Citation
On the way to Wonderland

Material Information

Title:
On the way to Wonderland
Creator:
Bates, Clara Doty, 1838-1895
D. Lothrop & Company
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publisher:
D. Lothrop and Company
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
38 p. : col. ill. ; 26 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's poetry.
Nursery rhymes.
Baldwin -- 1885.
Genre:
Children's poetry ( aat )
Nursery rhymes ( aat )
fairy tales ( aat )
Publishers' advertisements ( local )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston.

Notes

General Note:
Publisher's advertisements follow text.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in Special Collections, George A. Smathers Libraries
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026605618 ( ALEPH )
ALG2987 ( NOTIS )
10247015 ( OCLC )

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Full Text






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7



“DING, DONG, BELL!
THE CAT’s IN THE WELL!”



ON Wit Wy DY

TO WONDERLAND

io Miko. DA On AG Ps






Zs Tita (Cade we, (
ee : beat
mn aiuive a me ay) UYiats
“AIM

BOS LON
PeyeeOlLHROP AND COMPANY

FRANKLIN AND HAWLEY STREETS
Copyright by I. Lothrop & Co., 1885.



LITTLE BO-BEEP.





Why, little Bo-Peep was a shepherdess!
© And she dressed in a short white petticoat,
And a kirtle of blue, with a looped-up look,
Z ras And a snowy kerchief about her throat,
And held in her hand a crook,

x

They had tears to laugh with, and tears to weep.
So fringy, and shy, and blue, and sweet, 5
That even the summer skies in color, gt
Or the autumn gentians under her feet, S,
Less tender were and duller.
























Now, a shepherdess ought to watch her sheep ;
But the careless little girl, Bo-Peep,
Was hunting for late wild strawberries,
The sweetest her tongue had ever tasted ;
They were few in number, and small in size,
Too good, though, to be wasted.




- And in that way the little Bo-Peep,
The first she knew, had lost her sheep!
To the top of the nearest knoll she ran,
The better to look the pasture over;
She shaded her face, and called, “Nan! Nan!?
But none of them could discover. a








About and about went little Bo-Peep;

’ Her feet grew tired, the hills were steep ;
¢ And in trying her fears to overcome ;

«She sighed, “I don’t know where to find ’em.

o But leé’em alone, and they’ll come home,

And bring their tails behind ’em!”





¢



es

ny,

i
£
i
:
i
3

So down sat trustful little Bo-Peep,
, And in a minute was fast asleep!
Arm over her head, and her finger-ends
! _ All red with the fruit she had been eating ;
(Wie her thoughts were only of her lost friends,
‘ And she dreamed she heard them bleating.

&
ae
pee A

3

Twas a happy dream for little Bo-Peep ;
As she lay on the grass, her flock of sheep,
With scatter and clatter and patter of feet,
Came hastening from all ways hither, thither ;
First‘one would bleat, then another would bleat,
Se Then “b-a-a—a-a!” all together!





LITTLE BO-PEEP.



















et all of th dn stood;-and tried to iy
At a little distance from Bo-Peep !
( They knew her Joie, sal were very glad *
Iie To have her comé with her crook to find them, &
| But they felt so strangely because they had

he Not a single tail behind them. pY













46,

| iis iiaaeetttaned old mother-sheep, Te

Who bleated and stamped to greet Bo-Peep,

\? With their tails shorn close, were odd enough ;'

Wy But the very oddest of all was when a ;

Group of the lambs went galloping off, ¢. \
All legs, and hadn’t any! i












Though sorry enough was little Bo-Peep 8 /
, Lhat the tails were lost from her pretty sheep,

Ce


















}
| © She murmured, “I'll find them easily, ‘
wy And there’s very little good in crying!” _, |
4 ‘ Ip |
: So away she went, and at last, in a tree, i
| HW, She nay them hung a-drying ! C 5 |
: She piled them up in a great white heap, ©
AA ae cay hates ae And the best she could do, poor little Bo-Peef !
oe as saah aay calcen 2 Was to try to fasten them where they grey |
That her flock was with her ; for when she woke, B ae tes ne ee ~ ap ebe ini oe |
Rubbing her eyes to see the clearer, » Bue ee 2 ee car
She found that her dream was alli a joke, wh ea 2 ye ae nee
And they were nowhere near her. t ae
Tearful and sorrowful grew Bo-Peep! :
| Down from her lashes the tears would creep ; i

But she started out, as there was need,
Before it should be too dark to find them ;

She found them indeed, but it made her heart bleed,
For they’d left their tails behind them!

Did she laugh or cry, our little Bo-Peep,
To see such a comical crowd of sheep ?
There were plenty of bodies, white and fat ;
And plenty of wide mouths, eating, eating ;
Plenty of soft wool, and all that ;
And plenty of noisy bleat’ng ;









WEE WILLIE WINKIE.



O, Willie Winkie, and hey, Willie Winkie!
Now through the window there floats,
All laden with cargoes of beautiful dreams,
A fleet of poppy-boats.



“The stars, they are swimming like golden swans,
And the moon, she has climbed the steep, _
And now through her silver ocean rides
A thousand fathoms deep. ®
®
“ Like an arrow of light down the milky way,
Straight over the moonlit sea,
With its crimson sails puffed out with wind,
- The fleet it sails to thee.

“And the child whom his mother has kissed good-
night,
And the soonest doth fall asleep,
The loveliest dream in the poppy-boats
He will get for his own to keep,

“But ho, Willie Winkie; and hey, Willie Winkie !
The child that will feeep awake,

The worst and the ugliest dream in the fleet
Is the dream he will have to take.





WEE WILLIE WINKIE.

































































“Rose-leaves round the window, they rustle so
soft; = — |
All things that are little and sweet — ’ a
The rose-bud babies and all the flowers —
They wait for the poppy fleet.





Hi

“Grass waves o’er the sparrow asleep in her nest;
_ The robins are sleeping all ;
| And the echoes have died from the clouds away
|| Of the skylark’s silver call.

“White doves are asleep in the tall bell-tower;.
The sky-lark sleeps in his nest ;

And the baby-prince he has gone to sleep
Upon the fair Queen’s breast.



| “Oho, Willie Winkie ; and hey, Willie Winkie!
: The moonbeams they sleep on the sea:

Catch the loveliest dreams in the poppy-fleet,
And here is a kiss for thee.”

7a







WEE WILLIE WINKIE,



s
=
=

Wee Willie Winkie sat up in bed,
Stubbornly shaking his curly head,
{hen his mother had shut the door:
s the Prince asleep? I would like to see;
"Is the robin asleep in the cherry-tree,
And every little flower?” & &

“The flowerS-are awake and play with the bees,
The robins, they sing in the cherry-trees,
And the Prince a gladdest of all;
For he’s merry and wide awake, of course,
He is prancing about on his rocking-horse,
Or see he is playing at ball.”

Wee Willie Winkie sat up in bed,
Stubbornly shaking his curly head —
The moon shone bright as day ;
“Tl run through the town myself,” said he, &

“And see if they all asleep can be — Le
I think they are all at play!” Bn,

Wee Willie Winkie—no shoes on his feet,

No hat on his head — ran down the street,
And he called at every lock :

“ Are your babies asleep in their cradles now?

Do your lilies asleep in the night-wind blow?

‘of ’tis now ten o’clock !” /





WEE WILLIE WINKIE.



Wee Willie Winkie in his nightgown,
Little fat, rosy boy, ran thro’ the town;
His curly head damp with-dew:
* Are the robins and babies and roses all
Abed and asleep?” he loud would call —.,
“Tf they are, ’ll go too!” &

To Wee Willie Winkie, who loudly tapped
‘At the window-panes where the babies napped,
- A-strange thing did befall;
For the white-haired babies, the birds and flowers
Who had slept and dreamed through the evening
hours, eae
‘He awoke from their slumbers all.

And everything that was little and sweet
Came trooping out on the moonlit street,
All crying out with glee ;.:
‘And through the streets of the.silent town
' With Wee Willie Winkie ran up and down,
As merry as they could be..

‘Wee willie tiokie marched at the head, *
Poor little wight, quite pale with dread,
. - Along line after him: ;
Twittering larks and. murmuring bees,
Dandelions blown on the evening breeze,
And tiger-lilies grim ;





WEE WILLIE WINKIE.


























































































Cooing babies, and bleating lambs

Stealing away from their sleeping dams,
Behind him ambled and crept ;

Singing treetoads and katydids,

Robin red-breasts and frolicsome kids,

Flew and hopped and leaped ;



And the gay little Prince was there, of course,
Prancing along on his rocking-horse,

In his white silk nightgown fine. 7

Wee Willie Winkie, he shook with fear : [

i “Oh, what would I give, my mamma dear, (
To sleep in that bed of mine?” ie

Quite over the town the tumult spread : 7






From many a window a nightcapped head
Came continuously popping out ;
The King awoke and -began to frown;

“The foe, they are riding upon the town !
__The courtiers ’gan to-shout:

a
Wee Willie Winkie came up the street, __
Crying aloud, on his little bare feet, \. if
With his train to the palace door; ;
“ Queer sights I have:seen,” quoth slowly the King;
“But I never have seen, by my signet-ring,
A sight like this before ! )





WEE WILLIE

“And what do you mean, I pray, wee sir,

That the whole of the town you wake and stir
At ten o’clock of the night ?

That the babies, and birds and lambs, and all,

From their cradles into the street you call, &
And give folks such a fright ?

“And you’ve waked the Prince,” halloed the King,
“And now will I, by my signet-ring ” —
Wee Willie, he screamed aloud, #
And lo! in his crib he was lying alone,
And in at his window the moon she shone
Through a silver and amber cloud,

WINKIE,

cor owho, Willie Winkie ; and hey, Willie Winkie!
And What is the matter, my dear ?

And weep not, my rose and my lily and dove,
For thy mother is with thee here! ”

Wee Willie Winkie sat up in bed,
Soberly shaking his curly head,

_ With a sob in his pretty throat:
“I went to sleep the last,” said he,
“And the worst of the dreams has come to me

In any poppy-boat!

“ But after this, I’ll be first of afl
I'll go to bed when the shadows fall,
And the stars begin to peep!
Then the loveliest dream in the poppy fleet
That will fill the room like a rose with sweet;
I will get for my own to keep!”

*.

e







THE SLEEPING PRINCESS,
























































































































































































































































ve ringing bells wd cannon
: : Proclaimed on a su Om em

hat in the good king’s reyal ee Iq
A Princess had been born. =















\
a towers flung out their brightest banners,
The ships their streamers gay,
And every one, from iord to peasant,
4, Made joyful holiday.







Great plans for feasting and merry-making
Were made by the happy king;

And, to bring good fortune, seven fairies

€ BS Were bid to the christening.

















Made out of the best red gold,
thickly round on the sides and covers
| With jewels of price untold.




=
When the day of the christening came, the bugles
Blew forth their shrillest notes; :
Drums throbbed, and endless lines of soldiers iC OEE ge 2 Al
Filed past in scarlet coats. And the fairies were there the king had bidden,
— Bearing their gifts of good —
* right in the midst a strange old woman
Surly and scowling stood.







































































ey knew her to be the old, old fairy,
All nose and eyes and ears,

x yA who, oe not peeped, till now, from her dungeon’
Vor more than fit ; E
= we ty years Bis

oot Zs was to have been forgotten A

Where others were guests, and to ae
That neither seat nor a dish at the basiquet
To her he been assigned,











































































THE SLEEPING PRINCESS.














Now came the hour for the gift-bestowing ;

And the fairy first in place
Touched with her wand the child and gave her
“Beauty of form and face!”

Fairy the second bade,) Be witty ! ”
The third said, /“ Never fail !*”! = a
The fourth, “Dance well ! ” and the fifth, “O Princess,
Sing like the nightingale!”









The sixth gave, “Joyin the heart forever !']’
But before the seventh could speak,

The ergoked, black old Dame came forward,
And, tapping the baby’s cheek,

‘74,ou shall prick your finger upon a spindle,
: And die of it!” she cried.
All trembling were the lords and ladies, ||
And the king and queen beside.

But the seventh fairy interrupted,

Uy “Do not tremble nor weep!
/ That cruel curse I can change and soften,
And instead of death give sleep!

“But the sleep, though I do my best and kindest,
Must last for an hundred years!”
| On the king’s stern face was a dreadful pallor,
In the eyes of the queen were tears.

@ Yet after the hundred years are vanished,” —
3 The fairy added beside, —

| $A Prince of a noble line shall find her,

And take her for his bride.”































































































== || But the king, with a hope to change the future,

= Proclaimed this law to be :

| That, if in all the tand ‘there was kept one spindle,
Sure death was the penalty.

















































——































. °



THE SLEEPING PRINCESS,



The Princess grew, from her very cradle
Lovely and witty and good ;

And at last, in the course of years, had blossomed
Into full sweet maidenhood.

And one day, in her father’s summer palace,
As blithe as the very air,

She climbed to the top of the highest turret,
Over an old worn stair

And there in the dusky cobwebbed garret,
Where dimly the daylight shone, <9
A little, doleful, hunch-backed woman
Sat spinning all alone. =























“*O Goody,” she cried, “ what ate a doing?”
“Why, spinning, you little dunce ! ”
The Princess laughed: “’Tis so very fing,
Pray let me try it once!”
4

She caught the half-spun thread,
And the fatal spindle pricked her finger !
Down fell she as if dead !

4

And Goody shrieking, the frightened courtiers
Climbed up the old worn stair 2

Only to find, in heavy slumber, oe ae

The Princess lying there. we 7a ecefm

They bore her down to a lofty Sates / i
They robed her in her best, «

And ona. couch of gold and purple. Ae Bee
They laid her for her rest, Me ?
Brad an < }

The roses upon her cheek still blooming, <“*

And the red still on her lips, (

== While the lids of her eyes, like night-shut lilies, ©
= Were closed in white eclipse. i







Then the fairy who strove her fate to alter
From the dismal doom of death,

= Now that the vital hour impended,

Came ae in a breath.

I

And then about the a palace —_ at
The fairy made up-spring ‘
Aswood so heavy and dense that never

~ Could enter a living thing,

















THE SLEEPING PRINCESS.



And there for a century the Princess \
Lay in a trance so deep

That neither the roar of winds nor fa “i

Could rouse her from her sleep. \
























i

Old wood, rode a new king’s son,
Who, catching a glimpse of a royal turret
Above the forest dun

Felt in his heart a strange wis for exploring
The thorny and briery place,

And, lo, a path through the deepest thicket
Opened before his face!

On, on he went, till he spied a terrace,
And further a sleeping guard,

And rows of soldiers upon their carbines
Leaning, and snoring hard.

Up the broad steps! The doors swung backward !
The wide hails heard no tread !

But a lofty chamber, opening, showed him
A gold and purple bed.

















: Th !
And there in her beauty, warm and glowing, | The lady sk mee g fe d

The enchanted Princess lay!
While only a word from his lips was needed
- To drive her sleep away.

“ How long I have walied for youl?” 2

——S

/ap Thenat once neabit great ae palace
fy Was wakewed and all astir; SSS
4 Yet the Prince, in joy at the Sleeping Beaute] 7
Could only look at her. Se /
= | aN t
; She was the bride who for years an hundred os
Had waited for him to come,
And now that the hour was here to claim A ‘
Should eyes or tongue be dumb? (
The Princess blushed at his royal wooing, /
= Bowed “yes” with her lovely head,
And the chaplain, yawning, but very lively,
Came in and they were wed!

But about the dress of the happy Princess,
_ | havemy woman’s fears —
It must have grown somewhat old-fashioned
In the course of so many years !



CINDERELLA.



ENN L




















Pe pretty little thing she
The sweetest-faced of girls,
With eyes as blue as larkspurs,

And a mass of tossing curls ;
eS But Ker step-mother had for her
‘V e Only blows and bitter words,

{While she thought her own two ugly crows,
The whitest of all birds.

She was the little household drudge,
And wore a cotton gown,

While the sisters, clad in silk and satin,
Flaunted through the town.

When her work was done, her only place
Was the chimney-corner bench,

For which one called her “ Cinderella,”

The other, ‘Cinder-wench.”



















ut year.
Bloomed like a wild-wood rose,
wie In spite of all her kitchen-work,
And her common, dingy clothes ;
While the two step-sisters, year by year;
Grew scrawnier and plainer ; ee
Two peacocks, with their tails out
Were never any vainer.

Which was an invitation
To a ball, from the king’s son.

Oh, then poor Cinderella

Had to starch, and iron, and plait

nd run of errands, frill and crimp

#,And ruffle, early and late. :










And when the ball-n
She helped to paint their faces,
To lace their satin shoes, and deck
Them up with flowers and laces ;
Then watched their coach roll grandly
Out of sight; and, after that,
She sat down by the chimney,
In the cinders, with the cat,



CINDERELLA.




















































And sobbed as if her heart would break. :
Hot tears were on her lashes,

Her little hands got black with soot,
Her feet begrimed with ashes,

When right before her, on the hearth,
She knew not how nor why,

A little odd old woman stood,
And said, “ Why do you cry?”

= *It is so very lonely here,”
= ; Poor Cinderella said,
1} And sobbed again. ‘The little odd
Old woman bobbed her head,
And laughed a merry kind of laugh,
And whispered, “Ts that all?
, Wouldn’t my little Cinderella
Like to go to the ball?




un to the’ garden, then, and fetch

A pumpkin, large and nice ;

Go to the pantry shelf, and from
The mouse-traps get the mice ;

Rats you will find in the rat-trap ;
And, from the watering-pot,

Or from under the big, flat garden stone,
Six lizards must be got.”

Nimble as crickets in the grass
She ran, till it was done,

And then God-mother stretched her wand
And touched them every one.

‘The pumpkin changed into a coach,
Which glittered as-it rolled,

And the mice became six horses,
With harnesses of gold.

-One rat a herald was, to blow

-__A trumpet in advance,

And the first blast that he sounded
Made the horses plunge and prance ;

And the lizards were made footmen,

Because they were so spry ;

And the old rat-coachman on the box
Wore jeweled livery.

- And then on Cinderella’s dress

"The magic wand was laid,

And straight the dingy gown became
A glistening gold brocade.

The gems that shone upon her fingers
Nothing could surpass ;

And on her dainty little feet

=< Were slippers made of glass.



“ Be sure you get back here, my dear,
At twelve o'clock at night,”

Godmother said, and in a twinkling
She was out of sight.

When Cinderella reached the ball,
And entered at the door,

So béautiful a lady
Noné had ever seen before.

The Prince his admiration showed
In every word and glance ;
He led her out to supper,
And he chose her for the dance ;
But she kept in mind the warning
That her Godmothes had given,
And left the ball, with all its charms,
At just half after eleven.

Next night there was another ball ;
She helped her sisters twain
To pinch their waists, and curl their hair,
And paint their cheeks again.
Then came the fairy Godmother,
And, with her wand, once more
Arrayed her out in greater splendor
Even than before.

CINDERELLA.




























= ’
Spee a ee
Ge Bera Perea at

sane




Ait



noe i
fd six, with vay outriders,

Bore her through thé street, i

ad a crowd was gathered round to look,

The lady was so sweet, — ci

So light of heart, and face, and mien,
As happy children are ;

And when her foot stepped down,

Her slipper twinkled like a star.




Again the Prince chose only her
For waltz or dte-a-tele ;

So swift the minutes flew she did not
Dream it could be late,

But all at once, remembering
What her Godmother had said,

And hearing twelve begin to strike
Upon the clock, she fled.

Swift as a swallow on the wing
She darted, but, alas!

Dropped from one flying foot the tiny
Slipper made of glass ;

-But she got away, and well it was
She did, for in a trice

Her coach changed to a pumpkin,
And her horses became mice ;



CINDERELLA.








And scolded, and all that, :

|. Tittered out behind his hat.
For here was all the evidence

The Prince had asked, complete,
Two little slippers made of glass,
Fitting two little feet.

So the Prince, with all his retinue,
Came there to claim his wife ;
And he promised he would love her

With devotion all his life.

At the marriage there was splendid
Music, dancing, wedding cake ;
And he kept the slipper as a treasur
_ Ever, for her sake.

_ The prince secured the slipper,

ateful anger cried, and stormed,

And back into the cinder dress
Was changed the gold brocade !






























Aud this proclamation made:
That the country should be searched,
And any lady, far or wide, |
Who could get the slipper on her oS 5
Should straightway be his bride.

So every lady tried it,
With her “Mys!” and “ Ahs!” and “Oh
And Cinderella’s sisters pared
Their heels, and pared their toes, —
But all-in vain! Nobody’s foot
Was small enough for it,
Till Cinderella tried it,
And it was a perfect fit.

Then the royal heralds hardly
Knew what it was best to do,
When from out her tattered pocket
Forth she drew the other shoe,
While the eyelids on the larkspur eyes

Dropped down a snowy vail,
And the sisters turned from pale to re
And then from red to pale,



PER te gs HH ner



JACK AND JILL,

Teas .
RR
NSS





JACK AND JILL.







THE ENCHANTED TALE OF BANBURY CROSS. :










THE ENCHANTED TALE OP

:

By Mary E WILKINS.

“ Ride a cock-horse to Banbury Cross, - a.

To see an old woman jump daa white horse, OO en eee cars | tee

With rings on her fingers aa PBail on of toes, d AR ee Se

She shall make music wherever she goes’ if va iy — =
Old. Nursery Rhyme, i ee










Pe show the way to Banbury Cross,” ow ; Le ON ZN
Silver bells are ringing. Ae Za A His > SS
To find the place I’m at a 10ss,7 -2. 4° ~*~ oe ix > at “ag
fo

Silver beils aré ringing:







the@orher toward the right,
*SePass f6ur.whité roses; turn once more,
oby 2 bed of gilly-flower,

tL b ¢ ong-of Primrose ; turn again

EGOoe Where, glittering with silver rain,

he - ‘There is a violet-bank; then pass

A meadow green with velvet grass,

18 foe lively lights and shadows play,
.°-dind white lambs frolic all the day,

YF tbe here blooming trees their branchés toss —

Ea = ie . 5 = a ”
if ger Then will ‘you come to Banbury Cross.











THE ENCHANTED TALE OF BANBURY CROSS.



















The white horse: arched: his slender neck,
Silver bells are ringing,
Snow-white: he was without a speck; :
Silver bells are ringing. :
“An old: wife: held his: bridle-rein, ’
(The king was there with all his train ay
Her gray ‘hair fluttered: in the wind, we
Her gaze turned inward on her mind ;
‘And not -one face seemed she to. seek ,
{n-all that: goodly company. :: 4
“Gems sparkled on her: withered hagdy
Her ankles gleamed with silyeti iardde®
“On which’ Sweet silver bells wetgirs





The white horse er for the start,
_ Silver bells are PROTOS oi ta
Before him leapt his fiery, heart,
Silver bells. are ringing.
Upon his back the old wife sprung, »

_ Her silver bells, how sweet they rung !
She gave her milk-white steed thexein
And round they swept, and round again.
A-merry sight it was to see,

And the silver bells rang lustil

The gallant horse with gold w Ho
So fleetly leapt he o’er the sod,
He passed the king before he knew ;
And past his flying ‘shadow flew.





THE ENCHANTED TALE OF BANBURY CROSS.



Ca : er Vc S tet ee cea Z
Cee: ’ Ae Sree Ea een eee ee

g









va Bane
t # A pretty sight it was, forsooth,
4% Silver, bells are ringing,
For dame ti children, maid and youth,



Stuer bells are ringing. se
The princess laughed outwith delight,

And @lapped her hands, so lilyAvhite —_
The darling princess, sweet was she

As any flowering hawthornAree.

She stood béside her sire; the king,

And heard pees music ring,

And watched the old wife o’er the plain
Sweep round, ajd‘round, and round again
Till, suddenly sHe slacked her pace,

And stopped before her wondering face;

,/ £2
And snatched her up béfore they&ghew,
Silver bells are ringing, =
And with her from their Vision flew,
Silver bells are ringing. ol
The nobles to ‘their’ saddlés spring,
Aiid follow headed by the kifig !
They gallop over meadows green;
‘They Jéap the bars that lie between;
Thr? thé cool woodland ride they now,
*’Neath xustling branches, bending low;
Thé silver music draws them on,
But, when they reach it, it is gone —
The white dew falls, the sun is set,
“~And.no trace of the princess yet.


































iad a a Silver bells are ringing, #4
E za In violet shadows in the vale, =
Silver bells are ringing. &

Return with us, oh, gracious king!

This search is but a bootless thing,

A spell is laid upon our minds,

Our thoughts are tossed as by the winds,
And deeper o’er our senses swells

The music of those silver bells!

Return, oh, king, ere ’tis too late ;

| The Wise Man by the palace-gate

ie Hy Will give to thee his kindly aid,

Kees ith: So shalt thou find the royal maid.” .%&



























THE ENCHANTED TALE OF BANBURY CROSS.



SS
ae ee

Bis jij | LOZ DO OO IES

They galloped back o’er hill and dale,
Sidver belis are ringing,
In soft gusts came the southern gale,
Silver belis are ringing.
The trembling king knelt ‘down:before
The Wise Man at the palace-door:
“Oh, Wise Man! art thou truly wise.
Find.out my child with thy bright eyes!”
“Thy daughter clings to.carven stone,
White dove-wings from her shoulders, grown’;
In downy dove-plumes she is drest#
They shine like: jewels on her breasts
She sits beneath thé/minster eaves,
Amongst the clustering:ivy.leaves,

a
va

|
yb
é 44

Wy
Ny i i

NM
Mi





THE ENCHANTED TALE OF BANBURY CROSS.




















“She was so full of angel-love,”
Silver bells are ringing,
“They could but make her a white dove,”
Silver bells are ringing...
The king stood ’neath the minster-wall,
And loudly on his child did call.
A snow-white dove beneath the eaves,
Looked down from ’mongst the ivy-leaves,
Then flew down to the monarch’s breast,
And, sorely panting there did rest.
Then spake the Wise Man by his side:

_ “Oh, king, canst thou subdue thy pride
And hang thy crown beneath the eaves,
Amongst the clustering ivy-leaves

pa

ede 0'V/00 NS Alig |
IS NAT ut ‘ Ai .

A \ =

Alec










Szlver bells are ringing,
P< spel find but thu




t from the dark-green ivy shone!
The white dove softly folds her wings, g,’
Then lightly to the ground she springs—
A lovely princess, sweet the more, oS
For being a white dove an hour,

They went home through the happy town,
The king forgot his royal crown,

And, soon, beneath the minster-eaves,
‘Twas hidden by the ivy-leaves.



THE BEGGAR KING.




The burgher’s daughter clean forgot
Her snood of silk and pearls,

And full of dread, popped our her head, ~
With its tumbled yellow curis.

A rosebud-smote her on the lips: Ve
Down went the rattling blind;

But still the maid, ail curious, stai
And slyly peeped behind.
oe














HH frantic, down the city streets,

‘The barking dogs they tore;

The dust it flew, and no man-knew
The like of it before.

The eae Bernard’s booming bass,
The hound’s sepulchrai howl,
The tertier-whelp’s staccato yelp,a@
And the bull-dog’ See growl ‘
“rt S85 handsome lord, with smiling lips,
In chorus sounded cs sown: = Peaneaivom the opposite tow a
aC windows up they ea © Pwo withered hags, in dirt and rags,
Thro’ every space a gaping face vA, Did from their garret glower.
: so—

Inguiringly was bent.
The tailor left his goose te ce

And got his coat-ablaze;
Three peasant maids, with shining braids,
eed on in wild. amaze.



THE BEGGAR KING.





‘Fhe-emperor’s-palace: windows-high,
~All: open-they. were ‘set—
From: the: gray ‘stone-red: jewels shone,
And ‘gold and -violet.

The: ladies. of ‘the-emperor’s coutt
Leaned- out-with stately grace;

And-each began hex peacock fan
‘To wave before ‘her\face;





“Hark l-hark! hark! the dogs do-bark !’
‘The emperor. left his throne
At the:uproar, and o’er the flogr,

He trailed his-ermine gown:



|Airs from ‘the Beggar’s-Opera NES
|. -On broken fiddles played;
iQn: pans.they drum. and wildly. strum, Mey





The: dogs press round: the eae. “a A.

The guards they wave them“back ;: "= Filched from a dairy-maid: $6
But.all in ‘vain with -might-and main, a &
Dance -round:the yelping pack. With tenor-whine, and-basso-groan, \
‘Fhe‘chorus-is complete;
Hark! hark?! hark! o’er-growl-and: bar | ] And, far and wide, -there-sounds beside
There.sounds.a trumpet-call The. tramp. of ‘many feet!
Now, rat-tat-tat, pray what is that Rm :

“ Hark! harkt hark! the-dogs do bark!”
Ah, ‘what.a‘horrid din!

The Beggars wait outside the gate;
And ‘clamor to get in:

Outside the’ city-wall ?



A-herald to the emperorrode:
«Save | save the emerald crown!

For, -hatk | hark | hark! the -dogs:do -bark!
The-Beggars ‘storm-the:town!”

The-emperor-donneéd-his-clinking- mail,
Called-out-his: royal guard,

‘The city-gate, with furious. rate,
Went galloping toward:

A-captain-with-a-flag of - truce
“Thus parleyed-on‘the wall:
*“Why-do-ye-wait- outside ‘the gate,
And ‘why:so loudly. call?”








He’spoke, then-eyed them with
For-o’er the valley spread
The-elamoring crowd, and: st
A: king tode-at ‘their hea

ismay ;

and-proud

In‘mothy-ermine he-w:
As sada horse he-r
With: jaunty-air, quite
As ever-man bestrode;



THE BEGGAR KING.



A en en



f f #:

The Beggars stumped and limped behind,
With wails and whines and groans —

“ Some in rags, and some in tags,
And some in velvet gowns.”

A great court-beauty’s splendid dress
Was there, all soiled and frayed;

The scarf, once bright, a belted knight if
Wore at his accolade ; %

A queen’s silk hose; a bishop’s robe;
A monarch’s funeral-pall;

The shoes, all mud, @ prince-o’-the-blood
Had danced in at a ball.

The Beggars stumped_and limped along,
Aping their old-time grace:

Upon the wind, flew out behind,
Ribbons of silk and lace. —

A wretched company it was
Around the city gate—

The sour and sad, the sick and bad,
And all disconsolate.

But in the wretched company
There was one dainty thing :

A maiden, white as still moonlight,
Who rode beside the king.



Her hands were full of apple-flowers
Plucked in the country lanes ;

Her little feet, like lilies sweet,
O’erlaced with violet veins,



Hung down beneath her tattered dress ;
A bank of lilies, showed
“Her shoulders fair; her dusky hair
Down to her girdle flowed.





THE BEGGAR KING.

























¢ Wide: open flew.
Out rode-the

Upon: his Hopfs of gold.

““Now what we juldst thou, O: Beggar King?
What wouldest thou with meé?.-
For all the gold the town doth hold
Would not suffice for thee.”

eS Beholdést thou my daughter dear.

O° emperor, by my sidé?
Though wild the rose, it sweetly grows,
GZ Bo she shall be thy bride,

“And thou: shalt seat her on thy throne.
When:thou thy troth hast pledged,
Her. beauty grace with gems and lace,
And robes with ermine edged;

Up spoke the haughty Beggar King:
“T-want no parleying word!
“Bid come to me, right speedily,

‘The emperor, your Lord!”
ESMIRCEON tora, “Or else, on ‘thee, -O emperor,

Like locusts we'll come down:!
“hs And naught that’s fair or rich or rare;
We'll leave within the town!

yg Fhe children all shall lack for food,
2 peAnd the lords and ladies pine ;

For we will eat your dainties sweet,
ve And: drink your red old wine!
“Now what say’st thou; O emperor?
~ Wed thou my daughter deat;
To-morrow day, by dawning gray,
Thy borders shall be-clear.”

~- She shyly dropped her-head ;

Her apple-flowers fell down-in showers,

Her soft white cheeks grew. red. =" &
wz

a

Shi






wh , .
? “Wlitigre,



“THE BEGGAR KING.
















TRE empetor lovéd’ her at the sight:

© “1 take your terms!” cried he,

“Nor wilt thou fear, O maiden dear, @ '
To wed. to-night with me?” } ,

Mer long, dark lashes swept her cheek;

A word she could not find, /
' For to and fro her thoughts did blow, —_//,
i Like lilies in a wind.

\ydi2 She toward him reached her little hand,
~< Then — drew it back again ; ;
. She smiled and sighed —all satisfied, ,

« He grasped her bridle-rein.





Then clattered courtiers thro’ the street,
Fast ran the folk, 1 ween,
And under feet strewed roses sweet,
» And boughs of apple-green.

The emperor, on his gold-shod horse, |
Came pacing thro’ the town, /

And by his side his timid bride —/
Rode in her tattered gown.

A crocus-broidered petticoat,

Robes stiff with threads of gold,
The maids found soon, and satin shoo,
And lace in spices rolled.



THE BEGGAR KING.



hey led the trembling beggar-maid
; s~ All gently up the stair,
. i hro’ golden doors with sills of flowers,
Â¥ Into a a fair.

L They lodsed fom her her faded gear ;
They kissed her gentle face ;
From head to feet clad her so sweet

a.

In linen fine and lace ; le












me *








e—

“y

They clasped her golden-threaded

“ Darling, thou art so fair!”

With strings of pearls, amid the curls,
They dressed her flowing hair.








“Now, pardy!” cried the emperor,
“The rose-tree is in flower!

-= In the world green was never seen

Queen half so sweet before!”










The people, dressed as for a feast,
Thronged round the palace-doors ;
The minstrels sung, the joy-bells rung,

ie roses fell in showers. | ,

e Beggar King looked towatds
‘‘ Farewell, my daughter deat
The east,was gray — he rodg)
swallowed down a te












~









GOODY TWO-SHOES.

GOODY TWO-SHOES.

VERSIFIED BY MRS. CLARA DOTY BATES,

WO-Shoes, Two-Shoes,
Little Goody Two-Shoes !
Do you know about her? Well,
I’m ready now to tell
How the little creature came
By so odd a name.

It was very long ago,
In the days of good Queen Bess,
When upon the cold world’s care,
Fatherless and motherless,

There were thrown two helpless ones,
Destitute as they could be;

Tom, they called the little boy,
And the girl was Margery.

Many a day they cried for food

When the cup-board shelves were bare ;
Many an hour they roamed the streets
Scarcely knowing why or where.

As to kindred, all were dead ;
As to shelter, they had none;

As to shoes, Tom had a pair;
Little Margery had but one!

One-Shoe, One-Shoe,

Think of Little One-Shoe!
Think how never a pretty boot
Was buttoned on the tender foot ;
Nor yet a slipper, fairy-light,

With dainty knot or buckle bright!





GOODY TWO-SHOES.





tert
































But above our human woes
Bends an always loving Heaven ;
And to every hungry cry
Is there somewhere answer given.

/ Kind eyes watched the. wandering ones,
Pitied their forlorn distress ;
* Grieved to note Tom’s ragged coat,

-
is And Margery’s tattered dress.

| “ee ’Twas the village clergyman,
&, And he sought them tenderly,
Gave them warm, soft clothes to wear.
Ordered shoes for Margery.

“Two shoes, two shoes,

Oh, see my two shoes!”
So did little Margery cry,
When the cobbler came to try
If they fitted trim and neat ‘
On the worn and tired feet: f
That is how and why she came ;
By so strange a name.

Tom went off to London town;
Margery went to village school;

Apt she was, and quick to learn,
Docile to the simplest rule.



Out from the long alphabet if
Letters locked at her and smiled, i

Almost seemed to nod and speak, Y
Glad to know so bright a child,

Ranged themselves in winsome words ;
Then in sentences. Indeed, oe

Quite before she knew the fact,
Margery had learned to read.



Ul
any ee?





GOODY TW0O-SHOES.






















Two-Shoes, Two-Shoes,

Eager Goody Two-Shoes!

When the magic art she knew,

She planned to help poor children too ;

And those who had no chance to learn

Their letters, she would teach in turn. ¢
AN Be

Now, in the days of good Queet¥ Bess, or

Few books were printed, very few — =~
None, scarcely, for the little folks ;
So Margery studied what to do.

She cut from proper blocks of wood
Sets of the letters: A, B,C; b
And in some cosy shady place
Would group the children round her knee od

And teach them —not alone to read, eas
But how to spell, and how to sing; i
And how to practice gentle ways,
And to be kind to everything.





All living things seemed drawn to her:
A helpless lamb, whose dam had died,

She reared and tended till he ran

Tame asa kittéff at her side : ae



Two-Shoes, Two-Shoes,

So grew Goody Two-Shoes!
First a maiden, comely, sweet;
Then a woman, wise, discreet ;
Called now, as a courtesy,
Little Mrs. Margery.









A sky-lark stolen from its nest
Sang on her finger, though he knew
His unclipped wings were free to soar he
At will into the heaven’s blue ;




An honored, faithful teacher she!
And every year an added grace,

More fair than youth’s fair roses are,
Blossomed upon her charming face.

oe we






“A raven which had fought and torn

Its captor’s hand with savage beak,
And which at first could only croak,

She taught in gracious words to speak ;





Jumper, the dog, watched all her steps
With constant eyes and jealous love ;
A great cat purred and rubbed her dress ;
And on her shoulder perched a dove.

Two-Shoes, Two-Shoes,

Ah me, Margery Two-Shoes !
Maybe the days of good Queen Bess
Were times of wisdom ; nevertheless,
Witches (the people said) might be—
And a witch they thought our Margery !





GOODY TWO-SHOES.



; ickey Noodle, a simpleton, >

, Whoraised the cry, “A witch, a witch!”

| Then she was summoned to the court,

/ Amused, or grieved, she scarce knew which.

Plenty of friends, however, proved
How false was Justice Shallow’s plea

That “She must be a witch, because —
Because of the raven, don’t you see? ”

Sir Edward Lovell, a baronet,
Who stood in court and saw her grace
Her sweet good sense, her dignity,
And the pure beauty of her face,

Sighed heavily in his high-born breast
As Mrs, Margery was set free,
Saying, “I Zzow she is a witch,
For, ah, she so bewitches me!”





GOODY TWO-SHOES.





He watched her go her quiet ways,
‘And vowed, whatever might betide,
Tf his best love could win her heart
And hand, then she should be his bride.



Two-Shoes, Two-Shoes —
Lady Lovell, if she choose!
Her the noble lover wooed,
'Humbly, as a lover should,
Eagerly, as lover ought,
With entire heart and thought.

What her answer, ail may guess,

For the old church chime that rung
Its next wedding anthem sung

With a most delighted tongue :.<>





GOODY TWO-SHOES.








Jamies

‘ \

ae L,

* Two-Shoes, Two-Shoes, oo ay = ‘ é ne
Wedding day of Two-Shoes {

pyBarecfoot lass but yesterdays p
Lady Lovell is to-day! ¥ pee

Â¥Bvo-Shocs, TLwo-Sho.






















Who is this ¢ ities so fast,
With plumed ‘hat and cheek of brown,
With golden trappings on his horse,

The flecks of foam are on his ret
The dust of journey whitens him, he
He leans to see the bridal train! ~

Two-Shoes, Two-Shoes,
Lady Goody Two-Shoes !
Tom it is, come home once more!
Even now he’s at the door,
. Rich and grand as any king —
€ome to bless the wedding ring!





LIST OF D. LOTHROP & CO?S ILLUSTRATED PUBLICATIONS.

sage = F'rom the Hudson to the Neva.
By DAVID KER.


















A boy’s book. 36 illustrations. 12mo.

A story of travel and adventure largely in
Southern Europe, and the Malay Islands.
While the incidents are of an exciting nature,
the narrative is unusually true to nature, the
author, a well-known New York journalist and
traveler, having the year previous visited the

scenes and people he describes.















Frout FROM THE HUDSON TO THE NEVA,





PEACE ISLAND SERIES,

6 vols., 12 mo, cloth, $4.50. Six to ten

original fuli-page illustrations in each volume.

Jo Lambert’s Ferry. By GrorcE Cary
EGGLESTON. With other stories of the fron-

tier and early settlers.

Dolly’s Kettledrum. By Nora PERRY.

With other stories for girls.

Nellie’s Heroics. By HARRIET BEECHER
SToweE. With other heroic stories.

Lost in Pompeii. By H. II. CLark, U.S.
N. With other stories of Adventure.

Peace Island. By Exior McCormick.
With other stories for boys.

Katy’s Birthday. By Sara O, JEWETT.
With other stories by famous authors.















































A most entertaining little library for boys



















wad girls, by the best of American authors. From PEACE

ISLAND SERIES.





2A

zr

LIST OF D. LOTHROP & CO.S {LLUSTRATED PUBLICATIONS.



from THE KINGDOM OF HOME.

THE KINGDOM OF HOME.

vo, extra cloth, bevelled, gilt edges, $6.00;
Turkey morocco, antique, gilt edges, $9.00.

Homely Poems for Home Lovers. The
choicest poems from all sources and all times.
Selected and arranged by Arthur Gilman.
Fully illustrated with Albertypes, Gravotypes
and wood engravings.

‘A book that should be in every household
where there are hearts to respond to the key
note of its pages—“ Home.” It is for home
lovers, and its melodies run through songs for
all ages. It is a large and very elegant quarto,
profusely and beautifully illustrated, and suit-
able for birthday gift, wedding present or
Christmas remembrance.

PARLOR COMEDIES.

BY CHARLES R,. TALBOT.
Hlustrated by Francis Miller and H. Pruett
Share. Quarto, $1.00.
Sparkling comedies of modern society life
equally adapted for reading or for private

theatricals.

from PARLOR COMEDIES.



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Full Text






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“DING, DONG, BELL!
THE CAT’s IN THE WELL!”
ON Wit Wy DY

TO WONDERLAND

io Miko. DA On AG Ps






Zs Tita (Cade we, (
ee : beat
mn aiuive a me ay) UYiats
“AIM

BOS LON
PeyeeOlLHROP AND COMPANY

FRANKLIN AND HAWLEY STREETS
Copyright by I. Lothrop & Co., 1885.
LITTLE BO-BEEP.





Why, little Bo-Peep was a shepherdess!
© And she dressed in a short white petticoat,
And a kirtle of blue, with a looped-up look,
Z ras And a snowy kerchief about her throat,
And held in her hand a crook,

x

They had tears to laugh with, and tears to weep.
So fringy, and shy, and blue, and sweet, 5
That even the summer skies in color, gt
Or the autumn gentians under her feet, S,
Less tender were and duller.
























Now, a shepherdess ought to watch her sheep ;
But the careless little girl, Bo-Peep,
Was hunting for late wild strawberries,
The sweetest her tongue had ever tasted ;
They were few in number, and small in size,
Too good, though, to be wasted.




- And in that way the little Bo-Peep,
The first she knew, had lost her sheep!
To the top of the nearest knoll she ran,
The better to look the pasture over;
She shaded her face, and called, “Nan! Nan!?
But none of them could discover. a








About and about went little Bo-Peep;

’ Her feet grew tired, the hills were steep ;
¢ And in trying her fears to overcome ;

«She sighed, “I don’t know where to find ’em.

o But leé’em alone, and they’ll come home,

And bring their tails behind ’em!”





¢



es

ny,

i
£
i
:
i
3

So down sat trustful little Bo-Peep,
, And in a minute was fast asleep!
Arm over her head, and her finger-ends
! _ All red with the fruit she had been eating ;
(Wie her thoughts were only of her lost friends,
‘ And she dreamed she heard them bleating.

&
ae
pee A

3

Twas a happy dream for little Bo-Peep ;
As she lay on the grass, her flock of sheep,
With scatter and clatter and patter of feet,
Came hastening from all ways hither, thither ;
First‘one would bleat, then another would bleat,
Se Then “b-a-a—a-a!” all together!


LITTLE BO-PEEP.



















et all of th dn stood;-and tried to iy
At a little distance from Bo-Peep !
( They knew her Joie, sal were very glad *
Iie To have her comé with her crook to find them, &
| But they felt so strangely because they had

he Not a single tail behind them. pY













46,

| iis iiaaeetttaned old mother-sheep, Te

Who bleated and stamped to greet Bo-Peep,

\? With their tails shorn close, were odd enough ;'

Wy But the very oddest of all was when a ;

Group of the lambs went galloping off, ¢. \
All legs, and hadn’t any! i












Though sorry enough was little Bo-Peep 8 /
, Lhat the tails were lost from her pretty sheep,

Ce


















}
| © She murmured, “I'll find them easily, ‘
wy And there’s very little good in crying!” _, |
4 ‘ Ip |
: So away she went, and at last, in a tree, i
| HW, She nay them hung a-drying ! C 5 |
: She piled them up in a great white heap, ©
AA ae cay hates ae And the best she could do, poor little Bo-Peef !
oe as saah aay calcen 2 Was to try to fasten them where they grey |
That her flock was with her ; for when she woke, B ae tes ne ee ~ ap ebe ini oe |
Rubbing her eyes to see the clearer, » Bue ee 2 ee car
She found that her dream was alli a joke, wh ea 2 ye ae nee
And they were nowhere near her. t ae
Tearful and sorrowful grew Bo-Peep! :
| Down from her lashes the tears would creep ; i

But she started out, as there was need,
Before it should be too dark to find them ;

She found them indeed, but it made her heart bleed,
For they’d left their tails behind them!

Did she laugh or cry, our little Bo-Peep,
To see such a comical crowd of sheep ?
There were plenty of bodies, white and fat ;
And plenty of wide mouths, eating, eating ;
Plenty of soft wool, and all that ;
And plenty of noisy bleat’ng ;






WEE WILLIE WINKIE.



O, Willie Winkie, and hey, Willie Winkie!
Now through the window there floats,
All laden with cargoes of beautiful dreams,
A fleet of poppy-boats.



“The stars, they are swimming like golden swans,
And the moon, she has climbed the steep, _
And now through her silver ocean rides
A thousand fathoms deep. ®
®
“ Like an arrow of light down the milky way,
Straight over the moonlit sea,
With its crimson sails puffed out with wind,
- The fleet it sails to thee.

“And the child whom his mother has kissed good-
night,
And the soonest doth fall asleep,
The loveliest dream in the poppy-boats
He will get for his own to keep,

“But ho, Willie Winkie; and hey, Willie Winkie !
The child that will feeep awake,

The worst and the ugliest dream in the fleet
Is the dream he will have to take.


WEE WILLIE WINKIE.

































































“Rose-leaves round the window, they rustle so
soft; = — |
All things that are little and sweet — ’ a
The rose-bud babies and all the flowers —
They wait for the poppy fleet.





Hi

“Grass waves o’er the sparrow asleep in her nest;
_ The robins are sleeping all ;
| And the echoes have died from the clouds away
|| Of the skylark’s silver call.

“White doves are asleep in the tall bell-tower;.
The sky-lark sleeps in his nest ;

And the baby-prince he has gone to sleep
Upon the fair Queen’s breast.



| “Oho, Willie Winkie ; and hey, Willie Winkie!
: The moonbeams they sleep on the sea:

Catch the loveliest dreams in the poppy-fleet,
And here is a kiss for thee.”

7a




WEE WILLIE WINKIE,



s
=
=

Wee Willie Winkie sat up in bed,
Stubbornly shaking his curly head,
{hen his mother had shut the door:
s the Prince asleep? I would like to see;
"Is the robin asleep in the cherry-tree,
And every little flower?” & &

“The flowerS-are awake and play with the bees,
The robins, they sing in the cherry-trees,
And the Prince a gladdest of all;
For he’s merry and wide awake, of course,
He is prancing about on his rocking-horse,
Or see he is playing at ball.”

Wee Willie Winkie sat up in bed,
Stubbornly shaking his curly head —
The moon shone bright as day ;
“Tl run through the town myself,” said he, &

“And see if they all asleep can be — Le
I think they are all at play!” Bn,

Wee Willie Winkie—no shoes on his feet,

No hat on his head — ran down the street,
And he called at every lock :

“ Are your babies asleep in their cradles now?

Do your lilies asleep in the night-wind blow?

‘of ’tis now ten o’clock !” /


WEE WILLIE WINKIE.



Wee Willie Winkie in his nightgown,
Little fat, rosy boy, ran thro’ the town;
His curly head damp with-dew:
* Are the robins and babies and roses all
Abed and asleep?” he loud would call —.,
“Tf they are, ’ll go too!” &

To Wee Willie Winkie, who loudly tapped
‘At the window-panes where the babies napped,
- A-strange thing did befall;
For the white-haired babies, the birds and flowers
Who had slept and dreamed through the evening
hours, eae
‘He awoke from their slumbers all.

And everything that was little and sweet
Came trooping out on the moonlit street,
All crying out with glee ;.:
‘And through the streets of the.silent town
' With Wee Willie Winkie ran up and down,
As merry as they could be..

‘Wee willie tiokie marched at the head, *
Poor little wight, quite pale with dread,
. - Along line after him: ;
Twittering larks and. murmuring bees,
Dandelions blown on the evening breeze,
And tiger-lilies grim ;


WEE WILLIE WINKIE.


























































































Cooing babies, and bleating lambs

Stealing away from their sleeping dams,
Behind him ambled and crept ;

Singing treetoads and katydids,

Robin red-breasts and frolicsome kids,

Flew and hopped and leaped ;



And the gay little Prince was there, of course,
Prancing along on his rocking-horse,

In his white silk nightgown fine. 7

Wee Willie Winkie, he shook with fear : [

i “Oh, what would I give, my mamma dear, (
To sleep in that bed of mine?” ie

Quite over the town the tumult spread : 7






From many a window a nightcapped head
Came continuously popping out ;
The King awoke and -began to frown;

“The foe, they are riding upon the town !
__The courtiers ’gan to-shout:

a
Wee Willie Winkie came up the street, __
Crying aloud, on his little bare feet, \. if
With his train to the palace door; ;
“ Queer sights I have:seen,” quoth slowly the King;
“But I never have seen, by my signet-ring,
A sight like this before ! )


WEE WILLIE

“And what do you mean, I pray, wee sir,

That the whole of the town you wake and stir
At ten o’clock of the night ?

That the babies, and birds and lambs, and all,

From their cradles into the street you call, &
And give folks such a fright ?

“And you’ve waked the Prince,” halloed the King,
“And now will I, by my signet-ring ” —
Wee Willie, he screamed aloud, #
And lo! in his crib he was lying alone,
And in at his window the moon she shone
Through a silver and amber cloud,

WINKIE,

cor owho, Willie Winkie ; and hey, Willie Winkie!
And What is the matter, my dear ?

And weep not, my rose and my lily and dove,
For thy mother is with thee here! ”

Wee Willie Winkie sat up in bed,
Soberly shaking his curly head,

_ With a sob in his pretty throat:
“I went to sleep the last,” said he,
“And the worst of the dreams has come to me

In any poppy-boat!

“ But after this, I’ll be first of afl
I'll go to bed when the shadows fall,
And the stars begin to peep!
Then the loveliest dream in the poppy fleet
That will fill the room like a rose with sweet;
I will get for my own to keep!”

*.

e




THE SLEEPING PRINCESS,
























































































































































































































































ve ringing bells wd cannon
: : Proclaimed on a su Om em

hat in the good king’s reyal ee Iq
A Princess had been born. =















\
a towers flung out their brightest banners,
The ships their streamers gay,
And every one, from iord to peasant,
4, Made joyful holiday.







Great plans for feasting and merry-making
Were made by the happy king;

And, to bring good fortune, seven fairies

€ BS Were bid to the christening.

















Made out of the best red gold,
thickly round on the sides and covers
| With jewels of price untold.




=
When the day of the christening came, the bugles
Blew forth their shrillest notes; :
Drums throbbed, and endless lines of soldiers iC OEE ge 2 Al
Filed past in scarlet coats. And the fairies were there the king had bidden,
— Bearing their gifts of good —
* right in the midst a strange old woman
Surly and scowling stood.







































































ey knew her to be the old, old fairy,
All nose and eyes and ears,

x yA who, oe not peeped, till now, from her dungeon’
Vor more than fit ; E
= we ty years Bis

oot Zs was to have been forgotten A

Where others were guests, and to ae
That neither seat nor a dish at the basiquet
To her he been assigned,








































































THE SLEEPING PRINCESS.














Now came the hour for the gift-bestowing ;

And the fairy first in place
Touched with her wand the child and gave her
“Beauty of form and face!”

Fairy the second bade,) Be witty ! ”
The third said, /“ Never fail !*”! = a
The fourth, “Dance well ! ” and the fifth, “O Princess,
Sing like the nightingale!”









The sixth gave, “Joyin the heart forever !']’
But before the seventh could speak,

The ergoked, black old Dame came forward,
And, tapping the baby’s cheek,

‘74,ou shall prick your finger upon a spindle,
: And die of it!” she cried.
All trembling were the lords and ladies, ||
And the king and queen beside.

But the seventh fairy interrupted,

Uy “Do not tremble nor weep!
/ That cruel curse I can change and soften,
And instead of death give sleep!

“But the sleep, though I do my best and kindest,
Must last for an hundred years!”
| On the king’s stern face was a dreadful pallor,
In the eyes of the queen were tears.

@ Yet after the hundred years are vanished,” —
3 The fairy added beside, —

| $A Prince of a noble line shall find her,

And take her for his bride.”































































































== || But the king, with a hope to change the future,

= Proclaimed this law to be :

| That, if in all the tand ‘there was kept one spindle,
Sure death was the penalty.

















































——































. °
THE SLEEPING PRINCESS,



The Princess grew, from her very cradle
Lovely and witty and good ;

And at last, in the course of years, had blossomed
Into full sweet maidenhood.

And one day, in her father’s summer palace,
As blithe as the very air,

She climbed to the top of the highest turret,
Over an old worn stair

And there in the dusky cobwebbed garret,
Where dimly the daylight shone, <9
A little, doleful, hunch-backed woman
Sat spinning all alone. =























“*O Goody,” she cried, “ what ate a doing?”
“Why, spinning, you little dunce ! ”
The Princess laughed: “’Tis so very fing,
Pray let me try it once!”
4

She caught the half-spun thread,
And the fatal spindle pricked her finger !
Down fell she as if dead !

4

And Goody shrieking, the frightened courtiers
Climbed up the old worn stair 2

Only to find, in heavy slumber, oe ae

The Princess lying there. we 7a ecefm

They bore her down to a lofty Sates / i
They robed her in her best, «

And ona. couch of gold and purple. Ae Bee
They laid her for her rest, Me ?
Brad an < }

The roses upon her cheek still blooming, <“*

And the red still on her lips, (

== While the lids of her eyes, like night-shut lilies, ©
= Were closed in white eclipse. i







Then the fairy who strove her fate to alter
From the dismal doom of death,

= Now that the vital hour impended,

Came ae in a breath.

I

And then about the a palace —_ at
The fairy made up-spring ‘
Aswood so heavy and dense that never

~ Could enter a living thing,














THE SLEEPING PRINCESS.



And there for a century the Princess \
Lay in a trance so deep

That neither the roar of winds nor fa “i

Could rouse her from her sleep. \
























i

Old wood, rode a new king’s son,
Who, catching a glimpse of a royal turret
Above the forest dun

Felt in his heart a strange wis for exploring
The thorny and briery place,

And, lo, a path through the deepest thicket
Opened before his face!

On, on he went, till he spied a terrace,
And further a sleeping guard,

And rows of soldiers upon their carbines
Leaning, and snoring hard.

Up the broad steps! The doors swung backward !
The wide hails heard no tread !

But a lofty chamber, opening, showed him
A gold and purple bed.

















: Th !
And there in her beauty, warm and glowing, | The lady sk mee g fe d

The enchanted Princess lay!
While only a word from his lips was needed
- To drive her sleep away.

“ How long I have walied for youl?” 2

——S

/ap Thenat once neabit great ae palace
fy Was wakewed and all astir; SSS
4 Yet the Prince, in joy at the Sleeping Beaute] 7
Could only look at her. Se /
= | aN t
; She was the bride who for years an hundred os
Had waited for him to come,
And now that the hour was here to claim A ‘
Should eyes or tongue be dumb? (
The Princess blushed at his royal wooing, /
= Bowed “yes” with her lovely head,
And the chaplain, yawning, but very lively,
Came in and they were wed!

But about the dress of the happy Princess,
_ | havemy woman’s fears —
It must have grown somewhat old-fashioned
In the course of so many years !
CINDERELLA.



ENN L




















Pe pretty little thing she
The sweetest-faced of girls,
With eyes as blue as larkspurs,

And a mass of tossing curls ;
eS But Ker step-mother had for her
‘V e Only blows and bitter words,

{While she thought her own two ugly crows,
The whitest of all birds.

She was the little household drudge,
And wore a cotton gown,

While the sisters, clad in silk and satin,
Flaunted through the town.

When her work was done, her only place
Was the chimney-corner bench,

For which one called her “ Cinderella,”

The other, ‘Cinder-wench.”



















ut year.
Bloomed like a wild-wood rose,
wie In spite of all her kitchen-work,
And her common, dingy clothes ;
While the two step-sisters, year by year;
Grew scrawnier and plainer ; ee
Two peacocks, with their tails out
Were never any vainer.

Which was an invitation
To a ball, from the king’s son.

Oh, then poor Cinderella

Had to starch, and iron, and plait

nd run of errands, frill and crimp

#,And ruffle, early and late. :










And when the ball-n
She helped to paint their faces,
To lace their satin shoes, and deck
Them up with flowers and laces ;
Then watched their coach roll grandly
Out of sight; and, after that,
She sat down by the chimney,
In the cinders, with the cat,
CINDERELLA.




















































And sobbed as if her heart would break. :
Hot tears were on her lashes,

Her little hands got black with soot,
Her feet begrimed with ashes,

When right before her, on the hearth,
She knew not how nor why,

A little odd old woman stood,
And said, “ Why do you cry?”

= *It is so very lonely here,”
= ; Poor Cinderella said,
1} And sobbed again. ‘The little odd
Old woman bobbed her head,
And laughed a merry kind of laugh,
And whispered, “Ts that all?
, Wouldn’t my little Cinderella
Like to go to the ball?




un to the’ garden, then, and fetch

A pumpkin, large and nice ;

Go to the pantry shelf, and from
The mouse-traps get the mice ;

Rats you will find in the rat-trap ;
And, from the watering-pot,

Or from under the big, flat garden stone,
Six lizards must be got.”

Nimble as crickets in the grass
She ran, till it was done,

And then God-mother stretched her wand
And touched them every one.

‘The pumpkin changed into a coach,
Which glittered as-it rolled,

And the mice became six horses,
With harnesses of gold.

-One rat a herald was, to blow

-__A trumpet in advance,

And the first blast that he sounded
Made the horses plunge and prance ;

And the lizards were made footmen,

Because they were so spry ;

And the old rat-coachman on the box
Wore jeweled livery.

- And then on Cinderella’s dress

"The magic wand was laid,

And straight the dingy gown became
A glistening gold brocade.

The gems that shone upon her fingers
Nothing could surpass ;

And on her dainty little feet

=< Were slippers made of glass.
“ Be sure you get back here, my dear,
At twelve o'clock at night,”

Godmother said, and in a twinkling
She was out of sight.

When Cinderella reached the ball,
And entered at the door,

So béautiful a lady
Noné had ever seen before.

The Prince his admiration showed
In every word and glance ;
He led her out to supper,
And he chose her for the dance ;
But she kept in mind the warning
That her Godmothes had given,
And left the ball, with all its charms,
At just half after eleven.

Next night there was another ball ;
She helped her sisters twain
To pinch their waists, and curl their hair,
And paint their cheeks again.
Then came the fairy Godmother,
And, with her wand, once more
Arrayed her out in greater splendor
Even than before.

CINDERELLA.




























= ’
Spee a ee
Ge Bera Perea at

sane




Ait



noe i
fd six, with vay outriders,

Bore her through thé street, i

ad a crowd was gathered round to look,

The lady was so sweet, — ci

So light of heart, and face, and mien,
As happy children are ;

And when her foot stepped down,

Her slipper twinkled like a star.




Again the Prince chose only her
For waltz or dte-a-tele ;

So swift the minutes flew she did not
Dream it could be late,

But all at once, remembering
What her Godmother had said,

And hearing twelve begin to strike
Upon the clock, she fled.

Swift as a swallow on the wing
She darted, but, alas!

Dropped from one flying foot the tiny
Slipper made of glass ;

-But she got away, and well it was
She did, for in a trice

Her coach changed to a pumpkin,
And her horses became mice ;
CINDERELLA.








And scolded, and all that, :

|. Tittered out behind his hat.
For here was all the evidence

The Prince had asked, complete,
Two little slippers made of glass,
Fitting two little feet.

So the Prince, with all his retinue,
Came there to claim his wife ;
And he promised he would love her

With devotion all his life.

At the marriage there was splendid
Music, dancing, wedding cake ;
And he kept the slipper as a treasur
_ Ever, for her sake.

_ The prince secured the slipper,

ateful anger cried, and stormed,

And back into the cinder dress
Was changed the gold brocade !






























Aud this proclamation made:
That the country should be searched,
And any lady, far or wide, |
Who could get the slipper on her oS 5
Should straightway be his bride.

So every lady tried it,
With her “Mys!” and “ Ahs!” and “Oh
And Cinderella’s sisters pared
Their heels, and pared their toes, —
But all-in vain! Nobody’s foot
Was small enough for it,
Till Cinderella tried it,
And it was a perfect fit.

Then the royal heralds hardly
Knew what it was best to do,
When from out her tattered pocket
Forth she drew the other shoe,
While the eyelids on the larkspur eyes

Dropped down a snowy vail,
And the sisters turned from pale to re
And then from red to pale,



PER te gs HH ner
JACK AND JILL,

Teas .
RR
NSS


JACK AND JILL.




THE ENCHANTED TALE OF BANBURY CROSS. :










THE ENCHANTED TALE OP

:

By Mary E WILKINS.

“ Ride a cock-horse to Banbury Cross, - a.

To see an old woman jump daa white horse, OO en eee cars | tee

With rings on her fingers aa PBail on of toes, d AR ee Se

She shall make music wherever she goes’ if va iy — =
Old. Nursery Rhyme, i ee










Pe show the way to Banbury Cross,” ow ; Le ON ZN
Silver bells are ringing. Ae Za A His > SS
To find the place I’m at a 10ss,7 -2. 4° ~*~ oe ix > at “ag
fo

Silver beils aré ringing:







the@orher toward the right,
*SePass f6ur.whité roses; turn once more,
oby 2 bed of gilly-flower,

tL b ¢ ong-of Primrose ; turn again

EGOoe Where, glittering with silver rain,

he - ‘There is a violet-bank; then pass

A meadow green with velvet grass,

18 foe lively lights and shadows play,
.°-dind white lambs frolic all the day,

YF tbe here blooming trees their branchés toss —

Ea = ie . 5 = a ”
if ger Then will ‘you come to Banbury Cross.








THE ENCHANTED TALE OF BANBURY CROSS.



















The white horse: arched: his slender neck,
Silver bells are ringing,
Snow-white: he was without a speck; :
Silver bells are ringing. :
“An old: wife: held his: bridle-rein, ’
(The king was there with all his train ay
Her gray ‘hair fluttered: in the wind, we
Her gaze turned inward on her mind ;
‘And not -one face seemed she to. seek ,
{n-all that: goodly company. :: 4
“Gems sparkled on her: withered hagdy
Her ankles gleamed with silyeti iardde®
“On which’ Sweet silver bells wetgirs





The white horse er for the start,
_ Silver bells are PROTOS oi ta
Before him leapt his fiery, heart,
Silver bells. are ringing.
Upon his back the old wife sprung, »

_ Her silver bells, how sweet they rung !
She gave her milk-white steed thexein
And round they swept, and round again.
A-merry sight it was to see,

And the silver bells rang lustil

The gallant horse with gold w Ho
So fleetly leapt he o’er the sod,
He passed the king before he knew ;
And past his flying ‘shadow flew.


THE ENCHANTED TALE OF BANBURY CROSS.



Ca : er Vc S tet ee cea Z
Cee: ’ Ae Sree Ea een eee ee

g









va Bane
t # A pretty sight it was, forsooth,
4% Silver, bells are ringing,
For dame ti children, maid and youth,



Stuer bells are ringing. se
The princess laughed outwith delight,

And @lapped her hands, so lilyAvhite —_
The darling princess, sweet was she

As any flowering hawthornAree.

She stood béside her sire; the king,

And heard pees music ring,

And watched the old wife o’er the plain
Sweep round, ajd‘round, and round again
Till, suddenly sHe slacked her pace,

And stopped before her wondering face;

,/ £2
And snatched her up béfore they&ghew,
Silver bells are ringing, =
And with her from their Vision flew,
Silver bells are ringing. ol
The nobles to ‘their’ saddlés spring,
Aiid follow headed by the kifig !
They gallop over meadows green;
‘They Jéap the bars that lie between;
Thr? thé cool woodland ride they now,
*’Neath xustling branches, bending low;
Thé silver music draws them on,
But, when they reach it, it is gone —
The white dew falls, the sun is set,
“~And.no trace of the princess yet.































iad a a Silver bells are ringing, #4
E za In violet shadows in the vale, =
Silver bells are ringing. &

Return with us, oh, gracious king!

This search is but a bootless thing,

A spell is laid upon our minds,

Our thoughts are tossed as by the winds,
And deeper o’er our senses swells

The music of those silver bells!

Return, oh, king, ere ’tis too late ;

| The Wise Man by the palace-gate

ie Hy Will give to thee his kindly aid,

Kees ith: So shalt thou find the royal maid.” .%&
























THE ENCHANTED TALE OF BANBURY CROSS.



SS
ae ee

Bis jij | LOZ DO OO IES

They galloped back o’er hill and dale,
Sidver belis are ringing,
In soft gusts came the southern gale,
Silver belis are ringing.
The trembling king knelt ‘down:before
The Wise Man at the palace-door:
“Oh, Wise Man! art thou truly wise.
Find.out my child with thy bright eyes!”
“Thy daughter clings to.carven stone,
White dove-wings from her shoulders, grown’;
In downy dove-plumes she is drest#
They shine like: jewels on her breasts
She sits beneath thé/minster eaves,
Amongst the clustering:ivy.leaves,

a
va

|
yb
é 44

Wy
Ny i i

NM
Mi


THE ENCHANTED TALE OF BANBURY CROSS.




















“She was so full of angel-love,”
Silver bells are ringing,
“They could but make her a white dove,”
Silver bells are ringing...
The king stood ’neath the minster-wall,
And loudly on his child did call.
A snow-white dove beneath the eaves,
Looked down from ’mongst the ivy-leaves,
Then flew down to the monarch’s breast,
And, sorely panting there did rest.
Then spake the Wise Man by his side:

_ “Oh, king, canst thou subdue thy pride
And hang thy crown beneath the eaves,
Amongst the clustering ivy-leaves

pa

ede 0'V/00 NS Alig |
IS NAT ut ‘ Ai .

A \ =

Alec










Szlver bells are ringing,
P< spel find but thu




t from the dark-green ivy shone!
The white dove softly folds her wings, g,’
Then lightly to the ground she springs—
A lovely princess, sweet the more, oS
For being a white dove an hour,

They went home through the happy town,
The king forgot his royal crown,

And, soon, beneath the minster-eaves,
‘Twas hidden by the ivy-leaves.
THE BEGGAR KING.




The burgher’s daughter clean forgot
Her snood of silk and pearls,

And full of dread, popped our her head, ~
With its tumbled yellow curis.

A rosebud-smote her on the lips: Ve
Down went the rattling blind;

But still the maid, ail curious, stai
And slyly peeped behind.
oe














HH frantic, down the city streets,

‘The barking dogs they tore;

The dust it flew, and no man-knew
The like of it before.

The eae Bernard’s booming bass,
The hound’s sepulchrai howl,
The tertier-whelp’s staccato yelp,a@
And the bull-dog’ See growl ‘
“rt S85 handsome lord, with smiling lips,
In chorus sounded cs sown: = Peaneaivom the opposite tow a
aC windows up they ea © Pwo withered hags, in dirt and rags,
Thro’ every space a gaping face vA, Did from their garret glower.
: so—

Inguiringly was bent.
The tailor left his goose te ce

And got his coat-ablaze;
Three peasant maids, with shining braids,
eed on in wild. amaze.
THE BEGGAR KING.





‘Fhe-emperor’s-palace: windows-high,
~All: open-they. were ‘set—
From: the: gray ‘stone-red: jewels shone,
And ‘gold and -violet.

The: ladies. of ‘the-emperor’s coutt
Leaned- out-with stately grace;

And-each began hex peacock fan
‘To wave before ‘her\face;





“Hark l-hark! hark! the dogs do-bark !’
‘The emperor. left his throne
At the:uproar, and o’er the flogr,

He trailed his-ermine gown:



|Airs from ‘the Beggar’s-Opera NES
|. -On broken fiddles played;
iQn: pans.they drum. and wildly. strum, Mey





The: dogs press round: the eae. “a A.

The guards they wave them“back ;: "= Filched from a dairy-maid: $6
But.all in ‘vain with -might-and main, a &
Dance -round:the yelping pack. With tenor-whine, and-basso-groan, \
‘Fhe‘chorus-is complete;
Hark! hark?! hark! o’er-growl-and: bar | ] And, far and wide, -there-sounds beside
There.sounds.a trumpet-call The. tramp. of ‘many feet!
Now, rat-tat-tat, pray what is that Rm :

“ Hark! harkt hark! the-dogs do bark!”
Ah, ‘what.a‘horrid din!

The Beggars wait outside the gate;
And ‘clamor to get in:

Outside the’ city-wall ?



A-herald to the emperorrode:
«Save | save the emerald crown!

For, -hatk | hark | hark! the -dogs:do -bark!
The-Beggars ‘storm-the:town!”

The-emperor-donneéd-his-clinking- mail,
Called-out-his: royal guard,

‘The city-gate, with furious. rate,
Went galloping toward:

A-captain-with-a-flag of - truce
“Thus parleyed-on‘the wall:
*“Why-do-ye-wait- outside ‘the gate,
And ‘why:so loudly. call?”








He’spoke, then-eyed them with
For-o’er the valley spread
The-elamoring crowd, and: st
A: king tode-at ‘their hea

ismay ;

and-proud

In‘mothy-ermine he-w:
As sada horse he-r
With: jaunty-air, quite
As ever-man bestrode;
THE BEGGAR KING.



A en en



f f #:

The Beggars stumped and limped behind,
With wails and whines and groans —

“ Some in rags, and some in tags,
And some in velvet gowns.”

A great court-beauty’s splendid dress
Was there, all soiled and frayed;

The scarf, once bright, a belted knight if
Wore at his accolade ; %

A queen’s silk hose; a bishop’s robe;
A monarch’s funeral-pall;

The shoes, all mud, @ prince-o’-the-blood
Had danced in at a ball.

The Beggars stumped_and limped along,
Aping their old-time grace:

Upon the wind, flew out behind,
Ribbons of silk and lace. —

A wretched company it was
Around the city gate—

The sour and sad, the sick and bad,
And all disconsolate.

But in the wretched company
There was one dainty thing :

A maiden, white as still moonlight,
Who rode beside the king.



Her hands were full of apple-flowers
Plucked in the country lanes ;

Her little feet, like lilies sweet,
O’erlaced with violet veins,



Hung down beneath her tattered dress ;
A bank of lilies, showed
“Her shoulders fair; her dusky hair
Down to her girdle flowed.


THE BEGGAR KING.

























¢ Wide: open flew.
Out rode-the

Upon: his Hopfs of gold.

““Now what we juldst thou, O: Beggar King?
What wouldest thou with meé?.-
For all the gold the town doth hold
Would not suffice for thee.”

eS Beholdést thou my daughter dear.

O° emperor, by my sidé?
Though wild the rose, it sweetly grows,
GZ Bo she shall be thy bride,

“And thou: shalt seat her on thy throne.
When:thou thy troth hast pledged,
Her. beauty grace with gems and lace,
And robes with ermine edged;

Up spoke the haughty Beggar King:
“T-want no parleying word!
“Bid come to me, right speedily,

‘The emperor, your Lord!”
ESMIRCEON tora, “Or else, on ‘thee, -O emperor,

Like locusts we'll come down:!
“hs And naught that’s fair or rich or rare;
We'll leave within the town!

yg Fhe children all shall lack for food,
2 peAnd the lords and ladies pine ;

For we will eat your dainties sweet,
ve And: drink your red old wine!
“Now what say’st thou; O emperor?
~ Wed thou my daughter deat;
To-morrow day, by dawning gray,
Thy borders shall be-clear.”

~- She shyly dropped her-head ;

Her apple-flowers fell down-in showers,

Her soft white cheeks grew. red. =" &
wz

a

Shi






wh , .
? “Wlitigre,
“THE BEGGAR KING.
















TRE empetor lovéd’ her at the sight:

© “1 take your terms!” cried he,

“Nor wilt thou fear, O maiden dear, @ '
To wed. to-night with me?” } ,

Mer long, dark lashes swept her cheek;

A word she could not find, /
' For to and fro her thoughts did blow, —_//,
i Like lilies in a wind.

\ydi2 She toward him reached her little hand,
~< Then — drew it back again ; ;
. She smiled and sighed —all satisfied, ,

« He grasped her bridle-rein.





Then clattered courtiers thro’ the street,
Fast ran the folk, 1 ween,
And under feet strewed roses sweet,
» And boughs of apple-green.

The emperor, on his gold-shod horse, |
Came pacing thro’ the town, /

And by his side his timid bride —/
Rode in her tattered gown.

A crocus-broidered petticoat,

Robes stiff with threads of gold,
The maids found soon, and satin shoo,
And lace in spices rolled.
THE BEGGAR KING.



hey led the trembling beggar-maid
; s~ All gently up the stair,
. i hro’ golden doors with sills of flowers,
Â¥ Into a a fair.

L They lodsed fom her her faded gear ;
They kissed her gentle face ;
From head to feet clad her so sweet

a.

In linen fine and lace ; le












me *








e—

“y

They clasped her golden-threaded

“ Darling, thou art so fair!”

With strings of pearls, amid the curls,
They dressed her flowing hair.








“Now, pardy!” cried the emperor,
“The rose-tree is in flower!

-= In the world green was never seen

Queen half so sweet before!”










The people, dressed as for a feast,
Thronged round the palace-doors ;
The minstrels sung, the joy-bells rung,

ie roses fell in showers. | ,

e Beggar King looked towatds
‘‘ Farewell, my daughter deat
The east,was gray — he rodg)
swallowed down a te












~






GOODY TWO-SHOES.

GOODY TWO-SHOES.

VERSIFIED BY MRS. CLARA DOTY BATES,

WO-Shoes, Two-Shoes,
Little Goody Two-Shoes !
Do you know about her? Well,
I’m ready now to tell
How the little creature came
By so odd a name.

It was very long ago,
In the days of good Queen Bess,
When upon the cold world’s care,
Fatherless and motherless,

There were thrown two helpless ones,
Destitute as they could be;

Tom, they called the little boy,
And the girl was Margery.

Many a day they cried for food

When the cup-board shelves were bare ;
Many an hour they roamed the streets
Scarcely knowing why or where.

As to kindred, all were dead ;
As to shelter, they had none;

As to shoes, Tom had a pair;
Little Margery had but one!

One-Shoe, One-Shoe,

Think of Little One-Shoe!
Think how never a pretty boot
Was buttoned on the tender foot ;
Nor yet a slipper, fairy-light,

With dainty knot or buckle bright!


GOODY TWO-SHOES.





tert
































But above our human woes
Bends an always loving Heaven ;
And to every hungry cry
Is there somewhere answer given.

/ Kind eyes watched the. wandering ones,
Pitied their forlorn distress ;
* Grieved to note Tom’s ragged coat,

-
is And Margery’s tattered dress.

| “ee ’Twas the village clergyman,
&, And he sought them tenderly,
Gave them warm, soft clothes to wear.
Ordered shoes for Margery.

“Two shoes, two shoes,

Oh, see my two shoes!”
So did little Margery cry,
When the cobbler came to try
If they fitted trim and neat ‘
On the worn and tired feet: f
That is how and why she came ;
By so strange a name.

Tom went off to London town;
Margery went to village school;

Apt she was, and quick to learn,
Docile to the simplest rule.



Out from the long alphabet if
Letters locked at her and smiled, i

Almost seemed to nod and speak, Y
Glad to know so bright a child,

Ranged themselves in winsome words ;
Then in sentences. Indeed, oe

Quite before she knew the fact,
Margery had learned to read.



Ul
any ee?


GOODY TW0O-SHOES.






















Two-Shoes, Two-Shoes,

Eager Goody Two-Shoes!

When the magic art she knew,

She planned to help poor children too ;

And those who had no chance to learn

Their letters, she would teach in turn. ¢
AN Be

Now, in the days of good Queet¥ Bess, or

Few books were printed, very few — =~
None, scarcely, for the little folks ;
So Margery studied what to do.

She cut from proper blocks of wood
Sets of the letters: A, B,C; b
And in some cosy shady place
Would group the children round her knee od

And teach them —not alone to read, eas
But how to spell, and how to sing; i
And how to practice gentle ways,
And to be kind to everything.





All living things seemed drawn to her:
A helpless lamb, whose dam had died,

She reared and tended till he ran

Tame asa kittéff at her side : ae



Two-Shoes, Two-Shoes,

So grew Goody Two-Shoes!
First a maiden, comely, sweet;
Then a woman, wise, discreet ;
Called now, as a courtesy,
Little Mrs. Margery.









A sky-lark stolen from its nest
Sang on her finger, though he knew
His unclipped wings were free to soar he
At will into the heaven’s blue ;




An honored, faithful teacher she!
And every year an added grace,

More fair than youth’s fair roses are,
Blossomed upon her charming face.

oe we






“A raven which had fought and torn

Its captor’s hand with savage beak,
And which at first could only croak,

She taught in gracious words to speak ;





Jumper, the dog, watched all her steps
With constant eyes and jealous love ;
A great cat purred and rubbed her dress ;
And on her shoulder perched a dove.

Two-Shoes, Two-Shoes,

Ah me, Margery Two-Shoes !
Maybe the days of good Queen Bess
Were times of wisdom ; nevertheless,
Witches (the people said) might be—
And a witch they thought our Margery !


GOODY TWO-SHOES.



; ickey Noodle, a simpleton, >

, Whoraised the cry, “A witch, a witch!”

| Then she was summoned to the court,

/ Amused, or grieved, she scarce knew which.

Plenty of friends, however, proved
How false was Justice Shallow’s plea

That “She must be a witch, because —
Because of the raven, don’t you see? ”

Sir Edward Lovell, a baronet,
Who stood in court and saw her grace
Her sweet good sense, her dignity,
And the pure beauty of her face,

Sighed heavily in his high-born breast
As Mrs, Margery was set free,
Saying, “I Zzow she is a witch,
For, ah, she so bewitches me!”


GOODY TWO-SHOES.





He watched her go her quiet ways,
‘And vowed, whatever might betide,
Tf his best love could win her heart
And hand, then she should be his bride.



Two-Shoes, Two-Shoes —
Lady Lovell, if she choose!
Her the noble lover wooed,
'Humbly, as a lover should,
Eagerly, as lover ought,
With entire heart and thought.

What her answer, ail may guess,

For the old church chime that rung
Its next wedding anthem sung

With a most delighted tongue :.<>


GOODY TWO-SHOES.








Jamies

‘ \

ae L,

* Two-Shoes, Two-Shoes, oo ay = ‘ é ne
Wedding day of Two-Shoes {

pyBarecfoot lass but yesterdays p
Lady Lovell is to-day! ¥ pee

Â¥Bvo-Shocs, TLwo-Sho.






















Who is this ¢ ities so fast,
With plumed ‘hat and cheek of brown,
With golden trappings on his horse,

The flecks of foam are on his ret
The dust of journey whitens him, he
He leans to see the bridal train! ~

Two-Shoes, Two-Shoes,
Lady Goody Two-Shoes !
Tom it is, come home once more!
Even now he’s at the door,
. Rich and grand as any king —
€ome to bless the wedding ring!


LIST OF D. LOTHROP & CO?S ILLUSTRATED PUBLICATIONS.

sage = F'rom the Hudson to the Neva.
By DAVID KER.


















A boy’s book. 36 illustrations. 12mo.

A story of travel and adventure largely in
Southern Europe, and the Malay Islands.
While the incidents are of an exciting nature,
the narrative is unusually true to nature, the
author, a well-known New York journalist and
traveler, having the year previous visited the

scenes and people he describes.















Frout FROM THE HUDSON TO THE NEVA,





PEACE ISLAND SERIES,

6 vols., 12 mo, cloth, $4.50. Six to ten

original fuli-page illustrations in each volume.

Jo Lambert’s Ferry. By GrorcE Cary
EGGLESTON. With other stories of the fron-

tier and early settlers.

Dolly’s Kettledrum. By Nora PERRY.

With other stories for girls.

Nellie’s Heroics. By HARRIET BEECHER
SToweE. With other heroic stories.

Lost in Pompeii. By H. II. CLark, U.S.
N. With other stories of Adventure.

Peace Island. By Exior McCormick.
With other stories for boys.

Katy’s Birthday. By Sara O, JEWETT.
With other stories by famous authors.















































A most entertaining little library for boys



















wad girls, by the best of American authors. From PEACE

ISLAND SERIES.


2A

zr

LIST OF D. LOTHROP & CO.S {LLUSTRATED PUBLICATIONS.



from THE KINGDOM OF HOME.

THE KINGDOM OF HOME.

vo, extra cloth, bevelled, gilt edges, $6.00;
Turkey morocco, antique, gilt edges, $9.00.

Homely Poems for Home Lovers. The
choicest poems from all sources and all times.
Selected and arranged by Arthur Gilman.
Fully illustrated with Albertypes, Gravotypes
and wood engravings.

‘A book that should be in every household
where there are hearts to respond to the key
note of its pages—“ Home.” It is for home
lovers, and its melodies run through songs for
all ages. It is a large and very elegant quarto,
profusely and beautifully illustrated, and suit-
able for birthday gift, wedding present or
Christmas remembrance.

PARLOR COMEDIES.

BY CHARLES R,. TALBOT.
Hlustrated by Francis Miller and H. Pruett
Share. Quarto, $1.00.
Sparkling comedies of modern society life
equally adapted for reading or for private

theatricals.

from PARLOR COMEDIES.



Tr fre

we A Tt



a,



ws











F

x



+
+





















































RICH MAN +
GOR MA

THIER. ,

DOCTOR

LAWYER +
TRDTAN CHI











































































































































































































































































































































































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bcf0fbd30f65606a74f915176dbce453
bdf5e5e107943f9b67533965f2c98e937770d1e2
'2012-05-18T10:10:24-04:00'
describe
'734231' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABQZW' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
086ea48780a49dc221b94fca2f5c1012
610cad44a5c0a85dec7e0bd07532fc011bbc8187
describe
'62320' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABQZX' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
e796a4cc9090df37a625f8a338931b27
fc9f93f0a29e72cf4fc464cbc983e713cd45633b
'2012-05-18T10:14:02-04:00'
describe
'764989' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABQZY' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
1fa579bdfd59059205107071058db7bc
4f889271a4b71ab8b1a9d126a670a6ca02d53e7d
'2012-05-18T10:11:08-04:00'
describe
'22466' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABQZZ' 'sip-files00027.pro'
6ef097ddf2c5fc62f2ab807ad755146d
28bf84ecf07ca8cbcfddbd829280acd3227485c7
'2012-05-18T10:16:59-04:00'
describe
'759677' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRAA' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
c75533bddb224ac789539f18c8e14e6c
be976e40d4a6d3fb064bbabd827249a2a4ec77bd
describe
'838974' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRAB' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
f09a0d142dc6622bda9b68f87d94c1c0
4628f785680edd7282ea4da642865c35d12c011d
'2012-05-18T10:10:48-04:00'
describe
'18471980' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRAC' 'sip-files00038.tif'
7ebe5afd63c1d3430a4a55b1d4ad28da
4ef8286e21910e59084f6e570635eb28611396b7
'2012-05-18T10:13:31-04:00'
describe
'736487' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRAD' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
1b147b398e34a498727373ca132d04f8
9cd3d8e927a6d81480eb3c594eeadf9bb8538207
'2012-05-18T10:11:52-04:00'
describe
'719186' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRAE' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
fa62406c32e9b54a83f2589d3b5c9531
6220d29764f520af0d506521b593ac60a5f7e279
'2012-05-18T10:17:12-04:00'
describe
'24086' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRAF' 'sip-files00015.pro'
41b3a5503735196a32b7541552f8ccad
10c1ad23c6ba5f79ff50d709debd584bbee9b882
'2012-05-18T10:10:16-04:00'
describe
'73348' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRAG' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
90ae9d5808afe32c5eadccb567c55490
87b77618cafff0e5f41ca1c76b782d955f4b9e5c
'2012-05-18T10:09:50-04:00'
describe
'420262' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRAH' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
bc55b5a5c0e988e791b9ffab1165367e
a93aca53d634e019754307e6439e4e3427622dcd
'2012-05-18T10:12:01-04:00'
describe
'209187' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRAI' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
1d63f994b499c7cab6f17bc4e00618a4
a2e04be8428bfeede4df11a41f108393779734f7
'2012-05-18T10:14:24-04:00'
describe
'72075' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRAJ' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
3e87d553a798277520fdfb3528cb4fb1
0743d7f5400a3aedf606023d6c07438caadc91b9
'2012-05-18T10:15:04-04:00'
describe
'951' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRAK' 'sip-files00011.txt'
f0ccc042274e0ea825b45405e818fca3
fcfd031570752085f33759a8b98a6975a8ac9533
'2012-05-18T10:09:52-04:00'
describe
'65841' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRAL' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
697b7e0dd619963c7b100ac9c2a73549
59b4b4acefff7dd5657fa5b50ca96f2d4104bfe4
'2012-05-18T10:14:12-04:00'
describe
'17301236' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRAM' 'sip-files00023.tif'
f8d090a1c3d59ae27e8f4e931f939204
6910d1d7f9c1c7d0017e981ad7e90eda2a4d2408
'2012-05-18T10:11:38-04:00'
describe
'682386' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRAN' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
dbcef40edfbd60b3c242b2dce4df1059
635d683c6305f46c9fb9415358cb1176b22fcf41
'2012-05-18T10:10:29-04:00'
describe
'2924' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRAO' 'sip-files00024.txt'
b6cfad739cf054db872c2fc68a136d74
20b495481e5923e93f769ff56b62e88aaeb4a33f
'2012-05-18T10:12:18-04:00'
describe
'18296932' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRAP' 'sip-files00014.tif'
476f30999bf20e6d5bc973ed3aa31904
7aa206147d007a8e5d6c446a08724ae6cd37e57e
'2012-05-18T10:10:18-04:00'
describe
'73076' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRAQ' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
961e568125fd5ddc78f96e60e7f70f04
f6933ea30246420ce39ea36fbe55f3bb82c54240
'2012-05-18T10:10:58-04:00'
describe
'743748' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRAR' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
016995ee8b07d6a2372fe0183c6b84fe
a5fb517ec10e18174af1648c01be73959ba53986
'2012-05-18T10:12:23-04:00'
describe
'532823' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRAS' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
2fb02dc4b25cf7b9cf5fe1fb0e698a7f
52767204ed964fcdd5dfd95ad8c80750d47fc365
'2012-05-18T10:09:18-04:00'
describe
'70396' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRAT' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
b8a0703ca67de3042a1ff7665c6be537
cbb8138ae6fdedb436446a8df3c3788b6924ca34
'2012-05-18T10:11:21-04:00'
describe
'18692636' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRAU' 'sip-files00040.tif'
18ad2cf1be8c34c7e082e0509acf7d20
436919d69189fc9943bcf22ab65885196ac3075a
'2012-05-18T10:11:42-04:00'
describe
'585' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRAV' 'sip-files00002.txt'
2119ea34d7342cb1024458cef59c0447
903f1fbad20eaddaf51b7d7541c7fb86ace75c7d
'2012-05-18T10:10:45-04:00'
describe
'771414' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRAW' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
749d05167b532c69114bbe94f6f82d91
e75f2b08d16333e57dbcbc3744fa41f582e946b5
'2012-05-18T10:16:06-04:00'
describe
'781433' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRAX' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
78a707892e10d2dcaa0530100cf71c08
1f5181055d13508fb5914a5022a20d2c72144f8c
'2012-05-18T10:08:56-04:00'
describe
'779241' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRAY' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
22a7e22e6aac518f1096344827d4f4d2
0cf9c34dc745e1b62154c68fa050e793f8e3eb31
'2012-05-18T10:16:26-04:00'
describe
'71478' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRAZ' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
e56604c42f3de9abc18782abdc43d058
dbadaba908a299a876eebea321c9a750adb16e2e
'2012-05-18T10:13:58-04:00'
describe
'772660' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRBA' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
dc04d41d97c9636f903c51319f853003
b15b0f41c7c7c6158ea69f0aa1d10dd14420dde8
'2012-05-18T10:10:05-04:00'
describe
'40726' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRBB' 'sip-files00021.pro'
32612cfa74412dfdf8de2a4360cbfd18
85aa169e99b407bc15fe6a1d57dad587b942da57
'2012-05-18T10:13:05-04:00'
describe
'665463' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRBC' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
b6f7cc5ca485178886722a1531effc86
3587a296176009593fb8eb24bc2ad9674d0b8c23
'2012-05-18T10:16:14-04:00'
describe
'2698' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRBD' 'sip-files00017.txt'
a613df8849a49039c5f5212f56701139
8cf513943ebd307ffdfa44ddda5a6827490bf31c
'2012-05-18T10:09:57-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'18096764' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRBE' 'sip-files00010.tif'
0c82b4b5ba2861bade0d60286d1b5a5d
b31742fb975ff837209c23169a4528e1a34e51cb
'2012-05-18T10:11:32-04:00'
describe
'735644' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRBF' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
d108f94cab7484485206b928c1b53803
6f0444a99ef5379d754ffee448ec1b6fc82792fa
'2012-05-18T10:08:57-04:00'
describe
'1328' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRBG' 'sip-files00050.txt'
098da4e9e531beac16a5f7c06788532c
3d8aeeb05e10d748180e642b74888b77715b7fe8
'2012-05-18T10:09:41-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10412' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRBH' 'sip-files00025.pro'
59182a80fc544ff17a1561dde80e8013
82409c82dc84b7e5ad2ae54d8037c261ccb7564a
'2012-05-18T10:14:21-04:00'
describe
'217293' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRBI' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
550e3b9f5d929ebf57162f082517bb44
4f3742a6c1295c856971ef59b1aa705b1b6d42d7
'2012-05-18T10:16:01-04:00'
describe
'762145' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRBJ' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
6c5a8436decd4f76d228f340645f75e3
47066bc535bf533df3eefef366b3eb75b21832da
'2012-05-18T10:11:04-04:00'
describe
'216965' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRBK' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
986f32b835b8faea012a180692a6f30c
6687323a7d9ba073a335180e7fc28773ec0c7b16
'2012-05-18T10:14:32-04:00'
describe
'14060' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRBL' 'sip-files00032.pro'
9b0825528ad907f9903f2c6da68197fb
ada636e9ffc3c2496308c2bbb2e7cb0e218a85aa
'2012-05-18T10:10:44-04:00'
describe
'612467' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRBM' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
0067054549918a668fc2bf66443b70b7
7a477548c3b4e03b29ed4baea2227a8d97ff40e2
'2012-05-18T10:10:30-04:00'
describe
'225467' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRBN' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
1232a46a598a5b7b57823d4c6fbeba70
c92046079fd821ce82bc40c77ca1615fd046b3c5
'2012-05-18T10:09:31-04:00'
describe
'25827' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRBO' 'sip-files00037.pro'
22a147a6c1ca3208146a338bb785252b
04db3a6249a4965f44505e2a9b8152ff368affd3
'2012-05-18T10:11:30-04:00'
describe
'767629' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRBP' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
c741da61136771958742d3d109f0eaf2
39c1552a13a4386af16fa17226fbc5ec3010134d
'2012-05-18T10:09:24-04:00'
describe
'174031' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRBQ' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
ceee1f2c1d24af58f0710fd1d07bf488
3895e3e9d2c889ed4e81927a2899a6f6a4ec2d3b
describe
'738954' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRBR' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
8c1f34fa6eadf56a83680d22b127c1ec
f49cb67d679b72515ea4dcbc1270539c5cc0aaa4
'2012-05-18T10:16:42-04:00'
describe
'220904' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRBS' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
5316c3ce53ea479bf95246fa1a623c6a
c295aed50c269be82c1a2e390ab1b4faec30fd45
'2012-05-18T10:10:25-04:00'
describe
'665599' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRBT' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
0d0f31b504951c42337fe4fb537a87a2
38ab43b8c4ec5054993339248a11c8acd08fe9d3
'2012-05-18T10:15:32-04:00'
describe
'2789' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRBU' 'sip-files00043.txt'
775173c41848253b066b56a61c814468
6576df6eefc2b2f6b5fcda5bdc8887989a9af7f3
'2012-05-18T10:12:54-04:00'
describe
'47938' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRBV' 'sip-files00020.pro'
12faa24da16f3fe3c2e9e5380ea2cb93
b49e56e499c985671458225e2c2bd35ea067f5d2
'2012-05-18T10:15:38-04:00'
describe
'55818' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRBW' 'sip-filesUF00054260_00001.mets'
f63b7fe33290ed058fbb4cefc2cfb538
a729a00de09b37876dbcb6216cfcc3fcc2f85f3d
'2012-05-18T10:09:01-04:00'
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-10T15:33:53-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'680428' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRBZ' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
d447f5540914f6f459aceccde2468980
a378fc316645794632c95f949afd533fca20c61f
'2012-05-18T10:09:23-04:00'
describe
'713524' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRCA' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
87c0c1fcbe5771a5e5c3e6c374f8b562
a3ed14b4af1176a503604b33ca29c2401b7cfb19
'2012-05-18T10:14:53-04:00'
describe
'721591' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRCB' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
b356ac20fc92610a56da2a1d81e0d6e2
7d7e7ace789353a703e159815a0ec1c75de4522a
'2012-05-18T10:10:47-04:00'
describe
'655572' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRCC' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
d6c4469dc9d920599fd063c85ca76efb
253d9aee7e0f65bee77e51bc182baf27cadfd559
'2012-05-18T10:10:27-04:00'
describe
'722539' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRCD' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
06ba462a10d7cf5b1f301366b94417d3
d4a6028bd77775e84bb23f2fe50759fa714effb2
'2012-05-18T10:12:17-04:00'
describe
'703378' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRCE' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
ab4e2c604d1b498537cd1543d62923e4
c73991cd6380a984efe427917c8ad9985bc96a08
'2012-05-18T10:11:07-04:00'
describe
'701709' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRCF' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
8e5d7b0454c37f3a7a7602b24ef47941
ceb80ac5c64aeb20c998a90fc2c44c1aed72aeed
'2012-05-18T10:12:02-04:00'
describe
'737360' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRCG' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
76a53ffa89fb047af544cdd866ef9645
ff5ef6fa947d11ce102f4ca094679a615816092e
'2012-05-18T10:10:00-04:00'
describe
'711806' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRCH' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
15d118c6ddec1b75509febfb2de65c85
84e897e0c7cc91ceb7202a4a518816754679a00c
'2012-05-18T10:09:27-04:00'
describe
'706637' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRCI' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
f28165287631d43c063c715d2e23a36b
77fb9497ad2e3b75f7a9af6e88abf9d842e553d5
describe
'757868' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRCJ' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
083a37bc7b0b220b6229643ebcdac208
fd2946ce08c2fd697412aeef2d08ff19d84de9ba
'2012-05-18T10:14:15-04:00'
describe
'689228' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRCK' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
6c06a3634cf7646da414af269c1fb227
b9f3568103a725566a28f9320879e8af0a029d14
'2012-05-18T10:15:43-04:00'
describe
'725763' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRCL' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
2dd20671e9628b9d87b664eba93435e3
71a50571683ab26f5c8666caa9fcecb0b0703603
describe
'751790' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRCM' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
b7b1f90a768c581ac9deddbc8e3a2310
ff2a6f88186bb81e9bb14e87e7549121ac30c0d7
'2012-05-18T10:10:33-04:00'
describe
'724998' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRCN' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
8852b5690140baa8677f1ac15c3c6c83
bbe8e72b1ec8acc9f55b355ab86423e230b67c30
describe
'712092' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRCO' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
f17a7f94d4f240a7421573848ff090ab
c2df3e08e9d16804a115b1895a8659a582c9216f
'2012-05-18T10:16:40-04:00'
describe
'668795' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRCP' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
3edfa26cb11f0c27f3930b8e40b8f19c
d475cf1d971a19993af6c99cc3801b2442d11b25
'2012-05-18T10:11:14-04:00'
describe
'664203' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRCQ' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
aaafc18efca0598a8b3148eac960a73e
7e52ff84c4b14b7a8e81abe6cdd6f079226caad5
'2012-05-18T10:11:13-04:00'
describe
'684834' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRCR' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
7f162247246ffc2de3ac42c558a4511f
e1936cab8b0d96302597c065a288bde3b87f674d
'2012-05-18T10:15:44-04:00'
describe
'681451' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRCS' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
5989a8bc96402532ad6f98ada9f13644
70e68e704030cacba41dd13902c665b68d402947
'2012-05-18T10:15:59-04:00'
describe
'568433' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRCT' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
7252d264a045cb57fd0234a20de47bca
2aca9148698740327039fe3317803360635a05de
'2012-05-18T10:16:52-04:00'
describe
'600236' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRCU' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
44783e8afe14e604d8c6917f4e57049c
b292c64e53c5516b4ec250cb0ca1d238a3d75331
'2012-05-18T10:15:26-04:00'
describe
'602937' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRCV' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
90508a46d52f73eb075783c641d5636f
27edefd105399dbc3273e710159e7b47be432130
'2012-05-18T10:14:13-04:00'
describe
'836455' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRCW' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
d256c9e5f76261cf062744b207386bc7
195a7baee408c1100fdad4725828decc3234a51e
'2012-05-18T10:09:54-04:00'
describe
'847524' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRCX' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
1f5272d60ca7b318fd8cbb9586236fb0
d297c19bfc55ecde0d205bf91ca642ca6cb4d3be
'2012-05-18T10:13:38-04:00'
describe
'761987' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRCY' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
dfd61f7186442fc2b9d9027a64c91b62
3b08cb040bcd2d3dae87e02cefb6ae4dee7c2a6a
'2012-05-18T10:13:46-04:00'
describe
'750648' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRCZ' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
e5e82b62bc9392fb13d3aad01abc56cd
22ca07205923f056ae2fcf16acf31cbb522c7bea
describe
'756918' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRDA' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
eea2f7e342bcebd2537d559d2a3de785
2142c83fb4ffd6e2dd68f91679b09a409614f5ee
'2012-05-18T10:11:06-04:00'
describe
'787180' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRDB' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
11c3372ec2eb7c6dc476f1e58df7f2b6
abf37cf5edc6812691745c0e8d57debe2d6e57c0
'2012-05-18T10:09:43-04:00'
describe
'773862' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRDC' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
6ffdd9604cdb2ec8091587cbb923143c
542f17d4528915675ead4801067aa0cbd834f332
'2012-05-18T10:17:09-04:00'
describe
'785240' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRDD' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
90461f32ec8b6a448fd59e4e55f101d0
6b6a3897d2087ea49d891eca765d9478502a21f9
'2012-05-18T10:16:50-04:00'
describe
'720454' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRDE' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
370583d60c3594a6b132388a7ebed9be
79c448c5c80f57108019ad9df32ad0a06f8fb45c
'2012-05-18T10:11:03-04:00'
describe
'765423' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRDF' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
41214bd94b49f18e4ece143054e1ee0e
56163a449e8e5d313b215d44b94f2e84df81b2ba
'2012-05-18T10:15:36-04:00'
describe
'768946' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRDG' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
2d771cc33566d42ce6b593f045f1b014
5a1851ecaf21770b283f178f5332c7832b0b5a6c
'2012-05-18T10:14:16-04:00'
describe
'777920' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRDH' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
6779132d29d1a5ec70bf0af85db89455
e0f4b14ca6a784becabecfde40c63e888b12e507
'2012-05-18T10:16:13-04:00'
describe
'777355' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRDI' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
722c0f6fd615fd2bba97f6c1fdb6f81c
94c11603bc7b9ce6e599c35bd65c832e081a09ad
describe
'700081' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRDJ' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
c973d2107ed8d85812527097cbf7d877
b51152028f6dc0cc96c9a491fc009b0f715ba5cf
'2012-05-18T10:17:28-04:00'
describe
'779200' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRDK' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
4704a07f49d1f26f80e8e7e01ca53797
6fb1981d33b0fb25ad03adf6b49fc36195f734a3
'2012-05-18T10:09:21-04:00'
describe
'772426' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRDL' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
4a85289a2fd924c40d6383704a477a89
8cfef49934b27c54be88ad8e74fa5daa0ebaabee
'2012-05-18T10:15:39-04:00'
describe
'767429' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRDM' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
7183596b779da68cf19028f4029ef7eb
10d5899134dd10dfde96d8983dd7acd8d5255159
'2012-05-18T10:09:22-04:00'
describe
'755703' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRDN' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
924a9c8fefd0abd87a9e1a51475bd8e0
cfddbd574dcd507ab6a244a64640d2920a5d79be
'2012-05-18T10:16:27-04:00'
describe
'780340' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRDO' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
e5758ae47214d2e8ce890cef0dd0f226
b9c1c2e0b5e2c369d74f11fdf32e1716b7eca328
'2012-05-18T10:14:36-04:00'
describe
'791178' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRDP' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
e3c9540562c6103469529a0f976b6102
916178b7a98c301ec40e996a5c7a13d0c90fd08d
'2012-05-18T10:12:13-04:00'
describe
'778175' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRDQ' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
c60e8ffdc2038adbb030d0a0289f75e7
4beb12708a1bb1585821d822509632ac7bca0c23
'2012-05-18T10:09:14-04:00'
describe
'777855' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRDR' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
a41a7213bc038c7c845aff532e4587ae
5d296a49848f2d2258af3f0e86ac041c4922f4c1
'2012-05-18T10:14:41-04:00'
describe
'776783' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRDS' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
a94eace7ab8be2fdb73b7aaa6845bcdc
b145dcd7c7db5794e13daaaa9ae5644f1603fd16
'2012-05-18T10:15:48-04:00'
describe
'775446' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRDT' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
76f1f7909133b581e39faa80c6a02571
ecd26112ef38d5fafe7e218d0b7a26d80ea7ab5c
'2012-05-18T10:15:57-04:00'
describe
'774255' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRDU' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
83c019799d3c53302f6c00f33c02fe47
b567b1a5698402f2e8d6fd401d5b542b99714adf
'2012-05-18T10:12:16-04:00'
describe
'757303' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRDV' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
93226f2e6b2e4f864eb088ae95042bb6
d62f6602377a37669925611fb761046fc6b83661
'2012-05-18T10:09:20-04:00'
describe
'848157' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRDW' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
8b191e9b2dd2c4d61b18140d3ade5748
57e893d685cd00e1d920be2b6fbb2906cf263e24
describe
'20096700' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRDX' 'sip-files00001.tif'
8c1a82e57d5bbae842b51dde13a7917a
75c02340d1858648d8674f7792a2b58d3b655929
'2012-05-18T10:12:15-04:00'
describe
'18311868' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRDY' 'sip-files00006.tif'
e86b3d8d4a6d1ce854119e8cac5ae923
a23a7b596035d48c576b948bcd4662e7460400f0
'2012-05-18T10:09:13-04:00'
describe
'18034348' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRDZ' 'sip-files00007.tif'
8ca08b7a4b4309839ed126270d6a37f4
37cb27d6b5bdb3e804e70155c5aeacbf868b538a
'2012-05-18T10:13:00-04:00'
describe
'18189060' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABREA' 'sip-files00009.tif'
d8f81cc184b693ace7d271afb9804d2e
6e603be03c76da52ccc18b47a6c6eb80fd1495bf
'2012-05-18T10:16:55-04:00'
describe
'18914320' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABREB' 'sip-files00011.tif'
487c65c8551e7247dc79a41310e36d78
373a0427a320584f8a6917fabcebeba845abfe37
'2012-05-18T10:11:58-04:00'
describe
'18600340' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABREC' 'sip-files00012.tif'
392365b51e38e6a1c018a4ac8ea1238a
934eaeccc1c2c7a019f83f3a6e12323058d68547
'2012-05-18T10:16:07-04:00'
describe
'18139720' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRED' 'sip-files00013.tif'
103a898f4f1ad55c5e0b89646fc0202a
e50489099ee4e8c76d42a67291b4f7e02f7c10e6
'2012-05-18T10:14:27-04:00'
describe
'18868104' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABREE' 'sip-files00015.tif'
d272f0c8b9d79c9928fd0beeaddd673b
f37184366f5cd638030e32058e01ec606f84cc80
'2012-05-18T10:10:15-04:00'
describe
'17313772' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABREF' 'sip-files00016.tif'
b6d0f237656cda03775ba93b72c6d838
6a84ed8d086a4bdb3ac4e442c896c86a07405421
'2012-05-18T10:16:19-04:00'
describe
'18394524' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABREG' 'sip-files00017.tif'
432c08842a8b2d4afd32fd96bfef5968
4e14605998859fc078ffcd002b4604d21f162445
'2012-05-18T10:15:56-04:00'
describe
'18693692' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABREH' 'sip-files00019.tif'
3bbb5b36033f6e63e200c4871ddc412b
557c9129cda9ff349c817acf8e5ceb2c5869a380
'2012-05-18T10:09:09-04:00'
describe
'18315844' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABREI' 'sip-files00021.tif'
486361515d6016ba32cca191bc1fd956
250a8c7a684b6676c30c310ee303cb27789de19a
'2012-05-18T10:16:39-04:00'
describe
'16824504' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABREJ' 'sip-files00022.tif'
c1d7bfde1e005cf62cde9e53daeabcbe
dfb8a0820fa0bdfa31f26ed02ba25a440a79e2f5
'2012-05-18T10:09:12-04:00'
describe
'18776452' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABREK' 'sip-files00024.tif'
5aa1572566e7d08d9ee900338aed8406
e298b00425bee6d616f432d766dff31d1b74295e
describe
'18725496' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABREL' 'sip-files00025.tif'
e5a17590569940718c602a9058c36894
e897fd15eca917f0b99e4927d94602a467400a78
'2012-05-18T10:15:52-04:00'
describe
'18561140' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABREM' 'sip-files00027.tif'
b7fc35347782414555b8fdd731854359
1a9c116d0705f9aee20faad4b29a44de2c1164f2
'2012-05-18T10:13:44-04:00'
describe
'18442164' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABREN' 'sip-files00029.tif'
32010d03aa363ba99ede48be3e8ddeed
5c54f5f8a9f7d4fbbafb32efcd69a05946861974
'2012-05-18T10:14:34-04:00'
describe
'18539860' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABREO' 'sip-files00032.tif'
473a67011e4030c559e860d380cefbb9
d0393019eca3186eabb8ad46173127e401da6423
'2012-05-18T10:13:23-04:00'
describe
'18160228' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABREP' 'sip-files00033.tif'
454a5f0065a5e5e97a4e7d4400c96de3
bc7fe3c316fe598f364ced32e3ca65d1016dba7c
'2012-05-18T10:10:36-04:00'
describe
'18751432' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABREQ' 'sip-files00034.tif'
696ebcae9084a867e574de5793e2608b
df97ab23e5b86dd8f8351e58daf64473bf027066
'2012-05-18T10:09:25-04:00'
describe
'18384148' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRER' 'sip-files00035.tif'
032e7f4b8f86c791b562d7483f931cfb
c98e066e4445c50b15c2e5c64e807b14c5cc8d53
'2012-05-18T10:16:23-04:00'
describe
'19011520' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRES' 'sip-files00036.tif'
c56b8f2595607c7926310bb1c3dfce37
2258fbf52cfd7d34e2349eab14b5b61ca77a61e4
'2012-05-18T10:12:40-04:00'
describe
'18700728' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRET' 'sip-files00037.tif'
b5ba42a050dc4024072e2ade1718bb52
9291254c3e703f9dba0c2c9f5658dec3c286ac96
'2012-05-18T10:15:28-04:00'
describe
'18666896' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABREU' 'sip-files00041.tif'
ad07dff97147055da3e0a50d35e73103
614981e64d68a934f9f111905f7162931a52878c
'2012-05-18T10:11:37-04:00'
describe
'18634408' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABREV' 'sip-files00043.tif'
73794ee1c787c968efb58109dce07289
757705242229e184f55a5fc6de3c5e253eb6d379
'2012-05-18T10:14:30-04:00'
describe
'18605012' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABREW' 'sip-files00044.tif'
fd84fee971428a6cc7d462490548053c
2881b6f26ad58fc85c4039c5dd1518bb1994660d
'2012-05-18T10:13:21-04:00'
describe
'18673376' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABREX' 'sip-files00045.tif'
f5517e09201e52ebfc0f520fad0c9e88
681df649eb8662deba02f9657bffb28ac12ca390
'2012-05-18T10:14:01-04:00'
describe
'18196160' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABREY' 'sip-files00048.tif'
6ca057f2fcc6c35f16b2262e05465a26
84c727b4cae001bd7c08a7858a44b4d57d72c943
'2012-05-18T10:17:24-04:00'
describe
'20157232' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABREZ' 'sip-files00049.tif'
9157c1df56dcf93c1ebd8ffd93cbb93c
d4a74c414cade028741892455d19224a33486477
'2012-05-18T10:09:35-04:00'
describe
'20376896' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRFA' 'sip-files00050.tif'
dc2a8846c0f1d926cc1bb17208e17cf6
2c80eb62e6ef53c9bf06bf480b5d732195d6ef90
'2012-05-18T10:16:04-04:00'
describe
'1833' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRFB' 'sip-files00002.pro'
106ddc5134ee94f659e289fd25465753
178db622b16deee964bb3b72eb03ffa150305f6d
'2012-05-18T10:12:21-04:00'
describe
'1324' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRFC' 'sip-files00006.pro'
0552b741f74ac98fb1e09db23ea37649
8597de469f04f6d55c9206c77ef90a69e7807c1b
describe
'5936' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRFD' 'sip-files00007.pro'
a02096fb6b010be72cb2d17023643512
7443bfc67181bc114bcc6ec26e166e4957ad6d4b
'2012-05-18T10:14:18-04:00'
describe
'45866' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRFE' 'sip-files00010.pro'
d5ea7c3074e7d0729002e67580f9b65a
605037a6a0eb4d1ef8d0ca1503013e36f707c64f
'2012-05-18T10:12:27-04:00'
describe
'16527' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRFF' 'sip-files00011.pro'
1c094039b15cdff2608c7a4030490829
26732a1b986a52c408d9114559e171b14407ca6f
'2012-05-18T10:16:16-04:00'
describe
'28720' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRFG' 'sip-files00013.pro'
20adaf902497a7c4dae5c3ad80297ce8
c2fbd752007b503ed8d9dbfed55ceb7259a6aa15
'2012-05-18T10:13:35-04:00'
describe
'27303' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRFH' 'sip-files00014.pro'
82662d0d1cb409f10d0318a28cd94a2a
542684ba7b5984b81539e2fc8a518303c152a6ff
describe
'30517' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRFI' 'sip-files00016.pro'
69e0e4e01e0f6702d3c38ec3c8cec832
7aba74ffebdfad5e42c87d4282580cc36ab6f7be
'2012-05-18T10:17:14-04:00'
describe
'40822' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRFJ' 'sip-files00017.pro'
86b3ce0cd1c3043f24e6ff5a14f82d94
98239d473c7505d09c3065689f5dea2e02384824
'2012-05-18T10:16:28-04:00'
describe
'35761' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRFK' 'sip-files00018.pro'
c9dea8dfc85dc61b4b315fefd119180a
7d4f9147f4dd2370ad0626a562f04ecd8e971271
'2012-05-18T10:15:24-04:00'
describe
'39219' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRFL' 'sip-files00019.pro'
9d2aa23febd7165976598182f2efd6fb
e21d7adad7984db9ed3a12ab1b6b2ff056b2a6e2
describe
'44918' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRFM' 'sip-files00022.pro'
9541de4b884bf0c16577399f859d207b
e1c50aec3a70b39fbe8074e1f18666b14752bffa
describe
'43760' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRFN' 'sip-files00023.pro'
c5ff124404e11ef4d9115d989c9033bf
4a74d8bceb022432392590f61aa734cd6fe1768a
'2012-05-18T10:12:08-04:00'
describe
'39919' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRFO' 'sip-files00024.pro'
96bb1f0ac40f75700aac43d0c60315a4
50b87e51adf5747c045f32be4cd4940514ddedd7
'2012-05-18T10:10:38-04:00'
describe
'11091' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRFP' 'sip-files00026.pro'
6f8d6596a667879af002fd2dbc60ffc8
2186412c83ebaf28116bfd7a5197062e9fc8551e
'2012-05-18T10:14:44-04:00'
describe
'25976' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRFQ' 'sip-files00029.pro'
9e18352015e45d94257b689fc137f321
93e490f4f01ad5a0725eb18b2db79ca63bdc8ffc
'2012-05-18T10:15:02-04:00'
describe
'16507' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRFR' 'sip-files00033.pro'
b7d3c86ddacac093c1bb506f12414412
5b12d8ab7924a7bb05577ecb2efadeae45c06e3b
describe
'36042' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRFS' 'sip-files00035.pro'
35de8a5c6ff13bb036e4fd17cd3740b5
6ae4102e8f6bed1597b2bf5bb5ed9e1f5d1615f9
'2012-05-18T10:15:29-04:00'
describe
'44703' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRFT' 'sip-files00036.pro'
59ed83326618d00c480d5f55f7a798c7
b356d60483cea072462943ecc32905493c6d1aaf
describe
'33937' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRFU' 'sip-files00038.pro'
837f210ef645d259b205a549c34164c4
d4103358e282d1f52ce7a23fedd1c46c8df58183
'2012-05-18T10:11:40-04:00'
describe
'22718' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRFV' 'sip-files00039.pro'
414d529ea5fd2a1eac23d19fc233c063
48fe4ed95b1b177375781570103698c08b3db23e
describe
'24219' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRFW' 'sip-files00041.pro'
99ad9abac14ba0c6cd9edecd583f6b75
6a3f4bf4eb6476020138a17d45adebba00ee0411
describe
'31008' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRFX' 'sip-files00042.pro'
3f0dd6ff6125c0a3b4f595a1976400fc
93371260e48ca7f7d91dd696269e7f5c0eb640f5
'2012-05-18T10:11:22-04:00'
describe
'46965' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRFY' 'sip-files00043.pro'
576902ee23f96854425d3290eb08ef3f
d67ed1dbec1278e99cbee63592601c4fff7ca756
'2012-05-18T10:13:13-04:00'
describe
'15698' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRFZ' 'sip-files00044.pro'
11950744983f209df22c2a8c9556c834
e581c45d999e36aec39bdb672ddff869c60a4628
'2012-05-18T10:12:28-04:00'
describe
'15102' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRGA' 'sip-files00045.pro'
3556c5c792d11023f131611abd667000
fc1be0b733f8e23d3905d4a91315510feb0c834d
describe
'17388' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRGB' 'sip-files00046.pro'
fc9cc899d7d735ba4acb87f525cf1c9f
279c68a633b1edb73b4422d22ca13a001cbac40f
'2012-05-18T10:13:08-04:00'
describe
'23407' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRGC' 'sip-files00048.pro'
f70655c944630fa14f1114ad5d2cf42b
369678d8af6fc3afabe442c49e7135fe943af29d
'2012-05-18T10:15:25-04:00'
describe
'26424' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRGD' 'sip-files00049.pro'
c76c15cedd098033eb8bc6f2b1893f56
8f30415bf6a6473a308a9a2c8fed842347bd9739
describe
'30170' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRGE' 'sip-files00050.pro'
742366d59a8e2c45bb8408ea5b9c07a9
b1b01739ca499f3755bb22729b8049ccfdbb398a
'2012-05-18T10:11:23-04:00'
describe
'1360' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRGF' 'sip-files00001.txt'
6cdc80b6aedc574032fba05e2d512cac
b1f5958cf640cb2955ba27f8acfdfcdef9e8502b
'2012-05-18T10:10:51-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'193' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRGG' 'sip-files00006.txt'
c1fba62db5e32a8cf5e835168b220b5c
0adec595ea27358d43059494ab8b5987b3fb66d4
describe
'332' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRGH' 'sip-files00007.txt'
d4f71c47e975545393eebdb5ae104060
f636de41b781ee83cf60eab35faa066c32c185cf
'2012-05-18T10:10:56-04:00'
describe
'2922' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRGI' 'sip-files00009.txt'
598421b1f1616aa46cc3cd69576e31c2
7e7f6cb2c78d062cc34a6038c21d50b9e79e4f2b
'2012-05-18T10:10:32-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'3004' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRGJ' 'sip-files00010.txt'
2f07b1394ac49424cdace0e532d07135
ea8f9f58efd03c1bf2586c7c2d21f1c8cccfb9ec
'2012-05-18T10:17:06-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'963' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRGK' 'sip-files00012.txt'
b883dc645c4b2cdef6d648eae80039b0
b9172a85db87ec54c783bd6029062e41e32b55fc
'2012-05-18T10:14:38-04:00'
describe
'2131' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRGL' 'sip-files00013.txt'
cc95ace88bca3dd5f3a2c32cdce3e87b
c65a262baeb55f75e5d1377cfa3b12d580438473
'2012-05-18T10:14:57-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1350' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRGM' 'sip-files00014.txt'
2c832f6e21e756787e0c4e3fc788adc6
605b0175d2805272294bd81c43fed64a989836d6
'2012-05-18T10:12:46-04:00'
describe
'2005' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRGN' 'sip-files00015.txt'
c43649b26ae8657f731c3b8c9538de5e
327133ddc6336253afed75d466cfae93af72edc0
'2012-05-18T10:16:11-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1935' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRGO' 'sip-files00016.txt'
936192fe8024ab17382cc56f2fd7cdf2
0e73ab3bba09d358088a57312788a572f9d77e55
'2012-05-18T10:12:43-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'3171' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRGP' 'sip-files00019.txt'
e7d8d1fbcb61585f9336d8d036629425
7dddfe616955a9ebd4efd88c257fb9888bac517a
'2012-05-18T10:12:56-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'3194' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRGQ' 'sip-files00020.txt'
cbd2dfd202bfb2dfef32f549c6997d28
43a6f6e017ebdf01829f05848a68fa50e2781728
'2012-05-18T10:15:55-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2680' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRGR' 'sip-files00021.txt'
8911383a4c474f66c2cf436d33f93444
482ea5ded6950e7fba333c29663d943379eea310
'2012-05-18T10:12:24-04:00'
describe
'3876' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRGS' 'sip-files00022.txt'
9a0f825636eb9ca3025dbdaf1561d164
4093b0e30e364816ac78fba686e901481fc6cec4
'2012-05-18T10:16:43-04:00'
describe
'3218' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRGT' 'sip-files00023.txt'
5d882aa9a44ab63711c64bdecdeb05a2
38bd059992878c66751b88636c4a5ee7b5940601
'2012-05-18T10:09:40-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'840' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRGU' 'sip-files00026.txt'
19435723cf589569a0b5b3f7df7f1944
10c54cd0609554c3345fd066d82b53c83fa232fa
'2012-05-18T10:15:45-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1098' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRGV' 'sip-files00027.txt'
a705b284f1f774132aa378af37ddf655
74badc38c2208d5138f2aad6663ad8755476715c
'2012-05-18T10:10:42-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1269' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRGW' 'sip-files00028.txt'
508607ccaad794316a3943cc18579b2c
316fcf52cdd7baaa7a0e98e98cd9a8a33c9c2f7e
'2012-05-18T10:14:58-04:00'
describe
'1287' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRGX' 'sip-files00029.txt'
7ddde6d67e398efb3d65f4002d97fee4
98fae3e4518707afb8eb18dabcf29a355c2e509d
'2012-05-18T10:09:37-04:00'
describe
'813' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRGY' 'sip-files00032.txt'
e29683c910f04923130a13b5a6d982ff
005af5f138e25da0faac22de07b1d8e8ab2c503e
'2012-05-18T10:14:51-04:00'
describe
'1052' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRGZ' 'sip-files00033.txt'
2edb673a4c207954c2366336069ff5e0
d06aeaf8aed4445ddc88f1b2b7623a330d1ec834
'2012-05-18T10:11:29-04:00'
describe
'2019' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRHA' 'sip-files00034.txt'
85734b29b0810c6077b3c200486a5992
2324167f015f9ee126787e8c76f3444b5a4dd883
'2012-05-18T10:10:55-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1822' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRHB' 'sip-files00035.txt'
da7206620cda3f6fd93b1b5c42f07d4a
262b5880ef155320aad474fb343a26a7bf207060
'2012-05-18T10:11:27-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'3446' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRHC' 'sip-files00036.txt'
463d4f2ff0ad3634a990627a1530ead1
c4d5d6f940624d3256a081dbb6ed899fcfa81503
describe
'2316' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRHD' 'sip-files00037.txt'
5a391460f9cb23df4b31cd979f20ade8
2374afd2209a6bb9d251ab064cacd6fa7a30fcbb
'2012-05-18T10:16:45-04:00'
describe
'2972' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRHE' 'sip-files00038.txt'
b3de1e6ac528dbe84fc4ec65dd3cc4e7
f3b4adb0b76dbf9565e28af40a0416adff692823
'2012-05-18T10:15:01-04:00'
describe
'1072' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRHF' 'sip-files00039.txt'
5b2d29e5fc44e641dd8dfdcbed37230b
8e5a975eea483dabd76cd63e576155fc6293a8f6
'2012-05-18T10:14:17-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1202' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRHG' 'sip-files00041.txt'
13edf5963664520f604411a850ed8d3b
84bc0b70e336685f5bb6fe8195b7b70ce671ecb0
'2012-05-18T10:10:17-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2445' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRHH' 'sip-files00042.txt'
b6b86740f3cae4455b24100bdda75edc
002ca48cdffe7418bdb690a77cffb4cac736d23e
'2012-05-18T10:09:53-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'751' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRHI' 'sip-files00044.txt'
536a12a068cec1bf76d9d79aa577c341
24ebce79c3d4fe5c05acf68718707150caf88f73
describe
'1004' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRHJ' 'sip-files00045.txt'
8126a7e332653871a21a8f852bc2e905
cdf928972e14e2beb07589943fd89a974f84e69c
describe
Invalid character
'941' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRHK' 'sip-files00046.txt'
048b36da0a06e5632de94fd6b6d9e3dd
492e9befff495a11991cfe06146edb0b3dcfc458
'2012-05-18T10:13:02-04:00'
describe
'1478' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRHL' 'sip-files00048.txt'
a5a6d6d21ebe113e950740f227f60381
c3260aaaed71d81c4b3fe6b51a281e554f45b674
describe
Invalid character
'1250' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRHM' 'sip-files00049.txt'
ec07a3aa9c4fbdb7dd0934b5aab75b52
460d1fa19e934399087460c7e29dcd1b43059d06
'2012-05-18T10:10:43-04:00'
describe
'201406' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRHN' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
8f6cefad1ef4ccfe258243bc616cff9d
49c0df1fa371b2faefb601328f56e5f00ef6d8c7
describe
'66989' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRHO' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
03ba28c083913d75f9dddb621b3da272
ed00cd69d3dea46535c9fb75de8f8d60dfa46283
'2012-05-18T10:13:19-04:00'
describe
'206761' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRHP' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
1d92c58e02a39a759e2022134efd8353
af3a7229aae6bb609b60e72b5ccfb8c7d7f12f33
'2012-05-18T10:12:12-04:00'
describe
'76154' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRHQ' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
812536036f0d730b40a8aa3980a8cd09
8a6a735be26a2c5baf07d0e221fc7d991ca7a2f1
'2012-05-18T10:14:56-04:00'
describe
'212629' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRHR' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
157f531c12ca184dfb77914e07ff6f97
a81b86d3848fca7f2110424d9516ee2ff25e64d6
'2012-05-18T10:14:42-04:00'
describe
'206094' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRHS' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
9f788bc5bf108fd15e1515f2088bfa82
ab852944070fa23cc045297e02621d03d37fc117
'2012-05-18T10:13:24-04:00'
describe
'70585' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRHT' 'sip-filesUF00054260_00001.xml'
4c43b5f30c4ca56880cb681d11a7dfdf
96784aa7eeeed1c236cc3416cf482f3d5e5fa539
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-10T15:33:54-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'201338' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRHU' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
8e7b2c80ef10ac950d7daf39ab55e8bf
2936db53136e65a4053e959a61c6928dd2af5fc5
'2012-05-18T10:13:36-04:00'
describe
'102550' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRHV' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
13cd7f0f5d95b1558431c0e3e41fba91
dd80e82cc6b1be376a8aecb20952540f52ed8871
'2012-05-18T10:15:30-04:00'
describe
'41751' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRHW' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
c19d4335fe0368b8ded411272b26c2af
daab8949c7d80b9652df31d0321930228ab0be1c
'2012-05-18T10:11:50-04:00'
describe
'162462' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRHX' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
220328c093e75e054ef7b5fd30c786cc
e6af44c544ab06f1e58eb222fb1caee57c88ea56
'2012-05-18T10:11:00-04:00'
describe
'57974' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRHY' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
24a62c05cd68adbd11c2f7ed1c72407a
5af65765ca079507a9e629a9bb739796ca6dfe9b
'2012-05-18T10:11:46-04:00'
describe
'133753' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRHZ' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
08565b8ec84b4c5f8bfa4ac8c1eefb1d
6f76b5a303fa7bd11a64a81a1795955f90c541a1
describe
'49981' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRIA' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
5400527c41aa8efa3637b3fc6f7a11c3
3f0bbf19a7741f8f43bad8a3bf4384995b8f5254
'2012-05-18T10:12:32-04:00'
describe
'71299' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRIB' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
5f470bbbe716cb8eabce1ed3df8f8ea3
88356d827e851cb9f04fdd044901bbec4a72d273
'2012-05-18T10:10:07-04:00'
describe
'74286' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRIC' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
f90acaaddf2c743b6cd7b15beb3a9a8e
10356a0a7022bbeb1c2ce66341f2a6662aafeb02
describe
'66720' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRID' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
98dbb73c7c7f02669a82ee8b6a520081
de4c4bcd02b534c535e798ff2e90d13a81785de3
'2012-05-18T10:10:06-04:00'
describe
'195265' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRIE' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
2cec5fc41ea9ed8ace853f8824746297
1459d5edc5e3bf0c70df37c74954b1440fe04ebe
'2012-05-18T10:10:31-04:00'
describe
'67642' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRIF' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
3b1221b20e94201223bffef559c1e3b7
f73f06eaba4675757624f56f6e133f49436f344e
'2012-05-18T10:12:41-04:00'
describe
'205150' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRIG' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
6a474d39e5bcb652a1c0896d7df94ed6
b500b0ebb4da72d6cbf3ef16c4ac4a1412391d1a
'2012-05-18T10:11:19-04:00'
describe
'214092' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRIH' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
91042a4a358e4dbf70f1bcb0d242a219
ee0d9521db6661be4dd2b4b3e9015f8b35a5688b
'2012-05-18T10:09:28-04:00'
describe
'71302' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRII' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
77cfc49b450bc58dbb38cb7ccfa4ba62
e5540469843d6fda4ea2007b6b4725cfa27f18d8
'2012-05-18T10:11:28-04:00'
describe
'202707' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRIJ' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
d36ddd218fee5a5d2376d6b61e500e5d
bce4053a306210b5b4c004b4f3c8ec399a475509
'2012-05-18T10:15:00-04:00'
describe
'68787' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRIK' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
60ed5499cab8686afe11c8c481656124
673fde5470b55793cb86e092a013e5f841d6c715
'2012-05-18T10:15:40-04:00'
describe
'71091' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRIL' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
f2658fdb5e7c3848017918fbd4eb4bbc
436391d4bcb738abedc2bf58a10740c9ca6a79ce
'2012-05-18T10:12:22-04:00'
describe
'69483' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRIM' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
c185b772f046aaf164473eb15799cd12
180f20e1eb8f9efef596fe92d021bd703fa3918e
describe
'70538' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRIN' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
acef6f1bdebac90802858bfa83a4f743
185fb3a16d6d319523e040a5f05a99539afff160
'2012-05-18T10:17:26-04:00'
describe
'208174' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRIO' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
c341bd5c18d13c78c2c8257f74b71de5
e56d20d1d4dc5935ba166aa199a3975c05528bfb
'2012-05-18T10:14:05-04:00'
describe
'213551' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRIP' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
881eb49609551a0492e8c7149391558d
c7ba9179a0a604d88baaac5f98cf497b0d696f5e
'2012-05-18T10:09:03-04:00'
describe
'71899' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRIQ' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
7ee6d255bd6806ad61991876e529742b
3c5750a869c7ff96b0e32ade8feddeb752aa2a9b
'2012-05-18T10:16:47-04:00'
describe
'218829' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRIR' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
f332898e7becd88adc58d5fab489cc60
8321a0880a2f23b3dec4d72a6a1aecbd93d82cb5
'2012-05-18T10:13:15-04:00'
describe
'213175' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRIS' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
60f46732a8b39ead98e00bd55f2c0a68
fc047c4d1776a1f1efb4705343f025911a1bb05f
describe
'71246' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRIT' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
2852733533f59459b63df4e0eb94d566
4011abf889e940139fd666199310e819c9c00256
'2012-05-18T10:11:54-04:00'
describe
'200467' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRIU' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
54c74ce5c370c77e64a979651d57d9dc
938d137c18b445e5ec67be0187cf1af99a4e7446
'2012-05-18T10:09:30-04:00'
describe
'68259' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRIV' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
c04d1c5a36826e3d4ed7ea0c40aa18fb
7447662c61329b2a8c4366c6cff0a9c508b4a987
'2012-05-18T10:17:01-04:00'
describe
'73340' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRIW' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
85c15a3264192c981cbf4a930ec942ea
14bb41132c6fecdb56162c0c36ad84398782ee18
'2012-05-18T10:17:15-04:00'
describe
'213262' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRIX' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
e59a2abc30d43da0e3f35ab7036b49d8
f66cfa1836feca262107a4fb57e91bab72bc7d28
'2012-05-18T10:09:51-04:00'
describe
'71787' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRIY' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
090841d79f55f87da46377644284c2f7
9836c43bc6c1d2decd9cc428876e90b2d93b775f
'2012-05-18T10:09:33-04:00'
describe
'225590' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRIZ' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
f4ed4cdb047945dedd974f8d178ec1d7
6cc87c56bad5fbdc7aa1bc2252811ea6f025430a
describe
'73553' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRJA' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
90d1f3ac7cb9d1cc888c55316d982c52
ca31ec12af502047556e8f3d97491ce8ac7ba3c3
'2012-05-18T10:16:30-04:00'
describe
'75149' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRJB' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
6eac6126a17451d10e68cf15e739987f
e0f1017bd2d0ec56174e3671ca10ae42d582e513
'2012-05-18T10:13:37-04:00'
describe
'219312' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRJC' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
1aa2c1c746ab78b5c5ac8565ef234a0f
7f2f759643ed40ffa8a719d5b7240060785d4a6d
describe
'73644' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRJD' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
da718bde838e9842921b33cdf18164b9
4f9abec0c984e3a4faf9f2483f1c041d1b30d9d4
'2012-05-18T10:15:49-04:00'
describe
'211788' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRJE' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
61c55100ceae18fae1c26c4f2d28936f
8d9855da0b47f54055d1f0394771c6b54e22b859
'2012-05-18T10:10:23-04:00'
describe
'71898' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRJF' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
e88cc00fba2a4e320921e7b617096102
9b9c6ca6278cb6039351dbca575962b6770ab374
describe
'227615' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRJG' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
6afdf320c044a44c4d8b47f7c940f1e7
b05d24b58efd8a61d7d77088cca252bfafa8db4c
describe
'70383' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRJH' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
f7d763dc13da5dd7dc8447a15fe96f23
e1c0d00e09effd7337423c4206fdc0931c164cff
'2012-05-18T10:14:04-04:00'
describe
'74070' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRJI' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
39a3cacf9494bec6dcd85ce3b9110731
7d34a31770f486eaf6223bc4f229d91629bb478c
'2012-05-18T10:15:53-04:00'
describe
'214984' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRJJ' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
27a7003ff8d6eb4c1b90844175a58731
03a54c008d449ffdfd1b9576039aab4826a1657f
'2012-05-18T10:09:26-04:00'
describe
'215732' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRJK' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
d286800440b50fae03877f586cb12092
514ff70cf0554e33d5eeede4bc7db0c4bb1a611e
'2012-05-18T10:14:40-04:00'
describe
'209384' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRJL' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
68e247baf56fad852a59bbc8f62cce9b
a16d216c7f0257beb7f9024d2742c02c92cfbef7
'2012-05-18T10:11:39-04:00'
describe
'208148' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRJM' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
8f1c6dbaa271f9cedce5505b89798031
b744640a4189a656fe762d96baa0a7f6a1e272b0
describe
'70586' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRJN' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
811206507edfa3c551bdf58c50d07d03
1ebea0d1642eb45461ac9df0ba75e903e089f40d
describe
'70242' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRJO' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
f9e519c740da6a7b36a8be6bf86d0105
b207a9656f51b1ac2dd51097adb0dd71aafc47ab
describe
'201118' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRJP' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
4ed6e42743b97285bf3251c125e81224
47cb6f16f76f22f32bee608f9dcd08fa8eec84a3
'2012-05-18T10:09:38-04:00'
describe
'69892' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRJQ' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
f2137598a75ff1b92d6a5411e593b399
787916070ae3331074a86d1844470e39956240ac
describe
'183497' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRJR' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
ac796d96cd457a25cc92e66330e1c6d2
9acee330c74553352ccb05741b6512ce02d814ca
'2012-05-18T10:10:53-04:00'
describe
'198044' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRJS' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
8a20ba75166a624c587416151946473b
1d53a12ffe7093afce0b594d6c47e0d10f77eb4b
'2012-05-18T10:12:29-04:00'
describe
'68356' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRJT' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
5526a00f671d07a0d471fbaa29431143
6d0616b07f8e5533f454064c080ac0afff85a8f4
describe
'200913' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRJU' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
074bda0fbd329d7fc03f85a80dd37c49
4ae41a56df3ef8e49b9a4c6549ab0c2f4034538f
describe
'69604' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRJV' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
7439d3e716a0fccb78198786f71e5ec5
328d5682bf8927d5ffc18e71e1ee095505b0c65d
'2012-05-18T10:14:11-04:00'
describe
'204544' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRJW' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
bb3d7f5783704416713762964f794539
a4310d31ccc10ff7bc4ac0b0c561b82341517d9e
describe
'69527' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRJX' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
8a197a4e436b7a141110622ba80866df
b9dcb23c64539838c34f00670b461f58433c387d
'2012-05-18T10:16:05-04:00'
describe
'70517' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRJY' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
565b7316246ae840199026ba3daa6cf2
fddc007e14d0fdb6ff64c5d973192a187102da2e
'2012-05-18T10:10:02-04:00'
describe
'61471' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRJZ' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
89a027048fd429b2a37aaab0c0bec93d
8545d1a7ce34acbdf948654a54422044ac4f75d8
'2012-05-18T10:15:37-04:00'
describe
'184831' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRKA' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
21f91e2a6004a2db09d0a88678c51ad6
087167144c24e5e3300a1caff0f0151b0dbb0d00
describe
'64823' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRKB' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
372f89c09a23c5813c4fbf1125f9e0c4
e5261ecb3708814c49033bb592aec5e2cea716e1
'2012-05-18T10:16:21-04:00'
describe
'180723' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAFIfileF20100129_AABRKC' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
0bc7848062de820ca29baa3f8daea185
60000557437f72ed8462ea664f3b091add16c133
'2012-05-18T10:09:02-04:00'
describe