in the reality of the
second room, separated only by lofty folding doors! At one
of the windows overlooking the square, in a low easy-chair,
sat the fair gentle lady they had seen the evening before for
a moment when they arrived, and by her side the two pretty
little girls, the elder doing some gay crewel work, the little
one sitting on a stool at her mother’s feet, playing with the
identical doll whose red cloak had been the means of attract-
ing Madge in the crowd, and so saving her life. She looked
as bright and as sunny as if she had never been in the
slightest danger or caused any one the least anxiety! Mrs.
Connor had told Madge to make a curtsey when she saw
the lady, even showing her how to do it rightly; but



EXAMPLE BETTER THAN PRECEPT. 83

when the time came, Madge forgot all about it in her
shyness and fright, so that it was not a very polished
little maiden who stood there. But Mrs. Gilbert never
thought of that; she only saw in her the girl who had
saved her little darling’s life, and whom she felt she never
could thank or repay sufficiently. Madge was more than
ever confused by the torrent of tearful thanks with which
the lady greeted her; but before long her gentle manner
made her feel more at ease, and she was able to answer her
many questions.

The little ones soon fraternised. In the first excitement
Nellie had touched the doll in silent admiration, and before
the others knew what they were doing, the two were happily
playing together with childish innocence of the difference
in rank. Madge was horrified, but Mrs. Gilbert smilingly
interfered, telling her to leave them alone, as she wished to
speak to her. Alice had told her mother all she knew of
Madge, so Mrs. Gilbert asked all about her sick mother, how
long she had been ill, and when she was to be home; what
the children did every day, whether they went to school,
and who took care of them. She was filled with pity, and
Alice with wonder, at this little girl (just her own age, as it
turned out), who managed everything in her mother’s
absence, and took such care of her little sister. As Madge
became more at ease, Mrs. Gilbert was struck by her simple
earnestness of manner, quiet and unassuming, bashful, though
not awkward; and she felt utterly puzzled as to how she
could reward her as she wished, for when she hinted it the
child grew perfectly silent. Nellie, who was playing near



84 EXAMPLE BETTER THAN PRECEPT.

another window, catching sight of Mrs. Connor's check shawl, ©
patiently going up and down outside, ran over exclaiming,
“There she is, sissy! there she is again !”

“Hush |” whispered Madge, “don’t make a noise, Nellie!”

“Who is it?” asked Mrs. Gilbert kindly. “What does
she mean ?”

“Ts Mrs. Connor, ma’am,” said little Nell, now quite at
home, and delighted beyond measure with all the untold
wealth of playthings she saw for the first time in her little
life. Mrs. Gilbert looked at Madge for explanation.

“She came with us here, ma’am; she lives in our house,
and is the kindest friend we ever had; she said she would
wait till we were ready to go back.”

Mrs. Gilbert rang the bell and desired the servant to ask
the woman who was walking up and down outside to come
in, as she wished to speak to her, thinking perhaps that
through her she might find out what she wanted better
than from Madge. Mrs. Connor, flushed with surprise, came
into the room, making her lowest curtsey, and looking what
she was—a thoroughly respectable, decent old woman.

“ Alice, dear,” said Mrs. Gilbert, “take these little girls
to the school-room, I told Mathilde to have dinner ready
there; and when they have finished, you might show them
the dolls’ house, and all your pretty things.”

The children followed Alice out of the room, and when
the door was shut Mrs. Gilbert, making Mrs. Connor sit in
a comfortable chair near her, began to ask her all about
Madge, as she had very soon discovered she might do, for
Mrs. Connor’s honest face showed she could be trusted.



EXAMPLE BEITER THAN PRECEPT. 85

Her account of Madge was all Mrs. Gilbert could wish; she
told how unselfish and self-denying she was in the untiring
care she bestowed on her little sister; how difficult it was
for a child of her age to fill the place vacant by the absence
of her sick mother, and in a few words told that their
father was neither very steady nor very kind to them.
This she did not tell from gossip or unkindness, but that it
simply formed part of the children’s history. She then
spoke of what she herself owed to Madge; how she had per-
suaded her at first to go with her to church, which for many
years she had neglected doing, and that gradually, what
she did at first to please the child, she and her husband
did regularly now, as their own greatest pleasure as well
as duty, looking forward to Mr. Arnold’s visits and week-
evening services with joy.

“Mr. Arnold! is his church near here?” inquired Mrs.
Gilbert with interest. 2

“ Yes, ma'am,” replied Mrs. Connor, “it is the nearest to
us, and is not far from this on the other side.”

“Tam so glad,” said Mrs. Gilbert. “We used to know
Mr. Arnold years ago; he is a truly good man! I knew he
lived in town, but being strangers ourselves, I did not know
whether his church would be near us or not. I am very
glad, indeed, for we shall certainly attend it.”

“He is a good man indeed,” said Mrs. Connor warmly,
“and ours is a different place since he came; he knows
every one, and is as friendly and plain-like with us as if
we were his equals; he’d come in, and sit down for a chat,



86 EXAMPLE BETTER THAN PRECEPT.

without being a bit afraid of himself? What with his
services, schools, and Band of Hope, he has done a power of
good.”

“Band of Hope,” said Mrs. Gilbert, “I am glad he
goes in for that; I believe that is one of the most impor-
tant institutions in a parish. Well, I am very much
pleased to find we, too, are living in his parish, and I
don’t doubt we shall soon become better acquainted with
all its workings.” She then asked Mrs. Connor might
she give Madge and her sister some clothes, which she
thought would just fit them; she hoped to do something
more substantial for them, but this would be a beginning.
Mrs. Connor was as pleased as if the children were her own,
for their clothes were worn, and shabby to a degree, and
there was no prospect of money to buy new. Mrs. Gilbert
then took her upstairs to the nursery, and made a selection
of suitable things, neither too grand nor too flimsy to be of
use. Mrs. Connor was in high delight at the comfortable
stockings, boots, and underclothes, in particular, as well as
plain hats, jackets, and frocks, in which she pictured her
little favourites going to church and school on Sundays.
Some weeks ago she would have distrusted the idea of such
nice clothes coming into Stevenson’s possession, but he was
so much steadier now, she felt almost sure he would not take
them from his little children. At any rate, she would keep
a sharp lookout on them, so she gladly packed them in a
large bundle to carry home, where she said she thought
it was time for them now to go.



EXAMPLE BETTER THAN PRECEPT. 87

When they went to seek the children, the school-room
was in rare confusion; playthings of all kinds strewn about,
which Mathilde, the French maid, not understanding half
that was said, was good-humouredly trying to put in their
places. But she knew that this little girl had saved her
precious little mademoiselle from a cruel fate, therefore
nothing could be too good for her. Every time she spoke
to her young ladies in her own language, Nellie first stared,
then stuffed her little hands into her mouth to hide her
laughter; for, as she afterwards told Madge, it sounded
exactly like the way the monkey-man chatted to his monkey
on the barrel-organ! Miss Alice and Madge had gone
through the usual little girls’ ceremony of making friends:
had compared ages and tastes; but Madge could not under-
stand how Miss Alice could bear to come to town just as
the trees were budding, primroses growing, and lambs in the
fields skipping about as she described; while Alice equally
wondered how any one could be ever tired of seeing the gay
shops, crowded streets, soldiers, bands, and amusing sights
with which town abounded. But on their dissimilarity of
tastes they agreed to differ. Altogether it was a day to
our poor children to be marked with a white stone in their
calendar—a day to be long remembered, talked over, and
dreamed of, whose various pleasures far outbalanced in
all four children’s minds the danger of the previous day.
Yes; it was “un jour des plaisirs” which stood out in their
memories, although at the time they did not think of its
having any more important result,



CHAPTER X.

HOME ONCE MORE.

** Several acts may seem in themselves trivial ; but so are the continuous
acts of daily life. Like snowflakes they fall unperceived ; each flake added
to the pile produces no sensible change, and yet the accumulation of snow-
flakes makes the avalanche. So do repeated acts: the one following the
other, at length become consolidated in habit, determine the action of the
human being for good or for evil, and, in a word, form the character.”

—Smiles’ “‘ Character.”

“Mamma,” said Alice Gilbert to her mother, the first time
they were alone, “ what is the meaning of a Band of Hope?”

“A number of people who join or band together in pro-
mising not to take wine, or any other kind of intoxicating
drink, except as a medicine,” answered Mrs. Gilbert. “They
make the promise, and sign their names to it, which is called
‘taking the pledge;’ then as long as they keep their pledge-
card they are bound not to take any sort of ‘alcohol,’ as it
is called, as it would be breaking a solemn promise, taken in
the presence of a witness. But if a person tires of it, he
may return the card, and cease to be a member, which I
think is very shabby.”

“Ts it a good thing, mamma?” asked Alice again.

“ Certainly it is, dear,” replied her mother. “Why do you
ask? What put it into your head?”

“That little girl, Madge Stevenson, told me of it, mamma,”
answered Alice. “She belongs to it, and it seems so nice.
She says she will get a medal when she has been a whole



HOME ONCE MORE! 89

year a member, and she will get some other thing if she gets
ten new people to become members.”

“That is a very good plan,” said Mrs. Gilbert. “I am
glad she belongs to it.”

“Mamma, do other people ever join?” asked Alice ; “or is
it only for people like Madge and Mrs. Connor—I mean, do
people like us—oh, you know what I mean?”

“Yes, Alice, I think I do,” said her mother smiling. “To
be sure they do; for instance, although we are not actually
members of any society, papa and I never take any sort of
wine, so that we are almost the same as if we had signed.”

“Then, why don’t you, mamma?” asked Alice.

“T don’t really know why,” returned Mrs. Gilbert, “for
our sympathies are entirely with it; I think it is one of the
best safeguards any one in any rank, or of any age, can
have.”

“T thought, perhaps, it was only for the common people,”
said Alice hesitatingly.

“Oh no,” said her mother, “ if it is wrong for them to take
strong drink, it is doubly so for us, because we should know
better.”

“Then, mamma, might I sign?” said Alice eagerly, “I
should like to so much.”

“TJ don’t know about that, dear,” said Mrs. Gilbert. “ For
my own part I have not the least objection, I should like to
see every one I love a teetotaler, but I do not know what
papa would say to your joining.”

“Well, may Iask him, mamma?” persisted Alice.



90 HOME ONCE MORE!

“Yes, you certainly may do that,” replied her mother,
“and you must abide by whatever he says; but now, darling,
leave me, I am too tired to talk any more.”

Alice ran to the school-room, where she found Mathilde,
and began the subject anew to her; but to her surprise she
found Mathilde knew a great deal more of it than she did,
and said she had often wished to have an opportunity of
joining some such society.

“Oh then, Mathilde,” cried Alice joyfully, “if I get leave
from papa to sign, you shall come too, and we can do it
together. I would sign for Madge, and you would sign for
me, wouldn’t you? for I mean to get ten people too.”

Alice’s energetic little mind was so full of this, that she
could not think of anything else, and she longed for evening
to come, that she might ask her father about it. So as soon
as dinner was over, and she and Eva came down to dessert,
she preferred her request; but although he did not decidedly
say “no,” he would not say “yes.” Like most people who
live in the country, he had an intense dread of infection,
and was convinced that if his children went to Sunday-
school, or any sort of crowded meeting, they must surely
bring home scarlatina, measles, or some sort of dreadful
illness. Mrs. Gilbert laughed at his fears, saying that when
she was a girl living in town, she went to all sorts of classes,
yet she never took any kind of infection; she really wished
that Alice might attend Mr, Arnold’s Sunday-school, for in
the country she often felt the disadvantage of living at too
great a distance to allow them the privileges which were so



HOME ONCE MORE! 91

easily obtained in town, and she earnestly wished that every
member of the household should take advantage of these
golden opportunities now that they were within their reach.
However, the most that Mr. Gilbert would promise, was that
he would speak to Mr. Arnold (whom he was delighted to
find was their pastor), and with this promise Alice was
obliged to be content for the present.

On Saturday afternoon, to Madge’s great joy, Mrs. Steven-
son came home! She had written the day before to her
husband, telling him when he might expect her, so Madge
devoted the whole of Saturday to preparing the room for
ier receptien. Fortunately there was no school that day,
so she had plenty of time, and her kind friend Mrs. Connor,
giving up her own usual weekly cleaning, assisted in scour-
ing and washing floor, table, chairs, and clothes. Poor
Madge, with the recollection of the scrupulously white beds
and floors of the hospital, feared her mother could never be
satisfied with their room, but Mrs. Connor consoled her with
the old adage, “the best can dono more.” Then during
their work, Miss Arnold came in for a minute. She had
heard from Mrs. Stevenson that she was going home that
day, so she brought, “to look pretty,” as she said, some
primroses and other spring flowers, and a little basket with
tea, sugar, nice butter, and a couple of fresh eggs, so that
Madge’s mind was at rest on that score. She arranged the
flowers in a cracked tumbler, putting them in the middle of
the table; and someway they seemed to brighten up the
whole room, which, when a little fire was lighted, the kettle



92 HOME ONCE MORE!

put on to boil, and the table laid for tea, really looked quite
homelike. Oh! how glad was Madge when the cab drove
up and her mother got out! How she hugged her and clung
to her, as if she could never bear to part from her again.
Good Mrs. Connor welcomed her as if she had been her own
daughter, then retired to her own little room, feeling that
it was better to leave the children and their mother to
themselves. Madge had thought her mother looking so
much better the last day she saw her in hospital, but now
that she saw her in her old accustomed place, she was grieved
to see how pale and delicate she was still) When Joe came
home from his work, the marvellous change in his room
astonished him, He was really glad to see his wife back
again, and in his unreasoning fashion, attributed every-
thing, comfort, cleanliness, flowers, and food, to the fact of
her presence! to which, even had Madge known it, she
would have gladly agreed! When supper was over Mrs.
Stevenson, knowing her husband’s habits of old, dreaded his
going out, so she produced the knitting with which Miss
Arnold had supplied her, and sitting beside him began to
chat pleasantly. Madge was very tired after her day’s hard
work, so was glad to go early to bed, thus leaving her father
and mother quietly together, when they enjoyed a happier
evening than either had spent for many and many a long
day.

Next morning Mrs. Stevenson really did feel proud of her
two little girls when she saw them dressed in their nice new
clothes ready to go to Sunday-school. Respectable and bonnie



HOME ONCE MORE! 93

they looked: even Joe seemed pleased. He knew well where
the clothes had come from, and for what reason. . Mrs. Connor
need have hadno fear of his appropriating them; in his heart he
felt proud of them, and he would as soon now think of giving
either of his children poison as of depriving them of one
article of their new clothes. On Monday evening Madge
wondered very much would Nurse Mooney remember her
promise of going with her to the Band of Hope meeting. She
did so hope she would! For once she was able to leave little
Nellie at home, “to keep mammie company,” as she said, and
went with her two old friends to the hall, where, to her great
delight, she found Nurse Mooney waiting for her, so they all
went in together. When the meeting was over, the Connors
waited while Madge escorted her new friend up to the table
at which, as usual, Mr. Arnold presided. “Well done, Madge,”
said he smiling when he saw then, “You are a capital recruit-
ing sergeant. I wish all our members were as active! I like
to see new members joining our ranks—the more the better.”

Madge coloured with pleasure at these words, and Mrs.
Mooney felt gratified at being the means of her receiving
such praise,

“Now,” said Mr. Arnold when all had signed their names,
“T wish you would each try to work as busily as this little
girl, who, I plainly see, is going in fora silver bar! Think
of how much good would be done in the world if every one
who joins the Band of Hope induced ten more to join also!
Take any one of you here, for instance. Suppose you get
ten recruits. Well, suppose each of those ten gets ten more, .



94 HOME ONCE MORE!

that would be one hundred! And if each of the hundred
induced ten more to join, what an army there would be! for
it is most likely they would be scattered about, not all in
this town or even country, but the good work would be spread-
ing all the time, the farther away the greater the influence.”

“JT don’t think that would be very hard,” whispered a boy
who had just signed; “I think I'll try.”

“Do,” said Mr. Arnold, quickly turning to him. “ What
matter if it is a little hard; who minds a little trouble when
there is a good object in view! Now, I'll tell you what this
reminds me of. Is there any one of you who has not watched
a pebble thrown into smooth water? Now,a little circle comes,
which spreads into another, and that again into another, till
the whole surface of the stream is covered by gradually widen-
ing circles, until at last the shore at each side is reached. Yet
all this is caused by a little pebble thrown in, perhaps by the
hand of some little child! Could not each of you try to be
the centre of a gradually widening circle of total abstainers?
At anyrate, you might put it before you, and each one of you
try your best how many friends, neighbours, or acquaintances
you can bring in! Now, I am not going to preach, but I want
each of you to try and remember what I have said, and also
what I always say before any one signs, that this is a work
not to be rashly undertaken in vain self-dependence, but
prayerfully; for if you think you can keep your pledge by
your own strength you are greatly mistaken. Any one who
does that is sure to fail; but what is impossible to do of our-
selves is easy to do with God’s help. And He is ready and



- HOME ONCE MORE! 95

willing to give you that help if you only ask Him for it.” And
with a kindly good-night, and shaking hands with each new
brother member, Mr. Arnold went home.

Every one said Mr. Arnold was a wonderful man to get
through all he did, and so he certainly was. Not a moment
in the day was unemployed, for, besides all the parish work,
he had an immensity of visiting. No one was forgotten, and
the same day that he visited poor Mrs. Stevenson in her
dingy two-pair room in Back Lane, when his words cheered
her heart and made her better able to face her anxieties, he
called on Mrs. Gilbert in her elegantly furnished drawing-
room in Buckland Square. They had known each other years
before, so were very glad to meet, and had much to say. Mr.
Gilbert, who seldom came in to see his wife’s visitors, came
to see this welcome guest, and enjoyed a cup of afternoon
tea together with his agreeable conversation.

“Mamma,” whispered Alice during a pause, “do you think
will papa remember to speak to Mr. Arnold? He said he
would the first time he had an opportunity.”

“What about, dear?” said Mrs. Gilbert.

“OQ mamma, don’t you remember? The Band of Hope.”

“Ah! to be sure,” said her mother smiling. “ William,
Alice wants me to remind you to ask Mr. Arnold about whether
or not she should be allowed to join the Band of Hope?”

“That is a very familiar word in my ears. Is there any
doubt on the subject?” said Mr. Arnold, turning to Alice
with his bright, genial look. “I hope, my dear, you are
going to join us?”



96 HOME ONCE MORE!

“Tf papa allows me,” said Alice looking down.

“Papas and mammas have to be careful in their ‘yeses or
noes,” said Mr. Gilbert laughing. “So I have learned not
to commit mye but told Alice I would leave it entirely to
your decision.”

“Tn that case you have your answer at once,” said Mr.
Arnold laughing. “I would advise every one to join, each
for different reasons—some for the sake of example (which,
believe me, is better than precept), some for expediency, all
because it is right.”

“ There, Allies, ” said Mr. Gilbert to his little girl, “papa
has committed himself after all!”

“Then may I, papa?” she asked eagerly.

“You are in Mr. Arnold’s hands,” he answered smiling.

“Very well, Alice,” said Mr. Arnold; “TI shall expect you
on Monday evening at seven o'clock, that is the time we
always mect, and I shall be very glad indeed to enroll you a
member.” Then, turning to Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert, he spoke
on other matters connected with the church and schools
which did not interest her; but, having gained her point, she
ran off to tell Mathilde that on Monday evening she too, if
she wished, might come and join the Band of Hope,



CHAPTER XI.

MORE RECRUITS AND A GREAT OBJECT GAINED.

*¢ Know all the good that individuals find,
Or God and Nature meant to mere mankind,
Reason’s whole pleasure, all the joys of sense,
Lie in three words, health, peace, and competence ;
But health consists with temperance alone,
And peace, O virtue! peace is all thy own.”
—Pope.

*¢ Happiness is much more equally divided than
Some of us imagine. One man shall possess
Most of the materials, but little of the thing ;
Another may possess much of the thing,

But very few of the materials,
—Cotton.

MapceE did not forget her promise to the poor woman in the
hospital to go to see her; but for some days after her
mother’s return, she was extremely busy when she came
from school; for Mrs. Stevenson believed that the best thing
she could do for her little daughter was to train her to work
well, Therefore, the housework which poor Madge had done
so badly when alone, was now overseen and directed by her
mother, who was very particular, allowing no mistake to
pass, rightly thinking that what was thoroughly learned
when young, would not be forgotten when old, However,
at last a day came when Madge was at leisure, so, oe



Full Text
The Baldwin Library





|) Madge and Ber Cor Recruits.

a
ws QQEMPERANCE SRALE.

BY

E 6. E,

Author of “ Ethel Clemence,’ “ Mattie’s Happy Home,” “ Aimée,? &¢t.

** Absence of occupation is not rest,
A mind quite vacant is a mind distress’d.”
—COWPER.

GLASGOW:
JOHN S MARR AND SONS,
51 DUNDAS STREET.
1885,


CONTENTS.

CHAP. 3 PAGER
I. Tue First River 1n THe BAND or Hore CHAIN, . 5
II. In tox Hosprran Warp, , 0 9 . 13
Ill Toe Dawn or Licut, ‘ ; , . . 21
IV. Unconscious INFLUENCE, . c . 0 30
V. “Ir av First you Don’r SuccrEp—Try Agatn,” 7 38
VI. A PracticaL View or ToTaL ABSTINENCE, 3 a 47
VII. Manpcer’s First Recruits, . . 7 . . 55
VIII. A Curtous ADVENTURE AND ITs CONSEQUENCES, : . 65
IX. ExampLe BerrerR THAN PRECEPT, . 3 7 . 77
X. Home once Mors, . : a 5 . . 88
XI, More Recruits anp A Great Opsect GAINED, . 0 97
XII. A Treat or FLowers, : - . . . lll

XIU. THe Excursion, . ; ' 0 e . 120
MADGE AND HER TEN RECRUITS.

CHAPTER I.
THE FIRST RIVET IN THE BAND OF HOPE CHAIN.

‘Do what you can for fellow-man

With honest heart and true,

Much may be done by every one,
There’s work for all to do.

Though you can do but little,
That little’s something still ;

Youll find a way for something,
If you but have the will.

Be kind to those around you,
To charity hold fast,

Let each think first of others
And leave himself till last.

Act as you would that others should
Act always unto you ;

Mvci MAY BE DONE BY EVERY ONE—
THERE’S WORK FOR ALL TO DO.”

Ir was a bleak cold evening in winter, and the misty rain
and sharp wind pierced the thin scanty clothing of two
children, who, though not begging, were aimlessly wandering
up and down a quiet street. “O Madge, come home!”
pleaded the smaller of the two. “Iam so cold, and tired,
and hungry; do let us come home.”
6 THE FIRST RIVET IN THE BAND OF HOPE CHAIN.

Poor Madge! was she not the same, and anxious into the
bargain? “Let us sit down here, Nellie,” she said coaxingly,
“and I will take you on my lap to keep you warm. We
can’t go home yet, because of father—there now, isn’t that
better?” and she wrapped her thin shawl round the shiver-
ing child and held her close.

But Nellie was not so easily pacified. “It’s not much
better,” she whined, then breaking into a cry, she sobbed, “O
Madge, come home, it’s so cold here, and I’m so tired.”
Madge knew it would be useless to go home yet. The church
clock had just chimed, and she well knew that a long time
must pass before there was even a chance of her father
coming out of that brilliantly-lighted public-house at the
corner, where he spent his evenings. She wanted to be near
to take him home, and besides, to-night he had locked the
door, or she could have put little Nellie to bed, and come
out again to wait for him; so nothing remained to be done
but be patient, and try to amuse the weary little child.
“See, Nellie,” she said cheerfully, “all these boys and girls.
I wonder where they are going! What a lot! seven, eight,
nine; how they run!” Nellie stopped crying, interested in
watching the children, who were hurrying along in all direc-
tions.

“Look, Madge!” she cried, emerging from the shawl, that
she might see better, “there are more coming down the other
way, all going to the same place; big people, too; there’s a
woman with a baby in her arms.”

“Shall we go too?” said Madge, whose own curiosity was
THE FIRST RIVET IN THE BAND OF HOPE CHAIN. 7

now aroused. “Here, take my hand, and we'll see what
it is.”

Following the stream of people round a corner, they came
to a brightly lighted house: the door stood open invitingly,
but Madge and Nellie held back, although all the others
hurried in as if quite at home.

“Come along,” said a man who stood inside, “aren’t you

_coming in? the meeting is just going to begin.”

“We didn’t know we might, sir,” said Madge.

“To be sure,” said the man good-naturedly, “every one is
welcome at the Band of Hope; the more the better; here
are more children, in with you all, or you'll be late,” and
almost before Madge knew what she was doing, she found
herself and Nellie seated in such a nice, warm, bright room,
filled with people of all ages, young and old. Nellie had
forgotten her troubles in the pleasure of this new scene. So
Madge was quite satisfied; this was a much nicer place to
wait for father in, and if Nellie was good and happy that was
the chief thing. So she gave herself up to enjoying herself
for once, and looked about with great interest. At the
farthest end of the room was a table, behind which sat some
gentlemen, and on which Madge’s sharp eyes spied rows of
shining silvery things like half-crowns ; what could they be
for? Presently one of the gentlemen gave out a hymn,
every one stood up, Nellie and Madge doing whatever they
saw the others do, and Madge found herself joining quite
loudly in the chorus, for she had a quick ear, and a sweet
little voice, and the words and tune of
8 THE FIRST RIVET IN THE BAND OF HOPE CHAIN,

‘*Rescue the perishing,
Care for the dying,
Jesus is merciful,
Jesus will save,”

were just as easy and far prettier than the songs she knew
well from hearing so constantly in the streets. Then every
one knelt down and aclergyman prayed. Madge did not
quite take in all his words, but she listened and liked what
he said. Then after a pause one of the gentlemen stood up,
and said he was now going to give away medals to all those
members who had kept their pledges faithfully for a year;
and while Madge was wondering what he meant, he began
to call out different names, when boys, girls, men, and women
from different parts of the room went up, each to receive
one of the shining things which Madge had seen on the
table, and which they now fastened on their coats, suspended _
_ by a blue ribbon. The two children gazed at this strange
scene with the deepest interest until every medal was gone,
and the noise of clapping (in which Nellie had assisted until
her little hands were quite hot) had subsided; then the
gentleman said he had still to give away the highest prize—
that for obtaining ten recruits, and he called on Janie Wilson
to come up for it. To Madge’s great surprise, the people on
the row with her began to make room, and a little girl who
sat next to her got up, smiling and blushing, and went up
to the table. As Janie passed, Madge saw that she already
had a medal and blue ribbon on, so she wondered what she
was to get, but as she returned to her seat, she held in her
THE FIRST RIVET IN THE BAND OF HOPE CHAIN. 9

hand a little silver bar, which she began to fasten on the
ribbon. Seeing Madge watch so earnestly, she said, “ Look,
isn’t it pretty ?”

“Very,” replied Madge, “but what is it? and why did you
get it?”

“The medal is because I have been a year a teetotaler—
never drink spirits or. anything like that, you know—and
the bar is because I got ten other people to sign, or promise
they wouldn't either.”

“ How nice,” said Madge admiringly. “I would like to
get one.”

“Well, will you sign?” said Janie eagerly. But just then
there was a cry of “ Hush-sh,” and a woman sitting behind
tapped them sharply on their shoulders, so Madge did not
answer. Another gentleman began to speak so simply and
plainly that she understood every word he said. He told
several stories which made the children laugh, but chiefly
he spoke in an earnest way of the sin and misery caused by
drink, which went to Madge’s very heart, and when alluding
to homes which had once been happy, but were rendered
wretched by drunken fathers, who spent all their earnings on
drink while their children starved, Madge started and looked
at the gentleman, quite sure he was speaking of them, but
he was looking another way, and she remembered with a
sigh that there were plenty of other poor children as sad
and wretched as they were. In conclusion he said, “ This is
a great war which we have to carry into the enemy’s camp,
and if we mean to win, we must be like true soldiers—brave.
10 THE FIRST RIVET IN THE BAND OF HOPE CHAIN.

and steady. I iment a great many in this room to-night
have already signed, but there may be some who have not,
and to them I address myself particularly. I beg of you not
to go home before joining our ranks, by signing our Band of
Hope pledge. Let no one say, ‘J am of no consequence; or,
‘What good could J do by joining?’ We want every one to
join. The grandest castle in the world is formed of multitudes
of stones, all different sizes and shapes, but cemented together
by mortar into one grand edifice; let us be like that; you can-
not all be the polished handsome stones, but you can be like
the useful mortar that binds them together, filling every chink.
If every one here who has not yet signed will do so to-night,
and will then try each to get one more before our next meeting,
what a fine addition to our ranks that would be! At the
close of this meeting any one who wishes can be given a
pledge-card; do let me once more urge on you not to lose
this opportunity ; who knows if you may have another?”
He sat down, and the closing hymn was sung. Madge pon-
dered over the words she had heard. Young as she was,
poor child, she had seen enough of the evils of drink to
make her feel she would do anything to put an end to it;
the gentleman had said he hoped nobody would go away
without signing, but she was a stranger, too shy to go for-
ward alone. While she was thinking what she should do,
her neighbour touched her arm, saying pleasantly,

“Well, will you join?”

“T don’t know how,” answered Madge. “I'd like to, but
Pm afraid.”
THE FIRST RIVET IN THE BAND OF HOPE CHAIN. 11

“Qh nonsense,” replied the other, “it’s so easy; and it’s
so nice to feel you belong to the Band of Hope. Yow don’t
want ever to drink, do you?”

“Oh no, no,” said Madge with a shudder, “indeed, I don’t.”

“Well then come with me, I’ll show you what to do.”

Madge got up, holding her little sister’s hand, and followed
her new friend shyly to the table. One of the gentlemen
looked up with a smile, saying, “Janie Wilson is an inde-
fatigable agent; here she is with a new recruit. Well, Janie,
are you going in for another bar ?”

“ Please, sir, this is a little girl who would like to sign,
but doesn’t know what to do,” said Janie, “so I brought her
up ; she may sign, mayn’t she ?”

“ Of course, indeed she may,” said the gentleman kindly ;
then turning to Madge he said, “ Well, my little girl, what is
your name ?”

“ Madge Stevenson, sir.”

“Where do you live?”

“Tn 3 Back Lane, sir.”

“How old are you?” Madge was not sure; she only
knew she was a great deal older than Nellie.

“No matter,” said the gentleman, “I daresay you are
old enough to understand what it is you are going to do;
listen now while I explain it.” He then clearly explained
the nature of the pledge, and made Madge repeat after him
that by God’s help she would “abstain from all intoxicating
drinks as beverages.” Then he filled up a little card, and
desired her to sign her name. Poor Madge thought it was
12 THE FIRST RIVET IN THE BAND OF HOPE CHAIN.

all up, for she could not write; but the gentleman wrote the
name for her, and showed her where to put her mark. How
proud and happy she felt when he gave her the pretty
little card, telling her to keep it safe, and that she was now
a regular member of the Band of Hope! Nellie was tired
out with the evening’s excitement, and was almost asleep ;
so Madge took her in her arms, waiting patiently near the
door of the public-house until her father should come out.
The words of the hymn “ Rescue the perishing, care for the
dying,” rang in her ears; while she went over in her mind
what she had heard about the war needing brave soldiers,
or the castle needing many stones, and wondered if she was
like the mortar now that she had taken the pledge, and
would she ever become one of the great stones, until she
nearly fell asleep sitting on the cold doorstep.
CHAPTER II.
IN THE HOSPITAL WARD.

On life’s ocean wide

Your fellow-creatures guide,

And point to a shore beyond the stormy tide!

What is marred make right,

What is severed unite,

And leave where’er you go love’s golden thread of light !

JOE STEVENSON when sober (now, alas! a rare occurrence)
was not unkind to his children ; indeed, at one time he had

deen an affectionate, loving father; but so long ago that

Nellie had quite, and Madge almost, forgotten it.

The recollection therefore of the weary, patient, cold little
children, waiting outside the public-house for him that bitter
evening, caused him severe self-reproach next morning. It
was only Tuesday, yet what had become of his Saturday’s
wages? True, some had gone for the rent, and some to
Madge to buy food and fire; but what of the rest? He well
knew it had gone for his own selfish gratification in three
evenings at the “public.” With mind and body both
uncomfortable, he turned from the scanty allowance of stir-
about prepared by Madge for breakfast, and went out to try
to seek work, having been told by his employer on Satur-
day that he need not come back again, as he was too
unsatisfactory. But what was in reality the prickings of.
conscience, the children very naturally mistook for an
increase of bad humour; so that they felt a sense of relief
14 IN THE HOSPITAL WARD.

when the door closed after him, and they were able to
speak to each other without fear of a harsh word or blow.

“Do you know what day this is, Nellie?” asked Madge,
as she washed up the breakfast things, giving them carefully
to her little sister to dry and put in their places.

“ Visiting day,” answered Nellie brightly.

“Yes,” replied Madge. “We'll see mammie to-day, and
tell her all the news. I wonder what she’ll say when she
hears I’m a Band of Hope!”

“Won't you show her your nice little book that the
gentleman wrote your name in?” asked Nellie.

“To be sure I will,” answered Madge. “I’ve got a bit of
clean paper to wrap it in, to keep it from getting soiled.
Won’t it be nice when I get a medal with a blue ribbon!
I mean to get a silver bar too, like the little girl that sat
next us.”

“ How will you get it?” asked Nellie with interest.

“ By getting ten people to sign their names,” said Madge.

“T’d like one too,” said little Nellie, “I want to be a
Band of Hope.”

“You’re too little yet,” said Madge. “The gentleman
said so; but maybe you'll be big enough to be the last of my
ten people!”

“Who will they be?” asked Nellie. “I wish you’d get
father.”

A shade crossed Madge’s face, indeed she wished so too;
but there was almost nothing she would dread more than to
speak to him on the subject. “Come along now,” she said
IN THE HOSPITAL WARD. 15

to her little sister, “it’s time we were going to see mother;
‘T'll dress you first, and you must stay quiet till I’m ready.”
Soon they were ready to start. Madge took Nellie’s hand
as they walked through the crowded strects to the hospital
where their mother was. Madge had been there so often,
that she was not shy now when they passed through the
big gates and went into the large hall, where the good-
natured porter nodded to them, telling them they might go
up. Nellie tightened her hold of her sister’s hand, as they
went up flight after flight of scrupulously clean stairs, along
corridors, into a large airy room, with long rows of white

‘beds down each side, and tables down the middle, on which
were scrap-books, flowers, &c.

Many a languid eye followed the children as they passed
down the room without even glancing around them, till
they reached almost the end; then with a cry of joy they
sprang forward, half. pacers their mother with kisses.
The sick woman raised herself on her elbow, holding out
both her hands. “O mammie! mammie!” said Madge,
kneeling down beside her, “I am so glad to see you!”
Little Nellie climbed up into the bed beside her mother, and
with her arms tight round her neck, hugged her with all
her might, smiling defiance at the nurse, who, passing by,
warned her it was against the rules to get into the beds.

“ And how are you, mammie?” asked Madge.

“ Better,” answered her mother cheerfully, “The doctor
says I’m doing nicely.”

“When may you come home?” asked Madge.
16 IN THE HOSPITAL WARD.

“T don’t know that,” said Mrs. Stevenson. “He hasn’t
said a word of that yet.” -

“© mother! we do want you so much,” said poor Madge.

“Do you think I don’t want you too?” said her mother
softly, stroking her hair. “How is father?”

Another cloud passed over Madge’s face as she replied,
“He’s very well.”

“TI thought maybe he would come to-day to see me,” said
his poor wife wistfully.

“He went out to seek work,” said Madge, then turning
the subject, she exclaimed, “O mammie, do you know
where we went last night? It was so nice, and now I ama
Band of Hope, a member, you know; and I’ve promised I'll
never again take anything to drink.”

“* Never take anything to drink!’ bless the child, what
does she mean?” exclaimed Mrs. Stevenson in surprise. -

Madge produced from her pocket a tiny parcel, and
unwrapping several papers, took out her little pledge-card,
saying, “Here it is; now, mammie, read what is on it, and
you’ll know all about it.”

Mrs. Stevenson took the card, but her eyes were weak,
and the print small, so she gave it back to Madge.

“Give it to me, child,” said a woman in the next bed, “I’m
a good scholard, I'll read it for her.”

Madge did so, and the woman slowly and carefully read:
“TI hereby promise, by God’s help, to abstain from all intoxi-
cating liquors (‘that means whisky, or beer, or porter,’
explained Madge, ‘the gentleman told me’) as beverages,
IN THE HOSPITAL WARD. 17

and I consider this promise binding until I return this card
of membership, or have my name removed from the roll of
members.” ;

Madge then gave a minute account of their adventures
the night before, detailing every word almost that she could
remember. While not only her mother, but the women at
each side of her, listened attentively. “You don’t mind my
signing, mother, do you?” she asked in conclusion.

“Mind! indeed I don’t,” answered her mother. “I’ve
seen enough of drink to make me hate it; but there was
nothing of this sort in my day, or I’d have joined it too

‘myself. I’d be only thankful to feel sure that no child of
mine would ever touch a drop of it.”

Madge was surprised at this outburst from her usually
quiet mother, but she only answered, “ Well, then, mammie,
when you come home, you can join and be the first of my
ten recruits.” Mrs. Stevenson smiled, and said she would.

“Drink is a bad thing,” remarked one of the women.
“Teetotalism is good, I’m sure, though I don’t know much
of it myself.”

“Maybe it would be better for you, ma’am, if you did,”
observed the nurse politely, as she, too, listened attentively
to the conversation. The woman winced a little. Nurse
Mooney knew more about her private affairs than she cared
to be made public, and could, if she chose, disclose the
fact that drink had been the cause of the accident which
brought her to the hospital.

I wish the Parliament would make a law that not a
2
18 IN THE HOSPITAL WARD.

drop of liquor could be sold; it’s a curse to the country,”
said Mrs. Stevenson’s other neighbour. “Only for it I
wouldn’t be here now.”

“You! Mrs. Tracy,” exclaimed the nurse. “Why, I
thought you were the soberest woman in the place; even
when you were ordered stimulants you wouldn’t take it.”

“J never touch it myself,” answered Mrs. Tracy quietly, “but
all the same, it’s what brought me here. I was coming home
one night from my work; I suppose I was tired and was walk-
ing slow; but suddenly a carriage dashed round a corner,
the coachman was lashing the horses, and was too drunk to
pull up when he saw me. I was knocked down, and the
wheel went over my leg; there was a crowd in a moment,
some of them carried me here, and the coachman was taken
to the station-house. They only knew that he had been
leaving his master and mistress at a party, and had stopped
at a public-house on his way home; so that is how I came
here.” i

“T don’t deny that it must be a good thing to be a
teetotaler,” said the first woman, “but it must be awfully
hard to give up what you're used to; I don’t think I could
do that.”

“What's that written on the rest of the card?” asked
the nurse,

The woman took it up again, and read slowly and dis-
tinctly, “O Almighty God and merciful Father, listen,
I beseech Thee, to my prayer: forgive me all my sins}
help me to keep my promise of abstinence; bless me in ny
IN THE HOSPITAL WARD. 19

efforts in Thy service, and may I ever trust only in Thy
heavenly grace; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.”
Then turning the card round and round, she read, “Without
me ye can do nothing ;” “ Watch and pray ;” “ Even Christ
pleased not Himself;” “Bear ye one another’s burdens;” “In
Me is thine help,” texts which were printed on the margins.
When she came to this last, there was a silence; each of
the women seemed to feel that it was a sort of answer to
her last remark, and nobody liked to speak.

“ Here is the lady with the flowers,” said nurse, presently
breaking the silence.

A lady with a basket of evergreens came up to the
bed, saying pleasantly, “I’m sorry we have no flowers yet,
but even these bunches of evergreens are pretty,” and
she handed each of the women a nice little bunch of a
shiny dark plant, box and cyclemen leaves; then seeing
Nellie’s dark eyes peeping over her mother’s shoulder
she smilingly handed her one too, and with a curious look
at Madge she wished them all good morning, and passed
down the other side of the room, distributing her bouquets,
for which an eager hand was held out from every bed.

“Tt’s very kind of you, Miss Arnold, to come here, even
in the winter time,” said the nurse. “The patients love
the flowers in summer, and these green things will be a
treat to us.” Miss Arnold said she hoped soon to have
flowers also ; then nodding pleasantly, she left the ward.

“Mammie!” whispered Madge, “I know that lady’s face;
she was at the meeting last night when I got my card;
20 IN THE HOSPITAL WARD.

I think she knew me too, for she looked very hard at
me.”

“Tsn’t she kind to bring us these?” said Mrs. Stevenson,
putting her little bunch into a glass which stood beside her
bed. “I had what she brought last week until to-day,
when they were so withered, nurse took them away. I’d
give these to you, only Nellie has some for herself; put
them in water, Madge, when you go home, they'll look nice
for father when he comes in: he used to be very fond of
flowers. I’m glad they came before you had to go away.
Nobody knows the pleasure these flowers give to us poor
sick people in the wards.”
CHAPTER III.

THE DAWN OF LIGHT,

** Yet some there are upon whose childish brows
Wan poverty hath done the work of care.

Look up, ye sad ones!—'tis your Father's house

Beneath whose consecrated dome you are ;

More gorgeous robes ye see, and trappings rare,

And watch the gaudier forms that gaily move,

And deem, perchance, mistaken as you are,

The ‘ coat of many colours’ proves His love,

Whose sign is in the heart, and whose reward above.”

—Mrs, Sigourney.
“THERE’S a knock at our door, Madge.”

Madge, who was singing at the top of her voice, almost
drowning the very discordant accompaniment of cleaning
with a knife the saucepan in which their breakfast of stir-
about had been cooked, stopped both occupations, and
shouted, “Come in:” thinking it was either one of their
fellow-lodgers come to borrow something, or the landlady,
although, indeed, she always dispensed with the ceremony
of knocking.

Great, therefore, was her surprise when the door opened,
and a nicely dressed lady entered, saying pleasantly, “Does
a little girl called Madge Stevenson live here?”

“Yes, ma’am, that’s me,” said Madge, awkwardly twirling
her apron, while Nellie looked up in surprise from the old
doll which she was nursing in the corner, and whispered,
“Tt’s the flower lady.”
22 THE DAWN OF LIGHT.

“To be sure,” said the lady, “I might have known your
face: I am sure I saw you lately,” then catching sight of
Nellie’s bright eyes glancing in the direction of the mug of
flowers, she added, “Oh yes, I remember now, that is the
little girl who was in her mother’s bed at the hospital
yesterday, and I saw you both before at”

“The meeting on Monday night,” said Madge promptly.

“Exactly,” answered the lady. “And now, are you not
wondering what brings me here to-day ?”

Madge was wondering very much, but did not like to say so.

Miss Arnold continued, “Well, I am what is called ‘a
district visitor,’ and when you joined the Band of Hope it
became my duty to come to see you, to become acquainted
with you, in fact! However, I daresay you don’t understand
much about that. Now, tell me, do you two children live
all alone here while your mother is in hospital ?”

“There’s father,” said Madge doubtfully.

Miss Arnold’s quick eye glanced round the cheerless,
uncomfortable room, taking in more of the family history
than Madge would have dreamed of telling; she was used
to visiting the poor, and understood the circumstances of
the case pretty well. Changing the subject she asked, “I
suppose you and your little sister go to school every day ?”

“No, ma’am.”

“No; nor to Sunday-school ?’

“No, ma’am.”

“That is a pity. But you go to church, I hope?”

“No, ma’am.” '


THE DAWN OF LIGHT. 23

“Ts it possible?” said Miss Arnold. “You would like it
so much if you went.”

“We didn’t always live here,’ said Madge looking down.
“ And we didn’t know we might go to the school.”

“Of course you may,” said the lady cheerfully. “Can
you read ?”

“ No, ma’am.”

“Would you like to learn? If you would, and if your
parents have no objection, I can easily arrange for you.”

Madge looked greatly pleased, and answered at once, “I'd
like to go school well; I often wished I could learn to read.”

“Well, so you shall then,” said Miss Arnold, “at least if
we can get leave; tell me, before your mother was ill did
you never go to church, or chapel, or any such place?”

Madge was not quite sure; mother had not been able to
walk much, and father never went.

“Well, about school, there is no time like the present, and
you might as well begin at once,” said the lady. “I will
take you to-morrow, if you can only ask leave from your
father first.” s

“T’d rather ask mother,” said Madge; “but we can’t see
her till next visiting day.”

“That’s too bad,” said Miss Arnold, who was quite up to
hospital rules, and knew that this was the case, “but wait!
I’ve thought of a plan. I will go to the hospital now, I
can always get in, and I will ask your mother if she will
allow you to go to school; if she says no, I shall call here
and tell you; but if she has no objection, you must come to
24 THE DAWN OF LIGHT.

my house to-morrow morning, and I shall take you myself.
Now, do you think you understand ?”

“Yes, ma’am,” said Madge; “if you don’t come back by-
and-bye, we're to know that mother says we may go to you
to-morrow morning.”

“ Quite right,” said the young lady smiling. “Now I must
explain where you are to go. Do you know Clarence
Street ?”

“Yes, ma’am ; it’s not far from this.”

“Very well, then, go to No. 15, and ask for Miss Arnold,
and don’t be later than ten o’clock. Now, do you think you
can remember all that?”

Madge smiled too, and repeated, “Go to 15 Clarence Street
at ten o'clock, and ask for Miss Arnold.”

“Very good,” said the lady. “I think you won’t forget.
Now, good-bye, I hope I shan’t see you again to-day, because
if I don’t it will mean that I shall see you to-morrow!
Good-bye, little one, what is your name?”

“Nellie,” replied the child shyly, while Madge opened
the door, and showed her guest down the rickety stairs.
Then bounding up again she cried, “O Nellie, Nellie, don’t
you hope mother will let us go? it would be so much nicer
to go to school than to sit here all-day, or play in the street.
I do hope she will say yes.”

Little Nellie always liked what Madge liked, and not
knowing anything about school did not much care; but
seeing her sister so excited, she was quite content to be so
too, and went down to the front door with her, where she
THE DAWN OF LIGHT, 25

sat curled up on Madge’s lap, with the old doll in her own
little arms, watching to see if Miss Arnold should come
again, until daylight faded, and the lamps in the street were
lighted; when with a sigh of relief Madge declared there
was no chance of her coming that night, and they went
indoors.

Miss Arnold’s visit to the hospital was most satisfactory.
Mrs. Stevenson was an ignorant, poor woman, but very fond
of her children, and so pleased and grateful for any interest
shown in them that she readily and willingly gave her con-
sent to all the plans for their good. Miss Arnold was sorry
she had made such a negative arrangement with Madge, and
would have gone round again by Back Lane to tell her the
result, but it was too late; however, she need not have been
afraid of her forgetting her promise, for next morning,
punctually as the church clock struck ten, a modest ring
sounded at the door of 15 Clarence Street, and the servant
came in to say that two little girls were waiting in the hall.
Madge had made herself and Nellie as tidy as possible, and
it was well she had, for, as she said afterwards, “ the lady was
that good, she actually walked with the likes of us herself.”
When they reached the school, Madge was much interested
to see the way in which all the girls stood up in answer to
Miss Arnold’s pleasant greeting—she seemed to know each
one of them separately, asking for mothers, sisters, or fathers,
as if she knew all quite well. After a few words with the
teacher, Miss Arnold stood up to leave, patting Madge’s
shoulder, and telling her to be a good girl, and do whatever
26 THE DAWN OF LIGHT.

Miss Anderson told her. A monitress was then called up to
take her in hand, and Madge felt inclined to either ery or
run away, when lo! who should it prove to be, but her old
acquaintance, Janie Wilson! so that she felt quite at home,
and soon found that school was not so formidable as she
feared. When three o’clock came, she and Nellie felt quite
proud of themselves as they walked home, swinging the bag
of books which Miss Anderson had given them, in imitation
of the other girls.

Since their mother’s illness, Sunday had always been an
unusually dreary day to the children. Their father had no
work to do, so slept half the day. If fine, they went out,
but if wet, they were afraid to make a noise or do anything
to make him angry; so that the idea of going to Sunday-
school was a joyful one.

According to Miss Arnold’s directions, they went to her
house, and with her to the school, which was ever connected
in Madge’s mind with the Band of Hope meeting. She was
put in a class with several other little girls of her own age,
and was so pleased to hear them repeat their verses correctly,
that she wished she could do go also; but firstly, she had no
Bible, and if she had she could not read it, so she contented
herself by listening attentively to what her teacher said.
The lesson was about Christ feeding the multitude, and it
went home at once to Madge’s heart. She was very hungry;
as usual their allowance of food had been very small, and
whatever it was, Nellie always got the largest share; so
that to her was particularly appropriate the story of the
THE DAWN OF LIGHT. 27

wonderful man, who cured the sick, taught the people who
followed Him in crowds, and when night came, and they
were too far from home to go back, would not listen to the
suggestions of those who said they might go and buy food
for themselves, saying the poor tired men and women might
faint by the way, but desired them to sit down on the grass
in rows, so that nobody should be forgotten or overlooked,
and divided the food amongst them, not only each person
getting as much as he could eat, but plenty being left over.
Madge was sorry when the lesson was over, she felt so
interested, and now she did not quite know what was to be
done next. While she was waiting in uncertainty at the
school-door, holding Nellie’s hand, somebody touched her,
and looking round she saw Janie Wilson.

“T thought,” said she, “that perhaps you would not know
where to sit in church, would you like to come with me?”

“Oh! very much,” replied Madge, “I was just wondering
what I was to do.”

“Well, come along then,” said Janie. “How did you like
Sunday-school ?”

“ Very much,” answered Madge decidedly, “I thought that
a lovely story ; I couldn’t help wishing that man lived now,
and would cure sick people and give food to hungry people.”

“That's like the hymn,” said Janie, “ where it says—

‘*T wish that His hands had been laid on my head,
And His arm had been thrown around me,
That I might have seen His kind look when He said,
‘ Let the little ones come unto me!’”
28 THE DAWN OF LIGHT.

“That's just what I would say,” said Madge. “Is there
any more?”

“Yes,” replied Janie, “there is another verse that goes on
like this—

** But now to His footstool in prayer I may go,
To ask for a share of His love,
And if I thus earnestly seek Him below,
I shall see Him and hear Him above.”

“That’s not so pretty,” said Madge, “ besides I don’t know
what His footstool means.”

“Oh! that means praying,” said Janie. “Though we can’t
sce Him, He sees us and hears us too; and we may ask Him
for anything we want.”

“But would we get it?” asked Madge with interest.

“T suppose we should if it was good for us,” answered
Janie. “Yes, I know we should, for there is a verse that
says, ‘ Ask, and it shall be given you.’”

“Well, I never!” said Madge slowly. “To think of any
one so great-and powerful as He is, listening to a poor child
like me. Are you in earnest, Janie?”

“T am indeed,” said Janie, “but hush! here we are at the
church, we mustn’t talk any more now.”

Madge and Nellie followed quietly into the seat Janie
entered. Everything was very new to them; the size of the
church, the grandeur of its coloured windows and tall pillars,
the swelling of the organ, which just then began to play, and
the crowds of ladies and gentlemen combined to overawe
them and kept Nellie quiet; as for Madge, she listened to
THE DAWN OF LIGHT. 29

every word and watched every movement of the clergyman
as if she could not be tired. Of course there was a great
deal she did not understand, but there also was a good deal
she did, and the chapters and some of the prayers she liked
greatly. When the service was over, Madge observed that
every one knelt down in silent prayer, so, following their
example, she did so too. Janie’s verse, “Ask, and it shall
be given you,” had been in her mind all the time, and the
thought now came that she would try if the good Lord
would really hear her if she did “ask.” So with bowed head
she whispered to herself, “Don’t be angry with me for ask-
ing, but I am very hungry, and I know there is no food at
home; will the kind Lord who gave bread to all the hungry
people in the far country, give us some too? and help me to
try to be a good girl and learn about Him, and will He soon
cure mammie, and send her home?”

Madge then took Nellie’s little hand and went home feel-
ing, she knew not why, as if she did not mind being hungry
as much as she had done.
CHAPTER IV.

UNCONSCIOUS INFLUENCE.

** In man’s most dark extremity
Oft succour dawns from Heaven.”
Lord of the Isles, Canto 20.

WHEN the children got home they found the door locked.

“Oh dear,” said Madge in dismay, “I never thought father
would go out so early ; what shall we do?”

“Ts that Madge Stevenson?” called a voice downstairs.

“Yes, ma’am,” cried Madge, running down quickly.

“Your father has gone out,” said the woman. “My
man’s out too, and I’ve just got a present from my sister in
the country, so I thought you two might as well come and
help us to eat it.”

“Oh! thank you, Mrs. Connor,” said Madge gratefully ;
“that’s real good of you.”

“ One good turn deserves another,” said Mrs. Connor, “and
you often give me a helping hand when I’m busy, and I |
daresay often will.”

“ Indeed I will, ma’am,” said Madge.

“Well, sit down now, and try if country bread isn’t better
than what you get to buy.”

The children needed no second bidding, and ‘igre ehty
UNCONSCIOUS INFLUENCE. $1

enjoyed the thick slices of bread and butter which kind-
hearted Mrs. Connor cut for them. When she had finished
Nellie went to play with a kitten on the hearth, where after
a good romp they both fell asleep together.

“Poor child! she’s tired out,” observed Mrs. Connor;
“what have you been doing with her all day ?”

“We've been to Sunday-school, and to church,” replied
Madge importantly, as she covered the sleeping child with
her own little jacket.

“Well! well!” remarked Mrs. Connor, “that is a new
thing. What put that into your head? See, there is the
’ rain, it’s well you are in here. I'll tell you what, you help
me to tidy up a bit, and you can stay comfortably here till
your father comes in.”

Madge joyfully agreed, it was pouring rain now, and if
they were out it would only be to sit outside the public-
house door, waiting to catch their father, to coax him for a
penny or two, which most likely he would not have to give;
besides, this room was a perfect paradise compared to their
own.

“ Well, so you’ve been to school,” said Mrs. Connor when
the “tidying” was done, and they sat down at the fire.
“T’m glad to hear it, there’s nothing like education when
you are young.”

“T am learning to read and write,” said Madge.

“Very good,” returned her friend. “I wish I'd learned
when I was your age. Why, once we were offered a fine
situation, to care for offices, and Connor to be hall-porter,
32 UNCONSCIOUS INFLUENCE.

but when they found neither of us could read well, they
wouldn’t take us.”

“Think of that,” said Madge. “I’m glad I’m learning.”

“And another time,” continued Mrs. Connor, “I could
have got a place as housekeeper, only I couldn’t read much,
and wasn’t a teetotaler.”

“T’m one,” said Madge. “I joined the Band of Hope on
Monday night.”

“You! child,” said Mrs. Connor in surprise; “if it was
your father now, there would be some sense in it; but you.”

“T’m very glad I did then,” said Madge, “only for that
I’d never have gone to school,” and she began the story of
their unexpected visit from Miss Arnold after the Band of
Hope meeting, and how she had got them to go to school.
Then came a description of the Sunday-school, and the
beautiful story she had heard there; to which Mrs. Connor
listened with deep attention. When she had finished telling
of the church, and all she had seen and heard there, Madge
suddenly exclaimed, “ Oh! I do believe He heard me.”

“ Who heard what, child?” asked Mrs. Connor.

Madge’s colour deepened. “If he did, it’s the most
wonderful thing I ever heard of,” she said slowly. “A
girl told me that the same Lord Jesus that gave the
crowds of people all the food is in heaven now, and that
He hears any one that asks Him for what they want. So
though I wasn’t sure if she was in earnest, I thought I’d
try, for I was very hungry, we'd had so little breakfast
before we went out, and I just asked Him to send us some-
UNCONSCIOUS INFLUENCE, 33

thing to eat. I never thought of it till now, but, sure
enough, though our door was locked that we couldn’t get in,
you brought us in here, and gave us twice as nice things as
we would get at home ; so it must have been that He heard
what I said, and made you ask us in.”

“That’s very queer,” said Mrs. Connor. “I don’t know
when I saw my sister before, and she brought us such a lot
of bread and things, that I couldn’t help thinking when I
saw you two going away into the rain, it would be a pity
not to give you a share when we had plenty; but, the
queerest part is, I don’t think I ever did it before, and I
don’t know what made me do it now.”

“Well! that is wonderful,” said Madge. ‘“ How good He
must be to hear me, and answer me so quickly.”

“T haven’t heard that sort of talk for years,” said Mrs.
Connor reflectively. “Long ago, my mother used to tell
me that very story, and I used to go to church, aye, and
pray too, but someway I got out of the way of it. Now
Connor and me, we’re very respectable, we don’t drink the
way others do, our room is very snug,” and she looked round
it complacently, “and we put by something every week,
but as to going to church, I don’t think we were there since
the day we were married.”

“Will you come with me to-night?” asked Madge. “I
know it will be again by-and-bye.”

“Tut, child, you'll be tired,” said Mrs. Connor.

“No, I won't,” said Madge. “Id like to go, besides
when I got what I asked for there, it would be only right

3
34 UNCONSCIOUS INFLUENCE.

for me to go, and thank Him for it; do come, will
you?”

“ Well, I don’t mind if I do,” said Mrs. Connor hesitat-
ingly, “someway that story you told me has set me thinking
of old times; I’d like to go, if it was only to hear ‘Our
Father’ again, but I’m ashamed, that’s the fact.”

“Never mind,” said Madge, who didn’t know what she
meant by “Our Father.” “I know the way now, and I'll
show you; Nellie will sleep safe enough till we come back.”

“Well, ll go,” said Mrs. Connor getting up; “when I
take a thing into my head, I have to doit. Connor will be
in presently, and will mind the child, but he’ll think I am
mad surely.”

If Madge thought the church imposing in the morning, it
seemed doubly so now, with the numerous brilliant gas-
lights. The organ was playing as they went in, so they
slipped quietly into a seat near the door, just as the clergy-
man began to read—‘“I will arise and go to my father,
and will say unto him, Father, I have sinned against Heaven,
and before thee, and am no more worthy to be called thy
son.” When Madge looked next round at her companion,
she was astonished to see tears running down her cheeks.
Mrs. Connor was generally so self-possessed and good-
humoured, that it was all the more strange, and Madge
eyed her with curiosity, but made no remark. As they
walked home, Mrs. Connor said, “I think now I’ve been to
church, I’ll go regular. I would be a better woman now if
Ihadn’t given it up. Oh! dear, but it reminded me of long
UNCONSCIOUS INFLUENCE, 35

ago—hearing the very same words. If I shut my eyes I
could have fancied I was a girl again sitting beside my poor
mother. Madge, you’re young; don’t be like me when
you’re old, regretting all the things you ought to have done.”

Before Madge could answer they reached the house, and
at the same moment her father came up in the opposite
direction, so she just ran into Mrs. Connor’s room for the
still sleeping Nellie, and followed her father upstairs, but
not before her kind friend put a large piece of the country
bread into her pocket, telling her to eat it for her supper.
Madge looked furtively at her father, and was relieved to
see he was not in a very bad humour. The “early Sunday
closing” of the public-house was a boon to her. “ Where
were you coming from when I met you?” he asked.

“From church, father,’ answered the child; but instead
of being surprised as she expected, he went on,

“T saw your mother to-day, and she told me of some fine
friend that had sent you to school—queer that you didn’t
tell me, though I was in the house with you.”

“Oh, Iam so glad you went to see mother,” cried Madge,
disregarding the latter part of his speech. “She is always
so glad to see you, and so disappointed when you don’t

”

go.

Joe Stevenson’s face softened ; he used to be very fond of
his wife, and his conscience pricked him when he thought
how‘seldom he had taken the trouble to go to see her, now
she was ill, although, as Madge said, it gave her such pleasure.

“Father,” said Madge timidly, taking the bread out of
36 UNCONSCIOUS INFLUENCE.

her pocket, “Mrs, Connor gave me this, will you have a
bit?”

The father looked ashamed. “No, child,” said he, “eat it
yourselves ; it’s well for you that strangers are kind, for I
think it’s precious little you have here.”

“But you’ve had no supper, father,” persisted Madge.

“Never mind,” he answered gruffly ; then added, “ Who is
this lady that has taken you up?”

“Miss Arnold, father, of Clarence Street,” answered
Madge.

“Miss Arnold, the clergyman’s daughter!” said her father
in surprise ; “how on earth did you come across her ?”

Madge told the whole story of their following the crowd
on Monday evening into the meeting, of Miss Arnold’s visit
a few days after, and of the trouble she took to get permission
for them to go to school.

“But whatever made her do all that for you?” asked
Stevenson; “she didn’t know you; what made her take
such a lot of trouble?”

“T don’t know,” replied Madge simply, “unless it is that
she is real good.”

“ And so you’ve signed the pledge,” said her father again.
“What good will that do you? You didn’t want it.”

“No,” said Madge, “but they say the good of getting chil-
dren to join is, that if they never taste drink when they are
little, they won’t want it when they grow up.”

Joe Stevenson nodded his head in a sort of sad assent; he
felt the truth of what his little daughter had said. Madge
UNCONSCIOUS INFLUENCE. 37

could hardly believe that she was really talking so familiarly
with her father, of whom she generally was so afraid; she
went on, “If I keep my pledge without once breaking it for
a whole year, I shall get a lovely medal on a blue ribbon, to
hang here,” touching her frock; “and if I can get ten other
people to join too, I shall get a silver bar to put on the
ribbon, wouldn’t that be nice, father?” No answer.

Madge, greatly interested in her subject, went on without
heeding, “I told mammie about it the day we saw her at
the hospital, and she promised to be one of my ten recruits
when she comes home; I wish you would be another, father,
will you?” But Joe Stevenson’s good humour had vanished.

“Hold your tongue,” said he angrily, “and be off to bed;
it’s where you ought to have been sent long ago. I won't
stand talk like that, so you needn't try it on; be off with
you at once.”

Poor little Madge! so this was the end of her nice chat
with her father, which, in her own little mind, she thought
was the beginning, perhaps, of better times! Bitterly dis-
appointed, and more than ever frightened at his manner, she
went away, and quietly creeping into bed beside little Nellie,
she silently cried herself to sleep.
CHAPTER V.

“Ip AT FIRST YOU DON’T SUCCEED—TRY AGAIN.”

“Tn this is our safety—doing the daily ‘/itéles’ as opportunity is given,
and leaving the issue with God.”—Agnes Jones.

Days and weeks passed by. The children went regularly to
school, and made fair progress. The weekly visits to the
hospital, anxiously looked for, were paid, when every scrap
of news was eagerly told, and as eagerly heard. Mrs,
Stevenson was much better, and the doctors held out pro-
mises that very soon she might go home. The Band of
Hope meetings were great objects of interest, and whatever
the weather might be, the two little figures were always to
be seen sitting in the front row. Madge’s taste for singing
was gratified, as she now attended the practice of hymns to
be sung, and delighted in learning the pretty tunes. In-
deed, there seemed no end to the privileges to which her
Band of Hope membership admitted her. They had been
to a magic-lantern display, and already the school children
were talking of the “excursion” in the summer. What this
was Madge and Nellie were not quite sure, but they took
it for granted it was something delightful, looking forward
accordingly.

This was the bright side of the picture, but there was a
dark one too, Their father spent as much time as ever at
“TF AT FIRST YOU DON’T SUCCEED—TRY AGAIN.” 39

the public-house. Monday and Tuesday he never worked,
and occasionally his employer dismissed him for idleness.
Then when he got his wages, some was always overdue for
rent, a little went to Madge to buy necessary food, and all
the rest Joe Stevenson spent on his own selfish gratification.
Child as Madge was, she couldn’t help thinking how well it
was her mother was provided for in the hospital, and what
they would do to get her good food when she came home.
Then, though the days were longer, the March winds were
bitterly cold, and whistled through the children’s clothes as
they sat almost every night waiting in the street for their
father. Thanks to kind Miss Arnold, they had warmer
clothes now; but even these were not proof against the cold
blast that blew round that corner shop which the children
had good reason to hate. Mrs. Connor was unfailingly kind
to them; many a comfortable meal they got in her warm
room, where she often allowed Madge to learn her school
lessons by the light of her fire and candle. Whether Connor
had thought his wife mad, as she predicted, for going to
church or not never transpired; but she went again and
again, until at last he began to go too, and also to the week
evening service, to which they could drop in in their work-
ing clothes without being remarked. Madge often tried to
induce them to go with her to the Band of Hope, but with-
out success. “They were too old,” they said, “to go to that
sort of place, it was more suited to children.”

“Tndeed,” said Madge earnestly one Monday evening,
when, after helping her kind friend to “clean up,” she was
40 “IF AT FIRST YOU DON’T SUCCEED—-TRY AGAIN.”

trying to persuade them to come with her and Nellie, “in-
deed, plenty of grown-up people go, real old men and women
too; do come, I know you’d like it ever so much; there’s
lovely music, and nice speaking, and funny reading too; do
come this once, and sce if you don’t like it ; I know you will.”

But Mr. Connor only shook his head.

“Nonsense, Connor,” said his wife, “you could go if you
liked, don’t disappoint the child.”

“Why don’t you go yourself then?” asked her husband
laughing.

Madge perceived her advantage, and hastened to urge it, —
saying coaxingly, “Do come, I know if you were once there
you would like it; for the same gentleman is to speak that
was there the first night we went, and he is a lovely speaker ;
if you don’t like it I’ll never ask you to go again.”

“Well, there is something in that,” said Connor good-
naturedly. “What do you say, missus?”

“T don’t care if I go this once, just to please the child,”
said Mrs. Connor; “she’s always asking, and we’re always
refusing.”

“Well, hurry up then,” said Connor, “and mind you're
never to ask us again.”

“That is, if you don’t like it,” said Madge archly, as she
ran in delight upstairs to dress herself and Nellie for the
meeting. As they went along the streets, Madge was
half afraid her friends would even then change their minds,
and it was not until they were all seated in good places
that she felt easy about them, .
“TF AT FIRST YOU DON’T SUCCEED—TRY AGAIN.” 41

She was glad that the hymn was one of her favourite
lively tunes, with a good full chorus, and she sang with
redoubled energy when she saw her friend nodding his
head, and keeping time with his foot. Then came a spirited
dialogue between two boys, which was followed by a couple
of songs, one a simple ballad, the other a rattling sea-song,
both equally pleasing to the taste of the audience. Then
came the speech of the evening. Madge almost wondered
did the gentleman know who was present, for he began by
saying he was going to address himself, not to drunkards,
but to the sober, respectable people who had not signed any
pledge, and who felt themselves secure, in no danger of temp-
tation, or of being ledaway. Madge stole a glance to see how
her companions took this, but they looked interested, which
was all she wanted. The speaker then went on to say, he
was “a soldier employed in the cause of warring against
one great enemy, the drink traffic, an enemy more dangerous,
because more insidious, than if an army of Zulus, under
Cetewayo himself, assailed our shores. In that case every
one would make common cause, and cowardly indeed would
be the man who would keep back from the fight from fear
of what people would think of him, or from fear of exposing
himself to privation or discomfort. Now here was an enemy
which had almost taken possession, not only of our own
country, but of every country in the world;” in proof of

which he read an extract from the writings of Robertson, the
celebrated American historian, who said, “it seems to have
been one of the first exertions of human ingenuity, to dis-
42 “IF AT FIRST YOU DON’T SUCCEED—TRY AGAIN,”

cover some composition of an intowicating quality, and
there is hardly a nation so rude, or so destitute of invention,
as not to have succeeded.”

“Now an enemy which had conquered nearly every nation
in the world, must indeed be a powerful one; and yet what
a mere handful, comparatively speaking, there was to battle
against it! Was it any wonder the captains wished to
recruit their ranks, when they saw this enemy in their own
towns, their own neighbourhoods, aye, many of them in
their own families? Was it a time for half-hearted people,
merely content with being decent and temperate themselves,
but who did not care to join in fighting the foe and driving
it out of the country? People of this kind might be com-
pared to Englishmen who would give food and shelter to
the supposed Zulus landing on their shores, but protested
that because they had not actually joined them, they were
not really encouraging them.” Here Connor gave the floor
an angry knock with his stick, and Madge looked up at
him in alarm; but she saw that it was only in sympathetic
indignation at the picture drawn by the speaker, and that
his interest had carried him away. “What brave man or
woman in this room could see a person walking heedlessly
on the brink of a precipice, and say, ‘Let him do it, it is no
business of mine to interfere;’ instead of, at least, giving a
word of warning; or, if the person tumble over, say ‘Serve
him right, he deserves it, he should have looked where he
was going.’ Should you not rather warn him of his danger,
and then, if necessary, stretch out the helping hand to pull
“IF AT FIRST YOU DON’T SUCCEED—TRY AGAIN.” 43

him back. Yet how many are there who act on this plan,
seeing friends, neighbours, relatives walk on, day by day,
to the brink of the precipice of drink (down which, if they
fall, it is so hard to get up again), without a word of warning
or advice; literally acting on the words, ‘Am I my brother's
keeper ?’ and if they fall mentally say, ‘Serve him right.’
Dear friends, remember who it was that said ‘he that is not
with Me is against Me; and he that gathereth not with Me
seattereth abroad!’ You must be either one thing or the
other; either on our side, which is the right one, or on that
of the enemy fighting against us. And now, to take a
more personal, practical view of what this enemy does for
us”—the speaker then entered into the statistics of how
much was annually spent on drink; how many millions
went into the pockets of distillers, brewers, and publicans,
while public appeals were being made on behalf of the
starving poor in the country, who, although unable to buy
ordinary food, could generally spare money for drink. How
much each person, even the most temperate, spent, if he
put together every glass of porter, ale, wine, or spirits, and
made out the sum-total at the end of a year. Madge thought
this part extremely stupid, but was satisfied when she saw
how earnestly her companions were listening; indeed Connor
got so excited and red in the face, that Madge was afraid
he would speak out. However, when the speaker sat down,
he contented himself by vigorously applauding with hands,
stick, and feet.

“That’s what I call a fine speech,” said he, as they went
44 “IF AT FIRST YOU DON’T SUCCEED—TRY AGAIN.”

home. “There’s no nonsense about that man; didn’t he
put it plain? I am sure I never thought before that a
simple glass of something every day was any harm, but,
according to him, it is encouraging the drink traffic, little
as itis. But sure enough if every one did it, what a lot of
money must go to the publicans; and if nobody did it!—
Mary, how much do we get a day ?”

“Not much indeed,” replied Mrs. Connor, “just a pint of
porter each with our dinner.”

“Well, that’s threepence a day, and threepence a day is
one and ninepence a week,” said Connor getting excited
with his subject. “One and ninepence a week comes to,
let me see—four pounds eleven a year. And that, counting
odd treats, festivals, and those sort of things, certainly
mounts up to five pounds at least. I say, wife,” and he
gave his stick an angry knock on the pavement, stopping
short as he did so, “what do you say to that? Did you think
that you and I spent five pounds a year on drink ?”

“Tndeed, I did not,” she answered ruefully. “Oh dear,
what a lot of things that would buy.”

“ Aye, or better still, think if we had saved it what a
nice little sum we’d have now in the bank. How long are
we married ?”

“Five and twenty years last Christmas,” answered his
wife promptly.

“Then, if we’d put by the five pounds a year all that
time, we’d have one hundred and twenty-five pounds now!”
eried Connor, waxing wrathful, “And all that time we’ve
“IF AT FIRST YOU DON’T SUCCEED—TRY AGAIN.” 45

dealt regular at Simpson’s. All our good money has gone
into his pocket. There he is, driving his carriage, with his
wife and children dressed so fine, too grand to look at the
like of us. That’s the fellow that wouldn’t even give me a.
letter of recommendation when I asked him, saying ‘he
didn’t know me!’ Not another penny of mine shall he ever
get, mind that, Mary.”

“Sure it will be as bad if you give it to some one else,”
said practical Mrs. Connor. “They are all the same. If we
don’t go to Simpson’s, there’s Fox’s, the next nearest to us,
and his wife is a real fine lady, with riding horses for herself
and her children, and a grand country house. They wouldn't
live over a public-house !”

“Then I'll go to none of them,” cried Connor. “It’s our
hard-earned wages that pays for their grandeur. Simpson
and I were boys together, though ‘he doesn’t know me’ now.
Maybe if I’d taken to selling whisky I’d be a rich man now
too. See, here is a handbill I got at the door just now, say-
ing that gentleman, Mr. Hamilton, is going to give a lecture
at the Town Hall to-morrow evening on the same subject.
I’ve a great mind to go and hear him again.”

Madge’s eyes twinkled, but she wisely said nothing, though
her heart leaped with joy at the success of her undertaking.

“ Hollo, what’s this?” exclaimed Connor, as they reached
their own door; and in the dark, ill-lighted lane he stumbled
over a prostrate figure.

“Oh, it’s father,” uttered Madge, springing forward. “He
is dead, his head has hit against the doorstep.”
46 “IF AT FIRST YOU DON’T SUCCEED—TRY AGAIN.”

“No, child, he’s only drunk,” said Connor, raising him up.
“ Hold on now, and I'll soon get him upstairs for you.”

“Only drunk!” When Connor came down again, heated
with the exertion of helping Joe Stevenson up to his room,
where he left him with his two helpless little girls, he said to
his wife thoughtfully, “Mary, I think that’s a case of leaving
aman to walk on the brink of the precipice without a word
of warning, and now he has fallen over, and no mistake. [
might be tempted to say, ‘Serve him right, if it was only
himself, but it’s a sore sight to see those innocent children
suffering for him. I believe the gentleman is right; drink
is an enemy that ought to be put down.”

“Don’t make your mind up too sudden,” said his wife
cautiously. “Sleep on it.”

“T will,” he answered; “for when I say a thing I do it.
But that man’s words are ringing in my ears. I’d like to
hold a helping hand to poor Joe Stevenson, for his children’s
sake; but how could I preach to him if 1 took my bottle
every day myself? Anyway, it has given us something to
think of.”

*
CHAPTER VI

A PRACTICAL VIEW OF TOTAL ABSTINENCE.

‘Live the life of faith; let God, and the glory of God, be the end and aim
of all your occupations ; love one another as Jesus Christ loves you ; yield
yourselves wholly to His guardian care; listen not to the suggestions of your
interests, but lend your ears to the calling whereunto ye are called; and
while ye behold with love and forbearance each other’s imperfections, strive,
each of you, with all energy and carefulness, to live as though you were the
least of all your companions.” —WSister Liduvine Barré.

Next day was hospital visiting day, and the children ran all
the way from school lest they should lose a moment of the
precious time allowed them. They found their mother, with
her two companions, sitting at the fire, all much improved in
health. Nellie nestled in her mother’s arms, eager to show her
a treasured doll lately given her by Miss Arnold. Madge sat
on a low stool at her feet, in perfect contentment at being
beside her. People say an hospital ward is a little world in
itself, with its petty jealousies, friendships, and cares; but, if
so, what a narrow little world it is! Madge’s visits were
quite events to the strange wonten, who listened to all her
news with deep interest. This day she hada great deal to
tell about the exciting meeting the night before. She had a
wonderful memory, and could generally give the substance
of anything she heard quite plainly enough to be interesting,
and Mr. Hamilton’s speech being rather off the common, she
remembered with remarkable accuracy all about the Zulu.
48 A PRACTICAL VIEW OF TOTAL ABSTINENCE.

army compared to the enemy drink; and the cowards who
were afraid to warn people from the dangerous precipice, or
to help them back if they fell over. To all of which her
audience listened with admiring interest. But she became
rather hazy about the statistical part, only remembering what
Mr. Connor had calculated about his spending five pounds a
year on porter.

“Dear, dear, think of that!” exclaimed one of the women.
“Who would imagine that threepence a day could mount to
that in a year? Why, I’m sure I spend more than that my-
self alone, and then there’s my husband and my two sons!
I’m sure they spend twice as much each of them.”

“Well, suppose, then, you all spend the same,” said Mrs.
Stevenson quietly, “there’s twenty pounds a year gone out
of your family. What do you think of that?”

Mrs, Sims stared blankly into the fire while she totted it
up in her mind to try if there could be any mistake, but
finding there was not, she ejaculated, “ Well I never!”

“You ought to give it up, Mrs. Sims,” observed the nurse,
who generally joined the conversation when not busy. “You
would soon be a rich woman.”

“ Kasier said than done,” returned Mrs. Sims sulkily.

“J don’t care a pin about it,” said the nurse. “I only
take my beer because it is part of my rations, served out to
me like any other allowance, but I’d just as soon not take it
as take it.”

“Well, will you give it up then, ma’am?” asked Madge
eagerly,
A PRACTICAL VIEW OF TOTAL ABSTINENCE. 49

Nurse Mooney looked sharply at the child to see if she
meant to insult her; but Madge’s clear, innocent eyes met
hers so fully that she saw the child never dreamed of giving
offence.

“T wish if you did you would be one of iy ten,” she said
simply. “Nobody has yet promised me to sign but mammie,
and I am so anxious to get some names.”

“Well, if I ever do sign, Il do it for you,” said nurse
laughing, “and I’d do it to-morrow if I had to buy beer, but
when I’m given it, it is different.”

“Ask them to give you the money instead,” suggested
Mrs. Stevenson.

“That’s not a bad idea,” said nurse; “I declare I willl.
(ll ask the matron this very day.”

“And then you'll come with me and join the Band of
Hope,” said Madge oily: “but mind if you sign, you
must keep your pledge.”

“Why, child, do you think I mean to break my word?”
said nurse half offended. “No, if I promise, I keep it, and
Ill say this much, if the matron grants what I ask her, I'll
let you know.” 4

“And mammie will sign when she comes home,” said
Madge, laying her head on her mother’s lap.

“Indeed, I will,” said Mrs. Stevenson. “I think if I can
get a cup of tea and a little food, it’s as much as I can
expect then. O Madge, dear, I keep wondering how we
are to get on; if I only could get some work to help to keep

the house: bit what can I do?”
, 4
50 A PRACTICAL VIEW OF TOTAL ABSTINENCE,

“You won’t be able for any hard work, mammie,” said
Madge sorrowfully, looking at her mother’s pale face.

“No, not for many a day,” replied Mrs. Stevenson, “ but if
I could get needlework—only now I am so out of practice ; I
mean to speak to Miss Arnold about it the next day she
comes here, I am sure she will help me if she can; O
Madgie, she is so kind to me: her very visits seem to cheer
me up.”

“T wish I could help too, mammie,” said Madge.

“So you do,” answered her mother cheerfully. “Don’t
you think it is a comfort to me here, that my little Madge
is at home taking care of Nellie, and making father com-
fortable ?”

“O mammie,’ said Madge sadly, “that is just it. It is
easy enough to mind Nellie, she’s no trouble, but I can’t do
_anything for father; he is just as bad as ever: whether I
make the room nice for him, or don’t touch it at all, it is
all the same. I vexed him once, and he never speaks to me
now.” And the recollection of the fright he gave her the
night before overcame the poor child, though she wisely
said nothing about it: she laid her face on her mother’s
knee, and sobbed.

“ Poor little one,” said Mrs. Stevenson softly stroking her
hair, “you have a hard time of it at home, but soon [Il
be back to help you, and it won’t be quite so bad when
we can share it together. Madge, there’s one thing I’ve
learned since I came to this place, thanks to Mr. and Miss
Arnold, and that is, that God will take care of us in all our
A PRACTICAL VIEW OF TOTAL ABSTINENCE. 51

troubles, and help us out of them. Mr. Arnold gave mea
beautiful verse one day I was fretting sorely, ‘Casting all
your care upon Him, for He careth for you’ Someway,
whenever I think of those words, I feel more easy. I am
quite sure we'll be taken care of somehow. So I don’t
mean to fret over it now.”

“But about father,” said Madge looking up. “If he stays
this way, we couldn’t be happy.”

“That is part of the ‘care’ I suppose,” said Mrs,
Stevenson thoughtfully. “So we must leave it, and maybe |
God will look after poor father for us. At all events He
knows best, so we had better leave it to Him; the verse
says ‘He cares for us,’ and if so, He will settle all about us.”

Madge had need that evening to try and think of her
mother’s words; for when they got home she found her
father had again been dismissed by his employer for drink
and idleness, and had consequently come home in a very
bad humour, It was supper-time, but there was nothing to
eat, and when she timidly told him so, he swore at her; and
when little Nellie, tired after the day, and frightened at her
father’s words, burst into a fit of nervous crying, he struck
and shook her violently, saying he would beat her if she did
not stop; and strode angrily out of the room, as Madge well
knew, to the public-house. Poor Madge, she soothed her
little sister as well as she could, although she needed cheer-
ing herself. Cold, hungry, lonely—they had no fire, food,
or friend; true they might go to bed, and forget their
sorrows in sleep, but when morning came, it would be as
52 A PRACTICAL VIEW OF TOTAL ABSTINENCE.

bad—no food, no fire. Madge knew she had only to go
downstairs to her kind friends, and they would give her all
she wanted, but she shrank from asking them. They were
so very kind, that she couldn’t bear to beg from them,
besides she suddenly recollected that this was the evening
Connor had said he would go again to hear Mr. Hamilton
at the Town Hall, so that even if she wished, there would
be no use in her going down, as they were out. Then her
mother’s words came again, “ ‘Casting all your care upon
Him, for He careth for you!’ someway when I think of
those words I feel more easy.” “Mammie has more to fret
about than I have,” thought Madge, “for she is sick and
away ; so if they make her feel happier, I ought to also. I
wonder does He care for us. I'll ask Him to, at all events.
And the poor little weary, sorrowful girl knelt down to
pray, before lying down in bed with her still sobbing little
sister.

“There’s that Joe Stevenson going out,” said Mrs. Connor
looking over the geraniums that nearly filled their little
window. “I wonder what brought him home so early.”

“J’m afraid he must have been shunted again,” said her
husband. “It’s a great pity: such a clever workman as he
is might earn what he liked, if he would only keep steady.”

“My heart aches for those poor children,” said Mrs.
Connor. “They look as if they were half starved; I wonder
now has he left them their supper! I’ve a mind to go up
and see.”

“Well, bad as he is, he would hardly be such a ruffian as
A PRACTICAL VIEW OF TOTAL ABSTINENCE, 53

not do that,” said Connor. “I say, missus, do you know
what time it is? if we don’t make haste we shall be late for
the lecture; I’m curious to hear that gentleman again.” So
Mrs. Connor had not time to go upstairs to see after her
little protégés, but all the way her thoughts ran on them,
and her heart misgave her. When they reached the Town
Hall, it was almost filled throughout ; and Connor whispered
to his wife with a chuckle, that it would put a start in the
enemy to see how many were against him ! *

Mr. Hamilton took up the same ground as the evening
before ; speaking still more strongly on each point, especially
dwelling on the duty of each person who considered himself
not in danger, to warn, help, or encourage those who were :
“Let him who thinketh he standeth, take heed lest he fall!”
Every strong point of the other side of the question was
assailed in turn, fairly discussed, and finally beaten. Mr.
Hamilton seemed to have arguments to prove everything:
yet he did it so quietly, fairly, and practically, that they
were conclusive.

Connor listened breathlessly : he was an intelligent man,
who understood and appreciated scientific explanations of
the subject; but it was so very new to him, that it was like
newly opening his eyes to a fresh view of an old familiar
subject. Amongst the numerous rows of faces his, honest,
beaming, and intelligent, was conspicuous, and attracted the
attention of the speaker, who, orator as he was, felt encou-
raged by the manifest attention and interest this man, in
particular, took in his subject. When he had finished, Mr.
54 A PRACTICAL VIEW OF TOTAL ABSTINENCE.

Hamilton slipped away from the platform, and singling
Connor out from the crowd who were slowly making their
way out, addressed him pleasantly. In a few minutes they
were deep in conversation, and several points to which
Connor could not quite agree, Mr. Hamilton patiently
went over, proving and explaining in the most persuasive
way. “I think, my friend,” said he at length, “you could
not do better than join us! Come; will you?”

“T am strongly thinking I will, sir,’ said Connor, “but
not to-night.”

“Why not?” asked Mr. Hamilton. “There is no time
like the present, and I have not much faith in putting off
to a more convenient season; I like to strike while the iron
is hot!”

“Well, sir, so do I,” said Connor slowly; “but if I join
at all, I’d like to do it for a little girl; it was she who first
spoke to me about total abstaining, and though I used to
laugh at her, she never left me alone, till at last I said I’d
go with her for once, just to stop her bothering. She thinks
a deal of her ‘recruits,’ as she calls them, so I wouldn’t for
anything disappoint her.”

“Certainly not,” said Mr. Hamilton warmly, “I quite
agree with you, and I am not afraid of your disappointing
either her or me. If I am not mistaken, you will be a good
friend to our cause some day. Good-night to you,” and he
shook hands heartily with Connor and his wife.
CHAPTER VII

MADGE'S FIRST RECRUITS.

‘* The Lord will fashion in His own good time
(Be this the labourer’s proudly humble creed)
Such ends as, to His wisdom, fittest chime
With His vast love’s eternal harmonies,
There is no failure for the good and wise ;
What tho’ thy seed fall by the way-side
And the birds snatch it ; yet the birds are fed ;
Or they may bear it far across the tide,
To give rich harvests after thou art dead.”
—Polities for the People.
Next morning Mrs. Connor sent up to the children, and
before they went to school gave them a good comfortable
breakfast, at the same time administering a friendly scolding
for not having come down to her the night before instead of
going to bed hungry, as she found out they had done; but,
after getting a promise from Madge that she would never do
so again, she forgave them, and they ran off to school happy
and contented. At twelve o’clock Connor, as usual, came
home for his dinner, and at the door met Joe Stevenson,
lounging with his hands in his pockets, smoking idly.
“Morrow, neighbour,” said Connor cheerily, “what brings
you here at this time of day?”
“Got nothing to do,” answered Stevenson erufily.
“Out of work, eh?” said Connor. “That’s bad these hard
times. It’s hard enough when you’re in work to keep the

pot boiling.”
56 MADGE’S FIRST RECRUITS.

“Tt’s my luck,” grumbled Stevenson.

Connor felt inclined to question this, but wisely refrained.
He was thinking of the two lectures he had heard, and in
his own rough, honest way was trying to put some of his
good resolutions into practice. Here was a man whom he
had seen for a long time stumbling along at the edge of the
pit without feeling himself called on to utter a word of warn-
ing from his own safe standpoint. Now the man had gone
over, should he not do his utmost to draw him back? But
he was not a diplomatist. Whatever was in his mind he gave
utterance to without trying to modify or soften its plainness.

“T say, neighbour,” said he bluntly, “do you want
work?”

“Of course I do,’ answered Stevenson. “It’s not from
choice I’d stay at home and starve.”

“Well, then,” continued the other, “I think I could get
you some if you chose to take it. We’re short a hand at our
place, and you are just the man that would do if you were
steady ; but, to tell you the truth, I wouldn’t like to recom-
mend you at present.”

Stevenson fired up at this, and said angrily—“I don’t know
what you mean; I am as good as you any day.”

“Oh, you know well enough,” said Connor.

“ Well,” said Stevenson, changing his ground, “I don’t see
much difference. I take my drink at the public, if that is
what you mean; and you get yours there and take it at home;
it comes to much the same.”

“Tam going to give it up,” said Connor quietly.
MADGE’S FIRST RECRUITS. 57

“You are,” returned Stevenson, with a sneering laugh;

“when will you begin?”

“This minute, if you like,” answered Connor good-humour-
edly. “I really am going to give it up (not that I ever took
much, but that’s nothing), and if you'll promise me to do the
same, Ill nearly promise you a good situation. I think I’ve
only to ask for it. You see, I know you are a first-rate
workman, so in that way I can recommend you.”

Stevenson stared at him, utterly unprepared for this, and
not knowing what to answer.

Connor went on :—“I know there’s no good in rowing a
fellow when he’s down. The best plan is to help him up
again; so if you will do what I advise, I’ll try and give you
a hand. Just make up your mind not to go near the public,
say fora week. Try how you get on, and I'll speak for you
when I go back to work after dinner. I know they’re ina
hobble for the want of a man, and you’d just suit the place.
But if there was a chance of your going off drinking in a day
or two, I wouldn’t ask for you.”

“T’d have every one laughing at me,” muttered Stevenson.

“Not a bit of it,’ said Connor; “but I must go in, or I'll
have no time for my dinner. See here, you come in too, I'll
engage my missus has enough for us both, and we'll talk it
over.”

“No, no,” said Stevenson, drawing back. “TI’ll think over
what you said, but Dl not go in.” ;

“Oh, come along, man,” urged Connor, but Joe still refused.
He felt really ashamed of himself, for he well knew the kind-
58 MADGE'S FIRST RECRUITS.

ness his neighbours invariably showed his children. He knew
that only that very morning they would have been breakfast-
less but for the kind message which he overheard when all
thought he was asleep. He knew he might, if he chose, often
have done a civil turn for them, but that instead he was
always markedly rude in his manner when they met, so that
now Connot’s kind offer to get him a situation, and his friendly
invitation, made him for once feel quite abashed. He was
pleased the children should accept this hospitality, but for
himself, he felt as if one mouthful, under all these circum-
stances, would choke him. Muttering something about having
dined, Stevenson said he would think over what they had
been discussing, and would meet Connor on his way to his
work to tell him bis decision. Whatever this was, Connor
spoke to his employer, and came home in the evening with
orders for Joe Stevenson to go with him to the works next
morning.

Madge knew nothing of all this, for her friends rightly
thought it was not fit for her to discuss her father’s conduct;
but she was thankful and delighted to find he had got work
again. “TI’ll tell mammie about this,” thought she, “when I
see her next. Surely it is wonderful how God knows what
we want. I never felt so lonely and miserable as last night,
but I asked Him to help us, and I tried to say over and over
till I fell asleep mother’s verse—‘Casting all your cares upon
Him,’ and before I wakened this morning He had made things
better for us. It must have been Him who put it into Mrs.
Connor's mind to think we had no breakfast, and to give us
MADGE’S FIRST RECRUITS. 59

some; and now He has sent father work. How good it is of
Him! I wonder if I never stop asking would He make
father give up drinking! That would be nice; but, oh dear,
I don’t think anything would make him do that. Anyway,
Dll try,” and Madge remembered one of the large texts on the
walls of the school which said, “ Whatsoever ye shall ask in
my name, I will do it.” So, with a feeling of relief, as if she
had got an answer to her question, she put on her hat to go
as usual with her friends to the working people’s service. She
knew nothing of her father’s resolve not to go to the public-
house that evening; so never thought of staying at home
with him, nor would he have liked it if she had. Madge often
wondered how her friends had liked the lecture at the Town
Hall, but they never mentioned it. She felt a little disap-
pointed, for she expected great things from it. Connor had
taken such a keen interest in the first, that she quite thought
he would like the next still better. She longed to ask, but
was afraid, for had he not told her on Monday that he would
go that once if she promised never to ask him again. Little
she guessed all that was passing through his mind. He was
an elderly man, and, on his own showing, had been accus-
tomed for twenty-five years, at least, to take some stimulant
every day, so that it was no small sacrifice of inclination and
habit to give it suddenly up. Mrs. Connor was satisfied with
an extra cup of tea, but when dinner-hour came, and he came
home hot after his work, he missed his long-accustomed
frothing glass of porter more than he could have imagined
possible—so much, indeed, that he wondered at himself, for
60 MADGE’S FIRST RECRUITS.

he always had prided himself on being so abstemious as to
care very little about it. Still, though he missed it, he felt
none the worse for that. He did as good a day’s work as
ever. He slept well, looked well, and, still better, felé well,
so that he could not object on that score. His wife acknow-
ledged she felt just as he did, and at the end of the week
produced one and ninepence, saved from their porter.

“ Simpson is that much the poorer,” said Connor triumph-
antly, as he looked at the money. “Mary, for curiosity
sake, keep it safe; that’s the firstfruits of our temperance,”
then added reverently, “and please God it won’t be our last.”
That was really Tom Connor’s pledge. Until he uttered
those words, he had not fully decided on which side to stay;
but from that moment his mind was made up. He always
said he was slow to take an idea, but that once convinced
that a thing was right he did it, and it was so now: from
that day Connor and his wife were total abstainers from
conviction. Tom Connor loved a joke, and he determined
that Madge should know nothing of his intentions until
Monday night. He wanted to see if she would ask him again
to go with her to the Band of Hope; but if he knew how
to keep a promise, so did she, and when the evening came,
although she was longing to know if he would go with her,
she refrained from asking. She had been helping Mrs.
Connor with her washing, and, as usual, stayed afterwards
for supper, but when the clock pointed to seven, she rose up.

“Youre not going yet, surely?” said he in pretended
surprise.
MADGE’S FIRST RECRUITS. 61

“Yes, this is Band of Hope night,” answered Madge
unsuspectingly.

“T suppose you don’t want us to go there any more,” said
Connor, his eyes twinkling.

“Oh, indeed, I do,” cried Madge; “only I promised I
would not ask you to go again—that is, if you didn’t like
it. O Mr. Connor, you are laughing at me! Are you only
joking?”

“ Indeed I am,” said Connor. “We meant to go all the
time; aye, and more than that, me and the missus are
going to sign for you to-night, too! What do you say to
that ?”

Madge hardly knew what to say. She clapped her hands,
and hugged her two friends with all her might, then,
stopping short, she asked—“ But what will you do without
your porter every day ?”

“Never mind that,” replied Connor gaily “We haven’t
touched it for some days, and we are alive still; so I suppose
we can do without it. Now be off and get ready.”

How happy Madge was ushering her friends again into
the hall! How she listened to everything for them, hoping
they would like it, and sang with redoubled energy when she
thought that next time they would be members too! She
was glad they should see how many were the privileges to
which members were entitled, for this very evening it was
announced that ata certain time prizes would be awarded to
children under a particular age for essay-writing, or examina-
tions on a given subject, and for window gardening, flower-
62 MADGE’S FIRST RECRUITS.

seeds for which would be sold to members after the meeting.
Of essays and examinations, of course, Madge knew nothing,
but she dearly loved flowers, and would gladly have gone
in for that, but where would she get the pennies to pay for
the seeds? So she put it out of her head.

When the meeting was over, the general public went
away, but a few went to the far end of the room to buy
their seeds, and a few more remained to sign—amongst
these were our friends. Proudly important was Madge, as
bidding Nellie sit quietly on the bench, she elbowed her
way, followed by her recruits, to the large table at which
Mr. Arnold himself was sitting ; but he looked so kind and
pleasant that she did not feel a bit afraid of him, and said
simply— Please, sir, here’s Mr. and Mrs. Connor come to
sign,”

“T am very glad to hear it,” said Mr. Arnold warmly,
turning to the old couple. He had noticed them lately at
the services, and especially had observed Connor's energetic
appreciation of the temperance lectures. He then desired
all to kneel down, while he offered up a prayer that none
might undertake this pledge in his own strength, but that
He who had begun this good work in them, might enable
them to keep it firmly and faithfully to the end. “Now who
will sign first?” asked Mr. Arnold, when the prayer was
over.

For a moment there was a silence, then Connor came
forward, saying—“ Here goes, I will.”

Mr. Arnold smiled, and took up a little pledge-book, in
MADGE'S FIRST RECRUITS. 63

which, after reading aloud the contents,he wrote the date,
then gave it to him to sign.

Connor took the pen, and with infinite pains, in his
biggest writing, with many flourishes, wrote his name—
« edie Connor.”

Mr. Arnold then called upon his wife, to whom writing
was a much greater labour; however with her spectacles on
her nose, and her pen oe balanced, she carefully wrote
—“ Mary Connor.”

“T suppose I may enter these to your account?” said Mr.
Arnold smilingly to Madge, who answered blushing—“ Yes,
please, sir.”

“Very good,” said he, referring to her name on the roll
of members. “That is a good beginning.”

Connor and his wife took their little books, and carefully
put them in their respective pockets; but before they
reached the door, Connor exclaimed—* Now I am a member
of the Band of Hope, and have a right to buy flower-seeds
as well as any one else; how do you sell them, ma’am ?”

“They are only meant for children,” answered a lady who
was selling them at the table.

“Well, it’s for a child I want them,” replied Connor.
“ Here, Madge, what kind will you have?”

“Me!” exclaimed Madge in surprise. “Oh, thank you,
Mr. Connor. I was just wishing I could get some;” and,
looking up at the lady, she saw that it was Miss Taylor,
her own teacher in the Sunday-school.
64 MADGE’S FIRST RECRUITS.

“So you are going in for the gardening prize, Madge,” said
she with a smile. “ Now choose, what will you have?”

Madge did not know one name from another, so Miss
Taylor chose for her some sweet-pea, mignonnette, and dwarf
nasturtium, saying as she did so—‘ Do you know how to
sow them ?”

“T think so, ma’am,” answered Madge; “but I haven’t
any pots.”

“Never mind, child,” said Mrs. Connor, “I’ve got some
old boxes at home that will do just as well, and Connor
will get you some good soil, I am sure. They wouldn’t
grow in the stuff about our place—a mixture of mortar and
dust.”

So Madge went home with her treasured packages of
seeds, as happy and light-hearted as if she was going
home to a palace, and brimming over with pleasure at
having succeeded in getting her two kind old friends to
join the Band of Hope.
CHAPTER VIII.

A CURIOUS ADVENTURE AND ITS CONSEQUENCES.

‘Tn the baron’s hall of pride,
By the poor man’s dull fireside ;
*Mid the mighty, ’mid the mean,
Little children may be seen,
Like the flowers that spring up fair,
Bright and countless everywhere !

‘* Blessings on them! they in me
Move a kindly sympathy,
With their wishes, hopes, and fears,
With their laughter and their tears,
With their wonder so intense,
And their small experience!

§* Little children, not alone
On the wide earth are ye known,
Mid its labours and its cares,
’Mid its sufferings and its snares ;
Free from sorrow, free from strife,
In the world of love and life,
Where no sinful thing hath trod,
In the presence of your God,
Spotless, blameless, glorified,
Little children, ye abide! ”— ary Howitt.

ManpcE was not long in perceiving that her father did not
go, as before, to the public. He came in more regularly,
and gave her’more money, so she tried her very utmost to
make him comfortable, and please him in any way; but in -
spite of all her efforts she was conscious of failing miserably,
and day after day she longed for her mother to come home.
She had always told her to keep the room clean, for that
father disliked a dirty floor; so one day after eon Madge
66 A CURLOUS ADVENTURE AND ITS CONSEQUENCHS.

set to work with much difficulty to wash it out; but the
day was damp, and she had so deluged it with water that it
would not dry, and when six o’clock came, and her father
came home, he swore at her for the state of discomfort the
place was in, and saying he would catch his death of rheu-
matism if he stayed in it, strode away in a rage, while poor
Madge, every bone aching with her exertions, sobbed with
disappointment. Then when Stevenson gave her more
money he quite expected he would get better food; but
Madge knew nothing of cooking beyond making tea or stir-
about, and unsavoury indeed were her attempts at frying
bacon or fish, or even boiling potatoes, from which her father
would turn in anger, saying she only wasted the food. Poor
child! she did her best, and she was only a child, but the
best was very bad indeed! Their clothes, too, were in a sad
state for want of mending; but though Madge learned to sew
at school, she had not become proficient enough yet to be of
much use, and her attempts at mending was mere cobbling.
Oh! how she did long for her mother to come home and set
things right. She was very anxious, too, to hear the result
of Nurse Mooney’s proposal of giving up her beer; but
several times that Madge went to the hospital, nurse herself
was ill, so she could not hear. At last one day she went
she was glad to see the nurse back as usual at her post. “O
mammie, mammie! when are you coming home?” she cried,
throwing herself into her mother’s arms.

“Very soon now, dearie,” said her mother. “The doctor
is to tell me to-morrow what day I may go out.”
A CURIOUS ADVENTURE AND ITS CONSEQUENCES. 67

“T am glad,” said Madge with a sigh of relief. “ But,
mammie, I’m afraid you won’t be as comfortable as here.”

“Home is home, dearie,” said Mrs. Stevenson smiling.

“Ves, but, mammie,” said Madge, “I’m afraid you will
miss the nice meals at regular hours, and these lovely soft
beds,” and she glanced admiringly at the beds with the com-
fortable wooden spring mattresses.

“But I shall have father, and you, and Nellie,” said Mrs.
Stevenson, “I’d rather have that than all the comforts of a
palace. O Madge! I have some good news for you! I spoke
to Miss Arnold about getting me some work; she asked
could I sew, but I said on account of my eyes I could not do
any fine work; so then she asked could I knit? Of course I
said yes, for I have been knitting all my life, so she got me
an order for a dozen pairs of stockings to begin with; she is
to supply the wool, and she says she thinks she can get me
as much as I can do. Isn’t that a comfort, Madge? Don’t
you think we may be sure now that God does care for us?”

“O mammie! that is good news,” said Madge, her eyes
filling with tears. “That will be nice easy work that won’t
tire you. I am so glad.”

“Here is a little pair of socks I made for Nellie,” said her
mother, trying them on her little foot. “A lady gave me
some wool to amuse myself with, and I have another pair
for you nearly done.” Madge’s eyes sparkled now.

“Well, Madge,” said nurse coming up, “you never asked
about the beer money.”

“T couldn't, for I didn’t see you, ma’am,” said Madge, “but
68
I thought of it very often, and I asked mother, only she
didn’t know.”

“Well, I went to the matron that very day, as I said I
would,” continued nurse, “and she at once said she would be
very glad to do it, and wished all the rest would do the same;
so I’ve got the money instead ever since.”

“That’s all right!” cried Madge joyfully. “You won’t
forget your promise to me, will you?”

“No fear,” said nurse laughing. “ When will be the next
day?”

“On Monday evening,” replied Madge.

“Not till then? I hoped it would be sooner; Id like to
do it at once. Never mind, you may be sure I won’t forget
it then, so look out for me at the hall, for you must show me
the way.”

Nurse was called away before Madge had time to express
her delight, but she saw how glad she was.

“OQ mammie,” said Madge, “I do think this is a day of
good news. Everything I’ve heard since I came here has
been good.”

“Will you think this good also, Madge?” said one of the
women whom she had got quite to look on asa friend. “I
am going out to-morrow.”

“Are you, Mrs. Tracy?” said Madge. “It is well mother
is going soon too, or she would miss you; yes, I think that
is good news too.”

“T shall be lonely enough,” said Mrs. Tracy, “for I’ve been
very comfortable here; but your mother says you don’t live
A CURIOUS ADVENTURE AND ITS CONSEQUENCES. 69

far from where I stop, so I want to know will you sometimes
come in to see me?”

“Indeed I will,” said Madge, “if mother lets me.”

“T expect at first Pll be rather lonesome,” said Mrs. Tracy;
“you see I live alone, and till my leg gets quite strong, I
can’t go about much; and here [I’ve got so used to seeing
people come in and out, that T’ll miss them, so I’d be very
glad if you will come to see me. I like to hear all your news
about the Band of Hope and the schools and church.”

Madge little guessed how all her weekly chat had en-
livened or interested this poor stranger in her monotonous
life in the hospital !

“Miss Arnold has promised to go see you, hasn’t she?”
said Mrs. Stevenson.

“Yes; God bless her,” replied Mrs. Tracy. “She is like
a ray of sunshine that brings light and warmth wherever it
goes.”

“Miss Arnold is our district visitor,’ said Madge, “she
came to see Mrs. Connor the other day, and she says she is _
the nicest young lady in the world.”

“OQ Madge! what about your seeds?” said her mother,
“have you planted them yet?”

“O mammie,” said Madge ruefully, “1 made such a stupid
mistake ; I was so vexed: Mr. Connor brought me a big bag
of good clay, and Mrs. Connor gave me some boxes to put
them in, but I never planted seeds before, and I put the dear
little mignonnette seeds in first, and then covered them up
with the clay, wasn’t it a pity?” All the women laughed
heartily at poor Madge’s mistake, while she went on, “I was
70 A CURIOUS ADVENTURE AND ITS CONSEQUENCES.

so sorry, but fortunately Miss Arnold happened to come in,
so she showed me the right way to do it, and I think the
rest will come up nicely; I have a bit of broken glass over
the top of each box, and I water them every day.”

“When will the show be?” asked Mrs. Stevenson.

“Some time in summer,” replied Madge; “you will be
home then, mammie, and will be quite strong long before it.
O mammie, there’s going to be an excursion in summer
too. Miss Taylor says Nellie and I may go, and any one that
is a Band of Hope; won't it be nice?”

“What is it?” asked Mrs. Stevenson.

“J don’t quite know,” said Madge. “The children say
it’s lovely ; they go in a train to the country, and see the
sea, and gather shells or flowers, Mammie, if you’re a
Band of Hope then, you can come too.” But Mrs. Stevenson
in her present state did not feel equal to any such great
exertion, so made no remark, not liking to damp the ardour
of her little daughter, who had so few pleasures.

As the children were going home, Nellie pulled her sister's
hand, saying, “ Look, Sissy, at those pretty little girls; what
a lovely dolly the littlest one has got.” There were two little
girls, almost their own sizes, walking before them, but the
elder, unlike Madge, left the little one to take care of herself
while she gazed with admiration into the shop windows.
They were pretty children, and beautifully dressed. Madge
and Nellie followed them, watching them until they had
reluctantly to go into a shop to do a message for one of the
hospital nurses. When they came out the pretty children
had disappeared,



A CURIOUS ADVENTURE AND ITS CONSEQUENCES, 71

“Sissy, did you see her doll’s lovely little red cloak?”
asked Nellie.

“No; I was looking at the little girl herself,” answered
Madge. “She had such beautiful long golden curls, and a
lovely little hat with a real bird in it.”

“T’m glad you don’t leave me to walk alone, Sissy,” said
little Nellie, skipping along on one foot, as she held her
sister’s hand. “I think I would get frightened in the
crowded streets.”

“Tf you weren’t, I would be to see you walk alone,” said
Madge laughing. She watched over this little one as if she
had been her mother.

“ Sissy, there is the biggest little girl again,” cried Nellie
suddenly ; “but she is alone, and she is crying! What is
the matter 4”

Yes, there was the “ biggest little girl,” as Nellie described
her, standing at the door of a fashionable shop crying bitterly,
while a couple of women questioned her, and a tall police-
man looked down majestically on them all. “I only ran
across to look in at a shop window for a moment,” sobbed
the child, “and when I came back she was gone. Oh dear!
papa will be so angry, and mamma will be so sorry! Oh,
what shall I do?”

“The idea of leaving a child alone in this crowd,” said one
of the women indignantly.

“Depend upon it she has gone somewhere,” observed the
policeman sententiously.

“That’s just it,” said the woman, “so she must; but the
thing is, where did she go?”
72 A CURIOUS ADVENTURE AND ITS CONSEQUENCES.

“T’d go and look for her, only I don’t know what she is
like.”

“T do,” exclaimed Madge eagerly. “I know her; do let
me go? I'll try to find her.”

“Oh thank you, thank you,” said the little girl, drying
her streaming eyes, never thinking of asking how she could
possibly know her.

“Then you must stay here, or the child won’t know where
to find you,” said the woman. “Would the little girl know
her way home, do you think %”

“No, we never were in town before,” said the child, sob-
bing afresh. “We only came yesterday from the country.
Our maid left us in the square this afternoon, but we thought
it stupid, like the country, and not half as much fun as look-
ing at the shops, so we thought we would go into the streets
for a while; we didn’t think it would be any harm.”

“Well, if you stay there, I’ll go and look for her,’ said
Madge compassionately, while the policeman and women
questioned her about her name and address; and, holding
Nellie’s hand very tight, she ran down the street. But here
was a great thoroughfare, one street led into another, while
each was filled with people, horses, carriages, and tram-cars.
Which way to take was a puzzle—each seemed equally un-
likely —so she turned down the most crowded, looking
keenly from side to side. Just as she almost was giving up
in despair, she caught sight, to her great joy, of the little
figure with the long golden curls,and the doll’s scarlet cloak.
Two tram-cars were coming in opposite directions, a carriage
and pair was close beside, and several cabs driving hither
A CURIOUS ADVENTURE AND ITS CONSEQUENCES. 73

and thither, while the little girl, bewildered with noise and
bustle, was preparing to run across.

“O Nellie, she’ll be killed,” screamed Madge. “Stop
where you are; don’t you stir for your life—I’ll be back in
a@ moment.”

“Child, are you mad? you'll be killed yourself!” cried
a man, catching her arm; but Madge, freeing herself from
his grasp, darted into the street and caught the child just as
a tram-car glided by, and a coachman pulled up his horses
so suddenly as to nearly throw them down. A policeman
came up and held Madge, who had got a severe blow and
hardly knew where she was. A crowd collected.

“Tt was no fault of mine,” began the coachman, when he
suddenly stopped, and looking at the unconscious cause of
the accident, exclaimed, “ Why if that isn’t our Miss Eva!
How on earth did you get here, Missie?”

“O Smithson, save me!” cried the little girl.

The coachman took her up in his arms, while the police-
man held the horses. “But, Miss Eva, whatever brought
you here alone?” he asked ; “and who is this girl that saved
you? for that’s what she did, and no mistake,”

“You’d better get on now,” said the policeman ; “there’s
no harm done.”

“T won't go without this girl, too,” said Smithson. “My
master shall hear of what she has done for him to-day; that
child is the very apple of his eye.”

“Well, let the child go too,” said A 44, beginning to tire of
the scene.

“No, no,” said Madge faintly, “I must go to Nellie.”
74

“Where?” asked the man.

“Tt’s her little sister,” said some one in the crowd. “I saw
her bid the child stay still when she rushed off under the
horses’ feet.”

The policeman marched over to the pathway where Nellie
was standing, and led her to Madge, who, for the first time
realising the horrors of what had been, burst into tears.

“Now, coachman, drive on,” ordered the policeman, “don’t
stop the way any longer.”

“There’s the other little girl; I promised I would look for
this one if she’d stay where I left her,” said Madge, vainly
struggling against being put in the carriage. “I must go
and tell her she is safe.”

“So you shall, then,” said Smithson, beginning to compre-
hend what she meant. “There, get in, like a good girl; I'll
drive slowly along, and you can show me where you left her.”

Madge told him the street, and they drove off. Little Eva,
now quite recovered from her fright, stared steadily at Nellie,
who, thinking it very good fun to be in a grand carriage like
this, stared equally fixedly at her. Not so Madge; she gazed
out of the window, in terror lest they should pass the little
lady, whom she at last spied still at the door of the shop
where she had left her. “There she is,” cried Madge, while
Smithson pulled up, saying severely, “I don’t know what
your papa will say to all this, Miss Alice, nor what brought
you young ladies out in the crowded streets alone; but this
I do know, only for this brave little girl, Miss Eva would
have been killed under a tram-car or by these very horses.
Now, jump in, like a good child.”
A CURIOUS ADVENTURE AND ITS CONSEQUENCES, 75

“ Please, sir, let us get out,” pleaded Madge. “I’d much
rather walk.”

“You're not able to walk,” said the man, turning the
handle safely. “Besides, you must come home, that my
master may hear of what you’ve done ;” and, without wait-
ing for an answer, he drove off.

Alice put her hand into Madge’s, saying timidly, “I am
very, very much obliged to you. Thank you for what you
did.”

Madge smiled. She felt rather sick, and couldn't talk
much, but managed to say, “ You should hold her hand all
the time; I never let Nellie’s go.”

“Ts this Nellie?” “Yes, miss.”

“And what is your name ?”

“Madge Stevenson,” replied Madge.

“Do you live near here?” again asked Alice.

“Pretty near,” replied Madge. “Mother is in hospital.
This is visiting day, so we’ve been to see her, and were
coming home when we met you,”

“Ts your mother sick?” asked Alice.

“She was; but she’s nearly well now. She is coming
home in a few days,” answered Madge.

But just then the carriage stopped at the door of a very
handsome house, and a number of people rushed down the
steps when they saw the children. A tall gentleman seized
little Eva in his arms, and covering her with kisses, bore her
into the house, where a fair, gentle lady met her at the door,
sobbing, “Ob, my child, my darling, you don’t know what a
fright you gave us! Thank God, you are safe,”
76 A CURIOUS ADVENTURE AND ITS CONSEQUENCES,

“You may well say that, ma'am,” muttered Smithson.
“Wait till you hear all.”

Meantime Madge and Nellie felt very uncomfortable. No-
body noticed them, and they wished they could go home.
But Smithson was determined his master should hear of
them, so bidding them stand in the hall, he followed his
master into the library, while a groom led the horses away.
Ina few minutes the gentleman came out, looking very pale,
with something very like tears glistening in his eyes. Hold-
ing out his hand to Madge, he said in a deep voice, “ Little
girl, I cannot thank you for what you have done for us
to-day. I never can express what her mother and I owe
you. My man has told me about it. You have saved us
from a sorrow too deep to think of.”

Madge was quite frightened, and not by any means proud
of le She felt much inclined to run away.

The gentleman then catching sight of the blood trickling
down her face, cried in alarm, “My child, were you hurt too?”

“Not much, sir,” said Madge in great confusion.

“Here, Smithson, I leave them in your charge,” said Mr.
Gilbert. “Take them both downstairs, and let the women
dress the child’s cut. See they have something nice to eat,
and then take them home in a cab; and you, my little girl,”
turning to Madge, and speaking in tones of deep feeling, “I
want you to-morrow. Smithson will arrange about your
coming. Mrs. Gilbert wishes to see you herself, but she is
too excited now to bear it at present. Smithson, I leave you
to see that these children get every attention,” which kind-
hearted Smithson gladly promised to do.
CHAPTER IX.
EXAMPLE BETTER THAN PRECEPT.

_**Bad custom, consolidated into habit, is such a tyrant that; men some-
times cling to vices even while they curse them. ‘They have become the
slaves of habits whose powers they are impotent to resist.—Samuel Smiles,

Hap Mrs. Stevenson been at home, she would have been
alarmed at the non-appearance of the children, but their
father troubled himself very little about them. Hour after
hour struck without his once thinking it strange they were
not in. Not so Mrs. Connor. Her motherly heart was
ereatly disturbed. Knowing that the hospital rules forbade
their staying beyond a certain hour, she could not imagine
what kept them out so late. Great therefore was her relief
when a cab drove down the narrow lane where they lived,
and stopped at their door. It was dark by this time, but
the light of a gas-lamp showed a livery servant lifting
Nellie out of the cab, while Madge followed.

“Gracious me!” exclaimed Mrs. Connor, catching sight
of a bandage across Madge’s forehead, “what has happened?
How did you get hurt, child? What 2s the matter?”

“Tt’s all right now, ma’am,” said Smithson, “but there
might have been matter enough; wait till I pay the cab,
and you shall hear all about it. I’ve brought you home a
wounded hero, or heroine, or whatever you like to call her,
anyway she’s the bravest little girl in the country.” He
then dismissed the cab, and following into Mrs. Connor’s ”
snug room, began the whole story which he had already
78 EXAMPLE BETTER THAN PRECEPT.

recounted to his master, and to all the servants assembled
in the servants’ hall, of how, only for Madge’s prompt action
and “pluck,” the darling of his master’s house, the precious
little Eva, would inevitably have been run over by either a
tram-car or his own horses. While he was speaking, Joe
Stevenson, attracted by the unusual bustle, entered the
room unperceived, and without knowing at first that it was
of his own daughter the man was talking in such glowing
terms. “My mistress is very delicate,” continued the man,
“and she got an awful shock; for some of the people who
heard Miss Alice’s story, and found out her address, rushed
off to the house with the news that Miss Eva was lost; so
that when we got home, the poor lady was nearly frightened
to death, and could not bear the excitement of hearing the
particulars, much less seeing the girl; but my master desired
me to be sure to say she is to come to-morrow, for they want
to see her very particular.”

“Oh, please no!” cried Madge, “indeed I’d rather not;
I’ve been thanked enough already, and I’m sure I never
did it for that.”

“T’m sure you didn’t,” said Smithson, “but you don’t know
my master! When he says a thing, he means it to be done;
so if you don’t come to him to-morrow, he’ll come to you!
Now, ma’am,” turning to Mrs. Connor, “will you see she
comes? She's not much hurt (strange to say), and my
mistress will be real vexed if she doesn’t see her herself.”

“That I will,” said Mrs. Connor heartily, “Ill take her
myself; stay, here’s her father.” Smithson looked at Steven-
son—was he the father of this brave little girl?
EXAMPLE BETTER THAN PRECEPT. 79

“She shall go,” said he, for the first time feeling a sort of
admiration for his little daughter, “and I am much obliged
to you for all your trouble.”

“Not at all,” said Smithson, “J owe her something too,
for only for her pulling the child away, at the risk of her
own life, I couldn’t have held those horses back; law, I
can’t bear to think of it! Good-night to you all,” and he went
out quickly.

Madge was glad when the fuss was over. It had been an
exciting day, and the praise and admiration she had received
were very new to her, so she kissed her kind old friends,
and went wearily up to bed. But nothing was so new, or
so unusual, as, when she was in bed, to find her father
bending over her with a kiss! Madge sprang up in amaze-
ment.

“T’ve been a bad father to you, Madge,” said he, “that’s
a fact, but I mean to be better.”

“© father, you have been better,” cried Madge, “a great,
great deal better lately. It’s I that haven't been able to
take proper care of you, or make you comfortable; but,
father, mammie is coming home in a few days now, and
then we'll be happy again: she’ll make us all right.”

“You're a good child,” said her father in a softened voice,
and to her surprise he stooped down to give her another
kiss. He had not realised, until he heard Smithson’s story,
how fond he really was of his little girl, nor how terribly
near losing her he was. A wave of recollections swept over
his mind—of when, as a young man, he had just brought his
blooming bride home to a snug little cottage, while it had
80 EXAMPLE BETTER THAN PRECEPT.

been his boast that she should want nothing, as long as he
had strength to work; then his pride and joy when his
little girl was born, and christened after her mother; how he
worked doubly hard: that both wife and child should live
comfortably ; then the beginning of his downward course,
when a fellow-workman first tempted him to “the Crown
and Anchor;” the removal from the suburban cottage toa
room in town; the birth and death of two little boys; the
parting with one, after another, all their nice furniture ; his
wife’s delicacy, brought on by fretting; and finally, their
removal to this narrow lane, where the scantily furnished
room told its own story—poverty, neglect, caused by DRINK.
A wild longing to cast it all away as a bad dream, and
begin again, came over him. Oh! if he could only undo
the past, and live a new life for the future! Then he
thought of Madge’s words: “ Mammie is coming home; then
we'll be happy again: she'll make all right,” and something
more like a prayer than he had said for many a long day
rose to his lips, that this indeed might be the case. He
knew how forgiving and loving she always was to him, so
that the fault was altogether his own, and a lurking con-
viction grew stronger in his heart that his love for drink
was at the bottom of all. Could he but overcome that, all
might yet be well. Yes, this was his enemy, which had
turned him into a selfish animal, robbing him of all love for
wife or children or self-respect. He used to pride himself on
his strength; he was strong still, surely he would not allow
himself to be vanquished, body and soul, without a struggle. |
An intense burning desire to be free once more caused his
EXAMPLE BETTER THAN PRECEPT. 81

heart to throb wildly. Madge’s conversation with him
weeks ago came into his mind. Could he ever humble
himself so as to do as she asked him that night, and sign
the pledge for her! He got up and walked rapidly up and
- down the room to clear his brain. How his companions
would laugh at him, how they would sneer and jeer at his
expense! Would he ever have strength of mind to bear it!
But an enemy which had taken complete possession for
several years was not to be evicted at a minute’s notice ;
its stronghold was shaken, but not destroyed; and when
Joe Stevenson at last lay down in bed, a hattle between
right and wrong, conscience and inclination, was raging
within him. Which would win? Oh for a good angel to
watch over him and guide him aright! Yes, there was One,
who, looking down from heaven, saw the conflict ; whose
loving heart yearned over this one sheep, apparently so
hopelessly lost in the wilderness, and determined that He
would seek for it and save it, that in its safety it might
secure the happiness of the two little tender lambs, whose
very lives till now had been in such jeopardy. Joe Steven-
son little thought that he was being led by One whose
never-failing Providence ordered all things both in heaven
and earth, and would not even suffer one sparrow to fall to
the ground without His permission. Quite unknown to
himself this poor wandering sheep was being watched and
led home by a way which he knew not.

Next day Mrs. Connor fulfilled her promise of taking
the children to see the lady. Madge implored to be let
off, and when her friend would not hear of it, she worked
82 EXAMPLE BETTER THAN PRECEPT.

herself into such a state of trepidation, that when they
reached the house she could hardly stand. Mrs, Connor
preferred staying outside, and as the children, hand in hand,
went up the flight of stone steps alone, Madge’s knees
trembled so under her, that she almost fell. With beating
heart she timidly rang the bell, and would greatly have
liked to run away before the door was opened; but when it
was, the servant received her as one who was both expected
and welcome, desiring her to go upstairs. Madge felt as if
all hope for escape was gone when the door shut behind
her, and they followed the servant up stairs carpeted soft
as velvet, past a conservatory, where flowers, more beautiful
than Madge had ever dreamed of, bloomed, perfuming the
whole house with their sweetness, into a drawing-room
beautifully furnished, and so covered with mirrors, that for
a time Madge thought there were endless rooms opening off
each other, and then did not believe in the reality of the
second room, separated only by lofty folding doors! At one
of the windows overlooking the square, in a low easy-chair,
sat the fair gentle lady they had seen the evening before for
a moment when they arrived, and by her side the two pretty
little girls, the elder doing some gay crewel work, the little
one sitting on a stool at her mother’s feet, playing with the
identical doll whose red cloak had been the means of attract-
ing Madge in the crowd, and so saving her life. She looked
as bright and as sunny as if she had never been in the
slightest danger or caused any one the least anxiety! Mrs.
Connor had told Madge to make a curtsey when she saw
the lady, even showing her how to do it rightly; but
EXAMPLE BETTER THAN PRECEPT. 83

when the time came, Madge forgot all about it in her
shyness and fright, so that it was not a very polished
little maiden who stood there. But Mrs. Gilbert never
thought of that; she only saw in her the girl who had
saved her little darling’s life, and whom she felt she never
could thank or repay sufficiently. Madge was more than
ever confused by the torrent of tearful thanks with which
the lady greeted her; but before long her gentle manner
made her feel more at ease, and she was able to answer her
many questions.

The little ones soon fraternised. In the first excitement
Nellie had touched the doll in silent admiration, and before
the others knew what they were doing, the two were happily
playing together with childish innocence of the difference
in rank. Madge was horrified, but Mrs. Gilbert smilingly
interfered, telling her to leave them alone, as she wished to
speak to her. Alice had told her mother all she knew of
Madge, so Mrs. Gilbert asked all about her sick mother, how
long she had been ill, and when she was to be home; what
the children did every day, whether they went to school,
and who took care of them. She was filled with pity, and
Alice with wonder, at this little girl (just her own age, as it
turned out), who managed everything in her mother’s
absence, and took such care of her little sister. As Madge
became more at ease, Mrs. Gilbert was struck by her simple
earnestness of manner, quiet and unassuming, bashful, though
not awkward; and she felt utterly puzzled as to how she
could reward her as she wished, for when she hinted it the
child grew perfectly silent. Nellie, who was playing near
84 EXAMPLE BETTER THAN PRECEPT.

another window, catching sight of Mrs. Connor's check shawl, ©
patiently going up and down outside, ran over exclaiming,
“There she is, sissy! there she is again !”

“Hush |” whispered Madge, “don’t make a noise, Nellie!”

“Who is it?” asked Mrs. Gilbert kindly. “What does
she mean ?”

“Ts Mrs. Connor, ma’am,” said little Nell, now quite at
home, and delighted beyond measure with all the untold
wealth of playthings she saw for the first time in her little
life. Mrs. Gilbert looked at Madge for explanation.

“She came with us here, ma’am; she lives in our house,
and is the kindest friend we ever had; she said she would
wait till we were ready to go back.”

Mrs. Gilbert rang the bell and desired the servant to ask
the woman who was walking up and down outside to come
in, as she wished to speak to her, thinking perhaps that
through her she might find out what she wanted better
than from Madge. Mrs. Connor, flushed with surprise, came
into the room, making her lowest curtsey, and looking what
she was—a thoroughly respectable, decent old woman.

“ Alice, dear,” said Mrs. Gilbert, “take these little girls
to the school-room, I told Mathilde to have dinner ready
there; and when they have finished, you might show them
the dolls’ house, and all your pretty things.”

The children followed Alice out of the room, and when
the door was shut Mrs. Gilbert, making Mrs. Connor sit in
a comfortable chair near her, began to ask her all about
Madge, as she had very soon discovered she might do, for
Mrs. Connor’s honest face showed she could be trusted.
EXAMPLE BEITER THAN PRECEPT. 85

Her account of Madge was all Mrs. Gilbert could wish; she
told how unselfish and self-denying she was in the untiring
care she bestowed on her little sister; how difficult it was
for a child of her age to fill the place vacant by the absence
of her sick mother, and in a few words told that their
father was neither very steady nor very kind to them.
This she did not tell from gossip or unkindness, but that it
simply formed part of the children’s history. She then
spoke of what she herself owed to Madge; how she had per-
suaded her at first to go with her to church, which for many
years she had neglected doing, and that gradually, what
she did at first to please the child, she and her husband
did regularly now, as their own greatest pleasure as well
as duty, looking forward to Mr. Arnold’s visits and week-
evening services with joy.

“Mr. Arnold! is his church near here?” inquired Mrs.
Gilbert with interest. 2

“ Yes, ma'am,” replied Mrs. Connor, “it is the nearest to
us, and is not far from this on the other side.”

“Tam so glad,” said Mrs. Gilbert. “We used to know
Mr. Arnold years ago; he is a truly good man! I knew he
lived in town, but being strangers ourselves, I did not know
whether his church would be near us or not. I am very
glad, indeed, for we shall certainly attend it.”

“He is a good man indeed,” said Mrs. Connor warmly,
“and ours is a different place since he came; he knows
every one, and is as friendly and plain-like with us as if
we were his equals; he’d come in, and sit down for a chat,
86 EXAMPLE BETTER THAN PRECEPT.

without being a bit afraid of himself? What with his
services, schools, and Band of Hope, he has done a power of
good.”

“Band of Hope,” said Mrs. Gilbert, “I am glad he
goes in for that; I believe that is one of the most impor-
tant institutions in a parish. Well, I am very much
pleased to find we, too, are living in his parish, and I
don’t doubt we shall soon become better acquainted with
all its workings.” She then asked Mrs. Connor might
she give Madge and her sister some clothes, which she
thought would just fit them; she hoped to do something
more substantial for them, but this would be a beginning.
Mrs. Connor was as pleased as if the children were her own,
for their clothes were worn, and shabby to a degree, and
there was no prospect of money to buy new. Mrs. Gilbert
then took her upstairs to the nursery, and made a selection
of suitable things, neither too grand nor too flimsy to be of
use. Mrs. Connor was in high delight at the comfortable
stockings, boots, and underclothes, in particular, as well as
plain hats, jackets, and frocks, in which she pictured her
little favourites going to church and school on Sundays.
Some weeks ago she would have distrusted the idea of such
nice clothes coming into Stevenson’s possession, but he was
so much steadier now, she felt almost sure he would not take
them from his little children. At any rate, she would keep
a sharp lookout on them, so she gladly packed them in a
large bundle to carry home, where she said she thought
it was time for them now to go.
EXAMPLE BETTER THAN PRECEPT. 87

When they went to seek the children, the school-room
was in rare confusion; playthings of all kinds strewn about,
which Mathilde, the French maid, not understanding half
that was said, was good-humouredly trying to put in their
places. But she knew that this little girl had saved her
precious little mademoiselle from a cruel fate, therefore
nothing could be too good for her. Every time she spoke
to her young ladies in her own language, Nellie first stared,
then stuffed her little hands into her mouth to hide her
laughter; for, as she afterwards told Madge, it sounded
exactly like the way the monkey-man chatted to his monkey
on the barrel-organ! Miss Alice and Madge had gone
through the usual little girls’ ceremony of making friends:
had compared ages and tastes; but Madge could not under-
stand how Miss Alice could bear to come to town just as
the trees were budding, primroses growing, and lambs in the
fields skipping about as she described; while Alice equally
wondered how any one could be ever tired of seeing the gay
shops, crowded streets, soldiers, bands, and amusing sights
with which town abounded. But on their dissimilarity of
tastes they agreed to differ. Altogether it was a day to
our poor children to be marked with a white stone in their
calendar—a day to be long remembered, talked over, and
dreamed of, whose various pleasures far outbalanced in
all four children’s minds the danger of the previous day.
Yes; it was “un jour des plaisirs” which stood out in their
memories, although at the time they did not think of its
having any more important result,
CHAPTER X.

HOME ONCE MORE.

** Several acts may seem in themselves trivial ; but so are the continuous
acts of daily life. Like snowflakes they fall unperceived ; each flake added
to the pile produces no sensible change, and yet the accumulation of snow-
flakes makes the avalanche. So do repeated acts: the one following the
other, at length become consolidated in habit, determine the action of the
human being for good or for evil, and, in a word, form the character.”

—Smiles’ “‘ Character.”

“Mamma,” said Alice Gilbert to her mother, the first time
they were alone, “ what is the meaning of a Band of Hope?”

“A number of people who join or band together in pro-
mising not to take wine, or any other kind of intoxicating
drink, except as a medicine,” answered Mrs. Gilbert. “They
make the promise, and sign their names to it, which is called
‘taking the pledge;’ then as long as they keep their pledge-
card they are bound not to take any sort of ‘alcohol,’ as it
is called, as it would be breaking a solemn promise, taken in
the presence of a witness. But if a person tires of it, he
may return the card, and cease to be a member, which I
think is very shabby.”

“Ts it a good thing, mamma?” asked Alice again.

“ Certainly it is, dear,” replied her mother. “Why do you
ask? What put it into your head?”

“That little girl, Madge Stevenson, told me of it, mamma,”
answered Alice. “She belongs to it, and it seems so nice.
She says she will get a medal when she has been a whole
HOME ONCE MORE! 89

year a member, and she will get some other thing if she gets
ten new people to become members.”

“That is a very good plan,” said Mrs. Gilbert. “I am
glad she belongs to it.”

“Mamma, do other people ever join?” asked Alice ; “or is
it only for people like Madge and Mrs. Connor—I mean, do
people like us—oh, you know what I mean?”

“Yes, Alice, I think I do,” said her mother smiling. “To
be sure they do; for instance, although we are not actually
members of any society, papa and I never take any sort of
wine, so that we are almost the same as if we had signed.”

“Then, why don’t you, mamma?” asked Alice.

“T don’t really know why,” returned Mrs. Gilbert, “for
our sympathies are entirely with it; I think it is one of the
best safeguards any one in any rank, or of any age, can
have.”

“T thought, perhaps, it was only for the common people,”
said Alice hesitatingly.

“Oh no,” said her mother, “ if it is wrong for them to take
strong drink, it is doubly so for us, because we should know
better.”

“Then, mamma, might I sign?” said Alice eagerly, “I
should like to so much.”

“TJ don’t know about that, dear,” said Mrs. Gilbert. “ For
my own part I have not the least objection, I should like to
see every one I love a teetotaler, but I do not know what
papa would say to your joining.”

“Well, may Iask him, mamma?” persisted Alice.
90 HOME ONCE MORE!

“Yes, you certainly may do that,” replied her mother,
“and you must abide by whatever he says; but now, darling,
leave me, I am too tired to talk any more.”

Alice ran to the school-room, where she found Mathilde,
and began the subject anew to her; but to her surprise she
found Mathilde knew a great deal more of it than she did,
and said she had often wished to have an opportunity of
joining some such society.

“Oh then, Mathilde,” cried Alice joyfully, “if I get leave
from papa to sign, you shall come too, and we can do it
together. I would sign for Madge, and you would sign for
me, wouldn’t you? for I mean to get ten people too.”

Alice’s energetic little mind was so full of this, that she
could not think of anything else, and she longed for evening
to come, that she might ask her father about it. So as soon
as dinner was over, and she and Eva came down to dessert,
she preferred her request; but although he did not decidedly
say “no,” he would not say “yes.” Like most people who
live in the country, he had an intense dread of infection,
and was convinced that if his children went to Sunday-
school, or any sort of crowded meeting, they must surely
bring home scarlatina, measles, or some sort of dreadful
illness. Mrs. Gilbert laughed at his fears, saying that when
she was a girl living in town, she went to all sorts of classes,
yet she never took any kind of infection; she really wished
that Alice might attend Mr, Arnold’s Sunday-school, for in
the country she often felt the disadvantage of living at too
great a distance to allow them the privileges which were so
HOME ONCE MORE! 91

easily obtained in town, and she earnestly wished that every
member of the household should take advantage of these
golden opportunities now that they were within their reach.
However, the most that Mr. Gilbert would promise, was that
he would speak to Mr. Arnold (whom he was delighted to
find was their pastor), and with this promise Alice was
obliged to be content for the present.

On Saturday afternoon, to Madge’s great joy, Mrs. Steven-
son came home! She had written the day before to her
husband, telling him when he might expect her, so Madge
devoted the whole of Saturday to preparing the room for
ier receptien. Fortunately there was no school that day,
so she had plenty of time, and her kind friend Mrs. Connor,
giving up her own usual weekly cleaning, assisted in scour-
ing and washing floor, table, chairs, and clothes. Poor
Madge, with the recollection of the scrupulously white beds
and floors of the hospital, feared her mother could never be
satisfied with their room, but Mrs. Connor consoled her with
the old adage, “the best can dono more.” Then during
their work, Miss Arnold came in for a minute. She had
heard from Mrs. Stevenson that she was going home that
day, so she brought, “to look pretty,” as she said, some
primroses and other spring flowers, and a little basket with
tea, sugar, nice butter, and a couple of fresh eggs, so that
Madge’s mind was at rest on that score. She arranged the
flowers in a cracked tumbler, putting them in the middle of
the table; and someway they seemed to brighten up the
whole room, which, when a little fire was lighted, the kettle
92 HOME ONCE MORE!

put on to boil, and the table laid for tea, really looked quite
homelike. Oh! how glad was Madge when the cab drove
up and her mother got out! How she hugged her and clung
to her, as if she could never bear to part from her again.
Good Mrs. Connor welcomed her as if she had been her own
daughter, then retired to her own little room, feeling that
it was better to leave the children and their mother to
themselves. Madge had thought her mother looking so
much better the last day she saw her in hospital, but now
that she saw her in her old accustomed place, she was grieved
to see how pale and delicate she was still) When Joe came
home from his work, the marvellous change in his room
astonished him, He was really glad to see his wife back
again, and in his unreasoning fashion, attributed every-
thing, comfort, cleanliness, flowers, and food, to the fact of
her presence! to which, even had Madge known it, she
would have gladly agreed! When supper was over Mrs.
Stevenson, knowing her husband’s habits of old, dreaded his
going out, so she produced the knitting with which Miss
Arnold had supplied her, and sitting beside him began to
chat pleasantly. Madge was very tired after her day’s hard
work, so was glad to go early to bed, thus leaving her father
and mother quietly together, when they enjoyed a happier
evening than either had spent for many and many a long
day.

Next morning Mrs. Stevenson really did feel proud of her
two little girls when she saw them dressed in their nice new
clothes ready to go to Sunday-school. Respectable and bonnie
HOME ONCE MORE! 93

they looked: even Joe seemed pleased. He knew well where
the clothes had come from, and for what reason. . Mrs. Connor
need have hadno fear of his appropriating them; in his heart he
felt proud of them, and he would as soon now think of giving
either of his children poison as of depriving them of one
article of their new clothes. On Monday evening Madge
wondered very much would Nurse Mooney remember her
promise of going with her to the Band of Hope meeting. She
did so hope she would! For once she was able to leave little
Nellie at home, “to keep mammie company,” as she said, and
went with her two old friends to the hall, where, to her great
delight, she found Nurse Mooney waiting for her, so they all
went in together. When the meeting was over, the Connors
waited while Madge escorted her new friend up to the table
at which, as usual, Mr. Arnold presided. “Well done, Madge,”
said he smiling when he saw then, “You are a capital recruit-
ing sergeant. I wish all our members were as active! I like
to see new members joining our ranks—the more the better.”

Madge coloured with pleasure at these words, and Mrs.
Mooney felt gratified at being the means of her receiving
such praise,

“Now,” said Mr. Arnold when all had signed their names,
“T wish you would each try to work as busily as this little
girl, who, I plainly see, is going in fora silver bar! Think
of how much good would be done in the world if every one
who joins the Band of Hope induced ten more to join also!
Take any one of you here, for instance. Suppose you get
ten recruits. Well, suppose each of those ten gets ten more, .
94 HOME ONCE MORE!

that would be one hundred! And if each of the hundred
induced ten more to join, what an army there would be! for
it is most likely they would be scattered about, not all in
this town or even country, but the good work would be spread-
ing all the time, the farther away the greater the influence.”

“JT don’t think that would be very hard,” whispered a boy
who had just signed; “I think I'll try.”

“Do,” said Mr. Arnold, quickly turning to him. “ What
matter if it is a little hard; who minds a little trouble when
there is a good object in view! Now, I'll tell you what this
reminds me of. Is there any one of you who has not watched
a pebble thrown into smooth water? Now,a little circle comes,
which spreads into another, and that again into another, till
the whole surface of the stream is covered by gradually widen-
ing circles, until at last the shore at each side is reached. Yet
all this is caused by a little pebble thrown in, perhaps by the
hand of some little child! Could not each of you try to be
the centre of a gradually widening circle of total abstainers?
At anyrate, you might put it before you, and each one of you
try your best how many friends, neighbours, or acquaintances
you can bring in! Now, I am not going to preach, but I want
each of you to try and remember what I have said, and also
what I always say before any one signs, that this is a work
not to be rashly undertaken in vain self-dependence, but
prayerfully; for if you think you can keep your pledge by
your own strength you are greatly mistaken. Any one who
does that is sure to fail; but what is impossible to do of our-
selves is easy to do with God’s help. And He is ready and
- HOME ONCE MORE! 95

willing to give you that help if you only ask Him for it.” And
with a kindly good-night, and shaking hands with each new
brother member, Mr. Arnold went home.

Every one said Mr. Arnold was a wonderful man to get
through all he did, and so he certainly was. Not a moment
in the day was unemployed, for, besides all the parish work,
he had an immensity of visiting. No one was forgotten, and
the same day that he visited poor Mrs. Stevenson in her
dingy two-pair room in Back Lane, when his words cheered
her heart and made her better able to face her anxieties, he
called on Mrs. Gilbert in her elegantly furnished drawing-
room in Buckland Square. They had known each other years
before, so were very glad to meet, and had much to say. Mr.
Gilbert, who seldom came in to see his wife’s visitors, came
to see this welcome guest, and enjoyed a cup of afternoon
tea together with his agreeable conversation.

“Mamma,” whispered Alice during a pause, “do you think
will papa remember to speak to Mr. Arnold? He said he
would the first time he had an opportunity.”

“What about, dear?” said Mrs. Gilbert.

“OQ mamma, don’t you remember? The Band of Hope.”

“Ah! to be sure,” said her mother smiling. “ William,
Alice wants me to remind you to ask Mr. Arnold about whether
or not she should be allowed to join the Band of Hope?”

“That is a very familiar word in my ears. Is there any
doubt on the subject?” said Mr. Arnold, turning to Alice
with his bright, genial look. “I hope, my dear, you are
going to join us?”
96 HOME ONCE MORE!

“Tf papa allows me,” said Alice looking down.

“Papas and mammas have to be careful in their ‘yeses or
noes,” said Mr. Gilbert laughing. “So I have learned not
to commit mye but told Alice I would leave it entirely to
your decision.”

“Tn that case you have your answer at once,” said Mr.
Arnold laughing. “I would advise every one to join, each
for different reasons—some for the sake of example (which,
believe me, is better than precept), some for expediency, all
because it is right.”

“ There, Allies, ” said Mr. Gilbert to his little girl, “papa
has committed himself after all!”

“Then may I, papa?” she asked eagerly.

“You are in Mr. Arnold’s hands,” he answered smiling.

“Very well, Alice,” said Mr. Arnold; “TI shall expect you
on Monday evening at seven o'clock, that is the time we
always mect, and I shall be very glad indeed to enroll you a
member.” Then, turning to Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert, he spoke
on other matters connected with the church and schools
which did not interest her; but, having gained her point, she
ran off to tell Mathilde that on Monday evening she too, if
she wished, might come and join the Band of Hope,
CHAPTER XI.

MORE RECRUITS AND A GREAT OBJECT GAINED.

*¢ Know all the good that individuals find,
Or God and Nature meant to mere mankind,
Reason’s whole pleasure, all the joys of sense,
Lie in three words, health, peace, and competence ;
But health consists with temperance alone,
And peace, O virtue! peace is all thy own.”
—Pope.

*¢ Happiness is much more equally divided than
Some of us imagine. One man shall possess
Most of the materials, but little of the thing ;
Another may possess much of the thing,

But very few of the materials,
—Cotton.

MapceE did not forget her promise to the poor woman in the
hospital to go to see her; but for some days after her
mother’s return, she was extremely busy when she came
from school; for Mrs. Stevenson believed that the best thing
she could do for her little daughter was to train her to work
well, Therefore, the housework which poor Madge had done
so badly when alone, was now overseen and directed by her
mother, who was very particular, allowing no mistake to
pass, rightly thinking that what was thoroughly learned
when young, would not be forgotten when old, However,
at last a day came when Madge was at leisure, so, oe
98 MORE RECRUITS AND A GREAT OBJECT GAINED.

herself neatly, she set off, and with a little difficulty found
the house. Mrs. Tracy was delighted to see her; she was
still very weak after her accident, and, living at the top of
the house, was not able to go about much, “I thought you
had forgotten me,” she said, “for I have watched, expecting
you every day; now come, and tell me all the news; how is
your mother ?”

Madge explained why she had not been, and proceeded to
tell all she could think of, the chief thing ue that mother
had come home.

“And how are your flowers getting on?” asked Mrs.
Tracy.

“Oh! they are actually coming up,” cried Madge. “The
sweet pea and nasturtium are doing beautifully, but I
thought my poor little mignonnette would die after my
foolish mistake, however it has really begun to come up
nicely, so I am in hopes, with great care, it will be all right ;
but not, of course, in time for the show. Tl be content if it
ever flowers at all.”

“ And how does the school get on?” asked Mrs. Tracy.

“We go every day,” replied Madge. “I can now read
almost quite well, ma’am.”

“Tam glad to hear it,” said Mrs. Tracy. “Once you can
read you'll never be lonely. I don’t know what I would do
without it here by myself, though indeed, except my Bible
and prayer-book, I have hardly any books; but I read them
over and over till I know them nearly off by heart.”

“ Are you fond of stories ¢” asked Madge.
MORE RECRUITS AND A GREAT OBJECT GAINED. 99

“Tndeed I am,” answered the woman. “When I was a
girl in service, my mistress used to say I read too much!
Have you any you could lend me ?”

“No. I have not been long enough at school to get a
prize yet,” replied Madge. “ The other girls have beautiful
prize books, and I will too, some day. But, ma’am, if you
only belonged to our Band of Hope, there is a grand library
where you can get books, and change them whenever you
like, and you've only to pay sixpence for six months.”

“Bless me! but I'd like to join that,’ said Mrs. Tracy.
“Why, that is next to nothing.”

“Ah! but it’s only for members,” said Madge, shaking her
head.

“Well, ’m almost the same as one,” said Mrs. Tracy. “1
never touch a drop of anything, though I never actually
signed the pledge.”

“That won't do,” said Madge sagely. “I know, because I
went with a girl to ask about it for her sister; it’s only real
members can join.”

“Dear me, that’s a pity!” said Mrs. Tracy. “Id like well
to join, for my son—he that is a soldier in India—sent me
some money when he heard I was ill, so I could afford it.”

“Suppose you join the Band of Hope,” suggested Madge,
“then you could.”

“T never liked to do that,’ said Mrs. Tracy, “I never
took anything, but I always thought if I signed the pledge
people would think I’d had to do it.”

“Let them think what they like,” said Madge stoutly. “I
100 MORE RECRUITS AND A GREAT OBJECT GAINED.

wouldn’t care if I was you: I’d just do what I thought was
right.”

“ Besides, how could I get the books?” said Mrs. Tracy.
“T’m so lame, I couldn’t get up and down these stairs,
much less walk so far.”

“T would do it for you,” cried Madge. “O Mrs. Tracy,
do join the Band of Hope, join for me, and be one of my
ten! Do: you'll like it so much, every one does.”

“I won't promise,” said Mrs. Tracy, “though maybe I'll
see about it. I couldn’t walk so far.”

“JT wish you’d come and live in our house,” said Madge,
“there’s a room on the groundfloor empty now, just behind
Mrs. Connor’s, so you’d have no stairs to go up.”

“Ts there?” said Mrs. Tracy interested. “Could you find
out about it for me, child? I’m lost at the top of this
house, for I’ve nobody hardly to come near me.”

“Indeed, I will,” said Madge. “Mrs,.Connor will know
all about it.”

“ And will you come soon to tell me?”

“JT will,” said Madge laughing, “on condition you'll do
as I ask you.”

“Well, I'll think about it,” said Mrs. Tracy, laughing too,
“and I’ll tell you when you come. I’d like well to go
live in your house; it would be company-like, for it’s very
lonesome here since I can’t use my leg. Only for my boy
sending me that money, I’d have to go into the workhouse,
for I don’t know when I'll be able to work again.” -

Madge asked Mrs. Connor, as she promised, about the
MORE RECRUITS AND A GREAT OBJECT GAINED. 101

room, and with a satisfactory answer went next day to tell
Mrs. Tracy. One advantage poor people have over rich is
that they can manage their flittings with so much less
trouble. No notice to quit was necessary, but when the
week was up she had only to go, and an hour sufficed to do
all. A donkey cart carried Mrs. Tracy and all her worldly
possessions from one house to the other, she herself being
seated on a feather-bed; and once settled, by the assistance
of Mrs. Connor and Madge, she felt almost in a palace in her
tiny back parlour, without having those long, weary stairs
to mount, which, as Mrs. Connor observed, would give her
leg a chance now of getting well. Madge was not slow to
claim her reward of getting Mrs. Tracy to join the Band of
Hope, which, backed as it was by arguments from the
Connors and Mrs. Stevenson, she at length, to Madge’s
great joy, agreed to do! Her objection of not being able to
walk so far was met by Connor offering her the use of his
strong arm to lean on. So, on Monday evening they set off,
Mrs. Tracy with a sixpence safe inside her cotton glove,
ready to pay her subscription to the library as soon as she
was entitled to the privilege of doing so!

She was still very lame, so they had to walk but slowly;
consequently, when they reached the hall it was pretty well
filled, and they were obliged to go into the back benches;
but they heard well enough, and made their way up to the
front when the meeting concluded, where, to Madge’s great
‘Surprise, who should be at the table but Miss Alice Gilbert
and her French maid! The little girls smiled their recogni-
102 MORE RECRUITS AND A GREAT OBJECT GAINED.

tion of each other, and Alice slipped round to whisper to
Madge, “I have got leave to sign, and when I have done it,
Mathilde is to sign for me; isn’t it fun?” Mr. Arnold took
the signature of the poor lame woman first, that she might
not be tired by standing too Jong, and gave Madge an
approving smile when he found she had come with her; but
when Alice Gilbert told him she was another of Madge’s
recruits, his astonishment was so great that he could not
help asking how she had ever had an opportunity of getting
‘hold of her. Alice told him immediately how it had hap-
pened, that Madge was the first person who ever spoke to
her on the subject, and that now she meant to try and get ten
recruits for herself, of whom Mathilde Perrier was the first.
Surely the circles caused by Madge’s pebble were widening
already.

But in spite of all this, there was a deep feeling of dis-
appointment in Madge’s heart. She had fully counted on
her mother being at least one of the first to sign for her,
yet day after day, and week after week passed, without her
doing it. It could not be that she was not strong enough
to walk so far, for she had been to church, and went regu-
larly to the weekly service; but every time Madge asked
her would she come next time to the Band of Hope, her
mother answered vaguely that she hoped she would soon,
but not just yet. Madge little guessed the reason for her
delay, nor how patiently her mother was biding her time,
until father would go too. She had been surprised and
thankful at the change in him when she came home, but
MORE RECRUITS AND A GREAT OBJECT GAINED. 103

knew that she would gain the desired end far better by
patience and gentleness, than if she urged him to take the
step at once, which he, she well knew, would then refuse.
So, though sorry to disappoint her little girl, she determined
to wait herself, in order to support him by example and
company whenever he would make up his mind; but this
he could not do from an uncontrollable dread of being
laughed at by his former companions. Strange that a man
who physically was afraid of nothing, should morally be
such an arrant coward! But Mrs. Stevenson never despaired,
feeling assured that what she asked faithfully she should
obtain effectually.

Summer was coming on apace, and all the school children
were looking forward to the two great treats of the year—
the local flower-show and the “excursion,” which took place
within a few days of each other before the holidays. Those
who had been before gave glowing accounts of the country
and sea, which excited Madge and Nellie to the highest pitch
of enthusiasm. They, poor children, had never even seen real
country in their lives, the nearest approach to it being pick-
ing daisies or dandelions in dusty hedges, but never beyond
the region of tram-cars, telegraph-poles, and postmen! A
whole day, therefore, far away in the country was a delight-
ful prospect. ATI the school children whom the master and
mistress recommended as deserving, were entitled to go, and
all their parents who belonged to the Band of Hope might
have this privilege also, but not unless they were members,
it being a sort of encouragement to adults to join. Madge
104 MORE RECRUITS AND A GREAT OBJECT GAINED.

was in an agony of anxiety for her “mammie” to join, so
that she, too, might have the treat. She saw how pale she
looked, how hard she worked at the never-ending knitting,
and she felt sure that a day in the fresh sea air would
freshen her up, after the closeness and heat of the little
house in Back Lane in June. But in spite of all her
coaxings and entreaties she could not get her to promise.
There was only one opportunity more, for on the next
Monday evening, after the usual meeting, the names of those
who wished to go to the excursion were to be given in, so
that provision might be made for their accommodation.
The children were not afraid now to chatter before their
father, although Madge at least seldom ventured to address
him personally ; but on the morning of this Monday she was
so full of the idea of her mother being able to go, that she
could think or talk of nothing else, urging and coaxing
with all her powers.

“You ought to go, Maggie,” said Joe to his wife. “The
child is right, you do want a breath of fresh air. Suppose
you go with her to-night and give in your name.”

Madge held her breath.

“Not without you, Joe,” said his wife in a low tone, but
firmly. :

“Well, you’re a fool, then,” said Joe, taking up his hat and
bag of tools; “you'll only lose the day’s pleasure.”

“O father,” pleaded Madge, “will you come too? Mr.
Connor is getting the day, and he says he can get it for you
too, Do, do come!”
MORE RECRUITS AND A GREAT OBTECT GAINED. 105

But her father had left the room. Madge was bitterly dis-
appointed. It was a dream, one of her few pleasant ones,
that mother should sign (she despaired of father) for her, and
that through her she should spend a long, long day enjoying
the country pleasures, of which she herself had no experi-
ence. Now the last chance was gone. If such a thing as
distrusting her mother’s wisdom and love were possible, it
would have been now; but, fortunately, it was not possible,
only Madge could not understand her reasons. Mrs. Steven-
son was grieved at having to give her little girl such pain,
and there was unusual tenderness in the kiss she gave each
crimson spot that burned in her little cheeks as she started

_for school; but she felt her duty lay with her husband rather
than with her child, and she preferred to sacrifice herself to
losing the remotest chance of one day gaining him over,
Madge walked slowly on to school, her tears dropping on
the dusty pavement, and little heeding Nellie’s unceasing
prattle. She had not felt so miserable for a long time. She
used to think if they had plenty of food, and mother at home,
nothing would be left to wish for; yet now she felt almost
more unhappy than ever in her life before. Suddenly there
came into her mind the recollection of her first day in Sun-
day-school and church; of Janie Wilson’s text, “ Ask, and it
shall be given you;” of her first real prayer when she was
hungry, and of its wonderful answer. If she had been heard
then, why should she not be again? They had reached the
school, but before going in she lifted her eyes to the cloudless
blue sky above, and murmured, “Oh! good Lord, who heard me
106 MORE RECRUITS AND A GREAT OBJECT GAINED,

before, and gave me what I asked, wilt Thou hear me again;
and, if it is right, give me what I now want so much? If not,
make me content with all Thou hast given me already, for
Jesus’ sake. Amen,” She then went up to the school-room,
determined not to let her mind run on this subject any more,
but to do her very best at her lessons. She had told God of
all her trouble and anxiety. He would do for her whatever
He knew to be right. So she felt she might leave all the
rest with Him. She worked so industriously, and did what
to her was a very difficult sum, that when a visitor happened
to come in to see the school, Madge had the pleasure of hear-
ing the mistress mention her name as one of her most diligent
pupils, who had made the greatest progress in her studies.
When the hour for needlework came, Madge was devoting
all her energies to an intricate patch which she was putting
on one of her father’s shirts (for the girls were allowed to do
their household mending at school under the teacher’s direc-
tions), when her neighbour startled her by asking—

“Are you going to the Band of Hope to-night ?”

“ Of course I am,” replied Madge. “Why?”

“Sarah and I wanted to know if we might go with you,”
said the girl. “You wanted us long ago to sign, but we
didn’t like to. However, Sarah is going to-morrow to a
situation, and she wants to sign before she goes. So I might
as well, too, for I am going to the country to my aunt in a
day or two.”

“Oh, Iam so glad,” cried Madge. “I thought you had
forgotten what I said.”
MORE RECRUITS AND A GREAT OBJECT GAINED. 107

“Oh no,” replied the girl; “we always meant, if we did it
at all, to do it for you, Madge. It was what you said made
us first ls it right, so it’s only fair you end know it
before we go.” Madge’s face glowed.

“Will you call for us, or shall we meet you there?” asked
the girl.

“T think if you meet me at the door,” said Madge, “I'll
look out for you, and we can go up together.”

So it was agreed. This was very cheering to her, for she
had known these two girls were soon going away, and greatly
feared if they did not sign before they left that they would
not afterwards. Besides, now her number of recruits was
increasing! She counted them up on her fingers—Mr. and
Mrs. Connor, two; Nurse Mooney, three; Mrs. Tracey, four;
Miss Gilbert, five; Sarah and Annie Duncan would be seven.
Yes, she was getting on! When the children went home,
Mrs. Stevenson was glad to see Madge so much herself again.
Even she did not know what had caused the change, and
attributed it to the fact of the two girls who were to sign in
the evening, of which Madge told her. Monday was Mrs.
Connor's washing-day, so Madge helped her as usual, besides
having some messages to do for Mrs. Tracy before laying the
table and boiling the kettle for their own tea, so that she
really was so busy she had not time to think much, and was
tired and hungry enough when her father came home, and
they all sat down to supper. When the church clock chimed,
Madge got up to “tidy ” herself and Nellie before going out,
but to her amazement her father got up too.
108 MORE RECRUITS AND A GREAT OBJECT GAINED,

“Maggie,” said he, nervously pinching up a crumb of bread,
“what do you say to going to-night with these youngsters ?
Tl go if you will.”

Ifshe would! Could he ask? A light came into Mrs.Steven-
son’s eyes that had not been there since she was first married
and living in their suburban cottage. This was what she had
waited for, longed for, prayed for. Her husband was a, diffe-
rent man to what he had been, but still she felt she could not
be sure he would not relapse before temptation; but once he
signed the pledge, it would be such a safeguard; his bad
companions would not care to be with him; it would give
him an interest in better things.

“O Joe, indeed, indeed I will,” she said, looking up grate-
fully at him.

Her words were not much, but he understood them. It
had caused him a considerable effort to make up his mind,
but he felt himseif now almost rewarded, for Madge, forget-
ting her dread of him, threw her arms round his neck, and,
hugging him tightly as Nellie might have done, cried, “O
father, dear father, Iam so glad! Oh, I am so glad!”

“Now mammie can come to the excursion,” put in Nellie
wisely. “She couldn’t go ’cos she'd be tired if father wasn’t
there to help her; father ’ll carry me too, if I’m tired, won’t
you?”

“Mr. Connor will be there,” said Stevenson. “He would
carry you if you're tired.”

“Ah! but he’s not father,” said the little one, burying her
curly head in his neck,
MORE RECRUITS AND A GREAT OBJECT GAINED. 109

This was conclusive. Joe wondered at himself for not
having been fonder of his children, He did not guess, for
he could not remember how cruelly he had treated them
over and over again, but those times were past. Brighter
days were dawning. Henceforward he would be a better
man,

Mr. and Mrs. Connor made no remark when they saw Joe
Stevenson, with his wife leaning on his arm, set out with
the children for the temperance meeting ; but they were very
glad, for they knew that this had long been the cherished
scheme of both Madge and her mother. At the door of the
hall were Sarah and Annie Duncan ready waiting, so they
all went in together unnoticed, for there was an unusually
large attendance that evening of old and young, on account
of so many coming to get tickets for the excursion.

When Madge brought up the two girls, Mr Arnold, as
usual, smiled, saying she was indefatigable; but when she
brought forward her father and mother to join, the smile
changed into something more, for Mr. Arnold knew and
appreciated what she had done. He could almost have
pointed the little girl out as a heroine in her own small
circle, and he felt she was an unconscious example to every
one inthe room. Joe’s hand shook so that he could hardly
sign his name when his turn came, and a mist was before
his eyes, so that he could hardly see. He was awfully
afraid of, as he expressed it, “making a fool of himself ;” but
just then their attentions were diverted by Nellie, who, after
looking about her, and nodding to all her little friends, sud-
110 MORE RECRUITS AND A GREAT OBJECT GAINED.

denly discovered that her father and mother were signing
too,

“Oh, I want to be a Band of Hope,” she cried piteously,
“T thought father was waiting for me to be big enough, but
now he’s gone and done it without me.”

Madge was scandalised at Nellie making such a disturb-
ance, but the child would not be pacified, and kept repeating
in piteous tones, “I want to be a Band of Hope.”

“Well, so you shall, my little woman,” said Mr. Arnold
kindly, “when you are old enough to write your name.”

“But 1 want to be it now,” sobbed Nellie, “and Iam able
to write my name now. I know all about it, and I wanted
to try whether father or I would keep it best. Please, mayn’t
I do it dow?”

Mr. Arnold patted the little girl’s head, “Yes, I think
you may,” said he; “you are in good hands, and I am not
afraid of your undertaking such a solemn promise without
knowing what it means. Yes, you may join the Band of
Hope to-night.”

Nellie was in great delight. She dried her tears, and
making her father lift her up high enough at the table,
signed “ Nellie Stevenson,” in big roundhand letters, which
more than covered the space on the card allotted to the
name.

The whole party then went to the other room, where they
gave in their names to a gentleman as members of the Band
of Hope, who wished to go to the country excursion on
Thursday.
CHAPTER XII.

A TREAT OF FLOWERS.

“Take up a subject and pursue it well, and you cannot fail to succeed,
There is fortune in it if you pursue it with energy.”
—Dr, Marshall Hall.

OnE day while the children were at school as usual,
a handsome carriage and pair appeared in Back Lane, and
stopped at the Stevensons’ door. Miss Arnold, followed by
a sweet, gentle-looking lady, alighted, and, after knocking,
entered. Mrs. Stevenson curtsied, while she placed chairs
for her visitors, saying as she did so, “I beg your pardon,
ladies, I did not hear you come up.”

“ Never mind, Mrs. Stevenson,” said Miss Arnold pleasantly,
“I came to see how you are, and to bring this lady, who
wanted to see you. This is Mrs. Gilbert, whom you know
so well by name, don’t you?”

“J have wished for a long time to come to see you,” said
Mrs. Gilbert, “and to tell you how grateful I feel to your
little girl for what she did for mine; but I am not strong.”

“OQ ma’am,” said Mrs. Stevenson in confusion, “don’t
mention it, you have already done so much for us, it’s we that
ought to be grateful to you, and so we are, ma’am.”

“Nay,” said Mrs. Gilbert gently, “you must let me thank
you; if my child had done an equally brave act, I know how
112 A TREAT OF FLOWERS.

proud and pleased I should feel, and you must feel the same
for your little girl.”

Mrs. Stevenson’s eyes glistened as she said, “She is a good
child, ma’am, I must say that for her. She is always trying
to help some one, and never thinking of herself. It was
that made her do what she did that day; she never thought
of being praised or rewarded.”

“T know that, indeed,” said Mrs. Gilbert warmly; “it is
one reason I am sorry I cannot do more for her now, but as
long as we are both spared, I hope she will find me a true
friend. I came to-day to pay you for some of the work you
have done already, and to ask if you would like to under-
take another job—a large quilt in fine cotton, which I wish
to get done, but for which I am in no hurry.”

“Thank you, ma’am,” said Mrs. Stevenson gladly, “I'll
be only too pleased; knitting is no trouble to me, and it is
such a geat comfort to feel I can do something to help us on.”

While Mrs. Gilbert took out her purse to pay what she
owed, Miss Arnold glanced round the room, contrasting it
mentally with what it had been the day of her first visit,
now many months ago. Of course there was still very little
furniture, but what there was, was beautifully clean. Mrs.
Gilbert followed the direction of her eyes, and said, “How
nicely you keep your room; but is it not a great exertion
to you when you are still so delicate ?”

“Me, ma’am!” answered Mrs. Stevenson, “Oh, I never do
anything; I could not stoop down for scrubbing as I used to
do. Madge keeps the room just as you see it.”
A TREAT OF FLOWERS. 1138

“Is it possible?” exclaimed Mrs. Gilbert in surprise.
“What a clever child she must be!”

“Of course I show her what to do,” explained Mrs. Steven-
son. “J used to bea hard worker myself. I was brought
up in a farm-house, where I was taught all a good servant
ought to do. So I know how it ought to be done, and I am
very particular with Madge, not to pass over any mistake.”

“ Quite right,” said Mrs. Gilbert. “It is no kindness to a
girl to be easily satisfied with half-done work.”

“T daresay she sometimes thinks me over particular,” said
Mrs. Stevenson with a quiet smile, “ when I make her go all
over again something she thinks quite bright enough, but
she will see the sense of it some day. If I have nothing else
to give her, I can at least give her a good training that will
stand to her whatever her future may be.”

“Well, this room speaks well for both you and her,” said
Miss Arnold. “She has improved marvellously in every way
since I first made her acquaintance.”

“T see you are fond of flowers,” said Mrs. Gilbert, standing
up and going to the window to look at the sweet-pea and
mignonnette.

“Yes, ma'am, but those are Madge’s,” said Mrs. Stevenson.
“She thinks a deal of them flowers. I wish every child was
as well cared !”

“They are for the flower show,” explained Miss Arnold to
Mrs. Gilbert. “There will be prizes given for the best plants,
which must be grown by the members themselves.”

“ Members?” inquired Mrs, Gilbert in a puzzled me
114 A TREAT OF FLOWERS.

“Of the Band of Hope,” said Miss Arnold laughing. “T
forgot you were not quite so conversant with the term as we
are. Everything in this parish hinges on ‘The Band of
Hope,’ doesn’t it, Mrs. Stevenson ?”

“Tudeed that it does, ma’am,” answered she in a heartfelt
manner, which Miss Arnold understood.

Meantime Madge and Nellie were running home from school
as fast as they could. As they came to Back Lane, Nellie
exclaimed, “ Look, sissy, there is our carriage I do believe!”

“¢QOur carriage,’ you funny child; what do you mean?”
said Madge laughing.

“Yes it is,” persisted Nellie. “I remember Mr. Smithson’s
face, and his lovely big horses.”

“So it is really,” said Madge in surprise; “and it’s at our
door too. I wonder what brings it there?”

“Maybe Miss Alice has come to see mammie,” said Nellie.

“Well, little one,” said Smithson, looking down kindly
from his lofty seat, “I’m glad to see you well, You see I
don’t forget you.”

“Thank you, sir,” said Madge smiling, “I don’t forget you.”

“Here are the ladies,” said Smithson, gathering up his
reins as Mrs. Gilbert, followed by Miss Arnold, came out of
the narrow door. j

“We have just been looking at your flowers,” said Mrs.
Gilbert kindly. “You seem to have taken great care of them.”

“They look very well, Madge,” said Miss Arnold. “I
daresay you will have a chance of a prize for them.”

Madge’s face beamed with pleasure.
A TREAT OF FLOWERS. 115

“ Arve you fond of growing flowers?” asked Mrs. Gilbert.

“Oh yes, ma'am,” replied Madge, “I love them, but I never
tried rearing any until now.”

“Well, if you would like to have some cuttings and young
geraniums,” said Mrs. Gilbert, “if you come to my house this
evening I shall give you several. ‘They will be allowed also
at the flower show, will they not? or must there be only
annuals ?”

“Yes, there are other prizes for them,” said Madge eagerly.
“Oh, thank you, ma’am, I’d dearly like to have some of them,
but ”—and her face fell—*TI forgot I must have the plant at
least three months myself or I couldn’t send it in to the show,
that is one of the rules. I am sorry.”

“Never mind,” said Mrs. Gilbert, “you can come all the
same and get the plants, and perhaps your father would come
with you to-night to help you to carry them. The pots will be
heavy, and awkward besides; you never could manage by
yourself. Now, good-bye; I shall expect you this evening.”

Madge made her lowest curtsey, then rushed upstairs to
tell her mother the good news; for if there was anything
Madge longed for, it was to have some plants of her own to
take care of through the winter, and she pictured to herself
how pretty their room would look with the window full of
brilliant scarlet, pink, or white flowers.

“What a respectable, sensible woman that is,” remarked
Mrs. Gilbert as they drove off. “She seems quite above the
ordinary run of people in that rank.”

“Yes,” answered Miss Arnold, “she is one of the very few
116 A TREAT OF FLOWERS,

mothers we meet who see that the greatest kindness they
can show their children is to teach them to work, and make
them do it. We so often find clever, hard-working women
allowing their daughters to grow up idle, useless fine ladies.
They do not mind how hard they themselves work, but they
like to spare their children.”

“Tt is a false kindness,” observed Mrs. Gilbert. “TI believe
in the old saying that ‘a light-footed mother makes a heavy-
footed daughter!’ Don’t you? But still, I think, there must
be something particularly good to work on in that little girl
Madge.”

“She is a good child,” said Miss Arnold warmly. “You
have no idea what she has had to contend with, nor how
wonderfully she has improved in the short time that I have
known her. When I first saw her she was in the depths of
misery, with her mother away sick in hospital for months,
and a drunken father, who gave them barely as much food
as kept them alive. That room which we admired just now
for its cleanliness was simply wretched, while she and Nellie
were in rags, miserable, delicate-looking children.”

“She looks the picture of health now, at anyrate,” remarked
Mrs. Gilbert, “in spite of her hard work.”

«And hard it certainly is,” added Miss Arnold. “I suppose
she has done quite a day’s work already before they went to
school; and she will be busy now until bed-time, but she
never fails to make time to attend all our Band of Hope
meetings. She is one of the most regular, as well as active,
of our members.”
A TREAT OF FLOWERS. 117

“Where there’s a will; there’s a way,” said Mrs. Gilbert
reflectively. “It is curious that although the temperance
movement has been all my life of the deepest interest to me,
I have never spoken much to Alice on the subject, while
this poor little strange girl, the very first time they met,
spoke to Alice so strongly about this Band of Hope of yours
as to thoroughly arouse her sympathies and interest.”

“ Out of the mouths of babes,” quoted Miss Arnold; “ you
see children have a way of entering heartily into things
that we grown-up people seldom can do; they are so single-
minded, they do not fear being ridiculed or laughed at for
riding their hobbies, as, I am afraid, we too often are!”

“T think Alice bids fair to be as energetic a member as
Madge,” said Mrs. Gilbert laughing. “Our maid Mathilde
signed for her the very evening Alice did so herself ; and
now she is trying her best to persuade some of her cousins
to join also. You know most of our friends are, unfortun-
ately, quite of the other way of thinking, and chaff Alice
unmercifully about her pledge-card ; but she does not mind
that in the least, and I think she has almost succeeded in
persuading some of her little friends to join, although getting
their parents’ consent has been no easy matter.’

“ How very nice,” exclaimed Miss Arnold; “that is great
encouragement to us, and I assure you we often need it,
for there are ‘lions in the path’ at every turn. It is very
pleasant occasionally to get a little bit of cheering news like
this, to help us on in our task, and show that it is not in
yain }”
118 A TREAT OF FLOWERS,

7

“ Mathilde, too, has taken it up ‘con amore,” continued
Mrs. Gilbert. “I think she and Alice are trying who will
get the most recruits, as they call it. Mathilde has begun
to preach quite a temperance crusade in the servants’ hall;
so much so, that I should not wonder if she succeeded in
making all the servants teetotalers before long.”

“T must tell father of what you say,” said Miss Arnold,
“he will be greatly pleased. It is just like his simile of the
pebble thrown into the water, of which he was telling the
people one evening lately at the Band of Hope meet-
ing.”

“ What was that ?” inquired Mrs. Gilbert.

“You see he always tries to speak as plainly there as
possible,” said Miss Arnold; and, on this particular occasion,
when speaking of the spreading influences of total absti-
nence, he compared it to a pebble thrown (by some child’s
hand, perhaps) into a smooth stream, causing one circle after
another to rise on the surface, each widening into several
more still wider, till at last the outermost circles reached
the shore from side to side.”

“Tt is a pretty idea,” observed Mrs. Gilbert thoughtfully,
“and a very true one, too. I suppose we hardly consider
how many opportunities we lose of saying or doing some-
thing useful or good. Indeed, Emily, you make me feel quite
ashamed of myself for being such a useless drone, now that
I have had a peep into this busy hive of working bees!”

“Nonsense,” said Miss Arnold laughing, “our lives run in
such totally different grooves that they cannot bear compari-
A TREAT OF FLOWERS. 119

son; besides you are so far from strong, whereas I am blessed
with a superabundant supply of health and energy!”

“Won't you come in?” asked Mrs. Gilbert, “1 am just
going to have my afternoon tea, do come, and join me at it.”

“Thank you very much, but not to-day,’ said Miss
Arnold, “I must hurry home now, as already I am rather
late. We dine early, and father will be waiting for his tea,
wondering what has become of me. He has a lecture to-night
at which he is to preside, so I must not delay. Good-bye,
Mrs, Gilbert, and many thanks for this pleasant drive, it has
been quite a treat to me this warm day.”

“That is a good girl,” thought Mrs. Gilbert, as she
watched Miss Arnold hurrying along the square. “ Whata
help she must be to her father, and how her influence must
strengthen his hands.” And as she slowly went upstairs,
she pondered, whether in spite of her really delicate health,
she might not be able to do more for the good of others.

That evening punctually at the hour named, Madge and
her father arrived at the door in Buckland Square, he
remaining outside while Madge was taken into the conserva-
tory, where Mrs. Gilbert had set apart for her two beautiful
geraniums and a pot of musk, besides slips of several of the
other plants, for which Mr. Gilbert gave her money to buy
proper mould and pots. Madge gratefully thanked them,
and, with her father’s help, took the flowers home, delightedly
anticipating next year’s show when these cuttings would be
grand plants,
CHAPTER XIII

THE EXCURSION,

“ Now from the town
Buried in smoke, and sleep, and noisome damps,
Oft let me wander o’er the dewy fields,
Where freshness breathes, and dash the trembling drops
From the bent bush, as thro’ the verdant maze
Of sweet-briar hedges I pursue my walk.”
—Thomson.

‘God made the country, man made the town.”
—Cowper.

THURSDAY morning dawned beautiful and bright as any one
could desire, with the soft haze which surely betokens a
hot day. Buta hot day at the seaside is very different to
the same ina close lane! It was perfect weather for an
excursion, and fully an hour before the appointed time,
groups of children began to assemble at the place of meeting.

There was only one drawback to Mrs. Stevenson’s pleasure
in going, and that was the shabbiness of her and Joe’s
clothes. During her long illness, when she almost thought
she would never recover, they had parted with her best
things, while he had only his working clothes, which already
were sadly worn, She was not proud, but on an occasion of
this kind she would certainly have liked to make a decent
appearance ; so she washed, ironed, and brushed, but without
any very marked result. However, the night before the
THE EXCURSION, 121

excursion, a parcel arrived from Mrs. Gilbert, containing a
dress, cloak, and bonnet of her own, plain and nice, for Mrs.
Stevenson, and an entire suit of her husband’s rough tweed
shooting clothes for Joe. Nothing could be more opportune.
Madge wondered how Mrs. Gilbert could have known they
wanted them so much just then; but her mother privately
thought Miss Arnold knew something about it. Anyway she
was very thankful, for now Joe would have no excuse for not
going to church. It was a very happy party that sallied
forth from the house in Back Lane, the Connors and Steven-
sons going together, Mrs. Tracy alone remaining to keep
house, but with one of her beloved library books she was
not lonely, and nodded cheerfully to the children, who waved
their hands to her as long as they were in sight. Joe
Stevenson began to feel very proud of his wife and children
in their nice clothes. He had not seen his Maggie look so
well since she was a girl. Madge and Nellie’s admiration
for “mammie” knew no bounds, they thought there was
nobody in the whole party who could compare with her!
Great was the excitement at the railway station, but, con-
sidering the number of travellers, they were packed into
their places with wonderfully little confusion, and at last
the heavily-laden train started, with long cheers from the
excited children. At first, as they passed the outskirts
of the town, the women hanging clothes to dry in the
little yards or children playing in the streets, looked up
at the train with its carriages filled with bright-faced
children, who occasionally recognised a companion or friend,
122 THE EXCURSION,

and cheered accordingly ; but a very few minutes brought
them out of the region of brick and mortar, and then what
joy! everything gave pleasure, the wild roses in the hedges,
the hay-fields, sheep, cows, the farmyards by which they
flew, with their cocks and hens, pigs and ducks, everything
was new to the poor little town children. “ Who will be the
first to see the sea?” said Mr. Arnold, who was guarding a
large contingent of children. Every eye was strained imme-
diately, and Madge exclaimed, “I do!” but what she thought
must be the sea, was only a lake, of not very large size even.
So after a hearty laugh at her mistake she subsided. But
when the real sea did appear, even the noisiest child was
awed ; it was so grand, so beautiful, so much larger than they
expected. The sun was dancing on the little waves, which
sparkled and glittered like millions of diamonds. Several
boats were gliding about, and in the distance the smoke of a
steamer was visible against the horizon. Madge was speech-
less with admiration and astonishment. This was more than ~
her wildest dreams had pictured. “O mammie!” she cried,
when at last she could find words, “I had no idea the sea
would be so big. I never saw anything before so lovely.”
But now the train stopped, and the platform of the little
country station was crowded with eager children, almost
tumbling over each other in their fear of being carried on.
Another cheer was raised as the train steamed on its way,
while its passengers looked out of the windows smiling at the
excited little crowd. Then they were marshalled in order, and
led to a delightful hayfield close to the seashore, where they
THE EXCURSION. 123

might either tumble in the sweet, new-mown hay, or pick
shells on the beach. In fact, the day was all too short for
the pleasures to be enjoyed, and the children trying to do
everything rushed wildly back and forward, not knowing
which they liked best. Mr. Arnold guessing that most of
the party had started very early indeed, and must be hungry,
had dinner ready, and very ready the guests were for it.
How they did enjoy the nice cold meat, pies, or puddings
which were provided in abundance, and how heartily they
joined in thanking God for these and all His other mercies.
After dinner, the men generally went for a long walk, the
children went to pick shells, and Mrs. Connor and Mrs.
Stevenson, not being walkers, seated themselves in the
delicious, newly-cut hay to enjoy a chat, but not idly, for the
latter produced the inevitable knitting from her pocket,
while little Nellie, in perfect enjoyment, made daisy chains at
their feet. Then came tea, with quantities of cake and
gooseberries ; the children trooped back to the field at the
sound of the big bell, their pockets bulging out with shells
or seaweeds, their handkerchiefs filled with treasures, and
their shoes wet and filled with sand. But little recked they
of such trifles! Nothing but dire fatigue reconciled them
to the necessity of going home; but when the shadows on
the grass grew long, and the western sky was brilliant with
crimson and gold, melting into the blue sea and tinging its
waves with purple, although there was a murmur that it
was an “awful pity ” to have to leave so soon, even the most
active person was getting tired, and there were many sleepy
124 THE EXCURSION.

eyes before they were long in the train. But it had been a
happy day! Joe Stevenson acknowledged to himself that
he had not thought it possible he would ever again enjoy
anything so much, and was pleased and proud to feel his
wife leaning on his arm, while be carried his little Nellie,
already fast asleep with one little arm round his neck.
Madge did not wonder now that “the excursion” was a topic
of interest all the year, and went to sleep, looking forward
already to the next one, and dreaming of trains, sea, boats,
shells, daisies, and sweet-smelling hay, all mixed in one
jumble!

But there was still one more piece of excitement before
the holidays—the flower show. Almost every child in the
school had taken seeds to grow for this, so great was the
emulation among them as to who should gain prizes.

Mrs. Stevenson had shown Madge how to tie up the sweet-
pea and mignonnette with slender sticks to keep them from
growing unevenly, and no day had passed without her giving
them careful watering and turning the pots round, that each
side equally might have the benefit of the sun. Consequently
her flowers -were really in very good condition, and the
unfortunate mignonnette, in its old biscuit-tin, not only
had struggled up, but was actually showing signs of
blossom.

All the flowers were to be taken to the hall on a certain
day, when they were to be judged and exhibited to the.
public. And the prizes were to be awarded to the successful
competitors on the following Monday evening at the Band





THE EXCURSION. 125

of Hope mecting, when prizes would also be given for the
best essays and examinations.

Madge was afraid of knocking off one blossom from her
precious plants if she carried them herself, and was puzzled
how she could get them safely conveyed to the hall, when
her father volunteered to carry them for her. So, following
with the mignonnette herself, as there was no danger of its
tiny flower being spoiled, they set out for the hall. There was
quite an imposing array of flowers, each with the name, age,
and address of its owner plainly written on a card attached to
it. The annuals were all placed together in one division; the
geraniums, fuschias, calceolarias, pelargoniums in another,
and ferns in another. There were several window-boxes full
of flowers in brilliant bloom ; some most tastefully arranged
with a background of fuschia like a bower, shading the more
delicate geraniums and prince’s feather. When the public
were admitted there was great excitement to see who had
gained prizes, but it was capitally managed, for there were
so many divisions and sections, according to age or residence
of the children, that hardly any one was left out without, at
least, a card marked “Highly commended.” Madge was

overjoyed to find her sweet-pea had gained a first prize, while
a mysterious card, unlike any other in the collection, was

fastened to the tin of mignonnette. Nobody could make out
what it meant, so she was obliged to wait in patience until
Monday evening, when the prizes would be awarded and
this mystery cleared up. Her friend, Janie Wilson, had
gained several honours, both for annuals and larger plants,
126 THE EXCURSION.

while a large glass of delicate maiden-hair fern attracted
general admiration, and was unanimously pronounced de-
serving of a first prize. Madge felt very happy, holding
Nellie’s little hand as of old, as she walked round the rooms,
but now with father and mother close behind. She looked
forward to Monday evening with eagerness, for father had
promised to come that he might see her get her prize, and
perhaps, if he liked it very much, he might make that a
beginning, and attend regularly.

When the evening came, the house-door was locked, for
even Mrs. Tracy hobbled out, and all arriving early, got
good places in the front seats. But to Madge’s surprise,
unlike the ordinary Band of Hope nights, there was on the
table the display of medals and ribbons which had so
attracted her that first memorable evening that she had gone
in. And when Mr. Arnold took his place, he announced that
before the prizes for the flower show were given away, there
was to be a distribution of medals to all who had earned
them, by having kept the pledge for a whole year.

Of course this was most interesting, for besides the feeling
that if they were all spared for a few months more, they
would themselves be entitled to go up for their medals, there
were a great many going up whom they knew, several being
school-fellows of the children. Then there was a pause, and
Mr. Arnold said, he had now a pleasing but most unusual
duty to perform, namely, to award a silver bar to a little
girl who had gained ten recruits, although she was not yet
a year in the society, and therefore had nota medal. Madge’s
THE EXCURSION. 127

heart began to beat, and her cheeks to burn, surely it was
very like her case, only she had not yet ten recruits, only
nine—stay, Nellie had signed! Yes, she was the tenth;
could Mr. Arnold mean her? She was not long in suspense,
for the secretary in a loud voice called “Madge Stevenson,”
and she had to go up. There was something almost affec-
tionate in Mr. Arnold’s voice and manner as he handed her
the blue ribbon with a tiny bar upon it, saying that he
hoped ere long she would have her medal too, to hang at the
other end. Madge returned to her seat blushing at the loud
applause which she received, and which her father and Mr.
Connor assisted to give her with all their might, while
Nellie, wriggling on her seat with glee, and clapping her
little hands, cried, “Only for me, Madge, you wouldn’t have
got that. If I hadn’t been a Band of Hope that night you
wouldn’t have had ten recruits! Iam so glad I helped to
get it for you!” Then came, what seemed now the less
important ceremony of distributing the prizes, and Madge
received as her first prize a nicely bound Bible, while for
her unfortunate mignonnette, Mr Arnold, amid much amuse-
ment and laughing from the judges, awarded her a special
prize of a small story book, saying that it was the general
opinion that under the circumstances the plant must either
be unusually healthy, or have had unusual attention and
care to allow it to grow at all! and so they considered it
deserved a very special prize to itself !

After singing the doxology, the meeting broke up, and
our friends returned to their humble home in Back Lane,
128 THE EXCURSION.

happy with their pleasant evening, thankful for having
been enabled to take advantage of it, and filled with earnest
hopes for the future, that in their own ways they might
strive to perform their duty to their neighbour as faithfully
and humbly as little Madge had done hers, and with the
same confidence that whatever they should ask, believing,
they should receive.

e@

THE END.

JOHN S. MARR AND SONS, GLASGOW.
93h 1159


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describe
'38498' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHUZ' 'sip-files00111.pro'
ba080ff57136a86b2445021db4a911ec
1a333c72aef03494742ccf0b5dcd739cd89c78bd
'2012-05-18T12:59:43-04:00'
describe
'380380' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHVA' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
e4604983a3cf442fcdaf62c9d56365dd
8c553e5c6809dc65579374738ab540e9d7f3b0b8
'2012-05-18T12:58:03-04:00'
describe
'55216' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHVB' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
57ac6cf9da2379cac432da508fe4887e
0938287eedf56811d0e28b2e5464ebd97cfa0f86
'2012-05-18T13:00:39-04:00'
describe
'54924' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHVC' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
648110db6caab26d6894d3ecd873f232
eebb21233ee022dcc11adc8557412e10a67942b3
'2012-05-18T12:56:45-04:00'
describe
'146965' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHVD' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
93f58afb21971cf15895848879313342
f8893c667da3d74d9a0bf13d586a4b1b2299359f
'2012-05-18T13:00:01-04:00'
describe
'348110' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHVE' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
48bd05dd8a663833e456f668a2e75727
bb93049af2ed61f7a43e0839afcc9ba4f65d627a
'2012-05-18T12:59:11-04:00'
describe
'415352' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHVF' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
54374ae8167be0af1c5dfad5bf31a12f
fce6f1b89486415f3e24a47a37e5904ef89b5031
'2012-05-18T13:00:36-04:00'
describe
'443975' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHVG' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
ee2babaa0d9832c867592105e41a5f08
b6fc2242ccd09a0111ea8e99e718bdf38edafb24
'2012-05-18T12:59:03-04:00'
describe
'422037' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHVH' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
f6100fa456a50e9a19013224cf781afc
fe5460618c7adf969dcc8a0548866f93a76ffd39
'2012-05-18T13:00:10-04:00'
describe
'54785' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHVI' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
2393b88d1c5e142e54b067d1ddae5c88
4f7bd3661bc583ec0252dcbc2030277d097bb7ee
'2012-05-18T12:55:45-04:00'
describe
'357833' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHVJ' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
20e74a6aed7682ef1014f588e15552e4
5819a4c37d3056fc4485bc11f3d1ddebceee7eb9
'2012-05-18T12:57:52-04:00'
describe
'54110' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHVK' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
61cac66666ceb91c801dc46c12e422e4
12aef702c32d558e1abfb70c014ff3ab53f48805
describe
'354158' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHVL' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
73450d7e0f46b9118291abb345d4e81e
ef2fc624c69a7281ad313a904c7e530cf60df0a5
'2012-05-18T12:55:54-04:00'
describe
'56569' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHVM' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
8b144a2e5865653b5c9b752bb94ea0a6
3c7debff9cb9d591f18274ab3c393c0eda111c5c
'2012-05-18T12:55:55-04:00'
describe
'55623' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHVN' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
cbb3fe9e3683bf6731d8c745a7d358c0
086538028d038fabe3ba5131e1e29705a6159c24
describe
'354244' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHVO' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
2d0382d7dbeef57d465d68d86622d575
1f508822abbb66987d09b03499a586da30304011
'2012-05-18T12:58:29-04:00'
describe
'38323' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHVP' 'sip-files00058.pro'
c2780c493ae7dee3862c71bc27719ba4
42b0b1e62253f03d2024b911bf893d6de4bc763f
'2012-05-18T12:57:16-04:00'
describe
'363133' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHVQ' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
c135f66779b55c596effe95235494f51
76c08c8154a1c40c3b72761ab57a266433a1319e
'2012-05-18T12:59:41-04:00'
describe
'453186' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHVR' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
4e00df21863c57ce4daf13a74e28ac5d
d9e1e4f86b568b175fe758a5a7e74452fa290909
describe
'444068' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHVS' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
36d95090cbd1dc1b148ab4ad4aedb0d4
ef117bac7426b2138d686dc02639c821d9fb2c37
'2012-05-18T12:57:21-04:00'
describe
'347895' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHVT' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
8fae90321563d31ce657f2a89e30b2d3
259f822bfaabbb609ae902f4504870aa2f8425ba
'2012-05-18T12:56:22-04:00'
describe
'55813' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHVU' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
e1906d2886937148e66db9a572ac55ea
aafbcd40c2ad7b680091fa0b6853a95a7ff104ec
'2012-05-18T12:55:53-04:00'
describe
'356254' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHVV' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
be7aa9e73bfdab62c8c37ea4c4ae6094
a25905c528b7bba84b5ddca39b66cfccd0a429fa
'2012-05-18T12:56:00-04:00'
describe
'1775' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHVW' 'sip-files00097.txt'
a1d12a5aef08486036c6b6eaab629b4b
a77fc5e03cefa233dd0378e2a2ddbbb4f0faad0c
'2012-05-18T13:01:20-04:00'
describe
'54007' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHVX' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
036154f0b06ec4e0c1bf14a793ab22ae
725427b9cd989f0e3857ba576912a9bb3383c6d6
'2012-05-18T12:56:34-04:00'
describe
'356232' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHVY' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
e535a1d330f5203bf2d8d3d1f3051e1b
7f24a98c55e39c29c0cd5a7f6e6a1c86829fc00c
'2012-05-18T13:00:26-04:00'
describe
'447041' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHVZ' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
4571422c32681dc56097afba8115ea65
69b83d11044c6d95cdfae31f898202f0e745f31d
'2012-05-18T12:55:49-04:00'
describe
'3033396' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHWA' 'sip-files00064.tif'
3dddd4296b7273a99b56b0a4390873df
3e75e8205da8afdc23f4baa5e9115fc07be43266
'2012-05-18T12:56:10-04:00'
describe
'53126' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHWB' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
e3f1ade3efd3752d99baccb77afa68e1
52467b0f226fcec4f42922767a8b0f86b7921aef
'2012-05-18T13:01:09-04:00'
describe
'148438' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHWC' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
3c06215d149fa8a96d3707530329284f
88735cf74614ec3d1f4906d2050e2ae137d70c15
'2012-05-18T12:55:33-04:00'
describe
'156069' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHWD' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
baaf054891d9b96713184c5ea3e20313
e9b9d441626bf4f4115e94114a37192a59b54f69
describe
'41840' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHWE' 'sip-files00028.pro'
355a3de665c553c4d7f260021456ab68
4f099cc8eb569119c6b1d0534bf065a5108fb084
'2012-05-18T12:57:34-04:00'
describe
'559' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHWF' 'sip-files00132.txt'
8f797fff9fb02ab351af3342552d8eb0
59051a27d1e77648b6c28201e9c651f7b2395416
'2012-05-18T12:58:30-04:00'
describe
'43590' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHWG' 'sip-files00126.pro'
0011faf919c3b41fc63d5167bfbd56d3
c50b121f328702fdacddf302762f5102c666be6b
'2012-05-18T12:57:17-04:00'
describe
'2874828' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHWH' 'sip-files00026.tif'
6835acb1e046678ec14563add1561cff
1df5c480e4c2402d016e882b6df0341e1b93ff85
'2012-05-18T12:57:59-04:00'
describe
'1491' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHWI' 'sip-files00018.txt'
305895f69de57c5494a465f72ed5f8eb
19221864f5e3ddd3973bb898ecd0a925b503031f
'2012-05-18T13:00:20-04:00'
describe
'41359' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHWJ' 'sip-files00075.pro'
3cbe2d2bf37d4243baa767b320d12ad0
f5f83aca05bc64cc031cb7c88c4674640ab4f0c5
describe
'2970132' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHWK' 'sip-files00005.tif'
26d1df30d2ce0d7da03b0371f49d8af6
0c353370e2d122522e5692b1d69dfe9195cf00a9
'2012-05-18T12:56:31-04:00'
describe
'431905' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHWL' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
37dc6c6754531a1e2e7a6b8b688a73a5
4dd3ed2028b3b644feab233835cc77e271958f2a
'2012-05-18T12:56:52-04:00'
describe
'436819' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHWM' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
5da9e3885e281b5ab1e4c8dd7c4858ad
1e12c2eec835f51a79113de9f5d6c0507ae9ea5b
'2012-05-18T12:58:27-04:00'
describe
'373779' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHWN' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
f35207e49c7dfe584239ef5da4643dae
03f99b61cffd5175b561a3c8f2360584677b3fc5
'2012-05-18T13:01:22-04:00'
describe
'2952852' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHWO' 'sip-files00020.tif'
656eed041be9d6f27f46aae4fcf9056c
e23979f11d195c92c7773d38d97746a440312d22
'2012-05-18T12:59:36-04:00'
describe
'40513' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHWP' 'sip-files00118.pro'
eeaa8d91fd711b18ba1f32f6c59f5f7c
f86fabbfa1306913874c68a4e73c0282508a81cf
describe
'355594' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHWQ' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
f05cac15d1298c272a98bcb81efeeadc
36305161f230beaf8e7f6368cfd5a141df748abb
'2012-05-18T12:57:13-04:00'
describe
'40556' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHWR' 'sip-files00009.pro'
3393bc90aba29e73c0e8cb6eafa0c397
bf11f7f86f4a872c4a36ccc1aabbfebc3cebddfe
'2012-05-18T13:01:14-04:00'
describe
'372293' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHWS' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
916e7ee4deba7db72ceaa551b1384efc
8b2248d782a6ca8851acea1b2f1a7fb8b52b80d2
describe
'372829' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHWT' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
0e31cd9f37aaae008b7a3feb6a713ffd
d8b7869d718aaa571350b29fc528aa777f531987
'2012-05-18T12:58:54-04:00'
describe
'141173' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHWU' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
484b87f9cb665fbe10a506ade60b51b1
4aae286461862fefb5885b8447283af8fc186e8e
'2012-05-18T12:57:33-04:00'
describe
'363354' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHWV' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
c3de8f3b99d70c156893ba5393b106eb
cb3a297370ab910aa50ea438d7f260ffef423978
describe
'356122' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHWW' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
157f63aa6419d1d3e17c1f6d4a86c53d
e02bb647b210b2ec19bdc61ccfb8b48aedaa81f6
'2012-05-18T12:56:40-04:00'
describe
'57777' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHWX' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
a02a554d66cf350b848cccc4cf67a89e
ea68cad366e9bd093869effa7c0805ab0d6e9e77
'2012-05-18T12:59:10-04:00'
describe
'1494' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHWY' 'sip-files00051.txt'
1e4423c60a7c8b23bda75f77969e4f74
5c818254bf96fb3e0d8fbe77779952fc3a80c14d
'2012-05-18T12:57:43-04:00'
describe
'2884104' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHWZ' 'sip-files00028.tif'
8750cab9d2a9603804f6c4f4977b64da
02ae34feabb56ac43d29337e33bb8a8dcdade03a
'2012-05-18T12:58:33-04:00'
describe
'376389' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHXA' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
fe4a59ee71fcbca0e79d47ce6fcd0ae8
8c63b81b69cf39937c287e68388f68740f6b2bf3
describe
'391198' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHXB' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
ebc43aa69a94cc9dca5ef65d84bc601d
c0b5ec13a99fb10c903e95d44fb5ce48821509be
'2012-05-18T12:58:49-04:00'
describe
'1361' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHXC' 'sip-files00040.txt'
62db93f1711b4a18c9eeda6d73f13f0d
b5402e8c6cda18442bdfe62f5f183151dbc34aa7
'2012-05-18T13:00:34-04:00'
describe
'136101' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHXD' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
a08dae2d8cac36f1906ea0d428c8d346
9e4aae2acde3867f226c43ae73c1a7af99b7220a
'2012-05-18T12:59:18-04:00'
describe
'3065296' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHXE' 'sip-files00056.tif'
b4748032183519bfc62c140ec0d5ff30
b12c8015cd7bec574a705387ad2843d7ffc2af53
'2012-05-18T12:58:53-04:00'
describe
'9846276' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHXF' 'sip-files00002.tif'
9adfa8865e3cd695c6a1bd39d98ca1d6
dfae52399d8a92c332152507fe8fe043b855ced7
'2012-05-18T13:00:25-04:00'
describe
'380400' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHXG' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
f6216b7edd30b74822af1e4032f1f366
8084917711b1d1844854ee3e8c12c79809040255
describe
'429550' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHXH' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
13f3b31648a9317cb82f397c43479c87
af6276448c3f445bf18ec146ceb192566e6b9357
'2012-05-18T12:57:41-04:00'
describe
'2863832' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHXI' 'sip-files00008.tif'
85e09546fc2820ed68d5f20d3167304f
d222055d1b2d3cb6302b18d139fc5c6ab1589750
'2012-05-18T12:59:58-04:00'
describe
'434321' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHXJ' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
49a158726de8a8e13af82fd824a880ba
f4db39bd66e575ae1a277844f562f1b4eab7ace0
'2012-05-18T13:00:02-04:00'
describe
'410345' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHXK' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
a5735912875e036ad1d57d372bba4ebd
77e5374169b4da035884847bd8808c5261ac79c9
describe
'53245' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHXL' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
541302e660de7235a09824b47cc9b5d0
0000c74ac796cad088a4d00372c57004cc186003
'2012-05-18T12:57:53-04:00'
describe
'2907732' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHXM' 'sip-files00046.tif'
abfb27b8214081d806aa1ad13d537b81
e58bd9bca7ba66fb6b6973b1e5ceb07cb1f6a033
'2012-05-18T12:56:41-04:00'
describe
'1636' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHXN' 'sip-files00121.txt'
28d7d66de13d6623ec4ce11c7e5b1a5c
804ff81695e6ebd71a8c0aff03971ba582676e87
'2012-05-18T12:55:35-04:00'
describe
'381506' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHXO' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
d6efa40407d81c1800b52254b8998098
5652b450298641613375e94bb200b244c7a9c71e
'2012-05-18T12:57:19-04:00'
describe
'49284' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHXP' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
d2ec1077ebab3ff599531bac41d86e01
eb286e7232b58789cfd3c4ff78d61b72441bbf11
describe
'398660' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHXQ' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
5ee6a4fd5262348487e04b2349e0d044
90a5ddd08533907aca50e2e104d254b5593e4c4c
'2012-05-18T12:55:52-04:00'
describe
'357545' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHXR' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
0a7548b3330e6596e302c54a599046ca
6c29cdf4a575c3eaa895fa207305661bcbc59936
'2012-05-18T12:56:57-04:00'
describe
'30720' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHXS' 'sip-files00099.pro'
9cb4b2919d0fa2f8e6766aa537b4f4d1
8eefe84a27896f92c216c704c61a92498afd8c44
'2012-05-18T12:55:47-04:00'
describe
'2856656' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHXT' 'sip-files00018.tif'
6e2434c70e8176ce8e31e6fc7e5c322f
25cc2f3b4c9098f399a79e96c7504c70a4fcab0d
'2012-05-18T12:56:06-04:00'
describe
'364239' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHXU' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
824815f38275fcbed8fa15b007c483cc
539911c38f43e217a07a7dd806671f822ad19318
'2012-05-18T12:57:06-04:00'
describe
'40559' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHXV' 'sip-files00008.pro'
21208326e65921615e4b911c67e4d8b9
07190ace66216ff87e67d7fac6de4f669e5e1ac7
'2012-05-18T12:58:10-04:00'
describe
'1766' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHXW' 'sip-files00108.txt'
4d8fdbc9aede80e29b2acf7def7065cc
2447aed8b36acf54ca2e6cef79dc6e010273241a
'2012-05-18T12:57:36-04:00'
describe
'37216' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHXX' 'sip-files00117.pro'
ee7332aee33977d92af1c50444c20884
00256c989aedfbba91d80f456c5c5dc8ffe37c6f
'2012-05-18T12:57:25-04:00'
describe
'135715' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHXY' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
ca7f8bd5fe1f235018a74405f541e7ac
8f07c0c9e282aeb0619d7051e18cc16bff65a878
'2012-05-18T12:56:25-04:00'
describe
'53160' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHXZ' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
b4db03d2b23276503bbd2aedacc7de0a
7e27ccaac53d1c1a46977d8abc461053da8989a1
'2012-05-18T12:55:37-04:00'
describe
'151790' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHYA' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
9037c7d075c3ee3cceba2c88876546d9
9b4c804ea48aa49c1f940021725d9e339fbefa21
'2012-05-18T13:00:18-04:00'
describe
'53189' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHYB' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
152690a86ef6c0befef72edbf8147af6
a2845bf4d2e4f18b39c33d07c1f53be15547cd86
'2012-05-18T13:01:33-04:00'
describe
'16' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHYC' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
f309932eb7ab3d77308f66c59433563c
bd29e9fbcebd976cd9da95abfbc05bb65dd59f3c
describe
'351006' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHYD' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
989e5fade8a51f0740990f38e5eebccc
196c8aa06520875e46ea0ede408f197133df76ae
'2012-05-18T12:58:43-04:00'
describe
'1689' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHYE' 'sip-files00055.txt'
feaf5f8c1ef4bd67af3fe54488d763af
c05d25ef713a9882db489dc24d4231a766a9364d
'2012-05-18T12:57:48-04:00'
describe
'384831' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHYF' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
130e1185205befc176947d83d2a949f6
d8eaad85e0133b0ff7c0f53fc067adc8dcc34448
'2012-05-18T12:59:47-04:00'
describe
'1679' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHYG' 'sip-files00093.txt'
f6ea661ab77cc381f1850db2aabf202d
2d2cf0e296cbfa01196b0598a8f685f0436c34d8
'2012-05-18T12:56:27-04:00'
describe
'438428' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHYH' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
26638c865ca8f791cb6bb3f096a9ba0e
af98bff1d266296e4c0eea70c6245257c6d29c2b
'2012-05-18T12:58:58-04:00'
describe
'427131' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHYI' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
a041f9abe3ec54365b53be8d48caaae9
03e4e75346a00f48f51c7a0d15fa0ca405a4dd9f
'2012-05-18T13:00:00-04:00'
describe
'55765' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHYJ' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
76295aa62111885124edf7e567a464d0
697b681e2eb82f7288d74ede1af34785cad90f9b
'2012-05-18T12:56:15-04:00'
describe
'354306' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHYK' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
2ededb75692a10c9f4a8b34a9ebfeb9e
8efe5800ac1da4005d8d0d14ee85eba55e3ef29a
'2012-05-18T13:00:37-04:00'
describe
'42876' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHYL' 'sip-files00027.pro'
243883ad9899a0fbf5c28a5f7f3e1025
f8ef7cf13364585745d2bbe9abce068a084c1255
'2012-05-18T12:56:19-04:00'
describe
'2897092' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHYM' 'sip-files00080.tif'
79f73e881c06a1a33533099d2208b733
5024db8c5b4e58098cf84d87f725e070a0f2e1b4
'2012-05-18T12:59:24-04:00'
describe
'1741' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHYN' 'sip-files00104.txt'
d159a60ed3791a396abc97401260a9b3
02b1d6f77acf2b92778254ed8674482758fca8f1
'2012-05-18T12:58:17-04:00'
describe
'360573' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHYO' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
6c9ade1f4f0c572316132b1ec7d05c2b
ceba3268a08c9eaa7aa9999629c9b2030e324a53
describe
'428' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHYP' 'sip-files00135.pro'
e05235023add3bf753adf28672782f66
431e55df1e7c77fe2c308dda946e5d5331665546
describe
'359125' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHYQ' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
8524ca2e0afead1bf87f20a6e471201a
990bb9cf21c0ed0712e3d9f4c19637928c6da02f
'2012-05-18T12:57:18-04:00'
describe
'2807828' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHYR' 'sip-files00038.tif'
c20a8466c4793853dc9c9d212b009f49
7c2503448e33abc6c04f2f8b5610d99e7f527243
'2012-05-18T12:56:13-04:00'
describe
'409248' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHYS' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
eaa7dfd6fc5e0173332aeeda9b3998f4
6ba9f96ce213d1390f8a5511be55631d53429acd
'2012-05-18T13:01:05-04:00'
describe
'395949' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHYT' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
9cdfbd6d5ffd1f57e399f1f7c7ffb907
9a96a0f7132286c8ef82898d7579e9ca38360814
'2012-05-18T12:56:38-04:00'
describe
'415133' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHYU' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
76458506f9afb815c48ad4dcda44f81c
9f5f285a0f8abd32f5fad1b0b5b4622e76b666aa
'2012-05-18T12:57:31-04:00'
describe
'359140' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHYV' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
5f2498e475ea585b557c8ca3c60b570e
6fabd981160b482b87f422c5a7d0672f41e5c308
describe
'34516' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHYW' 'sip-files00015.pro'
d0eb5a91254dc2c6888b7a3de8077a2f
c4f38a62d380be688bde2e49a116eb3d5c965a07
'2012-05-18T12:56:28-04:00'
describe
'55159' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHYX' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
838c27c5dd4b5913d1e2754193d7884e
e2d655bf8a94fdfb551ee5fb42a73dc7e132e89a
'2012-05-18T13:00:59-04:00'
describe
'151681' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHYY' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
fed905bccc72c7e9c096633a7f413eae
651ed83acd7539b500d47391e8082551eee34639
'2012-05-18T13:00:45-04:00'
describe
'366052' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHYZ' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
5843caf3d89a09ba5336a81d370a855f
27959757dcd1b62ebab069dec3e3de96aeed0826
'2012-05-18T12:58:48-04:00'
describe
'41007' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHZA' 'sip-files00121.pro'
33018ce8d1665a2837850df477cfb5e8
2d3e68dd5e3e8acd14786ee385e6564259702b76
'2012-05-18T12:58:24-04:00'
describe
'299021' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHZB' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
b6ac6a67f9a6ce19031560e064bd7f52
56d2c1b1903be62b5c01d64b7e9016ddc216d8e4
'2012-05-18T12:57:11-04:00'
describe
'144981' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHZC' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
10a7419d401e973839328fa769ec2f11
b1b77d189f9f5df0b4d77ba735356eea92db9ff6
'2012-05-18T12:55:34-04:00'
describe
'149923' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHZD' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
2be2ae14cf6a6e1ceb2da6a2a05e17b8
656bd3793192c49b331b2163853f4582f1c34dac
'2012-05-18T12:55:32-04:00'
describe
'54218' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHZE' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
e2b0c2156ede250d0d026eb3f653aac1
00e1ecfd264e12a6113947f471210b70c924bea5
describe
'44878' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHZF' 'sip-files00083.pro'
8716ad3e4eead0cdfb977fc16755fd8d
78128a7df602e40bcf5fc1cb15fb896e53a7184e
'2012-05-18T12:59:33-04:00'
describe
'41491' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHZG' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
fcf9576edeacc4a7931d6867e57a5665
a797482afce562c5d5c09773c6dc7f0cfd1b5e99
describe
'1660' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHZH' 'sip-files00062.txt'
f0c4410be3fc729b48c266fd39117f7f
06f702de31df446ca16c5a92bd2567bc850bbf3d
'2012-05-18T13:00:16-04:00'
describe
'2919880' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHZI' 'sip-files00031.tif'
8867ba95600ef49c0c50324472e699da
9f074cfc541dfa19e2da83484e74cd859c51e08a
describe
'354791' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHZJ' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
5a1f52f7f6e311eddc29ce05878dd4eb
f057372f3f47ec7b6908da8ae6822c028c68dd96
'2012-05-18T13:00:51-04:00'
describe
'209' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHZK' 'sip-files00136.pro'
f4518ad25c001db405d67b0e55effd7c
f1a29f5f804c959b83a3c19013954cbc71d07397
describe
'1564' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHZL' 'sip-files00011.txt'
b214d17e1ce2ec68c216a2a9bc49ebb3
11c243883c41763ef3d86ce7c678ca234f9183d6
describe
'361142' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHZM' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
a7f24835ccf507a5679baae5e5c97815
b42e2a8595f8694006f43911f6b1bb546c3ec9c3
'2012-05-18T12:57:01-04:00'
describe
'155206' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHZN' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
1bed0c4cec8b5db14745e7a988284cad
8e1437776f96856234fd1aa4d38d1d4515ce16a5
'2012-05-18T13:00:11-04:00'
describe
'41865' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHZO' 'sip-files00053.pro'
5ebf2aa5c31defda6266bab4255c4d0b
bfd67839f4ba1e5d9e297cba786a7786db8c92d1
'2012-05-18T12:57:03-04:00'
describe
'360516' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHZP' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
9f32e353a01d8929b099fe28479168c5
967573bd583fdb7c8d9a4e2b14a3b04caa5825c7
'2012-05-18T13:00:05-04:00'
describe
'2899128' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHZQ' 'sip-files00067.tif'
8095c3b09488933f1c6c308b4e66d89d
e0deb1f09c0395ac5b61b6e62f0108df8d9c1982
'2012-05-18T12:57:20-04:00'
describe
'432024' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHZR' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
9d538b8668af91fffaf9f1cd970a9b62
19166c206fee1541d15617b9af2b87face1a0e27
'2012-05-18T12:59:16-04:00'
describe
'357886' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHZS' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
e0586de4b6142d80f45632d9be8d342d
5de3c87dbe86164ad7a8d43625e3fb1049fcc3f7
'2012-05-18T12:58:20-04:00'
describe
'54461' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHZT' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
59da2e28a89fa68213ea2af97293dcfc
a60201d9c970c86ace898c691e35e0d53944fb16
describe
'3064708' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHZU' 'sip-files00023.tif'
5183a6827af8873107d5e9adafd1c33f
3c2ee79cba0c1f53b3eafb3fb198c028c2bb7d2e
'2012-05-18T12:56:33-04:00'
describe
'54000' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHZV' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
48311f2ac0f62d0e638efa706788218e
09e5c3c1759aebccf9182d3178e17a6415fb2d7f
'2012-05-18T13:00:43-04:00'
describe
'53803' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHZW' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
cf4aa559bf412f9a38defaa1a70b90bc
0a14b2dc3c90ee02491597e349c32d4e27d2f69f
describe
'413957' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHZX' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
c141fc3c083e551400283edaed20eeb9
1a346123c54173860365ec55416c05288d4bfa19
'2012-05-18T13:01:08-04:00'
describe
'1629' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHZY' 'sip-files00098.txt'
396f7ef4492184bb1d4ed11039a829cc
865fef8a414e9450394fe28b1ff517ee4edbbb2d
describe
'1471' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAHZZ' 'sip-files00024.txt'
f44a19d4333967370758766c4f118cb2
01803717074778de05e968f34976d6f16f9694a7
describe
'3065740' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIAA' 'sip-files00061.tif'
8c3f009eb61248c619d30a4a802f2b21
340e134f3e8d8596fffed22439c9393613153b81
'2012-05-18T12:58:35-04:00'
describe
'2885856' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIAB' 'sip-files00063.tif'
89163517aa6079547a14196e2996b4ee
4360ba7cf5b38d5c5d6c4029e1a094cc606e05ce
'2012-05-18T12:56:55-04:00'
describe
'2883008' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIAC' 'sip-files00014.tif'
ccfcfb6eed9abd8aebc104c78e112ebe
d0230aa65c489f6fa26b2e014e87dae384a8f53d
'2012-05-18T12:59:25-04:00'
describe
'54480' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIAD' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
db30a5b4c413a0e5cf12b62cdef79c7f
49d4c2ca8c5820e596641ff5d490a73eda08ed73
'2012-05-18T12:55:42-04:00'
describe
'360010' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIAE' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
ef613125606c7aaa491cbf3e2855abf8
09acbe4a5adf057edf54f73bc26966bfefa929af
'2012-05-18T12:55:48-04:00'
describe
'357679' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIAF' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
832d46d8c945403c20333fe0d380e593
4cd139816682faa254a3405023f8a75df8795efc
'2012-05-18T12:58:57-04:00'
describe
'151144' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIAG' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
60009f929fb87c770c6da826c3b18f9f
e7d7eb38aea9cb0c2cab11524d6e9a4dc15899ee
describe
'2908888' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIAH' 'sip-files00099.tif'
6bfaa527c84f889650f689595e821a06
b7b024772f0f808360910e4e5e46195f56449d0f
'2012-05-18T12:57:39-04:00'
describe
'618715' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIAI' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
4c728ccc7984043a1d2c03ad4ae9fd1e
da806400e6b1696d4c08ccbd65ccda1990846805
'2012-05-18T13:00:17-04:00'
describe
'1776' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIAJ' 'sip-files00085.txt'
88641fe4e3a1ba88eafe19ff4391e81d
5e0c255d2b7ab0d9ae5a63e955f520060146d8f1
'2012-05-18T13:00:07-04:00'
describe
'380372' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIAK' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
322326e9d7aac6148973860e49003b23
5b3a52118eeac77e1e0b7e8300a8fdd86de5fe9b
'2012-05-18T12:58:19-04:00'
describe
'39387' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIAL' 'sip-files00071.pro'
6c1ebf78d6ba08615b60ce64c9ca045c
c62f5ea2134b4522b2c752eb8f1747830b15dd04
describe
'41973' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIAM' 'sip-files00062.pro'
db68aebf01ae6a542839a440f87f46c1
dc17ed4b4148e0ef25cc9fe61654c05b8d33f824
'2012-05-18T12:56:36-04:00'
describe
'35328' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIAN' 'sip-files00030.pro'
238985ae902947c900850105c75e80a9
612e6c8d969cd477ae9044f35b01d6bea8162310
'2012-05-18T12:58:51-04:00'
describe
'2936432' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIAO' 'sip-files00095.tif'
971296980e8f6676d29987f2e46dc00e
27e141af8bc2bba361212821c8b10462f9b2a5bc
describe
'245587' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIAP' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
b9ba9f7e6a9d80348fd2fdc2c3eeee0a
c570211ca69ed722416448125e37cdeff06986d1
'2012-05-18T12:57:56-04:00'
describe
'339654' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIAQ' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
97c4c5bf2c5b3aeb3ab0b880828fcd40
b5aaca9a4264fcada77c3668bee4cb85c27fbecf
describe
'54744' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIAR' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
d2ff74202dd3f92edfc6a6a1dde158b3
e935ab3e1d669dafa69a30d2e3d403314e23d6f8
'2012-05-18T12:57:47-04:00'
describe
'2904984' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIAS' 'sip-files00122.tif'
6a92da0fe690d22b4559763da9796d4b
e154d35bb76927064a3ad30d2ec86cba3473dae8
describe
'151574' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIAT' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
690d36a933e9b7aa9a178bec9281b8c3
978b09ac4cfdb720997a2295f158f48f2ff3e9a9
'2012-05-18T12:57:15-04:00'
describe
'2876804' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIAU' 'sip-files00040.tif'
b6098a21b298af220ba28397ac18ecfe
a8f6da80dd1d86e1a1a948668727376b9c84f61b
describe
'229' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIAV' 'sip-files00002.txt'
f3c4e2050c1325fcd3e0e35bc330b59c
68e603a333820ebbe7134479714ad04fbf95fabb
describe
'364008' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIAW' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
8314ee15cc9f6454c79cabe039395e6b
3df4ae1f25897f670fd26271f1cc0ccacb525d3c
'2012-05-18T12:59:06-04:00'
describe
'2955200' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIAX' 'sip-files00115.tif'
23f2a214231e46ed63771ddfcc621546
f99c2422551f33ecfcaffe97f11ec1573bbf1fe2
describe
'28368' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIAY' 'sip-files00031.pro'
2e1abb83b1dad6ea1e25b6a9c1b27101
25f1ea6e78891156d86158fa39b5880e08599740
describe
'362512' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIAZ' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
4092d57bcb128b7f7cbcc765a068cff1
0220a92563b0a9c423f6ce877c60eaf951fa4565
'2012-05-18T13:01:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIBA' 'sip-files00088.txt'
68d62724acb6a9bd95a5a44938917d7e
5e1a3c4992978695e0d0729b2489b80e25d27a20
'2012-05-18T12:59:30-04:00'
describe
'1710' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIBB' 'sip-files00094.txt'
eb7bdf38e5aaaf2a70ffaa1006e99003
40198f44bab182aad84b84a5d0cde06339b4eaee
'2012-05-18T12:56:53-04:00'
describe
'380419' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIBC' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
4e33176fd60bdafcb2ef3639a685bc01
8bb67ce174b1f12683e6bd3794db5482301a2853
'2012-05-18T12:57:08-04:00'
describe
'54914' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIBD' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
7709e61bf767f964c4d3d6942923de53
15ede3368f419892fe822dc59ef5da19ce6df7ee
'2012-05-18T12:59:31-04:00'
describe
'9909988' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIBE' 'sip-files00136.tif'
8a537b9c13db51e43b1d534571b4c5a2
2e7783382236406f466962238fa75e0e3327df15
describe
'42557' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIBF' 'sip-files00079.pro'
f76139e5a12d8a496ab0f800a15c3d93
663da8e27b48ddef6218e587b7212c3a3b351bd8
'2012-05-18T12:58:07-04:00'
describe
'42360' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIBG' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
c2647f26d6c77e9b0a2561c0a009b2d4
b1f31eaa2ade026dba3c08a77e6a8033952304ec
'2012-05-18T12:58:12-04:00'
describe
'145338' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIBH' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
ea5cffaa641a91c1d4688e4d0e610039
a6fbe6ad21fe04b4575d8e79da2564448aa3cf94
'2012-05-18T12:57:26-04:00'
describe
'356527' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIBI' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
29fdd8e7777ad80073b1fcea1123238e
6cd34ae08c92ffeaa976081545fe2b9c62ee836d
describe
'40912' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIBJ' 'sip-files00021.pro'
cdb47d70a9bcbb5f2194df023351436a
44c4123244f5246ef127fc11edc8246d0c44be0c
'2012-05-18T12:57:40-04:00'
describe
'22425' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIBK' 'sip-files00066.pro'
728b02e248ebd5542459fb109b1e1a69
0029d6bba1ed51f4f676e4344d9a9f3ae0b34fda
describe
'144337' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIBL' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
09ffd945d40d7be7becd5601ba557663
f49792faba7492d1542fd56451f9df2927d7b04a
'2012-05-18T12:58:11-04:00'
describe
'380433' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIBM' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
7b0a1a1e6f025c880baf73db74376cd1
45e23d7b8d1f21b844ad64d9fb197d412c16c0dd
describe
'363131' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIBN' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
0c236aefddb1519d072cafeb1fed8121
0a5f012592510ae88684685d80350350d926fef9
describe
'40437' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIBO' 'sip-files00127.pro'
6cd393607c340cc30ef19233f47082b0
894f302486224b2ed2d00cb8f0d15875c118797c
describe
'421471' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIBP' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
103f9a278c2044f6de0b629698c5402e
7da3772df26e45d1d1d21b61cf4f2888197485fb
'2012-05-18T12:56:49-04:00'
describe
'154981' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIBQ' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
4bacbd141b59beea572f687605507080
751a1884eab33461fb3094236c070a265d26e1a4
'2012-05-18T12:59:07-04:00'
describe
'146500' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIBR' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
51be31b1ea3deb268cd589bdd26cf194
8cfcd91de6723fad0e4320f829c8779fb0ad0a7b
'2012-05-18T13:00:49-04:00'
describe
'3102904' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIBS' 'sip-files00132.tif'
115adf84b8f4988b925741eac8026022
ca4d9f23063d391b7c0c2baafa6e787847c61f0b
describe
'39304' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIBT' 'sip-files00064.pro'
6bdc16389df4880eac427551f8cb9e78
588edeb943d46243742b108b5f912e83af75fe82
describe
'350286' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIBU' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
e550703240d862aa9d6b207e64f866ba
cbfcb675d87c4be3cdd9f6b2a595db2662b9fa8b
'2012-05-18T12:59:23-04:00'
describe
'1734' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIBV' 'sip-files00125.txt'
264d76adb89fb99bc313f67610bce278
0d7e86f20b663617ccd5778f3292320e7f61c237
'2012-05-18T12:57:30-04:00'
describe
'2903908' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIBW' 'sip-files00125.tif'
38bc2fbf4f783d77cf9b22ac0135b5fa
8afc0966b5a8fdb6b63a47a85413721c21e862ac
describe
'42886' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIBX' 'sip-files00124.pro'
9243bd2d588c0384ff81ad6aa405295b
32e91905489a43db925770c6422b7ea8082e1dc4
describe
'1622' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIBY' 'sip-files00017.txt'
08c04988572a2dca0fb2afe760d0ea6c
9ed6d933a54ab3bf8ada19a2b1705327ae9d5352
'2012-05-18T12:56:30-04:00'
describe
'2925148' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIBZ' 'sip-files00126.tif'
2dd03061fcbaa18b055da71463abbe4f
89fac7a111a0e84cc5b91f02aec4e1e5eaa0c4a8
describe
'158376' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAICA' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
36c522ed1c2b55fa5600c3392d40c7a9
52e51fe49fc648a8aae2187447ecb258302ce5d3
'2012-05-18T12:58:04-04:00'
describe
'47989' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAICB' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
1c7331f65bad51939c8f55fb38e941fd
b3526e0b579a733996086349612ba5b495e20a25
'2012-05-18T12:58:59-04:00'
describe
'2955408' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAICC' 'sip-files00030.tif'
e627d6650e02d1423844a630d2516bda
a75e87f35da76f401f6a1e70e78f1c49ef87ff1c
'2012-05-18T12:57:37-04:00'
describe
'205350' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAICD' 'sip-filesUF00054264_00001.xml'
f6c62dc7f1b6e8324d3d53be88d65a19
a6edbe23eddbf236866764c2529a5eb2d570b48b
'2012-05-18T12:56:43-04:00'
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-10T15:21:05-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'550615' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAICG' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
b16618c774b7c2a243fe58cce9c3e185
468d4b88b0889a343623031962f0b35027daf3e3
'2012-05-18T12:57:05-04:00'
describe
'331434' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAICH' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
ac8e94cf8ab4852a46f95c4722d6a421
6e31375cc65f47632b5ec8454e1fb2b8a42d43c0
'2012-05-18T12:56:18-04:00'
describe
'19723' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAICI' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
77b9190792d54760a44202ac0034538f
6f3b0de13becac89ef708a1ffc78e398c94508f2
'2012-05-18T12:57:04-04:00'
describe
'424972' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAICJ' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
6828e37d7e95cb672e4eae837f57a049
af77b3ae5a50e6e1cc9ebd85191c02de962bfc49
describe
'438043' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAICK' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
79dfe3c650211d79baa19223aced1c15
de66a1cdcfb84ab4a928d803a602a41fa010c72d
describe
'441135' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAICL' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
0dc8b3005f1c76b8ef6085d41e9adc5c
623068a59a888c1dedb81d6fc182cfdc6ed9890d
describe
'343699' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAICM' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
58066dde557d04dbdb2fd00e457d599f
8af997c78936587830d4469ed0321bac7d2c3670
'2012-05-18T12:57:29-04:00'
describe
'408678' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAICN' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
6a9a76797d906118934a7fb9869960cf
c8a0ec381aa22885eaa1209d39c80d6124ca19e9
'2012-05-18T12:59:44-04:00'
describe
'438633' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAICO' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
fb4913e53654c4cc0b3b20a88cfbe7c8
25a748b10c7015f6985ef6502f821324c5577a44
'2012-05-18T12:58:13-04:00'
describe
'422773' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAICP' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
b89d206a548159b2f53caac3eed431b5
ca594bfefd678a9d30310044ac5b3168107d84be
'2012-05-18T12:56:42-04:00'
describe
'425637' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAICQ' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
c4ae0f9e1281ac7baf175f1ce4f49559
0902865440ffff78ce37e1b4b11a82132801aa4d
'2012-05-18T12:56:46-04:00'
describe
'413009' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAICR' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
0b875ced31520e5156c00de757400b8c
189fa6cbfbc5ea9955fad212439651ad5e7edfa6
'2012-05-18T13:00:19-04:00'
describe
'297826' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAICS' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
6497fadab5fa537b16bd948421f741e5
8e75f35758e0ee0566b0ad46ff14343e7c242c00
describe
'369138' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAICT' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
0140db10e2d7caf501db5b4edb755fb8
583b69cfb0e6a452e10ed2e0c66ab9f5870d9065
'2012-05-18T12:55:39-04:00'
describe
'411118' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAICU' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
edb66cde09b2068fdc647e00f215112a
45c6b1aa764aa154df8b19e8a8d598e18dccf4c2
'2012-05-18T13:01:16-04:00'
describe
'423412' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAICV' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
1919c943c4004dae49d248d74a74d646
a62d8d1cab20f04a0b37dd7510a7dc13863543de
'2012-05-18T12:58:41-04:00'
describe
'370662' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAICW' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
dcddca27ca1fd1a04c48593d77c83f83
49e7d126e0fe75d46d784a5b786432da92b5568c
describe
'343880' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAICX' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
a9b362ce29dddc05a8ea51bd8137d812
0661180db2657e056361ad4842afbb616d42a651
describe
'418519' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAICY' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
0cb6946a5b4958fcaff0cae4b2d1b2b6
0414e7dc243eabfbc8844440799d885ab9f300f7
describe
'444218' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAICZ' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
141fe2622620fc68e2cf5a29c8c7ac3f
c7dab9135a8b60bb54032bcabe84d459722aa904
describe
'432812' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIDA' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
5ba1eee1d69baf2c314c1d478b4fe577
3cb3f0e2118e1b1450a05d731d2156f63a41e510
'2012-05-18T12:55:40-04:00'
describe
'430625' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIDB' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
ad7161281cf2b7fb6c2dcc9e3e0fd1da
4cefddc45737f241747619f7ce4eae23bcbd96db
'2012-05-18T12:59:35-04:00'
describe
'395940' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIDC' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
7a97d00f90e66b88aa06de1bcac22873
8ab663c2307906b197b8dab485b7144037a03782
'2012-05-18T13:01:10-04:00'
describe
'447689' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIDD' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
65663c7d1f7fabb386cfcab000d368da
36b74126564f3ae0fca93ca067cd19fdbee72073
'2012-05-18T12:57:50-04:00'
describe
'420726' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIDE' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
761b953a22f08ce7d6823ac1ee1a00c4
63c4cb6fdbe3af9688e7c4a823c4fa667c2520ec
describe
'454020' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIDF' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
a6b023bfc7c6f2c7a5c29a62fdcb72ba
6f90cdfe73ed6d23c55ed6c47a3ad1b6161f9ed3
describe
'450956' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIDG' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
81e3571967c85f55b14ec1bc58733416
86dbdf14ec74f1f42e4db96b19d237fdecf9c4a9
'2012-05-18T13:00:53-04:00'
describe
'425421' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIDH' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
07f41585b996bf5fee0470b47de63551
bd6b2c298be8758d591cdcec92d2aa294b22e63d
'2012-05-18T12:59:27-04:00'
describe
'425515' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIDI' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
492e8bf4d055fe32c3db996128b1bd44
e600e023f60352510dddc46e2d1bf78df649e333
'2012-05-18T13:01:29-04:00'
describe
'368122' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIDJ' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
7bd9dd764d0c91c4ab7d887ef0d52664
e2ed30660bc0ff4d9855ed73f05ab3a303b9b43a
describe
'415906' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIDK' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
dad82b1ca46764d801ae4e40e327e643
cae2fd4a12a658e4980ee16087456928e7aa7d52
'2012-05-18T12:59:52-04:00'
describe
'440832' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIDL' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
329753ecf9b00a09d8d166a7d8d3739a
92ff14a5487a7098f8fb4f141de330fa0eb68ce8
'2012-05-18T12:56:23-04:00'
describe
'403507' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIDM' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
2c5d0b34a16ee61ee5fbb40edb6333d5
4decf59a87064c7e6111e134e5148dd8591b2e30
'2012-05-18T12:59:05-04:00'
describe
'416527' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIDN' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
cdb2c03bb897fcce1073d26bfb607055
e475f6bfc55bffb55ad0ad645be208a75acd3e57
describe
'416404' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIDO' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
4c7d3e1140bf2736ee77fd2c485342a4
761e5177f0cd024359539b9ee33fa942d8d06d85
describe
'433154' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIDP' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
710c581a64375f95a15a40d99b8dad75
7cd1c38dc449dcb90cc2b0edeb8e108a1cfbb060
'2012-05-18T13:01:40-04:00'
describe
'389064' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIDQ' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
5959707ddb9295c39a0d5bc087a876e9
48fee43b7dd8135819928a74d6389498b7fb3fb0
'2012-05-18T12:56:26-04:00'
describe
'344112' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIDR' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
6b677f000fd6134e7c142dafa61cc2de
cca3e7d42f44bd62bcccfdd704fcc9775144fde7
describe
'414829' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIDS' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
f57a2ea4f77627a01464f40feb360c69
4af566003c7b2c847f4bfd946bcdbc3dfac3abc0
describe
'387018' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIDT' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
7956cb9da90ea5e6ae13e987da5f5a74
b23a9d321bae05ac2d9812972f9be998e5d8adf7
describe
'417577' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIDU' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
4a46e85be2da674382887c27d1bcd7e4
138353819477ee7617abd4e5b8c09f69da3a6fb5
'2012-05-18T12:56:04-04:00'
describe
'408410' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIDV' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
2553fc93c017d2dcdf0838781a4d56f6
723c06939e8ddf74787fadcf8495b76a8e0efc76
'2012-05-18T12:59:46-04:00'
describe
'410079' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIDW' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
9e8bb822634a4ad633b56331283134a4
e3b8d874e4e4eb59bc1bf7e394d648c868ed11a2
'2012-05-18T12:58:45-04:00'
describe
'383714' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIDX' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
c29003a767f851313f21156ae668b783
509ccde905c96b125bfda2d06f4eac7047bad441
'2012-05-18T12:56:37-04:00'
describe
'317000' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIDY' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
5e4f7f84612a1a21768535f1f73c215c
4c660f17d1a857268d301ba2ef49904a0b8d0f02
describe
'347688' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIDZ' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
68143b72034c6f049003d73fdb55891a
22e31b3d38ef5d43635736c0470530dcc6872648
'2012-05-18T12:59:20-04:00'
describe
'459815' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIEA' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
23cb24a4e5de5c15ba769351f7f9e188
cd0482f580145204cc6a788023da7323fa1a38ea
describe
'414101' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIEB' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
be835f42d4996106321432f6eee2ebd4
19a2264d4a3eb01090ce5316f4f45f633d84e07f
describe
'407907' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIEC' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
11270c6f39b790a01201a9510a614b3c
54984fe08ec4545431ed7e0300f203185fdf042b
'2012-05-18T12:59:14-04:00'
describe
'448173' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIED' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
81c8e6931e821dfb92093bb64511e1f1
a62bf948c3850593a0c2072d8bc4a3bac1e34160
'2012-05-18T12:59:45-04:00'
describe
'404362' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIEE' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
fdd1b005a683f0efbcf162681ba17c84
cd03b09d39c4b9facbf418d0aed0d2dca5d89687
'2012-05-18T12:59:51-04:00'
describe
'455255' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIEF' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
1bcf326e40b21f03688996ba0139fb11
92683069038170c21354aee46f1642eee92cb414
'2012-05-18T12:57:54-04:00'
describe
'445753' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIEG' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
d6cddd9c3334d6c3ab88f99e3bef8a38
ff9843e7e821d2a91bde071e24c5756066c23f94
describe
'452336' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIEH' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
1b9db24b996b6316e11947682a62b03b
d7c3645c909b45ef46d2ef200c755ccf2ef62b1f
describe
'408498' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIEI' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
84d0e937970b36fb6881f2f393006840
16f35412909e4896889bfff2689ed7c15923f708
'2012-05-18T12:57:22-04:00'
describe
'455114' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIEJ' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
4491b07e41c6f8cc8fb2fa300f7470b8
dbd15254b63c0610851f796a23d141fe440b79c1
'2012-05-18T12:57:09-04:00'
describe
'456396' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIEK' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
55484cf54d03089da1f45b6b789b4b32
e2f0f316e351f7fd7e68d083ae9c1d1fce3c53ad
describe
'461607' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIEL' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
88673c6261501091245cf446b61d5f80
d9c329f5832c7d1f637f91acfeb993b08464d75a
'2012-05-18T13:00:30-04:00'
describe
'438053' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIEM' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
abda11711e98104481e7036bafb92e55
b6d3e0551864a2ca47ca3ca1b1d76d56c2d8922a
'2012-05-18T12:57:24-04:00'
describe
'447255' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIEN' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
49e1d32e27a2bdf1cb98b5dbe5abc2da
d424c6fbec238c490d5dfb29b925c45dd1719cb2
'2012-05-18T13:00:04-04:00'
describe
'426527' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIEO' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
03b74b268b55705b73cb3a7759f928b8
6cbd559e425e980d7dd2298b323d11ef12def0fa
'2012-05-18T12:59:21-04:00'
describe
'427635' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIEP' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
a3afeed21d7f6981495e83262eaf2b58
a6f6bd4255aca54186d08dffc2c753ec04d26976
describe
'403665' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIEQ' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
5a79d95bdf7440257ec5426a05bcc980
f6137676bc16272fc42dc7b6a645b42be8b671a4
describe
'439004' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIER' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
730a770593ab9735ee0f582de1914c52
b1f9208bdad6c1f966bead5bd96db9696baac839
'2012-05-18T12:58:31-04:00'
describe
'413142' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIES' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
c31aa4b36b96485d2a1ec9dcfe818340
80653739f1444d2b27425ca63f99efeeb18b461c
describe
'413261' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIET' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
20096da162aefa5e56d3dfbd897ef4a1
c6a3652007fbefa10328be9ea9dcd9cbdc9f767e
'2012-05-18T12:58:01-04:00'
describe
'384764' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIEU' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
016e7c320b0b11194ee424cd8cafadd4
97e5ab9200fbd86087b3ea266a7c7834b5b31b9b
describe
'345373' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIEV' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
b63daedd07464443daf8ec0b793892f1
36813117b5786c4e357ba2c751f62b6bac1514ad
describe
'420789' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIEW' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
e7eba3ee8d36c51e4b03ee29dd8a2894
0cddf64fe473a4b169c95c91591c9d4133da3417
'2012-05-18T13:00:03-04:00'
describe
'383761' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIEX' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
d1d108e7f433e8e603c04e0d1cb4f762
3526403e52411d1de3a32aa74b04b6ab6bde79a6
describe
'415893' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIEY' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
baabb85eb886246134fb66877df2587d
dbfdb1c2e59f8b72fbe75ae05ba01ba1ae312481
describe
'448585' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIEZ' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
72b99e680885003a1d7ec87fa4063617
7f5470797b9000cda2b0c278ed9c7e9392f7299b
'2012-05-18T13:00:29-04:00'
describe
'444537' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIFA' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
2c782d5075d0a57ad4ecc76cc3577a06
4f3e68a6332d6f16ee5df149f4173365da345154
describe
'429134' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIFB' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
d28c9fdc7bbcb33c2f96eaa492e91e89
16620448d8605220707bdffdaf1fede9445b9a68
'2012-05-18T13:00:44-04:00'
describe
'448135' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIFC' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
523d3603cf7024c10a0c2b4a34636a45
6c3905c6f6a7ab32c1b311a0e2708cb8fac4b38b
describe
'431689' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIFD' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
e0975ae7637d0c991f8df85b37623654
af83b39963855b183159bebcffb41453940cddb9
describe
'431842' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIFE' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
ed1bf6b870243b892ab22f9f03c45ed7
7c255be1bcc44de087873551e2629733eaa9df6f
'2012-05-18T12:57:55-04:00'
describe
'432465' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIFF' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
76f08558be5e38428f1ab63560145b9c
10e740b2a396ca6f193a10b6008acd41705f2feb
'2012-05-18T12:58:42-04:00'
describe
'440216' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIFG' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
ded5467abf8d63ec01001ffd25c4392a
114b43b542ef35963f5e7d9f99f773f8e8012200
'2012-05-18T12:55:57-04:00'
describe
'407040' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIFH' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
3e924cf6c3f2d9969ede581531c0a9a8
c052830e274bb80249747ef48ce61daf9acbb61c
describe
'356509' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIFI' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
4063db5e8de5cb2726e7faf126cbf754
0eff6d920d2faadbe980f56501daafa09236ff4e
'2012-05-18T13:00:32-04:00'
describe
'427681' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIFJ' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
f2eefc4638bcd916e088c2c5faaa16ec
f1aa629180136ca95de1179481c85e772b7d7abb
'2012-05-18T13:01:30-04:00'
describe
'409415' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIFK' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
62a9d588eec7fafd9eb0df53426376a9
c092ea9bd29df5401e2bdda1ff53e81753d91d9d
describe
'415973' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIFL' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
04b035d0fb9ab3ff676bd30874d0ebd8
7bca27b2a4646f5b9a2f17d507bf1be87aad2e52
'2012-05-18T12:56:54-04:00'
describe
'413559' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIFM' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
c14009f9255a643d7041deb47ce3f1fd
a8bc2f6e5b025f3cf0e4b38a4d2e4be69f95a1ff
describe
'420297' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIFN' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
b79161b61fbee505bb465263fda89c88
52a63b819e442b118d48ad060869db31419152df
'2012-05-18T12:55:58-04:00'
describe
'426551' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIFO' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
8c4712b2649fbfcb7aaabf8aafe58cea
825c43ae016d56b5ea73e14ea6ee85553d413a55
'2012-05-18T12:56:47-04:00'
describe
'423645' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIFP' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
71122269c6d02e4671f77706921b3f9f
74de20a9d12a4f90bef7ff492b865749d7f36c15
describe
'452824' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIFQ' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
c3779fd27389aeb32dab2920d47ac72c
3593fabe797371735d51ac697c6c1f211c9d2a83
describe
'451953' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIFR' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
c4bc1bd31834de31369d6afa4589cd9d
6613694d758db0fa572a28f2afa576a9cfa0a366
describe
'450418' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIFS' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
06a57b9dc1e075b350a0aed0ec3912a0
e174dff6a258557e657180bfd8dce439967f85cc
'2012-05-18T12:58:00-04:00'
describe
'439589' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIFT' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
d145106283db09040dd8e80012ea54be
f0aa212d9b7388cea5385fb7290b5ac6e0141dd8
describe
'339741' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIFU' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
c0da6c46b4225e55b41cca7243933171
dbfb12e612f02c6b04e59c059b8d66329c1edca2
'2012-05-18T13:01:43-04:00'
describe
'432284' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIFV' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
5e8b570a6f626b1daa699a7ff98ad41b
c506a5938b35d9fce00996ebc12f83f4660e8b27
'2012-05-18T13:00:12-04:00'
describe
'441087' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIFW' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
15391098219cac44268c419e62f2b3f3
28912a55b05635135af73306d5365bb60670fd18
'2012-05-18T13:01:25-04:00'
describe
'441973' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIFX' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
63fe53b72f718230454157939f8c7ab6
905db6cd4904e0dff8b7f6b42fb27a684d930040
'2012-05-18T12:59:29-04:00'
describe
'262732' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIFY' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
60ff189d0d9421e15e87516d6ec8200e
f757b46ef3693906314a506efb3f5ee21a05d8fb
'2012-05-18T12:57:10-04:00'
describe
'526413' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIFZ' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
d946145247ed04abfcf358fb03b72afc
0c962f64fa61872f4d9082240251e5bc5351f69b
'2012-05-18T12:58:06-04:00'
describe
'151795' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIGA' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
06983f89307dba79d55f85f469a8884c
02d0a59964ebaab8ced8f9b83f768dfda66a8484
'2012-05-18T13:00:48-04:00'
describe
'417201' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIGB' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
18f37705de870f9037d53eadc8a5c786
c4ee4fcc96bca6a5119dd89ca77d636461d7fedf
'2012-05-18T12:58:02-04:00'
describe
'409394' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIGC' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
57a01bb937c49876b40a1a95491b1a3e
3f40a71884f1effe2b09acd596b06da1db28ae39
describe
'363933' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIGD' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
b37866ad831ebcfdb7014db7e6e79880
96411a3da8d122defc92d9f0c27548d6ccee8040
'2012-05-18T12:59:50-04:00'
describe
'1707' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIGE' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
f52f1b5bd9ab156fe7f1890b4bef42b4
31cd88b09ca4b2d815730923e45bf22f9c31bd07
describe
'368662' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIGF' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
da89da18a1efb8b262904b8055ef0074
c623349c40ee467adb69a67704e0bedb2da832e1
'2012-05-18T12:55:59-04:00'
describe
'364183' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIGG' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
b4cfd305b05f039bd1fb7997040780a0
030a9aef9887b4fc9fc61a37c72c020cc9807c82
'2012-05-18T13:00:50-04:00'
describe
'360199' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIGH' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
cfa93640739dbe47e6a9992e57aa28fe
8ed34b6fc4561065130449c5bb3d00cbe7ed622e
'2012-05-18T12:55:38-04:00'
describe
'355097' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIGI' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
ff39e73432df389cc35883cc857ce730
e81fe3876a324f4bdc3e356d7536fa1e4ec96669
describe
'356736' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIGJ' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
737ab4c1d035fd1c29249294594ca1c4
5ed7c07b63783e6d7b286720551caeac37d6634f
describe
'358295' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIGK' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
5ee223633168c89abf3bd6d1918a6d57
9aa6ceeb894f9d3d0001b0f243a48315c0fae5c8
describe
'358573' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIGL' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
1c5606877802aa3deffb6747ec68cd1a
6f4c54793d2c97cecfc507464b1d2c9bcbaf6238
'2012-05-18T13:00:28-04:00'
describe
'355581' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIGM' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
73aae28ced7cf9612c1bb9d147aede72
79587f12a1c353adf98cebe7f4e96176da89ed7d
'2012-05-18T12:55:43-04:00'
describe
'362036' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIGN' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
4888a509307d644164f61c58dfcbae30
2f3b99c84af6fbc2586f278081e8b8bb5ba0f5f6
'2012-05-18T13:00:14-04:00'
describe
'353648' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIGO' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
719405bf2d426afacae12913b5e8476e
66a3c816b4b97b5b79d355fc1dded42ae985d11f
describe
'354211' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIGP' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
3130a393b5926ae9d16e095323493cfe
4a7496930531bdfad8308ed55a5f0930499852cb
describe
'354800' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIGQ' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
18f496c6b74f50c66339f3c3f48bda21
6a90c69adc438df4cd11452d91fc5da3a4580bdb
'2012-05-18T12:55:50-04:00'
describe
'366264' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIGR' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
a11bef7d800737517f050087dadbab7e
bd9173ec0ab6c2fcc21583a67ac419eb83d84712
describe
'363125' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIGS' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
fd3ae2af638f70b7edfc246b7105e8e5
773d3255098c59a72e1a6ee44d5cb6db1e50a69a
'2012-05-18T13:01:03-04:00'
describe
'364687' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIGT' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
bd80ce28f78d14a8d6facdf69af5432e
dca579bba05913d718543c8818a2ff05441d40a3
'2012-05-18T12:58:32-04:00'
describe
'380424' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIGU' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
b5f2e62cb912cf9cfe36c3e4c2eef1a8
b3a51eca0e8e4fba5582ba79aac8a1d889fc27dd
describe
'361784' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIGV' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
feb23f62117e2e49ad5dbca5e8aec8a5
b6fc1685385ac75027b5301604a2f6b8f9fcd211
describe
'361787' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIGW' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
185d22e068fc23babf4dc880ae7d02f0
1b4a9f02863e3f61e512541f696dcccd65f7d329
'2012-05-18T12:56:07-04:00'
describe
'366629' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIGX' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
6ea8a8994ab1eddb8e4cbd9d8eeb6339
9eac825a4ec19a18ba14c0a19dc93c7113ea116f
describe
'362258' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIGY' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
fe3e48b45a7444e01a00ca32f3622550
c105ed55325d653701f1c4ebf51164cf57e9b133
'2012-05-18T12:59:01-04:00'
describe
'361960' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIGZ' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
83d0824b49beebc0bafc440e08fbe511
f66b01f5cbb90581648a44c3a7175b5f623d1eff
'2012-05-18T13:00:35-04:00'
describe
'355248' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIHA' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
e1532f4b1badd1a5e239d209d1b6fc0f
e9396d1b7fe25b933b5e6646371bbf30c9582c94
'2012-05-18T13:00:58-04:00'
describe
'361226' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIHB' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
795da3a8092700442ab5907ae37e8c9e
be410e458ca3e014b3ba3ef347e380dc1c264a4e
describe
'361063' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIHC' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
eb362279d8fd6c2292b598ab27efcae4
de1435c10f5973ddc3b2b3ef466507d7d9a5bdc5
describe
'356854' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIHD' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
c154bd039b5a0a5c5ad5a7bb6df620e1
bc8a41babc31749b561768089697c9f081f22a40
'2012-05-18T13:01:02-04:00'
describe
'361900' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIHE' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
cd409b4e84b823b09264e74e45ce5e6e
6f3213b1fa7326f0697e16e1fa441670fd2aef07
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIHF' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
50a16711da75a5e70553599a92836448
b83ac8af5ed9c66a3c9f96693bd33d62374ed4da
describe
'356677' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIHG' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
088e4c6c32d092590be9798bf49c5404
78becb8b7d66fa50073b6ae24fa4a2b790f0aec7
'2012-05-18T12:57:27-04:00'
describe
'380371' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIHH' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
7b0ace55dacfb334ae6d18f2a2f2a0c5
52d120a5ea5650b5c11730293abf29b12e7d8cc1
describe
'373336' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIHI' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
1026b5b4295000b0f517fa9f5a31dd7e
b704a6d9eae61736d9e26c8f168130ab6af4c31e
'2012-05-18T12:56:20-04:00'
describe
'356301' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIHJ' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
da0a71fc497c9083b6f761aacb5bf1ff
78bef6fec142d43ea4b294be88dc6469a04b6fed
describe
'358178' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIHK' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
ff91f06ecced302ad6056e209dbde67d
0b91fcbb62eba2582ef6355175511eb6ff4c61f1
'2012-05-18T12:56:39-04:00'
describe
'361264' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIHL' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
94a7de3b4262573e35707c8a7b141380
111076fc14147cef434f399aa9055fd98d4035d6
'2012-05-18T12:58:40-04:00'
describe
'380425' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIHM' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
113224c833a27c72a8b7176a8aa9a9e5
a3a1b24022676171d913c64d7bb6842bce8722b4
describe
'360329' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIHN' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
dce4e6a20b5052b2a8b0c9b33d162bd8
724eff5a2584d6d535165e9635144275620a50f6
describe
'380396' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIHO' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
dd0c87faca472aae17baf35100ebe3d9
e92f3ff09a87856c9d96978520dca3903f4b8194
'2012-05-18T12:59:42-04:00'
describe
'378411' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIHP' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
796ced493ca4f265e601f6c9aa884455
9541e07ab8086e4534c733ca145cc0d2875a31b4
describe
'380358' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIHQ' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
e2b9405aa9f19e2aaef877429157001d
3600c94db2081ac5e479abe6b57dee447beabac0
describe
'357578' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIHR' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
767488811a8973d88571c70305dadbed
48b5c5c0ab7c76c5928e99213412a42df5b1a674
describe
'363516' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIHS' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
5d815430b671901fee4a1f6d2b61a719
dd7e7037b41ffb3380b6a226171a54e33233881c
'2012-05-18T13:01:45-04:00'
describe
'359775' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIHT' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
d9b67a91060225f635b69da47ced9981
bb4d4f91f9ac9852d196aaf76e214346aaf0867e
describe
'380411' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIHU' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
47f607b48f558a0d78ed8ec929fb363d
62a49d6249fb298bc985cca490a0eb0fddfb6f8a
describe
'358324' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIHV' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
6b3d7c7274fe0153b4798bbf080e524a
dbcc91f6f28e9fde7b13f326f90242eff6fddc4c
describe
'358359' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIHW' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
0c7103bf995f8d157ed9cd4285c7e5e1
b0f4238ff78c580d99b646dcc6e677ac7ce2e8ac
describe
'346697' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIHX' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
475aa5dc051bb41660c64e4f9e43f96c
e043c2288aba095a0d1c9479ac84b4693f8c7201
describe
'356210' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIHY' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
5ee68747caa5b6a76634a0bab63262d4
9755c1a1eb11f19bb0ee67814f818a75c21d7909
'2012-05-18T12:55:46-04:00'
describe
'359826' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIHZ' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
828cd7f5f24ac3ea4df9e3a87329ba68
787570fd3a33e189682b912d8ff24101d3e72e01
'2012-05-18T13:00:46-04:00'
describe
'362014' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIIA' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
2c088ace70333bd06bcfd851bc8f7129
b5e92515a11ef32dc43053e5f4b765fa06e35f60
describe
'359322' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIIB' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
6f7d3b8a793f7bb0b53233327c919d87
68118117a84a1094bf4d4aa758d374bf963d4e57
'2012-05-18T12:55:44-04:00'
describe
'380413' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIIC' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
a4f64baa5103a07d459cd48b764fb57a
8fe26ee34218a97b321657325ed0148237b8e0e4
describe
'362644' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIID' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
1c2e583accdf0255664731ba266890e8
cd617d14be65a2cdbfa6e4a945aabc74eda0267a
describe
'364265' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIIE' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
654038136e906b680e06c0beb74ad217
0faf46a8f5c5337063b9d36560eee84b033ceed6
describe
'359047' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIIF' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
1b256c34cce2f196326bec5ec6772f71
53c4133578ed15c4235167fda32a971d32be125b
'2012-05-18T12:57:28-04:00'
describe
'359269' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIIG' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
04a409fe2eabc5aad1e5525f35dc642a
716f66fb556f41d8fd10ae5509f23dc2a11f305a
'2012-05-18T13:00:13-04:00'
describe
'361821' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIIH' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
1f339f411175df4a7a86775621615d44
8f7b714172cb3aa3b0b25cf9ccb42351f079772f
'2012-05-18T12:57:51-04:00'
describe
'359233' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIII' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
91ce838e81c185f42c82f3c57724c0da
d9abedfa9e2b4459bac3593ddbaf041ffe353b56
'2012-05-18T13:01:44-04:00'
describe
'359529' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIIJ' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
b9be7c4d3782dad668f6b7c2590ab4a3
9d52fd38a40f2f09371a0b26f8a65829bed4ca3c
describe
'380355' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIIK' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
633bd1ef212827e5f6482c5dd4873508
209655506c71110c9c39f72595a4e48422cb3344
'2012-05-18T13:00:52-04:00'
describe
'356388' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIIL' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
c94f4fab88cfd45c69fe65d20e737697
58c81f074802711765953dc49f110c3a991d947e
'2012-05-18T12:55:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIIM' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
b93add78523fbd7756770818af602f91
93e1bbc3e1d4efc4c3b5395d215bc407fc41ae31
'2012-05-18T13:00:31-04:00'
describe
'380389' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIIN' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
700133b499630db08d1683ac5710ae93
dbe81bf28f52825f160ee95f825bdc7959ab0f3a
'2012-05-18T13:01:34-04:00'
describe
'358782' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIIO' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
047da7d1341016a1925257c51b841583
d8f32cd7e6613187af03f7aab73941e73444d851
describe
'359661' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIIP' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
86a2bd7c7a1788f315e2bbf030cb3bdc
9066a3783e696f383ff0dbcedfc39dff83c61376
'2012-05-18T13:00:15-04:00'
describe
'360752' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIIQ' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
5dfeea3eb7c4938e2ddfee9b0932a22e
b89178670ec6a12f390b291096df3e108da67595
'2012-05-18T13:01:01-04:00'
describe
'361425' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIIR' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
72bbbbf5661a877e7aeb8f56f64189e7
ff6145db2bd61e8e1c597bb462d75ffcc33b76b3
describe
'355230' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIIS' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
d6d4ddf6d133ae13447f9814038826fe
327387403cb9de19a9a79828f9838c60dd5f012c
describe
'366316' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIIT' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
65c77f8f02b04517338b2a8dc0972f88
8f14ae94690d8ace19b56a9d4a6b9e8e891b7bb2
describe
'351528' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIIU' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
cbb0bddb942bb3cea3b28edb1b22e998
0b605c3245f63d378f167832bc240161481bf133
'2012-05-18T12:59:53-04:00'
describe
'355795' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIIV' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
d14e80386de21a50063df852d82452ec
25807ebf0e700a558d467237de58d1c6fe0f58b4
'2012-05-18T13:00:40-04:00'
describe
'361029' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIIW' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
2233f45527c15329d85f750a02f62974
ead4f651686505b3dc6980926cc27977e6d70c13
describe
'371567' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIIX' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
78c2d292cff31c98897238cf2f1e587f
d3699668d5cd5642300193efaafaf607301aba8c
describe
'355112' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIIY' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
10245bca22249d6ce3af0032a67863da
e47b5a26af3e6c7f8beef400676eb998eab0e21d
describe
'348584' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIIZ' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
1af9941007d388a8376ab44fcdd539f7
ae6ccbe4a2b10c860acf34100cfc427e598d8e52
describe
'367446' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIJA' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
3ebc629973c29f38459376e466d10d6b
3a1730dfdcd665227acbca79b4edbc922c69365c
describe
'380350' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIJB' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
38e3dfe76e43c0d7b8e97faf750dd472
414ccb0ab3e300644e211326a38e39518992dd2a
describe
'366591' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIJC' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
d44ebf5e6f0ecced340a55fb6f952efe
b6be564ed5619e444e17bb82912bfb3ac7f50850
'2012-05-18T12:58:34-04:00'
describe
'380421' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIJD' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
4fb1a5f2abf4cbf6942c87c2d4995880
7a29ce2c2a92b96cade6e9b6413eefc290b70c66
'2012-05-18T12:57:38-04:00'
describe
'361149' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIJE' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
08f980b0f9c39c16c77883e0cd8ba4e0
448ee76db48d083b96bfa3bc21d20bea14d74f9f
describe
'380428' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIJF' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
14c3435261b8ccaa40467999676f3e0c
ad39a2b80c076bdae3bca38bbd8a360120e46908
describe
'380405' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIJG' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
e98f0f4cead03118fa2e7ea997dd0f0f
e237f633d06b4d3276532dd2ace31670240a2869
'2012-05-18T12:58:36-04:00'
describe
'360299' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIJH' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
4ff0ce2c3a0d2d8fd7091a0f038873bf
07f2f1441c72043b13f593539ec48860b5db1607
describe
'364741' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIJI' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
2252f3b3daef76d5b83e3f4dac7e3b21
708e1659bbe19b24dc24e3f7d2a941bea240f5cf
describe
'363165' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIJJ' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
2830edac46112b0a19ae0f1aca88bdd6
34572fe4280c28ae1bee1a08e674869274915eae
describe
'360159' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIJK' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
2f8dfd31374f696a3788c0de4ec3a4a5
02010c4dad8eb880e7ba4a9451a29def4f53a3c1
'2012-05-18T12:58:39-04:00'
describe
'362809' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIJL' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
3e6207fad284c45bc334d9c4b4a044d7
e62d0558f2e998856bcefe9d14b7f3a0ab5ea5f1
describe
'360860' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIJM' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
4f83588fc5413f8ed7d2679bc269bf21
f83957fde59e4771366ce4d0cadc28bc442adda3
describe
'357296' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIJN' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
1d660c069519e929b325a447182c6200
6990b0b156963814f047b3c3cf4113bdc40e53cc
'2012-05-18T13:00:54-04:00'
describe
'385439' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIJO' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
35b908daeab40b34233a52fdcb1dfc03
6566f9ed8c5700a647fa8cef745a495505f69194
describe
'417147' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIJP' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
6acf7a22b401c369733610aa53c7b60c
5ab55414a93b9e3dd7aaa517ed0c41683cbe1fe6
describe
'412191' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIJQ' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
e67f843677ea376d5fe0906b66ae4cbb
28b2a3ccb6ff7b0d233ab2e8b508338ebf4b55a2
describe
'66708' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIJR' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
a13df2e0ca61196435b02105dd0d0aa6
2c3aac81389b2660e77ed08c142c546fca08a5b5
'2012-05-18T12:56:56-04:00'
describe
'10032456' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIJS' 'sip-files00001.tif'
2c89d177725458160377f80b24f0f4ae
6a6c5be71c44bc050978162567f4ce673353ffc7
describe
'8758056' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIJT' 'sip-files00003.tif'
b82b73efe868e058d9cd5c079596499b
9552308aff73f9c7607b99c7839223668c11e849
'2012-05-18T12:57:57-04:00'
describe
'2933744' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIJU' 'sip-files00006.tif'
e9f863cc1f007a21fb8076089007af02
55962f58d1eae27fa8717d40e984bf99e5a1e2bc
'2012-05-18T12:58:25-04:00'
describe
'2903384' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIJV' 'sip-files00007.tif'
bb261d75ed90c7a621c503518f522488
888d95b3ff7e54f4f600ba616bbd4f2d404ffe84
describe
'2876892' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIJW' 'sip-files00009.tif'
8f4d567701a99d79e06b1c5840baa147
9381675c9c5f9fde24ab4da511f79fc2fcb7f01e
describe
'2830936' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIJX' 'sip-files00010.tif'
6b9db3c83d06c8bb0076c82a6c7e61f6
e22fa31e69ccfa0ec8c12227632281c67b46d317
describe
'2889176' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIJY' 'sip-files00011.tif'
0832db80d5e315da242db36fe3a7e159
91eb426018db157171079cf639fa99f518f19619
describe
'2892104' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIJZ' 'sip-files00012.tif'
4856e578877d64f368394553b12853a1
1a207b966b81e23e3da9f637440be4915fa9bc39
'2012-05-18T12:59:19-04:00'
describe
'2872700' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIKA' 'sip-files00013.tif'
701057ae437cd1cc7013d6a55481edc3
6c44a9f2ae9d96fc8f3f0df6107043c0ae32f241
describe
'2866952' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIKB' 'sip-files00015.tif'
c2538de86f00b721a462137aa9e7db5d
416fac16ff7e251d9b099aa695bb535890fcac66
describe
'2919112' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIKC' 'sip-files00016.tif'
57dd1c9f4a736017f5b7fe7fe2ae2bd5
baebed691fd1762f244aeec073dfbfbb9f1a2ec9
'2012-05-18T12:59:08-04:00'
describe
'2852152' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIKD' 'sip-files00017.tif'
a6c55b47a082b6800b226eb8c4efd472
b034fd7a4b217a4ec6dcb2e60924cafbcf927377
'2012-05-18T12:57:46-04:00'
describe
'2861996' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIKE' 'sip-files00019.tif'
2ed23b35719825f28f1d66744025dc4c
03355b14b4483f2448e0e7e483aaed69fedfb2cb
describe
'2927572' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIKF' 'sip-files00021.tif'
f07876d4fbf638da478075822c33a290
bdea345a8263581f7fa7705b3af21130c3e0fbcb
describe
'2938440' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIKG' 'sip-files00022.tif'
1ee7d83f8c79e4a75fc5b06925bc1250
a044978fda04be1c87ef61f2fafd1fe3f07d4a68
'2012-05-18T12:56:11-04:00'
describe
'2922600' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIKH' 'sip-files00024.tif'
b6d101b692bad761c121e8124c0f5607
e3ece47bdc5663704baaffa0ca6942322bc50212
describe
'3065656' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIKI' 'sip-files00025.tif'
53f85896d1521c2911af07274a6f0dd1
0a03bc676cc3509642c70173189bac8a04691a3e
'2012-05-18T12:55:36-04:00'
describe
'2917528' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIKJ' 'sip-files00027.tif'
bec602ba0627c720156e42adc9cdd5e9
534ee70fae05250a901bbdfe89126c66a2f3a30d
describe
'2916628' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIKK' 'sip-files00029.tif'
91ed37986bada739c99411fc8ecd610d
c526d0527d18c3ebe9def43ce68d4e46925fea30
'2012-05-18T12:58:47-04:00'
describe
'2933900' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIKL' 'sip-files00032.tif'
dc12a23680d3cf07fc48360afea2e2a3
4893251374926009698a51386b22cd52de1e84b8
'2012-05-18T12:56:08-04:00'
describe
'2918424' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIKM' 'sip-files00033.tif'
b301b35fe822e2e5f7572628a34e681f
06748ed7ddb37371074a7378855283d0c8fb5544
'2012-05-18T12:56:35-04:00'
describe
'2865272' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIKN' 'sip-files00034.tif'
cf7e447f68dc4813d6ed9093071a4acb
3c848c117bb2338d302706792c30d967a154d632
describe
'2857428' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIKO' 'sip-files00035.tif'
38c81e1c17e9cbf3af91a157e6b25cc1
a1432a974ffd8c32b7d54cb637bc612ae3c61dab
describe
'2912412' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIKP' 'sip-files00036.tif'
f867be6e2836dba4dba0d751d9325d26
7b03df29771eb834d9c58872123baa28a498728f
describe
'2911396' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIKQ' 'sip-files00037.tif'
1700ff251068b1a0281989c99abf3f6b
81586603138b07c50e93c37aae6e275fcb78833b
'2012-05-18T12:57:44-04:00'
describe
'2918240' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIKR' 'sip-files00041.tif'
72d7599727561df7fc61f550cf282d52
0b508038035b22cb40e88a6fefa93207896fe435
describe
'3065896' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIKS' 'sip-files00043.tif'
a8d6e88471b996962927b9f57f3f0140
f724e856f2b1f6a128425ee7270595ea3706f1ff
describe
'2876336' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIKT' 'sip-files00044.tif'
18f2d3db4fc389f0797737bd7b826176
b8ba98145e17d3b10e50b5a56e9c5d10cda69451
describe
'2857068' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIKU' 'sip-files00045.tif'
b2eb7bd95ae4b1287d6235b2fad7aba6
b4ab596db0eba7c03325f03171cfda65125c8b05
describe
'3066248' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIKV' 'sip-files00047.tif'
1c1468f9dab45b57fc53130ee3cef97c
124cbf89a9065464f9dfb14da98135c2608700a2
describe
'3007920' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIKW' 'sip-files00048.tif'
b741060f61ed59110bb4a95c1eda6043
91cbbf8f4b57f942a49febfcae8d034933093bd2
describe
'2894844' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIKX' 'sip-files00049.tif'
c4ac1030410f46397b52e6bc57dea58c
f7a604bfdf23f737ed2d2b359e03e28fa504031e
'2012-05-18T12:56:02-04:00'
describe
'2873048' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIKY' 'sip-files00050.tif'
ff383e02601f7460a3c09aee6b0459ed
70d3632440a1c87e7235a2e6f66ee870a7d33cab
describe
'2871412' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIKZ' 'sip-files00051.tif'
028ff5cdf2da8c41594acf63d9182cdc
ab357b3ef3537a2255a5219686737a7d357ab3ff
describe
'2888012' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAILA' 'sip-files00052.tif'
f93942b3dc94a4c5645534eab4b2c0fd
928f9b4626db622566d21d6d7c19ec40924d59be
'2012-05-18T12:57:58-04:00'
describe
'3065704' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAILB' 'sip-files00053.tif'
3fe03043cb9814f136355d73754b8687
2ffab7ca6f2430040ca9bf97fc58fe19818c7a3e
describe
'2883520' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAILC' 'sip-files00054.tif'
07ed8acfc3f4beaf3de647a857625be2
9648f41f1d4abf1aa89f2ec352a423f64228b9bc
describe
'2913076' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAILD' 'sip-files00055.tif'
c564edf45301f3802784b7211b749de5
9a88818fb2707d9244a6dc1cb4f6852e8a0dba0c
'2012-05-18T13:00:33-04:00'
describe
'2903920' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAILE' 'sip-files00057.tif'
eabb5ab45419ec4a46c15f4ffa591517
581db354345a413b61ebc9478c548a26a925e5d7
'2012-05-18T12:56:51-04:00'
describe
'2911668' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAILF' 'sip-files00058.tif'
a324e835a17120451079bd278c595305
ce65628faf5ccbb27fb8f98104cf89de925d680a
describe
'3065620' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAILG' 'sip-files00059.tif'
86d0a10944e092751e36eb42e048a340
f04a1546feb174648e660976379a4a086e335dc0
'2012-05-18T12:58:14-04:00'
describe
'3049280' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAILH' 'sip-files00060.tif'
644b7d043074243e5649134256bc273c
06af84af67ceef7bb760d7951b3b3ee61ed56eb5
'2012-05-18T12:57:23-04:00'
describe
'2943928' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAILI' 'sip-files00062.tif'
e6f8cdc5c6dc4f4f8c157b2f6ab82506
63d75a0f1a852eae8c367ea756cfcb9461dce19e
describe
'2882696' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAILJ' 'sip-files00065.tif'
09c4c2651a82bbf5cc07d4bc27b27556
e6269981bc7b2dd09ec7ced9b1245eed4cf143ce
describe
'2929524' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAILK' 'sip-files00066.tif'
cab6a830a4fc7075ebe1856e17121df4
cbb5b5dee5c3c33a42aca6e747ac1c9c0849004c
describe
'2867648' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAILL' 'sip-files00068.tif'
bf20b72c13055a30eb9e0e01831b352f
712a4d6012651c3fef7cb8cafeb753e1b6f4af15
'2012-05-18T12:58:21-04:00'
describe
'3066128' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAILM' 'sip-files00069.tif'
210367c3e48c6e03c8f3c33364068928
0b44f68ef1cdf515740d693dbd91892e75a659a4
'2012-05-18T13:01:32-04:00'
describe
'2889168' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAILN' 'sip-files00070.tif'
b279388d7cbbe7e0e0a1b787529614ef
99929d4c32d35e8039df8da7279eba87904169dc
'2012-05-18T13:01:39-04:00'
describe
'2889904' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAILO' 'sip-files00071.tif'
131727af51b82498ff81a97d78bc3261
c03a349d7d06afc0e4c01783979281659d464a88
'2012-05-18T13:00:22-04:00'
describe
'2950888' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAILP' 'sip-files00072.tif'
6a44cee6cdaab070e0670dccbda27587
9ed545ee783a19f7e69a10e847b9bbf3fe1a522f
describe
'2799120' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAILQ' 'sip-files00073.tif'
8ae99850d99c9bb6a607133dcc68abfa
5cf8fad90ca047df3d1deb0665e613dc22ebc722
'2012-05-18T13:01:36-04:00'
describe
'2856144' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAILR' 'sip-files00074.tif'
ec1636a24bd13cf11077195003e3974c
d4638efc5c672035364f01e44d5c082109156ca0
'2012-05-18T12:58:37-04:00'
describe
'2861784' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAILS' 'sip-files00075.tif'
0962493b82e2e9e75b88f1d60b8f2854
48a059aeccaf3bb13de9087105770453ae04247e
describe
'2872780' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAILT' 'sip-files00076.tif'
f3162e809a644c041cb6a5f8210bd0f9
de40ef0938e6466c32a98a237a3789d3829767ea
describe
'2902260' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAILU' 'sip-files00077.tif'
7b29844cffaad1fe8a7d297538611a6f
94d21fd7ef87a8783c5ee2f67ab87b723604fee4
'2012-05-18T13:00:57-04:00'
describe
'2895708' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAILV' 'sip-files00078.tif'
0b0e0e2c6383810b97d92cfaa4a2f849
95cab15b421f28fbe8607691f1723ff9efb70cb2
describe
'2919264' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAILW' 'sip-files00079.tif'
e68ebcc88af242c60e764338636c666a
d848417583732b6c0e8744a9ccdac90a4bcca431
describe
'2928488' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAILX' 'sip-files00081.tif'
818f87b5324ea5b3c178bb216ff06157
aafd9473fcea794a331be529886aad5d1f5e6180
'2012-05-18T13:01:00-04:00'
describe
'3066256' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAILY' 'sip-files00082.tif'
49f21f07ead17cd1bdca15a171e22147
f3614ced666352e8e9ad34abb604dd3e2786a8e6
'2012-05-18T13:01:07-04:00'
describe
'2924528' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAILZ' 'sip-files00083.tif'
cab46f87e24c2e58eae462d38feec4c5
136d020ab4ac56ea729bb7df9f80bbf38ba3bb6d
describe
'2937144' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIMA' 'sip-files00084.tif'
bd617efd2e3c33dc7e620d40ab9acdf1
d2381b3f254935cfb12fd6aff32fe32912ba34fd
describe
'2895856' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIMB' 'sip-files00085.tif'
4ba0411fb77a54dc5cf010a3ce062773
ccd210d7fd90af62ec7e9b157ea45f93ba5f549d
'2012-05-18T12:59:02-04:00'
describe
'2928688' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIMC' 'sip-files00086.tif'
2232851690df75a0d6cdf86727f6f395
202682b28f4625390768a3e5d395ce7fbd5ea5a9
describe
'2897396' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIMD' 'sip-files00087.tif'
2f215a6408fa827c3cf315fad7a8b38d
999d28069acfd0493e64a027d5890a760d6574c6
describe
'2872692' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIME' 'sip-files00089.tif'
879f1e650b08881dd950e404bc9331ed
d6588b85621899aa66875ec79d8ea739f7b0b03d
describe
'2896988' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIMF' 'sip-files00090.tif'
ce2df88c9741775cbb97a04e54d72c72
6fb7e31838767a848793c57b8690eccb5d98ef91
describe
'3065604' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIMG' 'sip-files00092.tif'
3e11901de538269341e86108610eac5a
7e27263c234cbbcdd6323f0352a9e401330d2190
'2012-05-18T13:00:56-04:00'
describe
'3065632' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIMH' 'sip-files00094.tif'
d9c3a44c2e21c5893b6bf04b3e18eb04
45e38d89bc3889d36408c87204c47abd444643e4
describe
'3065760' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIMI' 'sip-files00096.tif'
02100da9ed12be504190f79c38cc441a
13d47e58f89cbfa076e39cec6024bff75cd73358
describe
'2894152' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIMJ' 'sip-files00097.tif'
1a299d04270e6d520aab24f005ef05b9
86a80e230f5a737f07bd14c5c9554c327f3a56a6
describe
'2899428' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIMK' 'sip-files00098.tif'
777b5222989714264f0d3e16b3c9e3eb
28902eb5fb1135e38e18ef18a16a5fe4a3691a63
describe
'2905424' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIML' 'sip-files00100.tif'
b0764f14ef47a951d1b9f0d07bed8376
86ed9992acd27cc44053bd525c7a5efd28ebcbb5
describe
'2902416' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIMM' 'sip-files00101.tif'
43c372e1e657e633a0cff470e9d55cda
dc14fb89e5953296578e7475c81a31eaf0b6f14c
describe
'3065664' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIMN' 'sip-files00102.tif'
07190ab56280734d86fb8c76639c65b8
094967b4eb95ec41066acec0f7fa66a005a08d7d
describe
'2865564' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIMO' 'sip-files00104.tif'
7f8374d1bb085d418e47637ca2b2ffeb
3df72a2c5f515d4532b7cec225170c4bede37095
describe
'2952976' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIMP' 'sip-files00105.tif'
07dbb403bedec591319899d5b87c2991
0239e2b7d08f56e32e990efc52b12a9001195eda
'2012-05-18T13:01:37-04:00'
describe
'2834776' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIMQ' 'sip-files00106.tif'
5a21c917ca848995d5db06259976cd0a
c96e3afd200a00141908dd04008e1a723566b070
'2012-05-18T12:56:12-04:00'
describe
'2869244' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIMR' 'sip-files00107.tif'
7e535da21c978dbfe117d26e68116512
26af78cfea1291de0178d4111f8683fe35f26a0e
describe
'2911804' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIMS' 'sip-files00108.tif'
963970c89c9a0cecd806fe5542e6daf2
934cab872961bf101ed0ac932416919aa6466c9d
describe
'2863420' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIMT' 'sip-files00110.tif'
2c789c07a2ff415e8d2b586af3eb8ba9
4f75fb6f005aea6d94f4e95276145da3edc586da
describe
'2825076' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIMU' 'sip-files00111.tif'
bcd1bb4b4ca5dc52f040697424e1f863
ad7e18561b5ec8c87b7469673f54f5f054475d63
describe
'2811472' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIMV' 'sip-files00112.tif'
84de76377d03aba33ee03fc038822053
103e2f06497aefe876ab792445b57b106fb4e5c3
describe
'2961956' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIMW' 'sip-files00113.tif'
448e102606530d1d267900d1c2aac90a
89f3313815a6f85a94127729032e51b35b0e5e78
describe
'3064636' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIMX' 'sip-files00114.tif'
dd1d61cac1ccadd051f4ab0e94b2238d
5fb61ef570174bf410bffe8402f9e037af83fca3
'2012-05-18T12:59:12-04:00'
describe
'3065636' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIMY' 'sip-files00116.tif'
2173762442b434d21052f7d36da5d776
7c510a9220e283f4aebf8a9e9e24384cabca761a
describe
'2911740' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIMZ' 'sip-files00117.tif'
23670bbdc62ab3e9100316414ea6e4a8
4809cc991336dc983ee5489be47d195235308355
describe
'2996736' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAINA' 'sip-files00119.tif'
d833f6355785153141f8d5f4ae53dd2a
657278a815b3803ffa8ce76d077a02a61f3d8310
describe
'3065424' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAINB' 'sip-files00120.tif'
8197f42e06c7b9c9b9731baf54a94f7c
e587102e3e47330767622d87ca5c8228147559f0
'2012-05-18T12:59:00-04:00'
describe
'2929512' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAINC' 'sip-files00121.tif'
5c5ddd4cfb502cbb62a17046e24f747d
bb98dcce30ddd10b97a67d354f5c71358b01b15a
'2012-05-18T12:57:42-04:00'
describe
'2939812' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIND' 'sip-files00123.tif'
25dcc3bfb53bef66fe431af521a1a891
28f591073eb282c8110eebf44c32a9f8b0106f35
describe
'2928068' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAINE' 'sip-files00124.tif'
d695b81077c0d48d457059b32dc8c4b0
9ce15a9f9040856c1b36c91f6ca4353e8f6f2a6c
describe
'3014428' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAINF' 'sip-files00128.tif'
738bd794285e8d91cd58ea02afe871ea
8deaf7a20d1dc6fe33c1d9e5d150b30f97ca47c0
'2012-05-18T12:59:39-04:00'
describe
'3065860' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAING' 'sip-files00129.tif'
36d10612e8cdbf1a761d3c46dbef7b91
9c575dbbd0575529fc9b71c0b5010bb986b18d0e
describe
'3005432' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAINH' 'sip-files00130.tif'
4403e1ba1c4fa249f85431e8e0d4cf64
42623bf28410a663df4a03516b576646c7b0692e
'2012-05-18T12:56:59-04:00'
describe
'2881376' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAINI' 'sip-files00131.tif'
0b46ab2f259d5e169a0d71a12f34f3e3
03ee588354e57ba02bcbe35028f99c60b8afd6b0
describe
'10036792' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAINJ' 'sip-files00135.tif'
1d81a03d38544074a8a2d6693564a72e
b0edb80dc5f7c6bcbdc435bc925d1e438cef14b3
'2012-05-18T12:57:00-04:00'
describe
'1617292' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAINK' 'sip-files00137.tif'
19674dccf30d7f5880a274b44b3c79a7
e664c5ecf75d569c121f9bfc4c58a3f4fbad93d4
describe
'1329' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAINL' 'sip-files00002.pro'
930a020df13b5bb6f21c08c8722cb36d
b003f7287eec07c018fe2e745712f225c1ba3a66
describe
'1202' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAINM' 'sip-files00003.pro'
9783629d6191ebe4f0411e1d3acdbc3f
a60f3e1f1d393c69cc4a95bb8b20de8b86c2f439
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAINN' 'sip-files00004.pro'
d70b42eda1a0b4ae095dad69390405f7
d9830717b4620558e8f8252acd4ec7c327141eac
describe
'6250' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAINO' 'sip-files00005.pro'
161414a327d694d13aaac4f406e80378
0db483a5e27618fa9cac141370c8e3aded604e22
describe
'18562' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAINP' 'sip-files00006.pro'
94e5008e73a08c9d4e257f9729b0748d
f8f53b795aae49be58da142f5d2d5cd8a7e08c34
'2012-05-18T12:58:38-04:00'
describe
'22607' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAINQ' 'sip-files00007.pro'
b91edd72cb917ed698375a802a16b39e
e5052d267bce6cb2bf6a927ed38c05e276f9ad3d
describe
'40075' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAINR' 'sip-files00010.pro'
d567e37139f2531c69cb49b44ea354dd
b9b9a809235e61f841a66e6cfdef60b11410ea0b
describe
'38983' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAINS' 'sip-files00011.pro'
5a83efd748f1c4ea0444baa34a42affd
02e6d92817aebca67f31aff4c0f21e95747b2b48
describe
'37387' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAINT' 'sip-files00013.pro'
64d6f68990835f2d2ea9d51f935b4ba0
b75326e772b62477636f9cb07229119136753c1c
describe
'23692' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAINU' 'sip-files00014.pro'
c7f34ec01b04386f0859eed41ac9d22f
c4a259bd7d519daafa83e7a218eabc4a3ffc1eff
describe
'36123' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAINV' 'sip-files00016.pro'
be508436078046990cb12f270f421d0e
e5cc5f4123c81882cf408849bd76fd2f24934855
describe
'40439' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAINW' 'sip-files00017.pro'
35f7c8f310228572956eddbebad85e2c
a345f674591adbf7933c51f7ab9eb9d749143077
describe
'37347' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAINX' 'sip-files00018.pro'
117728e20f31d74922d9b20249d32568
8ad55970917eebd979987f7cb9065bd421a22f94
'2012-05-18T12:58:28-04:00'
describe
'38673' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAINY' 'sip-files00019.pro'
9450b6fed3811640fdd68d6da78319f9
621b27797a1f529728b12bf7cf6f8c8a6a4922b6
describe
'37641' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAINZ' 'sip-files00020.pro'
3b8a8c5faa9b307e4531cc5065c1e787
55f371cc43f4dd596361cb87c5f1f8824200be2e
describe
'16511' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIOA' 'sip-files00022.pro'
f5d551987465ba50033d03ea9f09b93e
98ae3e309c7132eb6d80108159a42dbcd58274fe
'2012-05-18T13:00:55-04:00'
describe
'32936' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIOB' 'sip-files00023.pro'
129195f94310b10d936efeb422f894fc
d2030ab540b87fe47d867cdbb223535566d78456
describe
'36605' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIOC' 'sip-files00024.pro'
eac721c16b4ca589cd2550415f70eb8a
fdf8746251678401533ad055082cc6724e9e0189
'2012-05-18T12:58:09-04:00'
describe
'36992' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIOD' 'sip-files00025.pro'
8fcef7302930b4e5c804687028e471cb
7735a48958f691f996d4fe6211936edddc372974
'2012-05-18T12:57:45-04:00'
describe
'37014' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIOE' 'sip-files00026.pro'
2fc278bd88b08c5c43fc44163a697561
9d14b91176275c97a9a11e704e75ee2356ea105f
describe
'38822' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIOF' 'sip-files00029.pro'
92966ac4f868aedc08ecd519cd550c51
9e5c46b7ddec8d1289c42422ec70a0c1d59f292e
describe
'25496' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIOG' 'sip-files00032.pro'
baa7d6d3c3058945d11ef006d3b2dcb3
248824c7ed3c517a344c98b1891b727a8d0b5d70
describe
'37880' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIOH' 'sip-files00033.pro'
5c0ef44340435e94c9e449034b2cee11
8ea7baee215c3f66c4505ebd74c2d8b4ee8e7191
describe
'39612' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIOI' 'sip-files00035.pro'
76dc02d3127049c65f90c2e7ee4d4407
489896dcddf7ed77134c0d3b520bb532f8795e8e
describe
'39597' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIOJ' 'sip-files00036.pro'
fd4e223c14a8fe09cbf928c4521de5aa
1a37704778a749310847f94794e3df1d96d51dc3
describe
'40904' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIOK' 'sip-files00037.pro'
112b9cc55bc7063297ec702bacb05b76
ccee6612fcc8d3bf6b082452acddccf6d3ea2f6f
'2012-05-18T13:01:35-04:00'
describe
'35910' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIOL' 'sip-files00038.pro'
9743b41e1f866588dbf688b3bba77a47
a91a214ba228408eb72097c89dc9b1b8c09d97ff
describe
'33130' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIOM' 'sip-files00039.pro'
c481e10cca1b058bf1d5ae506e453605
a026e0c280c453d21def9c8124c29b9a6c7e9f05
describe
'43359' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAION' 'sip-files00041.pro'
8f999a94e101d386f0bd4fd73b3c9685
335fa358f7996da00201e5871d6b57e69ffb2a32
describe
'37747' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIOO' 'sip-files00042.pro'
343f866d3e31b51f726565a384054f65
f377beba1f3b35ad20a95f7d58efea5c271bf37c
describe
'43720' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIOP' 'sip-files00043.pro'
571dc419ca1ac04b268e7b5a402f1249
be0d3356fb14997c44b365f4370acba82a0e68fb
describe
'42910' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIOQ' 'sip-files00044.pro'
069d99ed4ecb36614f02503c17ba4140
4c68ecebb3c442c87b0ace36933cfed060acbd0d
describe
'42799' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIOR' 'sip-files00045.pro'
c590afa27bb68ef2e1b7eefb5a792592
1a59291e0085aaf0528f0094cd189bdeb1bdb6b8
describe
'38382' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIOS' 'sip-files00046.pro'
7dd7d191358563d693bcfff27c0abc8d
3f4d1506f413260a056627cc1273a020b0bc911f
'2012-05-18T12:58:44-04:00'
describe
'41412' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIOT' 'sip-files00047.pro'
d7a85cfea2ef0cabf02a3e91f29bdff5
534de7d3241c11bd8dc4002d8b4232019f1a98b0
describe
'29302' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIOU' 'sip-files00048.pro'
a3fc7108b455320cd397b99016586776
af0080833f0dae022e239838b66cc628025d22b8
'2012-05-18T13:01:27-04:00'
describe
'40837' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIOV' 'sip-files00049.pro'
99382c41284e6f4cdea13e8b9b1d2549
1bfb338422c09e8b57c670a3b0f7784a9f9514f7
describe
'38577' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIOW' 'sip-files00050.pro'
c04f94c60fdcd24fc74948a2c0483f7f
e53c063d59ee6b80e9a4722e2c79fa9ff4c69140
describe
'35974' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIOX' 'sip-files00051.pro'
ad8de7a42560435d7c7fdd7dffdd3b32
cff8de40da7a242d0191565980633558c8a28dab
describe
'39258' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIOY' 'sip-files00052.pro'
f3f5b494cf5351b20077101069966d9e
9de77c20e3d4ebbe90232cf8c9e6e07234779bb8
describe
'40183' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIOZ' 'sip-files00054.pro'
e96285e255302ee6006ecdc6de8fd01a
b21719ef95affb9216f06639fc88720fb01aac55
'2012-05-18T12:56:29-04:00'
describe
'42659' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIPA' 'sip-files00055.pro'
890596197663346e6bf20ac9076441a1
c8b59914d5ba0163fe04396e1876fca01c489552
describe
'36761' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIPB' 'sip-files00056.pro'
b1b91c3bd07c5cacf2ddb5fef610785c
2dad2d055ec6dc7c47a632090e08724c4bf07b2c
describe
'33659' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIPC' 'sip-files00057.pro'
9f6ba0fff508e3974a3c5d6da73ebd2b
3c06c81e0f0805346b3719503d362ef16a54e3a4
'2012-05-18T12:58:52-04:00'
describe
'39440' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIPD' 'sip-files00059.pro'
904d1540d001ca3d3f9ddc51365814df
4cddc3ce3debdfe40d5d8b47c3c5299ab584556d
describe
'43067' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIPE' 'sip-files00060.pro'
309e35f64369b37ba0c5f1892112e5a5
18e065e0730f2609ce674fd6e6ac1491e27c98d8
describe
'44747' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIPF' 'sip-files00061.pro'
ffcde3327606b9cf4080f51b0bec5573
2a28ba0eab52bea5662f151d063d59485c9ea7dc
'2012-05-18T12:56:50-04:00'
describe
'36967' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIPG' 'sip-files00063.pro'
692a661f43197c3ed3d4edad3680312a
e33c1d1f918d0277bb896b61adf876cdca6a0ae1
'2012-05-18T12:59:17-04:00'
describe
'34980' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIPH' 'sip-files00065.pro'
1ac382ecff3682acf458b71aa0c76902
7163130218b6cacb9d279994812121c09907fe7a
describe
'32292' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIPI' 'sip-files00067.pro'
48f0c82ce0bbf27a354fca7c717178a2
5ce0e590faef9e00dc60a2ac908fea2b6fabb6e5
describe
'42858' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIPJ' 'sip-files00068.pro'
468da8213bad734f877e60cbe9dfec45
ed1770fd14274af02102bd0bd419326233cfd1e1
describe
'41048' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIPK' 'sip-files00069.pro'
9102cbe0264cbde5230c7e3e71b51d31
388720ef74670fd41ff37e4178f66bee5b8b63fa
describe
'34858' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIPL' 'sip-files00070.pro'
35fc0e5321631ff26fcd04dac5755ec5
1b572f9f690ca8546787ef6bb2961a7025b15d08
describe
'42672' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIPM' 'sip-files00072.pro'
e1705865b154964e2becfdf523114690
782866d666b1c87910d962ea3d9b8834268ea469
describe
'5150' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIPN' 'sip-files00073.pro'
e5571e6c3fa0ca15bf510a91269ac7fb
9f7217da48136f5767ce02d7262e06d7d41c7543
describe
'37138' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIPO' 'sip-files00074.pro'
43cd2bd8ca23f901c20c3b634296aee5
949ac57b69c8277e715cd9f964df6a4d528166cb
describe
'39006' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIPP' 'sip-files00076.pro'
7dee12aa3f5d04bb0ac823908aa6a144
3f1ee6905d1e52cce0cb0e3091679b74b48d60f1
'2012-05-18T12:59:37-04:00'
describe
'42012' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIPQ' 'sip-files00077.pro'
9f133dca50a13e6fb023f434b5739193
11eb7180c824601324a8ab1bd31696d606eef3d4
describe
'36337' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIPR' 'sip-files00078.pro'
552a9dd3a7964033fa1b4a3f8045cb2d
1a8e876b8441e63ae31b18daebbc6496cf47c5a2
'2012-05-18T12:58:22-04:00'
describe
'38798' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIPS' 'sip-files00080.pro'
cf2f814248a577915cdad0d100fdd2e9
0ebc864af95c7eb27033c39ac0109a1556f688c6
describe
'42972' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIPT' 'sip-files00081.pro'
8119d2e2ed1cd23a6b0399a5f17b0d7c
55c694f29f1bb18cbae1a2892add03505b60f912
describe
'41009' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIPU' 'sip-files00082.pro'
53678aff32d09ba4585a4e21a378f26d
97a078bf357b2b8dadfe1ce061a37368afb8a006
describe
'43105' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIPV' 'sip-files00084.pro'
5b7f7d7e7bf77ff11708ac2bf7dc9003
1cf5d11a30a0f0333def5ab35a9f47e4be0da1a5
describe
'45210' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIPW' 'sip-files00085.pro'
319c79b1337e5dda47be8a9f7e18ecca
7b272606d53e3a63678b4d9b2a50503847be0f56
'2012-05-18T12:57:49-04:00'
describe
'43762' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIPX' 'sip-files00086.pro'
72efbafa12062d08f80c730c2df5c770
ec13a93125c0d9d92b24c7128c72871f1fd31d17
describe
'41651' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIPY' 'sip-files00087.pro'
51c200778e7d784df30845826ea3696a
785d908480586b6fc034b885512b428a62444659
describe
'42615' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIPZ' 'sip-files00090.pro'
e9db9a4f995b761c7d9419e08d5d4c13
0e359013f14baf6b1b68b8bdb01cc660f0ac9491
describe
'38449' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIQA' 'sip-files00091.pro'
b6145d749da1ff9e80803b2cdf83ae24
163c198910bb82771b3b091d74583578432848f3
'2012-05-18T12:56:03-04:00'
describe
'35993' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIQB' 'sip-files00092.pro'
3d8e6e21f89b15301853a0df43042907
0605389cef98b96022d1efbf01bafe60ea88de65
'2012-05-18T12:56:32-04:00'
describe
'41053' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIQC' 'sip-files00093.pro'
ee6063d37ce18bdbd1540d37d7264eec
edfc68857b68c942f365ea0b385a29410603a77a
describe
'42720' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIQD' 'sip-files00094.pro'
992023a56941fe97df8b6bd6dc1df5cb
2153fced8ccc6eb93ca3f10859bca3d676e665bf
describe
'41699' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIQE' 'sip-files00095.pro'
8f47b35534ef64e6647b9f4ef8e3b84a
674f7886f78627654543aa4fcc772e7c24f66b2b
describe
'42865' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIQF' 'sip-files00096.pro'
6a1d4f8a31a19275a5636a599ec082ff
c2c025a5b3642435c52ce1fbf0c8dd111fe29919
describe
'44425' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIQG' 'sip-files00097.pro'
2080f7fd6b109624c875726edfda72e9
206e3d6f9dabf1162a44f3687c0cd3e2ea302f80
describe
'40338' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIQH' 'sip-files00098.pro'
3fd8eab9eacd46e8c8548b39dfd249fb
ec067c1cba9a4872b41bf3ef5013cbb60e9a13c4
describe
'30563' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIQI' 'sip-files00100.pro'
1028cfaef4648e092007ca5e2ae30832
80ff90f27306b76d66d37f0e9b496ed44378585c
'2012-05-18T12:56:48-04:00'
describe
'37754' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIQJ' 'sip-files00101.pro'
d3e546adf4a86aef20e4684137193da3
3bd6540909d0f427ffa60ee3f404713ca5fcf72d
describe
'37103' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIQK' 'sip-files00102.pro'
5eab55066d1c8308c8596b3b4f4a9f20
058a175f22b1874bebf781f191f847ae2c95422a
describe
'36585' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIQL' 'sip-files00103.pro'
c08cd9926b66be8f8c4fc755f6293e02
783030b60f96486baa84911f762272b03b5a9bd0
describe
'43332' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIQM' 'sip-files00104.pro'
86bc17c5e29417281cd8f5f5ef89c239
405d7c4b73aa6f5cd8208ba92c56a195fb3d94b2
describe
'42019' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIQN' 'sip-files00105.pro'
f0a7d71a979bed1905d44542d726c3b4
9c5881f9a8911a29b01c4814360e1b7e5a17ca7b
'2012-05-18T13:01:19-04:00'
describe
'42970' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIQO' 'sip-files00106.pro'
2c91220adf813c243baac20c61b871b6
d52762e27506adbf509aeb33ffc821a0ee1262e1
describe
'38686' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIQP' 'sip-files00107.pro'
a8225507d309b6dc62dc91a31d11f1e2
1225511ed350697fdc072bbeaaeba44895836872
describe
'41324' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIQQ' 'sip-files00109.pro'
7d8ceb274b71dec22709e3e1f401e29f
90adda57a1b9d9c020ef2696234a35dd747690a6
describe
'41331' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIQR' 'sip-files00110.pro'
c3327533a34dc93e99ddfb5d50b139f7
01e80d365ddd02ece8fc424f5516976f519f8342
describe
'41410' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIQS' 'sip-files00112.pro'
6e43a342c19d8aace13c7eccc50b5554
48ce5a3e22d33a28a40127b99155c8b441a61fdb
describe
'36178' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIQT' 'sip-files00113.pro'
7c85f816621518bf6422791d317c46f4
aad678005b5320dc480594f08b5bdf60b4e16051
describe
'32152' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIQU' 'sip-files00114.pro'
861aae4f8086497742924abf80fa2add
482a5d3120403a38ff05adb2e7e7f050f2bf4ee2
describe
'41075' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIQV' 'sip-files00115.pro'
d9195363ebb4d8dd44c15bf0a082c7de
e8ac5e64c8a086b005c08dc90ccee6b4c8d7bc88
describe
'40109' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIQW' 'sip-files00119.pro'
003609f96e47666d29a351bab67fd3c2
6c24f8d01443393980cf8554c0f88e3385025344
describe
'42256' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIQX' 'sip-files00120.pro'
656dc657f7a189e79a34c317ba4b2dde
4c31f857dd473e4f98bb035b6465d28f88847b34
describe
'40144' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIQY' 'sip-files00122.pro'
ac914cab2088921df1574d058e5712d7
787d3e1f46b8d59c46ccf4f0c70032c3dfad041e
describe
'31369' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIQZ' 'sip-files00123.pro'
61c8104ee09b6997c80bcbc2c2b1aa36
bd2a66c2b4a101a85303b9f9db026ee0cef3c702
describe
'44064' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIRA' 'sip-files00125.pro'
5ca7b4e05cb4c264ac0fdc75140b5f30
7e33411b7129d46a8845f7d451060eecfb83c2b4
describe
'4297' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIRB' 'sip-files00128.pro'
f9dab0bdc7e89a40cc9512f1edb2afbe
301f6319632c1d5fe88f0e375429dbf9d9d4b017
describe
'43443' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIRC' 'sip-files00129.pro'
ad679d64d7ab89c28abf0f30eea6d63d
9f772fe9389685d9b8f85f5b49328cccc7c044fe
'2012-05-18T12:59:57-04:00'
describe
'42669' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIRD' 'sip-files00130.pro'
d287cda8f78d90d4429b32689c182065
630ead26b6b752d0c40db4b0b3e0f66757ab88bd
describe
'42465' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIRE' 'sip-files00131.pro'
d20437cbbf618e5ebd82118d22bac4fa
4db388944230ba2b6ab0939ef2c5280ffdec88e6
describe
'11665' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIRF' 'sip-files00132.pro'
76636d55cddb4c09addaf69ecf609011
353fa83fe830ccd184c1474ed40a72cba5868d42
'2012-05-18T13:01:41-04:00'
describe
'71' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIRG' 'sip-files00001.txt'
d7d1177c72be8c02da02d2da80bf7ad9
d6fad07f635f8d9a79071b4a5ec23f77a8fdf670
describe
'94' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIRH' 'sip-files00003.txt'
6b4c7ad19d4bec423ac0bbdc9f0e1e26
39c212fb6b4ad0c6b7779221eb51d2ab4c876719
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIRI' 'sip-files00004.txt'
81051bcc2cf1bedf378224b0a93e2877
ba8ab5a0280b953aa97435ff8946cbcbb2755a27
describe
No printable characters
No printable characters
No printable characters
'437' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIRJ' 'sip-files00005.txt'
7a6183b34d059cb216500d95008b0e9a
7b198688518964cdee0407cde474934f4d22f999
'2012-05-18T13:01:26-04:00'
describe
'900' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIRK' 'sip-files00006.txt'
94e9501ccd433aaafd46bf82560560af
399879a9977b9f85fa31e137ee521f7bd74889b6
describe
'1242' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIRL' 'sip-files00007.txt'
8a4d9d44f6c93ee1288cf7116d3a9b86
84f8a8639db87ff7f9349a73512c0bedb512267f
'2012-05-18T13:01:04-04:00'
describe
'1609' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIRM' 'sip-files00009.txt'
0d31aec61740fdef0a3dbfd26d2e3053
171869e73c4c377e52dca0252d458367fada3901
describe
'1665' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIRN' 'sip-files00010.txt'
4bbe32f2026f1f912d617e61b131e0a9
51786629fb132ec600ddf43e196671024f0dcbf3
describe
'1646' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIRO' 'sip-files00012.txt'
8a66417f3dcccc7516ecb452a28168e1
95376fa3181e829f4df770df779087f9f36f4cc0
'2012-05-18T12:59:04-04:00'
describe
'1506' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIRP' 'sip-files00013.txt'
2d1debe3d0120c1bc168d87c1c2d2f35
c69afe536eaae603b433fa241c22b53f32a39aa6
'2012-05-18T12:58:08-04:00'
describe
'935' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIRQ' 'sip-files00014.txt'
261518bb16b5757f682944ec60aa5841
b694892fc79e42a2c5e3c780c1560f906e3a0773
describe
'1465' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIRR' 'sip-files00015.txt'
08a54eb43ded4613df0f3406da703b17
4859fc74f24b6661caaf1eb3920d0996a891feb6
describe
'1446' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIRS' 'sip-files00016.txt'
31cc58bb540cf13d5ad42160df77d020
3889b05edddd9e60dae78b31538077b4751faab6
describe
'1618' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIRT' 'sip-files00019.txt'
97b18e4c21c4faf316c92049a97bea70
3cc4ec66dad946772b8c28c173d188f47ffc1298
'2012-05-18T13:01:11-04:00'
describe
'1499' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIRU' 'sip-files00020.txt'
150a7431b357d5a61f8f3a4c7e2654bc
1b8d2e1ea7b031f0c15a938f6ef921a71c6d9fb5
'2012-05-18T12:58:50-04:00'
describe
'1637' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIRV' 'sip-files00021.txt'
dc9eb76c69916fa949a7bf2dc92db5d1
0fa7a01156913322220e10d216a3c0ebc21307a5
describe
'666' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIRW' 'sip-files00022.txt'
6ad3f235bde208c246ca76d4bc165b67
d391464e345f25208f1ef879056c11d61870e989
'2012-05-18T13:01:28-04:00'
describe
'1483' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIRX' 'sip-files00023.txt'
8d4e614c9ae97230819de4a8794aa4e2
1d77470f3c25eb16a37d6355f3160675d6e57f18
describe
'1481' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIRY' 'sip-files00026.txt'
e90878258c1dc07db6f8821aff173b6e
f23ba0bc977a5e472d812871cec5c0a531c44939
'2012-05-18T12:59:28-04:00'
describe
'1706' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIRZ' 'sip-files00027.txt'
9e25a3876ed61c0bad8d4afe4320cebb
ed754ca9c4aebeace689edbce8ec7fa738a4993f
describe
'1654' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAISA' 'sip-files00028.txt'
ed6ecff19b423f58dca799812f319482
3ecb3ecafcbb73e35bd153485f73d04eb001723e
describe
'1611' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAISB' 'sip-files00029.txt'
cea584d2d199b094423f709374e16c0f
ff47182c6196d371ee16e86fcaf098a1404cc476
describe
'1476' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAISC' 'sip-files00030.txt'
4023823d8db7dae5df4d485092b3664f
e91192190bd99795442c74f1f0ccf8edfb3d118d
describe
'1143' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAISD' 'sip-files00031.txt'
48e1a45901c18f1407e0bd9cfa4512de
42841fcd3952ec37d7c2ce23e69d1f1d4e1cb024
describe
'1135' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAISE' 'sip-files00032.txt'
0c727718adce2e2b5b13db90e2def7d0
eafa92ab2ce4b32b45df039b307636d713be1549
describe
'1533' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAISF' 'sip-files00033.txt'
c7df81b124e5950b9c37dd2e857696f0
4ecaa0d5de7c76bc5014ff4f7b3ee2581ba88618
describe
'1555' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAISG' 'sip-files00034.txt'
e36f7c3e83d9f81a86312aa64fa10124
cb79fb65fe87c1c347bd6bc6838184f99fcd3b0a
describe
'1642' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAISH' 'sip-files00035.txt'
bffa9adeae1945d23bc34c750d3d5b10
c6cd2cf582836bca3f86321ca2bb227939f0febf
describe
'1571' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAISI' 'sip-files00036.txt'
d811339098bc355c6b4f01d20edba7f4
21b566832a988d35404b9fd265d6b1fa9a1fb4f9
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAISJ' 'sip-files00037.txt'
dc1d601f22c2d21ea78afadb99afc8df
99bea01579cb7cc728461a42be1ed9a3dc4ae334
describe
'1447' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAISK' 'sip-files00038.txt'
3f1ba6105915f0285ca8021f10545768
0052f709d07a3dc8836278e0744a2f3fb916e8c6
describe
'1326' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAISL' 'sip-files00039.txt'
be99c20327ac687eb7bdf5cac9b388b7
c32938ad158b832b3ced7cc10d3916703c1d0358
describe
'1712' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAISM' 'sip-files00041.txt'
4d78e46faf9827f881761c90cee471a2
56801864079fb931da4c91b98166552b97941096
describe
'1507' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAISN' 'sip-files00042.txt'
5a78f106dc3ad54d26942f92d5489895
fe87d7a489e21823086b025f8eae939fbdc6a2b3
describe
'1748' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAISO' 'sip-files00043.txt'
da306ca536f823ee3b15129cec6cac16
953abd42fbae5152e9cba59db5b636a16de48fa7
describe
'1708' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAISP' 'sip-files00044.txt'
4e97444d2d836d9ab768642b2db42655
350ec3d729f2d3a7b7f26882a9a95c806e72a90a
describe
'1690' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAISQ' 'sip-files00045.txt'
6e2c927e72f90fe46da3f27b82b389f2
72d50cb5f85ecce89b56f14661c330c75dfd8c94
describe
'1523' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAISR' 'sip-files00046.txt'
df995ff68289a7efef46e3681c20d58f
32ace43565e9e9ea36a4ea4ad7434432d9dc848b
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAISS' 'sip-files00047.txt'
910a14b77f08f4405e716478507342a9
39322ec6aad15b12da6b135e3dde8a46b94afbd1
'2012-05-18T13:01:21-04:00'
describe
'1162' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIST' 'sip-files00048.txt'
5bc908b14b1e6e91703a8a8464f5f9e5
197123ddfa01462d46d587ce3880dbf46213f835
describe
'1667' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAISU' 'sip-files00049.txt'
d54d7e52111f5de7671787977057cfe3
66be784cbe9267877df88246147b69e64063b408
'2012-05-18T13:01:06-04:00'
describe
'1531' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAISV' 'sip-files00050.txt'
c6b1210b6a8ecb7d2356ba88e7f9b2f1
96d9316f12c5ac5f47899da16839b3256d611a72
describe
'1568' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAISW' 'sip-files00052.txt'
f332252f1ffca0eabe648e94494c2464
570f35e3bc759e5dc0f70660889fa4126316def6
describe
'1662' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAISX' 'sip-files00053.txt'
7e4a38f2e3de9476cb02accd66de2247
415fa6fbddade274c1c20c6f13e6c0f5af717c49
describe
'1589' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAISY' 'sip-files00054.txt'
577242b8fde1b59bef478715f1107b3d
61eb1ef5f8f583e5500f44dcd5eacf1181ffe8ee
describe
'1458' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAISZ' 'sip-files00056.txt'
a1b2bc454319201ad36cf27bdd278acd
bffe5d265d3c8a5d419978763eca180c9ea6b0a3
describe
'1546' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAITA' 'sip-files00057.txt'
b4f2c9032c81a888140ae7228884648a
eea4be966aaf96c06b6db8da9335ea309d9b27fb
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAITB' 'sip-files00058.txt'
442c589c16ed3c52f39ea32290b9d3b0
56184d9626938d0c31712487b7921b9b8b8ae43e
describe
'1583' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAITC' 'sip-files00059.txt'
306219a766bc5a86025cfdc2bf1c9ea2
83b019989998db0e85366f0bb6bcdec9dd8855cf
'2012-05-18T12:59:54-04:00'
describe
'1695' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAITD' 'sip-files00060.txt'
0b1f08d3aff238d9053463ac52a3fa61
cf43401936b2b5d3227ed490db6730a6dfaa6be4
describe
'1770' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAITE' 'sip-files00061.txt'
1e29355ba2efa73d1cc3087cbadac6f2
c0e0a626ef153ba669efa807adca3f8e82804a73
describe
'1496' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAITF' 'sip-files00063.txt'
16c4f41c7f2f0ad4eb34b0e1c83cea93
a6b7239c1bbd1ef172a0a9677729323db25c5a2c
describe
'1552' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAITG' 'sip-files00064.txt'
063e1100ffc4a2774909c014fb5b33ab
2a6c77b007bc961f0a3eaec31a6d18120cfef9e4
describe
'1413' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAITH' 'sip-files00065.txt'
b1259ff0dba51ef7c3eb542ad7febb4d
ffef59d662c83d0515760302a4279b2174265609
'2012-05-18T12:59:40-04:00'
describe
'901' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAITI' 'sip-files00066.txt'
930afcdf001ab7ad9964e0d58d47085d
e07bae168faeb11d4b25e78163b6a35f4c3ca489
describe
'1760' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAITJ' 'sip-files00067.txt'
2f2baa8b11b9c853630e856b23264e71
b0eb1b7d4ca5f01d74d1b4f8c078a140e676105a
describe
'1686' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAITK' 'sip-files00068.txt'
585f291ea0184f25eea1c22bc6f4d65c
9e9bc758eb07228cda86c5942e35f7a402f41009
describe
'1640' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAITL' 'sip-files00069.txt'
441de9e0221368f7babae653060438e7
3d365c84372450cf08e20a2de1d7a5ec3b971bb5
describe
'1394' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAITM' 'sip-files00070.txt'
30f699ba12b5e73df7f50a51a6dbddd5
89d57d229f54920ff8ceb78073863545c8541275
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAITN' 'sip-files00071.txt'
fd53d8b1c1bf3df0a2901c4dc7c91c76
b0abe86771aeb16c85626dd3a3c0f318d2fb5cd7
describe
'1684' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAITO' 'sip-files00072.txt'
23046d53325ebcc2f44a79d22827e3c5
7c6a24ccd0a1fa10981d4902809588e53bdfcdad
describe
'364' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAITP' 'sip-files00073.txt'
343135ea9ea1631f8aac1ac94e78457b
8ca713451041d93d454c309cd495fc9e98a4a973
describe
'1489' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAITQ' 'sip-files00074.txt'
68b043545c6f93336d4b7af4ec653de5
9e9d4084b64853abdf2d7a2c5a53fca563619c1e
describe
'1641' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAITR' 'sip-files00075.txt'
aa4f879062ceb2055e48499b56dce529
ed07ba647670b418558687e4b79c9efd55cd4ce7
'2012-05-18T12:57:32-04:00'
describe
'1581' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAITS' 'sip-files00076.txt'
8c73e9451d60dcba254ce45317a3e12e
dd6cf7ab6a5f23f11b26a677b14fb10f8012ebee
'2012-05-18T12:59:38-04:00'
describe
'1459' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAITT' 'sip-files00078.txt'
d47804a53b6bb6be657835398d822fc0
4dfbe3190a1ac6b0fdd86d671bba2b9279e3ec7a
describe
'1685' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAITU' 'sip-files00079.txt'
5dee1a816a743deaade7040edbb723b1
4e93df1af0da1a792e9062a0ee80f8f68d6cddc0
describe
'1580' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAITV' 'sip-files00080.txt'
b250eaeccee2dc6eb60ab301e65265ed
0517e8783a0a82b2a758ad972fe5f2ac4c8962fa
'2012-05-18T12:56:16-04:00'
describe
'1711' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAITW' 'sip-files00081.txt'
49b8d54ef70f316b5a8e3a9fe5624bda
474bb4cdec039dccc068829fd9711540a021e407
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAITX' 'sip-files00082.txt'
75481fb1db72823559ee7ddac5576201
20ef63b4f26af0fa6b323f44bc06b9ef34a39b86
describe
'1764' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAITY' 'sip-files00083.txt'
8e1f464e65597d19cd155ae9a3550cd2
57fc4a61010515e188e6c65aac4a677a1e124473
describe
'1783' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAITZ' 'sip-files00084.txt'
9a9ef4567ef41f9af5a123906d782ff6
3e7ea1632ee6a173a4eddb3b3dc5c4b37edd1a73
describe
'1736' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIUA' 'sip-files00086.txt'
faceabb10bb8737fe44f76bb1201435b
174337cfdeb92adfe3752173d8a8efa59ad172c4
describe
'1657' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIUB' 'sip-files00087.txt'
c2b91b56b7233c168f4ef913e45391df
2cc9372272e34e6831a6b37491c3921b333fd445
describe
'1691' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIUC' 'sip-files00090.txt'
981b2470cb46ed67a1139f2b171c808c
50007715e7a151a1423f3d75a5c20ce7dbc76b12
describe
'1630' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIUD' 'sip-files00091.txt'
92daf5bdfe0e422e9039dd6a63d5fafa
83ba38e28d9d4f288efc5ca76491fd7cefc57cce
describe
'1462' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIUE' 'sip-files00092.txt'
716b81d4c42f8360267869dd8b6736b1
13506aa6cf13344f40d9f153ec70cc46f226841f
describe
'1643' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIUF' 'sip-files00095.txt'
1d80d0bde5c6f7f9c9969aec23839982
e79dea83677287febcf69d38d1ed4420a117f5d0
describe
'1709' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIUG' 'sip-files00096.txt'
fc46c429f483afb0bdf84754a70d8066
3e45e3aab6892e874fffe1f376e9d29a53d1aeab
'2012-05-18T12:59:13-04:00'
describe
'1237' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIUH' 'sip-files00099.txt'
66bd9a53e36ba33f91ec1029905d2742
c57b31b06e1ac0453b9b7e1778a761752dd8a576
describe
'1545' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIUI' 'sip-files00100.txt'
a2a4984e14db4fe947a27af3013e030e
4e3e0ee96adb2fd33d67f9ba6c28f76486ce5b67
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIUJ' 'sip-files00101.txt'
0de93421ba1a21f8a51c748649205f4f
cf9024295a937e121bde93803ed24b278fac647a
describe
'1484' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIUK' 'sip-files00102.txt'
c4117acaccbbe538ea15db8bc34104dc
d4b4e54139a0c1f0fdeaf457f6fa516de1be8720
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIUL' 'sip-files00103.txt'
0cfdc0b0c6c21f08f9fa8dd2d2086811
39e6c1ac936c48295d921820ed453b3adad2929d
describe
'1652' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIUM' 'sip-files00105.txt'
de60194241d9f51b86a7840782328779
cb4eaf34fe889c3c0dcc50eac3b61f05a74efa8d
describe
'1698' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIUN' 'sip-files00106.txt'
056b99906082e679a6441b1c30581432
c5f293265c1632517e938e0aed32cc67c57cb6b6
'2012-05-18T12:59:49-04:00'
describe
'1537' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIUO' 'sip-files00107.txt'
ee28667b2b2204f4514563186da28250
102033fcd2875e6dfc9ef394721cabd06e8ec4fb
describe
'1624' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIUP' 'sip-files00109.txt'
d3b8ffa01eb034a0772c71a53fe050b9
c753a2c9ca121aea9c816e0485cdf4b0117e1619
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIUQ' 'sip-files00110.txt'
0f9afac2aefc58d686560915e315ddb0
86b315b51db0e49b9fe69cd37f062cec8a3ed4b6
describe
'1527' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIUR' 'sip-files00111.txt'
457761a6592b7d8852af293548837785
4d3d2a7600f28e31162427ad850e770f554aede3
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIUS' 'sip-files00112.txt'
dddffb0132f91640438eb0f6c4cb3a7a
9d5b50f976e83b31ac930a20e76d29a035603571
describe
'1441' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIUT' 'sip-files00113.txt'
9a8e526ed2deeec643f4b40d3636a541
80bd6860c3754f97bff04eeada39046ced1e6788
describe
'1370' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIUU' 'sip-files00114.txt'
3fe2e4a540d3403b59e5d2fce6885c27
ac97b2497dc617674006c85d5c2d65e83f595072
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIUV' 'sip-files00115.txt'
3a573700183627676fb6cab928db9e45
204779c5f890e2b86d76f6bd17b6699562fc84e4
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIUW' 'sip-files00116.txt'
5efeb0fa9b80abebe18dad0a7afac057
40c98754f25ffd9a7739a74812b7d73730b12f9c
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIUX' 'sip-files00117.txt'
386b40e57202f46b957419284d883a07
f0f2c0cd3d9d38aefb24977563199da2ae5f3234
describe
'1626' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIUY' 'sip-files00118.txt'
70065eb9bf586b88ab58c416ed8cf2b4
d24e58154fce1f23542057591072d6c61b33e406
describe
'1590' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIUZ' 'sip-files00119.txt'
c3539e709d2b44244f27400a2def7340
3b2a1796b9d14ebdae5620394b0d1ce92d4123a0
describe
'1688' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIVA' 'sip-files00120.txt'
24ac4b7dc37e3bc63d83940c8ba97929
401d80adca5e9385704527fad6a6f2a7d2f4958d
describe
'1603' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIVB' 'sip-files00122.txt'
c94a0630afca3ea09eb9c42f1f4b35da
c12cabaee12d200600c3ba873670efeaa4004473
describe
'1464' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIVC' 'sip-files00123.txt'
8f1c71081df5c2c90ca73e452ab1d1e1
1fc2497a66f3c9ec498d157e8d6f185b368080e3
describe
'1715' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIVD' 'sip-files00124.txt'
6ee8c1149a8de923e8fd092cd1c1a439
d1d2b324d567973076c332be609c7bf735a9bb65
describe
'1740' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIVE' 'sip-files00126.txt'
d64fd8da5e988158b5acaee900ced51d
dd943d147710452c4cf84d8ad5812c0ef3abed68
'2012-05-18T12:56:58-04:00'
describe
'1599' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIVF' 'sip-files00127.txt'
9b739cc5216c2402ede1714a8779817e
977ee1a99f61a4cb083b8e2145dd781cdbdf0026
describe
'236' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIVG' 'sip-files00128.txt'
947c72e51429f85c5953725fc5f2b350
31c03ef112e993d18130ed1772c2b3ab105af27d
describe
Invalid character
'1731' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIVH' 'sip-files00129.txt'
578759276d74a7fac2a5e79a5c59f9c3
1e88f9e59334509dd073c8ef50d81cb6a1bf7281
describe
'1678' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIVI' 'sip-files00130.txt'
42291a91e7fd24c15d61577b5265e7e5
7ea32becaec6932e1fb6f64c84215d8961016589
describe
'1700' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIVJ' 'sip-files00131.txt'
7cfd4563d4337129330ef9c71b220bc3
37612bc9fc9adf02117c49f209130a8e906733e4
describe
'15' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIVK' 'sip-files00135.txt'
ee7871a5e96653b9f4f31f6d34170366
4312f75e3dcd5536f776fa0813b1294682b1c040
describe
'163945' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIVL' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
a80ac8d3296e9e9cf4dc3af6128ed10a
4474930aab831c14a78aebd89af5865ca845895c
describe
'56919' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIVM' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
69b44abf6d698a83679a78907328eec7
c38bf1776fff9d496d4a527f52438b8c5266ed8b
'2012-05-18T13:00:21-04:00'
describe
'108766' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIVN' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
8301a3c15cdd4bd13f255ce948e03a9d
d10ae2ac651c7486a01d341fd8ff64319fb046da
describe
'42194' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIVO' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
92e392adb50bd8fcfaeeca926956dd2c
6aad266166397b8458e98e7c19e563aae827f04d
describe
'108550' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIVP' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
9f5768a23a230ce1d2a9819347df4eae
590177a8df7f30f66ab0fde921cfff99dabe9ca7
describe
'45158' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIVQ' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
5f08ac3a16b8215837fbd1331da75f6a
add9c28483db39d2fb6b8e47974d837a1d6bc34d
describe
'13163' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIVR' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
13e415482da2e7dc11b44868d8c37328
b23d889931e9d089bb2ed6805c8356b23f5ed178
describe
'95457' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIVS' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
2292c147ac45978a9dbe3967a27da2df
fb4f4cd2b2bb3adec82cc5fea211d37eacffb5c3
describe
'92324' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIVT' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
337ba33998fe70df0618a958e9cf477f
b11a4d77e2c0772ebe68427712242aa9145280db
describe
'39916' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIVU' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
69bbc0e269a0faeec34d1c50ba7ea658
77f39db3982ae08c58177ca6631ba3b7afe46f10
describe
'102506' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIVV' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
633479aaa42ed1ed4a2eb8c603e0c40a
02dafc9a4d6ac70a330273983039ff5a3209becb
describe
'42316' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIVW' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
c0f09b23c4ecbfd19d5f685b5f5958b8
1f5500cfdb69dd040b16c80c0c6872112ad4616e
describe
'155074' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIVX' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
97662bdea1557b3facb81cc3f26cff46
322d2168f98c3babf6342b1f9c24aae8bcefb956
describe
'150323' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIVY' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
8518473f2943b5e20e8893518917db7f
3eefe374fc6247b1d3fe8f565a8a397c946e34ad
describe
'55475' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIVZ' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
e991f3a3dcec983b4d79929efd7ea3b7
0640b3937c25ceaa32693f6ab6d3d8a6279c7b56
describe
'151258' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIWA' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
9110854eeb5aa69314aef1c0eac6c39c
9e8252977f9fd92a3dcd4df0be03e6630d0a84c2
describe
'54472' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIWB' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
5425e7a330d36704075d51f07672661e
34a764a750564d672850bb822f8d7a3c355184ce
describe
'54922' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIWC' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
8231d188142d6dfb4cfd107dacf1fa31
4d421d5a530ae7250465f3a943a4540134f7628d
describe
'152656' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIWD' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
561e0016a87d71629386653128b10104
7b36a1fa952d895b72b95be51a7bfd850cbf9b7a
describe
'55507' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIWE' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
e495b1335ab4e9bb63605c804ddc2218
ae4170abd2f6a5103c70ff360f14b8f38f457507
describe
'146650' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIWF' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
931e791280a906a81fea061e8fe17ded
d58027d49173bb044835234a87ac60c8069f6a21
describe
'117899' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIWG' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
edebe70aaf66e0d391266199b286ec8b
7818c9b4c2388e9b1db8cb9038997027105da6e4
describe
'44822' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIWH' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
143152519b7a37d467dc948f04333217
48961c77a0396520105a45d4309f7835f205e82a
describe
'138767' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIWI' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
f9cea8528d79fe24fe7c442524139a25
c0226ada55c34b778bad5f071c37f5d0dc8fb55f
describe
'52128' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIWJ' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
09e504af1c207d1fa93f94fcd95faad1
e32a3374473a989d557bb329f679e51e6707a433
describe
'55140' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIWK' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
a6925fe285ef91dec26001a075780c63
e55483ac52f4a84f366a137f0cd21d059e649994
describe
'156117' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIWL' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
06b5861822ba8f403adad5f3e2c97ef8
3cfe9b1defdf8194ff15565acb801ff1366fa871
describe
'57347' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIWM' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
6f0169032a92bb1c63b19364dbf04dd4
0f2d2b086bdbdc613e2fe5a97dd5b39f215a29c5
describe
'56004' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIWN' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
b88965ad16ff4386fbcb543f9100e5f6
a7588d6cc38fd1a2677d6386c705586757cc038a
describe
'146051' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIWO' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
e29117e2f52612ac648d28c39477798b
e05092f5b37c5daf525e23e6ab728df3f25aac0e
describe
'152209' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIWP' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
99df997b9fd54c48e1d1c3d220c4bdd3
eedeb6692a19953d6027b253eaa4803dfdecfc80
describe
'54891' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIWQ' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
47f10d501e31ac8b719ac84d172040cb
aff7196896ad8645101405cb19622593911467a5
describe
'102801' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIWR' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
3aba871418d2d384efdecb648a366f15
336687301ab175649de35ba0a9c1de861bf7b54c
describe
'125224' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIWS' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
8b2f204f25b20a5f4db31801dcdc24e0
3bc2073bd61bec3007f84fbf76e06c19c6e58ce3
describe
'48083' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIWT' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
dcc32475879e9d66c062640056149be3
82fc0d44204a6c1e5adc6cd2d81b9f2521addf9f
describe
'142363' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIWU' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
9c77c9f50cf33db735668b28d80c12d0
4801daaf9e3006276ec5f6556b402c2bee77dbc6
describe
'53155' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIWV' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
ef6b5db4d2018fa9cc203797115e47b9
f7b3f7f596ccfd9c24debac08c343e7a0a8d3f0f
describe
'137287' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIWW' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
30c801d7e30a99bed89a572b97d09ea4
2b1106a42b69fcbab2c4ca8ea9f68e328a6435b8
describe
'52226' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIWX' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
71de2d5ad24e75911e39f5ed60f8c069
b6241a08025c586d169ec7fe4b1a8c718800d0fd
describe
'146171' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIWY' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
47c2673016f76abced09b62205f962be
b1fac58adad52ecd33c9c5f34d51ca9ae1cb22a0
describe
'54854' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIWZ' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
c2eba1f1a40e386914d5163f72f1d625
27131b08fd08bc9f8a56bb731630f0b4b091d772
'2012-05-18T12:59:59-04:00'
describe
'153219' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIXA' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
35836087a7e8b0f3f6b53224a28c4257
b95b01c529dbe955bdbdd9d6aeac38e90fb401d0
describe
'55777' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIXB' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
49142675b062028497b10ad6fbc4972a
654e979686d387be9ab745fbbda30b49e24f6434
describe
'152553' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIXC' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
83cc1a4fe7cfad6ff5c528712c65433c
51bef5c19fe138dc11c6ff73d6a44dd3295fc1dd
describe
'55509' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIXD' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
fc025ed4a3e2528d006a32a26f015e7b
99a018a8fd4a2757d88995320a2db3cb9fdaba4f
describe
'146984' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIXE' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
127d49859715554f23a009a630bb9aec
4600a8f6e629a78bbc87dbdbf69cc2e7a71e0559
describe
'53931' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIXF' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
65590e40fe4ce5a02624d455b32d5380
c150caf9987a6861e0e3d98ec3b0cc2713effdd6
describe
'137760' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIXG' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
a54afe0653a4c85f585bc3ecddf0d52c
edd6b71288862af99212a1d4d746bfdc9bd3333a
describe
'51817' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIXH' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
cae9d6d0956e51df876f431eade666f1
46a0758ff416b5ea75c4986d3136685f62069ca6
describe
'126961' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIXI' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
e0b8231e9c5be39c3c0d974a33f9eb08
181e149d9ca5d2bd995adf23bf09995abcb138a2
describe
'118870' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIXJ' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
78ab5e068829c708a7afd9e9398e802a
35035a417a83647f08dcc6920ac4cfc3f9e84fa7
describe
'47803' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIXK' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
203043db99f633a5895c0b708f6a3874
1fc8684c05b68bde0d0dcd0a9f72339ea679267e
describe
'145470' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIXL' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
9a85da3da08f69e66ce7d13ffde7b40f
90a818d56277fdc11fa2b3d184f0c29c8839cbe5
describe
'54869' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIXM' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
e79dfc4666850270e08c03073c558f99
717c59fbf531360e16a8dfb115af4889bc57c5b3
describe
'56878' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIXN' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
452df16efa68ea72641d20ef009269f1
e25611551c33d836450a19ee2411b1973ed9cf9f
describe
'155566' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIXO' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
3fc7996526c4744d4018638ac76097c8
00bb049a01415c9828dd08e892ff9cdf3166afba
describe
'56196' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIXP' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
a53446ea7d236b5b5af7c0d22820db17
87f65518ddc4cb1ea4a61a96bc46c9cda3baaf5a
'2012-05-18T12:59:32-04:00'
describe
'148844' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIXQ' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
d86d7c50d748e0430c4f2384f4ae5f45
c0fc84c51701c5b89bb4a320fde18486a90e7f89
describe
'153138' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIXR' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
5b3ed47d01fab62980361a5e175b7025
2f1e562951e940acdff735c2d0ae666371cab75f
describe
'152669' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIXS' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
c34e7b49f8733726b04f95f536f07719
402b12ffef24ae682e638f35b26c1c1498edbe98
describe
'130586' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIXT' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
a4609709a847ce0f8fc66a3fcf8925a9
a9f1b918e12b582517423d0f75f44c772ec6a000
describe
'49338' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIXU' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
bf385511c142a9c4b3f22e08d0222280
34303fe2c2e416228540738dec2d525535967e7a
describe
'138243' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIXV' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
c53b228e92e9bae16c1704f97531a614
385b41af4431d22031c016b224d964579349d3a1
'2012-05-18T12:59:55-04:00'
describe
'50964' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIXW' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
17cff020e399c41cfdf58ced8a02e5e4
9117089a16532e3e56944779aac6817746a1e031
describe
'155378' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIXX' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
6e5a6f8c319d31e005f010390c7de5eb
3fc6e7cf94ed00a615dfb9fb0767a6eea3069a12
describe
'56298' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIXY' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
5bb33a2866186790499eb4fceb61351b
35222984a2adac90b5fe945492363ce02647dd43
'2012-05-18T13:01:18-04:00'
describe
'145790' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIXZ' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
a96c5d1546cbd37f1fe3d1b576d73c44
dab8fa460d610502de4b3bfbaee7d4261b6683ea
describe
'149359' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIYA' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
54151692a3a5c4ad0acf886a1cb8da5e
cf78fac106b8037bf7f242d7a6d4151e102bde34
describe
'54297' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIYB' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
018e23108afaa355309ffc64d9fe40e5
b0e2922470d25b2d26e3b6fa55c86db3bf69c0bd
describe
'157670' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIYC' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
0978359ace290d9ab02c76dee12be087
b32cbd94f8b87a5b952b8a1ee87495925ff8ad29
describe
'55564' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIYD' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
6ff1975ddf9645dd35e10f313ff133cc
f86b834a6b522fdd8ef63fa144abb3bb5f841896
describe
'159754' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIYE' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
c7aadb249d707a9c15610ece22d54b19
6cec886d80165d007edf1b24afda7a42ee5abfb7
'2012-05-18T12:59:09-04:00'
describe
'56791' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIYF' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
464d9d0d7cdd2a059ed14c32afc5deef
17a48e63bd09ea99d25dc74abaf3eab93e56e388
describe
'149360' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIYG' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
ffa2e5d5d721443eb221eea308b03117
bc8369825124443c6afa78bb70a5266971f6cd02
describe
'55983' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIYH' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
5f309a583232622b2f29e872865be65c
743299649feab8c7bed886f266b440d00eeed296
describe
'146841' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIYI' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
d8098a852d75b89950b9b177ae2c1585
b5cf912123b004412c8bb44e4ac5b566177d39b1
describe
'54714' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIYJ' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
47146ceffde0e4b1bb4602dcd510bb3f
58f8972ffc1b5d3c1527db9e18ab0cdd0b3f3a2d
describe
'126189' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIYK' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
7b523fc91091a7804fa73b150838d4ad
0e0d797dc1f0923bf5d3efa3fa3bce9e45fe5912
describe
'48218' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIYL' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
3ffa43674ab2fe34eac9f9f515483da4
9914d4d08e9e622c878abef63d69feedac9ad116
describe
'140281' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIYM' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
f0ff6bd380b21a43041b4c367fe02fc7
d3de42349707f4d1cbeff21b67adbcfa9d704f10
describe
'52157' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIYN' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
fc4bcb0e5f19df257e7cc1fc69773395
e847eca78169b1e236536e1e2e9b3697dd23ba71
'2012-05-18T12:59:34-04:00'
describe
'151070' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIYO' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
c36472a69ae1a796412c8db9d7d76d72
473a4853ba5eecdea816e4edc81d27221876f592
describe
'141007' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIYP' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
577c523aae0510c61bdef61a0246d936
39a9f7e73de796c239aa4509a090125e164e83d3
describe
'54496' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIYQ' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
5390d0273793f9bea552f29140c7b0dc
70809ff9d9120ec36b8555ce1f5d4c96c223f28d
describe
'148073' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIYR' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
97cca62ced3d5109f0c3ad3f40e4c376
2fca036f3693ee1c20370d210dfe0d2650d64b4f
describe
'54857' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIYS' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
f23d9062234800e37f8f4341f413d0b2
0305019b9a3c44f3bdd4c280f42978c2ee60c17c
describe
'143327' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIYT' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
f706d1b4ea08d3b6d3d8415944bae976
045e68dad1d0df5e583127b993ef2fce4abd4d38
describe
'53003' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIYU' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
ee0d6dcdbaa97dcda1e0740bf92d7054
d56a2f77dbbbe170b617fe64dc73f2b069c13bca
describe
'150840' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIYV' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
a7b9e38815679fbf751abe498fbdc44a
6fcdf5cf81f20d2c60a3cf67329223dbfab43bc5
describe
'55569' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIYW' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
4a8c0fa005df25c72211f7f336deba78
39cd136a0b0409828fcd9ac39b288f0cc4fea3b4
'2012-05-18T12:58:46-04:00'
describe
'55281' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIYX' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
76fe68c3e64e954256c73fc23a203c9f
e664da9b57d1cc98d80696e5b04fbc4a02bb70e6
describe
'51715' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIYY' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
d695fdda5f8b3114f24d8519834131c0
781462ecf16725f0652b91bce05faa8769d95b53
describe
'119539' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIYZ' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
bdd408dd4518732a031aa69b56864ca6
c723251429abf9664f0998f026fceec22e84a9d4
describe
'46193' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIZA' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
1ffcfa70fad7c73746c6b9ffad32ad11
81b27dee022468e38ea4912fe80e90e7268bc01f
describe
'53856' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIZB' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
a625e2734e95667d428305b48df725c0
ffbde5658823f9bc264597cc8b876b6d05b8be91
'2012-05-18T13:01:17-04:00'
describe
'135187' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIZC' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
96e523efab88b6f1660a1d3cde8a31ec
7b13c2e81047c7b155ff81e986b63f9bb940b56b
'2012-05-18T13:01:31-04:00'
describe
'51306' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIZD' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
e6bee1244eb7cb19dad4b87bb16d2828
f92f7fa117ba9acdc1940fc1b618f95c1ea65581
describe
'145219' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIZE' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
948cdec642e02784f75bb1b98aca6b51
46296c5ab8147b66271c82d706c359451240ce52
describe
'146052' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIZF' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
1e0678103da8aae68b72120e82fc11db
0d4f28c39303e773b412fb42f8719aa2d4fc451b
describe
'145689' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIZG' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
fb6fac06b74dd574c4dd43d6e4d43c9a
bf5d838ef4dac63950a99c89e6656ab28ebece5a
describe
'54290' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIZH' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
44aa63ed8330e5ebaafb63c5c37d6508
c87037792013320b10ce3292e2a28482a24c6d3b
describe
'142449' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIZI' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
d33783d9d692a1bcdd3500c6c06fbda4
3711edaa1fb8f76aaece39c89d8324a0b8e44e50
describe
'134054' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIZJ' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
bde5e84ae382f24c15be7c5a20dc7e87
4471f817414c29b07fe013e40fbcceac8d44399f
describe
'50945' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIZK' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
2483a09040d45cee9ac22ccd1c96e34b
f0bfa40289c9c7b8157c838ce530ed5b7e192246
describe
'111300' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIZL' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
12d6d5047833c6ba0b34774ada73cc7a
19b25ca6a4dfe58b903be6928e901c9ed9049c6c
describe
'44310' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIZM' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
3bb025b844553575832ea2f453d6502d
b977a49de4d159d6444b3c1759385c232fafc5e0
describe
'117149' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIZN' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
da21a2285aabe6ec31e050f9f485d1db
79a1b1d30b3182e13a2550ad8124a4b50f61cb0f
describe
'46061' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIZO' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
386b1dd904c372dd94b86b0141539559
b0bc7a757a49203ff8cca090dd1884147de11860
describe
'158556' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIZP' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
c476b1b6f7a5820d5733c68bb79f7f1f
0c03848772c48a2ab6fe8fc915cc67289f6bdeb5
describe
'144168' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIZQ' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
fe1e1d25c3b85a6bd1f21b12806404b5
7be98f4355863146c9d530b0fcd1444b490480b9
describe
'52778' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIZR' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
c740f7583189e7b859918171ffd3baf5
3b38bef204d4d4f3a2afc2e6ea502e29a514e7b2
describe
'142146' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIZS' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
cca38fef330e8b4335109170d3a723de
27ae46cdb353f5bb8eef18ed9dedf23480140449
describe
'54089' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIZT' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
b17b151858c2e22c779e739c114fc825
337db835035cffbea3d41cc4fe6f18f25a1dea10
describe
'146070' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIZU' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
3dafaee91046e89421d691e9115f2446
298d617f6372d1e86a40aea876d6dd9a0999fc06
'2012-05-18T12:59:22-04:00'
describe
'54507' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIZV' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
bdd2c315e22bea612133d81291c3eb32
fab9509c7aae0928d943c9fdb6c81569db921756
describe
'153239' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIZW' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
69083e7154a60751fde9c0214c91d8fa
1324167005c2cd2f3834803f16b7361324b2e882
describe
'55636' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIZX' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
422c2668e9f75f466c9e208feae34cd8
5bf999550eb8ea8d8d09465da2f95ee42bfff59a
describe
'183185' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIZY' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
115a2d98fe32b2f09aea8651b681d3d7
4e80350a1b44931c64f22de8c50fd2bc05995db7
describe
'62846' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAIZZ' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
28934f2a3bd5d0b30a53b0097927516a
92f00474faac4aec30f8da4ba08dfb2941f9a7f7
describe
'143118' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJAA' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
3dec2786c8d923071a15c41dace01f2f
f8393b0c537f7a892579f6acada880217742a874
describe
'159619' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJAB' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
a63be44bfb4050c8819d56ab6ac204b6
4e7713cbb553b0367e7fd755bc91d68f163a25d6
describe
'58189' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJAC' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
79fcdbe73181d4e8b07d3d496851b3ee
15ee8a3bb4deae072103e389d9954a3bc8ce89ea
describe
'147067' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJAD' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
740e51063fe1f8addf788df8dbf31b1b
bf2ae8abe4a1e1d8d3759f35b9bc330f33e8c1e8
describe
'154205' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJAE' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
8d18a425e96bb94123ddc3b1ec7c30f1
c2985b1f261cedce9dfe9350c7cfbeb08645851b
describe
'56265' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJAF' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
937f8570c93d8a35f0a55425aac68542
451d26cca33dcad55c1232f0d88996c7cc8f5538
describe
'155392' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJAG' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
efd517329bbb4669b7c7a03b6bdf8e96
85d8022b10f4bd2455391cf423eaf7fd8043942b
describe
'56451' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJAH' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
430a58e0c0baf3f0fb217b58bc7e179f
2c08bc6e783323b2d134942ca970c207a788ae97
describe
'144664' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJAI' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
974c3c246c84dabab8e5f2a42282077c
f2cf26e241d0c00d74543e8501efc08f09e6c34e
describe
'52451' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJAJ' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
df7df481f540e3b98ed85641b91aacd4
7e5c7f93e6ca41dcd56e795d6ff233c1d86e0331
describe
'56078' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJAK' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
c90a18856fb94cd571e4efe5bc65b8c1
a4844bf362f6675d3efc9ec4fcb438fd487b7c2b
describe
'145127' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJAL' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
8ca2ae3f1ce034c5e36221dbcda2c97e
2176a0cded6f5adc91d7865cbc417be0e71a14f9
describe
'54230' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJAM' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
88154db488f1e4bda8d8da626cf516ed
7909857debdea20aa00fe4278142fd021a429671
describe
'157635' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJAN' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
85591b113d6d7e1f551c9339ddad566d
5fbbf189c6f79fb9d931536115cf78948de56523
describe
'56162' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJAO' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
87257e1a571ee9475853b96c07a28958
b4137128c065763054855cff5bfbe2a430deccb0
describe
'153142' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJAP' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
afadd28627199f516551d4985bea6d8b
c0184b71dc443c0e360befe8f15db5cdb089e70e
describe
'55622' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJAQ' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
26a70bef754a6dcad9966bc265ef2118
4bd5c5fe1f1180f555406f74892072b54b317f16
describe
'56617' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJAR' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
13e89ad3d1a651f4b6c27268af1f4e12
2322e9151e648e83bdbb110ca2f8de8b958c7be2
describe
'152784' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJAS' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
7db48a28d8690dc44738cc098447ec9c
51150b09348b76952eff9868e2b166f93fda9721
describe
'155817' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJAT' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
ec87c7c2f3675f3b37e09a7bee9fd6a6
fe26572ce08e245e5e173cc3474579e3a407b2eb
describe
'56634' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJAU' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
591b7adf1e4ca2a212ae4d1da17c36c9
3214cc24acd2a12434b45a3ade5fa08cd919c8f5
describe
'55288' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJAV' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
52fe6559ccbdd5263274a16571b13cd2
7c8e1bc0947194cdfb18eff0e37030929f4b94e9
describe
'149139' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJAW' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
2a50f5924239ecfd1f13a74b2c6a2d0d
3f176502bc2115f8a633ad6d978c69935aa6fdf1
'2012-05-18T12:58:26-04:00'
describe
'53740' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJAX' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
ae2267928650e9e7619b31c337d89a76
85bb5c8ccad9e253f56d9fd5c7fca842950d5d32
describe
'150627' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJAY' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
5a78765e14a8c545c1df31425cc2efa3
2ecd0c30c677d9efc516dd178fc3d716e9c9a531
describe
'54159' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJAZ' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
889bf7cd28597905fb73359119490a9a
461d9d5a6d744597848137d9983174918ffbc423
describe
'136929' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJBA' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
1b91b2ce77706763100535d4530ab6bc
f4bc38f820f9af842367558bcaa32cee71d3d8c5
describe
'51529' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJBB' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
d09036878e710ee1471962c128825724
137d160e07678227a7df21be64d2b47d5aee8a93
describe
'133962' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJBC' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
26e557c6d60ed9829c3012ecdabeb83c
ae1110757784e3fe33b88b012dcf9518fe5b1b82
describe
'51004' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJBD' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
dc1dd7af605fd531d5b074c67a07d1f8
ffc221f4d0b5340c48498d506a6e80370db8054d
describe
'55013' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJBE' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
8c88e9df7cde47676f1aa61208f727be
b59c9f0392338cdb12b4cab8b24ebb4d904769d7
describe
'143417' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJBF' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
387c32d200b8fc543288d94dc0b33840
751f35c3acdf5e61691a2459971d514756820d86
describe
'51652' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJBG' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
193c8b4cae31900cadbbdecdf1dc6f17
3f8aad5cea61e279e0c8f2dffd1a3fe4038abc65
describe
'143810' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJBH' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
97fd530856fd42f51746066b21a7e527
ab65caef63e8b50b3fe5583b1134e8f7ed389dce
describe
'52918' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJBI' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
5dbe07bebdb1bde72981d029b5df1102
885c212fa3f96804fc84af00da74b590b5584db1
describe
'55590' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJBJ' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
d85ba57d1b68c5c357eeded924df1b55
584a118d41d4c13f9435e2c6c5ae0f1d712c1fc6
describe
'144752' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJBK' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
3e6ed44d2044cc1be0ab923356376c71
6b53c26b5715fc356a34ef071ecb87edd00bc65f
describe
'131476' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJBL' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
a4632ad7f329fb7b8db18b890fa8871f
84ef844372a31689627bf679521f9b4cfc48f998
describe
'119505' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJBM' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
3f881013b42b9c7585592ee0108a8d3f
76db28507b327bf51e2c0fa1b3672e3ffe5c8b3a
describe
'47300' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJBN' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
98435897ca27936d61d60f867fb5bb8a
f267e35d5f1dc41342a967ebfcce71270a07d204
describe
'147391' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJBO' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
23b214df97192c95e484f5fb7afac1f8
eaf7f139eab4b07962a1072f7c9c0eea36e4c261
describe
'54223' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJBP' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
72aeb4880c3287edef024578655feac1
24db0ed1c5b530e8586c9735849a59a8099af397
describe
'52203' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJBQ' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
74924400fdccb12ef78a2df77326f854
b8f8d8a8344a850aabfdace0f5732a7a77ce02ae
describe
'144694' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJBR' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
7c38f62c16163ee982d6fb8108ba4df3
cf98aab5a57bb80ce335549256f7fd2f5ec44fe4
describe
'54017' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJBS' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
677705911ac0bfd7d9d780f5eb90ca5f
41f93ce799fc26984f65c6e66cbd01e70813f47d
describe
'157604' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJBT' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
cc5b915efda431b6e934680c7e3af403
dcb035746b20785470b255b63396f864fe5a4a8b
describe
'56552' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJBU' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
b4ca92659a48aa93332b87c3fff5d218
1c0a9469bc2c13a1acaad36969df5fbc7cff3626
describe
'152041' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJBV' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
0fb68e2799d3873cc1a14649febfd80b
a2d59b4b7da2cb9ade7be8d2411c78a74effe5bd
describe
'54832' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJBW' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
42b761527ee2a47bacb3ba61dbb71493
f2712b9589c227afc714acc184419bdced4e0c5f
describe
'154950' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJBX' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
abbcb5c8b89a619148765a4da490738f
b715917f8eb0e03df25197a6ea179d4c93bcbb1f
describe
'56356' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJBY' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
7822dd6a00b55c9b396bdaf5910aef72
e33d96e954286e2f7b1fccc2592bb5059f6935c0
describe
'149323' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJBZ' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
90dea5f72998a0883d27e05bd0600c84
f5852fd05b6c0c4312f7faadd980ae244f7f76c2
describe
'55678' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJCA' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
c5cfe2c1c55869ff0663ab733525cb0b
1d7d70d14664baf98e1b9f8eb9be5f35fb01e111
describe
'153929' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJCB' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
6fd7e49ad0b77257729a5504b39bf9fb
b704dcb1c0706af9dfeca5195dda65c06fe889ba
describe
'54994' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJCC' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
3423af1724c5e9b725fece1637ccbd90
a6fffd91ac3affab5444732173e71901aabd6156
describe
'147927' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJCD' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
5c662a1ec358b5e5aec146d6606f3205
03b6310b72a468b789f3eb28a035ba98cd003b73
describe
'53655' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJCE' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
df6d57b1ecb9b698ed6ac203b4270f8e
caac9ebc2ee72580ff17bd1d9ae58adb1bfa5a82
describe
'150308' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJCF' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
4f36fa46b181405543d1ca84e13a93ad
864b565b8eae3bb29cdb506aac0a3366d931397f
describe
'148967' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJCG' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
a1dd4789fb7022fa0d741b937b8707b6
39d2b557ddd58c9ffecb660060834fea5f729251
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJCH' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
ac4bf90f2812fa8e4ea3d4a620425a70
fd23f0cad94036e364c01e8319311a8951b32e50
describe
'155532' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJCI' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
040589b32851992015bbac209f2d8e60
3ea955a92020b2d19042912a55f09a04adbae27a
describe
'56650' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJCJ' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
226b66192eeb4aab977ba6648061bfb2
0331674b5f3805ae16db6bd6657389bb9d4229a0
describe
'141237' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJCK' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
df653df7cbdc04798db77d4daad531ae
ab2ae993f3332150ee9e8f02a595b7e08473c646
describe
'54792' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJCL' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
6d485be6ab86eb4ef919ad6cb6a69eaf
60e637056c1810d0f65ee38297faa0dd93f777a1
describe
'124139' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJCM' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
fc339193ce5b34b7c49d1106c189d997
c9e459994e751d3779293dc4f55f2c40df778360
describe
'47470' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJCN' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
b9a5db8c4403ba460fbd62dd3bf25279
3bf41533a1bf72f37bc3825e50fc5684cf95a9eb
describe
'146294' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJCO' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
d203b654cdbd941f07aaf84931df5a98
cc1e9532db60c230363493d898f96831b0cc59c4
describe
'54011' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJCP' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
7444e2ea880df79e2ae20ee4ddadb3f1
658eb4d0e30bcb3b1115840eceba997600ab24a7
describe
'52968' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJCQ' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
2ba732f210d78d907c93bccccffa5bb4
83b0e8bd6584283ba5368d5ba718c3512f3cff1f
describe
'143256' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJCR' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
945dc8ae402155927367fc2748cc8d4d
6d1e159a0a7af689c1d18e932c5098cffcfb10d9
describe
'142306' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJCS' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
24d4044c3464f63330eabb43e69fe2d4
87052813c8a43bf3f640407b0c6d742d3c8805af
describe
'53139' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJCT' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
33141763bc013f7195776cec0cde8678
41bcfd09dfeae764991ec01405b16cf0cc9b17cf
describe
'146545' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJCU' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
47aaebf97bc036fe02616cf9cd442a35
346d43df2f34c66641442af5484f1f78cdb202d3
describe
'53900' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJCV' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
c67206018ab83c7670c4cb30d9736ad6
816a1f494a9d4779111f5c4a1845c3005439ca09
describe
'143857' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJCW' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
64064cd63e3427326da1be22a842efb1
4159b4daa3e456085cd812b81ab9fc492cc8a270
describe
'52698' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJCX' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
8d82bd72ca43faa36f9d4f1686a7ddbb
221599383e57fbe144f8ee425f30c66112a067cf
describe
'129941' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJCY' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
368d3fe03807b3225a718a6439c5ff00
3ef2e32d14f77c7fec91a2f54dc226c10f8e4240
describe
'49112' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJCZ' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
28bc255b51b074174ccfe667e7495964
0391791b9320cf229974486e66c7dc711febc65e
describe
'157410' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJDA' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
8a508fe605b4bbc5607b959dec8b058a
075ad4c6330d75261212e316d2aa8f4d6b3c9834
describe
'56270' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJDB' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
d05236b29b69ef8af205bc6f73c77f5f
88a7eb35c620e5e5fe0ec428c3e02b913d2c5c04
describe
'55780' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJDC' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
146c7a11255f7491b339c6ac700112a9
7b29689622710eeac7d65c5e231abd289babfd52
describe
'154435' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJDD' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
6bd0a20690c5bba75b149ded476df633
2fb6704a0d125c8049ac6e1c704307208ce55839
describe
'55899' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJDE' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
94adf0b9da85c628a91b2bb55f620455
899294a371e23d7a757abe8da7d69c0ef4f0a851
describe
'151039' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJDF' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
06f3ac927879dcc4ee9310101307f90b
df2d21d3446c8fec0934d4d8bed68d8840a2eede
describe
'54835' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJDG' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
378c1770b234a001f7d6e0d0edbf0dd6
b24505475cc27c8140051b447ad034d2ead6245e
describe
'109041' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJDH' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
985f8537923608f82b6dd99856f31c49
1bfce0e799cb359e135b0da3811bfe811b952913
describe
'45315' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJDI' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
fd76b1b634175716baa61ae2f0837bc1
af8672dc59d931df8b67e9930d3548d0cfd11e7d
'2012-05-18T13:01:42-04:00'
describe
'149340' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJDJ' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
4a4aedd85ce63960dfe5c14fee32b0b2
40febddf921eb103224556bfeed629ba7559d08a
describe
'53331' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJDK' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
d1461785ba71c9b3df7a9141ee82f6de
cc4f4eb9ad86136dd3038840a59bbc5c12d4e800
describe
'154202' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJDL' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
6461cc1d6ecbf6ad7172ae992cdc68af
f123eeee5f01751080c263b04574552d283448b6
describe
'55542' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJDM' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
ee36549b9e1709ddfbfc349620b559b8
95749076e2d30f0bbeaeeb0ad5d2da620f87ef83
describe
'89766' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJDN' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
a584135b817883932a0fa01d1a0552cb
9310830a210f07f5fa82065bcb36475ad34e4ad6
describe
'37248' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJDO' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
7b17c341ee7e70650bccf167ba0a704e
781c2d38604ed0cd1871076e1f55d141c989af4f
describe
'106104' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJDP' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
d69fd1e40b31f33f409aa1e8de5d0ac6
0bc9cbd88313da439fd3289e868e0fa64230d54a
describe
'41213' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJDQ' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
69b7dad894b786231f206d85af35fb39
5338512a9e14e8264c858800a2026e2419ac7c24
describe
'149484' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJDR' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
9ce65a4dbcc54c3c4470f4e8b0220e74
bcfca33c1102722de2d92189b861130189bcd946
describe
'50276' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJDS' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
a829ff0ef453cbc00d4b96eddf87cbf6
5fefc763f990b229b162223b158ae552c8bf80fc
describe
'56389' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJDT' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
f87e7114885742f3c64a444e3d5d0ce9
31b10fc915a23812f6b433e3fadcffcfa8348158
describe
'33542' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJDU' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
bff4710f758a07c9ae299ade0cd7c773
10de69c67717984538615a9579dcfa5bee418596
describe
'160188' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAABBfileF20100130_AAAJDV' 'sip-filesUF00054264_00001.mets'
d27c8177ccef2d88830a24812d33f234
e6e7e6b50bc48d62fc979cf274170ec842f9e379
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-10T15:21:07-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.